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Sample records for submicrometer ceramic particles

  1. Filtration of submicrometer particles by pelagic tunicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Kelly R; Madin, Laurence P; Stocker, Roman

    2010-08-24

    Salps are common in oceanic waters and have higher per-individual filtration rates than any other zooplankton filter feeder. Although salps are centimeters in length, feeding via particle capture occurs on a fine, mucous mesh (fiber diameter d approximately 0.1 microm) at low velocity (U = 1.6 +/- 0.6 cmxs(-1), mean +/- SD) and is thus a low Reynolds-number (Re approximately 10(-3)) process. In contrast to the current view that particle encounter is dictated by simple sieving of particles larger than the mesh spacing, a low-Re mathematical model of encounter rates by the salp feeding apparatus for realistic oceanic particle-size distributions shows that submicron particles, due to their higher abundances, are encountered at higher rates (particles per time) than larger particles. Data from feeding experiments with 0.5-, 1-, and 3-microm diameter polystyrene spheres corroborate these findings. Although particles larger than 1 microm (e.g., flagellates, small diatoms) represent a larger carbon pool, smaller particles in the 0.1- to 1-microm range (e.g., bacteria, Prochlorococcus) may be more quickly digestible because they present more surface area, and we find that particles smaller than the mesh size (1.4 microm) can fully satisfy salp energetic needs. Furthermore, by packaging submicrometer particles into rapidly sinking fecal pellets, pelagic tunicates can substantially change particle-size spectra and increase downward fluxes in the ocean.

  2. Probing dielectric ceramics surface at sub-micrometer scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorenza, Patrick; Lo Nigro, Raffaella; Raineri, Vito [Istituto per la Microelettronica e Microsistemi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Stradale Primosole 50, 95121 Catania (Italy); Schmidt, Rainer; Sinclair, Derek C, E-mail: patrick.fiorenza@imm.cnr.it [Department of Engineering Materials, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) with conductive tips has been used to image the dielectric properties of ceramics with giant permittivity. In particular, measurements in impedance mode of local resistivity allowed to image the permittivity map on polycrystalline materials. Such imaging provides correlation between the dielectric properties and the sample structure, in particular focusing on defects inside the single grains. Great attention has been devoted to the possible artefacts due to surface imperfections, such as huge roughness and/or contamination. A reliable surface investigation has been obtained after the definition of both the physical and geometrical criteria to avoid the artefacts due to both the surface or anomalous tip-sample contact area variation (for instance, in grain boundaries, holes and cracks in the ceramic pills). In particular, the power spectral density (PSD) allows to get access to the different periodic components of the surface roughness. The PSD demonstrated to be a sensitive tool to check the surface conditions after the polishing procedures aimed to the progressive decreasing of surface roughness, in order to reach the SPM limits and to avoid artefacts inducing wrong data interpretation.

  3. Focusing of sub-micrometer particles and bacteria enabled by two-dimensional acoustophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antfolk, M.; Muller, Peter Barkholt; Augustsson, P.

    2014-01-01

    Handling of sub-micrometer bioparticles such as bacteria are becoming increasingly important in the biomedical field and in environmental and food analysis. As a result, there is an increased need for less labor-intensive and time-consuming handling methods. Here, an acoustophoresis-based microfl......Handling of sub-micrometer bioparticles such as bacteria are becoming increasingly important in the biomedical field and in environmental and food analysis. As a result, there is an increased need for less labor-intensive and time-consuming handling methods. Here, an acoustophoresis......-based microfluidic chip that uses ultrasound to focus sub-micrometer particles and bacteria, is presented. The ability to focus sub-micrometer bioparticles in a standing one-dimensional acoustic wave is generally limited by the acoustic-streaming-induced drag force, which becomes increasingly significant the smaller...... particles as small as 0.5 μm in diameter in microchannels of square or rectangular cross sections, is demonstrated. Numerical analysis was used to determine generic transverse particle trajectories in the channels, which revealed spiral-shaped trajectories of the sub-micrometer particles towards the center...

  4. Sub-micrometer refractory carbonaceous particles in the polar stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütze, Katharina; Wilson, James Charles; Weinbruch, Stephan; Benker, Nathalie; Ebert, Martin; Günther, Gebhard; Weigel, Ralf; Borrmann, Stephan

    2017-10-01

    Eleven particle samples collected in the polar stratosphere during SOLVE (SAGE III Ozone loss and validation experiment) from January until March 2000 were characterized in detail by high-resolution transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM/SEM) combined with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. A total of 4202 particles (TEM = 3872; SEM = 330) were analyzed from these samples, which were collected mostly inside the polar vortex in the altitude range between 17.3 and 19.9 km. Particles that were volatile in the microscope beams contained ammonium sulfates and hydrogen sulfates and dominated the samples. Some particles with diameters ranging from 20 to 830 nm were refractory in the electron beams. Carbonaceous particles containing additional elements to C and O comprised from 72 to 100 % of the refractory particles. The rest were internal mixtures of these materials with sulfates. The median number mixing ratio of the refractory particles, expressed in units of particles per milligram of air, was 1.1 (mg air)-1 and varied between 0.65 and 2.3 (mg air)-1. Most of the refractory carbonaceous particles are completely amorphous, a few of the particles are partly ordered with a graphene sheet separation distance of 0.37 ± 0.06 nm (mean value ± standard deviation). Carbon and oxygen are the only detected major elements with an atomic O/C ratio of 0.11 ± 0.07. Minor elements observed include Si, S, Fe, Cr and Ni with the following atomic ratios relative to C: Si/C: 0.010 ± 0.011; S/C: 0.0007 ± 0.0015; Fe/C: 0.0052 ± 0.0074; Cr/C: 0.0012 ± 0.0017; Ni/C: 0.0006 ± 0.0011 (all mean values ± standard deviation).High-resolution element distribution images reveal that the minor elements are distributed within the carbonaceous matrix; i.e., heterogeneous inclusions are not observed. No difference in size, nanostructure and elemental composition was found between particles collected inside and outside the polar vortex. Based on chemistry and nanostructure

  5. Sub-micrometer refractory carbonaceous particles in the polar stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schütze

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Eleven particle samples collected in the polar stratosphere during SOLVE (SAGE III Ozone loss and validation experiment from January until March 2000 were characterized in detail by high-resolution transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM/SEM combined with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. A total of 4202 particles (TEM  =  3872; SEM  =  330 were analyzed from these samples, which were collected mostly inside the polar vortex in the altitude range between 17.3 and 19.9 km. Particles that were volatile in the microscope beams contained ammonium sulfates and hydrogen sulfates and dominated the samples. Some particles with diameters ranging from 20 to 830 nm were refractory in the electron beams. Carbonaceous particles containing additional elements to C and O comprised from 72 to 100 % of the refractory particles. The rest were internal mixtures of these materials with sulfates. The median number mixing ratio of the refractory particles, expressed in units of particles per milligram of air, was 1.1 (mg air−1 and varied between 0.65 and 2.3 (mg air−1. Most of the refractory carbonaceous particles are completely amorphous, a few of the particles are partly ordered with a graphene sheet separation distance of 0.37 ± 0.06 nm (mean value ± standard deviation. Carbon and oxygen are the only detected major elements with an atomic O∕C ratio of 0.11 ± 0.07. Minor elements observed include Si, S, Fe, Cr and Ni with the following atomic ratios relative to C: Si∕C: 0.010 ± 0.011; S∕C: 0.0007 ± 0.0015; Fe∕C: 0.0052 ± 0.0074; Cr∕C: 0.0012 ± 0.0017; Ni∕C: 0.0006 ± 0.0011 (all mean values ± standard deviation.High-resolution element distribution images reveal that the minor elements are distributed within the carbonaceous matrix; i.e., heterogeneous inclusions are not observed. No difference in size, nanostructure and elemental composition was found between

  6. Population characteristics of submicrometer-sized craters on regolith particles from asteroid Itokawa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Toru; Hasegawa, S.; Nakao, S.; Sakai, M.; Yurimoto, H.

    2018-03-01

    We investigated impact crater structures on regolith particles from asteroid Itokawa using scanning electron microscopy. We observed the surfaces of 51 Itokawa particles, ranging from 15 μm to 240 μm in size. Craters with average diameters ranging from 10 nm to 2.8 μm were identified on 13 Itokawa particles larger than 80 μm. We examined the abundance, spatial distribution, and morphology of approximately 900 craters on six Itokawa particles. Craters with sizes in excess of 200 nm are widely dispersed, with spatial densities from 2.6 μm2 to 4.5 μm2; a fraction of the craters was locally concentrated with a density of 0.1 μm2. The fractal dimension of the cumulative crater diameters ranges from 1.3 to 2.3. Craters of several tens of nanometers in diameter exhibit pit and surrounding rim structures. Craters of more than 100 nm in diameter commonly have melted residue at their bottom. These morphologies are similar to those of submicrometer-sized craters on lunar regolith. We estimated the impactor flux on Itokawa regolith-forming craters, assuming that the craters were accumulated during direct exposure to the space environment for 102 to 104 yr. The range of impactor flux onto Itokawa particles is estimated to be at least one order of magnitude higher than the interplanetary dust flux and comparable to the secondary impact flux on the Moon. This indicates that secondary ejecta impacts are probably the dominant cratering process in the submicrometer range on Itokawa regolith particles, as well as on the lunar surface. We demonstrate that secondary submicrometer craters can be produced anywhere in centimeter- to meter-sized depressions on Itokawa's surface through primary interplanetary dust impacts. If the surface unevenness on centimeter to meter scales is a significant factor determining the abundance of submicrometer secondary cratering, the secondary impact flux could be independent of the overall shapes or sizes of celestial bodies, and the secondary

  7. A comparison of submicrometer particle dose between Australian and Italian people

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonanno, G.; Morawska, L.; Stabile, L.; Wang, L.; Giovinco, G.

    2012-01-01

    Alveolar and tracheobronchial-deposited submicrometer particle number and surface area data received by different age groups in Australia are shown. Activity patterns were combined with microenvironmental data through a Monte Carlo method. Particle number distributions for the most significant microenvironments were obtained from our measurement survey data and people activity pattern data from the Australian Human Activity Pattern Survey were used. Daily alveolar particle number (surface area) dose received by all age groups was equal to 3.0 × 10 10 particles (4.5 × 10 2 mm 2 ), varying slightly between males and females. In contrast to gender, the lifestyle was found to significantly affect the daily dose, with highest depositions characterizing adults. The main contribution was due to indoor microenvironments. Finally a comparison between Italian and Australian people in terms of received particle dose was reported; it shows that different cooking styles can affect dose levels: higher doses were received by Italians, mainly due to their particular cooking activity. - Highlights: ► Particle number and surface area deposition in alveolar and tracheobronchial areas. ► Activity pattern and microenvironment data combination by Monte Carlo simulation. ► Deposition increases as a function of age group: maximum value for 19–40 years old. ► Major contributions arise from cooking, eating and transportation activities. ► Italian people statistically experience a dose higher than Australian one. - Alveolar and tracheobronchial-deposited submicrometer particle doses, in terms of number and surface area, were evaluated through a Monte Carlo method for different age groups population in Brisbane, Australia and compared to previously published Italian data.

  8. Surfactant-assisted solvothermal preparation of submicrometer-sized hollow hematite particles and their photocatalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian Suoyuan; Wang Enbo; Gao Lei; Wu Di; Song Yanli; Xu Lin

    2006-01-01

    Submicrometer-sized hollow hematite particles were prepared through a surfactant-assisted solvothermal process. The amount of FeCl 3 .H 2 O and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, and the acidity of the solution were systematically altered to study their effects on the final results. Hollow hematite particles with shapes from sphere, ellipsoid to peanut were obtained. Their sizes range from 500 nm to 2 μm with shell thickness from 100 to 500 nm. Powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction were applied to investigate the products' crystallinity, purity, morphology, size and structural features. Finally, the study on the photocatalysis of Fe 2 O 3 for the destruction of diethyl phthalate in water was carried out. The result proved that Fe 2 O 3 hollow particles were effective photocatalysts for the degradation of DEP, with 96.8% destruction ratio being obtained within 60 min

  9. Seasonal variation of aliphatic amines in marine sub-micrometer particles at the Cape Verde islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Herrmann

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Monomethylamine (MA, dimethylamine (DMA and diethylamine (DEA were detected at non-negligible concentrations in sub-micrometer particles at the Cap Verde Atmospheric Observatory (CVAO located on the island of São Vicente in Cape Verde during algal blooms in 2007. The concentrations of these amines in five stage impactor samples ranged from 0–30 pg m−3 for MA, 130–360 pg m−3 for DMA and 5–110 pg m−3 for DEA during the spring bloom in May 2007 and 2–520 pg m−3 for MA, 100–1400 pg m−3 for DMA and 90–760 pg m−3 for DEA during an unexpected winter algal bloom in December 2007. Anomalously high Saharan dust deposition and intensive ocean layer deepening were found at the Atmospheric Observatory and the associated Ocean Observatory during algal bloom periods. The highest amine concentrations in fine particles (impactor stage 2, 0.14–0.42 μm indicate that amines are likely taken up from the gas phase into the acidic sub-micrometer particles. The contribution of amines to the organic carbon (OC content ranged from 0.2–2.5% C in the winter months, indicating the importance of this class of compounds to the carbon cycle in the marine environment. Furthermore, aliphatic amines originating from marine biological sources likely contribute significantly to the nitrogen content in the marine atmosphere. The average contribution of the amines to the detected nitrogen species in sub-micrometer particles can be non-negligible, especially in the winter months (0.1% N–1.5% N in the sum of nitrate, ammonium and amines. This indicates that these smaller aliphatic amines can be important for the carbon and the nitrogen cycles in the remote marine environment.

  10. Hygroscopic growth of sub-micrometer and one-micrometer aerosol particles measured during ACE-Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Massling

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles in the sub-micrometer and one-micrometer size ranges were measured during the ACE-Asia study (Aerosol Characterization Experiment-Asia in spring 2001. The measurements took place off the coasts of Japan, Korea, and China. All instruments contributing to this study were deployed in a container on the forward deck of the NOAA Research Vessel Ronald H. Brown. Air masses with primarily marine influence and air masses from the Asian continent affected by both anthropogenic sources and by the transport of desert dust aerosol were encountered during the cruise.

    Results showed very different hygroscopic behavior in the sub-micrometer size range compared to the one-micrometer size range. In general, for all continentally influenced air masses, the one-micrometer particle population was characterized by two different particle groups – a nearly hydrophobic fraction with growth factors around 1.0 representative of dust particles and a sea salt fraction with hygroscopic growth factors around 2.0. The number fraction of dust particles was generally about 60% independent of long-range air mass origin.

    For sub-micrometer particles, a dominant, more hygroscopic particle fraction with growth factors between 1.5 and 1.9 (depending on dry particle size consistent with ammonium sulfate or non-neutralized sulfates as major component was always found. In marine air masses and for larger sizes within the sub-micrometer range (Dp=250 and 350 nm, a sea salt fraction with growth factors between 2.0 and 2.1 was also observed. For all other air masses, the more hygroscopic particle fraction in the sub-micrometer size range was mostly accompanied by a less hygroscopic particle fraction with growth factors between 1.20 and 1.55 depending on both the continental sources and the dry particle size. Number fractions of this particle group varied between 4 and 39% depending on dry particle size and air mass

  11. Highly Localized Acoustic Streaming and Size-Selective Submicrometer Particle Concentration Using High Frequency Microscale Focused Acoustic Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, David J; Ma, Zhichao; Ai, Ye

    2016-05-17

    Concentration and separation of particles and biological specimens are fundamental functions of micro/nanofluidic systems. Acoustic streaming is an effective and biocompatible way to create rapid microscale fluid motion and induce particle capture, though the >100 MHz frequencies required to directly generate acoustic body forces on the microscale have traditionally been difficult to generate and localize in a way that is amenable to efficient generation of streaming. Moreover, acoustic, hydrodynamic, and electrical forces as typically applied have difficulty manipulating specimens in the submicrometer regime. In this work, we introduce highly focused traveling surface acoustic waves (SAW) at high frequencies between 193 and 636 MHz for efficient and highly localized production of acoustic streaming vortices on microfluidic length scales. Concentration occurs via a novel mechanism, whereby the combined acoustic radiation and streaming field results in size-selective aggregation in fluid streamlines in the vicinity of a high-amplitude acoustic beam, as opposed to previous acoustic radiation induced particle concentration where objects typically migrate toward minimum pressure locations. Though the acoustic streaming is induced by a traveling wave, we are able to manipulate particles an order of magnitude smaller than possible using the traveling wave force alone. We experimentally and theoretically examine the range of particle sizes that can be captured in fluid streamlines using this technique, with rapid particle concentration demonstrated down to 300 nm diameters. We also demonstrate that locations of trapping and concentration are size-dependent, which is attributed to the combined effects of the acoustic streaming and acoustic forces.

  12. Submicrometer Metallic Barcodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicewarner-Peña, Sheila R.; Freeman, R. Griffith; Reiss, Brian D.; He, Lin; Peña, David J.; Walton, Ian D.; Cromer, Remy; Keating, Christine D.; Natan, Michael J.

    2001-10-01

    We synthesized multimetal microrods intrinsically encoded with submicrometer stripes. Complex striping patterns are readily prepared by sequential electrochemical deposition of metal ions into templates with uniformly sized pores. The differential reflectivity of adjacent stripes enables identification of the striping patterns by conventional light microscopy. This readout mechanism does not interfere with the use of fluorescence for detection of analytes bound to particles by affinity capture, as demonstrated by DNA and protein bioassays.

  13. Influence of short chain organic acids and bases on the wetting properties and surface energy of submicrometer ceramic powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neirinck, Bram; Soccol, Dimitri; Fransaer, Jan; Van der Biest, Omer; Vleugels, Jef

    2010-08-15

    The effect of short chained organic acids and bases on the surface energy and wetting properties of submicrometer alumina powder was assessed. The surface chemistry of treated powders was determined by means of Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform spectroscopy and compared to untreated powder. The wetting of powders was measured using a modified Washburn method, based on the use of precompacted powder samples. The geometric factor needed to calculate the contact angle was derived from measurements of the porous properties of the powder compacts. Contact angle measurements with several probe liquids before and after modification allowed a theoretical estimation of the surface energy based on the surface tension component theory. Trends in the surface energy components were linked to observations in infrared spectra. The results showed that the hydrophobic character of the precompacted powder depends on both the chain length and polar group of the modifying agent. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Condensational Growth of Combination Drug-Excipient Submicrometer Particles for Targeted High Efficiency Pulmonary Delivery: Comparison of CFD Predictions with Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to investigate the hygroscopic growth of combination drug and excipient submicrometer aerosols for respiratory drug delivery using in vitro experiments and a newly developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Methods Submicrometer combination drug and excipient particles were generated experimentally using both the capillary aerosol generator and the Respimat inhaler. Aerosol hygroscopic growth was evaluated in vitro and with CFD in a coiled tube geometry designed to provide residence times and thermodynamic conditions consistent with the airways. Results The in vitro results and CFD predictions both indicated that the initially submicrometer particles increased in mean size to a range of 1.6–2.5 µm for the 50:50 combination of a non-hygroscopic drug (budesonide) and different hygroscopic excipients. CFD results matched the in vitro predictions to within 10% and highlighted gradual and steady size increase of the droplets, which will be effective for minimizing extrathoracic deposition and producing deposition deep within the respiratory tract. Conclusions Enhanced excipient growth (EEG) appears to provide an effective technique to increase pharmaceutical aerosol size, and the developed CFD model will provide a powerful design tool for optimizing this technique to produce high efficiency pulmonary delivery. PMID:21948458

  15. Condensational growth of combination drug-excipient submicrometer particles for targeted high efficiency pulmonary delivery: comparison of CFD predictions with experimental results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longest, P Worth; Hindle, Michael

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the hygroscopic growth of combination drug and excipient submicrometer aerosols for respiratory drug delivery using in vitro experiments and a newly developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Submicrometer combination drug and excipient particles were generated experimentally using both the capillary aerosol generator and the Respimat inhaler. Aerosol hygroscopic growth was evaluated in vitro and with CFD in a coiled tube geometry designed to provide residence times and thermodynamic conditions consistent with the airways. The in vitro results and CFD predictions both indicated that the initially submicrometer particles increased in mean size to a range of 1.6-2.5 μm for the 50:50 combination of a non-hygroscopic drug (budesonide) and different hygroscopic excipients. CFD results matched the in vitro predictions to within 10% and highlighted gradual and steady size increase of the droplets, which will be effective for minimizing extrathoracic deposition and producing deposition deep within the respiratory tract. Enhanced excipient growth (EEG) appears to provide an effective technique to increase pharmaceutical aerosol size, and the developed CFD model will provide a powerful design tool for optimizing this technique to produce high efficiency pulmonary delivery.

  16. Sub-micrometer scale minor element mapping in interplanetary dust particles: a test for stratospheric contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, G.J.; Keller, L.P.; Sutton, S.R.

    2006-01-01

    We mapped the spatial distribution of minor elements including K, Mn, and Zn in 3 IDPs and found no evidence for the surface coatings (rims) of these elements that would be expected if the enrichments previously reported were due to contamination. Combined X-ray microprobe (XRM), energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence using a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), and electron microprobe measurements have determined that the average bulk chemical composition of the interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the Earth's stratosphere is enriched relative to the CI meteorite composition by a factor of 2 to 4 for carbon and for the moderately volatile elements Na, K, P, Mn, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, and Se, and enriched to ∼30 times CI for Br. However, Jessberger et al., who have reported similar bulk enrichments using Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), attribute the enrichments to contamination by meteor-derived atmospheric aerosols during the several weeks these IDPs reside in the Earth's atmosphere prior to collection. Using scanning Auger spectroscopy, a very sensitive surface analysis technique, Mackinnon and Mogk have observed S contamination on the surface of IDPs, presumably due to the accretion of sulfate aerosols during stratospheric residence. But the S-rich layer they detected was so thin (∼100 angstroms thick) that the total amount of S on the surface was too small to significantly perturb the bulk S-content of a chondritic IDP. Stephan et al. provide support for the contamination hypothesis by reporting the enrichment of Br on the edges of the IDPs using Time-of-Flight Secondary-Ion Mass-Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), but TOF-SIMS is notorious for producing false edge-effects, particularly on irregularly-shaped samples like IDPs. Sutton et al. mapped the spatial distribution of Fe, Ni, Zn, Br, and Sr, at the ∼2 (micro)m scale, in four IDPs using element-specific x-ray fluorescence (XRF) computed microtomography. They found the moderately volatile

  17. Method for producing ceramic particles and agglomerates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jonathan; Gleiman, Seth S.; Chen, Chun-Ku

    2001-01-01

    A method for generating spherical and irregularly shaped dense particles of ceramic oxides having a controlled particle size and particle size distribution. An aerosol containing precursor particles of oxide ceramics is directed into a plasma. As the particles flow through the hot zone of the plasma, they melt, collide, and join to form larger particles. If these larger particles remain in the hot zone, they continue melting and acquire a spherical shape that is retained after they exit the hot zone, cool down, and solidify. If they exit the hot zone before melting completely, their irregular shape persists and agglomerates are produced. The size and size distribution of the dense product particles can be controlled by adjusting several parameters, the most important in the case of powder precursors appears to be the density of powder in the aerosol stream that enters the plasma hot zone. This suggests that particle collision rate is responsible for determining ultimate size of the resulting sphere or agglomerate. Other parameters, particularly the gas flow rates and the microwave power, are also adjusted to control the particle size distribution.

  18. Emanation of /sup 232/U daughter products from submicrometer particles of uranium oxide and thorium dioxide by nuclear recoil and inert gas diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coombs, M.A.; Cuddihy, R.G. (Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (USA). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.)

    1983-01-01

    Emanation of /sup 232/U daughter products by nuclear recoil and inert gas diffusion from spherical, submicrometer particles of uranium oxide and thorium dioxide was studied. Monodisperse samples of particles containing 1% /sup 232/U and having physical diameters between 0.1 and 1 ..mu..m were used for the emanation measurements. Thorium-228 ions recoiling from the particles after alpha-decay of /sup 232/U were collected electrostatically on a recoil cathode. Radon-220 diffusing from the particles was swept by an airstream into a 4 l. chamber where the /sup 220/Rn daughters were collected on a second cathode. Mathematical models of radionuclide emanation from spherical particles were used to calculate the recoil range of /sup 228/Th and the diffusion coefficient of /sup 220/Rn in the particle matrix. A /sup 228/Th recoil range of 0.02 ..mu..m and a /sup 220/Rn diffusion coefficient of 3 x 10/sup -14/ cm/sup 2//sec were obtained in both uranium oxide and thorium dioxide particles.

  19. Slip casting nano-particle powders for making transparent ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Joshua D [Livermore, CA; Soules, Thomas F [Livermore, CA; Landingham, Richard Lee [Livermore, CA; Hollingsworth, Joel P [Oakland, CA

    2011-04-12

    A method of making a transparent ceramic including the steps of providing nano-ceramic powders in a processed or unprocessed form, mixing the powders with de-ionized water, the step of mixing the powders with de-ionized water producing a slurry, sonifing the slurry to completely wet the powder and suspend the powder in the de-ionized water, separating very fine particles from the slurry, molding the slurry, and curing the slurry to produce the transparent ceramic.

  20. Variability of sub-micrometer particle number size distributions and concentrations in the Western Mediterranean regional background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Cusack

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the daily and seasonal variability of particle number size distributions and concentrations, performed at the Montseny (MSY regional background station in the western Mediterranean from October 2010 to June 2011. Particle number concentrations at MSY were shown to be within range of various other sites across Europe reported in literature, but the seasonality of the particle number size distributions revealed significant differences. The Aitken mode is the dominant particle mode at MSY, with arithmetic mean concentrations of 1698 cm3, followed by the accumulation mode (877 cm−3 and the nucleation mode (246 cm−3. Concentrations showed a strong seasonal variability with large increases in particle number concentrations observed from the colder to warmer months. The modality of median size distributions was typically bimodal, except under polluted conditions when the size distribution was unimodal. During the colder months, the daily variation of particle number size distributions are strongly influenced by a diurnal breeze system, whereby the Aitken and accumulation modes vary similarly to PM1 and BC mass concentrations, with nocturnal minima and sharp day-time increases owing to the development of a diurnal mountain breeze. Under clean air conditions, high levels of nucleation and lower Aitken mode concentrations were measured, highlighting the importance of new particle formation as a source of particles in the absence of a significant condensation sink. During the warmer months, nucleation mode concentrations were observed to be relatively elevated both under polluted and clean conditions due to increased photochemical reactions, with enhanced subsequent growth owing to elevated concentrations of condensable organic vapours produced from biogenic volatile organic compounds, indicating that nucleation at MSY does not exclusively occur under clean air conditions. Finally, mixing of air masses between polluted and non

  1. A study of the horizontal and vertical profile of submicrometer particles in relation to a busy road

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawska, Lidia; Thomas, Stephen; Gilbert, Dale; Greenaway, Chris; Rijnders, Esther

    Epidemiological studies are consistently reporting an association between fine particulate pollution and ill-health. Motor vehicle emissions are considered to be the main source of fine particles in ambient urban air of cities which are not directly influenced by industrial emissions. The aim of this work was to assess the influence of a major arterial road on concentration levels of airborne fine particles in its vicinity. Measurements of over 500 particle size distributions in the particle size range 16-626 nm, were made using two scanning mobility particle sizers (SMPS). A subsequent comparison of the recorded values from differing locations is discussed, with reference made to topographic and climatic influences. Both horizontal and vertical profile measurements of fine particle number size distributions are described; the combination of the two yielding information as to the relative exposures of occupants of buildings in the vicinity of a major arterial route. With the exception of measurements in close proximity to the freeway (about 15 m), the horizontal profile measurements did not provide any evidence of a statistically significant difference in fine particle number concentration with respect to distance at ground level up to a distance of 200 m within the study area. The vertical profile measurements also revealed no significant correlation between particle concentration and height. However, for buildings in the immediate proximity to the arterial road (about 15 m) concentrations around the building envelope are very high, comparable to those in the immediate vicinity of the road, indicating undiluted concentrations drawn directly from the freeway. This finding has a significant implication for management of indoor air quality in the buildings located in the immediate vicinity of major roads.

  2. Photocatalytic performances of BiFeO3 particles with the average size in nanometer, submicrometer, and micrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Chunxue; FushengWen,; Xiang, Jianyong; Hou, Hang; Lv, Weiming; Lv, Yifei; Hu, Wentao; Liu, Zhongyuan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Three different synthesis routes have been taken to successfully prepare the BiFeO 3 particles with the different morphologies and average size in 50, 500 nm, and 15 μm. • For photodegradation of dyes under visible irradiation in the presence of BiFeO 3 , the photocatalytic efficiency increases quickly with the decrease in size. • The enhanced photocatalytic efficiency of BiFeO 3 nanoparticles may attribute to more surface active catalytic-sites and shorter distances carriers have to migrate to the surface reaction sites. - Abstract: Three different synthesis routes were taken to successfully prepare the BiFeO 3 particles with the different morphologies and average size in 50, 500 nm, and 15 μm, respectively. The crystal structure was recognized to be a distorted rhombohedral one with the space group R3c. With the decrease in particle size, obvious decrease in peak intensity and redshift in peak position were observed for the Raman active bands. The narrow band gap was determined from the UV–vis absorption spectra, indicating the semiconducting nature of the BiFeO 3 . For photodegradation of dyes under visible irradiation in the presence of BiFeO 3 , the photocatalytic efficiency increased quickly with the decrease in size which may attribute to more surface active catalytic-sites and shorter distances carriers had to migrate to the surface reaction sites

  3. Preparation of submicrometer monodispersed magnetic silica particles using a novel water in oil microemulsion: properties and application for enzyme immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttolomondo, Maria Victoria; Villanueva, Maria Emilia; Alvarez, Gisela Solange; Desimone, Martín Federico; Díaz, Luis Eduardo

    2013-10-01

    The synthesis of monodispersed magnetic silica nanoparticles (MSN) is described using a water-in-oil reverse microemulsion system that does not require the use of co-surfactants. Sodium silicate, Tween 20 as a neutral surfactant and 1-butanol as the organic phase were used. There are several advantages of the proposed method including a saturation magnetization value of 10 emu/g for the particles obtained, uniformity of size and that they are easily functionalized to bind urease covalently. Moreover, the intra-day, inter-day and long-term stability results confirm that the procedure was successful and the enzyme-linked MSNs were stable over repeated uses and storage retaining more than 75% activity after 4 months.

  4. Different immunomodulatory effects associated with sub-micrometer particles in ambient air from rural, urban and industrial areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wichmann, Gunnar; Franck, Ulrich; Herbarth, Olf; Rehwagen, Martina; Dietz, Andreas; Massolo, Laura; Ronco, Alicia; Mueller, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Immunomodulatory effects of chemicals adsorbed to particles with aerodynamic diameter below 0.49 μm (PM 0.5 ) collected in winter 2001 at three sampling points (industrial area [LPIn], traffic-influenced urban area [LPCi], and control area [LPCo]) of La Plata, Argentina, were investigated. The sampling of particulate matter was carried out with high-volume collectors using cascade impactors. PM 0.5 -adsorbed compounds were hexane-extracted by accelerated solvent extraction. For immunological investigations, human peripheral blood lymphocytes were activated by phytohemagglutinin and exposed to dimethyl-sulfoxide dilutions of PM 0.5 -extracts for 24 h. Vitality/proliferation was quantified using MTT, released interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) by ELISA. Cytokine production but not vitality/proliferation was significantly suppressed by all of the highest extract concentrations. Generally, suppression of IFN-γ by PM 0.5 -extracts was stronger than those of IL-4. Based on administered mass of PM 0.5 , all extracts suppressed IFN-γ production nearly uniform. Contrary, LPCi-extracts exerted maximum IFN-γ suppression based either on air volume or regarding PM 0.5 -adsorbed PAH. Also the ranking of PM 0.5 -associated effects on IL-4 production differs in dependence of the chosen reference points, either mass or [μg/ml] or air volume [m 3 /ml] related dust quantities in cell culture. Based on the corresponding air volume, LPCi-extracts inhibited IL-4 production to the maximum extend, whereas suppression of IL-4 was comparable based on concentrations. This indicates that not only the disparate PM 0.5 -masses in air cause varying impacts, but also that disparities in PM 0.5 -adsorbed chemicals provoke different effects on immune responses and shifts in the regulatory balance that might have implications for allergy and cancer development

  5. The Particle Distribution in Liquid Metal with Ceramic Particles Mould Filling Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qi; Xing, Shu-ming

    2017-09-01

    Adding ceramic particles in the plate hammer is an effective method to increase the wear resistance of the hammer. The liquid phase method is based on the “with the flow of mixed liquid forging composite preparation of ZTA ceramic particle reinforced high chromium cast iron hammer. Preparation method for this system is using CFD simulation analysis the particles distribution of flow mixing and filling process. Taking the 30% volume fraction of ZTA ceramic composite of high chromium cast iron hammer as example, by changing the speed of liquid metal viscosity to control and make reasonable predictions of particles distribution before solidification.

  6. Composite of ceramic-coated magnetic alloy particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhead, Arthur J.; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2000-01-01

    A composite structure and method for manufacturing same, the composite structure being comprised of metal particles and an inorganic bonding media. The method comprises the steps of coating particles of a metal powder with a thin layer of an inorganic bonding media selected from the group of powders consisting of a ceramic, glass, and glass-ceramic. The particles are assembled in a cavity and heat, with or without the addition of pressure, is thereafter applied to the particles until the layer of inorganic bonding media forms a strong bond with the particles and with the layer of inorganic bonding media on adjacent particles. The resulting composite structure is strong and remains cohesive at high temperatures.

  7. Cytotoxicity evaluation of ceramic particles of different sizes and shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Akiko; Honma, Rieko; Sumita, Masae; Hanawa, Takao

    2004-02-01

    When artificial hip or knee joints are implanted in the human body, they release metallic, ceramic, and polymeric debris into the surrounding tissues. The toxicity of the released particles is of two types: chemical, caused by the released soluble ions and monomers, and mechanical, a result of mechanical stimulation produced by the insoluble particles. In this study, the cytotoxicity of particles of TiO2, Al2O3, ZrO2, Si3N4, and SiC for murine fibroblasts and macrophages were examined to evaluate just their mechanical toxicity because these particles are not expected to release soluble metal ions. Different sizes and shapes of TiO2 particles were used to evaluate the effect of size and shape on particle cytotoxicity. The results suggest that the cytotoxicity of ceramic particles does not depend on their chemical species. Cytotoxicity levels were lower than those of corresponding metal ions, indicating that the mechanical toxicity of particles is lower than the chemical toxicity of released soluble ions and monomers. The differences in size did not affect the mechanical toxicity of these particles. The dendritic particles had a higher cytotoxicity level for macrophages than did spindle and spheric particles. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res 68A: 244-256, 2004

  8. Metallized ceramic vacuum pipe for particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, B.L.; Featherby, M.

    1990-01-01

    A ceramic vacuum chamber segment in the form of a long pipe of rectangular cross section has been assembled from standard shapes of alumina ceramic using glass bonding techniques. Prior to final glass bonding, the internal walls of the pipe are metallized using an electroplating technology. These advanced processes allow for precision patterning and conductivity control of surface conducting films. The ability to lay down both longitudinal and transverse conductor patterns separated by insulating layers of glass give the accelerator designer considerable freedom in tailoring longitudinal and transverse beam pipe impedances. Assembly techniques of these beam pipes are followed through two iterations of semi-scale pipe sections made using candidate materials and processes. These demonstrate the feasibility of the concepts and provide parts for electrical characterization and for further refinement of the approach. In a parallel effort, a variety of materials, joining processes and assembly procedures have been tried to assure flexibility and reliability in the construction of 10-meter long sections to any required specifications

  9. Fine particle magnetic mineralogy of archaeological ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, D; King, J A

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the magnetic mineralogy of a worldwide collection of archaeological pottery. The mineral types, the mass fractions and the domain states of the constituent magnetic fine particles were elucidated from a range of measurements including magnetic hysteresis behaviour, the acquisition of isothermal remanence, low field susceptibility and thermomagnetic curves. The magnetic mineralogy of most samples was dominated by magnetite. Titanomagnetites with limited titanium substitution and cation deficient magnetites (indicative of low temperature oxidation) were dominant in some samples. Haematite was detected in 53% of the samples, but seldom contributed much to the saturation magnetization. Magnetic particle sizes are skewed to smaller sizes, with sherds mostly having a large superparamagnetic or a stable single domain fraction. Low temperature susceptibility data suggest that 30% of samples had some multidomain component. The percentage by mass of magnetic material in the ancient pottery studied was less than 0.8% for all but one of the samples and the majority of samples contain less than 0.3% by weight of magnetic fine particles. The presence of low temperature oxidation in many samples and the occurrence of a multidomain component in a third of the collection suggest that ancient pottery may not always be suitable for determining the intensity of the ancient geomagnetic field

  10. Particle-induced amorphization of complex ceramics. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing, R.C.; Wang, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    The crystalline-to-amorphous (c-a) phase transition is of fundamental importance. Particle irradiations provide an important, highly controlled means of investigating this phase transformation and the structure of the amorphous state. The interaction of heavy-particles with ceramics is complex because these materials have a wide range of structure types, complex compositions, and because chemical bonding is variable. Radiation damage and annealing can produce diverse results, but most commonly, single crystals become aperiodic or break down into a polycrystalline aggregate. The authors continued the studies of the transition from the periodic-to-aperiodic state in natural materials that have been damaged by α-recoil nuclei in the uranium and thorium decay series and in synthetic, analogous structures. The transition from the periodic to aperiodic state was followed by detailed x-ray diffraction analysis, in-situ irradiation/transmission electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy/x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy and other spectroscopic techniques. These studies were completed in conjunction with bulk irradiations that can be completed at Los Alamos National Laboratory or Sandia National Laboratories. Principal questions addressed in this research program included: (1) What is the process at the atomic level by which a ceramic material is transformed into a disordered or aperiodic state? (2) What are the controlling effects of structural topology, bond-type, dose rate, and irradiation temperature on the final state of the irradiated material? (3) What is the structure of the damaged material? (4) What are the mechanisms and kinetics for the annealing of interstitial and aggregate defects in these irradiated ceramic materials? (5) What general criteria may be applied to the prediction of amorphization in complex ceramics?

  11. Supramolecular curcumin-barium prodrugs for formulating with ceramic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalasanan, Kaladhar; Anupriya; Deepa, M K; Sharma, Chandra P

    2014-10-01

    A simple and stable curcumin-ceramic combined formulation was developed with an aim to improve curcumin stability and release profile in the presence of reactive ceramic particles for potential dental and orthopedic applications. For that, curcumin was complexed with barium (Ba(2+)) to prepare curcumin-barium (BaCur) complex. Upon removal of the unbound curcumin and Ba(2+) by dialysis, a water-soluble BaCur complex was obtained. The complex was showing [M+1](+) peak at 10,000-20,000 with multiple fractionation peaks of MALDI-TOF-MS studies, showed that the complex was a supramolecular multimer. The (1)H NMR and FTIR studies revealed that, divalent Ba(2+) interacted predominantly through di-phenolic groups of curcumin to form an end-to-end complex resulted in supramolecular multimer. The overall crystallinity of the BaCur was lower than curcumin as per XRD analysis. The complexation of Ba(2+) to curcumin did not degrade curcumin as per HPLC studies. The fluorescence spectrum was blue shifted upon Ba(2+) complexation with curcumin. Monodisperse nanoparticles with size less than 200dnm was formed, out of the supramolecular complex upon dialysis, as per DLS, and upon loading into pluronic micelles the size was remaining in similar order of magnitude as per DLS and AFM studies. Stability of the curcumin was improved greater than 50% after complexation with Ba(2+) as per UV/Vis spectroscopy. Loading of the supramloecular nanoparticles into pluronic micelles had further improved the stability of curcumin to approx. 70% in water. These BaCur supramolecule nanoparticles can be considered as a new class of prodrugs with improved solubility and stability. Subsequently, ceramic nanoparticles with varying chemical composition were prepared for changing the material surface reactivity in terms of the increase in, degradability, surface pH and protein adsorption. Further, these ceramic particles were combined with curcumin prodrug formulations and optimized the curcumin release

  12. Amorphization of complex ceramics by heavy-particle irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing, R.C.; Wang, L.M.

    1994-11-01

    Complex ceramics, for the purpose of this paper, include materials that are generally strongly bonded (mixed ionic and covalent), refractory and frequently good insulators. They are distinguished from simple, compact ceramics (e.g., MgO and UO 2 ) by structural features which include: (1) open network structures, best characterized by a consideration of the shape, size and connectivity of coordination polyhedra; (2) complex compositions which characteristically lead to multiple cation sites and lower symmetry; (3) directional bonding; (4) bond-type variations within the structure. The heavy particle irradiations include ion-beam irradiations and recoil-nucleus damage resulting from a-decay events from constituent actinides. The latter effects are responsible for the radiation-induced transformation to the metamict state in minerals. The responses of these materials to irradiation are complex, as energy may be dissipated ballistically by transfer of kinetic energy from an incident projectile or radiolytically by conversion of radiation-induced electronic excitations into atomic motion. This results in isolated Frenkel defect pairs, defect aggregates, isolated collision cascades or bulk amorphization. Thus, the amorphization process is heterogeneous. Only recently have there been systematic studies of heavy particle irradiations of complex ceramics on a wide variety of structure-types and compositions as a function of dose and temperature. In this paper, we review the conditions for amorphization for the tetragonal orthosilicate, zircon [ZrSiO 4 ]; the hexagonal orthosilicate/phosphate apatite structure-type [X 10 (ZO 4 ) 6 (F,Cl,O) 2 ]; the isometric pyrochlores [A 1-2 B 2 O 6 (O,OH,F) 0-1p H 2 O] and its monoclinic derivative zirconotite [CaZrTi 2 O 7 ]; the olivine (derivative - hcp) structure types, α- VI A 2 IV BO 4 , and spinel (ccp), γ- VI A 2 IV BO 4

  13. Encapsulation of sacrificial silicon containing particles for SH oxide ceramics via a boehmite precursor route

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carabat, A.L.; Van der Zwaag, S.; Sloof, W.G.

    2013-01-01

    Easy crack propagation in oxide ceramic coatings limits their application in high temperature environment (e.g. such as engines and gas turbine components) [1]. In order to overcome this problem, incorporation of sacrificial particles into an oxide ceramic coating may be a viable option. Particles

  14. Interaction mechanisms between ceramic particles and atomized metallic droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    1992-10-01

    The present study was undertaken to provide insight into the dynamic interactions that occur when ceramic particles are placed in intimate contact with a metallic matrix undergoing a phase change. To that effect, Al-4 wt pct Si/SiCp composite droplets were synthesized using a spray atomization and coinjection approach, and their solidification microstructures were studied both qualitatively and quantitatively. The present results show that SiC particles (SiCp) were incor- porated into the matrix and that the extent of incorporation depends on the solidification con- dition of the droplets at the moment of SiC particle injection. Two factors were found to affect the distribution and volume fraction of SiC particles in droplets: the penetration of particles into droplets and the entrapment and/or rejection of particles by the solidification front. First, during coinjection, particles collide with the atomized droplets with three possible results: they may penetrate the droplets, adhere to the droplet surface, or bounce back after impact. The extent of penetration of SiC particles into droplets was noted to depend on the kinetic energy of the particles and the magnitude of the surface energy change in the droplets that occurs upon impact. In liquid droplets, the extent of penetration of SiC particles was shown to depend on the changes in surface energy, ΔEs, experienced by the droplets. Accordingly, large SiC particles encoun- tered more resistance to penetration relative to small ones. In solid droplets, the penetration of SiC particles was correlated with the dynamic pressure exerted by the SiC particles on the droplets during impact and the depth of the ensuing crater. The results showed that no pene- tration was possible in such droplets. Second, once SiC particles have penetrated droplets, their final location in the microstructure is governed by their interactions with the solidification front. As a result of these interactions, both entrapment and rejection of

  15. Encapsulation of human serum albumin in submicrometer magnetic poly(lactide-co-glycolide) particles as a model system for targeted drug delivery

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shubhra, Q. T. H.; Macková, Hana; Horák, Daniel; Fodor-Kardos, A.; Tóth, J.; Gyenis, J.; Feczkó, T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2013), s. 310-318 ISSN 1618-7229 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN401220801; GA MŠk 7E12054 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 259796 - DIATOOLS Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : magnetic * PLGA * particles Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.330, year: 2013

  16. Particle Swarm Optimization approach to defect detection in armour ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesharaju, Manasa; Nagarajah, Romesh

    2017-03-01

    In this research, various extracted features were used in the development of an automated ultrasonic sensor based inspection system that enables defect classification in each ceramic component prior to despatch to the field. Classification is an important task and large number of irrelevant, redundant features commonly introduced to a dataset reduces the classifiers performance. Feature selection aims to reduce the dimensionality of the dataset while improving the performance of a classification system. In the context of a multi-criteria optimization problem (i.e. to minimize classification error rate and reduce number of features) such as one discussed in this research, the literature suggests that evolutionary algorithms offer good results. Besides, it is noted that Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) has not been explored especially in the field of classification of high frequency ultrasonic signals. Hence, a binary coded Particle Swarm Optimization (BPSO) technique is investigated in the implementation of feature subset selection and to optimize the classification error rate. In the proposed method, the population data is used as input to an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) based classification system to obtain the error rate, as ANN serves as an evaluator of PSO fitness function. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Moulding of Sub-micrometer Surface Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pranov, Henrik; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2006-01-01

    The experiments strongly suggest that the possibility to injection mould sub-micrometer surface structures in polymers mainly relates to the forces originating from the adhesive energy between polymer and shim.......The experiments strongly suggest that the possibility to injection mould sub-micrometer surface structures in polymers mainly relates to the forces originating from the adhesive energy between polymer and shim....

  18. Nano/micro particle beam for ceramic deposition and mechanical etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Doo-Man; Kim, Min-Saeng; Kim, Min-Hyeng; Ahn, Sung-Hoon; Yeo, Jun-Cheol; Lee, Caroline Sunyong

    2010-01-01

    Nano/micro particle beam (NPB) is a newly developed ceramic deposition and mechanical etching process. Additive (deposition) and subtractive (mechanical etching) processes can be realized in one manufacturing process using ceramic nano/micro particles. Nano- or micro-sized powders are sprayed through the supersonic nozzle at room temperature and low vacuum conditions. According to the process conditions, the ceramic powder can be deposited on metal substrates without thermal damage, and mechanical etching can be conducted in the same process with a simple change of process conditions and powders. In the present work, ceramic aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) thin films were deposited on metal substrates. In addition, the glass substrate was etched using a mask to make small channels. Deposited and mechanically etched surface morphology, coating thickness and channel depth were investigated. The test results showed that the NPB provides a feasible additive and subtractive process using ceramic powders.

  19. Seasonal Variations in Health Hazards from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Bound to Submicrometer Particles at Three Characteristic Sites in the Heavily Polluted Polish Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Kozielska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Suspended particles with aerodynamic diameters not greater than 1 μm (PM1 were sampled at the urban background; regional background; and urban traffic points in southern Poland. In total, 120 samples were collected between 2 August 2009 and 27 December 2010. Sixteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs were determined in each sample. The samples were collected with a high volume sampler (Digitel. Afterwards, they were chemically analyzed with a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector (Perkin Elmer Clarus 500. The mean concentration values of the PAH sum (ΣPAH and particular PAHs; the percentages of carcinogenic PAHs in total PAHs (ΣPAHcarc/ΣPAH; carcinogenic equivalent (CEQ; mutagenic equivalent (MEQ; and TCDD-toxic equivalent (TEQ were much higher in the winter (heating season than in the summer (non-heating one. For both periods, the resulting average values obtained were significantly higher (a few; and sometimes a several dozen times higher in the researched Polish region than the values observed in other areas of the world. Such results indicate the importance of health hazards resulting from PM1 and PM1-bound PAHs in this Polish area.

  20. Effects of the application of different particle sizes of mill scale (residue) in mass red ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnt, A.B.C.; Rocha, M.R.; Meller, J.G.

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the influence of particle size of mill scale, residue, when added to a mass ceramic. This residue rich in iron oxide may be used as pigment in the ceramics industry. The use of pigments in ceramic products is related to the characteristics of non-toxicity, chemical stability and determination of tone. The tendency to solubilize the pigment depends on the specific surface area. The residue study was initially subjected to physical and chemical characterization and added in a proportion of 5% at a commercial ceramic white burning, with different particle sizes. Both formulations were sintered at a temperature of 950 ° C and evaluated for: loss on ignition, firing linear shrinkage, water absorption, flexural strength and difference of tone. Samples with finer particles of mill scale 0.038 μ showed higher mechanical strength values in the order of 18 MPa. (author)

  1. In vitro comparison of the biological activity of alumina ceramic and titanium particles associated with aseptic loosening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Yue; Qin Chuqiang; Xu Jie; Huang Dongsheng; Fu Yuru

    2012-01-01

    Prosthetic wear particles are thought to play a central role in the initiation and development of periprosthetic osteolysis, leading to aseptic loosening of prostheses. This study aimed to compare the biological activity of ceramic and titanium particles that are associated with particle-induced, aseptic joint loosening. Different sizes of alumina-ceramic particles and titanium particles were prepared to stimulate murine macrophage cells RAW 264.7, of which the expressions of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) were measured by qPCR and ELISA at various time points. In the presence of all particles, the expression of TNF-alpha increased in a time-dependent manner, whereas the expression of RANKL showed no regular expression patterns. Notably, particles of smaller sizes provoked significantly higher levels of TNF-alpha and RANKL than those of larger sizes. Compared to the titanium particles, the ceramic particles provoked a significantly lower production of TNF-alpha. Thus, the bioactivities of titanium and alumina ceramic particles were inversely proportional to the sizes of the particles, and the expression of RANKL was not parallel to that of TNF-alpha. The successful outcome of ceramic-on-ceramic artificial joint prostheses may be attributed to the low biological activity of ceramic particles, as evidenced here. (paper)

  2. Behavior of micro-particles in monolith ceramic membrane filtration with pre-coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonekawa, H; Tomita, Y; Watanabe, Y

    2004-01-01

    This paper is intended to clarify the characteristics unique to monolith ceramic membranes with pre-coagulation by referring to the behavior of micro-particles. Flow analysis and experiments have proved that monolith ceramic membranes show a unique flow pattern in the channels within the element, causing extremely rapid flocculation in the channel during dead-end filtration. It was assumed that charge-neutralized micro-particles concentrated near the membrane surface grow in size due to flocculation, and as a result, coarse micro-particles were taken up by the shearing force to flow out. As the dead end points of flow in all the channels are located near the end of the channels with higher filterability, most of the flocculated coarse particles are formed to a columnar cake intensively at the dead end point. Therefore cake layer forming on the membrane other than around the dead end point is alleviated. This behavior of particle flocculation and cake formation at the dead end point within the channels are unique characteristics of monolith ceramic membranes. This is why all monolith ceramic membrane water purification systems operating in Japan do not have pretreatment equipment for flocculation and sedimentation.

  3. High temperature tribological properties of plasma-sprayed metallic coatings containing ceramic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallaire, S.; Legoux, J.G.

    1995-01-01

    For sealing a moving metal component with a dense silica-based ceramic pre-heated at 800 C, coatings with a low coefficient of friction and moderate wear loss are required. As reported previously, plasma-sprayed coatings containing solid lubricants could reduce sliding wear in high-temperature applications. Plasma-sprayed metal-based coatings containing ceramic particles have been considered for high temperature sealing. Selected metal powders (NiCoCrAlY, CuNi, CuNiIn, Ag, Cu) and ceramic particles (boron nitride, Zeta-B ceramic) were agglomerated to form suitable spray powders. Plasma-sprayed composite coatings and reference materials were tested in a modified pin-on-disc apparatus in which the stationary disc consisted of a dense silica-based ceramic piece initially heated at 800 C and allowed to cool down during tests. The influence of single exposure and repeated contacts with a dense silica-based ceramic material pre-heated to 800 C on the coefficient of friction, wear loss and damage to the ceramic piece was evaluated. Being submitted to a single exposure at high temperature, coatings containing malleable metals such as indium, silver and copper performed well. The outstanding tribological characteristics of the copper-Zeta-B ceramic coating was attributed to the formation of a glazed layer on the surface of this coating which lasted over exposures to high temperature. This glazed layer, composed of fine oxidation products, provided a smooth and polished surface and helped maintaining the coefficient of friction low

  4. Ultrasonic control of ceramic membrane fouling: Effect of particle characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Weavers, Linda K; Walker, Harold W

    2006-02-01

    In this study, the effect of particle characteristics on the ultrasonic control of membrane fouling was investigated. Ultrasound at 20 kHz was applied to a cross-flow filtration system with gamma-alumina membranes in the presence of colloidal silica particles. Experimental results indicated that particle concentration affected the ability of ultrasound to control membrane fouling, with less effective control of fouling at higher particle concentrations. Measurements of sound wave intensity and images of the cavitation region indicated that particles induced additional cavitation bubbles near the ultrasonic source, which resulted in less turbulence reaching the membrane surface and subsequently less effective control of fouling. When silica particles were modified to be hydrophobic, greater inducement of cavitation bubbles near the ultrasonic source occurred for a fixed concentration, also resulting in less effective control of fouling. Particle size influenced the cleaning ability of ultrasound, with better permeate recovery observed with larger particles. Particle size did not affect sound wave intensity, suggesting that the more effective control of fouling by large particles was due to greater lift and cross-flow drag forces on larger particles compared to smaller particles.

  5. Laser melt injection of ceramic particles in metals : Processing, microstructure and properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelík, V.; De Hosson, J.Th.M.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present an overview of the possibilities of the laser melt injection (LMI) methodology to enhance the surface of light-weighted metals by adding hard ceramic particles in the top layer, with the aim to enhance the wear resistance and to increase the hardness. In

  6. Preparation of a ceramic superconductor from ultrafine particles by freeze-dry process in Ba-Y-Cu-O system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zuyao; Qian Yitai; Wan Yanjian; Rong Jingfang; Zhang Han; Pan Guoqiang; Zhao Yong; Zhang Qirui

    1989-01-01

    Freeze-dry technique is first reported for preparing ceramic ultrafines. The single-phase complex oxide Ba 2 YCu 3 O/sub 9-δ/, a poly-crystallized compound, and ceramic superconductor have been synthesized successfully. The experimental results show that not only is the ceramic superconductor obtained uniform with fine particles and excellent superconductivity, but the conditions for solid reactions are relatively limited

  7. Thermal Protection of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Composites by Ceramic Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baljinder Kandola

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermal barrier efficiency of two types of ceramic particle, glass flakes and aluminum titanate, dispersed on the surface of carbon-fiber epoxy composites, has been evaluated using a cone calorimeter at 35 and 50 kW/m2, in addition to temperature gradients through the samples’ thicknesses, measured by inserting thermocouples on the exposed and back surfaces during the cone tests. Two techniques of dispersing ceramic particles on the surface have been employed, one where particles were dispersed on semi-cured laminate and the other where their dispersion in a phenolic resin was applied on the laminate surface, using the same method as used previously for glass fiber composites. The morphology and durability of the coatings to water absorption, peeling, impact and flexural tension were also studied and compared with those previously reported for glass-fiber epoxy composites. With both methods, uniform coatings could be achieved, which were durable to peeling or water absorption with a minimal adverse effect on the mechanical properties of composites. While all these properties were comparable to those previously observed for glass fiber composites, the ceramic particles have seen to be more effective on this less flammable, carbon fiber composite substrate.

  8. Coatings with laser melt injection of ceramic particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hosson, J.T.M.; Ocelik, V.; de Oliveira, U.; Seal, S; Dahotre, NB; Moore, JJ; Suryanarayana, C; Agarwal, A

    2003-01-01

    The conditions for a successful Laser Melt Injection (LMI) of SiC and WC particles into the melt pool of Al8Si and Ti6Al4V alloys were studied experimentally and theoretically by FEM calculations. The laser employed is a high power Nd:YAG The formation of a relatively thick aluminium oxide layer on

  9. The characteristics and application of sludge-fly ash ceramic particles (SFCP) as novel filter media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Shuxin; Yue Qinyan; Yue Min; Gao Baoyu; Li Qian; Yu Hui; Zhao Yaqin; Qi Yuanfeng

    2009-01-01

    Novel filter media-sludge-fly ash ceramic particles (SFCP) were prepared using dewatered sludge, fly ash and clay with a mass ratio of 1:1:1. Compared with commercial ceramic particles (CCP), SFCP had higher total porosity, larger total surface area and lower bulk and apparent density. Tests of heavy metal elements in lixivium proved that SFCP were safe for wastewater treatment. A lab-scale upflow anaerobic bioreactor was employed to ascertain the application of SFCP in denitrification process using acetate as carbon source. The results showed that SFCP reactor brought a relative superiority to CCP reactor in terms of total nitrogen (TN) removal at the optimum C/N ratio of 4.03 when volumetric loading rates (VLR) ranged from 0.33 to 3.69 kg TN (m 3 d) -1 . Therefore, SFCP application, as a novel process of treating wastes with wastes, provided a promising way in sludge and fly ash utilization.

