WorldWideScience

Sample records for subjects receiving placebo

  1. Safety and tolerability of intravenous regadenoson in healthy subjects: A randomized, repeat-dose, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Robert; Desai, Amit; Rammelsberg, Diane; Kowalski, Donna; Simmons, Neal; Kitt, Therese M

    2017-02-01

    Regadenoson is a selective A 2A adenosine receptor agonist indicated for radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging in patients unable to undergo adequate exercise stress. However, the safety, tolerability, and plasma concentrations associated with repeated doses have not previously been assessed. Healthy males and females were randomized to receive intravenous regadenoson [100 μg (3 doses), 200 μg (3 doses), or 400 μg (2 doses)], or placebo (2 or 3 doses; 0.9% sodium chloride); all doses 10 minutes apart. The primary endpoint was vital sign measurements (blood pressure and heart rate). Secondary endpoints included 12-lead electrocardiogram measurements, clinical laboratory evaluations (hematology, chemistry, and urinalysis), and adverse events. Thirty-six subjects were randomized and completed the study. Plasma concentrations of regadenoson increased in a dose-related manner and with successive doses. No consistent effect was observed for systolic blood pressure, although diastolic blood pressure was slightly lower than placebo for all regadenoson groups. Transient, dose-dependent increases in heart rate were observed in all regadenoson groups. There were no serious adverse events; 27 adverse events occurred in 14 regadenoson-treated subjects vs two events in two placebo-treated subjects. Repeated doses of regadenoson appeared to be safe and well tolerated in healthy subjects.

  2. The Impact of Intraocular Pressure Reduction on Retinal Ganglion Cell Function Measured using Pattern Electroretinogram in Eyes Receiving Latanoprost 0.005% versus Placebo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehi, Mitra; Grewal, Dilraj S.; Feuer, William J.; Greenfield, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the impact of intraocular (IOP) reduction on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) function measured using pattern electroretinogram optimized for glaucoma (PERGLA) in glaucoma suspect and glaucomatous eyes receiving latanoprost 0.005% versus placebo. Methods This was a prospective, placebo-controlled, double masked, crossover clinical trial. One randomly selected eye of each subject meeting eligibility criteria was enrolled. At each visit, subjects underwent five diurnal measurements between 8:00 am and 4:00 pm consisting of Goldmann IOP, and PERGLA measurements. A baseline examination was performed following a four-week washout period, and repeat examination after randomly receiving latanoprost or placebo for four-weeks. Subjects were then crossed over to receive the alternative therapy for four weeks following a second washout period, and underwent repeat examination. Linear mixed-effect models were used for the analysis. Results Sixty-eight eyes (35 glaucoma, 33 glaucoma suspect) of 68 patients (mean age 67.4 ±10.6 years) were enrolled. The mean IOP (mmHg) after latanoprost 0.005% therapy (14.9±3.8) was significantly lower than baseline (18.8±4.7, pradian) using latanoprost (0.49 ± 0.22 and 1.71 ± 0.22, respectively) were similar (p>0.05) to baseline (0.49±0.24 and 1.69±0.19) and placebo (0.50±0.24 and 1.72±0.23). No significant (p>0.05) diurnal variation in PERGLA amplitude was observed at baseline, or using latanoprost or placebo. Treatment with latanoprost, time of day, and IOP were not significantly (p>0.05) associated with PERGLA amplitude or phase. Conclusion Twenty percent IOP reduction using latanoprost monotherapy is not associated with improvement in RGC function measured with PERGLA. PMID:20813123

  3. Chronic administration of apple polyphenols ameliorates hyperglycaemia in high-normal and borderline subjects: A randomised, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Toshihiko; Yamada, Mitsuhiro; Miura, Tomisato; Nagashima, Kazuaki; Ogura, Kasane; Inagaki, Nobuya; Maeda-Yamamoto, Mari

    2017-07-01

    We previously reported that apple polyphenols (AP) and their major active components, procyanidins, had beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis and diabetes in diabetic ob/ob mice. The present study was performed to evaluate the effects of chronic AP administration on glucose tolerance in high-normal and borderline human subjects. Subjects (n=65) with a fasting plasma glucose (FPG) level of 100-125mg/dL determined during a recent health check-up were randomised to receive tablets containing AP (600mg/day) or placebo tablets for 12weeks in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial. The primary outcome was insulin resistance, assessed using a 75g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The 12-week chronic administration of AP significantly reduced the increase in glucose at 30-min post-75g OGTT (OGTT 30-min glucose ) value, compared to the placebo regimen. Furthermore, in a subgroup of the high-normal (FPG value, 100-109mg/dL; 2-h post-75g OGTT glucose (OGTT 2-h glucose ) value, <140mg/dL) and borderline (FPG value, 110-125mg/dL; OGTT 2-h glucose value, <140mg/dL and FPG value, <126mg/dL; OGTT 2-h glucose value, 140-199mg/dL) subjects, OGTT 30-min glucose value in the AP group (164.0±7.4mg/dL) was significantly lower than that of the placebo group (194.7±10.4mg/dL, p<0.05). No significant changes in the other lipid parameters and cytokine levels were observed. Chronic AP administration significantly improved impaired glucose tolerance in high-normal and borderline subjects. Larger and/or longer-term scale human studies are required to confirm the potential glucose homeostasis of AP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Randomized placebo controlled trial of furosemide on subjective perception of dyspnoea in patients with pulmonary oedema because of hypertensive crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer-Richling, Nina; Holzer, Michael; Herkner, Harald; Riedmüller, Eva; Havel, Christof; Kaff, Alfred; Malzer, Reinhard; Schreiber, Wolfgang

    2011-06-01

    To compare the administration of furosemide with placebo on the subjective perception of dyspnoea in patients with acute pulmonary oedema because of hypertensive crisis. Design  Randomized, controlled and double-blinded clinical trial. Municipal emergency medical service system and university-based emergency department. Fifty-nine patients with pulmonary oedema because of hypertensive crisis. Additional to administration of oxygen, morphine-hydrochloride and urapidil until the systolic blood pressure was below 160mmHg, the patients were randomized to receive furosemide 80mg IV bolus (furosemide group) or saline placebo (placebo group). The primary outcome was the subjective perception of dyspnoea as measured with a modified BORG scale at one hour after randomization. Secondary outcome parameters were the subjective perception of dyspnoea of patients as measured with a modified BORG scale and a visual analogue scale at 2, 3 and 6h after randomization of the patient; course of the systolic arterial pressure and peripheral oxygen saturation and lactate at admission and at 6h after admission. In 25 patients in the furosemide group and in 28 patients in the placebo group, a BORG score could be obtained. There was no statistically significant difference in the severity of dyspnoea at one hour after randomization (P=0·40). The median BORG score at 1h after randomization in the furosemide group was 3 (IQR 2 to 4) compared to 3 (IQR 2 to 7) in the placebo group (P=0·40). Those patients who were randomized to the placebo group needed higher doses of urapidil at 20min after randomization. There were no significant differences in the rate of adverse events, nonfatal cardiac arrests or death between the two groups. The subjective perception of dyspnoea in patients with hypertensive pulmonary oedema was not influenced by the application of a loop-diuretic. Therefore, additional furosemide therapy needs to be scrutinized in the therapy of these patients. © 2010 The Authors

  5. Pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of AMG 531, a thrombopoiesis-stimulating peptibody, in healthy Japanese subjects: a randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Yuji; Fujita, Tomoe; Ozaki, Machiko; Sahashi, Kunihiko; Ohkura, Masayuki; Ohtsu, Tomoko; Arai, Yoshihiro; Sonehara, Yusuke; Nichol, Janet L

    2007-12-01

    AMG 531 is a novel thrombopoiesis-stimulating peptibody being investigated for the treatment of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura. This double-blind, phase I study evaluated the safety, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics of AMG 531 in healthy Japanese men. Thirty subjects were randomly assigned 4:1 (AMG 531/placebo) to receive 1 dose of AMG 531 (0.3, 1, or 2 microg/kg) or placebo by subcutaneous injection; subjects were evaluated for 6 weeks. AMG 531 was generally well tolerated, with adverse events similar to placebo. Treatment-related adverse events (headache, "feeling hot," malaise) were reported for 5 of 24 AMG 531-treated subjects. Platelets generated after exposure to AMG 531 functioned normally. Four of 8 subjects receiving 1 microg/kg and 7 of 8 receiving 2 microg/kg had platelet count increases > or =1.5-fold over baseline, an effect similar to that seen in non-Japanese subjects. Serum AMG 531 concentrations were below the lower limit of quantification in all but 2 subjects receiving 2 microg/kg.

  6. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study assessing the safety and tolerability of regadenoson in subjects with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenner, Bruce M; Bukofzer, Stan; Behm, Sarah; Feaheny, Kathleen; McNutt, Bruce E

    2012-08-01

    Adenosine receptor stress agents for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) may cause A(2B) and/or A(3) receptor-mediated bronchoconstriction, of particular concern to physicians testing patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A Phase 4, randomized, double-blind study (NCT00862641) assessed the safety of the selective A(2A) receptor agonist, regadenoson, compared with placebo in subjects with asthma or COPD who represented likely candidates for MPI. Overall, 356 and 176 subjects with asthma and 316 and 151 subjects with COPD received regadenoson and placebo, respectively. The percentage of subjects experiencing a >15% decrease in FEV(1) from baseline to any assessment up to 24 hours post-baseline was not statistically significantly different between the regadenoson and the placebo groups in the asthma or COPD stratum. Dyspnea, the most frequent respiratory adverse event, occurred with higher incidence (P regadenoson group than the placebo group in the asthma (10.7% vs 1.1%) and COPD (18.0% vs 2.6%) strata. No subjects experienced severe bronchoconstriction, although the occurrence of such reactions with adenosine receptor agonists cannot be ruled out, such that caution is advised. This information may be helpful to physicians selecting a pharmacologic stress agent for MPI in patients with asthma or COPD.

  7. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the safety and tolerance of regadenoson in subjects with stage 3 or 4 chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthasubramaniam, Karthik; Weiss, Robert; McNutt, Bruce; Klauke, Barbara; Feaheny, Kathleen; Bukofzer, Stan

    2012-04-01

    The safety and tolerability of regadenoson, a pharmacologic stress agent that is excreted primarily by the kidneys, were examined in subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD). This multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study involved men and women, ≥18 years of age, with stage 3 or 4 [estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) 30-59 mL/minute/1.73 m(2) and 15-29 mL/minute/1.73 m(2), respectively] CKD and known or suspected coronary artery disease. Subjects were randomized 2:1 to receive one 10-second intravenous injection of regadenoson 0.4 mg or placebo. The primary outcome measure was the frequency of serious adverse events over 24-h post-dose. The study included 432 subjects with stage 3 (regadenoson n = 287; placebo n = 145) and 72 with stage 4 (regadenoson n = 47; placebo n = 25) CKD. No serious adverse events or deaths were reported over 24-h post-dose. The overall adverse event incidence was higher with regadenoson than placebo (62.6% vs 21.2%; P regadenoson, headache (24.9% vs 7.1%), dyspnea (19.2% vs 0.6%), chest discomfort (14.7% vs 0.6%), nausea (14.7% vs 1.2%), flushing (12.0% vs 1.8%), and dizziness (9.6% vs 0.6%) occurred significantly more often (P regadenoson than placebo. There were no trends for clinically meaningful changes in eGFR from baseline to 24-h post-dose in subjects with stage 3 or 4 CKD. Regadenoson was not associated with any serious or unexpected adverse events in subjects with stage 3 or 4 CKD.

  8. Small Amounts of Gluten in Subjects With Suspected Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Cross-Over Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sabatino, Antonio; Volta, Umberto; Salvatore, Chiara; Biancheri, Paolo; Caio, Giacomo; De Giorgio, Roberto; Di Stefano, Michele; Corazza, Gino R

    2015-09-01

    There is debate over the existence of nonceliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms in response to ingestion of gluten-containing foods by people without celiac disease or wheat allergy. We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial to determine the effects of administration of low doses of gluten to subjects with suspected NCGS. We enrolled 61 adults without celiac disease or a wheat allergy who believed ingestion of gluten-containing food to be the cause of their intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms. Participants were assigned randomly to groups given either 4.375 g/day gluten or rice starch (placebo) for 1 week, each via gastrosoluble capsules. After a 1-week gluten-free diet, participants crossed over to the other group. The primary outcome was the change in overall (intestinal and extraintestinal) symptoms, determined by established scoring systems, between gluten and placebo intake. A secondary outcome was the change in individual symptom scores between gluten vs placebo. According to the per-protocol analysis of data from the 59 patients who completed the trial, intake of gluten significantly increased overall symptoms compared with placebo (P = .034). Abdominal bloating (P = .040) and pain (P = .047), among the intestinal symptoms, and foggy mind (P = .019), depression (P = .020), and aphthous stomatitis (P = .025), among the extraintestinal symptoms, were significantly more severe when subjects received gluten than placebo. In a cross-over trial of subjects with suspected NCGS, the severity of overall symptoms increased significantly during 1 week of intake of small amounts of gluten, compared with placebo. Clinical trial no: ISRCTN72857280. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A placebo-controlled evaluation of butterbur and fexofenadine on objective and subjective outcomes in perennial allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D K C; Gray, R D; Robb, F M; Fujihara, S; Lipworth, B J

    2004-04-01

    There are presently no placebo-controlled data regarding the effects of butterbur (BB) on subjective and objective outcomes in patients with perennial allergic rhinitis. We performed a placebo-controlled evaluation of the effects of BB and fexofenadine (FEX) on subjective and objective outcomes in patients with perennial allergic rhinitis. Sixteen patients with perennial allergic rhinitis and house dust mite sensitization were randomized in double-blind cross-over fashion to receive for 1 week either BB 50 mg twice daily, FEX 180 mg once daily and placebo (PL) once daily, or PL twice daily. The peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF) response to adenosine monophosphate (AMP) challenge administered as a single 400 mg/mL dose was measured over a 60-min period after challenge, and domiciliary total nasal symptom score was recorded. Pre-challenge values for mean+/-SEM PNIF (L/min) were not significantly different comparing all groups; BB (138+/-8), FEX (140+/-9), and PL (138+/-8). The maximum % PNIF fall from baseline after nasal AMP challenge was significantly attenuated (P<0.05) compared to PL (46+/-3), with BB (34+/-3) and FEX (39+/-3). The area under the 60-min time-response curve (%.min) was also significantly attenuated (P<0.05) compared to PL (1734+/-156), with BB (1052+/-258) and FEX (1194+/-161). There was also a significant reduction (P<0.05) in total nasal symptom score with BB (1.8+/-0.4) and FEX (1.8+/-0.4), compared to PL (2.8+/-0.5). There were no significant differences between BB and FEX for any outcomes. BB and FEX, in comparison to PL, were equally effective in attenuating the nasal response to AMP and in improving nasal symptoms, highlighting a potential role for BB in the treatment of allergic rhinitis.

  10. Objective approach for fending off the sublingual immunotherapy placebo effect in subjects with pollenosis: double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralimarkova, Tanya Z; Popov, Todor A; Staevska, Maria; Mincheva, Roxana; Lazarova, Cvetelina; Racheva, Rumyana; Mustakov, Tihomir B; Filipova, Violina; Koleva, Margarita; Bacheva, Kalina; Dimitrov, Vasil D

    2014-07-01

    Symptom scoring for the assessment of allergen immunotherapy is associated with a substantial placebo effect. To assess the ability of exhaled breath temperature (EBT), a putative marker of airway inflammation, to evaluate objectively the efficacy of grass pollen sublingual immunotherapy in a proof-of-concept study. This was a double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial in 56 subjects (mean ± SD 30 ± 12 years old, 33 men) sensitized to grass pollen. The objective measurements were EBT, spirometry, and periostin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in blood. Overall discomfort scored on a visual analog scale was used as a proxy for subjective symptoms. Evaluations were performed before, during, and after the grass pollen season. Fifty-one subjects (25 and 26 in the active treatment and placebo groups, respectively) were assessed before and during the pollen season. The mean pre- vs in-season increase in EBT was significantly smaller (by 59.1%) in the active treatment than in the placebo group (P = .030). Of the other objective markers, only the blood periostin level increased significantly during the pollen season (P = .047), but without intergroup differences. Subjectively, the mean pre- vs in-season increase in the visual analog scale score was 32.3% smaller in the active treatment than in the placebo group, although this difference did not reach statistical significance (P = .116). These results suggest that the efficacy of grass pollen sublingual immunotherapy can be assessed by EBT, a putative quantitative measurement of airway inflammation, which is superior in its power to discriminate between active and placebo treatment than a subjective assessment of symptoms assessed on a visual analog scale. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01785394. Copyright © 2014 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Diagnostic inaccuracy and subject exclusions render placebo and observational studies of acute otitis media inconclusive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichichero, Michael E; Casey, Janet R

    2008-11-01

    Diagnostic accuracy and appropriate inclusion/exclusion criteria representative of children at greatest risk is of paramount importance in trials to evaluate placebo or observation as an option for acute otitis media (AOM) management. Twelve observational studies spanning the time frame 1958-2005 and 13 natural history studies spanning the time frame 1968-2006 were evaluated for the diagnostic criteria, inclusion criteria, and exclusion criteria applied within the study design. Although a bulging or full tympanic membrane (TM) with effusion is the best indication of a diagnosis of bacterial AOM based on tympanocentesis findings, few observational and natural history studies required a bulging TM. Examination of subject inclusion criteria showed that many subjects did not have AOM but rather had no middle ear disease at all or they had otitis media with effusion. Exclusion criteria of subjects were also remarkable. Frequently children bias in exclusion criteria among placebo/natural history trials in AOM. The current data favoring observation of children with AOM should be reconsidered until better studies are conducted.

  12. Effect of a four-week course of interleukin-10 on cytokine production in a placebo-controlled study of HIV-1-infected subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, Gregory B; Sailer, Carrie A; Porat, Reuven; Peskind, Robert L; Fuchs, Amy C; Angel, Jonathan B; Skolnik, Paul R; Jacobson, Mark A; Giordano, Michael F; Lebeaut, Alexandre; Grint, Paul C; Dinarello, Charles A; Shapiro, Leland

    2007-06-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10 suppresses synthesis of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)alpha, IL-1beta, and interferon (IFN)gamma. Since pro-inflammatory cytokines have been implicated in the production of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), cytokine synthesis in whole blood cultures were determined during a 4-week course of subcutaneous IL-10 injections in 33 HIV-1-infected patients. Patients were randomized into four groups: placebo (nine), IL-10 at 1 microg/kg/day (nine), IL-10 at 4 microg/kg/day (six) and IL-10 at 8 microg/kg three times per week (nine). Whole blood was obtained at the beginning and conclusion of the study and was stimulated for 24 hours with the combination of IL-18 plus lipopolysaccharide. TNFalpha production in stimulated whole blood was reduced three and six hours after the first injection of IL-10 compared to subjects injected with the placebo. After four weeks of treatment, production of IFNgamma was suppressed in a greater number of patients in the IL-10 treatment groups compared to subjects in the placebo group. Similarly, IL-1beta production was lower in the IL-10 treatment groups compared to subjects receiving placebo. In contrast, after four weeks of IL-10, circulating levels of the anti-inflammatory TNF soluble receptor p55 increased dose-dependently compared to placebo subjects. Patient heterogeneity and small sample size presented difficulties in establishing statistical significance. Although the cytokine changes in our study did not demonstrate statistically significant changes, the data nevertheless reveal that four weeks of IL-10 therapy in HIV-1 infected subjects produced the anticipated suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  13. Expectancy, self-efficacy, and placebo effect of a sham supplement for weight loss in obese subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippens, Kimberly M; Purnell, Jonathan Q; Gregory, William L; Connelly, Erin; Hanes, Douglas; Oken, Barry; Calabrese, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the role of expectancy in the placebo effect of a sham dietary supplement for weight loss in 114 obese adults. All participants received lifestyle education and were randomized to one of three conditions: 1) a daily placebo capsule and told that they were taking an active weight loss supplement; 2) daily placebo and told they had a 50% random chance of receiving either the active or placebo; or 3) no capsules. At 12 weeks, weight loss and metabolic outcomes were similar among the three groups. Participants in both groups that took capsules showed decreased weight loss self-efficacy and increased expectations of benefit from dietary supplements. Participants not taking capsules showed the opposite. Adverse events were more frequently reported in groups taking capsules than those who were not. These findings suggest that supplements without weight loss effects may have nocebo effects through diminished self-efficacy. PMID:24695007

  14. Placebo Controlled Trials: Interests of Subjects versus Interests of Drug Regulators

    OpenAIRE

    Sasongko, Teguh Haryo; Othman, Nor Hayati; Hussain, Nik Hazlina Nik; Lee, Yeong Yeh; Abdullah, Sarimah; Husin, Azlan; Van Rostenberghe, Hans

    2017-01-01

    The use of placebo-controlled trials in situations where established therapies are available is considered ethically problematic since the patients randomised to the placebo group are deprived of the beneficial treatment. The pharmaceutical industry and drug regulators seem to argue that placebo-controlled trials with extensive precautions and control measures in place should still be allowed since they provide necessary scientific evidence for the efficacy and safety of new drugs. On the oth...

  15. Subjective Probability of Receiving Harm as a Function of Attraction and Harm Delivered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Barry R.; And Others

    It was hypothesized that subjects who liked a source of potential harm would estimate the probability of receiving harm mediated by him as lower than would subjects who disliked the source. To test the hypothesis, subjects were asked to estimate the probability that a liked or disliked confederate would deliver an electric shock on each of 10…

  16. Prolonged release melatonin for improving sleep in totally blind subjects: a pilot placebo-controlled multicenter trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roth T

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Roth,1 Tali Nir,2 Nava Zisapel2,3 1Henry Ford Sleep Disorders Center, Detroit, MI, USA; 2Neurim Pharmaceuticals Ltd, Tel Aviv, Israel; 3Department of Neurobiology Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel Introduction: Melatonin, secreted by the pineal gland during the night phase, is a regulator of the biological clock and sleep tendency. Totally blind subjects frequently report severe, periodic sleep problems, with 50%–75% of cases displaying non-24-hour sleep–wake disorder (N24HSWD due to inability to synchronize with the environmental day–night cycle. Melatonin immediate-release preparations are reportedly effective in N24HSWD. Here, we studied the efficacy and safety of prolonged-release melatonin (PRM, a registered drug for insomnia, for sleep disorders in totally blind subjects living in normal social environments. The primary endpoint was demonstration of clinically meaningful effects on sleep duration (upper confidence interval [CI] limit >20 minutes whether significant or not to allow early decision-making on further drug development in this indication. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov registry – NCT00972075. Methods: In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled proof-of-principle study, 13 totally blind subjects had 2 weeks' placebo run-in, 6 weeks' randomized (1:1 PRM (Circadin® or placebo nightly, and 2 weeks' placebo run-out. Outcome measures included daily voice recorded sleep diary, Clinical Global Impression of Change (CGIC, WHO-Five Well-being Index (WHO-5, and safety. Results: Mean nightly sleep duration improved by 43 minutes in the PRM and 16 minutes in the placebo group (mean difference: 27 minutes, 95% CI: -14.4 to 69 minutes; P=0.18; effect size: 0.82 meeting the primary endpoint. Mean sleep latency decreased by 29 minutes with PRM over placebo (P=0.13; effect size: 0.92 and nap duration decreased in the PRM but not placebo group. The variability in sleep onset/offset and

  17. Yeast (1,3)-(1,6)-beta-glucan helps to maintain the body?s defence against pathogens: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicentric study in healthy subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Auinger, Annegret; Riede, Linda; Bothe, Gordana; Busch, Regina; Gruenwald, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The effect of brewers? yeast (1,3)-(1,6)-beta-d-glucan consumption on the number of common cold episodes in healthy subject was investigated. Methods In a placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized, multicentric clinical trial, 162 healthy participants with recurring infections received 900?mg of either placebo (n?=?81) or an insoluble yeast (1,3)-(1,6)-beta-d-glucan preparation (n?=?81) per day over a course of 16?weeks. Subjects were instructed to document each occurring common co...

  18. Body fat loss achieved by stimulation of thermogenesis by a combination of bioactive food ingredients: a placebo-controlled, double-blind 8-week intervention in obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belza, A; Frandsen, E; Kondrup, J

    2007-01-01

    A combination of tyrosine, capsaicin, catechines and caffeine may stimulate the sympathetic nervous system and promote satiety, lipolysis and thermogenesis. In addition, dietary calcium may increase fecal fat excretion. To investigate the acute and subchronic effect of a supplement containing the above mentioned agents or placebo taken t.i.d on thermogenesis, body fat loss and fecal fat excretion. In total, 80 overweight-obese subjects ((body mass index) 31.2+/-2.5 kg/m(2), mean+/-s.d.) underwent an initial 4-week hypocaloric diet (3.4 MJ/day). Those who lost>4% body weight were instructed to consume a hypocaloric diet (-1.3 MJ/day) and were randomized to receive either placebo (n=23) or bioactive supplement (n=57) in a double-blind, 8-week intervention. The thermogenic effect of the compound was tested at the first and last day of intervention, and blood pressure, heart rate, body weight and composition were assessed. Weight loss during the induction phase was 6.8+/-1.9 kg. At the first exposure the thermogenic effect of the bioactive supplement exceeded that of placebo by 87.3 kJ/4 h (95%CI: 50.9;123.7, P=0.005) and after 8 weeks this effect was sustained (85.5 kJ/4 h (47.6;123.4), P=0.03). Body fat mass decreased more in the supplement group by 0.9 kg (0.5; 1.3) compared with placebo (P<0.05). The bioactive supplement had no effect on fecal fat excretion, blood pressure or heart rate. The bioactive supplement increased 4-h thermogenesis by 90 kJ more than placebo, and the effect was maintained after 8 weeks and accompanied by a slight reduction in fat mass. These bioactive components may support weight maintenance after a hypocaloric diet.

  19. Yeast (1,3)-(1,6)-beta-glucan helps to maintain the body's defence against pathogens: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicentric study in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auinger, Annegret; Riede, Linda; Bothe, Gordana; Busch, Regina; Gruenwald, Joerg

    2013-12-01

    The effect of brewers' yeast (1,3)-(1,6)-beta-D-glucan consumption on the number of common cold episodes in healthy subject was investigated. In a placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized, multicentric clinical trial, 162 healthy participants with recurring infections received 900 mg of either placebo (n = 81) or an insoluble yeast (1,3)-(1,6)-beta-D-glucan preparation (n = 81) per day over a course of 16 weeks. Subjects were instructed to document each occurring common cold episode in a diary and to rate ten predefined infection symptoms during an infections period, resulting in a symptom score. The subjects were examined by the investigator during the episode visit on the 5th day of each cold episode. In the per protocol population, supplementation with insoluble yeast (1,3)-(1,6)-beta-glucan reduced the number of symptomatic common cold infections by 25% as compared to placebo (p = 0.041). The mean symptom score was 15% lower in the beta-glucan as opposed to the placebo group (p = 0.125). Beta-glucan significantly reduced sleep difficulties caused by cold episode as compared to placebo (p = 0.028). Efficacy of yeast beta-glucan was rated better than the placebo both by physicians (p = 0.004) participants (p = 0.012). The present study demonstrated that yeast beta-glucan preparation increased the body's potential to defend against invading pathogens.

  20. Efficacy of ginger for prophylaxis of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in breast cancer patients receiving adriamycin-cyclophosphamide regimen: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamlikitkul, Lucksamon; Srimuninnimit, Vichien; Akewanlop, Charuwan; Ithimakin, Suthinee; Techawathanawanna, Sirisopa; Korphaisarn, Krittiya; Chantharasamee, Jomjit; Danchaivijitr, Pongwut; Soparattanapaisarn, Nopadol

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the efficacy of ginger for reducing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in breast cancer patients receiving adriamycin and cyclophosphamide (AC) regimens. We enrolled breast cancer patients receiving AC who experienced moderate to severe nausea or vomiting during the first chemotherapy cycle. Subjects were randomized to receive a 500-mg ginger capsule or placebo twice a day for 5 days starting on the first day of the second AC cycle and were switched to the other treatment in the third cycle. All participants also received ondansetron and dexamethasone for CINV prophylaxis. Nausea severity was recorded once a day during the first 5 days of each cycle. The primary outcome was reduction in nausea score. Thirty-four subjects (68 cycles of AC) were enrolled. Mean (range) maximum nausea score in the first AC cycle was 58 (40-90). Thirty-three subjects (97 %) received the same AC doses in the second as in the third cycle. Mean (±standard error) maximum nausea scores in patients receiving ginger and placebo were 35.36 (±4.43) and 32.17 (±3.71), respectively. The difference in mean maximum nausea scores was 3 (95 % confidence interval, -3 to 9; P = 0.3). There were no significant differences between ginger and placebo in terms of vomiting incidence and severity, rescue medication use, chemotherapy compliance, and adverse events. Ginger (500 mg) twice daily was safe, but conferred no additional benefit in terms of reducing nausea severity in breast cancer patients receiving AC and ondansetron and dexamethasone for CINV prophylaxis.

  1. Effects of oral α-lipoic acid administration on body weight in overweight or obese subjects: a crossover randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nong; Yan, Weili; Hu, Xiaojuan; Huang, Yongdi; Wang, Fugang; Zhang, Weiguo; Wang, Qian; Wang, Xiaoling; Sun, Kehong

    2017-05-01

    Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) has shown beneficial properties on diabetes and obesity. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of oral ALA on body weight in subjects with overweight or obese. Single-centre, randomized, double-blind, crossover controlled study. A total of 166 subjects of Chinese Han ethnicity with a BMI ≥25 kg/m2 were screened and 103 subjects fulfilled the study requirements, in terms of informed consent and participation to the study. The subjects were randomized (1:1) to receive either ALA (1200 mg/day) or placebo treatment in a crossover design for 8 weeks. The primary end-point was the change in body weight. The secondary end-points were the changes in waist circumference, BMI, lipid profile, plasma leptin levels and the adverse events that occurred following ALA treatment. The changes in the body weight and waist circumference noted in the ALA group were significantly different compared to the placebo group as demonstrated by mixed model statistical analysis (both P weight reduction was seen in the ALA group, and no significant differences were noted as regards cholesterol levels, triglyceride levels, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and adverse events between the two groups. The administration of ALA was well tolerated, and no serious adverse events were noted. Oral administration of ALA (1200 mg/day) for 8 weeks induced mild weight loss accompanied by a reduction in waist circumference. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. A randomized, crossover, placebo- and moxifloxacin-controlled study to evaluate the effects of bosutinib (SKI-606), a dual Src/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor, on cardiac repolarization in healthy adult subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Richat; Hug, Bruce A; Leister, Cathie; Sonnichsen, Daryl

    2012-08-01

    Effects of therapeutic and supratherapeutic concentrations of bosutinib, a dual Src/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor, on the corrected QT interval (QTc) in 60 healthy adults were assessed, according to ICH-E14 guidelines, in this 2-part, randomized, single-dose, double-blind, crossover, placebo- and open-label moxifloxacin-controlled study. Subjects received placebo, moxifloxacin and bosutinib 500 mg with food (therapeutic) in Part 1. In Part 2, subjects received placebo and bosutinib 500 mg plus ketoconazole (supratherapeutic). ANOVA compared baseline-adjusted QTc for bosutinib with placebo; and bosutinib plus ketoconazole with placebo plus ketoconazole. Primary endpoint was population-specific QT correction (QTcN). Secondary endpoints were Bazett QT correction (QTcB), Fridericia's formula QT correction (QTcF) and individual QT correction (QTcI). Upper bounds for 90% confidence intervals were bosutinib concentrations and QTc. No subjects had QTcB, QTcF, QTcI or QTcN >450 msec or change from baseline >30 msec. In summary, therapeutic and supratherapeutic bosutinib exposures are not associated with QTc prolongation in healthy adults. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  3. Safety and tolerability of intravenous regadenoson in healthy subjects: A randomized, repeat-dose, placebo-controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Townsend, Robert; Desai, Amit; Rammelsberg, Diane; Kowalski, Donna; Simmons, Neal; Kitt, Therese M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Regadenoson is a selective A2A adenosine receptor agonist indicated for radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging in patients unable to undergo adequate exercise stress. However, the safety, tolerability, and plasma concentrations associated with repeated doses have not previously been assessed. Method and Results Healthy males and females were randomized to receive intravenous regadenoson [100??g (3 doses), 200??g (3 doses), or 400??g (2 doses)], or placebo (2 or 3 doses; 0.9% sod...

  4. The effect of cortisol on emotional responses depends on order of cortisol and placebo administration in a within-subjects design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Michelle M.; Scherer, Sean M.; Hoks, Roxanne M.; Abercrombie, Heather C.

    2010-01-01

    Cortisol does not exhibit a straightforward relationship with mood states; administration of glucocorticoids to human subjects has produced mixed effects on mood and emotional processing. In this study, participants (N=46) received intravenous hydrocortisone (synthetic cortisol; 0.1 mg/kg body weight) and placebo in randomized order over two sessions 48 hours apart. Following the infusion, participants rated neutral and unpleasant pictures. In Session 1, participants reported elevated negative affect (NA) following the picture-rating task, regardless of treatment. In Session 2, however, only participants who received cortisol (and thus who had received placebo in Session 1) reported elevated NA. Arousal ratings for unpleasant pictures followed a similar pattern. These findings suggest that the effects of cortisol on emotion vary based on situational factors, such as drug administration order or familiarity with the tasks and setting. Such factors can influence cortisol’s effects on emotion in two ways: A) cortisol may only potentiate NA and arousal ratings in the absence of other, overwhelming influences on affect, such as the novelty of the setting and tasks in Session 1; and B) cortisol in Session 1 may facilitate learning processes (e.g. habituation to the stimuli and setting; extinction of aversive responses) such that emotional responses to the pictures are lessened in Session 2. This interpretation is compatible with a body of literature on the effects of glucocorticoids on learning and memory processes. PMID:21232874

  5. Efficacy and tolerability of Meratrim for weight management: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in healthy overweight human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudiganti, Venkateshwarlu; Kodur, Raveendra Ramamurthy; Kodur, Sushma Raveendra; Halemane, Manjunath; Deep, Dheeraj Kumar

    2016-08-24

    Meratrim is a blend of two plant extracts obtained from Sphaeranthus indicus flower heads and Garcinia mangostana fruit rinds. Previous studies have demonstrated that Meratrim is effective for weight management in obese individuals. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of Meratrim in managing body weight in healthy overweight subjects. Sixty participants with a mean BMI of 28.3 kg/m(2) were randomized into two groups receiving either 400 mg of Meratrim twice daily or two identical placebo capsules for a period of 16 weeks. Subjects were asked to consume about 2,000 kcal/day throughout the study period and walk 5 days a week for 30 min daily. The primary endpoint was defined as the change in body weight from baseline to end of week 16 for the Meratrim group versus placebo. Fifty seven subjects completed the trial. At study conclusion, statistically significant reductions in body weight (5.09 vs. 1.1 kg; p 38 vs. 5.11 cm; p nic.in.

  6. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-response study to assess the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of gabapentin enacarbil in subjects with restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Ritu; Ellenbogen, Aaron; Chen, Dan; Zomorodi, Katie; Atluri, Harisha; Luo, Wendy; Tovera, James; Hurt, Janet; Bonzo, Daniel; Lassauzet, Marie-Liesse; Vu, Amanda; Cundy, Kenneth C

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine steady-state gabapentin exposures and corresponding relief of symptoms and safety profile produced by 4 dose levels of gabapentin enacarbil (GEn) in subjects with restless legs syndrome (RLS). Subjects with RLS (n = 217) were randomized to receive once-daily, orally administered GEn 600 (n = 48), 1200 (n = 45), 1800 (n = 38), or 2400 mg (n = 45) or placebo (n = 41) in this 12-week, double-blind, multicenter study (NCT01332305). Clinic visits were at screening, baseline, and weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12; plasma gabapentin concentrations were measured by a validated liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry method at weeks 4 and 12. Exposure to gabapentin was proportional to GEn dose. Time to maximum plasma concentration was 7 to 9 hours, and elimination half-life was ~6 hours. The mean reduction from baseline to week 12 in International Restless Legs Syndrome Rating Scale total score and proportions of subjects with "much improved"/"very much improved" Clinical Global Impression-Improvement scores (investigator and patient ratings) ranged from -12.9 to -13.9 for GEn treatment groups versus -9.3 for placebo. The 2 most commonly reported adverse events were somnolence and dizziness. Gabapentin exposure was approximately proportional to GEn dose. Efficacy data showed that a once-daily dose of GEn 600 to 2400 mg provides greater relief of RLS symptoms than placebo; GEn was generally well tolerated with an adverse event profile consistent with gabapentin.

  7. Effects of AMG 145 on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels: results from 2 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, ascending-dose phase 1 studies in healthy volunteers and hypercholesterolemic subjects on statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Clapton S; Shaywitz, Adam J; Wasserman, Scott M; Smith, Brian P; Gao, Bing; Stolman, Dina S; Crispino, Caroline P; Smirnakis, Karen V; Emery, Maurice G; Colbert, Alexander; Gibbs, John P; Retter, Marc W; Cooke, Blaire P; Uy, Stephen T; Matson, Mark; Stein, Evan A

    2012-11-06

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and effects of AMG 145 on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in healthy and hypercholesterolemic subjects on statin therapy. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) down-regulates surface expression of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R), increasing serum LDL-C. AMG 145, a fully human monoclonal antibody to PCSK9, prevents PCSK9/LDL-R interaction, restoring LDL-R recycling. Healthy adults (phase 1a) were randomized to 1 dose of AMG 145: 7, 21, 70, 210, or 420 mg SC; 21 or 420 mg IV; or matching placebo. Hypercholesterolemic adults (phase 1b) receiving low- to moderate-dose statins were randomized to multiple SC doses of AMG 145: 14 or 35 mg once weekly (QW) ×6, 140 or 280 mg every 2 weeks (Q2W) ×3, 420 mg every 4 weeks ×2, or matching placebo. Eleven subjects receiving high-dose statins and 6 subjects with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia were randomized to SC AMG 145 140 mg or placebo Q2W ×3. In the trials (AMG 145 n = 85, placebo n = 28), AMG 145 reduced LDL-C up to 64% (p AMG 145 versus placebo groups: 69% versus 71% (phase 1a); 65% versus 64% (phase 1b). In phase 1 studies, AMG 145 significantly reduced serum LDL-C in healthy and hypercholesterolemic statin-treated subjects, including those with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia or taking the highest doses of atorvastatin or rosuvastatin, with an overall AE profile similar to placebo. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A double-blind placebo-controlled trial of omeprazole on urinary pH in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, P J; Rasmussen, L; Pedersen, S A

    1992-01-01

    Urinary pH is related to urinary calculus formation as well as urinary infection. Omeprazole is an effective inhibitor of gastric acid secretion through inhibition of the parietal cell H+K+ATPase. In this study we have evaluated a possible effect of omeprazole on urine acidification. Ten healthy...... male subjects took placebo and omeprazole, 40 mg o.m., for 10 days in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Morning fasting urinary pH was measured on day 10 of each treatment course using a pH meter. No effect of omeprazole on urinary pH could be demonstrated. It is thus unlikely...... that it is necessary to take omeprazole treatment into consideration in stone screening. As omeprazole did not affect urinary pH, no urological side effects related to changes in urinary pH can be expected....

  9. Aprepitant as an add-on therapy in children receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshi, Sameer; Batra, Atul; Biswas, Bivas; Dhawan, Deepa; Paul, Reeja; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla

    2015-11-01

    Aprepitant, a neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist, in combination with 5 HT-3 antagonist and dexamethasone is recommended in adults receiving moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy to reduce chemotherapy-induced vomiting (CIV). Data for use of aprepitant in children is limited and hence aprepitant is not recommended by Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario guidelines for prevention of CIV in children chemotherapy naïve children (5-18 years) receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy. All patients received intravenous ondansetron (0.15 mg/kg) and dexamethasone (0.15 mg/kg) prior to chemotherapy followed by oral ondansetron and dexamethasone. Patients randomly assigned to aprepitant arm received oral aprepitant (15-40 kg = days 1-3, 80 mg; 41-65 kg = day 1, 125 mg and days 2-3, 80 mg) 1 h before chemotherapy. Control group received placebo as add-on therapy. Primary outcome measure was the incidence of acute moderate to severe vomiting, which was defined as more than two vomiting episodes within 24 h after the administration of the first chemotherapy dose until 24 h after the last chemotherapy dose in the block. Complete response (CR) was defined as absence of vomiting and retching during the specified phase. Of the 96 randomized patients, three were excluded from analysis; 93 patients were analyzed (50 in aprepitant arm and 43 in placebo arm). Acute moderate and severe vomiting was reported in 72 % patients receiving placebo and 38 % patients receiving aprepitant (p = 0.001). Complete response rates during acute phase were significantly higher in aprepitant arm (48 vs. 12 %, p effects were reported by patients/guardians. This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial shows that aprepitant significantly decreases the incidence of CIV during acute phase when used as an add-on drug with ondansetron and dexamethasone in children receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy.

  10. Acute and chronic effects of flavanol-rich cocoa on vascular function in subjects with coronary artery disease: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farouque, H M Omar; Leung, Michael; Hope, Sarah A; Baldi, Mauro; Schechter, Clyde; Cameron, James D; Meredith, Ian T

    2006-07-01

    Evidence suggests that flavonoid-containing diets reduce cardiovascular risk, but the mechanisms responsible are unclear. In the present study, we sought to determine the effect of flavanol-rich cocoa on vascular function in individuals with CAD (coronary artery disease). Forty subjects (61+/-8 years; 30 male) with CAD were recruited to a 6-week randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study. Subjects consumed either a flavanol-rich chocolate bar and cocoa beverage daily (total flavanols, 444 mg/day) or matching isocaloric placebos daily (total flavanols, 19.6 mg/day) for 6 weeks. Brachial artery FMD (flow-mediated dilation) and SAC (systemic arterial compliance) were assessed at baseline, 90 min following the first beverage and after 3 and 6 weeks of daily consumption. Soluble cellular adhesion molecules and FBF (forearm blood flow) responses to ACh (acetylcholine chloride; 3-30 microg/min) and SNP (sodium nitroprusside; 0.3-3 microg/min) infusions, forearm ischaemia and isotonic forearm exercise were assessed at baseline and after 6 weeks. FMD, SAC and FBF responses did not differ between groups at baseline. No acute or chronic changes in FMD or SAC were seen in either group. No difference in soluble cellular adhesion molecules, FBF responses to ischaemia, exercise, SNP or ACh was seen in the group receiving flavanol-rich cocoa between baseline and 6 weeks. These data suggest that over a 6-week period, flavanol-rich cocoa does not modify vascular function in patients with established CAD.

  11. N08C9 (Alliance): A Phase 3 Randomized Study of Sulfasalazine Versus Placebo in the Prevention of Acute Diarrhea in Patients Receiving Pelvic Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Robert C., E-mail: miller.robert@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Petereit, Daniel G. [Rapid City Regional Oncology Group, Rapid City, South Dakota (United States); Sloan, Jeff A.; Liu, Heshan [Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Martenson, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Bearden, James D. [Upstate Carolina Community Clinical Oncology Program, Spartanburg, South Carolina (United States); Sapiente, Ronald [Carle Cancer Center CCOP, Urbana, Illinois (United States); Seeger, Grant R. [Altru Health Systems, Grand Forks, North Dakota (United States); Mowat, Rex B. [Toledo Community Hospital Oncology Program CCOP, Toledo, Ohio (United States); Liem, Ben [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States); Iott, Matthew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Loprinzi, Charles L. [Division of Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To provide confirmatory evidence on the use of sulfasalazine to reduce enteritis during pelvic radiation therapy (RT), following 2 prior single-institution trials suggestive that benefit existed. Methods and Materials: A multi-institution, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 trial was designed to assess the efficacy of sulfasalazine versus placebo in the treatment of RT-related enteritis during RT including the posterior pelvis (45.0-53.5 Gy) and conducted through a multicenter national cooperative research alliance. Patients received 1000 mg of sulfasalazine or placebo orally twice daily during and for 4 weeks after RT. The primary endpoint was maximum severity of diarrhea (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0). Toxicity and bowel function were assessed by providers through a self-administered bowel function questionnaire taken weekly during RT and for 6 weeks afterward. Results: Eighty-seven patients were enrolled in the trial between April 29, 2011, and May 13, 2013, with evenly distributed baseline factors. At the time of a planned interim toxicity analysis, more patients with grade ≥3 diarrhea received sulfasalazine than received placebo (29% vs 11%, P=.04). A futility analysis showed that trial continuation would be unlikely to yield a positive result, and a research board recommended halting study treatment. Final analysis of the primary endpoint showed no significant difference in maximum diarrhea severity between the sulfasalazine and placebo arms (P=.41). Conclusions: Sulfasalazine does not reduce enteritis during pelvic RT and may be associated with a higher risk of adverse events than placebo. This trial illustrates the importance of confirmatory phase 3 trials in the evaluation of symptom-control agents.

