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Sample records for submicroscopic chromosomal imbalances

  1. Submicroscopic chromosome imbalance in patients with developmental delay and/or dysmorphism referred specifically for Fragile X testing and karyotype analysis

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    Docherty Zoe

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microdeletion syndromes are generally identified because they usually give rise to specific phenotypic features; many of these deletions are mediated by duplicons or LCRs. The phenotypes associated with subtelomeric deletions are also becoming recognised. However, reciprocal duplication events at these loci are less easily recognised and identified, as they may give rise to milder phenotypic features, and the individuals carrying them may not therefore be referred for appropriate testing. 403 patients with developmental delay and/or dysmorphism, referred to our Genetics Centre for karyotyping and Fragile X expansion testing, were assessed for chromosome imbalance by Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA. Two MLPA kits were used, one containing probes for the subtelomere regions, and one containing probes for common microdeletion loci. 321 patients were tested with both kits, 75 with the subtelomere kit alone, and 7 with the microdeletion kit alone. Results 32 patients had abnormal results; the overall abnormality detection rate was 2.5% for karyotype analysis and 7.2% for MLPA testing; 5.5% of subtelomere tests and 2.1% of microdeletion tests gave abnormal results. Of the abnormal MLPA results, 5 were in cases with cytogenetically visible abnormalities; of the remaining, submicroscopic, changes, 3 results were established as de novo and 8 were inherited; parental samples were not available for the remaining cases. None of the patients was found to have a Fragile X expansion. Conclusion Karyotype analysis in combination with MLPA assays for subtelomeres and microdeletion loci may be recommended for this patient group.

  2. Identification of submicroscopic chromosomal aberrations in fetuses with increased

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    Leung, Tak Yeung; Vogel, Ida; Lau, Tze Kin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Fetal nuchal translucency (NT) is assessed by ultrasound as a screening tool for aneuploidy at 11-13+6 weeks’ gestation. Fetuses with increased NT but apparently normal karyotyping result are still at higher risk of structural abnormality and a range of genetic syndromes, which may...... sonographic anomalies, and 5.3% (2/38) among those without. Conclusions: aCGH allows detection of submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities of which the prevalence may be increased in fetuses with NT>3.5mm and an apparently normal karyotype....... be related to major and submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities. The aim of our study is to report the prevalence of submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities in a cohort of apparently euploid fetuses that presented with increased NT. Methods: DNA was extracted from stored CVS specimens relating to fetuses...

  3. Array-CGH detection of three cryptic submicroscopic imbalances in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    patient with a language disorder and mild mental retardation by array-CGH. Am. J. Med. Genet. Part A 129A, 254–260. Zwaigenbaum L., Sonnenberg L. K., Heshka T., Eastwood S. and. Xu J. 2005 A girl with pervasive developmental disorder and complex chromosome rearrangement involving 8p and 10p. J. Autism. Dev.

  4. Submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities in fetuses with increased nuchal translucency and normal karyotype.

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    Yang, Xin; Li, Ru; Fu, Fang; Zhang, Yongling; Li, Dongzhi; Liao, Can

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities in fetuses with increased nuchal translucency (NT) and normal karyotype. Total of 296 fetuses with increased NT (≥3.0 mm) were tested by conventional karyotyping. When cytogenetic analysis showed normal chromosome, the pregnancies were then consulted for array-comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis and received subsequent morphology scan between 20 and 24 weeks gestation. Submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities were assessed and compared between the fetuses with and without structural defects. Chromosomal abnormality was identified in 19.9% (59/296) fetuses. Two hundred and twenty samples were tested by array CGH. Submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 9.1% (20/220) fetuses. For the fetuses with abnormal morphology scan, the detection rate of submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities was higher than those with normal morphology scan (26.9% versus 6.7%, p karyotype, especially when the structural defects were found at second or third trimester.

  5. Chromosomal imbalances are uncommon in chagasic megaesophagus

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    Silva Ana E

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chagas' disease is a human tropical parasitic illness and a subset of the chronic patients develop megaesophagus or megacolon. The esophagus dilation is known as chagasic megaesophagus (CM and one of the severe late consequences of CM is the increased risk for esophageal carcinoma (ESCC. Based on the association between CM and ESCC, we investigated whether genes frequently showing unbalanced copy numbers in ESCC were altered in CM by fluorescence in situ (FISH technology. Methods A total of 50 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded esophageal mucosa specimens (40 from Chagas megaesophagus-CM, and 10 normal esophageal mucosa-NM were analyzed. DNA FISH probes were tested for FHIT, TP63, PIK3CA, EGFR, FGFR1, MYC, CDKN2A, YES1 and NCOA3 genes, and centromeric sequences from chromosomes 3, 7 and 9. Results No differences between superficial and basal layers of the epithelial mucosa were found, except for loss of copy number of EGFR in the esophageal basal layer of CM group. Mean copy number of CDKN2A and CEP9 and frequency of nuclei with loss of PIK3CA were significantly different in the CM group compared with normal mucosa and marginal levels of deletions in TP63, FHIT, PIK3CA, EGFR, CDKN2A, YES and gains at PIK3CA, TP63, FGFR1, MYC, CDNK2A and NCOA3 were detected in few CM cases, mainly with dilation grades III and IV. All changes occurred at very low levels. Conclusions Genomic imbalances common in esophageal carcinomas are not present in chagasic megaesophagus suggesting that these features will not be effective markers for risk assessment of ESCC in patients with chagasic megaesophagus.

  6. A Rare Chromosome 3 Imbalance and Its Clinical Implications

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    Karen Sims

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The duplication of chromosome 3q is a rare disorder with varying chromosomal breakpoints and consequently symptoms. Even rarer is the unbalanced outcome from a parental inv(3 resulting in duplicated 3q and a deletion of 3p. Molecular karyotyping should aid in precisely determining the length and breakpoints of the 3q+/3p− so as to better understand a child’s future development and needs. We report a case of an infant male with a 57.5 Mb duplication from 3q23-qter. This patient also has an accompanying 1.7 Mb deletion of 3p26.3. The duplicated segment in this patient encompasses the known critical region of 3q26.3-q27, which is implicated in the previously reported 3q dup syndrome; however, the accompanying 3p26.3 deletion is smaller than the previously reported cases. The clinical phenotype of this patient relates to previously reported cases of 3q+ that may suggest that the accompanying 1.7 Mb heterozygous deletion is not clinically relevant. Taken together, our data has refined the location and extent of the chromosome 3 imbalance, which will aid in better understanding the molecular underpinning of the 3q syndrome.

  7. Chromosomal microarray analysis as a first-line test in pregnancies with a priori low risk for the detection of submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities.

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    Fiorentino, Francesco; Napoletano, Stefania; Caiazzo, Fiorina; Sessa, Mariateresa; Bono, Sara; Spizzichino, Letizia; Gordon, Anthony; Nuccitelli, Andrea; Rizzo, Giuseppe; Baldi, Marina

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to explore the utility of chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) in groups of pregnancies with a priori low risk for detection of submicroscopic chromosome abnormalities, usually not considered an indication for testing, in order to assess whether CMA improves the detection rate of prenatal chromosomal aberrations. A total of 3000 prenatal samples were processed in parallel using both whole-genome CMA and conventional karyotyping. The indications for prenatal testing included: advanced maternal age, maternal serum screening test abnormality, abnormal ultrasound findings, known abnormal fetal karyotype, parental anxiety, family history of a genetic condition and cell culture failure. The use of CMA resulted in an increased detection rate regardless of the indication for analysis. This was evident in high risk groups (abnormal ultrasound findings and abnormal fetal karyotype), in which the percentage of detection was 5.8% (7/120), and also in low risk groups, such as advanced maternal age (6/1118, 0.5%), and parental anxiety (11/1674, 0.7%). A total of 24 (0.8%) fetal conditions would have remained undiagnosed if only a standard karyotype had been performed. Importantly, 17 (0.6%) of such findings would have otherwise been overlooked if CMA was offered only to high risk pregnancies.The results of this study suggest that more widespread CMA testing of fetuses would result in a higher detection of clinically relevant chromosome abnormalities, even in low risk pregnancies. Our findings provide substantial evidence for the introduction of CMA as a first-line diagnostic test for all pregnant women undergoing invasive prenatal testing, regardless of risk factors.

  8. Submicroscopic interstitial deletion of chromosome 11q22.3 in a girl with mild mental retardation and facial dysmorphism: Case report

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    Zagorac Andreja

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Except for terminal deletions that lead to Jacobsen syndrome, interstitial deletions involving the long arm of chromosome 11 are not frequently reported. A clinically distinct phenotype is usually observed in these cases, and no clear genotype-phenotype correlation is proposed. Results Here we present a case study of a 5-year-old girl with de novo submicroscopic deletion of chromosome 11q22.3 with mild mental retardation and facial dysmorphism. A standard cytogenetic analysis did not reveal any structural aberrations. In contrary, array-CGH analysis indicated a small deletion of 11q22.3. Discussion To our knowledge, this is the smallest 11q22.3 deletion reported in literature, containing nine RefSeq genes. Although none of the deleted genes are obvious candidates for the features observed in our patient, genes CUL5 and SLN could play a key role in the features described.

  9. Microarray comparative genomic hybridization detection of chromosomal imbalances in uterine cervix carcinoma

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    García José; Pérez Carlos; López Ricardo; Lazos Minerva; González José; Hernández Dulce; Vázquez-Ortiz Guelaguetza; Piña Patricia; Arreola Hugo; Petersen Iver; Baudis Michael; Hidalgo Alfredo; Vázquez Karla; Alatorre Brenda; Salcedo Mauricio

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Chromosomal Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) has been applied to all stages of cervical carcinoma progression, defining a specific pattern of chromosomal imbalances in this tumor. However, given its limited spatial resolution, chromosomal CGH has offered only general information regarding the possible genetic targets of DNA copy number changes. Methods In order to further define specific DNA copy number changes in cervical cancer, we analyzed 20 cervical samples (3 ...

  10. A 5-year-old white girl with Prader-Willi syndrome and a submicroscopic deletion of chromosome 15q11q13

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    Butler, M.G. [Vanderbilt Univ. Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Christian, S.L.; Kubota, T.; Ledbetter, D.H. [National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1996-10-16

    We report on a 5-year-old white girl with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and a submicroscopic deletion of 15q11q13 of approximately 100-200 kb in size. High resolution chromosome analysis was normal but fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), Southern hybridization, and microsatellite data from the 15q11q13 region demonstrated that the deletion was paternal in origin and included the SNRPN, PAR-5, and PAR-7 genes from the proximal to distal boundaries of the deletion segment. SNRPN and PW71B methylation studies showed an abnormal pattern consistent with the diagnosis of PWS and supported the presence of a paternal deletion of 15q11q13 or an imprinting mutation. Biparental (normal) inheritance of PW71B (D15S63 locus) and a deletion of the SNRPN gene were observed by microsatellite, quantitative Southern hybridization, and/or FISH analyses. Our patient met the diagnostic criteria for PWS, but has no reported behavior problems, hyperphagia, or hypopigmentation. Our patient further supports SNRPN and possibly other genomic sequences which are deleted as the cause of the phenotype recognized in PWS patients. 21 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Specific chromosomal imbalances in human papillomavirus-transfected cells during progression toward immortality

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    Solinas-Toldo, Sabina; Dürst, Matthias; Lichter, Peter

    1997-01-01

    High risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) known to be closely associated with cervical cancer, such as HPV16 and HPV18, have the potential to immortalize human epithelial cells in culture. Four lines of HPV-transfected keratinocytes were analyzed by comparative genomic hybridization at different time points after transfection. A number of chromosomal imbalances was found to be highly characteristic for the cultures progressing toward immortality. Whereas several of these were new and previously not found as recurrent aberrations in cervical tumors, some were identical to chromosomal changes observed during cervical carcinogenesis. The data put new emphasis on the studied cell system as a relevant model for HPV-induced pathogenesis. PMID:9108068

  12. Genomic imbalances in 5918 malignant epithelial tumors: an explorative meta-analysis of chromosomal CGH data

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    Baudis Michael

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with most human malignancies, with gains and losses on some genomic regions associated with particular entities. Methods Of the 15429 cases collected for the Progenetix molecular-cytogenetic database, 5918 malignant epithelial neoplasias analyzed by chromosomal Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH were selected for further evaluation. For the 22 clinico-pathological entities with more than 50 cases, summary profiles for genomic imbalances were generated from case specific data and analyzed. Results With large variation in overall genomic instability, recurring genomic gains and losses were prominent. Most entities showed frequent gains involving 8q2, while gains on 20q, 1q, 3q, 5p, 7q and 17q were frequent in different entities. Loss "hot spots" included 3p, 4q, 13q, 17p and 18q among others. Related average imbalance patterns were found for clinically distinct entities, e.g. hepatocellular carcinomas (ca. and ductal breast ca., as well as for histologically related entities (squamous cell ca. of different sites. Conclusion Although considerable case-by-case variation of genomic profiles can be found by CGH in epithelial malignancies, a limited set of variously combined chromosomal imbalances may be typical for carcinogenesis. Focus on the respective regions should aid in target gene detection and pathway deduction.

  13. Accumulation of numerical and structural chromosome imbalances in spermatozoa from reciprocal translocation carriers.

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    Godo, A; Blanco, J; Vidal, F; Anton, E

    2013-03-01

    Is there a relationship between the occurrence of specific segregation modes and the production of additional numerical abnormalities in spermatozoa from reciprocal translocation carriers? The production of aneuploid and diploid spermatozoa tends to be associated with an unbalanced segregation outcome of the rearranged chromosomes. Carriers of reciprocal translocations have an increased genetic reproductive risk as a consequence of producing higher numbers of unbalanced spermatozoa. These imbalances can originate during the segregation of the rearranged chromosomes and also from the occurrence of interchromosomal effects (ICEs). Usually, the outcome of both events is studied independently by means of sperm fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). We designed a sequential FISH protocol based on two successive hybridization rounds to study the segregation outcome of the rearranged chromosomes and the presence of additional numerical abnormalities in the same sperm nuclei. The study was performed between February 2010 and February 2012. Sperm samples from eight reciprocal translocation carriers were processed for FISH analysis. Numerical abnormalities for chromosomes X, Y, 13, 18 and 21 were evaluated in the first hybridization round. The aneuploid and diploid nuclei were relocated and analysed for the segregation outcome of the rearranged chromosomes in the second hybridization round. In every carrier, another population of non-selected spermatozoa was also analysed with the aim of defining the general segregation outcome of each reorganization event. Overall, the selected population of aneuploid and diploid spermatozoa showed significant increased frequencies of unbalanced segregation modes of the rearranged chromosomes (3:1, 4:0 and 'other') when compared with the non-selected population of spermatozoa. A P-value of chromosomes. Information about the content of additional chromosomes would have been useful in order to broaden the number of aneuploid spermatozoa

  14. Chromosomal imbalances in four new uterine cervix carcinoma derived cell lines

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    Vázquez Guelaguetza

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uterine cervix carcinoma is the second most common female malignancy worldwide and a major health problem in Mexico, representing the primary cause of death among the Mexican female population. High risk human papillomavirus (HPV infection is considered to be the most important risk factor for the development of this tumor and cervical carcinoma derived cell lines are very useful models for the study of viral carcinogenesis. Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH experiments have detected a specific pattern of chromosomal imbalances during cervical cancer progression, indicating chromosomal regions that might contain genes that are important for cervical transformation. Methods We performed HPV detection and CGH analysis in order to initiate the genomic characterization of four recently established cervical carcinoma derived cell lines from Mexican patients. Results All the cell lines were HPV18 positive. The most prevalent imbalances in the cell lines were gains in chromosomes 1q23-q32, 3q11.2-q13.1, 3q22-q26.1, 5p15.1-p11.2, this alteration present as a high copy number amplification in three of the cell lines, 7p15-p13, 7q21, 7q31, 11q21, and 12q12, and losses in 2q35-qter, 4p16, 6q26-qter, 9q34 and 19q13.2-qter. Conclusions Analysis of our present findings and previously reported data suggest that gains at 1q31-q32 and 7p13-p14, as well as losses at 6q26-q27 are alterations that might be unique for HPV18 positive cases. These chromosomal regions, as well as regions with high copy number amplifications, coincide with known fragile sites and known HPV integration sites. The general pattern of chromosomal imbalances detected in the cells resembled that found in invasive cervical tumors, suggesting that the cells represent good models for the study of cervical carcinoma.

  15. Chromosomal Imbalances are Associated with Metastasis-Free Survival in Breast Cancer Patients

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    Michaela Aubele

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple chromosomal imbalances have been identified in breast cancer using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH. Their association with the primary tumors' potential for building distant metastases is unknown. In this study we have investigated 39 invasive breast carcinomas with a mean follow‐up period of 99 months (max. 193 months by CGH to determine the prognostic value of chromosomal gains and losses. The mean number of chromosomal imbalances per tumor was 6.5±0.7 (range 2 to 18. The most frequent alterations identified in more than 1/3 of cases were gains on chromosomes 11q13, 12q24, 16, 17, and 20q, and losses on 2q and 13q. A significantly different frequency of chromosomal aberrations (p≤0.05 was found between DNA‐diploid and non‐diploid tumors (gain on chromosome 17. Differences were also noted between tumors progressing to distant metastases within the period of follow‐up and those which do not (gains on 11q13 and 12q24; loss on 12q. Significant univariate correlations (p≤0.05 with the metastasis‐free survival of patients were found for lymph node status, the cytometrical determined DNA ploidy (diploid/non‐diploid and anisokaryosis, and for DNA gains on 11q13, 12q24, 17, and 18p. An unexpected inverse correlation was found between clinical outcome and gains on 11q13 and 12q24. In multivariate analysis independent prognostic value, in addition to lymph node status, was found for chromosomal gains on 11q13, 12q24, 17 and 18p. Amplification on 20q, which did not correlate with metastasis‐free survival in a univariate analysis, showed weak prognostic significance in combination with the nodal status. The prognostic value of chromosomal alterations – some of them by inverse correlation – suggests an interaction and/or compensation of the involved amplified genes and their effects on the occurrence of distant metastases in breast cancer patients.

  16. Microarray comparative genomic hybridization detection of chromosomal imbalances in uterine cervix carcinoma

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    García José

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH has been applied to all stages of cervical carcinoma progression, defining a specific pattern of chromosomal imbalances in this tumor. However, given its limited spatial resolution, chromosomal CGH has offered only general information regarding the possible genetic targets of DNA copy number changes. Methods In order to further define specific DNA copy number changes in cervical cancer, we analyzed 20 cervical samples (3 pre-malignant lesions, 10 invasive tumors, and 7 cell lines, using the GenoSensor microarray CGH system to define particular genetic targets that suffer copy number changes. Results The most common DNA gains detected by array CGH in the invasive samples were located at the RBP1-RBP2 (3q21-q22 genes, the sub-telomeric clone C84C11/T3 (5ptel, D5S23 (5p15.2 and the DAB2 gene (5p13 in 58.8% of the samples. The most common losses were found at the FHIT gene (3p14.2 in 47% of the samples, followed by deletions at D8S504 (8p23.3, CTDP1-SHGC- 145820 (18qtel, KIT (4q11-q12, D1S427-FAF1 (1p32.3, D9S325 (9qtel, EIF4E (eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E, 4q24, RB1 (13q14, and DXS7132 (Xq12 present in 5/17 (29.4% of the samples. Conclusion Our results confirm the presence of a specific pattern of chromosomal imbalances in cervical carcinoma and define specific targets that are suffering DNA copy number changes in this neoplasm.

  17. Chromosome microarrays in human reproduction.

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    Rajcan-Separovic, Evica

    2012-01-01

    Chromosome microarray (CMA) testing allows automatic and easy identification of large chromosomal abnormalities detectable by conventional cytogenetics as well as the detection of submicroscopic chromosomal imbalances. A PubMed search was performed in order to review the current use of CMA testing in the field of human reproduction. Articles discussing the use of CMA in the preimplantation setting, ongoing pregnancies, miscarriages and patients with reproductive disorders were considered. A high rate of concordance between conventional methods of detecting chromosomal abnormalities [e.g. fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), karyotyping] and CMA was reported in the prenatal setting with CMA providing more comprehensive and detailed results as it investigates the whole genome at higher resolution. In preimplantation genetic screening, CMA is replacing FISH and the selection of embryos based on CMA has already resulted in live births. For ongoing pregnancies and miscarriages, CMA eliminates tissue culture failures and artifacts and allows a quick turnaround time. The detection of submicroscopic imbalances [or copy number variants (CNVs)] is beneficial when the imbalance has a clear clinical consequence but is challenging for previously undescribed imbalances, particularly for ongoing pregnancies. Recurrent CNVs have been documented in patients with reproductive disorders; however, the application of CMA in this field is still limited. CMA enhances reproductive medicine as it facilitates better understanding of the genetic aspects of human development and reproduction and more informed patient management. Further clinical validation of CMA in the prenatal setting, creation of practice guidelines and catalogs of newly discovered submicroscopic imbalances with clinical outcomes are areas that will require attention in the future.

  18. Regions of allelic imbalance in the distal portion of chromosome 12q in gastric cancer.

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    Schneider, B G; Rha, S Y; Chung, H C; Bravo, J C; Mera, R; Torres, J C; Plaisance, K T; Schlegel, R; McBride, C M; Reveles, X T; Leach, R J

    2003-06-01

    To define regions of loss on the distal portion of chromosome 12q in gastric adenocarcinoma. Microsatellite analysis on chromosome 12 was performed on 19 human gastric cancer cell lines using 77 markers, 71 of which were within or distal to 12q21; some portions of this region showed extended regions of homozygosity (ERHs) in 10 of 19 gastric cancer cell lines. In addition, microdissected tumour cells from 76 primary gastric adenocarcinomas were examined using 13 markers of interest implicated by the cell line data; 70% of these showed allelic imbalance (AI) at one or more markers in or distal to 12q21. Mapping ERHs in the cell lines and sites of AI in the tumours identified three regions that contain putative tumour suppressor genes: region A is located within 2.8 Mb between markers D12S1667 and D12S88; region B, within 1.9 Mb between markers D12S1607 and D12S78; and region C, in 0.74 Mb between markers D12S342 and D12S324. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) analysis in two cell lines confirmed that two of the ERHs reflected deletions, not amplifications, of D12S81 in region A and D12S340 in region C. FISH analysis of marker D12S1075 within an ERH containing region B in one cell line showed neither amplification nor deletion. AI on 12q was not associated with prognosis, but was associated with ethnicity of the patient. These results identify regions on chromosome 12 that appear to contain tumour suppressor genes important in the development of gastric cancer.

  19. Array CGH analysis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia reveals frequent cryptic monoallelic and biallelic deletions of chromosome 22q11 that include the PRAME gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunn, Shelly R.; Bolla, Aswani R.; Barron, Lynn L.; Gorre, Mercedes E.; Mohammed, Mansoor S.; Bahler, David W.; Mellink, Clemens H. M.; van Oers, Marinus H. J.; Keating, Michael J.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Coombes, Kevin R.; Abruzzo, Lynne V.; Robetorye, Ryan S.

    2009-01-01

    We used BAC array-based CGH to detect genomic imbalances in 187 CLL cases. Submicroscopic deletions of chromosome 22q11 were observed in 28 cases (15%), and the frequency of these deletions was second only to loss of the 13q14 region, the most common genomic aberration in CLL. Oligonucleotide-based

  20. Screening of 20 patients with X-linked mental retardation using chromosome X-specific array-MAPH.

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    Kousoulidou, L.; Parkel, S.; Zilina, O.; Palta, P.; Puusepp, H.; Remm, M.; Turner, G.; Boyle, J.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; Brouwer, A.; Esch, H. van; Froyen, G.; Ropers, H.H.; Chelly, J.; Moraine, C.; Gecz, J.; Kurg, A.; Patsalis, P.C.

    2007-01-01

    The rapid advancement of high-resolution DNA copy number assessment methods revealed the significant contribution of submicroscopic genetic imbalances to abnormal phenotypes, including mental retardation. In order to detect submicroscopic genetic imbalances, we have screened 20 families with

  1. Subtelomeric study of 132 patients with mental retardation reveals 9 chromosomal anomalies and contributes to the delineation of submicroscopic deletions of 1pter, 2qter, 4pter, 5qter and 9qter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogaard, Marie; Tümer, Zeynep; Hjalgrim, Helle

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cryptic chromosome imbalances are increasingly acknowledged as a cause for mental retardation and learning disability. New phenotypes associated with specific rearrangements are also being recognized. Techniques for screening for subtelomeric rearrangements are commercially available...... dysmorphic features. Five had imbalances leading to recognizable phenotypes. CONCLUSION: Subtelomeric screening is a useful adjunct to conventional cytogenetic analyses, and should be considered in mentally retarded subjects with dysmorphic features and unknown cause......., allowing the implementation in a diagnostic service laboratory. We report the diagnostic yield in a series of 132 subjects with mental retardation, and the associated clinical phenotypes. METHODS: We applied commercially available subtelomeric fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). All patients...

  2. Chromosomal imbalances associated with carcinoma in situ and associated testicular germ cell tumours of adolescents and adults

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    Summersgill, B; Osin, P; Lu, Y-J; Huddart, R; Shipley, J

    2001-01-01

    Carcinoma in situ (CIS) or intratubular germ cell neoplasia is generally considered the precursor lesion of adult testicular germ cell tumours (TGCT). The chromosomal imbalances associated with CIS and the corresponding seminoma (SE) or nonseminoma (NS) have been determined by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis of microdissected material from seven cases. Significantly, the CIS showed no gain of 12p material whereas in the invasive components of all cases gain of 12p was found, in 2 cases associated with amplification of the 12p11.2–12.1 region. Interphase fluorescence in situ analysis was consistent with this and provided evidence for the i(12p) or 12p11.2–12.1 amplification in the SE and NS but not in the corresponding CIS. This suggests a role for these changes in progression of CIS to invasive testicular cancer or progression of the invasive disease. Other imbalances such as gain of material from chromosomes 1, 5, 7, 8, 12q and X and loss of material from chromosome 18 were frequently identified (> 40% of cases) in the CIS associated with both SE and NS as well as in the invasive components. Loss of material from chromosome 4 and 13 and gain of 2p were more frequently found in the invasive components. The results shed light on the genetic relationship between the non-invasive and invasive components of testicular cancer and the stage at which particular chromosomal changes may be important. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11461079

  3. Spontaneous transformation of murine epithelial cells requires the early acquisition of specific chromosomal aneuploidies and genomic imbalances.

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    Padilla-Nash, Hesed M; Hathcock, Karen; McNeil, Nicole E; Mack, David; Hoeppner, Daniel; Ravin, Rea; Knutsen, Turid; Yonescu, Raluca; Wangsa, Danny; Dorritie, Kathleen; Barenboim, Linda; Hu, Yue; Ried, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    Human carcinomas are defined by recurrent chromosomal aneuploidies, which result in a tissue-specific distribution of genomic imbalances. In order to develop models for these genome mutations and to determine their role in tumorigenesis, we generated 45 spontaneously transformed murine cell lines from normal epithelial cells derived from bladder, cervix, colon, kidney, lung, and mammary gland. Phenotypic changes, chromosomal aberrations, centrosome number, and telomerase activity were assayed in control uncultured cells and in three subsequent stages of transformation. Supernumerary centrosomes, binucleate cells, and tetraploidy were observed as early as 48 hr after explantation. In addition, telomerase activity increased throughout progression. Live-cell imaging revealed that failure of cytokinesis, not cell fusion, promoted genome duplication. Spectral karyotyping demonstrated that aneuploidy preceded immortalization, consisting predominantly of whole chromosome losses (4, 9, 12, 13, 16, and Y) and gains (1, 10, 15, and 19). After transformation, focal amplifications of the oncogenes Myc and Mdm2 were frequently detected. Fifty percent of the transformed lines resulted in tumors on injection into immunocompromised mice. The phenotypic and genomic alterations observed in spontaneously transformed murine epithelial cells recapitulated the aberration pattern observed during human carcinogenesis. The dominant aberration of these cell lines was the presence of specific chromosomal aneuploidies. We propose that our newly derived cancer models will be useful tools to dissect the sequential steps of genome mutations during malignant transformation, and also to identify cancer-specific genes, signaling pathways, and the role of chromosomal instability in this process. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Chimerism and multiple numerical chromosome imbalances in a spontaneously aborted fetus.

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    Vorsanova, S G; Iourov, I Y; Demidova, I A; Kirillova, E A; Soloviev, I V; Yurov, Y B

    2006-01-01

    We report on a case of chimerism and multiple abnormalities of chromosomes 21, Xand Yin spontaneous abortion specimen. To the best our knowledge the present case is the first documented chimera in a spontaneously aborted fetus. The application of interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using chromosome enumeration and site-specific DNA probes showed trisomy X in 92 nuclei (23 %), tetrasomy X in 100 nuclei (25 %), pentasomy of chromosome X in 40 nuclei (10 %), XXY in 36 nuclei (9 %), XXXXXXYY in 12 nuclei (3 %), XXXXXYYYYY in 8 nuclei (2 %), trisomy 21 and female chromosome complement in 40 nuclei (10 %), normal female chromosome complement in 72 nuclei (18 %) out of 400 nuclei scored. Our experience indicates that the frequency of chimerism coupled with multiple chromosome abnormalities should be no less than 1 : 400 among spontaneous abortions. The difficulties of chimerism identification in fetal tissues are discussed.

  5. Chromosome 5 derived small supernumerary marker: towards a genotype/phenotype correlation of proximal chromosome 5 imbalances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Joana Barbosa; Backx, Liesbeth; Vermeesch, Joris R; Santos, Heloisa G; Sousa, Ana C; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Weise, Anja; von Eggeling, Ferdinand; Liehr, Thomas; Carreira, Isabel Marques

    2011-05-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are a morphological heterogeneous group of additional abnormal chromosomes that cannot be characterized alone by conventional banding cytogenetics. Molecular cytogenetic techniques are valuable tools for the accurate identification of sSMC and a prerequisite for sound genetic counseling based on refined genotype/phenotype correlation. We describe a new case of a retarded patient with an sSMC derived from chromosome 5. The characterization of the sSMC was done by subcentromere-specific multicolor (subcenM) fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) and by full tilling resolution array analysis, after microdissection and amplification of the marker DNA. Uniparental disomy for normal sister chromosomes of the sSMC(5) was excluded. The karyotype was mos47,XX,+r(5)(::p11.1 → q12.1::)[70%]/46,XX[30%], being the trisomic region between 46.15 ∼ 49.56 Mb and 61.25 ∼ 61.335 Mb, a region known to harbor ∼45 annotated genes. Together with a review of the previously described cases of sSMC(5) and duplications involving the 5q proximal region, we can conclude that trisomy of the 5q11 region is associated with learning difficulties and speech delay.

  6. Submicroscopic Nature Needs Megascience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Leon

    2005-04-01

    The history of ``submicroscopic nature,'' that is, the history of particle physics, begins in the early 1950's and builds on the construction of a post WWII series of particle accelerators developed to study nuclear physics had been applied to the collisions, in the earth's atmosphere, of cosmic rays. These were high energy particles generated in cosmological events and colliding with oxygen and nitrogen in our atmosphere to create new particles. These studies discovered muons, pions, kaons and lambdas---the beginnings of a vast ``zoo.'' Clearly, studies of the inhabitants of the zoo required energetic collisions, the higher the energy of the accelerator, the more extensive was the range of masses that could be produced and studied. Our paper will review the developments over the past 50 years. As accelerators grew, so did the particle detectors and the sizes of the experimental groups. This will bring us to Fermilab in 2005. Finally, we will describe the ˜900 physicist groups that are cheerfully collaborating, building particle detectors designed to peer deeply into the structure of matter, based upon the ``Large Hadron Collider'' (LHC), an accelerator of unprecedented size, cost, and complexity. The story then takes us from the 100 MeV (10^8 eV) ``atom smashers'' of 1950, to the ˜10 TeV (10^13 eV) behemoth now under construction in Europe. Thus, we move from dozens of machines often on University campuses around the world, to one single megascience device shared by physicists around the world. The motivation for this evolution is physics, as we shall attempt to explain.

  7. Prenatal diagnosis of sub-microscopic partial trisomy 10q using chromosomal microarray analysis in a phenotypically abnormal fetus with normal karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, P C; Adam, S; Badr, M; Brooks, C R; Edwards, J; Walker, P; Mohamed, S; Gregg, A R

    2016-05-17

    Partial trisomy of the 10q region was originally reported in 1979 [1]. For 25 years, the diagnosis was made microscopically based on large, visible insertions in the region identified by karyotype analysis. Previous case reports have included both unbalanced translocations and large duplications/insertions in the 10q region [2]. Probands with partial trisomy 10q syndrome often have an abnormal phenotype that may include developmental delay [3-5], craniofacial abnormalities [3, 5], talipes (clubfoot) [2], microcephaly [2-4], or congenital heart disease [2-6]. Prenatal diagnoses by karyotype have been made following ultrasound diagnosis of sacrococcygeal teratoma [7], renal pyelectasis [3, 8-10], and other fetal abnormalities [4]. In this case, we report the first prenatal diagnosis of partial trisomy 10q (10q22.3-10q23.2) with a normal karyotype and an abnormal chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA). This is the smallest copy number variant (CNV) (7.5 Mb) in the 10q22.3-10q23.2 regions yet reported.

  8. Synchronous clear cell renal cell carcinoma and tubulocystic carcinoma: genetic evidence of independent ontogenesis and implications of chromosomal imbalances in tumor progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quiroga-Garza Gabriela

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Seven percent of renal cell carcinoma (RCC cases are diagnosed as "unclassified" RCC by morphology. Genetic profiling of RCCs helps define renal tumor subtypes, especially in cases where morphologic diagnosis is inconclusive. This report describes a patient with synchronous clear cell RCC (ccRCC and a tubulocystic renal carcinoma (TCRC in the same kidney, and discusses the pathologic features and genetic profile of both tumors. A 67 year-old male underwent CT scans for an unrelated medical event. Two incidental renal lesions were found and ultimately removed by radical nephrectomy. The smaller lesion had multiple small cystic spaces lined by hobnail cells with high nuclear grade separated by fibrous stroma. This morphology and the expression of proximal (CD10, AMACR and distal tubule cell (CK19 markers by immunohistochemistry supported the diagnosis of TCRC. The larger lesion was a typical ccRCC, with Fuhrman's nuclear grade 3 and confined to the kidney. Molecular characterization of both neoplasms using virtual karyotyping was performed to assess relatedness of these tumors. Low grade areas (Fuhrman grade 2 of the ccRCC showed loss of 3p and gains in chromosomes 5 and 7, whereas oncocytic areas displayed additional gain of 2p and loss of 10q; the high grade areas (Fuhrman grade 3 showed several additional imbalances. In contrast, the TCRC demonstrated a distinct profile with gains of chromosomes 8 and 17 and loss of 9. In conclusion, ccRCC and TCRC show distinct genomic copy number profiles and chromosomal imbalances in TCRC might be implicated in the pathogenesis of this tumor. Second, the presence of a ccRCC with varying degrees of differentiation exemplifies the sequence of chromosomal imbalances acquired during tumor progression. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1790525735655283

  9. Synchronous clear cell renal cell carcinoma and tubulocystic carcinoma: genetic evidence of independent ontogenesis and implications of chromosomal imbalances in tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga-Garza, Gabriela; Piña-Oviedo, Sergio; Cuevas-Ocampo, Karime; Goldfarb, Richard; Schwartz, Mary R; Ayala, Alberto G; Monzon, Federico A

    2012-02-27

    Seven percent of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cases are diagnosed as "unclassified" RCC by morphology. Genetic profiling of RCCs helps define renal tumor subtypes, especially in cases where morphologic diagnosis is inconclusive. This report describes a patient with synchronous clear cell RCC (ccRCC) and a tubulocystic renal carcinoma (TCRC) in the same kidney, and discusses the pathologic features and genetic profile of both tumors. A 67 year-old male underwent CT scans for an unrelated medical event. Two incidental renal lesions were found and ultimately removed by radical nephrectomy. The smaller lesion had multiple small cystic spaces lined by hobnail cells with high nuclear grade separated by fibrous stroma. This morphology and the expression of proximal (CD10, AMACR) and distal tubule cell (CK19) markers by immunohistochemistry supported the diagnosis of TCRC. The larger lesion was a typical ccRCC, with Fuhrman's nuclear grade 3 and confined to the kidney. Molecular characterization of both neoplasms using virtual karyotyping was performed to assess relatedness of these tumors. Low grade areas (Fuhrman grade 2) of the ccRCC showed loss of 3p and gains in chromosomes 5 and 7, whereas oncocytic areas displayed additional gain of 2p and loss of 10q; the high grade areas (Fuhrman grade 3) showed several additional imbalances. In contrast, the TCRC demonstrated a distinct profile with gains of chromosomes 8 and 17 and loss of 9. In conclusion, ccRCC and TCRC show distinct genomic copy number profiles and chromosomal imbalances in TCRC might be implicated in the pathogenesis of this tumor. Second, the presence of a ccRCC with varying degrees of differentiation exemplifies the sequence of chromosomal imbalances acquired during tumor progression. The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1790525735655283.

  10. Common chromosomal imbalances and stemness-related protein expression markers in endometriotic lesions from different anatomical sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silveira, Cássia G T; Abrão, Mauricio S; Dias, João A

    2012-01-01

    per sample. DNA losses were more frequently detected and involved mainly 3p, 5q, 7p, 9p, 11q, 16q, 18q and 19q. Many of the genomic imbalances detected were common to endometriotic stroma and epithelia and also among different endometriotic sites from the same patient. These findings suggested...

  11. Imported submicroscopic malaria in Madrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez-Olivencia Germán

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Submicroscopic malaria (SMM can be defined as low-density infections of Plasmodium that are unlikely to be detected by conventional microscopy. Such submicroscopic infections only occasionally cause acute disease, but they are capable of infecting mosquitoes and contributing to transmission. This entity is frequent in endemic countries; however, little is known about imported SMM. The goals of this study were two-fold: a to know the frequency of imported SMM, and b to describe epidemiological, laboratorial and clinical features of imported SMM. Methods A retrospective study based on review of medical records was performed. The study population consisted of patients older than 15 years attended at the Tropical Medicine Unit of Hospital Carlos III, between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2007. Routinely detection techniques for Plasmodium included Field staining and microscopic examination through thick and thin blood smear. A semi-nested multiplex malaria PCR was used to diagnose or to confirm cases with low parasitaemia. Results SMM was diagnosed in 104 cases, representing 35.5% of all malaria cases. Mean age (IC95% was 40.38 years (37.41-43.34, and sex distribution was similar. Most cases were in immigrants, but some cases were found in travellers. Equatorial Guinea was the main country where infection was acquired (81.7%. Symptoms were present only in 28.8% of all SMM cases, mainly asthenia (73.3% of symptomatic patients, fever (60% and arthromialgias (53.3%. The associated laboratory abnormalities were anaemia (27.9%, leukopaenia (15.4% and thrombopaenia (15.4%. Co-morbidity was described in 75 cases (72.1%. Conclusions Results from this study suggest that imported SMM should be considered in some patients attended at Tropical Medicine Units. Although it is usually asymptomatic, it may be responsible of fever, or laboratory abnormalities in patients coming from endemic areas. The possibility of transmission in SMM has

  12. Screening of 20 patients with X-linked mental retardation using chromosome X-specific array-MAPH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousoulidou, Ludmila; Parkel, Sven; Zilina, Olga; Palta, Priit; Puusepp, Helen; Remm, Maido; Turner, Gillian; Boyle, Jackie; van Bokhoven, Hans; de Brouwer, Arjan; Van Esch, Hilde; Froyen, Guy; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Chelly, Jamel; Moraine, Claude; Gecz, Jozef; Kurg, Ants; Patsalis, Philippos C

    2007-01-01

    The rapid advancement of high-resolution DNA copy number assessment methods revealed the significant contribution of submicroscopic genetic imbalances to abnormal phenotypes, including mental retardation. In order to detect submicroscopic genetic imbalances, we have screened 20 families with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) using a chromosome X-specific array-MAPH platform with median resolution of 238kb. Among the 20 families, 18 were experimental, as they were not previously screened with any microarray method, and two were blind controls with known aberrations, as they were previously screened by array-CGH. This study presents the first clinical application of chromosome X-specific array-MAPH methodology. The screening of 20 affected males from 20 unrelated XLMR families resulted in the detection of an unknown deletion, spanning a region of 7-23kb. Family studies and population screening demonstrated that the detected deletion is an unknown rare copy number variant. One of the control samples, carrying approximately 6-Mb duplication was correctly identified, moreover it was found to be interrupted by a previously unknown 19kb region of normal copy number. The second control 50kb deletion was not identified, as this particular region was not covered by array-MAPH probes. This study demonstrates that the chromosome X-specific array-MAPH platform is a valuable tool for screening patients with XLMR, or other X-linked disorders, and emerges the need for introducing new high-resolution screening methods for the detection of genetic imbalances.

  13. The database of chromosome imbalance regions and genes resided in lung cancer from Asian and Caucasian identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Fang-Yi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer-related genes show racial differences. Therefore, identification and characterization of DNA copy number alteration regions in different racial groups helps to dissect the mechanism of tumorigenesis. Methods Array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH was analyzed for DNA copy number profile in 40 Asian and 20 Caucasian lung cancer patients. Three methods including MetaCore analysis for disease and pathway correlations, concordance analysis between array-CGH database and the expression array database, and literature search for copy number variation genes were performed to select novel lung cancer candidate genes. Four candidate oncogenes were validated for DNA copy number and mRNA and protein expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR, chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH, reverse transcriptase-qPCR (RT-qPCR, and immunohistochemistry (IHC in more patients. Results We identified 20 chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 459 genes for Caucasian and 17 regions containing 476 genes for Asian lung cancer patients. Seven common chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 117 genes, included gain on 3p13-14, 6p22.1, 9q21.13, 13q14.1, and 17p13.3; and loss on 3p22.2-22.3 and 13q13.3 were found both in Asian and Caucasian patients. Gene validation for four genes including ARHGAP19 (10q24.1 functioning in Rho activity control, FRAT2 (10q24.1 involved in Wnt signaling, PAFAH1B1 (17p13.3 functioning in motility control, and ZNF322A (6p22.1 involved in MAPK signaling was performed using qPCR and RT-qPCR. Mean gene dosage and mRNA expression level of the four candidate genes in tumor tissues were significantly higher than the corresponding normal tissues (PP=0.06. In addition, CISH analysis of patients indicated that copy number amplification indeed occurred for ARHGAP19 and ZNF322A genes in lung cancer patients. IHC analysis of paraffin blocks from Asian Caucasian patients demonstrated that the frequency of

  14. The database of chromosome imbalance regions and genes resided in lung cancer from Asian and Caucasian identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Fang-Yi; Chang, Jer-Wei; Chang, I-Shou; Chen, Yann-Jang; Hsu, Han-Shui; Huang, Shiu-Feng Kathy; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Kanteti, Rajani; Nandi, Suvobroto; Salgia, Ravi; Wang, Yi-Ching

    2012-06-12

    Cancer-related genes show racial differences. Therefore, identification and characterization of DNA copy number alteration regions in different racial groups helps to dissect the mechanism of tumorigenesis. Array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) was analyzed for DNA copy number profile in 40 Asian and 20 Caucasian lung cancer patients. Three methods including MetaCore analysis for disease and pathway correlations, concordance analysis between array-CGH database and the expression array database, and literature search for copy number variation genes were performed to select novel lung cancer candidate genes. Four candidate oncogenes were validated for DNA copy number and mRNA and protein expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH), reverse transcriptase-qPCR (RT-qPCR), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in more patients. We identified 20 chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 459 genes for Caucasian and 17 regions containing 476 genes for Asian lung cancer patients. Seven common chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 117 genes, included gain on 3p13-14, 6p22.1, 9q21.13, 13q14.1, and 17p13.3; and loss on 3p22.2-22.3 and 13q13.3 were found both in Asian and Caucasian patients. Gene validation for four genes including ARHGAP19 (10q24.1) functioning in Rho activity control, FRAT2 (10q24.1) involved in Wnt signaling, PAFAH1B1 (17p13.3) functioning in motility control, and ZNF322A (6p22.1) involved in MAPK signaling was performed using qPCR and RT-qPCR. Mean gene dosage and mRNA expression level of the four candidate genes in tumor tissues were significantly higher than the corresponding normal tissues (P<0.001~P=0.06). In addition, CISH analysis of patients indicated that copy number amplification indeed occurred for ARHGAP19 and ZNF322A genes in lung cancer patients. IHC analysis of paraffin blocks from Asian Caucasian patients demonstrated that the frequency of PAFAH1B1 protein overexpression was 68

  15. 3p22.1p21.31 microdeletion identifies CCK as Asperger syndrome candidate gene and shows the way for therapeutic strategies in chromosome imbalances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iourov, Ivan Y; Vorsanova, Svetlana G; Voinova, Victoria Y; Yurov, Yuri B

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to other autism spectrum disorders, chromosome abnormalities are rare in Asperger syndrome (AS) or high-functioning autism. Consequently, AS was occasionally subjected to classical positional cloning. Here, we report on a case of AS associated with a deletion of the short arm of chromosome 3. Further in silico analysis has identified a candidate gene for AS and has suggested a therapeutic strategy for manifestations of the chromosome rearrangement. Using array comparative genomic hybridization, an interstitial deletion of 3p22.1p21.31 (~2.5 Mb in size) in a child with Asperger's syndrome, seborrheic dermatitis and chronic pancreatitis was detected. Original bioinformatic approach to the prioritization of candidate genes/processes identified CCK (cholecystokinin) as a candidate gene for AS. In addition to processes associated with deleted genes, bioinformatic analysis of CCK gene interactome indicated that zinc deficiency might be a pathogenic mechanism in this case. This suggestion was supported by plasma zinc concentration measurements. The increase of zinc intake produced a rise in zinc plasma concentration and the improvement in the patient's condition. Our study supported previous linkage findings and had suggested a new candidate gene in AS. Moreover, bioinformatic analysis identified the pathogenic mechanism, which was used to propose a therapeutic strategy for manifestations of the deletion. The relative success of this strategy allows speculating that therapeutic or dietary normalization of metabolic processes altered by a chromosome imbalance or genomic copy number variations may be a way for treating at least a small proportion of cases of these presumably incurable genetic conditions.

  16. A new direction for prenatal chromosome microarray testing: software-targeting for detection of clinically significant chromosome imbalance without equivocal findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Wook Ahn

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To design and validate a prenatal chromosomal microarray testing strategy that moves away from size-based detection thresholds, towards a more clinically relevant analysis, providing higher resolution than G-banded chromosomes but avoiding the detection of copy number variants (CNVs of unclear prognosis that cause parental anxiety.Methods. All prenatal samples fulfilling our criteria for karyotype analysis (n = 342 were tested by chromosomal microarray and only CNVs of established deletion/duplication syndrome regions and any other CNV >3 Mb were detected and reported. A retrospective full-resolution analysis of 249 of these samples was carried out to ascertain the performance of this testing strategy.Results. Using our prenatal analysis, 23/342 (6.7% samples were found to be abnormal. Of the remaining samples, 249 were anonymized and reanalyzed at full-resolution; a further 46 CNVs were detected in 44 of these cases (17.7%. None of these additional CNVs were of clear clinical significance.Conclusion. This prenatal chromosomal microarray strategy detected all CNVs of clear prognostic value and did not miss any CNVs of clear clinical significance. This strategy avoided both the problems associated with interpreting CNVs of uncertain prognosis and the parental anxiety that are a result of such findings.

  17. Clinical implementation of chromosomal microarray technology in prenatal diagnosis. (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ji Un; Koo, Sun Hoe

    2012-12-01

    Chromosomal microarray technology represents the technical convergence of molecular genetics and cytogenetics, and is rapidly revolutionizing modern cytogenetics. Expected genomic aberrations are accurately identified and provide readily interpretable results that are suitable for clinical risk stratification and therapeutic strategies. The application of array technology in prenatal genetic diagnosis provides distinct advantages over conventional cytogenetic analysis in detecting both the majority of microscopic and submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities. In the last few years, the validity of array technology has become obvious to medical and laboratory communities involved in prenatal diagnostic testing. However, whether or not microarray analysis is sufficient for the detection of cytogenetic abnormalities in prenatal diagnosis and if traditional cytogenetics continue to be important in this new era has yet to be confirmed. In the present study, we systematically reviewed the current status of microarray technology in the identification of pathogenic genomic imbalances and discussed practical considerations for its routine implementation in prenatal diagnosis.

  18. Widespread dysregulation of MiRNAs by MYCN amplification and chromosomal imbalances in neuroblastoma: association of miRNA expression with survival.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bray, Isabella

    2009-01-01

    MiRNAs regulate gene expression at a post-transcriptional level and their dysregulation can play major roles in the pathogenesis of many different forms of cancer, including neuroblastoma, an often fatal paediatric cancer originating from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system. We have analyzed a set of neuroblastoma (n = 145) that is broadly representative of the genetic subtypes of this disease for miRNA expression (430 loci by stem-loop RT qPCR) and for DNA copy number alterations (array CGH) to assess miRNA involvement in disease pathogenesis. The tumors were stratified and then randomly split into a training set (n = 96) and a validation set (n = 49) for data analysis. Thirty-seven miRNAs were significantly over- or under-expressed in MYCN amplified tumors relative to MYCN single copy tumors, indicating a potential role for the MYCN transcription factor in either the direct or indirect dysregulation of these loci. In addition, we also determined that there was a highly significant correlation between miRNA expression levels and DNA copy number, indicating a role for large-scale genomic imbalances in the dysregulation of miRNA expression. In order to directly assess whether miRNA expression was predictive of clinical outcome, we used the Random Forest classifier to identify miRNAs that were most significantly associated with poor overall patient survival and developed a 15 miRNA signature that was predictive of overall survival with 72.7% sensitivity and 86.5% specificity in the validation set of tumors. We conclude that there is widespread dysregulation of miRNA expression in neuroblastoma tumors caused by both over-expression of the MYCN transcription factor and by large-scale chromosomal imbalances. MiRNA expression patterns are also predicative of clinical outcome, highlighting the potential for miRNA mediated diagnostics and therapeutics.

  19. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Farida El-Baz

    2015-06-19

    Jun 19, 2015 ... Abstract Background: Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by clinical, etio- logic and genetic heterogeneity. Many surveys revealed cytogenetically visible chromosomal abnor- malities in 7.4% of autistic patients documented as well as several submicroscopic variants. This study had ...

  20. Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromosomes are structures found in the center (nucleus) of cells that carry long pieces of DNA. DNA ... is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist in ...

  1. CHARGE IMBALANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, John

    1980-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the theory of charge imbalance, and to discuss its relevance to a number of experimental situations. We introduce the concepts of quasiparticle charge and charge imbalance, and discuss the generation and detection of charge imbalance by tunneling. We describe the relaxation of the injected charge imbalance by inelastic scattering processes, and show how the Boltzmann equation can be solved to obtain the steady state quasiparticle distribution and the charge relaxation rate. Details are given of experiments to measure charge imbalance and the charge relaxation rate when inelastic scattering is the predominant relaxation mechanism. Experiments on and theories of other charge relaxation mechanisms are discussed, namely relaxation via elastic scattering in the presence of energy gap anisotropy, or in the presence of a pair breaking mechanism such as magnetic impurities or an applied supercurrent or magnetic field. We describe three other situations in which charge imbalance occurs, namely the resistance of the NS interface, phase slip centers, and the flow of a supercurrent in the presence of a temperature gradient.

  2. Array comparative genomic hybridisation-based identification of two imbalances of chromosome 1p in a 9-year-old girl with a monosomy 1p36 related phenotype and a family history of learning difficulties: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitzgibbon Gregory J

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Monosomy 1p36 is one of the most common terminal deletion syndromes, with an approximate incidence of 1 in every 5000 live births. This syndrome is associated with several pronounced clinical features including characteristic facial features, cardiac abnormalities, seizures and mental retardation, all of which are believed to be due to haploinsufficiency of genes within the 1p36 region. The deletion size varies from approximately 1.5 Mb to 10 Mb with the most common breakpoints located at 1p36.13 to 1p36.33. Over 70% of 1p36 deletion patients have a true terminal deletion. A further 7% have interstitial deletions and a proportion have a derivative chromosome 1 where the 1p telomere is replaced by material from another chromosome, either as a result of a de-novo rearrangement or as a consequence of malsegregation of a balanced parental translocation at meiosis. Case presentation Array comparative genomic hybridisation analysis of a 9-year-old Caucasian girl presenting with dysmorphic facial features and learning difficulties, for whom previous routine karyotyping had been normal, identified two submicroscopic rearrangements within chromosome 1p. Detection of both an insertional duplication of a region of 1p32.3 into the subtelomeric region of the short arm of a chromosome 1 homologue and a deletion within 1p36.32 of the same chromosome instigated a search for candidate genes within these regions which could be responsible for the clinical phenotype of the patient. Several genes were identified by computer-based annotation, some of which have implications in neurological and physical development. Conclusion Array comparative genomic hybridisation is providing a robust method for pinpointing regions of candidate genes associated with clinical phenotypes that extend beyond the resolution of the light microscope. This case report provides an example of how this method of analysis and the subsequent reporting of findings have

  3. Detection of subtelomere imbalance using MLPA: validation, development of an analysis protocol, and application in a diagnostic centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hills Alison

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Commercial MLPA kits (MRC-Holland are available for detecting imbalance at the subtelomere regions of chromosomes; each kit consists of one probe for each subtelomere. Methods For validation of the kits, 208 patients were tested, of which 128 were known to be abnormal, corresponding to 8528 genomic regions overall. Validation samples included those with trisomy 13, 18 and 21, microscopically visible terminal deletions and duplications, sex chromosome abnormalities and submicroscopic abnormalities identified by multiprobe FISH. A robust and sensitive analysis system was developed to allow accurate interpretation of single probe results, which is essential as breakpoints may occur between MLPA probes. Results The validation results showed that MLPA is a highly efficient technique for medium-throughput screening for subtelomere imbalance, with 95% confidence intervals for positive and negative predictive accuracies of 0.951-0.996 and 0.9996-1 respectively. A diagnostic testing strategy was established for subtelomere MLPA and any subsequent follow-up tests that may be required. The efficacy of this approach was demonstrated during 15 months of diagnostic testing when 455 patients were tested and 27 (5.9% abnormal cases were detected. Conclusion The development of a robust, medium-throughput analysis system for the interpretation of results from subtelomere assays will be of benefit to other Centres wishing to implement such an MLPA-based service.

  4. Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a new cell, the centromere serves as an attachment site for the two halves of each replicated ... of each chromosome is inherited from the female parent and the other from the male parent. This ...

  5. Evidence-based genomic diagnosis characterized chromosomal and cryptic imbalances in 30 elderly patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Rachana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the clinical validity of genome-wide oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH for detecting somatic abnormalities, we have applied this genomic analysis to 30 cases (13 MDS and 17 AML with clonal chromosomal abnormalities detected in more than 50% of analyzed metaphase cells. Results The aCGH detected all numerical chromosomal gains and losses from the mainline clones and 113 copy number alterations (CNAs ranging from 0.257 to 102.519 megabases (Mb. Clinically significant recurrent deletions of 5q (involving the RPS14 gene, 12p12.3 (ETV6 gene, 17p13 (TP53 gene, 17q11.2 (NF1 gene and 20q, double minutes containing the MYC gene and segmental amplification involving the MLL gene were further characterized with defined breakpoints and gene contents. Genomic features of microdeletions at 17q11.2 were confirmed by FISH using targeted BAC clones. The aCGH also defined break points in a derivative chromosome 6, der(6t(3;6(q21.3;p22.2, and an isodicentric X chromosome. However, chromosomally observed sideline clonal abnormalities in five cases were not detected by aCGH. Conclusions Our data indicated that an integrated cytogenomic analysis will be a better diagnostic scheme to delineate genomic contents of chromosomal and cryptic abnormalities in patients with MDS and AML. An evidence-based approach to interpret somatic genomic findings was proposed.

  6. Identification of subtelomeric genomic imbalances and breakpoint mapping with quantitative PCR in 296 individuals with congenital defects and/or mental retardation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brockmann Knut

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Submicroscopic imbalances in the subtelomeric regions of the chromosomes are considered to play an important role in the aetiology of mental retardation (MR. The aim of the study was to evaluate a quantitative PCR (qPCR protocol established by Boehm et al. (2004 in the clinical routine of subtelomeric testing. Results 296 patients with MR and a normal karyotype (500–550 bands were screened for subtelomeric imbalances by using qPCR combined with SYBR green detection. In total, 17 patients (5.8% with 20 subtelomeric imbalances were identified. Six of the aberrations (2% were classified as causative for the symptoms, because they occurred either de novo in the patients (5 cases or the aberration were be detected in the patient and an equally affected parent (1 case. The extent of the deletions ranged from 1.8 to approximately 10 Mb, duplications were 1.8 to approximately 5 Mb in size. In 6 patients, the copy number variations (CNVs were rated as benign polymorphisms, and the clinical relevance of these CNVs remains unclear in 5 patients (1.7%. Therefore, the overall frequency of clinically relevant imbalances ranges between 2% and 3.7% in our cohort. Conclusion This study illustrates that the qPCR/SYBR green technique represents a rapid and versatile method for the detection of subtelomeric imbalances and the option to map the breakpoint. Thus, this technique is highly suitable for genotype/phenotype studies in patients with MR/developmental delay and/or congenital defects.

  7. Performance of chromosomal microarray for patients with intellectual disabilities/developmental delay, autism, and multiple congenital anomalies in a Chinese cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Wilson Wai Sing; Lo, Ivan Fai Man; Lam, Stephen Tak Sum; Wang, Chi Chiu; Luk, Ho Ming; Leung, Tak Yeung; Choy, Kwong Wai

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal microarray (CMA) is currently the first-tier genetic test for patients with idiopathic neuropsychiatric diseases in many countries. Its improved diagnostic yield over karyotyping and other molecular testing facilitates the identification of the underlying causes of neuropsychiatric diseases. In this study, we applied oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization as the molecular genetic test in a Chinese cohort of children with DD/ID, autism or MCA. CMA identified 7 clinically significant microduplications and 17 microdeletions in 19.0% (20/105) patients, with size of aberrant regions ranging from 11 kb to 10.7 Mb. Fourteen of the pathogenic copy number variant (CNV) detected corresponded to well known microdeletion or microduplication syndromes. Four overlapped with critical regions of recently identified genomic syndromes. We also identified a rare de novo 2.3 Mb deletion at 8p21.3-21.2 as a pathogenic submicroscopic CNV. We also identified two novel CNVs, one at Xq28 and the other at 12q21.31-q21.33, in two patients (1.9%) with unclear clinical significance. Overall, the detection rate of CMA is comparable to figures previously reported for accurately detect submicroscopic chromosomal imbalances and pathogenic CNVs except mosaicism, balanced translocation and inversion. This study provided further evidence of an increased diagnostic yield of CMA and supported its use as a first line diagnostic tool for Chinese individuals with DD/ID, ASD, and MCA.

  8. The role of submicroscopic and symbolic representations in chemical explanations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treagust, David F.; Chittleborough, Gail; Mamiala, Thapelo L.

    2003-11-01

    Chemistry is commonly portrayed at three different levels of representation - macroscopic, submicroscopic and symbolic - that combine to enrich the explanations of chemical concepts. In this article, we examine the use of submicroscopic and symbolic representations in chemical explanations and ascertain how they provide meaning. Of specific interest is the development of students' levels of understanding, conceived as instrumental (knowing how) and relational (knowing why) understanding, as a result of regular Grade 11 chemistry lessons using analogical, anthropomorphic, relational, problem-based, and model-based explanations. Examples of both teachers' and students' dialogue are used to illustrate how submicroscopic and symbolic representations are manifested in their explanations of observed chemical phenomena. The data in this research indicated that effective learning at a relational level of understanding requires simultaneous use of submicroscopic and symbolic representations in chemical explanations. Representations are used to help the learner learn; however, the research findings showed that students do not always understand the role of the representation that is assumed by the teacher.

  9. Carriage of sub-microscopic sexual and asexual Plasmodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SUMMARY. Background: We investigated the prevalence of sub-microscopic Plasmodium falciparum infections and gameto- cyte carriage in asymptomatic individuals in Navrongo in northern Ghana, an area of seasonal malaria transmission. Design: A cross sectional study of 209 randomly selected participants of all ...

  10. Carriage of sub-microscopic sexual and asexual Plasmodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carriage of sub-microscopic sexual and asexual Plasmodium falciparum stages in the dry season at Navrongo, Ghana. ... infections and therefore the need for active case detection surveillance to eliminate "asymptomatic reservoir" parasites and consequently break the transmission of the disease in Ghana. Funding: Bill ...

  11. High prevalence of sub-microscopic infections in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Andres F; Chaparro, Pablo E; Benavides, Yoldy; Álvarez, Álvaro; Quintero, Juan Pablo; Padilla, Julio; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Herrera, Sócrates

    2015-05-15

    Malaria transmission in Latin America is typically characterized as hypo-endemic and unstable with ~170 million inhabitants at risk of malaria infection. Although Colombia has witnessed an important decrease in malaria transmission, the disease remains a public health problem with an estimated ~10 million people currently living in areas with malaria risk and ~61,000 cases reported in 2012. This study aimed to establish the malaria prevalence in three endemic regions of Colombia to aid in designing new interventions for malaria elimination. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in three regions of Colombia with different malaria epidemiological profiles: Tierralta (Ta), Tumaco (Tu) and Buenaventura (Bv). The Annual Parasite Index (API) was 10.7, 6.9 and 3.1, respectively. Participants were asked to respond to a sociodemographic questionnaire and then were bled to determine the Duffy genotype and the prevalence of malaria infection by microscopy and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). The study was conducted between October 2011 and January 2012. Eight sentinel sites with 1,169 subjects from 267 households were included. The overall prevalence of sub-microscopic infections measured by thick blood smear (TBS) was 0.3% (n=4) whereas by qPCR it was 9.7% (n=113), with a greater proportion (13%) in 40-50 years old individuals. Furthermore, different regions displayed different prevalence of sub-microscopic infections: Bv 12%, Ta 15%, and Tu 4%. From these 113 samples (qPCR), 74% were positive for P. vivax and 22% for P. falciparum, and 4% were mixed infections, which correlates to the overall parasite prevalence in Colombia. This study showed that in the southern Pacific coast of Colombia (Bv and Tu), around 56% of the population have a Duffy-negative genotype, compared to the northern region (Ta) where the percentage of Duffy-negative genotype is around 3%. Sub-microscopic infections are prevalent across different regions in Colombia, particularly in areas with

  12. Genome-wide copy number profiling on high-density bacterial artificial chromosomes, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and oligonucleotide microarrays: a platform comparison based on statistical power analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hehir-Kwa, J.Y.; Egmont-Peterson, M.; Janssen, I.M.; Smeets, D.F.C.M.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.; Veltman, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, comparative genomic hybridization onto bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) arrays (array-based comparative genomic hybridization) has proved to be successful for the detection of submicroscopic DNA copy-number variations in health and disease. Technological improvements to achieve a

  13. Genomic imbalances in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Verbitsky, Miguel; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Fasel, David A.; Levy, Brynn; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Wuttke, Matthias; Abraham, Alison G.; Kaskel, Frederick; Köttgen, Anna; Warady, Bradley A.; Furth, Susan L; Wong, Craig S.; Gharavi, Ali G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND. There is frequent uncertainty in the identification of specific etiologies of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children. Recent studies indicate that chromosomal microarrays can identify rare genomic imbalances that can clarify the etiology of neurodevelopmental and cardiac disorders in children; however, the contribution of unsuspected genomic imbalance to the incidence of pediatric CKD is unknown.

