WorldWideScience

Sample records for submerged plant litter

  1. Bacterial and fungal colonization and decomposition of submerged plant litter: consequences for biogenic silica dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfredsson, Hanna; Clymans, Wim; Stadmark, Johanna; Conley, Daniel; Rousk, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    We studied bacterial and fungal colonization of submerged plant litter, using a known Si-accumulator (Equisetum arvense), in experimental microcosms during one month. We specifically addressed the microbial decomposer role concerning biogenic silica (bSiO2) dissolution from the degrading litter. To vary the rates and level of microbial colonization, the litter was combined with a range of mineral nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) supplements. Overall microbial growth on plant litter increased with higher levels of N and P. There was a tendency for higher relative bacterial than fungal stimulation with higher nutrient levels. Differences in microbial colonization of litter between treatments allowed us to test how Si remineralization from plants was influenced by microbial litter decomposition. Contrary to previous results and expectations, we observed a general reduction in Si release from plant litter colonized by a microbial community, compared with sterile control treatments. This suggested that microbial growth resulted in a reduction of dissolved Si concentrations, and we discuss candidate mechanisms to explain this outcome. Hence, our results imply that the microbial role in plant litter associated Si turnover is different from that commonly assumed based on bSiO2 dissolution studies in aquatic ecosystems. © FEMS 2016.

  2. Effects of Plant Growth Form and Water Substrates on the Decomposition of Submerged Litter: Evidence of Constructed Wetland Plants in a Greenhouse Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunmei Ping

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wetland plants are important components in constructed wetlands (CWs, and one of their most important functions in CWs is to purify the water. However, wetland plant litter can also increase eutrophication of water via decomposition and nutrient release, and few studies have focused on the interspecific variation in the decomposition rate and nutrient release of multiple plant species in CWs. Here a greenhouse litter-bag experiment was conducted to quantify the decomposition rates and nutrient release of 7 dominant macrophytes (2 floating plants and 5 emergent plants in three types of water substrate. The results showed that plant litter species and growth forms significantly affected the litter mass losses. The nutrient release was significantly different among plant litter species, but not between floating and emergent plants. Litter traits, such as litter lignin, total nitrogen (TN and total phosphorus (TP can well predict the decomposition rates of submerged litter. These results indicated that submerging litter in water did not change the relationships between litter traits and litter decomposition rates, and leaching might play a more important role in the decomposition of submerged litter in CWs than that in other terrestrial ecosystems. These findings can provide suggestions for managers about the maintenance of constructed wetlands.

  3. Drought and submergence tolerance in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hewei; Zhou, Yufan; Oksenberg, Nir; Ronald, Pamela

    2017-11-14

    The invention provides methods of genetically modified plants to increase tolerance to drought and/or submergence. The invention additionally provides plants having increased drought and/or submergence tolerance engineered using such methods.

  4. Effect of inorganic nutrients on relative contributions of fungi and bacteria to carbon flow from submerged decomposing leaf litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladislav Gulis; Keller Suberkropp

    2003-01-01

    The relative contributions of fungi and bacteria to carbon flow from submerged decaying plant litter at different levels of inorganic nutrients (N and P) were studied. We estimated leaf mass loss, fungal and bacterial biomass and production, and microbial respiration and constructed partial carbon budgets for red maple leaf disks precolonized in a stream and then...

  5. Riparian plant litter quality increases with latitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyero, Luz; Graça, Manuel A S; Tonin, Alan M; Pérez, Javier; J Swafford, Andrew; Ferreira, Verónica; Landeira-Dabarca, Andrea; A Alexandrou, Markos; Gessner, Mark O; McKie, Brendan G; Albariño, Ricardo J; Barmuta, Leon A; Callisto, Marcos; Chará, Julián; Chauvet, Eric; Colón-Gaud, Checo; Dudgeon, David; Encalada, Andrea C; Figueroa, Ricardo; Flecker, Alexander S; Fleituch, Tadeusz; Frainer, André; Gonçalves, José F; Helson, Julie E; Iwata, Tomoya; Mathooko, Jude; M'Erimba, Charles; Pringle, Catherine M; Ramírez, Alonso; Swan, Christopher M; Yule, Catherine M; Pearson, Richard G

    2017-09-05

    Plant litter represents a major basal resource in streams, where its decomposition is partly regulated by litter traits. Litter-trait variation may determine the latitudinal gradient in decomposition in streams, which is mainly microbial in the tropics and detritivore-mediated at high latitudes. However, this hypothesis remains untested, as we lack information on large-scale trait variation for riparian litter. Variation cannot easily be inferred from existing leaf-trait databases, since nutrient resorption can cause traits of litter and green leaves to diverge. Here we present the first global-scale assessment of riparian litter quality by determining latitudinal variation (spanning 107°) in litter traits (nutrient concentrations; physical and chemical defences) of 151 species from 24 regions and their relationships with environmental factors and phylogeny. We hypothesized that litter quality would increase with latitude (despite variation within regions) and traits would be correlated to produce 'syndromes' resulting from phylogeny and environmental variation. We found lower litter quality and higher nitrogen:phosphorus ratios in the tropics. Traits were linked but showed no phylogenetic signal, suggesting that syndromes were environmentally determined. Poorer litter quality and greater phosphorus limitation towards the equator may restrict detritivore-mediated decomposition, contributing to the predominance of microbial decomposers in tropical streams.

  6. Impacts of climate change on submerged and emergent wetland plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick T. Short; Sarian Kosten; Pamela A. Morgan; Sparkle L Malone; Gregg E. Moore

    2016-01-01

    Submerged and emergent wetland plant communities are evaluated for their response to global climate change (GCC), focusing on seagrasses, submerged freshwater plants, tidal marsh plants, freshwater marsh plants and mangroves. Similarities and differences are assessed in plant community responses to temperature increase, CO2increase, greater UV-B exposure, sea...

  7. Crassulacean acid metabolism in submerged aquatic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Jon E.; Sybesme, C.

    1984-01-01

    CO2-fixation in the dark is known to occur in various organs of many plants. However, only in species possessing crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) does dark CO2-fixation contribute substantially to the carbon economy of the plant. Until very recently CAM was known only from terrestrial species, largely drought adapted succulents. The discovery of CAM in the submerged aquatic fern ally Isoetes howellii (Isoetaceae)(Keeley 1981) adds a new dimension to our understanding of crassulacean acid metabolism. In this paper I will summarize 1) the evidence of CAM in Isoetes howellii, 2) the data on the distribution of CAM in aquatic species, and 3) the work to date on the functional significance of CAM in aquatic species.

  8. Litter quality mediated nitrogen effect on plant litter decomposition regardless of soil fauna presence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weidong; Chao, Lin; Yang, Qingpeng; Wang, Qingkui; Fang, Yunting; Wang, Silong

    2016-10-01

    Nitrogen addition has been shown to affect plant litter decomposition in terrestrial ecosystems. The way that nitrogen deposition impacts the relationship between plant litter decomposition and altered soil nitrogen availability is unclear, however. This study examined 18 co-occurring litter types in a subtropical forest in China in terms of their decomposition (1 yr of exposure in the field) with nitrogen addition treatment (0, 0.4, 1.6, and 4.0 mol·N·m(-2) ·yr(-1) ) and soil fauna exclusion (litter bags with 0.1 and 2 cm mesh size). Results showed that the plant litter decomposition rate is significantly reduced because of nitrogen addition; the strength of the nitrogen addition effect is closely related to the nitrogen addition levels. Plant litters with diverse quality responded to nitrogen addition differently. When soil fauna was present, the nitrogen addition effect on medium-quality or high-quality plant litter decomposition rate was -26% ± 5% and -29% ± 4%, respectively; these values are significantly higher than that of low-quality plant litter decomposition. The pattern is similar when soil fauna is absent. In general, the plant litter decomposition rate is decreased by soil fauna exclusion; an average inhibition of -17% ± 1.5% was exhibited across nitrogen addition treatment and litter quality groups. However, this effect is weakly related to nitrogen addition treatment and plant litter quality. We conclude that the variations in plant litter quality, nitrogen deposition, and soil fauna are important factors of decomposition and nutrient cycling in a subtropical forest ecosystem. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  9. Impeded Carbohydrate Metabolism in Rice Plants under Submergence Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malay Kumar ADAK

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The detrimental effects of submergence on physiological performances of some rice varieties with special references to carbohydrate metabolisms and their allied enzymes during post-flowering stages have been documented and clarified in the present investigation. It was found that photosynthetic rate and concomitant translocation of sugars into the panicles were both related to the yield. The detrimental effects of the complete submergence were recorded in generation of sucrose, starch, sucrose phosphate synthase and phosphorylase activity in the developing panicles of the plants as compared to those under normal or control (i.e. non-submerged condition. The accumulation of starch was significantly lower in plants under submergence and that was correlated with ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity. Photosynthetic rate was most affected under submergence in varying days of post-flowering and was also related to the down regulation of Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity. However, under normal or control condition, there recorded a steady maintenance of photosynthetic rate at the post-flowering stages and significantly higher values of Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity. Still, photosynthetic rate of the plants under both control and submerged conditions had hardly any significant correlation with sugar accumulation and other enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism like invertase with grain yield. Finally, plants under submergence suffered significant loss of yield by poor grain filling which was related to impeded carbohydrate metabolism in the tissues. It is evident that loss of yield under submergence is attributed both by lower sink size or sink capacity (number of panicles, in this case as well as subdued carbohydrate metabolism in plants and its subsequent partitioning into the grains.

  10. ROLE OF MICROORGANISM AND MICROFAUNA IN PLANT LITTER DECOMPOSITION

    OpenAIRE

    Raj Singh*, Anju Rani, Permod Kumar, Gyanika Shukla, Amit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Though the fungi play a very significant role in the plant litter decomposition, studies revealed that the bacteria colonize the litters in the initial stages of decomposition. It has been observed that leaf species with low C:N ratio harbored higher number of bacteria than the more resistant species. The results of various workers outlined the development of the bacterial flora after litter fall due to improved moisture conditions but there is no change in the species composition. The plant ...

  11. Through-flow of water in leaves of a submerged plant is influenced by the apical opening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole; Jørgensen, Lise Bolt; Sand-Jensen, Kaj

    1997-01-01

    Submerged plant, apical opening, hydathode, Sparganium, hydraulic architecture, leaf specific conductivity......Submerged plant, apical opening, hydathode, Sparganium, hydraulic architecture, leaf specific conductivity...

  12. Do physical plant litter traits explain non-additivity in litter mixtures? A test of the improved microenvironmental conditions theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makkonen, M.A.; van Logtestijn, R.S.P; van Hal, J.R.; Aerts, R.; Berg, M.P.

    2012-01-01

    The decomposition rates of plant litter mixtures often deviate from the averaged rates of monocultures of their component litter species. The mechanisms behind these non-additive effects in decomposition of litter mixtures are lively debated. One plausible explanation for non-additive effects is

  13. Do physical plant litter traits explain non-additivity in litter mixtures? A test of the improved microenvironmental conditions theory.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makkonen, M.A.; Berg, M.P.; van Logtestijn, R.S.P; van Hal, J.R.; Aerts, R.

    2013-01-01

    The decomposition rates of plant litter mixtures often deviate from the averaged rates of monocultures of their component litter species. The mechanisms behind these non-additive effects in decomposition of litter mixtures are lively debated. One plausible explanation for non-additive effects is

  14. Reactive oxygen species mediate growth and death in submerged plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianka eSteffens

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic and semi-aquatic plants are well adapted to survive partial or complete submergence which is commonly accompanied by oxygen deprivation. The gaseous hormone ethylene controls a number of adaptive responses to submergence including adventitious root growth and aerenchyma formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS act as signaling intermediates in ethylene-controlled submergence adaptation and possibly also independent of ethylene. ROS levels are controlled by synthesis, enzymatic metabolism and nonenzymatic scavenging. While the actors are by and large known, we still have to learn about altered ROS at the subcellular level and how they are brought about, and the signaling cascades that trigger a specific response. This review briefly summarizes our knowledge on the contribution of ROS to submergence adaptation and describes spectrophotometrical, histochemical and live cell imaging detection methods that have been used to study changes in ROS abundance. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy is introduced as a method that allows identification and quantification of specific ROS in cell compartments. The use of advanced technologies such as EPR spectroscopy will be necessary to untangle the intricate and partially interwoven signaling networks of ethylene and ROS.

  15. CAM Photosynthesis in Submerged Aquatic Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is a CO2-concentrating mechanism selected in response to aridity in terrestrial habitats, and, in aquatic environments, to ambient limitations of carbon. Evidence is reviewed for its presence in five genera of aquatic vascular plants, including Isoe??tes, Sagittaria, Vallisneria, Crassula, and Littorella. Initially, aquatic CAM was considered by some to be an oxymoron, but some aquatic species have been studied in sufficient detail to say definitively that they possess CAM photosynthesis. CO2-concentrating mechanisms in photosynthetic organs require a barrier to leakage; e.g., terrestrial C4 plants have suberized bundle sheath cells and terrestrial CAM plants high stomatal resistance. In aquatic CAM plants the primary barrier to CO2 leakage is the extremely high diffusional resistance of water. This, coupled with the sink provided by extensive intercellular gas space, generates daytime CO2(Pi) comparable to terrestrial CAM plants. CAM contributes to the carbon budget by both net carbon gain and carbon recycling, and the magnitude of each is environmentally influenced. Aquatic CAM plants inhabit sites where photosynthesis is potentially limited by carbon. Many occupy moderately fertile shallow temporary pools that experience extreme diel fluctuations in carbon availability. CAM plants are able to take advantage of elevated nighttime CO2 levels in these habitats. This gives them a competitive advantage over non-CAM species that are carbon starved during the day and an advantage over species that expend energy in membrane transport of bicarbonate. Some aquatic CAM plants are distributed in highly infertile lakes, where extreme carbon limitation and light are important selective factors. Compilation of reports on diel changes in titratable acidity and malate show 69 out of 180 species have significant overnight accumulation, although evidence is presented discounting CAM in some. It is concluded that similar proportions of the aquatic

  16. Phytoremediation of arsenic in submerged soil by wetland plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomjun, Nateewattana; Siripen, Trichaiyaporn; Maliwan, Saeouy; Jintapat, Nateewattana; Prasak, Thavornyutikarn; Somporn, Choonluchanon; Petch, Pengchai

    2011-01-01

    Wetland aquatic plants including Canna glauca L., Colocasia esculenta L. Schott, Cyperus papyrus L. and Typha angustifolia L. were used in the phytoremediation of submerged soil polluted by arsenic (As). Cyperus papyrus L. was noticed as the largest biomass producer which has arsenic accumulation capacity of 130-172 mg As/kg plant. In terms of arsenic removal rate, however, Colocasia esculenta L. was recognized as the largest and fastest arsenic remover in this study. Its arsenic removal rate was 68 mg As/m2/day while those rates of Canna glauca L., Cyperus papyrus L. and Typha angustifolia L. were 61 mg As/m2/day, 56 mg As/m2/day, and 56 mg As/m2/day, respectively. Although the 4 aquatic plants were inferior in arsenic accumulation, their high arsenic removal rates were observed. Phytostabilization should be probable for the application of these plants.

  17. The Effects of Benomyl and Glyphosate Treated Plant Litter on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The experiment is, therefore, aimed at finding out if Roundup (herbicide) and Benlate (fungicide), with Glyphosate and Benomyl, as their respective active ingredients r ecommended for use on cocoa plantations in Ghana, have any effect on nitrogen mineralization by affecting decomposition of plant litter. It is also to find out ...

  18. Applying the seedling-emergence method under waterlogged conditions to detect the seed bank of aquatic plants in submerged sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boedeltje, G; ter Heerdt, GNJ; Bakker, JP

    Seed bank studies focused on submerged aquatic plants are generally performed under submerged conditions, using the seedling-emergence method. However, if a study targets at both submerged species and helophytes, submerged conditions are generally not suitable. We tested the emergence of seedlings

  19. Underwater Photosynthesis of Submerged Plants – Recent Advances and Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Ole; Colmer, Timothy D.; Sand-Jensen, Kaj

    2013-01-01

    We describe the general background and the recent advances in research on underwater photosynthesis of leaf segments, whole communities, and plant dominated aquatic ecosystems and present contemporary methods tailor made to quantify photosynthesis and carbon fixation under water. The majority of studies of aquatic photosynthesis have been carried out with detached leaves or thalli and this selectiveness influences the perception of the regulation of aquatic photosynthesis. We thus recommend assessing the influence of inorganic carbon and temperature on natural aquatic communities of variable density in addition to studying detached leaves in the scenarios of rising CO2 and temperature. Moreover, a growing number of researchers are interested in tolerance of terrestrial plants during flooding as torrential rains sometimes result in overland floods that inundate terrestrial plants. We propose to undertake studies to elucidate the importance of leaf acclimation of terrestrial plants to facilitate gas exchange and light utilization under water as these acclimations influence underwater photosynthesis as well as internal aeration of plant tissues during submergence. PMID:23734154

  20. Plant litter decomposition in wetlands receiving acid mine drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittle, D.L.; McGraw, J.B.; Garbutt, K. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Biology

    1995-03-01

    The impact of acid mine drainage on the decomposition of wetland plant species of northern West Virginia was studied to determine if the potential exists for nutrient cycling to be altered in systems used to treat this drainage. There were two objectives of this study. First, decomposition of aboveground plant material was measured to determine species decomposition patterns as a function of pH. Second, decomposition of litter from various pH environments was compared to assess whether litter origin affects decomposition rates. Species differences were detected throughout the study. Decomposition rates of woolgrass ({ital Scirpus cyperinus} (L.) Kunth) and common rush ({ital Juncus effusus} L.) were significantly lower than the use of calamus ({ital Acorus calamus} L.) and rice cutgrass ({ital Leersia oryzoids} L.). Differences among species explained a large proportion of the variation in percentage of biomass remaining. Thus, differences in litter quality among species was important in determining the rate of decomposition. In general, significantly more decomposition occurred for all species in high pH environments, indicating impeded decomposition at low pH. While decomposition of some species litter differed depending on its origin, other species showed no effect. Cattail ({ital Typha latifolia} L.) in particular, was found to have lower decomposition rates occurring with material grown at low pH. Lower decomposition rates could result in lower nutrient availability leading to further reduction of productivity under low pH conditions. 34 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Biodiversity at the plant-soil interface: microbial abundance and community structure respond to litter mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Samantha K; Newman, Gregory S

    2010-03-01

    The interactive effects of diversity in plants and microbial communities at the litter interface are not well understood. Mixtures of plant litter from different species often decompose differently than when individual species decompose alone. Previously, we found that litter mixtures of multiple conifers decomposed more rapidly than expected, but litter mixtures that included conifer and aspen litter did not. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these diversity effects may help explain existing anomalous decay dynamics and provide a glimpse into the elusive linkage between plant diversity and the fungi and bacteria that carry out decomposition. We examined the microbial communities on litter from individual plant species decomposing both in mixture and alone. We assessed two main hypotheses to explain how the decomposer community could stimulate mixed-litter decomposition above predicted rates: either by being more abundant, or having a different or more diverse community structure than when microbes decompose a single species of litter. Fungal, bacterial and total phospholipid fatty acid microbial biomass increased by over 40% on both conifer and aspen litter types in mixture, and microbial community composition changed significantly when plant litter types were mixed. Microbial diversity also increased with increasing plant litter diversity. While our data provide support for both the increased abundance hypothesis and the altered microbial community hypothesis, microbial changes do not translate to predictably altered litter decomposition and may only produce synergisms when mixed litters are functionally similar.

  2. Swan foraging shapes spatial distribution of two submerged plants, favouring the preferred prey species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandsten, H.; Klaassen, M.R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Compared to terrestrial environments, grazing intensity on belowground plant parts may be particularly strong in aquatic environments, which may have great effects on plant-community structure. We observed that the submerged macrophyte, Potamogeton pectinatus, which mainly reproduces with tubers,

  3. Oxygen absorption by adventitious roots promotes the survival of completely submerged terrestrial plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayi, Qiaoli; Zeng, Bo; Liu, Jianhui; Li, Siqi; van Bodegom, Peter M; Cornelissen, Johannes H C

    2016-04-10

    Flooding imposes stress upon terrestrial plants because it results in oxygen deficiency, which is considered a major problem for submerged plants. A common response of terrestrial plants to flooding is the formation of aquatic adventitious roots. Some studies have shown that adventitious roots on submerged plants are capable of absorbing water and nutrients. However, there is no experimental evidence for the possible oxygen uptake function of adventitious roots or for how important this function might be for the survival of plants during prolonged submergence. This study aims to investigate whether adventitious roots absorb oxygen from the water column, and whether this new function is beneficial to the survival of completely submerged plants. TakingAlternanthera philoxeroides(Mart.) Griseb. as a representative species, the profiling of the underwater oxygen gradient towards living and dead adventitious roots on completely submerged plants was conducted, the oxygen concentration in stem nodes with and without adventitious roots was measured, and the growth, survival and non-structural carbohydrate content of completely submerged plants with and without adventitious roots was investigated. Oxygen profiles in the water column of adventitious roots showed that adventitious roots absorbed oxygen from water. It is found that the oxygen concentration in stem nodes having adventitious roots was higher than that in stem nodes without adventitious roots, which implies that the oxygen absorbed by adventitious roots from water was subsequently transported from the roots to other plant tissues. Compared with plants whose adventitious roots had been pruned, those with intact adventitious roots had slower leaf shedding, slower plant mass reduction, more efficient carbohydrate economy and prolonged survival when completely submerged. The adventitious roots ofA. philoxeroidesformed upon submergence can absorb oxygen from ambient water, thereby alleviating the adverse effects of

  4. Plant litter functional diversity effects on litter mass loss depend on the macro-detritivore community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patoine, Guillaume; Thakur, Madhav P; Friese, Julia; Nock, Charles; Hönig, Lydia; Haase, Josephine; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael; Eisenhauer, Nico

    2017-11-01

    A better understanding of the mechanisms driving litter diversity effects on decomposition is needed to predict how biodiversity losses affect this crucial ecosystem process. In a microcosm study, we investigated the effects of litter functional diversity and two major groups of soil macro-detritivores on the mass loss of tree leaf litter mixtures. Furthermore, we tested the effects of litter trait community means and dissimilarity on litter mass loss for seven traits relevant to decomposition. We expected macro-detritivore effects on litter mass loss to be most pronounced in litter mixtures of high functional diversity. We used 24 leaf mixtures differing in functional diversity, which were composed of litter from four species from a pool of 16 common European tree species. Earthworms, isopods, or a combination of both were added to each litter combination for two months. Litter mass loss was significantly higher in the presence of earthworms than in that of isopods, whereas no synergistic effects of macro-detritivore mixtures were found. The effect of functional diversity of the litter material was highest in the presence of both macro-detritivore groups, supporting the notion that litter diversity effects are most pronounced in the presence of different detritivore species. Species-specific litter mass loss was explained by nutrient content, secondary compound concentration, and structural components. Moreover, dissimilarity in N concentrations increased litter mass loss, probably because detritivores having access to nutritionally diverse food sources. Furthermore, strong competition between the two macro-detritivores for soil surface litter resulted in a decrease of survival of both macro-detritivores. These results show that the effects of litter functional diversity on decomposition are contingent upon the macro-detritivore community and composition. We conclude that the temporal dynamics of litter trait diversity effects and their interaction with

  5. Reciprocal effects of litter from exotic and congeneric native plant species via soil nutrients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelein Meisner

    Full Text Available Invasive exotic plant species are often expected to benefit exclusively from legacy effects of their litter inputs on soil processes and nutrient availability. However, there are relatively few experimental tests determining how litter of exotic plants affects their own growth conditions compared to congeneric native plant species. Here, we test how the legacy of litter from three exotic plant species affects their own performance in comparison to their congeneric natives that co-occur in the invaded habitat. We also analyzed litter effects on soil processes. In all three comparisons, soil with litter from exotic plant species had the highest respiration rates. In two out of the three exotic-native species comparisons, soil with litter from exotic plant species had higher inorganic nitrogen concentrations than their native congener, which was likely due to higher initial litter quality of the exotics. When litter from an exotic plant species had a positive effect on itself, it also had a positive effect on its native congener. We conclude that exotic plant species develop a legacy effect in soil from the invaded range through their litter inputs. This litter legacy effect results in altered soil processes that can promote both the exotic plant species and their native congener.

  6. Highly consistent effects of plant litter identity and functional traits on decomposition across a latitudinal gradient.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makkonen, M.A.; Berg, M.P.; Handa, T.; Hattenschwiler, S.; van Ruijven, J.; van Bodegom, P.M.; Aerts, R.

    2012-01-01

    Plant litter decomposition is a key process in terrestrial carbon cycling, yet the relative importance of various control factors remains ambiguous at a global scale. A full reciprocal litter transplant study with 16 litter species that varied widely in traits and originated from four forest sites

  7. Highly consistent effects of plant litter identity and functional traits on decomposition across a latitudinal gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makkonen, M.; Berg, M.P.; Handa, I.T.; Hättenschwiler, S.; Ruijven, van J.; Bodegom, van P.M.; Aerts, M.A.P.A.

    2012-01-01

    Plant litter decomposition is a key process in terrestrial carbon cycling, yet the relative importance of various control factors remains ambiguous at a global scale. A full reciprocal litter transplant study with 16 litter species that varied widely in traits and originated from four forest sites

  8. A new conceptual model for the fate of lignin in decomposing plant litter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klotzbücher, T.; Kaiser, K.; Guggenberger, G.; Gatzek, C.; Kalbitz, K.

    2011-01-01

    Lignin is a main component of plant litter. Its degradation is thought to be critical for litter decomposition rates and the build-up of soil organic matter. We studied the relationships between lignin degradation and the production of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and of CO2 during litter

  9. Environmental Assessment: Submerged Aquatic Plant Management of Banks Lake, Banks Lake NWR, Lakeland, Georgia

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Environmental Assessment is an analysis of five alternatives developed to address themanagement of the submerged aquatic plants of Banks Lake on Banks Lake...

  10. Anatomy of floating and submerged leaves of heterophyllous plant of Nymphaea candida L.

    OpenAIRE

    E.N. Klimenko

    2014-01-01

    The data on anatomy of floating and submerged leaves of heterophyllous aquatic plant Nymphaea candida L. are presented. Anatomy of floating leaves is shown to be different from that of submerged leaves: the absence of stomata, asterosclereids, and differentiated parenchyma, as well as by reduce intercellular volume and leaf width. Common patterns of leaf structure plasticity of aquatic heterophyllous plants in dependence on the environment are discussed.

  11. Flower litters of alpine plants affect soil nitrogen and phosphorus rapidly in the eastern Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinniu; Xu, Bo; Wu, Yan; Gao, Jing; Shi, Fusun

    2016-10-01

    Litters of reproductive organs have rarely been studied despite their role in allocating nutrients for offspring reproduction. This study determines the mechanism through which flower litters efficiently increase the available soil nutrient pool. Field experiments were conducted to collect plant litters and calculate biomass production in an alpine meadow of the eastern Tibetan Plateau. C, N, P, lignin, cellulose content, and their relevant ratios of litters were analyzed to identify their decomposition features. A pot experiment was performed to determine the effects of litter addition on the soil nutrition pool by comparing the treated and control samples. The litter-bag method was used to verify decomposition rates. The flower litters of phanerophyte plants were comparable with non-flower litters. Biomass partitioning of other herbaceous species accounted for 10-40 % of the aboveground biomass. Flower litter possessed significantly higher N and P levels but less C / N, N / P, lignin / N, and lignin and cellulose concentrations than leaf litter. The litter-bag experiment confirmed that the flower litters of Rhododendron przewalskii and Meconopsis integrifolia decompose approximately 3 times faster than mixed litters within 50 days. Pot experiment findings indicated that flower litter addition significantly increased the available nutrient pool and soil microbial productivity. The time of litter fall significantly influenced soil available N and P, and soil microbial biomass. Flower litters fed the soil nutrition pool and influenced nutrition cycling in alpine ecosystems more efficiently because of their non-ignorable production, faster decomposition rate, and higher nutrient contents compared with non-flower litters. The underlying mechanism can enrich nutrients, which return to the soil, and non-structural carbohydrates, which feed and enhance the transitions of soil microorganisms.

  12. Species-specific effects of woody litter on seedling emergence and growth of herbaceous plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadri Koorem

    Full Text Available The effect of litter on seedling establishment can influence species richness in plant communities. The effect of litter depends on amount, and also on litter type, but relatively little is known about the species-specific effects of litter. We conducted a factorial greenhouse experiment to examine the effect of litter type, using two woody species that commonly co-occur in boreonemoral forest--evergreen spruce (Picea abies, deciduous hazel (Corylus avellana, and a mixture of the two species--and litter amount--shallow (4 mm, deep (12 mm and leachate--on seedling emergence and biomass of three understorey species. The effect of litter amount on seedling emergence was highly dependent on litter type; while spruce needle litter had a significant negative effect that increased with depth, seedling emergence in the presence of hazel broadleaf litter did not differ from control pots containing no litter. Mixed litter of both species also had a negative effect on seedling emergence that was intermediate compared to the single-species treatments. Spruce litter had a marginally positive (shallow or neutral effect (deep on seedling biomass, while hazel and mixed litter treatments had significant positive effects on biomass that increased with depth. We found non-additive effects of litter mixtures on seedling biomass indicating that high quality hazel litter can reduce the negative effects of spruce. Hazel litter does not inhibit seedling emergence; it increases seedling growth, and creates better conditions for seedling growth in mixtures by reducing the suppressive effect of spruce litter, having a positive effect on understorey species richness.

  13. Aquatic adventitious root development in partially and completely submerged wetland plants Cotula coronopifolia and Meionectes brownii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Sarah Meghan; Ludwig, Martha; Colmer, Timothy David

    2012-07-01

    A common response of wetland plants to flooding is the formation of aquatic adventitious roots. Observations of aquatic root growth are widespread; however, controlled studies of aquatic roots of terrestrial herbaceous species are scarce. Submergence tolerance and aquatic root growth and physiology were evaluated in two herbaceous, perennial wetland species Cotula coronopifolia and Meionectes brownii. Plants were raised in large pots with 'sediment' roots in nutrient solution and then placed into individual tanks and shoots were left in air or submerged (completely or partially). The effects on growth of aquatic root removal, and of light availability to submerged plant organs, were evaluated. Responses of aquatic root porosity, chlorophyll and underwater photosynthesis, were studied. Both species tolerated 4 weeks of complete or partial submergence. Extensive, photosynthetically active, aquatic adventitious roots grew from submerged stems and contributed up to 90 % of the total root dry mass. When aquatic roots were pruned, completely submerged plants grew less and had lower stem and leaf chlorophyll a, as compared with controls with intact roots. Roots exposed to the lowest PAR (daily mean 4.7 ± 2.4 µmol m(-2) s(-1)) under water contained less chlorophyll, but there was no difference in aquatic root biomass after 4 weeks, regardless of light availability in the water column (high PAR was available to all emergent shoots). Both M. brownii and C. coronopifolia responded to submergence with growth of aquatic adventitious roots, which essentially replaced the existing sediment root system. These aquatic roots contained chlorophyll and were photosynthetically active. Removal of aquatic roots had negative effects on plant growth during partial and complete submergence.

  14. Acclimation of a terrestrial plant to submergence facilitates gas exchange under water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mommer, L.; Pedersen, O.; Visser, E.J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Flooding imposes stress upon terrestrial plants since it severely hampers gas exchange rates between the shoot and the environment. The resulting oxygen deficiency is considered to be the major problem for submerged plants. Oxygen microelectrode studies have, however, shown that aquatic plants

  15. Constructed tropical wetlands with integrated submergent-emergent plants for sustainable water quality management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Norio; Jinadasa, K B S N; Werellagama, D R I B; Mowjood, M I M; Ng, W J

    2006-01-01

    Improvement of primary effluent quality by using an integrated system of emergent plants (Scirpus grossus in the leading subsurface flow arrangement) and submergent plants (Hydrilla verticillata in a subsequent channel) was investigated. The primary effluent was drawn from a septic tank treating domestic sewage from a student dormitory at the University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. Influent and effluent samples were collected once every 2 weeks from May 2004 through July 2005 and analyzed to determine water quality parameters. Both the emergent and submergent plants were harvested at predetermined intervals. The results suggested that harvesting prolonged the usefulness of the system and the generation of a renewable biomass with potential economic value. The mean overall pollutant removal efficiencies of the integrated emergent and submergent plant system were biological oxygen demand (BOD5), 65.7%; chemical oxygen demand (COD), 40.8%; ammonium (NH4+-N), 74.8%; nitrate (NO3--N), 38.8%; phosphate (PO43-), 61.2%; total suspended solids (TSS), 65.8%; and fecal coliforms, 94.8%. The submergent plant subsystem improved removal of nutrients that survived the emergent subsystem operated at low hydraulic retention times. The significant improvement in effluent quality following treatment by the submergent plant system indicates the value of incorporating such plants in wetland systems.

  16. Submergence Causes Similar Carbohydrate Starvation but Faster Post-Stress Recovery than Darkness in Alternanthera philoxeroides Plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Qi Ye

    Full Text Available Carbon assimilation by submerged plants is greatly reduced due to low light levels. It is hypothesized that submergence reduces carbohydrate contents and that plants recover from submergence in the same way as darkness-treated plants. To test this hypothesis, the responses of plants to submergence and darkness were studied and compared. Plants of a submergence-tolerant species, Alternanthera philoxeroides, were exposed to well drained and illuminated conditions, complete submergence conditions or darkness conditions followed by a recovery growth period in a controlled experiment. The biomass maintenance and accumulation, carbohydrate content dynamics and respiration rate in the plants were assessed to quantify the carbohydrate utilization rate and regrowth. The submerged plants maintained higher chlorophyll contents, more green leaf tissue and more biomass; recovered more quickly; and accumulated more carbohydrates and biomass than darkness-treated plants. The respiration rate was continuously reduced in the same pattern under both stress conditions but was maintained at a significantly lower level in the submerged plants; the total soluble sugar and total fructan contents were decreased at approximately the same rate of decrease, reaching similar low levels, in the two stress treatments. The A. philoxeroides plants were more tolerant of submergence than darkness. The faster recovery of desubmerged plants could not be explained by the similar carbohydrate contents at the start of recovery. Other types of carbon reserves besides carbohydrates or other mechanisms such as higher post-stress photosynthetic performance might be involved.

  17. Parametric and Nonparametric Analysis of LANDSAT TM and MSS Imagery for Detecting Submerged Plant Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackleson, S. G.; Klemas, V.

    1984-01-01

    The spatial, spectral and radiometric characteristics of LANDSAT TM and MSS imagery for detecting submerged aquatic vegetation are assessed. The problem is approached from two perspectives; purely stochastic or nonparametric in a radiative sense and theoretical in which radiative transfer equations are used to predict upwelling radiance at satellite altitude. The spectral and radiometric aspects of the theoretical approach are addressed with which a submerged plant canopy is distinguished from a surrounding bottom of sand or mud.

  18. Litter for life : assessing the multifunctional legacy of plant traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dias, André Tavares Corrêa; Cornelissen, Johannes H.C.; Berg, Matty P.

    2017-01-01

    Litter drives a wide variety of important functions in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. However, the role of litter in regulating community dynamics and ecosystem processes has mostly been studied in terms of litter presence or amount. Besides in biogeochemistry, we still do not know how

  19. Interactions between plants, litter and microbes in cycling of nitrogen and phosphorus in the arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasson, Sven Evert; Castro, Jorge; Michelsen, Anders

    2006-01-01

    that had been pre-treated by 12 year of warming and fertilizer addition, we incubated soils together with litter and plants added and examined whether the absence of plants and litter in ‘traditional' incubations could explain the discrepancy. The pre-treatment had no effect on nitrogen (N) mineralization...... but increased phosphorus (P) mineralization, while litter addition decreased N and increased P mineralization but without any effect on plant and microbial N and P sequestration. Incubations of soils with plants increased N mobilization to the soil inorganic plus plant pools several-fold as compared to the net...

  20. [Influence of Submerged Plants on Microbial Community Structure in Sediment of Hongze Lake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ding-yu; Zhang, Ting-xi; Dong, Dan-ping; Li, De-fang; Wang, Guo-xiang

    2016-05-15

    Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) method was applied to analyze the influence of submerged plants on sediment microbial community structure, in order to investigate the changes of sediment microbial community structure for different kinds of the submerged plants in different growth periods. Particularly, Potamogeton crispus L., Potamogeton pectinatus L and the mixed group were chosen as the typical submerged plants in Hongze Lake for investigation in this paper. The results indicated that the change of total PLFAs in different periods was significant, on the contrary, the PLFA change for different groups in the same period was insignificant. The values of G⁺ PLFA/G⁻ PLFA in the submerged plant group were also highly related to the different growth periods, which demonstrated that the root function of the submerged plant had a severe impact on the microbial community in sediment. Furthermore, some environmental factors, such as Temperature, pH, TOC and DO, were correlated to characteristic phospholipid of PLFAs in sediment, which means the environmental factors could also affect the microbial community structure.

  1. Strong growth limitation of a floating plant (Lemna gibba) by the submerged macrophyte (Elodea nuttallii) under laboratory conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szabo, S.; Scheffer, M.; Roijackers, R.M.M.; Waluto, B.; Zambrano, L.

    2010-01-01

    1. The asymmetric competition for light and nutrients between floating and submerged aquatic plants is thought to be key in explaining why dominance by either of these groups can be stable and difficult to change. 2. Although the shading effect of floating plants on submerged plants has been well

  2. Plant litter chemistry and mycorrhizal roots promote a nitrogen feedback in a temperate forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nina Wurzburger; Ronald L. Hendrick

    2009-01-01

    1. Relationships between mycorrhizal plants and soil nitrogen (N) have led to the speculation that the chemistry of plant litter and the saprotrophy of mycorrhizal symbionts can function together to...

  3. Dynamics of microbial communities during decomposition of litter from pioneering plants in initial soil ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Esperschütz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In initial ecosystems, concentrations of all macro- and micronutrients can be considered as extremely low. Plant litter therefore strongly influences the development of a degrader's food web and is an important source for C and N input into soil in such ecosystems. In the present study, a 13C litter decomposition field experiment was performed for 30 weeks in initial soils from a post-mining area near the city of Cottbus (Germany. Two of this region's dominant but contrasting pioneering plant species (Lotus corniculatus L. and Calamagrostis epigejos L. were chosen to investigate the effects of litter quality on the litter decomposing microbial food web in initially nutrient-poor substrates. The results clearly indicate the importance of litter quality, as indicated by its N content, its bioavailability for the degradation process and the development of microbial communities in the detritusphere and soil. The degradation of the L. corniculatus litter, which had a low C / N ratio, was fast and showed pronounced changes in the microbial community structure 1–4 weeks after litter addition. The degradation of the C. epigejos litter material was slow and microbial community changes mainly occurred between 4 and 30 weeks after litter addition to the soil. However, for both litter materials a clear indication of the importance of fungi for the degradation process was observed both in terms of fungal abundance and activity (13C incorporation activity

  4. Dynamics of microbial communities during decomposition of litter from pioneering plants in initial soil ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esperschütz, J.; Zimmermann, C.; Dümig, A.; Welzl, G.; Buegger, F.; Elmer, M.; Munch, J. C.; Schloter, M.

    2013-07-01

    In initial ecosystems, concentrations of all macro- and micronutrients can be considered as extremely low. Plant litter therefore strongly influences the development of a degrader's food web and is an important source for C and N input into soil in such ecosystems. In the present study, a 13C litter decomposition field experiment was performed for 30 weeks in initial soils from a post-mining area near the city of Cottbus (Germany). Two of this region's dominant but contrasting pioneering plant species (Lotus corniculatus L. and Calamagrostis epigejos L.) were chosen to investigate the effects of litter quality on the litter decomposing microbial food web in initially nutrient-poor substrates. The results clearly indicate the importance of litter quality, as indicated by its N content, its bioavailability for the degradation process and the development of microbial communities in the detritusphere and soil. The degradation of the L. corniculatus litter, which had a low C / N ratio, was fast and showed pronounced changes in the microbial community structure 1-4 weeks after litter addition. The degradation of the C. epigejos litter material was slow and microbial community changes mainly occurred between 4 and 30 weeks after litter addition to the soil. However, for both litter materials a clear indication of the importance of fungi for the degradation process was observed both in terms of fungal abundance and activity (13C incorporation activity)

  5. Spatial patterns of plant litter in a tidal freshwater marsh and implications for marsh persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Andrew J; Engelhardt, Katharina A M; Cadol, Daniel; Palinkas, Cindy M

    2016-04-01

    The maintenance of marsh platform elevation under conditions of sea level rise is dependent on mineral sediment supply to marsh surfaces and conversion of above- and belowground plant biomass to soil organic material. These physical and biological processes interact within the tidal zone, resulting in elevation-dependent processes contributing to marsh accretion. Here, we explore spatial pattern in a variable related to aboveground biomass, plant litter, to reveal its role in the maintenance of marsh surfaces. Plant litter persisting through the dormant season represents the more recalcitrant portion of plant biomass, and as such has an extended period of influence on ecosystem processes. We conducted a field and remote sensing analysis of plant litter height, aboveground biomass, vertical cover, and stem density (collectively termed plant litter structure) at a tidal freshwater marsh located within the Potomac River estuary, USA. LiDAR and field observations show that plant litter structure becomes more prominent with increasing elevation. Spatial patterns in litter structure exhibit stability from year to year and correlate with patterns in soil organic matter content, revealed by measuring the loss on ignition of surface sediments. The amount of mineral material embedded within plant litter decreases with increasing elevation, representing an important tradeoff with litter structure. Therefore, at low elevations where litter structure is short and sparse, the role of plant litter is to capture sediment; at high elevations where litter structure is tall and dense, aboveground litter contributes organic matter to soil development. This organic matter contribution has the potential to eclipse that of belowground biomass as the root:shoot ratio of dominant species at high elevations is low compared to that of dominant species at low elevations. Because of these tradeoffs in mineral and organic matter incorporation into soil across elevation gradients, the rate of

  6. Palatability of selected alpine plant litters for the decomposer Lumbricus rubellus (Lumbricidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Rief

    Full Text Available On alpine pastureland the decline in large-bodied earthworm numbers and biomass after abandonment of management might be the result of a shift from highly palatable grass litter to poorly digestible leaf litter of dwarf shrubs. To test this hypothesis, we analysed nitrogen, phosphorous and total phenolic contents of fresh and aged litter of eight commonly occuring alpine plant species and compared consumption rates of these food sources in a controlled feeding experiment with Lumbricus rubellus (Lumbricidae. Furthermore, we analysed the microbial community structure of aged litter materials to check for a relationship between the microbial characteristics of the different plant litter types and the food choice of earthworms. Plant litters differed significantly in their chemical composition, earthworms, however, showed no preference for any litter species, but generally rejected fresh litter material. Microbial community structures of the litter types were significantly different, but we could find no evidence for selective feeding of L. rubellus. We conclude that L. rubellus is a widespread, adaptable ubiquist, which is able to feed on a variety of food sources differing in quality and palatability, as long as they have been exposed to wheathering.

  7. Variation in Plant Litter Decomposition Rates across Extreme Dry Environments in Qatar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alsafran, Mohammed; Sarneel, J.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304836923; Alatalo, Juha

    2017-01-01

    Decomposition of plant litter is a key process for transfer of carbon and nutrients in ecosystems. Carbon contained in decaying biomass is released to the atmosphere as respired CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to global warming. To our knowledge, there have been no studies on litter

  8. A new mechanism of macrophyte mitigation: how submerged plants reduce malathion's acute toxicity to aquatic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, William R; Relyea, Rick A

    2014-08-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that aquatic plants can mitigate the toxicity of insecticides to sensitive aquatic animals. The current paradigm is that this ability is driven primarily by insecticide sorption to plant tissues, especially for hydrophobic compounds. However, recent work shows that submerged plants can strongly mitigate the toxicity of the relatively hydrophilic insecticide malathion, despite the fact that this compound exhibits a slow sorption rate to plants. To examine this disparity, we tested the hypothesis that the mitigating effect of submerged plants on malathion's toxicity is driven primarily by the increased water pH from plant photosynthesis causing the hydrolysis of malathion, rather than by sorption. To do this, we compared zooplankton (Daphnia magna) survival across five environmentally relevant malathion concentrations (0, 1, 4, 6, or 36 μg L(-1)) in test containers where we chemically manipulated water pH in the absence of plants or added the submerged plant (Elodea canadensis) but manipulated plant photosynthetic activity via shading or no shading. We discovered that malathion was equally lethal to Daphnia at all concentrations tested when photosynthetically inactive (i.e. shaded) plants were present (pH at time of dosing=7.8) or when pH was chemically decreased (pH=7.7). In contrast, when photosynthetically active (i.e. unshaded) plants were present (pH=9.8) or when pH was chemically increased (pH=9.5), the effects of 4 and 6 μg L(-1) of malathion on Daphnia were mitigated strongly and to an equal degree. These results demonstrate that the mitigating effect of submerged plants on malathion's toxicity can be explained entirely by a mechanism of photosynthesizing plants causing an increase in water pH, resulting in rapid malathion hydrolysis. Our findings suggest that current ecotoxicological models and phytoremediation strategies may be overlooking a critical mechanism for mitigating pesticides. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd

  9. Two-flow simulation of the natural light field within a canopy of submerged aquatic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackleson, S. G.; Klemas, V.

    1986-01-01

    A two-flow model is developed to simulate a light field composed of both collimated and diffuse irradiance within natural waters containing a canopy of bottom-adhering plants. To account for the effects of submerging a canopy, the transmittance and reflectance terms associated with each plant structure (leaves, stems, fruiting bodies, etc.) are expressed as functions of the ratio of the refractive index of the plant material to the refractive index of the surrounding media and the internal transmittance of the plant stucture. Algebraic solutions to the model are shown to yield plausible physical explanations for unanticipated variations in volume reflectance spectra. The effect of bottom reflectance on the near-bottom light field is also investigated. These indicate that within light-limited submerged aquatic plant canopies, substrate reflectance may play an important role in determining the amount of light available to the plants and, therefore, canopy productivity.

  10. [Soluble organic carbon in plant litters on Loess Plateau: content and biodegradability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-yang; Zhou, Jian-bin; Xia, Zhi-min; Chen, Xing-li

    2010-12-01

    The litters of eight plant species from the Loess Plateau were cut into pieces with 2 mm and 1 cm in size, and extracted with distilled water and 0.01 mol x L(-1) CaCl2 to determine the soluble organic carbon (SOC) content. In the meantime, a 7-day indoor incubation test was conducted at (25 +/- 3) degrees C to investigate their biodegradability. The SOC content and the ratio of SOC to total carbon (SOC/TC) in the litters were 18.20-156.82 g x kg(-1) and 4.21%-32.84%, respectively. Shrub litter had a slightly higher SOC content than tree litter, while grass litter had the lowest SOC content. After 7-day incubation, the biodegradation rate of SOC in the plant litters ranged from 44.5% to 80.6% (62.9% on average), and decreased in the order of shrub > tree > grass. By the end of the incubation, the proportion of soluble organic matter in solution had a significant increasing trend, which was related to the rapid biodegradation of labile composition in the litters. The higher content and higher biodegradation rate of SOC in plant litters might play important roles in nutrient cycling and energy flow during the vegetation restoration on Loess Plateau.

  11. Acclimation of a terrestrial plant to submergence facilitates gas exchange under water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mommer, L.; Pedersen, O.; Visser, E. J. W.

    2004-01-01

    Flooding imposes stress upon terrestrial plants since it severely hampers gas exchange rates between the shoot and the environment. The resulting oxygen deficiency is considered to be the major problem for submerged plants. Oxygen microelectrode studies have, however, shown that aquatic plants...... maintain relatively high internal oxygen pressures under water, and even may release oxygen via the roots into the sediment, also in dark. Based on these results, we challenge the dogma that oxygen pressures in submerged terrestrial plants immediately drop to levels at which aerobic respiration is impaired....... The present study demonstrates that the internal oxygen pressure in the petioles of Rumex palustris plants under water is indeed well above the critical oxygen pressure for aerobic respiration, provided that the air-saturated water is not completely stagnant. The beneficial effect of shoot acclimation...

  12. Surprising spectra of root-associated fungi in submerged aquatic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohout, Petr; Sýkorová, Zuzana; Ctvrtlíková, Martina; Rydlová, Jana; Suda, Jan; Vohník, Martin; Sudová, Radka

    2012-04-01

    Similarly to plants from terrestrial ecosystems, aquatic species harbour wide spectra of root-associated fungi (RAF). However, comparably less is known about fungal diversity in submerged roots. We assessed the incidence and diversity of RAF in submerged aquatic plants using microscopy, culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques. We studied RAF of five submerged isoetid species collected in four oligotrophic freshwater lakes in Norway. Levels of dark septate endophytes (DSE) colonization differed among the lakes and were positively related to the organic matter content and negatively related to pH. In total, we identified 41 fungal OTUs using culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques, belonging to Mucoromycotina, Chytridiomycota, Glomeromycota, Ascomycota as well as Basidiomycota. Sequences corresponding to aquatic hyphomycetes (e.g. Nectria lugdunensis, Tetracladium furcatum and Varicosporium elodeae) were obtained. Eight arbuscular mycorrhizal taxa belonging to the orders Archaeosporales, Diversisporales and Glomerales were also detected. However, the vast majority of the fungal species detected (e.g. Ceratobasidium sp., Cryptosporiopsis rhizophila, Leptodontidium orchidicola, and Tuber sp.) have previously been known only from roots of terrestrial plants. The abundance and phylogenetic distribution of mycorrhizal as well as nonmycorrhizal fungi in the roots of submerged plants have reshaped our views on the fungal diversity in aquatic environment. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of surrounding land use on metal accumulation in environments and submerged plants in subtropical ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Bu, Hongmei; Liu, Guihua; Wang, Zhixiu; Liu, Wenzhi

    2015-12-01

    Ponds are widely used as stormwater treatment facilities to retain contaminants, including metals, and to improve water quality throughout the world. However, there is still a limited understanding of the effects of surrounding land use on metal accumulation in pond environments and organisms. To address this gap, we measured the concentrations of nine metals (i.e., Al, Ba, Ca, K, Li, Mg, Na, Se, and Sr) in water, sediments, and submerged plants collected from 37 ponds with different surrounding land uses in southwestern China and assessed the metal accumulation capacity of four dominant submerged plant species. Our results showed that Al, Ca, and K concentrations in the water were above drinking water standards. In the sediments, the average concentrations of Ca and Sr were higher than the corresponding soil background values. Ceratophyllum demersum L. could accumulate more K in aboveground biomass than Myriophyllum spicatum L. and Potamogeton maackianus A. Benn. The K concentration in submerged plants was positively influenced by the corresponding metal concentration in the water and negatively influenced by water temperature. Among the nine studied metals, only the water K concentration in ponds receiving agricultural runoff was significantly higher than that for ponds receiving urban and forested runoff. This result suggests that surrounding land use types have no significant effect on metal accumulation in sediments and submerged plants in the studied ponds. A large percentage of the metals in these ponds may be derived from natural sources such as the weathering of rocks.

  14. Comparison of radionuclide levels in soil, sagebrush, plant litter, cryptogams, and small mammals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landeen, D.S.

    1994-09-01

    Soil, sagebrush, plant litter, cryptogam, and small mammal samples were collected and analyzed for cesium-137, strontium-90, plutonium-238, plutonium 239/240, technetium-99, and iodine-129 from 1981 to 1986 at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State as part of site characterization and environmental monitoring activities. Samples were collected on the 200 Areas Plateau, downwind from ongoing waste management activities. Plant litter, cryptogams, and small mammals are media that are not routinely utilized in monitoring or characterization efforts for determination of radionuclide concentrations. Studies at Hanford, other US Department of Energy sites, and in eastern Europe have indicated that plant litter and cryptogams may serve as effective ``natural`` monitors of air quality. Plant litter in this study consists of fallen leaves from sagebrush and ``cryptogams`` describes that portion of the soil crust composed of mosses, lichens, algae, and fungi. Comparisons of cesium-137 and strontium-90 concentrations in the soil, sagebrush, litter, and cryptogams revealed significantly higher (p<0.05) levels in plant litter and cryptogams. Technetium-99 values were the highest in sagebrush and litter. Plutonium-238 and 239/40 and iodine-129 concentrations never exceeded 0.8 pCi/gm in all media. No evidence of any significant amounts of any radionuclides being incorporated into the small mammal community was discovered. The data indicate that plant litter and cryptogams may be better, indicators of environmental quality than soil or vegetation samples. Augmenting a monitoring program with samples of litter and cryptogams may provide a more accurate representation of radionuclide environmental uptake and/or contamination levels in surrounding ecosystems. The results of this study may be applied directly to other radioecological monitoring conducted at other nuclear sites and to the monitoring of other pollutants.

  15. Nitrogen addition affects chemical compositions of plant tissues, litter and soil organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Wu, Nana; Wang, Hui; Sun, Jianfei; Peng, Bo; Jiang, Ping; Bai, Edith

    2016-07-01

    Increasing nitrogen (N) deposition or fertilization has been found to significantly affect carbon (C) cycling. However, a comprehensive understanding of how different C chemical components of plant, litter, and soil would respond to external N addition is still lacking. We compiled data of 1,160 observations from 52 individual studies and conducted a meta-analysis of N addition effects on 18 variables related to C chemical compositions in terrestrial ecosystems. Results showed that plant lignin (+7.13%), plant protein (+25.94%), and soil lignin (+7.30%) were significantly increased by N addition, and plant hemicellulose (-4.39%) was significantly decreased, whereas plant fiber, plant cellulose, plant non-structural carbohydrate (NSC), litter lignin, and litter cellulose were not significantly changed. The effects of N addition on C chemical composition varied among different ecosystems/plant types and different forms of N addition. Increasing treatment duration did not significantly change the effects of N addition on the chemical composition of plant, litter, and soil C. With increasing N addition rate, the effect of N addition on plant lignin, plant fiber, plant cellulose, and plant protein increased, while the effect of N addition on plant hemicellulose, plant NSC, and litter cellulose became more negative. Our meta-analysis provided a systematic evaluation of the responses of different C chemical components to N addition in the plant-litter-soil continuum. Results suggest that the change of plant and soil C chemical composition under N addition may be beneficial for ecosystem C sequestration and could affect ecosystem structure and function in the future. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  16. Correlation between earthworms and plant litter decomposition in a tropical wet forest of Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer Dechainea; Honghua Ruanb; Yaniria Sanchez-de Leon; Xiaoming Zou

    2005-01-01

    Earthworms are recognized to play an important role in the decomposition of organic materials. To test the use of earthworms as an indicator of plant litter decomposition, we examined the abundance and biomass of earthworms in relation to plant litter decomposition in a tropical wet forest of Puerto Rico. We collected earthworms at 0–0.1m and 0.1–0.25m soil depths from...

  17. Underwater photosynthesis of submerged plants - recent advances and methods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pedersen, Ole; Colmer, Timothy D; Sand-Jensen, Kaj

    2013-01-01

    We describe the general background and the recent advances in research on underwater photosynthesis of leaf segments, whole communities, and plant dominated aquatic ecosystems and present contemporary...

  18. Environmental factors and traits that drive plant litter decomposition do not determine home-field advantage effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, G.F.; Sundqvist, Maja K.; Wardle, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The ‘home-field advantage’ (HFA) hypothesis predicts that plant litter is decomposed faster than expected underneath the plant from which it originates (‘home’) than underneath other plants (‘away’), because decomposer communities are specialized to break down litter from the plants they associate

  19. Plant and litter influences on earthworm abundance and community structures in a tropical wet forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. Gonzalez; X. Zou

    1999-01-01

    Plant communities differ in species composition and litter input. To examine the influence of plant species on the abundance and community structure of soil fauna, we sampled earthworms in areas close to and away from the bases of Dacryodes excelsa and Heliconia caribaea, two distinct plant communities within a tropical wet forest in Puerto Rico. We also carried out a...

  20. Earthworms, arthropods and plant litter decomposition in aspen (Populus tremuloides) and lodgepole pine(Pinus contorta) forests in Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grizelle Gonzalez; Timothy R. Seastedt; Zugeily Donato

    2003-01-01

    We compared the abundance and community composition of earthworms, soil macroarthropods, and litter microarthropods to test faunal effects on plant litter decomposition rates in two forests in the subalpine in Colorado, USA. Litterbags containing recently senesced litter of Populus tremuloides (aspen) and Pinus contorta (lodgepole pine) were placed in aspen and pine...

  1. Some Sensitivity Studies of Chemical Transport Simulated in Models of the Soil-Plant-Litter System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begovich, C.L.

    2002-10-28

    Fifteen parameters in a set of five coupled models describing carbon, water, and chemical dynamics in the soil-plant-litter system were varied in a sensitivity analysis of model response. Results are presented for chemical distribution in the components of soil, plants, and litter along with selected responses of biomass, internal chemical transport (xylem and phloem pathways), and chemical uptake. Response and sensitivity coefficients are presented for up to 102 model outputs in an appendix. Two soil properties (chemical distribution coefficient and chemical solubility) and three plant properties (leaf chemical permeability, cuticle thickness, and root chemical conductivity) had the greatest influence on chemical transport in the soil-plant-litter system under the conditions examined. Pollutant gas uptake (SO{sub 2}) increased with change in plant properties that increased plant growth. Heavy metal dynamics in litter responded to plant properties (phloem resistance, respiration characteristics) which induced changes in the chemical cycling to the litter system. Some of the SO{sub 2} and heavy metal responses were not expected but became apparent through the modeling analysis.

  2. Development and validation of phytotoxicity tests with emergent and submerged aquatic plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, J.S. [Carolina Ecotox, Inc., Durham, NC (United States); Powell, R.L. [Monsanto Co., St. Louis, MO (United States); Nelson, M.K. [National Biological Service, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Toxicity testing procedures have recently been developed for assessment of contaminant effects on emergent and submerged aquatic macrophytes commonly found in freshwater wetlands. These tests have potential application in risk assessments for contaminated wetlands as well as for new chemical substances. The objective of this study was to evaluate and modify, if necessary, these methods and to validate them, using two benchmark chemicals, in a contract laboratory setting. Oryza sativa (domestic rice) was used as a surrogate emergent vascular plant, while Ceratophylium demersum (coontail) and Myriophyllum heterophyllum (variable-leaf milfoil) were the representative submerged vascular plants. Subsequent to evaluating culturing techniques and testing conditions, toxicity tests were conducted using boron and metribuzin. The test procedure for the emergent plants involves a two-week pro-exposure period followed by a two-week aqueous exposure. Five types of sediment, including both natural and artificial sediments, were evaluated for use with rice. Fresh weight and chlorophyll a content were the selected test endpoints. The submerged plants were exposed for two weeks, and the response variables evaluated included length, weight (fresh and dry), and root number. The sensitivity of these tests were comparable to the results obtained for the same two chemicals using the green alga, Selenastrum capricornutum, and the duckweed, Lemna gibba, with the exception that rice was less sensitive to metribuzin than the other species.

  3. Functional leaf attributes predict litter decomposition rate in herbaceous plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, J. H C; Thompson, K.

    1997-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that functional attributes of living leaves provide a basis for predicting the decomposition rate of leaf litter. The data were obtained from standardized screening tests on 38 British herbaceous species. Graminoid monocots had physically tougher leaves with higher silicon

  4. Seed weight and germination behavior of the submerged plant Potamogeton pectinatus in the arid zone of northwest China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Zhongqiang; Lu, Wei; Yang, Lei; Kong, Xianghong; Deng, Xuwei

    2015-01-01

    .... This study examined within‐species variation in seed weight and germination attributes and the effects of environmental factors on seed traits of the submerged plant P otamogeton pectinatus in the arid zone of northwest China...

  5. Species-specific effects of live roots and shoot litter on soil decomposer abundances do not forecast plant litter-nitrogen uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saj, Stéphane; Mikola, Juha; Ekelund, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    Plant species produce litter of varying quality and differ in the quality and quantity of compounds they release from live roots, which both can induce different decomposer growth in the soil. To test whether differences in decomposer growth can forecast the amount of N species acquire from plant...... microbes and their protozoan and nematode feeders, and to link decomposer growth and plant nutrient uptake, we measured the amount of N taken up by plants from the added litter. We hypothesised that those species that induce the highest growth of microbes, and especially that of microbial feeders......-specific ability of plants to induce decomposer growth....

  6. Side-effects of plant domestication: ecosystem impacts of changes in litter quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Palacios, Pablo; Milla, Rubén; Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel; Martín-Robles, Nieves; Alvaro-Sánchez, Mónica; Wall, Diana H

    2013-04-01

    Domestication took plants from natural environments to agro-ecosystems, where resources are generally plentiful and plant life is better buffered against environmental risks such as drought or pathogens. We hypothesized that predictions derived from the comparison of low vs high resource ecosystems (faster-growing plants promoting faster nutrient cycling in the latter) extrapolate to the process of domestication. We conducted the first comprehensive assessment of the consequences of domestication on litter quality and key biogeochemical processes by comparing 24 domesticated crops against their closest wild ancestors. Twelve litter chemistry traits, litter decomposability and indicators of soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling were assessed in each domesticated vs wild ancestor pair. These assessments were done in microbial-poor and microbial-rich soils to exemplify intensively and extensively managed agricultural soils, respectively. Plant domestication has increased litter quality, encouraging litter decomposability (36% and 44% increase in the microbial-rich and microbial-poor soils, respectively), higher soil NO3 - availability and lower soil C : N ratios. These effects held true for the majority of the crops surveyed and for soils with different microbial communities. Our results support ecological theory predictions derived from the comparison of low- and high-resource ecosystems, suggesting a parallelism between ecosystem-level impacts of natural and artificial selection. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Comparing chemistry and bioactivity of burned versus decomposed plant litter: different pathways but same result?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanomi, Giuliano; Incerti, Guido; Abd El-Gawad, Ahmed M; Cesarano, Gaspare; Sarker, Tushar C; Saulino, Luigi; Lanzotti, Virginia; Saracino, Antonio; Rego, Francisco C; Mazzoleni, Stefano

    2017-10-24

    Litter burning and biological decomposition are oxidative processes co-occurring in many terrestrial ecosystems, producing organic matter with different chemical properties and differently affecting plant growth and soil microbial activity. We tested the chemical convergence hypothesis i.e. materials with different initial chemistry converge towards a common profile, with similar biological effects, as the oxidative process advances, for burning and decomposition. We compared the molecular composition, assessed by (13) C NMR, of 7 plant litter types either fresh, decomposed for 30, 90, 180 days in a microcosms incubation experiment, or heated at 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 °C for thirty minutes. We used litter water extracts (5% dw) as treatments in bioassays on plant (Lepidium sativum) and fungal (Aspergillus niger) growth, and a washed quartz sand amended with litter (0.5% dw) to assess heterotrophic respiration by flux chamber (i.e. μg of CO2 released per g of added litter per day). We observed different molecular variations for materials either burning (i.e. a sharp increase of aromatic C and a decrease of other fractions above 200 °C) or decomposing (i.e. early increase of alkyl, methoxyl and N-alkyl C and decrease of O-alkyl and di-O-alkyl C fractions). Soil respiration and fungal growth decreased with litter age and heating severity, down to 20% relative to fresh litter. Plant was inhibited on fresh litter (on average 13% of the control), but recovered on aged (180 days) and heated (30 minutes at 500°C) materials, up to 126% and 63% of the control, respectively. Correlation between the intensity of (13) C NMR signals in litter spectra and bioassay results showed that O-alkyl, methoxyl, and aromatic C fractions are crucial to understand organic matter effects, with plant response negatively affected by labile C but positively associated to lignification and pyrogenic C. The pattern of association of soil respiration and fungal growth to these C fractions was

  8. Plant diversity does not buffer drought effects on early-stage litter mass loss rates and microbial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Anja; Eisenhauer, Nico; Weigelt, Alexandra; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Human activities are decreasing biodiversity and changing the climate worldwide. Both global change drivers have been shown to affect ecosystem functioning, but they may also act in concert in a non-additive way. We studied early-stage litter mass loss rates and soil microbial properties (basal respiration and microbial biomass) during the summer season in response to plant species richness and summer drought in a large grassland biodiversity experiment, the Jena Experiment, Germany. In line with our expectations, decreasing plant diversity and summer drought decreased litter mass loss rates and soil microbial properties. In contrast to our hypotheses, however, this was only true for mass loss of standard litter (wheat straw) used in all plots, and not for plant community-specific litter mass loss. We found no interactive effects between global change drivers, that is, drought reduced litter mass loss rates and soil microbial properties irrespective of plant diversity. High mass loss rates of plant community-specific litter and low responsiveness to drought relative to the standard litter indicate that soil microbial communities were adapted to decomposing community-specific plant litter material including lower susceptibility to dry conditions during summer months. Moreover, higher microbial enzymatic diversity at high plant diversity may have caused elevated mass loss of standard litter. Our results indicate that plant diversity loss and summer drought independently impede soil processes. However, soil decomposer communities may be highly adapted to decomposing plant community-specific litter material, even in situations of environmental stress. Results of standard litter mass loss moreover suggest that decomposer communities under diverse plant communities are able to cope with a greater variety of plant inputs possibly making them less responsive to biotic changes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Neotropical woodlice (isopoda colonizing leaf-litter of pioneer plants in a coal residue disposal environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Regina Podgaiski

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The irregular disposal of coal combustion residues has adverse impacts on terrestrial ecosystems. Pioneer plants and soil invertebrates play an important role in the recovery of these areas. The goal of this study was to investigate the colonization patterns of terrestrial isopods (Oniscidea in leaf litter of three spontaneous pioneer plants (grass - Poaceae, shrub - Euphorbiaceae, tree - Anarcadiaceae at sites used for fly ash or boiler slag disposal. The experiment consisted of eight blocks (four per disposal site of 12 litter bags each (four per plant species that were randomly removed after 6, 35, 70 or 140 days of field exposure. Three isopod species were found in the litter bags: Atlantoscia floridana (van Name, 1940 (Philosciidae; n = 116, Benthana taeniata Araujo & Buckup, 1994 (Philosciidae; n = 817 and Balloniscus sellowii (Brandt, 1833 (Balloniscidae; n = 48. The isopods colonized the three leaf-litter species equally during the exposure period. However, the pattern of leaf-litter colonization by these species suggests a conflict of objectives between high quality food and shelter availability. The occurrence of A. floridana and the abundance and fecundity of B. taeniata were influenced by the residue type, indicating that the isopods have different degrees of tolerance to the characteristics of the studied sites. Considering that terrestrial isopods are abundant detritivores and stimulate the humus-forming processes, it is suggested that they could have an indirect influence on the soil restoration of this area.