  12. The Effect of Cumin cyminum L. Plus Lime Administration on Weight Loss and Metabolic Status in Overweight Subjects: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Memarzadeh, Mohammad Reza; Abedi, Fatemeh; Sharifi, Nasrin; Karamali, Fatemeh; Fakhrieh Kashan, Zohreh; Asemi, Zatollah

    2016-08-01

    Limited data are available regarding the effects of combined administration of Cumin cyminum L. and lime on weight loss and metabolic profiles among subjects with overweight subjects. The current study aimed to assess the effects of combined administration of Cumin cyminum L. and lime on weight loss and metabolic profiles among subjects with overweight. This randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted on 72 subjects with overweight, aged 18 - 50 years old. Participants were randomly divided into three groups: Group A received high-dose Cumin cyminum L. and lime capsules (75 mg each, n = 24), group B low-dose Cumin cyminum L. and lime capsules (25 mg each, n = 24) and group C placebos (n = 24) twice daily for eight weeks. After eight weeks of intervention, compared with low-dose C. cyminum L. plus lime and placebo, taking high-dose C. cyminum L. plus lime resulted in significant weight loss (in the high-dose group: -2.1 ± 1.7 vs. in the low-dose group: -1.2 ± 1.5 and in the placebo group: + 0.2 ± 1.3 kg, respectively; P < 0.001) and body mass index (-0.8 ± 0.6 vs. -0.5 ± 0.5 and +0.1 ± 0.5 kg/m(2), respectively; P < 0.001). In addition, administration of high-dose C. cyminum L. plus lime compared with low-dose C. cyminum L. plus lime and placebo, led to a significant reduction in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (P < 0.001) and a significant rise in quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) (+ 0.02 ± 0.02 vs. + 0.01 ± 0.02 and 0.01 ± 0.01, respectively; P = 0.01). Moreover, a significant decrease in serum triglycerides (-14.1 ± 56.2 vs. +13.9 ± 36.8 and + 10.6 ± 25.1 mg/dL; respectively; P = 0.03), total-cholesterol (-18.4 ± 28.6 vs. +8.6 ± 28.5 and -1.0 ± 24.8 mg/dL; respectively; P = 0.004) and low density lipoproteins- (LDL)-cholesterol levels (-11.8 ± 20.7 vs. +6.5 ± 23.2 and -2.9 ± 20.4 mg/dL, respectively; P = 0.01) was observed following the consumption of high-dose C. cyminum L. plus lime compared with

  13. Subjective and Cardiovascular Effects of Intravenous Methamphetamine during Perindopril Maintenance: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Human Laboratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrico, Christopher D; Haile, Colin N; De La Garza, Richard; Grasing, Kenneth; Kosten, Thomas R; Newton, Thomas F

    2016-07-01

    Our pilot study suggested that the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor perindopril might reduce some subjective effects produced by i.v. methamphetamine. We characterized the impact of a wider range of perindopril doses on methamphetamine-induced effects in a larger group of non-treatment-seeking, methamphetamine-using volunteers. Before treatment, participants received 30mg methamphetamine. After 5 to 7 days of perindopril treatment (0, 4, 8, or 16mg/d), participants received 15 and 30mg of methamphetamine on alternate days. Before and after treatment, participants rated subjective effects and cardiovascular measures were collected. Prior to treatment with perindopril, there were no significant differences between treatment groups on maximum or peak subjective ratings or on peak cardiovascular effects. Following perindopril treatment, there were significant main effects of treatment on peak subjective ratings of "anxious" and "stimulated"; compared to placebo treatment, treatment with 8mg perindopril significantly reduced peak ratings of both anxious (P=.0009) and stimulated (P=.0070). There were no significant posttreatment differences between groups on peak cardiovascular effects. Moderate doses of perindopril (8mg) significantly reduced peak subjective ratings of anxious and stimulated as well as attenuated many other subjective effects produced by methamphetamine, likely by inhibiting angiotensin II synthesis. Angiotensin II is known to facilitate the effects of norepinephrine, which contributes to methamphetamine's subjective effects. The lack of a classic dose-response function likely results from either nonspecific effects of perindopril or from between-group differences that were not accounted for in the current study (i.e., genetic variations and/or caffeine use). The current findings suggest that while angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors can reduce some effects produced by methamphetamine, more consistent treatment effects might be achieved by

  14. Memantine treatment in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease already receiving a cholinesterase inhibitor: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porsteinsson, Anton P; Grossberg, George T; Mintzer, Jacobo; Olin, Jason T

    2008-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of memantine in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) receiving cholinesterase inhibitor (ChEI) treatment. Participants (N= 433) with probable AD, Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) scores between 10-22 (inclusive), and concurrent stable use of ChEIs (donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine) were randomized to placebo or memantine (20 mg once daily) for 24 weeks. Primary outcomes were changes from baseline on the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog) and on Clinician's Interview-Based Impression of Change Plus Caregiver Input (CIBIC-Plus) score. Secondary measures comprised the 23-item Alzheimer Disease Cooperative Study-Activities of Daily Living Scale (ADCS-ADL(23)), Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), and MMSE. At the end of the trial, there were no statistically significant differences between the memantine- and placebo group on primary and secondary outcome measures. The incidence of adverse events (AEs) was similar between the two groups, with no AE occurring in more than 5% of memantine-treated patients and at a rate twice that of the placebo group. In this trial, memantine did not show an advantage over placebo based on protocol-specified primary or secondary analyses in patients with mild to moderate AD on stable ChEI regimens. There were no significant differences in tolerability and safety between the memantine- and placebo groups.

  15. Resveratrol does not influence metabolic risk markers related to cardiovascular health in overweight and slightly obese subjects: a randomized, placebo-controlled crossover trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne M van der Made

    Full Text Available In vitro and animal studies have shown positive effects of resveratrol on lipid and lipoprotein metabolism, but human studies specifically designed to examine these effects are lacking.The primary outcome parameter of this study in overweight and slightly obese subjects was the effect of resveratrol on apoA-I concentrations. Secondary outcome parameters were effects on other markers of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism, glucose metabolism, and markers for inflammation and endothelial function.This randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study was conducted in 45 overweight and slightly obese men (n = 25 and women (n = 20 with a mean age of 61 ± 7 years. Subjects received in random order resveratrol (150 mg per day or placebo capsules for 4 weeks, separated by a 4-week wash-out period. Fasting blood samples were collected at baseline and at the end of each intervention period.Compliance was excellent as indicated by capsule count and changes in resveratrol and dihydroresveratrol concentrations. No difference between resveratrol and placebo was found in any of the fasting serum or plasma metabolic risk markers (mean ± SD for differences between day 28 values of resveratrol vs. placebo: apoA-I; 0.00 ± 0.12 g/L (P = 0.791, apoB100; -0.01 ± 0.11 g/L (P = 0.545, HDL cholesterol; 0.00 ± 0.09 mmol/L (P = 0.721, LDL cholesterol -0.03 ± 0.57 mmol/L (P = 0.718, triacylglycerol; 0.10 ± 0.54 mmol/L (P = 0.687, glucose; -0.08 ± 0.28 mmol/L (P = 0.064, insulin; -0.3 ± 2.5 mU/L (P = 0.516. Also, no effects on plasma markers for inflammation and endothelial function were observed. No adverse events related to resveratrol intake were observed.150 mg of daily resveratrol intake for 4 weeks does not change metabolic risk markers related to cardiovascular health in overweight and slightly obese men and women. Effects on glucose metabolism warrant further study.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01364961.

  16. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of neramexane in patients with moderate to severe subjective tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jastreboff Pawel J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neramexane is a new substance that exhibits antagonistic properties at α9α10 cholinergic nicotinic receptors and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, suggesting potential efficacy in the treatment of tinnitus. Methods A total of 431 outpatients with moderate to severe subjective tinnitus (onset 3-18 months before screening were assigned randomly to receive either placebo or neramexane mesylate (25 mg/day, 50 mg/day and 75 mg/day for 16 weeks, with assessment at 4-week intervals. The primary (intention-to-treat efficacy analysis was based on the change from baseline in Week 16 in the total score of the adapted German short version of the validated Tinnitus Handicap Inventory questionnaire (THI-12. Results Compared with placebo, the largest improvement was achieved in the 50 mg/d neramexane group, followed by the 75 mg/d neramexane group. This treatment difference did not reach statistical significance at the pre-defined endpoint in Week 16 (p = 0.098 for 50 mg/d; p = 0.289 for 75 mg/d neramexane, but consistent numerical superiority of both neramexane groups compared with placebo was observed. Four weeks after the end of treatment, THI-12 scores in the 50 mg/d group were significantly better than those of the controls. Secondary efficacy variables supported this trend, with p values of Conclusions This study demonstrated the safety and tolerability of neramexane treatment in patients with moderate to severe tinnitus. The primary efficacy variable showed a trend towards improvement of tinnitus suffering in the medium- and high-dose neramexane groups. This finding is in line with consistent beneficial effects observed in secondary assessment variables. These results allow appropriate dose selection for further studies. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00405886

  17. Zinc monotherapy increases serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels and decreases depressive symptoms in overweight or obese subjects: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solati, Zahra; Jazayeri, Shima; Tehrani-Doost, Mehdi; Mahmoodianfard, Salma; Gohari, Mahmood Reza

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have shown a positive effect of zinc as an adjunctive therapy on reducing depressive symptoms. However, to our knowledge, no study has examined the effect of zinc monotherapy on mood. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of zinc monotherapy on depressive symptoms and serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in overweight or obese subjects. Fifty overweight or obese subjects were randomly assigned into two groups and received either 30 mg zinc or placebo daily for 12 weeks. At baseline and post-intervention, depression severity was assessed using Beck depression inventory II (BDI II), and serum BDNF and zinc levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and atomic absorption spectrophotometry, respectively. The trial was completed with 46 subjects. After a 12-week supplementation, serum zinc and BDNF levels increased significantly in the zinc-supplemented group compared with the placebo group. BDI scores declined in both the groups at the end of the study, but reduction in the zinc-supplemented group was significantly higher than the placebo group. More analysis revealed that following supplementation, BDI scores decreased in subgroup of subjects with depressive symptoms (BDI ≥ 10) (n = 30), but did not change in the subgroup of non-depressed subjects (BDI BDNF levels and depression severity in all participants. Interestingly, a significant positive correlation was found between serum BDNF and zinc levels at baseline. Zinc monotherapy improves mood in overweight or obese subjects most likely through increasing BDNF levels.

  18. A within-group design of nontreatment seeking 5-HTTLPR genotyped alcohol-dependent subjects receiving ondansetron and sertraline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, George A; Zywiak, William H; McGeary, John E; Leggio, Lorenzo; McGeary, Chinatsu; Wang, Shirley; Grenga, Andrea; Swift, Robert M

    2009-02-01

    Serotonergic mechanisms are associated with the development of alcohol dependence (AD), however, studies evaluating serotonergic medications have produced conflicting results. One hypothesis suggests that differential response may be due to a functional polymorphism of the 5-HTTLPR promoter region of the serotonin re-uptake transporter (5-HTT). The L/L genotype is postulated to be associated with early onset alcoholism and the S/S or S/L genotypes associated with late onset alcoholism. The aim of this study was to match and mismatch L/L, S/S, or S/L genotypes with administration of ondansetron and sertraline. Fifteen nontreatment seeking alcohol-dependent individuals were randomized to 1 of 2 counterbalanced arms to receive either 200 mg/d of sertraline or ondansetron 0.5 mg/d for 3 weeks followed by an alcohol self-administration experiment (ASAE), then received placebo for 3 weeks followed by a second ASAE. Participants then received the alternate drug for 2 weeks followed by a third ASAE. At the first ASAE compared to sertraline, ondansetron significantly improved drinking outcomes for the L/L genotype for the ASAE volume consumed (100% reduction based on between-subjects comparison, t = 2.35), and for drinks per drinking day during the 7 days prior to the ASAE (79% reduction and t = 4.34). Compared with ondansetron for S/S or S/L genotypes, outcomes at ASAE 1 for sertraline and S/S or S/L genotypes are opposite than hypothesized. Overall, subjects reduced drinking across their participation in the trial, as there appears to be an order effect. This study suggests that ondansetron may reduce alcohol consumption in alcohol-dependent individuals who have the L/L genotype as measured naturalistically and during the ASAE. By contrast there was no support that sertraline reduces alcohol use in individuals who have S/S or S/L genotypes. Evidence in the literature suggests that AD in some individuals may be influenced by a gene by socio-environmental interaction making

  19. Seroreversion in subjects receiving antiretroviral therapy during acute/early HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, C Bradley; Pappalardo, Brandee L; Busch, Michael P; Karlsson, Annika C; Phelps, Bruce H; Alexander, Steven S; Bentsen, Christopher; Ramstead, Clarissa A; Nixon, Douglas F; Levy, Jay A; Hecht, Frederick M

    2006-03-01

    We assessed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody seroreversion among individuals initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) during acute/early HIV infection and determined whether seroreversion was associated with loss of cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. Subjects in a cohort with acute/early HIV infection (HIV type 1 ribonucleic acid levels of 24 weeks were selected. Two clinically available second-generation enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) and a confirmatory Western blot were used to screen subjects for antibody reversion. Those with negative screening test results underwent additional antibody testing, including a third-generation EIA, and were assessed for cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. Of 87 subjects identified, 12 (14%) had negative antibody test results at the start of ART; all 12 had seroconversion, although 1 had seroconversion only on a third-generation EIA. Of the 87 subjects, 6 (7%) had seroreversion on at least 1 EIA antibody assay while receiving ART during a median follow-up of 90 weeks. The only clinical predictor of seroreversion was a low baseline "detuned" (less sensitive) antibody. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to HIV Gag peptides were detected in 4 of 5 subjects with seroreversion who could be tested. All 5 who had seroreversion who stopped ART experienced virologic rebound and antibody evolution. HIV antibody seroconversion on second-generation EIA antibody tests may fail to occur when ART is initiated early. Seroreversion was not uncommon among subjects treated early, although cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to HIV antigens remained detectable in most subjects. Antibody seroreversion did not indicate viral eradication. A third-generation EIA was the most sensitive test for HIV antibodies.

  20. Impact of chromium dinicocysteinate supplementation on inflammation, oxidative stress, and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic subjects: an exploratory analysis of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

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    Zainulabedin M. Saiyed

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chromium dinicocysteinate (CDNC is a unique chromium complex consisting of chromium, niacin, and L-cysteine. Previous preclinical and clinical studies support the safety and efficacy of CDNC in modulating oxidative stress, vascular inflammation, and glycemia in type 2 diabetes. Objective: Herein, we report the results of several exploratory analyses conducted on type 2 diabetic subjects who previously participated in a 3-month randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial and were treated with only metformin as standard diabetic care in addition to receiving the test supplementations. Design: Results from 43 metformin users, who were randomly assigned to receive either placebo (P, n=13, chromium picolinate (CP, 400 µg elemental Cr3+/day, n=12, or CDNC (400 µg elemental Cr3+/day, n=18, were analyzed for blood markers of vascular inflammation, insulin resistance, and oxidative stress at baseline and at 3 months of supplementation. Results: A statistically significant decrease in insulin resistance in the CDNC-supplemented cohort compared to placebo (p=0.01 was observed at 3 months. The CDNC group also demonstrated a significant reduction in insulin levels (p=0.03, protein carbonyl (p=0.02, and in TNF-α (p=0.03 compared to the placebo group. The CP group only showed a significant reduction in protein carbonyl levels (p=0.03 versus placebo. Conclusions: When controlling for diabetes medication, CDNC supplementation showed beneficial effects on blood markers of vascular inflammation, insulin resistance, and oxidative stress compared to placebo. The findings suggest that CDNC supplementation has potential as an adjunct therapy for individuals with type 2 diabetes.

  1. Randomized, placebo-controlled trial of mipomersen in patients with severe hypercholesterolemia receiving maximally tolerated lipid-lowering therapy.

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    Mary P McGowan

    Full Text Available Mipomersen, an antisense oligonucleotide targeting apolipoprotein B synthesis, significantly reduces LDL-C and other atherogenic lipoproteins in familial hypercholesterolemia when added to ongoing maximally tolerated lipid-lowering therapy. Safety and efficacy of mipomersen in patients with severe hypercholesterolemia was evaluated.Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial. Patients (n  = 58 were ≥18 years with LDL-C ≥7.8 mmol/L or LDL-C ≥5.1 mmol/L plus CHD disease, on maximally tolerated lipid-lowering therapy that excluded apheresis. Weekly subcutaneous injections of mipomersen 200 mg (n  = 39 or placebo (n  = 19 were added to lipid-lowering therapy for 26 weeks.percent reduction in LDL-C from baseline to 2 weeks after the last dose of treatment. Mipomersen (n = 27 reduced LDL-C by 36%, from a baseline of 7.2 mmol/L, for a mean absolute reduction of 2.6 mmol/L. Conversely, mean LDL-C increased 13% in placebo (n = 18 from a baseline of 6.5 mmol/L (mipomersen vs placebo p<0.001. Mipomersen produced statistically significant (p<0.001 reductions in apolipoprotein B and lipoprotein(a, with no change in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Mild-to-moderate injection site reactions were the most frequently reported adverse events with mipomersen. Mild-to-moderate flu-like symptoms were reported more often with mipomersen. Alanine transaminase increase, aspartate transaminase increase, and hepatic steatosis occurred in 21%, 13% and 13% of mipomersen treated patients, respectively. Adverse events by category for the placebo and mipomersen groups respectively were: total adverse events, 16(84.2%, 39(100%; serious adverse events, 0(0%, 6(15.4%; discontinuations due to adverse events, 1(5.3%, 8(20.5% and cardiac adverse events, 1(5.3%, 5(12.8%.Mipomersen significantly reduced LDL-C, apolipoprotein B, total cholesterol and non-HDL-cholesterol, and lipoprotein(a. Mounting evidence suggests it may be a

  2. Short-term efficacy of calcium fructoborate on subjects with knee discomfort: a comparative, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study

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    Pietrzkowski Z

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Zbigniew Pietrzkowski,1 Michael J Phelan,2 Robert Keller,3 Cynthia Shu,1 Ruby Argumedo,1 Tania Reyes-Izquierdo11FutureCeuticals, Inc., Applied BioClinical Laboratory; 2Department of Statistics, School of Information and Computer Science, University of California at Irvine; 3NutraClinical Inc., Irvine, CA, USAAbstract: Calcium fructoborate (CFB at a dose of 110 mg twice per day was previously reported to improve knee discomfort during the first 14 days of treatment. In this study, 60 participants with self-reported knee discomfort were randomized into two groups receiving CFB or placebo. Initial levels of knee discomfort were evaluated by Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC and McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ scores at the beginning of the study and also at 7 and 14 days after treatment. Results showed that supplementation with CFB significantly improved knee discomfort in the study subjects; significant reductions of mean within-subject change in WOMAC and MPQ scores were observed for the CFB group compared to the placebo group at both 7 and 14 days after treatment. Estimated treatment differences for the MPQ score were -5.8 (P=0.0009 and -8.9 (P<0.0001 at Day 7 and 14, respectively. Estimated differences for the WOMAC score were -5.3 (P=0.06 and -13.73 (P<0.0001 at Day 7 and 14, respectively. Negative values indicate greater reductions in reported discomfort. On both Day 7 and Day 14, the trend was toward greater improvement in the CFB group. The placebo group did not exhibit any change in the WOMAC and MPQ scores. In conclusion, supplementation with 110 mg CFB twice per day was associated with improving knee discomfort during the 2 weeks of intake.Keywords: CFB, joint discomfort, WOMAC score, McGill pain score

  3. Knemometry Assessment of Short-term Growth in Children With Asthma Receiving Fluticasone Furoate for 2 Weeks: A Randomized, Placebo-controlled, Crossover Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolthers, Ole D; Stone, Sally; Bareille, Philippe; Tomkins, Susan; Khindri, Sanjeev

    2017-06-01

    A dry powder inhaler formulation of the inhaled corticosteroid fluticasone furoate (FF) is being evaluated for use in children. An important potential risk associated with the use of inhaled corticosteroids in children is growth suppression. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the short-term lower leg growth in children with asthma treated for 2 weeks with inhaled FF versus placebo from the ELLIPTA inhaler. Prepubertal children with persistent asthma (n = 60; aged 5 to <12 years) were recruited into a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2-way crossover, noninferiority study. The study consisted of four 2-week periods: run-in, 2 treatment periods, 1 washout period, and a 1-week follow-up period. Interventions were FF 50 µg and placebo once daily in the evening. Lower leg length was measured by using knemometry. The randomized ITT population comprised 36 boys and 24 girls with a mean age of 8.7 (standard deviation, 1.5; range, 5-11) years; 58% had a duration of asthma ≥5 years. Fifty-eight subjects completed both treatment periods. The least squares mean growth rate was 0.31 mm/week during treatment with FF and 0.36 mm/week during the placebo period. The difference in adjusted least squares mean growth rates between FF and placebo was -0.052 mm/week with a 95% CI of -0.122 to 0.018. This finding was greater than the prespecified noninferiority margin of -0.20 mm/week. The overall incidence of adverse events was 35% with placebo and 22% with FF. Inhaled FF 50 µg provided once daily for 2 weeks was noninferior to placebo in terms of effects on short-term lower leg growth in children with asthma. To further quantify the risk of growth suppression in children, intermediate-term growth studies should be conducted. Inhaled FF 50 µg was well tolerated in this study population. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02502734. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The cognitive and psychomotor effects of opioid analgesics. I. A randomized controlled trial of single doses of dextropropoxyphene, lorazepam and placebo in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, W M; Hanks, G W; White, L; Simpson, P; Wesnes, K

    1995-01-01

    Twelve subjects (3 male) took part in a randomised double-blind four way crossover study designed to examine the cognitive and psychomotor effects of single doses of dextroproxyphene. On four study days one week apart each subject received each study product (i) dextropropoxyphene napsylate 100 mg, (ii) dextropropoxyphene napsylate 200 mg, (iii) lorazepam 2 mg and (iv) placebo. Performance measures were simple reaction time, choice reaction time, number vigilance, memory scanning, word recall (immediate and delayed), word recognition, picture recognition, critical flicker fusion threshold (CFFT) and visual analogue scales of alertness, calmness and contentment. Lorazepam had a marked effect on the range of tests used illustrating the sensitivity of the best battery. This was in contrast to the effects of dextropropoxyphene. A dose related effect in CFFT was detected, the 200 mg dose producing a significant decrease in CFFT throughout the testing period. Dextropropoxyphene also showed a tendency to improve scores on the verbal memory tasks. These data indicate that dextropropoxyphene in the usual doses does not produce significant impairment of cognitive and psychomotor function.

  5. Safety and effects of two mistletoe preparations on production of Interleukin-6 and other immune parameters - a placebo controlled clinical trial in healthy subjects

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    Huber Roman

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Germany, Iscucin® Populi (IP, a preparation from mistletoe growing on the poplar tree, is used in cancer therapy while Viscum Mali e planta tota (VM, a preparation from mistletoe growing on the apple tree, is used in patients with osteoarthritis. Since mistletoe preparations are suspected to induce production of potentially tumor promoting cytokines like interleukin (IL-6, further studies on the immunological effects are of interest. Methods In this 3-armed randomized, double blind clinical trial healthy volunteers received increasing doses of either IP (strength F, 0.0125%, G, 0.25% and H, 5%, each for 4 weeks, or VM (1:1000 [D3], 1:100 [D2] and 2% each for 4 weeks or placebo (isotonic solution subcutaneously twice per week over a period of 12 weeks. Physical examination was performed weekly. Routine laboratory parameters and immunological parameters (C-reactive protein (CRP, differential blood count, lymphocyte subsets, immunoglobulins, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α were analysed every 4 weeks. Results 71 subjects were included in the study (IP = 30, VM = 21, placebo = 20 of whom 69 concluded it according to protocol. Application of IP strengths G and H caused strong local reactions at the site of injection. In parallel, a distinct eosinophilia (p Conclusion Treatment with IP results in eosinophilia and an increase of CD4 cells but not in an increase of IL-6 or CRP. No safety concerns regarding the two mistletoe preparations have been raised by this study. EudraCT-Number 2007-002166-35. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01378702

  6. The subjective experiences of people who regularly receive depot neuroleptic medication in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, L; McCann, E

    2007-09-01

    Little has been written on the subjective experiences of people who receive depot injections in the community. The authors of this paper have identified distinct gaps in the literature in terms of the views of service users regarding this particular intervention. Existing studies tend to focus upon the side effects of depot neuroleptic medication and the attitudes of Community Mental Health Nurses (CMHNs) towards administering depot medication and issues of compliance and non-compliance. Mental health nurses are frequently perceived as adhering solely to a biomedical approach to patient care in their practice and the therapeutic aspects of their role is frequently unacknowledged. This paper explores how, within the process of giving a depot injection, CMHNs are able to carry out an assessment of their client's needs as well as being someone who is consistent, reliable and supportive. This means that the process of giving a depot injection may be considered as a therapeutic intervention. Qualitative data were obtained through the administration of a semi-structured interview schedule that was constructed and consisted of a range of questions that elicited service users views and opinions related to their experiences of receiving depot neuroleptic medication in the community. The relationship between patient and nurse, as this study reveals, was one that was not only therapeutic, but also provided a forum where psychosocial and clinical issues could be discussed and explored. Crucially, the service users felt they did have a role and an influence in the delivery of their care.

  7. Cognitive effects of oxybutynin chloride topical gel in older healthy subjects: a 1-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Gary G; Staskin, David R; MacDiarmid, Scott; McIlwain, Marilyn; Dahl, Naomi V

    2012-10-01

    Oxybutynin is a common antimuscarinic therapy for overactive bladder. Transdermally administered oxybutynin chloride topical gel 10% (OTG) has a low propensity for anticholinergic adverse effects and possibly also a low risk of cognitive impairment. A randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled study evaluated the effects of OTG on cognitive and psychomotor functions in older healthy adults. Healthy adults aged 60-79 years were assigned randomly (1:1:1) to 1-week's treatment with OTG (1 g [100 mg oxybutynin] applied once daily on rotating sites of upper arms/shoulders, abdomen or thighs) plus oral placebo, immediate-release oxybutynin (OXB-IR; 5 mg capsule three times/day) plus placebo gel, or double placebo. Delayed recall Name-Face Association Test (NFAT) score was the primary end point. Treatments were compared by analysis of covariance. Of 152 participants (mean age, 68 years), 49 received OTG, 52 OXB-IR and 51 placebo. NFAT Delayed Recall tests revealed no significant treatment differences (overall, p = 0.2733; OTG vs placebo, p = 0.1551; OXB-IR vs placebo, p = 0.1767). However, a significant effect (p = 0.0294) was noted for the Misplaced Objects Test, with scores declining only for OXB-IR. Approximately twice as many participants receiving OXB-IR (n = 10) as those receiving OTG (n = 5) or placebo (n = 6) showed a significant decline (≥6 points) in Total Recall score for the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised. No significant effects on psychomotor reaction time were observed. The most common adverse event, dry mouth, occurred in 6.1%, 73.1% and 7.8% of participants receiving OTG, OXB-IR and placebo, respectively. OTG applied for 1 week had no clinically meaningful effect on recent memory or other cognitive functions in healthy, older adults. Registered as NCT00752141 at www.clinicaltrials.gov.

  8. Breast cancer development in transsexual subjects receiving cross-sex hormone treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooren, Louis J; van Trotsenburg, Michael A A; Giltay, Erik J; van Diest, Paul J

    2013-12-01

    Transsexual people receive cross-sex hormones as part of their treatment, potentially inducing hormone-sensitive malignancies. To examine the occurrence of breast cancer in a large cohort of Dutch male and female transsexual persons, also evaluating whether the epidemiology accords with the natal sex or the new sex. Number of people with breast cancer between 1975 and 2011. We researched the occurrence of breast cancer among transsexual persons 18-80 years with an exposure to cross-sex hormones between 5 to >30 years. Our study included 2,307 male-to-female (MtF) transsexual persons undergoing androgen deprivation and estrogen administration (52,370 person-years of exposure), and 795 female-to-male (FtM) subjects receiving testosterone (15,974 total years of exposure). Among MtF individuals one case was encountered, as well as a probable but not proven second case. The estimated rate of 4.1 per 100,000 person-years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.8-13.0) was lower than expected if these two cases are regarded as female breast cancer, but within expectations if viewed as male breast cancer. In FtM subjects, who were younger and had shorter exposure to cross-sex hormones compared with the MtF group, one breast cancer case occurred. This translated into a rate of 5.9 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI: 0.5-27.4), again lower than expected for female breast cancer but within expected norms for male breast cancer. The number of people studied and duration of hormone exposure are limited but it would appear that cross-sex hormone administration does not increase the risk of breast cancer development, in either MtF or FtM transsexual individuals. Breast carcinoma incidences in both groups are comparable to male breast cancers. Cross-sex hormone treatment of transsexual subjects does not seem to be associated with an increased risk of malignant breast development. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  9. A Dietary Supplement Containing Cinnamon, Chromium and Carnosine Decreases Fasting Plasma Glucose and Increases Lean Mass in Overweight or Obese Pre-Diabetic Subjects: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuejun Liu

    Full Text Available Preventing or slowing the progression of prediabetes to diabetes is a major therapeutic issue.Our aim was to evaluate the effects of 4-month treatment with a dietary supplement containing cinnamon, chromium and carnosine in moderately obese or overweight pre-diabetic subjects, the primary outcome being change in fasting plasma glucose (FPG level. Other parameters of plasma glucose homeostasis, lipid profile, adiposity and inflammatory markers were also assessed.In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 62 subjects with a FPG level ranging from 5.55 to 7 mmol/L and a body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m(2, unwilling to change their dietary and physical activity habits, were allocated to receive a 4-month treatment with either 1.2 g/day of the dietary supplement or placebo. Patients were followed up until 6 months post-randomization.Four-month treatment with the dietary supplement decreased FPG compared to placebo (-0.24 ± 0.50 vs +0.12 ± 0.59 mmol/L, respectively, p = 0.02, without detectable significant changes in HbA1c. Insulin sensitivity markers, plasma insulin, plasma lipids and inflammatory markers did not differ between the treatment groups. Although there were no significant differences in changes in body weight and energy or macronutrient intakes between the two groups, fat-free mass (% increased with the dietary supplement compared to placebo (p = 0.02. Subjects with a higher FPG level and a milder inflammatory state at baseline benefited most from the dietary supplement.Four-month treatment with a dietary supplement containing cinnamon, chromium and carnosine decreased FPG and increased fat-free mass in overweight or obese pre-diabetic subjects. These beneficial effects might open up new avenues in the prevention of diabetes.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01530685.

  10. Effect of Stress-free Therapy on Cerebral Blood Flow: Comparisons among patients with metabolic cardiovascular disease, healthy subjects and placebo-treated subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryotokuji, Kenji; Ishimaru, Keisou; Kihara, Kazuhiko; Namiki, Yoshihisa; Nakashima, Takuma; Otani, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: We have developed a Stress-free Therapy® device wherein “Pinpoint Plantar Long-wavelength Infrared Light Irradiation (PP-LILI)” increases peripheral-deep body temperature and blood flow volume and stabilizes blood pressure as well as significantly reduces stress hormones such as adrenocorticotrophic hormone and cortisol without using drugs. Moreover, we have found this therapy to significantly improve blood glucose and insulin resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes. Based on this background of clinical efficacy, we validated changes in cerebral blood flow in patients with metabolic cardiovascular disease and examined the efficacy of Stress-free Therapy® on cerebral blood flow as compared to that in healthy control subjects and placebo-treated patients. Results: The change in cerebral blood flow volume during 15-minute PP-LILI was 5.1 ± 1.8 mL/min in patients with metabolic cardiovascular disease, showing a significant increase (P<0.05) of 3.1 mL/min as compared with the mean blood flow value after resting for 15 minutes. Conclusions: Our results suggested Stress-free Therapy® to significantly increase cerebral blood flow, possibly leading to the prevention of metabolic cardiovascular disease. PMID:24771966

  11. The effects of alcohol mixed with energy drink (AMED) on subjective intoxication and alertness : results from a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Loo, Aurora J A E; van Andel, Nienke; van Gelder, Charlotte A G H; Janssen, Boris S G; Titulaer, Joep; Jansen, Jimmy; Verster, Joris C

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this double blind placebo controlled study was to examine if specific effects on subjective intoxication and alertness-sleepiness ratings could be demonstrated after consuming alcohol mixed with energy drink (AMED) when compared to consuming alcohol only (AO). METHODS: 56

  12. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in patients with plantar fasciitis. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial with ultrasonographic and subjective outcome assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahdatpour, Babak; Sajadieh, Sepideh; Bateni, Vahid; Karami, Mehdi; Sajjadieh, Hamidreza

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim: Results of previous studies have been conflicting on the efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in the treatment of plantar fasciitis. We evaluated the effects of ESWT on plantar fasciitis in terms of ultrasonographic and subjective evaluations. Materials and Methods: In this randomized placebo-controlled trial, patients with plantar fasciitis were assigned to receive ESWT (4000 shock waves/session of 0.2 mJ/mm2) in 3 sessions at weekly intervals) or sham therapy (n = 20 in each group). Outcomes were documented by the ultrasonographic appearance of the aponeurosis and by patients’ pain scores, performed at baseline and 12 weeks after completion of the therapy. Results: The two groups were similar in baseline characteristics. Over the study period, plantar fascia thickness significantly reduced in the ESWT group (4.1 ± 1.3 to 3.6 ± 1.2 mm, P plantar fasciitis and ultrasound imaging is able to depict the morphologic changes related to plantar fasciitis as a result of this therapy. PMID:23826009

  13. Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Cognitive Function Profile of Rupatadine 10, 20 and 40 mg in Healthy Japanese Subjects: A Randomised Placebo-Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    T?ubel, J?rg; Ferber, Georg; Fernandes, Sara; Lorch, Ulrike; Santamar?a, Eva; Izquierdo, I?aki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rupatadine is a marketed second generation antihistamine, with anti-PAF activity, indicated for symptomatic treatment of allergic rhinitis and urticaria. This study was conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), safety and tolerability of rupatadine in healthy Japanese subjects after single and multiple oral doses. Methods In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 27 male and female healthy Japanese subjects were administered single ...

  14. The effects of Kinesio taping on muscle tone in healthy subjects: a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Soriano, Julio; Abián-Vicén, Javier; Aparicio-García, Carlos; Ruiz-Lázaro, Pilar; Simón-Martínez, Cristina; Bravo-Esteban, Elisabeth; Fernández-Rodríguez, José Manuel

    2014-04-01

    Kinesio taping (KT) has been proposed to modulate muscle tone. However no studies have systematically studied the efficacy of KTon this primary outcome measure. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of Kinesio taping (KT) applied over the gastrocnemius muscles on muscle tone, extensibility, electromyography (EMG) and strength. Nineteen healthy subjects were enrolled in a double-blind, placebo controlled crossover trial. KT and sham-tape were applied onto the gastrocnemius muscles of all subjects in two randomized sessions. Measurements before, at 10 min and 24 h after the intervention were taken. Outcome measurements included passive resistive torque to ankle dorsiflexion, dorsiflexion passive range of motion (PROM), surface Gastrocnemius Medialis (GM) EMG and maximal isometric voluntary force (MIVF). No significant differences were found between the sham-tape and KT groups for passive resistive torque, PROM nor maximal plantarflexion isometric voluntary force. A short-term increase of GM EMG activity was found in the KT group during the PROM mobilization, which was not maintained at 24 h following treatment. A short-term decrease in dorsiflexion force was produced 10 min after KT with respect to sham-tape application. These results demonstrate that the application of KT in the gastrocnemius muscles has no effect on healthy muscle tone, extensibility nor strength. However a short-term increase of GM EMG activity after KT treatment suggests the activation of central nervous system mechanisms, although without a therapeutic implication. Further studies with more appropriate designs are needed to clarify the physiological and therapeutic effects of this taping technique.

  15. Randomized placebo-controlled study of the safety, tolerability, antiviral activity, and pharmacokinetics of 10-day monotherapy with BMS-986001, a novel HIV NRTI, in treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotte, Laurent; Dellamonica, Pierre; Raffi, Francois; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Molina, Jean-Michel; Boué, François; Urata, Yasuo; Chan, H Phyllis; Zhu, Li; Chang, Ih; Bertz, Richard; Hanna, George J; Grasela, Dennis M; Hwang, Carey

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and antiviral activity of BMS-986001 (a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor) in treatment-experienced, HIV-1-infected subjects not exposed to antiretroviral treatment in the previous 3 months. Thirty-two HIV-1-infected subjects were randomized (3:1) to receive BMS-986001 or placebo once daily for 10 days in this double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalating monotherapy phase IIa study. There were 4 treatment groups (100, 200, 300, and 600 mg, all once daily) of 8 subjects each (BMS-986001, n = 6/placebo n = 2). BMS-986001 was generally well tolerated, with no discontinuations due to adverse events and no deaths occurring. Adverse events were experienced by 22 of 24 BMS-986001-treated subjects and did not seem to be dose related. The majority were mild and considered unrelated or unlikely to be related to the study drug. The pharmacokinetics of BMS-986001 were dose proportional. Median decrease in plasma HIV-1 RNA from baseline to day 11 was 0.97, 1.15, 1.28, and 1.15 log10 copies/mL for BMS-986001 at 100, 200, 300, and 600 mg, respectively. Plasma area under the curve correlated with the antiviral activity of BMS-986001, indicating that area under the curves produced by 100-600 mg doses were on the upper end of the exposure-response curve. One subject with a single thymidine analog mutation at baseline responded well to BMS-986001. Administration of BMS-986001 for 10 days resulted in substantial decreases in plasma HIV-1 RNA levels for all dose groups and was generally well tolerated. These data support continued clinical development of BMS-986001 at a dose of 100 mg, once daily or greater. EUDRACT Number 2008-004810-29.

  16. Cognitive and motor function after administration of hydrocodone bitartrate plus ibuprofen, ibuprofen alone, or placebo in healthy subjects with exercise-induced muscle damage: a randomized, repeated-dose, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, George J; Hartl, Tamara L; Duffany, Shannon; Smith, Stefanie F; VanHeest, Jaci L; Anderson, Jeffrey M; Hoffman, Jay R; Kraemer, William J; Maresh, Carl M

    2003-03-01

    Medications combining hydrocodone bitartrate and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents appear more beneficial than anti-inflammatory medications alone in treating pain and inflammation from acute soft tissue trauma, but opiate side effects may include sedation and impaired cognitive and motor performance. Performance on complex cognitive and motor tasks was evaluated in healthy subjects with exercise-induced muscle damage who were treated with a hydrocodone-ibuprofen combination, ibuprofen alone, or placebo. This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, repeated-dose clinical trial compared the effects of hydrocodone bitartrate (7.5 mg) plus ibuprofen (200 mg), ibuprofen alone, and placebo on cognitive and motor function in 72 healthy college men. Muscle damage in the quadriceps of each subject's dominant leg was induced by an eccentric exercise protocol. Subjects took the study medication four times daily (every 4-6 h) for 5 days. Forty minutes after medication ingestion at the same time each day, subjects underwent tests of attention/concentration, motor performance, and reaction time. Four trained assessors rotated among subjects so that none tested the same participant on more than three occasions. Repeated measures analyses of covariance revealed no between-group differences on a complex memory and cognition task or complex reaction time. Subjects using hydrocodone bitartrate plus ibuprofen performed significantly less well on a simple tracking task and made significantly more errors on a simple reaction-time task than the other two groups. These deficits were found to be highly transitory and not related to confusion or fatigue. Hydrocodone plus ibuprofen was not associated with deterioration in complex cognition but was related to very transitory decrements in tasks involving simple hand-eye coordination.

  17. The Relieving Effects of BrainPower Advanced, a Dietary Supplement, in Older Adults with Subjective Memory Complaints: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

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    Jingfen Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Subjective memory complaints (SMCs are common in older adults that can often predict further cognitive impairment. No proven effective agents are available for SMCs. The effect of BrainPower Advanced, a dietary supplement consisting of herbal extracts, nutrients, and vitamins, was evaluated in 98 volunteers with SMCs, averaging 67 years of age (47–88, in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Subjective hypomnesis/memory loss (SML and attention/concentration deficits (SAD were evaluated before and after 12-week supplementation of BrainPower Advanced capsules (n=47 or placebo (n=51, using a 5-point memory questionnaire (1 = no/slight, 5 = severe. Objective memory function was evaluated using 3 subtests of visual/audio memory, abstraction, and memory recall that gave a combined total score. The BrainPower Advanced group had more cases of severe SML (severity ⩾ 3 (44/47 and severe SAD (43/47 than the placebo group (39/51 and 37/51, < 0.05, < 0.05, resp. before the treatment. BrainPower Advanced intervention, however, improved a greater proportion of the severe SML (29.5%(13/44 (P<0.01 and SAD (34.9%(15/43(P<0.01 than placebo (5.1% (2/39 and 13.5% (5/37, resp.. Thus, 3-month BrainPower Advanced supplementation appears to be beneficial to older adults with SMCs.

  18. Black tea consumption improves postprandial glycemic control in normal and pre-diabetic subjects: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butacnum, Arisa; Chongsuwat, Rewadee; Bumrungpert, Akkarach

    2017-01-01

    Postprandial glycemic control is important for prevention of diabetes. Black tea consumption may improve postprandial glycemic control. The major bioactive compounds are polyphenols, black tea polymerized polyphenol (BTPP).This study examined the effect of black tea consumption on postprandial blood glucose and insulin response following sucrose loading in normal and pre-diabetes subjects. This study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study. Twenty-four subjects, male and female aged 20-60 years, normal and pre-diabetic, randomly ingested a sucrose solution with a low dose (110 mg BTPP), a high dose (220 mg BTPP) of black tea drink or a placebo drink (0 mg BTPP). Blood samples were collected at 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min from commencement of drink ingestion to measure blood glucose and insulin levels. The drink containing low dose and high dose BTPP significantly decreased incremental blood glucose area under the curve (AUC) after sucrose intake compared with placebo in the normal (T0-60 min 3,232±356 vs 3,295±312 vs 3,652±454 mg.min/dL; p=0.016) and pre-diabetic subjects (T0-60 min 2,554±395 vs 2,472±280 vs 2,888±502 mg.min/dL; p=0.048). There was no statistically significant difference of changes in insulin levels between the placebo and black tea groups (p>0.05). No significant differences in adverse effects were observed with the placebo, low dose and high dose of BTPP groups. Black tea consumption can decrease postprandial blood glucose after sucrose intake.

  19. Placebo analgesia induced by social observational learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colloca, Luana; Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2009-07-01

    Although it has long been known that psychosocial factors play a crucial role in placebo responses, no attempt has been made to understand if social observation shapes the placebo analgesic effect. To address this question, we compared placebo analgesia induced through social observation (Group 1) with first-hand experience via a typical conditioning procedure (Group 2) and verbal suggestion alone (Group 3). In Group 1, subjects underwent painful stimuli and placebo treatment after they had observed a demonstrator (actually a simulator) showing analgesic effect when the painful stimuli were paired to a green light. In Group 2, subjects were conditioned according to previous studies, whereby a green light was associated to the surreptitious reduction of stimulus intensity, so as to make them believe that the treatment worked. In Group 3, subjects received painful stimuli and were verbally instructed to expect a benefit from a green light. Pain perception was assessed by means of a Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) ranging from 0=no pain to 10=maximum imaginable pain. Empathy trait and heart rate were also measured. We found that observing the beneficial effects in the demonstrator induced substantial placebo analgesic responses, which were positively correlated with empathy scores. Moreover, observational social learning produced placebo responses that were similar to those induced by directly experiencing the benefit through the conditioning procedure, whereas verbal suggestions alone produced significantly smaller effects. These findings show that placebo analgesia is finely tuned by social observation and suggest that different forms of learning take part in the placebo phenomenon.

  20. A randomized, double blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled clinical trial to assess the effects of Candesartan on the insulin sensitivity on non diabetic, non hypertense subjects with dysglyce mia and abdominal obesity. "ARAMIA"

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    Rueda-Clausen Christian F

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The raising prevalence of type-2 diabetes mellitus and obesity has been recognized as a major problem for public health, affecting both developed and developing countries. Impaired fasting plasma glucose has been previously associated with endothelial dysfunction, higher levels of inflammatory markers and increased risk of developing insulin resistance and cardiovascular events. Besides life-style changes, the blockade of the renin-angiotensin system has been proposed as a useful alternative intervention to improve insulin resistance and decrease the number of new type-2 diabetes cases. The aim of this clinical trial is to study the effect of the treatment with Candesartan, an angiotensin II receptor antagonist, on the insulin resistance, the plasma levels of adipoquines, oxidative stress and prothrombotic markers, in a group of non diabetic, non hypertensive, dysglycemic and obese subjects. Methods and design A randomized, double blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled, clinical trial was designed to assess the effects of Candesartan (up to 32 mg/day during 6 months on the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA index, lipid profile, protrombotic state, oxidative stress and plasma levels of inflammatory markers. The participants will be recruited in the "Fundación Cardiovascular de Colombia". Subjects who fullfil selection criteria will receive permanent educational, nutritional and exercise support during their participation in the study. After a 15 days-run-in period with placebo and life-style recommendations, the patients who have a treatment compliance equal or greater than 80% will be randomlly assigned to one of the treatment groups. Group A will receive Candesartan during 6 months and placebo during 6 months. Group B will receive placebo during the first 6 months, and then, Candesartan during the last 6 months. Control visits will be programed monthly and all parameters of interest will be evaluated every 6 months

  1. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, linear dose, crossover study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a green coffee bean extract in overweight subjects

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    Vinson JA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Joe A Vinson1, Bryan R Burnham3, Mysore V Nagendran31Chemistry Department, 2Psychology Department, University of Scranton, Scranton, PA, USA; 3Health Sciences Clinic, Bangalore, IndiaBackground: Adult weight gain and obesity have become worldwide problems. Issues of cost and potential side effects of prescription weight loss drugs have led overweight and obese adults to try nutraceuticals that may aid weight loss. One promising nutraceutical is green coffee extract, which contains high concentrations of chlorogenic acids hat are known to have health benefits and to influence glucose and fat metabolism. A 22-week crossover study was conducted to examine the efficacy and safety of a commercial green coffee extract product GCA™ at reducing weight and body mass in 16 overweight adults.Methods: Subjects received high-dose GCA (1050 mg, low-dose GCA (700 mg, or placebo in separate six-week treatment periods followed by two-week washout periods to reduce any influence of preceding treatment. Treatments were counterbalanced between subjects. Primary measurements were body weight, body mass index, and percent body fat. Heart rate and blood pressure were also measured.Results: Significant reductions were observed in body weight (-8.04 ± 2.31 kg, body mass index (-2.92 ± 0.85 kg/m2, and percent body fat (-4.44% ± 2.00%, as well as a small decrease in heart rate (-2.56 ± 2.85 beats per minute, but with no significant changes to diet over the course of the study. Importantly, the decreases occurred when subjects were taking GCA. Body mass index for six subjects shifted from preobesity to the normal weight range (<25.00 kg/m2.Conclusion: The results are consistent with human and animal studies and a meta-analysis of the efficacy of green coffee extract in weight loss. The results suggest that GCA may be an effective nutraceutical in reducing weight in preobese adults, and may be an inexpensive means of preventing obesity in overweight adults

  2. A randomized, active- and placebo-controlled study of the efficacy and safety of different doses of dutasteride versus placebo and finasteride in the treatment of male subjects with androgenetic alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubelin Harcha, Walter; Barboza Martínez, Julia; Tsai, Tsen-Fang; Katsuoka, Kensei; Kawashima, Makoto; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Barnes, Allison; Ferron-Brady, Geraldine; Chetty, Dushen

    2014-03-01

    Dihydrotestosterone is the main androgen causative of androgenetic alopecia, a psychologically and physically harmful condition warranting medical treatment. We sought to compare the efficacy and safety of dutasteride (type 1 and 2 5-alpha reductase inhibitor) with finasteride (type 2 5-alpha reductase inhibitor) and placebo in men with androgenetic alopecia. Men aged 20 to 50 years with androgenetic alopecia were randomized to receive dutasteride (0.02, 0.1, or 0.5 mg/d), finasteride (1 mg/d), or placebo for 24 weeks. The primary end point was hair count (2.54-cm diameter) at week 24. Other assessments included hair count (1.13-cm diameter) and width, photographic assessments (investigators and panel), change in stage, and health outcomes. In total, 917 men were randomized. Hair count and width increased dose dependently with dutasteride. Dutasteride 0.5 mg significantly increased hair count and width in a 2.54-cm diameter and improved hair growth (frontal view; panel photographic assessment) at week 24 compared with finasteride (P = .003, P = .004, and P = .002, respectively) and placebo (all P < .001). The number and severity of adverse events were similar among treatment groups. The study was limited to 24 weeks. Dutasteride increased hair growth and restoration in men with androgenetic alopecia and was relatively well tolerated. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Multi-Center Randomized Phase II Study Comparing Cediranib plus Gefitinib with Cediranib plus Placebo in Subjects with Recurrent/Progressive Glioblastoma.