  14. Alternative Frameworks of the Secondary School Students on the Concept of Condensation at Submicroscopic Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Nurdiana; Surif, Johari; Ismail, Syuhaida

    2016-01-01

    The study was carried out to identify the alternative frameworks on the concept of condensation at submicroscopic level among secondary school students (N = 324). Data was collected by using the qualitative method through the Understanding Test on the Concept of Matter at Submicroscopic Level which consisted of 10 open-ended questions. The…

  15. The Effect of Different Textual Narrations on Students' Explanations at the Submicroscopic Level in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Balushi, Sulaiman M.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of different textual versions (macroscopic (control), submicroscopic, and guided imagery) of the explanation of a chemical phenomenon on students' submicroscopic explanation of a related phenomenon was examined. The sample included 152 pre-service science teachers. The three textual versions of the explanation were distributed randomly…

  16. Submicroscopic deletions at the WAGR locus, revealed by nonradioactive in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantes, J.A.; Bickmore, W.A.; Fletcher, J.M.; Hanson, I.M.; Heyningen, V. van (Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)); Ballesta, F. (Hospital Clinic 1, Barcelona (Spain))

    1992-12-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with biotin-labeled probes mapping to 11p13 has been used for the molecular analysis of deletions of the WAGR (Wilms tumor, aniridia, genitourinary abnormalities, and mental retardation) locus. They have detected a submicroscopic 11p13 deletion in a child with inherited aniridia who subsequently presented with Wilms tumor in a horseshoe kidney, only revealed at surgery. The mother, who has aniridia, was also found to carry a deletion including both the aniridia candidate gene (AN2) and the Wilms tumor predisposition gene (WT1). This is therefore a rare case of an inherited WAGR deletion. Wilms tumor has so far only been associated with sporadic de novo aniridia cases. The authors have shown that a cosmid probe for a candidate aniridia gene, homologous to the mouse Pax-6 gene, is deleted in cell lines from aniridia patients with previously characterized deletions at 11p13, while another cosmid marker mapping between two aniridia-associated translocation breakpoints (and hence a second candidate marker) is present on both chromosomes. These results support the Pax-6 homologue as a strong candidate for the AN2 gene. FISH with cosmid probes has proved to be a fast and reliable technique for the molecular analysis of deletions. It can be used with limited amounts of material and has strong potential for clinical applications. 41 refs., 1 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism | El-Baz | Egyptian Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by clinical, etiologic and genetic heterogeneity. Many surveys revealed cytogenetically visible chromosomal abnormalities in 7.4% of autistic patients documented as well as several submicroscopic variants. This study had been conducted to identify some ...

  18. Prader-Willi syndrome and atypical submicroscopic 15q11-q13 deletions with or without imprinting defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Maaz; Butler, Merlin G

    2016-11-01

    We report a 20 year follow up on a Caucasian female, now 26 years of age, with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) harboring an atypical 15q11-q13 submicroscopic deletion of 100-200 kb in size first detected in 1996 involving the imprinting center, SNRPN gene and surrounding region. PWS is a rare complex disorder caused by the loss of paternally expressed genes in the 15q11-q13 region. With high resolution chromosomal microarray and methylation - specific MLPA analysis, we updated the genetic findings on our patient and found a 209,819bp deletion including the SNURF-SNRPN gene complex which includes the imprinting center and the SNORD116 region. We compared with four other similarly reported individuals in the literature with atypical submicroscopic deletions within this region but without imprinting center involvement to better characterize the specific genetic lesions causing PWS clinical findings. Clinically, our patient met the diagnostic criteria of PWS including infantile hypotonia, a poor suck with feeding difficulties, global developmental delays and later food foraging, childhood obesity, small hands and skin picking. Small atypical deletions of comparable sizes were seen in the 15q11-q13 region in all five cases and similar behavioral/physical characteristics were found despite an imprinting defect in our patient. These results further support an overlapping critical deletion region involving the non-coding snoRNA SNORD116 in common in the five individuals playing a key role in contributing to the PWS phenotype. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Three Phase Power Imbalance Decomposition into Systematic Imbalance and Random Imbalance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kong, Wangwei; Ma, Kang; Wu, Qiuwei

    2017-01-01

    is calculated based on the systematic imbalance component to guide phase swapping. Case studies demonstrate that 72.8% of 782 low voltage substations have systematic imbalance components. The degree of power imbalance results reveal the maximum need for phase swapping and the random imbalance components reveal...

  20. The Role and Potential Dangers of Visualisation When Learning about Sub-Microscopic Explanations in Chemistry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilks, Ingo; Witteck, Torsten; Pietzner, Verena

    2012-01-01

    The core of theory-driven chemistry education consists of the constant shift between the different representational domains of chemical thinking: the macroscopic, the sub-microscopic, and the symbolic domains. Because the sub-microscopic domain can neither be seen nor directly visualised, it requires specific forms of visualisation, i.e. pictures…

  1. Adjustment of macroeconomic imbalances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta Barbulescu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The global financial and economic crisis was the factor that triggered the adjustment of macroeconomic imbalances accumulated in Romania. The current account deficit and budget deficit were two major structural imbalances that have created a high vulnerability for the economy and explained the extent of economic contraction in Romania during the economic crisis. This article identifies the main causes that lead to the need for fiscal adjustment both in the EU and in Romania, as well as main effects of adjustments in respect of their experience in recent years. The article deals with this topic, because the current topical debate in the field of fiscal adjustments implemented both in the EU and our country, and their need for economic activity aimed at economic recovery.

  2. Submicroscopic deletions of 11q24-25 in individuals without Jacobsen syndrome: re-examination of the critical region by high-resolution array-CGH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Christine; Qiao, Ying; Harvard, Chansonette; Liu, Xudong; Bernier, Francois P; McGillivray, Barbara; Farrell, Sandra A; Arbour, Laura; Chudley, Albert E; Clarke, Lorne; Gibson, William; Dyack, Sarah; McLeod, Ross; Costa, Teresa; Vanallen, Margot I; Yong, Siu-Li; Graham, Gail E; Macleod, Patrick; Patel, Millan S; Hurlburt, Jane; Holden, Jeanette Ja; Lewis, Suzanne Me; Rajcan-Separovic, Evica

    2008-11-11

    Jacobsen syndrome is a rare contiguous gene disorder that results from a terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. It is typically characterized by intellectual disability, a variety of physical anomalies and a distinctive facial appearance. The 11q deletion has traditionally been identified by routine chromosome analysis. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) has offered new opportunities to identify and refine chromosomal abnormalities in regions known to be associated with clinical syndromes. Using the 1 Mb BAC array (Spectral Genomics), we screened 70 chromosomally normal children with idiopathic intellectual disability (ID) and congenital abnormalities, and identified five cases with submicroscopic abnormalities believed to contribute to their phenotypes. Here, we provide detailed molecular cytogenetic descriptions and clinical presentation of two unrelated subjects with de novo submicroscopic deletions within chromosome bands 11q24-25. In subject 1 the chromosome rearrangement consisted of a 6.18 Mb deletion (from 128.25-134.43 Mb) and an adjacent 5.04 Mb duplication (from 123.15-128.19 Mb), while in subject 2, a 4.74 Mb interstitial deletion was found (from 124.29-129.03 Mb). Higher resolution array analysis (385 K Nimblegen) was used to refine all breakpoints. Deletions of the 11q24-25 region are known to be associated with Jacobsen syndrome (JBS: OMIM 147791). However, neither of the subjects had the typical features of JBS (trigonocephaly, platelet disorder, heart abnormalities). Both subjects had ID, dysmorphic features and additional phenotypic abnormalities: subject 1 had a kidney abnormality, bilateral preauricular pits, pectus excavatum, mild to moderate conductive hearing loss and behavioral concerns; subject 2 had macrocephaly, an abnormal MRI with delayed myelination, fifth finger shortening and squaring of all fingertips, and sensorineural hearing loss. Two individuals with ID who did not have the typical clinical

  3. Students' Mind Wandering in Macroscopic and Submicroscopic Textual Narrations and Its Relationship with Their Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Balushi, Sulaiman M.; Al-Harthy, Ibrahim S.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate students' mind wandering while reading different types of textual narrations (macroscopic and submicroscopic) in chemistry. Another goal was to determine the relationship between mind wandering and students' reading comprehension. The participants were 65 female ninth grade students in Oman. Using a…

  4. Polymers and Cross-Linking: A CORE Experiment to Help Students Think on the Submicroscopic Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Mitchell R. M.; Bruce, Alice E.; Avargil, Shirly; Amar, Francois G.; Wemyss, Thomas M.; Flood, Virginia J.

    2016-01-01

    The Polymers and Cross-Linking experiment is presented via a new three phase learning cycle: CORE (Chemical Observations, Representations, Experimentation), which is designed to model productive chemical inquiry and to promote a deeper understanding about the chemistry operating at the submicroscopic level. The experiment is built on two familiar…

  5. Investigating Macroscopic, Submicroscopic, and Symbolic Connections in a College-Level General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thadison, Felicia Culver

    2011-01-01

    Explanations of chemical phenomena rely on understanding the behavior of submicroscopic particles. Because this level is "invisible," it is described using symbols such as models, diagrams and equations. For this reason, students often view chemistry as a "difficult" subject. The laboratory offers a unique opportunity for the students to…

  6. Investigating macroscopic, submicroscopic, and symbolic connections in a college-level general chemistry laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thadison, Felicia Culver

    Explanations of chemical phenomena rely on understanding the behavior of submicroscopic particles. Because this level is "invisible," it is described using symbols such as models, diagrams and equations. For this reason, students often view chemistry as a "difficult" subject. The laboratory offers a unique opportunity for the students to experience chemistry macroscopically as well as symbolically. The purpose of this investigation was to determine how chemistry lab students explained chemical phenomenon on the macroscopic, submicroscopic, and representational/symbolic level. The participants were undergraduate students enrolled in an introductory level general chemistry lab course. Students' background information (gender, the number of previous chemistry courses), scores on final exams, and final average for the course were collected. Johnstone's triangle of representation guided the design and implementation of this study. A semi-structured interview was also conducted to bring out student explanations. The questionnaires required students to draw a molecule of water, complete acid base reaction equations, represent, submicroscopically, the four stages of an acid-base titration, and provide definitions of various terms. Students were able represent the submicroscopic level of water. Students were not able to represent the submicroscopic level of the reaction between an acid and a base. Students were able to represent the macroscopic level of an acid base reaction. Students were able to symbolically represent the reaction of an acid and a base. These findings indicate that students can use all three levels of chemical representation. However, students showed an inability to connect the levels in relation to acid-base chemistry. There was no relationship between a student's ability to use the levels and his or her final score in the course.

  7. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Dijet imbalance in hadronic collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Daniel; Mulders, Piet J.; Pisano, Cristian

    2009-01-01

    The imbalance of dijets produced in hadronic collisions has been used to extract the average transverse momentum of partons inside the hadrons. In this paper we discuss new contributions to the dijet imbalance that could complicate or even hamper this extraction. They are due to polarization of

  9. Chiral imbalance in QCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrianov Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The chiral imbalance (ChI is given by a difference between the numbers of RH and LH quarks which may occur in the fireball after heavy ion collision. To characterize it adiabatically a quark chiral (axial chemical potential must be introduced taking into account emergence of a ChI in such a phase. In this report the phenomenology of formation of Local spatial Parity Breaking (LPB in the hot and dense baryon matter is discussed and its simulation within a number of QCD-inspired models is outlined. The appearance of new states in the spectra of scalar, pseudoscalar and vector particles in such a matter is elucidated. In particular, from the effective vector meson theory in the presence of Chern-Simons interaction it is demonstrated that the spectrum of massive vector mesons splits into three polarization components with different effective masses. The asymmetry in production of longitudinally and transversely polarized states of ρ and ω mesons for various values of the dilepton invariant mass can serve as a characteristic indication of the LPB in PHENIX, STAR and ALICE experiments.

  10. [Cancer and electrolytes imbalance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Hiroyuki

    2010-06-01

    The electrolyte imbalance in advanced cancer patients, including hyperkalemia, hypercalcemia and hyponatremia, can be induced by various factors. Hyperkalemia is occasionally induced by chemotherapy for very large malignant tumors, due to tumor lysis syndrome. Hypercalcemia and hyponatremia are often observed in patients with breast cancer, renal cancer, prostate cancer, and the like, as a paraneoplastic syndrome. Some part of hypercalcemia results from osteolysis, but the majority is induced by hormonal factors, such as parathyroid hormone-related protein. One of the paraneoplastic causes of hyponatremia is antidiuretic hormone-producing tumor. These disorders could be morbid or even motile, resulting from encephalopathy or arrhythmia in some cases. However, it should be kept in mind that they could be improved or cured by prompt treatment. Recently, after approval of the molecular targeted drugs for epidermal growth factor receptors, such as cetuximab and panitumumab, the incidence of hypomagnesia with use of these monoclonal antibodies, is relatively frequent. In addition, small molecular targeted drugs, such as m-TORinhibitors and ABL kinase inhibitors, also exert adverse reactions including hypomagnesia and hypophosphatemia. Careful monitoring of the serum concentration of magnesium and phosphate ions, to which little attention was paid previously, is a key issue in these cases.

  11. Chiral imbalance in QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianov, Alexander; Andrianov, Vladimir; Espriu, Domenec

    2017-03-01

    The chiral imbalance (ChI) is given by a difference between the numbers of RH and LH quarks which may occur in the fireball after heavy ion collision. To characterize it adiabatically a quark chiral (axial) chemical potential must be introduced taking into account emergence of a ChI in such a phase. In this report the phenomenology of formation of Local spatial Parity Breaking (LPB) in the hot and dense baryon matter is discussed and its simulation within a number of QCD-inspired models is outlined. The appearance of new states in the spectra of scalar, pseudoscalar and vector particles in such a matter is elucidated. In particular, from the effective vector meson theory in the presence of Chern-Simons interaction it is demonstrated that the spectrum of massive vector mesons splits into three polarization components with different effective masses. The asymmetry in production of longitudinally and transversely polarized states of ρ and ω mesons for various values of the dilepton invariant mass can serve as a characteristic indication of the LPB in PHENIX, STAR and ALICE experiments.

  12. Submicroscopic malaria parasite carriage: how reproducible are polymerase chain reaction-based methods?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Camargos Costa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based methods for the diagnosis of malaria infection are expected to accurately identify submicroscopic parasite carriers. Although a significant number of PCR protocols have been described, few studies have addressed the performance of PCR amplification in cases of field samples with submicroscopic malaria infection. Here, the reproducibility of two well-established PCR protocols (nested-PCR and real-time PCR for the Plasmodium 18 small subunit rRNA gene were evaluated in a panel of 34 blood field samples from individuals that are potential reservoirs of malaria infection, but were negative for malaria by optical microscopy. Regardless of the PCR protocol, a large variation between the PCR replicates was observed, leading to alternating positive and negative results in 38% (13 out of 34 of the samples. These findings were quite different from those obtained from the microscopy-positive patients or the unexposed individuals; the diagnosis of these individuals could be confirmed based on the high reproducibility and specificity of the PCR-based protocols. The limitation of PCR amplification was restricted to the field samples with very low levels of parasitaemia because titrations of the DNA templates were able to detect < 3 parasites/µL in the blood. In conclusion, conventional PCR protocols require careful interpretation in cases of submicroscopic malaria infection, as inconsistent and false-negative results can occur.

  13. Molecular Cytogenetics: Genomic Imbalances in Colorectal Cancer and their Clinical Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Grade

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal aberrations play a dominant role in colorectal carcinogenesis. The application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH based techniques such as comparative genomic hybridization (CGH and spectral karyotyping (SKY revealed that colorectal carcinomas are characterized by a specific pattern of chromosomal imbalances which sequentially accumulate during cancer progression. This review aims to summarize molecular cytogenetic studies, provides a background on the functional relevance of chromosomal aberrations for colorectal cancer progression and discusses their potential clinical impact.

  14. Drivers of imbalance cost of wind power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obersteiner, C.; Siewierski, T.; Andersen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    varies in a wide range. To explain differences we indentify parameters influencing imbalance cost and compare them for case studies in Austria, Denmark and Poland. Besides the wind power forecast error also the correlation between imbalance and imbalance price influences imbalance cost significantly....... Especially in systems with significant wind shares, an assessment of imbalance cost based on the amount of imbalance and average System Sell and System Buy Prices is therefore not reliable. While imbalance cost rather reflects cash flows within the clearing of imbalances, the presented concept of cost...... of imperfect forecast is better suited to reflect real cost incurred due to inaccurate wind power forecasts....

  15. Effectiveness of Intermittent Preventive Treatment in Pregnancy with Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine against Submicroscopic falciparum Malaria in Central Region, Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekene K. Nwaefuna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria infections undetectable by microscopy but detectable by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR (submicroscopic malaria are common in endemic areas like Ghana. Submicroscopic malaria has been linked with severe pregnancy outcomes as well as contributing to malaria transmission. In this cross-sectional study 872 consenting pregnant women (gestation ≥ 20 weeks were recruited from 8 hospitals in Central Region, Ghana, between July and December 2009. Malaria infection was detected by microscopy and PCR. Haemoglobin was measured and anaemia was defined as haemoglobin lower than 11 g/dL. Majority of the women, 555 (63.6%, were Intermittent Preventive Treatment in Pregnancy with Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine (IPTp-SP users while 234 (36.4% were nonusers. The prevalence of malaria by microscopy was 20.9% (182/872 and 9.7% (67/688 of microscopy negative women had submicroscopic malaria. IPTp-SP usage significantly (odds ratio = 0.13, 95% confidence interval = 0.07–0.23, p=0.005 reduced the prevalence of submicroscopic malaria as more nonusers (51/234 than users (16/454 were PCR positive. After controlling for other variables the effect of IPTp-SP remained statistically significant (odds ratio = 0.11, 95% confidence interval = 0.02–0.22, p=0.006. These results suggest that Intermittent Preventive Treatment with Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine is useful in the reduction of submicroscopic malaria in pregnancy.

  16. Inverse imbalance reconstruction in rotordynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramlau, R. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Linz (Austria). Johann Radon Inst. for Computational and Applied Mathematics; Dicken, V. [MeVis GmbH, Bremen (Germany); Maass, P. [Bremen Univ. (Germany). Zentrum fuer Technomathematik; Streller, C. [Rolls-Royce Germany GmbH, Dahlewitz (Germany); Rienaecker, A. [MTU Aero Engines GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    The goal of this work is to establish and compare algorithms for inverse imbalance reconstruction in aircraft turbines. Such algorithms are based on a validated whole engine model of a turbo engine under consideration. Base on the model, the impact of an imbalance distribution on the vibration behaviour of the turbine can be described as a matrix-vector multiplication Af = g, where f is the imbalance distribution and g the vibration response. It turns out that the matrix A is very ill-conditioned. As the measured data is highly affected with noise, we have to use regularization methods in order to stabilize the inversion. Our main interest was in the use of nonlinear regularization methods, in particular nonlinear filtered singular value decomposition and conjugate gradient regularization. (orig.)

  17. Submicroscopic Plasmodium falciparum gametocyte carriage is common in an area of low and seasonal transmission in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shekalaghe, Seif A; Bousema, J Teun; Kunei, Karaine K

    2007-01-01

    . In this study, we investigated submicroscopic asexual parasitaemia and gametocytaemia in inhabitants of an area of hypoendemic and seasonal malaria in Tanzania. METHODS: Two cross-sectional malariometric surveys were conducted in the dry and wet seasons of 2005 in villages in lower Moshi, Tanzania. Finger prick...... blood samples were taken to determine the prevalence of P. falciparum parasites by microscopy, rapid diagnostic test and real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (QT-NASBA). RESULTS: 2752 individuals participated in the surveys, of whom 1.9% (51/2721) had microscopically confirmed asexual...... reveal that carriage of submicroscopic asexual parasite and gametocyte densities is relatively common in this low transmission area. Submicroscopic gametocytaemia is likely to be responsible for maintaining malarial transmission in the study area....

  18. The Role and Potential Dangers of Visualisation when Learning about Sub-Microscopic Explanations in Chemistry Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo Eilks

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The core of theory-driven chemistry education consists of the constantshift between the different representational domains of chemical thinking: the macroscopic, the sub-microscopic, and the symbolic domains. Because the sub-microscopic domain can neither be seen nor directly visualised, it requires specific forms of visualisation, i.e. pictures and animations illustrating the model-based level of discrete particles, atoms, or molecular structures. This paper considers the central role visualisations play when learning about the model-based, sub-microscopic level, but it also reflects the dangers inherent in employing isufficiently examined, poorly considered, or even misleading visualisations. This is outlined using different examples taken from both textbooks for lower secondary chemistry education (for students aged 10 to 15 and from the internet. Implications for structuring and using sub-micro visualisations in chemistry education are also given.

  19. Substantial asymptomatic submicroscopic Plasmodium carriage during dry season in low transmission areas in Senegal: Implications for malaria control and elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niang, Makhtar; Thiam, Laty Gaye; Sane, Rokhaya; Diagne, Nafissatou; Talla, Cheikh; Doucoure, Souleymane; Faye, Joseph; Diop, Fode; Badiane, Abdoulaye; Diouf, Babacar; Camara, Diogop; Diene-Sarr, Fatoumata; Sokhna, Cheikh; Richard, Vincent; Toure-Balde, Aissatou

    2017-01-01

    In the progress towards malaria elimination, the accurate diagnosis of low-density asymptomatic infections is critical. Low-density asymptomatic submicroscopic malaria infections may act as silent reservoirs that maintain low-level residual malaria transmission in the community. Light microscopy, the gold standard in malaria diagnosis lacks the sensitivity to detect low-level parasitaemia. In this study, the presence and prevalence of submicroscopic Plasmodium carriage were investigated to estimate the parasites reservoir among asymptomatic individuals living in low transmission areas in Dielmo and Ndiop, Senegal during the dry season. A total of 2,037 blood samples were collected during cross-sectional surveys prior the malaria transmission season in July 2013 (N = 612), June 2014 (N = 723) and June 2015 (N = 702) from asymptomatic individuals living in Dielmo and Ndiop, Senegal. Samples were used to determine the prevalence of submicroscopic Plasmodium carriage by real time PCR (qPCR) in comparison to microscopy considered as gold standard. The prevalence of submicroscopic Plasmodium carriage was 3.75% (23/612), 12.44% (90/723) and 6.41% (45/702) in 2013, 2014 and 2015, respectively. No Plasmodium carriage was detected by microscopy in 2013 while microscopy-based prevalence of Plasmodium carriage accounted for only 0.27% (2/723) and 0.14% (1/702) in 2014 and 2015, respectively. Plasmodium falciparum accounted for the majority of submicroscopic infections and represented 86.95% (20/23), 81.11% (73/90) and 95.55 (43/45) of infections in 2013, 2014 and 2015 respectively. Low-density submicroscopic asymptomatic Plasmodium carriage is common in the study areas during the dry season indicating that traditional measures are insufficient to assess the scale of parasite reservoir when transmission reaches very low level. Control and elimination strategies may wish to consider using molecular methods to identify parasites carriers to guide Mass screening and Treatment

  20. Submicroscopic deletions of 11q24-25 in individuals without Jacobsen syndrome: re-examination of the critical region by high-resolution array-CGH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VanAllen Margot I

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Jacobsen syndrome is a rare contiguous gene disorder that results from a terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. It is typically characterized by intellectual disability, a variety of physical anomalies and a distinctive facial appearance. The 11q deletion has traditionally been identified by routine chromosome analysis. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH has offered new opportunities to identify and refine chromosomal abnormalities in regions known to be associated with clinical syndromes. Results Using the 1 Mb BAC array (Spectral Genomics, we screened 70 chromosomally normal children with idiopathic intellectual disability (ID and congenital abnormalities, and identified five cases with submicroscopic abnormalities believed to contribute to their phenotypes. Here, we provide detailed molecular cytogenetic descriptions and clinical presentation of two unrelated subjects with de novo submicroscopic deletions within chromosome bands 11q24-25. In subject 1 the chromosome rearrangement consisted of a 6.18 Mb deletion (from 128.25–134.43 Mb and an adjacent 5.04 Mb duplication (from 123.15–128.19 Mb, while in subject 2, a 4.74 Mb interstitial deletion was found (from 124.29–129.03 Mb. Higher resolution array analysis (385 K Nimblegen was used to refine all breakpoints. Deletions of the 11q24-25 region are known to be associated with Jacobsen syndrome (JBS: OMIM 147791. However, neither of the subjects had the typical features of JBS (trigonocephaly, platelet disorder, heart abnormalities. Both subjects had ID, dysmorphic features and additional phenotypic abnormalities: subject 1 had a kidney abnormality, bilateral preauricular pits, pectus excavatum, mild to moderate conductive hearing loss and behavioral concerns; subject 2 had macrocephaly, an abnormal MRI with delayed myelination, fifth finger shortening and squaring of all fingertips, and sensorineural hearing loss. Conclusion Two

  1. Submicroscopic deletions of 11q24-25 in individuals without Jacobsen syndrome: re-examination of the critical region by high-resolution array-CGH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Christine; Qiao, Ying; Harvard, Chansonette; Liu, Xudong; Bernier, Francois P; McGillivray, Barbara; Farrell, Sandra A; Arbour, Laura; Chudley, Albert E; Clarke, Lorne; Gibson, William; Dyack, Sarah; McLeod, Ross; Costa, Teresa; VanAllen, Margot I; Yong, Siu-li; Graham, Gail E; MacLeod, Patrick; Patel, Millan S; Hurlburt, Jane; Holden, Jeanette JA; Lewis, Suzanne ME; Rajcan-Separovic, Evica

    2008-01-01

    Background Jacobsen syndrome is a rare contiguous gene disorder that results from a terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. It is typically characterized by intellectual disability, a variety of physical anomalies and a distinctive facial appearance. The 11q deletion has traditionally been identified by routine chromosome analysis. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) has offered new opportunities to identify and refine chromosomal abnormalities in regions known to be associated with clinical syndromes. Results Using the 1 Mb BAC array (Spectral Genomics), we screened 70 chromosomally normal children with idiopathic intellectual disability (ID) and congenital abnormalities, and identified five cases with submicroscopic abnormalities believed to contribute to their phenotypes. Here, we provide detailed molecular cytogenetic descriptions and clinical presentation of two unrelated subjects with de novo submicroscopic deletions within chromosome bands 11q24-25. In subject 1 the chromosome rearrangement consisted of a 6.18 Mb deletion (from 128.25–134.43 Mb) and an adjacent 5.04 Mb duplication (from 123.15–128.19 Mb), while in subject 2, a 4.74 Mb interstitial deletion was found (from 124.29–129.03 Mb). Higher resolution array analysis (385 K Nimblegen) was used to refine all breakpoints. Deletions of the 11q24-25 region are known to be associated with Jacobsen syndrome (JBS: OMIM 147791). However, neither of the subjects had the typical features of JBS (trigonocephaly, platelet disorder, heart abnormalities). Both subjects had ID, dysmorphic features and additional phenotypic abnormalities: subject 1 had a kidney abnormality, bilateral preauricular pits, pectus excavatum, mild to moderate conductive hearing loss and behavioral concerns; subject 2 had macrocephaly, an abnormal MRI with delayed myelination, fifth finger shortening and squaring of all fingertips, and sensorineural hearing loss. Conclusion Two individuals with ID who

  2. TARGET Imbalances at Record Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallett, Andrew Hughes

    TARGET is the payments system for making settlements between euro area economies and five other EU economies. Cross-border transactions generate claims/surpluses and liabilities/deficits among national central banks which “net out” for the system as a whole. These imbalances are manageable in rel...

  3. Gender imbalance in secondary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Howgego Mugisha

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Significantly fewer girls than boys attend schools inrefugee camps. As the level of education increases, there is a corresponding decrease in the numbers of female participants. This has resulted in a severe gender imbalance in refugee secondary schools.

  4. Genomic imbalances in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbitsky, Miguel; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Fasel, David A; Levy, Brynn; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Wuttke, Matthias; Abraham, Alison G; Kaskel, Frederick; Köttgen, Anna; Warady, Bradley A; Furth, Susan L; Wong, Craig S; Gharavi, Ali G

    2015-05-01

    There is frequent uncertainty in the identification of specific etiologies of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children. Recent studies indicate that chromosomal microarrays can identify rare genomic imbalances that can clarify the etiology of neurodevelopmental and cardiac disorders in children; however, the contribution of unsuspected genomic imbalance to the incidence of pediatric CKD is unknown. We performed chromosomal microarrays to detect genomic imbalances in children enrolled in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) prospective cohort study, a longitudinal prospective multiethnic observational study of North American children with mild to moderate CKD. Patients with clinically detectable syndromic disease were excluded from evaluation. We compared 419 unrelated children enrolled in CKiD to multiethnic cohorts of 21,575 children and adults that had undergone microarray genotyping for studies unrelated to CKD. We identified diagnostic copy number disorders in 31 children with CKD (7.4% of the cohort). We detected 10 known pathogenic genomic disorders, including the 17q12 deletion HNF1 homeobox B (HNF1B) and triple X syndromes in 19 of 419 unrelated CKiD cases as compared with 98 of 21,575 control individuals (OR 10.8, P = 6.1 × 10⁻²⁰). In an additional 12 CKiD cases, we identified 12 likely pathogenic genomic imbalances that would be considered reportable in a clinical setting. These genomic imbalances were evenly distributed among patients diagnosed with congenital and noncongenital forms of CKD. In the vast majority of these cases, the genomic lesion was unsuspected based on the clinical assessment and either reclassified the disease or provided information that might have triggered additional clinical care, such as evaluation for metabolic or neuropsychiatric disease. A substantial proportion of children with CKD have an unsuspected genomic imbalance, suggesting genomic disorders as a risk factor for common forms of pediatric nephropathy

  5. Submicroscopic malaria infections in pregnant women from six departments in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbadry, Maha A; Tagliamonte, Massimiliano S; Raccurt, Christian P; Lemoine, Jean F; Existe, Alexandre; Boncy, Jacques; Weppelmann, Thomas A; Dame, John B; Okech, Bernard A

    2017-08-01

    To describe the epidemiology of malaria in pregnancy in Haiti. Cross-sectional study among pregnant women in six departments of Haiti. After obtaining informed consent, whole blood samples and demographic surveys were collected to investigate malaria prevalence, anaemia and socio-behavioural risk factors for infection, respectively. A total of 311 pregnant women were screened for Plasmodium falciparum infection using a rapid diagnostic test (RDT), microscopy and a novel, quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction method (qRT-PCR). Overall, 1.2% (4/311) of pregnant women were tested positive for malaria infection by both microscopy and RDT. However, using the qRT-PCR, 16.4% (51/311) of pregnant women were positive. The prevalence of malaria infection varied with geographical locations ranging between 0% and 46.4%. Additionally, 53% of pregnant women had some form of anaemia; however, no significant association was found between anaemia and submicroscopic malaria infection. The socio-behavioural risk factors identified to be protective of malaria infection were marital status (P < 0.05) and travel within one month prior to screening (P < 0.05). This study is the first to document the high prevalence of submicroscopic malaria infections among pregnant women in Haiti and identify social and behavioural risk factors for disease transmission. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Telomerase activity in high-grade cervical lesions is associated with allelic imbalance at 6Q14-22.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duin, van M.; Steenbergen, R.D.M.; Wilde, de J.; Helmerhorst, TJ; Verheijen, R.H.M.; Risse, E.K.J.; Meijer, C.J.L.M.; Snijders, P.J.F.

    2003-01-01

    Our study attempts to establish the relationship between telomerase activity and allelic imbalance (AI) on chromosomes 3p and 6 in high-risk HPV-containing cervical lesions. These chromosomes were implicated previously in telomerase regulation in HPV containing immortalized cells and cervical cancer

  7. Distinct evolutionary mechanisms for genomic imbalances in high-risk and low-risk neuroblastomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øra Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroblastoma (NB is the most common extracranial solid tumour of childhood. Several genomic imbalances correlate to prognosis in NB, with structural rearrangements, including gene amplification, in a near-diploid setting typically signifying high-risk tumours and numerical changes in a near-triploid setting signifying low-risk tumours. Little is known about the temporal sequence in which these imbalances occur during the carcinogenic process. Methods We have reconstructed the appearance of cytogenetic imbalances in 270 NBs by first grouping tumours and imbalances through principal component analysis and then using the number of imbalances in each tumour as an indicator of evolutionary progression. Results Tumours clustered in four sub-groups, dominated respectively by (1 gene amplification in double minute chromosomes and few other aberrations, (2 gene amplification and loss of 1p sequences, (3 loss of 1p and other structural aberrations including gain of 17q, and (4 whole-chromosome gains and losses. Temporal analysis showed that the structural changes in groups 1–3 were acquired in a step-wise fashion, with loss of 1p sequences and the emergence of double minute chromosomes as the earliest cytogenetic events. In contrast, the gains and losses of whole chromosomes in group 4 occurred through multiple simultaneous events leading to a near-triploid chromosome number. Conclusion The finding of different temporal patterns for the acquisition of genomic imbalances in high-risk and low-risk NBs lends strong support to the hypothesis that these tumours are biologically diverse entities, evolving through distinct genetic mechanisms.

  8. Chromosome Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... XX), and males have an X and a Y chromosome (XY). The mother and father each contribute one ... chromosome has attached to another at the centromere. Inversions: A portion of the chromosome has broken off, turned upside down, and reattached. ...

  9. Down syndrome and the complexity of genome dosage imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2017-03-01

    Down syndrome (also known as trisomy 21) is the model human phenotype for all genomic gain dosage imbalances, including microduplications. The functional genomic exploration of the post-sequencing years of chromosome 21, and the generation of numerous cellular and mouse models, have provided an unprecedented opportunity to decipher the molecular consequences of genome dosage imbalance. Studies of Down syndrome could provide knowledge far beyond the well-known characteristics of intellectual disability and dysmorphic features, as several other important features, including congenital heart defects, early ageing, Alzheimer disease and childhood leukaemia, are also part of the Down syndrome phenotypic spectrum. The elucidation of the molecular mechanisms that cause or modify the risk for different Down syndrome phenotypes could lead to the introduction of previously unimaginable therapeutic options.

  10. Genomic imbalances in syndromic congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molck, Miriam Coelho; Simioni, Milena; Paiva Vieira, Társis; Sgardioli, Ilária Cristina; Paoli Monteiro, Fabíola; Souza, Josiane; Fett-Conte, Agnes Cristina; Félix, Têmis Maria; Lopes Monlléo, Isabella; Gil-da-Silva-Lopes, Vera Lúcia

    To identify pathogenic genomic imbalances in patients presenting congenital heart disease (CHD) with extra cardiac anomalies and exclusion of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS). 78 patients negative for the 22q11.2 deletion, previously screened by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and/or multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA) were tested by chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA). Clinically significant copy number variations (CNVs ≥300kb) were identified in 10% (8/78) of cases. In addition, potentially relevant CNVs were detected in two cases (993kb duplication in 15q21.1 and 706kb duplication in 2p22.3). Genes inside the CNV regions found in this study, such as IRX4, BMPR1A, SORBS2, ID2, ROCK2, E2F6, GATA4, SOX7, SEMAD6D, FBN1, and LTPB1 are known to participate in cardiac development and could be candidate genes for CHD. These data showed that patients presenting CHD with extra cardiac anomalies and exclusion of 22q11.2 DS should be investigated by CMA. The present study emphasizes the possible role of CNVs in CHD. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Chromosomal 16p microdeletion in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome detected by oligonucleotide-based array comparative genomic hybridization: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Fadley Md A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Chromosomal aberrations of chromosome 16 are uncommon and submicroscopic deletions have rarely been reported. At present, a cytogenetic or molecular abnormality can only be detected in 55% of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome patients, leaving the diagnosis in 45% of patients to rest on clinical features only. Interestingly, this microdeletion of 16 p13.3 was found in a young child with an unexplained syndromic condition due to an indistinct etiological diagnosis. To the best of our knowledge, no evidence of a microdeletion of 16 p13.3 with contiguous gene deletion, comprising cyclic adenosine monophosphate-response element-binding protein and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 genes, has been described in typical Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. Case presentation We present the case of a three-year-old Malaysian Chinese girl with a de novo microdeletion on the short arm of chromosome 16, identified by oligonucleotide array-based comparative genomic hybridization. Our patient showed mild to moderate global developmental delay, facial dysmorphism, bilateral broad thumbs and great toes, a moderate size atrial septal defect, hypotonia and feeding difficulties. A routine chromosome analysis on 20 metaphase cells showed a normal 46, XX karyotype. Further investigation by high resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization revealed a 120 kb microdeletion on chromosomal band 16 p13.3. Conclusion A mutation or abnormality in the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-response element-binding protein has previously been determined as a cause of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. However, microdeletion of 16 p13.3 comprising cyclic adenosine monophosphate-response element-binding protein and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 genes is a rare scenario in the pathogenesis of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. Additionally, due to insufficient coverage of the human genome by conventional techniques, clinically significant genomic

  12. Marker chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kiran Prabhaker; Belogolovkin, Victoria

    2013-04-01

    Marker chromosomes are a morphologically heterogeneous group of structurally abnormal chromosomes that pose a significant challenge in prenatal diagnosis. Phenotypes associated with marker chromosomes are highly variable and range from normal to severely abnormal. Clinical outcomes are very difficult to predict when marker chromosomes are detected prenatally. In this review, we outline the classification, etiology, cytogenetic characterization, and clinical consequences of marker chromosomes, as well as practical approaches to prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  13. Nutrient imbalance in Norway spruce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelin, Gunnar

    2000-11-01

    The studies presented in my thesis indicate that growing Norway spruce in monoculture does not constitute sustainable forest management in a high N and S deposition environment, such as in southern Sweden. The combination of N-induced high growth rates and leaching due to soil acidification causes soil reserves of nutrients to decrease. This will increase the risk of nutrient imbalance within the trees when nutrient demands are not met. The development of nutrient imbalance in Scania, southern Sweden, was shown as negative trends in needle and soil nutrient status from the mid-80s to the present in Norway spruce and Scots pine stands. This imbalance appears to be connected to high levels of N and S deposition. Clear negative effects on tree vitality were found when using a new branch development method. Today, growth and vitality seems to be limited by K, rather than N, in spruce stands older than 40 years. However, younger stands appear to be able to absorb the deposited N without negative effects on growth and vitality. When investigating effects of nutrient stress on tree vitality, indicators such as branch length and shoot multiplication rate, which include effects accumulated over several years, are suitable. Countermeasures are needed in order to maintain the forest production at a high level. Positive effects on tree nutrient status after vitality fertilization (N-free fertilization) was shown in two micronutrient deficient stands in south-central Sweden. In addition, tree vitality was positively affected after the application of a site-adapted fertilizer to the canopy. Site-adaption of fertilizers will most likely improve the possibilities of a positive response on tree growth and vitality in declining stands. In a survey of Norway spruce in mixtures with beech, birch, or oak compared to monocultures it was shown that spruce nutrient status was higher in mixtures with deciduous species than in monocultures. By using mixed-species stands the need for

  14. Adult Spinal Deformity: Sagittal Imbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavanilles-Walker JM

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Spinal sagittal imbalance, deformity of the spine in the sagittal plane, is nowadays a major cause of pain and disability among patients presenting to the spine clinic in daily practice. Normal sagittal spinal balance is a result of mutual articulation of the pelvis and the spine in the sagittal plane. Sagittal imbalance of the spine could be related to many spinal pathologies interesting primarily the spine or could appear after an instrumentation spinal surgery. Variations in the spine sagittal alignment can be compensated by compensatory mechanisms occurring in the spine, pelvis and lower limb areas. The main objective of these mechanisms is to allow the patient to keep an erect position within the cone of economy in an energy-efficient way. Once a spinal deformity surpasses these compensatory mechanisms surgical intervention is often requested. In this paper the Authors performed comprehensive a critical analysis of the rigidity of the deformity, including the spinal and pelvic parameters. The compensatory mechanisms are paramount in order to be able to offer a tailored solution to these patients. Since conservative measures fail in most patients, successful management of these patients requires achieving fusion of a balanced spine. Appropriate preoperative optimization as well as appropriate surgical preoperative planning are critical in order to avoid potential complications. Selecting the appropriate surgical technique to achieve spinal balance is crucial to success.

  15. A familial pericentric inversion of chromosome 11 associated with a microdeletion of 163 kb and microduplication of 288 kb at 11p13 and 11q22.3 without aniridia or eye anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balay, Lara; Totten, Ellen; Okada, Luna; Zell, Sidney; Ticho, Benjamin; Israel, Jeannette; Kogan, Jillene

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial deletions of 11p13 involving MPPED2, DCDC5, DCDC1, DNAJC24, IMMP1L, and ELP4 are previously reported to have downstream transcriptional effects on the expression of PAX6, due to a downstream regulatory region (DRR). Currently, no clear genotype-phenotype correlations have been established allowing for conclusive information regarding the exact location of the PAX6 DRR, though its location has been approximated in mouse models to be within the Elp4 gene. Of the clinical reports currently published examining patients with intact PAX6 genes but harboring deletions identified in genes downstream of PAX6, 100% indicate phenotypes which include aniridia, whereas approximately half report additional eye deformities, autism, or intellectual disability. In this clinical report, we present a 12-year-old male patient, his brother, and mother with pericentric inversions of chromosome 11 associated with submicroscopic interstitial deletions of 11p13 and duplications of 11q22.3. The inversions were identified by standard cytogenetic analysis; microarray and FISH detected the chromosomal imbalance. The patient's phenotype includes intellectual disability, speech abnormalities, and autistic behaviors, but interestingly neither the patient, his brother, nor mother have aniridia or other eye anomalies. To the best of our knowledge, these findings in three family members represent the only reported cases with 11p13 deletions downstream of PAX6 not demonstrating phenotypic characteristics of aniridia or abnormal eye development. Although none of the deleted genes are obvious candidates for the patient's phenotype, the absence of aniridia in the presence of this deletion in all three family members further delineates the location of the DRR for PAX6. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Asymptomatic and Submicroscopic Carriage of Plasmodium knowlesi Malaria in Household and Community Members of Clinical Cases in Sabah, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornace, Kimberly M; Nuin, Nor Afizah; Betson, Martha; Grigg, Matthew J; William, Timothy; Anstey, Nicholas M; Yeo, Tsin W; Cox, Jonathan; Ying, Lau Tiek; Drakeley, Chris J

    2016-03-01

    Although asymptomatic carriage of human malaria species has been widely reported, the extent of asymptomatic, submicroscopic Plasmodium knowlesi parasitemia is unknown. In this study, samples were obtained from individuals residing in households or villages of symptomatic malaria cases with the aim of detecting submicroscopic P. knowlesi in this population. Four published molecular assays were used to confirm the presence of P. knowlesi. Latent class analysis revealed that the estimated proportion of asymptomatic individuals was 6.9% (95% confidence interval, 5.6%-8.4%). This study confirms the presence of a substantial number of asymptomatic monoinfections across all age groups; further work is needed to estimate prevalence in the wider community. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  17. Aggregate savings and external imbalances in China

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Dennis Tao

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, the internal and external macroeconomic imbalances in China have risen to unprecedented levels. In 2008, China's national savings rate soared to over 53 percent of its GDP, whereas its current account surplus exceeded 9 percent of GDP. This paper presents a unified framework for understanding the structural causes of these imbalances. I argue that the imbalances are attributable to a set of policies and institutions embedded in the economy. I propose a unified framework ...

  18. Energy Imbalance Markets (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-09-01

    The anticipated increase in variable renewable generation, such as wind and solar power, over the next several years has raised concerns about how system operators will maintain balance between electricity production and demand in the Western Interconnection, especially in its smaller balancing authority areas (BAAs). Given renewable portfolio standards in the West, it is possible that more than 50 gigawatts of wind capacity will be installed by 2020. Significant quantities of solar generation are likely to be added as well. Meanwhile, uncertainties about future load growth and challenges siting new transmission and generation resources may add additional stresses on the Western Interconnection of the future. One proposed method of addressing these challenges is an energy imbalance market (EIM). An EIM is a means of supplying and dispatching electricity to balance fluctuations in generation and load. It aggregates the variability of generation and load over multiple balancing areas (BAs).

  19. Identifying acid-base and electrolyte imbalances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooch, Michael D

    2015-08-15

    Acid-base and electrolyte imbalances often complicate patient management in acute care settings. Correctly identifying the imbalance and its cause is vital. This article will review the physiology of acid-base and electrolyte balance, their common disturbances, associated causes, clinical manifestations, and management implications for nurse practitioners.

  20. Development of new postnatal diagnostic methods for chromosome disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Lisa G; Bejjani, Bassem A

    2011-04-01

    Chromosome imbalances are the leading cause of intellectual and developmental disabilities in the population. This paper reviews the current methods used to diagnose chromosome abnormalities in children including karyotyping, fluorescence in situ hybridization and microarray technologies. Advances in molecular cytogenetics, especially with the use of microarrays, have substantially increased the detection of chromosome abnormalities in children with disabilities and congenital anomalies above that achievable with conventional cytogenetic banding and light microscopy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Gender Imbalance and Terrorism in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younas, Javed; Sandler, Todd

    2017-03-01

    This article investigates whether gender imbalance may be conducive to domestic terrorism in developing countries. A female-dominated society may not provide sufficient administration, law, or order to limit domestic terrorism, especially since societies in developing countries primarily turn to males for administration, policing, and paramilitary forces. Other economic considerations support female imbalance resulting in grievance-generated terrorism. Because male dominance may also be linked to terrorism, empirical tests are ultimately needed to support our prediction. Based on panel data for 128 developing countries for 1975 to 2011, we find that female gender imbalance results in more total and domestic terrorist attacks. This female gender imbalance does not affect transnational terrorism in developing countries or domestic and transnational terrorism in developed countries. Further tests show that gender imbalance affects terrorism only when bureaucratic institutions are weak. Many robustness tests support our results.

  2. Earth's energy imbalance and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hansen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Improving observations of ocean heat content show that Earth is absorbing more energy from the Sun than it is radiating to space as heat, even during the recent solar minimum. The inferred planetary energy imbalance, 0.58 ± 0.15 W m−2 during the 6-yr period 2005–2010, confirms the dominant role of the human-made greenhouse effect in driving global climate change. Observed surface temperature change and ocean heat gain together constrain the net climate forcing and ocean mixing rates. We conclude that most climate models mix heat too efficiently into the deep ocean and as a result underestimate the negative forcing by human-made aerosols. Aerosol climate forcing today is inferred to be −1.6 ± 0.3 W m−2, implying substantial aerosol indirect climate forcing via cloud changes. Continued failure to quantify the specific origins of this large forcing is untenable, as knowledge of changing aerosol effects is needed to understand future climate change. We conclude that recent slowdown of ocean heat uptake was caused by a delayed rebound effect from Mount Pinatubo aerosols and a deep prolonged solar minimum. Observed sea level rise during the Argo float era is readily accounted for by ice melt and ocean thermal expansion, but the ascendency of ice melt leads us to anticipate acceleration of the rate of sea level rise this decade.

  3. Dosage compensation, the origin and the afterlife of sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Jan; Meller, Victoria H

    2006-01-01

    Over the past 100 years Drosophila has been developed into an outstanding model system for the study of evolutionary processes. A fascinating aspect of evolution is the differentiation of sex chromosomes. Organisms with highly differentiated sex chromosomes, such as the mammalian X and Y, must compensate for the imbalance in gene dosage that this creates. The need to adjust the expression of sex-linked genes is a potent force driving the rise of regulatory mechanisms that act on an entire chromosome. This review will contrast the process of dosage compensation in Drosophila with the divergent strategies adopted by other model organisms. While the machinery of sex chromosome compensation is different in each instance, all share the ability to direct chromatin modifications to an entire chromosome. This review will also explore the idea that chromosome-targeting systems are sometimes adapted for other purposes. This appears the likely source of a chromosome-wide targeting system displayed by the Drosophila fourth chromosome.

  4. Interphase chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Interphase chromosomes. Genomes within interphase nuclei occupy discrete, three-dimensional regions known as 'chromosome territories' (Bridger and Bickmore, 1998, Cremer and Cremer, 2001, Parada and Misteli, 2002). The non-randomness of CT organization within an ...

  5. Modeling Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Learning about chromosomes is standard fare in biology classrooms today. However, students may find it difficult to understand the relationships among the "genome", "chromosomes", "genes", a "gene locus", and "alleles". In the simple activity described in this article, which follows the 5E approach…

  6. Trunk imbalance in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Carole; Grunstein, Erin; Labelle, Hubert; Parent, Stefan; Ehrmann Feldman, Debbie

    2016-06-01

    Trunk imbalance (ie, frontal trunk shift measured with a plumb line from C7 to S1) is part of the clinical evaluation in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), but its prevalence and relationship with scoliosis, back pain, and health-related factors are not well documented. The principal objectives are to document trunk imbalance prevalence and to explore the association between trunk imbalance and the following factors: Cobb angle, type of scoliosis, back pain, function, mental health, and self-image. The secondary objective is to determine back pain prevalence and the relationship between back pain and each of the following: Cobb angle, function, mental health, and self-image. This is a cross-sectional study in a scoliosis clinic of a tertiary university hospital center. The sample includes youth with AIS (N=55). The outcome measures were trunk imbalance prevalence and magnitude, and back pain prevalence and intensity using the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS) and the Scoliosis Research Society-22 (SRS-22) pain score, and the function, self-image, and mental health domains of the SRS-22. Trunk imbalance and back pain were assessed in 55 patients with AIS (Cobb angle: 10-60°). Patients completed the SRS-22 questionnaire and the NPRS. Correlations were done between trunk imbalance and scoliosis (Cobb angle, type of scoliosis), back pain (NPRS and SRS-22 pain score), and health-related factors using Pearson correlation coefficients (r) and logistic regression models. Trunk imbalance prevalence is 85% and back pain prevalence is 73%. We found fair to moderate significant positive correlation between trunk imbalance and Cobb angle (r=0.32-0.66, pscoliosis. Lower self-reported pain significantly correlated with lower Cobb angles (r=0.29, p=.03), higher function (r=0.55, p=.000), higher self-image (r=0.44, p=.001), and better mental health (r=0.48, p=.000). There was a trend for trunk imbalance to be related with lower pain in logistic regression models. The high

  7. Histological and submicroscopical findings on the seminiferous parenchyma in rams after copper oxide intoxication from industrial emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrzgulová, M

    1993-01-01

    In this work the author examined the histological and submicroscopical picture of the seminiferous parenchyma in 5 breeding rams from a herd in which intoxication with copper oxide from industrial emissions of a copper producing plant had been diagnosed. The toxic effect irreversibly damages all developmental stages of the germ cells. It injures the cell membranes of both germ cells and Sertoli cells. Similar changes were observed on the interstitial cells. The degree of injury to the germinative epithelium confirms its significant role in the decreased reproduction rate of the herd under examination.

  8. A de novo chromosomal abnormality in Cri du Chat syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shunchang C; Luo, Fuwei W; Zhou, Zhiming M; Peng, Yunsheng S; Song, Huiwen W

    2014-07-01

    To find the length and location of the deletions in the short arm of chromosome 5 in one case of Cri du Chat syndrome using oligo array comparative genomic hybridization. Metaphase chromosomes were prepared from peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures using standard cytogenetic protocols. Chromosomal analysis was done in G-banded metaphases. Oligo array comparative genomic hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization were performed by the commercially available kits. Oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis revealed a 23.263 Mb deletion at region 5p14.2-->qter, combined with a duplication of 14.602 Mb in size in the area 12p13.1-->pter. Chromosomal aberrations were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The male neonate with Cri du Chat syndrome had an unbalanced translocation which was inherited from his father who was a balanced carrier with a karyotype 46, XY, t (5; 12) (p14.2; p13.1). This report shows the clinical utility of the oligonucleotide array in the detection of submicroscopic chromosomal aberrations, thus improving the molecular diagnosis of Cri du Chat syndrome.

  9. Association of sub-microscopic malaria parasite carriage with transmission intensity in north-eastern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjurano Alphaxard

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In malaria endemic areas, individuals are frequently asymptomatic and may be undetected by conventional microscopy or newer, rapid diagnostic tests. Molecular techniques allow a more accurate assessment of this asymptomatic parasite burden, the extent of which is important for malaria control. This study examines the relative prevalence of sub-microscopic level parasite carriage and clonal complexity of infections (multiplicity of infection over a range of endemicities in a region of north-eastern Tanzania where altitude is an established proxy of malaria transmission. The PCR prevalence was then compared against other measures of transmission intensity collected in the same area. Methods This study used 1,121 blood samples collected from a previously conducted cross-sectional malario-metric survey during the short rainy season in 2001 from 13 villages (three at 1,200 m in altitude above sea level. Samples were analysed by PCR for carriage of parasites and multiplicity of infection. These data were compared with other measures of transmission intensity collected from the same area. Results Parasite prevalence was 34.7% by PCR and 13.6% by microscopy; a 2.5-fold difference in line with other recent observations. This fold difference was relatively consistent at the different altitude bands despite a marked decrease in parasite prevalence with altitude: vs 28.6, 600-1,200 m 35.5 vs 9.9, > 1,200 m 15.8 vs 5.9. The difference between parasite prevalence by PCR was 3.2 in individuals aged between 15 and 45 years (34.5 vs 10.9 compared with 2.5 in those aged 1-5 (34.0 vs 13.5 though this was not statistically significant. Multiplicity of infection (MOI ranged from 1.2 to 3.7 and was positively associated with parasite prevalence assessed by both PCR and microscopy. There was no association of MOI and age. Village level PCR parasite prevalence was strongly correlated with altitude, sero-conversion rate and predicted entomological

  10. Malaria elimination challenges in Mesoamerica: evidence of submicroscopic malaria reservoirs in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, Shirley Evelyn; Miranda, Adolfo; Henao, Juliana; Vallejo, Andres F; Perez, Julianh; Alvarez, Alvaro; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Herrera, Sócrates

    2016-08-30

    Even though malaria incidence has decreased substantially in Guatemala since 2000, Guatemala remains one of the countries with the highest malaria transmission in Mesoamerica. Guatemala is committed to eliminating malaria as part of the initiative 'Elimination of Malaria in Mesoamerica and the Island of Hispaniola' (EMMIE); however, it is still in the control phase. During the past decade, the government strengthened malaria control activities including mass distribution of long-lasting insecticide-impregnated bed nets, early diagnosis and prompt treatment. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of malaria, including gametocytes, in three areas of Guatemala using active case detection (ACD) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Cross-sectional surveys were conducted in three departments with varying transmission intensities: Escuintla, Alta Verapaz and Zacapa. Blood samples from 706 volunteers were screened for malaria using microscopy and qPCR which was also used to determine the prevalence of gametocytes among infected individuals. Results were collected and analysed using REDCap and R Project, respectively. Malaria was diagnosed by microscopy in only 2.8 % (4/141) of the volunteers from Escuintla. By contrast, qPCR detected a prevalence of 7.1 % (10/141) in the same volunteers, 8.4 % (36/429) in Alta Verapaz, and 5.9 % (8/136) in Zacapa. Overall, 7.6 % (54/706) of the screened individuals were positive, with an average parasitaemia level of 40.2 parasites/μL (range 1-1133 parasites/μL) and 27.8 % carried mature gametocytes. Fifty-seven percent (31/54) of qPCR positive volunteers were asymptomatic and out of the 42.6 % of symptomatic individuals, only one had a positive microscopy result. This study found a considerable number of asymptomatic P. vivax infections that were mostly submicroscopic, of which, approximately one-quarter harboured mature gametocytes. This pattern is likely to contribute to maintaining transmission across the

  11. Gene dosage imbalances: action, reaction, and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitia, Reiner A; Potier, Marie Claude

    2015-06-01

    Single-gene deletions, duplications, and misregulation, as well as aneuploidy, can lead to stoichiometric imbalances within macromolecular complexes and cellular networks, causing their malfunction. Such alterations can be responsible for inherited or somatic genetic disorders including Mendelian diseases, aneuploid syndromes, and cancer. We review the effects of gene dosage alterations at the transcriptomic and proteomic levels, and the various responses of the cell to counteract their effects. Furthermore, we explore several biochemical models and ideas that can provide the rationale for treatments modulating the effects of gene dosage imbalances. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Hegelian dialectics of global imbalances

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    Célestin Monga

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Traditional narratives of external imbalances have focused on the analysis of national accounts, trade flows, and financial flows. They have generated two opposing views of the current situation of the world economy: on one side, a prudent, if not pessimistic view considers large imbalances as evidence of problems with the international monetary and financial system, and symptoms of domestic distortions (mainly in the United States and China. On the other side, a relaxed, if not optimistic view suggests that global imbalances are not anomalies but simply the predictable outcome of a world with increasingly globalized financial flows in search of the right mix of risks and returns. This paper offers a critical analysis of these competing explanations of the United States-China imbalances and suggests a way of reconciling them. The paper uses Hegel’s parable of the development of self-consciousness to explain the dynamics between the two countries. Hegel may not have been a great philosopher of history but his study of lordship and bondage provides a good framework for analyzing the dialectics of recognition and acknowledgement that currently characterizes the macroeconomic relationships between the United States and China.

  13. Analysis of Levene's Test under Design Imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Tim K.; Levy, Martin S.

    1997-01-01

    H. Levene (1960) proposed a heuristic test for heteroscedasticity in the case of a balanced two-way layout, based on analysis of variance of absolute residuals. Conditions under which design imbalance affects the test's characteristics are identified, and a simple correction involving leverage is proposed. (SLD)

  14. Karyotypic Determinants of Chromosome Instability in Aneuploid Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, William D.; Li, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies in cancer cells and budding yeast demonstrated that aneuploidy, the state of having abnormal chromosome numbers, correlates with elevated chromosome instability (CIN), i.e. the propensity of gaining and losing chromosomes at a high frequency. Here we have investigated ploidy- and chromosome-specific determinants underlying aneuploidy-induced CIN by observing karyotype dynamics in fully isogenic aneuploid yeast strains with ploidies between 1N and 2N obtained through a random meiotic process. The aneuploid strains exhibited various levels of whole-chromosome instability (i.e. chromosome gains and losses). CIN correlates with cellular ploidy in an unexpected way: cells with a chromosomal content close to the haploid state are significantly more stable than cells displaying an apparent ploidy between 1.5 and 2N. We propose that the capacity for accurate chromosome segregation by the mitotic system does not scale continuously with an increasing number of chromosomes, but may occur via discrete steps each time a full set of chromosomes is added to the genome. On top of such general ploidy-related effect, CIN is also associated with the presence of specific aneuploid chromosomes as well as dosage imbalance between specific chromosome pairs. Our findings potentially help reconcile the divide between gene-centric versus genome-centric theories in cancer evolution. PMID:22615582

  15. Education in the imbalance of Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlafman, L. M.; Kontar, V. A.

    2013-12-01

    There are two concepts understanding of the real Nature: balanced and imbalanced. The traditional balanced concept understanding of Nature was originated in prehistoric times to calm the frightened souls of prehistoric man and manage groups of people. The balanced concept presupposes that Nature is isotropic, balanced, etc. The balanced concept of understanding of Nature gradually has moved to science and technology. The balanced concept of understanding of Nature is dominating from the prehistoric time up to today. But always parallel and opposite was exists the concept imbalanced understanding of Nature, which presupposes that Nature is anisotropy, imbalanced, etc. The balanced concept is much simpler than Imbalanced. The balanced concept has given mankind a lot of rough description of Nature which helped to solve a lot of practical problems but with sufficient accuracy, i.e. approximately, but not with an absolute precision. While people were few, and a lot of resources, person could take from Nature only what Nature gave willingly. During this period, people feared and respected Nature and Nature was able easily compensate the activity of people. The high accuracy of the description of Nature was not needed when resources were plentiful and people were few. But now the situation is completely different. The population has become a very large and growing. Traditional resources are almost run out and the lack of resources escalates. People are not afraid of Nature and bravely try to take by force what Nature does not give voluntarily. People invaded into imbalance Nature, and Nature can no longer compensate activity of people. The era of global change is started, including those that man provokes. In the conditions of global changes is insufficiently of the approximate solutions of the traditional balanced concept. The balanced concept is exhausted, and increasingly misleads people. The balanced concept cannot solve the problems that arise in the global change

  16. Non‐invasive prenatal screening for chromosomal abnormalities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    More recently, cell-free fetal DNA testing was presented as a non-invasive test that uses maternal plasma to obtain fetal DNA in order to search for fetal aneuploidies or other chromosomal imbalances. Methodology: Searches of PubMed were performed, being restricted to English-language publications and to humans.

