WorldWideScience

Sample records for submerged shell structures

  1. Structural and Acoustic Responses of a Submerged Stiffened Conical Shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meixia Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the vibrational behavior and far-field sound radiation of a submerged stiffened conical shell at low frequencies. The solution for the dynamic response of the conical shell is presented in the form of a power series. A smeared approach is used to model the ring stiffeners. Fluid loading is taken into account by dividing the conical shell into narrow strips which are considered to be local cylindrical shells. The far-field sound pressure is solved by the Element Radiation Superposition Method. Excitations in two directions are considered to simulate the loading on the surface of the conical shell. These excitations are applied along the generator and normal to the surface of the conical shell. The contributions from the individual circumferential modes on the structural responses of the conical shell are studied. The effects of the external fluid loading and stiffeners are discussed. The results from the analytical models are validated by numerical results from a fully coupled finite element/boundary element model.

  2. Reduction of the radiating sound of a submerged finite cylindrical shell structure by active vibration control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heung Soo; Sohn, Jung Woo; Jeon, Juncheol; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2013-02-06

    In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water.

  3. Reduction of the Radiating Sound of a Submerged Finite Cylindrical Shell Structure by Active Vibration Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Bok Choi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water.

  4. Flow and scour around vertical submerged structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Although past investigations establish the effect of various parameters on scour around vertical submerged structures for live and clear water condition, yet further studies are required to analyze the scour around group of submerged structures for various bed sediments, understand the flow physics around the group and ...

  5. Accuracy verification and analysis of SEA method for calculating radiation noise pressure of submerged cylindrical shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Kai

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Statistical Energy Analysis(SEAis an effective method for solving high frequency structural vibration and acoustic radiation problems. When we use it to analyze submerged structures, it is necessary to consider the actions of fluid as'heavy fluid' relative to structures, which differs from when it is used in the air. The simple model of a submerged cylindrical shell is used to calculate at a higher frequency using FEM/BEM. The SEA and FEM method are then used to calculate the radiation sound pressure level, verifying the accuracy of the SEA prediction for submerged structures. The classified method of subsystems and the effect of the error of the internal loss factor on the accuracy of the results are explored. The calculated results of SEA and FEM/BEM are very different below 400 Hz, and basically the same above 400 Hz. The error caused by the division of different subsystems is about 5 dB. The error in the calculation results caused by the error of the internal loss factor is 2-3 dB. It is possible to use SEA to calculate the radiated noise of an underwater cylindrical shell when the modal density is high enough.For the cylindrical shell, dividing the subsystems along the circumference is not reliable at a low frequency, as it may lead to inaccurate calculation results. At a high frequency, it is more accurate to divide the subsystems along the circumference than the axle. For subsystems with high energy, the internal loss factor has a greater effect on the simulation results, so a more accurate way should be taken to determine the internal loss factor of subsystems with high energy.

  6. Topology optimization for submerged buoyant structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picelli, R.; van Dijk, R.; Vicente, W.M.; Pavanello, R.; Langelaar, M.; van Keulen, A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an evolutionary structural topology optimization method for the design of completely submerged buoyant modules with design-dependent fluid pressure loading. This type of structure is used to support offshore rig installation and pipeline transportation at all water depths. The

  7. Shell-like structures

    CERN Document Server

    Altenbach, Holm

    2011-01-01

    In this volume, scientists and researchers from industry discuss the new trends in simulation and computing shell-like structures. The focus is put on the following problems: new theories (based on two-dimensional field equations but describing non-classical effects), new constitutive equations (for materials like sandwiches, foams, etc. and which can be combined with the two-dimensional shell equations), complex structures (folded, branching and/or self intersecting shell structures, etc.) and shell-like structures on different scales (for example: nano-tubes) or very thin structures (similar

  8. Durability performance of submerged concrete structures - phase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This project determined that severe corrosion of steel can occur in the submerged : portions of reinforced concrete structures in marine environments. Field studies of decommissioned : pilings from Florida bridges revealed multiple instances of stron...

  9. Temporal structures in shell models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, F.

    2001-01-01

    The intermittent dynamics of the turbulent Gledzer, Ohkitani, and Yamada shell-model is completely characterized by a single type of burstlike structure, which moves through the shells like a front. This temporal structure is described by the dynamics of the instantaneous configuration of the shell...

  10. Temporal Structures in Shell Models

    OpenAIRE

    Okkels, Fridolin

    2000-01-01

    The intermittent dynamics of the turbulent GOY shell-model is characterised by a single type of burst-like structure, which moves through the shells like a front. This temporal structure is described by the dynamics of the instantaneous configuration of the shell-amplitudes revealing a approximative chaotic attractor of the dynamics.

  11. Plate shell structures of glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Anne

    to their curved shape. A plate shell structure maintains a high stiffness-to-weight ratio, while facilitating the use of plane structural elements. The study focuses on using laminated glass panes for the load bearing facets. Various methods of generating a plate shell geometry are suggested. Together with Ghent......, such as facet size, imperfections, and connection characteristics. The critical load is compared to that of a similar, but smoothly curved, shell structure. Based on the investigations throughout the study, a set of guidelines for the structural design of plate shells of glass is proposed....

  12. Are Hadrons Shell-Structured?

    CERN Document Server

    Palazzi, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    A stability analysis of the mass spectrum indicates that hadrons, like atoms and nuclei, are shell-structured. The mesonic shells mass series, combined with the results of a mass quantization analysis, reveals striking similarities with the nuclear shells. In addition, the mesonic mass patterns suggest solid-phase partonic bound states on an fcc lattice, compatible with a model by A. O. Barut with stable leptons as constituents, bound by magnetism. Baryonic shells grow with a lower density, and only start at shell 3 with the nucleon.

  13. Mesoscale structure of chiral nematic shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ye; Guo, Ashley; Zhang, Rui; Armas-Perez, Julio C; Martínez-González, José A; Rahimi, Mohammad; Sadati, Monirosadat; de Pablo, Juan J

    2016-11-09

    There is considerable interest in understanding and controlling topological defects in nematic liquid crystals (LCs). Confinement, in the form of droplets, has been particularly effective in that regard. Here, we employ a Landau-de Gennes formalism to explore the geometrical frustration of nematic order in shell geometries, and focus on chiral materials. By varying the chirality and thickness in uniform shells, we construct a phase diagram that includes tetravalent structures, bipolar structures (BS), bent structures and radial spherical structures (RSS). It is found that, in uniform shells, the BS-to-RSS structural transition, in response to both chirality and shell geometry, is accompanied by an abrupt change of defect positions, implying a potential use for chiral nematic shells as sensors. Moreover, we investigate thickness heterogeneity in shells and demonstrate that non-chiral and chiral nematic shells exhibit distinct equilibrium positions of their inner core that are governed by shell chirality c.

  14. THE STUDY ON THE DURABILITY OF SUBMERGED STRUCTURE DISPLACEMENT DUE TO CONCRETE FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mohd

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Concrete structures that exposed to marine environments are subjected to multiple deterioration mechanisms. An overview of the existing technology for submerged concrete, pressure resistant, concrete structures which related such as cracks, debonds, and delamination are discussed. Basic knowledge related to drowning durability such as submerged concrete structures in the maritime environment are the durability of a concrete and the ability to resist to weathering, chemical attack, abrasion or other deterioration processes. The measuring techniques and instrumentation for geometrical monitoring of submerged structural displacements have traditionally been categorized into two groups according to the two main groups, namely as geodetic surveying and geotechnical structural measurements of local displacements. This paper aims to study the durability of submerged concrete displacement and harmful effects of submerged concrete structures.

  15. Voronoi Grid-Shell Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Pietroni, Nico; Tonelli, Davide; Puppo, Enrico; Froli, Maurizio; Scopigno, Roberto; Cignoni, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a framework for the generation of grid-shell structures that is based on Voronoi diagrams and allows us to design tessellations that achieve excellent static performances. We start from an analysis of stress on the input surface and we use the resulting tensor field to induce an anisotropic non-Euclidean metric over it. Then we compute a Centroidal Voronoi Tessellation under the same metric. The resulting mesh is hex-dominant and made of cells with a variable density, which depen...

  16. Shell Structure of Exotic Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobaczewski, J. [Warsaw University; Michel, N. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Nazarewicz, Witold [ORNL; Ploszajczak, M. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL); Rotureau, J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2007-01-01

    Theoretical predictions and experimental discoveries for neutron-rich, short-lived nuclei far from stability indicate that the familiar concept of nucleonic shell structure should be considered as less robust than previously thought. The notion of single-particle motion in exotic nuclei is reviewed with a particular focus on three aspects: (i) variations of nuclear mean field with neutron excess due to tensor interactions; (ii) importance of many-body correlations; and (iii) influence of open channels on properties of weakly bound and unbound nuclear states.

  17. Prediction of the vibroacoustic behavior of a submerged shell with non-axisymmetric internal substructures by a condensed transfer function method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, V.; Maxit, L.; Guyader, J.-L.; Leissing, T.

    2016-01-01

    The vibroacoustic behavior of axisymmetric stiffened shells immersed in water has been intensively studied in the past. On the contrary, little attention has been paid to the modeling of these shells coupled to non-axisymmetric internal frames. Indeed, breaking the axisymmetry couples the circumferential orders of the Fourier series and considerably increases the computational costs. In order to tackle this issue, we propose a sub-structuring approach called the Condensed Transfer Function (CTF) method that will allow assembling a model of axisymmetric stiffened shell with models of non-axisymmetric internal frames. The CTF method is developed in the general case of mechanical subsystems coupled along curves. A set of orthonormal functions called condensation functions, which depend on the curvilinear abscissa along the coupling line, is considered. This set is then used as a basis for approximating and decomposing the displacements and the applied forces at the line junctions. Thanks to the definition and calculation of condensed transfer functions for each uncoupled subsystem and by using the superposition principle for passive linear systems, the behavior of the coupled subsystems can be deduced. A plane plate is considered as a test case to study the convergence of the method with respect to the type and the number of condensation functions taken into account. The CTF method is then applied to couple a submerged non-periodically stiffened shell described using the Circumferential Admittance Approach (CAA) with internal substructures described by Finite Element Method (FEM). The influence of non-axisymmetric internal substructures can finally be studied and it is shown that it tends to increase the radiation efficiency of the shell and can modify the vibrational and acoustic energy distribution.

  18. Fluid-structure coupled analysis of underwater cylindrical shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Shang-Mao; Sun, Li-Ping

    2008-06-01

    Underwater cylindrical shell structures have been found a wide of application in many engineering fields, such as the element of marine, oil platforms, etc. The coupled vibration analysis is a hot issue for these underwater structures. The vibration characteristics of underwater structures are influenced not only by hydrodynamic pressure but also by hydrostatic pressure corresponding to different water depths. In this study, an acoustic finite element method was used to evaluate the underwater structures. Taken the hydrostatic pressure into account in terms of initial stress stiffness, an acoustical fluid-structure coupled analysis of underwater cylindrical shells has been made to study the effect of hydrodynamic pressures on natural frequency and sound radiation. By comparing with the frequencies obtained by the acoustic finite element method and by the added mass method based on the Bessel function, the validity of present analysis was checked. Finally, test samples of the sound radiation of stiffened cylindrical shells were acquired by a harmonic acoustic analysis. The results showed that hydrostatic pressure plays an important role in determining a large submerged body motion, and the characteristics of sound radiation change with water depth. Furthermore, the analysis methods and the results are of significant reference value for studies of other complicated submarine structures.

  19. Periodic Orbits and Deformed Shell Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Arita, K.; Magner, A. G.; Matsuyanagi, K.

    2002-01-01

    Relationship between quantum shell structure and classical periodic orbits is briefly reviewed on the basis of semi-classical trace formula. Using the spheroidal cavity model, it is shown that three-dimensional periodic orbits, which are born out of bifurcation of planar orbits at large prolate deformations, generate the superdeformed shell structure.

  20. Plate shell structures - statics and stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almegaard, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the basic structural system, statics and spatial stability of plate shells. The structural system can be considered as a single layer of planar elements, where each element only transfers in-plane (membrane) forces to its neighbouring elements. External out-of-plane loads...... system is dual to that of a spatial truss system, which means the stringer system [1] can be applied to plate-shell structures....

  1. Structural shell analysis understanding and application

    CERN Document Server

    Blaauwendraad, Johan

    2014-01-01

    The mathematical description of the properties of a shell is much more elaborate than those of beam and plate structures. Therefore many engineers and architects are unacquainted with aspects of shell behaviour and design, and are not familiar with sufficiently reliable shell theories for the different shell types as derived in the middle of the 20th century. Rather than contributing to theory development, this university textbook focuses on architectural and civil engineering schools. Of course, practising professionals will profit from it as well. The book deals with thin elastic shells, in particular with cylindrical, conical and spherical types, and with elliptic and hyperbolic paraboloids. The focus is on roofs, chimneys, pressure vessels and storage tanks. Special attention is paid to edge bending disturbance zones, which is indispensable knowledge in FE meshing. A substantial part of the book results from research efforts in the mid 20th century at Delft University of Technology. As such, it is a valua...

  2. CO2 Hydration Shell Structure and Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukowski, Samual R; Mitev, Pavlin D; Hermansson, Kersti; Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2017-07-06

    The hydration-shell of CO2 is characterized using Raman multivariate curve resolution (Raman-MCR) spectroscopy combined with ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) vibrational density of states simulations, to validate our assignment of the experimentally observed high-frequency OH band to a weak hydrogen bond between water and CO2. Our results reveal that while the hydration-shell of CO2 is highly tetrahedral, it is also occasionally disrupted by the presence of entropically stabilized defects associated with the CO2-water hydrogen bond. Moreover, we find that the hydration-shell of CO2 undergoes a temperature-dependent structural transformation to a highly disordered (less tetrahedral) structure, reminiscent of the transformation that takes place at higher temperatures around much larger oily molecules. The biological significance of the CO2 hydration shell structural transformation is suggested by the fact that it takes place near physiological temperatures.

  3. [Influence of Submerged Plants on Microbial Community Structure in Sediment of Hongze Lake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ding-yu; Zhang, Ting-xi; Dong, Dan-ping; Li, De-fang; Wang, Guo-xiang

    2016-05-15

    Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) method was applied to analyze the influence of submerged plants on sediment microbial community structure, in order to investigate the changes of sediment microbial community structure for different kinds of the submerged plants in different growth periods. Particularly, Potamogeton crispus L., Potamogeton pectinatus L and the mixed group were chosen as the typical submerged plants in Hongze Lake for investigation in this paper. The results indicated that the change of total PLFAs in different periods was significant, on the contrary, the PLFA change for different groups in the same period was insignificant. The values of G⁺ PLFA/G⁻ PLFA in the submerged plant group were also highly related to the different growth periods, which demonstrated that the root function of the submerged plant had a severe impact on the microbial community in sediment. Furthermore, some environmental factors, such as Temperature, pH, TOC and DO, were correlated to characteristic phospholipid of PLFAs in sediment, which means the environmental factors could also affect the microbial community structure.

  4. Core-Shell Structured Magnetic Ternary Nanocubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lingyan; Wang, Xin; Luo, Jin; Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Wang, Chong M.; Chernova, Natalya; Engelhard, Mark H.; Liu, Yao; Bae, In-Tae; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2010-12-01

    While transition metal-doped ferrite nanoparticles constitute an important class of soft magnetic nanomaterials with spinel structures, the ability to control the shape and composition would enable a wide range of applications in homogeneous or heterogeneous reactions such as catalysis and magnetic separation of biomolecules. This report describes novel findings of an investigation of core-shell structured MnZn ferrite nanocubes synthesized in organic solvents by manipulating the reaction temperature and capping agent composition in the absence of the conventionally-used reducing agents. The core-shell structure of the highly-monodispersed nanocubes (~20 nm) are shown to consist of an Fe3O4 core and an (Mn0.5Zn0.5)(Fe0.9, Mn1.1)O4 shell. In comparison with Fe3O4 and other binary ferrite nanoparticles, the core-shell structured nanocubes were shown to display magnetic properties regulated by a combination of the core-shell composition, leading to a higher coercivity (~350 Oe) and field-cool/zero-field-cool characteristics drastically different from many regular MnZn ferrite nanoparticles. The findings are discussed in terms of the unique core-shell composition, the understanding of which has important implication to the exploration of this class of soft magnetic nanomaterials in many potential applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, fuel cells, and batteries.

  5. Damage Tolerance of Large Shell Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnetyan, L.; Chamis, C. C.

    1999-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of large shell structures is investigated. A computer model is used for the assessment of structural response, progressive fracture resistance, and defect/damage tolerance characteristics. Critical locations of a stiffened conical shell segment are identified. Defective and defect-free computer models are simulated to evaluate structural damage/defect tolerance. Safe pressurization levels are assessed for the retention of structural integrity at the presence of damage/ defects. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture are included in the simulations. Damage propagation and burst pressures for defective and defect-free shells are compared to evaluate damage tolerance. Design implications with regard to defect and damage tolerance of a large steel pressure vessel are examined.

  6. UHPFRC in large span shell structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Maten, R.N.; Grunewald, S.; Walraven, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-High Performance Fibre-Reinforced Concrete (UHPFRC) is an innovative concrete type with a high compressive strength and a far more durable character compared to conventional concrete. UHPFRC can be applied in structures with aesthetic appearance and high material efficiency. Shell structures

  7. Corrosion monitoring for underground and submerged concrete structures - examples and interpretation issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Peelen, W.H.A.; Leegwater, G.

    2008-01-01

    Since about 1980 Corrosion Monitoring Systems have been used in many concrete structures in aggressive environmentworldwide. While these systemswork properly in aboveground environment, some questions have arisen for submerged conditions, e.g. the outer sides of tunnels, piers in seawater or

  8. Conceptual Design Tool for Concrete Shell Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Malene Kirstine; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on conceptual tools for concrete shell structures when working within the span of performance-based design and computational morphogenesis. The designer, referred to as the Architect-Engineer, works through several iterations parallel with aesthetic, functional and technical...

  9. Modeling plate shell structures using pyFormex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Anne; Verhegghe, Benedict; Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    2009-01-01

    A shell structure made of glass combines a light-weight structural concept with glass’ high permeability to light. If the geometry of the structure is plane-based facetted (plate shell structure), the glass elements will be plane panes, and these glass panes will comprise the primary load......-bearing structure. A plate shell structure is contrary to a triangulated facetted shell structure, where the shell action is concentrated in the edges and vertices of the geometry, thereby resulting in the need for a triangulated lattice structure outlining the edges of the geometry. These two structural principles...... (plate shells and triangulated lattice shells) may not differ in complexity regarding the topology, but when it comes to the practical generation of the geometry, e.g. in CAD, the plate shell is far more troublesome to handle than the triangulated geometry. The free software tool “pyFormex”, developed...

  10. Automated shell theory for rotating structures (ASTROS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, B. J.; Thomas, J. M.

    1971-01-01

    A computer program for analyzing axisymmetric shells with inertial forces caused by rotation about the shell axis is developed by revising the STARS II shell program. The basic capabilities of the STARS II shell program, such as the treatment of the branched shells, stiffened wall construction, and thermal gradients, are retained.

  11. The structural acoustic properties of stiffened shells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luan, Yu

    2008-01-01

    . This is important when a number of stiffened plates are combined in a complicated structure composed of many plates. However, whereas the equivalent plate theory is well established there is no similar established theory for stiffened shells. This paper investigates the mechanical and structural acoustic properties......Plates stiffened with ribs can be modeled as homogeneous isotropic or orthotropic plates, and modeling such an equivalent plate numerically with, say, the finite element method is, of course, far more economical in terms of computer resources than modelling the complete, stiffened plate...

  12. Structural Assessment of Advanced Composite Tow-Steered Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Stanford, Bret K.; Hrinda, Glenn A.; Wang, Zhuosong; Martin, Robert a.; Kim, H. Alicia

    2013-01-01

    The structural performance of two advanced composite tow-steered shells, manufactured using a fiber placement system, is assessed using both experimental and analytical methods. The fiber orientation angles vary continuously around the shell circumference from 10 degrees on the shell crown and keel, to 45 degrees on the shell sides. The two shells differ in that one shell has the full 24-tow course applied during each pass of the fiber placement system, while the second shell uses the fiber placement system s tow drop/add capability to achieve a more uniform shell wall thickness. The shells are tested in axial compression, and estimates of their prebuckling axial stiffnesses and bifurcation buckling loads are predicted using linear finite element analyses. These preliminary predictions compare well with the test results, with an average agreement of approximately 10 percent.

  13. Video monitoring of sandbar-shoreline response to an offshore submerged structure at a microtidal beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvier, Clément; Balouin, Yann; Castelle, Bruno

    2017-10-01

    In early 2013, an 800-m long and 12-m wide submerged breakwater with its crest in 2-m depth was implemented at the wave-dominated barred beach of Sète, SE France, to fight against erosion and submersion hazards. Daily video images from April 2011 to April 2016 covering an alongshore distance of 3.5 km are used to analyse the response of both the sandbar(s) and the shoreline to the structure implementation. Results show that the breakwater had a profound impact on the nearshore system, both shoreward of the structure and well away from it alongshore. A progressive rotation and linearisation of the sandbar was observed shoreward of the submerged breakwater. This resulted in the splitting of the sandbar adjacent to the structure during a net offshore sandbar migration event driven by a severe storm in December 2013. The typical formation of a salient or tombolo was not observed. Instead, shoreline coupled to the sandbar geometry, which resulted in a slight seaward migration of the shoreline in front of the structure. Overall, this study highlights that the role of the sandbar is critical to shoreline response to the implementation of breakwaters on barred beaches.

  14. Impact Crater Morphology and the Structure of Europa's Ice Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, Elizabeth A.; Johnson, Brandon C.

    2017-12-01

    We performed numerical simulations of impact crater formation on Europa to infer the thickness and structure of its ice shell. The simulations were performed using iSALE to test both the conductive ice shell over ocean and the conductive lid over warm convective ice scenarios for a variety of conditions. The modeled crater depth-diameter is strongly dependent on the thermal gradient and temperature of the warm convective ice. Our results indicate that both a fully conductive (thin) shell and a conductive-convective (thick) shell can reproduce the observed crater depth-diameter and morphologies. For the conductive ice shell over ocean, the best fit is an approximately 8 km thick conductive ice shell. Depending on the temperature (255-265 K) and therefore strength of warm convective ice, the thickness of the conductive ice lid is estimated at 5-7 km. If central features within the crater, such as pits and domes, form during crater collapse, our simulations are in better agreement with the fully conductive shell (thin shell). If central features form well after the impact, however, our simulations suggest that a conductive-convective shell (thick shell) is more likely. Although our study does not provide a firm conclusion regarding the thickness of Europa's ice shell, our work indicates that Valhalla class multiring basins on Europa may provide robust constraints on the thickness of Europa's ice shell.

  15. Structural Acoustic Physics Based Modeling of Curved Composite Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-19

    NUWC-NPT Technical Report 12,236 19 September 2017 Structural Acoustic Physics -Based Modeling of Curved Composite Shells Rachel E. Hesse...SUBTITLE Structural Acoustic Physics -Based Modeling of Curved Composite Shells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...study was to use physics -based modeling (PBM) to investigate wave propagations through curved shells that are subjected to acoustic excitation. An

  16. Integrable structure in discrete shell membrane theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schief, W K

    2014-05-08

    We present natural discrete analogues of two integrable classes of shell membranes. By construction, these discrete shell membranes are in equilibrium with respect to suitably chosen internal stresses and external forces. The integrability of the underlying equilibrium equations is proved by relating the geometry of the discrete shell membranes to discrete O surface theory. We establish connections with generalized barycentric coordinates and nine-point centres and identify a discrete version of the classical Gauss equation of surface theory.

  17. Stage–discharge relationship for a pipe overflow structure in both free and submerged flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Isenmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many facilities for urban drainage systems are equipped with a pipe overflow structure that can often be treated as a circular broad-crested weir. Thus it is possible to evaluate the overflow discharge through this device by measuring the water levels in the upstream tank and at the outlet of the pipe. In the present study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD is used to determine a relationship between the discharge and the water levels upstream and downstream of the orifice for a range of diameters between 200 and 600 mm and a relative head up to 2. Over 50 numerical simulations are performed to take into account all the operating conditions of the system: free flow, submerged flow and pressurized flow. A regression is applied to the resulting data in order to obtain an orifice equation valid in both free-flow and submerged-flow regimes. Specific formulas, derived from Bernoulli's theorem, are also given for pressurized flows. The proposed methodology is applied to two examples.

  18. Material with core-shell structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhrs, Claudia [Rio Rancho, NM; Richard, Monique N [Ann Arbor, MI; Dehne, Aaron [Maumee, OH; Phillips, Jonathan [Rio Rancho, NM; Stamm, Kimber L [Ann Arbor, MI; Fanson, Paul T [Brighton, MI

    2011-11-15

    Disclosed is a material having a composite particle, the composite particle including an outer shell and a core. The core is made from a lithium alloying material and the outer shell has an inner volume that is greater in size than the core of the lithium alloying material. In some instances, the outer mean diameter of the outer shell is less than 500 nanometers and the core occupies between 5 and 99% of the inner volume. In addition, the outer shell can have an average wall thickness of less than 100 nanometers.

  19. Vibrations of structurally orthotropic laminated shells under thermal power loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, E. A.; Lopanitsyn, E. A.

    2017-05-01

    On the basis of the linearized version of equations obtained in a geometrically nonlinear statement and describing the nonaxisymmetric strain of nonshallow sandwich structure orthotropic shells under thermal power loading, the Rayleigh-Ritz method with polynomial approximation of displacements and shear strains is used to solve the problem of small free vibrations of axisymmetrically thermally preloaded freely supported three-layer conical shell. The causes of dynamical fracture of the shell under study are revealed.

  20. Composite fuselage shell structures research at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Shuart, Mark J.

    1992-01-01

    Fuselage structures for transport aircraft represent a significant percentage of both the weight and the cost of these aircraft primary structures. Composite materials offer the potential for reducing both the weight and the cost of transport fuselage structures, but only limited studies of the response and failure of composite fuselage structures have been conducted for transport aircraft. The behavior of these important primary structures must be understood, and the structural mechanics methodology for analyzing and designing these complex stiffened shell structures must be validated in the laboratory. The effects of local gradients and discontinuities on fuselage shell behavior and the effects of local damage on pressure containment must be thoroughly understood before composite fuselage structures can be used for commercial aircraft. This paper describes the research being conducted and planned at NASA LaRC to help understand the critical behavior or composite fuselage structures and to validate the structural mechanics methodology being developed for stiffened composite fuselage shell structure subjected to combined internal pressure and mechanical loads. Stiffened shell and curved stiffened panel designs are currently being developed and analyzed, and these designs will be fabricated and then tested at Langley to study critical fuselage shell behavior and to validate structural analysis and design methodology. The research includes studies of the effects of combined internal pressure and mechanical loads on nonlinear stiffened panel and shell behavior, the effects of cutouts and other gradient-producing discontinuities on composite shell response, and the effects of local damage on pressure containment and residual strength. Scaling laws are being developed that relate full-scale and subscale behavior of composite fuselage shells. Failure mechanisms are being identified and advanced designs will be developed based on what is learned from early results from

  1. Structural Response of Submerged Air-Backed Plates by Experimental and Numerical Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lloyd Hammond

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a series of small-scale underwater shock experiments that measured the structural responses of submerged, fully clamped, air-backed, steel plates to a range of high explosive charge sizes. The experimental results were subsequently used to validate a series of simulations using the coupled LS-DYNA/USA finite element/boundary element codes. The modelling exercise was complicated by a significant amount of local cavitation occurring in the fluid adjacent to the plate and difficulties in modelling the boundary conditions of the test plates. The finite element model results satisfactorily predicted the displacement-time history of the plate over a range of shock loadings although a less satisfactory correlation was achieved for the peak velocities. It is expected that the predictive capability of the finite element model will be significantly improved once hydrostatic initialisation can be fully utilised with the LS-DYNA/USA software.

  2. Semi-analytical postbuckling strength analysis of anisotropic shell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauns, J.; Skadins, U.

    2017-10-01

    An investigation of the forms of shell buckling has been the subject of many experimental and theoretical studies. On the basis of analysing of the forms of equilibrium it is possible to determine the stability of a structure as a whole, especially if a statistical analysis is used. The numerical analysis of the shells considered is based on a semi-analytical treatment of displacement and stress field. This method is proven for static and dynamic nonlinear analysis of general shells of revolution and leads to important advantages in efficiency and accuracy compared with a common finite element analysis, especially in the case of geometrically imperfect shells. The method developed permits determination of stresses in a shell by means of an experimental deflection function. Failure criterion allows predicting the sites of fracture and maintenance of a shell upon loss of stability.

  3. The Structural Response of Cylindrical Shells to Internal Shock Loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beltman, W.M.; Burcsu, E.N.; Shepherd, J.E.; Zuhal, L.

    The internal shock loading of cylindrical shells can be represented as a step load advancing at constant speed. Several analytical models are available to calculate the structural response of shells to this type of loading. These models show that the speed of the shock wave is an important

  4. Nuclear Quadrupole Moments and Nuclear Shell Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townes, C. H.; Foley, H. M.; Low, W.

    1950-06-23

    Describes a simple model, based on nuclear shell considerations, which leads to the proper behavior of known nuclear quadrupole moments, although predictions of the magnitudes of some quadrupole moments are seriously in error.

  5. Process to make core-shell structured nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhrs, Claudia; Phillips, Jonathan; Richard, Monique N

    2014-01-07

    Disclosed is a process for making a composite material that contains core-shell structured nanoparticles. The process includes providing a precursor in the form of a powder a liquid and/or a vapor of a liquid that contains a core material and a shell material, and suspending the precursor in an aerosol gas to produce an aerosol containing the precursor. In addition, the process includes providing a plasma that has a hot zone and passing the aerosol through the hot zone of the plasma. As the aerosol passes through the hot zone of the plasma, at least part of the core material and at least part of the shell material in the aerosol is vaporized. Vapor that contains the core material and the shell material that has been vaporized is removed from the hot zone of the plasma and allowed to condense into core-shell structured nanoparticles.

  6. Snap-Through Buckling Problem of Spherical Shell Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumirin Sumirin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of a numerical study on the nonlinear behavior of shells undergoing snap-through instability. This research investigates the problem of snap-through buckling of spherical shells applying nonlinear finite element analysis utilizing ANSYS Program. The shell structure was modeled by axisymmetric thin shell of finite elements. Shells undergoing snap-through buckling meet with significant geometric change of their physical configuration, i.e. enduring large deflections during their deformation process. Therefore snap-through buckling of shells basically is a nonlinear problem. Nonlinear numerical operations need to be applied in their analysis. The problem was solved by a scheme of incremental iterative procedures applying Newton-Raphson method in combination with the known line search as well as the arc- length methods. The effects of thickness and depth variation of the shell is taken care of by considering their geometrical parameter l. The results of this study reveal that spherical shell structures subjected to pressure loading experience snap-through instability for values of l≥2.15. A form of ‘turn-back’ of the load-displacement curve took place at load levels prior to the achievement of the critical point. This phenomenon was observed for values of l=5.0 to l=7.0.

  7. Investigation of stresses in facetted glass shell structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Anne; Jönsson, Jeppe; Wester, Ture

    2007-01-01

    The typical use of triangular and quadrangular facets in doubly curved facetted shells requires the use of triangulated truss systems or quadrangular truss framing with diagonals or cross tension cabling. In such a structure, the load carrying ability is based on concentrated forces in the framing...... system, while the glass merely serves as a separation of the inside environment from the outside. In this paper facetted glass shell structures with three way vertices, i.e. with three adjoining edges in each vertex are considered, since the load carrying ability of such a structure is achieved primarily...... bending moments from distributed load, other types of bending moments are likely to occur, especially if the shell has areas of low stiffness, for example along a free edge. A facetted shell structure has been modelled in a finite element program, and the resulting stresses are presented and discussed....

  8. Textile structures from hyaluronan based core-shell fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitucha, T.; Lipenska, K.; Kubickova, J.; Zapotocky, V.; Velebny, V.

    2017-10-01

    Core-shell fibers based on the combination of soluble and insoluble types of hyaluronan were successfully created using wet-spinning method. High swelling of the fibers in synergy with tight textile structures were employed to ensure release of the dissolved fiber core through local cracks in the fiber shell. Thanks to the biocompatibility and resorbability of hyaluronan, the braided or knitted textile structures made from these fibers have a potential to be employed as a drug carrier in medical applications.

  9. Rapid, Quantitative Assessment of Submerged Cultural Resource Degradation Using Repeat Video Surveys and Structure from Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertes, J. R.; Zant, C. N.; Gulley, J. D.; Thomsen, T. L.

    2017-08-01

    Monitoring, managing and preserving submerged cultural resources (SCR) such as shipwrecks can involve time consuming detailed physical surveys, expensive side-scan sonar surveys, the study of photomosaics and even photogrammetric analysis. In some cases, surveys of SCR have produced 3D models, though these models have not typically been used to document patterns of site degradation over time. In this study, we report a novel approach for quantifying degradation and changes to SCR that relies on diver-acquired video surveys, generation of 3D models from data acquired at different points in time using structure from motion, and differencing of these models. We focus our study on the shipwreck S.S. Wisconsin, which is located roughly 10.2 km southeast of Kenosha, Wisconsin, in Lake Michigan. We created two digital elevation models of the shipwreck using surveys performed during the summers of 2006 and 2015 and differenced these models to map spatial changes within the wreck. Using orthomosaics and difference map data, we identified a change in degradation patterns. Degradation was anecdotally believed to be caused by inward collapse, but maps indicated a pattern of outward collapse of the hull structure, which has resulted in large scale shifting of material in the central upper deck. In addition, comparison of the orthomosaics with the difference map clearly shows movement of objects, degradation of smaller pieces and in some locations, an increase in colonization of mussels.

  10. Interface Fracture in Adhesively Bonded Shell Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2007-01-01

    Two methods for the prediction of crack propagation through the interface of adhesively bonded shells are discussed. One is based on a fracture mechanics approach; the other is based on a cohesive zone approach. Attention is focussed on predicting the shape of the crack front and the critical...... stress required to propagate the crack under quasi-static conditions. The fracture mechanical model is theoretically sound and it is accurate and numerically stable. The cohesive zone model has some advantages over the fracture mechanics based model. It is easier to generalise the cohesive zone model...... to take into account effects such as plastic deformation in the adhering shells, and to take into account effects of large local curvatures of the interface crack front. The comparison shows a convergence of the results based on the cohesive zone model towards the results based on a fracture mechanics...

  11. Structural Integrity of Single Shell Tanks at Hanford - 9491

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinker, Michael W.; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Karri, Naveen K.; Deibler, John E.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Holbery, James D.; Mullen, O Dennis; Hurley, David E.

    2009-03-01

    The 149 Single Shell Tanks at the Hanford Site were constructed between the 1940’s and the 1960’s. Many of the tanks are either known or suspected to have leaked in the past. While the free liquids have been removed from the tanks, they still contain significant waste volumes. Recently, the tank farm operations contractor established a Single Shell Tank Integrity Program. Structural integrity is one aspect of the program. The structural analysis of the Single Shell Tanks has several challenging factors. There are several tank sizes and configurations that need to be analyzed. Tank capacities range from fifty-five thousand gallons to one-million gallons. The smallest tank type is approximately twenty feet in diameter, and the three other tank types are all seventy-five feet in diameter. Within each tank type there are varying concrete strengths, types of steel, tank floor arrangements, in-tank hardware, riser sizes and locations, and other appurtenances that need to be addressed. Furthermore, soil properties vary throughout the tank farms. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting preliminary structural analyses of the various single shell tank types to address these parameters. The preliminary analyses will assess which aspects of the tanks will require further detailed analysis. Evaluation criteria to which the tanks will be analyzed are also being developed for the Single Shell Tank Integrity Program. This information will be reviewed by the Single Shell Tank Integrity Expert Panel that has been formed to issue recommendations to the DOE and to the tank farm operations contractor regarding Single Shell Tank Integrity. This paper provides a summary of the preliminary analysis of the single shell tanks, a summary of the recommendations for the detailed analyses, and the proposed evaluation criteria by which the tanks will be judged.

  12. Shell micro-structure of the Late Miocene freshwater unionid Parreysia binaiensis (Mollusca : Bivalvia) from Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Gurung, Damayanti; Kobayashi, Iwao

    1998-01-01

    A Late Miocene freshwater bivalvian shell of Parreysia binaiensis Takayasu, Gurung & Matsuoka, 1995, is examined to assess its state of preservation as well as to determine its shell structure and mineral composition. The characters of shell micro-structure are valuable for their systematics, phylogeny and environmental analysis. It is found that the shell is well preserved with most of the shell layers intact. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the mineral species of the shell is whol...

  13. Imperfection surveys on a 10-ft-diameter shell structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbocz, J.; Williams, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    The results of an extensive imperfection survey on a 10-ft-diameter integrally stiffened cylindrical shell are presented. The shape of the measured initial imperfections is clearly influenced by details of the shell construction. The modal components of the measured imperfection surface as a function of the circumferential and of the axial wave numbers are calculated. The discrete axial power spectral density functions and the corresponding root-mean-square values of the imperfections are also determined for given circumferential wave numbers. Using the Fourier coefficients of the measured initial imperfections, buckling loads are calculated by solving the nonlinear Donnell-type imperfect shell equations iteratively. The calculated lowest buckling load compares favorably with the values usually recommended for similar shell structures.

  14. Perspective: Structure and ultrafast dynamics of biomolecular hydration shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laage, Damien; Elsaesser, Thomas; Hynes, James T

    2017-07-01

    The structure and function of biomolecules can be strongly influenced by their hydration shells. A key challenge is thus to determine the extent to which these shells differ from bulk water, since the structural fluctuations and molecular excitations of hydrating water molecules within these shells can cover a broad range in both space and time. Recent progress in theory, molecular dynamics simulations, and ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy has led to new and detailed insight into the fluctuations of water structure, elementary water motions, and electric fields at hydrated biointerfaces. Here, we discuss some central aspects of these advances, focusing on elementary molecular mechanisms and processes of hydration on a femto- to picosecond time scale, with some special attention given to several issues subject to debate.

  15. Stress Recovery and Error Estimation for Shell Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, A. A.; Riggs, H. R.; Tessler, A.

    2000-01-01

    The Penalized Discrete Least-Squares (PDLS) stress recovery (smoothing) technique developed for two dimensional linear elliptic problems is adapted here to three-dimensional shell structures. The surfaces are restricted to those which have a 2-D parametric representation, or which can be built-up of such surfaces. The proposed strategy involves mapping the finite element results to the 2-D parametric space which describes the geometry, and smoothing is carried out in the parametric space using the PDLS-based Smoothing Element Analysis (SEA). Numerical results for two well-known shell problems are presented to illustrate the performance of SEA/PDLS for these problems. The recovered stresses are used in the Zienkiewicz-Zhu a posteriori error estimator. The estimated errors are used to demonstrate the performance of SEA-recovered stresses in automated adaptive mesh refinement of shell structures. The numerical results are encouraging. Further testing involving more complex, practical structures is necessary.

  16. Perspective: Structure and ultrafast dynamics of biomolecular hydration shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Laage

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The structure and function of biomolecules can be strongly influenced by their hydration shells. A key challenge is thus to determine the extent to which these shells differ from bulk water, since the structural fluctuations and molecular excitations of hydrating water molecules within these shells can cover a broad range in both space and time. Recent progress in theory, molecular dynamics simulations, and ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy has led to new and detailed insight into the fluctuations of water structure, elementary water motions, and electric fields at hydrated biointerfaces. Here, we discuss some central aspects of these advances, focusing on elementary molecular mechanisms and processes of hydration on a femto- to picosecond time scale, with some special attention given to several issues subject to debate.

  17. Radar attenuation in Europa's ice shell: Obstacles and opportunities for constraining the shell thickness and its thermal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalousová, Klára; Schroeder, Dustin M.; Soderlund, Krista M.

    2017-03-01

    Young surface and possible recent endogenic activity make Europa one of the most exciting solar system bodies and a primary target for spacecraft exploration. Future Europa missions are expected to carry ice-penetrating radar instruments designed to investigate its subsurface thermophysical structure. Several authors have addressed the radar sounders' performance at icy moons, often ignoring the complex structure of a realistic ice shell. Here we explore the variation in two-way radar attenuation for a variety of potential thermal structures of Europa's shell (determined by reference viscosity, activation energy, tidal heating, surface temperature, and shell thickness) as well as for low and high loss temperature-dependent attenuation model. We found that (i) for all investigated ice shell thicknesses (5-30 km), the radar sounder will penetrate between 15% and 100% of the total thickness, (ii) the maximum penetration depth varies laterally, with deepest penetration possible through cold downwellings, (iii) direct ocean detection might be possible for shells of up to 15 km thick if the signal travels through cold downwelling ice or the shell is conductive, (iv) even if the ice/ocean interface is not directly detected, penetration through most of the shell could constrain the deep shell structure through returns from deep non-ocean interfaces or the loss of signal itself, and (v) for all plausible ice shells, the two-way attenuation to the eutectic point is ≲30 dB which shows a robust potential for longitudinal investigation of the ice shell's shallow thermophysical structure.

  18. Overview of Hanford Single Shell Tank (SST) Structural Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rast, Richard S.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Johnson, Jeremy M.

    2013-11-14

    To improve the understanding of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) integrity, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS), the USDOE Hanford Site tank contractor, developed an enhanced Single-Shell Tank Integrity Project (SSTIP) in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity, consisting of various subject matters experts in industry and academia, was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. This panel developed 33 recommendations in four main areas of interest: structural integrity, liner degradation, leak integrity and prevention, and mitigation of contamination migration, Seventeen of these recommendations were used to develop the basis for the M-45-10-1 Change Package for the Hanford Federal Agreement and Compliance Order, which is also known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The structural integrity of the tanks is a key element in completing the cleanup mission at the Hanford Site. There are eight primary recommendations related to the structural integrity of Hanford Single-Shell Tanks. Six recommendations are being implemented through current and planned activities. The structural integrity of the Hanford is being evaluated through analysis, monitoring, inspection, materials testing, and construction document review. Structural evaluation in the form of analysis is performed using modern finite element models generated in ANSYS. The analyses consider in-situ, thermal, operating loads and natural phenomena such as earthquakes. Structural analysis of 108 of 149 Hanford Single-Shell Tanks has concluded that the tanks are structurally sound and meet current industry standards. Analysis of the remaining Hanford Single-Shell Tanks is scheduled for FY2014. Hanford Single-Shell Tanks are monitored through a dome deflection program. The program looks for deflections of the tank dome greater than 1/4 inch. No such deflections have been recorded. The tanks are also subjected to visual inspection. Digital cameras record the interior surface of

  19. Accurate Determination of the Frequency Response Function of Submerged and Confined Structures by Using PZT-Patches†

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Presas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To accurately determine the dynamic response of a structure is of relevant interest in many engineering applications. Particularly, it is of paramount importance to determine the Frequency Response Function (FRF for structures subjected to dynamic loads in order to avoid resonance and fatigue problems that can drastically reduce their useful life. One challenging case is the experimental determination of the FRF of submerged and confined structures, such as hydraulic turbines, which are greatly affected by dynamic problems as reported in many cases in the past. The utilization of classical and calibrated exciters such as instrumented hammers or shakers to determine the FRF in such structures can be very complex due to the confinement of the structure and because their use can disturb the boundary conditions affecting the experimental results. For such cases, Piezoelectric Patches (PZTs, which are very light, thin and small, could be a very good option. Nevertheless, the main drawback of these exciters is that the calibration as dynamic force transducers (relationship voltage/force has not been successfully obtained in the past. Therefore, in this paper, a method to accurately determine the FRF of submerged and confined structures by using PZTs is developed and validated. The method consists of experimentally determining some characteristic parameters that define the FRF, with an uncalibrated PZT exciting the structure. These parameters, which have been experimentally determined, are then introduced in a validated numerical model of the tested structure. In this way, the FRF of the structure can be estimated with good accuracy. With respect to previous studies, where only the natural frequencies and mode shapes were considered, this paper discuss and experimentally proves the best excitation characteristic to obtain also the damping ratios and proposes a procedure to fully determine the FRF. The method proposed here has been validated for the

  20. Accurate Determination of the Frequency Response Function of Submerged and Confined Structures by Using PZT-Patches†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presas, Alexandre; Valentin, David; Egusquiza, Eduard; Valero, Carme; Egusquiza, Mònica; Bossio, Matias

    2017-03-22

    To accurately determine the dynamic response of a structure is of relevant interest in many engineering applications. Particularly, it is of paramount importance to determine the Frequency Response Function (FRF) for structures subjected to dynamic loads in order to avoid resonance and fatigue problems that can drastically reduce their useful life. One challenging case is the experimental determination of the FRF of submerged and confined structures, such as hydraulic turbines, which are greatly affected by dynamic problems as reported in many cases in the past. The utilization of classical and calibrated exciters such as instrumented hammers or shakers to determine the FRF in such structures can be very complex due to the confinement of the structure and because their use can disturb the boundary conditions affecting the experimental results. For such cases, Piezoelectric Patches (PZTs), which are very light, thin and small, could be a very good option. Nevertheless, the main drawback of these exciters is that the calibration as dynamic force transducers (relationship voltage/force) has not been successfully obtained in the past. Therefore, in this paper, a method to accurately determine the FRF of submerged and confined structures by using PZTs is developed and validated. The method consists of experimentally determining some characteristic parameters that define the FRF, with an uncalibrated PZT exciting the structure. These parameters, which have been experimentally determined, are then introduced in a validated numerical model of the tested structure. In this way, the FRF of the structure can be estimated with good accuracy. With respect to previous studies, where only the natural frequencies and mode shapes were considered, this paper discuss and experimentally proves the best excitation characteristic to obtain also the damping ratios and proposes a procedure to fully determine the FRF. The method proposed here has been validated for the structure vibrating

  1. The giant molecular cloud Monoceros R2. 1: Shell structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Taoling; Goldsmith, Paul F.

    1994-01-01

    We have obtained a 45 sec resolution, Nyquist-sampled map in CO J = 1-0 covering approximately a 3 deg x 3 deg region of the giant molecular cloud Monoceros R2. The map consists of 167,000 spectra observed with the 15 element focal-plane array system on the FCRAO 14 m telescope. The data reveal that the large-scale structure of Mon R2 is dominated by a is approximately 30 pc diameter largely hemispherical shell containing approximately 4 x 10(exp 4) solar mass of molecular material and expanding at approximately 3-4 km s(exp -1) with symmetric axis roughly along the line of sight. The dynamical timescale of the shell is estimated to be approximately 4 x 10(exp 6) yr, which is consistent with the age of main-sequence stars powering the clusters of reflection nebulea in this region. There is no evidence for a redshifted shell on the far side of the interior 'bubble,' which is largely devoid of molecular material. Distortions of the shell are obvious, suggesting inhomogeneity of the cloud and possible presence of a magnetic field prior to its formation. Dense clumps in Mon R2, including the main core and the GGD 12-15 core, appear to be condensations located on the large shell. The reflection nebulea with their illuminating stars as well as embedded IRAS sources suggest that triggered star formation has taken place over a large part of the Mon R2 shell.

  2. Ocular shell structures in some Cretaceous trachyleberid Ostracoda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontrovitz, M.; Puckett, T.M.

    1998-01-01

    This is the first study of internal ocular shell structures of Cretaceous ostracodes. Internal molds from eight species of four genera from Santonian, Campanian, and Maastrichtian strata revealed a stalked ocular sinus constricted along its length and distally inflated. The latter part has anterior and posterior lobes and a subcentral concavity. These Cretaceous trachyleberids have ocular shell structures similar to Cenozoic taxa and it is presumed they functioned similarly. However, each taxon has a diagnostic ocular sinus and an inner surface of the eye tubercle that distinguishes each from all other forms examined.

  3. Passively Damped Laminated Piezoelectric Shell Structures with Integrated Electric Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanos, Dimitris A.

    1999-01-01

    Multi-field mechanics are presented for curvilinear piezoelectric laminates interfaced with distributed passive electric components. The equations of motion for laminated piezoelectric shell structures with embedded passive electric networks are directly formulated and solved using a finite element methodology. The modal damping and frequencies of the piezoelectric shell are calculated from the poles of the system. Experimental and numerical results are presented for the modal damping and frequency of composite beams with a resistively shunted piezoceramic patch. The modal damping and frequency of plates, cylindrical shells and cylindrical composite blades with piezoelectric-resistor layers are predicted. Both analytical and experimental studies illustrate a unique dependence of modal damping and frequencies on the shunting resistance and show the effect of structural shape and curvature on piezoelectric damping.

  4. The effect of mesh size on failure for shell structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walters, C.L.; Schipperen, J.H.A.

    2012-01-01

    More than any other application, simulation of crash events depends on the precise representation of fracture. At the same time, practical considerations typically force the crash analyst to use shell elements for many types of thin-walled structures, such as cars, aircraft, and ships. For these

  5. Dynamic fracture modeling in shell structures based on XFEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsson, R.; Mediavilla, J.; Fagerström, M.

    2011-01-01

    Through-the-thickness crack propagation in thin-walled structures is dealt with in this paper. The formulation is based on the cohesive zone concept applied to a kinematically consistent shell model enhanced with an XFEM-based discontinuous kinematical representation. The resulting formulation

  6. "Shell and space structures in modern engineering: Challenges and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    "Shell and space structures in modern engineering: Challenges and opportunities" - An Inaugural Lecture. A Zingoni. Abstract. An Inaugural Lecture Given in the University of Zimbabwe On 4 July 2001. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  7. Topology optimization of 3D shell structures with porous infill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anders; Andreassen, Erik; Sigmund, Ole

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a 3D topology optimization approach for designing shell structures with a porous or void interior. It is shown that the resulting structures are significantly more robust towards load perturbations than completely solid structures optimized under the same conditions. The study...... indicates that the potential benefit of using porous structures is higher for lower total volume fractions. Compared to earlier work dealing with 2D topology optimization, we found several new effects in 3D problems. Most notably, the opportunity for designing closed shells significantly improves...... the performance of porous structures due to the sandwich effect. Furthermore, the paper introduces improved filter boundary conditions to ensure a completely uniform coating thickness at the design domain boundary....

  8. Topology optimization of 3D shell structures with porous infill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Anders; Andreassen, Erik; Sigmund, Ole

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a 3D topology optimization approach for designing shell structures with a porous or void interior. It is shown that the resulting structures are significantly more robust towards load perturbations than completely solid structures optimized under the same conditions. The study indicates that the potential benefit of using porous structures is higher for lower total volume fractions. Compared to earlier work dealing with 2D topology optimization, we found several new effects in 3D problems. Most notably, the opportunity for designing closed shells significantly improves the performance of porous structures due to the sandwich effect. Furthermore, the paper introduces improved filter boundary conditions to ensure a completely uniform coating thickness at the design domain boundary.

  9. Austromegabalanus psittacus barnacle shell structure and proteoglycan localization and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, M S; Arias, J I; Neira-Carrillo, A; Arias, J L

    2015-09-01

    Comparative analyzes of biomineralization models have being crucial for the understanding of the functional properties of biominerals and the elucidation of the processes through which biomacromolecules control the synthesis and structural organization of inorganic mineral-based biomaterials. Among calcium carbonate-containing bioceramics, egg, mollusk and echinoderm shells, and crustacean carapaces, have being fairly well characterized. However, Thoraceca barnacles, although being crustacea, showing molting cycle, build a quite stable and heavily mineralized shell that completely surround the animal, which is for life firmly cemented to the substratum. This makes barnacles an interesting model for studying processes of biomineralization. Here we studied the main microstructural and ultrastructural features of Austromegabalanus psittacus barnacle shell, characterize the occurrence of specific proteoglycans (keratan-, dermatan- and chondroitin-6-sulfate proteoglycans) in different soluble and insoluble organic fractions extracted from the shell, and tested them for their ability to crystallize calcium carbonate in vitro. Our results indicate that, in the barnacle model, proteoglycans are good candidates for the modification of the calcite crystal morphology, although the cooperative effect of some additional proteins in the shell could not be excluded. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Better Finite-Element Analysis of Composite Shell Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    A computer program implements a finite-element-based method of predicting the deformations of thin aerospace structures made of isotropic materials or anisotropic fiber-reinforced composite materials. The technique and corresponding software are applicable to thin shell structures in general and are particularly useful for analysis of thin beamlike members having open cross-sections (e.g. I-beams and C-channels) in which significant warping can occur.

  11. Cu cluster shell structure at elevated temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ole Bøssing; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1991-01-01

    Equilibrium structures of small (3–29)-atom Cu clusters are determined by simulated annealing, and finite-temperature ensembles are simulated by Monte Carlo techniques using the effective-medium theory for the energy calculation. Clusters with 8, 18, and 20 atoms are found to be particularly stab...

  12. Preparation of porous carbon particle with shell/core structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Porous carbon particles with a shell/core structure have been prepared successfully by controlled precipitation of the polymer from droplets of oil-in-water emulsion, followed by curing and carbonization. The droplets of the oil phase are composed of phenolic resin (PFR, a good solvent (ethyl acetate and porogen (Poly(methyl methacrylate, PMMA. The microstructure was characterized in detail by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, nitrogen adsorption, and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA. The obtained carbon particles have a capsular structure with a microporous carbon shell and a mesoporous carbon core. The BET surface area and porous volume are calculated to be 499 m2g-1 and 0.56 cm3g-1, respectively. The effects of the amount of porogen (PMMA, co-solvent (acetone and surfactant on the resultant structure were studied in detail.

  13. Curved Thermopiezoelectric Shell Structures Modeled by Finite Element Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho-Jun

    2000-01-01

    "Smart" structures composed of piezoelectric materials may significantly improve the performance of aeropropulsion systems through a variety of vibration, noise, and shape-control applications. The development of analytical models for piezoelectric smart structures is an ongoing, in-house activity at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field focused toward the experimental characterization of these materials. Research efforts have been directed toward developing analytical models that account for the coupled mechanical, electrical, and thermal response of piezoelectric composite materials. Current work revolves around implementing thermal effects into a curvilinear-shell finite element code. This enhances capabilities to analyze curved structures and to account for coupling effects arising from thermal effects and the curved geometry. The current analytical model implements a unique mixed multi-field laminate theory to improve computational efficiency without sacrificing accuracy. The mechanics can model both the sensory and active behavior of piezoelectric composite shell structures. Finite element equations are being implemented for an eight-node curvilinear shell element, and numerical studies are being conducted to demonstrate capabilities to model the response of curved piezoelectric composite structures (see the figure).

  14. Periodic-Orbit Bifurcation and Shell Structure in Reflection-Asymmetric Deformed Cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Sugita, A.; Arita, K.; Matsuyanagi, K.

    1997-01-01

    Shell structure of the single-particle spectrum for reflection-asymmetric deformed cavity is investigated. Remarkable shell structure emerges for certain combinations of quadrupole and octupole deformations. Semiclassical periodic-orbit analysis indicates that bifurcation of equatorial orbits plays an important role in the formation of this new shell structure.

  15. Direct imaging the upconversion nanocrystal core/shell structure at the subnanometer level: shell thickness dependence in upconverting optical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Che, Renchao; Li, Xiaomin; Yao, Chi; Yang, Jianping; Shen, Dengke; Hu, Pan; Li, Wei; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2012-06-13

    Lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles have shown considerable promise in solid-state lasers, three-dimensional flat-panel displays, and solar cells and especially biological labeling and imaging. It has been demonstrated extensively that the epitaxial coating of upconversion (UC) core crystals with a lattice-matched shell can passivate the core and enhance the overall upconversion emission intensity of the materials. However, there are few papers that report a precise link between the shell thickness of core/shell nanoparticles and their optical properties. This is mainly because rare earth fluoride upconversion core/shell structures have only been inferred from indirect measurements to date. Herein, a reproducible method to grow a hexagonal NaGdF(4) shell on NaYF(4):Yb,Er nanocrystals with monolayer control thickness is demonstrated for the first time. On the basis of the cryo-transmission electron microscopy, rigorous electron energy loss spectroscopy, and high-angle annular dark-field investigations on the core/shell structure under a low operation temperature (96 K), direct imaging the NaYF(4):Yb,Er@NaGdF(4) nanocrystal core/shell structure at the subnanometer level was realized for the first time. Furthermore, a strong linear link between the NaGdF(4) shell thickness and the optical response of the hexagonal NaYF(4):Yb,Er@NaGdF(4) core/shell nanocrystals has been established. During the epitaxial growth of the NaGdF(4) shell layer by layer, surface defects of the nanocrystals can be gradually passivated by the homogeneous shell deposition process, which results in the obvious enhancement in overall UC emission intensity and lifetime and is more resistant to quenching by water molecules.

  16. Electronic shell and supershell structure in graphene flakes

    CERN Document Server

    Manninen, M; Akola, J

    2008-01-01

    We use a simple tight-binding (TB) model to study electronic properties of free graphene flakes. Valence electrons of triangular graphene flakes show a shell and supershell structure which follows an analytical expression derived from the solution of the wave equation for triangular cavity. However, the solution has different selection rules for triangles with armchair and zigzag edges, and roughly 40000 atoms are needed to see clearly the first supershell oscillation. In the case of spherical flakes, the edge states of the zigzag regions dominate the shell structure which is thus sensitive to the flake diameter and center. A potential well that is made with external gates cannot have true bound states in graphene due to the zero energy band gap. However, it can cause strong resonances in the conduction band.

  17. Structural Concrete Using Oil Palm Shell (OPS) as Lightweight Aggregate

    OpenAIRE

    TEO, D. C. L.; M. A. Mannan; V.J. Kurian

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents part of the experimental results of an on-going research project to produce structural lightweight concrete using solid waste, oil palm shell (OPS), as a coarse aggregate. Reported in the paper are the compressive strength, bond strength, modulus of elasticity, and flexural behaviour of OPS concrete. It was found that although OPS concrete has a low modulus of elasticity, full-scale beam tests revealed that deflection under the design service loads is acceptable a...

  18. Dynamic model of open shell structures buried in poroelastic soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordón, J. D. R.; Aznárez, J. J.; Maeso, O.

    2017-08-01

    This paper is concerned with a three-dimensional time harmonic model of open shell structures buried in poroelastic soils. It combines the dual boundary element method (DBEM) for treating the soil and shell finite elements for modelling the structure, leading to a simple and efficient representation of buried open shell structures. A new fully regularised hypersingular boundary integral equation (HBIE) has been developed to this aim, which is then used to build the pair of dual BIEs necessary to formulate the DBEM for Biot poroelasticity. The new regularised HBIE is validated against a problem with analytical solution. The model is used in a wave diffraction problem in order to show its effectiveness. It offers excellent agreement for length to thickness ratios greater than 10, and relatively coarse meshes. The model is also applied to the calculation of impedances of bucket foundations. It is found that all impedances except the torsional one depend considerably on hydraulic conductivity within the typical frequency range of interest of offshore wind turbines.

  19. Shell

    OpenAIRE

    Harper, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    Susie MacMurray's Shell installation manifests in Pallant House Gallery, Chichester, like some pulsing exotica, a heavily-textured wall-paper, darkly decorative, heavily luxurious, broodingly present, with more than a hint of the uncanny or the gothic. A remarkable undertaking by an artist of significance, this work's life-span will be just one year, and then it will disappear, leaving no physical trace, but undoubtedly contributing in a much less tangible way to an already rich layering of n...

  20. Shell structure of potassium isotopes deduced from their magnetic moments

    CERN Document Server

    Papuga, J; Kreim, K; Barbieri, C; Blaum, K; De Rydt, M; Duguet, T; Garcia Ruiz, R F; Heylen, H; Kowalska, M; Neugart, R; Neyens, G; Nortershauser, W; Rajabali, M M; Sanchez, R; Smirnova, N; Soma, V; Yordanov, D T

    2014-01-01

    $\\textbf{Background:}$ Ground-state spins and magnetic moments are sensitive to the nuclear wave function, thus they are powerful probes to study the nuclear structure of isotopes far from stability. \\\\ \\\\ $\\textbf{Purpose:}$ Extend our knowledge about the evolution of the $1/2^+$ and $3/2^+$ states for K isotopes beyond the $N = 28$ shell gap. \\\\ \\\\ $\\textbf{Method:}$ High-resolution collinear laser spectroscopy on bunched atomic beams. \\\\ \\\\ $\\textbf{Results:}$ From measured hyperfine structure spectra of K isotopes, nuclear spins and magnetic moments of the ground states were obtained for isotopes from $N = 19$ up to $N = 32$. In order to draw conclusions about the composition of the wave functions and the occupation of the levels, the experimental data were compared to shell-model calculations using SDPF-NR and SDPF-U effective interactions. In addition, a detailed discussion about the evolution of the gap between proton $1d_{3/2}$ and $2s_{1/2}$ in the shell model and $\\textit{ab initio}$ framework is al...

  1. Magnetization processes in core/shell exchange-spring structures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, J. S.

    2015-03-27

    The magnetization reversal processes in cylindrical and spherical soft core/hard shell exchange-spring structures are investigated via the analytical nucleation theory, and are verified with numerical micromagnetic simulations. At small core sizes, the nucleation of magnetic reversal proceeds via the modified bulging mode, where the transverse component of the magnetization is only semi-coherent in direction and the nucleation field contains a contribution from self-demagnetization. For large core sizes, the modified curling mode, where the magnetization configuration is vortex-like, is favored at nucleation. The preference for the modified curling mode is beneficial in that the fluxclosure allows cylindrical and spherical core/shell exchange-spring elements to be densely packed into bulk permanent magnets without affecting the nucleation field, thereby offering the potential for high energy product.

  2. Pore structure of the activated coconut shell charcoal carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budi, E.; Nasbey, H.; Yuniarti, B. D. P.; Nurmayatri, Y.; Fahdiana, J.; Budi, A. S.

    2014-09-01

    The development of activated carbon from coconut shell charcoal has been investigated by using physical method to determine the influence of activation parameters in term of temperature, argon gas pressure and time period on the pore structure of the activated carbon. The coconut shell charcoal was produced by pyrolisis process at temperature of about 75 - 150 °C for 6 hours. The charcoal was activated at various temperature (532, 700 and 868 °C), argon gas pressure (6.59, 15 and 23.4 kgf/cm2) and time period of (10, 60 and 120 minutes). The results showed that the pores size were reduced and distributed uniformly as the activation parameters are increased.

  3. The influence of plate thickness on the welding residual stresses from submerged arc welding in offshore steel structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    to an improved design, which consequently may be included in future norms and standards. Submerged Arc Welding (SAW) was used to make a fully penetrated butt weld in 10 mm and 40 mm thick steel plates with the same welding parameters as used in the production procedures. The base material is thermomechanical hot......Welding-induced residual tensile stresses and distortion have become a major concern in relation to the structural integrity of welded structures within the offshore wind industry. The stresses have a negative impact on the integrity of the welded joint, as they promote distortion, reduce fatigue...... life, and attribute to the corrosion cracking and brittle fracture in the weld components. This study investigates the influence of plate thickness on the welding-induced residual stresses. The residual stresses are investigated through experiments and in accordance with existing production procedures...

  4. Magnetic mirror structure for testing shell-type quadrupole coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Chlachidze, G.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; Nobrega, F.; Novitski, I.; Tartaglia, N.; Turrioni, D.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents magnetic and mechanical designs and analyses of the quadrupole mirror structure to test single shell-type quadrupole coils. Several quadrupole coils made of different Nb{sub 3}Sn strands, cable insulation and pole materials were tested using this structure at 4.5 and 1.9 K. The coils were instrumented with voltage taps, spot heaters, temperature sensors and strain gauges to study their mechanical and thermal properties and quench performance. The results of the quadrupole mirror model assembly and test are reported and discussed.