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    Nicholas Brown

    Full Text Available Cediranib, an oral pan-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, failed to show benefit over lomustine in relapsed glioblastoma. One resistance mechanism for cediranib is up-regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. This study aimed to determine if dual therapy with cediranib and the oral EGFR inhibitor gefitinib improved outcome in recurrent glioblastoma.This was a multi-center randomized, two-armed, double-blinded phase II study comparing cediranib plus gefitinib versus cediranib plus placebo in subjects with first relapse/first progression of glioblastoma following surgery and chemoradiotherapy. The primary outcome measure was progression free survival (PFS. Secondary outcome measures included overall survival (OS and radiologic response rate. Recruitment was terminated early following suspension of the cediranib program. 38 subjects (112 planned were enrolled with 19 subjects in each treatment arm. Median PFS with cediranib plus gefitinib was 3.6 months compared to 2.8 months for cediranib plus placebo (HR; 0.72, 90% CI; 0.41 to 1.26. Median OS was 7.2 months with cediranib plus gefitinib and 5.5 months with cediranib plus placebo (HR; 0.68, 90% CI; 0.39 to 1.19. Eight subjects (42% had a partial response in the cediranib plus gefitinib arm versus five patients (26% in the cediranib plus placebo arm.Cediranib and gefitinib in combination is tolerated in patients with glioblastoma. Incomplete recruitment led to the study being underpowered. However, a trend towards improved survival and response rates with the addition of gefitinib to cediranib was observed. Further studies of the combination incorporating EGFR and VEGF inhibition are warranted.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01310855.

  4. Effect of the cumin cyminum L. Intake on Weight Loss, Metabolic Profiles and Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Overweight Subjects: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Memarzadeh, Mohammad Reza; Asemi, Zatollah; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    The current study was performed to determine the effects of cumin cyminum L. intake on weight loss and metabolic profiles among overweight subjects. This randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted among 78 overweight subjects (male, n = 18; female, n = 60) aged 18-60 years old. Participants were randomly assigned into three groups to receive: (1) cumin cyminum L. capsule (n = 26); (2) orlistat120 capsule (n = 26) and (3) placebo (n = 26) three times a day for 8 weeks. Anthropometric measures and fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and after 8 weeks of intervention. Consumption of the Cuminum cyminum L. and orlistat120 resulted in a similar significant decrease in weight (-1.1 ± 1.2 and -0.9 ± 1.5 vs. 0.2 ± 1.5 kg, respectively, p = 0.002) and BMI (-0.4 ± 0.5 and -0.4 ± 0.6 vs. 0.1 ± 0.6 kg/m(2), respectively, p = 0.003) compared with placebo. In addition, taking Cuminum cyminum L., compared with orlistat and placebo, led to a significant reduction in serum insulin levels (-1.4 ± 4.5 vs. 1.3 ± 3.3 and 0.3 ± 2.2 µIU/ml, respectively, p = 0.02), HOMA-B (-5.4 ± 18.9 vs. 5.8 ± 13.3 and 1.0 ± 11.0, respectively, p = 0.02) and a significant rise in QUICKI (0.01 ± 0.01 vs. -0.005 ± 0.01 and -0.004 ± 0.01, respectively, p = 0.02). Taking cumin cyminum L. for eight weeks among overweight subjects had the same effects of orlistat120 on weight and BMI and beneficial effects on insulin metabolism compared with orlistat120 and placebo. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. A randomized, placebo- and moxifloxacin-controlled thorough QT study of umeclidinium monotherapy and umeclidinium/vilanterol combination in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Dennis; Tombs, Lee; Preece, Andrew; Brealey, Noushin; Mehta, Rashmi

    2014-10-01

    The long-acting muscarinic antagonist umeclidinium (UMEC) and the combination of UMEC with the long-acting beta2 agonist vilanterol (VI) are approved maintenance treatments for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the US and EU. This study investigated the effect of UMEC and UMEC/VI on the QT interval corrected using Fridericia's correction (QTcF) following a 10-day treatment period. Randomized, placebo- and moxifloxacin-controlled, 4-period incomplete block crossover study of healthy non-smokers (n = 103). All treatments were double blind, except for moxifloxacin/moxifloxacin placebo controls which were single blinded. Subjects were randomized to a treatment sequence which consisted of 4 of 5 regimens. Each regimen consisted of once-daily doses on Days 1-10 via the ELLIPTA™ dry powder inhaler and a single tablet on Day 10 of the following: placebo + placebo; placebo + moxifloxacin; UMEC 500 μg + placebo; UMEC/VI 125/25 μg (delivered dose: 113/22 μg) + placebo; UMEC/VI 500/100 μg + placebo. QT interval, additional cardiac parameters, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety were assessed. No clinically significant changes from baseline in QTcF occurred with UMEC 500 μg and UMEC/VI 125/25 μg compared with placebo, however, there was a change in QTcF from baseline of 6.4 ms (90% confidence interval [CI]: 4.3, 8.5) at 10 min and 8.2 ms (90%: 6.2, 10.2) at 30 min post dose following UMEC/VI 500/100 μg compared with placebo. On Day 10, categorical analysis demonstrated absolute QTcF values >450-480 ms for UMEC/VI 125/25 μg (1 subject) and moxifloxacin (3 subjects), and a change from baseline QTcF of >30-60 ms for UMEC/VI 125/25 μg, UMEC 500/100 μg and placebo (1 subject each) and moxifloxacin (2 subjects). On Day 10, the mean change from baseline in heart rate was increased with UMEC/VI 125/25 μg and UMEC 500/100 μg compared with placebo with the maximum increase occurring at 10 min post dose (8.4 bpm [90% CI: 7.0, 9

  6. Inverse Effects of Oxytocin on Attributing Mental Activity to Others in Depressed and Healthy Subjects: A Double-Blind Placebo Controlled fMRI Study.

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    David Pincus

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oxytocin is a stress-attenuating and pro-social neuropeptide. To date, no study has looked at the effects of oxytocin in modulating brain activity in depressed individuals nor attempted to correlate this activity with attribution of mental activity in others. Method: We enrolled 10 unmedicated depressed adults and 10 matched healthy controls in a crossover, double blind placebo controlled fmri 40 i.u. intra-nasal oxytocin study (20 i.u. per nostril. Each subject performed Reading the Mind in the Eyes task (RMET before and after inhalation of oxytocin or placebo control for a total of 80 scans. Results: Before oxytocin administration, RMET engaged medial and lateral prefrontal cortex, amygdala, insula and associative areas. Depressed subjects showed increased anterior ventral activation for the RMET minus gender identification contrast whereas matched controls showed increased dorsal and frontal activity. Compared to placebo, oxytocin in depressed subjects showed increased activity in the superior middle frontal gyrus and insula, while controls exhibited more activity in ventral regions. Oxytocin also led to inverse effects in reaction times on attribution task between groups, with controls getting faster and depressed individuals slower to respond. Conclusion: Depression is associated with increased paralimbic activity during emotional mental attribution of others, appearing to be distinctly modulated by oxytocin when compared to healthy controls. Further studies are needed to explore long-term exposure to pro-social neuropeptides on mood in depressed populations and assess their clinical relevance.

  7. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in patients with plantar fasciitis. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial with ultrasonographic and subjective outcome assessments

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    Babak Vahdatpour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Results of previous studies have been conflicting on the efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT in the treatment of plantar fasciitis. We evaluated the effects of ESWT on plantar fasciitis in terms of ultrasonographic and subjective evaluations. Materials and Methods: In this randomized placebo-controlled trial, patients with plantar fasciitis were assigned to receive ESWT (4000 shock waves/session of 0.2 mJ/mm 2 in 3 sessions at weekly intervals or sham therapy (n = 20 in each group. Outcomes were documented by the ultrasonographic appearance of the aponeurosis and by patients′ pain scores, performed at baseline and 12 weeks after completion of the therapy. Results : The two groups were similar in baseline characteristics. Over the study period, plantar fascia thickness significantly reduced in the ESWT group (4.1 ± 1.3 to 3.6 ± 1.2 mm, P < 0.001, but slightly increased in the sham group (4.1 ± 0.8 to 4.5 ± 0.9 mm, P = 0.03. Both groups showed significant pain improvement over the course of the study (P < 0.001, though pain scores were significantly more reduced in the ESWT than the sham group (-4.2 ± 2.9 vs. -2.7 ± 1.8, P = 0.049. Conclusions: Extracorporeal shock wave therapy contributes to healing and pain reduction in plantar fasciitis and ultrasound imaging is able to depict the morphologic changes related to plantar fasciitis as a result of this therapy.

  8. Effect of consumption of chicory inulin on bowel function in healthy subjects with constipation: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micka, Antje; Siepelmeyer, Anne; Holz, Anja; Theis, Stephan; Schön, Christiane

    2017-02-01

    Constipation is among the most common health impairments in Western countries. This study aimed to determine the effect of the chicory-derived fermentable dietary fiber Orafti ® Inulin on stool frequency in healthy subjects with constipation. The study was conducted according to recent guidance documents for investigating bowel function and used a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design with a 2-week wash-out phase. Each study period comprised a run-in phase followed by 4 weeks daily intake of 3 × 4g inulin or maltodextrin (placebo). Forty-four healthy volunteers with constipation documented stool frequency and consistency, gastrointestinal characteristics and quality of life. Consumption of Orafti ® Inulin significantly increased stool frequency compared to placebo (median 4.0 [IQR 2.5-4.5] versus 3.0 [IQR 2.5-4.0] stools/week, p = 0.038). This was accompanied by a softening of stools and trend toward higher satisfaction versus placebo (p = 0.059). In conclusion, Orafti ® Inulin was effective in volunteers with chronic constipation and significantly improved bowel function. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02548247.

  9. Concentration-QT analysis of the randomized, placebo- and moxifloxacin-controlled thorough QT study of umeclidinium monotherapy and umeclidinium/vilanterol combination in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Rashmi; Green, Michelle; Patel, Bela; Wagg, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    The long-acting muscarinic antagonist umeclidinium (UMEC) is approved as a once-daily monotherapy and in combination with the long-acting β2 agonist vilanterol (VI) for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The objective of this analysis was to assess the relationship between observed plasma UMEC and/or VI concentrations and QT interval corrected using Fridericia's correction (QTcF). 103 subjects were enrolled and 86 (83 %) completed the study. Subjects were randomized to 4 of 5 repeat-dose treatments (days 1-10: n = 77 subjects received placebo, n = 76 UMEC 500 µg, n = 78 UMEC/VI 125/25 µg, or n = 76 UMEC/VI 500/100 µg; day 10: n = 74 oral tablet moxifloxacin 400 mg [positive control]). The concentration-QTcF interval relationship was examined using nonlinear mixed-effects methods. For UMEC, predicted QTcF interval prolongation (at observed geometric mean of maximum plasma concentrations) was -2.38 ms (90 % prediction interval [PI] -3.82, -0.85) with UMEC 500 µg and -0.50 ms (90 % PI -0.80, -0.18) and -2.01 ms (90 % PI -3.22, -0.72) with UMEC/VI 125/25 µg and 500/100 µg, respectively. For VI, estimates were 5.89 ms (90 % PI 4.89, 6.91) and 7.23 ms (90 % PI 5.88, 8.55) with UMEC/VI 125/25 µg and 500/100 µg, respectively. Combined additive mean effects were estimated for UMEC/VI 125/25 µg (5.39 ms [90 % PI 4.40, 6.47]) and 500/100 µg (5.22 ms [90 % PI 3.72, 6.80]). The model-predicted decrease with UMEC and increase with UMEC/VI combination in QTcF interval suggest that the QT effect is likely attributable to VI. These model-predicted results support those of previously-published traditional statistical analyses.

  10. Effect of fermented milk product containing lactotripeptides and plant sterol esters on haemodynamics in subjects with the metabolic syndrome--a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautaniemi, Elina J; Tikkakoski, Antti J; Tahvanainen, Anna; Nordhausen, Klaus; Kähönen, Mika; Mattsson, Tiina; Luhtala, Satu; Turpeinen, Anu M; Niemelä, Onni; Vapaatalo, Heikki; Korpela, Riitta; Pörsti, Ilkka H

    2015-08-14

    We investigated the effects of fermented milk product containing isoleucine-proline-proline, valine-proline-proline and plant sterol esters (Pse) on plasma lipids, blood pressure (BP) and its determinants systemic vascular resistance and cardiac output. In a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 104 subjects with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) were allocated to three groups in order to receive fermented milk product containing (1) 5 mg/d lactotripeptides (LTP) and 2 g/d plant sterols; (2) 25 mg/d LTP and 2 g/d plant sterols; (3) placebo for 12 weeks. Plasma lipids and home BP were monitored. Haemodynamics were examined in a laboratory using radial pulse wave analysis and whole-body impedance cardiography in the supine position and during orthostatic challenge. There were no differences between the effects of the two treatments and placebo on the measurements of BP at home or on BP, systemic vascular resistance index and cardiac index in the laboratory, neither in the supine nor in the upright position. The changes in plasma LDL-cholesterol concentration were - 0.1 (95% CI - 0.3, 0.1 and - 0.3, 0.0) mmol/l in the 5 and 25 mg/d LTP groups, respectively, and +0.1 (95% CI - 0.1, 0.3) mmol/l during placebo (P= 0.024). Both at baseline and at week 12, the increase in systemic vascular resistance during head-up tilt was lower in the 25 mg/d LTP group than in the 5 mg/d LTP group (Peffect of borderline significance, while no antihypertensive effect was observed at home or in the laboratory.

  11. Effect of Febuxostat on Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Subjects With Hyperuricemia and Hypertension: A Phase 2 Randomized Placebo-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardhana, Lhanoo; McLean, Lachy; Punzi, Henry A; Hunt, Barbara; Palmer, Robert N; Whelton, Andrew; Feig, Daniel I

    2017-11-04

    Hyperuricemia is associated with hypertension, with elevated serum uric acid levels postulated to have a causal role in the development of hypertension. Consequently, serum uric acid reduction may help lower blood pressure (BP). A Phase 2, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted to assess the potential BP-lowering effects of the xanthine oxidase inhibitor febuxostat in subjects with hypertension and hyperuricemia (serum uric acid ≥0.42 mmol/L [≥7.0 mg/dL]). Subjects (n=121) were randomized 1:1 to febuxostat 80 mg once daily or to placebo. The primary end point was change from baseline to Week 6 in 24-hour mean ambulatory systolic BP (SBP). Additional end points included the following: change from baseline to Week 3 in 24-hour mean SBP and changes from baseline to Weeks 3 and 6 in 24-hour mean ambulatory diastolic BP, serum uric acid, mean daytime and nighttime ambulatory SBP/diastolic BP, and clinic SBP/diastolic BP. For the overall study population, there were no significant differences between febuxostat and placebo for changes from baseline to Weeks 3 or 6 in ambulatory, daytime or nighttime, or clinic SBP or diastolic BP. However, in a preplanned subgroup analysis, there was a significant decrease in SBP from baseline to Week 6 in subjects with normal renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate ≥90 mL/min) treated with febuxostat versus placebo; least squares mean difference, -6.7; 95% confidence interval -13.3 to -0.0; P=0.049. This study suggests that febuxostat may lower BP in hyperuricemic patients with hypertension and normal renal function; further studies should be conducted to confirm this finding. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01496469. © 2017 The Authors and Takeda Pharmaceuticals. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  12. Measuring Quality of Life in Stroke Subjects Receiving an Implanted Neural Prosthesis for Drop Foot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kottink, Anke I.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Catharina Gerarda Maria; Kottink, A.I.R.

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to determine if the treatment of a drop foot by means of an implantable two-channel peroneal nerve stimulator improves health-related quality of life (HRQoL). All subjects were measured at baseline and after a follow-up period of 12 and 26 weeks. Twenty-nine stroke survivors with chronic

  13. Efficacy of a novel herbal composition licorice flavonoid oil in subject with metabolic syndrome: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaku Nakagawa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:In order toevaluate the effects of licorice flavonoid oil (LFOon abdominalwaist circumference, blood pressure, body weight, body mass index (BMI, lipid profile, body fat composition,and fasting blood glucose in patients with metabolic syndrome, a 12 week randomized double-blind placebo-controlledstudywas conducted. Methods: Fiftypatientswith metabolic syndrome agedbetween 18-75 years were assigned toeither the LFO or placebo group. Abdominal waist circumference, blood pressure, body weight,and BMI were assessed atbaseline, week 4, week 8,and week 12. Clinical laboratory examinations, fat composition,andfasting blood glucose level wereassessed at baseline (week 0 and final visit(week 12.Results: Atotal of 50 subjects (25 subjects in each groupcompleted the 12-weekstudy. Significant difference inchangesfrom the baseline wasobserved in body weight, waist circumference,and BMI in the LFOgroup compared to the placebo group from week 4or week 8 onwards. No adverse events were noted throughout the study. Conclusion: The present study suggeststhat LFOisa promising dietary nutrient forimproving metabolic syndrome, particularlythroughits beneficial effect of normalizingbody weight, BMI,and possibly the amount of visceral fatand HDL cholesterol.

  14. A phase II randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study of 6-gingerol as an anti-emetic in solid tumor patients receiving moderately to highly emetogenic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konmun, J; Danwilai, K; Ngamphaiboon, N; Sripanidkulchai, B; Sookprasert, A; Subongkot, S

    2017-04-01

    6-Gingerol is a natural compound extracted from ginger. Preclinical studies demonstrated that 6-gingerol has an anti-emetic activity by inhibiting neurokinin-1, serotonin, and dopamine receptors. Several clinical trials examined crude ginger powder for preventing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV), but none of them was conducted with a standardized bioactive compound. Patients who received moderately to highly emetogenic adjuvant chemotherapy were randomized to receive 6-gingerol 10 mg or placebo orally twice daily for 12 weeks. Ondansetron, metoclopramide, and dexamethasone were given to all patients. The primary endpoint was complete response (CR) rate defined as no emesis or rescue treatment at any time. Eighty-eight patients were randomized to receive 6-gingerol (N = 42) or placebo (N = 46). Most patients received highly emetogenic chemotherapy (93%). Overall CR rate was significantly higher in 6-gingerol group as compared with that of the placebo (77 vs. 32%; P gingerol group at 64 days as compared with that of placebo group (72.36) (P gingerol was observed. Patients treated with 6-gingerol reported significantly less grade 3 fatigue (2 vs. 20%; P = 0.020). 6-Gingerol significantly improved overall CR rate in CINV, appetite and quality of life in cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. A phase III randomized study of 6-gingerol is warranted to confirm these results.

  15. Participant experiences from chronic administration of a multivitamin versus placebo on subjective health and wellbeing: a double-blind qualitative analysis of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Jerome; Cox, Katherine H M; Camfield, David A; Scholey, Andrew; Stough, Con; Fogg, Erin; Kras, Marni; White, David J; Sali, Avni; Pipingas, Andrew

    2012-12-14

    While many randomised controlled trials have been conducted on multivitamins, to our knowledge no qualitative research exploring the subjective experience of taking a multivitamin during a clinical trial has been reported. Semi-structured and open-ended written questions were incorporated into a 16-week double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, parallel groups trial of once-daily multivitamin administration. At the final study visit (week 16), three open-ended questions were posed to elucidate any positive, negative or unusual experiences from taking either the multivitamin or matched placebo. Qualitative thematic analysis was undertaken by researchers who were blind as to treatment condition of participants, and triangulation (independent analysis from three researchers) was employed to ensure methodological rigour. Participant's experiences were categorised as "positive" or "negative" and a Chi Square analysis was then applied to each of the experiential themes, to compare experiences between the multivitamin and placebo groups, (subdividing the groups by gender). Usual experiences were categorised and discussed separately. Of the 182 participants enrolled, 116 completed the study and qualitative data were available from 114 participants. Thematic analysis revealed significant effects in favour of the multivitamin over placebo for participants experiencing increased energy levels (p=.022) and enhanced mood (p=.027). The beneficial effect on energy levels was particularly evident among female participants. A trend was found for participants reporting better sleep in the multivitamin over placebo. The multivitamin and placebo groups did not significantly differ in perceived positive or negative effects in areas relating to other aspects of mental function or physical health. No significant negative effects were revealed, although there was a non-significant trend for more people in the multivitamin group having minor digestive complaints. This represents the

  16. Participant experiences from chronic administration of a multivitamin versus placebo on subjective health and wellbeing: a double-blind qualitative analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarris Jerome

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While many randomised controlled trials have been conducted on multivitamins, to our knowledge no qualitative research exploring the subjective experience of taking a multivitamin during a clinical trial has been reported. Methods Semi-structured and open-ended written questions were incorporated into a 16-week double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, parallel groups trial of once-daily multivitamin administration. At the final study visit (week 16, three open-ended questions were posed to elucidate any positive, negative or unusual experiences from taking either the multivitamin or matched placebo. Qualitative thematic analysis was undertaken by researchers who were blind as to treatment condition of participants, and triangulation (independent analysis from three researchers was employed to ensure methodological rigour. Participant’s experiences were categorised as “positive” or “negative” and a Chi Square analysis was then applied to each of the experiential themes, to compare experiences between the multivitamin and placebo groups, (subdividing the groups by gender. Usual experiences were categorised and discussed separately. Results Of the 182 participants enrolled, 116 completed the study and qualitative data were available from 114 participants. Thematic analysis revealed significant effects in favour of the multivitamin over placebo for participants experiencing increased energy levels (p=.022 and enhanced mood (p=.027. The beneficial effect on energy levels was particularly evident among female participants. A trend was found for participants reporting better sleep in the multivitamin over placebo. The multivitamin and placebo groups did not significantly differ in perceived positive or negative effects in areas relating to other aspects of mental function or physical health. No significant negative effects were revealed, although there was a non-significant trend for more people in the multivitamin

  17. Dose response of Gabapentin Enacarbil versus placebo in subjects with moderate-to-severe primary restless legs syndrome: an integrated analysis of three 12-week studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanMeter, Susan A; Kavanagh, Sarah T; Warren, Samantha; Barrett, Ronald W

    2012-09-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of gabapentin enacarbil (Horizant®; GlaxoSmithKline, Brentford, UK) has been demonstrated in several restless legs syndrome (RLS) phase II and phase III clinical studies at various doses from 600 mg to 2400 mg. The objective of this study was to evaluate key efficacy and safety outcomes in subjects with RLS treated with once-daily gabapentin enacarbil 600 mg, 1200 mg, 1800 mg and 2400 mg, providing supportive evidence of the efficacy of gabapentin enacarbil 600 mg compared with higher doses and placebo. Integrated post hoc analysis of three 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in subjects with RLS. The three studies were carried out at multiple centres in the US. In total, 760 subjects were included in the pooled analysis (placebo, n = 245; gabapentin enacarbil 600 mg, n = 163; gabapentin enacarbil 1200 mg, n = 269; gabapentin enacarbil 1800 mg, n = 38; gabapentin enacarbil 2400 mg, n = 45). In all studies, gabapentin enacarbil or placebo was administered once daily at approximately 5 p.m. with food. Gabapentin enacarbil was initiated at a dose of 600 mg with subsequent titration in 600 mg increments every 3 days up to the randomized dose. The efficacy endpoints analysed for the purpose of this integrated analysis were change from baseline in International Restless Legs Scale (IRLS) total score and the proportion of responders (subjects rated as 'much' or 'very much' improved) on the investigator-rated Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I) scale. Safety endpoints assessed were the incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs. Gabapentin enacarbil 600 mg significantly improved IRLS total score compared with placebo (adjusted mean [standard error] change in IRLS total score from baseline to week 12 last observation carried forward: -13.6 [0.71] vs -9.3 [0.55]; adjusted mean treatment difference: -4.3; 95% CI -6.01, -2.52; p < 0

  18. Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Cognitive Function Profile of Rupatadine 10, 20 and 40 mg in Healthy Japanese Subjects: A Randomised Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Täubel, Jörg; Ferber, Georg; Fernandes, Sara; Lorch, Ulrike; Santamaría, Eva; Izquierdo, Iñaki

    2016-01-01

    Rupatadine is a marketed second generation antihistamine, with anti-PAF activity, indicated for symptomatic treatment of allergic rhinitis and urticaria. This study was conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), safety and tolerability of rupatadine in healthy Japanese subjects after single and multiple oral doses. In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 27 male and female healthy Japanese subjects were administered single and multiple escalating rupatadine dose of 10, 20 and 40 mg or placebo. Blood samples were collected at different time points for PK measurements and subjects were assessed for safety and tolerability. The effect of rupatadine on cognitive functioning was evaluated by means of computerized cognitive tests: rapid visual information processing (RVP), reaction time (RT), spatial working memory (SWM) and visual analogue scales (VAS). Exposure to rupatadine as measured by Cmax and AUC was found to increase in a dose dependent manner over the dose range of 10-40 mg for both single and multiple dose administration. The safety assessments showed that all treatment related side effects were of mild intensity and there were no serious adverse events (SAEs) or withdrawals due to treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) in this study. The therapeutic dose of rupatadine did not show any CNS impairment in any of the cognitive tests. This study demonstrated that rupatadine is safe and well tolerated by Japanese healthy subjects. The PK-PD profile confirmed previous experience with rupatadine.

  19. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 skin cancer prevention study of DFMO in subjects with previous history of skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, HH; Kim, K; Verma, A; Sielaff, K; Larson, PO; Snow, S; Lenaghan, T; Viner, JL; Douglass, J; Dreckschmidt, N; Hamielec, M; Pomplun, M; Sharata, HH; Puchalsky, D; Berg, ER; Havighurst, T; Carbone, PP

    2009-01-01

    Preclinical studies have shown the inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) by α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and resultant decreases in tissue concentrations of polyamines (putrescine & spermidine) prevents neoplastic developments in many tissue types. Clinical studies of oral DFMO at 500 mg/m2/day revealed it to be safe and tolerable and resulted in significant inhibition of phorbol ester-induced skin ODC activity. Two hundred and ninety-one participants (mean 61 y.o., 60% male) with a history of prior non-melanoma skin cancer (mean 4.5 skin cancers) were randomized to oral DFMO (500 mg/m2/day) or placebo for 4–5 years. There was a trend toward a history of more prior skin cancers in subjects randomized to placebo, but all other characteristics including sunscreen and NSAID use were evenly distributed. Evaluation of 1200-person years of follow-up revealed a new non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) rate of 0.5 events/person/year. The primary endpoint, new NMSC’s, was not significantly different between subjects taking DFMO and placebo (260 vs. 363 cancers, p=0.069, two-sample t test). Evaluation of basal cell (BCC) and squamous cell (SCC) cancers separately revealed very little difference in SCC between treatment groups but a significant difference in new BCC (DFMO 163 cancers; Placebo 243 cancers; expressed as event rate 0.28 BCC/person/year vs. 0.40 BCC/person/year, p=0.03). Compliance with DFMO was >90% and it appeared to be well tolerated with evidence of mild ototoxicity as measured by serial audiometric examination when compared to placebo subjects. Analysis of normal skin biopsies revealed a significant (pskin cancer taking daily DFMO had an insignificant reduction (p=0.069), in new NMSC that was predominantly due to a marked reduction in new BCC. Based on these data, the potential of DFMO, alone or in combination, to prevent skin cancers should be explored further. PMID:20051371

  20. Acupuncture for residual insomnia associated with major depressive disorder: a placebo- and sham-controlled, subject- and assessor-blind, randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ka-Fai; Yeung, Wing-Fai; Yu, Yee-Man; Yung, Kam-Ping; Zhang, Shi-Ping; Zhang, Zhang-Jin; Wong, Man-Tak; Lee, Wing-King; Chan, Lai-Wah

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for residual insomnia and other residual symptoms associated with major depressive disorder (MDD). 150 participants having significant insomnia for more than 3 months and a history of MDD (both based on DSM-IV-TR criteria) were recruited from 4 psychiatric outpatient clinics in Hong Kong from May 2011 to August 2013 to receive 9 sessions of treatment over 3 weeks. They were randomized to receive acupuncture, minimal acupuncture, or placebo acupuncture. Primary outcome was sleep diary-derived sleep efficiency. Secondary outcomes included other sleep diary parameters, actigraphy, anxiety and depressive symptoms, daytime functioning, and adverse events. The mean difference in sleep diary-derived sleep efficiency at 1-week posttreatment was -1.40 (95% CI, -7.08 to 4.28) between the acupuncture and minimal acupuncture groups and was 3.10 (95% CI, -3.64 to 9.84) between the acupuncture and placebo acupuncture groups. A χ(2) test showed that acupuncture produced a significantly higher proportion of participants achieving sleep-onset latency ≤ 30 minutes than did minimal acupuncture at 1-week posttreatment (P = .04). However, there was no significant between-group difference in most of the other outcomes. Treatment blinding was successful, as a majority of participants did not know which treatment they had received. Acupuncture was well tolerated, but the efficacy was only mild and similar to that of minimal acupuncture and placebo acupuncture. A high proportion of patients remained clinically significantly affected by insomnia after treatment. The finding raises certain doubts about the value of acupuncture and underscores the difficulties in the treatment of residual insomnia in MDD. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01707706. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  1. Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy with mefloquine in HIV-infected women receiving cotrimoxazole prophylaxis: a multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel González

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP is recommended for malaria prevention in HIV-negative pregnant women, but it is contraindicated in HIV-infected women taking daily cotrimoxazole prophylaxis (CTXp because of potential added risk of adverse effects associated with taking two antifolate drugs simultaneously. We studied the safety and efficacy of mefloquine (MQ in women receiving CTXp and long-lasting insecticide treated nets (LLITNs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A total of 1,071 HIV-infected women from Kenya, Mozambique, and Tanzania were randomized to receive either three doses of IPTp-MQ (15 mg/kg or placebo given at least one month apart; all received CTXp and a LLITN. IPTp-MQ was associated with reduced rates of maternal parasitemia (risk ratio [RR], 0.47 [95% CI 0.27-0.82]; p=0.008, placental malaria (RR, 0.52 [95% CI 0.29-0.90]; p=0.021, and reduced incidence of non-obstetric hospital admissions (RR, 0.59 [95% CI 0.37-0.95]; p=0.031 in the intention to treat (ITT analysis. There were no differences in the prevalence of adverse pregnancy outcomes between groups. Drug tolerability was poorer in the MQ group compared to the control group (29.6% referred dizziness and 23.9% vomiting after the first IPTp-MQ administration. HIV viral load at delivery was higher in the MQ group compared to the control group (p=0.048 in the ATP analysis. The frequency of perinatal mother to child transmission of HIV was increased in women who received MQ (RR, 1.95 [95% CI 1.14-3.33]; p=0.015. The main limitation of the latter finding relates to the exploratory nature of this part of the analysis. CONCLUSIONS: An effective antimalarial added to CTXp and LLITNs in HIV-infected pregnant women can improve malaria prevention, as well as maternal health through reduction in hospital admissions. However, MQ was not well tolerated, limiting its potential for IPTp and indicating the need to find alternatives with

  2. Efficacy and safety of casopitant mesylate, a neurokinin 1 (NK1)-receptor antagonist, in prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients receiving cisplatin-based highly emetogenic chemotherapy: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunberg, Steven M; Rolski, Janusz; Strausz, Janos

    2009-01-01

    control, n=266 single-dose oral casopitant mesylate, n=269 3-day intravenous and oral casopitant mesylate). Safety was reported in 802 patients who received either placebo or study medication. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00431236. FINDINGS: Significantly more patients in each......-drug antiemetic regimen of ondansetron, dexamethasone, and the neurokinin-1-receptor antagonist casopitant mesylate was able to prevent acute and delayed CINV events in patients naive to chemotherapy with a malignant solid tumour who were scheduled to receive cisplatin-based HEC regimens. METHODS: The study...... was done between Nov 6, 2006, and Oct 9, 2007, in 77 participating centres in 22 countries. All 810 patients enrolled in the trial received dexamethasone and ondansetron. Patients were randomly assigned to also receive placebo (n=269), single oral dose of casopitant mesylate (150 mg oral, n=271), or 3-day...

  3. Multivariate normally distributed biomarkers subject to limits of detection and receiver operating characteristic curve inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Neil J; Schisterman, Enrique F; Vexler, Albert

    2013-07-01

    Biomarkers are of ever-increasing importance to clinical practice and epidemiologic research. Multiple biomarkers are often measured per patient. Measurement of true biomarker levels is limited by laboratory precision, specifically measuring relatively low, or high, biomarker levels resulting in undetectable levels below, or above, a limit of detection (LOD). Ignoring these missing observations or replacing them with a constant are methods commonly used although they have been shown to lead to biased estimates of several parameters of interest, including the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and regression coefficients. We developed asymptotically consistent, efficient estimators, via maximum likelihood techniques, for the mean vector and covariance matrix of multivariate normally distributed biomarkers affected by LOD. We also developed an approximation for the Fisher information and covariance matrix for our maximum likelihood estimations (MLEs). We apply these results to an ROC curve setting, generating an MLE for the area under the curve for the best linear combination of multiple biomarkers and accompanying confidence interval. Point and confidence interval estimates are scrutinized by simulation study, with bias and root mean square error and coverage probability, respectively, displaying behavior consistent with MLEs. An example using three polychlorinated biphenyls to classify women with and without endometriosis illustrates how the underlying distribution of multiple biomarkers with LOD can be assessed and display increased discriminatory ability over naïve methods. Properly addressing LODs can lead to optimal biomarker combinations with increased discriminatory ability that may have been ignored because of measurement obstacles. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Exact closed form expressions for outage probability of GSC receivers over Rayleigh fading channel subject to self-interference

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Sungsik

    2010-11-01

    Previous work on performance analyses of generalized selection combining (GSC) RAKE receivers based on the signal to noise ratio focused on the development of methodologies to derive exact closed-form expressions for various performance measures. However, some open problems related to the performance evaluation of GSC RAKE receivers still remain to be solved such that an assessment of the impact of self-interference on the performance of GSC RAKE receivers. To have a full and exact understanding of the performance of GSC RAKE receivers, the outage probability of GSC RAKE receivers needs to be analyzed as closed-form expressions. The major difficulty in this problem is to derive some joint statistics of ordered exponential variates. With this motivation in mind, we capitalize in this paper on some new order statistics results to derive exact closed-form expressions for outage probability of GSC RAKE receivers subject to self-interference over independent and identically distributed Rayleigh fading channels. © 2010 IEEE.

  5. The effects of receiver placement on probe microphone, performance, and subjective measures with open canal hearing instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alworth, Lynzee N; Plyler, Patrick N; Reber, Monika Bertges; Johnstone, Patti M

    2010-04-01

    Open canal hearing instruments differ in method of sound delivery to the ear canal, distance between the microphone and the receiver, and physical size of the devices. Moreover, RITA (receiver in the aid) and RITE (receiver in the ear) hearing instruments may also differ in terms of retention and comfort as well as ease of use and care for certain individuals. What remains unclear, however, is if any or all of the abovementioned factors contribute to hearing aid outcome. To determine the effect of receiver location on performance and/or preference of listeners using open canal hearing instruments. An experimental study in which subjects were exposed to a repeated measures design. Twenty-five adult listeners with mild sloping to moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss (mean age 67 yr). Participants completed two six-week trial periods for each device type. Probe microphone, objective, and subjective measures (quiet, noise) were conducted unaided and aided at the end of each trial period. Occlusion effect results were not significantly different between the RITA and RITE instruments; however, frequency range was extended in the RITE instruments, resulting in significantly greater maximum gain for the RITE instruments than the RITA instruments at 4000 and 6000 Hz. Objective performance in quiet or in noise was unaffected by receiver location. Subjective measures revealed significantly greater satisfaction ratings for the RITE than for the RITA instruments. Similarly, preference in quiet and overall preference were significantly greater for the RITE than for the RITA instruments. Although no occlusion differences were noted between instruments, the RITE did demonstrate a significant difference in reserve gain before feedback at 4000 and 6000 Hz. Objectively; no positive benefit was noted between unaided and aided conditions on speech recognition tests. These results suggest that such testing may not be sensitive enough to determine aided benefit with open canal

  6. Effects of a commercial product containing guaraná on psychological well-being, anxiety and mood: a single-blind, placebo-controlled study in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestrini, Gianluca Ivan; Marino, Franca; Cosentino, Marco

    2013-05-25

    Guaranà (Paulinia cupana) seed extracts are increasingly popular worldwide for their stimulant, cognitive and behavioral effects. To assess the effects on psychological well-being, anxiety and mood of a commercially available guaranà preparation taken regularly over several days according to the labelled dosages and instructions, 27 healthy volunteers were enrolled in a prospective, randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Guaranà 350 mg × 3 daily just after breakfast or placebo were given for 5 consecutive days. Assessment was performed one day after the last intake and included the psychological well-being (PWB) scales, the self-rating anxiety state scale (SAS), and the Bond-Lader mood scales. There were no significant differences between guaranà and placebo in any of the 6 areas of PWB, in SAS, as well as in any of the 16 mood scales. In healthy subjects a 5-day treatment with a commercial preparation of guaranà used according to labelled instructions provided no evidence for any major effects on psychological well-being, anxiety and mood. Considering the increasing popularity of guaranà-containing products sold as dietary supplements for fitness purposes, controlled studies are strongly warranted to assess their benefits in comparison to the labelled claims.

  7. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluating the effects of quercetin-rich onion on cognitive function in elderly subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mie Nishimura

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Quercetin, a phenolic compound, exhibits various functional effectsthat includeanti-oxidant, anti-dyslipidemic, and anti-dysglycemic activities, in addition tobeneficial effects on cognitive function. We evaluated the effects of a powder made from quercetin-rich onions (‘Quergold’ and ‘Sarasara-gold’ on cognitive function.Methods:In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, we randomized 50 adults (25 males and 25 females, aged 65–84 years and made them consume products made from quercetin-rich (active test food group or quercetin-free(placebo food group onions. Cognitive function,hematological, and biological examinations were performed at the beginning (week 0 of the study and at weeks 12 and 24 after the start of the study. Results:There were no differences in the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE and cognitive impairment rating scale scores between the two groups. However, in younger subjects, the MMSE scores were significantly higher in the active test food group than in the placebo food group at week 24 (p = 0.019. Conclusion: These results suggest that the ingestion of quercetin-rich onions improves cognitive function and reduce cognitive declinein elderly people.

  8. Investigating the 'placebo personality' outside the pain paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darragh, Margot; Booth, Roger J; Consedine, Nathan S

    2014-05-01

    To identify personality traits related to placebo responding outside the context of pain. Sixty three healthy volunteers completed the study. Personality traits were measured online one week prior to a laboratory session in which two psychosocial stress tests were administered. Prior to the second test, the placebo group received an intranasal spray of 'serotonin' (placebo) with the suggestion that it would enhance recovery. Subjective stress, heart rate and heart rate variability were measured. Self reported and physiological responses to the placebo suggestion were assessed against personality variables. Placebo effects were demonstrated in both self reported and physiological stress metrics. Lower optimism and less empathic concern predicted greater perceived benefits from the placebo treatment; and lower drive, fun, and sensation seeking were related to a greater physiological response to the manipulation. Multivariate analyses revealed lower optimism and behavioural drive to be predictive of responding to the placebo manipulation. Findings are in contrast with prior work in pain paradigms which found higher levels of the same traits to be related to greater placebo analgesic responses. A cluster of traits characterised by behavioural drive, extraversion, optimism and novelty or fun seeking appears to be germane to placebo responsiveness, but contextual stimuli may generate different patterns of responding. A new conceptualisation of placebo responsiveness may be useful. Rather than a 'placebo personality' it may be that responsiveness is better typified by a two faceted transactional model, in which different personality facets respond to different contextual contingencies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Glucosamine-containing supplement improves locomotor functions in subjects with knee pain a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanzaki N

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Noriyuki Kanzaki,1 Yoshiko Ono,1 Hiroshi Shibata,1 Toshio Moritani2 1Institute for Health Care Science, Suntory Wellness Ltd, Seika-cho, Soraku-gun, 2Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of a glucosamine-containing supplement to improve locomotor functions in subjects with knee pain.Methods: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group comparative study was conducted for 16 weeks in 100 Japanese subjects (age, 51.8±0.8 years with knee pain. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the two supplements containing 1 1,200 mg of glucosamine hydrochloride, 60 mg of chondroitin sulfate, 45 mg of type II collagen peptides, 90 mg of quercetin glycosides, 10 mg of imidazole peptides, and 5 µg of vitamin D per day (GCQID group, n=50 or 2 a placebo (placebo group, n=50. Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure, visual analog scale score, normal walking speed, and knee-extensor strength were measured to evaluate the effects of the supplement on knee-joint functions and locomotor functions.Results: In subjects eligible for efficacy assessment, there was no significant group × time interaction, and there were improvements in knee-joint functions and locomotor functions in both groups, but there was no significant difference between the groups. In subjects with mild-to-severe knee pain at baseline, knee-extensor strength at week 8 (104.6±5.0% body weight vs 92.3±5.5% body weight, P=0.030 and the change in normal walking speed at week 16 (0.11±0.03 m/s vs 0.05±0.02 m/s, P=0.038 were significantly greater in the GCQID group than in the placebo group. Further subgroup analysis based on Kellgren–Lawrence (K–L grade showed that normal walking speed at week 16 (1.36±0.05 m/s vs 1.21±0.02 m/s, P<0.05 was significantly greater in the GCQID group than in the placebo group in subjects with K–L grade I. No

  10. Acceptability, Safety, and Efficacy of Oral Administration of Extracts of Black or Red Maca (Lepidium meyenii in Adult Human Subjects: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Gonzales-Arimborgo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The plant maca, grown at 4000 m altitude in the Peruvian Central Andes, contains hypocotyls that have been used as food and in traditional medicine for centuries. The aim of this research was to provide results on some health effects of oral administration of spray-dried extracts of black or red maca (Lepidium meyenii in adult human subjects living at low (LA and high altitude (HA. A total of 175 participants were given 3 g of either placebo, black, or red maca extract daily for 12 weeks. Primary outcomes were changes in sexual desire, mood, energy, health-related quality of life score (HRQL, and chronic mountain sickness (CMS score, or in glycaemia, blood pressure, and hemoglobin levels. Secondary outcomes were acceptability and safety, assessed using the Likert test and side effect self-recording, respectively, and the effect of altitude. At low altitude, 32, 30, and 32 participants started the study receiving placebo, red maca, or black maca, respectively. At high altitudes, 33, 35, and 31 participants started the study receiving placebo, red maca, and black maca, respectively. Consumption of spray-dried extracts of red and black maca resulted in improvement in mood, energy, and health status, and reduced CMS score. Fatty acids and macamides were higher in spray-dried extracts of black maca than in red maca. GABA predominated in spray-dried extracts of red maca. Effects on mood, energy, and CMS score were better with red maca. Black maca and, in smaller proportions, red maca reduced hemoglobin levels only in highlanders with abnormally high hemoglobin levels; neither variety of maca reduced hemoglobin levels in lowlanders. Black maca reduced blood glucose levels. Both varieties produced similar responses in mood, and HRQL score. Maca extracts consumed at LA or HA had good acceptability and did not show serious adverse effects. In conclusion, maca extract consumption relative to the placebo improved quality of life parameters. Differences in

  11. Acceptability, Safety, and Efficacy of Oral Administration of Extracts of Black or Red Maca (Lepidium meyenii) in Adult Human Subjects: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales-Arimborgo, Carla; Yupanqui, Irma; Montero, Elsa; Alarcón-Yaquetto, Dulce E; Zevallos-Concha, Alisson; Caballero, Lidia; Gasco, Manuel; Zhao, Jianping; Khan, Ikhlas A; Gonzales, Gustavo F

    2016-08-18

    The plant maca, grown at 4000 m altitude in the Peruvian Central Andes, contains hypocotyls that have been used as food and in traditional medicine for centuries. The aim of this research was to provide results on some health effects of oral administration of spray-dried extracts of black or red maca (Lepidium meyenii) in adult human subjects living at low (LA) and high altitude (HA). A total of 175 participants were given 3 g of either placebo, black, or red maca extract daily for 12 weeks. Primary outcomes were changes in sexual desire, mood, energy, health-related quality of life score (HRQL), and chronic mountain sickness (CMS) score, or in glycaemia, blood pressure, and hemoglobin levels. Secondary outcomes were acceptability and safety, assessed using the Likert test and side effect self-recording, respectively, and the effect of altitude. At low altitude, 32, 30, and 32 participants started the study receiving placebo, red maca, or black maca, respectively. At high altitudes, 33, 35, and 31 participants started the study receiving placebo, red maca, and black maca, respectively. Consumption of spray-dried extracts of red and black maca resulted in improvement in mood, energy, and health status, and reduced CMS score. Fatty acids and macamides were higher in spray-dried extracts of black maca than in red maca. GABA predominated in spray-dried extracts of red maca. Effects on mood, energy, and CMS score were better with red maca. Black maca and, in smaller proportions, red maca reduced hemoglobin levels only in highlanders with abnormally high hemoglobin levels; neither variety of maca reduced hemoglobin levels in lowlanders. Black maca reduced blood glucose levels. Both varieties produced similar responses in mood, and HRQL score. Maca extracts consumed at LA or HA had good acceptability and did not show serious adverse effects. In conclusion, maca extract consumption relative to the placebo improved quality of life parameters. Differences in the level of

  12. Anti-emetic effect of ginger powder versus placebo as an add-on therapy in children and young adults receiving high emetogenic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Anu Kochanujan; Sharma, Kamlesh K; Gupta, Yogendra K; Bakhshi, Sameer

    2011-02-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) are major adverse effects of chemotherapy. Ginger has been used in postoperative and pregnancy-induced nausea and vomiting. Data on its utility in reducing CINV in children and young adults are lacking. Sixty chemotherapy cycles of cisplatin/doxorubicin in bone sarcoma patients were randomized to ginger root powder capsules or placebo capsules as an additional antiemetic to ondensetron and dexamethasone in a double-blind design. Acute CINV was defined as nausea and vomiting occurring within 24 hr of start of chemotherapy (days 1-4) and delayed CINV as that occurring after 24 hr of completion of chemotherapy (days 5-10). CINV was evaluated as per Edmonton's Symptom Assessment Scale and National Cancer Institute criteria respectively. Acute moderate to severe nausea was observed in 28/30 (93.3%) cycles in control group as compared to 15/27 (55.6%) cycles in experimental group (P = 0.003). Acute moderate to severe vomiting was significantly more in the control group compared to the experimental group [23/30 (76.7%) vs. 9/27 (33.33%) respectively (P= 0.002)]. Delayed moderate to severe nausea was observed in 22/30 (73.3%) cycles in the control group as compared to 7/27 (25.9%) in the experimental group (P < 0.001). Delayed moderate to severe vomiting was significantly more in the control group compared to the experimental group [14/30 (46.67%) vs. 4/27 (14.81%) (P = 0.022)]. Ginger root powder was effective in reducing severity of acute and delayed CINV as additional therapy to ondensetron and dexamethasone in patients receiving high emetogenic chemotherapy (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00940368). Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Influence of a Suggestive Placebo Intervention on Psychobiological Responses to Social Stress: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann-Viehoff, Frank; Steckhan, Nico; Meissner, Karin; Deter, Hans-Christian; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a suggestive placebo intervention can reduce the subjective and neurobiological stress response to psychosocial stress. Fifty-four healthy male subjects with elevated levels of trait anxiety were randomly assigned in a 4:4:1 fashion to receive either no treatment (n = 24), a placebo pill (n = 24), or a herbal drug (n = 6) before undergoing a stress test. We repeatedly measured psychological variables as well as salivary cortisol, alpha-amylase, and heart rate variability prior to and following the stress test. The stressor increased subjective stress and anxiety, salivary cortisol, and alpha-amylase, and decreased heart rate variability (all P placebo or no treatment were found. Subjects receiving placebo showed increased wakefulness during the stress test compared with no-treatment controls (P placebo intervention increased alertness, but modulated neither subjective stress and anxiety nor the physiological response to psychosocial stress. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Effect of pulsed short-wave diathermy on pain and function of subjects with osteoarthritis of the knee: a placebo-controlled double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Y; Zilberman, R; Porat, R; Nahir, A M

    2005-05-01

    To examine the effects of pulsed short-wave diathermy (PSWD), delivered at an intensity sufficient to induce a thermal sensation and at an athermal intensity, in comparison with a placebo short-wave diathermy treatment, on reported pain, stiffness and functional ability and on mobility performance of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. A placebo-controlled double-blind trial with sequential allocation of patients to different treatment groups. Outpatient physiotherapy department. One hundred and three consecutive patients, mean age 73.7 (+/-6.6) years with osteoarthritis of one or both knees for at least three months. All participants received three 20-min-long treatments per week for three weeks. One group received PSWD with mean power of 18 W (thermal effect), one group received PSWD with mean power of 1.8 W (athermal effect), and one group received sham short-wave diathermy treatment. Patients were assessed before the initial treatment, immediately following the last treatment, and at a three-month follow-up. Outcome measures included the WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index, which assessed reported pain, stiffness, and functional ability, and four measures of mobility performance: Timed Get Up and Go test (TGUG), stair-climbing, stair, descending and a 3-min walk. A difference across time was observed for the pain and stiffness categories of the WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index (p = 0.033 and p = 0.008, respectively), with no differences between groups. No other significant differences across time or between groups were observed in any of the other measures. The findings do not demonstrate pulsed short-wave diathermy, as it is utilized in clinical settings, to be effective in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee.