  17. Gene dosage imbalance during DNA replication controls bacterial cell-fate decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoshin, Oleg

    Genes encoding proteins in a common regulatory network are frequently located close to one another on the chromosome to facilitate co-regulation or couple gene expression to growth rate. Contrasting with these observations, here we demonstrate a functional role for the arrangement of Bacillus subtilis sporulation network genes on opposite sides of the chromosome. We show that the arrangement of two sporulation network genes, one located close to the origin, the other close to the terminus leads to a transient gene dosage imbalance during chromosome replication. This imbalance is detected by the sporulation network to produce cell-cycle coordinated pulses of the sporulation master regulator Spo0A~P. This pulsed response allows cells to decide between sporulation and continued vegetative growth during each cell-cycle spent in starvation. Furthermore, changes in DNA replication and cell-cycle parameters with decreased growth rate in starvation conditions enable cells to indirectly detect starvation without the need for evaluating specific metabolites. The simplicity of the uncovered coordination mechanism and starvation sensing suggests that it may be widely applicable in a variety of gene regulatory and stress-response settings. This work is supported by National Science Foundation Grants MCB-1244135, EAGER-1450867, MCB-1244423, NIH NIGMS Grant R01 GM088428 and HHMI International Student Fellowship.

  18. Electrolyte Imbalance in Patients with Sheehan's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Chur Hoan Lim; Ji Hyun Han; Joon Jin; Ji Eun Yu; Jin Ook Chung; Dong Hyeok Cho; Dong Jin Chung; Min Young Chung

    2015-01-01

    Background We investigated the prevalence of electrolyte imbalance and the relationship between serum electrolyte and anterior pituitary hormone levels in patients with Sheehan's syndrome. Methods In a retrospective study, we investigated 78 patients with Sheehan's syndrome. We also included 95 normal control subjects who underwent a combined anterior pituitary hormone stimulation test and showed normal hormonal responses. Results In patients with Sheehan's syndrome, the serum levels of sodiu...

  19. Synthetic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    What a living organism looks like and how it works and what are its components-all this is encoded on DNA, the genetic blueprint. Consequently, the way to change an organism is to change its genetic information. Since the first pieces of recombinant DNA have been used to transform cells in the 1970s, this approach has been enormously extended. Bigger and bigger parts of the genetic information have been exchanged or added over the years. Now we are at a point where the construction of entire chromosomes becomes a reachable goal and first examples appear. This development leads to fundamental new questions, for example, about what is possible and desirable to build or what construction rules one needs to follow when building synthetic chromosomes. Here we review the recent progress in the field, discuss current challenges and speculate on the appearance of future synthetic chromosomes. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Financial Imbalances and Macro-prudential Policies

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    Polikarpova Olga S.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The credit crisis and its transformation into a sovereign debt crisis have illustrated the limited character of the traditional macro financial politics. The financial crisis has shown that the priority of price stability does not guarantee macroeconomic stability. Revision of the goals and objectives of the monetary and credit policy is being carried out in many countries. In order to ensure macroeconomic stability, central banks have to use new instruments considering financial stability as an additional object. Since 2009 the IMF recommends central banks to use macro-prudential instruments for reducing macro-financial risks and imbalances in the financial system structure. The effectiveness of macro-prudential policy depends on its calibration with the monetary and credit policy. The growth of financial imbalances in the first decade after the adoption of the euro, presence of contradictory fiscal policies, deployment of a spiral of rapid crediting and price inflation have led to apraxia in the monetary and credit policy, and fiscal policy was limited by institutional arrangements. Accumulating funds during the budget surplus the countries-members of the European Monetary System (EMS attempted to reduce asymmetric shocks. The priority of price stability in the EMS had been achieved but the economies of these countries suffered from financial imbalances. Macro-prudential policy is aimed at prevention and mitigation of systemic risk, plays a significant role in reforming the new policy of central banks. That is why European countries are developing new methods and an institutional framework for the implementation of a new macro-prudential policy. Problems of structural arbitration and the possibility of emergence of new financial imbalances in the EMS are becoming increasingly real. The flow of financial capitals and financial institutions to more lenient jurisdictions is connected with the establishment of macro-prudential policy. The macro

  1. The Global Imbalance of the Inanimate Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargashkin, V. Y.

    2013-12-01

    The preservation laws serve is the general expression of balancing properties and stability in nature. The preservation laws, according to Noether's theorem, are displays of properties of uniformity and isotropy of space and time. So, in the most global representation, the imbalance of the Universe assumes presence of some large-scale non-uniformity in it. The scale of such non-uniformity may form the basis for balance and imbalance correlation in the nature as a whole. This heterogeneity may lead to global infringement of laws of preservation, such as laws of preservation of an impulse, the impulse and the moment of energy. So, the most global imbalance of the inanimate nature may be connected with existence of large-scale fluctuations of properties of the Universe matter. It is possible to think about existence of such imbalance with presence of the allocated areas and directions on celestial sphere. Now most of interest in a science is represented by some types of global anisotropy. First, it is spatial anisotropy of cosmic microwave background. It depends of direction on celestial sphere, including formation of the allocated directions, and also "hot" and "cold" spots. Secondly, it is anisotropy of substance's density, concerning clusters and super clusters of galaxies. It is known as a large-scale structure of the Universe. This kind of anisotropy is connected with imbalance between distributions of radiated substance and observable emptiness. The geometry of this kind of imbalance is that the shining matter forms "cellular", "sheet" or "filaments" structure, forming the cells, filled with visible "voids". Thirdly, it is the hypothetical anisotropy connected with prospective dependence of speed of expansion of the Universe with direction on celestial sphere, and also with time. The relative size for this speed is known as Hubble's parameter. The told testifies about actuality of systematization, and also revelation of an interconnection and mutual

  2. BAC CGH-array identified specific small-scale genomic imbalances in diploid DMBA-induced rat mammary tumors

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    Samuelson Emma

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of breast cancer is a multistage process influenced by hormonal and environmental factors as well as by genetic background. The search for genes underlying this malignancy has recently been highly productive, but the etiology behind this complex disease is still not understood. In studies using animal cancer models, heterogeneity of the genetic background and environmental factors is reduced and thus analysis and identification of genetic aberrations in tumors may become easier. To identify chromosomal regions potentially involved in the initiation and progression of mammary cancer, in the present work we subjected a subset of experimental mammary tumors to cytogenetic and molecular genetic analysis. Methods Mammary tumors were induced with DMBA (7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthrazene in female rats from the susceptible SPRD-Cu3 strain and from crosses and backcrosses between this strain and the resistant WKY strain. We first produced a general overview of chromosomal aberrations in the tumors using conventional kartyotyping (G-banding and Comparative Genome Hybridization (CGH analyses. Particular chromosomal changes were then analyzed in more details using an in-house developed BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome CGH-array platform. Results Tumors appeared to be diploid by conventional karyotyping, however several sub-microscopic chromosome gains or losses in the tumor material were identified by BAC CGH-array analysis. An oncogenetic tree analysis based on the BAC CGH-array data suggested gain of rat chromosome (RNO band 12q11, loss of RNO5q32 or RNO6q21 as the earliest events in the development of these mammary tumors. Conclusions Some of the identified changes appear to be more specific for DMBA-induced mammary tumors and some are similar to those previously reported in ACI rat model for estradiol-induced mammary tumors. The later group of changes is more interesting, since they may represent anomalies that involve

  3. Cryptic genomic imbalances in patients with de novo or familial apparently balanced translocations and abnormal phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanavakis Emanuel

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carriers of apparently balanced translocations are usually phenotypically normal; however in about 6% of de novo cases, an abnormal phenotype is present. In the current study we investigated 12 patients, six de novo and six familial, with apparently balanced translocations and mental retardation and/or congenital malformations by applying 1 Mb resolution array-CGH. In all de novo cases, only the patient was a carrier of the translocation and had abnormal phenotype. In five out of the six familial cases, the phenotype of the patient was abnormal, although the karyotype appeared identical to other phenotypically normal carriers of the family. In the sixth familial case, all carriers of the translocations had an abnormal phenotype. Results Chromosomal and FISH analyses suggested that the rearrangements were "truly balanced" in all patients. However, array-CGH, revealed cryptic imbalances in three cases (3/12, 25%, two de novo (2/12, 33.3% and one familial (1/12, 16.6%. The nature and type of abnormalities differed among the cases. In the first case, what was identified as a de novo t(9;15(q31;q26.1, a complex rearrangement was revealed involving a ~6.1 Mb duplication on the long arm of chromosome 9, an ~10 Mb deletion and an inversion both on the long arm of chromosome 15. These imbalances were located near the translocation breakpoints. In the second case of a de novo t(4;9(q25;q21.2, an ~6.6 Mb deletion was identified on the short arm of chromosome 7 which is unrelated to the translocation. In the third case, of a familial, t(4;7(q13.3;p15.3, two deletions of ~4.3 Mb and ~2.3 Mb were found, each at one of the two translocation breakpoints. In the remaining cases the translocations appeared balanced at 1 Mb resolution. Conclusion This study investigated both de novo and familial apparently balanced translocations unlike other relatively large studies which are mainly focused on de novo cases. This study provides additional

  4. Power-law tails in the distribution of order imbalance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Gu, Gao-Feng; Xu, Hai-Chuan; Xiong, Xiong; Chen, Wei; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the probability distribution of order imbalance calculated from the order flow data of 43 Chinese stocks traded on the Shenzhen Stock Exchange. Two definitions of order imbalance are considered based on the order number and the order size. We find that the order imbalance distributions of individual stocks have power-law tails. However, the tail index fluctuates remarkably from stock to stock. We also investigate the distributions of aggregated order imbalance of all stocks at different timescales Δt. We find no clear trend in the tail index with respect Δt. All the analyses suggest that the distributions of order imbalance are asymmetric.

  5. Molecular Detection of Malaria at Delivery Reveals a High Frequency of Submicroscopic Infections and Associated Placental Damage in Pregnant Women from Northwest Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango, Eliana M.; Samuel, Roshini; Agudelo, Olga M.; Carmona-Fonseca, Jaime; Maestre, Amanda; Yanow, Stephanie K.

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium infection in pregnancy causes substantial maternal and infant morbidity and mortality. In Colombia, both P. falciparum and P. vivax are endemic, but the impact of either species on pregnancy is largely unknown in this country. A cross-sectional study was carried out with 96 pregnant women who delivered at their local hospital. Maternal, placental, and cord blood were tested for malaria infection by microscopy and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). A high frequency of infection was detected by qPCR (45%). These infections had low concentrations of parasite DNA, and 79% were submicroscopic. Submicroscopic infections were associated with placental villitis and intervillitis. In conclusion, the overall frequency of Plasmodium infection at delivery in Colombia is much higher than previously reported. These data prompt a re-examination of the local epidemiology of malaria using molecular diagnostics to establish the clinical relevance of submicroscopic infections during pregnancy as well as their consequences for mothers and newborns. PMID:23716408

  6. Chromosome structure and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risley, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents topics in chromosome structure and function. Topics covered include: the structure of interphase chromatin; chromatin structure, gene expression and differentiation; organization of mitotic chromosomes; organization of meiotic chromosomes and synaptonimal complexes; the lampbrush chromsome of animal oocytes; dosage compensation in mammals: x chromosome inactivation; and polytene chromosomes.

  7. Evidence for high frequency of chromosomal mosaicism in spontaneous abortions revealed by interphase FISH analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorsanova, Svetlana G; Kolotii, Alexei D; Iourov, Ivan Y; Monakhov, Viktor V; Kirillova, Elena A; Soloviev, Ilia V; Yurov, Yuri B

    2005-03-01

    Numerical chromosomal imbalances are a common feature of spontaneous abortions. However, the incidence of mosaic forms of chromosomal abnormalities has not been evaluated. We have applied interphase multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization using original DNA probes for chromosomes 1, 9, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 21, 22, X, and Y to study chromosomal abnormalities in 148 specimens of spontaneous abortions. We have detected chromosomal abnormalities in 89/148 (60.1%) of specimens. Among them, aneuploidy was detected in 74 samples (83.1%). In the remaining samples, polyploidy was detected. The mosaic forms of chromosome abnormality, including autosomal and sex chromosomal aneuploidies and polyploidy (31 and 12 cases, respectively), were observed in 43/89 (48.3%) of specimens. The most frequent mosaic form of aneuploidy was related to chromosome X (19 cases). The frequency of mosaic forms of chromosomal abnormalities in samples with male chromosomal complement was 50% (16/32 chromosomally abnormal), and in samples with female chromosomal complement, it was 47.4% (27/57 chromosomally abnormal). The present study demonstrates that the postzygotic or mitotic errors leading to chromosomal mosaicism in spontaneous abortions are more frequent than previously suspected. Chromosomal mosaicism may contribute significantly to both pregnancy complications and spontaneous fetal loss.

  8. Electrolyte Imbalance in Patients with Sheehan's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chur Hoan Lim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWe investigated the prevalence of electrolyte imbalance and the relationship between serum electrolyte and anterior pituitary hormone levels in patients with Sheehan's syndrome.MethodsIn a retrospective study, we investigated 78 patients with Sheehan's syndrome. We also included 95 normal control subjects who underwent a combined anterior pituitary hormone stimulation test and showed normal hormonal responses.ResultsIn patients with Sheehan's syndrome, the serum levels of sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, magnesium, and inorganic phosphate were significantly lower than those in control subjects. The prevalence of hyponatremia, hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, hypomagnesemia, and hypophosphatemia in patients with Sheehan's syndrome was 59.0% (n=46, 26.9% (n=21, 35.9% (n=28, 47.4% (n=37, and 23.1% (n=18, respectively. Levels of sodium and ionized calcium in serum were positively correlated with levels of all anterior pituitary hormones (all P<0.05. Levels of potassium in serum were positively correlated with adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH and growth hormone (GH levels (all P<0.05. Levels of inorganic phosphate in serum were positively correlated with levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone, prolactin, and GH (all P<0.05, and levels of magnesium in serum were positively correlated with delta ACTH (P<0.01.ConclusionElectrolyte imbalance was common in patients with Sheehan's syndrome. Furthermore, the degree of anterior pituitary hormone deficiency relates to the degree of electrolyte disturbance in patients with this disease.

  9. Electrolyte Imbalance in Patients with Sheehan's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chur Hoan; Han, Ji Hyun; Jin, Joon; Yu, Ji Eun; Chung, Jin Ook; Cho, Dong Hyeok; Chung, Dong Jin; Chung, Min Young

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the prevalence of electrolyte imbalance and the relationship between serum electrolyte and anterior pituitary hormone levels in patients with Sheehan's syndrome. In a retrospective study, we investigated 78 patients with Sheehan's syndrome. We also included 95 normal control subjects who underwent a combined anterior pituitary hormone stimulation test and showed normal hormonal responses. In patients with Sheehan's syndrome, the serum levels of sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, magnesium, and inorganic phosphate were significantly lower than those in control subjects. The prevalence of hyponatremia, hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, hypomagnesemia, and hypophosphatemia in patients with Sheehan's syndrome was 59.0% (n=46), 26.9% (n=21), 35.9% (n=28), 47.4% (n=37), and 23.1% (n=18), respectively. Levels of sodium and ionized calcium in serum were positively correlated with levels of all anterior pituitary hormones (all PElectrolyte imbalance was common in patients with Sheehan's syndrome. Furthermore, the degree of anterior pituitary hormone deficiency relates to the degree of electrolyte disturbance in patients with this disease.

  10. Operating a redox flow battery with a negative electrolyte imbalance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Quoc; Chang, On; Durairaj, Sumitha

    2015-03-31

    Loss of flow battery electrode catalyst layers during self-discharge or charge reversal may be prevented by establishing and maintaining a negative electrolyte imbalance during at least parts of a flow battery's operation. Negative imbalance may be established and/or maintained actively, passively or both. Actively establishing a negative imbalance may involve detecting an imbalance that is less negative than a desired threshold, and processing one or both electrolytes until the imbalance reaches a desired negative level. Negative imbalance may be effectively established and maintained passively within a cell by constructing a cell with a negative electrode chamber that is larger than the cell's positive electrode chamber, thereby providing a larger quantity of negative electrolyte for reaction with positive electrolyte.

  11. [Cardiac arrhythmias caused by electrolyte imbalance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, M; Nakayama, K; Ishikawa, Y

    1996-08-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are known to be caused by many factors. Among them, electrolyte imbalance is the most important because of electrical activity of the heart is composed of transmembrane fluxes of Na+, Ca2+ and K+. In this review article, we describe the effects of high or low concentrations of these electrolytes on the active and passive electrical properties of the membrane in the cardiac tissues, and the mechanisms by which these electrolytes cause abnormal impulse formation and conduction in the heart. Antagonism and synergism of electrolytes and pathological conditions such as digitalis intoxication and ischemia are discussed with respect to not only cardiac electrophysiology but also cellular metabolism. A pathophysiological role of Mg2+ to maintain normal excitation and conduction of the heart is also pointed out.

  12. Chitosan-sodium alginate nanoparticles as submicroscopic reservoirs for ocular delivery: formulation, optimisation and in vitro characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motwani, Sanjay K; Chopra, Shruti; Talegaonkar, Sushma; Kohli, Kanchan; Ahmad, Farhan J; Khar, Roop K

    2008-03-01

    Management of extraocular disease is mainly limited by the inability to provide long-term extraocular drug delivery without avoiding the systemic drug exposure and/or affecting the intraocular structures and poor availability of drugs, which may be overcome by prolonging the contact time with the ocular surface, for instance with bioadhesive polymers. In the present study, mucoadhesive chitosan (CS)-sodium alginate (ALG) nanoparticles were investigated as a new vehicle for the prolonged topical ophthalmic delivery of antibiotic, gatifloxacin. A modified coacervation or ionotropic gelation method was used to produce gatifloxacin-loaded submicroscopic nanoreservoir systems. It was optimised using design of experiments by employing a 3-factor, 3-level Box-Behnken statistical design. Independent variables studied were the amount of the bioadhesive polymers: CS, ALG and the amount of drug in the formulation. The dependent variables were the particle size, zetapotential, encapsulation efficiency and burst release. Response surface plots were drawn, statistical validity of the polynomials was established and optimised formulations were selected by feasibility and grid search. Nanoparticles were characterised by FT-IR, DSC, TEM and atomic force microscopy. Drug content, encapsulation efficiency and particle properties such as size, size distribution (polydispersity index) and zetapotential were determined. The designed nanoparticles have average particle size from 205 to 572 nm (polydispersity from 0.325 to 0.489) and zetapotential from 17.6 to 47.8 mV. Nanoparticles revealed a fast release during the first hour followed by a more gradual drug release during a 24-h period following a non-Fickian diffusion process. Box-Behnken experimental design thus facilitated the optimisation of mucoadhesive nanoparticulate carrier systems for prolonged ocular delivery of the drug.

  13. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy of angiopathic changes in patients with inherited gene imbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brkić Predrag

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Phenotype match inherited by genes is in most cases present in monozygotic twins. Their phenotypic resemblance is unfortunately characterized by strong susceptibility for the development of chronic non-infectious diseases. One of the most common non-infectious chronic diseases that are phenotipically represented in twins is diabetes mellitus. Genetic imbalance is, in most cases, placed in 2, 3, 7, 8, 11, 12, 19 and 20 chromosomal pair of the human genome. CASE OUTLINE This study describes a pair of monozygotic twins, aged 54, who were diagnosed for diabetes type 2 ten years earlier. The first patient had trophic changes of muscles and skin tissues of the lower limb, and a necrotic wound on his right leg tibial region with the claudication distance of 50 m. After arteriography, he was referred by a vascular surgeon for hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO. HBO protocol implied 70 min. application of 100% oxygen at 2.5 absolute atmospheres. After the first series of HBO therapies consisting of 20 HBO treatments, claudication was eliminated and the necrotic wound healed. Next, surgical aortofemoral bypass was done. During the second HBO treatment, his monozygotic twin brother presented with angiopathic changes due to diabetes. In both patients, biochemical parameters corresponded to the expected level for diabetes type 2 imbalance, and the localization of the chromosomal defect (placed on 3, 11 and 19 chromosomal pair was also in accordance with the respective disorder. After they were included into next 10 HBO treatments, Doppler imaging of the major arteries of limbs revealed normal findings. Conclusion Identical genetic impairment in monozygotic twins can lead to identical somatic changes with resultant consequences. HBO treatment of such patients associated with other therapeutic procedures (conducted by diabetologist, vascular surgeon and physiatrist can postpone or prevent irreversible changes occurring due to blood vessel disorders.

  14. rDNA genetic imbalance and nucleolar chromatin restructuring is induced by distant hybridization between Raphanus sativus and Brassica alboglabra.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Long

    Full Text Available The expression of rDNA in hybrids inherited from only one progenitor refers to nucleolar dominance. The molecular basis for choosing which genes to silence remains unclear. We report genetic imbalance induced by distant hybridization correlates with formation of rDNA genes (NORs in the hybrids between Raphanus sativus L. and Brassica alboglabra Bailey. Moreover, increased CCGG methylation of rDNA in F1 hybrids is concomitant with Raphanus-derived rDNA gene silencing and rDNA transcriptional inactivity revealed by nucleolar configuration restriction. Newly formed rDNA gene locus occurred through chromosomal in F1 hybrids via chromosomal imbalance. NORs are gained de novo, lost, and/or transposed in the new genome. Inhibition of methyltransferases leads to changes in nucleolar architecture, implicating a key role of methylation in control of nucleolar dominance and vital nucleolar configuration transition. Our findings suggest that gene imbalance and methylation-related chromatin restructuring is important for rDNA gene silencing that may be crucial for synthesis of specific proteins.

  15. rDNA genetic imbalance and nucleolar chromatin restructuring is induced by distant hybridization between Raphanus sativus and Brassica alboglabra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Hong; Chen, Chunli; Wang, Bing; Feng, Yanni

    2015-01-01

    The expression of rDNA in hybrids inherited from only one progenitor refers to nucleolar dominance. The molecular basis for choosing which genes to silence remains unclear. We report genetic imbalance induced by distant hybridization correlates with formation of rDNA genes (NORs) in the hybrids between Raphanus sativus L. and Brassica alboglabra Bailey. Moreover, increased CCGG methylation of rDNA in F1 hybrids is concomitant with Raphanus-derived rDNA gene silencing and rDNA transcriptional inactivity revealed by nucleolar configuration restriction. Newly formed rDNA gene locus occurred through chromosomal in F1 hybrids via chromosomal imbalance. NORs are gained de novo, lost, and/or transposed in the new genome. Inhibition of methyltransferases leads to changes in nucleolar architecture, implicating a key role of methylation in control of nucleolar dominance and vital nucleolar configuration transition. Our findings suggest that gene imbalance and methylation-related chromatin restructuring is important for rDNA gene silencing that may be crucial for synthesis of specific proteins.

  16. Effort reward imbalance, and salivary cortisol in the morning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eller, Nanna Hurwitz; Nielsen, Søren Feodor; Blønd, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Effort reward imbalance (ERI) is suggested to increase risk for stress and is hypothesized to increase cortisol levels, especially the awakening cortisol response, ACR.......Effort reward imbalance (ERI) is suggested to increase risk for stress and is hypothesized to increase cortisol levels, especially the awakening cortisol response, ACR....

  17. Golden Jubilee Photos: A Universal Imbalance

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    http://www.cern.ch/cern50/ View along the NA48 beamline with the detector in the distance. No one is sure why the Universe wound up the way it has: all matter and no antimatter. According to prevailing theories, the early universe had equal amounts of matter and antimatter. However, whenever such opposites meet, they annihilate and become a burst of energy. This would seem to leave the Universe with neither matter nor antimatter - and thus no stars, planets, or physicists. If nature shows a bias for matter over antimatter, this could explain why the Universe is all matter. To see what might be missing from the theories, physicists search for the rare cases in which matter and antimatter behave differently. One such imbalance, called direct CP violation, showed up in the NA 31 experiment at CERN. The results from this experiment, first presented in 1993, showed that when K mesons and their antimatter cousins decay, they show a slight preference for matter over antimatter. Later experiments with neutral K mes...

  18. Large Genomic Imbalances in Brugada Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Mademont-Soler

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome (BrS is a form of cardiac arrhythmia which may lead to sudden cardiac death. The recommended genetic testing (direct sequencing of SCN5A uncovers disease-causing SNVs and/or indels in ~20% of cases. Limited information exists about the frequency of copy number variants (CNVs in SCN5A in BrS patients, and the role of CNVs in BrS-minor genes is a completely unexplored field.220 BrS patients with negative genetic results were studied to detect CNVs in SCN5A. 63 cases were also screened for CNVs in BrS-minor genes. Studies were performed by Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification or Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS.The detection rate for CNVs in SCN5A was 0.45% (1/220. The detected imbalance consisted of a duplication from exon 15 to exon 28, and could potentially explain the BrS phenotype. No CNVs were found in BrS-minor genes.CNVs in current BrS-related genes are uncommon among BrS patients. However, as these rearrangements may underlie a portion of cases and they undergo unnoticed by traditional sequencing, an appealing alternative to conventional studies in these patients could be targeted NGS, including in a single experiment the study of SNVs, indels and CNVs in all the known BrS-related genes.

  19. The Precarious Prokaryotic Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary selection for optimal genome preservation, replication, and expression should yield similar chromosome organizations in any type of cells. And yet, the chromosome organization is surprisingly different between eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic accommodation of genetic material accounts for the distinct eukaryotic and prokaryotic modes of genome evolution, but it falls short of explaining the differences in the chromosome organization. I propose that the two distinct ways to organize chromosomes are driven by the differences between the global-consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes and the local-concurrent chromosome cycle of prokaryotes. Specifically, progressive chromosome segregation in prokaryotes demands a single duplicon per chromosome, while other “precarious” features of the prokaryotic chromosomes can be viewed as compensations for this severe restriction. PMID:24633873

  20. Spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance in amblyopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, MiYoung; Wiecek, Emily; Dakin, Steven C.; Bex, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    While amblyopia involves both binocular imbalance and deficits in processing high spatial frequency information, little is known about the spatial-frequency dependence of binocular imbalance. Here we examined binocular imbalance as a function of spatial frequency in amblyopia using a novel computer-based method. Binocular imbalance at four spatial frequencies was measured with a novel dichoptic letter chart in individuals with amblyopia, or normal vision. Our dichoptic letter chart was composed of band-pass filtered letters arranged in a layout similar to the ETDRS acuity chart. A different chart was presented to each eye of the observer via stereo-shutter glasses. The relative contrast of the corresponding letter in each eye was adjusted by a computer staircase to determine a binocular Balance Point at which the observer reports the letter presented to either eye with equal probability. Amblyopes showed pronounced binocular imbalance across all spatial frequencies, with greater imbalance at high compared to low spatial frequencies (an average increase of 19%, p binocular imbalance may be useful for diagnosing amblyopia and as an outcome measure for recovery of binocular vision following therapy. PMID:26603125

  1. Evaluation of chromosome 11p imbalances in aniridia and Wilms tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Maike; Leube, Barbara; Thiel, Anne; Schanze, Ina; Beier, Manfred; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte

    2013-05-01

    Newborn sporadic aniridia patients with an 11p13 deletion including the WT1 gene have an increased risk to develop Wilms tumor. At present a risk for Wilms tumor cannot be estimated in patients with deletions not extending into, but ending close to WT1. Therefore, it is important to determine the distance of deletion endpoints from the WT1 gene and survey these patients for a longer follow-up time to obtain a more defined risk estimation. Using molecular methods, such as Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA), deletion endpoints can be mapped more accurately than with FISH. We describe here the analysis of six aniridia patients, in two of these the deletions extend close to the 3' end of WT1. At the ages of 3.8 and 4 years they have not developed a Wilms tumor, suggesting a low tumor risk in such patients. In addition we have studied 24 non-AN cases with a higher likelihood for WT1 alterations with MLPA and found no deletions. In conclusion newborns with aniridia should be studied with molecular methods that can determine deletion endpoints in 11p13 exactly. For a better Wilms tumor risk estimation cases with deletion endpoints close to WT1 should be followed for at least 4-5 years. Furthermore germ line intragenic deletions affecting WT1 in patients with a higher likelihood for a WT1 association, for example, bilateral tumors, genitourinary aberrations, or nephrotic syndrome, were not found in this study, suggesting that deletions are rare events. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Chromosomal imbalances in four new uterine cervix carcinoma derived cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Hidalgo, Alfredo; Monroy, Alberto; Arana, Rosa Ma; Taja, Lucía; Vázquez, Guelaguetza; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background Uterine cervix carcinoma is the second most common female malignancy worldwide and a major health problem in Mexico, representing the primary cause of death among the Mexican female population. High risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered to be the most important risk factor for the development of this tumor and cervical carcinoma derived cell lines are very useful models for the study of viral carcinogenesis. Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) experim...

  3. Detection of chromosomal imbalances using combined MLPA kits in patients with syndromic intellectual disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sireteanu Adriana

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dizabilitatea intelectuală (DI este o afecțiune frecventă, cu consecințe majore pentru individ, familie și societate. Datorită heterogenității sale clinice și genetice, în aproximativ 50% din cazuri etiologia bolii nu poate fi stabilită. Scopul acestui studiu a fost evaluarea capacității de stabilire a diagnosticului etiologic la 369 pacienți cu DI sindromic și rezultat normal sau incert la cariotip folosind o combinație de kituri MLPA. Toţi pacienţii au fost investigaţi prin metoda MLPA, folosind fie kiturile SALSA MLPA P064 sau P096, dacă fenotipul a fost sugestiv pentru un sindrom cu microdeleţie (subgrupul A - 186 pacienți, fie kiturile subtelomerice P036 și P070, dacă fenotipul nu a fost sugestiv pentru un sindrom cu microdeleţie sau rezultatul la cariotipul standard a fost incert (subgrupul B - 183 pacienți. Rezultatele anormale detectate de aceste kituri au fost caracterizate folosind kiturile MLPA corespunzătoare de urmărire (Telomere Follow-up set, P029-A1, P250-B2, ME028-B1. În subgrupul A am identificat 25 de pacienți cu microdeleții (13,4%. Folosind kiturile de screening subtelomeric și de urmărire la subgrupul B am detectat rearanjări criptice în 7,5% din cazuri și am identificat originea materialului suplimentar observat la cariotipul standard la 10 din 11 pacienți. Sumarizând datele obţinute din cele două loturi, folosirea combinată a seturilor MLPA a dus la stabilirea diagnosticului la 10,6% (38/358 dintre pacienții cu cariotip normal. Folosirea seturilor MLPA de urmărire a permis atât confirmarea prezenţei anomaliei, cât şi determinarea dimensiunii ei, ceea ce a facilitat interpretarea semnificaţiei clinice a rearanjărilor. Pentru laboratoarele care nu au acces la tehnologiile bazate pe microarray, folosirea mai multor kituri MLPA reprezintă o strategie eficientă pentru stabilirea diagnosticului etiologic la pacienţii cu DI.

  4. Measuring Earth's Radiation Imbalance using Cubesat Constellations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, W. D.; Courtade, S.; Immel, T. J.; Feldman, D.; Lorentz, S. R.; Dyrud, L. P.

    2016-12-01

    At present, the global annual-mean Earth Radiation Imbalance (ERI) is estimated to be of order 1 W/m2, although the uncertainty in ERI is much larger than this estimate. The best current satellite-only observational determinations of ERI range from -2 to +7 W/m2 unless major adjustments are made using ocean observations. Since measurements of ERI accurate to better than 0.5 W/m2 are essential for understanding and predicting changes in our climate, new missions to determine ERI in conjunction with ongoing ocean observations are urgently needed. These missions should reliably determine Earth's radiation balance at the temporal and spatial scales sufficient for relating ERI to the physical processes responsible for variability. The compelling objective of measuring ERI can be met using a constellation of satellites making global, high-frequency radiation measurements of the solar energy reflected and infrared energy radiated back to space with sufficient accuracy to determine the ERI to within 0.5 W/m2. In this presentation, we discuss the reasons and prospects for deploying a Cubesat constellation to realize this objective, simulations of the data that could be produced by this constellation, and the advantages of the spatial coverage and high temporal frequency afforded by the constellation. These advantages apply both to estimating long-term ERI and to quantifying the radiation budgets of individual synoptic-scale weather systems. The innovations in this system involve both the use of Cubesats and of compact, continuously calibrated wide-field-of-view radiometers. We demonstrate the feasibility of such a constellation using the ongoing proof-of-concept deployment of the target radiometers onboard the upcoming NASA RAVAN (Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes) mission.

  5. Sex chromosomes and sex chromosome abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xu

    2011-12-01

    This article focuses on constitutional sex chromosome abnormalities detected by conventional cytogenetics and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The author discusses the two general classifications of abnormalities: numerical and structural. Also included are descriptions of unique aspects of X and Y chromosomes, technological advances in detection, and future perspectives.

  6. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...... A + B). Pregnant women 35 years of age, women who previously had a chromosomally abnormal child, families with translocation carriers or other heritable chromosomal disease, families where the father was 50 years or more and women in families with a history of Down's syndrome (group A), were compared...... to women having amniocentesis, although considered not to have any increased risk of fetal chromosome abnormality (1390 pregnancies, group B). They were also compared with 750 consecutive pregnancies in women 25-34 years of age, in whom all heritable diseases were excluded (group C). The risk of unbalanced...

  7. Chromosome Disorder Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Visit our Photo Gallery Education, Advocacy, Information & Support Chromosome Disorder Outreach, Inc is a non-profit organization. ... Inc. All Rights Reserved You are donating to : Chromosome Disorder Outreach, Inc, a 501c non-profit organization. ...

  8. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in

  9. ZEBRAFISH CHROMOSOME-BANDING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PIJNACKER, LP; FERWERDA, MA

    1995-01-01

    Banding techniques were carried out on metaphase chromosomes of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. The karyotypes with the longest chromosomes consist of 12 metacentrics, 26 submetacentrics, and 12 subtelocentrics (2n = 50). All centromeres are C-band positive. Eight chromosomes have a pericentric

  10. Coenzyme Q10 and oxidative imbalance in Down syndrome: biochemical and clinical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiano, L; Padella, L; Carnevali, P; Gabrielli, O; Bruge, F; Principi, F; Littarru, G P

    2008-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a chromosomal abnormality (trisomy 21) associated with mental retardation and Alzheimer-like dementia, characteristic change of the individual's phenotype and premature ageing. Oxidative stress is known to play a major role in this pathology since a gene dose effect leads to elevated ratio of superoxide dismutase to catalase/glutathione peroxidase compared to controls in all age categories suggesting that oxidative imbalance contributes to the clinical manifestation of DS. Hyperuricemia is another feature of DS that has an interesting relationship with oxidative stress since uric acid represents an important free radical scavenger. However its formation is connected to the conversion of Xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) to Xanthine oxidase (XO) which leads to concomitant production of free radicals. Here we report that plasma samples from DS patients in pediatric age, despite an increased total antioxidant capacity, largely due to elevated Uric acid content (UA), present significantly elevated markers of oxidative damage such as increased allantoin levels. Moreover DS plasma samples do not differ from healthy control ones in terms of Coenzyme Q10 and susceptibility to peroxidative stimuli. On the contrary, lymphocyte and platelet CoQ10 content was significantly lower in DS patients, a fact that might underlie oxidative imbalance at a cellular level.

  11. Genomic imbalance in subjects with idiopathic intellectual disability ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genomic imbalance in subjects with idiopathic intellectual disability detected by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. SHRUTHI MOHAN VETTRISELVI VENKATESAN SOLOMON FD PAUL TEEENA KOSHY VENKATACHALAM PERUMAL. RESEARCH NOTE Volume 95 Issue 2 June 2016 pp 469-474 ...

  12. East-West News Flow "Imbalance": Qualifying the Quantifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Duc, Don R.

    1981-01-01

    A study of Eurovision-Intervision news exchange patterns suggests that any global explanation for imbalance will be premature until the news item values in each exchange are understood as clearly as its news item volume. (PD)

  13. Chiral Imbalance in QCD and its consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrianov Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Under extreme conditions of high temperature and/or large quark (baryon density, the vacuum of QCD changes its properties, and deconfinement, chiral symmetry restoration as well as chiral symmetry breaking take place. These transitions (phases are accompanied by the rapid change in the rate and nature of topological transitions connecting different topological sectors. The heavy ion collisions (HIC program opens a possibility to study these phenomena in so-called non-Abelian Quark-gluon plasma (QGP. In these phases the currents of light quarks (vector and axial-vector can be independently examined for right-handed (RH and left-handed (LH quarks. To describe such a quark matter chiral chemical potential can be introduced to quantify the presence of chirality imbalance (ChI i.e. the difference between the average numbers of RH and LH quarks in the fireball after HIC. In this review talk we will focus our attention on the discussion of the ChI related developments in heavy ion physics at central collisions and the plans for the future experiments aimed at establishing (or falsifying the presence of Local spacial Parity Breaking (LPB in heavy ion data. We describe some of experimental observables in detecting the signal of LPB. A number of measurements is proposed that allow to reach a definite conclusion on the occurrence of LPB effects in non-Abelian QGP produced in central heavy ion collisions and its simulation within a number of QCD-inspired models is outlined. Based on the effective meson theory in the presence of Chern-Simons interaction it is found that the spectrum of massive vector mesons splits into three polarization components with different effective masses. Moreover a resonance broadening occurs that leads to an increase of spectral contribution to the dilepton production as compared to the vacuum state. The asymmetry in production of longitudinally and transversely polarized states of ρ and ω mesons for various values of the

  14. Competitiveness and external imbalances within the euro area

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The onset of the financial crisis in 2008 has highlighted the problems of diverging external imbalances within Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) and the role of persistent losses in competitiveness. This paper starts by investigating some of the competitiveness factors which contributed to external imbalances in euro area countries. The evidence suggests significant heterogeneity across countries in both price/cost and non-price competitiveness in the euro area and that there is no one factor...

  15. Mapping strategies: Chromosome 16 workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The following topics from a workshop on chromosome 16 are briefly discussed: genetic map of chromosome 16; chromosome breakpoint map of chromosome 16; integrated physical/genetic map of chromosome 16; pulsed field map of the 16p13.2--p13.3 region (3 sheets); and a report of the HGM10 chromosome 16 committee.

  16. Pooled PCR testing strategy and prevalence estimation of submicroscopic infections using Bayesian latent class models in pregnant women receiving intermittent preventive treatment at Machinga District Hospital, Malawi, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhiyong; Mitchell, Rebecca Mans; Gutman, Julie; Wiegand, Ryan E; Mwandama, Dyson A; Mathanga, Don P; Skarbinski, Jacek; Shi, Ya Ping

    2014-12-18

    Low malaria parasite densities in pregnancy are a diagnostic challenge. PCR provides high sensitivity and specificity in detecting low density of parasites, but cost and technical requirements limit its application in resources-limited settings. Pooling samples for PCR detection was explored to estimate prevalence of submicroscopic malaria infection in pregnant women at delivery. Previous work uses gold-standard based methods to calculate sensitivity and specificity of tests, creating a challenge when newer methodologies are substantially more sensitive than the gold standard. Thus prevalence was estimated using Bayesian latent class models (LCMs) in this study. Nested PCR (nPCR) for the 18S rRNA gene subunit of Plasmodium falciparum was conducted to detect malaria infection in microscopy-negative Malawian women on IPTp. Two-step sample pooling used dried blood spot samples (DBSs) collected from placenta or periphery at delivery. Results from nPCR and histology as well as previously published data were used to construct LCMs to estimate assay sensitivity and specificity. Theoretical confidence intervals for prevalence of infection were calculated for two-step and one-step pooling strategies. Of 617 microscopy-negative Malawian women, 39 (6.3%) were identified as actively infected by histology while 52 (8.4%) were positive by nPCR. One hundred forty (22.7%) individuals had past infection assessed by histology. With histology as a reference, 72% of women in the active infection group, 7.1% in the past infection group and 3.2% in histology-negative group were nPCR positive. Using latent class models without a gold standard, histology had a median sensitivity of 49.7% and specificity of 97.6% for active infection while PCR had a median sensitivity of 96.0% and specificity of 99.1%. The true prevalence of active infection was estimated at 8.0% (CI: 5.8-10.5%) from PCR. PCR also had similar sensitivity for detecting either peripheral or placental malaria for

  17. Molecular analysis of chromosome 21 in a patient with a phenotype of down syndrome and apparently normal karyotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlbom, B.E.; Wadelius, C.; Zech, L.; Anneren, G. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1996-06-28

    Down syndrome (DS) is caused in most cases by the presence of an extra chromosome 21. It has been shown that the DS phenotype is produced by duplication of only a small part of the long arm of chromosome 21, the 21q22 region, including and distal to locus D21S55. We present molecular investigations on a woman with clinically typical DS but apparently normal chromosomes. Her parents were consanguineous and she had a sister with a DS phenotype, who died at the age of 15 days. Repeated cytogenetic investigations (G-banding and high resolution banding) on the patient and her parents showed apparently normal chromosomes. Autoradiographs of quantitative Southern blots of DNAs from the patient, her parents, trisomy 21 patients, and normal controls were analyzed after hybridization with unique DNA sequences regionally mapped on chromosome 21. Sequences D21S59, D21S1, D21S11, D21S8, D21S17, D21S55, ERG, D21S15, D21S112, and COL6A1 were all found in two copies. Fluorescent in situ hybridization with a chromosome 21-specific genomic library showed no abnormalities and only two copies of chromosome 21 were detected. Nineteen markers from the critical region studied with polymerase chain reaction amplification of di- and tetranucleotide repeats did not indicate any partial trisomy 21. From his study we conclude that the patient does not have any partial submicroscopic trisomy for any segment of chromosome 21. It seems reasonable to assume that she suffers from an autosomal recessive disorder which is phenotypically indistinguishable from DS. 23 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Unstable transmission of a familial complex chromosome rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Binsbergen, Ellen; Hochstenbach, Ron; Giltay, Jacques; Swinkels, Marielle

    2012-11-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs) are rare genomic structural aberrations involving three or more breakpoints on two or more chromosomes. About one-third of all CCRs are familial. Transmittance of such a CCR results either in genomic imbalance due to abnormal segregation at meiosis I or is stably passed on to the next generation. Here we present a phenotypically normal mother with a CCR involving chromosomes 1, 3, and 5 that gave birth to a phenotypically abnormal son. The boy presented with hypotonia, mild facial dysmorphisms, and severe intellectual disability. Conventional karyotyping revealed the same apparently balanced CCR as in the mother. However, by use of array-comparative genome hybridization (array-CGH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) we discovered that one of the derivative chromosomes in the patient contained a de novo rearrangement. It appears that during transmission of the CCR, an additional de novo deletion and duplication had arisen in one of the derivative chromosomes. We speculate that this was the result of the inverted duplication with a distal deletion mechanism. We also demonstrate the importance of high-resolution breakpoint analysis in CCRs and stress that genetic counseling of a familial CCR is not straightforward. To our knowledge, this would be the first description of this mechanism operating on a structurally abnormal chromosome. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Rapid molecular cytogenetic analysis of X-chromosomal microdeletions: Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for complex glycerol kinase deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worley, K.C.; Lindsay, E.A.; McCabe, E.R.B. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-17

    Diagnosis of X-chromosomal microdeletions has relied upon the traditional methods of Southern blotting and DNA amplification, with carrier identification requiring time-consuming and unreliable dosage calculations. In this report, we describe rapid molecular cytogenetic identification of deleted DNA in affected males with the Xp21 contiguous gene syndrome (complex glycerol kinase deficiency, CGKD) and female carriers for this disorder. CGKD deletions involve the genes for glycerol kinase, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and/or adrenal hypoplasia congenita. We report an improved method for diagnosis of deletions in individuals with CGKD and for identification of female carriers within their families using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a cosmid marker (cosmid 35) within the glycerol kinase gene. When used in combination with an Xq control probe, affected males demonstrate a single signal from the control probe, while female carriers demonstrate a normal chromosome with two signals, as well as a deleted chromosome with a single signal from the control probe. FISH analysis for CGKD provides the advantages of speed and accuracy for evaluation of submicroscopic X-chromosome deletions, particularly in identification of female carriers. In addition to improving carrier evaluation, FISH will make prenatal diagnosis of CGKD more readily available. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Sex Chromosome Drive

    OpenAIRE

    Helleu, Quentin; Gérard, Pierre R.; Montchamp-Moreau, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosome drivers are selfish elements that subvert Mendel's first law of segregation and therefore are overrepresented among the products of meiosis. The sex-biased progeny produced then fuels an extended genetic conflict between the driver and the rest of the genome. Many examples of sex chromosome drive are known, but the occurrence of this phenomenon is probably largely underestimated because of the difficulty to detect it. Remarkably, nearly all sex chromosome drivers are found in t...

  1. Chromosomal Evolution in Chiroptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele G. Sotero-Caio

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chiroptera is the second largest order among mammals, with over 1300 species in 21 extant families. The group is extremely diverse in several aspects of its natural history, including dietary strategies, ecology, behavior and morphology. Bat genomes show ample chromosome diversity (from 2n = 14 to 62. As with other mammalian orders, Chiroptera is characterized by clades with low, moderate and extreme chromosomal change. In this article, we will discuss trends of karyotypic evolution within distinct bat lineages (especially Phyllostomidae, Hipposideridae and Rhinolophidae, focusing on two perspectives: evolution of genome architecture, modes of chromosomal evolution, and the use of chromosome data to resolve taxonomic problems.

  2. Chromosome analyses in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann-Berg, N; Bullerdiek, J; Murua Escobar, H; Nolte, I

    2012-01-01

    Cytogenetics is the study of normal and abnormal chromosomes. Every species is characterized by a given number of chromosomes that can be recognized by their specific shape. The chromosomes are arranged according to standard classification schemes for the respective species. While pre- and postnatal chromosome analyses investigate the constitutional karyotype, tumor cytogenetics is focused on the detection of clonal acquired, tumor-associated chromosome aberrations. Cytogenetic investigations in dogs are of great value especially for breeders dealing with fertility problems within their pedigrees, for veterinarians and last but not least for the dog owners. Dogs and humans share a variety of genetic diseases, including cancer. Thus, the dog has become an increasingly important model for genetic diseases. However, cytogenetic analyses of canine cells are complicated by the complex karyotype of the dog. Only just 15 years ago, a standard classification scheme for the complete canine karyotype was established. For chromosome analyses of canine cells the same steps of chromosome preparation are used as in human cytogenetics. There are few reports about cytogenetic changes in non-neoplastic cells, involving predominantly the sex chromosomes. Cytogenetic analyses of different entities of canine tumors revealed that, comparable to human tumors, tumors of the dog are often characterized by clonal chromosome aberrations, which might be used as diagnostic and prognostic markers. The integration of modern techniques (molecular genetic approaches, adaptive computer programs) will facilitate and complete conventional cytogenetic studies. However, conventional cytogenetics is still non-replaceable.

  3. Ring chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C A; Hertz, Jens Michael; Petersen, M B

    1992-01-01

    A stillborn male child with anencephaly and multiple malformations was found to have the karyotype 46,XY,r(13) (p11q21.1). The breakpoint at 13q21.1, determined by high resolution banding, is the most proximal breakpoint ever reported in patients with ring chromosome 13. In situ hybridisation...... with the probe L1.26 confirmed the derivation from chromosome 13 and DNA polymorphism analysis showed maternal origin of the ring chromosome. Our results, together with a review of previous reports of cases with ring chromosome 13 with identified breakpoints, could neither support the theory of distinct clinical...

  4. Exotic meson decays in the environment with chiral imbalance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianov, A. A.; Andrianov, V. A.; Espriu, D.; Iakubovich, A. V.; Putilova, A. E.

    2017-10-01

    An emergence of Local Parity Breaking (LPB) in central heavy-ion collisions (HIC) at high energies is discussed. LPB in the fireball can be produced by a difference between the number densities of right- and left-handed chiral fermions (Chiral Imbalance) which is implemented by a chiral (axial) chemical potential. The effective meson lagrangian induced by QCD is extended to the medium with Chiral Imbalance and the properties of light scalar and pseudoscalar mesons (π, α0) are analyzed. It is shown that exotic decays of scalar mesons arise as a result of mixing of π and α0 vacuum states in the presence of chiral imbalance. The pion electromagnetic formfactor obtains an unusual parity-odd supplement which generates a photon polarization asymmetry in pion polarizability. We hope that the above pointed indications of LPB can be identified in experiments on LHC, RHIC, CBM FAIR and NICA accelerators.

  5. How gender disparities drive imbalances in health care leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoss MAK

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Mary Ann Keogh Hoss1, Paula Bobrowski2, Kathryn J McDonagh3, Nancy M Paris41Health Services Administration, Eastern Washington University, College of Business and Public Administration, Spokane, WA, USA; 2College of Liberal Arts, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA; 3Executive Relations, Hospira Inc, Lake Forest, IL, USA; 4Georgia Center for Oncology Research and Education, Atlanta, GA, USAAbstract: Low female representation in US hospital chief executive officer positions has persisted for decades. This article addresses gender disparity in professional development, the rationale for gender differences, and practical strategies to address this imbalance. The health care workforce consists of 75% women, but according to two recent surveys, ie, a state survey and a survey of the top 100 US hospitals, women hold only about 12% of chief executive officer positions in US hospitals. Significant and dedicated efforts by both individuals and organizations are necessary to rectify this imbalance.Keywords: gender, imbalance, leadership, United States, hospitals

  6. Neoliberalism, trade imbalances, and economic policy in the Eurozone crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engelbert Stockhammer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the causes of the Eurozone crisis. In doing so, it carefully surveys authors from different economic schools of thought. The paper discusses competing explanations for European current account imbalances. Remarkably, opposing views on the relative importance of cost developments and demand developments in explaining current account imbalances can be found in both heterodox and orthodox economics. Regarding the assessment of fiscal and monetary policy there is a clearer polarisation, with heterodox analysis regarding austerity as unhelpful and most of orthodox economics endorsing it. We advocate a post-Keynesian view, which holds that current account imbalances are not a fundamental cause of the sovereign debt crisis. Rather, the economic policy architecture of the Eurozone, which aims at restricting the role of fiscal and monetary policy, is the key to understanding the crisis in Europe.

  7. Exotic meson decays in the environment with chiral imbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrianov A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An emergence of Local Parity Breaking (LPB in central heavy-ion collisions (HIC at high energies is discussed. LPB in the fireball can be produced by a difference between the number densities of right- and left-handed chiral fermions (Chiral Imbalance which is implemented by a chiral (axial chemical potential. The effective meson lagrangian induced by QCD is extended to the medium with Chiral Imbalance and the properties of light scalar and pseudoscalar mesons (π, α0 are analyzed. It is shown that exotic decays of scalar mesons arise as a result of mixing of π and α0 vacuum states in the presence of chiral imbalance. The pion electromagnetic formfactor obtains an unusual parity-odd supplement which generates a photon polarization asymmetry in pion polarizability. We hope that the above pointed indications of LPB can be identified in experiments on LHC, RHIC, CBM FAIR and NICA accelerators.

  8. Detection of small genomic imbalances using microarray-based multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsalis, Philippos C; Kousoulidou, Ludmila; Männik, Katrin; Sismani, Carolina; Zilina, Olga; Parkel, Sven; Puusepp, Helen; Tõnisson, Neeme; Palta, Priit; Remm, Maido; Kurg, Ants

    2007-02-01

    Array-based genome-wide screening methods were recently introduced to clinical practice in order to detect small genomic imbalances that may cause severe genetic disorders. The continuous advancement of such methods plays an extremely important role in diagnostic genetics and medical genomics. We have modified and adapted the original multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization (MAPH) to a novel microarray format providing an important new diagnostic tool for detection of small size copy-number changes in any locus of human genome. Here, we describe the new array-MAPH diagnostic method and show proof of concept through fabrication, interrogation and validation of a human chromosome X-specific array. We have developed new bioinformatic tools and methodology for designing and producing amplifiable hybridization probes (200-600 bp) for array-MAPH. We designed 558 chromosome X-specific probes with median spacing 238 kb and 107 autosomal probes, which were spotted onto microarrays. DNA samples from normal individuals and patients with known and unknown chromosome X aberrations were analyzed for validation. Array-MAPH detected exactly the same deletions and duplications in blind studies, as well as other unknown small size deletions showing its accuracy and sensitivity. All results were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and probe-specific PCR. Array-MAPH is a new microarray-based diagnostic tool for the detection of small-scale copy-number changes in complex genomes, which may be useful for genotype-phenotype correlations, identification of new genes, studying genetic variation and provision of genetic services.

  9. Parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates imprinting in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline E Jullien

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In mammals and in plants, parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates embryo growth and might be involved in reproductive isolation between emerging new species. Increased dosage of maternal genomes represses growth while an increased dosage of paternal genomes has the opposite effect. These observations led to the discovery of imprinted genes, which are expressed by a single parental allele. It was further proposed in the frame of the parental conflict theory that parental genome imbalances are directly mirrored by antagonistic regulations of imprinted genes encoding maternal growth inhibitors and paternal growth enhancers. However these hypotheses were never tested directly. Here, we investigated the effect of parental genome imbalance on the expression of Arabidopsis imprinted genes FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT SEED2 (FIS2 and FLOWERING WAGENINGEN (FWA controlled by DNA methylation, and MEDEA (MEA and PHERES1 (PHE1 controlled by histone methylation. Genome dosage imbalance deregulated the expression of FIS2 and PHE1 in an antagonistic manner. In addition increased dosage of inactive alleles caused a loss of imprinting of FIS2 and MEA. Although FIS2 controls histone methylation, which represses MEA and PHE1 expression, the changes of PHE1 and MEA expression could not be fully accounted for by the corresponding fluctuations of FIS2 expression. Our results show that parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates imprinting using mechanisms, which are independent from known regulators of imprinting. The complexity of the network of regulations between expressed and silenced alleles of imprinted genes activated in response to parental dosage imbalance does not support simple models derived from the parental conflict hypothesis.

  10. Parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates imprinting in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jullien, Pauline E; Berger, Frédéric

    2010-03-19

    In mammals and in plants, parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates embryo growth and might be involved in reproductive isolation between emerging new species. Increased dosage of maternal genomes represses growth while an increased dosage of paternal genomes has the opposite effect. These observations led to the discovery of imprinted genes, which are expressed by a single parental allele. It was further proposed in the frame of the parental conflict theory that parental genome imbalances are directly mirrored by antagonistic regulations of imprinted genes encoding maternal growth inhibitors and paternal growth enhancers. However these hypotheses were never tested directly. Here, we investigated the effect of parental genome imbalance on the expression of Arabidopsis imprinted genes FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT SEED2 (FIS2) and FLOWERING WAGENINGEN (FWA) controlled by DNA methylation, and MEDEA (MEA) and PHERES1 (PHE1) controlled by histone methylation. Genome dosage imbalance deregulated the expression of FIS2 and PHE1 in an antagonistic manner. In addition increased dosage of inactive alleles caused a loss of imprinting of FIS2 and MEA. Although FIS2 controls histone methylation, which represses MEA and PHE1 expression, the changes of PHE1 and MEA expression could not be fully accounted for by the corresponding fluctuations of FIS2 expression. Our results show that parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates imprinting using mechanisms, which are independent from known regulators of imprinting. The complexity of the network of regulations between expressed and silenced alleles of imprinted genes activated in response to parental dosage imbalance does not support simple models derived from the parental conflict hypothesis.

  11. Parallel Universes for Models of X Chromosome Dosage Compensation in Drosophila: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchler, James A

    2016-01-01

    Dosage compensation in Drosophila involves an approximately 2-fold increase in expression of the single X chromosome in males compared to the per gene expression in females with 2 X chromosomes. Two models have been considered for an explanation. One proposes that the male-specific lethal (MSL) complex that is associated with the male X chromosome brings histone modifiers to the sex chromosome to increase its expression. The other proposes that the inverse effect which results from genomic imbalance would tend to upregulate the genome approximately 2-fold, but the MSL complex sequesters histone modifiers from the autosomes to the X to mute this autosomal male-biased expression. On the X, the MSL complex must override the high level of resulting histone modifications to prevent overcompensation of the X chromosome. Each model is evaluated in terms of fitting classical genetic and recent molecular data. Potential paths toward resolving the models are suggested. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. SHOULDER MUSCLE IMBALANCE AND SUBACROMIAL IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME IN OVERHEAD ATHLETES

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Subacromial impingement is a frequent and painful condition among athletes, particularly those involved in overhead sports such as baseball and swimming. There are generally two types of subacromial impingement: structural and functional. While structural impingement is caused by a physical loss of area in the subacromial space due to bony growth or inflammation, functional impingement is a relative loss of subacromial space secondary to altered scapulohumeral mechanics resulting from glenohumeral instability and muscle imbalance. The purpose of this review is to describe the role of muscle imbalance in subacromial impingement in order to guide sports physical therapy evaluation and interventions. PMID:21655457

  13. In-phase and quadrature imbalance modeling, estimation, and compensation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yabo

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a unified IQ imbalance model and systematically reviews the existing estimation and compensation schemes. It covers the different assumptions and approaches that lead to many models of IQ imbalance. In wireless communication systems, the In-phase and Quadrature (IQ) modulator and demodulator are usually used as transmitter (TX) and receiver (RX), respectively. For Digital-to-Analog Converter (DAC) and Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) limited systems, such as multi-giga-hertz bandwidth millimeter-wave systems, using analog modulator and demodulator is still a low power and l

  14. AllelicImbalance: An R/ bioconductor package for detecting, managing, and visualizing allele expression imbalance data from RNA sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gådin, Jesper R.; van't Hooft, Ferdinand M.; Eriksson, Per

    2015-01-01

    Background: One aspect in which RNA sequencing is more valuable than microarray-based methods is the ability to examine the allelic imbalance of the expression of a gene. This process is often a complex task that entails quality control, alignment, and the counting of reads over heterozygous single......-nucleotide polymorphisms. Allelic imbalance analysis is subject to technical biases, due to differences in the sequences of the measured alleles. Flexible bioinformatics tools are needed to ease the workflow while retaining as much RNA sequencing information as possible throughout the analysis to detect and address...... the possible biases. Results: We present AllelicImblance, a software program that is designed to detect, manage, and visualize allelic imbalances comprehensively. The purpose of this software is to allow users to pose genetic questions in any RNA sequencing experiment quickly, enhancing the general utility...

  15. Factors That Promote Gender Imbalance in the Teaching of Science ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research was carried out to investigate factors that promote gender imbalance in the teaching of science/mathematics Fifty (50) Public Secondary and Primary Schools were selected randomly for the study. A total of one thousand (1000) teachers were used for the study comprising 400 males and 600 females. A twenty ...

  16. KRAS Allelic Imbalance: Strengths and Weaknesses in Numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Gary J; Kerr, Emma M; Martins, Carla P

    2017-05-01

    The identification of therapeutic vulnerabilities in mutant KRAS tumors has proven difficult to achieve. Burgess and colleagues recently reported in Cell that mutant/wild-type Kras allelic dosage determines clonal fitness and MEK inhibitor sensitivity in a leukemia model, demonstrating that KRAS allelic imbalance is likely an important and overlooked variable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Labor Markets in Imbalance: Review of Qualitative Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medoff, James L.; Wiener, Jonathan B.

    Recent statistical investigations indicate that labor market imbalance has increased during the past decade and has had important deleterious effects on the nation's inflation and productivity growth records. A growing difficulty in filling skilled jobs at a given unemployment rate is reflected. Business community analysts attribute the growing…

  18. Gender Power Imbalance on Women's Capacity to Negotiate Self ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FOMCS2

    African Health Sciences Vol 5 No 3 September 2005. 188 ... Objectives: To examine the influence of gender power imbalance and other ... of South Africa and Botswana, the study used descriptive statistics and logistic regression to reveal a number of gender related ...... states, politicians, sports figures, and other celebrities,.

  19. The human Y chromosome: a masculine chromosome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordam, Michiel J.; Repping, Sjoerd

    2006-01-01

    Once considered to be a genetic wasteland of no scientific interest beyond sex determination, the human Y chromosome has made a significant comeback in the past few decades and is currently implicated in multiple diseases, including spermatogenic failure - absent or very low levels of sperm

  20. Genomic imbalances are confined to non-proliferating cells in paediatric patients with acute myeloid leukaemia and a normal or incomplete karyotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Ballabio

    Full Text Available Leukaemia is often associated with genetic alterations such as translocations, amplifications and deletions, and recurrent chromosome abnormalities are used as markers of diagnostic and prognostic relevance. However, a proportion of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML cases have an apparently normal karyotype despite comprehensive cytogenetic analysis. Based on conventional cytogenetic analysis of banded chromosomes, we selected a series of 23 paediatric patients with acute myeloid leukaemia and performed whole genome array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH using DNA samples derived from the same patients. Imbalances involving large chromosomal regions or entire chromosomes were detected by aCGH in seven of the patients studied. Results were validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH to both interphase nuclei and metaphase chromosomes using appropriate bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC probes. The majority of these copy number alterations (CNAs were confirmed by FISH and found to localize to the interphase rather than metaphase nuclei. Furthermore, the proliferative states of the cells analyzed by FISH were tested by immunofluorescence using an antibody against the proliferation marker pKi67. Interestingly, these experiments showed that, in the vast majority of cases, the changes appeared to be confined to interphase nuclei in a non-proliferative status.

  1. Meiotic recombination, synapsis, meiotic inactivation and sperm aneuploidy in a chromosome 1 inversion carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Gordon; Chow, Victor; Ma, Sai

    2012-01-01

    Disrupted meiotic behaviour of inversion carriers may be responsible for suboptimal sperm parameters in these carriers. This study investigated meiotic recombination, synapsis, transcriptional silencing and chromosome segregation effects in a pericentric inv(1) carrier. Recombination (MLH1), synapsis (SYCP1, SYCP3) and transcriptional inactivation (γH2AX, BRCA1) were examined by fluorescence immunostaining. Chromosome specific rates of recombination were determined by fluorescence in-situ hybridization. Furthermore, testicular sperm was examined for aneuploidy and segregation of the inv(1). Our findings showed that global recombination rates were similar to controls. Recombination on the inv(1) and the sex chromosomes were reduced. The inv(1) associated with the XY body in 43.4% of cells, in which XY recombination was disproportionately absent, and 94.3% of cells displayed asynapsed regions which displayed meiotic silencing regardless of their association with the XY body. Furthermore, a low frequency of chromosomal imbalance was observed in spermatozoa (3.4%). Our results suggest that certain inversion carriers may display unimpaired global recombination and impaired recombination on the involved and the sex chromosomes during meiosis. Asynapsis or inversion-loop formation in the inverted region may be responsible for impaired spermatogenesis and may prevent sperm-chromosome imbalance. Copyright © 2011 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Status of dosage compensation of X chromosome in bovine genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ka, Sojeong; Ahn, Hyeonju; Seo, Minseok; Kim, Heebal; Kim, Jin Nam; Lee, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-08-01

    Dosage compensation system with X chromosome upregulation and inactivation have evolved to overcome the genetic imbalance between sex chromosomes in both male and female of mammals. Although recent development of chromosome-wide technologies has allowed us to test X upregulation, discrete data processing and analysis methods draw disparate conclusions. A series of expression studies revealed status of dosage compensation in some species belonging to monotremes, marsupials, rodents and primates. However, X upregulation in the Artiodactyla order including cattle have not been studied yet. In this study, we surveyed the genome-wide transcriptional upregulation in X chromosome in cattle RNA-seq data using different gene filtration methods. Overall examination of RNA-seq data revealed that X chromosome in the pituitary gland expressed more genes than in other peripheral tissues, which was consistent with the previous results observed in human and mouse. When analyzed with globally expressed genes, a median X:A expression ratio was 0.94. The ratio of 1-to-1 ortholog genes between chicken and mammals, however, showed considerable reduction to 0.68. These results indicate that status of dosage compensation for cattle is not deviated from those found in rodents and primate, and this is consistent with the evolutionary history of cattle.