  10. Ageing kinetics and strength of airborne-particle abraded 3Y-TZP ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotič, Jasna; Jevnikar, Peter; Kocjan, Andraž

    2017-07-01

    The combined effects of alumina airborne-particle abrasion and prolonged in vitro ageing on the flexural strength of 3Y-TZP ceramic have been studied. The aim was to identify the different effects on the surface and subsurface regions that govern the performance of this popular bioceramic known for its susceptibility to low-temperature degradation (LTD). As-sintered or airborne-particle abraded 3Y-TZP discs were subjected to ageing at 134°C for up to 480h. Biaxial flexural strength was measured and the relative amount of monoclinic phase determined using X-ray diffraction. The transformed zone depth (TZD) was observed on cross-sections with scanning electron microscopy coupled with a focused ion beam. Segmented linear regression was used to analyze the flexural strength and TZD as functions of the ageing time. A two-step linear ageing kinetics was detected in airborne-particle abraded specimens, reflecting the different microstructures through which the LTD proceeds into the bulk. A 10μm thick altered zone under the abraded surface was involved in both the surface strengthening and the increased ageing resistance. When the zone was annihilated by the LTD, the strength of the ceramic specimens and the speed of LTD returned to the values measured before abrasion. Even at prolonged ageing times, the strength of abraded groups was not lower than that of as-sintered groups. Both the ageing kinetics and the flexural strength were prominently affected by airborne-particle abrasion, which altered the subsurface microstructure and phase composition. Airborne-particle abrasion was not harmful to the 3Y-TZP ceramics' stability. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. TiB2/Al2O3 ceramic particle reinforced aluminum fabricated by spray deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xing; Yang Chengxiao; Guan Leding; Yan Biao

    2008-01-01

    Aluminum matrix ceramic particle reinforced composites (AMCs) is a kind of composite with great importance. Aluminum matrix composite reinforced with TiB 2 /Al 2 O 3 ceramic particles was successfully in situ synthesized in Al-TiO 2 -B 2 O 3 system in this paper, using spray deposition with hot-press treatment technique. Five groups of composites with different reinforcement volume contents were prepared and the comparisons of porosity, ultimate tensile strength (UTS), elongation and Brinell hardness (BH) between the composites with and without hot-press treating were carried out. The composite with 21.0% reinforcement volume content was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Energy Disperse Spectroscopy (EDS). The results revealed the formation and uniform distribution of fine reinforcements in the matrix after hot-press treating, while a new intermetallic phase Al 3 Ti was found besides TiB 2 /Al 2 O 3 ceramic phase

  12. Microstructure and property of WC particles ceramic-metal composite coatings by laser surface cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Xiaoyan; Zhu Beidi; Tao Zengyi; Yang Shuguo; Cui Kun

    1993-01-01

    Ceramic-metal is widely used as a kind of good hardfacing material. The coarse WC particles ceramic-metal composite coatings with WC density of 67% it weight and the thickness of 1.6-2.0 mm have been cladded on 20Ni 4 Mo steel surface by a 2kw CO 2 laser. The sintered WC particles with the size of 600-1,000 μm are chosen as the main strengthening phase, Ni-base self-flux alloy as the binder in the composite coatings. The microstructure and micro-hardness of both WC particles and binder are analyzed. The rigid ball indention with acoustic emission technique is used to evaluate the brittleness of the coating. Finally, the abrasive wear resistance of the coatings are tested, Besides, the coatings with the same ratio and size of WC particles within low carbon steel tube were cladded on 20Ni 4 Mo steel by atomic hydrogen welding technique and analyzed by the same ways their result are compared

  13. Enhancement of Compatibility between Ultrahigh-Molecular-Weight Polyethylene Particles and Butadiene.Nitrile Rubber Matrix with Nanoscale Ceramic Particles and Characterization of Evolving Layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shadrinov, Nikolay V.; Sokolova, Marina D.; Cho, Jinho; Okhlopkova, A. A.; Lee, Jungkeun; Jeong, Daeyong

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the modification of surface properties of ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) with nanoscale ceramic particles to fabricate an improved composite with butadiene.nitrile rubber (BNR). Adhesion force data showed that ceramic zeolite particles on the surface of UHMWPE modulated the surface state of the polymer and increased its compatibility with BNR. Atomic force microscopy phase images showed that UHMWPE made up the microphase around the zeolite particles and formed the evolving layer with a complex interface. The complex interface resulted in improvements in the mechanical properties of the composite, especially its low-temperature resistance coefficients, thereby improving its performance in low-temperature applications

  14. Effect of sintering temperatures on titanium matrix composites reinforced by ceramic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, F.; Amigo, V.; Busquets, D.; Klyatskina, E. [Mechanical and Materials Engineering Department. Polytechnical University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    Titanium and titanium composites have a potential use in aerospace and biotechnology industries, and nowadays in others like sports and fashion ones. In this work composite materials, based on titanium matrix reinforced with ceramic particles, have been developed. PM route is used to obtain compact and sintered samples. TiN and TiAl powders, are milled with Ti powder in different volumetric percentages in a ball mill. These mixtures are pressed in a uniaxial press and sintered in a vacuum furnace at different temperatures between 1180 to 1220 deg. C. Porosity of samples is analysed, before and after the sintering process, by Archimedes technique and by image analysis. Mechanical properties and the reinforcement particles influence in the titanium matrix are studied by flexion test in green and sintered states, and by hardness and microhardness tests. Complimentarily, a microstructural analysis is carried out by optical and electron microscopy, and the reactivity between the reinforce particles and titanium matrix are studied. (authors)

  15. Removal of virus to protozoan sized particles in point-of-use ceramic water filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielefeldt, Angela R; Kowalski, Kate; Schilling, Cherylynn; Schreier, Simon; Kohler, Amanda; Scott Summers, R

    2010-03-01

    The particle removal performance of point-of-use ceramic water filters (CWFs) was characterized in the size range of 0.02-100 microm using carboxylate-coated polystyrene fluorescent microspheres, natural particles and clay. Particles were spiked into dechlorinated tap water, and three successive water batches treated in each of six different CWFs. Particle removal generally increased with increasing size. The removal of virus-sized 0.02 and 0.1 microm spheres were highly variable between the six filters, ranging from 63 to 99.6%. For the 0.5 microm spheres removal was less variable and in the range of 95.1-99.6%, while for the 1, 2, 4.5, and 10 microm spheres removal was >99.6%. Recoating four of the CWFs with colloidal silver solution improved removal of the 0.02 microm spheres, but had no significant effects on the other particle sizes. Log removals of 1.8-3.2 were found for natural turbidity and spiked kaolin clay particles; however, particles as large as 95 microm were detected in filtered water. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Low LET protons focused to submicrometer shows enhanced radiobiological effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, T E; Zlobinskaya, O; Michalski, D; Molls, M; Multhoff, G; Greubel, C; Hable, V; Girst, S; Siebenwirth, C; Dollinger, G; Schmid, E

    2012-01-01

    This study shows that enhanced radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) values can be generated focusing low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation and thus changing the microdose distribution. 20 MeV protons (LET = 2.65 keV µm −1 ) are focused to submicrometer diameter at the ion microprobe superconducting nanoprobe for applied nuclear (Kern) physics experiments of the Munich tandem accelerator. The RBE values, as determined by measuring micronuclei (RBE MN = 1.48 ± 0.07) and dicentrics (RBE D = 1.92 ± 0.15), in human–hamster hybrid (A L ) cells are significantly higher when 117 protons were focused to a submicrometer irradiation field within a 5.4 × 5.4 µm 2 matrix compared to quasi homogeneous in a 1 × 1 µm 2 matrix applied protons (RBE MN = 1.28 ± 0.07; RBE D = 1.41 ± 0.14) at the same average dose of 1.7 Gy. The RBE values are normalized to standard 70 kV (dicentrics) or 200 kV (micronuclei) x-ray irradiation. The 117 protons applied per point deposit the same amount of energy like a 12 C ion with 55 MeV total energy (4.48 MeV u −1 ). The enhancements are about half of that obtained for 12 C ions (RBE MN = 2.20 ± 0.06 and RBE D = 3.21 ± 0.10) and they are attributed to intertrack interactions of the induced damages. The measured RBE values show differences from predictions of the local effect model (LEM III) that is used to calculate RBE values for irradiation plans to treat tumors with high LET particles. (paper)

  17. Low LET protons focused to submicrometer shows enhanced radiobiological effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, T. E.; Greubel, C.; Hable, V.; Zlobinskaya, O.; Michalski, D.; Girst, S.; Siebenwirth, C.; Schmid, E.; Molls, M.; Multhoff, G.; Dollinger, G.

    2012-10-01

    This study shows that enhanced radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) values can be generated focusing low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation and thus changing the microdose distribution. 20 MeV protons (LET = 2.65 keV µm-1) are focused to submicrometer diameter at the ion microprobe superconducting nanoprobe for applied nuclear (Kern) physics experiments of the Munich tandem accelerator. The RBE values, as determined by measuring micronuclei (RBEMN = 1.48 ± 0.07) and dicentrics (RBED = 1.92 ± 0.15), in human-hamster hybrid (AL) cells are significantly higher when 117 protons were focused to a submicrometer irradiation field within a 5.4 × 5.4 µm2 matrix compared to quasi homogeneous in a 1 × 1 µm2 matrix applied protons (RBEMN = 1.28 ± 0.07; RBED = 1.41 ± 0.14) at the same average dose of 1.7 Gy. The RBE values are normalized to standard 70 kV (dicentrics) or 200 kV (micronuclei) x-ray irradiation. The 117 protons applied per point deposit the same amount of energy like a 12C ion with 55 MeV total energy (4.48 MeV u-1). The enhancements are about half of that obtained for 12C ions (RBEMN = 2.20 ± 0.06 and RBED = 3.21 ± 0.10) and they are attributed to intertrack interactions of the induced damages. The measured RBE values show differences from predictions of the local effect model (LEM III) that is used to calculate RBE values for irradiation plans to treat tumors with high LET particles.

  18. Microstructures and performance of CaO-based ceramic cores with different particle size distributions for investment casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, P. P.; Wu, G. Q.; Tao, Y.; Cheng, X.; Zhao, J. Q.; Nan, H.

    2018-02-01

    A series of calcium-based ceramic cores for casting titanium alloy were prepared by mixing different amounts of coarse and fine powders through injection molding. The effects of particle size on the microstructures and properties of the ceramic cores were investigated using quantitative and statistical analysis methods. It is found that the shrinkage and room-temperature strength of the ceramic cores were enhanced as increasing the contents of fine particles. Moreover, the creep resistance of the ceramic cores increased initially and then decreased. The increase in the fine particle content of the cores reduced the number and mean diameter of pores after sintering. The grain boundary density decreased firstly and then increased. The flexural strength of the ceramic cores at room temperature decreased with increasing porosity of ceramic cores, whereas the creep resistance increased with decreasing grain boundary density. A core exhibiting the optimal property was obtained when mixing 65 wt% of coarse powders (75-150 μm) and 35 wt% of fine powders (25-48 μm).

  19. Nanometer, submicron and micron sized aluminum powder prepared by semi-solid mechanical stirring method with addition of ceramic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, X.H.; Jiang, D.L.; Dong, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    Composite powder, which is a mixture of Al/Al 2 O 3 composite particles and nanometer, submicron and micron sized aluminum powder, was prepared by semi-solid mechanical stirring method with addition of Al 2 O 3 ceramic particles. The ceramic particles have an average diameter of 80 μm and a volume fraction of 15% in the slurry. The methods used to measure the size distribution of particles greater than 50 μm and less than 50 μm were sieve analysis and photosedimentation, respectively. The surface morphology and transverse sections of the composite powder of different sizes were examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM), optical microscope and auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The results indicate that the composite powder prepared in present work have a wide size distribution ranging from less than 50-900 μm, and the aluminum particles and Al/Al 2 O 3 composite particles are separated and isolated. The particles greater than 200 μm and less than 50 μm are almost pure aluminum powder. The rate of conversion of ingot aluminum into particles less than 1 μm containing nanometer and submicron sizes is 1.777 wt.% in this work. The aluminum powder of different sizes has different shape and surface morphology, quasi-spherical in shape with rough surface for aluminum particles of micron scale, irregular in shape for aluminum particles of submicron scale, and quite close to a globular or an excellent globular in shape for aluminum particles of nanometer size. On the other hand, the surface of ceramic particle was coated by aluminum particles with maximum thickness less than 10 μm containing nanometer and submicron sizes as a single layer. It is suggested that the surface of ceramic particles can provide more nucleation sites for solidification of liquid aluminum and the nucleation of liquid aluminum can take place readily, grow and adhere on the surface of ceramic particles, although it is poorly wetted by the liquid aluminum and the semi-solid slurry can

  20. Tensile flow stress of ceramic particle-reinforced metal in the presence of particle cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, R. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Laboratory for Mechanical Metallurgy, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Rossoll, A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Laboratory for Mechanical Metallurgy, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)], E-mail: andreas.rossoll@epfl.ch; Weber, L. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Laboratory for Mechanical Metallurgy, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Bourke, M.A.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), LANSCE-12, P.O. Box 1663, MS H805, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Dunand, D.C. [Northwestern University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Mortensen, A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Laboratory for Mechanical Metallurgy, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2008-10-15

    A simplified model is proposed to quantify the effect of damage in the form of particle cracking on the elastic and plastic behaviour of particle-reinforced metal matrix composites under uniaxial tensile loading: cracked particles are simply replaced, in a mean-field model, with as much matrix. Pure aluminium reinforced with 44 vol.% alumina particles, tested in tension and unloaded at periodic plastic deformations, is analysed by neutron diffraction during each reloading elastic step, at 30%, 50%, 70% and 90% of the tensile flow stress. The data give the evolution of the elastic matrix strains in the composite and also measure the progress of internal damage by particle cracking. The test gives (i) the evolution of the in situ matrix flow stress, and (ii) the evolution of load partitioning during elastic deformation with increasing composite damage. Predictions of the present model compare favourably with relevant results in the literature, and with results from the present neutron diffraction experiments.

  1. Tensile flow stress of ceramic particle-reinforced metal in the presence of particle cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, R.; Rossoll, A.; Weber, L.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Dunand, D.C.; Mortensen, A.

    2008-01-01

    A simplified model is proposed to quantify the effect of damage in the form of particle cracking on the elastic and plastic behaviour of particle-reinforced metal matrix composites under uniaxial tensile loading: cracked particles are simply replaced, in a mean-field model, with as much matrix. Pure aluminium reinforced with 44 vol.% alumina particles, tested in tension and unloaded at periodic plastic deformations, is analysed by neutron diffraction during each reloading elastic step, at 30%, 50%, 70% and 90% of the tensile flow stress. The data give the evolution of the elastic matrix strains in the composite and also measure the progress of internal damage by particle cracking. The test gives (i) the evolution of the in situ matrix flow stress, and (ii) the evolution of load partitioning during elastic deformation with increasing composite damage. Predictions of the present model compare favourably with relevant results in the literature, and with results from the present neutron diffraction experiments

  2. Influence of glass particle size of resin cements on bonding to glass ceramic: SEM and bond strength evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Fernanda; Moraes, Rafael R; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Boscato, Noéli

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of the filler particle size (micron or submicron) of experimental resin cements on the microtensile bond strength to a glass-ceramic pretreated with hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching or alumina airborne-particle abrasion (AA). Cements were obtained from a Bis-GMA/TEGDMA mixture filled with 60 mass% micron-sized (1 ± 0.2 µm) or submicron-sized (180 ± 30 µm) Ba-Si-Al glass particles. Ceramic blocks (PM9; VITA) were treated with 10% HFA for 60 s or AA for 15 s. Silane and adhesive were applied. Ceramic blocks were bonded to resin composite blocks (Z250; 3M ESPE) using one of the cements. Bonded specimens were sectioned into beams (n = 20/group) and subjected to microtensile bond strength tests. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' tests (5%). Failure modes were classified under magnification. Morphologies of the treated ceramic surfaces and bonded interfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The HFA-submicron group had lower bond strengths than the other groups. All AA-submicron specimens debonded prematurely. Mixed failures were predominant for HFA groups, whereas interfacial failures predominated for AA groups. SEM revealed a honeycomb-like aspect in the HFA-treated ceramic, whereas the AA-treated groups showed an irregular retentive pattern. Continuity of cement infiltration along the bonded interface was more uniform for HFA-treated compared to AA-treated specimens. Cracks toward the bulk of the ceramic were observed in AA-treated specimens. Particle size significantly influenced the ceramic bond strength, whereas surface treatment had a minor effect. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Characteristics and fabrication of cermet spent nuclear fuel casks: ceramic particles embedded in steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Swaney, P.M.; Tiegs, T.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Cermets are being investigated as an advanced material of construction for casks that can be used for storage, transport, or disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Cermets, which consist of ceramic particles embedded in steel, are a method to incorporate brittle ceramics with highly desirable properties into a strong ductile metal matrix with a high thermal conductivity, thus combining the best properties of both materials. Traditional applications of cermets include tank armor, vault armor, drill bits, and nuclear test-reactor fuel. Cermets with different ceramics (DUO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, etc.) are being investigated for the manufacture of SNF casks. Cermet casks offer four potential benefits: greater capacity (more SNF assemblies) for the same gross weight cask, greater capacity (more SNF assemblies) for the same external dimensions, improved resistance to assault, and superior repository performance. These benefits are achieved by varying the composition, volume fraction, and particulate size of the ceramic particles in the cermet with position in the cask body. Addition of depleted uranium dioxide (DUO{sub 2}) to the cermet increases shielding density, improves shielding effectiveness, and increases cask capacity for a given cask weight or size. Addition of low-density aluminium oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to the outer top and bottom sections of the cermet cask, where the radiation levels are lower, can lower cask weight without compromising shielding. The use of Al2O3 and other oxides, in appropriate locations, can increase resistance to assault. Repository performance may be improved by compositional control of the cask body to (1) create a local geochemical environment that slows the long-term degradation of the SNF and (2) enables the use of DUO{sub 2} for longterm criticality control. While the benefits of using cermets follow directly from their known properties, the primary challenge is to develop low-cost methods to fabricate

  4. Characteristics and fabrication of cermet spent nuclear fuel casks: ceramic particles embedded in steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Swaney, P.M.; Tiegs, T.N.

    2004-01-01

    Cermets are being investigated as an advanced material of construction for casks that can be used for storage, transport, or disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Cermets, which consist of ceramic particles embedded in steel, are a method to incorporate brittle ceramics with highly desirable properties into a strong ductile metal matrix with a high thermal conductivity, thus combining the best properties of both materials. Traditional applications of cermets include tank armor, vault armor, drill bits, and nuclear test-reactor fuel. Cermets with different ceramics (DUO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , Gd 2 O 3 , etc.) are being investigated for the manufacture of SNF casks. Cermet casks offer four potential benefits: greater capacity (more SNF assemblies) for the same gross weight cask, greater capacity (more SNF assemblies) for the same external dimensions, improved resistance to assault, and superior repository performance. These benefits are achieved by varying the composition, volume fraction, and particulate size of the ceramic particles in the cermet with position in the cask body. Addition of depleted uranium dioxide (DUO 2 ) to the cermet increases shielding density, improves shielding effectiveness, and increases cask capacity for a given cask weight or size. Addition of low-density aluminium oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) to the outer top and bottom sections of the cermet cask, where the radiation levels are lower, can lower cask weight without compromising shielding. The use of Al2O3 and other oxides, in appropriate locations, can increase resistance to assault. Repository performance may be improved by compositional control of the cask body to (1) create a local geochemical environment that slows the long-term degradation of the SNF and (2) enables the use of DUO 2 for longterm criticality control. While the benefits of using cermets follow directly from their known properties, the primary challenge is to develop low-cost methods to fabricate casks with variable cermet compositions

  5. Particle migration using local variation of the viscosity (LVOV) model in flow of a non-Newtonian fluid for ceramic tape casting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Spangenberg, Jon; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the migration of secondary particles in a non-Newtonian ceramic slurry inthe tape casting process is investigated with the purpose of understanding the particle distribution patterns along the casting direction. The Ostwald-de Waele power law model for the non-Newtonian flow...... the substratevelocity (casting speed) leads to a more uniform distribution of the particles inside the ceramic slurry, in which case the shear induced particle migration is dominating over the gravity induced one....

  6. A particle swarm-based algorithm for optimization of multi-layered and graded dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Ehsan; Flores, Paulo; Silva, Filipe

    2018-01-01

    The thermal residual stresses (TRSs) generated owing to the cooling down from the processing temperature in layered ceramic systems can lead to crack formation as well as influence the bending stress distribution and the strength of the structure. The purpose of this study is to minimize the thermal residual and bending stresses in dental ceramics to enhance their strength as well as to prevent the structure failure. Analytical parametric models are developed to evaluate thermal residual stresses in zirconia-porcelain multi-layered and graded discs and to simulate the piston-on-ring test. To identify optimal designs of zirconia-based dental restorations, a particle swarm optimizer is also developed. The thickness of each interlayer and compositional distribution are referred to as design variables. The effect of layers number constituting the interlayer between two based materials on the performance of graded prosthetic systems is also investigated. The developed methodology is validated against results available in literature and a finite element model constructed in the present study. Three different cases are considered to determine the optimal design of graded prosthesis based on minimizing (a) TRSs; (b) bending stresses; and (c) both TRS and bending stresses. It is demonstrated that each layer thickness and composition profile have important contributions into the resulting stress field and magnitude. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Performances and nitrification properties of biological aerated filters with zeolite, ceramic particle and carbonate media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Liping; Zhang, Shoubin; Wang, Guangwei; Du, Mao'an

    2010-10-01

    The performance and nitrification properties of three BAFs, with ceramic, zeolite and carbonate media, respectively, were investigated to evaluate the feasibility of employing these materials as biological aerated filter media. All three BAFs shown a promising COD and SS removal performance, while influent pH was 6.5-8.1, air-liquid ratio was 5:1 and HRT was 1.25-2.5 h, respectively. Ammonia removal in BAFs was inhibited when organic and ammonia nitrogen loading were increased, but promoted effectively with the increase pH value. Zeolite and carbonate were more suitable for nitrification than ceramic particle when influent pH below 6.5. It is feasible to employ these media in BAF and adequate bed volume has to be supplied to satisfy the requirement of removal COD, SS and ammonia nitrogen simultaneously in a biofilter. The carbonate with a strong buffer capacity is more suitable to treat the wastewater with variable or lower pH. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of silica and calcium levels in nanobioglass ceramic particles on osteoblast proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moorthi, A.; Parihar, P.R.; Saravanan, S.; Vairamani, M.; Selvamurugan, N.

    2014-01-01

    At nanoscale, bioglass ceramic (nBGC) particles containing calcium oxide (lime), silica and phosphorus pentoxide promote osteoblast proliferation. However, the role of varied amounts of calcium and silica present in nBGC particles on osteoblast proliferation is not yet completely known. Hence, the current work was aimed at synthesizing two different nBGC particles with varied amounts of calcium oxide and silica, nBGC-1: SiO 2 :CaO:P 2 O 5 ; mol% ∼ 70:25:5 and nBGC-2: SiO 2 :CaO:P 2 O 5 ; mol% ∼ 64:31:5, and investigating their role on osteoblast proliferation. The synthesized nBGC particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. They exhibited their size at nanoscale and were non-toxic to human osteoblastic cells (MG-63). The nBGC-2 particles were found to have more effect on stimulation of osteoblast proliferation and promoted entering of more cells into G2/M cell cycle phase compared to nBGC-1 particles. There was a differential expression of cyclin proteins in MG-63 cells by nBGC-1 and nBGC-2 treatments, and the expression of cyclin B1 and E proteins was found to be more by nBGC-2 treatment. Thus, these results provide us a new insight in understanding the design of various nBGC particles by altering their ionic constituents with desirable biological properties thereby supporting bone augmentation. - Highlights: • nBGC particles with varied amounts of calcium and silica were synthesized. • They were non-toxic to human osteoblastic cells. • nBGC-2 particles had more effect on stimulation of osteoblast proliferation. • nBGC-2 particles promoted entering of osteoblasts into G2/M cell cycle phase. • Expression of cyclin B1 and E proteins was found to be more by nBGC-2 treatment

  9. Effects of silica and calcium levels in nanobioglass ceramic particles on osteoblast proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moorthi, A.; Parihar, P.R.; Saravanan, S.; Vairamani, M.; Selvamurugan, N., E-mail: selvamurugan.n@ktr.srmuniv.ac.in

    2014-10-01

    At nanoscale, bioglass ceramic (nBGC) particles containing calcium oxide (lime), silica and phosphorus pentoxide promote osteoblast proliferation. However, the role of varied amounts of calcium and silica present in nBGC particles on osteoblast proliferation is not yet completely known. Hence, the current work was aimed at synthesizing two different nBGC particles with varied amounts of calcium oxide and silica, nBGC-1: SiO{sub 2}:CaO:P{sub 2}O{sub 5}; mol% ∼ 70:25:5 and nBGC-2: SiO{sub 2}:CaO:P{sub 2}O{sub 5}; mol% ∼ 64:31:5, and investigating their role on osteoblast proliferation. The synthesized nBGC particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. They exhibited their size at nanoscale and were non-toxic to human osteoblastic cells (MG-63). The nBGC-2 particles were found to have more effect on stimulation of osteoblast proliferation and promoted entering of more cells into G2/M cell cycle phase compared to nBGC-1 particles. There was a differential expression of cyclin proteins in MG-63 cells by nBGC-1 and nBGC-2 treatments, and the expression of cyclin B1 and E proteins was found to be more by nBGC-2 treatment. Thus, these results provide us a new insight in understanding the design of various nBGC particles by altering their ionic constituents with desirable biological properties thereby supporting bone augmentation. - Highlights: • nBGC particles with varied amounts of calcium and silica were synthesized. • They were non-toxic to human osteoblastic cells. • nBGC-2 particles had more effect on stimulation of osteoblast proliferation. • nBGC-2 particles promoted entering of osteoblasts into G2/M cell cycle phase. • Expression of cyclin B1 and E proteins was found to be more by nBGC-2 treatment.

  10. Physics and Technology of Transparent Ceramic Armor: Sintered Al2O3 vs Cubic Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krell, Andreas; Hutzler, Thomas; Klimke, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Sintered sub-micrometer alumina (alpha-Al2O3) is the hardest transparent armor. However, its trigonal structure gives rise to a strong thickness effect that makes thicker components translucent. Cubic ceramics (no birefringence...

  11. Stress–rupture measurements of cast magnesium strengthened by in-situ production of ceramic particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraj M. Chelliah

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We have introduced a polymer precursor into molten magnesium and then in-situ pyrolyzed to produce castings of metal matrix composites (P-MMCs containing silicon-carbonitride (SiCNO ceramic particles. Stress-rupture measurements of as-cast P-MMCs was performed at 350 °C (0.69TM to 450 °C (0.78TM under dead load condition corresponding to tensile stress of 2.5 MPa to 20 MPa. The time-to-fracture data were analyzed using the classical Monkman–Grant equation. The time-to-fracture is thermally activated and follows a power-law stress exponent exhibiting dislocation creep. Fractography analysis revealed that while pure magnesium appears to fracture by dislocation slip, the P-MMCs fail from the nucleation and growth of voids at the grain boundaries.

  12. Effects of different lasers and particle abrasion on surface characteristics of zirconia ceramics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakineh Arami

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the surface of yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP after surface treatment with lasers and airborne-particle abrasion.First, 77 samples of presintered zirconia blocks measuring 10 × 10 × 2 mm were made, sintered and polished. Then, they were randomly divided into 11 groups (n=7 and received surface treatments namely, Er:YAG laser irradiation with output power of 1.5, 2 and 2.5 W, Nd:YAG laser with output power of 1.5, 2 and 2.5 W, CO2 laser with output power of 3, 4 and 5 W, AL2O3 airborne-particle abrasion (50μ and no treatment (controls. Following treatment, the parameters of surface roughness such as Ra, Rku and Rsk were evaluated using a digital profilometer and surface examination was done by SEM.According to ANOVA and Tukey's test, the mean surface roughness (Ra after Nd:YAG laser irradiation at 2 and 2.5 W was significantly higher than other groups. Roughness increased with increasing output power of Nd:YAG and CO2 lasers. Treated surfaces by Er:YAG laser and air abrasion showed similar surface roughness. SEM micrographs showed small microcracks in specimens irradiated with Nd:YAG and CO2 lasers.Nd:YAG laser created a rough surface on the zirconia ceramic with many microcracks; therefore, its use is not recommended. Air abrasion method can be used with Er:YAG laser irradiation for the treatment of zirconia ceramic.

  13. Metallic nano-particles in lustre glazed ceramics from the 15th century in Seville studied by PIXE and RBS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polvorinos del Rio, A.; Castaing, J.; Aucouturier, M.

    2006-01-01

    Lustre ceramics, found in a workshop located in Triana (Sevilla), have been analysed to determine the composition of glazes including the metallic particle layers giving rise to the lustre effect. PIXE and RBS were used for the elemental composition and the sub-surface concentration profiles, respectively. Copper and silver at the origin of the lustre are detected by PIXE. RBS gives access to the detailed distribution of the elements in the surface layers. The simulation of RBS spectra confirms the occurrence of thin layers (less than 300 nm) containing metallic silver and/or copper. The results are compared with those obtained on other types of lustre ceramics

  14. Elaboration of silicon carbides nano particles (SiC): from the powder synthesis to the sintered ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reau, A.

    2008-01-01

    Materials for the reactor cores of the fourth generation will need materials supporting high temperatures with fast neutrons flux. SiC f /SiC ceramics are proposed. One of the possible elaboration process is to fill SiC fiber piece with nano particles SiC powder and to strengthen by sintering. The aim of this thesis is to obtain a nano structured SiC ceramic as a reference for the SiC f /SiC composite development and to study the influence of the fabrication parameters. (A.L.B.)

  15. Microstructures and properties of ceramic particle-reinforced metal matrix composite layers produced by laser cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingmao; He, Jingjiang; Liu, Wenjin; Zhong, Minlin

    2005-01-01

    Different weight ratio of titanium, zirconium, WC and Fe-based alloy powders were mixed, and cladded onto a medium carbon steel substrate using a 3kW continuous wave CO2 laser, aiming at producing Ceramic particles- reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) layers. The microstructures of the layers are typical hypoeutectic, and the major phases are Ni3Si2, TiSi2, Fe3C, FeNi, MC, Fe7Mo3, Fe3B, γ(residual austenite) and M(martensite). The microstructure morphologies of MMCs layers are dendrites/cells. The MC-type reinforcements are in situ synthesis Carbides which main compositions consist of transition elements Zr, Ti, W. The MC-type particles distributed within dendrite and interdendritic regions with different volume fractions for single and overlapping clad layers. The MMCs layers are dense and free of cracks with a good metallurgical bonding between the layer and substrate. The addition ratio of WC in the mixtures has the remarkable effect on the microhardness of clad layers.

  16. Impact of Particle Size of Ceramic Granule Blends on Mechanical Strength and Porosity of 3D Printed Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Spath

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing is a promising method for the fabrication of scaffolds in the field of bone tissue engineering. To date, the mechanical strength of 3D printed ceramic scaffolds is not sufficient for a variety of applications in the reconstructive surgery. Mechanical strength is directly in relation with the porosity of the 3D printed scaffolds. The porosity is directly influenced by particle size and particle-size distribution of the raw material. To investigate this impact, a hydroxyapatite granule blend with a wide particle size distribution was fractioned by sieving. The specific fractions and bimodal mixtures of the sieved granule blend were used to 3D print specimens. It has been shown that an optimized arrangement of fractions with large and small particles can provide 3D printed specimens with good mechanical strength due to a higher packing density. An increase of mechanical strength can possibly expand the application area of 3D printed hydroxyapatite scaffolds.

  17. Passive photonic alignment with submicrometer repeatability and accuracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurp, J.F.C.; Tichem, M; Staufer, U.; Zhao, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report on passive alignment with submicrometer accuracy of two photonic chips on a silicon optical bench. An effective design principle to minimize the tolerance chain is presented and applied to a case study. The chips have been successfully manufactured and an experimental setup

  18. SEM, optical, and Moessbauer studies of submicrometer chromite in Allende

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housley, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    New scanning electron and optical microscope results are presented showing that sub-micrometer chromite is abundant along healed cracks and grain boundaries in Allende chondrule olivine. Some wider healed cracks also contain pentlandite and euhedral Ni3Fe grains. Also reported are Moessbauer measurements on Allende HF-HCl residues confirming a high Fe(+++)/Fe(++) ratio.

  19. Long term measurements of submicrometer urban aerosols: statistical analysis for correlations with meteorological conditions and trace gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Wehner

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term measurements (over 4 years of particle number size distributions (submicrometer particles, 3-800 nm in diameter, trace gases (NO, NO2, and O3, and meteorological parameters (global radiation, wind speed and direction, atmospheric pressure, etc. were taken in a moderately polluted site in the city of Leipzig (Germany. The resulting complex data set was analyzed with respect to seasonal, weekly, and diurnal variation of the submicrometer aerosol. Car traffic produced a peak in the number size distribution at around 20 nm particle diameter during morning rush hour on weekdays. A second peak at 10-15 nm particle diameter occurred around noon during summer, confirmed by high correlation between concentration of particles less than 20 nm and the global radiation. This new-particle formation at noon was correlated with the amount of global radiation. A high concentration of accumulation mode particles (between 100 and 800 nm, which are associated with large particle-surface area, might prevent this formation. Such high particle concentration in the ultrafine region (particles smaller than 20 nm in diameter was not detected in the particle mass, and thus, particle mass concentration is not suitable for determining the diurnal patterns of particles. In summer, statistical time series analysis showed a cyclic pattern of ultrafine particles with a period of one day and confirmed the correlation with global radiation. Principal component analysis (PCA revealed a strong correlation between the particle concentration for 20-800 nm particles and the NO- and NO2-concentrations, indicating the influence of combustion processes on this broad size range, in particular during winter. In addition, PCA also revealed that particle concentration depended on meteorological conditions such as wind speed and wind direction, although the dependence differed with particle size class.

  20. Evaluation and Modification of Commercial Dry Powder Inhalers for the Aerosolization of a Submicrometer Excipient Enhanced Growth (EEG) Formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Yoen-Ju; Longest, P. Worth; Tian, Geng; Hindle, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and modify commercial dry powder inhalers (DPIs) for the aerosolization of a submicrometer excipient enhanced growth (EEG) formulation. The optimized device and formulation combination was then tested in a realistic in vitro mouth-throat - tracheobronchial (MT-TB) model. An optimized EEG submicrometer powder formulation, consisting of albuterol sulfate (drug), mannitol (hygroscopic excipient), L-leucine (dispersion enhancer) and poloxamer 188 (surfactant) in a ratio of 30:48:20:2 was prepared using a Büchi Nano spray dryer. The aerosolization performance of the EEG formulation was evaluated with 5 conventional DPIs: Aerolizer, Novolizer, HandiHaler, Exubera and Spiros. To improve powder dispersion, the HandiHaler was modified with novel mouth piece (MP) designs. The aerosol performance of each device was assessed using a next generation impactor (NGI) at airflow rates generating a pressure drop of 4 kPa across the DPI. In silico and in vitro deposition and hygroscopic growth of formulations was studied using a MT-TB airway geometry model. Both Handihaler and Aerolizer produced high emitted doses (ED) together with a significant submicrometer aerosol fraction. A modified HandiHaler with a MP including a three-dimensional (3D) array of rods (HH-3D) produced a submicrometer particle fraction of 38.8% with a conventional fine particle fraction (% <5µm) of 97.3%. The mass median diameter (MMD) of the aerosol was reduced below 1 µm using this HH-3D DPI. The aerosol generated from the modified HandiHaler increased to micrometer size (2.8 µm) suitable for pulmonary deposition, when exposed to simulated respiratory conditions, with negligible mouth-throat (MT) deposition (2.6 %). PMID:23608613

  1. Evaluation of fine ceramics raw powders with particle size analyzers having different measuring principle and its problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Osamu; Nakahira, Kenji; Tsubaki, Junichiro.

    1995-01-01

    Many kinds of analyzers based on various principles have been developed for measuring particle size distribution of fine ceramics powders. But the reproducibility of the results, interchangeability of the models, reliability of the ends of the measured distribution have not been investigated for each principle. In this paper, these important points for particle size analysis were clarified by measuring raw material powders of fine ceramics. (1) in the case of laser diffraction and scattering method, the reproducibility in the same model is good, however, interchangeability of the different models is not so good, especially at the ends of the distribution. Submicron powders having high refractive index show such a tendency remarkably. (2) the photo sedimentation method has some problems to be conquered, especially in measuring submicron powders having high refractive index or flaky shape particles. The reproducibility of X-ray sedimentation method is much better than that of photo sedimentation. (3) the light obscuration and electrical sensing zone methods, show good reproducibility, however, sometime bad interchangeability is affected by calibration and so on. (author)

  2. The performance of biological anaerobic filters packed with sludge-fly ash ceramic particles (SFCP) and commercial ceramic particles (CCP) during the restart period: effect of the C/N ratios and filter media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Qinyan; Han, Shuxin; Yue, Min; Gao, Baoyu; Li, Qian; Yu, Hui; Zhao, Yaqin; Qi, Yuanfeng

    2009-11-01

    Two lab-scale upflow biological anaerobic filters (BAF) packed with sludge-fly ash ceramic particles (SFCP) and commercial ceramic particles (CCP) were employed to investigate effects of the C/N ratios and filter media on the BAF performance during the restart period. The results indicated that BAF could be restarted normally after one-month cease. The C/N ratio of 4.0 was the thresholds of nitrate removal and nitrite accumulation. TN removal and phosphate uptake reached the maximum value at the same C/N ratio of 5.5. Ammonia formation was also found and excreted a negative influence on TN removal, especially when higher C/N ratios were applied. Nutrients were mainly degraded within the height of 25 cm from the bottom. In addition, SFCP, as novel filter media manufactured by wastes-dewatered sludge and fly ash, represented a better potential in inhibiting nitrite accumulation, TN removal and phosphate uptake due to their special characteristics in comparison with CCP.

  3. A self-setting particle-stabilized porous ceramic panel prepared from commercial cement and loaded with carbon for potential radar'absorbing applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang-Hoon Ha

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Porous ceramic materials are in a current research focus because of their outstanding thermal stability, chemical stability and lightweight. Recent research has widened the range of applications to radar absorption to utilize the advantages of porous ceramic materials. There has been long-standing interest in the development of lightweight radar-absorbing materials for military applications such as camouflaging ground-based facilities against airborne radar detection. Therefore, in this study, a novel lightweight radar-absorbing material for X-band frequencies was developed using a self-setting particle-stabilized porous ceramic panel composited with carbon. The panel was prepared using a commercial calcium aluminate cement (as a self-setting matrix, zeolite 13X particles with propyl gallate (as a particle-stabilized pore former and carbon (as a radar-absorbing material. The panel contained macropores approximately 200 to 400 µm in size formed by zeolite 13X particles that are irreversibly adsorbed at liquid-gas interfaces. The self-setting particle-stabilized porous ceramic panels were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, mercury porosimetry, physisorption analysis, capillary flow porosimetry and network analysis. When 0.2 wt.% carbon was added to a self-setting particle-stabilized porous ceramic panel to fabricate a composite 7 mm thick, the maximum reflection loss was −11.16 dB at 12.4 GHz. The effects of the amount of added carbon and the thickness variation of a self-setting particle-stabilized porous ceramic panel on the radar-absorbing properties remain important issues for further research.

  4. Sub-micrometer waveguide for nano-optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Dyndgaard, Morten Glarborg; Andersen, Karin Nordström

    2003-01-01

    With the recent progress within the field of processing nano structures, there is an increasing interest in coupling light into such structures both for characterization of optical properties and new optical components. In this work we propose the use of a sub-micrometer planar waveguide for prob......With the recent progress within the field of processing nano structures, there is an increasing interest in coupling light into such structures both for characterization of optical properties and new optical components. In this work we propose the use of a sub-micrometer planar waveguide...... for probing the reflection of light against a nano structure. The planar waveguide is based on a silicon nitride core layer, surrounded by a silica cladding region. In our design we utilize this waveguide to couple light into a nano-structure....

  5. Fabrication and properties of submicrometer structures of magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.I.; Velez, M.; Nogues, J.; Schuller, I.K.

    1998-01-01

    The method of electron beam lithography is described. This technique allows to fabricate well defined submicrometer structures of magnetic materials, that are suitable to show and study interesting physical properties by transport measurements either in Superconductivity or in Magnetism. In particular, using these structures, we have analyzed pinning effects of the vortex lattice in superconductors and magnetization reversal processes in magnetic materials. (Author) 15 refs

  6. Improvement in the Design of Metal-Ceramic High Voltage Feedthroughs for use in High Energy Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Weterings, W

    1999-01-01

    Large high-voltage devices operate in particle accelerators to steer charged particles in the desired direction. Solid and hollow rods of sintered alumina are used as insulating supports and high-voltage feedthroughs to power the electrodes of these electrostatic systems. The performance of the systems is often limited by voltage breakdown along the surface of the ceramic insulator (so-called surface flashover) or discharge between feedthrough and vacuum tank, which can lead to significant disruptions in terms of overall machine efficiency. Available results on the influence of the mechanical preparation, thermal history and particular cleaning techniques on commercially obtainable alumina samples have been studied in order to investigate possibilities for better preparation methodology of the insulating supports. Also the influence of the relative position of the feedthrough inside the vacuum tank on the high-voltage breakdown behaviour has been studied. This paper describes the theoretical and practical bac...

  7. Intake and subsequent fate of a ceramic particle containing 2. 85 microCi /sup 241/Am: a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, L R; Sullivan, P A; Laferriere, J; Cumming, E; Demis, D

    1983-04-01

    Intake of /sup 241/Am was reported in a young female technologist. External monitoring, whole body counting, urinalysis and fecal analysis were performed to determine the subsequent fate of the contaminant. Five days later, more than 99.5% of the radioactivity was voided in a fecal sample. A single particle, containing 2.85 microCi of /sup 241/AmO2 incorporated in a ceramic matrix, was isolated from the fecal sample. Brief descriptions of the radioanalytical results and dosimetry implications are presented. A shadow shield whole body counter was conveniently used to make an early estimate of the intake. This initial estimate enabled staff to decide that it was not necessary to artifically remove the contaminant. It was estimated that the lower large intestine was the organ which received the highest dose due to the passage of the ceramic particle. Systemic uptake of /sup 241/JAm was indicated by urinalysis. The fractional transfer of /sup 241/Am from the GI tract to the blood was estimated to be less than 6 X 10(-5). This maximum estimate is limited by the MDA of the analytical procedures used. The fractional transfer of the /sup 241/Am from the GI tract to blood in this case is about an order of magnitude less than recent ICRP recommendations for ''all compounds of americium''.

  8. Effect of kaolin particle size and loading on the characteristics of kaolin ceramic support prepared via phase inversion technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Khadijah Hubadillah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, low cost ceramic supports were prepared from kaolin via phase inversion technique with two kaolin particle sizes, which are 0.04–0.6 μm (denoted as type A and 10–15 μm (denoted as type B, at different kaolin contents ranging from 14 to 39 wt.%, sintered at 1200 °C. The effect of kaolin particle sizes as well as kaolin contents on membrane structure, pore size distribution, porosity, mechanical strength, surface roughness and gas permeation of the support were investigated. The support was prepared using kaolin type A induced asymmetric structure by combining macroporous voids and sponge-like structure in the support with pore size of 0.38 μm and 1.05 μm, respectively, and exhibited ideal porosity (27.7%, great mechanical strength (98.9 MPa and excellent gas permeation. Preliminary study shows that the kaolin ceramic support in this work is potential to gas separation application at lower cost.

  9. Research on sludge-fly ash ceramic particles (SFCP) for synthetic and municipal wastewater treatment in biological aerated filter (BAF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yaqin; Yue, Qinyan; Li, Renbo; Yue, Min; Han, Shuxin; Gao, Baoyu; Li, Qian; Yu, Hui

    2009-11-01

    Sludge-fly ash ceramic particles (SFCP) and clay ceramic particles (CCP) were employed in two lab-scale up-flow biological aerated filters (BAF) for wastewater treatment to investigate the availability of SFCP used as biofilm support compared with CCP. For synthetic wastewater, under the selected hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 1.5, 0.75 and 0.37 h, respectively, the removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand (COD(Cr)) and ammonium nitrogen (NH(4)(+)-N) in SFCP reactor were all higher than those of CCP reactor all through the media height. Moreover, better capabilities responding to loading shock and faster recovery after short intermittence were observed in the SFCP reactor compared with the CCP reactor. For municipal wastewater treatment, which was carried out under HRT of 0.75 h, air-liquid ratio of 7.5 and backwashing period of 48 h, the SFCP reactor also performed better than the CCP reactor, especially for the removal of NH(4)(+)-N.

  10. Dimensional measurements with submicrometer uncertainty in production environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, L.; Gudnason, M. M.; Madruga, D.

    2015-01-01

    The work concerns a laboratory investigation of a method to achieve dimensional measurements with submicrometer uncertainty under conditions that are typical of a production environment. The method involves the concurrent determination of dimensions and material properties from measurements carried...... gauge blocks along with their uncertainties were estimated directly from the measurements. The length of the two workpieces at the reference temperature of 20 °C was extrapolated from the measurements and compared to certificate values. The investigations have documented that the developed approach...

  11. Particle flow of ceramic breeder pebble beds in bi-axial compression experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermsmeyer, S.; Reimann, J.

    2002-01-01

    Pebble beds of ceramic material are investigated within the framework of developing solid breeder blankets for future fusion power plants. A thermo-mechanical characterisation of such pebble beds is mandatory for understanding the behaviour of pebble beds, and thus the overall blanket, under fusion environment conditions. The mechanical behaviour of pebble beds is typically explored with uni-axial, bi-axial and tri-axial compression experiments. The latter two types of experiment are particularly revealing since they contain explicitly, beyond a compression behaviour of the bed, information on the conditions for pebble flow, i.e. macroscopic relocation, in the pebble bed. (orig.)

  12. Characterization, optical properties and laser ablation behavior of epoxy resin coatings reinforced with high reflectivity ceramic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenzhi; Kong, Jing; Wu, Taotao; Gao, Lihong; Ma, Zhuang; Liu, Yanbo; Wang, Fuchi; Wei, Chenghua; Wang, Lijun

    2018-04-01

    Thermal damage induced by high power energy, especially high power laser, significantly affects the lifetime and performance of equipment. High-reflectance coating/film has attracted considerable attention due to its good performance in the damage protection. Preparing a high-reflectance coating with high reaction endothermal enthalpy will effectively consume a large amount of incident energy and in turn protect the substrate from thermal damage. In this study, a low temperature process was used to prepare coatings onto substrate with complex shape and avoid thermal effect during molding. An advanced high reflection ceramic powder, La1‑xSrxTiO3+δ , was added in the epoxy adhesive matrix to improve the reflectivity of coating. The optical properties and laser ablation behaviors of coatings with different ceramic additive ratio of La1‑xSrxTiO3+δ and modified epoxy-La1‑xSrxTiO3+δ with ammonium polyphosphate coatings were investigated, respectively. We found that the reflectivity of coatings is extremely high due to mixed high-reflection La1‑xSrxTiO3+δ particles, up to 96% at 1070 nm, which can significantly improve the laser resistance. In addition, the ammonium polyphosphate modifies the residual carbon structure of epoxy resin from discontinuous fine particles structure to continuous and porous structure, which greatly enhances the thermal-insulation property of coating. Furthermore, the laser ablation threshold is improved obviously, which is from 800 W cm‑2 to 1000 W cm‑2.

  13. Statistical analysis and parameterization of the hygroscopic growth of the sub-micrometer urban background aerosol in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Wu, Zhijun; Ma, Nan; Wu, Yusheng; Zeng, Limin; Zhao, Chunsheng; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    2018-02-01

    The take-up of water of aerosol particles plays an important role in heavy haze formation over North China Plain, since it is related with particle mass concentration, visibility degradation, and particle chemistry. In the present study, we investigated the size-resolved hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) of sub-micrometer aerosol particles (smaller than 350 nm) on a basis of 9-month Hygroscopicity-Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer measurement in the urban background atmosphere of Beijing. The mean hygroscopicity parameter (κ) values derived from averaging over the entire sampling period for particles of 50 nm, 75 nm, 100 nm, 150 nm, 250 nm, and 350 nm in diameters were 0.14 ± 0.07, 0.17 ± 0.05, 0.18 ± 0.06, 0.20 ± 0.07, 0.21 ± 0.09, and 0.23 ± 0.12, respectively, indicating the dominance of organics in the sub-micrometer urban aerosols. In the spring, summer, and autumn, the number fraction of hydrophilic particles increased with increasing particle size, resulting in an increasing trend of overall particle hygroscopicity with enhanced particle size. Differently, the overall mean κ values peaked in the range of 75-150 nm and decreased for particles larger than 150 nm in diameter during wintertime. Such size-dependency of κ in winter was related to the strong primary particle emissions from coal combustion during domestic heating period. The number fraction of hydrophobic particles such as freshly emitted soot decreased with increasing PM2.5 mass concentration, indicating aged and internal mixed particles were dominant in the severe particulate matter pollution. Parameterization schemes of the HGF as a function of relative humidity (RH) and particle size between 50 and 350 nm were determined for different seasons and pollution levels. The HGFs calculated from the parameterizations agree well with the measured HGFs at 20-90% RH. The parameterizations can be applied to determine the hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles at ambient conditions for the area

  14. Submicrometer aerosol in rural and urban backgrounds in southern Poland: primary and secondary components of PM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogula-Kozłowska, Wioletta; Klejnowski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Diurnal samples of PM(1) (submicrometer particles, having aerodynamic diameters not greater than 1 μm) were collected at an urban background site in Zabrze (from 01.08. to 31.12.2009) and a rural background site in Racibórz (from 01.08. to 31.12.2010). The samples were analyzed for carbon (organic and elemental), water soluble ions (Na(+), NH(4) (+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Cl(-), NO(3)(-), SO(4)(2-)) and concentrations of 21 elements by using, respectively, a Sunset Laboratory carbon analyzer, a Herisau Metrohm AG ion chromatograph, a PANalitycal Epsilon 5 spectrometer. To perform the monthly mass closure calculations for PM(1), the chemical components were categorized into organic matter (OM), elemental carbon (EC), secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA), crustal matter (CM), marine components (MC), other elements (OE) and unidentified matter (UM). The mass contributions of secondary (SOM) and primary (POM) organic matter to PM(1) were also estimated. In average, 50 % of PM(1) in Zabrze and 40 % in Racibórz were secondary aerosol coming from the transformations of its gaseous precursors. High concentrations and mass contributions of EC and OM to PM, and probable PM acidic nature in Zabrze, indicate particularly high hazard from the ambient submicrometer particles to the inhabitants of southern Poland.

  15. Improvement in retention of solid fission products in HTGR fuel particles by ceramic kernel additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerthmann, R.; Groos, E.; Gruebmeier, H.

    1975-08-01

    Increased requirements concerning the retention of long-lived solid fission products in fuel elements for use in advanced High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors led to the development of coated particles with improved fission product retention of the kernel, which represent an alternative to silicon carbide-coated fuel particles. Two irradiation experiments have shown that the release of strontium, barium, and caesium from pyrocarbon-coated particles can be reduced by orders of magnitude if the oxide kernel contains alumina-silica additives. It was detected by electron microprobe analysis that the improved retention of the mentioned fission products in the fuel kernel is caused by formation of the stable aluminosilicates SrAl 2 Si 2 O 8 , BaAl 2 Si 2 O 8 and CsAlSi 2 O 6 in the additional aluminasilica phase of the kernel. (orig.) [de

  16. Particle flow of ceramic breeder pebble beds in bi-axial compression experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermsmeyer, S.; Reimann, J.

    2002-01-01

    Pebble beds of Tritium breeding ceramic material are investigated within the framework of developing solid breeder blankets for future nuclear fusion power plants. For the thermo-mechanical characterisation of such pebble beds, bed compression experiments are the standard tools. New bi-axial compression experiments on 20 and 30 mm high pebble beds show pebble flow effects much more pronounced than in previous 10 mm beds. Owing to the greater bed height, conditions are reached where the bed fails in cross direction and unhindered flow of the pebbles occurs. The paper presents measurements for the orthosilicate and metatitanate breeder materials that are envisaged to be used in a solid breeder blanket. The data are compared with calculations made with a Drucker-Prager soil model within the finite-element code ABAQUS, calibrated with data from other experiments. It is investigated empirically whether internal bed friction angles can be determined from pebble beds of the considered heights, which would simplify, and broaden the data base for, the calibration of the Drucker-Prager pebble bed models

  17. Three-dimensional structure of brain tissue at submicrometer resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiga, Rino; Mizutani, Ryuta, E-mail: ryuta@tokai-u.jp [Department of Applied Biochemistry, Tokai University, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Inomoto, Chie; Takekoshi, Susumu; Nakamura, Naoya; Tsuboi, Akio; Osawa, Motoki [Tokai University School of Medicine, Isehara, Kanagawa 259-1193 (Japan); Arai, Makoto; Oshima, Kenichi; Itokawa, Masanari [Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Setagaya, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Uesugi, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Terada, Yasuko; Suzuki, Yoshio [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI/SPring-8), Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2016-01-28

    Biological objects are composed of submicrometer structures such as cells and organelles that are essential for their functions. Here, we report on three-dimensional X-ray visualization of cells and organelles at resolutions up to 100 nm by imaging microtomography (micro-CT) equipped with Fresnel zone plate optics. Human cerebral tissue, fruit fly cephalic ganglia, and Escherichia coli bacteria labeled with high atomic-number elements were embedded in epoxy resin and subjected to X-ray microtomography at the BL37XU and BL47XU beamlines of the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. The obtained results indicated that soft tissue structures can be visualized with the imaging microtomography.

  18. In situ ceramic layer growth on coated fuel particles dispersed in a zirconium metal matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrani, K. A.; Silva, C. M.; Kiggans, J. O.; Cai, Z.; Shin, D.; Snead, L. L.

    2013-06-01

    The extent and nature of the chemical interaction between the outermost coating layer of coated fuel particles embedded in zirconium metal during fabrication of metal matrix microencapsulated fuels were examined. Various particles with outermost coating layers of pyrocarbon, SiC, and ZrC have been investigated in this study. ZrC-Zr interaction was the least substantial, while the PyC-Zr reaction can be exploited to produce a ZrC layer at the interface in an in situ manner. The thickness of the ZrC layer in the latter case can be controlled by adjusting the time and temperature during processing. The kinetics of ZrC layer growth is significantly faster from what is predicted using literature carbon diffusivity data in ZrC. SiC-Zr interaction is more complex and results in formation of various chemical phases in a layered aggregate morphology at the interface.

  19. Improvement in retention of solid fission products in HTGR fuel particles by ceramic kernel additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerthmann, R.; Groos, E.; Gruebmeier, H.

    1975-08-15

    Increased requirements concerning the retention of long-lived solid fission products in fuel elements for use in advanced High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors led to the development of coated particles with improved fission product retention which represent an alternative to silicon carbide-coated fuel particles. Two irradiation experiments have shown that the release of strontium, barium, and caesium from pyrocarbon-coated particles can be reduced by orders of magnitude if the oxide kernel contains alumina-silica additives. It was detected by electron microprobe analysis that the improved retention of the mentioned fission products in the fuel kernel is caused by formation of the stable aluminosilicates SrAl2Si2O8, BaAl2Si2O8and CsAlSi2O6 in the additional alumina-silica phase of the kernel.