  15. Frequency and time to onset of community-acquired respiratory tract infections in patients receiving esomeprazole: a retrospective analysis of patient-level data in placebo-controlled studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estborn, L; Joelson, S

    2015-09-01

    Debate continues on whether a causal association exists between the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and the risk of respiratory tract infections, in particular pneumonia. To investigate the occurrence of community-acquired respiratory tract infections, including pneumonia, in patients receiving esomeprazole. A retrospective investigation of pooled data on adverse events related to respiratory tract infections, originally reported in 24 randomised, double-blind clinical studies, was conducted. The frequencies of respiratory tract infections and their relative risks were calculated retrospectively for the total patient population (9602 patients receiving esomeprazole and 5500 receiving placebo) and for sub-populations defined according to sex, age, esomeprazole dose, indication and geographical region. The cumulative frequency of first occurrence of events was calculated over 180 days. Frequencies of respiratory tract infections were similar in patients receiving esomeprazole and in those receiving placebo (any respiratory tract infection or signs/symptoms potentially indicating an respiratory tract infection, 0.278 and 0.296 patients per patient-year; lower respiratory tract infections, 0.048 and 0.058 per patient-year; pneumonia, 0.006 and 0.009 per patient-year, respectively). The relative risk for any respiratory tract infection in patients receiving esomeprazole compared with placebo was 0.94 (95% CI, 0.86-1.04). For lower respiratory tract infections, the relative risk was 0.82 (95% CI, 0.65-1.03) and for pneumonia, 0.66 (95% CI, 0.36-1.22). Sub-analyses by demographics, dose and indication yielded similar results to the overall analysis. The occurrence of respiratory tract infections was evenly distributed over time and similar in the esomeprazole and placebo groups. There is no causal association between treatment with esomeprazole and the occurrence of community-acquired respiratory tract infections, including pneumonia. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Opicapone: a short lived and very long acting novel catechol‐O‐methyltransferase inhibitor following multiple dose administration in healthy subjects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rocha, José Francisco; Almeida, Luis; Falcão, Amílcar; Palma, P. Nuno; Loureiro, Ana I; Pinto, Roberto; Bonifácio, Maria João; Wright, Lyndon C; Nunes, Teresa; Soares‐da‐Silva, Patrício

    2013-01-01

    ...) activity following repeated doses of opicapone. This randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study enrolled healthy male subjects who received either once daily placebo or opicapone 5, 10, 20 or 30 mg for 8 days...

  17. Proarrhythmic safety of repeat doses of mirabegron in healthy subjects: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-, and active-controlled thorough QT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, M; van Gelderen, E M; Lee, J H; Kowalski, D L; Yen, M; Goldwater, R; Mujais, S K; Schaddelee, M P; de Koning, P; Kaibara, A; Moy, S S; Keirns, J J

    2012-12-01

    Potential effects of the selective β(3)-adrenoceptor agonist mirabegron on cardiac repolarization were studied in healthy subjects. The four-arm, parallel, two-way crossover study was double-blind and placebo- and active (moxifloxacin)-controlled. After 2 baseline ECG days, subjects were randomized to one of eight treatment sequences (22 females and 22 males per sequence) of placebo crossed over with once-daily (10 days) 50, 100, or 200 mg mirabegron or a single 400-mg moxifloxacin dose on day 10. In each period, continuous ECGs were recorded at two baselines and on the last drug administration day. The lower one-sided 95% confidence interval for moxifloxacin effect on QTcI was >5 ms, demonstrating assay sensitivity. According to ICH E14 criteria, mirabegron did not cause QTcI prolongation at the 50-mg therapeutic and 100-mg supratherapeutic doses in either sex. Mirabegron prolonged QTcI interval at the 200-mg supratherapeutic dose (upper one-sided 95% CI >10 ms) in females, but not in males.

  18. Psychomotor and subjective effects of bilastine, hydroxyzine, and cetirizine, in combination with alcohol: a randomized, double-blind, crossover, and positive-controlled and placebo-controlled Phase I clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gea, Consuelo; Martínez, Joan; Ballester, Maria Rosa; Gich, Ignasi; Valiente, Román; Antonijoan, Rosa Maria

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of concomitant administration of alcohol and bilastine versus alcohol alone on the central nervous system. Twenty-four healthy young volunteers of both sexes participated in a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, crossover, and positive-controlled and placebo-controlled clinical trials. At 1-week intervals, subjects received six different treatments: (i) placebo; (ii) alcohol 0.8 g/kg alone (ALC); (iii) ALC in combination with: bilastine 20 mg (B20 + A); (iv) bilastine 80 mg (B80 + A); (v) cetirizine 10 mg (CET + A); and (vi) hydroxyzine 25 mg (HYD + A). Psychomotor performance tests (fine motor, finger tapping, nystagmus, critical flicker-fusion frequency, temporal estimation, 'd2' cancellation, and simple reaction time) and subjective self-reports (drunkenness, drowsiness, mental slowness, clumsiness, anger, attentiveness, competence, happiness, hostility, interest, and extroversion) were carried out at baseline and multiple points thereafter. All active treatments induced a significant psychomotor impairment. The greatest and most lasting impairment was observed with HYD + A followed by B80 + A and CET + A. In contrast, objective measures showed less impairment with B20 + A and ALC, both with a similar magnitude. Self-reports showed a subjective perception of performance impairment in all active treatments. Concomitant administration of bilastine (at therapeutic dose) and alcohol does not produce greater central nervous system depressant effects than ACL alone. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Double-blind, placebo-controlled pharmacodynamic studies with a nutraceutical and a pharmaceutical dose of ademetionine (SAMe) in elderly subjects, utilizing EEG mapping and psychometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, O; Saletu, B; Anderer, P; Assandri, A; di Padova, C; Corrado, M; Saletu-Zyhlarz, G M

    2005-10-01

    In a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, the effects of S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAMe) on brain function measures of 12 normal elderly volunteers (6 m/6 f, aged 57-73 years, mean: 61 years) were investigated by means of EEG mapping and psychometry. In random order, the subjects were orally administered a pharmaceutical dose of 1600 mg SAMe, a nutraceutical dose of 400 mg SAMe and placebo, each over a period of 15 days, with wash-out periods of 2 weeks in between. EEG recordings, psychometric tests and evaluations of tolerability and side effects were carried out 0, 1, 3 and 6 h after drug administration on days 1 and 15. Multivariate analysis based on MANOVA/Hotelling T2 tests of quantitative EEG data demonstrated significant central effects of SAMe as compared with placebo after acute, subacute and superimposed drug administration of both the nutraceutical and the pharmaceutical dose. EEG changes induced by SAMe were characterized by an increase in total power, a decrease in absolute and relative power in the delta/theta and slow alpha frequencies, an increase in absolute and relative power in the alpha-2 and beta frequencies as well as an acceleration of the alpha centroid and the centroid of the total power spectrum. The delta/theta and the beta centroid showed variable changes over time. The dominant alpha frequency was accelerated, the absolute and relative power in the dominant alpha frequency attenuated after SAMe as compared with placebo. These acute and subacute pharmaco-EEG findings in elderly subjects are typical of activating antidepressants. Time-efficacy calculations showed that acute oral administration of SAMe in both the nutraceutical and the pharmaceutical dose induced the pharmacodynamic peak effect in the first hour with a subsequent decline. The 3rd and 6th hours still showed a significant encephalotropic effect after the 1600 mg dose. The maximum EEG effect was noted after 2 weeks of oral administration of both 1600 mg/die and

  20. Self-esteem, confidence, and relationships in Brazilian men with erectile dysfunction receiving sildenafil citrate: a randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glina, Sidney; Damião, Ronaldo; Abdo, Carmita; Afif-Abdo, João; Tseng, Li-Jung; Stecher, Vera

    2009-01-01

    Psychosocial manifestations of erectile dysfunction (ED) differ across cultures. Understanding the treatment response to ED medications within cultural groups can aid in resource allocation and in developing treatment strategies. Evaluate the effect of sildenafil treatment on self-esteem, confidence, and sexual relationship satisfaction in Brazilian men with ED. The Self-Esteem and Relationship (SEAR) questionnaire, a validated, 14-question instrument developed to specifically address self-esteem and relationship issues within the context of ED. Men aged 18 years or older with a clinical diagnosis of ED (self-esteem subscale of the SEAR questionnaire. Thirteen Brazilian sites participated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of sildenafil treatment for ED. Patients were randomized to receive either 50 mg of sildenafil (adjustable to 25 mg or 100 mg based on patient response) or matching placebo approximately 1 hour before anticipated sexual activity but not more than once a day. At the end of double-blind treatment, 63 and 66 patients in the placebo and sildenafil groups, respectively, from 13 Brazilian sites were assessed for efficacy. Brazilian patients receiving sildenafil had significantly greater improvements in their scores on the SEAR self-esteem subscale (42.9 [95% confidence interval 35.7-50.0]) compared with placebo (21.1 [95% confidence interval 13.7-28.6]; P self-esteem, confidence, and relationships after treatment with sildenafil.

  1. First-In-Human, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized, Dose-Escalation Study of BG00010, a Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Family Member, in Subjects with Unilateral Sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolan, Paul E; O'Neill, Gilmore; Versage, Eve; Rana, Jitesh; Tang, Yongqiang; Galluppi, Gerald; Aycardi, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of single doses of BG00010 (neublastin, artemin, enovin) in subjects with unilateral sciatica. This was a single-center, blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized Phase 1 sequential-cohort, dose-escalation study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00961766; funded by Biogen Idec). Adults with unilateral sciatica were enrolled at The Royal Adelaide Hospital, Australia. Four subjects were assigned to each of eleven cohorts (intravenous BG00010 0.3, 1, 3, 10, 25, 50, 100, 200, 400, or 800 μg/kg, or subcutaneous BG00010 50 μg/kg) and were randomized 3:1 to receive a single dose of BG00010 or placebo. The primary safety and tolerability assessments were: adverse events; clinical laboratory parameters and vital signs; pain as measured by a Likert rating scale; intra-epidermal nerve fiber density; and longitudinal assessment of quantitative sensory test parameters. Blood, serum, and plasma samples were collected for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic assessments. Subjects were blinded to treatment assignment throughout the study. The investigator was blinded to treatment assignment until the Data Safety Review Committee review of unblinded data, which occurred after day 28. Beyond the planned enrollment of 44 subjects, four additional subjects were enrolled into to the intravenous BG00010 200 μg/kg cohort after one original subject experienced mild generalized pruritus. Therefore, a total of 48 subjects were enrolled between August 2009 and December 2011; all were included in the safety analyses. BG00010 was generally well tolerated: in primary analyses, the most common treatment-emergent adverse events were changes in temperature perception, pruritus, rash, or headache; no trends were observed in clinical laboratory parameters, vital signs, intra-epidermal nerve fiber density, or quantitative sensory testing. BG00010 was not associated with any clear, dose-dependent trends in Likert pain scores. BG00010 was

  2. A Phase IIIb, Multicentre, Randomised, Parallel-Group, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Study to Investigate the Efficacy and Safety of OROS Hydromorphone in Subjects with Moderate-to-Severe Chronic Pain Induced by Osteoarthritis of the Hip or the Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Vojtaššák

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Opioid analgesics are included in treatment guidelines for the symptomatic management of osteoarthritis (OA. Starting with a low dose of opioid and slowly titrating to a higher dose may help avoid intolerable side effects. Methods. Subjects aged ≥40 years, with moderate to severe pain induced by OA of the hip or knee not adequately controlled by previous non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs or paracetamol treatment, were enrolled. Subjects received OROS hydromorphone 4 mg or placebo once-daily. The dose was titrated every 3-4 days in case of unsatisfactory pain control during the 4-week titration phase. A 12 week maintenance phase followed. The primary efficacy endpoint was the change in “pain on average” measured on the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI scale from baseline to the end of the maintenance phase. Results. 139 subjects received OROS hydromorphone and 149 subjects received placebo. All efficacy endpoints showed similar improvements from baseline to end of study in the 2 groups. The safety results were consistent with the safety profile of OROS hydromorphone. Conclusion.The study did not meet the primary endpoint; although many subjects' pain was not adequately controlled at inclusion, their pain may have improved with continued paracetamol or NSAID treatment.

  3. The placebo effect and nothingness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tine

    In this paper I shall discuss the placebo effect from a posthuman angle. The placebo effect is a medical conundrum, as it is a medical effect that is produced by “nothing”. Placebo literally means, ”I please”, and the placebo has, among other things, been defined as an inert substance, often...... a calcium pill. Placebos are being used in medical trials to determine how much of the medical effect is caused by other factors than medical. There is a vast amount of literature on the placebo effect and it has been studied since the late 1940’ies, mainly for the purpose of pre-elimination from medical......, applying Karen Barad’s concept of agential realism to the problem. I argue that the placebo effect is a cuttingtogether- apart that produces specific agencies in the placebo phenomenon – that is, both the subject under treatment and the placebo emerge in the placebo effect. Through quantum physics, Barad...

  4. Effect of repeated doses of netazepide, a gastrin receptor antagonist, omeprazole and placebo on 24 h gastric acidity and gastrin in healthy subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Malcolm; Warrington, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Aim To administer repeated oral doses of netazepide to healthy subjects for the first time, to assess safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and effect on 24 h gastric pH and plasma gastrin. Method We did two randomized, double-blind, parallel group studies. The first compared netazepide 25 and 100 mg 12 hourly, omeprazole 20 mg once daily and placebo for 7 days. On day 7 only, we measured pH and assayed plasma gastrin. The second study compared netazepide 5, 10 and 25 mg and placebo once daily for 14 days. We measured pH on days 1, 7 and 14 and assayed plasma gastrin on days 1 and 14. We compared treatments by time gastric pH ≥ 4 during 0–4, 4–9, 9–13 and 13–24 h after the morning dose, and by plasma gastrin. P gastrin significantly. Netazepide had linear pharmacokinetics. In the second study, netazepide caused dose-dependent, sustained increases in pH on day 1, but as in the first study, netazepide had little effect on pH on days 7 and 14. Again, netazepide increased plasma gastrin significantly. Conclusion Although repeated doses of netazepide led to tolerance to its effect on pH, the accompanying increase in plasma gastrin is consistent with continued inhibition of acid secretion, via gastrin receptor antagonism and gene up-regulation. PMID:23432415

  5. A Phase 1, Single-center, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Study in Healthy Subjects to Assess the Safety, Tolerability, Clinical Effects, and Pharmacokinetics-Pharmacodynamics of Intravenous Cyclopropyl-methoxycarbonylmetomidate (ABP-700) after a Single Ascending Bolus Dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struys, Michel M R F; Valk, Beatrijs I; Eleveld, Douglas J; Absalom, Anthony R; Meyer, Peter; Meier, Sascha; den Daas, Izaak; Chou, Thomas; van Amsterdam, Kai; Campagna, Jason A; Sweeney, Steven P

    2017-07-01

    Cyclopropyl-methoxycarbonylmetomidate (ABP-700) is a new "soft" etomidate analog. The primary objectives of this first-in-human study were to describe the safety and efficacy of ABP-700 and to determine its maximum tolerated dose. Secondary objectives were to characterize the pharmacokinetics of ABP-700 and its primary metabolite (cyclopropyl-methoxycarbonyl acid), to assess the clinical effects of ABP-700, and to investigate the dose-response and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships. Sixty subjects were divided into 10 cohorts and received an increasing, single bolus of either ABP-700 or placebo. Safety was assessed by clinical laboratory evaluations, infusion-site reactions, continuous monitoring of vital signs, physical examination, adverse event monitoring, and adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation testing. Clinical effects were assessed with modified observer's assessment of alertness/sedation and Bispectral Index monitoring. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. Stopping criteria were met at 1.00 mg/kg dose. No serious adverse events were reported. Adverse events were dose-dependent and comprised involuntary muscle movement, tachycardia, and ventilatory effects. Adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation evoked a physiologic cortisol response in all subjects, no different from placebo. Pharmacokinetics were dose-proportional. A three-compartment pharmacokinetic model described the data well. A rapid onset of anesthesia/sedation after bolus administration and also a rapid recovery were observed. A quantitative concentration-effect relationship was described for the modified observer's assessment of alertness/sedation and Bispectral Index. This first-in-human study of ABP-700 shows that ABP-700 was safe and well tolerated after single-bolus injections up to 1.00 mg/kg. Bolus doses of 0.25 and 0.35 mg/kg were found to provide the most beneficial clinical effect versus side-effect profile.

  6. Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled, Trial of Risedronate for the Prevention of Bone Mineral Density Loss in Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy Plus Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Lukka, Himu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juravinski Cancer Center, McMaster University, Hamilton (Canada); Cheung, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Corbett, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juravinski Cancer Center, McMaster University, Hamilton (Canada); Briones-Urbina, Rosario [Department of Medicine, Women' s College Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Vieth, Reinhold [Departments of Nutritional Sciences and Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Ehrlich, Lisa [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto (Canada); Kiss, Alex [Department of Health Policy, Management, and Evaluation, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Danjoux, Cyril, E-mail: Cyril.danjoux@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been used as an adjuvant treatment to radiation therapy (RT) for the management of locally advanced prostate carcinoma. Long-term ADT decreases bone mineral density (BMD) and increases the risk of osteoporosis. The objective of this clinical trial was to evaluate the efficacy of risedronate for the prevention of BMD loss in nonmetastatic prostate cancer patients undergoing RT plus 2 to 3 years of ADT. Methods and Materials: A double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized trial was conducted for nonmetastatic prostate cancer patients receiving RT plus 2 to 3 years of ADT. All had T scores > −2.5 on dual energy x-ray absorptiometry at baseline. Patients were randomized 1:1 between risedronate and placebo for 2 years. The primary endpoints were the percent changes in the BMD of the lumbar spine at 1 and 2 years from baseline, measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Analyses of the changes in BMD and bone turnover biomarkers were carried out by comparing mean values of the intrapatient changes between the 2 arms, using standard t tests. Results: One hundred four patients were accrued between 2004 and 2007, with 52 in each arm. Mean age was 66.8 and 67.5 years for the placebo and risedronate, respectively. At 1 and 2 years, mean (±SE) BMD of the lumbar spine decreased by 5.77% ± 4.66% and 13.55% ± 6.33%, respectively, in the placebo, compared with 0.12% ± 1.29% at 1 year (P=.2485) and 0.85% ± 1.56% (P=.0583) at 2 years in the risedronate. The placebo had a significant increase in serum bone turnover biomarkers compared with the risedronate. Conclusions: Weekly oral risedronate prevented BMD loss at 2 years and resulted in significant suppression of bone turnover biomarkers for 24 months for patients receiving RT plus 2 to 3 years of ADT.

  7. A Randomized, Double-Blind Study Assessing Changes in Cognitive Function in Indian School Children Receiving a Combination of Bacopa monnieri and Micronutrient Supplementation vs. Placebo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tora Mitra-Ganguli

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have indicated a chronic cognitive enhancing effect of Bacopa monnieri across different ages and cognitive impairment associated with vitamin and mineral deficiencies in children. Therefore, we investigated the effects of 4-month supplementation with a combination of B. monnieri extract and multiple micronutrients on cognitive functions in Indian school children aged 7–12 years. This was a randomized, double-blind, parallel design, single-center study in which 300 children were randomized to receive a beverage either fortified with B. monnieri and multiple micronutrients (“fortified” or a non-fortified isocaloric equivalent (“control” twice-daily for 4 months. Cognitive function was assessed by the Cambridge Neuropsychological Automated Test Battery (CANTAB administered at baseline, Day 60 and Day 121. The primary endpoint was change in short-term memory (working memory from baseline in subjects receiving “fortified” vs. “control” beverages after 4 months. Secondary endpoints included sustained attention, episodic memory, and executive function. The “fortified” beverage did not significantly improve short-term memory or any of the secondary outcomes tested relative to the “control” beverage. However, the spatial working memory “strategy” score showed significant improvement on Day 60 (difference between groups in change from baseline: −0.55; p < 0.05, but not on Day 121 due to the active intervention. Study products were well-tolerated. Reasons for these unexpected findings are discussed.

  8. Placebo can enhance creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenkrantz, Liron; Mayo, Avraham E; Ilan, Tomer; Hart, Yuval; Noy, Lior; Alon, Uri

    2017-01-01

    The placebo effect is usually studied in clinical settings for decreasing negative symptoms such as pain, depression and anxiety. There is interest in exploring the placebo effect also outside the clinic, for enhancing positive aspects of performance or cognition. Several studies indicate that placebo can enhance cognitive abilities including memory, implicit learning and general knowledge. Here, we ask whether placebo can enhance creativity, an important aspect of human cognition. Subjects were randomly assigned to a control group who smelled and rated an odorant (n = 45), and a placebo group who were treated identically but were also told that the odorant increases creativity and reduces inhibitions (n = 45). Subjects completed a recently developed automated test for creativity, the creative foraging game (CFG), and a randomly chosen subset (n = 57) also completed two manual standardized creativity tests, the alternate uses test (AUT) and the Torrance test (TTCT). In all three tests, participants were asked to create as many original solutions and were scored for originality, flexibility and fluency. The placebo group showed higher originality than the control group both in the CFG (pcreativity. This strengthens the view that placebo can be used not only to reduce negative clinical symptoms, but also to enhance positive aspects of cognition. Furthermore, we find that the impact of placebo on creativity can be tested by CFG, which can quantify multiple aspects of creative search without need for manual coding. This approach opens the way to explore the behavioral and neural mechanisms by which placebo might amplify creativity.

  9. Interval estimation for the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve when data are subject to error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanhong; Koval, John J; Donner, Allan; Zou, G Y

    2010-10-30

    The area (A) under the receiver operating characteristic curve is commonly used to quantify the ability of a biomarker to correctly classify individuals into two populations. However, many markers are subject to measurement error, which must be accounted for to prevent understating their effectiveness. In this paper, we develop a new confidence interval procedure for A which is adjusted for measurement error using either external or internal replicated measurements. Based on the observation that A is a function of normal means and variances, we develop the procedure by recovering variance estimates needed from confidence limits for normal means and variances. Simulation results show that the procedure performs better than the previous ones based on the delta-method in terms of coverage percentage, balance of tail errors and interval width. Two examples are presented. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Interexaminer reliability of the electromagnetic radiation receiver for determining lumbar spinal joint dysfunction in subjects with low back pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemmell, H.A.; Jacobson, B.H.; Edwards, S.W.; Heng, B.J.

    1990-03-01

    Twenty subjects (6 male, 14 female) with low back pain were examined by two experienced and licensed chiropractic doctors (E1 and E2). Both examiners examined the patients using a Toftness Electromagnetic Radiation Receiver (EMRR) and by manual palpation (MP) of the spinous processes. Interexaminer reliability was calculated at three sites (L3, L4, L5) for the following combinations: (a) E1,MP--E2,MP; (b) E1,EMRR--E2,EMRR; (c) E1,MP--E2,EMRR; and (d) E2,MP--E1,EMRR, and intraexaminer reliability was calculated for the following variables: (e) E1,MP--E1,EMRR; and (f) E2,MP--E2,EMRR. Results of a Kappa coefficient analysis for interexaminer reliability of the stated combinations and at the specific sites were: (a) -0.071, 0.400, 0.200; (b) -0.013, 0.100, -0.120; (c) 0.286, 0.300, 0.200; (d) -0.081, 0.000, 0.048. These results predominantly indicate a poor to fair interexaminer reliability. The results of a Kappa coefficient analysis for intraexaminer reliability of the stated combinations were: (e) 0.111, 0.400, 0.737; (f) 0.000, 0.100, 0.368. These results indicate a poor to fair reliability. It was concluded that in subjects with low back pain the EMRR may not be a reliable indicator of spinal joint dysfunction.

  11. Sleep-wake difficulties in community-dwelling cancer patients receiving palliative care: subjective and objective assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatchez, Marie Solange; Savard, Josée; Savard, Marie-Hélène; Aubin, Michèle; Ivers, Hans

    2017-09-21

    Prevalence rates of sleep difficulties in advanced cancer patients have varied widely across studies (12 to 96%), and none of these employed a diagnostic interview to distinguish different types of sleep-wake disorders. Moreover, very limited information is available on subjective and objective sleep parameters in this population. Our study was conducted in palliative cancer patients and aimed to assess rates of sleep-wake disorders and subsyndromal symptoms and to document subjective and objective sleep-wake parameters across various types of sleep-wake difficulties. The sample was composed of 51 community-dwelling cancer patients receiving palliative care and having an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group score of 2 or 3. Relevant sections of the Duke Interview for Sleep Disorders were administered over the phone. An actigraphic recording and a daily sleep diary were completed for 7 consecutive days. Overall, 68.6% of the sample had at least one type of sleep-wake difficulty (disorder or symptoms): 31.4% had insomnia and 29.4% had hypersomnolence as their main sleep-wake problem. Participants with insomnia as their main sleep difficulty had greater disruptions of subjective sleep parameters, while objectively-assessed sleep was more disrupted in patients with hypersomnolence comorbid with another sleep-wake difficulty. Significance of the Results: The high rates of sleep-wake difficulties found in this study indicate a need to screen more systematically for sleep-wake disorders, including insomnia and hypersomnolence, in both palliative care research and clinical practice, and to develop effective nonpharmacological interventions specifically adapted to this population.

  12. ESSENS dyslipidemia: A placebo-controlled, randomized study of a nutritional supplement containing red yeast rice in subjects with newly diagnosed dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasliwal, Ravi R; Bansal, Manish; Gupta, Rajeev; Shah, Siddharth; Dani, Sameer; Oomman, Abraham; Pai, Vikas; Prasad, Guru Mallapa; Singhvi, Sunil; Patel, Jitendra; Sivam, Sakthivel; Trehan, Naresh

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests prolonged exposure to lower levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), starting at a younger age, substantially lowers cardiovascular (CV) risk. Accordingly, the CV pandemic affecting younger population in low- to low-middle-income countries, where statin usage is poor even in secondary prevention, may benefit from lipid-lowering nutritional products, as nutritional intervention is generally preferred in these cultures. However, the safety and efficacy of such preparations have not been systematically tested. In this multicenter, double-blind study, 191 statin-free subjects with newly-diagnosed hyperlipidemia (LDL-C >120 mg/dL, 3.11 mmol/L) and no evidence of CV disease were randomized to one capsule of a proprietary bioactive phytonutrient formulation containing red yeast rice, grape-seed, niacinamide, and folic acid (RYR-NS) or matched placebo twice daily, along with lifestyle modification, for 12 wk. Mean baseline LDL-C levels were 148.5 ± 24.0 mg/dL (3.85 ± 0.62 mmol/L) and 148.6 ± 21.9 mg/dL (3.85 ± 0.57 mmol/L) in the RYR-NS and placebo groups respectively. Compared with placebo, RYR-NS resulted in a significant reduction in LDL-C (-29.4% versus -3.5%, P < 0.0001) and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C; -29.8% versus -10.3%, P < 0.0001) at 12 wk. With RYR-NS, 43.4% individuals attained desirable LDL-C levels and 55.4% desirable non-HDL-C levels by week 12, compared to only 0% and 1.1%, respectively, at baseline. No safety issues were observed. This study demonstrates the efficacy and safety of RYR-NS in lowering LDL-C and non-HDL-C after 12 wk, with magnitude of LDL-C reduction being comparable to that seen with moderate-intensity statin therapy. Further long-term studies are required to determine the impact of RYR-NS on treatment adherence and clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2 study evaluating the efficacy and safety of romiplostim treatment of patients with low or intermediate-1 risk myelodysplastic syndrome receiving lenalidomide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Eunice S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lenalidomide treatment in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS may lead to thrombocytopenia and dose reductions/delays. This study evaluated the safety and tolerability of the thrombopoietin mimetic romiplostim and its effects on the incidence of clinically significant thrombocytopenic events (CSTEs in lower risk MDS patients receiving lenalidomide. Methods Patients were assigned to weekly placebo (n = 12 or romiplostim 500 μg (n = 14 or 750 μg (n = 13 for four 28-day lenalidomide cycles. Results The treatment groups were generally similar with respect to baseline disease characteristics. Del(5q abnormalities were noted in 1 (8% patient in the placebo group, 3 (21% in the romiplostim 500 μg group, and two (15% in the 750 μg group. CSTEs were noted in 8 (67% patients in the placebo group, 4 (29% in the romiplostim 500 μg group, and 8 (62% in the romiplostim 750 μg group. Throughout the study, median platelet counts trended lower in placebo-treated than in romiplostim-treated patients. Thrombocytopenia-related adjustments in lenalidomide occurred in 6 (50% patients in the placebo group, 5 (36% in the romiplostim 500 μg group, and 2 (15% in the 750 μg group. Although the percentages of patients who received platelet transfusions were similar across treatment groups, there was a trend toward lower numbers of transfusions in both romiplostim groups during each treatment cycle. There were two serious treatment-related adverse events during the treatment period (cerebrovascular accident, placebo; worsening thrombocytopenia, romiplostim 500 μg. Two patients (romiplostim 500 and 750 μg, respectively had an increase in bone marrow blasts to >20% during treatment, but had no post-treatment biopsy to confirm or exclude the diagnosis of progression to AML. Conclusions These data suggest that romiplostim administered to MDS patients during lenalidomide treatment may decrease the frequency of dose

  14. Subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Vega Encabo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I claim that subjectivity is a way of being that is constituted through a set of practices in which the self is subject to the dangers of fictionalizing and plotting her life and self-image. I examine some ways of becoming subject through narratives and through theatrical performance before others. Through these practices, a real and active subjectivity is revealed, capable of self-knowledge and self-transformation. 

  15. Effect of repeated doses of netazepide, a gastrin receptor antagonist, omeprazole and placebo on 24 h gastric acidity and gastrin in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Malcolm; Warrington, Steve

    2013-11-01

    To administer repeated oral doses of netazepide to healthy subjects for the first time, to assess safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and effect on 24 h gastric pH and plasma gastrin. We did two randomized, double-blind, parallel group studies. The first compared netazepide 25 and 100 mg 12 hourly, omeprazole 20 mg once daily and placebo for 7 days. On day 7 only, we measured pH and assayed plasma gastrin. The second study compared netazepide 5, 10 and 25 mg and placebo once daily for 14 days. We measured pH on days 1, 7 and 14 and assayed plasma gastrin on days 1 and 14. We compared treatments by time gastric pH ≥ 4 during 0-4, 4-9, 9-13 and 13-24 h after the morning dose, and by plasma gastrin. P gastrin significantly. Netazepide had linear pharmacokinetics. In the second study, netazepide caused dose-dependent, sustained increases in pH on day 1, but as in the first study, netazepide had little effect on pH on days 7 and 14. Again, netazepide increased plasma gastrin significantly. Although repeated doses of netazepide led to tolerance to its effect on pH, the accompanying increase in plasma gastrin is consistent with continued inhibition of acid secretion, via gastrin receptor antagonism and gene up-regulation. © 2013 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. Validation of the post sleep questionnaire for assessing subjects with restless legs syndrome: results from two double-blind, multicenter, placebo-controlled clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharmal Murtuza

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of the subjective nature of Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS symptoms and the impact of these symptoms on sleep, patient-reported outcomes (PROs play a prominent role as study endpoints in clinical trials investigating RLS treatments. The objective of this study was to validate a new measure, the Post Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ, to assess sleep dysfunction in subjects with moderate-to-severe RLS symptoms. Methods Pooled data were analyzed from two 12-week, randomized, placebo-controlled trials of gabapentin enacarbil (N = 540. At baseline and Week 12, subjects completed the PSQ and other validated health surveys: IRLS Rating Scale, Clinical Global Impression of Improvement (CGI-I, Profile of Mood States (POMS, Medical Outcomes Study Scale-Sleep (MOS-Sleep, and RLS-Quality of Life (RLSQoL. Pooled data were used post hoc to examine the convergent, divergent, known-group validity and the responsiveness of the PSQ. Results Convergent validity was demonstrated by significant correlations between baseline PSQ items and total scores of IRLS, POMS, RLSQoL, and the MOS-Sleep Scale (p ≤ 0.007 each. Divergent validity was demonstrated through the lack of significant correlations between PSQ items and demographic characteristics. Correlations (p Conclusions Although these analyses were potentially limited by the use of clinical trial data and not prospective data from a study conducted solely for validation purposes, the PSQ demonstrated robust psychometric properties and is a valid instrument for assessing sleep and sleep improvements in subjects with moderate-to-severe RLS symptoms. Trial Registration This study analyzed data from two registered trials, NCT00298623 and NCT00365352.

  17. Objective and subjective sleep quality: Melatonin versus placebo add-on treatment in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder withdrawing from long-term benzodiazepine use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baandrup, Lone; Glenthøj, Birte Yding; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2016-06-30

    Benzodiazepines are frequently long-term prescribed for the treatment of patients with severe mental illness. This prescribing practice is problematic because of well-described side effects including risk of dependence. We examined the efficacy of prolonged-release melatonin on objective and subjective sleep quality during benzodiazepine discontinuation and whether sleep variables were associated with benzodiazepine withdrawal. Eligible patients included adults with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or bipolar disorder and long-term use of benzodiazepines in combination with antipsychotics. All participants gradually tapered the use of benzodiazepines after randomization to add-on treatment with melatonin versus placebo. Here we report a subsample of 23 patients undergoing sleep recordings (one-night polysomnography) and 55 patients participating in subjective sleep quality ratings. Melatonin had no effect on objective sleep efficiency, but significantly improved self-reported sleep quality. Reduced benzodiazepine dosage at the 24-week follow-up was associated with a significantly decreased proportion of stage 2 sleep. These results indicate that prolonged-release melatonin has some efficacy for self-reported sleep quality after gradual benzodiazepine dose reduction, and that benzodiazepine discontinuation is not associated with rebound insomnia in medicated patients with severe mental illness. However, these findings were limited by a small sample size and a low retention rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Acute cardiovascular effects of bitter orange extract (p-synephrine) consumed alone and in combination with caffeine in human subjects: A placebo-controlled, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratamess, Nicholas A; Bush, Jill A; Stohs, Sidney J; Ellis, Nicole L; Vought, Ira T; O'Grady, Elizabeth A; Kuper, Jeremy D; Hasan, Saif B; Kang, Jie; Faigenbaum, Avery D

    2018-01-01

    The purpose was to examine cardiovascular responses to supplementation with p-synephrine alone and in combination with caffeine during quiet sitting. Sixteen subjects were given (in double-blind manner) either 103 mg of p-synephrine (S), 233 mg of caffeine +104 mg of p-synephrine (LC + S), 240 mg of caffeine (LC), 337 mg of caffeine +46 mg of p-synephrine (HC + S), 325 mg of caffeine (HC), or a placebo. The subjects sat quietly for 3 hr while heart rate (HR) and blood pressure were measured. Only HC + S and HC significantly increased mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) during the second hour and tended to increase mean SBP during the third hour. Mean diastolic blood pressure in S was significantly lower than the other trials during the first and second hours, and mean arterial pressure was significantly lower in S compared to the LC, LC + S, HC, and HC + S trials. No differences were observed in HR. Consumption of p-synephrine may acutely reduce diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure and not affect SBP or HR during quiet sitting. The addition of p-synephrine to caffeine did not augment SBP or HR indicating that consumption of up to 104 mg of p-synephrine does not induce cardiovascular stress during quiet sitting. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. A Phase II, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled, Dose-Response Trial of the Melatonin Effect on the Pain Threshold of Healthy Subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Cadore Stefani

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that melatonin may produce antinociception through peripheral and central mechanisms. Based on the preliminary encouraging results of studies of the effects of melatonin on pain modulation, the important question has been raised of whether there is a dose relationship in humans of melatonin on pain modulation.The objective was to evaluate the analgesic dose response of the effects of melatonin on pressure and heat pain threshold and tolerance and the sedative effects.Sixty-one healthy subjects aged 19 to 47 y were randomized into one of four groups: placebo, 0.05 mg/kg sublingual melatonin, 0.15 mg/kg sublingual melatonin or 0.25 mg/kg sublingual melatonin. We determine the pressure pain threshold (PPT and the pressure pain tolerance (PPTo. Quantitative sensory testing (QST was used to measure the heat pain threshold (HPT and the heat pain tolerance (HPTo. Sedation was assessed with a visual analogue scale and bispectral analysis.Serum plasma melatonin levels were directly proportional to the melatonin doses given to each subject. We observed a significant effect associated with dose group. Post hoc analysis indicated significant differences between the placebo vs. the intermediate (0.15 mg/kg and the highest (0.25 mg/kg melatonin doses for all pain threshold and sedation level tests. A linear regression model indicated a significant association between the serum melatonin concentrations and changes in pain threshold and pain tolerance (R(2  = 0.492 for HPT, R(2  = 0.538 for PPT, R(2  = 0.558 for HPTo and R(2  = 0.584 for PPTo.The present data indicate that sublingual melatonin exerts well-defined dose-dependent antinociceptive activity. There is a correlation between the plasma melatonin drug concentration and acute changes in the pain threshold. These results provide additional support for the investigation of melatonin as an analgesic agent. Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry (ReBec: (U1111

  20. Subjective and Cardiovascular Effects of Intravenous Methamphetamine during Perindopril Maintenance: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Human Laboratory Study

    OpenAIRE

    Verrico, Christopher D.; Haile, Colin N.; De La Garza, Richard; Grasing, Kenneth; Kosten, Thomas R.; Newton, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Our pilot study suggested that the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor perindopril might reduce some subjective effects produced by i.v. methamphetamine. We characterized the impact of a wider range of perindopril doses on methamphetamine-induced effects in a larger group of non-treatment-seeking, methamphetamine-using volunteers. Methods: Before treatment, participants received 30mg methamphetamine. After 5 to 7 days of perindopril treatment (0, 4, 8, or 16mg/d), participants...

  1. Optimization of selenoprotein P and other plasma selenium biomarkers for the assessment of the selenium nutritional requirement: a placebo-controlled, double-blind study of selenomethionine supplementation in selenium-deficient Chinese subjects1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yiming; Hill, Kristina E; Li, Ping; Xu, Jiayuan; Zhou, Dingyou; Motley, Amy K; Wang, Li; Byrne, Daniel W; Burk, Raymond F

    2010-01-01

    Background: The intake of selenium needed for optimal health has not been established. Selenoproteins perform the functions of selenium, and the selenium intake needed for their full expression is not known. Objective: This study sought to determine the intake of selenium required to optimize plasma selenoprotein P (SEPP1) and to compare SEPP1 with other plasma selenium biomarkers. Design: A 40-wk placebo-controlled, double-blind study of selenium repletion was carried out in 98 healthy Chinese subjects who had a daily dietary selenium intake of 14 mu g. Fourteen subjects each were assigned randomly to daily dose groups of 0, 21, 35, 55, 79, 102, and 125 mu g Se as l-selenomethionine. Plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity, SEPP1, and selenium were measured. A biomarker was considered to be optimized when its value was not different from the mean value of the subjects receiving larger supplements. Results: The SEPP1 concentration was optimized at 40 wk by the 35- mu g supplement, which indicated that 49 mu g/d could optimize it. GPX activity was optimized by 21 mu g (total ingestion: 35 mu g/d). The selenium concentration showed no tendency to become optimized. Conclusions: The present results indicate that SEPP1 concentration is the best plasma biomarker studied for assessing optimal expression of all selenoproteins, because its optimization required a larger intake of selenium than did GPX activity. On the basis of the selenium intake needed for SEPP1 optimization with adjustments for body weight and individual variation, ap 75 mu g Se/d as selenomethionine is postulated to allow full expression of selenoproteins in US residents. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00428649. PMID:20573787

  2. Cardiovascular Safety of Oral p-Synephrine (Bitter Orange) in Healthy Subjects: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Cross-over Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shara, Mohd; Stohs, Sidney J; Mukattash, Tareq L

    2016-05-01

    Bitter orange (Citrus aurantium) extract and its primary protoalkaloid p-synephrine are widely consumed in combination with multiple herbal ingredients for weight management and sports performance. p-Synephrine is also present in juices and foods derived from a variety of Citrus species. Questions exist regarding the safety of p-synephrine because of structural similarities with other biogenic amines. This study assessed the cardiovascular (stimulatory) effects of bitter orange extract (49-mg p-synephrine) given to 18 healthy subjects (nine men and nine women) in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled cross-over study. Heart rates, blood pressures, and electrocardiograms were determined at baseline, 30, 60, 90 min, 2, 4 , 6, and 8 h. Blood samples were drawn at baseline, 2 h and 8 h for serum chemistries, blood cell counts, and p-synephrine and caffeine levels. No significant changes occurred in electrocardiograms, heart rates, systolic blood pressure, blood chemistries, or blood cell counts at any time point in either control or p-synephrine treated group. A small (4.5 mmHg) decrease in diastolic blood pressure occurred in the p-synephrine treated group at 60 min. No adverse effects were reported. Caffeine ingestion varied markedly among the participants. p-Synephrine does not act as a stimulant at the dose used. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Effect of fish oil supplementation on quality of life in a general population of older Dutch subjects: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rest, O. van de; Geleijnse, J.M.; Kok, F.J.; Staveren, W.A. van; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Beekman, A.T.; Groot, L.C. de

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation on quality of life (QOL). DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. SETTING: Independently living individuals from the general older Dutch population. PARTICIPANTS:

  4. Effect of fish oil supplementation on quality of life in a general population of older Dutch subjects: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rest, van de O.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Kok, F.; Staveren, van W.A.; Olderikkert, M.G.M.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Groot, de L.C.P.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation on quality of life (QOL). DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. SETTING: Independently living individuals from the general older Dutch population. PARTICIPANTS:

  5. Multi-regional local anesthetic infiltration during laparoscopic cholecystectomy in patients receiving prophylactic multi-modal analgesia: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, T; Klarskov, B; Kristiansen, V B

    1999-01-01

    Pain is the dominant complaint after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. No study has examined the combined effects of a somato-visceral blockade during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Therefore, we investigated the effects of a somato-visceral local anesthetic blockade on pain and nausea in patients...... undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In addition, all patients received multi-modal prophylactic analgesic treatment. Fifty-eight patients were randomized to receive a total of 286 mg (66 mL) ropivacaine or 66 mL saline via periportal and intraperitoneal infiltration. During the first 3...... dominated over other pain localizations in both groups (P patients...

  6. Placebo Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... placebo effect to use as part of medical therapy. REFERENCES 1. de la Fuente-Fernandez R, Ruth TJ, Sossi V, et al. Expec- tation and dopamine release: mechanism of the placebo effect in Parkinson’s disease. Science 2001;293:1164– 1166. 2. Diederich NJ, ...

  7. A randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 1/2 study of tivantinib (ARQ 197) in combination with irinotecan and cetuximab in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with wild-type KRAS who have received first-line systemic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Cathy; Bessudo, Alberto; Hart, Lowell L; Severtsev, Aleksey; Gladkov, Oleg; Müller, Lothar; Kopp, Mikhail V; Vladimirov, Vladimir; Langdon, Robert; Kotiv, Bogdan; Barni, Sandro; Hsu, Ching; Bolotin, Ellen; von Roemeling, Reinhard; Schwartz, Brian; Bendell, Johanna C

    2016-07-01

    Cetuximab in combination with an irinotecan-containing regimen is a standard treatment in patients with KRAS wild-type (KRAS WT), metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We investigated the addition of the oral MET inhibitor tivantinib to cetuximab + irinotecan (CETIRI) based on preclinical evidence that activation of the MET pathway may confer resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. Previously treated patients with KRAS WT advanced or mCRC were enrolled. The phase 1, open-label 3 + 3, dose-escalation study evaluated the safety and maximally tolerated dose of tivantinib plus CETIRI. The phase 2, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study of biweekly CETIRI plus tivantinib or placebo was restricted to patients who had received only one prior line of chemotherapy. The phase 2 primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). The recommended phase 2 dose was tivantinib (360 mg/m(2) twice daily) with biweekly cetuximab (500 mg/m(2)) and irinotecan (180 mg/m(2)). Among 117 patients evaluable for phase 2 analysis, no statistically significant PFS difference was observed: 8.3 months on tivantinib vs. 7.3 months on placebo (HR, 0.85; 95% confidence interval, 0.55-1.33; P = 0.38). Subgroup analyses trended in favor of tivantinib in patients with MET-High tumors by immunohistochemistry, PTEN-Low tumors, or those pretreated with oxaliplatin, but subgroups were too small to draw conclusions. Neutropenia, diarrhea, nausea and rash were the most frequent severe adverse events in tivantinib-treated patients. The combination of tivantinib and CETIRI was well tolerated but did not significantly improve PFS in previously treated KRAS WT mCRC. Tivantinib may be more active in specific subgroups. © 2016 The Authors International Journal of Cancer published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of UICC.