  3. Y chromosome loss in male patients with primary biliary cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lleo, Ana; Oertelt-Prigione, Sabine; Bianchi, Ilaria; Caliari, Lisa; Finelli, Palma; Miozzo, Monica; Lazzari, Roberta; Floreani, Annarosa; Donato, Francesca; Colombo, Massimo; Gershwin, M Eric; Podda, Mauro; Invernizzi, Pietro

    2013-03-01

    Sex chromosome abnormalities have been advocated to be involved in the striking female prevalence of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and women with PBC manifest an increased X chromosome loss in peripheral blood mononuclear cells compared to age-matched healthy women. Our knowledge of the etiopathogenesis of autoimmunity in male patients remains, however, limited. Next to the possible role of androgens and their imbalances, the Y chromosome appears as a potential candidate for influence of the immune function in men. Herein we analyzed a population of male patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (n = 26) and healthy controls (n = 88) to define a potential association of disease and the loss of the Y chromosome. We demonstrate that Y chromosome loss indeed is higher in PBC males compared to healthy controls, and this phenomenon increases with aging. We were, thus, able to confirm the existence of an analogous mechanism in the male population to previously identified X haploinsufficiency in female patients with organ-specific autoimmune disease. We propose that this commonality might represent a relevant feature in the etiopathogenesis of autoimmune diseases that should be further investigated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Chromosomal mosaicism goes global

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurov Yuri B

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular differences of chromosomal content in the same individual are defined as chromosomal mosaicism (alias intercellular or somatic genomic variations or, in a number of publications, mosaic aneuploidy. It has long been suggested that this phenomenon poorly contributes both to intercellular (interindividual diversity and to human disease. However, our views have recently become to change due to a series of communications demonstrated a higher incidence of chromosomal mosaicism in diseased individuals (major psychiatric disorders and autoimmune diseases as well as depicted chromosomal mosaicism contribution to genetic diversity, the central nervous system development, and aging. The later has been produced by significant achievements in the field of molecular cytogenetics. Recently, Molecular Cytogenetics has published an article by Maj Hulten and colleagues that has provided evidences for chromosomal mosaicism to underlie formation of germline aneuploidy in human female gametes using trisomy 21 (Down syndrome as a model. Since meiotic aneuploidy is suggested to be the leading genetic cause of human prenatal mortality and postnatal morbidity, these data together with previous findings define chromosomal mosaicism not as a casual finding during cytogenetic analyses but as a more significant biological phenomenon than previously recognized. Finally, the significance of chromosomal mosaicism can be drawn from the fact, that this phenomenon is involved in genetic diversity, normal and abnormal prenatal development, human diseases, aging, and meiotic aneuploidy, the intrinsic cause of which remains, as yet, unknown.

  5. High Rates of Asymptomatic, Sub-microscopic Plasmodium vivax Infection and Disappearing Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in an Area of Low Transmission in Solomon Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltmann, Andreea; Darcy, Andrew W; Harris, Ivor; Koepfli, Cristian; Lodo, John; Vahi, Ventis; Piziki, David; Shanks, G Dennis; Barry, Alyssa E; Whittaker, Maxine; Kazura, James W; Mueller, Ivo

    2015-05-01

    Solomon Islands is intensifying national efforts to achieve malaria elimination. A long history of indoor spraying with residual insecticides, combined recently with distribution of long lasting insecticidal nets and artemether-lumefantrine therapy, has been implemented in Solomon Islands. The impact of these interventions on local endemicity of Plasmodium spp. is unknown. In 2012, a cross-sectional survey of 3501 residents of all ages was conducted in Ngella, Central Islands Province, Solomon Islands. Prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, P. ovale and P. malariae was assessed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and light microscopy (LM). Presence of gametocytes was determined by reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). By qPCR, 468 Plasmodium spp. infections were detected (prevalence = 13.4%; 463 P. vivax, five mixed P. falciparum/P. vivax, no P. ovale or P. malariae) versus 130 by LM (prevalence = 3.7%; 126 P. vivax, three P. falciparum and one P. falciparum/P. vivax). The prevalence of P. vivax infection varied significantly among villages (range 3.0-38.5%, p<0.001) and across age groups (5.3-25.9%, p<0.001). Of 468 P. vivax infections, 72.9% were sub-microscopic, 84.5% afebrile and 60.0% were both sub-microscopic and afebrile. Local residency, low education level of the household head and living in a household with at least one other P. vivax infected individual increased the risk of P. vivax infection. Overall, 23.5% of P. vivax infections had concurrent gametocytaemia. Of all P. vivax positive samples, 29.2% were polyclonal by MS16 and msp1F3 genotyping. All five P. falciparum infections were detected in residents of the same village, carried the same msp2 allele and four were positive for P. falciparum gametocytes. P. vivax infection remains endemic in Ngella, with the majority of cases afebrile and below the detection limit of LM. P. falciparum has nearly disappeared, but the risk of re-introductions and outbreaks due to travel to nearby islands

  6. Molecular cytogenetic detection of chromosome 15 deletions in patients with Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chadwick, D.E.; Weksberg, R.; Shuman, C. [Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are clinically distinct genetic disorders involving alterations of chromosome 15q11-q13. Approximately 75% of individuals with PWS and AS have deletions within 15q11-q13 by molecular analysis. We have evaluated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the clinical laboratory detection of del(15)(q11q13) using the cosmid probes D15S11 and GABRB3 (ONCOR, Gaithersburg, NY). 4/4 PWS and 1/1 AS patients previously identified as having cytogenetic deletions were deleted for both probes. In a prospectively ascertained series of 54 patient samples referred to rule out either PWS or AS, 8 were deleted for D15S11 and GABRB3. In addition, an atypical deletion patient with PWS was also identified who was found to be deleted for GABRB3 but not D15S11. The SNRPN locus was also deleted in this patient. Only 4 of the 9 patient samples having molecular cytogenetic deletions were clearly deleted by high resolution banding (HRB) analysis. The microscopic and submicroscopic deletions have been confirmed by dinucleotide (CA) repeat analysis. Microsatellite polymorphism analysis was also used to demonstrate that five non-deletion patients in this series had biparental inheritance of chromosome 15, including region q11-q13. Deletions were not detected by either HRB, FISH or microsatellite polymorphism analysis in samples obtained from parents of the deletion patients. Methylation studies of chromosome 15q11-q13 are in progress for this series of PWS and AS families. FISH analysis of chromosome 15q11-q13 in patients with PWS and AS is a rapid, sensitive and reliable method for deletion detection.

  7. Visualization of interphase chromosomes in postmitotic cells of the human brain by multicolour banding (MCB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iourov, I Y; Liehr, T; Vorsanova, S G; Kolotii, A D; Yurov, Y B

    2006-01-01

    Molecular cytogenetics offers the unique possibility of investigating numerical and structural chromosomal aberrations in interphase nuclei of somatic cells. Previous fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) investigations gave hints of numerical chromosomal imbalances in the human brain, present as low-level mosaicism. However, as precise identification of aneuploidy rates in somatic tissues faces major difficulties due to the limitations of FISH using whole chromosome painting or centromeric probes, in this study low-level mosaicism in the human brain was addressed for the first time using microdissection-based multicolour banding (MCB) probe sets. We demonstrated that MCB is suitable for this application and leads to more reliable results than the use of centromeric probes in parallel on the same samples. Autosomes and the active X chromosome appear as discrete metaphase chromosome-like structures, while the inactive X chromosome is condensed in more than 95% of interphase nuclei. The frequency of stochastic aneuploidy was found to be 0.2-0.5% (mean 0.35%) per autosome pair, 2% for the X chromosome in the female brain, and 0.4% in the male brain, giving a cumulative frequency of aneuploidy of approximately 10% in the adult brain. Moreover, MCB as well as multi-probe FISH using centromeric probes revealed associated signals in a large proportion of brain cells (10-40%). While co-localized signals could not be discriminated from numerical chromosome imbalances after FISH using centromeric probes, interphase MCB allows such differentiation. In summary, MCB is the only approach available at present that provides the possibility of characterizing the chromosomal integrity of arbitrary interphase cell populations. Thus, cytogenetics is no longer limited in its application to dividing cells, which is a great step forward for brain research.

  8. Chromosomal Abnormalties with Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between specific chromosome abnormalties and various epilepsies was investigated by a study of 76 patients’ records obtained by questionnaires distributed to members of Kyoto Multi-institutional Study Group of Pediatric Neurology.

  9. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  10. Pure distal 11q deletion without additional genomic imbalances in a female infant with Jacobsen syndrome and a de novo unbalanced reciprocal translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C-P; Lin, S-P; Hsu, C-H; Chern, S-R; Su, J-W; Chen, Y-J; Pan, C-W; Wang, W

    2012-01-01

    We report a neonate with pure deletion of distal 11q (11q23.3-->qter) and Jacobsen syndrome. The patient had growth restriction, petechiae, thrombocytopenia, dilation of renal pelvis, congenital heart defects, and seizures. Array comparative genomic hybridization revealed a 15.8-Mb deletion from 11q23.3 to 11q25 without genomic imbalances in other chromosomes. Cytogenetic analysis revealed a karyotype of 46,XX,der(7)(7pter-->7q32),der(11)(11pter--> 11q23.3::7q32-->7qter). The parental karyotypes were normal. This is the first report of pure distal 11q deletion without additional genomic imbalances in a patient with Jacobsen syndrome and a de novo unbalanced reciprocal translocation.

  11. Epigenetics and autoimmune diseases: the X chromosome-nucleolus nexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Wesley H; Renaudineau, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur more often in females, suggesting a key role for the X chromosome. X chromosome inactivation, a major epigenetic feature in female cells that provides dosage compensation of X-linked genes to avoid overexpression, presents special vulnerabilities that can contribute to the disease process. Disruption of X inactivation can result in loss of dosage compensation with expression from previously sequestered genes, imbalance of gene products, and altered endogenous material out of normal epigenetic context. In addition, the human X has significant differences compared to other species and these differences can contribute to the frequency and intensity of the autoimmune disease in humans as well as the types of autoantigens encountered. Here a link is demonstrated between autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, and the X chromosome by discussing cases in which typically non-autoimmune disorders complicated with X chromosome abnormalities also present lupus-like symptoms. The discussion is then extended to the reported spatial and temporal associations of the inactive X chromosome with the nucleolus. When frequent episodes of cellular stress occur, the inactive X chromosome may be disrupted and inadvertently become involved in the nucleolar stress response. Development of autoantigens, many of which are at least transiently components of the nucleolus, is then described. Polyamines, which aid in nucleoprotein complex assembly in the nucleolus, increase further during cell stress, and appear to have an important role in the autoimmune disease process. Autoantigenic endogenous material can potentially be stabilized by polyamines. This presents a new paradigm for autoimmune diseases: that many are antigen-driven and the autoantigens originate from altered endogenous material due to episodes of cellular stress that disrupt epigenetic control. This suggests that epigenetics and the X chromosome are important aspects of autoimmune

  12. Activation of X Chromosome Inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Maduro (Cheryl)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractIn mammals, males are the heterogametic sex having an X chromosome and a Y chromosome whereas females have two X chromosomes. Despite originating from an ancient homologous autosomal pair, the X and Y chromosome now differ greatly in size and gene content after ~180 MY of evolution.

  13. Modified Mahalanobis Taguchi System for Imbalance Data Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud El-Banna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mahalanobis Taguchi System (MTS is considered one of the most promising binary classification algorithms to handle imbalance data. Unfortunately, MTS lacks a method for determining an efficient threshold for the binary classification. In this paper, a nonlinear optimization model is formulated based on minimizing the distance between MTS Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC curve and the theoretical optimal point named Modified Mahalanobis Taguchi System (MMTS. To validate the MMTS classification efficacy, it has been benchmarked with Support Vector Machines (SVMs, Naive Bayes (NB, Probabilistic Mahalanobis Taguchi Systems (PTM, Synthetic Minority Oversampling Technique (SMOTE, Adaptive Conformal Transformation (ACT, Kernel Boundary Alignment (KBA, Hidden Naive Bayes (HNB, and other improved Naive Bayes algorithms. MMTS outperforms the benchmarked algorithms especially when the imbalance ratio is greater than 400. A real life case study on manufacturing sector is used to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed model and to compare its performance with Mahalanobis Genetic Algorithm (MGA.

  14. Genomic Landscape Established by Allelic Imbalance in the Cancerization Field of a Normal Appearing Airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubek, Yasminka; Lang, Wenhua; Vattathil, Selina; Garcia, Melinda; Xu, Li; Huang, Lili; Yoo, Suk-Young; Shen, Li; Lu, Wei; Chow, Chi-Wan; Weber, Zachary; Davies, Gareth; Huang, Jing; Behrens, Carmen; Kalhor, Neda; Moran, Cesar; Fujimoto, Junya; Mehran, Reza; El-Zein, Randa; Swisher, Stephen G; Wang, Jing; Fowler, Jerry; Spira, Avrum E; Ehli, Erik A; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Scheet, Paul; Kadara, Humam

    2016-07-01

    Visually normal cells adjacent to, and extending from, tumors of the lung may carry molecular alterations characteristics of the tumor itself, an effect referred to as airway field of cancerization. This airway field has been postulated as a model for early events in lung cancer pathogenesis. Yet the genomic landscape of somatically acquired molecular alterations in airway epithelia of lung cancer patients has remained unknown. To begin to fill this void, we sought to comprehensively characterize the genomic architecture of chromosomal alterations inducing allelic imbalance (AI) in the airway field of the most common type of lung tumors, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To do so, we conducted a genome-wide survey of multiple spatially distributed normal-appearing airways, multiregion tumor specimens, and uninvolved normal tissues or blood from 45 patients with early-stage NSCLC. We detected alterations in airway epithelia from 22 patients, with an increased frequency in NSCLCs of squamous histology. Our data also indicated a spatial gradient of AI in samples at closer proximity to the NSCLC. Chromosome 9 displayed the highest levels of AI and comprised recurrent independent events. Furthermore, the airway field AI included oncogenic gains and tumor suppressor losses in known NSCLC drivers. Our results demonstrate that genome-wide AI is common in the airway field of cancerization, providing insights into early events in the pathogenesis of NSCLC that may comprise targets for early treatment and chemoprevention. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3676-83. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gevers Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an open question to what extent the two chromosomes themselves share a common history since their formation. Results Single copy genes from each chromosome (142 genes from chromosome I and 42 genes from chromosome II were identified from 19 sequenced Vibrionales genomes and their phylogenetic comparison suggests consistent phylogenies for each chromosome. Additionally, study of the gene organization and phylogeny of the respective origins of replication confirmed the shared history. Conclusions Thus, while elements within the chromosomes may have experienced significant genetic mobility, the backbones share a common history. This allows conclusions based on multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA for one chromosome to be applied equally to both chromosomes.

  16. KNEE ISOKINETIC TORQUE IMBALANCE IN FEMALE FUTSAL PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina de Mello Alves Rodrigues

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: The specificity of sports training can lead to muscle specialization with a possible change in the natural hamstring/quadriceps torque ratio (HQ ratio, constituting a risk factor for muscle injury at the joint angles in which muscle imbalance may impair dynamic stability. Objective: The aim was to evaluate the torque distribution of the hamstrings and quadriceps and the HQ ratio throughout the range of motion in order to identify possible muscle imbalances at the knee of female futsal athletes. Methods: Nineteen amateur female futsal athletes had their dominant limb HQ ratio evaluated in a series of five maximum repetitions of flexion/extension of the knee at 180°/second in the total joint range of motion (30° to 80°. The peak flexor and extensor torque and the HQ ratio (% were compared each 5° of knee motion using one-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test (p<0.05 to determine the joint angles that present muscular imbalance. Results: Quadriceps torque was higher than 50° to 60° of knee flexion, while hamstrings torque was higher than 55° to 65°. The HQ ratio presented lower values than 30° to 45° of knee flexion and four athletes presented values lower than 60%, which may represent a risk of injury. However, the HQ ratio calculated by the peak torque showed only one athlete with less than 60%. Conclusion: The HQ ratio analyzed throughout the knee range of motion allowed identifying muscle imbalance at specific joint angles in female futsal players.

  17. Evidence for charge imbalance waves in phase-slip centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadin, A. M.; Varmazis, C.; Lukens, J. E.

    1981-08-01

    We have examined the I-V characteristics of superconducting phase-slip centers (PSCs) located in the middle of narrow In channels. Features in dV/dI can be associated with resonances in charge imbalance waves driven by the PSC, as suggested by the model of Kadin, Smith and Skocpol. The velocity and temperature dependence of the waves thus inferred are in rough accord with theoretical predictions.

  18. Analysis of Regional Imbalance of E-commerce in China

    OpenAIRE

    Wenjing Cai; Wei Song; ShuLiang Zhao

    2013-01-01

    With the rapid development of knowledge economy in the 21st century, e-commerce is undoubtedly a more popular topic, with high efficiency and low cost in all areas. However, regional imbalance of e-commerce is a new problem in China. In this paper, we present an explanation from eight perspectives to analyze the causes of this phenomenon: economic level, Internet penetration, government policy, credit system, logistics, enterprise participation, talent, and customers’ attitude. Based on analy...

  19. Intratumour diversity of chromosome copy numbers in neuroblastoma mediated by on-going chromosome loss from a polyploid state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Gisela; Jin, Yuesheng; Sehic, Daniel; Øra, Ingrid; Versteeg, Rogier; Gisselsson, David

    2013-01-01

    Neuroblastomas (NBs) are tumours of the sympathetic nervous system accounting for 8-10% of paediatric cancers. NBs exhibit extensive intertumour genetic heterogeneity, but their extent of intratumour genetic diversity has remained unexplored. We aimed to assess intratumour genetic variation in NBs with a focus on whole chromosome changes and their underlying mechanism. Allelic ratios obtained by SNP-array data from 30 aneuploid primary NBs and NB cell lines were used to quantify the size of clones harbouring specific genomic imbalances. In 13 cases, this was supplemented by fluorescence in situ hybridisation to assess copy number diversity in detail. Computer simulations of different mitotic segregation errors, single cell cloning, analysis of mitotic figures, and time lapse imaging of dividing NB cells were used to infer the most likely mechanism behind intratumour variation in chromosome number. Combined SNP array and FISH analyses showed that all cases exhibited higher inter-cellular copy number variation than non-neoplastic control tissue, with up to 75% of tumour cells showing non-modal chromosome copy numbers. Comparisons of copy number profiles, resulting from simulations of different segregation errors to genomic profiles of 120 NBs indicated that loss of chromosomes from a tetraploid state was more likely than other mechanisms to explain numerical aberrations in NB. This was supported by a high frequency of lagging chromosomes at anaphase and polyploidisation events in growing NB cells. The dynamic nature of numerical aberrations was corroborated further by detecting substantial copy number diversity in cell populations grown from single NB cells. We conclude that aneuploid NBs typically show extensive intratumour chromosome copy number diversity, and that this phenomenon is most likely explained by continuous loss of chromosomes from a polyploid state.

  20. Intratumour diversity of chromosome copy numbers in neuroblastoma mediated by on-going chromosome loss from a polyploid state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Lundberg

    Full Text Available Neuroblastomas (NBs are tumours of the sympathetic nervous system accounting for 8-10% of paediatric cancers. NBs exhibit extensive intertumour genetic heterogeneity, but their extent of intratumour genetic diversity has remained unexplored. We aimed to assess intratumour genetic variation in NBs with a focus on whole chromosome changes and their underlying mechanism. Allelic ratios obtained by SNP-array data from 30 aneuploid primary NBs and NB cell lines were used to quantify the size of clones harbouring specific genomic imbalances. In 13 cases, this was supplemented by fluorescence in situ hybridisation to assess copy number diversity in detail. Computer simulations of different mitotic segregation errors, single cell cloning, analysis of mitotic figures, and time lapse imaging of dividing NB cells were used to infer the most likely mechanism behind intratumour variation in chromosome number. Combined SNP array and FISH analyses showed that all cases exhibited higher inter-cellular copy number variation than non-neoplastic control tissue, with up to 75% of tumour cells showing non-modal chromosome copy numbers. Comparisons of copy number profiles, resulting from simulations of different segregation errors to genomic profiles of 120 NBs indicated that loss of chromosomes from a tetraploid state was more likely than other mechanisms to explain numerical aberrations in NB. This was supported by a high frequency of lagging chromosomes at anaphase and polyploidisation events in growing NB cells. The dynamic nature of numerical aberrations was corroborated further by detecting substantial copy number diversity in cell populations grown from single NB cells. We conclude that aneuploid NBs typically show extensive intratumour chromosome copy number diversity, and that this phenomenon is most likely explained by continuous loss of chromosomes from a polyploid state.

  1. Systemic Redox Imbalance in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantina P. Poulianiti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD experience imbalance between oxygen reactive species (ROS production and antioxidant defenses leading to cell and tissue damage. However, it remains unclear at which stage of renal insufficiency the redox imbalance becomes more profound. The aim of this systematic review was to provide an update on recent advances in our understanding of how the redox status changes in the progression of renal disease from predialysis stages 1 to 4 to end stage 5 and whether the various treatments and dialysis modalities influence the redox balance. A systematic review was conducted searching PubMed and Scopus by using the Cochrane and PRISMA guidelines. In total, thirty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Even from an early stage, imbalance in redox status is evident and as the kidney function worsens it becomes more profound. Hemodialysis therapy per se seems to negatively influence the redox status by the elevation of lipid peroxidation markers, protein carbonylation, and impairing erythrocyte antioxidant defense. However, other dialysis modalities do not so far appear to confer advantages. Supplementation with antioxidants might assist and should be considered as an early intervention to halt premature atherogenesis development at an early stage of CKD.

  2. Money and age in schools: Bullying and power imbalances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaux, Enrique; Castellanos, Melisa

    2015-05-01

    School bullying continues to be a serious problem around the world. Thus, it seems crucial to clearly identify the risk factors associated with being a victim or a bully. The current study focused in particular on the role that age and socio-economic differences between classmates could play on bullying. Logistic and multilevel analyses were conducted using data from 53,316 5th and 9th grade students from a representative sample of public and private Colombian schools. Higher age and better family socio-economic conditions than classmates were risk factors associated with being a bully, while younger age and poorer socio-economic conditions than classmates were associated with being a victim of bullying. Coming from authoritarian families or violent neighborhoods, and supporting beliefs legitimizing aggression, were also associated with bullying and victimization. Empathy was negatively associated with being a bully, and in some cases positively associated with being a victim. The results highlight the need to take into account possible sources of power imbalances, such as age and socio-economic differences among classmates, when seeking to prevent bullying. In particular, interventions focused on peer group dynamics might contribute to avoid power imbalances or to prevent power imbalances from becoming power abuse. Aggr. Behav. 41:280-293, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Positional Nystagmus in Patients Evaluated for Dizziness and Imbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Roberts

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is variability in the literature regarding the presence of positional nystagmus in healthy participants with reportedly normal vestibular and central nervous system function. This ranges from 7.5% to 88% and raises an important clinical question. If 88% of healthy participants have positional nystagmus then how is the clinician to interpret the presence of positional nystagmus in a patient presenting with dizziness and/or disequilibrium? The primary purpose of this investigation was to examine the prevalence and characteristics of positional nystagmus in patients evaluated specifically for dizziness and imbalance. Data was collected using retrospective chart review. 200 charts were randomly selected from all patients seen for evaluation of dizziness and imbalance over a period of eight months. Clinicians independently reviewed the data from positional testing for each chart. Nystagmus was present if there was a clear slow and fast phase component and there were three beats in a 10 s time window. Nystagmus direction and intensity data were collected. Results indicate positional nystagmus is present in 10.5% to 21% of patients evaluated for dizziness and imbalance. Use of liberal criteria for determining presence of positional nystagmus (i.e., 3 beats in 20 sec may account for higher prevalence rates across other studies.

  4. Yule-generated trees constrained by node imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disanto, Filippo; Schlizio, Anna; Wiehe, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    The Yule process generates a class of binary trees which is fundamental to population genetic models and other applications in evolutionary biology. In this paper, we introduce a family of sub-classes of ranked trees, called Ω-trees, which are characterized by imbalance of internal nodes. The degree of imbalance is defined by an integer 0 ≤ ω. For caterpillars, the extreme case of unbalanced trees, ω = 0. Under models of neutral evolution, for instance the Yule model, trees with small ω are unlikely to occur by chance. Indeed, imbalance can be a signature of permanent selection pressure, such as observable in the genealogies of certain pathogens. From a mathematical point of view it is interesting to observe that the space of Ω-trees maintains several statistical invariants although it is drastically reduced in size compared to the space of unconstrained Yule trees. Using generating functions, we study here some basic combinatorial properties of Ω-trees. We focus on the distribution of the number of subtrees with two leaves. We show that expectation and variance of this distribution match those for unconstrained trees already for very small values of ω. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Imbalance between abstract and concrete repetitive thinking modes in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurage, Pierre; Philippot, Pierre; Grynberg, Delphine; Leleux, Dominique; Delatte, Benoît; Mangelinckx, Camille; Belge, Jan-Baptist; Constant, Eric

    2017-10-01

    Repetitive thoughts can be divided in two modes: abstract/analytic (decontextualized and dysfunctional) and concrete/experiential (problem-focused and adaptive). They constitute a transdiagnostic process involved in many psychopathological states but have received little attention in schizophrenia, as earlier studies only indexed increased ruminations (related to dysfunctional repetitive thoughts) without jointly exploring both modes. This study explored the two repetitive thinking modes, beyond ruminations, to determine their imbalance in schizophrenia. Thirty stabilized patients with schizophrenia and 30 matched controls completed the Repetitive Response Scale and the Mini Cambridge-Exeter Repetitive Thought Scale, both measuring repetitive thinking modes. Complementary measures related to schizophrenic symptomatology, depression and anxiety were also conducted. Compared to controls, patients with schizophrenia presented an imbalance between repetitive thinking modes, with increased abstract/analytic and reduced concrete/experiential thoughts, even after controlling for comorbidities. Schizophrenia is associated with stronger dysfunctional repetitive thoughts (i.e. abstract thinking) and impaired ability to efficiently use repetitive thinking for current problem-solving (i.e. concrete thinking). This imbalance confirms the double-faced nature of repetitive thinking modes, whose influence on schizophrenia's symptomatology should be further investigated. The present results also claim for evaluating these processes in clinical settings and for rehabilitating the balance between opposite repetitive thinking modes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Consensus-based Distributed Control for Accurate Reactive, Harmonic and Imbalance Power Sharing in Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Jianguo; Kim, Sunghyok; Zhang, Huaguang

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the issue of accurate reactive, harmonic and imbalance power sharing in a microgrid. Harmonic and imbalance droop controllers are developed to proportionally share the harmonic power and the imbalance power among distributed generation (DG) units and improve the voltage qu...

  7. Prevalence and distribution of muscle-imbalance in the human body ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The phenomenon of muscle imbalance is pandemic, and may contribute to problems such as poor posture, low back pain. Significant is the fact that muscle imbalance may influence the motor patterning process. Key words: Muscle imbalance, low back pain, posture, malposture, withdrawal response. (Af. J. Physical, Health ...

  8. The Role of Grade Sensitivity in Explaining the Gender Imbalance in Undergraduate Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rask, Kevin; Tiefenthaler, Jill

    2008-01-01

    There is a gender imbalance in undergraduate economics departments with most departments educating a strong majority of young men. This imbalance has led many economists to ponder the question of why relatively few women choose to take courses and major in economics. Our hypothesis is that the gender imbalance in undergraduate economics,…

  9. Clinical characteristics in patients with interstitial deletions of chromosome region 12q21-q22 and identification of a critical region associated with keratosis pilaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Maawali, Almundher; Marshall, Christian R; Scherer, Stephen W; Dupuis, Lucie; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J

    2014-03-01

    We report on a male patient with a submicroscopic 1.21 Mb de novo deletion at 12q21.33-q22 with global developmental delay, characteristic facial features, and keratosis pilaris. Thus far, five other cases with a 12q de novo deletion including this segment have been reported; our case represents the smallest de novo deletion within this chromosome region. High resolution SNP microarray analysis showed a deletion of RefSeq genes BTG1 and LOC256021, and partial deletion of DCN. We propose that BTG1 is a critical gene for the development of the distinctive keratosis pilaris observed in patients with interstitial deletion of 12q21-q22, and suggest candidate genes that may contribute to dysmorphic features and global developmental delay. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. De novo dup p/del q or dup q/del p rearranged chromosomes: review of 104 cases of a distinct chromosomal mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, H; Domínguez, M G; Vásquez-Velásquez, A I; Lurie, I W

    2013-01-01

    We compiled 104 constitutional de novo or sporadic rearranged chromosomes mimicking recombinants from a parental pericentric inversion in order to comment on their occurrence and parental derivation, meiotic or postzygotic origin, mean parental ages, and underlying pathways. Chromosomes involved were 1-9, 13-18, 20-22, and X (64 autosomes and 40 X chromosomes). In the whole series, mean paternal and maternal ages in cases of paternal (proved or possible; n=29) or maternal (proved or possible; n=36) descent were 31.14 and 28.31 years, respectively. Rearranged X chromosomes appeared to be of paternal descent and to arise through intrachromosomal non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR), whereas rec-like autosomes were of either maternal or paternal origin and resulted from mechanisms proper of non-recurrent rearrangements. Except for some mosaic cases, most rearranged chromosomes apparently had a meiotic origin. Except for 8 rearranged X chromosomes transmitted maternally, all other cases compiled here were sporadic. Hence, the recurrence risk for sibs of propositi born to euploid parents is virtually zero, regardless of the imbalance's size. In brief, recombinant-like or rea chromosomes are not related to advanced parental age, may (chromosome X) or may not (autosomes) have a parent-of-origin bias, arise in meiosis or postzygotically, and appear to be mediated by NAHR, nonhomologous end joining, and telomere transposition. Because rearranged chromosomes 10, 11, and Y are also on record, albeit just in abstracts or listed in large series, we remark that all chromosomes can undergo this distinct rearrangement, even if it is still to be described for pairs 12 and 19. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Time-Variation of Imbalance of Order Book in Foreign Exchange Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueshige, Takumi; Kanazawa, Kiyoshi; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako

    The time-variation of the limit order book is studied in terms of the imbalance of the bid and ask sides for foreign exchange markets. We first introduce a set of variables quantifying the imbalance between the bid and ask orders, and study the probability distribution of the imbalance to show its time-variation. We also suggest an approximate Gaussian fit for the imbalance distributions for cross-sectional views. This result implies the localization tendency of the order book imbalance around the Gaussian peak.

  12. [Y chromosome and spermatogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravel, C; Siffroi, J-P

    2009-01-01

    Human Y chromosome evolution has progressively been directed towards a role in sex determination and reproduction. Cytogenetically visible structural abnormalities have determined long arm chromosomal regions which define the AZF factor that contains genes implicated in the spermatogenic process. By using molecular tools, the AZF factor has been subdivided into three loci, AZFa, b and c, the deletion of which leads to specific spermatogenesis impairments due to the loss of particular genes. Most AZF genes are specifically expressed in testis but their functions are far to be known precisely. Partial deletions of AZF regions have been described. Some of them have allowed to define more precise genotype-phenotype relationships whereas others are considered as variants in relation to Y chromosome polymorphism.

  13. Rapid high-resolution mapping of balanced chromosomal rearrangements on tiling CGH arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greisman, Harvey A; Hoffman, Noah G; Yi, Hye Son

    2011-11-01

    The diagnosis and classification of many cancers depends in part on the identification of large-scale genomic aberrations such as chromosomal deletions, duplications, and balanced translocations. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) can detect chromosomal imbalances on a genome-wide scale but cannot reliably identify balanced chromosomal rearrangements. We describe a simple modification of array CGH that enables simultaneous identification of recurrent balanced rearrangements and genomic imbalances on the same microarray. Using custom tiling oligonucleotide arrays and gene-specific linear amplification primers, translocation CGH (tCGH) maps balanced rearrangements to ∼100-base resolution and facilitates the rapid cloning and sequencing of novel rearrangement breakpoints. As proof of principle, we used tCGH to characterize nine of the most common gene fusions in mature B-cell neoplasms and myeloid leukemias. Because tCGH can be performed in any CGH-capable laboratory and can screen for multiple recurrent translocations and genome-wide imbalances, it should be of broad utility in the diagnosis and classification of various types of lymphomas, leukemias, and solid tumors. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cytogenetic and molecular analysis of male infertility: Y chromosome deletion during nonobstructive azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dada, Rima; Gupta, N P; Kucheria, K

    2006-01-01

    Reduced male fertility and subfertility can be caused by genetic factors that affect both germ cell development, differentiation, and function; in particular, chromosome abnormalities and Yq microdeletions are a possible cause of spermatogenetic impairment in males as shown by their higher frequency in infertile men than in the general male population. Microdeletion of the long arm of the Y chromosome (Yq) are associated with spermatogenic failure and have been used to define three regions on Yq (AZFa, AZFb, and AZFc) that are critical for germ cell development. With the advent of assisted reproductive technology and intracytoplasmic sperm injection, knowledge about the various factors leading to spermatogenic impairment is one of the most important aspects of scientific research. Therefore, this study was designed to identify the frequency of cytogenetic and submicroscopic interstitial deletions in azoospermia factor loci in infertile Indian males. One hundred and eighty males with nonobstructive oligozoospermia and azoospermia were included in this study. Semen analysis was done in each case to determine the spermatogenic status. Individuals were subjected to detailed clinical examination, family history, and endocrinological and cytogenetic study after consent from the patient. Peripheral blood cultures were set up according to standard protocols and 30 G-banded metaphases were analyzed in each case. Numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 40 infertile cases. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis was done in some cases to identify the percentage of mosaic cell lines and any cryptic or low-level mosaicism. Polymerase chain reaction microdeletion analysis was done in 140 cytogenetically normal cases. Of the 140 cases, 8 showed deletion of at least one of the sequence-tagged site markers. Review of literature has shown that the overall frequency of microdeletions varies from 1 to 55%. In the present study, the frequency of

  15. Policy and organizational implications of gender imbalance in the NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Karen

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to examine the policy and organizational implications of gender imbalance in management, which research suggests exists in the NHS. The research in this paper involved a qualitative approach with an analysis of elite interviews conducted with a non-random sample of officials involved in health policy and interviews with a random sample of senior managers in NHS Scotland. The research formed part of a larger study, which explored the enablers and inhibitors to female career progression in various Scottish sectors. The paper finds that gender imbalance in management exists in the NHS. This is manifested in a masculine organizational context, leadership and policy decision-making process, which have implications for female career advancement opportunities and subsequently access to macro policy decisions. The paper involved a sample (30 percent) of senior managers and examined policy processes in NHS Scotland. To improve the external validity of the findings further research should be conducted in NHS organizations in England and Wales. The findings in the paper suggest that gender imbalance in management and a masculine organizational context and leadership style within the NHS create a less than conducive environment for female employees. This has practical implications in terms of levels of part-time employment, career progression and attrition rates. The paper adds to the debate of gender and organizational studies by examining the health sector, which has high levels of female employment but low levels of female representation at senior management levels. The paper therefore adds to an often-neglected area of study, women in leadership and senior managerial positions. The paper is original in its approach by examining the micro and meso organizational dimensions which impact on women's ability to influence macro health policy.

  16. Compound heterozygosity of a paternal submicroscopic deletion and a maternal missense mutation in POR gene: Antley-bixler syndrome phenotype in three sibling fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzetis, Maria; Konstantinidou, Anastasia; Sofocleous, Christalena; Kosma, Konstantina; Mitrakos, Anastasios; Tzannatos, Christina; Kitsiou-Tzeli, Sofia

    2016-07-01

    Antley-Bixler syndrome (ABS) is an exceptionally rare craniosynostosis syndrome that can be accompanied by disordered steroidogenesis, and is mainly caused by mutations in the POR gene, inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Here we report the prenatal and postmortem findings of three sibling fetuses with ABS as a result of compound heterozygosity of a paternal submicroscopic deletion and a maternal missense mutation in the POR gene. Prenatal ultrasound and postmortem examination were performed in three sibling fetuses with termination of pregnancy at 22, 23, and 17 weeks of gestation, respectively. Molecular analysis of fetus 2 and 3 included (a) bidirectional sequencing of exon 8 of the POR gene after amplification of the specific locus by polymerase chain reaction, to detect single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and (b) high resolution comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) positive single nucleotide polymorphism array CGH (aCGH) analysis to detect copy number variants (CNVs), copy neutral areas of loss of heterozygosity and uniparental disomy. The diagnosis of ABS was suggested by the postmortem examination findings. The combination of the POR gene molecular analysis and aCGH revealed a compound heterozygous genotype of a maternal SNV (p.A287P) and a paternal CNV (NC_000007.13:g.(?_75608488)_(75615534_?)del). To the best of our knowledge, these sibling fetuses add to the few reported cases of ABS, caused by a combination of a SNV and a CNV in the POR gene. The detailed description of the pathologic and radiographic findings of second trimester fetuses affected with ABS adds novel knowledge concerning the early ABS phenotype, in lack of previous relevant reports. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 106:536-541, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Is severe electrolyte imbalance a contraindication for heart transplant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir Mohammad Sadeghi, Mohsen; Behdad Mehr, Gholamreza; Mir Mohammad Sadeghi, Amir; Mir Mohammad Sadeghi, Pouya; Samani, Shahin; Mansourian, Soheila

    2012-02-01

    Owing to the increasing numbers of patients with end-stage congestive heart failure awaiting heart transplant and the limited number of suitable donor organs, a decrease in stringency of donor criteria has become widely accepted over the last decade. Here, we present a case of a heart donor with severe electrolyte imbalance, specifically severe hypokalemia, and severe hypernatremia. Despite this, heart transplant was a success, and the recipient was discharged from the hospital in good general condition. We recommend further study of this issue with a larger sample size.

  18. Western Interconnection Energy Imbalance Market Status and Prospects (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; King, J.; Beuning, S.

    2011-10-01

    This presentation describes how a new wholesale electricity market for energy imbalance ancillary services could be implemented and operated. Some conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Method for calculating additional reserve requirements due to wind and solar production; (2) EIM results in substantial reduction in reserves requirements and ramping demand; (3) Reduced participation reduces benefits for all but reduces the benefits to non-participants the most; (4) Full participation leads to maximum benefit across the Western Interconnection, up to 42% of total reserve requirement; and (5) Regional EIM implementations have smaller but substantial benefits.

  19. New Y chromosomes and early stages of sex chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... [Traut W. 2010 New Y chromosomes and early stages of sex chromosome differentiation: sex determination in Megaselia. J. Genet. 89, ..... Schultheis C., Böhne A., Schartl M., Volff J. and Galiana-Arnoux D. 2009 Sex determination diversity and sex chromosome evolution in poeciliid fish. Sex. Dev. 3, 68–77 ...

  20. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The organization of chromosomes, the structure and function of genes and the role of genetic mutations in diseases continue to be an area of intense scientific investigation. The size of an ... 39 years, while Mendel formulated his laws of inheritance 130 years ago ..... Harper International edition, Harper and Row, New York.

  1. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a gene located on the X chromosome is expressed in males more often than in females? For most genes ..... Disease results in light sensitive skin lesions, fragile skin due to deficiency of uroporphyrinogen dicarboxylase, an enzyme involved in biosynthesis of ... Aufwomall'SctlSSlve protein. PX MPl Zellweger syndrome (ZS).

  2. The Y Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Y chromosome is of great interest to students and can be used to teach about many important biological concepts in addition to sex determination. This paper discusses mutation, recombination, mammalian sex determination, sex determination in general, and the evolution of sex determination in mammals. It includes a student activity that…

  3. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 3. Know Your Chromosomes The Strong Holds of Family Trees. Vani Brahmachari. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 3 March 1996 pp 30-38. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  4. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 1. Know Your Chromosomes Nature's Way of Packing Genes. Vani Brahmachari. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 1 January 1996 pp 40-47. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. Electochemical detection of chromosome translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dimaki, Maria; Silahtaroglu, Asli

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetics is a study of the cell structure with a main focus on chromosomes content and their structure. Chromosome abnormalities, such as translocations may cause various genetic disorders and heametological malignancies. Chromosome translocations are structural rearrangements of two...... chromosomes that results in formation of derivative chromosomes with a mixed DNA sequence. The method currently used for their detection is Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization, which requires a use of expensive, fluorescently labeled probes that target the derivative chromosomes. We present here a double...... hybridization approach developed for label-free detection of the chromosome translocations. For specific translocation detection it is necessary to determine that the two DNA sequences forming a derivative chromosome are connected, which is achieved by two subsequent hybridization steps. The electrochemical...

  6. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murnane, John P., E-mail: jmurnane@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143-1331 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The ends of chromosomes are composed of a short repeat sequence and associated proteins that together form a cap, called a telomere, that keeps the ends from appearing as double-strand breaks (DSBs) and prevents chromosome fusion. The loss of telomeric repeat sequences or deficiencies in telomeric proteins can result in chromosome fusion and lead to chromosome instability. The similarity between chromosome rearrangements resulting from telomere loss and those found in cancer cells implicates telomere loss as an important mechanism for the chromosome instability contributing to human cancer. Telomere loss in cancer cells can occur through gradual shortening due to insufficient telomerase, the protein that maintains telomeres. However, cancer cells often have a high rate of spontaneous telomere loss despite the expression of telomerase, which has been proposed to result from a combination of oncogene-mediated replication stress and a deficiency in DSB repair in telomeric regions. Chromosome fusion in mammalian cells primarily involves nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which is the major form of DSB repair. Chromosome fusion initiates chromosome instability involving breakage-fusion-bridge (B/F/B) cycles, in which dicentric chromosomes form bridges and break as the cell attempts to divide, repeating the process in subsequent cell cycles. Fusion between sister chromatids results in large inverted repeats on the end of the chromosome, which amplify further following additional B/F/B cycles. B/F/B cycles continue until the chromosome acquires a new telomere, most often by translocation of the end of another chromosome. The instability is not confined to a chromosome that loses its telomere, because the instability is transferred to the chromosome donating a translocation. Moreover, the amplified regions are unstable and form extrachromosomal DNA that can reintegrate at new locations. Knowledge concerning the factors promoting telomere loss and its consequences is

  7. [Dicentric Y chromosome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmoula, N Bouayed; Amouri, A

    2005-01-01

    Dicentric Y chromosomes are the most common Y structural abnormalities and their influence on gonadal and somatic development is extremely variable. Here, we report the third comprehensive review of the literature concerning dicentric Y chromosomes reported since 1994. We find 78 new cases for which molecular studies (PCR or FISH) have been widely applied to investigate SRY (68% of cases), GBY, ZFY, RFS4Y, GCY and different genes at AZF region. For dic(Yq), all cases (n = 20) were mosaic for 45,X and 4 of them were also mosaic for a 46,XY cell line. When breakpoints were available (15/20 cases), they were in Yp11. 50% of cases were phenotypic female and 20% phenotypic male while 20% of cases were reported with gonadal dysgenesis. Gonadal histology was defined in 8 cases but only in one case, gonadal tissu was genetically investigated because of gonadoblastoma. For dic(Yp) (n = 55), mosaicism concerned only 45,X cell line and was found in 50 cases while the remainder five cases were homogeneous. When breakpoints were available, it was at Yq11 in 50 cases and at Yq12 in two cases. 54% of cases were phenotypic female, 26% were phenotypic male and 18% were associated with genitalia ambiguous. SRY was analyzed in 33 cases, sequenced in 9 cases and was muted in only one case. Gonads were histologically explored in 34 cases and genetically investigated in 8 cases. Gonadoblastoma was found in only two cases. Through this review, it seems that phenotype-genotype correlations are still not possible and that homogeneous studies of dic(Y) in more patients using molecular tools for structural characterization of the rearranged Y chromosome and assessment of mosaicism in many organs are necessary to clarify the basis of the phenotypic heterogeneity of dicentric Y chromosomes and then to help phenotypic prediction of such chromosome rearrangement.

  8. Hypobaric Hypoxia Imbalances Mitochondrial Dynamics in Rat Brain Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushbu Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain is predominantly susceptible to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction during hypobaric hypoxia, and therefore undergoes neurodegeneration due to energy crisis. Evidences illustrate a high degree of association for mitochondrial fusion/fission imbalance and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial fusion/fission is a recently reported dynamic mechanism which frequently occurs among cellular mitochondrial network. Hence, the study investigated the temporal alteration and involvement of abnormal mitochondrial dynamics (fusion/fission along with disturbed mitochondrial functionality during chronic exposure to hypobaric hypoxia (HH. The Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to simulated high altitude equivalent to 25000 ft for 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. Mitochondrial morphology, distribution within neurons, enzyme activity of respiratory complexes, Δψm, ADP: ATP, and expression of fission/fusion key proteins were determined. Results demonstrated HH induced alteration in mitochondrial morphology by damaged, small mitochondria observed in neurons with disturbance of mitochondrial functionality and reduced mitochondrial density in neuronal processes manifested by excessive mitochondrial fragmentation (fission and decreased mitochondrial fusion as compared to unexposed rat brain hippocampus. The study suggested that imbalance in mitochondrial dynamics is one of the noteworthy mechanisms occurring in hippocampal neurons during HH insult.

  9. Quantification of the effect of energy imbalance on bodyweight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kevin D; Sacks, Gary; Chandramohan, Dhruva; Chow, Carson C; Wang, Y Claire; Gortmaker, Steven L; Swinburn, Boyd A

    2013-01-01

    Obesity interventions can result in weight loss, but accurate prediction of the bodyweight time course requires properly accounting for dynamic energy imbalances. In this report, we describe a mathematical modelling approach to adult human metabolism that simulates energy expenditure adaptations during weight loss. We also present a web-based simulator for prediction of weight change dynamics. We show that the bodyweight response to a change of energy intake is slow, with half times of about 1 year. Furthermore, adults with greater adiposity have a larger expected weight loss for the same change of energy intake, and to reach their steady-state weight will take longer than it would for those with less initial body fat. Using a population-averaged model, we calculated the energy-balance dynamics corresponding to the development of the US adult obesity epidemic. A small persistent average daily energy imbalance gap between intake and expenditure of about 30 kJ per day underlies the observed average weight gain. However, energy intake must have risen to keep pace with increased expenditure associated with increased weight. The average increase of energy intake needed to sustain the increased weight (the maintenance energy gap) has amounted to about 0·9 MJ per day and quantifies the public health challenge to reverse the obesity epidemic. PMID:21872751

  10. Convulsion following gastroenteritis in children without severe electrolyte imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorashi, Ziaaedin; Nezami, Nariman; Soltani-Ahari, Hassan; Ghorashi, Sona

    2010-01-01

    Three to five million children from among one billion with gastroenteritis die annually worldwide. The etiologic agent in developed countries is viral in 15-60% of cases, while in developing countries, bacteria and parasites are frequently reported as the etiologic factors. Neurologic signs including convulsion are seen in some cases of diarrhea. This study aimed to investigate the etiology, risk factors and short-term prognosis of gastroenteritis with convulsion. During a case-control study, 100 patients with gastroenteritis were enrolled into the case and control groups on the basis of convulsion or no convulsion development, respectively. This study was conducted in Tabriz Children's Hospital from March 2004 to March 2007. The age of patients ranged from 2 months to 7 years, and the groups were age- and sex-matched. Body temperature (BT), severity and type of dehydration, stool exam and culture, past history of convulsion in the patient and first-degree relatives, electrolyte imbalance, and short-term prognosis were studied and compared. The mean weight of groups was not different, while the frequency of fever at the time of admission, past history of febrile convulsion in first-degree relatives and severity of dehydration were significantly higher in the case group (p electrolyte imbalance was observed in patients with gastroenteritis experiencing febrile convulsion.

  11. Gender equity imbalance in electrocardiology: A call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke Whalen, E; Xu, G; Cygankiewicz, I; Bacharova, L; Zareba, W; Steinberg, J S; Tereshchenko, L G; Baranchuk, A

    Despite the increasing number of women entering the medical profession, senior positions and academic productivity in many fields of medicine remain to be men dominated. We explored gender equity in electrocardiology as perceived by recent academic productivity and also active participation (presidencies and board constituents) in both the International Society of Electrocardiology (ISE) and the International Society for Holter and Noninvasive Electrocardiology (ISHNE). Academic productivity was measured by authorship (first and senior) in the Journal of Electrocardiology (JECG) and the Annals of Noninvasive Electrocardiology (ANE) in 2015. The percentage of women ISE and ISHNE Presidents was 5.6% and 0%, respectively. Current women board constituents for each society was 12.1% for ISE, and 9.4% for ISHNE. JECG articles published in 2015 had considerably less women compared to men for both senior (16.3%) and first (25.3%) authorship. ANE articles published in 2015 followed the same trends in gender, having less women compared to men for both senior (9.4%) and first (19.3%) authorship. There is a gender equity imbalance in the field of Electrocardiology. Identifying a gender imbalance is important for understanding reasons behind these trends, and may also help improve gender equity in Electrocardiology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of intestinal flora imbalance in pathogenesis of pouchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiao-Bo; Jiang, Jun; Li, Min; Wang, Gang; You, Jin-Wei; Zuo, Jian

    2016-08-01

    To discuss the role of intestinal flora imbalance in the pathogenesis of pouchitis. The pouchitis rat model was established and the faeces sample and the mucous membrane sample were collected regularly, in which the bacterial nucleic acids were extracted for quantitative analysis of the intestinal flora in the samples through using the real-time quantitative PCR technique and high energy sequencing technology. The disorder phenomenon of the intestinal flora appeared at the 7th day of the experiment, and the pouchitis was presented at the 21st day of the experiment. At the 31st day of the experiment, compared to control group and non-pouchitis group, the quantity of Bifidobacterium and the Lactobacillus of the pouchitis model rats in the mucous membrane sample and the faeces sample were significantly decreased (P flora in the mucous membrane of pouchitis, the bacterial diversity of non-pouchitis group and control group was significantly higher than that of the pouchitis group (P intestinal flora imbalance is one of the factors that cause the incidence of the pouchitis; this study provides a clue of the pathogenesis and treatment direction of the intestinal inflammatory disease. Copyright © 2016 Hainan Medical College. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular karyotyping by array CGH in a Russian cohort of children with intellectual disability, autism, epilepsy and congenital anomalies

    OpenAIRE

    Iourov Ivan Y; Vorsanova Svetlana G; Kurinnaia Oxana S; Zelenova Maria A; Silvanovich Alexandra P; Yurov Yuri B

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) has been repeatedly shown to be a successful tool for the identification of genomic variations in a clinical population. During the last decade, the implementation of array CGH has resulted in the identification of new causative submicroscopic chromosome imbalances and copy number variations (CNVs) in neuropsychiatric (neurobehavioral) diseases. Currently, array-CGH-based technologies have become an integral part of molecular d...

  14. Evaluation of Breast Cancer Polyclonality by Combined Chromosome Banding and Comparative Genomic Hybridization Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel R. Teixeira

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetically unrelated clones have been detected by chromosome banding analysis in many breast carcinomas. Because these karyotypic studies were performed on short-term cultured samples, it may be argued that in vitro selection occurred or that small clones may have arisen during culturing. To address this issue, we analyzed 37 breast carcinomas by Gbanding and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH, a fluorescent in situ hybridization-based screening technique that does not require culturing or tumor metaphases. All but two of the 37 karyotypically abnormal cases presented copy number changes by CGH. The picture of genomic alterations revealed by the two techniques overlapped only partly. Sometimes the CGH analysis revealed genomic imbalances that belonged to cell populations not picked up by the cytogenetic analysis and in other cases, especially when the karyotypes had many markers and chromosomes with additional material of unknown origin, CGH gave a more reliable overall picture of the copy number gains and losses. However, besides sometimes revealing cell populations with balanced chromosome aberrations or unbalanced changes that nevertheless remained undetected by CGH, G-banding analysis was essential to understand how the genomic imbalances arose in the many cases in which both techniques detected the same clonal abnormalities. Furthermore, because CGH pictures only imbalances present in a significant proportion of the test sample, the very detection by this technique of imbalances belonging to apparently small, cytogenetically unrelated clones of cells proves that these clones must have been present in vivo. This constitutes compelling evidence that the cytogenetic polyclonality observed after short-term culturing of breast carcinomas is not an artifact.

  15. The chromosome cycle of prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Summary In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, chromosomal DNA undergoes replication, condensation-decondensation and segregation, sequentially, in some fixed order. Other conditions, like sister-chromatid cohesion (SCC), may span several chromosomal events. One set of these chromosomal transactions within a single cell cycle constitutes the “chromosome cycle”. For many years it was generally assumed that the prokaryotic chromosome cycle follows major phases of the eukaryotic one: -replication-condensation-segregation-(cell division)-decondensation-, with SCC of unspecified length. Eventually it became evident that, in contrast to the strictly consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes, all stages of the prokaryotic chromosome cycle run concurrently. Thus, prokaryotes practice “progressive” chromosome segregation separated from replication by a brief SCC, and all three transactions move along the chromosome at the same fast rate. In other words, in addition to replication forks, there are “segregation forks” in prokaryotic chromosomes. Moreover, the bulk of prokaryotic DNA outside the replication-segregation transition stays compacted. I consider possible origins of this concurrent replication-segregation and outline the “nucleoid administration” system that organizes the dynamic part of the prokaryotic chromosome cycle. PMID:23962352

  16. Chromosome 19 International Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pericak-Vance, M.A. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Medical Center); Ropers, H.H. (Univ. Hospital Nijmegen, (The Netherlands). Dept. of Human Genetics); Carrano, A.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1993-01-04

    The Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 19 was hosted on January 25 and 26, 1992, by the Department of Human Genetics, University Hospital Nijmegen, The Netherlands, at the 'Meerdal Conference Center'. The workshop was supported by a grant from the European Community obtained through HUGO, the Dutch Research Organization (NWO) and the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA). Travel support for American participants was provided by the Department of Energy. The goals of this workshop were to produce genetic, physical and integrated maps of chromosome 19, to identify inconsistencies and gaps, and to discuss and exchange resources and techniques available for the completion of these maps. The second day of the meeting was largely devoted to region or disease specific efforts. In particular, the meeting served as a platform for assessing and discussing the recent progress made into the molecular elucidation of myotonic dystrophy.

  17. The X chromosome in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jégu, Teddy; Aeby, Eric; Lee, Jeannie T

    2017-06-01

    Extensive 3D folding is required to package a genome into the tiny nuclear space, and this packaging must be compatible with proper gene expression. Thus, in the well-hierarchized nucleus, chromosomes occupy discrete territories and adopt specific 3D organizational structures that facilitate interactions between regulatory elements for gene expression. The mammalian X chromosome exemplifies this structure-function relationship. Recent studies have shown that, upon X-chromosome inactivation, active and inactive X chromosomes localize to different subnuclear positions and adopt distinct chromosomal architectures that reflect their activity states. Here, we review the roles of long non-coding RNAs, chromosomal organizational structures and the subnuclear localization of chromosomes as they relate to X-linked gene expression.

  18. (20-01) "Order Imbalances and Market Efficiency: Evidence from the Taiwan Stock Exchange"

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yi-Tsung; Liu, Yu-Jane; Roll, Richard; Subrahmanyam, Avanidhar

    2001-01-01

    Data from the Taiwan Stock Exchange identify the originator of each submitted order. We study order imbalances categorized by trade size and by investor type, (individuals, domestic institutions, foreign institutions.) Aggregate order imbalances for a given stock are positively autocorrelated from day to day. The persistence in order imbalances is strongest for small foreign institutions and weakest for large individual investors. All investor types are contrarian; they submit excess buy orde...

  19. Effects of specific muscle imbalance improvement training on the balance ability in elite fencers

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Taewhan; Kil, Sekee; Chung, Jinwook; Moon, Jeheon; Oh, Eunyoung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The lunge Motion that occurs frequently in fencing training and matches results in imbalance of the upper and lower limbs muscles. This research focuses on the improvement of the imbalance that occurs in the national team fencers of the Republic of Korea through specific muscle imbalance improvement training. [Subjects] The subjects of this research were limited to right-handed male fencers. Nine male, right-handed national fencing athletes were selected for this study (4 epee, 5 sa...

  20. X-autosome and X-Y translocations in female carriers: X-chromosome inactivation easily detectable by 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donat M

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Here we report one new case each of an X-autosome translocation (maternally derived, and an X-Y-chromosome translocation. Besides characterizing the involved breakpoints and/or imbalances in detail by molecular cyto-genetics, also skewed X-chromosome inactivation was determined on single cell level using 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU. Thus, we confirmed that the recently suggested EdU approach can be simply adapted for routine diagnostic use. The latter is important, as only by knowing the real pattern of the skewed X-chromosome inactivation, correct interpretation of obtained results and subsequent reliable genetic counseling, can be done.

  1. Efficient Compensation of Transmitter and Receiver IQ Imbalance in OFDM Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tandur Deepaknath

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radio frequency impairments such as in-phase/quadrature-phase (IQ imbalances can result in a severe performance degradation in direct-conversion architecture-based communication systems. In this paper, we consider the case of transmitter and receiver IQ imbalance together with frequency selective channel distortion. The proposed training-based schemes can decouple the compensation of transmitter and receiver IQ imbalance from the compensation of channel distortion in an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM systems. The presence of frequency selective channel fading is a requirement for the estimation of IQ imbalance parameters when both transmitter/receiver IQ imbalance are present. However, the proposed schemes are equally applicable over a frequency flat/frequency selective channel when either transmitter or only receiver IQ imbalance is present. Once the transmitter and receiver IQ imbalance parameters are estimated, a standard channel equalizer can be applied to estimate/compensate for the channel distortion. The proposed schemes result in an overall lower training overhead and a lower computational requirement, compared to the joint compensation of transmitter/receiver IQ imbalance and channel distortion. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed schemes provide a very efficient compensation with performance close to the ideal case without any IQ imbalance.

  2. Redox Imbalance and Viral Infections in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Limongi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are essential molecules for many physiological functions and act as second messengers in a large variety of tissues. An imbalance in the production and elimination of ROS is associated with human diseases including neurodegenerative disorders. In the last years the notion that neurodegenerative diseases are accompanied by chronic viral infections, which may result in an increase of neurodegenerative diseases progression, emerged. It is known in literature that enhanced viral infection risk, observed during neurodegeneration, is partly due to the increase of ROS accumulation in brain cells. However, the molecular mechanisms of viral infection, occurring during the progression of neurodegeneration, remain unclear. In this review, we discuss the recent knowledge regarding the role of influenza, herpes simplex virus type-1, and retroviruses infection in ROS/RNS-mediated Parkinson’s disease (PD, Alzheimer’s disease (AD, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS.

  3. Investigation of Global Imbalances Based on a Gravity Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Hoon Lee

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Using the US Treasury International Capital (TIC data, this paper attempts to analyze the size and trend of foreign investment in the U.S. in the form of equities, bonds and bank lending during the period of 2001-2007. In addition, this paper assesses the determinants of foreign investment in the U.S., using the financial gravity model which includes an East Asian dummy as an explanatory variable. The results show that most East Asian countries have invested more in the U.S. than the optimal level suggested by the gravity model. Such an over-investment is more evident in long-term bond investment than in equity investment or bank lending. Thus, the results confirm that global imbalance does exist between East Asian countries and the U.S.

  4. Quality control of reconstructed sagittal balance for sagittal imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kao-Wha; Leng, Xiangyang; Zhao, Wenhai; Ching-Wei, Cheng; Chen, Tsung-Chein; Chang, Ku-I; Chen, Yin-Yu

    2011-02-01

    Prospective radiographic study. To investigate the feasibility of controlling quality of reconstructed sagittal balance for sagittal imbalance. Patients with sagittal imbalance cannot walk or stand erect without overwork of musculature because of compromised biomechanical advantage. The result is muscle fatigue and activity-related pain. During reconstructive surgery, restoration of optimal sagittal balance is crucial for obtaining satisfactory clinical results. However, there is no way to control quality of reconstructed sagittal balance before or during surgery. A method was developed to determine the lumbosacral curve in a way that theoretically would bring sagittal balance to an ideal state by calculation and simulation for each patient before surgery and then template rods of the curve and a blueprint were made accordingly for operative procedures. Ninety-four consecutive patients with sagittal imbalance due to lumbar kyphosis were treated for intractable pain and then followed up for a mean of 4.3 years. Radiographs were analyzed before surgery, 2 months after surgery, and at most recent follow-up. The mean estimated values of L1-S1 lordosis, sacral inclination angle, sacrofemoral distance, and distribution of L1-S1 lordosis at the closing-opening wedge osteotomy site and L4-S1 segments were 30.8°, 24.6°, 0 mm, 16.1% (-5°), and 62% (-19°), respectively. The mean reconstructed values were 41.1°, 23.3°, 3.9 mm, 41% (-17°), and 46% (-19°), respectively. There were significant differences between estimated and reconstructed values of L1-S1 lordosis and the percentage of distributions; however, there was no significant difference between the estimated and reconstructed magnitude of L4-S1 lordosis, sacral inclination angle, and sacrofemoral distance. A properly oriented pelvis can be brought nearly directly above the hip axis. The mean sagittal global balance, represented by the distance between the vertical line through the hip axis and sacral promontory

  5. Wet cupping therapy restores sympathovagal imbalances in cardiac rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Müzeyyen; Yeşilçam, Nesibe; Aydin, Duygu; Yüksel, Ramazan; Dane, Senol

    2014-04-01

    A recent study showed that cupping had therapeutic effects in rats with myocardial infarction and cardiac arrhythmias. The current studyaimed to investigate the possible useful effects of cupping therapy on cardiac rhythm in terms of heart rate variability (HRV). Forty healthy participants were included. Classic wet cupping therapy was applied on five points of the back. Recording electrocardiography (to determine HRV) was applied 1 hour before and 1 hour after cupping therapy. All HRV parameters increased after cupping therapy compared with before cupping therapy in healthy persons. These results indicate for the first time in humans that cupping might be cardioprotective. In this study, cupping therapy restored sympathovagal imbalances by stimulating the peripheral nervous system.