  10. Disparate effects of plant genotypic diversity on foliage and litter arthropod communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crutsinger, Greg [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Reynolds, Nicholas [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Classen, Aimee T [ORNL; Sanders, Dr. Nathan James [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2008-01-01

    Intraspecific diversity within plant species is increasingly recognized as an important influence on the structure of associated arthropod communities, though whether there are congruent responses of above- and belowground communities to intraspecific diversity remains unclear. In this study, we compare the effects of host-plant genotype and genotypic diversity of the perennial plant, Solidago altissima, on the arthropod community associated with living plant tissue (foliage-based community) and microarthropods associated with leaf litter (litter-based community). We found that variation among host-plant genotypes had strong effects on the diversity and composition of foliage-based arthropods, but only weak influence on litter-based microarthropods. Furthermore, host-plant genotypic diversity was positively related to the abundance and diversity of foliage-based arthropods, including herbivore and predator trophic levels. In contrast, there were minimal effects of genotypic diversity in litter on microarthropods. Our study illustrates that incorporating both above- and belowground perspective into community genetics studies leads to very different conclusions about the importance of intraspecific diversity, than when considering aboveground responses in isolation.

  11. Effects of snails, submerged plants and their coexistence on eutrophication in aquatic ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Shuqing

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Eutrophication resulting from nutrient loading to freshwater habitats is a severe problem, leading to degradation of ecosystems, including deterioration of water quality, water clarity and loss of biodiversity. Measures enacted to restore degraded freshwater ecosystems often involve the reintroduction of submerged plants and aquatic animals with beneficial ecological functions. In a mesocosm experiment, three treatments (planting with Vallisneria natans, introduction of the snail Bellamya aeruginosa and a combined treatment with both plants and snails were compared with controls to evaluate their effects on trophic state. The total nitrogen (TN, total phosphorus (TP and chlorophyll a (Chl a concentrations of planktonic and benthic algal samples were determined every two weeks, along with light intensity at the sediment surface. The plant-only treatment significantly reduced the TN levels and planktonic and benthic algal biomass and increased the light intensity at the sediment surface. The snail-only treatment reduced the concentrations of TN and reduced planktonic and benthic algal biomass. The combined treatment decreased the concentrations of TN and TP, reduced planktonic algal biomass and increased the light intensity on the sediment surface. The results indicate that while submerged plants and snails can both improve water quality, the most pronounced effect in aquatic ecosystems is achieved by their presence in combination. A combined reintroduction approach may provide enhanced benefits in restoring the eutrophic ecosystems, following the reduction of external nutrient loading.

  12. Plant recruitment in a northern Arizona ponderosa pine forest: Testing seed- and leaf litter-limitation hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott R. Abella

    2008-01-01

    Seed availability and leaf litter limit plant establishment in some ecosystems. To evaluate the hypothesis that these factors limit understory plant recruitment in Pinus ponderosa forests, I conducted a seeding and litter removal experiment at six thinned sites in the Fort Valley Experimental Forest, northern Arizona. Experimental seeding of four native species (

  13. Plant recruitment in a northern Arizona ponderosa pine forest: Testing seed- and leaf litter-limitation hypotheses (P-53)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott R. Abella

    2008-01-01

    Seed availability and leaf litter limit plant establishment in some ecosystems. To evaluate the hypothesis that these factors limit understory plant recruitment in Pinus ponderosa forests, I conducted a seeding and litter removal experiment at six thinned sites in the Fort Valley Experimental Forest, northern Arizona. Experimental seeding of four native species (...

  14. Arctic emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds – from plants, litter and soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Sarah Hagel

    Significant amounts of biogenic volatile organic compounds are emitted from terrestrial ecosystems. These emissions may influence the atmospheric chemistry and the climate. Climate warming will be most pronounced in the Arctic and this will likely have a large effect on the BVOC emissions from...... in adsorbent cartridges and analyzed using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Ecosystem BVOC emissions were highly dominated by terpenoids but the composition of terpenoids differed between different plant species. Litter emissions were less dominated by terpenoids than the ecosystem emissions, however...... they still constituted approximately 50 % of the total emissions. I suggested that the litter emissions derived both from microbial soil processes and from stores inside the litter tissue and that the relative importance of these two sources were plant species specific. Furthermore, emissions of non...

  15. Studies of Physcomitrella patens reveal that ethylene-mediated submergence responses arose relatively early in land-plant evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Yasumura, Yuki

    2012-10-18

    Colonization of the land by multicellular green plants was a fundamental step in the evolution of life on earth. Land plants evolved from fresh-water aquatic algae, and the transition to a terrestrial environment required the acquisition of developmental plasticity appropriate to the conditions of water availability, ranging from drought to flood. Here we show that extant bryophytes exhibit submergence-induced developmental plasticity, suggesting that submergence responses evolved relatively early in the evolution of land plants. We also show that a major component of the bryophyte submergence response is controlled by the phytohormone ethylene, using a perception mechanism that has subsequently been conserved throughout the evolution of land plants. Thus a plant environmental response mechanism with major ecological and agricultural importance probably had its origins in the very earliest stages of the colonization of the land. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Adsorption of Arsenite by Six Submerged Plants from Nansi Lake, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nansi Lake is the largest and the most important freshwater lake in north China for the South-North Water Transfer Project. Due to long-time and large-scale fish farming of history, the excess fish food and excretion usually release pentavalent arsenic, which is converted into trivalent arsenic (As (III in the lake sediment and released into lake water. Adsorption of arsenite using six submerged plants (Mimulicalyx rosulatus, Potamogeton maackianus, Hydrilla, Watermifoil, Pteris vittata, and Potamogeton crispus as adsorbing materials was investigated. The experimental data obtained have been analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models and the pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion kinetics models. According to the results, the As (III equilibrium data agreed well with the Freundlich isotherm model. The adsorption capacity of the plants was in the following order: Potamogeton crispus > Pteris vittata > Potamogeton maackianus > Mimulicalyx rosulatus > Hydrilla > Watermifoil. The sorption system with the six submerged plants was better described by pseudo-second-order than by first-order kinetics. Moreover, the adsorption with Potamogeton crispus could follow intraparticle diffusion (IPD model. The initial adsorption and rate of IPD using Potamogeton crispus and Pteris vittata were higher than those using other plants studied.

  17. Microbial plant litter decomposition in aquatic and terrestrial boreal systems along a natural fertility gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, A. Margarida P. M.; Kritzberg, Emma S.; Rousk, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    Plant litter decomposition is a global ecosystem process, with a crucial role in carbon and nutrient cycling. The majority of litter processing occurs in terrestrial systems, but an important fraction also takes place in inland waters. Among environmental factors, pH impacts the litter decomposition through its selective influence on microbial decomposers. Fungal communities are less affected by pH than bacteria, possibly owing to a wider pH tolerance by this group. On the other hand, bacterial pH optima are constrained to a narrower range of pH values. The microbial decomposition of litter is universally nutrient limited; but few comparisons exist between terrestrial and aquatic systems. We investigated the microbial colonisation and decomposition of plant litter along a fertility gradient, which varied in both pH and N availability in both soil and adjacent water. To do this we installed litterbags with birch (Betula pendula) in streams and corresponding soils in adjacent riparian areas in a boreal system, in Krycklan, Sweden. During the four months covering the ice-free growth season we monitored the successional dynamics of fungal (acetate incorporation into ergosterol) and bacterial growth (thymidine incorporation), microbial respiration in leaf litter, and quantitative and qualitative changes in litter over time. We observed that bacterial growth rates were initially higher in litter decomposing in streams than those in soils, but differences between terrestrial and aquatic bacterial production converged towards the end of the experiment. In litter bags installed in soils, bacterial growth was lower at sites with more acidic pH and lower N availability, while aquatic bacteria were relatively unaffected by the fertility level. Fungal growth rates were two-fold higher for litter decomposing in streams than in soils. In aquatic systems, fungal growth was initially lower in low fertility sites, but differences gradually disappeared over the time course. Fungal

  18. Hyperspectral remote sensing tools for quantifying plant litter and invasive species in arid ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagler, Pamela L.; Sridhar, B.B. Maruthi; Olsson, Aaryn Dyami; Glenn, Edward P.; van Leeuwen, Willem J.D.; Thenkabail, Prasad S.; Huete, Alfredo; Lyon, John G.

    2012-01-01

    Green vegetation can be distinguished using visible and infrared multi-band and hyperspectral remote sensing methods. The problem has been in identifying and distinguishing the non-photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) landscape components, such as litter and soils, and from green vegetation. Additionally, distinguishing different species of green vegetation is challenging using the relatively few bands available on most satellite sensors. This chapter focuses on hyperspectral remote sensing characteristics that aim to distinguish between green vegetation, soil, and litter (or senescent vegetation). Quantifying litter by remote sensing methods is important in constructing carbon budgets of natural and agricultural ecosystems. Distinguishing between plant types is important in tracking the spread of invasive species. Green leaves of different species usually have similar spectra, making it difficult to distinguish between species. However, in this chapter we show that phenological differences between species can be used to detect some invasive species by their distinct patterns of greening and dormancy over an annual cycle based on hyperspectral data. Both applications require methods to quantify the non-green cellulosic fractions of plant tissues by remote sensing even in the presence of soil and green plant cover. We explore these methods and offer three case studies. The first concerns distinguishing surface litter from soil using the Cellulose Absorption Index (CAI), as applied to no-till farming practices where plant litter is left on the soil after harvest. The second involves using different band combinations to distinguish invasive saltcedar from agricultural and native riparian plants on the Lower Colorado River. The third illustrates the use of the CAI and NDVI in time-series analyses to distinguish between invasive buffelgrass and native plants in a desert environment in Arizona. Together the results show how hyperspectral imagery can be applied to

  19. Modeling complex flow structures and drag around a submerged plant of varied posture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothroyd, Richard J.; Hardy, Richard J.; Warburton, Jeff; Marjoribanks, Timothy I.

    2017-04-01

    Although vegetation is present in many rivers, the bulk of past work concerned with modeling the influence of vegetation on flow has considered vegetation to be morphologically simple and has generally neglected the complexity of natural plants. Here we report on a combined flume and numerical model experiment which incorporates time-averaged plant posture, collected through terrestrial laser scanning, into a computational fluid dynamics model to predict flow around a submerged riparian plant. For three depth-limited flow conditions (Reynolds number = 65,000-110,000), plant dynamics were recorded through high-definition video imagery, and the numerical model was validated against flow velocities collected with an acoustic Doppler velocimeter. The plant morphology shows an 18% reduction in plant height and a 14% increase in plant length, compressing and reducing the volumetric canopy morphology as the Reynolds number increases. Plant shear layer turbulence is dominated by Kelvin-Helmholtz type vortices generated through shear instability, the frequency of which is estimated to be between 0.20 and 0.30 Hz, increasing with Reynolds number. These results demonstrate the significant effect that the complex morphology of natural plants has on in-stream drag, and allow a physically determined, species-dependent drag coefficient to be calculated. Given the importance of vegetation in river corridor management, the approach developed here demonstrates the necessity to account for plant motion when calculating vegetative resistance.

  20. Mn accumulation in a submerged plant Egeria densa (Hydrocharitaceae) is mediated by epiphytic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Kousuke; Asayama, Takuma; Shiraki, Nozomi; Inoue, Shota; Okuda, Erina; Hayashi, Chizuru; Nishida, Kazuma; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Harada, Emiko

    2017-07-01

    Many aquatic plants act as biosorbents, removing and recovering metals from the environment. To assess the biosorbent activity of Egeria densa, a submerged freshwater macrophyte, plants were collected monthly from a circular drainage area in Lake Biwa basin and the Mn concentrations of the plants were analysed. Mn concentrations in these plants were generally above those of terrestrial hyperaccumulators, and were markedly higher in spring and summer than in autumn. Mn concentrations were much lower in plants incubated in hydroponic medium at various pH levels with and without Mn supplementation than in field-collected plants. The precipitation of Mn oxides on the leaves was determined by variable pressure scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray analysis and Leucoberbelin blue staining. Several strains of epiphytic bacteria were isolated from the field-collected E. densa plants, with many of these strains, including those of the genera Acidovorax, Comamonas, Pseudomonas and Rhizobium, found to have Mn-oxidizing activity. High Mn concentrations in E. densa were mediated by the production of biogenic Mn oxide in biofilms on leaf surfaces. These findings provide new insights into plant epidermal bacterial flora that affect metal accumulation in plants and suggest that these aquatic plants may have use in Mn phytomining. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Degradation and metabolism of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) in submerged soil and soil-plant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Feifei; Kolvenbach, Boris Alexander; Nastold, Peter; Jiang, Bingqi; Ji, Rong; Corvini, Philippe Francois-Xavier

    2014-12-16

    Contamination by tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), the most widely used brominated flame retardant, is a matter of environmental concern. Here, we investigated the fate and metabolites of (14)C-TBBPA in a submerged soil with an anoxic-oxic interface and planted or not with rice (Oryza sativa) and reed (Phragmites australis) seedlings. In unplanted soil, TBBPA dissipation (half-life 20.8 days) was accompanied by mineralization (11.5% of initial TBBPA) and the substantial formation (60.8%) of bound residues. Twelve metabolites (10 in unplanted soil and 7 in planted soil) were formed via four interconnected pathways: oxidative skeletal cleavage, O-methylation, type II ipso-substitution, and reductive debromination. The presence of the seedlings strongly reduced (14)C-TBBPA mineralization and bound-residue formation and stimulated debromination and O-methylation. Considerable radioactivity accumulated in rice (21.3%) and reed (33.1%) seedlings, mainly on or in the roots. While TBBPA dissipation was hardly affected by the rice seedlings, it was strongly enhanced by the reed seedlings, greatly reducing the half-life (11.4 days) and increasing monomethyl TBBPA formation (11.3%). The impact of the interconnected aerobic and anaerobic transformation of TBBPA and wetland plants on the profile and dynamics of the metabolites should be considered in phytoremediation strategies and environmental risk assessments of TBBPA in submerged soils.

  2. Effect of biotic lignin decomposition on the fate of radiocesium-contaminated plant litter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashida, Shin-nosuke; Yoshihara, Toshihiro [Environmental Science Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Abiko 1646, Abiko-shi, Chiba (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Fungi are the most important components in the fate of radionuclides deposited in forests following the Fukushima nuclear accident. Pruned woody parts and litter contain a considerable amount of radiocesium. Studies that focused on the migration of radiocesium have demonstrated that its ecological half-life is lower in the humus layer than in the deeper soil zone, suggesting a substantial contribution of litter decomposition on the mobilization of radiocesium. Furthermore, white-rot fungi appear to play a key role in the mobilization of radiocesium because they are the primary source of enzymes necessary to degrade the litter organic matter. Cell walls are the primary component of plant litter; they are composed of cellulose, hemi-cellulose, and lignin. Although cellulose is the most abundant organic compound in litter, the strength of the cell wall is limited by rigid hemi-cellulose complexes that protect the surrounding cellulose microfibrils. In the cell wall, lignin fills the spaces between cellulose and hemi-cellulose; thus, the biotic degradation of lignin could be considered a primary step in litter decomposition. The contribution of the amount of lignin on the fate of radiocesium has not been identified, which limits the possibility of predicting the effect of the bacterial community structure that determines the biodegradation activity of lignin on the vertical migration of radiocesium. Here, we directly addressed the role of lignin as controller of the distribution of radiocesium in soil-ecosystems. Radiocesium-contaminated litter samples were collected with traps set under the target stands, i.e., Japanese flowering cherry trees (Prunus x yedoensis cv. Somei-Yoshino) and Japanese cedars (Cryptomeria japonica) at Abiko (Laboratory of Environmental Science, CRIEPI) located approximately 200 km SSW from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in 2011. The litter samples were inoculated with white-rot fungi having ligno-celluloses-degrading activity, i

  3. Decomposition of plant litter in Pacific coast tidal marshes, 2014-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janousek, Christopher; Buffington, Kevin J.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Thorne, Karen M.; Dugger, Bruce D.; Takekawa, John Y.

    2017-01-01

    Decomposition of plant matter is one of the key processes affecting carbon cycling and storage in tidal wetlands. In this study, we evaluated the effects of factors related to climate change (temperature, inundation) and vegetation composition on rates of litter decay in seven tidal marsh sites along the Pacific coast. In 2014 we conducted manipulative experiments to test inundation effects on litter decay at Siletz Bay, OR and Petaluma marsh, CA. In 2015 we studied decay of litter in high and low elevation marshes at seven Pacific coast sites.These data support the following publication: Janousek, C.N., Buffington, K.J., Guntenspergen, G.R. et al. Ecosystems (2017). doi:10.1007/s10021-017-0111-6. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10021-017-0111-6

  4. Low Nitrogen Retention in Soil and Litter under Conditions without Plants in a Subtropical Pine Plantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmei Xiong

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil acts as a major sink for added nitrogen (N in forests, but it remains unclear about the capacity of soil to immobilize N under conditions without plant roots and whether added N interacts with ecosystem N to affect N retention. We added 15NH415NO3 to in situ soil columns (with leaching and leaf litter (without leaching of two tree species in a subtropical Pinus elliottii plantation. Soil and litter were collected three or eight months after N addition to measure concentrations of indigenous and exogenous N. About 70% of exogenous N was retained in soil three months after N addition, of which 65.9% were in inorganic forms. Eight months after N addition, 16.0% of exogenous N was retained in soil and 9.8%–13.6% was immobilized in litter. N addition increased the mineral release and nitrification of soil indigenous N. Loss of litter indigenous N was also increased by N addition. Our results suggest that N deposition on lands with low root activities or low soil carbon (C contents may lead to increased N output due to low N immobilization. Moreover, the effects of added N on ecosystem indigenous N may decrease the capacity of soil and litter in N retention.

  5. Saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima Invasion Alters Decomposer Fauna and Plant Litter Decomposition in a Temperate Xerophytic Deciduous Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Camilo Bedano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant invasions may alter the soil system by changing litter quality and quantity, thereby affecting soil community and ecosystem processes. We investigated the effect of Tamarix ramosissima invasion on the decomposer fauna and litter decomposition process, as well as the importance of litter quality in decomposition. Litter decomposition and decomposer communities were evaluated in two monospecific saltcedar forests and two native forests in Argentina, in litterbags containing either local litter (saltcedar or dominant native species or a control litter. Saltcedar invasion produced an increase in Collembola, Acari, and total mesofauna abundance, regardless of the litter type. Control litter decomposition was higher in the native forest than in the saltcedar forest, showing that increased abundance of decomposer fauna does not necessarily accelerate decomposition processes. Local litter decomposition was not different between forests, suggesting that decomposer fauna of both ecosystems is adapted to efficiently decompose the autochthonous litter. Our results suggest that the introduction of a resource with higher quality than the local one has a negative effect on decomposition in both ecosystems, which is more pronounced in the invaded forest than in the native forest. This finding stresses the low plasticity of saltcedar decomposer community to adapt to short-term environmental changes.

  6. Global relationship of wood and leaf litter decomposability: the role of functional traits within and across plant organs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pietsch, K.A.; Ogle, K.; Cornelissen, J.H.C.; Cornwell, W.K.; Bönisch, G.; Craine, J.M.; Jackson, B.G.; Kattge, J.; Peltzer, D.A.; Penuelas, J.; Reich, P.B.; Wardle, D.A.; Weedon, J.T.; Wright, I.J.; Zanne, A.E.; Wirth, C.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Recent meta-analyses have revealed that plant traits and their phylogenetic history influence decay rates of dead wood and leaf litter, but it remains unknown if decay rates of wood and litter covary over a wide range of tree species and across ecosystems. We evaluated the relationships between

  7. Multiple mitigation mechanisms: Effects of submerged plants on the toxicity of nine insecticides to aquatic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, William R; Relyea, Rick A

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the processes that regulate contaminant impacts in nature is an increasingly important challenge. For insecticides in surface waters, the ability of aquatic plants to sorb, or bind, hydrophobic compounds has been identified as a primary mechanism by which toxicity can be mitigated (i.e. the sorption-based model). However, recent research shows that submerged plants can also rapidly mitigate the toxicity of the less hydrophobic insecticide malathion via alkaline hydrolysis (i.e. the hydrolysis-based model) driven by increased water pH resulting from photosynthesis. However, it is still unknown how generalizable these mitigation mechanisms are across the wide variety of insecticides applied today, and whether any general rules can be ascertained about which types of chemicals may be mitigated by each mechanism. We quantified the degree to which the submerged plant Elodea canadensis mitigated acute (48-h) toxicity to Daphnia magna using nine commonly applied insecticides spanning three chemical classes (carbamates: aldicarb, carbaryl, carbofuran; organophosphates: malathion, diazinon, chlorpyrifos; pyrethroids: permethrin, bifenthrin, lambda-cyhalothrin). We found that insecticides possessing either high octanol-water partition coefficients (log K ow ) values (i.e. pyrethroids) or high susceptibility to alkaline hydrolysis (i.e. carbamates and malathion) were all mitigated to some degree by E. canadensis, while the plant had no effect on insecticides possessing intermediate log K ow values and low susceptibility to hydrolysis (i.e. chlorpyrifos and diazinon). Our results provide the first general insights into which types of insecticides are likely to be mitigated by different mechanisms based on known chemical properties. We suggest that current models and mitigation strategies would be improved by the consideration of both mitigation models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Chromium accumulation in submerged aquatic plants treated with tannery effluent at Kanpur, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kiran; Gaumat, Sumati; Mishra, Kumkum

    2011-09-01

    Aquatic macrophytes have been widely studied because of their capability of absorbing contaminants from water and their subsequent use in biomonitoring. This study presents a comparison of Cr accumulating potential of submerged aquatic plants viz Vallisneria spiralis and Hydrilla verticillata. These plants were treated with various concentrations of treated tannery effluent collected from UASB, Jajmau, Kanpur under repeated exposure in controlled laboratory conditions in order to assess their maximum bioaccumulation potential. The maximum accumulation of 385.6 and 201.6 microg g(-1) dry weight was found in roots of V. spiralis and the whole plants of H. verticillata, respectively at 100% concentration after 9th day of effluent exposure. The chlorophyll and protein content of both species decreased with increase in effluent concentration and duration. At highest concentration and duration a maximum reduction of 67.4 and 62.66% in total chlorophyll content, 9.97 and 4.66% in carotenoid content and 62.66 and 59.36% in protein content was found in V. spiralis and H. verticillata respectively. Anatomical studies in both V. spiralis and H. verticillata was carried out to assess the effects of metal accumulation within the plants. Changes in the anatomical structures of both plants exhibits the capacity of these species to act as indicator of effluent toxicity. The high accumulation potential of Cr by both plants revealed their capability to remove pollutants from effluent.

  9. Evaluation of the Environmental DNA Method for Estimating Distribution and Biomass of Submerged Aquatic Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuhashi, Saeko; Doi, Hideyuki; Fujiwara, Ayaka; Watanabe, Sonoko; Minamoto, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    The environmental DNA (eDNA) method has increasingly been recognized as a powerful tool for monitoring aquatic animal species; however, its application for monitoring aquatic plants is limited. To evaluate eDNA analysis for estimating the distribution of aquatic plants, we compared its estimated distributions with eDNA analysis, visual observation, and past distribution records for the submerged species Hydrilla verticillata. Moreover, we conducted aquarium experiments using H. verticillata and Egeria densa and analyzed the relationships between eDNA concentrations and plant biomass to investigate the potential for biomass estimation. The occurrences estimated by eDNA analysis closely corresponded to past distribution records, and eDNA detections were more frequent than visual observations, indicating that the method is potentially more sensitive. The results of the aquarium experiments showed a positive relationship between plant biomass and eDNA concentration; however, the relationship was not always significant. The eDNA concentration peaked within three days of the start of the experiment in most cases, suggesting that plants do not release constant amounts of DNA. These results showed that eDNA analysis can be used for distribution surveys, and has the potential to estimate the biomass of aquatic plants.

  10. Growth and physiological responses of submerged plant Vallisneria natans to water column ammonia nitrogen and sediment copper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengjie Zhu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. The decline of submerged plant populations due to high heavy metal (e.g., Cu levels in sediments and ammonia nitrogen (ammonia-N accumulation in the freshwater column has become a significant global problem. Previous studies have evaluated the effect of ammonia-N on submerged macrophytes, but few have focused on the influence of sediment Cu on submerged macrophytes and their combined effects. Methods. In this paper, we selected three levels of ammonia-N (0, 3, and 6 mg L−1 and sediment Cu (25.75 ± 6.02 as the control, 125.75 ± 6.02, and 225.75 ± 6.02 mg kg−1, to investigate the influence of sediment Cu and ammonia-N on submerged Vallisneria natans. We measured the relative growth rate (RGR, above- and below- ground biomass, chlorophyll, non-protein thiol (NP-SH, and free proline. Results and Discussion. The below-ground biomass of V. natans decreased with increasing Cu sediment levels, suggesting that excessive sediment Cu can result in significant damage to the root of V. natans. Similarly, the above-ground biomass significantly decreased with increasing ammonia-N concentrations, indicating that excessive water ammonia-N can cause significant toxicity to the leaf of V. natans. In addition, high ammonia-N levels place a greater stress on submerged plants than sediment Cu, which is indicated by the decline of RGR and chlorophyll, and the increase of (NP-SH and free proline. Furthermore, high sediment Cu causes ammonia-N to impose greater injury on submerged plants, and higher sediment Cu levels (Cu ≥ 125.75 mg kg−1 led to the tolerant values of ammonia-N for V. natans decreasing from 6 to 3 mg L−1. This study suggests that high sediment Cu restricts the growth of plants and intensifies ammonia-N damage to V. natans.

  11. Will rising atmospheric CO2affect leaf litter quality and in situ decomposition rates in native plant communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschel, G; Körner, C; Arnone Iii, J A

    1997-04-01

    Though field data for naturally senesced leaf litter are rare, it is commonly assumed that rising atmospheric CO 2 concentrations will reduce leaf litter quality and decomposition rates in terrestrial ecosystems and that this will lead to decreased rates of nutrient cycling and increased carbon sequestration in native ecosystems. We generally found that the quality of␣naturally senesced leaf litter (i.e. concentrations of C, N and lignin; C:N, lignin:N) of a variety of native plant species produced in alpine, temperate and tropical communities maintained at elevated CO 2 (600-680 μl l -1 ) was not significantly different from that produced in similar communities maintained at current ambient CO 2 concentrations (340-355 μl l -1 ). When this litter was allowed to decompose in situ in a humid tropical forest in Panama (Cecropia peltata, Elettaria cardamomum, and Ficus benjamina, 130 days exposure) and in a lowland temperate calcareous grassland in Switzerland (Carex flacca and a graminoid species mixture; 261 days exposure), decomposition rates of litter produced under ambient and elevated CO 2 did not differ significantly. The one exception to this pattern occurred in the high alpine sedge, Carex curvula, growing in the Swiss Alps. Decomposition of litter produced in situ under elevated CO 2 was significantly slower than that of litter produced under ambient CO 2 (14% vs. 21% of the initial litter mass had decomposed over a 61-day exposure period, respectively). Overall, our results indicate that relatively little or no change in leaf litter quality can be expected in plant communities growing under soil fertilities common in many native ecosystems as atmospheric CO 2 concentrations continue to rise. Even in situations where small reductions in litter quality do occur, these may not necessarily lead to significantly slower rates of decomposition. Hence in many native species in situ litter decomposition rates, and the time course of decomposition, may

  12. Data on litter quality of host grass plants with and without fungal endophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.E. Gundel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Certain Pooideae species form persistent symbiosis with fungal endophytes of Epichloë genus. Although endophytes are known to impact the ecology and evolution of host species, their effects on parameters related with quality of plant biomass has been elusive. This article provides information about parameters related with the quality of plant litter biomass of two important grass species (Schedonorus phoenix and Schedonorus pratensis affected by the symbiosis with fungal endophytes (Epichloë coenophiala and Epichloë uncinata, respectively. Four population origins of S. phoenix and one of S. pratensis were included. Mineral, biochemical and structural parameters were obtained from three samples per factors combination [species (and population origin×endophyte]. This data can be potentially used in other studies which, by means of ‘data reanalyzing’ or meta-analysis, attempt to find generalizations about endophyte effects on host plant litter biomass. The present data is associated with the research article “Role of foliar fungal endophytes on litter decomposition among species and population origins” (Gundel et al., In preparation [1].

  13. Biosorption of arsenic in drinking water by submerged plant: Hydrilla verticilata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Shubha; Gopal, Krishna; Vankar, Padma S

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the biosorption efficacy of submerged aquatic plant Hydrilla verticilata for arsenic uptake from drinking water. H. verticillata, a submerged aquatic plant was utilized successfully for arsenic uptake from aqueous solution. Batch studies with various parameters viz. pH, sorbent dose, contact time, initial metal ion concentration, and temperature were carried out. Data were utilized to plot Lagergren graph along with pseudo-second-order graphs for kinetic studies to estimate the removal efficacy and to determine the nature of reaction. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) have been performed for characterization of metals on biomass. The study showed 96.35 % maximum absorption of arsenic by H. verticilata at initial concentration of 100 ppb with 0.5 g of biomass/100 ml for 5 h contact time at pH 6.0 with 150 rpm agitation rate. Data followed Langmuir isotherm showing sorption to be monolayer on homogeneous surface of biosorbent. The negative values of ΔG° indicated spontaneous nature; whereas ΔH° indicates exothermic nature of system and negative value of ∆S° entropy change correspond to a decrease in the degree of freedom to the adsorbed species followed by pseudo-second-order adsorption kinetics. FTIR and SEM results showed apparent changes in functional group regions after metal chelation and the changes in surface morphology of biosorbent. This is a comparatively more effective, economic, easily available, and environmentally safe source for arsenic uptake from solution due to its high biosorption efficacy than other biosorbents already used.

  14. Temperature effect on mineralization of SOM, plant litter and priming: modified by soil type?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzaroli Bleken, Marina; Berland Frøseth, Randi

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide improved temperature response functions to be used in models of soil organic carbon (SOC) and litter mineralization, with focus on the winter period. Our working hypothesis were: 1) decomposition of SOM and plant residue occurs also at temperature close to the freezing point; 2) the effect of temperature on SOC decomposition is stronger in clayey than in sandy soil; 3) decomposition and response to temperature of added plant litter is not affected by soil type. A silty clay loam (27% clay, 3% sand) and a sandy loam (6% clay, 51% sand) with similar weather and cultivation history were pre-incubated at about 15° C for about 4.5 months. Clover leaves labelled with 13C were added to half of the samples, and soil with and without clover was incubated for 142 days at 0, 4, 8.5 or 15 °C. Mineralization of SOC and clover leaves was observed also at 0° C. In the absence of added plant material, SOC decomposition followed a first order reaction which was twice as fast in the sandy soil as in the clay soil. The decomposition rate of clover leaves was also higher in the sandy soil than in the clay soil. However, the influence of temperature on SOC and on clover decomposition was the same in both soils. In presence of plant material, there was a positive priming effect on SOC, which initially correlated with decomposition of plant litter. There was a progressively lower priming effect at higher temperatures, particularly in the sandy soil, that could be understood as substrates exhaustion in a restricted volume of influence around the added clover leaves. We provide parameterised Arrhenius and alternative modifying linear temperature functions together with decay rates at reference temperature, which can be used for predicting decay rates of SOC per se and of the labile pool of clover leaves. We also show the superiority of these functions compared to the use of Q10 as temperature factor. Further, we suggest approaches for modelling

  15. Non-Additive effects on decomposition from mixing litter of the invasive Mikania micrantha H.B.K. with native plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Ming Chen

    Full Text Available A common hypothesis to explain the effect of litter mixing is based on the difference in litter N content between mixed species. Although many studies have shown that litter of invasive non-native plants typically has higher N content than that of native plants in the communities they invade, there has been surprisingly little study of mixing effects during plant invasions. We address this question in south China where Mikania micrantha H.B.K., a non-native vine, with high litter N content, has invaded many forested ecosystems. We were specifically interested in whether this invader accelerated decomposition and how the strength of the litter mixing effect changes with the degree of invasion and over time during litter decomposition. Using litterbags, we evaluated the effect of mixing litter of M. micrantha with the litter of 7 native resident plants, at 3 ratios: M1 (1∶4, = exotic:native litter, M2 (1∶1 and M3 (4∶1, = exotic:native litter over three incubation periods. We compared mixed litter with unmixed litter of the native species to identify if a non-additive effect of mixing litter existed. We found that there were positive significant non-additive effects of litter mixing on both mass loss and nutrient release. These effects changed with native species identity, mixture ratio and decay times. Overall the greatest accelerations of mixture decay and N release tended to be in the highest degree of invasion (mix ratio M3 and during the middle and final measured stages of decomposition. Contrary to expectations, the initial difference in litter N did not explain species differences in the effect of mixing but overall it appears that invasion by M. micrantha is accelerating the decomposition of native species litter. This effect on a fundamental ecosystem process could contribute to higher rates of nutrient turnover in invaded ecosystems.

  16. A Greener Arctic: Vascular Plant Litter Input in Subarctic Peat Bogs Changes Soil Invertebrate Diets and Decomposition Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krab, E. J.; Berg, M. P.; Aerts, R.; van Logtestijn, R. S. P.; Cornelissen, H. H. C.

    2014-12-01

    Climate-change-induced trends towards shrub dominance in subarctic, moss-dominated peatlands will most likely have large effects on soil carbon (C) dynamics through an input of more easily decomposable litter. The mechanisms by which this increase in vascular litter input interacts with the abundance and diet-choice of the decomposer community to alter C-processing have, however, not yet been unraveled. We used a novel 13C tracer approach to link invertebrate species composition (Collembola), abundance and species-specific feeding behavior to C-processing of vascular and peat moss litters. We incubated different litter mixtures, 100% Sphagnum moss litter, 100% Betula leaf litter, and a 50/50 mixture of both, in mesocosms for 406 days. We revealed the transfer of C from the litters to the soil invertebrate species by 13C labeling of each of the litter types and assessed 13C signatures of the invertebrates Collembola species composition differed significantly between Sphagnum and Betula litter. Within the 'single type litter' mesocosms, Collembola species showed different 13C signatures, implying species-specific differences in diet choice. Surprisingly, the species composition and Collembola abundance changed relatively little as a consequence of Betula input to a Sphagnum based system. Their diet choice, however, changed drastically; species-specific differences in diet choice disappeared and approximately 67% of the food ingested by all Collembola originated from Betula litter. Furthermore, litter decomposition patterns corresponded to these findings; mass loss of Betula increased from 16.1% to 26.2% when decomposing in combination with Sphagnum, while Sphagnum decomposed even slower in combination with Betula litter (1.9%) than alone (4.7%). This study is the first to empirically show that collective diet shifts of the peatland decomposer community from mosses towards vascular plant litter may drive altered decomposition patterns. In addition, we showed that

  17. Swan foraging shapes spatial distribution of two submerged plants, favouring the preferred prey species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandsten, Håkan; Klaassen, Marcel

    2008-06-01

    Compared to terrestrial environments, grazing intensity on belowground plant parts may be particularly strong in aquatic environments, which may have great effects on plant-community structure. We observed that the submerged macrophyte, Potamogeton pectinatus, which mainly reproduces with tubers, often grows at intermediate water depth and that P. perfoliatus, which mainly reproduces with rhizomes and turions, grows in either shallow or deep water. One mechanism behind this distributional pattern may be that swans prefer to feed on P. pectinatus tubers at intermediate water depths. We hypothesised that when swans feed on tubers in the sediment, P. perfoliatus rhizomes and turions may be damaged by the uprooting, whereas the small round tubers of P. pectinatus that escaped herbivory may be more tolerant to this bioturbation. In spring 2000, we transplanted P. perfoliatus rhizomes into a P. pectinatus stand and followed growth in plots protected and unprotected, respectively, from bird foraging. Although swan foraging reduced tuber biomass in unprotected plots, leading to lower P. pectinatus density in spring 2001, this species grew well both in protected and unprotected plots later that summer. In contrast, swan grazing had a dramatic negative effect on P. perfoliatus that persisted throughout the summer of 2001, with close to no plants in the unprotected plots and high densities in the protected plots. Our results demonstrate that herbivorous waterbirds may play a crucial role in the distribution and prevalence of specific plant species. Furthermore, since their grazing benefitted their preferred food source, the interaction between swans and P. pectinatus may be classified as ecologically mutualistic.

  18. Plant litter chemistry and microbial priming regulate the accrual, composition and stability of soil carbon in invaded ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Mioko; Tharayil, Nishanth

    2014-07-01

    Soil carbon (C) sequestration, as an ecosystem property, may be strongly influenced by invasive plants capable of depositing disproportionately high quantities of chemically distinct litter that disrupt ecosystem processes. However, a mechanistic understanding of the processes that regulate soil C storage in invaded ecosystems remains surprisingly elusive. Here, we studied the impact of the invasion of two noxious nonnative species, Polygonum cuspidatum, which produces recalcitrant litter, and Pueraria lobata, which produces labile litter, on the quantity, molecular composition, and stability of C in the soils they invade. Compared with an adjacent noninvaded old-field, P. cuspidatum-invaded soils exhibited a 26% increase in C, partially through selective preservation of plant polymers. Despite receiving a 22% higher litter input, P. lobata-invaded Pinus stands exhibited a 28% decrease in soil C and a twofold decrease in plant biomarkers, indicating microbial priming of native soil C. The stability of C exhibited an opposite trend: the proportion of C that was resistant to oxidation was 21% lower in P. cuspidatum-invaded soils and 50% higher in P. lobata-invaded soils. Our results highlight the capacity of invasive plants to feed back to climate change by destabilizing native soil C stocks and indicate that environments that promote the biochemical decomposition of plant litter would enhance the long-term storage of soil C. Further, our study highlights the concurrent influence of dominant plant species on both selective preservation and humification of soil organic matter. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. There's no place like home? An exploration of the mechanisms behind plant litter-decomposer affinity in terrestrial ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Amy T; Vivanco, Lucía; González-Arzac, Adelia; Pérez, Luis I

    2014-08-08

    Litter decomposition in terrestrial ecosystems is an important first step for carbon and nutrient cycling, as senescent plant material is degraded and consequently incorporated, along with microbial products, into soil organic matter. The identification of litter affinity effects, whereby decomposition is accelerated in its home environment (home-field advantage, HFA), highlights the importance of plant-soil interactions that have consequences for biogeochemical cycling. While not universal, these affinity effects have been identified in a range of ecosystems, particularly in forests without disturbance. The optimization of the local decomposer community to degrade a particular combination of litter traits is the most oft-cited explanation for HFA effects, but the ways in which this specialized community can develop are only beginning to be understood. We explore ways in which HFA, or more broadly litter affinity effects, could arise in terrestrial ecosystems. Plant-herbivore interactions, microbial symbiosis, legacies from phyllosphere communities and attractors of specific soil fauna could contribute to spatially defined affinity effects for litter decomposition. Pyrosequencing soil communities and functional linkages of soil fauna provide great promise in advancing our mechanistic understanding of these interactions, and could lead to a greater appreciation of the role of litter-decomposer affinity in the maintenance of soil functional diversity. © 2014 The Authors New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Impact of Temperature and Nutrients on Carbon: Nutrient Tissue Stoichiometry of Submerged Aquatic Plants: An Experiment and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velthuis, Mandy; van Deelen, Emma; van Donk, Ellen; Zhang, Peiyu; Bakker, Elisabeth S

    2017-01-01

    Human activity is currently changing our environment rapidly, with predicted temperature increases of 1-5°C over the coming century and increased nitrogen and phosphorus inputs in aquatic ecosystems. In the shallow parts of these ecosystems, submerged aquatic plants enhance water clarity by resource competition with phytoplankton, provide habitat, and serve as a food source for other organisms. The carbon:nutrient stoichiometry of submerged aquatic plants can be affected by changes in both temperature and nutrient availability. We hypothesized that elevated temperature leads to higher carbon:nutrient ratios through enhanced nutrient-use efficiency, while nutrient addition leads to lower carbon:nutrient ratios by the luxurious uptake of nutrients. We addressed these hypotheses with an experimental and a meta-analytical approach. We performed a full-factorial microcosm experiment with the freshwater plant Elodea nuttallii grown at 10, 15, 20, and 25°C on sediment consisting of pond soil/sand mixtures with 100, 50, 25, and 12.5% pond soil. To address the effect of climatic warming and nutrient addition on the carbon:nutrient stoichiometry of submerged freshwater and marine plants we performed a meta-analysis on experimental studies that elevated temperature and/or added nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus). In the microcosm experiment, C:N ratios of Elodea nuttallii decreased with increasing temperature, and this effect was most pronounced at intermediate nutrient availability. Furthermore, higher nutrient availability led to decreased aboveground C:P ratios. In the meta-analysis, nutrient addition led to a 25, 22, and 16% reduction in aboveground C:N and C:P ratios and belowground C:N ratios, accompanied with increased N content. No consistent effect of elevated temperature on plant stoichiometry could be observed, as very few studies were found on this topic and contrasting results were reported. We conclude that while nutrient addition consistently leads to

  1. Impact of Temperature and Nutrients on Carbon: Nutrient Tissue Stoichiometry of Submerged Aquatic Plants: An Experiment and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Velthuis

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Human activity is currently changing our environment rapidly, with predicted temperature increases of 1–5°C over the coming century and increased nitrogen and phosphorus inputs in aquatic ecosystems. In the shallow parts of these ecosystems, submerged aquatic plants enhance water clarity by resource competition with phytoplankton, provide habitat, and serve as a food source for other organisms. The carbon:nutrient stoichiometry of submerged aquatic plants can be affected by changes in both temperature and nutrient availability. We hypothesized that elevated temperature leads to higher carbon:nutrient ratios through enhanced nutrient-use efficiency, while nutrient addition leads to lower carbon:nutrient ratios by the luxurious uptake of nutrients. We addressed these hypotheses with an experimental and a meta-analytical approach. We performed a full-factorial microcosm experiment with the freshwater plant Elodea nuttallii grown at 10, 15, 20, and 25°C on sediment consisting of pond soil/sand mixtures with 100, 50, 25, and 12.5% pond soil. To address the effect of climatic warming and nutrient addition on the carbon:nutrient stoichiometry of submerged freshwater and marine plants we performed a meta-analysis on experimental studies that elevated temperature and/or added nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus. In the microcosm experiment, C:N ratios of Elodea nuttallii decreased with increasing temperature, and this effect was most pronounced at intermediate nutrient availability. Furthermore, higher nutrient availability led to decreased aboveground C:P ratios. In the meta-analysis, nutrient addition led to a 25, 22, and 16% reduction in aboveground C:N and C:P ratios and belowground C:N ratios, accompanied with increased N content. No consistent effect of elevated temperature on plant stoichiometry could be observed, as very few studies were found on this topic and contrasting results were reported. We conclude that while nutrient addition

  2. Experimental wave attenuation study over flexible plants on a submerged slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zegao; Yang, Xiaoyu; Xu, Yuanzhao; Ding, Meiling; Lu, Haixiang

    2017-12-01

    Using plants is a kind of environmentally-friendly coastal protection to attenuate wave energy. In this paper, a set of experiments were conducted to investigate the wave attenuation performance using flexible grasses on a submerged slope, and the wave attenuation coefficient for these experiments was calculated for different still water depths, slope and grass configurations. It was found that the slope plays a significant role in wave attenuation. The wave attenuation coefficient increases with increasing relative row number and relative density. For a small relative row number, the two configurations from the slope top to its toe and from the slope toe to its top performed equally to a large extent. For a medium relative row number, the configuration from the slope toe to its top performed more poorly than that from the slope top to its toe; however, it performed better than that from the slope top to its toe for a high relative row number. With a single row of grasses close to the slope top from the slope toe, the wave attenuation coefficient shows double peaks. With increasing grass rows or still water depth, the grass location corresponding to the maximum wave attenuation coefficient is close to the slope top. The dimensional analysis and the least square method were used to derive an empirical equation of the wave attenuation coefficient considering the effect of relative density, the slope, the relative row number and the relative location of the middle row, and the equation was validated to experimental data.

  3. Changing leaf litter feedbacks on plant production across contrasting sub-arctic peatland species and growth forms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorrepaal, E.; Cornelissen, J.H.C.; Aerts, R.

    2007-01-01

    Plant species and growth forms differ widely in litter chemistry, which affects decay and may have important consequences for plant growth via e.g. the release of nutrients and growth-inhibitory compounds. We investigated the overall short-term (9.5 months) and medium-term (21.5 months) feedback

  4. LITTER DECOMPOSITION IN A SIERRA NEVADA RIPARIAN MEADOW AS A FUNCTION OF PLANT SPECIES, DISTANCE FROM STREAM EDGE, AND GRAZING

    Science.gov (United States)

    A key process in nutrient cycling is decomposition of plant litter and the potential resulting increase in soil nutrient levels. We compare the decomposition rate (k-value yr-1) of four riparian graminoids as influenced by plant species, distance from stream edge (2.5, 20, and 50 m), and grazi...

  5. Strong Genetic Differentiation of Submerged Plant Populations across Mountain Ranges: Evidence from Potamogeton pectinatus in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Shabnam; Afsharzadeh, Saeed; Saeidi, Hojjatollah; Triest, Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    Biogeographic barriers for freshwater biota can be effective at various spatial scales. At the largest spatial scale, freshwater organisms can become genetically isolated by their high mountain ranges, vast deserts, and inability to cross oceans. Isolation by distance of aquatic plants is expected to be stronger across than alongside mountain ridges whereas the heterogeneity of habitats among populations and temporary droughts may influence connectivity and hamper dispersal. Suitable aquatic plant habitats became reduced, even for the widespread submerged Potamogeton pectinatus L. (also named Stuckenia pectinata) giving structure to various aquatic habitats. We compared the level of genetic diversity in a heterogeneous series of aquatic habitats across Iran and tested their differentiation over distances and across mountain ranges (Alborz and Zagros) and desert zones (Kavir), with values obtained from temperate region populations. The diversity of aquatic ecosystems across and along large geographic barriers provided a unique ecological situation within Iran. P. pectinatus were considered from thirty-six sites across Iran at direct flight distances ranging from 20 to 1,200 km. Nine microsatellite loci revealed a very high number of alleles over all sites. A PCoA, NJT clustering and STRUCTURE analysis revealed a separate grouping of individuals of southeastern Iranian sites and was confirmed by their different nuclear ITS and cpDNA haplotypes thereby indicating an evolutionary significant unit (ESU). At the level of populations, a positive correlation between allelic differentiation Dest with geographic distance was found. Individual-based STRUCTURE analysis over 36 sites showed 7 genetic clusters. FST and RST values for ten populations reached 0.343 and 0.521, respectively thereby indicating that allele length differences are more important and contain evolutionary information. Overall, higher levels of diversity and a stronger differentiation was revealed among

  6. Strong Genetic Differentiation of Submerged Plant Populations across Mountain Ranges: Evidence from Potamogeton pectinatus in Iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabnam Abbasi

    Full Text Available Biogeographic barriers for freshwater biota can be effective at various spatial scales. At the largest spatial scale, freshwater organisms can become genetically isolated by their high mountain ranges, vast deserts, and inability to cross oceans. Isolation by distance of aquatic plants is expected to be stronger across than alongside mountain ridges whereas the heterogeneity of habitats among populations and temporary droughts may influence connectivity and hamper dispersal. Suitable aquatic plant habitats became reduced, even for the widespread submerged Potamogeton pectinatus L. (also named Stuckenia pectinata giving structure to various aquatic habitats. We compared the level of genetic diversity in a heterogeneous series of aquatic habitats across Iran and tested their differentiation over distances and across mountain ranges (Alborz and Zagros and desert zones (Kavir, with values obtained from temperate region populations. The diversity of aquatic ecosystems across and along large geographic barriers provided a unique ecological situation within Iran. P. pectinatus were considered from thirty-six sites across Iran at direct flight distances ranging from 20 to 1,200 km. Nine microsatellite loci revealed a very high number of alleles over all sites. A PCoA, NJT clustering and STRUCTURE analysis revealed a separate grouping of individuals of southeastern Iranian sites and was confirmed by their different nuclear ITS and cpDNA haplotypes thereby indicating an evolutionary significant unit (ESU. At the level of populations, a positive correlation between allelic differentiation Dest with geographic distance was found. Individual-based STRUCTURE analysis over 36 sites showed 7 genetic clusters. FST and RST values for ten populations reached 0.343 and 0.521, respectively thereby indicating that allele length differences are more important and contain evolutionary information. Overall, higher levels of diversity and a stronger differentiation was

  7. Photoinhibition-like damage to the photosynthetic apparatus in plant leaves induced by submergence treatment in the dark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xingli; Zhang, Zishan; Gao, Huiyuan; Yang, Cheng; Liu, Meijun; Li, Yuting; Li, Pengmin

    2014-01-01

    Submergence is a common type of environmental stress for plants. It hampers survival and decreases crop yield, mainly by inhibiting plant photosynthesis. The inhibition of photosynthesis and photochemical efficiency by submergence is primarily due to leaf senescence and excess excitation energy, caused by signals from hypoxic roots and inhibition of gas exchange, respectively. However, the influence of mere leaf-submergence on the photosynthetic apparatus is currently unknown. Therefore, we studied the photosynthetic apparatus in detached leaves from four plant species under dark-submergence treatment (DST), without influence from roots and light. Results showed that the donor and acceptor sides, the reaction center of photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I (PSI) in leaves were significantly damaged after 36 h of DST. This is a photoinhibition-like phenomenon similar to the photoinhibition induced by high light, as further indicated by the degradation of PsaA and D1, the core proteins of PSI and PSII. In contrast to previous research, the chlorophyll content remained unchanged and the H2O2 concentration did not increase in the leaves, implying that the damage to the photosynthetic apparatus was not caused by senescence or over-accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). DST-induced damage to the photosynthetic apparatus was aggravated by increasing treatment temperature. This type of damage also occurred in the anaerobic environment (N2) without water, and could be eliminated or restored by supplying air to the water during or after DST. Our results demonstrate that DST-induced damage was caused by the hypoxic environment. The mechanism by which DST induces the photoinhibition-like damage is discussed below.

  8. Photoinhibition-like damage to the photosynthetic apparatus in plant leaves induced by submergence treatment in the dark.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingli Fan

    Full Text Available Submergence is a common type of environmental stress for plants. It hampers survival and decreases crop yield, mainly by inhibiting plant photosynthesis. The inhibition of photosynthesis and photochemical efficiency by submergence is primarily due to leaf senescence and excess excitation energy, caused by signals from hypoxic roots and inhibition of gas exchange, respectively. However, the influence of mere leaf-submergence on the photosynthetic apparatus is currently unknown. Therefore, we studied the photosynthetic apparatus in detached leaves from four plant species under dark-submergence treatment (DST, without influence from roots and light. Results showed that the donor and acceptor sides, the reaction center of photosystem II (PSII and photosystem I (PSI in leaves were significantly damaged after 36 h of DST. This is a photoinhibition-like phenomenon similar to the photoinhibition induced by high light, as further indicated by the degradation of PsaA and D1, the core proteins of PSI and PSII. In contrast to previous research, the chlorophyll content remained unchanged and the H2O2 concentration did not increase in the leaves, implying that the damage to the photosynthetic apparatus was not caused by senescence or over-accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. DST-induced damage to the photosynthetic apparatus was aggravated by increasing treatment temperature. This type of damage also occurred in the anaerobic environment (N2 without water, and could be eliminated or restored by supplying air to the water during or after DST. Our results demonstrate that DST-induced damage was caused by the hypoxic environment. The mechanism by which DST induces the photoinhibition-like damage is discussed below.

  9. Light limitation and litter of an invasive clonal plant, Wedelia trilobata, inhibit its seedling recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Shan-Shan; Dai, Zhi-Cong; Miao, Shi-Li; Zhai, De-Li; Si, Chun-Can; Huang, Ping; Wang, Rui-Ping; Du, Dao-Lin

    2014-08-01

    Invasive clonal plants have two reproduction patterns, namely sexual and vegetative propagation. However, seedling recruitment of invasive clonal plants can decline as the invasion process proceeds. For example, although the invasive clonal Wedelia trilobata (Asteraceae) produces numerous seeds, few seedlings emerge under its dense population canopy in the field. In this study it is hypothesized that light limitation and the presence of a thick layer of its own litter may be the primary factors causing the failure of seedling recruitment for this invasive weed in the field. A field survey was conducted to determine the allocation of resources to sexual reproduction and seedling recruitment in W. trilobata. Seed germination was also determined in the field. Effects of light and W. trilobata leaf extracts on seed germination and seedling growth were tested in the laboratory. Wedelia trilobata blooms profusely and produces copious viable seeds in the field. However, seedlings of W. trilobata were not detected under mother ramets and few emerged seedlings were found in the bare ground near to populations. In laboratory experiments, low light significantly inhibited seed germination. Leaf extracts also decreased seed germination and inhibited seedling growth, and significant interactions were found between low light and leaf extracts on seed germination. However, seeds were found to germinate in an invaded field after removal of the W. trilobata plant canopy. The results indicate that lack of light and the presence of its own litter might be two major factors responsible for the low numbers of W. trilobata seedlings found in the field. New populations will establish from seeds once the limiting factors are eliminated, and seeds can be the agents of long-distance dispersal; therefore, prevention of seed production remains an important component in controlling the spread of this invasive clonal plant. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of

  10. Underwater photosynthesis and respiration in leaves of submerged wetland plants: gas films improve CO2 and O2 exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colmer, Timothy David; Pedersen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Many wetland plants have gas films on submerged leaf surfaces. We tested the hypotheses that leaf gas films enhance CO(2) uptake for net photosynthesis (P(N)) during light periods, and enhance O(2) uptake for respiration during dark periods. Leaves of four wetland species that form gas films, and......(N) was enhanced up to sixfold. Gas films on submerged leaves enable continued gas exchange via stomata and thus bypassing of cuticle resistance, enhancing exchange of O(2) and CO(2) with the surrounding water, and therefore underwater P(N) and respiration.......Many wetland plants have gas films on submerged leaf surfaces. We tested the hypotheses that leaf gas films enhance CO(2) uptake for net photosynthesis (P(N)) during light periods, and enhance O(2) uptake for respiration during dark periods. Leaves of four wetland species that form gas films......, and two species that do not, were used. Gas films were also experimentally removed by brushing with 0.05% (v/v) Triton X. Net O(2) production in light, or O(2) consumption in darkness, was measured at various CO(2) and O(2) concentrations. When gas films were removed, O(2) uptake in darkness was already...

  11. Plant litter effects on soil nutrient availability and vegetation dynamics: changes that occur when annual grasses invade shrub-steppe communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheel Bansal; Roger L. Sheley; Bob Blank; Edward A. Vasquez

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the quantity and quality of plant litter occur in many ecosystems as they are invaded by exotic species, which impact soil nutrient cycling and plant community composition. Such changes in sagebrush-steppe communities are occurring with invasion of annual grasses (AG) into a perennial grass (PG) dominated system. We conducted a 5-year litter manipulation...

  12. Production and decomposition of plant litter in an arid rangeland of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Overall, in this arid environment, litter production and decomposition is pulsed in nature, and trends are closely related to rainfall occurrence. Moisture is thus a limiting factor both to the production and decomposition of litter. Belowground litter plays a significant role in nutrient cycling. Keywords: dead herbage yield; dryland ...

  13. Spot Application of Diammonium Phosphate and Poultry Litter at Establishment in an Old-Field Planted Loblolly Pine Plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan C. McElvany; E. David Dickens; Tucker Price

    2004-01-01

    A study area was installed in the Coastal Plain (Quitman County) of Georgia to determine the benefits of surface microsite application of diammonium phosphate (DAP) and poultry litter to planted loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedlings on an old-field site. Soils were Bonneau and Orangeburg. Experimental design was complete block with 3 replications...

  14. Effects of Plant Functional Group Loss on Soil Microbial Community and Litter Decomposition in a Steppe Vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chunwang; Zhou, Yong; Su, Jiaqi; Yang, Fan

    2017-01-01

    Globally, many terrestrial ecosystems are experiencing a rapid loss of biodiversity. Continued improvements in our understanding of interrelationships between plant diversity and soil microbes are critical to address the concern over the consequences of the decline in biodiversity on ecosystem functioning and services. By removing forbs, or grasses, or, to an extreme scenario, both forbs and grasses in a steppe vegetation in Inner Mongolia, we studied how plant functional group (PFG) loss affects soil microbial community composition using phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA) and litter decomposition using a litter-bag method. PFG loss significantly decreased above- and below-ground plant biomass, soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC) and nitrogen (SMBN), but had no effect on the ratio of SMBC to SMBN. Although the ratio of fungal to bacterial PLFAs remained unaffected, PFG loss significantly reduced the amount of bacterial, fungal, and total PLFAs. PFG loss decreased litter monthly mass loss and decay constant, and such decrease was significant when both forbs and grasses were removed. Our results provide robust evidence that PFG loss in grassland ecosystem can lead to a rapid response of soil microbial activity which may affect litter decomposition and soil nutrient cycling, suggesting that the assessment of plant-microbe interactions in soils is an integral component of ecosystem response to biodiversity loss.

  15. Effects of poultry litter biochar on soil enzyme activities and tomato, pepper and lettuce plants growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhittin Onur Akça

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Biochar application to soils is being considered as a means to sequester carbon (C while concurrently improving soil functions. A greenhouse experiment was carried out to determine the effects of biochar from the pyrolysis poultry litter (PL on the soil enzyme activities, organic matter content and growth of tomato, pepper and lettuce plants. In the experiment, the combination of 15.15.15 composite fertilizer with 0, 200, 400 and 600kg/da doses of PL biochar were applied into the clay loam soil. Compared to the control and chemical fertilizer alone, the soil organic matter was significantly increased after biochar amendments. β-glucosidase, alkaline phosphatase, urease and arylsulphatase enzyme activities in soils were increased by the biochar applications significantly (P<0.05. Plant fresh and dry weight of tomato, pepper and lettuce plants were higher in 4kg/ha PL biochar treatment than in the other treatments. The results showed that PL biochar amendment to soils in the agricultural use increased yield of plants and enzyme activities with increasing soil organic matter content as well as improving soil properties.

  16. Captive bubble and sessile drop surface characterization of a submerged aquatic plant, Hydrilla verticillata

    Science.gov (United States)

    The surface energy parameters of the invasive aquatic weed, Hydrilla verticillata, were determined using contact angle measurements using two different methods. The abaxial and adaxial surfaces of the leaves and stem were characterized for the weed while submerged in water using captive air and octa...

  17. Negative and positive interactions among plants: effects of competitors and litter on seedling emergence and growth of forest and grassland species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loydi, A; Donath, T W; Otte, A; Eckstein, R L

    2015-05-01

    Living plant neighbours, but also their dead aboveground remains (i.e. litter), may individually exert negative or positive effects on plant recruitment. Although living plants and litter co-occur in most ecosystems, few studies have addressed their combined effects, and conclusions are ambivalent. Therefore, we examined the response in terms of seedling emergence and growth of herbaceous grassland and forest species to different litter types and amounts and the presence of competitors. We conducted a pot experiment testing the effects of litter type (grass, oak), litter amount (low, medium, high) and interspecific competition (presence or absence of four Festuca arundinacea individuals) on seedling emergence and biomass of four congeneric pairs of hemicryptophytes from two habitat types (woodland, grassland). Interactions between litter and competition were weak. Litter presence increased competitor biomass. It also had positive effects on seedling emergence at low litter amounts and negative effects at high litter amounts, while competition had no effect on seedling emergence. Seedling biomass was negatively affected by the presence of competitors, and this effect was stronger in combination with high amounts of litter. Litter affected seedling emergence while competition determined the biomass of the emerged individuals, both affecting early stages of seedling recruitment. High litter accumulation also reduced seedling biomass, but this effect seemed to be additive to competitor effects. This suggests that live and dead plant mass can affect species recruitment in natural systems, but the mechanisms by which they operate and their timing differ. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  18. Ecophysiology of two tropical species in an abandoned eucalypt plantation: effect of plant litter removal and seasonality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Lage-Pinto

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the removal of plant litter on photosynthetic variables (gas exchanges, chlorophyll a fluorescence, and content of photosynthetic pigments of the tropical species Xylopia sericea A. St.-Hil. and Siparuna guianensis Aubl. was evaluated in an abandoned plantation of eucalypt (Corymbia citriodora (Hook. K.D. Hill & L.A.S. Johnson (Myrtaceae. The study was conducted at the União Biological Reserve, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil during the rainy and dry periods, after five years of litter removal. The removal of plant litter did not influence the ecophysiological responses of the species. There was however significant seasonal variation. During the dry period, intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci, transpiration (E, and stomatal conductance (gs were decreased, while intrinsic efficiency of water use (IWUE, non-photochemical quenching (NPQ, and carotenoid values increased, suggesting a protective strategy against stress. Nevertheless, the values for Fv/Fm (maximum quantum efficiency and Fm/Fo (ratio of fluorescence yields for open and closed states indicated that even during the dry period there was no reduction in photochemical activity in these species. Only S. guianensis exhibited a reduced net photosynthetic rate (A during the dry period. The data indicated that X. sericea was photosynthetically more efficient under conditions of low water availability and that a 5-year period of plant litter removal failed to produce differences in ecophysiological processes in the species analyzed.