  20. Influence of thermophoresis on particle removal in a moving granular bed filter and heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudnick, S.N.; First, M.W.; Price, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Bench-scale investigations were made to determine the influence of thermophoresis on particle removal in a moving granular bed filter. A continuous flow of 2-mm diameter ceramic granules at ambient temperature entered the top of the filter and moved slowly downward under the influence of gravity countercurrent to the gas stream. At an inlet gas temperature of 240 0 C, gas mass velocity of 0.12 kg/(s.m 2 ), and granule velocities up to 0.015 cm/s, clean bed collection efficiency for a submicrometer sodium chloride aerosol was found to increase the more the gas was cooled, indicating that thermophoretic forces were playing a measurable role in particle collection

  1. [Comparison of in vivo characteristics of polyethylene wear particles produced by a metal and a ceramic femoral component in total knee replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veigl, D; Vavřík, P; Pokorný, D; Slouf, M; Pavlova, E; Landor, I

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate in vivo and compare, in terms of the quality and number of ultra high-molecular polyethylene (UHMWPE) wear particles, total knee replacements of identical construction differing only in the material used for femoral component production, i.e., CoCrMo alloy or ZrO2 ceramics. Samples of peri-prosthetic granuloma tissue were collected in two patients with total knee replacement suffering from implant migration, who were matched in relevant characteristics. The primary knee replacement in Patient 1 with a CoCrMo femoral component was done 7.2 years and in Patient 2 with a ZrO2 implant 6.8 years before this assessment. The polyethylene wear-induced granuloma was analysed by the MORF method enabling us to assess the shape and size of wear debris and the IRc method for assessment of particle concentration. In the granuloma tissue samples of Patient 1, on the average, particles were 0.30 mm in size and their relative volume was 0.19. In the Patient 2 tissue samples, the average size of particles was 0.33 mm and their relative volume was 0.26. There was no significant difference in either particle morphology or their concentration in the granuloma tissue between the two patients. One of the options of how to reduce the production of polyethylene wear particles is to improve the tribological properties of contacting surfaces in total knee replacement by substituting a cobalt-chrome femoral component with a zirconia ceramic femoral component. The previous in vitro testing carried out with a mechanical simulator under conditions approaching real weight-bearing in the human body did show a nearly three-fold decrease in the number of UHMWPE wear particles in zirconia components. The evaluation of granuloma tissue induced by the activity of a real prosthetic joint for nearly seven years, however, did not reveal any great difference in either quality or quantity of polyethylene debris between the two replacements. The difference of surface

  2. Preparation of UO_2 Fine Particle by Hydrolysis of Uranium(IV) Alkoxide

    OpenAIRE

    Satoh, Isamu; Takahashi, Mitsuyuki; Miura, Shigeyuki

    1997-01-01

    Fine particles of uranium(IV) dioxides were obtained by hydrolysis of uranium(IV) ethoxide which was synthesized by reacting uranium tetrachloride with sodium ethoxide. The monodispersed submicrometer particles were confirmed by SEM observation.

  3. Data Descriptor : Collocated observations of cloud condensation nuclei, particle size distributions, and chemical composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmale, Julia; Henning, Silvia; Henzing, Bas; Keskinen, Helmi; Sellegri, Karine; Ovadnevaite, Jurgita; Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Kalivitis, Nikos; Stavroulas, Iasonas; Jefferson, Anne; Park, Minsu; Schlag, Patrick; Kristensson, Adam; Iwamoto, Yoko; Pringle, Kirsty; Reddington, Carly; Aalto, Pasi; Äijälä, Mikko; Baltensperger, Urs; Bialek, Jakub; Birmili, Wolfram; Bukowiecki, Nicolas; Ehn, Mikael; Fjæraa, Ann Mari; Fiebig, Markus; Frank, Göran; Fröhlich, Roman; Frumau, Arnoud; Furuya, Masaki; Hammer, Emanuel; Heikkinen, Liine; Herrmann, Erik; Holzinger, Rupert; Hyono, Hiroyuki; Kanakidou, Maria; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Kinouchi, Kento; Kos, Gerard P A; Kulmala, Markku; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Motos, Ghislain; Nenes, Athanasios; O'Dowd, Colin; Paramonov, Mikhail; Petäjä, Tuukka; Picard, David; Poulain, Laurent; Prévôt, André Stephan Henry; Slowik, Jay; Sonntag, Andre; Swietlicki, Erik; Svenningsson, Birgitta; Tsurumaru, Hiroshi; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Wittbom, Cerina; Ogren, John A.; Matsuki, Atsushi; Yum, Seong Soo; Myhre, Cathrine Lund; Carslaw, Ken; Stratmann, Frank; Gysel, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentrations alongside with submicrometer particle number size distributions and particle chemical composition have been measured at atmospheric observatories of the Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research InfraStructure (ACTRIS) as well as other

  4. On the influence of particle morphology on the post-impact ballistic response of ceramic armour materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Amer; Appleby-Thomas, Gareth; Wood, David; Jaansalu, Kevin

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies have shown evidence that the ballistic-resistance of fragmented (comminuted) ceramics is independent of the original strength of the material. In particular, experimental investigations into the ballistic behaviour of such fragmented ceramics have indicated that this response is correlated to shattered ceramic morphology. This suggests that careful control of ceramic microstructure - and therefore failure paths - might provide a route to optimise post-impact ballistic performance, thereby enhancing multi-hit capability. In this study, building on previous in-house work, ballistic tests were conducted using pre-formed `fragmented-ceramic' analogues based around three morphologically differing (but chemically identical) alumina feedstock materials compacted into target `pucks. In an evolution of previous work, variation of target thickness provided additional insight into an apparent morphology-based contribution to ballistic response.

  5. High frequency nonlinear scattering from a micrometer to submicrometer sized lipid encapsulated contrast agent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goertz, David E.; Frijlink, Martijn E.; de Jong, N.; van der Steen, A.F.W.

    2006-01-01

    An experimental lipid encapsulated contrast agent comprised substantially of micrometer to submicrometer diameter bubbles was evaluated for its capacity to produce nonlinear scattering in response to high transmit frequencies. Agent characterization experiments were conducted at transmit frequencies

  6. Ultrasonic control of ceramic membrane fouling by particles: effect of ultrasonic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Weavers, Linda K; Walker, Harold W

    2006-07-01

    Ultrasound at 20 kHz was applied to a cross-flow ultrafiltration system with gamma-alumina membranes in the presence of colloidal silica particles to systematically investigate how ultrasonic factors affect membrane cleaning. Based on imaging of the ultrasonic cavitation region, optimal cleaning occurred when the membrane was outside but close to the cavitation region. Increasing the filtration pressure increased the compressive forces driving cavitation collapse and resulted in fewer cavitation bubbles absorbing and scattering sound waves and increasing sound wave penetration. However, an increased filtration pressure also resulted in greater permeation drag, and subsequently less improvement in permeate flux compared to low filtration pressure. Finally, pulsed ultrasound with short pulse intervals resulted in permeate flux improvement close to that of continuous sonication.

  7. Ceramic Electron Multiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comby, G.

    1996-01-01

    The Ceramic Electron Multipliers (CEM) is a compact, robust, linear and fast multi-channel electron multiplier. The Multi Layer Ceramic Technique (MLCT) allows to build metallic dynodes inside a compact ceramic block. The activation of the metallic dynodes enhances their secondary electron emission (SEE). The CEM can be used in multi-channel photomultipliers, multi-channel light intensifiers, ion detection, spectroscopy, analysis of time of flight events, particle detection or Cherenkov imaging detectors. (auth)

  8. On the Stability of c-BN-Reinforcing Particles in Ceramic Matrix Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Kathrin Wolfrum

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cubic boron nitride (c-BN composites produced at high pressures and temperatures are widely used as cutting tool materials. The advent of new, effective pressure-assisted densification methods, such as spark plasma sintering (SPS, has stimulated attempts to produce these composites at low pressures. Under low-pressure conditions, however, transformation of c-BN to the soft hexagonal BN (h-BN phase can occur, with a strong deterioration in hardness and wear. In the present work, the influence of secondary phases (B2O3, Si3N4, and oxide glasses on the transformation of c-BN was studied in the temperature range between 1100 °C and 1575 °C. The different heat treated c-BN particles and c-BN composites were analyzed by SEM, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. The transformation mechanism was found to be kinetically controlled solution–diffusion–precipitation. Given a sufficiently low liquid phase viscosity, the transformation could be observed at temperatures as low as 1200 °C for the c-BN–glass composites. In contrast, no transformation was found at temperatures up to 1575 °C when no liquid oxide phase is present in the composite. The results were compared with previous studies concerning the c-BN stability and the c-BN phase diagram.

  9. High-performance DC SQUIDs with submicrometer niobium Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Waal, V.J.; Klapwijk, T.M.; van den Hamer, P.

    1983-11-01

    We report on the fabrication and performance of low-noise, all-niobium, thin-film planar dc SQUIDs with submicrometer Josephson junctions. The junctions are evaporated obliquely through a metal shadow evaporation mask, which is made using optical lithography with 0.5 ..mu..m tolerance. The Josephson junction barrier is formed by evaporating a thin silicon film and with a subsequent oxidation in a glow discharge. The junction parameters can be reproduced within a factor of two. Typical critical currents of the SQUIDs are about 3 ..mu..A and the resistances are about 100 ..cap omega... With SQUIDs having an inductance of 1 nH the voltage modulation is a least 60 ..mu..V. An intrinsic energy resolution of 4 x 10/sup -32/ J/Hz has been reached. The SQUIDs are coupled to wire-wound input coils or with thin-film input coils. The thin-film input coil consists of a niobium spiral of 20 turns on a separate substrate. In both cases the coil is glued onto a 2-nH SQUID with a coupling efficiency of at least 0.5. Referred to the thin-film input coil, the best coupled energy resolution achieved is 1.2 x 10/sup -30/ J/Hz measured in a flux-locked loop at frequencies above 10 Hz. As far as we know, this is the best figure achieved with an all-refractory-metal thin-film SQUID. The fabrication technique used is suited for making circuits with SQUID and pickup coil on the same substrate. We describe a compact, planar, first-order gradiometer integrated with a SQUID on a single substrate. The gradient noise of this device is 3 x 10/sup -12/ Tm/sup -1/. The gradiometer has a size of 12 mm x 17 mm, is simple to fabricate, an is suitable for biomedical applications.

  10. High-performance dc SQUIDs with submicrometer niobium Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waal, V. J.; Klapwijk, T. M.; van den Hamer, P.

    1983-11-01

    We report on the fabrication and performance of low-noise, all-niobium, thin-film planar dc SQUIDs with submicrometer Josephson junctions. The junctions are evaporated obliquely through a metal shadow evaporation mask, which is made using optical lithography with 0.5 µm tolerance. The Josephson junction barrier is formed by evaporating a thin silicon film and with a subsequent oxidation in a glow discharge. The junction parameters can be reproduced within a factor of two. Typical critical currents of the SQUIDs are about 3 µA and the resistances are about 100 Ω. With SQUIDs having an inductance of 1 nH the voltage modulation is at least 60 µV. An intrinsic energy resolution of 4×10-32 J/Hz has been reached. The SQUIDs are coupled to wire-wound input coils or with thin-film input coils. The thin-film input coil consists of a niobium spiral of 20 turns on a separate substrate. In both cases the coil is glued onto a 2-nH SQUID with a coupling efficiency of at least 0.5. Referred to the thin-film input coil, the best coupled energy resolution achieved is 1.2×10-30 J/Hz measured in a flux-locked loop at frequencies above 10 Hz. As far as we know, this is the best figure achieved with an all-refractory-metal thin-film SQUID. The fabrication technique used is suited for making circuits with SQUID and pickup coil on the same substrate. We describe a compact, planar, first-order gradiometer integrated with a SQUID on a single substrate. The gradient noise of this device is 3×10-12 T m-1. The gradiometer has a size of 12 mm×17 mm, is simple to fabricate, and is suitable for biomedical applications.

  11. Ceramic nanostructures and methods of fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Morrell, Jonathan S [Knoxville, TN

    2009-11-24

    Structures and methods for the fabrication of ceramic nanostructures. Structures include metal particles, preferably comprising copper, disposed on a ceramic substrate. The structures are heated, preferably in the presence of microwaves, to a temperature that softens the metal particles and preferably forms a pool of molten ceramic under the softened metal particle. A nano-generator is created wherein ceramic material diffuses through the molten particle and forms ceramic nanostructures on a polar site of the metal particle. The nanostructures may comprise silica, alumina, titania, or compounds or mixtures thereof.

  12. On-tip sub-micrometer Hall probes for magnetic microscopy prepared by AFM lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregusova, D.; Martaus, J.; Fedor, J.; Kudela, R.; Kostic, I.; Cambel, V.

    2009-01-01

    We developed a technology of sub-micrometer Hall probes for future application in scanning hall probe microscopy (SHPM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM). First, the Hall probes of ∼9-μm dimensions are prepared on the top of high-aspect-ratio GaAs pyramids with an InGaP/AlGaAs/GaAs active layer using wet-chemical etching and non-planar lithography. Then we show that the active area of planar Hall probes can be downsized to sub-micrometer dimensions by local anodic oxidation technique using an atomic force microscope. Such planar probes are tested and their noise and magnetic field sensitivity are evaluated. Finally, the two technologies are combined to fabricate sub-micrometer Hall probes on the top of high-aspect ratio mesa for future SHPM and MFM techniques.

  13. A novel catalytic ceramic membrane fabricated with CuMn2O4 particles for emerging UV absorbers degradation from aqueous and membrane fouling elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yang; Song, Zilong; Xu, Bingbing; Li, Yanning; Qi, Fei; Croue, Jean-Philippe; Yuan, Donghai

    2018-02-15

    A novel catalytic ceramic membrane (CM) for improving ozonation and filtration performance was fabricated by surface coating CuMn 2 O 4 particles on a tubular CM. The degradation of ultraviolet (UV) absorbers, reduction of toxicity, elimination of membrane fouling and catalytic mechanism were investigated. The characterization results suggested the particles were well-fixed on membrane surface. The modified membrane showed improved benzophenone-3 removal performance (from 28% to 34%), detoxification (EC 50 as 12.77%) and the stability of catalytic activity. In the degradation performance of model UV absorbers, the developed membrane significantly decreased the UV254 and DOC values in effluent. Compared with a virgin CM, this CM ozonation increased water flux as 29.9% by in-situ degrade effluent organic matters. The CuMn 2 O 4 modified membrane enhanced the ozone self-decompose to generate O 2 - and initiated the chain reaction of ozone decomposition, and subsequently reacted with molecule ozone to produce OH. Additionally, CM was able to promote the interaction between ozone and catalyst/organic chemicals to form H 2 O 2 that promoted the formation of OH. This catalytic ceramic membrane combining with ozonation showed potential applications in emerging pollutant degradation and membrane fouling elimination, and acted as a novel ternary technology for wastewater treatment and water reuse. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  15. Fabrication of mullite-bonded porous SiC ceramics from multilayer-coated SiC particles through sol-gel and in-situ polymerization techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimpour, Omid

    In this work, mullite-bonded porous silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics were prepared via a reaction bonding technique with the assistance of a sol-gel technique or in-situ polymerization as well as a combination of these techniques. In a typical procedure, SiC particles were first coated by alumina using calcined powder and alumina sol via a sol-gel technique followed by drying and passing through a screen. Subsequently, they were coated with the desired amount of polyethylene via an in-situ polymerization technique in a slurry phase reactor using a Ziegler-Natta catalyst. Afterward, the coated powders were dried again and passed through a screen before being pressed into a rectangular mold to make a green body. During the heating process, the polyethylene was burnt out to form pores at a temperature of about 500°C. Increasing the temperature above 800°C led to the partial oxidation of SiC particles to silica. At higher temperatures (above 1400°C) derived silica reacted with alumina to form mullite, which bonds SiC particles together. The porous SiC specimens were characterized with various techniques. The first part of the project was devoted to investigating the oxidation of SiC particles using a Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) apparatus. The effects of particle size (micro and nano) and oxidation temperature (910°C--1010°C) as well as the initial mass of SiC particles in TGA on the oxidation behaviour of SiC powders were evaluated. To illustrate the oxidation rate of SiC in the packed bed state, a new kinetic model, which takes into account all of the diffusion steps (bulk, inter and intra particle diffusion) and surface oxidation rate, was proposed. Furthermore, the oxidation of SiC particles was analyzed by the X-ray Diffraction (XRD) technique. The effect of different alumina sources (calcined Al2O 3, alumina sol or a combination of the two) on the mechanical, physical, and crystalline structure of mullite-bonded porous SiC ceramics was studied in the

  16. Steady- and transient-state analysis of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel with randomly dispersed tristructural isotropic particles via two-temperature homogenized model-I: Theory and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yoon Hee; Cho, Bum Hee; Cho, Nam Zin

    2016-01-01

    As a type of accident-tolerant fuel, fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) fuel was proposed after the Fukushima accident in Japan. The FCM fuel consists of tristructural isotropic particles randomly dispersed in a silicon carbide (SiC) matrix. For a fuel element with such high heterogeneity, we have proposed a two-temperature homogenized model using the particle transport Monte Carlo method for the heat conduction problem. This model distinguishes between fuel-kernel and SiC matrix temperatures. Moreover, the obtained temperature profiles are more realistic than those of other models. In Part I of the paper, homogenized parameters for the FCM fuel in which tristructural isotropic particles are randomly dispersed in the fine lattice stochastic structure are obtained by (1) matching steady-state analytic solutions of the model with the results of particle transport Monte Carlo method for heat conduction problems, and (2) preserving total enthalpies in fuel kernels and SiC matrix. The homogenized parameters have two desirable properties: (1) they are insensitive to boundary conditions such as coolant bulk temperatures and thickness of cladding, and (2) they are independent of operating power density. By performing the Monte Carlo calculations with the temperature-dependent thermal properties of the constituent materials of the FCM fuel, temperature-dependent homogenized parameters are obtained

  17. Double-layer imprint lithography on wafers and foils from the submicrometer to the millimeter scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, P.F.; Yakimets, I.; Peter, M.; Meinders, E.R.; Huskens, J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a thermal imprint technique, double-layer nanoimprint lithography (dlNIL), is introduced, allowing complete filling of features in the dimensional range of submicrometer to millimeter. The imprinting and filling quality of dlNIL was studied on Si substrates as a model system and

  18. Injection molding of nanopatterned surfaces in the sub-micrometer range with induction heating aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menotti, Stefano; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Bissacco, Giuliano

    2014-01-01

    . A tool insert having a surface containing functional geometries in the sub-micrometer range was produced using aluminum anodization and nickel electroplating. In order to provide elevated mold temperatures necessary for the complete replica of the pattern, a new mold setup was developed, which allows...

  19. Synthesis and characterization of monoclinic KGd(WO4)2 particles for non-cubic transparent ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangaraju, D.; Durairajan, A.; Balaji, D.; Moorthy Babu, S.

    2013-02-01

    Monoclinic KGd(WO4)2 (KGW) particles were synthesized using polymeric metal complex sol-gel synthesis method. The derived particles were made as colloidal suspension form for better rotation of particles to have optimum response for applied magnetic field. The KGW fine particle suspension was prepared using electrostatic repulsion by electrolyte polymer. Prepared suspension was kept at 2 T and particles were settled using electrophoretic sedimentation using pH adjustment. The derived sediment was dried at 100 °C and the properties were characterized using XRD.

  20. Novel processing of bioglass ceramics from silicone resins containing micro- and nano-sized oxide particle fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocco, L; Bernardo, E; Colombo, P; Cacciotti, I; Bianco, A; Bellucci, D; Sola, A; Cannillo, V

    2014-08-01

    Highly porous scaffolds with composition similar to those of 45S5 and 58S bioglasses were successfully produced by an innovative processing method based on preceramic polymers containing micro- and nano-sized fillers. Silica from the decomposition of the silicone resins reacted with the oxides deriving from the fillers, yielding glass ceramic components after heating at 1000°C. Despite the limited mechanical strength, the obtained samples possessed suitable porous architecture and promising biocompatibility and bioactivity characteristics, as testified by preliminary in vitro tests. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. What every surgeon should know about Ceramic-on-Ceramic bearings in young patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hernigou, Philippe; Roubineau, Fran?ois; Bouthors, Charlie; Flouzat-Lachaniette, Charles-Henri

    2016-01-01

    Based on the exceptional tribological behaviour and on the relatively low biological activity of ceramic particles, Ceramic-on-Ceramic (CoC) total hip arthroplasty (THA) presents significant advantages CoC bearings decrease wear and osteolysis, the cumulative long-term risk of dislocation, muscle atrophy, and head-neck taper corrosion. However, there are still concerns regarding the best technique for implantation of ceramic hips to avoid fracture, squeaking, and revision of ceramic hips with...

  2. Elaboration of silicon carbides nano particles (SiC): from the powder synthesis to the sintered ceramic; Elaboration de ceramiques nanostructurees en carbure de silicium (SiC): de la synthese de poudre a la ceramique frittee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reau, A. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMA), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    Materials for the reactor cores of the fourth generation will need materials supporting high temperatures with fast neutrons flux. SiC{sub f}/SiC ceramics are proposed. One of the possible elaboration process is to fill SiC fiber piece with nano particles SiC powder and to strengthen by sintering. The aim of this thesis is to obtain a nano structured SiC ceramic as a reference for the SiC{sub f}/SiC composite development and to study the influence of the fabrication parameters. (A.L.B.)

  3. A nanonewton force facility to test Newton's law of gravity at micro- and submicrometer distances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesterov, Vladimir; Buetefisch, Sebastian; Koenders, Ludger

    2013-01-01

    An experiment to test Newton's law of gravity at micro- and submicrometer distances using a nanonewton force facility at PTB and modern microtechnologies is proposed. It is anticipated that the proposed method can advance the search for non-Newtonian gravity forces via an enhanced sensitivity of 10 3 to 10 4 in comparison to current experiments at the micrometer length scale. (copyright 2013 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Wonderland of ceramics superplasticity; Ceramics chososei no sekai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakai, F. [National Industrial Research Inst. of Nagoya, Nagoya (Japan)

    1995-07-01

    It has been ten years since it was found that ceramics, which is strong and hard at room temperatures and does not deform at all, may exhibit a superplasticity phenomenon at high temperatures that it endlessly elongates when pulled as if it were chewing gum. This phenomenon is one of peculiar behaviours which nano-crystal ceramics, pulverized to an extent that the crystalline particle size is on the order of nanometers, show. The application of superplasticity made the material engineers`s old dream come true that hard ceramics are arbitrarily deformed and machined like metal. Using as models materials such as silicone nitride, alumina and zirconia, this paper describes the history and deformation mechanism of ceramics superplasticity, material design aiming at superplasticization and application of ceramics superplasticity to the machining technology. Furthermore, it describes the trend and future development of international joint researches on the basic surveys on ceramics superplasticity. 25 refs., 11 figs.

  5. Laser melt injection of hard ceramic particles into Al and Ti alloys - processing, microstructure and mechanical behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, V; Nijman, S.; van Ingen, R; Oliveira, U; De Hosson, J Th M

    2003-01-01

    The conditions for a successful Laser Melt Injection (LMI) of SiC and WC particles into the melt pool of Al8Si and Ti6Al4V alloys were studied exptl. and theor. by FEM calcns. The laser employed is a high power Nd:YAG. The formation of a relatively thick aluminum oxide layer on the Al melt surface

  6. Laser melt injection of hard ceramic particles into Al and Ti alloys - processing, microstructure and mechanical behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, V.; Nijman, S.; van Ingen, R.; Oliveira, U.; de Hosson, J.T.M.; Brebbia, CA; DeHosson, JTM; Nishida, SI

    2003-01-01

    The conditions for a successful Laser Melt Injection (LMI) of SiC and WC particles into the melt pool of Al8Si and Ti6A14V alloys were studied experimentally and theoretically by FEM calculations. The laser employed is a high power Nd:YAG. The formation of a relatively thick aluminium oxide layer on

  7. Advanced Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The First Florida-Brazil Seminar on Materials and the Second State Meeting about new materials in Rio de Janeiro State show the specific technical contribution in advanced ceramic sector. The others main topics discussed for the development of the country are the advanced ceramic programs the market, the national technic-scientific capacitation, the advanced ceramic patents, etc. (C.G.C.) [pt

  8. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Shiu-Wing; Johnson, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  9. Fracture-dissociation of ceramic liner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sung Kwan; Oh, Jin-Rok; Her, Man Seung; Shim, Young Jun; Cho, Tae Yeun; Kwon, Sung Min

    2008-08-01

    The use of BIOLOX delta ceramic (CeramTec AG, Plochingen, Germany) has been increasing. This ceramic prevents cracking by restraining the phase transformation due to the insertion of nano-sized, yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia into the alumina matrix. This restrains the progress of cracking through the formation of platelet-like crystal or whiskers due to the addition of an oxide additive. We observed a case of BIOLOX delta ceramic liner (CeramTec AG) rim fracture 4 months postoperatively. Radiographs showed that the ceramic liner was subluxated from the acetabular cup. Scratches on the acetabular cup and femoral neck were seen, and the fracture was visible on the rim of the liner. Under electron microscope, metal particle coatings from the ceramic liner were identified. The ceramic liner, fracture fragments, and adjacent tissues were removed and replaced with a ceramic liner and femoral head of the same size and design. We believe the mechanism of the fracture-dissociation of the ceramic liner in this case is similar to a case of separation of the ceramic liner from the polyethylene shell in a sandwich-type ceramic-ceramic joint. To prevent ceramic liner fracture-dissociation, the diameter of the femoral neck needs to be decreased in a new design, while the diameter of the femoral head needs to be increased to ensure an increase in range of motion.

  10. Moisture Absorption Characteristics of Epoxy Based Adhesive Reinforced with CTBN and Ceramic Particles for Bonded-in Timber Connection: Fickian or Non-Fickian Behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Z; Ansell, M P; Smedley, D

    2011-01-01

    For in-situ bonding of pultruded rod into timber structural members, such as in the construction of bonded-in timber connection, strengthening and repair of timber structures, the adhesive used must be thixotropic, room temperature cure, environmentally stable and friendly and applied at without pressure. This study investigates the moisture absorption characteristics of three adhesives specially formulated for bonded-in timber connections where the adhesives are reinforced with nano- and micro-particles denoted as CB10TSS (standard adhesive), Albipox (CB10TSS/CTBN) and Timberset (ceramics filled adhesive) with the aim to improve mechanical properties and raise glass transition temperature. The effect of high temperatures and high humidity on the properties of adhesives were determined following conditioning at different temperatures (20 deg. C, 30 deg. C and 50 deg. C) and relative humidities (65%, 75% and 95%) and soaking in water at 20 deg. C In all cases the properties of Albipox were least affected by environment but Timberset exhibited the lowest moisture uptake. Exposure to humid environments at temperatures 20 deg. C and 30 deg. C for CB10TSS and Albipox and 50deg. C for Timberset resulted in water uptake characterized as Fickian which had only a modest effect on properties. However, exposure to humid environments at temperature (50 deg. C) which is higher than Tg resulted in non-Fickian uptake of water for CB10TSS and Albipox and a more adverse effect on properties.

  11. Application and advantages of novel clay ceramic particles (CCPs) in an up-flow anaerobic bio-filter (UAF) for wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei; Yue, Qinyan; Wu, Suqing; Zhao, Yaqin; Gao, Baoyu; Li, Qian; Wang, Yan

    2013-06-01

    Utilization of clay ceramic particles (CCPs) as the novel filter media employed in an up-flow anaerobic bio-filter (UAF) was investigated. After a series of tests and operations, CCPs have presented higher total porosity and roughness, meanwhile lower bulk and grain density. When CCPs were utilized as fillers, the reactor had a shorter start up period of 45 days comparing with conventional reactors, and removal rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD) still reached about 76% at a relatively lower temperature during the stable state. In addition, degradation of COD and ammonia nitrogen (NH4-N) at different media height along the reactor was evaluated, and the dates showed that the main reduction process happened within the first 30 cm media height from the bottom flange. Five phases were observed according to different organic loadings during the experiment period, and the results indicated that COD removal increased linearly when the organic loading was increased. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of nepheline syenite particle size on diametrical compression strength and reliability of extruded ceramic Raschig rings used in packed towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem, Amin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the effect of nepheline syenite particle size on physico-chemical properties of ceramic Raschig rings, the fluxing agent was grinded at different milling times. The compositions were prepared by blending the illitic-kaolinitic clay and pre-grinded particles. The rings were shaped by a laboratory extruder and then were sintered at 1200 ºC. The mechanical reliability of sintered specimens was mathematically described by Weibull theory and the effect of pre-grinding of fluxing agent on Weibull modulus was evaluated by measuring the diametrical compression strength. Weibull modulus and strength were the criteria for selecting the suitable particle size range of nepheline syenite. It was found that the pre-grinding of nepheline syenite acts as fairly strong parameter on microstructure of rings. The investigation concludes that reliable rings can be fabricated if the particle size of nepheline syenite is arranged between 53 and 75 μm. This enhancement in reliability is valuable in packed towers.Para conocer el efecto del tamaño de partícula de nefelina sienita sobre las propiedades fisicoquímicas de los anillos Raschig cerámicos, este fundente fue molido a diferentes tiempos. Las composiciones se prepararon mediante la mezcla de la arcilla caolinítica illitica y las partículas pre-molidas. Los anillos se obtuvieron en una extrusora de laboratorio y luego fueron sinterizados a 1200 ºC. La fiabilidad mecánica de las muestras sinterizadas se describe matemáticamente por la teoría de Weibull y el efecto de pre-molienda del fundente en el módulo de Weibull se evaluó midiendo la resistencia a la compresión diametral. El módulo de Weibull y la resistencia fueron los criterios para seleccionar el rango de tamaño de partícula adecuado de nefelina sienita para la fabricación de los anillos que se determinó estaba entre 53 y 75 μm comprobándose que influye considerablemente en la microestructura de los mismos. La

  13. Effect of Surface Forces on the Rheology of Particle-Liquid Systems and the Consolidation of Ceramic Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-31

    isxeduced by the addition of citric acid, a potential determining ion. The addition of potassium nitrate, an indifferent ion, did not affect the yield...Leong, T.W. Healy, D.V. Boger, "Surface Chemistry and Rheology of ZrO2 Suspensions Containing Polyacrylate : Effects of Molecular Weight and ZrO2...REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Fr 1 940131 ANNUAL REPORT 2/l/93-1/31/94 "EFFECT OF SURFACE FORCES ON THE RHEOLOGY OF PARTICLE-I LIQUID SYSTEMS AND THE

  14. Ceramic joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehman, R.E. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the relation between reactions at ceramic-metal interfaces and the development of strong interfacial bonds in ceramic joining. Studies on a number of systems are described, including silicon nitrides, aluminium nitrides, mullite, and aluminium oxides. Joints can be weakened by stresses such as thermal expansion mismatch. Ceramic joining is used in a variety of applications such as solid oxide fuel cells.

  15. A modified suspension spray combined with particle gradation method for preparation of protonic ceramic membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Kui; Wang, Songlin; Chen, Xiaorui; Jiang, Tao; Lin, Bin; Wei, Ming; Liu, Xingqin; Meng, Guangyao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Yan, Ruiqiang [Department of Materials Engineering, Taizhou University, Linhai, Zhejiang 317000 (China); Dong, Dehua [Department of Chemical Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2008-05-01

    In order to prepare a dense proton-conductive Ba(Zr{sub 0.1}Ce{sub 0.7})Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} (BZCY7) electrolyte membrane, a proper anode composition with 65% Ni{sub 2}O{sub 3} in weight ratio was determined after investigating the effects of anode compositions on anode shrinkages for co-sintering. The thermal expansion margins between sintered anodes and electrolytes, which were less than 1% below 750 C, also showed good thermal expansion compatibility. A suspension spray combined with particle gradation method had been introduced to prepare dense electrolyte membrane on porous anode support. After a heat treatment at 1400 C for 5 h, a cell with La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCO) cathode was assembled and tested with hydrogen and ammonia as fuels. The outputs reached as high as 330 mW cm{sup -2} in hydrogen and 300 mW cm{sup -2} in ammonia at 700 C, respectively. Comparing with the interface of another cell prepared by dry-pressing method, this one also showed a good interface contact between electrodes and electrolyte. To sum up, this combined technique can be considered as commercial fabrication technology candidate. (author)

  16. Sensitive Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Sensitive Ceramics is showing an interactive digital design tool for designing wall like composition with 3d ceramics. The experiment is working on two levels. One which has to do with designing compositions and patterns in a virtual 3d universe based on a digital dynamic system that responds on ...... with realizing the modules in ceramics by 3d printing directly in porcelain with a RapMan printer that coils up the 3d shape in layers. Finally the ceramic modules are mounted in a laser cut board that reflects the captured composition of the movement of the hands....

  17. Repair of Cranial Bone Defects Using rhBMP2 and Submicron Particle of Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Ceramics with Through-Hole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Chul Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently a submicron particle of biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic (BCP with through-hole (donut-shaped BCP (d-BCP was developed for improving the osteoconductivity. This study was performed to examine the usefulness of d-BCP for the delivery of osteoinductive rhBMP2 and the effectiveness on cranial bone regeneration. The d-BCP was soaked in rhBMP2 solution and then freeze-dried. Scanning electron microscope (SEM, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, and Raman spectroscopy analyses confirmed that rhBMP2 was well delivered onto the d-BCP surface and the through-hole. The bioactivity of the rhBMP2/d-BCP composite was validated in MC3T3-E1 cells as an in vitro model and in critical-sized cranial defects in C57BL/6 mice. When freeze-dried d-BCPs with rhBMP2 were placed in transwell inserts and suspended above MC3T3-E1, alkaline phosphatase activity and osteoblast-specific gene expression were increased compared to non-rhBMP2-containing d-BCPs. For evaluating in vivo effectiveness, freeze-dried d-BCPs with or without rhBMP2 were implanted into critical-sized cranial defects. Microcomputed tomography and histologic analysis showed that rhBMP2-containing d-BCPs significantly enhanced cranial bone regeneration compared to non-rhBMP2-containing control. These results suggest that a combination of d-BCP and rhBMP2 can accelerate bone regeneration, and this could be used to develop therapeutic strategies in hard tissue healing.

  18. Repair of Cranial Bone Defects Using rhBMP2 and Submicron Particle of Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Ceramics with Through-Hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Byung-Chul; Choi, Hyuck; Hur, Sung-Woong; Kim, Jung-Woo; Oh, Sin-Hye; Kim, Hyun-Seung; Song, Soo-Chang; Lee, Keun-Bae; Park, Kwang-Bum; Koh, Jeong-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Recently a submicron particle of biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic (BCP) with through-hole (donut-shaped BCP (d-BCP)) was developed for improving the osteoconductivity. This study was performed to examine the usefulness of d-BCP for the delivery of osteoinductive rhBMP2 and the effectiveness on cranial bone regeneration. The d-BCP was soaked in rhBMP2 solution and then freeze-dried. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and Raman spectroscopy analyses confirmed that rhBMP2 was well delivered onto the d-BCP surface and the through-hole. The bioactivity of the rhBMP2/d-BCP composite was validated in MC3T3-E1 cells as an in vitro model and in critical-sized cranial defects in C57BL/6 mice. When freeze-dried d-BCPs with rhBMP2 were placed in transwell inserts and suspended above MC3T3-E1, alkaline phosphatase activity and osteoblast-specific gene expression were increased compared to non-rhBMP2-containing d-BCPs. For evaluating in vivo effectiveness, freeze-dried d-BCPs with or without rhBMP2 were implanted into critical-sized cranial defects. Microcomputed tomography and histologic analysis showed that rhBMP2-containing d-BCPs significantly enhanced cranial bone regeneration compared to non-rhBMP2-containing control. These results suggest that a combination of d-BCP and rhBMP2 can accelerate bone regeneration, and this could be used to develop therapeutic strategies in hard tissue healing.

  19. A new classification system for all-ceramic and ceramic-like restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracis, Stefano; Thompson, Van P; Ferencz, Jonathan L; Silva, Nelson R F A; Bonfante, Estevam A

    2015-01-01

    Classification systems for all-ceramic materials are useful for communication and educational purposes and warrant continuous revisions and updates to incorporate new materials. This article proposes a classification system for ceramic and ceramic-like restorative materials in an attempt to systematize and include a new class of materials. This new classification system categorizes ceramic restorative materials into three families: (1) glass-matrix ceramics, (2) polycrystalline ceramics, and (3) resin-matrix ceramics. Subfamilies are described in each group along with their composition, allowing for newly developed materials to be placed into the already existing main families. The criteria used to differentiate ceramic materials are based on the phase or phases present in their chemical composition. Thus, an all-ceramic material is classified according to whether a glass-matrix phase is present (glass-matrix ceramics) or absent (polycrystalline ceramics) or whether the material contains an organic matrix highly filled with ceramic particles (resin-matrix ceramics). Also presented are the manufacturers' clinical indications for the different materials and an overview of the different fabrication methods and whether they are used as framework materials or monolithic solutions. Current developments in ceramic materials not yet available to the dental market are discussed.

  20. Nano-scale measurement of sub-micrometer MEMS in-plane dynamics using synchronized illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnat, S; Forbrigger, C; Kujath, M; Hubbard, T

    2015-01-01

    A method for measuring the sub-micrometer in-plane dynamics of MEMS devices with nano-scale precision using a CCD camera and synchronized pulsating illumination is presented. Typical MEMS actuators have fast responses (generally in the 1–200 kHz range), much faster than typical cameras which record a time averaged motion. Under constant illumination the average displacement is steady state and independent of dynamic amplitude or phase. Methods such as strobe illumination use short light pulses to freeze the motion. This paper develops the use of longer pulses of illumination that do not freeze the image, but make the average displacement depend on dynamic amplitude and phase; thus allowing both properties to be extracted. The expected signal is derived as a function of light pulse width and delay, and short versus longer pulses are compared. Measurements using a conventional microscope with replacement of the lamp with LEDs confirmed the derived equations. The system was used to measure sub-micrometer motion of MEMS actuators with ∼5 nm precision. The time constant of a thermal actuator was measured and found to be 48 µs. A resonant peak of a MEMS device was measured at 123.30 kHz with an amplitude of 238 nm. (paper)

  1. [Ceramic posts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie; Legros, Caroline; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    As a result of ceramics and all-ceram technologies development esthetic inlay core and abutments flooded the market. Their tooth-colored appearance enhances restoration biomimetism principally on the marginal gingiva area. This article reviews indications and types of cores designed for natural teeth and implants.

  2. Ceramic drug-delivery devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasserre, A; Bajpai, P K

    1998-01-01

    A variety of ceramics and delivery systems have been used to deliver chemicals, biologicals, and drugs at various rates for desired periods of time from different sites of implantation. In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that ceramics can successfully be used as drug-delivery devices. Matrices, inserts, reservoirs, cements, and particles have been used to deliver a large variety of therapeutic agents such as antibiotics, anticancer drugs, anticoagulants, analgesics, growth factors, hormones, steroids, and vaccines. In this article, the advantages and disadvantages of conventional drug-delivery systems and the different approaches used to deliver chemical and biological agents by means of ceramic systems will be reviewed.

  3. Study and evaluation of atmospheric pollution in Spain: necessary measures arising from the EC Directive on PM10 and PM2.5 particles in the Ceramic industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez, S.

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available The European Commission Directive, 1999/30/EC, approved on the 22nd of April 1999, on atmospheric particles establishes a standard that is more stringent than the current one. This Directive proposes the monitoring of particles lower than 10 μm (PM10, thoracic particles based on health impact criteria. The proposed EC limits are 40 μgPM10.m-3 and 20 μgPM10.m-3 as annual means in 2005 and 2010, respectively. In accordance with the European Commission (EC, the future PM10 limits will be revised in 2003 if the European States can demonstrate that the exceedances of the new limits are attributed to natural inputs. The exceedances due to natural inputs are more frequent in Mediterranean countries due to the re-suspension of natural soil particles and to the higher frequency of Saharan air mass intrusions. This study summarises the preliminary results obtained from two research projects in Spain focused on: 1 establishing the criteria for the discrimination of natural/anthropogenic inputs of PM10; 2 identifying the events when the proposed limits are exceeded by natural inputs and 3 determining the most suitable monitoring parameter, PM10 or PM2.5, in order to avoid natural interference. Given the importance of the ceramic industry in Castelló, special attention will be placed on the preliminary results obtained this area.La Directiva de la comisión Europea, 1999/30/CE, aprobada el 22 de Abril de 1999, referida a partículas atmosféricas en suspensión, establece una normativa más estricta que la vigente. Esta normativa propone el control de las partículas inferiores a 10 μm (PM10, partículas torácicas basándose en criterios de impacto en la salud. Según esta directiva no se podrán superar medias diarias anuales de 40 μgPM10.m-3 en el 2005 y de 20 μgPM10.m-3 en el 2010. La directiva contempla la revisión de los límites normativos y de los parámetros de control en el 2003, pudiendo variar estos en el caso de que los Estados miembros

  4. Oxide ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryshkewitch, E.; Richerson, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    The book explores single-phase ceramic oxide systems from the standpoint of physical chemistry and technology. This second edition also focuses on advances in technology since publication of the original edition. These include improvements in raw materials and forming and sintering techniques, and the major role that oxide ceramics have had in development of advanced products and processes. The text is divided into five major sections: general fundamentals of oxide ceramics, advances in aluminum oxide technology, advances in zirconia technology, and advances in beryllium oxide technology

  5. Monodisperse, submicrometer-scale platinum colloidal spheres with high electrocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lixue; Wang, Liang; Guo, Shaojun; Zhai, Junfeng; Dong, Shaojun; Wang, Erkang [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 130022 Jilin, Changchun (China)

    2009-02-15

    Monodisperse, submicrometer-scale platinum (Pt) colloidal spheres were prepared through a simple direct chemical reduction of p-phenylenediamine (PPD)-chloroplatinic acid (H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}) coordination polymer colloids. It was found that the prepared Pt colloids had the similar size and morphology with their coordination polymer precursors, and the prepared Pt colloids with rough surfaces were three-dimensional (3D) structured assemblies of high-density small Pt nanoparticles. The electrochemical experiments confirmed that the prepared Pt colloids possessed a high electrocatalytic activity towards mainly four-electron reduction of dioxygen to water, making the prepared Pt colloids potential candidates for the efficient cathode material in fuel cells. (author)

  6. Narrow thermal hysteresis of NiTi shape memory alloy thin films with submicrometer thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Huilong; Hamilton, Reginald F., E-mail: rfhamilton@psu.edu; Horn, Mark W. [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) thin films were fabricated using biased target ion beam deposition (BTIBD), which is a new technique for fabricating submicrometer-thick SMA thin films, and the capacity to exhibit shape memory behavior was investigated. The thermally induced shape memory effect (SME) was studied using the wafer curvature method to report the stress-temperature response. The films exhibited the SME in a temperature range above room temperature and a narrow thermal hysteresis with respect to previous reports. To confirm the underlying phase transformation, in situ x-ray diffraction was carried out in the corresponding phase transformation temperature range. The B2 to R-phase martensitic transformation occurs, and the R-phase transformation is stable with respect to the expected conversion to the B19′ martensite phase. The narrow hysteresis and stable R-phase are rationalized in terms of the unique properties of the BTIBD technique.

  7. Improved External Base Resistance Extraction for Submicrometer InP/InGaAs DHBT Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Krozer, Viktor; Nodjiadjim, Virginie

    2011-01-01

    An improved direct parameter extraction method is proposed for III–V heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) external base resistance $R_{\\rm bx}$ extraction from forward active $S$-parameters. The method is formulated taking into account the current dependence of the intrinsic base–collector cap......An improved direct parameter extraction method is proposed for III–V heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) external base resistance $R_{\\rm bx}$ extraction from forward active $S$-parameters. The method is formulated taking into account the current dependence of the intrinsic base...... factor given as the ratio of the emitter to the collector area. The determination of the parameters $I_{p}$ and $X_{0}$ from experimental $S$-parameters is described. The method is applied to high-speed submicrometer InP/InGaAs DHBT devices and leads to small-signal equivalent circuit models, which...

  8. Characterization techniques to predict mechanical behaviour of green ceramic bodies fabricated by ceramic microstereolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adake, Chandrashekhar V.; Bhargava, Parag; Gandhi, Prasanna

    2018-02-01

    Ceramic microstereolithography (CMSL) has emerged as solid free form (SFF) fabrication technology in which complex ceramic parts are fabricated from ceramic suspensions which are formulated by dispersing ceramic particles in UV curable resins. Ceramic parts are fabricated by exposing ceramic suspension to computer controlled UV light which polymerizes resin to polymer and this polymer forms rigid network around ceramic particles. A 3-dimensional part is created by piling cured layers one over the other. These ceramic parts are used to build microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices after thermal treatment. In many cases green ceramic parts can be directly utilized to build MEMS devices. Hence characterization of these parts is essential in terms of their mechanical behaviour prior to their use in MEMS devices. Mechanical behaviour of these green ceramic parts depends on cross link density which in turn depends on chemical structure of monomer, concentrations of photoinitiator and UV energy dose. Mechanical behaviour can be determined with the aid of nanoindentation. And extent of crosslinking can be verified with the aid of DSC. FTIR characterization is used to analyse (-C=C-) double bond conversion. This paper explains characterization tools to predict the mechanical behaviour of green ceramic bodies fabricated in CMSL

  9. Steady- and transient-state analysis of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel with randomly dispersed tristructural isotropic particles via two-temperature homogenized model-II: Applications by coupling with COREDAX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yoon Hee; Cho, Bum Hee; Cho, Nam Zin

    2016-01-01

    In Part I of this paper, the two-temperature homogenized model for the fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel, in which tristructural isotropic particles are randomly dispersed in a fine lattice stochastic structure, was discussed. In this model, the fuel-kernel and silicon carbide matrix temperatures are distinguished. Moreover, the obtained temperature profiles are more realistic than those obtained using other models. Using the temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of uranium nitride and the silicon carbide matrix, temperature-dependent homogenized parameters were obtained. In Part II of the paper, coupled with the COREDAX code, a reactor core loaded by fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel in which tristructural isotropic particles are randomly dispersed in the fine lattice stochastic structure is analyzed via a two-temperature homogenized model at steady and transient states. The results are compared with those from harmonic- and volumetric-average thermal conductivity models; i.e., we compare keff eigenvalues, power distributions, and temperature profiles in the hottest single channel at a steady state. At transient states, we compare total power, average energy deposition, and maximum temperatures in the hottest single channel obtained by the different thermal analysis models. The different thermal analysis models and the availability of fuel-kernel temperatures in the two-temperature homogenized model for Doppler temperature feedback lead to significant differences

  10. Current all-ceramic systems in dentistry: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maria Jacinta M C; Costa, Max Dorea; Rubo, José H; Pegoraro, Luis Fernando; Santos, Gildo C

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the ceramic systems and processing techniques available today in dentistry. It aims to help clinicians understand the advantages and disadvantages of a myriad of ceramic materials and technique options. The microstructural components, materials' properties, indications, and names of products are discussed to help clarify their use. Key topics will include ceramics, particle-filled glasses, polycrystalline ceramics, CAD/CAM, and adhesive cementation.

  11. What every surgeon should know about Ceramic-on-Ceramic bearings in young patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernigou, Philippe; Roubineau, François; Bouthors, Charlie; Flouzat-Lachaniette, Charles-Henri

    2016-04-01

    Based on the exceptional tribological behaviour and on the relatively low biological activity of ceramic particles, Ceramic-on-Ceramic (CoC) total hip arthroplasty (THA) presents significant advantagesCoC bearings decrease wear and osteolysis, the cumulative long-term risk of dislocation, muscle atrophy, and head-neck taper corrosion.However, there are still concerns regarding the best technique for implantation of ceramic hips to avoid fracture, squeaking, and revision of ceramic hips with fracture of a component.We recommend that surgeons weigh the potential advantages and disadvantages of current CoC THA in comparison with other bearing surfaces when considering young very active patients who are candidates for THA. Cite this article: Hernigou P, Roubineau F, Bouthors C, Flouzat-Lachaniette C-H. What every surgeon should know about Ceramic-on-Ceramic bearings in young patients. EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:107-111. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000027.

  12. Hygroscopicity of the submicrometer aerosol at the high-alpine site Jungfraujoch, 3580 m a.s.l., Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sjogren

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Data from measurements of hygroscopic growth of submicrometer aerosol with a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA during four campaigns at the high alpine research station Jungfraujoch, Switzerland, are presented. The campaigns took place during the years 2000, 2002, 2004 and 2005, each lasting approximately one month. Hygroscopic growth factors (GF, i.e. the relative change in particle diameter from dry diameter, D0, to diameter measured at higher relative humidity, RH are presented for three distinct air mass types, namely for: 1 free tropospheric winter conditions, 2 planetary boundary layer influenced air masses (during a summer period and 3 Saharan dust events (SDE. The GF values at 85% RH (D0=100 nm were 1.40±0.11 and 1.29±0.08 for the first two situations while for SDE a bimodal GF distribution was often found. No phase changes were observed when the RH was varied between 10–90%, and the continuous water uptake could be well described with a single-parameter empirical model. The frequency distributions of the average hygroscopic growth factors and the width of the retrieved growth factor distributions (indicating whether the aerosol is internally or externally mixed are presented, which can be used for modeling purposes.

    Measurements of size resolved chemical composition were performed with an aerosol mass spectrometer in parallel to the GF measurements. This made it possible to estimate the apparent ensemble mean GF of the organics (GForg using inverse ZSR (Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson modeling. GForg was found to be ~1.20 at aw=0.85, which is at the upper end of previous laboratory and field data though still in agreement with the highly aged and oxidized nature of the Jungfraujoch aerosol.

  13. CVI-R gas phase processing of porous, biomorphic SiC-ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieber, H.; Vogli, E.; Mueller, F.; Greil, P. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (DE). Dept. of Materials Science (III) Glass and Ceramics; Popovska, N.; Gerhard, H. [Univ. of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Dept. of Industrial Chemistry I, Erlangen (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Natural pine wood was converted into biomorphic SiC-ceramics by CVI-R processing (chemical vapour infiltration - reaction). The wood samples were first pyrolyzed in inert atmosphere at temperatures of 800 C to yield biocarbon-derived template structures. Subsequently, the biocarbon preforms were infiltrated with silicon by isothermal CVI processing with MTS (methyltrichlorosilane) in excess of hydrogen at temperatures between 800 and 850 C, then converted into SiC-ceramic by annealing in inert atmosphere at temperatures between 1200-1600 C. During processing, the inherent open porous structure of the pine wood is retained down to the submicrometer level, yielding a highly porous SiC-ceramic with a unique microcellular morphology. (orig.)

  14. Influência da distribuição granulométrica na estabilidade dimensional de placas cerâmicas de base vermelha Influence of particle size distribution on the dimensional stability of red ceramic tiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. A. Prado

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available As propriedades do revestimento cerâmico queimado estão intrinsecamente ligadas às características da massa, dentre estas se encontram o tamanho, a distribuição, o formato e o arranjo das partículas. O efeito da distribuição granulométrica de partículas sobre a estabilidade dimensional de placas cerâmicas para revestimentos de base vermelha foi estudado em três massas, todas continham no mínimo 57% de material advindo da Formação Corumbataí. Foram estudadas duas distribuições granulométricas - uma parecida com aquelas usadas no Pólo Cerâmico de Santa Gertrudes e, outra, com uma massa de grés. De uma maneira geral, granulações mais grossas, semelhantes à massa de Santa Gertrudes, variaram menos dimensionalmente quando as placas apresentaram médias e altas porosidades (absorção de água entre 3,0 e 10,0%. Já, granulações mais finas, similares a massas de grés, foram necessárias para a produção de placas de baixa absorção (menor que 3,0%.The properties of final ceramic tiles are related with the mass characteristics, among them the size, shape, distribution and arrange of particles. The effect of particle size distribution on dimensional stability of red ceramic tiles was studied in three masses; all of them composed with, at minimum, 57% of Corumbataí Formation's materials. Two particle size distributions were investigated: the first was similar to the masses that are used in the Santa Gertrudes Ceramic Pole's factories and the other was similar to the stoneware mass. In general, masses with larger particle sizes, similar to that of Santa Gertrudes, had greater dimensional stability in the products with 3 to 10% of water absorption. On the other hand, in the manufacture of low porosity tiles (water absorption capacity < 3% it is recommended the use of smaller grain size.

  15. Ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , BeO, Si 3 N 4 and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying responses to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today that will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications. (author)

  16. Ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle, and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , BeO, Si 3 N 4 and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying response to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today which will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications

  17. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  18. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  19. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  20. Steady- and Transient-State Analyses of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel with Randomly Dispersed Tristructural Isotropic Particles via Two-Temperature Homogenized Model—I: Theory and Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoonhee Lee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As a type of accident-tolerant fuel, fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM fuel was proposed after the Fukushima accident in Japan. The FCM fuel consists of tristructural isotropic particles randomly dispersed in a silicon carbide (SiC matrix. For a fuel element with such high heterogeneity, we have proposed a two-temperature homogenized model using the particle transport Monte Carlo method for the heat conduction problem. This model distinguishes between fuel-kernel and SiC matrix temperatures. Moreover, the obtained temperature profiles are more realistic than those of other models. In Part I of the paper, homogenized parameters for the FCM fuel in which tristructural isotropic particles are randomly dispersed in the fine lattice stochastic structure are obtained by (1 matching steady-state analytic solutions of the model with the results of particle transport Monte Carlo method for heat conduction problems, and (2 preserving total enthalpies in fuel kernels and SiC matrix. The homogenized parameters have two desirable properties: (1 they are insensitive to boundary conditions such as coolant bulk temperatures and thickness of cladding, and (2 they are independent of operating power density. By performing the Monte Carlo calculations with the temperature-dependent thermal properties of the constituent materials of the FCM fuel, temperature-dependent homogenized parameters are obtained.

  1. Multimodal sensing and imaging technology by integrated scanning electron, force, and nearfield microwave microscopy and its application to submicrometer studies

    OpenAIRE

    Hänßler, Olaf C.

    2018-01-01

    The work covers a multimodal microscope technology for the analysis, manipulation and transfer of materials and objects in the submicrometer range. An atomic force microscope (AFM) allows imaging of the surface topography and a Scanning Microwave Microscope (SMM) detects electromagnetic properties, both operating in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The described technology demonstrator allows to observe the region-of-interest live with the SEM, while at the same time a characterization w...

  2. Ceramics as nuclear reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeve, K.D.

    1975-01-01

    Ceramics are widely accepted as nuclear reactor fuel materials, for both metal clad ceramic and all-ceramic fuel designs. Metal clad UO 2 is used commercially in large tonnages in five different power reactor designs. UO 2 pellets are made by familiar ceramic techniques but in a reactor they undergo complex thermal and chemical changes which must be thoroughly understood. Metal clad uranium-plutonium dioxide is used in present day fast breeder reactors, but may eventually be replaced by uranium-plutonium carbide or nitride. All-ceramic fuels, which are necessary for reactors operating above about 750 0 C, must incorporate one or more fission product retentive ceramic coatings. BeO-coated BeO matrix dispersion fuels and silicate glaze coated UO 2 -SiO 2 have been studied for specialised applications, but the only commercial high temperature fuel is based on graphite in which small fuel particles, each coated with vapour deposited carbon and silicon carbide, are dispersed. Ceramists have much to contribute to many aspects of fuel science and technology. (author)

  3. Fabrication of transparent ceramics using nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepy, Nerine J; Tillotson, Thomas M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Payne, Stephen A

    2012-09-18

    A method of fabrication of a transparent ceramic using nanoparticles synthesized via organic acid complexation-combustion includes providing metal salts, dissolving said metal salts to produce an aqueous salt solution, adding an organic chelating agent to produce a complexed-metal sol, heating said complexed-metal sol to produce a gel, drying said gel to produce a powder, combusting said powder to produce nano-particles, calcining said nano-particles to produce oxide nano-particles, forming said oxide nano-particles into a green body, and sintering said green body to produce the transparent ceramic.

  4. Ceramic Seal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smartt, Heidi A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Romero, Juan A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Custer, Joyce Olsen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hymel, Ross W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Krementz, Dan [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gobin, Derek [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Harpring, Larry [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Varble, Don [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DiMaio, Jeff [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States); Hudson, Stephen [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  5. Ceramic Seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smartt, Heidi A.; Romero, Juan A.; Custer, Joyce Olsen; Hymel, Ross W.; Krementz, Dan; Gobin, Derek; Harpring, Larry; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael; Varble, Don; DiMaio, Jeff; Hudson, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  6. Distribution analysis of thermal effusivity for sub-micrometer YBCO thin films using thermal microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, T.; Taketoshi, N.; Kato, H.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal effusivity measurements have been carried out for sub-micrometer YBCO superconducting films using thermal microscope based upon thermoreflectance technique. Two samples were prepared: c-axis aligned YBCO thin films with 800 nm in thickness synthesized on MgO and SrTiO 3 substrates. Measured thermal effusivities perpendicular to the surface, i.e. in parallel with c-axis were determined to be 1770 J/m 2 s 0.5 K on MgO substrate and 1420 J/m 2 s 0.5 K for that on SrTiO 3 substrate, respectively. The scatter of the measurements is estimated to be lower than ±5.2%. These values are consistent with reported values of YBCO single crystal in the direction of c-axis. In addition, 2D profiling image, that is, in-plane distribution of thermal effusivity was well obtained for the YBCO film on MgO substrate by operating this thermal microscope in a scanning mode. Its standard deviation of the in-plane thermal effusivity scattering due to the non-uniformity is evaluated to be ±5.7%

  7. Characterization and evaluation of ceramic properties of clay used in structural ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, A.S.; Oliveira, J.N.; Della-Sagrillo, V.P.; Valenzuela-Diaz, F.R.