  6. A case of myotonic dystrophy with electrolyte imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Weon-Jin; Kim, Kwang-Yeol; Kim, So-Mi; Hong, Seung-Jae; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Song, Ran; Yang, Hyung-In; Lee, Yeon-Ah

    2013-07-01

    Type 1 myotonic dystrophy (DM1) is an autosomal-dominant inherited disorder with a multisystem involvement, caused by an abnormal expansion of the CTG sequence of the dystrophic myotonia protein kinase (DMPK) gene. DM1 is a variable multisystem disorder with muscular and nonmuscular abnormalities. Increasingly, endocrine abnormalities, such as gonadal, pancreatic, and adrenal dysfunction are being reported. But, Electrolytes imbalance is a very rare condition in patients with DM1 yet. Herein we present a 42-yr-old Korean male of DM1 with abnormally elevated serum sodium and potassium. The patient had minimum volume of maximally concentrated urine without water loss. It was only cured by normal saline hydration. The cause of hypernatremia was considered by primary hypodipsia. Hyperkalemic conditions such as renal failure, pseudohyperkalemia, cortisol deficiency and hyperkalemic periodic paralysis were excluded. Further endocrine evaluation suggested selective hyperreninemic hypoaldosteronism as a cause of hyperkalemia.

  7. Depersonalization disorder may be related to glutamate receptor activation imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikwer, Andreas

    2011-10-01

    Low-dose ketamine administration mimics, both clinically and on gross neuroimaging, depersonalization disorder. The perceptual effects of ketamine may be due to secondary stimulation of glutamate release and lamotrigine, possibly by inhibited glutamate release, may reduce some of ketamine's so-called dissociative effects. However, lamotrigine does not seem to be useful in the treatment of depersonalization disorder. Glutamate release in prefrontal cortex is increased by subanaesthetic doses of ketamine, resulting in increased inhibition, possibly via intercalated GABAerg cells, of projections from amygdala, affecting structures critically involved in depersonalization. I speculate that, in depersonalization disorder, the increased glutamate activity in prefrontal cortex is due to intrinsic imbalance, resulting in long-term potentiation, at the postsynaptic glutamate receptors on the GABAerg interneurons while the same receptor abnormality at the synapses on the intercalated GABAerg cells of the amygdala result in long-term depression in the case of either normal or high glutamate release. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. FDI Inflows and Trade Imbalances: Evidence from Developing Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi Anh-Dao Tran

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper examines the effects of FDI inflows on external imbalances in the developing and transition countries in Asia during the period 1991-2011. To this end, we extend the conventional trade balance model by reformulating the determinants of exports and imports. Our empirical findings suggest that current FDI inflows increase trade deficits, leading to negative consequences for the host country’s macroeconomic stability. However, the coefficient estimated becomes negative when we lag the FDI variable, implying that FDI inflows worsen the trade balance first and then improve it. We also find that a real depreciation tends to worsen trade balances because the usual Marshall-Lerner constraint is magnified by the import content of exports. Lastly, higher domestic absorption and larger productive capacity in the manufacturing sector improve the trade balance. Thelatter result supports the export-investment nexus, one of the most distinctive features of Asia.

  9. Interaction between Current Imbalance and Magnetization in LHC Cables

    CERN Document Server

    Bottura, L; Kuijper, A; den Ouden, A; ten Haken, B; ten Kate, H H J

    2001-01-01

    The quality of the magnetic field in superconducting accelerator magnets is associated with the properties of the superconducting cable. Current imbalances due to coupling currents DI, as large as 100 A, are induced by spatial variations of the field sweep rate and contact resistances. During injection at a constant field all magnetic field components show a decay behavior. The decay is caused by a diffusion of coupling currents into the whole magnet. This results in a redistribution of the transport current among the strands and causes a demagnetization of the superconducting cable. As soon as the field is ramped up again after the end of injection, the magnetization rapidly recovers from the decay and follows the course of the original hysteresis curve. In order to clarify the interactions between the changes in current and magnetization during injection we performed a number of experiments. A magnetic field with a spatially periodic pattern was applied to a superconducting wire in order to simulate the cou...

  10. Genomic imbalances in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma identified by molecular cytogenetic techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilanda Ferreira Bellini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the chromosomal changes detected by molecular cytogenetic approaches in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC, the ninth most common malignancy in the world. Whole genome analyses of ESCC cell lines and tumors indicated that the most frequent genomic gains occurred at 1, 2q, 3q, 5p, 6p, 7, 8q, 9q, 11q, 12p, 14q, 15q, 16, 17, 18p, 19q, 20q, 22q and X, with focal amplifications at 1q32, 2p16-22, 3q25-28, 5p13-15.3, 7p12-22, 7q21-22, 8q23-24.2, 9q34, 10q21, 11p11.2, 11q13, 13q32, 14q13-14, 14q21, 14q31-32, 15q22-26, 17p11.2, 18p11.2-11.3 and 20p11.2. Recurrent losses involved 3p, 4, 5q, 6q, 7q, 8p, 9, 10p, 12p, 13, 14p, 15p, 18, 19p, 20, 22, Xp and Y. Gains at 5p and 7q, and deletions at 4p, 9p, and 11q were significant prognostic factors for patients with ESCC. Gains at 6p and 20p, and losses at 10p and 10q were the most significant imbalances, both in primary carcinoma and in metastases, which suggested that these regions may harbor oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Gains at 12p and losses at 3p may be associated with poor relapse-free survival. The clinical applicability of these changes as markers for the diagnosis and prognosis of ESCC, or as molecular targets for personalized therapy should be evaluated.

  11. Propensity to obesity impacts the neuronal response to energy imbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc-Andre eCornier

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms responsible for the propensity to gain weight or remain normal weight are poorly understood. The objective of this study was to study the neuronal response to visual food cues during short-term energy imbalance in healthy adults recruited as obesity-resistant (OR or obesity-prone (OP based on self-identification, BMI, and personal/family weight history. 25 OR and 28 OP subjects were studied in underfed (UF and overfed (OF as compared to eucaloric (EU conditions in a randomized crossover design. Each study phase included a 3 day run-in diet, 1 day of controlled feeding (basal energy needs for EU, 40% above/below basal energy needs for OF/UF, and a test day. On the test day fMRI was performed in the acute fed stated (30 minutes after a test meal while subjects viewed images of foods of high hedonic value and neutral non-food objects. Measures of appetite and hormones were also performed before and every 30 minutes after the test meal. UF was associated with significantly increased activation of insula, somatosensory cortex, inferior and medial prefrontal cortex, parahippocampus, precuneus, cingulate and visual cortex in OR. However, UF had no impact in OP. As a result, UF was associated with significantly greater activation, specifically in the insula, inferior prefrontal cortex, and somatosensory cortex in OR as compared to OP. While OF was overall associated with reduced activation of inferior visual cortex, no group interaction was observed with OF. In summary, these findings suggest that individuals resistant to weight gain and obesity are more sensitive to short-term energy imbalance, particularly with UF, than those prone to weight gain. The inability to sense or adapt to changes in energy balance may represent an important mechanism contributing to excess energy intake and risk for obesity.

  12. Chromosomal imbalances exclusively detected in invasive front area are associated with poor outcome in laryngeal carcinomas from different anatomical sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambrosio, Eliane Papa; Silveira, Cássia Gisele Terrassani; Drigo, Sandra Aparecida

    2013-01-01

    Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) is a malignant neoplasm exhibiting aggressive phenotype, high recurrence rate, and risk of developing second primary tumors. Current evidence suggests that cells in the invasive front of carcinomas have different molecular profiles compared to those in sup...

  13. Method for obtaining Chromosomes Method for obtaining Chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogart James P.

    1973-09-01

    Full Text Available It is very easy to obtain chromosomes from anuran amphibians.Amphibians have very large chromosomes which can easily be seen with an ordinary microscope. The method used has been tested in the laboratory and also at collecting sites. All that is required are a few chemicals and simple equipment.It is very easy to obtain chromosomes from anuran amphibians.Amphibians have very large chromosomes which can easily be seen with an ordinary microscope. The method used has been tested in the laboratory and also at collecting sites. All that is required are a few chemicals and simple equipment.

  14. Chromosome 7 Multiplication in EGFR-positive Lung Carcinomas Based on Tissue Microarray Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiambas, Evangelos; Mastronikolis, Nicholas S; Lefas, Alicia Y; Georgiannos, Stavros N; Ragos, Vasileios; Fotiades, Panagiotis P; Tsoukalas, Nikolaos; Kavantzas, Nikolaos; Karameris, Andreas; Peschos, Dimitrios; Patsouris, Efstratios; Syrigos, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) over-activation is observed in significant proportions of non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC). Our aim was to investigate the role of chromosome 7 multiplication with regard to its influence in EGFR expression, combined or not with gene amplification. Using tissue microarray technology, fifty (n=50) primary NSCLCs were cored and re-embedded into the final recipient block. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and also chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) were performed. EGFR expression at any level was detected in 40/50 (80%) cores. Over-expression was observed in 23/40 (57.5%) cases. Gene amplification was identified in 11/50 (22%) cases whereas chromosome 7 polysomy in 8/50 (16%) cases. Pure chromosome 7 multiplication alone led to low or moderate levels of expression. Overall EGFR expression was correlated with gene (p=0.001) and interestingly with chromosome 7 centromere numerical imbalances (p=0.004). EGFR expression is associated not only with amplification, but also with chromosome 7 centromere multiple copies. Chromosome 7 multiplication -due to centromere region amplification or true polysomy- is critical for applying monoclonal antibody targeted therapeutic strategies excluding the pure non-amplified cases. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  15. Y chromosome morphology of cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, W L; Upton, P C

    1979-11-01

    Metaphase chromosomes from cultured lymphocytes were prepared from 246 bulls including Bos indicus, Bos taurus. Bos (Bibos) banteng, Sanga and interspecific and intra-specific breed crosses. Morphology and karyotype position of the Y chromosome for each bull were noted. Karyotype position of the Y chromosome varied between bulls from 25th to 29th pair and the Y chromosomes of Bos indicus and breeds derived from Bos indicus bulls were acrocentric while those of Bos taurus, Sanga and breeds derived from these bulls were metacentric/submetacentric. Two forms of Y chromosome were noted in the Droughtmaster breed. C-banding patterns of the acrocentric Y chromosome were characteristic and enabled easy identification.

  16. Intraspecific chromosome variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Dubinin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available (Editorial preface. The publication is presented in order to remind us of one of dramatic pages of the history of genetics. It re-opens for the contemporary reader a comprehensive work marking the priority change from plant cytogenetics to animal cytogenetics led by wide population studies which were conducted on Drosophila polytene chromosomes. The year of the publication (1937 became the point of irretrievable branching between the directions of Old World and New World genetics connected with the problems of chromosome variability and its significance for the evolution of the species. The famous book of T. Dobzhansky (1937 was published by Columbia University in the US under the title “Genetics and the origin of species”, and in the shadow of this American ‘skybuilding’ all other works grew dim. It is remarkable that both Dobzhansky and Dubinin come to similar conclusions about the role of chromosomes in speciation. This is not surprising given that they both might be considered as representatives of the Russian genetic school, by their birth and education. Interestingly, Dobzhansky had never referred to the full paper of Dubinin et al. (1937, though a previous short communication in Nature (1936 was included together with all former papers on the related subject. In full, the volume of the original publication printed in the Biological Journal in Moscow comprised 47 pages, in that number 41 pages of the Russian text accompanied by 16 Figs, a table and reference list, and, above all, 6 pages of the English summary. This final part in English is now reproduced in the authors’ version with the only addition being the reference list in the originally printed form.

  17. High-resolution mapping of the [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit [beta]3 and [alpha]5 gene cluster on chromosome 15q11-q13, and localization of breakpoints in two Angelman syndrome patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinnett, D.; Wagstaff, J.; Woolf, E. (Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States) Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Glatt, K. (Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)); Kirkness, E.J. (National Inst. of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Rockville, MD (United States))Lalande, M. (Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States) Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States) Howard Hughes Medical Inst., Boston, MA (United States))

    1993-06-01

    The [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA[sub A]) receptors are a family of ligand-gated chloride channels constituting the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the nervous system. In order to determine the genomic organization of the GABA[sub A] receptor [beta]3 subunit gene (GABRB3) and [alpha]5 subunit gene (GABRA5) in chromosome 15q11-q13, the authors have constructed a high-resolution physical map using the combined techniques of field-inversion gel electrophoresis and phage genomic library screening. This map, which covers nearly 1.0 Mb, shows that GABRB3 and GABRA5 are separated by less than 100 kb and are arranged in a head-to-head configuration. GABRB3 encompasses approximately 250 kb, while GABRA5 is contained within 70 kb. This difference in size is due in large part to an intron of 150 kb within GABRB3. The authors have also identified seven putative CpG islands within a 600-kb interval. Chromosomal rearrangement breakpoints -- in one Angelman syndrome (AS) patient with an unbalanced translocation and in another patient with a submicroscopic deletion -- are located within the large GABRB3 intron. These findings will facilitate chromosomal walking strategies for cloning the regions disrupted by the DNA rearrangements in these AS patients and will be valuable for mapping new genes to the AS chromosomal region. 64 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. X Chromosome Evolution in Cetartiodactyla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proskuryakova, Anastasia A; Kulemzina, Anastasia I; Perelman, Polina L; Makunin, Alexey I; Larkin, Denis M; Farré, Marta; Kukekova, Anna V; Lynn Johnson, Jennifer; Lemskaya, Natalya A; Beklemisheva, Violetta R; Roelke-Parker, Melody E; Bellizzi, June; Ryder, Oliver A; O'Brien, Stephen J; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2017-08-31

    The phenomenon of a remarkable conservation of the X chromosome in eutherian mammals has been first described by Susumu Ohno in 1964. A notable exception is the cetartiodactyl X chromosome, which varies widely in morphology and G-banding pattern between species. It is hypothesized that this sex chromosome has undergone multiple rearrangements that changed the centromere position and the order of syntenic segments over the last 80 million years of Cetartiodactyla speciation. To investigate its evolution we have selected 26 evolutionarily conserved bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from the cattle CHORI-240 library evenly distributed along the cattle X chromosome. High-resolution BAC maps of the X chromosome on a representative range of cetartiodactyl species from different branches: pig (Suidae), alpaca (Camelidae), gray whale (Cetacea), hippopotamus (Hippopotamidae), Java mouse-deer (Tragulidae), pronghorn (Antilocapridae), Siberian musk deer (Moschidae), and giraffe (Giraffidae) were obtained by fluorescent in situ hybridization. To trace the X chromosome evolution during fast radiation in specious families, we performed mapping in several cervids (moose, Siberian roe deer, fallow deer, and Pere David's deer) and bovid (muskox, goat, sheep, sable antelope, and cattle) species. We have identified three major conserved synteny blocks and rearrangements in different cetartiodactyl lineages and found that the recently described phenomenon of the evolutionary new centromere emergence has taken place in the X chromosome evolution of Cetartiodactyla at least five times. We propose the structure of the putative ancestral cetartiodactyl X chromosome by reconstructing the order of syntenic segments and centromere position for key groups.

  19. Chromatin dynamics during cell cycle mediate conversion of DNA damage into chromatid breaks and affect formation of chromosomal aberrations: Biological and clinical significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terzoudi, Georgia I.; Hatzi, Vasiliki I. [Institute of Radioisotopes and Radiodiagnostic Products, National Centre for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' , 15310 Ag. Paraskevi Attikis, Athens (Greece); Donta-Bakoyianni, Catherine [Oral Diagnosis and Radiology, University of Athens Dental School, Athens (Greece); Pantelias, Gabriel E., E-mail: gabriel@ipta.demokritos.gr [Institute of Radioisotopes and Radiodiagnostic Products, National Centre for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' , 15310 Ag. Paraskevi Attikis, Athens (Greece)

    2011-06-03

    The formation of diverse chromosomal aberrations following irradiation and the variability in radiosensitivity at different cell-cycle stages remain a long standing controversy, probably because most of the studies have focused on elucidating the enzymatic mechanisms involved using simple DNA substrates. Yet, recognition, processing and repair of DNA damage occur within the nucleoprotein complex of chromatin which is dynamic in nature, capable of rapid unfolding, disassembling, assembling and refolding. The present work reviews experimental work designed to investigate the impact of chromatin dynamics and chromosome conformation changes during cell-cycle in the formation of chromosomal aberrations. Using conventional cytogenetics and premature chromosome condensation to visualize interphase chromatin, the data presented support the hypothesis that chromatin dynamic changes during cell-cycle are important determinants in the conversion of sub-microscopic DNA lesions into chromatid breaks. Consequently, the type and yield of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations at a given cell-cycle-stage depends on the combined effect of DNA repair processes and chromatin dynamics, which is cell-cycle-regulated and subject to up- or down-regulation following radiation exposure or genetic alterations. This new hypothesis is used to explain the variability in radiosensitivity observed at various cell-cycle-stages, among mutant cells and cells of different origin, or among different individuals, and to revisit unresolved issues and unanswered questions. In addition, it is used to better understand hypersensitivity of AT cells and to provide an improved predictive G2-assay for evaluating radiosensitivity at individual level. Finally, experimental data at single cell level obtained using hybrid cells suggest that the proposed hypothesis applies only to the irradiated component of the hybrid.

  20. Know Your Chromosomes Hybrid Cells and Human Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 6. Know Your Chromosomes Hybrid Cells and Human Chromosomes. Vani Brahmachari. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 6 June 1996 pp 41-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. Chromosome Connections: Compelling Clues to Common Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammer, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Students compare banding patterns on hominid chromosomes and see striking evidence of their common ancestry. To test this, human chromosome no. 2 is matched with two shorter chimpanzee chromosomes, leading to the hypothesis that human chromosome 2 resulted from the fusion of the two shorter chromosomes. Students test that hypothesis by looking for…

  2. Homeostatic Imbalance in Epithelial Ducts and Its Role in Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna A. Rejniak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An epithelial duct is a well-defined multicellular structure composed of tightly packed cells separating and protecting body compartments that are used for enzyme secretion and its transport across the internal. The structural and functional integrity (homeostasis of such ducts is vital in carrying many life functions (breathing, lactation, production of hormones. However, the processes involved in maintaining the homeostatic balance are not yet fully understood. On the other hand, the loss of epithelial tissue architecture, such as filled lumens or ductal disorganization, are among the first symptoms of the emerging epithelial tumors (carcinomas. Using the previously developed biomechanical model of epithelial ducts: IBCell, we investigated how different signals and mechanical stimuli imposed on individual epithelial cells can impact the homeostatic (imbalance and integrity of the whole epithelial tissue. We provide a link between erroneous responses of individual epithelial cells to specific signals and the emerging ductal morphologies characteristic for preinvasive cancers observed in pathology specimens, or characteristic for multicellular structures arising from mutated cells cultured in vitro. We summarize our finding in terms of altered properties of epithelial cell polarization, and discuss the relative importance of various polarization signals on the formation of tumor-like multicellular structures.

  3. Electrolyte depletion and osmotic imbalance in amphibians with chytridiomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voyles, Jamie; Berger, Lee; Young, Sam; Speare, Rick; Webb, Rebecca; Warner, Jeffrey; Rudd, Donna; Campbell, Ruth; Skerratt, Lee F

    2007-09-14

    Mounting evidence implicates the disease chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, in global amphibian declines and extinctions. While the virulence of this disease has been clearly demonstrated, there is, as yet, no mechanistic explanation for how B. dendrobatidis kills amphibians. To investigate the pathology of chytridiomycosis, blood samples were collected from uninfected, aclinically infected and clinically diseased amphibians and analyzed for a wide range of biochemical and hematological parameters. Here, we show that green tree frogs Litoria caerulea with severe chytridiomycosis had reduced plasma osmolality, sodium, potassium, magnesium and chloride concentrations. Stable plasma albumin, hematocrit and urea levels indicated that hydration status was unaffected, signifying depletion of electrolytes from circulation rather than dilution due to increased water uptake. We suggest that B. dendrobatidis kills amphibians by disrupting normal epidermal functioning, leading to osmotic imbalance through loss of electrolytes. Determining how B. dendrobatidis kills amphibians is fundamental to understanding the host-pathogen relationship and thus the population declines attributed to B. dendrobatidis. Understanding the mechanisms of mortality may also explain interspecific variation in susceptibility to chytridiomycosis.

  4. Child underreporting, fertility, and sex ratio imbalance in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodkind, Daniel

    2011-02-01

    Child underreporting is often neglected in studies of fertility and sex ratio imbalance in China. To improve estimates of these measures, I use intercensal comparisons to identify a rise in underreporting, which followed the increased enforcement and penalization under the birth planning system in 1991. A new triangulation of evidence indicates that about 19% of children at ages 0-4 were unreported in the 2000 census, more than double that of the 1990 census. This evidence contradicts assumptions underlying the fertility estimates of most recent studies. Yet, the analysis also suggests that China's fertility in the late 1990s (and perhaps beyond) was below officially adjusted levels. I then conduct a similar intercensal analysis of sex ratios of births and children, which are the world's highest primarily because of prenatal sex selection. However, given excess underreporting of young daughters, especially pronounced just after 1990, estimated ratios are lower than reported ratios. Sex ratios in areas with a "1.5-child" policy are especially distorted because of excess daughter underreporting, as well as sex-linked stopping rules and other factors, although it is unclear whether such policies increase use of prenatal sex selection. China's sex ratio at birth, once it is standardized by birth order, fell between 2000 and 2005 and showed a continuing excess in urban China, not rural China.

  5. Biomedical Implications of Heavy Metals Induced Imbalances in Redox Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bechan Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several workers have extensively worked out the metal induced toxicity and have reported the toxic and carcinogenic effects of metals in human and animals. It is well known that these metals play a crucial role in facilitating normal biological functions of cells as well. One of the major mechanisms associated with heavy metal toxicity has been attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which develops imbalance between the prooxidant elements and the antioxidants (reducing elements in the body. In this process, a shift to the former is termed as oxidative stress. The oxidative stress mediated toxicity of heavy metals involves damage primarily to liver (hepatotoxicity, central nervous system (neurotoxicity, DNA (genotoxicity, and kidney (nephrotoxicity in animals and humans. Heavy metals are reported to impact signaling cascade and associated factors leading to apoptosis. The present review illustrates an account of the current knowledge about the effects of heavy metals (mainly arsenic, lead, mercury, and cadmium induced oxidative stress as well as the possible remedies of metal(s toxicity through natural/synthetic antioxidants, which may render their effects by reducing the concentration of toxic metal(s. This paper primarily concerns the clinicopathological and biomedical implications of heavy metals induced oxidative stress and their toxicity management in mammals.

  6. Biomedical implications of heavy metals induced imbalances in redox systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bechan; Singh, Shweta; Siddiqi, Nikhat J

    2014-01-01

    Several workers have extensively worked out the metal induced toxicity and have reported the toxic and carcinogenic effects of metals in human and animals. It is well known that these metals play a crucial role in facilitating normal biological functions of cells as well. One of the major mechanisms associated with heavy metal toxicity has been attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which develops imbalance between the prooxidant elements and the antioxidants (reducing elements) in the body. In this process, a shift to the former is termed as oxidative stress. The oxidative stress mediated toxicity of heavy metals involves damage primarily to liver (hepatotoxicity), central nervous system (neurotoxicity), DNA (genotoxicity), and kidney (nephrotoxicity) in animals and humans. Heavy metals are reported to impact signaling cascade and associated factors leading to apoptosis. The present review illustrates an account of the current knowledge about the effects of heavy metals (mainly arsenic, lead, mercury, and cadmium) induced oxidative stress as well as the possible remedies of metal(s) toxicity through natural/synthetic antioxidants, which may render their effects by reducing the concentration of toxic metal(s). This paper primarily concerns the clinicopathological and biomedical implications of heavy metals induced oxidative stress and their toxicity management in mammals.

  7. Appetite regulation in response to sitting and energy imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, Kirsten; Stephens, Brooke R; Malin, Steven K; Zderic, Theodore W; Hamilton, Marc T; Braun, Barry

    2012-04-01

    The impact of sitting and energy imbalance on appetite and appetite-regulating hormones (acylated ghrelin and leptin) was assessed in response to 1 day of sitting, with and without changes in energy intake. Fourteen men and women completed each of three 24-h conditions: high energy expenditure (standing) with energy balance (STAND), low energy expenditure (sitting) with energy surplus (SIT), and sitting with energy balance (SIT-BAL). Ghrelin, leptin, and appetite were measured in the fasted state and following a standardized meal. In the fasted state, there were no differences among conditions. Following the meal, ghrelin was lower in SIT than in STAND, with no change in appetite. When intake was reduced (SIT-BAL), the decrease in ghrelin when sitting was attenuated, hunger increased, and fullness decreased. SIT led to lower ghrelin concentrations in the men, whereas in the women, leptin increased. SIT-BAL led to an increase in ghrelin in the men but attenuated the leptin response, reduced ghrelin, increased hunger, and decreased fullness in the women. Because a dramatic reduction in energy expenditure was not accompanied by reduced appetite, prolonged sitting may promote excess energy intake, leading to weight gain in both men and women.

  8. Biomedical Implications of Heavy Metals Induced Imbalances in Redox Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shweta; Siddiqi, Nikhat J.

    2014-01-01

    Several workers have extensively worked out the metal induced toxicity and have reported the toxic and carcinogenic effects of metals in human and animals. It is well known that these metals play a crucial role in facilitating normal biological functions of cells as well. One of the major mechanisms associated with heavy metal toxicity has been attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which develops imbalance between the prooxidant elements and the antioxidants (reducing elements) in the body. In this process, a shift to the former is termed as oxidative stress. The oxidative stress mediated toxicity of heavy metals involves damage primarily to liver (hepatotoxicity), central nervous system (neurotoxicity), DNA (genotoxicity), and kidney (nephrotoxicity) in animals and humans. Heavy metals are reported to impact signaling cascade and associated factors leading to apoptosis. The present review illustrates an account of the current knowledge about the effects of heavy metals (mainly arsenic, lead, mercury, and cadmium) induced oxidative stress as well as the possible remedies of metal(s) toxicity through natural/synthetic antioxidants, which may render their effects by reducing the concentration of toxic metal(s). This paper primarily concerns the clinicopathological and biomedical implications of heavy metals induced oxidative stress and their toxicity management in mammals. PMID:25184144

  9. The man-made creators of the imbalance of water in Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlafman, L. M.; Kontar, V. A.

    2013-12-01

    At 2011 we have described the imbalance of water in Nature as the system [1]. At 2012 we have described water and carbon and the glaciers [2], [3] as creators of the imbalance of Nature. Now we are describing some man-made creators of the imbalance of Nature. The photosynthesis is a powerful creator of the imbalance of Nature. The photosynthesis significantly increases the complexity of the structures and reduces the entropy. Earth's hydrosphere contains water less than it was flowed via photosynthesis. This is an example of the imbalance of involving when the return of water has delayed because water is involved into the processes of life and other processes. People widely use photosynthesis and create not only an additional man-made imbalance of water in Nature, but also the man-made changing the albedo, and a lot of other important parameters of the planet of Earth. All of these processes are significantly imbalanced. The fossil hydrocarbons have accumulated during millions of years, but now are burned. This is an example of the imbalance delay by time. The man-made burning of the hydrocarbons is creating the imbalances of impact or explosive type, because of the burning processes is in millions of times faster than the accumulation processes. Please pay attention to the imbalance of redeployment by places. For example, oil and gas are extracted in one places, and burned in others. During combustion is standing out not only water, but energy, and other components. The temperature in the centers of big cities is always higher and there is dominating the rising air. It pollutes the environment, changes circulations, create greenhouse effect, etc. Other examples of the imbalance of relocation are shown in the production and consumption of food. The irrigation systems transfer water from one place to another. This transfer of water creates a lot of imbalances in change climate, ecosystems, etc in places where water was took and where the water was brought. Usually

  10. Chromosomal rearrangements occurred repeatedly and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All examined Paroedura showed NORs on the smallest chromosome pair; moreover, six of the eleven examined species show a 2n = 36 karyotype, with a pair of metacentrics and 17 telocentric pair. The remaining species exhibited karyotypes with a diploid chromosome number ranging from 2n = 31 to 2n = 38. We assume ...

  11. Vibrio chromosome-specific families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Ussery, David

    2014-01-01

    many membrane-associated activities, such as ion channels, transmembrane transporters, and electron transport chain proteins. Thus, it appears that whilst there are many "housekeeping systems" encoded in chromosome 1, there are far fewer core functions found in chromosome 2. However, the presence...

  12. Cohesin in determining chromosome architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haering, Christian H., E-mail: christian.haering@embl.de [Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg (Germany); Jessberger, Rolf, E-mail: rolf.jessberger@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Cells use ring-like structured protein complexes for various tasks in DNA dynamics. The tripartite cohesin ring is particularly suited to determine chromosome architecture, for it is large and dynamic, may acquire different forms, and is involved in several distinct nuclear processes. This review focuses on cohesin's role in structuring chromosomes during mitotic and meiotic cell divisions and during interphase.

  13. Slit scan flow cytometry of isolated chromosomes following fluorescence hybridization: an approach of online screening for specific chromosomes and chromosome translocations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hausmann, M.; Dudin, G.; Aten, J. A.; Heilig, R.; Diaz, E.; Cremer, C.

    1991-01-01

    The recently developed methods of non radioactive in situ hybridization of chromosomes offer new aspects for chromosome analysis. Fluorescent labelling of hybridized chromosomes or chromosomal subregions allows to facilitate considerably the detection of specific chromosomal abnormalities. For many

  14. Chromosomal Evolution in Lower Vertebrates: Sex Chromosomes in Neotropical Fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Bello Cioffi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Fishes exhibit the greatest diversity of species among vertebrates, offering a number of relevant models for genetic and evolutionary studies. The investigation of sex chromosome differentiation is a very active and striking research area of fish cytogenetics, as fishes represent one of the most vital model groups. Neotropical fish species show an amazing variety of sex chromosome systems, where different stages of differentiation can be found, ranging from homomorphic to highly differentiated sex chromosomes. Here, we draw attention on the impact of recent developments in molecular cytogenetic analyses that helped to elucidate many unknown questions about fish sex chromosome evolution, using excellent characiform models occurring in the Neotropical region, namely the Erythrinidae family and the Triportheus genus. While in Erythrinidae distinct XY and/or multiple XY-derived sex chromosome systems have independently evolved at least four different times, representatives of Triportheus show an opposite scenario, i.e., highly conserved ZZ/ZW system with a monophyletic origin. In both cases, recent molecular approaches, such as mapping of repetitive DNA classes, comparative genomic hybridization (CGH, and whole chromosome painting (WCP, allowed us to unmask several new features linked to the molecular composition and differentiation processes of sex chromosomes in fishes.

  15. Field-flow fractionation of chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giddings, J.C.

    1990-09-01

    Research continued on field flow fractionation of chromosomes. Progress in the past year can be organized into three main categories: (1) chromosome sample preparation; (2) preliminary chromosome fractionation; (3) fractionation of a polystyrene aggregate model which approximates the chromosome shape. We have been successful in isolating metaphase chromosomes from the Chinese hamster. We also received a human chromosome sample from Dr. Carolyn Bell-Prince of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Results are discussed. 2 figs.

  16. Diagnosis of nutrient imbalances with vector analysis in agroforestry systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Marney E; Kimaro, Anthony A

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural intensification has had unintended environmental consequences, including increased nutrient leaching and surface runoff and other agrarian-derived pollutants. Improved diagnosis of on-farm nutrient dynamics will have the advantage of increasing yields and will diminish financial and environmental costs. To achieve this, a management support system that allows for site-specific rapid evaluation of nutrient production imbalances and subsequent management prescriptions is needed for agroecological design. Vector diagnosis, a bivariate model to depict changes in yield and nutritional response simultaneously in a single graph, facilitates identification of nutritional status such as growth dilution, deficiency, sufficiency, luxury uptake, and toxicity. Quantitative data from cocoa agroforestry systems and pigeonpea intercropping trials in Ghana and Tanzania, respectively, were re-evaluated with vector analysis. Relative to monoculture, biomass increase in cocoa ( L.) under shade (35-80%) was accompanied by a 17 to 25% decline in P concentration, the most limiting nutrient on this site. Similarly, increasing biomass with declining P concentrations was noted for pigeonpea [ (L). Millsp.] in response to soil moisture availability under intercropping. Although vector analysis depicted nutrient responses, the current vector model does not consider non-nutrient resource effects on growth, such as ameliorated light and soil moisture, which were particularly active in these systems. We revisit and develop vector analysis into a framework for diagnosing nutrient and non-nutrient interactions in agroforestry systems. Such a diagnostic technique advances management decision-making by increasing nutrient precision and reducing environmental issues associated with agrarian-derived soil contamination. American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.

  17. Copper Imbalances in Ruminants and Humans: Unexpected Common Ground1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttle, Neville F.

    2012-01-01

    Ruminants are more vulnerable to copper deficiency than humans because rumen sulfide generation lowers copper availability from forage, increasing the risk of conditions such as swayback in lambs. Molybdenum-rich pastures promote thiomolybdate (TM) synthesis and formation of unabsorbable Cu-TM complexes, turning risk to clinical reality (hypocuprosis). Selection pressures created ruminant species with tolerance of deficiency but vulnerability to copper toxicity in alien environments, such as specific pathogen–free units. By contrast, cases of copper imbalance in humans seemed confined to rare genetic aberrations of copper metabolism. Recent descriptions of human swayback and the exploratory use of TM for the treatment of Wilson’s disease, tumor growth, inflammatory diseases, and Alzheimer’s disease have created unexpected common ground. The incidence of pre–hemolytic copper poisoning in specific pathogen–free lambs was reduced by an infection with Mycobacterium avium that left them more responsive to treatment with TM but vulnerable to long-term copper depletion. Copper requirements in ruminants and humans may need an extra allowance for the “copper cost” of immunity to infection. Residual cuproenzyme inhibition in TM-treated lambs and anomalies in plasma copper composition that appeared to depend on liver copper status raise this question “can chelating capacity be harnessed without inducing copper-deficiency in ruminants or humans?” A model of equilibria between exogenous (TM) and endogenous chelators (e.g., albumin, metallothionein) is used to predict risk of exposure and hypocuprosis; although risk of natural exposure in humans is remote, vulnerability to TM-induced copper deficiency may be high. Biomarkers of TM impact are needed, and copper chaperones for inhibited cuproenzymes are prime candidates. PMID:22983845

  18. Imbalance aware lithography hotspot detection: a deep learning approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haoyu; Luo, Luyang; Su, Jing; Lin, Chenxi; Yu, Bei

    2017-07-01

    With the advancement of very large scale integrated circuits (VLSI) technology nodes, lithographic hotspots become a serious problem that affects manufacture yield. Lithography hotspot detection at the post-OPC stage is imperative to check potential circuit failures when transferring designed patterns onto silicon wafers. Although conventional lithography hotspot detection methods, such as machine learning, have gained satisfactory performance, with the extreme scaling of transistor feature size and layout patterns growing in complexity, conventional methodologies may suffer from performance degradation. For example, manual or ad hoc feature extraction in a machine learning framework may lose important information when predicting potential errors in ultra-large-scale integrated circuit masks. We present a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) that targets representative feature learning in lithography hotspot detection. We carefully analyze the impact and effectiveness of different CNN hyperparameters, through which a hotspot-detection-oriented neural network model is established. Because hotspot patterns are always in the minority in VLSI mask design, the training dataset is highly imbalanced. In this situation, a neural network is no longer reliable, because a trained model with high classification accuracy may still suffer from a high number of false negative results (missing hotspots), which is fatal in hotspot detection problems. To address the imbalance problem, we further apply hotspot upsampling and random-mirror flipping before training the network. Experimental results show that our proposed neural network model achieves comparable or better performance on the ICCAD 2012 contest benchmark compared to state-of-the-art hotspot detectors based on deep or representative machine leaning.

  19. T lymphocyte subset imbalances in patients contribute to ankylosing spondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, CHENGGONG; LIAO, QIANDE; HU, YIHE; ZHONG, DA

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease, which is characterized by inflammation of the spine and the sacroiliac joints. To date, the disease etiology remains unclear. In the present study, the correlation of T lymphocyte subset changes with the progression of ankylosing spondylitis was investigated. A total of 55 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (22 severe and 23 mild cases) and 20 healthy individuals were selected. Firstly, the punctured cells in the lesions and the serum were collected, and the lymphocytes and the peripheral blood mononuclear cells were prepared. Secondly, quantitative PCR, ELISA and flow cytometry analyses were carried out to detect the levels of a series of immunoglobulins, complements, helper T cells, cytotoxic T cells, regulatory cells and cytokines. The expression levels of α-globulin, γ-globulin, immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgA, IgM, serum complement C3, and complement C4 were found to be significantly increased in ankylosing spondylitis patients. In addition, the percentage of Th1 and Th17 cells was found to be significantly higher in the ankylosing spondylitis groups (mild and severe) compared with the healthy individuals. As a result, the Th1/Th2 and Th17/Treg ratios were significantly higher in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. In addition, T lymphocyte subset ratio imbalances contributed to an increased expression of immune mediators, including interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17A. The mRNA and protein expression levels of IFN-γ and IL-17A were found to be higher in the ankylosing spondylitis groups compared with the control group. The present study provided further evidence on the function and underlying mechanism of T lymphocyte subsets, which may be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:25452811

  20. Salt and water imbalance in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrinello, Gaspare; Torres, Daniele; Paterna, Salvatore

    2011-10-01

    In chronic heart failure (CHF), neurohumoral systems, which help to maintain circulatory homeostasis, are maladaptive and responsible for disease progression and congestion in the long term. The activation of sympathetic hormones and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), in addition to non-osmotic vasopressin release, up-regulation of aquoporine 2 and renal sodium transporters, and renal resistance to natriuretic peptide lead to a salt- and water-avid state. A primary decrease in cardiac output and arterial vasodilatation brings about arterial underfilling, which activates neuro-humoral reflexes and systems. The heart disease is the primum movens, but the kidney is the end organ responsible for increased tubular reabsorption of sodium and water. The most important hemodynamic alteration in the kidneys is constriction of glomerular efferent arterioles, which increases intraglomerular pressure and hence glomerular filtration rate. The resulting changes in intrarenal oncotic and hydrostatic pressures promote tubular reabsorption. Over time, a gradually falling glomerular filtration rate, due to CHF progression, medications or chronic kidney injury due to comorbidities, becomes more critical in sodium/water imbalance. Moreover, long-term use of diuretics can lead to a diuretic-resistant state, which necessitates the use of higher doses further activating RAAS, often at the expense of worsening renal function. However, every patient is a case in itself and the general pathophysiology of hydro-saline balance may be different in each subject. A mechanism can prevail over others and the kidney may have different responses to the same diuretic. So, it is necessary to customize each individual's long-term therapy, tailoring medical treatment according to clinical profiles, comorbidities and renal function, introducing active control of body weight by the patient himself, fluid restriction, a less restricted sodium intake, flexibility of diuretic doses, early and

  1. Imbalance aware lithography hotspot detection: a deep learning approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haoyu; Luo, Luyang; Su, Jing; Lin, Chenxi; Yu, Bei

    2017-03-01

    With the advancement of VLSI technology nodes, light diffraction caused lithographic hotspots have become a serious problem affecting manufacture yield. Lithography hotspot detection at the post-OPC stage is imperative to check potential circuit failures when transferring designed patterns onto silicon wafers. Although conventional lithography hotspot detection methods, such as machine learning, have gained satisfactory performance, with extreme scaling of transistor feature size and more and more complicated layout patterns, conventional methodologies may suffer from performance degradation. For example, manual or ad hoc feature extraction in a machine learning framework may lose important information when predicting potential errors in ultra-large-scale integrated circuit masks. In this paper, we present a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) targeting representative feature learning in lithography hotspot detection. We carefully analyze impact and effectiveness of different CNN hyper-parameters, through which a hotspot-detection-oriented neural network model is established. Because hotspot patterns are always minorities in VLSI mask design, the training data set is highly imbalanced. In this situation, a neural network is no longer reliable, because a trained model with high classification accuracy may still suffer from high false negative results (missing hotspots), which is fatal in hotspot detection problems. To address the imbalance problem, we further apply minority upsampling and random-mirror flipping before training the network. Experimental results show that our proposed neural network model achieves highly comparable or better performance on the ICCAD 2012 contest benchmark compared to state-of-the-art hotspot detectors based on deep or representative machine leaning.

  2. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagnarelli, Paola, E-mail: P.Vagnarelli@ed.ac.uk

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes

  3. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions) have profound genetic...

  4. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the continued development of a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and...

  5. Sequencing of a patient with balanced chromosome abnormalities and neurodevelopmental disease identifies disruption of multiple high risk loci by structural variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathon Blake

    Full Text Available Balanced chromosome abnormalities (BCAs occur at a high frequency in healthy and diseased individuals, but cost-efficient strategies to identify BCAs and evaluate whether they contribute to a phenotype have not yet become widespread. Here we apply genome-wide mate-pair library sequencing to characterize structural variation in a patient with unclear neurodevelopmental disease (NDD and complex de novo BCAs at the karyotype level. Nucleotide-level characterization of the clinically described BCA breakpoints revealed disruption of at least three NDD candidate genes (LINC00299, NUP205, PSMD14 that gave rise to abnormal mRNAs and could be assumed as disease-causing. However, unbiased genome-wide analysis of the sequencing data for cryptic structural variation was key to reveal an additional submicroscopic inversion that truncates the schizophrenia- and bipolar disorder-associated brain transcription factor ZNF804A as an equally likely NDD-driving gene. Deep sequencing of fluorescent-sorted wild-type and derivative chromosomes confirmed the clinically undetected BCA. Moreover, deep sequencing further validated a high accuracy of mate-pair library sequencing to detect structural variants larger than 10 kB, proposing that this approach is powerful for clinical-grade genome-wide structural variant detection. Our study supports previous evidence for a role of ZNF804A in NDD and highlights the need for a more comprehensive assessment of structural variation in karyotypically abnormal individuals and patients with neurocognitive disease to avoid diagnostic deception.

  6. Identification of two critically deleted regions within chromosome segment 7q35-q36 in EVI1 deregulated myeloid leukemia cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An De Weer

    Full Text Available Chromosomal rearrangements involving the EVI1 proto-oncogene are a recurrent finding in myeloid leukemias and are indicative of a poor prognosis. Rearrangements of the EVI1 locus are often associated with monosomy 7 or cytogenetic detectable deletions of part of 7q. As EVI1 overexpression alone is not sufficient to induce leukemia, loss of a 7q tumour suppressor gene might be a required cooperating event. To test this hypothesis, we performed high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization analysis of twelve EVI1 overexpressing patients and three EVI1 deregulated cell lines to search for 7q submicroscopic deletions. This analysis lead to the delineation of two critical regions, one of 0.39 Mb on 7q35 containing the CNTNAP2 gene and one of 1.33 Mb on chromosome bands 7q35-q36 comprising nine genes in EVI1 deregulated cell lines. These findings open the way to further studies aimed at identifying the culprit EVI1 implicated tumour suppressor genes on 7q.

  7. Selective genomic copy number imbalances and probability of recurrence in early-stage breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A Thompson

    Full Text Available A number of studies of copy number imbalances (CNIs in breast tumors support associations between individual CNIs and patient outcomes. However, no pattern or signature of CNIs has emerged for clinical use. We determined copy number (CN gains and losses using high-density molecular inversion probe (MIP arrays for 971 stage I/II breast tumors and applied a boosting strategy to fit hazards models for CN and recurrence, treating chromosomal segments in a dose-specific fashion (-1 [loss], 0 [no change] and +1 [gain]. The concordance index (C-Index was used to compare prognostic accuracy between a training (n = 728 and test (n = 243 set and across models. Twelve novel prognostic CNIs were identified: losses at 1p12, 12q13.13, 13q12.3, 22q11, and Xp21, and gains at 2p11.1, 3q13.12, 10p11.21, 10q23.1, 11p15, 14q13.2-q13.3, and 17q21.33. In addition, seven CNIs previously implicated as prognostic markers were selected: losses at 8p22 and 16p11.2 and gains at 10p13, 11q13.5, 12p13, 20q13, and Xq28. For all breast cancers combined, the final full model including 19 CNIs, clinical covariates, and tumor marker-approximated subtypes (estrogen receptor [ER], progesterone receptor, ERBB2 amplification, and Ki67 significantly outperformed a model containing only clinical covariates and tumor subtypes (C-Index(full model, train[test]  =  0.72[0.71] ± 0.02 vs. C-Index(clinical + subtype model, train[test]  =  0.62[0.62] ± 0.02; p<10(-6. In addition, the full model containing 19 CNIs significantly improved prognostication separately for ER-, HER2+, luminal B, and triple negative tumors over clinical variables alone. In summary, we show that a set of 19 CNIs discriminates risk of recurrence among early-stage breast tumors, independent of ER status. Further, our data suggest the presence of specific CNIs that promote and, in some cases, limit tumor spread.

  8. X Chromosome Evolution in Cetartiodactyla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proskuryakova, Anastasia A.; Kulemzina, Anastasia I.; Makunin, Alexey I.; Kukekova, Anna V.; Lynn Johnson, Jennifer; Lemskaya, Natalya A.; Beklemisheva, Violetta R.; Roelke-Parker, Melody E.; Bellizzi, June; Ryder, Oliver A.; O’Brien, Stephen J.; Graphodatsky, Alexander S.

    2017-01-01

    The phenomenon of a remarkable conservation of the X chromosome in eutherian mammals has been first described by Susumu Ohno in 1964. A notable exception is the cetartiodactyl X chromosome, which varies widely in morphology and G-banding pattern between species. It is hypothesized that this sex chromosome has undergone multiple rearrangements that changed the centromere position and the order of syntenic segments over the last 80 million years of Cetartiodactyla speciation. To investigate its evolution we have selected 26 evolutionarily conserved bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from the cattle CHORI-240 library evenly distributed along the cattle X chromosome. High-resolution BAC maps of the X chromosome on a representative range of cetartiodactyl species from different branches: pig (Suidae), alpaca (Camelidae), gray whale (Cetacea), hippopotamus (Hippopotamidae), Java mouse-deer (Tragulidae), pronghorn (Antilocapridae), Siberian musk deer (Moschidae), and giraffe (Giraffidae) were obtained by fluorescent in situ hybridization. To trace the X chromosome evolution during fast radiation in specious families, we performed mapping in several cervids (moose, Siberian roe deer, fallow deer, and Pere David’s deer) and bovid (muskox, goat, sheep, sable antelope, and cattle) species. We have identified three major conserved synteny blocks and rearrangements in different cetartiodactyl lineages and found that the recently described phenomenon of the evolutionary new centromere emergence has taken place in the X chromosome evolution of Cetartiodactyla at least five times. We propose the structure of the putative ancestral cetartiodactyl X chromosome by reconstructing the order of syntenic segments and centromere position for key groups. PMID:28858207

  9. Allelic imbalance and cytogenetic deletion of 1p in colorectal adenomas: a target region identified between DIS199 and DIS234

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bomme, L; Heim, S; Bardi, G

    1998-01-01

    Both cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses have shown that many colorectal adenomas carry an acquired deletion distally in the short arm of one chromosome 1, but the two methods have never been brought to bear on the same tumors. The major part of this study was the analysis of 53 previously...... region. This genomic area contains the human homologue of the tumor modifier gene Mom1 (1p35-36.1), which, in mice, modifies the number of intestinal tumors in multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min)-mutated animals. To evaluate whether the imbalances corresponded to interstitial deletions of 1p material, we...... at five of eight microsatellite loci. A comparison of the genetic findings with clinicopathologic data indicated that adenomas in the rectum have 1p abnormalities more often than do adenomas of the sigmoid colon, and that adenomas with 1p changes are larger than adenomas without abnormalities...

  10. Codigestion of manure and industrial organic waste at centralized biogas plants: process imbalances and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsø Nielsen, Henrik; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    The present study focuses on process imbalances in Danish centralized biogas plants treating manure in combination with industrial waste. Collection of process data from various full-scale plants along with a number of interviews showed that imbalances occur frequently. High concentrations...... conditions) and high fractions of industrial waste in the feedstock was also observed. The process imbalances and suboptimal conditions are mainly allowed to occur due to 1) inadequate knowledge about the waste composition, 2) inadequate knowledge about the waste degradation characteristics, 3) inadequate...... of ammonia or long chain fatty acids is in most cases expected to be the cause of microbial inhibitions/imbalances while foaming in the prestorage tanks and digesters is the most important practical process problem at the plants. A correlation between increased residual biogas production (suboptimal process...

  11. An Analysis of Economic Growth, Competitiveness and Macroeconomic Imbalances in the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Hurduzeu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Taking into consideration the determinants of the economic crisis and of the sovereign debt crisis, we aim to analyze the dynamics of the European economies and discuss changes related to macroeconomic imbalances, as highlighted by the recent crises as an important factor of the unfavorable dynamics registered during the last years. In this respect we considered both internal and external imbalances, as specified in the macroeconomic imbalance procedure that was implemented for the European Union member states since 2012, as a response to the crises that affected all open economies of the world. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive analysis of economic imbalances in the European Union and to determine their influence on economic growth.

  12. SYSTEMIC IMBALANCE OF ESSENTIAL METALS AND CARDIAC GENE EXPRESSION IN RATS FOLLOWING ACUTE PULMONARY ZINC EXPOSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have recently demonstrated that PM containing water-soluble zinc may cause cardiac injury following pulmonary exposure. To investigate if pulmonary zinc exposure causes systemic metal imbalance and direct cardiac effects, we intratracheally (IT) instilled male Wistar Kyoto (WK...

  13. Consensus-based Distributed Control for Accurate Reactive, Harmonic and Imbalance Power Sharing in Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Jianguo; Kim, Sunghyok; Zhang, Huaguang

    2017-01-01

    quality at the point of common coupling (PCC). Further, a distributed consensus protocol is developed to adaptively regulate the virtual impedance at fundamental frequency and selected harmonic frequencies. Additionally, a dynamic consensus based method is adopted to restore the voltage to their average......This paper investigates the issue of accurate reactive, harmonic and imbalance power sharing in a microgrid. Harmonic and imbalance droop controllers are developed to proportionally share the harmonic power and the imbalance power among distributed generation (DG) units and improve the voltage...... voltage. With the proposed methods, the microgrid system reliability and flexibility can be enhanced and the knowledge of the line impedance is not required. And the reactive, harmonic and imbalance power can be proportionally shared among the DG units. Moreover, the quality of the voltage at PCC can...

  14. Are foreign investments in land leading to an imbalance in the hydrological cycle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenhuis, T. S.; Theodore, C.; Makki, F. M.

    2012-12-01

    Over the past few years, large-scale acquisitions of farmland have taken place across the world. Although the land acquisitions are generally portrayed as a land grab in Africa, in almost all cases it is the extra water that is consumed by the crops that brings a new imbalance in the hydrological science. Understanding the imbalance is central to livelihoods and food security of the people downstream because almost all rivers in Africa with the exception of the Congo are being fully consumed before they enter the ocean. In this talk we will show what the effects on the water imbalance caused by foreign and national investments in the Blue Nile basin in the Ethiopian highlands has on the water availability in the downstream countries and whether the imbalance can be made up by increasing irrigation efficiency.

  15. Analysis and compensation of I/Q imbalance in amplify-and-forward cooperative systems

    KAUST Repository

    Qi, Jian

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, dual-hop amplify-and-forward (AF) cooperative systems in the presence of in-phase and quadrature-phase (I/Q) imbalance, which refers to the mismatch between components in I and Q branches, are investigated. First, we analyze the performance of the considered AF cooperative protocol without compensation for I/Q imbalance as the benchmark. Furthermore, a compensation algorithm for I/Q imbalance is proposed, which makes use of the received signals at the destination, from the source and relay nodes, together with their conjugations to detect the transmitted signal. The performance of the AF cooperative system under study is evaluated in terms of average symbol error probability (SEP), which is derived considering transmission over Rayleigh fading channels. Numerical results are provided and show that the proposed compensation algorithm can efficiently mitigate the effect of I/Q imbalance. © 2012 IEEE.

  16. Cenozoic carbon cycle imbalances and a variable weathering feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caves, Jeremy K.; Jost, Adam B.; Lau, Kimberly V.; Maher, Kate

    2016-09-01

    The long-term stability of Earth's climate and the recovery of the ocean-atmosphere system after carbon cycle perturbations are often attributed to a stabilizing negative feedback between silicate weathering and climate. However, evidence for the operation of this feedback over million-year timescales and in response to tectonic and long-term climatic change remains scarce. For example, the past 50 million years of the Cenozoic Era are characterized by long-term cooling and declining atmospheric CO2 (pCO2). During this interval, constant or decreasing carbon fluxes from the solid Earth to the atmosphere suggest that stable or decreasing weathering fluxes are needed to balance the carbon cycle. In contrast, marine isotopic proxies of weathering (i.e., 87Sr/86Sr, δ7 Li , and 187Os/188Os) are interpreted to reflect increasing weathering fluxes. Here, we evaluate the existence of a negative feedback by reconstructing the imbalance in the carbon cycle during the Cenozoic using the surface inventories of carbon and alkalinity. Only a sustained 0.25-0.5% increase in silicate weathering is necessary to explain the long-term decline in pCO2 over the Cenozoic. We propose that the long-term decrease in pCO2 is due to an increase in the strength of the silicate weathering feedback (i.e., the constant of proportionality between the silicate weathering flux and climate), rather than an increase in the weathering flux. This increase in the feedback strength, which mirrors the marine isotope proxies, occurs as transient, 1 million year timescales remains invariant to match the long-term inputs of carbon. Over the Cenozoic, this results in stable long-term weathering fluxes even as pCO2 decreases. We attribute increasing feedback strength to a change in the type and reactivity of rock in the weathering zone, which collectively has increased the reactivity of the surface of the Earth. Increasing feedback strength through the Cenozoic reconciles mass balance in the carbon cycle with

  17. Drug-target interaction prediction via class imbalance-aware ensemble learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzat, Ali; Wu, Min; Li, Xiao-Li; Kwoh, Chee-Keong

    2016-12-22

    Multiple computational methods for predicting drug-target interactions have been developed to facilitate the drug discovery process. These methods use available data on known drug-target interactions to train classifiers with the purpose of predicting new undiscovered interactions. However, a key challenge regarding this data that has not yet been addressed by these methods, namely class imbalance, is potentially degrading the prediction performance. Class imbalance can be divided into two sub-problems. Firstly, the number of known interacting drug-target pairs is much smaller than that of non-interacting drug-target pairs. This imbalance ratio between interacting and non-interacting drug-target pairs is referred to as the between-class imbalance. Between-class imbalance degrades prediction performance due to the bias in prediction results towards the majority class (i.e. the non-interacting pairs), leading to more prediction errors in the minority class (i.e. the interacting pairs). Secondly, there are multiple types of drug-target interactions in the data with some types having relatively fewer members (or are less represented) than others. This variation in representation of the different interaction types leads to another kind of imbalance referred to as the within-class imbalance. In within-class imbalance, prediction results are biased towards the better represented interaction types, leading to more prediction errors in the less represented interaction types. We propose an ensemble learning method that incorporates techniques to address the issues of between-class imbalance and within-class imbalance. Experiments show that the proposed method improves results over 4 state-of-the-art methods. In addition, we simulated cases for new drugs and targets to see how our method would perform in predicting their interactions. New drugs and targets are those for which no prior interactions are known. Our method displayed satisfactory prediction performance and was

  18. Widely Linear Blind Adaptive Equalization for Transmitter IQ-Imbalance/Skew Compensation in Multicarrier Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porto da Silva, Edson; Zibar, Darko

    2016-01-01

    Simple analytical widely linear complex-valued models for IQ-imbalance and IQ-skew effects in multicarrier transmitters are presented. To compensate for such effects, a 4×4 MIMO widely linear adaptive equalizer is proposed and experimentally validated.......Simple analytical widely linear complex-valued models for IQ-imbalance and IQ-skew effects in multicarrier transmitters are presented. To compensate for such effects, a 4×4 MIMO widely linear adaptive equalizer is proposed and experimentally validated....

  19. General characteristics of patients with electrolyte imbalance admitted to emergency department

    OpenAIRE

    Balcı, Arif Kadri; Koksal, Ozlem; Kose, Ataman; Armagan, Erol; Ozdemir, Fatma; Inal, Taylan; Oner, Nuran

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fluid and electrolyte balance is a key concept to understand for maintaining homeostasis, and for a successful treatment of many metabolic disorders. There are various regulating mechanisms for the equilibrium of electrolytes in organisms. Disorders of these mechanisms result in electrolyte imbalances that may be life-threatening clinical conditions. In this study we defined the electrolyte imbalance characteristics of patients admitted to our emergency department. METHODS: This s...

  20. Drug-target interaction prediction via class imbalance-aware ensemble learning

    OpenAIRE

    Ezzat, Ali; Wu, Min; Li, Xiao-Li; Kwoh, Chee-Keong

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple computational methods for predicting drug-target interactions have been developed to facilitate the drug discovery process. These methods use available data on known drug-target interactions to train classifiers with the purpose of predicting new undiscovered interactions. However, a key challenge regarding this data that has not yet been addressed by these methods, namely class imbalance, is potentially degrading the prediction performance. Class imbalance can be divided ...

  1. Employment and the “Investment Gap”: An Econometric Model of European Imbalances

    OpenAIRE

    Campiglio, Luigi Pierfranco

    2015-01-01

    We specify a VEC model based on six main macroeconomic imbalances to explain the Great European Recession, in Germany, France, Spain and Italy, from 1999 to 2013, estimating their long-term relationships. We focus on employment and unemployment as the main imbalances and identify consumption and investment slumps, prompted by fiscal consolidation, as the causes and current account rebalance and low inflation as the main consequences. Our main results are the following: a) public investment is...

  2. Examination of Potential Benefits of an Energy Imbalance Market in the Western Interconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milligan, M.; Clark, K.; King, J.; Kirby, B.; Guo, T.; Liu, G.

    2013-03-01

    In the Western Interconnection, there is significant interest in improving approaches to wide-area coordinated operations of the bulk electric power system, in part because of the increasing penetration of variable generation. One proposed solution is an energy imbalance market. This study focused on that approach alone, with the goal of identifying the potential benefits of an energy imbalance market in the year 2020.

  3. Comprehensive Investigation on Current Imbalance among Parallel Chips inside MW-Scale IGBT Power Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Rui; Smirnova, Liudmila; Wang, Huai

    2015-01-01

    With the demands for increasing the power rating and improving reliability level of the high power IGBT modules, there are further needs of understanding how to achieve stable paralleling and identical current sharing between the chips. This paper investigates the stray parameters imbalance among...... parallel chips inside the 1.7 kV/1 kA high power IGBT modules at different frequencies by Ansys Q3D parastics extractor. The resulted current imbalance is further confirmed by experimental measurement....

  4. Are There Knots in Chromosomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan T. Siebert

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments have for the first time allowed the determination of three-dimensional structures of individual chromosomes and genomes in nuclei of single haploid mouse embryonic stem (ES cells based on Hi–C chromosome conformation contact data. Although these first structures have a relatively low resolution, they provide the first experimental data that can be used to study chromosome and intact genome folding. Here we further analyze these structures and provide the first evidence that G1 phase chromosomes are knotted, consistent with the fact that plots of contact probability vs sequence separation show a power law dependence that is intermediate between that of a fractal globule and an equilibrium structure.

  5. Chromosome fragility in Freemartin cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Barbieri

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to verify chromosome fragility in freemartin cattle using chromosome aberration (CA and sister chromatid exchange (SCE tests. A total of eighteen co-twins were investigated. Fourteen animals were identified as cytogenetically chimeric (2n=60, XX/XY while 4 were classified as normal. Freemartin cattle showed a higher percentage of aneuploid cells (18.64% and highly significant statistical differences (P < 0.001 in mean values of gaps (4.53 ± 2.05, chromatid breaks (0.26 ± 0.51, and significant statistical differences (P < 0.005 in mean values of chromosome breaks (0.12 ± 0.43 when compared to 10 control animals from single births (aneuploid cells, 11.20%; gaps, 2.01 ± 1.42; chromatid breaks, 0.05 ± 0.22; chromosome breaks, 0.02 ± 0.14.

  6. Dynamic organization of mitotic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Kazuhisa; Hirano, Tatsuya

    2017-06-01

    The assembly of rod-shaped chromosomes during mitosis is an essential prerequisite for faithful segregation of genetic information into daughter cells. Despite the long history of chromosome research, it is only recently that we have acquired powerful approaches and crucial tools that help to unlock the secret of this seemingly complex process. In particular, in vitro assays, mammalian genetics, Hi-C analyses and computer simulations have provided valuable information during the past two years. These studies are now beginning to elucidate how the core components of mitotic chromosomes, namely, histones, topoisomerase IIα and condensins, cooperate with each other to convert very long stretches of DNA into rod-shaped chromosomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Allostatic Load and Effort-Reward Imbalance: Associations over the Working-Career

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ignacio Cuitún Coronado

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Although associations between work stressors and stress-related biomarkers have been reported in cross-sectional studies, the use of single time measurements of work stressors could be one of the reasons for inconsistent associations. This study examines whether repeated reports of work stress towards the end of the working career predicts allostatic load, a measure of chronic stress related physiological processes. Data from waves 2 to 6 of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA were analysed, with a main analytical sample of 2663 older adults (aged 50+ who had at least one measurement of effort-reward imbalance between waves 2–6 and a measurement of allostatic load at wave 6. Cumulative work stress over waves 2–6 were measured by the effort-reward imbalance model. ELSA respondents who had reported two or more occasions of imbalance had a higher (0.3 estimate of the allostatic load index than those who did not report any imbalance, controlling for a range of health and socio-demographic factors, as well as allostatic load at baseline. More recent reports of imbalance were significantly associated with a higher allostatic load index, whereas reports of imbalance from earlier waves of ELSA were not. The accumulation of work related stressors could have adverse effects on chronic stress biological processes.