  19. Effects of Plant Functional Group Loss on Soil Microbial Community and Litter Decomposition in a Steppe Vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunwang Xiao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Globally, many terrestrial ecosystems are experiencing a rapid loss of biodiversity. Continued improvements in our understanding of interrelationships between plant diversity and soil microbes are critical to address the concern over the consequences of the decline in biodiversity on ecosystem functioning and services. By removing forbs, or grasses, or, to an extreme scenario, both forbs and grasses in a steppe vegetation in Inner Mongolia, we studied how plant functional group (PFG loss affects soil microbial community composition using phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA and litter decomposition using a litter-bag method. PFG loss significantly decreased above- and below-ground plant biomass, soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC and nitrogen (SMBN, but had no effect on the ratio of SMBC to SMBN. Although the ratio of fungal to bacterial PLFAs remained unaffected, PFG loss significantly reduced the amount of bacterial, fungal, and total PLFAs. PFG loss decreased litter monthly mass loss and decay constant, and such decrease was significant when both forbs and grasses were removed. Our results provide robust evidence that PFG loss in grassland ecosystem can lead to a rapid response of soil microbial activity which may affect litter decomposition and soil nutrient cycling, suggesting that the assessment of plant–microbe interactions in soils is an integral component of ecosystem response to biodiversity loss.

  20. The influences of sugars and plant growth regulators on β-glucan synthesis of G. lucidum mycelium in submerged culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thao, Cao Phuong; Tien, Le Thi Thuy

    2017-09-01

    β - glucan is intracellular polysaccharide (IPS), extracted from Ganoderma lucidum mycelium that can enhance human immune respond. This study aimed to stimulate the production of β - glucan in G. lucidum mycelium through optimating the carbonhydrates and plant rowth regulators in submerged culture. The results showed that the stimulation or inhibition of IPS production as well as β - glucan biosynthesis could be adjusted depend on the type and concentration of carbonhydrates and plant growth regulators. The supplement of lactose 80 g/L and BA 1 mg/L in medium could cause the highest IPS production (644.478 mg/g DW) and β - glucan increased up to 0.15/DW, that raised twice as much as without plant growth regulators. Futhermore, the optimation of other environmental elements were figured out were completely dark and 150 rpm on rotary shaker. This result could be used as premise for production of β - glucan in pilot.

  1. Differential contribution of soil biota groups to plant litter decomposition as mediated by soil use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo A. Castro-Huerta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant decomposition is dependant on the activity of the soil biota and its interactions with climate, soil properties, and plant residue inputs. This work assessed the roles of different groups of the soil biota on litter decomposition, and the way they are modulated by soil use. Litterbags of different mesh sizes for the selective exclusion of soil fauna by size (macro, meso, and microfauna were filled with standardized dried leaves and placed on the same soil under different use intensities: naturalized grasslands, recent agriculture, and intensive agriculture fields. During five months, litterbags of each mesh size were collected once a month per system with five replicates. The remaining mass was measured and decomposition rates calculated. Differences were found for the different biota groups, and they were dependant on soil use. Within systems, the results show that in the naturalized grasslands, the macrofauna had the highest contribution to decomposition. In the recent agricultural system it was the combined activity of the macro- and mesofauna, and in the intensive agricultural use it was the mesofauna activity. These results underscore the relative importance and activity of the different groups of the edaphic biota and the effects of different soil uses on soil biota activity.

  2. Carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium stoichiometry of plants and litter in boreal peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M.; Moore, T. R.

    2013-12-01

    Ecological stoichiometry, dealing with the balance of multiple elements during ecological processes and interactions, provides an integrative framework linking the biogeochemical patterns at a global scale to physiological constraints that operate at cellular or organismal levels. Unlike the well-explained and constrained carbon:nitrogen:phosphorus (C:N:P) ratios in marine plankton (e.g. Redfield ratio), terrestrial ecosystems have evoked less attention. We examined the leaf-level C:N:P:potassium (K) stoichiometry of the dominant vascular plants (deciduous, evergreen, forb and graminoid) and Sphagnum mosses from four boreal bogs in eastern Canada. A generally convergent C:N:P:K stoichiometric ratio (632:14:1:9, mass ratio) in current year's leaves (or capitula of Sphagnum mosses) was observed in the fast growing season (June to July), indicating N and P co-limitation. With ~50% of N, P and K being resorbed during leaf senescence, the C:nutrients ratios in the matures leaves (C:N:P:K = 826:17:1:6) of two dominant evergreen species (Chamaedaphne calyculata and Rhododendron groenlandicum) were increased in senesced leaves (C:N:P:K = 964:15:1:5) whereas no substantial changes were observed in N:P:K ratios. The dramatic imbalance between litter and soil microbes stoichiometry (C:N:P = 31:3:1) governs the overall nutrient cycling and C sequestration in peatland ecosystems. Overall, N and P seem to co-limit both plant growth and microbial activity in ombrotrophic bogs.

  3. Community structure and estimated contribution of primary consumers (Nematodes and Copepods) of decomposing plant litter (Juncus roemerianus and Rhizophora mangle) in South Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fell, J.W.; Cefalu, R.

    1984-01-01

    The paper discusses the meiofauna associated with decomposing leaf litter from two species of coastal marshland plants: the black needle rush, Juncus roemerianus and the red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle. The following aspects were investigated: (1) types of meiofauna present, especially nematodes; (2) changes in meiofaunal community structures with regard to season, station location, and type of plant litter; (3) amount of nematode and copepod biomass present on the decomposing plant litter; and (4) an estimation of the possible role of the nematodes in the decomposition process. 28 references, 5 figures, 9 tables. (ACR)

  4. Development and implementation of bottom ash crushing system in Submerged Scrapper Conveyor (SSC for Coal-fired Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basim Ismail Firas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence of Submerged Scrapper Conveyor (SSC in coal-fired power plant is to handle the by-product of bottom ash. However, soot-blowing will be performed sometimes, in order to remove slag formed at the boiler furnace wall. Thence, this lead to a sudden loading of large amount of slags and bottom ash at SSC after soot-blowing, causing SSC conveying system to jam and conveying chain breakage. In this paper, a new SSC design with additional crushing system is proposed. By implementing the new design proposed, it is expected to improve the overall current performances, and to reduce the trip issue of SSC in coal-fired power plant. The new 3D model of SSC is designed, and stress-strain simulation of the model is analysed by using software of PTC Creo Parametric. Final cost and safety factor analysis of model is made to prove its validation.

  5. Are fire, soil fertility and toxicity, water availability, plant functional diversity, and litter decomposition related in a Neotropical savanna?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Gustavo Henrique; Batalha, Marco Antônio; Silva, Igor Aurélio; Cianciaruso, Marcus Vinicius; Petchey, Owen L

    2014-07-01

    Understanding how biodiversity and ecosystem functioning respond to changes in the environment is fundamental to the maintenance of ecosystem function. In realistic scenarios, the biodiversity-ecosystem functioning path may account for only a small share of all factors determining ecosystem function. Here, we investigated the strength to which variations in environmental characteristics in a Neotropical savanna affected functional diversity and decomposition. We sought an integrative approach, testing a number of pairwise hypotheses about how the environment, biodiversity, and functioning were linked. We used structural equation modelling to connect fire frequency, soil fertility, exchangeable Al, water availability, functional diversity of woody plants, tree density, tree height, and litter decomposition rates in a causal chain. We found significant effects of soil nutrients, water availability, and Al on functional diversity and litter decomposition. Fire did not have a significant direct effect on functional diversity or litter decomposition. However, fire was connected to both variables through soil fertility. Functional diversity did not influence rates of litter decomposition. The mediated effects that emerged from pairwise interactions are encouraging not only for predicting the functional consequences of changes in environmental variables and biodiversity, but also to caution against predictions based on only environmental or only biodiversity change.

  6. Estimation of leaf area index and plant area index of a submerged macrophyte canopy using digital photography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehua Zhao

    Full Text Available Non-destructive estimation using digital cameras is a common approach for estimating leaf area index (LAI of terrestrial vegetation. However, no attempt has been made so far to develop non-destructive approaches to LAI estimation for aquatic vegetation. Using the submerged plant species Potamogeton malainus, the objective of this study was to determine whether the gap fraction derived from vertical photographs could be used to estimate LAI of aquatic vegetation. Our results suggested that upward-oriented photographs taken from beneath the water surface were more suitable for distinguishing vegetation from other objects than were downward-oriented photographs taken from above the water surface. Exposure settings had a substantial influence on the identification of vegetation in upward-oriented photographs. Automatic exposure performed nearly as well as the optimal trial exposure, making it a good choice for operational convenience. Similar to terrestrial vegetation, our results suggested that photographs taken for the purpose of distinguishing gap fraction in aquatic vegetation should be taken under diffuse light conditions. Significant logarithmic relationships were observed between the vertical gap fraction derived from upward-oriented photographs and plant area index (PAI and LAI derived from destructive harvesting. The model we developed to depict the relationship between PAI and gap fraction was similar to the modified theoretical Poisson model, with coefficients of 1.82 and 1.90 for our model and the theoretical model, respectively. This suggests that vertical upward-oriented photographs taken from below the water surface are a feasible alternative to destructive harvesting for estimating PAI and LAI for the submerged aquatic plant Potamogeton malainus.

  7. Impact of temperature and nutrients on carbon:nutrient tissue stoichiometry of submerged aquatic plants: an experiment and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthuis, M.; van Deelen, Emma; van Donk, E.; Zhang, P.; Bakker, E.S.

    2017-01-01

    Human activity is currently changing our environment rapidly, with predicted temperature increases of 1–5°C over the coming century and increased nitrogen and phosphorus inputs in aquatic ecosystems. In the shallow parts of these ecosystems, submerged aquatic plants enhance water clarity by resource

  8. Technical Note: Reactivity of C1 and C2 organohalogens formation – from plant litter to bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Wang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available C1/C2 organohalogens (organohalogens with one or two carbon atoms can have significant environmental toxicity and ecological impact, such as carcinogenesis, ozone depletion and global warming. Natural halogenation processes have been identified for a wide range of natural organic matter, including soils, plant and animal debris, algae, and fungi. Yet, few have considered these organohalogens generated from the ubiquitous bacteria, one of the largest biomass pools on earth. Here, we report and confirm the formation of chloroform (CHCl3 dichloro-acetonitrile (CHCl2CN, chloral hydrate (CCl3CH(OH2 and their brominated analogues by direct halogenation of seven strains of common bacteria and nine cellular monomers. Comparing different major C stocks during litter decomposition stages in terrestrial ecosystems, from plant litter, decomposed litter, to bacteria, we found increasing reactivity for nitrogenous organohalogen yield with decreasing C/N ratio. Our results raise the possibility that natural halogenation of bacteria represents a significant and overlooked contribution to global organohalogen burdens. As bacteria are decomposers that alter the C quality by transforming organic matter pools from high to low C/N ratio and constitute a large organic N pool, the bacterial activity is expected to affect the C, N, and halogen cycling through natural halogenation reactions.

  9. Benefits of flooding-induced aquatic adventitious roots depend on the duration of submergence: linking plant performance to root functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Huber, Heidrun; Beljaars, Simone J M; Birnbaum, Diana; de Best, Sander; de Kroon, Hans; Visser, Eric J W

    2017-07-01

    Temporal flooding is a common environmental stress for terrestrial plants. Aquatic adventitious roots (aquatic roots) are commonly formed in flooding-tolerant plant species and are generally assumed to be beneficial for plant growth by supporting water and nutrient uptake during partial flooding. However, the actual contribution of these roots to plant performance under flooding has hardly been quantified. As the investment into aquatic root development in terms of carbohydrates may be costly, these costs may - depending on the specific environmental conditions - offset the beneficial effects of aquatic roots. This study tested the hypothesis that the balance between potential costs and benefits depends on the duration of flooding, as the benefits are expected to outweigh the costs in long-term but not in short-term flooding. The contribution of aquatic roots to plant performance was tested in Solanum dulcamara during 1-4 weeks of partial submergence and by experimentally manipulating root production. Nutrient uptake by aquatic roots, transpiration and photosynthesis were measured in plants differing in aquatic root development to assess the specific function of these roots. As predicted, flooded plants benefited from the presence of aquatic roots. The results showed that this was probably due to the contribution of roots to resource uptake. However, these beneficial effects were only present in long-term but not in short-term flooding. This relationship could be explained by the correlation between nutrient uptake and the flooding duration-dependent size of the aquatic root system. The results indicate that aquatic root formation is likely to be selected for in habitats characterized by long-term flooding. This study also revealed only limited costs associated with adventitious root formation, which may explain the maintenance of the ability to produce aquatic roots in habitats characterized by very rare or short flooding events.

  10. Plant litter chemistry alters the content and composition of organic carbon associated with soil mineral and aggregate fractions in invaded ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Mioko; Suseela, Vidya; Simpson, Myrna; Powell, Brian; Tharayil, Nishanth

    2017-10-01

    Through the input of disproportionate quantities of chemically distinct litter, invasive plants may potentially influence the fate of organic matter associated with soil mineral and aggregate fractions in some of the ecosystems they invade. Although context dependent, these native ecosystems subjected to prolonged invasion by exotic plants may be instrumental in distinguishing the role of plant-microbe-mineral interactions from the broader edaphic and climatic influences on the formation of soil organic matter (SOM). We hypothesized that the soils subjected to prolonged invasion by an exotic plant that input recalcitrant litter (Japanese knotweed, Polygonum cuspidatum) would have a greater proportion of plant-derived carbon (C) in the aggregate fractions, as compared with that in adjacent soil inhabited by native vegetation that input labile litter, whereas the soils under an invader that input labile litter (kudzu, Pueraria lobata) would have a greater proportion of microbial-derived C in the silt-clay fraction, as compared with that in adjacent soils that receive recalcitrant litter. At the knotweed site, the higher C content in soils under P. cuspidatum, compared with noninvaded soils inhabited by grasses and forbs, was limited to the macroaggregate fraction, which was abundant in plant biomarkers. The noninvaded soils at this site had a higher abundance of lignins in mineral and microaggregate fractions and suberin in the macroaggregate fraction, partly because of the greater root density of the native species, which might have had an overriding influence on the chemistry of the above-ground litter input. At the kudzu site, soils under P. lobata had lower C content across all size fractions at a 0-5 cm soil depth despite receiving similar amounts of Pinus litter. Contrary to our prediction, the noninvaded soils receiving recalcitrant Pinus litter had a similar abundance of plant biomarkers across both mineral and aggregate fractions, potentially because of

  11. Nitrification with submerged filters. Air supply and comsumption at the pilot-plant at the Bekkelaget treatment plant

    OpenAIRE

    Englund, G

    1990-01-01

    During the three months research period (October 1989 - January 1990) the average nitrification efficiencies for municipal sewage were 48% and 61 % for respectively one-step and two-step biological submerged filters placed after chemical precipitation. Correspondi- ng nitrification rates were 0.69 and 0.56 g NH4-N/m² d. The air/liquid ratio (m³/m³) varied from 18-35 for the diffused aeration, giving high 02-concentrations, but indicating an inefficient aeration system. No logging problems occ...

  12. Leaf economics traits predict litter decomposition of tropical plants and differ among land use types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.A.; Carreño Rocabado, G.; Poorter, L.

    2011-01-01

    1. Decomposition is a key ecosystem process that determines nutrient and carbon cycling. Individual leaf and litter characteristics are good predictors of decomposition rates within biomes worldwide, but knowledge of which traits are the best predictors for tropical species remains scarce. Also, the

  13. A model for the release, dispersion and environmental impact of a postulated reactor accident from a submerged commercial nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertch, Timothy Creston

    1998-12-01

    Nuclear power plants are inherently suitable for submerged applications and could provide power to the shore power grid or support future underwater applications. The technology exists today and the construction of a submerged commercial nuclear power plant may become desirable. A submerged reactor is safer to humans because the infinite supply of water for heat removal, particulate retention in the water column, sedimentation to the ocean floor and inherent shielding of the aquatic environment would significantly mitigate the effects of a reactor accident. A better understanding of reactor operation in this new environment is required to quantify the radioecological impact and to determine the suitability of this concept. The impact of release to the environment from a severe reactor accident is a new aspect of the field of marine radioecology. Current efforts have been centered on radioecological impacts of nuclear waste disposal, nuclear weapons testing fallout and shore nuclear plant discharges. This dissertation examines the environmental impact of a severe reactor accident in a submerged commercial nuclear power plant, modeling a postulated site on the Atlantic continental shelf adjacent to the United States. This effort models the effects of geography, decay, particle transport/dispersion, bioaccumulation and elimination with associated dose commitment. The use of a source term equivalent to the release from Chernobyl allows comparison between the impacts of that accident and the postulated submerged commercial reactor plant accident. All input parameters are evaluated using sensitivity analysis. The effect of the release on marine biota is determined. Study of the pathways to humans from gaseous radionuclides, consumption of contaminated marine biota and direct exposure as contaminated water reaches the shoreline is conducted. The model developed by this effort predicts a significant mitigation of the radioecological impact of the reactor accident release

  14. Experimental evaluation of herbivory on live plant seedlings by the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris L. in the presence and absence of soil surface litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchberger, Johannes; Eisenhauer, Nico; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Türke, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggested that the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris might act as a seedling predator by ingesting emerging seedlings, and individuals were observed damaging fresh leaves of various plant species in the field. To evaluate the significance of herbivore behavior of L. terrestris for plant and earthworm performance we exposed 23- to 33-days-old seedlings of six plant species to earthworms in two microcosm experiments. Plants belonged to the three functional groups grasses, non-leguminous herbs, and legumes. Leaf damage, leaf mortality, the number of leaves as well as mortality and growth of seedlings were followed over a period of up to 26 days. In a subset of replicates 0.1 g of soil surface litter of each of the six plant species was provided and consumption was estimated regularly to determine potential feeding preferences of earthworms. There was no difference in seedling growth, the number of live seedlings and dead leaves between treatments with or without worms. Fresh leaves were damaged eight times during the experiment, most likely by L. terrestris, with two direct observations of earthworms tearing off leaf parts. Another nine leaves were partly pulled into earthworm burrows. Lumbricus terrestris preferred to consume legume litter over litter of the other plant functional groups. Earthworms that consumed litter lost less weight than individuals that were provided with soil and live plants only, indicating that live plants are not a suitable substitute for litter in earthworm nutrition. Our results demonstrate that L. terrestris damages live plants; however, this behavior occurs only rarely. Pulling live plants into earthworm burrows might induce microbial decomposition of leaves to make them suitable for later consumption. Herbivory on plants beyond the initial seedling stage may only play a minor role in earthworm nutrition and has limited potential to influence plant growth.

  15. Changes in organic compounds during leaf litter leaching: laboratory experiment on eight plant species of the Sudano-guinea Savannas of Ngaoundere, Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biyanzi P

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory experiment was carried out on the leaf litter of 8 agroforestry plant species of the Sudano-guinea Savannas of Ngaoundere in order to compare patterns of their water absorption and dynamics of four important energetic organic compounds (soluble sugars, cellulose, phenol and lignin among these plant species during the leaching phase and to determine the influence of initial litter properties on these processes. To this end, 168 samples of leaf litter (5.00 ± 0.01 g of Annona senegalensis, Lophira lanceolata, Syzygium guineense var. guineense, Syzygium guineense var. macrocarpum, Vitellaria paradoxa, Vitex doniana, Vitex madiensis and Ximenia americana were immersed for 15 days in distilled water at a temperature of 23 °C and relative humidity of 65 ± 1%. Three samples of each plant species were taken at 1, 6, 24, 72, 168, 240 and 360 hours. Depending on the species, water absorption capacity after 360 h of leaching varied from 162.77 (S. g. var. macrocarpum to 264.00% (V. madiensis of dry litter mass. The release of water-soluble substances varied between 9.61 (L. lanceolata and 34.12% (X. americana. Water absorption and release of water-soluble substances rate constants were the highest in V. madiensis (0.32 h-1 and 0.25 h-1 and the lowest one respectively in S. g. guineense (0.03 h-1 and S. g. var. macrocarpum (0.006 h-1. Organic compound of original litter also varied significantly among species and decreased with leaching time for water-soluble sugars and phenols, while increased for cellulose and lignin. Water absorption by litter was significantly correlated with initial water-soluble sugars and phenol content, leaf litter area and thickness. The release of water-soluble substances by litters was also correlated with initial water-soluble sugars, water content and leaf litter area. The leaching rate constant was correlated with that of water absorption. These preliminary results lead to a better understanding of the litter

  16. Internal nitrogen removal from sediments by the hybrid system of microbial fuel cells and submerged aquatic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Xiao, En-Rong; Xu, Dan; Zhou, Yin; He, Feng; Liu, Bi-Yun; Zeng, Lei; Wu, Zhen-Bin

    2017-01-01

    Sediment internal nitrogen release is a significant pollution source in the overlying water of aquatic ecosystems. This study aims to remove internal nitrogen in sediment-water microcosms by coupling sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) with submerged aquatic plants. Twelve tanks including four treatments in triplicates were designed: open-circuit (SMFC-o), closed-circuit (SMFC-c), aquatic plants with open-circuit (P-SMFC-o) and aquatic plants with closed-circuit (P-SMFC-c). The changes in the bio-electrochemical characteristics of the nitrogen levels in overlying water, pore water, sediments, and aquatic plants were documented to explain the migration and transformation pathways of internal nitrogen. The results showed that both electrogenesis and aquatic plants could facilitate the mineralization of organic nitrogen in sediments. In SMFC, electrogenesis promoted the release of ammonium from the pore water, followed by the accumulation of ammonium and nitrate in the overlying water. The increased redox potential of sediments due to electrogenesis also contributed to higher levels of nitrate in overlying water when nitrification in pore water was facilitated and denitrification at the sediment-water interface was inhibited. When the aquatic plants were introduced into the closed-circuit SMFC, the internal ammonium assimilation by aquatic plants was advanced by electrogenesis; nitrification in pore water and denitrification in sediments were also promoted. These processes might result in the maximum decrease of internal nitrogen with low nitrogen levels in the overlying water despite the lower power production. The P-SMFC-c reduced 8.1%, 16.2%, 24.7%, and 25.3% of internal total nitrogen compared to SMFC-o on the 55th, 82th, 136th, and 190th days, respectively. The smaller number of Nitrospira and the larger number of Bacillus and Pseudomonas on the anodes via high throughput sequencing may account for strong mineralization and denitrification in the sediments

  17. Internal nitrogen removal from sediments by the hybrid system of microbial fuel cells and submerged aquatic plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xu

    Full Text Available Sediment internal nitrogen release is a significant pollution source in the overlying water of aquatic ecosystems. This study aims to remove internal nitrogen in sediment-water microcosms by coupling sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs with submerged aquatic plants. Twelve tanks including four treatments in triplicates were designed: open-circuit (SMFC-o, closed-circuit (SMFC-c, aquatic plants with open-circuit (P-SMFC-o and aquatic plants with closed-circuit (P-SMFC-c. The changes in the bio-electrochemical characteristics of the nitrogen levels in overlying water, pore water, sediments, and aquatic plants were documented to explain the migration and transformation pathways of internal nitrogen. The results showed that both electrogenesis and aquatic plants could facilitate the mineralization of organic nitrogen in sediments. In SMFC, electrogenesis promoted the release of ammonium from the pore water, followed by the accumulation of ammonium and nitrate in the overlying water. The increased redox potential of sediments due to electrogenesis also contributed to higher levels of nitrate in overlying water when nitrification in pore water was facilitated and denitrification at the sediment-water interface was inhibited. When the aquatic plants were introduced into the closed-circuit SMFC, the internal ammonium assimilation by aquatic plants was advanced by electrogenesis; nitrification in pore water and denitrification in sediments were also promoted. These processes might result in the maximum decrease of internal nitrogen with low nitrogen levels in the overlying water despite the lower power production. The P-SMFC-c reduced 8.1%, 16.2%, 24.7%, and 25.3% of internal total nitrogen compared to SMFC-o on the 55th, 82th, 136th, and 190th days, respectively. The smaller number of Nitrospira and the larger number of Bacillus and Pseudomonas on the anodes via high throughput sequencing may account for strong mineralization and denitrification in the

  18. Seed weight and germination behavior of the submerged plant Potamogeton pectinatus in the arid zone of northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongqiang; Lu, Wei; Yang, Lei; Kong, Xianghong; Deng, Xuwei

    2015-04-01

    Variation in seed weight is common within and among plant species, but few studies have attempted to document the pattern of seed weight and germination attributes for aquatic macrophytes at a large scale. This study examined within-species variation in seed weight and germination attributes and the effects of environmental factors on seed traits of the submerged plant Potamogeton pectinatus in the arid zone of northwest China. Our results showed that the average seed weight was 0.24 g per 100 seeds with a coefficient of variation (CV) of 28.4% among the eight P. pectinatus populations. The total germination fraction of seeds of P. pectinatus was relatively poor, less than 35% in seven P. pectinatus populations, and the lowest germination percentage found was only 2%. There were significant differences in seed weight, time to onset of germination, and total germination fraction among the eight different populations. Hierarchical partitioning analysis showed a strongly positive correlation between seed weight and water temperature and pH. Seed weight and the maternal environmental factors significantly affected both time to initiation of germination and total germination fraction. Our results suggest that (1) seed weight variation in P. pectinatus primarily is the result of temperature variation during fruit development; (2) relatively poor germination fraction suggests that seeds are relatively unimportant in the short-term survival of populations and that it may be another adaptive trait allowing plants to take place in the right place and at the right time, especially in harsh environment; and (3) variation in seed germination traits should be determined by local environmental and intrinsic factors that interact in a complex fashion.

  19. Synergistic effects of heavy metal pollutants on senescence in submerged aquatic plants. [Potamogeton pectinatus L. , Vallisneria spiralis L. , Hydrialla Verticillata (L. f. ) Royle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jana, S.; Choudhuri, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of many combinations of toxic concentrations of heavy metal pollutants, viz., mercuric chloride, lead acetate, cadmium chloride and cupric sulphate, on the senescence of isolated mature leaves of submerged aquatic plants, Potamogeton pectinatus L., Vallisneria spiralis L., and Hydrilla Verticillata (L.f.) Royle were studied. All of the combinations of heavy metal pollutants caused senescence in all three species by decreasing chlorophyll, DNA, RNA, protein and dry wt, and increasing free amino acid, tissue permeability, the activities of protease and RNase, and the ratio of acid to alkaline pyrophosphatase activity over control values. The effects were highest in Potamogeton and lowest in Hydrilla. The degree of senescence in the three submerged plants by combinations of toxic concentrations of heavy metal pollutants is much higher due to synergism than that by individual heavy metal pollutants.

  20. Retention of dead standing plant biomass (marcescence) increases subsequent litter decomposition in the soil organic layer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Angst, Šárka; Cajthaml, T.; Angst, Gerrit; Šimáčková, H.; Brus, Jiří; Frouz, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 418, 1-2 (2017), s. 571-579 ISSN 0032-079X Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : photodegradation * C-13 CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy * litter decomposition * pyrolysis GC-MS * Calamagrostis epigeios * photo-facilitation Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science; CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V) OBOR OECD: Soil science; Polymer science (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 3.052, year: 2016

  1. Actinides and other radionuclides in sediments and submerged plants of the Yenisei River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolsunovsky, A. [Institute of Biophysics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)], E-mail: radecol@ibp.ru; Bondareva, L. [Institute of Biophysics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2007-10-11

    The source of radioactive contamination of the Yenisei River floodplain, including contamination with actinides, is the Mining-and-Chemical combine (MCC), which has for many years been producing weapons-grade plutonium. Actinides have been detected not only in the soil and sediment of the river but also in the biomass of aquatic plants. The aim of our investigation was to assess the levels of actinides and other radionuclides in sediments and aquatic plants both near the MCC and at a considerable distance from it, down the Yenisei River. Investigations of the Yenisei River sediment samples revealed high activity concentrations of actinides (Pu isotopes and {sup 241}Am), which were 100 times higher than their global fallout levels. Sequential extraction of radionuclides from samples of sediments collected near the MCC showed that the amounts of extracted {sup 241}Am were the largest (up to 98% of initial activity). It was found that aquatic plants of the Yenisei River collected both near the MCC discharge site and at a distance up to 200 km downstream contained several actinide isotopes. The aquatic moss, Fontinalis antipyretica, was found to contain higher levels of radionuclides than Potamogeton lucens. Leaves of P. lucens contained higher levels of radionuclides, including {sup 239}Np, than stems. Sequential extraction of radionuclides from samples of aquatic plants showed that {sup 239}Np levels in exchangeable and adsorption fractions of P. lucens biomass were higher than in the respective fractions of F. antipyretica biomass.

  2. How do physicochemical properties influence the toxicity of silver nanoparticles on freshwater decomposers of plant litter in streams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Daniela; Pascoal, Cláudia; Cássio, Fernanda

    2017-06-01

    AgNP physicochemical properties may affect AgNP toxicity, but their effects on plant litter decomposition and the species driving this key ecosystem process in freshwaters have been poorly investigated. We assessed the impacts of AgNPs with different size and surface coating (100nm PVP (polyvinylpyrrolidone)-dispersant, 50-60nm and 35nm uncoated) on freshwater decomposers of leaf litter by exposing leaf associated microbial assemblages to increasing concentrations of AgNPs (up to 200mgL-1) and of AgNO3 (up to 25mgL-1). We further conducted a feeding preference experiment with a common invertebrate shredder, Limnephilus sp., which was allowed to feed on microbially-colonized leaves previously exposed to AgNPs and AgNO3. Leaf decomposition and microbial activity and diversity were inhibited when exposed to increased concentrations of 100nm AgNPs (≥25mgL-1), while microbial activity was stimulated by exposure to 35nm AgNPs (≥100mgL-1). Invertebrate shredders preferred leaves exposed to 35nm AgNPs (25mgL-1) and avoided leaves exposed to AgNO3 (≥2mgL-1). Results from the characterization of AgNPs by dynamic light scattering revealed that AgNps with PVP-dispersant were more stable than the uncoated AgNPs. Our results highlight the importance of considering the physicochemical properties of NPs when assessing their toxicity to litter decomposers in freshwaters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Plant species richness leaves a legacy of enhanced root litter-induced decomposition in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cong, Wen-Feng; van Ruijven, Jasper; van der Werf, Wopke; De Deyn, Gerlinde B.; Mommer, Liesje; Berendse, Frank; Hoffland, Ellis

    2015-01-01

    Increasing plant species richness generally enhances plant biomass production, which may enhance accumulation of carbon (C) in soil. However, the net change in soil C also depends on the effect of plant diversity on C loss through decomposition of organic matter. Plant diversity can affect organic

  4. Influence of poultry litter and plant density on the production and chemical composition of the essential oil of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Tabaldi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the production and chemical composition of the essential oil of Brazilian pepper fruits grown in single and double rows using different doses of semi decomposed poultry litter in two evaluation times. The experiment was carried out at the Federal University of Grande Dourados, in the city of Dourados, state o- Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, from October 2009 to November 2010. Brazilian pepper plants were grown in single and double rows in soil with incorporated poultry litter at the doses of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 t ha-1. Treatments were arranged as a 2 x 5 factorial experiment in a randomized block design with four replications. Fruits were harvested 180 and 390 days after transplant (DAT. There was a significant interaction for fresh weight of fruits and weight of 50 fruits, being the values higher at 180 DAT in the double rows with increasing poultry litter doses. Fruits harvested 390 DAT showed higher diameter compared with those harvested 180 DAT. The number of fruits per bunch was significantly influenced by the doses of poultry litter, presenting a linear increase with increasing doses. The essential oil of the Brazilian pepper fruits obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by Gas chromatography - mass spectrometry exhibited predominance of monoterpenes, highlighting α-pinene (20.14% as the major constituent. The chemical composition of the essential oil was not influenced by the number of plant rows in the plot or by the doses of poultry litter in any evaluation time. Therefore, the cultivation of Brazilian pepper plants is recommended in double rows, with 13.59 t ha-1 of incorporated poultry litter in the soi, and with harvest of 180 DAT for higher fruit production.

  5. Oxygen dynamics in submerged rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colmer, Timothy D.; Pedersen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Complete submergence of plants prevents direct O2 and CO2 exchange with air. Underwater photosynthesis can result in marked diurnal changes in O2 supply to submerged plants. Dynamics in pO2 had not been measured directly for submerged rice (Oryza sativa), but in an earlier study, radial O2 loss...

  6. Soil mineral composition matters: response of microbial communities to phenanthrene and plant litter addition in long-term matured artificial soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babin, Doreen; Vogel, Cordula; Zühlke, Sebastian; Schloter, Michael; Pronk, Geertje Johanna; Heister, Katja; Spiteller, Michael; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Smalla, Kornelia

    2014-01-01

    The fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil is determined by a suite of biotic and abiotic factors, and disentangling their role in the complex soil interaction network remains challenging. Here, we investigate the influence of soil composition on the microbial community structure and its response to the spiked model PAH compound phenanthrene and plant litter. We used long-term matured artificial soils differing in type of clay mineral (illite, montmorillonite) and presence of charcoal or ferrihydrite. The soils received an identical soil microbial fraction and were incubated for more than two years with two sterile manure additions. The matured artificial soils and a natural soil were subjected to the following spiking treatments: (I) phenanthrene, (II) litter, (III) litter + phenanthrene, (IV) unspiked control. Total community DNA was extracted from soil sampled on the day of spiking, 7, 21, and 63 days after spiking. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene and fungal internal transcribed spacer amplicons were quantified by qPCR and subjected to denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). DGGE analysis revealed that the bacterial community composition, which was strongly shaped by clay minerals after more than two years of incubation, changed in response to spiked phenanthrene and added litter. DGGE and qPCR showed that soil composition significantly influenced the microbial response to spiking. While fungal communities responded only in presence of litter to phenanthrene spiking, the response of the bacterial communities to phenanthrene was less pronounced when litter was present. Interestingly, microbial communities in all artificial soils were more strongly affected by spiking than in the natural soil, which might indicate the importance of higher microbial diversity to compensate perturbations. This study showed the influence of soil composition on the microbiota and their response to phenanthrene and litter, which may increase our understanding of

  7. Soil Mineral Composition Matters: Response of Microbial Communities to Phenanthrene and Plant Litter Addition in Long-Term Matured Artificial Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babin, Doreen; Vogel, Cordula; Zühlke, Sebastian; Schloter, Michael; Pronk, Geertje Johanna; Heister, Katja; Spiteller, Michael; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Smalla, Kornelia

    2014-01-01

    The fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil is determined by a suite of biotic and abiotic factors, and disentangling their role in the complex soil interaction network remains challenging. Here, we investigate the influence of soil composition on the microbial community structure and its response to the spiked model PAH compound phenanthrene and plant litter. We used long-term matured artificial soils differing in type of clay mineral (illite, montmorillonite) and presence of charcoal or ferrihydrite. The soils received an identical soil microbial fraction and were incubated for more than two years with two sterile manure additions. The matured artificial soils and a natural soil were subjected to the following spiking treatments: (I) phenanthrene, (II) litter, (III) litter + phenanthrene, (IV) unspiked control. Total community DNA was extracted from soil sampled on the day of spiking, 7, 21, and 63 days after spiking. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene and fungal internal transcribed spacer amplicons were quantified by qPCR and subjected to denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). DGGE analysis revealed that the bacterial community composition, which was strongly shaped by clay minerals after more than two years of incubation, changed in response to spiked phenanthrene and added litter. DGGE and qPCR showed that soil composition significantly influenced the microbial response to spiking. While fungal communities responded only in presence of litter to phenanthrene spiking, the response of the bacterial communities to phenanthrene was less pronounced when litter was present. Interestingly, microbial communities in all artificial soils were more strongly affected by spiking than in the natural soil, which might indicate the importance of higher microbial diversity to compensate perturbations. This study showed the influence of soil composition on the microbiota and their response to phenanthrene and litter, which may increase our understanding of

  8. Role of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria in modulating the efficiency of poultry litter composting with rock phosphate and its effect on growth and yield of wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billah, Motsim; Bano, Asghari

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the role of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) in P solubilisation from rock phosphate through composting with poultry litter, and further to study the effects of prepared enriched composts on growth, yield, and phosphorus uptake of wheat crop. Various phosphorus-enriched composts were prepared from rock phosphate and poultry litter (1:10) with and without inoculation of plant growth promoting rhizobacterias (Pseudomonas sp. and Proteus sp.). Results showed that the rock-phosphate-added poultry litter had higher total phosphorus, available (Mehlic-3 extracted) phosphorus, microbial biomass (carbon and phosphorus), and lower total organic carbon, total nitrogen, and carbon/nitrogen ratio over poultry litter alone. Inoculation of Pseudomonas sp. with rock phosphate-added poultry litter showed maximum increase in available phosphorus (41% of total phosphorus) followed by Proteus sp. inoculation (30% of total phosphorus) over uninoculated treatment (23% of total phosphorus) on the 120th day of composting. Microbial biomass (carbon and phosphorus) increased up to Day 45 and tended to decrease till the 120th day of composting, irrespective of the treatments. However, in pot experiments, wheat seeds receiving inoculation with plant growth promoting rhizobacterias, subsequently treated with rock phosphate-enriched compost proved highly stimulatory to plant height, phosphorus uptake, grain yield, and seed phosphorus content over uninoculated untreated control. The plant growth promoting rhizobacterias inoculation can be a sustainable source releasing phosphorus from low grade rock phosphate through composting and application of rock phosphate-enriched compost can be an alternative to chemical fertilisers for better crop production. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Submerged Medium Voltage Cable Systems at Nuclear Power Plants. A Review of Research Efforts Relevant to Aging Mechanisms and Condition Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Jason [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bernstein, Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); White, II, Gregory Von [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Glover, Steven F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Neely, Jason C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pena, Gary [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Williamson, Kenneth Martin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Zutavern, Fred J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gelbard, Fred [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    and industrial literature was performed to identify : 1) findings regarding the degradation mechanisms of submerged cabling and 2) condition monitoring methods that may prove useful in predict ing the remaining lifetime of submerged medium voltage p ower cables . The re search was conducted by a multi - disciplinary team , and s ources includ ed official NRC reports, n ational l aboratory reports , IEEE standards, conference and journal proceedings , magazine articles , PhD dissertations , and discussions with experts . The purpose of this work was to establish the current state - of - the - art in material degradation modeling and cable condition monitoring techniques and to identify research gaps . Subsequently, future areas of focus are recommended to address these research gaps and thus strengthen the efficacy of the NRC's developing cable condition monitoring program . Results of this literature review and details of the test ing recommendations are presented in this report . FOREWORD To ensure the safe, re liable, and cost - effective long - term operation of nuclear power plants, many systems, structures, and components must be continuously evaluated. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has identified that cables in submerged environments are of concern, particularly as plants are seeking license renewal. To date, there is a lack of consensus on aging and degradation mechanisms even though the area of submerged cables has been extensively studied. Consequently, the ability to make lifetime predictions for submerged cable does not yet exist. The NRC has engaged Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to lead a coordinated effort to help elucidate the aging and degradation of cables in submerged environments by collaborating with cable manufacturers, utilities, universities, and other government agencies. A team of SNL experts was assembled from the laboratories including electrical condition monitoring, mat erial science, polymer degradation, plasma physics

  10. Arsenic, zinc, and aluminium removal from gold mine wastewater effluents and accumulation by submerged aquatic plants (Cabomba piauhyensis, Egeria densa, and Hydrilla verticillata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Bakar, Ahmad Farid; Yusoff, Ismail; Fatt, Ng Tham; Othman, Faridah; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel

    2013-01-01

    The potential of three submerged aquatic plant species (Cabomba piauhyensis, Egeria densa, and Hydrilla verticillata) to be used for As, Al, and Zn phytoremediation was tested. The plants were exposed for 14 days under hydroponic conditions to mine waste water effluents in order to assess the suitability of the aquatic plants to remediate elevated multi-metals concentrations in mine waste water. The results show that the E. densa and H. verticillata are able to accumulate high amount of arsenic (95.2%) and zinc (93.7%) and resulted in a decrease of arsenic and zinc in the ambient water. On the other hand, C. piauhyensis shows remarkable aluminium accumulation in plant biomass (83.8%) compared to the other tested plants. The ability of these plants to accumulate the studied metals and survive throughout the experiment demonstrates the potential of these plants to remediate metal enriched water especially for mine drainage effluent. Among the three tested aquatic plants, H. verticillata was found to be the most applicable (84.5%) and suitable plant species to phytoremediate elevated metals and metalloid in mine related waste water.

  11. Arsenic, Zinc, and Aluminium Removal from Gold Mine Wastewater Effluents and Accumulation by Submerged Aquatic Plants (Cabomba piauhyensis, Egeria densa, and Hydrilla verticillata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Farid Abu Bakar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential of three submerged aquatic plant species (Cabomba piauhyensis, Egeria densa, and Hydrilla verticillata to be used for As, Al, and Zn phytoremediation was tested. The plants were exposed for 14 days under hydroponic conditions to mine waste water effluents in order to assess the suitability of the aquatic plants to remediate elevated multi-metals concentrations in mine waste water. The results show that the E. densa and H. verticillata are able to accumulate high amount of arsenic (95.2% and zinc (93.7% and resulted in a decrease of arsenic and zinc in the ambient water. On the other hand, C. piauhyensis shows remarkable aluminium accumulation in plant biomass (83.8% compared to the other tested plants. The ability of these plants to accumulate the studied metals and survive throughout the experiment demonstrates the potential of these plants to remediate metal enriched water especially for mine drainage effluent. Among the three tested aquatic plants, H. verticillata was found to be the most applicable (84.5% and suitable plant species to phytoremediate elevated metals and metalloid in mine related waste water.

  12. [Litter decomposition and soil faunal diversity of two understory plant debris in the alpine timberline ecotone of western Sichuan in a snow cover season].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Run-lian; Chen, Ya-mei; Deng, Chang-chun; Yan, Wan-qin; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Yang

    2015-03-01

    In order to understand the relationship between litter decomposition and soil fauna diversity during snow cover season, litterbags with plant debris of Actinothuidium hookeri, Cystopteris montana, two representative understory plants in the alpine timberline ecotone, and their mixed litter were incubated in the dark coniferous forest, timberline and alpine meadow, respectively. After a snow cover season, the mass loss and soil fauna in litterbags were investigated. After decomposition with a snow cover season, alpine meadow showed the highest mass loss of plant debris in comparison with coniferous forest and timberline, and the mass loss of A. hookeri was more significant. The mixture of two plants debris accelerated the mass loss, especially in the timberline. A total of 968 soil invertebrates, which belonged to 5 classes, 10 orders and 35 families, were captured in litterbags. Acarina and Collembola were the dominant groups in plant debris. The numbers of individuals and groups of soil faunal communities in litter of timberline were higher than those of alpine meadow and dark coniferous forest. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicated that the groups of soil animals were related closely with the average temperature, and endemic species such as Isoptera and Geophilomorpha were observed only in coniferous forest, while Hemiptera and Psocoptera only in.the alpine meadow. The diversity of soil faunal community was more affected by plant debris varieties in the timberline than in the coniferous forest and alpine meadow. Multiple regression analysis indicated that the average temperature and snow depth explained 30.8% of the variation of litter mass loss rate, soil animals explained 8.3%, and altogether explained 34.1%. Snow was one of the most critical factors impacting the decomposition of A. hookeri and C. montana debris in the alpine timberline ecotone.

  13. Dimensioning of activation systems using submerged membranes at municipal sewage treatment plants; Bemessung von Membranbelebungsanlagen beim Einsatz zur Reinigung kommunaler Abwaesser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohle, P.; Dorgeloh, E. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (DE). Inst. fuer Siedlungswasserwirtschaft (ISA)

    1999-07-01

    Dimensioning of conventional activation systems in Germany as a rule relies on instruction sheet A131 of the Abwassertechnische Vereinigung or follows the Hochschulgruppen approach (HSG). They contain recommendations as to the size of the nitrification and denitrification zones, the amount of oxygen supplied and sludge production, and the size of the final sedimentation tank. For the use of sludge activation techniques by means of submerged membranes at municipal sewage treatment plant there so far do not exist any clues to dimensioning that make allowance for the modified boundary conditions. The present paper analyses instruction sheet A131 for its suitability as a basis in the dimensioning of sludge activation systems with submerged membranes at municipal sewage treatment plant. Then the dimensioning instructions are modified to suit the changed boundary conditions, and recommendations for the dimensioning of activation systems with submerged membranes on the basis of extensive studies carried out at the Institut fuer Siedlungswasserwirtschaft ISA of Aachen Technical University RWTH are given. (orig.) [German] Die Bemessung konventioneller Belebungsverfahren erfolgt in Deutschland i.d.R. auf der Grundlage des Arbeitsblatts A 131 der Abwassertechnischen Vereinigung bzw. nach dem Hochschulgruppenansatz (HSG). Sie enthalten Empfehlungen bezueglich der Dimensionierung von Nitrifikations- und Denitrifikationszone, Sauerstoffversorgung, Schlammproduktion und Nachklaerbecken. Fuer den Einsatz von Membranbelebungsanlagen in kommunalen Klaeranlagen existieren bislang keine Bemessungshinweise, die den veraenderten Randbedingungen Rechnung tragen. Der vorliegende Beitrag analysiert das Arbeitsblatt A 131 in Hinsicht auf die Moeglichkeit zur Anwendung fuer die Bemessung von Membranbelebungsanlagen beim Einsatz zur kommunalen Abwasserreinigung. Im Weiteren erfolgt die Modifikation der Bemessungshinweise hinsichtlich der geaenderten Randbedingungen und die Angabe von

  14. Decomposition of plant litter in Pacific coast tidal marshes, 2014-2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Decomposition of plant matter is one of the key processes affecting carbon cycling and storage in tidal wetlands. In this study, we evaluated the effects of factors...

  15. Exploring the Spatial-Seasonal Dynamics of Water Quality, Submerged Aquatic Plants and Their Influencing Factors in Different Areas of a Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The degradation of water quality in lakes and its negative effects on freshwater ecosystems have become a serious problem worldwide. Exploring the dynamics in the associated factors is essential for water pollution management and control. GIS interpolation, principal component analysis (PCA and multivariate statistical techniques were used to identify the main pollution sources in different areas of Honghu Lake. The results indicate that the spatial distribution of the concentrations of total nitrogen (TN, total phosphate (TP, ammonia nitrogen (NH4+–N, and permanganate index (CODMn have similar characteristics and that their values gradually increased from south to north during the three seasons in Honghu Lake. The major influencing factors of water quality varied across the different areas and seasons. The relatively high concentrations of TN and TP, which might limit the growth of submerged aquatic plants, were mainly caused by anthropogenic factors. Our work suggests that spatial analyses combined with PCA are useful for investigating the factors that influence water quality and submerged aquatic plant biomass in different areas of a lake. These findings provide sound information for the future water quality management of the lake or even the entire lake basin.

  16. Plant herbivory responses through changes in leaf quality have no effect on subsequent leaf-litter decomposition in a neotropical rain forest tree community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Rafael E; Hättenschwiler, Stephan; Valencia, Renato; Argoti, Adriana; Dangles, Olivier

    2015-08-01

    It is commonly accepted that plant responses to foliar herbivory (e.g. plant defenses) can influence subsequent leaf-litter decomposability in soil. While several studies have assessed the herbivory-decomposability relationship among different plant species, experimental tests at the intra-specific level are rare, although critical for a mechanistic understanding of how herbivores affect decomposition and its consequences at the ecosystem scale. Using 17 tree species from the Yasuní National Park, Ecuadorian Amazonia, and applying three different herbivore damage treatments, we experimentally tested whether the plant intra-specific responses to herbivory, through changes in leaf quality, affect subsequent leaf-litter decomposition in soil. We found no effects of herbivore damage on the subsequent decomposition of leaf litter within any of the species tested. Our results suggest that leaf traits affecting herbivory are different from those influencing decomposition. Herbivore damage showed much higher intra-specific than inter-specific variability, while we observed the opposite for decomposition. Our findings support the idea that interactions between consumers and their resources are controlled by different factors for the green and the brown food-webs in tropical forests, where herbivory may not necessarily generate any direct positive or negative feedbacks for nutrient cycling. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Adaptações de plantas submersas à absorção do carbono inorgânico Adaptations of submerged plants to inorganic carbon uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Andréa Pierini

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available No presente trabalho são discutidos alguns aspectos teóricos dos mecanismos e adaptações empregados pela vegetação submersa para maximizar o aproveitamento do carbono inorgânico na água. O tipo de estratégia utilizada pelas macrófitas aquáticas submersas deve-se a diferenças genéticas entre as espécies e também às condições ambientais predominantes. Vários mecanismos fisiológicos e morfológicos, como a utilização do metabolismo C4, do ácido das crassuláceas (CAM, a utilização do bicarbonato (HCO3-, a utilização do CO2 da água intersticial do sedimento e o desenvolvimento de folhas aéreas foram considerados as principais adaptações para evitar a limitação do carbono no ambiente aquático. De relevância ecológica, a utilização destas diferentes estratégias pode compensar baixas ofertas de CO2 às taxas fotossintéticas de várias espécies submersas e suprimir a fotorrespiração por garantir altas concentrações intracelulares de CO2. Assim, estes mecanismos são responsáveis, em parte, pelo sucesso das macrófitas aquáticas submersas em ambientes oligotróficos, com baixas concentrações de CO2.In this paper, the main theoretical aspects of the mechanisms and adaptations used by submerged vegetation to maximize the utilization of inorganic carbon are discussed. The type of strategy used by submerged plants is related to both genetic differences among species and environmental conditions. The use of C4 metabolism and crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM, uptake of bicarbonate (HCO3-, uptake of CO2 from interstitial (sediment water and the development of aerial leaves are considered the main physiological and morphological adaptations to avoid CO2 limitation. These mechanisms are ecologically important given that their utilization overcome the low CO2 availability to several submerged species. In addition, they suppress the photorespiration by increasing the intracellular CO2 concentrations. Thus, these

  18. Decomposition of Carex and Sphagnum litter in two mesotrophic fens differing in dominant plant species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, R.A.; Van Logtestijn, R. S P; Verhoeven, J. T A

    2001-01-01

    Peatlands can be classified into fens and bogs based on their hydrology. Development of fens to bogs is accompanied by the invasion of Sphagnum species. The purpose of this study was to determine how the decomposition process in fens is influenced by the transition from a vascular plant-dominated

  19. Soil fauna and plant litter decomposition in tropical and subalpine forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. Gonzalez; T.R. Seastedt

    2001-01-01

    The decomposition of plant residues is influenced by their chemical composition, the physical-chemical environment, and the decomposer organisms. Most studies interested in latitudinal gradients of decomposition have focused on substrate quality and climate effects on decomposition, and have excluded explicit recognition of the soil organisms involved in the process....

  20. Sources and modes of action of invasive knotweed allelopathy: the effects of leaf litter and trained soil on the germination and growth of native plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalin Parepa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Invasive knotweeds, native to Eastern Asia, are among the most dominant plant invaders of European and North American temperate ecosystems. Recent studies indicate that one cause of this dominance might be allelopathy, but the possible sources and modes of action of this allelopathy are insufficiently understood. Here, we asked whether the invasive knotweed Fallopia × bohemica can exert allelopathic effects on native plants also through its leaf litter, or through persistent soil contaminants, and whether these affect the germination or growth of native plants. In a germination experiment with nine native species neither litter leachate, an aqueous extract of knotweed leaves added to the soil, nor trained soil with a history of Fallopia pre-cultivation suppressed the germination or early growth of natives. A mesocosm study with experimental native communities showed that the presence of F. × bohemica, although not a dominant in these communities, caused significant shifts of life-history strategy in two dominant natives, and that similar effects could be elicited through litter leachates or trained soil alone. However, there were hardly any effects on the biomass of natives. Our study indicates that knotweed allelopathy acts on the growth rather than germination of natives, and that soil contamination through persistent allelochemicals may not be a significant problem in habitat restoration. It also shows that allelopathic effects can sometimes be subtle changes in life-history and allocation patterns of the affected species.

  1. Litter chemistry prevails over litter consumers in mediating effects of past steel industry activities on leaf litter decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucisine, Pierre; Lecerf, Antoine; Danger, Michaël; Felten, Vincent; Aran, Delphine; Auclerc, Apolline; Gross, Elisabeth M; Huot, Hermine; Morel, Jean-Louis; Muller, Serge; Nahmani, Johanne; Maunoury-Danger, Florence

    2015-12-15

    Soil pollution has adverse effects on the performance and life history traits of microorganisms, plants, and animals, yet evidence indicates that even the most polluted sites can support structurally-complex and dynamic ecosystems. The present study aims at determining whether and how litter decomposition, one of the most important soil ecological processes leaf, is affected in a highly trace-metal polluted site. We postulated that past steel mill activities resulting in soil pollution and associated changes in soil characteristics would influence the rate of litter decomposition through two non-exclusive pathways: altered litter chemistry and responses of decomposers to lethal and sub-lethal toxic stress. We carried out a litter-bag experiment using Populus tremula L. leaf litter collected at, and allowed to decompose in, a trace metal polluted site and in three unpolluted sites used as controls. We designed a fully-factorial transplant experimental design to assess effects of litter origin and exposure site on the rate of litter decomposition. We further determined initial litter chemistry, fungal biomass, mesofauna abundance in litter bags, and the soil macrofauna community. Irrespective of the site of litter exposure, litter originating from the polluted site had a two-fold faster decomposition than litter from the unpolluted sites. Litter chemistry, notably the lignin content, seemed most important in explaining the degradation rate of the leaf litter. Abundance of meso and macro-detritivores was higher at the polluted site than at the unpolluted sites. However, litter decomposition proceeded at similar rates in polluted and unpolluted sites. Our results show that trace metal pollution and associated soil and litter changes do not necessarily weaken consumer control on litter decomposition through lethal and sub-lethal toxic stress. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Experimentally simulated global warming and nitrogen enrichment effects on microbial litter decomposers in a marsh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Sabine; Gessner, Mark O

    2011-02-01

    Atmospheric warming and increased nitrogen deposition can lead to changes of microbial communities with possible consequences for biogeochemical processes. We used an enclosure facility in a freshwater marsh to assess the effects on microbes associated with decomposing plant litter under conditions of simulated climate warming and pulsed nitrogen supply. Standard batches of litter were placed in coarse-mesh and fine-mesh bags and submerged in a series of heated, nitrogen-enriched, and control enclosures. They were retrieved later and analyzed for a range of microbial parameters. Fingerprinting profiles obtained by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) indicated that simulated global warming induced a shift in bacterial community structure. In addition, warming reduced fungal biomass, whereas bacterial biomass was unaffected. The mesh size of the litter bags and sampling date also had an influence on bacterial community structure, with the apparent number of dominant genotypes increasing from spring to summer. Microbial respiration was unaffected by any treatment, and nitrogen enrichment had no clear effect on any of the microbial parameters considered. Overall, these results suggest that microbes associated with decomposing plant litter in nutrient-rich freshwater marshes are resistant to extra nitrogen supplies but are likely to respond to temperature increases projected for this century.

  3. US State Submerged Lands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Submerged Lands Act (43 U.S.C. Section 1301 et seq.) grants coastal states title to natural resources located within their coastal submerged lands and navigable...

  4. Temporal dynamics of abiotic and biotic factors on leaf litter of three plant species in relation to decomposition rate along a subalpine elevation gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxiao Zhu

    Full Text Available Relationships between abiotic (soil temperature and number of freeze-thaw cycles or biotic factors (chemical elements, microbial biomass, extracellular enzymes, and decomposer communities in litter and litter decomposition rates were investigated over two years in subalpine forests close to the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau in China. Litterbags with senescent birch, fir, and spruce leaves were placed on the forest floor at 2,704 m, 3,023 m, 3,298 m, and 3,582 m elevation. Results showed that the decomposition rate positively correlated with soil mean temperature during the plant growing season, and with the number of soil freeze-thaw cycles during the winter. Concentrations of soluble nitrogen (N, phosphorus (P and potassium (K had positive effects but C:N and lignin:N ratios had negative effects on the decomposition rate (k, especially during the winter. Meanwhile, microbial biomass carbon (MBC, N (MBN, and P (MBP were positively correlated with k values during the first growing season. These biotic factors accounted for 60.0% and 56.4% of the variation in decomposition rate during the winter and the growing season in the first year, respectively. Specifically, litter chemistry (C, N, P, K, lignin, C:N and lignin:N ratio independently explained 29.6% and 13.3%, and the microbe-related factors (MBC, MBN, MBP, bacterial and fungal biomass, sucrase and ACP activity explained 22.9% and 34.9% during the first winter and the first growing season, respectively. We conclude that frequent freeze-thaw cycles and litter chemical properties determine the winter decomposition while microbe-related factors play more important roles in determining decomposition in the subsequent growing season.

  5. Submergence tolerance in Hordeum marinum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole; Malik, Al I.; Colmer, Timothy D.

    2010-01-01

    Floodwaters differ markedly in dissolved CO(2), yet the effects of CO(2) on submergence responses of terrestrial plants have rarely been examined. The influence of dissolved CO(2) on underwater photosynthesis and growth was evaluated for three accessions of the wetland plant Hordeum marinum Huds......) movement, would all contribute to submergence tolerance in H. marinum. The present study demonstrates that dissolved CO(2) levels can determine submergence tolerance of terrestrial plants. So, submergence experiments should be conducted with defined CO(2) concentrations and enrichment might be needed...

  6. Effects of Co2 Concentrations and light intensity on photosynthesis of a rootless submerged plant, ceratophyllum demersum L., used for aquatic food production in bioregenerative life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaya, Y.; Okayama, T.; Murakami, K.; Takeuchi, T.

    Aquatic higher plants are likely to play an important role in aquatic food production modules in bioregenerative systems for producing feeds for fish, converting CO2 to O2 and remedying water quality in addition to green microalgae. In the present study, the effects of culture conditions on the net photosynthetic rate of a rootless submerged plant, Ceratophyllum demersum L., was investigated to determine the optimum culture conditions for plant function in aquatic food production modules including both plant culture and fish culture systems . The net photosynthetic rate in plants was determined by the increase in dissolved O2 concentrations in a closed vessel containing a plantlet and water. The water in the vessel was aerated sufficiently with a gas containing a known level CO 2 gas mixed with N2 gas before closing the vessel. The CO 2 concentrations in the aerating gas ranged from 0.3 to 100 mmol mol-1 . Photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) in the vessel ranged from 0 (dark) to 1.0 mmol m-2 s-1 , which was controlled with a metal halide lamp. Temperature was kept at 28 C. The net photosynthetic rate increased with increasing PPFD levels and was saturated at 0.2 and 0.5 mmol m-2 s-1 PPFD under CO 2 levels of 1.0 and 3.0 mmol mol-1 , respectively. The net photosynthetic rate increased with increasing CO2 levels from 0.3 to 3.0 mmol mol-1 showing the maximum value, 70 nmolO 2 gDW s at 3.0 mmol mol-1 CO2 and gradually decreased with increasing CO 2 levels from 3.0 to 100 mmol mol-1 . The results demonstrate that Ceratophyllum demersum L. could be an efficient CO 2 to O2 converter under a 3.0 mmol mol-1 CO2 level and relatively low PPFD levels in aquatic food production modules.

  7. [A field study of tundra plant litter decomposition rate via mass loss and carbon dioxide emission: the role of biotic and abiotic controls, biotope, season of year, and spatial-temporal scale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochikalov, A V; Karelin, D V

    2014-01-01

    Although many recently published original papers and reviews deal with plant matter decomposition rates and their controls, we are still very short in understanding of these processes in boreal and high latiude plant communities, especially in permafrost areas of our planet. First and foremost, this is holds true for winter period. Here, we present the results of 2-year field observations in south taiga and south shrub tundra ecosystems in European Russia. We pioneered in simultaneous application of two independent methods: classic mass loss estimation by litter-bag technique, and direct measurement of CO2 emission (respiration) of the same litter bags with different types of dead plant matter. Such an approach let us to reconstruct intra-seasonal dynamics of decomposition rates of the main tundra litter fractions with high temporal resolution, to estimate the partial role of different seasons and defragmentation in the process of plant matter decomposition, and to determine its factors under different temporal scale.

  8. Effects of CO 2 concentration and light intensity on photosynthesis of a rootless submerged plant, Ceratophyllumdemersum L., used for aquatic food production in bioregenerative life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaya, Y.; Okayama, T.; Murakami, K.; Takeuchi, T.

    In addition to green microalgae, aquatic higher plants are likely to play an important role in aquatic food production modules in bioregenerative systems for producing feed for fish, converting CO 2 to O 2 and remedying water quality. In the present study, the effects of culture conditions on the net photosynthetic rate of a rootless submerged plant, Ceratophyllum demersum L., was investigated to determine the optimum culture conditions for maximal function of plants in food production modules including both aquatic plant culture and fish culture systems. The net photosynthetic rate in plants was determined by the increase in dissolved O 2 concentrations in a closed vessel containing a plantlet and water. The water in the vessel was aerated sufficiently with a gas containing a known concentration of CO 2 gas mixed with N 2 gas before closing the vessel. The CO 2 concentrations in the aerating gas ranged from 0.3 to 10 mmol mol -1. Photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) in the vessel ranged from 0 (dark) to 1.0 mmol M -2 s -1, which was controlled with a metal halide lamp. Temperature was kept at 28°C. The net photosynthetic rate increased with increasing PPFD levels and was saturated at 0.2 and 0.5 mmol m -2 s -1 PPFD under CO 2 levels of 1.0 and 3.0 mmol mol -1, respectively. The net photosynthetic rate increased with increasing CO 2 levels from 0.3 to 3.0 mmol mol -1 showing the maximum value, 75 nmolO 2 gDW -1 s -1, at 2-3 mmol mol -1 CO 2 and gradually decreased with increasing CO 2 levels from 3.0 to 10 mmol mol -1. The results demonstrate that C. demersum could be an efficient CO 2 to O 2 converter under a 2.0 mmol mol -1 CO 2 level and relatively low PPFD levels in aquatic food production modules.

  9. Effects of CO2 concentration and light intensity on photosynthesis of a rootless submerged plant, Ceratophyllum demersum L., used for aquatic food production in bioregenerative life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaya, Y.; Okayama, T.; Murakami, K.; Takeuchi, T.

    2003-01-01

    In addition to green microalgae, aquatic higher plants are likely to play an important role in aquatic food production modules in bioregenerative systems for producing feed for fish, converting CO2 to O2 and remedying water quality. In the present study, the effects of culture conditions on the net photosynthetic rate of a rootless submerged plant, Ceratophyllum demersum L., was investigated to determine the optimum culture conditions for maximal function of plants in food production modules including both aquatic plant culture and fish culture systems. The net photosynthetic rate in plants was determined by the increase in dissolved O2 concentrations in a closed vessel containing a plantlet and water. The water in the vessel was aerated sufficiently with a gas containing a known concentration of CO2 gas mixed with N2 gas before closing the vessel. The CO2 concentrations in the aerating gas ranged from 0.3 to 10 mmol mol-1. Photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) in the vessel ranged from 0 (dark) to 1.0 mmol m-2 s-1, which was controlled with a metal halide lamp. Temperature was kept at 28 degrees C. The net photosynthetic rate increased with increasing PPFD levels and was saturated at 0.2 and 0.5 mmol m-2 s-1 PPFD under CO2 levels of 1.0 and 3.0 mmol mol-1, respectively. The net photosynthetic rate increased with increasing CO2 levels from 0.3 to 3.0 mmol mol-1 showing the maximum value, 75 nmol O2 gDW-1 s-1, at 2-3 mmol mol-1 CO2 and gradually decreased with increasing CO2 levels from 3.0 to 10 mmol mol-1. The results demonstrate that C. demersum could be an efficient CO2 to O2 converter under a 2.0 mmol mol-1 CO2 level and relatively low PPFD levels in aquatic food production modules. c2003 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cross-biome transplants of plant litter show decomposition models extend to a broader climatic range but lose predictability at the decadal time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    William S. Currie; Mark E. Harmon; Ingrid C. Burke; Stephen C. Hart; William J. Parton; Whendee L. Silver

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed results from 10-year long field incubations of foliar and fine root litter from the Long-term lntersite Decomposition Experiment Team (LIDET) study. We tested whether a variety of climate and litter quality variables could be used to develop regression models of decomposition parameters across wide ranges in litter quality and climate and whether these...