    2014-01-01

    The clay used in the manufacture of structural ceramic products must meet quality requirements that are influenced by their chemical, physical, mineralogical and microstructural characteristics, which control the ceramic properties of the final products. This paper aims to characterize the clay used in the manufacture of ceramic roof tiles and bricks. The clay was characterized through XRF, XRD, thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis, Atterberg limits and particle size distribution. Specimens were shaped, dried at 110°C, and burned at 900 deg C in an industrial kiln. After that, they were submitted to tests of water absorption, apparent porosity, bulk density and flexural strength. The results show that the chemical composition of clay has significant amount of silica and alumina and adequate levels of kaolinite for use in structural ceramic. The ceramic properties evaluated in the specimens partially meet the requirements of the Brazilian standard-clays for structural ceramics. (author)

  8. Industrial ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mengelle, Ch.

    1999-04-01

    After having given the definition of the term 'ceramics', the author describes the different manufacturing processes of these compounds. These materials are particularly used in the fields of 1)petroleum industry (in primary and secondary reforming units, in carbon black reactors and ethylene furnaces). 2)nuclear industry (for instance UO 2 and PuO 2 as fuels; SiC for encapsulation; boron carbides for control systems..)

  9. Hemorrhagic iliopsoas bursitis complicating well-functioning ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung Soon; Diwanji, Sanket R; Kim, Hyung Keun; Song, Eun Kyoo; Yoon, Taek Rim

    2009-08-01

    Iliopsoas bursitis has been increasingly recognized as a complication of total hip arthroplasty and is usually associated with polyethylene wear. Here, the authors report a case of hemorrhagic iliopsoas bursitis complicating an otherwise well-functioning ceramic-on-ceramic arthroplasty performed by minimal invasive modified 2-incision technique. The bursitis in turn resulted in femoral nerve palsy and femoral vein compression. In this report, there was no evidence to support that the bursitis was due to an inflammatory response to ceramic wear particles or any other wear particles originating from the total hip arthroplasty.

  10. Deposition and consolidation of porous ceramic films for membrane separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmøe, Tobias Dokkedal; Tricoli, Antonio; Johannessen, Tue

    The deposition of porous ceramic films for membrane separation can be done by several processes such as thermophoresis [1], dip-coating [2] and spray pyrolysis [3]. Here we present a high-speed method, in which ceramic nano-particles form a porous film by filtration on top of a porous ceramic...... substrate [4]. Ceramic nano-particles are generated in a flame, using either a premixed (gas) flame, in which a metal-oxide precursor is evaporated in an N2 stream, which is combusted with methane and air, or using a flame spray pyrolysis, in which a liquid metal-oxide precursor is sprayed through a nozzle...

  11. Shock compression profiles in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, D.E.; Moody, R.L.

    1996-03-01

    An investigation of the shock compression properties of high-strength ceramics has been performed using controlled planar impact techniques. In a typical experimental configuration, a ceramic target disc is held stationary, and it is struck by plates of either a similar ceramic or by plates of a well-characterized metal. All tests were performed using either a single-stage propellant gun or a two-stage light-gas gun. Particle velocity histories were measured with laser velocity interferometry (VISAR) at the interface between the back of the target ceramic and a calibrated VISAR window material. Peak impact stresses achieved in these experiments range from about 3 to 70 GPa. Ceramics tested under shock impact loading include: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, AlN, B{sub 4}C, SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, TiB{sub 2}, WC and ZrO{sub 2}. This report compiles the VISAR wave profiles and experimental impact parameters within a database-useful for response model development, computational model validation studies, and independent assessment of the physics of dynamic deformation on high-strength, brittle solids.

  12. Influence of nanosized carbon particles on the formation of the structure and properties of microarc ceramic coatings based on aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vityaz', P.A.; Komarov, A.I.; Komarova, V.I.

    2013-01-01

    A carbon-composite material based on a ceramic coating formed on aluminum alloys due to microarc oxidation and nanostructured carbon synthesized by the electric breakdown of liquid hydrocarbon (cyclohexane) is developed. The highest concentration of carbon nanoparticles is recorded in the coating surface coating 30-50 (μm in depth and also near the interface coating - base. It is shown that the nanocarbon introduced in electrolytes enhances the content of high-temperature modifications of aluminum oxide α-Al 2 O 3 by a factor of 3, as compared to the coating resulting in a solution without additives. The latter achieves higher tribomechanical properties - the 1.6-fold increase of microhardness, the multiple growth of wear resistance in the high pressure range (45,60 MPa) with a simultaneous reduction of the coefficient 2-9 times. (authors)

  13. Calcination and solid state reaction of ceramic-forming components to provide single-phase superconducting materials having fine particle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Poeppel, Roger B.; Emerson, James E.; Johnson, Stanley A.

    1992-01-01

    An improved method for the preparation of single phase, fine grained ceramic materials from precursor powder mixtures where at least one of the components of the mixture is an alkali earth carbonate. The process consists of heating the precursor powders in a partial vacuum under flowing oxygen and under conditions where the partial pressure of CO.sub.2 evolved during the calcination is kept to a very low level relative to the oxygen. The process has been found particularly suitable for the preparation of high temperature copper oxide superconducting materials such as YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x "123" and YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.4 O.sub.8 "124".

  14. Method of forming a ceramic to ceramic joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Raymond Ashton; Hutchings, Kent Neal; Kleinlein, Brian Paul; Carolan, Michael Francis

    2010-04-13

    A method of joining at least two sintered bodies to form a composite structure, includes: providing a joint material between joining surfaces of first and second sintered bodies; applying pressure from 1 kP to less than 5 MPa to provide an assembly; heating the assembly to a conforming temperature sufficient to allow the joint material to conform to the joining surfaces; and further heating the assembly to a joining temperature below a minimum sintering temperature of the first and second sintered bodies. The joint material includes organic component(s) and ceramic particles. The ceramic particles constitute 40-75 vol. % of the joint material, and include at least one element of the first and/or second sintered bodies. Composite structures produced by the method are also disclosed.

  15. Durabilidade de peças cerâmicas vermelhas com adição de rejeito de rocha ornamental isenta de granalha Durability of red ceramic samples with addition of ornamental rock waste free of steel particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Rodrigues

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Para avaliação da degradação acelerada em laboratório sofrida pelos corpos de prova de cerâmica vermelha com adição de rejeito de rocha ornamental isento de granalha, foi utilizado um equipamento que lixivia com água quente e fria em tempos controlados, e também, congela a amostra em até -4 ºC. Os corpos de prova cerâmicos foram confeccionados com até 10% em massa de rejeito de rocha ornamental a seco, e em seguida, umedecidos e moldados por extrusão. Os materiais produzidos foram calcinados nas temperaturas de 700 ºC, 800 ºC e 900 ºC. Após 1060 h de degradação acelerada em equipamento de laboratório, analisaram-se as propriedades cerâmicas do material. Os resultados das resistências mecânicas foram comparados através da distribuição de Weibull, antes e depois da degradação. Nota-se que o material com adição de 10% de rejeito de rocha ornamental na massa cerâmica é mais confiável quando queimada a 900 ºC após a degradação, quando comparados com as amostras sem adição de rejeito, proporcionando maior durabilidade.For the evaluation of the accelerated degradation in laboratory of red ceramic specimens with addition of ornamental rock waste free from steel particles, an equipment that leach with hot and cool water and time control, and also freezing the specimen at -4 ºC was used,. The ceramic samples were made with up to 10 wt.% of the dry ornamental rock waste, and after humidifying and molding by extrusion. The specimens were fired at 700 ºC, 800 ºC and 900 ºC. After 1060 h of accelerated degradation lab test, ceramic properties were evaluated. The results of the strength were compared for Weibull distribution, before and after degradation. The specimens with addition of 10 wt.% waste is more durable and reliable when fired to 900 ºC after the degradation.

  16. Multidecadal persistence of organic matter in soils: insights from spatially resolved investigations at the submicrometer scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfalla, Suzanne; Barré, Pierre; Bernard, Sylvain; Le Guillou, Corentin; Alléon, Julien; Chenu, Claire

    2016-04-01

    Better understanding the mechanisms responsible for the pluri-decadal persistence of carbon in soils requires well constraining the dynamics, the distribution and the chemical nature of both the soil organic carbon (SOC) and the associated mineral phases. The question we address in this work is whether different mineral species lead to different organo-mineral interactions and stabilize different quantities of SOM and different types of SOC. Here, benefiting from the unique opportunity offered by an INRA long term bare fallow (LTBF) experiment having started in 1928 in Versailles (France), we report the in-situ characterization of SOC dynamics in four clay fractions of this silty loam soil (total clays [TC, clays [CC, 0.2-2μm], intermediate clays [IC, 0.05-0.2μm] and fine clays [FC, 0-0.05μm]). The IC and FC fractions only contain smectite and illite/smectite mixed-layered clay minerals while the CC fraction also contains illite and kaolinite. In the absence of any carbon input, the plant-free LTBF clay fractions from Versailles progressively lost SOC during the first 50 years of the experiment, until they reached a seemingly stable concentration. Of note, the investigated clay fractions did not lose the same amount of SOC and do not exhibit the same final carbon concentrations. The decrease of the organic C:N ratios with LTBF duration corresponds to a progressive enrichment in N-rich SOC for all fractions which can be attributed to microbial material. Even though the speciation of SOC appears to only slightly evolve with LTBF duration, an enrichment in carboxyl and carbonyl groups is revealed by bulk-scale C-NEXAFS data for SOC from all clay fractions. In addition, STXM-based NEXAFS investigations at the submicrometer scale reveal three types of SOC-clay assemblages in addition to clay-free SOC and organic-free clays. While SOC appears mostly adsorbed onto clay surfaces within the IC and FC fractions, other protection mechanisms occur within the CC fraction

  17. Aerodynamic Factors Responsible for the Deaggregation of Carrier-Free Drug Powders to form Micrometer and Submicrometer Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longest, P. Worth; Son, Yoen-Ju; Holbrook, Landon; Hindle, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to employ in vitro experiments combined with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis to determine which aerodynamic factors were most responsible for deaggregating carrier-free powders to form micrometer and submicrometer aerosols from a capsule-based platform. Methods Eight airflow passages were evaluated for deaggregation of the aerosol including a standard constricted tube, impaction surface, 2D mesh, inward radial jets, and newly proposed 3D grids and rod arrays. CFD simulations were implemented to evaluate existing and new aerodynamic factors for deaggregation and in vitro experiments were used to evaluate performance of each inhaler. Results For the carrier-free formulation considered, turbulence was determined to be the primary deaggregation mechanism. A strong quantitative correlation was established between the mass median diameter (MMD) and newly proposed non-dimensional specific dissipation (NDSD) factor, which accounts for turbulent energy, inverse of the turbulent length scale, and exposure time. A 3D rod array design with unidirectional elements maximized NDSD and produced the best deaggregation with MMD<1μm. Conclusions The new NDSD parameter can be used to develop highly effective dry powder inhalers like the 3D rod array that can efficiently produce submicrometer aerosols for next-generation respiratory drug delivery applications. PMID:23471640

  18. Large-scale, rapid synthesis and application in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of sub-micrometer polyhedral gold nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Shaojun; Wang Yuling; Wang Erkang

    2007-01-01

    Macromolecule-protected sub-micrometer polyhedral gold nanocrystals have been facilely prepared by heating an aqueous solution containing poly (N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (PVP) and HAuCl 4 without adding other reducing agents. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX), ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectroscopy (UV-vis-NIR), and x-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to characterize the obtained polyhedral gold nanocrystals. It is found that the 10:1 molar ratio of PVP to gold is a key factor for obtaining quasi-monodisperse polyhedral gold nanocrystals. Furthermore, the application of polyhedral gold nanocrystals in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was investigated by using 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) as a probe molecule. The results indicated that the sub-micrometer polyhedral gold nanocrystals modified on the ITO substrate exhibited higher SERS activity compared to the traditional gold nanoparticle modified film. The enhancement factor (EF) on polyhedral gold nanocrystals was about six times larger than that obtained on aggregated gold nanoparticles (∼25 nm)

  19. Effect of airborne particle abrasion protocols on surface topography of Y-TZP ceramic Efeito do protocolo de jateamento com partículas na topografia da superfície de uma cerâmica Y-TZP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. C. Queiroz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate Y-TZP surface after different airborne particle abrasion protocols. Seventy-six Y-TZP ceramic blocks (5×4×4 mm³ were sintered and polished. Specimens were randomly divided into 19 groups (n=4 according to control group and 3 factors: a protocol duration (2 and 4 s; b particle size (30 µm, alumina coated silica particle; 45 µm, alumina particle; and 145 µm, alumina particle and; c pressure (1.5, 2.5 and 4.5 bar. Airborne particle abrasion was performed following a strict protocol. For qualitative and quantitative results, topography surfaces were analyzed in a digital optical profilometer (Interference Microscopic, using different roughness parameters (Ra, Rq, Rz, X-crossing, Mr1, Mr2 and Sdr and 3D images. Surface roughness also was analyzed following the primer and silane applications on Y-TZP surfaces. One-way ANOVA revealed that treatments (application period, particle size and pressure of particle blasting provided significant difference for all roughness parameters. The Tukey test determined that the significant differences between groups were different among roughness parameters. In qualitative analysis, the bonding agent application reduced roughness, filing the valleys in the surface. The protocols performed in this study verified that application period, particle size and pressure influenced the topographic pattern and amplitude of roughness.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a superfície de uma cerâmica à base de zircônia tetragonal estabilizada por ítria (Y-TZP após diferentes protocolos de jateamento com partículas. Setenta e seis blocos cerâmicos de Y-TZP (5 x 4 x 4 mm³ foram sinterizados e polidos. As amostras foram randomicamente divididas em 19 grupos (n=4 sendo um controle e 18 grupos utilizando 3 fatores: a tempo (2 e 4 s; b tamanho de partícula (30 µm - partículas de alumina revestida por sílica; 45 µm - partículas de alumina; 145 µm - partículas de alumina e; c pressão (1

  20. Modelling of Tape Casting for Ceramic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Masoud

    was increased by improving the steady state model with a quasi-steady state analytical model. In order to control the most important process parameter, tape thickness, the two-doctor blade configuration was also modeled analytically. The model was developed to control the tape thickness based on the machine...... for magnetic refrigeration applications. Numerical models were developed to track the migration of the particles inside the ceramic slurry. The results showed the presence of some areas inside the ceramic in which the concentration of the particles is higher compared to other parts, creating the resulting...

  1. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Thomé

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to outstanding physicochemical properties, ceramics are key engineering materials in many industrial domains. The evaluation of the damage created in ceramics employed in radiative media is a challenging problem for electronic, space, and nuclear industries. In this latter field, ceramics can be used as immobilization forms for radioactive wastes, inert fuel matrices for actinide transmutation, cladding materials for gas-cooled fission reactors, and structural components for fusion reactors. Information on the radiation stability of nuclear materials may be obtained by simulating the different types of interactions involved during the slowing down of energetic particles with ion beams delivered by various types of accelerators. This paper presents a review of the radiation effects occurring in nuclear ceramics, with an emphasis on recent results concerning the damage accumulation processes. Energetic ions in the KeV-GeV range are used to explore the nuclear collision (at low energy and electronic excitation (at high energy regimes. The recovery by electronic excitation of the damage created by ballistic collisions (SHIBIEC process is also addressed.

  2. Facile synthesis of Li2S-P2S5 glass-ceramics electrolyte with micron range particles for all-solid-state batteries via a low-temperature solution technique (LTST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sunho; Lee, Sewook; Park, Jongyeop; Nichols, William T.; Shin, Dongwook

    2018-06-01

    A lithium ion conductive 75Li2Sṡ25P2S5 glass-ceramics electrolyte is, for the first time, successfully synthesized via a new low-temperature solution technique (LTST) and compared to the conventional mechanical-milling technique. Both samples are composed of the highly lithium ion conductive thio-LISICON III analog phase. Due to the uniform dispersion of reactants in an organic liquid, the use of LTST produced significantly smaller and more uniform particle sizes (2.2 ± 1.68 μm) resulting in a 6.5 times higher specific surface area compared to the mechanically-milled sample. A pronounced enhancement of both the rate capability and cyclability is demonstrated for the LTST solid electrolyte sample due to the more intimate contact with the LiCoO2 active material. Furthermore, the LTST sample shows excellent electrochemical stability throughout the potential range of -1 to 5 V. These results suggest that the proposed technique using the optimized LTST process is promising for the preparation of 75Li2Sṡ25P2S5 solid electrolytes for use in advanced Li-ion batteries.

  3. Thermal oxidation of medical Ti6Al4V blasted with ceramic particles: Effects on the microstructure, residual stresses and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieblich, M; Barriuso, S; Multigner, M; González-Doncel, G; González-Carrasco, J L

    2016-02-01

    Roughening of Ti6Al4V by blasting with alumina or zirconia particles improves the mechanical fixation of implants by increasing the surface area available for bone/implant apposition. Additional thermal oxidation treatments of the blasted alloy have already shown to be a complementary low-cost solution to enhancing the in vitro biocompatibility and corrosion resistance of the alloy. In this work, the effects of oxidation treatment on a grit blasted Ti6Al4V biomedical alloy have been analysed in order to understand the net effect of the combined treatments on the alloy fatigue properties. Synchrotron radiation diffraction experiments have been performed to measure residual stresses before and after the treatments and microstructural and hardness changes have been determined. Although blasting of Ti6Al4V with small spherical zirconia particles increases the alloy fatigue resistance with respect to unblasted specimens, fatigue strength after oxidation decreases below the unblasted value, irrespective of the type of particle used for blasting. Moreover, at 700°C the as-blasted compressive residual stresses (700MPa) are not only fully relaxed but even moderate tensile residual stresses, of about 120MPa, are found beneath the blasted surfaces. Contrary to expectations, a moderate increase in hardness occurs towards the blasted surface after oxidation treatments. This can be attributed to the fact that grit blasting modifies the crystallographic texture of the Ti6Al4V shifting it to a random texture, which affects the hardness values as shown by additional experiments on cold rolled samples. The results indicate that the oxidation treatment performed to improve biocompatibility and corrosion resistance of grit blasted Ti6Al4V should be carried out with caution since the alloy fatigue strength can be critically diminished below the value required for high load-bearing components. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Polymer derived non-oxide ceramics modified with late transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaheer, Muhammad; Schmalz, Thomas; Motz, Günter; Kempe, Rhett

    2012-08-07

    This tutorial review highlights the methods for the preparation of metal modified precursor derived ceramics (PDCs) and concentrates on the rare non-oxide systems enhanced with late transition metals. In addition to the main synthetic strategies for modified SiC and SiCN ceramics, an overview of the morphologies, structures and compositions of both, ceramic materials and metal (nano) particles, is presented. Potential magnetic and catalytic applications have been discussed for the so manufactured metal containing non-oxide ceramics.

  5. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Villalobos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements.

  6. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Jasbinder; Kim, Woohong; Villalobos, Guillermo; Shaw, Brandon; Baker, Colin; Frantz, Jesse; Sadowski, Bryan; Aggarwal, Ishwar

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements. PMID:28817044

  7. Edge-state-dependent tunneling of dipole-exchange spin waves in submicrometer magnetic strips with an air gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, X J; Zhang, D; Li, S W

    2012-12-14

    We have investigated the tunneling of dipole-exchange spin waves across an air gap in submicrometer-sized permalloy magnetic strips by means of micromagnetic simulations. The magnetizations beside the gap could form three distinct end-domain states with various strengths of dipolar coupling. Spin-wave tunneling through the gap at individual end-domain states is studied. It is found that the tunneling behavior is strongly dependent on these domain states. Nonmonotonic decay of transmission of spin waves with the increase of the gap width is observed. The underlying mechanism for these behaviors is proposed. The tunneling characteristics of the dipole-exchange spin waves differ essentially from those of the magnetostatic ones reported previously.

  8. Electrospray ionizer for mass spectrometry of aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Siqin; Hogan, Chris; Li, Lin; Liu, Benjamin Y. H.; Naqwi, Amir; Romay, Francisco

    2017-09-19

    A device and method are disclosed to apply ESI-based mass spectroscopy to submicrometer and nanometer scale aerosol particles. Unipolar ionization is utilized to charge the particles in order to collect them electrostatically on the tip of a tungsten rod. Subsequently, the species composing the collected particles are dissolved by making a liquid flow over the tungsten rod. This liquid with dissolved aerosol contents is formed into highly charged droplets, which release unfragmented ions for mass spectroscopy, such as time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. The device is configured to operate in a switching mode, wherein aerosol deposition occurs while solvent delivery is turned off and vice versa.

  9. Factors affecting the electrostatic charge of ceramic powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorite, I.; Romero, J.; Fernandez, J. F.

    2011-01-01

    The phenomenon of electrostatic charge in ceramic powders takes place when the particle surfaces enter in contact between them or with the containers. The accumulation of electrostatic charge is of relevance in ceramic powders in view of their insulating character and the risk of explosions during the material handling. In this work the main factors that affect the appearance of intrinsic charge and tribo-charge in ceramic powder have been studied. In ceramic powders of alumina it has been verified that the smallest particle sizes present an increase of the electrostatic charge of negative polarity. A correlation has been observed between the nature of the OH -surface groups and the electrostatic charge. The intrinsic charge and the tribocharge in ceramic powders can be diminished by compensating the surface groups that support the charge. The dry dispersion of nanoparticles on microparticles allows surface charge compensation with a noticeable modification of the powder agglomeration. (Author) 19 refs.

  10. Interfaces in ceramic nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeve, K.D.

    Internal interfaces in all-ceramic dispersion fuels (such as these for HTGRs) are discussed for two classes: BeO-based dispersions, and coated particles for graphite-based fuels. The following points are made: (1) The strength of a two-phase dispersion is controlled by the weaker dispersed phase bonded to the matrix. (2) Differential expansion between two phases can be controlled by an intermediate buffer zone of low density. (3) A thin ceramic coating should be in compression. (4) Chemical reaction between coating and substrate and mass transfer in service should be minimized. The problems of the nuclear fuel designer are to develop coatings for fission product retention, and to produce radiation-resistant interfaces. 44 references, 18 figures

  11. Flash sintering of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancer, C. E. J.

    2016-10-01

    During flash sintering, ceramic materials can sinter to high density in a matter of seconds while subjected to electric field and elevated temperature. This process, which occurs at lower furnace temperatures and in shorter times than both conventional ceramic sintering and field-assisted methods such as spark plasma sintering, has the potential to radically reduce the power consumption required for the densification of ceramic materials. This paper reviews the experimental work on flash sintering methods carried out to date, and compares the properties of the materials obtained to those produced by conventional sintering. The flash sintering process is described for oxides of zirconium, yttrium, aluminium, tin, zinc, and titanium; silicon and boron carbide, zirconium diboride, materials for solid oxide fuel applications, ferroelectric materials, and composite materials. While experimental observations have been made on a wide range of materials, understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for the onset and latter stages of flash sintering is still elusive. Elements of the proposed theories to explain the observed behaviour include extensive Joule heating throughout the material causing thermal runaway, arrested by the current limitation in the power supply, and the formation of defect avalanches which rapidly and dramatically increase the sample conductivity. Undoubtedly, the flash sintering process is affected by the electric field strength, furnace temperature and current density limit, but also by microstructural features such as the presence of second phase particles or dopants and the particle size in the starting material. While further experimental work and modelling is still required to attain a full understanding capable of predicting the success of the flash sintering process in different materials, the technique non-etheless holds great potential for exceptional control of the ceramic sintering process.

  12. Sintering characteristics of nano-ceramic coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hosson, J.T.M.; Popma, R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper concentrates on sintering characteristics of nano-sized ceramic SiO2 particles. The sintering process is studied as a function of temperature using a conventional furnace and using a laser beam. The underlying idea is to combine the nanoceramic sol-gel concept with inkjet technology and

  13. Flame assisted synthesis of catalytic ceramic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Johnny; Mosleh, Majid; Johannessen, Tue

    2004-01-01

    technology it is possible to make supported catalysts, composite metal oxides, catalytically active surfaces, and porous ceramic membranes. Membrane layers can be formed by using a porous substrate tube (or surface) as a nano-particle filter. The aerosol gas from the flame is led through a porous substrate...

  14. Thermal conductivity analysis of SiC ceramics and fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyeon-Geun; Kim, Daejong; Lee, Seung Jae; Park, Ji Yeon; Kim, Weon-Ju

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal conductivity of SiC ceramics and FCM pellets was measured and discussed. • Thermal conductivity of FCM pellets was analyzed by the Maxwell-Eucken equation. • Effective thermal conductivity of TRISO particles applied in this study was assumed. - Abstract: The thermal conductivity of SiC ceramics and FCM fuel composites, consisting of a SiC matrix and TRISO coated particles, was measured and analyzed. SiC ceramics and FCM pellets were fabricated by hot press sintering with Al_2O_3 and Y_2O_3 sintering additives. Several factors that influence thermal conductivity, specifically the content of sintering additives for SiC ceramics and the volume fraction of TRISO particles and the matrix thermal conductivity of FCM pellets, were investigated. The thermal conductivity values of samples were analyzed on the basis of their microstructure and the arrangement of TRISO particles. The thermal conductivity of the FCM pellets was compared to that predicted by the Maxwell-Eucken equation and the thermal conductivity of TRISO coated particles was calculated. The thermal conductivity of FCM pellets in various sintering conditions was in close agreement to that predicted by the Maxwell-Eucken equation with the fitted thermal conductivity value of TRISO particles.

  15. Creep in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    This textbook is one of its kind, since there are no other books on Creep in Ceramics. The book consist of two parts: A and B. In part A general knowledge of creep in ceramics is considered, while part B specifies creep in technologically important ceramics. Part B covers creep in oxide ceramics, carnides and nitrides. While covering all relevant information regarding raw materials and characterization of creep in ceramics, the book also summarizes most recent innovations and developments in this field as a result of extensive literature search.

  16. Ceramic Parts for Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. D.; Carpenter, Harry W.; Tellier, Jim; Rollins, Clark; Stormo, Jerry

    1987-01-01

    Abilities of ceramics to serve as turbine blades, stator vanes, and other elements in hot-gas flow of rocket engines discussed in report. Ceramics prime candidates, because of resistance to heat, low density, and tolerance of hostile environments. Ceramics considered in report are silicon nitride, silicon carbide, and new generation of such ceramic composites as transformation-toughened zirconia and alumina and particulate- or whisker-reinforced matrices. Report predicts properly designed ceramic components viable in advanced high-temperature rocket engines and recommends future work.

  17. Forming of superplastic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesuer, D.R.; Wadsworth, J.; Nieh, T.G.

    1994-05-01

    Superplasticity in ceramics has now advanced to the stage that technologically viable superplastic deformation processing can be performed. In this paper, examples of superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of ceramic components are given. Recent work in biaxial gas-pressure forming of several ceramics is provided. These include yttria-stabilized, tetragonal zirconia (YTZP), a 20% alumina/YTZP composite, and silicon. In addition, the concurrent superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of a hybrid ceramic-metal structure are presented. These forming processes offer technological advantages of greater dimensional control and increased variety and complexity of shapes than is possible with conventional ceramic shaping technology.

  18. Ceramic gas turbine shroud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.

    2014-07-22

    An example gas turbine engine shroud includes a first annular ceramic wall having an inner side for resisting high temperature turbine engine gasses and an outer side with a plurality of radial slots. A second annular metallic wall is positioned radially outwardly of and enclosing the first annular ceramic wall and has a plurality of tabs in communication with the slot of the first annular ceramic wall. The tabs of the second annular metallic wall and slots of the first annular ceramic wall are in communication such that the first annular ceramic wall and second annular metallic wall are affixed.

  19. Thin film ceramic thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Otto (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave (Inventor); Wrbanek, John (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A thin film ceramic thermocouple (10) having two ceramic thermocouple (12, 14) that are in contact with each other in at least on point to form a junction, and wherein each element was prepared in a different oxygen/nitrogen/argon plasma. Since each element is prepared under different plasma conditions, they have different electrical conductivity and different charge carrier concentration. The thin film thermocouple (10) can be transparent. A versatile ceramic sensor system having an RTD heat flux sensor can be combined with a thermocouple and a strain sensor to yield a multifunctional ceramic sensor array. The transparent ceramic temperature sensor that could ultimately be used for calibration of optical sensors.

  20. Mass transfer effects in hygroscopic measurements of aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Chan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA has been widely utilized to measure the hygroscopicity of laboratory-generated and atmospheric submicrometer particles. An important concern in investigating the hygroscopicity of the particles is if the particles have attained equilibrium state in the measurements. We present a literature survey to investigate the mass transfer effects in hygroscopicity measurements. In most TDMA studies, a residence time in the order of seconds is used for humidification (or dehumidification. NaCl and (NH42SO4 particles are usually used to verify the equilibrium measurements during this residence time, which is presumed to be sufficient for other particles. There have been observations that not all types of submicrometer particles, including atmospheric particles, attain their equilibrium sizes within this time scale. We recommend that experimentation with different residence times be conducted and that the residence time should be explicitly stated in future TDMA measurements. Mass transfer effects may also exist in the measurements of other properties related to the water uptake of atmospheric particles such as relative humidity dependent light scattering coefficients and cloud condensation nuclei activity.

  1. Ceramic pore channels with inducted carbon nanotubes for removing oil from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinwei; Hong, Liang; Xu, Yanfang; Ong, Zheng Wei

    2012-04-01

    Water contaminated with tiny oil emulsions is costly and difficult to treat because of the colloidal stability and deformable nature of emulsified oil. This work utilizes carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in macro/mesopore channels of ceramic membrane to remove tiny oil droplets from water. The CNTs were implanted into the porous ceramic channels by means of chemical vapor deposition. Being hydrophobic in nature and possessing an interfacial curvature at nanoscale, CNTs enabled tiny oil emulsion in submicrometer and nano scales to be entrapped while permeating through the CNTs implanted pore channels. Optimizing the growth condition of the CNTs resulted in a uniform distribution of CNT grids, which allowed the development of lipophilic layers during filtration. These lipo-layers drastically enhanced the separation performance. The filtration capability of CNT-ceramic membrane was assessed by the purification of a dilute oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion containing ca. 210 ppm mineral oil 1600 ppm emulsifier, and a trace amount of dye, a proxy polluted water source. The best CNT-tailored ceramic membrane, prepared under the optimized CNT growth condition, claimed 100% oil rejection rate and a permeation flux of 0.6 L m(-2) min(-1), driven by a pressure drop of ca. 1 bar for 3 days on the basis of UV measurement. The CNT-sustained adsorption complements the size-exclusion mechanism in removing soluble oil.

  2. Advantages and disadvantages of ceramic on ceramic total hip arthroplasty: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Jiri; Goodman, Stuart Barry; Lostak, Jiri; Janout, Martin

    2012-09-01

    Ceramic on ceramic (COC) total hip arthroplasty (THA) was developed to reduce wear debris and accordingly, the occurrence of osteolysis and aseptic loosening especially in younger patients. Based on the excellent tribological behavior of current COC bearings and the relatively low biological activity of ceramic particles, significant improvement in survivorship of these implants is expected. We used manual search to identify all relevant studies reporting clinical data on COC THAs in PubMed. The objective was to determine whether current COC THA offers a better clinical outcome and survivorship than non-COC THA. Studies with early generation ceramic bearings yielded 68% to 84% mean survivorship at 20 years follow-up which is comparable with the survivorship of non-COC THAs. Studies on current ceramic bearings report a 10-year revision-free interval of 92% to 99%. These outcomes are comparable to the survivorship of the best non-COC THAs. However, there are still concerns regarding fracture of sandwich ceramic liners, squeaking, and impingement of the femoral neck on the rim of the ceramic liner leading to chipping, especially in younger and physically active patients. Current COC THA leads to equivalent but not improved survivorship at 10 years follow-up in comparison to the best non-COC THA. Based on this review, we recommend that surgeons weigh the potential advantages and disadvantages of current COC THA in comparison to other bearing surfaces when considering young very active patients who are candidates for THA.

  3. Improving the strength of ceramics by controlling the interparticle forces and rheology of the ceramic suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Yi-Ping

    2001-01-01

    This thesis describes a study of the modification of the interparticle forces of colloidal ceramic particles in aqueous suspensions in order to improve the microstructural homogeneity, and hence the reliability and mechanical performances, of subsequently formed ceramic compacts. A concentrated stable fine ceramic powder suspension has been shown to be able to generate a higher density of a ceramic product with better mechanical, and also electrical, electrochemical and optical, properties of the ceramic body. This is because in a colloidally stable suspension there are no aggregates and so defect formation, which is responsible for the ceramic body performance below its theoretical maximum, is reduced. In order to achieve this, it is necessary to form a well dispersed ceramic suspension by ensuring the interparticle forces between the particles are repulsive, with as a high a loading with particles as possible. By examining the rheological behaviour and the results of Atomic Force Microscope, the dispersion state of the suspensions and hence the interparticle forces can be analysed. In this study, concentrated ceramic suspensions were made from two kinds of zirconia powders, monoclinic (DK1) and yttria partially stabilised (HSY3) zirconia, in the presence of a dispersant, 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid disodium salt (Tiron), in aqueous system. The optimum dispersant concentrations, where the viscosity and rheological moduli are the entire minimum, for DK1 and HSY3 suspensions, respectively, are 0.625% and 0.1%. The modifications of the interparticle forces were also achieved by pH adjustment and it was found that both of the suspensions at the optimum dispersant concentration were stable over the pH range 7 ∼ 10, which coincide with the results of the electrophoretic mobility measurements. Ceramic compacts have then been made by slip casting the suspensions of different dispersant concentration, followed by firing procedure. Mechanical properties of

  4. On the analysis of small particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vis, R.D.

    2002-01-01

    The analysis of small, micrometer or even submicrometer sized, particles represents a challenging problem. The whole analytical procedure, including quality assurance and control, needs careful planning. Even the sampling itself is in many cases not trivial at all and the question as to whether the sample is representative for the suite of particles on wants to measure is sometimes difficult to assess. The question of representativity is even more important if one performs single particle analysis. Only large numbers of such analyses will lead to meaningful and interpretable results. In this contribution a few aspects of the various steps in the analytical protocol will be described. Starting point is that it is the elemental composition of the particle that is of interest

  5. Thermal Conductivity Measurement and Analysis of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. G.; Kim, D. J.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, W. J.; Lee, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    FCM nuclear fuel is composed of tristructural isotropic(TRISO) fuel particle and SiC ceramic matrix. SiC ceramic matrix play an essential part in protecting fission product. In the FCM fuel concept, fission product is doubly protected by TRISO coating layer and SiC ceramic matrix in comparison with the current commercial UO2 fuel system of LWR. In addition to a safety enhancement of FCM fuel, thermal conductivity of SiC ceramic matrix is better than that of UO2 fuel. Because the centerline temperature of FCM fuel is lower than that of the current UO2 fuel due to the difference of thermal conductivity of fuel, an operational release of fission products from the fuel can be reduced. SiC ceramic has attracted for nuclear fuel application due to its high thermal conductivity properties with good radiation tolerant properties, a low neutron absorption cross-section and a high corrosion resistance. Thermal conductivity of ceramic matrix composite depends on the thermal conductivity of each component and the morphology of reinforcement materials such as fibers and particles. There are many results about thermal conductivity of fiber-reinforced composite like as SiCf/SiC composite. Thermal conductivity of SiC ceramics and FCM pellets with the volume fraction of TRISO particles were measured and analyzed by analytical models. Polycrystalline SiC ceramics and FCM pellets with TRISO particles were fabricated by hot press sintering with sintering additives. Thermal conductivity of the FCM pellets with TRISO particles of 0 vol.%, 10 vol.%, 20 vol.%, 30 vol.% and 40 vol.% show 68.4, 52.3, 46.8, 43.0 and 34.5 W/mK, respectively. As the volume fraction of TRISO particles increased, the measured thermal conductivity values closely followed the prediction of Maxwell's equation

  6. Improved lifetime of new fibrous carbon/ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumula, Teresa

    2018-03-01

    New carbon/ceramic composites have been synthesized from low-cost phenol-formaldehyde resin and polysiloxane preceram. A reference carbon composite reinforced with carbon fibre (CC composite) is obtained in first place from a carbon fibre roving impregnated with a solution of phenol-formaldehyde resin in isopropyl alcohol. To obtain fibrous carbon/ceramic composites the CC perform is impregnated with polymethylphenylsiloxane polymer and then a thermal treatment in an inert atmosphere is applied. Depending on the temperature of this process, the resulting ceramics can be silicon carbide (SiC) or silicon oxycarbide (SiCO). Three representative samples, named CC/SiCO( a) (obtained at 1000 °C), CC/SiCO( b) (1500 °C) and CC/SiC (1700 °C), have been tested for fatigue behaviour and oxidation resistance. The value of the Young's modulus remains constant in fatigue tests done in flexion mode for the three new composites during a high number of cycles until sudden degradation begins. This is an unusual and advantageous characteristic for this type of materials and results in the absence of delamination during the measurements. In contrast, the CC reference composite shows a progressive degradation of the Young's modulus accompanied by delamination. SEM micrographs revealed that the formation of filaments of submicrometer diameter during the heat treatment can be responsible for the improved behaviour of these composites. The CC/SiC composite shows the best oxidation resistance among the three types of composites, with a 44% mass loss after 100 h of oxidation.

  7. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabloff, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics

  8. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 2. Science and Technology of Ceramics - Advanced Ceramics: Structural Ceramics and Glasses. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 5 Issue 2 February 2000 pp 4-11 ...

  9. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabloff, J A [ed.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  10. Fabrication of yttrium-doped barium zirconate thin films with sub-micrometer thickness by a sol–gel spin coating method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Hanlin; Su, Pei-Chen, E-mail: peichensu@ntu.edu.sg

    2015-06-01

    A modified sol–gel process was developed for the fabrication of sub-micrometer scale yttrium-doped barium zirconate (BZY) thin film at much lower processing temperatures. The film was fabricated by direct spin-coating of the sol on a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} passivated Si substrate, followed by low temperature thermal annealing at 1000 °C, and single BZY phase without barium carbonate residue was obtained. A 200 nm-thick thin film without obvious through-film cracks was fabricated with optimized process parameters of sol concentration and heating rate. The stoichiometry of the BZY thin film was well-controlled and no Ba evaporation was observed due to the low processing temperature. The combination of sol–gel and spin coating method can be a promising alternative to vacuum-based thin film deposition techniques for the fabrication of sub-micrometer scale BZY thin film. - Highlights: • A sol–gel spin coating method was developed for the fabrication of BZY thin films. • The processing temperature was much lower compared to powder-based sintering. • Sub-micrometer scale BZY thin film with well-controlled stoichiometry was obtained.

  11. [Ceramic inlays and onlays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pelt, A W; de Kloet, H J; van der Kuy, P

    1996-11-01

    Large direct composite restorations can induce shrinkage related postoperative sensitivity. Indirect resin-bonded (tooth colored) restorations may perhaps prevent these complaints. Indirect bonded ceramics are especially attractive because of their biocompatibility and esthetic performance. Several procedures and techniques are currently available for the fabrication of ceramic restorations: firing, casting, heat-pressing and milling. In this article the different systems are described. Advantages, disadvantages and clinical performance of ceramic inlays are compared and discussed.

  12. Displacive Transformation in Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-28

    PZT ), ceramics have attracted natural abundance. much attention for use in nonvolatile semiconductor mem- We attribute the observed spectra in Fig. I to...near a crack tip in piezoelectric ceramics of lead zirconate titanate ( PZT ) and barium titanate. They reasoned that the poling of ferroelectric... Texture in Ferroelastic Tetragonal Zirconia," J. Am. Ceram . Soc., 73 (1990) no. 6: 1777-1779. 27. J. F. Jue and A. Virkar, "Fabrication, Microstructural

  13. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fareed, Ali [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States); Craig, Phillip A. [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  14. Piezo-electrostrictive ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho Gi; Shin, Byeong Cheol

    1991-09-01

    This book deals with principle and the case of application of piezo-electrostrictive ceramics, which includes definition of piezoelectric materials and production and development of piezoelectric materials, coexistence of Pb(zr, Ti)O 3 ceramics on cause of coexistence in MPB PZT ceramics, electrostrictive effect of oxide type perovskite, practical piezo-electrostrictive materials, and breaking strength, evaluation technique of piezoelectric characteristic, and piezoelectric accelerometer sensor like printer head, ink jet and piezoelectric relay.

  15. Method of sintering ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1992-01-01

    A method for sintering ceramic materials is described. A ceramic article is coated with layers of protective coatings such as boron nitride, graphite foil, and niobium. The coated ceramic article is embedded in a container containing refractory metal oxide granules and placed within a microwave oven. The ceramic article is heated by microwave energy to a temperature sufficient to sinter the ceramic article to form a densified ceramic article having a density equal to or greater than 90% of theoretical density.

  16. Cathodic electrodeposition of ceramic and organoceramic materials. Fundamental aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitomirsky, I

    2002-03-29

    Electrodeposition of ceramic materials can be performed by electrophoretic (EPD) or electrolytic (ELD) deposition. Electrophoretic deposition is achieved via motion of charged particles towards an electrode under an applied electric field. Electrolytic deposition produces colloidal particles in cathodic reactions for subsequent deposition. Various electrochemical strategies and deposition mechanisms have been developed for electrodeposition of ceramic and organoceramic films, and are discussed in the present article. Electrode-position of ceramic and organoceramic materials includes mass transport, accumulation of particles near the electrode and their coagulation to form a cathodic deposit. Various types of interparticle forces that govern colloidal stability in the absence and presence of processing additives are discussed. Novel theoretical contributions towards an interpretation of particle coagulation near the electrode surface are reviewed. Background information is given on the methods of particle charging, stabilization of colloids in aqueous and non-aqueous media, electrophoretic mobility of ceramic particles and polyelectrolytes, and electrode reactions. This review also covers recent developments in the electrodeposition of ceramic and organoceramic materials.

  17. Defect production in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinoshita, C. [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  18. Ceramic piezoelectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaszuwara, W.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic piezoelectric materials conert reversibility electric energy into mechanical energy. In the presence of electric field piezoelectric materials exhibit deformations up to 0.15% (for single crystals up to 1.7%). The deformation energy is in the range of 10 2 - 10 3 J/m 3 and working frequency can reach 10 5 Hz. Ceramic piezoelectric materials find applications in many modern disciplines such as: automatics, micromanipulation, measuring techniques, medical diagnostics and many others. Among the variety of ceramic piezoelectric materials the most important appear to be ferroelectric materials such as lead zirconate titanate so called PZT ceramics. Ceramic piezoelectric materials can be processed by methods widely applied for standard ceramics, i.e. starting from simple precursors e.g. oxides. Application of sol-gel method has also been reported. Substantial drawback for many applications of piezoelectric ceramics is their brittleness, thus much effort is currently being put in the development of piezoelectric composite materials. Other important research directions in the field of ceramic piezoelectric materials composite development of lead free materials, which can exhibit properties similar to the PZT ceramics. Among other directions one has to state processing of single crystals and materials having texture or gradient structure. (author)

  19. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics are promising materials for a range of high temperature applications. Selected current and future applications are listed. In all such applications, the ceramics are exposed to high temperature gases. Therefore it is critical to understand the response of these materials to their environment. The variables to be considered here include both the type of ceramic and the environment to which it is exposed. Non-oxide ceramics include borides, nitrides, and carbides. Most high temperature corrosion environments contain oxygen and hence the emphasis of this chapter will be on oxidation processes.

  20. Spin-valves with modified synthetic antiferromagnets exhibiting an enhanced bias point control capability at submicrometer dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.-S.; Lee, S.-R.; Kim, Y.K.

    2004-01-01

    Bias point control is of practical importance for operating read sensors for magnetic recording and magnetic random access memory devices. To attain bias point control capability, in particular, at submicrometer cell size, a modified synthetic antiferromagnet-based spin-valve (MSSV) structure was devised. A series of calculations were carried out to investigate the effect of size variation on their MR transfer behaviors. The cell dimension was varied from 10 to 0.05 μm. The typical MSSV comprises IrMn (9.0)/CoFe (P1, 1.5)/Ru (0.7)/CoFe (P2, 3.0)/Ru (0.7)/CoFe (P3, 1.5)/Cu (2.8)/CoFe (1.6)/NiFe (3.2) (in nm). As the cell size decreased, the bias point in the MSSV maintained nearly zero regardless of the cell size. The bias point was further tuned by varying the P3 layer thickness. Moreover, the effective exchange field (H ex.eff ) of the MSSV was much larger than that of the conventional SSV. The field sensitivity of the MSSV was very high indicating that the free layer can rotate more sharply

  1. Spin-valves with modified synthetic antiferromagnets exhibiting an enhanced bias point control capability at submicrometer dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Suk; Lee, Seong-Rae; Kim, Young Keun

    2004-08-01

    Bias point control is of practical importance for operating read sensors for magnetic recording and magnetic random access memory devices. To attain bias point control capability, in particular, at submicrometer cell size, a modified synthetic antiferromagnet-based spin-valve (MSSV) structure was devised. A series of calculations were carried out to investigate the effect of size variation on their MR transfer behaviors. The cell dimension was varied from 10 to 0.05 μm. The typical MSSV comprises IrMn (9.0)/CoFe (P1, 1.5)/Ru (0.7)/CoFe (P2, 3.0)/Ru (0.7)/CoFe (P3, 1.5)/Cu (2.8)/CoFe (1.6)/NiFe (3.2) (in nm). As the cell size decreased, the bias point in the MSSV maintained nearly zero regardless of the cell size. The bias point was further tuned by varying the P3 layer thickness. Moreover, the effective exchange field ( Hex.eff) of the MSSV was much larger than that of the conventional SSV. The field sensitivity of the MSSV was very high indicating that the free layer can rotate more sharply.

  2. Porous ceramics achievement by soybean and corn agricultural waste insertion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdameri, C.Z.; Ank, A.; Zatta, L.; Anaissi, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Porous ceramic materials are produced by incorporating organic particles and stable foams. Generally it improves low thermal conductivity, which gives thermal comfort for buildings. The southwest region of Parana state is one of the largest producers of grains in Brazil, this causes the disposal of a large amount of waste in the agricultural processing. This paper presents the characterization of porous ceramics produced from clay minerals and agricultural waste (soybeans and corn). The precursor was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) techniques. For the ceramic materials produced, characterizations about density, water absorption, tensile strength by diametrical compression strength and flexural strength curves was performed. The results showed high possibility of industrial/commercial application because the ceramic materials were produced from low costs precursors leading to ceramic products with properties of interest in construction. (author)

  3. High temperature strengthening of zirconium-toughened ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claussen, N.

    1986-01-01

    Transformation-toughened (i.e. ZrO/sub 2/-toughened) ceramics represent a new class of high performance ceramics with spectacular strength properties at low and intermediate temperatures. However, at temperatures above about 700 0 C, most of these tough oxide-base ceramics can no longer be used as load-bearing engineering parts because of characteristic deficiencies. The aim of the present paper is to provide and discuss microstructural design strategies which may enable ZrO/sub 2/-toughened ceramics to be applied at higher temperatures. From the various strategies suggested, three appear to show good prospects, namely (a) the prevention of glassy intergranular films, (b) the addition of hard high modulus particles and (c) whikser or fibre reinforcement. Experimental approaches are presented from some ZrO/sub 2/-toughened ceramics, elg. tetragonal ZrO/sub 2/ polycrystals and ZrO/sub 2/-toughened cordierite, spinel and mullite

  4. Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  5. Simulation and performance study of ceramic THGEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jia-Qing; Xie, Yu-Guang; Hu, Tao; Lu, Jun-Guang; Zhou, Li; Qu, Guo-Pu; Cai, Xiao; Niu, Shun-Li; Chen, Hai-Tao

    2015-06-01

    THGEMs based on a ceramic substrate have been successfully developed for neutron and single photon detection. The influences on thermal neutron scattering and internal radioactivity of both ceramic and FR-4 substrates were studied and compared. The ceramic THGEMs are homemade, of 200 μm hole diameter, 600 μm pitch, 200 μm thickness, 80 μm rim, and 50 mm×50 mm sensitive area. FR-4 THGEMs with the same geometry were used as a reference. The gas gain, energy resolution and gain stability were measured in different gas mixtures using 5.9 keV X-rays. The maximum gain of a single layer ceramic THGEM reaches 6×104 and 1.5×104 at Ne+CH4=95:5 and Ar + i-C4H10 = 97:3, respectively. The energy resolution is better than 24%. Good gain stability was obtained during a more than 100 hour continuous test in Ar+CO2 = 80:20. By using a 239Pu source, the alpha deposited energy spectrum and gain curve of the ceramic THGEM were measured. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205173) and State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics (H9294206TD)

  6. Fine particles in the Soufriere eruption plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, D. C.; Chuan, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The size distributions of fine particles measured at tropospheric altitudes in the periphery of the eruption plume formed during the April 17, 1979 eruption of Soufriere Volcano and in the low-level effluents on May 15, 1979 were found to be bimodal, having peak concentrations at geometric mean diameters of 1.1 and 0.23 micrometers. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis of the samples revealed an abundance of aluminum and silicon and traces of sodium, magnesium, chlorine, potassium, calcium, and iron in the large-particle mode. The submicrometer-sized particles were covered with liquid containing sulfur, assumed to be in the form of liquid sulfuric acid.

  7. New ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, R.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.

    2010-01-01

    This article is to provide a new ceramic materials in which, with a control of their processing and thus their microstructural properties, you can get ceramic approaching ever closer to a metal, both in its structural behavior at low as at high temperatures. (Author) 30 refs.

  8. Characterization of granite waste for use in red ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, M.C.; Monteiro, S.N.; Vieira, C.M.F.; Borlini, M.C.

    2011-01-01

    This work aims to study the characterization of the granite waste from the city of Santo Antonio de Padua-RJ for the use in red ceramic. The chemical, physical and morphological characterization of the waste was performed by chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction, particle size distribution, thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicated that this waste is a material with great potential to be used as a component of ceramic body due to its capacity to act as flux during the firing, and to improve the properties of the ceramic when is incorporate. (author)

  9. Characterization of sugarcane bagasse ash for use in ceramic bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, K.C.P.; Gurgel, R.F.; Holanda, J.N.F., E-mail: katiacpf@terra.com.br, E-mail: rfguenf2009@hotmail.com, E-mail: holanda@uenf.br [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (LAMAV/GMCer/UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes-RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this work is to characterization of sugarcane bagasse ash waste aiming the use it in red ceramic industry. The characterization was done in terms of chemical composition, X-ray diffraction, particle size distribution, morphology, and plasticity. The results show that the cane bagasse ash waste is a non plastic material, which contains high content of silica and minor amounts of Al, Fe, Ca, Mg, and K oxides. Thus, the sugar cane bagasse ash waste presents high potential for application in the manufacture of ceramic products such as bricks, roofing tiles, and ceramic tiles. (author)

  10. Characterization of sugarcane bagasse ash for use in ceramic bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, K.C.P.; Gurgel, R.F.; Holanda, J.N.F.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work is to characterization of sugarcane bagasse ash waste aiming the use it in red ceramic industry. The characterization was done in terms of chemical composition, X-ray diffraction, particle size distribution, morphology, and plasticity. The results show that the cane bagasse ash waste is a non plastic material, which contains high content of silica and minor amounts of Al, Fe, Ca, Mg, and K oxides. Thus, the sugar cane bagasse ash waste presents high potential for application in the manufacture of ceramic products such as bricks, roofing tiles, and ceramic tiles. (author)

  11. Diffusion of transmutation isotope in YBaCuO ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkovich, R.Sh.

    2005-01-01

    The diffusion of a transmutation isotope generated in YBaCuO ceramics irradiated by high-energy charged particles is mathematically analyzed. The model is based on the assumption that copper isotope atoms created in subsurface layers of ceramic grains segregate at the grain boundaries in the course of subsequent annealing and then rapidly diffuse via intergranular regions in depth of the material and penetrate into the bulk of grains [ru

  12. Synthesis of luminescent YVO4:Eu3+ submicrometer crystals through hydrogels as directing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yan; Zheng, Yuhui; Wang, Qianming; Zhang, Cheng Cheng

    2012-01-01

    The innovative hydrogel template (polyacrylamide or polyacrylic acid) directed synthesis of YVO 4 :Eu 3+ phosphor in a controlled manner was thoroughly studied. Photoluminescence spectra show the europium(III)-doped yttrium orthovanadate could exhibit strong red emissions within the soft matrix (polyacrylamide) and remain relatively stable even when the temperature reached nearly 100 °C. After calcination process, X-ray powder diffraction patterns, SEM and DLS measurements implied that the sample was in agreement with pure tetragonal phase and the particle sizes were in the range of 100–200 nm. More importantly, YVO 4 :Eu 3+ products prepared based on hydrogels have remarkable improvement in emission intensities compared to phosphors synthesized by conventional approach. Similar results of overall quantum efficiency also support that YVO 4 :Eu 3+ assembled by PAM hydrogel (1.94%) is better than the routine way (0.91%). -- Highlights: ► YVO 4 :Eu 3+ could be formed within the soft matrix. ► The as-derived YVO 4 :Eu 3+ exhibited red emissions and remain relatively stable nearly 100 °C. ► YVO 4 :Eu 3+ prepared by hydrogels has remarkable improvement in emission intensities.

  13. Preparation of Polyamide-6 Submicrometer-Sized Spheres by In Situ Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xingke; Xia, Housheng; Fu, Xubing; Duan, Jianping; Yang, Guisheng

    2015-11-01

    Polyamide-6 (PA6) submicron-sized spheres are prepared by two steps: (1) anionic ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactam in the presence of poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly-(propylene glycol)-block-poly(ethylene glycol)(PEG-b-PPG-b-PEG) and (2) separation of PA6 spheres by dissolving PEG-b-PPG-b-PEG from the prepared blends. The PA6 microspheres obtained are regular spherical, with diameter ranging from 200 nm to 2 μm and narrow size distribution, as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. By comparison with PA6/PS and PA6/PEG systems, it is denominated that the PEG blocks in PEG-b-PPG-b-PEG can effectively reduce the surface tension of PA6 droplets and further decrease the diameter of the PA6 microspheres. The PPG block in PEG-b-PPG-b-PEG can prevent the PA6 droplets coalescing with each other, and isolated spherical particles can be obtained finally. The phase inversion of the PA6/PEG-b-PPG-b-PEG blends occurs at very low PEG-b-PPG-b-PEG content; the PEG-b-PPG-b-PEG phase can be removed by water easily. The whole experiment can be finished in a short time (approximately in half an hour) without using any organic solvents; it is an efficient strategy for the preparation of submicron-sized PA6 microspheres. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Mounting for ceramic scroll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Jack D.

    1993-01-01

    A mounting for a ceramic scroll on a metal engine block of a gas turbine engine includes a first ceramic ring and a pair of cross key connections between the first ceramic ring, the ceramic scroll, and the engine block. The cross key connections support the scroll on the engine block independent of relative radial thermal growth and for bodily movement toward an annular mounting shoulder on the engine. The scroll has an uninterrupted annular shoulder facing the mounting shoulder on the engine block. A second ceramic ring is captured between mounting shoulder and the uninterrupted shoulder on the scroll when the latter is bodily shifted toward the mouting shoulder to define a gas seal between the scroll and the engine block.

  15. Ceramic heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaHaye, Paul G.; Rahman, Faress H.; Lebeau, Thomas P. E.; Severin, Barbara K.

    1998-01-01

    A tube containment system. The tube containment system does not significantly reduce heat transfer through the tube wall. The contained tube is internally pressurized, and is formed from a ceramic material having high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good thermal shock resistance. The tube containment system includes at least one ceramic fiber braid material disposed about the internally pressurized tube. The material is disposed about the tube in a predetermined axial spacing arrangement. The ceramic fiber braid is present in an amount sufficient to contain the tube if the tube becomes fractured. The tube containment system can also include a plurality of ceramic ring-shaped structures, in contact with the outer surface of the tube, and positioned between the tube and the ceramic fiber braid material, and/or at least one transducer positioned within tube for reducing the internal volume and, therefore, the energy of any shrapnel resulting from a tube fracture.