  5. Fabrication of composite shell structure for advanced space transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penton, A. P.; Johnson, R., Jr.; Freeman, V. L.

    1978-01-01

    It is pointed out that future space missions, such as those involving spacecraft and structural assemblies to be used in geosynchronous orbits, will require ultralightweight composite structures to achieve maximum payloads. Of equal importance is the requirement to provide designs that are cost-competitive with metal designs. For space structures that must resist buckling, graphite-epoxy materials offer an attractive potential for providing lightweight, low-cost structural components that will meet future space mission requirements. A description is presented of a program which was conducted to evaluate the merits of graphite-epoxy cylindrical shells and to continue the development of a design data base for ultralightweight structures. An objective of the program was to design, fabricate, and test a corrugated graphite-epoxy cylinder 10 ft in diameter and 10 ft long.

  6. Parameter identification of material constants in a composite shell structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, David R.; Carne, Thomas G.

    1988-01-01

    One of the basic requirements in engineering analysis is the development of a mathematical model describing the system. Frequently comparisons with test data are used as a measurement of the adequacy of the model. An attempt is typically made to update or improve the model to provide a test verified analysis tool. System identification provides a systematic procedure for accomplishing this task. The terms system identification, parameter estimation, and model correlation all refer to techniques that use test information to update or verify mathematical models. The goal of system identification is to improve the correlation of model predictions with measured test data, and produce accurate, predictive models. For nonmetallic structures the modeling task is often difficult due to uncertainties in the elastic constants. A finite element model of the shell was created, which included uncertain orthotropic elastic constants. A modal survey test was then performed on the shell. The resulting modal data, along with the finite element model of the shell, were used in a Bayes estimation algorithm. This permitted the use of covariance matrices to weight the confidence in the initial parameter values as well as confidence in the measured test data. The estimation procedure also employed the concept of successive linearization to obtain an approximate solution to the original nonlinear estimation problem.

  7. Modeling complex flow structures and drag around a submerged plant of varied posture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothroyd, Richard J.; Hardy, Richard J.; Warburton, Jeff; Marjoribanks, Timothy I.

    2017-04-01

    Although vegetation is present in many rivers, the bulk of past work concerned with modeling the influence of vegetation on flow has considered vegetation to be morphologically simple and has generally neglected the complexity of natural plants. Here we report on a combined flume and numerical model experiment which incorporates time-averaged plant posture, collected through terrestrial laser scanning, into a computational fluid dynamics model to predict flow around a submerged riparian plant. For three depth-limited flow conditions (Reynolds number = 65,000-110,000), plant dynamics were recorded through high-definition video imagery, and the numerical model was validated against flow velocities collected with an acoustic Doppler velocimeter. The plant morphology shows an 18% reduction in plant height and a 14% increase in plant length, compressing and reducing the volumetric canopy morphology as the Reynolds number increases. Plant shear layer turbulence is dominated by Kelvin-Helmholtz type vortices generated through shear instability, the frequency of which is estimated to be between 0.20 and 0.30 Hz, increasing with Reynolds number. These results demonstrate the significant effect that the complex morphology of natural plants has on in-stream drag, and allow a physically determined, species-dependent drag coefficient to be calculated. Given the importance of vegetation in river corridor management, the approach developed here demonstrates the necessity to account for plant motion when calculating vegetative resistance.

  8. Experimental evidence for a shell structure of the proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levintov, I.I.

    1983-11-01

    Spin effects in nucleon-nucleon scattering are explained by the interaction of Fock configurations of the type (qqQQ-barq), having the structure of p shells. The number of nucleon p shells is N = n/sub f/ -1 (n/sub f/ is the number of flavors). The strong spin effect in p/sub arrow-up/p/sub arrow-up/ scattering for p/sup 2//sub perpendicular/ > or approx. =4 (GeV/c)/sup 2/ (the Argonne effect) is explained by the presence of the configuration (qqcc-barq) in the proton. An analogous effect in the region p/sup 2//sub perpendicular/ > or approx. =100 (GeV/c)/sup 2/, due to the configuration (qqbb-barq), is predicted. In scattering of unpolarized hadrons by a polarized proton target for constant theta/sub cms/ and variation of s (i.e., p/sup 2//sub perpendicular/), it is predicted that there are structures in the asymmetry in the region p/sup 2//sub perpendicular/ approx.4m/sup 2//sub Q/ (Q = c, b, ...).

  9. Structure of the PduU shell protein from the Pdu microcompartment of Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Christopher S; Sawaya, Michael R; Bobik, Thomas A; Yeates, Todd O

    2008-09-10

    The Pdu microcompartment is a proteinaceous, subcellular structure that serves as an organelle for the metabolism of 1,2-propanediol in Salmonella enterica. It encapsulates several related enzymes within a shell composed of a few thousand protein subunits. Recent structural studies on the carboxysome, a related microcompartment involved in CO(2) fixation, have concluded that the major shell proteins from that microcompartment form hexamers that pack into layers comprising the facets of the shell. Here we report the crystal structure of PduU, a protein from the Pdu microcompartment, representing the first structure of a shell protein from a noncarboxysome microcompartment. Though PduU is a hexamer like other characterized shell proteins, it has undergone a circular permutation leading to dramatic differences in the hexamer pore. In view of the hypothesis that microcompartment metabolites diffuse across the outer shell through these pores, the unique structure of PduU suggests the possibility of a special functional role.

  10. Validating Finite Element Models of Assembled Shell Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Claus

    2006-01-01

    The validation of finite element models of assembled shell elements is presented. The topics include: 1) Problems with membrane rotations in assembled shell models; 2) Penalty stiffness for membrane rotations; 3) Physical stiffness for membrane rotations using shell elements with 6 dof per node; and 4) Connections avoiding rotations.

  11. Active vibration control of ring-stiffened cylindrical shell structure using macro fiber composite actuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Jung Woo; Jeon, Juncheol; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2014-10-01

    Vibration control performance of the ring-stiffened cylindrical shell structure is experimentally evaluated in this work. In order to achieve high control performance, advanced flexible piezoelectric actuator whose commercial name is Macro-Fiber Composite (MFC) is adapted to the shell structure. Governing equation is derived by finite element method and dynamic characteristics are investigated from the modal analysis results. Ring-stiffened cylindrical shell structure is then manufactured and modal test is conducted to verify modal analysis results. An optimal controller is designed and experimentally realized to the proposed shell structure system. Vibration control performance is experimentally evaluated in time domain and verified by simulated control results.

  12. Stress Recovery and Error Estimation for 3-D Shell Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, H. R.

    2000-01-01

    The C1-continuous stress fields obtained from finite element analyses are in general lower- order accurate than are the corresponding displacement fields. Much effort has focussed on increasing their accuracy and/or their continuity, both for improved stress prediction and especially error estimation. A previous project developed a penalized, discrete least squares variational procedure that increases the accuracy and continuity of the stress field. The variational problem is solved by a post-processing, 'finite-element-type' analysis to recover a smooth, more accurate, C1-continuous stress field given the 'raw' finite element stresses. This analysis has been named the SEA/PDLS. The recovered stress field can be used in a posteriori error estimators, such as the Zienkiewicz-Zhu error estimator or equilibrium error estimators. The procedure was well-developed for the two-dimensional (plane) case involving low-order finite elements. It has been demonstrated that, if optimal finite element stresses are used for the post-processing, the recovered stress field is globally superconvergent. Extension of this work to three dimensional solids is straightforward. Attachment: Stress recovery and error estimation for shell structure (abstract only). A 4-node, shear-deformable flat shell element developed via explicit Kirchhoff constraints (abstract only). A novel four-node quadrilateral smoothing element for stress enhancement and error estimation (abstract only).

  13. Highly Porous Core-Shell Structured Graphene-Chitosan Beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, An; Wang, Chunhui; Wu, Shiting; Shi, Enzheng; Zhao, Wenqi; Cao, Anyuan; Wu, Dehai

    2015-07-08

    Graphene oxide (GO) sheets have been assembled into various three-dimensional porous structures and composites, with potential applications in energy and environmental areas. Here, we show the combination of GO and chitosan (CTS) into inorganic-organic heterocomposites as ∼3 mm diameter core-shell beads with controlled microstructure. The spherical GO-CTS beads, made by a two-step freeze-casting method, consist of a GO core wrapped by a CTS shell with abrupt interface; both parts have high porosities (94-96%) and mesopores volume (0.246 cm(3)/g) yet with different pore morphologies. Incorporation of a GO core into the CTS beads significantly improved the methyl orange adsorption capacity (353 mg/g at 318 K) compared with pure CTS beads. Key factors such as the pH value, adsorbent dosage, concentration, time, and temperature have been studied in detail, whereas adsorption isotherm and kinetic studies reveal a Langmuir model following the pseudo-second order.

  14. OVERVIEW OF HANFORD SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY - 12123

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RAST RS; RINKER MW; WASHENFELDER DJ; JOHNSON JB

    2012-01-25

    To improve the understanding of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) integrity, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS), the USDOE Hanford Site tank contractor, developed an enhanced Single-Shell Tank Integrity Project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity, consisting of various subject matters experts in industry and academia, was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. This panel developed 33 recommendations in four main areas of interest: structural integrity, liner degradation, leak integrity and prevention, and mitigation of contamination migration. Seventeen of these recommendations were used to develop the basis for the M-45-10-1 Change Package for the Hanford Federal Agreement and Compliance Order, which is also known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The structural integrity of the tanks is a key element in completing the cleanup mission at the Hanford Site. There are eight primary recommendations related to the structural integrity of Hanford SSTs. Six recommendations are being implemented through current and planned activities. The structural integrity of the Hanford SSTs is being evaluated through analysis, monitoring, inspection, materials testing, and construction document review. Structural evaluation in the form of analysis is performed using modern finite element models generated in ANSYS{reg_sign} The analyses consider in-situ, thermal, operating loads and natural phenomena such as earthquakes. Structural analysis of 108 of 149 Hanford SSTs has concluded that the tanks are structurally sound and meet current industry standards. Analyses of the remaining Hanford SSTs are scheduled for FY2013. Hanford SSTs are monitored through a dome deflection program. The program looks for deflections of the tank dome greater than 1/4 inch. No such deflections have been recorded. The tanks are also subjected to visual inspection. Digital cameras record the interior surface of the concrete tank domes, looking for cracks and

  15. Assembly principles and structure of a 6.5-MDa bacterial microcompartment shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Markus; Greber, Basil; Aussignargues, Clement; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2017-06-23

    Many bacteria contain primitive organelles composed entirely of protein. These bacterial microcompartments share a common architecture of an enzymatic core encapsulated in a selectively permeable protein shell; prominent examples include the carboxysome for CO2 fixation and catabolic microcompartments found in many pathogenic microbes. The shell sequesters enzymatic reactions from the cytosol, analogous to the lipid-based membrane of eukaryotic organelles. Despite available structural information for single building blocks, the principles of shell assembly have remained elusive. We present the crystal structure of an intact shell from Haliangium ochraceum, revealing the basic principles of bacterial microcompartment shell construction. Given the conservation among shell proteins of all bacterial microcompartments, these principles apply to functionally diverse organelles and can inform the design and engineering of shells with new functionalities. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  16. Determination of Core-Shell Structures in Pd-Hg Nanoparticles by STEM-EDX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deiana, Davide; Verdaguer Casadevall, Arnau; Malacrida, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The structural and elemental configuration of a high-performing Pd-Hg electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction to hydrogen peroxide has been studied by means of high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. Pd-Hg nanoparticles are shown to have a crystalline core-shell structure, with a Pd...... core and a Pd-Hg ordered alloy shell. The ordered shell is responsible for the high oxygen reduction selectivity to H2O2....

  17. A Solution Method for Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Shell Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-01

    continuum mechanics theory and it is applicable to the analysis of thin and thick shells. The formulation of the element and the solutions to...Linear analysis of a cylindrical ( Scordelis -Lo) shell 26 4.3 Linear analysis of a pinched cylinder 26 4.4 Large deflection analysis of a...latter approach has the advantage of being independent of any particular shell theory , and this approach was used in ref. [3] to formulate a general

  18. Theory of elastic thin shells solid and structural mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Gol'Denveizer, A L; Dryden, H L

    1961-01-01

    Theory of Elastic Thin Shells discusses the mathematical foundations of shell theory and the approximate methods of solution. The present volume was originally published in Russian in 1953, and remains the only text which formulates as completely as possible the different sets of basic equations and various approximate methods of shell analysis emphasizing asymptotic integration. The book is organized into five parts. Part I presents the general formulation and equations of the theory of shells, which are based on the well-known hypothesis of the preservation of the normal element. Part II is

  19. Tuning structure and mobility of solvation shells surrounding tracer additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmer, James; Jain, Avni; Bollinger, Jonathan A; van Swol, Frank; Truskett, Thomas M

    2015-03-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations and a stochastic Fokker-Planck equation based approach are used to illuminate how position-dependent solvent mobility near one or more tracer particle(s) is affected when tracer-solvent interactions are rationally modified to affect corresponding solvation structure. For tracers in a dense hard-sphere fluid, we compare two types of tracer-solvent interactions: (1) a hard-sphere-like interaction, and (2) a soft repulsion extending beyond the hard core designed via statistical mechanical theory to enhance tracer mobility at infinite dilution by suppressing coordination-shell structure [Carmer et al., Soft Matter 8, 4083-4089 (2012)]. For the latter case, we show that the mobility of surrounding solvent particles is also increased by addition of the soft repulsive interaction, which helps to rationalize the mechanism underlying the tracer's enhanced diffusivity. However, if multiple tracer surfaces are in closer proximity (as at higher tracer concentrations), similar interactions that disrupt local solvation structure instead suppress the position-dependent solvent dynamics.

  20. Structural and magnetic properties of core-shell Au/Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Coaquira, L. León Fénix J. A. H.; Martínez, M. A. R.; Goya, G. F.; Mantilla, J.; Sousa, M. H.; Valladares, L. de los Santos; Barnes, C. H. W.; Morais, P. C.

    2017-01-01

    We present a systematic study of core-shell Au/Fe_3O_4 nanoparticles produced by thermal decomposition under mild conditions. The morphology and crystal structure of the nanoparticles revealed the presence of Au core of = (6.9\\pm 1.0) nm surrounded by Fe_3O_4 shell with a thickness of ~3.5 nm, epitaxially grown onto the Au core surface. The Au/Fe_3O_4 core-shell structure was demonstrated by high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis. The magnetite shell...

  1. Fe3O4/Polypyrrole/Au nanocomposites with core/shell/shell structure: synthesis, characterization, and their electrochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhong, Xue; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2008-12-02

    Uniform Fe3O4 nanospheres with a diameter of 100 nm were rapidly prepared using a microwave solvothermal method. Then Fe304/polypyrrole (PPy) composite nanospheres with well-defined core/shell structures were obtained through chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole in the presence of Fe3O4; the average thickness of the coating shell was about 25 nm. Furthermore, by means of electrostatic interactions, plentiful gold nanoparticles with a diameter of 15 nm were assembled on the surface of Fe3O4/PPy to get Fe3O4/PPy/Au core/shell/shell structure. The morphology, structure, and composition of the products were characterized by transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The resultant nanocomposites not only have the magnetism of Fe3O4 nanoparticles that make the nanocomposites easily controlled by an external magnetic field but also have the good conductivity and excellent electrochemical and catalytic properties of PPy and Au nanoparticles. Furthermore, the nanocomposites showed excellent electrocatalytic activities to biospecies such as ascorbic acid (AA).

  2. An immersed-shell method for modelling fluid-structure interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viré, A; Xiang, J; Pain, C C

    2015-02-28

    The paper presents a novel method for numerically modelling fluid-structure interactions. The method consists of solving the fluid-dynamics equations on an extended domain, where the computational mesh covers both fluid and solid structures. The fluid and solid velocities are relaxed to one another through a penalty force. The latter acts on a thin shell surrounding the solid structures. Additionally, the shell is represented on the extended domain by a non-zero shell-concentration field, which is obtained by conservatively mapping the shell mesh onto the extended mesh. The paper outlines the theory underpinning this novel method, referred to as the immersed-shell approach. It also shows how the coupling between a fluid- and a structural-dynamics solver is achieved. At this stage, results are shown for cases of fundamental interest. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Structural Performance of Advanced Composite Tow-Steered Shells With Cutouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Turpin, Jason D.; Stanford, Bret K.; Martin, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The structural performance of two advanced composite tow-steered shells with cutouts, manufactured using an automated fiber placement system, is assessed using both experimental and analytical methods. The shells' fiber orientation angles vary continuously around their circumference from +/-10 degrees on the crown and keel, to +/-45 degrees on the sides. The raised surface features on one shell result from application of all 24 tows during each fiber placement system pass, while the second shell uses the system's tow drop/add capability to achieve a more uniform wall thickness. These unstiffened shells were previously tested in axial compression and buckled elastically. A single cutout, scaled to represent a passenger door on a commercial aircraft, is then machined into one side of each shell. The prebuckling axial stiffnesses and bifurcation buckling loads of the shells with cutouts are also computed using linear finite element structural analyses for initial comparisons with test data. When retested, large deflections were observed around the cutouts, but the shells carried an average of 92 percent of the axial stiffness, and 86 percent of the buckling loads, of the shells without cutouts. These relatively small reductions in performance demonstrate the potential for using tow steering to mitigate the adverse effects of typical design features on the overall structural performance.

  4. Structural Characterization of Advanced Composite Tow-Steered Shells with Large Cutouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Turpin, Jason D.; Gardner, Nathaniel W.; Stanford, Bret K.; Martin, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    The structural performance of two advanced composite tow-steered shells with large cutouts, manufactured using an automated fiber placement system, is assessed using both experimental and analytical methods. The fiber orientation angles of the shells vary continuously around their circumference from +/- 10 degrees on the crown and keel, to +/- 45 degrees on the sides. The raised surface features on one shell result from application of all 24 tows during each fiber placement system pass, while the second shell uses the tow drop/add capability of the system to achieve a more uniform wall thickness. These unstiffened shells, both without and with small cutouts, were previously tested in axial compression and buckled elastically. In this study, a single unreinforced cutout, scaled to represent a cargo door on a commercial aircraft, is machined into one side of each shell. The prebuckling axial stiffnesses and bifurcation buckling loads of these shells with large cutouts are also computed using linear finite element structural analyses for preliminary comparisons with test data. During testing, large displacements are observed around the large cutouts, but the shells maintain an average of 91 percent of the axial stiffness, and also carry 85 percent of the buckling loads, when compared to the pristine shells without cutouts. These relatively small reductions indicate that there is great potential for using tow steering to mitigate the adverse effects of large cutouts on the overall structural performance.

  5. US State Submerged Lands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Submerged Lands Act (43 U.S.C. Section 1301 et seq.) grants coastal states title to natural resources located within their coastal submerged lands and navigable...

  6. Structure - Slug Flow Coupling: Small Scale Experiments with Submerged Flexible Pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Hemeda, Amr Khalil Hemeda Khalil

    2015-01-01

    Multiphase flows include several flow regimes that exist with different conditions. The time varying forces in flexible pipes conveying two-phase flows results in very dynamic structural behavior. These varying forces contribute to fatigue stresses which have a major effect on a riser life time. Studying the dynamic response of flexible pipes conveying two-phase flows can reveal crucial information regarding induced vibrations and oscillations in risers. These information can be utilized i...

  7. Structural and magnetic properties of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Luise Theil; Bojesen, A.; Timmermann, L.

    2002-01-01

    magnetite (Fe3O4). We observed that the nanoparticles were stable against further oxidation, and Mossbauer spectroscopy at high applied magnetic fields and low temperatures revealed a stable form of partly oxidized magnetite. The nanocrystalline structure of the oxide shell results in strong canting......We present studies of the structural and magnetic properties of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles. alpha-Fe nanoparticles were fabricated by sputtering and subsequently covered with a protective nanocrystalline oxide shell consisting of either maghaemite (gamma-Fe2O3) or partially oxidized...... of the spin structure in the oxide shell, which thereby modifies the magnetic properties of the core-shell nanoparticles....

  8. Laser Scanner Reliefs of Selected Archeological Structures in the Submerged Baiae (naples)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidde Petriaggi, B.; Gomez de Ayala, G.

    2015-04-01

    In 2011 the ISCR (Rome), in the frame of the Project Restoring Underwater directed by Barbara Davidde Petriaggi, started to test Naumacos Laser Scann 1, designed by Gabriele Gomez de Ayala, in order to document the restoration of a room paved with opus sectile probably part of the Bath of Punta Epitaffio (Underwater Park of Baiae - Marine Protected Area, Naples). The experimentation conducted in Baiae by ISCR has shown the effectiveness of the Laser Scanner; this method also allowed to considerably reduce times and costs of underwater surveying. Moreover, the 3D relief obtained, has the characteristic of being geometrically (accuracy is sub-millimetric) and chromatically faithful to the reconstructed structure, as well as being exportable in various forms and usable in several contexts. From 2011 to 2013 the evolution of the instrument Naumacos Laser Scanner 3 was developed and tested in the restoration work of the Villa con ingresso a protiro, where three structures were documented in 3D (a paved with black and white mosaic decorated with hexagons and peltae, a very fragmentary black and white mosaic and a stone artefact. This paper shows the results of this documentation campaign and it underlines the prominent role in documentation and in museum display of Underwater Cultural Heritage played by the three-dimensional laser scanning survey. This technique also contributes to the increase of the value of scientific dissemination.

  9. The shell model. Towards a unified description of nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poves, Alfredo [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma Cantoblanco, 28049 - Madrid (Spain); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    In this series of lectures we present the foundations of the spherical shell model that we treat as an approximation to the exact solution of the full secular problem. We introduce the notions of valence space, effective interaction and effective operator. We analyse the structure of the realistic effective interactions, identifying their monopole part with the spherical mean field. The multipole Hamiltonian is shown to have a universal (simple) form that includes pairing (isovector and isoscalar), quadrupole, octupole, deca-pole, and ({sigma}{center_dot}{tau})({sigma}{center_dot}{tau}). We describe the methods of resolution of the secular problem, in particular the Lanczos method. The model is applied to the description of nuclear deformation and its relationship with the deformed mean field theories is studied. We propose a new symmetry, `quasi`-SU3, to understand deformation in the spherical basis. Finally, we discuss the domain of nuclei very far from the valley of {beta} stability, addressing the vanishing of some magic closures that can be explained in terms of intruder states. (author) 53 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Structural Lightweight Concrete Production by Using Oil Palm Shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibur Rahman Sobuz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional building materials are widely used in a developing country like Malaysia. This type of material is costly. Oil palm shell (OPS is a type of farming solid waste in the tropical region. This paper aims to investigate strength characteristics and cost analysis of concrete produced using the gradation of OPS 0–50% on conventional coarse aggregate with the mix proportions 1 : 1.65 : 2.45, 1 : 2.5 : 3.3, and 1 : 3.3 : 4.2 by the weight of ordinary Portland cement, river sand, crushed stone, and OPS as a substitution for coarse aggregate. The corresponding w/c ratios were used: 0.45, 0.6, and 0.75, respectively, for the defined mix proportions. Test results indicate that compressive strength of concrete decreased as the percentage of the OPS increased in each mix ratio. Other properties of OPS concrete, namely, modulus of rupture, modulus of elasticity, splitting tensile strength, and density, were also determined and compared to the corresponding properties of conventional concrete. Economic analysis also indicates possible cost reduction of up to 15% due to the use of OPS as coarse aggregate. Finally, it is concluded that the use of OPS has great potential in the production of structural lightweight concrete.

  11. High thermal stability of core-shell structures dominated by negative interface energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong-Fu; Zhao, Ning; Jin, Bo; Zhao, Ming; Jiang, Qing

    2017-03-29

    Nanoscale core/shell structures are of interest in catalysis due to their superior catalytic properties. Here we investigated the thermal stability of the coherent core-shell structures in a thermodynamic way by considering the impact from the core with the bulk melting point Tm(∞) lower or higher than the shell. When a low-Tm(∞) core is adopted, core-shell melting induced by the melting depression of the core does not occur upon heating because of the superheating, although the melting depression of the core can be triggered ultimately by the preferential melting of the high-Tm(∞) shell for small cores. The superheating of the core is contributed by the negative solid-solid interface energy, while the depression is originated from the positive solid-liquid interface energy. Owing to the presence of the negative interface energy, moreover, the low-Tm(∞)-core structure possesses a low difference in thermal expansion between the core and the shell, high activation energy of outward atomic diffusion from the core to shell, and low heat capacity. This result is beneficial for the core-shell structure design for its application in catalysis.

  12. Design, fabrication and test of a lightweight shell structure, phase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported in the construction of lightweight orthogrid shells. Graphite/epoxy panels are being used in the fabrication. The shell structure is diagramed in detail. Panel laminates, and panel stiffener flanges are described while illustrations delineate panel assembly procedures.

  13. Analysis of Completely Prevaporized Spray Flames with Water/Octane Core/Shell Structured Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yao Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of studies on laminar flame propagation in off-stoichiometric dilute sprays of monodispersed inert or fuel drops had been investigated by large activation energy asymptotics. The present study extends previous theoretical model to consider water/octane core/shell structured drops instead of single-phase drops. The core/shell structured drops are composed of core fluid (water encased by a layer of shell fluid (n-octane. In this study, we only deal with the case that core/shell structured drops are vaporized completely just at flame location. Namely, the discussions of this paper are restricted to the completely prevaporized mode. By varying parameters of core water radius, core-to-shell ratio, the amount of liquid loading, and the stoichiometric ratio (lean or rich burning, we examine the gasification of core water and shell fuel of core/shell structured drops upstream of the bulk flame and its relation to the internal heat transfer. The effects of drop radius, core-to-shell ratio, liquid loading, and overall heat loss or gain on flame propagation flux are reported and discussed.

  14. Shell-like structures advanced theories and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Eremeyev, Victor

    2017-01-01

    The book presents mathematical and mechanical aspects of the theory of plates and shells, applications in civil, aero-space and mechanical engineering, as well in other areas. The focus relates to the following problems: • comprehensive review of the most popular theories of plates and shells, • relations between three-dimensional theories and two-dimensional ones, • presentation of recently developed new refined plates and shells theories (for example, the micropolar theory or gradient-type theories), • modeling of coupled effects in shells and plates related to electromagnetic and temperature fields, phase transitions, diffusion, etc., • applications in modeling of non-classical objects like, for example, nanostructures, • presentation of actual numerical tools based on the finite element approach.

  15. Iodine-incorporated BiOCl core-shell structure and its high photocatalytic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Kun

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Iodine-incorporated BiOCl core-shell micro-spheres were first time fabricated using one-step approach under atmospheric pressure.Iodine anions were utilized as both structure directing agents for fabricating core-shell structure and doped ions incorporated in the framework of the core-shell BiOCl spheres to extend the light adsorption edge to visible light region.Super strong photocatalytic performance for this structure can be also obtained.This work provides a novel and easy pathway for creating advanced photocatalytic properties,serving as new promising functional materials for advanced water treatment technology.

  16. Laminated Thin Shell Structures Subjected to Free Vibration in a Hygrothermal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.; Guptill, James D.

    1994-01-01

    Parametric studies were performed to assess the effects of various parameters on the free-vibration behavior (natural frequencies) of (+/- theta)(sub 2) angle-ply, fiber composite, thin shell structures in a hygrothermal environment. Knowledge of the natural frequencies of structures is important in considering their response to various kinds of excitation, especially when structures and force systems are complex and when excitations are not periodic. The three dimensional, finite element structural analysis computer code CSTEM was used in the Cray YMP computer environment. The fiber composite shell was assumed to be cylindrical and made from T300 graphite fibers embedded in an intermediate-modulus, high-strength matrix. The following parameters were investigated: the length and the laminate thickness of the shell, the fiber orientation, the fiber volume fraction, the temperature profile through the thickness of the laminate, and laminates with different ply thicknesses. The results indicate that the fiber orientation and the length of the laminated shell had significant effects on the natural frequencies. The fiber volume fraction, the laminate thickness, and the temperature profile through the shell thickness had weak effects on the natural frequencies. Finally, the laminates with different ply thicknesses had an insignificant influence on the behavior of the vibrated laminated shell. Also, a single through-the-thickness, eight-node, three dimensional composite finite element analysis appears to be sufficient for investigating the free-vibration behavior of thin, composite, angle-ply shell structures.

  17. Structural synergy in a core-shell spin crossover nanoparticle investigated by an electroelastic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slimani, Ahmed; Khemakhem, Hamadi; Boukheddaden, Kamel

    2017-05-01

    Understanding how surrounding environments act on the functional properties of switchable nano-objects across extended and multiple length scales is of growing interest in many areas of material science. Here, we examine in details, using a microscopic model, the interplay between the structural properties of an inert shell and a spin-active spin-crossover (SCO) core, composed of atoms which can switch thermally between the low-spin (LS) and high-spin (HS) states, a transition which is accompanied with a volume expansion. To come closer to realistic experimental data, we considered a shell having the lattice parameter of the HS state. Intensive Monte Carlo simulations, running on the spin states and atomic positions, are performed on the core-shell spin-crossover nanoparticle using an electroelastic model based on a compressible 2D lattice. A detailed analysis of the effect of the shell's size and rigidity on the magnetostructural properties of the core allows us to address the following issues: (i) the heteroelastic properties of the lattice induce a spatially inhomogeneous pressure (negative in the shell and positive in the core) which strongly distorts the lattice when the core is in the LS state, creating a visible spatial deflection of the shell/core interface; (ii) the thermally-induced first-order SCO transition of the core is significantly affected by the increase of the shell size, which lowers the transition temperature and reduces the thermal hysteresis width; (iii) the shell's rigidity dependence of the thermal hysteresis of the nanoparticle exhibited a resonance behavior when the shell's rigidity equals that of the core, a feature that is analyzed on the basis of acoustic impedance mismatch between the core and the shell. All these outcomes reflect the crucial influence of the surrounding environment on the structural properties of the nanoparticle and provide potentialities in the control of the bistability and cooperativity of the SCO nanoparticles

  18. Structural instability of shell-like assemblies of a keplerate-type polyoxometalate induced by ionic strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, S.J.; Kegel, W.K.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a new structural instability of shell-like assemblies of polyoxometalates. Besides the colloidal instability, that is, the formation of aggregates that consist of many single layered POM-shells, these systems also display an instability on a structural scale within the shell-like

  19. Study of CRFP Shell Structures under Dynamic Loading in Shock Tube Setup

    OpenAIRE

    H. A. Khawaja; T. A. Bertelsen; R. Andreassen; M Moatamedi

    2014-01-01

    The paper gives the study of the response of carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CRFP) quasi-isotropic shell structures under the influence of dynamic loading. The quasi-isotropic CRFP shell specimens are fabricated using Multipreg E720 laminates. These laminates are laid in such a way that shell structure has equal strength and mechanical properties in the two-dimensional (2D) plane and hence can be regarded as quasi-isotropic. In this study, the dynamic loading is generated using shock waves ...

  20. Core-shell structure microcapsules with dual pH-responsive drug release function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chih-Hui; Wang, Chih-Yu; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Wang, Andrew H-J; Hsiao, Ching-Ju; Chen, Zu-Yu; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2014-09-01

    We report dual pH-responsive microcapsules manufactured by combining electrostatic droplets (ESD) and microfluidic droplets (MFD) techniques to produce monodisperse core (alginate)-shell (chitosan) structure with dual pH-responsive drug release function. The fabricated core-shell microcapsules were size controllable by tuning the synthesis parameters of the ESD and MFD systems, and were responsive in both acidic and alkaline environment, We used two model drugs (ampicillin loaded in the chitosan shell and diclofenac loaded in the alginate core) for drug delivery study. The results show that core-shell structure microcapsules have better drug release efficiency than respective core or shell particles. A biocompatibility test showed that the core-shell structure microcapsules presented positive cell viability (above 80%) when evaluated by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results indicate that the synthesized core-shell microcapsules were a potential candidate of dual-drug carriers. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. A mesoporous "shell-in-shell" structured nanocatalyst with large surface area, enhanced synergy, and improved catalytic performance for Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baocang; Niu, Yuefang; Li, Yan; Yang, Fan; Guo, Jiamin; Wang, Qin; Jing, Peng; Zhang, Jun; Yun, Guohong

    2014-10-21

    A novel mesoporous "shell-in-shell" structured nanocatalyst (@Pd/meso-TiO2/Pd@meso-SiO2) with large surface area, enhanced synergy, and improved catalytic performance is created for catalyzing Suzuki-Miyaura coupling and 4-nitrophenol reduction reactions.

  2. Fluid-structural interactions using Navier-Stokes flow equations coupled with shell finite element structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Byun, Chansup

    1993-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented to study fluid-structural interaction problems for three-dimensional aerospace structures. The flow is modeled using the three-dimensional unsteady Euler/Navier-Stokes equations and solved using the finite-difference approach. The three dimensional structure is modeled using shell/plate finite-element formulation. The two disciplines are coupled using a domain decomposition approach. Accurate procedures both in time and space are developed to combine the solutions from the flow equations with those of the structural equations. Time accuracy is maintained using aeroelastic configuration-adaptive moving grids that are computed every time step. The work done by aerodynamic forces due to structural deformations is preserved using consistent loads. The present procedure is validated by computing the aeroelastic response of a wing and comparing with experiment. Results are illustrated for a typical wing-body configuration.

  3. Yolk-shell structure of polyaniline-coated sulfur for lithium-sulfur batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weidong; Yu, Yingchao; Chen, Hao; DiSalvo, Francis J; Abruña, Héctor D

    2013-11-06

    Lithium–sulfur batteries have attracted much attention in recent years due to their high theoretical capacity of 1672 mAh g(–1) and low cost. However, a rapid capacity fade is normally observed, attributed mainly to polysulfide dissolution and volume expansion. Although many strategies have been reported to prolong the cyclability, the high cost and complex preparation processes still hinder their practical application. Here, we report the synthesis of a polyaniline–sulfur yolk–shell nanocomposite through a heating vulcanization of a polyaniline–sulfur core–shell structure. We observed that this heating treatment was much more effective than chemical leaching to prepare uniform yolk–shell structures. Compared with its sulfur–polyaniline core–shell counterparts, the yolk–shell nanostructures delivered much improved cyclability owing to the presence of internal void space inside the polymer shell to accommodate the volume expansion of sulfur during lithiation. The yolk–shell material exhibited a stable capacity of 765 mAh g(–1) at 0.2 C after 200 cycles, representing a promising future for industrial scale Li–S batteries.

  4. Fluid-structure interaction simulations of deformable structures with non-linear thin shell elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharzadeh, Hafez; Hedayat, Mohammadali; Borazjani, Iman; Scientific Computing; Biofluids Laboratory Team

    2017-11-01

    Large deformation of structures in a fluid is simulated using a strongly coupled partitioned fluid-structure interaction (FSI) approach which is stabilized with under-relaxation and the Aitken acceleration technique. The fluid is simulated using a recently developed implicit Newton-Krylov method with a novel analytical Jacobian. Structures are simulated using a triangular thin-shell finite element formulation, which considers only translational degrees of freedom. The thin-shell method is developed on the top of a previously implemented membrane finite element formulation. A sharp interface immersed boundary method is used to handle structures in the fluid domain. The developed FSI framework is validated against two three-dimensional experiments: (1) a flexible aquatic vegetation in the fluid and (2) a heaving flexible panel in fluid. Furthermore, the developed FSI framework is used to simulate tissue heart valves, which involve large deformations and non-linear material properties. This work was supported by American Heart Association (AHA) Grant 13SDG17220022 and the Center of Computational Research (CCR) of University at Buffalo.

  5. Structural and Spectroscopic Characterization of PM 597 Dye-Silica Core-Shell Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Biladi, Tahani R.; Al Dwayyan, A. S.; M. Naziruddin Khan; Saif M. H. Qaid; Khalid Al Zahrani

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured fluorescent pyrromethene (PM) doped-silica core-shell particles were successfully prepared by Stöber process. The average size of the particles was in the range of 10–20 nm measured by TEM micrograph. The atomic structure and morphology of PM 597/SiO2 core/shell nanoparticles were studied by AFM and SEM, respectively. Absorption and emission spectra of the PM 597/SiO2 core/shell nanoparticles under the UV irradiation were studied and not significantly influenced at the position...

  6. Core-shell structured carbon nanoparticles derived from light pyrolysis of waste tires

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shuo; Wan, Chaoying; Wu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Shifeng

    2016-01-01

    Carbon black nanoparticles (CBlp) were derived from waste tire rubbers via a melt-extrusion pyrolysis process at 300 °C. A polymeric shell was observed on the surface of CBlp, which was formed by bound rubber. The chemical structure and content of the bound rubber shell were characterized and quantified, and compared with the commercial carbon black N330 and pyrolytic carbon black (CBp). The average particle size of CBlp is about 22 nm, with a rubber shell thickness of 7–12 nm. Functional car...

  7. Electronic Structure of Open-Shell Singlet Molecules: Diradical Character Viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Masayoshi

    2017-04-01

    This chapter theoretically explains the electronic structures of open-shell singlet systems with a wide range of open-shell (diradical) characters. The definition of diradical character and its correlation to the excitation energies, transition properties, and dipole moment differences are described based on the valence configuration interaction scheme using a two-site model with two electrons in two active orbitals. The linear and nonlinear optical properties for various polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with open-shell character are also discussed as a function of diradical character.

  8. Establishing the Structural Integrity of Core-Shell Nanoparticles against Elemental Migration using Luminescent Lanthanide Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; Peng, Dengfeng; Chen, Xian; Qiao, Xvsheng; Fan, Xianping; Wang, Feng

    2015-10-19

    Core-shell structured nanoparticles are increasingly used to host luminescent lanthanide ions but the structural integrity of these nanoparticles still lacks sufficient understanding. Herein, we present a new approach to detect the diffusion of dopant ions in core-shell nanostructures using luminescent lanthanide probes whose emission profile and luminescence lifetime are sensitive to the chemical environment. We show that dopant ions in solution-synthesized core-shell nanoparticles are firmly confined in the designed locations. However, annealing at certain temperatures (greater than circa 350 °C) promotes diffusion of the dopant ions and leads to degradation of the integrity of the nanoparticles. These insights into core-shell nanostructures should enhance our ability to understand and use lanthanide-doped luminescent nanoparticles. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. A study on the nonlinear finite element analysis of reinforced concrete structures: shell finite element formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Jin; Seo, Jeong Moon

    2000-08-01

    The main goal of this research is to establish a methodology of finite element analysis of containment building predicting not only global behaviour but also local failure mode. In this report, we summerize some existing numerical analysis techniques to be improved for containment building. In other words, a complete description of the standard degenerated shell finite element formulation is provided for nonlinear stress analysis of nuclear containment structure. A shell finite element is derived using the degenerated solid concept which does not rely on a specific shell theory. Reissner-Mindlin assumptions are adopted to consider the transverse shear deformation effect. In order to minimize the sensitivity of the constitutive equation to structural types, microscopic material model is adopted. The four solution algorithms based on the standard Newton-Raphson method are discussed. Finally, two numerical examples are carried out to test the performance of the adopted shell medel.

  10. Structure of a bacterial microcompartment shell protein bound to a cobalamin cofactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael C; Crowley, Christopher S; Kopstein, Jeffrey; Bobik, Thomas A; Yeates, Todd O

    2014-12-01

    The EutL shell protein is a key component of the ethanolamine-utilization microcompartment, which serves to compartmentalize ethanolamine degradation in diverse bacteria. The apparent function of this shell protein is to facilitate the selective diffusion of large cofactor molecules between the cytoplasm and the lumen of the microcompartment. While EutL is implicated in molecular-transport phenomena, the details of its function, including the identity of its transport substrate, remain unknown. Here, the 2.1 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of a EutL shell protein bound to cobalamin (vitamin B12) is presented and the potential relevance of the observed protein-ligand interaction is briefly discussed. This work represents the first structure of a bacterial microcompartment shell protein bound to a potentially relevant cofactor molecule.

  11. Coupled mixed-field laminate theory and finite element for smart piezoelectric composite shell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanos, Dimitris A.

    1996-01-01

    Mechanics for the analysis of laminated composite shells with piezoelectric actuators and sensors are presented. A new mixed-field laminate theory for piezoelectric shells is formulated in curvilinear coordinates which combines single-layer assumptions for the displacements and a layerwise representation for the electric potential. The resultant coupled governing equations for curvilinear piezoelectric laminates are described. Structural mechanics are subsequently developed and an 8-node finite-element is formulated for the static and dynamic analysis of adaptive composite structures of general laminations containing piezoelectric layers. Evaluations of the method and comparisons with reported results are presented for laminated piezoelectric-composite plates, a closed cylindrical shell with a continuous piezoceramic layer and a laminated composite semi-circular cantilever shell with discrete cylindrical piezoelectric actuators and/or sensors.

  12. On the shape and orientation control of an orbiting shallow spherical shell structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainum, P. M.; Reddy, A. S. S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The dynamics of orbiting shallow flexible spherical shell structures under the influence of control actuators was studied. Control laws are developed to provide both attitude and shape control of the structure. The elastic modal frequencies for the fundamental and lower modes are closely grouped due to the effect of the shell curvature. The shell is gravity stabilized by a spring loaded dumbbell type damper attached at its apex. Control laws are developed based on the pole clustering techniques. Savings in fuel consumption can be realized by using the hybrid shell dumbbell system together with point actuators. It is indicated that instability may result by not including the orbital and first order gravity gradient effects in the plant prior to control law design.

  13. On the shape and orientation control of orbiting shallow spherical shell structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainum, P. M.; Reddy, A. S. S. R.

    1983-01-01

    The dynamics of orbiting shallow flexible spherical shell structures under the influence of control actuators was studied. Control laws are developed to provide both attitude and shape control of the structure. The elastic modal frequencies for the fundamental and lower modes are closely grouped due to the effect of the shell curvature. The shell is gravity stabilized by a spring loaded dumbell type damper attached at its apex. Control laws are developed based on the pole clustering techniques. Savings in fuel consumption can be realized by using the hybrid shell dumbbell system together with point actuators. It is indicated that instability may result by not including the orbital and first order gravity gradient effects in the plant prior to control law design. Previously announced in STAR as N82-17243

  14. Stress-strain state simulation of large-sized cable-stayed shell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, S.; Zhukov, A.; Belkov, A.; Ponomarev, V.; Belov, S.; Pavlov, M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper studies the opportunities for applying framed cable-stayed shell structures to generate innovative structures in civil engineering. Numerical solution methods for stress-strain state problems of these kinds of geometrically nonlinear structures were developed. Developed methods efficiency is presented by a range of large-dimensional space antenna reflectors.

  15. Economic Development through Globalisation in Nigeria : An analysis of Shell & the IMF Structural Adjustment Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Bokhari, Sven; Del Duca, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    Date: 2008/06/03 Level: Master thesis in International Business and Entrepreneurship, 10p (15ECTS) Authors: Sven Bokhari Fabrizio Del Duca Title: Economic Development through globalisation in Nigeria. An analysis of Shell & the IMF Structural Adjustment Programs Tutor: Leif Linnskog, Ph.D. Research Question: Can globalisation be seen as positive or negative for the Economic Development of Nigeria? A focus on Shell and the International Monetary Fund Research Issue: Globalisation in its cu...

  16. The neural origins of shell structure and pattern in aquatic mollusks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettiger, Alistair; Ermentrout, Bard; Oster, George

    2009-04-21

    We present a model to explain how the neurosecretory system of aquatic mollusks generates their diversity of shell structures and pigmentation patterns. The anatomical and physiological basis of this model sets it apart from other models used to explain shape and pattern. The model reproduces most known shell shapes and patterns and accurately predicts how the pattern alters in response to environmental disruption and subsequent repair. Finally, we connect the model to a larger class of neural models.

  17. Mapping the Atomistic Structure of Graded Core/Shell Colloidal Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarema, Maksym; Xing, Yunhua; Lechner, Rainer T; Ludescher, Lukas; Dordevic, Nikola; Lin, Weyde M M; Yarema, Olesya; Wood, Vanessa

    2017-09-15

    Engineering the compositional gradient for core/shell semiconductor nanocrystals improves their optical properties. To date, however, the structure of graded core/shell nanocrystal emitters has only been qualitatively described. In this paper, we demonstrate an approach to quantify nanocrystal structure, selecting graded Ag-In-Se/ZnSe core/shell nanocrystals as a proof-of-concept material. A combination of multi-energy small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy techniques enables us to establish the radial distribution of ZnSe with sub-nanometer resolution. Using ab initio shape-retrieval analysis of X-ray scattering spectra, we further determine the average shape of nanocrystals. These results allow us to generate three-dimensional, atomistic reconstructions of graded core/shell nanocrystals. We use these reconstructions to calculate solid-state Zn diffusion in the Ag-In-Se nanocrystals and the lattice mismatch between nanocrystal monolayers. Finally, we apply these findings to propose design rules for optimal shell structure and record-luminescent core/shell nanocrystals.

  18. Sound Transmission through Cylindrical Shell Structures Excited by Boundary Layer Pressure Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yvette Y.; Silcox, Richard J.; Robinson, Jay H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines sound transmission into two concentric cylindrical sandwich shells subject to turbulent flow on the exterior surface of the outer shell. The interior of the shells is filled with fluid medium and there is an airgap between the shells in the annular space. The description of the pressure field is based on the cross-spectral density formulation of Corcos, Maestrello, and Efimtsov models of the turbulent boundary layer. The classical thin shell theory and the first-order shear deformation theory are applied for the inner and outer shells, respectively. Modal expansion and the Galerkin approach are used to obtain closed-form solutions for the shell displacements and the radiation and transmission pressures in the cavities including both the annular space and the interior. The average spectral density of the structural responses and the transmitted interior pressures are expressed explicitly in terms of the summation of the cross-spectral density of generalized force induced by the boundary layer turbulence. The effects of acoustic and hydrodynamic coincidences on the spectral density are observed. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the method for both subsonic and supersonic flows.

  19. Impact of high pCO2 on shell structure of the bivalve Cerastoderma edule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Stefania; Schöne, Bernd R; Wang, Schunfeng; Müller, Werner E

    2016-08-01

    Raised atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) result in an increased ocean pCO2 level and decreased carbonate saturation state. Ocean acidification potentially represents a major threat to calcifying organisms, specifically mollusks. The present study focuses on the impact of elevated pCO2 on shell microstructural and mechanical properties of the bivalve Cerastoderma edule. The mollusks were collected from the Baltic Sea and kept in flow-through systems at six different pCO2 levels from 900 μatm (control) to 24,400 μatm. Extreme pCO2 levels were used to determine the effects of potential leaks from the carbon capture and sequestration sites where CO2 is stored in sub-seabed geological formations. Two approaches were combined to determine the effects of the acidified conditions: (1) Shell microstructures and dissolution damage were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and (2) shell hardness was tested using nanoindentation. Microstructures of specimens reared at different pCO2 levels do not show significant changes in their size and shape. Likewise, the increase of pCO2 does not affect shell hardness. However, dissolution of ontogenetically younger portions of the shell becomes more severe with the increase of pCO2. Irrespective of pCO2, strong negative correlations exist between microstructure size and shell mechanics. An additional sample from the North Sea revealed the same microstructural-mechanical interdependency as the shells from the Baltic Sea. Our findings suggest that the skeletal structure of C. edule is not intensely influenced by pCO2 variations. Furthermore, our study indicates that naturally occurring shell mechanical property depends on the shell architecture at μm-scale. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Methanol oxidation reaction on core-shell structured Ruthenium-Palladium nanoparticles: Relationship between structure and electrochemical behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kübler, Markus; Jurzinsky, Tilman; Ziegenbalg, Dirk; Cremers, Carsten

    2018-01-01

    In this work the relationship between structural composition and electrochemical characteristics of Palladium(Pd)-Ruthenium(Ru) nanoparticles during alkaline methanol oxidation reaction is investigated. The comparative study of a standard alloyed and a precisely Ru-core-Pd-shell structured catalyst allows for a distinct investigation of the electronic effect and the bifunctional mechanism. Core-shell catalysts benefit from a strong electronic effect and an efficient Pd utilization. It is found that core-shell nanoparticles are highly active towards methanol oxidation reaction for potentials ≥0.6 V, whereas alloyed catalysts show higher current outputs in the lower potential range. However, differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) experiments reveal that the methanol oxidation reaction on core-shell structured catalysts proceeds via the incomplete oxidation pathway yielding formaldehyde, formic acid or methyl formate. Contrary, the alloyed catalyst benefits from the Ru atoms at its surface. Those are found to be responsible for high methanol oxidation activity at lower potentials as well as for complete oxidation of CH3OH to CO2 via the bifunctional mechanism. Based on these findings a new Ru-core-Pd-shell-Ru-terrace catalyst was synthesized, which combines the advantages of the core-shell structure and the alloy. This novel catalyst shows high methanol electrooxidation activity as well as excellent selectivity for the complete oxidation pathway.

  1. Fullerenes in Aromatic Solvents: Correlation between Solvation-Shell Structure, Solvate Formation, and Solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peerless, James S; Bowers, G Hunter; Kwansa, Albert L; Yingling, Yaroslava G

    2015-12-10

    In this work, an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation technique was employed to gain insight into the dynamic structure of the solvation shell formed around C60 and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) in nine aromatic solvents. A new method was developed to visualize and quantify the distribution of solvent molecule orientations in the solvation shell. A strong positive correlation was found between the regularity of solvent molecule orientations in the solvation shell and the experimentally obtained solubility limits for both C60 and PCBM. This correlation was extended to predict a solubility of 36 g/L for PCBM in 1,2,4-trimethylbenze. The relationship between solvation-shell structure and solubility provided detailed insight into solvate formation of C60 and solvation in relation to solvent molecular structure and properties. The determined dependence of the solvation-shell structure on the geometric shape of the solvent might allow for enhanced control of fullerene solution-phase behavior during processing by chemically tailoring the solvent molecular structure, potentially diminishing the need for costly and environmentally harmful halogenated solvents and/or additives.

  2. Surface energy effect on free vibration of nano-sized piezoelectric double-shell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xue-Qian; Zhu, Chang-Song; Liu, Jin-Xi; Liu, Xiang-Lin

    2018-01-01

    Combining Goldenveizer-Novozhilov shell theory, thin plate theory and electro-elastic surface theory, the size-dependent vibration of nano-sized piezoelectric double-shell structures under simply supported boundary condition is presented, and the surface energy effect on the natural frequencies is discussed. The displacement components of the cylindrical nano-shells and annular nano-plates are expanded as the superposition of standard Fourier series based on Hamilton's principle. The total stresses with consideration of surface energy effect are derived, and the total energy function is obtained by using Rayleigh-Ritz energy method. The free vibration equation is solved, and the natural frequency is analyzed. In numerical examples, it is found that the surface elastic constant, piezoelectric constant and surface residual stress show different effects on the natural frequencies. The effect of surface piezoelectric constant is the maximum. The effect of dimensions of the double-shell under different surface material properties is also examined.

  3. Synthesis, structural, optical and photocatalytic properties of CdS/ZnS core/shell nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Ch. Venkata; Shim, Jaesool; Cho, Migyung

    2017-04-01

    CdS, ZnS and CdS/ZnS core/shell nanoparticles were successfully synthesized via two-step synthesis method. The as-prepared CdS, ZnS and CdS/ZnS core/shell nanoparticles were used to study the structural, morphological, and optical properties by PXRD, TEM, HRTEM, UV-vis spectroscopy, N2 adsorption-desorption, FT-IR, PL and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The XRD pattern confirms the crystal structure of the prepared ZnS, CdS, and CdS/ZnS core/shell nanoparticles. The crystallinity of the as-prepared samples is confirmed by PXRD, TEM and HRTEM analysis. The BET analysis showed that the CdS/ZnS core/shell nanoparticles had larger surface area and pore diameter than CdS and ZnS. The Raman and FT-IR spectra confirm the fundamental vibrational modes of CdS and ZnS respectively. Compared to pure CdS and ZnS, CdS/ZnS core/shell nanoparticles exhibited higher photocatalytic activity for the degradation of methyl orange (MO). The enhancement of photocatalytic activity in the CdS/ZnS core/shell nanoparticles is due to the interface actions between CdS and ZnS, which greatly reduces the recombination of photogenerated electrons-holes pair. The proposed mechanism for degradation of MO dye is discussed in detail.

  4. Manifestation of Geometric and Electronic Shell Structures of Metal Clusters in Intercluster Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnadas, K R; Baksi, Ananya; Ghosh, Atanu; Natarajan, Ganapati; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2017-06-27

    Monolayer protected clusters exhibit rich diversity in geometric and electronic structures. However, structure-reactivity relationships in these clusters are rarely explored. In this context, [Ag44(SR)30]4-, where -SR is an alkyl/aryl thiolate, is an interesting system due to its geometrically and electronically closed-shell structures and distinct charge states. We demonstrate that these structural features of [Ag44(SR)30]4- are distinctly manifested in its solution-state reaction with another cluster, [Au25(SR)18]-. Through this reaction, an alloy cluster anion, [Au12Ag32(SR)30]4-, evolves spontaneously as revealed by high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations indicate that [Au12Ag32(SR)30]4- is formed by the substitution of all of the Ag atoms in the innermost icosahedral shell of [Ag44(SR)30]4- and the abundance is attributed to its higher stability due to closed geometric as well as electronic shell structure, similar to the reactant clusters. We further demonstrate that the substitution of metal atoms in the middle dodecahedral shell and the outermost mount sites are also possible, however such substitutions produce AuxAg44-x(SR)30 alloy clusters with geometrically and electronically open shells. Depending on specific sites of substitution, an unexpected superatom-nonsuperatom transition occurs in the distribution of AuxAg44-x(SR)30 alloy clusters formed in this reaction. Our results present a unique example of a structure-reactivity relationship in the metal atom substitution chemistry of monolayer protected clusters, wherein a systematic trend, reflecting the geometric and the electronic shell structures of the reactant as well as the product clusters, was observed.

  5. Research advances in polymer emulsion based on "core-shell" structure particle design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian-zhong; Liu, Yi-hong; Bao, Yan; Liu, Jun-li; Zhang, Jing

    2013-09-01

    In recent years, quite many studies on polymer emulsions with unique core-shell structure have emerged at the frontier between material chemistry and many other fields because of their singular morphology, properties and wide range of potential applications. Organic substance as a coating material onto either inorganic or organic internal core materials promises an unparalleled opportunity for enhancement of final functions through rational designs. This contribution provides a brief overview of recent progress in the synthesis, characterization, and applications of both inorganic-organic and organic-organic polymer emulsions with core-shell structure. In addition, future research trends in polymer composites with core-shell structure are also discussed in this review. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Shell-based support structures for Nb$_{3}$Sn accelerator quadrupole magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Ferracin, P

    2009-01-01

    Shell-based support structures are being fabricated and tested as part of the development of large-aperture Nb3Sn superconducting quadrupoles for future upgrades of the LHC Interaction Regions. These structures utilize water pressurized bladders for room-temperature pre-load control, and rely on a pre-tensioned aluminum shell to deliver a substantial part of the coil pre-stress during cooldown. The coil final pre-load is therefore monotonically approached from below, without overstressing the strainsensitive conductor. This method has been adopted by the US LARP collaboration to test subscale racetrack coils (SQ series), 1 m long cos-theta coils (TQS series), and 4 m long magnets (LRS and LQS series). We present recent progress in the development of shell-based support structures, with a description of the principles of operations and the future plans.

  7. Thermal Stability of Co-Pt and Co-Au Core-Shell Structured Nanoparticles: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yu-Hua; Huang, Rao; Shao, Gui-Fang; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2017-09-07

    Co-Pt and Co-Au core-shell nanoparticles were heated by molecular dynamics simulations to investigate their thermal stability. Two core structures, that is, hcp Co and fcc Co, have been addressed. The results demonstrate that the hcp-fcc phase transition happens in the hcp-Co-core/fcc-Pt-shell nanoparticle, while it is absent in the hcp-Co-core/fcc-Au-shell one. The stacking faults appear in both Pt and Au shells despite different structures of the Co core. The Co core and Pt shell concurrently melt and present an identical melting point in both Co-Pt core-shell nanoparticles. However, typical two-stage melting occurs in both Co-Au core-shell nanoparticles. Furthermore, the Au shell in the hcp-Co-core/fcc-Au-shell nanoparticle exhibits a lower melting point than that in the fcc-Co-core/fcc-Au-shell one, while the melting points are closely equal for both hcp and fcc Co cores. All of these observations suggest that their thermal stability strongly depends on the structure of the core and the element of the shell.

  8. Structural and Spectroscopic Characterization of PM 597 Dye-Silica Core-Shell Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahani R. Al-Biladi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured fluorescent pyrromethene (PM doped-silica core-shell particles were successfully prepared by Stöber process. The average size of the particles was in the range of 10–20 nm measured by TEM micrograph. The atomic structure and morphology of PM 597/SiO2 core/shell nanoparticles were studied by AFM and SEM, respectively. Absorption and emission spectra of the PM 597/SiO2 core/shell nanoparticles under the UV irradiation were studied and not significantly influenced at the position of peaks. Finally, amplified spontaneous emission (ASE and photobleaching of dye were examined and found no significant influence on the peaks of PM dye due to the formation of smaller sizes of PM 597/SiO2 core/shell nanoparticles. The observed PM 597/SiO2 core/shell nanoparticles were different in shapes with smaller size distribution and highly luminescent. Majority of nanoparticles were roughly spherical with many of them aggregated. The less photobleaching of dye core may be due to the protection of pumped energy by SiO2 shell and restricts the leakage of dye.

  9. Structural and Magnetic Response in Bimetallic Core/Shell Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairan, Adeela; Khan, Usman; Iqbal, Munawar; Khan, Maaz; Javed, Khalid; Riaz, Saira; Naseem, Shahzad; Han, Xiufeng

    2016-04-14

    Bimagnetic monodisperse CoFe₂O₄/Fe₃O₄ core/shell nanoparticles have been prepared by solution evaporation route. To demonstrate preferential coating of iron oxide onto the surface of ferrite nanoparticles X-ray diffraction (XRD), High resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) and Raman spectroscopy have been performed. XRD analysis using Rietveld refinement technique confirms single phase nanoparticles with average seed size of about 18 nm and thickness of shell is 3 nm, which corroborates with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Low temperature magnetic hysteresis loops showed interesting behavior. We have observed large coercivity 15.8 kOe at T = 5 K, whereas maximum saturation magnetization (125 emu/g) is attained at T = 100 K for CoFe₂O₄/Fe₃O₄ core/shell nanoparticles. Saturation magnetization decreases due to structural distortions at the surface of shell below 100 K. Zero field cooled (ZFC) and Field cooled (FC) plots show that synthesized nanoparticles are ferromagnetic till room temperature and it has been noticed that core/shell sample possess high blocking temperature than Cobalt Ferrite. Results indicate that presence of iron oxide shell significantly increases magnetic parameters as compared to the simple cobalt ferrite.

  10. Structural and Magnetic Response in Bimetallic Core/Shell Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairan, Adeela; Khan, Usman; Iqbal, Munawar; Khan, Maaz; Javed, Khalid; Riaz, Saira; Naseem, Shahzad; Han, Xiufeng

    2016-01-01

    Bimagnetic monodisperse CoFe2O4/Fe3O4 core/shell nanoparticles have been prepared by solution evaporation route. To demonstrate preferential coating of iron oxide onto the surface of ferrite nanoparticles X-ray diffraction (XRD), High resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) and Raman spectroscopy have been performed. XRD analysis using Rietveld refinement technique confirms single phase nanoparticles with average seed size of about 18 nm and thickness of shell is 3 nm, which corroborates with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Low temperature magnetic hysteresis loops showed interesting behavior. We have observed large coercivity 15.8 kOe at T = 5 K, whereas maximum saturation magnetization (125 emu/g) is attained at T = 100 K for CoFe2O4/Fe3O4 core/shell nanoparticles. Saturation magnetization decreases due to structural distortions at the surface of shell below 100 K. Zero field cooled (ZFC) and Field cooled (FC) plots show that synthesized nanoparticles are ferromagnetic till room temperature and it has been noticed that core/shell sample possess high blocking temperature than Cobalt Ferrite. Results indicate that presence of iron oxide shell significantly increases magnetic parameters as compared to the simple cobalt ferrite. PMID:28335200

  11. [Scattering properties of core-shell structure of mist wrapped dust particles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shi-qi; Song, Wei; Wang, Yan; Miao, Xin-hui; Xu, Li-jun; Liu, Yu; Li, Cheng; Li Wen-long; Wang, Yi-ran; Cai, Hong-xing

    2014-12-01

    The authors have investigated the optical properties of core-shell structure of mist wrapped dust particles based on the method of discrete dipole approximation (DDA). The influence on the thickness of the elliptical core-shell structure were calculated which the ratio of long axis and short axis is 2:1, and the change of scattering angle for scattering characteristics. The results shows that the thickness of outer layer increase from 1.2 to 4.8 μm with the scattering and extinction coefficient of double core-shell layers particles decrease from 3.4 and 3.43 to 2.543 and 2.545, when the size of inner core isn't change. And scattering relative strength also increased obviously. The thickness of inner core increase from 0.6 to 2.4 μm with the of scattering and extinction coefficient change from 2.59 and 2.88 to 2.6 and 2.76 when thickness of outer remain constant. Effect of the thickness of visible outer layer on the scattering characteristics of double core-shell layers particles is greater, because of the interaction between scattering light and outer materials. The scattering relative intensity decrease with wavelength increased, while increased with the scale of core-shell structure increase. The results make a promotion on the study of the transportation characteristics of laser and scattering characteristics when the atmospheric aerosol and water mist interact together.

  12. Understanding irregular shell formation of Nautilus in aquaria: chemical composition and structural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moini, Mehdi; O'Halloran, Aoife; Peters, Alan M; France, Christine A M; Vicenzi, Edward P; DeWitt, Tamsen G; Langan, Esther; Walsh, Tim; Speakman, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Irregular shell formation and black lines on the outside of live chambered nautilus shells have been observed in all adult specimens at aquariums and zoos soon after the organisms enter aquaria. Black lines have also been observed in wild animals at sites of broken shell, but continued growth from that point returns to a normal, smooth structure. In contrast, rough irregular deposition of shell continues throughout residence in aquaria. The composition and reasons for deposition of the black material and mitigation of this irregular shell formation is the subject of the current study. A variety of analytical techniques were used, including stable isotope mass spectrometry (SI-MS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), micro x-ray fluorescence (µXRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) based X-ray microanalysis. Results indicate that the black material contains excess amounts of copper, zinc, and bromine which are unrelated to the Nautilus diet. The combination of these elements and proteins plays an important role in shell formation, growth, and strengthening. Further study will be needed to compare the proteomics of the shell under aquaria versus natural wild environments. The question remains as to whether the occurrence of the black lines indicates normal healing followed by growth irregularities that are caused by stress from chemical or environmental conditions. In this paper we begin to address this question by examining elemental and isotopic differences of Nautilus diet and salt water. The atomic composition and light stable isotopic ratios of the Nautilus shell formed in aquaria verses wild conditions are presented. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Synthesis and Microwave Absorption Properties of Core-Shell Structured Co3O4-PANI Nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Hongyan Xu; Zhenyin Hai; Jiangtao Diwu; Qiang Zhang; Libo Gao; Danfeng Cui; Junbin Zang; Jun Liu; Chenyang Xue

    2015-01-01

    The core-shell structured Co3O4-PANI nanocomposites have been successfully prepared using an in situ polymerization method, while the core Co3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized by carbon-assisted method using degreasing cotton as a template. The obtained samples were characterized by XRD, TEM, FTIR, and XPS. The results indicated that the amorphous PANI was well covered on the surface of the spinel Co3O4 and the Co3O4-PANI with core-shell structure was formed with particle size of about 100 nm...