  11. Species mixture effects on flammability across plant phylogeny: the importance of litter particle size and the special role for non-Pinus Pinaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weiwei; Cornwell, William K; van Pomeren, Marinda; van Logtestijn, Richard S P; Cornelissen, Johannes H C

    2016-11-01

    Fire affects and is affected by plants. Vegetation varies in flammability, that is, its general ability to burn, at different levels of ecological organization. To scale from individual plant traits to community flammability states, understanding trait effects on species flammability variation and their interaction is important. Plant traits are the cumulative result of evolution and they show, to differing extents, phylogenetic conservatism. We asked whether phylogenetic distance between species predicts species mixture effects on litterbed flammability. We conducted controlled laboratory burns for 34 phylogenetically wide-ranging species and 34 random two-species mixtures from them. Generally, phylogenetic distance did not predict species mixture effects on flammability. Across the plant phylogeny, most species were flammable except those in the non-Pinus Pinaceae, which shed small needles producing dense, poorly ventilated litterbeds above the packing threshold and therefore nonflammable. Consistently, either positive or negative dominance effects on flammability of certain flammable or those non-flammable species were found in mixtures involving the non-Pinus Pinaceae. We demonstrate litter particle size is key to explaining species nonadditivity in fuelbed flammability. The potential of certain species to influence fire disproportionately to their abundance might increase the positive feedback effects of plant flammability on community flammability state if flammable species are favored by fire.

  12. Study of the dynamics of Zn, Fe, and Cu in the soil-plant system during leaf litter decomposition using isotopic compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichat, S.; Fekiacova, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Litter decomposition is a key process in the cycle of the elements in the soil-plant system. We have investigated the dynamics of three essential micronutrients (Zn, Fe, and Cu) in the vegetal cover, litter, organic horizons, and upper soil horizon (0-2 and 5-10 cm) using both element concentrations and isotopic compositions. The study was conducted on the O3HP (Oak Observatory at the Haute-Provence Observatory) experimental field site in southern France. O3HP is located far from pollution sources. It has been a fallow land for 70 years with the tree cover represented mainly by oak trees (Quercus pubescens). The soil is a thin layer of Calcisol developed under Mediterranean climate. The area has been subdivided in four zones as a function of plant cover. The results for two of these zones, dominated by respectively Poaceae and Genista hispanica, are reported here. We found that the concentrations of the three elements increase from the Ol to the Of horizon. Copper concentration in the Of horizon is close to that of the soil, whereas it is lower for Fe and Zn. For isotopic compositions, the behavior of the three elements is, however, different, which suggests different processes of redistribution for these elements. An enrichment in light Fe isotopes was observed from the Ol to the Of horizon, the latter having an isotopic composition similar to that of the soil. Zinc isotopic compositions are also similar in the Of horizon and the soil but they are isotopically heavier than in the Ol horizon. For Cu, the O horizons are isotopically heavier than the soil, with Of being the heaviest horizon. In addition, for Cu and Zn, the profiles in the O-horizons in the Poaceae-dominated and Genista hispanica-dominated areas are similar but their values are offset, suggesting an influence of the vegetal cover. The increase in concentration for Cu, Zn and Fe with age/depth in the O horizons is in agreement with what is commonly observed in litter-bag experiments, e.g. 1,2. Two

  13. The ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus converts organic matter in plant litter using a trimmed brown-rot mechanism involving Fenton chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rineau, Francois; Roth, Doris; Shah, Firoz

    2012-01-01

    enzymes needed for metabolizing the released carbon. The saprotrophic activity has been reduced to a radical-based biodegradation system that can efficiently disrupt the organic matterprotein complexes and thereby mobilize the entrapped nutrients. We suggest that the released carbon then becomes available...... the mycorrhizal fungi. To capture the nitrogen, the fungi must at least partly disrupt the recalcitrant organic matterprotein complexes within which the nitrogen is embedded. This disruption process is poorly characterized. We used spectroscopic analyses and transcriptome profiling to examine the mechanism...... by which the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus degrades organic matter when acquiring nitrogen from plant litter. The fungus partially degraded polysaccharides and modified the structure of polyphenols. The observed chemical changes were consistent with a hydroxyl radical attack, involving Fenton...

  14. DECOTAB: a multipurpose standard substrate to assess effects of litter quality on microbial decomposition and invertebrate consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampfraath, A.A.; Hunting, E.R.; Mulder, C.; Breure, A.M.; Gessner, M.O.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Admiraal, W.

    2012-01-01

    Currently available tools for studying plant litter decomposition and invertebrate consumption in aquatic ecosystems have at least 2 major limitations: 1) the difficulty of manipulating litter chemical composition to provide mechanistic insights into attributes of litter quality controlling

  15. Long-term litter decomposition controlled by manganese redox cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiluweit, Marco; Nico, Peter; Harmon, Mark E; Mao, Jingdong; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Kleber, Markus

    2015-09-22

    Litter decomposition is a keystone ecosystem process impacting nutrient cycling and productivity, soil properties, and the terrestrial carbon (C) balance, but the factors regulating decomposition rate are still poorly understood. Traditional models assume that the rate is controlled by litter quality, relying on parameters such as lignin content as predictors. However, a strong correlation has been observed between the manganese (Mn) content of litter and decomposition rates across a variety of forest ecosystems. Here, we show that long-term litter decomposition in forest ecosystems is tightly coupled to Mn redox cycling. Over 7 years of litter decomposition, microbial transformation of litter was paralleled by variations in Mn oxidation state and concentration. A detailed chemical imaging analysis of the litter revealed that fungi recruit and redistribute unreactive Mn(2+) provided by fresh plant litter to produce oxidative Mn(3+) species at sites of active decay, with Mn eventually accumulating as insoluble Mn(3+/4+) oxides. Formation of reactive Mn(3+) species coincided with the generation of aromatic oxidation products, providing direct proof of the previously posited role of Mn(3+)-based oxidizers in the breakdown of litter. Our results suggest that the litter-decomposing machinery at our coniferous forest site depends on the ability of plants and microbes to supply, accumulate, and regenerate short-lived Mn(3+) species in the litter layer. This observation indicates that biogeochemical constraints on bioavailability, mobility, and reactivity of Mn in the plant-soil system may have a profound impact on litter decomposition rates.

  16. Microbial flora associated with submerged mangrove leaf litter in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanasamy Rajendran

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We studied the microbial flora in decomposing mangrove leaves in relation to changes in nitrogen and tannin levels, and in penaeid prawn assemblages. Senescent leaves of two mangrove species (Rhizophora apiculata and Avicennia marina kept in nylon bags, were separately immersed for 80 days in five tanks full of mangrove water. A known amount of decomposing leaves was collected every ten days from each tank for microorganism counts, total nitrogen and tannin measurement, and juvenile penaeid prawn counts. Five genera of total heterotrophic bacteria (THB, three species of azotobacters and 19 species of fungi were identified. The azotobacters showed a significant peak around 40-50 days after the beginning of of decomposition, similar to the trend for total nitrogen and for prawn assemblages. Rev. Biol. Trop. 55 (2: 393-400. Epub 2007 June, 29.Se estudió la flora microbiana en hojas en descomposición de mangles, considerando nitrógeno, taninos y camarones peneidos jóvenes. Colocamos hojas viejas de dos especies de mangle (Rhizophora apiculata y Avicennia marina en bolsas de nylon y las sumergimos en agua de manglar durante 80 días usando cinco tanques separados. Cada diez días extrajimos una cantidad conocida de hojas en descomposición de cada tanque. Hallamos cinco géneros de bacterias heterotróficas totales (THB, tres especies de azotobacterias y 19 especies de hongos. Las azotobacterias presentaron un pico significativo de abundancia alrededor de los 40-50 días de descomposición, un patrón similar a los del nitrógeno total y los camarones.

  17. Microbial flora associated with submerged mangrove leaf litter in India

    OpenAIRE

    Narayanasamy Rajendran; Kandasamy Kathiresan

    2007-01-01

    We studied the microbial flora in decomposing mangrove leaves in relation to changes in nitrogen and tannin levels, and in penaeid prawn assemblages. Senescent leaves of two mangrove species (Rhizophora apiculata and Avicennia marina) kept in nylon bags, were separately immersed for 80 days in five tanks full of mangrove water. A known amount of decomposing leaves was collected every ten days from each tank for microorganism counts, total nitrogen and tannin measurement, and juvenile penaeid ...

  18. Investigation of n-Alkane Distributions in Modern Plant Litter from Hawaii wetlands: a potential proxy for past vegetation and hydroclimate changes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, C.; Beilman, D. W.; Nichols, J. E.; Elison Timm, O.

    2016-12-01

    Holocene peat deposits from the Hawaiian Islands provide a unique opportunity to resolve millennial to centennial-scale climate variability over the central Pacific region, where data remain scarce. Because both extratropical and tropical modes of climate variability have a strong influence on modern rainfall over the archipelago, hydroclimate proxies from peat would provide valuable information about past Pacific climate changes. The few terrestrial records studied, based on pollen or leaf wax biomarkers, showed evidence for substantial vegetation changes that have been linked to a drying trend over the Holocene. Leaf wax n-alkanes, as well as their stable isotopic compositions (δ13C and δD), are indeed increasingly used to reconstruct past hydroclimate conditions. The interpretation of n-alkanes as biomarkers requires however a thorough knowledge of their distribution in modern plants that contribute to sediments, but in Hawaii the modern vegetation is understudied compared to proxy applications. Here we report results from a preliminary investigation of n-alkanes distributions in dominant modern plant litter collected at a bog site at the summit of the Waianae mountains on the Island of Oahu. We compared n-alkane distributions among species and plant groups in order to test whether taxa or plant functional types (mosses, ferns, woody plants, and sedges) can be discriminated from their n-alkane profiles. Results showed that general plant groups were difficult to distinguish based on individual n-alkanes abundances, chain lengths, or ratios. At the species level, the sedge Machaerina augustifolia, was largely dominated by n-C29 ( 60%), suggesting some chain lengths could be useful as proxies for identifying the contribution of sedges to sedimentary records. Woody plant average chain length was highly variable but overall was not shorter (even slightly higher) than in other terrestrial plants, as it is often assumed. A sedimentary profile from this site shows

  19. Effects of forest structure on litter production, soil chemical composition and litter-soil interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elivane Salete Capellesso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Litter production in forest ecosystems is a major indicator of primary productivity because litter helps incorporate carbon and nutrients from plants into the soil and is directly involved in plant-soil interactions. To our knowledge, few studies have investigated the relationship between species diversity and ecosystem processes in subtropical forest fragments. In this work, we determined forest structural parameters and assessed seasonal leaf litter input, leaf decomposition rate, litter quality and soil characteristics in two subtropical Atlantic Forest fragments. Litter production was greater in the native fragment with the higher species diversity (FN1. The two native fragments (FN1 and FN2 differed in basal area, volume and dominance in the upper stratum, which were positively correlated with litter production in FN1 but negatively correlated in FN2. Soil in FN1 exhibited higher contents of organic C, available phosphorus and exchangeable calcium, and the leaf litter had a higher C:N ratio. Although these results are consistent with a plant-soil feedback, which suggests the presence of a complementary effect, the dominance of certain families in subtropical forest fragments results in a selection effect on litter productivity and decomposition.

  20. Calculation method for determination of carbon in the peatand moss litter of forest swamps by ash content of plant substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. T. Efremova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies were carried out in the lowmountain part of the Kuznetsk Alatau. The spruce stands were studied in the peaty valley of river Tunguzhul and swamp near Agaskyr Lake (valley of river Pechische, basin of river Black Iyus. The objects belong to the group of high ash content flood plain peat lands of cryogenicseries. We have done the evaluation of organic carbon response to physical-chemical properties – decomposition degree, ash content, and bulk density, connected together (r – 0.5–0.7, that in contrast to carbon, is easy determined analytically. Received results according to stepwise regression analysis characterize the strong conditionality predictors of carbon: multiple determination index R2 – 0.86. The highest partial correlation coefficient with the response belongs to the ash content in range (5–68 %. Partial correlation coefficient values of bulk density and decomposition degree is not significant. The determination index (R2 – 0.93, constant and negative coefficient of pair regression analysis are highly significant and evidence of the strong bond of carbon and organic substrate ash content. The relative error of approximation is in the range of 2–8 % and characterizes the high accuracy of prognosis. Including only one indicator (ash content in the calculation formula makes it convenient and simple in practical application for the carbon content prediction on the forest litter, modern peat soils, buried peat and peat-mineral formations with ash content of 5–68 %. We are the first to present the geochemical characteristics of forest swamps peat mine for the KuznetskAlatau intermountain basins.

  1. Impacts of Soil Warming and Plant Rhizosphere on Root Litter Decomposition at Different Soil Depths in a Mediterranuan Grassland Lysimeter Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, B.; Hicks Pries, C.; Castanha, C.; Curtis, J. B.; Porras, R. C.; Torn, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate understanding of soil carbon cycling is critical for predicting climate-ecosystem feedbacks. Decomposition of root litter and its transformation into soil organic matter (SOM) are critical processes of soil carbon cycling. We aim to study the impacts of soil warming and plant rhizosphere on the fate of 13C-labeled roots buried at two soil depths using a field lysimeter facility at Hopland, California. The lysimeters contain soil columns of 38-cm diameter and 48-cm depth (0-15 cm A-horizon, and 15-48 cm B-horizon, Laughlin soil series) sown with annual grasses dominated by Avena barbata. The experiment has three treatments (planted-ambient, planted-warming (+4°C), and unplanted-ambient). In February 2014, 13C-labeled A. fatua roots were added to two depths (8-12 and 38-42 cm). We measured root-derived 13C in respired CO2 collected at the soil surface and in leachate dissolved organic carbon (DOC) collected from the lysimeters during the growing season and in soil harvested in August 2014. We found (1) soil temperature at two depths (10- and 40-cm) have been elevated by 4±0.2°C in the warmed compared to the ambient lysimeters; (2) surface (10-cm) volumetric soil moisture followed this order (unplanted-ambient > planted-ambient > planted-warming), while subsurface (40-cm) soil moisture showed little variation among treatments; (3) ecosystem respiration was enhanced by soil warming during the early growing season (March 15th and April 5th) when soil moisture was not limiting (>20%), while it was suppressed by soil warming during the late growing season (May 7th) when soil moisture was limiting (plant biomass increased 25% with soil warming. More data including 13C values of ecosystem respiration, DOC loss, and harvested soil samples, as well as soil nutrient supply rates, microbial biomass and community structure will be presented during the meeting. Overall, these results suggest that the impact of soil warming and plant rhizosphere on ecosystem carbon

  2. The ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus converts organic matter in plant litter using a trimmed brown-rot mechanism involving Fenton chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rineau, Francois; Roth, Doris; Shah, Firoz; Smits, Mark; Johansson, Tomas; Canbäck, Björn; Olsen, Peter Bjarke; Persson, Per; Grell, Morten Nedergaard; Lindquist, Erika; Grigoriev, Igor V; Lange, Lene; Tunlid, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Soils in boreal forests contain large stocks of carbon. Plants are the main source of this carbon through tissue residues and root exudates. A major part of the exudates are allocated to symbiotic ectomycorrhizal fungi. In return, the plant receives nutrients, in particular nitrogen from the mycorrhizal fungi. To capture the nitrogen, the fungi must at least partly disrupt the recalcitrant organic matter–protein complexes within which the nitrogen is embedded. This disruption process is poorly characterized. We used spectroscopic analyses and transcriptome profiling to examine the mechanism by which the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus degrades organic matter when acquiring nitrogen from plant litter. The fungus partially degraded polysaccharides and modified the structure of polyphenols. The observed chemical changes were consistent with a hydroxyl radical attack, involving Fenton chemistry similar to that of brown-rot fungi. The set of enzymes expressed by Pa. involutus during the degradation of the organic matter was similar to the set of enzymes involved in the oxidative degradation of wood by brown-rot fungi. However, Pa. involutus lacked transcripts encoding extracellular enzymes needed for metabolizing the released carbon. The saprotrophic activity has been reduced to a radical-based biodegradation system that can efficiently disrupt the organic matter–protein complexes and thereby mobilize the entrapped nutrients. We suggest that the released carbon then becomes available for further degradation and assimilation by commensal microbes, and that these activities have been lost in ectomycorrhizal fungi as an adaptation to symbiotic growth on host photosynthate. The interdependence of ectomycorrhizal symbionts and saprophytic microbes would provide a key link in the turnover of nutrients and carbon in forest ecosystems. PMID:22469289

  3. Cars submerged in water.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    Crashes in which cars are submerged in deep water or in a ditch are often complicated and serious. Considering their severity and the fact that approximately half the fatalities in this crash type are not due to drowning but to injury, preventive measures are to be preferred above measures that have

  4. Simulated acid rain alters litter decomposition and enhances the allelopathic potential of the invasive plant Wedelia trilobata (Creeping Daisy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invasive species and acid rain cause global environmental problems. Limited information exists, however, concerning the effects of acid rain on the invasiveness of these plants. For example, creeping daisy, an invasive exotic allelopathic weed, has caused great damage in southern China where acid ra...

  5. Marine Anthropogenic Litter

    OpenAIRE

    Bergmann, Melanie; Gutow, Lars; Klages, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This book describes how manmade litter, primarily plastic, has spread into the remotest parts of the oceans and covers all aspects of this pollution problem from the impacts on wildlife and human health to socio-economic and political issues. Marine litter is a prime threat to marine wildlife, habitats and food webs worldwide. The book illustrates how advanced technologies from deep-sea research, microbiology and mathematic modelling as well as classic beach litter counts by volunteers co...

  6. Restoration of Shallow Lakes in Subtropical and Tropical China: Response of Nutrients and Water Clarity to Biomanipulation by Fish Removal and Submerged Plant Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlei Yu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fish removal has been used to restore temperate lakes, and positive effects on ecological state and water clarity have frequently been recorded in many lakes. Recently, a supplementary measure, transplantation of submerged macrophytes after fish removal, has been applied to restore warm Chinese shallow lakes in order to compensate for the expected lack of increasing grazing control of phytoplankton after the biomanipulation. These measures have successfully shifted turbid warm lakes to a clear water state, but little is known about the responses to restoration of key physico-chemical variables. We analyzed the seasonal variation in nutrient concentrations in two subtropical and one tropical biomanipulated shallow Chinese lakes subjected to restoration. In all three lakes, a marked decline occurred in the concentrations of lake total nitrogen (TN, total phosphorus (TP, total suspended solids (TSS, and chlorophyll a (Chl a, while the transparency (SD:WD ratio, Secchi depth to water depth ratio increased. A clear water state was established, lasting so far for 7 to 23 months, and TN, TP, Chl a, and TSS levels in the three restored lakes decreased to, on average, 49%, 58%, 41%, and 18% of the level prior to restoration and/or the level in a reference lake, respectively, while the annual mean SD:WD ratio exhibited a 1.5–4 fold increase. In conclusion, lake restoration by transplantation of submerged macrophytes after fish removal had major positive effects on the physico-chemical variables in our study lakes. However, continuous control of omnivorous and herbivorous fish biomass is recommended as the fish typically present in warm, shallow lakes to some extent feed on submerged macrophytes, when available.

  7. LBA-ECO ND-11 Litter Decomposition, Carbon, and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agroforestry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains the results of an experiment to determine litter decomposition and dynamics of carbon and nitrogen release from plant litter of differing...

  8. LBA-ECO ND-11 Litter Decomposition, Carbon, and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agroforestry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains the results of an experiment to determine litter decomposition and dynamics of carbon and nitrogen release from plant litter of...

  9. Litter traits and palatability to detritivores: a case study across bio-geographical boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Ferreira Quadros

    Full Text Available The activity of the litter-feeding macrofauna affects litter decomposition rates at the local scale, and their preference for particular litter types is mediated by litter traits. Environmental changes such as invasion by exotic plants may change the characteristics of the litter at a local scale, with consequences to ecosystem processes. Here we evaluated the feeding preferences of four detritivores (terrestrial isopods from two biogeographic regions (neotropical and palearctic, offering them native or non-native litter in cafeteria experiments. Our results show that isopods from different geographical regions exhibit essentially the same food preference, irrespective of whether or not they previously had encountered the litter tested. Combining the isopods' preference ranks with the principal component analysis of nine litter traits, we show that preference increases with increasing nitrogen and calcium contents and decreases with increasing toughness, C:N ratio and thickness, irrespective of the geographical origin of both litter and detritivores. We conclude that the palatability of a non-native litter to the native detritivore community can be predicted from their respective litter traits and thus, native detritivores will feed on a particular non-native litter type as likely as do detritivores in the native range of the plant. As the combination of traits that indicates palatability to the isopods also indicates litter decomposability, it could be possible to predict ecosystem responses in terms of litter decomposition rates upon changes in litter composition.

  10. Leaf gas films contribute to rice (Oryza sativa) submergence tolerance during saline floods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzog, Max; Konnerup, Dennis; Pedersen, Ole

    2018-01-01

    Floods and salinization of agricultural land adversely impact global rice production. We investigated whether gas films on leaves of submerged rice delay salt entry during saline submergence. Two-week-old plants with leaf gas films (+GF) or with gas films experimentally removed (-GF) were submerg...

  11. Equilibrium and kinetic studies of copper biosorption by dead Ceriporia lacerata biomass isolated from the litter of an invasive plant in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaona; Li, Airong; Long, Mingzhong; Tian, Xingjun

    2015-01-01

    Ceriporia lacerata, a strain of white-rot fungus isolated from the litter of an invasive plant (Solidago canadensis) in China, was little known about its properties and utilization. In this work, the copper(II) biosorption characteristics of formaldehyde inactivated C. lacerata biomass were examined as a function of initial pH, initial copper(II) concentration and contact time, and the adsorptive equilibrium and kinetics were simulated, too. The optimum pH was found to be 6.0 at experimental conditions of initial copper(II) concentration 100 mg/L, biomass dose 2 g/L, contact time 12 h, shaking rate 150 r/min and temperature 25°C. Biosorption equilibrium cost about 1 hour at experimental conditions of pH 6.0, initial copper(II) concentration 100 mg/L, C. lacerata dose 2 g/L, shaking rate 150 r/min and temperature 25°C. At optimum pH 6.0, highest copper(II) biosorption amounts were 6.79 and 7.76 mg/g for initial copper(II) concentration of 100 and 200 mg/L, respectively (with other experimental parameters of C. lacerata dose 2 g/L, shaking rate 150 r/min and temperature 25°C). The pseudo second-order adsorptive model gave the best adjustment for copper(II) biosorption kinetics. The equilibrium data fitted very well to both Langmuir and Freundlich adsorptive isotherm models. Without further acid or alkali treatment for improving adsorption properties, formaldehyde inactivated C. lacerata biomass possesses good biosorption characteristics on copper(II) removal from aqueous solutions.

  12. Compaction of poultry litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhart, M; Fasina, O O; Fulton, J; Wood, C W

    2010-01-01

    Poultry litter, a combination of accumulated chicken manure, feathers and bedding materials, is a potential feedstock for bioenergy and other value-added applications. The use of this waste product has been historically limited to within few miles of the place of generation because of its inherent low density. Compaction is one possible way to enhance the storage and transportation of the litter. This study therefore investigates the effect of moisture content (19.8-70.7%, d.b.) and pressure (0.8-8.4 MPa) on the compaction characteristics of poultry litter. Results obtained showed that the initial density of densified poultry litter, energy required for compaction and the strength of the densified material after 2 months of storage were significantly (Ppoultry litter.

  13. Effect of temperature and nutrients on the competition between free-floating Salvinia natans and submerged Elodea nuttallii in mesocosms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netten, J.J.C.; Arts, G.H.P.; Gylstra, R.; Nes, van E.H.; Scheffer, M.; Roijackers, R.M.M.

    2010-01-01

    In many aquatic ecosystems, free-floating plants compete with submerged plants for nutrients and light. Being on top of the water surface free-floating plants are superior competitors for light. Submerged plants can take up nutrients from the sediment and the water column, hereby reducing these

  14. THE FATE OF TANNINS IN CORSICAN PINE LITTER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nierop, K.G.J.; Verstraten, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Tannins are ubiquitous in higher plants and therefore also in litter and soils where they affect many biogeochemical processes. Despite this well recognized role, the fate of tannins in litter and mineral soils is hardly known as often only trace amounts, if any, of tannins are measured. In this

  15. Litter evenness influences short-term peatland decomposition processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Susan E; Ostle, Nick J; McNamara, Niall P; Bardgett, Richard D

    2010-10-01

    There is concern that changes in climate and land use could increase rates of decomposition in peatlands, leading to release of stored C to the atmosphere. Rates of decomposition are driven by abiotic factors such as temperature and moisture, but also by biotic factors such as changes in litter quality resulting from vegetation change. While effects of litter species identity and diversity on decomposition processes are well studied, the impact of changes in relative abundance (evenness) of species has received less attention. In this study we investigated effects of changes in short-term peatland plant species evenness on decomposition in mixed litter assemblages, measured as litter weight loss, respired CO(2) and leachate C and N. We found that over the 307-day incubation period, higher levels of species evenness increased rates of decomposition in mixed litters, measured as weight loss and leachate dissolved organic N. We also found that the identity of the dominant species influenced rates of decomposition, measured as weight loss, CO(2) flux and leachate N. Greatest rates of decomposition were when the dwarf shrub Calluna vulgaris dominated litter mixtures, and lowest rates when the bryophyte Pleurozium schreberi dominated. Interactions between evenness and dominant species identity were also detected for litter weight loss and leachate N. In addition, positive non-additive effects of mixing litter were observed for litter weight loss. Our findings highlight the importance of changes in the evenness of plant community composition for short-term decomposition processes in UK peatlands.

  16. Environmentally friendly animal litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chett, Boxley; McKelvie, Jessica

    2013-08-20

    A method of making an animal litter that includes geopolymerized ash, wherein, the animal litter is made from a quantity of a pozzolanic ash mixed with a sufficient quantity of water and an alkaline activator to initiate a geopolymerization reaction that forms geopolymerized ash. After the geopolymerized ash is formed, it is dried, broken into particulates, and sieved to a desired size. These geopolymerized ash particulates are used to make a non-clumping or clumping animal litter. Odor control may be accomplished with the addition of a urease inhibitor, pH buffer, an odor eliminating agent, and/or fragrance.

  17. Plant litter decomposition and carbon sequestration for arable soils. Final report of works. April 2005; Biodegradation des litieres et sequestration du carbone dans les ecosystemes cultives et perennes. Rapport final des travaux Avril 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recous, S.; Barrois, F.; Coppens, F.; Garnier, P.; Grehan, E. [Institut National de Recherches Agronomiques (INRA), Unite d' Agronomie Laon-Reims-Mons (France); Balesdent, J. [CNRS-CEA-Univ.de la Mediterranee, UMR 6191, Lab. d' Ecologie Microbienne de la Rhizosphere, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Dambrine, E.; Zeller, B. [Institut National de Recherches Agronomiques (INRA), Unite Biogeochimie des Ecosystemes Forestiers, 54 - Nancy (France); Loiseau, P.; Personeni, E. [Institut National de Recherches Agronomiques (INRA), Unite d' Agronomie, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2002-07-01

    The general objective of this project was to contribute to the evaluation of land use and management impacts on C sequestration and nitrogen dynamics in soils. The land used through the presence/absence of crops and their species, and the land management through tillage, localisation of crop residues, fertilizer applications,... are important factors that affect the dynamics of organic matters in soils, particularly the mineralization of C and N, the losses to the atmosphere and hydrosphere, the retention of carbon into the soil. This project was conducted by four research groups, three of them having expertise in nutrient cycling of three major agro-ecosystems (arable crops, grasslands, forests) and the fourth one having expertise in modelling long term effects of land use on C storage into the soils. Within this common project one major objective was to better understand the fate of plant litter entering the soil either as above litter or as root litter. The focus was put on two factors that particularly affect decomposition: the initial biochemical quality of plant litter, and the location of the decomposing litter. One innovative aspect of the project was the use of stable isotope as {sup 13}C for carbon, based on the use of enriched or depleted {sup 13}C material, the only option to assess the dynamics of 'new' C entering the soil on the short term, in order to reveal the effects of decomposition factors. Another aspect was the simultaneous study of C and N. The project consisted in experiments relevant for each agro-ecosystem, in forest, grassland and arable soils for which interactions between residue quality and nitrogen availability on the one hand, residue quality and location on the other hand, was investigated. A common experiment was set up to investigate the potential degradability of the various residue used (beech leaf rape straw, young rye, Lolium and dactylic roots) in a their original soils and in a single soil was assessed. Based on

  18. Optimization of submerged vane parameters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Submerged vanes are airfoils which are in general placed at certain angle with respect to the flow direction in a channel to induce artificial circulations downstream. By virtue of these artificially generated circulations, submerged vanes were utilized to protect banks of rivers against erosion, to control shifting of rivers, to avoid ...

  19. Optimization of submerged vane parameters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H Sharma

    velocities simulated from CFD using standard k-x model were very much in accordance with what it was measured by Wang and Odgaard [4]. Thus, model can be used to study the turbulence characteristics around submerged vanes and to predict various parameters downstream of the submerged vanes. After the model ...

  20. Root transcript profiling of two Rorippa (brassicaceae) species reveals gene clusters associated with extreme submergence tolerance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sasidharan, R.; Mustroph, A.; Boonman, A.; Akman, M.; Ammerlaan, A.M.H.; Breit, T.M.; Schranz, M.E.; Voesenek, L.A.C.J.; Tienderen, van P.H.

    2013-01-01

    Complete submergence represses photosynthesis and aerobic respiration, causing rapid mortality in most terrestrial plants. However, some plants have evolved traits allowing them to survive prolonged flooding, such as species of the genus Rorippa, close relatives of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis

  1. Root transcript profiling of two Rorippa species reveals gene clusters associated with extreme submergence tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sasidharan, R.; Mustroph, A.; Boonman, A.; Akman, M.; Ammerlaan, A.M.H.; Breit, T.M.; Schranz, M.E.; Voesenek, L.A.C.J.; van Tienderen, P.H.

    2013-01-01

    Complete submergence represses photosynthesis and aerobic respiration, causing rapid mortality in most terrestrial plants. However, some plants have evolved traits allowing them to survive prolonged flooding, such as species of the genus Rorippa, close relatives of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis

  2. Species specificity of resistance to oxygen diffusion in thin cuticular membranes from amphibious plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost-Christensen, Henning; Jørgensen, Lise Bolt; Floto, Franz

    2003-01-01

    oxygen, diffusion, cuticula, amphibious plants, Hygrophila, Berula, Lobelia, Mentha, Potamogeton, Veronica, aquatic plants, submerged plants......oxygen, diffusion, cuticula, amphibious plants, Hygrophila, Berula, Lobelia, Mentha, Potamogeton, Veronica, aquatic plants, submerged plants...

  3. Leaf litter variation influences invasion dynamics in the invasive wetland grass Phalaris arundinacea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaproth, M.A.; Eppinga, M.B.; Molofsky, J.

    High litter mass is hypothesized to produce an invader-directed invasion by changing ecosystem properties such as nutrient cycling rates and light availability. An invasive plant species that stimulates litter accumulation may induce a positive feedback when it benefits from high litter

  4. Litter Decomposition Rates, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set contains decomposition rates for litter of Salicornia pacifica, Distichlis spicata, and Deschampsia cespitosa buried at 7 tidal marsh sites in 2015....

  5. Litter quality and environmental controls of home-field advantage effects on litter decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, G. F.; Freschet, G.T.; Ordonez, A.; Wardle, D.A.

    2015-01-01

    The ‘home-field advantage (HFA) hypothesis’ predicts that plant litter is decomposed faster than expected in the vicinity of the plant where it originates from (i.e. its ‘home’) relative to some other location (i.e. ‘away’) because of the presence of specialized decomposers. Despite growing evidence

  6. Submerged AUV Charging Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A.; Chao, Yi; Curtin, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) are becoming increasingly important for military surveillance and mine detection. Most AUVs are battery powered and have limited lifetimes of a few days to a few weeks. This greatly limits the distance that AUVs can travel underwater. Using a series of submerged AUV charging stations, AUVs could travel a limited distance to the next charging station, recharge its batteries, and continue to the next charging station, thus traveling great distances in a relatively short time, similar to the Old West “Pony Express.” One solution is to use temperature differences at various depths in the ocean to produce electricity, which is then stored in a submerged battery. It is preferred to have the upper buoy submerged a reasonable distance below the surface, so as not to be seen from above and not to be inadvertently destroyed by storms or ocean going vessels. In a previous invention, a phase change material (PCM) is melted (expanded) at warm temperatures, for example, 15 °C, and frozen (contracted) at cooler temperatures, for example, 8 °C. Tubes containing the PCM, which could be paraffin such as pentadecane, would be inserted into a container filled with hydraulic oil. When the PCM is melted (expanded), it pushes the oil out into a container that is pressurized to about 3,000 psi (approx equals 20.7 MPa). When a valve is opened, the high-pressure oil passes through a hydraulic motor, which turns a generator and charges a battery. The low-pressure oil is finally reabsorbed into the PCM canister when the PCM tubes are frozen (contracted). Some of the electricity produced could be used to control an external bladder or a motor to the tether line, such that depth cycling is continued for a very long period of time. Alternatively, after the electricity is generated by the hydraulic motor, the exiting low-pressure oil from the hydraulic motor could be vented directly to an external bladder on the AUV, such that filling of the bladder

  7. The global stoichiometry of litter nitrogen mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefano Manzoni; Robert B. Jackson; John A. Trofymow; Amilcare Porporato

    2008-01-01

    Plant residue decomposition and the nutrient release to the soil play a major role in global carbon and nutrient cycling. Although decomposition rates vary strongly with climate, nitrogen immobilization into litter and its release in mineral forms are mainly controlled by the initial chemical composition of the residues. We used a data set of ~2800 observations to show...

  8. Litter mixture dominated by leaf litter of the invasive species, Flaveria bidentis, accelerates decomposition and favors nitrogen release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiyan; Wei, Zishang; Huangfu, Chaohe; Chen, Xinwei; Yang, Dianlin

    2017-01-01

    In natural ecosystems, invasive plant litter is often mixed with that of native species, yet few studies have examined the decomposition dynamics of such mixtures, especially across different degrees of invasion. We conducted a 1-year litterbag experiment using leaf litters from the invasive species Flaveria bidentis (L.) and the dominant co-occurring native species, Setaria viridis (L.). Litters were allowed to decompose either separately or together at different ratios in a mothproof screen house. The mass loss of all litter mixtures was non-additive, and the direction and strength of effects varied with species ratio and decomposition stage. During the initial stages of decomposition, all mixtures had a neutral effect on the mass loss; however, at later stages of decomposition, mixtures containing more invasive litter had synergistic effects on mass loss. Importantly, an increase in F. bidentis litter with a lower C:N ratio in mixtures led to greater net release of N over time. These results highlight the importance of trait dissimilarity in determining the decomposition rates of litter mixtures and suggest that F. bidentis could further synchronize N release from litter as an invasion proceeds, potentially creating a positive feedback linked through invasion as the invader outcompetes the natives for nutrients. Our findings also demonstrate the importance of species composition as well as the identity of dominant species when considering how changes in plant community structure influence plant invasion.

  9. Parthenium sp. as a plant biomass for the production of alkalitolerant xylanase from mutant Penicillium oxalicum SAU{sub E}-3.510 in submerged fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwivedi, Pallavi; Vivekanand, V.; Ganguly, Ruma; Singh, Rajesh P. [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)

    2009-04-15

    The use of congress grass (Parthenium sp.) and water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) as low cost raw materials for xylanase production from mutant Penicillium oxalicum SAU{sub E}-3.510 in submerged fermentation was investigated. For development of mutant from wild type P. oxalicum SA-8 ITCC 6024, a strategy of mixed mutagenesis was followed using UV-irradiation and ethidium bromide, which had resulted into 1.87 fold increases in the activity of the enzyme. For enzyme production, the fungus was cultivated in mineral medium containing congress grass as carbon source. Considerably higher levels of production (475.2 {+-} 6.0 IU ml{sup -1}) were achieved in media containing congress grass, although it was slightly less than that was obtained (488.5 {+-} 6.5 IU ml{sup -1}) in presence of commercial oat spelt xylan. This fact confirms the feasibility of using this low cost non-food resource as an alternative carbon source to save costs of the enzyme production process. Maximum xylanase activity was reported at 55 C with its stability at 80 C for 2 h. The highest activity of xylanase at pH 9.0 and its stability at similar pH for 24 h denote the alkalitolerant nature of enzyme. (author)

  10. A test of the hierarchical model of litter decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradford, Mark A.; Veen, G. F.; Bonis, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Our basic understanding of plant litter decomposition informs the assumptions underlying widely applied soil biogeochemical models, including those embedded in Earth system models. Confidence in projected carbon cycle-climate feedbacks therefore depends on accurate knowledge about the controls...

  11. Tropical terrestrial model ecosystems for evaluation of soil fauna and leaf litter quality effects on litter consumption, soil microbial biomass and plant growth Efeitos de fauna de solo e qualidade de liteira sobre o consumo, biomassa microbiana e crescimento de plantas em modelo de ecossistemas terrestres tropicais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Förster

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate whether terrestrial model ecosystems (TMEs are a useful tool for the study of the effects of litter quality, soil invertebrates and mineral fertilizer on litter decomposition and plant growth under controlled conditions in the tropics. Forty-eight intact soil cores (17.5-cm diameter, 30-cm length were taken out from an abandoned rubber plantation on Ferralsol soil (Latossolo Amarelo in Central Amazonia, Brazil, and kept at 28ºC in the laboratory during four months. Leaf litter of either Hevea pauciflora (rubber tree, Flemingia macrophylla (a shrubby legume or Brachiaria decumbens (a pasture grass was put on top of each TME. Five specimens of either Pontoscolex corethrurus or Eisenia fetida (earthworms, Porcellionides pruinosus or Circoniscus ornatus (woodlice, and Trigoniulus corallinus (millipedes were then added to the TMEs. Leaf litter type significantly affected litter consumption, soil microbial biomass and nitrate concentration in the leachate of all TMEs, but had no measurable effect on the shoot biomass of rice seedlings planted in top soil taken from the TMEs. Feeding rates measured with bait lamina were significantly higher in TMEs with the earthworm P. corethrurus and the woodlouse C. ornatus. TMEs are an appropriate tool to assess trophic interactions in tropical soil ecossistems under controlled laboratory conditions.O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o modelo de ecossistema terrestre (TME como ferramenta para o estudo dos efeitos da qualidade da liteira, de invertebrados do solo e da fertilização mineral na decomposição da liteira e no crescimento das plantas em condições controladas. Foram coletados quarenta e oito cilindros de solo intacto (Latossolo Amarelo de 17,5 cm de diâmetro e 30 cm de comprimento em um seringal abandonado na Amazônia Central brasileira e mantidos a 28ºC em laboratório, por quatro meses. Folhas da liteira de Hevea pauciflora (seringueira, ou de Flemingia

  12. Growth rate, protein:RNA ratio and stoichiometric homeostasis of submerged macrophytes under eutrophication stress

    OpenAIRE

    Xing W.; Shi Q.; Liu H.; Liu G.

    2016-01-01

    Growth rate hypothesis (GRH) and stoichiometric homeostasis of photoautotrophs have always been questioned. However, little is known about GRH and stoichiometric homeostasis of aquatic plants, especially submerged macrophytes. Therefore, we aim to test the GRH and explore stoichiometric homeostasis of four freshwater submerged macrophytes under eutrophication stress. At the single species level and the multi-species level, N:P ratios ...

  13. Larger phylogenetic distances in litter mixtures: lower microbial biomass and higher C/N ratios but equal mass loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pan, Xu; Berg, M.P.; Butenschoen, O.; Murray, P.J.; Bartisch, I.V.; Cornelissen, J.H.C.; Dong, Ming; Prinzing, A.

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic distances of coexisting species differ greatly within plant communities, but their consequences for decomposers and decomposition remain unknown. We hypothesized that large phylogenetic distance of leaf litter mixtures increases differences of their litter traits, which may, in turn,

  14. Fate of mercury in tree litter during decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Pokharel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We performed a controlled laboratory litter incubation study to assess changes in dry mass, carbon (C mass and concentration, mercury (Hg mass and concentration, and stoichiometric relations between elements during decomposition. Twenty-five surface litter samples each, collected from four forest stands, were placed in incubation jars open to the atmosphere, and were harvested sequentially at 0, 3, 6, 12, and 18 months. Using a mass balance approach, we observed significant mass losses of Hg during decomposition (5 to 23 % of initial mass after 18 months, which we attribute to gaseous losses of Hg to the atmosphere through a gas-permeable filter covering incubation jars. Percentage mass losses of Hg generally were less than observed dry mass and C mass losses (48 to 63 % Hg loss per unit dry mass loss, although one litter type showed similar losses. A field control study using the same litter types exposed at the original collection locations for one year showed that field litter samples were enriched in Hg concentrations by 8 to 64 % compared to samples incubated for the same time period in the laboratory, indicating strong additional sorption of Hg in the field likely from atmospheric deposition. Solubility of Hg, assessed by exposure of litter to water upon harvest, was very low (<0.22 ng Hg g−1 dry mass and decreased with increasing stage of decomposition for all litter types. Our results indicate potentially large gaseous emissions, or re-emissions, of Hg originally associated with plant litter upon decomposition. Results also suggest that Hg accumulation in litter and surface layers in the field is driven mainly by additional sorption of Hg, with minor contributions from "internal" accumulation due to preferential loss of C over Hg. Litter types showed highly species-specific differences in Hg levels during decomposition suggesting that emissions, retention, and sorption of Hg are dependent on litter type.

  15. Effects of fire frequency on litter decomposition as mediated by changes to litter chemistry and soil environmental conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cari D Ficken

    Full Text Available Litter quality and soil environmental conditions are well-studied drivers influencing decomposition rates, but the role played by disturbance legacy, such as fire history, in mediating these drivers is not well understood. Fire history may impact decomposition directly, through changes in soil conditions that impact microbial function, or indirectly, through shifts in plant community composition and litter chemistry. Here, we compared early-stage decomposition rates across longleaf pine forest blocks managed with varying fire frequencies (annual burns, triennial burns, fire-suppression. Using a reciprocal transplant design, we examined how litter chemistry and soil characteristics independently and jointly influenced litter decomposition. We found that both litter chemistry and soil environmental conditions influenced decomposition rates, but only the former was affected by historical fire frequency. Litter from annually burned sites had higher nitrogen content than litter from triennially burned and fire suppression sites, but this was correlated with only a modest increase in decomposition rates. Soil environmental conditions had a larger impact on decomposition than litter chemistry. Across the landscape, decomposition differed more along soil moisture gradients than across fire management regimes. These findings suggest that fire frequency has a limited effect on litter decomposition in this ecosystem, and encourage extending current decomposition frameworks into disturbed systems. However, litter from different species lost different masses due to fire, suggesting that fire may impact decomposition through the preferential combustion of some litter types. Overall, our findings also emphasize the important role of spatial variability in soil environmental conditions, which may be tied to fire frequency across large spatial scales, in driving decomposition rates in this system.

  16. Consequences of biodiversity loss for litter decomposition across biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, I Tanya; Aerts, Rien; Berendse, Frank; Berg, Matty P; Bruder, Andreas; Butenschoen, Olaf; Chauvet, Eric; Gessner, Mark O; Jabiol, Jérémy; Makkonen, Marika; McKie, Brendan G; Malmqvist, Björn; Peeters, Edwin T H M; Scheu, Stefan; Schmid, Bernhard; van Ruijven, Jasper; Vos, Veronique C A; Hättenschwiler, Stephan

    2014-05-08

    The decomposition of dead organic matter is a major determinant of carbon and nutrient cycling in ecosystems, and of carbon fluxes between the biosphere and the atmosphere. Decomposition is driven by a vast diversity of organisms that are structured in complex food webs. Identifying the mechanisms underlying the effects of biodiversity on decomposition is critical given the rapid loss of species worldwide and the effects of this loss on human well-being. Yet despite comprehensive syntheses of studies on how biodiversity affects litter decomposition, key questions remain, including when, where and how biodiversity has a role and whether general patterns and mechanisms occur across ecosystems and different functional types of organism. Here, in field experiments across five terrestrial and aquatic locations, ranging from the subarctic to the tropics, we show that reducing the functional diversity of decomposer organisms and plant litter types slowed the cycling of litter carbon and nitrogen. Moreover, we found evidence of nitrogen transfer from the litter of nitrogen-fixing plants to that of rapidly decomposing plants, but not between other plant functional types, highlighting that specific interactions in litter mixtures control carbon and nitrogen cycling during decomposition. The emergence of this general mechanism and the coherence of patterns across contrasting terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems suggest that biodiversity loss has consistent consequences for litter decomposition and the cycling of major elements on broad spatial scales.

  17. Flow Velocity and Morphology of a Submerged Patch of the Aquatic Species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornacchia, L.; Licci, S.; van de Koppel, J.; van der Wal, D.; Wharton, G.; Puijalon, S.; Bouma, T.J.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between macrophytes and hydrodynamic conditions is animportant feature in many aquatic ecosystems. Submerged macrophytes can formmonospecific patches that interact with the flow and alter current velocity; withinthe same vegetation patch, plants are exposed to different levels of

  18. Submergence induced changes of molecular species in membrane lipids in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulan Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The composition of membrane lipids is sensitive to environmental stresses. Submergence is a type of stress often encountered by plants. However, how the molecular species of membrane lipids respond to submergence has not yet been characterised. In this study, we used a lipidomic approach to profile the molecular species of membrane lipids in whole plants of Arabidopsis thaliana that were completely submerged for three days. The plants survived one day of submergence, after which, we found that the total membrane lipids were only subtly decreased, showing significant decreases of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG and phosphatidylcholine (PC and an increase of phosphatidic acid (PA; however, the basic lipid composition was retained. In contrast, three days of submergence caused plants to die, and the membranes deteriorated via the rapid loss of 96% of lipid content together with a 229% increase in PA. The turnover of molecular species from PG and MGDG to PA indicated that submergence-induced lipid changes occurred through PA-mediated degradation. In addition, molecular species of extraplastidic PG degraded sooner than plastidic ones, lyso-phospholipids exhibited various patterns of change, and the double-bond index (DBI remained unchanged until membrane deterioration. Our results revealed the unique changes of membrane lipids upon submergence and suggested that the major cause of the massive lipid degradation could be anoxia.

  19. Oxygen dynamics during submergence in the halophytic stem succulent Halosarcia pergranulata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole; Vos, Harrie; Colmer, Timothy David

    2006-01-01

    This study elucidated O2 dynamics in shoots and roots of submerged Halosarcia pergranulata (Salicornioideae), a perennial halophytic stem succulent that grows on flood-prone mudflats of salt lakes. Oxygen within shoots and roots was measured using microelectrodes, for plants when waterlogged...... the roots, at least during the first several hours (the time period measured) after submergence or when light periods followed darkness. The influence of light on tissue O2 dynamics was confirmed in an experiment on a submerged plant in a salt lake in south-western Australia. In the late afternoon, partial...

  20. Experimentally simulated global warming and nitrogen enrichment effects on microbial litter decomposers in a marsh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flury, Sabine; Gessner, Mark

    2011-01-01

    obtained by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) indicated that simulated global warming induced a shift in bacterial community structure. In addition, warming reduced fungal biomass, whereas bacterial biomass was unaffected. The mesh size of the litter bags and sampling date also had...... of simulated climate warming and pulsed nitrogen supply. Standard batches of litter were placed in coarse-mesh and fine-mesh bags and submerged in a series of heated, nitrogen-enriched, and control enclosures. They were retrieved later and analyzed for a range of microbial parameters. Fingerprinting profiles...

  1. Tree leaf and root traits mediate soil faunal contribution to litter decomposition across an elevational gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fujii, Saori; Cornelissen, Johannes H.C.; Berg, Matty P.; Mori, Akira S.

    2018-01-01

    © 2018 British Ecological Society. Plant litter decomposition is key to carbon and nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Soil fauna are important litter decomposers, but how their contribution to decomposition changes with alterations in plant composition and climate is not well established.

  2. Submerged membrane distillation for desalination of water

    KAUST Repository

    Francis, Lijo

    2016-10-27

    Submerged membrane modules for use for desalination of water are disclosed. In one or more aspects, the membrane modules can be submerged either in a feed solution tank or the feed solution can pass through the lumen side of the membrane submerged within the tank. The feed solution can be a water-based feed stream containing an amount of salt.

  3. Morphogenetic Litter Types of Bog Spruce Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. T. Efremova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available For the first time the representation of moss litter morphogenetic structure of valley-riverside and streamside spruce forests was determined for the wetland intermountain area of Kuznetsk Alatau. In general, the litter of (green moss-hypnum spruce forest can be characterized as medium thickness (9–17 cm with high storage of organic matter (77–99 t/ha, which differs in neutral environmental conditions pH 6.8–7.0 and high percentage of ash 11–28 %. Formation litter types were identified, which depend on the content of mineral inclusions in organogenic substrate and the degree of its drainage. The differentiation of litter subhorizons was performed, visual diagnostic indicators of fermentative layers were characterized, and additional (indexes to indicate their specificity were developed. Peat- and peaty-fermentative, humified-fermentative and (black mold humus-fermentative layers were selected. Peat- and peaty-fermentative layers are characterized by content of platy peat macroaggregates of coarse vegetable composition, the presence of abundant fungal mycelium and soil animals are the primary decomposers – myriopoda, gastropoda mollusks. Humified-fermentative layers are identified by including the newly formed amorphous humus-like substances, nutty-granular structural parts of humus nature and soil animals’ humificators – enchytraeids and earthworms. (Black mold humus-fermentative layers are diagnosed by indicators with similar humified-fermentative, but differ from them in clay-humus composition of nutty-granular blue-grey parts. The nomenclature and classification of moss litter were developed on the basis of their diagnostic characteristics of fermentative layers – peat, peaty, reduced peaty, (black mold humus-peaty, reduced (black mold humus-peaty. Using the method of discriminant analysis, we revealed that the physical-chemical properties, mainly percentage of ash and decomposition degree of plant substrate, objectively

  4. Flammability across the gymnosperm phylogeny: the importance of litter particle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, William K; Elvira, Alba; van Kempen, Lute; van Logtestijn, Richard S P; Aptroot, André; Cornelissen, J Hans C

    2015-04-01

    Fire is important to climate, element cycles and plant communities, with many fires spreading via surface litter. The influence of species on the spread of surface fire is mediated by their traits which, after senescence and abscission, have 'afterlife' effects on litter flammability. We hypothesized that differences in litter flammability among gymnosperms are determined by litter particle size effects on litterbed packing. We performed a mesocosm fire experiment comparing 39 phylogenetically wide-ranging gymnosperms, followed by litter size and shape manipulations on two chemically contrasting species, to isolate the underlying mechanism. The first-order control on litter flammability was, indeed, litter particle size in both experiments. Most gymnosperms were highly flammable, but a prominent exception was the non-Pinus Pinaceae, in which small leaves abscised singly produced dense, non-flammable litterbeds. There are two important implications: first, ecosystems dominated by gymnosperms that drop small leaves separately will develop dense litter layers, which will be less prone to and inhibit the spread of surface litter fire. Second, some of the needle-leaved species previously considered to be flammable in single-leaf experiments were among the least flammable in litter fuel beds, highlighting the role of the litter traits of species in affecting surface fire regimes. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Large litter sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandøe, Peter; Rutherford, K.M.D.; Berg, Peer

    2012-01-01

    possible to achieve a drop in relative piglet mortality and the related welfare problems. However, there will be a growing problem with the need to use foster or nurse sows which may have negative effects on both sows and piglets. This gives rise to new challenges for management....... adverse consequences for animal welfare of Danish breeding for large litter sizes due to increased piglet mortality and the subsequent attempts to reverse these consequences by breeding for number of live piglets at day five rather than number of piglets born. By this change of breeding goal it seems...

  6. Direct and indirect effects of UV-B exposure on litter decomposition: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinzhang Song

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet-B (UV-B exposure in the course of litter decomposition may have a direct effect on decomposition rates via changing states of photodegradation or decomposer constitution in litter while UV-B exposure during growth periods may alter chemical compositions and physical properties of plants. Consequently, these changes will indirectly affect subsequent litter decomposition processes in soil. Although studies are available on both the positive and negative effects (including no observable effects of UV-B exposure on litter decomposition, a comprehensive analysis leading to an adequate understanding remains unresolved. Using data from 93 studies across six biomes, this introductory meta-analysis found that elevated UV-B directly increased litter decomposition rates by 7% and indirectly by 12% while attenuated UV-B directly decreased litter decomposition rates by 23% and indirectly increased litter decomposition rates by 7%. However, neither positive nor negative effects were statistically significant. Woody plant litter decomposition seemed more sensitive to UV-B than herbaceous plant litter except under conditions of indirect effects of elevated UV-B. Furthermore, levels of UV-B intensity significantly affected litter decomposition response to UV-B (P<0.05. UV-B effects on litter decomposition were to a large degree compounded by climatic factors (e.g., MAP and MAT (P<0.05 and litter chemistry (e.g., lignin content (P<0.01. Results suggest these factors likely have a bearing on masking the important role of UV-B on litter decomposition. No significant differences in UV-B effects on litter decomposition were found between study types (field experiment vs. laboratory incubation, litter forms (leaf vs. needle, and decay duration. Indirect effects of elevated UV-B on litter decomposition significantly increased with decay duration (P<0.001. Additionally, relatively small changes in UV-B exposure intensity (30% had significant direct effects

  7. Species mixture effects on flammability across plant phylogeny: the importance of litter particle size and the special role for non-Pinus Pinaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, W.; Cornwell, W.K.; van Pomeren, M.; van Logtestijn, R.S.P; Cornelissen, J.H.C.

    2016-01-01

    Fire affects and is affected by plants. Vegetation varies in flammability, that is, its general ability to burn, at different levels of ecological organization. To scale from individual plant traits to community flammability states, understanding trait effects on species flammability variation and

  8. Over-expression of Sub1 A, a submergence tolerance gene from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sub1A, an ethylene-response-factor-like (ERE-like) gene, mediates the extinguished submergence tolerance of rice. To gain further insight into the function of Sub1A in other species, we transformed tobacco plants with the gene under the control of the ubiquitin promoter. Compared to the wild-type plants, transgenic plants ...

  9. Harm caused by Marine Litter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werner, S.; Budziak, A.; Franeker, van J.A.; Galgani, F.; Hanke, G.; Maes, T.; Matiddi, M.; Nilsson, P.; Oosterbaan, L.; Priestland, E.; Thompson, R.; Veiga, J.; Vlachogianni, T.

    2016-01-01

    Marine litter is a global concern with a range of problems associated to it, as recognised by the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). Marine litter can impact organisms at different levels of biological organization and habitats in a number of ways namely: through entanglement in, or

  10. Countervailing effects on pine and oak leaf litter decomposition in human-altered Mediterranean ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffer, Efrat; Canham, Charles D; Kigel, Jaime; Perevolotsky, Avi

    2015-04-01

    Species affect the dynamics of litter decay through the intrinsic properties of their litter, but also by influencing the environmental conditions imposed by their canopy, roots, and litter layers. We examined how human-induced changes in the relative abundances of two dominant Mediterranean trees-Pinus halepensis and Quercus calliprinos-impact leaf litter decomposition. A reciprocal transplant experiment tested decomposition of pine, oak, and mixed leaf litter in oak woodland and pine forest ecosystems with different relative abundances of pine and oak. Using likelihood methods, we tested the importance and magnitude of the environmental effects of local species abundance, litter layer composition, and soil properties on litter mass loss. Oak litter decomposition was slower than pine, and had an antagonistic effect on mixed litter decay. These results differ from other reported pine-oak associations, and are probably associated with a higher content of tannins and phenols in oak compared to pine litter in our study sites. The environmental effects of the two species were opposite to their litter decomposition dynamics. An increased proportion of pine in the oak woodlands and a higher content of pine needles in the litter layer of pine forests reduced decay rates. The presence of more oak and broadleaf litter in the litter layer accelerated decomposition in pine forests. Our results highlight the importance of considering multidimensional species effects mediated by both chemical and physical properties, and imply that man-made changes in the composition and configuration of plant communities may result in complex unpredicted consequences to ecosystem biogeochemistry.

  11. Land use not litter quality is a stronger driver of decomposition in hyperdiverse tropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both, Sabine; Elias, Dafydd M O; Kritzler, Ully H; Ostle, Nick J; Johnson, David

    2017-11-01

    In hyperdiverse tropical forests, the key drivers of litter decomposition are poorly understood despite its crucial role in facilitating nutrient availability for plants and microbes. Selective logging is a pressing land use with potential for considerable impacts on plant-soil interactions, litter decomposition, and nutrient cycling. Here, in Borneo's tropical rainforests, we test the hypothesis that decomposition is driven by litter quality and that there is a significant "home-field advantage," that is positive interaction between local litter quality and land use. We determined mass loss of leaf litter, collected from selectively logged and old-growth forest, in a fully factorial experimental design, using meshes that either allowed or precluded access by mesofauna. We measured leaf litter chemical composition before and after the experiment. Key soil chemical and biological properties and microclimatic conditions were measured as land-use descriptors. We found that despite substantial differences in litter quality, the main driver of decomposition was land-use type. Whilst inclusion of mesofauna accelerated decomposition, their effect was independent of land use and litter quality. Decomposition of all litters was slower in selectively logged forest than in old-growth forest. However, there was significantly greater loss of nutrients from litter, especially phosphorus, in selectively logged forest. The analyses of several covariates detected minor microclimatic differences between land-use types but no alterations in soil chemical properties or free-living microbial composition. These results demonstrate that selective logging can significantly reduce litter decomposition in tropical rainforest with no evidence of a home-field advantage. We show that loss of key limiting nutrients from litter (P & N) is greater in selectively logged forest. Overall, the findings hint at subtle differences in microclimate overriding litter quality that result in reduced

  12. Individual and combined suppressive effects of submerged and floating-leaved macrophytes on algal blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Mayumi; Takamura, Noriko; Iwasa, Yoh

    2013-02-21

    Shallow lakes and ponds are often characterised either by clear water with abundant submerged macrophytes or by turbid water with abundant phytoplankton. Blooms of toxic filamentous blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) often dominate the phytoplankton community in eutrophic lakes, which threatens ecological functions and biodiversity of freshwater ecosystems. We studied a simple lake model in order to evaluate individual and combined suppressive effects of rooted submerged and rooted floating-leaved macrophytes on algal blooms. Floating-leaved plants are superior competitors for light, whereas submerged plants absorb and reduce available phosphorus in a water column that rooted floating-leaved plants exploit to a lesser extent. We found that mixed vegetation that includes both submerged and floating-leaved plants is more resistant than vegetation comprised by a single plant type to algal invasion triggered by phosphorus loading. In addition, competitive exclusion of submerged plants by floating-leaved plants may promote an algal bloom. These predictions were confirmed by the decision tree analysis of field data from 35 irrigation ponds in Hyogo Prefecture, Japan. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Instrumentation, control, and automation for submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Robles Martínez, Ángel; Durán Pinzón, Freddy; Ruano García, María Victoria; Ribes Bertomeu, José; Rosado Muñoz, Alfredo; SECO TORRECILLAS, AURORA; Ferrer, J.

    2015-01-01

    A submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) demonstration plant with two commercial hollow-fibre ultrafiltration systems (PURON® , Koch Membrane Systems, PUR-PSH31) was designed and operated for urban wastewater treatment. An instrumentation, control, and automation (ICA) system was designed and implemented for proper process performance. Several single-input-single-output (SISO) feedback control loops based on conventional on off and PID algorithms were implemented to control the follo...

  14. An Application of the Phosphorus Consistent Rule for Environmentally Acceptable Cost-Efficient Management of Broiler Litter in Crop Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Krishna P.; Limaye, Ashutosh; Adhikari, Murali; Martin, Neil R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    We calculated the profitability of using broiler litter as a source of plant nutrients using the phosphorus consistent litter application rule. The cost saving by using litter is 37% over the use of chemical fertilizer-only option to meet the nutrient needs of major crops grown in Alabama. In the optimal solution, only a few routes of all the possible routes developed were used for inter- and intra- county litter hauling. If litter is not adopted as the sole source of crop nutrients, the best environmental policy may be to pair the phosphorus consistent rule with taxes, marketable permits, and subsidies.flaws

  15. The freezer defrosting: global warming and litter decomposition rates in cold biomes. Essay review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aerts, R.

    2006-01-01

    1 Decomposition of plant litter, a key component of the global carbon budget, is hierarchically controlled by the triad: climate > litter quality > soil organisms. Given the sensitivity of decomposition to temperature, especially in cold biomes, it has been hypothesized that global warming will lead

  16. Microbial communities may modify how litter quality affects potential decomposition rates as tree species migrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley D. Keiser; Jennifer D. Knoepp; Mark A. Bradford

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims Climate change alters regional plant species distributions, creating new combinations of litter species and soil communities. Biogeographic patterns in microbial communities relate to dissimilarity in microbial community function, meaning novel litters to communities may decompose differently than predicted from their chemical composition. Therefore...

  17. Leaf litter decomposition rates increase with rising mean annual temperature in Hawaiian tropical montane wet forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lori D. Bothwell; Paul C. Selmants; Christian P. Giardina; Creighton M. Litton

    2014-01-01

    Decomposing litter in forest ecosystems supplies nutrients to plants, carbon to heterotrophic soil microorganisms and is a large source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Despite its essential role in carbon and nutrient cycling, the temperature sensitivityof leaf litter decay in tropical forest ecosystems remains poorly resolved, especially in tropical...