  8. Investigation of Psychological Health and Migraine Headaches Among Personnel According to Effort-Reward Imbalance Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Darami

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: The relationship between physical-mental health and Migraine headaches and stress, especially job stress, is known. Many factors can construct job stress in work settings. The factor that has gained much attention recently is inequality (imbalance of employees’ effort versus the reward they gain. The aim of the current attempt was to investigate the validity of effort-reward imbalance model and indicate the relation of this model with migraine headaches and psychological well-being among subjects in balance and imbalance groups. Methods: Participants were 180 personnel of Oil distribution company located in Isfahan city, and instruments used were General health questionnaire (Goldberg & Hilier, Social Re-adjustment Rating Scale (Holmes & Rahe, Ahvaz Migraine Questionnaire (Najariyan and Effort-reward imbalance scale (Van Vegchel & et al.   Results: The result of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis for investigating the Construct validity of the effort-reward imbalance model showed that in both analyses, the two factor model was confirmed. Moreover, findings indicate that balance group was in better psychological (p<0/01 and physical (migraine (p<0/05 status comparing to the imbalance group. These findings indicate the significance of justice to present appropriate reward relative to personnel performance on their health.   Conclusion: Implication of these findings can improve Iranian industrial personnel health from both physical and psychological aspects.  

  9. Effects of specific muscle imbalance improvement training on the balance ability in elite fencers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taewhan; Kil, Sekee; Chung, Jinwook; Moon, Jeheon; Oh, Eunyoung

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] The lunge Motion that occurs frequently in fencing training and matches results in imbalance of the upper and lower limbs muscles. This research focuses on the improvement of the imbalance that occurs in the national team fencers of the Republic of Korea through specific muscle imbalance improvement training. [Subjects] The subjects of this research were limited to right-handed male fencers. Nine male, right-handed national fencing athletes were selected for this study (4 epee, 5 sabre; age 28.2 ± 2.2 years; height 182.3 ± 4.0 cm; weight 76.5 ± 8.2 kg; experience 12.4 ± 3.0 years). [Methods] The specific muscle imbalance improvement training program was performed for 12 weeks and Pre-Post tests were to evaluate its effect on the experimental group. Measurements comprised anthropometry, test of balance, and movement analysis. [Results] After the training program, mediolateral sway of the nondominant lower limb and the balance scale showed statistically significant improvement. [Conclusion] The specific muscle imbalance improvement training program used in this research was proven to be effective for improving the muscle imbalance of elite fencers.

  10. Erasure and reestablishment of random allelic expression imbalance after epigenetic reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Aaron Richard; Uwanogho, Dafe Aghogho; Cocks, Graham; Perfect, Leo William; Dempster, Emma; Mill, Jonathan; Price, Jack

    2016-10-01

    Clonal level random allelic expression imbalance and random monoallelic expression provides cellular heterogeneity within tissues by modulating allelic dosage. Although such expression patterns have been observed in multiple cell types, little is known about when in development these stochastic allelic choices are made. We examine allelic expression patterns in human neural progenitor cells before and after epigenetic reprogramming to induced pluripotency, observing that loci previously characterized by random allelic expression imbalance (0.63% of expressed genes) are generally reset to a biallelic state in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We subsequently neuralized the iPSCs and profiled isolated clonal neural stem cells, observing that significant random allelic expression imbalance is reestablished at 0.65% of expressed genes, including novel loci not found to show allelic expression imbalance in the original parental neural progenitor cells. Allelic expression imbalance was associated with altered DNA methylation across promoter regulatory regions, with clones characterized by skewed allelic expression being hypermethylated compared to their biallelic sister clones. Our results suggest that random allelic expression imbalance is established during lineage commitment and is associated with increased DNA methylation at the gene promoter. © 2016 Jeffries et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  11. Application of next-generation sequencing for 24-chromosome aneuploidy screening of human preimplantation embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haiyan; Jin, Hua; Liu, Lian; Liu, Jianqiao; Wang, Wei-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Aneuploidy is a leading cause of repeat implantation failure and recurrent miscarriages. Preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) enables the assessment of the numeral and structural chromosomal errors of embryos before transfer in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization. Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) has been demonstrated to be an accurate PGS method and in present thought to be the gold standard, but new technologies, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), continue to emerge. Validation of the new comprehensive NGS-based 24-chromosome aneuploidy screening technology is still needed to determine the preclinical accuracy before it might be considered as an alternative method for human PGS. In the present study, 43 human trophectoderm (TE) biopsy samples and 5 cytogenetically characterized cell lines (Coriell Cell Repositories) were tested. The same whole genome amplified product of each sample was blindly assessed with Veriseq NGS and Agilent aCGH to identify the aneuploidy status. The result showed that the NGS identified all abnormalities identified in aCGH including the numeral chromosomal abnormalities (again or loss) in the embryo samples and the structural (partial deletion and duplication) in the Coriell cell lines. Both technologies can identify a segmental imbalance as small as 1.8 Mb in size. Among the 41 TE samples with abnormal karyotypes in this study, eight (19.5 %) samples presented as multiple chromosome abnormalities. The abnormalities occurred to almost all chromosomes, except chromosome 6, 7, 17 and Y chromosome. Given its reliability and high level of consistency with an established aCGH methodology, NGS has demonstrated a robust high-throughput methodology ready for extensive clinical application in reproductive medicine, with potential advantages of reduced costs and enhanced precision. Then, a randomized controlled clinical trial confirming its clinical effectiveness is advisable to obtain a larger sequencing dataset

  12. Origin and domestication of papaya Yh chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex in papaya is controlled by a pair of nascent sex chromosomes. Females are XX, and two slightly different Y chromosomes distinguish males (XY) and hermaphrodites (XYh). The hermaphrodite-specific region of the Yh chromosome (HSY) and its X chromosome counterpart were sequenced and analyzed previo...

  13. Transient Neonatal Diabetes Associated with Chromosome 6Q24 Imprinting Abnormalities. Part 2. Epidemiology, Etiology and Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Ye. Abaturov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the genetic variants of transient neonatal diabetes, the incidence of different genetic defects in patients with 6q24-TNDM syndrome. There were presented in detail the mechanisms of genetic disorders leading to this disease. It is shown that the development of 6q24-TNDM is associated with paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 6, unbalanced q24 duplication on the copy of paternal chromosome 6 and ICR hypomethylation on the maternal copy of chromosome 6q24. Deficiency of gene expression of transcription factor PDX-1 plays an important role in the regeneration of the pancreas and in the differentiation of β-cells, and high rate of proliferation and apoptosis of the cells is associated with imbalance in the production of insulin and the need for it. There was indicated the role of ZAC1 protein in the pathoge­nesis of the disease.

  14. Characterization of regions of chromosomes 12 and 16 involved in nephroblastoma tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austruy, E; Candon, S; Henry, I; Gyapay, G; Tournade, M F; Mannens, M; Callen, D; Junien, C; Jeanpierre, C

    1995-12-01

    There are at least three loci involved in Wilms' tumor (WT) tumorigenesis: WT1 in 11p13, WT2 in 11p15.5, and WT3, as yet unmapped. A compilation of cytogenetic data published for 107 WT revealed that deletion of chromosome 16 and duplication of chromosome 12 occur as frequently as the well-documented 11p deletions. Allelic imbalance for chromosomes 16 and 12 was investigated in a series of 28 WT. By use of a large panel of restriction fragment length polymorphisms and (CA)n probes, we demonstrated loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for 16q in seven (25%) of the tumors. The whole length of 16q was involved in six of the tumors. Moreover, consistent with a previous report of 16q13 LOH in a sporadic WT and a constitutional breakpoint with a Beckwith-Wiedemann patient, we map a region of particular interest to between D16S308 and D16S320. The assumption that 16q LOH may be an early event was based on: 1) the detection of 16q LOH in one case of nephroblastomatosis; 2) the presence of a complete (clonal) 16q LOH in a tumor with partial (mosaic) 11p LOH; and 3) 16q LOH as the sole abnormality in one WT. By quantification of chromosome 12 allelic imbalance, we detected duplication in 18% of the total series and in 25% of the sporadic unilateral cases. The common region extended from the centromere to D12S7 in 12q21.1-q23. We also suggest that the various pathogenetically important loci are not equally involved in the different forms of WT and that their sequential involvement may differ.

  15. Intrinsic MYH7 expression regulation contributes to tissue level allelic imbalance in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, Judith; Syring, Mandy; Rose, Julia; Weber, Anna-Lena; Ernstberger, Pia; Mayer, Anne-Kathrin; Becker, Edgar; Keyser, Britta; Dos Remedios, Cristobal; Perrot, Andreas; van der Velden, Jolanda; Francino, Antonio; Navarro-Lopez, Francesco; Ho, Carolyn Yung; Brenner, Bernhard; Kraft, Theresia

    2017-11-03

    HCM, the most common inherited cardiac disease, is mainly caused by mutations in sarcomeric genes. More than a third of the patients are heterozygous for mutations in the MYH7 gene encoding for the β-myosin heavy chain. In HCM-patients, expression of the mutant and the wildtype allele can be unequal, thus leading to fractions of mutant and wildtype mRNA and protein which deviate from 1:1. This so-called allelic imbalance was detected in whole tissue samples but also in individual cells. There is evidence that the severity of HCM not only depends on the functional effect of the mutation itself, but also on the fraction of mutant protein in the myocardial tissue. Allelic imbalance has been shown to occur in a broad range of genes. Therefore, we aimed to examine whether the MYH7-alleles are intrinsically expressed imbalanced or whether the allelic imbalance is solely associated with the disease. We compared the expression of MYH7-alleles in non-HCM donors and in HCM-patients with different MYH7-missense mutations. In the HCM-patients, we identified imbalanced as well as equal expression of both alleles. Also at the protein level, allelic imbalance was determined. Most interestingly, we also discovered allelic imbalance and balance in non-HCM donors. Our findings therefore strongly indicate that apart from mutation-specific mechanisms, also non-HCM associated allelic-mRNA expression regulation may account for the allelic imbalance of the MYH7 gene in HCM-patients. Since the relative amount of mutant mRNA and protein or the extent of allelic imbalance has been associated with the severity of HCM, individual analysis of the MYH7-allelic expression may provide valuable information for the prognosis of each patient.

  16. Effect of effort-reward imbalance and burnout on infection control among Ecuadorian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colindres, C V; Bryce, E; Coral-Rosero, P; Ramos-Soto, R M; Bonilla, F; Yassi, A

    2017-11-07

    Nurses are frequently exposed to transmissible infections, yet adherence to infection control measures is suboptimal. There has been inadequate research into how the psychosocial work environment affects compliance with infection control measures, especially in low- and middle-income countries. To examine the association between effort-reward imbalance, burnout and adherence to infection control measures among nurses in Ecuador. A cross-sectional study linking psychosocial work environment indicators to infection control adherence. The study was conducted among 333 nurses in four Ecuadorian hospitals. Self-administered questionnaires assessed demographic variables, perceived infection risk, effort-reward imbalance, burnout and infection control adherence. Increased effort-reward imbalance was found to be a unique incremental predictor of exposure to burnout, and burnout was a negative unique incremental predictor of nurses' self-reported adherence with infection control measures. Results suggest an effort-reward imbalance-burnout continuum, which, at higher levels, contributes to reduce adherence to infection control. The Ecuadorean government has made large efforts to improve universal access to health care, yet this study suggests that workplace demands on nurses remain problematic. This study highlights the contribution of effort-reward-imbalance-burnout continuum to the chain of infection by decreased adherence to infection control of nurses. Health authorities should closely monitor the effect of new policies on psychosocial work environment, especially when expanding services and increasing public accessibility with limited resources. Additionally, organizational and psychosocial interventions targeting effort-reward imbalance and burnout in nurses should be considered part of a complete infection prevention and control strategy. Further study is warranted to identify interventions that best ameliorate effort-reward imbalance and burnout in low- and middle

  17. Segregation of chromosomes in sperm of a t(X;18)(q11;p11.1) carrier inherited from his mother: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, A; Douet-Guilbert, N; Le Bris, M J; Keromnes, G; Langlois, M L; Barrière, P; Amice, J; Amice, V; De Braekeleer, M; Morel, F

    2008-01-01

    Balanced reciprocal translocations are the most common structural abnormalities; most involve two autosomes while a few involve a gonosome (X or Y chromosome) and an autosome. These rearrangements are usually associated with infertility and/or a higher risk of chromosomal imbalances among offspring. This 26 years old man was first seen because of a 3-year history of primary infertility. He had been found to have a translocation, t(X;18)(q11;p11.1), inherited from his mother when he was 9 years old. Semen analysis showed a very severe oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT). A total of 447 spermatozoa were analysed using three-colour fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The alternate segregation pattern, leading to a normal or balanced chromosomal content, was found in 54.36% of the spermatozoa studied. The frequencies of Adjacent I, Adjacent II, 3:1 segregation and diploidy (or 4:0 segregation) were 8.28, 5.14, 22.37 and 2.01%, respectively. Balanced reciprocal translocations between an autosome and the X chromosome lead to important disruptions in human spermatogenesis. Almost all the males with an X-autosome translocation have azoospermia. The man reported here had very severe OAT and is the first in whom the meiotic segregation pattern was analysed. This case further emphasizes the interest in performing FISH studies in infertile males with a chromosomal translocation to provide them with a personalized imbalance risk.

  18. Application of molecular cytogenetic techniques to clarify apparently balanced complex chromosomal rearrangements in two patients with an abnormal phenotype: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongen Michel A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCR are rare cytogenetic findings that are difficult to karyotype by conventional cytogenetic analysis partially because of the relative low resolution of this technique. High resolution genotyping is necessary in order to identify cryptic imbalances, for instance near the multiple breakpoints, to explain the abnormal phenotype in these patients. We applied several molecular techniques to elucidate the complexity of the CCRs of two adult patients with abnormal phenotypes. Results Multicolour fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH showed that in patient 1 the chromosomes 1, 10, 15 and 18 were involved in the rearrangement whereas for patient 2 the chromosomes 5, 9, 11 and 13 were involved. A 250 k Nsp1 SNP-array analysis uncovered a deletion in chromosome region 10p13 for patient 1, harbouring 17 genes, while patient 2 showed no pathogenic gains or losses. Additional FISH analysis with locus specific BAC-probes was performed, leading to the identification of cryptic interstitial structural rearrangements in both patients. Conclusion Application of M-FISH and SNP-array analysis to apparently balanced CCRs is useful to delineate the complex chromosomal rearrangement in detail. However, it does not always identify cryptic imbalances as an explanation for the abnormal phenotype in patients with a CCR.

  19. Inherited unbalanced structural chromosome abnormalities at prenatal chromosome analysis are rarely ascertained through recurrent miscarriage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, M. T. M.; Korevaar, J. C.; Tjoa, W. M.; Leschot, N. J.; Bossuyt, P. M. M.; Knegt, A. C.; Suykerbuyk, R. F.; Hochstenbach, R.; van der Veen, F.; Goddijn, M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the mode of ascertainment of inherited unbalanced structural chromosome abnormalities detected at prenatal chromosome analysis. METHODS: From the databases of three centres for clinical genetics in the Netherlands, all cases of inherited unbalanced structural chromosome

  20. Inherited unbalanced structural chromosome abnormalities at prenatal chromosome analysis are rarely ascertained through recurrent miscarriage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, M. T. M.; Korevaar, J. C.; Tjoa, W. M.; Leschot, N. J.; Bossuyt, P. M. M.; Knegt, A. C.; Suykerbuyk, R. F.; Hochstenbach, R.; van der Veen, F.; Goddijn, M.

    Objective To determine the mode of ascertainment of inherited unbalanced structural chromosome abnormalities detected at prenatal chromosome analysis. Methods From the databases of three centres for clinical genetics in the Netherlands, all cases of inherited unbalanced structural chromosome

  1. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S. [GSI, Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    Recent studies on radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the progeny of exposed mammalian cells were briefly described as well as other related studies. For the analysis of chromosomal damage in clones, cells were seeded directly after exposure in cell well-dish to form single cell clones and post-irradiation chromosome aberrations were scored. Both exposure to isoeffective doses of X-ray or 270 MeV/u C-ions (13 keV/{mu}m) increased the number of clones with abnormal karyotype and the increase was similar for X-ray and for C-ions. Meanwhile, in the progeny of cells for mass cultures, there was no indication of a delayed expression of chromosomal damage up to 40 population doublings after the exposure. A high number of aberrant cells were only observed directly after exposure to 10.7 MeV/u O-ions, i.e. in the first cycle cells and decreased with subsequent cell divisions. The reason for these differences in the radiation-induced chromosomal instability between clonal isolates and mass culture has not been clarified. Recent studies indicated that genomic instability occurs at a high frequency in the progeny of cells irradiated with both sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. Such genomic instability is thought likely to increase the risk of carcinogenesis, but more data are required for a well understanding of the health risks resulting from radiation-induced delayed instability. (M.N.)

  2. Chromosome segregation in plant meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda eZamariola

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Faithful chromosome segregation in meiosis is essential for ploidy stability over sexual life cycles. In plants, defective chromosome segregation caused by gene mutations or other factors leads to the formation of unbalanced or unreduced gametes creating aneuploid or polyploid progeny, respectively. Accurate segregation requires the coordinated execution of conserved processes occurring throughout the two meiotic cell divisions. Synapsis and recombination ensure the establishment of chiasmata that hold homologous chromosomes together allowing their correct segregation in the first meiotic division, which is also tightly regulated by cell-cycle dependent release of cohesin and monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules. In meiosis II, bi-orientation of sister kinetochores and proper spindle orientation correctly segregate chromosomes in four haploid cells. Checkpoint mechanisms acting at kinetochores control the accuracy of kinetochore-microtubule attachment, thus ensuring the completion of segregation. Here we review the current knowledge on the processes taking place during chromosome segregation in plant meiosis, focusing on the characterization of the molecular factors involved.

  3. New Advances in Chromosome Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Our knowledge of the "architecture" of chromosomes has grown enormously in the past decade. This new insight has been enabled largely through advances in interdisciplinary research methods at the cutting-edge interface of the life and physical sciences. Importantly this has involved several state-of-the-art biophysical tools used in conjunction with molecular biology approaches which enable investigation of chromosome structure and function in living cells. Also, there are new and emerging interfacial science tools which enable significant improvements to the spatial and temporal resolution of quantitative measurements, such as in vivo super-resolution and powerful new single-molecule biophysics methods, which facilitate probing of dynamic chromosome processes hitherto impossible. And there are also important advances in the methods of theoretical biophysics which have enabled advances in predictive modeling of this high quality experimental data from molecular and physical biology to generate new understanding of the modes of operation of chromosomes, both in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Here, I discuss these advances, and take stock on the current state of our knowledge of chromosome architecture and speculate where future advances may lead.

  4. Mechanisms for Complex Chromosomal Insertions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shen; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Akdemir, Zeynep Coban; Yuan, Bo; Cooper, Mitchell L; Magriñá, Maria A; Bacino, Carlos A; Lalani, Seema R; Breman, Amy M; Smith, Janice L; Patel, Ankita; Song, Rodger H; Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Carvalho, Claudia M B; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Lupski, James R

    2016-11-01

    Chromosomal insertions are genomic rearrangements with a chromosome segment inserted into a non-homologous chromosome or a non-adjacent locus on the same chromosome or the other homologue, constituting ~2% of nonrecurrent copy-number gains. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms of their formation. We identified 16 individuals with complex insertions among 56,000 individuals tested at Baylor Genetics using clinical array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Custom high-density aCGH was performed on 10 individuals with available DNA, and breakpoint junctions were fine-mapped at nucleotide resolution by long-range PCR and DNA sequencing in 6 individuals to glean insights into potential mechanisms of formation. We observed microhomologies and templated insertions at the breakpoint junctions, resembling the breakpoint junction signatures found in complex genomic rearrangements generated by replication-based mechanism(s) with iterative template switches. In addition, we analyzed 5 families with apparently balanced insertion in one parent detected by FISH analysis and found that 3 parents had additional small copy-number variants (CNVs) at one or both sides of the inserting fragments as well as at the inserted sites. We propose that replicative repair can result in interchromosomal complex insertions generated through chromothripsis-like chromoanasynthesis involving two or three chromosomes, and cause a significant fraction of apparently balanced insertions harboring small flanking CNVs.

  5. Mechanisms for Complex Chromosomal Insertions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Gu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal insertions are genomic rearrangements with a chromosome segment inserted into a non-homologous chromosome or a non-adjacent locus on the same chromosome or the other homologue, constituting ~2% of nonrecurrent copy-number gains. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms of their formation. We identified 16 individuals with complex insertions among 56,000 individuals tested at Baylor Genetics using clinical array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. Custom high-density aCGH was performed on 10 individuals with available DNA, and breakpoint junctions were fine-mapped at nucleotide resolution by long-range PCR and DNA sequencing in 6 individuals to glean insights into potential mechanisms of formation. We observed microhomologies and templated insertions at the breakpoint junctions, resembling the breakpoint junction signatures found in complex genomic rearrangements generated by replication-based mechanism(s with iterative template switches. In addition, we analyzed 5 families with apparently balanced insertion in one parent detected by FISH analysis and found that 3 parents had additional small copy-number variants (CNVs at one or both sides of the inserting fragments as well as at the inserted sites. We propose that replicative repair can result in interchromosomal complex insertions generated through chromothripsis-like chromoanasynthesis involving two or three chromosomes, and cause a significant fraction of apparently balanced insertions harboring small flanking CNVs.

  6. Dean flow fractionation of chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockin, Matt; Sant, Himanshu J.; Capecchi, Mario; Gale, Bruce K.

    2016-03-01

    Efforts to transfer intact mammalian chromosomes between cells have been attempted for more than 50 years with the consistent result being transfer of sub unit length pieces regardless of method. Inertial microfluidics is a new field that has shown much promise in addressing the fractionation of particles in the 2-20 μm size range (with unknown limits) and separations are based upon particles being carried by curving confined flows (within a spiral shaped, often rectangular flow chamber) and migrating to stable "equilibrium" positions of varying distance from a chamber wall depending on the balance of dean and lift forces. We fabricated spiral channels for inertial microfluidic separations using a standard soft lithography process. The concentration of chromosomes, small contaminant DNA and large cell debris in each outlets were evaluated using microscope (60X) and a flow cytometer. Using Dean Flow Fractionation, we were able to focus 4.5 times more chromosomes in outlet 2 compared to outlet 4 where most of the large debris is found. We recover 16% of the chromosomes in outlet #1- 50% in 2, 23% in 3 and 11% in 4. It should be noted that these estimates of recovery do not capture one piece of information- it actually may be that the chromosomes at each outlet are physically different and work needs to be done to verify this potential.

  7. Genetic imbalances detected by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification in a cohort of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma-the first step towards clinical personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Ilda Patrícia; Marques, Francisco; Caramelo, Francisco; Ferrão, José; Prazeres, Hugo; Julião, Maria José; Rifi, Widad; Savola, Suvi; de Melo, Joana Barbosa; Baptista, Isabel Poiares; Carreira, Isabel Marques

    2014-05-01

    Oral tumors are a growing health problem worldwide; thus, it is mandatory to establish genetic markers in order to improve diagnosis and early detection of tumors, control relapses and, ultimately, delineate individualized therapies. This study was the first to evaluate and discuss the clinical applicability of a multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) probe panel directed to head and neck cancer. Thirty primary oral squamous cell tumors were analyzed using the P428 MLPA probe panel. We detected genetic imbalances in 26 patients and observed a consistent pattern of distribution of genetic alterations in terms of losses and gains for some chromosomes, particularly for chromosomes 3, 8, and 11. Regarding the latter, some specific genes were highlighted due to frequent losses of genetic material--RARB, FHIT, CSMD1, GATA4, and MTUS1--and others due to gains--MCCC1, MYC, WISP1, PTK2, CCND1, FGF4, FADD, and CTTN. We also verified that the gains of MYC and WISP1 genes seem to suggest higher propensity of tumors localized in the floor of the mouth. This study proved the value of this MLPA probe panel for a first-tier analysis of oral tumors. The probemix was developed to include target regions that have been already shown to be of diagnostic/prognostic relevance for oral tumors. Furthermore, this study emphasized several of those specific genetic targets, suggesting its importance to oral tumor development, to predict patients' outcomes, and also to guide the development of novel molecular therapies.

  8. A large proportion of asymptomatic Plasmodium infections with low and sub-microscopic parasite densities in the low transmission setting of Temotu Province, Solomon Islands: challenges for malaria diagnostics in an elimination setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Ivor

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many countries are scaling up malaria interventions towards elimination. This transition changes demands on malaria diagnostics from diagnosing ill patients to detecting parasites in all carriers including asymptomatic infections and infections with low parasite densities. Detection methods suitable to local malaria epidemiology must be selected prior to transitioning a malaria control programme to elimination. A baseline malaria survey conducted in Temotu Province, Solomon Islands in late 2008, as the first step in a provincial malaria elimination programme, provided malaria epidemiology data and an opportunity to assess how well different diagnostic methods performed in this setting. Methods During the survey, 9,491 blood samples were collected and examined by microscopy for Plasmodium species and density, with a subset also examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs. The performances of these diagnostic methods were compared. Results A total of 256 samples were positive by microscopy, giving a point prevalence of 2.7%. The species distribution was 17.5% Plasmodium falciparum and 82.4% Plasmodium vivax. In this low transmission setting, only 17.8% of the P. falciparum and 2.9% of P. vivax infected subjects were febrile (≥38°C at the time of the survey. A significant proportion of infections detected by microscopy, 40% and 65.6% for P. falciparum and P. vivax respectively, had parasite density below 100/μL. There was an age correlation for the proportion of parasite density below 100/μL for P. vivax infections, but not for P. falciparum infections. PCR detected substantially more infections than microscopy (point prevalence of 8.71%, indicating a large number of subjects had sub-microscopic parasitemia. The concordance between PCR and microscopy in detecting single species was greater for P. vivax (135/162 compared to P. falciparum (36/118. The malaria RDT detected the 12 microscopy and

  9. Partial X chromosome trisomy with functional disomy of Xp due to failure of X inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustashaw, K.M.; Zurcher, V.; Dickerman, L.H.; Stallard, R.; Willard, H.F. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1994-10-15

    A 5-month-old girl with mild phenotypic abnormalities, developmental delay, and seizures was found to have the de novo karyotype 46,XX,-13,+der(13)t(X;13)(p21.2;p11.1). The partial trisomy of Xp21.2 {yields} pter was confirmed with fluorescence in situ hybridization, using an X chromosome painting probe and several cosmid and YAC probes for Xp sequences. Replication banding showed that one of the structurally normal X chromosomes was late-replicating, but that the Xp segment of the der(13) was early-replicating in all cells examined. Since segments of the X chromosome separated from the X inactivation center in Xq13.2 cannot undergo X inactivation, the result is functional disomy of distal Xp. As the loss of short arm material from chromosome 13 is not considered to be clinically significant, the genomic imbalance of Xp expressed in this patient most likely accounts for her abnormal phenotype. 39 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Carrier Frequency Offset Estimation and I/Q Imbalance Compensation for OFDM Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Omair Ahmad

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Two types of radio-frequency front-end imperfections, that is, carrier frequency offset and the inphase/quadrature (I/Q imbalance are considered for orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM communication systems. A preamble-assisted carrier frequency estimator is proposed along with an I/Q imbalance compensation scheme. The new frequency estimator reveals the relationship between the inphase and the quadrature components of the received preamble and extracts the frequency offset from the phase shift caused by the frequency offset and the cross-talk interference due to the I/Q imbalance. The proposed frequency estimation algorithm is fast, efficient, and robust to I/Q imbalance. An I/Q imbalance estimation/compensation algorithm is also presented by solving a least-square problem formulated using the same preamble as employed for the frequency offset estimation. The computational complexity of the I/Q estimation scheme is further reduced by using part of the short symbols with a little sacrifice in the estimation accuracy. Computer simulation and comparison with some of the existing algorithms are conducted, showing the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  11. Liquidity Effects on the Simultaneity of Trading Volume and Order Imbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erman Denny Arfianto

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to analyze the simultaneity between trading volume and order imbalance, the influence of past performance, market risk, market capitalization, tick size to the trading volume and the influence of tick size, depth and bid-ask spread to the order imbalance of companies that were listed on LQ 45 index. The samples in this research were selected by using the purposive sampling method with some selected criteria. Fifty-five companies listed on 2014’s LQ 45 index were chosen as the sample. The results showed that the trading volume is simultaneously related to the order imbalance; past performance, market risk, and market capitalization have the positive and significant effect to the trading volume; tick size has the negative and significant effect to the trading volume; the order imbalance has the negative and insignificant effect to the trading volume; tick size, depth, bid-ask spread, and trading volume have no significant effect to the order imbalance.

  12. Effort-reward imbalance and organisational injustice among aged nurses: a moderated mediation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topa, Gabriela; Guglielmi, Dina; Depolo, Marco

    2016-09-01

    To test the effort-reward imbalance model among older nurses, expanding it to include the moderation of overcommitment and age in the stress-health complaints relationship, mediated by organisational injustice. The theoretical framework included the effort-reward imbalance, the uncertainty management and the socio-emotional selectivity models. Employing a two-wave design, the participants were 255 nurses aged 45 years and over, recruited from four large hospitals in Spain (Madrid and Basque Country). The direct effect of imbalance on health complaints was supported: it was significant when overcommitment was low but not when it was high. Organisational injustice mediated the influence of effort-reward imbalance on health complaints. The conditional effect of the mediation of organisational injustice was significant in three of the overcommitment/age conditions but it weakened, becoming non-significant, when the level of overcommitment was low and age was high. The study tested the model in nursing populations and expanded it to the settings of occupational health and safety at work. The results of this study highlight the importance of effort-reward imbalance and organisational justice for creating healthy work environments. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. De novo complex intra chromosomal rearrangement after ICSI: characterisation by BACs micro array-CGH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quimsiyeh Mazin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In routine Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART men with severe oligozoospermia or azoospermia should be informed about the risk of de novo congenital or chromosomal abnormalities in ICSI program. Also the benefits of preimplantation or prenatal genetic diagnosis practice need to be explained to the couple. Methods From a routine ICSI attempt, using ejaculated sperm from male with severe oligozoospermia and having normal karyotype, a 30 years old pregnant woman was referred to prenatal diagnosis in the 17th week for bichorionic biamniotic twin gestation. Amniocentesis was performed because of the detection of an increased foetal nuchal translucency for one of the fetus by the sonographic examination during the 12th week of gestation (WG. Chromosome and DNA studies of the fetus were realized on cultured amniocytes Results Conventional, molecular cytogenetic and microarray CGH experiments allowed us to conclude that the fetus had a de novo pericentromeric inversion associated with a duplication of the 9p22.1-p24 chromosomal region, 46,XY,invdup(9(p22.1p24 [arrCGH 9p22.1p24 (RP11-130C19 → RP11-87O1x3]. As containing the critical 9p22 region, our case is in coincidence with the general phenotype features of the partial trisomy 9p syndrome with major growth retardation, microcephaly and microretrognathia. Conclusion This de novo complex chromosome rearrangement illustrates the possible risk of chromosome or gene defects in ICSI program and the contribution of array-CGH for mapping rapidly de novo chromosomal imbalance.

  14. Chromosome abnormalities in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas: analysis of 231 Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoli; Fan, Rong; Lin, Guowei; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2013-09-01

    Genome instability is a hallmark of cancer. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma with high levels of chromosomal aberrations. The purpose of this study was to characterize chromosomal aberrations in Chinese DLBCL patients and to compare chromosomal abnormalities between germinal centre B-cell-like (GCB) and non-GCB subgroups. Fluorescence in situ hybridization, G-band cytogenetics and immunohistochemistry were performed in 231 cases of de novo DLBCL. We demonstrated that the rate of abnormal and complex karyotypes was 89.1% (139/156) and 92.8% (129/139), respectively. We found a total of 490 structural chromosomal aberrations, including 96 frequent and recurring structural alterations. Most importantly, we identified several rare or novel chromosomal alterations: eight gains (5, 13, 14q, 17, 19p, 20, 21p, Y), one loss (21) and three recurrent translocations [t(7;15)(q22;q22), t(3;20)(p24;q13.1), t(2;3)(q21;q25)]. Moreover, the frequent recurrent genomic imbalance between GCB and non-GCB subgroups was different. Finally, we discovered two cases of concurrent IGH-BCL6 and MYC rearrangements. The rate of abnormal karyotypes in DLBCL patients of Chinese descent was similar to that of Western countries, but some common karyotypes were different, as were the abnormal karyotypes of GCB and non-GCB subgroups. Our discovery of rare and novel abnormal karyotypes may represent unique chromosomal alterations in Chinese DLBCL patients. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Chromosomal Evolution in Lower Vertebrates: Sex Chromosomes in Neotropical Fishes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cioffi, M. de B.; Yano, C. F.; Sember, Alexandr; Bertollo, L.A.C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 10 (2017), č. článku 258. ISSN 2073-4425 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_003/0000460 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : alternative evolutionary models * simple and multiple sex chromosomes * independent and common origins Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 3.600, year: 2016

  16. Asynchronous Cholinergic Drive Correlates with Excitation-Inhibition Imbalance via a Neuronal Ca2+ Sensor Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keming Zhou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Excitation-inhibition imbalance in neural networks is widely linked to neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. However, how genetic factors alter neuronal activity, leading to excitation-inhibition imbalance, remains unclear. Here, using the C. elegans locomotor circuit, we examine how altering neuronal activity for varying time periods affects synaptic release pattern and animal behavior. We show that while short-duration activation of excitatory cholinergic neurons elicits a reversible enhancement of presynaptic strength, persistent activation results to asynchronous and reduced cholinergic drive, inducing imbalance between endogenous excitation and inhibition. We find that the neuronal calcium sensor protein NCS-2 is required for asynchronous cholinergic release in an activity-dependent manner and dampens excitability of inhibitory neurons non-cell autonomously. The function of NCS-2 requires its Ca2+ binding and membrane association domains. These results reveal a synaptic mechanism implicating asynchronous release in regulation of excitation-inhibition balance.

  17. Evolutionary Cluster-Based Synthetic Oversampling Ensemble (ECO-Ensemble) for Imbalance Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Pin; Goh, Chi Keong; Tan, Kay Chen

    2017-09-01

    Class imbalance problems, where the number of samples in each class is unequal, is prevalent in numerous real world machine learning applications. Traditional methods which are biased toward the majority class are ineffective due to the relative severity of misclassifying rare events. This paper proposes a novel evolutionary cluster-based oversampling ensemble framework, which combines a novel cluster-based synthetic data generation method with an evolutionary algorithm (EA) to create an ensemble. The proposed synthetic data generation method is based on contemporary ideas of identifying oversampling regions using clusters. The novel use of EA serves a twofold purpose of optimizing the parameters of the data generation method while generating diverse examples leveraging on the characteristics of EAs, reducing overall computational cost. The proposed method is evaluated on a set of 40 imbalance datasets obtained from the University of California, Irvine, database, and outperforms current state-of-the-art ensemble algorithms tackling class imbalance problems.

  18. Thermal imbalance force modelling for a GPS satellite using the finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigue, Yvonne; Schutz, Bob E.

    1991-01-01

    Methods of analyzing the perturbation due to thermal radiation and determining its effects on the orbits of GPS satellites are presented, with emphasis on the FEM technique to calculate satellite solar panel temperatures which are used to determine the magnitude and direction of the thermal imbalance force. Although this force may not be responsible for all of the force mismodeling, conditions may work in combination with the thermal imbalance force to produce such accelerations on the order of 1.e-9 m/sq s. If submeter accurate orbits and centimeter-level accuracy for geophysical applications are desired, a time-dependent model of the thermal imbalance force should be used, especially when satellites are eclipsing, where the observed errors are larger than for satellites in noneclipsing orbits.

  19. Chromosomal rearrangements formed by rrn recombination do not improve replichore balance in host-specific Salmonella enterica serovars.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T David Matthews

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most of the ∼2,600 serovars of Salmonella enterica have a broad host range as well as a conserved gene order. In contrast, some Salmonella serovars are host-specific and frequently exhibit large chromosomal rearrangements from recombination between rrn operons. One hypothesis explaining these rearrangements suggests that replichore imbalance introduced from horizontal transfer of pathogenicity islands and prophages drives chromosomal rearrangements in an attempt to improve balance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This hypothesis was directly tested by comparing the naturally-occurring chromosomal arrangement types to the theoretically possible arrangement types, and estimating their replichore balance using a calculator. In addition to previously characterized strains belonging to host-specific serovars, the arrangement types of 22 serovar Gallinarum strains was also determined. Only 48 out of 1,440 possible arrangement types were identified in 212 host-specific strains. While the replichores of most naturally-occurring arrangement types were well-balanced, most theoretical arrangement types had imbalanced replichores. Furthermore, the most common types of rearrangements did not change replichore balance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results did not support the hypothesis that replichore imbalance causes these rearrangements, and suggest that the rearrangements could be explained by aspects of a host-specific lifestyle.

  20. What is Driving Global Imbalances? The Global Savings Glut Hypothesis Reexamined

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai-Won Ryou

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the middle of the global financial crisis, global imbalances seem to have been resolved to some extent, but it remains to be seen whether these imbalances will emerge again along with economic recovery. In order to cope with this global issue, we need to clarify what caused global imbalances in the first place. This paper aims to evaluate the relative importance of the "global savings glut" to the U.S. external imbalances. Drawing on the portfolio balance model, we analyze how the process of interaction between the U.S. current account deficit, capital inflows, and the U.S. dollar exchange rate is linked to domestic and external factors. Our empirical analysis shows that the U.S. current account deficit maintained since the early 1990s is mainly driven by the domestic factors, such as a decrease in the U.S. national savings and an increase in money supply growth. The size of the negative effect of a "global savings glut" measured by an increase in the East Asian countries' national savings (i.e. China, Japan and Korea on the U.S. current account seems to be exaggerated. Meanwhile, current account does not appear to be sensitive to changes in the exchange rate. This finding implies that the rectification of global imbalances is hardly possible to achieve by means of depreciating the U.S. dollar alone while leaving the structural factors unchanged. In order to achieve global rebalancing, the U.S. should increase its savings rate, reduce fiscal deficit, and tighten its money supply. While an increase in the domestic demand in the surplus countries such as China and Japan may be helpful in rectifying global imbalances, it appears to be insufficient per se.

  1. Determinants of Pre-Operative Shoulder Imbalance in Patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ghandhari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Disfiguring complications of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS could significantly affect the patients’ satisfaction. In this regard, shoulder imbalance has recently received much attention in spite of its poorly understood challenge. Objectives While the majority of previous studies have attempted to explore preoperative determinants of postoperative shoulder imbalance, in this study we aimed to investigate the factors correlated with the preoperative shoulder imbalance. Methods A total of 72 AIS patients with no previous history of corrective surgery took part in this study. The study sample comprised 63 females and 9 males with the mean age of 15.72 ± 3.08 years, ranging from 11 to 26 years. Shoulder imbalance parameters including T1 tilt, first rib angle (FRA, and clavicle angle (CA were assessed and their correlation with radiographic characteristics of the curves and patients’ demographic data including age and sex was evaluated. Results T1 tilt was more severe in males (mean -8.2° than females (mean -2.8° (P = 0.04. Moreover, a significant correlation was found between age and FRA (P = 0.04. A significant correlation was also observed between main thoracic (MT curve size and all the three parameters of shoulder imbalance (P < 0.001. The reverse correlation of T5 - T12 kyphosis angle with FRA was also significant (P = 0.04. Conclusions According to our results, in AIS, pre-operative radiographic shoulder imbalance could be affected by some curve parameters including MT and kyphosis size and demographic characteristics of patients including age and gender.

  2. Multi-hop amplify-and-forward relaying cooperation in the presence of I/Q imbalance

    KAUST Repository

    Qi, Jian

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, multi-hop cooperative networks implementing channel state information (CSI)-assisted amplify-and-forward (AF) relaying in the presence of in-phase and quadrature-phase (I/Q) imbalance are investigated. We propose a compensation algorithm for the I/Q imbalance. The performance of the multi-hop CSI-assisted AF cooperative networks with and without compensation for I/Q imbalance in Nakagami-m fading environment is evaluated in terms of average symbol error probability. Numerical results are provided and show that the proposed compensation method can effectively mitigate the impact of I/Q imbalance. © 2013 IEEE.

  3. Electrolyte imbalance and sleep problems during anti-retroviral therapy: an under-recognized problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Dilshad Manzar

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, and the anti-retroviral therapy (ART associated complications necessitate that the medical care system keeps evolving for proper management of this group of patients. Electrolyte imbalance and sleep problems are common in patients on ART. Both of these conditions are associated with increased morbidity (such as acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, low CD4 count, non-adherence and depression and mortality. Therefore, screening for both sleep problems and electrolytes imbalance may help to decrease the risk of complications in patients on ART.

  4. Electrolyte imbalance and sleep problems during anti-retroviral therapy: an under-recognized problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzar, Md Dilshad; Sony, Peter; Salahuddin, Mohammed; Kumalo, Abera; Geneto, Mathewos; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Moscovitch, Adam; BaHammam, Ahmed S

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and the anti-retroviral therapy (ART) associated complications necessitate that the medical care system keeps evolving for proper management of this group of patients. Electrolyte imbalance and sleep problems are common in patients on ART. Both of these conditions are associated with increased morbidity (such as acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, low CD4 count, non-adherence and depression) and mortality. Therefore, screening for both sleep problems and electrolytes imbalance may help to decrease the risk of complications in patients on ART.

  5. CONTROL PARAMETERS FOR UNDERSTANDING AND PREVENTING PROCESS IMBALANCES IN BIOGAS PLANTS. EMPHAS IS ON VFA DYNAMICS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsø Nielsen, Henrik

    H. The experiments were carried out in lab-scale thermophilic continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTR) treating livestock waste. The imbalances included inhibition by long chain fatty acids (LCFA), inhibition by ammonia, organic overloading with proteins and organic overloading with industrial waste, i.e. meat...... and bone meal and lipids. During the main part of the experiments one reactor was connected to an online VFA sensor giving a detailed profile of the VFA dynamics during the process imbalances. Based on the results it was concluded, that propionate was the most reliable single parameter for indication...

  6. Imbalance in resting state functional connectivity is associated with eating behaviors and adiposity in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BettyAnn A. Chodkowski

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: In the absence of any explicit eating-related stimuli, the developing brain is primed toward food approach and away from food avoidance behavior with increasing adiposity. Imbalance in resting state functional connectivity that is associated with non-homeostatic eating develops during childhood, as early as 8–13 years of age. Our results indicate the importance of identifying children at risk for obesity for earlier intervention. In addition to changing eating habits and physical activity, strategies that normalize neural functional connectivity imbalance are needed to maintain healthy weight. Mindfulness may be one such approach as it is associated with increased response inhibition and decreased impulsivity.

  7. Non-invasive detection of genomic imbalances in Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells in early and advanced stage Hodgkin's lymphoma by sequencing of circulating cell-free DNA: a technical proof-of-principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberghe, Peter; Wlodarska, Iwona; Tousseyn, Thomas; Dehaspe, Luc; Dierickx, Daan; Verheecke, Magali; Uyttebroeck, Anne; Bechter, Oliver; Delforge, Michel; Vandecaveye, Vincent; Brison, Nathalie; Verhoef, Gregor E G; Legius, Eric; Amant, Frederic; Vermeesch, Joris R

    2015-02-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma is one of the most common lymphoid neoplasms in young adults, but the low abundance of neoplastic Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells in the tumour hampers the elucidation of its pathogenesis, biology, and diversity. After an incidental observation that genomic aberrations known to occur in Hodgkin's lymphoma were detectable in circulating cell-free DNA, this study was undertaken to investigate whether circulating cell-free DNA can be informative about genomic imbalances in Hodgkin's lymphoma. We applied massive parallel sequencing to circulating cell-free DNA in a prospective study of patients with biopsy proven nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's lymphoma. Genomic imbalances in Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells were investigated by fluorescence in-situ hybridisation (FISH) on tumour specimens. By non-invasive prenatal testing, we observed several genomic imbalances in circulating cell-free DNA of a pregnant woman, who was subsequently diagnosed with early-stage nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's lymphoma stage IIA during gestation. FISH on tumour tissue confirmed corresponding genomic imbalances in Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells. We prospectively studied circulating cell-free DNA of nine nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's lymphoma cases: eight at first diagnosis and one at first relapse. Seven patients had stage IIA disease and two had stage IVB disease. In eight, genomic imbalances were detected, including, among others, gain of chromosomes 2p and 9p, known to occur in Hodgkin's lymphoma. These gains and losses in circulating cell-free DNA were extensively validated by FISH on Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells in biopsy samples. Initiation of chemotherapy induced normalisation of circulating cell-free DNA profiles within 2-6 weeks. The cell cycle indicator Ki67 and cleaved caspase-3 were detected in Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells by immunohistochemistry, suggesting high turnover of Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells. In early and advanced stage nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's lymphoma, genomic

  8. Algorithm for sorting chromosomal aberrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ida; Lund, Najaaraq; Rasmussen, Steen

    2017-01-01

    Prenatal diagnostic methods and screening procedures change rapidly in these years. Years ago only karyotyping was performed prenatally, and we monitored only Down syndrome(1) . Since then the diagnostic possibilities have increased to QF-PCR, FISH, MLPA and chromosomal microarray....

  9. Chromosomal Abnormalities Associated With Omphalocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Fetuses with omphalocele have an increased risk for chromosomal abnormalities. The risk varies with maternal age, gestational age at diagnosis, association with umbilical cord cysts, complexity of associated anomalies, and the contents of omphalocele. There is considerable evidence that genetics contributes to the etiology of omphalocele. This article provides an overview of chromosomal abnormalities associated with omphalocele and a comprehensive review of associated full aneuploidy such as trisomy 18, trisomy 13, triploidy, trisomy 21, 45,X, 47,XXY, and 47,XXX, partial aneuploidy such as dup(3q, dup(11p, inv(11, dup(1q, del(1q, dup(4q, dup(5p, dup(6q, del(9p, dup(15q, dup(17q, Pallister-Killian syndrome with mosaic tetrasomy 12p and Miller-Dieker lissencephaly syndrome with deletion of 17p13.3, and uniparental disomy (UPD such as UPD 11 and UPD 14. Omphalocele is a prominent marker for chromosomal abnormalities. Perinatal identification of omphalocele should alert chromosomal abnormalities and familial unbalanced translocations, and prompt thorough cytogenetic investigations and genetic counseling.

  10. Interpreting chromosomal abnormalities using Prolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, G; Friedman, J M

    1990-04-01

    This paper describes an expert system for interpreting the standard notation used to represent human chromosomal abnormalities, namely, the International System for Human Cytogenetic Nomenclature. Written in Prolog, this program is very powerful, easy to maintain, and portable. The system can be used as a front end to any database that employs cytogenetic notation, such as a patient registry.

  11. CHROMOSOMAL MULTIPLICITY IN BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have used CHEF gel electrophoresis to screen preparations of large DNA from different Burkholderia cepacia isolates for the presence of DNA species corresponding to the linearized forms of the three chromosomes of 3.4,2.5, and 0.9 Mb identified in B. cepacia strain 17616. DNA ...

  12. Chromosome Aberrations by Heavy Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarini, Francesca; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    It is well known that mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation can show different types of chromosome aberrations (CAs) including dicentrics, translocations, rings, deletions and complex exchanges. Chromosome aberrations are a particularly relevant endpoint in radiobiology, because they play a fundamental role in the pathways leading either to cell death, or to cell conversion to malignancy. In particular, reciprocal translocations involving pairs of specific genes are strongly correlated (and probably also causally-related) with specific tumour types; a typical example is the BCR-ABL translocation for Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia. Furthermore, aberrations can be used for applications in biodosimetry and more generally as biomarkers of exposure and risk, that is the case for cancer patients monitored during Carbon-ion therapy and astronauts exposed to space radiation. Indeed hadron therapy and astronauts' exposure to space radiation represent two of the few scenarios where human beings can be exposed to heavy ions. After a brief introduction on the main general features of chromosome aberrations, in this work we will address key aspects of the current knowledge on chromosome aberration induction, both from an experimental and from a theoretical point of view. More specifically, in vitro data will be summarized and discussed, outlining important issues such as the role of interphase death/mitotic delay and that of complex-exchange scoring. Some available in vivo data on cancer patients and astronauts will be also reported, together with possible interpretation problems. Finally, two of the few available models of chromosome aberration induction by ionizing radiation (including heavy ions) will be described and compared, focusing on the different assumptions adopted by the authors and on how these models can deal with heavy ions.

  13. Complex chromosome rearrangements related 15q14 microdeletion plays a relevant role in phenotype expression and delineates a novel recurrent syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaiuolo Anna

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Complex chromosome rearrangements are constitutional structural rearrangements involving three or more chromosomes or having more than two breakpoints. These are rarely seen in the general population but their frequency should be much higher due to balanced states with no phenotypic presentation. These abnormalities preferentially occur de novo during spermatogenesis and are transmitted in families through oogenesis. Here, we report a de novo complex chromosome rearrangement that interests eight chromosomes in eighteen-year-old boy with an abnormal phenotype consisting in moderate developmental delay, cleft palate, and facial dysmorphisms. Standard G-banding revealed four apparently balanced traslocations involving the chromosomes 1;13, 3;19, 9;15 and 14;18 that appeared to be reciprocal. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis showed no imbalances at all the breakpoints observed except for an interstitial microdeletion on chromosome 15. This deletion is 1.6 Mb in size and is located at chromosome band 15q14, distal to the Prader-Willi/Angelman region. Comparing the features of our patient with published reports of patients with 15q14 deletion this finding corresponds to the smallest genomic region of overlap. The deleted segment at 15q14 was investigated for gene content.

  14. Chromosome imaging by atomic force microscopy: influencing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    investigated factors influencing chromosome ultrastructures or species-specific ultrastructural characteristics. We studied the effects of several factors on AFM imag- ing of chromosomal ultrastructures. We found that process- ing time had little effect on chromosomal ultrastructures, but that trypsin digestion had a large effect.

  15. Morphology and structure of polytene chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhimulev, I.F. [Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31

    The morphology and structure of polytene chromosomes is the subject of this detailed volume of Advances in Genetics. Polytene chromosomes are the only interphase chromosomes that appear throughout as individual structures, and therefore offer the kind of detail of the molecular biology that geneticists need. 2869 refs., 123 figs., 27 tabs.

  16. Chromosome number and cytomorphological characterization of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromosome counts from natural populations of Abrus pulchellus in Nigeria were carried out. Tetraploid (2n = 44) chromosome number was constant in all the samples investigated. The 44 chromosomes fall into three cytomorphological categories: eight metacentric and eight submetacentric pairs, and six acrocentric pairs.

  17. Familial transmission of a ring chromosome 21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael

    1987-01-01

    A ring chromosome 21 was found in a phenotypically normal mother and her son. The clinical findings in the son were bilateral retention of the testes and a slightly delayed puberty onset. Consequences of a ring formation of a chromosome 21 in phenotypically normal patients are presented...... and discussed, and the previously reported cases of familially transmitted G-group ring chromosomes are reviewed....

  18. High resolution analysis of interphase chromosome domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A. E.; Jaunin, F.; Fakan, S.; Aten, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Chromosome territories need to be well defined at high resolution before functional aspects of chromosome organization in interphase can be explored. To visualize chromosomes by electron microscopy (EM), the DNA of Chinese hamster fibroblasts was labeled in vivo with thymidine analogue BrdU. Labeled

  19. A DNA Crosslinker Collects Mitotic Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingxuan; Heald, Rebecca

    2017-09-11

    Incorporating each set of daughter chromosomes into a single nucleus at the end of mitosis is essential for genome stability. In a recent Cell paper, Samwer et al. (2017) show that by non-covalently crosslinking DNA, BAF promotes chromosome coalescence, preventing nuclear membranes from enwrapping individual chromosomes to form micronuclei. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Plain English Map of the Human Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Presents a chromosome map for 19 known chromosomes in human genetics. Describes the characteristics attributed to the genetic codes for each of the chromosomes and discusses the teaching applications of the chromosome map. (MDH)

  1. Combined FISH and PRINS sperm analysis of complex chromosome rearrangement t(1;19;13): an approach facilitating PGD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loup, V; Bernicot, I; Janssens, P; Hedon, B; Hamamah, S; Pellestor, F; Anahory, T

    2010-02-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs) are structural aberrations involving three or more breakpoints on two or more chromosomes. These CCRs result in a high rate of chromosome imbalances potentially leading to subfertility and congenital abnormality. In this study, we analysed meiotic segregation in the sperm of a patient with a familial CCR 46, XY,t(1;19;13)(p31;q13.2;q31)mat included in an intracytoplasmic sperm injection program because of oligoasthenozoospermia. The rearrangement was first identified using conventional and molecular cytogenetic methods. Primed in situ labelling (PRINS) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques were then combined allowing the simultaneous use of five fluorochromes on the same sperm preparation, for the segregation analysis and the evaluation of the reproductive options for this patient. Segregation analysis was performed in a total of 1822 sperm nuclei from the translocation carrier. The percentage of unbalanced sperm was 75.9%, including 34.1% from 3:3 segregation, 38.2% from 4:2 segregation, 3.5% from 5:1 segregation and 0.05% from 6:0 segregation. Only 14.8% of sperm nuclei were consistent with a normal or balanced chromosome complement. In conclusion, chromosome segregation analysis combining FISH and PRINS was performed in sperm from a CCR carrier using five fluorochromes. These results advance our understanding of the mechanisms of meiotic segregation, and facilitate the assessment of the usefulness of preimplantation genetic diagnosis procedures in CCR couples.

  2. Maternal heterodisomy/isodisomy and paternal supernumerary ring of chromosome 7 in a child with Silver-Russell syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combi, Romina; Sala, Elena; Villa, Nicoletta; Crosti, Francesca; Beccaria, Luciano; Cogliardi, Anna; Tenchini, Maria L; Dalprà, Leda

    2008-01-01

    Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) is clinically variable although most cases have several common signs. Different chromosomes and chromosomal regions have been associated with SRS. Maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) of chromosome 7 is responsible for 5-10% of cases, probably because of an imbalance between maternal and paternal imprinted genes and more recently maternal duplication or epimutations in the 11p15 imprinted region have been described. To date, only two patients with maternal UPD7 and a mosaic condition for a supernumerary ring 7 marker have been reported, and we here report a further case. Standard QFQ banding of lymphocytes as well as fluorescence in-situ hybridization analyses were performed to identify and characterize the supernumerary marker. UPD testing was performed on both the patient's and parents' DNA using chromosome 7 microsatellite markers. The patient demonstrated a ring in about 4% of the analysed cells. On the basis of cytogenetic and molecular results, break points were tentatively identified as 7p11.2 and 7q21. Maternal hetero-/iso-UPD and a paternal origin for the supernumerary ring were demonstrated. Clinical data comparison between our patient who has a SRS phenotype and cases with hetero-/iso-UPD7 mat and mosaicism for a paternally derived chromosome 7 ring and previously reported ring 7 cases suggest that the SRS phenotype is probably because of the UPD rather than to the partial trisomy.

  3. Single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based concurrent screening of 24-chromosome aneuploidy and unbalanced translocations in preimplantation human embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treff, Nathan R; Northrop, Lesley E; Kasabwala, Khushabu; Su, Jing; Levy, Brynn; Scott, Richard T

    2011-04-01

    To develop, validate, and apply a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray-based method for simultaneous preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of unbalanced inheritance of rearranged chromosomes and 24-chromosome aneuploidy screening. Prospective clinical research study. Academic reproductive medicine center. Eighteen couples carrying a balanced reciprocal or Robertsonian chromosomal rearrangement. PGD on blastocyst trophectoderm biopsy specimens. Aneuploidy, implantation, pregnancy, and delivery rates after SNP microarray-based aneuploidy and translocation screening. Single nucleotide polymorphism microarray was capable of detecting translocation-associated imbalances as small as 9.0 megabases. In the 12 transfers performed, sustained implantation occurred for 9 (45%) of 20 balanced-normal and euploid embryos replaced. The clinical pregnancy rate in patients receiving a transfer was 75% with six singleton deliveries and three ongoing singleton pregnancies thus far. Significantly fewer embryos were eligible for transfer with the incorporation of simultaneous 24-chromosome aneuploidy screening. Arrested embryos were also significantly more likely to possess unbalanced chromosomes when compared with developmentally competent blastocysts. This SNP microarray-based method provides the first opportunity to improve outcomes through comprehensive identification of euploid embryos from translocation carrier couples. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Sex chromosome-linked genes in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Sachihiro

    2006-08-01

    Recent studies of plant sex chromosome-linked genes have revealed many interesting characteristics, although there are limited reports about heteromorphic sex chromosomes in flowering plants. Sex chromosome-linked genes in angiosperms have been characterized mainly in the dioecious plant Silene latifolia. Although all such genes were isolated from transcripts of male flower buds of S. latifolia, most seem to be housekeeping genes except for the petal- and stamen-specific MADS box gene on the Y chromosome (SlAP3Y) and the male reproductive organ-specific gene on the X chromosome (MROS3X). Recent evolutionary studies have revealed at least three evolutionary strata on the X chromosome that are related to stepwise loss of recombination between the sex chromosomes. Moreover, genetic maps showed conservation of gene organization on the X chromosome in the genus Silene and substantial pericentric inversion between the X and Y chromosomes of S. latifolia during evolution. A comparison between paralogs on the sex chromosomes revealed that introns of the Y-linked genes are longer than those of X-linked paralogs. Although analyses of sex chromosome-linked genes suggest that degeneration of the Y chromosome has occurred, the Y chromosome in flowering plants remains the largest in the male genome, unlike that of mammals. Accumulation of repetitive sequences and the entire chloroplast genome on the Y chromosome appear to have contributed to this large size. However, more detailed studies will be required to help explain the basis for the fact that heteromorphic sex chromosomes in angiosperms are large.

  5. Endocrine milieu and erectile dysfunction: is oestradiol-testosterone imbalance, a risk factor in the elderly?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Srilatha, Balasubramanian; Adaikan, P Ganesan

    2011-01-01

    ...) in the elderly may well be due to pathophysiological E2T imbalance; the altered hormonal ratio may also explain the higher incidence of ED in hyperestrogenism or following exposure to environmental/plant oestrogens. Asian Journal of Andrology (2011) 13, 569573; doi:10.1038/aja.2010.129; published online 21 March 2011 Keywords: aging; erectil...

  6. Economic concepts to address future water supply-demand imbalances in Iran, Morocco and Saudi Arabia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellegers, P.J.G.J.; Immerzeel, W.; Droogers, P.

    2013-01-01

    In Middle East and North Africa (MENA) countries, renewable groundwater and surface water supply are limited while demand for water is growing rapidly. Climate change is expected to increase water demand even further. The main aim of this paper is to evaluate the water supply–demand imbalances in

  7. Economic concepts to address future water supply-demand imbalances in Iran, Morocco and Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellegers, Petra; Immerzeel, Walter; Droogers, Peter

    2013-10-01

    In Middle East and North Africa (MENA) countries, renewable groundwater and surface water supply are limited while demand for water is growing rapidly. Climate change is expected to increase water demand even further. The main aim of this paper is to evaluate the water supply-demand imbalances in Iran, Morocco and Saudi Arabia in 2040-2050 under dry, average and wet climate change projections and to show on the basis of the marginal cost and marginal value of water the optimum mix of supply-side and demand-side adjustments to address the imbalance. A hydrological model has been used to estimate the water supply-demand imbalance. Water supply and demand curves have been used to explore for which (marginal value of) water usage the marginal cost of supply-enhancement becomes too expensive. The results indicate that in the future in all cases, except in Iran under the wet climate projection, the quantity of water demanded has to be reduced considerably to address the imbalance, which is indeed what is currently happening already.

  8. Quasiparticle Lifetime in Ultracold Fermionic Mixtures with Density and Mass Imbalance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lan, Zhihao; Bruun, Georg; Lobo, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    We show that atomic Fermi mixtures with density and mass imbalance exhibit a rich diversity of scaling laws for the quasiparticle decay rate beyond the quadratic energy and temperature dependence of conventional Fermi liquids. For certain densities and mass ratios, the decay rate is linear, where...

  9. Love and fear of heights: the pathophysiology and psychology of height imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salassa, John R; Zapala, David A

    2009-01-01

    Individual psychological responses to heights vary on a continuum from acrophobia to height intolerance, height tolerance, and height enjoyment. This paper reviews the English literature and summarizes the physiologic and psychological factors that generate different responses to heights while standing still in a static or motionless environment. Perceptual cues to height arise from vision. Normal postural sway of 2 cm for peripheral objects within 3 m increases as eye-object distance increases. Postural sway >10 cm can result in a fall. A minimum of 20 minutes of peripheral retinal arc is required to detect motion. Trigonometry dictates that a 20-minute peripheral retinal arch can no longer be achieved in a standing position at an eye-object distance of >20 m. At this distance, visual cues conflict with somatosensory and vestibular inputs, resulting in variable degrees of imbalance. Co-occurring deficits in the visual, vestibular, and somatosensory systems can significantly increase height imbalance. An individual's psychological makeup, influenced by learned and genetic factors, can influence reactions to height imbalance. Enhancing peripheral vision and vestibular, proprioceptive, and haptic functions may improve height imbalance. Psychotherapy may improve the troubling subjective sensations to heights.

  10. Effects of interaction imbalance in a strongly repulsive one-dimensional Bose gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfknecht, Rafael Emilio; Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas; Foerster, Angela

    2018-01-01

    We calculate the spatial distributions and the dynamics of a few-body two-component strongly interacting Bose gas confined to an effectively one-dimensional trapping potential. We describe the densities for each component in the trap for different interaction and population imbalances. We calcula...

  11. A low-complexity feed-forward I/Q imbalance compensation algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moseley, N.A.; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a low-complexity adaptive feed- forward I/Q imbalance compensation algorithm. The feed-forward so- lution has guaranteed stability. Due to its blind nature the algorithm is easily incorporated into an existing receiver design. The algorithm uses three estimators to obtain the

  12. Charge imbalance waves and time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Octavio, M.; Skocpol, W. J.

    1981-08-01

    We have numerically solved the generalized time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation of Kramer and Watts-Tobin, modified to include the capacitive term of Kadin, Smith, and Skocpol. We obtain oscillatory phase-slip solutions which generate damped waves of charge imbalance that propagate along the one-dimensional superconducting filament.