  14. NURBS-Based Collocation Methods for the Structural Analysis of Shells of Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Laura De Bellis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present a collocation method for the structural analysis of shells of revolution based on Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS interpolation. The method is based on the strong formulation of the equilibrium equations according to Reissner-Mindlin theory, with Fourier series expansion of dependent variables, which makes the problem 1D. Several numerical tests validate convergence, accuracy, and robustness of the proposed methodology, and its feasibility as a tool for the analysis and design of complex shell structures.

  15. Structural instability of shell-like assemblies of a keplerate-type polyoxometalate induced by ionic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veen, Sandra J; Kegel, Willem K

    2009-11-19

    We demonstrate a new structural instability of shell-like assemblies of polyoxometalates. Besides the colloidal instability, that is, the formation of aggregates that consist of many single layered POM-shells, these systems also display an instability on a structural scale within the shell-like assemblies. This instability occurs at significantly lower ionic strength than the colloidal stability limit and only becomes evident after a relatively long time. For the polyoxometalate, abbreviated as {Mo(72)Fe(30)}, it is shown that the structural stability limit of POM-shells lies between a NaCl concentration of 1.00 and 5.00 mM in aqueous solution.

  16. Shell and membrane theories in mechanics and biology from macro- to nanoscale structures

    CERN Document Server

    Mikhasev, Gennadi

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the latest results related to shells  characterize and design shells, plates, membranes and other thin-walled structures, a multidisciplinary approach from macro- to nanoscale is required which involves the classical disciplines of mechanical/civil/materials engineering (design, analysis, and properties) and physics/biology/medicine among others. The book contains contributions of a meeting of specialists (mechanical engineers, mathematicians, physicists and others) in such areas as classical and non-classical shell theories. New trends with respect to applications in mechanical, civil and aero-space engineering, as well as in new branches like medicine and biology are presented which demand improvements of the theoretical foundations of these theories and a deeper understanding of the material behavior used in such structures.

  17. Nuclear Shell Structure and Beta Decay I. Odd A Nuclei II. Even A Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, M.G.; Moszkowski, S.A.; Nordheim, L.W.

    1951-05-01

    In Part I a systematics is given of all transitions for odd A nuclei for which sufficiently reliable data are available. The allowed or forbidden characters of the transitions are correlated with the positions of the initial and final odd nucleon groups in the nuclear shell scheme. The nuclear shells show definite characteristics with respect to parity of the ground states. The latter is the same as the one obtained from known spins and magnetic moments in a one-particle interpretation. In Part II a systematics of the beta transitions of even-A nuclei is given. An interpretation of the character of the transitions in terms of nuclear shell structure is achieved on the hypothesis that the odd nucleon groups have the same structure as in odd-A nuclei, together with a simple coupling rule between the neutron and proton groups in odd-odd nuclei.

  18. Directed assembly of bifunctional silica-iron oxide nanocomposite with open shell structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Hui Xin; Yeap, Swee Pin; Osman, Mohamed Syazwan; Ahmad, Abdul Latif; Lim, JitKang

    2014-10-08

    The synthesis of nanocomposite with controlled surface morphology plays a key role for pollutant removal from aqueous environments. The influence of the molecular size of the polyelectrolyte in synthesizing silica-iron oxide core-shell nanocomposite with open shell structure was investigated by using dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Here, poly(diallydimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) was used to promote the attachment of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) onto the silica surface to assemble a nanocomposite with magnetic and catalytic bifunctionality. High molecular weight PDDA tended to adsorb on silica colloid, forming a more extended conformation layer than low molecular weight PDDA. Subsequent attachment of IONPs onto this extended PDDA layer was more randomly distributed, forming isolated islands with open space between them. By taking amoxicillin, an antibiotic commonly found in pharmaceutical waste, as the model system, better removal was observed for silica-iron oxide nanocomposite with a more extended open shell structure.

  19. Study of CRFP Shell Structures under Dynamic Loading in Shock Tube Setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Khawaja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the study of the response of carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CRFP quasi-isotropic shell structures under the influence of dynamic loading. The quasi-isotropic CRFP shell specimens are fabricated using Multipreg E720 laminates. These laminates are laid in such a way that shell structure has equal strength and mechanical properties in the two-dimensional (2D plane and hence can be regarded as quasi-isotropic. In this study, the dynamic loading is generated using shock waves in a shock tube experimental setup. The strain and pressure data is collected from the experiments. Additional tests are carried out using Material Test System (MTS for both tensile and flexural response of CRFP. Results obtained from experiments are compared with numerical simulations using ANSYS Multiphysics 14.0 finite element method (FEM package. The numerical simulation and experimental results are found to be in good agreement.

  20. Controllable synthesis and characterization of novel copper-carbon core-shell structured nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Jing [Sin-China Nano Technology Center, Key Lab for Nanomaterials, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Research Center of the Ministry of Education for High Gravity Engineering and Technology, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, No. 15 Beisanhuan Dong Lu, Beijing 100029 (China); Tao, Xia; Pu, Yuan; Zeng, Xiao-Fei [Sin-China Nano Technology Center, Key Lab for Nanomaterials, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Chen, Jian-Feng, E-mail: chenjf@mail.buct.edu.cn [Research Center of the Ministry of Education for High Gravity Engineering and Technology, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, No. 15 Beisanhuan Dong Lu, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} We reported a facile, green and cheap hydrothermal method to obtain novel copper-carbon core-shell nanoparticles. {yields} The as-formed particles with controllable size and morphology are antioxidant. {yields} The particles with organic-group-loaded surfaces and protective shells are expected to be applied in fields of medicine, electronics, sensors and lubricant. -- Abstract: A facile hydrothermal method was developed for preparing copper-carbon core-shell structured particles through a reaction at 160 {sup o}C in which glucose, copper sulfate pentahydrate and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide were used as starting materials. The original copper-carbon core-shell structured particles obtained were sized of 100-250 nm. The thickness of carbonaceous shells was controlled ranging from 25 to 100 nm by adjusting the hydrothermal duration time and the concentrations of glucose in the process. Products were characterized with transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Since no toxic materials were involved in the preparation, particles with stable carbonaceous framework and reactive surface also showed promising applications in medicine, electronics, sensors, lubricant, etc.

  1. Structural characterization of Pt-Pd core-shell nanoparticles by Cs-corrected STEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esparza, R., E-mail: resparza@fata.unam.mx [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada (Mexico); Garcia-Ruiz, Amado F. [UPIICSA-COFAA, Instituto Politecnico Nacional (Mexico); Velazquez Salazar, J. J. [University of Texas at San Antonio, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United States); Perez, R. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada (Mexico); Jose-Yacaman, M. [The University of Texas at San Antonio, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Pt-Pd core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized using a modified polyol method. A thermal method under refluxing, carrying on the reaction up to 285 Degree-Sign C, has been performed to reduce metallic salts using ethylene glycol as reducer and poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) as protective reagent of the formed bimetallic nanoparticles. According to other works, this type of structure has been studied and utilized to successfully increase the catalytic properties of monometallic nanoparticles Pt or Pd. Core-shell bimetallic nanoparticles were structurally characterized using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM) equipped with a high-angle annular dark field detector, energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). The high-resolution elemental line scan and mappings were carried out using a combination of STEM-EDS and STEM-EELS. The obtained results show the growth of the Pd shell on the Pt core with polyhedral morphology. The average size of the bimetallic nanoparticles was 13.5 nm and the average size of the core was 8.5 nm; consequently, the thickness of the shell was around 2.5 nm. The growth of the Pd shell on the Pt core is layer by layer, suggesting a Frank-van der Merwe growth mechanism.

  2. A Study on the Application of Submerged Arc Welding for Thin Plate of A-Grade 3.2 Thickness Steel in Ship Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Soo; Yun, Jin-Oh; Lim, Dong-Yong; Jang, Yong-Won; Kim, Bong-Joon; Oh, Chong-In

    2010-06-01

    This paper is focused on application submerged arc welding process, which offers many advantages compared to conventional CO2 welding process, for thin plate in ship structure. For this purpose, optimized welding conditions are determined according to combination of wire & flux, relationship between welding parameters, bead shapes and mechanical tests such as tensile, bend and hardness. Also finite element(FE) based numerical simulation of thermal history and welding residual stress in welded joint of A-grade 3.2 thickness steel has been checked to qualitative tendency in this paper. In conclusion our company applied to this method in work piece and it was no problem. From the result of this study, it makes substantial saving of time and manufacturing cost and raises the welding quality of product.

  3. Numerical analysis of stiffened shells of revolution. Volume 3: Users' manual for STARS-2B, 2V, shell theory automated for rotational structures, 2 (buckling, vibrations), digital computer programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svalbonas, V.

    1973-01-01

    The User's manual for the shell theory automated for rotational structures (STARS) 2B and 2V (buckling, vibrations) is presented. Several features of the program are: (1) arbitrary branching of the shell meridians, (2) arbitrary boundary conditions, (3) minimum input requirements to describe a complex, practical shell of revolution structure, and (4) accurate analysis capability using a minimum number of degrees of freedom.

  4. Electronic shell structure and chemisorption on gold nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ask Hjorth; Kleis, Jesper; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2011-01-01

    We use density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the electronic structure and chemical properties of gold nanoparticles. Different structural families of clusters are compared. For up to 60 atoms we optimize structures using DFT-based simulated annealing. Cluster geometries are found...

  5. pH-Responsive drug release and NIR-triggered singlet oxygen generation based on a multifunctional core-shell-shell structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Renlu; Yi, Haopeng; Shi, Junhui; Liu, Zongjun; Wang, Hao; Hou, Yafei; Wang, You

    2016-09-14

    A multifunctional platform with pH-responsive drug release and near-infrared (NIR) light-triggered photodynamic therapy (PDT) was designed and prepared using the novel core-shell-shell structure. The multifunctional platform consists of an upconversion nanoparticle (UCNP) emission core, a photosensitizer methylene blue (MB) embedded dense silica sandwich shell, and a polyethyleneimine conjugated folic acid (PEI-FA) gated mesoporous silica (MS) outmost shell with doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) loaded inside. The simulated drug release experiments revealed that DOX will release from the nanoparticles because of the distortion in the PEI-FA layer under acidic conditions. Moreover, under 980 nm NIR irradiation, a 660 nm red light emission was excited, activating MB to generate a singlet oxygen (1O2), which acts as the PDT drug. The multifunctional platform integrated pH-responsive drug release and UCNP-based PDT drug together show promising potential in nanomedicine for future chemotherapy and NIR-triggered PDT.

  6. High responsivity, fast ultraviolet photodetector fabricated from ZnO nanoparticle-graphene core-shell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Dali; Yu, Mingpeng; Sun, Hongtao; Hu, Tao; Lian, Jie; Sawyer, Shayla

    2013-04-01

    We report a simple, efficient and versatile method for assembling metal oxide nanomaterial-graphene core-shell structures. An ultraviolet photodetector fabricated from the ZnO nanoparticle-graphene core-shell structures showed high responsivity and fast transient response, which are attributed to the improved carrier transport efficiency arising from graphene encapsulation.

  7. The shell structure effects in neutron cross section calculation by a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of the shell structure properties of the nucleus in the calculation of neutron-induced reaction cross-section data based on nuclear reaction theory has been investigated. In this investigation, measured, evaluated and calculated (n.p) reaction cross-section data on la spherical nucleus (i.e. 112Sn) and a deformed ...

  8. Ultrafast structural and vibrational dynamics of the hydration shell around DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szyc Ł

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy in the frequency range of OH- and NH stretch excitations serves for a direct mapping of hydration dynamics around DNA. A moderate slowing down of structural dynamics and resonant OH stretch energy transfer is observed in the DNA water shell compared to bulk water.

  9. Effect of C60 adducts on the dynamic structure of aromatic solvation shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peerless, James S.; Bowers, G. Hunter; Kwansa, Albert L.; Yingling, Yaroslava G.

    2017-06-01

    We report herein on the use of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the solvation environment of C60 and four C60-derived fullerenes immersed in a variety of aromatic solvents. Utilizing a recently developed solvation shell analysis technique that quantifies the spatial relationships between fullerenes and solvent on a molecular level, we show that the number of fullerene substituents and solvent chemistry are crucial determinants of the solvation shell structure and thus fullerene solvation behavior. Specifically, it is shown for the derivatives investigated that the number of fullerene substituents is more critical to solvation behavior than the substituent chemistry.

  10. Buckling Design and Imperfection Sensitivity of Sandwich Composite Launch-Vehicle Shell Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Marc R.; Sleight, David W.; Myers, David E.; Waters, W. Allen, Jr.; Chunchu, Prasad B.; Lovejoy, Andrew W.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Composite materials are increasingly being considered and used for launch-vehicle structures. For shell structures, such as interstages, skirts, and shrouds, honeycomb-core sandwich composites are often selected for their structural efficiency. Therefore, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the structural response, including buckling, of sandwich composite shell structures. Additionally, small geometric imperfections can significantly influence the buckling response, including considerably reducing the buckling load, of shell structures. Thus, both the response of the theoretically perfect structure and the buckling imperfection sensitivity must be considered during the design of such structures. To address the latter, empirically derived design factors, called buckling knockdown factors (KDFs), were developed by NASA in the 1960s to account for this buckling imperfection sensitivity during design. However, most of the test-article designs used in the development of these recommendations are not relevant to modern launch-vehicle constructions and material systems, and in particular, no composite test articles were considered. Herein, a two-part study on composite sandwich shells to (1) examine the relationship between the buckling knockdown factor and the areal mass of optimized designs, and (2) to interrogate the imperfection sensitivity of those optimized designs is presented. Four structures from recent NASA launch-vehicle development activities are considered. First, designs optimized for both strength and stability were generated for each of these structures using design optimization software and a range of buckling knockdown factors; it was found that the designed areal masses varied by between 6.1% and 19.6% over knockdown factors ranging from 0.6 to 0.9. Next, the buckling imperfection sensitivity of the optimized designs is explored using nonlinear finite-element analysis and the as-measured shape of a large-scale composite cylindrical

  11. Electronic structure of InAs/GaSb core-shell nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, V. V. Ravi; Partoens, B.; Peeters, F. M.

    2012-10-01

    The electronic and optical properties of InAs/GaSb core-shell nanowires are investigated within the effective mass k·p approach. These systems have a broken band gap, which results in spatially separated confinement of electrons and holes. We investigated these structures for different sizes of the InAs and GaSb core and shell radius. We found that for certain configurations, the conduction band states penetrate into the valence band states resulting in a negative band gap (Egground state that lies below the valence band ground state at the Γ point. For certain core-shell wires, only one conduction band state penetrates into the valence band and in this case, a minigap Δ opens up away from the Γ point and as a consequence the electronic properties of the nanowire now depend on both Eg and Δ values.

  12. Optimal design of hollow core–shell structural active materials for lithium ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjuan Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To mitigate mechanical and chemical degradation of active materials, hollow core–shell structures have been applied in lithium ion batteries. Without embedding of lithium ions, the rigid coating shell can constrain the inward volume deformation. In this paper, optimal conditions for the full use of inner hollow space are identified in terms of the critical ratio of shell thickness and inner size and the state of charge. It is shown that the critical ratios are 0.10 and 0.15 for Si particle and tube (0.12 and 0.18 for Sn particle and tube, and above which there is lack of space for further lithiation.

  13. Strain-induced structural defects and their effects on the electrochemical performances of silicon core/germanium shell nanowire heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yung-Chen; Kim, Dongheun; Li, Zhen; Nguyen, Binh-Minh; Li, Nan; Zhang, Shixiong; Yoo, Jinkyoung

    2017-01-19

    We report on strain-induced structural defect formation in core Si nanowires of a Si/Ge core/shell nanowire heterostructure and the influence of the structural defects on the electrochemical performances in lithium-ion battery anodes based on Si/Ge core/shell nanowire heterostructures. The induced structural defects consisting of stacking faults and dislocations in the core Si nanowire were observed for the first time. The generation of stacking faults in the Si/Ge core/shell nanowire heterostructure is observed to prefer settling in either only the Ge shell region or in both the Ge shell and Si core regions and is associated with the increase of the shell volume fraction. The relaxation of the misfit strain in the [112] oriented core/shell nanowire heterostructure leads to subsequent gliding of Shockley partial dislocations, preferentially forming the twins. The observation of crossover of defect formation is of great importance for understanding heteroepitaxy in radial heterostructures at the nanoscale and for building three dimensional heterostructures for the various applications. Furthermore, the effect of the defect formation on the nanomaterial's functionality is investigated using electrochemical performance tests. The Si/Ge core/shell nanowire heterostructures enhance the gravimetric capacity of lithium ion battery anodes under fast charging/discharging rates compared to Si nanowires. However, the induced structural defects hamper lithiation of the Si/Ge core/shell nanowire heterostructure.

  14. Shell Layer Thickness-Dependent Photocatalytic Activity of Sputtering Synthesized Hexagonally Structured ZnO-ZnS Composite Nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuan-Chang; Lo, Ya-Ru; Wang, Chein-Chung; Xu, Nian-Cih

    2018-01-07

    ZnO-ZnS core-shell nanorods are synthesized by combining the hydrothermal method and vacuum sputtering. The core-shell nanorods with variable ZnS shell thickness (7-46 nm) are synthesized by varying ZnS sputtering duration. Structural analyses demonstrated that the as-grown ZnS shell layers are well crystallized with preferring growth direction of ZnS (002). The sputtering-assisted synthesized ZnO-ZnS core-shell nanorods are in a wurtzite structure. Moreover, photoluminance spectral analysis indicated that the introduction of a ZnS shell layer improved the photoexcited electron and hole separation efficiency of the ZnO nanorods. A strong correlation between effective charge separation and the shell thickness aids the photocatalytic behavior of the nanorods and improves their photoresponsive nature. The results of comparative degradation efficiency toward methylene blue showed that the ZnO-ZnS nanorods with the shell thickness of approximately 17 nm have the highest photocatalytic performance than the ZnO-ZnS nanorods with other shell layer thicknesses. The highly reusable catalytic efficiency and superior photocatalytic performance of the ZnO-ZnS nanorods with 17 nm-thick ZnS shell layer supports their potential for environmental applications.

  15. Monte Carlo study of core/shell polymer nano-structure systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouini, S.; Ziti, S.; Labrim, H.; Bahmad, L.

    2017-11-01

    In this present work, we study the magnetic properties of the polymer nano-systems involving a core-shell structure. In fact, we investigate the effects of the external magnetic field, the anisotropy effect, the exchange coupling interactions and the temperature in order to explicit the magnetic properties of these polymer nano-structure systems. On the other hand, we examine the existence of the compensation temperature induced by the presence of the core-shell structure. Firstly, we present the ground state phase diagrams, in different planes of the physical parameters. On the other hand, we applied the Monte Carlo simulations, at non null temperature values, in order to investigate the thermal behavior of such nano-structure systems. To complete this study, we investigate the anisotropy crystalline effect on the partial and total magnetizations.

  16. High performance carbon nanotube-Si core-shell wires with a rationally structured core for lithium ion battery anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yu; Zhang, Qing; Lu, Congxiang; Xiao, Qizhen; Wang, Xinghui; Tay, Beng Kang

    2013-02-21

    Core-shell Si nanowires are very promising anode materials. Here, we synthesize vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with relatively large diameters and large inter-wire spacing as core wires and demonstrate a CNT-Si core-shell wire composite as a lithium ion battery (LIB) anode. Owing to the rationally engineered core structure, the composite shows good capacity retention and rate performance. The excellent performance is superior to most core-shell nanowires previously reported.

  17. Fully-Stressed-Design Algorithm For Plate/Shell Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Hirokazu

    1991-01-01

    Modification of basic stress-ratio algorithm enhances convergence. In conjunction with reliable stress-analysis algorithm, stress-ratio algorithm used to compute fully stressed state to obtain efficient distribution of materials in structure.

  18. Shell structure and distribution of Cloudina, a potential index fossil for the terminal Proterozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, S. W.; Knoll, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Cloudina-bearing biosparites and biomicrites in the lower part of the Nama Group, Namibia, contain a wide morphological diversity of shell fragments that can all be attributed to the two named species C. hartmannae and C. riemkeae. The curved to sinuous tubular shells of Cloudina were multi-layered. Each shell layer was 8 to 50 micrometers thick and in the form of a slightly flaring tube with one end open and the other closed. Growth appears to have been periodic with successive shell layers forming within older layers. Each added layer was slightly elevated from the previous layer at the proximal end and was asymmetrically placed within the older layer so that only a portion of the new shell layer was fused to the previous layer. This type of growth left a relatively large unminerialized area between the shell layers which was often partially or fully occluded by early marine cements. The thin shell layers exhibit both plastic and brittle deformation and were likely formed of a rigid CaCO3-impregnated organic-rich material. Often the shell layers are preferentially dolomitized suggesting an original mineralogy of high-magnesian calcite. Both species in the Nama Group formed thickets, or perhaps bioherms, and this sedentary and gregarious habit suggests that Cloudina was probably a filter-feeding metazoan of at least a cnidarian grade of organization. The unusual shell structure of Cloudina gives rise to a characteristic suite of taphonomic and diagenetic features that can be used to identify Cloudina-bearing deposits within the Nama Group and in other terminal Proterozoic deposits around the world. Species of Cloudina occur in limestones from Brazil, Spain, China, and Oman in sequences consistent with a latest Proterozoic age assignment. In addition, supposed lower Cambrian, pre-trilobitic, shelly fossils from northwest Mexico and the White-Inyo Mountains in California and Nevada, including Sinotubulites, Nevadatubulus, and Wyattia, are all either closely related

  19. Tuning upconversion through a sensitizer/activator-isolated NaYF₄ core/shell structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shuai; Chen, Guanying; Shao, Wei; Qu, Junle; Prasad, Paras N

    2015-03-07

    The ability to tune the emission color of upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) will greatly enhance the scope of their applications, ranging from infrared solar cells to volumetric multiplexed bioimaging. Conventional methods to tune upconversion are to vary the type and/or the concentration of doped rare-earth ions in these nanoparticle formulations. Here, we introduce a different approach to vary the emission colors of the frequently used sensitizer/activator pairs of Yb(3+)/RE(3+) (RE = Ho, Er, Tm) via utilization of a sensitizer/activator-isolated NaYF4 core-shell structure. We show that the typical green, yellow, and blue luminescent colors from Yb(3+)/Ho(3+)-, Yb(3+)/Er(3+)-, and Yb(3+)/Tm(3+)-co-doped NaYF4 UCNPs can be converted into the quasi-white, green, and pink blue, when corresponding core-shell structures of NaYF4:Yb(3+) @NaYF4:Ho(3+), NaYF4:Yb(3+) @NaYF4:Er(3+) and NaYF4:Yb(3+) @NaYF4:Tm(3+) are built. Time-resolved spectra indicate that decay lifetimes of the emission bands from the sensitizer/activator-isolated core-shell structure significantly vary from that of the sensitizer/activator-codoped NaYF4 UCNPs, verifying the strain-induced modulation of emission channels in the core-shell structure. These sensitizer-activator-isolated core-shell UCNPs have implications for a range of biophotonic or photonic applications.

  20. H-Adaptive Methods for Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Shell Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Ho Lee

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The implementation and application of h-adaptivity in an explicit finite element program for nonlinear structural dynamics is described. Particular emphasis is placed on developing procedures for general purpose structural dynamics programs and efficiently handling adaptivity in shell elements. New projection techniques for error estimation and projecting variables on new meshes after fission or fusion are described. Several problems of severe impact are described.

  1. Modeling of Sound Transmission through Shell Structures with Turbulent Boundary Layer Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yvette Y.; Silcox, Richard J.; Robinson, Jay H.

    1996-01-01

    The turbulent boundary layer (TBL) pressure field is an important source of cabin noise during cruise of high subsonic and supersonic commercial aircraft. The broadband character of this excitation field results in an interior noise spectrum that dominates the overall sound pressure level (SPL) and speech interference metrics in the forward and midcabins of many aircraft. In the authors' previous study, sound transmission through an aircraft fuselage, modeled by two concentric cylindrical sandwich shells and excited by a TBL statistical model was investigated analytically. An assessment of point and global structural vibration levels and resulting interior noise levels was obtained for different TBL models, flight conditions and fuselage structural designs. However, due to the complication of the shell structure, the important noise transmission mechanisms were difficult to discern. Previous experience has demonstrated that a fundamental understanding of the range of modes (or wavenumbers) generated by the TBL source both in the structure and the acoustic cavity is key to the development of both active and passive control technologies. In an initial effort to provide this insight, the objective of this paper is to develop an analytical model of sound transmission through a simple unstiffened cylindrical aluminum shell excited by a TBL pressure field. The description of the turbulent pressure field is based on the Corcos formulation for the cross-spectral density (CSD) of the pressure fluctuations. The coupled shell and interior and exterior acoustic equations are solved for the structural displacement and the interior acoustic response using a Galerkin approach to obtain analytical solutions. Specifically, this study compares the real part of the normalized CSD of the TBL excitation field, the structural displacement and the interior acoustic field. Further the modal compositions of the structural and cavity response are examined and some inference of the dominant

  2. Core-shell structured PEO-chitosan nanofibers by coaxial electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakravan, Mehdi; Heuzey, Marie-Claude; Ajji, Abdellah

    2012-02-13

    Core-shell structured PEO-chitosan nanofibers have been produced using a coaxial electrospinning setup. PEO and chitosan solutions, both in an aqueous acetic acid solvent, were used as the inner (core) and outer (shell) layer, respectively. Uniform-sized defect-free nanofibers of 150-190 nm diameter were produced. In addition, hollow nanofibers could be obtained subsequent to PEO washing of the membranes. The core-shell nanostructure and existence of chitosan on the shell layer were confirmed by TEM images obtained before and after washing the PEO content with water. The presence of chitosan on the surface of the composite nanofibers was further supported by XPS studies. The chitosan and PEO compositions in the nanofibrous mats were determined by TGA analysis, which were similar to their ratio in the feed solutions. The local compositional homogeneity of the membranes and the efficiency of the washing step to remove PEO were also verified by FTIR. In addition, DSC and XRD were used to characterize the crystalline structure and morphology of the co-electrospun nonwoven mats. The prepared coaxial nanofibers (hollow and solid) have several potential applications due to the presence of chitosan on their outer surfaces.

  3. Synthesis and Surface Properties of Silica Spheres with Core Shell Structure by One Convenient Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Das

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Earlier, we have published a paper on the preparation of silica sphere using propanol as cosurfactant. We report here a highly cost-effective method of preparation of mesoporous silica spheres with core shell structure using sodium silicate as silica precursor, cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB as surfactant, and methanol as cosurfactant. Thus after removal of the template by dissolutions or/and activation at higher temperature, mesoporous silica spheres with core shell structure were obtained. The products prepared with methanol to CTAB molar ratio 8.5 : 1 were confirmed to give best results. All the spherical products have very large surface area (∼589–1044 m2/g, pore volume (∼0.98–1.41 cm3/g, and ordered pore structure.

  4. Novel yolk-shell structure bismuth-rich bismuth molybdate microspheres for enhanced visible light photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinliang; Liu, Xinjuan; Sun, Zhuo; Sun, Yi; Pan, Likun

    2015-08-15

    The yolk-shell structure Bi(4-2x)Mo(x)O6 (x⩽1) microspheres were successfully synthesized via a simple solvothermal method. The morphology, structure and photocatalytic performances of the samples in the degradation of rhodamine B (RhB) and methyl orange (MO) were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectra, respectively. The results show that the yolk-shell structure Bi(2.38)Mo(0.81)O6 microspheres exhibit the best photocatalytic performance for the degradation of RhB and MO with a degradation rate of 99% and 72% under visible light irradiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. TEM Study of the Growth Mechanism, Phase Transformation, and Core/shell Structure of Semiconductor Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tai Lun

    In this thesis, the fabrication and characterization of one-dimensional nanostructures have been studied systematically to understand the growth mechanism and structure transformation of one-dimensional nanostructures. The growth behavior of the ultrathin ZnSe nanowires with diameter less than 60 nm was found to be different from classical vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process. The growth rate increases when the diameter of nanowires decreases, in contrast to the classical VLS process in which the growth rate increases with the diameter. The nucleation, initial growth, growth rates, defects, interface structures and growth direction of the nanowires were investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We found the structure and growth direction of ultra-thin nanowires are highly sensitive to growth temperatures and diameters of nanowires. At a low growth temperature (380°C), the growth direction for most nanowires is along . Planar defects were found throughout the nanowires. At a high growth temperature (530°C), uniform nanowires with diameters around 10nm were grown along and directions, and the nanowires with diameters larger than 20nm were mainly grown along direction. The possible growth mechanism of ultrathin nanowires was proposed by combining the solid catalytic growth with the interface diffusion theory, in order to explain how the growth temperature and the size of the catalysts influent the morphology, growth direction and growth rate of ultrathin nanowires. Structural and phase transformation of a nickel coated Si nanowire to NiSi2/SiC core-shell nanowire heterostructures has been investigated by the in-situ Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). The phase transformation is a single-site nucleation process and therefore a single crystalline NiSi2 core resulted in the core-shell nanowire heterostructures. The transformation of the Si nanowire to NiSi2/SiC core-shell nanowire heterostructures was extremely fast and completed

  6. The stability and catalytic activity of W13@Pt42 core-shell structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Jin-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Xu; Li, Lu; Cheng, Hai-Xia; Su, Yan-Jing; Qian, Ping

    2016-10-19

    This paper reports a study of the electronic properties, structural stability and catalytic activity of the W13@Pt42 core-shell structure using the First-principles calculations. The degree of corrosion of W13@Pt42 core-shell structure is simulated in acid solutions and through molecular absorption. The absorption energy of OH for this structure is lower than that for Pt55, which inhibits the poison effect of O containing intermediate. Furthermore we present the optimal path of oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by W13@Pt42. Corresponding to the process of O molecular decomposition, the rate-limiting step of oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by W13@Pt42 is 0.386 eV, which is lower than that for Pt55 of 0.5 eV. In addition by alloying with W, the core-shell structure reduces the consumption of Pt and enhances the catalytic efficiency, so W13@Pt42 has a promising perspective of industrial application.

  7. The scale dependence of single-nucleon shell structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somà, V., E-mail: vittorio.soma@cea.fr [Centre de Saclay, IRFU/Service de Physique Nucléaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Duguet, T. [Centre de Saclay, IRFU/Service de Physique Nucléaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1321 (United States); NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1321 (United States); Hergert, H. [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1321 (United States); The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Holt, J. D. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    We address the scale dependence of (effective) single-particle energies, non-observable quantities that are commonly used for interpreting nuclear structure observables measured in experiments and computed in many-body theories. We first demonstrate their scale dependence on a formal level, making them intrinsically theoretical objects, before illustrating this point via ab initio calculations in the oxygen isotopes. Finally, we consider a modified definition of effective single-particle energy and investigate its running properties.

  8. Comparative analysis of shell color variety and genetic structure among five high-quality freshwater pearl mussel populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L M; Bai, Z Y; Liu, X J; Jin, C; Yin, H; Li, J L

    2016-12-02

    Four Hyriopsis cumingii populations, a breeding population (BP), a cultured population (FP), two wild populations from Poyang Lake (PY) and Dongting Lake (DT), and an H. schlegelii population were collected (JX), and the first filial generations (F1) were bred synchronously. The shell nacre polymorphisms, population genetic diversity, and genetic structures of the F1 of each population were analyzed and compared using CIELAB colorimetric measurements and microsatellite markers. The color parameters of the shell nacre (L*, a*, dE*) in the BP were significantly different from those in the FP, PY, and JX populations (P shell nacre color did not differ significantly between the left and right sides of the shells within the same population (P > 0.05). The BP had relatively darker nacre at the posterior end of the shell, and the color parameters (L*, a*, b*, and dE*) differed significantly from those at the front end (P shell nacre color, with potential for further genetic improvement.

  9. Cu–Ni core–shell nanoparticles: structure, stability, electronic, and magnetic properties: a spin-polarized density functional study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qiang, E-mail: wangqiang@njtech.edu.cn; Wang, Xinyan; Liu, Jianlan; Yang, Yanhui [Nanjing Tech University, School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Institute of Advanced Synthesis (IAS) (China)

    2017-02-15

    Bimetallic core–shell nanoparticles (CSNPs) have attracted great interest not only because of their superior stability, selectivity, and catalytic activity but also due to their tunable properties achieved by changing the morphology, sequence, and sizes of both core and shell. In this study, the structure, stability, charge transfer, electronic, and magnetic properties of 13-atom and 55-atom Cu and Cu–Ni CSNPs were investigated using the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The results show that Ni@Cu CSNPs with a Cu surface shell are more energetically favorable than Cu@Ni CSNPs with a Ni surface shell. Interestingly, three-shell Ni@Cu{sub 12}@Ni{sub 42} is more stable than two-shell Cu{sub 13}@Ni{sub 42}, while two-shell Ni{sub 13}@Cu{sub 42} is more stable than three-shell Cu@Ni{sub 12}@Cu{sub 42}. Analysis of Bader charge illustrates that the charge transfer increases from Cu core to Ni shell in Cu@Ni NPs, while it decreases from Ni core to Cu shell in Ni@Cu NPs. Furthermore, the charge transfer results that d-band states have larger shift toward the Fermi level for the Ni@Cu CSNPs with Cu surface shell, while the Cu@Ni CSNPs with Ni surface shell have similar d-band state curves and d-band centers with the monometallic Ni NPs. In addition, the Cu–Ni CSNPs possess higher magnetic moment when the Ni atoms aggregated at core region of CSNPs, while having lower magnetic moment when the Ni atoms segregate on surface region. The change of the Cu atom location in CSNPs has a weak effect on the total magnetic moment. Our findings provide useful insights for the design of bimetallic core–shell catalysts.

  10. Crystal Structure and Morphology Dependence of the Phase of Mollusc Shell: A Case Study of XRD, SEM and ESR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siriprom, W [Faculty of Resources and Environment, Kasetsart University, Sriracha Campus, Chonburi, 20230 (Thailand); Kaewkhao, J [Center of Excellence in Glass Technology and Materials Science (CEGM), Nakhon Pathom Rajabhat University, 73000 (Thailand); Phachana, K [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Burapha University, Chonburi, 20131 (Thailand); Limsuwan, P, E-mail: mink110@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand)

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the physical properties in the Paphia undulate and Amusium pleuronectes shells collected from the coastal area of Chonburi province, Thailand. The crystal structure of the shells was studied by x-ray diffraction (XRD). The XRD patterns spectra reveal that the Paphia undulate shells and Amusium pleuronectes shells are made of a pure aragonite phase, and a mixture phase of aragonite and calcite, respectively, the identification and quantitative analysis were performed by using the Rietveld method. In this study, we also used the scanning electron microscope (SEM) to study the Morphology of the Paphia undulate shells and Amusium pleuronectes shells. The results on SEM micrographs agree well with those of XRD. In addition, the ions in the shell samples were also studied by Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy (ESR). The ESR spectra show that the samples of both shells were consisting of Mn{sup 2+} ions. The pattern of the ESR spectrum is thus strongly influenced by the environment of the paramagnetic ions, and then it can be used to identification of crystal structure of mollusc shell

  11. Ionic core–shell dendrimers with a polycationic core: structural aspects and host–guest binding properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Coevering, R.; Bruijnincx, P.C.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/33799529X; Lutz, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304828971; Spek, A.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/156517566; van Koten, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073839191; Klein Gebbink, R.J.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/166032646

    2007-01-01

    The structural aspects and host–guest binding properties of ionic core–shell dendrimers [1]Br8 and [2]Br4, which bear a polycationic core and a neutral shell of Fréchet-type poly(benzyl aryl ether) dendrons, have been investigated by means of dendritic wedges [3]Br2 and [4]Br, that resemble one of

  12. Rational Integration of Inbuilt Aperture with Mesoporous Framework in Unusual Asymmetrical Yolk-Shell Structures for Energy Storage and Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ting; Zhu, Liangliang; Wang, Jing; Ho, Ghim Wei

    2016-12-07

    Despite the attractive benefits of hollow structures as electrodes for advanced energy storage-conversion capabilities, one prevailing shortcoming is their compromised structural integrity and volumetric energy density due to the introduction of an ultrathin shell with an excessively underutilized large hollow cavity. Herein, we report a facile and template-free synthetic route to realize unusual asymmetrical yolk-shell (AYs) structures composed of mixed-valence NiCo2O4 material. Explicitly, this work highlights the unusual off-central core, an AYs structure that encompasses a hemispherical hollow interior, and a mesoporous solid counterpart. As such, it retains desirable hollow structural characteristics while favorably precludes the excessive unexploited hollow interior space for increased active material packing. Unlike the conventional symmetrical yolk-shell (SYs) which is composed of a porous shell framework radially throughout the structure, the mesoporous solid constitution of the AYs structure offers an inbuilt reinforced framework to support the partial porous shell and concurrently leaves sufficient void for volumetric buffering. Another unique structural feature of the AYs structure is the formation of a submicron aperture or opening on the shell that enhances accessibility of electrolyte diffusion. All of these synergistic structural features of NiCo2O4 AYs structures enhance the pseudocapacitive and electrocatalytic properties.

  13. G33.6 + 0.1 - A shell type supernova remnant with unusual structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velusamy, T.; Becker, R. H.; Seward, F. D.

    1991-01-01

    The morphology of Supernova Remnant G33.6 + 0.1 (Kes 79) has been studied in the X-rays with Einstein and in the radio wavelengths using the VLA. Multifrequency high resolution observations of the VLA at 327, 1500, and 5000 MHz are used to study the radio spectrum and polarization. The radio emission shows well formed outer shell structure and very bright central emission. Although the overall distribution of spectral index (about -0.6 to -0.75) is consistent with that of shell type remnants, the bright filamentary emission along the 'inner ring' has relatively flatter spectrum (alpha about -0.4). Both radio and X-rays show strong central emission; existence of a plerion near the center cannot be ruled out. The X-ray image does not show the characteristic limb brightening for shell type SNRs. The X-ray and radio morphology may be understood in terms of very thick shell and the bright central emission as due to reverse shock.

  14. Selected optical properties of core/shell ZnMnTe/ZnO nanowire structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gas, Katarzyna; Janik, Elzbieta; Zaleszczyk, Wojciech; Dynowska, Elzbieta; Kutrowski, Miroslaw; Wachnicki, Lukasz; Wojciechowski, Tomasz; Guziewicz, Elzbieta; Wojtowicz, Tomasz; Szuszkiewicz, Wojciech [Institute of Physics, PAS, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Kaminska, Agnieszka; Holyst, Robert [Institute of Physical Chemistry, PAS, ul. Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Morhange, Jean-Francois [Institut des Nanosciences de Paris, CNRS UMR 7588, UMPC, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); Godlewski, Marek [Institute of Physics, PAS, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Department of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, College of Sciences UKSW, Dewajtis 5, 01-815 Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-07-15

    We report here on selected optical properties of core/shell Zn{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te/ZnO nanowires (NWs). The Zn{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te cores of the investigated structures (containing from 3.5 to 7% of Mn) were grown by the MBE technique using gold-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. Polycrystalline ZnO shells coating Zn{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te NWs were overgrown by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) method. Core/shell NWs were then examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman scattering, and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The lines characteristic of the ZnO band edge emission and the intra-Mn{sup 2+} transition were observed in the PL spectra. Modification of the Raman spectra of as-grown Zn{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te samples induced by the ZnO shell is demonstrated and discussed. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Emergence of a thin shell structure during collapse in isotropic coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchesne, Hugues; Edery, Ariel

    2012-02-01

    Numerical studies of gravitational collapse in isotropic coordinates have recently shown an interesting connection between the gravitational Lagrangian and black hole thermodynamics. A study of the actual spacetime was not the main focus of this work and, in particular, the rich and interesting structure of the interior has not been investigated in much detail and remains largely unknown. We elucidate its features by performing a numerical study of the spacetime in isotropic coordinates during gravitational collapse of a massless scalar field. The most salient feature to emerge is the formation of a thin shell of matter just inside the apparent horizon. The energy density and Ricci scalar peak at the shell and there is a jump discontinuity in the extrinsic curvature across the apparent horizon, the hallmark that a thin shell is present in its vicinity. At late stages of the collapse, the spacetime consists of two vacuum regions separated by the thin shell. The interior is described by an interesting collapsing isotropic universe. It tends towards a vacuum (never reaches a perfect vacuum) and there is a slight inhomogeneity in the interior that plays a crucial role in the collapse process as the areal radius tends to zero. The spacetime evolves towards a curvature (physical) singularity in the interior, both a Weyl and Ricci singularity. In the exterior, our numerical results match closely the analytical form of the Schwarzschild metric in isotropic coordinates, providing a strong test of our numerical code.

  16. Nonobservable nature of the nuclear shell structure: Meaning, illustrations, and consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguet, T.; Hergert, H.; Holt, J. D.; Somà, V.

    2015-09-01

    Background: The concept of single-nucleon shells constitutes a basic pillar of our understanding of nuclear structure. Effective single-particle energies (ESPEs) introduced by French [Proceedings of the International School of Physics "Enrico Fermi," Course XXXVI, Varenna 1965, edited by C. Bloch (Academic Press, New York, 1966)] and Baranger [Nucl. Phys. A 149, 225 (1970), 10.1016/0375-9474(70)90692-5] represent the most appropriate tool to relate many-body observables to a single-nucleon shell structure. As briefly discussed in Duguet and Hagen [Phys. Rev. C 85, 034330 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevC.85.034330], the dependence of ESPEs on one-nucleon transfer probability matrices makes them purely theoretical quantities that "run" with the nonobservable resolution scale λ employed in the calculation. Purpose: Given that ESPEs provide a way to interpret the many-body problem in terms of simpler theoretical ingredients, the goal is to specify the terms, i.e., the exact sense and conditions, in which this interpretation can be conducted meaningfully. Methods: While the nuclear shell structure is both scale and scheme dependent, the present study focuses on the former. A detailed discussion is provided to illustrate the scale (in)dependence of observables and nonobservables and the reasons why ESPEs, i.e., the shell structure, belong to the latter category. State-of-the-art multireference in-medium similarity renormalization group and self-consistent Gorkov Green's function many-body calculations are employed to corroborate the formal analysis. This is done by comparing the behavior of several observables and of nonobservable ESPEs (and spectroscopic factors) under (quasi) unitary similarity renormalization group transformations of the Hamiltonian parametrized by the resolution scale λ . Results: The formal proofs are confirmed by the results of ab initio many-body calculations in their current stage of implementation. In practice, the unitarity of the similarity

  17. Modified Anderson orthogonality catastrophe power law in the presence of shell structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandopadhyay, Swarnali; Hentschel, Martina

    2011-01-01

    We study Anderson orthogonality catastrophe (AOC) for parabolic quantum dots and focus on the effects of degeneracies, realized through the inherent shell structure of their energy levels that can be lifted through an external magnetic field, on the Anderson overlap. We find rich and interesting behaviors as a function of the strength and position of the perturbation, the system size, and the applied magnetic field. In particular, even for weak perturbations, we observe a pronounced AOC that is related to the degeneracy of energy levels. Most importantly, the power-law decay of the Anderson overlap as a function of the number of particles is modified in comparison to the metallic case due to the rearrangement of the energy-level shell structure. We support our analytical results by numerical calculations and also study the distribution of Anderson overlaps.

  18. Cars submerged in water.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    Crashes in which cars are submerged in deep water or in a ditch are often complicated and serious. Considering their severity and the fact that approximately half the fatalities in this crash type are not due to drowning but to injury, preventive measures are to be preferred above measures that have

  19. Surface Plasmon Resonance from Bimetallic Interface in Au?Ag Core?Shell Structure Nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu Jian

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Transverse surface plasmon resonances (SPR) in Au–Ag and Ag–Au core–shell structure nanowires have been investigated by means of quasi-static theory. There are two kinds of SPR bands resulting from the outer surface of wall metal and the interface between core and wall metals, respectively. The SPR corresponding to the interface, which is similar to that of alloy particle, decreases and shifts obviously with increasing the wall thickness. However, the SPR correspond...

  20. A Triangular Thin Shell Element for the Linear Analysis of Stiffened Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    Cantileaver Beam Example ...................................... 13 Twisted Beam .................................................. 14 Scordelis -Lo Roof...will relate the constants a, to ais, a, to the node rotations ply. From the theory of thin plates the curvature-displacement relationships are defined by...0.005399 -0.5 0.001735 -1.1 - 15 - Scordelis -Lo Roof The shell structure shown in figure 8 is a standard test problem [6]. Table 2 summarizes the maximum

  1. Alloy Cu₃Pt nanoframes through the structure evolution in Cu-Pt nanoparticles with a core-shell construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lin; Liu, Hui; Cui, Penglei; Peng, Zhijian; Zhang, Suojiang; Yang, Jun

    2014-09-18

    Noble metal nanoparticles with hollow interiors and customizable shell compositions have immense potential for catalysis. Herein, we present an unique structure transformation phenomenon for the fabrication of alloy Cu₃Pt nanoframes with polyhedral morphology. This strategy starts with the preparation of polyhedral Cu-Pt nanoparticles with a core-shell construction upon the anisotropic growth of Pt on multiply twinned Cu seed particles, which are subsequently transformed into alloy Cu₃Pt nanoframes due to the Kirkendall effect between the Cu core and Pt shell. The as-prepared alloy Cu₃Pt nanoframes possess the rhombic dodecahedral morphology of their core-shell parents after the structural evolution. In particular, the resulting alloy Cu₃Pt nanoframes are more effective for oxygen reduction reaction but ineffective for methanol oxidation reaction in comparison with their original Cu-Pt core-shell precursors.

  2. Evolution of Structure in Nuclei: Meditation by Sub-Shell Modifications and Relation to Binding Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casten, R. F.; Cakirli, R. B.

    2009-03-01

    Understanding the development of configuration mixing, coherence, collectivity, and deformation in nuclei is one of the crucial challenges in nuclear structure physics, and one which has become all the more important with the advent of next generation facilities for the study of exotic nuclei. We will discuss recent work on phase/shape transitional behavior in nuclei, and the role of changes in sub-shell structure in mediating such transitional regions. We will also discuss a newly found, much deeper, link between nuclear structure and nuclear binding energies.

  3. Damage identification in plate and shell structures by trilateration method using Lamb waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun P., Durai; C. N., Sathyanarayana; Raja, S.; V. P. S., Naidu

    2017-04-01

    A two-stage algorithm that detects and locates damages in thin walled structures using Lamb wave signals is proposed. Isotropic plate and shell structures with adhesively bonded piezoelectric transducers in circular and rectangular array patterns are considered. Lamb waves are generated and sensed by these transducers in pitch-catch mode, before and after making damages in the structure-under-test for baseline subtraction. In the damage identification process, first the correlation coefficient is determined using current and baseline signals. Further, the Trilateration method is adopted to locate the damage using parameters like Time-of-Flight and Group velocity from the damage-scattered Lamb wave signals.

  4. Optical and structural investigation of ZnO@ZnS core–shell nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, Efracio Mamani; Raubach, Cristiane W.; Gouvea, Rogério [CCAF, Instituto de Física e Matemática (IFM), Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Campus Capão do Leão PO Box 354, CEP: 96010970, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Longo, Elson [INCTMN-UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, P.O. Box 355, Araraquara 14801-907, SP (Brazil); Cava, Sergio [CCAF, Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnológico, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Rua Félix da Cunha 809, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Moreira, Mário L., E-mail: mlucio3001@gmail.com [CCAF, Instituto de Física e Matemática (IFM), Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Campus Capão do Leão PO Box 354, CEP: 96010970, Pelotas, RS (Brazil)

    2016-04-15

    In the present work, are reported the experimental study of ZnO@ZnS core–shell synthesised by a microwave-assisted solvothermal (MAS) method. Some synthesis parameters such as, time, precursor concentration and temperature were fixed. In order to investigate the effect of growing shell on the structural and optical properties, the samples were grown with two different solvent (water or ethylene glycol). The characterizations were performed by X-ray diffraction, absorption spectroscopy in the UV–vis range, scanning electron microscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The results show that both ZnO and ZnS diffractions are present for all samples, however the crystallinity degree of ZnS shell are too low. The better decorations of ZnS (shell) on the ZnO (core) are obtained for ethylene glycol (EG) solvent, which is verified through FE-SEM images of ZnO@ZnS (EG). On the other hand, non morphological solvent dependence was observed for ZnO multi-wires. Also the luminescent emission for decorated system in water were more intense and leads to form a type-II band alignment for ZnO@ZnS core–shell system. - Highlights: • Obtation of ZnO@ZnS decorated systens using different solvents by MAS methodology. • Growth solvent dependence of hexagonal and cubic phases for ZnS. • Potential application of ZnO@ZnS decorated nanostructures as replacement material for solar cells. • Control over band alignment between ZnO and ZnS.

  5. Structure and magnetic properties of irradiated Fe/Fe oxide core-shell nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCloy, John S.; Jiang, Weilin; Sundararajan, Jennifer A.; Qiang, You; Burks, Edward; Liu, Kai

    2013-04-25

    A cluster deposition method was used to produce a film of loosely aggregated particles of Fe-Fe3O4 core-shell nanoclusters with an 8 nm iron core size and 2 nm oxide shell thickness. The film of particles on a silicon substrate was irradiated with 5.5 MeV Si2+ ions to a fluence of 1016 cm-2 near room temperature, and computer simulations based on the SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) code show that the implanted Si species stops near the film-substrate interface. The ion irradiation creates a structural change in the film with corresponding chemical and magnetic changes. X-ray diffraction shows that the core size and chemistry stay the same but the shell becomes FeO that grows to a thickness of 17 nm. Helium ion microscopy shows that the previously separate particles have densified into a nearly continuous film. Major loop magnetic hysteresis measurements show a decrease in saturation magnetization that we attribute to the presence of the antiferromagnetic (AFM) FeO shell. First-order reversal curve measurements on the irradiated film performed with a vibrating sample magnetometer show that the AFM shell prevents the particles from interacting magnetically, leading to low coercivity from the iron core and little bias field from the core interactions. These results, and others reported previously on different compositions (Fe3O4 or FeO+Fe3N nanoclusters), show that the ion irradiation behavior of nanocluster films such as these depends strongly on the initial nanostructure and chemistry.

  6. Transformation of the matrix structure of shrimp shells during bacterial deproteination and demineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background After cellulose and starch, chitin is the third-most abundant biopolymer on earth. Chitin or its deacetylated derivative chitosan is a valuable product with a number of applications. It is one of the main components of shrimp shells, a waste product of the fish industry. To obtain chitin from Penaeus monodon, wet and dried shrimp shells were deproteinated with two specifically enriched proteolytic cultures M1 and M2 and decalcified by in-situ lactic acid forming microorganisms. The viscosity of biologically processed chitin was compared with chemically processed chitin. The former was further investigated for purity, structure and elemental composition by several microscopic techniques and 13C solid state NMR spectroscopy. Results About 95% of the protein of wet shrimp shells was removed by proteolytic enrichment culture M2 in 68 h. Subsequent decalcification by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) took 48 h. Deproteination of the same amount of dried shrimps that contained a 3 × higher solid content by the same culture was a little bit faster and was finished after 140 h. The viscosity of chitin was in the order of chemically processed chitin > bioprocessed chitin > commercially available chitin. Results revealed changes in fine structure and chemical composition of the epi-, exo- and endocuticle of chitin from shrimp shells during microbial deproteination and demineralization. From transmission electron microscopy (TEM) overlays and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) analysis, it was found that most protein was present in the exocuticle, whereas most chitin was present in the endocuticle. The calcium content was higher in the endocuticle than in the exocuticle.13C solid state NMR spectra of different chitin confirmed shell waste resulted in a chitin with high purity. Its viscosity was higher than that of commercially available chitin but lower than that of chemically prepared chitin in our lab. Nevertheless, the biologically processed chitin is a

  7. Colours and metallic sheen in beetle shells - A biomimetic search for material structuring principles causing light interference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker; Barfoed, Michael

    2008-01-01

    and it can reflect all colours of the spectrum. Another structure is the Bouligand structure that resembles cholesteric liquid crystals with a twist of layer directions reflecting circular polarized light. The colours of the transparent structures are structural colours caused by light interference...... that generate them. The metallic and bright colours of beetle shells are structural colours deriving from at least two different internal shell structures with different light reflecting properties. One nano-structure is the multilayer stack which is composed of layered pairs with different refractive indices...

  8. Core-shell structure dependent reactivity of Fe@Fe₂O₃ nanowires on aerobic degradation of 4-chlorophenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Zhihui; Gao, Zhiting; Zhang, Lizhi; He, Weiwei; Yin, Jun Jie

    2013-05-21

    In this study, core-shell Fe@Fe₂O₃ nanowires with different iron oxide shell thickness were synthesized through tuning water-aging time after the reduction of ferric ions with sodium borohydride without any stirring. We found that these Fe@Fe₂O₃ nanowires exhibited interesting core-shell structure dependent reactivity on the aerobic degradation of 4-chlorophenol. Characterization results revealed that the core-shell structure dependent aerobic oxidative reactivity of Fe@Fe₂O₃ nanowires was arisen from the combined effects of incrassated iron oxide shell and more surface bound ferrous ions on amorphous iron oxide shell formed during the water-aging process. The incrassated iron oxide shell would gradually block the outward electron transfer from iron core for the subsequent two-electron molecular oxygen activation, but more surface bound ferrous ions on iron oxide shell with prolonging aging time could favor the single-electron molecular oxygen activation, which was confirmed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy with spin trap technique. The mineralization of 4-chlorophenol was monitored by total organic carbon measurement and the oxidative degradation intermediates were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This study provides new physical insight on the molecular oxygen activation mechanism of nanoscale zerovalent iron and its application on aerobic pollutant removal.

  9. Structural Evolution of Core-Shell Gold Nanoclusters: Aun(-) (n = 42-50).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Seema; Huang, Wei; Shao, Nan; Wang, Lei-Ming; Khetrapal, Navneet; Mei, Wai-Ning; Jian, Tian; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-11-22

    Gold nanoclusters have attracted great attention in the past decade due to their remarkable size-dependent electronic, optical, and catalytic properties. However, the structures of large gold clusters are still not well-known because of the challenges in global structural searches. Here we report a joint photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and theoretical study of the structural evolution of negatively charged core-shell gold nanoclusters (Aun(-)) for n = 42-50. Photoelectron spectra of size-selected Aun(-) clusters are well resolved with distinct spectral features, suggesting a dominating structural type. The combined PES data and density functional calculations allow us to systematically identify the global minimum or candidates of the global minima of these relatively large gold nanoclusters, which are found to possess low-symmetry structures with gradually increasing core sizes. Remarkably, the four-atom tetrahedral core, observed first in Au33(-), continues to be highly robust and is even present in clusters as large as Au42(-). Starting from Au43(-), a five-atom trigonal bipyramidal core appears and persists until Au47(-). Au48(-) possesses a six-atom core, while Au49(-) and Au50(-) feature seven- and eight-atom cores, respectively. Notably, both Au46(-) and Au47(-) contain a pyramidal Au20 motif, which is stacked with another truncated pyramid by sharing a common 10-atom triangular face. The present study sheds light on our understanding of the structural evolution of the medium-sized gold nanoclusters, the shells and core as well as how the core-shell structures may start to embrace the golden pyramid (bulk-like) fragment.

  10. Structure elucidation and properties of different lignins isolated from acorn shell of Quercus variabilis Bl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yawei; Yang, Lina; Wang, Dongmei; Li, Dengwu

    2017-09-25

    Chemical and structure properties of Ethanol lignin (EL), alkali lignin (AL), milled wood lignin (MWL) and cellulase enzymatic lignin (CEL) extracted from acorn shell of Quercus variabilis Bl. was studied by GPC, TG, SEM, FT-IR, 13C NMR, DEPT-135 NMR, 2D-HSQC and functional groups measurement. Results indicated that AL had a lower quantity of ArOH (2.19mmol/g) in four lignin samples. TG results proved the existence of a less thermally stable domain within the lignin polymer. SEM, FT-IR, 13C NMR, DEPT-135 NMR and 2D-HSQC confirmed the lignin structural characters of the extracted samples, it was found that the relative content of β-O-4' linkage in MWL (51.15%) was lower than that of in EL(55.83%), AL (57.93%) and CEL (64.81%), suggesting that β-O-4' linkage was cleaved greatly during the milled wood lignin isolation process. AL had a higher S/G ratio than EL, MWL and CEL. The indentified substructures are plotted depended on the spectrogams. The differences in the composition of the lignin samples further supported that the deposition of lignin in the shell of Q. variabilis is inhomogeneous. In short, these findings will enhance our understanding of native lignin in acorn shell and theoretical foundation is laid for the further study of degradation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Synthesis and Microwave Absorption Properties of Core-Shell Structured Co3O4-PANI Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The core-shell structured Co3O4-PANI nanocomposites have been successfully prepared using an in situ polymerization method, while the core Co3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized by carbon-assisted method using degreasing cotton as a template. The obtained samples were characterized by XRD, TEM, FTIR, and XPS. The results indicated that the amorphous PANI was well covered on the surface of the spinel Co3O4 and the Co3O4-PANI with core-shell structure was formed with particle size of about 100 nm. The interfacial interaction of the core-shell nanocomposite greatly enhances the microwave absorption properties. The maximum reflection loss of Co3O4-PANI is up to −45.8 dB at 11.7 GHz with a thickness of 2.5 mm and the adsorption bandwidth with the reflection loss below −10 dB reaches 14.1 GHz ranging from 3.9 to 18 GHz when the thickness is between 2 and 5.5 mm. Therefore, the facilely synthesized and low-cost Co3O4-PANI nanocomposite with superior microwave absorption properties can be a promising nanomaterial for high efficient microwave absorption.

  12. Charge radii of magnesium isotopes by laser spectroscopy a structural study over the $sd$ shell

    CERN Multimedia

    Schug, M; Krieger, A R

    We propose to study the evolution of nuclear sizes and shapes over the magnesium chain by measuring the root-mean-square charge radii of $^{21 - 32}$Mg, essentially covering the entire $\\textit{sd}$ shell. Our goal is to detect the structural changes, which in the neutron-deficient isotopes may originate from clustering, in a way similar to neon, and on the neutron-rich side would characterize the transition to the "island of inversion". We will combine, for the first time, the sensitive $\\beta$-detection technique with traditional fluorescence spectroscopy for isotope-shift measurements and in such a way gain access to the exotic species near the ${N}$ = 8 and ${N}$ = 20 shell closures.

  13. Experimental and numerical modelling of ductile crack propagation in large-scale shell structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup; Törnquist, R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a combined experimental-numerical procedure for development and calibration of macroscopic crack propagation criteria in large-scale shell structures. A novel experimental set-up is described in which a mode-I crack can be driven 400 mm through a 20(+) mm thick plate under fully....... The applicability of the often-used equivalent strain criterion is discussed versus a more rationally based criterion which takes into account the stress tri-axiality. A large-scale grounding experiment is also simulated showing very good agreement with measurements. The performance of the proposed model...... is in general good and it is believed that the presented results and experimental-numerical calibration procedure can be of use in practical finite-element simulations of collision and grounding events with the use of shell elements. As discussed, the paper provides a clean framework for further development...

  14. Surface Plasmon Resonance from Bimetallic Interface in Au–Ag Core–Shell Structure Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Jian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transverse surface plasmon resonances (SPR in Au–Ag and Ag–Au core–shell structure nanowires have been investigated by means of quasi-static theory. There are two kinds of SPR bands resulting from the outer surface of wall metal and the interface between core and wall metals, respectively. The SPR corresponding to the interface, which is similar to that of alloy particle, decreases and shifts obviously with increasing the wall thickness. However, the SPR corresponding to the outer surface, which is similar to that of pure metal particle, increases and shifts slightly with increasing the wall thickness. A mechanism based on oscillatory surface electrons under coulombic attraction is developed to illuminate the shift fashion of SPR from bimetallic core–shell interface. The net charges and extra coulombic force in metallic wall affect the SPR energy and the shift fashion.

  15. Open structure ZnO/CdSe core/shell nanoneedle arrays for solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Open structure ZnO/CdSe core/shell nanoneedle arrays were prepared on a conducting glass (SnO2:F) substrate by solution deposition and electrochemical techniques. A uniform CdSe shell layer with a grain size of approximately several tens of nanometers was formed on the surface of ZnO nanoneedle cores after annealing at 400°C for 1.5 h. Fabricated solar cells based on these nanostructures exhibited a high short-circuit current density of about 10.5 mA/cm2 and an overall power conversion efficiency of 1.07% with solar illumination of 100 mW/cm2. Incident photo-to-current conversion efficiencies higher than 75% were also obtained. PMID:22995031

  16. Role of the first coordination shell in determining the equilibrium structure and dynamics of simple liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren; Dyre, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    The traditional view that the physical properties of a simple liquid are determined primarily by its repulsive forces was recently challenged by Berthier and Tarjus, who showed that in some cases ignoring the attractions leads to large errors in the dynamics [L. Berthier and G. Tarjus, Phys. Rev...... of the Kob-Andersen binary Lennard-Jones mixture. By varying the range of the forces via a shifted-forces cutoff, results for the thermodynamics, dynamics, and structure show that the determining factor for getting the correct statics and dynamics is not whether or not the attractive forces per se...... are included in the simulations. What matters is whether or not interactions are included from all particles within the first coordination shell – the attractive forces can thus be ignored, but only at extremely high densities. The recognition of the importance of a local shell in condensed fluids goes back...

  17. Transforming powder mechanical properties by core/shell structure: compressible sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Limin; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2010-11-01

    Some active pharmaceutical ingredients possess poor mechanical properties and are not suitable for tableting. Using fine sand (silicon dioxide), we show that a core/shell structure, where a core particle (sand) is coated with a thin layer of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), can profoundly improve powder compaction properties. Sand coated with 5% PVP could be compressed into intact tablets. Under a given compaction pressure, tablet tensile strength increases dramatically with the amount of coating. This is in sharp contrast to poor compaction properties of physical mixtures, where intact tablets cannot be made when PVP content is 20% or less. The profoundly improved tabletability of core/shell particles is attributed to the formation of a continuous three-dimensional bonding network in the tablet. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  18. Quantum well engineering in InGaN/GaN core-shell nanorod structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, C. G.; Le Boulbar, E. D.; Coulon, P.-M.; Edwards, P. R.; Gîrgel, I.; Allsopp, D. W. E.; Shields, P. A.; Martin, R. W.

    2017-10-01

    We report the ability to control relative InN incorporation in InGaN/GaN quantum wells (QWs) grown on the semi-polar and non-polar facets of a core-shell nanorod LED structure by varying the growth conditions. A study of the cathodoluminescence emitted from series of structures with different growth temperatures and pressures for the InGaN QW layer revealed that increasing the growth pressure had the effect of increasing InN incorporation on the semi-polar facets, while increasing the growth temperature improves the uniformity of light emission from the QWs on the non-polar facets.

  19. Analysis of shell-type structures subjected to time-dependent mechanical and thermal loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simitses, G. J.