  8. Metabolic Function and the Prevalence of Lipodystrophy in a Population of HIV-Infected African Subjects Receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutimura, Eugene; Stewart, Aimee; Rheeder, Paul; Crowther, Nigel John

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study measured the prevalence of lipodystrophy and the metabolic effects of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV-infected African subjects. Methods Prevalence was measured in 571 Rwandans receiving HAART for ≥6 months. Metabolic variables were measured in 100 HIV-positive adults with lipodystrophy, 50 HIV-positive nonlipodystrophic adults, and 50 HIV-negative controls. Results A HAART regimen of stavudine, lamivudine, and nevirapine was used by 81.6% of subjects; none received protease inhibitors. Lipodystrophy was observed in 34% (48.5% in urban groups and 17.3% in rural groups) of subjects, with a prevalence of 69.6% in those receiving HAART for >72 weeks. Peripheral lipoatrophy combined with abdominal lipohypertrophy was observed in 72% of lipodystrophic subjects. HIV-positive adults with lipodystrophy had a significantly higher waist-to-hip ratio (WHR; 0.99 ± 0.05 vs. 0.84 ± 0.03: P lipodystrophy (3.60 [1.38]) than in HIV-positive nonlipodystrophic adults (3.19 [0.65]; P lipodystrophy, 16% of HIV-positive nonlipodystrophic adults, and 2% of controls, but insulin levels did not differ. Conclusions African subjects with lipodystrophy have increased WHR, glucose, and cholesterol levels. Glucose concentrations are also elevated in nonlipodystrophic HIV-positive subjects. Therefore, factors other than body fat redistribution contribute to the glucose intolerance. PMID:18077834

  9. Placebo in Surgical Research: A Case-Based Ethical Analysis and Practical Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostiuc, Sorin; Rentea, Irina; Drima, Eduard; Negoi, Ionut

    2016-01-01

    Placebo is a form of simulated medical treatment intended to deceive the patient/subject who believes that he/she received an active therapy. In clinical medicine, the use of placebo is allowed in particular circumstances to assure a patient that he is taken care of and that he/she receives an active drug, even if this is not the case. In clinical research placebo is widely used, as it allows a baseline comparison for the active intervention. If the use of placebo is highly regulated in pharmacological trials, surgery studies have a series of particularities that make its use extremely problematic and regarded less favorably. The purpose of this paper is to present three famous cases of placebo use in surgical trials and to perform an ethical analysis of their acceptability using the Declaration of Helsinki as a main regulatory source.

  10. A randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study on acceptability, safety and efficacy of oral administration of sacha inchi oil (Plukenetia volubilis L.) in adult human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Gustavo F; Gonzales, Carla

    2014-03-01

    The study was designed to assess acceptability and side-effects of consumption of sacha inchi oil, rich in α-linolenic acid and sunflower oil, rich in linoleic acid, in adult human subjects. Thirty subjects received 10 or 15ml daily of sacha inchi or sunflower oil for 4months. Acceptability was assessed with daily self-report and with a Likert test at the end of the study. Safety was assessed with self- recording of side-effects and with hepatic and renal markers. Primary efficacy variables were the change in lipid profile. Subjects reported low acceptability of sacha inchi oil at week-1 (37.5%). However, since week-6, acceptability was significantly increased to 81.25-93.75%. No differences were observed in acceptability with respect to sex or oil volume (P>0.05). Most frequent adverse effects during first weeks of consuming sacha inchi oil or sunflower oil were nauseas. The side-effects were reduced with time. Biochemical markers of hepatic and kidney function were maintained unchanged. Serum total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels and arterial blood pressure were lowered with both oils (P<0.05). Higher HDL-cholesterol was observed with sacha inchi oil at month-4. In conclusion, sacha inchi oil consumed has good acceptability after week-1 of consumption and it is safety. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of a natural extract of chicken combs with a high content of hyaluronic acid (Hyal-Joint® on pain relief and quality of life in subjects with knee osteoarthritis: a pilot randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwartz Howard

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intra-articular hyaluronic acid represents a substantive addition to the therapeutic armamentarium in knee osteoarthritis. We examined the effect of dietary supplementation with a natural extract of chicken combs with a high content of hyaluronic acid (60% (Hyal-Joint® (active test product, AP on pain and quality of life in subjects with osteoarthritis of the knee. Methods Twenty subjects aged ≥40 years with knee osteoarthritis (pain for at least 15 days in the previous month, symptoms present for ≥6 months, Kellgren/Lawrence score ≥2 participated in a randomized double-blind controlled trial. Ten subjects received AP (80 mg/day and 10 placebo for 8 weeks. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC and quality of life by the Short Form-36 (SF-36v2 were administered at baseline and after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment. Results WOMAC pain (primary efficacy variable was similar in both study groups (mean [SD] with 6.6 (4.0 points in the AP group and 6.4 (2.7 in the placebo group (P = 0.943. As compared with baseline, subjects in both groups showed statistically significant improvements in WOMAC pain, stiffness, physical function subscales, and in the aggregate score, but the magnitude of changes was higher in the AP group for WOMAC physical function (-13.1 [12.0] vs. -10.1 [8.6], P = 0.575 and total symptoms (-18.6 [16.8] vs. -15.8 [11.4], P = 0.694. At 4 weeks, statistically significant mean changes compared with baseline were observed in the SF-36v2 scales of role-physical, bodily pain, social functioning and role-emotional among subjects in the AP group, and in physical functioning, bodily pain, and social functioning in the placebo group. At 8 weeks, changes were significant for role-physical, bodily pain, and physical component summary in the AP group, and for physical functioning and role-emotional in the placebo arm. Changes in bodily pain and social functioning were of greater magnitude

  12. Placebo can enhance creativity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liron Rozenkrantz

    Full Text Available The placebo effect is usually studied in clinical settings for decreasing negative symptoms such as pain, depression and anxiety. There is interest in exploring the placebo effect also outside the clinic, for enhancing positive aspects of performance or cognition. Several studies indicate that placebo can enhance cognitive abilities including memory, implicit learning and general knowledge. Here, we ask whether placebo can enhance creativity, an important aspect of human cognition.Subjects were randomly assigned to a control group who smelled and rated an odorant (n = 45, and a placebo group who were treated identically but were also told that the odorant increases creativity and reduces inhibitions (n = 45. Subjects completed a recently developed automated test for creativity, the creative foraging game (CFG, and a randomly chosen subset (n = 57 also completed two manual standardized creativity tests, the alternate uses test (AUT and the Torrance test (TTCT. In all three tests, participants were asked to create as many original solutions and were scored for originality, flexibility and fluency.The placebo group showed higher originality than the control group both in the CFG (p<0.04, effect size = 0.5 and in the AUT (p<0.05, effect size = 0.4, but not in the Torrance test. The placebo group also found more shapes outside of the standard categories found by a set of 100 CFG players in a previous study, a feature termed out-of-the-boxness (p<0.01, effect size = 0.6.The findings indicate that placebo can enhance the originality aspect of creativity. This strengthens the view that placebo can be used not only to reduce negative clinical symptoms, but also to enhance positive aspects of cognition. Furthermore, we find that the impact of placebo on creativity can be tested by CFG, which can quantify multiple aspects of creative search without need for manual coding. This approach opens the way to explore the behavioral and neural mechanisms by which

  13. Blood glucose control in healthy subject and patients receiving intravenous glucose infusion or total parenteral nutrition using glucagon-like peptide 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nauck, Michael A; Walberg, Jörg; Vethacke, Arndt

    2004-01-01

    It was the aim of the study to examine whether the insulinotropic gut hormone GLP-1 is able to control or even normalise glycaemia in healthy subjects receiving intravenous glucose infusions and in severely ill patients hyperglycaemic during total parenteral nutrition....

  14. Heat transfer experiments with a central receiver tube subjected to unsteady and non-uniform heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Torrijos, María; Marugán-Cruz, Carolina; Sobrino, Celia; Santana, Domingo

    2017-06-01

    In this work, a molten salt test loop to study the heat transfer process in external molten salt receivers is described. The experimental installation is formed by a cylindrical molten salt tank, a pump, a flow meter, and an induction heater to generate the heat flux, which is applied in a small rectangular region of the tube surface. In central tower plants, the external receiver pipe is considered to be under unilateral concentrated solar radiation, because only one side of the pipe receives high heat flux. The main advantage of using an induction heater is the control of heating in different areas of the tube. In order to measure the effects of a non-homogenous and unsteady heat flux on the wall temperature distribution a series of experiments have been carried out. 4 K-type thermocouples have been welded at different axial and azimuthal positions of the pipe to obtain the wall temperature distribution. Different temperature measurements have been made varying the heat flux and water velocity to study their effects on the heat transfer process.

  15. Comparative gut microbiota and resistome profiling of intensive care patients receiving selective digestive tract decontamination and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buelow, Elena; Bello González, Teresita D J; Fuentes, Susana; de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Lahti, Leo; Bayjanov, Jumamurat R; Majoor, Eline A M; Braat, Johanna C; van Mourik, Maaike S M; Oostdijk, Evelien A N; Willems, Rob J L; Bonten, Marc J M; van Passel, Mark W J; Smidt, Hauke; van Schaik, Willem

    2017-08-14

    The gut microbiota is a reservoir of opportunistic pathogens that can cause life-threatening infections in critically ill patients during their stay in an intensive care unit (ICU). To suppress gut colonization with opportunistic pathogens, a prophylactic antibiotic regimen, termed "selective decontamination of the digestive tract" (SDD), is used in some countries where it improves clinical outcome in ICU patients. Yet, the impact of ICU hospitalization and SDD on the gut microbiota remains largely unknown. Here, we characterize the composition of the gut microbiota and its antimicrobial resistance genes ("the resistome") of ICU patients during SDD and of healthy subjects. From ten patients that were acutely admitted to the ICU, 30 fecal samples were collected during ICU stay. Additionally, feces were collected from five of these patients after transfer to a medium-care ward and cessation of SDD. Feces from ten healthy subjects were collected twice, with a 1-year interval. Gut microbiota and resistome composition were determined using 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic profiling and nanolitre-scale quantitative PCRs. The microbiota of the ICU patients differed from the microbiota of healthy subjects and was characterized by lower microbial diversity, decreased levels of Escherichia coli and of anaerobic Gram-positive, butyrate-producing bacteria of the Clostridium clusters IV and XIVa, and an increased abundance of Bacteroidetes and enterococci. Four resistance genes (aac(6')-Ii, ermC, qacA, tetQ), providing resistance to aminoglycosides, macrolides, disinfectants, and tetracyclines, respectively, were significantly more abundant among ICU patients than in healthy subjects, while a chloramphenicol resistance gene (catA) and a tetracycline resistance gene (tetW) were more abundant in healthy subjects. The gut microbiota of SDD-treated ICU patients deviated strongly from the gut microbiota of healthy subjects. The negative effects on the resistome were limited to selection

  16. Placebo Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the side effects of medications. WHY ARE THESE STUDIES IMPORTANT? WHAT DOES THE FUTURE HOLD? The authors point out that placebo effects make the study of new treatments very difficult. This is because ...

  17. Orlistat vs Placebo in the Inhibition of Dietary Fat in Obese Adult ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prior to allocation to treatment, subjects were given placebo for a 7-day period, while receiving a moderate hypocaloric supporting diet as prescribed for each individual by the dietician. During this period, a 72-hour faeces was collected from each subject for estimation of baseline faecal fat excretion. Additionally blood and ...

  18. Acyclovir given as prophylaxis against oral ulcers in acute myeloid leukaemia: randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Bergmann, O.J.; Ellermann-Eriksen, S; Mogensen, S C; Ellegaard, J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To evaluate (a) the prophylactic effect of the antiherpetic drug acyclovir on oral ulcers in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia receiving remission induction chemotherapy and thus (b), indirectly, the role of herpes simplex virus in the aetiology of these ulcers. DESIGN--Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial. SUBJECTS--74 herpes simplex virus seropositive patients aged 18-84. Thirty seven patients received acyclovir (800 mg by mouth daily) and 37 placebo. The patie...

  19. Body fluids, circadian blood pressure and plasma renin during growth hormone administration: a placebo-controlled study with two growth hormone doses in healthy adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jens; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Frandsen, Erik

    1995-01-01

    with two different dosages in healthy adults. Eight healthy male subjects aged 24-32 years were examined during three 2-week study periods in a double-blind placebo controlled study. They received, in random order, GH (3 or 6 IU m-2 daily) or placebo during 2 weeks. Bio-impedance was measured every 2nd day...

  20. Effect of the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, BB-12®, on defecation frequency in healthy subjects with low defecation frequency and abdominal discomfort: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Eskesen, Dorte; Jespersen, Lillian; Michelsen, Birgit; Whorwell, Peter; Müller-Lissner, Stefan; Morberg, Cathrine M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, BB-12?, on two primary end points ? defecation frequency and gastrointestinal (GI) well-being ? in healthy adults with low defecation frequency and abdominal discomfort. A total of 1248 subjects were included in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. After a 2-week run-in period, subjects were randomised to 1 or 10 billion colony-forming units/d of the probiotic strain BB-12? o...

  1. Effects of ginger and expectations on symptoms of nausea in a balanced placebo design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Weimer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Ginger effects on (experimental nausea have been described, but also strong placebo effects and sex differences when nausea is involved. The "balanced placebo design" has been proposed to allow better separation of drug and placebo effects. METHODS: Sixty-four healthy participants (32 women were randomly assigned to receive an antiemetic ginger preparation or placebo, and half of each group was told to have received drug or placebo. They were exposed to 5×2 min body rotations to induce nausea. Subjective symptoms and behavioral (rotation tolerance, head movements and physiological measures (electrogastrogram, cortisol were recorded. Groups were balanced for sex of participants and experimenters. RESULTS: Ginger and the information given did not affect any outcome measure, and previous sex differences could not be confirmed. Adding the experimenters revealed a significant four-factorial interaction on behavioral but not on subjective or physiological measures Men who received placebo responded to placebo information when provided by the male experimenter, and to ginger information when provided by the female experimenter. This effect was not significant in women. CONCLUSION: The effects of an antiemetic drug and provided information interact with psychosocial variables of participants and experimenters in reports of nausea.

  2. Efficacy and safety characteristics of mometasone furoate/formoterol fumarate fixed-dose combination in subjects with moderate to very severe COPD: findings from pooled analysis of two randomized, 52-week placebo-controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tashkin DP

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Donald P Tashkin1, Dennis E Doherty2, Edward Kerwin3, Carlos E Matiz-Bueno4, Barbara Knorr5, Tulin Shekar5, Davis Gates5, Heribert Staudinger51David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, 2Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 3Clinical Research Institute of Southern Oregon, Medford, OR, USA; 4Fundación Salud Bosque, Bogota, Colombia, 5Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp, Whitehouse Station, NJ, USABackground: The clinical efficacy and safety of a mometasone furoate/formoterol fumarate (MF/F fixed-dose combination formulation administered via a metered-dose inhaler was investigated in patients with moderate to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD.Methods: Two 52-week, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials with identical study designs were conducted in current or ex-smokers (aged ≥40 years, and pooled study results are presented herein. Subjects (n = 2251 were randomized to 26 weeks of twice-daily treatment with MF/F 400/10 µg, MF/F 200/10 µg, MF 400 µg, F 10 µg, or placebo. After the 26-week treatment period, placebo subjects completed the trial and 75% of subjects on active treatment entered a 26-week safety extension. Coprimary efficacy variables were mean changes in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1, area under the curve from 0 to 12 hours postdose (AUC0–12 h, and morning predose/trough FEV1 from baseline to the week 13 endpoint. Key secondary efficacy variables were St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire scores, symptom-free nights, time-to-first exacerbation, and partly stable COPD at the week 26 endpoint.Results: In the 26-week treatment period, significantly greater increases in FEV1 AUC0–12 h occurred with MF/F 400/10 versus MF 400 and placebo at the week 13 and week 26 endpoints (P ≤ 0.032. These increases were over three-fold greater with MF/F 400/10 than with MF 400. Also, significantly greater increases in morning

  3. Effects of a commercial product containing guaran? on psychological well-being, anxiety and mood: a single-blind, placebo-controlled study in healthy subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Silvestrini, Gianluca Ivan; Marino, Franca; Cosentino, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Background Guaran? (Paulinia cupana) seed extracts are increasingly popular worldwide for their stimulant, cognitive and behavioral effects. To assess the effects on psychological well-being, anxiety and mood of a commercially available guaran? preparation taken regularly over several days according to the labelled dosages and instructions, 27 healthy volunteers were enrolled in a prospective, randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Results Guaran? 350 mg ? 3 daily just...

  4. Repetitive Intermittent Hypoxia and Locomotor Training Enhances Walking Function in Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury Subjects: A Randomized, Triple-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete-Opazo, Angela; Alcayaga, Julio; Sepúlveda, Oscar; Rojas, Enrique; Astudillo, Carolina

    2017-05-01

    Incomplete spinal cord injuries (iSCI) leave spared synaptic pathways below the level of injury. Intermittent hypoxia (IH) elicits plasticity in the spinal cord and strengthens spared synaptic pathways, expressed as respiratory and somatic functional recovery in experimental animals and humans with iSCI. This study is a randomized, triple-blind, two-arm parallel clinical trial performed in Santiago, Chile. We compared the effects of a 4-week protocol of IH combined with body weight-supported treadmill training (BWSTT), with continuous normoxia (Nx) and BWSTT on 10-meter walk test (10MWT), 6-minute walk test (6MWT), and timed up and go (TUG) test in American Spinal Injury Association C and D individuals with iSCI. Subjects received daily IH (cycling 9%/21% O 2 every 1.5 min, 15 cycles/day) or continuous Nx (21% O 2 ) combined with 45 min BWSTT for 5 consecutive days, followed by IH/Nx 3 × per week (3 × wIH/Nx) for 3 additional weeks. Subjects were assessed at day 5, weekly from weeks 2-4, and at a 2-week follow-up. Daily IH plus BWSTT enhanced walking speed, expressed as decreased 10MWT time at day 5 versus baseline (IH: -10.2 ± 3.0 vs. Nx: -1.7 ± 1.7 sec, p = 0.006), and walking endurance expressed as increased 6MWT distance at day 5 versus baseline (IH: 43.0 ± 10.7 vs. Nx: 6.1 ± 3.4 m, p = 0.012), but not TUG time. Further, 3 × wIH maintained the daily IH-induced walking speed, and enhanced the daily IH-induced walking endurance, which is maintained up to the 2-week follow-up. We conclude that daily IH enhances walking recovery in subjects with iSCI, confirming previous findings. Moreover, 3 × wIH prolonged or enhanced daily IH-induced walking speed and endurance improvements, respectively, up to 5 weeks post-daily IH. Repetitive IH may be a safe and effective therapeutic alternative for persons with iSCI.

  5. A comparative study with depressed patients on the acceptability of placebo use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feffer, Kfir; Lichtenberg, Pesach; Becker, Gideon; Bloch, Yuval; Netzer, Roni; Nitzan, Uri

    2016-01-01

    High rates of placebo responses are consistently reported in patients with major depressive disorder. Nonetheless, treating depression with placebo is still ethically controversial and generally prohibited in the clinical setting. In the present study, we assess the acceptability of placebo usage among depressed patients. Ninety-six outpatients with major depressive disorder were matched to 114 healthy controls. After a thorough explanation of the placebo effect, its efficacy and limitations in the treatment of depression, the study participants completed a 32-item self-report questionnaire. The five core questions addressed the attitude and willingness of subjects to be treated with a placebo in the clinical setting. Among study group patients, the majority (56.7%) conveyed consent for placebo treatment if they were to suffer another depressive episode. Both study group and control group expressed high rates of willingness to waive their right to informed consent (55.6% and 50%, respectively), and they did not consider placebo treatment to be a deceit (56%) or to diminish their sense of autonomy (56.7%). Most patients with depression are willing to waive their right to informed consent in order to receive placebo treatment. These findings should encourage further studies of placebo usage and its legitimacy in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pantethine, a derivative of vitamin B5, favorably alters total, LDL and non-HDL cholesterol in low to moderate cardiovascular risk subjects eligible for statin therapy: a triple-blinded placebo and diet-controlled investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans M

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Malkanthi Evans,1 John A Rumberger,2 Isao Azumano,3 Joseph J Napolitano,4 Danielle Citrolo,5 Toshikazu Kamiya5 1KGK Synergize Inc, London, ON, Canada; 2The Princeton Longevity Center, Princeton, NJ, USA; 3Daiichi Fine Chemical Co, Ltd, Toyama, Japan; 4Independent Consultant, Allentown, PA, USA; 5Kyowa Hakko USA, New York, NY, USA Abstract: High serum concentration of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease. The efficacy of pantethine treatment on cardiovascular risk markers was investigated in a randomized, triple-blinded, placebo-controlled study, in a low to moderate cardiovascular disease (CVD risk North American population eligible for statin therapy, using the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP guidelines. A total of 32 subjects were randomized to pantethine (600 mg/day from weeks 1 to 8 and 900 mg/day from weeks 9 to16 or placebo. Compared with placebo, the participants on pantethine showed a significant decrease in total cholesterol at 16 weeks (P=0.040 and LDL-C at 8 and 16 weeks (P=0.020 and P=0.006, respectively, and decreasing trends in non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol at week 8 and week 12 (P=0.102 and P=0.145, respectively that reached significance by week 16 (P=0.042. An 11% decrease in LDL-C from baseline was seen in participants on pantethine, at weeks 4, 8, 12, and 16, while participants on placebo showed a 3% increase at week 16. This decrease was significant between groups at weeks 8 (P=0.027 and 16 (P=0.010. The homocysteine levels for both groups did not change significantly from baseline to week 16. Coenzyme Q10 significantly increased from baseline to week 4 and remained elevated until week 16, in both the pantethine and placebo groups. After 16 weeks, the participants on placebo did not show significant improvement in any CVD risk end points. This study confirms that pantethine lowers cardiovascular risk markers in low to moderate CVD risk participants

  7. The effects of d-amphetamine on extrastriatal dopamine D{sub 2}/D{sub 3} receptors: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled PET study with [{sup 11}C]FLB 457 in healthy subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aalto, Sargo [University of Turku, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Aabo Akademi University, Department of Psychology, Turku (Finland); Hirvonen, Jussi; Kajander, Jaana; Naagren, Kjell; Rinne, Juha O. [University of Turku, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Kaasinen, Valtteri [University of Turku, Department of Neurology, P.O. Box 52, Turku (Finland); Hagelberg, Nora [University of Turku, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care, Emergency Care and Pain Medicine, Turku (Finland); Seppaelae, Timo [Drug Research Unit, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki (Finland); Scheinin, Harry [University of Turku, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); University of Turku, Department of Pharmacology, Drug Development and Therapeutics, Turku (Finland); Hietala, Jarmo [University of Turku, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); University of Turku, Department of Psychiatry, Turku (Finland)

    2009-03-15

    The dopamine D{sub 2}/D{sub 3} receptor ligand [{sup 11}C]FLB 457 and PET enable quantification of low-density extrastriatal D{sub 2}/D{sub 3} receptors, but it is uncertain whether [{sup 11}C]FLB 457 can be used for measuring extrastriatal dopamine release. We studied the effects of d-amphetamine (0.3 mg/kg i.v.) on extrastriatal [{sup 11}C]FLB 457 binding potential (BP{sub ND}) in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study including 24 healthy volunteers. The effects of d-amphetamine on [{sup 11}C]FLB 457 BP{sub ND} and distribution volume (V{sub T}) in the frontal cortex were not different from those of placebo. Small decreases in [{sup 11}C]FLB 457 BP{sub ND} were observed only in the posterior cingulate and hippocampus. The regional changes in [{sup 11}C]FLB 457 BP{sub ND} did not correlate with d-amphetamine-induced changes in subjective ratings of euphoria. This placebo-controlled study showed that d-amphetamine does not induce marked changes in measures of extrastriatal dopamine D{sub 2}/D{sub 3} receptor binding. Our results indicate that [{sup 11}C]FLB 457 PET is not a useful method for measuring extrastriatal dopamine release in humans. (orig.)

  8. Serum retinol-binding protein 4 correlates with obesity, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia in HIV-infected subjects receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang Hoon; Chin, Bum Sik; Lee, Han Sung; Jeong, Su Jin; Choi, Hee Kyoung; Kim, Chang Oh; Choi, Jun Yong; Song, Young Goo; Lee, Hyun Chul; Kim, June Myung

    2009-11-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) contributes to the development of metabolic complications including dyslipidemia, insulin resistance (IR), and lipodystrophy (LD). Recent studies reported that retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) is associated with IR, dyslipidemia, and obesity in non-HIV-infected populations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations between RBP4 and LD or metabolic abnormalities in HIV-infected subjects receiving HAART. We performed a cross-sectional study with 113 HIV-infected subjects receiving HAART for more than 6 months. Body composition and abdominal fat were measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis and ultrasonography, and fasting serum RBP4 was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Retinol-binding protein 4 levels in subjects with LD were similar to those without LD (P = .839). Retinol-binding protein 4 had significantly positive correlations with waist circumference (r = 0.298, P = .002), waist-to-hip ratio (r = 0.336, P = .001), body mass index (r = 0.310, P = .002), total body fat mass (r = 0.323, P = .001), total cholesterol (r = 0.188, P = .048), log (triglyceride) (r = 0.269, P = .004), and log (homeostasis model assessment of IR) (r = 0.207, P = .036), and negative correlations with quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (r = -0.209, P = .034) after adjustment for age and sex. In stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis, waist-to-hip ratio was the most significant independent predictor of increased RBP4 (standardized beta = .351, P = .001). These results suggest that serum RBP4 is associated with obesity, IR, and dyslipidemia in HIV-infected subjects receiving HAART.

  9. Effect of the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, BB-12®, on defecation frequency in healthy subjects with low defecation frequency and abdominal discomfort: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskesen, Dorte; Jespersen, Lillian; Michelsen, Birgit; Whorwell, Peter J; Müller-Lissner, Stefan; Morberg, Cathrine M

    2015-11-28

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, BB-12®, on two primary end points - defecation frequency and gastrointestinal (GI) well-being - in healthy adults with low defecation frequency and abdominal discomfort. A total of 1248 subjects were included in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. After a 2-week run-in period, subjects were randomised to 1 or 10 billion colony-forming units/d of the probiotic strain BB-12® or a matching placebo capsule once daily for 4 weeks. Subjects completed a diary on bowel habits, relief of abdominal discomfort and symptoms. GI well-being, defined as global relief of abdominal discomfort, did not show significant differences. The OR for having a defecation frequency above baseline for ≥50% of the time was 1·31 (95% CI 0·98, 1·75), P=0·071, for probiotic treatment overall. Tightening the criteria for being a responder to an increase of ≥1 d/week for ≥50 % of the time resulted in an OR of 1·55 (95% CI 1·22, 1·96), P=0·0003, for treatment overall. A treatment effect on average defecation frequency was found (P=0·0065), with the frequency being significantly higher compared with placebo at all weeks for probiotic treatment overall (all PEffects on defecation frequency were similar for the two doses tested, suggesting that a ceiling effect was reached with the one billion dose. Overall, 4 weeks' supplementation with the probiotic strain BB-12® resulted in a clinically relevant benefit on defecation frequency. The results suggest that consumption of BB-12® improves the GI health of individuals whose symptoms are not sufficiently severe to consult a doctor (ISRCTN18128385).

  10. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-, and positive-controlled clinical pilot study to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of standardized aqueous extracts of Terminalia chebula and Terminalia bellerica in subjects with hyperuricemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usharani P

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pingali Usharani,1 Chandrasekhar Nutalapati,1 Venkata Kishan Pokuri,1 Chiranjeevi Uday Kumar,1 Gangadhar Taduri,21Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 2Department of Nephrology, Nizam's Institute of Medical Sciences, Panjagutta, Hyderabad, India Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of standardized aqueous extracts of Terminalia chebula and Terminalia bellerica versus febuxostat and placebo on reduction in serum uric acid levels in subjects with hyperuricemia. Materials and methods: A total of 110 eligible subjects with hyperuricemia were enrolled and randomized to either of the five treatment groups – T. chebula 500 mg twice a day (BID, T. bellerica 250 mg BID, T. bellerica 500 mg BID, placebo BID, and febuxostat 40 mg once daily plus an identical placebo – for a duration of 24 weeks. Serum uric acid levels were measured at baseline and at the end of 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 weeks. Statistical analysis was done using GraphPad Prism Software 4. Results and interpretation: All active treatment groups showed a reduction in serum uric acid levels compared to baseline and placebo. Significant reduction in mean serum uric acid levels started as early as 4 weeks following treatment, compared to baseline, with T. bellerica (500 and 250 mg, febuxostat (P<0.001, and T. chebula 500 mg (P<0.01; an increase in serum uric acid levels was seen with placebo (P<0.05. The serum uric acid levels became steady after 16 weeks of treatment and remained the same until the end of 24 weeks. The reduction of serum uric acid levels in the T. bellerica 500 mg group was nearly twice that of the T. chebula 500 mg group as well as T. bellerica 250 mg group at all time points. T. bellerica 500 mg reduced serum uric acid levels from 8.07±0.87 to 5.78±0.25 compared to febuxostat, which reduced serum uric acid levels from 8.53±0.97 to 4.28±0.67 (P<0.001 at the end of 24 weeks. The efficacy of T. bellerica appeared to be dose dependent

  11. A soy-based phosphatidylserine/ phosphatidic acid complex (PAS) normalizes the stress reactivity of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal-axis in chronically stressed male subjects: a randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellhammer, Juliane; Vogt, Dominic; Franz, Nadin; Freitas, Ulla; Rutenberg, David

    2014-07-31

    Supplementation with a phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylserine/ phosphatidic acid complex (PAS) has been observed to normalize stress induced dysregulations of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA). Prolonged stress first induces a hyper-activation of the HPAA, which then can be followed by a state of hypo-activation.The aim of this study was to examine effects of an oral supplementation with 400 mg PS & 400 mg PA (PAS 400) per day on the endocrine stress response (ACTH, saliva and serum cortisol) to a psychosocial stressor. A special focus was to analyze subgroups of low versus high chronically stressed subjects as well as to test efficacy of 200 mg PS & 200 mg PA (PAS 200). 75 healthy male volunteers were enrolled for this double-blind, placebo-controlled study, stratified by chronic stress level, and randomly allocated to one of three study arms (placebo, PAS 200 and PAS 400 per day, respectively). Study supplementation was administered for 42 days for each participant. Chronic stress was measured with the Trier Inventory for Chronic Stress (TICS), and subgroups of high and low chronic stress were differentiated by median values as provided by the TICS authors. A six week period of supplementation was followed by an acute stress test (Trier Social Stress Test - TSST). Chronic stress levels and other baseline measures did not differ between treatment groups (all p>0.05). Acute stress was successfully induced by the TSST and resulted in a hyper-responsivity of the HPAA in chronically stressed subjects. Compared to placebo, a supplementation with a daily dose of PAS 400 was effective in normalizing the ACTH (p=0.010), salivary (p=0.043) and serum cortisol responses (p=0.035) to the TSST in chronically high but not in low stressed subjects (all p>0.05). Compared to placebo, supplementation with PAS 200 did not result in any significant differences in these variables (all p>0.05). There were no significant effects of supplementation with PAS on heart rate

  12. Partial reinforcement, extinction, and placebo analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au Yeung, Siu Tsin; Colagiuri, Ben; Lovibond, Peter F; Colloca, Luana

    2014-06-01

    Numerous studies indicate that placebo analgesia can be established via conditioning procedures. However, these studies have exclusively involved conditioning under continuous reinforcement. Thus, it is currently unknown whether placebo analgesia can be established under partial reinforcement and how durable any such effect would be. We tested this possibility using electrocutaneous pain in healthy volunteers. Sixty undergraduates received placebo treatment (activation of a sham electrode) under the guise of an analgesic trial. The participants were randomly allocated to different conditioning schedules, namely continuous reinforcement (CRF), partial reinforcement (PRF), or control (no conditioning). Conditioning was achieved by surreptitiously reducing pain intensity during training when the placebo was activated compared with when it was inactive. For the CRF group, the placebo was always followed by a surreptitious reduction in pain during training. For the PRF group, the placebo was followed by a reduction in pain stimulation on 62.5% of trials only. In the test phase, pain stimulation was equivalent across placebo and no placebo trials. Both CRF and PRF produced placebo analgesia, with the magnitude of initial analgesia being larger after CRF. However, although the placebo analgesia established under CRF extinguished during test phase, the placebo analgesia established under PRF did not. These findings indicate that PRF can induce placebo analgesia and that these effects are more resistant to extinction than those established via CRF. PRF may therefore reflect a novel way of enhancing clinical outcomes via the placebo effect. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. All rights reserved.

  13. Placebo-induced decrease in fatigue: evidence for a central action on the preparatory phase of movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedimonte, Alessandro; Benedetti, Fabrizio; Carlino, Elisa

    2015-02-01

    Placebos have been found to affect a number of pathological processes and physiological functions through expectations of clinical improvement. Recently, the study of the placebo effect has moved from the clinical to the physical performance setting, wherein placebos can boost performance by increasing muscle work and by decreasing perceived exertion. However, nothing is known about the neurobiological underpinnings of this phenomenon. Here we show for the first time that a placebo, which subjects believed to be endurance-increasing caffeine, reduces fatigue by acting at the central level on the preparatory phase of movement. In fact, we recorded the readiness potential, which is the expression of the preparatory phase of movement at the level of the supplementary motor area, during repeated flexions of the index finger in a control group that did not receive any treatment and in a placebo group that received placebo caffeine. In the control group, as the number of flexions increased, both fatigue and readiness potential amplitude increased. By contrast, in the placebo group, as the number of flexions increased we found a decrease in perceived exertion along with no increase in readiness potential amplitude. This placebo-induced modulation of the readiness potential suggests that placebos reduce fatigue by acting centrally during the anticipatory phase of movement, thus emphasizing the important role of the central nervous system in the generation of fatigue. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Delta Inulin Adjuvant Enhances Plasmablast Generation, Expression of Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase and B-Cell Affinity Maturation in Human Subjects Receiving Seasonal Influenza Vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Li

    Full Text Available There is a major need for new adjuvants to improve the efficacy of seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines. Advax is a novel polysaccharide adjuvant based on delta inulin that has been shown to enhance the immunogenicity of influenza vaccine in animal models and human clinical trials. To better understand the mechanism for this enhancement, we sought to assess its effect on the plasmablast response in human subjects. This pilot study utilised cryopreserved 7 day post-vaccination (7dpv peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples obtained from a subset of 25 adult subjects from the FLU006-12 trial who had been immunized intramuscularly with a standard dose of 2012 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV alone (n=9 subjects or combined with 5mg (n=8 or 10mg (n=8 of Advax adjuvant. Subjects receiving Advax adjuvant had increased 7dpv plasmablasts, which in turn exhibited a 2-3 fold higher rate of non-silent mutations in the B-cell receptor CDR3 region associated with higher expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID, the major enzyme controlling BCR affinity maturation. Together, these data suggest that Advax adjuvant enhances influenza immunity in immunized subjects via multiple mechanisms including increased plasmablast generation, AID expression and CDR3 mutagenesis resulting in enhanced BCR affinity maturation and increased production of high avidity antibody. How Advax adjuvant achieves these beneficial effects on plasmablasts remains the subject of ongoing investigation.Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Register ACTRN12612000709842 https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=362709.

  15. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Phase II Trial Investigating the Safety and Immunogenicity of Modified Vaccinia Ankara Smallpox Vaccine (MVA-BN® in 56-80-Year-Old Subjects.

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    Richard N Greenberg

    Full Text Available Modified Vaccinia Ankara MVA-BN® is a live, highly attenuated, viral vaccine under advanced development as a non-replicating smallpox vaccine. In this Phase II trial, the safety and immunogenicity of Modified Vaccinia Ankara MVA-BN® (MVA was assessed in a 56-80 years old population.MVA with a virus titer of 1 x 108 TCID50/dose was administered via subcutaneous injection to 56-80 year old vaccinia-experienced subjects (N = 120. Subjects received either two injections of MVA (MM group or one injection of Placebo and one injection of MVA (PM group four weeks apart. Safety was evaluated by assessment of adverse events (AE, focused physical exams, electrocardiogram recordings and safety laboratories. Solicited AEs consisted of a set of pre-defined expected local reactions (erythema, swelling, pain, pruritus, and induration and systemic symptoms (body temperature, headache, myalgia, nausea and fatigue and were recorded on a memory aid for an 8-day period following each injection. The immunogenicity of the vaccine was evaluated in terms of humoral immune responses measured with a vaccinia-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and a plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT before and at different time points after vaccination.Vaccinations were well tolerated by all subjects. No serious adverse event related to MVA and no case of myopericarditis was reported. The overall incidence of unsolicited AEs was similar in both groups. For both groups immunogenicity responses two weeks after the final vaccination (i.e. Visit 4 were as follows: Seroconversion (SC rates (doubling of titers from baseline in vaccine specific antibody titers measured by ELISA were 83.3% in Group MM and 82.8% in Group PM (difference 0.6% with 95% exact CI [-13.8%, 15.0%], and 90.0% for Group MM and 77.6% for Group PM measured by PRNT (difference 12.4% with 95% CI of [-1.1%, 27.0%]. Geometric mean titers (GMT measured by ELISA two weeks after the final vaccination for

  16. Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Indonesian Subjects with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors Who Were Not Receiving Lipid-Lowering Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaligis, Rinambaan W M; Adiarto, Suko; Nugroho, Johanes; Pradnyana, Bagus Ari; Lefi, Achmad; Rifqi, Sodiqur

    2016-09-01

    Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) is frequently utilized for detection of subclinical atherosclerosis. This study aims to investigate the association between the CIMT values and demographic characteristics, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, lipid biochemistry profiles, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels among the Indonesian population. Subjects who had two or more CVD risk factors but were not receiving lipid-lowering therapy were recruited from six hospitals of Indonesia. Measurements of CIMT are obtained by ultrasonography of 12 sites within the common carotid artery. CVD risk factors, lipid and glucose profiles, and hs-CRP values were analyzed with respect to distribution of CIMT. The mean-max CIMT was 0.805 ± 0.190 mm (minimum, 0.268 mm; maximum, 1.652 mm) and the mean-mean CIMT was 0.614 ± 0.190 mm (minimum, 0.127 mm; maximum, 1.388 mm). Multivariate analyses confirmed an independent association between increasing CIMT and increasing age (regression coefficient = 0.004; p = 0.004). Our data show normative mean-mean CIMT data for Indonesian subjects with two or more CVD risk factors who are not receiving lipid-lowering therapy, which may guide CVD risk stratification of asymptomatic individuals in Indonesia.

  17. Oral intake of a combination of glucosyl hesperidin and caffeine elicits an anti-obesity effect in healthy, moderately obese subjects: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Tatsuya; Muroyama, Koutarou; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Murosaki, Shinji

    2016-01-19

    We have previously shown that a combination of glucosyl hesperidin (G-hesperidin) plus caffeine reduces accumulation of body fat, whereas G-hesperidin or caffeine alone shows little effect on high-fat diet-induced obesity in mice. The aim of this study is to evaluate the anti-obesity effect of G-hesperidin plus caffeine on body fat and serum TG in healthy subjects with moderately high body mass index (BMI) and serum TG. Since we considered that there are individual differences in caffeine sensitivity, we conducted dose-finding study of caffeine combined with G-hesperidin. Seventy-five healthy subjects with moderately high BMI (24-30 kg/m(2)) and serum TG (100-250 mg/dl) were divided and assigned to 12-week intervention with daily intakes of 500 mg of G-hesperidin with or without 25, 50, or 75 mg of caffeine, or placebo in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled design . After intervention, decreases in abdominal fat area (AFA), especially subcutaneous fat area (SFA), were significantly greater in the G-hesperidin with 50-mg caffeine group (AFA:-8.4 ± 21.9 v.s. 16.3 ± 34.1 cm(2); p hesperidin with 75-mg caffeine group (AFA:-17.0 ± 31.4 v.s. 16.3 ± 34.1 cm(2); p hesperidin were enhanced dose-dependently by caffeine addition. BMI decreases were significantly greater in the G-hesperidin with 75-mg caffeine group than in the placebo group (-0.56 ± 0.74 v.s. -0.02 ± 0.58 kg/m(2); p hesperidin with/without caffeine had no effect on serum TG (p > 0.05 v.s. placebo). These data suggested that a combination of 500-mg G-hesperidin with 50- or 75-mg caffeine may be useful for the prevention or treatment of obesity. UMIN Clinical Trials Registry 000019241 .

  18. The lipid-lowering effect of tenofovir/emtricitabine: a randomized, crossover, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, José R; Saumoy, María; Curran, Adrian; Bravo, Isabel; Llibre, Josep M; Navarro, Jordi; Estany, Carla; Podzamczer, Daniel; Ribera, Esteban; Negredo, Eugènia; Clotet, Bonaventura; Paredes, Roger

    2015-08-01

    It is unknown if tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), which is often coformulated with the lipid-neutral emtricitabine (FTC), has a lipid-lowering effect. We performed a randomized, crossover, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected subjects with HIV-1 RNA placebo (washout) and 12 additional weeks of placebo (placebo period). Subjects in arm 2 added placebo for 12 weeks (placebo period) followed by TDF/FTC for 12 weeks and placebo for 12 additional weeks (washout). The primary endpoint was change in median fasting TC levels. Of 46 subjects enrolled, 56% received darunavir/ritonavir and 44% lopinavir/ritonavir. Exposure to TDF/FTC reduced TC from 234 to 205 mg/dL (P placebo (P = .001 and P = .002, respectively). The TC/HDL-c ratio and triglyceride levels did not change with TDF/FTC exposure. Coformulated TDF/FTC has an intrinsic lipid-lowering effect, likely attributable to TDF. NCT01458977. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Placebo interventions, placebo effects and clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Linde, Klaus; Fässler, Margrit; Meissner, Karin

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the role of placebo interventions and placebo effects in clinical practice. We first describe the relevance of different perspectives among scientists, physicians and patients on what is considered a placebo intervention in clinical practice. We then summarize how placebo effects have been investigated in randomized controlled trials under the questionable premise that such effects are produced by placebo interventions. We further discuss why a shift of focus from the pla...

  20. Weight loss approach during routine follow-up is effective for obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome subjects receiving nasal continuous positive airway pressure treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Hiroko; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Muto, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the effectiveness of a weight loss program during routine medical follow-up with regularity on promoting weight reduction in obese obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) subjects receiving continuous positive airway pressure treatment (CPAP). A total of 10 male obese OSAHS subjects treated with CPAP were enrolled in the present study that was an intervention study without a control and had a pre-post test study design. The age was 50.7 (7.8) (mean (SD)) years, and body mass index was 30.7 (2.5) kg/m(2). A 4-month weight loss program was developed, using a combined approach of diet and physical activity based on individual counseling with behavioral approach. At 4 months, weight was significantly decreased compared with the baseline value (88.4 (8.9) kg to 86.9 (8.8) kg, p=0.005), and the mean weight loss was a 1.7% decrease from the baseline. There was significantly higher percent weight loss in the group with a CPAP duration or = 30 months (2.7 (1.6) % vs. 0.6 (0.5) %, p=0.032). The present study shows that a weight loss program may be useful in reducing weight for male obese OSAHS subjects treated with CPAP.