  16. ATTAP/AGT101 - Year 2 progress in ceramic technology development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, J. R.; Lindberg, L. J.; Morey, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    The progress made by the Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) is summarized, with emphasis on the following areas: ceramic materials assessment and characterization, ceramic impact damage assessment, ceramic combustor evaluation, turbine inlet particle separator development, impact-tolerant turbine designs, and net-shape ceramic component fabrications. In the evolutionary ceramics development in the Automotive Gas Turbine (AGT101) and ATTAP programs initial designs were conceived to reduce stresses by using well-established criteria: bodies of revolution were preferred over nonaxisymmetric geometries, sharp corners were avoided, the contact area between components was kept as large as possible, and small parts were preferred over large when feasible. Projects discussed include: initial ceramic component fabrication by ceramic suppliers in 1990, engine test to 1371 C in 1991, 100-hr test bed engine durability test in 1991, and 300-hr test bed engine durability in 1992.

  17. Current Progress in Bioactive Ceramic Scaffolds for Bone Repair and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chengde; Deng, Youwen; Feng, Pei; Mao, Zhongzheng; Li, Pengjian; Yang, Bo; Deng, Junjie; Cao, Yiyuan; Shuai, Cijun; Peng, Shuping

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive ceramics have received great attention in the past decades owing to their success in stimulating cell proliferation, differentiation and bone tissue regeneration. They can react and form chemical bonds with cells and tissues in human body. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the application of bioactive ceramics for bone repair and regeneration. The review systematically summarizes the types and characters of bioactive ceramics, the fabrication methods for nanostructure and hierarchically porous structure, typical toughness methods for ceramic scaffold and corresponding mechanisms such as fiber toughness, whisker toughness and particle toughness. Moreover, greater insights into the mechanisms of interaction between ceramics and cells are provided, as well as the development of ceramic-based composite materials. The development and challenges of bioactive ceramics are also discussed from the perspective of bone repair and regeneration. PMID:24646912

  18. Development of ceramic glaze with photocatalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tezza, V.B.; Uggioni, E.; Carrera, A.A. Duran; Bernardin, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Glazes were developed by adding anatase in commercial ceramic plates as an agent of photocatalysis. The glazes were coated on ceramic tiles, which were fired between 800 and 1000°C. The formulations were characterized (SEM, XRD), and the wettability was determined by measuring the water contact angle. The microstructural analysis (SEM) showed that the anatase particles can disperse properly in the glaze matrix. The X-ray diffraction shows that from 1000°C, the glaze becomes very reactive, and particles of anatase are transformed into titanite or rutile, depending on the glaze used. The determination of the contact angle shows the clear influence of the glaze type and sintering temperature on the wettability characteristics of the obtained layer. (author)

  19. Method for estimating the atmospheric content of sub-micrometer aerosol using direct-sun photometric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, S.; Filip, L.

    2009-04-01

    It is well known that the aerosol generated by human activity falls in the sub-micrometer rage [1]. The rapid increase of such emissions led to massive accumulations in the planetary boundary layer. Aerosol pollutants influence the quality of life on the Earth in at least two ways: by direct physiological effects following their penetration into living organisms and by the indirect implications on the overall energy balance of the Earth-atmosphere system. For these reasons monitoring the sub-micrometer aerosol on a global scale, become a stringent necessity in protecting the environment. The sun-photometry proved a very efficient way for such monitoring activities, mainly when vast networks of instruments (like AERONET [2]) are used. The size distribution of aerosols is currently a product of AERONET obtained through an inversion algorithm of sky-photometry data [3, 4]. Alternatively, various methods of investigating the aerosol size distribution have been developed through the use of direct-sun photometric data, with the advantages of simpler computation algorithms and a more convenient use [5, 6]. Our research aims to formulate a new simpler way to retrieve aerosol fine and coarse mode volume concentrations, as well as dimensional information, from direct-sun data. As in other works from the literature [3-6], the main hypothesis is that of a bi-modal shape of the size distribution of aerosols that can be reproduced rather satisfactorily by a linear combination of two lognormal functions. Essentially, the method followed in this paper relies on aerosol size information retrieval through fitting theoretical computations to measured aerosol optical depth (AOD) and related data. To this purpose, the experimental spectral dependence of AOD is interpolated and differentiated numerically to obtain the Ǻngström parameter. The reduced (i.e. normalized to the corresponding columnar volumetric content) contributions of the fine and coarse modes to the AOD have also been

  20. The analysis of Chinese porcelains and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peisach, M.; Jacobson, L.; Vos, H.N.

    1985-01-01

    Fragments of Chinese porcelains and ceramics have been excavated in the southern Cape. Because of the cultural history value of the material, analyses were carried out by the non-destructive methods of PIPPS (particle-induced prompt photon spectrometry) and PIXE using the external beam facility at the Faure Van de Graaff accelerator. For comparison a suite of English porcelain from about the same period was analysed as a control

  1. Biocompatible wear-resistant thick ceramic coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogt Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sensitisation to immunologically active elements like chromium, cobalt or nickel and debris particle due to wear are serious problems for patients with metallic implants. We tested the approach of using a hard and thick ceramic coating as a wear-resistant protection of titanium implants, avoiding those sensitisation and foreign body problems. We showed that the process parameters strongly influence the coating porosity and, as a consequence, also its hardness.

  2. Stereolithographic processing of ceramics: Photon diffusion in colloidal dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Rajeev

    The technique of ceramic stereolithography (CSL) has been developed for fabricating near net shape ceramic objects. In stereolithography, the three-dimensional computer design file of the object is sliced into thin layers. Each layer is physically fabricated by photocuring the surface of a liquid photo-polymerizable resin bath by raster scanning an ultra-violet laser across the surface of the resin. In CSL, the liquid resin is a high concentration colloidal dispersion in a solution of ultraviolet curable polymers. The ceramic green body fabricated by ceramic stereolithography technique is subjected to the post processing steps of drying, binder burnout and sintering to form a dense ceramic object. An aqueous alumina dispersion in photocuring polymers with particle volume fraction greater than 0.5 was formulated for CSL process. Low molecular weight solution polymers were found to be best suited for formulating ceramic resins due to their inherently low viscosity and favorable interactions with the ceramic dispersant. A hydroxyapatite ceramic resin was also developed for the use in the CSL technique. A model is developed to describe the photocuring process in concentrated ceramic dispersion. The curing profile in ceramic dispersion is governed by multiple scattering from the ceramic particles and absorption by the photocuring polymers. Diffusion theory of light transport is used to model the multiple scattering and absorption phenomena. It is found that diffusive transport adequately describes the phenomena of laser pulse propagation in highly concentrated colloidal dispersions. A model was developed to describe the absorption in highly concentrated ceramic dispersion. Various complex-shaped monolithic alumina and hydroxyapatite objects were fabricated by CSL and shown to possess uniform microstructure. The mechanical properties and sintering behavior of the parts fabricated by CSL are shown to be comparable to those fabricated by other ceramic processing technique

  3. Industrial ceramics - Properties, forming and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantozzi, Gilbert; Niepce, Jean-Claude; Bonnefont, Guillaume; Alary, J.A.; Allard, B.; Ayral, A.; Bassat, J.M.; Elissalde, C.; Maglione, M.; Beauvy, M.; Bertrand, G.; Bignon, A.; Billieres, D.; Blanc, J.J.; Blumenfeld, P.; Bonnet, J.P.; Bougoin, M.; Bourgeon, M.; Boussuge, M.; Thorel, A.; Bruzek, C.E.; Cambier, F.; Carrerot, H.; Casabonne, J.M.; Chaix, J.M.; Chevalier, J.; Chopinet, M.H.; Couque, H.; Courtois, C.; Leriche, A.; Dhaler, D.; Denape, J.; Euzen, P.; Ganne, J.P.; Gauffinet, S.; Girard, A.; Gonon, M.; Guizard, C.; Hampshire, S.; Joulin, J.P.; Julbe, A.; Ferrato, M.; Fontaine, M.L.; Lebourgeois, R.; Lopez, J.; Maquet, M.; Marinel, S.; Marrony, M.; Martin, J.F.; Mougin, J.; Pailler, R.; Pate, M.; Petitpas, E.; Pijolat, C.; Pires-Franco, P.; Poirier, C.; Poirier, J.; Pourcel, F.; Potier, A.; Tulliani, J.M.; Viricelle, J.P.; Beauger, A.

    2013-01-01

    After a general introduction to ceramics (definition, general properties, elaboration, applications, market data), this book address conventional ceramics (elaboration, material types), thermo-structural ceramics (oxide based ceramics, non-oxide ceramics, fields of application, functional coatings), refractory ceramics, long fibre and ceramic matrix composites, carbonaceous materials, ceramics used for filtration, catalysis and the environment, ceramics for biomedical applications, ceramics for electronics and electrical engineering (for capacitors, magnetic, piezoelectric, dielectric ceramics, ceramics for hyper-frequency resonators), electrochemical ceramics, transparent ceramics (forming and sintering), glasses, mineral binders. The last chapter addresses ceramics used in the nuclear energy sector: in nuclear fuels and fissile material, absorbing ceramics and shields, in the management of nuclear wastes, new ceramics for reactors under construction or for future nuclear energy

  4. Contribution from indoor sources to particle number and mass concentrations in residential houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Congrong; Morawska, Lidia; Hitchins, Jane; Gilbert, Dale

    As part of a large study investigating indoor air in residential houses in Brisbane, Australia, the purpose of this work was to quantify emission characteristics of indoor particle sources in 15 houses. Submicrometer particle number and approximation of PM 2.5 concentrations were measured simultaneously for more than 48 h in the kitchen of all the houses by using a condensation particle counter (CPC) and a photometer (DustTrak), respectively. In addition, characterizations of particles resulting from cooking conducted in an identical way in all the houses were measured by using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) and a DustTrak. All the events of elevated particle concentrations were linked to indoor activities using house occupants diary entries, and catalogued into 21 different types of indoor activities. This enabled quantification of the effect of indoor sources on indoor particle concentrations as well as quantification of emission rates from the sources. For example, the study found that frying, grilling, stove use, toasting, cooking pizza, cooking, candle vaporizing eucalyptus oil and fan heater use, could elevate the indoor submicrometer particle number concentration levels by more than five times, while PM 2.5 concentrations could be up to 3, 30 and 90 times higher than the background levels during smoking, frying and grilling, respectively.

  5. Preparation of non-spherical particles by shell-shield etching for near-field nanopatterning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Jian; Liesbet, Lagae

    2014-01-01

    The shape of polymer particles plays an important role in determining their function. In this paper, we describe a simple and unconventional method called shell-shield etching (SSE) that allows us to prepare freestanding submicrometer- or micrometer-sized polymer particles with various shapes. By precisely varying the time of ultraviolet ozone treatment under the partial shielding effect of the silica shell, we controllably reshape polymer spheres into symmetry-reduced polymer peaches, mushrooms, bowls, and plates. Finite difference time domain simulations indicate that the non-spherical particles obtained from the SSE method might have potential for near-field nanopatterning applications. (papers)

  6. The precursors effects on biomimetic hydroxyapatite ceramic powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoruç, Afife Binnaz Hazar; Aydınoğlu, Aysu

    2017-06-01

    In this study, effects of the starting material on chemical, physical, and biological properties of biomimetic hydroxyapatite ceramic powders (BHA) were investigated. Characterization and chemical analysis of BHA powders were performed by using XRD, FT-IR, and ICP-AES. Microstructural features such as size and morphology of the resulting BHA powders were characterized by using BET, nano particle sizer, pycnometer, and SEM. Additionally, biological properties of the BHA ceramic powders were also investigated by using water-soluble tetrazolium salts test (WST-1). According to the chemical analysis of BHA ceramic powders, chemical structures of ceramics which are prepared under different conditions and by using different starting materials show differences. Ceramic powders which are produced at 80°C are mainly composed of hydroxyapatite, dental hydroxyapatite (contain Na and Mg elements in addition to Ca), and calcium phosphate sulfide. However, these structures are altered at high temperatures such as 900°C depending on the features of starting materials and form various calcium phosphate ceramics and/or their mixtures such as Na-Mg-hydroxyapatite, hydroxyapatite, Mg-Whitlockit, and chloroapatite. In vitro cytotoxicity studies showed that amorphous ceramics produced at 80°C and ceramics containing chloroapatite structure as main or secondary phases were found to be extremely cytotoxic. Furthermore, cell culture studies showed that highly crystalline pure hydroxyapatite structures were extremely cytotoxic due to their high crystallinity values. Consequently, the current study indicates that the selection of starting materials which can be used in the production of calcium phosphate ceramics is very important. It is possible to produce calcium phosphate ceramics which have sufficient biocompatibility at physiological pH values and by using appropriate starting materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Ceramic breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    The breeding blanket is a key component of the fusion reactor because it directly involves tritium breeding and energy extraction, both of which are critical to development of fusion power. The lithium ceramics continue to show promise as candidate breeder materials. This promise was recognized by the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER) design team in its selection of ceramics as the first option for the ITER breeder material. Blanket design studies have indicated properties in the candidate materials data base that need further investigation. Current studies are focusing on tritium release behavior at high burnup, changes in thermophysical properties with burnup, compatibility between the ceramic breeder and beryllium multiplier, and phase changes with burnup. Laboratory and in-reactor tests, some as part of an international collaboration for development of ceramic breeder materials, are underway. 32 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  8. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-23

    Ceramic materials are disclosed which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200--550 C or organic salt (including SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) at temperatures of 25--200 C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components. 1 fig.

  9. Ceramic injection molding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agueda, Horacio; Russo, Diego

    1988-01-01

    Interest in making complex net-shape ceramic parts with good surface finishing and sharp tolerances without machining is a driving force for studying the injection molding technique. This method consists of softhening the ceramic material by means of adding some plastic and heating in order to inject the mixture under pressure into a relatively cold mold where solidification takes place. Essentially, it is the same process used in thermoplastic industry but, in the present case, the ceramic powder load ranges between 80 to 90 wt.%. This work shows results obtained from the fabrication of pieces of different ceramic materials (alumina, barium titanate ferrites, etc.) in a small scale, using equipments developed and constructed in the laboratory. (Author) [es

  10. Applications of Piezoelectric Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Applications of Piezoelectric Ceramics. Piezoelectric Actuators. Nano and Micropositioners. Vibration Control Systems. Computer Printers. Piezoelectric Transformers,Voltage Generators, Spark Plugs, Ultrasonic Motors,. Ultrasonic Generators and Sensors. Sonars, Medical Diagnostic. Computer Memories. NVFRAM ...

  11. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  12. Making Ceramic Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  13. High temperature resistant cermet and ceramic compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, W. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Cermet compositions having high temperature oxidation resistance, high hardness and high abrasion and wear resistance, and particularly adapted for production of high temperature resistant cermet insulator bodies are presented. The compositions are comprised of a sintered body of particles of a high temperature resistant metal or metal alloy, preferably molybdenum or tungsten particles, dispersed in and bonded to a solid solution formed of aluminum oxide and silicon nitride, and particularly a ternary solid solution formed of a mixture of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride. Also disclosed are novel ceramic compositions comprising a sintered solid solution of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride.

  14. Bonded carbon or ceramic fiber composite filter vent for radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassell, Gilbert W.; Brugger, Ronald P.

    1985-02-19

    Carbon bonded carbon fiber composites as well as ceramic or carbon bonded ceramic fiber composites are very useful as filters which can separate particulate matter from gas streams entraining the same. These filters have particular application to the filtering of radioactive particles, e.g., they can act as vents for containers of radioactive waste material.

  15. Technology Implementation Plan. Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Commercial Light Water Reactor Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Terrani, Kurt A.; Powers, Jeffrey J.; Worrall, Andrew; Robb, Kevin R.; Snead, Mary A.

    2015-01-01

    This report is an overview of the implementation plan for ORNL's fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) light water reactor fuel. The fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel consists of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particles embedded inside a fully dense SiC matrix and is intended for utilization in commercial light water reactor application.

  16. Technology Implementation Plan. Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Commercial Light Water Reactor Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, Lance Lewis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Snead, Mary A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This report is an overview of the implementation plan for ORNL's fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) light water reactor fuel. The fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel consists of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particles embedded inside a fully dense SiC matrix and is intended for utilization in commercial light water reactor application.

  17. Selecting Ceramics - Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Cassidy, M.

    2002-01-01

    AIM OF PRESENTATION: To compare a number of materials for extracoronal restoration of teeth with particular reference to CAD-CAM ceramics. CASE DESCRIPTION AND TREATMENT CARRIED OUT: This paper will be illustrated using clinical examples of patients treated using different ceramic restorations to present the advantages and disadvantages and each technique. The different requirements of tooth preparation, impression taking and technical procedures of each system will be presented and compar...

  18. Cavitation damage of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, V.I.; Marinin, V.G.

    1988-01-01

    Consideration is given to results of investigation of ceramic material damage under the effect of cavitation field on their surface, formed in water under the face of exponential concentrator, connected with ultrasonic generator UZY-3-0.4. Amplitude of vibrations of concentrator face (30+-2)x10 -6 m, frequency-21 kHz. It was established that ceramics resistance to cavitation effect correlated with the product of critical of stress intensity factor and material hardness

  19. Impact of Wildfire Emissions on Chloride and Bromide Depletion in Marine Aerosol Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Rachel A; Dadashazar, Hossein; MacDonald, Alexander B; Aldhaif, Abdulamonam M; Maudlin, Lindsay C; Crosbie, Ewan; Aghdam, Mojtaba Azadi; Hossein Mardi, Ali; Sorooshian, Armin

    2017-08-15

    This work examines particulate chloride (Cl - ) and bromide (Br - ) depletion in marine aerosol particles influenced by wildfires at a coastal California site in the summers of 2013 and 2016. Chloride exhibited a dominant coarse mode due to sea salt influence, with substantially diminished concentrations during fire periods as compared to nonfire periods. Bromide exhibited a peak in the submicrometer range during fire and nonfire periods, with an additional supermicrometer peak in the latter periods. Chloride and Br - depletions were enhanced during fire periods as compared to nonfire periods. The highest observed %Cl - depletion occurred in the submicrometer range, with maximum values of 98.9% (0.32-0.56 μm) and 85.6% (0.56-1 μm) during fire and nonfire periods, respectively. The highest %Br - depletion occurred in the supermicrometer range during fire and nonfire periods with peak depletion between 1.8-3.2 μm (78.8% and 58.6%, respectively). When accounting for the neutralization of sulfate by ammonium, organic acid particles showed the greatest influence on Cl - depletion in the submicrometer range. These results have implications for aerosol hygroscopicity and radiative forcing in areas with wildfire influence owing to depletion effects on composition.

  20. Real time measurements of submicrometer aerosols in Seoul, Korea: Sources, characteristics, and processing of organic aerosols during winter time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Zhang, Q.

    2016-12-01

    Highly time-resolved chemical characterization of non-refractory submicrometer particulate matter (NR-PM1) was conducted in Seoul, the capital of Korea, using an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). The measurements were performed during winter when persistent air quality problems associated with elevated PM concentrations were observed. The average NR-PM1 concentration was 27.5 µg m-3 and the average mass was dominated by organics (44%), followed by nitrate (24%) and sulfate (10%). Five distinct sources of organic aerosol (OA) were identified from positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the AMS data: vehicle emissions represented by a hydrocarbon-like OA factor (HOA), cooking represented by a cooking OA factor (COA), wood combustion represented by a biomass burning OA factor (BBOA), and secondary aerosol formation in the atmosphere that is represented by a semi-volatile oxygenated OA factor (SVOOA) and a low volatile oxygenated OA factor (LVOOA). These factors, on average, contributed 16, 20, 23, 15 and 26% to the total OA mass, respectively, with primary organic aerosol (POA = HOA + COA + BBOA) accounting for 59% of the OA mass. On average, both primary emissions and secondary aerosol formation are important factors affecting air quality in Seoul during winter, contributing approximately equal. However, differences in the fraction of PM source and properties were observed between high and low loading PM period. For example, during stagnant period with low wind speed (WS) (0.99 ± 0.7 m/s) and high RH (71%), high PM loadings (43.6 ± 12.4 µg m-3) with enhanced fractions of nitrate (27%) and SVOOA (8%) were observed, indicating a strong influence from locally generated secondary aerosol. On the other hand, when low PM loadings (12.6 ± 7.1 µg m-3), which were commonly associated with high WS (1.8 ± 1.1 m/s) and low RH (50 %), were observed, the fraction of regional sources, such as sulfate (12%) and LVOOA (21

  1. Dielectric silicone elastomers with mixed ceramic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiubianu, George; Bele, Adrian; Cazacu, Maria; Racles, Carmen; Vlad, Stelian; Ignat, Mircea

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Composite ceramics nanoparticles (MCN) with zirconium dioxide and lead zirconate. • Dielectric elastomer films wDith PDMS matrix and MCN as dielectric filler. • Hydrophobic character—water resistant and good flexibility specific to siloxanes. • Increased value of dielectric constant with the content of MCN in dielectric films. • Increased energy output from uniaxial deformation of the dielectric elastomer films. - Abstract: A ceramic material consisting in a zirconium dioxide-lead zirconate mixture has been obtained by precipitation method, its composition being proved by wide angle X-ray powder diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The average diameter of the ceramic particles ranged between 50 and 100 nm, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy images. These were surface treated and used as filler for a high molecular mass polydimethylsiloxane-α,ω-diol (Mn = 450,000) prepared in laboratory, the resulted composites being further processed as films and crosslinked. A condensation procedure, unusual for polydimethylsiloxane having such high molecular mass, with a trifunctional silane was approached for the crosslinking. The effect of filler content on electrical and mechanical properties of the resulted materials was studied and it was found that the dielectric permittivity of nanocomposites increased in line with the concentration of ceramic nanoparticles

  2. Dielectric silicone elastomers with mixed ceramic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiubianu, George, E-mail: george.stiubianu@icmpp.ro [“Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Aleea Gr. Ghica Voda 41A, Iasi 700487 (Romania); Bele, Adrian; Cazacu, Maria; Racles, Carmen; Vlad, Stelian [“Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Aleea Gr. Ghica Voda 41A, Iasi 700487 (Romania); Ignat, Mircea [National R& D Institute for Electrical Engineering ICPE-CA Bucharest, Splaiul Unirii 313, District 3, Bucharest 030138 (Romania)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Composite ceramics nanoparticles (MCN) with zirconium dioxide and lead zirconate. • Dielectric elastomer films wDith PDMS matrix and MCN as dielectric filler. • Hydrophobic character—water resistant and good flexibility specific to siloxanes. • Increased value of dielectric constant with the content of MCN in dielectric films. • Increased energy output from uniaxial deformation of the dielectric elastomer films. - Abstract: A ceramic material consisting in a zirconium dioxide-lead zirconate mixture has been obtained by precipitation method, its composition being proved by wide angle X-ray powder diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The average diameter of the ceramic particles ranged between 50 and 100 nm, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy images. These were surface treated and used as filler for a high molecular mass polydimethylsiloxane-α,ω-diol (Mn = 450,000) prepared in laboratory, the resulted composites being further processed as films and crosslinked. A condensation procedure, unusual for polydimethylsiloxane having such high molecular mass, with a trifunctional silane was approached for the crosslinking. The effect of filler content on electrical and mechanical properties of the resulted materials was studied and it was found that the dielectric permittivity of nanocomposites increased in line with the concentration of ceramic nanoparticles.

  3. Erosion of magnesium potassium phosphate ceramic waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goretta, K. C.

    1998-01-01

    Phosphate-based chemically bonded ceramics were formed from magnesium potassium phosphate (MKP) binder and either industrial fly ash or steel slag. The resulting ceramics were subjected to solid-particle erosion by a stream of either angular Al 2 O 3 particles or rounded SiO 2 sand. Particle impact angles were 30 or 90degree and the impact velocity was 50 m/s. Steady-state erosion rates, measured as mass lost from a specimen per mass of impacting particle, were dependent on impact angle and on erodent particle size and shape. Material was lost by a combination of fracture mechanisms. Evolution of H 2 O from the MKP phase appeared to contribute significantly to the material loss

  4. Erosion of magnesium potassium phosphate ceramic waste forms.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goretta, K. C.

    1998-11-20

    Phosphate-based chemically bonded ceramics were formed from magnesium potassium phosphate (MKP) binder and either industrial fly ash or steel slag. The resulting ceramics were subjected to solid-particle erosion by a stream of either angular Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles or rounded SiO{sub 2} sand. Particle impact angles were 30 or 90{degree} and the impact velocity was 50 m/s. Steady-state erosion rates, measured as mass lost from a specimen per mass of impacting particle, were dependent on impact angle and on erodent particle size and shape. Material was lost by a combination of fracture mechanisms. Evolution of H{sub 2}O from the MKP phase appeared to contribute significantly to the material loss.

  5. Large ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauth, W.E.; Stoddard, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    Prominent ceramic raw materials and products manufacturers were surveyed to determine the state of the art for alumina ceramic fabrication. This survey emphasized current capabilities and limitations for fabrication of large, high-density, high-purity, complex shapes. Some directions are suggested for future needs and development. Ceramic-to-ceramic sealing has applications for several technologies that require large and/or complex vacuum-tight ceramic shapes. Information is provided concerning the assembly of complex monolithic ceramic shapes by bonding of subassemblies at temperatures ranging from 450 to 1500 0 C. Future applications and fabrication techniques for various materials are presented

  6. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anu, Sharma, E-mail: issaranu@gmail.com; Gayatri, Sharma, E-mail: sharmagayatri@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Govt. College of Engineering & Technology, Bikaner, Rajasthan (India)

    2016-05-06

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  7. The history of ceramic filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishima, S

    2000-01-01

    The history of ceramic filters is surveyed. Included is the history of piezoelectric ceramics. Ceramic filters were developed using technology similar to that of quartz crystal and electro-mechanical filters. However, the key to this development involved the theoretical analysis of vibration modes and material improvements of piezoelectric ceramics. The primary application of ceramic filters has been for consumer-market use. Accordingly, a major emphasis has involved mass production technology, leading to low-priced devices. A typical ceramic filter includes monolithic resonators and capacitors packaged in unique configurations.

  8. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  9. Filtração de aerossóis em altas temperaturas utilizando filtros cerâmicos de dupla camada: influência do diâmetro de partícula na eficiência de coleta Filtration of aerosols at high temperatures using a double layer ceramic filter: influence of the particle diameter in the collection efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L de Freitas

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho foram utilizados filtros cerâmicos para filtração de aerossóis, constituídos por dupla camada, onde a primeira camada é formada por um suporte celular de elevada porosidade com diâmetro de poro controlado e a segunda formada por uma película filtrante. A camada suporte foi obtida pela técnica de replicação cerâmica de espuma poliuretânica, por meio da impregnação de uma suspensão aquosa de Al2O3. Foram utilizados suportes de 45 e 75 poros/polegada. A membrana filtrante (Al2O3 e argila foi a mesma para ambos os suportes, sendo composta por uma massa granular cerâmica de baixa porosidade. Os experimentos de filtração foram realizados em temperaturas de 25 a 700 ºC onde mediu-se a capacidade dos filtros de limpar um aerossol de partículas finas polidispersas (diâmetro mediano de 4,6 µm e calculou-se a eficiência de coleta para diâmetros de partícula entre 0,4 e 8,5 µm. Os resultados mostraram que a eficiência diminuiu com o aumento da temperatura e aumentou com o diâmetro da partícula.In this work, ceramic filters were used for aerosol filtration. The filters were constituted by two layers, where the first layer was formed by of a highly porous ceramic support with controlled pore size and the second layer constituted by a fine membrane. The ceramic support was obtained from polymeric foams utilizing a technique of alumina impregnation. The supports had 45 and 75 pores per inch (ppi. The membrane (a mixture of alumina and clay was the same for the two supports, with much smaller pore sizes. The filtration experiments were accomplished at temperatures varying from 25 to 700 ºC, where the ability of the filters for cleaning an aerosol constituted by fine particles (median diameter of 4.6 µm was measured. The collection efficiency was calculated for particle diameters between 0.4 and 8.5 µm. The results showed that the collection efficiency decreased with the increase of the temperature and increased

  10. New ceramics containing dispersants for improved fracture toughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevitt, M.V.; Aldred, A.T.; Chan, Sai-Kit

    1985-07-01

    The invention is a ceramic composition containing a new class of dispersant for hindering crack propagation by means of one or more energy-dissipative mechanisms. The composition is composed of a ceramic matrix with dispersed particles of a transformation-prone rare-earth niobate, tantalate or mixtures of these with each other and/or with a rare-earth vanadate. The dispersants, having a generic composition tRBO/sub 4/, where R is a rare-earth element, B if Nb or Ta and O is oxygen, are mixed in powder form with a powder of the matrix ceramic and sintered to produce a ceramic form or body. The crack-hindering mechanisms operates to provide improved performance over a wide range of temperature and operating conditions.

  11. Ceramic membrane microfilter as an immobilized enzyme reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, T J; Gainer, J L; Kirwan, D J

    1992-10-01

    This study investigated the use of a ceramic microfilter as an immobilized enzyme reactor. In this type of reactor, the substrate solution permeates the ceramic membrane and reacts with an enzyme that has been immobilized within its porous interior. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of permeation rate on the observed kinetic parameters for the immobilized enzyme in order to assess possible mass transfer influences or shear effects. Kinetic parameters were found to be independent of flow rate for immobilized penicillinase and lactate dehydrogenase. Therefore, neither mass transfer nor shear effects were observed for enzymes immobilized within the ceramic membrane. Both the residence time and the conversion in the microfilter reactor could be controlled simply by regulating the transmembrane pressure drop. This study suggests that a ceramic microfilter reactor can be a desirable alternative to a packed bed of porous particles, especially when an immobilized enzyme has high activity and a low Michaelis constant.

  12. Novel technique for manipulating MOX fuel particles using radiation pressure of a laser light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, R.

    2000-01-01

    We have continued theoretical and experimental studies on laser manipulation of nuclear fuel particles, such as UO 2 , PuO 2 and ThO 2 , In this paper, we investigate the applicability of the collection of MOX particles floating in air using radiation pressure of a laser light; some preliminary results are shown. This technique will be useful for removal and confinement of MOX particles being transported by air current or dispersed in a cell box. First, we propose two types of principles for collecting MOX particles. Second, we show some experimental results, Third, we show numerical results of radiation pressure exerted on submicrometer-sized UO 2 particles using Generalized Lorentz-Mie theory. Because optical constants of UO 2 are similar to those of MOX fuel particles, it seems that calculation results obtained hold for MOX fuel particles. 2. Principles of collecting MOX fuel particles using radiation pressure (authors)

  13. Surface modification of ceramics. Ceramics no hyomen kaishitsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hioki, T. (Toyota Central Research and Development Labs., Inc., Nagoya (Japan))

    1993-07-05

    Surface modification of ceramics and some study results using in implantation in surface modification are introduced. The mechanical properties (strength, fracture toughness, flaw resistance) of ceramics was improved and crack was repaired using surface modification by ion implantation. It is predicted that friction and wear properties are considerably affected because the hardness of ceramics is changed by ion implantation. Cementing and metalization are effective as methods for interface modification and the improvement of the adhesion power of the interface between metal and ceramic is their example. It was revealed that the improvement of mechanical properties of ceramics was achieved if appropriate surface modification was carried out. The market of ceramics mechanical parts is still small, therefore, the present situation is that the field of activities for surface modification of ceramics is also narrow. However, it is thought that in future, ceramics use may be promoted surely in the field like medicine and mechatronics. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  14. CeO2-stabilized tetragonal ZrO2 polycrystals (Ce-TZP ceramics)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade Nono, M.C. de.

    1990-12-01

    This work presents the development and the characterization of CeO 2 -stabilized tetragonal ZrO 2 polycrystals (Ce-TZP ceramics), since it is considered candidate material for applications as structural high performance ceramics. Sintered ceramics were fabricated from mixtures of powders containing different CeO 2 content prepared by conventional and nonconventional techniques. These powders and their resultant sintered ceramics were specified by chemical and physical characterization, compactation state and mechanical properties. The chemical characteristics were determined by chemical analysis and the physical characteristics were evaluated by phase content, particle and agglomerate size and aspect, and powder porosity. (author)

  15. Lava ultimate resin nano ceramic for CAD/ CAM: customization case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, M; Arnetzl, G V; Holly, L; Arnetzl, G

    2012-01-01

    Lava Ultimate Resin Nano Ceramic (RNC) blocks are innovative new CAD/CAM materials that make it possible to achieve superior esthetic results in easy steps. The blocks are made of nano ceramic particles embedded in a highly cured resin matrix. Therefore, composite materials can be used to characterize and adjust resin nano ceramic restorations after milling. The milled RNC restorations can be individualized intra-orally or extra-orally, either before or after insertion. Unlike conventional ceramic restorations, customization and glaze firing is neither necessary nor possible with RNC restorations. This opens up the opportunity for intraoral individualization and adaptation of the restorations.

  16. [Ceramic-on-ceramic bearings in total hip arthroplasty (THA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentürk, U; Perka, C

    2015-04-01

    The main reason for total hip arthroplasty (THA) revision is the wear-related aseptic loosening. Younger and active patients after total joint replacement create high demands, in particular, on the bearings. The progress, especially for alumina ceramic-on-ceramic bearings and mixed ceramics have solved many problems of the past and lead to good in vitro results. Modern ceramics (alumina or mixed ceramics containing alumina) are extremely hard, scratch-resistant, biocompatible, offer a low coefficient of friction, superior lubrication and have the lowest wear rates in comparison to all other bearings in THA. The disadvantage of ceramic is the risk of material failure, i.e., of ceramic fracture. The new generation of mixed ceramics (delta ceramic), has reduced the risk of head fractures to 0.03-0.05 %, but the risk for liner fractures remains unchanged at about 0.02 %. Assuming a non-impinging component implantation, ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have substantial advantages over all other bearings in THA. Due to the superior hardness, ceramic bearings produce less third body wear and are virtually impervious to damage from instruments during the implantation process. A specific complication for ceramic-on-ceramic bearings is "squeaking". The high rate of reported squeaking (0.45 to 10.7 %) highlights the importance of precise implant positioning and the stem and patient selection. With precise implant positioning this problem is rare with many implant designs and without clinical relevance. The improved tribology and the presumable resulting implant longevity make ceramic-on-ceramic the bearing of choice for young and active patients. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Porosity and biocompatibility study of ceramic implants based on ZrO2 and Al2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvinova, Larisa; Shupletsova, Valeria; Leitsin, Vladimir; Vasyliev, Roman; Zubov, Dmitry; Buyakov, Ales; Kulkov, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    The work studies ZrO 2 (Me x O y )-based porous ceramics produced from the powders consisting of hollow spherical particles. It was shown that the structure is represented by a cellular framework with bimodal porosity consisting of sphere-like large pores and pores that were not filled with the powder particles during the compaction. For such ceramics, the increase of pore volume is accompanied by the increased strain in an elastic area. It was also shown that the porous ZrO 2 ceramics had no acute or chronic cytotoxicity. At the same time, ceramics possess the following osteoconductive properties: adhesion support, spreading, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs

  18. Effects of process variables on the properties of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) ceramics formed by investment casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, M. W.; Taylor, T. D.; Leigh, H. D.; Wise, S. A.; Buckley, J. D.; Vasquez, P.; Buck, G. M.; Hicks, L. P.

    1993-01-01

    An investment casting process has been developed to produce net-shape, superconducting ceramics. In this work, a factorial experiment was performed to determine the critical process parameters for producing cast YBa2Cu3O7 ceramics with optimum properties. An analysis of variance procedure indicated that the key variables in casting superconductive ceramics are the particle size distribution and sintering temperature. Additionally, the interactions between the sintering temperature and the other process parameters (e.g., particle size distribution and the use of silver dopants) were also found to influence the density, porosity, and critical current density of the fired ceramics.

  19. Local thermal conductivity of polycrystalline AlN ceramics measured by scanning thermal microscopy and complementary scanning electron microscopy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yue-Fei; Wang Li; Wei Bin; Ji Yuan; Han Xiao-Dong; Zhang Ze; Heiderhoff, R.; Geinzer, A. K.; Balk, L. J.

    2012-01-01

    The local thermal conductivity of polycrystalline aluminum nitride (AlN) ceramics is measured and imaged by using a scanning thermal microscope (SThM) and complementary scanning electron microscope (SEM) based techniques at room temperature. The quantitative thermal conductivity for the AlN sample is gained by using a SThM with a spatial resolution of sub-micrometer scale through using the 3ω method. A thermal conductivity of 308 W/m·K within grains corresponding to that of high-purity single crystal AlN is obtained. The slight differences in thermal conduction between the adjacent grains are found to result from crystallographic misorientations, as demonstrated in the electron backscattered diffraction. A much lower thermal conductivity at the grain boundary is due to impurities and defects enriched in these sites, as indicated by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  20. Testing method for ceramic armour and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2016-01-01

    TNO developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this alternative test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armour are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  1. Testing method for ceramic armor and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    TNO has developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the standard Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armor are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  2. Possibilities of special cements in ceramic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capmas, A.; Bier, T.A.

    1993-01-01

    About 25 years ago, the only way to have confinement material for high temperature applications was to prepare a ceramic by sintering or fusion at high temperature. A new technology came, with the production of Low Cement Castables. This new product was obtained by a careful choice of the granulometry of the aggregates, an optimization of the defloculation of fine particles, including the cement (Calcium Aluminate Cement) and the addition of silica fume. Silica fume brought two improvements: a) a fluidifying effect, due partly to the low sensitivity of viscosity to pH, and partly to the geometric effect of the nicely spherical particle, b) a chemical effect, brought by the reaction of silica and Calcium Aluminate Cement to give a coherent zeolithic structure, through which water could escape during the first firing. From a ceramist point of view, it is interesting to understand how this components, nearly colloidal system mixed in water can be heated up to ceramization without any noticeable change in mechanical characteristics and shrinkage. From a more practical point of view, it is also interesting to realize that some characteristics, usually attributed only to ceramics, also apply with low cement castables technology: high compressive strength, flexural strength, corrosion resistance, abrasion resistance, impact resistance. (orig.)

  3. Mechanical properties of ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the mechanical properties of ceramics and aims to provide both a solid background for undergraduate students, as well as serving as a text to bring practicing engineers up to date with the latest developments in this topic so they can use and apply these to their actual engineering work.  Generally, ceramics are made by moistening a mixture of clays, casting it into desired shapes and then firing it to a high temperature, a process known as 'vitrification'. The relatively late development of metallurgy was contingent on the availability of ceramics and the know-how to mold them into the appropriate forms. Because of the characteristics of ceramics, they offer great advantages over metals in specific applications in which hardness, wear resistance and chemical stability at high temperatures are essential. Clearly, modern ceramics manufacturing has come a long way from the early clay-processing fabrication method, and the last two decades have seen the development of sophisticated technique...

  4. Fatigue of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-12-01

    Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ceramic combustor mounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Melvin G.; Janneck, Frank W.

    1982-01-01

    A combustor for a gas turbine engine includes a metal engine block including a wall portion defining a housing for a combustor having ceramic liner components. A ceramic outlet duct is supported by a compliant seal on the metal block and a reaction chamber liner is stacked thereon and partly closed at one end by a ceramic bypass swirl plate which is spring loaded by a plurality of circumferentially spaced, spring loaded guide rods and wherein each of the guide rods has one end thereof directed exteriorly of a metal cover plate on the engine block to react against externally located biasing springs cooled by ambient air and wherein the rod spring support arrangement maintains the stacked ceramic components together so that a normal force is maintained on the seal between the outlet duct and the engine block under all operating conditions. The support arrangement also is operative to accommodate a substantial difference in thermal expansion between the ceramic liner components of the combustor and the metal material of the engine block.

  6. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  7. Ceramic impregnated superabrasives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Robert P.; Sherman, Andrew

    2009-02-10

    A superabrasive fracture resistant compact is formed by depositing successive layers of ceramic throughout the network of open pores in a thermally stable self-bonded polycrystalline diamond or cubic boron nitride preform. The void volume in the preform is from approximately 2 to 10 percent of the volume of the preform, and the average pore size is below approximately 3000 nanometers. The preform is evacuated and infiltrated under at least about 1500 pounds per square inch pressure with a liquid pre-ceramic polymerizable precursor. The precursor is infiltrated into the preform at or below the boiling point of the precursor. The precursor is polymerized into a solid phase material. The excess is removed from the outside of the preform, and the polymer is pyrolized to form a ceramic. The process is repeated at least once more so as to achieve upwards of 90 percent filling of the original void volume. When the remaining void volume drops below about 1 percent the physical properties of the compact, such as fracture resistance, improve substantially. Multiple infiltration cycles result in the deposition of sufficient ceramic to reduce the void volume to below 0.5 percent. The fracture resistance of the compacts in which the pores are lined with formed in situ ceramic is generally at least one and one-half times that of the starting preforms.

  8. Diffusion in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to changes that occur in solids such as ceramics, mainly at high temperatures, which are diffusion controlled, as well as presenting research data. Such changes are related to the kinetics of various reactions such as precipitation, oxidation and phase transformations, but are also related to some mechanical changes, such as creep. The book is composed of two parts, beginning with a look at the basics of diffusion according to Fick's Laws. Solutions of Fick’s second law for constant D, diffusion in grain boundaries and dislocations are presented along with a look at the atomistic approach for the random motion of atoms. In the second part, the author discusses diffusion in several technologically important ceramics. The ceramics selected are monolithic single phase ones, including: A12O3, SiC, MgO, ZrO2 and Si3N4. Of these, three refer to oxide ceramics (alumina, magnesia and zirconia). Carbide based ceramics are represented by the technologically very important Si-ca...

  9. Preliminary analysis in a clayey mass aimed at ceramic blocks production: physical and mineralogical characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, L.J.M.D. da; Apolonio, T.G.; Salviano, A.F.; Taveira, S.K.A.; Garcia, T.G.C.; Silva, J; Luna, P.A.; Macedo, R.S.

    2016-01-01

    The physical, chemical and mineralogical characterization of the clayey mass are important in determining its properties, allowing a better knowledge of the raw material used in the manufacture of ceramic products. This work aims to characterize the raw material used in the manufacture of ceramic sealing blocks in a ceramic industry. Thus, it was evaluated by laboratory tests the raw material used in the production of ceramic blocks in a ceramics industry in the region of Carnauba dos Dantas, RN. The methodology used in the tests is the same as the IPT, which consists in carrying out the plasticity testing, particle size, chemical analysis and X-ray diffraction. Results indicate that the sample studied by the physical and mineralogical characteristics, has the potential to be applied in the manufacture of red ceramic products for use in construction. (author)

  10. Improved performance of diatomite-based dental nanocomposite ceramics using layer-by-layer assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaoli; Xia, Yang; Liu, Mei; Qian, Yunzhu; Zhou, Xuefeng; Gu, Ning; Zhang, Feimin

    2012-01-01

    To fabricate high-strength diatomite-based ceramics for dental applications, the layer-by-layer technique was used to coat diatomite particles with cationic [poly(allylamine hydrochloride)] and anionic [poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate)] polymers to improve the dispersion and adsorption of positively charged nano-ZrO2 (zirconia) as a reinforcing agent. The modified diatomite particles had reduced particle size, narrower size distribution, and were well dispersed, with good adsorption of nano-ZrO2. To determine the optimum addition levels for nano-ZrO2, ceramics containing 0, 20, 25, 30, and 35 wt% nano-ZrO2 were sintered and characterized by the three-point bending test and microhardness test. In addition to scanning electron microscopy, propagation phase-contrast synchrotron X-ray microtomography was used to examine the internal structure of the ceramics. The addition of 30 wt% nano-ZrO2 resulted in the highest flexural strength and fracture toughness with reduced porosity. Shear bond strength between the core and veneer of our diatomite ceramics and the most widely used dental ceramics were compared; the shear bond strength value for the diatomite-based ceramics was found to be significantly higher than for other groups (P ceramics are good potential candidates for ceramic-based dental materials. PMID:22619551

  11. Improved performance of diatomite-based dental nanocomposite ceramics using layer-by-layer assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaoli; Xia, Yang; Liu, Mei; Qian, Yunzhu; Zhou, Xuefeng; Gu, Ning; Zhang, Feimin

    2012-01-01

    To fabricate high-strength diatomite-based ceramics for dental applications, the layer-by-layer technique was used to coat diatomite particles with cationic [poly(allylamine hydrochloride)] and anionic [poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate)] polymers to improve the dispersion and adsorption of positively charged nano-ZrO(2) (zirconia) as a reinforcing agent. The modified diatomite particles had reduced particle size, narrower size distribution, and were well dispersed, with good adsorption of nano-ZrO(2). To determine the optimum addition levels for nano-ZrO(2), ceramics containing 0, 20, 25, 30, and 35 wt% nano-ZrO(2) were sintered and characterized by the three-point bending test and microhardness test. In addition to scanning electron microscopy, propagation phase-contrast synchrotron X-ray microtomography was used to examine the internal structure of the ceramics. The addition of 30 wt% nano-ZrO(2) resulted in the highest flexural strength and fracture toughness with reduced porosity. Shear bond strength between the core and veneer of our diatomite ceramics and the most widely used dental ceramics were compared; the shear bond strength value for the diatomite-based ceramics was found to be significantly higher than for other groups (P < 0.05). Our results show that diatomite-based nanocomposite ceramics are good potential candidates for ceramic-based dental materials.

  12. Effect of Impact Angle on Ceramic Deposition Behavior in Composite Cold Spray: A Finite-Element Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Rohan; Song, Jun

    2017-10-01

    During the cold spraying of particle-reinforced metal matrix composite coatings (ceramic and metal particles mixture) on metal substrates, ceramic particles may either get embedded in the substrate/deposited coating or may rebound from the substrate surface. In this study, the dependence of the ceramic rebounding phenomenon on the spray angle and its effect on substrate erosion have been analyzed using finite-element analysis. From the numerical simulations, it was found that the ceramic particle density and substrate material strength played the major roles in determining the embedding and ceramic retention behavior. Substrate material erosion also influenced the ceramic retention, and the material loss increased as the impact angles decreased from normal. In general, the results concluded that decreasing the impact angle promoted the retention possibility of ceramics in the substrate. This study provides new theoretical insights into the effect of spray angles on the ceramic retention and suggests a new route toward optimizing the spraying process to increase the ceramic retention in composite coatings cold spray.

  13. Production of ceramics from coal fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angjusheva Biljana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dense ceramics are produced from fly ash from REK Bitola, Republic of Macedonia. Four types of fly ash from electro filters and one from the collected zone with particles < 0.063 mm were the subject of this research. Consolidation was achieved by pressing (P= 133 MPa and sintering (950, 1000, 1050 and 11000C and heating rates of 3 and 100/min. Densification was realized by liquid phase sintering and solid state reaction where diopside [Ca(Mg,Al(Si,Al2O6] was formed. Ceramics with optimal properties (porosity 2.96±0.5%, bending strength - 47.01±2 MPa, compressive strength - 170 ±5 MPa was produced at 1100ºC using the heating rate of 10ºC/min.

  14. High flow ceramic pot filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Halem, D.; van der Laan, H.; Soppe, A. I.A.; Heijman, S.G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic pot filters are considered safe, robust and appropriate technologies, but there is a general consensus that water revenues are limited due to clogging of the ceramic element. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of high flow ceramic pot filters to produce more

  15. Ceramic composites: Enabling aerospace materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have the potential for significant impact on the performance of aerospace propulsion and power systems. In this paper, the potential benefits are discussed in broad qualitative terms and are illustrated by some specific application case studies. The key issues in need of resolution for the potential of ceramics to be realized are discussed.

  16. Verification of Ceramic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Lafenetre, Stephanie; Cornillon, Laurence; Rancurel, Michael; De Graaf, Dennis; Hartmann, Peter; Coe, Graham; Laine, Benoit

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the “Mechanical Design and Verification Methodologies for Ceramic Structures” contract [1] awarded by ESA, Thales Alenia Space has investigated literature and practices in affiliated industries to propose a methodological guideline for verification of ceramic spacecraft and instrument structures. It has been written in order to be applicable to most types of ceramic or glass-ceramic materials - typically Cesic®, HBCesic®, Silicon Nitride, Silicon Carbide and ZERODUR®. The proposed guideline describes the activities to be performed at material level in order to cover all the specific aspects of ceramics (Weibull distribution, brittle behaviour, sub-critical crack growth). Elementary tests and their post-processing methods are described, and recommendations for optimization of the test plan are given in order to have a consistent database. The application of this method is shown on an example in a dedicated article [7]. Then the verification activities to be performed at system level are described. This includes classical verification activities based on relevant standard (ECSS Verification [4]), plus specific analytical, testing and inspection features. The analysis methodology takes into account the specific behaviour of ceramic materials, especially the statistical distribution of failures (Weibull) and the method to transfer it from elementary data to a full-scale structure. The demonstration of the efficiency of this method is described in a dedicated article [8]. The verification is completed by classical full-scale testing activities. Indications about proof testing, case of use and implementation are given and specific inspection and protection measures are described. These additional activities are necessary to ensure the required reliability. The aim of the guideline is to describe how to reach the same reliability level as for structures made of more classical materials (metals, composites).

  17. Cyclic mechanical fatigue in ceramic-ceramic composites: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D. III

    1983-01-01

    Attention is given to cyclic mechanical fatigue effects in a number of ceramics and ceramic composites, including several monolithic ceramics in which significant residual stresses should be present as a result of thermal expansion mismatches and anisotropy. Fatigue is also noted in several BN-containing ceramic matrix-particulate composites and in SiC fiber-ceramic matrix composites. These results suggest that fatigue testing is imperative for ceramics and ceramic composites that are to be used in applications subject to cyclic loading. Fatigue process models are proposed which provide a rationale for fatigue effect observations, but do not as yet provide quantitative results. Fiber composite fatigue damage models indicate that design stresses in these materials may have to be maintained below the level at which fiber pullout occurs

  18. Fabrication of high-alloy powders consisting of spherical particles from ultradispersed components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhin, A. V.; Fadeev, A. A.; Sinayskiy, M. A.; Alekseev, N. V.; Tsvetkov, Yu. V.; Arzhatkina, O. A.

    2017-07-01

    It is shown that powders of a model high alloy consisting of spherical particles 25-50 μm in size can be synthesized from a starting ultradispersed powder, which is made of a mixture of the alloy components and is fabricated by the magnesiothermal reduction of metal chlorides in the potassium chloride melt. The synthesis includes the stages of microgranulation of an ultradispersed powder, heat treatment of microgranules, classification of the microgranules with the separation of microgranule fraction of 25-50 μm, spheroidization of the separated fraction in a thermal plasma flow, and classification with the separation of a fraction of micro- and submicrometer-sized particles.

  19. Apparatus for manufacturing ceramics microspheres for cementing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The micro spheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about Illbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  20. Characterization of Conventional and High-Translucency Y-TZP Dental Ceramics Submitted to Air Abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tostes, Bhenya Ottoni; Guimarães, Renato Bastos; Noronha-Filho, Jaime Dutra; Botelho, Glauco Dos Santos; Guimarães, José Guilherme Antunes; Silva, Eduardo Moreira da

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of air-abrasion on t®m phase transformation, roughness, topography and the elemental composition of three Y-TZP (Yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal) dental ceramics: two conventional (Lava Frame and IPS ZirCad) and one with high-translucency (Lava Plus). Plates obtained from sintered blocks of each ceramic were divided into four groups: AS (as-sintered); 30 (air-abrasion with 30 mm Si-coated Al2O3 particles); 50 (air-abrasion with 50 mm Al2O3 particles) and 150 (air-abrasion with 150 mm Al2O3 particles). After the treatments, the plates were submitted to X-ray diffractometry; 3-D profilometry and SEM/EDS. The AS surfaces were composed of Zr and t phases. All treatments produced t®m phase transformation in the ceramics. The diameter of air-abrasion particles influenced the roughness (150>50>30>AS) and the topography. SEM analysis showed that the three treatments produced groove-shaped microretentions on the ceramic surfaces, which increased with the diameter of air-abrasion particles. EDS showed a decrease in Zr content along with the emergence of O and Al elements after air-abrasion. Presence of Si was also detected on the plates air-abraded with 30 mm Si-coated Al2O3 particles. It was concluded that irrespective of the type and diameter of the particles, air-abrasion produced t®m phase transformation, increased the roughness and changed the elemental composition of the three Y-TZP dental ceramics. Lava Plus also behaved similarly to the conventional Y-TZP ceramics, indicating that this high translucency ceramic could be more suitable to build monolithic ceramic restorations in the aesthetic restorative dentistry field.

  1. Alkaline resistant ceramics; Alkalimotstaandskraftiga keramer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westberg, Stig-Bjoern [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Aelvkarleby (Sweden)

    2001-02-01

    Despite durability in several environments, ceramics and refractories can not endure alkaline environments at high temperature. An example of such an environment is when burning biofuel in modern heat and power plants in which the demand for increasing efficiency results in higher combustion temperatures and content of alkaline substances in the flue gas. Some experiences of these environments has been gained from such vastly different equipment as regenerator chambers in the glass industry and MHD-generators. The grains of a ceramic material are usually bonded together by a glassy phase which despite it frequently being a minor constituent render the materials properties and limits its use at elevated temperature. The damage is usually caused by alkaline containing low-melting phases and the decrease of the viscosity of the bonding glass phase which is caused by the alkaline. The surfaces which are exposed to the flue gas in a modern power plant are not only exposed to the high temperature but also a corroding and eroding, particle containing, gas flow of high velocity. The use of conventional refractory products is limited to 1300-1350 deg C. Higher strength and fracture toughness as well as durability against gases, slag and melts at temperatures exceeding 1700 deg C are expected of the materials of the future. Continuous transport of corrosive compounds to the surface and corrosion products from the surface as well as a suitable environment for the corrosion to occur in are prerequisites for extensive corrosion to come about. The highest corrosion rate is therefore found in a temperature interval between the dew point and the melting point of the alkaline-constituent containing compound. It is therefore important that the corrosion resistance is sufficient in the environment in which alkaline containing melts or slag may appear. In environments such as these, even under normal circumstances durable ceramics, such as alumina and silicon carbide, are attacked

  2. Ceramic/metal nanocomposites by lyophilization: Processing and HRTEM study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez-Gonzalez, C.F.; Agouram, S.; Torrecillas, R.; Moya, J.S.; Lopez-Esteban, S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A cryogenic route has been used to obtain ceramic/metal nanostructured powders. ► The powders present good homogeneity and dispersion of metal. ► The metal nanoparticle size distributions are centred in 17–35 nm. ► Both phases, ceramic and metal, present a high degree of crystallinity. ► Good metal/ceramic interfaces due to epitaxial growth, studied by HRTEM. -- Abstract: This work describes a wet-processing route based on spray-freezing and subsequent lyophilization designed to obtain nanostructured ceramic/metal powders. Starting from the ceramic powder and the corresponding metal salt, a water-based suspension is sprayed on liquid nitrogen. The frozen powders are subsequently freeze-dried, calcined and reduced. The material was analyzed using X-ray diffraction analysis at all stages. High resolution transmission electron microscopy studies showed a uniform distribution of metal nanoparticles on the ceramic grain surfaces, good interfaces and high crystallinity, with an average metal particle size in the nanometric range.

  3. Structural properties and neutron irradiation effects of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Toyohiko

    1994-01-01

    In high temperature gas-cooled reactors and nuclear fusion reactors being developed at present, various ceramics are to be used in the environment of neutron irradiation for undertaking important functions. The change of the characteristics of those materials by neutron irradiation must be exactly forecast, but it has been known that the response of the materials is different respectively. The production method of ceramics and the resulted structures of ceramics which control their characteristics are explained. The features of covalent bond and ionic bond, the synthesis of powder and the phase change by heating, sintering and sintering agent, and grain boundary phase are described. The smelling of ceramics by neutron irradiation is caused by the formation of the clusters of Frenkel defects and minute spot defects. Its restoration by annealing is explained. The defects remaining in materials after irradiation are the physical defects by flipping atoms cut due to the collision with high energy particles and the chemical defects by nuclear transformation. Some physical defects can be restored, but chemical defects are never restored. The mechanical properties of ceramics and the effect of irradiation on them, and the thermal properties of ceramics and the effect of irradiation on them are reported. (K.I.)

  4. Transparent ceramics and methods of preparation thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Joel P.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Seeley, Zachary M.; Soules, Thomas F.

    2012-12-25

    A method for forming a transparent ceramic preform in one embodiment includes forming a suspension of oxide particles in a solvent, wherein the suspension includes a dispersant, with the proviso that the suspension does not include a gelling agent; and uniformly curing the suspension for forming a preform of gelled suspension. A method according to another embodiment includes creating a mixture of inorganic particles, a solvent and a dispersant, the inorganic particles having a mean diameter of less than about 2000 nm; agitating the mixture; adding the mixture to a mold; and curing the mixture in the mold for gelling the mixture, with the proviso that no gelling agent is added to the mixture.

  5. Distorting the ceramic familiar: materiality and non-ceramic intervention, Conference, Keramik Museum, Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Livingstone, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Invited conference speaker, Westerwald Keramik Museum, August 2009. Paper title: Distorting the ceramic familiar: materiality and non-ceramic intervention.\\ud \\ud This paper will examine the integration of non-ceramic media into the discourse of ceramics.