    1989-01-01

    The objective is to develop a general mathematical model and solution methodologies for analyzing structural response of thin, metallic shell-type structures under large transient, cyclic, or static thermomechanical loads. Among the system responses, which are associated with these load conditions, are thermal buckling, creep buckling, and racheting. Thus, geometric as well as material-type nonlinearities (of high order) can be anticipated and must be considered in the development of the mathematical model. Furthermore, this must also be accommodated in the solution procedures.

  20. Ply-based Optimization of Laminated Composite Shell Structures under Manufacturing Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rene; Lund, Erik

    2012-01-01

    This work concerns a new ply-based parameterization for performing simultaneous material selection and topology optimization of fiber reinforced laminated composite structures while ensuring that a series of different manufacturing constraints are fulfilled. The material selection can either...... be performed on the basis of different materials, and/or consist of discrete selection of the same orthotropic material with different orientations of the fibers. The problem considered is the optimization of a general laminated composite shell structure with respect to maximum stiffness (minimum compliance...

  1. Atomic shell structures observed in photoionization spectra of nickel and cobalt clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vialle, J.L. [Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Lab. de Spectrometrie Ionique et Moleculaire; Pellarin, M. [Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Lab. de Spectrometrie Ionique et Moleculaire; Baguenard, B. [Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Lab. de Spectrometrie Ionique et Moleculaire; Lerme, J. [Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Lab. de Spectrometrie Ionique et Moleculaire; Broyer, M. [Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Lab. de Spectrometrie Ionique et Moleculaire

    1995-12-31

    Nickel and cobalt clusters have been studied by near threshold laser-photoionization and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. In the size domain from 50 up to 800 atoms, the mass distributions of the photoionized products look very similar for nickel and cobalt clusters. In both cases a regular structure is observed which is periodic on a N{sup 1/3} scale. It is found to be consistent with the filling of successive icosahedral shells of atoms. The recurring details of this structure agree with the so-called umbrellas model. (orig.)

  2. Comparison of Welding Residual Stresses of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding and Submerged Arc Welding in Offshore Steel Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen; Guerrero-Mata, Martha Patricia

    2016-01-01

    In the offshore industry, welding-induced distortion and tensile residual stresses have become a major concern in relation to the structural integrity of a welded structure. Particularly, the continuous increase in size of welded plates and joints needs special attention concerning welding induced residual stresses. These stresses have a negative impact on the integrity of the welded joint as they promote distortion, reduce fatigue life, and contribute to corrosion cracking and premature fail...

  3. Isostructural solid-solid phase transition in monolayers of soft core-shell particles at fluid interfaces: structure and mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Marcel; Fernández-Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Steinacher, Mathias; Scheidegger, Laura; Geisel, Karen; Richtering, Walter; Squires, Todd M; Isa, Lucio

    2016-04-21

    We have studied the complete two-dimensional phase diagram of a core-shell microgel-laden fluid interface by synchronizing its compression with the deposition of the interfacial monolayer. Applying a new protocol, different positions on the substrate correspond to different values of the monolayer surface pressure and specific area. Analyzing the microstructure of the deposited monolayers, we discovered an isostructural solid-solid phase transition between two crystalline phases with the same hexagonal symmetry, but with two different lattice constants. The two phases corresponded to shell-shell and core-core inter-particle contacts, respectively; with increasing surface pressure the former mechanically failed enabling the particle cores to come into contact. In the phase-transition region, clusters of particles in core-core contacts nucleate, melting the surrounding shell-shell crystal, until the whole monolayer moves into the second phase. We furthermore measured the interfacial rheology of the monolayers as a function of the surface pressure using an interfacial microdisk rheometer. The interfaces always showed a strong elastic response, with a dip in the shear elastic modulus in correspondence with the melting of the shell-shell phase, followed by a steep increase upon the formation of a percolating network of the core-core contacts. These results demonstrate that the core-shell nature of the particles leads to a rich mechanical and structural behavior that can be externally tuned by compressing the interface, indicating new routes for applications, e.g. in surface patterning or emulsion stabilization.

  4. Comparison of Welding Residual Stresses of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding and Submerged Arc Welding in Offshore Steel Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    In the offshore industry, welding-induced distortion and tensile residual stresses have become a major concern in relation to the structural integrity of a welded structure. Particularly, the continuous increase in size of welded plates and joints needs special attention concerning welding induced...... residual stresses. These stresses have a negative impact on the integrity of the welded joint as they promote distortion, reduce fatigue life, and contribute to corrosion cracking and premature failure in the weld components. This paper deals with the influence and impact of welding method on the welding...... induced residual stresses. It is also investigated whether the assumption of residual stresses up to yield strength magnitude are present in welded structures as stated in the design guidelines. The fatigue strength for welded joints is based on this assumption. The two welding methods investigated...

  5. Design, fabrication, and test of lightweight shell structure. [for application to the space tug design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    A cylindrical shell skirt structure was subjected to a design and analysis study using a wide variety of structural materials and concepts. The design loading, axial compression, and torsion is representative of that expected on a typical space tug skirt section. Structural concepts evaluated included honeycomb sandwich, truss, isogrid, and skin/stringer/frame. The materials considered included a wide variety of structural metals as well as glass, graphite, and boron-reinforced composites. Honeycomb sandwich with aluminum faceskins, honeycomb sandwich with graphite/epoxy faceskins, and aluminum truss with fiberglass meteoroid protection layers were the designs selected for further evaluation. Procurement of materials required for fabrication is reported and the structural test plan and fabrication drawings are included. Construction of the graphite/epoxy faceskins, chem mill of the aluminum faceskins, chem mill of aluminum truss components, and fabrication of the graphite/epoxy honeycomb sandwich development panel is also reported.

  6. Spherical shells buckling to the sound of music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Anna; Marthelot, Joel; Reis, Pedro

    We study how the critical buckling load of spherical elastic shells can be modified by a fluctuating external pressure field. In our experiments, we employ thin elastomeric shells of nearly uniform thickness fabricated by the coating of a hemispherical mold with a polymer solution, which upon curing yields elastic structures. A shell is submerged in a water bath and loaded quasi-statically until buckling occurs by reducing its inner volume with a syringe pump. Simultaneously, a plunger connected to an electromagnetic shaker is placed above the shell and driven sinusoidally to create a fluctuating external pressure field that can excite dynamic vibration modes of the shell. These dynamic modes induce effective compressive stresses, in addition to those from the inner pressure loading, which can modify the critical conditions for the onset of buckling. We systematically quantify how the frequency and amplitude of the external driving affects the buckling strength of our shells. In specific regions of the parameter space, we find that pressure fluctuations can result in large reductions of the critical buckling pressure. This is analogous to the classic knock-down effect in shells due to intrinsic geometric imperfections, albeit now in a way that can be controlled externally.

  7. Preparation and characterization of core-shell structure of SiO2@Cu antibacterial agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nianchun; Gao, Yanhong; Zhang, Hui; Feng, Xuan; Cai, Huaihong; Liu, Yingliang

    2010-12-01

    A simple, low cost and convenient method was used to prepare SiO2@Cu core-shell composite using SiO2 spheres as the core and copper nanoparticles as the shell. A uniform spherical particle of SiO2 was fabricated according to an improved Stöber method. The SiO2 spheres served as a support for the immobilization of copper by reducing Cu2+ in aqueous solution using Fe power. The chemical structures and morphologies of the SiO2 and SiO2@Cu composite were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). E. coli (Escherichia coli), S. aureus (Staphylococcus aureus) and C. albicans (Candida albicans) were utilized to test its antibacterial effect. Results of XRD, TEM and XPS demonstrated that the copper nanoparticles shell supported on the surface of SiO2 spheres. With regard to the antibacterial effect, E. coli was more easily killed than S. aureus and C. albicans after 24 h incubation, and the pictures of TEM showed obviously morphological changes of the antibacterial activity. The results demonstrated that Cu supported on the surface of SiO2 spheres without aggregation, which was proved to be a good novel antibacterial material. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Fluid-structure interaction for nonlinear response of shells conveying pulsatile flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubaldi, Eleonora; Amabili, Marco; Païdoussis, Michael P.

    2016-06-01

    Circular cylindrical shells with flexible boundary conditions conveying pulsatile flow and subjected to pulsatile pressure are investigated. The equations of motion are obtained based on the nonlinear Novozhilov shell theory via Lagrangian approach. The flow is set in motion by a pulsatile pressure gradient. The fluid is modeled as a Newtonian pulsatile flow and it is formulated using a hybrid model that contains the unsteady effects obtained from the linear potential flow theory and the pulsatile viscous effects obtained from the unsteady time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. A numerical bifurcation analysis employs a refined reduced order model to investigate the dynamic behavior. The case of shells containing quiescent fluid subjected to the action of a pulsatile transmural pressure is also addressed. Geometrically nonlinear vibration response to pulsatile flow and transmural pressure are here presented via frequency-response curves and time histories. The vibrations involving both a driven mode and a companion mode, which appear due to the axial symmetry, are also investigated. This theoretical framework represents a pioneering study that could be of great interest for biomedical applications. In particular, in the future, a more refined model of the one here presented will possibly be applied to reproduce the dynamic behavior of vascular prostheses used for repairing and replacing damaged and diseased thoracic aorta in cases of aneurysm, dissection or coarctation. For this purpose, a pulsatile time-dependent blood flow model is here considered by applying physiological waveforms of velocity and pressure during the heart beating period. This study provides, for the first time in literature, a fully coupled fluid-structure interaction model with deep insights in the nonlinear vibrations of circular cylindrical shells subjected to pulsatile pressure and pulsatile flow.

  9. Nickel Cobalt Sulfide core/shell structure on 3D Graphene for supercapacitor application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beka, Lemu Girma; Li, Xin; Liu, Weihua

    2017-05-18

    Three-dimensional (3D) core/shell structure of nickel cobalt sulfide is nano-engineered by using series of hydrothermal steps on a CVD grown graphene for supercapacitor application. This core/shell is composited of NiCo2S4 nanotube (NCS) as core and CoxNi(3-x)S2 (CNS) nanosheets as a shell. The as-synthesized composite exhibits excellent electrochemical properties by using the advantage of NCS nanontube core as superhighway for electron and ion transport, and CNS nanosheets shell as high active area pseudocapacitive material. The 3D graphene layer serves as excellent surface area to support 3D NCS/CNS; moreover, it provides excellent electrical conductivity between nickel foam current collector and the 3D NCS/NCS composite. Using these hybrid advantages the as-synthesized graphene/NCS/CNS composite electrode exhibits high areal capacitance of 15.6 F/cm2 at current density of 10 mA/cm2; excellent cycling stability of 93% after 5000 of cycles and excellent rate capability of 74.36% as current increase from 10 to 100 mA/cm2. Moreover, a prototype of asymmetric device fabricated using graphene/NCS/CNS as positive electrode and RGO as negative electrode exhibits high energy density of 23.9 Wh/kg and power density of 2460.6 W/kg at high operating current of 100 mA. Such high performance electrode material may get great application in future energy storage device.

  10. Site-specific carbon deposition for hierarchically ordered core/shell-structured graphitic carbon with remarkable electrochemical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yingying; Wu, Zhangxiong; Qian, Xufang; Fang, Yin; Feng, Dan; Xia, Yongyao; Tu, Bo; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2013-10-01

    A fascinating core-shell-structured graphitic carbon material composed of ordered microporous core and uniform mesoporous shell is fabricated for the first time through a site-specific chemical vapor deposition process by using a nanozeolite@mesostructured silica composite molecular sieve as the template. The mesostructure-directing agent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide in the shell of the template can be either burned off or carbonized so that it is successfully utilized as a pore switch to turn the shell of the template "on" or "off" to allow selective carbon deposition. The preferred carbon deposition process can be performed only in the inner microporous zeolite cores or just within the outer mesoporous shells, resulting in a zeolite-like ordered microporous carbon or a hollow mesoporous carbon. Full carbon deposition in the template leads to the new core-shell-structured microporous@mesoporous carbon with a nanographene-constructed framework for fast electron transport, a microporous nanocore with large surface area for high-capacity storage of lithium ions, a mesoporous shell with highly opened mesopores as a transport layer for lithium ions and electron channels to access inner cores. The ordered micropores are protected by the mesoporous shell, avoiding pore blockage as the formation of solid electrolyte interphase layers. Such a unique core-shell-structured microporous@mesoporous carbon material represents a newly established lithium ion storage model, demonstrating high reversible energy storage, excellent rate capability, and long cyclic stability. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Enhancing oxidative stability in heated oils using core/shell structures of collagen and α-tocopherol complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gim, Seo Yeong; Hong, Seungmi; Kim, Jisu; Kwon, YongJun; Kim, Mi-Ja; Kim, GeunHyung; Lee, JaeHwan

    2017-11-15

    In this study, collagen mesh structure was prepared by carrying α-tocopherol in the form of core/shell complex. Antioxidant properties of α-tocopherol loaded carriers were tested in moisture added bulk oils at 140°C. From one gram of collagen core/shell complex, 138mg α-tocopherol was released in medium chain triacylglycerol (MCT). α-Tocopherol was substantially protected against heat treatment when α-tocopherol was complexed in collagen core/shell. Oxidative stability in bulk oil was significantly enhanced by added collagen mesh structure or collagen core/shell complex with α-tocopherol compared to that in control bulk oils (pstructure and collagen core/shell with α-tocopherol (p>0.05). Results of DPPH loss in methanol demonstrated that collagen core/shell with α-tocopherol had significantly (pstructure up to a certain period. Therefore, collagen core/shell complex is a promising way to enhance the stability of α-tocopherol and oxidative stability in oil-rich foods prepared at high temperature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Preparation of core-shell structured T-ZnOw/polyaniline composites via graft polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xiaolang [Key laboratory of Advanced Materials Technology (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China)], E-mail: chenxl612@sina.com.cn; Zhou Zuowan [Key laboratory of Advanced Materials Technology (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China)], E-mail: zwzhou@swjtu.edu.cn; Lv Wangchun; Huang Ting; Hu Shuchun [Key laboratory of Advanced Materials Technology (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China)

    2009-05-15

    The tetra-needle like zinc oxide whisker (T-ZnOw) was treated with {gamma}-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS), a coupling agent of silane with amino-group, to form a protection and bonding layer on its surface, where polyaniline (PANI) was in situ polymerized to form a new kind of core-shell structured T-ZnOw/PANI composites. The structure, morphologies, and conductivity of the synthesized products were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, etc. The FTIR spectra reveal that the T-ZnOw is successfully modified by APTS and finally forms the T-ZnOw/PANI core-shell structure composites. The SEM results indicate surface modification plays distinct roles both for keeping the intactness of the morphology structure of T-ZnOw and for providing an in situ polymerization site on the surface of the T-ZnOw. The electrical conductivity of the PANI covered T-ZnOw is 7.2 x 10{sup -1} S cm{sup -1}, which appears much higher than that of the pure T-ZnOw.

  13. Magnetic properties and interaction mechanisms of iron-based core-shell structures prepared by sputtering at low substrate temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Villacorta, F; Prieto, C [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049-Madrid (Spain)

    2008-02-27

    The magnetic properties of partially oxidized nanocrystalline iron thin films prepared by DC-magnetron sputtering at low substrate temperatures in the 175-300 K range are studied. The preparation method is presented as a simple method for fabricating granular structures. Films prepared at intermediate temperatures exhibit granular magnetic behaviour, in which nanocrystalline grains act as almost decoupled particles, surrounded by an oxide shell, forming exchange bias core-shell systems. The magnetic features of granular systems obtained by this new method are described and the mechanisms of interaction between metallic grains and their oxide shells are explained, as are their effects in the magnetization reversal process.

  14. The Kernel and Shell Structure as a Tool for Improving the Graph of Transportation Connections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Mażbic-Kulma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A model of a transportation system is expected to be useful in simulations of a real system to solve given transportation tasks. A connection graph is routinely used to describe a transportation system. Vertices can be train stations, bus stops, airports etc. The edges show direct connections between vertices. A direct approach can be difficult and computational problems can arise in attempts to organize or optimize such a transportation system. Therefore, a method for aggregating such graphs was introduced, using a general kernel and shell structure and its particular instances: α-clique structured graphs of connections and a hub and spoke transformation of the source graph. These structures enable the concentration and ordering of transport between vertices and reduction of the analyzed graph. To obtain the desired structures, several versions of a specialized evolutionary algorithm were developed and applied. (original abstract

  15. Development of Mathematical Models and Computer Technologies for the Virtu al Destructive Testing of Shell Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.N. Shevchenko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The method for numerical investigation of the stress-strain state and the strength of thin-walled structural element in the process of loading by increasing internal pressure is elaborated. Constitutive equations of the theory of elasticplastic deformation of isotropic materials along the trajectories of small curvature, the relations of the theory of thin shells of revolution, the strength criteria, methods for solving of boundary value problems of plasticity and corresponding computer programs are used. Calculation results for the failure loading and experimental data confirmed the effectiveness of the developed mathematical model.

  16. Morphology and Oxide Shell Structure of Iron Nanoparticles Grown by Sputter-Gas-Aggregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chong M.; Baer, Donald R.; Amonette, James E.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Qiang, You; Antony, Jiji

    2007-06-27

    Much recent research effort has been made on the synthesis, characterization, and property evaluation of core-shell structured Fe nanoparticles. Fundamental properties of these particles depend on both their external crystal faceting planes and the nature of a protective oxide layer. In this paper, the crystal faceting planes and oxide coating structures of core-shell structured iron/iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized by a sputter-gas-aggregation process were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction and Wulff shape construction. The particles grown by this process and deposited on a support at room temperature process have been compared with particles grown and deposited at high temperature as reported in literature. Most synthesis processes produce round particles for particles less than 20 nm in diameter. For larger particles crystallographic facets are observed. It has been found that the Fe nanoparticles formed at RT are invariantly faceted on the {100} lattice planes and truncated by the {110} planes at different degrees. Substantial fraction of particles are confined only by the 6 {100} planes (not truncated by the {110} planes), this contrasts with the Fe particles formed at high temperature (HT) for which a predominance of {110} planes has been reported. Furthermore, at RT no particle was identified to be only confined by the 12 {110} planes which is relatively common for the particles formed at HT. The Fe cubes defined by the 6 {100} planes show a characteristic inward relaxation along the <100> and <110> directions and the reason for this behavior is not fully understood. The oxide shell on the Fe {100} plane maintains an orientation relationship: Fe(001)//Fe3O4(001) and Fe[100]//Fe3O4[110], which is same as the oxide formed on a bulk Fe(001) through thermal oxidation. Orientation of the oxide that forms on the Fe{110} facets differs from that on Fe{001}, therefore, properties of core-shell structured Fe nanoparticle

  17. Reinforcement of Natural Rubber with Core-Shell Structure Silica-Poly(Methyl Methacrylate) Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Qinghuang Wang; Yongyue Luo; Chunfang Feng; Zhifeng Yi; Quanfang Qiu; Kong, L. X.; Zheng Peng

    2012-01-01

    A highly performing natural rubber/silica (NR/SiO2) nanocomposite with a SiO2 loading of 2 wt% was prepared by combining similar dissolve mutually theory with latex compounding techniques. Before polymerization, double bonds were introduced onto the surface of the SiO2 particles with the silane-coupling agent. The core-shell structure silica-poly(methyl methacrylate), SiO2-PMMA, nanoparticles were formed by grafting polymerization of MMA on the surface of the modified SiO2 particles via in si...

  18. Shell supports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almegaard, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    A new statical and conceptual model for membrane shell structures - the stringer system - has been found. The principle was first published at the IASS conference in Copenhagen (OHL91), and later the theory has been further developed (ALMO3)(ALMO4). From the analysis of the stringer model it can...... be concluded that all membrane shells can be described by a limited number of basic configurations of which quite a few have free edges....

  19. The Corneoscleral Shell of the Eye: an Age-Related Analysis of Structural Biomechanical Properties. Literature review

    OpenAIRE

    E. N. Iomdina; S. Yu. Petrov; A. A. Аntonov; I. A. Novikov; I. A. Pahomova

    2016-01-01

    Structural biomechanical properties of the ocular corneoscleral shell largely determine its anatomic and optical parameters and its supporting and protective function. Therefore, changes related to age restructuring processes may affect the state of the cornea and the sclera, which should be taken into account in diagnosing eye diseases, especially age-related. According to actual literary data, age-related changes of the corneoscleral shell affecting its biomechanical properties involve all ...

  20. Progressive Fracture of Fiber Composite Thin Shell Structures Under Internal Pressure and Axial Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.; Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    1996-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy composite thin shell structures were simulated to investigate damage and fracture progression due to internal pressure and axial loading. Defective and defect-free structures (thin cylinders) were examined. The three different laminates examined had fiber orientations of (90/0/+/-0)(sub s), where 0 is 45, 60, and 75 deg. CODSTRAN, an integrated computer code that scales up constituent level properties to the structural level and accounts for all possible failure modes, was used to simulate composite degradation under loading. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture were included in the simulation. Burst pressures for defective and defect-free shells were compared to evaluate damage tolerance. The results showed that damage initiation began with matrix failure whereas damage and/or fracture progression occurred as a result of additional matrix failure and fiber fracture. In both thin cylinder cases examined (defective and defect-free), the optimum layup configuration was (90/0/+/-60)(sub s) because it had the best damage tolerance with respect to the burst pressure.

  1. Subscale and Full-Scale Testing of Buckling-Critical Launch Vehicle Shell Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Haynie, Waddy T.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Roberts, Michael G.; Norris, Jeffery P.; Waters, W. Allen; Herring, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    New analysis-based shell buckling design factors (aka knockdown factors), along with associated design and analysis technologies, are being developed by NASA for the design of launch vehicle structures. Preliminary design studies indicate that implementation of these new knockdown factors can enable significant reductions in mass and mass-growth in these vehicles and can help mitigate some of NASA s launch vehicle development and performance risks by reducing the reliance on testing, providing high-fidelity estimates of structural performance, reliability, robustness, and enable increased payload capability. However, in order to validate any new analysis-based design data or methods, a series of carefully designed and executed structural tests are required at both the subscale and full-scale level. This paper describes recent buckling test efforts at NASA on two different orthogrid-stiffened metallic cylindrical shell test articles. One of the test articles was an 8-ft-diameter orthogrid-stiffened cylinder and was subjected to an axial compression load. The second test article was a 27.5-ft-diameter Space Shuttle External Tank-derived cylinder and was subjected to combined internal pressure and axial compression.

  2. Yolk-shell structured Sb@C anodes for high energy Na-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Junhua; Yan, Pengfei; Luo, Langli; Qi, Xingguo; Rong, Xiaohui; Zheng, Jianming; Xiao, Biwei; Feng, Shuo; Wang, Chongmin; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Lin, Yuehe; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Li, Xiaolin

    2017-10-01

    Despite great advances in sodium-ion battery developments, the search for high energy and stable anode materials remains a challenge. Alloy or conversion-typed anode materials are attractive candidates of high specific capacity and low voltage potential, yet their applications are hampered by the large volume expansion and hence poor electrochemical reversibility and fast capacity fade. Here, we use antimony (Sb) as an example to demonstrate the use of yolk-shell structured anodes for high energy Na-ion batteries. The Sb@C yolk-shell structure prepared by controlled reduction and selective removal of Sb2O3 from carbon coated Sb2O3 nanoparticles can accommodate the Sb swelling upon sodiation and improve the structural/electrical integrity against pulverization. It delivers a high specific capacity of ~554 mAh•g-1, good rate capability (315 mhA•g-1 at 10C rate) and long cyclability (92% capacity retention over 200 cycles). Full-cells of O3-Na0.9[Cu0.22Fe0.30Mn0.48]O2 cathodes and Sb@C-hard carbon composite anodes demonstrate a high specific energy of ~130 Wh•kg-1 (based on the total mass of cathode and anode) in the voltage range of 2.0-4.0 V, ~1.5 times energy of full-cells with similar design using hard carbon anodes.

  3. Structure and Function of a Bacterial Microcompartment Shell Protein Engineered to Bind a [4Fe-4S] Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aussignargues, Clément; Pandelia, Maria-Eirini; Sutter, Markus; Plegaria, Jefferson S; Zarzycki, Jan; Turmo, Aiko; Huang, Jingcheng; Ducat, Daniel C; Hegg, Eric L; Gibney, Brian R; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2016-04-27

    Bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) are self-assembling organelles composed of a selectively permeable protein shell and encapsulated enzymes. They are considered promising templates for the engineering of designed bionanoreactors for biotechnology. In particular, encapsulation of oxidoreductive reactions requiring electron transfer between the lumen of the BMC and the cytosol relies on the ability to conduct electrons across the shell. We determined the crystal structure of a component protein of a synthetic BMC shell, which informed the rational design of a [4Fe-4S] cluster-binding site in its pore. We also solved the structure of the [4Fe-4S] cluster-bound, engineered protein to 1.8 Å resolution, providing the first structure of a BMC shell protein containing a metal center. The [4Fe-4S] cluster was characterized by optical and EPR spectroscopies; it has a reduction potential of -370 mV vs the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) and is stable through redox cycling. This remarkable stability may be attributable to the hydrogen-bonding network provided by the main chain of the protein scaffold. The properties of the [4Fe-4S] cluster resemble those in low-potential bacterial ferredoxins, while its ligation to three cysteine residues is reminiscent of enzymes such as aconitase and radical S-adenosymethionine (SAM) enzymes. This engineered shell protein provides the foundation for conferring electron-transfer functionality to BMC shells.

  4. [Synthesis and photoluminescent properties of core/shell structure ZnS : Mn/SiO2 nanocrystals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dai-Xun; Cao, Li-Xin; Liu, Wei; Su, Ge; Qu, Hua; Sun, Yuan-Guang; Dong, Bo-Hua

    2010-03-01

    Mn-doped ZnS nanopatricles synthesized by solvothermal method were successfully coated with SiO2 shells of various thicknesses by hydrolysis reaction of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS). The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy images (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the room temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra. When the ZnS : Mn nanoparticles were coated with SiO2 shells, an obvious increase in particle size and a clear shell of SiO2 can be observed. The XPS measurement also gave the evidence for the core/shell structure of ZnS : Mn/SiO2 nanoparticles. Because the surface modification effect and the decrease in luminescent centers effect are concurrent in the SiO2 shells, the Mn emission intensity first increased and then decreased with the thickening of the SiO2 shell. The intensity, which attained its maxium at 5 shell thickness, was as 7 times as that for the bare ZnS : Mn nanoparticles.

  5. Shell structure of natural rubber particles: evidence of chemical stratification by electrokinetics and cryo-TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochette, Christophe N; Crassous, Jérôme J; Drechsler, Markus; Gaboriaud, Fabien; Eloy, Marie; de Gaudemaris, Benoît; Duval, Jérôme F L

    2013-11-26

    The interfacial structure of natural rubber (NR) colloids is investigated by means of cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and electrokinetics over a broad range of KNO3 electrolyte concentrations (4-300 mM) and pH values (1-8). The asymptotic plateau value reached by NR electrophoretic mobility (μ) in the thin double layer limit supports the presence of a soft (ion- and water-permeable) polyelectrolytic type of layer located at the periphery of the NR particles. This property is confirmed by the analysis of the electron density profile obtained from cryo-TEM that evidences a ∼2-4 nm thick corona surrounding the NR polyisoprene core. The dependence of μ on pH and salt concentration is further marked by a dramatic decrease of the point of zero electrophoretic mobility (PZM) from 3.6 to 0.8 with increasing electrolyte concentration in the range 4-300 mM. Using a recent theory for electrohydrodynamics of soft multilayered particles, this "anomalous" dependence of the PZM on electrolyte concentration is shown to be consistent with a radial organization of anionic and cationic groups across the peripheral NR structure. The NR electrokinetic response in the pH range 1-8 is indeed found to be equivalent to that of particles surrounded by a positively charged ∼3.5 nm thick layer (mean dissociation pK ∼ 4.2) supporting a thin and negatively charged outermost layer (0.6 nm in thickness, pK ∼ 0.7). Altogether, the strong dependence of the PZM on electrolyte concentration suggests that the electrostatic properties of the outer peripheral region of the NR shell are mediated by lipidic residues protruding from a shell containing a significant amount of protein-like charges. This proposed NR shell interfacial structure questions previously reported NR representations according to which the shell consists of either a fully mixed lipid-protein layer, or a layer of phospholipids residing exclusively beneath an outer proteic film.

  6. Design, fabrication and test of lightweight shell structure. [axial compression loads and torsion stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lager, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    A cylindrical shell structure 3.66 m (144 in.) high by 4.57 m (180 in.) diameter was designed using a wide variety of materials and structural concepts to withstand design ultimate combined loading 1225.8 N/cm (700 lb/in.) axial compression and 245.2 N/cm (140 lb/in.) torsion. The overall cylinder geometry and design loading are representative of that expected on a high performance space tug vehicle. The relatively low design load level results in designs that use thin gage metals and fibrous-composite laminates. Fabrication and structural tests of small panels and components representative of many of the candidate designs served to demonstrate proposed fabrication techniques and to verify design and analysis methods. Three of the designs evaluated, honeycomb sandwich with aluminum faceskins, honeycomb sandwich with graphite/epoxy faceskins, and aluminum truss with fiber-glass meteoroid protection layers, were selected for further evaluation.

  7. Atomically Monodisperse Gold Nanoclusters Catalysts with Precise Core-Shell Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhan Sun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The emphasis of this review is atomically monodisperse Aun nanoclusters catalysts (n = number of metal atom in cluster that are ideally composed of an exact number of metal atoms. Aun which range in size from a dozen to a few hundred atoms are particularly promising for nanocatalysis due to their unique core-shell structure and non-metallic electronic properties. Aun nanoclusters catalysts have been demonstrated to exhibit excellent catalytic activity in hydrogenation and oxidation processes. Such unique properties of Aun significantly promote molecule activation by enhancing adsorption energy of reactant molecules on catalyst surface. The structural determination of Aun nanoclusters allows for a precise correlation of particle structure with catalytic properties and also permits the identification of catalytically active sites on the gold particle at an atomic level. By learning these fundamental principles, one would ultimately be able to design new types of highly active and highly selective gold nanocluster catalysts for a variety of catalytic processes.

  8. Synthesis, structural, and optical properties of type-II ZnO–ZnS core–shell nanostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sookhakian, M., E-mail: m.sokhakian@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Amin, Y.M. [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Basirun, W.J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Nanotechnology and Catalysis Research Centre (NanoCat), Institute of Postgraduate Studies, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Tajabadi, M.T. [Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Kamarulzaman, N. [Centre for Nanomaterials Research Institute of Science, Level 3 Block C (Old Engineering Building), Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-01-15

    We demonstrate a facile one-step method for the preparation of ZnO–ZnS core–shell type-II nanostructures, pure ZnS quantum dots and pure ZnO nanoparticles with different experimental conditions. Treatment with sodium hydroxide as a capping agent is investigated systematically during the synthesis of ZnS quantum dots (QDs). The thickness of the ZnS shell is controlled by the concentration of the sodium sulphide during the synthesis of ZnO–ZnS core–shell nanostructures. The morphology and structure of samples are verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The UV–vis absorption spectra of the pure ZnS QDs exhibit a blue shift in the absorption edge due to the quantum confinement effect. The PL emission spectra of the ZnO–ZnS core–shell nanostructure are compared with the ZnO nanoparticles. The ZnO–ZnS core–shell nanostructures show decrease in the UV and green emissions with the appearance of a blue emission, which are not found in the ZnO nanoparticles. -- Highlights: • It has synthesised ZnO–ZnS core–shell type II in one-step for the first time. • The as-synthesised samples were characterised by using XRD, UV–vis. • The photoluminescence properties of ZnO–ZnS core–shell was compared with ZnO. • The UV and green emission in the PL spectrum of ZnO–ZnS core–shell decreased. • The blue emission in the PL spectrum of ZnO–ZnS core–shell appeared.

  9. The role of Argopecten purpuratus shells structuring the soft bottom community in shallow waters of southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomovasky, Betina J.; Gamero, Patricia A.; Romero, Leonardo; Firstater, Fausto N.; Gamarra Salazar, Alex; Hidalgo, Fernando; Tarazona, Juan; Iribarne, Oscar O.

    2015-12-01

    Accumulation of Argopecten purpuratus shells often occurs after El Niño events in shallow waters of Independencia Bay (14°17‧S-76°10‧W; Pisco, Peru). Here we experimentally investigate the effects of their shell accumulation on macrobenthos assemblages in soft bottom, shallow areas of the bay. A field experiment (from May 2006 to May 2007), including four treatments with different coverage levels of empty shells of A. purpuratus, were randomly arranged in: (1) areas devoid of shells ("Empty" treatment: experimental control), (2) 50% of the plot area covered with shells haphazardly distributed over the bottom ("medium" treatment), (3) 100% of the plot area covered with shells, forming a 10 cm valve layer ("full" treatment) and (4) "natural control". We found a total of 124 taxa throughout the experiment. Polychaetes, crustaceans and mollusks were the most abundant groups in "natural controls", dominated by the gastropod Nassarius gayi and the polychaetes Prionospio peruana, Platynereis bicanaliculata and Mediomastus branchiferus. The abundance of individuals (N) and the species richness (S) were higher in the "medium" treatment, but only in one month under positive sea bottom thermal anomalies. Similarity analysis (Bray-Curtis) showed that "natural control", "empty" and "full" treatments were more similar among them than the "medium" treatment. Multidimensional analysis showed no clear species association among treatments and a higher grouping among the samplings of Jun-06, Aug-06 and Nov-06. Our results also showed that the commercial crab Romaleon polyodon and the polyplacophora Tonicia elegans were positively affected by shell accumulations ("medium" treatment), while the limpet Fissurella crassa was negatively affected. Our study shows that directly by changing habitat structure or indirectly by changing sediment characteristics, the addition of scallop shells to the soft bottom can modify the macrobenthic assemblage; however, the seasonal oceanographic

  10. Au@SiO2 core-shell structure involved with methotrexate: Fabrication, biodegradation process and bioassay explore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Xiaolei; Dai, Chaofan; Tian, Deying; Li, Shuping; Li, Xiaodong

    2015-12-30

    A new strategy is proposed to synthesize a kind of Au@SiO2 core-shell structure with methotrexate (MTX) loaded within it. Firstly, MTX molecules are attracted to the surface and vicinity of Au nanoparticles (NPs). Then the enriched MTX molecules on the surface of Au NPs have a good chance to be wrapped into the core-shell structure when SiO2 is uniformly deposited on the Au core. Secondly, the effect of Au amount and MTX content on the drug-loading capacity is emphatically studied and the result shows that core-shell structure plays a vital role in drug loading. In addition, the biodegradation process is also examined in phosphate buffer solution (PBS) at 37°C. The results show that the biodegradation of Au-MTX@SiO2 core-shell structure can be divided into two stages: the release of drug together with the fragmentation of core-shell structure and the subsequent dissolution of SiO2 layers. Lastly, in vitro bioassay tests give the evidence that obvious tumor inhibition can be achieved in presence of Au-MTX@SiO2 NPs even at low concentration and the efficacy can be greatly enhanced by the photothermal therapy on Au cores. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Versatile Core-Shell Nanoparticle@Metal-Organic Framework Nanohybrids: Exploiting Mussel-Inspired Polydopamine for Tailored Structural Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiajing; Wang, Peng; Wang, Chenxu; Goh, Yi Ting; Fang, Zheng; Messersmith, Phillip B; Duan, Hongwei

    2015-07-28

    We report a versatile strategy based on the use of multifunctional mussel-inspired polydopamine for constructing well-defined single-nanoparticle@metal-organic framework (MOF) core-shell nanohybrids. The capability of polydopamine to form a robust conformal coating on colloidal substrates of any composition and to direct the heterogeneous nucleation and growth of MOFs makes it possible for customized structural integration of a broad range of inorganic/organic nanoparticles and functional MOFs. Furthermore, the unique redox activity of polydopamine adds additional possibilities to tailor the functionalities of the nanohybrids by sandwiching plasmonic/catalytic metal nanostructures between the core and shell via localized reduction. The core-shell nanohybrids, with the molecular sieving effect of the MOF shell complementing the intrinsic properties of nanoparticle cores, represent a unique class of nanomaterials of considerable current interest for catalysis, sensing, and nanomedicine.

  12. Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Phosphate Ion in Water: Insights into Solvation Shell Structure, Dynamics, and Kosmotropic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bikramjit; Chandra, Amalendu

    2017-11-22

    The structure and dynamics of solvation shells of the phosphate ion in deuterated water are studied by means of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulation. The total number of molecules in the first and second solvation shells is found to be close to the effective hydration number reported experimentally. The OD bonds that are hydrogen bonded to the phosphate ion are found to be red shifted as compared to bulk water, which is consistent with experimental results. However, the two OD bonds of the same water molecule in the first hydration shell are found to be vibrationally distinct, which can be attributed to different strengths of the ion-water and water-water hydrogen bonds near the ion. Also, the hydrogen bonds formed by the second solvation shell OD bonds are somewhat stronger than the bulk. This finding shows a long ranged effect of the phosphate ion on water and also gives insights into the water structure making property of this anion. The dynamics of water in the first solvation shell is found to be significantly slower than that of the bulk. We have investigated the origin of the orientational slowing down of the first solvation shell water molecules and made connections to similar results observed experimentally.

  13. Optimization of submerged vane parameters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Submerged vanes are airfoils which are in general placed at certain angle with respect to the flow direction in a channel to induce artificial circulations downstream. By virtue of these artificially generated circulations, submerged vanes were utilized to protect banks of rivers against erosion, to control shifting of rivers, to avoid ...

  14. Optimization of submerged vane parameters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H Sharma

    velocities simulated from CFD using standard k-x model were very much in accordance with what it was measured by Wang and Odgaard [4]. Thus, model can be used to study the turbulence characteristics around submerged vanes and to predict various parameters downstream of the submerged vanes. After the model ...

  15. In situ preparation and protein delivery of silicate-alginate composite microspheres with core-shell structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chengtie; Fan, Wei; Gelinsky, Michael; Xiao, Yin; Chang, Jiang; Friis, Thor; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2011-12-07

    The efficient loading and sustained release of proteins from bioactive microspheres remain a significant challenge. In this study, we have developed bioactive microspheres which can be loaded with protein and then have a controlled rate of protein release into a surrounding medium. This was achieved by preparing a bioactive microsphere system with core-shell structure, combining a calcium silicate (CS) shell with an alginate (A) core by a one-step in situ method. The result was to improve the microspheres' protein adsorption and release, which yielded a highly bioactive material with potential uses in bone repair applications. The composition and the core-shell structure, as well as the formation mechanism of the obtained CS-A microspheres, were investigated by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometer dot and line-scanning analysis. The protein loading efficiency reached 75 per cent in CS-A microspheres with a core-shell structure by the in situ method. This is significantly higher than that of pure A or CS-A microspheres prepared by non-in situ method, which lack a core-shell structure. CS-A microspheres with a core-shell structure showed a significant decrease in the burst release of proteins, maintaining sustained release profile in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at both pH 7.4 and 4.3, compared with the controls. The protein release from CS-A microspheres is predominantly controlled by a Fickian diffusion mechanism. The CS-A microspheres with a core-shell structure were shown to have improved apatite-mineralization in simulated body fluids compared with the controls, most probably owing to the existence of bioactive CS shell on the surface of the microspheres. Our results indicate that the core-shell structure of CS-A microspheres play an important role in enhancing protein delivery and mineralization, which makes these composite materials promising candidates for application in bone tissue

  16. Optimal Sensor Placement for Latticed Shell Structure Based on an Improved Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimal sensor placement is a key issue in the structural health monitoring of large-scale structures. However, some aspects in existing approaches require improvement, such as the empirical and unreliable selection of mode and sensor numbers and time-consuming computation. A novel improved particle swarm optimization (IPSO algorithm is proposed to address these problems. The approach firstly employs the cumulative effective modal mass participation ratio to select mode number. Three strategies are then adopted to improve the PSO algorithm. Finally, the IPSO algorithm is utilized to determine the optimal sensors number and configurations. A case study of a latticed shell model is implemented to verify the feasibility of the proposed algorithm and four different PSO algorithms. The effective independence method is also taken as a contrast experiment. The comparison results show that the optimal placement schemes obtained by the PSO algorithms are valid, and the proposed IPSO algorithm has better enhancement in convergence speed and precision.

  17. Preparation, and Luminescence Properties of SiO2@Sm(MABA-Siphen Core-Shell Structure Nanometer Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Li-Na

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel ternary samarium complex was prepared using HOOCC6H4N(CONH(CH23Si- (OCH2CH332 (MABA-Si as first ligand, and phen as second ligand. The corresponding SiO2@Sm(MABA-Siphen core-shell structure nanometer composite was synthesized as well, and the silica spheres was the core, and the ternary samarium complex was the shell layer. The ternary samarium complex has been characterized by element analysis, molar conductivity and IR spectra. The results show that the chemical formula of the complex is Sm(MABA-Si(phen2(ClO43·2H2O. The fluorescent spectra illustrat that the luminescence properties of the samarium complex are superior. The core-shell structure of SiO2@Sm(MABA-Siphen nanometer composite is characterized by SEM, TEM and IR spectra. The SiO2@Sm(MABA-Siphen core-shell structure composites exhibit stronger emission intensity than the ternary samarium complex. The fluorescence lifetime of the complex and core-shell structure composite is measured as well.

  18. Load requirements for maintaining structural integrity of Hanford single-shell tanks during waste feed delivery and retrieval activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JULYK, L.J.

    1999-09-22

    This document provides structural load requirements and their basis for maintaining the structural integrity of the Hanford Single-Shell Tanks during waste feed delivery and retrieval activities. The requirements are based on a review of previous requirements and their basis documents as well as load histories with particular emphasis on the proposed lead transfer feed tanks for the privatized vitrification plant.

  19. Core/shell nano-structuring of metal oxide semiconductors and their photocatalytic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, S.; Rakkesh, R. Ajay

    2013-02-01

    Core/Shell Nanostructures of Metal Oxide Semiconductors (MOS) have attracted much attention because of their most fascinating tunable applications. These core shell morphologies can be easily engineered to enhance the unique properties of the metal-oxide nanostructures, which make them suitable as photocatalyst due to their high catalytic activity, substantial stability, and brilliant perspective in applications. This paper provides an overview on our work on the synthesis of some interesting core/ shell nanostructures of MOS such as ZnO-TiO2, ZnO-MoO3, and V2O5-TiO2 using a low temperature wet chemical route and hydrothermal techniques and their photocatalytic properties from the aspects of different shell materials and shell thicknesses. The effect of process parameters such as pH, temperature, and ratio of core and shell materials, was systematically studied. Here the evidence for the core shell formation with different shell thicknesses came from the X-ray diffraction peak intensities. The shell thickness variation was also confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopic studies. Effect of shell thickness on optical band gap of the core shell fabricated was also investigated using DRS UV-Visible spectroscopy. A comprehensive study was carried out for the photocatalytic efficiency of core shell nanostructures by evaluating the photo-degradation of Acridine Orange (AO) dye in aqueous solution under visible and solar light irradiations. These results offered simple approaches to the nanoscale engineering and synthesis of MOS hybrid systems to serve as better photocatalytic materials.

  20. The importance of inner-shell electronic structure for enhancing the EUV absorption of photoresist materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closser, Kristina D; Ogletree, D Frank; Naulleau, Patrick; Prendergast, David

    2017-04-28

    In order to increase computation power and efficiency, the semiconductor industry continually strives to reduce the size of features written using lithographic techniques. The planned switch to a shorter wavelength extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source presents a challenge for the associated photoresists, which in their current manifestation show much poorer photoabsorption cross sections for the same dose. Here we consider the critical role that an inner-shell electronic structure might play in enhancing photoabsorption cross sections, which one can control by the choice of substituent elements in the photoresist. In order to increase the EUV sensitivity of current photoresists, it is critical to consider the inner-shell atomic structure of the elements that compose the materials. We validate this hypothesis using a series of halogenated organic molecules, which all have similar valence structures, but differ in the character of their semi-core and deep valence levels. Using various implementations of time-dependent density functional theory, the absorption cross sections are computed for the model systems of CH3X, X = H, OH, F, Cl, Br, I, as well as a representative polymer fragment: 2-methyl-phenol and its halogenated analogues. Iodine has a particularly high cross section in the EUV range, which is due to delayed absorption by its 4d electrons. The computational results are compared to standard database values and experimental data when available. Generally we find that the states that dominate the EUV oscillator strength are generated by excitations of deep valence or semi-core electrons, which are primarily atomic-like and relatively insensitive to the specific molecular structure.

  1. Submerged AUV Charging Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A.; Chao, Yi; Curtin, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) are becoming increasingly important for military surveillance and mine detection. Most AUVs are battery powered and have limited lifetimes of a few days to a few weeks. This greatly limits the distance that AUVs can travel underwater. Using a series of submerged AUV charging stations, AUVs could travel a limited distance to the next charging station, recharge its batteries, and continue to the next charging station, thus traveling great distances in a relatively short time, similar to the Old West “Pony Express.” One solution is to use temperature differences at various depths in the ocean to produce electricity, which is then stored in a submerged battery. It is preferred to have the upper buoy submerged a reasonable distance below the surface, so as not to be seen from above and not to be inadvertently destroyed by storms or ocean going vessels. In a previous invention, a phase change material (PCM) is melted (expanded) at warm temperatures, for example, 15 °C, and frozen (contracted) at cooler temperatures, for example, 8 °C. Tubes containing the PCM, which could be paraffin such as pentadecane, would be inserted into a container filled with hydraulic oil. When the PCM is melted (expanded), it pushes the oil out into a container that is pressurized to about 3,000 psi (approx equals 20.7 MPa). When a valve is opened, the high-pressure oil passes through a hydraulic motor, which turns a generator and charges a battery. The low-pressure oil is finally reabsorbed into the PCM canister when the PCM tubes are frozen (contracted). Some of the electricity produced could be used to control an external bladder or a motor to the tether line, such that depth cycling is continued for a very long period of time. Alternatively, after the electricity is generated by the hydraulic motor, the exiting low-pressure oil from the hydraulic motor could be vented directly to an external bladder on the AUV, such that filling of the bladder

  2. Pump Coastdown with the Submerged Flywheel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyun-Gi; Seo, KyoungWoo; Kim, Seong Hoon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Many research reactors are generally designed as open pool types in consideration of the heat removal of the nuclear fuels, reactor operation and accessibility. Reactor structure assembly is generally placed at the pool bottom as shown in Fig. 1. Primary cooling system pump circulates the coolant from the reactor structure to the heat exchanger in order to continuously remove the heat generated from the reactor core in the research reactor as shown in Fig. 1. The secondary cooling system releases the transferred heat to the atmosphere by the cooling tower. Coastdown flow rate of the primary cooling system pump with the submerged flywheel are calculated analytically in case of the accident situation. Coastdown flow rate is maintained until almost 80 sec when the pump stops normally. But, coastdown flow rate is rapidly decreased when the flywheel is submerged because of the friction load on the flywheel surface.

  3. Wear Resistance and Mechanical Behaviour of Epoxy/Mollusk Shell Biocomposites developed for Structural Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.O. Oladele

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Epoxy resin is one of the strongest commercially exploitable thermosetting polymers in the polymer family; however its expensive nature in comparison with other thermosetting polymers such as vinylester and polyester limits its applications as a structural material. Inexpensive fillers on the other hand, especially those derived from agro-industrial wastes are very important in reducing the overall cost of polymer composites and furthermore influential in enhancing some of their engineering properties. In the present study, the wear resistance and mechanical behaviour of epoxy polymer matrix filled with <75 and 75 μm calcined particles of African land snail shells have been comparatively investigated. The wear resistance and the mechanical behaviour of the composites were studied via Taber Abraser and INSTRON universal testing machine. Also, the elemental constituents of the calcined snail shell and the epoxy biocomposites were characterized by X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersion Spectroscopy. From the experimental results, it was observed that, at the highest filler loading, smaller particle size presented a biocomposite with significant enhancement in wear and mechanical properties. However, it was also observed that increase in particle size showed no significant enhancement in the mechanical properties of the biocomposites.

  4. Using High-Fidelity Analysis Methods and Experimental Results to Account for the Effects of Imperfections on the Buckling Response of Composite Shell Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2003-01-01

    The results of an experimental and analytical study of the effects of initial imperfections on the buckling response of unstiffened thin-walled compression-loaded graphite-epoxy cylindrical shells are presented. The analytical results include the effects of traditional and nontraditional initial imperfections and uncertainties in the values of selected shell parameters on the buckling loads of the shells. The nonlinear structural analysis results correlate very well with the experimental results. The high-fidelity nonlinear analysis procedure used to generate the analytical results can also be used to form the basis of a new shell design procedure that could reduce the traditional dependence on empirical results in the shell design process. KEYWORDS: high-fidelity nonlinear structural analysis, composite shells, shell stability, initial imperfections

  5. Incipient motion of sediment in presence of submerged flexible vegetation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hao; Tang, Hong-Wu; Zhao, Han-Qing; Xuan-yu ZHAO; Lü, Sheng-qi

    2015-01-01

    The presence of submerged vegetation on river beds can change the water flow structure and alter the state of sediment motion. In this study, the incipient motion of sediment in the presence of submerged flexible vegetation in open channels was investigated in a laboratory experiment. The vegetation was simulated with flexible rubber cylinders arranged in parallel arrays. The effect of the vegetation density, water depth, and sediment grain size on the incipient motion was investigated. The e...

  6. Explicit Dynamic Finite Element Method for Predicting Implosion/Explosion Induced Failure of Shell Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Hoon Song

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A simplified implementation of the conventional extended finite element method (XFEM for dynamic fracture in thin shells is presented. Though this implementation uses the same linear combination of the conventional XFEM, it allows for considerable simplifications of the discontinuous displacement and velocity fields in shell finite elements. The proposed method is implemented for the discrete Kirchhoff triangular (DKT shell element, which is one of the most popular shell elements in engineering analysis. Numerical examples for dynamic failure of shells under impulsive loads including implosion and explosion are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the method.

  7. Core-Shell Structuring of Pure Metallic Aerogels towards Highly Efficient Platinum Utilization for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Bin; Hübner, René; Sasaki, Kotaro; Zhang, Yuanzhe; Su, Dong; Ziegler, Christoph; Vukmirovic, Miomir B; Rellinghaus, Bernd; Adzic, Radoslav R; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2018-03-05

    The development of core-shell structures remains a fundamental challenge for pure metallic aerogels. Here we report the synthesis of Pd x Au-Pt core-shell aerogels composed of an ultrathin Pt shell and a composition-tunable Pd x Au alloy core. The universality of this strategy ensures the extension of core compositions to Pd transition-metal alloys. The core-shell aerogels exhibited largely improved Pt utilization efficiencies for the oxygen reduction reaction and their activities show a volcano-type relationship as a function of the lattice parameter of the core substrate. The maximum mass and specific activities are 5.25 A mg Pt -1 and 2.53 mA cm -2 , which are 18.7 and 4.1 times higher than those of Pt/C, respectively, demonstrating the superiority of the core-shell metallic aerogels. The proposed core-based activity descriptor provides a new possible strategy for the design of future core-shell electrocatalysts. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Physical mechanism of surface roughening of the radial Ge-core/Si-shell nanowire heterostructure and thermodynamic prediction of surface stability of the InAs-core/GaAs-shell nanowire structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y Y; Ouyang, G; Wang, C X; Yang, G W

    2013-02-13

    As a promising and typical semiconductor heterostructure at the nanoscale, the radial Ge/Si NW heterostructure, that is, the Ge-core/Si-shell NW structure, has been widely investigated and used in various nanodevices such as solar cells, lasers, and sensors because of the strong changes in the band structure and increased charge carrier mobility. Therefore, to attain high quality radial semiconductor NW heterostructures, controllable and stable epitaxial growth of core-shell NW structures has become a major challenge for both experimental and theoretical evaluation. Surface roughening is usually undesirable for the epitaxial growth of high quality radial semiconductor NW heterostructures, because it would destroy the core-shell NW structures. For example, the surface of the Ge-core/Si-shell NWs always exhibits a periodic modulation with island-like morphologies, that is, surface roughening, during epitaxial growth. Therefore, the physical understanding of the surface roughening behavior during the epitaxial growth of core-shell NW structures is essential and urgent for theoretical design and experimentally controlling the growth of high quality radial semiconductor NW heterostructures. Here, we proposed a quantitative thermodynamic theory to address the physical process of epitaxial growth of core-shell NW structures and surface roughening. We showed that the transformation from the Frank-van der Merwe mode to the Stranski-Krastanow mode during the epitaxial growth of radial semiconductor NW heterostructures is the physical origin of surface roughening. We deduced the thermodynamic criterion for the formation of the surface roughening and the phase diagram of growth and showed that the radius of the NWs and the thickness of the shell layer can not only determine the formation of the surface roughening in a core-shell NW structure, but also control the periodicity and amplitude of the surface roughness. The agreement between the theoretical results and the

  9. Gastropod shells: a dynamic resource that helps shape benthic community structure. [Calliactis tricolor; Pagurus pollicaris; Calappa flammea; Octopus joubini; Panulirus argus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLean, R.

    1983-01-01

    Empty gastropod shells are an important resource for many animals in shallow benthic marine communities. Shells provide shelter for hermit crabs, octopuses, and fishes, provide attachment substratum for hermit crab symbionts, and directly or indirectly modify hermit crab predation. Creation of an empty shell due to predation of one gastropod on another and acquisition of that shell by a hermit crab are two key events in the subsequent use of that shell. Shells of different gastropod species and the species of hermit crab acquiring them affect the symbiont complement that attaches to the shell, which in turn may affect future shell use by other symbionts. Certain shell types worn by the hermit crab, Pagurus pollicaris Say, are positively associated with the symbiotic sea anemone, Calliactis tricolor (Lesueur), which protects the hermit crab from predation by the crab, Calappa flammea (Herbst), and possibly from the octopus, Octopus joubini Robson. Shells of other species of gastropods are resistant to being crushed by the spiny lobster, Panulirus argus (Latreille). The inter- and intraspecific interactions centered on the gastropod shell are termed a ''habitat web.'' The potential of the shell to limit the size and distribution of animal populations demonstrates how this resource helps shape community structure.

  10. Self-assembled core-shell and Janus microphase separated structures of polymer blends in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongyu; Qiu, Xueqing; Zhou, Jian

    2013-08-28

    Dissipative particle dynamics simulations are performed to systematically investigate the effects of hydrophobicity and compatibility on the inner phase separated structures (core-shell type or Janus type) of polymer nanoparticles self-assembled from a series of polymer blends in aqueous solution. Moreover, the temperature-dependent core-shell-to-Janus phase transition of a thermo-sensitive polymer blend is captured and explored by dissipative particle dynamics simulations for the first time. Our simulations reveal that both hydrophobicity and compatibility among blended polymers and the solvent play important roles in controlling the inner structures (core-shell or Janus) of polymer blend nanoparticles in aqueous solution. The phase separated structures of the studied polymer blend nanoparticles can be well predicted by using the criteria based on Neumann's triangle concept, which is derived from the corresponding interfacial tensions among the polymers and water. Besides, it was found that the hydrophobicity change of the blended thermo-responsive block copolymer induced by temperature plays a major role in the reversible transition from core-shell structure to Janus structure of the thermo-sensitive polymer blend nanoparticles. The present work is expected to provide some guidelines for designing and preparing novel polymer nanoparticles with desired structures and facilitating their applications in switching devices, nano-sensors, drug delivery system, etc.

  11. Using Spline Functions for the Shape Description of the Surface of Shell Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenda, Grzegorz

    2014-12-01

    The assessment of the cover shape of shell structures makes an important issue both from the point of view of safety, as well as functionality of the construction. The most numerous group among this type of constructions are objects having the shape of a quadric (cooling towers, tanks with gas and liquids, radio-telescope dishes etc.). The material from observation of these objects (point sets), collected during periodic measurements is usually converted into a continuous form in the process of approximation, with the use of the quadric surface. The created models, are then applied in the assessment of the deformation of surface in the given period of time. Such a procedure has, however, some significant limitations. The approximation with the use of quadrics, allows the determination of basic dimensions and location of the construction, however it results in ideal objects, not providing any information on local surface deformations. They can only be defined by comparison of the model with the point set of observations. If the periodic measurements are carried out in independent, separate points, then it will be impossible to define the existing deformations directly. The second problem results from the one-equation character of the ideal approximation model. Real deformations of the object change its basic parameters, inter alia the lengths of half-axis of main quadrics. The third problem appears when the construction is not a quadric; no information on the equation describing its shape is available either. Accepting wrong kind of approximation function, causes the creation of a model of large deviations from the observed points. All the mentioned above inconveniences can be avoided by applying splines to the shape description of the surface of shell structures. The use of the function of this type, however, comes across other types of limitations. This study deals with the above subject, presenting several methods allowing the increase of accuracy and decrease of

  12. Core-shell structured titanium-nitrogen alloys with high strength, high thermal stability and good plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. S.; Zhao, Y. H.; Zhang, W.; Lu, J. W.; Hu, J. J.; Huo, W. T.; Zhang, P. X.

    2017-01-01

    Multifunctional materials with more than two good properties are widely required in modern industries. However, some properties are often trade-off with each other by single microstructural designation. For example, nanostructured materials have high strength, but low ductility and thermal stability. Here by means of spark plasma sintering (SPS) of nitrided Ti particles, we synthesized bulk core-shell structured Ti alloys with isolated soft coarse-grained Ti cores and hard Ti-N solid solution shells. The core-shell Ti alloys exhibit a high yield strength (~1.4 GPa) comparable to that of nanostructured states and high thermal stability (over 1100 °C, 0.71 of melting temperature), contributed by the hard Ti-N shells, as well as a good plasticity (fracture plasticity of 12%) due to the soft Ti cores. Our results demonstrate that this core-shell structure offers a design pathway towards an advanced material with enhancing strength-plasticity-thermal stability synergy.

  13. Core-shell structured titanium-nitrogen alloys with high strength, high thermal stability and good plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y S; Zhao, Y H; Zhang, W; Lu, J W; Hu, J J; Huo, W T; Zhang, P X

    2017-01-06

    Multifunctional materials with more than two good properties are widely required in modern industries. However, some properties are often trade-off with each other by single microstructural designation. For example, nanostructured materials have high strength, but low ductility and thermal stability. Here by means of spark plasma sintering (SPS) of nitrided Ti particles, we synthesized bulk core-shell structured Ti alloys with isolated soft coarse-grained Ti cores and hard Ti-N solid solution shells. The core-shell Ti alloys exhibit a high yield strength (~1.4 GPa) comparable to that of nanostructured states and high thermal stability (over 1100 °C, 0.71 of melting temperature), contributed by the hard Ti-N shells, as well as a good plasticity (fracture plasticity of 12%) due to the soft Ti cores. Our results demonstrate that this core-shell structure offers a design pathway towards an advanced material with enhancing strength-plasticity-thermal stability synergy.

  14. HL-20 structural design comparison - Conformal shell versus cylindrical crew compartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Lance B.; Wahls, Deborah M.; Robinson, James C.

    1993-01-01

    Extensive studies have been performed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) on personnel launch systems (PLS) concepts. The primary mission of a PLS is the transport of Space Station crew members from Earth to the Space Station and return. The NASA LaRC PLS studies have led to the design of a lifting body configuration named the HL-20. In this study, two different HL-20 structural configurations are evaluated. The two configurations are deemed the conformal shell and the cylindrical crew compartment. The configurations are based on two different concerns for maintenance and operations. One configuration allows for access to subsystems while on-orbit from the interior, while the other allows for easy access to the subsystems during ground maintenance and operations. For each concept, the total structural weight required to sustain the applied loads is quantified through a structural evaluation. Structural weight for both configurations is compared along with the particular attributes of each. Analyses of both configurations indicate no appreciable weight or load relief advantage of one concept over the other. Maintainability and operability, therefore become the primary discriminator, leading to a choice of a crew compartment configuration.

  15. Isolation and Structural Characterization of a Mackay 55-Metal-Atom Two-Shell Icosahedron of Pseudo-Ih Symmetry, Pd55L12(μ3-CO)20 (L = PR3, R = Isopropyl): Comparative Analysis with Interior Two-Shell Icosahedral Geometries in Capped Three-Shell Pd145, Pt-Centered Four-Shell Pd-Pt M165, and Four-Shell Au133 Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Jeremiah D; Mednikov, Evgueni G; Ivanov, Sergei A; Dahl, Lawrence F

    2016-02-10

    We present the first successful isolation and crystallographic characterization of a Mackay 55-metal-atom two-shell icosahedron, Pd55L12(μ3-CO)20 (L = PPr(i)3) (1). Its two-shell icosahedron of pseudo-Ih symmetry (without isopropyl substituents) enables a structural/bonding comparison with interior 55-metal-atom two-shell icosahedral geometries observed within the multi-shell capped 145-metal-atom three-shell Pd145(CO)72(PEt3)30 and 165-metal-atom four-shell Pt-centered (μ12-Pt)Pd164-xPtx(CO)72(PPh3)20 (x ≈ 7) nanoclusters, and within the recently reported four-shell Au133(SC6H4-p-Bu(t))52 nanocluster. DFT calculations carried out on a Pd55(CO)20(PH3)12 model analogue, with triisopropyl phosphine substituents replaced by H atoms, revealed a positive +0.84 e charge for the entire Pd55 core, with a highly positive second-shell Pd42 surface of +1.93 e.

  16. Effect of the STereoLithography file structure on the ear shell production for hearing aids according to DICOM images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KIm, Hyeong Gyun [Dept. of Radiological Science, Far East University, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    A technique for producing the ear shell for a hearing aid using DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine) image and a 3D printing was studied. It is a new application method, and is an application technique that can improve the safety and infection of hearing aid users and can reduce the production time and process stages. In this study, the effects on the shape surface were examined before and after the printing of the ear shell using a 3D printer based on the values obtained from the raw data of the DICOM images at the volumes of 0.5 mm, 1.0 mm, and 2.0 mm, respectively. Before the printing, relative relationship was compared with respect to the STL (STereoLithography) file structure; and after the printing, the intervals of the layered structure of the ear shell shape surface were compared by magnifying them using a microscope. For the STL file structure, the numbers of triangular vertices, more than five intersecting points, and maximum intersecting points were large in the order of 0.5 mm, 1.0 m, and 2.0 mm, respectively; and the triangular structure was densely distributed in the order of the bending, angle, and crest regions depending on the sinuosity of the external auditory meatus shape. As for the ear shell shape surface examined by the digital microscope, the interval of the layered structure was thick in the order of 2.0 mm, 1.0 mm, and 0.5 mm. For the STL surface structure mentioned above, the intersecting STL triangular structure was denser as the sinuosity of the 3D ear shell shape became more irregular and the volume of the raw data decreased.

  17. Facile Synthesis of Yolk/Core-Shell Structured TS-1@Mesosilica Composites for Enhanced Hydroxylation of Phenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houbing Zou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the current work, we developed a facile synthesis of yolk/core-shell structured TS-1@mesosilica composites and studied their catalytic performances in the hydroxylation of phenol with H2O2 as the oxidant. The core-shell TS-1@mesosilica composites were prepared via a uniform coating process, while the yolk-shell TS-1@mesosilica composite was prepared using a resorcinol-formaldehyde resin (RF middle-layer as the sacrificial template. The obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, N2 sorption, Fourier transform infrared spectoscopy (FT-IR UV-Visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The characterization results showed that these samples possessed highly uniform yolk/core-shell structures, high surface area (560–700 m2 g−1 and hierarchical pore structures from oriented mesochannels to zeolite micropores. Importantly, owing to their unique structural properties, these composites exhibited enhanced activity, and also selectivity in the phenol hydroxylation reaction.