  1. Drug*placebo interaction effect may bias clinical trials interpretation: hybrid balanced placebo and randomized placebo-controlled design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, Muhammad M; Hammami, Safa; Al-Swayeh, Reem; Al-Gaai, Eman; Farah, Faduma Abdi; De Padua, Sophia J S

    2016-11-29

    Conventional randomized placebo-controlled study design assumes the absence of drug*placebo interaction. We hypothesized the presence of such an interaction and that conventionally estimated drug effect might be biased. The objectives of the study were to determine the drug*placebo interaction effect (main) and compare conventionally estimated and interaction model-estimated drug effects (secondary). We used a hybrid of balanced placebo and randomized placebo-controlled designs. Four hundred eighty healthy volunteers were randomized to three groups. The first received hydroxyzine (25 mg) described as hydroxyzine or placebo, the second received placebo described as hydroxyzine or placebo, and the third received hydroxyzine and placebo described as unknown; each in a randomized crossover design. Seven participants failed to crossover. Group assignment was concealed from participants and study coordinators. Coordinators were blinded to group and intervention assignment. Participants and coordinators were deceived as to study objectives. Main outcomes were mean area-under-the-curve of drowsiness (therapeutic outcome) and mouth-dryness (adverse outcome), self-reported on 100 mm visual analog scale over 7 h. Drug, placebo, placebo + interaction, and total effects were estimated using analysis of covariance by comparing received hydroxyzine/told placebo to received placebo/told placebo, received placebo/told hydroxyzine to received placebo/told placebo, received hydroxyzine/told hydroxyzine to received hydroxyzine/told placebo, and received hydroxyzine/told hydroxyzine to received placebo/told placebo, respectively. Drug effect was also conventionally estimated in the third group. Mean (SD) age was 31.4 (6.6) years, 65% were males. There was significant difference between placebo + interaction effect and placebo effect for both drowsiness and mouth-dryness with a mean difference (95% confidence interval) of 35.1 (5.6 to 64.6) and 23.8 (2.4 to 45.2) mm

  2. Interaction between drug and placebo effects: a cross-over balanced placebo design trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvi Syed

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The total effect of a medication is the sum of its drug effect, placebo effect (meaning response, and their possible interaction. Current interpretation of clinical trials' results assumes no interaction. Demonstrating such an interaction has been difficult due to lack of an appropriate study design. Methods 180 adults were randomized to caffeine (300 mg or placebo groups. Each group received the assigned intervention described by the investigators as caffeine or placebo, in a randomized crossover design. 4-hour-area-under-the-curve of energy, sleepiness, nausea (on 100 mm visual analog scales, and systolic blood pressure levels as well as caffeine pharmacokinetics (in 22 volunteers nested in the caffeine group were determined. Caffeine drug, placebo, placebo-plus-interaction, and total effects were estimated by comparing outcomes after, receiving caffeine described as placebo to receiving placebo described as placebo, receiving placebo described as caffeine or placebo, receiving caffeine described as caffeine or placebo, and receiving caffeine described as caffeine to receiving placebo described as placebo, respectively. Results The placebo effect on area-under-the-curve of energy (mean difference and sleepiness (geometric mean ratio was larger than placebo-plus-interaction effect (16.6 [95% CI, 4.1 to 29.0] vs. 8.4 [-4.2 to 21.0] mm*hr and 0.58 [0.39 to 0.86] vs. 0.69 [0.49 to 0.97], respectively, similar in size to drug effect (20.8 [3.8 to 37.8] mm*hr and 0.49 [0.30 to 0.91], respectively, and its combination with the later was larger than total caffeine effect (29.5 [11.9 to 47.1] mm*hr and 0.37 [0.22 to 0.64]. Placebo-plus-interaction effect increased caffeine terminal half-life by 0.40 [0.12 to 0.68] hr (P = 0.007. Conclusions Drug and placebo effects of a medication may be less than additive, which influences the interpretation of clinical trials. The placebo effect may increase active drug terminal half-life, a novel

  3. Randomised controlled trials may underestimate drug effects: balanced placebo trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Karen; Vase, Lene; Petersen, Gitte L; Jensen, Troels S; Finnerup, Nanna B

    2014-01-01

    It is an inherent assumption in randomised controlled trials that the drug effect can be estimated by subtracting the response during placebo from the response during active drug treatment. To test the assumption of additivity. The primary hypothesis was that the total treatment effect is smaller than the sum of the drug effect and the placebo effect. The secondary hypothesis was that non-additivity was most pronounced in participants with large placebo effects. We used a within-subject randomised blinded balanced placebo design and included 48 healthy volunteers (50% males), mean (SD) age 23.4 (6.2) years. Experimental pain was induced by injections of hypertonic saline into the masseter muscle. Participants received four injections with hypertonic saline along with lidocaine or matching placebo in randomised order: A: received hypertonic saline/told hypertonic saline; B: received hypertonic saline+lidocaine/told hypertonic saline; C: received hypertonic saline+placebo/told hypertonic saline+pain killer; D: received hypertonic saline+lidocaine/told hypertonic saline+pain killer. The primary outcome measure was the area under the curve (AUC, mm(2)) of pain intensity during injections. There was a significant difference between the sum of the drug effect and the placebo effect (mean AUC 6279 mm(2) (95% CI, 4936-7622)) and the total treatment effect (mean AUC 5455 mm(2) (95% CI, 4585-6324)) (P = 0.049). This difference was larger for participants with large versus small placebo effects (P = 0.015), and the difference correlated significantly with the size of the placebo effect (r = 0.65, P = 0.006). Although this study examined placebo effects and not the whole placebo response as in randomised controlled trials, it does suggest that the additivity assumption may be incorrect, and that the estimated drug effects in randomised controlled trials may be underestimated, particularly in studies reporting large placebo responses. The implications for

  4. Randomised Controlled Trials May Underestimate Drug Effects: Balanced Placebo Trial Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Karen; Vase, Lene; Petersen, Gitte L.; Jensen, Troels S.; Finnerup, Nanna B.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is an inherent assumption in randomised controlled trials that the drug effect can be estimated by subtracting the response during placebo from the response during active drug treatment. Objective To test the assumption of additivity. The primary hypothesis was that the total treatment effect is smaller than the sum of the drug effect and the placebo effect. The secondary hypothesis was that non-additivity was most pronounced in participants with large placebo effects. Methods We used a within-subject randomised blinded balanced placebo design and included 48 healthy volunteers (50% males), mean (SD) age 23.4 (6.2) years. Experimental pain was induced by injections of hypertonic saline into the masseter muscle. Participants received four injections with hypertonic saline along with lidocaine or matching placebo in randomised order: A: received hypertonic saline/told hypertonic saline; B: received hypertonic saline+lidocaine/told hypertonic saline; C: received hypertonic saline+placebo/told hypertonic saline+pain killer; D: received hypertonic saline+lidocaine/told hypertonic saline+pain killer. The primary outcome measure was the area under the curve (AUC, mm2) of pain intensity during injections. Results There was a significant difference between the sum of the drug effect and the placebo effect (mean AUC 6279 mm2 (95% CI, 4936–7622)) and the total treatment effect (mean AUC 5455 mm2 (95% CI, 4585–6324)) (P = 0.049). This difference was larger for participants with large versus small placebo effects (P = 0.015), and the difference correlated significantly with the size of the placebo effect (r = 0.65, P = 0.006). Conclusion Although this study examined placebo effects and not the whole placebo response as in randomised controlled trials, it does suggest that the additivity assumption may be incorrect, and that the estimated drug effects in randomised controlled trials may be underestimated, particularly in studies reporting large

  5. Nutritional status assessed by scored patient-generated subjective global assessment associated with length of hospital stay in adult patients receiving an appendectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Hao Huang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malnutrition has been associated with poor health outcomes in hospitalized patients. This study assessed the validity of the scored patient-generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA in adult patients who had undergone an open appendectomy, and examined the association of this assessment tool with length of hospital stay. Methods: Nutritional status was determined by using the scored PG-SGA in adult patients (n = 86 who had undergone an open appendectomy within 24 hours of admission. Variables were compared between well-nourished and malnourished participants. Regression analysis was used to identify potential predictors for length of hospital stay. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC analysis was used to examine the validity of the PG-SGA score to predict the nutritional status. Results: On admission, 17% of the study subjects were malnourished and associated with a significantly older age (53.0 vs. 39.5, greater PG-SGA score (8 vs. 2, higher comorbidity (67% vs. 27%, and longer length of hospital stay (6.9 d vs. 4.1 d. The PG-SGA score and comorbidity were the determined risk factors for length of hospital stay after performing multiple regression analysis. Furthermore, the PG-SGA score had a significantly positive correlation with length of hospital stay (Spearman's rho = 0.378, p < 0.001. The area under the ROC curve indicating the PG-SGA score, compared with nutritional status, is 0.9751. Conclusions: The scored PG-SGA in adults receiving an appendectomy is significantly associated with length of hospital stay, and is an effective tool for assessing the nutritional status of patients with cancer and chronic illness, as well as of patients with acute surgical abdomen.

  6. Placebo effect and placebos: what are we talking about? Some conceptual and historical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Ana; Farré, Magí; Baños, Josep-E

    2003-08-01

    Placebos and the placebo effect have always been present in medical history. However, they have not received the same consideration over the years. Somewhere between art and science, the placebo historical references come from Ancient Egypt and cross over the major civilisations, beliefs and scientific advances. The use of placebo as a methodological tool has assumed a leading role in the last 50 years and has become an important role in controlled clinical trials, the main element of the "evidence-based-medicine" paradigm. Knowledge of the conceptual and historical considerations of placebo may help to understand its role in medical practice. Even without a consensual definition, and assuming that the placebo effect does not seem to be fully dependent on a placebo administration, one issue seems unquestionable: the placebo effect is present in clinical practice and in clinical trials, no matter which name we choose to call it.

  7. Evaluation of the Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) as a predictor of febrile neutropenia in gynecologic cancer patients receiving combination chemotherapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phippen, Neil T; Lowery, William J; Barnett, J Cory; Hall, Lisa A; Landt, Cristy; Leath, Charles A

    2011-11-01

    Determine if pre-treatment Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) predicts febrile neutropenia (FN) in gynecologic cancer patients receiving primary combination chemotherapy. Following IRB approval, clinicopathologic variables, pre-treatment laboratory values and PG-SGA were recorded from eligible patients. Bone marrow toxicity (CTC 3.0) divided groups of patients: (1) No grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, (2) grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, (3) FN. Statistical analysis with Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance and a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were performed. 58 patients met study inclusion: 25 in group 1, 28 in group 2, and 5 in group 3. Mean age was 61 and the majority, 42 (72%), had ovarian cancer. Median PG-SGA scores were: 6 (group 1) vs. 7 (group 2) vs. 14 (group 3) (p=0.019). Both median albumin: (1) 4.2 vs. (2) 4.0 vs. (3) 3.4 g/dl (p=0.041), and hemoglobin: (1) 12.1 vs. (2) 11.75 vs. (3) 10.6g/dl (p=0.05) differed between the groups. The overall AUC of the ROC curve for PG-SGA was 0.831 ± 0.064 (95% CI=0.706 to 0.956, p=0.015). Using the ROC, selecting a PG-SGA score of 7.5 to be predictive of febrile neutropenia yields a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 60%. When the cutoff value is set at 12.5, the specificity improves to 81% while decreasing sensitivity to 80%. PG-SGA scores were higher for patients experiencing FN and may be a reasonably predictive marker of FN in patients receiving multi-agent primary chemotherapy and likely benefactors of prophylactic GCSF. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Rilpivirine versus efavirenz in HIV-1-infected subjects receiving emtricitabine/tenofovir DF: pooled 96-week data from ECHO and THRIVE Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M R; Elion, R A; Cohen, C J; Mills, A; Hodder, S L; Segal-Maurer, S; Bloch, M; Garner, W; Guyer, B; Williams, S; Chuck, S; Vanveggel, S; Deckx, H; Stevens, M

    2013-01-01

    Week 96 efficacy and safety of the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) rilpivirine (RPV) was compared to efavirenz (EFV) in subset of 1,096 subjects who received emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (FTC/TDF) in pooled data from 2 phase 3 studies. ECHO and THRIVE are double-blind, double-dummy, randomized, active-controlled, non-inferiority phase 3 studies of RPV versus EFV plus 2 NRTIs in antiretroviral-naïve adult subjects. The primary and secondary endpoints were the proportion of subjects with HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/ mL using an intent-to-treat, time to loss of virologic response (ITT-TLOVR) analysis at weeks 48 and 96, respectively. Safety, tolerability, immunologic response, adherence level, and other measures were also evaluated. At week 48, noninferior efficacy of RPV+FTC/TDF over EFV+FTC/TDF was established, and at week 96 RPV+FTC/TDF remained noninferior (77% overall response rate in both groups). Through week 96, rates of virologic failure were higher in the RPV+FTC/ TDF group, with low and similar rates of virologic failure and resistance mutations occurring during the second year of follow-up. Treatment with RPV+FTC/TDF was associated with a lower rate of discontinuation due to adverse events and grade 2-4 adverse events including dizziness, abnormal dreams/nightmares, rash, and lipid abnormalities. The pooled ECHO and THRIVE studies demonstrated noninferiority of RPV+FTC/TDF in achieving virologic response with safety and tolerability advantages over EFV+FTC/TDF through 96 weeks. Higher rates of virologic failure in the RPV+FTC/TDF group were balanced with higher rates of discontinuations due to adverse events in the EFV+FTC/TDF group.

  9. The placebo effect in rheumatology: new data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Jean-Marie

    2011-03-01

    The placebo effect is often poorly understood or confused with evaluation bias or spontaneous improvement, particularly when study inclusion criteria select patients at the peak of their symptoms. Cerebral imaging studies have confirmed that the placebo effect exists, although it is now known to involve a combination of conditioned reflexes and reward anticipation. The magnitude of the placebo effect can be evaluated by randomly dividing patients into three groups, one of which receives no treatment at all; by crossover studies; or by the newly developed open-hidden study design. This last design has established that rebound effects can occur after placebo discontinuation, and other experiments have shown that anxiety is associated with a weaker placebo response. This anti-placebo effect of anxiety, similar to the nocebo effect, may involve the release of cholecystokinin. The strength of the placebo effect varies across procedures and joints. A marked placebo effect can be seen in rheumatology patients, as shown recently by two high-quality double-blind studies that found no difference between vertebroplasty and a sham procedure. Effective blinding is crucial both to obtain a strong placebo effect and to separate an intrinsic effect from a placebo effect. Beliefs of the patients and physicians regarding the active drug and the existence and strength of the placebo effect could also be usefully evaluated throughout clinical studies. Copyright © 2010 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. PLACEBO EFFECTS IN COMPETITIVE SPORT: QUALITATIVE DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Beedie

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the placebo effect in sports performance. The possibility that the placebo effect is a more common phenomenon than the quantity of published research would suggest is briefly addressed. It is suggested that the placebo control design often used in sports performance research masks any placebo effects and thus presents a false picture of the mechanisms underlying performance-enhancing interventions in the real world. An electronic survey was sent to 48 competitive, international and professional athletes. Questions related to the placebo effect in competitive sport. Thirty responses were received. Data indicate that the majority (97% of respondents believe that the placebo effect can exert an influence on sports performance, and that a significant number (73% have experienced what they defined as a placebo effect. Inductive content analysis reveals that these experiences fall into several categories such as explicit placebo effects, inadvertent false beliefs, ritual and reverse placebo effects. Furthermore, 10 respondents (33% offer explanations as to the nature of the placebo effect. Again, inductive content analysis reveals that these explanations fall into several categories including deliberate changes in competitive strategy, belief/expectancy, faith in a third party, and marketing. Overall, responses support previous experimental research and anecdotal reports that have found a relationship between belief and sports performance. It is suggested that further research be structured to not simply control for the placebo effect, but to elucidate it

  11. Nothingness and the placebo effect phenomenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tine

    The placebo effect is a pharmacological conundrum, since it is a medical effect that is produced by “nothing” because no pharmacologically active substance is present in placebo. Placebo has, among other things, been defined as an inert substance, often a calcium pill. Simultaneously it presents...... a psychophysiological challenge in the question of what it is exactly that the subject reacts to. In other words, the relation between the subject and the placebo is a precarious one. There is a vast amount of literature on the placebo effect, and it has been studied as a separate field of investigation since the late...... 1940’ies, mainly for pre-elimination from medical trials. It has been studied as an effect of personality traits, as an expectational effect, and as a psychophysiological phenomenon. Through history "Placebo reactants" have been labelled, difficult, simple minded and hypochondriacs. But all attempts...

  12. Greater incidence of depression with hypnotic use than with placebo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kripke Daniel F

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although it has been claimed that insomnia causes an increased risk for depression, adequate controlled trials testing this hypothesis have not been available. This study contrasted the incidence of depression among subjects receiving hypnotics in randomized controlled trials versus those receiving placebo. Methods The incidence of depression among patients randomized to hypnotic drugs or placebo was compiled from prescribing information approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA and from FDA New Drug Application documents. Available data for zolpidem, zaleplon, eszopiclone, and ramelteon were accessed. Results Data for 5535 patients randomized to a hypnotic and for 2318 randomized to placebo were compiled. The incidence of depression was 2.0% among participants randomized to hypnotics as compared to 0.9% among those randomized in parallel to placebo (p Conclusion Modern hypnotics were associated with an increased incidence of depression in data released by the FDA. This suggests that when there is a risk of depression, hypnotics may be contra-indicated. Preventive treatments such as antidepressant drugs, cognitive-behavioral therapy, or bright light might be preferred. Limitations in the FDA data prevented a formal meta-analysis, and there was a lack of information about drop-out rates and definitions of depression. Trials specifically designed to detect incident depression when treating insomnia with hypnotic drugs and better summarization of adverse events in trials submitted to the FDA are both necessary.

  13. Placebo-induced somatic sensations: a multi-modal study of three different placebo interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beissner, Florian; Brünner, Franziska; Fink, Maria; Meissner, Karin; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Napadow, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    Somatic sensations induced by placebos are a frequent phenomenon whose etiology and clinical relevance remains unknown. In this study, we have evaluated the quantitative, qualitative, spatial, and temporal characteristics of placebo-induced somatic sensations in response to three different placebo interventions: (1) placebo irritant solution, (2) placebo laser stimulation, and (3) imagined laser stimulation. The quality and intensity of evoked sensations were assessed using the McGill pain questionnaire and visual analogue scales (VAS), while subjects' sensation drawings processed by a geographic information system (GIS) were used to measure their spatial characteristics. We found that all three interventions are capable of producing robust sensations most frequently described as "tingling" and "warm" that can reach consider-able spatial extent (≤ 205 mm²) and intensity (≤ 80/100 VAS). Sensations from placebo stimulation were often referred to areas remote from the stimulation site and exhibit considerable similarity with referred pain. Interestingly, there was considerable similarity of qualitative features as well as spatial patterns across subjects and placebos. However, placebo laser stimulation elicited significantly stronger and more widespread sensations than placebo irritant solution. Finally, novelty seeking, a character trait assessed by the Temperament and Character Inventory and associated with basal dopaminergic activity, was less pronounced in subjects susceptible to report placebo-induced sensations. Our study has shown that placebo-induced sensations are frequent and can reach considerable intensity and extent. As multiple somatosensory subsystems are involved despite the lack of peripheral stimulus, we propose a central etiology for this phenomenon.

  14. Neurocognitive performance, subjective well-being, and psychosocial functioning after benzodiazepine withdrawal in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder: a randomized clinical trial of add-on melatonin versus placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baandrup, Lone; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Glenthoj, Birte

    2017-03-01

    Chronic benzodiazepine use is common in patients with mental illness and is associated with cognitive impairment. It is unclear whether benzodiazepine-induced cognitive impairment is reversible. Amelioration of cognitive dysfunction may be facilitated during benzodiazepine tapering by add-on melatonin due to its anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties. We examined how melatonin and benzodiazepine withdrawal affect cognition, subjective well-being, and psychosocial functioning. Eighty patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder were randomized to add-on treatment once daily with either prolonged-release melatonin or placebo in a 24-week, double-blind clinical trial. All participants gradually tapered usual benzodiazepine dosage in a closely monitored treatment setting. We used the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS) to assess neurocognitive performance with additional assessments of subjective well-being and psychosocial functioning. BACS composite and subscale scores (except motor speed) significantly improved in parallel with benzodiazepine dose reduction, but there was no additional effect of melatonin. Cognitive performance was still markedly impaired post-tapering compared with normative data. Neither benzodiazepine withdrawal nor treatment group affected subjective well-being or psychosocial functioning. In conclusion, add-on melatonin does not seem to affect cognition, well-being, or psychosocial functioning in patients with severe mental illness. The observed improvement in cognitive performance could not be distinguished from retest effects, which may in turn have been facilitated by the benzodiazepine tapering.

  15. Efficacy of yogurt drink with added plant stanol esters (Benecol®, Colanta) in reducing total and LDL cholesterol in subjects with moderate hypercholesterolemia: a randomized placebo-controlled crossover trial NCT01461798.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez-Trespalacios, Elsa M; Romero-Palacio, Johanna

    2014-08-06

    Cardiovascular diseases have become the leading cause of death from chronic diseases in the world. Main risk factors include hypercholesterolemia, which is caused in most cases by a high saturated fat diet. Plant stanol esters partly block cholesterol absorption in the digestive tract and thereby reduce total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol serum levels. Based on epidemiological data, a 10 percent reduction of LDL cholesterol leads to a 20 percent decrease in the coronary heart disease risk throughout life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of yogurt drink with added plant stanol esters (Benecol® yogurt drink) in higher doses than the typically used (2g/d stanols), in lowering blood lipids in moderately hypercholesterolemic subjects. A randomized double-blind crossover, placebo-controlled study in moderately hypercholesterolemic subjects (n = 40) aged between 20 and 50 years old. Yogurt drink with added plant stanols (4 g) as esters (Benecol®, Colanta) consumption compared to regular yogurt drink caused a statistically significant decrease in total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol by 7.2% and 10.3%. During the two periods and compared to controls, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides were not significantly different. Yogurt drink with an active ingredient in Benecol®, plant stanol esters, reduced total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol in moderately hypercholesterolemic subjects. NCT01461798.

  16. A DOUBLE-BLIND, PLACEBO-CONTROLLED EVALUATION OF THE ANXIOLYTIC EFFICACY FF AN ETHANOLIC EXTRACT OF WITHANIA SOMNIFERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; Aswath, Anitha; Chaturvedi, S.K.; Srinivasa, M.; Raguram, R.

    2000-01-01

    A double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy an ethanolic extract of Aswagandha (Withania somnifera), in patients with ICD-10 anxiety disorders. The sample comprised 39 subjects, of whom 20 received the drug and 19 received placebo. The two groups were sociodemographically and clinically similar at baseline. At 2 and 6 weeks follow-up, data from approximately 85% of patients in each group were available for analysis. Statistical trends favouring the drug were observed at both time points. At 6 weeks, significantly more patients met a priori response criteria in the drug group (88.2%) as compared with the placebo group (50%). The drug was well-tolerated and did not occasion more adverse effects than did placebo. It is concluded that this ethanolic extract of Withania somnifera has useful anxiolytic potential and merits further investigation. PMID:21407960

  17. Acute effects of a wild green-oat (Avena sativa) extract on cognitive function in middle-aged adults: A double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David O; Jackson, Philippa A; Forster, Joanne; Khan, Julie; Grothe, Torsten; Perrinjaquet-Moccetti, Tania; Haskell-Ramsay, Crystal F

    2017-02-01

    A wild green-oats extract (Neuravena ® ) containing a range of potentially bioactive components, including flavonoids and triterpene saponins, has previously been shown to enhance animal stress responses and memory, and improve cognitive performance in humans at a dose of 1600 mg. Methods This double-blind, placebo-controlled, counterbalanced cross-over study assessed the effects of single doses of the green-oat extract (GOE) across a broad range of cognitive domains in healthy adults aged 40-65 years who self-reported that they felt that their memory had declined with age. Participants attended on six occasions, receiving a single dose of either placebo, 800, or 1600 mg GOE on each occasion, with the counterbalanced order of treatments repeated twice for each participant. Cognitive function was assessed with a range of computerized tasks measuring attention, spatial/working/episodic memory, and executive function pre-dose and at 1, 2.5, 4, and 6 hours post-dose. Results The results showed that 800mg GOE increased the speed of performance across post-dose assessments on a global measure including data from all of the timed tasks. It also improved performance of a delayed word recall task in terms of errors and an executive function task (Peg and Ball) in terms of decreased thinking time and overall completion time. Working memory span (Corsi blocks) was also increased, but only on the second occasion that this dose was taken. Discussion These results confirm the acute cognitive effects of GOE seen in previous research, and suggest that the optimal dose lies at or below 800 mg.

  18. Dry eye, sleep quality, and mood status in glaucoma patients receiving prostaglandin monotherapy were comparable with those in non-glaucoma subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shugyoku Ra

    Full Text Available Prior studies suggested that glaucoma patients suffer worse dry eye and mood and sleep disorders than non-glaucoma subjects. Prostaglandin analogues are first-line therapy for glaucoma, inducing few instillation problems and sufficient pressure-reduction effects. This study compared dry eye, sleep quality, and mood status between glaucoma patients receiving prostaglandin monotherapy and non-glaucoma subjects.This cross-sectional study evaluated 1520 patients (579 males and 941 females for glaucoma status and dry eye-related symptoms (dryness, eye fatigue, photophobia, pain, blurring and signs (Schirmer test, tear break-up time, corneal staining scores. Of the total cohort, 93 patients were also evaluated by Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI and hospital anxiety and depression score (HADS. Inclusion criteria were consecutive patients ≥ 51 years of age and best-corrected visual acuity ≥ 20/25. Glaucoma patients included those treated with prostaglandin or a fixed combination including prostaglandin. Exclusion criteria were history of ocular surgery within one month. Data were analyzed using the chi-square or Mann-Whitney U tests, at 5% significance.There were no significant differences in dry eye-related signs and symptoms between the control (n = 1431, mean age of 66.9 years and glaucoma groups (n = 89, 67.9 years. The psychiatric sub-analysis of the control (n = 61, 66.2 years and glaucoma groups (n = 32, 67.3 years revealed mean scores of 5.02 ± 3.10 and 5.16 ± 3.46 for PSQI (normal range ≤ 5, 9.47 ± 5.61 and 9.42 ± 7.36 for HADS (normal range ≤ 10, 4.84 ± 3.22 and 4.71 ± 3.45 for anxiety (normal range ≤ 5, and 4.63 ± 3.05 and 4.71 ± 4.40 for depression (normal range ≤ 5, respectively, without statistical significance.Our results were comparable between glaucoma patients on prostaglandin monotherapy and non-glaucoma subjects for dry eye-related clinical manifestations, sleep quality, and mood status.

  19. Phase I, Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled, Single-dose, and Multiple-dose Studies of Erenumab in Healthy Subjects and Patients With Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Hoon, Jan; Van Hecken, Anne; Vandermeulen, Corinne; Yan, Lucy; Smith, Brian; Chen, Jiyun Sunny; Bautista, Edgar; Hamilton, Lisa; Waksman, Javier; Vu, Thuy; Vargas, Gabriel

    2017-07-24

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) signaling are being explored as prophylactic treatments for migraine. Erenumab (AMG 334) is the first potent, selective, and competitive human mAb antagonist of the CGRP receptor. We report the data from two phase I studies assessing the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamics of single and multiple administrations of erenumab in healthy subjects and patients with migraine. The results indicate that the PK profile of erenumab is nonlinear from 1 mg to 70 mg and the linear portion of the clearance from 70 mg to 210 mg is consistent with other human immunoglobulin G2 antibodies. Single doses of erenumab resulted in >75% inhibition of capsaicin-induced dermal blood flow, with no apparent dose-dependency for erenumab ≥21 mg. Erenumab was generally well tolerated, with an acceptable safety profile, supporting further clinical development of erenumab for migraine prevention. © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  20. Population pharmacokinetics analysis of AMG 416, an allosteric activator of the calcium-sensing receptor, in subjects with secondary hyperparathyroidism receiving hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ping; Melhem, Murad; Xiao, Jim; Kuchimanchi, Mita; Perez Ruixo, Juan Jose

    2015-06-01

    This study characterizes the population pharmacokinetics of AMG 416, an allosteric activator of the calcium-sensing receptor, in subjects with secondary hyperparathyroidism receiving hemodialysis. AMG 416 doses ranging from 2.5 to 60 mg were administered intravenously as single or multiple thrice weekly (TIW) doses at the end of hemodialysis during rinseback. The influence of demographics, concomitant medications, and other disease-related biomarkers on pharmacokinetic parameters was explored. The predictability of the final model was evaluated using bootstrapping and visual predictive checks. A 3-compartment linear pharmacokinetic model that accounts for the hemodialysis clearance best described the data. Plasma clearance (interindividual variability) was 0.564 L/h (14.0%CV). The hemodialysis clearance was 22.2 L/h. The volume of distribution at steady-state was approximately 624 L (82%CV). The mean time to achieve 90% steady-state predialysis concentrations with 3- and 6-hour hemodialysis TIW was 46 and 32 days, respectively. No statistically significant (P AMG 416 exhibits linear and stationary pharmacokinetics within the range of doses evaluated. Within the range of covariate values investigated, pharmacokinetically driven adjustments of AMG 416 dosing on the basis of these covariates were not warranted. © 2015, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  1. The Effect of the Type and Colour of Placebo Stimuli on Placebo Effects Induced by Observational Learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Świder

    Full Text Available Research shows that placebo analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia can be induced through observational learning. Our aim was to replicate and extend these results by studying the influence of the type and colour of stimuli used as placebos on the placebo effects induced by observational learning. Three experimental and two control groups were tested. All participants received pain stimuli of the same intensity preceded by colour lights (green and red or geometric shapes (circles and squares. Before receiving pain stimuli, participants in the experimental groups, but not in the control groups, observed a model who rated pain stimuli that were preceded by either green lights (green placebo group, red lights (red placebo group, or circles (circle placebo group as being less painful than those preceded by either red lights (green placebo group, green lights (red placebo group, or squares (circle placebo group. As a result participants in the experimental groups rated pain stimuli preceded by either green lights (green placebo group, red lights (red placebo group, or circles (circle placebo group as being less painful than the participants in the control groups did, indicating that placebo effect was induced. No statistically significant differences were found in the magnitudes of the placebo effects between the three experimental groups (green placebo, red placebo, and circle placebo groups, indicating that neither the type nor the colour of placebo stimuli affected the placebo effects induced by observational learning. The placebo effects induced by observational learning were found to be unrelated to the individual differences in pain anxiety, fear of pain, and empathy.

  2. The Effect of the Type and Colour of Placebo Stimuli on Placebo Effects Induced by Observational Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świder, Karolina; Bąbel, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    Research shows that placebo analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia can be induced through observational learning. Our aim was to replicate and extend these results by studying the influence of the type and colour of stimuli used as placebos on the placebo effects induced by observational learning. Three experimental and two control groups were tested. All participants received pain stimuli of the same intensity preceded by colour lights (green and red) or geometric shapes (circles and squares). Before receiving pain stimuli, participants in the experimental groups, but not in the control groups, observed a model who rated pain stimuli that were preceded by either green lights (green placebo group), red lights (red placebo group), or circles (circle placebo group) as being less painful than those preceded by either red lights (green placebo group), green lights (red placebo group), or squares (circle placebo group). As a result participants in the experimental groups rated pain stimuli preceded by either green lights (green placebo group), red lights (red placebo group), or circles (circle placebo group) as being less painful than the participants in the control groups did, indicating that placebo effect was induced. No statistically significant differences were found in the magnitudes of the placebo effects between the three experimental groups (green placebo, red placebo, and circle placebo groups), indicating that neither the type nor the colour of placebo stimuli affected the placebo effects induced by observational learning. The placebo effects induced by observational learning were found to be unrelated to the individual differences in pain anxiety, fear of pain, and empathy.

  3. A red yeast rice-olive extract supplement reduces biomarkers of oxidative stress, OxLDL and Lp-PLA2, in subjects with metabolic syndrome: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Nina; Van der Auwera, Anastasia; Breynaert, Annelies; Verlaet, Annelies; De Bruyne, Tess; Van Gaal, Luc; Pieters, Luc; Verhoeven, Veronique

    2017-07-03

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) refers to clustered cardiovascular risk factors (abdominal obesity, pre-diabetes, high blood pressure, dyslipidaemia). Therapies targeting oxidative stress may delay progression to atherosclerosis and diabetes. We investigated the anti-oxidative effect of a supplement combining red yeast rice and olive extract in patients with MetS. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised trial was conducted with 50 patients with MetS as defined by National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Forty-nine subjects randomly assigned to red yeast rice-olive extract (RYR-olive extract; 10.82 mg of monacolins and 9.32 mg of hydroxytyrosol per Cholesfytolplus capsule) or placebo completed the 8-week trial. Whereas effects on cardiovascular risk parameters of MetS have been reported recently, the observed significant 20% increase in oxidised low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) prompted us to investigate other oxidative stress-related parameters: malondialdehyde (MDA), lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). Statistical calculations included univariate quantitative analysis, multivariate linear regression and correlation analysis. The updated results indicate that an RYR-olive extract supplement significantly reduced Lp-PLA2 by 7% (p  0.05). Reductions in OxLDL (20%) and Lp-PLA2 (7%) were associated with each other (r = 0.740, p < 0.001). RYR-olive extract significantly reduced Lp-PLA2 in correlation with the marked reduction in plasma OxLDL, which may lead to a reduced risk for cardiovascular disease in patients with MetS. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02065180 . Registered on 13 February 2014.

  4. Effects of butterbur treatment in intermittent allergic rhinitis: a placebo-controlled evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Robert D; Haggart, Kay; Lee, Daniel K C; Cull, Steven; Lipworth, Brian J

    2004-07-01

    Butterbur (Petasites hybridus) contains the active ingredient petasin, which exhibits antileukotriene and antihistamine activity. Previous studies of intermittent allergic rhinitis (IAR) have demonstrated a comparable response to butterbur compared with a histamine H1-receptor antagonist on the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey quality-of-life score. However, there has been no placebo-controlled study of the effects of butterbur use on objective and subjective outcomes in IAR. To evaluate the effects of treatment with butterbur vs placebo on objective and subjective outcomes in IAR. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study was carried out during the grass pollen season in Tayside, Scotland. Thirty-five patients (14 men and 21 women) with IAR received butterbur, 50 mg twice daily, or placebo for 2 weeks. Domiciliary measurements were taken in the morning and evening for peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF) (the primary outcome variable), nasal and eye symptoms, and rhinoconjunctivitis-specific quality-of-life score. Butterbur treatment had no significant effect on PNIF, total nasal symptom score, eye symptom score, or quality of life compared with placebo use. Mean (SEM) morning and evening PNIF values were 107 (6) and 114 (6) L/min, respectively, for butterbur vs 105 (6) and 117 (6) L/min for placebo. Mean (SEM) morning and evening total nasal symptom scores (maximum total score, 12) were 3.4 (0.4) and 3.5 (0.4), respectively, for butterbur vs 3.7 (0.3) and 3.8 (0.4) for placebo. There was no significant clinical efficacy of butterbur use vs placebo use on objective and subjective outcomes in IAR. Further studies are now indicated to investigate the use of butterbur in persistent allergic rhinitis.

  5. Subjective discomfort in children receiving 3 T MRI and experienced adults' perspective on children's tolerability of 7 T: a cross-sectional questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I-Jun; Tench, Christopher R; Gowland, Penny; Jaspan, Tim; Dineen, Rob A; Evangelou, Nikos; Abdel-Fahim, Rasha; Whitehouse, William P; Constantinescu, Cris S

    2014-10-15

    To explore the possible discomfort perceived by children participating in 7 T MRI research, and the age range in which children are most likely to tolerate it well. A cross-sectional survey using age-appropriate questionnaires containing six measures of subjective discomfort (general discomfort, dizziness, noisiness, claustrophobia and feeling of cold or warm). For children, 3 T clinical scanner in a tertiary referral teaching hospital; for adults, 3 and 7 T scanner in a university research building. Non-sedated children and young people under 18 years of age who underwent 3 T clinical MRI for brain or musculoskeletal scans and adult volunteers attending 7 T with or without 3 T for brain scans. 83% (89/107) of involved individuals returned questionnaires. The most common discomfort among 31 children receiving 3 T MRI was noisiness (39%), followed by cold (19%), general discomfort (16%), dizziness (13%) and claustrophobia (10%). The noise was reported more frequently in children younger than 12 years than those older (p=0.021). The most common discomfort for 58 adults receiving 7 T MRI was noisiness (43%). In adults, there was a higher frequency of general discomfort during 7 than 3 T scans (p=0.031). More than 85% of adult respondents thought children aged 12-17 years would tolerate 7 T scans well, but only 35% and 15% thought children aged 10-11 and 8-9 years, respectively, would. Noisiness was the most common discomfort across all ages in 3 and 7 T scanners. Although general discomfort was more common during 7 than 3 T scans in adults, most adults thought children aged 12 years or more would tolerate 7 T MRI well. Cautious enrolment of children in 7 T MRI study is warranted, but until there is more evidence of how well those aged 12 years or more tolerate 7 T MRI, we would caution against enrolling younger children. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  6. Placebo effects in competitive sport: qualitative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beedie, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    The paper examines the placebo effect in sports performance. The possibility that the placebo effect is a more common phenomenon than the quantity of published research would suggest is briefly addressed. It is suggested that the placebo control design often used in sports performance research masks any placebo effects and thus presents a false picture of the mechanisms underlying performance-enhancing interventions in the real world. An electronic survey was sent to 48 competitive, international and professional athletes. Questions related to the placebo effect in competitive sport. Thirty responses were received. Data indicate that the majority (97%) of respondents believe that the placebo effect can exert an influence on sports performance, and that a significant number (73%) have experienced what they defined as a placebo effect. Inductive content analysis reveals that these experiences fall into several categories such as explicit placebo effects, inadvertent false beliefs, ritual and reverse placebo effects. Furthermore, 10 respondents (33%) offer explanations as to the nature of the placebo effect. Again, inductive content analysis reveals that these explanations fall into several categories including deliberate changes in competitive strategy, belief/expectancy, faith in a third party, and marketing. Overall, responses support previous experimental research and anecdotal reports that have found a relationship between belief and sports performance. It is suggested that further research be structured to not simply control for the placebo effect, but to elucidate it. Key pointsA survey of 30 athletes revealed that 73% have experienced a placebo effect in sport.Athletes suggest several potential explanations for these effects.Findings support the idea that placebo effects might be common in sport.Researchers and practitioners should be aware of the possible impact of these effects on research findings and competitive performance.

  7. Paroxetine Treatment in Children and Adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder: A Randomized, Multicenter, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, Graham J.; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Kutcher, Stan; Krulewicz, Stan; Fong, Regan; Carpenter, David J.; Lipschitz, Alan; Machin, Andrea; Wilkinson, Christel

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy and tolerability of paroxetine in pediatric major depressive disorder. Method: Subjects 7 to 17 years old with major depressive disorder received paroxetine (10-50 mg/day) or placebo for 8 weeks from 2000 to 2001. The primary efficacy measure was change from baseline in the Children's Depression Rating…

  8. Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Phase I/IIa Study (Safety and Efficacy) with Buspirone/Levodopa/Carbidopa (SpinalonTM) in Subjects with Complete AIS A or Motor-Complete AIS B Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishna, Mohan; Steuer, Inge; Prince, Francois; Roberts, Mary; Mongeon, David; Kia, Maryam; Dyck, Sasha; Matte, Gilbert; Vaillancourt, Mario; Guertin, Pierre A

    2017-01-01

    No drug treatment capable of restoring locomotor capabilities in patients suffering a motor-complete spinal cord injury (SCI) has ever been developed. We assessed the safety and efficacy of an activator of spinal locomotor neurons in humans, which were shown in paraplegic animals to elicit temporary episodes of involuntary walking. Single administration of buspirone/levodopa/carbidopa (SpinalonTM), levodopa/carbidopa (ratio 4: 1), and buspirone or placebo was performed using a dose-escalation design in 45 subjects placed in supine position who had had an SCI classified as complete (AIS A) or motor-complete/sensory incomplete (AIS B) for at least 3 months. Blood samples before and at regular intervals (15, 30, 60, 120, 240 min) after treatment were collected for hematological and pharmacokinetic (PK) analyses. Electromyographic (EMG) activity of eight muscles (four per leg) was monitored prior to and at several time points after drug administration. SpinalonTM (10-35 mg buspirone/100-350 mg levodopa/25-85 mg carbidopa) displayed no sign of safety concerns - only mild nausea was found in 3 cases. At higher doses, 50 mg/500 mg/125 mg SpinalonTM was considered to have reached maximum tolerated dose (MTD) since 3 out of 4 subjects experienced related adverse events including vomiting. PK analyses showed comparable data between groups suggesting no significant drugdrug interaction with SpinalonTM. Only the SpinalonTM-treated groups displayed significant EMG activity accompanied by locomotor-like characteristics - that is with rhythmic and bilaterally alternating bursts. Therefore, this study provides evidence of safety and preliminary efficacy following a single administration of SpinalonTM in subjects with SCI. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Effect of oral magnesium supplementation on measures of airway resistance and subjective assessment of asthma control and quality of life in men and women with mild to moderate asthma: a randomized placebo controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazaks, Alexandra G; Uriu-Adams, Janet Y; Albertson, Timothy E; Shenoy, Sonia F; Stern, Judith S

    2010-02-01

    Epidemiological data shows low dietary magnesium(Mg) may be related to incidence and progression of asthma. To determine if long term(6.5 month) treatment with oral Mg would improve asthma control and increase serum measures of Mg status in men and women with mild-to-moderate asthma. 55 males and females aged 21 to 55 years with mild to moderate asthma according to the 2002 National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute(NHLBI) and Asthma Education and Prevention Program(NAEPP) guidelines and who used only beta-agonists or inhaled corticosteroids(ICS) as asthma medications were enrolled. Subjects were randomly assigned to consume 340 mg(170 mg twice a day) of Mg or a placebo for 6.5 months. Multiple measures of Mg status including serum, erythrocyte, urine, dietary, ionized and IV Mg were measured. markers of asthma control were: methacholine challenge test(MCCT) and pulmonary function test(PFT) results. Subjective validated questionnaires on asthma quality of life(AQLQ) and control(ACQ) were completed by participants. Markers of inflammation, including c-reactive protein(CRP) and exhaled nitric oxide(eNO) were determined. The concentration of methacholine required to cause a 20% drop in forced expiratory volume in in minute(FEV(1)) increased significantly from baseline to month 6 within the Mg group. Peak expiratory flow rate(PEFR) showed a 5.8% predicted improvement over time(P = 0.03) in those consuming the Mg. There was significant improvement in AQLQ mean score units(P reactivity to methacholine and PEFR and in subjective measures of asthma control and quality of life.

  10. Ayurvedic treatment of obesity: a randomised double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranjpe, P; Patki, P; Patwardhan, B

    1990-04-01

    Seventy obese subjects were randomised into four groups. Ayurvedic drug treatments were given for three months while one group received a placebo. Physical, clinical and pathological investigations were carried out at regular intervals. A significant weight loss was observed in drug therapy groups when compared with the placebo. Body measurements such as skin fold thickness and hip and waist circumferences were significantly decreased. Decreases in serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels were observed. No side effects of any kind were observed during the treatment period.

  11. Fecal Microbial Transplant In Children With Ulcerative Colitis: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michail, Sonia

    2017-10-06

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a condition characterized by chronic inflammation of the colon and is related to a genetically and environmentally-generated altered immune response to the enteric microbiome. Previous work in the PI laboratory suggests that children with UC harbor a unique gut microbial profile, which can predict therapeutic response. We hypothesized that children with ulcerative colitis will benefit from fecal transplant therapy (FMT). To this date there have been a number of reports describing the role of FMT in this disease albeit without uniform success and without controlled pediatric studies. Therefore, there is a strong need to determine its safety and efficacy in controlled trials. We report pilot data in a randomized, double-blinded, controlled study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of FMT from healthy donor versus placebo (subject's own stools) in combination with 5-ASA in mild to moderate disease. Twelve children were randomized to receive FMT or placebo. Subjects were monitored for 12 months. Remission or a 20-point improvement of PUCAI scores were seen in 60% of children receiving FMT versus 28% receiving placebo. More importantly, children receiving FMT did not require escalation of therapy in contrast to 71% receiving placebo. No serious adverse events related to FMT. Bloating and fever were adverse events that were considered related to FMT. To summarize, there appears to be a prospect of benefit in this small number of children receiving FMT for mild to moderate ulcerative colitis. FMT appeared to be safe in this patient population.

  12. Lidocaine patch (5%) is no more potent than placebo in treating chronic back pain when tested in a randomised double blind placebo controlled brain imaging study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The 5% Lidocaine patch is used for treating chronic neuropathic pain conditions such as chronic back pain (CBP), diabetic neuropathy and complex regional pain syndrome, but is effective in a variable proportion of patients. Our lab has reported that this treatment reduces CBP intensity and associated brain activations when tested in an open labelled preliminary study. Notably, effectiveness of the 5% Lidocaine patch has not been tested against placebo for treating CBP. In this study, effectiveness of the 5% Lidocaine patch was compared with placebo in 30 CBP patients in a randomised double-blind study where 15 patients received 5% Lidocaine patches and the remaining patients received placebo patches. Functional MRI was used to identify brain activity for fluctuations of spontaneous pain, at baseline and at two time points after start of treatment (6 hours and 2 weeks). Results There was no significant difference between the treatment groups in either pain intensity, sensory and affective qualities of pain or in pain related brain activation at any time point. However, 50% patients in both the Lidocaine and placebo arms reported a greater than 50% decrease in pain suggesting a marked placebo effect. When tested against an untreated CBP group at similar time points, the patch treated subjects showed significantly greater decrease in pain compared to the untreated group (n = 15). Conclusions These findings suggest that although the 5% Lidocaine is not better than placebo in its effectiveness for treating pain, the patch itself induces a potent placebo effect in a significant proportion of CBP patients. PMID:22531485

  13. Placebo Use in Pain Management: A Mechanism-Based Educational Intervention Enhances Placebo Treatment Acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisaalita, Nkaku R; Hurley, Robert W; Staud, Roland; Robinson, Michael E

    2016-02-01

    Health care providers use treatments whose effectiveness derives partially or completely from 'nonspecific' factors, frequently referred to as placebo effects. Although the ethics of interventional placebo use continues to be debated, evidence suggests that placebos can produce clinically meaningful analgesic effects. Burgeoning evidence suggest that patients with chronic pain might be open to placebo treatments in certain contexts despite limited knowledge of their well-established psychoneurobiological underpinnings. In this investigation we sought to examine the effects of a brief, mechanism-based placebo analgesia educational intervention on aspects placebo knowledge and acceptability. Participants with chronic musculoskeletal pain completed a web-based survey in which they rated their knowledge of placebo analgesia, assessed placebo acceptability across different medical contexts, and evaluated 6 unique patient-provider treatment scenarios to assess the role of treatment effectiveness and deception on patient-provider attributions. Using a pre-post design, participants were randomized to receive either a placebo educational intervention or an active control education. Results showed that the educational intervention greatly improved perceptions of placebo knowledge, effectiveness, and acceptability, even in deceptive treatment contexts. This was the first study of its kind to show the value of an educational intervention in increasing openness to and knowledge of placebo analgesic interventions among patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. In this we article highlight how patients with chronic pain might be open to placebo interventions, particularly adjunct and/or complementary treatments, when provided education on the neurobiological and psychological mechanisms that underlie placebo effects. Study findings highlight ethically acceptable ways to potentially use placebo factors to enhance existing pain treatments and improve patient health outcomes

  14. A placebo-controlled study of lofexidine in the treatment of children with tic disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederhofer, Helmut; Staffen, Wolfgang; Mair, Alois

    2003-03-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of Lofexidine in treating children with tic disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Subjects from a specialty tic disorders clinic were randomly assigned to receive 8 weeks of treatment with lofexidine or placebo under double-blind conditions. Follow-up visits occurred every 2 weeks for safety monitoring and dose adjustment. Fourty-four medication-free subjects (41 boys and three girls; mean age of 10.4 years) with ADHD, combined type, and a tic disorder participated. After 8 weeks of treatment, lofexidine was associated with a mean improvement of 41% in the total score on the teacher-rated ADHD Rating Scale compared to 7% improvement for placebo. Eleven of 22 subjects who received lofexidine were blindly rated on the Clinical Global Scale-Improvement as either much improved or very much improved compared to none of 22 subjects who received placebo. The mean score on the parent-rated hyperactivity index improved by 29% in the lofexidine group and 18% in the placebo group, which was not a significant difference. On the Continuous Performance Test, commission errors decreased by 25% and omission errors by 20% in the lofexidine group, compared with increases of 33% in commission errors and of 36% in omission errors in the placebo group. Tic severity decreased by 27% in the lofexidine group, compared to 0% in the placebo group. One lofexidine subject with sedation withdrew at week 4. Lofexidine was associated with insignificant decreases in blood pressure and pulse. Lofexidine appears to be a safe and effective treatment for children with tic disorders and ADHD.