  6. Piezoelectric displacement in ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.; Cain, M.; Gee, M.

    1999-01-01

    This Good Practice Guide is intended to aid a user to perform displacement measurements on piezoelectric ceramic materials such as PZT (lead zirconium titanate) in either monolithic or multilayer form. The various measurement issues that the user must consider are addressed, and good measurement practise is described for the four most suitable methods. (author)

  7. Dense ceramic articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockbain, A.G.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for the manufacture of articles of substantially pure dense ceramic materials, for use in severe environments. Si N is very suitable for use in such environments, but suffers from the disadvantage that it is not amenable to sintering. Some disadvantages of the methods normally used for making articles of Si N are mentioned. The method described comprises mixing a powder of the substantially pure ceramic material with an additive that promotes densification, and which is capable of nuclear transmutation into a gas when exposed to radiation, and hot pressing the mixture to form a billet. The billet is then irradiated to convert the additive into a gas which is held captive in the billet, and it is then subjected to a hot forging operation, during which the captive gas escapes and an article of substantially pure dense ceramic material is forged. The method is intended primarily for use for Si N, but may be applied to other ceramic materials. The additive may be Li or Be or their compounds, to the extent of at least 5 ppm and not more than 5% by weight. Irradiation is effected by proton or neutron bombardment. (UK)

  8. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendfra Nagabhushana

    2001-07-01

    The mechanical properties of model systems were analyzed. A reasonably accurate finite element model was implemented and a rational metric to predict the strength of ceramic/metal concentrical joints was developed. The mode of failure of the ceramic/metal joints was determined and the importance of the mechanical properties of the braze material was assessed. Thermal cycling experiments were performed on the model systems and the results were discussed. Additionally, experiments using the concept of placing diffusion barriers on the ceramic surface to limit the extent of the reaction with the braze were performed. It was also observed that the nature and morphology of the reaction zone depends greatly on the nature of the perovskite structure being used. From the experiments, it is observed that the presence of Cr in the Fe-occupied sites decreases the tendency of Fe to segregate and to precipitate out of the lattice. In these new experiments, Ni was observed to play a major role in the decomposition of the ceramic substrate.

  9. Dissolution of crystalline ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    The present program objectives are to lay out the fundamentals of crystalline waste form dissolution. Nuclear waste ceramics are polycrystalline. An assumption of the work is that to the first order, the release rate of a particular radionuclide is the surface-weighted sum of the release rates of the radionuclide from each crystalline form that contains it. In the second order, of course, there will be synergistic effects. There will be also grain boundary and other microstructural influences. As a first approximation, we have selected crystalline phases one at a time. The sequence of investigations and measurements is: (i) Identification of the actual chemical reactions of dissolution including identification of the solid reaction products if such occur. (ii) The rates of these reactions are then determined empirically to give what may be called macroscopic kinetics. (iii) Determination of the rate-controlling mechanisms. (iv) If the rate is controlled by surface reactions, the final step would be to determine the atomic kinetics, that is the specific atomic reactions that occur at the dissolving interface. Our concern with the crystalline forms are in two areas: The crystalline components of the reference ceramic waste form and related ceramics and the alumino-silicate phases that appear in some experimental waste forms and as waste-rock interaction products. Specific compounds are: (1) Reference Ceramic Phases (zirconolite, magnetoplumbite, spinel, Tc-bearing spinel and perovskite); (2) Aluminosilicate phases (nepheline, pollucite, CsAlSi 5 O 12 , Sr-feldspar). 5 figures, 1 table

  10. Ceramic analysis in Greece

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilditch, J.

    2016-01-01

    Scientific, analytical or ‘archaeometric’ techniques for investigating ceramic material have been used within archaeology for over 50 years and now constitute an indispensable tool for archaeologists in the Aegean world (see Jones 1986 for a detailed summary of early work in Greece and Italy) and

  11. Ceramic solid electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodenough, John B. [Center for Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-02-15

    Strategies for the design of ceramic solid electrolytes are reviewed. Problems associated with stoichiometric and doped compounds are compared. In the illustration of design principles, emphasis is given to oxide-ion electrolytes for use in solid-oxide fuel cells, oxygen pumps, and oxygen sensors

  12. Study on Metal Microfilter Coated with Ceramics by Using Plasma Thermal Spray Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, In Gyu; Shin, Hyun Myung; Choi, Hae Woon; Lee, Young Min

    2011-01-01

    This research was performed on a microfilter made of a hybrid material (ceramic + metal) that was coated with ceramics on the metal-filter surface by using the thermal spray method. The ceramic powders used were Al 2 O 3 +40TiO 2 powder with a particle size of 20 μm and Al 2 O 3 (98%+)powder with a particle size of 45 μm. The metal filters were filter-grade 20 μm, 30 μm, and 50 μm sintered metal powder filters (SIKA-R 20 IS, 30 IS, 50 IS: Sinter Metals Filters) and filter-grade 75 μm sintered mesh filter with five layers. Ceramic-coated filters that were coated using the thermal spray method had a great influence on powder material, particle size, and coating thickness. However, these filters showed a fine performance when used as micro-filters

  13. Characterization of ashes of elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum) for potential added in mass red ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, A.M.F.D.; Sales, K.A.; Monteiro, S.N.; Vieira, C.M.F.

    2012-01-01

    This work is in characterizing ash from biomass grass (Pennisetum purpureums) for incorporation into red ceramic masses. The ashes of elephant grass were generated from burning this dry biomass in an industrial furnace of red ceramic. The morphology of the material generated was observed by an optical microscope. The chemical composition was determined by fluorescence X-ray spectrometry, and the identification of phases by X-ray diffraction. The particle size distribution was obtained by sieving. Thermogravimetric analyzes were also conducted. The results indicate that these ashes are constituted of high quantities of SiO 2 , MgO, CaO and K 2 O, totaling approximately 75% of composition of matter. They have a particle size of 0.7 to 2.2mm featuring. The residue as a kind of coarse particles. Therefore, the results of this study can support future research to the addition of this residue in structural ceramics products (red ceramic)

  14. Tensile test of a silicon microstructure fully coated with submicrometer-thick diamond like carbon film using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenlei; Uesugi, Akio; Hirai, Yoshikazu; Tsuchiya, Toshiyuki; Tabata, Osamu

    2017-06-01

    This paper reports the tensile properties of single-crystal silicon (SCS) microstructures fully coated with sub-micrometer thick diamond like carbon (DLC) film using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). To minimize the deformations or damages caused by non-uniform coating of DLC, which has high compression residual stress, released SCS specimens with the dimensions of 120 µm long, 4 µm wide, and 5 µm thick were coated from the top and bottom side simultaneously. The thickness of DLC coating is around 150 nm and three different bias voltages were used for deposition. The tensile strength improved from 13.4 to 53.5% with the increasing of negative bias voltage. In addition, the deviation in strength also reduced significantly compared to bare SCS sample.

  15. Nanofunctionalized zirconia and barium sulfate particles as bone cement additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riaz Gillani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Riaz Gillani1, Batur Ercan1, Alex Qiao3, Thomas J Webster1,21Division of Engineering, 2Department of Orthopaedics, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 3G3 Technology Innovations, LLC, Pittsford, NY, USAAbstract: Zirconia (ZrO2 and barium sulfate (BaSO4 particles were introduced into a methyl methacrylate monomer (MMA solution with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA beads during polymerization to develop the following novel bone cements: bone cements with unfunctionalized ZrO2 micron particles, bone cements with unfunctionalized ZrO2 nanoparticles, bone cements with ZrO2 nanoparticles functionalized with 3-(trimethoxysilylpropyl methacrylate (TMS, bone cements with unfunctionalized BaSO4 micron particles, bone cements with unfunctionalized BaSO4 nanoparticles, and bone cements with BaSO4 nanoparticles functionalized with TMS. Results demonstrated that in vitro osteoblast (bone-forming cell densities were greater on bone cements containing BaSO4 ceramic particles after four hours compared to control unmodified bone cements. Osteoblast densities were also greater on bone cements containing all of the ceramic particles after 24 hours compared to unmodified bone cements, particularly those bone cements containing nanofunctionalized ceramic particles. Bone cements containing ceramic particles demonstrated significantly altered mechanical properties; specifically, under tensile loading, plain bone cements and bone cements containing unfunctionalized ceramic particles exhibited brittle failure modes whereas bone cements containing nanofunctionalized ceramic particles exhibited plastic failure modes. Finally, all bone cements containing ceramic particles possessed greater radio-opacity than unmodified bone cements. In summary, the results of this study demonstrated a positive impact on the properties of traditional bone cements for orthopedic applications with the addition of unfunctionalized and TMS functionalized ceramic nanoparticles

  16. Hydroxyapatite additive influenced the bioactivity of bioactive nano-titania ceramics and new bone-forming capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Zhensheng [Third Military Medical University, College of Biomedical Engineering and Medical Imaging (China); Yang Xiaozhan [Chongqing University of Technology, School of Optoelectronic Information (China); Guo Hongfeng [Third Military Medical University, Tissue Engineering Research Center of Chongqing, Department of Anatomy, College of Basic Medical Sciences (China); Yang Xiaochao; Sun Lili [Third Military Medical University, College of Biomedical Engineering and Medical Imaging (China); Dong Shiwu, E-mail: shiwudong@gmail.com [Third Military Medical University, Tissue Engineering Research Center of Chongqing, Department of Anatomy, College of Basic Medical Sciences (China)

    2012-09-15

    Bioceramics plays an important role in bone-substitutes. In this study, titania porous ceramics with excellent bioactivity were prepared using hydroxyapatite (HA, 10 vol.% contents) as a grain growth inhibitor. The pure TiO{sub 2} porous ceramics were also prepared as a control. After sintered at 1,000 Degree-Sign C with a pressureless sintering method, the particle size of the pure TiO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2}/HA (10 vol.%) porous ceramics were 450 and 310 nm, respectively. Each of the porous ceramics presented numerous pores, which were cross-connected. The size of the pores ranged from 100 to 300 {mu}m. There were also profuse micropores inside the pore wall and between the particles. A SBF soaking experiment demonstrated that the HA additive played an important role in promoting apatite formation. The cell proliferation demonstrated that osteoblasts on the TiO{sub 2}/HA (10 vol.%) porous ceramics proliferated faster than that on the pure TiO{sub 2} ceramics. The histological sections and EDX assay results of the two porous ceramics also illustrated that TiO{sub 2}/HA (10 vol.%) composite ceramics combined with Ca and P elements induced much better apatite formation than that of the pure TiO{sub 2} ceramics. These results indicated that titania ceramics combined with HA holds great promise for bone-substitutes.

  17. Microstructure and fracture analysis of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. G.; Kim, D. J.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, W. J.; Lee, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear fuel enhancing the accident tolerance is satisfied two parts. First, the performance has to be retained compared to the existing UO 2 nuclear fuel and zircaloy cladding system under the normal operation condition. Second, under the severe accident condition, the high temperature structural integrity has to be kept and the generation rate of hydrogen has to be reduced largely. FCM nuclear fuel is composed of tristructural isotropic(TRISO) fuel particle and SiC ceramic matrix. SiC ceramic matrix play an essential part in protecting fission product. In the FCM fuel concept, fission product is doubly protected by TRISO coating layer and SiC ceramic matrix compared to the current commercial UO 2 fuel system. SiC ceramic has excellent properties for fuel application. SiC ceramic has low neutron absorption cross-section, excellent irradiation resistivity and high thermal conductivity. Additionally, the relative thermal conductivity of the SiC ceramic as compared to UO 2 is quite good, reducing operational release of fission products form the fuel. TRISO coating layer which is deposited on UO 2 kernel is consists of PyC/SiC/PyC trialyer and buffer PyC layer. SiC matrix composite with TRISO particle was fabricated by hot pressing. 3 to 20 wt.% of sintering additives were added to investigate reaction between sintering additives and outer PyC layer of TRISO coating layer. The relative densities of all specimens show above 92%. The reaction between sintering additives and PyC is observed in most TRISO particles, the thickness of reactants shows about ten micrometers. The thermal shock resistance of SiC matrix composite was investigated

  18. Thermal shock behavior of toughened gadolinium zirconate/YSZ double-ceramic-layered thermal barrier coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Xinghua; Zhao, Huayu; Zhou, Xiaming; Liu, Chenguang; Wang, Liang; Shao, Fang; Yang, Kai; Tao, Shunyan; Ding, Chuanxian

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Gd 2 Zr 2 O 7 /YSZ DCL thermal barrier coating was designed and fabricated. • The Gd 2 Zr 2 O 7 top ceramic layer was toughened by addition of nanostructured 3YSZ. • Remarkable improvement in thermal shock resistance of the DCL coating was achieved. - Abstract: Double-ceramic-layered (DCL) thermal barrier coating system comprising of toughened Gadolinium zirconate (Gd 2 Zr 2 O 7 , GZ) as the top ceramic layer and 4.5 mol% Y 2 O 3 partially-stabilized ZrO 2 (4.5YSZ) as the bottom ceramic layer was fabricated by plasma spraying and thermal shock behavior of the DCL coating was investigated. The GZ top ceramic layer was toughened by addition of nanostructured 3 mol% Y 2 O 3 partially-stabilized ZrO 2 (3YSZ) to improve fracture toughness of the matrix. The thermal shock resistance of the DCL coating was enhanced significantly compared to that of single-ceramic-layered (SCL) GZ-3YSZ composite coating, which is believed to be primarily attributed to the two factors: (i) the increase in fracture toughness of the top ceramic layer by incorporating nanostructured YSZ particles and (ii) the improvement in strain tolerance through the utilization of 4.5YSZ as the bottom ceramic layer. In addition, the failure mechanisms are mainly attributed to the still low fracture toughness of the top ceramic layer and oxidation of the bond-coat

  19. Bond strength between zirconium ceramic and dual resinous cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Galan Junior

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the influence of different surface treatments on the bond strength between the resinous cement Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan and the structure of In-Ceram YZ (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany. Methods: Fifteen ceramic blocks were assessed: Group 1, finishing with abrasive paper; Group 2, finishing, airborne Al2O3 particle abrasion and silanization; Group 3, finishing, airborne particle abrasion, silicatization and silanization. After treatment, the blocks received cementation of resin composite cylinders with Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan and were submitted to the shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine. Results: The results were statistically analyzed (ANOVA and multiple comparison Student-Newman-Keuls test: Group 1 (9.66 ± 1.67 MPa < Group 2 (16.61 ± 3.38 MPa = Group 3 (19.23 ± 5.69 MPa, with p = 0.007. Conclusion: The structures of the In-Ceram YZ system (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany associated with Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan require previous etching to achieve greater bond strength between the ceramic and cement, and this treatment may be performed with airborne particle abrasion I or traditional silicatization, both followed by silanization.

  20. FIBROUS CERAMIC-CERAMIC COMPOSITE MATERIALS PROCESSING AND PROPERTIES

    OpenAIRE

    Naslain , R.

    1986-01-01

    The introduction of continuous fibers in a ceramic matrix can improve its toughness, if the fiber-matrix bonding is weak enough, due to matrix microcracking and fiber pull-out. Ceramic-ceramic composite materials are processed according to liquid or gas phase techniques. The most important are made of glass, carbide, nitride or oxide matrices reinforced with carbon, SiC or Al2O3 fibers.

  1. Coated particles for lithium battery cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mohit; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Pratt, Russell Clayton; Mullin, Scott Allen; Wang, Xiao-Liang

    2017-07-18

    Particles of cathodic materials are coated with polymer to prevent direct contact between the particles and the surrounding electrolyte. The polymers are held in place either by a) growing the polymers from initiators covalently bound to the particle, b) attachment of the already-formed polymers by covalently linking to functional groups attached to the particle, or c) electrostatic interactions resulting from incorporation of cationic or anionic groups in the polymer chain. Carbon or ceramic coatings may first be formed on the surfaces of the particles before the particles are coated with polymer. The polymer coating is both electronically and ionically conductive.

  2. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husband, P.; Bartošová, I.; Slugeň, V.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics.

  3. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husband, P; Selim, F A; Bartošová, I; Slugeň, V

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics. (paper)

  4. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, E.S.; Forsythe, G.D.; Domanski, D.M.; Chambers, J.A.; Rajendran, G.P.

    1999-05-11

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter is described having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during back pulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  5. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Elizabeth Sokolinski; Forsythe, George Daniel; Domanski, Daniel Matthew; Chambers, Jeffrey Allen; Rajendran, Govindasamy Paramasivam

    1999-01-01

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during backpulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  6. Ceramic Composite Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, Rodney S. (Inventor); Stankovich, Sasha (Inventor); Dikin, Dmitriy A. (Inventor); Nguyen, SonBinh T. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A ceramic composite thin film or layer includes individual graphene oxide and/or electrically conductive graphene sheets dispersed in a ceramic (e.g. silica) matrix. The thin film or layer can be electrically conductive film or layer depending the amount of graphene sheets present. The composite films or layers are transparent, chemically inert and compatible with both glass and hydrophilic SiOx/silicon substrates. The composite film or layer can be produced by making a suspension of graphene oxide sheet fragments, introducing a silica-precursor or silica to the suspension to form a sol, depositing the sol on a substrate as thin film or layer, at least partially reducing the graphene oxide sheets to conductive graphene sheets, and thermally consolidating the thin film or layer to form a silica matrix in which the graphene oxide and/or graphene sheets are dispersed.

  7. Advanced ceramic in structural engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso Rodea, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    The work deals with "Advanced Ceramics in Structural Engineering”. Throughout this work we present the different types of ceramic that are currently in wider use, and the main research lines that are being followed. Ceramics have very interesting properties, both mechanical and electrical and refractory where we can find some of the most interesting points of inquiry. Through this work we try tounderstand this complex world, analyzing both general and specific properties of ...

  8. The technical ceramics (second part)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auclerc, S.; Poulain, E.

    2004-01-01

    This work deals with ceramics used in the nuclear and the automotive industries. Concerning the nuclear sector, ceramics are particularly used in reactors, in the treatment of radioactive wastes and for the storage of the ultimate wastes. Details are given about the different ceramics used. In the automobile sector, aluminium is principally used for its lightness and cordierite, basic material of catalyst supports is especially used in the automobile devices of cleansing. (O.M.)

  9. Ceramic superconductors II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    This volume compiles papers on ceramic superconductors. Topics include: structural patterns in High-Tc superconductors, phase equilibria of barium oxide superconductors, localized electrons in tetragonal YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-δ/, lattice and defect structure and properties of rare earth/alkaline earth-copper-oxide superconductors, alternate candidates for High-Tc superconductors, perovskite-structure superconductors; superconductive thin film fabrication, and superconductor/polymer composites

  10. Piezoelectric Ceramics Characterization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jordan, T

    2001-01-01

    ... the behavior of a piezoelectric material. We have attempted to cover the most common measurement methods as well as introduce parameters of interest. Excellent sources for more in-depth coverage of specific topics can be found in the bibliography. In most cases, we refer to lead zirconate titanate (PZT) to illustrate some of the concepts since it is the most widely used and studied piezoelectric ceramic to date.

  11. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-01-01

    Conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels and chemicals is a major goal for the Nation as it enters the 21st Century. Technically robust and economically viable processes are needed to capture the value of the vast reserves of natural gas on Alaska's North Slope, and wean the Nation from dependence on foreign petroleum sources. Technologies that are emerging to fulfill this need are all based syngas as an intermediate. Syngas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) is a fundamental building block from which chemicals and fuels can be derived. Lower cost syngas translates directly into more cost-competitive fuels and chemicals. The currently practiced commercial technology for making syngas is either steam methane reforming (SMR) or a two-step process involving cryogenic oxygen separation followed by natural gas partial oxidation (POX). These high-energy, capital-intensive processes do not always produce syngas at a cost that makes its derivatives competitive with current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals. This project has the following 6 main tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques

  12. Ion conductivity of nasicon ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoj, J.W.; Engell, J.

    1989-01-01

    The Nasicon ss ,Na 1 + X Zr 2 Si X P 3 - X O 12 o , X , 3, includes some of the best solid state sodium conductors known today. Compositions in the interval 1.6 , X , 2.6 show conductivities comparable to the best β double-prime-alumina ceramics. It is well known that the ion conductivity of β-alumina is strongly dependent on the texture of the ceramic. Here a similar behavior is reported for Nasicon ceramics. Ceramics of the bulk composition Na 2.94 Zr 1.49 Si 2.20 P 0.80 O 10.85 were prepared by a gel method. The final ceramics consist of Nasicon crystals with x = 2.14 and a glass phase. The grain size and texture of the ceramics were controlled by varying the thermal history of the gel based raw materials and the sintering conditions. The room temperature resistivity of the resulting ceramics varies from 3.65*10 3 ohm cm to 1.23*10 3 ohm cm. Using the temperature comparison method and estimates of the area of grain boundaries in the ceramics, the resistivity of the Nasicon phase is estimated to be 225 ohm cm at 25 degrees C. B 2 O 3 - or Al 2 O 3 -doping of the glass bearing Nasicon ceramic lower the room temperature resistivity by a factor 2 to 5. The dopants do not substitute into the Nasicon phase in substantial amounts

  13. Using of sawing quartzite fine residual for obtaining ceramic coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobrega, L.F.P.M.; Souza, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    Quartzite is a metamorphic rock that is consisting mainly of quartz. In Paraiba there is a mining activity of this rock, in the region of Varzea and Junco do Serido especially where many wastes are created, including the sawing residue. The objective is to use the waste cited as the ceramic component coating mass, thereby replacing the quartz. Initially, the raw materials samples were taken and the chemical analysis was done of them. This passed the comminution process to achieve the required minimum particle size. After this, a formulation which added the residue in ceramic mass was made. The specimens were subjected to sintering and it was later made physical tests according to NBR 13818. The results show that the residue can replace the quartz ceramic mass successfully, but not as good as the original raw material. (author)

  14. [Microstructure and mechanical property of a new IPS-Empress 2 dental glass-ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao-ping; Watts, D C; Wilson, N H F; Silsons, N; Cheng, Ya-qin

    2005-03-01

    To investigate the microstructure and mechanical properties of a new IPS-Empress 2 dental glass-ceramic. AFM, SEM and XRD were used to analyze the microstructure and crystal phase of IPS-Empress 2 glass-ceramic. The flexural strength and fracture toughness were tested using 3-point bending method and indentation method respectively. IPS-Empress 2 glass-ceramic mainly consisted of lithium disilicate crystal, lithium phosphate and glass matrix, which formed a continuous interlocking structure. The crystal phases were not changed before and after hot-pressed treatment. AFM showed nucleating agent particles of different sizes distributed on the highly polished ceramic surface. The strength and fracture toughness were 300 MPa and 3.1 MPam(1/2). The high strength and fracture toughness of IPS-Empress 2 glass ceramic are attributed to the fine lithium disilicate crystalline, interlocking microstructure and crack deflection.

  15. Phase transition stability within ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, E.; Wang, D.

    1992-01-01

    Irreversible thermodynamics is applied to analyse nucleation, both in metals and ceramics, in order to distinguish the stability of metastable under cooled melts. The hypothesis of local equilibrium has been used to apply research results from equilibrium thermodynamics, for the study of irreversible processes. The under cooling equation for homogenous nucleation only depends on a coefficient which is not related to the melting point of the material. The calculated critical under cooling values for metals are compared with experimental data. The metastable phase formation of plasma-sprayed alumina and zircon coatings has been discussed based on irreversible thermodynamics. A critical under cooling parameter (β) is defined. The metastable phase formation of plasma-sprayed alumina and zircon has been discussed. The analysis shows that γ-Al 2 O 3 is first formed in the coating since it has a lower β value than α-Al 2 O 3 . Zircon dissociates into ZrO 2 and SiO 2 , and rapid quenching of plasma spraying prevents their re association. The cooling rate determines whether t-ZrO 2 or c-ZrO 2 will form in the sprayed coating. It can be confirmed by the experiments that the content of t-ZrO 2 will increase correspondingly as the sprayed particle size decreases. At high transition temperatures, c-ZrO 2 will be formed because of the anisotropic thermal expansion behaviour in the crystal structure. 22 refs., 2 tabs

  16. Evaluation of Surface Treatment Methods on the Bond Strength of Zirconia Ceramics Systems, Resin Cements and Tooth Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkuş Emek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the effects of airborne-particle abrasion (APA and tribochemical silica coating (TSC surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramics systems, resin cements and tooth surface

  17. Fracture strength of three all-ceramic systems: Top-Ceram compared with IPS-Empress and In-Ceram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quran, Firas Al; Haj-Ali, Reem

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the fracture loads and mode of failure of all-ceramic crowns fabricated using Top-Ceram and compare it with all-ceramic crowns fabricated from well-established systems: IPS-Empress II, In-Ceram. Thirty all-ceramic crowns were fabricated; 10 IPS-Empress II, 10 In-Ceram alumina and 10 Top-Ceram. Instron testing machine was used to measure the loads required to introduce fracture of each crown. Mean fracture load for In-Ceram alumina [941.8 (± 221.66) N] was significantly (p > 0.05) higher than those of Top-Ceram and IPS-Empress II. There was no statistically significant difference between Top-Ceram and IPS-Empress II mean fracture loads; 696.20 (+222.20) and 534 (+110.84) N respectively. Core fracture pattern was highest seen in Top- Ceram specimens.

  18. Multilayer Ceramic Regenerator Materials for 4 K Cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numazawa, T.; Kamiya, K.; Satoh, T.; Nozawa, H.; Yanagitani, T.

    2006-01-01

    The ceramics oxide magnetic materials have shown excellent properties for use as regenerator materials used in 4 K crycoolers. Currently four kinds of oxide magnetic materials GdVO4, GAP=GdAlO3, GOS=Gd2O2S and Tb2O2S are available for applications for regenerators or thermal anchors from 2 K to 8 K. This paper focused on controlling the heat capacity of the (GdxTb1-x)2O2S system to cover the refrigeration temperatures between 6 K and 8 K. A concept of multilayer regenerator material consisting of multicomponent magnetic materials has been proposed and investigated. Two-layer ceramic material including two kinds of magnetic materials (Gd0.1Tb0.9)2O2S+Tb2O2S was successfully fabricated in the form of regenerator particles with an average diameter of 0.25 mm. Measured heat capacity data showed that it had twin peaks relating to those of (Gd0.1Tb0.9)2O2S and Tb2O2S, and the entire curve became broader and wider. The mechanical properties of strength and hardness of the two-layer ceramic material were the same as other ceramic regenerator materials like GOS. Thus, it is concluded that the multilayer ceramic material is very useful to control the heat capacity of the regenerator particles. The cooling tests using the two-layer ceramic material with HoCu2 and GOS have been done to investigate the 2nd stage regenerator configuration

  19. Particle emissions from compressed natural gas engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristovski, Z.D.; Morawska, L.; Hitchins, J.; Thomas, S.; Greenaway, C.; Gilbert, D.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the results of measurements conducted to determine particle and gas emissions from two large compressed natural gas (CNG) spark ignition (SI) engines. Particle size distributions in the range from 0.01-30 μm, and gas composition were measured for five power settings of the engines: 35, 50, 65, 80 and 100% of full power. Particle emissions in the size range between 0.5 and 30 μm, measured by the aerodynamic particle sizer (APS), were very low at a level below two particles cm -3 . These concentrations were comparable with average ambient concentration, and were not considered in the succeeding analysis. Both engines produce significant amounts of particles in the size range between 0.015 and 0.7 μm, measured by the scanning mobility particle size (SMPS). Maximum number of concentrations of about 1 x 10 7 particles cm -3 were very similar for both engines. The CMDs were in the range between 0.020 and 0.060 μm. The observed levels of particulate emission are in terms of number of the same order as emissions from heavy duty diesel engines (Morawska et al., Environ. Sci. Tech. 32, 2033-2042). On the other hand, emissions of CO and NO x of 5.53 and 3.33 g k W h -1 , respectively, for one of the tested engines, were considerably lower than set by the standards. According to the specifications for the gas emissions, provided by the US EPA (US EPA, 1997), this engine can be considered as a 'low-emission' engine, although emissions of submicrometer particles are of the same order as heavy-duty vehicles. (Author)

  20. Multilayer ultra-high-temperature ceramic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehman, Ronald E [Albuquerque, NM; Corral, Erica L [Tucson, AZ

    2012-03-20

    A coated carbon-carbon composite material with multiple ceramic layers to provide oxidation protection from ultra-high-temperatures, where if the carbon-carbon composite material is uninhibited with B.sub.4C particles, then the first layer on the composite material is selected from ZrB.sub.2 and HfB.sub.2, onto which is coated a layer of SiC coated and if the carbon-carbon composite material is inhibited with B.sub.4C particles, then protection can be achieved with a layer of SiC and a layer of either ZrB.sub.2 and HfB.sub.2 in any order.

  1. Particle fuel bed tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, F.L.; Powell, J.R.; Savino, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Gas-cooled reactors, using packed beds of small diameter coated fuel particles have been proposed for compact, high-power systems. The particulate fuel used in the tests was 800 microns in diameter, consisting of a thoria kernel coated with 200 microns of pyrocarbon. Typically, the bed of fuel particles was contained in a ceramic cylinder with porous metallic frits at each end. A dc voltage was applied to the metallic frits and the resulting electric current heated the bed. Heat was removed by passing coolant (helium or hydrogen) through the bed. Candidate frit materials, rhenium, nickel, zirconium carbide, and zirconium oxide were unaffected, while tungsten and tungsten-rhenium lost weight and strength. Zirconium-carbide particles were tested at 2000 K in H 2 for 12 hours with no visible reaction or weight loss

  2. Ceramic Inclusions In Powder Metallurgy Disk Alloys: Characterization and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacuse, Pete; Kantzos, Pete; Telesman, Jack

    2002-01-01

    Powder metallurgy alloys are increasingly used in gas turbine engines, especially as the material chosen for turbine disks. Although powder metallurgy materials have many advantages over conventionally cast and wrought alloys (higher strength, higher temperature capability, etc.), they suffer from the rare occurrence of ceramic defects (inclusions) that arise from the powder atomization process. These inclusions can have potentially large detrimental effect on the durability of individual components. An inclusion in a high stress location can act as a site for premature crack initiation and thereby considerably reduce the fatigue life. Because these inclusions are exceedingly rare, they usually don't reveal themselves in the process of characterizing the material for a particular application (the cumulative volume of the test bars in a fatigue life characterization is typically on the order of a single actual component). Ceramic inclusions have, however, been found to be the root cause of a number of catastrophic engine failures. To investigate the effect of these inclusions in detail, we have undertaken a study where a known population of ceramic particles, whose composition and morphology are designed to mimic the 'natural' inclusions, are added to the precursor powder. Surface connected inclusions have been found to have a particularly large detrimental effect on fatigue life, therefore the volume of ceramic 'seeds' added is calculated to ensure that a minimum number will occur on the surface of the fatigue test bars. Because the ceramic inclusions are irregularly shaped and have a tendency to break up in the process of extrusion and forging, a method of calculating the probability of occurrence and expected intercepted surface and embedded cross-sectional areas were needed. We have developed a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the distributions of these parameters and have verified the simulated results with observations of ceramic inclusions found in macro

  3. Wear and creep of highly crosslinked polyethylene against cobalt chrome and ceramic femoral heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, A L; Jennings, L M; Tipper, J L; Ingham, E; Fisher, J

    2010-10-01

    The wear and creep characteristics of highly crosslinked ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) articulating against large-diameter (36mm) ceramic and cobalt chrome femoral heads have been investigated in a physiological anatomical hip joint simulator for 10 million cycles. The crosslinked UHMWPE/ceramic combination showed higher volume deformation due to creep plus wear during the first 2 million cycles, and a steady-state wear rate 40 per cent lower than that of the crosslinked UHMWPE/cobalt chrome combination. Wear particles were isolated and characterized from the hip simulator lubricants. The wear particles were similar in size and morphology for both head materials. The particle isolation methodology used could not detect a statistically significant difference between the particles produced by the cobalt chrome and alumina ceramic femoral heads.

  4. Thermoluminescence, a method for determining the date at which a ceramic object was fired

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayre, E.V.

    The theory on which thermoluminescence dating of archeological ceramic objects is based and the measurement methods used are outlined. Separation of fine grain particles and quartz particles permits the determination of the thermoluminescence of each and often a more accurate age determination. The application of the method to the dating of a bronze horse from the Metropolitan Museum is described

  5. Deodorant ceramic catalyst. Dasshu ceramics shokubai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, K. (Kobe Steel Ltd., Kobe (Japan)); Naka, R. (Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-07-01

    Concerning debromination to be used for the filter of deodorizing device, those of long life and high deodorizing performance are demanded a great deal. As one of this kind of debromination, a deodorant ceramic catalyst (mangantid) has been developed and put for practical use as deodorant for refrigerator. In this article, the information and knowledge obtained by the development of mangantid, the features as well as several properties of the product are stated. The deodorizing methods currently used practically are roughly divided into 6 kinds such as the adsorption method, the direct combustion method, the catalytic method and the oxidation method, but each of them has its own merit and demerit, hence it is necessary to select the method in accordance with the kind of odor and its generating condition. Mangantid is a compound body of high deodorant material in a honeycomb configuration, and has the features that in comparison with the existing deordorants, its pressure loss is smaller, its deodorizing rate is bigger, and acidic, neutral and basic gaseous components can be removed in a well-balanced manner. Deodorization with mangantid has the mechanism to let the odorous component contact and react with the catalyst and change the component to the non-odorous component in the temperature range from room temperature to the low temperature region. 5 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Glass/Ceramic Composites for Sealing Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Choi, Sung R.

    2007-01-01

    A family of glass/ceramic composite materials has been investigated for use as sealants in planar solid oxide fuel cells. These materials are modified versions of a barium calcium aluminosilicate glass developed previously for the same purpose. The composition of the glass in mole percentages is 35BaO + 15CaO + 5Al2O3 + 10B2O3 + 35SiO2. The glass seal was found to be susceptible to cracking during thermal cycling of the fuel cells. The goal in formulating the glass/ ceramic composite materials was to (1) retain the physical and chemical advantages that led to the prior selection of the barium calcium aluminosilicate glass as the sealant while (2) increasing strength and fracture toughness so as to reduce the tendency toward cracking. Each of the composite formulations consists of the glass plus either of two ceramic reinforcements in a proportion between 0 and 30 mole percent. One of the ceramic reinforcements consists of alumina platelets; the other one consists of particles of yttria-stabilized zirconia wherein the yttria content is 3 mole percent (3YSZ). In preparation for experiments, panels of the glass/ceramic composites were hot-pressed and machined into test bars.

  7. Pre-Hispanic ceramics analyzed using PIXE and radiographic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, S.C.; Rizzutto, M.A.; Added, N.; Barbosa, M.D.L.; Trindade, G.F.; Fleming, M.I.D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Ceramics objects are the most common artifacts found during excavation of archaeological sites and often depicts cultural habits and manufacturing technologies of the culture. The determination of macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of the ceramic objects such as the ceramic porosity, addition of tempers in the clay, main chemical components and the trace elements present in the ceramic can reveal many aspects about the manufacturing processes used by the culture, its degree of development, the provenance of the raw materials and the exchange networks. Also the radiography can help to investigate the manufactured processes, the size of the tempers used and the conservation status of the artifacts. In this present work two non-destructive techniques, radiography and PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) were used to characterize one set of thirty-six pre-Hispanic ceramic pieces from the Chimu Culture conserved in the Museu de Arqueologia e Etnologia (MAE/USP). The PIXE analyses performed in the external beam setup at LAMFI (Laboratório de Análise de Materiais por Feixes Iônicos) allowed measure the principal chemical elements such as Al, Si, K, Ti, Fe and Ca, present in this group of pieces. X-ray imagings allowed identify the manufacture processes, the granularity of the tempers used, as well as the similarity and the differences between the pieces studied.

  8. LSA glass-ceramic tiles made by powder pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueira, F.C.; Bertan, F.M.; Riella, H.G.; Uggioni, E.; Bernardin, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    A low cost alternative for the production of glass-ceramic materials is the pressing of the matrix glass powders and its consolidation simultaneously with crystallization in a single stage of sintering. The main objective of this work was to obtain LSA glass ceramics with low thermal expansion, processed by pressing and sintering a ceramic frit powder. The raw materials were homogenized and melted (1480 deg C, 80min), and the melt was poured in water. The glass was chemically (XRF and AAS) and thermally (DTA, 10 deg C/min, air) characterized, and then ground (60min and 120min). The ground powders were characterized (laser diffraction) and compressed (35MPa and 45MPa), thus forming four systems. The compacts were dried (150 deg C, 24h) and sintered (1175 deg C and 1185 deg C, 10 deg C/min). Finally, the glass-ceramics were characterized by microstructural analysis (SEM and XRD), mechanical behavior (σbending) and thermal analysis (α). The best results for thermal expansion were those for the glass-ceramics processed with smaller particle size and greater compaction pressure. (author)

  9. Method of preparing porous, rigid ceramic separators for an electrochemical cell. [Patent application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, G.; Dusek, J.T.

    Porous, rigid separators for electrochemical cells are prepared by first calcining particles of ceramic material at temperatures above about 1200/sup 0/C for a sufficient period of time to reduce the sinterability of the particles. A ceramic powder that has not been calcined is blended with the original powder to control the porosity of the completed separator. The ceramic blend is then pressed into a sheet of the desired shape and sintered at a temperature somewhat lower than the calcination temperature. Separator sheets of about 1 to 2.5 mm thickness and 30 to 70% porosity can be prepared by this technique. Ceramics such as yttria, magnesium oxide, and magnesium-aluminium oxide have advantageously been used to form separators by this method.

  10. Particle Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Particle Pollution Public Health Issues Particle Pollution Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Particle pollution — ... see them in the air. Where does particle pollution come from? Particle pollution can come from two ...

  11. Exposure to airborne ultrafine particles from cooking in Portuguese homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordado, J C; Gomes, J F; Albuquerque, P C

    2012-10-01

    Cooking was found to be a main source of submicrometer and ultrafine aerosols from gas combustion in stoves. Therefore, this study consisted of the determination of the alveolar deposited surface area due to aerosols resulting from common domestic cooking activities (boiling fish, vegetables, or pasta, and frying hamburgers and eggs). The concentration of ultrafine particles during the cooking events significantly increased from a baseline of 42.7 microm2/cm3 (increased to 72.9 microm2/cm3 due to gas burning) to a maximum of 890.3 microm2/cm3 measured during fish boiling in water and a maximum of 4500 microm2/cm3 during meat frying. This clearly shows that a domestic activity such as cooking can lead to exposures as high as those of occupational exposure activities. The approach of this study considers the determination of alveolar deposited surface area of aerosols generated from cooking activities, namely, typical Portuguese dishes. This type of measurement has not been done so far, in spite of the recognition that cooking activity is a main source of submicrometer and ultrafine aerosols. The results have shown that the levels of generated aerosols surpass the outdoor concentrations in a major European town, which calls for further determinations, contributing to a better assessment of exposure of individuals to domestic activities such as this one.

  12. Improvement microstructural and damage characterization of ceramic composites Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} – V{sub 2}O{sub 5} with MgO nano particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Issa, T. T., E-mail: alazbrh@yahoo.com; Hasan, J. M.; Abdullah, E. T. [University of Baghdad, College of Science, Physics Department, Jaderiha, Baghdad (Iraq); Shokr, F. S. [King Abdul Aziz Universit, Faculty of Science& Art, Physics Department, Rabigh, KSA (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-04-21

    Compacted samples of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-V{sub 2}O{sub 5} – MgO Nano – particles wt. % sintered at different sintering temperature (700, 900, 1100, 1300) ) C° for 2 hours under static air were investigated by x-ray diffraction and differential thermal analysis(DTA), to identify the phase present .Microstructure examination achieved by scanning electron microscopy .Sintered density and porosity were measured for all sintered samples .Compression was tested too and the Brake down voltage and dielectric strength were measure for all sintered samples .The clear improvement were noticed in both microstructure and damage characterization respectively after existing the MgO Nano-particles, by increasing in about 30% in sintered density and 25% for the compressive strength .The improvement also noticed on both brake down voltage and dielectric strength.

  13. Cryo-SEM studies of latex/ceramic nanoparticle coating microstructure development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hui; Scriven, L E; Francis, Lorraine F

    2007-12-15

    Cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) was used to investigate microstructure development of composite coatings prepared from dispersions of antimony-doped tin oxide (ATO) nanoparticles (approximately 30 nm) or indium tin oxide (ITO) nanoparticles (approximately 40 nm) and latex particles (polydisperse, D(v): approximately 300 nm). Cryo-SEM images of ATO/latex dispersions as-frozen show small clusters of ATO and individual latex particles homogeneously distribute in a frozen water matrix. In contrast, cryo-SEM images of ITO/latex dispersions as-frozen show ITO particles adsorb onto latex particle surfaces. Electrostatic repulsion between negatively charged ATO and negatively charged latex particles stabilizes the ATO/latex dispersion, whereas in ITO/latex dispersion, positively charged ITO particles are attracted onto surfaces of negatively charged latex particles. These results are consistent with calculations of interaction potentials from past research. Cryo-SEM images of frozen and fractured coatings reveal that both ceramic nanoparticles and latex become more concentrated as drying proceeds; larger latex particles consolidate with ceramic nanoparticles in the interstitial spaces. With more drying, compaction flattens the latex-latex particle contacts and shrinks the voids between them. Thus, ceramic nanoparticles are forced to pack closely in the interstitial spaces, forming an interconnected network. Finally, latex particles partially coalesce at their flattened contacts, thereby yielding a coherent coating. The research reveals how nanoparticles segregate and interconnect among latex particles during drying.

  14. Factors affecting the electrostatic charge of ceramic powders; Factores que afectan la carga electrostatica en polvos ceremicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorite, I; Romero, J; Fernandez, J F

    2011-07-01

    The phenomenon of electrostatic charge in ceramic powders takes place when the particle surfaces enter in contact between them or with the containers. The accumulation of electrostatic charge is of relevance in ceramic powders in view of their insulating character and the risk of explosions during the material handling. In this work the main factors that affect the appearance of intrinsic charge and tribo-charge in ceramic powder have been studied. In ceramic powders of alumina it has been verified that the smallest particle sizes present an increase of the electrostatic charge of negative polarity. A correlation has been observed between the nature of the OH -surface groups and the electrostatic charge. The intrinsic charge and the tribocharge in ceramic powders can be diminished by compensating the surface groups that support the charge. The dry dispersion of nanoparticles on microparticles allows surface charge compensation with a noticeable modification of the powder agglomeration. (Author) 19 refs.

  15. Development of the mitigation method for carbon steel corrosion with ceramics in PWR secondary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Masato; Shibasaki, Osamu; Miyazaki, Toyoaki; Kaneko, Tetsuji

    2012-09-01

    To verify the effect of depositing ceramic (TiO 2 , La 2 O 3 , and Y 2 O 3 ) on carbon steel to mitigate corrosion, corrosion tests were conducted under simulated chemistry conditions in a PWR secondary system. Test specimens (STPT410) were prepared with and without deposited ceramics. The ceramics were deposited on the specimens under high-temperature and high-pressure water conditions. Corrosion tests were conducted under high pH conditions (9.8) with a flow rate of 1.0-4.7 m/s at 185 deg. C for 200 hours. At a flow rate of 1.0 m/s, the amount of corrosion of the specimens with the ceramics was less than half of that of the specimens without the ceramics. As the flow rate increased, the amount of corrosion increased. However, even at a flow rate of 4.7 m/s, the amount of corrosion was reduced by approximately 30% by depositing the ceramics. After the corrosion tests, the surfaces of the specimens were analyzed with SEM and XRD. When the deposited ceramic was TiO 2 , the surface was densely covered with fine particles (less than 1 μm). From XRD analysis, these particles were identified as ilmenite (FeTiO 3 ). We consider that ilmenite may play an important role in mitigating the corrosion of carbon steel. (authors)

  16. Crystallization of high-strength nano-scale leucite glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharopoulos, A; Chen, X; Wilson, R M; Hill, R; Cattell, M J

    2013-11-01

    Fine-grained, high strength, translucent leucite dental glass-ceramics are synthesized via controlled crystallization of finely milled glass powders. The objectives of this study were to utilize high speed planetary milling of an aluminosilicate glass for controlled surface crystallization of nano-scale leucite glass-ceramics and to test the biaxial flexural strength. An aluminosilicate glass was synthesized, attritor or planetary milled and heat-treated. Glasses and glass-ceramics were characterized using particle size analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Experimental (fine and nanoscale) and commercial (Ceramco-3, IPS Empress Esthetic) leucite glass-ceramics were tested using the biaxial flexural strength (BFS) test. Gaussian and Weibull statistics were applied. Experimental planetary milled glass-ceramics showed an increased leucite crystal number and nano-scale median crystal sizes (0.048-0.055 μm(2)) as a result of glass particle size reduction and heat treatments. Experimental materials had significantly (p0.05) strength difference. All other groups' mean BFS and characteristic strengths were found to be significantly different (pglass-ceramics with high flexural strength. These materials may help to reduce problems associated with brittle fracture of all-ceramic restorations and give reduced enamel wear. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Micromolding for ceramic microneedle arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nieuwkasteele-Bystrova, Svetlana Nikolajevna; Lüttge, Regina

    2011-01-01

    The fabrication process of ceramic microneedle arrays (MNAs) is presented. This includes the manufacturing of an SU-8/Si-master, its double replication resulting in a PDMS mold for production by micromolding and ceramic sintering. The robustness of the replicated structures was tested by means of

  18. Ceramics in nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikalla, T D; Mendel, J E [eds.

    1979-05-01

    Seventy-three papers are included, arranged under the following section headings: national programs for the disposal of radioactive wastes, waste from stability and characterization, glass processing, ceramic processing, ceramic and glass processing, leaching of waste materials, properties of nuclear waste forms, and immobilization of special radioactive wastes. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the papers. (DLC)

  19. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 12. Science and Technology of Ceramics - Functional Ceramics. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 4 Issue 12 December 1999 pp 21-30. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  20. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 8. Science and Technology of Ceramics - Traditional Ceramics. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 4 Issue 8 August 1999 pp 16-24. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. High-temperature LDV seed particle development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frish, Michael B.; Pierce, Vicky G.

    1989-05-01

    The feasibility of developing a method for making monodisperse, unagglomerated spherical particles greater than 50 nm in diameter was demonstrated. Carbonaceous particles were made by pyrolyzing ethylene with a pulsed CO2 laser, thereby creating a non-equilibrium mixture of carbon, hydrogen, hydrocarbon vapors, and unpyrolyzed ethylene. Via a complex series of reactions, the carbon and hydrocarbon vapors quickly condensed into the spherical particles. By cooling and dispersing them in a supersonic expansion immediately after their creation, the hot newly-formed spheres were prevented from colliding and coalescing, thus preventing the problem of agglomeration which as plagued other investigators studying laser-simulated particle formation. The cold particles could be left suspended in the residual gases indefinitely without agglomerating. Their uniform sizes and unagglomerated nature were visualized by collecting the particles on filters that were subsequently examined using electron microscopy. It was found the mean particle size can be coarsely controlled by varying the initial ethylene pressure, and can be finely controlled by varying the fluence (energy/unit area) with which the laser irradiates the gas. The motivating application for this research was to manufacture particles that could be used as laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) seeds in high-temperature high-speed flows. Though the particles made in this program will not evaporate until heated to about 3000 K, and thus could serve as LDV seeds in some applications, they are not ideal when the hot atmosphere is also oxidizing. In that situation, ceramic materials would be preferable. Research performed elsewhere has demonstrated that selected ceramic materials can be manufactured by laser pyrolysis of appropriate supply gases. It is anticipated that, when the same gases are used in conjunction with the rapid cooling technique, unagglomerated spherical ceramic particles can be made with little difficulty. Such

  2. Overview of surface measurements and spatial characterization of submicrometer particulate matter during the DISCOVER-AQ 2013 campaign in Houston, TX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Y J; Sanchez, N P; Wallace, H W; Karakurt Cevik, B; Hernandez, C S; Han, Y; Flynn, J H; Massoli, P; Floerchinger, C; Fortner, E C; Herndon, S; Bean, J K; Hildebrandt Ruiz, L; Jeon, W; Choi, Y; Lefer, B; Griffin, R J

    2017-08-01

    The sources of submicrometer particulate matter (PM 1 ) remain poorly characterized in the industrialized city of Houston, TX. A mobile sampling approach was used to characterize PM 1 composition and concentration across Houston based on high-time-resolution measurements of nonrefractory PM 1 and trace gases during the DISCOVER-AQ Texas 2013 campaign. Two pollution zones with marked differences in PM 1 levels, character, and dynamics were established based on cluster analysis of organic aerosol mass loadings sampled at 16 sites. The highest PM 1 mass concentrations (average 11.6 ± 5.7 µg/m 3 ) were observed to the northwest of Houston (zone 1), dominated by secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass likely driven by nighttime biogenic organonitrate formation. Zone 2, an industrial/urban area south/east of Houston, exhibited lower concentrations of PM 1 (average 4.4 ± 3.3 µg/m 3 ), significant organic aerosol (OA) aging, and evidence of primary sulfate emissions. Diurnal patterns and backward-trajectory analyses enable the classification of airmass clusters characterized by distinct PM sources: biogenic SOA, photochemical aged SOA, and primary sulfate emissions from the Houston Ship Channel. Principal component analysis (PCA) indicates that secondary biogenic organonitrates primarily related with monoterpenes are predominant in zone 1 (accounting for 34% of the variability in the data set). The relevance of photochemical processes and industrial and traffic emission sources in zone 2 also is highlighted by PCA, which identifies three factors related with these processes/sources (~50% of the aerosol/trace gas concentration variability). PCA reveals a relatively minor contribution of isoprene to SOA formation in zone 1 and the absence of isoprene-derived aerosol in zone 2. The relevance of industrial amine emissions and the likely contribution of chloride-displaced sea salt aerosol to the observed variability in pollution levels in zone 2 also are captured by PCA. This

  3. Characterization of cutting soda-lime glass sludge for the formulation of red ceramic products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filogonio, P.H.C.; Reis, A.S.; Louzada, D.M.; Della, V.P.

    2014-01-01

    Considering previous works that have demonstrated the feasibility of soda-lime glass incorporation into red ceramics, this paper aims to determine the potential for incorporation of cutting soda-lime glass sludge in red ceramic manufacturing. Therefore, the waste was characterized by X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, particle size distribution and thermal behavior. The results confirm the chemical and mineralogical similarity between waste and soda-lime glass. Because of this similarity, it is concluded that the soda-lime glass waste has the capability to be used in the manufacturing of red ceramics. (author)

  4. Porous ceramic membrane with superhydrophobic and superoleophilic surface for reclaiming oil from oily water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Changhong; Xu, Youqian; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Yang; Li, Jun

    2012-01-01

    A porous ceramic tube with superhydrophobic and superoleophilic surface was fabricated by sol-gel and then surface modification with polyurethane-polydimethysiloxane, and an oil-water separator based on the porous ceramic tube was erected to characterize superhydrophobic and superoleophilic surface's separation efficiency and velocity when being used to reclaim oil from oily water and complex oily water containing clay particle. The separator is fit for reclaiming oil from oily water.

  5. Particle processing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Yoshio

    2014-02-01

    includes two papers on the fabrication of mechanically reliable nanocomposites by dispersing graphene into a ceramic matrix, and on supercapacitors with high energy densities in a Co(OH)2 system decorated with graphene and carbon nanotubes. As a novel preparation method of oxide films, the fabrication of alumina films with laminated structures by ac anodization is reviewed. Moreover a new type of nanosheet has been fabricated by the exfoliation of layered, ternary transition-metal carbide and nitride compounds, known as Mn + 1AXn phases (or MAX phases) where M is an early transition metal, such as Ti or Nb, A is an A group element, such as Si or Al, X is carbon and/or nitrogen and n = 1-3 [4]. Among the MAX phases, those containing Mo have been theoretically calculated by first-principles calculations to be a source for obtaining Mo2C nanosheets with potentially unique properties. As an example of improving bulk ceramic properties, texturing by using a high magnetic field [5] and sintering by the electric current activated/assisted sintering (ECAS) technology [6] have been demonstrated for ultra-high temperature ceramics with high-temperature strength. A project on the development of materials and particle processing for the field of environment and energy has been ongoing at the National Institute for Materials Science since April 2011. This project employs various core competence technologies for particle processing such as ion beam irradiation for nanoparticle fabrication [7], fullerene nanomaterial processing using liquid-liquid interface precipitation [8], a gas reduction nitridation process to obtain Si3N4-based phosphor materials [9], advanced phosphors via novel processing [10, 11], ultra-high pressure technology for processing and in situ analysis [12, 13], colloidal processing in a high magnetic field to obtain laminated, textured ceramics [1, 3, 5], the ECAS process for nanostructuring ceramics [6] and so forth. Here, I would like to introduce some research

  6. Development of a thin film vitreous bond based composite ceramic coating for corrosion and abrasion services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franke, B.

    2003-01-01

    IPC has been involved with the Alberta Research Council in developing a vitreous bond (VB) - based composite ceramic fluoropolymer coating technology. Compared to the present state of the art which is based on a hard discontinuous phase (ceramic particles) suspended in a soft continuous matrix (fluoropolymer mix) the novelty of our approach consists of designing a composite system in which both the ceramic and the fluoropolymer phases are continuous. The ceramic matrix will provide the strength and the erosion resistance for the fluoropolymer matrix even at high temperatures. The ceramic formulation employed is not affected by temperatures up to 500 o F while the fluoropolymer matrix provides a corrosion protection seal for the ceramic matrix. The inherent flexibility of the polymer matrix will protect against brittle fractures that may develop by handling or impact. Therefore the composite coating is able to withstand the deformation of the substrate without chipping or disbanding. The fluoropolymer matrix also provides dry lubrication properties further enhancing the erosion resistance of the ceramic phase. The thickness of the coating is very thin, in the 25 to 100 micron range. In summary, the coating technology is able to provide the following features: Corrosion protection levels similar to those of fluoropolymer coatings; Erosion resistance similar to that of ceramic coatings; Price comparable to that of polymer coatings; Exceptional wear resistance properties; and Capability for coating complicated shapes internally or externally or both. This paper will discuss the theory and development of this new technology and the resultant coating and potential properties. (author)

  7. Low thermal expansion glass ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    This book is one of a series reporting on international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies With the series, Schott aims to provide an overview of its activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide where glasses and glass ceramics are of interest Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated This volume describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization Thus glass ceramics with thermal c...

  8. Ceramic membrane development in NGK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi, E-mail: kinsakai@ngk.co.jp [Corporate R and D, NGK Insulators, Ltd., Nagoya 467-8530 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    NGK Insulators, Ltd. was established in 1919 to manufacture the electric porcelain insulators for power transmission lines. Since then, our business has grown as one of the world-leading ceramics manufacturing companies and currently supply with the various environmentally-benign ceramic products to worldwide. In this paper, ceramic membrane development in NGK is described in detail. We have been selling ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes and ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for many years to be used for solid/liquid separation in various fields such as pharmaceutical, chemical, food and semiconductor industries. In Corporate R and D, new ceramic membranes with sub-nanometer sized pores, which are fabricated on top of the membrane filters as support, are under development for gas and liquid/liquid separation processes.

  9. Ceramic membrane development in NGK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi

    2011-05-01

    NGK Insulators, Ltd. was established in 1919 to manufacture the electric porcelain insulators for power transmission lines. Since then, our business has grown as one of the world-leading ceramics manufacturing companies and currently supply with the various environmentally-benign ceramic products to worldwide. In this paper, ceramic membrane development in NGK is described in detail. We have been selling ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes and ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for many years to be used for solid/liquid separation in various fields such as pharmaceutical, chemical, food and semiconductor industries. In Corporate R&D, new ceramic membranes with sub-nanometer sized pores, which are fabricated on top of the membrane filters as support, are under development for gas and liquid/liquid separation processes.

  10. Method of forming a ceramic matrix composite and a ceramic matrix component

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Diego, Peter; Zhang, James

    2017-05-30

    A method of forming a ceramic matrix composite component includes providing a formed ceramic member having a cavity, filling at least a portion of the cavity with a ceramic foam. The ceramic foam is deposited on a barrier layer covering at least one internal passage of the cavity. The method includes processing the formed ceramic member and ceramic foam to obtain a ceramic matrix composite component. Also provided is a method of forming a ceramic matrix composite blade and a ceramic matrix composite component.