  18. Facile Synthesis of Yolk/Core-Shell Structured TS-1@Mesosilica Composites for Enhanced Hydroxylation of Phenol

    KAUST Repository

    Zou, Houbing

    2015-12-14

    © 2015 by the authors. In the current work, we developed a facile synthesis of yolk/core-shell structured TS-1@mesosilica composites and studied their catalytic performances in the hydroxylation of phenol with H2O2 as the oxidant. The core-shell TS-1@mesosilica composites were prepared via a uniform coating process, while the yolk-shell TS-1@mesosilica composite was prepared using a resorcinol-formaldehyde resin (RF) middle-layer as the sacrificial template. The obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 sorption, Fourier transform infrared spectoscopy (FT-IR) UV-Visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The characterization results showed that these samples possessed highly uniform yolk/core-shell structures, high surface area (560–700 m2 g−1) and hierarchical pore structures from oriented mesochannels to zeolite micropores. Importantly, owing to their unique structural properties, these composites exhibited enhanced activity, and also selectivity in the phenol hydroxylation reaction.

  19. Determination of the bending and buckling effect in the stress analysis of shell structures accessible from one side only

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dose, A

    1941-01-01

    The present report describes a device for ascertaining the bending and buckling effect in stress measurements on shell structures accessible from one side only. Beginning with a discussion of the relationship between flexural strain and certain parameters, the respective errors of the test method for great or variable skin curvature within the test range are analyzed and illustrated by specimen example.

  20. Novel core-shell structure microspheres based on lanthanide complexes for white-light emission and fluorescence sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Xiao; Yan, Bing

    2016-02-14

    A series of new core-shell structure materials based on lanthanide complexes [H2NMe2]3[Ln(dpa)3] (Ln = Eu, Tb, Sm, Dy, Nd, and Yb; [H2NMe2](+) = dimethylamino cation; dpa = 2-dipicolinate) and silica microspheres has been prepared under solvothermal conditions. Electron microscopy reveals that the nanosized materials SiO2@Ln-dpa are spherical with a narrow size distribution and a [H2NMe2]3[Ln(L)3] coating was generated on the surface of silica microspheres successfully. The core-shell structure materials exhibit excellent optical performance. The white-light-emitting material SiO2@(Dy:Eu)-dpa has a potential application in the development of a white-light device, as a result of the fact that its CIE chromaticity coordinate is very close to that of pure white. Then, we selected SiO2@Eu-dpa as a representative sample for sensing experiments. Eventually, we found that the core-shell structure sensors are highly selective and sensitive for acetone and Cu(2+) cations. The detection of Cu(2+) in the human body is an important issue. Interestingly, the core-shell structure materials display better selectivity and higher sensitivity than the pure lanthanide complexes in sensing Cu(2+) and the value of the quenching effect coefficient has increased by more than 20%.

  1. Energy storage in ferroelectric polymer nanocomposites filled with core-shell structured polymer@BaTiO3 nanoparticles: understanding the role of polymer shells in the interfacial regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming; Huang, Xingyi; Yang, Ke; Zhai, Xing; Zhang, Jun; He, Jinliang; Jiang, Pingkai

    2014-11-26

    The interfacial region plays a critical role in determining the electrical properties and energy storage density of dielectric polymer nanocomposites. However, we still know a little about the effects of electrical properties of the interfacial regions on the electrical properties and energy storage of dielectric polymer nanocomposites. In this work, three types of core-shell structured polymer@BaTiO3 nanoparticles with polymer shells having different electrical properties were used as fillers to prepare ferroelectric polymer nanocomposites. All the polymer@BaTiO3 nanoparticles were prepared by surface-initiated reversible-addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, and the polymer shells were controlled to have the same thickness. The morphology, crystal structure, frequency-dependent dielectric properties, breakdown strength, leakage currents, energy storage capability, and energy storage efficiency of the polymer nanocomposites were investigated. On the other hand, the pure polymers having the same molecular structure as the shells of polymer@BaTiO3 nanoparticles were also prepared by RAFT polymerization, and their electrical properties were provided. Our results show that, to achieve nanocomposites with high discharged energy density, the core-shell nanoparticle filler should simultaneously have high dielectric constant and low electrical conductivity. On the other hand, the breakdown strength of the polymer@BaTiO3-based nanocomposites is highly affected by the electrical properties of the polymer shells. It is believed that the electrical conductivity of the polymer shells should be as low as possible to achieve nanocomposites with high breakdown strength.

  2. Three-Point Bending Fracture Behavior of Single Oriented Crossed-Lamellar Structure in Scapharca broughtonii Shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hong-Mei; Zhang, Wen-Qian; Wang, Xu; Li, Xiao-Wu

    2015-09-15

    The three-point bending strength and fracture behavior of single oriented crossed-lamellar structure in Scapharca broughtonii shell were investigated. The samples for bending tests were prepared with two different orientations perpendicular and parallel to the radial ribs of the shell, which corresponds to the tiled and stacked directions of the first-order lamellae, respectively. The bending strength in the tiled direction is approximately 60% higher than that in the stacked direction, primarily because the regularly staggered arrangement of the second-order lamellae in the tiled direction can effectively hinder the crack propagation, whereas the cracks can easily propagate along the interfaces between lamellae in the stacked direction.

  3. Cross-sectional mapping for refined beam elements with applications to shell-like structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, A.; de Miguel, A. G.; Carrera, E.

    2017-06-01

    This paper discusses the use of higher-order mapping functions for enhancing the physical representation of refined beam theories. Based on the Carrera unified formulation (CUF), advanced one-dimensional models are formulated by expressing the displacement field as a generic expansion of the generalized unknowns. According to CUF, a novel physically/geometrically consistent model is devised by employing Legendre-like polynomial sets to approximate the generalized unknowns at the cross-sectional level, whereas a local mapping technique based on the blending functions method is used to describe the exact physical boundaries of the cross-section domain. Classical and innovative finite element methods, including hierarchical p-elements and locking-free integration schemes, are utilized to solve the governing equations of the unified beam theory. Several numerical applications accounting for small displacements/rotations and strains are discussed, including beam structures with cross-sectional curved edges, cylindrical shells, and thin-walled aeronautical wing structures with reinforcements. The results from the proposed methodology are widely assessed by comparisons with solutions from the literature and commercial finite element software tools. The attention is focussed on the high computational efficiency and the marked capabilities of the present beam model, which can deal with a broad spectrum of structural problems with unveiled accuracy in terms of geometrical representation of the domain boundaries.

  4. Organic-Inorganic Hydrophobic Nanocomposite Film with a Core-Shell Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Chen, Ying; Yu, Zhiwu

    2016-12-17

    A method to prepare novel organic-inorganic hydrophobic nanocomposite films was proposed by a site-specific polymerization process. The inorganic part, the core of the nanocomposite, is a ternary SiO₂-Al₂O₃-TiO₂ nanoparticles, which is grafted with methacryloxy propyl trimethoxyl silane (KH570), and wrapped by fluoride and siloxane polymers. The synthesized samples are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrscopy, X-ray diffractometry (XRD), contact angle meter (CA), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results indicate that the novel organic-inorganic hydrophobic nanocomposite with a core-shell structure was synthesized successfully. XRD analysis reveals the nanocomposite film has an amorphous structure, and FTIR analysis indicates the nanoparticles react with a silane coupling agent (methacryloxy propyl trimethoxyl silane KH570). Interestingly, the morphology of the nanoparticle film is influenced by the composition of the core. Further, comparing with the film synthesized by silica nanoparticles, the film formed from SiO₂-Al₂O₃-TiO₂ nanoparticles has higher hydrophobic performance, i.e., the contact angle is greater than 101.7°. In addition, the TEM analysis reveals that the crystal structure of the particles can be changed at high temperatures.

  5. Design Optimization and Residual Strength Assessment of a Cylindrical Composite Shell Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rais-Rohani, Masoud

    2000-01-01

    A summary of research conducted during the specified period is presented. The research objectives included the investigation of an efficient technique for the design optimization and residual strength assessment of a semi-monocoque cylindrical shell structure made of composite materials. The response surface methodology is used in modeling the buckling response of individual skin panels under the combined axial compression and shear loading. These models are inserted into the MSC/NASTRAN code for design optimization of the cylindrical structure under a combined bending-torsion loading condition. The comparison between the monolithic and sandwich skin design cases indicated a 35% weight saving in using sandwich skin panels. In addition, the residual strength of the optimum design was obtained by identifying the most critical region of the structure and introducing a damage in the form of skin-stringer and skin-stringer-frame detachment. The comparison between the two skin design concepts indicated that the sandwich skin design is capable of retaining a higher residual strength than its monolithic counterpart. The results of this investigation are presented and discussed in this report.

  6. Organic-Inorganic Hydrophobic Nanocomposite Film with a Core-Shell Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A method to prepare novel organic-inorganic hydrophobic nanocomposite films was proposed by a site-specific polymerization process. The inorganic part, the core of the nanocomposite, is a ternary SiO2–Al2O3–TiO2 nanoparticles, which is grafted with methacryloxy propyl trimethoxyl silane (KH570, and wrapped by fluoride and siloxane polymers. The synthesized samples are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectrscopy, X-ray diffractometry (XRD, contact angle meter (CA, and scanning electron microscope (SEM. The results indicate that the novel organic-inorganic hydrophobic nanocomposite with a core-shell structure was synthesized successfully. XRD analysis reveals the nanocomposite film has an amorphous structure, and FTIR analysis indicates the nanoparticles react with a silane coupling agent (methacryloxy propyl trimethoxyl silane KH570. Interestingly, the morphology of the nanoparticle film is influenced by the composition of the core. Further, comparing with the film synthesized by silica nanoparticles, the film formed from SiO2–Al2O3–TiO2 nanoparticles has higher hydrophobic performance, i.e., the contact angle is greater than 101.7°. In addition, the TEM analysis reveals that the crystal structure of the particles can be changed at high temperatures.

  7. Core-shell structured Ag@C for direct electrochemistry and hydrogen peroxide biosensor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Shuxian; Long, Yumei; Li, Weifeng; Tu, Yifeng; Deng, Anping

    2013-10-15

    Ag@C core-shell nano-composites have been prepared by a simple one-step hydrothermal method and are further explored for protein immobilization and bio-sensing. The electrochemical behavior of immobilized horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on Ag@C modified indium-tin-oxide (ITO) electrode and its application as H₂O₂ sensor are investigated. Electrochemical and UV-vis spectroscopic measurements demonstrated that Ag@C nano-composites provide excellent matrixes for the adsorption of HRP and the entrapped HRP retains its bioactivities. It is found that on the HRP-Ag@C/ITO electrode, HRP exhibited a fast electron transfer process and good electrocatalytic reduction toward H₂O₂. Under optimum experimental conditions the biosensor linearly responds to H₂O₂ concentration in the range of 5.0×10⁻⁷-1.4×10⁻⁴ M with a detection limit of 2.0×10⁻⁷ M (S/N=3). The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K(app)(M)) of the biosensor is calculated to be 3.75×10⁻⁵ M, suggesting high enzymatic activity and affinity toward H₂O₂. In addition, the HRP-Ag@C/ITO bio-electrode shows good reproducibility and long-term stability. Thus, the core-shell structured Ag@C is an attractive material for application in the fabrication of biosensors due to its direct electrochemistry and functionalized surface for efficient immobilization of bio-molecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Hollow MnCo2O4 submicrospheres with multilevel interiors: from mesoporous spheres to yolk-in-double-shell structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingfa; Wang, Jiazhao; Liang, Xin; Zhang, Zhijia; Liu, Huakun; Qian, Yitai; Xiong, Shenglin

    2014-01-08

    We present a general strategy to synthesize uniform MnCo2O4 submicrospheres with various hollow structures. By using MnCo-glycolate submicrospheres as the precursor with proper manipulation of ramping rates during the heating process, we have fabricated hollow MnCo2O4 submicrospheres with multilevel interiors, including mesoporous spheres, hollow spheres, yolk-shell spheres, shell-in-shell spheres, and yolk-in-double-shell spheres. Interestingly, when tested as anode materials in lithium ion batteries, the MnCo2O4 submicrospheres with a yolk-shell structure showed the best performance among these multilevel interior structures because these structures can not only supply a high contact area but also maintain a stable structure.

  9. A dodecameric CcmK2 structure suggests β-carboxysomal shell facets have a double-layered organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samborska, Bożena; Kimber, Matthew S

    2012-08-08

    Cyanobacteria fix carbon within carboxysomes. Here, RubisCO and carbonic anhydrase are coencapsulated within a semipermeable protein shell built from paralogs of the CcmK proteins. Crystal packing patterns suggest that the shell facets may be built as a single layer of CcmK molecules tiled hexagonally in a continuous sheet. We used fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to measure interactions mediated by CcmK paralogs from Thermosynechococcus elongatus. CcmK2-an abundant, universally present paralog-shows uniquely strong self-interactions. The CcmK2 structure reveals a back-to-back dodecameric organization, with interactions mediated by a helix comprised of residues 95-101. Modeling indicates that this dodecameric interaction could seamlessly fuse two sheets into a double-layered shell. This model predicts several aspects of CcmK2 interactions, including the attenuation of FRET by Glu95Ala variants at the dodecameric interface. This model also accurately predicts the observed shell thickness, implying that the β-carboxysome shell is most likely organized as a double layer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cellulose nanofibers reinforced sodium alginate-polyvinyl alcohol hydrogels: Core-shell structure formation and property characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yiying; Han, Jingquan; Han, Guangping; French, Alfred D; Qi, Yadong; Wu, Qinglin

    2016-08-20

    Core-shell structured hydrogels consisting of a flexible interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) core and a rigid semi-IPN shell were prepared through chemical crosslinking of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and sodium alginate (SA) with Ca(2+) and glutaraldehyde. Short cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) extracted from energycane bagasse were incorporated in the hydrogel. The shell was micro-porous and the core was macro-porous. The hydrogels could be used in multiple adsorption-desorption cycles for dyes, and the maximum methyl blue adsorption capacity had a 10% increase after incorporating CNFs. The homogeneous distribution of CNFs in PVA-SA matrix generated additional hydrogen bonds among the polymer molecular chains, resulting in enhanced density, viscoelasticity, and mechanical strength for the hydrogel. Specifically, the compressive strength of the hydrogel reached 79.5kPa, 3.2 times higher than that of the neat hydrogel. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Optical and Structural Characterization of Confined and Strained Core/Multi-Shell Semiconducting Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickenscher, Melodie

    This work uses a broad range of optical spectroscopies and electron microscopy to characterize the structure and electronic states of nanowires. We place an emphasis on understanding how to alter the electronic properties using strain and quantum confinement. We seek to develop a comprehensive understanding of NW properties through comparisons with model predictions. In addition, we adapt optical techniques traditionally used with larger structures to obtain a sub-micron measurement of nanowire diffusion and mobility. First, we extend our optical techniques by spatially resolving the diffusion of excitons along the long axis of a nanowire using a solid immersion lens (SIL). By sampling the time decays as a function of distance along the nanowire, we can measure the diffusion of excitons directly. The extracted diffusion constants for defect free single crystal GaAs measured between 45--100 cm2/s with resultant mobilities of 52,000--116,000 cm 2/eV s. In contrast, a mixed phase InP nanowire shows a much shorter spatial diffusion limited by defect states with measured diffusion constants of 22 cm2/s and mobilities of 29,000 cm2/eV s. Turning our focus to novel NW morphologies in Chapter 3--5, we first study the strain effects from a series of a lattice mismatched (3.6%) GaAs/GaP core shell NWs. Strain on a semiconductor creates deformations in the lattice of the material which in turn effect the electronic states and possibly the material quality. We compare our PL energies with theoretical predictions and find that our measurements are lower than predicted. We next exploit correlations between PL emission and TO2 phonon emission to predict the hydrostatic and sheer strains in cases when the light hole emission is not visible and/or TO1 phonon cannot be resolved. In chapter 4, we investigate the material quality issues with these strained nanowires and find that the presence of dislocations results in non-radiative recombination centers which causes the electron

  12. Mapping of Force: A Process of Parametric Design from the Prototype Mechanical Mechanism to the Structural Form of a Woven HYPAR Shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Kang Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available From a new perspective of structural engineering, with the integration of the 1st and 3rd principal stress distribution of HYPAR shell structure into the selection of texture variation zone, this paper analyzes and demonstrates the key questions of how to establish the association between the force-flow, the texture direction and the form parameters; how to develop a dynamic, performance-optimized and adaptive iteration model of HYPAR shell structural form by setting and adjusting structurally sensitive parameters; and how to realize the process of parametric design from the mechanical mechanism of the prototype to the structural form of the woven HYPAR shell.

  13. Particle-spring method for form finding grid shell structures consisting of flexible members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijvenhoven, M.; Hoogenboom, P.C.J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a general design method is described that can significantly reduce the effort needed for form finding grid shells consisting of flexible members. This design method is based on particle-spring models for simulating the behaviour of a grid shell during construction. Hereby, the stress

  14. FLECS, a flexible coupling shell, application to fluid-structure interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Nool (Margreet); E.J. Lingen; A. de Boer; H. Bijl

    2006-01-01

    htmlabstractNumerical simulations involving multiple, physically different domains can be solved effectively by coupling simulation programs, or solvers. The coordination of the different solvers is commonly handled by a coupling shell. A coupling shell synchronizes the execution of the solvers and

  15. Development of high performance CFRP shell structures for the pixel detector in the ATLAS experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Himmel, N; Pfaff, Thomas; Schmitt, Uwe

    2003-01-01

    The "Large Hadron Collider (LHC)" which will be the world's largest and most powerful accelerator and particle collider for particle research experiments is planned to start operation at CERN in 2007. The reported work includes the development of three interleaved cylindrical CFRP shell support structures for a high-resolution detector device within an experimental test equipment named ATLAS, which will be installed into LHC. As the shell structures will be positioned only a few centimetres apart from the point of particle collision, an ultra-light weight component design with extremely tight geometrical tolerances, applying composite materials with extreme stiffness and high radiation hardness is stipulated. The article describes the development of these structures including the design of all components and the manufacturing technology to be used. Furthermore, it reports on geometry testing efforts on a prototype structure to prove the design concept and to derive optimisation potential.

  16. What role do beds of submerged macrophytes play in structuring estuarine fish assemblages? Lessons from a warm-temperate South African estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Jill N.; James, Nicola C.; Whitfield, Alan K.; Cowley, Paul D.

    2011-11-01

    Habitat variability is one of the factors influencing species richness within estuarine systems, and a loss of habitat can result in a restructuring of the estuarine ichthyofaunal assemblage, particularly if these conditions persist over long time periods. The potential effects of the loss of extensive submerged macrophyte beds ( Ruppia cirrhosa and Potamogeton pectinatus) on an estuarine fish assemblage were investigated through an analysis of a long-term seine net catch dataset from the temporarily open/closed East Kleinemonde Estuary, South Africa. Catch data for a 12-year period, encompassing six years of macrophyte presence and six years of macrophyte senescence, indicated that the loss of this habitat did not influence species richness but changes in the relative abundance of certain species were evident. A shift in dominance from vegetation-associated species to those associated with sandy environments ( e.g. members of the family Mugilidae) was observed. However, species wholly dependent on macrophytes such as the critically endangered estuarine pipefish Syngnathus watermeyeri were only recorded during years when macrophyte beds were present, while vegetation-associated species such as the sparid Rhabdosargus holubi persisted at lower levels of relative abundance. The reduced abundance of all vegetation-associated fish species during years of macrophyte senescence was probably reflective of declining food resources resulting from the loss of macrophyte beds and/or increased vulnerability to predation. Submerged beds of aquatic plants are therefore important habitats within temporarily open/closed estuaries, South Africa's dominant estuary type.

  17. Effective Simulation of Delamination in Aeronautical Structures Using Shells and Cohesive Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Camanho, Pedro P.; Turon, Albert

    2007-01-01

    A cohesive element for shell analysis is presented. The element can be used to simulate the initiation and growth of delaminations between stacked, non-coincident layers of shell elements. The procedure to construct the element accounts for the thickness offset by applying the kinematic relations of shell deformation to transform the stiffness and internal force of a zero-thickness cohesive element such that interfacial continuity between the layers is enforced. The procedure is demonstrated by simulating the response and failure of the Mixed Mode Bending test and a skin-stiffener debond specimen. In addition, it is shown that stacks of shell elements can be used to create effective models to predict the inplane and delamination failure modes of thick components. The results indicate that simple shell models can retain many of the necessary predictive attributes of much more complex 3D models while providing the computational efficiency that is necessary for design.

  18. Solvation of fullerene and fulleride ion in liquid ammonia: structure and dynamics of the solvation shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Malay Kumar; Chandra, Amalendu

    2012-10-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the solvation characteristics of neutral fullerene (C(60)) and charged fulleride anion (C(60)(5-)) in liquid ammonia. Potassium ions are present as counterions in the system containing fulleride ion. In addition to solvation characteristics, dynamical properties of solvation shells are also found out for both the neutral and anionic solutes. Our results reveal the presence of a rather large solvation shell of ammonia molecules around the C(60)(5-) ion. It is found that the ammonia molecules are more closely packed in the first solvation shell of C(60)(5-) than that of C(60). The distributions of ammonia molecules in the solvation shells of C(60) and C(60)(5-) solutes together with hydrogen bonding characteristics of the solvent in different solvation shells are investigated. It is found that the solvation of the small counterions (K(+)) in liquid ammonia is affected very little by the presence of the large C(60)(5-) anion. Regarding the dynamics of ammonia in solvation shells, it is found that the residence, translational and rotational dynamics of ammonia molecules differ significantly between the solvation shells of the neutral and charged fullerene solutes, especially in the first solvation shells. The average lifetimes of ammonia-ammonia hydrogen bonds are calculated from both continuous and intermittent hydrogen bond correlation functions. The calculations of binding energies reveal that the hydrogen bonds are weaker, hence short lived in the solvation shell of C(60)(5-) compared to those in the solvation shell of neutral C(60) and also in bulk liquid ammonia.

  19. Advanced Deployable Shell-Based Composite Booms for Small Satellite Structural Applications Including Solar Sails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Juan M.

    2017-01-01

    State of the art deployable structures are mainly being designed for medium to large size satellites. The lack of reliable deployable structural systems for low cost, small volume, rideshare-class spacecraft severely constrains the potential for using small satellite platforms for affordable deep space science and exploration precursor missions that could be realized with solar sails. There is thus a need for reliable, lightweight, high packaging efficiency deployable booms that can serve as the supporting structure for a wide range of small satellite systems including solar sails for propulsion. The National Air and Space Administration (NASA) is currently investing in the development of a new class of advanced deployable shell-based composite booms to support future deep space small satellite missions using solar sails. The concepts are being designed to: meet the unique requirements of small satellites, maximize ground testability, permit the use of low-cost manufacturing processes that will benefit scalability, be scalable for use as elements of hierarchical structures (e.g. trusses), allow long duration storage, have high deployment reliability, and have controlled deployment behavior and predictable deployed dynamics. This paper will present the various rollable boom concepts that are being developed for 5-20 m class size deployable structures that include solar sails with the so-called High Strain Composites (HSC) materials. The deployable composite booms to be presented are being developed to expand the portfolio of available rollable booms for small satellites and maximize their length for a given packaged volume. Given that solar sails are a great example of volume and mass optimization, the booms were designed to comply with nominal solar sail system requirements for 6U CubeSats, which are a good compromise between those of smaller form factors (1U, 2U and 3U CubeSats) and larger ones (12 U and 27 U future CubeSats, and ESPA-class microsatellites). Solar

  20. Immobilization of cholesterol oxidase on magnetic fluorescent core-shell-structured nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jun, E-mail: hjun@whut.edu.cn; Liu, Huichao; Zhang, Peipei; Zhang, Pengfei; Li, Mengshi; Ding, Liyun

    2015-12-01

    The magnetic fluorescent core-shell structured nanoparticles, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}(F)@meso–SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, were prepared. Cholesterol oxidase (COD) was immobilized on their surface to form Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}(F)@meso–SiO{sub 2}@COD nanoparticles. Optimal immobilization was achieved with 2.5% (v/v) APTES, 2.0% (v/v) GA, 10 mg COD (in 15 mg carrier) and solution pH of 7.0. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}(F)@meso–SiO{sub 2}@COD nanoparticles showed maximal catalytic activity at pH 7.0 and 50 °C. The thermal, storage and operational stabilities of COD were improved greatly after its immobilization. After the incubation at 50 °C for 5 h, the nanoparticles and free COD retained 80% and 46% of its initial activity, respectively. After kept at 4 °C for 30 days, the nanoparticles and free COD maintained 86% and 65% of initial activity, respectively. The nanoparticles retained 71% of its initial activity after 7 consecutive operations. Since Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}(F)@meso–SiO{sub 2}@COD nanoparticles contained tris(2,2-bipyridyl)dichloro-ruthenium(II) hexahydrate (Ru(bpy){sub 3}Cl{sub 2}) and were optical sensitive to oxygen in solution, it might be used as the sensing material and has the application potential in multi parameter fiber optic biosensor based on enzyme catalysis and oxygen consumption. - Highlights: • COD was immobilized on magnetic fluorescent core-shell structured nanoparticles. • The nanoparticles were optical sensitive to oxygen in water solution. • The nanoparticles have remarkable improved stability compared with free COD. • The nanoparticles can probably be used in multi parameter fiber optic Biosensor.

  1. Light-stimulated cargo release from a core–shell structured nanocomposite for site-specific delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yun; Ling, Li; Li, Xiaofang [Department of Neurology, Affiliated Hospital of Hebei University, Baoding 071000 (China); Chen, Meng [Department of Rheumatology, Affiliated Hospital of Hebei University, Baoding 071000 (China); Su, Likai, E-mail: zhangdong19992003@163.com [Department of Neurology, Affiliated Hospital of Hebei University, Baoding 071000 (China)

    2015-03-15

    This paper reported a core–shell structured site-specific delivery system with a light switch triggered by low energy light (λ=510 nm). Its core was composed of supermagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles for magnetic guiding and targeting. Its outer shell consisted of mesoporous silica molecular sieve MCM-41 which offered highly ordered hexagonal tunnels for cargo capacity. A light switch N1-(4aH-cyclopenta[1,2-b:5,4-b′]dipyridin-5(5aH)-ylidene)benzene-1, 4-diamine (CBD) was covalently grafted into these hexagonal tunnels, serving as light stimuli acceptor with loading content of 1.1 μM/g. This composite was fully characterized and confirmed by SEM, TEM, XRD patterns, N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption, thermogravimetric analysis, IR, UV–vis absorption and emission spectra. Experimental data suggested that this composite had a core as wide as 150 nm and could be magnetically guided to specific sites. Its hexagonal tunnels were as long as 180 nm. Upon light stimuli of “on” and “off” states, controllable release was observed with short release time of ~900 s (90% capacity). - Graphical abstract: A core–shell structured site-specific delivery system with a light switch triggered by yellow light was constructed. Controllable release was observed with short release time of ~900 s (90% capacity). - Highlights: • A core–shell structured site-specific delivery system was constructed. • It consisted of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} core and MCM-41 shell grafted with light switch. • This delivery system was triggered by low energy light. • Controllable release was observed with short release time of ~900 s.

  2. Structure-Related Optical Fingerprints in the Absorption Spectra of Colloidal Quantum Dots: Random Alloy vs. Core/Shell Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mourad, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We argue that the experimentally easily accessible optical absorption spectrum can often be used to distinguish between a random alloy phase and a stoichiometrically equivalent core/shell realization of ensembles of monodisperse colloidal semiconductor quantum dots without the need for more advanced structural characterization tools. Our proof-of-concept is performed by conceptually straightforward exact-disorder tight-binding calculations. The underlying stochastical tight-binding scheme only parametrizes bulk band structure properties and does not employ additional free parameters to calculate the optical absorption spectrum, which is an easily accessible experimental property. The method is applied to selected realizations of type-I Cd(Se,S) and type-II (Zn,Cd)(Se,S) alloyed quantum dots with an underlying zincblende crystal structure and the corresponding core/shell counterparts.

  3. Synthesis of Yolk-Shell Structured Fe3O4@void@CdS Nanoparticles: A General and Effective Structure Design for Photo-Fenton Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wen; Du, Dan; Shen, Bin; Cui, Chuanfeng; Lu, Liujia; Wang, Lingzhi; Zhang, Jinlong

    2016-08-17

    Yolk-shell (Y-S) structured Fe3O4@void@CdS nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized through a one-pot coating-etching process with Fe3O4@SiO2 as the core, where the coating of an outer CdS shell from a chemical bath deposition (CBD) process is simultaneously accompanied by the gradual etching of an inner SiO2 shell. The as-prepared Fe3O4@void@CdS NPs (ca. 200 nm) possess good monodispersity and a uniform CdS shell of ca.15 nm. This composite exhibits excellent photo-Fenton (ph-F) activity toward the degradation of methylene blue (MB) in a wide pH working range of 4.5-11 under the visible light irradiation. A series of control experiments demonstrate the unique Y-S structure contributes to the enhanced activity, where the separation of hole-electron pair from CdS and the reduction of Fe(2+) from Fe(3+) are mutually promoted. The similar efficiency can also be achieved when the shell component changes to TiO2 or CeO2, demonstrating a general strategy for the design of robust ph-F agent.

  4. Spatial and Orientational Structure of the Hydration Shell of Benzene in Sub- and Supercritical Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Ashu; Chandra, Amalendu

    2015-07-09

    The spatial and orientational structure of the solvation shell of benzene in sub- and supercritical water are investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The present study reveals different local organization of water molecules at different parts of the solute. The π-hydrogen-bonding between benzene and water along the axial direction is found to exist even at supercritical conditions although to a reduced extent. The coordination number of benzene decreases substantially on increase of temperature and decrease of density. While the π-hydrogen-bonded part in the axial region shows a slight expansion, the hydrophobically solvated part in the equatorial plane shows an opposite behavior as the temperature is increased from normal to the supercritical temperature. Two other distribution functions, namely the radial/angular and spatial orientational functions (SOFs) are calculated to explore the spatially resolved angular preferences of water molecules around the benzene solute. Water molecules located axial to the benzene are found to have strong inward orientation toward the solute, however an opposite behavior is found in the equatorial region. Although at supercritical conditions, the orientational distributions of water molecules are broadened, the preferential orientations in the axial and equatorial regions remain similar to that under ambient condition on average.

  5. Micromagnetic Modeling of Reversal Nucleation in Core/Shell Exchange-Spring Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J. S.; Bader, Sam

    2015-03-01

    Nanocomposite exchange-spring permanent magnet materials promise superior performance and are a potential solution to the supply criticality in rare earth elements. The nucleation of magnetization reversal in cylindrical and spherical soft core/hard shell exchange-spring structures has been investigated by solving the linearized Brown's equation perturbatively, and has been verified with numerical simulations. Accounting for the magnetostatic self-interaction field leads to a modification to the proposed quasi-coherent ``bulging'' mode of nucleation for small core sizes. The modified curling mode, where the magnetization configuration is vortex-like and flux-closed, becomes favored at large core sizes. The mode crossover occurs at a core diameter of approximately twice the exchange length for the cylindrical geometry. Since flux-closure allows magnetic elements to be densely packed without affecting the nucleation field, a potential direction for improving permanent magnet materials is to induce the modified curling mode by creating a soft-cylinder-in-hard-matrix exchange-spring microstructure. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  6. Nanoscopic Insights into InGaN/GaN Core-Shell Nanorods: Structure, Composition, and Luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Marcus; Veit, Peter; Krause, Florian F; Schimpke, Tilman; Metzner, Sebastian; Bertram, Frank; Mehrtens, Thorsten; Müller-Caspary, Knut; Avramescu, Adrian; Strassburg, Martin; Rosenauer, Andreas; Christen, Jürgen

    2016-09-14

    Nitride-based three-dimensional core-shell nanorods (NRs) are promising candidates for the achievement of highly efficient optoelectronic devices. For a detailed understanding of the complex core-shell layer structure of InGaN/GaN NRs, a systematic determination and correlation of the structural, compositional, and optical properties on a nanometer-scale is essential. In particular, the combination of low-temperature cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy directly performed in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), and quantitative high-angle annular dark field imaging enables a comprehensive study of the nanoscopic attributes of the individual shell layers. The investigated InGaN/GaN core-shell NRs, which were grown by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy using selective-area growth exhibit an exceptionally low density of extended defects. Using highly spatially resolved CL mapping of single NRs performed in cross-section, we give a direct insight into the optical properties of the individual core-shell layers. Most interesting, we observe a red shift of the InGaN single quantum well from 410 to 471 nm along the nonpolar side wall. Quantitative STEM analysis of the active region reveals an increasing thickness of the single quantum well (SQW) from 6 to 13 nm, accompanied by a slight increase of the indium concentration along the nonpolar side wall from 11% to 13%. Both effects, the increased quantum-well thickness and the higher indium incorporation, are responsible for the observed energetic shift of the InGaN SQW luminescence. Furthermore, compositional mappings of the InGaN quantum well reveal the formation of locally indium rich regions with several nanometers in size, leading to potential fluctuations in the InGaN SQW energy landscape. This is directly evidenced by nanometer-scale resolved CL mappings that show strong localization effects of the excitonic SQW emission.

  7. Density dependence of the entropy and the solvation shell structure in supercritical water via molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Haibo

    2012-06-07

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations of supercritical water (SCW) with a wide range of densities along a near critical isotherm using the simple point charge extended (SPC/E) pair potential in order to study the entropy and the solvation shell structure around a central water molecule. It is shown that both the translational and orientational two-particle correlation entropy terms can serve as the metrics of the translational-orientational structural orders in water and it is revealed that the translational structural order is very sensitive to the density variation in the gas-like and liquid-like region, while the orientational structural order is much more dependent upon compression in the medium-density SCW region. The comparison of the magnitudes of the full thermodynamic excess entropy and two-particle correlation entropy confirms the recent findings that the many-body terms other than two-body ones also present significant and non-neglectable contributions to the full excess entropy for the highly anomalous fluids like water. The analysis of entropy terms as a function of intermolecular distance and the orientational distribution functions as well as the three-dimensional spatial distribution functions indicate that the structural order occurs only in a much more diffused first solvation shell due to the elongated hydrogen bonds under supercritical conditions. It is revealed that no obvious second or higher neighbor shells occur in SCW, in contrast with the feature of normal liquid water that the anomalous decrease of translational order upon compression occurs mainly in the second shell.

  8. Core-shell structured mZVI/Ca(OH)2 particle: Morphology, aggregation and corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Cai-Jie; Wang, Xiao-Mao; Li, Xiao-Yan

    2018-01-15

    A calcium hydroxide shell was coated onto the surface of micro-sized zero valent iron (mZVI) particles by hydrothermal approach in oversaturated Ca(OH)2 solution. The heterogeneous nucleation of nano-scale Ca(OH)2 particle on micro-scale spherical ZVI surface was clearly observed by scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The moderate solubility of Ca(OH)2 was demonstrated as the crucial factor in inducing slow nucleation rate and in facilitating the abundant growth of Ca(OH)2 nuclei on mZVI surface. The growth of shell thickness was found to obey the zero order kinetics with the rate constant at about 15nm/h. The Ca(OH)2 shell was demonstrated to be anticorrosive to protect reactive Fe0 from oxidation based on standard corrosion test. In addition, the instant aggregation process of mZVI within 120s was slowed down after Ca(OH)2 shell coating. The saturation magnetization of mZVI, measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), was gradually diminished along with the shell formation with a 32% reduction after excluding the Fe0 content change effect. This indicated that Ca(OH)2 shell coating can partially eliminated particle-particle or cluster-cluster magnetic attraction force to enhance the dispersion stability and resultantly facilitate the transportation. The dissolution of Ca(OH)2 shell was greatly dependent on the pH value of the background water environment. The pH gradient change resulted from the Ca(OH)2 shell dissolution along mZVI particle transport was illustrated by a conceptual model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Li4Ti5O12/TiO2@CNT Core/Shell Structure for Rechargeable Li Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Liu, Jianzhong; Niu, Xiaoying; Chen, Ying; Zhong, Liqiao; Cai, Chennan; Gao, Lijun; Ni, Jiangfeng

    2015-09-01

    Li4Ti5O12 is an important type of anode material for rechargeable Li battery due to its excellent cycling and thermal reliability, but the poor conductivity represents a significant challenge in the scalable application. Here we design a ternary Li4Ti5O12/TiO2@CNT core/shell structure to well mitigate the conductivity issue. The hybrid core/shell structure is fabricated by a facile hydrothermal reaction followed by heat treatment at 600 degrees C. It is comprised of Li4Ti5O12/TiO2 nanocrystals several nanometers in dimension tightly anchored on CNT network. The CNT network provides a fast and robust conductive way for electron transport, while the minor rutile-TiO2 phase improves the kinetics of Li4Ti5O12 toward fast lithium insertion/extraction. The electrochemical results indicate that the core/shell structure displays a high electrochemical activity in terms of reversible capacity and rate capability. The hybrid structure also shows excellent long-term cycling stability when operated at a high rate of 5 C.

  10. Atomic structure and thermal stability of Pt-Fe bimetallic nanoparticles: from alloy to core/shell architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rao; Wen, Yu-Hua; Shao, Gui-Fang; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2016-06-22

    Bimetallic nanoparticles comprising noble metal and non-noble metal have attracted intense interest over the past few decades due to their low cost and significantly enhanced catalytic performances. In this article, we have explored the atomic structure and thermal stability of Pt-Fe alloy and core-shell nanoparticles by molecular dynamics simulations. In Fe-core/Pt-shell nanoparticles, Fe with three different structures, i.e., body-centered cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc), and amorphous phases, has been considered. Our results show that Pt-Fe alloy is the most stable configuration among the four types of bimetallic nanoparticles. It has been discovered that the amorphous Fe cannot stably exist in the core and preferentially transforms into the fcc phase. The phase transition from bcc to hexagonal close packed (hcp) has also been observed in bcc-Fe-core/Pt-shell nanoparticles. In contrast, Fe with the fcc structure is the most preferred as the core component. These findings are helpful for understanding the structure-property relationships of Pt-Fe bimetallic nanoparticles, and are also of significance to the synthesis and application of noble metal based nanoparticle catalysts.

  11. Facile synthesis of core-shell structured PANI-Co3O4 nanocomposites with superior electrochemical performance in supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Zhenyin; Gao, Libo; Zhang, Qiang; Xu, Hongyan; Cui, Danfeng; Zhang, Zengxing; Tsoukalas, Dimitris; Tang, Jun; Yan, Shubin; Xue, Chenyang

    2016-01-01

    Core-shell structured PANI-Co3O4 nanocomposites for supercapacitor applications were synthesized by combination of carbon-assisted method and in situ polymerization method. The crystalline structure, optical band gap, morphology, and hydrophilic property, as the major factors affecting the performances of supercapacitors, were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis spectrophotometry (UV-vis), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and water contact angle (WCA). The core-shell structured PANI-Co3O4 nanocomposites are characterized by amorphous PANI, small bandgaps, large surface area and favorable hydrophilicity, which indicates the superior electrochemical performances of the nanocomposites as electrode material for supercapacitors. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge/discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements were conducted in 6 M KOH aqueous solution to evaluate the electrochemical performances. The results shows that core-shell structured PANI-Co3O4 nanocomposites exhibit a high specific capacitance of 1184 F g-1 at 1.25 A g-1, excellent cycling stability of a capacitance retention of 84.9% after 1000 galvanostatic charge/discharge cycles, good electrical conductivity and ion diffusion behavior.

  12. On the impact of radiation pressure on the dynamics and inner structure of dusty wind-driven shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-González, Sergio; Silich, Sergiy; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo, E-mail: silich@inaoep.mx [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica Óptica y Electrónica, AP 51, 72000 Puebla (Mexico)

    2014-04-20

    Massive young stellar clusters are strong sources of radiation and mechanical energy. Their powerful winds and radiation pressure sweep up interstellar gas into thin expanding shells that trap the ionizing radiation produced by the central clusters affecting the dynamics and the distribution of their ionized gas. Here we continue our comparison of the star cluster winds and radiation pressure effects on the dynamics of shells around young massive clusters. We calculate the impact that radiation pressure has on the distribution of matter and thermal pressure within such shells, as well as on the density-weighted ionization parameter U{sub w} , and put our results on the diagnostic diagram, which allows one to discriminate between the wind-dominated and radiation-dominated regimes. We found that model-predicted values of the ionization parameter agree well with typical values found in local starburst galaxies. Radiation pressure may affect the inner structure and the dynamics of wind-driven shells, but only during the earliest stages of evolution (before ∼3 Myr) or if a major fraction of the star cluster mechanical luminosity is dissipated or radiated away within the star cluster volume and thus the star cluster mechanical energy output is significantly smaller than star cluster synthetic models predict. However, even in these cases radiation dominates over the wind dynamical pressure only if the exciting cluster is embedded into a high-density ambient medium.

  13. Solvent-surface interactions control the phase structure in laser-generated iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Philipp; Jakobi, Jurij; Rehbock, Christoph; Chakravadhanula, Venkata Sai Kiran; Thede, Claas; Wiedwald, Ulf; Bartsch, Mathias; Kienle, Lorenz; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2016-03-23

    This work highlights a strategy for the one-step synthesis of FeAu nanoparticles by the pulsed laser ablation of alloy targets in the presence of different solvents. This method allows particle generation without the use of additional chemicals; hence, solvent-metal interactions could be studied without cross effects from organic surface ligands. A detailed analysis of generated particles via transmission electron microscopy in combination with EDX elemental mapping could conclusively verify that the nature of the used solvent governs the internal phase structure of the formed nanoparticles. In the presence of acetone or methyl methacrylate, a gold shell covering a non-oxidized iron core was formed, whereas in aqueous media, an Au core with an Fe3O4 shell was generated. This core-shell morphology was the predominant species found in >90% of the examined nanoparticles. These findings indicate that fundamental chemical interactions between the nanoparticle surface and the solvent significantly contribute to phase segregation and elemental distribution in FeAu nanoparticles. A consecutive analysis of resulting Fe@Au core-shell nanoparticles revealed outstanding oxidation resistance and fair magnetic and optical properties. In particular, the combination of these features with high stability magnetism and plasmonics may create new opportunities for this hybrid material in imaging applications.

  14. Phase-change core/shell structured nanofibers based on eicosane/poly(vinylidene fluoride) for thermal storage applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, Cong Van [Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Nguyen, Thuy Thu Thi; Park, Jun Seo [Hankyong National University, Anseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-15

    We fabricated eicosane/poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) core/shell nanofibers by melt coaxial electrospinning as potential heat-storage applications. Eicosane, a hydrocarbon with melting point near the human body temperature and high latent heat, was chosen as the core material. Melted eicosane and PVDF solutions were coaxially electrospun using a double spinneret, in which melted eicosane was fed at 0.090-0.210 mL/h while the feeding rate of PVDF solution was maintained constant at 1.500 mL/h. The applied voltage and working distance were maintained constant at 12 kV and 17 cm, respectively. Good core/shell structure of nanofibers was observed at core feed rates of 0.090-0.180mL/h by transmission electron microscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis values indicated good thermal stability and high energy-storage capacity of the obtained nanofibers. The highest amount of eicosane encapsulated in the electrospun core/shell nanofibers reached 32.5 wt% at core feed rate 0.180 mL/h and had a latent heat of 77 J/g at melting point 39.2 .deg. C. These shape-stabilized core/shell composite nanofibers showed good thermoregulating properties and had sufficiently high tensile strength for potential energy-storage applications, especially in smart textiles.

  15. On the structural behavior of ship's shell structures due to impact loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Kyun Lim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available When collision accident between ships or between ship and offshore platform occurs, a common phenomenon that occurs in structures is the plastic deformation accompanied by a large strain such as fracture. In this study, for the rational design against accidental limit state, the plastic material constants of steel plate which is heated by line heating and steel plate formed by cold bending procedure have been defined through the numerical simulation for the high speed tension test. The usefulness of the material constants included in Cowper–Symonds model and Johnson–Cook model and the assumption that strain rate can be neglected when strain rate is less than the intermediate speed are verified through free drop test as well as comparing with numerical results in several references. This paper ends with describing the future study.

  16. Immobilization of Thermostable Lipase QLM on Core-Shell Structured Polydopamine-Coated Fe3O4 Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenhui Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Here, core-shell structured polydopamine-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles were constructed to immobilize thermostable lipase QLM from Alcaligenes sp. Systematical characterization indicated that lipase QLM was successfully immobilized on the surface of nanoparticles with an enzyme loading of 21.4 ± 1.47 mg/g immobilized enzyme. Then, the immobilized enzyme was demonstrated to possess favorable catalytic activity and stability in the ester hydrolysis, using p-nitrophenyl caprylate as the substrate. Further, it was successfully employed in the kinetic resolution of (R, S-2-octanol, and satisfactory enantioselectivity and recyclability could be obtained with an enantiomeric ratio (E of 8–15 over 10 cycle reactions. Thus, core-shell structured polydopamine-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles can be potentially used as a carrier for enzyme immobilization to improve their activity, stability, and reusability, which is beneficial for constructing efficient catalysts for industrial biocatalysis.

  17. Nitrite sensing composite systems based on a core-shell emissive-superamagnetic structure: Construction, characterization and sensing behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Liu, Liang; Zha, Jianhua; Yuan, Ningyi

    2017-04-15

    Two recyclable nitrite sensing composite samples were designed and constructed through a core-shell structure, with Fe3O4 nanoparticles as core, silica molecular sieve MCM-41 as shell and two rhodamine derivatives as chemosensors, respectively. These samples and their structure were identified with their electron microscopy images, N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms, magnetic response, IR spectra and thermogravimetric analysis. Their nitrite sensing behavior was discussed based on emission intensity quenching, their limit of detection was found as low as 1.2μM. Further analysis suggested a static sensing mechanism between nitrite and chemosensors through an additive reaction between NO+ and chemosensors. After finishing their nitrite sensing, these composite samples and their emission could be recycled and recovered by sulphamic acid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Drought and submergence tolerance in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hewei; Zhou, Yufan; Oksenberg, Nir; Ronald, Pamela

    2017-11-14

    The invention provides methods of genetically modified plants to increase tolerance to drought and/or submergence. The invention additionally provides plants having increased drought and/or submergence tolerance engineered using such methods.

  19. Core–Shell Structure of Monodisperse Poly(ethylene glycol)-Grafted Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Studied by Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The promising applications of core–shell nanoparticles in the biological and medical field have been well investigated in recent years. One remaining challenge is the characterization of the structure of the hydrated polymer shell. Here we use small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to investigate iron oxide core–poly(ethylene glycol) brush shell nanoparticles with extremely high polymer grafting density. It is shown that the shell density profile can be described by a scaling model that takes into account the locally very high grafting density near the core. A good fit to a constant density region followed by a star-polymer-like, monotonously decaying density profile is shown, which could help explain the unique colloidal properties of such densely grafted core–shell nanoparticles. SAXS experiments probing the thermally induced dehydration of the shell and the response to dilution confirmed that the observed features are associated with the brush and not attributed to structure factors from particle aggregates. We thereby demonstrate that the structure of monodisperse core–shell nanoparticles with dense solvated shells can be well studied with SAXS and that different density models can be distinguished from each other. PMID:26321792

  20. Core-Shell Structure of Monodisperse Poly(ethylene glycol)-Grafted Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Studied by Small-Angle X-ray Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünewald, Tilman A; Lassenberger, Andrea; van Oostrum, Peter D J; Rennhofer, Harald; Zirbs, Ronald; Capone, Barbara; Vonderhaid, Iris; Amenitsch, Heinz; Lichtenegger, Helga C; Reimhult, Erik

    2015-07-14

    The promising applications of core-shell nanoparticles in the biological and medical field have been well investigated in recent years. One remaining challenge is the characterization of the structure of the hydrated polymer shell. Here we use small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to investigate iron oxide core-poly(ethylene glycol) brush shell nanoparticles with extremely high polymer grafting density. It is shown that the shell density profile can be described by a scaling model that takes into account the locally very high grafting density near the core. A good fit to a constant density region followed by a star-polymer-like, monotonously decaying density profile is shown, which could help explain the unique colloidal properties of such densely grafted core-shell nanoparticles. SAXS experiments probing the thermally induced dehydration of the shell and the response to dilution confirmed that the observed features are associated with the brush and not attributed to structure factors from particle aggregates. We thereby demonstrate that the structure of monodisperse core-shell nanoparticles with dense solvated shells can be well studied with SAXS and that different density models can be distinguished from each other.

  1. Determination of the structural and chemisorption characteristics of granulated active charcoal on the basis of coconut shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milenković Dragan D.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Wastewater purification and the acquirement of drinking water from water streams that are in most cases recipients of various industrial plants, present a significant problem nowadays. The structural characteristics of granulated active charcoal (GAC obtained by the carbonization of coconut shells and activated by steam are presented in this paper. The established kinetics of suspending cyanide from aqueous solution using GAC impregnated with copper(II acetate were studied and a mathematical model estabkusged by a regression - correlation analysis.

  2. Single and multi-layered core-shell structures based on ZnO nanorods obtained by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sáenz-Trevizo, A.; Amézaga-Madrid, P.; Pizá-Ruiz, P.; Antúnez-Flores, W.; Ornelas-Gutiérrez, C.; Miki-Yoshida, M., E-mail: mario.miki@cimav.edu.mx

    2015-07-15

    Core–shell nanorod structures were prepared by a sequential synthesis using an aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition technique. Several samples consisting of ZnO nanorods were initially grown over TiO{sub 2} film-coated borosilicate glass substrates, following the synthesis conditions reported elsewhere. Later on, a uniform layer consisting of individual Al, Ni, Ti or Fe oxides was grown onto ZnO nanorod samples forming the so-called single MO{sub x}/ZnO nanorod core–shell structures, where MO{sub x} was the metal oxide shell. Additionally, a three-layer core–shell sample was developed by growing Fe, Ti and Fe oxides alternately, onto the ZnO nanorods. The microstructure of the core–shell materials was characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was employed to corroborate the formation of different metal oxides. X-ray diffraction outcomes for single core–shell structures showed solely the presence of ZnO as wurtzite and TiO{sub 2} as anatase. For the multi-layered shell sample, the existence of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} as hematite was also detected. Morphological observations suggested the existence of an outer material grown onto the nanorods and further microstructural analysis by HR-STEM confirmed the development of core–shell structures in all cases. These studies also showed that the individual Al, Fe, Ni and Ti oxide layers are amorphous; an observation that matched with X-ray diffraction analysis where no apparent extra oxides were detected. For the multi-layered sample, the development of a shell consisting of three different oxide layers onto the nanorods was found. Overall results showed that no alteration in the primary ZnO core was produced during the growth of the shells, indicating that the deposition technique used herein was and it is suitable for the synthesis of homogeneous and complex nanomaterials high in quality and purity. In addition

  3. Electrochemical Synthesis of Core-Shell-Structured NbC-Fe Composite Powder for Enforcement in Low-Carbon Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongmei; Song, Qiushi; Xu, Qian; Chen, Ying; Xu, Liang; Man, Tiannan

    2017-11-01

    An NbC-Fe composite powder was synthesized from an Nb₂O₅/Fe/C mixture by electrochemical reduction and subsequent carbonization in molten CaCl₂-NaCl. The composite has a core-shell structure, in which NbC acts as the cores distributing in the Fe matrix. A strong bonding between NbC and Fe is benefit from the core-shell structure. The sintering and electrochemical reduction processes were investigated to probe the mechanism for the reactions. The results show that NbC particles about several nanometers were embraced by the Fe shell to form a composite about 100 nm in size. This featured structure can feasibly improve the wettability and sinterability of NbC as well as the uniform distribution of the carbide in the cast steel. By adding the composite into steel in the casting process, the grain size of the casted steel was markedly deceased from 1 mm to 500 μm on average, favoring the hardening of the casted steel.

  4. Preparation of core-shell structured CaCO3 microspheres as rapid and recyclable adsorbent for anionic dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mengen; Chen, Zhenhua; Lv, Xinyan; Zhou, Kang; Zhang, Jie; Tian, Xiaohan; Ren, Xiuli; Mei, Xifan

    2017-09-01

    Core-shell structured CaCO3 microspheres (MSs) were prepared by a facile, one-pot method at room temperature. The adsorbent dosage and adsorption time of the obtained CaCO3 MSs were investigated. The results suggest that these CaCO3 MSs can rapidly and efficiently remove 99-100% of anionic dyes within the first 2 min. The obtained CaCO3 MSs have a high Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area (211.77 m2 g-1). In addition, the maximum adsorption capacity of the obtained CaCO3 MSs towards Congo red was 99.6 mg g-1. We also found that the core-shell structured CaCO3 MSs have a high recycling capability for removing dyes from water. Our results demonstrate that the prepared core-shell structured CaCO3 MSs can be used as an ideal, rapid, efficient and recyclable adsorbent to remove dyes from aqueous solution.

  5. Anti-wear properties of the molluscan shell Scapharca subcrenata: Influence of surface morphology, structure and organic material on the elementary wear process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Limei, E-mail: lmtian@jlu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Bionic Engineering (Jilin University), Ministry of Education, Changchun 130022 (China); Tian, Ximei, E-mail: txm@jlu.edu.cn [Secretariat of the International Society of Bionic Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Wang, Yinci [Key Laboratory of Bionic Engineering (Jilin University), Ministry of Education, Changchun 130022 (China); Hu, Guangliang, E-mail: guoliang_huu@163.com [School of Automobile and Traffic Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Ren, Luquan, E-mail: lqren@jlu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Bionic Engineering (Jilin University), Ministry of Education, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2014-09-01

    As a typical natural biological mineralisation material, molluscan shells have excellent wear-resistance properties that result from the interactions amongst biological coupling elements such as morphology, structure and material. The in-depth study of the wear-resistance performance of shells and the contribution made by each coupling element may help to promote the development of new bionic wear-resistant devices. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of surface morphology (rib distribution on the shell), structure (rib coupled with nodules) and material (organic matter) on the anti-wear performance of the molluscan Scapharca subcrenata shell. The effect and contribution of each of these biological coupling elements were systematically investigated using the comparative experiment method. All three were found to exert significant effects on the shell's wear-resistance ability, and their individual contributions to that ability were revealed. Organic material can be classified as the principal coupling element, rib morphology as the secondary coupling element and the combined rib-nodule structure as the general coupling element. - Highlights: • We found that the S. subcrenata shell has an anti-wear ability. • This is related to the morphology, structure and material of the shell surface. • Organic material is the principal coupling element in its anti-wear ability. • Rib morphology could be considered the secondary coupling element. • The coupled structure could be regarded as the general coupling element.

  6. Synergetic Effect of Yolk-Shell Structure and Uniform Mixing of SnS-MoS₂ Nanocrystals for Improved Na-Ion Storage Capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung Ho; Kang, Yun Chan

    2015-11-11

    Mixed metal sulfide composite microspheres with a yolk-shell structure for sodium-ion batteries are studied. Tin-molybdenum oxide yolk-shell microspheres prepared by a one-pot spray pyrolysis process transform into yolk-shell SnS-MoS2 composite microspheres. The discharge capacities of the yolk-shell and dense-structured SnS-MoS2 composite microspheres for the 100th cycle are 396 and 207 mA h g(-1), and their capacity retentions measured from the second cycle are 89 and 47%, respectively. The yolk-shell SnS-MoS2 composite microspheres with high structural stability during repeated sodium insertion and desertion processes have low charge-transfer resistance even after long-term cycling. The synergetic effect of the yolk-shell structure and uniform mixing of the SnS and MoS2 nanocrystals result in the excellent sodium-ion storage properties of the yolk-shell SnS-MoS2 composite microspheres by improving their structural stability during cycling.

  7. Submerged membrane distillation for desalination of water

    KAUST Repository

    Francis, Lijo

    2016-10-27

    Submerged membrane modules for use for desalination of water are disclosed. In one or more aspects, the membrane modules can be submerged either in a feed solution tank or the feed solution can pass through the lumen side of the membrane submerged within the tank. The feed solution can be a water-based feed stream containing an amount of salt.

  8. Supersaturation-controlled surface structure evolution of Pd@Pt core-shell nanocrystals: enhancement of the ORR activity at a sub-10 nm scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Kun; Zheng, Weitao; Cui, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Here, we designed and implemented a facile strategy for controlling the surface evolution of Pd@Pt core-shell nanostructures by simply adjusting the volume of OH- to control the reducing ability of ascorbic acid and finally manipulating the supersaturation in the reaction system. The surface structure of the obtained Pd@Pt bimetallic nanocrystals transformed from a Pt {111} facet-exposed island shell to a conformal Pt {100} facet-exposed shell by increasing the pH value. The as-prepared well aligned Pd@Pt core-island shell nanocubes present both significantly enhanced electrocatalytic activity and favorable long-term stability toward the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media.Here, we designed and implemented a facile strategy for controlling the surface evolution of Pd@Pt core-shell nanostructures by simply adjusting the volume of OH- to control the reducing ability of ascorbic acid and finally manipulating the supersaturation in the reaction system. The surface structure of the obtained Pd@Pt bimetallic nanocrystals transformed from a Pt {111} facet-exposed island shell to a conformal Pt {100} facet-exposed shell by increasing the pH value. The as-prepared well aligned Pd@Pt core-island shell nanocubes present both significantly enhanced electrocatalytic activity and favorable long-term stability toward the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07940c

  9. Ultra-high-performance core-shell structured Ru@Pt/C catalyst prepared by a facile pulse electrochemical deposition method

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Dan; Li, Yuexia; Liao, Shijun; Su, Dong; Song, Huiyu; Li, Yingwei; Yang, Lijun; Li, Can

    2015-01-01

    Core-shell structured catalysts, made by placing either a monolayer or a thin layer of a noble metal on relatively cheap core-metal nanoparticles, are fascinating and promising fuel cell catalysts due...

  10. First-principles investigation on Au n @(ZnO)42 (n = 6-16) core-shell nanoparticles: structure stability and catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yaowen; Huo, Jinrong; Wang, Xiaoxu; Wang, Rongming

    2017-11-01

    A family of Au n @(ZnO)42 (n = 6 -16) cluster-assembled nanoparticles are studied by density-functional theory calculations. Different sizes, up to 100 atoms, are considered for several compositions. For each n, we design and construct a converged model for Au n @(ZnO)42 to analyze the coupling effect of adding Au atoms into ZnO outer shell. Among the optimized geometrical structures, we find that Au13 @(ZnO)42 has the most stable structure. The electronic properties, optical properties and catalytic activity of the Au13 @(ZnO)42 core-shell have been systematically investigated, which also shows consistency with the experimental results. It is found that forming a core-shell structure enhances the visible-light photocatalytic ability and Au13 @(ZnO)42 core-shell structure has a high catalytic efficiency for the reaction CO oxidation.

  11. Thermal Stability of Platinum-Cobalt Bimetallic Nanoparticles: Chemically Disordered Alloys, Ordered Intermetallics, and Core-Shell Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rao; Shao, Gui-Fang; Zhang, Yang; Wen, Yu-Hua

    2017-04-12

    Pt-Co bimetallic nanoparticles are promising candidates for Pt-based nanocatalysts and magnetic-storage materials. By using molecular dynamics simulations, we here present a detailed examination on the thermal stabilities of Pt-Co bimetallic nanoparticles with three configurations including chemically disordered alloy, ordered intermetallics, and core-shell structures. It has been revealed that ordered intermetallic nanoparticles possess better structural and thermal stability than disordered alloyed ones for both Pt3Co and PtCo systems, and Pt3Co-Pt core-shell nanoparticles exhibit the highest melting points and the best thermal stability among Pt-Co bimetallic nanoparticles, although their meltings all initiate at the surface and evolve inward with increasing temperatures. In contrast, Co-Pt core-shell nanoparticles display the worst thermal stability compared with the aforementioned nanoparticles. Furthermore, their melting initiates in the core and extends outward surface, showing a typical two-stage melting mode. The solid-solid phase transition is discovered in Co core before its melting. This work demonstrates the importance of composition distribution to tuning the properties of binary nanoparticles.

  12. Pulse electrodeposition to prepare core-shell structured AuPt@Pd/C catalyst for formic acid fuel cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xueyi; Luo, Fan; Song, Huiyu; Liao, Shijun; Li, Hualing

    2014-01-01

    A novel core-shell structured AuPt@Pd/C catalyst for the electrooxidation of formic acid is synthesized by a pulse electrodeposition process, and the AuPt core nanoparticles are obtained by a NaBH4 reduction method. The catalyst is characterized with X-ray powder diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, cyclic voltammetry, CO stripping and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The core-shell structure of the catalyst is revealed by the increase in particle size resulting from a Pd layer covering the AuPt core, and by a negative shift in the CO stripping peaks. The addition of a small amount of Pt improves the dispersion of Au and results in smaller core particles. The catalyst's activity is evaluated by cyclic voltammetry in formic acid solution. The catalyst shows excellent activity towards the anodic oxidation of formic acid, the mass activity reaches 4.4 A mg-1Pd and 0.83 A mg-1metal, which are 8.5 and 1.6 times that of commercial Pd/C. This enhanced electrocatalytic activity could be ascribed to the good dispersion of Au core particles resulting from the addition of Pt, as well as to the interaction between the Pd shell layer and the Au and Pt in the core nanoparticles.

  13. Constraints on Enceladus' Internal Structure from Cassini Gravity: Beyond Hydrostatic Cores and Uniformly Compensated Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, W. B.; Bland, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    Cassini has determined three important gravitational coefficients for Enceladus, J2, C22 and J3 (Iess et al., Science 344, 78). The gravity field is non-hydrostatic to 3σ (J2/C22 = 3.38-3.63, as opposed to 10/3). Iess et al. interpret these in terms of a hydrostatic interior (core) and isostatic (not hydrostatic) floating ice shell. The hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic contributions are separated by assuming the isostatic compensation depth is the same for each gravity term, although this can't be strictly true in the case of a regional south polar sea. The inferred normalized moment-of-inertia (0.335) implies a core density of 2340-2400 kg/m3, consistent with a highly hydrated and oxidized (sulfate-rich) core, or more plausibly (in a cosmochemical sense), a porous, water-saturated core. The long-term stability of such porosity is questionable, however. Modest topography on a more indurated core could significantly contribute to the gravity signal. For example, if Enceladus' core density were 3000 kg/m3, excess topography of only 1 km amplitude could provide the same "hydrostatic" J2 component as modeled in Iess et al. (and requires only 0.1 MPa of stress support). There is also the question of compensation depth of the ice shell. Different formalisms for spherical shells exist in the literature (e.g., Lambeck vs. Turcotte); Iess et al. follow the former and derive a 30-to-40-km thick shell at the south pole, whereas the Turcotte formalism gives a shell only 18-25-km thick. We pay particular attention to this issue, and note a thinner shell would be more mechanically compatible with the spacing of the "tiger stripes," if the fissures are indeed crevasses open to the ocean below.

  14. Laser spectroscopy of cadmium isotopes: probing the nuclear structure between the neutron 50 and 82 shell closures

    CERN Multimedia

    Blaum, K; Stroke, H H; Krieger, A R

    We propose to study the isotopic chain of cadmium with high-resolution laser spectroscopy for the first time. Our goal is to determine nuclear spins, moments and root-mean-square charge radii of ground and isomeric states between the neutron 50 and 82 shell closures, contributing decisively to a better understanding of the nuclear structure in the vicinity of the doubly-magic $^{100}$Sn and $^{132}$Sn. On the neutron-rich side this is expected to shed light on a shell-quenching hypothesis and consequently on the duration of the r-process along the waiting-point nuclei below $^{130}$Cd. On the neutron-deficient side it may elucidate the role of the cadmium isotopes in the rp-process for rapidly accreting neutron stars.