  18. Flammability across the gymnosperm phylogeny: the importance of litter particle size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornwell, W.K.; Elvira, A.; van Kempen, L.; van Logtestijn, R.S.P; Aptroot, A.; Cornelissen, J.H.C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Fire is important to climate, element cycles and plant communities, with many fires spreading via surface litter. The influence of species on the spread of surface fire is mediated by their traits which, after senescence and abscission, have 'afterlife' effects on litter flammability. We

  19. Physiological and transcriptomic characterization of submergence and reoxygenation responses in soybean seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamang, Bishal G; Magliozzi, Joseph O; Maroof, M A Saghai; Fukao, Takeshi

    2014-10-01

    Complete inundation at the early seedling stage is a common environmental constraint for soybean production throughout the world. As floodwaters subside, submerged seedlings are subsequently exposed to reoxygenation stress in the natural progression of a flood event. Here, we characterized the fundamental acclimation responses to submergence and reoxygenation in soybean at the seedling establishment stage. Approximately 90% of seedlings succumbed during 3 d of inundation under constant darkness, whereas 10 d of submergence were lethal to over 90% of seedlings under 12 h light/12 h dark cycles, indicating the significance of underwater photosynthesis in seedling survival. Submergence rapidly decreased the abundance of carbohydrate reserves and ATP in aerial tissue of seedlings although chlorophyll breakdown was not observed. The carbohydrate and ATP contents were recovered upon de-submergence, but sudden exposure to oxygen also induced lipid peroxidation, confirming that reoxygenation induced oxidative stress. Whole transcriptome analysis recognized genome-scale reconfiguration of gene expression that regulates various signalling and metabolic pathways under submergence and reoxygenation. Comparative analysis of differentially regulated genes in shoots and roots of soybean and other plants defines conserved, organ-specific and species-specific adjustments which enhance adaptability to submergence and reoxygenation through different metabolic pathways. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Environmentally-friendly animal litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxley, Chett; McKelvie, Jessica

    2013-09-03

    An animal litter composition that includes geopolymerized ash particulates having a network of repeating aluminum-silicon units is described herein. Generally, the animal litter is made from a quantity of a pozzolanic ash mixed with an alkaline activator to initiate a geopolymerization reaction that forms geopolymerized ash. This geopolymerization reaction may occur within a pelletizer. After the geopolymerized ash is formed, it may be dried and sieved to a desired size. These geopolymerized ash particulates may be used to make a non-clumping or clumping animal litter or other absorbing material. Aluminum sulfate, clinoptilolite, silica gel, sodium alginate and mineral oil may be added as additional ingredients.

  1. Leaf traits capture the effects of land use changes and climate on litter decomposability of grasslands across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunel, Claire; Garnier, Eric; Joffre, Richard; Kazakou, Elena; Quested, Helen; Grigulis, Karl; Lavorel, Sandra; Ansquer, Pauline; Castro, Helena; Cruz, Pablo; Dolezal, Jirí; Eriksson, Ove; Freitas, Helena; Golodets, Carly; Jouany, Claire; Kigel, Jaime; Kleyer, Michael; Lehsten, Veiko; Leps, Jan; Meier, Tonia; Pakeman, Robin; Papadimitriou, Maria; Papanastasis, Vasilios P; Quétier, Fabien; Robson, Matt; Sternberg, Marcelo; Theau, Jean-Pierre; Thébault, Aurélie; Zarovali, Maria

    2009-03-01

    Land use and climate changes induce shifts in plant functional diversity and community structure, thereby modifying ecosystem processes. This is particularly true for litter decomposition, an essential process in the biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nutrients. In this study, we asked whether changes in functional traits of living leaves in response to changes in land use and climate were related to rates of litter potential decomposition, hereafter denoted litter decomposability, across a range of 10 contrasting sites. To disentangle the different control factors on litter decomposition, we conducted a microcosm experiment to determine the decomposability under standard conditions of litters collected in herbaceous communities from Europe and Israel. We tested how environmental factors (disturbance and climate) affected functional traits of living leaves and how these traits then modified litter quality and subsequent litter decomposability. Litter decomposability appeared proximately linked to initial litter quality, with particularly clear negative correlations with lignin-dependent indices (litter lignin concentr tion, lignin:nitrogen ratio, and fiber component). Litter quality was directly related to community-weighted mean traits. Lignin-dependent indices of litter quality were positively correlated with community-weighted mean leaf dry matter content (LDMC), and negatively correlated with community-weighted mean leaf nitrogen concentration (LNC). Consequently, litter decomposability was correlated negatively with community-weighted mean LDMC, and positively with community-weighted mean LNC. Environmental factors (disturbance and climate) influenced community-weighted mean traits. Plant communities experiencing less frequent or less intense disturbance exhibited higher community-weighted mean LDMC, and therefore higher litter lignin content and slower litter decomposability. LDMC therefore appears as a powerful marker of both changes in land use and of the

  2. Formation of soil organic matter via biochemical and physical pathways of litter mass loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotrufo, M. Francesca; Soong, Jennifer L.; Horton, Andrew J.; Campbell, Eleanor E.; Haddix, Michelle L.; Wall, Diana H.; Parton, William J.

    2015-10-01

    Soil organic matter is the largest terrestrial carbon pool. The pool size depends on the balance between formation of soil organic matter from decomposition of plant litter and its mineralization to inorganic carbon. Knowledge of soil organic matter formation remains limited and current C numerical models assume that stable soil organic matter is formed primarily from recalcitrant plant litter. However, labile components of plant litter could also form mineral-stabilized soil organic matter. Here we followed the decomposition of isotopically labelled above-ground litter and its incorporation into soil organic matter over three years in a grassland in Kansas, USA, and used laboratory incubations to determine the decay rates and pool structure of litter-derived organic matter. Early in decomposition, soil organic matter formed when non-structural compounds were lost from litter. Soil organic matter also formed at the end of decomposition, when both non-structural and structural compounds were lost at similar rates. We conclude that two pathways yield soil organic matter efficiently. A dissolved organic matter-microbial path occurs early in decomposition when litter loses mostly non-structural compounds, which are incorporated into microbial biomass at high rates, resulting in efficient soil organic matter formation. An equally efficient physical-transfer path occurs when litter fragments move into soil.

  3. Effects of litters with different concentrations of phenolics on the competition between Calluna vulgaris and Deschampsia flexuosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofland-Zijlstra, J.D.; Berendse, F.

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesized that the outcome of competition between ericaceous plants and grasses is strongly affected by the concentrations of phenolics in the litter that they produce. To test the effect of phenolic-rich litter on soluble soil nitrogen concentrations, plant nitrogen uptake and inter-specific

  4. Galling by Rhopalomyia solidaginis alters Solidago altissima architecture and litter nutrient dynamics in an old-field ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crutsinger, Greg [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Habenicht, Melissa N [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Classen, Aimee T [ORNL; Schweitzer, Jennifer A [ORNL; Sanders, Dr. Nathan James [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2008-01-01

    Plant-insect interactions can alter ecosystem processes, especially if the insects modify plant architecture, quality, or the quantity of leaf litter inputs. In this study, we investigated the interactions between the gall midge Rhopalomyia solidaginis and tall goldenrod, Solidago altissima, to quantify the degree to which the midge alters plant architecture and how the galls affect rates of litter decomposition and nutrient release in an old-field ecosystem. R. solidaginis commonly leads to the formation of a distinct apical rosette gall on S. altissima and approximately 15% of the ramets in a S. altissima patch were galled (range: 3-34%). Aboveground biomass of galled ramets was 60% higher and the leaf area density was four times greater on galled leaf tissue relative to the portions of the plant that were not affected by the gall. Overall decomposition rate constants did not differ between galled and ungalled leaf litter. However, leaf-litter mass loss was lower in galled litter relative to ungalled litter, which was likely driven by modest differences in initial litter chemistry; this effect diminished after 12 weeks of decomposition in the field. The proportion of N remaining was always higher in galled litter than in ungalled litter at each collection date indicating differential release of nitrogen in galled leaf litter. Several studies have shown that plant-insect interactions on woody species can alter ecosystem processes by affecting the quality or quantity of litter inputs. Our results illustrate how plant-insect interactions in an herbaceous species can affect ecosystem processes by altering the quality and quantity of litter inputs. Given that S. altissima dominates fields and roadsides and that R. solidaginis galls are highly abundant throughout eastern North America, these interactions are likely to be important for both the structure and function of old-field ecosystems.

  5. Using poultry litter in black walnut nutrient management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Jr. Ponder; James E. Jones; Rita Mueller

    2005-01-01

    Poultry litter was evaluated as a fertilizer in a young (three-year-old) and an old (35-year-old) black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) plantation in southwest Missouri. The older planting had a fescue (Festuca arundinaceae Schreb.) ground cover that is grazed by cattle. In the young plantation, weeds were mowed and sprayed with...

  6. Flow and scour around vertical submerged structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Although past investigations establish the effect of various parameters on scour around vertical submerged structures for live and clear water condition, yet further studies are required to analyze the scour around group of submerged structures for various bed sediments, understand the flow physics around the group and ...

  7. Clonal variation in the thermal response of the submerged aquatic macrophyte Potamogeton pectinatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pilon, J.; Santamaria, L.

    2002-01-01

    Broadly distributed plants have to cope with dramatic differences across latitude in the prevailing environmental temperature. We investigated the effect of water temperature on plant morphology, biomass accumulation and oxygen-exchange for five clones of the submerged aquatic macrophyte Potamogeton

  8. Leaf litter quality drives litter mixing effects through complementary resource use among detritivores.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, V.C.A.; van Ruijven, J.; Berg, M.P.; Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Berendse, F.

    2013-01-01

    To comprehend the potential consequences of biodiversity loss on the leaf litter decomposition process, a better understanding of its underlying mechanisms is necessary. Here, we hypothesize that positive litter mixture effects occur via complementary resource use, when litter species complement

  9. Leaf litter quality drives litter mixing effects through complementary resource use among detritivores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, V.C.A.; Ruijven, van J.; Berg, M.P.; Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Berendse, F.

    2013-01-01

    To comprehend the potential consequences of biodiversity loss on the leaf litter decomposition process, a better understanding of its underlying mechanisms is necessary. Here, we hypothesize that positive litter mixture effects occur via complementary resource use, when litter species complement

  10. Ethylene response factor BnERF2-like (ERF2.4 from Brassica napus L. enhances submergence tolerance and alleviates oxidative damage caused by submergence in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyan Lv

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene response factor proteins play an important role in regulating a variety of stress responses in plants, but their exact functions in submergence stress are not well understood. In this study, we isolated BnERF2.4 from Brassica napus L. to study its function in submergence tolerance. The expression of the BnERF2.4 gene in B. napus and the expression of antioxidant enzyme genes in transgenic Arabidopsis were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. The expression of BnERF2.4 was induced by submergence in B. napus and the overexpression of BnERF2.4 in Arabidopsis increased the level of tolerance to submergence and oxidative stress. A histochemical method detected lower levels of H2O2, O2•− and malondialdehyde (MDA in transgenic Arabidopsis. Compared to the wild type, transgenic lines also had higher soluble sugar content and higher activity of antioxidant enzymes, which helped to protect plants against the oxidative damage caused by submergence. It was concluded that BnERF2.4 increased the tolerance of plants to submergence stress and may be involved in regulating soluble sugar content and the antioxidant system in defense against submergence stress.

  11. Photobleaching Kinetics of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter Derived from Mangrove Leaf Litter and Floating Sargassum Colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the photoreactivity of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) derived from Rhizophora mangle (red mangrove) leaf litter and floating Sargassum colonies as these marine plants can be important contributors to coastal and open ocean CDOM pools, respectively. Mangr...

  12. Prospects for phosphorus recovery from poultry litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szogi, A A; Vanotti, M B

    2009-11-01

    Land disposal of poultry litter is an environmental concern often associated to excess phosphorus (P) in soils and potential water pollution in regions with intense poultry production. Although poultry litter can be moved off the farm and traded as fertilizer, its transportation becomes less economical with increasing distances from the farm. Thus, new litter management alternatives are needed to reduce the environmental impact of P litter application to land. This paper summarizes established and emerging alternative technologies in the U.S. that facilitate handling, concentration, and transporting of litter P. Furthermore, it examines the potential integration of technologies into poultry litter management systems that could reduce poultry litter volume and increase P content in litter byproducts. The adoption of alternative technologies may encourage new opportunities to produce bio-energy, fertilizer, and other valuable P byproducts from poultry litter while reducing environmental impact and promoting sustainable poultry production.

  13. Detritivores enhance the mobilization of {sup 137}Cs from leaf-litter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Masashi; Suzuki, Takahiro [Community Ecology Lab., Biology Course, Faculty of Science, Chiba University, Chiba, 263-8522 (Japan); Ishii, Nobuyoshi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Ohte, Nobuhito [Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, 113-8657 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    A large amount of radioactive material was released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident after the disastrous earthquake and subsequent tsunami of March 2011. Since most of the Japanese land area is covered by forest ecosystems, {sup 137}Cs was mostly deposited and accumulated on the land surface of forest. The fate of radioactive materials accumulated on the leaf litters should be conscientiously monitored to understand the future distribution and the spread to the surrounding landscapes. Because the accident took place on 11 March 2011, just before the bud-break of deciduous trees, the {sup 137}Cs are highly accumulated on the surface of leaf litter on the forest floor. This accumulated {sup 137}Cs had transferred to higher trophic organisms mainly through the detritus food chain. However, on the litter surface, {sup 137}Cs considered to be strongly and immediately fixed and highly immobilized. Decomposition processes in the forest floor can re-mobilise the nutritional elements which are contained within detritus and make them available for the organisms. In the present study, the feeding effect of detritivore soil arthropods on the mobilization of {sup 137}Cs from leaf litter was experimentally examined. Furthermore, the effect of detritivores on the plant uptake of {sup 137}Cs was examined by small-scale nursery experiment. Decomposition experiment in the small microcosms was performed using a larvae of Trypoxylus dichotomus, whichis a detritivores feeding on dead plant materials such as wood debris and leaf litters. Contaminated leaf litters were collected in a forest of the Kami-Oguni River catchment in the northern part of Fukushima Prefecture. The leaf litters at A0 layers which are highly contaminated by {sup 137}Cs were utilized for the experiment. The contaminated leaf litter was fed to the larvae for ten days. The litter with larvae excreta was washed by 2 M KCl and deionized water. The {sup 137}Cs concentration was measured

  14. Throughfall-mediated alterations to soil microbial community structure in a forest plot of homogenous soil texture, litter, and plant species composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Stan, John; Rosier, Carl; Moore, Leslie; Gay, Trent; Reichard, James; Wu, Tiehang; Kan, Jinjun

    2015-04-01

    Identifying spatiotemporal influences on soil microbial community (SMC) structure is critical to our understanding of patterns in biogeochemical cycling and related ecological services (e.g., plant community structure, water quality, response to environmental change). Since forest canopy structure alters the spatiotemporal patterning of precipitation water and solute supplies to soils (via "throughfall"), is it possible that changes in SMC structure could arise from modifications in canopy elements? Our study investigates this question by monitoring throughfall water and dissolved ion supply to soils beneath a continuum of canopy structure: from large gaps (0% cover), to bare Quercus virginiana Mill. (southern live oak) canopy (~50-70%), to heavy Tillandsia usneoides L. (Spanish moss) canopy (>90% cover). Throughfall water supply diminished with increasing canopy cover, yet increased washoff/leaching of Na+, Cl-, PO43-, and SO42- from the canopy to the soils. Presence of T. usneoides diminished throughfall NO3-, but enhanced NH4+, concentrations supplied to subcanopy soils. The mineral soil horizon (0-10 cm) sampled in triplicate from locations receiving throughfall water and solutes from canopy gaps, bare canopy, and T. usneoides-laden canopy significantly differed in soil chemistry parameters (pH, Ca2+, Mg2+, CEC). Polymerase Chain Reaction-Denaturant Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) banding patterns beneath similar canopy covers (experiencing similar throughfall dynamics) also produced high similarities per ANalyses Of SIMilarity (ANO-SIM), and clustered together when analyzed by Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS). These results suggest that modifications of forest canopy structures are capable of affecting mineral-soil horizon SMC structure via throughfall when canopies' biomass distribution is highly heterogeneous. As SMC structure, in many instances, relates to functional diversity, we suggest that future research seek to identify functional

  15. Iodine Removal Efficiency in Non-Submerged and Submerged Self-Priming Venturi Scrubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Majid; Yan, Changqi; Sun, Zhongning; Gu, Haifeng; Wang, Junlong; Mehboob; Khurram [Harbin Engineering Univ., Harbin (China)

    2013-04-15

    The objective of this conducted research is to study the iodine removal efficiency in a self-priming venturi scrubber for submerged and non-submerged operating conditions experimentally and theoretically. The alkaline solution is used as an absorbent, which is prepared by dissolving sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium thiosulphate (Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in water to remove the gaseous iodine (I{sub 2}) from the gas. Iodine removal efficiency is examined at various gas flow rates and inlet concentrations of iodine for submerged and non-submerged operating conditions. In the non-submerged venturi scrubber, only the droplets take part in iodine removal efficiency. However, in a submerged venturi scrubber condition, the iodine gas is absorbed from gas to droplets inside the venturi scrubber and from bubbles to surrounding liquid at the outlet of a venturi scrubber. Experimentally, it is observed that the iodine removal efficiency is greater in the submerged venturi scrubber as compare to a non-submerged venturi scrubber condition. The highest iodine removal efficiency of 0.99±0.001 has been achieved in a submerged self-priming venturi scrubber condition. A mathematical correlation is used to predict the theoretical iodine removal efficiency in submerged and non-submerged conditions, and it is compared against the experimental results. The Wilkinson et al. correlation is used to predict the bubble diameter theoretically whereas the Nukiyama and Tanasawa correlation is used for droplet diameter. The mass transfer coefficient for the gas phase is calculated from the Steinberger and Treybal correlation. The calculated results for a submerged venturi scrubber agree well with experimental results but underpredicts in the case of the non-submerged venturi scrubber.

  16. IODINE REMOVAL EFFICIENCY IN NON-SUBMERGED AND SUBMERGED SELF-PRIMING VENTURI SCRUBBER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAJID ALI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this conducted research is to study the iodine removal efficiency in a self-priming venturi scrubber for submerged and non-submerged operating conditions experimentally and theoretically. The alkaline solution is used as an absorbent, which is prepared by dissolving sodium hydroxide (NaOH and sodium thiosulphate (Na2S2O3 in water to remove the gaseous iodine (I2 from the gas. Iodine removal efficiency is examined at various gas flow rates and inlet concentrations of iodine for submerged and non-submerged operating conditions. In the non-submerged venturi scrubber, only the droplets take part in iodine removal efficiency. However, in a submerged venturi scrubber condition, the iodine gas is absorbed from gas to droplets inside the venturi scrubber and from bubbles to surrounding liquid at the outlet of a venturi scrubber. Experimentally, it is observed that the iodine removal efficiency is greater in the submerged venturi scrubber as compare to a non-submerged venturi scrubber condition. The highest iodine removal efficiency of 0.99±0.001 has been achieved in a submerged self-priming venturi scrubber condition. A mathematical correlation is used to predict the theoretical iodine removal efficiency in submerged and non-submerged conditions, and it is compared against the experimental results. The Wilkinson et al. correlation is used to predict the bubble diameter theoretically whereas the Nukiyama and Tanasawa correlation is used for droplet diameter. The mass transfer coefficient for the gas phase is calculated from the Steinberger and Treybal correlation. The calculated results for a submerged venturi scrubber agree well with experimental results but underpredicts in the case of the non-submerged venturi scrubber.

  17. Growth rate, protein:RNA ratio and stoichiometric homeostasis of submerged macrophytes under eutrophication stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing W.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth rate hypothesis (GRH and stoichiometric homeostasis of photoautotrophs have always been questioned. However, little is known about GRH and stoichiometric homeostasis of aquatic plants, especially submerged macrophytes. Therefore, we aim to test the GRH and explore stoichiometric homeostasis of four freshwater submerged macrophytes under eutrophication stress. At the single species level and the multi-species level, N:P ratios of Potamogeton maackianus, Myriophyllum spicatum, Vallisneria natans and Ceratophyllum demersum had no consistent trends with growth rates. However, protein:RNA ratios of P. maackianus, M. spicatum and V. natans all correlated negatively with growth rates, demonstrating GRH can apply to freshwater submerged macrophytes, even though they are threatening by eutrophication stress. Protein:RNA ratios positively correlated with N:P ratios in culture media and tissues in submerged macrophytes except in P. maackianus (30d, suggesting effects of varying N:P ratios in culture media on protein:RNA ratios are basically in concert with tissue N:P ratios under short-time eutrophication stress. Stoichiometric homeostasis coefficients (HN:P indicated submerged macrophytes have weak homeostasis. Stoichiometric homeostasis of V. natans was stronger than those of P. maackianus, M. spicatum and C. demersum. The differences in GRH and homeostasis of the four submerged macrophytes may be due to species traits.

  18. Research efforts for detection and recovery of submerged oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, K. [United States Coast Guard, Groton, CT (United States). Research and Development Center

    2009-07-01

    Submerged oil can sink and destroy shellfish and other marine populations in addition to causing closure of water intakes at industrial facilities and power plants. However, current methods to find and recover oil from spills involving submerged oil are inadequate. The underwater environment presents major challenges such as poor visibility, difficulty in tracking oil spill movement, colder temperatures, inadequate containment methods and problems with the equipment's interaction with water. This paper reported on a multi-year project launched by the Research and Development Center of the United States Coast Guard to develop a complete approach for spills of submerged oil. The project involved detection technologies and recovery methods for oil on the bottom of any body of water. Proof of concept (POC) and prototype tests of potential detection technologies were evaluated during tests at the Ohmsett facility in Leonardo, New Jersey. The technologies included sonar, laser fluorometry, real-time mass spectrometry and in-situ fluorometry. This paper described the development of a complete specification for an integrated recovery system along with a plan for future development. 9 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs.

  19. Improvement of Photosynthesis by Sub1 QTL in Rice Under Submergence: Probed by Chlorophyll Fluorescence OJIP Transients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panda Debabrata

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of submergence on the photosynthetic activity in rice plants either possessing or not possessing Sub1 QTL i.e. Swarna and Swarna Sub1 cultivars (cv. were evaluated under simulated complete submergence. The leaf photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance decreased in both the cv. during the progression of submergence as compared to control plant but significant varietal differences was observed after 1 day (d of submergence. Submergence also alters the photo-system (PS II activity, as reflected in a decrease in the values of Fo, Fm and the Fv/Fm ratio and degradation of chlorophyll, more in Swarna than that of Swarna Sub1. Under complete submergence the shape of the OJIP transient also changed in rice leaves with decrease in maximal fluorescence (P=Fm intensity, resulted lowering of variable fluorescence levels. The decrease was more pronounced in Swarna compared to the Swarna Sub1 cv. Thus, Swarna Sub1 improves photosynthetic activity showing more photosynthetic rate compared to Swarna under submergence because, of less degradation of chlorophyll, higher stomatal conductance, and efficient PS II activity.

  20. Determinants of Littering: An Experimental Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Fatima Salim Khawaja; Anwar Shah

    2013-01-01

    Littering, the improper disposal of small quantities of waste, is one of the main causes of environmental degradation. To protect the environment from this degradation, we need to factor out the determinants of littering behaviour. In this study, we conduct a controlled laboratory experiment to examine whether people would avoid littering if the social cost of this behaviour was internalised. Based on the microeconomic theory relating to externality, we test whether penalising littering decre...

  1. Surviving floods: leaf gas films improve O2 and CO2 exchange, root aeration, and growth of completely submerged rice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole; Rich, Sarah Meghan; Colmer, Timothy David

    2009-01-01

    that the improved gas exchange was not caused by differences in diffusive boundary layers adjacent to submerged leaves with or without gas films; instead, reduced resistance to gas exchange was probably due to the enlarged water–gas interface (cf. aquatic insects). When gas films were removed artificially......When completely submerged, the leaves of some species retain a surface gas film. Leaf gas films on submerged plants have recently been termed 'plant plastrons', analogous with the plastrons of aquatic insects. In aquatic insects, surface gas layers (i.e. plastrons) enlarge the gas–water interface...... to promote O2 uptake when under water; however, the function of leaf gas films has rarely been considered. The present study demonstrates that gas films on leaves of completely submerged rice facilitate entry of O2 from floodwaters when in darkness and CO2 entry when in light. O2 microprofiles showed...

  2. How Much Is Poultry Litter Worth?

    OpenAIRE

    Carreira, Rita I.; Goodwin, Harold L., Jr.; Hamm, Sandra J.

    2006-01-01

    Land-applying poultry litter to nutrient-deficient soils instead of commercial fertilizer could absorb nutrients from concentrated poultry production areas and help crop farmers. A survey of potential litter users showed that although farmers have used/are interested in using litter, there are still some problems that prevent the market from fully developing.

  3. Estimating a Demand Function for Poultry Litter

    OpenAIRE

    Carreira, Rita I.; Goodwin, Harold L., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Excess poultry litter could be a sustainable source of crop nutrients outside of nutrient-saturated regions if crop farmers are willing to utilize it. Using nearly 150 observations of actual poultry litter purchases in Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Missouri we estimate a demand function for poultry litter produced in northwest Arkansas.

  4. Nutrient Dynamics and Litter Decomposition in Leucaena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eighteen litter bags were used for the studies. The litter bags were numbered and placed on the field (above ground) on 26th April 2005. Three bags were retrieved randomly from the field at 20-day intervals for 120 days. The nutrient concentration in L. leucocephala followed the trend N > P > Mg > Ca > K > Na for leaf litter ...

  5. Inulinase Production by a Mexican Semi-Desert Xerophylic Penicillium citrinum Strain under Submerged Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana C. Flores-Gallegos; Jesús Morlett-Chávez; Aguilar, Cristóbal N.; Raúl Rodríguez-Herrera

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to produce inulinase under submerged culture (SmC) by a xerophylic fungal strain isolated from the Mexican semi-dessert and to verify its potential as an industrial inulinase producer. This enzyme can be obtained from microorganisms that live in close association with inulin plant store tissues. Inulin is a widespread plant polyfructan that serves as a storage polysaccharide in several plants and its depolymerization involves the action of inulinase. Inulinases are cl...

  6. Quantification of litter in the forest fragment national park Serra de Itabaiana, Sergipe State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audenis Fagner de Jesus Nascimento

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural forests are areas rich in biodiversity that contribute to the maintenance of environmental sustainability through the production of litter and nutrient cycling. Litter is a major route of nutrient return to the system plant – soil – plant and its determination to analyze the restructuring of anthropogenic forest environments. The knowledge of litterfall is critical to determine the potential for regeneration of an area through the intake and nutrient cycling. We quantified litter production in areas of white sand with vegetation in different stages of regeneration the National Park Sierra de Itabaiana, Sergipe State. In each of the areas of white sands open (ABA, white sands intermediary (ABI and white sands closed (ABF was installed 15 litter traps and litter fall was collected monthly from January to December 2011. The total contribution of litter on the White Sand Closed (2092 kg ha-1 was more than double the contribution in Areia Branca Open (881 kg ha-1 and White Sand Intermediate (687 kg ha-1. The leaf fraction contributed the largest mass in all areas and periods, and was the one with greater seasonal variation related to variation in precipitation. Precipitation was one of the factors that determined the seasonality of litter deposition in natural vegetation of the National Park of Sierra de Itabaiana, Sergipe State.

  7. Long-term presence of tree species but not chemical diversity affect litter mixture effects on decomposition in a neotropical rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barantal, Sandra; Roy, Jacques; Fromin, Nathalie; Schimann, Heidy; Hättenschwiler, Stephan

    2011-09-01

    Plant litter diversity effects on decomposition rates are frequently reported, but with a strong bias towards temperate ecosystems. Altered decomposition and nutrient recycling with changing litter diversity may be particularly important in tree species-rich tropical rainforests on nutrient-poor soils. Using 28 different mixtures of leaf litter from 16 Amazonian rainforest tree species, we tested the hypothesis that litter mixture effects on decomposition increase with increasing functional litter diversity. Litter mixtures and all single litter species were exposed in the field for 9 months using custom-made microcosms with soil fauna access. In order to test the hypothesis that the long-term presence of tree species contributing to the litter mixtures increases mixture effects on decomposition, microcosms were installed in a plantation at sites including the respective tree species composition and in a nearby natural forest where these tree species are absent. We found that mixture decomposition deviated from predictions based on single species, with predominantly synergistic effects. Functional litter diversity, defined as either richness, evenness, or divergence based on a wide range of chemical traits, did not explain the observed litter mixture effects. However, synergistic effects in litter mixtures increased with the long-term presence of tree species contributing to these mixtures as the home field advantage hypothesis assumes. Our data suggest that complementarity effects on mixed litter decomposition may emerge through long-term interactions between aboveground and belowground biota.

  8. Climate and litter quality differently modulate the effects of soil fauna on litter decomposition across biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Palacios, Pablo; Maestre, Fernando T; Kattge, Jens; Wall, Diana H

    2013-08-01

    Climate and litter quality have been identified as major drivers of litter decomposition at large spatial scales. However, the role played by soil fauna remains largely unknown, despite its importance for litter fragmentation and microbial activity. We synthesised litterbag studies to quantify the effect sizes of soil fauna on litter decomposition rates at the global and biome scales, and to assess how climate, litter quality and soil fauna interact to determine such rates. Soil fauna consistently enhanced litter decomposition at both global and biome scales (average increment ~ 37%). [corrected]. However, climate and litter quality differently modulated the effects of soil fauna on decomposition rates between biomes, from climate-driven biomes to those where climate effects were mediated by changes in litter quality. Our results advocate for the inclusion of biome-specific soil fauna effects on litter decomposition as a mean to reduce the unexplained variation in large-scale decomposition models. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  9. Climatic effects on decomposing litter and substrate chemistry along climatological gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, B.

    2009-04-01

    Climatic effects on decomposing litter and substrate chemistry along climatological gradients. B. Berg, Dipartimento Biologia Strutturale e Funzionale, Complesso Universitario, Monte San Angelo, via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli, Italy and Department of Forest Ecology, P.O. Box 27, University of Helsinki, FIN-00014, Helsinki, Finland. Studies of several processes, using climatic gradients do provide new information as compared with studies at e.g. a single site. Decomposition of plant litter in such gradients give response in decomposition rates to natural climate conditions. Thus Scots pine needle litter incubated in a climate gradient with annual average temperature (AVGT) ranging from -0.5 to 6.8oC had a highly significant increase in initial mass-loss rate with R2 = 0.591 (p<0.001) and a 5o increase in temperature doubled the mass-loss rate. As a contrast - needle litter of Norway spruce incubated in the same transect had no significant response to climate and for initial litter a 5o increase increased mass-loss rate c. 6%. For more decomposed Scots pine litter we could see that the effect of temperature on mass-loss rate gradually decreased until it disappeared. Long-term decomposition studies revealed differences in litter decomposition patterns along a gradient, even for the same type of litter. This could be followed by using an asymptotic function that gave, (i) a measure a maximum level of decomposition, (ii) the initial decomposition rate. Over a gradient the calculated maximum level of decomposition decreased with increasing AVGT. Other gradient studies revealed an effect of AVGT on litter chemical composition. Pine needle litter from stands under different climate conditions had nutrient concentrations related to AVGT. Thus N, P, K, and S were positively related to AVGT and Mn negatively, all of them significantly. This information may be used to explain the changing pattern in decomposition over the gradient.

  10. Leaf litter resource quality induces morphological changes in wood frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) metamorphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoler, Aaron B; Stephens, Jeffrey P; Relyea, Rick A; Berven, Keith A; Tiegs, Scott D

    2015-11-01

    For organisms that exhibit complex life cycles, resource conditions experienced by individuals before metamorphosis can strongly affect phenotypes later in life. Such resource-induced effects are known to arise from variation in resource quantity, yet little is known regarding effects stemming from variation in resource quality (e.g., chemistry). For larval anurans, we hypothesized that variation in resource quality will induce a gradient of effects on metamorph morphology. We conducted an outdoor mesocosm experiment in which we manipulated resource quality by rearing larval wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) under 11 leaf litter treatments. The litter species represented plant species found in open- and closed-canopy wetlands and included many plant species of current conservation concern (e.g., green ash, common reed). Consistent with our hypothesis, we found a gradient of responses for nearly all mass-adjusted morphological dimensions. Hindlimb dimensions and gut mass were positively associated with litter nutrient content and decomposition rate. In contrast, forelimb length and head width were positively associated with concentrations of phenolic acids and dissolved organic carbon. Limb lengths and widths were positively related with the duration of larval period, and we discuss possible hormonal mechanisms underlying this relationship. There were very few, broad differences in morphological traits of metamorphs between open- and closed-canopy litter species or between litter and no-litter treatments. This suggests that the effects of litter on metamorph morphology are litter species-specific, indicating that the effects of changing plant community structure in and around wetlands will largely depend on plant species composition.

  11. Impeller Submergence Depth for Stirred Tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiyam T. Devi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Impeller submergence governs the performance of mixing tanks employed in oxygen transfer operation. Present work experimentally investigates the effect of impeller submergence depths on oxygen transfer and corresponding power consumption. It has been found that at higher range of impeller submergence, mixing tanks consume less power and gives higher values of oxygen transfer coefficient. Optimal range of submergence depth is 0.7 to 0.9 times the impeller diameter. Copyright ©2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.(Received: 4th March 2011; Revised: 12nd July 2011; Accepted: 14th July 2011[How to Cite: T.T. Devi, A.P. Sinha, M. Thakre, and B. Kumar. (2011. Impeller Submergence Depth for Stirred Tanks. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6 (2: 123-128. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.2.826.123-128][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.2.826.123-128 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/826] | View in 

  12. Influence of tropical leaf litter on nitrogen mineralization and community structure of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diallo, MD.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Description of the subject. The present study concerns the relationships among leaf litter decomposition, substrate quality, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB community composition and nitrogen (N availability. Decomposition of organic matter affects the biogeochemical cycling of carbon (C and N. Since the composition of the soil microbial community can alter the physiological capacity of the community, it is timely to study the litter quality effect on N dynamic in ecosystems. Objectives. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of leaf litter decomposition on N mineralization. The specific objectives of this study were to evaluate the influence of the litter biochemistry of five plants species (Faidherbia albida A.Chev., Azadirachta indica A.Juss., Casuarina equisetifolia L., Andropogon gayanus Kunth and Eragrostis tremula Hochst. ex Steud. on N mineralization in a tropical ferrous soil (Lixisol, nitrification, and genetic diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE of amplified fragments of genes coding for 16S rRNA was used to study the development of bacterial communities during decomposition of leaf litter in soils. Method. Community structure of AOB was determined at two time periods: day 0 and day 140. Ten strains were tested and each of these strains produced a single band. Thus, DGGE DNA band patterns were used to estimate bacterial diversity. Plant secondary compounds such as polyphenols are purported to influence nutrient cycling by affecting organic matter degradation, mineralization rates, N availability and humus formation. In a laboratory study, we investigated the influence of six phenolic acids (ferulic, gallic, vanillic, syringic, p-coumaric and p-HBA acids commonly found in the plant residues on N mineralization and NH4+ and NO3- production in soils. Results. The results showed that litter type did affect soil nitrification. Faidherbia albida litter was associated with

  13. Significance of microbial asynchronous anabolism to soil carbon dynamics driven by litter inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhaosheng; Liang, Chao

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle. However, it remains largely unknown how plant litter inputs impact magnitude, composition and source configuration of the SOC stocks over long term through microbial catabolism and anabolism, mostly due to uncoupled research on litter decomposition and SOC formation. This limits our ability to predict soil system responses to changes in land-use and climate. Here, we examine how microbes act as a valve controlling carbon sequestrated from plant litters versus released to the atmosphere in natural ecosystems amended with plant litters varying in quantity and quality. We find that litter quality - not quantity - regulates long-term SOC dynamics under different plausible scenarios. Long-term changes in bulk SOC stock occur only when the quality of carbon inputs causes asynchronous change in a microbial physiological trait, defined as ``microbial biosynthesis acceleration'' (MBA). This is the first theoretical demonstration that the response of the SOC stocks to litter inputs is critically determined by the microbial physiology. Our work suggests that total SOC at an equilibrium state may be an intrinsic property of a given ecosystem, which ultimately is controlled by the asynchronous MBA between microbial functional groups.

  14. Marine litter prediction by artificial intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balas, Can Elmar; Ergin, Aysen; Williams, Allan T; Koc, Levent

    2004-03-01

    Artificial intelligence techniques of neural network and fuzzy systems were applied as alternative methods to determine beach litter grading, based on litter surveys of the Antalya coastline (the Turkish Riviera). Litter measurements were categorized and assessed by artificial intelligence techniques, which lead to a new litter categorization system. The constructed neural network satisfactorily predicted the grading of the Antalya beaches and litter categories based on the number of litter items in the general litter category. It has been concluded that, neural networks could be used for high-speed predictions of litter items and beach grading, when the characteristics of the main litter category was determined by field studies. This can save on field effort when fast and reliable estimations of litter categories are required for management or research studies of beaches--especially those concerned with health and safety, and it has economic implications. The main advantages in using fuzzy systems are that they consider linguistic adjectival definitions, e.g. many/few, etc. As a result, additional information inherent in linguistic comments/refinements and judgments made during field studies can be incorporated in grading systems.

  15. Association between litterers' profile and littering behavior: A chi-square approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmui, Mas'udah; Zaki, Suhanom Mohd; Wahid, Sharifah Norhuda Syed; Mokhtar, Noorsuraya Mohd; Harith, Siti Suhaila

    2017-05-01

    Littering is not a novelty, yet a prolonged issue. The solutions have been discussed for a long time; however this issue still remains unresolved. Littering is commonly associated with littering behavior and awareness. The littering behavior is normally influenced by the litter profile such as gender, family income, education level and age. Jengka Street market, which is located in Pahang, is popularly known as a trade market. It offers diversities of wet and dry goods and is awaited by local residents and tourists. This study analyzes association between litterers' profile and littering behavior. Littering behavior is measured based on factors of trash bin facilities, awareness campaign and public littering behavior. 114 respondents were involved in this study with 62 (54.39%) are female aged more than 18 years old and majority of these female respondents are diploma holders. In addition, 78.95% of the respondents have family income below than RM3,000.00 per month. Based on the data analysis, it was found that first-time visitors littered higher than frequent visitors, lack of providing trash bin facilities contributes to positive littering behavior and there is a significant association between litterers' age and littering behavior by using chi-square approach.

  16. Laser Beam Submerged Arc Hybrid Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisgen, Uwe; Olschok, Simon; Jakobs, Stefan; Schleser, Markus; Mokrov, Oleg; Rossiter, Eduardo

    The laser beam-submerged arc hybrid welding method originates from the knowledge that, with increasing penetration depth, the laser beam process has a tendency to pore formation in the lower weld regions. The coupling with the energy-efficient submerged-arc process improves degassing and reduces the tendency to pore formation. The high deposition rate of the SA process in combination with the laser beam process offers, providing the appropriate choice of weld preparation, the possibility of welding plates with a thickness larger than 20° mm in a single pass, and also of welding thicker plates with the double-sided single pass technique.

  17. Multielement stoichiometry of submerged macrophytes across Yunnan plateau lakes (China)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xing, Wei; Wu, Haoping; Shi, Qiao; Hao, Beibei; Liu, Han; Wang, Zhixiu; Liu, Guihua

    2015-01-01

    .... We predicted that tissue element composition in submerged macrophytes is affected by lake trophic level and taxonomy, and submerged macrophytes have weak stoichiometric homeostasis for all above 16 elements...

  18. Submergence-induced morphological, anatomical, and biochemical responses in a terrestrial species affect gas diffusion resistance and photosynthetic performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mommer, L; Pons, TL; Wolters-Arts, M; Venema, JH; Visser, EJW

    Gas exchange between the plant and the environment is severely hampered when plants are submerged, leading to oxygen and energy deficits. A straightforward way to reduce these shortages of oxygen and carbohydrates would be continued photosynthesis under water, but this possibility has received only

  19. Litter decay controlled by temperature, not soil properties, affecting future soil carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorich, Edward G; Janzen, Henry; Ellert, Benjamin H; Helgason, Bobbi L; Qian, Budong; Zebarth, Bernie J; Angers, Denis A; Beyaert, Ronald P; Drury, Craig F; Duguid, Scott D; May, William E; McConkey, Brian G; Dyck, Miles F

    2017-04-01

    Widespread global changes, including rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations, climate warming and loss of biodiversity, are predicted for this century; all of these will affect terrestrial ecosystem processes like plant litter decomposition. Conversely, increased plant litter decomposition can have potential carbon-cycle feedbacks on atmospheric CO2 levels, climate warming and biodiversity. But predicting litter decomposition is difficult because of many interacting factors related to the chemical, physical and biological properties of soil, as well as to climate and agricultural management practices. We applied (13) C-labelled plant litter to soil at ten sites spanning a 3500-km transect across the agricultural regions of Canada and measured its decomposition over five years. Despite large differences in soil type and climatic conditions, we found that the kinetics of litter decomposition were similar once the effect of temperature had been removed, indicating no measurable effect of soil properties. A two-pool exponential decay model expressing undecomposed carbon simply as a function of thermal time accurately described kinetics of decomposition. (R(2)  = 0.94; RMSE = 0.0508). Soil properties such as texture, cation exchange capacity, pH and moisture, although very different among sites, had minimal discernible influence on decomposition kinetics. Using this kinetic model under different climate change scenarios, we projected that the time required to decompose 50% of the litter (i.e. the labile fractions) would be reduced by 1-4 months, whereas time required to decompose 90% of the litter (including recalcitrant fractions) would be reduced by 1 year in cooler sites to as much as 2 years in warmer sites. These findings confirm quantitatively the sensitivity of litter decomposition to temperature increases and demonstrate how climate change may constrain future soil carbon storage, an effect apparently not influenced by soil properties. © 2016 Her Majesty

  20. Metal release from contaminated leaf litter and leachate toxicity for the freshwater crustacean Gammarus fossarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maunoury-Danger, Florence; Felten, Vincent; Bojic, Clément; Fraysse, Fabrice; Cosin Ponce, Mar; Dedourge-Geffard, Odile; Geffard, Alain; Guérold, François; Danger, Michael

    2017-06-18

    Industrialization has left large surfaces of contaminated soils, which may act as a source of pollution for contiguous ecosystems, either terrestrial or aquatic. When polluted sites are recolonized by plants, dispersion of leaf litter might represent a non-negligible source of contaminants, especially metals. To evaluate the risks associated to contaminated leaf litter dispersion in aquatic ecosystems, we first measured the dynamics of metal loss from leaf litter during a 48-h experimental leaching. We used aspen (Populus tremula L.), a common tree species on these polluted sites, and collected leaf litter on three polluted sites (settling pond of a former steel mill) and three control sites situated in the same geographic area. Then, toxicity tests were carried out on individuals of a key detritivore species widely used in ecotoxicology tests, Gammarus fossarum (Crustacea, Amphipoda), with uncontaminated and contaminated leaf litter leachates, using a battery of biomarkers selected for their sensitivity to metallic stress. Leaf litters collected on polluted sites exhibited not only significantly higher cadmium and zinc concentrations but also lower lignin contents. All leaf litters released high amounts of chemical elements during the leaching process, especially potassium and magnesium, and, in a lesser extent, phosphorus, calcium, and trace metals (copper, cadmium, and zinc but not lead). Toxicity tests revealed that the most important toxic effects measured on G. fossarum were due to leaf litter leachates by themselves, whatever the origin of litter (from polluted or control sites), confirming the toxicity of such substances, probably due to their high content in phenolic compounds. Small additional toxic effects of leachates from contaminated leaf litters were only evidenced on gammarid lipid peroxidation, indicating that contaminated leaf litter leachates might be slightly more toxic than uncontaminated ones, but in a very reduced manner. Further studies will

  1. Cigarette Litter: Smokers’ Attitudes and Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia C. Cartwright

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette butts are consistently the most collected items in litter clean-up efforts, which are a costly burden to local economies. In addition, tobacco waste may be detrimental to our natural environment. The tobacco industry has conducted or funded numerous studies on smokers’ littering knowledge and behavior, however, non-industry sponsored research is rare. We sought to examine whether demographics and smokers’ knowledge and beliefs toward cigarette waste as litter predicts littering behavior. Smokers aged 18 and older (n = 1,000 were interviewed about their knowledge and beliefs towards cigarette waste as litter. Respondents were members of the Research Now panel, an online panel of over three million respondents in the United States. Multivariate logistic regressions were conducted to determine factors significantly predictive of ever having littered cigarette butts or having littered cigarette butts within the past month (p-value < 0.05. The majority (74.1% of smokers reported having littered cigarette butts at least once in their life, by disposing of them on the ground or throwing them out of a car window. Over half (55.7% reported disposing of cigarette butts on the ground, in a sewer/gutter, or down a drain in the past month. Those who did not consider cigarette butts to be litter were over three and half times as likely to report having ever littered cigarette butts (OR = 3.68, 95%CI = 2.04, 6.66 and four times as likely to have littered cigarette butts in the past month (OR = 4.00, 95%CI = 2.53, 6.32. Males were significantly more likely to have littered cigarette butts in the past month compared to females (OR = 1.49, 95%CI = 1.14, 1.94. Holding the belief that cigarette butts are not litter was the only belief in this study that predicted ever or past-month littering of cigarette waste. Messages in anti-cigarette-litter campaigns should emphasize that cigarette butts are not just litter but are toxic

  2. Nitrogen supply differentially affects litter decomposition rates and nitrogen dynamics of sub-arctic bog species.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aerts, R.; van Logtestijn, R.S.P; Karlsson, P.S.

    2006-01-01

    High-latitude peatlands are important soil carbon sinks. In these ecosystems, the mineralization of carbon and nitrogen are constrained by low temperatures and low nutrient concentrations in plant litter and soil organic matter. Global warming is predicted to increase soil N availability for plants

  3. Benthic bacterial diversity in submerged sinkhole ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nold, Stephen C; Pangborn, Joseph B; Zajack, Heidi A; Kendall, Scott T; Rediske, Richard R; Biddanda, Bopaiah A

    2010-01-01

    Physicochemical characterization, automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) community profiling, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing approaches were used to study bacterial communities inhabiting submerged Lake Huron sinkholes inundated with hypoxic, sulfate-rich groundwater. Photosynthetic cyanobacterial mats on the sediment surface were dominated by Phormidium autumnale, while deeper, organically rich sediments contained diverse and active bacterial communities.

  4. Production of extracellular aspartic protease in submerged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    29(1): 1-6. Fraile ER, Bernardinelli SE, Handel M, Jauregui AM (1978). Selección de cepas de Mucor sp productoras de enzimas coagulantes de leche. Rev. Arg. Microbiol. 10(2): 65-69. Ghareib M, Hamdy HS, Khalil AA (2001). Production of intracellular milk clotting enzyme in submerged cultures of Fusarium subglutinans.

  5. Topology optimization for submerged buoyant structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picelli, R.; van Dijk, R.; Vicente, W.M.; Pavanello, R.; Langelaar, M.; van Keulen, A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an evolutionary structural topology optimization method for the design of completely submerged buoyant modules with design-dependent fluid pressure loading. This type of structure is used to support offshore rig installation and pipeline transportation at all water depths. The

  6. Production of extracellular aspartic protease in submerged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fungal milk-clotting enzymes have gained value as bovine Chymosin substitutes in the cheese industry. In this work, the effects of culture conditions on the production of extracellular milk clotting enzymes from Mucor mucedo DSM 809 in submerged fermentation were studied. The maximum activity was observed after 48 h ...

  7. Effects of stoichiometry and temperature perturbations on beech litter decomposition, enzyme activities and protein expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiblinger, K. M.; Schneider, T.; Roschitzki, B.; Schmid, E.; Eberl, L.; Hämmerle, I.; Leitner, S.; Richter, A.; Wanek, W.; Riedel, K.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.

    2011-12-01

    Microbes are major players in leaf litter decomposition and therefore advances in the understanding of their control on element cycling are of paramount importance. Our aim was to investigate the influence of leaf litter stoichiometry in terms of carbon (C) : nitrogen (N) : phosphorus (P) on the decomposition process, and to follow changes in microbial community structure and function in response to temperature-stress treatments. To elucidate how the stoichiometry of beech litter (Fagus sylvatica L.) and stress treatments interactively affect the decomposition processes, a terrestrial microcosm experiment was conducted. Beech litter from different Austrian sites covering C:N ratios from 39 to 61 and C:P ratios from 666 to 1729 were incubated at 15 °C and 60% moisture for six months. Part of the microcosms were then subjected to severe changes in temperature (+30 °C and -15 °C) to monitor the influence of temperature stress. Extracellular enzyme activities were assayed and respiratory activities measured. A semi-quantitative metaproteomics approach (1D-SDS PAGE combined with liquid chromatography and tandem mass-spectrometry; unique spectral counting) was employed to investigate the impact of the applied stress treatments in dependency of litter stoichiometry on structure and function of the decomposing community. In litter with narrow C:nutrient ratios microbial decomposers were most abundant. Cellulase, chitinase, phosphatase and protease activity decreased after heat and frost treatments. Decomposer communities and specific functions varied with site i.e. stoichiometry. The applied stress evoked strong changes of enzyme activities, dissolved organic nitrogen and litter pH. Freeze treatments resulted in a decline in residual plant litter material, and increased fungal abundance indicating slightly accelerated decomposition. Overall, we could detect a strong effect of litter stoichiometry on microbial community structure as well as function. Temperature

  8. Litter dominates surface fluxes of carbonyl sulfide in a Californian oak woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wu; Maseyk, Kadmiel; Lett, Céline; Seibt, Ulli

    2016-02-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is a promising tracer for partitioning terrestrial photosynthesis and respiration from net carbon fluxes, based on its daytime co-uptake alongside CO2 through leaf stomata. Because ecosystem COS fluxes are the sum of plant and soil fluxes, using COS as a photosynthesis tracer requires accurate knowledge of soil COS fluxes. At an oak woodland in Southern California, we monitored below-canopy surface (soil + litter) COS and CO2 fluxes for 40 days using chambers and laser spectroscopy. We also measured litter fluxes separately and used a depth-resolved diffusion-reaction model to quantify the role of litter uptake in surface COS fluxes. Soil and litter were primarily COS sinks, and mean surface COS uptake was small (˜1 pmol m-2 s-1). After rainfall, uptake rates were higher (6-8 pmol m-2 s-1), and litter contributed a significant fraction (up to 90%) to surface fluxes. We observed rapid concurrent increases in COS uptake and CO2 efflux following the onset of rain. The patterns were similar to the Birch effect widely documented for soils; however, both COS and CO2 flux increases originated mainly in the litter. The synchronous COS-CO2 litter Birch effect indicates that it results from a rapid increase in litter microbial activity after rainfall. We expect that the drying-rewetting cycles typical for mediterranean and other semiarid ecosystems create a pronounced seasonality in surface COS fluxes. Our results highlight that litter uptake is an important component of surface COS exchange that needs to be taken into account in ecosystem COS budgets and model simulations.

  9. Removal of volatile organic compounds by natural materials during composting of poultry litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, N G; Akdemir, A; Ergun, O N

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to reduce volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during composting of poultry litter. The natural zeolite, expanded perlite, pumice and expanded vermiculite as the natural materials were used for the reducing of VOCs. Composting was performed in a laboratory scale in-vessel composting plant. Poultry litter was composted for 100 d with volumetric ratio of natural materials:poultry litter of 1:10. The VOCs were tested using the FT-IR method by VOCs analyzer. Studies showed that VOCs generation was the greatest in the control treatment without any natural materials. The natural materials significantly reduced VOCs. At the end of the processes, removal efficiency was 79.73% for NZ treatment, 54.59% for EP treatment, 88.22% for P treatment and 61.53% for EV treatment. Potential of removal for VOCs on poultry litter matrix using natural materials was in order of: P>NZ>EV>EP.

  10. The mechanism of improved aeration due to gas films on leaves of submerged rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verboven, Pieter; Pedersen, Ole; Ho, Quang Tri; Nicolai, Bart M; Colmer, Timothy D

    2014-10-01

    Some terrestrial wetland plants, such as rice, have super-hydrophobic leaf surfaces which retain a gas film when submerged. O2 movement through the diffusive boundary layer (DBL) of floodwater, gas film and stomata into leaf mesophyll was explored by means of a reaction-diffusion model that was solved in a three-dimensional leaf anatomy model. The anatomy and dark respiration of leaves of rice (Oryza sativa L.) were measured and used to compute O2 fluxes and partial pressure of O2 (pO2 ) in the DBL, gas film and leaf when submerged. The effects of floodwater pO2 , DBL thickness, cuticle permeability, presence of gas film and stomatal opening were explored. Under O2 -limiting conditions of the bulk water (pO2  gas film significantly increases the O2 flux into submerged leaves regardless of whether stomata are fully or partly open. With a gas film, tissue pO2 substantially increases, even for the slightest stomatal opening, but not when stomata are completely closed. The effect of gas films increases with decreasing cuticle permeability. O2 flux and tissue pO2 decrease with increasing DBL thickness. The present modelling analysis provides a mechanistic understanding of how leaf gas films facilitate O2 entry into submerged plants. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Elevation dynamics in a restored versus a submerging salt marsh in Long Island Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisfeld, Shimon C.; Hill, Troy D.; Cahoon, Donald R.

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated sea-level rise (SLR) poses the threat of salt marsh submergence, especially in marshes that are relatively low-lying. At the same time, restoration efforts are producing new low-lying marshes, many of which are thriving and avoiding submergence. To understand the causes of these different fates, we studied two Long Island Sound marshes: one that is experiencing submergence and mudflat expansion, and one that is undergoing successful restoration. We examined sedimentation using a variety of methods, each of which captures different time periods and different aspects of marsh elevation change: surface-elevation tables, marker horizons, sediment cores, and sediment traps. We also studied marsh hydrology, productivity, respiration, nutrient content, and suspended sediment. We found that, despite the expansion of mudflat in the submerging marsh, the areas that remain vegetated have been gaining elevation at roughly the rate of SLR over the last 10 years. However, this elevation gain was only possible thanks to an increase in belowground volume, which may be a temporary response to waterlogging. In addition, accretion rates in the first half of the twentieth century were much lower than current rates, so century-scale accretion in the submerging marsh was lower than SLR. In contrast, at the restored marsh, accretion rates are now averaging about 10 mm yr−1 (several times the rate of SLR), much higher than before restoration. The main cause of the different trajectories at the two marshes appeared to be the availability of suspended sediment, which was much higher in the restored marsh. We considered and rejected alternative hypotheses, including differences in tidal flooding, plant productivity, and nutrient loading. In the submerging marsh, suspended and deposited sediment had relatively high organic content, which may be a useful indicator of sediment starvation.

  12. Nutrient value of alum-treated poultry litter for land application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, M; Song, W

    2009-09-01

    Alum-treated poultry litter has different chemical composition and biological properties than conventional poultry litter. To develop agronomic application rates for this particular organic fertilizer to cropland, the nutrient value (nutrient plant availability) of alum-treated poultry litter needs to be determined. Typical alum-treated poultry litter was collected from a broiler farm and examined for nutrient content, nutrient release kinetics, and nutrient value by leaching the material for 190 d under simulated weathering conditions. Nutrients recovered in the leachate were characterized and treated as the potentially plant-available portion. The artificial leaching revealed that alum-treated poultry litter released 21.4 g of dissolved organic C, 13.8 g of total dissolved N, 0.6 g of total dissolved P, and 34.6 g of K per kilogram into leachate during the 190-d weathering. The predominant nutrient release occurred in the first 5 wk and fit first-order exponential rise-to-maximum models (for dissolved organic C, total dissolved P, total dissolved N, NH4-N, K+, Na+, Cl-, and SO4(2-)) and logarithmic equations (for Ca2+ and Mg2+). The nutrient value of alum-treated poultry litter is estimated at N, 13.8 g.kg(-1); P, 0.75 g.kg(-1); K, 34.6 g.kg(-1); and S, 24.2 g.kg(-1). The concentration of Al in litter leachate remained below 0.2 mM and thus no Al toxicity should be concerned. Based on these results, it is recommended to apply alum-treated poultry litter at 7.3 t.ha(-1) for achieving an N supply of 100 kg.ha(-1) to common field crops while preventing excessive P runoff losses from high test P soils.

  13. Role of litter decomposition sensitivity to water content in non-additive litter mixture effect: theoretical demonstration and validation with a peatland litter experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogo, Sébastien; Leroy, Fabien; Zoccatelli, Renata; Bernard-Jannin, Léonard; Laggoun-Défarge, Fatima

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we showed theoretically that differences in litter water content, evaporation rate and reaction rate sensitivity to water content can give account of non-additive litter mixture effect. More specifically two litters with the same dependence to litter water content and contrasted water content, and 2 litters with contrasted decomposition sensitivity to litter water content can exert synergistic mixture effect on decomposition when the 2 litters interact. In these situations, water can flow from the wettest to the driest litter, changing the whole reaction rate without changing the whole litter water content. The reaction rate increase of the litter receiving the water was relatively more important than the reaction rate decrease of the litter supplying the water. These theoretical considerations were validated with experimental data. Sphagnum rubellum and Molinia caerulea decompose faster in measured mixture than expected from the rates obtained in monoculture incubation. Sphagnum rubellum litter can contain more water, which evaporates at a slower rate than Molinia caerulea. It is thus proposed that water flowed from Sphagnum rubellum litter to the Molinia caerulea litter, with a substantial increase of the decomposition of the latter. The physical and biochemical litter characteristics towards water explains a fraction of the synergistic effect of mixing the 2 litters, which suggests that other factors intervene in this effect, such as the carbon substrate.

  14. Increasing shrub abundance and N addition in Arctic tundra affect leaf and root litter decomposition differently

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, J.; van de Weg, M. J.; Shaver, G. R.; Gough, L.

    2013-12-01

    Changes in global climate have resulted in a ';greening' of the Arctic as the abundance of deciduous shrub species increases. Consequently, not only the living plant community, but also the litter composition changes, which in turn can affect carbon turnover patterns in the Arctic. We examined effects of changing litter composition (both root and leaf litter) on decomposition rates with a litter bag study, and specifically focused on the impact of deciduous shrub Betula nana litter on litter decomposition from two evergreen shrubs (Ledum palustre, and Vaccinium vitis-idaea) and one graminoid (Eriophorum vaginatum) species. Additionally, we investigated how decomposition was affected by nutrient availability by placing the litterbags in an ambient and a fertilized moist acidic tundra environment. Measurements were carried out seasonally over 2 years (after snow melt, mid-growing season, end growing season). We measured litter mass loss over time, as well as the respiration rates (standardized for temperature and moisture) and temperature sensitivity of litter respiration at the time of harvesting the litter bags. For leaves, Betula litter decomposed faster than the other three species, with Eriophorum leaves decomposing the slowest. This pattern was observed for both mass loss and litter respiration rates, although the differences in respiration became smaller over time. Surprisingly, combining Betula with any other species resulted in slower overall weight loss rates than would be predicted based on monoculture weight loss rates. This contrasted with litter respiration at the time of sampling, which showed a positive mixing effect of adding Betula leaf liter to the other species. Apparently, during the first winter months (September - May) Betula litter decomposition is negatively affected by mixing the species and this legacy can still be observed in the total mass loss results later in the year. For root litter there were fewer effects of species identity on root

  15. BIOMASS YIELD AND FLAVONOID AND PHENOL CONTENT OF Schinus terebinthifolius CULTIVATED IN SINGLE OR DOUBLE ROW WITH POULTRY LITTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Almeri Tabaldi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the addition of poultry litter on growth, biomass yield, flavonoid and phenol content, and antioxidant activity in leaves of pink pepper. The experiment was carried out at the Federal University of Grande Dourados, in Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul state, from October 2009 to May 2010. Pink pepper was grown in single or double row in soil with incorporated poultry litter at doses of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 t ha -1 . Treatments were arranged as 2 x 5 factorial in a randomized block design with four replications. There was a significant interaction between the doses of poultry litter and evaluation times for plant height and chlorophyll content. A linear increase in leaf area, fresh and dry weight of leaves and diameter of main stems with increasing doses of poultry litter was observed. Plants grown in single row showed higher fresh weight of stem with increasing doses of poultry litter. Poultry litter at 15 and 20 t ha -1 promoted an increase in flavonoid and phenolic contents in the leaves. No significant effect on the antioxidant activity was observed by the chemical method using DPPH. Therefore, it is recommended the cultivation of pink pepper plants with double row and 20 t ha -1 of poultry litter to higher growth, biomass yield, and flavonoid and phenol content.

  16. Det litterært uhyggelige

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    En indkredsning af det uhyggelige som en kvalitet ved litterære tekster og med en eksemplarisk læsning af en novelle af Naja Marie Aidt, "Bryllupsrejse"......En indkredsning af det uhyggelige som en kvalitet ved litterære tekster og med en eksemplarisk læsning af en novelle af Naja Marie Aidt, "Bryllupsrejse"...

  17. Collecting marine litter during regular fish surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluis, van der M.T.; Hal, van R.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the results of the marine litter monitoring on the IBTS survey of 2014 and the BTS survey of 2013. Since 2013 marine litter is collected during the International Bottom Trawl Survey (IBTS) and Dutch Beam Trawl Survey (BTS) following a protocol developed by ICES. The composition

  18. Leaf litter mixtures alter microbial community development: mechanisms for non-additive effects in litter decomposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha K Chapman

    Full Text Available To what extent microbial community composition can explain variability in ecosystem processes remains an open question in ecology. Microbial decomposer communities can change during litter decomposition due to biotic interactions and shifting substrate availability. Though relative abundance of decomposers may change due to mixing leaf litter, linking these shifts to the non-additive patterns often recorded in mixed species litter decomposition rates has been elusive, and links community composition to ecosystem function. We extracted phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs from single species and mixed species leaf litterbags after 10 and 27 months of decomposition in a mixed conifer forest. Total PLFA concentrations were 70% higher on litter mixtures than single litter types after 10 months, but were only 20% higher after 27 months. Similarly, fungal-to-bacterial ratios differed between mixed and single litter types after 10 months of decomposition, but equalized over time. Microbial community composition, as indicated by principal components analyses, differed due to both litter mixing and stage of litter decomposition. PLFA biomarkers a15∶0 and cy17∶0, which indicate gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria respectively, in particular drove these shifts. Total PLFA correlated significantly with single litter mass loss early in decomposition but not at later stages. We conclude that litter mixing alters microbial community development, which can contribute to synergisms in litter decomposition. These findings advance our understanding of how changing forest biodiversity can alter microbial communities and the ecosystem processes they mediate.

  19. Characterization of Forest Structure and an Assessment of Litter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterization of Forest Structure and an Assessment of Litter Production, Accumulation and Litter-asscociated Invertebrates in Two Naturally Occuring Rhizophora mucronata Stands in Mauritius (Indian Ocean)

  20. Radiocesium immobilization to leaf litter by fungi during first-year decomposition in a deciduous forest in Fukushima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yao; Kaneko, Nobuhiro; Nakamori, Taizo; Miura, Toshiko; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Nonaka, Masanori; Takenaka, Chisato

    2016-02-01

    Vast forest areas in eastern Japan have been contaminated with radio-isotopes by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident. Radiocesium (radioCs) is known to remain bioavailable in forest ecosystems for a long time, and it is necessary to terminate the cycling process to decontaminate the forest ecosystem. We observed radiocesium concentrations of leaf litter during decomposition on a forest floor where radiocesium ((137)Cs) contamination was ∼155 kBq/m(2). Litter bag experiments were conducted with newly fallen mixed deciduous leaf litter in a deciduous forest (alt. 610 m) about 50 km from the FDNPP. Litter bags were retrieved in April, June, August, October, and December 2012. Fresh litter (137)Cs concentration was ∼3000 Bq/kg in December 2011. During the decomposition process on the forest floor, litter (137)Cs concentration increased rapidly and exceeded 25,000 Bq/kg after 6 months, whereas potassium (K) concentration in the litter was rather stable, indicating that radiocesium and K showed contrasting dynamics during the early decomposition phase. Nitrogen, phosphorus, and (137)Cs contents were positively correlated to fungal biomass, evaluated by phospholipid fatty acids in the litter during decomposition. The increase of radiocesium concentration mainly occurred during from April to October, when fungal growth peaked. Therefore, this suggests fungal translocation of nutrients from outside the litter substrate (immobilization) is the mechanism to increase radiocesium in the decomposing litter. The amount of (137)Cs contained in the 1-year-old decomposed leaf litter was estimated to be 4% per area of the soil-contaminated (137)Cs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhanced litter input rather than changes in litter chemistry drive soil carbon and nitrogen cycles under elevated CO2: a microcosm study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingli Lui; John S. King; Fitzgerald L. Booker; Christian P. Giardina; H. Lee Allen; Shuijin Hu

    2009-01-01

    Elevated CO2 has been shown to stimulate plant productivity and change litter chemistry. These changes in substrate availability may then alter soil microbial processes and possibly lead to feedback effects on N availability. However, the strength of this feedback, and even its direction, remains unknown. Further, uncertainty remains whether...