  11. Zirconia based ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressiani, J.C.; Bressiani, A.H.A.

    1989-05-01

    Within the new generation of ceramic materials, zirconia continues to attract ever increasing attention of scients, technologists and users by virtue of its singular combination of properties and being able to perform thermo-mechanical, electroeletronic, chemico-biological functions. Nevertheless, in order to obtain these properties, a through understanding of the phase transformation mechanisms and microstructural changes is necessary. This paper discusses the main parameters that require control during fabrication of these materials to obtain desired properties for a specific application. (author) [pt

  12. Directionally Solidified Multifunctional Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    Vidrio , Vol. 44 [5] (2005) pp 347 - 352. 9. F. W. Dynys and A. Sayir, "Self Assemble Silicide Architectures by Directional Solidification," Journal...Sociedad Espanola de Ceramica y Vidrio , Vol. 43 [4] (2004) pp 753 - 758. 21. A. Sayir and F. S. Lowery, "Combustion-Resistance of Silicon-Based Ceramics...Espafiola de Cerdmica y Vidrio , Vol. 43 [3], 2004. ISSN-0366-3175-BSCVB9. 14 37. P. Berger, A. Sayir and M. H. Berger, "Nuclear Microprobe using Elastic

  13. Formulation and synthesis by melting process of titanate enriched glass-ceramics and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advocat, T.; Fillet, C.; Lacombe, J.; Bonnetier, A.; McGlinn, P.

    1999-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to provide containment for the separated radionuclides in stable oxide phases with proven resistance to leaching and irradiation damage and in consequence to obtain a glass ceramic or a ceramic material using a vitrification process. Sphene glass ceramic, zirconolite glass ceramic and zirconolite enriched ceramic have been fabricated and characterized by XRD, SEM/EDX and DTA

  14. Nano-ceramics and its molding technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jian; Xu Yunshu

    2007-01-01

    Nano-ceramics and its related knowledge were introduced. Fabrication of nano-ceramic powder, as well as the molding and sintering technologies of nano-ceramics were reviewed. Features of the present molding technologies were analyzed. The applications of nano-ceramics were prospected. (authors)

  15. Preparation of 147Pm ceramic source core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mielcarski, M.

    1989-01-01

    Preparation of ceramic pellets containing fixed promethium-147 is described. Incorporation rate of 147 Pm into the ceramic material was determined. The leachability and vaporization of promethium from the obtained ceramics was investigated. The ceramic pellets prepared by the described procedure, mounted in special holders, can be applied as point sources in beta backscatter thickness gauges. (author)

  16. Fibrous monolithic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovar, D.; King, B.H.; Trice, R.W.; Halloran, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Fibrous monolithic ceramics are an example of a laminate in which a controlled, three-dimensional structure has been introduced on a submillimeter scale. This unique structure allows this all-ceramic material to fail in a nonbrittle manner. Materials have been fabricated and tested with a variety of architectures. The influence on mechanical properties at room temperature and at high temperature of the structure of the constituent phases and the architecture in which they are arranged are discussed. The elastic properties of these materials can be effectively predicted using existing models. These models also can be extended to predict the strength of fibrous monoliths with an arbitrary orientation and architecture. However, the mechanisms that govern the energy absorption capacity of fibrous monoliths are unique, and experimental results do not follow existing models. Energy dissipation occurs through two dominant mechanisms--delamination of the weak interphases and then frictional sliding after cracking occurs. The properties of the constituent phases that maximize energy absorption are discussed. In this article, the authors examine the structure of Si 3 N 4 -BN fibrous monoliths from the submillimeter scale of the crack-deflecting cell-cell boundary features to the nanometer scale of the BN cell boundaries

  17. Ceramic fiber reinforced filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, David P.; McLaughlin, Jerry C.; Lowden, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    A filter for removing particulate matter from high temperature flowing fluids, and in particular gases, that is reinforced with ceramic fibers. The filter has a ceramic base fiber material in the form of a fabric, felt, paper of the like, with the refractory fibers thereof coated with a thin layer of a protective and bonding refractory applied by chemical vapor deposition techniques. This coating causes each fiber to be physically joined to adjoining fibers so as to prevent movement of the fibers during use and to increase the strength and toughness of the composite filter. Further, the coating can be selected to minimize any reactions between the constituents of the fluids and the fibers. A description is given of the formation of a composite filter using a felt preform of commercial silicon carbide fibers together with the coating of these fibers with pure silicon carbide. Filter efficiency approaching 100% has been demonstrated with these filters. The fiber base material is alternately made from aluminosilicate fibers, zirconia fibers and alumina fibers. Coating with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is also described. Advanced configurations for the composite filter are suggested.

  18. Evaluation of width and width uniformity of near-field electrospinning printed micro and sub-micrometer lines based on optical image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Libo; Xia, Yong; Hebibul, Rahman; Wang, Jiuhong; Zhou, Xiangyang; Hu, Yingjie; Li, Zhikang; Luo, Guoxi; Zhao, Yulong; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents an experimental study using image processing to investigate width and width uniformity of sub-micrometer polyethylene oxide (PEO) lines fabricated by near-filed electrospinning (NFES) technique. An adaptive thresholding method was developed to determine the optimal gray values to accurately extract profiles of printed lines from original optical images. And it was proved with good feasibility. The mechanism of the proposed thresholding method was believed to take advantage of statistic property and get rid of halo induced errors. Triangular method and relative standard deviation (RSD) were introduced to calculate line width and width uniformity, respectively. Based on these image processing methods, the effects of process parameters including substrate speed (v), applied voltage (U), nozzle-to-collector distance (H), and syringe pump flow rate (Q) on width and width uniformity of printed lines were discussed. The research results are helpful to promote the NFES technique for fabricating high resolution micro and sub-micro lines and also helpful to optical image processing at sub-micro level.

  19. Influence of size and shape of sub-micrometer light scattering centers in ZnO-assisted TiO2 photoanode for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Trang T. T.; Mathews, Nripan; Lam, Yeng-Ming; Mhaisalkar, Subodh

    2018-03-01

    Sub-micrometer cavities have been incorporated in the TiO2 photoanode of dye-sensitized solar cell to enhance its optical property with light scattering effect. These are large pores of several hundred nanometers in size and scatter incident light due to the difference refraction index between the scattering center and the surrounding materials, according to Mie theory. The pores are created using polystyrene (PS) or zinc oxide (ZnO) templates reported previously which resulted in ellipsoidal and spherical shapes, respectively. The effect of size and shape of scattering center was modeled using a numerical analysis finite-difference time-domain (FDTD). The scattering cross-section was not affected significantly with different shapes if the total displacement volume of the scattering center is comparable. Experiments were carried out to evaluate the optical property with varying size of ZnO templates. Photovoltaic effect of dye-sensitized solar cells made from these ZnO-assisted films were investigated with incident-photon-to-current efficiency to understand the effect of scattering center size on the enhancement of absorption. With 380 nm macropores incorporated, the power conversion efficiency has increased by 11% mostly thanks to the improved current density, while 170 nm and 500 nm macropores samples did not have increment in sufficiently wide range of absorbing wavelengths.

  20. Removing Pathogens Using Nano-Ceramic-Fiber Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Frederick; Kaledin, Leonid

    2005-01-01

    A nano-aluminum-oxide fiber of only 2 nanometers in diameter was used to develop a ceramic-fiber filter. The fibers are electropositive and, when formulated into a filter material (NanoCeram(TradeMark)), would attract electro-negative particles such as bacteria and viruses. The ability to detect and then remove viruses as well as bacteria is of concern in space cabins since they may be carried onboard by space crews. Moreover, an improved filter was desired that would polish the effluent from condensed moisture and wastewater, producing potable drinking water. A laboratory- size filter was developed that was capable of removing greater than 99.9999 percent of bacteria and virus. Such a removal was achieved at flow rates hundreds of times greater than those through ultraporous membranes that remove particles by sieving. Because the pore size of the new filter was rather large as compared to ultraporous membranes, it was found to be more resistant to clogging. Additionally, a full-size cartridge is being developed that is capable of serving a full space crew. During this ongoing effort, research demonstrated that the filter media was a very efficient adsorbent for DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), RNA (ribonucleic acid), and endotoxins. Since the adsorption is based on the charge of the macromolecules, there is also a potential for separating proteins and other particulates on the basis of their charge differences. The separation of specific proteins is a major new thrust of biotechnology. The principal application of NanoCeram filters is based on their ability to remove viruses from water. The removal of more than 99.9999 percent of viruses was achieved by a NanoCeram polishing filter added to the effluent of an existing filtration device. NanoCeram is commercially available in laboratory-size filter discs and in the form of a syringe filter. The unique characteristic of the filter can be demonstrated by its ability to remove particulate dyes such as Metanyl yellow. Its

  1. High flow ceramic pot filters

    OpenAIRE

    van Halem, D.; van der Laan, H.; Soppe, A. I.A.; Heijman, S.G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic pot filters are considered safe, robust and appropriate technologies, but there is a general consensus that water revenues are limited due to clogging of the ceramic element. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of high flow ceramic pot filters to produce more water without sacrificing their microbial removal efficacy. High flow pot filters, produced by increasing the rice husk content, had a higher initial flow rate (6–19 L h−1), but initial LRVs for E. coli o...

  2. Hardness of ion implanted ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, W.C.; McHargue, C.J.; Farlow, G.C.; White, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    It has been established that the wear behavior of ceramic materials can be modified through ion implantation. Studies have been done to characterize the effect of implantation on the structure and composition of ceramic surfaces. To understand how these changes affect the wear properties of the ceramic, other mechanical properties must be measured. To accomplish this, a commercially available ultra low load hardness tester has been used to characterize Al 2 O 3 with different implanted species and doses. The hardness of the base material is compared with the highly damaged crystalline state as well as the amorphous material

  3. Porous ceramics out of oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakunov, V.S.; Balkevich, V.L.; Vlasov, A.S.; Guzman, I.Ya.; Lukin, E.S.; Poluboyarinov, D.N.; Poliskij, R.Ya.

    1977-01-01

    A review is made of manufacturing procedures and properties of oxide ceramics intended for high-temperature thermal insulation and thermal protection applications. Presented are structural characteristics of porous oxide refractories and their properties. Strength and thermal conductivity was shown to depend upon porosity. Described is a procedure for manufacturing porous ceramic materials from aluminium oxide, zirconium dioxide, magnesium oxide, beryllium oxide. The thermal resistance of porous ceramics from BeO is considerably greater than that of other high-refractoriness oxides. Listed are areas of application for porous materials based on oxides

  4. Improved performance of diatomite-based dental nanocomposite ceramics using layer-by-layer assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu X

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoli Lu1,2, Yang Xia1, Mei Liu1, Yunzhu Qian3, Xuefeng Zhou4, Ning Gu4, Feimin Zhang1,41Institute of Stomatology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, 2Nantong Stomatological Hospital, Nantong, 3Center of Stomatology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Suzhou University, Suzhou, 4Suzhou Institute, Southeast University, Suzhou, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: To fabricate high-strength diatomite-based ceramics for dental applications, the layer-by-layer technique was used to coat diatomite particles with cationic [poly(allylamine hydrochloride] and anionic [poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate] polymers to improve the dispersion and adsorption of positively charged nano-ZrO2 (zirconia as a reinforcing agent. The modified diatomite particles had reduced particle size, narrower size distribution, and were well dispersed, with good adsorption of nano-ZrO2. To determine the optimum addition levels for nano-ZrO2, ceramics containing 0, 20, 25, 30, and 35 wt% nano-ZrO2 were sintered and characterized by the three-point bending test and microhardness test. In addition to scanning electron microscopy, propagation phase-contrast synchrotron X-ray microtomography was used to examine the internal structure of the ceramics. The addition of 30 wt% nano-ZrO2 resulted in the highest flexural strength and fracture toughness with reduced porosity. Shear bond strength between the core and veneer of our diatomite ceramics and the most widely used dental ceramics were compared; the shear bond strength value for the diatomite-based ceramics was found to be significantly higher than for other groups (P < 0.05. Our results show that diatomite-based nanocomposite ceramics are good potential candidates for ceramic-based dental materials.Keywords: layer-by-layer, diatomite, nanoceramics, zirconia (ZrO2, dental materials

  5. Deformation of a dental ceramic following adhesive cementation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2010-01-01

    Stress-induced changes imparted in a \\'dentin-bonded-crown\\' material during sintering, annealing, pre-cementation surface modification, and resin coating have been visualized by profilometry. The hypothesis tested was that operative techniques modify the stressing pattern throughout the material thickness. We polished the upper surfaces of 10 ceramic discs to remove surface imperfections before using a contact profilometer (40-nm resolution) to measure the \\'flatness\\'. Discs were re-profiled after annealing and after alumina particle air-abrasion and resin-coating of the \\'fit\\' surface. Polished surfaces were convex, with a mean deflection of 8.4 + or - 1.5 microm. Mean deflection was significantly reduced (P = 0.029) following alumina particle air-abrasion and increased (P < 0.001) on resin-coating. Polishing induced a tensile stress state, resulting in surface convexity. Alumina particle air-abrasion reduced the relative tensile stress state of the contralateral polished surface. Resin-polymerization generated compression within the resin-ceramic \\'hybrid layer\\' and tension in the polished surface and is likely to contribute to the strengthening of ceramics by resin-based cements.

  6. Recycling ceramic industry wastes in sound absorbing materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Arenas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this investigation is to develop a material mainly composed (80% w/w of ceramic wastes that can be applied in the manufacture of road traffic noise reducing devices. The characterization of the product has been carried out attending to its acoustic, physical and mechanical properties, by measuring the sound absorption coefficient at normal incidence, the open void ratio, density and compressive strength. Since the sound absorbing behavior of a porous material is related to the size of the pores and the thickness of the specimen tested, the influence of the particle grain size of the ceramic waste and the thickness of the samples tested on the properties of the final product has been analyzed. The results obtained have been compared to a porous concrete made of crushed granite aggregate as a reference commercial material traditionally used in similar applications. Compositions with coarse particles showed greater sound absorption properties than compositions made with finer particles, besides presenting better sound absorption behavior than the reference porous concrete. Therefore, a ceramic waste-based porous concrete can be potentially recycled in the highway noise barriers field.

  7. Morphological characterization of ceramic fillers made from Indonesian natural sand as restorative dental materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlina, E.; Susra, S.; Fatmala, Y.; Hartoyo, H. M.; Takarini, V.; Usri, K.; Febrida, R.; Djustiana, N.; Panatarani, C.; Joni, I. M.

    2018-02-01

    Dental composite as restorative dental materials can be reinforced using ceramic fillers. Homogeneous distribution of filler particles shall improve its mechanical properties. This paper presents the results of the preliminary study on the ZrO2-Al2O3-SiO2 ceramic fillers made from Indonesian natural sand that can increase the mechanical properties of dental composite. The synthesis was done using zirconium silicate sand (ZrSiO4) and aluminium oxide (Al2O3) precursors, which dissolved together with 70:30 weight ratios. Two types of sand were used: (1) manufactured sand (mesh #80) and (2) natural sand (mesh #400). The samples then heated in the furnace at 1100 °C for 8 hours. The morphological characterization was then evaluated using JEOL Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) for the surface structure that analyze particles size and distribution. Ceramic fillers made from natural sand is homogenous, well distributed with average particle size of 5-10 µm. Comparably, ceramic filler made from the manufactured sand is heterogeneous, poorly distributed and appear as agglomerates with average particle size are 30-50 µm. The results suggest that ceramic fillers made from natural sand demonstrate better character to represent as a functional restorative dental material.

  8. High level leaching of heavy metals from colorful ceramic foodwares: a potential risk to human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderemi, Taiwo Adedoyin; Adenuga, Adeniyi Abiodun; Oyekunle, John Adekunle Oyedele; Ogunfowokan, Aderemi Okunola

    2017-07-01

    Ceramic foodwares are among the products used by people on daily basis without being cautious of exposures to heavy metals through possible leaching from the glaze ceramics. This study investigated the levels of heavy metals found in some commonly used ceramic foodwares in Nigeria with the aim of determining levels of human exposures through the use of the ceramics. To achieve this, acid digestion was carried out for the total metal concentrations and leaching tests were done using 4% acetic acid as a leaching agent. Metal concentrations were quantified using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and particle-induced X-ray emission spectrometry (PIXES) analysis. All the ceramic foodwares studied were found to contain varied amounts of heavy metals in their glazes, with concentrations in the range of 26.45-2071.46, 5.20-547.00, 1.24-2681.02, 2590.00-8848.40, 6.42-654.66, 112.69-649.95, 63.38-2518.51, and 3786.51-8249.44 μg g -1 for Pb, Cd, Zn, As, Cu, Cr, Mn, and Fe, respectively. Concentrations of the metals leached from the ceramics were in the range of 0.11-0.97, 0.01-0.28, 0.00-4.19, 1.93-15.00, 0.01-0.41, 0.09-0.60, 0.01-2.14, and 0.01-11.53 mgL -1 for Pb, Cd, Zn, As, Cu, Cr, Mn, and Fe, respectively. Comparing the ratio of the metals leached from the ceramic wares with those of the metal oxides in the ceramics, it was noticeable that not all the metals detected in the ceramic samples were domiciled in the glaze but in the clay materials used for the ceramics.

  9. Agglomeration of ceramic powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, James D.; Larosa, Judith; Dirkse, Fredrick

    1989-01-01

    A research program directed at a critical comparison of numerical models for power agglomeration with experimental observations is currently underway. Central to this program is the quantitative characterization of the distribution of mass within an agglomerate as a function of time. Current experiments are designed to restrict agglomeration to a surface, which is oriented perpendicular to the force of gravity. These experiments are discussed with reference to: their significance to ceramic processing; artifacts which may be avoided in microgravity experiments; and the comparison of information available in real space (from optical microscopy) to that in reciprocal space (from light scattering). The principle machine requirement appears to be a need to obtain information at small scattering angles.

  10. Creep in electronic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Routbort, J. L.; Goretta, K. C.; Arellano-Lopez, A. R.

    2000-04-27

    High-temperature creep measurements combined with microstructural investigations can be used to elucidate deformation mechanisms that can be related to the diffusion kinetics and defect chemistry of the minority species. This paper will review the theoretical basis for this correlation and illustrate it with examples from some important electronic ceramics having a perovskite structure. Recent results on BaTiO{sub 3}, (La{sub 1{minus}x}Sr){sub 1{minus}y}MnO{sub 3+{delta}}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x}, (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and Sr(Fe,Co){sub 1.5}O{sub x} will be presented.

  11. Ceramics for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a number of applications in fusion devices, among the most critical of which are magnetic coil insulators, windows for RF heating systems, and structural uses. Radiation effects dominate consideration of candidate materials, although good pre-irradiation properties are a requisite. Materials and components can be optimized by careful control of chemical and microstructural content, and application of brittle material design and testing techniques. Future directions for research and development should include further extension of the data base in the areas of electrical, structural, and thermal properties; establishment of a fission neutron/fusion neutron correlation including transmutation gas effects; and development of new materials tailored to meet the specific needs of fusion reactors

  12. Synthesis of luminescent YVO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} submicrometer crystals through hydrogels as directing agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yan; Zheng, Yuhui [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Qianming, E-mail: qmwang@scnu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Ministry of Education (MOE) Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Environmental Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhang, Cheng Cheng [Departments of Physiology and Developmental Biology, University of Texas Southwestern MedicalCenter, Dallas (United States)

    2012-08-15

    The innovative hydrogel template (polyacrylamide or polyacrylic acid) directed synthesis of YVO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphor in a controlled manner was thoroughly studied. Photoluminescence spectra show the europium(III)-doped yttrium orthovanadate could exhibit strong red emissions within the soft matrix (polyacrylamide) and remain relatively stable even when the temperature reached nearly 100 Degree-Sign C. After calcination process, X-ray powder diffraction patterns, SEM and DLS measurements implied that the sample was in agreement with pure tetragonal phase and the particle sizes were in the range of 100-200 nm. More importantly, YVO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} products prepared based on hydrogels have remarkable improvement in emission intensities compared to phosphors synthesized by conventional approach. Similar results of overall quantum efficiency also support that YVO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} assembled by PAM hydrogel (1.94%) is better than the routine way (0.91%). -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YVO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} could be formed within the soft matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The as-derived YVO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} exhibited red emissions and remain relatively stable nearly 100 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YVO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} prepared by hydrogels has remarkable improvement in emission intensities.

  13. Sintering behavior of LZSA glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Rubem Klegues Montedo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The LZSA glass-ceramic system (Li2O-ZrO2-SiO2-Al2O 3 shows interesting properties, such as good chemical resistance, low thermal expansion, high abrasion resistance, and a low dielectric constant. However, in order to obtain a high performance material for specific applications, the sintering behavior must be better understood so that the porosity may be reduced and other properties improved. In this context, a sintering investigation for a specific LZSA glass-ceramic system composition was carried out. A 18.8Li2O-8.3ZrO2-64.2SiO2-8.7Al 2O3 glass was prepared by melting the solids, quenching the melt in water, and grinding the resulting solid in order to obtain a powder (3.68 μm average particle diameter. Subsequently, the glass powder was characterized (chemical analysis and determination of thermal properties and the sintering behavior was investigated using optical non-contact dilatometry measurements. The results showed that the crystallization process strongly reduced the sintering in the temperature interval from 785 to 940 °C, and a maximum thermal shrinkage of 15.4% was obtained with operating conditions of 1020 °C and 180 minutes.

  14. Moessbauer studies of Inca ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, U.; Wagner, F.E.; Marticorena, B.; Salazar, R.; Schwabe, R.; Riederer, J.

    1986-01-01

    To obtain information on the firing of Inca ceramics, 7 samples from different locations were studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy including a detailed laboratory refiring procedure. The glaze typical for the surface of this ware was studied by Moessbauer scattering. (Auth.)

  15. Non destructive evaluation of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, R.E. Jr

    1992-01-01

    While monolithic and composite ceramics have been successfully manufactured, inconsistencies in processing and the unpredictable nature of their failure have limited their use as engineering materials. The optimization of the processing and properties of ceramics and the structures, devices and systems made from them demand the innovative application of modern nondestructive materials characterization techniques to monitor and control as many stages of the production process as possible. This paper will describe the state-of-the-art of nondestructive evaluation techniques for characterization of monolithic ceramics and ceramic composites. Among the techniques to be discussed are laser ultrasonics, acoustic microscopy, thermography, microfocus and x-ray tomography, and micro-photoelasticity. Application of these and other nondestructive evaluation techniques for more effective and efficient real-time process control will result in improved product quality and reliability. 27 refs

  16. Low Thermal Expansion Glass Ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Hans

    2005-01-01

    This book appears in the authoritative series reporting the international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies. This series provides an overview of Schott's activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide in which glasses and glass ceramics are of interest. Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated. This new extended edition describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics. The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions. Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization. Thus g...

  17. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  18. Preparation of porous ceramics from nanocrystalline zirconia and its microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitin, D.S.; Zhukov, V.A.; Kul'kov, S.N.; Perkov, V.V.; Buyakova, S.P.

    2004-01-01

    The behaviour of ZrO 2 (Y) nanocrystalline powder under pressing, the effect of forming pressure, the temperature and the time of sintering on the structure of the sintered porous ceramics are under study. It is shown that on pressing the fracturing of powder particles and their agglomerates takes place even at low pressures (≅50 MPa). The change of densification mechanisms is revealed - from quasi-liquid displacement of powder particles at the beginning of mechanical action to fracture of coarse structural elements. It is established that a strong skeleton responsible for needed porosity is formed even at the initial stage of sintering [ru

  19. Metal-ceramic joint assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian

    2002-01-01

    A metal-ceramic joint assembly in which a brazing alloy is situated between metallic and ceramic members. The metallic member is either an aluminum-containing stainless steel, a high chromium-content ferritic stainless steel or an iron nickel alloy with a corrosion protection coating. The brazing alloy, in turn, is either an Au-based or Ni-based alloy with a brazing temperature in the range of 9500 to 1200.degree. C.

  20. Multiphase-Multifunctional Ceramic Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-30

    systems for high temperatura applications” “ Estudios de Ferroelasticidad en Sistemas Cerámicos Multifásicos para Aplicaciones en Alta Temperatura ...Ceramic Coatings Performing Organization names: Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional – Unidad Queretaro...materials, Cinvestav. Thesis: “Ferroelasticity studies in multiphase ceramic systems for high temperatura applications”. Her work mainly focused in the

  1. Nano-Ceramic Coated Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junghyun

    2013-01-01

    Plastic products, due to their durability, safety, and low manufacturing cost, are now rapidly replacing cookware items traditionally made of glass and ceramics. Despite this trend, some still prefer relatively expensive and more fragile ceramic/glassware because plastics can deteriorate over time after exposure to foods, which can generate odors, bad appearance, and/or color change. Nano-ceramic coatings can eliminate these drawbacks while still retaining the advantages of the plastic, since the coating only alters the surface of the plastic. The surface coating adds functionality to the plastics such as self-cleaning and disinfectant capabilities that result from a photocatalytic effect of certain ceramic systems. These ceramic coatings can also provide non-stick surfaces and higher temperature capabilities for the base plastics without resorting to ceramic or glass materials. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) are the candidates for a nano-ceramic coating to deposit on the plastics or plastic films used in cookware and kitchenware. Both are wide-bandgap semiconductors (3.0 to 3.2 eV for TiO2 and 3.2 to 3.3 eV for ZnO), so they exhibit a photocatalytic property under ultraviolet (UV) light. This will lead to decomposition of organic compounds. Decomposed products can be easily washed off by water, so the use of detergents will be minimal. High-crystalline film with large surface area for the reaction is essential to guarantee good photocatalytic performance of these oxides. Low-temperature processing (nano-ceramic coatings (TiO2, ZnO) on plastic materials (silicone, Teflon, PET, etc.) that can possess both photocatalytic oxide properties and flexible plastic properties. Processing cost is low and it does not require any expensive equipment investment. Processing can be scalable to current manufacturing infrastructure.

  2. Method for preparing ceramic composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, K.B.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.

    1996-01-09

    A process is disclosed for preparing ceramic composite comprising blending TiC particulates, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particulates and nickel aluminide and consolidating the mixture at a temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite having fracture toughness equal to or greater than 7 MPa m{sup 1/2}, a hardness equal to or greater than 18 GPa. 5 figs.

  3. Methods of three-dimensional electrophoretic deposition for ceramic and cermet applications and systems thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Klint Aaron; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Worsley, Marcus

    2016-09-27

    A ceramic, metal, or cermet according to one embodiment includes a first layer having a gradient in composition, microstructure and/or density in an x-y plane oriented parallel to a plane of deposition of the first layer. A ceramic according to another embodiment includes a plurality of layers comprising particles of a non-cubic material, wherein each layer is characterized by the particles of the non-cubic material being aligned in a common direction. Additional products and methods are also disclosed.

  4. Microstructure Control of Barium Titanate Grain-oriented Ceramics and Their Piezoelectric Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Rintaro; Nakashima, Koichi; Fujii, Ichiro; Wada, Satoshi; Hayashi, Hiroshi; Nagamori, Yoshitaka; Yamamoto, Yuichi

    2011-01-01

    The Barium titanate (BaTiO 3 , BT) [110] grain-oriented ceramics along [110] direction were prepared by a templated grain growth (TGG) method. The [110] oriented BT platelike particles (t-BT) were used as template particles. The relationship between poling treatment program and piezoelectric constant was investigated. The change in the poling conditions did not greatly influence domain size and the piezoelectric constant. The relationship between piezoelectric properties and domain size in BT grain-oriented ceramics was investigated. The smaller domain size was required to increase the piezoelectric constant.

  5. Mechanical activation of ceramic powders and its influence on the quality of the refractory linings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceganac, Z.; Acimovic, Z.; Andric, Lj.; Petrov, M.; Mihajlovic, S.

    2003-01-01

    In the paper we present results of the investigation of the influence of mechanical activation of ceramic powders-talc and alumina, on the quality of refractory linings for casting applications. It is shown that additional fine grinding of ceramic powders increases the quality of the refractory lining. Grinding and activation of the particles with various granulations contributes to the creation of the homogenous continuous layer of refractory lining on the sand moulds and cores, as well as on the evaporating polystyrene patterns for applications in the Lost foam casting process. Refractory linings obtained within the activation of particles procedure have better adherence to moulds, cores and evaporating patterns. (Original)

  6. Microwave sintering of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayannis, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the potential of microwave irradiation as an innovative energy- efficient alternative to conventional heating technologies in ceramic manufacturing is reviewed, addressing the advantages/disadvantages, while also commenting on future applications of possible commercial interest. Ceramic materials have been extensively studied and used due to several advantages they exhibit. Sintering ceramics using microwave radiation, a novel technology widely employed in various fields, can be an efficient, economic and environmentally-friendlier approach, to improve the consolidation efficiency and reduce the processing cycle-time, in order to attain substantial energy and cost savings. Microwave sintering provides efficient internal heating, as energy is supplied directly and penetrates the material. Since energy transfer occurs at a molecular level, heat is generated throughout the material, thus avoiding significant temperature gradients between the surface and the interior, which are frequently encountered at high heating rates upon conventional sintering. Thus, rapid, volumetric and uniform heating of various raw materials and secondary resources for ceramic production is possible, with limited grain coarsening, leading to accelerated densification, and uniform and fine-grained microstructures, with enhanced mechanical performance. This is particularly important for manufacturing large-size ceramic products of quality, and also for specialty ceramic materials such as bioceramics and electroceramics. Critical parameters for the process optimization, including the electromagnetic field distribution, microwave-material interaction, heat transfer mechanisms and material transformations, should be taken into consideration.

  7. Method for Waterproofing Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliostro, Domenick E. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Hygroscopic ceramic materials which are difficult to waterproof with a silane, substituted silane or silazane waterproofing agent, such as an alumina containing fibrous, flexible and porous, fibrous ceramic insulation used on a reentry space vehicle, are rendered easy to waterproof if the interior porous surface of the ceramic is first coated with a thin coating of silica. The silica coating is achieved by coating the interior surface of the ceramic with a silica precursor converting the precursor to silica either in-situ or by oxidative pyrolysis and then applying the waterproofing agent to the silica coated ceramic. The silica precursor comprises almost any suitable silicon containing material such as a silane, silicone, siloxane, silazane and the like applied by solution, vapor deposition and the like. If the waterproofing is removed by e.g., burning, the silica remains and the ceramic is easily rewaterproofed. An alumina containing TABI insulation which absorbs more that five times its weight of water, absorbs less than 10 wt. % water after being waterproofed according to the method of the invention.

  8. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and

  9. Solid state reaction in alumina nanoparticles/LZSA glass-ceramic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montedo, O.K.; Oliveira, A.N. de; Raupp-Pereira, F.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this work is to present results related to solid state reactions on LZSA glass-ceramic composites containing alumina reinforcement nano-particles. A LZSA (Li2O-ZrO2-SiO2-Al2O3) glass-ceramic has been prepared by sintering of powders and characterized. Composites containing 0 to 77 vol.% of alumina nanoparticles (27-43 nm APS, 35 m2.g-1 SSA) and a 16.9Li2O•5.0ZrO2•65.1SiO2•8.6Al2O3 glass-ceramic matrix have been prepared. X-ray diffractometry studies have been performed in order of investigating the solid state reactions occurring in LZSA-based composites. Results of the XRD patterns have been related to the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), Young modulus, and dielectric constant, showing that, in comparison with the glass-ceramic composition, the composites showed a decrease of CTE with the alumina concentration increasing, due to the increasing of beta-spodumeness formation (solid solution of beta-spodumene, Li2O.Al2O3.4-10SiO2). The performance of the glass-ceramic was improved with the alumina nano-particles addition, showing potential of using in the preparation of Low Thermal Co-fired Ceramics (LTCC). (author)

  10. Factors controlling crystallization of miserite glass-ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammed, Fenik K; Moorehead, Robert; van Noort, Richard; Pollington, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate a range of variables affecting the synthesis of a miserite glass-ceramic (GC). Miserite glass was synthesized by the melt quench technique. The crystallization kinetics of the glass were determined using Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA). The glasses were ground with dry ball-milling and then sieved to different particle sizes prior to sintering. These particle sizes were submitted to heat treatment regimes in a high temperature furnace to form the GC. The crystal phases of the GC were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the microstructure of the cerammed glass. XRD analysis confirmed that the predominant crystalline phase of the GC was miserite along with a minor crystalline phase of cristobalite only when the particle size is <20 μm and the heat treatment at 1000°C was carried out for 4h and slowly cooled at the furnace rate. For larger particle sizes and faster cooling rates, a pseudowollastonite crystalline phase was produced. Short sintering times produced either a pseudowollastonite or xonotolite crystalline phase. The current study has shown that particle size and heat treatment schedules are major factors in controlling the synthesis of miserite GC. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Processing and properties of pressable ceramic with non-uniform reinforcement for selective-toughening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Wei [School of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); School of Dentistry, The University of Western Australia, WA 6009 (Australia); Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Hu, Xiaozhi, E-mail: xiao.zhi.hu@uwa.edu.au [School of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); Ichim, Paul [School of Dentistry, The University of Western Australia, WA 6009 (Australia); Sun, Xudong [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Brittle low-strength and low-toughness pressable dental ceramic can be reinforced by ductile elongated gold-particles (GP). A customized crown structure can be adequately strengthened by distributing GP only in critical sections of the crown, where high tensile stresses are experienced. In the present study, a non-uniformly structured ceramic-matrix composite with excellent interfacial bonding, twofold fracture toughness and strength at desired locations, is fabricated using pressable dental ceramic and GP. The layout pattern and sequence of different GP/ceramic powder mixtures, high-temperature flow properties of these mixtures during hot-pressing and the sample mold geometry are used to control the distribution and locations of GP for selective toughening and strengthening. Nano-crystalline structures of the pressable ceramic-matrix and the nano-scaled interfacial region around GP have been revealed by high-magnification field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Toughening and strengthening mechanisms of the elongated GP including residual stresses from composite processing and ductile fracture of GP are discussed together with SEM observations. Bulk flexural strength and local micro-indentation fracture and deformation characteristics of the selective-toughened ceramic/metal composite have been compared to those of the monolithic pressable ceramic to validate the toughening and strengthening mechanisms.

  12. Aqueous dispersion of red clay-based ceramic powder with the addition of starch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Victoria Alcantar Umaran

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The optimum dispersion and rheological properties of red clay-based ceramic suspension loaded with unary and binary starch were investigated in aqueous medium. The aqueous ceramic suspension was prepared consisting of red clay, quartz, feldspar, and distilled water. Using a polyelectrolyte dispersant (Darvan 821A, the ternary ceramic powder was initially optimized to give the smallest average particle size at 0.8 wt. (% dispersant dosage as supported by sedimentation test. This resulted into an optimum high solid loading of 55 wt. (%. The addition of either unary or binary starches to the optimized ceramic slurry increased the viscosity but maintained an acceptable fluidity. The mechanism of such viscosity increase was found to be due to an adsorption of starch granules onto ceramic surfaces causing tolerable agglomeration. Correspondingly, the rheological evaluations showed that the flow behaviors of all starch-loaded ceramic slurries can be described using Herschel-Bulkley model. The parameters from this model indicated that all ceramic slurries loaded with starch are shear thinning that is required for direct casting process.

  13. Electron beam treatments of electrophoretic ceramic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Riccardis, M.F.; Carbone, D.; Piscopiello, E.; Antisari, M. Vittori

    2008-01-01

    In this work a method to densify ceramic coating obtained by electrophoresis and to improve its adhesion to the substrate is proposed. It consists in irradiating the coating surface by electron beam (EB). Alumina and alumina-zirconia coatings were deposited on stainless steel substrates and treated by low power EB. SEM, XRD and TEM characterizations demonstrated that the sintering occurred. Moreover, it is shown that on alumina-zirconia coating the EB irradiation produced a composite material consisting principally of tetragonal zirconia particles immersed in an amorphous alumina matrix. The adhesion stress of EB treated coating was estimated by stud pull test and it was found to be comparable to that of plasma-sprayed coatings

  14. Ceramics based on calcium pyrophosphate nanopowders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana V. Safronova

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Present work is aimed at the fabrication of resorbable bioceramics based on calcium pyrophosphate (CPP from the synthesized powders of amorphous hydrated calcium pyrophosphate (AHCPP. Amorphous hydratedcalcium pyrophosphate in the form of nanopowders was precipitated from Ca(NO3 2 and (NH4 4P2O7 solutions at room temperature in the presence of PO3– ions. Crystalline CPP powder was fabricated from AHCPP by its thermal decomposition at 600 °C and consisted of β- and α- phase. Small particles, with the size less than 200 nm, were formed promoting sintering of the ceramic material. The final sample, sintered at 900 °C, exhibits microstructure with submicron grains, apparent density of 87% of theoretical density (TD and demonstrates tensile strength of 70 MPa.

  15. Particle beam generator using a radioactive source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, D.G.

    1993-03-30

    The apparatus of the present invention selects from particles emitted by a radioactive source those particles having momentum within a desired range and focuses the selected particles in a beam having at least one narrow cross-dimension, and at the same time attenuates potentially disruptive gamma rays and low energy particles. Two major components of the present invention are an achromatic bending and focusing system, which includes sector magnets and quadrupole, and a quadrupole doublet final focus system. Permanent magnets utilized in the apparatus are constructed of a ceramic (ferrite) material which is inexpensive and easily machined.

  16. KNN–NTK composite lead-free piezoelectric ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuoka, T., E-mail: ta-matsuoka@mg.ngkntk.co.jp; Kozuka, H.; Kitamura, K.; Yamada, H.; Kurahashi, T.; Yamazaki, M.; Ohbayashi, K. [NGK SPARK PLUG Co., Ltd., 2808 Iwasaki, Komaki, Aichi 485-8510 (Japan)

    2014-10-21

    A (K,Na)NbO₃-based lead-free piezoelectric ceramic was successfully densified. It exhibited an enhanced electromechanical coupling factor of kₚ=0.52, a piezoelectric constant d₃₃=252 pC/N, and a frequency constant Nₚ=3170 Hz m because of the incorporation of an elaborate secondary phase composed primarily of KTiNbO₅. The ceramic's nominal composition was 0.92K₀.₄₂Na₀.₄₄Ca₀.₀₄Li₀.₀₂Nb₀.₈₅O₃–0.047K₀.₈₅Ti₀.₈₅Nb₁.₁₅O₅–0.023BaZrO₃ –0.0017Co₃O₄–0.002Fe₂O₃–0.005ZnO, abbreviated herein as KNN–NTK composite. The KNN–NTK ceramic exhibited a dense microstructure with few microvoids which significantly degraded its piezoelectric properties. Elemental maps recorded using transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (TEM–EDS) revealed regions of high concentrations of Co and Zn inside the NTK phase. In addition, X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed that a small portion of the NTK phase was converted into K₂(Ti,Nb,Co,Zn)₆O₁₃ or CoZnTiO₄ by a possible reaction between Co and Zn solutes and the NTK phase during a programmed sintering schedule. TEM studies also clarified a distortion around the KNN/NTK interfaces. Such an NTK phase filled voids between KNN particles, resulting in an improved chemical stability of the KNN ceramic. The manufacturing process was subsequently scaled to 100 kg per batch for granulated ceramic powder using a spray-drying technique. The properties of the KNN–NTK composite ceramic produced using the scaled-up method were confirmed to be identical to those of the ceramic prepared by conventional solid-state reaction sintering. Consequently, slight changes in the NTK phase composition and the distortion around the KNN/NTK interfaces affected the KNN–NTK composite ceramic's piezoelectric characteristics.

  17. Effect of texturing on polarization switching dynamics in ferroelectric ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, Sergey; Genenko, Yuri A.; Koruza, Jurij; Schultheiß, Jan; von Seggern, Heinz; Sakamoto, Wataru; Ichikawa, Hiroki; Murata, Tatsuro; Hayashi, Koichiro; Yogo, Toshinobu

    2016-01-01

    Highly (100),(001)-oriented (Ba0.85Ca0.15)TiO3 (BCT) lead-free piezoelectric ceramics were fabricated by the reactive templated grain growth method using a mixture of plate-like CaTiO3 and BaTiO3 particles. Piezoelectric properties of the ceramics with a high degree of texture were found to be considerably enhanced compared with the BCT ceramics with a low degree of texture. With increasing the Lotgering factor from 26% up to 94%, the piezoelectric properties develop towards the properties of a single crystal. The dynamics of polarization switching was studied over a broad time domain of 8 orders of magnitude and was found to strongly depend on the degree of orientation of the ceramics. Samples with a high degree of texture exhibited 2-3 orders of magnitude faster polarization switching, as compared with the ones with a low degree of texture. This was rationalized by means of the Inhomogeneous Field Mechanism model as a result of the narrower statistical distribution of the local electric field values in textured media, which promotes a more coherent switching process. The extracted microscopic parameters of switching revealed a decrease of the critical nucleus energy in systems with a high degree of texture providing more favorable switching conditions related to the enhanced ferroelectric properties of the textured material.

  18. Laser and Particle Guiding Micro-Elements for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Plettner, Tomas; Spencer, James; Wisdom, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    Laser driven particle accelerators based on the current generation of lasers will require sub-micron control of the laser field as well as precise beam guiding. Hence the fabrication techniques that allow integrating both elements into an accelerator-on-chip format become critical for the success of such particle accelerators. Micromachining technology for silicon has been shown to be one such feasible technology in PAC2003 but with a variety of complications on the laser side. Fortunately, in recent years the fabrication of transparent ceramics has become an interesting technology that could be applied for laser-particle accelerators in several ways. We discuss this area, its advantages such as the range of materials it provides and various ways to implement it followed by some different test examples that have been considered. One important goal of this approach is an integrated system that could avoid the necessity of having to inject either laser or particle pulses into these structures.

  19. Design and In-Situ Processing of Metal-Ceramic and Ceramic-Ceramic Microstructures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sass, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    .... Metal-ceramic microstructures have been synthesized in situ by a variety of novel processing techniques, including the partial reduction of oxide compounds and displacement reactions and sol-gel...

  20. FOREWORD: Focus on Advanced Ceramics Focus on Advanced Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Naoki

    2011-06-01

    Much research has been devoted recently to developing technologies for renewable energy and improving the efficiency of the processes and devices used in industry and everyday life. Efficient solutions have been found using novel materials such as platinum and palladium-based catalysts for car exhaust systems, samarium-cobalt and neodymium-iron-boron permanent magnets for electrical motors, and so on. However, their realization has resulted in an increasing demand for rare elements and in their deficit, the development of new materials based on more abundant elements and new functionalities of traditional materials. Moreover, increasing environmental and health concerns demand substitution of toxic or hazardous substances with nature-friendly alternatives. In this context, this focus issue on advanced ceramics aims to review current trends in ceramics science and technology. It is related to the International Conference on Science and Technology of Advanced Ceramics (STAC) held annually to discuss the emerging issues in the field of ceramics. An important direction of ceramic science is the collaboration between experimental and theoretical sciences. Recent developments in density functional theory and computer technology have enabled the prediction of physical and chemical properties of ceramics, thereby assisting the design of new materials. Therefore, this focus issue includes articles devoted to theory and advanced characterization techniques. As mentioned above, the potential shortage of rare elements is becoming critical to the industry and has resulted in a Japanese government initiative called the 'Ubiquitous Element Strategy'. This focus issue also includes articles related to this strategy and to the associated topics of energy conversion, such as phosphors for high-efficiency lighting and photocatalysts for solar-energy harvesting. We hope that this focus issue will provide a timely overview of current trends and problems in ceramics science and

  1. All-ceramic crowns: bonding or cementing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospiech, Peter

    2002-12-01

    Despite the wide variety of all-ceramic systems available today, the majority of dental practitioners hesitate to recommend and insert all-ceramic crowns. This article regards the nature of the ceramic materials, the principles of bonding and adhesion, and the clinical problems of the acid-etch technique for crowns. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed, and the influences of different factors on the strength of all-ceramic crowns are presented. Finally, the conclusion is drawn that conventional cementing of all-ceramic crowns is possible when the specific properties of the ceramics are taken into consideration.

  2. Exoelectron emission from magnesium borate glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Takamichi; Yanagisawa, Hideo; Nakamichi, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Riichi; Kawanishi, Masaharu.

    1986-01-01

    Thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) of a magnesium borate glass ceramics was investigated for its application to dosemetric use. It has been found that the TSEE glow patterns of the magnesium borate glass ceramics as well as a Li 2 B 4 O 7 glass ceramics depend on the kind of the radiation used and that the heat resistance of the magnesium borate glass ceramics is higher than that of the Li 2 B 4 O 7 glass ceramics. Therefore, the TSEE glow patterns of the magnesium borate glass ceramics indicate a possibility to be used as the dose measurement for each kind of radiation in the mixed radiation field. (author)

  3. Producing ceramic laminate composites by EPD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, P.S.; Sarkar, P.; Datta, S.

    1996-01-01

    The search for tough structural ceramics to operate at high temperatures in hostile environments has led to the development of ceramic composites. This class of material includes laminar ceramic-ceramic composites, continuous-fiber-reinforced ceramic composites and functionally graded materials. The present authors developed electrophoretic deposition (EPD) to synthesize lamellar, fiber-reinforced and functionally graded composites. This paper briefly describes the synthesis and characterization of these EPD composites and introduces a novel class of lamellar composites with nonplanar layers. The synthesis of the latter demonstrates the facility of the EPD process for the synthesis of ceramic composites. The process is totally controllable via suspension concentration, deposition current, voltage and time

  4. Support Services for Ceramic Fiber-Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, J.P.

    2000-06-06

    Structural and functional materials used in solid- and liquid-fueled energy systems are subject to gas- and condensed-phase corrosion and erosion by entrained particles. For a given material, its temperature and the composition of the corrodents determine the corrosion rates, while gas flow conditions and particle aerodynamic diameters determine erosion rates. Because there are several mechanisms by which corrodents deposit on a surface, the corrodent composition depends not only on the composition of the fuel, but also on the temperature of the material and the size range of the particles being deposited. In general, it is difficult to simulate under controlled laboratory conditions all of the possible corrosion and erosion mechanisms to which a material may be exposed in an energy system. Therefore, with funding from the Advanced Research Materials Program, the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is coordinating with NCC Engineering and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to provide researchers with no-cost opportunities to expose materials in pilot-scale systems to conditions of corrosion and erosion similar to those occurring in commercial power systems. The EERC has two pilot-scale solid-fuel systems available for exposure of materials coupons. The slagging furnace system (SFS) was built under the DOE Combustion 2000 Program as a testing facility for advanced heat exchanger subsystems. It is a 2.5-MMBtu/hr (2.6 x 10{sup 6} kJ/hr) solid-fuel combustion system with exit temperatures of 2700 to 2900 F to ensure that the ash in the main combustor is molten and flowing. Sample coupons may be exposed in the system either within the slagging zone or near the convective air heater at 1800 F (980 C). In addition, a pilot-scale entrained-bed gasifier system known as the transport reactor development unit (TRDU) is available. Also operating at approximately 2.5 MMBtu/hr (2.6 x 10{sup 6} kJ/hr), it is a pressurized unit

  5. Thermal-Conductivity Studies of Macro-porous Polymer-Derived SiOC Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, L.; Li, Y. M.; Zheng, X. H.; Zhu, J.; Tang, D. W.; Wu, J. Q.; Xu, C. H.

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional reticular macro-porous SiOC ceramics structure, made of spherical agglomerates, has been thermally characterized using a freestanding sensor-based method. The effective thermal conductivity of the macro-porous SiOC ceramics, including the effects of voids, is found to be to at room temperature, comparable with that of alumina aerogel or carbon aerogel. These results suggest that SiOC ceramics hold great promise as a thermal insulation material for use at high temperatures. The measured results further reveal that the effective thermal conductivity is limited by the low solid-phase volume fraction for the SiOC series processed at the same conditions. For SiOC ceramics processed under different pyrolysis temperatures, the contact condition between neighboring particles in the SiOC networks is another key factor influencing the effective thermal conductivity.

  6. High quality ceramic coatings sprayed by high efficiency hypersonic plasma spraying gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Sheng; Xu Binshi; Yao JiuKun

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduced the structure of the high efficiency hypersonic plasma spraying gun and the effects of hypersonic plasma jet on the sprayed particles. The optimised spraying process parameters for several ceramic powders such as Al 2 O 3 , Cr 2 O 3 , ZrO 2 , Cr 3 C 2 and Co-WC were listed. The properties and microstructure of the sprayed ceramic coatings were investigated. Nano Al 2 O 3 -TiO 2 ceramic coating sprayed by using the high efficiency hypersonic plasma spraying was also studied. Compared with the conventional air plasma spraying, high efficiency hypersonic plasma spraying improves greatly the ceramic coatings quality but at low cost. (orig.)

  7. Effect of Liquid Phase Content on Thermal Conductivity of Hot-Pressed Silicon Carbide Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Kwang-Young; Jang, Hun; Lee, Seung-Jae; Kim, Young-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a promising material for Particle-Based Accident Tolerant (PBAT) fuel, fission, and fusion power applications due to its superior physical and thermal properties such as low specific mass, low neutron cross section, excellent radiation stability, low coefficient of thermal expansion, and high thermal conductivity. Thermal conductivity of PBAT fuel is one of very important factors for plant safety and energy efficiency of nuclear reactors. In the present work, the effect of Y 2 O 3 -Sc 2 O 3 content on the microstructure and thermal properties of the hot pressed SiC ceramics have been investigated. Suppressing the β to α phase transformation of SiC ceramics is beneficial in increasing the thermal conductivity of liquid-phase sintered SiC ceramics. Developed SiC ceramics with Y 2 O 3 -Sc 2 O 3 additives are very useful for thermal conductivity on matrix material of the PBAT fuel

  8. Residual stress in ceramics and ceramic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oden, M.

    1992-01-01

    Residual stresses in Si 3 N 4 and SiC have been measured with X-ray diffraction after grinding and thermal shock. The produced surface stresses are compressive after both treatments. The stresses show a strong dependence on the quenching temperature up to a certain temperature when cracks relax the stresses. The influence of the amount of reinforcing phase on the residual stress state in a Al 2 O 3 /SiC whisker composite was investigated and correlated to a modified Eshelby model. The agreement is excellent. The composite was quenched in liquid He (4K) and the stress state measured after show no relaxation of stresses, indicating elastic behaviour. An in situ strain measurement as a function of temperature conducted on a Al 2 O 3 /SiC whisker composite and a SiC/TiB 2 particle composite show very good agreement with the Eshelby model for the Al 2 O 3 /SiC system but not agreement for the SiC/TiB 2 system. The reason is believed to be stress relaxation during sample preparation. (au) (53 refs., 24 figs., 14 tabs.)

  9. Density determination of sintered ceramic nuclear fuel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landspersky, H.; Medek, J.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility was tested of using solids for pycnometric determination of the density of uranium dioxide-based sintered ceramic fuel materials manufactured by the sol-gel method in the shape of spherical particles of 0.7 to 1.0 mm in size and of particles smaller than 200 μm. For fine particles, this is the only usable method of determining their density which is a very important parameter of the fine fraction when it is employed for the manufacture of fuel elements by vibration compacting. The method consists in compacting a mixture of pycnometric material and dispersed particles of uranium dioxide, determining the size and weight of the compact, and in calculating the density of the material measured from the weight of the oxide sample in the mixture. (author)

  10. Laser-driven particle acceleration towards radiobiology and medicine

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book deals with the new method of laser-driven acceleration for application to radiation biophysics and medicine. It provides multidisciplinary contributions from world leading scientist in order to assess the state of the art of innovative tools for radiation biology research and medical applications of ionizing radiation. The book contains insightful contributions on highly topical aspects of spatio-temporal radiation biophysics, evolving over several orders of magnitude, typically from femtosecond and sub-micrometer scales. Particular attention is devoted to the emerging technology of laser-driven particle accelerators and their applicatio to spatio-temporal radiation biology and medical physics, customization of non-conventional and selective radiotherapy and optimized radioprotection protocols.

  11. Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2012-01-01

    A glass ceramic waste form is being developed for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel (Crum et al. 2012b). The waste stream contains a mixture of transition metals, alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanides, several of which exceed the solubility limits of a single phase borosilicate glass (Crum et al. 2009; Caurant et al. 2007). A multi-phase glass ceramic waste form allows incorporation of insoluble components of the waste by designed crystallization into durable heat tolerant phases. The glass ceramic formulation and processing targets the formation of the following three stable crystalline phases: (1) powellite (XMoO4) where X can be (Ca, Sr, Ba, and/or Ln), (2) oxyapatite Yx,Z(10-x)Si6O26 where Y is alkaline earth, Z is Ln, and (3) lanthanide borosilicate (Ln5BSi2O13). These three phases incorporate the waste components that are above the solubility limit of a single-phase borosilicate glass. The glass ceramic is designed to be a single phase melt, just like a borosilicate glass, and then crystallize upon slow cooling to form the targeted phases. The slow cooling schedule is based on the centerline cooling profile of a 2 foot diameter canister such as the Hanford High-Level Waste canister. Up to this point, crucible testing has been used for glass ceramic development, with cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) targeted as the ultimate processing technology for the waste form. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will conduct a scaled CCIM test in FY2012 with a glass ceramic to demonstrate the processing behavior. This Data Package documents the laboratory studies of the glass ceramic composition to support the CCIM test. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling to identify a processing window (temperature range) for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the

  12. Disc piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jirií; Půlpán, Petr; Doleček, Roman; Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít

    2013-08-01

    In this contribution, we present our study on disc-shaped and homogeneously poled piezoelectric ceramic transformers working in planar-extensional vibration modes. Transformers are designed with electrodes divided into wedge, axisymmetrical ring-dot, moonie, smile, or yin-yang segments. Transformation ratio, efficiency, and input and output impedances were measured for low-power signals. Transformer efficiency and transformation ratio were measured as a function of frequency and impedance load in the secondary circuit. Optimum impedance for the maximum efficiency has been found. Maximum efficiency and no-load transformation ratio can reach almost 100% and 52 for the fundamental resonance of ring-dot transformers and 98% and 67 for the second resonance of 2-segment wedge transformers. Maximum efficiency was reached at optimum impedance, which is in the range from 500 Ω to 10 kΩ, depending on the electrode pattern and size. Fundamental vibration mode and its overtones were further studied using frequency-modulated digital holographic interferometry and by the finite element method. Complementary information has been obtained by the infrared camera visualization of surface temperature profiles at higher driving power.

  13. Bar piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jiří; Pulpan, Půlpán; Rusin, Luboš

    2013-07-01

    Bar-shaped piezoelectric ceramic transformers (PTs) working in the longitudinal vibration mode (k31 mode) were studied. Two types of the transformer were designed--one with the electrode divided into two segments of different length, and one with the electrodes divided into three symmetrical segments. Parameters of studied transformers such as efficiency, transformation ratio, and input and output impedances were measured. An analytical model was developed for PT parameter calculation for both two- and three-segment PTs. Neither type of bar PT exhibited very high efficiency (maximum 72% for three-segment PT design) at a relatively high transformation ratio (it is 4 for two-segment PT and 2 for three-segment PT at the fundamental resonance mode). The optimum resistive loads were 20 and 10 kΩ for two- and three-segment PT designs for the fundamental resonance, respectively, and about one order of magnitude smaller for the higher overtone (i.e., 2 kΩ and 500 Ω, respectively). The no-load transformation ratio was less than 27 (maximum for two-segment electrode PT design). The optimum input electrode aspect ratios (0.48 for three-segment PT and 0.63 for two-segment PT) were calculated numerically under no-load conditions.

  14. Effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation on bonding property of zirconia ceramics to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yihua; Song, Xiaomeng; Chen, Yaming; Zhu, Qingping; Zhang, Wei

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether or not an erbium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser could improve the bonding property of zirconia ceramics to resin cement. Surface treatments can improve the bonding properties of dental ceramics. However, little is known about the effect of Er:YAG laser irradiated on zirconia ceramics. Specimens of zirconia ceramic pieces were made, and randomly divided into 11 groups according to surface treatments, including one control group (no treatment), one air abrasion group, and nine Er:YAG laser groups. The laser groups were subdivided by applying different energy intensities (100, 200, or 300 mJ) and irradiation times (5, 10, or 15 sec). After surface treatments, ceramic pieces had their surface morphology observed, and their surface roughness was measured. All specimens were bonded to resin cement. Shear bond strength was measured after the bonded specimens were stored in water for 24 h, and additionally aged by thermocycling. Statistical analyses were performed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test for shear bond strength, and Dunnett's t test for surface roughness, with α=0.05. Er:YAG laser irradiation changed the morphological characteristics of zirconia ceramics. Higher energy intensities (200, 300 mJ) could roughen the ceramics, but also caused surface cracks. There were no significant differences in the bond strength between the control group and the laser groups treated with different energy intensities or irradiation times. Air abrasion with alumina particles induced highest surface roughness and shear bond strength. Er:YAG laser irradiation cannot improve the bonding property of zirconia ceramics to resin cement. Enhancing irradiation intensities and extending irradiation time have no benefit on the bond of the ceramics, and might cause material defect.