  15. Biodegradable Core–Multishell Nanocarriers: Influence of Inner Shell Structure on the Encapsulation Behavior of Dexamethasone and Tacrolimus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Unbehauen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We here present the synthesis and characterization of a set of biodegradable core–multishell (CMS nanocarriers. The CMS nanocarrier structure consists of hyperbranched polyglycerol (hPG as core material, a hydrophobic (12, 15, 18, 19, and 36 C-atoms inner and a polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether (mPEG outer shell that were conjugated by ester bonds only to reduce the toxicity of metabolites. The loading capacities (LC of the drugs, dexamethasone and tacrolimus, and the aggregate formation, phase transitions, and degradation kinetics were determined. The intermediate inner shell length (C15 system had the best overall performance with good LCs for both drugs as well as a promising degradation and release kinetics, which are of interest for dermal delivery.

  16. 1p3/2 Proton-Hole State in Sn132 and the Shell Structure Along N =82

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taprogge, J.; Jungclaus, A.; Grawe, H.; Nishimura, S.; Doornenbal, P.; Lorusso, G.; Simpson, G. S.; Söderström, P.-A.; Sumikama, T.; Xu, Z. Y.; Baba, H.; Browne, F.; Fukuda, N.; Gernhäuser, R.; Gey, G.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Jung, H. S.; Kameda, D.; Kim, G. D.; Kim, Y.-K.; Kojouharov, I.; Kubo, T.; Kurz, N.; Kwon, Y. K.; Li, Z.; Sakurai, H.; Schaffner, H.; Steiger, K.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Vajta, Zs.; Watanabe, H.; Wu, J.; Yagi, A.; Yoshinaga, K.; Benzoni, G.; Bönig, S.; Chae, K. Y.; Coraggio, L.; Covello, A.; Daugas, J.-M.; Drouet, F.; Gadea, A.; Gargano, A.; Ilieva, S.; Kondev, F. G.; Kröll, T.; Lane, G. J.; Montaner-Pizá, A.; Moschner, K.; Mücher, D.; Naqvi, F.; Niikura, M.; Nishibata, H.; Odahara, A.; Orlandi, R.; Patel, Z.; Podolyák, Zs.; Wendt, A.

    2014-04-01

    A low-lying state in In82131, the one-proton hole nucleus with respect to double magic Sn132, was observed by its γ decay to the Iπ=1/2- β-emitting isomer. We identify the new state at an excitation energy of Ex=1353 keV, which was populated both in the β decay of Cd13183 and after β-delayed neutron emission from Cd13284, as the previously unknown πp3/2 single-hole state with respect to the Sn132 core. Exploiting this crucial new experimental information, shell-model calculations were performed to study the structure of experimentally inaccessible N =82 isotones below Sn132. The results evidence a surprising absence of proton subshell closures along the chain of N =82 isotones. The consequences of this finding for the evolution of the N =82 shell gap along the r-process path are discussed.

  17. Thermal spin transition of circularly shaped nanoparticles in a core-shell structure investigated with an electroelastic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slimani, A.; Boukheddaden, K.; Yamashita, K.

    2014-06-01

    The functionalization of spin crossover materials as nanoscopic devices is a big challenge to overcome. It will entail a detailed exploration of why and how size reduction affects spin crossover behavior. We investigated the thermal spin transition of a nanoparticle in a core-shell structure as a function of particle size, the intensity of interactions between molecules, and also the thickness of the shell and its stiffness. The analysis was performed using an electroelastic model based on Monte Carlo methods on a distortable two-dimensional lattice, the sites of which are occupied by high-spin or low-spin atoms. Such analysis reflects the crucial influence of size as well as of the surrounding environment on the behavior of the spin transition, and it provides reliable explanations based on the elastic properties of the system.

  18. PREFACE: 11th International Spring Seminar on Nuclear Physics: Shell Model and Nuclear Structure - achievements of the past two decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The 11th International Seminar on Nuclear Physics was held in Ischia from May 12 to May 16, 2014. This Seminar was dedicated to Aldo Covello, who has been the promoter of this series of meetings, which started in Sorrento in 1986 and continued with meetings held every two or three years in the Naples area. Aldo's idea was to offer to a group of researchers, actively working in selected fields of Nuclear Physics, the opportunity to confront their points of view in a lively and informal way. The choice for the period of the year, Spring, as well as the sites chosen reflected this intent. The first meeting was of a purely theoretical nature, but it was immediately clear that the scope of these conferences needed to be enlarged calling into play the experimental community. Then, starting from the second meeting, all the following ones have been characterized by fruitful discussion between theoretical and experimental researchers on current achievements and future developments of nuclear structure. This may be read, in fact, as one of the motivating factors for Aldo's election as Fellow of the American Physical Society in 2008 "... for his outstanding contributions to the international nuclear physics community by providing, for over two decades, a venue for theorists and experimentalists to share their latest ideas." The present meeting, organized by Aldo's former students and with the benefit of his suggestions, has maintained this tradition. The title "Shell model and nuclear structure: achievements of the past two decades" recalls that of the 2nd International Spring Seminar "Shell Model and Nuclear Structure: where do we stand?". The main aim of this 11th Seminar was, in fact, to discuss the changes of the past two decades on our view of nuclei in terms of shell structure as well as the perspectives of the shell model, which has been one of the key points in Aldo's research. This point is well accounted by the Opening Speech of Igal Talmi, one of the fathers of the

  19. Glass transition of poly (methyl methacrylate) filled with nanosilica and core-shell structured silica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Yihu; Bu, Jing; Zuo, Min

    2017-01-01

    Core-shell (CS) nanocomposite particles with 53.4 wt% cross-linked poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) shell of 11.6 nm in thickness were fabricated via miniemulsion polymerization of methyl methacrylate in the presence of modified nanosilica. The influence of nanosilica and CS nanoparticles on glass...... transition and segmental dynamics of PMMA in the nanocomposites prepared via solution casting was compared. The remarkable depression (≥10 °C) of glass transition temperature (Tg) induced by the incorporation of SiO2 and CS was both observed at low loadings. Here, different mechanisms were responsible...

  20. Enhanced microwave absorption properties and mechanism of core/shell structured magnetic nanoparticles/carbon-based nanohybrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Xiaosi, E-mail: sci.xsqi@gzu.edu.cn [Physics Department, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures and Jiangsu Provincial Laboratory for NanoTechnology, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Hu, Qi; Xu, Jianle; Xie, Ren; Bai, Zhongchen; Jiang, Yang; Qin, Shuijie [Physics Department, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Zhong, Wei, E-mail: wzhong@nju.edu.cn [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures and Jiangsu Provincial Laboratory for NanoTechnology, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Du, Youwei [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures and Jiangsu Provincial Laboratory for NanoTechnology, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2016-09-15

    Graphical abstract: In the article, core/shell Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/C, Fe/helical carbon nanotubes were synthesized selectively. The results indicated that the optimum reflection loss (RL) could reach −47.1 dB at 17.39 GHz with a matching thickness of 1.39 mm. The absorption bandwidth with the RL below −20 dB was up to 11.59 GHz. Moreover, based on the obtained results, the possibly enhanced microwave absorption mechanisms were also discussed in detail. - Highlights: • An efficient scheme was designed to synthesize core/shell magnetic nanoparticles/carbon-based hybrids. • By controlling the temperature, different categories of core/shell nanohybrids were synthesized. • The obtained Fe/CNT hybrid exhibits enhanced microwave absorption property. • Enhanced microwave absorbing mechanism was discussed in detail. - Abstract: An efficient scheme was designed to selectively synthesize different categories of core/shell structured magnetic nanoparticles/carbon-based nanohybrids such as Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/C and Fe/helical carbon nanotubes (HCNTs) through the decomposition of acetylene directly over Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanotubes by controlling the pyrolysis temperature. The measured electromagnetic parameters indicated that the Fe/HCNT nanohybrids exhibited enhanced microwave absorption properties, which may be related to their special structures. The optimum reflection loss (RL) could reach −47.1 dB at 17.39 GHz with a matching thickness of 1.39 mm. The absorption bandwidth with the RL values below −20 dB was up to 11.59 GHz. Moreover, based on the obtained results, the possible enhanced EM absorption mechanisms were also discussed in detail. The results show excellent microwave absorption materials that are lightweight, have strong absorption and a wide absorption frequency band may be realized in these nanohybrids.

  1. A First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Study of the Solvation Shell Structure, Vibrational Spectra, Polarity, and Dynamics around a Nitrate Ion in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sushma; Choudhary, Ashu; Chandra, Amalendu

    2017-09-28

    A first-principles molecular dynamics study is presented for the structural, dynamical, vibrational, and dipolar properties of the solvation shell of a nitrate ion in deuterated water. A detailed description of the anisotropic structure of the solvation shell is presented through calculations of various structural distributions in different conical shells around the perpendicular axis of the ion. The nitrate ion-water dimer potential energies are also calculated for many different orientations of water. The average vibrational stretch frequency of OD modes in the solvation shell is found to be higher than that of other OD modes in the bulk, which signifies a weakening of hydrogen bonds in the hydration shell. A splitting of the NO stretch frequencies and an associated fast spectral diffusion of the solute are also observed in the current study. The dynamics of rotation and hydrogen bond relaxation are found to be faster in the hydration shell than that in the bulk water. The residence time of water in the hydration shell is, however, found to be rather long. The nitrate ion is found to have a dipole moment of 0.9 D in water which can be attributed to its fluctuating interactions with the surrounding water.

  2. Preparation and formation process of α-MnS@MoS2 microcubes with hierarchical core/shell structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xin; Li, Huan; He, Jin; Kang, Liping; Jiang, Ruibing; Shi, Feng; Xu, Hua; Lei, Zhibin; Liu, Zong-Huai

    2017-12-01

    α-MnS@MoS2 microcubes with hierarchical core/shell structure are prepared by one-step hydrothermal method in a reaction system of δ-MnO2 nanowires, thioacetamide and Na2MoO4 at 200°C for 24h, and the formation process and phase transition behavior has been investigated in detail. Research results indicate that uniform nanosheets of MoS2 with thickness of about 20nm and size up to hundreds of nanometers are vertically grow on the surface of α-MnS core, and the amount of sodium molybdate plays a crucial role in adjusting the crystal phase and structure of the obtained materials. The formation process of α-MnS@MoS2 microcubes with hierarchical core/shell structure consist of four stages, δ-MnO2 nanowires with layered structure are firstly transforms into tetragonal Mn3O4 nanoparticles, then into γ-MnS hexagonal prisms and α-MnS microcubes, and finally into α-MnS@MoS2 microcubes. In compare with β-MnS and γ-MnS phases, α-MnS can be formed in α-MnS@MoS2 microcubes because it has not only higher lattice energy, but also the lowest Gibbs free energy and the sufficient activation energy at high hydrothermal treatment temperature. By using this one-step hydrothermal technology without template assisted route, other transition metal sulfide materials with novel core/shell structure and morphology can be designed and prepared by selecting transition metal and adjusting the amount of sulfur source. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Structure of Chiral Au44(2,4-DMBT)26 Nanocluster with an 18-Electron Shell Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Lingwen; Zhuang, Shengli; Yao, Chuanhao; Yan, Nan; Chen, Jishi; Wang, Chengming; Xia, Nan; Liu, Xu; Li, Man-Bo; Li, Lingling; Bao, Xiaoli; Wu, Zhikun

    2016-08-24

    The 18-electron shell closure structure of Au nanoclusters protected by thiol ligands has not been reported until now. Herein, we synthesize a novel nanocluster bearing the same gold atom number but a different thiolate number as another structurally resolved nanocluster Au44(TBBT)28 (TBBTH = 4-tert-butylbenzenelthiol). The new cluster was determined to be Au44(2,4-DMBT)26 (2,4-DMBTH = 2,4-dimethylbenzenethiol) using multiple techniques, including mass spectrometry and single crystal X-ray crystallography (SCXC). Au44(2,4-DMBT)26 represents the first 18-electron closed-shell gold nanocluster. SCXC reveals that the atomic structure of Au44(2,4-DMBT)26 is completely different from that of Au44(TBBT)28 but is similar to the structure of Au38Q. The arrangement of staples (bridging thiolates) and part of the Au29 kernel atom induces the chirality of Au44(2,4-DMBT)26. The finding that a small portion of the gold kernel exhibits chirality is interesting because it has not been previously reported to the best of our knowledge. Although Au44(2,4-DMBT)26 bears an 18-electron shell closure structure, it is less thermostable than Au44(TBBT)28, indicating that multiple factors contribute to the thermostability of gold nanoclusters. Surprisingly, the small difference in Au/thiolate molar ratio between Au44(2,4-DMBT)26 and Au44(TBBT)28 leads to a dramatic distinction in Au 4f X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, where it is found that the charge state of Au in Au44(2,4-DMBT)26 is remarkably more positive than that in Au44(TBBT)28 and even slightly more positive than the charge states of gold in Au-(2,4-DMBT) or Au-TBBT complexes.

  4. The No Core Gamow Shell Model for ab-initio Nuclear Structure Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papadimitriou G.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We apply the Berggren basis in a No-Core Shell Model framework to calculate ground state (g.s. energies of 3H, 4He and 5He. In our studies we use the Argonne υ18 and the chiral N3LO potentials, both of which are renormalized via a Vlow−k process.

  5. Rotational band structure of intruder configurations -- Success and limitations of the cranked shell model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyss, R. [Joint Inst. for Heavy-Ion Research, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility

    1993-12-31

    Rotational bands built on intruder configurations are discussed within the Cranked Shell Model. The experimental observed alignment pattern occurring in these bands cannot be accounted for by standard mean field calculations. The discrepancy between theory and experiment is traced back to the fact that the neutron-proton interaction is only partly and indirectly included in the standard mean field approach.

  6. Flecs, a flexible coupling shell - Parallel application to fluid-structure interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Nool (Margreet); E.J. Lingen; M.C.A. van Zuijlen; M. Stroeven; H. Bijl; S.E. Simon (Sunil); G. Maroulis

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we discuss the second version of FLECS, a generic, open-source coupling shell that can be used to join two or more arbitrary solvers. In general multidisciplinary computations are very computing-intensive. A remedy against long computing times is large-scale parallelism.

  7. FLECS, a Flexible Coupling Shell Parallel Application to Fluid-Structure Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Nool (Margreet); E.J. Lingen; M.C.A. van Zuijlen; M. Stroeven; H. Bijl; T.E. Simos

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we discuss the second version of FLECS, a generic, open-source coupling shell that can be used to join two or more arbitrary solvers. In general multidisciplinary computations are very computing-intensive. A remedy against long computing times is large-scale parallelism.

  8. Palm-Kernel Shell Concrete For Structural Use – A Preliminary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper reports on the results of an investigation into the physical and strength characteristics of concrete (norminal mixes), which contains crushed palm-kernel shell as fine aggregates instead of normal river sand. 66 No beams of 100mm x 100mm x 500mm sizes and 396 No 100mm cubes as well were tested with ...

  9. Crystalline/amorphous tungsten oxide core/shell hierarchical structures and their synergistic effect for optical modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, D; Xie, D; Shi, F; Wang, D H; Ge, X; Xia, X H; Wang, X L; Gu, C D; Tu, J P

    2015-12-15

    High-performance electrochromic films with large color contrast and fast switching speed are of great importance for developing advanced smart windows. In this work, crystalline/amorphous WO3 core/shell (c-WO3@a-WO3) nanowire arrays rationally are synthesized by combining hydrothermal and electrodeposition methods. The 1D c-WO3@a-WO3 core/shell hierarchical structures show a synergistic effect for the enhancement of optical modulation, especially in the infrared (IR) region. By optimizing the electrodeposition time of 400s, the core/shell array exhibits a significant optical modulation (70.3% at 750nm, 42.0% at 2000nm and 51.4% at 10μm), fast switching speed (3.5s and 4.8s), high coloration efficiency (43.2cm(2)C(-1) at 750nm) and excellent cycling performance (68.5% after 3000 cycles). The crystalline/amorphous nanostructured film can provide an alternative way for developing high-performance electrochromic materials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effective adsorbent for arsenic removal: core/shell structural nano zero-valent iron/manganese oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Trung Huu; Kim, Choonsoo; Hong, Sung Pil; Yoon, Jeyong

    2017-11-01

    Recently, nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) has emerged as an effective adsorbent for the removal of arsenic from aqueous solutions. However, its use in various applications has suffered from reactivity loss resulting in a decreased efficiency. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop an effective arsenic adsorbent as a core/shell structural nZVI/manganese oxide (or nZVI/Mn oxide) to minimize the reactivity loss of the nZVI. As the major result, the arsenic adsorption capacities of the nZVI/Mn oxide for As(V) and As(III) were approximately two and three times higher than that of the nZVI, respectively. In addition, the As(V) removal efficiency of the nZVI/Mn oxide was maintained through 4 cycles of regeneration whereas that of the nZVI was decreased significantly. The enhanced reactivity and reusability of the nZVI/Mn oxide can be successfully explained by the synergistic interaction of the nZVI core and manganese oxide shell, in which the manganese oxides participate in oxidation reactions with corroded Fe(2+) and subsequently retard the release of aqueous iron providing additional surface sites for arsenic adsorption. In summary, this study reports the successful fabrication of a core/shell nZVI/Mn oxide as an effective adsorbent for the removal of arsenic from aqueous solutions.

  11. Assembly and luminescence properties of lanthanide-polyoxometalates/polyethyleneimine/SiO{sub 2} particles with core–shell structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jun, E-mail: junwang924@yahoo.com.cn; Fan, Shaohua; Zhao, Weiqian; Zhang, Hongyan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, two lanthanide-polyoxometalate (LnW{sub 10}) complexes were bonded on the surface of the polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified silica nanoparticles with different sizes, resulting in the formation of LnW{sub 10}/PEI/SiO{sub 2} particles. The hybrid core–shell particles were characterized by infrared, luminescent spectra, scanning electronic microscope, and transmission electronic microscope. The particles obtained exhibit the fine spherical core–shell structure and the excellent luminescence properties. The luminescence spectra studies revealed that the formation of LnW{sub 10}/PEI/SiO{sub 2} particles and the size of particle have an influence on the luminescence properties of lanthanide ions. - Highlights: ► SiO{sub 2}/polyethyleneimine (PEI) shows the chemisorption for Ln-polyoxometalates (LnW{sub 10}). ► The core-shell LnW{sub 10}/PEI/SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles with different sizes were fabricated. ► The hybrid particles exhibit the excellent luminescence properties. ► The sizes of particles affect the luminescence properties of lanthanide ions.

  12. Core–shell-structure Ag–BaTiO{sub 3} composite nanopowders prepared directly by flame spray pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung Ho; Ko, You Na; Lee, Jung-Kul [Department of Chemical Engineering, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Byung Kyu [Suncheon Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Suncheon 540-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Yun Chan, E-mail: yckang@konkuk.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    Core–shell-structure Ag–BaTiO{sub 3} composite nanopowders are prepared directly by flame spray pyrolysis. The single-crystalline Ag was located in the core part of the composite powder, and the Ba and Ti components are uniformly distributed in the shell part. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of the Ag–BaTiO{sub 3} composite powders have the main crystal peaks of Ag and broad peaks at around 28°. The Ag–BaTiO{sub 3} pellets with low Ag contents (below 20 wt%) have a dense structure and fine grain size. Abnormal grain growth of the Ag(30 wt%)–BaTiO{sub 3} pellets occurs even at a low sintering temperature of 1000 °C. The Ag–BaTiO{sub 3} pellet had a mixed crystal structure of BaTiO{sub 3} and Ag phases. Silver is uniformly distributed in the BaTiO{sub 3} matrix without phase separation. The dielectric constants of the BaTiO{sub 3}, Ag(10 wt%)–BaTiO{sub 3}, and Ag(30 wt%)–BaTiO{sub 3} pellets are 830, 2130, and 4680, respectively. - Highlights: • Core–shell-structure Ag–BaTiO{sub 3} nanopowders are prepared by flame spray pyrolysis. • The single-crystalline Ag is located in the core part of the composite nanopowders. • The dielectric constant of the Ag(30 wt%)–BaTiO{sub 3} pellet is high as 4680.

  13. Formation of an Anti-Core–Shell Structure in Layered Oxide Cathodes for Li-Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hanlei [Materials; amp, Department; NorthEast; Omenya, Fredrick [NorthEast; Whittingham, M. Stanley [NorthEast; Wang, Chongmin [Environmental; Zhou, Guangwen [Materials; amp, Department; NorthEast

    2017-10-20

    The layered → rock-salt phase transformation in the layered dioxide cathodes for Li-ion batteries is believed to result in a “core-shell” structure of the primary particles, in which the core region maintains as the layered phase while the surface region undergoes the phase transformation to the rock-salt phase. Using transmission electron microscopy, here we demonstrate the formation of an “anti-core-shell” structure in cycled primary particles with a formula of LiNi0.80Co0.15Al0.05O2, in which the surface and subsurface regions remain as the layered structure while the rock-salt phase forms as domains in the bulk with a thin layer of the spinel phase between the rock-salt core and the skin of the layered phase. Formation of this anti-core-shell structure is attributed to the oxygen loss at the surface that drives the migration of oxygen from the bulk to the surface, thereby resulting in localized areas of significantly reduced oxygen levels in the bulk of the particle, which subsequently undergoes the phase transformation to the rock-salt domains. The formation of the anti-core-shell rock-salt domains is responsible for the reduced capacity, discharge voltage and ionic conductivity in cycled cathode.

  14. Structural and Optical Properties of Core-Shell TiO2/CdS Prepared by Chemical Bath Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jawad, Selma M. H.

    2017-10-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanorod arrays (NRAs) sensitized with cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles (NPs) were deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD). TiO2 NRAs were also obtained by using the same method on glass substrates coated with fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO). The structure of the FTO/TiO2/CdS core-shell was characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescence, and photoelectrocatalysis of FTO/TiO2 and FTO/TiO2/CdS. The FTO/TiO2 conformed to anatase and rutile phase structures for different pH values and also with annealing. XRD patterns of the FTO/TiO2/CdS sample exhibited two peaks corresponding to hexagonal (100) and (101) for CdS. Scanning electron micrographs showed nanorod structures for the TiO2 thin films deposited at a pH value equal 0.7. Optical results showed the CdS deposited on nanorod TiO2 exhibited increased absorption ability in the visible light, indicating an increased photocatalytic activity for TiO2/CdS core-shell nanorods in the visible light. When illuminated with a UV-Vis light source, the TiO2/CdS core-shell films displayed high responses. A composite exists between the TiO2 nanostructure and CdS NPs because the film absorbs the incident light located in both the visible and UV-Vis regions. A higher response to UV-Vis light was attained with the use of TiO2 NRAs/CdS NPs films prepared by CBD. This approach offers a technique for fabricating photoelectrodes.

  15. Off-energy-shell behavior of scattering amplitude and the structure of NN potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Almaliev, A N; Shikhalev, M A

    2002-01-01

    For two rather distinct types of NN potentials - with forbidden states and common ones with short-range repulsion - an extensive investigation into off-shell behavior of the scattering amplitudes and associated pp -> pp gamma Bremsstrahlung observables are undertaken. The emphasis is on the action of the shape and deepness of the central part of the potentials on the mentioned quantities. The necessity of taking into consideration the meson-exchange sector of the NN interaction is also stressed. It is shown that, provided one uses potentials which give a good description of phase shifts as well as low off-shell momentum-transfer behavior of the scattering amplitudes, the reaction pp -> pp gamma cannot allow to make a choice between the potentials, at least up to the energy of protons about 400 MeV in laboratory frame

  16. Attapulgite Nanofiber-Cellulose Nanocomposite with Core-Shell Structure for Dye Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposite particle used for adsorption has attracted continuous attention because of large specific surface area and adjustable properties from nanocomponent. Herein nanocomposite particle with cellulose core and attapulgite nanofibers shell was prepared. The size of cellulose core was about 2 mm and the thickness of nanofibers shell is about 300 μm. Adsorption capacity of nanocomposite particle to methylene blue can reach up to 11.07 mg L−1 and the best adsorption effect occurs at pH = 8; pseudo-first-order equation and the Langmuir equation best describe the adsorption kinetic and isotherm, respectively; repeated adsorption-desorption experimental results show that 94.64% of the original adsorption capacity can be retained after being reused three times.

  17. Structure and magnetic properties of iron-platinum particles with {gamma}-ferric-oxide shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basit, L.; Shukoor, I.; Ksenofontov, V.; Fecher, G.H.; Tremel, W.; Felser, C. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Mainz (Germany); Nepijko, S.A.; Schoenhense, G. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik, Mainz (Germany); Klimenkov, M. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Institut fuer Materialforschung I, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    Nanoparticles of solid solution Fe{sub x}Pt{sub 1-x}, where 0.25{>=}x{>=}0 (fcc lattice) with {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} shell (lattice of the spinel type) were synthesised and characterised by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, electron energy loss spectroscopy, Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetometry. From the point of view of magnetic properties, such two-phase particles are interesting because their core is antiferromagnetic or paramagnetic (at very small values of x) whereas the shell is ferrimagnetic. The size of the particles was in the range of several nanometers. The Moessbauer measurements revealed a blocking temperature of about 100 K above which the particles are superparamagnetic. Towards lower temperatures, the magnetic characteristics of an ensemble of such particles show an increase of magnetic rigidity. (orig.)

  18. Structure and magnetic properties of iron-platinum particles with iron oxide shell.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basit, Lubna; Shukoor, Ibrahim; Ksenofontov, Vadim; Tremel, Wolfgang; Fecher, Gerhard H.; Felser, Claudia [Institut of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg - University, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Nepijko, Sergei A.; Schoenhense, Gerd [Institut of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg - University, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Klimenkov, Michael [Institut of Materials Research I, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Nanoparticles of solid solution Fe{sub x}Pt{sub 1-x}, where 0.25{>=}x {>=}0 with Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} shell were synthesized and characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, electron energy loss spectroscopy, Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetometry. The magnetic properties, of such two-phase particles are interesting because their core is antiferromagnetic or paramagnetic (at very small values of x) whereas the shell is ferrimagnetic. The size of the particles was in the range of several nanometers. {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy revealed a blocking temperature of about 100 K above which the particles are superparamagnetic. Towards lower temperatures, the magnetic characteristics showed an increase of magnetic rigidity. The saturation magnetization increases by a factor of 1.4 between room temperature and 5 K.

  19. Shell structure and level migrations in zinc studied using collinear laser spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Tungate, G; De rydt, M A E; Flanagan, K; Rajabali, M M; Hammen, M; Blaum, K; Froemmgen, N E; Kowalska, M; Campbell, P; Neugart, R; Kreim, K D; Stroke, H H; Krieger, A R; Procter, T J

    We propose to perform collinear laser spectroscopy of zinc isotopes to measure the nuclear spin, magnetic dipole moment, electric quadrupole moment and mean-square charge radius. The yield database indicates that measurements of the isotopes $^{60-81}$Zn will be feasible. These measurements will cross the N = 50 shell closure and provide nuclear moments in a region where an inversion of ground-state spin has been identified in neighbouring chains.

  20. The Development of a Composite Consumable Insert for Submerged ARC Welding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1980-01-01

    .... When the submerged arc process was utilized to weld the butt joint in large flat plate structures, the repositioning of the plate for welding of the reverse side was a costly time consuming procedure...

  1. Swan foraging shapes spatial distribution of two submerged plants, favouring the preferred prey species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandsten, H.; Klaassen, M.R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Compared to terrestrial environments, grazing intensity on belowground plant parts may be particularly strong in aquatic environments, which may have great effects on plant-community structure. We observed that the submerged macrophyte, Potamogeton pectinatus, which mainly reproduces with tubers,

  2. Magnetic MSP@ZrO₂ microspheres with yolk-shell structure: designed synthesis and application in highly selective enrichment of phosphopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wan-Fu; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Ting; Yu, Meng; Guo, Jia; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Hao-Jie; Wang, Chang-Chun

    2014-06-10

    Magnetic yolk-shell MSP@ZrO2 microspheres consisting of a movable magnetic supraparticle (MSP) core and a crystalline ZrO2 shell were synthesized via a two-step controlled "sol-gel" approach for the first time. First, a large amount of the generated hydrolyzate Zr(OH)4 was firmly fixed onto the surface of the cross-linked polymethylacrylic acid matrix via a strong hydrogen-bonding interaction between Zr(OH)4 and the carboxyl groups. Then a calcination process was adopted to convert the Zr(OH)4 into a continuous ZrO2 shell and simultaneously make the ZrO2 shell crystallized. At the same time, the polymer matrix could be selectively removed to form a yolk-shell structure, which has better dispersibility and higher adsorbing efficiency of phosphopeptides than its solid counterpart. The formation mechanism of such yolk-shell microspheres could be reasonably proved by the results of TEM, TGA, VSM, XRD, and FT-IR characterization. By taking advantage of the unique properties, the yolk-shell MSP@ZrO2 exhibited high specificity and great capability in selective enrichment of phosphopeptides, and a total of 33 unique phosphopeptides mapped to 33 different phosphoproteins had been identified from 1 mL of human saliva. This result clearly demonstrated that the yolk-shell MSP@ZrO2 has great performance in purifying and identifying the low-abundant phosphopeptides from real complex biological samples. Moreover, the synthetic method can be used to produce hybrid yolk-shell MSP@ZrO2-TiO2.

  3. Dilute Nitride Nanowire Lasers Based on a GaAs/GaNAs Core/Shell Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shula; Jansson, Mattias; Stehr, Jan E; Huang, Yuqing; Ishikawa, Fumitaro; Chen, Weimin M; Buyanova, Irina A

    2017-03-08

    Nanowire (NW) lasers operating in the near-infrared spectral range are of significant technological importance for applications in telecommunications, sensing, and medical diagnostics. So far, lasing within this spectral range has been achieved using GaAs/AlGaAs, GaAs/GaAsP, and InGaAs/GaAs core/shell NWs. Another promising III-V material, not yet explored in its lasing capacity, is the dilute nitride GaNAs. In this work, we demonstrate, for the first time, optically pumped lasing from the GaNAs shell of a single GaAs/GaNAs core/shell NW. The characteristic "S"-shaped pump power dependence of the lasing intensity, with the concomitant line width narrowing, is observed, which yields a threshold gain, gth, of 3300 cm-1 and a spontaneous emission coupling factor, β, of 0.045. The dominant lasing peak is identified to arise from the HE21b cavity mode, as determined from its pronounced emission polarization along the NW axis combined with theoretical calculations of lasing threshold for guided modes inside the nanowire. Even without intentional passivation of the NW surface, the lasing emission can be sustained up to 150 K. This is facilitated by the improved surface quality due to nitrogen incorporation, which partly suppresses the surface-related nonradiative recombination centers via nitridation. Our work therefore represents the first step toward development of room-temperature infrared NW lasers based on dilute nitrides with extended tunability in the lasing wavelength.

  4. Ag-Sn Bimetallic Catalyst with a Core-Shell Structure for CO2 Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luc, Wesley; Collins, Charles; Wang, Siwen; Xin, Hongliang; He, Kai; Kang, Yijin; Jiao, Feng

    2017-02-08

    Converting greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) to value-added chemicals is an appealing approach to tackle CO2 emission challenges. The chemical transformation of CO2 requires suitable catalysts that can lower the activation energy barrier, thus minimizing the energy penalty associated with the CO2 reduction reaction. First-row transition metals are potential candidates as catalysts for electrochemical CO2 reduction; however, their high oxygen affinity makes them easy to be oxidized, which could, in turn, strongly affect the catalytic properties of metal-based catalysts. In this work, we propose a strategy to synthesize Ag-Sn electrocatalysts with a core-shell nanostructure that contains a bimetallic core responsible for high electronic conductivity and an ultrathin partially oxidized shell for catalytic CO2 conversion. This concept was demonstrated by a series of Ag-Sn bimetallic electrocatalysts. At an optimal SnOx shell thickness of ∼1.7 nm, the catalyst exhibited a high formate Faradaic efficiency of ∼80% and a formate partial current density of ∼16 mA cm-2 at -0.8 V vs RHE, a remarkable performance in comparison to state-of-the-art formate-selective CO2 reduction catalysts. Density-functional theory calculations showed that oxygen vacancies on the SnO (101) surface are stable at highly negative potentials and crucial for CO2 activation. In addition, the adsorption energy of CO2- at these oxygen-vacant sites can be used as the descriptor for catalytic performance because of its linear correlation to OCHO* and COOH*, two critical intermediates for the HCOOH and CO formation pathways, respectively. The volcano-like relationship between catalytic activity toward formate as a function of the bulk Sn concentration arises from the competing effects of favorable stabilization of OCHO* by lattice expansion and the electron conductivity loss due to the increased thickness of the SnOx layer.

  5. Growth control, structure, chemical state, and photoresponse of CuO-CdS core-shell heterostructure nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mel, A A; Buffière, M; Bouts, N; Gautron, E; Tessier, P Y; Henzler, K; Guttmann, P; Konstantinidis, S; Bittencourt, C; Snyders, R

    2013-07-05

    The growth of single-crystal CuO nanowires by thermal annealing of copper thin films in air is studied. We show that the density, length, and diameter of the nanowires can be controlled by tuning the morphology and structure of the copper thin films deposited by DC magnetron sputtering. After identifying the optimal conditions for the growth of CuO nanowires, chemical bath deposition is employed to coat the CuO nanowires with CdS in order to form p-n nanojunction arrays. As revealed by high-resolution TEM analysis, the thickness of the polycrystalline CdS shell increases when decreasing the diameter of the CuO core for a given time of CdS deposition. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy combined with transmission x-ray microscopy allows the chemical analysis of isolated nanowires. The absence of modification in the spectra at the Cu L and O K edges after the deposition of CdS on the CuO nanowires indicates that neither Cd nor S diffuse into the CuO phase. We further demonstrate that the core-shell nanowires exhibit the I-V characteristic of a resistor instead of a diode. The electrical behavior of the device was found to be photosensitive, since increasing the incident light intensity induces an increase in the collected electrical current.

  6. Electronic fine structure calculation of metal complexes with three-open-shell s, d, and p configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanantoanina, Harry; Daul, Claude

    2017-08-01

    The ligand field density functional theory (LFDFT) algorithm is extended to treat the electronic structure and properties of systems with three-open-shell electron configurations, exemplified in this work by the calculation of the core and semi-core 1s, 2s, and 3s one-electron excitations in compounds containing transition metal ions. The work presents a model to non-empirically resolve the multiplet energy levels arising from the three-open-shell systems of non-equivalent ns, 3d, and 4p electrons and to calculate the oscillator strengths corresponding to the electric-dipole 3d m  → ns 13d m 4p 1 transitions, with n = 1, 2, 3 and m = 0, 1, 2, …, 10 involved in the s electron excitation process. Using the concept of ligand field, the Slater-Condon integrals, the spin-orbit coupling constants, and the parameters of the ligand field potential are determined from density functional theory (DFT). Therefore, a theoretical procedure using LFDFT is established illustrating the spectroscopic details at the atomic scale that can be valuable in the analysis and characterization of the electronic spectra obtained from X-ray absorption fine structure or electron energy loss spectroscopies.

  7. Synthesis, characterization and nitrite ion sensing performance of reclaimable composite samples through a core-shell structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiao; Yuqing, Zhao; Cui, Jiantao; Zheng, Qian; Bo, Wang

    2018-02-15

    The following paper reported and discussed a nitrite ion optical sensing platform based on a core-shell structure, using superamagnetic nanoparticles as the core, a silica molecular sieve MCM-41 as the shell and two rhodamine derivatives as probe, respectively. This superamagnetic core made this sensing platform reclaimable after finishing nitrite ion sensing procedure. This sensing platform was carefully characterized by means of electron microscopy images, porous structure analysis, magnetic response, IR spectra and thermal stability analysis. Detailed analysis suggested that the emission of these composite samples was quenchable by nitrite ion, showing emission turn off effect. A static sensing mechanism based on an additive reaction between chemosensors and nitrite ion was proposed. These composite samples followed Demas quenching equation against different nitrite ion concentrations. Limit of detection value was obtained as low as 0.4μM. It was found that, after being quenched by nitrite ion, these composite samples could be reclaimed and recovered by sulphamic acid, confirming their recyclability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Synthesis, characterization and nitrite ion sensing performance of reclaimable composite samples through a core-shell structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiao; Yuqing, Zhao; Cui, Jiantao; Zheng, Qian; Bo, Wang

    2018-02-01

    The following paper reported and discussed a nitrite ion optical sensing platform based on a core-shell structure, using superamagnetic nanoparticles as the core, a silica molecular sieve MCM-41 as the shell and two rhodamine derivatives as probe, respectively. This superamagnetic core made this sensing platform reclaimable after finishing nitrite ion sensing procedure. This sensing platform was carefully characterized by means of electron microscopy images, porous structure analysis, magnetic response, IR spectra and thermal stability analysis. Detailed analysis suggested that the emission of these composite samples was quenchable by nitrite ion, showing emission turn off effect. A static sensing mechanism based on an additive reaction between chemosensors and nitrite ion was proposed. These composite samples followed Demas quenching equation against different nitrite ion concentrations. Limit of detection value was obtained as low as 0.4 μM. It was found that, after being quenched by nitrite ion, these composite samples could be reclaimed and recovered by sulphamic acid, confirming their recyclability.

  9. Anisotropic structure and dynamics of the solvation shell of a benzene solute in liquid water from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Ashu; Chandra, Amalendu

    2016-02-17

    The anisotropic structure and dynamics of the hydration shell of a benzene solute in liquid water have been investigated by means of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations using the BLYP (Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr) and dispersion corrected BLYP-D functionals. The main focus has been to look at the influence of π-hydrogen-bonding and hydrophobic interactions on the distance and angle resolved various structural and dynamic properties of solvation shell. The structure of hydration shell water molecules around benzene is found to be highly anisotropic as revealed by the radial distribution functions of different conical regions and joint radial/angular distribution functions. The benzene-water dimer potential energy curves are calculated for a variety of orientations of water along the axial and equatorial directions for both BLYP and BLYP-D functionals. The simulation results of the hydration shell structure of benzene, particularly the axial and equatorial benzene-water RDFs are discussed based on the differences in the benzene-water potential energies for different orientations and functionals. The inter-particle distance/angle correlations show an enhanced water structure in the solvation shell of benzene compared to that between the solvation shell and bulk and also between the bulk molecules. On average, a single πH-bond is found to be formed between water and benzene in the 45° axial conical region of the solvation shell. The πH-bonded water molecules are found to have faster translational dynamics and also found to follow a fast jump mechanism of reorientation to change their hydrogen bonded partners. The presence of π-hydrogen-bonded water makes the overall dynamics of the axial region faster than that of the equatorial region where the water molecules are hydrophobically solvated and hydrogen bonded to other water molecules.

  10. Tuning Sn-Catalysis for Electrochemical Reduction of CO2 to CO via the Core/Shell Cu/SnO2 Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Fu, Jiaju; Zhu, Wenlei; Chen, Zhengzheng; Shen, Bo; Wu, Liheng; Xi, Zheng; Wang, Tanyuan; Lu, Gang; Zhu, Jun-Jie; Sun, Shouheng

    2017-03-29

    Tin (Sn) is known to be a good catalyst for electrochemical reduction of CO2 to formate in 0.5 M KHCO3. But when a thin layer of SnO2 is coated over Cu nanoparticles, the reduction becomes Sn-thickness dependent: the thicker (1.8 nm) shell shows Sn-like activity to generate formate whereas the thinner (0.8 nm) shell is selective to the formation of CO with the conversion Faradaic efficiency (FE) reaching 93% at -0.7 V (vs reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)). Theoretical calculations suggest that the 0.8 nm SnO2 shell likely alloys with trace of Cu, causing the SnO2 lattice to be uniaxially compressed and favors the production of CO over formate. The report demonstrates a new strategy to tune NP catalyst selectivity for the electrochemical reduction of CO2 via the tunable core/shell structure.

  11. Supersaturation-controlled surface structure evolution of Pd@Pt core-shell nanocrystals: enhancement of the ORR activity at a sub-10 nm scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Kun; Zheng, Weitao; Cui, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-21

    Here, we designed and implemented a facile strategy for controlling the surface evolution of Pd@Pt core-shell nanostructures by simply adjusting the volume of OH(-) to control the reducing ability of ascorbic acid and finally manipulating the supersaturation in the reaction system. The surface structure of the obtained Pd@Pt bimetallic nanocrystals transformed from a Pt {111} facet-exposed island shell to a conformal Pt {100} facet-exposed shell by increasing the pH value. The as-prepared well aligned Pd@Pt core-island shell nanocubes present both significantly enhanced electrocatalytic activity and favorable long-term stability toward the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media.

  12. A facile in situ self-assembly strategy for large-scale fabrication of CHS@MOF yolk/shell structure and its catalytic application in a flow system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongyi; Luan, Yi; Chaikittikul, Kullapat; Dong, Wenjun; Li, Jie; Zhang, Xiaowei; Jia, Dandan; Yang, Mu; Wang, Ge

    2015-03-04

    A hierarchical yolk/shell copper hydroxysulfates@MOF (CHS@MOF, where MOF = metal-organic frameworks) structure was fabricated from a homogeneous yolk/shell CHS template composed of an active shell and a stabilized core via a facile self-template strategy at room temperature. The active shell of the template served as the source of metal ion and was in situ transformed into a well-defined MOF crystal shell, and the relatively stabilized core retained its own nature during the formation of the MOF shell. The strategy of in situ transformation of CHS shell to MOF shell avoided the self-nucleation of MOF in the solution and complex multistep procedures. Furthermore, a flow reaction system using CHS@MOF as self-supported stationary-phase catalyst was developed, which demonstrated excellent catalytic performance for aldehyde acetalization with ethanol, and high yields and selectivities were achieved under mild conditions.

  13. Scalable Synthesis of Triple-Core-Shell Nanostructures of TiO2 @MnO2 @C for High Performance Supercapacitors Using Structure-Guided Combustion Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dongjoon; Shin, Jungho; Yeo, Taehan; Hwang, Hayoung; Park, Seonghyun; Choi, Wonjoon

    2018-01-22

    Core-shell nanostructures of metal oxides and carbon-based materials have emerged as outstanding electrode materials for supercapacitors and batteries. However, their synthesis requires complex procedures that incur high costs and long processing times. Herein, a new route is proposed for synthesizing triple-core-shell nanoparticles of TiO2 @MnO2 @C using structure-guided combustion waves (SGCWs), which originate from incomplete combustion inside chemical-fuel-wrapped nanostructures, and their application in supercapacitor electrodes. SGCWs transform TiO2 to TiO2 @C and TiO2 @MnO2 to TiO2 @MnO2 @C via the incompletely combusted carbonaceous fuels under an open-air atmosphere, in seconds. The synthesized carbon layers act as templates for MnO2 shells in TiO2 @C and organic shells of TiO2 @MnO2 @C. The TiO2 @MnO2 @C-based electrodes exhibit a greater specific capacitance (488 F g-1 at 5 mV s-1 ) and capacitance retention (97.4% after 10 000 cycles at 1.0 V s-1 ), while the absence of MnO2 and carbon shells reveals a severe degradation in the specific capacitance and capacitance retention. Because the core-TiO2 nanoparticles and carbon shell prevent the deformation of the inner and outer sides of the MnO2 shell, the nanostructures of the TiO2 @MnO2 @C are preserved despite the long-term cycling, giving the superior performance. This SGCW-driven fabrication enables the scalable synthesis of multiple-core-shell structures applicable to diverse electrochemical applications. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Carbon quantum dots from carbonized walnut shells: Structural evolution, fluorescence characteristics, and intracellular bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chaoge; Shi, Yanni; Li, Min; Xing, Malcolm; Wu, Qilin

    2017-10-01

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) have attracted tremendous attention for their prominent fluorescence, excellent stability, and outstanding biocompatibility. Herein, we report a facile method to prepare CQDs from walnut shells, which mainly consist of natural cellulose. After carbonization of the walnut shells and acid treatments, zigzag and armchair edges of CQDs with an average size of 3.4nm were revealed by the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Consistent with the (100) planes of graphitic carbon, the lattice spacing distance of these CQDs was 0.258nm. The photoluminescence behaviors related to the size/shape and corresponding edge-state. The CQDs exhibited green fluorescence when the excitation wavelength ranging from 360nm to 460nm. Meanwhile, the CQDs showed hydrophilic, pH-sensitive and up-converted photoluminescence properties. We also found pH and solvent had reversible effects on CQDs' photoluminescence. The CQDs were then tested with live-cell fluorescent images for the potential intracellular probes. Raman mapping technique was also applied to detect the CQDs' distribution in vitro and clarify the entering procedure of CQDs into cells besides confocal microscopy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Knockout reactions on p-shell nuclei for tests of structure and reaction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchera, A. N.; Bazin, D.; Babo, M.; Baumann, T.; Bowry, M.; Bradt, J.; Brown, J.; Deyoung, P. A.; Elman, B.; Finck, J. E.; Gade, A.; Grinyer, G. F.; Jones, M. D.; Lunderberg, E.; Redpath, T.; Rogers, W. F.; Stiefel, K.; Thoennessen, M.; Weisshaar, D.; Whitmore, K.

    2015-10-01

    A series of knockout reactions on p-shell nuclei were studied to extract exclusive cross sections and to investigate the neutron knockout mechanism. The measured cross sections provide stringent tests of shell model and ab initio calculations while measurements of neutron+residual coincidences test the accuracy and validity of reaction models used to predict cross sections. Six different beams ranging from A = 7 to 12 were produced at the NSCL totaling measurements of nine different reaction settings. The reaction settings were determined by the magnetic field of the Sweeper magnet which bends the residues into charged particle detectors. The reaction target was surrounded by the high efficiency CsI array, CAESAR, to tag gamma rays for cross section measurements of low-lying excited states. Additionally, knocked out neutrons were detected with MoNA-LISA in coincidence with the charged residuals. Preliminary results will be discussed. This work is partially supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY11-02511 and the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award No. DE-NA0000979.

  16. Zero-valent iron treatment of dark brown colored coffee effluent: Contributions of a core-shell structure to pollutant removals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Mayuka; Kurosu, Shunji; Kobayashi, Maki; Kawase, Yoshinori

    2016-12-01

    The decolorization and total organic carbon (TOC) removal of dark brown colored coffee effluent by zero-valent iron (ZVI) have been systematically examined with solution pH of 3.0, 4.0, 6.0 and 8.0 under oxic and anoxic conditions. The optimal decolorization and TOC removal were obtained at pH 8.0 with oxic condition. The maximum efficiencies of decolorization and TOC removal were 92.6 and 60.2%, respectively. ZVI presented potential properties for pollutant removal at nearly neutral pH because of its core-shell structure in which shell or iron oxide/hydroxide layer on ZVI surface dominated the decolorization and TOC removal of coffee effluent. To elucidate the contribution of the core-shell structure to removals of color and TOC at the optimal condition, the characterization of ZVI surface by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was conducted. It was confirmed that the core-shell structure was formed and the shell on ZVI particulate surface and the precipitates formed during the course of ZVI treatment consisted of iron oxides and hydroxides. They were significantly responsible for decolorization and TOC removal of coffee effluent via adsorption to shell on ZVI surface and inclusion into the precipitates rather than the oxidative degradation by OH radicals and the reduction by emitted electrons. The presence of dissolved oxygen (DO) enhanced the formation of the core-shell structure and as a result improved the efficiency of ZVI treatment for the removal of colored components in coffee effluents. ZVI was found to be an efficient material toward the treatment of coffee effluents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. On two site-specific nitrite-sensing nanocomposites having a core-shell structure: Construction, characterization and sensing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadeerhazi, Muhetaer; Ali, Azam; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din

    2017-01-15

    This paper reported two site-specific nitrite-sensing nanocomposite samples having a core-shell structure, where Fe3O4 nanoparticles were used as core, two rhodamine derivatives served as chemosensor and MCM-41 was applied as supporting host, respectively. These composite samples and their structure were analyzed and confirmed SEM/TEM, XRD, N2 adsorption/desorption, magnetic feature, IR and thermogravimetric analysis. Their nitrite sensing performance was discussed based on emission quenching, with limit of detection as low as 1.2μM. Detailed analysis suggested that these composite samples followed a static sensing mechanism based on an additive reaction between NO+ and chemosensors. After being quenched by nitrite, these samples could be recovered by sulphamic acid. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Surface polarization matters: enhancing the hydrogen-evolution reaction by shrinking Pt shells in Pt-Pd-graphene stack structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Song; Wang, Chengming; Deng, Mingsen; Gong, Ming; Bai, Yu; Jiang, Jun; Xiong, Yujie

    2014-11-03

    Surface charge state plays an important role in tuning the catalytic performance of nanocrystals in various reactions. Herein, we report a synthetic approach to unique Pt-Pd-graphene stack structures with controllable Pt shell thickness. These unique hybrid structures allow us to correlate the Pt thickness with performance in the hydrogen-evolution reaction (HER). The HER activity increases with a decrease in the Pt thickness, which is well explained by surface polarization mechanism as suggested by first-principles simulations. In this hybrid system, the difference in work functions of Pt and Pd results in surface polarization on the Pt surface, tuning its charge state for hydrogen reduction. Meanwhile, the supporting graphene provides two-dimensional channels for efficient charge transport, improving the HER activities. This work opens up possibilities of reducing Pt usage while achieving high HER performance. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. The preparation of core/shell structured microsphere of multi first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs and evaluation of biological safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hao; Pang, Xiaoyang; Wang, Shuo; Xu, Zhengquan; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Penghui; Zhang, Yupeng; Liu, Zheng; Luo, Chengke; Wang, Xiyang; Nie, Hemin

    2015-01-01

    To introduce a modified method, namely coaxial electrohydrodynamic atomization for the fabrication of distinct core/shell structured microspheres of four first-line ant-tuberculosis drugs with different characteristics in hydrophilic properties in one single step. In group B, we prepared microspheres in which the core and the shell contain hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs, respectively. In contrast, in group C, the opposite is prepared. The detection of encapsulation efficiency and in vitro release test were performed to confirm the feasibility of the drug-loaded core/shell structured microspheres. Moreover, cell culture experiments and animal experiments have been carried out to evaluate the biological safety of different microspheres in cell growth, cell viability, osteogenesis and migration of BMSCs in vitro and the bone fusion in a bone deficits model in SD rat. Meanwhile, the distribution of drugs and liver and kidney toxicity were monitored. The release patterns of the two groups are significantly different. The release of drugs from Group B microspheres is rather sequential, whereas group C microspheres release drugs in a parallel (co-release) manner. And various concentrations of carrier materials produces core/shell structured microspheres with different appearance. Moreover, the biological safety of core/shell structured microspheres was testified to be satisfactory. These findings present the advantages and possible application of this kind of multi-drug release system in treating skeletal tuberculosis. Moreover, the characteristic sequential release of multi-drugs can be controlled and adjusted based on treatment need and used in treating other disorders.

  20. Synthesis and property investigations of well-defined polymer/inorganic core-shell nanomaterials with structural, optical, electronic and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravano, Stefanie Marie

    Polymer grafted inorganic nano-objects typically consist of an inorganic core with an end-grafted, tailored polymer shell. Herein described is the combination of magnetic, electronic, or optical properties of the inorganic core with the versatile mechanical and chemical properties of the polymer shell. The synthesis, characterization and application of nanomaterials require interdisciplinary work. For example, Fe2O3/Poly(styrene) core-shell structures were synthesized using chemical analysis, characterized using physics and implemented as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agent using biology. There are three structural components to the core-shell particles: the inorganic core, the interface and the polymer shell. The inorganic core can impart properties to the overall structure, such as photoluminescence, magnetism, and mechanical reinforcement, which cannot easily be obtained using just organic materials. The interface where the core and shell meet is another key component in the design of the core-shell nanoparticle. The polymeric shell must be tethered to the core for optimum stability of the structure and to overcome potential incompatibilities between the two phases. The distribution of polymeric initiators as tethers allowed for polymerization from the surface. The research described used "grafting from" methods by living polymerizations. The grafted polymer can add function to the overall hybrid, as chemical functionality in the side chains can assist in particle self-assembly or serve as a scaffold for the attachment of biological molecules. The polymer, itself, can serve as a protective barrier, a matrix for the composite, or a solubility/dispersibility enhancer. The effect of variations in the length of the polymer chains on mechanical and morphological properties was studied. The research described herein will develop the ideas of core-shell structures: (1) in macro-scale synthesis and application of spherical silica particles in poly

  1. The electronic structure and effective excitonic g factors of GaAs/GaMnAs core-shell nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong-Xiao; Xiong, Wen

    2017-12-01

    We calculate the electronic structures of cylindrical GaAs/GaMnAs core-shell nanowires in the magnetic field based on the eight-band effective-mass kṡp theory, and it is found that the hole states can present strong band-crossings. The probability densities of several lowest electron states and highest hole states at the Γ point are analyzed, and strangely, the distribution of the electron states are more complex than that of the hole states. Furthermore, the components of the electron states will change substantially as the increase of the radius R, which are almost unchanged for the hole states. A very interesting phenomenon is that the effective excitonic g factors gex can be tuned from a large positive value for GaMnAs nanowires to a small negative value for GaAs nanowires, and gex of GaAs nanowires and GaMnAs nanowires will vary slightly and greatly, respectively as the increase of the magnetic field. Meanwhile, we can obtain large gex in cylindrical GaAs/GaMnAs core-shell nanowires when the small magnetic field, the large concentration of manganese ions, the small core radius and the small radius are chosen. Another important result is also found that the radiative intensities of two σ polarized lights can be separated gradually by decreasing the core radius Rc , which can be used to detect two σ polarized lights in the experiment.

  2. CdS@SiO2 Core-Shell Electroluminescent Nanorod Arrays Based on a Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunfeng; Peng, Dengfeng; Zhao, Jing; Bao, Rongrong; Li, Tianfeng; Tian, Li; Dong, Lin; Shen, Changyu; Pan, Caofeng

    2016-11-01

    Enormous advancement has been achieved in the field of one-dimensional (1D) semiconductor light-emitting devices (LEDs), however, LEDs based on 1D CdS nanostructures have been rarely reported. The fabrication of CdS@SiO2 core-shell nanorod array LEDs based on a Au-SiO2 -CdS metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure is presented. The MIS LEDs exhibit strong yellow emission with a low threshold voltage of 2.7 V. Electroluminescence with a broad emission ranging from 450 nm to 800 nm and a shoulder peak at 700 nm is observed, which is related to the defects and surface states of the CdS nanorods. The influence of the SiO2 shell thickness on the electroluminescence intensity is systematically investigated. The devices have a high light-emitting spatial resolution of 1.5 μm and maintain an excellent emission property even after shelving at room temperature for at least three months. Moreover, the fabrication process is simple and cost effective and the MIS device could be fabricated on a flexible substrate, which holds great potential for application as a flexible light source. This prototype is expected to open up a new route towards the development of large-scale light-emitting devices with excellent attributes, such as high resolution, low cost, and good stability. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Morphology-controlled synthesis of monodispersed graphitic carbon coated core/shell structured Ni/NiO nanoparticles with enhanced magnetoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patange, M; Biswas, S; Yadav, A K; Jha, S N; Bhattacharyya, D

    2015-12-28

    Graphitic carbon coated core/shell structured Ni/NiO nanoparticles were synthesized by a sol-gel type chemical precursor method and their structural, morphological and magnetic properties were evaluated. The synthesis method provides an improved and comparatively facile approach towards controlled growth of the composite structure of a metallic ferromagnetic (FM) core and an antiferromagnetic (AFM) metal oxide shell along with in situ growth of a supplementary surface functionalization layer of graphitic carbon. In addition, the process allows a precise control over the shape and size of this important class of core/shell type functional materials for a wide range of pertinent applications. The structural properties of the derived samples were studied with X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), Raman spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The microstructural features in the core/shell structured particles were evaluated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). Magnetic properties of the derived samples were studied using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) in the 80-300 K temperature range. The surface functionalized Ni/NiO nanoparticles exhibit a distinctly enhanced magnetoresistance (MR), e.g., -10% at 290 K, than reported values in compacted Ni/NiO powders or composites.

  4. Structural vibration a uniform accurate solution for laminated beams, plates and shells with general boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Guoyong; Su, Zhu

    2015-01-01

    This book develops a uniform accurate method which is capable of dealing with vibrations of laminated beams, plates and shells with arbitrary boundary conditions including classical boundaries, elastic supports and their combinations. It also provides numerous solutions for various configurations including various boundary conditions, laminated schemes, geometry and material parameters, which fill certain gaps in this area of reach and may serve as benchmark solutions for the readers. For each case, corresponding fundamental equations in the framework of classical and shear deformation theory are developed. Following the fundamental equations, numerous free vibration results are presented for various configurations including different boundary conditions, laminated sequences and geometry and material properties. The proposed method and corresponding formulations can be readily extended to static analysis.

  5. Design tunable materials: Ferroelectric-antiferroelectric composite with core-shell structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curecheriu, Lavinia-Petronela; Buscaglia, Maria Teresa; Maglia, Filippo; Anselmi-Tamburini, Umberto; Buscaglia, Vincenzo; Mitoseriu, Liliana

    2014-12-01

    Permittivity, tunability, and ferroelectric properties can be tailored to meet specific requirements for applications by combining ferroelectric (BaTiO3-BT) and antiferroelectric (La0.04Pb0.96Ti0.1Zr0.9O3-PLZT) and by exploiting interdiffusion and grain size effects at nanoscale. The dielectric properties, dc-tunability, and P(E) loops of ferroelectric-antiferroelectric nanostructured composites produced from mechanically mixed powders (PLZT-BT) and from core-shell particles (PLZT@BT) were comparatively analyzed. Interdiffusion accompanied by local composition gradients occurred during sintering of PLZT@BT composites and caused a thermally stable permittivity. Permittivity was reduced below 1000 in both cases (900 for PLZT-BT and 290 for PLZT@BT), while preserving tunability to 1.2-1.4 (E = 40 kV/cm), with a linear field dependence.

  6. Tests results of Nb$_{3}$Sn quadrupole magnets using a shell-based support structure

    CERN Document Server

    Caspi, S

    2009-01-01

    In support of the development of a 90 mm aperture Nb3Sn superconducting quadrupole for the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP), test results of five quadrupole magnets are compared. All five assemblies used key and bladder technology to compress and support the coils within an iron yoke and an aluminium shell. The first three models (TQS01a, b, c) used Nb3Sn MJR conductor and segmented bronze poles. The last two models (TQS02a, b) used Nb3Sn RRP conductor, and segmented titanium alloy (TiAl6V4) poles, with no axial gaps during reaction. This presentation summarizes the magnets performance during assembly, cool-down and excitation and compares measurements with design expectations.

  7. Existence of equilibrium states of hollow elastic cylinders submerged in a fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. M. Elgindi

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the existence of equilibrium states of thin-walled elastic, cylindrical shell fully or partially submerged in a fluid. This problem obviously serves as a model for many problems with engineering importance. Previous studies on the deformation of the shell have assumed that the pressure due to the fluid is uniform. This paper takes into consideration the non-uniformity of the pressure by taking into account the effect of gravity. The presence of a pressure gradient brings additional parameters to the problem which in turn lead to the consideration of several boundary value problems.

  8. Dietary Probiotics Affect Gastrointestinal Microbiota, Histological Structure and Shell Mineralization in Turtles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Rawski

    Full Text Available Probiotics are widely used in nutrition, and their mode of action is intensively studied in mammals and birds; however, it is almost unknown in reptiles. In the present study, Trachemys scripta scripta and Sternotherus odoratus were used to assess the effects of dietary probiotics on chelonian gastrointestinal tract microecology. In the first, 20-week experiment, 40 young T. s. scripta were randomly distributed to four experimental groups: 1st, (CON--with no additives; 2nd, (SSPA with Bacillus subtilis PB6; 3rd, (MSP--with multiple strain probiotic; and 4th, (SSPB with Bacillus subtilis C-3102. The first study has shown that SSPA and MSP decreased the numbers of total bacteria, Enterobacteriace, Staphylococcus sp. and Streptococcus sp. excreted to water and increased the villous height and mucosa thickness in duodenum. SSPB improved the duodenal microstructure; however, it also increased numbers of kanamycin and vancomycin resistant bacteria, Staphylococcus sp. and Streptococcus sp., in water. In the second, 52-week experiment, 30 S. odoratus were randomly assigned to three dietary treatments. CON, SSPA and MSP groups. The MSP preparation increased the body weight gain, crude ash, Ca and P share in the turtles' shells. Both probiotics affected duodenal histomorphology. SSPA decreased the villous height, while MSP increased the villous height and mucosa thickness, and decreased the crypt depth. SSPA decreased the concentrations of bacteria excreted to water. In the case of intestinal microbiota, bacteria suppressing effects were observed in the case of both probiotics. MSP increased the number of Bifidobacterium sp. and Lactobacillus sp./Enteroccoccus sp., and decreased the number of Clostridium perfringens and Campylobacter sp. in the small intestine. In the large intestine it lowered, amongst others, Bacteroides-Pervotella cluster, Clostridium leptum subgroup and Clostridium perfringens numbers. The above-mentioned results suggest that

  9. Vanadium fine-structure K-shell electron impact ionization cross sections for fast-electron diagnostic in laser–solid experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmeri, P., E-mail: patrick.palmeri@umons.ac.be [Astrophysique et Spectroscopie, Université de Mons - UMONS, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Quinet, P., E-mail: pascal.quinet@umons.ac.be [Astrophysique et Spectroscopie, Université de Mons - UMONS, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); IPNAS, Université de Liège, B-4000 Liège (Belgium); Batani, D., E-mail: batani@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CELIA, Université de Bordeaux, F-33400 Talence (France)

    2015-09-15

    The K-shell electron impact ionization (EII) cross section, along with the K-shell fluorescence yield, is one of the key atomic parameters for fast-electron diagnostic in laser–solid experiments through the K-shell emission cross section. In addition, in a campaign dedicated to the modeling of the K lines of astrophysical interest (Palmeri et al. (2012)), the K-shell fluorescence yields for the K-vacancy fine-structure atomic levels of all the vanadium isonuclear ions have been calculated. In this study, the K-shell EII cross sections connecting the ground and the metastable levels of the parent vanadium ions to the daughter ions K-vacancy levels considered in Palmeri et al. (2012) have been determined. The relativistic distorted-wave (DW) approximation implemented in the FAC atomic code has been used for the incident electron kinetic energies up to 20 times the K-shell threshold energies. Moreover, the resulting DW cross sections have been extrapolated at higher energies using the asymptotic behavior of the modified relativistic binary encounter Bethe model (MRBEB) of Guerra et al. (2012) with the density-effect correction proposed by Davies et al. (2013)

  10. Synthesis of core-shell hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanoplates: Quantitative analysis of the particle structure and shape, high coercivity and low cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadic, Marin; Kopanja, Lazar; Panjan, Matjaz; Kralj, Slavko; Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina; Stojanovic, Zoran

    2017-05-01

    Hematite core-shell nanoparticles with plate-like morphology were synthesized using a one-step hydrothermal synthesis. An XRPD analysis indicates that the sample consist of single-phase α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. SEM and TEM measurements show that the hematite sample is composed of uniform core-shell nanoplates with 10-20 nm thickness, 80-100 nm landscape dimensions (aspect ratio ∼5) and 3-4 nm thickness of the surface shells. We used computational methods for the quantitative analysis of the core-shell particle structure and circularity shape descriptor for the quantitative shape analysis of the nanoparticles from TEM micrographs. The calculated results indicated that a percentage of the shell area in the nanoparticle area (share [%]) is significant. The determined values of circularity in the perpendicular and oblique perspective clearly show shape anisotropy of the nanoplates. The magnetic properties revealed the ferromagnetic-like properties at room temperature with high coercivity HC = 2340 Oe, pointing to the shape and surface effects. These results signify core-shell hematite nanoparticles' for practical applications in magnetic devices. The synthesized hematite plate-like nanoparticles exhibit low cytotoxicity levels on the human lung fibroblasts (MRC5) cell line demonstrating the safe use of these nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

  11. Synthesis of novel core-shell structured dual-mesoporous silica nanospheres and their application for enhancing the dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chao, E-mail: wuchao27@126.com [Department of Pharmaceutics, Liaoning Medical University, 40 Songpo Road, Linghe District, Jinzhou, Liaoning Province 121001 (China); Sun, Xiaohu [Management Center for Experiments, Bohai University, 19 Keji Road, Songshan District, Jinzhou, Liaoning Province 121000 (China); Zhao, Zongzhe; Zhao, Ying; Hao, Yanna; Liu, Ying [Department of Pharmaceutics, Liaoning Medical University, 40 Songpo Road, Linghe District, Jinzhou, Liaoning Province 121001 (China); Gao, Yu, E-mail: gaoyu_1116@163.com [Department of Medical Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, 40 Songpo Road, Linghe District, Jinzhou, Liaoning Province 121001 (China)

    2014-11-01

    Novel core-shell dual-mesoporous silica nanospheres (DMSS) with a tunable pore size were synthesized successfully using a styrene monomer as a channel template for the core and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as a channel template for the shell in order to improve the dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drugs. Simvastatin was used as a model drug and loaded into DMSS and the mesoporous core without the shell (MSC) by the solvent evaporation method. The drug loading efficiency of DMSS and MSC were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV). Characterization, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed that simvastatin adsorbed in DMSS and MSC was in an amorphous state, and in vitro release test results demonstrated that both DMSS and MSC increased the water solubility and dissolution rate of simvastatin. The shell structure of DMSS was able to regulate the release of simvastatin compared with MSC. It is worth noting that DMSS has significant potential as a carrier for improving the dissolution of poorly water-soluble drugs and reducing the rapid release. - Highlights: • A novel core-shell DMSS is prepared for improving the dissolution rate of simvastatin. • The diffusional resistance of the mesoporous shell can delay and regulate drug release. • Simvastatin absorbed in DMSS exists in amorphous form due to spatial confinement.