  13. Money Overhang, Credit Overhang and Financial Imbalances in the Euro Area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, C.J.M.; de Regt, E.; van Veen, T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper focusses on the relation between external imbalances and domestic money and credit growth in the euro area. We compute money and credit overhang both for the euro area as a whole and for individual member countries. Our results show that both aggregate money and credit overhang have

  14. Reverse knowledge and technology transfer: imbalances caused by cognitive barriers in asymmetric relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Millar-Schijf, Carla C.J.M.; Choi, Chong-Ju

    2009-01-01

    An imbalance exists in almost any type of knowledge and technology transfer due to the information asymmetry of the relationship. However, this is especially the case for reverse technology and knowledge transfer which is epitomised for us by "transfers from an MNC's subsidiary to its headquarters".

  15. Effort reward imbalance is associated with vagal withdrawal in Danish public sector employees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eller, Nanna Hurwitz; Blønd, Morten; Nielsen, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The current study analyzed the relationship between psychosocial work environment assessed by the Effort Reward Imbalance Model (ERI-model) and heart rate variability (HRV) measured at baseline and again, two years later, as this relationship is scarcely covered by the literature....

  16. Socio-Cultural Imbalances in AIED Research: Investigations, Implications and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Emmanuel G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates international representations in the Artificial Intelligence in Education (AIED) research field. Its methodological and theoretical groundings are inspired by Arnett (2008) and Henrich et al. (2010a) who addressed the same issue in psychology, and respectively a) discovered massive imbalances in representation in top-tier…

  17. Structural imbalance promotes behavior analogous to aesthetic preference in domestic chicks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Elliott

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visual images may be judged 'aesthetic' when their positioning appears imbalanced. An apparent imbalance may signify an as yet incomplete action or event requiring more detailed processing. As such it may refer to phylogenetically ancient stimulus-response mechanisms such as those mediating attentional deployment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied preferences for structural balance or imbalance in week-old domestic chicks (Gallus gallus, using a conditioning procedure to reinforce pecking at either "aligned" (balanced or "misaligned" (imbalanced training stimuli. A testing phase with novel balanced and imbalanced stimuli established whether chicks would retain their conditioned behavior or revert to chance responding. Whereas those trained on aligned stimuli were equally likely to choose aligned or misaligned stimuli, chicks trained on misaligned stimuli maintained the trained preference. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results are consistent with the idea that the coding of structural imbalance is primary and even overrides classical conditioning. Generalized to the humans, these results suggest aesthetic judgments based upon structural imbalance may be based on evolutionarily ancient mechanisms, which are shared by different vertebrate species.

  18. The impact of effort-reward imbalance and learning motivation on teachers' sickness absence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derycke, Hanne; Vlerick, Peter; Van de Ven, Bart; Rots, Isabel; Clays, Els

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of the effort-reward imbalance and learning motivation on sickness absence duration and sickness absence frequency among beginning teachers in Flanders (Belgium). A total of 603 teachers, who recently graduated, participated in this study. Effort-reward imbalance and learning motivation were assessed by means of self-administered questionnaires. Prospective data of registered sickness absence during 12 months follow-up were collected. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. An imbalance between high efforts and low rewards (extrinsic hypothesis) was associated with longer sickness absence duration and more frequent absences. A low level of learning motivation (intrinsic hypothesis) was not associated with longer sickness absence duration but was significantly positively associated with sickness absence frequency. No significant results were obtained for the interaction hypothesis between imbalance and learning motivation. Further research is needed to deepen our understanding of the impact of psychosocial work conditions and personal resources on both sickness absence duration and frequency. Specifically, attention could be given to optimizing or reducing efforts spent at work, increasing rewards and stimulating learning motivation to influence sickness absence. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Storage battery operation technique of photovoltaic system to prevent the imbalance of state of charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hirotake; Takigawa, Kiyoshi; Takeda, Yukihiro

    For the large scale storage battery system of a MW class photovoltaic system, simulation analyses were conducted to prevent the imbalance of state of charge. Effects of the charge and discharge I-V characteristics dispersion of individual storage battery on the dispersion of state of charge were elucidated through these analyses. Furthermore, a proper operation method to prevent the imbalance of state of charge was investigated. In the internal resistance and the electromotive voltage which determines the charge and discharge I-V characteristics, when the dispersion is found in the electromotive voltage in particular, the dispersion of state of charge gets larger. The electromotive voltage of storage battery depends on the specific gravity of electrolyte. Consequently, in order to prevent the imbalance of state of charge, it is important to control the specific gravity. For operating the system effectively preventing the imbalance of state of charge, the specific gravity should be controlled within (+ or -) 0.3 percent of approximate mean value.

  20. Evaluation of electrolyte imbalance among tuberculosis patients receiving treatments in Southwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebimpe Wasiu Olalekan

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Hyponatraemia, hyperkalaemia, and hypochloremia characterized some of the electrolyte imbalance among TB patients receiving treatments. The raised level of bicarbonate may be attributed to overcorrection of respiratory acidosis often found in patients with tuberculosis. Monitoring electrolytes is therefore an important component of TB management.

  1. Burnout among psychosocial oncologists : an application and extension of the effort-reward imbalance model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasmussen, Victoria; Turnell, Adrienne; Butow, Phyllis; Juraskova, Ilona; Kirsten, Laura; Wiener, Lori; Patenaude, Andrea; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette; Grassi, Luigi

    ObjectivesBurnout is a significant problem among healthcare professionals working within the oncology setting. This study aimed to investigate predictors of emotional exhaustion (EE) and depersonalisation (DP) in psychosocial oncologists, through the application of the effort-reward imbalance (ERI)

  2. Allelic imbalance in the diagnosis of benign, atypical and malignant Spitz tumours.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, M.C.R.F. van; Rombout, P.D.M.; Mooi, W.J.; Molengraft, F.J. van de; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Ruiter, D.J.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.

    2002-01-01

    To test the diagnostic usefulness of allelic imbalance (AI) analysis based on routinely paraffin-embedded tissue, a series of 55 benign Spitz naevi, Spitz tumours with uncertain malignant potential, and malignant Spitzoid melanomas was investigated. Laser microdissection was used to ensure

  3. Relationship between effort-reward imbalance and hair cortisol concentration in female kindergarten teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qi, Xingliang; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yapeng; Ji, Shuang; Chen, Zheng; Sluiter, Judith K.; Deng, Huihua

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the relationship between effort-reward imbalance and hair cortisol concentration among teachers to examine whether hair cortisol can be a biomarker of chronic work stress. Hair samples were collected from 39 female teachers from three kindergartens. Cortisol was

  4. Cognitive vulnerability and implicit emotional processing : imbalance in frontolimbic brain areas?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewold, Nynke A.; Roest, Annelieke M.; Renken, Remco J.; Opmeer, Esther M.; Veltman, Dick J.; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; de Jonge, Peter; Aleman, Andre; Harmer, Catherine J.

    It has been proposed that the neural basis for cognitive vulnerability to depression involves an imbalance in frontolimbic activity during the processing of cues with a negative affective value. Although the question is central to cognitive theory, whether this association is amplified by diagnosis

  5. Mapping strategies: Chromosome 16 workshop. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    The following topics from a workshop on chromosome 16 are briefly discussed: genetic map of chromosome 16; chromosome breakpoint map of chromosome 16; integrated physical/genetic map of chromosome 16; pulsed field map of the 16p13.2--p13.3 region (3 sheets); and a report of the HGM10 chromosome 16 committee.

  6. Novel insights into mitotic chromosome condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskadlo, Ewa; Oliveira, Raquel A.

    2016-01-01

    The fidelity of mitosis is essential for life, and successful completion of this process relies on drastic changes in chromosome organization at the onset of nuclear division. The mechanisms that govern chromosome compaction at every cell division cycle are still far from full comprehension, yet recent studies provide novel insights into this problem, challenging classical views on mitotic chromosome assembly. Here, we briefly introduce various models for chromosome assembly and known factors involved in the condensation process (e.g. condensin complexes and topoisomerase II). We will then focus on a few selected studies that have recently brought novel insights into the mysterious way chromosomes are condensed during nuclear division. PMID:27508072

  7. Automated clinical system for chromosome analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleman, K. R.; Friedan, H. J.; Johnson, E. T.; Rennie, P. A.; Wall, R. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An automatic chromosome analysis system is provided wherein a suitably prepared slide with chromosome spreads thereon is placed on the stage of an automated microscope. The automated microscope stage is computer operated to move the slide to enable detection of chromosome spreads on the slide. The X and Y location of each chromosome spread that is detected is stored. The computer measures the chromosomes in a spread, classifies them by group or by type and also prepares a digital karyotype image. The computer system can also prepare a patient report summarizing the result of the analysis and listing suspected abnormalities.

  8. Chromosome congression explained by nanoscale electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, L John; Shain, Daniel H

    2014-02-24

    Nanoscale electrostatic microtubule disassembly forces between positively charged molecules in kinetochores and negative charges on plus ends of microtubules have been implicated in poleward chromosome motions and may also contribute to antipoleward chromosome movements. We propose that chromosome congression can be understood in terms of antipoleward nanoscale electrostatic microtubule assembly forces between negatively charged microtubule plus ends and like-charged chromosome arms, acting in conjunction with poleward microtubule disassembly forces. Several other aspects of post-attachment prometaphase chromosome motions, as well as metaphase oscillations, are consistently explained within this framework.

  9. Imbalance of Ecosystems and the Modified Newton's 3 Laws of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H.

    2013-12-01

    Sustainability calls for the unity of human knowledge that bridges the present "two cultures" gulf between the sciences and the humanities, and the transition from the age of machine to the age of the environment quests for harmony with nature (so-called eco-civilization). Ecosystems are fundamentally different from machines, where individual components contain complex organisms instead of identical nonliving entities. Because of heterogeneity, diversity, self-organization, and openness, imbalances abound in nature. These are reflected in entropy increase over time (S > 0) and gradient persistence over space (F > 0). In this paper, three modified Newton's laws of change for ecosystems are suggested, and examples of imbalances from landscape-soil-water-ecosystem-climate will be illustrated. ● Newton's 1st law of motion: ∑F=0 → dv/dt=0. i.e., if net force acting on an object is zero, then the object's velocity remains unchanged. Modified Newton's 1st law of change (imbalance #1): ∑F>0 → dv/dt≥0. i.e., unavoidable forcing exists in nature (∑F>0), thus change always happens; however, with inertia/resistance in some systems or minimum threshold needed to change, dv/dt≥0. ● Newton's 2nd law of motion: ∑F=ma. i.e., acceleration is inversely proportional to body mass. Modified Newton's 2nd law of change (imbalance #2): ∑F≠ma. i.e., either 1) it is hard to make change because of resilience, self-adjustment, nonlinearity of interactions-feedbacks in living systems (∑F≥ma), or 2) there is possible threshold behavior or sudden collapse of a system (∑Fchange (imbalance #3): ∑F(a,b)≠-∑F(b,a). i.e., to every action, there is an opposite but not necessarily equal reaction (because of energy dissipation and/or self-organization, among other factors).

  10. General characteristics of patients with electrolyte imbalance admitted to emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcı, Arif Kadri; Koksal, Ozlem; Kose, Ataman; Armagan, Erol; Ozdemir, Fatma; Inal, Taylan; Oner, Nuran

    2013-01-01

    Fluid and electrolyte balance is a key concept to understand for maintaining homeostasis, and for a successful treatment of many metabolic disorders. There are various regulating mechanisms for the equilibrium of electrolytes in organisms. Disorders of these mechanisms result in electrolyte imbalances that may be life-threatening clinical conditions. In this study we defined the electrolyte imbalance characteristics of patients admitted to our emergency department. This study was conducted in the Emergency Department (ED) of Uludag University Faculty of Medicine, and included 996 patients over 18 years of age. All patients had electrolyte imbalance, with various etiologies other than traumatic origin. Demographic and clinical parameters were collected after obtaining informed consent from the patients. The ethical committee of the university approved this study. The mean age of the patients was 59.28±16.79, and 55% of the patients were male. The common symptoms of the patients were dyspnea (14.7%), fever (13.7%), and systemic deterioration (11.9%); but the most and least frequent electrolyte imbalances were hyponatremia and hypermagnesemia, respectively. Most frequent findings in physical examination were confusion (14%), edema (10%) and rales (9%); and most frequent pathological findings in ECG were tachycardia in 24%, and atrial fibrillation in 7% of the patients. Most frequent comorbidity was malignancy (39%). Most frequent diagnoses in the patients were sepsis (11%), pneumonia (9%), and acute renal failure (7%). Electrolyte imbalances are of particular importance in the treatment of ED patients. Therefore, ED physicians must be acknowledged of their fluid-electrolyte balance dynamics and general characteristics.

  11. The Hypermethylated Regions in Avian Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Michael; Steinlein, Claus

    2017-01-01

    Chromosomal locations and amounts of 5-methylcytosine-rich chromosome regions were detected in the karyotypes of 13 bird species by indirect immunofluorescence using a monoclonal anti-5-methylcytosine antibody. These species belong to 7 orders and 10 families of modern (Neognathae) and primitive (Palaeognathae) birds and are characterized by macro- and microchromosomes as well as ZW sex chromosomes. In all 13 species, the hypermethylated chromosome segments are confined to constitutive heterochromatin. The chromosomal locations of hypermethylated DNA regions in the karyotypes are constant and species-specific. There is no general rule with regard to the distribution of these hypermethylated chromosome regions in the genomes of birds. In most instances, hypermethylated segments are located in the centromeric regions of chromosomes, but in the sex chromosomes, these can also be found in telomeric and interstitial postitions. In most of the species studied, the centromeric heterochromatin in many, if not all, of the microchromosomes is hypermethylated. However, in one species, the only detectable hypermethylated heterochromatic regions are located in one pair of macroautosomes and in the Z sex chromosome, but none of the microchromosomes contains visible quantities of 5-methylcytosine. The analysis of 5-methylcytosine-rich chromosome regions can be very helpful for the comparative cytogenetics of closely related species or subspecies. It also reflects the dynamic evolutionary process operating in the highly repetitive DNA of eukaryotic chromosomes. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Chromosomes aberations and enviromental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Srđan Z.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Explanation the topic: Changes in genetic material can lead to aberrant cell in the direction of disorders of cellular regulation, malignant transformation, cell death, or if the adjustment was made at the level of the reproductive cells, to genetic changes in some of the consequent off spring. The topic position in scientific/professional public: Breaking of chromosomes can occur spontaneously or can be induced. Chromatid/chromosome breakings can be induced by different environmental factors: chemicals, biological clastogenic agents, accidentally or intentionally. Conclusions: The authors suggest: - making conditions for strong respect of environmental regulations; - to use higher plants for the early detection of environmental mutagens; - create and orderly update National radionuclide database.

  13. Dynamics of chromosome segregation in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1960’es the conformation and segregation of the chromosome in Escherichia coli has been a subject of interest for many scientists. However, after 40 years of research, we still know incredibly little about how the chromosome is organized inside the cell, how it manages to duplicate...... this incredibly big molecule and separate the two daughter chromosomes and how it makes sure that the daughter cells receives one copy each. The fully extended chromosome is two orders of magnitude larger than the cell in which it is contained. Hence the chromosome is heavily compacted in the cell......, and it is obvious that structured cellular actions are required to unpack it, as required for its replication, and refold the two daughter chromosomes separately without getting them entangled in the process each generation. The intention of the study was initially to find out how the chromosome is organized...

  14. CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH RECURRENT MISCARRIAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Mierla

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are involved in the etiology of recurrent spontaneous pregnancy loss and sub-fertility. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency and contribution of chromosomal abnormalities in recurrent miscarriages. The results obtained and literature review are helpful in understanding the importance of cytogenetics analysis of female infertility. To investigate the distribution of chromosomal abnormalities in the Romanian population with recurrent miscarriage, karyotype analysis by G-banding was performed from peripheral blood in 967 women infertility. Results: Chromosomal abnormalities were found to 79 women (8,17%. The percentage of chromosomal abnormalities in the studied population correlates with the data in the literature. Chromosomal abnormalities could play the important role in etiology of infertility and are more frequently detected in this group of patients compared to general population. In the infertile couples balanced chromosomal abnormalities are the main cause of spontaneous abortions.

  15. Environmental pollution, chromosomes, and health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Peter M.

    In mid-May, 1980, President Carter declared a state of emergency at the Love Canal area, near Niagara Falls, New York. The reason for this was for the U.S. to underwrite the relocation costs ($3-5 million) of some 2500 residents who, according to a report by the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) may have suffered damaged chromosomes. These injuries were apparently caused by contact with toxic wastes that had been dumped in the area in the years prior to development for housing.That the toxic compounds exist in the Love Canal and Niagara Falls subsurface zones, including public water supplies, appears to be established fact. That the residents of the Love Canal area suffered chromosomal damage may be established fact as well. Whether or not these two findings can be linked to ill health of the residents is another matter. Recently, the EPA report has been described as having ‘close to zero scientific significance,’ and has been ‘discredited’(Science, 208, 123a, 1980). The reasons for this disparity go beyond differences of opinion, beyond possible inadequacies of the EPA study, and even beyond problems that probably will arise from future studies, including those now in the planning stages. The problem is that even if victims have easily recognizable injuries from toxic substances (injury that apparently has not occurred to Love Canal residents), medical science usually cannot show a causal relationship. Even chromosomal damage is, at best, difficult to interpret. In ideal studies of significant populations and control groups, the association of toxic chemical to chromosome damage and to cancer and birth defects is indirect and, up to now, has been shown to have little or no significance to an individual member of the exposed population.

  16. Amplification of the 20q Chromosomal Arm Occurs Early in Tumorigenic Transformation and May Initiate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buganim, Yosef; Solomon, Hilla; Goldfinger, Naomi; Hovland, Randi; Ke, Xi-Song; Oyan, Anne M.; Kalland, Karl-H.; Rotter, Varda; Domany, Eytan

    2011-01-01

    Duplication of chromosomal arm 20q occurs in prostate, cervical, colon, gastric, bladder, melanoma, pancreas and breast cancer, suggesting that 20q amplification may play a causal role in tumorigenesis. According to an alternative view, chromosomal imbalance is mainly a common side effect of cancer progression. To test whether a specific genomic aberration might serve as a cancer initiating event, we established an in vitro system that models the evolutionary process of early stages of prostate tumor formation; normal prostate cells were immortalized by the over-expression of human telomerase catalytic subunit hTERT, and cultured for 650 days till several transformation hallmarks were observed. Gene expression patterns were measured and chromosomal aberrations were monitored by spectral karyotype analysis at different times. Several chromosomal aberrations, in particular duplication of chromosomal arm 20q, occurred early in the process and were fixed in the cell populations, while other aberrations became extinct shortly after their appearance. A wide range of bioinformatic tools, applied to our data and to data from several cancer databases, revealed that spontaneous 20q amplification can promote cancer initiation. Our computational model suggests that 20q amplification induced deregulation of several specific cancer-related pathways including the MAPK pathway, the p53 pathway and Polycomb group factors. In addition, activation of Myc, AML, B-Catenin and the ETS family transcription factors was identified as an important step in cancer development driven by 20q amplification. Finally we identified 13 "cancer initiating genes", located on 20q13, which were significantly over-expressed in many tumors, with expression levels correlated with tumor grade and outcome suggesting that these genes induce the malignant process upon 20q amplification. PMID:21297939

  17. Amplification of the 20q chromosomal arm occurs early in tumorigenic transformation and may initiate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval Tabach

    Full Text Available Duplication of chromosomal arm 20q occurs in prostate, cervical, colon, gastric, bladder, melanoma, pancreas and breast cancer, suggesting that 20q amplification may play a causal role in tumorigenesis. According to an alternative view, chromosomal imbalance is mainly a common side effect of cancer progression. To test whether a specific genomic aberration might serve as a cancer initiating event, we established an in vitro system that models the evolutionary process of early stages of prostate tumor formation; normal prostate cells were immortalized by the over-expression of human telomerase catalytic subunit hTERT, and cultured for 650 days till several transformation hallmarks were observed. Gene expression patterns were measured and chromosomal aberrations were monitored by spectral karyotype analysis at different times. Several chromosomal aberrations, in particular duplication of chromosomal arm 20q, occurred early in the process and were fixed in the cell populations, while other aberrations became extinct shortly after their appearance. A wide range of bioinformatic tools, applied to our data and to data from several cancer databases, revealed that spontaneous 20q amplification can promote cancer initiation. Our computational model suggests that 20q amplification induced deregulation of several specific cancer-related pathways including the MAPK pathway, the p53 pathway and Polycomb group factors. In addition, activation of Myc, AML, B-Catenin and the ETS family transcription factors was identified as an important step in cancer development driven by 20q amplification. Finally we identified 13 "cancer initiating genes", located on 20q13, which were significantly over-expressed in many tumors, with expression levels correlated with tumor grade and outcome suggesting that these genes induce the malignant process upon 20q amplification.

  18. Microdissection and chromosome painting of the alien chromosome in an addition line of wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chromosome painting is an efficient tool for chromosome research. However, plant chromosome painting is relatively underdeveloped. In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and chromosomes of...

  19. Chromosome aberration assays in Allium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, W.F.

    1982-01-01

    The common onion (Allium cepa) is an excellent plant for the assay of chromosome aberrations after chemical treatment. Other species of Allium (A. cepa var. proliferum, A. carinatum, A. fistulosum and A. sativum) have also been used but to a much lesser extent. Protocols have been given for using root tips from either bulbs or seeds of Allium cepa to study the cytological end-points, such as chromosome breaks and exchanges, which follow the testing of chemicals in somatic cells. It is considered that both mitotic and meiotic end-points should be used to a greater extent in assaying the cytogenetic effects of a chemical. From a literature survey, 148 chemicals are tabulated that have been assayed in 164 Allium tests for their clastogenic effect. Of the 164 assays which have been carried out, 75 are reported as giving a positive reaction, 49 positive and with a dose response, 1 positive and temperature-related, 9 borderline positive, and 30 negative; 76% of the chemicals gave a definite positive response. It is proposed that the Allium test be included among those tests routinely used for assessing chromosomal damage induced by chemicals.

  20. De Novo Chromosome Structure Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Pierro, Michele; Cheng, Ryan R.; Lieberman-Aiden, Erez; Wolynes, Peter G.; Onuchic, Jose'n.

    Chromatin consists of DNA and hundreds of proteins that interact with the genetic material. In vivo, chromatin folds into nonrandom structures. The physical mechanism leading to these characteristic conformations, however, remains poorly understood. We recently introduced MiChroM, a model that generates chromosome conformations by using the idea that chromatin can be subdivided into types based on its biochemical interactions. Here we extend and complete our previous finding by showing that structural chromatin types can be inferred from ChIP-Seq data. Chromatin types, which are distinct from DNA sequence, are partially epigenetically controlled and change during cell differentiation, thus constituting a link between epigenetics, chromosomal organization, and cell development. We show that, for GM12878 lymphoblastoid cells we are able to predict accurate chromosome structures with the only input of genomic data. The degree of accuracy achieved by our prediction supports the viability of the proposed physical mechanism of chromatin folding and makes the computational model a powerful tool for future investigations.

  1. Mechanisms of Chromosome Congression during Mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helder Maiato

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome congression during prometaphase culminates with the establishment of a metaphase plate, a hallmark of mitosis in metazoans. Classical views resulting from more than 100 years of research on this topic have attempted to explain chromosome congression based on the balance between opposing pulling and/or pushing forces that reach an equilibrium near the spindle equator. However, in mammalian cells, chromosome bi-orientation and force balance at kinetochores are not required for chromosome congression, whereas the mechanisms of chromosome congression are not necessarily involved in the maintenance of chromosome alignment after congression. Thus, chromosome congression and maintenance of alignment are determined by different principles. Moreover, it is now clear that not all chromosomes use the same mechanism for congressing to the spindle equator. Those chromosomes that are favorably positioned between both poles when the nuclear envelope breaks down use the so-called “direct congression” pathway in which chromosomes align after bi-orientation and the establishment of end-on kinetochore-microtubule attachments. This favors the balanced action of kinetochore pulling forces and polar ejection forces along chromosome arms that drive chromosome oscillatory movements during and after congression. The other pathway, which we call “peripheral congression”, is independent of end-on kinetochore microtubule-attachments and relies on the dominant and coordinated action of the kinetochore motors Dynein and Centromere Protein E (CENP-E that mediate the lateral transport of peripheral chromosomes along microtubules, first towards the poles and subsequently towards the equator. How the opposite polarities of kinetochore motors are regulated in space and time to drive congression of peripheral chromosomes only now starts to be understood. This appears to be regulated by position-dependent phosphorylation of both Dynein and CENP-E and by spindle

  2. An unusually large 5q duplication in an adult female subject: spreading of inactivation and in vitro instability of the derivative Xp/5q chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovescalli, A; Ghidoni, A

    1989-01-01

    An unbalanced translocation resulting in an unusually large partial 5q trisomy (5q11-5qter) and partial Xp monosomy (Xp11-Xpter) is reported in a 24 yr old woman with phenotypic abnormalities including gonadal dysgenesis and mental retardation. The karyotypes of the parents and the brother were found normal. Peripheral blood stimulated lymphocytes and cutaneous fibroblasts of the proband exhibited constantly, after BrdU incorporation, selective inactivation of the derivative X;5 chromosome spreading to the 5q duplicate segment. A variety of numerical and structural changes involving the derivative chromosome were observed in about 10% of cells of the cultured lymphoblastoid line established from the subject's lymphocytes. The extended 5q duplication, according to the literature, is generally accompanied by a severe phenotype and by developmental failure; it is therefore believe that genetic inactivation of the 5q duplicated region permitted the proband's development to adult age, despite the profound chromosomal imbalance.

  3. Chromosomal divergence and evolutionary inferences in Rhodniini based on the chromosomal location of ribosomal genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Pita

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we used fluorescence in situ hybridisation to determine the chromosomal location of 45S rDNA clusters in 10 species of the tribe Rhodniini (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae. The results showed striking inter and intraspecific variability, with the location of the rDNA clusters restricted to sex chromosomes with two patterns: either on one (X chromosome or both sex chromosomes (X and Y chromosomes. This variation occurs within a genus that has an unchanging diploid chromosome number (2n = 22, including 20 autosomes and 2 sex chromosomes and a similar chromosome size and genomic DNA content, reflecting a genome dynamic not revealed by these chromosome traits. The rDNA variation in closely related species and the intraspecific polymorphism in Rhodnius ecuadoriensis suggested that the chromosomal position of rDNA clusters might be a useful marker to identify recently diverged species or populations. We discuss the ancestral position of ribosomal genes in the tribe Rhodniini and the possible mechanisms involved in the variation of the rDNA clusters, including the loss of rDNA loci on the Y chromosome, transposition and ectopic pairing. The last two processes involve chromosomal exchanges between both sex chromosomes, in contrast to the widely accepted idea that the achiasmatic sex chromosomes of Heteroptera do not interchange sequences.

  4. Chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shekhar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to study the chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle. Materials and Methods: 27 female cattle (21 arsenic affected and 6 normal were selected for cytogenetical study. The blood samples were collected, incubated, and cultured using appropriate media and specific methods. The samples were analyzed for chromosome number and morphology, relative length of the chromosome, arm ratio, and centromere index of X chromosome and chromosomal abnormalities in arsenic affected cattle to that of normal ones. Results: The diploid number of metaphase chromosomes in arsenic affected cattle as well as in normal cattle were all 2n=60, 58 being autosomes and 2 being sex chromosomes. From the centromeric position, karyotyping studies revealed that all the 29 pair of autosomes was found to be acrocentric or telocentric, and the sex chromosomes (XX were submetacentric in both normal and arsenic affected cattle. The relative length of all the autosome pairs and sex chrosomosome pair was found to be higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle. The mean arm ratio of X-chromosome was higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle, but it is reverse in case of centromere index value of X-chromosome. There was no significant difference of arm ratio and centromere index of X-chromosomes between arsenic affected and normal cattle. No chromosomal abnormalities were found in arsenic affected cattle. Conclusion: The chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle in West Bengal reported for the first time in this present study which may serve as a guideline for future studies in other species. These reference values will also help in comparison of cytological studies of arsenic affected cattle to that of various toxicants.

  5. Analysis of the flow imbalance in the KSTAR PF cryo-circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun-Jung, E-mail: yaeban@nfri.re.kr; Park, Dong-Seong; Kwag, Sang-Woo; Joo, Jae-Jun; Moon, Kyung-Mo; Kim, Nam-Won; Lee, Young-Joo; Park, Young-Min; Yang, Hyung-Lyeol

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Investigate of flow imbalance trend for the KSTAR PF superconducting magnet. • Flow imbalance is compared with individual magnet test and integration magnet test. • Intensifying of flow imbalance is proven from the flow monitoring in the KSTAR PF circuit. • Flow behavior is analyzed during magnet charging in the circulator circuit. • Variation of magnet outlet temperature is analyzed due to flow imbalance. - Abstract: The KSTAR PF cryo-circuit is a quasi-closed circulation system in which more than 370 g/s of supercritical helium (SHe) is circulated using a SHe circulator. The heated helium from superconducting magnet is cooled through sub cooler (4.3 K). The circulator is operated at 4.5 K and 6.5 bar, and the pressure drop of the circuit is kept at 2 bar in order to maintain the supercritical state and circulator stability. The circuit is connected with helium refrigerator system, distribution system, and supercritical magnet system. It has a hundred branches to supply supercritical helium to the poloidal field superconducting magnet. The branch was designed to optimize the operation conditions and they are grouped for one cryogenic valve has the same length within the cardinal principle of the optimization. Five cryogenic valves are installed to control the mass flow rate, and seven orifice mass flow meters, differential pressure gauges and temperature sensors were installed in front of the magnet in the distribution because upper magnet and lower magnet is symmetric theoretically. The cryogenic pipe line was manufactured with elevation about 10 m between upper magnet and lower magnet. The inlet and outlet helium feed-through were installed at the coil inside in case of KSTAR PF1–PF5 upper magnet and lower magnet. The flow imbalance is caused by void fraction and it could be changed due to manufacturing process even if it has the same length of cooling channel. This creates an imbalance among cooling channels and temperatures are

  6. Co-polarization channel imbalance determination by the use of bare soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Yang, Jie; Li, Pingxiang

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes a novel technique which determines the co-polarization channel imbalance by the use of natural bare soil, instead of a trihedral corner reflector (CR). In polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) remote sensing, the polarimetric calibration (PolCAL) is the key technique in quantitative earth parameter measurement. In general, the current PolCAL process can be separated into two parts. The first part tries to estimate the crosstalk and the cross-polarization (x-pol) channel imbalance components by the reflection symmetry and the reciprocity properties, without a CR. Then, at least one trihedral CR is required to determine the co-polarization (co-pol) channel imbalance; however, it is not always possible to deploy a CR in difficult terrain such as desert. In this paper, we utilize bare soil as a stable reference target, and four common natural constraints of bare soil are evaluated to determine the co-pol channel imbalance, without the use of a CR. It should be mentioned that we do not propose to replace the CR by a natural target, but we utilize the natural target to enhance the PolCAL accuracy when a CR is missing. The four constraints are: (1) the consistency of the polarimetric orientation angle (CPOA) between the PolSAR POA and the digital elevation model (DEM) derived POA; (2) the unitary zero POA (UZPOA) of a flat ground surface; (3) the zero helix (ZHEX) component of the ground surface; and (4) the unitary version of the previous zero helix (UZHEX). In the theoretical part of this paper, we demonstrate that the forth constraint is the most suitable in different scenes. We then propose a multi-scale algorithm to further improve the robustness of the co-pol channel imbalance determination. In the experimental part, we apply our new methods to simulated airborne SAR (AIRSAR) and real uninhabited aerial vehicle SAR (UAVSAR) data. Without the use of any CR, the recovered results show that the estimated amplitude and phase error of the co

  7. [Development and practice evaluation of blood acid-base imbalance analysis software].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Huang, Haiying; Zhou, Qiang; Peng, Shan; Jia, Hongyu; Ji, Tianxing

    2014-11-01

    To develop a blood gas, acid-base imbalance analysis computer software to diagnose systematically, rapidly, accurately and automatically determine acid-base imbalance type, and evaluate the clinical application. Using VBA programming language, a computer aided diagnostic software for the judgment of acid-base balance was developed. The clinical data of 220 patients admitted to the Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University were retrospectively analyzed. The arterial blood gas [pH value, HCO(3)(-), arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO₂)] and electrolytes included data (Na⁺ and Cl⁻) were collected. Data were entered into the software for acid-base imbalances judgment. At the same time the data generation was calculated manually by H-H compensation formula for determining the type of acid-base imbalance. The consistency of judgment results from software and manual calculation was evaluated, and the judgment time of two methods was compared. The clinical diagnosis of the types of acid-base imbalance for the 220 patients: 65 cases were normal, 90 cases with simple type, mixed type in 41 cases, and triplex type in 24 cases. The accuracy of the judgment results of the normal and triplex types from computer software compared with which were calculated manually was 100%, the accuracy of the simple type judgment was 98.9% and 78.0% for the mixed type, and the total accuracy was 95.5%. The Kappa value of judgment result from software and manual judgment was 0.935, P=0.000. It was demonstrated that the consistency was very good. The time for software to determine acid-base imbalances was significantly shorter than the manual judgment (seconds:18.14 ± 3.80 vs. 43.79 ± 23.86, t=7.466, P=0.000), so the method of software was much faster than the manual method. Software judgment can replace manual judgment with the characteristics of rapid, accurate and convenient, can improve work efficiency and quality of clinical doctors and has great

  8. Deciphering evolutionary strata on plant sex chromosomes and fungal mating-type chromosomes through compositional segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ravi S; Azad, Rajeev K

    2016-03-01

    Sex chromosomes have evolved from a pair of homologous autosomes which differentiated into sex determination systems, such as XY or ZW system, as a consequence of successive recombination suppression between the gametologous chromosomes. Identifying the regions of recombination suppression, namely, the "evolutionary strata", is central to understanding the history and dynamics of sex chromosome evolution. Evolution of sex chromosomes as a consequence of serial recombination suppressions is well-studied for mammals and birds, but not for plants, although 48 dioecious plants have already been reported. Only two plants Silene latifolia and papaya have been studied until now for the presence of evolutionary strata on their X chromosomes, made possible by the sequencing of sex-linked genes on both the X and Y chromosomes, which is a requirement of all current methods that determine stratum structure based on the comparison of gametologous sex chromosomes. To circumvent this limitation and detect strata even if only the sequence of sex chromosome in the homogametic sex (i.e. X or Z chromosome) is available, we have developed an integrated segmentation and clustering method. In application to gene sequences on the papaya X chromosome and protein-coding sequences on the S. latifolia X chromosome, our method could decipher all known evolutionary strata, as reported by previous studies. Our method, after validating on known strata on the papaya and S. latifolia X chromosome, was applied to the chromosome 19 of Populus trichocarpa, an incipient sex chromosome, deciphering two, yet unknown, evolutionary strata. In addition, we applied this approach to the recently sequenced sex chromosome V of the brown alga Ectocarpus sp. that has a haploid sex determination system (UV system) recovering the sex determining and pseudoautosomal regions, and then to the mating-type chromosomes of an anther-smut fungus Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae predicting five strata in the non

  9. Scaling Chromosomes for an Evolutionary Karyotype: A Chromosomal Tradeoff between Size and Number across Woody Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Guolu; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the expected scaling relationships between chromosome size and number across woody species and to clarify the importance of the scaling for the maintenance of chromosome diversity by analyzing the scaling at the inter- & intra-chromosomal level. To achieve for the goals, chromosome trait data were extracted for 191 woody species (including 56 evergreen species and 135 deciduous species) from the available literature. Cross-species analyses revealed a tradeoff among chromosomes between chromosome size and number, demonstrating there is selective mechanism crossing chromosomes among woody species. And the explanations for the result were presented from intra- to inter-chromosome contexts that the scaling may be compromises among scale symmetry, mechanical requirements, and resource allocation across chromosomes. Therein, a 3/4 scaling pattern was observed between total chromosomes and m-chromosomes within nucleus which may imply total chromosomes may evolve from more to less. In addition, the primary evolutionary trend of karyotype and the role of m-chromosomes in the process of karyotype evolution were also discussed.

  10. Breakpoint mapping by next generation sequencing reveals causative gene disruption in patients carrying apparently balanced chromosome rearrangements with intellectual deficiency and/or congenital malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluth-Bolard, Caroline; Labalme, Audrey; Cordier, Marie-Pierre; Till, Marianne; Nadeau, Gwenaël; Tevissen, Hélène; Lesca, Gaétan; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Rossignol, Sylvie; Rocas, Delphine; Dubruc, Estelle; Edery, Patrick; Sanlaville, Damien

    2013-03-01

    Apparently balanced chromosomal rearrangements (ABCR) are associated with an abnormal phenotype in 6% of cases. This may be due to cryptic genomic imbalances or to the disruption of genes at the breakpoint. However, breakpoint cloning using conventional methods (ie, fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH), Southern blot) is often laborious and time consuming. In this work, we used next generation sequencing (NGS) to locate breakpoints at the molecular level in four patients with multiple congenital abnormalities and/or intellectual deficiency (MCA/ID) who were carrying ABCR (one translocation, one complex chromosomal rearrangement and two inversions), which corresponded to nine breakpoints. Genomic imbalance was previously excluded by array comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) in all four patients. Whole genome paired-end protocol was used to identify breakpoints. The results were verified by FISH and by PCR with Sanger sequencing. We were able to map all nine breakpoints. NGS revealed an additional breakpoint due to a cryptic inversion at a breakpoint junction in one patient. Nine of 10 breakpoints occurred in repetitive elements and five genes were disrupted in their intronic sequence (TCF4, SHANK2, PPFIA1, RAB19, KCNQ1). NGS is a powerful tool allowing rapid breakpoint cloning of ABCR at the molecular level. We showed that in three out of four patients, gene disruption could account for the phenotype, allowing adapted genetic counselling and stopping unnecessary investigations. We propose that patients carrying ABCR with an abnormal phenotype should be explored systematically by NGS once a genomic imbalance has been excluded by array CGH.

  11. SMC complexes: from DNA to chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlmann, Frank

    2016-07-01

    SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) complexes - which include condensin, cohesin and the SMC5-SMC6 complex - are major components of chromosomes in all living organisms, from bacteria to humans. These ring-shaped protein machines, which are powered by ATP hydrolysis, topologically encircle DNA. With their ability to hold more than one strand of DNA together, SMC complexes control a plethora of chromosomal activities. Notable among these are chromosome condensation and sister chromatid cohesion. Moreover, SMC complexes have an important role in DNA repair. Recent mechanistic insight into the function and regulation of these universal chromosomal machines enables us to propose molecular models of chromosome structure, dynamics and function, illuminating one of the fundamental entities in biology.

  12. Genetically determined chromosome instability syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, T M

    1982-01-01

    Spontaneously increased chromosomal instability is well documented in the three autosomal recessive diseases, Fanconi's anemia (FA), Bloom's syndrome (BS), and ataxia telangiectasia (AT). Other conditions have been reported to be associated with chromosomal breakage. Some are still single observations: in Werner's syndrome only fibroblasts are affected, and systemic sclerosis may not be an inherited disease. Various aspects of FA, BS, and AT are discussed which have emerged since recent reviews have been published. The differential diagnosis in FA has become more important than it was in the past. Proven heterogeneity in FA demands definition of what to name FA and FA variants. The analysis of cancer frequencies and types in FA and AT lacks important clues. This should stimulate all of us to mutual exchange of data and creation of registries not only of patients and follow-ups, but also of characterized cell strains. A synopsis of results from cell and cytogenetic studies demonstrates similarities and differences in detail of the general phenomenon of chromosomal instability which FA, BS, and AT share. Results from biochemical studies at the DNA level together with cytogenetic findings indicate different but still undefined failures in DNA metabolism or DNA repair mechanisms due to the different genes. A new approach to analyzing the impairment of DNA repair in FA is briefly described. DNA related enzymes are produced in the cytoplasm and have to be transported to the nucleus. The subcellular distribution of topoisomerase activity was found to be unusual in three placentas of FA patients. Other DNA enzymes were distributed normally. Thus, a specific mechanism for movement of the enzyme through the nuclear membrane seems to be defective.

  13. CFD analysis of temperature imbalance in superheater/reheater region of tangentially coal-fired boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainudin, A. F.; Hasini, H.; Fadhil, S. S. A.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a CFD analysis of the flow, velocity and temperature distribution in a 700 MW tangentially coal-fired boiler operating in Malaysia. The main objective of the analysis is to gain insights on the occurrences in the boiler so as to understand the inherent steam temperature imbalance problem. The results show that the root cause of the problem comes from the residual swirl in the horizontal pass. The deflection of the residual swirl due to the sudden reduction and expansion of the flow cross-sectional area causes velocity deviation between the left and right side of the boiler. This consequently results in flue gas temperature imbalance which has often caused tube leaks in the superheater/reheater region. Therefore, eliminating the residual swirl or restraining it from being diverted might help to alleviate the problem.

  14. Profile and imbalance cost of wind energy in 2012; Profiel- en onbalanskosten van windenergie in 2020

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieuwenhout, F.D.J.; Lensink, S. [ECN Beleidsstudies, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Brand, A.J. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-03-28

    This paper describes the method to determine the profile and imbalance costs of wind energy under the SDE+ scheme (Renewable Energy Incentive Plus). This method was first applied in the advice on the final correction figures for 2012. For 2012, the sum of profile and imbalance charges is set at 12.4% of the market index. This implies a slight increase with respect to the percentage in previous years (11%) [Dutch] Deze notitie beschrijft de methode om de profiel- en onbalanskosten van windenergie te bepalen in het kader van de SDE+-regeling (Stimuleringsregeling Duurzame Energie Plus). Deze methode is voor het eerst toegepast in het advies over de definitieve correctiebedragen 2012. Voor 2012 is de som van profiel- en onbalanskosten bepaald op 12,4% van de marktindex. Dit impliceert een geringe stijging ten opzichte van het percentage in voorgaande jaren (11%)

  15. [A Case of Rectal Villous Tumor Detected with Heart Failure and Electrolyte Imbalance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Junya; Maeda, Yoshinari; Nagashima, Yukiko; Nishimura, Taku; Morita, Katsuhiko; Setoguchi, Mihoko; Sakata, Kouichiro

    2015-11-01

    A 74-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with a chief complaint of appetite loss, and already diagnosed dehydration and heart failure. After hospitalization, the signs of heart failure were improved with liquid supplementation and electrolyte revision. At admission, computed tomography incidentally detected a rectal tumor. She underwent colonography, which revealed a huge villous tumor in the rectum. Based on the result of the initial biopsy, it was classified as a group 4 tumor, but additional biopsy of specimens obtained from 6 places led to a diagnosis of group 5 tumor. Then, we performed laparoscopic super-low anterior resection and made an ileal stoma. The electrolyte imbalance was improved and did not recur after the operation. In this case, the electrolyte imbalance caused by the huge villous tumor was electrolyte depletion syndrome (EDS).

  16. Analysis and measurement of the electrolyte imbalance in a vanadium redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngamsai, Kittima; Arpornwichanop, Amornchai

    2015-05-01

    Electrolyte imbalance in vanadium redox flow batteries is an important problem for its long-term operation as it leads to loss of energy. To address this problem, a modified open circuit voltage (OCV) cell is developed by adding a middle half cell between the negative and positive half cells of a conventional OCV cell and used to predict the oxidation state of vanadium in the electrolyte solution from the measured voltage in each side of the electrolyte (positive and negative). The correlation between the oxidation state of vanadium and cell voltage is explained by a basic electrochemical principle and the Nernst equation. The experimental results show that at different oxidation states of vanadium, the predicted OCV agrees reasonably with the experimental data. In addition, the effect of the state of charge (SOC) and electrolyte imbalance on the energy capacity of a cell is discussed.

  17. Blind estimation of carrier frequency offset, I/Q imbalance and DC offset for OFDM systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Li, Hanzhang

    2012-12-01

    Sensitivity to carrier frequency offset (CFO) is one of the biggest drawbacks of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) system. A lot of CFO estimation algorithms had been studied for compensation of CFO in OFDM system. However, with the adoption of direct-conversion architecture (DCA), which introduces additional impairments such as dc offset (DCO) and in-phase/quadrature (I/Q) imbalance in OFDM system, the established CFO estimation algorithms suffer from performance degradation. In our previous study, we developed a blind CFO, I/Q imbalance and DCO estimation algorithm for OFDM systems with DCA. In this article, we propose an alternative algorithm with reduced computation complexity and better accuracy. Performance of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated by simulations.

  18. Effort-Reward Imbalance at Work and Incident Coronary Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragano, Nico; Siegrist, Johannes; Nyberg, Solja T

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic evidence for work stress as a risk factor for coronary heart disease is mostly based on a single measure of stressful work known as job strain, a combination of high demands and low job control. We examined whether a complementary stress measure that assesses an imbalance...... between efforts spent at work and rewards received predicted coronary heart disease. METHODS: This multicohort study (the "IPD-Work" consortium) was based on harmonized individual-level data from 11 European prospective cohort studies. Stressful work in 90,164 men and women without coronary heart disease...... at baseline was assessed by validated effort-reward imbalance and job strain questionnaires. We defined incident coronary heart disease as the first nonfatal myocardial infarction or coronary death. Study-specific estimates were pooled by random effects meta-analysis. RESULTS: At baseline, 31.7% of study...

  19. The impact of labour market imbalances on regional disparities in the post-crisis context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Cristina DIMIAN

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to examine how existing imbalances in the labour market influence regions’ future development and to formulate a series of recommendations that will allow that catching up process to be done in an sustainable manner.Basically, the objective refers to the integration of the development and restructuring strategy of the labour market policy to strengthen regional competitive advantage.Our intentions is to stress the fact that between labour market imbalances and regional disparities exists a bi-univocal relationship, both manifested in a complex external environment, dominated by variable factors and uncertainty.To achieve paper’ objectives scientific methods like: descriptive statistics, correlation analysis and aggregate indexes are applied.The main results are focused on formulating a set of scientifically based recommendations that can be used to conceive strategies whose overall objective is the reduction of economic disparities existing in certain regions through training and proper human resources development.

  20. Effort-Reward Imbalance at Work and Incident Coronary Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragano, Nico; Siegrist, Johannes; Nyberg, Solja T.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Epidemiologic evidence for work stress as a risk factor for coronary heart disease is mostly based on a single measure of stressful work known as job strain, a combination of high demands and low job control. We examined whether a complementary stress measure that assesses an imbalance...... between efforts spent at work and rewards received predicted coronary heart disease. Methods: This multicohort study (the “IPD-Work” consortium) was based on harmonized individual-level data from 11 European prospective cohort studies. Stressful work in 90,164 men and women without coronary heart disease...... at baseline was assessed by validated effort–reward imbalance and job strain questionnaires. We defined incident coronary heart disease as the first nonfatal myocardial infarction or coronary death. Study-specific estimates were pooled by random effects meta-analysis. Results: At baseline, 31.7% of study...

  1. Compensation for HPA nonlinearity and I/Q imbalance in MIMO beamforming systems

    KAUST Repository

    Qi, Jian

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effects of high-power amplifier (HPA) nonlinearity and in-phase and quadrature-phase (I/Q) imbalance on the performance of multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) transmit beamforming (TB) systems. Specifically, we propose a compensation method for HPA nonlinearity and I/Q imbalance together in MIMO TB systems. The performance of the MIMO TB system under study is evaluated in terms of the average symbol error probability (SEP) and system capacity, considering transmission over uncorrelated frequency-flat Rayleigh fading channels. Numerical results are provided and show the effects of several system parameters, such as the HPA parameters, image-leakage ratio, numbers of transmit and receive antennas, length of pilot symbols, and modulation order of phase-shift keying (PSK), on performance. © 2010 IEEE.

  2. Constraining the Global Ocean Heat Content Through Assimilation of CERES-Derived TOA Energy Imbalance Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storto, Andrea; Yang, Chunxue; Masina, Simona

    2017-10-01

    The Earth's energy imbalance (EEI) is stored in the oceans for the most part. Thus, estimates of its variability can be ingested in ocean retrospective analyses to constrain the global ocean heat budget. Here we propose a scheme to assimilate top of the atmosphere global radiation imbalance estimates from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) in a coarse-resolution variational ocean reanalysis system (2000-2014). The methodology proves able to shape the heat content tendencies according to the EEI estimates, without compromising the reanalysis accuracy. Spurious variability and underestimation (overestimation) present in experiments with in situ (no) data assimilation disappear when EEI data are assimilated. The warming hiatus present without the assimilation of EEI data is mitigated, inducing ocean warming at depths below 1,500 m and slightly larger in the Southern Hemisphere, in accordance with recent studies. Furthermore, the methodology may be applied to Earth System reanalyses and climate simulations to realistically constrain the global energy budget.

  3. Frequent loss of chromosome 9, homozygous CDKN2A/p14(ARF)/CDKN2B deletion and low TSC1 mRNA expression in pleomorphic xanthoastrocytomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, R G; Hoischen, A; Ehrler, M; Zipper, P; Kaulich, K; Blaschke, B; Becker, A J; Weber-Mangal, S; Jauch, A; Radlwimmer, B; Schramm, J; Wiestler, O D; Lichter, P; Reifenberger, G

    2007-02-15

    The molecular pathogenesis of pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA), a rare astrocytic brain tumor with a relatively favorable prognosis, is still poorly understood. We characterized 50 PXAs by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and found the most common imbalance to be loss on chromosome 9 in 50% of tumors. Other recurrent losses affected chromosomes 17 (10%), 8, 18, 22 (4% each). Recurrent gains were identified on chromosomes X (16%), 7, 9q, 20 (8% each), 4, 5, 19 (4% each). Two tumors demonstrated amplifications mapping to 2p23-p25, 4p15, 12q13, 12q21, 21q21 and 21q22. Analysis of 10 PXAs with available high molecular weight DNA by high-resolution array-based CGH indicated homozygous 9p21.3 deletions involving the CDKN2A/p14(ARF)/CDKN2B loci in six tumors (60%). Interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization to tissue sections confirmed the presence of tumor cells with homozygous 9p21.3 deletions. Mutational analysis of candidate genes on 9q, PTCH and TSC1, revealed no mutations in PXAs with 9q loss and no evidence of TSC1 promoter methylation. However, PXAs consistently showed low TSC1 transcript levels. Taken together, our study identifies loss of chromosome 9 as the most common chromosomal imbalance in PXAs and suggests important roles for homozygous CDKN2A/p14(ARF)/CDKN2B deletion as well as low TSC1 mRNA expression in these tumors.

  4. Using SNP array to identify aneuploidy and segmental imbalance in translocation carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, B.; Tan, K.; Tan, Y.Q.; Gong, F.; Zhang, S.P.; Lu, C.F.; Luo, K.L.; Lu, G.X.; Lin, G.

    2014-01-01

    Translocation is one of the more common structural rearrangements of chromosomes, with a prevalence of 0.2%. The two most common types of chromosomal translocations, Robertsonian and reciprocal, usually result in no obvious phenotypic abnormalities when balanced. However, these are still associated with reproductive risks, such as infertility, spontaneous abortion and the delivery of babies with mental retardation or developmental delay. In recent years, array-based whole-genome amplification...

  5. Chromosomal rearrangements in Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Debes, Nanette Mol; Hjermind, Lena E

    2013-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood-onset complex neurobiological disorder characterized by a combination of persistent motor and vocal tics and frequent presence of other neuropsychiatric comorbidities. TS shares the fate of other complex disorders, where the genetic etiology is largely unknown...... been an efficient tool for the cloning of disease genes in several Mendelian disorders and in a number of complex disorders. Through cytogenetic investigation of 205 TS patients, we identified three possibly disease-associated chromosome rearrangements rendering this approach relevant in chasing TS...

  6. Deletion of chromosome 13 in Moebius syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slee, J J; Smart, R D; Viljoen, D L

    1991-01-01

    A girl aged 2 1/2 years with Moebius syndrome was found to have a deletion of band q12.2 in chromosome 13 (46,XX,del(13)(q12.2]. This is the second report concerning involvement of chromosome 13q and Moebius syndrome. The observation raises the possibility that a gene responsible for Moebius syndrome is located in this region of chromosome 13. Images PMID:1870098

  7. Deletion of chromosome 13 in Moebius syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Slee, J J; Smart, R D; Viljoen, D L

    1991-01-01

    A girl aged 2 1/2 years with Moebius syndrome was found to have a deletion of band q12.2 in chromosome 13 (46,XX,del(13)(q12.2]. This is the second report concerning involvement of chromosome 13q and Moebius syndrome. The observation raises the possibility that a gene responsible for Moebius syndrome is located in this region of chromosome 13.

  8. AB26. Y chromosome and male infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Iijima, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    In infertile couples, a male contribution to infertility is found in 45-50%. The cause of male factor infertility remains largely unexplained, but varicocele and genetic disorder are recognized as major causes leading to spermatogenesis disability. Genetic disorder leads to male infertility include chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions. Chromosomal abnormalities (numerical or structural abnormalities) can be detected routine karyotype analysis. In non-obstructed azoospemia...

  9. Y chromosome haplogroups in autistic subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Jamain, Stéphane; Quach, Hélène; Quintana-Murci, Luis; Betancur, Catalina; Philippe, Anne; Gillberg, Christopher; Sponheim, Eili; Skjeldal, Ola H.; Fellous, Marc; Leboyer, Marion; Bourgeron, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    The male to female ratio in autism is 4:1 in the global autistic population, but increases to 23:1 in autistic subjects without physical or brain abnormalities. 1 Despite this well-recognised gender difference, male predisposition to autistic disorder remains unexplained and the role of sex chromosomes is still debated. Numerical and structural abnormalities of the sex chromosomes are among the most frequently reported chromosomal disorders associated with autism. However, genome scans have f...

  10. Steering neuronal growth cones by shifting the imbalance between exocytosis and endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tojima, Takuro; Itofusa, Rurika; Kamiguchi, Hiroyuki

    2014-05-21

    Extracellular molecular cues guide migrating growth cones along specific routes during development of axon tracts. Such processes rely on asymmetric elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations across the growth cone that mediates its attractive or repulsive turning toward or away from the side with Ca(2+) elevation, respectively. Downstream of these Ca(2+) signals, localized activation of membrane trafficking steers the growth cone bidirectionally, with endocytosis driving repulsion and exocytosis causing attraction. However, it remains unclear how Ca(2+) can differentially regulate these opposite membrane-trafficking events. Here, we show that growth cone turning depends on localized imbalance between exocytosis and endocytosis and identify Ca(2+)-dependent signaling pathways mediating such imbalance. In embryonic chicken dorsal root ganglion neurons, repulsive Ca(2+) signals promote clathrin-mediated endocytosis through a 90 kDa splice variant of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase type-1γ (PIPKIγ90). In contrast, attractive Ca(2+) signals facilitate exocytosis but suppress endocytosis via Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) that can inactivate PIPKIγ90. Blocking CaMKII or Cdk5 leads to balanced activation of both exocytosis and endocytosis that causes straight growth cone migration even in the presence of guidance signals, whereas experimentally perturbing the balance restores the growth cone's turning response. Remarkably, the direction of this resumed turning depends on relative activities of exocytosis and endocytosis, but not on the type of guidance signals. Our results suggest that navigating growth cones can be redirected by shifting the imbalance between exocytosis and endocytosis, highlighting the importance of membrane-trafficking imbalance for axon guidance and, possibly, for polarized cell migration in general. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/347165-14$15.00/0.

  11. REER Imbalances and Macroeconomic Adjustments in the Proposed West African Monetary Union

    OpenAIRE

    Asongu, Simplice A

    2013-01-01

    With the spectre of the Euro crisis hunting embryonic monetary unions, we use a dynamic model of a small open economy to analyze REERs imbalances and examine whether the movements in the aggregate real exchange rates are consistent with the underlying macroeconomic fundamentals in the proposed West African Monetary Union (WAMU). Using both country-oriented and WAMU panel-based specifications, we show that the long-run behavior of the REERs can be explained by fluctuations in the terms of trad...

  12. Subfunctionalization reduces the fitness cost of gene duplication in humans by buffering dosage imbalances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Ariel; Tzeng, Yun-Huei; Hsu, Sze-Bi

    2011-12-14

    Driven essentially by random genetic drift, subfunctionalization has been identified as a possible non-adaptive mechanism for the retention of duplicate genes in small-population species, where widespread deleterious mutations are likely to cause complementary loss of subfunctions across gene copies. Through subfunctionalization, duplicates become indispensable to maintain the functional requirements of the ancestral locus. Yet, gene duplication produces a dosage imbalance in the encoded proteins and thus, as investigated in this paper, subfunctionalization must be subject to the selective forces arising from the fitness bottleneck introduced by the duplication event. We show that, while arising from random drift, subfunctionalization must be inescapably subject to selective forces, since the diversification of expression patterns across paralogs mitigates duplication-related dosage imbalances in the concentrations of encoded proteins. Dosage imbalance effects become paramount when proteins rely on obligatory associations to maintain their structural integrity, and are expected to be weaker when protein complexation is ephemeral or adventitious. To establish the buffering effect of subfunctionalization on selection pressure, we determine the packing quality of encoded proteins, an established indicator of dosage sensitivity, and correlate this parameter with the extent of paralog segregation in humans, using species with larger population -and more efficient selection- as controls. Recognizing the role of subfunctionalization as a dosage-imbalance buffer in gene duplication events enabled us to reconcile its mechanistic nonadaptive origin with its adaptive role as an enabler of the evolution of genetic redundancy. This constructive role was established in this paper by proving the following assertion: If subfunctionalization is indeed adaptive, its effect on paralog segregation should scale with the dosage sensitivity of the duplicated genes. Thus

  13. Labour Market Reforms and Current Account Imbalances: Beggar-thy-neighbour policies in a currency union?

    OpenAIRE

    Baas, Timo; Belke, Ansgar

    2014-01-01

    Member countries of the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) initiated wide-ranging labour market reforms in the last decade. This process is ongoing as countries that are faced with serious labour market imbalances perceive reforms as the fastest way to restore competitiveness within a currency union. This fosters fears among observers about a beggar-thy-neighbour policy that leaves non-reforming countries with a loss in competitiveness and an increase in foreign debt. Using a two-country, two-...

  14. Relaxation of the chiral imbalance in dense matter of a neutron star

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvornikov Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the quantum field theory methods, we calculate the helicity flip of an electron scattering off protons in dense matter of a neutron star. The influence of the electroweak interaction between electrons and background nucleons on the helicity flip is examined. We also derive the kinetic equation for the chiral imbalance. The derived kinetic equation is compared with the results obtained by other authors.

  15. Seasonal Imbalances in Natural Gas Imports in Major Northeast Asian Countries: Variations, Reasons, Outlooks and Countermeasures

    OpenAIRE

    Zhaoyang Kong; Xiucheng Dong; Zhongbing Zhou

    2015-01-01

    The seasonal imbalances and price premiums of natural gas imports (NGIs) seriously affect the sustainability of these imports in major Northeast Asian countries, namely, China, Japan, and South Korea. Research on NGI seasonality might provide new insights that may help solve these issues. Unfortunately, little research has been conducted on this topic. Therefore, this paper examined the seasonalities of Chinese, Japanese, and South Korean NGIs using the X-12-ARIMA model to analyze monthly and...

  16. Subfunctionalization reduces the fitness cost of gene duplication in humans by buffering dosage imbalances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández Ariel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Driven essentially by random genetic drift, subfunctionalization has been identified as a possible non-adaptive mechanism for the retention of duplicate genes in small-population species, where widespread deleterious mutations are likely to cause complementary loss of subfunctions across gene copies. Through subfunctionalization, duplicates become indispensable to maintain the functional requirements of the ancestral locus. Yet, gene duplication produces a dosage imbalance in the encoded proteins and thus, as investigated in this paper, subfunctionalization must be subject to the selective forces arising from the fitness bottleneck introduced by the duplication event. Results We show that, while arising from random drift, subfunctionalization must be inescapably subject to selective forces, since the diversification of expression patterns across paralogs mitigates duplication-related dosage imbalances in the concentrations of encoded proteins. Dosage imbalance effects become paramount when proteins rely on obligatory associations to maintain their structural integrity, and are expected to be weaker when protein complexation is ephemeral or adventitious. To establish the buffering effect of subfunctionalization on selection pressure, we determine the packing quality of encoded proteins, an established indicator of dosage sensitivity, and correlate this parameter with the extent of paralog segregation in humans, using species with larger population -and more efficient selection- as controls. Conclusions Recognizing the role of subfunctionalization as a dosage-imbalance buffer in gene duplication events enabled us to reconcile its mechanistic nonadaptive origin with its adaptive role as an enabler of the evolution of genetic redundancy. This constructive role was established in this paper by proving the following assertion: If subfunctionalization is indeed adaptive, its effect on paralog segregation should scale with the dosage

  17. Serious Gender Imbalance in Medical and Dentistry Majors: How to Prevent a Crisis

    OpenAIRE

    SMJ Mortazavi; Rashidi Nejad HR

    2005-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Decreased males’ motivation for entering universities has caused a low male/female ratio in different university majors. In 2005-2006 academic year, enrollment of female students in Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences reached 83.14%. This tremendous gender imbalance may lead to the development of a mono-sex system for health service providers and will.affect the social health system. As females constitute the majority of students.in all medical sciences majors, in...

  18. Inflammation Activation Contributes to Adipokine Imbalance in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Chen, Lu-zhu; Zhao, Shui-ping; Huang, Xian-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation can be activated as a defensive response by the attack of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) for ischemic tissue injury. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of ACS-activated inflammation on adipokine imbalance and the effects of statins on the crosstalk between inflammation and adipokine imbalance during ACS. In this study, 586 subjects were categorized into: (1) control group; (2) SA (stable angina) group; and (3) ACS group. Circulating levels of hs-CRP, adiponectin and resistin were measured by ELISA. Furthermore, forty C57BL/6 mice were randomized into: sham, AMI, low-statin (atorvastatin, 2 mg/kg/day) and high-statin (atorvastatin, 20 mg/kg/day) group. After 3 weeks, AMI models were established by surgical coronary artery ligation. Circulating levels and adipose expressions of adiponectin and resistin were assessed in animals. Besides, we investigate the effects of atorvastatin on ox-LDL-induced adipokine imbalance in vitro. As a result, we found that ACS patients had higher hs-CRP and resistin levels and lower adiponectin levels. Our correlation analysis demonstrated hs-CRP concentrations were positively correlated with resistin but negatively with adiponectin levels in humans. Our animal findings indicated higher circulating hs-CRP and resistin levels and lower adiponectin levels in AMI mice. Atorvastatin pre-treatment dose-dependently decreased hs-CRP and resistin levels but increased adiponectin levels in mice. The consistent findings were observed about the adipose expressions of resistin and adiponectin in mice. In study in vitro, ox-LDL increased cellular resistin expressions and otherwise for adiponectin expressions, which dose-dependently reversed by the addition of atorvastatin. Therefore, our study indicates that the ACS attack activates inflammation leading to adipokine imbalance that can be ameliorated by anti-inflammation of atorvastatin.