  2. Influence of microbial diversity and plant growth hormones in compost and vermicompost from fermented tannery waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Balasubramani; Wong, Jonathan W C; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Sekaran, Ganesan

    2016-10-01

    This study focuses on the effect of the epigeic earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae (with and without addition) to transform solid state fermented (SSF) and submerged (SmF) state fermented TFL mixed with cow dung and leaf litter into value added products in compost and vermicompost bioreactors respectively. The significant role of microbes was identified during compost and vermicompost process. In addition, three important phytohormones (Indole 3-acetic acid, Gibberellic acid, Kinetin) were also detected in the compost and vermicompost products. The results revealed that the maximum amount of plant hormones were available in the vermicompost products which may be due to the joint action of earthworm and microorganisms. The overall results confirmed that the vermicomposting process produced a greater value added product. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Plasticity as a plastic response: how submergence-induced leaf elongation in Rumex palustris depends on light and nutrient availability in its early life stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Heidrun; Chen, Xin; Hendriks, Marloes; Keijsers, Danny; Voesenek, Laurentius A C J; Pierik, Ronald; Poorter, Hendrik; de Kroon, Hans; Visser, Eric J W

    2012-04-01

    Plants may experience different environmental cues throughout their development which interact in determining their phenotype. This paper tests the hypothesis that environmental conditions experienced early during ontogeny affect the phenotypic response to subsequent environmental cues. This hypothesis was tested by exposing different accessions of Rumex palustris to different light and nutrient conditions, followed by subsequent complete submergence. Final leaf length and submergence-induced plasticity were affected by the environmental conditions experienced at early developmental stages. In developmentally older leaves, submergence-induced elongation was lower in plants previously subjected to high-light conditions. Submergence-induced elongation of developmentally younger leaves, however, was larger when pregrown in high light. High-light and low-nutrient conditions led to an increase of nonstructural carbohydrates in the plants. There was a positive correlation between submergence-induced leaf elongation and carbohydrate concentration and content in roots and shoots, but not with root and shoot biomass before submergence. These results show that conditions experienced by young plants modulate the responses to subsequent environmental conditions, in both magnitude and direction. Internal resource status interacts with cues perceived at different developmental stages in determining plastic responses to the environment. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Leaf litter arthropod responses to tropical forest restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Rebecca J; Holl, Karen D; Zahawi, Rakan A; Wickey, Philipp; Townsend, Alan R

    2016-08-01

    Soil and litter arthropods represent a large proportion of tropical biodiversity and perform important ecosystem functions, but little is known about the efficacy of different tropical forest restoration strategies in facilitating their recovery in degraded habitats. We sampled arthropods in four 7- to 8-year-old restoration treatments and in nearby reference forests. Sampling was conducted during the wet and dry seasons using extractions from litter and pitfall samples. Restoration treatments were replicated in 50 × 50-m plots in four former pasture sites in southern Costa Rica: plantation - trees planted throughout the plot; applied nucleation/islands - trees planted in patches of different sizes; and natural regeneration - no tree planting. Arthropod abundance, measures of richness and diversity, and a number of functional groups were greater in the island treatment than in natural regeneration or plantation treatments and, in many cases, were similar to reference forest. Litter and pitfall morphospecies and functional group composition in all three restoration treatments were significantly different than reference sites, but island and plantation treatments showed more recovery than natural regeneration. Abundance and functional group diversity showed a much greater degree of recovery than community composition. Synthesis and applications: The less resource-intensive restoration strategy of planting tree islands was more effective than tree plantations in restoring arthropod abundance, richness, and functional diversity. None of the restoration strategies, however, resulted in similar community composition as reference forest after 8 years of recovery, highlighting the slow rate of recovery of arthropod communities after disturbance, and underscoring the importance of conservation of remnant forests in fragmented landscapes.

  5. VOC emission into the atmosphere by trees and leaf litter in Polish forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidorov, V.; Smolewska, M.; Tyszkiewicz, Z.

    2009-04-01

    It is generally recognized at present that the vegetation of continents is the principal source of reactive volatile organic compounds (VOC) of the atmosphere. The upper limit of the evaluation of global phytogenic VOC is 1100-1500 Tg/yr (Isidorov, 1990; Guenther et al., 1995). Although these global evaluations showing the place of phytogenic emission among of other VOC sources are important, evaluations for individual countries are also very important. This poster represents the results of the estimation of VOC emission from Polish forests. Calculations took into account the composition and age of forests. According to our estimation, the total VOC emission by the arboreal vegetation differs from 190 to 750 kt/yr, depending of weather conditions in different years. There are only few studies conducted on decaying plant material as a source of atmospheric VOCs, but still they are able to give evidence of the importance of this source. For Polish forests, the litter mass is estimated to be (16-19)106 t/yr. These organic materials undergo decomposition by mesofauna and microorganisms. In these processes volatile organic compounds (VOC) stored in the litter and secondary metabolites of litter-destroying fungi are emitted into the atmosphere. The scale of the phenomenon makes leaf litter an important VOC source in the atmosphere. The filling of numerous gaps in researches of VOC emissions from decomposing leaf litter demands carrying out of long term field experiments in various climatic conditions. In this communication we report also the results of 3.5-year experiment on qualitative and quantitative GC-MS investigations of VOC emitted into the gas phase from leaves litter of some species of deciduous and coniferous trees of Polish forests. Apart from terpenes and their oxygenated derivatives, which are usual in plant tissues, leaf litter intensively emits vast amounts of lower alcohols and carbonyl compounds. We suppose that these volatile substances are products

  6. Pump Coastdown with the Submerged Flywheel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyun-Gi; Seo, KyoungWoo; Kim, Seong Hoon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Many research reactors are generally designed as open pool types in consideration of the heat removal of the nuclear fuels, reactor operation and accessibility. Reactor structure assembly is generally placed at the pool bottom as shown in Fig. 1. Primary cooling system pump circulates the coolant from the reactor structure to the heat exchanger in order to continuously remove the heat generated from the reactor core in the research reactor as shown in Fig. 1. The secondary cooling system releases the transferred heat to the atmosphere by the cooling tower. Coastdown flow rate of the primary cooling system pump with the submerged flywheel are calculated analytically in case of the accident situation. Coastdown flow rate is maintained until almost 80 sec when the pump stops normally. But, coastdown flow rate is rapidly decreased when the flywheel is submerged because of the friction load on the flywheel surface.

  7. PAHs in decaying Quercus ilex leaf litter: mutual effects on litter decomposition and PAH dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nicola, F; Baldantoni, D; Alfani, A

    2014-11-01

    The investigation of the relationships between litter decomposition and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is important to shed light not only on the effects of these pollutants on fundamental ecosystem processes, such as litter decomposition, but also on the degradation of these pollutants by soil microbial community. This allows to understand the effect of atmospheric PAH contamination on soil PAH content via litterfall. At this aim, we studied mass and PAH dynamics of Quercus ilex leaf litters collected from urban, industrial and remote sites, incubated in mesocosms under controlled conditions for 361d. The results highlighted a litter decomposition rate of leaves sampled in urban>industrial>remote sites; the faster decomposition of litter of the urban site is also related to the low C/N ratio of the leaves. The PAHs showed concentrations at the beginning of the incubation of 887, 650 and 143 ng g(-1)d.w., respectively in leaf litters from urban, industrial and remote sites. The PAHs in litter decreased along the time, with the same trend observed for mass litter, showing the highest decrease at 361 d for the urban leaf litter. Anyway, PAH dynamics in all the litters exhibited two phases of loss, separated by a PAH increase observed at 246 d and mainly linked to benzo[e]pyrene. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Improving basic and translational science by accounting for litter-to-litter variation in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazic, Stanley E; Essioux, Laurent

    2013-03-22

    Animals from the same litter are often more alike compared with animals from different litters. This litter-to-litter variation, or "litter effects", can influence the results in addition to the experimental factors of interest. Furthermore, sometimes an experimental treatment can only be applied to whole litters rather than to individual offspring. An example is the valproic acid (VPA) model of autism, where VPA is administered to pregnant females thereby inducing the disease phenotype in the offspring. With this type of experiment the sample size is the number of litters and not the total number of offspring. If such experiments are not appropriately designed and analysed, the results can be severely biased as well as extremely underpowered. A review of the VPA literature showed that only 9% (3/34) of studies correctly determined that the experimental unit (n) was the litter and therefore made valid statistical inferences. In addition, litter effects accounted for up to 61% (p<0.001) of the variation in behavioural outcomes, which was larger than the treatment effects. In addition, few studies reported using randomisation (12%) or blinding (18%), and none indicated that a sample size calculation or power analysis had been conducted. Litter effects are common, large, and ignoring them can make replication of findings difficult and can contribute to the low rate of translating preclinical in vivo studies into successful therapies. Only a minority of studies reported using rigorous experimental methods, which is consistent with much of the preclinical in vivo literature.

  9. PERFORMANCE OF NEWLY CONFIGURED SUBMERGED MEMBRANE BIOREACTOR FOR AEROBIC INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gede Wenten

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The application of membrane to replace secondary clarifier of conventional activated sludge, known as membrane bioreactor, has led to a small footprint size of treatment with excellent effluent quality. The use of MBR eliminates almost all disadvantages encountered in conventional wastewater treatment plant such as low biomass concentration and washout of fine suspended solids. However, fouling remains as a main drawback. To minimize membrane fouling, a new configuration of submerged membrane bioreactor for aerobic industrial wastewater treatment has been developed. For the new configuration, a bed of porous particle is applied to cover the submerged ends-free mounted ultrafiltration membrane. Membrane performance was assessed based on flux productivity and selectivity. By using tapioca wastewater containing high organic matter as feed solution, reasonably high and stable fluxes around 11 l/m2.h were achieved with COD removal efficiency of more than 99%. The fouling analysis also shows that the newly configured ends-free membrane bioreactor exhibits lower irreversible resistance compared with the submerged one. In addition, the performance of pilot scale system, using a membrane module  with 10 m2 effective area and reactor tank with 120 L volume, was also assessed. The flux achieved from the pilot scale system around 8 l/m2.h with COD removal of more than 99%. Hence, this study has demonstrated the feasibility of the newly configured submerged ends-free MBR at larger scale.

  10. Coastline Protection by a Submerged Breakwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, B. D.; Hayatdavoodi, M.; Ertekin, R. C.

    2016-02-01

    Coastal communities are in danger of the impact caused by storm surge and waves. Storm surge brings the water level to a higher elevation and farther inland. This rise in water level increases the chance of a higher number and larger set of waves approaching shorelines, and it can potentially devastate the coastal infrastructure. In this study, we evaluate the performance of a submerged, horizontal breakwater located near shore. Unlike other types of breakwaters, such as the ones that extend to the surface, either fixed or floating, a submerged horizontal breakwater does not create any visual distraction or limit most of the recreational and commercial activities in the nearshore areas. The Level I Green-Naghdi (GN) nonlinear water wave equations are utilized here to study the wave transformation over a submerged breakwater that is located in shallow water. The GN theory is based on the theory of directed fluid sheets and assumes an incompressible and inviscid fluid; no assumption on the rotationality of the flow is required. In this approach, the nonlinear boundary conditions and the averaged conservation laws are satisfied exactly. The reflection and transmission coefficients due to nonlinear shallow water waves are determined implementing two approaches which use Goda's (1976) and Grue's (1992) methods. The results are compared with the existing laboratory experiments, and close agreement is observed overall. Preliminary results of the performance of the breakwater on dissipating storm waves during Hurricane Ike (2008), approaching the shore of Galveston, Texas, are presented.

  11. Evolutionary Position and Leaf Toughness Control Chemical Transformation of Litter, and Drought Reinforces This Control: Evidence from a Common Garden Experiment across 48 Species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pan, Xu; Song, Yao-Bin; Jiang, Can; Liu, Guo-Fang; Ye, Xue-Hua; Xie, Xiu-Fang; Hu, Yu-Kun; Zhao, W.; Cui, Lijuan; Cornelissen, J.H.C.; Dong, Ming; Prinzing, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Plant leaf litter is an important source of soil chemicals that are essential for the ecosystem and changes in leaf litter chemical traits during decomposition will determine the availability of multiple chemical elements recycling in the ecosystem. However, it is unclear whether the changes in

  12. Temperature sensitivity of microbial respiration of fine root litter in a temperate broad-leaved forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Makita

    Full Text Available The microbial decomposition respiration of plant litter generates a major CO2 efflux from terrestrial ecosystems that plays a critical role in the regulation of carbon cycling on regional and global scales. However, the respiration from root litter decomposition and its sensitivity to temperature changes are unclear in current models of carbon turnover in forest soils. Thus, we examined seasonal changes in the temperature sensitivity and decomposition rates of fine root litter of two diameter classes (0-0.5 and 0.5-2.0 mm of Quercus serrata and Ilex pedunculosa in a deciduous broad-leaved forest. During the study period, fine root litter of both diameter classes and species decreased approximately exponentially over time. The Q10 values of microbial respiration rates of root litter for the two classes were 1.59-3.31 and 1.28-6.27 for Q. serrata and 1.36-6.31 and 1.65-5.86 for I. pedunculosa. A significant difference in Q10 was observed between the diameter classes, indicating that root diameter represents the initial substrate quality, which may determine the magnitude of Q10 value of microbial respiration. Changes in these Q10 values were related to seasonal soil temperature patterns; the values were higher in winter than in summer. Moreover, seasonal variations in Q10 were larger during the 2-year decomposition period than the 1-year period. These results showed that the Q10 values of fine root litter of 0-0.5 and 0.5-2.0 mm have been shown to increase with lower temperatures and with the higher recalcitrance pool of the decomposed substrate during 2 years of decomposition. Thus, the temperature sensitivity of microbial respiration in root litter showed distinct patterns according to the decay period and season because of the temperature acclimation and adaptation of the microbial decomposer communities in root litter.

  13. Temperature sensitivity of microbial respiration of fine root litter in a temperate broad-leaved forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makita, Naoki; Kawamura, Ayumi

    2015-01-01

    The microbial decomposition respiration of plant litter generates a major CO2 efflux from terrestrial ecosystems that plays a critical role in the regulation of carbon cycling on regional and global scales. However, the respiration from root litter decomposition and its sensitivity to temperature changes are unclear in current models of carbon turnover in forest soils. Thus, we examined seasonal changes in the temperature sensitivity and decomposition rates of fine root litter of two diameter classes (0-0.5 and 0.5-2.0 mm) of Quercus serrata and Ilex pedunculosa in a deciduous broad-leaved forest. During the study period, fine root litter of both diameter classes and species decreased approximately exponentially over time. The Q10 values of microbial respiration rates of root litter for the two classes were 1.59-3.31 and 1.28-6.27 for Q. serrata and 1.36-6.31 and 1.65-5.86 for I. pedunculosa. A significant difference in Q10 was observed between the diameter classes, indicating that root diameter represents the initial substrate quality, which may determine the magnitude of Q10 value of microbial respiration. Changes in these Q10 values were related to seasonal soil temperature patterns; the values were higher in winter than in summer. Moreover, seasonal variations in Q10 were larger during the 2-year decomposition period than the 1-year period. These results showed that the Q10 values of fine root litter of 0-0.5 and 0.5-2.0 mm have been shown to increase with lower temperatures and with the higher recalcitrance pool of the decomposed substrate during 2 years of decomposition. Thus, the temperature sensitivity of microbial respiration in root litter showed distinct patterns according to the decay period and season because of the temperature acclimation and adaptation of the microbial decomposer communities in root litter.

  14. Litter quality versus soil microbial community controls over decomposition: a quantitative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Cory C.; Reed, Sasha C.; Keller, Adrienne B.; Nemergut, Diana R.; O'Neill, Sean P.; Ostertag, Rebecca; Vitousek, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    The possible effects of soil microbial community structure on organic matter decomposition rates have been widely acknowledged, but are poorly understood. Understanding these relationships is complicated by the fact that microbial community structure and function are likely to both affect and be affected by organic matter quality and chemistry, thus it is difficult to draw mechanistic conclusions from field studies. We conducted a reciprocal soil inoculum × litter transplant laboratory incubation experiment using samples collected from a set of sites that have similar climate and plant species composition but vary significantly in bacterial community structure and litter quality. The results showed that litter quality explained the majority of variation in decomposition rates under controlled laboratory conditions: over the course of the 162-day incubation, litter quality explained nearly two-thirds (64 %) of variation in decomposition rates, and a smaller proportion (25 %) was explained by variation in the inoculum type. In addition, the relative importance of inoculum type on soil respiration increased over the course of the experiment, and was significantly higher in microcosms with lower litter quality relative to those with higher quality litter. We also used molecular phylogenetics to examine the relationships between bacterial community composition and soil respiration in samples through time. Pyrosequencing revealed that bacterial community composition explained 32 % of the variation in respiration rates. However, equal portions (i.e., 16 %) of the variation in bacterial community composition were explained by inoculum type and litter quality, reflecting the importance of both the meta-community and the environment in bacterial assembly. Taken together, these results indicate that the effects of changing microbial community composition on decomposition are likely to be smaller than the potential effects of climate change and/or litter quality changes in

  15. A filtration model applied to submerged anaerobic MBRs (SAnMBRs)

    OpenAIRE

    Robles Martínez, Ángel; Ruano García, María Victoria; Ribes Bertomeu, José; SECO TORRECILLAS, AURORA; Ferrer, J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a model able to correctly reproduce the filtration process of submerged anaerobic MBRs (SAnMBRs). The proposed model was calibrated and validated in a SAnMBR demonstration plant fitted with industrial-scale hollow-fibre membranes. Three suspended components were contemplated in the model: total solids concentration; dry mass of cake on the membrane surface; and dry mass of irreversible fouling on the membrane surface. The model addressed the following phys...

  16. Mathematical modelling of filtration in submerged anaerobic MBRs (SAnMBRs): long-term validation

    OpenAIRE

    Robles Martínez, Ángel; Ruano García, María Victoria; Ribes Bertomeu, José; SECO TORRECILLAS, AURORA; Ferrer, J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was the long-term validation of a model capable of reproducing the filtration process occurring in a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAnMBR) system. The proposed model was validated using data obtained horn a SAnMBR demonstration plant fitted with industrial-scale hollow-fibre membranes. The validation was carried out using both lightly and heavily fouled membranes operating at different bulk concentrations, gas sparging intensities and transmembrane fluxes. Acr...

  17. Design methodology for submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR): A case study

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrer, J.; Pretel, R.; Durán Pinzón, Freddy; Giménez, JB; Robles Martínez, Ángel; Ruano García, María Victoria; Serralta Sevilla, Joaquín; Ribes Bertomeu, José; SECO TORRECILLAS, AURORA

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to propose guidelines for designing submerged anaerobic MBR (AnMBR) technology for municipal wastewater treatment. The design methodology was devised on the basis of simulation and experimental results from an AnMBR plant featuring industrial-scale hollow-fibre membranes. The proposed methodology aims to minimise both capital expenditure and operating expenses, and the key parameters considered were: hydraulic retention time, solids retention ti...

  18. Highly Active Ice Nuclei from Tree Leaf Litters Retain Activity for Decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, R. C.; Hill, T. C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Biogenic ice nuclei (IN) studied since the 1960s were first observed in tree leaf litters, in a few bacteria species and later in fungi and lichens. Recently, viable IN bacteria in precipitation have been used as a metric of their possible role in precipitation formation. Although bacterial IN activity is deactivated by a variety of common environmental stresses, we present data showing that IN found in a potpourri of decayed plant leaves, bacteria, molds and fungi etc. in plant litters are exceptionally stable and active over decades while in storage. As such, their atmospheric IN potential is worthy of further study due to their environmental persistence. In August 1970 litter collected in a grove of deciduous trees near Red Deer, AB, Canada was tested for IN (drop freezing technique). The sample initiated ice at -4C with 109 IN per gram of litter active at -10C. A few kilograms were stored in a plastic bag and tested every few years for IN content; the IN activity remained essentially unchanged over 40 years. In 2011, litter collected in the same grove had the same IN activity as the sample tested over the intervening 40 years. Boiling a gram sample of this litter in 100 grams of water deactivated 99 % of the IN activity down to -13C. None of 88 different bacteria cultures several of which appeared to Pseudomonads (common IN producing bacteria) from the fresh litter produced any active IN. A sample of the litter was placed on the top of a 15 cm column of laboratory grade kaolin and water dripped onto the litter. Ten days later the water reached the bottom of the column. The kaolin was dried and tested for IN. The prior essentially IN free kaolin now exhibited IN activity at -4C with 105 IN active at -10C. The litter exposed kaolin retained the IN activity for 25 years. Baking the kaolin removed the active IN. This suggests that IN activity attributed to kaolin particles sometimes seen at the nucleus of snow crystals could be of biological origin.

  19. An Approach to Litter Generation and Littering Practices in a Mexico City Neighborhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia E. Muñoz-Cadena

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Urban litter is generated by human societies everywhere. Some litter is recyclable waste. In this study, the acronym RMSW is used to refer to recyclable municipal solid waste generated in streets. Public attitude towards RMSW generation, generators’ perceptions, and quantification of RMSW in streets were examined in a Mexico City neighborhood, where litter presence causes major environmental problems affecting the population year after year. Interviews with neighborhood residents and item counts were carried out from 2010 to 2011. In all, 58% of interviewees reported generating RMSW at variable frequencies while 42% said they did not generate this kind of waste. Laziness, lack of vigilance by municipal authorities, no litter bins in streets, and imitation were the main causes identified by interviewees as reasons for littering. Potential litter generators may be of any age, educational level or income. Interviewees’ perception of RMSW generation was compared with item counts in the neighborhood studied.

  20. The measurement and reduction of urban litter entering stormwater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It proposes preliminary guidelines for the reduction of urban litter loads entering the drainage system by dealing with litter pollution at its source. Keywords: Litter management, Stormwater drainage systems, Water quality management, Source controls, Reduction of urban litter, Solid waste pollution control WaterSA ...

  1. Different pathways but same result? Comparing chemistry and biological effects of burned and decomposed litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, Stefano; Bonanomi, Giuliano; Incerti, Guido; El-Gawad, Ahmed M. Abd; Sarker, Tushar Chandra; Cesarano, Gaspare; Saulino, Luigi; Saracino, Antonio; Castro Rego, Francisco

    2017-04-01

    Litter burning and biological decomposition are oxidative processes co-occurring in many terrestrial ecosystems, producing organic matter with different chemical properties and differently affecting plant growth and soil microbial activity. Here, we tested the chemical convergence hypothesis (i.e. materials with different initial chemistry tend to converge towards a common profile, with similar biological effects, as the oxidative process advances) for burning and decomposition. We compared the molecular composition of 63 organic materials - 7 litter types either fresh, decomposed for 30, 90, 180 days, or heated at 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 °C - as assessed by 13C NMR. We used litter water extracts (5% dw) as treatments in bioassays on plant (Lepidium sativum) and fungal (Aspergillus niger) growth, and a washed quartz sand amended with litter materials (0.5 % dw) to assess heterotrophic respiration by CO2 flux chamber. We observed different molecular variations for materials either burning (i.e. a sharp increase of aromatic C and a decrease of most other fractions above 200 °C) or decomposing (i.e. early increase of alkyl, methoxyl and N-alkyl C and decrease of O-alkyl and di-O-alkyl C fractions). Soil respiration and fungal growth progressively decreased with litter age and temperature. Plant growth underwent an inhibitory effect by untreated litter, more and less rapidly released over decomposing and burning materials, respectively. Correlation analysis between NMR and bioassay data showed that opposite responses for soil respiration and fungi, compared to plants, are related to essentially the same C molecular types. Our findings suggest a functional convergence of decomposed and burnt organic substrates, emerging from the balance between the bioavailability of labile C sources and the presence of recalcitrant and pyrogenic compounds, oppositely affecting different trophic levels.

  2. IODINE REMOVAL EFFICIENCY IN NON-SUBMERGED AND SUBMERGED SELF-PRIMING VENTURI SCRUBBER

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Majid; CHANGQI, YAN; ZHONGNING, SUN; HAIFENG, GU; JUNLONG, WANG; MEHBOOB, KHURRAM

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this conducted research is to study the iodine removal efficiency in a self-priming venturi scrubber for submerged and non-submerged operating conditions experimentally and theoretically. The alkaline solution is used as an absorbent, which is prepared by dissolving sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium thiosulphate (Na2S2O3) in water to remove the gaseous iodine (I2) from the gas. Iodine removal efficiency is examined at various gas flow rates and inlet concentrations of iodine...

  3. An Approach to Litter Generation and Littering Practices in a Mexico City Neighborhood

    OpenAIRE

    Cecilia E. Muñoz-Cadena; Pedro Lina-Manjarrez; Irma Estrada-Izquierdo; Eva Ramón-Gallegos

    2012-01-01

    Urban litter is generated by human societies everywhere. Some litter is recyclable waste. In this study, the acronym RMSW is used to refer to recyclable municipal solid waste generated in streets. Public attitude towards RMSW generation, generators’ perceptions, and quantification of RMSW in streets were examined in a Mexico City neighborhood, where litter presence causes major environmental problems affecting the population year after year. Interviews with neighborhood residents and item cou...

  4. Annual Production of Decomposer Fungi Associated With Standing-Dead Litter of Typha angustifolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsowski, B. M.; Collins, M. D.; Tarry, D.; Francoeur, S. N.; Neely, R. K.; Kuehn, K. A.

    2005-05-01

    Microbial decomposition of standing-dead plant litter is an important process in wetlands dominated by emergent macrophytes. We determined the annual fungal biomass (ergosterol) and production (14C-acetate incorporation) associated with decaying standing litter (leaves and shoots) of the emergent macrophyte Typha angustifolia in small lake littoral wetland in southeastern Michigan. Mean annual detrital mass of standing-dead leaf and shoot litter was 656±238 g/m2 (range 284-873) and 1184±280 g/m2 (range 522-1525), respectively, during study period. Mean annual fungal biomass associated with decaying standing litter was 46 and 15 g/m2 for leaves and shoots, respectively. Annual fungal biomass production associated with leaves and shoots was 168 and 78 g/m2, respectively, with maximum production /m2 occurring during the summer season. These production estimates account for diel periodicity in water availability and the consequent periodicity in microbial activities that are characteristic of the standing litter environment. A partial organic matter budget constructed for this littoral wetland indicates that 9.4% of the annual aboveground production of T. angustifolia went into the production of fungal biomass. These results provide additional evidence indicating considerable carbon flow from emergent plant matter to fungal decomposers while in the standing-decay phase.

  5. Field and lab conditions alter microbial enzyme and biomass dynamics driving decomposition of the same leaf litter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary L Rinkes

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuations in climate and edaphic factors influence field decomposition rates and preclude a complete understanding of how microbial communities respond to plant litter quality. In contrast, laboratory microcosms isolate the intrinsic effects of litter chemistry and microbial community from extrinsic effects of environmental variation. Used together, these paired approaches provide mechanistic insights to decomposition processes. In order to elucidate the microbial mechanisms underlying how environmental conditions alter the trajectory of decay, we characterized microbial biomass, respiration, enzyme activities, and nutrient dynamics during early (< 10% mass loss, mid- (10-40% mass loss, and late (> 40% mass loss decay in parallel field and laboratory litter bag incubations for deciduous tree litters with varying recalcitrance (dogwood < maple < maple-oak mixture < oak. In the field, mass loss was minimal (< 10% over the first 50 days (January-February, even for labile litter types, despite above-freezing soil temperatures and adequate moisture during these winter months. In contrast, microcosms displayed high C mineralization rates in the first week. During mid-decay, the labile dogwood and maple litters in the field had higher mass loss per unit enzyme activity than the lab, possibly due to leaching of soluble compounds. Microbial biomass to litter mass (B:C ratios peaked in the field during late decay, but B:C ratios declined between mid- and late decay in the lab. Thus, microbial biomass did not have a consistent relationship with litter quality between studies. Higher oxidative enzyme activities in oak litters in the field, and higher nitrogen (N accumulation in the lab microcosms occurred in late decay. We speculate that elevated N suppressed fungal activity and/or biomass in microcosms. Our results suggest that differences in microbial biomass and enzyme dynamics alter the decay trajectory of the same leaf litter under field and lab

  6. Pulse frequency and soil-litter mixing alter the control of cumulative precipitation over litter decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, François-Xavier; Kurupas, Kelsey L; Throop, Heather L

    2017-09-01

    Macroclimate has traditionally been considered the predominant driver of litter decomposition. However, in drylands, cumulative monthly or annual precipitation typically fails to predict decomposition. In these systems, the windows of opportunity for decomposer activity may rather depend on the precipitation frequency and local factors affecting litter desiccation, such as soil-litter mixing. We used a full-factorial microcosm experiment to disentangle the relative importance of cumulative precipitation, pulse frequency, and soil-litter mixing on litter decomposition. Decomposition, measured as litter carbon loss, saturated with increasing cumulative precipitation when pulses were large and infrequent, suggesting that litter moisture no longer increased and/or microbial activity was no longer limited by water availability above a certain pulse size. More frequent precipitation pulses led to increased decomposition at high levels of cumulative precipitation. Soil-litter mixing consistently increased decomposition, with greatest relative increase (+194%) under the driest conditions. Collectively, our results highlight the need to consider precipitation at finer temporal scale and incorporate soil-litter mixing as key driver of decomposition in drylands. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  7. PERFORMANCE, CARCASS YIELD AND LITTER QUALITY OF BROILERS RAISED ON LITTERS TREATED WITH MICRO-ORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Prado da Cruz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aimed at evaluating the effect of adding beneficial micro-organisms to the litters on litter quality, performance and carcass yield for broilers. A total of 240 one-day chicks were used, and randomly distributed in blocks with four treatments and four replications. The following treatments were carried out in the housing: Treatment 1 – Control with weekly spraying of water on the litters; Treatment 2 – Litter treated with a mixture of inoculated and fermented meal by micro-organisms and weekly spraying of water; Treatment 3 – Litter treated by weekly spraying of micro-organisms; Treatment 4 – Litter treated with the same mixture of meals from treatment two and weekly spraying of micro-organisms. Performance was evaluated by the feed consumption, weight gain, feed conversion, viability and carcass, breast and leg yield. From litter samples, pH, dry matter, ashes and nitrogen were evaluated. No differences were found among the treatments. In the conditions the animals were raised, it can be concluded that the treatment on the litter does not affect performance, carcass yield and quality of the litter for broilers.

  8. Arst on patsiendi poolel / Galina Litter

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Litter, Galina, 1956-

    2006-01-01

    Naistearst Galina Litter seadusest, mis lubab alaealistel ilma vanema nõusolekuta aborti teha. Vastus artiklile : Varro Vooglaid. Vanemate vastutus - kas reaalne või paljasõnaline? // Õpetajate Leht (2006) 13. okt., lk. 1, 7

  9. Linear loss of litter over time, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This table contains data on dry mass remaining in a subset of Salicornia pacifica and Deschampsia cespitosa litter bags removed over a series of time points spanning...

  10. Cigarette litter: smokers' attitudes and behaviors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rath, Jessica M; Rubenstein, Rebecca A; Curry, Laurel E; Shank, Sarah E; Cartwright, Julia C

    2012-01-01

    .... In addition, tobacco waste may be detrimental to our natural environment. The tobacco industry has conducted or funded numerous studies on smokers' littering knowledge and behavior, however, non-industry sponsored research is rare...

  11. Can't See the Wood for the Litter: Evaluation of Litter Behavior Modification in a Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann-Matthies, Petra; Bonigk, Isabel; Benkowitz, Dorothee

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated elementary school children's (n = 171) litter behavior during guided forest tours following two different treatments. Four classes received a verbal appeal not to litter in the forest, while another four classes received both a verbal appeal and a demonstration of the desired litter behavior (picking up litter, putting it…

  12. IMPLICATIONS OF POLICY REGULATIONS ON LAND APPLICATIONS OF POULTRY LITTER

    OpenAIRE

    Govindasamy, Ramu; Cochran, Mark J.

    1998-01-01

    The growth of the poultry industry in Arkansas has exploded in the past decade. As a result, approximately 1.5 million tons of litter are produced every year. Concerns about possible contamination of ground and surface water from land applications of poultry litter have been raised. This paper compares four policy scenarios in terms of their efficiency and practicality to manage land applications of poultry litter. The results indicate that a litter tax per ton of litter applied could achieve...

  13. Resource stoichiometry and availability modulate species richness and biomass of tropical litter macro-invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochum, Malte; Barnes, Andrew D; Weigelt, Patrick; Ott, David; Rembold, Katja; Farajallah, Achmad; Brose, Ulrich

    2017-09-01

    High biodiversity and biomass of soil communities are crucial for litter decomposition in terrestrial ecosystems such as tropical forests. However, the leaf litter that these communities consume is of particularly poor quality as indicated by elemental stoichiometry. The impact of resource quantity, quality and other habitat parameters on species richness and biomass of consumer communities is often studied in isolation, although much can be learned from simultaneously studying both community characteristics. Using a dataset of 780 macro-invertebrate consumer species across 32 sites in tropical lowland rain forest and agricultural systems on Sumatra, Indonesia, we investigated the effects of basal resource stoichiometry (C:X ratios of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Na, S in local leaf litter), litter mass (basal resource quantity and habitat space), plant species richness (surrogate for litter habitat heterogeneity), and soil pH (acidity) on consumer species richness and biomass across different consumer groups (i.e. 3 feeding guilds and 10 selected taxonomic groups). In order to distinguish the most important predictors of consumer species richness and biomass, we applied a standardised model averaging approach investigating the effects of basal resource stoichiometry, litter mass, plant species richness and soil pH on both consumer community characteristics. This standardised approach enabled us to identify differences and similarities in the magnitude and importance of such effects on consumer species richness and biomass. Across consumer groups, we found litter mass to be the most important predictor of both species richness and biomass. Resource stoichiometry had a more pronounced impact on consumer species richness than on their biomass. As expected, taxonomic groups differed in which resource and habitat parameters (basal resource stoichiometry, litter mass, plant species richness and pH) were most important for modulating their community characteristics. The importance

  14. Production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) from waste materials and by-products by submerged and solid-state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilho, Leda R; Mitchell, David A; Freire, Denise M G

    2009-12-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates are biodegradable polymers produced by prokaryotic organisms from renewable resources. The production of PHAs by submerged fermentation processes has been intensively studied over the last 30 years. In recent years, alternative strategies have been proposed, such as the use of solid-state fermentation or the production of PHAs in transgenic plants. This paper gives an overview of submerged and solid-state fermentation processes used to produce PHAs from waste materials and by-products. The use of these low-cost raw materials has the potential to reduce PHA production costs, because the raw material costs contribute a significant part of production costs in traditional PHA production processes.

  15. CONTRIBUTION OF THE MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS ON THE SITE CLASSIFICATION IN PLANTED FORESTS OF Araucaria angustifolia (Bert. O. Ktze., BASED ON PHYSICAL AND MORPHOLOGICAL SOIL FACTORS AND ON THE LITTER NUTRIENT CONTENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloidir José Gerhardt

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, with the help of multivariate statistical techniques, it was studied the influence of morphological and physical soil factors and litter nutrient content on site classification of a 47 years old Araucaria angustifolia (Bert. O. Ktze. stand located on Canela National Forest, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. A stratified sampling, covering three natural sites that received four angle-count sampling (ACS each one, according to the methodology of BITTERLICH (1984 were installed. In the area of the ACS the tree with the average dominant height was felled for the trunk analysis and determination of the height growth, as defined by  Pollanchütz,  and  soil  samples at deeps of 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm  were  collected with am extractive cylinder. These samples were equidistantly distributed under the crown projection of the average dominant tree. Later, each sample was divided into two geometric horizons, A1 e A2, from which the physical characteristics of the soil were determined. Litter samples were obtained and their chemical content was analyzed. The cluster analysis classified the group of observations into three distinct groups, according to their locations in the different natural sites. The discriminant analysis confirmed the efficiency of the groupings and indicated, with a significance level of 0.01, that the variables soil depth, contents of clay, fine sand and loam, soil density and height mean annual increment presented a higher discriminating power of separating the groups. The first one corresponds to the site of higher yearly mean growth in height and it is located on the plains and low hillsides, where soils, are deep, loamy and sandy. The second, correspond to the lower height growth sites, located on intermontane plains which occurs in the form of irregular lowlands where soils are deep, clay, compacted and with rock residuals along its profile. The third, with yearly mean growth in height intermediary when compared

  16. Effects of litter manipulation on litter decomposition in a successional gradients of tropical forests in southern China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Hao; Gurmesa, Geshere A.; Liu, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Global changes such as increasing CO2, rising temperature, and land-use change are likely to drive shifts in litter inputs to forest floors, but the effects of such changes on litter decomposition remain largely unknown. We initiated a litter manipulation experiment to test the response of litter...... decomposition to litter removal/addition in three successional forests in southern China, namely masson pine forest (MPF), mixed coniferous and broadleaved forest (MF) and monsoon evergreen broadleaved forest (MEBF). Results showed that litter removal decreased litter decomposition rates by 27%, 10% and 8...

  17. Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds from litter are coupled with changes in the microbial community composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagel Svendsen, Sarah; Schostag, Morten; Voriskova, Jana; Kramshøj, Magnus; Priemé, Anders; Suhr Jacobsen, Carsten; Rinnan, Riikka

    2017-04-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from natural ecosystems have significant impact on atmospheric chemistry and belowground chemical processes. Most attention has been given to emissions from plants. However, several studies have found that soil, and especially the decomposing leaf and needle litter, emits substantial amounts of BVOCs. The contribution of litter to ecosystem BVOC emissions may be increasingly significant in the Arctic, where the living plant biomass is low, and the amount of litter increasing due to the expansion of deciduous vegetation in response to climate change. It is known that the types and amounts of BVOCs emitted from the soil are highly dependent on the microbial community composition and the type of substrate. In this study we measured emissions of BVOCs from the leaf litter of common arctic plant species at different temperatures. The BVOC measurements were coupled with an analysis of the relative abundance of dominating bacterial species (determined as operational taxonomic units, OTUs). Leaf litter from evergreen Cassiope tetragona and two species of deciduous Salix were collected from two arctic locations; one in the High Arctic and one in the Low Arctic. The litter was incubated in dark at 5 ?C. Over an eight week period the temperature was increased 7 ?C every two weeks, giving temperature incubations at 5 ?C, 12 ?C, 19 ?C and 26 ?C. Emissions of BVOCs from the litter were sampled in adsorbent cartridges weekly and analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The relative abundance of bacteria was determined at the end of the incubation at each temperature using DNA sequencing. Results showed that emissions of BVOCs belonging to different chemical functional groups responded differently to increasing temperatures and were highly dependent on the type of substrate. For instance, terpenoid emissions from the Cassiope litter increased with increasing temperature, whereas the emissions from the Salix

  18. Experimental evidence that the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model best describes the evolution of leaf litter decomposability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pan, Xu; Cornelissen, J.H.C.; Zhao, W.; Liu, Guo-Fang; Hu, Yu-Kun; Prinzing, A.; Dong, Ming; Cornwell, W.K.

    2014-01-01

    Leaf litter decomposability is an important effect trait for ecosystem functioning. However, it is unknown how this effect trait evolved through plant history as a leaf 'afterlife' integrator of the evolution of multiple underlying traits upon which adaptive selection must have acted. Did

  19. Leaf litter is an important mediator of soil respiration in an oak-dominated forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jared L. DeForest; Jiquan Chen; Steve G. McNulty

    2009-01-01

    The contribution of the organic (O) horizon to total soil respiration is poorly understood even though it can represent a large source of uncertainty due to seasonal changes in microclimate and O horizon properties due to plant phenology. Our objectives were to partition the CO2 effluxes of litter layer and mineral soil from total soil...

  20. CDOM PRODUCTION BY MANGROVE LEAF LITTER AND SARGASSUM COLONIES IN FLORIDA KEYS COASTAL WATERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have investigated the importance of leaf litter from red mangroves (Rhizophora mangle) and living Sargassum plants as sources of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) to the coastal ocean waters and coral reef system of the Florida Keys. The magnitude of UVB exposure t...

  1. Litter quality and decomposition rates of foliar litter produced under CO{sub 2} enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Neill, E.G.; Norby, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    Decomposition of senesced plant material is one of two critical processes linking above- and below-ground components of nutrient cycles. As such, it is a key area of concern in understanding and predicting ecosystem responses to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Just as root acquisition of nutrients from soils represents the major pathway for nutrient movement from the soil to vegetation, decomposition serves as the major path of return to the soil. For any given ecosystem, a long-term shift in decomposition rates could alter nutrient cycling rates and potentially change the structure, function, and even the persistence of that ecosystem type within a given region. There is wide-spread concern that decomposition processes would be altered in an enriched-CO{sub 2} world. What is lacking presently is sufficient experimental data at the ecosystem level to determine whether these concerns have merit. Two issues are discussed in this article: effects of carbon dioxide enrichement on foliar litter quality and subsequent effects on decomposition rates. The focus is primarily on nitrogen because in many terrestrial ecosystems, nitrogen is the major nutrient limiting plant growth and experimental results from diverse ecosystem types have demonstrated that nitrogen concentrations are consistently reduced in green foliage produced at elevated carbon dioxide. Methodological questions are also discussed.

  2. Calibration of submerged multi-sluice gates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F. Sauida

    2014-09-01

    The main objective of this work is to study experimentally and verify empirically the different parameters affecting the discharge through submerged multiple sluice gates (i.e., the expansion ratios, gates operational management, etc.. Using multiple regression analysis of the experimental results, a general equation for discharge coefficient is developed. The results show, that the increase in the expansion ratio and the asymmetric operation of gates, give higher values for the discharge coefficient. The obtained predictions of the discharge coefficient using the developed equations are compared to the experimental data. The present developed equations showed good consistency and high accuracy.

  3. Non-additive effects of litter diversity on greenhouse gas emissions from alpine steppe soil in Northern Tibet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Youchao; Sun, Jian; Xie, Fangting; Yan, Yan; Wang, Xiaodan; Cheng, Genwei; Lu, Xuyang

    2015-12-04

    While litter decomposition is a fundamental ecological process, previous studies have mainly focused on the decay of single species. In this study, we conducted a litter-mixing experiment to investigate litter diversity effects on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from an alpine steppe soil in Northern Tibet. Significant non-additive effects of litter diversity on GHG dynamics can be detected; these non-additive effects were the result of species composition rather than species richness. Synergistic effects were frequent for CO2 and N2O emissions, as they were found to occur in 70.5% and 47.1% of total cases, respectively; antagonistic effects on CH4 uptake predominated in 60.3% of the cases examined. The degree of synergism and antagonism may be significantly impacted by litter chemical traits, such as lignin and N, lignin:N ratio, and total phenols during decomposition (P mixing effects changed over incubation time. Our study provides an opportunity to gain insight into the relationship between litter diversity and soil ecological processes. The results indicate that higher plant diversity may generally enhance CO2 and N2O emissions while inhibiting CH4 uptake; meanwhile, the direction and strength of non-additive effects appear to be related to litter chemical traits.

  4. Metaproteome analysis of the microbial community during leaf litter decomposition - the impact of stoichiometry and temperature perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiblinger, K. M.; Schneider, T.; Leitner, S.; Hämmerle, I.; Riedel, K.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.

    2012-04-01

    Leaf litter decomposition is the breakdown of dead plant material, a terrestrial ecosystem process of paramount importance. Nutrients released during decomposition play a key role for microbial growth and plant productivity. These processes are controlled by abiotic factors, such as climate, and by biotic factors, such as litter nutrient concentration and stoichiometry (carbon:nutrient ratio) and activity of soil organisms. Future climate change scenarios predict temperature perturbations, therefore following changes of microbial community composition and possible feedbacks on ecosystem processes are of key interest; especially as our knowledge about the microbial regulation of these processes is still scarce. Our aim was to elucidate how temperature perturbations and leaf litter stoichiometry affect the composition of the microbial decomposer community. To this end a terrestrial microcosm experiment using beech (Fagus sylvatica) litter with different stoichiometry was conducted. In a semi-quantitative metaproteomics approach (1D-SDS PAGE combined with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry; unique spectral counting) we used the intrinsic metabolic function of proteins to relate specific microbial activities to their phylogenetic origin in multispecies communities. Decomposer communities varied on litter with different stoichiometry so that microbial decomposers (fungi and bacteria) were favoured in litter with narrow C:nutrient ratios. The fungal community was dominated by Ascomycota (Eurotiomycetes, Sordariomycetes) and Basidiomycota (Agaricomycetes) and the bacterial community was dominated by Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. The extracellular enzymes we detected belonged mainly to classes of xylanases, pectinases, cellulases and proteases and were almost exclusively of fungal origin (particularly Ascomycota). Temperature stress (heat and frost) evoked strong changes in community composition, enzyme activities, dissolved organic

  5. Litter Decomposition in a Semiarid Dune Grassland: Neutral Effect of Water Supply and Inhibitory Effect of Nitrogen Addition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulin Li

    Full Text Available The decomposition of plant material in arid ecosystems is considered to be substantially controlled by water and N availability. The responses of litter decomposition to external N and water, however, remain controversial, and the interactive effects of supplementary N and water also have been largely unexamined.A 3.5-year field experiment with supplementary nitrogen and water was conducted to assess the effects of N and water addition on mass loss and nitrogen release in leaves and fine roots of three dominant plant species (i.e., Artemisia halondendron, Setaria viridis, and Phragmites australis with contrasting substrate chemistry (e.g. N concentration, lignin content in this study in a desertified dune grassland of Inner Mongolia, China. The treatments included N addition, water addition, combination of N and water, and an untreated control. The decomposition rate in both leaves and roots was related to the initial litter N and lignin concentrations of the three species. However, litter quality did not explain the slower mass loss in roots than in leaves in the present study, and thus warrant further research. Nitrogen addition, either alone or in combination with water, significantly inhibited dry mass loss and N release in the leaves and roots of the three species, whereas water input had little effect on the decomposition of leaf litter and fine roots, suggesting that there was no interactive effect of supplementary N and water on litter decomposition in this system. Furthermore, our results clearly indicate that the inhibitory effects of external N on dry mass loss and nitrogen release are relatively strong in high-lignin litter compared with low-lignin litter.These findings suggest that increasing precipitation hardly facilitates ecosystem carbon turnover but atmospheric N deposition can enhance carbon sequestration and nitrogen retention in desertified dune grasslands of northern China. Additionally, litter quality of plant species

  6. Litter Decomposition in a Semiarid Dune Grassland: Neutral Effect of Water Supply and Inhibitory Effect of Nitrogen Addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yulin; Ning, Zhiying; Cui, Duo; Mao, Wei; Bi, Jingdong; Zhao, Xueyong

    2016-01-01

    The decomposition of plant material in arid ecosystems is considered to be substantially controlled by water and N availability. The responses of litter decomposition to external N and water, however, remain controversial, and the interactive effects of supplementary N and water also have been largely unexamined. A 3.5-year field experiment with supplementary nitrogen and water was conducted to assess the effects of N and water addition on mass loss and nitrogen release in leaves and fine roots of three dominant plant species (i.e., Artemisia halondendron, Setaria viridis, and Phragmites australis) with contrasting substrate chemistry (e.g. N concentration, lignin content in this study) in a desertified dune grassland of Inner Mongolia, China. The treatments included N addition, water addition, combination of N and water, and an untreated control. The decomposition rate in both leaves and roots was related to the initial litter N and lignin concentrations of the three species. However, litter quality did not explain the slower mass loss in roots than in leaves in the present study, and thus warrant further research. Nitrogen addition, either alone or in combination with water, significantly inhibited dry mass loss and N release in the leaves and roots of the three species, whereas water input had little effect on the decomposition of leaf litter and fine roots, suggesting that there was no interactive effect of supplementary N and water on litter decomposition in this system. Furthermore, our results clearly indicate that the inhibitory effects of external N on dry mass loss and nitrogen release are relatively strong in high-lignin litter compared with low-lignin litter. These findings suggest that increasing precipitation hardly facilitates ecosystem carbon turnover but atmospheric N deposition can enhance carbon sequestration and nitrogen retention in desertified dune grasslands of northern China. Additionally, litter quality of plant species should be considered

  7. Carbon dynamics in peatlands under changing hydrology. Effects of water level drawdown on litter quality, microbial enzyme activities and litter decomposition rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strakova, P.

    2010-07-01

    Pristine peatlands are carbon (C) accumulating wetland ecosystems sustained by a high water level (WL) and consequent anoxia that slows down decomposition. Persistent WL drawdown as a response to climate and/or land-use change directly affects decomposition: increased oxygenation stimulates decomposition of the 'old C' (peat) sequestered under prior anoxic conditions. Responses of the 'new C' (plant litter) in terms of quality, production and decomposability, and the consequences for the whole C cycle of peatlands are not fully understood. WL drawdown induces changes in plant community resulting in shift in dominance from Sphagnum and graminoids to shrubs and trees. There is increasing evidence that the indirect effects of WL drawdown via the changes in plant communities will have more impact on the ecosystem C cycling than any direct effects. The aim of this study is to disentangle the direct and indirect effects of WL drawdown on the 'new C' by measuring the relative importance of (1) environmental parameters (WL depth, temperature, soil chemistry) and (2) plant community composition on litter production, microbial activity, litter decomposition rates and, consequently, on the C accumulation. This information is crucial for modelling C cycle under changing climate and/or land-use. The effects of WL drawdown were tested in a large-scale experiment with manipulated WL at two time scales and three nutrient regimes. Furthermore, the effect of climate on litter decomposability was tested along a north-south gradient. Additionally, a novel method for estimating litter chemical quality and decomposability was explored by combining Near infrared spectroscopy with multivariate modelling. WL drawdown had direct effects on litter quality, microbial community composition and activity and litter decomposition rates. However, the direct effects of WL drawdown were overruled by the indirect effects via changes in litter type composition and

  8. Microbial decomposition is highly sensitive to leaf litter emersion in a permanent temperate stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Gómez, Juanita; Duarte, Sofia; Cássio, Fernanda; Pascoal, Cláudia; Romaní, Anna M

    2018-04-15

    Drought frequency and intensity in some temperate regions are forecasted to increase under the ongoing global change, which might expose permanent streams to intermittence and have severe repercussions on stream communities and ecosystem processes. In this study, we investigated the effect of drought duration on microbial decomposition of Populus nigra leaf litter in a temperate permanent stream (Oliveira, NW Portugal). Specifically, we measured the response of the structural (assemblage composition, bacterial and fungal biomass) and functional (leaf litter decomposition, extracellular enzyme activities (EEA), and fungal sporulation) parameters of fungal and bacterial communities on leaf litter exposed to emersion during different time periods (7, 14 and 21d). Emersion time affected microbial assemblages and litter decomposition, but the response differed among variables. Leaf decomposition rates and the activity of β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase and phosphatase were gradually reduced with increasing emersion time, while β-xylosidase reduction was similar when emersion last for 7 or more days, and the phenol oxidase reduction was similar at 14 and 21days of leaf emersion. Microbial biomass and fungal sporulation were reduced after 21days of emersion. The structure of microbial assemblages was affected by the duration of the emersion period. The shifts in fungal assemblages were correlated with a decreased microbial capacity to degrade lignin and hemicellulose in leaf litter exposed to emersion. Additionally, some resilience was observed in leaf litter mass loss, bacterial biomass, some enzyme activities and structure of fungal assemblages. Our study shows that drought can strongly alter structural and functional aspects of microbial decomposers. Therefore, the exposure of leaf litter to increasing emersion periods in temperate streams is expected to affect decomposer communities and overall decomposition of plant material by decelerating carbon cycling in

  9. Broiler litter management effects on the nutrient composition of the litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Application of poultry litter as a fertilizer source is a common practice in agriculture production. However, potential water quality concerns as a result of over application of poultry litter has risen as a major environmental issue in states with substantial poultry production. Fundamental to the ...

  10. Potential energy expenditure by litter-roosting bats associated with temperature under leaf litter during winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger W. Perry

    2013-01-01

    In temperate portions of North America, some bats that remain active during winter undergo short periods of hibernation below leaf litter on the forest floor during episodes of below-freezing weather. These winter roosts may provide above-freezing conditions, but the thermal conditions under leaf litter are unclear. Further, little is known of the relationship between...

  11. Litter NSV; marine litter monitoring by northern fulmars (a pilot study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franeker, van J.A.; Meijboom, A.

    2002-01-01

    The northern fulmar is a seabird known to consume litter such as plastic. The Dutch government has asked for an investigation of the possibility to use stomach contents of beach-washed fulmars as a monitoring tool for the abundance of marine litter inthe North Sea. Such monitoring is of importance

  12. Watching eyes on potential litter can reduce littering: evidence from two field experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Bateson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Littering constitutes a major societal problem, and any simple intervention that reduces its prevalence would be widely beneficial. In previous research, we have found that displaying images of watching eyes in the environment makes people less likely to litter. Here, we investigate whether the watching eyes images can be transferred onto the potential items of litter themselves. In two field experiments on a university campus, we created an opportunity to litter by attaching leaflets that either did or did not feature an image of watching eyes to parked bicycles. In both experiments, the watching eyes leaflets were substantially less likely to be littered than control leaflets (odds ratios 0.22–0.32. We also found that people were less likely to litter when there other people in the immediate vicinity than when there were not (odds ratios 0.04–0.25 and, in one experiment but not the other, that eye leaflets only reduced littering when there no other people in the immediate vicinity. We suggest that designing cues of observation into packaging could be a simple but fruitful strategy for reducing littering.

  13. Watching eyes on potential litter can reduce littering: evidence from two field experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateson, Melissa; Robinson, Rebecca; Abayomi-Cole, Tim; Greenlees, Josh; O'Connor, Abby; Nettle, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Littering constitutes a major societal problem, and any simple intervention that reduces its prevalence would be widely beneficial. In previous research, we have found that displaying images of watching eyes in the environment makes people less likely to litter. Here, we investigate whether the watching eyes images can be transferred onto the potential items of litter themselves. In two field experiments on a university campus, we created an opportunity to litter by attaching leaflets that either did or did not feature an image of watching eyes to parked bicycles. In both experiments, the watching eyes leaflets were substantially less likely to be littered than control leaflets (odds ratios 0.22-0.32). We also found that people were less likely to litter when there other people in the immediate vicinity than when there were not (odds ratios 0.04-0.25) and, in one experiment but not the other, that eye leaflets only reduced littering when there no other people in the immediate vicinity. We suggest that designing cues of observation into packaging could be a simple but fruitful strategy for reducing littering.

  14. Microbiological Safety of Chicken Litter or Chicken Litter-Based Organic Fertilizers: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chicken litter or chicken litter-based organic fertilizers are usually recycled into the soil to improve the structure and fertility of agricultural land. As an important source of nutrients for crop production, chicken litter may also contain a variety of human pathogens that can threaten humans who consume the contaminated food or water. Composting can inactivate pathogens while creating a soil amendment beneficial for application to arable agricultural land. Some foodborne pathogens may have the potential to survive for long periods of time in raw chicken litter or its composted products after land application, and a small population of pathogenic cells may even regrow to high levels when the conditions are favorable for growth. Thermal processing is a good choice for inactivating pathogens in chicken litter or chicken litter-based organic fertilizers prior to land application. However, some populations may become acclimatized to a hostile environment during build-up or composting and develop heat resistance through cross-protection during subsequent high temperature treatment. Therefore, this paper reviews currently available information on the microbiological safety of chicken litter or chicken litter-based organic fertilizers, and discusses about further research on developing novel and effective disinfection techniques, including physical, chemical, and biological treatments, as an alternative to current methods.

  15. Temperatures below leaf litter during winter prescribed burns: implications for litter-roosting bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger W. Perry; Virginia L. McDaniel

    2015-01-01

    Some bat species, including eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis), roost for short periods beneath leaf litter on the forest floor during winter in the south-eastern USA, a region subjected to frequent fire. The variability in fuel consumption, the heterogeneous nature of burns, and the effects of litter and duff moisture on forest-floor...

  16. Detrital stoichiometry as a critical nexus for the effects of streamwater nutrients on leaf litter breakdown rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, David W P; Rosemond, Amy D; Kominoski, John S; Gulis, Vladislav; Benstead, Jonathan P; Maerz, John C

    2015-08-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations are elevated in many freshwater systems, stimulating breakdown rates of terrestrially derived plant litter; however, the relative importance of N and P in driving litter breakdown via microbial and detritivore processing are not fully understood. Here, we determined breakdown rates of two litter species, Acer rubrum (maple) and Rhododendron maximum (rhododendron), before (PRE) and during two years (YR1, YR2) of experimental N and P additions to five streams, and quantified the relative importance of hypothesized factors contributing to breakdown. Treatment streams received a gradient of P additions (low to high soluble reactive phosphorus [SRP]; ~10-85 µg/L) crossed with a gradient of N additions (high to low dissolved inorganic nitrogen [DIN]; ~472-96 µg/L) to achieve target molar N:P ratios ranging from 128 to 2. Litter breakdown rates increased above pre-treatment levels by an average of 1.1-2.2x for maple, and 2.7-4.9x for rhododendron in YR1 and YR2. We used path analysis to compare fungal biomass, shredder biomass, litter stoichiometry (nutrient content as C:N or C:P), discharge, and streamwater temperature as predictors of breakdown rates and compared models containing streamwater N, P or N + P and litter C:N or C:P using model selection criteria. Litter breakdown rates were predicted equally with either streamwater N or P (R2 = 0.57). In models with N or P, fungal biomass, litter stoichiometry, discharge, and shredder biomass predicted breakdown rates; litter stoichiometry and fungal biomass were most important for model fit. However, N and P effects may have occurred via subtly different pathways. Litter N content increased with fungal biomass (N-driven effects) and litter P content increased with streamwater P availability (P-driven effects), presumably via P storage in fungal biomass. In either case, the effects of N and P through these pathways were associated with higher shredder biomass and breakdown

  17. Responses of potatoes plants inoculated with arbuscular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A pot experiment was set to examine the impact of the foliar litter (Hardwickia binata and Azadirachta indica) and an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus on the development of two varieties of potato plants (Aida, Atlas). Three litter doses (0, 25 and 50 g) were applied to the pots after bedding plantlets. The plants were ...

  18. Damage detection in submerged plates using ultrasonic guided waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suitable ultrasonic guided wave modes with optimum scanning capabilities have been generated and identified in submerged plate system. Finally, the propagation of selected modes through submerged notched plates is investigated. Sensitivity of leaky waves to the notches has been studied. The methodology would help ...

  19. Automating a submerged pump method for operating oil wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popa, I.

    1984-01-01

    The basic parameters of wells which operate in a mode of submerged operation are presented. The basic systems for measuring and testing the parameters of submerged operation are described. Worldwide experience in solving this particular problem is analyzed. Romanian (SRR) use of systems for automation, remote signaling and remote management is examined.

  20. Identification of a novel submergence response gene regulated by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuoyo Aghomotsegin

    2016-12-07

    Dec 7, 2016 ... 3Engineering Research Center of Ecology and Agricultural Use of Wetland, Ministry of Education, Yangzte University,. Jingzhou 434025, P.R. .... intolerance to submergence) and M202(Sub1A) by qRT-. PCR. We identified a novel gene responsive to submergence, called RS1. The expression patterns of.

  1. Identification of a novel submergence response gene regulated by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our results also show that RS1 is highly expressed under submergence, drought, and NaCl stresses, but not under cold or dehydration stress. Hormone ABA treatment induces, whereas GA treatment decreases, RS1 expression. The RS1 and Sub1A genes are co-regulated under submergence. Overexpression of RS1 in ...

  2. Tea polyphenols dominate the short-term tea (Camellia sinensis) leaf litter decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Dong-Mei; Fan, Kai; Yu, Cui-Ping; Lu, Ya-Ting; Wang, Xiao-Chang

    Polyphenols are one of the most important secondary metabolites, and affect the decomposition of litter and soil organic matter. This study aims to monitor the mass loss rate of tea leaf litter and nutrient release pattern, and investigate the role of tea polyphenols played in this process. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and classical litter bag method were used to simulate the decomposition process of tea leaf litter and track the changes occurring in major polyphenols over eight months. The release patterns of nitrogen, potassium, calcium, and magnesium were also determined. The decomposition pattern of tea leaf litter could be described by a two-phase decomposition model, and the polyphenol/N ratio effectively regulated the degradation process. Most of the catechins decreased dramatically within two months; gallic acid (GA), catechin gallate (CG), and gallocatechin (GC) were faintly detected, while others were outside the detection limits by the end of the experiment. These results demonstrated that tea polyphenols transformed quickly and catechins had an effect on the individual conversion rate. The nutrient release pattern was different from other plants which might be due to the existence of tea polyphenols.

  3. Effect of Fresh Poultry Litter and Compost on Soil Physical and Chemical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Stacy; Tsegaye, Teferi; Coleman, Tommy

    1998-01-01

    Application of poultry litter and compost as a substitute for fertilizer not only uses unwanted waste and decreases expenditures for commercial fertilizer, it adds nutrients to soil for plant uptake. The properties of soil affected by poultry litter were analyzed to determine the positive and negative aspects of using this substitute fertilizer. This study focused on changes associated with saturated hydraulic conductivity, bulk density, nitrate concentrations, and pH after application of varying concentrations of poultry litter and compost. Soil samples from Tennessee Valley Substation in Alabama were analyzed in a laboratory at Alabama A&M University. As a result of the application of fresh poultry litter and compost, we found that the saturated hydraulic conductivity increased and the bulk density decreased, while the pH was generally not affected. Using poultry litter and compost as an alternative commercial fertilizers could be adapted by the farming community to protect the sustainability of our environment. Unwanted waste is used productively and soil is enriched for farming.

  4. Experimental evidence that the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model best describes the evolution of leaf litter decomposability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xu; Cornelissen, Johannes H C; Zhao, Wei-Wei; Liu, Guo-Fang; Hu, Yu-Kun; Prinzing, Andreas; Dong, Ming; Cornwell, William K

    2014-09-01

    Leaf litter decomposability is an important effect trait for ecosystem functioning. However, it is unknown how this effect trait evolved through plant history as a leaf 'afterlife' integrator of the evolution of multiple underlying traits upon which adaptive selection must have acted. Did decomposability evolve in a Brownian fashion without any constraints? Was evolution rapid at first and then slowed? Or was there an underlying mean-reverting process that makes the evolution of extreme trait values unlikely? Here, we test the hypothesis that the evolution of decomposability has undergone certain mean-reverting forces due to strong constraints and trade-offs in the leaf traits that have afterlife effects on litter quality to decomposers. In order to test this, we examined the leaf litter decomposability and seven key leaf traits of 48 tree species in the temperate area of China and fitted them to three evolutionary models: Brownian motion model (BM), Early burst model (EB), and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model (OU). The OU model, which does not allow unlimited trait divergence through time, was the best fit model for leaf litter decomposability and all seven leaf traits. These results support the hypothesis that neither decomposability nor the underlying traits has been able to diverge toward progressively extreme values through evolutionary time. These results have reinforced our understanding of the relationships between leaf litter decomposability and leaf traits in an evolutionary perspective and may be a helpful step toward reconstructing deep-time carbon cycling based on taxonomic composition with more confidence.