  12. Polydopamine-coated, nitrogen-doped, hollow carbon-sulfur double-layered core-shell structure for improving lithium-sulfur batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weidong; Xiao, Xingcheng; Cai, Mei; Yang, Li

    2014-09-10

    To better confine the sulfur/polysulfides in the electrode of lithium-sulfur (Li/S) batteries and improve the cycling stability, we developed a double-layered core-shell structure of polymer-coated carbon-sulfur. Carbon-sulfur was first prepared through the impregnation of sulfur into hollow carbon spheres under heat treatment, followed by a coating polymerization to give a double-layered core-shell structure. From the study of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images, we demonstrated that the sulfur not only successfully penetrated through the porous carbon shell but also aggregated along the inner wall of the carbon shell, which, for the first time, provided visible and convincing evidence that sulfur preferred diffusing into the hollow carbon rather than aggregating in/on the porous wall of the carbon. Taking advantage of this structure, a stable capacity of 900 mA h g(-1) at 0.2 C after 150 cycles and 630 mA h g(-1) at 0.6 C after 600 cycles could be obtained in Li/S batteries. We also demonstrated the feasibility of full cells using the sulfur electrodes to couple with the silicon film electrodes, which exhibited significantly improved cycling stability and efficiency. The remarkable electrochemical performance could be attributed to the desirable confinement of sulfur through the unique double-layered core-shell architectures.

  13. Form and formation of flares and parabolae based on new observations of the internal shell structure in lytoceratid and perisphinctid ammonoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Radtke

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ultrastructure of pristine shells of Jurassic and Cretaceous lytoceratid and perisphinctid ammonoids indicates that flares and parabolae represent homologous structures. Both mark an interruption of shell growth. We dismiss earlier interpretations of parabolae as actual aperture, relics of resorbed apophyses or superstructure of the musculature associated to a semi-internal shell. Instead we propose an episodic growth model including several growth stops at the aperture during the formation of a frill-like aperture for parabolae and flares. Such an aperture is composed of the outer prismatic layer, the nacreous layer and an apertural prismatic coating. Here, we observed the apertural prismatic coating for the first time as an integral part of flares and parabolae. The apertural prismatic coating covers only the inner surface of the frill and was secreted by a permanent mantle cover indicating a prolonged period without the production of new shell material. Parabolae differ from flares by their general shape and the presence of ventro-lateral parabolic notches and nodes. The notches were formed by folding of the frill and had the potential to form semi-open spines. The corresponding parabolic nodes are caused by an outward swelling of the shell-secreting mantle tissue producing new shell material at the position of the folding. New shell material that belongs to the conch tube is attached to the base of flares and parabolae after withdrawal of the mantle edge representing the continuation of shell growth. Usually, the frilled aperture associated with flares and parabolae were removed during lifetime. This study reports on flares in Argonauticeras for the first time. In this genus they are typically associated with varices.

  14. The Corneoscleral Shell of the Eye: an Age-Related Analysis of Structural Biomechanical Properties. Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Iomdina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural biomechanical properties of the ocular corneoscleral shell largely determine its anatomic and optical parameters and its supporting and protective function. Therefore, changes related to age restructuring processes may affect the state of the cornea and the sclera, which should be taken into account in diagnosing eye diseases, especially age-related. According to actual literary data, age-related changes of the corneoscleral shell affecting its biomechanical properties involve all connective tissue components of the extracellular matrix: fibrous proteins (collagen and elastin and intermediate substance components (proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans. Aged patients have a larger diameter of elastic fiber fibrils in the external part of the sclera and a lower density of fibrils in the center as compared to young patients, which is an evidence of elastin damage at the molecular level and fibril degeneration. Age-related changes of proteoglycans are primarilymanifested in hydration loss, which leads to an increase in corneal and sclera density and regional thinning of tissues. Agerelated changes of collagen are less expressed than those of elastin and proteoglycans. Yet, the distance between collagen fibrils in the cornea becomes smaller with age; they are subject to destruction, and small spaces devoid of collagen tend to appear in the posterior stroma. The most pronounced age-related degenerative changes of collagen in the deeper layers of the corneal stroma occur in the limb, which accumulates more cross striated collagen fibrils. Recent years of research have shown that the formation of cross-linked chemical bonds, i.e. intra- and intermolecular cross links of collagen is the most important structural factor. It is this particular process that is responsible for structural stability of the corneal and scleral tissue, which tends to change with age or due to certain eye diseases, such as keratoconus or progressive myopia

  15. Shell structure in the vicinity of the doubly magic {sup 100}Sn via Coulomb excitation at PreSPEC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guastalla, Giulia

    2014-11-17

    The PreSPEC setup in combination with the high intensity primary beams available at GSI provided unique opportunities for the key nuclear structure studies on exotic nuclei. The experiment performed on the neutron deficient {sup 104}Sn aimed to deduce the reduced transition probability of the first excited 2{sup +} state quantified by the B(E2; 0{sup +} → 2{sup +}) value. This result is the central point in the discussion of the evolution of nuclear structure in proximity of the doubly magic nucleus {sup 100}Sn. As {sup 100}Sn is not yet accessible for such measurements, a series of experiments have been performed for neutron-deficient Sn isotopes over the past few years. These data showed excessive experimental B(E2) strength compared to shell model calculations below neutron number N=64 and they are therefore not excluding a constant or even increasing collectivity below {sup 106}Sn. Hence, the measurement of the B(E2) value in the next even-even isotope toward {sup 100}Sn, i.e. {sup 104}Sn, was a crucial step to verify the robustness of the shell gap of {sup 100}Sn. Moreover, {sup 104}Sn is the heaviest isotope of the Sn isotopic chain for which a shell model calculation without significant truncation of the valence space can be performed and therefore with this experimental value the validity of Large Scale Shell Model (LSSM) calculations could be tested. As a main result of the experiment a B(E2) value corresponding to 0.10(4) e{sup 2}b{sup 2} has been extracted for {sup 104}Sn. The experimental value showed a very good agreement with the predicted one and, despite the large error bar, it clearly established a downward trend of the B(E2) values of the Sn isotopic chain toward A=100. This implied enhanced stability of the N = Z = 50 shell closure against ph-excited quadrupole modes. However, an experiment of this kind is very challenging for several reasons. First, {sup 104}Sn lies in proximity of the proton drip line and has therefore a small production

  16. Pulsed laser deposited porous nano-carpets of indium tin oxide and their use as charge collectors in core-shell structures for dye sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Timothy R.; Farnum, Byron H.; Lopez, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Porous In2O3:Sn (ITO) films resembling from brush carpets to open moss-like discrete nanostructures were grown by pulsed laser deposition under low to high background gas pressures, respectively. The charge transport properties of these mesoporous substrates were probed by pulsed laser photo-current and -voltage transient measurements in N719 dye sensitized devices. Although the cyclic voltammetry and dye adsorption measurements suggest a lower proportion of electro-active dye molecules for films deposited at the high-end background gas pressures, the transient measurements indicate similar electron transport rates within the films. Solar cell operation was achieved by the deposition of a conformal TiO2 shell layer by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Much of the device improvement was shown to be due to the TiO2 shell blocking the recombination of photoelectrons with the electrolyte as recombination lifetimes increased drastically from a few seconds in uncoated ITO to over 50 minutes in the ITO with a TiO2 shell layer. Additionally, an order of magnitude increase in the electron transport rate in ITO/TiO2 (core/shell) films was observed, giving the core-shell structure a superior ratio of recombination/transport times.Porous In2O3:Sn (ITO) films resembling from brush carpets to open moss-like discrete nanostructures were grown by pulsed laser deposition under low to high background gas pressures, respectively. The charge transport properties of these mesoporous substrates were probed by pulsed laser photo-current and -voltage transient measurements in N719 dye sensitized devices. Although the cyclic voltammetry and dye adsorption measurements suggest a lower proportion of electro-active dye molecules for films deposited at the high-end background gas pressures, the transient measurements indicate similar electron transport rates within the films. Solar cell operation was achieved by the deposition of a conformal TiO2 shell layer by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Much

  17. Effects of Alloying Elements on the Formation of Core-Shell-Structured Reinforcing Particles during Heating of Al–Ti Powder Compacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijun Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To prepare core-shell-structured Ti@compound particle (Ti@compoundp reinforced Al matrix composite via powder thixoforming, the effects of alloying elements, such as Si, Cu, Mg, and Zn, on the reaction between Ti powders and Al melt, and the microstructure of the resulting reinforcements were investigated during heating of powder compacts at 993 K (720 °C. Simultaneously, the situations of the reinforcing particles in the corresponding semisolid compacts were also studied. Both thermodynamic analysis and experiment results all indicate that Si participated in the reaction and promoted the formation of Al–Ti–Si ternary compounds, while Cu, Mg, and Zn did not take part in the reaction and facilitated Al3Ti phase to form to different degrees. The first-formed Al–Ti–Si ternary compound was τ1 phase, and then it gradually transformed into (Al,Si3Ti phase. The proportion and existing time of τ1 phase all increased as the Si content increased. In contrast, Mg had the largest, Cu had the least, and Si and Zn had an equivalent middle effect on accelerating the reaction. The thicker the reaction shell was, the larger the stress generated in the shell was, and thus the looser the shell microstructure was. The stress generated in (Al,Si3Ti phase was larger than that in τ1 phase, but smaller than that in Al3Ti phase. So, the shells in the Al–Ti–Si system were more compact than those in the other systems, and Si element was beneficial to obtain thick and compact compound shells. Most of the above results were consistent to those in the semisolid state ones except the product phase constituents in the Al–Ti–Mg system and the reaction rate in the Al–Ti–Zn system. More importantly, the desirable core-shell structured Ti@compoundp was only achieved in the semisolid Al–Ti–Si system.

  18. Investigation of CuInSe2 nanowire arrays with core-shell structure electrodeposited at various duty cycles into anodic alumina templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Song; Wang, Na-Fu; Tsai, Yu-Zen; Lin, Jia-Jun; Houng, Mau-Phon

    2017-02-01

    Copper indium selenide (CuInSe2) nanowire (NW) arrays were prepared at various electrolyte duty cycles by filling anodic alumina templates through the pulsed electrodeposition technique. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that the nucleation mechanism of CuInSe2 NW arrays was affected by the electrodeposition duty cycle. Moreover, SEM images showed that the diameter and length of the NWs were 80 nm and 2 μm, respectively. Furthermore, PEDOT/CuInSe2 NW core-shell arrays were fabricated using surfactant-modified CuInSe2 NW surfaces showing the lotus effect. Transmission electron microscopy images confirmed that a core-shell structure was achieved. Current-voltage plots revealed that the CuInSe2 NW arrays were p-type semiconductors; moreover, the core-shell structure improved the diode ideality factor from 3.91 to 2.63.

  19. The Synthesis of the Core/Shell Structured Diamond/Akageneite Hybrid Particles with Enhanced Polishing Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Lu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the synthesis of the core/shell structured diamond/akageneite hybrid particles was performed through one-step isothermal hydrolyzing. The hybrid particle was characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectra. The test results overall reveal that the akageneite coating, phase β-FeO(OH, was uniformly coated onto the diamond surface. The polishing performance of the pristine diamond and hybrid particles for the sapphire substrate was evaluated respectively. The experimental results show that the hybrid particles exhibited improved polishing quality and prolonged effective processing time of polishing pad compared with diamond particles without compromising the material remove rate and surface roughness. The improved polishing behavior might be attributed to the β-FeOOH coating, which is conducive to less abrasive shedding and reducing the scratch depth.

  20. Anatomy of floating and submerged leaves of heterophyllous plant of Nymphaea candida L.

    OpenAIRE

    E.N. Klimenko

    2014-01-01

    The data on anatomy of floating and submerged leaves of heterophyllous aquatic plant Nymphaea candida L. are presented. Anatomy of floating leaves is shown to be different from that of submerged leaves: the absence of stomata, asterosclereids, and differentiated parenchyma, as well as by reduce intercellular volume and leaf width. Common patterns of leaf structure plasticity of aquatic heterophyllous plants in dependence on the environment are discussed.

  1. Oxygen absorption by adventitious roots promotes the survival of completely submerged terrestrial plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayi, Qiaoli; Zeng, Bo; Liu, Jianhui; Li, Siqi; van Bodegom, Peter M; Cornelissen, Johannes H C

    2016-04-10

    Flooding imposes stress upon terrestrial plants because it results in oxygen deficiency, which is considered a major problem for submerged plants. A common response of terrestrial plants to flooding is the formation of aquatic adventitious roots. Some studies have shown that adventitious roots on submerged plants are capable of absorbing water and nutrients. However, there is no experimental evidence for the possible oxygen uptake function of adventitious roots or for how important this function might be for the survival of plants during prolonged submergence. This study aims to investigate whether adventitious roots absorb oxygen from the water column, and whether this new function is beneficial to the survival of completely submerged plants. TakingAlternanthera philoxeroides(Mart.) Griseb. as a representative species, the profiling of the underwater oxygen gradient towards living and dead adventitious roots on completely submerged plants was conducted, the oxygen concentration in stem nodes with and without adventitious roots was measured, and the growth, survival and non-structural carbohydrate content of completely submerged plants with and without adventitious roots was investigated. Oxygen profiles in the water column of adventitious roots showed that adventitious roots absorbed oxygen from water. It is found that the oxygen concentration in stem nodes having adventitious roots was higher than that in stem nodes without adventitious roots, which implies that the oxygen absorbed by adventitious roots from water was subsequently transported from the roots to other plant tissues. Compared with plants whose adventitious roots had been pruned, those with intact adventitious roots had slower leaf shedding, slower plant mass reduction, more efficient carbohydrate economy and prolonged survival when completely submerged. The adventitious roots ofA. philoxeroidesformed upon submergence can absorb oxygen from ambient water, thereby alleviating the adverse effects of

  2. Dual Core-Shell-Structured S@C@MnO2 Nanocomposite for Highly Stable Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Lubin; Zhao, Gangjin; Yang, Guang; Niu, Guosheng; Chen, Ming; Diao, Guowang

    2017-10-11

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries have currently excited worldwide academic and industrial interest as a next-generation high-power energy storage system (EES) because of their high energy density and low cost of sulfur. However, the commercialization application is being hindered by capacity decay, mainly attributed to the polysulfide shuttle and poor conductivity of sulfur. Here, we have designed a novel dual core-shell nanostructure of S@C@MnO2 nanosphere hybrid as the sulfur host. The S@C@MnO2 nanosphere is successfully prepared using mesoporous carbon hollow spheres (MCHS) as the template and then in situ MnO2 growth on the surface of MCHS. In comparison with polar bare sulfur hosts materials, the as-prepared robust S@C@MnO2 composite cathode delivers significantly improved electrochemical performances in terms of high specific capacity (1345 mAh g-1 at 0.1 C), remarkable rate capability (465 mA h g-1 at 5.0 C) and excellent cycling stability (capacity decay rate of 0.052% per cycle after 1000 cycles at 3.0 C). Such a structure as cathode in Li-S batteries can not only store sulfur via inner mesoporous carbon layer and outer MnO2 shell, which physically/chemically confine the polysulfides shuttle effect, but also ensure overall good electrical conductivity. Therefore, these synergistic effects are achieved by unique structural characteristics of S@C@MnO2 nanospheres.

  3. Designing of luminescent GdPO4:Eu@LaPO4@SiO2 core/shell nanorods: Synthesis, structural and luminescence properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Anees A.; Labis, Joselito P.; Aslam Manthrammel, M.

    2017-09-01

    GdPO4:Eu3+ (core) and GdPO4:Eu@LaPO4 (core/shell) nanorods (NRs) were successfully prepared by urea based co-precipitation process at ambient conditions which was followed by coating with amorphous silica shell via the sol-gel chemical route. The role of surface coating on the crystal structure, crystallinity, morphology, solubility, surface chemistry and luminescence properties were well investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), UV-Vis, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. XRD pattern revealed highly purified, well-crystalline, single phase-hexagonal-rhabdophane structure of GdPO4 crystal. The TEM micrographs exhibited highly crystalline and narrow size distributed rod-shaped GdPO4:Eu3+ nanostructures with average width 14-16 nm and typical length 190-220 nm. FTIR spectra revealed characteristic infrared absorption bands of amorphous silica. High absorbance in a visible region of silica modified core/shell/Si NRs in aqueous environment suggests the high solubility along with colloidal stability. The photoluminescence properties were remarkably enhanced after growth of undoped LaPO4 layers due to the reduction of nonradiative transition rate. The advantages of presented high emission intensity and high solubility of core/shell and core/shell/Si NRs indicated the potential applications in monitoring biological events.

  4. Synthesis and study of structural and magnetic properties of superparamagnetic Fe3O4@SiO2 core/shell nanocomposite for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Helmi Rashid Farimani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: This paper describes coating of magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs with amorphous silica shells.   Materials and Methods: First, magnetite (Fe3O4 NPs were synthesized by co-precipitation method and then treated with stabilizer molecule of trisodium citrate to enhance their dispersibility. Afterwards, coating with silica was carried out via a sol-gel approach in which the electrostatically stabilized MNPs were used as seeds. The samples were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM. Results: The results of XRD analysis implied that the prepared nanocomposite consists of two compounds of crystalline magnetite and amorphous silica that formation of their core/shell structure with the shell thickness of about 5 nm was confirmed by TEM images. The magnetic studies also indicated that produced Fe3O4@SiO2 core/shell nanocomposite exhibits superparamagnetic properties at room temperature. Conclusion: These core/shell structure due to having superparamagnetic property of Fe3O4 and unique properties of SiO2, offers a high potential for many biomedical applications.

  5. Iodine Removal Efficiency in Non-Submerged and Submerged Self-Priming Venturi Scrubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Majid; Yan, Changqi; Sun, Zhongning; Gu, Haifeng; Wang, Junlong; Mehboob; Khurram [Harbin Engineering Univ., Harbin (China)

    2013-04-15

    The objective of this conducted research is to study the iodine removal efficiency in a self-priming venturi scrubber for submerged and non-submerged operating conditions experimentally and theoretically. The alkaline solution is used as an absorbent, which is prepared by dissolving sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium thiosulphate (Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in water to remove the gaseous iodine (I{sub 2}) from the gas. Iodine removal efficiency is examined at various gas flow rates and inlet concentrations of iodine for submerged and non-submerged operating conditions. In the non-submerged venturi scrubber, only the droplets take part in iodine removal efficiency. However, in a submerged venturi scrubber condition, the iodine gas is absorbed from gas to droplets inside the venturi scrubber and from bubbles to surrounding liquid at the outlet of a venturi scrubber. Experimentally, it is observed that the iodine removal efficiency is greater in the submerged venturi scrubber as compare to a non-submerged venturi scrubber condition. The highest iodine removal efficiency of 0.99±0.001 has been achieved in a submerged self-priming venturi scrubber condition. A mathematical correlation is used to predict the theoretical iodine removal efficiency in submerged and non-submerged conditions, and it is compared against the experimental results. The Wilkinson et al. correlation is used to predict the bubble diameter theoretically whereas the Nukiyama and Tanasawa correlation is used for droplet diameter. The mass transfer coefficient for the gas phase is calculated from the Steinberger and Treybal correlation. The calculated results for a submerged venturi scrubber agree well with experimental results but underpredicts in the case of the non-submerged venturi scrubber.

  6. IODINE REMOVAL EFFICIENCY IN NON-SUBMERGED AND SUBMERGED SELF-PRIMING VENTURI SCRUBBER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAJID ALI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this conducted research is to study the iodine removal efficiency in a self-priming venturi scrubber for submerged and non-submerged operating conditions experimentally and theoretically. The alkaline solution is used as an absorbent, which is prepared by dissolving sodium hydroxide (NaOH and sodium thiosulphate (Na2S2O3 in water to remove the gaseous iodine (I2 from the gas. Iodine removal efficiency is examined at various gas flow rates and inlet concentrations of iodine for submerged and non-submerged operating conditions. In the non-submerged venturi scrubber, only the droplets take part in iodine removal efficiency. However, in a submerged venturi scrubber condition, the iodine gas is absorbed from gas to droplets inside the venturi scrubber and from bubbles to surrounding liquid at the outlet of a venturi scrubber. Experimentally, it is observed that the iodine removal efficiency is greater in the submerged venturi scrubber as compare to a non-submerged venturi scrubber condition. The highest iodine removal efficiency of 0.99±0.001 has been achieved in a submerged self-priming venturi scrubber condition. A mathematical correlation is used to predict the theoretical iodine removal efficiency in submerged and non-submerged conditions, and it is compared against the experimental results. The Wilkinson et al. correlation is used to predict the bubble diameter theoretically whereas the Nukiyama and Tanasawa correlation is used for droplet diameter. The mass transfer coefficient for the gas phase is calculated from the Steinberger and Treybal correlation. The calculated results for a submerged venturi scrubber agree well with experimental results but underpredicts in the case of the non-submerged venturi scrubber.

  7. Error estimation and adaptive mesh refinement for parallel analysis of shell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Scott C.; Felippa, Carlos A.; Park, K. C.

    1994-01-01

    The formulation and application of element-level, element-independent error indicators is investigated. This research culminates in the development of an error indicator formulation which is derived based on the projection of element deformation onto the intrinsic element displacement modes. The qualifier 'element-level' means that no information from adjacent elements is used for error estimation. This property is ideally suited for obtaining error values and driving adaptive mesh refinements on parallel computers where access to neighboring elements residing on different processors may incur significant overhead. In addition such estimators are insensitive to the presence of physical interfaces and junctures. An error indicator qualifies as 'element-independent' when only visible quantities such as element stiffness and nodal displacements are used to quantify error. Error evaluation at the element level and element independence for the error indicator are highly desired properties for computing error in production-level finite element codes. Four element-level error indicators have been constructed. Two of the indicators are based on variational formulation of the element stiffness and are element-dependent. Their derivations are retained for developmental purposes. The second two indicators mimic and exceed the first two in performance but require no special formulation of the element stiffness mesh refinement which we demonstrate for two dimensional plane stress problems. The parallelizing of substructures and adaptive mesh refinement is discussed and the final error indicator using two-dimensional plane-stress and three-dimensional shell problems is demonstrated.

  8. Phylogeography of Ivory shell (Babylonia areolata in the Gulf of Thailand revealed by COI gene structure and differentiation of shell color by ITS1 DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amornrat Phongdara

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Babylonia areolata is an aquatic mollusk in the genus of the gastropod family Buccinidae. Genetic variations were observed in the 542 base pairs of the sequences from its cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI gene of mtDNA. COI alignments showed that there were two monophyletic clades on the phylogenetic tree, referred as B. areolata. These results point towards the possibility of B. areolata being a single species with strong phylogeographic subdivisions. About 520 base pairs of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1 sequence were able to distinguish between the shell colors (brown, cream and white of B. areolata.

  9. Optimization of the Manufacturing Process of Conical Shell Structures Using Prepreg Laminatees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakimova, Regina; Zimmermann, Rolf; Burau, Florian; Siebert, Marc; Arbelo, Mariano; Castro, Saullo; Degenhardt, Richard

    2014-06-01

    The design and manufacture of an unstiffened composite conical structure which is a scaled-down version of the Ariane 5 Midlife Evolution Equipment Bay Structure is presented. For such benchmarking structures the fiber orientation error is critical and then the manufacturing process becomes a big challenge. The paper therefore is focused on the implementation of a tailoring study and on the manufacturing process. The conical structure will be tested to validate a new design approach.This study contributes to the European Union (EU) project DESICOS, whose aim is to develop less conservative design guidelines for imperfection sensitive thin-walled structures.

  10. Catalyst-free fabrication of novel ZnO/CuO core-Shell nanowires heterojunction: Controlled growth, structural and optoelectronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Arif; Wahab, Yussof; Muhammad, Rosnita; Tahir, Muhammad; Sakrani, Samsudi

    2018-03-01

    Development of controlled growth and vertically aligned ZnO/CuO core-shell heterojunction nanowires (NWs) with large area by a catalyst free vapor deposition and oxidation approach has been investigated. Structural characterization reveals successful fabrication of a core ZnO nanowire having single crystalline hexagonal wurtzite structure along [002] direction and CuO nanostructure shell with thickness (8-10 nm) having polycrystalline monoclinic structure. The optical property analysis suggests that the reflectance spectrum of ZnO/CuO heterostructure nanowires is decreased by 18% in the visible range, which correspondingly shows high absorption in this region as compared to pristine ZnO nanowires. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of core-shell heterojunction nanowires measured by conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) shows excellent rectifying behavior, which indicates the characteristics of a good p-n junction. The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has confirmed the sharp junction interface between the core-shell heterojunction nanowire arrays. The valence band offset and conduction band offset at ZnO/CuO heterointerfaces are measured to be 2.4 ± 0.05 and 0.23 ± 0.005 eV respectively, using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and a type-II band alignment structure is found. The results of this study contribute to the development of new advanced device heterostructures for solar energy conversion and optoelectronics applications.

  11. Hierarchical core-shell structure of ZnO nanorod@NiO/MoO₂ composite nanosheet arrays for high-performance supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Sucheng; Zhang, Guanhua; Zeng, Wei; Zhu, Jian; Gong, Feilong; Li, Feng; Duan, Huigao

    2014-08-27

    A hierarchical core-shell structure of ZnO nanorod@NiO/MoO2 composite nanosheet arrays on nickel foam substrate for high-performance supercapacitors was constructed by a two-step solution-based method involving two hydrothermal processes followed by a calcination treatment. Compared to one composed of pure NiO/MoO2 composite nanosheets, the hierarchical core-shell structure electrode displays better pseudocapacitive behaviors in 2 M KOH, including high areal specific capacitance values of 1.18 F cm(-2) at 5 mA cm(-2) and 0.6 F cm(-2) at 30 mA cm(-2) as well as relatively good rate capability at high current densities. Furthermore, it also shows remarkable cycle stability, remaining at 91.7% of the initial value even after 4000 cycles at a current density of 10 mA cm(-2). The enhanced pseudocapacitive behaviors are mainly due to the unique hierarchical core-shell structure and the synergistic effect of combining ZnO nanorod arrays and NiO/MoO2 composite nanosheets. This novel hierarchical core-shell structure shows promise for use in next-generation supercapacitors.

  12. Fabrication of and drug delivery by an upconversion emission nanocomposite with monodisperse LaF3:Yb,Er core / mesoporous silica shell structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Y.; Qu, Y.; Zhao, J.; Zeng, Q.; Ran, Y.; Zhang, Q.; Kong, X.; Zhang, H.

    2010-01-01

    Monodisperse, uniform, encapsulated mesoporous silicananocomposites with a LaF3:Yb,Er core and a mesoporous silica shell structure, which still exhibit green upconversion photoluminescence (PL) under 980 nm irradiation, have been successfully synthesized and investigated as potential drug delivery

  13. Design aids for stiffened composite shells with cutouts

    CERN Document Server

    Sahoo, Sarmila

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the free vibrations of graphite-epoxy laminated composite stiffened shells with cutout both in terms of the natural frequencies and mode shapes. The dynamic analysis of shell structures, which may have complex geometry and arbitrary loading and boundary conditions, is solved efficiently by the finite element method, even including cutouts in shells. The results may be readily used by practicing engineers dealing with stiffened composite shells with cutouts. Several shell forms viz. cylindrical shell, hypar shell, conoidal shell, spherical shell, saddle shell, hyperbolic paraboloidal shell and elliptic paraboloidal shell are considered in the book. The dynamic characteristics of stiffened composite shells with cutout are described in terms of the natural frequency and mode shapes. The size of the cutouts and their positions with respect to the shell centre are varied for different edge constraints of cross-ply and angle-ply laminated composite shells. The effects of these parametric variat...

  14. Evaluating the Internal Structure of Core-Shell Nanoparticles Using X-ray Photoelectron Intensities and Simulated Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudzicki, M; Werner, W S M; Shard, A G; Wang, Y-C; Castner, D G; Powell, C J

    2015-08-06

    The functionality of a new version of the National Institute of Standards and Technology database Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA) has been extended by implementing a new geometry engine. The engine enables users to simulate Auger-electron spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectra for different predefined morphologies (planar, islands, spheres, multi-layer core-shell particles). We compared shell thicknesses of core-shell nanoparticles derived from core-shell XPS peak intensities using Shard's method, which allows one to estimate shell thicknesses of core-shell nanoparticles, and a series of SESSA simulations for a wide range of nanoparticle dimensions. We obtained very good agreement of the shell thicknesses for cases where elastic scattering within the shell can be neglected, a result that is in accordance with the underlying assumptions of the Shard model. If elastic-scattering effects are important, there can be thickness uncertainties of up to 25 %. Experimental spectra of functionalized gold nanoparticles obtained by Techane et al. were analyzed with SESSA 2.0 both with respect to the relevant peak intensities as well as the spectral shape. Good agreement between experiment and theory was found for both cases. These results show that the single-sphere model for core-shell nanoparticles is valid when just using peak intensities, but more detailed modeling is needed to describe the inelastic background.

  15. Dynamic Response Analysis of Cable of Submerged Floating Tunnel under Hydrodynamic Force and Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwen Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A simplified analysis model of cable for submerged floating tunnel subjected to parametrically excited vibrations in the ocean environment is proposed in this investigation. The equation of motion of the cable is obtained by a mathematical method utilizing the Euler beam theory and the Galerkin method. The hydrodynamic force induced by earthquake excitations is formulated to simulate real seaquake conditions. The random earthquake excitation in the time domain is formulated by the stochastic phase spectrum method. An analytical model for analyzing the cable for submerged floating tunnel subjected to combined hydrodynamic forces and earthquake excitations is then developed. The sensitivity of key parameters including the hydrodynamic, earthquake, and structural parameters on the dynamic response of the cable is investigated and discussed. The present model enables a preliminary examination of the hydrodynamic and seismic behavior of cable for submerged floating tunnel and can provide valuable recommendations for use in design and operation of anchor systems for submerged floating tunnel.

  16. I. Fission Probabilities, Fission Barriers, and Shell Effects. II. Particle Structure Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, Kexing [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-05-01

    In Part I, fission excitation functions of osmium isotopes 185,186, 187, 189 Os produced in 3He +182,183, 184, 186W reactions, and of polonium isotopes 209,210, 211, 212Po produced in 3He/4He + 206, 207, 208Pb reactions, were measured with high precision. These excitation functions have been analyzed in detail based upon the transition state formalism. The fission barriers, and shell effects for the corresponding nuclei are extracted from the detailed analyses. A novel approach has been developed to determine upper limits of the transient time of the fission process. The upper limits are constrained by the fission probabilities of neighboring isotopes. The upper limits for the transient time set with this new method are 15x 10–21 sec and 25x 10–21 sec for 0s and Po compound nuclei, respectively. In Part II, we report on a search for evidence of the optical modulations in the energy spectra of alpha particles emitted from hot compound nuclei. The optical modulations are expected to arise from the ~-particle interaction with the rest of the nucleus as the particle prepares to exit. Some evidence for the modulations has been observed in the alpha spectra measured in the 3He-induced reactions, 3He + natAg in particular. The identification of the modulations involves a technique that subtracts the bulk statistical background from the measured alpha spectra, in order for the modulations to become visible in the residuals. Due to insufficient knowledge of the background spectra, however, the presented evidence should only be regarded as preliminary and tentative.

  17. Effect of laser radiation on multi-wall carbon nanotubes: study of shell structure and immobilization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyoergy, Enikoe, E-mail: egyorgy@icmab.es; Perez del Pino, Angel [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Barcelona, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (ICMAB-CSIC) (Spain); Roqueta, Jaume; Ballesteros, Belen [Centro de Investigaciones en Nanociencia y Nanotecnologia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CIN2-CSIC) (Spain); Cabana, Laura; Tobias, Gerard [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Barcelona, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (ICMAB-CSIC) (Spain)

    2013-08-15

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with diameters between 10 and 15 nm were transferred and immobilized onto SiO{sub 2} glass substrates by ultraviolet matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (UV-MAPLE). Toluene was chosen as solvent material for the preparation of the composite MAPLE targets. An UV KrF* ({lambda} = 248 nm, {tau}{sub FWHM} {approx_equal} 25 ns, {nu} = 10 Hz) excimer laser source was used for the irradiation experiments. The effects of incident laser fluence on the structure of the laser transferred MWCNTs was investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The surface morphology of the laser processed MWCNTs was investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy in acoustic (dynamic) configuration. Network-like structures constituted by individual nanotubes and nanotube bundles were created onto solid substrates. Changes in the nanotubes' shell structure can be induced through the tuning of the laser fluence value incident onto the composite MAPLE targets.

  18. Preparation of Acid-Resistant Microcapsules with Shell-Matrix Structure to Enhance Stability of Streptococcus Thermophilus IFFI 6038.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huan Bin; Chen, Jiashu; Li, Shunyi; Zhang, Jianpan; Zhu, Chun E; Ran, Hao; Luo, Meihua; Pan, Xin; Hu, Haiyan; Wu, Chuanbin

    2017-08-01

    Microencapsulation is an effective technology used to protect probiotics against harsh conditions. Extrusion is a commonly used microencapsulation method utilized to prepare probiotics microcapsules that is regarded as economical and simple to operate. This research aims to prepare acid-resistant probiotic microcapsules with high viability after freeze-drying and optimized storage stability. Streptococcus thermophilus IFFI 6038 (IFFI 6038) cells were mixed with trehalose and alginate to fabricate microcapsules using extrusion. These capsules were subsequently coated with chitosan to obtain chitosan-trehalose-alginate microcapsules with shell-matrix structure. Chitosan-alginate microcapsules (without trehalose) were also prepared using the same method. The characteristics of the microcapsules were observed by measuring the freeze-dried viability, acid resistance, and long-term storage stability of the cells. The viable count of IFFI 6038 in the chitosan-trehalose-alginate microcapsules was 8.34 ± 0.30 log CFU g -1 after freeze-drying (lyophilization), which was nearly 1 log units g -1 greater than the chitosan-alginate microcapsules. The viability of IFFI 6038 in the chitosan-trehalose-alginate microcapsules was 6.45 ± 0.09 log CFU g -1 after 120 min of treatment in simulated gastric juices, while the chitosan-alginate microcapsules only measured 4.82 ± 0.22 log CFU g -1 . The results of the long-term storage stability assay indicated that the viability of IFFI 6038 in chitosan-trehalose-alginate microcapsules was higher than in chitosan-alginate microcapsules after storage at 25 °C. Trehalose played an important role in the stability of IFFI 6038 during storage. The novel shell-matrix chitosan-trehalose-alginate microcapsules showed optimal stability and acid resistance, demonstrating their potential as a delivery vehicle to transport probiotics. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  19. Fe/amorphous ceramics core/shell structured nanoflakes-assembled rod-like architecture for efficient microwave absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolong; Li, Zhenxing; Liu, Xianguo; Zhang, Shihong; Ran, Songlin

    2017-12-01

    A rod-like architecture self-assembled from Fe/amorphous ceramics core/shell structured nanoflakes has been prepared by arc discharging steelmaking slag in an Ar/H2 atmosphere, in which the amorphous ceramic shell is composed of MgO, Al2O3, MgSiO3 and CaSiO3. The electromagnetic absorbing performance of the rod-like architecture is evaluated over the range of 2–18 GHz. Multiple dielectric relaxation of the permittivity is attributed to the size distribution and novel morphology of the rod-like architecture. The experimental permeability is in good agreement with the calculated curves based on the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation. The magnetic loss ability is superior to the dielectric loss ability, due to the planar anisotropy of flake-shaped particles. At a thickness of 2.4 mm, the minimal reflection loss (RL) can reach  ‑35.04 dB at 10.96 GHz. In particular, the effective bandwidth with RL exceeding  ‑10 dB remains at least 2.56 GHz at a thickness of 1.6–4.1 mm, and exhibits a red shift phenomenon as layer thickness increases. Such efficient EM absorption performances originate from magnetic/dielectric loss ability accompanied by 1/4-wave elimination. The represented work not only provides a good reference for efficient microwave absorption, but also broadens the application of steelmaking slag.

  20. Spatio-temporal structure of Alfvén waves excited by a sudden impulse localized on an L-shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Klimushkin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the spatial structure and temporal evolution of the azimuthally small scale Alfvén wave generated by a sudden impulse concentrated on a given magnetic shell. At the outset, both poloidal and toroidal components are present in the wave's magnetic field. The oscillation in the poloidal component on a given magnetic shell is a superposition of two monochromatic oscillations, one with the local resonance frequency on this shell, and the other with the frequency corresponding to the resonance frequency on the source surface. The superposition of these two oscillations leads to beating. Due to phase mixing, the poloidal component of the oscillation decreases with time down to zero, transferring its energy to the toroidal component. Beating in the toroidal component is less pronounced. As time elapses, energy concentration near the source magnetic shell occurs with the frequency of the oscillation corresponding to the Alfvénic resonance frequency on this surface. Outside this thin region wave amplitudes become rather small at oscillation frequencies corresponding to the local resonance frequency of the respective magnetic shell.

  1. Synthesis of In2O3-In2S3 core-shell nanorods with inverted type-I structure for photocatalytic H2 generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xia; Xu, Jun; Wong, Tailun; Yang, Qingdan; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2013-08-14

    In2O3-In2S3 core-shell nanostructures were prepared via a simple hydrothermal process at low temperatures. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) shows that the In2O3-In2S3 nanorod is an inverted type I nanostructure. The energy potential in this structure would drive both the photo-generated holes and electrons towards the shell to facilitate photocatalytic H2 generation. Such inverted type-I nanostructure is firstly used for hydrogen generation. Comparing with reported indium-based photocatalysts upon UV-Vis illumination, the core-shell In2O3-In2S3 nanostructure obtained here exhibits a good H2 evolution rate of 61.4 μmol h(-1) g(-1).

  2. Structural analysis and design optimization of double shell system for fuel irradiation capsule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. S.; Choi, Y. J.; Choi, M. H.; Rhu, C. H.; Go, J. H.; Hong, S. J.; Lee, H. C. [Chungnam National Univ., Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    During irradiation tests, the fuel capsule expect that the high temperature will be occur. Thus, to estimate the structural integrity of fuel capsule during irradiation tests, it is needed to perform structural analysis and to obtain the information of mechanical characteristics for the system. In this study, the structure analysis of the circular capsule is performed using the finite element analysis program, ANSYS and analysis calculation. To obtain the mechanical characteristics of the circular capsule structure such as stresses, critical buckling loads and natural frequencies et al. the static nd model analysis are conducted. The effects of various wall thicknesses of capsule outer tube and support tube for circular capsule are obtained. Also, the effects of boundary conditions and principal materials of the fuel capsule on the structural behavior are investigated. The FE results are compared with the analysis results in case of possible. 13 refs., 34 figs., 10 tabs. (Author)

  3. Effects of size reduction on the structure and magnetic properties of core–shell Ni{sub 3}Si/silica nanoparticles prepared by electrochemical synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigozzi, Giancarlo, E-mail: giancarlo.pigozzi@empa.ch [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Mukherji, Debashis, E-mail: d.mukherji@tu-bs.de [Institut für Werkstoffe, Technical University of Braunschweig, Langer Kamp 8, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Elerman, Yalçin, E-mail: Yalcin.Elerman@ankara.edu.tr [Department of Engineering Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Ankara University, 06100 Besevler, Ankara (Turkey); Strunz, Pavel, E-mail: strunz@ujf.cas.cz [Nuclear Physics Institute (NPI), 25068 Řež (Czech Republic); Gilles, Ralph, E-mail: Ralph.Gilles@frm2.tum.de [Technische Universität München, Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (MLZ), 85747 Garching (Germany); Hoelzel, Markus, E-mail: markus.hoelzel@frm2.tum.de [Technische Universität München, Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (MLZ), 85747 Garching (Germany); Barbier, Bruno, E-mail: b.barbier@uni-bonn.de [Steinmann Institut, Poppelsdorfer Schloss, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Schmutz, Patrik [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland)

    2014-01-25

    Highlights: • β{sub 1}-Ni{sub 3}Si nanoparticles were produced by electrochemical selective phase dissolution. • A core–shell structure with ordered Ni{sub 3}Si core and silica shell is obtained. • The ordered L1{sub 2} crystal structure is maintained upon size reduction down to 20 nm. • Bulk Ni{sub 3}Si is ferromagnetic below 260 K with low saturation magnetization (2 emu/g). • Nanoparticles are superparamagnetic (T{sub B} ∼ 9–11 K) with magnetization >20 emu/g. -- Abstract: Nanostructured nickel silicides find application in electronics, high-temperature alloys, electrode materials and catalysis. In this work, the effect of size reduction on the structure and magnetic properties of β{sub 1}-Ni{sub 3}Si intermetallic phase nanoparticles is studied. Electrochemical selective phase dissolution (ESPD) was used to produce the β{sub 1}-Ni{sub 3}Si nanoparticles of different sizes (from 20 to 215 nm) by extracting β{sub 1} nano-size precipitates from two-phase Ni–Si and Ni–Si–Al precursor alloys. The extracted nanoparticles have a core–shell structure with β{sub 1}-Ni{sub 3}Si core and an amorphous silica shell. Particles size and shape are controlled by the composition and thermal treatment of the precursor alloys. Precipitates size is scaled without modifying the ordered L1{sub 2} lattice structure. The bulk β{sub 1}-Ni{sub 3}Si is ferromagnetic below 260 K with low saturation magnetization (2 emu/g), while the core–shell Ni{sub 3}Si/silica nanoparticles are superparamagnetic at low temperatures (<9–11 K) with low coercivity (<90 Oe) and magnetization >20 emu/g at 5 T. It is suggested that weak particle magnetic moments and low magnetic anisotropy of the L1{sub 2} structure are responsible for these properties. The shell on one hand protects the core from degradation; however the oxidation of the core/shell interface region can influence the magnetic behavior of the nano-powders.

  4. Submerged beachrock preservation in the context of wave ravinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Lauren; Green, Andrew N.; Andrew Cooper, J.

    2018-02-01

    This study examines a Holocene-aged submerged shoreline, Limestone Reef, located in the shallow subtidal zone of South Africa's east coast. It comprises an elongate, coast-oblique, slab-like outcrop of beachrock situated above the contemporary fair-weather wave base. It is currently undergoing mechanical disintegration. Its unique and rare preservation in a high-energy setting affords an opportunity to examine the mechanical processes occurring during wave ravinement associated with rising sea level. The submerged shoreline and the adjacent shoreface were examined using high-resolution seismic reflection, side-scan sonar and shallow-water multibeam echosounding techniques. Limestone Reef rests on top of unconsolidated Holocene deposits. The structure's surface is characterised by reef-perpendicular gullies with rubble derived from the slab fringing its seaward edge. Limestone Reef slopes gently seawards and has a steep landward-facing edge where gullies are most prominently developed. Teardrop-shaped rippled scour depressions, marked by high backscatter, are located seawards of the submerged shoreline. These elongate in a seaward direction and are filled with bioclastic gravels and residual rubble from Limestone Reef. The gullies in the upstanding structure are indicative of wave plucking and abrasion of the shoreline. The material exposed by the rippled scour depressions is identical to that comprising the postglacial ravinement surface identified in the offshore stratigraphy. These deposits are considered to represent the contemporary, actively forming wave ravinement surface. The results suggest that wave ravinement of submerged shorelines is a discontinuous process dominated by the seaward entrainment of material from its landward edge controlled by high-energy drawback during storm surges. The ravinement process appears to operate at the seasonal scale and averages out over the long-term millennial scale for the continuous surface.

  5. Tubular House - Form Follows Technology, Concrete Shell Structure with Inner Thermal Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idem, Robert; Kleczek, Paweł; Pawłowski, Krzysztof; Chudoba, Piotr

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this paper is the theoretical analysis of the possibilities and limitations of using an unconventional technology and the original architectural form stemming from it – the building with external construction and internal insulation. In Central European climatic conditions, the traditional solution for the walls of heated buildings relies on using external thermal insulation. This stems from building physics: it prevents interstitial condensation of water vapour in the wall. Internal insulation is used exceptionally. This is done e.g. in historical buildings undergoing thermal modernization (due to the impossibility of interfering with facade). In such cases, a thermal insulation layer is used on the internal wall surface, along with an additional layer of vapour barrier. The concept of building concerns the intentional usage of an internal insulation. In this case, the construction is a tight external reinforced concrete shell. The architectural form of such building is strongly interrelated with the technology, which was used to build it. The paper presents the essence of this concept in descriptive and drawing form. The basic elements of such building are described (the external construction, the internal insulation and ventilation). As a case study, authors present a project of a residential building along with the description of the applied materials and installation solutions, and the results obtained from thermal, humidity and energetic calculations. The discussion presents the advantages and disadvantages of the proposed concept. The basic advantage of this solution is potentially low building cost. This stems from minimizing the ground works, the simplicity of the joints and the outer finish, as well as from the possibility of prefabrication of the elements. The continuity of the thermal insulation allows to reduce the amount of thermal bridges. The applied technology and form are applicable most of all for small buildings, due to limited

  6. Ultra-high-performance core–shell structured Ru@Pt/C catalyst prepared by a facile pulse electrochemical deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dan; Li, Yuexia; Liao, Shijun; Su, Dong; Song, Huiyu; Li, Yingwei; Yang, Lijun; Li, Can

    2015-01-01

    Core–shell structured catalysts, made by placing either a monolayer or a thin layer of a noble metal on relatively cheap core-metal nanoparticles, are fascinating and promising fuel cell catalysts due to their high utilization of noble metals. Here, we report our development of a core–shell structured catalyst, Ru@Pt/C, generated by a novel and facile pulse electrochemical deposition (PED) approach. We demonstrate that compared with a commercial Pt/C catalyst, this novel catalyst achieves over four times higher mass activity towards the anodic oxidation of methanol, and 3.6 times higher mass activity towards the cathodic reduction of oxygen. Importantly, we find that the intrinsic activity of Pt in this Ru@Pt/C catalyst is doubled due to the formation of the core–shell structure. The catalyst also shows superior stability: even after 2000 scans, it still retains up to 90% of the peak current. Our findings demonstrate that this novel PED approach is a promising method for preparing high-performance core–shell catalysts for fuel cell applications. PMID:26235385

  7. Composites Based on Core-Shell Structured HBCuPc@CNTs-Fe3O4 and Polyarylene Ether Nitriles with Excellent Dielectric and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Zejun; Zhong, Jiachun; Liu, Xiaobo

    2017-10-01

    Core-shell structured magnetic carbon nanotubes (CNTs-Fe3O4) coated with hyperbranched copper phthalocyanine (HBCuPc) (HBCuPc@CNTs-Fe3O4) hybrids were prepared by the solvent-thermal method. The results indicated that the HBCuPc molecules were decorated on the surface of CNTs-Fe3O4 through coordination behavior of phthalocyanines, and the CNTs-Fe3O4 core was completely coaxial wrapped by a functional intermediate HBCuPc shell. Then, polymer-based composites with a relatively high dielectric constant and low dielectric loss were fabricated by using core-shell structured HBCuPc@CNTs-Fe3O4 hybrids as fillers and polyarylene ether nitriles (PEN) as the polymer matrix. The cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of composites showed that there is almost no agglomeration and internal delamination. In addition, the rheological analysis reveals that the core-shell structured HBCuPc@CNTs-Fe3O4 hybrids present better dispersion and stronger interface adhesion with the PEN matrix than CNTs-Fe3O4, thus resulting in significant improvement of the mechanical, thermal and dielectric properties of polymer-based composites.

  8. Pearl-necklace structures in core-shell molecular brushes: Experiments, Monte Carlo simulations and self-consistent field modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polotsky, A.; Charlaganov, M.; Xu, Y.P.; Leermakers, F.A.M.; Daoud, M.; Muller, A.H.E.; Dotera, T.; Borisov, O.V.

    2008-01-01

    We present theoretical arguments and experimental evidence for a longitudinal instability in core-shell cylindrical polymer brushes with a solvophobic inner (core) block and a solvophilic outer (shell) block in selective solvents. The two-gradient self-consistent field Scheutjens-Fleer (SCF-SF)

  9. Synthesis of Core@Shell Nanostructures in a Continuous Flow Droplet Reactor: Controlling Structure through Relative Flow Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Joshua S; Koczkur, Kallum M; Skrabalak, Sara E

    2017-06-20

    Bimetallic nanostructures are primarily synthesized in small volume batches. However, droplet-based reactors are receiving attention due to their ability to maintain thermal and compositional equilibrium within and between droplets, enabling flow operations for inline analyses and the scale-up of nanomaterial syntheses. Here, the syntheses of shape-controlled core@shell Au@Pd nanostructures with variable shell thicknesses are reported through control of the relative flow rates of reagents within the microreactor. Specifically, Pd shells were grown on cubic or octahedral Au seeds, selected as a model system. In batch reactions, shell thickness is determined by precursor concentration; however, as shown here, precursor feedstock concentration can be held constant, with the precursor concentration within the droplets being controlled through relative flow rates. This approach allows process conditions to be modified inline rather than from batch to batch to achieve particles with different shell thicknesses, and this procedure should be applicable to other multicomponent systems.

  10. Structural and optical studies of BiFeO3@SiO2 core/shell nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, S.; C, Mahender; Soam, Ankur; Nanda, J.

    2017-10-01

    Sol-gel synthesized bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) nanoparticles (NPs) were encapsulated with SiO2 by the Stöber method. The structural and microstructural studies were carried out by x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The XRD pattern revealed the coating of SiO2 on distorted rhombohedral (R3c) structured BiFeO3 (BFO). The particle size of BFO was estimated to be 100–120 nm. The inter-planar spacing between the (1 1 0) planes was found to be 0.28 nm. The coating of amorphous SiO2 shell on crystalline BFO was quite evident from the TEM micrographs. The presence of O–Si–O stretching vibration in FTIR spectra reconfirmed the coating of SiO2. The direct bandgap energy was calculated to be 2.02 eV for BFO and 2.12 eV for BFO@SiO2 (from UV–vis spectra). The optical absorption was observed to be higher for BFO@SiO2 than BFO. These NPs may be used as photoelectrodes in dye sensitized solar cell application.

  11. Plate/shell structure topology optimization of orthotropic material for buckling problem based on independent continuous topological variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hong-Ling; Wang, Wei-Wei; Chen, Ning; Sui, Yun-Kang

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of the present work is to study the buckling problem with plate/shell topology optimization of orthotropic material. A model of buckling topology optimization is established based on the independent, continuous, and mapping method, which considers structural mass as objective and buckling critical loads as constraints. Firstly, composite exponential function (CEF) and power function (PF) as filter functions are introduced to recognize the element mass, the element stiffness matrix, and the element geometric stiffness matrix. The filter functions of the orthotropic material stiffness are deduced. Then these filter functions are put into buckling topology optimization of a differential equation to analyze the design sensitivity. Furthermore, the buckling constraints are approximately expressed as explicit functions with respect to the design variables based on the first-order Taylor expansion. The objective function is standardized based on the second-order Taylor expansion. Therefore, the optimization model is translated into a quadratic program. Finally, the dual sequence quadratic programming (DSQP) algorithm and the global convergence method of moving asymptotes algorithm with two different filter functions (CEF and PF) are applied to solve the optimal model. Three numerical results show that DSQP&CEF has the best performance in the view of structural mass and discretion.

  12. Numerical simulation and transonic wind-tunnel test for elastic thin-shell structure considering fluid–structure interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunju Yan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic force can lead to the strong structural vibration of flying aircraft at a high speed. This harmful vibration can bring damage or failure to the electronic equipment fixed in aircraft. It is necessary to predict the structural dynamic response in the design course. This paper presents a new numerical algorithm and scheme to solve the structural dynamics responses when considering fluid–structure interaction (FSI. Numerical simulation for a free-flying structural model in transonic speed is completed. Results show that the small elastic deformation of the structure can greatly affect the FSI. The FSI vibration tests are carried out in a transonic speed wind-tunnel for checking numerical theory and algorithms, and the wind-tunnel test results well accord with that of the numerical simulation. This indicates that the presented numerical method can be applied to predicting the structural dynamics responses when containing the FSI.

  13. Structure and interactions of calcite spherulites with {alpha}-chitin in the brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus) shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heredia, A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Departamento de Quimica de Radiaciones y Radioquimica, UNAM, Circuito Exterior C.U. Apdo., Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Physikalisches Institut and Center for Nanotechnology, Universitaet Muenster, Gievenbecker Weg 11, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Aguilar-Franco, M. [Instituto de Fisica, Depto de Fisicoquimica, UNAM, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria Apartado Postal 20-364 01000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Magana, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Depto de Estado Solido, UNAM, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria Apartado Postal 20-364 01000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Flores, C. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Depto de Estado Solido, Laboratorio de Biomateriales, UNAM, Circuito Exterior C.U. S/N CP 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Pina, C. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Depto de Estado Solido, Laboratorio de Biomateriales, UNAM, Circuito Exterior C.U. S/N CP 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Velazquez, R. [Centro de Fisica Aplicada Tecnologia Avanzada, UNAM, Km. 15 Carretera Queretaro-San Luis Potosi, C.P. 76230, Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico); Schaeffer, T.E. [Physikalisches Institut and Center for Nanotechnology, Universitaet Muenster, Gievenbecker Weg 11, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Bucio, L. [Instituto de Fisica, Depto de Estado Solido, UNAM, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria Apartado Postal 20-364 01000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Basiuk, V.A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Departamento de Quimica de Radiaciones y Radioquimica, UNAM, Circuito Exterior C.U. Apdo., Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-01-15

    White spots form in the brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus, Decapoda) shell during frozen storage. The mineral formed consists of calcite incorporated into an amorphous {alpha}-chitin matrix. We studied mechanisms of interaction of amorphous {alpha}-chitin macromolecules with hkl crystal planes to form highly ordered structures, as well as the role of specific sites in the biopolymer, which can be related to nucleation and spheroidal crystal growth. We used low vacuum scanning electron microscopy (LVSEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and molecular mechanics modeling (MM+ method). AFM images showed fingerprint distances in the biopolymer and a highly layered structure in the crystalline material. The presence of {alpha}-chitin, with a specific spatial distribution of radicals, is thought to be responsible for nucleation and to thermodynamically stabilize ions to form the spherulite crystalline phase, which are usually oval to spherical (0.10 to 200 {mu}m in diameter). Our models of crystal-biopolymer interaction found high affinity of CO{sub 3} {sup 2-} anions in the (104) crystalline plane (the main plane in calcite monocrystals) to NH- groups of the biopolymer, as well as of the C=O in the biopolymer to Ca{sup 2+} cations in the crystalline structure. These interactions explain the spherical growth and inhibition in some planes. The specific physicochemical interactions (docking of groups depending on their geometrical distribution) suggest that the biomineral structure is controlled by the biopolymer on a local scale. This information is useful for further design and improvement of (hybrid) materials for versatile application, from nanotechnology to biomedicine and engineering.

  14. Wrinkling of Pressurized Elastic Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Dominic; Ajdari, Amin; Vaziri, Ashkan; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2011-10-01

    We study the formation of localized structures formed by the point loading of an internally pressurized elastic shell. While unpressurized shells (such as a ping-pong ball) buckle into polygonal structures, we show that pressurized shells are subject to a wrinkling instability. We study wrinkling in depth, presenting scaling laws for the critical indentation at which wrinkling occurs and the number of wrinkles formed in terms of the internal pressurization and material properties of the shell. These results are validated by numerical simulations. We show that the evolution of the wrinkle length with increasing indentation can be understood for highly pressurized shells from membrane theory. These results suggest that the position and number of wrinkles may be used in combination to give simple methods for the estimation of the mechanical properties of highly pressurized shells.

  15. Wrinkling of Pressurized Elastic Shells

    KAUST Repository

    Vella, Dominic

    2011-10-01

    We study the formation of localized structures formed by the point loading of an internally pressurized elastic shell. While unpressurized shells (such as a ping-pong ball) buckle into polygonal structures, we show that pressurized shells are subject to a wrinkling instability. We study wrinkling in depth, presenting scaling laws for the critical indentation at which wrinkling occurs and the number of wrinkles formed in terms of the internal pressurization and material properties of the shell. These results are validated by numerical simulations. We show that the evolution of the wrinkle length with increasing indentation can be understood for highly pressurized shells from membrane theory. These results suggest that the position and number of wrinkles may be used in combination to give simple methods for the estimation of the mechanical properties of highly pressurized shells. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  16. ZnS-Sb2S3@C Core-Double Shell Polyhedron Structure Derived from Metal-Organic Framework as Anodes for High Performance Sodium Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shihua; Li, Caixia; Ge, Xiaoli; Li, Zhaoqiang; Miao, Xianguang; Yin, Longwei

    2017-06-27

    Taking advantage of zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-8), ZnS-Sb2S3@C core-double shell polyhedron structure is synthesized through a sulfurization reaction between Zn2+ dissociated from ZIF-8 and S2- from thioacetamide (TAA), and subsequently a metal cation exchange process between Zn2+ and Sb3+, in which carbon layer is introduced from polymeric resorcinol-formaldehyde to prevent the collapse of the polyhedron. The polyhedron composite with a ZnS inner-core and Sb2S3/C double-shell as anode for sodium ion batteries (SIBs) shows us a significantly improved electrochemical performance with stable cycle stability, high Coulombic efficiency and specific capacity. Peculiarly, introducing a carbon shell not only acts as an important protective layer to form a rigid construction and accommodate the volume changes, but also improves the electronic conductivity to optimize the stable cycle performance and the excellent rate property. The architecture composed of ZnS inner core and a complex Sb2S3/C shell not only facilitates the facile electrolyte infiltration to reduce the Na-ion diffusion length to improve the electrochemical reaction kinetics, but also prevents the structure pulverization caused by Na-ion insertion/extraction. This approach to prepare metal sulfides based on MOFs can be further extended to design other nanostructured systems for high performance energy storage devices.

  17. Investigation of the electromagnetic absorption properties of Ni@TiO2 and Ni@SiO2 composite microspheres with core-shell structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Biao; Shao, Gang; Fan, Bingbing; Zhao, Wanyu; Zhang, Rui

    2015-01-28

    In this work, amorphous TiO2 and SiO2-coated Ni composite microspheres were successfully prepared by a two-step method. The phase purity, morphology, and structure of composite microspheres are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Due to the presence of the insulator SiO2 shell, the core-shell Ni-SiO2 composite microspheres exhibit better antioxidation capability than that of pure Ni microspheres. The core-shell Ni-SiO2 composite microspheres show the best microwave absorption properties than those of pure Ni microspheres and Ni-TiO2 composites. For Ni-SiO2 composite microspheres, an optimal reflection loss (RL) as low as -40.0 dB (99.99% absorption) was observed at 12.6 GHz with an absorber thickness of only 1.5 mm. The effective absorption (below -10 dB, 90% microwave absorption) bandwidth can be adjusted between 3.1 GHz and 14.4 GHz by tuning the absorber thickness in the range of 1.5-4.5 mm. The excellent microwave absorption abilities of Ni-SiO2 composite microspheres are attributed to a higher attenuation constant, Debye relaxation, interface polarization of the core-shell structure and synergistic effects between high dielectric loss and high magnetic loss.

  18. Structural Performance of Fiber-Placed, Variable-Stiffness Composite Conical and Cylindrical Shells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, A.W.

    2010-01-01

    The use of fiber-reinforced composites in aerospace structures has increased dramatically over the past decades. The high specific strength and stiffness, the tailorability, and the possibilities to integrate parts and reduce the number of fasteners give composites an advantage over metals.

  19. On the Half Shell: An Introduction to Oysters and Their Unique Structures and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, J. Adam; Haines, Sarah; Romano, Christina; Takacs, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    The eastern oyster, "Crassostrea virginica," is an ecologically and economically important species in Chesapeake Bay. Oysters are ecologically unique in the Chesapeake Bay because they build a structure known as a bar or reef by attaching to one another over a 45 long period of time. They have been coined the "Ecological Engineers…

  20. Metal-enhanced fluorescence-based core-shell Ag@SiO₂ nanoflares for affinity biosensing via target-induced structure switching of aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Qian, Yunxia; Wang, Lihui; Ma, Keke; Zhang, Yaodong

    2014-02-12

    One of the great challenges in metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) technology is the achievement of distance modulation with nanometer accuracy between the fluorophore and metal surface to obtain maximum enhancement. We propose an MEF-based core-shell Ag@SiO2 nanoflare for distance control via the thickness of silica shell with cooperation of DNA hybridization. The nanoflare contains a 50 nm spherical silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) core, a 8 nm silica shell, and cyanine (Cy5)-labeled aptamer hybridized with a complementary DNA (cDNA) immobilized onto the shell surface. The formation of the Cy5-labeled aptamer/cDNA duplex on the Ag@SiO2 NP surface results in the confinement of Cy5 to the shell surface and an increase in the fluorescence of Cy5 with a 32-fold enhancement factor in bulk solution (signal-on). In the presence of affinity-binding targets, the Cy5-labeled aptamers confined onto the Ag@SiO2 NP surface dissociate from their cDNA into the solution because of structure switching. The target-induced release of aptamer leads to a reduction in the enhanced fluorescence signal of the labeled Cy5 moiety (signal-off). Thus, the nanoflare can be used as a sensor for target recognition. Using adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) aptamer, detection of ATP has a linear response from 0 to 0.5 mM and a detection limit of 8 μM. With various types of DNA probes immobilized onto the core-shell Ag@SiO2 NPs, the MEF-based nanoflare has provided an effective platform for the detection and quantification of a broad range of analytes, such as mRNA regulation and detection, cell sorting, and gene profiling.