  19. Giemsa C-banding of Barley Chromosomes. IV. Chromosomal Constitution of Autotetraploid Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde-Laursen, Ib

    1984-01-01

    The progeny of an autotetraploid barley plant (C1) consisted of 45 tetraploids and 33 aneuploids. Giemsa C-banding was used to identify each of the chromosomes in 20 euploid and 31 aneuploid C2--seedlings, and in 11 C3--offspring of aneuploid C2--plants. The euploid C2--seedlings all had four...... homologues of each of the chromosomes. The aneuploid C2--seedlings were fairly equally distributed on hypo-and hyperploids, and on the seven chromosome groups. This suggests that a particular chromosome is lost or gained at random in gametes and embryos. The 11 C3--seedlings comprised seven true euploids......, one seedling with 2n=28 having an extra chromosome 6 and missing one chromosome 3, and three seedlings with 2n=29. The chromosomal composition of aneuploid C3--seedlings did not reflect that of their aneuploid C2--parents with respect to missing or extra chromosomes. Two hypohexaploid C2--seedlings...

  20. New Y chromosomes and early stages of sex chromosome differentiation: sex determination in Megaselia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traut, Walther

    2010-09-01

    The phorid fly Megaselia scalaris is a laboratory model for the turnover and early differentiation of sex chromosomes. Isolates from the field have an XY sex-determining mechanism with chromosome pair 2 acting as X and Y chromosomes. The sex chromosomes are homomorphic but display early signs of sex chromosome differentiation: a low level of molecular differences between X and Y. The male-determining function (M), maps to the distal part of the Y chromosome's short arm. In laboratory cultures, new Y chromosomes with no signs of a molecular differentiation arise at a low rate, probably by transposition of M to these chromosomes. Downstream of the primary signal, the homologue of the Drosophila doublesex (dsx) is part of the sex-determining pathway while Sex-lethal (Sxl), though structurally conserved, is not.

  1. Maternal mosaicism of sex chromosome causes discordant sex chromosomal aneuploidies associated with noninvasive prenatal testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Wang

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Our findings indicated that maternal mosaicism of sex chromosome could cause discordant sex chromosomal aneuploidies associated with NIPT. We highly recommended that maternal karyotype should be confirmed for the cases with abnormal results in NIPT.

  2. Impact of Hot Environment on Fluid and Electrolyte Imbalance, Renal Damage, Hemolysis, and Immune Activation Postmarathon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Assunção Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated the physiological changes induced by exercise exposure in hot environments. We investigated the hematological and oxidative changes and tissue damage induced by marathon race in different thermal conditions. Twenty-six male runners completed the São Paulo International Marathon both in hot environment (HE and in temperate environment (TE. Blood and urine samples were collected 1 day before, immediately after, 1 day after, and 3 days after the marathon to analyze the hematological parameters, electrolytes, markers of tissue damage, and oxidative status. In both environments, the marathon race promotes fluid and electrolyte imbalance, hemolysis, oxidative stress, immune activation, and tissue damage. The marathon runner’s performance was approximately 13.5% lower in HE compared to TE; however, in HE, our results demonstrated more pronounced fluid and electrolyte imbalance, renal damage, hemolysis, and immune activation. Moreover, oxidative stress induced by marathon in HE is presumed to be related to protein/purine oxidation instead of other oxidative sources. Fluid and electrolyte imbalance and protein/purine oxidation may be important factors responsible for hemolysis, renal damage, immune activation, and impaired performance after long-term exercise in HE. Nonetheless, we suggested that the impairment on performance in HE was not associated to the muscle damage and lipoperoxidation.

  3. An imbalance in progenitor cell populations reflects tumour progression in breast cancer primary culture models

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donatello, Simona

    2011-04-26

    Abstract Background Many factors influence breast cancer progression, including the ability of progenitor cells to sustain or increase net tumour cell numbers. Our aim was to define whether alterations in putative progenitor populations could predict clinicopathological factors of prognostic importance for cancer progression. Methods Primary cultures were established from human breast tumour and adjacent non-tumour tissue. Putative progenitor cell populations were isolated based on co-expression or concomitant absence of the epithelial and myoepithelial markers EPCAM and CALLA respectively. Results Significant reductions in cellular senescence were observed in tumour versus non-tumour cultures, accompanied by a stepwise increase in proliferation:senescence ratios. A novel correlation between tumour aggressiveness and an imbalance of putative progenitor subpopulations was also observed. Specifically, an increased double-negative (DN) to double-positive (DP) ratio distinguished aggressive tumours of high grade, estrogen receptor-negativity or HER2-positivity. The DN:DP ratio was also higher in malignant MDA-MB-231 cells relative to non-tumourogenic MCF-10A cells. Ultrastructural analysis of the DN subpopulation in an invasive tumour culture revealed enrichment in lipofuscin bodies, markers of ageing or senescent cells. Conclusions Our results suggest that an imbalance in tumour progenitor subpopulations imbalances the functional relationship between proliferation and senescence, creating a microenvironment favouring tumour progression.

  4. Can an energy balance model provide additional constraints on how to close the energy imbalance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Widmoser, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating the causes for the energy imbalance, i.e. the phenomenon that eddy covariance latent and sensible heat fluxes fall short of available energy, is an outstanding problem in micrometeorology. This paper tests the hypothesis that the full energy balance, through incorporation of additional independent measurements which determine the driving forces of and resistances to energy transfer, provides further insights into the causes of the energy imbalance and additional constraints on energy balance closure options. Eddy covariance and auxiliary data from three different biomes were used to test five contrasting closure scenarios. The main result of our study is that except for nighttime, when fluxes were low and noisy, the full energy balance generally did not contain enough information to allow further insights into the causes of the imbalance and to constrain energy balance closure options. Up to four out of the five tested closure scenarios performed similarly and in up to 53% of all cases all of the tested closure scenarios resulted in plausible energy balance values. Our approach may though provide a sensible consistency check for eddy covariance energy flux measurements. PMID:24465072

  5. Structural imbalances as a key factor of unemployment in the Russian labor market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I V Trotsuk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the problems of the Russian labor market, especially the scale and characteristics of youth unemployment, get very emotional and negative coverage in the scientific and journalistic discourses. The authors seek to show without any emotional evaluations what are the objective macroeconomic causes of the current situation with unemployment, especially youth unemployment. First, the authors identify the main challenges the labor market faces today in terms of the interaction of its key actors (workers, owners of the means of production, educational institutions and various intermediaries, including the state regulating the features of labor recruitment. Second, the article shows the main trends of the last decade that change the structure of employment of the economically active population. Third, the authors name the basic structural imbalances in the Russian labor market, primarily structural and professional imbalance between the demand for labor, the demand for vocational training and offer of educational services, which is quite evident, albeit in different ways, in all spheres of the economy. Fourth, the article describes the specific features of the youth labor market as both affected and contributing to the structural imbalances. Finally, the authors propose a methodology of macroeconomic forecasting that may reduce the problems the Russian society faces in the field of employment.

  6. Mineral imbalances in farm animals and their study and diagnosis with isotopic tracers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, E J

    1976-12-01

    Twenty-two mineral elements are known to be essential for animal life. These are calcium, phosphorus, sulphur, potassium, sodium, chlorine, magnesium, iron, iodine, copper, manganese, zinc, cobalt, molybdenum, selenium, chromium, tin, vanadium, fluorine, silicon, nickel and arsenic. Naturally occurring and man-made dietary imbalances of many of these elements and their interactions with other minerals are described and their functions and requirements by farm animals are outlined. The nature and importance of metabolic interactions among the mineral elements are discussed and the important concept stressed that there is no single minimum requirement or safe tolerance of a particular mineral, but a series of such minimum requirements and safe tolerances depending on the extent to which other minerals with which it interacts is present or absent from the diet. Radioactive tracer elements are shown to be of great value in the determination of mineral nutrient availability to the animal and for following mineral metabolic movements in the body. They are also shown to have considerable potential for the diagnosis of mineral imbalances. Various in vivo and in vitro techniques, involving both radioactive and stable tracers developed for the early diagnosis of mineral deficiencies are described and the strengths and weaknesses of such techniques in comparison with standard biochemical tests, are discussed. The need for further critical studies with isotopic tracers in the detection and diagnosis of mineral imbalances is emphasized. The main types of biochemical criteria used in the diagnosis of mineral deficiencies and excesses are given, with appropriate examples of their use.

  7. The immediate effect of kinesiology taping on muscular imbalance for infants with congenital muscular torticollis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öhman, Anna M

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the immediate effect of kinesiology taping (KT) on muscular imbalance in the lateral flexors of the neck. A retrospective study. Twenty-eight infants with congenital muscular torticollis and muscular imbalance in the lateral flexors of the neck were chosen consecutively. Data regarding the Muscle Function Scale (MFS) score before and after the first taping session were obtained from the records. A significant decrease in the difference between the MFS scores was found after KT was applied (P < .001). Significantly greater scores were noted on the unaffected side after KT (P = .02) and significantly lower scores were noted on the affected side after KT (P = .003). Multiple regression demonstrated that the MFS score on the unaffected side (P < .001) and use of the muscle-relaxing technique (P = .009) were significantly associated with a decrease in the difference between the MFS scores of the 2 sides. KT has an immediate effect on muscular imbalance in infants with congenital muscular torticollis. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Socio-economic and environmental aspects of the industry imbalances in the regional economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy Valer'evich Eidenzon

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an analysis of current socio-economic and environmental aspects of the industry imbalances in the regional economy by the example of Ural Federal District and Siberian Federal District. The main aim of it is to identify the actual socio-economic problems in the development of the regional economies. The authors analyze the economic, ecological and social aspects in the development of regional economies by the examples. They investigate the specifics of the correlation between industrial development, ecological problems and health problems of the local population. Particular emphasis is placed on the analysis of correlations between the mortality of the population and industrial pollution of air and water. The analysis has resulted in making proposals for optimization of the regional policy in the field of investments, manufacturing and ecology. The special attention is given to environment-oriented projects. The most practicable way in solving the problem of these regional industry imbalances would be the development of regional diversification programs of the Siberia and the Ural economies. It has to support manufacturing and the largest public-private investment projects for the foundation of enterprises in agriculture, food and other industries. The most prosperous among them is the direction of bioenergy and forest-engineering-oriented businesses. The results of the research can be useful in solving the problem of the industry imbalances in the regional economic policy of the Russian Federation.

  9. The impact of public debt on the twin imbalances in Europe: A threshold model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šuliková Veronika

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent empirical research rejecting twin deficits in indebted countries and current account imbalances adjustment in Europe led to the idea to test the twin imbalances at different public debt-to-GDP intervals. The analysis covers 14 EU countries over the time period 1995-2012. A panel data threshold model with fixed effects estimates two debt-to-GDP thresholds (40.2% and 96.6%, which determine three debt-to-GDP intervals in the twin relationship. If public debtto-GDP is less than 40.2%, the model determines a negative relationship (twin divergence between budget balance and current account. Twin deficits (surpluses are confirmed exclusively if debt-to-GDP is in the interval between 40.2% and 96.6%. A twin divergence is also confirmed if public debt-to-GDP is more than 96.6% (e.g., as in Greece and Italy. The results confirm that increased indebtedness in European countries contributed to their current account imbalance adjustment.

  10. Structure and function of eukaryotic chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennig, W.

    1987-01-01

    Contents: Introduction; Polytene Chromosomel Giant Chromosomes in Ciliates; The sp-I Genes in the Balbiani Rings of Chironomus Salivary Glands; The White Locus of Drosophila Melanogaster; The Genetic and Molecular Organization of the Dense Cluster of Functionally Related Vital Genes in the DOPA Decarboxylase Region of the Drosophila melanogaster Genome; Heat Shock Puffs and Response to Environmental Stress; The Y Chromosomal Lampbrush Loops of Drosophila; Contributions of Electron Microscopic Spreading Preparations (''Miller Spreads'') to the Analysis of Chromosome Structure; Replication of DNA in Eukaryotic Chromosomes; Gene Amplification in Dipteran Chromosomes; The Significance of Plant Transposable Elements in Biologically Relevant Processes; Arrangement of Chromosomes in Interphase Cell Nuclei; Heterochromatin and the Phenomenon of Chromosome Banding; Multiple Nonhistone Protein-DNA Complexes in Chromatin Regulate the Cell- and Stage-Specific Activity of an Eukaryotic Gene; Genetics of Sex Determination in Eukaryotes; Application of Basic Chromosome Research in Biotechnology and Medicine. This book presents an overview of various aspects of chromosome research.

  11. The Y chromosomes of the great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallast, Pille; Jobling, Mark A

    2017-05-01

    The great apes (orangutans, gorillas, chimpanzees, bonobos and humans) descended from a common ancestor around 13 million years ago, and since then their sex chromosomes have followed very different evolutionary paths. While great-ape X chromosomes are highly conserved, their Y chromosomes, reflecting the general lability and degeneration of this male-specific part of the genome since its early mammalian origin, have evolved rapidly both between and within species. Understanding great-ape Y chromosome structure, gene content and diversity would provide a valuable evolutionary context for the human Y, and would also illuminate sex-biased behaviours, and the effects of the evolutionary pressures exerted by different mating strategies on this male-specific part of the genome. High-quality Y-chromosome sequences are available for human and chimpanzee (and low-quality for gorilla). The chromosomes differ in size, sequence organisation and content, and while retaining a relatively stable set of ancestral single-copy genes, show considerable variation in content and copy number of ampliconic multi-copy genes. Studies of Y-chromosome diversity in other great apes are relatively undeveloped compared to those in humans, but have nevertheless provided insights into speciation, dispersal, and mating patterns. Future studies, including data from larger sample sizes of wild-born and geographically well-defined individuals, and full Y-chromosome sequences from bonobos, gorillas and orangutans, promise to further our understanding of population histories, male-biased behaviours, mutation processes, and the functions of Y-chromosomal genes.

  12. [Chromosome breakage syndrome and fragile X syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Y

    1995-11-01

    Chromosome instability is a characteristic cytogenetic feature of a number of genetically determined human disorders collectively known as chromosome breakage syndromes. Included among the disorders are Bloom's syndrome (BS), Fanconi's anemia (FA), ataxia telangiectasia (AT). In each of the syndromes chromosome instability exists in the form of increased frequencies of breaks and interchanges occurring either spontaneously or following treatment with various DNA-damaging agents. These diseases have in common an autosomal recessive transmission and an increased tendency to develop malignancies. The blood cells of subjects with AT, BS, or FA are significantly more radiosensitive than those of controls, particularly in the occurrence of chromosome aberrations.

  13. Movement of chromosomes with severed kinetochore microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forer, Arthur; Johansen, Kristen M; Johansen, Jørgen

    2015-05-01

    Experiments dating from 1966 and thereafter showed that anaphase chromosomes continued to move poleward after their kinetochore microtubules were severed by ultraviolet microbeam irradiation. These observations were initially met with scepticism as they contradicted the prevailing view that kinetochore fibre microtubules pulled chromosomes to the pole. However, recent experiments using visible light laser microbeam irradiations have corroborated these earlier experiments as anaphase chromosomes again were shown to move poleward after their kinetochore microtubules were severed. Thus, multiple independent studies using different techniques have shown that chromosomes can indeed move poleward without direct microtubule connections to the pole, with only a kinetochore 'stub' of microtubules. An issue not yet settled is: what propels the disconnected chromosome? There are two not necessarily mutually exclusive proposals in the literature: (1) chromosome movement is propelled by the kinetochore stub interacting with non-kinetochore microtubules and (2) chromosome movement is propelled by a spindle matrix acting on the stub. In this review, we summarise the data indicating that chromosomes can move with severed kinetochore microtubules and we discuss proposed mechanisms for chromosome movement with severed kinetochore microtubules.

  14. Incomplete sex chromosome dosage compensation in the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella, based on de novo transcriptome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Peter W; Mank, Judith E; Wedell, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Males and females experience differences in gene dose for loci in the nonrecombining region of heteromorphic sex chromosomes. If not compensated, this leads to expression imbalances, with the homogametic sex on average exhibiting greater expression due to the doubled gene dose. Many organisms with heteromorphic sex chromosomes display global dosage compensation mechanisms, which equalize gene expression levels between the sexes. However, birds and Schistosoma have been previously shown to lack chromosome-wide dosage compensation mechanisms, and the status in other female heterogametic taxa including Lepidoptera remains unresolved. To further our understanding of dosage compensation in female heterogametic taxa and to resolve its status in the lepidopterans, we assessed the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella. As P. interpunctella lacks a complete reference genome, we conducted de novo transcriptome assembly combined with orthologous genomic location prediction from the related silkworm genome, Bombyx mori, to compare Z-linked and autosomal gene expression levels for each sex. We demonstrate that P. interpunctella lacks complete Z chromosome dosage compensation, female Z-linked genes having just over half the expression level of males and autosomal genes. This finding suggests that the Lepidoptera and possibly all female heterogametic taxa lack global dosage compensation, although more species will need to be sampled to confirm this assertion.

  15. siRNAs from an X-linked satellite repeat promote X-chromosome recognition in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Debashish U; Coarfa, Cristian; Xiao, Weimin; Gunaratne, Preethi H; Meller, Victoria H

    2014-11-18

    Highly differentiated sex chromosomes create a lethal imbalance in gene expression in one sex. To accommodate hemizygosity of the X chromosome in male fruit flies, expression of X-linked genes increases twofold. This is achieved by the male- specific lethal (MSL) complex, which modifies chromatin to increase expression. Mutations that disrupt the X localization of this complex decrease the expression of X-linked genes and reduce male survival. The mechanism that restricts the MSL complex to X chromatin is not understood. We recently reported that the siRNA pathway contributes to localization of the MSL complex, raising questions about the source of the siRNAs involved. The X-linked 1.688 g/cm(3) satellite related repeats (1.688(X) repeats) are restricted to the X chromosome and produce small RNA, making them an attractive candidate. We tested RNA from these repeats for a role in dosage compensation and found that ectopic expression of single-stranded RNAs from 1.688(X) repeats enhanced the male lethality of mutants with defective X recognition. In contrast, expression of double-stranded hairpin RNA from a 1.688(X) repeat generated abundant siRNA and dramatically increased male survival. Consistent with improved survival, X localization of the MSL complex was largely restored in these males. The striking distribution of 1.688(X) repeats, which are nearly exclusive to the X chromosome, suggests that these are cis-acting elements contributing to identification of X chromatin.

  16. Chromosomal replicons of higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van' t Hof, J.

    1987-03-16

    This brief discussion of replicons of higher plants offers a glimpse into the properties of chromosomal DNA replication. It gives evidence that the S phase of unrelated plant species is comprised of temporally ordered replicon families that increase in number with genome size. This orderly process, which assures a normal inheritance of genetic material to recipient daughter cells, is maintained at the level of replicon clusters by two mutually exclusive mechanisms, one involving the rate at which single replicons replicate their allotment of DNA, and another by means of the tempo-pause. The same two mechanisms are used by cells to alter the pattern of chromosomal DNA replication just prior to and during normal development. Both mechanisms are genetically determined and produce genetic effects when disturbed of disrupted by additional non-conforming DNAs. Further insight into how these two mechanisms operate requires more molecular information about the nature of replicons and the factors that govern when a replicon family replicates. Plant material is a rich and ideal source for this information just awaiting exploitation. 63 refs.

  17. Increased chromosome radiosensitivity during pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricoul, Michelle; Sabatier, Laure; Dutrillaux, Bernard [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, DRR, DSV, Fontenay aux roses (France)

    1997-03-04

    It was necessary to consider the risks of exposure of pregnant women, not only in relation to the child, but also in relation to their own hypersensitivity. We have demonstrated that pregnancy increases radiosensitivity of chromosome in the mouse at the end of gestation. This is of importance since it may have implications on radioprotection of pregnant women and give experimental guidelines to the problems of hypersensitivity to drugs and cancer aggravation during pregnancy. Blood obtained from women at various times of pregnancy was exposed to ionizing radiations. By comparison to non-pregnant women, an increase in chromosome breakage was observed in metaphases from lymphocytes, after short-term culture in the presence of the serum of the same donor. Immediately after delivery, this increase in radiosensitivity disappeared. In a prospective study, serial analyses showed a very strong correlation between the amount of pregnancy hormones, progesterone in particular, and the increase in radiosensitivity. Pregnant women may have an increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation during the second half of their pregnancy. This study provides the first evidence in human that radiosensitivity may vary in relation to physiological conditions.

  18. Stabilization of chromosomes by DNA intercalators for flow karyotyping and identification by banding of isolated chromosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aten, J. A.; Buys, C. H.; van der Veen, A. Y.; Mesa, J. R.; Yu, L. C.; Gray, J. W.; Osinga, J.; Stap, J.

    1987-01-01

    A number of structurally unrelated DNA intercalators have been studied as stabilizers of mitotic chromosomes during isolation from rodent and human metaphase cells. Seven out of the nine intercalators tested were found to be useful as chromosome stabilizing agents. Chromosome suspensions prepared in

  19. Exchange of core chromosomes and horizontal transfer of lineage-specific chromosomes in Fusarium oxysporum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaardingerbroek, I.; Beerens, B.; Rose, L.; Fokkens, L.; Cornelissen, B.J.C.; Rep, M.

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal transfer of supernumerary or lineage-specific (LS) chromosomes has been described in a number of plant pathogenic filamentous fungi. So far it was not known whether transfer is restricted to chromosomes of certain size or properties, or whether 'core' chromosomes can also undergo

  20. Heterogeneous Chromosomal Aberrations in Intraductal Breast Lesions Adjacent to Invasive Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Aubele

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence that breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease phenotypically as well as molecular biologically. So far, heterogeneity on the molecular biological level has not been investigated in potential precursor lesions, such as ductal hyperplasia (DH and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS. In this study we applied comparative genomic hybridization (CGH to formalin‐fixed, paraffin‐embedded breast tissue with DH and DCIS, adjacent to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC, to screen these potential precursor lesions for whole genomic chromosomal imbalances. Laser‐microdissection was used to select pure cell populations from the sections. Isolated DNA was amplified by degenerate oligonucleotide primed PCR (DOP‐PCR and further processed for CGH analysis.

  1. The Imbalance and Self-Organization in the Earth's Climate System (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, L.

    2013-12-01

    The increase in frequency and severity of storms, hurricanes and other atmospheric phenomena indicates a progressive imbalance in all planetary systems. Study of the temperature curve obtained from the Antarctic ice core showed that this data can be considered as a sum of two components: the 'cyclic' component and the 'stochastic' component, representing two different but tightly interconnected processes. The 'cyclic' and the 'stochastic' components represent two different types of self-organization of the Earth's climate system. The self-organization in the 'cyclic' process is a non-linear reaction of the Earth's climate system, as a whole, to the input of solar radiation. The self-organization in the 'stochastic' part is a self-organized nonlinear critical process, taking energy from, and fluctuating around the 'cyclic' part of the temperature variations. As a whole, the Earth's climate can be characterized as a nonlinear, self-organized, dynamic system with two levels of self-organization. This research can shed some light on the global climate imbalance and help us to understand the current trends in global weather and to predict global weather trends in the distant and not so distant future. First of all, global warming, as can be seen in repeated high temperature spikes in temperature cycles, has happened in every past climate cycle. The present interglacial period lasts a little bit longer than previous similar periods. This can be because of additional warming caused by human industrial activity. But, following the 'cyclic' pattern of glacial and interglacial temperature cycles, one can conclude that we are at the very beginning of a gradual cooling period to temperatures below freezing. This process is accompanied by sharp and intense fluctuations of temperature, represented by the 'stochastic' part of global temperature curve. Atmospheric temperature fluctuations are the direct result, and at the same time, a cause of atmospheric imbalance. It is

  2. [Frequency of chromosome variants in human populations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuleshov, N P; Kulieva, L M

    1979-01-01

    Chromosome variants were analyzed in the course of the population chromosome investigation of 6000 newborns and clinical cytogenetic studies of 403 married couples with recurrent spontaneous abortions, stillbirths or offsprings having congenital malformations or Down's syndrome. The following variants were determined: 1) Igh+, 9gh+, 16gh+ - the enlargement of the secondary constrictions of the size, more than 1/4 of the long arm of the chromosome; 2) Dp+ or Gp+ - the enlargement of the short arms of acrocentrics, their size being more than the short arm of the chromosome 18; 3) Ds+ or Gs - large satellites of the acrocentrics which are equal or more than the thickness of the chromatids of the long arms; 4) Es+ - satellites on the short arms of the chromosomes 17 or 18; 5) Dss of Gss - double satellites; 6) Yq+ - the enlargement of the long arm of Y chromosome, the size of which being more than G chromosome; 7) Yq- - deletion of the long arm of Y chromosome, the size of the long arm being less than chromosomes 21--22. The total frequency of variants in newborns was 12.8/1000 births. The incidence of different types of variants per 1000 births was as follows: Igh+ - 0.33; 9gh+ - 0.17; 16gh+ - 0.50; Ds+ - 2.33; Dp+ - 1.50; Dp- - 0.17; Gs+ - 0.83; Gp+ - 2.17; Yq+ - 6.91/1000 males; Yg- - 0.99/1000 males; double variants - 0.33; other variants - 0.33. 4.0% of married couples with recurrent spontaneous abortions had major chromosome aberrations, 14.6% - extreme variants of chromosomes. Among 113 couples with the history of congenital malformations in their offsprings major chromosome abnormalities were found in 4.4%, chromosome variants - 13.3%. The frequency of chromosome variants among 139 patients with Down's syndrome was 7.2%. In one case Robertsonian translocation t(DqGa) was determined. The most frequent types of variant chromosomes were Ds+, Dp+, Es+, Yq+.

  3. Imbalance in Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions and its Relationship to the Coastal Zone Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontar, Y. A.; Ozorovich, Y. R.; Salokhiddinov, A. T.

    2011-12-01

    We report here some efforts and results in studying the imbalance in groundwater-surface water interactions and processes of groundwater-surface water interactions and groundwater flooding creating hazards in the coastal zones. Hazards, hydrological and geophysical risk analysis related to imbalance in groundwater-surface water interactions and groundwater flooding have been to a large extent under-emphasized for coastal zone applications either due to economical limitations or underestimation of significance of imbalance in groundwater-surface water interactions. This is particularly true for tsunamis creating salt water intrusion to coastal aquifers, even though most tsunami hazard assessments have in the past relied on scenario or deterministic type models, and to increasing mineralization of potable water because of intensive water diversions and also the abundance of highly toxic pollutants (mainly pesticides) in water, air and food, which contribute to the deterioration of the coastal population's health. In the wake of pressing environmental and economic issues, it is of prime importance for the scientific community to shed light onto the great efforts by hydrologists and geophysicists to quantify conceptual uncertainties and to provide quality assurances of potential coastal zone hazard evaluation and prediction under conditions of imbalance in groundwater-surface water interactions. This paper proposes consideration of two case studies which are important and significant for future understanding of a concept of imbalance in groundwater-surface water interactions and development and essential for feasibility studies of hazards in the coastal zone. The territory of the Aral Sea Region in Central Asia is known as an ecological disaster coastal zone. It is now obvious that, in order to provide reasonable living conditions to the coastal zone population, it is first of all necessary to drastically improve the quality of the water dedicated to human needs. Due

  4. Comparative Genomic Sequence Analysis of the Human Chromosome 21 Down Syndrome Critical Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Atsushi; Noguchi, Hideki; Taylor, Todd D.; Ito, Takehiko; Pletcher, Mathew T.; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Reeves, Roger H.; Hattori, Masahira

    2002-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of the gene content of human chromosome 21 (HSA21) is essential for understanding the etiology of Down syndrome (DS). Here we report the largest comparison of finished mouse and human sequence to date for a 1.35-Mb region of mouse chromosome 16 (MMU16) that corresponds to human chromosome 21q22.2. This includes a portion of the commonly described “DS critical region,” thought to contain a gene or genes whose dosage imbalance contributes to a number of phenotypes associated with DS. We used comparative sequence analysis to construct a DNA feature map of this region that includes all known genes, plus 144 conserved sequences ≥100 bp long that show ≥80% identity between mouse and human but do not match known exons. Twenty of these have matches to expressed sequence tag and cDNA databases, indicating that they may be transcribed sequences from chromosome 21. Eight putative CpG islands are found at conserved positions. Models for two human genes, DSCR4 and DSCR8, are not supported by conserved sequence, and close examination indicates that low-level transcripts from these loci are unlikely to encode proteins. Gene prediction programs give different results when used to analyze the well-conserved regions between mouse and human sequences. Our findings have implications for evolution and for modeling the genetic basis of DS in mice. [Sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the DDBJ/GenBank under accession nos. AP003148 through AP003158, and AB066227. Supplemental material is available at http://www.genome.org.] PMID:12213769

  5. Chromosomal painting and ZW sex chromosomes differentiation in Characidium (Characiformes, Crenuchidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artoni Roberto F

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Characidium (a Neotropical fish group have a conserved diploid number (2n = 50, but show remarkable differences among species and populations in relation to sex chromosome systems and location of nucleolus organizer regions (NOR. In this study, we isolated a W-specific probe for the Characidium and characterized six Characidium species/populations using cytogenetic procedures. We analyzed the origin and differentiation of sex and NOR-bearing chromosomes by chromosome painting in populations of Characidium to reveal their evolution, phylogeny, and biogeography. Results A W-specific probe for efficient chromosome painting was isolated by microdissection and degenerate oligonucleotide primed-polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR amplification of W chromosomes from C. gomesi. The W probe generated weak signals dispersed on the proto sex chromosomes in C. zebra, dispersed signals in both W and Z chromosomes in C. lauroi and, in C. gomesi populations revealed a proximal site on the long arms of the Z chromosome and the entire W chromosome. All populations showed small terminal W probe sites in some autosomes. The 18S rDNA revealed distinctive patterns for each analyzed species/population with regard to proto sex chromosome, sex chromosome pair, and autosome location. Conclusions The results from dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (dual-color FISH using W and 18S rDNA probes allowed us to infer the putative evolutionary pathways for the differentiation of sex chromosomes and NORs, from structural rearrangements in a sex proto-chromosome, followed by gene erosion and heterochromatin amplification, morphological differentiation of the sex chromosomal pair, and NOR transposition, giving rise to the distinctive patterns observed among species/populations of Characidium. Biogeographic isolation and differentiation of sex chromosomes seem to have played a major role in the speciation process in this group of fish.

  6. Impact of I/Q imbalance on the performance of two-way CSI-assisted AF relaying

    KAUST Repository

    Qi, Jian

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate half-duplex two-way dual-hop channel state information (CSI)-assisted amplify-and-forward (AF) relaying in the presence of in-phase and quadrature-phase (I/Q) imbalance. A compensation approach for the I/Q imbalance is proposed, which employs the received signals together with their conjugations to detect the desired signal. We also derive the average symbol error probability of the considered half-duplex two-way dual-hop CSI-assisted AF relaying networks with and without compensation for I/Q imbalance in Rayleigh fading channels. Numerical results are provided and show that the proposed compensation method mitigates the impact of I/Q imbalance to a certain extent. © 2013 IEEE.

  7. How to Protect the Chromosomal Ends?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 6. How to Protect the Chromosomal Ends? - Telomerase, Chromosome Stability and Aging. Anurag N Paranjape Annapoorni Rangarajan. General Article Volume 15 Issue 6 June 2010 pp 538-547 ...

  8. X-chromosome inactivation and escape

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-06

    Nov 6, 2015 ... She predicted many of the features of X inactivation, for e.g., .... feature that locks silencing, i.e. DNA methylation at CpG islands of X-linked ..... 1996 XIST RNA paints the inactive X chromosome at interphase: evidence for a novel RNA involved in nuclear/chromosome structure. J. Cell Biol. 132, 259–275.

  9. Chromosome studies in Cashew ( Anacardium occidentale L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromosome studies in Cashew (Anacardium occidentale L.) OM Aliyu, JA Awopetu. Abstract. Despite the increased cultivation of cashew as a commodity crop in sub-Sahara Africa, Asia and South America there are few chromosome studies on it. The present study investigates number, structure and behavior of ...

  10. Determination of chromosomal ploidy in Agave ssp.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... (2008) analyzed the karyotypes of several agave cul- tivars. Doughty (1936) reported the chromosomal ploidies of three varieties. However, little is known about the chromosome numbers of wild and local breeding. *Corresponding author. E-mail: lianzi9381@yahoo.com.cn. Tel: (+86)13922727215.

  11. Chromosome number9 specific repetitive DNA sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joste, N.E.; Cram, L.S.; Hildebrand, C.E.; Jones, M.; Longmire, J.; Robinson, T.; Moyzis, R.K.

    1986-05-01

    Human repetitive DNA libraries have been constructed and various recombinant DNA clones isolated that are likely candidates for chromosome specific sequences. The first clone tested (pHuR 98; plasmid human repeat 98) was biotinylated and hybridized to human chromosomes in situ. The hybridized recombinant probe was detected with fluoresceinated avidin, and chromosomes were counter-stained with either propidium iodide or distamycin-DAPI. Specific hybridization to chromosome band 9q1 was obtained. The localization was confirmed by hybridizing radiolabeled pHuR 98 DNA to human chromosomes sorted by flow cytometry. Various methods, including orthogonal field pulsed gel electrophoresis analysis indicate that 75 kilobase blocks of this sequence are interspersed with other repetitive DNA sequences in this chromosome band. This study is the first to report a human repetitive DNA sequence uniquely localized to a specific chromosome. This clone provides an easily detected and highly specific chromosomal marker for molecular cytogenetic analyses in numerous basic research and clinical studies.

  12. Genomic regulatory landscapes and chromosomal rearrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladegaard, Elisabete L Engenheiro

    2008-01-01

    specificity of the individual CNEs. In this PhD study I have studied several chromosomal rearrangements with breakpoints in the vicinity of trans-dev genes. This included chromosomal rearrangements compatible with known phenotype-genotype associations (Rieger syndrome-PITX2, Mowat-Wilson syndrome-ZEB2...

  13. [CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH INFERTILITY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylyp, L Y; Spinenko, L O; Verhoglyad, N V; Kashevarova, O O; Zukin, V D

    2015-01-01

    To assess the frequency and structure of chromosomal abnormalities in patients with infertility, a retrospective analysis of cytogenetic studies of 3414 patients (1741 females and 1673 males), referred to the Clinic of reproductive medicine "Nadiya" from 2007 to 2012, was performed. Chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 2.37% patients: 2.79% in males and 1.95% in females. Balanced structural chromosomal abnormalities prevailed over numerical abnormalities and corresponded to 80.2% of all chromosomal abnormalities detected in the studied group. Sex chromosome abnormalities made up 23.5% of chromosomal pathology (19/81) and included gonosomal aneuploidies in 84% of cases (16/19) and structural abnormalities of chromosome Y in 16% of cases (3/19). The low level sex chromosome mosaicism was detected with the frequency of 0.55%. Our results highlight the importance of cytogenetic studies in patients seeking infertility treatment by assisted reproductive technologies, since an abnormal finding not only provide a firm diagnosis to couples with infertility, but also influences significantly the approach to infertility treatment in such patients.

  14. Y chromosome haplogroups in autistic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamain, S; Quach, H; Quintana-Murci, L; Betancur, C; Philippe, A; Gillberg, C; Sponheim, E; Skjeldal, O H; Fellous, M; Leboyer, M; Bourgeron, T

    2002-01-01

    The male to female ratio in autism is 4:1 in the global autistic population, but increases to 23:1 in autistic subjects without physical or brain abnormalities.(1) Despite this well-recognised gender difference, male predisposition to autistic disorder remains unexplained and the role of sex chromosomes is still debated. Numerical and structural abnormalities of the sex chromosomes are among the most frequently reported chromosomal disorders associated with autism. However, genome scans have failed to detect linkage on the X chromosome(2,3,4) and this approach cannot study the non-recombining region of the Y chromosome. In this study, we searched for a specific Y chromosome effect in autistic subjects. Using informative Y-polymorphic markers, the Y chromosome haplotypes of 111 autistic subjects from France, Sweden and Norway were defined and compared with relevant control populations. No significant difference in Y-haplotype distribution between the affected and control groups was observed. Although this study cannot exclude the presence of a Y susceptibility gene, our results are not suggestive of a Y chromosome effect in autism.

  15. Human male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, M. de; Vosters, S.; Merkx, G.F.M.; Hauwers, K.W.M. d'; Wansink, D.G.; Ramos, L.; Boer, P. de

    2012-01-01

    In mammalian male gametogenesis the sex chromosomes are distinctive in both gene activity and epigenetic strategy. At first meiotic prophase the heteromorphic X and Y chromosomes are placed in a separate chromatin domain called the XY body. In this process, X,Y chromatin becomes highly

  16. Chromosome number and cytomorphological characterization of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    mistaken identity of species in earlier chromosome counts. Observations on chromosome morphology and size made in this study are an insight into what will be expected at meiosis. Distribution of several morphological categories namely acrocentrics, metacentrics and submetacentrics occurring in different size regimes as.

  17. Chromosomal Aneuploidies and Early Embryonic Developmental Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Maurer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Selecting the best embryo for transfer, with the highest chance of achieving a vital pregnancy, is a major goal in current in vitro fertilization (IVF technology. The high rate of embryonic developmental arrest during IVF treatment is one of the limitations in achieving this goal. Chromosomal abnormalities are possibly linked with chromosomal arrest and selection against abnormal fertilization products. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in preimplantation embryos with developmental arrest. Materials and Methods: This cohort study included blastomeres of embryos with early developmental arrest that were biopsied and analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH with probes for chromosomes 13, 16, 18, 21 and 22. Forty-five couples undergoing IVF treatment were included, and 119 arrested embryos were biopsied. All probes were obtained from the Kinderwunsch Zentrum, Linz, Austria, between August 2009 and August 2011. Results: Of these embryos, 31.6% were normal for all chromosomes tested, and 68.4% were abnormal. Eleven embryos were uniformly aneuploid, 20 were polyploid, 3 were haploid, 11 displayed mosaicism and 22 embryos exhibited chaotic chromosomal complement. Conclusion: Nearly 70% of arrested embryos exhibit chromosomal errors, making chromosomal abnormalities a major cause of embryonic arrest and may be a further explanation for the high developmental failure rates during culture of the embryos in the IVF setting.

  18. The Barley Chromosome 5 Linkage Map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.; Jørgensen, Jørgen Helms

    1975-01-01

    The literature is surveyed for data on recombination between loci on chromosome 5 of barley; 13 loci fall into the category “mapped” loci, more than 20 into the category “associated” loci and nine into the category “loci once suggested to be on chromosome 5”. A procedure was developed...

  19. CHROMOSOME STUDY OF SOME GRASSHOPPER SPECIES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hence, this research is aimed at studying the chromosomes of some Ethiopian grasshopper species. The grasshopper specimens used in this study were collected from eight localities in central Ethiopia. The specimens were identified as belonging to two families (Acrididae and Tetrigidae). Chromosome preparations were ...

  20. Translocations used to generate chromosome segment duplications ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary figure 1. (a–i) Putative novel genes created by the breakpoints. Translocation chromosomes are shown with the translocated segment indicated in red and the untranslocated segments in black or blue. Purple arrows indicate whether the chromosome is a donor (arrow pointing up) or a recipient (arrow ...

  1. Translocations used to generate chromosome segment duplications ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    progeny bearing a duplication (Dp) of the translocated chromosome segment. Here, 30 ... [Singh P K, Iyer V S, Sowjanya T N, Raj B K and Kasbekar D P 2010 Translocations used to generate chromosome segment duplications in. Neurospora can ... of this work, namely, the definition of breakpoint junction sequences of 12 ...

  2. A sexy spin on nonrandom chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charville, Gregory W; Rando, Thomas A

    2013-06-06

    Nonrandom chromosome segregation is an intriguing phenomenon linked to certain asymmetric stem cell divisions. In a recent report in Nature, Yadlapalli and Yamashita (2013) observe nonrandom segregation of X and Y chromosomes in Drosophila germline stem cells and shed light on the complex mechanisms of this fascinating process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Role of chromosomal instability in cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Sarah E

    2017-09-01

    Cancer cells often display chromosomal instability (CIN), a defect that involves loss or rearrangement of the cell's genetic material - chromosomes - during cell division. This process results in the generation of aneuploidy, a deviation from the haploid number of chromosomes, and structural alterations of chromosomes in over 90% of solid tumours and many haematological cancers. This trait is unique to cancer cells as normal cells in the body generally strictly maintain the correct number and structure of chromosomes. This key difference between cancer and normal cells has led to two important hypotheses: (i) cancer cells have had to overcome inherent barriers to changes in chromosomes that are not tolerated in non-cancer cells and (ii) CIN represents a cancer-specific target to allow the specific elimination of cancer cells from the body. To exploit these hypotheses and design novel approaches to treat cancer, a full understanding of the mechanisms driving CIN and how CIN contributes to cancer progression is required. Here, we will discuss the possible mechanisms driving chromosomal instability, how CIN may contribute to the progression at multiple stages of tumour evolution and possible future therapeutic directions based on targeting cancer chromosomal instability. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  4. Detection of submicroscopic infection with plasmodium spp., using classical and molecular techniques in pregnant patient from Córdoba, Colombia = Detección de casos submicroscópicos de Plasmodium spp., utilizando técnicas clásicas y moleculares en pacientes gestantes de Córdoba, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanquiceth, Yurany Patricia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gestational malaria affects both the mother and the development of her embryo or fetus. Rapid diagnosis and timely and effective treatment are required to prevent complications and deaths. Objective: To compare thick blood smear with nested PCR and real-time PCR (qRT-PCR for the diagnosis of submicroscopic infections with Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax. Methodology: 21 women with clinical manifestations of malaria, including both pregnant and non-pregnant, were studied in Puerto Libertador, Córdoba, Colombia. Peripheral blood specimens were obtained from all of them; umbilical cord and placenta blood specimens were taken in the pregnant ones. DNA was extracted and amplified for nested PCR or qRT-PCR. Statistical analysis was done using Graphpad PRISM and EPIDAT softwares. Results: The three techniques were satisfactory for the detection of Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax in peripheral blood and in the umbilical cord and placenta specimens. Molecular tests were 100% sensitive and specific. Two submicroscopic cases of P. falciparum infection were detected with the two PCR techniques. Conclusion: qRT-PCR is advantageous over nested PCR because its standardization is shorter, it requires lesser infrastructure and it allows the quantification of DNA.

  5. Cat-eye syndrome with unusual marker chromosome probably not chromosome 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, W; Verma, R S; Jhaveri, R C

    1984-05-01

    An unusual supernumerary chromosome with a single satellite on the long arm was found in a child with manifestations of the cat-eye syndrome including apparently low-set and malformed ears, preauricular tags, micrognathia, and imperforate anus. Although G-banding suggested that this extra material was chromosome 22, this was not confirmed by several other banding techniques. After examination of the parents' chromosomes, the nature and origin of this extra chromosome remains obscure. We conclude that patients previously diagnosed as having "partial trisomy 22" with incomplete cat-eye syndrome may have a different chromosome constitution when studied by various banding techniques.

  6. Analysis and Compensation of Transmitter and Receiver I/Q Imbalances in Space-Time Coded Multiantenna OFDM Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Yaning

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The combination of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM and multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO techniques has been widely considered as the most promising approach for building future wireless transmission systems. The use of multiple antennas poses then big restrictions on the size and cost of individual radio transmitters and receivers, to keep the overall transceiver implementation feasible. This results in various imperfections in the analog radio front ends. One good example is the so-called I/Q imbalance problem related to the amplitude and phase matching of the transceiver I and Q chains. This paper studies the performance of space-time coded (STC multiantenna OFDM systems under I/Q imbalance, covering both the transmitter and the receiver sides of the link. The challenging case of frequency-selective I/Q imbalances is assumed, being an essential ingredient in future wideband wireless systems. As a practical example, the Alamouti space-time coded OFDM system with two transmit and M receive antennas is examined in detail and a closed-form solution for the resulting signal-to-interference ratio (SIR at the detector input due to I/Q imbalance is derived. This offers a valuable analytical tool for assessing the I/Q imbalance effects in any STC-OFDM system, without lengthy data or system simulations. In addition, the impact of I/Q imbalances on the channel estimation in the STC-OFDM context is also analyzed analytically. Furthermore, based on the derived signal models, a practical pilot-based I/Q imbalance compensation scheme is also proposed, being able to jointly mitigate the effects of frequency-selective I/Q imbalances as well as channel estimation errors. The performance of the compensator is analyzed using extensive computer simulations, and it is shown to virtually reach the perfectly matched reference system performance with low pilot overhead.

  7. Analysis and Compensation of Transmitter and Receiver I/Q Imbalances in Space-Time Coded Multiantenna OFDM Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaning Zou

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The combination of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM and multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO techniques has been widely considered as the most promising approach for building future wireless transmission systems. The use of multiple antennas poses then big restrictions on the size and cost of individual radio transmitters and receivers, to keep the overall transceiver implementation feasible. This results in various imperfections in the analog radio front ends. One good example is the so-called I/Q imbalance problem related to the amplitude and phase matching of the transceiver I and Q chains. This paper studies the performance of space-time coded (STC multiantenna OFDM systems under I/Q imbalance, covering both the transmitter and the receiver sides of the link. The challenging case of frequency-selective I/Q imbalances is assumed, being an essential ingredient in future wideband wireless systems. As a practical example, the Alamouti space-time coded OFDM system with two transmit and M receive antennas is examined in detail and a closed-form solution for the resulting signal-to-interference ratio (SIR at the detector input due to I/Q imbalance is derived. This offers a valuable analytical tool for assessing the I/Q imbalance effects in any STC-OFDM system, without lengthy data or system simulations. In addition, the impact of I/Q imbalances on the channel estimation in the STC-OFDM context is also analyzed analytically. Furthermore, based on the derived signal models, a practical pilot-based I/Q imbalance compensation scheme is also proposed, being able to jointly mitigate the effects of frequency-selective I/Q imbalances as well as channel estimation errors. The performance of the compensator is analyzed using extensive computer simulations, and it is shown to virtually reach the perfectly matched reference system performance with low pilot overhead.

  8. Advances in understanding paternally transmitted Chromosomal Abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, F; Sloter, E; Wyrobek, A J

    2001-03-01

    Multicolor FISH has been adapted for detecting the major types of chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm including aneuploidies for clinically-relevant chromosomes, chromosomal aberrations including breaks and rearrangements, and other numerical abnormalities. The various sperm FISH assays have been used to evaluate healthy men, men of advanced age, and men who have received mutagenic cancer therapy. The mouse has also been used as a model to investigate the mechanism of paternally transmitted genetic damage. Sperm FISH for the mouse has been used to detect chromosomally abnormal mouse sperm, while the PAINT/DAPI analysis of mouse zygotes has been used to evaluate the types of chromosomal defects that can be paternally transmitted to the embryo and their effects on embryonic development.

  9. Flow Analysis and Sorting of Plant Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrána, Jan; Cápal, Petr; Šimková, Hana; Karafiátová, Miroslava; Čížková, Jana; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2016-10-10

    Analysis and sorting of plant chromosomes (plant flow cytogenetics) is a special application of flow cytometry in plant genomics and its success depends critically on sample quality. This unit describes the methodology in a stepwise manner, starting with the induction of cell cycle synchrony and accumulation of dividing cells in mitotic metaphase, and continues with the preparation of suspensions of intact mitotic chromosomes, flow analysis and sorting of chromosomes, and finally processing of the sorted chromosomes. Each step of the protocol is described in detail as some procedures have not been used widely. Supporting histograms are presented as well as hints on dealing with plant material; the utility of sorted chromosomes for plant genomics is also discussed. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. B chromosomes: from cytogenetics to systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Guilherme T; Nakajima, Rafael T; Fantinatti, Bruno E A; Marques, Diego F; Almeida, Rodrigo O; Simões, Rafael P; Martins, Cesar

    2017-02-01

    Though hundreds to thousands of reports have described the distribution of B chromosomes among diverse eukaryote groups, a comprehensive theory of their biological role has not yet clearly emerged. B chromosomes are classically understood as a sea of repetitive DNA sequences that are poor in genes and are maintained by a parasitic-drive mechanism during cell division. Recent developments in high-throughput DNA/RNA analyses have increased the resolution of B chromosome biology beyond those of classical and molecular cytogenetic methods; B chromosomes contain many transcriptionally active sequences, including genes, and can modulate the activity of autosomal genes. Furthermore, the most recent knowledge obtained from omics analyses, which is associated with a systemic view, has demonstrated that B chromosomes can influence cell biology in a complex way, possibly favoring their own maintenance and perpetuation.

  11. Energy Landscapes of Folding Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin

    The genome, the blueprint of life, contains nearly all the information needed to build and maintain an entire organism. A comprehensive understanding of the genome is of paramount interest to human health and will advance progress in many areas, including life sciences, medicine, and biotechnology. The overarching goal of my research is to understand the structure-dynamics-function relationships of the human genome. In this talk, I will be presenting our efforts in moving towards that goal, with a particular emphasis on studying the three-dimensional organization, the structure of the genome with multi-scale approaches. Specifically, I will discuss the reconstruction of genome structures at both interphase and metaphase by making use of data from chromosome conformation capture experiments. Computationally modeling of chromatin fiber at atomistic level from first principles will also be presented as our effort for studying the genome structure from bottom up.

  12. Chromosomal context and replication properties of ARS plasmids in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ARS) elements function as plasmid as well as chromosomal replication origins in yeasts. As compared to ARSs, different chromosomal origins vary greatly in their efficiency and timing of replication probably due to their wider chromosomal ...

  13. Meiotic cohesin-based chromosome structure is essential for homologous chromosome pairing in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Da-Qiao; Matsuda, Atsushi; Okamasa, Kasumi; Nagahama, Yuki; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2016-06-01

    Chromosome structure is dramatically altered upon entering meiosis to establish chromosomal architectures necessary for the successful progression of meiosis-specific events. An early meiotic event involves the replacement of the non-SMC mitotic cohesins with their meiotic equivalents in most part of the chromosome, forming an axis on meiotic chromosomes. We previously demonstrated that the meiotic cohesin complex is required for chromosome compaction during meiotic prophase in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. These studies revealed that chromosomes are elongated in the absence of the meiotic cohesin subunit Rec8 and shortened in the absence of the cohesin-associated protein Pds5. In this study, using super-resolution structured illumination microscopy, we found that Rec8 forms a linear axis on chromosomes, which is required for the organized axial structure of chromatin during meiotic prophase. In the absence of Pds5, the Rec8 axis is shortened whereas chromosomes are widened. In rec8 or pds5 mutants, the frequency of homologous chromosome pairing is reduced. Thus, Rec8 and Pds5 play an essential role in building a platform to support the chromosome architecture necessary for the spatial alignment of homologous chromosomes.

  14. Widespread dysregulation of MiRNAs by MYCN amplification and chromosomal imbalances in neuroblastoma: association of miRNA expression with survival

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bray, Isabella; Bryan, Kenneth; Prenter, Suzanne; Buckley, Patrick G; Foley, Niamh H; Murphy, Derek M; Alcock, Leah; Mestdagh, Pieter; Vandesompele, Jo; Speleman, Frank; London, Wendy B; McGrady, Patrick W; Higgins, Desmond G; O'Meara, Anne; O'Sullivan, Maureen; Stallings, Raymond L

    2009-01-01

    MiRNAs regulate gene expression at a post-transcriptional level and their dysregulation can play major roles in the pathogenesis of many different forms of cancer, including neuroblastoma, an often...

  15. Degree of glutathione deficiency and redox imbalance depend on subtype of mitochondrial disease and clinical status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory M Enns

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial disorders are associated with decreased energy production and redox imbalance. Glutathione plays a central role in redox signaling and protecting cells from oxidative damage. In order to understand the consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction on in vivo redox status, and to determine how this varies by mitochondrial disease subtype and clinical severity, we used a sensitive tandem mass spectrometry assay to precisely quantify whole blood reduced (GSH and oxidized (GSSG glutathione levels in a large cohort of mitochondrial disorder patients. Glutathione redox potential was calculated using the Nernst equation. Compared to healthy controls (n = 59, mitochondrial disease patients (n = 58 as a group showed significant redox imbalance (redox potential -251 mV ± 9.7, p<0.0001 with an increased level of oxidation by ∼ 9 mV compared to controls (-260 mV ± 6.4. Underlying this abnormality were significantly lower whole blood GSH levels (p = 0.0008 and GSH/GSSG ratio (p = 0.0002, and significantly higher GSSG levels (p<0.0001 in mitochondrial disease patients compared to controls. Redox potential was significantly more oxidized in all mitochondrial disease subgroups including Leigh syndrome (n = 15, electron transport chain abnormalities (n = 10, mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (n = 8, mtDNA deletion syndrome (n = 7, mtDNA depletion syndrome (n = 7, and miscellaneous other mitochondrial disorders (n = 11. Patients hospitalized in metabolic crisis (n = 7 showed the greatest degree of redox imbalance at -242 mV ± 7. Peripheral whole blood GSH and GSSG levels are promising biomarkers of mitochondrial dysfunction, and may give insights into the contribution of oxidative stress to the pathophysiology of the various mitochondrial disorders. In particular, evaluation of redox potential may be useful in monitoring of clinical status or response to redox-modulating therapies in clinical trials.

  16. Framework for interpretation of trypsin-antitrypsin imbalance and genetic heterogeneity in pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kun; Gao, Feng; Chen, Qingquan; Liu, Qicai; Chen, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Early intracellular premature trypsinogen activation was interpreted as the key initiator of pancreatitis. When the balance in the homeostasis of trypsin and antitrypsin system is disequilibrated, elevated aggressive enzymes directly attack the pancreatic tissue, which leads to pancreatic destruction and inflammation. However, trypsin alone is not enough to cause complications in pancreatitis, which may play a crucial role in modulating signaling events in the initial phase of the disease. NFκB activation is the major inflammatory pathway involved in the occurrence and development of pancreatitis and it can be induced by intrapancreatic activation of trypsinogen. Synthesis of trypsinogen occurs in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and ER stress is an important early acinar cell event. Components of ER stress response are known to be able to trigger cell death as well as NFκB signaling cascade. The strongest evidence supporting the trypsin-centered theory is that gene mutations, which lead to the generation of more trypsin, or reduce the activity of trypsin inhibitors or trypsin degradation, are associated with pancreatitis. Thus, trypsin-antitrypsin imbalance may be the first step leading to pancreatic autodigestion and inducing other pathways. Continued experimental studies are necessary to determine the specific relationships between trypsin-antitrypsin imbalance and genetic heterogeneity in pancreatitis. In this article, we review the latest advances that contributed to the understanding of the basic mechanisms behind the occurrence and development of pancreatitis with a focus on the interpretation of trypsin-antitrypsin imbalance and their relationships with other inflammation pathways. We additionally highlight genetic predispositions to pancreatitis and possible mechanisms associated with them.

  17. Electrolytes imbalance in saltwater near-drowning victims in the Gulf of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongsiri, Somchai; Dinchuthai, Pakapan; Thammakumpee, Jiranuch; Prongnamchai, Suriya; Chueansuwan, Rachaneeporn; Tangjaturonrasme, Siriporn; Chaivanit, Pechngam

    2013-10-01

    Near-drowning victims in saltwater are expected to have multiple electrolytes imbalance that affected treatment outcome. There are limited data about these parameters in Thailand to guide the treatment plan. To study the characteristic of electrolytes imbalance in saltwater near-drowning victims in the Gulf of Thailand. Retrospective analytic study of 39 medical records of near-drowning patients admitted to Burapha University Hospital between 2000 and 2010. Characteristics of the patients and serum electrolytes were analyzed by SPSS version 19 for windows. The study included 23 male, 16 female patients. Average age was 14.46 +/- 11.15 years and 19/39 (48.72%) patients were aged 10 or less. The following electrolytes imbalance were identified, hypokalemia 8/39 (20.51%), hypernatremia 12/39 (30.77%), hyperchloremia 15/39 (38.46%), high anion gap 23/39 (58.97%), and hypobicarbonatemia 28/39 (71.79%). Seven out of eight patients in the hypokalemia group were in the high anion gap group. Mean SpO2 in the patients who had high anion gap was significantly lower than those who had normal anion gap (87.06 +/- 17.68% vs. 95.8 +/- 5.94% p = 0.031) without difference in systolic blood pressure (112.59 +/- 14.63 vs. 105.67 +/- 13.98 p = 0.159). Those who were hypotensive significantly had lower bicarbonate (17.00 +/- 3.51 vs. 20.59 +/- 3.81 p = 0.038) and higher anion gap (19.29 +/- 1.799 vs. 16.25 +/- 6.25 p = 0.025) than normotensive patients. Hypobicarbonatemia, high anion gap, hypernatremia, and hypokalemia were common in saltwater near-drowning patients in the Gulf of Thailand. The cause of high anion gap was probably due to hypoxia and hypotension.

  18. A case of difficult management of fluid-electrolyte imbalance in choroid plexus papilloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Atsushi; Nishimura, Shinjitsu; Fujita, Tomoaki; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Nishijima, Michiharu

    2014-01-01

    A 22-month-old boy presented with nausea and gradual deterioration of gait disturbance. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated an intraventricular mass lesion in the right lateral ventricle. He was referred to our department 3 weeks after onset. Acute hydrocephalus gradually proceeded 4 days after admission, and external ventricular drainage (EVD) was performed. EVD revealed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) overproduction (800-1,500 mL/day) under constant pressure of 10 cm H2O above external auditory meatus. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a multi-lobular mass in the inferior horn of the right lateral ventricle. A choroid plexus tumor was suspected. The ratio of blood urea nitrogen:creatinine (BUN:Cre) remained between 30 and 40, and hemoglobin was between 14.0-17.0 mg/dL, suggesting marked dehydration. Serum sodium varied between 117 and 140 mmol/L, and serum potassium between 2.2 mmol/L and 6.9 mmol/L. The amount of EVD was unstable and fluid balance management was difficult. Hypotonic fluid with sodium chloride supplement was used to adjust the fluid and electrolyte imbalance. Surgical removal of the tumor was performed 6 days after EVD and tumor was grossly and totally removed. The high BUN:Cre ratio decreased to about 15 and hemoglobin recovered to 7.5-9.0 mg/dL after removal. Electrolytes returned to the normal range. Overproduction of CSF also markedly improved to electrolyte imbalance due to over-drainage after EVD, which could not be effectively controlled before tumor removal. Cautious fluid management and emergent surgical resection might be required to manage the overproduction of CSF and fluid-electrolyte imbalance.

  19. Imbalances in T Cell-Related Transcription Factors Among Patients with Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Safdari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Imbalances in effector T cell functioning have been associated with a number of autoimmune diseases, including Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT. Differentiation of effector T helper (Th 1, Th2, Th17 and regulatory T cell (Treg lymphocytes is regulated by transcription factors, including Th1-specific T box (T-bet, GATA binding protein-3 (GATA3, retinoid-related orphan receptor (ROR-α and forkhead box P3 (FOXP3. This study aimed to investigate Th1/Th2, Th1/Treg, Th2/Treg and Th17/Treg balances at the level of these transcription factors. Methods: This study took place between October 2015 and August 2016. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from a control group of 40 healthy women recruited from the Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran, and a patient group of 40 women with HT referred to the Hazrat Ali Asghar Hospital, Zahedan. Total ribonucleic acid extraction was performed and the gene expression of transcription factors was quantitated using a real-time polymerase chain reaction technique. Results: Expression of T-bet and GATA3 was significantly elevated, while FOXP3 expression was significantly diminished among HT patients in comparison with the controls (P = 0.03, 0.01 and 0.05, respectively. Expression of RORα was higher among HT patients, although this difference was not significant (P = 0.15. Expression of T-bet/FOXP3, GATA3/FOXP3 and RORα/FOXP3 ratios were increased among HT patients in comparison with the controls (P <0.02, <0.01 and <0.01, respectively. Conclusion: These results indicate that HT patients have imbalances in Th1/Treg, Th2/Treg and Th17/Treg lymphocytes at the level of the transcription factors, deviating towards Th1, Th2 and Th17 cells. Correction of these imbalances may therefore be therapeutic.

  20. Framework for Interpretation of Trypsin–antitrypsin Imbalance and Genetic Heterogeneity in Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kun; Gao, Feng; Chen, Qingquan; Liu, Qicai; Chen, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Early intracellular premature trypsinogen activation was interpreted as the key initiator of pancreatitis. When the balance in the homeostasis of trypsin and antitrypsin system is disequilibrated, elevated aggressive enzymes directly attack the pancreatic tissue, which leads to pancreatic destruction and inflammation. However, trypsin alone is not enough to cause complications in pancreatitis, which may play a crucial role in modulating signaling events in the initial phase of the disease. NFκB activation is the major inflammatory pathway involved in the occurrence and development of pancreatitis and it can be induced by intrapancreatic activation of trypsinogen. Synthesis of trypsinogen occurs in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and ER stress is an important early acinar cell event. Components of ER stress response are known to be able to trigger cell death as well as NFκB signaling cascade. The strongest evidence supporting the trypsin-centered theory is that gene mutations, which lead to the generation of more trypsin, or reduce the activity of trypsin inhibitors or trypsin degradation, are associated with pancreatitis. Thus, trypsin–antitrypsin imbalance may be the first step leading to pancreatic autodigestion and inducing other pathways. Continued experimental studies are necessary to determine the specific relationships between trypsin–antitrypsin imbalance and genetic heterogeneity in pancreatitis. In this article, we review the latest advances that contributed to the understanding of the basic mechanisms behind the occurrence and development of pancreatitis with a focus on the interpretation of trypsin–antitrypsin imbalance and their relationships with other inflammation pathways. We additionally highlight genetic predispositions to pancreatitis and possible mechanisms associated with them. PMID:26228362