  5. Intrapopulation Genotypic Variation of Foliar Secondary Chemistry during Leaf Senescence and Litter Decomposition in Silver Birch (Betula pendula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulla Paaso

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abundant secondary metabolites, such as condensed tannins, and their interpopulation genotypic variation can remain through plant leaf senescence and affect litter decomposition. Whether the intrapopulation genotypic variation of a more diverse assortment of secondary metabolites equally persists through leaf senescence and litter decomposition is not well understood. We analyzed concentrations of intracellular phenolics, epicuticular flavonoid aglycones, epicuticular triterpenoids, condensed tannins, and lignin in green leaves, senescent leaves and partly decomposed litter of silver birch, Betula pendula. Broad-sense heritability (H2 and coefficient of genotypic variation (CVG were estimated for metabolites in senescent leaves and litter using 19 genotypes selected from a B. pendula population in southern Finland. We found that most of the secondary metabolites remained through senescence and decomposition and that their persistence was related to their chemical properties. Intrapopulation H2 and CVG for intracellular phenolics, epicuticular flavonoid aglycones and condensed tannins were high and remarkably, increased from senescent leaves to decomposed litter. The rank of genotypes in metabolite concentrations was persistent through litter decomposition. Lignin was an exception, however, with a diminishing genotypic variation during decomposition, and the concentrations of lignin and condensed tannins had a negative genotypic correlation in the senescent leaves. Our results show that secondary metabolites and their intrapopulation genotypic variation can for the most part remain through leaf senescence and early decomposition, which is a prerequisite for initial litter quality to predict variation in litter decomposition rates. Persistent genotypic variation also opens an avenue for selection to impact litter decomposition in B. pendula populations through acting on their green foliage secondary chemistry. The negative genotypic correlations

  6. Inundation, vegetation, and sediment effects on litter decomposition in Pacific Coast tidal marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janousek, Christopher; Buffington, Kevin J.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Thorne, Karen M.; Dugger, Bruce D.; Takekawa, John Y.

    2017-01-01

    The cycling and sequestration of carbon are important ecosystem functions of estuarine wetlands that may be affected by climate change. We conducted experiments across a latitudinal and climate gradient of tidal marshes in the northeast Pacific to evaluate the effects of climate- and vegetation-related factors on litter decomposition. We manipulated tidal exposure and litter type in experimental mesocosms at two sites and used variation across marsh landscapes at seven sites to test for relationships between decomposition and marsh elevation, soil temperature, vegetation composition, litter quality, and sediment organic content. A greater than tenfold increase in manipulated tidal inundation resulted in small increases in decomposition of roots and rhizomes of two species, but no significant change in decay rates of shoots of three other species. In contrast, across the latitudinal gradient, decomposition rates of Salicornia pacifica litter were greater in high marsh than in low marsh. Rates were not correlated with sediment temperature or organic content, but were associated with plant assemblage structure including above-ground cover, species composition, and species richness. Decomposition rates also varied by litter type; at two sites in the Pacific Northwest, the grasses Deschampsia cespitosa and Distichlis spicata decomposed more slowly than the forb S. pacifica. Our data suggest that elevation gradients and vegetation structure in tidal marshes both affect rates of litter decay, potentially leading to complex spatial patterns in sediment carbon dynamics. Climate change may thus have direct effects on rates of decomposition through increased inundation from sea-level rise and indirect effects through changing plant community composition.

  7. Effects of Litter Exposure to UV Radiation on Subsequent Microbial Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y.; Scarlett, R. D.; King, J. Y.

    2013-12-01

    In arid ecosystems, photodegradation has recently been identified as a key process in ecosystem carbon cycling. Photodegradation directly contributes to organic matter decomposition through photochemical mineralization. However, it remains unclear how photodegradation interacts with biotic decomposition processes. It is commonly thought that photodegradation can facilitate subsequent microbial decomposition, as it can preferentially decompose lignin, a recalcitrant substrate in microbial decomposition. We hypothesized that ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure would increase the biodegradability of plant litter and that this effect would be greater with longer radiation exposure. In the field at the University of California's Sedgwick Reserve in Santa Ynez, CA, Bromus diandrus litter samples were exposed to two levels of UV radiation using screens: 'UV pass' (transmitting > 81% of UV radiation) and 'UV block' (transmitting carbon and nitrogen content, fiber fractions, water extractable carbon and nitrogen, and biodegradability. We evaluated the biodegradability of litter using a 30-day laboratory incubation experiment. Litter samples were incubated in the dark in sealed glass microcosms with soil inoculum. The CO2 accumulation in each microcosm headspace was measured every 1-2 days to assess microbial respiration rate. In contrast to our hypothesis, litter exposed under UV block conditions had 28% higher cumulative CO2 production than litter from UV pass when the length of exposure was 2.5 months (P = 0.02, n = 4). Litter from the UV block treatment also tended to show higher cumulative CO2 production than litter from UV pass when the exposure lasted for 4 months (P = 0.10, n = 4). For samples with longer exposure times (6 and 12 months), there was no difference in CO2 production between UV pass and UV block treatments. Litter lignin concentration was not affected by UV treatments, regardless of the length of UV exposure. Interestingly, there was a strong correlation

  8. Natural zeolites in diet or litter of broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, A F; Almeida, D S De; Yuri, F M; Zimmermann, O F; Gerber, M W; Gewehr, C E

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to analyse the influence of adding natural zeolites (clinoptilolite) to the diet or litter of broilers and their effects on growth performance, carcass yield and litter quality. Three consecutive flocks of broilers were raised on the same sawdust litter, from d 1 to d 42 of age, and distributed in three treatments (control with no added zeolites, addition of 5 g/kg zeolite to diet and addition of 100 g/kg zeolites to litter). The addition of zeolites to the diet or litter did not affect growth performance or carcass yield. The addition of zeolites to the diet did not influence moisture content of the litter, ammonia volatilisation was reduced only in the first flock and pH of litter was reduced in the second and third flock. However, the addition of zeolites to the litter reduced moisture content, litter pH and ammonia volatilisation in all flocks analysed. The addition of 5 g/kg zeolite to the diet in three consecutive flocks was not effective in maintaining litter quality, whereas the addition of 100 g/kg natural zeolites to sawdust litter reduced litter moisture and ammonia volatilisation in three consecutive flocks raised on the same litter.

  9. Laser-matter Interaction with Submerged Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariella, R; Rubenchik, A; Norton, M; Donohue, G; Roberts, K

    2010-03-25

    With the long-term goal in mind of investigating if one could possibly design a 'universal solid-sample comminution technique' for debris and rubble, we have studied pulsed-laser ablation of solid samples that were contained within a surrounding fluid. Using pulses with fluences between 2 J and 0.3 J, wavelengths of 351 and 527 nm, and samples of rock, concrete, and red brick, each submerged in water, we have observed conditions in which {micro}m-scale particles can be preferentially generated in a controlled manner, during the laser ablation process. Others have studied laser peening of metals, where their attention has been to the substrate. Our study uses non-metallic substrates and analyzes the particles that are ablated from the process. The immediate impact of our investigation is that laser-comminution portion of a new systems concept for chemical analysis has been verified as feasible.

  10. Submerged arc welding of heavy plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The submerged arc process is particularly suitable for heavy plate welding because of its ability to combine very high deposit rates along with excellent quality. It does these things without the smoke and spatter often accompanying other processes. It is available today in several forms that are pointed to the fabricators of heavy sections with long, short or round about welds. Tandem arc full automatic equipment is particularly suitable for those long heavy welds where speed and deposit rate are of the first order. An attachment called long stick-out which makes use of the IR drop on long electrode extensions can be included on this equipment to increase deposition rates 50% or more.

  11. Modeling tabular icebergs submerged in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, A. A.; Adcroft, A.; Sergienko, O.; Marques, G.

    2017-08-01

    Large tabular icebergs calved from Antarctic ice shelves have long lifetimes (due to their large size), during which they drift across large distances, altering ambient ocean circulation, bottom-water formation, sea-ice formation, and biological primary productivity in the icebergs' vicinity. However, despite their importance, the current generation of ocean circulation models usually do not represent large tabular icebergs. In this study, we develop a novel framework to model large tabular icebergs submerged in the ocean. In this framework, tabular icebergs are represented by pressure-exerting Lagrangian elements that drift in the ocean. The elements are held together and interact with each other via bonds. A breaking of these bonds allows the model to emulate calving events (i.e., detachment of a tabular iceberg from an ice shelf) and tabular icebergs breaking up into smaller pieces. Idealized simulations of a calving tabular iceberg, its drift, and its breakup demonstrate capabilities of the developed framework.

  12. Workshop on ROVs and deep submergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    The deep-submergence community has an opportunity on March 6 to participate in a unique teleconferencing demonstration of a state-of-the-art, remotely operated underwater research vehicle known as the Jason-Medea System. Jason-Medea has been developed over the past decade by scientists, engineers, and technicians at the Deep Submergence Laboratory at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The U.S. Navy, the Office of the Chief of Naval Research, and the National Science Foundation are sponsoring the workshop to explore the roles that modern computational, communications, and robotics technologies can play in deep-sea oceanographic research.Through the cooperation of Electronic Data Systems, Inc., the Jason Foundation, and Turner Broadcasting System, Inc., 2-1/2 hours of air time will be available from 3:00 to 5:30 PM EST on March 6. Twenty-seven satellite downlink sites will link one operating research vessel and the land-based operation with workshop participants in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, and Bermuda. The research ship Laney Chouest will be in the midst of a 3-week educational/research program in the Sea of Cortez, between Baja California and mainland Mexico. This effort is focused on active hydrothermal vents driven by heat flow from the volcanically active East Pacific Rise, which underlies the sediment-covered Guaymas Basin. The project combines into a single-operation, newly-developed robotic systems, state-of-the-art mapping and sampling tools, fiber-optic data transmission from the seafloor, instantaneous satellite communication from ship to shore, and a sophisticated array of computational and telecommunications networks. During the workshop, land-based scientists will observe and participate directly with their seagoing colleagues as they conduct seafloor research.

  13. Submerged membrane distillation for seawater desalination

    KAUST Repository

    Francis, Lijo

    2014-08-11

    A submerged membrane distillation (SMD) process for fresh water production from Red Sea water using commercially available hollow fiber membranes has been successfully employed and compared with the conventional direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) process. The hollow fiber membranes have been characterized for its morphology using field effect scanning electron microscope. In SMD process, a bunch of hollow fiber membranes are glued together at both ends to get a simplified open membrane module assembly submerged into the coolant tank equipped with a mechanical stirrer. Hot feed stream is allowed to pass through the lumen side of the membrane using a feed pump. Continuous stirring at the coolant side will reduce the temperature and concentration polarization. During the conventional DCMD process, using feed-coolant streams with co-current and counter-current flows has been tested and the results are compared in this study. In SMD process, a water vapor flux of 10.2 kg m-2 h-1 is achieved when using a feed inlet temperature of 80°C and coolant temperature of 20°C. Under the same conditions, during conventional DCMD process, a water vapor flux of 11.6 and 10.1 kg m-2 h-1 were observed during counter-current and co-current flow streams, respectively. Results show that the water production in the SMD process is comparable with the conventional DCMD process, while the feed-coolant flow streams are in the co-current direction. During conventional DCMD operation, a 15% increase in the water production is observed when feed-coolant streams are in the counter-current direction compared to the co-current direction. © 2014 © 2014 Balaban Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of stoichiometry and temperature perturbations on beech leaf litter decomposition, enzyme activities and protein expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Keiblinger

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Microbes are major players in leaf litter decomposition and therefore advances in the understanding of their control on element cycling are of paramount importance. Our aim was to investigate the influence of leaf litter stoichiometry in terms of carbon (C : nitrogen (N : phosphorus (P ratios on the decomposition processes and to track changes in microbial community structures and functions in response to temperature stress treatments. To elucidate how the stoichiometry of beech leaf litter (Fagus sylvatica L. and stress treatments interactively affect the microbial decomposition processes, a terrestrial microcosm experiment was conducted. Beech litter from different Austrian sites covering C:N ratios from 39 to 61 and C:P ratios from 666 to 1729 were incubated at 15 °C and 60% moisture for six months. Part of the microcosms were then subjected to severe changes in temperature (+30 °C and −15 °C to monitor the influence of temperature stress. Extracellular enzyme activities were assayed and respiratory activities measured. A semi-quantitative metaproteomics approach (1D-SDS PAGE combined with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry; unique spectral counting was employed to investigate the impact of the applied stress treatments in dependency of litter stoichiometry on structure and function of the decomposing community. In litter with narrow C:nutrient (C:N, C:P ratios, microbial decomposers were most abundant. Cellulase, chitinase, phosphatase and protease activity decreased after heat and freezing treatments. Decomposer communities and specific functions varied with site, i.e. stoichiometry. The applied stress combined with the respective time of sampling evoked changes of enzyme activities and litter pH. Freezing treatments resulted in a decline in residual plant litter material and increased fungal abundance, indicating slightly accelerated decomposition. Overall, a strong effect of litter stoichiometry on microbial

  15. Effects of stoichiometry and temperature perturbations on beech leaf litter decomposition, enzyme activities and protein expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiblinger, K. M.; Schneider, T.; Roschitzki, B.; Schmid, E.; Eberl, L.; Hämmerle, I.; Leitner, S.; Richter, A.; Wanek, W.; Riedel, K.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.

    2012-11-01

    Microbes are major players in leaf litter decomposition and therefore advances in the understanding of their control on element cycling are of paramount importance. Our aim was to investigate the influence of leaf litter stoichiometry in terms of carbon (C) : nitrogen (N) : phosphorus (P) ratios on the decomposition processes and to track changes in microbial community structures and functions in response to temperature stress treatments. To elucidate how the stoichiometry of beech leaf litter (Fagus sylvatica L.) and stress treatments interactively affect the microbial decomposition processes, a terrestrial microcosm experiment was conducted. Beech litter from different Austrian sites covering C:N ratios from 39 to 61 and C:P ratios from 666 to 1729 were incubated at 15 °C and 60% moisture for six months. Part of the microcosms were then subjected to severe changes in temperature (+30 °C and -15 °C) to monitor the influence of temperature stress. Extracellular enzyme activities were assayed and respiratory activities measured. A semi-quantitative metaproteomics approach (1D-SDS PAGE combined with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry; unique spectral counting) was employed to investigate the impact of the applied stress treatments in dependency of litter stoichiometry on structure and function of the decomposing community. In litter with narrow C:nutrient (C:N, C:P) ratios, microbial decomposers were most abundant. Cellulase, chitinase, phosphatase and protease activity decreased after heat and freezing treatments. Decomposer communities and specific functions varied with site, i.e. stoichiometry. The applied stress combined with the respective time of sampling evoked changes of enzyme activities and litter pH. Freezing treatments resulted in a decline in residual plant litter material and increased fungal abundance, indicating slightly accelerated decomposition. Overall, a strong effect of litter stoichiometry on microbial community structures and

  16. Litter decomposition and nutrient dynamics of ten selected tree ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Litter decomposition processes in tropical rainforests are still poorly understood. Leaf litter decomposition and nutrient dynamics of ten contrasting tree species, Entandraphragma utile, Guibourtia tessmannii, Klainedoxa gabonensis, Musanga cecropioides, Panda oleosa, Plagiostyles africana, Pterocarpus soyauxii, ...

  17. Simple relationships to predict attributes of fish assemblages in patches of submerged macrophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Mayer Pelicice

    Full Text Available Submerged macrophytes play an important role in structuring habitats and, therefore, in determining patterns of aquatic biodiversity. Because these plants are widespread in shallow areas of many Neotropical reservoirs, the present work investigated if variables related to habitat structure, measured in patches of submerged macrophytes (Egeria densa and E. najas, can be used to predict fish assemblage attributes (fish density and species richness. Based on patch characteristics at fine spatial extents (macrophyte patches within reservoir arms, we considered plant biomass, volume and proportional volume (i.e. percentage of macrophyte volume in the water column as potential predictors. Fish and macrophytes were sampled with a 1-m² throw trap in littoral habitats of Rosana Reservoir, Paranapanema River, and simple correlation analyses were performed. Fish richness and abundance were highly correlated with all variables (R = 0.53 to 0.90, a relationship consistently observed in all sites. When compared to biomass, plant volume and proportional volume did not yield stronger correlations. We observed stronger correlations when E. densa and E. najas patches were analyzed separately (mono-specificity, probably because particular effects of each macrophyte on habitat structuring were removed (e.g. unnoticed morphological differences or unknown effects on habitat quality. The high R values observed in all pairwise relationships are uncommon in ecological studies, highlighting the predictive potential of variables related to habitat structure. These results suggest that, at small spatial extents, macrophyte biomass may represent an interesting predictor of fish density and richness in reservoirs with extensive colonization of submerged plants.

  18. Experimental studies of the stress state of the surface layer of detailat treatment with submerged jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олександр Олександрович Анділахай

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the instrument and electrical industry was the use of the method of abrasive machining submerged jet, which is the most promising method for abrasive blasting of small parts of low stiffness. This method eliminates the main drawback сhip plants - abrasion channel nozzles or injection nozzles, but the state of the surface layer of machined parts are poorly understood and to make maximum use of the potential to provide the required quality parameters. The study of the state of the surfaces of parts resulting from abrasive blasting traditional methods, dedicated work, which define quality indicators: microhardness depth residual stress, as well as their nature (compressive, tensile. However, known from the literature values correspond to the conditions of surface treatment of parts in a fixed state with an abrasive material through the feed nozzle, and therefore the dynamics of the interaction of a single abrasive grain and significantly different parts. The process in question, and different modes of processing characteristics of the abrasive grains. In the paper, a series of experimental studies designed to assess the state of machined surfaces of parts as a result of abrasion submerged jets. It is established that during the treatment the non-oriented disorderly traces overlay the abrasive grains on the treated surface, thereby forming a tight skin layer thickness of 4 - 5 micrometers. Processed surface gets cold working, as evidenced by the study of microhardness before and after abrasive machining in a free state submerged jets

  19. Effect of Leaf Litters and Soils on Viability of Entomopathogenic Fungi Beauveria bassiana (Bals. Vuill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LISDAR IDWAN SUDIRMAN

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Viability of Beauveria bassiana is extremely low due to toxic compounds in soils. This research was aimed to study the effect of four groups of media on viability of B. bassiana Bb-Pb2. The first group was leaf litters of onion, flowering white cabbage, cabbage, and chinese mustard, respectively; the second group was the soils containing decomposed residues of each plant of the first group; the third group was the mixtures of each media of both groups above (1:1, and the fourth group was natural top soil as a control. Each plastic bag filled with one kg of each medium was inoculated with ten ml of B. bassiana conidia (106/ml of concentration and incubated in open area for 8 weeks. The results showed that all leaf litters of those plants and their compost soils affected the fungal viability. The highest decreasing number of colony was found on onion's leaf litters, soil containing of decomposed onion, and the mixtures of both media. The treated B. bassiana showed significant reducing abilities of growth, conidia production and conidia germination on PDA media, except the one of control. It is suggested that the Bb-Pb2 isolate might not be effective as bioinsecticide in the soils containing either those leaf litters or composts.

  20. Effect of Leaf Litters and Soils on Viability of Entomopathogenic Fungi Beauveria bassiana (Bals. Vuill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LISDAR IDWAN SUDIRMAN

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Viability of Beauveria bassiana is extremely low due to toxic compounds in soils. This research was aimed to study the effect of four groups of media on viability of B. bassiana Bb-Pb2. The first group was leaf litters of onion, flowering white cabbage, cabbage, and chinese mustard, respectively; the second group was the soils containing decomposed residues of each plant of the first group; the third group was the mixtures of each media of both groups above (1:1, and the fourth group was natural top soil as a control. Each plastic bag filled with one kg of each medium was inoculated with ten ml of B. bassiana conidia (106/ml of concentration and incubated in open area for 8 weeks. The results showed that all leaf litters of those plants and their compost soils affected the fungal viability. The highest decreasing number of colony was found on onion’s leaf litters, soil containing of decomposed onion, and the mixtures of both media. The treated B. bassiana showed significant reducing abilities of growth, conidia production and conidia germination on PDA media, except the one of control. It is suggested that the Bb-Pb2 isolate might not be effective as bioinsecticide in the soils containing either those leaf litters or composts.

  1. The use of bottle caps as submerged aerated filter medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasceno de Oliveira, Laurence; Motlagh, Amir Mohaghegh; Goel, Ramesh; de Souza Missagia, Beatriz; Alves de Abreu Filho, Benício; Lautenschlager, Sandro Rogério

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a submerged aerated filter (SAF) using bottle caps as a support medium was evaluated. The system was fed with effluent from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket system at ETE 2-South wastewater treatment plant, under different volumetric organic load rates (VOLRs). The population of a particular nitrifying microbial community was assessed by fluorescent in situ hybridization with specific oligonucleotide probes. The system showed an average removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) equal to 76% for VOLRs between 2.6 and 13.6 kg COD m(-3)_media.day(-1). The process of nitrification in conjunction with the removal of organic matter was observed from applying VOLRs lower than 5.5 kg COD m(-3)_media.day(-1) resulting in 78% conversion of NH4(+)-N. As the applied organic load was reduced, an increase in the nitrifying bacteria population was observed compared with total 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) stained cells. Generally, SAF using bottle caps as a biological aerated filter medium treating wastewater from an anaerobic system showed promising removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and conversion of NH4(+)-N.

  2. The effect of birth weight of boars and litter size in which were 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eugenia

    2017-05-22

    May 22, 2017 ... The evaluated boars were born from Polish Synthetic Line 990 sows of 2–4 parity and litters with 11–. 13 piglets. On the first day after birth, litters of 80 sows were standardized to 8 (40 litters) or 12 (40 litters) piglets per sow. Before the standardization of litters, all piglets were individually weighed. Each litter.

  3. Crayfish impact desert river ecosystem function and litter-dwelling invertebrate communities through association with novel detrital resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Eric K; Sabo, John L

    2013-01-01

    Shifts in plant species distributions due to global change are increasing the availability of novel resources in a variety of ecosystems worldwide. In semiarid riparian areas, hydric pioneer tree species are being replaced by drought-tolerant plant species as water availability decreases. Additionally, introduced omnivorous crayfish, which feed upon primary producers, allochthonous detritus, and benthic invertebrates, can impact communities at multiple levels through both direct and indirect effects mediated by drought-tolerant plants. We tested the impact of both virile crayfish (Orconectes virilis) and litter type on benthic invertebrates and the effect of crayfish on detrital resources across a gradient of riparian vegetation drought-tolerance using field cages with leaf litter bags in the San Pedro River in Southeastern Arizona. Virile crayfish increased breakdown rate of novel drought-tolerant saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima), but did not impact breakdown of drought-tolerant seepwillow (Baccharis salicifolia) or hydric Fremont cottonwood (Populus fremontii) and Gooding's willow (Salix goodingii). Effects on invertebrate diversity were observed at the litter bag scale, but no effects were found at the cage scale. Crayfish decreased alpha diversity of colonizing macroinvertebrates, but did not affect beta diversity. In contrast, the drought-tolerant litter treatment decreased beta diversity relative to hydric litter. As drought-tolerant species become more abundant in riparian zones, their litter will become a larger component of the organic matter budget of desert streams which may serve to homogenize the litter-dwelling community and support elevated populations of virile crayfish. Through impacts at multiple trophic levels, crayfish have a significant effect on desert stream ecosystems.

  4. Crayfish impact desert river ecosystem function and litter-dwelling invertebrate communities through association with novel detrital resources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric K Moody

    Full Text Available Shifts in plant species distributions due to global change are increasing the availability of novel resources in a variety of ecosystems worldwide. In semiarid riparian areas, hydric pioneer tree species are being replaced by drought-tolerant plant species as water availability decreases. Additionally, introduced omnivorous crayfish, which feed upon primary producers, allochthonous detritus, and benthic invertebrates, can impact communities at multiple levels through both direct and indirect effects mediated by drought-tolerant plants. We tested the impact of both virile crayfish (Orconectes virilis and litter type on benthic invertebrates and the effect of crayfish on detrital resources across a gradient of riparian vegetation drought-tolerance using field cages with leaf litter bags in the San Pedro River in Southeastern Arizona. Virile crayfish increased breakdown rate of novel drought-tolerant saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima, but did not impact breakdown of drought-tolerant seepwillow (Baccharis salicifolia or hydric Fremont cottonwood (Populus fremontii and Gooding's willow (Salix goodingii. Effects on invertebrate diversity were observed at the litter bag scale, but no effects were found at the cage scale. Crayfish decreased alpha diversity of colonizing macroinvertebrates, but did not affect beta diversity. In contrast, the drought-tolerant litter treatment decreased beta diversity relative to hydric litter. As drought-tolerant species become more abundant in riparian zones, their litter will become a larger component of the organic matter budget of desert streams which may serve to homogenize the litter-dwelling community and support elevated populations of virile crayfish. Through impacts at multiple trophic levels, crayfish have a significant effect on desert stream ecosystems.

  5. Litter decay rates are determined by lignin chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer M. Talbot; Daniel J. Yelle; James Nowick; Kathleen K. Treseder

    2011-01-01

    Litter decay rates are often correlated with the initial lignin:N or lignin:cellulose content of litter, suggesting that interactions between lignin and more labile compounds are important controls over litter decomposition. The chemical composition of lignin may influence these interactions, if lignin physically or chemically protects labile components from microbial...

  6. Macro-detritivore identity drives leaf litter diversity effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, V.C.A.; Ruijven, van J.; Berg, M.P.; Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Berendse, F.

    2011-01-01

    The importance of leaf litter diversity for decomposition, an important process in terrestrial ecosystems, is much debated. Previous leaf litter-mixing studies have shown that non-additive leaf litter diversity effects can occur, but it is not clear why they occurred in only half of the studies and

  7. Subject Review Article : Broiler litter as feed for ruminants - Potential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Generally, growth rate, milk production and feed efficiency were higher in animals (sheep, goats and cattle) fed broiler litter-based diet than in animals fed control diet (without broiler litter). This paper reviews the nutritional value, health hazard, processing techniques and factors affecting the acceptability of broiler litter as ...

  8. Dried rose ( Rosa damascena Mill.) dreg: an alternative litter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was carried out to determine the effects of using dried rose dreg (DRD) as an alternative litter material for broiler performance and microbiological characteristics of litter. A total of 225 day-old broiler chicks was raised on pine wood shavings (PS), DRD and PS+DRD until 42 days. The effects of litter ...

  9. Litter fall and decomposition of mangrove species Avicennia marina ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract—Litter fall and decomposition of mangrove leaves were compared for different seasons, species (Avicennia marina and Rhizophora mucronata) and sites in southern Mozambique. Mangrove leaf litter fall and decomposition was estimated using small mesh collecting-baskets and litter bags respectively in 2006 and ...

  10. Influence of Tourist Pressure on Beach Litter and Microbial Quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sam Eshun

    identified and the total number and weight of litter collected from La were 2261 and 72695 g, and that of Korle were 2691 and 43239 g, respectively. Plastic material dominated the total litter at 66% for Korle and 53% for La, respectively. The numbers of litter increased with increasing visitor pressure during the festive season ...

  11. C, N and P fertilization in an Amazonian rainforest supports stoichiometric dissimilarity as a driver of litter diversity effects on decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barantal, Sandra; Schimann, Heidy; Fromin, Nathalie; Hättenschwiler, Stephan

    2014-12-07

    Plant leaf litter generally decomposes faster as a group of different species than when individual species decompose alone, but underlying mechanisms of these diversity effects remain poorly understood. Because resource C : N : P stoichiometry (i.e. the ratios of these key elements) exhibits strong control on consumers, we supposed that stoichiometric dissimilarity of litter mixtures (i.e. the divergence in C : N : P ratios among species) improves resource complementarity to decomposers leading to faster mixture decomposition. We tested this hypothesis with: (i) a wide range of leaf litter mixtures of neotropical tree species varying in C : N : P dissimilarity, and (ii) a nutrient addition experiment (C, N and P) to create stoichiometric similarity. Litter mixtures decomposed in the field using two different types of litterbags allowing or preventing access to soil fauna. Litter mixture mass loss was higher than expected from species decomposing singly, especially in presence of soil fauna. With fauna, synergistic litter mixture effects increased with increasing stoichiometric dissimilarity of litter mixtures and this positive relationship disappeared with fertilizer addition. Our results indicate that litter stoichiometric dissimilarity drives mixture effects via the nutritional requirements of soil fauna. Incorporating ecological stoichiometry in biodiversity research allows refinement of the underlying mechanisms of how changing biodiversity affects ecosystem functioning. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Microbial biomass and activity in litter during the initial development of pure and mixed plantations of Eucalyptus grandis and Acacia mangium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Bini

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies on microbial activity and biomass in forestry plantations often overlook the role of litter, typically focusing instead on soil nutrient contents to explain plant and microorganism development. However, since the litter is a significant source of recycled nutrients that affect nutrient dynamics in the soil, litter composition may be more strongly correlated with forest growth and development than soil nutrient contents. This study aimed to test this hypothesis by examining correlations between soil C, N, and P; litter C, N, P, lignin content, and polyphenol content; and microbial biomass and activity in pure and mixed second-rotation plantations of Eucalyptus grandis and Acacia mangium before and after senescent leaf drop. The numbers of cultivable fungi and bacteria were also estimated. All properties were correlated with litter C, N, P, lignin and polyphenols, and with soil C and N. We found higher microbial activity (CO2 evolution in litter than in soil. In the E. grandis monoculture before senescent leaf drop, microbial biomass C was 46 % higher in litter than in soil. After leaf drop, this difference decreased to 16 %. In A. mangium plantations, however, microbial biomass C was lower in litter than in soil both before and after leaf drop. Microbial biomass N of litter was approximately 94 % greater than that of the soil in summer and winter in all plantations. The number of cultivable fungi and bacteria increased after leaf drop, especially so in the litter. Fungi were also more abundant in the E. grandis litter. In general, the A. mangium monoculture was associated with higher levels of litter lignin and N, especially after leaf drop. In contrast, the polyphenol and C levels in E. grandis monoculture litter were higher after leaf drop. These properties were negatively correlated with total soil C and N. Litter in the mixed stands had lower C:N and C:P ratios and higher N, P, and C levels in the microbial biomass. This suggests more

  13. Converting Poultry Litter into Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disposal of animal manure is one of the biggest problems facing agriculture today. Now new technology has been designed to covert manure into environmentally friendly and highly valued activated carbon. When pelletized and activated under specific conditions, the litter becomes a highly porous mat...

  14. Nutrient Dynamics and Litter Decomposition in Leucaena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    komla

    Energy flow and nutrient cycling are essential for the functioning of an ... biochemical (i.e. intra system) nutrient cycling and food webs; this refers to both the physical and ..... (1998) suggested that microbial activity could be limited by litter moisture .... Energy storage and the balance of producers and decomposers on ...

  15. Treating poultry litter with aluminum sulfate (alum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a USDA/ARS factsheet on how to treat poultry litter with aluminum sulfate (alum) to reduce ammonia emissions. Over half of the nitrogen excreted from chickens is lost to the atmosphere as ammonia before the manure is removed from the poultry houses. Research has shown that additions of alu...

  16. Arsenic speciation and reactivity in poultry litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Y.; Lanzirotti, A.; Sutton, S.; Davis, J.A.; Sparks, D.L.

    2003-01-01

    Recent U.S. government action to lower the maximum concentration levels (MCL) of total arsenic (As) (10 ppb) in drinking water has raised serious concerns about the agricultural use of As-containing biosolids such as poultry litter (PL). In this study, solid-state chemical speciation, desorbability, and total levels of As in PL and long-term amended soils were investigated using novel synchrotronbased probing techniques (microfocused (??) synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) and ??-X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopies) coupled with chemical digestion and batch experiments. The total As levels in the PL were as high as ???50 mg kg-1, and As(II/III and V) was always concentrated in abundant needle-shaped microscopic particles (???20/ ??m x 850 ??m) associated with Ca, Cu, and Fe and to a lesser extent with S, CI, and Zn. Postedge XANES features of litter particles are dissimilar to those of the organo-As(V) compound in poultry feed (i.e., roxarsone), suggesting possible degradation/transformation of roxarsone in the litter and/or in poultry digestive tracts. The extent of As desorption from the litter increased with increasing time and pH from 4.5 to 7, but at most 15% of the total As was released after 5 d at pH 7, indicating the presence of insoluble phases and/or strongly retained soluble compounds. No significant As accumulation (effects on As contamination in surrounding soilwater environments.

  17. Economic instruments and marine litter control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhuis, F.H.; Papyrakis, E.; Boteler, B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive up-to-date review of the literature on the economic instruments that can reduce marine litter. We assess their cost of implementation, level of effectiveness as well as indirect environmental and socio-economic effects (externalities) that may arise as a result of

  18. Solutions for global marine litter pollution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löhr, Ansje; Savelli, Heidi; Beunen, Raoul; Kalz, Marco; Ragas, Ad; Van Belleghem, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Since the 1950s the amount of plastics in the marine environment has increased dramatically. Worldwide there is a growing concern about the risks and possible adverse effects of (micro)plastics. This paper reflects on the sources and effects of marine litter and the effects of policies and other

  19. Ballonnen in zee = balloons as marine litter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franeker, van J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Releasing balloons seems harmless. However, remains of balloons, especially valves and ribbons are becoming a common and persistent type of marine litter found on beaches. Following Dutch Queens day 2007, large numbers of Dutch balloons were found in Normandy, France. Animals may become entangled in

  20. Climate history shapes contemporary leaf litter decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael S. Strickland; Ashley D. Keiser; Mark A. Bradford

    2015-01-01

    Litter decomposition is mediated by multiple variables, of which climate is expected to be a dominant factor at global scales. However, like other organisms, traits of decomposers and their communities are shaped not just by the contemporary climate but also their climate history. Whether or not this affects decomposition rates is underexplored. Here we source...

  1. Effects of insect and decapod exclusion and leaf litter species identity on breakdown rates in a tropical headwater stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón, José; Covich, Alan

    2014-04-01

    High species richness of tropical riparian trees influences the diversity of organic detritus entering streams, creating temporal variability in litter quantity and quality. We examined the influence of species of riparian plants and macroinvertebrate exclusion on leaf-litter breakdown in a headwater stream in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico. Leaf litter of Dacryodes excelsa (Burseraceae), Guarea guidonia (Meliaceae), Cecropia scheberiana (Moraceae), Manilkara bidentata (Sapotaceae), and Prestoea acuminata (Palmae) were incubated in litter bags in a pool of Quebrada Prieta. Fine mesh bags were used to exclude macroinvertebrates during leaf breakdown, and coarse mesh bags allowed access to decapod crustaceans (juvenile shrimps and crabs) and aquatic insects (mainly mayflies, chironomids, and caddisflies). D. excelsa and G. guidonia (in coarse- and fine-mesh bags) had significantly higher breakdown rates than C. scheberiana, M. bidentata, and P. acuminata. Breakdown rates were significantly faster in coarse-mesh bag treatments for all leaf types, thus indicating a positive contribution of macroinvertebrates in leaf litter breakdown in this headwater stream. After 42 days of incubation, densities of total invertebrates, mayflies and caddisflies, were higher in bags with D. excelsa and G. guidonia, and lower in P. acuminata, C. scheberiana y M. bidentata. Decay rates were positively correlated to insect densities. Our study highlights the importance of leaf identity and macroinvertebrate exclusion on the process of leaf litter breakdown in tropical headwater streams.

  2. The afterlife of interspecific indirect genetic effects: genotype interactions alter litter quality with consequences for decomposition and nutrient dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genung, Mark A; Bailey, Joseph K; Schweitzer, Jennifer A

    2013-01-01

    Aboveground-belowground linkages are recognized as divers of community dynamics and ecosystem processes, but the impacts of plant-neighbor interactions on these linkages are virtually unknown. Plant-neighbor interactions are a type of interspecific indirect genetic effect (IIGE) if the focal plant's phenotype is altered by the expression of genes in a neighboring heterospecific plant, and IIGEs could persist after plant senescence to affect ecosystem processes. This perspective can provide insight into how plant-neighbor interactions affect evolution, as IIGEs are capable of altering species interactions and community composition over time. Utilizing genotypes of Solidago altissima and Solidago gigantea, we experimentally tested whether IIGEs that had affected living focal plants would affect litter decomposition rate, as well as nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) dynamics after the focal plant senesced. We found that species interactions affected N release and genotype interactions affected P immobilization. From a previous study we knew that neighbor genotype influenced patterns of biomass allocation for focal plants. Here we extend those previous results to show that these changes in biomass allocation altered litter quality, that then altered rates of decomposition and nutrient cycling. Our results provide insights into above- and belowground linkages by showing that, through their effects on plant litter quality (e.g., litter lignin:N), IIGEs can have afterlife effects, tying plant-neighbor interactions to ecosystem processes. This holistic approach advances our understanding of decomposition and nutrient cycling by showing that evolutionary processes (i.e., IIGEs) can influence ecosystem functioning after plant senescence. Because plant traits are determined by the combined effects of genetic and environmental influences, and because these traits are known to affect decomposition and nutrient cycling, we suggest that ecosystem processes can be described as gene

  3. Durability performance of submerged concrete structures - phase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This project determined that severe corrosion of steel can occur in the submerged : portions of reinforced concrete structures in marine environments. Field studies of decommissioned : pilings from Florida bridges revealed multiple instances of stron...

  4. Submerged Aquatic Vegetation of Bogue Sound, North Carolina 1992 Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During 1992, 1:20,000 scale aerial photography for Bogue Sound, North Carolina was collected as part of an effort to map submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in...

  5. Submerged Aquatic Vegetation of Bogue Sound, North Carolina 1992 Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During 1992, 1:20,000 scale aerial photography for Bogue Sound, North Carolina was collected as part of an effort to map submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in...

  6. Marine algal flora of submerged Angria Bank (Arabian Sea)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Untawale, A.G.; Reddy, C.R.K.; Ambiye, V.

    Submerged Angria Bank was surveyed for the deep water marine algal flora. About 57 species were reported from this bank for the first time. Rhodophyta dominated (30 species) followed by Chlorophyta (18 species) and Phaeophyta (9 species). A few...

  7. Submerged Aquatic Vegetation of Bogue Sound, North Carolina 1992 Biotic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During 1992, 1:20,000 scale aerial photography for Bogue Sound, North Carolina was collected as part of an effort to map submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in...

  8. Submerged Aquatic Vegetation of Bogue Sound, North Carolina 1992 Geoform

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During 1992, 1:20,000 scale aerial photography for Bogue Sound, North Carolina was collected as part of an effort to map submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in...

  9. Supporting Calculations For Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposal Preconceptual Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajunen, A. J.; Tedeschi, A. R.

    2012-09-18

    This document provides supporting calculations for the preparation of the Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposal Preconceptual Study report The supporting calculations include equipment sizing, Hazard Category determination, and LAW Melter Decontamination Factor Adjustments.

  10. Incipient motion of sediment in presence of submerged flexible vegetation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hao; Tang, Hong-Wu; Zhao, Han-Qing; Xuan-yu ZHAO; Lü, Sheng-qi

    2015-01-01

    The presence of submerged vegetation on river beds can change the water flow structure and alter the state of sediment motion. In this study, the incipient motion of sediment in the presence of submerged flexible vegetation in open channels was investigated in a laboratory experiment. The vegetation was simulated with flexible rubber cylinders arranged in parallel arrays. The effect of the vegetation density, water depth, and sediment grain size on the incipient motion was investigated. The e...

  11. Advanced control system for optimal filtration in submerged anaerobic MBRs (SAnMBRs)

    OpenAIRE

    Robles Martínez, Ángel; Ruano García, María Victoria; Ribes Bertomeu, José; Ferrer, J.

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to develop an advanced controller to optimise filtration in submerged anaerobic MBRs (SAnMBRs). The proposed controller was developed, calibrated and validated in a SAnMBR demonstration plant fitted with industrial-scale hollow-fibre membranes with variable influent flow and load. This 2-layer control system is designed for membranes operating sub-critically and features a lower layer (on/off and PID controllers) and an upper layer (knowledge-based controller). ...

  12. Measuring air layer volumes retained by submerged floating-ferns Salvinia and biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Mayser, Matthias J; Bohn, Holger F; Meike Reker; Wilhelm Barthlott

    2014-01-01

    Some plants and animals feature superhydrophobic surfaces capable of retaining a layer of air when submerged under water. Long-term air retaining surfaces (Salvinia-effect) are of high interest for biomimetic applications like drag reduction in ship coatings of up to 30%. Here we present a novel method for measuring air volumes and air loss under water. We recorded the buoyancy force of the air layer on leaf surfaces of four different Salvinia species and on one biomimetic surface using a hig...

  13. The Afterlife of Interspecific Indirect Genetic Effects: Genotype Interactions Alter Litter Quality with Consequences for Decomposition and Nutrient Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genung, Mark A.; Bailey, Joseph K.; Schweitzer, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Aboveground-belowground linkages are recognized as divers of community dynamics and ecosystem processes, but the impacts of plant-neighbor interactions on these linkages are virtually unknown. Plant-neighbor interactions are a type of interspecific indirect genetic effect (IIGE) if the focal plant’s phenotype is altered by the expression of genes in a neighboring heterospecific plant, and IIGEs could persist after plant senescence to affect ecosystem processes. This perspective can provide insight into how plant-neighbor interactions affect evolution, as IIGEs are capable of altering species interactions and community composition over time. Utilizing genotypes of Solidago altissima and Solidago gigantea, we experimentally tested whether IIGEs that had affected living focal plants would affect litter decomposition rate, as well as nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) dynamics after the focal plant senesced. We found that species interactions affected N release and genotype interactions affected P immobilization. From a previous study we knew that neighbor genotype influenced patterns of biomass allocation for focal plants. Here we extend those previous results to show that these changes in biomass allocation altered litter quality, that then altered rates of decomposition and nutrient cycling. Our results provide insights into above- and belowground linkages by showing that, through their effects on plant litter quality (e.g., litter lignin:N), IIGEs can have afterlife effects, tying plant-neighbor interactions to ecosystem processes. This holistic approach advances our understanding of decomposition and nutrient cycling by showing that evolutionary processes (i.e., IIGEs) can influence ecosystem functioning after plant senescence. Because plant traits are determined by the combined effects of genetic and environmental influences, and because these traits are known to affect decomposition and nutrient cycling, we suggest that ecosystem processes can be described as

  14. Influence of litter thickness on the structure of litter macrofauna of deciduous forests of Ukraine’s steppe zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Brygadyrenko

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The litter in a forest ecosystem acts as a trophic substrate, and at the same time it is the environment for litter invertebrates. But despite this fact, there has been very little research conducted on the influence of litter thickness on the structure of litter macrofauna. The litter of steppe forests contains most types of integrated communities of forest ecosystems. This means that its thickness cannot avoid playing a significant role in the functioning of the ecosystem. Following to the standard methodologies, Invertebrates were collected using pit-fall traps in deciduous forests of Nikolaev, Zaporizhzhya, Dnipropetrovsk, Donetsk and Kharkiv oblasts, which are characterized by different types of geomorphological profile, different moisture conditions, soil salinity, tree crown and herbaceous vegetation density, soil texture and other factors. The total number of macrofauna increases in conditions where litter thickness exceeds40 mmin comparison with forest ecosystems with fragmented and average capacity litter. The number of litter macrofauna species also increases from 11–23 to 38 species on average when litter thickness increases to more than40 mm. The Shannon and Pielou diversity indexes show no definite tendencies to change in relation to changing degrees of litter thickness. At sites of greater thickness of the litter layer, the corresponding increase in the absolute number of litter mesofauna invertebrates is mostly due to saprophages, and the increase the number of species – due to zoophages. The optimum structure of domination was observed at sites with maximum thickness of litter. The proportion of large species shows no statistically significant change in relation to variations in litter thickness. The qualitative compound of the fauna at sites with thick litter changes mainly due to an increase in the number of Carabidae species.

  15. Subtidal littering: Indirect effects on soft substratum macrofauna?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. AKOUMIANAKI

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Changes in macrofauna community structure, abundance and species richness were examined both before and one year after the deployment of plastic and glass bottles at littered (litter density: 16 items / 100 m2 and non-littered (control surfaces at three unimpacted coastal areas of the western Saronikos Gulf (Greece. In parallel, LOI% at the adjacent sediments and changes in the composition of feeding types of the megaepifauna that colonized the litter were examined across treatments. Significant changes in macrofauna community structure were demonstrated between before and after littering. At only one of the sites was there detected a significant difference in macrofauna community structure between control and littered plots after littering. This difference was linked with a significant increase in the abundance of opportunistic polychaete species and LOI% levels in the sediment surface due to the entrapment of macrophytal debris within the littered surface. The study did not show a consistent direct response of macroinfauna community to litter and the associated megafauna. Unlike the megafauna attracted by litter items, soft-substratum macrofauna is less responsive to the addition of novel hard substrates in adjacent sediments. Alternatively, it could be that the impact of littering with small items triggers a macrofauna response detectable in the long-run.

  16. Incorporating effects of forest litter in a snow process model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, J. P.; Melloh, R.; Robinson, P.; Jordan, R.

    2000-12-01

    Net solar radiation often dominates the snow surface energy exchange during ablation in many conifer forests. Reflection of solar radiation from the snow surface depends not only on snow properties, but also on forest litter lying on and within the snowpack. We know of no validated model reported in the literature that accounts for the influence of forest litter on snow surface energy exchanges. The purpose of this work is to test an existing algorithm's ability to accumulate forest litter in snow layers and to predict the subsequent effect of litter on the snow surface albedo. Field studies in a conifer stand of red spruce-balsam fir in northern Vermont, USA, provided key data for validation, including subcanopy radiation, meteorology, snow depth, and images of litter accumulation. We ran the litter algorithm coupled with the snow model SNTHERM for the ablation season, and predictions compared well with measurements of snow depth, snow surface litter coverage, and snow surface albedo beneath the conifer canopy. Model results suggest that for this forest and ablation season, the current litter algorithm realistically distributes litter in the snowpack through time with validated effects on snow surface litter concentration and albedo. The poor relationship between mean wind speed and change in litter coverage on the snow surface suggest that, for this forest and ablation season, incorporating wind events into the algorithm will not improve the results.

  17. Heat transfer model for quenching by submerging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passarella, D N; Varas, F [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada II, E.T.S. de Ing. de Telecomunicacion, Universidad de Vigo, Campus Marcosende, 36310 Vigo (Spain); MartIn, E B, E-mail: diego@dma.uvigo.es, E-mail: fvaras@uvigo.es, E-mail: emortega@uvigo.es [Area de Mecanica de Fluidos, E.T.S. de Ing. Industriales, Universidad de Vigo, Campus Marcosende, 36310 Vigo (Spain)

    2011-05-01

    In quenching by submerging the workpiece is cooled due to vaporization, convective flow and interaction of both mechanisms. The dynamics of these phenomena is very complex and the corresponding heat fluxes are strongly dependent on local flow variables such as velocity of fluid and vapor fraction. This local dependence may produce very different cooling rates along the piece, responsible for inappropriate metallurgical transformations, variability of material properties and residual stresses. In order to obtain an accurate description of cooling during quenching, a mathematical model of heat transfer is presented here. The model is based on the drift-flux mixture-model for multiphase flows, including an equation of conservation of energy for the liquid phase and specific boundary conditions that account for evaporation and presence of vapor phase on the surface of the piece. The model was implemented on Comsol Multiphysics software. Generation of appropriate initial and boundary conditions, as well as numerical resolution details, is briefly discussed. To test the model, a simple flow condition was analyzed. The effect of vapor fraction on heat transfer is assessed. The presence of the typical vapor blanket and its collapse can be recovered by the model, and its effect on the cooling rates on different parts of the piece is analyzed. Comparisons between numerical results and data from literature are made.

  18. Temperature Sensitivity of Microbial Respiration of Fine Root Litter in a Temperate Broad-Leaved Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makita, Naoki; Kawamura, Ayumi

    2015-01-01

    The microbial decomposition respiration of plant litter generates a major CO2 efflux from terrestrial ecosystems that plays a critical role in the regulation of carbon cycling on regional and global scales. However, the respiration from root litter decomposition and its sensitivity to temperature changes are unclear in current models of carbon turnover in forest soils. Thus, we examined seasonal changes in the temperature sensitivity and decomposition rates of fine root litter of two diameter classes (0–0.5 and 0.5–2.0 mm) of Quercus serrata and Ilex pedunculosa in a deciduous broad-leaved forest. During the study period, fine root litter of both diameter classes and species decreased approximately exponentially over time. The Q10 values of microbial respiration rates of root litter for the two classes were 1.59–3.31 and 1.28–6.27 for Q. serrata and 1.36–6.31 and 1.65–5.86 for I. pedunculosa. A significant difference in Q10 was observed between the diameter classes, indicating that root diameter represents the initial substrate quality, which may determine the magnitude of Q10 value of microbial respiration. Changes in these Q10 values were related to seasonal soil temperature patterns; the values were higher in winter than in summer. Moreover, seasonal variations in Q10 were larger during the 2-year decomposition period than the 1-year period. These results showed that the Q10 values of fine root litter of 0–0.5 and 0.5–2.0 mm have been shown to increase with lower temperatures and with the higher recalcitrance pool of the decomposed substrate during 2 years of decomposition. Thus, the temperature sensitivity of microbial respiration in root litter showed distinct patterns according to the decay period and season because of the temperature acclimation and adaptation of the microbial decomposer communities in root litter. PMID:25658106

  19. The role of microbial communities in phosphorus cycling during litter decomposition in a tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret Sevilla, E.; Brodie, E.; Bouskill, N.; Hao, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient with a reduced availability in tropical forests. In these ecosystems, P is recycled highly efficiently through resorption and mineralization and P immobilization in the microbial biomass prevents its loss through occlusion in the soil mineral fraction. To improve models of ecosystem response to global change, further studies of the above and belowground plant and microbial traits related to P availability and uptake, are required. In tropical forests, high temperature and rainfall lead to some of the highest rates of litter decomposition on earth. Litter decomposition is a complex process mediated by a range of trophic groups: meso and microfauna initiate litter turnover through litter fragmentation facilitating colonization by fungi, and bacteria mediate the mineralization of organic matter and release of nutrients. To determine the important functional traits of these players in the efficient cycling of P in soils with low P availability, we are performing a leaf litter decomposition experiment in a humid tropical forest in Puerto Rico. Nylon litterbags with three mesh sizes (2mm, 20 μm and 0.45 μm) containing litter with different chemistry (tabonuco and palm) will be deployed on soil surface and sampled 6 times throughout 12 months. The use of different mesh sizes will allow us to identify the leading roles in litter turnover by physical allowance and/or exclusion of the decomposers. The 2 mm bags allow meso and microfauna, roots, fungi and bacteria. 20 μm bags will exclude fauna and roots and 0.45 μm only allow some bacteria. We hypothesize that fungi will dominate over bacteria in earlier stages of the decomposition with a higher production of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes. On the other hand, bacterial biomass is expected to increase with time. Qualitative changes in both fungal and bacterial communities along the decomposition process are also expected leading to changes in enzyme activity. We also postulate an

  20. Response of sago pondweed, a submerged aquatic macrophyte, to herbicides in three laboratory culture systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, W.J.; Ailstock, M.S.; Momot, J.J.; Norman, C.M.; Gorsuch, Joseph W.; Lower, William R.; Wang, Wun-cheng; Lewis, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    The phytotoxicity of atrazine, paraquat, glyphosate, and alachlor to sago pondweed (Potamogeton pectinatus), a submerged aquatic macrophyte, was tested under three types of laboratory culture conditions. In each case, tests were conducted in static systems, the test period was four weeks, and herbicide exposure was chronic, resulting from a single addition of herbicide to the test vessels at the beginning of the test period. The three sets of test conditions employed were(1) axenic cultures in 125-mL flasks containing a nutrient media and sucrose; (2) a microcosm system employing 18.9-L buckets containing a sand, shell, and peat substrate; and (3) an algae-free system employing O.95-L jars containing reconstituted freshwater and a nutrient agar substrate. The primary variable measured was biomass production. Plants grew well in all three test systems, with biomass of untreated plants increasing by a factor of about 5 to 6.5 during the four-week test period. Biomass production in response to herbicide exposure differed significantly among culture systems, which demonstrates the need for a standardized testing protocol for evaluating the effects of toxics on submerged aquatic plants.

  1. Oxygen, pH, and Eh microprofiles around submerged macrophyte Vallisneria natans response to growing stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, B.; Wang, G. X.; Yu, H. G.

    2017-08-01

    The periphyton, attached to the surfaces of submerged plants, has important effects on plant growth and development in eutrophic waters. Periphyton complicates the microenvironment of diffusive boundary layer around submerged plants. We researched periphyton characteristics, oxygen (O2), pH, and Eh microprofiles at various growing stages of Vallisneria natans. The results suggested that during the growing period of V. natans, O2 concentration and pH decreased from 0 to 2 mm above the leaf surface, whereas the Eh increased. As V. natans grew, O2 and pH gradually increased until they peaked during stable growing stages, while the Eh decreased. However, during the decline stage, O2 and pH gradually decreased, and Eh increased. To summarise, O2 and pH showed a unimodal pattern in response to the life cycle of V. natans, with the maximum levels during the stable growth stage and the minimum levels during the rapid growth and decline stages. Our study demonstrated that V. natans growth induced steep gradients in O2 concentrations, pH, and Eh at the DBL by increasing the layer’s thickness, macrophyte photosynthetic capacity, and periphyton biomass in eutrophic waters.

  2. Litter and soil properties are not altered by invasive deer browsing in forests of NW Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relva, María Andrea; Castán, Elisa; Mazzarino, María Julia

    2014-01-01

    It is largely accepted that large mammalian herbivores can indirectly influence ecosystem properties by changing the quantity and quality of litter inputs to soil through selective browsing on plant communities. However, idiosyncratic effects (positive, neutral and negative) have been found for different vegetation types, herbivory and soil properties. In this study we tested whether browsing by exotic deer introduced into Patagonian forests 90 years ago alters physical, chemical and biological soil properties and litter quantity and quality. As in many terrestrial ecosystems, N is the main nutrient that limits plant growth in Patagonia. Consequently, any disturbance that alters the N cycle, such as changes in the type or intensity of herbivory, is expected to affect these forest ecosystems. We compared soil and total litter from inside and outside five 7-yr old exclosures located on Isla Victoria, Parque Nacional Nahuel Huapi, Argentina. Despite introduced deer has significantly affected the composition, abundance and structure of the understory vegetation, we found no differences between browsed and unbrowsed areas in the physical (bulk density, moisture), chemical (pH, base cations, organic C and total N) and biological (potential microbial respiration and net N mineralization) soil properties. This could be attributable to the high capacity of volcanic soils to stabilize organic matter, buffering disturbance-induced changes. However, the quantity and quality (C, N and C/N ratio) of total litter were also not different between browsed and unbrowsed areas. Although non-significant differences were found between treatments in both compartments, litter and soil, most variables showed a slight trend toward higher values in unbrowsed areas. This suggests that 7 years of browsing exclusion would be not enough to detect changes induced by browsing, particularly in highly stable volcanic soils.

  3. The effect of saprophagous macrofauna on litter decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Previous experiments show that feeding of the larvae of Bibionidae on lef litter cause short term increase of respiration but in long term the decomposition of bibio feces is slower than decomposition of litter from which feces were produced. To understand why excrements of decompose more slowly than leaf litter, we fed Bibio marci larvae the litter of tree species differing in litter quality (Alnus glutinosa, Salix caprea, and Quercus robur) and then measured respiration induced by litter and excrements. We also measured respiration induced by the same litter artificially modified to mimic faunal effects; the litter was modified by grinding, grinding with alkalinization to pH 11, grinding with coating by kaolinite, and grinding with both alkalinization and coating. Decomposition of excrements tended to be slower for willow and was significantly slower for oak and alder than for the corresponding litter. With oak, decomposition was slower for all artificially modified litter than for non-modified litter. The reduction in the decomposition was similar for excrements and for alder and willow litter that was ground, coated, and alkalinized. In alder, a similar reduction was found in ground and alkalinized litter. 13C NMR indicated that gut passage increases aliphatic components and decreases polysaccharides. Pyrolysis indicated that gut passage increases the ratio of guaiacyl to hydroxymethyl derivatives in lignin. Our findings indicate that the decreased decomposition rate of excrements might result from the removal of easily available polysaccharides, the increase in aliphatic components, an increase in the resistant components of lignin, the accumulation of microbial cell walls, and the binding of nitrogen into complexes with aromatic components. Several of these mechanisms are supported or determined by litter alkalinization during gut passage.

  4. The recovery and dynamics of submerged aquatic macrophyte vegeta­tion in the Wilderness lakes, southern Cape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Weisser

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Between 1979 and 1981, the submerged aquatic macrophyte vegetation in the Wilderness lakes died back significantly, and in some areas disappeared altogether. This study documents the senescent phase and describes the recovery of the plant populations between May 1982 and May 1983. In two lakes, namely Langvlei and Eilandvlei, the plant biomass approximately doubled between the winters of 1982 and 1983. Seasonal changes in species composition are documented and possible factors accounting for the collapse and recovery of the plant populations are discussed.

  5. Climatic controls on leaf litter decomposition across European forests and grasslands revealed by reciprocal litter transplantation experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Portillo-Estrada, Miguel; Pihlatie, Mari; Korhonen, Janne F. J.

    2016-01-01

    , and positively correlated with the litter total specific leaf area. Also, litter N content increased as less litter mass remained and decay went further.Surprisingly, this study demonstrates that climatic controls on litter decomposition are quantitatively more important than species or site of origin...... for litter carbon and nitrogen remaining during the decomposition. Using mean annual air temperature, precipitation, soil water content and litter total specific leaf area as parameters we were able to predict the annual decomposition rate (k) accurately.......Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling under future climate change is associated with large uncertainties in litter decomposition and the turnover of soil C and N. In addition, future conditions (especially altered precipitation regimes and warming) are expected to result in changes in vegetation...

  6. Cellulose utilization in forest litter and soil: identification of bacterial and fungal decomposers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stursová, Martina; Zifčáková, Lucia; Leigh, Mary Beth; Burgess, Robert; Baldrian, Petr

    2012-06-01

    Organic matter decomposition in the globally widespread coniferous forests has an important role in the carbon cycle, and cellulose decomposition is especially important in this respect because cellulose is the most abundant polysaccharide in plant litter. Cellulose decomposition was 10 times faster in the fungi-dominated litter of Picea abies forest than in the bacteria-dominated soil. In the soil, the added (13)C-labelled cellulose was the main source of microbial respiration and was preferentially accumulated in the fungal biomass and cellulose induced fungal proliferation. In contrast, in the litter, bacterial biomass showed higher labelling after (13)C-cellulose addition and bacterial biomass increased. While 80% of the total community was represented by 104-106 bacterial and 33-59 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs), 80% of the cellulolytic communities of bacteria and fungi were only composed of 8-18 highly abundant OTUs. Both the total and (13)C-labelled communities differed substantially between the litter and soil. Cellulolytic bacteria in the acidic topsoil included Betaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Acidobacteria, whereas these typically found in neutral soils were absent. Most fungal cellulose decomposers belonged to Ascomycota; cellulolytic Basidiomycota were mainly represented by the yeasts Trichosporon and Cryptococcus. Several bacteria and fungi demonstrated here to derive their carbon from cellulose were previously not recognized as cellulolytic. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The roles of soil macrofauna on litter decomposition of Acacia mangium Willd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUSYAFA

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Acacia mangium has been widely planted in industrial forest plantation (HTI. High litter accumulation in floor of A. mangium (Acacia plantation due to slow process of decomposition, may disturb nutrient cycling process. It is also vulnerable to forest fire especially in dry season. The research was aimed to clarify the density of soil macrofauna in Acacia plantation and the roles of macrofauna in the decomposition of Acacia litter. The density of macrofauna was estimated by using pitfall traps and hand-sorting method in Acacia stand, at Wanagama Reaserch Center, Gadjah Mada University (GMU. In the laboratory, Spirobolus sp. (Diplopoda were fed with the litter of Acacia and the ingestion rate, defecation rate, and assimilatioan rate were determined. C and N content of the litter and feces were analyzed at Laboratory of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture GMU. The results showed that the density of soil macrofauna was low (74.6 individual/m2. The study in laboratory showed that Spirobolus did not est newly fallen leaves of Acacia. Ingestion rate, defecation rate, assimilation efficiency of millipede fed with partly decomposed Acacia leaves were 76.8 mg/g/day, 7.0 mg/g/day, 6.1 mg/g/day respectively. C/N ratio of feces was lower than that of partly decomposed Acacia leaves. It indicated significant change during gut passage of Spirobolus sp. This millipede should be introduced in Acacia plantation as a potential decomposer.

  8. Role of litter turnover in soil quality in tropical degraded lands of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Juan D; Osorio, Nelson W

    2014-01-01

    Land degradation is the result of soil mismanagement that reduces soil productivity and environmental services. An alternative to improve degraded soils through reactivation of biogeochemical nutrient cycles (via litter production and decomposition) is the establishment of active restoration models using new forestry plantations, agroforestry, and silvopastoral systems. On the other hand, passive models of restoration consist of promoting natural successional processes with native plants. The objective in this review is to discuss the role of litter production and decomposition as a key strategy to reactivate biogeochemical nutrient cycles and thus improve soil quality in degraded land of the tropics. For this purpose the results of different projects of land restoration in Colombia are presented based on the dynamics of litter production, nutrient content, and decomposition. The results indicate that in only 6-13 years it is possible to detect soil properties improvements due to litter fall and decomposition. Despite that, low soil nutrient availability, particularly of N and P, seems to be major constraint to reclamation of these fragile ecosystems.

  9. Role of Litter Turnover in Soil Quality in Tropical Degraded Lands of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan D. León

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Land degradation is the result of soil mismanagement that reduces soil productivity and environmental services. An alternative to improve degraded soils through reactivation of biogeochemical nutrient cycles (via litter production and decomposition is the establishment of active restoration models using new forestry plantations, agroforestry, and silvopastoral systems. On the other hand, passive models of restoration consist of promoting natural successional processes with native plants. The objective in this review is to discuss the role of litter production and decomposition as a key strategy to reactivate biogeochemical nutrient cycles and thus improve soil quality in degraded land of the tropics. For this purpose the results of different projects of land restoration in Colombia are presented based on the dynamics of litter production, nutrient content, and decomposition. The results indicate that in only 6–13 years it is possible to detect soil properties improvements due to litter fall and decomposition. Despite that, low soil nutrient availability, particularly of N and P, seems to be major constraint to reclamation of these fragile ecosystems.

  10. Interactions of bacteria and fungi on decomposing litter: differential extracellular enzyme activities

    OpenAIRE

    Romaní i Cornet, Anna M.; Fischer, Helmut; Mille-Lindblom, Cecilia; Tranvik, Lars J.

    2006-01-01

    Fungi and bacteria are key agents in plant litter decomposition in freshwater ecosystems. However, the specific roles of these two groups and their interactions during the decomposition process are unclear. We compared the growth and patterns of degradative enzymes expressed by communities of bacteria and fungi grown separately and in coexistence on Phragmites leaves. The two groups displayed both synergistic and antagonistic interactions. Bacteria grew better together with fungi than alon...