  1. Chemical protection of ZnO nanorods at ultralow pH To form a hierarchical BiFeO3/ZnO core-shell structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Leonard; Briscoe, Joe; Dunn, Steve

    2015-01-14

    ZnO is an interesting material for photoactive and optoelectronic devices because of the wide range of available nanostructures and advantageous semiconducting properties. However, a significant drawback of ZnO is the low stability in high or low pH solutions. This has limited the development of ZnO core-shell materials for use in Z-scheme systems or photovoltaics, where any secondary phase is produced using chemical solution processing at low or high pH. Here, we show a simple process to produce an organic capping layer of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane that can successfully stabilize nanostructured ZnO for processing below pH 1. We demonstrate that this process can be used to produce a ZnO-BiFeO3 (BFO) core-shell structure by a sol-gel process. Using a range of physical and analytical techniques, we show that BFO is highly crystalline and produces a conformal coating with a thickness of 2.5 nm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction confirm the phase and expected chemical composition of BFO. Finally we are able to demonstrate that diodes produced using the ZnO-BFO core-shell structure have improved performance with a rectification ratio at ±3 V of 2800 because of the reduction in reverse current typically associated with surface recombination on ZnO. Our process opens a route to producing a range of hitherto prohibited ZnO core-shell structures that may have applications ranging from photovoltaic devices to core-shell photocatalysts.

  2. Investigation of CuInSe{sub 2} nanowire arrays with core–shell structure electrodeposited at various duty cycles into anodic alumina templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Yu-Song [Institute of Microelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Wang, Na-Fu; Tsai, Yu-Zen [Department of Electronic Engineering, Cheng Shiu University, 840 Chengcing Rd., Niaosong District, Kaohsiung City 833, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jia-Jun [Institute of Microelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Houng, Mau-Phon, E-mail: mphoung@eembox.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Microelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • The present paper reports that CuInSe2 NW arrays were fabricated through pulsed electrode position onto an AAO template with various duty cycles, and a pore-filling ratio of approximately 92% was achieved. • GIXRD patterns showed that all CuInSe2 NW arrays were chalcopyrite and SAED images confirmed that the CuInSe2 NWs were polycrystalline. • PEDOT/CuInSe2 NW core–shell arrays were fabricated using surfactant-modified CuInSe2 NW surfaces showing the lotus effect. • Current–voltage plots revealed that the CuInSe2 NW arrays were p-type semiconductors; moreover, the core–shell structure improved the diode ideality factor from 3.91 to 2.63. - Abstract: Copper indium selenide (CuInSe{sub 2}) nanowire (NW) arrays were prepared at various electrolyte duty cycles by filling anodic alumina templates through the pulsed electrodeposition technique. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that the nucleation mechanism of CuInSe{sub 2} NW arrays was affected by the electrodeposition duty cycle. Moreover, SEM images showed that the diameter and length of the NWs were 80 nm and 2 μm, respectively. Furthermore, PEDOT/CuInSe{sub 2} NW core–shell arrays were fabricated using surfactant-modified CuInSe{sub 2} NW surfaces showing the lotus effect. Transmission electron microscopy images confirmed that a core–shell structure was achieved. Current–voltage plots revealed that the CuInSe{sub 2} NW arrays were p-type semiconductors; moreover, the core–shell structure improved the diode ideality factor from 3.91 to 2.63.

  3. The structure and photoluminescence properties of Bi2O3-core/SnO2-shell nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Changhyun; Kim, Hyunsoo; Lee, Chongmu

    2011-01-01

    Bi2O3-core/SnO2-shell nanowires have been prepared by using a two-step process: thermal evaporation of Bi2O3 powders and sputtering of SnO2. The crystalline nature of the Bi2O3-core/SnO2-shell nanowires has been revealed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). TEM analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicate that the Bi2O3-core/SnO2-shell nanowires consist of pure tetragonal alpha-Bi2O3-phase momocrystalline cores and tetragonal SnO2-phase polycrystalline shells. The photoluminescence (PL) measurements show that Bi2O3 nanowires have a broad emission band centered at around 560 nm in the yellow-green region. On the other hand, the Bi2O3-core/SnO2-shell coaxial nanowires with the sputtering times of 4 and 8 min have a blue emission band centered at around 450 nm. In contrast, those with a sputtering time of 10 min have a broad emission band centered at approximately 550 nm again. The origin of this yellow-green emission from the core/shell nanowires, however, quite differs from that from Bi2O3 nanowires, i.e., it is not from the Bi2O3 cores but from the SnO2 shells.

  4. Core–Shell Structure and Aggregation Number of Micelles Composed of Amphiphilic Block Copolymers and Amphiphilic Heterografted Polymer Brushes Determined by Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymusiak, Magdalena [Department; Kalkowski, Joseph [Department; Luo, Hanying [Department; Donovan, Alexander J. [Department; Zhang, Pin [Department; Liu, Chang [Department; Shang, Weifeng [Department; Irving, Thomas [Department; Herrera-Alonso, Margarita [Department; Liu, Ying [Department; Department

    2017-08-16

    A large group of functional nanomaterials employed in biomedical applications, including targeted drug delivery, relies on amphiphilic polymers to encapsulate therapeutic payloads via self-assembly processes. Knowledge of the micelle structures will provide critical insights into design of polymeric drug delivery systems. Core–shell micelles composed of linear diblock copolymers poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(caprolactone) (PEG-b-PCL), poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(lactic acid) (PEG-b-PLA), as well as a heterografted brush consisting of a poly(glycidyl methacrylate) backbone with PEG and PLA branches (PGMA-g-PEG/PLA) were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements to gain structural information regarding the particle morphology, core–shell size, and aggregation number. The structural information at this quasi-equilibrium state can also be used as a reference when studying the kinetics of polymer micellization.

  5. Core–Shell Structure and Aggregation Number of Micelles Composed of Amphiphilic Block Copolymers and Amphiphilic Heterografted Polymer Brushes Determined by Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymusiak, Magdalena; Kalkowski, Joseph; Luo, Hanying; Donovan, Alexander J.; Zhang, Pin; Liu, Chang; Shang, Weifeng; Irving, Thomas; Herrera-Alonso, Margarita; Liu, Ying (JHU); (IIT); (UIC)

    2017-08-31

    A large group of functional nanomaterials employed in biomedical applications, including targeted drug delivery, relies on amphiphilic polymers to encapsulate therapeutic payloads via self-assembly processes. Knowledge of the micelle structures will provide critical insights into design of polymeric drug delivery systems. Core–shell micelles composed of linear diblock copolymers poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(caprolactone) (PEG-b-PCL), poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(lactic acid) (PEG-b-PLA), as well as a heterografted brush consisting of a poly(glycidyl methacrylate) backbone with PEG and PLA branches (PGMA-g-PEG/PLA) were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements to gain structural information regarding the particle morphology, core–shell size, and aggregation number. The structural information at this quasi-equilibrium state can also be used as a reference when studying the kinetics of polymer micellization.

  6. Liquid-phase pulsed laser ablation synthesis of graphitized carbon-encapsulated palladium core-shell nanospheres for catalytic reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu-jin; Ma, Rory; Reddy, D. Amaranatha; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2015-12-01

    Graphitized carbon-encapsulated palladium (Pd) core-shell nanospheres were produced via pulsed laser ablation of a solid Pd foil target submerged in acetonitrile. The microstructural features and optical properties of these nanospheres were characterized via high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV-visible spectroscopy. Microstructural analysis indicated that the core-shell nanostructures consisted of single-crystalline cubic metallic Pd spheres that serve as the core material, over which graphitized carbon was anchored as a heterogeneous shell. The absorbance spectrum of the synthesized nanostructures exhibited a broad (absorption) band at ∼264 nm; this band corresponded to the typical inter-band transition of a metallic system and resulted possibly from the absorbance of the ionic Pd2+. The catalytic properties of the Pd and Pd@C core-shell nanostructures were investigated using the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline by an excess amount of NaBH4 in an aqueous solution at room temperature, as a model reaction. Owing to the graphitized carbon-layered structure and the high specific surface area, the resulting Pd@C nanostructures exhibited higher conversion efficiencies than their bare Pd counterparts. In fact, the layered structure provided access to the surface of the Pd nanostructures for the hydrogenation reaction, owing to the synergistic effect between graphitized carbon and the nanostructures. Their unique structure and excellent catalytic performance render Pd@C core-shell nanostructures highly promising candidates for catalysis applications.

  7. Large-Scale Fabrication of Core-Shell Structured C/SnO2 Hollow Spheres as Anode Materials with Improved Lithium Storage Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yong; Li, Qian; Wang, Chunli; Sun, Lianshan; Yi, Zheng; Wang, Limin

    2017-10-23

    Due to the high theoretical capacity as high as 1494 mAh g(-1) , SnO2 is considered as a potential anode material for high-capacity lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Therefore, the simple but effective method focused on fabrication of SnO2 is imperative. To meet this, a facile and efficient strategy to fabricate core-shell structured C/SnO2 hollow spheres by a solvothermal method is reported. Herein, the solid and hollow structure as well as the carbon content can be controlled. Very importantly, high-yield C/SnO2 spheres can be produced by this method, which suggest potential business applications in LIBs field. Owing to the dual buffer effect of the carbon layer and hollow structures, the core-shell structured C/SnO2 hollow spheres deliver a high reversible discharge capacity of 1007 mAh g(-1) at a current density of 100 mA g(-1) after 300 cycles and a superior discharge capacity of 915 mAh g(-1) at 500 mA g(-1) after 500 cycles. Even at a high current density of 1 and 2 A g(-1) , the core-shell structured C/SnO2 hollow spheres electrode still exhibits excellent discharge capacity in the long life cycles. Consideration of the superior performance and high yield, the core-shell structured C/SnO2 hollow spheres are of great interest for the next-generation LIBs. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Observation and tunability of room temperature photoluminescence of GaAs/GaInAs core-multiple-quantum-well shell nanowire structure grown on Si (100) by molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwang Wook; Park, Chang Young; Ravindran, Sooraj; Jang, Ja-Soon; Jo, Yong-Ryun; Kim, Bong-Joong; Lee, Yong Tak

    2014-01-01

    We report the observation of room temperature photoluminescence (PL) emission from GaAs/GaInAs core-multiple-quantum-well (MQW) shell nanowires (NWs) surrounded by AlGaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using a self-catalyzed technique. PL spectra of the sample show two PL peaks, originating from the GaAs core NWs and the GaInAs MQW shells. The PL peak from the shell structure red-shifts with increasing well width, and the peak position can be tuned by adjusting the width of the MQW shell. The GaAs/GaInAs core-MQW shell NW surrounded by AlGaAs also shows an enhanced PL intensity due to the improved carrier confinement owing to the presence of an AlGaAs clad layer. The inclined growth of the GaAs NWs produces a core-MQW shell structure having a different PL peak position than that of planar QWs. The PL emission by MQW shell and the ability to tune the PL peak position by varying the shell width make such core-shell NWs highly attractive for realizing next generation ultrasmall light sources and other optoelectronics devices. 81.07.Gf; 81.15.Hi; 78.55.Cr.

  9. Dynamic calculations of the core/shell structured Ising-type endohedral fullerenes: The effect of core and core/shell interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantar, Ersin

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we examine by comparing the dynamic magnetic and hysteretic properties of Ising-type endohedral fullerene (EF) with various dopant magnetic particles confined within a spherical cage. The model of EF X@C60(Spin-1/2) with X = spin-1/2, spin-1 and spin-3/2 is proposed to study the effect of the nature of core particle on the magnetic properties. The results were obtained by mean-field theory as well as Glauber-type stochastic dynamics, and focused on the response of thermal and hysteretic behaviors of systems. The system exhibits second- and first-order phase transitions. In three different core cases, the system also exhibits type-II superconductivity behavior with a dynamic hysteresis curves of the core. All results display magnetic properties of the EF which strongly depend on the nature of core particle. Moreover, core particle and core/shell (C-S) interaction are proposed as the basic factors affecting the magnetic properties of EF system.

  10. Reduction of silver (I) using defatted cashew nut shell starch and its structural comparison with commercial product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velmurugan, Palanivel; Park, Jung-Hee; Lee, Sang-Myeong; Jang, Jum-Suk; Yi, Young-Joo; Han, Sang-Sub; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Cho, Kwang-Min; Cho, Min; Oh, Byung-Taek

    2015-11-20

    In this current study, we report on the reduction of noble metal silver into silver nanoparticles using defatted cashew nut shell (CNS) starch as both the reducing and capping agents. Furthermore, it was compared with commercially available silver nanopowder for the first time. Color changes, ultraviolet-visible spectra (433.76nm), X-ray diffraction peaks (2θ=37.8, 46.3, 66.2, and 77.92) revealed the face-centered cubic (fcc) geometry of silver nanoparticles, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy confirmed the presence of elemental silver nanoparticles and the defatted CNS starch silver nanoparticle structures was in accordance to commercial silver nanopowder. The size of both the nanoparticles was found to be similar in the range of 10-50nm as analyzed using high resolution-transmission electron micrographs. The FT-IR spectroscopy revealed the shifting of NH and OH of defatted CNS starch, starch based silver nanoparticle and commercial silver nanopowder has parallel functional groups. The use of environmentally benign and renewable materials like defatted CNS starch offers an alternative to large scale synthesis of silver nanoparticle and includes numerous benefits like eco-friendly and compatibility for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Metal-based magnetic fluids with core-shell structure FeB@SiO2 amorphous particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mengchun; Bian, Xiufang; Wang, Tianqi; Wang, Junzhang

    2017-09-27

    FeB@SiO2 amorphous particles were firstly introduced into Ga85.8In14.2 alloys to prepare metal-based magnetic fluids. The morphology of the FeB amorphous particles is spherical with an average particle size of about 190 nm. The shape of the particles is regular and the particle size is homogeneous. Stable core-shell structure SiO2 modified FeB amorphous particles are obtained and the thickness of the SiO2 coatings is observed to be about 40 nm. The results of VSM confirm that the saturation magnetization of the FeB amorphous particles is 131.5 emu g-1, which is almost two times higher than that of the Fe3O4 particles. The saturation magnetization of the FeB@SiO2 amorphous particles is 106.9 emu g-1, an approximate decrease of 18.7% due to the non-magnetic SiO2 coatings. The results from the torsional oscillation viscometer show that the metal-based magnetic fluids with FeB amorphous particles exhibit a desirable high temperature performance and are ideal candidates for high temperature use.

  12. Local atomic structure of solid solutions with overlapping shells by EXAFS: The regularization method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babanov, Yu.A., E-mail: babanov@imp.uran.ru [M.N. Miheev Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation); Ponomarev, D.A.; Ustinov, V.V. [M.N. Miheev Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation); Baranov, A.N. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Zubavichus, Ya.V. [Russian Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • A method for determining bond lengths from combined EXAFS spectra for solid oxide solutions is proposed. • We have demonstrated a high resolution in r-space of close spacing atoms in the Periodical Table. • These results were obtained without any assumptions concerning interatomic distances for multi-component systems. • Coordinates ions for the solid solution with rock salt structure are determined. - Abstract: The regularization method of solving ill-posed problem is used to determine five partial interatomic distances on the basis of combined two EXAFS spectra. Mathematical algorithm and experimental results of the EXAFS analysis for Ni{sub c}Zn{sub 1−c}O (c = 0.0, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0) solid solutions with the rock salt (rs) crystal structure are discussed. Samples were synthesized from the binary oxide powders at pressure of 7.7 GPa and temperatures 1450–1650 K. The measurements were performed using synchrotron facilities (Russian Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow). The Ni and Zn K absorption spectra were recorded in transmission mode under room temperature. It is shown, the ideal rock salt lattice is distorted and long-range order exists only in the average (Vegard law). In order to determine coordinates ions for the solid solution with rock salt structure, we used the Pauling model. The simulation is performed for 343,000 cluster of oxide ions. The distribution functions for ions (Ni−O, Ni−Ni, Ni−Zn, Zn−Zn, Zn−O, O−O) depending on the distance are obtained. The width of the Gaussian distribution function is determined by the difference of the radii of the metal ions. The results are consistent with the data both X-ray diffraction and the EXAFS spectroscopy.

  13. An improved fully stressed design algorithm for plate/shell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, H.

    1990-01-01

    The stress-ratio algorithm associated with fully stressed design philosophy has been used as a convenient tool to achieve minimum weight design of strength-limited structures. The algorithm is effective and converges quickly for many cases. However, it presents extremely slow oscillatory iteration histories for plate-thickness design problems that involve transverse bending loads. Modification of the basic algorithm presented in this paper provides an effective remedy to this problem when both membrane and bending loads are present. The modified resizing algorithm requires numerical solutions of a fourth-order algebraic equation. No additional data, beyond the ordinary static analysis results, are required.

  14. Electronic structure of the 3d metals. An investigation by L-shell-photoionisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, T.S.

    2007-12-03

    The 3d transition metal elements from Sc to Cu have been investigated by both photo electron emission and photo absorption. Experimental spectra in the 2p energy range are discussed based on atomic multiplet models and Hartree- Fock calculations. The samples have been evaporated from an electron bombardment crucible and excited/ionized by monochromatized synchrotron radiation. Fundamental effects and the main interactions which govern the electronic structure of the 3d metal atoms are covered. Common spectral features and trends in the series are discussed as well as the importance of many body electron correlation effects. (orig.)

  15. Optical fiber-based core-shell coaxially structured hybrid cells for self-powered nanosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Caofeng; Zhu, Guang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Guo, Wenxi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Dong, Lin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); School of Materials Science and Enginnering, Zhenzhou University, Zhenghou 450001 (China); Wang, Zhong Lin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2012-07-03

    An optical fiber-based 3D hybrid cell consisting of a coaxially structured dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) and a nanogenerator (NG) for simultaneously or independently harvesting solar and mechanical energy is demonstrated. The current output of the hybrid cell is dominated by the DSSC, and the voltage output is dominated by the NG; these can be utilized complementarily for different applications. The output of the hybrid cell is about 7.65 {mu}A current and 3.3 V voltage, which is strong enough to power nanodevices and even commercial electronic components. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Core-Shell Zn/ZnO Structures with Improved Photocatalytic Properties Synthesized by Aqueous Solution Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuan Ming; Ma, Qing-Lan; Zhai, Bao-Gai

    2013-08-01

    A facile and green method was utilized to synthesize core-shelled Zn/ZnO microspheres by boiling Zn microparticles in water for improving the photocatalytic activity of ZnO. The synthesized Zn/ZnO core-shells were investigated by means of scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffractometer and photoluminescence spectrometer, respectively. The morphology analysis showed that the metallic Zn core was about 6 μm in diameter while the ZnO shell was about 600 nm in thickness. Compared to ZnO nanoparticles, the core-shelled Zn/ZnO microspheres exhibited improved photocatalytic activity in degrading methyl orange in water. Our results suggest that the metal-semiconductor junction formed at the Zn/ZnO interface is responsible for the enhanced photocatalytic activity of ZnO.

  17. Eduardo Torroja y la International Association for Shell and Spatial Structures (IASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astudillo, R.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Eduardo Torroja’s legacy doesn’t limit to his innovative designs, or to his contributions to concrete structures and their codes development. Throw his life, he founded, or contributed to found, several associations, national and international, which as IASS (1959 are working nowadays leading the progress of civil and architectural construction.El legado de Eduardo Torroja no se limita a sus innovadores proyectos, o a sus aportaciones al cálculo y desarrollo del hormigón armado y pretensado. A lo largo de su vida, fundó, o contribuyó a fundar, diversas asociaciones, nacionales e internacionales que, como la IASS (1959, continúan vivas liderando el progreso de la construcción civil y arquitectónica.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of Co/cenosphere core-shell structure composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xian-Feng; Shen, Xiang-Qian; Liu, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The cobalt film was successfully coated on the cenosphere particles using heterogeneous precipitation thermal reduction method. The morphology and microstructure of the products were analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). FE-SEM results implied that the Co film was relatively uniform and compact. XRD results indicated that the Co film coated on cenospheres was a face-centered cubic structure (fcc) and the crystallite size of Co particles was about 24.5 nm. The magnetic property of Co/cenosphere composites was measured by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and the results showed that the Co/cenosphere composites were of the weak soft magnetic property at room temperature, the Ms and Hc value was 18.2 Am2 kg-1 and 28.4 kA m-1, respectively.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of Co/cenosphere core-shell structure composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng Xianfeng, E-mail: mxf2029@ujs.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Shen Xiangqian; Liu Wei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2012-01-15

    The cobalt film was successfully coated on the cenosphere particles using heterogeneous precipitation thermal reduction method. The morphology and microstructure of the products were analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). FE-SEM results implied that the Co film was relatively uniform and compact. XRD results indicated that the Co film coated on cenospheres was a face-centered cubic structure (fcc) and the crystallite size of Co particles was about 24.5 nm. The magnetic property of Co/cenosphere composites was measured by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and the results showed that the Co/cenosphere composites were of the weak soft magnetic property at room temperature, the Ms and Hc value was 18.2 Am{sup 2} kg{sup -1} and 28.4 kA m{sup -1}, respectively.

  20. Probing nuclear shell structure beyond the N=40 subshell using multiple Coulomb excitation and transfer experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellgartner, Stefanie Christine

    2015-11-13

    In this work, the N=40 subshell closure is investigated with two complementary methods using a radioactive {sup 72}Zn ISOLDE beam: One- and two-neutron transfer reactions and multiple Coulomb excitation. In the one-neutron transfer reaction, two new levels of {sup 73}Zn were discovered. The two-neutron transfer channel allowed to study the differential cross section of the ground state and the 2{sup +}{sub 1} state of {sup 74}Zn. In the Coulomb excitation experiment, the measured B(E2) values and quadrupole moments of {sup 72}Zn showed that the yrast states 0{sup +}{sub 1}, 2{sup +}{sub 1} and 4{sup +}{sub 1} are moderately collective. Contrary, the 0{sup +}{sub 2} state has a different structure, since it features a stronger closed N=40 configuration compared to the ground state.

  1. Impeller Submergence Depth for Stirred Tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiyam T. Devi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Impeller submergence governs the performance of mixing tanks employed in oxygen transfer operation. Present work experimentally investigates the effect of impeller submergence depths on oxygen transfer and corresponding power consumption. It has been found that at higher range of impeller submergence, mixing tanks consume less power and gives higher values of oxygen transfer coefficient. Optimal range of submergence depth is 0.7 to 0.9 times the impeller diameter. Copyright ©2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.(Received: 4th March 2011; Revised: 12nd July 2011; Accepted: 14th July 2011[How to Cite: T.T. Devi, A.P. Sinha, M. Thakre, and B. Kumar. (2011. Impeller Submergence Depth for Stirred Tanks. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6 (2: 123-128. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.2.826.123-128][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.2.826.123-128 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/826] | View in 

  2. Elevated CO₂ levels do not affect the shell structure of the bivalve Arctica islandica from the Western Baltic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Stemmer

    Full Text Available Shells of the bivalve Arctica islandica are used to reconstruct paleo-environmental conditions (e.g. temperature via biogeochemical proxies, i.e. biogenic components that are related closely to environmental parameters at the time of shell formation. Several studies have shown that proxies like element and isotope-ratios can be affected by shell growth and microstructure. Thus it is essential to evaluate the impact of changing environmental parameters such as high pCO2 and consequent changes in carbonate chemistry on shell properties to validate these biogeochemical proxies for a wider range of environmental conditions. Growth experiments with Arctica islandica from the Western Baltic Sea kept under different pCO2 levels (from 380 to 1120 µatm indicate no affect of elevated pCO2 on shell growth or crystal microstructure, indicating that A. islandica shows an adaptation to a wider range of pCO2 levels than reported for other species. Accordingly, proxy information derived from A. islandica shells of this region contains no pCO2 related bias.

  3. Core-shell ellipsoidal MnCo₂O₄ anode with micro-/nano-structure and concentration gradient for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guoyong; Xu, Shengming; Xu, Zhenghe; Sun, Hongyu; Li, Linyan

    2014-12-10

    In this study, novel core-shell ellipsoidal MnCo2O4 powders with desired micro/nano-structure and a unique concentration gradient have been synthesized as anode material for Li-ion batteries. The special porous ellipsoid (2.5-4.5 μm in the long axis, 1.5-2.5 μm in the short axis, 200-300 nm in the thickness of shell) is built up by irregular nanoparticles attached to each other, and corresponding to the ellipsoid with concentration gradient, the Co/Mn atomic ratios of core and shell are about 1.76:1 and 2.34:1, respectively. The good performance, including high initial discharge capacities (1433.3 mAhg(-1) at 0.1 Ag(-1) and 1248.4 mAhg(-1) at 0.4 Ag(-1)), advanced capacity retention (∼900.0 mAhg(-1) after 60 cycles at 0.1 Ag(-1)), and fair rate performance (∼620.0 mAhg(-1) after 50 cycles at 0.4 Ag(-1)) has been measured by the battery test. Remarkably, the ellipsoidal shape and core-shell microstructure with concentration gradient are still maintained after 70 cycles of charge/discharge at 0.1 Ag(-1).

  4. PEGylation of αα-Hb using succinimidyl propionic acid PEG 5K: Conjugation chemistry and PEG shell structure dictate respectively the oxygen affinity and resuscitation fluid like properties of PEG αα-Hbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fantao; Tsai, Amy G; Intaglietta, Marcos; Acharya, Seetharama A

    2015-01-01

    PEGylation of intramolecularly crosslinked Hb has been studied here to overcome the limitation of dissociation of Hb tetramers. New hexa and deca PEGylated low oxygen affinity PEG-ααHbs have been generated. Influence of PEG conjugation chemistry and the PEG shell structure on the functional properties as well as PEGylation induced plasma expander like properties of the protein has been delineated. The results have established that in the design of PEG-Hbs as oxygen therapeutics, the influence of conjugation chemistry and the PEG shell structure on the oxygen affinity of Hb needs to be optimized independently besides optimizing the PEG shell structure for inducing resuscitation fluid like properties.

  5. Probing the structure of CuInS{sub 2}-ZnS core-shell and similar nanocrystals by Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhagan, Volodymyr, E-mail: dzhagan@isp.kiev.ua [Semiconductor Physics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany); V. E. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductors Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv 03028 (Ukraine); Kempken, Björn [Energy and Semiconductor Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, 26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Valakh, Mykhailo [V. E. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductors Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv 03028 (Ukraine); Parisi, Jürgen; Kolny-Olesiak, Joanna [Energy and Semiconductor Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, 26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Zahn, Dietrich R.T. [Semiconductor Physics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    CuInS{sub 2}/ZnS core-shell and alloyed nanocrystals (NCs) are promising candidates for applications in biolabeling, photocatalysis, solar energy conversion, and light emitting diodes. The growth mechanism and subsequent internal structure of such heterogeneous NCs are therefore of crucial importance, as it strongly affects their optical and electronic properties. Here, we investigated using resonant Raman spectroscopy the structure of CuInS{sub 2}/ZnS and Cu-Zn-In-S/ZnS core-shell NCs, as well as the evolution of Cu{sub 2−x}S NCs into CuInS{sub 2}via the heterogeneous Cu{sub 2−x}S/CuInS{sub 2} phase. We demonstrate that the particular phases can be distinguished based on their characteristic Raman modes and tuning the exciting laser energy into resonance with the bandgap of the particular phase.

  6. Microstructure and mechanical properties of a hot-extruded Al-based composite reinforced with core-shell-structured Ti/Al3Ti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Wu, Bao-lin; Liu, Yu-lin

    2017-12-01

    An Al-based composite reinforced with core-shell-structured Ti/Al3Ti was fabricated through a powder metallurgy route followed by hot extrusion and was found to exhibit promising mechanical properties. The ultimate tensile strength and elongation of the composite sintered at 620°C for 5 h and extruded at a mass ratio of 12.75:1 reached 304 MPa and 14%, respectively, and its compressive deformation reached 60%. The promising mechanical properties are due to the core-shell-structured reinforcement, which is mainly composed of Al3Ti and Ti and is bonded strongly with the Al matrix, and to the reduced crack sensitivity of Al3Ti. The refined grains after hot extrusion also contribute to the mechanical properties of this composite. The mechanical properties might be further improved through regulating the relative thickness of Al-Ti intermetallics and Ti metal layers by adjusting the sintering time and the subsequent extrusion process.

  7. Metal-Organic-Framework-Derived Yolk-Shell-Structured Cobalt-Based Bimetallic Oxide Polyhedron with High Activity for Electrocatalytic Oxygen Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhou; Bai, Yu; Liu, Yuxuan; Zhang, Shimin; Chen, Dandan; Zhang, Naiqing; Sun, Kening

    2017-09-20

    The development of inexpensive, efficient, and environmentally friendly catalysts for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is of great significant for green energy utilization. Herein, binary metal oxides (MxCo3-xO4, M = Zn, Ni, and Cu) with yolk-shell polyhedron (YSP) structure were fabricated by facile pyrolysis of bimetallic zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (MCo-ZIFs). Benefiting from the synergistic effects of metal ions and the unique yolk-shell structure, MxCo3-xO4 YSP displays good OER catalytic activity in alkaline media. Impressively, ZnxCo3-xO4 YSP shows a comparable overpotential of 337 mV at 10 mA cm-2 to commercial RuO2 and exhibits superior long-term durability. The high activity and good stability reveals its promising application.

  8. Finite element solution of transient fluid-structure interaction problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everstine, Gordon C.; Cheng, Raymond S.; Hambric, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    A finite element approach using NASTRAN is developed for solving time-dependent fluid-structure interaction problems, with emphasis on the transient scattering of acoustic waves from submerged elastic structures. Finite elements are used for modeling both structure and fluid domains to facilitate the graphical display of the wave motion through both media. For the liquid, the use of velocity potential as the fundamental unknown results in a symmetric matrix equation. The approach is illustrated for the problem of transient scattering from a submerged elastic spherical shell subjected to an incident tone burst. The use of an analogy between the equations of elasticity and the wave equation of acoustics, a necessary ingredient to the procedure, is summarized.

  9. Spherical carbon capsules with hollow macroporous core and mesoporous shell structures as a highly efficient catalyst support in the direct methanol fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Geun Seok; Yoon, Suk Bon; Kim, Jung Ho; Yu, Jong-Sung

    2004-12-07

    Carbon capsules with hollow core and mesoporous shell (HCMS) structures were used as a support material for Pt(50)-Ru(50) catalyst, and the catalytic performance of the HCMS supported catalyst in the direct methanol fuel cell was described; the HCMS carbon supported catalysts exhibited much higher specific activity for methanol oxidation than the commonly used E-TEK catalyst by about 80%, proving that the HCMS carbon capsules are an excellent support for electrode catalysts in DMFC.

  10. Morphology-Control Synthesis of a Core-Shell Structured NiCu Alloy with Tunable Electromagnetic-Wave Absorption Capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Biao; Zhao, Wanyu; Shao, Gang; Fan, Bingbing; Zhang, Rui

    2015-06-17

    In this work, dendritelike and rodlike NiCu alloys were prepared by a one-pot hydrothermal process at various reaction temperatures (120, 140, and 160 °C). The structure and morphology were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy, which that demonstrate NiCu alloys have core-shell heterostructures with Ni as the shell and Cu as the core. The formation mechanism of the core-shell structures was also discussed. The uniform and perfect dendritelike NiCu alloy obtained at 140 °C shows outstanding electromagnetic-wave absorption properties. The lowest reflection loss (RL) of -31.13 dB was observed at 14.3 GHz, and the effective absorption (below -10 dB, 90% attenuation) bandwidth can be adjusted between 4.4 and 18 GHz with a thin absorber thickness in the range of 1.2-4.0 mm. The outstanding electromagnetic-wave-absorbing properties are ascribed to space-charge polarization arising from the heterogeneous structure of the NiCu alloy, interfacial polarization between the alloy and paraffin, and continuous micronetworks and vibrating microcurrent dissipation originating from the uniform and perfect dendritelike shape of NiCu prepared at 140 °C.

  11. A Novel Organophosphorus Hybrid with Excellent Thermal Stability: Core-Shell Structure, Hybridization Mechanism, and Application in Flame Retarding Semi-Aromatic Polyamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xue-Bao; Du, Shuang-Lan; Long, Jia-Wei; Chen, Li; Wang, Yu-Zhong

    2016-01-13

    An organophosphorous hybrid (BM@Al-PPi) with unique core-shell structure was prepared through hybridization reaction between boehmite (BM) as the inorganic substrate and phenylphosphinic acid (PPiA) as the organic modifier. Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), solid state (31)P and (27)Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction, and element analysis were used to investigate the chemical structure of the hybrids, where the microrod-like core was confirmed as Al-PPi aggregates generated from the reaction between BM and PPiA, and those irregular nanoparticles in the shell belonged to residual BM. Compared with the traditional dissolution-precipitation process, a novel analogous suspension reaction mode was proposed to explain the hybridization process and the resulting product. Scanning electronic microscopy further proved the core-shell structure of the hybrids. BM exhibited much higher initial decomposition temperature than that of Al-PPi; therefore, the hybrid showed better thermal stability than Al-PPi, and it met the processing temperature of semi-aromatic polyamide (HTN, for instance) as an additive-type flame retardant. Limiting oxygen index and cone calorimetric analysis suggested the excellent flame-retardant performance and smoke suppressing activity by adding the resulting hybrid into HTN.

  12. Palladium nanoparticles encapsulated in core-shell silica: A structured hydrogenation catalyst with enhanced activity for reduction of oxyanion water pollutants

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yin

    2014-10-03

    Noble metal nanoparticles have been applied to mediate catalytic removal of toxic oxyanions and halogenated hydrocarbons in contaminated water using H2 as a clean and sustainable reductant. However, activity loss by nanoparticle aggregation and difficulty of nanoparticle recovery are two major challenges to widespread technology adoption. Herein, we report the synthesis of a core-shell-structured catalyst with encapsulated Pd nanoparticles and its enhanced catalytic activity in reduction of bromate (BrO3-), a regulated carcinogenic oxyanion produced during drinking water disinfection process, using 1 atm H2 at room temperature. The catalyst material consists of a nonporous silica core decorated with preformed octahedral Pd nanoparticles that were further encapsulated within an ordered mesoporous silica shell (i.e., SiO2@Pd@mSiO2). Well-defined mesopores (2.3 nm) provide a physical barrier to prevent Pd nanoparticle (6 nm) movement, aggregation, and detachment from the support into water. Compared to freely suspended Pd nanoparticles and SiO2@Pd, encapsulation in the mesoporous silica shell significantly enhanced Pd catalytic activity (by a factor of 10) under circumneutral pH conditions that are most relevant to water purification applications. Mechanistic investigation of material surface properties combined with Langmuir-Hinshelwood modeling of kinetic data suggest that mesoporous silica shell enhances activity by promoting BrO3- adsorption near the Pd active sites. The dual function of the mesoporous shell, enhancing Pd catalyst activity and preventing aggregation of active nanoparticles, suggests a promising general strategy of using metal nanoparticle catalysts for water purification and related aqueous-phase applications.

  13. Core-shell structured α-Fe2O3@TiO2 nanocomposites with improved photocatalytic activity in the visible light region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yubing; Yin, Longwei

    2013-11-14

    The core-shell structured Fe2O3@TiO2 nanocomposites prepared via a heteroepitaxial growth route using the Fe2O3 spindle as a hard template display improved photocatalytic degradation activity for Rhodamine B dye under visible light irradiation. The ratio of α-Fe2O3 : TiO2 in the α-Fe2O3@TiO2 core-shell nanocomposites can be tuned by etching the α-Fe2O3 core via controlling the concentration of HCl and etching time. An appropriate concentration of the Fe2O3 core could effectively induce a transition of the optical response from the UV to the visible region and decrease the recombination rate of photogenerated electrons and the holes of the core-shell structured catalyst, greatly contributing to the enhancement of visible light response and visible light photocatalytic activity of the Fe2O3@TiO2 catalysts. It is revealed that the optical response and photocatalytic performance of the core-shell α-Fe2O3@TiO2 nanocomposites can be tuned by adjusting the molar ratio of Fe2O3 : TiO2 of the α-Fe2O3@TiO2 nanocomposites. The α-Fe2O3@TiO2 core-shell nanocomposite with an optimal molar ratio of 7% for Fe2O3 : TiO2 exhibits the best photocatalytic performance under visible light irradiation. It is shown that the Fe2O3/TiO2 heterojunction structure is responsible for the efficient visible-light photocatalytic activity. As the concentration of Fe2O3 is high, Fe(3+) ions will act as recombination centres of the photogenerated electrons and holes. The present core-shell Fe2O3@TiO2 nanoparticles displaying enhanced photodegradation activity could find potential applications as photocatalysts for the abatement of various organic pollutants.

  14. Laser Beam Submerged Arc Hybrid Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisgen, Uwe; Olschok, Simon; Jakobs, Stefan; Schleser, Markus; Mokrov, Oleg; Rossiter, Eduardo

    The laser beam-submerged arc hybrid welding method originates from the knowledge that, with increasing penetration depth, the laser beam process has a tendency to pore formation in the lower weld regions. The coupling with the energy-efficient submerged-arc process improves degassing and reduces the tendency to pore formation. The high deposition rate of the SA process in combination with the laser beam process offers, providing the appropriate choice of weld preparation, the possibility of welding plates with a thickness larger than 20° mm in a single pass, and also of welding thicker plates with the double-sided single pass technique.

  15. STUDIES ON THE BIOCHEMISTRY AND FINE STRUCTURE OF SILICA SHELL FORMATION IN DIATOMS. II. THE STRUCTURE OF THE CELL WALL OF NAVICULA PELLICULOSA (BRÉB.) HILSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, B E; Leivin, J C; Volcani, B E

    1966-06-01

    The cell wall of the freshwater diatom Navicula pelliculosa (Bréb.) Hilse is composed of the silica shell and an organic skin which surrounds it. Isolated skins can be prepared by first removing the contents of the cell by mechanical shaking, followed by a posttreatment of these isolated cell walls with HF vapor to remove the silica shell. T h e skins can also be seen in sections, particularly well after the silica shell has been removed B y H. F; vapor. The origin and morphological composition of the shin in N. pelliculosa are not yet completely ascertaincd. As parts of the cell wn11, both the silica shell and the skin are extracellularly located. The growth of the silica shell, however, occurs intracellularly inside a vesicle delimited by a triple-layered membrane, the silicalemma. This membrane or secondary excreted organic material or both in various proportions may compose the skin.

  16. Structural appraisal of climate-induced effects on E. Torroja’s unreinforced brickwork shell structure of the IETcc winter garden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Río, O.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the design and causes of deterioration of the Winter Garden located in the Eduardo Torroja Institute for Construction Sciences (IETcc in Madrid, as well as the structural rehabilitation works carried out are discussed. The structural and architectural scheme was devised by E. Torroja and is examined using numerical analysis under dead load. This allows the failure pattern of the arches and shells to be assessed, as a consequence of water ingress through the cracks formed and settlement, as also the effectiveness of the repair techniques applied in 2009.En este trabajo, se discuten el diseño y las causas de deterioro del edificio del invierno situado en el Instituto de Ciencias de la Construcción Eduardo Torroja (IETcc en Madrid, así como las obras de rehabilitación de mantenimiento de la estructura ejecutadas. El esquema estructural y arquitectónico ideado por E. Torroja se examinó utilizando análisis numérico considerando el efecto de la carga muerta. Esto permite analizar el tipo de fallo observado en los arcos y la cubierta abovedada, como consecuencia del asentamiento y de la entrada de agua a través de las fisuras formadas así como la eficacia de las técnicas de reparación realizadas en 2009.

  17. Multielement stoichiometry of submerged macrophytes across Yunnan plateau lakes (China)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xing, Wei; Wu, Haoping; Shi, Qiao; Hao, Beibei; Liu, Han; Wang, Zhixiu; Liu, Guihua

    2015-01-01

    .... We predicted that tissue element composition in submerged macrophytes is affected by lake trophic level and taxonomy, and submerged macrophytes have weak stoichiometric homeostasis for all above 16 elements...

  18. Fast defluorination and removal of norfloxacin by alginate/Fe@Fe3O4 core/shell structured nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Hongyun; Dizhang; Meng, Zhaofu; Cai, Yaqi

    2012-08-15

    Alginate-Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) polymer coated Fe(3)O(4) magnetic nanoparticles (Fe(3)O(4)@ALG/Fe MNPs) with core/shell structure are prepared and used as heterogeneous Fenton nanocatalyst to degrade norfloxacin (NOF). The Fenton-like process based on Fe(3)O(4)@ALG/Fe shows much higher efficiency on NOF degradation. Compared with Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticle-H(2)O(2) system, NOF degradation in Fe(3)O(4)@AlG/Fe-H(2)O(2) system can be conducted in a wide pH range (pH 3.5-6.5) and independent on temperature. With 0.98 mM H(2)O(2) and 0.4 g L(-1) Fe(3)O(4)@ALG/Fe, 100% of NOF and 90% of TOC is removed within 60 min, and the fluorine element in NOF molecule changes into F(-) ions within 1 min, indicating that NOF degradation in this Fenton-like reaction is performed through direct defluorination pathway. XPS analysis shows that TOC removal in reaction solution mainly results from the adsorption of NOF degradation intermediates on catalyst. Due to the paramagneticity and high saturation magnetization of Fe(3)O(4)@ALG/Fe, the used catalyst with adsorbed NOF intermediate is collected from aqueous solution by applying an external magnetic field, leading to complete removal of NOF from water samples. As being composed of inorganic materials and biopolymer, Fe(3)O(4)@ALG/Fe MNPs are robust, thermo-stable, nontoxic and environmentally friendly. These attractive features endow Fe(3)O(4)@ALG/Fe as a potent Fenton-like catalyst for fluoroquinolones degradation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity in SnO{sub 2}@g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} core-shell structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Hao; Zhao, Xiaoru, E-mail: xrzhao@nwpu.edu.cn; Duan, Libing; Liu, Ruidi; Li, Hui

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Novel SnO{sub 2}@g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} core-shell structures were successfully synthesized. • The core-shell structures exhibited enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity. • The enhanced photocatalytic activity was due to synergic action of SnO{sub 2} and g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. - Abstract: SnO{sub 2}@g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} core-shell structures were successfully synthesized by simple calcination of SnO{sub 2} microspheres and urea in a muffle furnace. The investigation of morphologies and microstructures showed that g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was wrapped tightly on the surface of SnO{sub 2} microspheres with large intimate interface contact areas between the g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} shells and SnO{sub 2} cores. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results and photoluminescence spectra demonstrated that the intimate interface contacts could facilitate the transfer and separation of the photogenerated charge carriers at their interface, thus the recombination of the photogenerated electron-hole pairs was impeded. The photocatalytic activity of the synthesized composites was evaluated by the photodegradation of methyl orange under visible light irradiation. It was found that SnO{sub 2}@g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} exhibited higher photodegradation rate (k = 0.013 min{sup −1}) than that of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} (k = 0.008 min{sup −1}) and pure SnO{sub 2}. The enhanced photocatalytic activity could be attributed to the synergic action of SnO{sub 2} and g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}.

  20. High performance and durability of order-structured cathode catalyst layer based on TiO{sub 2}@PANI core-shell nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Meng; Yang, Zhaoyi [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 College Road, Beijing 100083 (China); School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 College Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, Xindong, E-mail: echem@ustb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 College Road, Beijing 100083 (China); School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 College Road, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • TiO{sub 2}@PANI core-shell nanowire arrays were prepared and applied as catalyst support. • As-prepared Pt-TiO{sub 2}@PANI core-shell nanowire arrays were applied as order-structured cathode catalyst layer. • The novel cathode catalyst structure without Nafion{sup ®} ionomer enhance the performance and durability of PEMFC. - Abstract: In this paper, an order-structured cathode catalyst layer consisting of Pt-TiO{sub 2}@PANI core-shell nanowire arrays that in situ grown on commercial gas diffusion layer (GDL) are prepared and applied to membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). In order to prepare the TiO{sub 2}@PANI core-shell nanowire arrays with suitable porosity and prominent conductivity, the morphologies of the TiO{sub 2} nanoarray and electrochemical polymerization process of aniline are schematically investigated. The MEA with order-structured cathode catalyst layer is assembled in the single cell to evaluate the electrochemical performance and durability of PEMFC. As a result, the PEMFC with order-structured cathode catalyst layer shows higher peak power density (773.54 mW cm{sup −2}) than conventional PEMFC (699.30 mW cm{sup −2}). Electrochemically active surface area (ECSA) and charge transfer impedance (R{sub ct}) are measured before and after accelerated degradation test (ADT), and the corresponding experimental results indicate the novel cathode structure exhibits a better stability with respect to conventional cathode. The enhanced electrochemical performance and durability toward PEMFC can be ascribed to the order-structured cathode nanoarray structure with high specific surface area increases the utilization of catalyst and reduces the tortuosity of transport pathways, and the synergistic effect between TiO{sub 2}@PANI support and Pt nanoparticles promotes the high efficiency of electrochemical reaction and improves the stability of catalyst. This research provides a facile and

  1. A highly ordered meso@microporous carbon-supported sulfur@smaller sulfur core-shell structured cathode for Li-S batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Jiang, Yan; Yuan, Lixia; Yi, Ziqi; Wu, Chao; Liu, Yang; Strasser, Peter; Huang, Yunhui

    2014-09-23

    For lithium-sulfur batteries, commercial application is hindered by the insulating nature of sulfur and the dissolution of the reaction intermediates of polysulfides. Here, we present an ordered meso-microporous core-shell carbon (MMCS) as a sulfur container, which combines the advantages of both mesoporous and microporous carbon. With large pore volume and highly ordered porous structure, the "core" promises a sufficient sulfur loading and a high utilization of the active material, while the "shell" containing microporous carbon and smaller sulfur acts as a physical barrier and stabilizes the cycle capability of the entire S/C composite. Such a S/MMCS composite exhibits a capacity as high as 837 mAh g(-1) at 0.5 C after 200 cycles with a capacity retention of 80% vs the second cycle (a decay of only 0.1% per cycle), demonstrating that the diffusion of the polysulfides into the bulk electrolyte can be greatly reduced. We believe that the tailored highly ordered meso-microporous core-shell structured carbon can also be applicable for designing some other electrode materials for energy storage.

  2. Oxygen dynamics in submerged rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colmer, Timothy D.; Pedersen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Complete submergence of plants prevents direct O2 and CO2 exchange with air. Underwater photosynthesis can result in marked diurnal changes in O2 supply to submerged plants. Dynamics in pO2 had not been measured directly for submerged rice (Oryza sativa), but in an earlier study, radial O2 loss...

  3. Synthesis of monodisperse core shell PVA@P(AMPS-co-NIPAm) nanogels structured for pre-concentration of Fe(III) ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoueir, Kamel R; Atta, Ayman M; Sarhan, Ali A; Akl, Magda A

    2017-04-01

    Core shell-structured poly(vinyl alcohol) @ poly(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propane-sulfonic acid-co-N-isopropylacrylamide) PVA@P(AMPS-co-NIPAm) spheres are synthesized. The well-defined PVA@P(AMPS-co-NIPAm) core shell nanogels with diameter nearly 30 nm enriches Fe(III), and the nanogels are characterized by FT-IR, TEM, SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The many factors affecting adsorption were successfully investigated. The maximum capacity of Fe(III) ions was 320 (mg/g) for PVA@P(90AMPS-co-10NIPAm) (wt.: wt%). The equilibrium data matching well with the Langmuir model and the pseudo-second-order form described the adsorption process better than the pseudo-first-order model. Findings of the present study highlight using a simple synthesis of PVA@P(AMPS-co-NIPAm) nanogels as superior and recyclable nanoadsorbents.

  4. Reverse micelle-derived Cu-doped Zn(1-x)Cd(x)S quantum dots and their core/shell structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Uk; Kim, Young Kwan; Yang, Heesun

    2010-01-01

    Reverse micelle chemistry-derived Cu-doped Zn(1-x)Cd(x)S quantum dots (QDs) with the composition (x) of 0, 0.5, 1 are reported. The Cu emission was found to be dependent on the host composition of QDs. While a dim green/orange emission was observed from ZnS:Cu QDs, a relatively strong red emission could be obtained from CdS:Cu and Zn(0.5)Cd(0.5)S:Cu QDs. Luminescent properties of undoped QDs versus Cu-doped ones and quantum yields of alloyed ZnCdS versus CdS QDs are compared and discussed. To enhance Cu-related red emission of CdS:Cu and Zn(0.5)Cd(0.5)S:Cu core QDs, core/shell structured QDs with a wider band gap of ZnS shell are also demonstrated.

  5. Benthic bacterial diversity in submerged sinkhole ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nold, Stephen C; Pangborn, Joseph B; Zajack, Heidi A; Kendall, Scott T; Rediske, Richard R; Biddanda, Bopaiah A

    2010-01-01

    Physicochemical characterization, automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) community profiling, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing approaches were used to study bacterial communities inhabiting submerged Lake Huron sinkholes inundated with hypoxic, sulfate-rich groundwater. Photosynthetic cyanobacterial mats on the sediment surface were dominated by Phormidium autumnale, while deeper, organically rich sediments contained diverse and active bacterial communities.

  6. Production of extracellular aspartic protease in submerged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    29(1): 1-6. Fraile ER, Bernardinelli SE, Handel M, Jauregui AM (1978). Selección de cepas de Mucor sp productoras de enzimas coagulantes de leche. Rev. Arg. Microbiol. 10(2): 65-69. Ghareib M, Hamdy HS, Khalil AA (2001). Production of intracellular milk clotting enzyme in submerged cultures of Fusarium subglutinans.

  7. Production of extracellular aspartic protease in submerged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fungal milk-clotting enzymes have gained value as bovine Chymosin substitutes in the cheese industry. In this work, the effects of culture conditions on the production of extracellular milk clotting enzymes from Mucor mucedo DSM 809 in submerged fermentation were studied. The maximum activity was observed after 48 h ...

  8. Biomechanics of turtle shells: how whole shells fail in compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magwene, Paul M; Socha, John J

    2013-02-01

    Turtle shells are a form of armor that provides varying degrees of protection against predation. Although this function of the shell as armor is widely appreciated, the mechanical limits of protection and the modes of failure when subjected to breaking stresses have not been well explored. We studied the mechanical properties of whole shells and of isolated bony tissues and sutures in four species of turtles (Trachemys scripta, Malaclemys terrapin, Chrysemys picta, and Terrapene carolina) using a combination of structural and mechanical tests. Structural properties were evaluated by subjecting whole shells to compressive and point loads in order to quantify maximum load, work to failure, and relative shell deformations. The mechanical properties of bone and sutures from the plastral region of the shell were evaluated using three-point bending experiments. Analysis of whole shell structural properties suggests that small shells undergo relatively greater deformations before failure than do large shells and similar amounts of energy are required to induce failure under both point and compressive loads. Location of failures occurred far more often at sulci than at sutures (representing the margins of the epidermal scutes and the underlying bones, respectively), suggesting that the small grooves in the bone created by the sulci introduce zones of weakness in the shell. Values for bending strength, ultimate bending strain, Young's modulus, and energy absorption, calculated from the three-point bending data, indicate that sutures are relatively weaker than the surrounding bone, but are able to absorb similar amounts of energy due to higher ultimate strain values. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Core-shell nanostructured catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiao; Lee, Ilkeun; Joo, Ji Bong; Zaera, Francisco; Yin, Yadong

    2013-08-20

    Novel nanotechnologies have allowed great improvements in the syn-thesis of catalysts with well-controlled size, shape, and surface properties. Transition metal nanostructures with specific sizes and shapes, for instance, have shown great promise as catalysts with high selectivities and relative ease of recycling. Researchers have already demonstrated new selective catalysis with solution-dispersed or supported-metal nanocatalysts, in some cases applied to new types of reactions. Several challenges remain, however, particularly in improving the structural stability of the catalytic active phase. Core-shell nanostructures are nanoparticles encapsulated and protected by an outer shell that isolates the nanoparticles and prevents their migration and coalescence during the catalytic reactions. The synthesis and characterization of effective core-shell catalysts has been at the center of our research efforts and is the focus of this Account. Efficient core-shell catalysts require porous shells that allow free access of chemical species from the outside to the surface of nanocatalysts. For this purpose, we have developed a surface-protected etching process to prepare mesoporous silica and titania shells with controllable porosity. In certain cases, we can tune catalytic reaction rates by adjusting the porosity of the outer shell. We also designed and successfully applied a silica-protected calcination method to prepare crystalline shells with high surface area, using anatase titania as a model system. We achieved a high degree of control over the crystallinity and porosity of the anatase shells, allowing for the systematic optimization of their photocatalytic activity. Core-shell nanostructures also provide a great opportunity for controlling the interaction among the different components in ways that might boost structural stability or catalytic activity. For example, we fabricated a SiO₂/Au/N-doped TiO₂ core-shell photocatalyst with a sandwich structure that showed

  10. (shell) nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    equations for the scattering of electromagnetic radiation by particles with spherical or cylindrical symmetry. Aden and Kerker have published complete details of scattering from concentric spherical shells in 1951 [28]. In Mie theory, the harmonically oscillating electromagnetic fields are expressed in terms of a set of spherical ...

  11. Structural and magnetic properties of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} core/shell nanocomposite prepared by the hydrothermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattar, A.A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, 11566 Abbasia, Cairo (Egypt); EL-Sayed, H.M., E-mail: h_m_elsaid@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, 11566 Abbasia, Cairo (Egypt); ALsuqia, Ibrahim [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education and Applied Science, Hajjah University, Alshahli, Hajjah (Yemen)

    2015-12-01

    CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} core/shell magnetic nanocomposite was synthesized by using hydrothermal method.The analysis of XRD indicated the coexistence of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}as core/shell composite. The core/shell structure of the composite sample has been confirmed by HR-TEM images, EDX and FT-IR measurements. The size of obtained core/shell nanoparticles was 17 nm in core diameter and about 3 nm in shell thickness. The magnetization measurements showed that both the coercive field and the saturation magnetization of the resulting core/shell nanocomposite were slightly decreased compared to those of the CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} core but the thermal stability is of the magnetization parameter was enhanced. Furthermore, superparamagnetic phase is established at temperatures higher than the room temperature. The results were discussed in terms of the surface pinning and the magnetic interaction at the interface between the core and shell. - Highlights: • CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} core/shell could be prepared by hydrothermal method. • The structural analysis proved the formation of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} shell with thickness 3 nm. • The thermal stability of M{sub s} and H{sub c} is enhanced due to the presence of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} as a shell. • Super paramagnetic transition is confirmed and the effective magnetic anisotropy was calculated.

  12. Hierarchical super-structure identified by polarized light microscopy, electron microscopy and nanoindentation: Implications for the limits of biological control over the growth mode of abalone sea shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Andreas S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mollusc shells are commonly investigated using high-resolution imaging techniques based on cryo-fixation. Less detailed information is available regarding the light-optical properties. Sea shells of Haliotis pulcherina were embedded for polishing in defined orientations in order to investigate the interface between prismatic calcite and nacreous aragonite by standard materialographic methods. A polished thin section of the interface was prepared with a defined thickness of 60 μm for quantitative birefringence analysis using polarized light and LC-PolScope microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy images were obtained for comparison. In order to study structural-mechanical relationships, nanoindentation experiments were performed. Results Incident light microscopy revealed a super-structure in semi-transparent regions of the polished cross-section under a defined angle. This super-structure is not visible in transmitted birefringence analysis due to the blurred polarization of small nacre platelets and numerous organic interfaces. The relative orientation and homogeneity of calcite prisms was directly identified, some of them with their optical axes exactly normal to the imaging plane. Co-oriented "prism colonies" were identified by polarized light analyses. The nacreous super-structure was also visualized by secondary electron imaging under defined angles. The domains of the super-structure were interpreted to consist of crystallographically aligned platelet stacks. Nanoindentation experiments showed that mechanical properties changed with the same periodicity as the domain size. Conclusions In this study, we have demonstrated that insights into the growth mechanisms of nacre can be obtained by conventional light-optical methods. For example, we observed super-structures formed by co-oriented nacre platelets as previously identified using X-ray Photo-electron Emission Microscopy (X-PEEM [Gilbert et al., Journal of the

  13. Wigner’s phase-space function and atomic structure: II. Ground states for closed-shell atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Michael; Dahl, Jens Peder

    1987-01-01

    display and analyze the function for the closed-shell atoms helium, beryllium, neon, argon, and zinc in the Hartree-Fock approximation. The quantum-mechanical exact results are compared with those obtained with the approximate Thomas-Fermi description of electron densities in phase space....

  14. One-Pot Method for Multifunctional Yolk Structured Nanocomposites with N-doped Carbon Shell Using Polydopamine as Precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanwei; Zhang, Min; Ding, Lei; Wang, Yongtao; Xu, Jingli

    2016-04-01

    Herein, we reported a facile method to prepared uniform yolk like nanocomposites with well-defined N-doped carbon shell (C), in which the cores@SiO2@polydopamine (Pdop) were used as the sacrificed template. Typically, inherited from the functional Au core, the yolk particles presented excellent catalytic activities.

  15. Framework for adjusting for both stress triaxiality and mesh size effect for failure of metals in shell structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walters, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    The current paper provides a procedure for adjusting the failure strain of shell elements based on both mesh size and stress triaxiality. This procedure is a general framework that gives a homogenisation of a neck over the entire length of an element and it uses an arbitrary forming limit diagram

  16. Numerical study on tsunami hazard mitigation using a submerged breakwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Taemin; Yoo, Jeseon; Han, Sejong; Cho, Yong-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Most coastal structures have been built in surf zones to protect coastal areas. In general, the transformation of waves in the surf zone is quite complicated and numerous hazards to coastal communities may be associated with such phenomena. Therefore, the behavior of waves in the surf zone should be carefully analyzed and predicted. Furthermore, an accurate analysis of deformed waves around coastal structures is directly related to the construction of economically sound and safe coastal structures because wave height plays an important role in determining the weight and shape of a levee body or armoring material. In this study, a numerical model using a large eddy simulation is employed to predict the runup heights of nonlinear waves that passed a submerged structure in the surf zone. Reduced runup heights are also predicted, and their characteristics in terms of wave reflection, transmission, and dissipation coefficients are investigated.

  17. Numerical Study on Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Using a Submerged Breakwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taemin Ha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most coastal structures have been built in surf zones to protect coastal areas. In general, the transformation of waves in the surf zone is quite complicated and numerous hazards to coastal communities may be associated with such phenomena. Therefore, the behavior of waves in the surf zone should be carefully analyzed and predicted. Furthermore, an accurate analysis of deformed waves around coastal structures is directly related to the construction of economically sound and safe coastal structures because wave height plays an important role in determining the weight and shape of a levee body or armoring material. In this study, a numerical model using a large eddy simulation is employed to predict the runup heights of nonlinear waves that passed a submerged structure in the surf zone. Reduced runup heights are also predicted, and their characteristics in terms of wave reflection, transmission, and dissipation coefficients are investigated.

  18. Thickness mapping of submerged portions of a BWR torus using an ROV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somers, T. (Marquest Group, Inc., Bourne, MA (United States)); Bagley, J.G. (Ebasco Quality Services, South Kearny, NJ (United States))

    1992-01-01

    A methodology has been developed for establishing an ultrasonic baseline of the submerged portions of a boiling water reactor torus shell. A remotely operated vehicle (ROV) is equipped to deliver an array of ultrasonic thickness transducers to within a fixed stand-off from the shell. The position of the transducers at each ultrasound reading is measured and recorded using a precision acoustic navigation system. The resulting thickness contour map makes it possible to visualize the condition of the torus shell and provides quantitative documentation of shell thickness at a large number of known locations. The navigation system can be reinstalled in the future so that by comparing future thickness readings acquired at the same location, it is possible to create a map of the rate of change in shell thickness. An ultrasonic thickness survey was conducted recently using a preliminary version of such a system. The experience gained in performing this survey has been incorporated in the design of a full-scale prototype system, which is currently under development. This system will include such features as automatic control of the ROV based on the acoustic navigation data, generation of three-dimensional thickness maps, and remote control of the data acquisition process from outside the radiation area.

  19. Electrochemical performance and structure evolution of core-shell nano-ring α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}@Carbon anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yan-Hui, E-mail: sunyanhui0102@163.com; Liu, Shan; Zhou, Feng-Chen; Nan, Jun-Min

    2016-12-30

    Core-shell nano-ring α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}@Carbon (CSNR) composites with different carbon content (CSNR-5%C and CSNR-13%C) are synthesized using a hydrothermal method by controlling different amounts of glucose and α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-rings with further annealing. The CSNR electrodes exhibit much improved specific capacity, cycling stability and rate capability compared with that of bare nano-ring α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (BNR), which is attributed to the core-shell nano-ring structure of CSNR. The carbon shell in the inner and outer surface of CSNR composite can increase electron conductivity of the electrode and inhibit the volume change of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} during discharge/charge processes, and the nano-ring structure of CSNR can buffer the volume change too. The CSNR-5%C electrode shows super high initial discharge/charge capacities of 1570/1220 mAh g{sup −1} and retains 920/897 mAh g{sup −1} after 200 cycles at 500 mA g{sup −1} (0.5C). Even at 2000 mA g{sup −1} (2C), the electrode delivers the initial capacities of 1400/900 mAh g{sup −1}, and still maintains 630/610 mAh g{sup −1} after 200 cycles. The core-shell nano-rings opened during cycling and rebuilt a new flower-like structure consisting of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}@Carbon nano-sheets. The space among the nano-sheet networks can further buffer the volume expansion of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and facilitate the transportation of electrons and Li{sup +} ions during the charge/discharge processes, which increases the capacity and rate capability of the electrode. It is the first time that the evolution of core-shell α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}@Carbon changing to flower-like networks during lithiation/de-lithiation has been reported.

  20. Studies on connecting structure between steel shell and steel reinforced concrete; Kokaku to tekkotsu tekkin concrete tono ketsugo kozo ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, A. [Kinki University, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Science and Engineering; Morikawa, H.; Ito, N. [Metropolitan Expressway Public Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-02-15

    On the insert reinforcing bar structure for the connecting part of the main tower of cable stayed bridges, this paper reports verification results on a load resistant safety with a full-scale model, structure analysis and construction work. The basic structure was composed of a drilled steel shell, inserted reinforcing bars, fixing structure of bars in lining concrete of the shell and a pressure bearing plate. As an experimental result, the connecting part had a sufficient load carrying capacity against both tensile and compressive loads. The shear stress of the insert reinforcing bar structure was estimated successfully under von Mises`s condition. The shear spring constant in deformation characteristics was linearly proportional to an inserted reinforcing bar ratio. In earthquake, nearly 60% of an allowable compressive load was transferred to concrete through the pressure bearing plate. The analytical results of load resistant deformation characteristics of the connecting part well agreed with experimental ones, and the proposed analytical model was applicable to estimation of a dynamic behavior. 5 refs., 22 figs., 4 tabs.