  15. A placebo-controlled study of guanfacine in the treatment of children with tic disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scahill, L; Chappell, P B; Kim, Y S; Schultz, R T; Katsovich, L; Shepherd, E; Arnsten, A F; Cohen, D J; Leckman, J F

    2001-07-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of guanfacine in treating children with tic disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Subjects from a specialty tic disorders clinic were randomly assigned to receive 8 weeks of treatment with guanfacine or placebo under double-blind conditions. Follow-up visits occurred every 2 weeks for safety monitoring and dose adjustment. Thirty-four medication-free subjects (31 boys and three girls with a mean age of 10.4 years) with ADHD, combined type, and a tic disorder participated. After 8 weeks of treatment, guanfacine was associated with a mean improvement of 37% in the total score on the teacher-rated ADHD Rating Scale, compared to 8% improvement for placebo. Nine of 17 subjects who received guanfacine were blindly rated on the Clinical Global Improvement scale as either much improved or very much improved, compared with none of 17 subjects who received placebo. The mean score on the parent-rated hyperactivity index improved by 27% in the guanfacine group and 21% in the placebo group, not a significant difference. On the Continuous Performance Test, commission errors decreased by 22% and omission errors by 17% in the guanfacine group, compared with increases of 29% in commission errors and of 31% in omission errors in the placebo group. Tic severity decreased by 31% in the guanfacine group, compared to 0% in the placebo group. One guanfacine subject with sedation withdrew at week 4. Guanfacine was associated with insignificant decreases in blood pressure and pulse. Guanfacine appears to be a safe and effective treatment for children with tic disorders and ADHD.

  16. [Placebo analgesia and sleep].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouchou, F; Lavigne, G-J

    2014-10-01

    The placebo response is a psychobiological phenomenon for clinical benefits following the administration of an inert substance whatever its form. This phenomenon can be attributed to a wide range of neurobiological processes, such as expectations of relief, the Pavlovian conditioning and learning, emotional regulation, and reward mechanisms, which are themselves under the influence of processes that take place during sleep. The study of placebo analgesia in healthy from a placebo conditioning associated with analgesic suggestions has highlighted a relationship between sleep, expectations of relief and placebo analgesia: when the induction is persuasive before sleep, expectations of relief modulate placebo response the next morning and paradoxical sleep correlates negatively with both expectations and the placebo response. When the analgesic experience before sleep is less persuasive, expectations of relief are still present but no longer interact with placebo analgesia while paradoxical sleep no longer correlates with the analgesic placebo response. Sleep-processes especially during paradoxical sleep seem to influence the relationship between expectations of relief and placebo analgesia. In this review, we describe the relationship between sleep and placebo analgesia, the mechanisms involved in the placebo response (e.g., conditioning, learning, memory, reward) and their potential link with sleep that could make it a special time for the building placebo response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Saffron supplements modulate serum pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance in patients with metabolic syndrome: A randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyebeh Kermani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We have investigated the effect of a saffron supplement, given at a dose of 100 mg/kg, on prooxidant-antioxidant balance (PAB in individuals with metabolic syndrome. Materials and Methods: A randomized, placebo-controlled trial design was used in 75 subjects with metabolic syndrome who were randomly allocated to one of two study groups: (1 the case group received 100mg/kg saffron and (2 the placebo control group received placebo for 12 weeks. The serum PAB assay was applied to all subjects before (week 0 and after (weeks 6 and 12 the intervention. Results: There was a significant (p=0.035 reduction in serum PAB between week 0 to week 6 and also from week 0 to week 12.  Conclusion: Saffron supplements can modulate serum PAB in subjects with metabolic syndrome, implying an improvement in some aspects of oxidative stress or antioxidant protection.

  18. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over pilot study to assess the effects of long-term opioid drug consumption and subsequent abstinence in chronic noncancer pain patients receiving controlled-release morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, David T; Wilson-Barnett, Jenifer; Griffiths, Peter; Vaughan, David J A; Gondhia, Anjalee; Allan, Laurie G

    2005-01-01

    The long-term use of strong opioid analgesics among chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) patients remains controversial because of concerns over problematic drug use. However, previous surveys suggest that this is not necessarily the case. Therefore, we designed a controlled study to generate evidence in support of these findings. Ten CNCP patients attending the pain clinic in a district general hospital had been taking an average daily dose of 40 mg controlled-release morphine sulphate (mean 40, range 10-90, SD 21 mg), for an average of 2 years (mean 2.175, range 2-2.25, SD 0.2 years). Randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled cross-over study. The study was based on the premise that abrupt cessation of opioid drugs is most likely to highlight problematic use and the consequent inability to stop using opioids. Morphine was substituted with placebo for 60-hour periods to compare the effects of abstinence with those of continued use. Assessment of morphine cessation and abstinence effects was through direct observation, physiological measurements, questionnaire responses, and Brief Pain Inventory scores. Following cessation and abstinence, there were no indications of psychological dependence or drug craving, but there was evidence of the detrimental effects of pain intensity on activity, mood, relationships, sleep, and enjoyment of life. Three patients (30%) reported opioid drug withdrawal symptoms. Pharmacokinetic data demonstrated compliance with abstinence by all patients. The results suggest the existence of a group of CNCP patients whose long-term opioid consumption can be beneficial and remain moderate without them suffering from the consequences of problematic opioid drug use.

  19. Influence of methylphenidate treatment assumptions on cognitive function in healthy young adults in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mommaerts JL

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Jean-Luc Mommaerts,1 Gerlinde Beerens,1 Lieve Van den Block,1 Eric Soetens,2 Sandrina Schol,1 Erwin Van De Vijver,1 Dirk Devroey1 1Department of Family Medicine, 2Department of Cognitive and Biological Psychology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium Background: Increasing numbers of students use stimulants such as methylphenidate (MPH to improve their study capacity, making them prone to subsequent prolonged drug abuse. This study explored the cognitive effects of MPH in students who either assumed they received MPH or assumed they received a placebo. Methods: In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial with a between-subjects design, 21 students were subjected to partial sleep deprivation, receiving no more than 4 hours sleep the night before they were tested. In the morning, they were given either a placebo or 20 mg of MPH. They then performed free recall verbal tests and Go/No-Go tasks repeatedly, their moods were evaluated using Profile of Mood States and their tiredness was assessed using a visual analog scale, with evaluation of vigilance. Results: No significant differences were found between those subjects who received MPH and those who received a placebo. However, significant differences were found between subjects who assumed they had received MPH or had no opinion, and those who assumed they had received a placebo. At three minutes, one hour, and one day after memorizing ten lists of 20 words, those who assumed they had received MPH recalled 54%, 58%, and 54% of the words, respectively, whereas those who assumed they had received placebo only recalled 35%, 37%, and 34%. Conclusion: Healthy, partially sleep-deprived young students who assume they have received 20 mg of MPH experience a substantial placebo effect that improves consolidation of information into long-term memory. This is independent of any pharmacologic effects of MPH, which had no significant effects on verbal memory in this study. This information may be

  20. Tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of TA-8995, a selective cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitor, in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ford, John; Lawson, Matt; Fowler, David; Maruyama, Nobuko; Mito, Seiji; Tomiyasu, Koichi; Kinoshita, Shuji; Suzuki, Chisa; Kawaguchi, Atsuhiro; Round, Patrick; Boyce, Malcolm; Warrington, Steve; Weber, Werner; van Deventer, Sander; Kastelein, John J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Two double-blind, randomized studies were conducted to assess the tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral TA-8995, a new cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitor, in healthy subjects. Study 1: Subjects received single doses of TA-8995 or placebo (fasted). Doses were 5,

  1. Dynamic Changes of Post-Translationally Modified Forms of CXCL10 and Soluble DPP4 in HCV Subjects Receiving Interferon-Free Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric G Meissner

    Full Text Available Serum levels of the interferon (IFN-stimulated chemokine CXCL10 are increased during chronic HCV infection and associate with outcome of IFN-based therapy. Elevated levels of NH2-terminal truncated CXCL10 (3-77aa, produced by DPP4 cleavage, negatively associate with spontaneous clearance of acute HCV infection and sustained virological response (SVR with IFN-based therapy for chronic infection. The association of different CXCL10 forms and DPP4 with outcome during IFN-free HCV therapy has not been examined. Using novel Simoa assays, plasma was analyzed from HCV genotype-1 (GT1 subjects who relapsed (n = 11 or achieved SVR (n = 10 after sofosbuvir and ribavirin (SOF/RBV treatment, and from SOF/RBV relapsers who achieved SVR with a subsequent SOF/ledipasvir regimen (n = 9. While the NH2-truncated form of CXCL10 was elevated in HCV infection relative to healthy controls, pre-treatment plasma concentrations of CXCL10 forms failed to stratify subjects based on treatment outcome to IFN-free regimens. However, a trend (statistically non-significant towards elevated higher levels of total and long CXCL10 was observed pre-treatment in subjects who relapsed. All forms of CXCL10 decreased rapidly following treatment initiation and were again elevated in subjects who experienced HCV relapse, indicating that CXCL10 production may be associated with active viral replication. While soluble DPP4 (sDPP4 and NH2-truncated CXCL10 concentrations were highly correlated, on-treatment sDPP4 levels and activity declined more slowly than CXCL10, suggesting differential regulation. These data suggest post-translationally modified forms of CXCL10 will not support the prediction of treatment outcome in HCV GT1 subjects treated with SOF/RBV.

  2. Once Daily Valacyclovir for Reducing Viral Shedding in Subjects Newly Diagnosed with Genital Herpes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark G. Martens

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Genital herpes (GH recurrences and viral shedding are more frequent in the first year after initial HSV-2 infection. The objective of this study was to provide the first evaluation of valacyclovir 1 g once daily compared to placebo in reducing viral shedding in subjects newly diagnosed with GH. Methods. 70 subjects were randomized to receive valacyclovir 1 g daily or placebo in a crossover design for 60 days with a 7-day washout period. A daily swab of the genital/anal-rectal area was self-collected for HSV-2 detection by PCR. Subjects attended the clinic for routine study visits and GH recurrence visits. Treatment differences were assessed using a nonparametric crossover analysis. Results. 52 subjects had at least one PCR measurement in both treatment periods and comprised the primary efficacy population. Valacyclovir significantly reduced HSV-2 shedding during all days compared to placebo (mean 2.9% versus 13.5% of all days (P<.01, a 78% reduction. Valacyclovir significantly reduced subclinical HSV-2 shedding during all days compared to placebo (mean 2.4% versus 11.0% of all days (P<.01, a 78% reduction. However, 79% of subjects had no GH recurrences while receiving valacyclovir compared to 52% of subjects receiving placebo (P<.01. Conclusion. In this study, the frequency of total and subclinical HSV-2 shedding was greater than reported in earlier studies involving subjects with a history of symptomatic genital recurrences. Our study is the first to demonstrate a significant reduction in viral shedding with valacyclovir 1 g daily compared to placebo in a population of subjects newly diagnosed with HSV-2 infection.

  3. The subtle central effect of nutraceuticals: Is it placebo or nocebo?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali I. Al-Gareeb

    2015-09-01

    Subjects and methods: This is a randomized, double-blind, controlled, and prospective study conducted in the Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Al-Mustansiriya University, Baghdad, Iraq during February 2013. One hundred sixty medical students participated in the study were randomly assigned equally to one of the following groups: Group A: received single dose of nigella sativa oil (500 ml capsule;Group B: received single dose of garlic (500 mg capsule; Group C: received single dose of Coq10 (120 mg capsule and; Group D: received single dose of matching oral placebo (300mg starchc capsule. For all participants, reaction time and flicker fusion threshold were measured by the Leeds psychomotor performance test battery before and after 3 hours of taking the drugs Results: Neither placebo nor nutraceuticals exerted significant effect on total reaction time. Although the recognition reaction time is insignificantly reduced by 2.77% (placebo, 5.83% (Nigella savita, 7.21% (Garlic and 12.64% (CoQ10 from the pretreatment values, they are adversely affect the motor reaction time to reach the significant level in subjects pretreated with Garlic (p=0.02. Conclusion: Nutraceuticals are not free from nocebo effect on psychomotor performance. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2015; 4(3.000: 221-223

  4. Hypnosis, hypnotizability, and placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischholz, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Raz's speculations about the relation between placebo responsivity and hypnotizability are critically examined. While there is no generally accepted theoretical definition of hypnosis, there is a general consensus that hypnotizability can be reliably measured. In contrast, there seems to be a general consensus about a theoretical definition of placebo (including placebo effect, placebo response, and nocebo). There is no widely accepted measure of individual differences in placebo responsivity. Various methodological considerations about how to examine the relation between placebo responsivity and hypnotizability are identified. Studies are identified which indicate that response to treatments which utilize adjunctive hypnosis are superior to placebo treatments. The only study which examined whether placebo responsivity was correlated with hypnotizability seems to indicate that they are only slightly related at best. The possibility that there may be such thing as a "good placebo responder (GPR)" is questioned, while the known clinical value of hypnotizability assessment is reaffirmed. Future directions for empirical research on the relation between placebo responsivity and hypnotizability are identified.

  5. Efficacy of quick-release lornoxicam versus placebo for acute pain management after dental implant surgery: a randomised placebo-controlled triple-blind trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bölükbasi, Nilüfer; Ersanli, Selim; Basegmez, Cansu; Ozdemir, Tayfun; Ozyalcin, Süleyman

    2012-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of quick-release lornoxicam (LNX) on patient-reported acute pain after dental implant surgery. The study included subjects in good general health, aged 18 to 65 and scheduled to receive a maximum of three implants in the same quadrant. Participants received either 8 mg LNX or placebo and were asked to use the medications in case of pain in the first 120 min after implant surgery. Assessment of efficacy was performed using self-assessment questionnaires for the evaluation of pain intensity and pain relief for 12 h post dosing. Patients were also asked to record the rescue analgesic number. Evaluation of patient satisfaction was assessed using a 7-point scale. Safety was evaluated by the incidence of adverse events. A total of 83 (LNX/placebo, 42/41) patients who met the inclusion criteria and finished the evaluation period were included in the study. The proportion of patients experiencing postoperative pain was significantly lower in the LNX-treated group compared to the placebo group. Patients in the LNX group reported significantly higher pain relief scores than the placebo group. Twenty-nine patients in the placebo group and 6 patients in the LNX group used rescue analgesics. The number of used rescue analgesics was 1.024 ± 0.79 and 0.167 ± 0.43 in the placebo and LNX groups, respectively. The level of patient satisfaction was significantly higher in the LNX-treated patients (P = 0.007). No adverse events were reported during the study period. Quick-release LNX is effective in postoperative acute pain control and has a high safety profile following dental implant surgery.

  6. Antioxidative Activity of Onion Peel Extract in Obese Women: A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Ah; Yim, Jung-Eun

    2015-09-01

    Quercetin, found abundantly in onion peel, has been known to have anticholesterol, antithrombotic and insulin-sensitizing properties. Here, we investigated the effect of quercetin-rich onion peel extract (OPE) on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and antioxidative defense in obese woman. This study was randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study. Thirty-seven healthy obese participants were randomly assigned that eighteen subjects received red soft capsuled OPE (100 mg/d, 50 mg bis in die), while the other nineteen subjects received same capsuled placebo for 12 weeks. ROS production and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in plasma were determined by using ROS and SOD assay kits, respectively. Baseline characteristics of anthropometric indicators and blood metabolic profiles were not significantly different between the two groups. Compared with baseline values, OPE consumption significantly reduced waist and hip circumference. Plasma ROS level and SOD activity were decreased in both placebo and OPE groups compared with baseline values. However, plasma ROS level in OPE group was significantly lower than in placebo group while plasma SOD activity in OPE group was significantly higher than in placebo group after 12 weeks of consumption. These findings indicate that OPE consumption may exert antioxidative effect by preventing the decrease of SOD activity as well as the production of ROS in obese women.

  7. Does different information disclosure on placebo control affect blinding and trial outcomes? A case study of participant information leaflets of randomized placebo-controlled trials of acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soyeon Cheon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While full disclosure of information on placebo control in participant information leaflets (PILs in a clinical trial is ethically required during informed consent, there have been concerning voices such complete disclosures may increase unnecessary nocebo responses, breach double-blind designs, and/or affect direction of trial outcomes. Taking an example of acupuncture studies, we aimed to examine what participants are told about placebo controls in randomized, placebo-controlled trials, and how it may affect blinding and trial outcomes. Methods Authors of published randomized, placebo-controlled trials of acupuncture were identified from PubMed search and invited to provide PILs for their trials. The collected PILs were subjected to content analysis and categorized based on degree of information disclosure on placebo. Blinding index (BI as a chance-corrected measurement of blinding was calculated and its association with different information disclosure was examined. The impact of different information disclosure from PILs on primary outcomes was estimated using a random effects model. Results In 65 collected PILs, approximately 57% of trials fully informed the participants of placebo control, i.e. full disclosure, while the rest gave deceitful or no information on placebo, i.e. no disclosure. Placebo groups in the studies with no disclosure tended to make more opposite guesses on the type of received intervention than those with disclosure, which may reflect wishful thinking (BI −0.21 vs. −0.16; p = 0.38. In outcome analysis, studies with no disclosure significantly favored acupuncture than those with full disclosure (standardized mean difference − 0.43 vs. −0.12; p = 0.03, probably due to enhanced expectations. Conclusions How participants are told about placebos can be another potential factor that may influence participant blinding and study outcomes by possibly modulating patient expectation. As we

  8. A placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized, multicenter study to assess the effects of dronedarone 400 mg twice daily for 12 weeks on atrial fibrillation burden in subjects with permanent pacemakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezekowitz, Michael D; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A; DiMarco, John P; Kaszala, Karoly; Boddy, Alexander; Geba, Gregory P; P, Gregory Geba; Koren, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Dronedarone is a benzofuran derivative with a pharmacological profile similar to amiodarone but has a more rapid onset of action and a much shorter half-life (13-19 h). Our goal was to evaluate the efficacy of dronedarone in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients using dual-chamber pacemakers capable of quantifying atrial fibrillation burden. Pacemakers were adjusted to optimize AF detection. Patients with AF burden >1% were randomized to dronedarone 400 mg twice daily (BID) or placebo. Pacemakers were interrogated after 4 and 12 weeks of treatment. The primary endpoint was the change in AF burden from baseline over the 12-week treatment period. Patients with permanent AF, severe/recently decompensated heart failure, and current use of antiarrhythmic drugs were excluded. AF burden was assessed by a core laboratory blinded to treatment assignment. From 285 patients screened, 112 were randomized (mean age 76 years, 60% male, 84% hypertensive, 65% with sick sinus syndrome, 26% with diabetes mellitus type II, 15% with heart failure). Baseline mean (SEM) AF burden was 8.77% (0.16) for placebo and 10.14% (0.17) for dronedarone. Over the 12-week study period, AF burden compared to baseline decreased by 54.4% (0.22) (P = 0.0009) with dronedarone and trended higher by 12.8% (0.16) (P = 0.450) with placebo. The absolute change in burden was decreased by 5.5% in the dronedarone group and increased by 1.1% in the placebo group. Heart rate during AF was reduced to approximately 4 beats/min with dronedarone (P = 0.285). Adverse events were higher with dronedarone compared to placebo (65 vs 56%). Dronedarone reduced pacemaker-assessed the relative AF burden compared to baseline and placebo by over 50% during the 12-week observation period.

  9. Theobromine for the treatment of persistent cough: a randomised, multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morice, Alyn H; McGarvey, Lorcan; Pavord, Ian D; Higgins, Bernard; Chung, Kian Fan; Birring, Surinder S

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the effect of BC1036 on health-related quality of life (QOL) in subjects with persistent cough. The secondary objective was to investigate the effect of BC1036 on subjective cough severity. This was a randomised, multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study in 289 subjects with persistent cough. Subjects received BC1036 or placebo twice daily for 14 days. The primary endpoint comprised cough-related QOL assessed using the validated Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ) at Day 14. Secondary endpoints comprised the LCQ scores at Day 7 and Day 28, cough severity VAS scores at each visit and pulmonary function tests. At baseline, mean total LCQ score in the BC1036 group was lower (i.e., worse QOL) than placebo (P<0.001), indicating significant between-group heterogeneity. Mean baseline-adjusted change in LCQ score at Day 14 was greater for BC1036 [mean (SD) 2.4±3.5] compared to placebo [mean (SD) score 2.2±3.0], but did not reach statistical significance (P=0.60). Mean cough severity VAS score decreased to a greater extent in the BC1036 group compared to placebo, but again the results were not statistically significant (-12.2±23.28 in BC1036 group and -11.0±21.34 in placebo group at Day 14, P=0.688). There was no significant change in pulmonary function measurements. The adverse event (AE) profile was similar in both groups. This study showed that BC1036 was well tolerated and, although the primary endpoint did not achieve statistical significance, the magnitude of improvement was greater with BC1036 compared to placebo with respect to improving QOL and reducing cough severity. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01656668.

  10. A double-blind, randomized, Phase III, multicenter study in 358 pediatric subjects receiving isotretinoin therapy demonstrates no effect on pediatric bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, K B; Miller, C G; Galante, N C; Langman, C B

    2015-10-01

    This study compared the effects of pediatric acne treatment with two isotretinoin formulations on bone mineral density. We demonstrated no difference in the effect of the two formulations. No effect on pediatric bone mineral density was identified for either formulation. Isotretinoin (13-cis-retinoic acid) is a treatment for recalcitrant nodular acne with a purported effect on bone mineral density (BMD). The side effects of isotretinoin on vertebral bone were evaluated to assess the safety of a new FDA-approved isotretinoin formulation: Lidose-isotretinoin (Cip-Iso). This double-blind, randomized, phase III, active control, parallel-group, multicenter study compared the safety, efficacy, and non-inferiority of CIP-Iso to a marketed reference product, Accutane®, in severe recalcitrant nodular acne subjects. Three hundred fifty-eight pediatric male and female subjects aged between 12 and 17 years underwent 20 weeks of treatment with PA lumbar spine dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurements obtained for bone mineral density (BMD) and Z-scores, 5.5 months apart on visits 1 and 8. One hundred sixty-eight of 358 subjects had height adjusted Z-scores (HAZ) calculated. There was no difference in the least squares (LS) mean Z-score or HAZ of the two drugs at visit 1 or 8. The mean and LS mean Z-score and HAZ were greater than zero at visits 1 and 8 for both drugs. The change in the LS mean spine Z-score, but not HAZ, between visits, was statistically significant for both drugs. There was a mean increase in BMD (g/cm(2)) for both products between visits. There is no difference in the effect of two formulations of isotretinoin on spine bone density after 6 months of treatment. BMD increased and the small change in spine Z-score over treatment disappeared after height adjustment. Mean positive Z-scores and HAZ in the study were likely due to the exclusion of low and inclusion of high Z-score subjects.

  11. Absorbed doses received by infants subjected to panoramic dental and cephalic radiographs; Dosis absorbida recibida por infantes sometidos a radiografias dentales panoramicas y cefalicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrizales, L.; Carreno, S. [Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas. Laboratorio Secundario de Calibracion Dosimetrica. Carretera Panamericana Km. 11. Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas (Venezuela)

    1998-12-31

    The IAEA Report No. 115 recommends that each country or region can establish levels of absorbed doses for each radiographic technique employed in diagnostic. assuming the extended and expensive of this purpose, we have been to begin in a first step with the dentistry area, in order to estimate the dose levels received at crystalline and thyroid level in infants that go to an important public institution in our country to realize panoramic and cephalic radiographs. This work will serve to justify and impel a quality assurance program in Venezuela on the dentistry area which includes aspects such as training for the medical lap referring the justification of the radiological practice, optimization of X-ray units to produce an adequate image quality that delivers to patient an absorbed dose as much lower as reasonably it can be reached without diagnostic detriment. (Author)

  12. Treating alcohol withdrawal with oral baclofen: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Jeffrey E; Khan, Raza A; Gessert, Charles E; Larson, Pamela M; Renier, Colleen M

    2011-10-01

    Abrupt cessation of alcohol intake causes habituated drinkers to experience symptoms of alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS). To determine the effect of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-B agonist baclofen on the course of acute symptomatic AWS. Prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study. Two tertiary-care hospitals in Duluth, Minnesota. Inpatient adults admitted for any reason (including AWS) judged to be at high risk for AWS. Inpatients who developed symptoms of AWS received symptom-triggered benzodiazepine treatment using lorazepam by standard protocol, and were randomized to receive baclofen 10 mg or placebo, 3 times per day, orally. AWS severity was assessed using the Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment of Alcohol Scale, Revised (CIWA-Ar); lorazepam dose was monitored. Seventy-nine subjects were enrolled. The 44 subjects who developed symptoms of AWS were randomized to baclofen or placebo. Thirty-one subjects (18 baclofen, 13 placebo) completed 72 hours of assessments, either entirely as inpatients or with outpatient follow-up. The need for high doses of benzodiazepines (20 mg or more of lorazepam over 72 hours) to control AWS was less likely in the baclofen treatment group (1 of 18) than in the placebo-treated group (7 of 13) (P = 0.004). We found that the use of baclofen was associated with a significant reduction in the use of high doses of benzodiazepine (lorazepam) in the management of symptomatic AWS. The use of low-dose baclofen in the management of AWS deserves further study, as reduced dependence on high-dose benzodiazepines in AWS management could improve patient safety. Copyright © 2011 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  13. Effects of rupatadine vs placebo on allergen-induced symptoms in patients exposed to aeroallergens in the Vienna Challenge Chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuebner, Petra; Horak, Friedrich; Zieglmayer, René; Arnáiz, Eva; Leuratti, Chiara; Pérez, Iñaki; Izquierdo, Iñaki

    2006-01-01

    Rupatadine is a novel compound with potent dual antihistamine and platelet-activating factor antagonist activities and no sedative effects. To evaluate the efficacy of rupatadine, 10 mg once daily, and placebo on allergen-induced symptoms (including nasal congestion), nasal airflow, nasal secretion, and subjective tolerability in response to grass pollen in a controlled allergen-exposure chamber. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial, 45 patients with a history of seasonal allergic rhinitis received rupatadine or placebo every morning for 8 days in 2 different periods separated by a 14-day washout interval. On day 8 of each crossover period, patients underwent a 6-hour allergen exposure in the Vienna Challenge Chamber, where a constant and homogeneous concentration of aeroallergens was maintained. Subjective and objective assessments were performed online during the exposure. Subjective single and composite nasal and nonnasal symptoms were consistently less severe with rupatadine use than with placebo use starting from the first evaluation at 15 minutes to the end of the 6-hour Vienna Challenge Chamber challenge, with the most significant effects seen for nasal rhinorrhea, nasal itching, sneezing attacks, and total nasal symptoms (P rupatadine therapy than with placebo use (P rupatadine treatment was well tolerated. Rupatadine treatment is effective and well tolerated in patients with allergen-induced symptoms exposed to aeroallergens in a controlled exposure chamber.

  14. Effects of a Combination of Berberis aristata, Silybum marianum and Monacolin on Lipid Profile in Subjects at Low Cardiovascular Risk; A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derosa, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Angela; Romano, Davide; Maffioli, Pamela

    2017-02-07

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an anti-hypercholesterolemic agent containing Berberis aristata, Silybum marianum and monacolin K and KA in a sample of Caucasian patients at low cardiovascular risk according to Framingham score. The primary outcome was to evaluate the effects of this nutraceutical combination on lipid profile; the secondary outcome was to evaluate the effect on some inflammatory markers, in particular high sensitivity C-reactive protein and tumor necrosis factor-α interleukin-6. One hundred and forty-three patients were randomized to placebo or Berberol(®) K, once a day, during the dinner, for 3 months, in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. We recorded a significant reduction of fasting plasma glucose with Berberol(®) K compared to placebo (-12.2%, p lipid profile were observed with placebo, while there was a significant decrease of total cholesterol (-20.5%, p lipid profile and an improvement of inflammatory parameters.

  15. Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) dose-dependently stimulates glucagon secretion in healthy human subjects at euglycaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, J J; Gallwitz, B; Siepmann, N

    2003-01-01

    secretion under normoglycaemic conditions. METHODS: Ten healthy subjects (9 men, 1 woman; age 33+/-11; BMI 26.8+/-2.2 kg/m(2)) received three different doses of intravenous GIP (7, 20, and 60 pmol/kg body weight) and placebo. Venous blood samples were drawn over 30 min for glucagon and GIP concentrations...

  16. The Placebo Effect

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 11. The Placebo Effect. Vasant Natarajan. General Article Volume 15 Issue 11 November 2010 pp 1003-1008. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/015/11/1003-1008. Keywords. Placebo ...

  17. Assessment of quality of life in patients receiving palliative care: comparison of measurement tools and single item on subjective well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiel, Stephanie; Psych, Dipl; Kues, Katharina; Krumm, Norbert; Radbruch, Lukas; Elsner, Frank

    2011-05-01

    Many quality-of-life assessment tools are not feasible in palliative care settings because of the severe impairment of the physical, cognitive, and psychological status of patients. This study investigated whether comprehensive instruments can be replaced by a single item concerning the well-being of patients. From April to December 2008 patients receiving palliative care in three different settings (palliative care unit, inpatient unit of the department of radiotherapy, inpatient hospice) were asked to answer the assessment tools Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Treatment (FACIT-G), European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC-QLQ-C30), Schedule for the Evaluation of the Individual Quality of Life (SEIQoL), and the Minimal Documentation System (MIDOS) including a single item on well-being. Correlations of sum and specific domain scores were used for correlational analysis. Datasets of 72 patients were collected. The MIDOS single item on well-being correlated significantly with the QoL indexes of the EORTC (Spearman rank correlation r = -0.563) and FACIT-G (0.527). SEIQoL had low to moderate correlations with the other assessment tools. Subscales on physical functioning from the FACIT-G (r = 0.583) and the EORTC-QLQ-C30 (r = 0.385) had the highest correlation with the single item on well-being. Well-being correlated higher with nonphysical subscales of the QoL instruments for patients in the palliative care unit than in the radiotherapy department. The single item is unable to completely replace comprehensive questionnaires, but it is useful to initiate communication on QoL and can be recommended as a substitute for physical-functional aspects of QoL assessment in the palliative care setting.

  18. A double blind, placebo controlled trial of modafinil for the treatment of cocaine dependence without co-morbid alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampman, Kyle M; Lynch, Kevin G; Pettinati, Helen M; Spratt, Kelly; Wierzbicki, Michael R; Dackis, Charles; O'Brien, Charles P

    2015-10-01

    Modafinil is a medication approved for narcolepsy and shift work sleep disorder. It has both dopaminergic and glutamatergic activity that could be useful for the treatment of cocaine dependence. Modafinil has reduced cocaine subjective effects and cocaine self-administration in human laboratory trials and has reduced cocaine use in cocaine dependent patients in some clinical trials. This was an 8-week, double blind, placebo controlled clinical trial involving 94 cocaine dependent subjects. Subjects received 300mg of modafinil or identical placebo daily along with weekly individual therapy. The primary outcome measure was cocaine use measured by self-report, and confirmed by twice weekly urine benzoylecgonine tests (UBT). Additional outcome measures included cocaine craving measured by the Brief Substance Craving Scale and global improvement measured by the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI). The odds ratio (OR) in favor of abstinence for modafinil vs. placebo was 2.54 (p=. 03) and modafinil-treated subjects were significantly more likely than placebo-treated subjects to be abstinent from cocaine during the last 3 weeks of the trial, 23% vs. 9%, χ(2)=3.9, pModafinil treated subjects were more likely to report very low levels of cocaine craving intensity and duration on the Brief Substance Craving Scale (OR=2.04, p=.03 and OR 1.06, p=.03 respectively). Modafinil-treated subjects were also more likely than placebo-treated subjects to rate themselves as "very much improved" on the CGI (OR=2.69, p=.03). Modafinil may be an efficacious treatment for cocaine dependence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pharmacotherapy Relapse Prevention in Body Dysmorphic Disorder: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katharine A; Keshaviah, Aparna; Dougherty, Darin D; Stout, Robert L; Menard, William; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2016-09-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder is common, distressing, and often severely impairing. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors appear efficacious, but the few existing pharmacotherapy studies were short term (≤4 months), and no relapse prevention studies or continuation phase studies have been conducted to the authors' knowledge. The authors report results from the first relapse prevention study in body dysmorphic disorder. Adults (N=100) with DSM-IV body dysmorphic disorder received open-label escitalopram for 14 weeks (phase 1); 58 responders were then randomized to double-blind continuation treatment with escitalopram versus switch to placebo for 6 months (phase 2). Reliable and valid outcome measures were utilized. In phase 1, 67.0% of treated subjects and 81.1% of subjects who completed phase 1 responded to escitalopram. Body dysmorphic disorder severity (in both the intent-to-treat and the completer groups) and insight, depressive symptoms, psychosocial functioning, and quality of life significantly improved from baseline to end of phase 1. In phase 2, time to relapse was significantly longer with escitalopram than with placebo treatment (hazard ratio=2.72, 95% CI=1.01-8.57). Phase 2 relapse proportions were 18% for escitalopram and 40% for placebo. Among escitalopram-treated subjects, body dysmorphic disorder severity significantly decreased over time during the continuation phase, with 35.7% of subjects showing further improvement. There were no significant group differences in body dysmorphic disorder severity or insight, depressive symptoms, psychosocial functioning, or quality of life. Continuation-phase escitalopram delayed time to relapse, and fewer escitalopram-treated subjects relapsed than did placebo-treated subjects. Body dysmorphic disorder severity significantly improved during 6 additional months of escitalopram treatment following acute response; more than one-third of escitalopram-treated subjects experienced further improvement.

  20. The Effect of the Type and Colour of Placebo Stimuli on Placebo Effects Induced by Observational Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Karolina Świder; Przemysław Bąbel

    2016-01-01

    Research shows that placebo analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia can be induced through observational learning. Our aim was to replicate and extend these results by studying the influence of the type and colour of stimuli used as placebos on the placebo effects induced by observational learning. Three experimental and two control groups were tested. All participants received pain stimuli of the same intensity preceded by colour lights (green and red) or geometric shapes (circles and squares). Be...

  1. Placebo-controlled trial of lubiprostone for constipation associated with Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondo, W G; Kenney, C; Sullivan, K; Davidson, A; Hunter, C; Jahan, I; McCombs, A; Miller, A; Zesiewicz, T A

    2012-05-22

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of lubiprostone (Amitiza) for constipation in Parkinson disease (PD) in a double-blind, randomized, controlled study. Patients with PD and clinically meaningful constipation (constipation rating scale score > 10 [range: 0-28]) were recruited from 2 academic movement disorder centers to participate in the study. After enrollment, patients were initially followed for 2 weeks and then were randomly assigned 1:1 to lubiprostone, and the dose was titrated up to 48 μg/day. They returned 4 weeks later for a final assessment. Data included stool diaries and global impressions (co-primary endpoints), demographics, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores, constipation scale scores, visual analog scale (VAS) scores, a stool diary, and adverse events. Fifty-four subjects (39 male, mean age 67.0 ± 10.1 years, and mean duration of PD 8.3 ± 5.4 years) were randomly assigned to lubiprostone or placebo. One patient in the drug group discontinued the study because of logistics, and one patient in the placebo group discontinued the study because of lack of efficacy. A marked or very marked clinical global improvement was reported by 16 of 25 (64.0%) subjects receiving drug vs 5 of 27 (18.5%) subjects receiving placebo (p = 0.001). The constipation rating scale (p lubiprostone seemed to be well tolerated and effective for the short-term treatment of constipation in PD.

  2. Placebo effects in cognitive training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Foroughi, Cyrus K; Monfort, Samuel S; Paczynski, Martin; McKnight, Patrick E; Greenwood, P M

    2016-01-01

    ...: specifically, the role of placebo effects. We designed a procedure to intentionally induce a placebo effect via overt recruitment in an effort to evaluate the role of placebo effects in fluid intelligence gains from cognitive training...

  3. Fluoxetine increases suicide ideation less than placebo during treatment of adults with minor depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlow, Steven J; Kinkead, Becky; Thase, Michael E; Judd, Lewis L; Rush, A John; Yonkers, Kimberly A; Kupfer, David J; Frank, Ellen; Schettler, Pamela J; Rapaport, Mark Hyman

    2013-09-01

    Some reports suggest an increase in suicide ideations and behaviors in patients treated with antidepressants. This is an analysis of the impact of fluoxetine on suicide ideations in outpatients with minor depressive disorder. Research subjects were adult outpatients with minor depressive disorder (N = 162), who received fluoxetine or placebo in a prospective, 12-week, double-blind randomized trial. The research participants were evaluated weekly with standard rating scales that included four suicide-related items: item 3 of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD), item 18 of Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS-C), and items 15 and 59 of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (SCL-90). Clinically significant intensification of suicide ideation was defined as an increase of ≥2 points on any of these items. Overall 60/162 subjects (37%) had an increase of ≥1 point during treatment and 17/162 (10.5%) of ≥2 points on at least one suicide item, with 12/81 (14.8%) placebo and 5/81 (6.2%) fluoxetine-treated subjects having a ≥2 point gain. Of the study participants with baseline suicide ideation, 9/22 (40.9%) placebo and 3/24 (12.5%) fluoxetine treated had ≥2 point increase (p = 0.04). Survival analysis revealed that subjects on placebo were significantly more likely (p = 0.050) to experience a ≥2 point increase on one or more item, a difference that emerged early and continued throughout the 12-week trial. Compared to placebo, fluoxetine was not associated with a clinically significant increase in suicide ideation among adults with minor depressive disorder during 12 weeks of treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Randomized placebo-controlled dose-ranging and pharmacodynamics study of roxadustat (FG-4592) to treat anemia in nondialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (NDD-CKD) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besarab, Anatole; Provenzano, Robert; Hertel, Joachim; Zabaneh, Raja; Klaus, Stephen J; Lee, Tyson; Leong, Robert; Hemmerich, Stefan; Yu, Kin-Hung Peony; Neff, Thomas B

    2015-10-01

    Roxadustat (FG-4592) is an oral hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor that stimulates erythropoiesis. This Phase 2a study tested efficacy (Hb response) and safety of roxadustat in anemic nondialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (NDD-CKD) subjects. NDD-CKD subjects with hemoglobin (Hb) ≤11.0 g/dL were sequentially enrolled into four dose cohorts and randomized to roxadustat or placebo two times weekly (BIW) or three times weekly (TIW) for 4 weeks, in an approximate roxadustat:placebo ratio of 3:1. Efficacy was assessed by (i) mean Hb change (ΔHb) from baseline (BL) and (ii) proportion of Hb responders (ΔHb ≥ 1.0 g/dL). Pharmacodynamic evaluation was performed in a subset of subjects. Safety was evaluated by adverse event frequency/severity. Of 116 subjects receiving treatment, 104 completed 4 weeks of dosing and 96 were evaluable for efficacy. BL characteristics for roxadustat and placebo groups were comparable. In roxadustat-treated subjects, Hb levels increased from BL in a dose-related manner in the 0.7, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mg/kg groups. Maximum ΔHb within the first 6 weeks was significantly higher in the 1.5 and 2.0 mg/kg groups than in the placebo subjects. Hb responder rates were dose dependent and ranged from 30% in the 0.7 mg/kg BIW group to 100% in the 2.0 mg/kg BIW and TIW groups versus 13% in placebo. Roxadustat transiently and moderately increased endogenous erythropoietin and reduced hepcidin. Adverse events were similar in the roxadustat and placebo groups. Roxadustat produced dose-dependent increases in blood Hb among anemic NDD-CKD patients in a placebo-controlled trial. Clintrials.gov #NCT00761657. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA.

  5. Bromelain and cardiovascular risk factors in diabetes: An exploratory randomized, placebo controlled, double blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, Chit Moy; Ni, Qing; Liao, Xing; Gao, Huai-Lin; Robinson, Nicola

    2016-10-01

    To assess whether the dietary supplement (bromelain) has the potential to reduce plasma fibrinogen and other cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in patients with diabetes. This randomized placebo controlled, double blind, parallel design, efficacy study was carried out in China and investigated the effect of 12 weeks of bromelain (1,050 mg/day) on plasma fibrinogen. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) recruited 68 Chinese diabetic patients [32 males and 36 females; Han origin, mean age of 61.26 years (standard deviation (SD), 12.62 years)] with at least one CVD risk factor. Patients were randomized into either bromelain or placebo group. While bromelain group received bromelain capsule, the placebo group received placebo capsule which consisted inert ingredient and has no treatment effect. Subjects were required to take 1,050 mg (3×350 mg) of either bromelain or starch-filled placebo capsules, two to be taken (2×350 mg) after breakfast and another (350 mg) after dinner, daily for 12 weeks. Plasma fibrinogen, CVD risk factors and anthropometric indicators were determined at baseline and at 12 weeks. The change in the fibrinogen level in the bromelain group at the end of the study showed a mean reduction of 0.13 g/L (standard deviation (SD) 0.86g/L) compared with the mean reduction of 0.36 g/L (SD 0.96 g/L) for the placebo group. However, there was no significant difference in the mean change in fibrinogen between the placebo and bromelain groups (mean difference=0.23g/L (SD 0.22 g/L), =0.291). Similarly, the difference in mean change in other CVD risk factors (blood lipids, blood pressure), blood glucose, C-reactive protein and anthropometric measures between the bromelain and placebo groups was also not statistically significant. Statistical differences in fibrinogen between bromelain and placebo groups before the trial despite randomization may have influenced the results of this study. This RCT failed to show a beneficial effect in reducing fibrinogen

  6. Oral sodium bicarbonate on the nutritional status of patients on chronic dialysis program: A randomized placebo controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Enríquez-Zarama

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effect of oral sodium bicarbonate in improving the nutritional status of patients with chronic renal failure on chronic dialysis therapy (hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. Design: Randomized double blind placebo clinical trial. Setting: RTS Renal Units of Popayan, Colombia. Patients and Methods: 162 patients on chronic dialysis (hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis were randomized to either placebo or bicarbonate. Patients received oral sodium bicarbonate, 1.0 g three times daily or placebo. Both groups received treatment for a 4-month period. Results: The study groups were comparable at the beginning of the study (study baseline and no significant differences were observed in any baseline parameters. At 4 months, the levels of albumin and Subjective Global Assessment (SGA improved with bicarbonate (p = 0.000, the malnutrition inflammation score and the score of malnutrition in dialysis with bicarbonate decreased significantly (p = 0.000. The PCR remained unchanged in both groups (p = 0,306. An increase of 20% or more from baseline serum albumin was observed in 6 (7.41% patients who received bicarbonate and 1 (1.23% of those receiving placebo (p = 0.02. At baseline albumin levels

  7. Pilot study on recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS): a randomized placebo-controlled trial for the comparative therapeutic effects of systemic prednisone and systemic montelukast in subjects unresponsive to topical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femiano, F; Buonaiuto, C; Gombos, F; Lanza, A; Cirillo, N

    2010-03-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is characterized by recurrent painful oral ulcers whose etiology remains largely unknown. Numerous therapeutic protocols have been tried so far, but effectiveness remains an issue. To test a new drug for patients with recurrent oral aphthae nonresponsive to local corticosteroid therapy, we compared the therapeutic effectiveness and adverse effects of systemic prednisone and systemic montelukast in a placebo-controlled trial. Sixty patients suffering from minor RAS for > or =6 months were studied and randomly assigned to 3 groups of 20 each in a double-blind study. Patients of group A took 25 mg prednisone orally daily for 15 days, 12.5 mg daily for 15 days, 6.25 mg daily for 15 days, then 6.25 mg on alternate days for 15 days. Patients of group B took 10 mg montelukast orally every evening and then on alternate days for the second month. Patients of group C took 100 mg cellulose (placebo) by mouth daily for the first month and on alternate days for the second month. Outcomes assessed were days til pain cessation, days to ulcer healing, and number of aphthae occurring during the follow-up period. Both prednisone and montelukast were effective in reducing the number of lesions and improving pain relief and ulcer healing when compared with placebo. Prednisone was more effective than montelukast in pain cessation (P < .0001) and in accelerating ulcer healing (P < .0001). However, adverse drug reactions recorded during the entire trial were more common in the prednisone group compared with montelukast (10%) and placebo (10%). These data suggest that the effectiveness of systemic montelukast is similar to that of systemic prednisone in patients with RAS. The lack of serious side effects makes montelukast a candidate drug to use in cases of RAS where pharmacologic therapy for long periods is needed. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Multicenter, placebo-controlled trial of lorcaserin for weight management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Steven R; Weissman, Neil J; Anderson, Christen M; Sanchez, Matilde; Chuang, Emil; Stubbe, Scott; Bays, Harold; Shanahan, William R

    2010-07-15

    Lorcaserin is a selective serotonin 2C receptor agonist that could be useful in reducing body weight. In this double-blind clinical trial, we randomly assigned 3182 obese or overweight adults (mean body-mass index [the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters] of 36.2) to receive lorcaserin at a dose of 10 mg, or placebo, twice daily for 52 weeks. All patients also underwent diet and exercise counseling. At week 52, patients in the placebo group continued to receive placebo but patients in the lorcaserin group were randomly reassigned to receive either placebo or lorcaserin. Primary outcomes were weight loss at 1 year and maintenance of weight loss at 2 years. Serial echocardiography was used to identify patients in whom valvulopathy (as defined by the Food and Drug Administration) developed. At 1 year, 55.4% of patients (883 of 1595) receiving lorcaserin and 45.1% of patients (716 of 1587) receiving placebo remained in the trial; 1553 patients continued into year 2. At 1 year, 47.5% of patients in the lorcaserin group and 20.3% in the placebo group had lost 5% or more of their body weight (Plorcaserin and 2.2+/-0.1 kg with placebo during year 1 (Plorcaserin during year 1 and who had lost 5% or more of their baseline weight at 1 year, the loss was maintained in more patients who continued to receive lorcaserin during year 2 (67.9%) than in patients who received placebo during year 2 (50.3%, Plorcaserin. Among the most frequent adverse events reported with lorcaserin were headache, dizziness, and nausea. The rates of serious adverse events in the two groups were similar. In conjunction with behavioral modification, lorcaserin was associated with significant weight loss and improved maintenance of weight loss, as compared with placebo. (Funded by Arena Pharmaceuticals; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00395135.) 2010 Massachusetts Medical Society

  9. Deceit and Transparency in Placebo Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justman, Stewart

    2013-01-01

    Studies designed to elicit the full strength of the placebo effect differ from those in which the placebo effect represents a nuisance factor to be accounted for in order to establish the efficacy of a treatment. In the latter, informed consent is the rule; in the first, while consent may be informed in some narrow sense of the word, deception is common. However, the trickery of placebo experimentation goes beyond straightforward lies to include the use of crafty ambiguities, half-truths, and deliberate omissions in scripts read to the subjects of these studies. As words come to resemble therapeutic agents in their own right, it is only to be expected that researchers would methodically exploit verbal effects to evoke the responses they are looking for. Even experiments in which placebo is disclosed as placebo have used language in leading and misleading ways. Such studies are conducted in the hope of yielding results that might translate into clinical practice, but it should be noted that good clinical practice has a placebo value of its own — that is, confers a benefit over and beyond the specific effects of treatments — even if nothing like a sugar pill is administered. PMID:24058307

  10. Effect of quetiapine vs. placebo on response to two virtual public speaking exposures in individuals with social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Christopher B; Kushner, Matt G; Thuras, Paul D; Murphy, Tom G; Van Demark, Joani B; Adson, David E

    2009-04-01

    Clinical practice and open-label studies suggest that quetiapine (an atypical anti-psychotic) might improve symptoms for individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD). The purpose of this study was to provide a rigorous test of the acute impact of a single dose of quetiapine (25mg) on SAD symptoms. Individuals with SAD (N=20) were exposed to a 4-min virtual reality (VR) public speaking challenge after having received quetiapine or placebo (double-blind) 1h earlier. A parallel VR challenge occurred 1 week later using a counter-balanced cross-over (within subject) design for the medication-placebo order between the two sessions. There was no significant drug effect for quetiapine on the primary outcome measures. However, quetiapine was associated with significantly elevated heart rate and sleepiness compared with placebo. Study findings suggest that a single dose of 25mg quetiapine is not effective in alleviating SAD symptoms in individuals with fears of public speaking.