  11. Genotype × herbivore effect on leaf litter decomposition in Betula Pendula saplings: ecological and evolutionary consequences and the role of secondary metabolites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarja Silfver

    Full Text Available Plant genetic variation and herbivores can both influence ecosystem functioning by affecting the quantity and quality of leaf litter. Few studies have, however, investigated the effects of herbivore load on litter decomposition at plant genotype level. We reduced insect herbivory using an insecticide on one half of field-grown Betula Pendula saplings of 17 genotypes, representing random intrapopulation genetic variation, and allowed insects to naturally colonize the other half. We hypothesized that due to induced herbivore defence, saplings under natural herbivory produce litter of higher concentrations of secondary metabolites (terpenes and soluble phenolics and have slower litter decomposition rate than saplings under reduced herbivory. We found that leaf damage was 89 and 53% lower in the insecticide treated saplings in the summer and autumn surveys, respectively, which led to 73% higher litter production. Litter decomposition rate was also affected by herbivore load, but the effect varied from positive to negative among genotypes and added up to an insignificant net effect at the population level. In contrast to our hypothesis, concentrations of terpenes and soluble phenolics were higher under reduced than natural herbivory. Those genotypes, whose leaves were most injured by herbivores, produced litter of lowest mass loss, but unlike we expected, the concentrations of terpenes and soluble phenolics were not linked to either leaf damage or litter decomposition. Our results show that (1 the genetic and herbivore effects on B. pendula litter decomposition are not mediated through variation in terpene or soluble phenolic concentrations and suggest that (2 the presumably higher insect herbivore pressure in the future warmer climate will not, at the ecological time scale, affect the mean decomposition rate in genetically diverse B. pendula populations. However, (3 due to the significant genetic variation in the response of decomposition to

  12. How does litter cover, litter diversity and fauna affect sediment discharge and runoff?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebes, Philipp; Seitz, Steffen; Kühn, Peter; Scholten, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Litter cover plays a major role in soil erosion processes. It is known that litter cover reduces erosivity of raindrops, decreases sediment discharge and lowers runoff volume compared to bare ground. However, in the context of biodiversity, the composition of litter cover, its effect on sediment discharge and runoff volume and their influence on soil erosion have not yet been analyzed in detail. Focusing on initial soil erosion (splash), our experimental design is designated to get a better understanding of these mechanisms. The experiments were carried out within the DFG research unit "Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning (BEF)-China" in subtropical China. The "New Integrated Litter Experiment (NILEx)" used as platform combining different subprojects of BEF-China dealing with "decomposition and nutrient cycling", "mechanisms of soil erosion" and "functional effects of herbivores, predators and saproxylics" in one experiment. In NILEx, 96 40cm x 40cm runoff plots on two hill slopes inside a castanea molissima forest plantation have been installed and filled with seven different types of litter cover. 16 one-species plots, 24 two-species plots, 4 four-species plots and 4 bare ground plots have been set up, each replicated once. We prepared 48 Plots with traps (Renner solution) for soil macrofauna (diplopods and collembola), so half of the plots were kept free from fauna while the other half was accessible for fauna. Rainfall was generated artificially by using a rainfall simulator with a continuous and stable intensity of 60 mm/h. Our experiments included two runs of 20 minutes duration each, both conducted at two different time steps (summer 2012 and autumn 2012). Runoff volume and sediment discharge were measured every 5 minutes during one rainfall run. Litter coverage and litter mass were recorded at the beginning (summer 2012) and at the end of the experiment (autumn 2012). Our results show that sediment discharge as well as runoff volume decreases

  13. Marine litter in submarine canyons of the Bay of Biscay

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Beld, Inge M. J.; Guillaumont, Brigitte; Menot, Lénaïck; Bayle, Christophe; Arnaud-Haond, Sophie; Bourillet, Jean-François

    2017-11-01

    Marine litter is a matter of increasing concern worldwide, from shallow seas to the open ocean and from beaches to the deep-seafloor. Indeed, the deep sea may be the ultimate repository of a large proportion of litter in the ocean. We used footage acquired with a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) and a towed camera to investigate the distribution and composition of litter in the submarine canyons of the Bay of Biscay. This bay contains many submarine canyons housing Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems (VMEs) such as scleractinian coral habitats. VMEs are considered to be important for fish and they increase the local biodiversity. The objectives of the study were to investigate and discuss: (i) litter density, (ii) the principal sources of litter, (iii) the influence of environmental factors on the distribution of litter, and (iv) the impact of litter on benthic communities. Litter was found in all 15 canyons and at three sites on the edge of the continental shelf/canyon, in 25 of 29 dives. The Belle-île and Arcachon Canyons contained the largest amounts of litter, up to 12.6 and 9.5 items per 100 images respectively. Plastic items were the most abundant (42%), followed by fishing-related items (16%). The litter had both a maritime and a terrestrial origin. The main sources could be linked to fishing activities, major shipping lanes and river discharges. Litter appeared to accumulate at water depths of 801-1100 m and 1401-1700 m. In the deeper of these two depth ranges, litter accumulated on a geologically structured area, accounting for its high frequency at this depth. A larger number of images taken in areas of coral in the shallower of these two depth ranges may account for the high frequency of litter detection at this depth. A larger number of litter items, including plastic objects in particular, were observed on geological structures and in coral areas than on areas of bare substratum. The distribution of fishing-related items was similar for the various types of

  14. Submerged cultivation of medicinal mushrooms: bioprocesses and products (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisashvili, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Medicinal mushrooms belonging to higher Basidiomycetes are an immensely rich yet largely untapped resource of useful, easily accessible, natural compounds with various biological activities that may promote human well-being. The medicinal properties are found in various cellular components and secondary metabolites (polysaccharides, proteins and their complexes, phenolic compounds, polyketides, triterpenoids, steroids, alkaloids, nucleotides, etc.), which have been isolated and identified from the fruiting bodies, culture mycelium, and culture broth of mushrooms. Some of these compounds have cholesterol-lowering, anti-diabetic, antioxidant, antitumor, immunomodulating, antimicrobial, and antiviral activities ready for industrial trials and further commercialization, while others are in various stages of development. Recently, the submerged cultivation of medicinal mushrooms has received a great deal of attention as a promising and reproducible alternative for the efficient production of mushroom mycelium and metabolites. Submerged cultivation of mushrooms has significant industrial potential, but its success on a commercial scale depends on increasing product yields and development of novel production systems that address the problems associated with this technique of mushroom cultivation. In spite of many researchers' efforts for the production of bioactive metabolites by mushrooms, the physiological and engineering aspects of submerged cultures are still far from being thoroughly studied. The vast majority of studies have focused on polysaccharide and ganoderic acid production in submerged cultivation of medicinal mushrooms, and very little has been written so far on the antioxidant and hemagglutinating activity of submerged mushroom cultures. The purpose of this review is to provide an update of the present state of the art and future prospects of submerged cultivation of medicinal mushrooms to produce mycelium and bioactive metabolites, and to make a

  15. Seasonal and Local Differences in Leaf Litter Flammability of Six Mediterranean Tree Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauf, Zorica; Fangmeier, Andreas; Rosavec, Roman; Španjol, Željko

    2015-03-01

    One of the suggested management options for reducing fire danger is the selection of less flammable plant species. Nevertheless, vegetation flammability is both complex and dynamic, making identification of such species challenging. While large efforts have been made to connect plant traits to fire behavior, seasonal changes and within species variability of traits are often neglected. Currently, even the most sophisticated fire danger systems presume that intrinsic characteristics of leaf litter stay unchanged, and plant species flammability lists are often transferred from one area to another. In order to assess if these practices can be improved, we performed a study examining the relationship between morphological characteristics and flammability parameters of leaf litter, thereby taking into account seasonal and local variability. Litter from six Mediterranean tree species was sampled throughout the fire season from three different locations along a climate gradient. Samples were subjected to flammability testing involving an epiradiator operated at 400 °C surface temperature with 3 g sample weight. Specific leaf area, fuel moisture content, average area, and average mass of a single particle had significant influences on flammability parameters. Effects of sampling time and location were significant as well. Due to the standardized testing conditions, these effects could be attributed to changes in intrinsic characteristics of the material. As the aforementioned effects were inconsistent and species specific, these results may potentially limit the generalization of species flammability rankings. Further research is necessary in order to evaluate the importance of our findings for fire danger modeling.

  16. Emissions of H2 and CO from leaf litter of Sequoiadendron giganteum, and their dependence on UV radiation and temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derendorp, L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314016414; Quist, J.B.; Holzinger, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/337989338; Röckmann, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304838233

    2011-01-01

    Senescent and dead plant material releases carbon monoxide (CO), methane and higher hydrocarbons upon heating or irradiation with UV, but emissions of hydrogen (H2) have not been reported. This study investigated whether leaf litter is able to emit H2 and which factors control the possible

  17. Soil macrofauna and litter nutrients in three tropical tree plantations on a disturbed site in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew W. Warren; Xiaoming Zou

    2002-01-01

    Tree plantations are increasingly common in tropical landscapes due to their multiple uses. Plantations vary in structure and composition, and these variations may alter soil fauna communities. Recent studies have demonstrated the important role of soil fauna in the regulation of plant litter decomposition in the tropics. However, little is known about how plantation...

  18. Total copper, manganese, and zinc levels in a Cecil soil during ten years of poultry litter application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heavy metals in poultry litter (PL) can cause environmental problems despite the cost-effectiveness of PL as source of plant nutrients. We compared total Cu, Mn, and Zn levels in a Cecil soil near Watkinsville, GA, in a 5-yr of cotton and 5-yr of corn study under conventional tillage (CT) and no-til...

  19. Total phosphorus, zinc, copper, and manganese concentrations in cecil soil through ten years of poultry litter application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poultry litter (PL) is an inexpensive and effective source of plant nutrients. However, over application could result in phosphorus and heavy metal accumulation in soils. A field experiment evaluating PL application to a Cecil soil used for cotton and corn production has been maintained for 10 years...

  20. Soil and foliar nutrient and nitrogen isotope composition (δ(15)N) at 5 years after poultry litter and green waste biochar amendment in a macadamia orchard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Shahla Hosseini; Xu, Cheng-Yuan; Xu, Zhihong; Blumfield, Timothy J; Zhao, Haitao; Wallace, Helen; Reverchon, Frédérique; Van Zwieten, Lukas

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the improvement in soil fertility and plant nutrient use in a macadamia orchard following biochar application. The main objectives of this study were to assess the effects of poultry litter and green waste biochar applications on nitrogen (N) cycling using N isotope composition (δ(15)N) and nutrient availability in a soil-plant system at a macadamia orchard, 5 years following application. Biochar was applied at 10 t ha(-1) dry weight but concentrated within a 3-m diameter zone when trees were planted in 2007. Soil and leaf samples were collected in 2012, and both soil and foliar N isotope composition (δ(15)N) and nutrient concentrations were assessed. Both soil and foliar δ(15)N increased significantly in the poultry litter biochar plots compared to the green waste biochar and control plots. A significant relationship was observed between soil and plant δ(15)N. There was no influence of either biochars on foliar total N concentrations or soil NH4 (+)-N and NO3 (-)-N, which suggested that biochar application did not pose any restriction for plant N uptake. Plant bioavailable phosphorus (P) was significantly higher in the poultry litter biochar treatment compared to the green waste biochar treatment and control. We hypothesised that the bioavailability of N and P content of poultry litter biochar may play an important role in increasing soil and plant δ(15)N and P concentrations. Biochar application affected soil-plant N cycling and there is potential to use soil and plant δ(15)N to investigate N cycling in a soil-biochar-tree crop system. The poultry litter biochar significantly increased soil fertility compared to the green waste biochar at 5 years following biochar application which makes the poultry litter a better feedstock to produce biochar compared to green waste for the tree crops.

  1. Universal Distribution of Litter Decay Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forney, D. C.; Rothman, D. H.

    2008-12-01

    Degradation of litter is the result of many physical, chemical and biological processes. The high variability of these processes likely accounts for the progressive slowdown of decay with litter age. This age dependence is commonly thought to result from the superposition of processes with different decay rates k. Here we assume an underlying continuous yet unknown distribution p(k) of decay rates [1]. To seek its form, we analyze the mass-time history of 70 LIDET [2] litter data sets obtained under widely varying conditions. We construct a regularized inversion procedure to find the best fitting distribution p(k) with the least degrees of freedom. We find that the resulting p(k) is universally consistent with a lognormal distribution, i.e.~a Gaussian distribution of log k, characterized by a dataset-dependent mean and variance of log k. This result is supported by a recurring observation that microbial populations on leaves are log-normally distributed [3]. Simple biological processes cause the frequent appearance of the log-normal distribution in ecology [4]. Environmental factors, such as soil nitrate, soil aggregate size, soil hydraulic conductivity, total soil nitrogen, soil denitrification, soil respiration have been all observed to be log-normally distributed [5]. Litter degradation rates depend on many coupled, multiplicative factors, which provides a fundamental basis for the lognormal distribution. Using this insight, we systematically estimated the mean and variance of log k for 512 data sets from the LIDET study. We find the mean strongly correlates with temperature and precipitation, while the variance appears to be uncorrelated with main environmental factors and is thus likely more correlated with chemical composition and/or ecology. Results indicate the possibility that the distribution in rates reflects, at least in part, the distribution of microbial niches. [1] B. P. Boudreau, B.~R. Ruddick, American Journal of Science,291, 507, (1991). [2] M

  2. Analysis of litter size and average litter weight in pigs using a recursive model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varona, Luis; Sorensen, Daniel; Thompson, Robin

    2007-01-01

    An analysis of litter size and average piglet weight at birth in Landrace and Yorkshire using a standard two-trait mixed model (SMM) and a recursive mixed model (RMM) is presented. The RMM establishes a one-way link from litter size to average piglet weight. It is shown that there is a one......-to-one correspondence between the parameters of SMM and RMM and that they generate equivalent likelihoods. As parameterized in this work, the RMM tests for the presence of a recursive relationship between additive genetic values, permanent environmental effects, and specific environmental effects of litter size......, on average piglet weight. The equivalent standard mixed model tests whether or not the covariance matrices of the random effects have a diagonal structure. In Landrace, posterior predictive model checking supports a model without any form of recursion or, alternatively, a SMM with diagonal covariance...

  3. Comparison of GC-MS and NMR for metabolite profiling of rice subjected to submergence stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barding, Gregory A; Béni, Szabolcs; Fukao, Takeshi; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Larive, Cynthia K

    2013-02-01

    Natural disasters such as drought, extreme temperatures, and flooding can severely impact crop production. Understanding the metabolic response of crops threatened with these disasters provides insights into biological response mechanisms that can influence survival. In this study, a comparative analysis of GC-MS and (1)H NMR results was conducted for wild-type and tolerant rice varieties stressed by up to 3 days of submergence and allowed 1 day of postsubmergence recovery. Most metabolomics studies are conducted using a single analytical platform. Each platform, however, has inherent advantages and disadvantages that can influence the analytical coverage of the metabolome. In this work, a more thorough analysis of the plant stress response was possible through the use of both (1)H NMR and GC-MS. Several metabolites, such as S-methyl methionine and the dipeptide alanylglycine, were only detected and quantified by (1)H NMR. The high dynamic range of NMR, as compared with that of the GC-TOF-MS used in this study, provided broad coverage of the metabolome in a single experiment. The sensitivity of GC-MS facilitated the quantitation of sugars, organic acids, and amino acids, some of which were not detected by NMR, and provided additional insights into the regulation of the TCA cycle. The combined metabolic information provided by (1)H NMR and GC-MS was essential for understanding the complex biochemical and molecular response of rice plants to submergence.

  4. Submerged Membrane Bioreactor (sMBR: a promising alternative to wastewater treatment for water reuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Lucas Subtil

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Treatment technology for wastewater treatment and reuse encompasses a vast number of options, and the Submerged Membrane Bioreactor is regarded as a key element for the role it can play in water reuse schemes. Thus, this study aimed to present and discuss the current status of sMBR implementation, as well as to present the results of a pilot plant with submerged flat sheet membranes treating wastewater from the residence halls and the restaurant of the University of São Paulo. The pilot plant was operated under stationary conditions over a period of 90 days with a concentration of 3422 ± 693 mg TSS/L. The results showed that the system can produce an effluent with low concentrations of color, turbidity, COD and BOD5 with values of 25 uC, 0.29 NTU, 5.5 mg O2/L and 24 mg O2/L, respectively. Furthermore, the ultrafiltration membranes used were able to reduce the density of pathogen indicators, with removal of 7 and 6 log of thermotolerant coliforms and E. coli respectively, resulting with concentrations of 9,3 ± 21,0 e 1,8 ± 4,0 MPN/100 mL, respectively.

  5. Odour emissions from poultry litter - A review litter properties, odour formation and odorant emissions from porous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Mark W; Blackall, Patrick J; Stuetz, Richard M

    2016-07-15

    Odour emissions from meat chicken sheds can at times cause odour impacts on surrounding communities. Litter is seen as the primary source of this odour. Formation and emission of odour from meat chicken litter during the grow-out period are influenced by various factors such as litter conditions, the environment, microbial activity, properties of the odorous gases and management practices. Odour emissions vary spatially and temporally. This variability has made it challenging to understand how specific litter conditions contribute to odour emissions from the litter and production sheds. Existing knowledge on odorants, odour formation mechanisms and emission processes that contribute to odour emissions from litter are reviewed. Litter moisture content and water thermodynamics (i.e. water activity, Aw) are also examined as factors that contribute to microbial odour formation, physical litter conditions and the exchange of individual odorant gases at the air-water interface. Substantial opportunities exist for future research on litter conditions and litter formation mechanisms and how these contribute to odour emissions. Closing this knowledge gap will improve management strategies that intercept and interfere with odour formation and emission processes leading to an overall reduction in the potential to cause community impacts. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. On-farm evaluation of aluminum sulfate (alum) as a poultry litter amendment: effects on litter properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, J T; Luka-McCafferty, N J

    2002-01-01

    Aluminum sulfate [alum; Al2(SO4)3] amendment of poultry litters has been suggested as a best management practice to help reduce the potential environmental effects of poultry production. Past research has shown that alum treatment reduced NH3 emissions from litters, decreased the loss in runoff of P and trace metals from litter-amended soils, improved poultry health, and reduced the costs of poultry production. We conducted a large scale, "on-farm" evaluation of alum as a poultry (broiler) litter amendment on the Delmarva peninsula to determine the effect of alum on (i) litter properties and elemental composition and (ii) the solubility of several elements in litter that are of particular concern for water quality (Al, As, Cu, P, and Zn). Alum was applied over a 16-mo period to 97 poultry houses on working poultry farms; 97 houses on other farms served as controls (no alum). Litter samples were analyzed initially and after approximately seven alum applications. We found that alum decreased litter pH and the water solubility of P, As, Cu, and Zn. Alum-treated houses also had higher litter total N, NH4-N, and total S concentrations and thus a greater overall fertilizer value than litters from the control houses. Higher litter NH4-N values also suggest that alum reduced NH3 losses from litters. Thus, alum appears to have promise as a best management practice (BMP) for poultry production. Future research should focus on the long-term transformations of P, Al, As, Cu, and Zn in soils amended with alum-treated litters.

  7. Litter Decomposition of Two Pioneer Tree Species and Associated Soil Fauna in Areas Reclaimed after Surface Coal Mining in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joice Martins de Freitas Frasson

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Decomposition of leaf litter from pioneer tree species and development of associated soil meso- and macrofauna are fundamental for rehabilitation processes in reclaimed coal mining areas. The aim of our study was to evaluate decomposition of Schinus terebinthifolius and Senna multijuga to answer three basic questions: (i What type of leaf litter degrades faster in reclaimed coal min\\ing areas? (ii Is leaf decomposition correlated with the stage of regeneration and exposure time? and (iii Does the type of leaf litter influence the diversity and abundance of the soil meso- and macrofauna species collected? Experiments were carried out in the state of Santa Catarina in three areas at different stages of regeneration. A total of 32 litter bags (16 per plant species were used per study site, and they were divided into four blocks along a transect. Sampling was carried out at 15, 30, 60, and 120 days, when one litter bag per species/block was removed at random. We found no statistically significant difference between S. terebinthifolius and S. multijuga in regard to leaf-litter decomposition rate. However, the “area”, “litter bag exposure time” and “fauna richness” factors were significant. Therefore, shading and time of reclamation of areas contribute to an increase in decomposition rate and in development of soil meso- and macrofauna communities.

  8. Influence of plastic slatted floors compared with pine shaving litter on Pekin Duck condition during the summer months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraley, S M; Fraley, G S; Karcher, D M; Makagon, M M; Lilburn, M S

    2013-07-01

    The management and well-being of commercial Pekin ducks has been studied in the European Union where straw is the predominant litter source. In the United States, however, the most prevalent litter is wood shavings, with a recent trend toward using plastic slatted flooring. A previous study in the United States evaluated the relationship between flooring type (litter, slats) and duck condition during winter months and found very few differences between the 2 in terms of overall duck condition. The purpose of the current study was to reevaluate the 2 flooring systems during the summer months to determine if seasonal differences would interact with flooring type to have an impact on duck condition. Eighteen commercial barns that produce Pekin ducks for Maple Leaf Farms Inc. (Leesburg, IN), located in northern Indiana and southern Wisconsin (n = 9 litter; n = 9 raised slatted floor), were used for this study. Twenty ducks were randomly selected from 5 predetermined areas within each house (n = 100 total) and scored for eye condition, nostril and feather cleanliness, and feather and foot pad quality at 7, 21, and 32 d of age. Environmental data, including carbon monoxide, ammonia, RH, and temperature, were also obtained at each collection day. The only statistical differences in body condition occurred at 7 d; there were more ducks with clear eyes and eye rings on the litter flooring, whereas average nostril scores were better on the plastic slatted floors. Live weight, weight gain per day, flock mortality, and condemnations at the plant were collected, and the only statistical difference was a higher gain per day for ducks reared on slatted floors compared with litter (P < 0.05). There were no differences between flooring systems in the environmental parameters measured within the barns. In summary, there were very few differences between the litter and slatted flooring systems, indicating that there may not be clear advantages for one particular flooring system over

  9. Effects of radionuclide contamination on leaf litter decomposition in the Chernobyl exclusion zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonzom, Jean-Marc; Hättenschwiler, Stephan; Lecomte-Pradines, Catherine; Chauvet, Eric; Gaschak, Sergey; Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Della-Vedova, Claire; Dubourg, Nicolas; Maksimenko, Andrey; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle

    2016-08-15

    The effects of radioactive contamination on ecosystem processes such as litter decomposition remain largely unknown. Because radionuclides accumulated in soil and plant biomass can be harmful for organisms, the functioning of ecosystems may be altered by radioactive contamination. Here, we tested the hypothesis that decomposition is impaired by increasing levels of radioactivity in the environment by exposing uncontaminated leaf litter from silver birch and black alder at (i) eleven distant forest sites differing in ambient radiation levels (0.22-15μGyh(-1)) and (ii) along a short distance gradient of radioactive contamination (1.2-29μGyh(-1)) within a single forest in the Chernobyl exclusion zone. In addition to measuring ambient external dose rates, we estimated the average total dose rates (ATDRs) absorbed by decomposers for an accurate estimate of dose-induced ecological consequences of radioactive pollution. Taking into account potential confounding factors (soil pH, moisture, texture, and organic carbon content), the results from the eleven distant forest sites, and from the single forest, showed increased litter mass loss with increasing ATDRs from 0.3 to 150μGyh(-1). This unexpected result may be due to (i) overcompensation of decomposer organisms exposed to radionuclides leading to a higher decomposer abundance (hormetic effect), and/or (ii) from preferred feeding by decomposers on the uncontaminated leaf litter used for our experiment compared to locally produced, contaminated leaf litter. Our data indicate that radio-contamination of forest ecosystems over more than two decades does not necessarily have detrimental effects on organic matter decay. However, further studies are needed to unravel the underlying mechanisms of the results reported here, in order to draw firmer conclusions on how radio-contamination affects decomposition and associated ecosystem processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of radionuclide contamination on leaf litter decomposition in the Chernobyl exclusion zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonzom, Jean-Marc, E-mail: jean-marc.bonzom@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV/SERIS, Cadarache, Bât. 183, BP 3, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Hättenschwiler, Stephan [Centre d' Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive (CEFE UMR 5175, CNRS–Université de Montpellier–Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier–EPHE), 1919 Route de Mende, F-34293 Montpellier (France); Lecomte-Pradines, Catherine [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV/SERIS, Cadarache, Bât. 183, BP 3, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Chauvet, Eric [EcoLab, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, UPS, INPT, 118 Route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse cedex (France); Gaschak, Sergey [Chernobyl Center for Nuclear Safety, Radioactive Waste and Radioecology, International Radioecology Laboratory, 07100 Slavutych (Ukraine); Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Della-Vedova, Claire; Dubourg, Nicolas [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV/SERIS, Cadarache, Bât. 183, BP 3, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Maksimenko, Andrey [Chernobyl Center for Nuclear Safety, Radioactive Waste and Radioecology, International Radioecology Laboratory, 07100 Slavutych (Ukraine); and others

    2016-08-15

    The effects of radioactive contamination on ecosystem processes such as litter decomposition remain largely unknown. Because radionuclides accumulated in soil and plant biomass can be harmful for organisms, the functioning of ecosystems may be altered by radioactive contamination. Here, we tested the hypothesis that decomposition is impaired by increasing levels of radioactivity in the environment by exposing uncontaminated leaf litter from silver birch and black alder at (i) eleven distant forest sites differing in ambient radiation levels (0.22–15 μGy h{sup −1}) and (ii) along a short distance gradient of radioactive contamination (1.2–29 μGy h{sup −1}) within a single forest in the Chernobyl exclusion zone. In addition to measuring ambient external dose rates, we estimated the average total dose rates (ATDRs) absorbed by decomposers for an accurate estimate of dose-induced ecological consequences of radioactive pollution. Taking into account potential confounding factors (soil pH, moisture, texture, and organic carbon content), the results from the eleven distant forest sites, and from the single forest, showed increased litter mass loss with increasing ATDRs from 0.3 to 150 μGy h{sup −1}. This unexpected result may be due to (i) overcompensation of decomposer organisms exposed to radionuclides leading to a higher decomposer abundance (hormetic effect), and/or (ii) from preferred feeding by decomposers on the uncontaminated leaf litter used for our experiment compared to locally produced, contaminated leaf litter. Our data indicate that radio-contamination of forest ecosystems over more than two decades does not necessarily have detrimental effects on organic matter decay. However, further studies are needed to unravel the underlying mechanisms of the results reported here, in order to draw firmer conclusions on how radio-contamination affects decomposition and associated ecosystem processes. - Highlights: • The effects of radioactivity on

  11. Molecular characteristics of continuously released DOM during one year of root and leaf litter decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Jens; Jansen, Boris; Kalbitz, Karsten; Filley, Timothy

    2013-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is one of the most dynamic carbon pools linking the terrestrial with the aquatic carbon cycle. Besides the insecure contribution of terrestrial DOM to the greenhouse effect, DOM also plays an important role for the mobility and availability of heavy metals and organic pollutants in soils. These processes depend very much on the molecular characteristics of the DOM. Surprisingly the processes that determine the molecular composition of DOM are only poorly understood. DOM can originate from various sources, which influence its molecular composition. It has been recognized that DOM formation is not a static process and DOM characteristics vary not only between different carbon sources. However, molecular characteristics of DOM extracts have scarcely been studied continuously over a longer period of time. Due to constant molecular changes of the parent litter material or soil organic matter during microbial degradation, we assumed that also the molecular characteristics of litter derived DOM varies at different stages during root and needle decomposition. For this study we analyzed the chemical composition of root and leaf samples of 6 temperate tree species during one year of litter decomposition in a laboratory incubation. During this long-term experiment we measured continuously carbon and nitrogen contents of the water extracts and the remaining residues, C mineralization rates, and the chemical composition of water extracts and residues by Curie-point pyrolysis mass spectrometry with TMAH We focused on the following questions: (I) How mobile are molecules derived from plant polymers like tannin, lignin, suberin and cutin? (II) How does the composition of root and leaf derived DOM change over time in dependence on the stage of decomposition and species? Litter derived DOM was generally dominated by aromatic compounds. Substituded fatty acids as typically cutin or suberin derived were not detected in the water extracts. Fresh leaf and

  12. Rice SUB1A constrains remodelling of the transcriptome and metabolome during submergence to facilitate post-submergence recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Anna M; Barding, Gregory A; Sathnur, Sumukh; Larive, Cynthia K; Bailey-Serres, Julia

    2017-11-02

    The rice (Oryza sativa L.) ethylene-responsive transcription factor gene SUB1A-1 confers tolerance to prolonged, complete submergence by limiting underwater elongation growth. Upon desubmergence, SUB1A-1 genotypes rapidly recover photosynthetic function and recommence development towards flowering. The underpinnings of the transition from stress amelioration to the return to homeostasis are not well known. Here, transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses were conducted to identify mechanisms by which SUB1A improves physiological function over the 24 hr following a sublethal submergence event. Evaluation of near-isogenic genotypes after submergence and over a day of reaeration demonstrated that SUB1A transiently constrains the remodelling of cellular activities associated with growth. SUB1A influenced the abundance of ca. 1,400 transcripts and had a continued impact on metabolite content, particularly free amino acids, glucose, and sucrose, throughout the recovery period. SUB1A promoted recovery of metabolic homeostasis but had limited influence on mRNAs associated with growth processes and photosynthesis. The involvement of low energy sensing during submergence and recovery was supported by dynamics in trehalose-6-phosphate and mRNAs encoding key enzymes and signalling proteins, which were modulated by SUB1A. This study provides new evidence of convergent signalling pathways critical to the rapidly reversible management of carbon and nitrogen metabolism in submergence resilient rice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The role of endophytic methane-oxidizing bacteria in submerged Sphagnum in determining methane emissions of Northeastern Siberian tundra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. C. Maximov

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of the microbial processes governing methane emissions from tundra ecosystems is receiving increasing attention. Recently, cooperation between methanotrophic bacteria and submerged Sphagnum was shown to reduce methane emissions but also to supply CO2 for photosynthesis for the plant. Although this process was shown to be important in the laboratory, the differences that exist in methane emissions from inundated vegetation types with or without Sphagnum in the field have not been linked to these bacteria before. In this study, chamber flux measurements, an incubation study and a process model were used to investigate the drivers and controls on the relative difference in methane emissions between a submerged Sphagnum/sedge vegetation type and an inundated sedge vegetation type without Sphagnum. It was found that methane emissions in the Sphagnum-dominated vegetation type were 50 % lower than in the vegetation type without Sphagnum. A model sensitivity analysis showed that these differences could not sufficiently be explained by differences in methane production and plant transport. The model, combined with an incubation study, indicated that methane oxidation by endophytic bacteria, living in cooperation with submerged Sphagnum, plays a significant role in methane cycling at this site. This result is important for spatial upscaling as oxidation by these bacteria is likely involved in 15 % of the net methane emissions at this tundra site. Our findings support the notion that methane-oxidizing bacteria are an important factor in understanding the processes behind methane emissions in tundra.

  14. Fungal contamination of poultry litter: a public health problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, C; Carolino, E; Malta-Vacas, J; Sabino, R; Viegas, S; Veríssimo, C

    2012-01-01

    Although numerous studies have been conducted on microbial contaminants associated with various stages related to poultry and meat products processing, only a few reported on fungal contamination of poultry litter. The goals of this study were to (1) characterize litter fungal contamination and (2) report the incidence of keratinophilic and toxigenic fungi presence. Seven fresh and 14 aged litter samples were collected from 7 poultry farms. In addition, 27 air samples of 25 litters were also collected through impaction method, and after laboratory processing and incubation of collected samples, quantitative colony-forming units (CFU/m³) and qualitative results were obtained. Twelve different fungal species were detected in fresh litter and Penicillium was the most frequent genus found (59.9%), followed by Alternaria (17.8%), Cladosporium (7.1%), and Aspergillus (5.7%). With respect to aged litter, 19 different fungal species were detected, with Penicillium sp. the most frequently isolated (42.3%), followed by Scopulariopsis sp. (38.3%), Trichosporon sp. (8.8%), and Aspergillus sp. (5.5%). A significant positive correlation was found between litter fungal contamination (CFU/g) and air fungal contamination (CFU/m³). Litter fungal quantification and species identification have important implications in the evaluation of potential adverse health risks to exposed workers and animals. Spreading of poultry litter in agricultural fields is a potential public health concern, since keratinophilic (Scopulariopsis and Fusarium genus) as well as toxigenic fungi (Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Penicillium genus) were isolated.

  15. Competence of Litter Ants for Rapid Biodiversity Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. Saumya E. Silva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid Biodiversity Assessment approaches associated with focusing taxa have overcome many of the problems related to large scale surveys. This study examined the suitability of litter ants as a focusing taxon by checking whether diversity and species assemblages of litter ants reflect the overall picture of arthropod diversity and assemblages in leaf litter in two vegetation types: secondary forest and pine plantation in Upper Hanthana forest reserve, Sri Lanka. In each vegetation type, arthropods were sampled using three sampling methods (Winkler extraction, hand collection, and pitfall traps along three 100 m line transects. From the two sites, 1887 litter ants (34 species and 3488 litter arthropods (52 species were collected. Species assemblages composition of both ants and other arthropods differed significantly between the two sites (ANOSIM, p=0.001 with both groups generating distinct clusters for the two sites (SIMPROF, p=0.001. But there was no significant correlation (p>0.05 between abundance and richness of litter ants and those of other arthropods in both vegetation types. The overall finding suggests that the litter ants do not reflect the holistic picture of arthropod diversity and assemblages in leaf litter, but the quality of the habitat for the survival of all litter arthropods.

  16. Change in lignin content during litter decomposition in tropical forest soils (Congo): comparison of exotic plantations and native stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard-Reversat, France; Schwartz, Dominique

    1997-09-01

    Fast-growing tree plantations are being extended in tropical countries resulting in new forest ecosystems, the functioning of which is yet not well known. In particular, few data are available concerning lignin decay rate. Lignin, nitrogen and tannin contents of fresh and decaying litter were measured in natural rain forest and in planted stands of Eucalyptus hybrids. Acacia mangium and A. auriculiformisin Congo, together with litter-fall and forest-floor accumulation. Lignin evolution in aging litter exhibited different patterns. Lignin was accumulated under Eucalyptus plantation, but disappeared under natural forest, and was intermediate under Acaciaplantations. The relationships with decomposition rates and lignin degradation factors, such as white rot fungi and termites, are also discussed.

  17. Arsenic species in broiler (Gallus gallus domesticus) litter, soils, maize (Zea mays L.), and groundwater from litter-amended fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Elisa; Zeigler, Georgia; Beck, E Glenn; Grove, John; Sikora, Frank

    2012-11-01

    Manure and bedding material (litter) generated by the broiler industry (Gallus gallus domesticus) often contain high levels of arsenic (As) when organoarsenical roxarsone and p-arsanilic acid are included in feed to combat disease and improve weight gain of the birds. This study was conducted to determine As levels and species in litter from three major broiler producing companies, and As levels in soils, corn tissue (Zea mays L.), and groundwater in fields where litter was applied. Total As in litter from the three different integrators ranged between precipitation of arsenate in Fe- and Al-rich soils. Ecological impacts of amending soils with As-laden litter depend on the As species in the litter, and chemical and physical properties of soil that strongly affect As mobility and bioavailability in the environment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Peculiarities of thermal dissociation of oxides during submerged arc welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid Zhdanov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A method of settlement of the process of thermal dissociation of oxides in reaction zone during the submerged arc welding and welding deposition is presented. Combined non-linear equations for definition of gas-vapour mixture composition were developed. They describe the dissociation of MeO, MeO2 and Me2O3 types of oxides. Calculations of the processes of oxide dissociation were performed for the oxides that are commonly included into welding fluxes. Their results and analysis are presented. The method proposed appeared to be adequate and applicable for analysis of processes during submerged arc operation that run in the gas phase.

  19. Short communication: A laboratory study to validate the impact of the addition of Alnus nepalensis leaf litter on carbon and nutrients mineralization in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAURAV MISHRA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Mishra G, Giri K, Dutta A, Hazarika S and Borgohain P. 2015. A laboratory study to validate the impact of the addition of Alnus nepalensis leaf litter on carbon and nutrients mineralization in soil. Nusantara Bioscience 8: 5-7. Plant litter or residues can be used as soil amendment to maintain the carbon stock and soil fertility. The amount and rate of mineralization depends on biochemical composition of plant litter. Alnus nepalensis (Alder is known for its symbiotic nitrogen fixation and capability to restore fertility of degraded lands. A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted for 60 days under controlled conditions to validate the carbon and nutrients mineralization potential of alder litter. Soil fertility indicators, i.e. soil organic carbon (SOC, available nitrogen (N, available phosphorus (P, and available potassium (K were analyzed using standard procedures. Significant differences were observed in the soil properties after addition of litter. Nutrient composition of alder litter was found superior by providing significantly higher organic matter and helped in better nutrient cycling. Therefore, alder based land use system may be replicated in other degraded lands or areas for productivity enhancement which is important for sustaining biodiversity and soil fertility.

  20. EAARL-B Submerged Topography—Saint Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A submerged topography digital elevation model (DEM) mosaic for a portion of the submerged environs of Saint Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands, was produced from remotely...

  1. EAARL-B Submerged Topography--Saint Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A submerged topography Digital Elevation Model (DEM) mosaic for a portion of the submerged environs of Saint Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, was produced from remotely...

  2. Long-term allelopathic control of phytoplankton by the submerged macrophyte Elodea nuttallii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderstukken, M.; Declerck, S.A.J.; Decaestecker, E.; Muylaert, K.

    2014-01-01

    Keywords: allelochemicals; chemical ecology; competition; nutrient limitation; shallow lakes Summary 1.It is well known that submerged macrophytes can suppress phytoplankton blooms in lakes and thus promote water quality and biodiversity. One of the possible mechanisms through which submerged

  3. Invasive Crayfish Threaten the Development of Submerged Macrophytes in Lake Restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, van der J.E.M.; Dorenbosch, M.; Immers, A.K.; Vidal Forteza, C.; Geurts Van Kessel, J.M.M.; Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Koese, B.; Bakker, E.S.

    2013-01-01

    Submerged macrophytes enhance water transparency and aquatic biodiversity in shallow water ecosystems. Therefore, the return of submerged macrophytes is the target of many lake restoration projects. However, at present, north-western European aquatic ecosystems are increasingly invaded by omnivorous

  4. Invasive crayfish threaten the development of submerged macrophytes in lake restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wal, J.E.M.; Dorenbosch, M.; Immers, A.; Vidal Forteza, C.; Geurts, J.J.M.; Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Koese, B.; Bakker, E.S.

    2013-01-01

    Submerged macrophytes enhance water transparency and aquatic biodiversity in shallow water ecosystems. Therefore, the return of submerged macrophytes is the target of many lake restoration projects. However, at present, north-western European aquatic ecosystems are increasingly invaded by omnivorous

  5. Efficacy of Activated Carbon from Broiler Litter in the Removal of Litter Generated Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over the past 10 years, the production of broilers has increased by 29 percent to approximately 9 billion in 2005. Ammonia (NH3) pollution from broiler excreta is a primary concern for industry viability which requires innovative treatment options. This research focused on the use of broiler litter ...

  6. Weaning and separation stress: maternal motivation decreases with litter age and litter size in farmed mink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmkvist, Jens; Sørensen, Dennis Dam; Larsen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    .01), indicative of dam hunger/metabolic burden in the preceding period. We found no signs of nipple/inflammation problems, evaluated visually and by Infrared Thermography (IRT) measuring surface temperatures of active teats.Dams separated at litter age 7 weeks had higher concentrations of cortisol metabolites...

  7. Weaning and separation stress: maternal motivation decreases with litter age and litter size in farmed mink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmkvist, Jens; Sørensen, Dennis Dam; Larsen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    and maternal motivation around the time of weaning and separation. Therefore, we investigated effects of separating the dam from the litter using brown first-parity farm mink dams (n = 374) taken away from the litter either day 49 ± 1 (7w, n = 185) or day 56 ± 1 (8w, n = 189) after birth. The aim...... was to investigate whether the dams experienced stress/had a different motivation to be reunited with the litter after7 and 8 weeks, estimated by non-invasive determination of cortisol (FCM: Faecal Cortisol Metabolites)and dam behaviour including calls the first week after separation (D0: Day of removal, D1: next...... day,D7: seven days after). Supplementary, we evaluated dam body condition (weight, score), nipple activity and health at separation. The two treatment groups had an equal litter size at the time of separation(7w: 5.5 ± 0.17; 8 w: 5.5 ± 0.17 kits; P = 0.76). Likewise, there was no significant...

  8. Effect of Quail Litter Biochar on Productivity of Four New Physic Nut Varieties Planted in Cadmium-Contaminated Soil Efecto del Biocarbón de Cama de Codorniz en la Productividad de Cuatro Variedades Nuevas de Jatrofa Plantadas en Suelo Contaminado con Cadmio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawadchai Suppadit

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Biochar can improve soil structure and water retention, enhance nutrient availability and retention, ameliorate acidity, and reduce heavy metal toxicity to plant roots. In this study, a basin experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of quail litter biochar (QLB on the availability of Cd to physic nut (Jatropha curcas L. plants. QLB was applied to the soil in which four new physic nut varieties (Takfa, Doi Saket, Lao, and Rayong in factorial combinations at four levels (0, 5, 10, and 15 g kg-1 soil to soil that contained 60.8 mg Cd kg-1. After transplanting plant height and canopy radius were measured every 2-mo and the number of leaves and branches at 6-mo, while yield components and Cd residues were measured at 8-mo intervals. The contaminated soil was analyzed for chemical characteristics, nutrients, and Cd residue after the plant harvest. The addition of QLB to soil caused a significant increase in the soil's growth potential and physic nut yield components (P Se ha visto que el biocarbón mejora la estructura del suelo y la retención de agua, mejora la disponibilidad y la retención de nutrientes, controla la acidez y reduce la toxicidad de metales pesados en las raíces de las plantas. En este trabajo se investiga el uso de biocarbón de cama de codorniz (QLB en la disponibilidad de Cd para la planta de jatrofa (Jatropha curcas L. en un estudio de laboratorio. Se realiza una combinación factorial con cuatro variedades nuevas de jatrofa (Takfa, Doi Saket, Lao y Rayong sobre cuatro proporciones de QLB a 0, 5, 10, y 15 g kg-1 añadidos por separado a suelo contaminado con 60,8 mg Cd kg-1. Tras el trasplante se midió la altura de la planta y la cubierta vegetal cada 2 meses, el número de hojas y ramas a los 6 meses y los parámetros de rendimiento así como el residuo de Cd a los 8 meses. A continuación, tras la cosecha de la planta, se analizaron las características químicas, nutrientes y residuo de Cd en el suelo contaminado

  9. Earthworms and litter management contributions to ecosystem services in a tropical agroforestry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonte, Steven J; Six, Johan

    2010-06-01

    The development of sustainable agricultural systems depends in part upon improved management of non-crop species to enhance the overall functioning and provision of services by agroecosystems. To address this need, our research examined the role of earthworms and litter management on nutrient dynamics, soil organic matter (SOM) stabilization, and crop growth in the Quesungual agroforestry system of western Honduras. Field mesocosms were established with two earthworm treatments (0 vs. 8 Pontoscolex corethrurus individuals per mesocosm) and four litter quality treatments: (1) low-quality Zea mays, (2) high-quality Diphysa robinioides, (3) a mixture of low- and high-quality litters, and (4) a control with no organic residues applied. Mesocosms included a single Z. mays plant and additions of 15N-labeled inorganic nitrogen. At maize harvest, surface soils (0-15 cm) in the mesocosms were sampled to determine total and available P as well as the distribution of C, N, and 15N among different aggregate-associated SOM pools. Maize plants were divided into grain and non-grain components and analyzed for total P, N, and 15N. Earthworm additions improved soil structure as demonstrated by a 10% increase in mean weight diameter and higher C and N storage within large macro-aggregates (>2000 microm). A corresponding 17% increase in C contained in micro-aggregates within the macro-aggregates indicates that earthworms enhance the stabilization of SOM in these soils; however, this effect only occurred when organic residues were applied. Earthworms also decreased available P and total soil P, indicating that earthworms may facilitate the loss of labile P added to this system. Earthworms decreased the recovery of fertilizer-derived N in the soil but increased the uptake of 15N by maize by 7%. Litter treatments yielded minimal effects on soil properties and plant growth. Our results indicate that the application of litter inputs and proper management of earthworm populations can have

  10. Links between plant and fungal diversity in habitat fragments of coastal shrubland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltz, Mia R; Treseder, Kathleen K; McGuire, Krista L

    2017-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation is widespread across ecosystems, detrimentally affecting biodiversity. Although most habitat fragmentation studies have been conducted on macroscopic organisms, microbial communities and fungal processes may also be threatened by fragmentation. This study investigated whether fragmentation, and the effects of fragmentation on plants, altered fungal diversity and function within a fragmented shrubland in southern California. Using fluorimetric techniques, we assayed enzymes from plant litter collected from fragments of varying sizes to investigate enzymatic responses to fragmentation. To isolate the effects of plant richness from those of fragment size on fungi, we deployed litter bags containing different levels of plant litter diversity into the largest fragment and incubated in the field for one year. Following field incubation, we determined litter mass loss and conducted molecular analyses of fungal communities. We found that leaf-litter enzyme activity declined in smaller habitat fragments with less diverse vegetation. Moreover, we detected greater litter mass loss in litter bags containing more diverse plant litter. Additionally, bags with greater plant litter diversity harbored greater numbers of fungal taxa. These findings suggest that both plant litter resources and fungal function may be affected by habitat fragmentation's constraints on plants, possibly because plant species differ chemically, and may thus decompose at different rates. Diverse plant assemblages may produce a greater variety of litter resources and provide more ecological niche space, which may support greater numbers of fungal taxa. Thus, reduced plant diversity may constrain both fungal taxa richness and decomposition in fragmented coastal shrublands. Altogether, our findings provide evidence that even fungi may be affected by human-driven habitat fragmentation via direct effects of fragmentation on plants. Our findings underscore the importance of restoring

  11. Links between plant and fungal diversity in habitat fragments of coastal shrubland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia R Maltz

    Full Text Available Habitat fragmentation is widespread across ecosystems, detrimentally affecting biodiversity. Although most habitat fragmentation studies have been conducted on macroscopic organisms, microbial communities and fungal processes may also be threatened by fragmentation. This study investigated whether fragmentation, and the effects of fragmentation on plants, altered fungal diversity and function within a fragmented shrubland in southern California. Using fluorimetric techniques, we assayed enzymes from plant litter collected from fragments of varying sizes to investigate enzymatic responses to fragmentation. To isolate the effects of plant richness from those of fragment size on fungi, we deployed litter bags containing different levels of plant litter diversity into the largest fragment and incubated in the field for one year. Following field incubation, we determined litter mass loss and conducted molecular analyses of fungal communities. We found that leaf-litter enzyme activity declined in smaller habitat fragments with less diverse vegetation. Moreover, we detected greater litter mass loss in litter bags containing more diverse plant litter. Additionally, bags with greater plant litter diversity harbored greater numbers of fungal taxa. These findings suggest that both plant litter resources and fungal function may be affected by habitat fragmentation's constraints on plants, possibly because plant species differ chemically, and may thus decompose at different rates. Diverse plant assemblages may produce a greater variety of litter resources and provide more ecological niche space, which may support greater numbers of fungal taxa. Thus, reduced plant diversity may constrain both fungal taxa richness and decomposition in fragmented coastal shrublands. Altogether, our findings provide evidence that even fungi may be affected by human-driven habitat fragmentation via direct effects of fragmentation on plants. Our findings underscore the importance

  12. Hydrogen mitigation in submerged arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimowicz, Steven

    With the role of hydrogen in weld metal well understood in its relation to cold cracking, there has been a push to produce welds with lower and lower diffusible hydrogen contents. The push for lower diffusible hydrogen contents has placed pressure on consumables manufactures to create consumables that can achieve the requirements for lower diffusible hydrogen content. Currently EM12K flux is produced so that it can achieve below 4 ml of diffusible hydrogen for every 100g of weld metal deposited (ml/100g) for submerged arc welding (SAW). The recent trend for industry is to preferentially achieve diffusible hydrogen contents below 3 ml/100g. Making it necessary to find a way to modify the flux to achieve a lower diffusible hydrogen content for the welds it produces. To achieve this goal a two phase plan was developed. The first phase was to characterize the entire welding system for hydrogen. Since the goal of the project is hydrogen mitigation, any amount of hydrogen that could be reduced is helpful and therefore must first be discovered. Sources of hydrogen may be found by analyzing the welding wire and base metal, as well as breaking the flux down into its components and production steps. The wire was analyzed for total hydrogen content as was the base metal. The flux and its components were analyzed using differential thermal analysis-simultaneous thermal analysis (DTA-STA) and later vacuum degassing for moisture content. The analysis of the wire showed that the copper coating on the wire was the largest contributor of hydrogen. There was lubricant present on the wire surface as well, but it did not contribute as much as the copper coating. It was found that a simple low temperature baking of the wire was enough to remove the lubricant and coating moisture. The base metal was found to have a similar total hydrogen content to that of the wire. The breakdown of the flux and production process for moisture content analysis revealed that the production process

  13. Will transgenic plants adversely affect the environment?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Bt pollen (0%). Mortality at 120 ..... leaf beetles and potato leafhoppers showed preferences for certain soybean varieties. but these effects ..... organisms involved in plant health, litter decomposition and nutrient cycling. The potential impacts of ...

  14. Nitrogen additions affect litter quality and soil biochemical properties in a peatland of Northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yanyu; Song, Changchun; Meng, Henan; Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Wang, Xianwei; Tan, Wenwen

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is a limiting nutrient in many peatland ecosystems. Enhanced N deposition, a major component of global climate change, affects ecosystem carbon (C) balance and alters soil C storage by changing plant and soil properties. However, the effects of enhanced N deposition on peatland ecosystems are poorly understood. We conducted a two-year N additions field experiment in a peatland dominated by Eriophorum vaginatum in the Da Xing’an Mountains, Northeast China. Four levels of N treatments were applied: (1) CK (no N added), (2) N1 (6 g N m−2 yr−1), (3) N2 (12 g N m−2 yr−1), and (4) N3 (24 g N m−2  yr−1). Plant and soil material was harvested at the end of the second growing season. N additions increased litter N and phosphorus (P) content, as well as β-glucosidase, invertase, and acid-phosphatase activity, but decreased litter C:N and C:P ratios. Litter carbon content remained unchanged. N additions increased available NH4+–N and NO3−–N as well as total Gram-positive (Gram+), Gram-negative (Gram−), and total bacterial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) in shallow soil (0–15 cm depth). An increase in these PLFAs was accompanied by a decrease in soil labile organic C (microbial biomass carbon and dissolved organic carbon), and appeared to accelerate decomposition and reduce the stability of the soil C pool. Invertase and urease activity in shallow soils and acid-phosphatase activity in deep soils (15–30 cm depth) was inhibited by N additions. Together, these findings suggest that an increase in N deposition in peatlands could accelerate litter decomposition and the loss of labile C, as well as alter microbial biomass and function.

  15. Effect of chlorsulfuron on growth of submerged aquatic macrophyte Potamogeton pectinatus (sago pondweed).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyner, A; Gupta, G; Jones, T

    2001-01-01

    Research has been conducted on the effect of chlorsulfuron on non-target plants but little information is available on its effects on aquatic macrophytes. Potamogeton pectinatus (sago pondweed) is an ecologically important submerged aquatic macrophyte found in freshwater bodies. Many species of wildlife use this plant as a food source. The objective of this study was to measure the phytotoxic effects of chlorsulfuron on sago pondweed. P. pectinatus plants were exposed to chlorsulfuron at 0, 0.25, 0.50, 1.0, or 2.0 ppb, in an environmental growth chamber. Plants exposed to 0.25 ppb chlorsulfuron showed a reduction in length (76%), number of leaves (50%), and number of stems (50%), compared to control plants. A reduction (47%) was also observed in the length of stems produced by plants treated with > or = 0.50 ppb chlorsulfuron. Significant reductions in wet and dry weights, and increased mortality were observed on treatments with > or = 1.0 ppb chlorsulfuron.

  16. Water depth affects reproductive allocation and reproductive allometry in the submerged macrophyte Vallisneria natans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Bonser, Stephen P; Lan, Zhichun; Xu, Ligang; Chen, Jiakuan; Song, Zhiping

    2017-12-04

    In freshwater ecosystems, shifts in hydrological regimes have profound effects on reproductive output (R), along with vegetative biomass (V) and survival of plants. Because reproductive allocation (RA) is allometric, it remains unclear whether the observed variation of RA in response to water level variability is due to fixed patterns of development or plasticity in the developmental trajectories. Here, we investigated shifts in RA of a submerged macrophyte Vallisneria natans in response to water depth to test the hypothesis that allometric trajectories of RA are highly plastic. Plants were grown at three water depths (50, 100 and 150 cm) and measured after 26 weeks of growth. The relationships between R and V among treatments were compared. Deep water affected both biomass and number of fruits produced per plant, leading to less sexual reproduction. Plants in deep water started flowering at a smaller size and despite their small mature size, had a relatively high RA. Furthermore, these plants had a much lower log R-log V relationship than shallow- or intermediate-water plants. In conclusion, reproduction of V. natans is highly variable across water depth treatments, and variations in reproductive allometry represent different strategies under an important stress gradient for these freshwater angiosperms.

  17. Marine Litter, Eutrophication and Noise Assessment Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazov, Atanas; Velcheva, Maya; Milkova, Tanya; Slabakova, Violeta; Marinova, Veselka

    2017-04-01

    MARLEN - Marine Litter, Eutrophication and Noise Assessment Tools is a project under the Programme BG02.03: Increased capacity for assessing and predicting environmental status in marine and inland waters, managed by Bulgarian Ministry of environment and waters and co-financed by the Financial Mechanism of the European Economic Area (EEA FM) 2009 - 2014. Project Beneficiary is the Institute of oceanology - Bulgarian Academy of Sciences with two partners: Burgas municipality and Bulgarian Black Sea Basin Directorate. Initial assessment of ecological state of Bulgarian marine waters showed lack of data for some descriptors of MSFD. The main goal of MARLEN is to build up tools for assessment of marine environment by implementing new technologies and best practices for addressing three main areas of interest with lack of marine data in particular: a) Marine litter detection and classification in coastal areas; b) Regular near real time surface water eutrophication monitoring on large aquatory; c) Underwater noise monitoring. Developed tools are an important source of real time, near real time and delay mode marine data for Bulgarian Black Sea waters. The partnership within the project increased capacity for environmental assessments and training of personnel and enhances collaboration between scientific institutes, regional and local authorities. Project results supported implementation of MSFD in Bulgarian marine waters for the benefit of coastal population, marine industry, tourism, marine research and marine spatial planning.

  18. Genetic parameters for within-litter variation in piglet birth weight and change in within-litter variation during suckling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damgaard, L H; Rydhmer, L; Løvendahl, P; Grandinson, K

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain whether maternal additive genetic variance exists for within-litter variation in birth weight and for change in within-litter variation in piglet weight during suckling. A further objective was to estimate maternal genetic correlations of these two traits with mortality, birth weight, growth, and number of piglets born alive. Data were obtained from Lövsta research station, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, and included 22,521 piglets born in 2,003 litters by 1,074 Swedish Yorkshire sows. No cross fostering was used in the herd. The following seven traits were analysed in a multivariate animal (sow) model: number of piglets born alive, within-litter SD in birth weight, within-litter SD in piglet weight at 3 wk of age, mean weight at birth, mean weight at 3 wk of age, proportion of stillborn piglets, and proportion of dead piglets during suckling. Maternal genetic variance for the change in within-litter SD in piglet weight during suckling was assessed from the estimated additive genetic covariance components by conditioning on within-litter SD in birth weight. Similarly, mean growth of piglets during suckling was assessed from the additive genetic covariance components by conditioning on mean weight at birth. The heritability for within-litter SD in birth weight was 0.08 and 0.06 for within-litter SD in piglet weight at 3 wk. The genetic correlation between these two traits was 0.71. Little maternal genetic variance was found for the change in within-litter SD in piglet weight during suckling, and opportunity for genetic improvement of this trait by selective breeding seems limited. The genetic correlation of within-litter SD in birth weight with proportion of dead piglets during suckling was 0.25 and of within-litter SD in birth weight with mean growth of piglets was -0.31. The maternal genetic variance and heritability found for within-litter SD in birth weight indicates that genetic improvement of this

  19. Proposed gas generation assembly would recover deeply submerged objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, C. W.

    1968-01-01

    Gas generation system, used for recovery of submerged objects, generates hydrogen gas by the reaction of sodium with sea water. The assembly consists of flooded flotation tanks cabled together, equipped with relief valves to equalize pressure as the array ascends and hydrostatic pressure diminishes, and carrying remotely activated welding units.

  20. Implementation of Submerged Arc Welding Training. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowick, Earl; Todd, John

    A unit on submerged arc welding (SAW) was developed and integrated into the welding program at Seattle Central Community College (Washington) during the period December 1983 through May 1984. During this time, 10 major users of SAW in the area were contacted and mailed questionnaires. Follow up consisted of telephone calls and personal contact as…

  1. Benthic Bacterial Diversity in Submerged Sinkhole Ecosystems▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nold, Stephen C.; Pangborn, Joseph B.; Zajack, Heidi A.; Kendall, Scott T.; Rediske, Richard R.; Biddanda, Bopaiah A.

    2010-01-01

    Physicochemical characterization, automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) community profiling, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing approaches were used to study bacterial communities inhabiting submerged Lake Huron sinkholes inundated with hypoxic, sulfate-rich groundwater. Photosynthetic cyanobacterial mats on the sediment surface were dominated by Phormidium autumnale, while deeper, organically rich sediments contained diverse and active bacterial communities. PMID:19880643

  2. Effects of submerged and anaerobic fermentations on cassava flour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oke Oluwatoyin Victoria

    2015-03-18

    Mar 18, 2015 ... Cassava tubers for processing into cassava flour, Lafun a Nigerian locally fermented product was subjected to two different types of fermentations: submerged and anaerobic fermentation for 72 h. Physicochemical changes that occurred during fermentation and their influence on the functional, rheological ...

  3. Surface Intermediate Zone of Submerged Turbulent Buoyant Jet in Current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, H. B.; Larsen, Torben

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with the intermediate zone between the jet and plume stages of a submerged buoyant discharge from sea outfall in current. The stability criteria, plume width and height after the intermediate zone and the dilution within the intermediate region have been studied theoretically and...

  4. Effects of prolonged elevated water salinity on submerged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    environmental change, global warming. * To whom all correspondence should be addressed. e-mail: ian.russell@sanparks.org. Received 9 March 2017; accepted in revised form 10 October 2017. INTRODUCTION. Estuarine submerged macrophyte communities can be highly variable at both spatial and temporal scales, ...

  5. Protein enrichment of cassava peel by submerged fermentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2010-01-11

    Jan 11, 2010 ... Key words: Cassava peel, Trichoderma viride, enzyme, submerged fermentation, protein, amino acids. INTRODUCTION. Protein-energy malnutrition remains a major public health problem in many developing countries and there is the need to increase daily intake of protein, especially animal protein, using ...

  6. Relationships between the biomass of waterfowl and submerged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Wilderness Lakes system, comprising three estuarine lakes (Eilandvlei, Langvlei and Rondevlei), supports a diverse waterbird community, which includes 12 duck species and the abundant Red-knobbed Coot Fulica cristata. Biannual counts of waterfowl (ducks and Red-knobbed Coot) and assessments of submerged ...

  7. Protein enrichment of cassava peel by submerged fermentation with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Protein enrichment of cassava peel by submerged fermentation with Trichoderma viride (ATCC 36316). OO Ezekiel, OC Aworh, HP Blaschek, TC Ezeji. Abstract. Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) peel is one of the solid wastes produced as a consequence of cassava processing. It is low in protein but contains a large ...

  8. Nitrification in a submerged attached growth bioreactor using Luffa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A laboratory-scale submerged attached growth bioreactor using Luffa cylindrica as support material for the immobilization of nitrifying bacteria was applied for polishing the effluent of an UASB reactor treating domestic wastewater under the tropical conditions of northeast Brazil, in the City of Campina Grande (7o 13' 11” ...

  9. Effects of submerged vegetation on water clarity across climates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosten, S.; Lacerot, G.; Jeppesen, E.; Motta Marques, D.M.L.; Nes, van E.H.; Mazzeo, N.; Scheffer, M.

    2009-01-01

    A positive feedback between submerged vegetation and water clarity forms the backbone of the alternative state theory in shallow lakes. The water clearing effect of aquatic vegetation may be caused by different physical, chemical, and biological mechanisms and has been studied mainly in temperate

  10. Influence of Covering Reused Broiler Litter with Plastic Canvas on Litter Characteristics and Bacteriology and the Subsequent Immunity and Microbiology of Broilers

    OpenAIRE

    Mesa, D; Lourenço, M; Souza, A; Bueno, A; Pereira, A; Sfeir, M; Santin, E

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In broiler production, the litter is reused for consecutives flocks, and it is treated during down time between flocks to reduce its microbial load. Although covering the litter with a plastic canvas is a common litter treatment in the field, there is little scientific information available on its efficacy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of covering broiler litter with a plastic canvas for eight days on litter microbiological, physical, and chemical parameters, and...

  11. Characterization of Forest Structure and an Assessment of Litter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nafiisah

    Many studies have cited mangroves as being among the most productive ecosystems of the world in terms of gross primary productivity and litter turnover, which forms a major food source for most estuarine animals. The present study aimed at characterizing the forest structure and assessing litter production, accumulation ...

  12. Radiation effects on moisture variation in ponderosa pine litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clive M. Countryman

    1977-01-01

    This exploratory study indicated that considerable variation in the moisture content of litter can occur within short horizontal distances. The variations ere found to be caused primarily by differences in the amount of solar radiation received by the litter and in the degree of cooling by radiation at night. Because actual fuel moisture lags behind equilibrium...

  13. Influence of breed and environmental factors on litter parameters of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of breed and environmental factors such as season, temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours and wind speed on litter parameters of rabbits raised in a semi-humid environment was investigated using two hundred and twenty four (224) litter records collected between 1991 and 1997. New Zealand White ...

  14. Influence of Tree Characters and Climate on Litter Characteristics in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Litter production and decomposition rates have great importance in maintaining the fertility of the soil. The study was carried out to determine the relationship tree characters (girth size, canopy radius, tree height, leaf area and number of primary branches), litter production and quality, and climatic variables among stands of ...

  15. The emission of volatile compounds from leaf litter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derendorp, L.

    2012-01-01

    Leaf litter is available at the Earth’s surface in large quantities. During the decomposition of leaf litter, volatile compounds can be released into the atmosphere, where they potentially influence local air quality, atmospheric chemistry or the global climate. In this thesis the focus was on the

  16. Specific leaf area predicts dryland litter decomposition via two mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Guofang; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Li; Pan, Xu; Huang, Zhenying; Dong, Ming; Cornelissen, Johannes H.C.

    2018-01-01

    Litter decomposition plays important roles in carbon and nutrient cycling. In dryland, both microbial decomposition and abiotic degradation (by UV light or other forces) drive variation in decomposition rates, but whether and how litter traits and position determine the balance between these

  17. Influence of soil organisms on accuracy predicting leaf litter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To use Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) in the study of litter decomposition in field conditions, it's essential to know the relative role of different environmental factors that may affect its accuracy. This study attempts to determine the effects of soil organisms on direct predicting by NIRS, the stage of litter decomposition, ...

  18. Decomposition of Cassava and Vegetable Cowpea leaf litters under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two related studies using three leaf residue types' cassava and vegetable cowpea leaves were carried out in the field and under controlled laboratory conditions to determine the rate of their decomposition using litter bag technique. The carbon dioxide evolution by the three leaf residues namely, Oven dry leaf litter, fresh ...

  19. Use of natural zeolite-supplemented litter increased broiler production

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the influence of natural zeolite, consisting mainly of clinoptilolite and mordenite, as a component of the litter material in broiler houses on the performance of the broilers and on some litter characteristics. Live weight gain, feed consumption, feed efficiency, viability and leg and body ...

  20. Use of natural zeolite-supplemented litter increased broiler production

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    smyo

    Abstract. The aim of this study was to ascertain the influence of natural zeolite, consisting mainly of clinoptilolite and mordenite, as a component of the litter material in broiler houses on the performance of the broilers and on some litter characteristics. Live weight gain, feed consumption, feed efficiency, viability and leg and ...