  15. Effect of slurries density on the properties of ceramic foam produced via polymer replication method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Al Amin Muhammad Nor; Lee Chain Hong; Hazizan Md Akil; Zainal Ariffin Ahmad

    2007-01-01

    Ceramic foams are a class of high porosity materials that are used or being considered for a wide range of technological applications. Ceramic foam was produce by polymer replication method. In this process, commercial polymeric sponge was use as template, dipping with ceramic particles slurry, drying and then sintered to yield a replica of the original foams. The study was focus on the fabrication of different density of ceramic foams by varying the density of ceramic slurries (1.1876, 1.2687, 1.3653 and 1.5295 g/cm?3). Properties of ceramic foam produced such as density was characterized accordingly to ASTM C 271-94 and porosity were characterized using Archimedes methods. Compressive and bending strength was performed accordingly to ASTM C1161-94 and C773-88 (1999), respectively. The morphological study was performed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and EDX. Density of ceramic foams produced was about 0.5588 and 1.1852 g/cm 3 , where as porosity was around 26.28 and 70.59 %. Compressive and bending strength was increase from strength also increases from 2.60 to 23.07 MPa and 1.20 to 11.10 MPa, respectively, with increasing of slurries density from 1.1876 to 1.3653 g/cm 3 . The SEM micrographs show that the cells structure become denser as the slurries density increased. EDX proved that the ceramic used is porcelain. As conclusion, increasing in slurries density produced ceramic foams with good mechanical properties such as compressive and bending strength and denser body. (Author)

  16. Reliability of ceramics for heat engine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages associated with the use of monolithic ceramics in heat engines are discussed. The principle gaps in the state of understanding of ceramic material, failure origins, nondestructive tests as well as life prediction are included.

  17. III Advanced Ceramics and Applications Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Gadow, Rainer; Mitic, Vojislav; Obradovic, Nina

    2016-01-01

    This is the Proceedings of III Advanced Ceramics and Applications conference, held in Belgrade, Serbia in 2014. It contains 25 papers on various subjects regarding preparation, characterization and application of advanced ceramic materials.

  18. Panel report on high temperature ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolet, T C [ed.

    1979-01-01

    Fundamental research is reported concerning high temperature ceramics for application in turbines, engines, batteries, gasifiers, MHD, fuel cells, heat exchangers, and hot wall combustors. Ceramics microstructure and behavior are included. (FS)

  19. Ceramics: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, J E

    1996-07-01

    The selection and application of synthetic materials for surgical implants has been directly dependent upon the biocompatibility profiles of specific prosthetic devices. The early rationale for ceramic biomaterials was based upon the chemical and biochemical inertness (minimal bioreactivity) of elemental compounds constituted into structural forms (materials). Subsequently, mildly reactive (bioactive), and partially and fully degradable ceramics were identified for clinical uses. Structural forms have included bulk solids or particulates with and without porosities for tissue ingrowth, and more recently, coatings onto other types of biomaterial substrates. The physical shapes selected were application dependent, with advantages and disadvantages determined by: (1) the basic material and design properties of the device construct; and (2) the patient-based functional considerations. Most of the ceramics (bioceramics) selected in the 1960s and 1970s have continued over the long-term, and the science and technology for thick and thin coatings have evolved significantly over the past decade. Applications of ceramic biomaterials range from bulk (100%) ceramic structures as joint and bone replacements to fully or partially biodegradable substrates for the controlled delivery of pharmaceutical drugs, growth factors, and morphogenetically inductive substances. Because of the relatively unique properties of bioceramics, expanded uses as structural composites with other biomaterials and macromolecular biologically-derived substances are anticipated in the future.

  20. Transparent ceramic lamp envelope materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, G C [OSRAM SYLVANIA, 71 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States)

    2005-09-07

    Transparent ceramic materials with optical qualities comparable to single crystals of similar compositions have been developed in recent years, as a result of the improved understanding of powder-processing-fabrication- sintering-property inter-relationships. These high-temperature materials with a range of thermal and mechanical properties are candidate envelopes for focused-beam, short-arc lamps containing various fills operating at temperatures higher than quartz. This paper reviews the composition, structure and properties of transparent ceramic lamp envelope materials including sapphire, small-grained polycrystalline alumina, aluminium oxynitride, yttrium aluminate garnet, magnesium aluminate spinel and yttria-lanthana. A satisfactory thermal shock resistance is required for the ceramic tube to withstand the rapid heating and cooling cycles encountered in lamps. Thermophysical properties, along with the geometry, size and thickness of a transparent ceramic tube, are important parameters in the assessment of its resistance to fracture arising from thermal stresses in lamps during service. The corrosive nature of lamp-fill liquid and vapour at high temperatures requires that all lamp components be carefully chosen to meet the target life. The wide range of new transparent ceramics represents flexibility in pushing the limit of envelope materials for improved beamer lamps.

  1. High flow ceramic pot filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Halem, D; van der Laan, H; Soppe, A I A; Heijman, S G J

    2017-11-01

    Ceramic pot filters are considered safe, robust and appropriate technologies, but there is a general consensus that water revenues are limited due to clogging of the ceramic element. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of high flow ceramic pot filters to produce more water without sacrificing their microbial removal efficacy. High flow pot filters, produced by increasing the rice husk content, had a higher initial flow rate (6-19 L h -1 ), but initial LRVs for E. coli of high flow filters was slightly lower than for regular ceramic pot filters. This disadvantage was, however, only temporarily as the clogging in high flow filters had a positive effect on the LRV for E. coli (from below 1 to 2-3 after clogging). Therefore, it can be carefully concluded that regular ceramic pot filters perform better initially, but after clogging, the high flow filters have a higher flow rate as well as a higher LRV for E. coli. To improve the initial performance of new high flow filters, it is recommended to further utilize residence time of the water in the receptacle, since additional E. coli inactivation was observed during overnight storage. Although a relationship was observed between flow rate and LRV of MS2 bacteriophages, both regular and high flow filters were unable to reach over 2 LRV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Production and study of the behavior of ceramic sintering SR2ALWO5,5 to application on the oil industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, M.M.; Ferreira, R.A. Sanguinetti; Yadava, Y.P.

    2011-01-01

    The complex perovskita ceramics based on tungsten are highly inert corrosive environments. For this reason, this type of ceramic is used in the manufacture of parts and components for the oil industry where the hostile environment is constant problem. We are working in manufacturing temperature sensors encased in ceramic to petroleum industry. Produce ceramic Sr 2 AlWO 5,5 thermo-mechanical process using a ball mill and subsequently heat treatment temperature of 1200°C for 24 hours. Studied the sintering behavior in the temperature range from 1200 to 1350 °C. In this process, the ceramic powder had a high homogeneity in terms of size and distribution of particles, which facilitates sintering at low temperature and shorter time. Structure and microstructure of calcined ceramic was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and presented at the congress. (author)

  3. Emerging Ceramic-based Materials for Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denry, I.; Kelly, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appropriate, the authors have added their opinions and guidance. PMID:25274751

  4. Ion implantation and fracture toughness of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.; Pollock, J.T.A.

    1985-01-01

    Ceramics generally lack toughness which is largely determined by the ceramic surface where stresses likely to cause failure are usually highest. Ion implantation has the capacity to improve the surface fracture toughness of ceramics. Significantly reduced ion size and reactivity restrictions exist compared with traditional methods of surface toughening. We are studying the effect of ion implantation on ceramic fracture toughness using indentation testing as the principal tool of analysis

  5. Ceramic cutting tools materials, development and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Whitney, E Dow

    1994-01-01

    Interest in ceramics as a high speed cutting tool material is based primarily on favorable material properties. As a class of materials, ceramics possess high melting points, excellent hardness and good wear resistance. Unlike most metals, hardness levels in ceramics generally remain high at elevated temperatures which means that cutting tip integrity is relatively unaffected at high cutting speeds. Ceramics are also chemically inert against most workmetals.

  6. Ferroelastic ceramic-reinforced metal matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Composite materials comprising ferroelastic ceramic particulates dispersed in a metal matrix are capable of vibration damping. When the ferroelastic ceramic particulates are subjected to stress, such as the cyclic stress experienced during vibration of the material, internal stresses in the ceramic cause the material to deform via twinning, domain rotation or domain motion thereby dissipating the vibrational energy. The ferroelastic ceramic particulates may also act as reinforcements to impro...

  7. Development of advanced ceramics at AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, B.J.F.; MacEwen, S.R.; Sawicka, B.D.; Hayward, P.J.; Sridhar, S.

    1986-12-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has a long history of developing ceramics for nuclear fission and fusion applications. AECL is now applying its multidisciplinary materials R and D capabilities, including unique capabilities in ceramic processing and nondestructive evaluation, to develop advanced ceramic materials for commercial and industrial applications. This report provides an overview of the facilities and programs associated with the development of advanced ceramics at AECL

  8. Influence of heating rate and temperature firing on the properties of bodies of red ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, B.J. da; Goncalves, W.P.; Cartaxo, J.M.; Macedo, R.S.; Neves, G.A.; Santana, L.N.L.; Menezes, R.R.

    2011-01-01

    In the red ceramic industry, the firing is one of the main stages of the production process. There are two heating rates prevailing at this stage: the slow (traditional ceramics) and fast. The slow rate more used in Brazil, is considered delayed. This study aims to evaluate the influence of particle size and chemical composition of three mixture of clay, used in the manufacture of red ceramic products and to study the influence of the firing temperature on their technological properties. When subjected to heating rates slow and fast. Initially, the mixtures were characterized subsequently were extruded, dried and subjected to firing at temperatures of 900 and 1000 ° C with heating rates of 5, 20 and 30 °C/min. The results indicated that the chemical composition and particle size influenced significantly the technological properties and that the bodies obtained with the paste that had lower levels of flux showed better stability. (author)

  9. Durability of feldspathic veneering ceramic on glass-infiltrated alumina ceramics after long-term thermocycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, A M M; Ozcan, M; Souza, R O A; Kojima, A N; Nishioka, R S; Kimpara, E T; Bottino, M A

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the bond strength durability of a feldspathic veneering ceramic to glass-infiltrated reinforced ceramics in dry and aged conditions. Disc shaped (thickness: 4 mm, diameter: 4 mm) of glass-infiltrated alumina (In-Ceram Alumina) and glass-infiltrated alumina reinforced by zirconia (In-Ceram Zirconia) core ceramic specimens (N=48, N=12 per groups) were constructed according to the manufacturers' recommendations. Veneering ceramic (VITA VM7) was fired onto the core ceramics using a mold. The core-veneering ceramic assemblies were randomly divided into two conditions and tested either immediately after specimen preparation (Dry) or following 30000 thermocycling (5-55 ºC±1; dwell time: 30 seconds). Shear bond strength test was performed in a universal testing machine (cross-head speed: 1 mm/min). Failure modes were analyzed using optical microscope (x20). The bond strength data (MPa) were analyzed using ANOVA (α=0.05). Thermocycling did not decrease the bond strength results for both In-Ceram Alumina (30.6±8.2 MPa; P=0.2053) and In-Ceram zirconia (32.6±9 MPa; P=0.3987) core ceramic-feldspathic veneering ceramic combinations when compared to non-aged conditions (28.1±6.4 MPa, 29.7±7.3 MPa, respectively). There were also no significant differences between adhesion of the veneering ceramic to either In-Ceram Alumina or In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (P=0.3289). Failure types were predominantly a mixture of adhesive failure between the veneering and the core ceramic together with cohesive fracture of the veneering ceramic. Long-term thermocycling aging conditions did not impair the adhesion of the veneering ceramic to the glass-infiltrated alumina core ceramics tested.

  10. Digital holography of particles: benefits of the 'inverse problem' approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gire, J; Denis, L; Fournier, C; Soulez, F; Ducottet, C; Thiébaut, E

    2008-01-01

    The potential of in-line digital holography to locate and measure the size of particles distributed throughout a volume (in one shot) has been established. These measurements are fundamental for the study of particle trajectories in fluid flow. The most important issues in digital holography today are poor depth positioning accuracy, transverse field-of-view limitations, border artifacts and computational burdens. We recently suggested an 'inverse problem' approach to address some of these issues for the processing of particle digital holograms. The described algorithm improves axial positioning accuracy, gives particle diameters with sub-micrometer accuracy, eliminates border effects and increases the size of the studied volume. This approach for processing particle holograms pushes back some classical constraints. For example, the Nyquist criterion is no longer a restriction for the recording step and the studied volume is no longer confined to the field of view delimited by the sensor borders. In this paper we present a review of the limitations commonly found in digital holography. We then discuss the benefits of the 'inverse problem' approach and the influence of some experimental parameters in this framework

  11. Summary of ceramic pigments by polymer precursors Pechini method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, E.M. da; Galvao, S.B.; Paskocimas, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    In this work were synthesized nitrate chromium nitrate and iron-doped titanium oxide by the polymeric precursor method, for application as ceramic pigments. The stains were developed between the temperatures 700 deg C to 1000 deg C, in green for chromium oxide and orange for iron. Noticing an increase of its opacity by increasing temperature. Characterization by thermogravimetry (TG) showed strong thermo decomposition from 355 deg C for the chromium oxide and thermo decomposition gradual for the iron. By analysis of X-ray diffraction revealed the formation of crystalline phases as Iron Titanate (FeTiO3) and Chrome Titanate (CrTiO3), respectively. The scanning electron microscopy showed the formation of rounded particles for both oxides. Thus, the synthesized oxides were within the requirements to be applied as pigments and shown to be possible to propose its use in ceramic materials. (author)

  12. Potential assisted fabrication of metal-ceramic composite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knote, A.; Schindler, U.; Krueger, H.G.; Kern, H.

    2003-01-01

    A possibility to produce uniform metal-ceramic composite coatings with a high content of ceramic particles up to 60 vol.% will be presented in this study. This method includes a combination of electrophoretic deposition and electrolytic deposition by several steps. A yttria-stabilized zirconia coating (Tosoh TZ-8Y) was first electrophoretically deposited on a ferritic steel plate and then sintered by 1100 C to an open porous layer. In the next step nickel was electrodeposited into the pores of the layer. By a final annealing step it was possible to improve the bonding of the composit coating on the substrate by diffusion of the metal components. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [de

  13. High field dielectric properties of anisotropic polymer-ceramic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomer, V.; Randall, C. A.

    2008-01-01

    Using dielectrophoretic assembly, we create anisotropic composites of BaTiO 3 particles in a silicone elastomer thermoset polymer. We study a variety of electrical properties in these composites, i.e., permittivity, dielectric breakdown, and energy density as function of ceramic volume fraction and connectivity. The recoverable energy density of these electric-field-structured composites is found to be highly dependent on the anisotropy present in the system. Our results indicate that x-y-aligned composites exhibit higher breakdown strengths along with large recoverable energy densities when compared to 0-3 composites. This demonstrates that engineered anisotropy can be employed to control dielectric breakdown strengths and nonlinear conduction at high fields in heterogeneous systems. Consequently, manipulation of anisotropy in high-field dielectric properties can be exploited for the development of high energy density polymer-ceramic systems

  14. Electronic Conductivity of Vanadium-Tellurite Glass-Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Yue, Yuanzheng; Bragatto, Caio B.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the electronic conductivity of 2TeO2-V2O5 glass-ceramics with crystallinity ranging from 0 to 100 wt.%, i.e., from entirely amorphous to completely crystalline. The glass is prepared by the melt quenching technique, and the crystal is prepared by subsequent heat...... spectroscopy. We find similar activation energies for both glass and crystal, implying that they have similar conduction mechanisms, i.e., thermally activated hopping. The electronic conductivity of 2TeO2-V2O5 glass is about one order of magnitude higher than that of the corresponding crystal......, and a percolation phenomenon occurs at a glass fraction of 61 wt.%, increasing from a lower conductivity in the crystal to a higher conductivity in the glass. We explain the behavior of electronic conduction in the 2TeO2-V2O5 glass-ceramics by considering constriction effects between particles as well...

  15. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landingham, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  16. Ceramic component with reinforced protection against radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubuisson, J.; Laville, H.; Le Gal, P.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramic components hardened against radiations are claimed (for example capacitors or ceramic substrates for semiconductors). They are prepared with a sintered ceramic containing a high proportion of heavy atoms (for instance barium titanate and a bismuth salt) provided with a glass layer containing a high proportion of light atoms. The two materials are joined by vitrification producing a diffusion zone at the interface [fr

  17. Study of brazilian market of advanvced ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veiga, M.M.; Soares, P.S.M.; SIlva, A.P. da; Alvarinho, S.B.

    1989-01-01

    The brazilian actual market survey of advanced ceramics, divided in sectors according to their function is described. The electroelectronics, magnetics, optics, mechanics and nuclears ceramics are presented. A forecasting of the brazilian market in advanced ceramics are also mentioned. (C.G.C.) [pt

  18. Polymer-ceramic piezoelectric composites (PZT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassora, L.A.; Eiras, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    Polymer-ceramic piezoelectric transducers, with 1-3 of connectivity were prepared with different concentration of ceramic material. Piezoelectric composites, with equal electromechanical coupling factor and acoustic impedance of one third from that ceramic transducer, were obtained when the fractionary volume of PZT reach 30%. (C.G.C.)

  19. Characterization of granite waste for use in red ceramic; Caracterizacao de residuo de granito para utilizacao em ceramica vermelha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, M.C.; Monteiro, S.N.; Vieira, C.M.F., E-mail: mari@uenf.br [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF/LAMAV), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Laboratorio de Materiais Avancados; Borlini, M.C. [Centro de Tecnologia Mineral (CETEM), Cachoeiro de Itapemirim, ES (Brazil). Centro Avancado

    2011-07-01

    This work aims to study the characterization of the granite waste from the city of Santo Antonio de Padua-RJ for the use in red ceramic. The chemical, physical and morphological characterization of the waste was performed by chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction, particle size distribution, thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicated that this waste is a material with great potential to be used as a component of ceramic body due to its capacity to act as flux during the firing, and to improve the properties of the ceramic when is incorporate. (author)

  20. Surface treatment of ceramic articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komvopoulos, K.; Brown, I.G.; Wei, B.; Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Bhatia, C.S.

    1998-01-01

    A process is disclosed for producing an article with improved ceramic surface properties including providing an article having a ceramic surface, and placing the article onto a conductive substrate holder in a hermetic enclosure. Thereafter a low pressure ambient is provided in the hermetic enclosure. A plasma including ions of solid materials is produced the ceramic surface of the article being at least partially immersed in a macroparticle free region of the plasma. While the article is immersed in the macroparticle free region, a bias of the substrate holder is biased between a low voltage at which material from the plasma condenses on the surface of the article and a high negative voltage at which ions from the plasma are implanted into the article. 15 figs

  1. Dynamic properties of ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grady, D.E.

    1995-02-01

    The present study offers new data and analysis on the transient shock strength and equation-of-state properties of ceramics. Various dynamic data on nine high strength ceramics are provided with wave profile measurements, through velocity interferometry techniques, the principal observable. Compressive failure in the shock wave front, with emphasis on brittle versus ductile mechanisms of deformation, is examined in some detail. Extensive spall strength data are provided and related to the theoretical spall strength, and to energy-based theories of the spall process. Failure waves, as a mechanism of deformation in the transient shock process, are examined. Strength and equation-of-state analysis of shock data on silicon carbide, boron carbide, tungsten carbide, silicon dioxide and aluminum nitride is presented with particular emphasis on phase transition properties for the latter two. Wave profile measurements on selected ceramics are investigated for evidence of rate sensitive elastic precursor decay in the shock front failure process

  2. Energy storage properties and relaxor behavior of lead-free Ba1-xSm2x/3Zr0.15Ti0.85O3 ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zheng; Li, Lingxia; Yu, Shihui; Kang, Xinyu; Chen, Siliang

    2017-10-24

    Lead-free Ba 1-x Sm 2x/3 Zr 0.15 Ti 0.85 O 3 (BSZT) ceramics were synthesized by a solid state reaction route. The microstructure, dielectric relaxor behavior and energy storage properties of BSZT ceramics were studied. The growth of grain size was suppressed with the increase of Sm addition and kept in the submicrometer scale. Successive substitution of Sm 3+ for Ba 2+ disrupted the long-range dipole and promoted the increase of polar nano-region (PNR) size, resulting in the enhanced degree of relaxor behavior. The increasing PNR size also lead to the slimmer hysteresis loops and improved the energy storage efficiency. Furthermore, high saturated polarization (P max ) and low remnant polarization (P r ) were obtained due to the formation of defect dipoles, which facilitated the switch of PNRs and contributed to the enhancement of energy storage density. The x = 0.003 sample was found to exhibit a higher energy storage density of 1.15 J cm -3 and an energy storage efficiency of 92%. The result revealed that the BSZT ceramics may be a good candidate for energy storage application.

  3. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, P.C.; Seydel, E.R.; Raj, R.

    1988-03-22

    A process is disclosed for preparing silicon nitride ceramic parts which are relatively flaw free and which need little or no machining, said process comprising the steps of: (a) preparing a starting powder by wet or dry mixing ingredients comprising by weight from about 70% to about 99% silicon nitride, from about 1% to about 30% of liquid phase forming additive and from 1% to about 7% free silicon; (b) cold pressing to obtain a preform of green density ranging from about 30% to about 75% of theoretical density; (c) sintering at atmospheric pressure in a nitrogen atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 1,400 C to about 2,200 C to obtain a density which ranges from about 50% to about 100% of theoretical density and which is higher than said preform green density, and (d) press forging workpiece resulting from step (c) by isothermally uniaxially pressing said workpiece in an open die without initial contact between said workpiece and die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing and so that pressed workpiece does not contact die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing, to substantially final shape in a nitrogen atmosphere utilizing a temperature within the range of from about 1,400 C to essentially 1,750 C and strain rate within the range of about 10[sup [minus]7] to about 10[sup [minus]1] seconds[sup [minus]1], the temperature and strain rate being such that surface cracks do not occur, said pressing being carried out to obtain a shear deformation greater than 30% whereby superplastic forging is effected.

  4. Chemical characterization of marajoara ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyota, Rosimeiri Galbiati

    2009-01-01

    In this study the elemental concentration of Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Na, Nd, Rb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, U, Yb and Zn were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) in 204 fragments of Marajoara archaeological ceramics, of which 156 were provided by the Archaeology and Ethnology Museum of Sao Paulo University (MAE) and 48 were provided by Dr. Denise Pahl Schaan, Marajo Museum curator. Also, 9 contemporary ceramics produced and marketed at Marajo Island were analyzed. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analyses were performed in 8 archaeological samples and 1 contemporary sample in order to identify the burning temperature of the samples. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed in 13 archaeological samples and 2 contemporary samples for the investigation of their mineralogical composition. Mahalanobis distance was used for the study of outlier while modified filter was used for the study of the temper added to the ceramic paste. Result interpretation was performed using cluster analysis, principal components analysis and discriminant analysis. Procrustes analysis was used for variable selection and it showed that the Ce, Fe, Eu, Hf, K and Th variables are adequate for the characterization of the analyzed samples. The comparative study among the archaeological and contemporary ceramics showed the arrangement of two well-defined and close groups for the archaeological samples and a third, distant group for the contemporary ones. This result indicates that the archaeological and contemporary ceramics differ in their composition. EPR and XRD analysis were inconclusive for the differentiation of archaeological and contemporary ceramics. (author)

  5. Stereolithography: A new method for processing dental ceramics by additive computer-aided manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehurtevent, Marion; Robberecht, Lieven; Hornez, Jean-Christophe; Thuault, Anthony; Deveaux, Etienne; Béhin, Pascal

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the physical and mechanical properties of stereolithography (SLA)- manufactured alumina ceramics of different composition to those of subtractive- manufactured ceramics and to produce suitable dental crown frameworks. The physical and mechanical properties of a control and six experimental SLA ceramics prepared from slurries with small (S) and large (L) particles (0.46±0.03 and 1.56±0.04μm, respectively) and three dry matter contents (70%, 75%, 80%) were evaluated by dynamic rheometry, hydrostatic weighing, three3-point flexural strength measurements, and Weibull analyses, and by the micrometrics measurement of shrinkage ratio before and after the heat treatments. S75 was the only small particle slurry with a significantly higher viscosity than L70. The viscosity of the S80 slurry made it impossible to take rheological measurements. The viscosities of the S75 and S80 slurries caused deformations in the printed layers during SLA manufacturing and were excluded from further consideration. SLA samples with low dry matter content had significantly lower and densityflexural strengths. Only SLA samples with a large particle size and high dry matter content (L75 and L80) were similar in density and flexural strength to the subtractive- manufactured samples. The 95% confidence intervals of the Weibull modulus of the L80 ceramic were higher (no overlap fraction) than those of the L75 ceramic and were similar to the control (overlap fraction). The Weibull characteristics of L80 ceramic were higher than those of L75 ceramic and the control. SLA can be used to process suitable crown frameworks but shows results in anisotropic shrinkage. The hH High particle size and dry matter content of the L80 slurry allowed made it possible to produce a reliable ceramic by SLA manufacturing with an anisotropic shrinkage, and a density, and flexural strength similar to those of a subtractive-manufactured ceramic. SLA allowed made it possible to build

  6. The Y2BaCuO5 oxide as green pigment in ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, F.; Colon, C.; Duran, A.; Barajas, R.; Llopis, J.; Paje, S.E.; Saez-Puche, R.; Julian, I.

    1998-01-01

    Fine particles of green yttrium-barium-copper-oxide pigments Y 2 BaCuO 5 have been prepared using two different synthesis methods. The process of combustion of mixed nitrates and urea needs a maximal temperature of 900 C and provides samples formed by aggregates of homogeneous small particles with a size of about 0.3 μm. However, the ceramic method requires 1050 C as synthesis temperature, and yields rather higher particle sizes. Even after grinding, these samples are formed by heterogeneous particles with mean sizes of about 3 μm. Diffuse reflectance spectra reveal that the samples obtained using the former method present a higher brilliancy, so they have been selected to be tested as green pigment in ceramics with good results. (orig.)

  7. Uranium determination in dental ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, I.; Gamboa, I.; Espinosa, G.; Moreno, A.

    1984-01-01

    There are many reports of high uranium concentration in dental ceramics, so they require to be controlled. The SSNTD is an optional method to determine the uranium concentration. In this work the analysis of several commercial dental ceramics used regularly in Mexico by dentists is presented. The chemical and electrochemical processes are used and the optimal conditions for high sensitivity are determined. CR-39 (allyl diglycol polycarbonate) was used as detector. The preliminary results show some materials with high uranium concentrations. Next step will be the analysis of equivalent dose and the effects in the public health. (author)

  8. Characterization of ceramic materials - Some methods employed in quality control of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, P.E.; Ferraz, W.B.; Lameiras, F.S.; Lopes, J.A.M.; Santos, A.M.M. dos; Ferreira, R.A.N.

    1986-01-01

    Measuring methods are presented for specific surface, density, open porosity and microstructure, such as bulk density of particles in form of nicrospheres, for characterization of ceramic materials used as nuclear fuels. Some of these methods are alternatives to those usually employed, and they present some advantages, such as economy, speed of execution, and accuracy. (Author) [pt

  9. Effects of various surface treatments on the biaxial flexural properties of yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teerthesh Jain

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Air particle abrasion with CoJet Sand, LTD, and CTs had no negative impact on biaxial flexural strength indeed it increased the biaxial flexural strength. Hence, these surface treatments can be done in routine clinical practice to improve the performance of ceramic restorations.

  10. Bond strength of the porcelain repair system to all-ceramic copings and porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang J; Cheong, Chan Wook; Wright, Robert F; Chang, Brian M

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength of the porcelain repair system on alumina and zirconia core ceramics, comparing this strength with that of veneering porcelain. Veneering ceramic (n = 12), alumina core (n = 24), and zirconia core (n = 24) blocks measuring 10 × 5 × 5 mm(3) were fabricated. Veneering ceramic blocks were used as the control. Alumina and zirconia core blocks were divided into 2 groups (n = 12 each), and a slot (2 × 2 × 4 mm(3)) filled with veneering ceramics was prepared into one of the alumina and zirconia core groups (n = 12). Followed by surface treatments of micro-abrasion with 30 μm alumina particles, etching with 35% phosphoric acid and silane primer and bond, composite resin blocks (2 × 2 × 2 mm(3)) were built up and light polymerized onto the treated surfaces by 3 configurations: (a) composite blocks bonded onto veneering ceramic surface alone, (b) composite blocks bonded onto alumina core or zirconia core surfaces, (c) a 50% surface area of the composite blocks bonded to veneering ceramics and the other 50% surface area of the composite blocks to alumina core or zirconia core surfaces. The shear bond strength of the composite to each specimen was tested by a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. The shear bond strength was analyzed by unpaired t-tests for within the configuration groups and ANOVA for among the different configuration groups. When the mean shear bond strength was compared within groups of the same configuration, there were no statistically significant differences. Comparison of the shear bond strength among groups of different configurations revealed statistically significant differences. The mean shear bond strength of composite onto 100% veneering ceramic surface and composite onto 50% veneering 50% all-ceramic cores was statistically higher than that of composite onto 100% all-ceramic cores; however, the differences of the shear bond strength of composite bonded

  11. A Brief Research Review for Improvement Methods the Wettability between Ceramic Reinforcement Particulate and Aluminium Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaq, Alaa Mohammed; Majid, Dayang Laila Abang Abdul; Ishak, M. R.; B, Uday M.

    2017-05-01

    The development of new methods for addition fine ceramic powders to Al aluminium alloy melts, which would lead to more uniform distribution and effective incorporation of the reinforcement particles into the aluminium matrix alloy. Recently the materials engineering research has moved to composite materials from monolithic, adapting to the global need for lightweight, low cost, quality, and high performance advanced materials. Among the different methods, stir casting is one of the simplest ways of making aluminium matrix composites. However, it suffers from poor distribution and combination of the reinforcement ceramic particles in the metal matrix. These problems become significantly effect to reduce reinforcement size, more agglomeration and tendency with less wettability for the ceramic particles in the melt process. Many researchers have carried out different studies on the wettability between the metal matrix and dispersion phase, which includes added wettability agents, fluxes, preheating the reinforcement particles, coating the reinforcement particles, and use composting techniques. The enhancement of wettability of ceramic particles by the molten matrix alloy and the reinforcement particles distribution improvement in the solidified matrix is the main objective for many studies that will be discussed in this paper.

  12. Radio-frequency plasma spraying of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, T.; Hamatani, H.; Yoshida, T.

    1989-01-01

    This study was aimed at developing a novel spraying process using a radio-frequency (rf) plasma. Experiments of Al 2 O 3 and ZrO 2 - 8 wt% Y 2 O 3 spraying showed that the initial powder size was the most important parameter for depositing dense coatings. The optimum powder sizes of Al 2 O 3 and ZrO 2 - 8 wt% Y 2 O 3 were considered to be around 100 and 80 μm, respectively. The use of such large-size powders compared with those used by conventional dc plasma spraying made it possible to deposit adherent ceramics coatings of 150 to 300 μm on as-rolled SS304 substrates. It was also shown that low particle velocity of about 10 m/s, which is peculiar to rf plasma spraying, was sufficient for particle deformation, though it imposed a severe limitation on the substrate position. These experimental results prove that rf plasma spraying is an effective process and a strong candidate to open new fields of spraying applications

  13. Fracture mechanics of ceramics. Vol. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradt, R.C.; Evans, A.G.; Hasselman, D.P.; Lange, F.F.

    1986-01-01

    This volume, together with volume 8, constitutes the proceedings of an international symposium on the fracture mechanics of ceramics. The topics discussed in this volume include the toughening of ceramics by whisker reinforcement; the mechanical properties of SiCwhisker-reinforced TZP; the fracture of brittle rock and oil shale under dynamic explosive loading; impact damage models of ceramic coatings used in gas turbine and diesel engines; the use of exploratory data analysis for the safety evaluation of structural ceramics; and proof testing methods for the reliability of structural ceramics used in gas turbines

  14. MHD oxidant intermediate temperature ceramic heater study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, A. W.; Chait, I. L.; Saari, D. P.; Marksberry, C. L.

    1981-09-01

    The use of three types of directly fired ceramic heaters for preheating oxygen enriched air to an intermediate temperature of 1144K was investigated. The three types of ceramic heaters are: (1) a fixed bed, periodic flow ceramic brick regenerative heater; (2) a ceramic pebble regenerative heater. The heater design, performance and operating characteristics under conditions in which the particulate matter is not solidified are evaluated. A comparison and overall evaluation of the three types of ceramic heaters and temperature range determination at which the particulate matter in the MHD exhaust gas is estimated to be a dry powder are presented.

  15. Alumina matrix ceramic-nickel composites formed by centrifugal slip casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Zygmuntowicz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the possibility of fabricating the alumina matrix ceramic-nickel composites with gradient concentration of metal particles. Centrifugal slip casting method was chosen for the composite fabrication. This method allows fabrication of the graded distribution of nickel particles in the hollow cylinder composites. The horizontal rotation axis was applied. The samples were characterized by XRD, SEM and quantitative description of the microstructure. The macroscopic as well as SEM observations of the prepared composites confirmed the gradient concentration of Ni particles in the composite materials. The application of the centrifugal slip casting method allows for the graded distribution of metal particles in the samples.

  16. Structural ceramics containing electric arc furnace dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stathopoulos, V.N., E-mail: vasta@teihal.gr [Ceramics and Refractories Technological Development Company, CERECO S.A., 72nd km Athens Lamia National Road, P.O. Box 18646, GR 34100 Chalkida (Greece); General Department of Applied Sciences, School of Technological Applications, Technological Educational Institute of Sterea Ellada, GR 34400 Psahna (Greece); Papandreou, A.; Kanellopoulou, D.; Stournaras, C.J. [Ceramics and Refractories Technological Development Company, CERECO S.A., 72nd km Athens Lamia National Road, P.O. Box 18646, GR 34100 Chalkida (Greece)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Zn is stabilized due to formation of ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel and/or willemite type phases. • EAFD/clay fired mixtures exhibit improved mechanical properties. • Hollow bricks were successfully fabricated from the mixtures studied. • Laboratory articles and scaled up bricks found as environmentally inert materials. -- Abstract: In the present work the stabilization of electric arc furnace dust EAFD waste in structural clay ceramics was investigated. EAFD was collected over eleven production days. The collected waste was characterized for its chemical composition by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. By powder XRD the crystal structure was studied while the fineness of the material was determined by a laser particle size analyzer. The environmental characterization was carried out by testing the dust according to EN12457 standard. Zn, Pb and Cd were leaching from the sample in significant amounts. The objective of this study is to investigate the stabilization properties of EAFD/clay ceramic structures and the potential of EAFD utilization into structural ceramics production (blocks). Mixtures of clay with 2.5% and 5% EAFD content were studied by TG/DTA, XRD, SEM, EN12457 standard leaching and mechanical properties as a function of firing temperature at 850, 900 and 950 °C. All laboratory facilities maintained 20 ± 1 °C. Consequently, a pilot-scale experiment was conducted with an addition of 2.5% and 5% EAFD to the extrusion mixture for the production of blocks. During blocks manufacturing, the firing step reached 950 °C in a tunnel kiln. Laboratory heating/cooling gradients were similar to pilot scale production firing. The as produced blocks were then subjected to quality control tests, i.e. dimensions according to EN772-17, water absorbance according to EN772-6, and compressive strength according to EN772-1 standard, in laboratory facilities certified under EN17025. The data obtained showed that the incorporation of EAFD resulted in

  17. Structural ceramics containing electric arc furnace dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulos, V N; Papandreou, A; Kanellopoulou, D; Stournaras, C J

    2013-11-15

    In the present work the stabilization of electric arc furnace dust EAFD waste in structural clay ceramics was investigated. EAFD was collected over eleven production days. The collected waste was characterized for its chemical composition by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. By powder XRD the crystal structure was studied while the fineness of the material was determined by a laser particle size analyzer. The environmental characterization was carried out by testing the dust according to EN12457 standard. Zn, Pb and Cd were leaching from the sample in significant amounts. The objective of this study is to investigate the stabilization properties of EAFD/clay ceramic structures and the potential of EAFD utilization into structural ceramics production (blocks). Mixtures of clay with 2.5% and 5% EAFD content were studied by TG/DTA, XRD, SEM, EN12457 standard leaching and mechanical properties as a function of firing temperature at 850, 900 and 950 °C. All laboratory facilities maintained 20 ± 1 °C. Consequently, a pilot-scale experiment was conducted with an addition of 2.5% and 5% EAFD to the extrusion mixture for the production of blocks. During blocks manufacturing, the firing step reached 950 °C in a tunnel kiln. Laboratory heating/cooling gradients were similar to pilot scale production firing. The as produced blocks were then subjected to quality control tests, i.e. dimensions according to EN772-17, water absorbance according to EN772-6, and compressive strength according to EN772-1 standard, in laboratory facilities certified under EN17025. The data obtained showed that the incorporation of EAFD resulted in an increase of mechanical strength. Moreover, leaching tests performed according to the Europeans standards on the EAFD-block samples showed that the quantities of heavy metals leached from crushed blocks were within the regulatory limits. Thus the EAFD-blocks can be regarded as material of no environmental concern. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B

  18. Structural ceramics containing electric arc furnace dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stathopoulos, V.N.; Papandreou, A.; Kanellopoulou, D.; Stournaras, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Zn is stabilized due to formation of ZnAl 2 O 4 spinel and/or willemite type phases. • EAFD/clay fired mixtures exhibit improved mechanical properties. • Hollow bricks were successfully fabricated from the mixtures studied. • Laboratory articles and scaled up bricks found as environmentally inert materials. -- Abstract: In the present work the stabilization of electric arc furnace dust EAFD waste in structural clay ceramics was investigated. EAFD was collected over eleven production days. The collected waste was characterized for its chemical composition by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. By powder XRD the crystal structure was studied while the fineness of the material was determined by a laser particle size analyzer. The environmental characterization was carried out by testing the dust according to EN12457 standard. Zn, Pb and Cd were leaching from the sample in significant amounts. The objective of this study is to investigate the stabilization properties of EAFD/clay ceramic structures and the potential of EAFD utilization into structural ceramics production (blocks). Mixtures of clay with 2.5% and 5% EAFD content were studied by TG/DTA, XRD, SEM, EN12457 standard leaching and mechanical properties as a function of firing temperature at 850, 900 and 950 °C. All laboratory facilities maintained 20 ± 1 °C. Consequently, a pilot-scale experiment was conducted with an addition of 2.5% and 5% EAFD to the extrusion mixture for the production of blocks. During blocks manufacturing, the firing step reached 950 °C in a tunnel kiln. Laboratory heating/cooling gradients were similar to pilot scale production firing. The as produced blocks were then subjected to quality control tests, i.e. dimensions according to EN772-17, water absorbance according to EN772-6, and compressive strength according to EN772-1 standard, in laboratory facilities certified under EN17025. The data obtained showed that the incorporation of EAFD resulted in an

  19. Rare particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, W.

    1984-01-01

    The use of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) to search for hypothetical particles and known particles of rare processes is discussed. The hypothetical particles considered include fractionally charged particles, anomalously heavy isotopes, and superheavy elements. The known particles produced in rare processes discussed include doubly-charged negative ions, counting neutrino-produced atoms in detectors for solar neutrino detection, and the spontaneous emission of 14 C from 223 Ra. 35 references

  20. Essential Factors Influencing the Bonding Strength of Cold-Sprayed Aluminum Coatings on Ceramic Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drehmann, R.; Grund, T.; Lampke, T.; Wielage, B.; Wüstefeld, C.; Motylenko, M.; Rafaja, D.

    2018-02-01

    The present work summarizes the most important results of a research project dealing with the comprehensive investigation of the bonding mechanisms between cold-sprayed Al coatings and various poly- and monocrystalline ceramic substrates (Al2O3, AlN, Si3N4, SiC, MgF2). Due to their exceptional combination of properties, metallized ceramics are gaining more and more importance for a wide variety of applications, especially in electronic engineering. Cold spray provides a quick, flexible, and cost-effective one-step process to apply metallic coatings on ceramic surfaces. However, since most of the existing cold-spray-related publications focus on metallic substrates, only very little is known about the bonding mechanisms acting between cold-sprayed metals and ceramic substrates. In this paper, the essential factors influencing the bonding strength in such composites are identified. Besides mechanical tensile strength testing, a thorough analysis of the coatings and especially the metal/ceramic interfaces was conducted by means of HRTEM, FFT, STEM, EDX, EELS, GAXRD, and EBSD. The influence of substrate material, substrate temperature, and particle size is evaluated. The results suggest that, apart from mechanical interlocking, the adhesion of cold-sprayed metallic coatings on ceramics is based on a complex interplay of different mechanisms such as quasiadiabatic shearing, static recrystallization, and heteroepitaxial growth.

  1. Characterization of composite materials based on cement-ceramic powder blended binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulovaná, Tereza; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-06-01

    Characterization of newly developed composite mortars with incorporated ceramic powder coming from precise brick cutting as partial Portland cement replacement up to 40 mass% is presented in the paper. Fine ceramic powder belongs to the pozzolanic materials. Utilization of pozzolanic materials is accompanied by lower request on energy needed for Portland clinker production which generally results in lower production costs of blended binder and lower CO2 emission. In this paper, the ceramic powder is used in cement based mortar composition in amount of 8, 16, 24, 32, and 40 mass% of cement. Chemical composition of ceramic powder is analyzed by X-Ray Fluorescence and X-Ray Diffraction. The particle size distribution of ceramics is accessed on laser diffraction principle. For 28 days cured mortar samples, basic physical and mechanical properties are experimentally determined. The obtained results demonstrate that ceramic powder has potential to replace a part of Portland cement in composition of cement based composites and to reduce negative environmental impact of their production.

  2. [Study of relationship between powder-size gradation and mechanical properties of Zirconia toughened glass infiltrated nanometer-ceramic composite powder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Feng; Xu, Ling; Liao, Yun-mao; Chao, Yong-lie

    2003-07-01

    The fabrication of all-ceramic dental restorations is challenged by ceramics' relatively low flexural strength and intrinsic poor resistance to fracture. This paper aimed at investigating the relationships between powder-size gradation and mechanical properties of Zirconia toughened glass infiltrated nanometer-ceramic composite (Al(2)O(3)-nZrO(2)). Al(2)O(3)-nZrO(2) ceramics powder (W) was processed by combination methods of chemical co-precipitation and ball milling with addition of different powder-sized ZrO(2). Field-emission scanning electron microscopy was used to determine the particle size distribution and characterize the particle morphology of powders. The matrix compacts were made by slip-casting technique and sintered to 1,450 degrees C and flexural strength and the fracture toughness of them were measured. 1. The particle distribution of Al(2)O(3)-nZrO(2) ceramics powder ranges from 0.02 - 3.5 micro m and among them the superfine particles almost accounted for 20%. 2. The ceramic matrix samples with addition of nZrO(2) (W) showed much higher flexural strength (115.434 +/- 5.319) MPa and fracture toughness (2.04 +/- 0.10) MPa m(1/2) than those of pure Al(2)O(3) ceramics (62.763 +/- 7.220 MPa; 1.16 +/- 0.02 MPa m(1/2)). The particle size of additive ZrO(2) may impose influences on mechanical properties of Al(2)O(3)-nZrO(2) ceramics matrix. Good homogeneity and reasonable powder-size gradation of ceramic powder can improve the mechanical properties of material.

  3. Fabrication and characterization of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrani, K.A., E-mail: kurt.terrani@gmail.com [Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Kiggans, J.O.; Katoh, Y. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Shimoda, K. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Montgomery, F.C.; Armstrong, B.L.; Parish, C.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Hinoki, T. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hunn, J.D. [Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Snead, L.L. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    The current generation of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuels, consisting of Tristructural Isotropic fuel particles embedded in a silicon carbide matrix, is fabricated by hot pressing. Matrix powder feedstock is comprised of alumina-yttria additives thoroughly mixed with silicon carbide nanopowder using polyethyleneimine as a dispersing agent. Fuel compacts are fabricated by hot pressing the powder-fuel particle mixture at a temperature of 1800-1900 Degree-Sign C using compaction pressures of 10-20 MPa. Detailed microstructural characterization of the final fuel compacts shows that oxide additives are limited in extent and are distributed uniformly at silicon carbide grain boundaries, at triple joints between silicon carbide grains, and at the fuel particle-matrix interface.

  4. Indoor particle levels in small- and medium-sized commercial buildings in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiangmei May; Apte, Michael G; Bennett, Deborah H

    2012-11-20

    This study monitored indoor and outdoor particle concentrations in 37 small and medium commercial buildings (SMCBs) in California with three buildings sampled on two occasions, resulting in 40 sampling days. Sampled buildings included offices, retail establishments, restaurants, dental offices, and hair salons, among others. Continuous measurements were made for both ultrafine and fine particulate matter as well as black carbon inside and outside of the building. Integrated PM(2.5), PM(2.5-10), and PM(10) samples were also collected inside and outside the building. The majority of the buildings had indoor/outdoor (I/O) particle concentration ratios less than 1.0, indicating that contributions from indoor sources are less than removal of outdoor particles. However, some of the buildings had I/O ratios greater than 1, indicating significant indoor particle sources. This was particularly true of restaurants, hair salons, and dental offices. The infiltration factor was estimated from a regression analysis of indoor and outdoor concentrations for each particle size fraction, finding lower values for ultrafine and coarse particles than for submicrometer particles, as expected. The I/O ratio of black carbon was used as a relative measure of the infiltration factor of particles among buildings, with a geometric mean of 0.62. The contribution of indoor sources to indoor particle levels was estimated for each building.

  5. Industrial ceramics in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regueiro, M.

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available The Spanish ceramic industry has experienced a amazing growth in the last four years. Such expansion has affected all sector, but has been particularly noteworthy in those directly related to construction: tiles. glazes, bricks and roof tiles. A combination of an extraordinary exporting effort, together with a record figure in new housing projects (415 000 houses in 1999, are responsible for such outburst. Other sectors, such as refractories have undergone significant growths due to the high rate of steel production increase, also in historical record figures (15m t in 1999. All this sectors doubled altogether the growing rate of their main European competitors. Raw material production has had an even more effervescent trend, almost doubling 1995 production. Such dynamic growth has been associated to a remarkable quality increase and to an unparalleled technological innovation process.

    La industria española de la cerámica ha experimentado un notable crecimiento en los últimos cuatro años; expansión que ha alcanzado a todos los sectores, pero que ha sido especialmente notable en los mas directamente asociados a la construcción: revestimientos, esmaltes, tejas y ladrillos. La combinación de un extraordinario esfuerzo exportador unido a las cifras récord en la viviendas iniciadas, 415 000 en 1999, justifican este auge. Otros sectores como refractarios han experimentado crecimientos significativos ante el ritmo elevado en la producción de acero, que alcanzó asimismo un récord histórico, 15 Mt en 1999. Para el conjunto de estos sectores el ritmo de crecimiento ha duplicado el de los principales competidores europeos. La producción de materias primas han experimentado un dinamismo aún mas elevado duplicándose prácticamente las cifras respecto a 1995. Este crecimiento ha estado asociado a un notable incremento en la calidad y en los procesos de innovación tecnológica.

  6. Deformation Behavior of Sub-micron and Micron Sized Alumina Particles in Compression.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay; Mook, William; Boyce, Brad; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; McKenzie, Bonnie Beth; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Hall, Aaron Christopher.

    2014-09-01

    The ability to integrate ceramics with other materials has been limited due to high temperature (>800degC) ceramic processing. Recently, researchers demonstrated a novel process , aerosol deposition (AD), to fabricate ceramic films at room temperature (RT). In this process, sub - micro n sized ceramic particles are accelerated by pressurized gas, impacted on the substrate, plastically deformed, and form a dense film under vacuum. This AD process eliminates high temperature processing thereby enabling new coatings and device integration, in which ceramics can be deposited on metals, plastics, and glass. However, k nowledge in fundamental mechanisms for ceramic particle s to deform and form a dense ceramic film is still needed and is essential in advancing this novel RT technology. In this wo rk, a combination of experimentation and atomistic simulation was used to determine the deformation behavior of sub - micron sized ceramic particle s ; this is the first fundamental step needed to explain coating formation in the AD process . High purity, singl e crystal, alpha alumina particles with nominal size s of 0.3 um and 3.0 um were examined. Particle characterization, using transmission electron microscopy (TEM ), showed that the 0.3 u m particles were relatively defect - free single crystals whereas 3.0 u m p articles were highly defective single crystals or particles contained low angle grain boundaries. Sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited ductile failure in compression. In situ compression experiments showed 0.3um particles deformed plastically, fractured, and became polycrystalline. Moreover, dislocation activit y was observed within the se particles during compression . These sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited large accum ulated strain (2 - 3 times those of micron - sized particles) before first fracture. I n agreement with the findings from experimentation , a tomistic simulation s of nano - Al 2 O 3 particles showed dislocation slip and

  7. Evaluation of clayey masses compositions starting from the residue incorporation of the red ceramic industry to obtain tubular ceramic membranes; Avaliacao das composicoes de massas argilosas a partir da incorporacao de residuo da industria de ceramica vermelha na obtencao de membranas ceramicas tubulares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Adriano Lima da; Chaves, Alexsandra Cristina; Luna, Carlos Bruno Barreto; Neves, Gelmires de Araujo; Lira, Helio de Lucena, E-mail: adrianolimadasilva@hotmail.com, E-mail: alexsandra.chaves@ifap.edu.br, E-mail: brunobarretodemaufcg@hotmail.com, E-mail: gelmires@ufcg.edu.br, E-mail: helio@ufcg.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UAEMa/CCT/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais

    2017-01-15

    The inappropriate residue disposal of red ceramic industry is very high. Nowadays, one of the major challenges is the investigation of processes to obtain alternative materials, enabling the use of these residues to manufacture new materials. This work's objective is to study clayey masses' compositions starting from the residue incorporation of the red ceramic industry to be used in tubular ceramic membranes. Two compositions of ceramic masses were established, composition A (50% of residue) and composition B (70% of residue). Granulometric analysis of the ceramic masses presented an average size of particles, what indicates membranes in the microfiltration scale. Another observed factor is related to the increase of residue amount, what favored a decrease in the ceramic mass' plasticity. A rise in the apparent porosity was also observed, probably because of a possible growing in the bigger pores numbers, due to the sintering high temperature and the elevation of residue quantity itself. (author)

  8. IDENTIFYING FRACTURE ORIGIN IN CERAMICS BY COMBINATION OF NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING AND DISCRETE ELEMENT ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senapati, Rajeev; Zhang Jianmei

    2010-01-01

    Advanced ceramic materials have been extensively applied in aerospace, automobile and other industries. However, the reliability of the advanced ceramics is a major concern because of the brittle nature of the materials. In this paper, combination of nondestructive testing and numerical modeling Discrete Element Method is proposed to identify the fracture origin in ceramics. The nondestructive testing--laser scattering technology is first performed on the ceramic components to reveal the machining-induced damage such as cracks and the material-inherent flaws such as voids, then followed by the four point bending test. Discrete Element software package PFC 2D is used to simulate the four point bending test and try to identify where the fractures start. The numerical representation of the ceramic materials is done by generating a densely packed particle system using the specimen genesis procedure and then applying the suitable microparameters to the particle system. Simulation of four point bending test is performed on materials having no defects, materials having manufacturing-induced defects like cracks, and materials having material-inherent flaws like voids. The initiation and propagation of defects is modeled and the mean contact force on the loading ball is also plotted. The simulation prediction results are well in accordance with the nondestructive testing results.

  9. Dispersion toughened silicon carbon ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    Fracture resistant silicon carbide ceramics are provided by incorporating therein a particulate dispersoid selected from the group consisting of (a) a mixture of boron, carbon and tungsten, (b) a mixture of boron, carbon and molybdenum, (c) a mixture of boron, carbon and titanium carbide, (d) a mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide, and (e) boron nitride. 4 figures.

  10. Microstructural Design for Tough Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-10-01

    or Rockwell cones) where the contact pressure (i.e. the ’hardness’) is effectively independent of load (Sperisen, Carry and Mocellin 1986, Makino...148. RrrcHM, R. 0., 1988, Mater. Sci. Engng, A, 103, 15. SPERmEN, T., CARRY, C., and MOCELLIN , A, 1986, Fracture Mechanics of Ceramics, Vol. 8, edited

  11. Electrical Degradation in Ceramic Dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-09

    and D. M. Smyth, " Positron Annihilation in Calcium-Doped Barium Titanate", in Electro- Ceramics and Solid State Ionsi, H. L. Tuller and D. M. Smyth...2 with the formation of ompensating oxygen vacancies, and this causes an increase in the ioni conductivity: 2CaO CaC + Call + 20 + (5) TiO2 --- V

  12. Natural Radioactivity in Ceramic Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Khadra, S.A.; Kamel, N.H.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramics are one of the most important types of the industrial building materials. The raw materials of the ceramic are made of a mixture of clay, feldspar, silica, talc kaolin minerals together with zirconium silicates (ZrSiO4).The ceramic raw materials and the final products contain naturally occurring radionuclide mainly U-238 and, Th-232 series, and the radioactive isotope of potassium K-40. Six raw ceramic samples were obtained from the Aracemco Company at Egypt together with a floor tile sample (final product) for measuring radioactive concentration levels., The activity of the naturally U-238, Th-232, and K-40 were determined as (Bq/kg) using gamma spectroscopy (Hyperactive pure germanium detector). Concentration of U and Th were determined in (ppm) using spectrophotometer technique by Arsenazo 111 and Piridy l-Azo -Resorcinol (PAR) indicators. Sequential extraction tests were carried out in order to determine the quantity of the radionuclide associated with various fractions as exchangeable, carbonate, acid soluble and in the residue. The results evaluated were compared to the associated activity indices (AI) that were defined by former USSR and West Germany

  13. [Posterior ceramic bonded partial restorations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    Posterior ceramic bonded partial restorations are conservative and esthetic approaches for compromised teeth. Overlays constitute a less invasive alternative for tooth tissues than crown preparations. With inlays and onlays they are also indicated in case of full arch or quadrant rehabilitations including several teeth. This article screens indications and realization of this type of restorations.

  14. GEORGIAN PRODUCTION PREFABRICATED CERAMIC FIREPLACE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaprindashvili, G.; Chemia, M.; Kartozia, L.

    2006-01-01

    General description and basic working principles of new construction prefabricated ceramic fireplace are given. The presented fireplace represents a unique synthesis of various fireplaces distributed in Georgian and some European countries; however, it is distinguished for its higher efficiency and other advantages. (author)

  15. Monolithic Integrated Ceramic Waveguide Filters

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, IC; Sandhu, MY

    2014-01-01

    Design techniques for a new class of integrated monolithic high permittivity ceramic waveguide filters are presented. These filters enable a size reduction of 50% compared to air-filled TEM filters with the same unloaded Q-Factor. Designs for both chebyshev and asymmetric generalized chebyshev filter are presented, with experimental results for an 1800 MHz chebyshev filter showing excellent agreement with theory.

  16. Compositionally Graded Multilayer Ceramic Capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyun-Cheol; Zhou, Jie E; Maurya, Deepam; Yan, Yongke; Wang, Yu U; Priya, Shashank

    2017-09-27

    Multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCC) are widely used in consumer electronics. Here, we provide a transformative method for achieving high dielectric response and tunability over a wide temperature range through design of compositionally graded multilayer (CGML) architecture. Compositionally graded MLCCs were found to exhibit enhanced dielectric tunability (70%) along with small dielectric losses (filters and power converters.

  17. Soft lithography of ceramic patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Göbel, Ole; Nedelcu, M.; Steiner, U.

    2007-01-01

    Polymer-based precursor solutions are patterned using a soft-lithographic patterning technique to yield sub-micrometer-sized ceramic patterns. By using a polymer-metal-nitrate solution as a lithographic resist, we demonstrate a micromolding procedure using a simple rubber stamp that yields a

  18. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These ceramics are developed by chemical synthesis, in other words, they ... Science in 1980 and was a post doctoral ... complex crystal structures that have anisotropic characteristics. (Box 1) .... is a rare-earth or transition metal ion) and hexagonal ferrites. .... dielectric loss factor and dielectric strength normally determine.

  19. Photovoltaic effect in ferroelectric ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, D. J.; Linz, A.; Jenssen, H. P.

    1982-01-01

    The ceramic structure was simulated in a form that is more tractable to correlation between experiment and theory. Single crystals (of barium titanate) were fabricated in a simple corrugated structure in which the pedestals of the corrugation simulated the grain while the intervening cuts could be filled with materials simulating the grain boundaries. The observed photovoltages were extremely small (100 mv).

  20. Doubled-ended ceramic thyratron

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The double-ended ceramic thyratron CX 1171 B, with its coaxial voltage divider for the SPS. Such a switch, paralleled by three ignitrons in series forms the "thyragnitron" arrangement, and can switch 10 kA, 25 ms pulses, with very fast rise times.