  11. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the efficacy and safety of 2 doses of vortioxetine in adults with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahableshwarkar, Atul R; Jacobsen, Paula L; Serenko, Michael; Chen, Yinzhong; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2015-05-01

    This 8-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, conducted August 2010-May 2012 in the United States, evaluated the safety and efficacy of vortioxetine 10 mg and 15 mg in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). The mechanism of action of vortioxetine is thought to be related to direct modulation of serotonin (5-HT) receptor activity and inhibition of the serotonin transporter. Adults aged 18-75 years with MDD (DSM-IV-TR) and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score ≥ 26 were randomized (1:1:1) to receive vortioxetine 10 mg or 15 mg or placebo once daily, with the primary efficacy end point being change from baseline at week 8 in MADRS analyzed by mixed model for repeated measures. Adverse events were recorded during the study, suicidal ideation and behavior were assessed using the Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS), and sexual dysfunction was assessed using the Arizona Sexual Experience (ASEX) scale. Of the 1,111 subjects screened, 469 subjects were randomized: 160 to placebo, 157 to vortioxetine 10 mg, and 152 to vortioxetine 15 mg. Differences from placebo in the primary efficacy end point were not statistically significant for vortioxetine 10 mg or vortioxetine 15 mg. Nausea, headache, dry mouth, constipation, diarrhea, vomiting, dizziness, and flatulence were reported in ≥ 5% of subjects receiving vortioxetine. Discontinuation due to adverse events occurred in 7 subjects (4.4%) in the placebo group, 8 (5.2%) in the vortioxetine 10 mg group, and 12 (7.9%) in the vortioxetine 15 mg group. ASEX total scores were similar across groups. There were no clinically significant trends within or between treatment groups on the C-SSRS, laboratory values, electrocardiogram, or vital sign parameters. In this study, vortioxetine did not differ significantly from placebo on MADRS total score after 8 weeks of treatment in MDD subjects. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01179516. © Copyright 2015 Physicians

  12. Effectiveness of low-dose doxycycline (LDD on clinical symptoms of Sjögren's Syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled cross-over study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuotila Tuija

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are proteolytic enzymes that may contribute to tissue destruction in Sjögren's syndrome (SS. Low-dose doxycycline (LDD inhibits MMPs. We evaluated the efficacy of LDD for the subjective symptoms in primary SS patients. This was a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled cross-over study. 22 patients were randomly assigned to receive either 20 mg LDD or matching placebo twice a day for 10 weeks. The first medication period was followed by 10-week washout period, after which the patient received either LDD or placebo, depending on the first drug received, followed by the second washout period. Stimulated saliva flow rates and pH were measured before and after one and ten weeks of each medication and after washout periods. VAS scale was used to assess the effect of LDD and placebo on following six subjective symptoms: xerostomia; xerophtalmia; difficulty of swallowing; myalgia; arthralgia; and fatigue. The effect was evaluated for each medication and washout period separately. Results Overall, the effects of medications on subjective symptoms were minor. Wilcoxon test demonstrated increased fatigue with LDD during medication (p Conclusion LDD may not be useful in reducing the primary SS symptoms.

  13. Evaluation of nasal symptoms induced by platelet activating factor, after nasal challenge in both healthy and allergic rhinitis subjects pretreated with rupatadine, levocetirizine or placebo in a cross-over study design

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz-Cano, Rosa; Valero, Antonio; Izquierdo, Ignacio; Sánchez-López, Jaume; Doménech, Alejandro; Bartra, Joan; Mullol, Joaquim; Picado, Cesar

    2013-01-01

    Background Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is produced by most inflammatory cells and it is involved in inflammatory and allergic reactions. We aimed to assess the anti-PAF effects of rupatadine and levocetirizine in the upper airways. Findings Healthy volunteers (HV, N = 10) and seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR, N = 10) asymptomatic patients were treated out of the pollen season with either rupatadine 20 mg, levocetirizine 10 mg, or placebo once a day during 5 days prior to the PAF nasal cha...

  14. A randomized, multicenter, placebo-controlled trial of polyethylene glycol laxative for chronic treatment of chronic constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipalma, Jack A; Cleveland, Mark Vb; McGowan, John; Herrera, Jorge L

    2007-07-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350 (MiraLAX) is currently approved for the short-term treatment of occasional constipation. This study was designed to compare the safety and efficacy of PEG laxative versus placebo over a 6-month treatment period in patients with chronic constipation. Study subjects who met defined criteria for chronic constipation were randomized in this double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel, multicenter study to receive PEG laxative as a single daily dose of 17 g or placebo for 6 months. Baseline constipation status was confirmed during a 14-day observation period. As a primary efficacy variable, treatment success was defined as relief of modified ROME criteria for constipation for 50% or more of their treatment weeks. Various secondary measures were assessed. An Interactive Voice Response System (IVRS) recorded daily bowel movement experience and study efficacy and safety information. Laboratory testing at baseline and monthly for the study duration was analyzed for hematology, blood chemistry including amylase, GGT, uric acid, lipids, and urinalysis. A total of 304 patients were enrolled and received treatment at one of 50 centers. Successful treatment according to the primary efficacy variable was seen in 52.0% of PEG and 11% of placebo subjects (P definition (based on individual treatment weeks), 61% of PEG treatment weeks versus 22% of the placebo weeks were successful (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences in laboratory findings or adverse events except for the gastrointestinal category where diarrhea, flatulence, and nausea were the most frequent with PEG although they were not individually statistically significant compared with placebo. Similar results were observed when analyzed for differences due to gender, race, or age. PEG laxative is safe and effective for use in patients with chronic constipation for 6 months.

  15. Mixed-amphetamine salts expectancies among college students: Is stimulant induced cognitive enhancement a placebo effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropsey, Karen L; Schiavon, Samantha; Hendricks, Peter S; Froelich, Morgan; Lentowicz, Iga; Fargason, Rachel

    2017-09-01

    Non-medical use of prescription stimulants for cognitive enhancement in college students is increasing, despite evidence showing little benefit in non-clinical populations. The balanced placebo design (BPD) was used to independently evaluate the pharmacologic versus expectancy effects of mixed amphetamine salts on cognitive performance among a non-clinical sample of college-aged students. Participants were screened and excluded for ADHD and other psychopathologies. A non-clinical sample (N=32) completed four two-hour laboratory sessions and were administered a neurocognitive battery in each session. Medication Assignment (10mg mixed-amphetamine salt (Adderall™) versus placebo) was crossed with Instructional Set (deception versus truth). A within-subjects design was used, such that all participants experienced each of the four conditions of the BPD during one of the four laboratory sessions. Participants performed no better than chance in identifying whether they received stimulant or placebo (Belief about Medication Assignment; 47% agreement; κ=-0.047, p=0.590). Participants showed improvement on only two of 31 subtests during active medication. Expecting and receiving stimulants was associated with improved cognitive performance. However, expecting placebo was associated with worse cognitive performance, regardless of the type of medication given. This study demonstrated that although non-medical use of stimulants does not enhance cognition, expectancies prominently influence cognitive performance. Participants who believed they received active medication both subjectively rated themselves as performing better and objectively performed better on a minority of subtests, independent of medication state. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Migraine treatment and placebo effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speciali, José G; Peres, Mário; Bigal, Marcelo E

    2010-03-01

    Placebos are typically defined as physiologically inactive substances that elicit a therapeutic response. The antipode of the placebo effect is the nocebo effect, or the negative effects of placebo, where unpleasant symptoms (e.g., adverse events) emerge after the administration of placebo. Placebo analgesia is one of the most striking examples of the cognitive modulation of pain perception. Herein we focus on the importance of placebo in headache research. We first review the mechanisms of the placebo effect. We then focus on the importance of placebo in the acute treatment of migraine. We follow by discussing the importance of placebo on the preventive treatment of migraine and our perspectives for the 5 years to come regarding the study of the placebos.

  17. A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Phase IIB Trial of Curcumin in Oral Leukoplakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriakose, Moni Abraham; Ramdas, Kunnambath; Dey, Bindu; Iyer, Subramanya; Rajan, Gunaseelan; Elango, Kalavathy K; Suresh, Amritha; Ravindran, Divya; Kumar, Rajneesh R; R, Prathiba; Ramachandran, Surya; Kumar, Nisha Asok; Thomas, Gigi; Somanathan, Thara; Ravindran, Hiran K; Ranganathan, Kannan; Katakam, Sudhakar Babu; Parashuram, Shivashankar; Jayaprakash, Vijayvel; Pillai, M Radhakrishna

    2016-08-01

    Oral leukoplakia is a potentially malignant lesion of the oral cavity, for which no effective treatment is available. We investigated the effectiveness of curcumin, a potent inhibitor of NF-κB/COX-2, molecules perturbed in oral carcinogenesis, to treat leukoplakia. Subjects with oral leukoplakia (n = 223) were randomized (1:1 ratio) to receive orally, either 3.6 g/day of curcumin (n = 111) or placebo (n = 112), for 6 months. The primary endpoint was clinical response obtained by bi-dimensional measurement of leukoplakia size at recruitment and 6 months. Histologic response, combined clinical and histologic response, durability and effect of long-term therapy for an additional six months in partial responders, safety and compliance were the secondary endpoints. Clinical response was observed in 75 (67.5%) subjects [95% confidence interval (CI), 58.4-75.6] in the curcumin and 62 (55.3%; 95% CI, 46.1-64.2) in placebo arm (P = 0.03). This response was durable, with 16 of the 18 (88.9%; 95% CI, 67.2-96.9) subjects with complete response in curcumin and 7 of 8 subjects (87.5%) in placebo arm, demonstrating no relapse after 6 months follow-up. Difference in histologic response between curcumin and placebo was not significant (HR, 0.88, 95% CI, 0.45-1.71; P = 0.71). Combined clinical and histologic response assessment indicated a significantly better response with curcumin (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.27-0.92; P = 0.02). Continued therapy, in subjects with partial response at 6 months, did not yield additional benefit. The treatment did not raise any safety concerns. Treatment of oral leukoplakia with curcumin (3.6 g for six months), thus was well tolerated and demonstrated significant and durable clinical response for 6 months. Cancer Prev Res; 9(8); 683-91. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, clinical trial of ozone therapy as treatment of sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragab, A; Shreef, E; Behiry, E; Zalat, S; Noaman, M

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the safety and efficacy of ozone therapy in adult patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Prospective, randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel group, clinical trial. Forty-five adult patients presented with sudden sensorineural hearing loss, and were randomly allocated to receive either placebo (15 patients) or ozone therapy (auto-haemotherapy; 30 patients). For the latter treatment, 100 ml of the patient's blood was treated immediately with a 1:1 volume, gaseous mixture of oxygen and ozone (from an ozone generator) and re-injected into the patient by intravenous infusion. Treatments were administered twice weekly for 10 sessions. The following data were recorded: pre- and post-treatment mean hearing gains; air and bone pure tone averages; speech reception thresholds; speech discrimination scores; and subjective recovery rates. Significant recovery was observed in 23 patients (77 per cent) receiving ozone treatment, compared with six (40 per cent) patients receiving placebo (p ozone-treated patients compared with placebo-treated patients (p Ozone therapy is a significant modality for treatment of sudden sensorineural hearing loss; no complications were observed.

  19. Noradrenergic α₁ receptor antagonist treatment attenuates positive subjective effects of cocaine in humans: a randomized trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F Newton

    Full Text Available Preclinical research implicates dopaminergic and noradrenergic mechanisms in mediating the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse, including cocaine. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of treatment with the noradrenergic α(1 receptor antagonist doxazosin on the positive subjective effects of cocaine.Thirteen non-treatment seeking, cocaine-dependent volunteers completed this single-site, randomized, placebo-controlled, within-subjects study. In one study phase volunteers received placebo and in the other they received doxazosin, with the order counterbalanced across participants. Study medication was masked by over-encapsulating doxazosin tablets and matched placebo lactose served as the control. Study medication treatment was initiated at 1 mg doxazosin or equivalent number of placebo capsules PO/day and increased every three days by 1 mg. After receiving 4 mg doxazosin or equivalent number of placebo capsules participants received masked doses of 20 and 40 mg cocaine IV in that order with placebo saline randomly interspersed to maintain the blind.Doxazosin treatment was well tolerated and doxazosin alone produced minimal changes in heart rate and blood pressure. During treatment with placebo, cocaine produced dose-dependent increases in subjective effect ratings of "high", "stimulated", "like cocaine", "desire cocaine", "any drug effect", and "likely to use cocaine if had access" (p<.001. Doxazosin treatment significantly attenuated the effects of 20 mg cocaine on ratings of "stimulated", "like cocaine", and "likely to use cocaine if had access" (p<.05. There were trends for doxazosin to reduce ratings of "stimulated", "desire cocaine", and "likely to use cocaine if had access" (p<.10.Medications that block noradrenergic α₁ receptors, such as doxazosin, may be useful as treatments for cocaine dependence, and should be evaluated further.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01062945.

  20. Efficacy of a Monovalent Human-Bovine (116E) Rotavirus Vaccine in Indian Infants: A Randomised Double Blind Placebo Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Nita; Rongsen-Chandola, Temsunaro; Bavdekar, Ashish; John, Jacob; Antony, Kalpana; Taneja, Sunita; Goyal, Nidhi; Kawade, Anand; Kang, Gagandeep; Rathore, Sudeep Singh; Juvekar, Sanjay; Muliyil, Jayaprakash; Arya, Alok; Shaikh, Hanif; Abraham, Vinod; Vrati, Sudhanshu; Proschan, Michael; Kohberger, Robert; Thiry, Georges; Glass, Roger; Greenberg, Harry B; Curlin, George; Mohan, Krishna; Harshavardhan, GVJA; Prasad, Sai; Rao, TS; Boslego, John; Bhan, Maharaj Kishan

    2015-01-01

    Background Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe dehydrating gastroenteritis in developing countries. Safe, effective, and affordable rotavirus vaccines are needed for developing countries. Methods In a double-blind placebo controlled multicentre trial, 6799 infants aged 6 to 7 weeks were randomised to receive three doses of an oral human-bovine natural reassortant vaccine (116E) or placebo at ages 6, 10, and 14 weeks. Primary outcome was severe (≥11 on the Vesikari scale) rotavirus gastroenteritis. Efficacy outcomes and adverse events were ascertained through active surveillance. Findings At analyses, the median age was 17·2 months; over 96% subjects received all three doses of the vaccine/placebo and ~1% were lost to follow up. 4532 and 2267 subjects were randomly assigned to receive vaccine and placebo, respectively. The per protocol analyses included 4354 subjects in the vaccine and 2187 subjects in the placebo group. 71 events of severe rotavirus gastroenteritis were reported in 4752 person years among the vaccinees compared to 76 events in 2360 person years in the placebo recipients; vaccine efficacy against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis was 53·6% (95% CI 35·0–66·9; Protavirus gastroenteritis episode was 55 (95% CI 37–97). The incidence of severe rotavirus gastroenteritis/100 person years was 1·5 in vaccine and 3·2 in placebo group and an incidence rate ratio of 0·46 (95% CI 0·33–0·65). The absolute rate reduction for severe rotavirus gastroenteritis was 1·7 (95% CI 2·5–0·9). Efficacy against severe gastroenteritis of any aetiology was 18·6% (95% CI 1·9–32·3); it was 24·1% (95% CI 5·8–38·7) in the first year of life. The prevalence of immediate, solicited, and serious adverse events were similar in both groups. There were six cases of intussusception amongst 4532 vaccinees and two amongst 2267 placebo recipients (P=0·73). All intussusception cases occurred after the third dose. Among vaccine and placebo recipients

  1. Evaluation of nasal symptoms induced by platelet activating factor, after nasal challenge in both healthy and allergic rhinitis subjects pretreated with rupatadine, levocetirizine or placebo in a cross-over study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Cano, Rosa; Valero, Antonio; Izquierdo, Ignacio; Sánchez-López, Jaume; Doménech, Alejandro; Bartra, Joan; Mullol, Joaquim; Picado, Cesar

    2013-11-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is produced by most inflammatory cells and it is involved in inflammatory and allergic reactions. We aimed to assess the anti-PAF effects of rupatadine and levocetirizine in the upper airways. Healthy volunteers (HV, N = 10) and seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR, N = 10) asymptomatic patients were treated out of the pollen season with either rupatadine 20 mg, levocetirizine 10 mg, or placebo once a day during 5 days prior to the PAF nasal challenge. Total 4-nasal symptom score (T4SS) and nasal patency (Vol2-5, by acoustic rhinometry) were assessed from 0 to 240 minutes after a repeated PAF challenge. In SAR patients but not in HV, both rupatadine and levocetirizine showed a trend to decrease PAF-induced T4SS from 60 to 120 minutes. Rupatadine but not levocetirizine caused a significant reduction (p Rupatadine and levocetirizine caused no significant changes on nasal patency compared to placebo. These results suggest that both rupatadine and levocetirizine showed a tendency decrease toward nasal symptoms, but only rupatadine significally reduces the overall nasal symptoms (AUC) induced by PAF in SAR patients.

  2. Change in Psychosocial Functioning and Quality of Life of Patients With Body Dysmorphic Disorder Treated With Fluoxetine: A Placebo-Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katharine A.; Rasmussen, Steven A.

    2006-01-01

    In a 12-week placebo-controlled study of fluoxetine in the treatment of body dysmorphic disorder, the authors investigated change in psychosocial functioning and mental health-related quality of life in 60 subjects. The subjects were assessed with the LIFE-RIFT (a measure of impaired functioning), Social and Occupational Functioning Scale (SOFAS), and Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) before and after receiving fluoxetine or placebo. At baseline, the patients had impaired psychosocial functioning and markedly poor mental health-related quality of life. Compared to placebo, fluoxetine was associated with significantly greater improvement in LIFE-RIFT and SOFAS scores and with improvement on the mental health subscale of the SF-36 that approached significance. Decrease in the severity of body dysmorphic disorder, as measured by the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale Modified for Body Dysmorphic Disorder, was significantly correlated with improvement in functioning and quality of life. PMID:15345790

  3. Effects of nicotine versus placebo e-cigarette use on symptom relief during initial tobacco abstinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Kenneth A; Karelitz, Joshua L; Michael, Valerie C

    2017-08-01

    Because electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) containing nicotine may relieve smoking abstinence symptoms similar to nicotine replacement therapy medication, we used within-subjects designs to test these effects with a first-generation e-cig in nonquitting and quitting smokers. In Study 1, 28 nontreatment-seeking smokers abstained overnight prior to each of 3 sessions. Minnesota Nicotine Withdrawal Scale (MNWS) withdrawal (and craving item) relief was assessed following 4 exposures (each 10 puffs) over 2 hr to e-cigs that either did (36 mg/ml) or did not (i.e., placebo, 0 mg/ml) contain nicotine or after no e-cig. Relief was greater after nicotine versus placebo e-cig (p < .05) but not after placebo versus no e-cig, showing relief was due to nicotine per se and not simple e-cig use behavior. Using a crossover design in Study 2, smokers preparing to quit soon engaged in 2 experimental 4-day quit periods on separate weeks. In weeks 1 and 3, all received a nicotine or placebo e-cig on Monday to use ad libitum while trying to abstain from smoking on Tuesday through Friday. (Week 2 involved resumption of ad libitum smoking.) MNWS and Questionnaire of Smoking Urges (QSU) craving were assessed at daily visits following 24-hr abstinence. Of 17 enrolled, 12 quit for ≥24 hr at least once, allowing test of relief because of e-cig use on quit days. Withdrawal and craving were reduced because of nicotine versus placebo e-cig use (both p < .05). In sum, compared with placebo e-cigs, nicotine e-cigs can relieve smoking abstinence symptoms, perhaps in a manner similar to Food and Drug Administration-approved nicotine replacement therapy products, although much more research with larger samples is needed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Risperidone versus placebo for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattehalli, Ranganath D; Zhao, Sai; Li, Bao Guo; Jayaram, Mahesh B; Xia, Jun; Sampson, Stephanie

    2016-12-15

    Risperidone is the first new-generation antipsychotic drug made available in the market in its generic form. To determine the clinical effects, safety and cost-effectiveness of risperidone compared with placebo for treating schizophrenia. On 19th October 2015, we searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register, which is based on regular searches of CINAHL, BIOSIS, AMED, EMBASE, PubMed, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and registries of clinical trials. We checked the references of all included studies and contacted industry and authors of included studies for relevant studies and data. Randomised clinical trials (RCTs) comparing oral risperidone with placebo treatments for people with schizophrenia and/or schizophrenia-like psychoses. Two review authors independently screened studies, assessed the risk of bias of included studies and extracted data. For dichotomous data, we calculated the risk ratio (RR), and the 95% confidence interval (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD) and the 95% CI. We created a 'Summary of findings table' using GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation). The review includes 15 studies (N = 2428). Risk of selection bias is unclear in most of the studies, especially concerning allocation concealment. Other areas of risk such as missing data and selective reporting also caused some concern, although not affected on the direction of effect of our primary outcome, as demonstrated by sensitivity analysis. Many of the included trials have industry sponsorship of involvement. Nonetheless, generally people in the risperidone group are more likely to achieve a significant clinical improvement in mental state (6 RCTs, N = 864, RR 0.64, CI 0.52 to 0.78, very low-quality evidence). The effect withstood, even when three studies with >50% attrition rate were removed from the analysis (3 RCTs, N = 589, RR 0.77, CI 0.67 to 0.88). Participants receiving placebo were less

  5. Naltrexone but Not Ketanserin Antagonizes the Subjective, Cardiovascular, and Neuroendocrine Effects of Salvinorin-A in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqueda, Ana Elda; Valle, Marta; Addy, Peter H; Antonijoan, Rosa Maria; Puntes, Montserrat; Coimbra, Jimena; Ballester, Maria Rosa; Garrido, Maite; González, Mireia; Claramunt, Judit; Barker, Steven; Lomnicka, Izabela; Waguespack, Marian; Johnson, Matthew W; Griffiths, Roland R; Riba, Jordi

    2016-07-01

    Salvinorin-A is a terpene found in the leaves of the plant Salvia divinorum. When administered to humans, salvinorin-A induces an intense but short-lasting modified state of awareness, sharing features with those induced by the classical serotonin-2A receptor agonist psychedelics. However, unlike substances such as psilocybin or mescaline, salvinorin-A shows agonist activity at the kappa-opioid receptor rather than at the serotonin-2A receptor. Here, we assessed the involvement of kappa-opioid receptor and serotonin-2A agonism in the subjective, cardiovascular, and neuroendocrine effects of salvinorin-A in humans. We conducted a placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind study with 2 groups of 12 healthy volunteers with experience with psychedelic drugs. There were 4 experimental sessions. In group 1, participants received the following treatment combinations: placebo+placebo, placebo+salvinorin-A, naltrexone+placebo, and naltrexone+salvinorin-A. Naltrexone, a nonspecific opioid receptor antagonist, was administered at a dose of 50mg orally. In group 2, participants received the treatment combinations: placebo+placebo, placebo+salvinorin-A, ketanserin+placebo, and ketanserin+salvinorin-A. Ketanserin, a selective serotonin-2A antagonist, was administered at a dose of 40mg orally. Inhalation of 1mg of vaporized salvinorin-A led to maximum plasma concentrations at 1 and 2 minutes after dosing. When administered alone, salvinorin-A severely reduced external sensory perception and induced intense visual and auditory modifications, increased systolic blood pressure, and cortisol and prolactin release. These effects were effectively blocked by naltrexone, but not by ketanserin. Results support kappa opioid receptor agonism as the mechanism of action underlying the subjective and physiological effects of salvinorin-A in humans and rule out the involvement of a serotonin-2A-mediated mechanism. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  6. Naltrexone but Not Ketanserin Antagonizes the Subjective, Cardiovascular, and Neuroendocrine Effects of Salvinorin-A in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqueda, Ana Elda; Valle, Marta; Addy, Peter H.; Antonijoan, Rosa Maria; Puntes, Montserrat; Coimbra, Jimena; Ballester, Maria Rosa; Garrido, Maite; González, Mireia; Claramunt, Judit; Barker, Steven; Lomnicka, Izabela; Waguespack, Marian; Johnson, Matthew W.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Salvinorin-A is a terpene found in the leaves of the plant Salvia divinorum. When administered to humans, salvinorin-A induces an intense but short-lasting modified state of awareness, sharing features with those induced by the classical serotonin-2A receptor agonist psychedelics. However, unlike substances such as psilocybin or mescaline, salvinorin-A shows agonist activity at the kappa-opioid receptor rather than at the serotonin-2A receptor. Here, we assessed the involvement of kappa-opioid receptor and serotonin-2A agonism in the subjective, cardiovascular, and neuroendocrine effects of salvinorin-A in humans. Methods: We conducted a placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind study with 2 groups of 12 healthy volunteers with experience with psychedelic drugs. There were 4 experimental sessions. In group 1, participants received the following treatment combinations: placebo+placebo, placebo+salvinorin-A, naltrexone+placebo, and naltrexone+salvinorin-A. Naltrexone, a nonspecific opioid receptor antagonist, was administered at a dose of 50mg orally. In group 2, participants received the treatment combinations: placebo+placebo, placebo+salvinorin-A, ketanserin+placebo, and ketanserin+salvinorin-A. Ketanserin, a selective serotonin-2A antagonist, was administered at a dose of 40mg orally. Results: Inhalation of 1mg of vaporized salvinorin-A led to maximum plasma concentrations at 1 and 2 minutes after dosing. When administered alone, salvinorin-A severely reduced external sensory perception and induced intense visual and auditory modifications, increased systolic blood pressure, and cortisol and prolactin release. These effects were effectively blocked by naltrexone, but not by ketanserin. Conclusions: Results support kappa opioid receptor agonism as the mechanism of action underlying the subjective and physiological effects of salvinorin-A in humans and rule out the involvement of a serotonin-2A-mediated mechanism. PMID:26874330

  7. Lack of effects between rupatadine 10 mg and placebo on actual driving performance of healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuurman, Eric; Theunissen, Eef; van Oers, Anita; van Leeuwen, Cees; Jolles, Jelle

    2007-07-01

    Rupatadine fumarate is a potent, selective, histamine H(1)-receptor antagonist and PAF inhibitor with demonstrated efficacy for the relief of allergic rhinitis. Rupatadine does not easily cross the blood-brain barrier and is believed to be non-sedating at therapeutic doses. Consequently, rupatadine should show no impairment on car driving. This study compared the acute effects of rupatadine, relative to placebo and hydroxyzine (as an active control), on healthy subjects' driving performance. Twenty subjects received a single dose of rupatadine 10 mg, hydroxyzine 50 mg, or placebo in each period of this randomized, double-blind, three-way crossover study. Two hours postdosing, subjects operated a specially instrumented vehicle in tests designed to measure their driving ability. Before and after the driving tests ratings of sedation were recorded. There was no significant difference between rupatadine and placebo in the primary outcome variable: standard deviation of lateral position (SDLP); however, hydroxyzine treatment significantly increased SDLP (p rupatadine. Rupatadine 10 mg is not sedating and does not impair driving performance.

  8. Placebo and criminal law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joerden, Jan C

    2004-01-01

    This article considers issues concerning cases where the use of placebo is lawful or is not lawful under aspects of German criminal law. It will differentiate between cases of individual therapy and cases of supervised experiments within the scope of medical tests. Thereby, it reveals that a medication of placebo with regard to an individual patient seems to be lawful if there is no alternative possibility of a better treatment using a chemically effective medicine and if the limits of presumed consent are complied with. On the other hand, in the context of the supervised experiment, the assignment of a patient to a group treated with placebo is only lawful if the patient has been fully informed about the possibilities of a treatment and if the patient has given consent to it.

  9. Subjective and objective effects of coffee consumption - caffeine or expectations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dömötör, Zs; Szemerszky, R; Köteles, F

    2015-03-01

    Impact of 5 mg/kg caffeine, chance of receiving caffeine (stimulus expectancies), and expectations of effects of caffeine (response expectancies) on objective (heart rate (HR), systolic/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP), measures of heart rate variability (HRV), and reaction time (RT)) and subjective variables were investigated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled experiment with a no-treatment group. Participants were 107 undergraduate university students (mean age 22.3 ± 3.96 years). Consumption of 5 mg/kg caffeine had an impact on participants' SBP, standard deviation of normal heartbeat intervals, HR (decrease), and subjective experience 40 minutes later even after controlling for respective baseline values, stimulus and response expectancies, and habitual caffeine consumption. No effects on DBP, high frequency component of HRV, the ratio of low- and high-frequency, and RT were found. Beyond actual caffeine intake, response expectancy score was also a determinant of subjective experience which refers to a placebo component in the total effect. Actual autonomic (SBP, HR) changes and somatosensory amplification tendency, however, had no significant impact on subjective experience. Placebo reaction plays a role in the subjective changes caused by caffeine consumption but it has no impact on objective variables. Conditional vs deceptive administration of caffeine (i.e. stimulus expectancies) had no impact on any assessed variable.

  10. Placebo effects in medicine: A bibliometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Katja; Berger, Bettina; Ostermann, Thomas; Heusser, Peter

    2016-07-01

    It was the aim of this bibliometric analysis to identify all publications dealing with so-called 'context effects/placebo effects' to bring some organisation into the publication landscape of the past 35 years. An electronic database search was carried out in Pubmed from its inception to November 2011. Already published articles and their participants were included. This review was carried out at an academic institution. Condition, country, year, journal, number of authors, type of publication and main focus of the publication. There are slight differences in the focus and the origin of research. Although the subject is multidimensional and covering all areas in healthcare, only a few research disciplines cover the field of placebo effects. The research field is shrinking as evident by the smaller number of researchers publishing in this field. It is suggested that the discussion regarding placebo and context effects is getting more homogenous and is turning into a specific field by itself. There is an increasing concentration of placebo effects being reproduced in experimental settings. It is debatable whether the complexity of the broad range of what produces placebo effects can be successfully detected in a randomized controlled trial setting.

  11. Books Received

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    VG Bhide. Shekhar Phatak and Associates. 1998, Rs.80. Books Received. Biotechnological Methods of. Pollution Control. S A Abbasi and E Ramasami. Universities Press. 1999, Rs.1S0. The Penguin India Career Guide,. Vol 2, The Scien~es. Usha Albuquerque. Penguin Books. 1996, Rs.250. Fixed Points. Yu A Shashldn.

  12. Books Received

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Akser

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In 2014 we have received a variety of books onc inema and media from these publishers: Bloomsbury Academic, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Continuum, Edinburgh University Press, Focal Press, Intellect, Paradigm, Peter Lang, Routledge, University of California Press, Wayne State University Press.

  13. Books Received

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Books Received. Challenge and Thrill of Pre-College. Mathematics. V Krishnamurthy et al. New Age International. 1996, Rs.220. Mathematics for Science. S M Uppal and H M Humphreys. New Age International. 1996, Rs.17S. Physics for Engineers. M R Srinivasan. New Age Publications. 1996. Statement about ownership ...

  14. Efficacy of auditory training in elderly subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Albuquerque Morais

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Auditory training (AT  has been used for auditory rehabilitation in elderly individuals and is an effective tool for optimizing speech processing in this population. However, it is necessary to distinguish training-related improvements from placebo and test-retest effects. Thus, we investigated the efficacy of short-term auditory training (acoustically controlled auditory training - ACAT in elderly subjects through behavioral measures and P300. Sixteen elderly individuals with APD received an initial evaluation (evaluation 1 - E1 consisting of behavioral and electrophysiological tests (P300 evoked by tone burst and speech sounds to evaluate their auditory processing. The individuals were divided into two groups. The Active Control Group [ACG (n=8] underwent placebo training. The Passive Control Group [PCG (n=8] did not receive any intervention. After 12 weeks, the subjects were  revaluated (evaluation 2 - E2. Then, all of the subjects underwent ACAT. Following another 12 weeks (8 training sessions, they underwent the final evaluation (evaluation 3 – E3. There was no significant difference between E1 and E2 in the behavioral test [F(9.6=0,.6 p=0.92, λ de Wilks=0.65] or P300 [F(8.7=2.11, p=0.17, λ de Wilks=0.29] (discarding the presence of placebo effects and test-retest. A significant improvement was observed between the pre- and post-ACAT conditions (E2 and E3 for all auditory skills according to the behavioral methods [F(4.27=0.18, p=0.94, λ de Wilks=0.97]. However, the same result was not observed for P300 in any condition. There was no significant difference between P300 stimuli. The ACAT improved the behavioral performance of the elderly for all auditory skills and was an effective method for hearing rehabilitation.

  15. Hahnemann and placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jütte, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Samuel Hahnemann (1755-1843) known today as the founder of homoeopathy, was - as far as we know - the first physician who administrated placebos to his patient on a systematic and regular basis. This study is based upon unpublished documents (e.g. patients' letters) in the Archives of the Institute for the History of Medicine of the Robert Bosch Foundation in Stuttgart. It also profited from the critical edition of Hahnemann's case journals and the editorial comments which have also been published in this series. Hahnemann differentiated clearly between homeopathic drugs and pharmaceutical substances which he considered as sham medicine (e.g. milk sugar). A close look at Hahnemann's case journals reveals that the percentage of placebo prescriptions was very high (between 54 and 85 percent). In most instances Hahnemann marked placebos with the paragraph symbol (§). The rationale behind this practice was that Hahnemann had encountered the well-known problem that patients were used to taking medicine on a daily basis as it was typical for the age of heroic medicine. The main reason for giving placebo was therefore to please the impatient patient who was used to frequent medications in allopathic medicine, not only every day but sometimes also hourly. Copyright © 2014 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Myofascial trigger point-focused head and neck massage for recurrent tension-type headache: A randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraska, Albert F.; Stenerson, Lea; Butryn, Nathan; Krutsch, Jason P.; Schmiege, Sarah J.; Mann, J. Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Objective Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are focal disruptions in skeletal muscle that can refer pain to the head and reproduce the pain patterns of tension-type headache (TTH). The present study applied massage focused on MTrPs of subjects with TTH in a placebo-controlled, clinical trial to assess efficacy on reducing headache pain. Methods Fifty-six subjects with TTH were randomized to receive 12 massage or placebo (detuned ultrasound) sessions over six weeks, or to wait-list. Trigger point release (TPR) massage focused on MTrPs in cervical musculature. Headache pain (frequency, intensity and duration) was recorded in a daily headache diary. Additional outcome measures included self-report of perceived clinical change in headache pain and pressure-pain threshold (PPT) at MTrPs in the upper trapezius and sub-occipital muscles. Results From diary recordings, group differences across time were detected in headache frequency (p=0.026), but not for intensity or duration. Post hoc analysis indicated headache frequency decreased from baseline for both massage (p<0.0003) and placebo (p=0.013), but no difference was detected between massage and placebo. Subject report of perceived clinical change was a greater reduction in headache pain for massage than placebo or wait-list groups (p=0.002). PPT improved in all muscles tested for massage only (all p's<0.002). Discussion Two findings from this study are apparent: 1) MTrPs are important components in the treatment of TTH, and 2) TTH, like other chronic conditions, is responsive to placebo. Clinical trials on headache that do not include a placebo group are at risk for overestimating the specific contribution from the active intervention. PMID:25329141

  17. Treatment with the GnRH antagonist ganirelix prevents premature LH rises and luteinization in stimulated intrauterine insemination: results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambalk, C B; Leader, A; Olivennes, F; Fluker, M R; Andersen, A Nyboe; Ingerslev, J; Khalaf, Y; Avril, C; Belaisch-Allart, J; Roulier, R; Mannaerts, B

    2006-03-01

    This study was designed to assess whether the use of ganirelix in women undergoing stimulated IUI could prevent the occurrence of premature LH rises and luteinization (LH+progesterone rises). Women of infertile couples, diagnosed with unexplained or male factor infertility, were randomized to receive either ganirelix (n=103) or placebo (n=100) in a double-blind design. All women were treated with an individualized, low-dose rFSH regimen started on day 2-3 of cycle. Ganirelix (0.25 mg/day) was started if one or more follicles>or=14 mm were visualized. Ovulation was triggered by HCG injection when at least one follicle>or=18 mm was observed and a single IUI was performed 34-42 h later. The primary efficacy outcome was the incidence of premature LH rises (+/-progesterone rise). In the ganirelix group, four subjects had a premature LH rise (value>or=10 IU/l), one LH rise prior to the start of ganirelix and three LH rises during ganirelix treatment, whereas in the placebo group 28 subjects had a premature LH rise, six subjects prior to the start of placebo and 22 subjects during placebo treatment. The incidence of LH rises was significantly lower in ganirelix cycles compared to placebo cycles (3.9 versus 28.0%; P=0.003 for ITT analysis). When excluding subjects with an LH value>or=10 IU/l before the start of ganirelix/placebo the incidence of LH rises was also significantly lower in ganirelix cycles compared to placebo cycles (2.9 versus 23.4%; P=0.003 for ITT analysis). Premature luteinization (LH rise with concomitant progesterone rise>or=1 ng/ml) was observed in one subject in the ganirelix group and in 17 subjects in the placebo group of which three subjects had a premature spontaneous ovulation. Ongoing pregnancy rates per attempt were 12.6 and 12.0% for the ganirelix and placebo groups respectively. Treatment with ganirelix effectively prevents premature LH rises, luteinization in subjects undergoing stimulated IUI. Low-dose rFSH regimen combined with a Gn

  18. Liposomal bupivacaine decreases pain following retropubic sling placement: a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazloomdoost, Donna; Pauls, Rachel N; Hennen, Erin N; Yeung, Jennifer Y; Smith, Benjamin C; Kleeman, Steven D; Crisp, Catrina C

    2017-07-08

    Midurethral slings are commonly used to treat stress urinary incontinence. Pain control, however, may be a concern. Liposomal bupivacaine is a local anesthetic with slow release over 72 hours, demonstrated to lower pain scores and decrease narcotic use postoperatively. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of liposomal bupivacaine on pain scores and narcotic consumption following retropubic midurethral sling placement. This randomized, placebo-controlled trial enrolled women undergoing retropubic midurethral sling procedures with or without concomitant anterior or urethrocele repair. Subjects were allocated to receive liposomal bupivacaine (intervention) or normal saline placebo injected into the trocar paths and vaginal incision at the conclusion of the procedure. At the time of drug administration, surgeons became unblinded, but did not collect outcome data. Participants remained blinded to treatment. Surgical procedures and perioperative care were standardized. The primary outcome was the visual analog scale pain score 4 hours after discharge home. Secondary outcomes included narcotic consumption, time to first bowel movement, and pain scores collected in the mornings and evenings until postoperative day 6. The morning pain item assessed "current level of pain"; the evening items queried "current level of pain," "most intense pain today," "average pain today with activity," and "average pain today with rest." Likert scales were used to measure satisfaction with pain control at 1- and 2-week postoperative intervals. Sample size calculation deemed 52 subjects per arm necessary to detect a mean difference of 10 mm on a 100-mm visual analog scale. To account for 10% drop out, 114 participants were needed. One hundred fourteen women were enrolled. After 5 exclusions, 109 cases were analyzed: 54 women received intervention, and 55 women received placebo. Mean participant age was 52 years, and mean body mass index was 30.4 kg/m(2). Surgical and

  19. The Agreement between the MMSE and IQCODE Tests in a Community-Based Sample of Subjects Aged 70 Years or Older Receiving In-Home Nursing: An Explorative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øyvind Kirkevold

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: It was the aim of this study to compare the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE with the Informant Questionnaire for Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (IQCODE and to explore the characteristics of subjects with possible dementia with only one of the two tools. Methods: We used a random sample of patients aged 70+ receiving social service or in-home nursing. The patients were tested with the MMSE, and the next of kin was interviewed using the following: the IQCODE, the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD, the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI, instrumental activities of daily living (IADL, personal ADL (PADL and the General Medical Health Rating (GMHR. Results: Subjects with dementia defined only according to the MMSE showed a pattern of scores on IADL, PADL, CSDD, NPI-10 and GMHR similar to the no-dementia group according to both the MMSE and the IQCODE. Those with dementia defined only according to the IQCODE showed a pattern of scores similar to the possible dementia group according to both the MMSE and the IQCODE.

  20. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study to establish the bifidogenic effect of a very-long-chain inulin extracted from globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus) in healthy human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costabile, Adele; Kolida, Sofia; Klinder, Annett; Gietl, Eva; Bäuerlein, Michael; Frohberg, Claus; Landschütze, Volker; Gibson, Glenn R

    2010-10-01

    There is growing interest in the use of inulins as substrates for the selective growth of beneficial gut bacteria such as bifidobacteria and lactobacilli because recent studies have established that their prebiotic effect is linked to several health benefits. In the present study, the impact of a very-long-chain inulin (VLCI), derived from globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus), on the human intestinal microbiota compared with maltodextrin was determined. A double-blind, cross-over study was carried out in thirty-two healthy adults who were randomised into two groups and consumed 10 g/d of either VLCI or maltodextrin, for two 3-week study periods, separated by a 3-week washout period. Numbers of faecal bifidobacteria and lactobacilli were significantly higher upon VLCI ingestion compared with the placebo. Additionally, levels of Atopobium group significantly increased, while Bacteroides-Prevotella numbers were significantly reduced. No significant changes in faecal SCFA concentrations were observed. There were no adverse gastrointestinal symptoms apart from a significant increase in mild and moderate bloating upon VLCI ingestion. These observations were also confirmed by in vitro gas production measurements. In conclusion, daily consumption of VLCI extracted from globe artichoke exerted a pronounced prebiotic effect on the human faecal microbiota composition and was well tolerated by all volunteers.

  1. A Dietary Supplement Containing Cinnamon, Chromium and Carnosine Decreases Fasting Plasma Glucose and Increases Lean Mass in Overweight or Obese Pre-Diabetic Subjects: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial: e0138646

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yuejun Liu; Aurélie Cotillard; Camille Vatier; Jean-Philippe Bastard; Soraya Fellahi; Marie Stévant; Omran Allatif; Clotilde Langlois; Séverine Bieuvelet; Amandine Brochot; Angèle Guilbot; Karine Clément; Salwa W Rizkalla

    2015-01-01

    .... Objectives Our aim was to evaluate the effects of 4-month treatment with a dietary supplement containing cinnamon, chromium and carnosine in moderately obese or overweight pre-diabetic subjects...

  2. Drug efficacy by direct and adjusted indirect comparison to placebo: An illustration by Mycobacterium avium complex prophylaxis in HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freedberg Kenneth A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our goal was to illustrate a method for making indirect treatment comparisons in the absence of head-to-head trials, by portraying the derivation of published efficacies for prophylaxis regimens of HIV-related opportunistic infections. Results We identified published results of randomized controlled trials from the United States in which HIV-infected patients received rifabutin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, or placebo for prophylaxis against Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC. We extracted the number of subjects, follow-up time, primary MAC events, mean CD4 count, and proportion of subjects on mono or dual antiretroviral therapy (ART from each study. We derived the efficacy of each drug using adjusted indirect comparisons and, when possible, by direct comparisons. Five articles satisfied our inclusion criteria. Using direct comparison, we estimated the efficacies of rifabutin, clarithromycin, and azithromycin compared to placebo to be 53% (95% CI, 48-61%, 66% (95% CI, 61-74%, and 66% (95% CI, 60-81%, respectively. Using adjusted indirect calculations, the efficacy of rifabutin compared to placebo ranged from 41% to 44%. The adjusted indirect efficacies of clarithromycin and azithromycin were estimated to be 73% and 72%, respectively. Conclusions Accurate estimates of specific drug dosages as compared to placebo are important for policy and implementation research. This study illustrates a simple method of adjusting for differences in study populations by using indirect comparisons in the absence of head-to-head HIV clinical trials.

  3. Effects of Febuxostat in Early Gout: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbeth, Nicola; Saag, Kenneth G; Palmer, William E; Choi, Hyon K; Hunt, Barbara; MacDonald, Patricia A; Thienel, Ulrich; Gunawardhana, Lhanoo

    2017-12-01

    To assess the effect of treatment with febuxostat versus placebo on joint damage in hyperuricemic subjects with early gout (1 or 2 gout flares). In this double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 314 subjects with hyperuricemia (serum uric acid [UA] level of ≥7.0 mg/dl) and early gout were randomized 1:1 to receive once-daily febuxostat 40 mg (increased to 80 mg if the serum UA level was ≥6.0 mg/dl on day 14) or placebo. The primary efficacy end point was the mean change from baseline to month 24 in the modified Sharp/van der Heijde erosion score for the single affected joint. Additional efficacy end points included change from baseline to month 24 in the Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring (RAMRIS) scores for synovitis, erosion, and edema in the single affected joint, the incidence of gout flares, and serum UA levels. Safety was assessed throughout the study. Treatment with febuxostat did not lead to any notable changes in joint erosion over 2 years. In both treatment groups, the mean change from baseline to month 24 in the modified Sharp/van der Heijde erosion score for the single affected joint was minimal, with no between-group differences. However, treatment with febuxostat significantly improved the RAMRIS synovitis score at month 24 compared with placebo treatment (change from baseline -0.43 versus -0.07; P gout flares (29.3% versus 41.4%; P gout flares in subjects with early gout. © 2017 The Authors. Arthritis & Rheumatology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Rheumatology.

  4. The effect of question wording in questionnaire surveys on placebo use in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babel, Przemyslaw

    2012-12-01

    To identify factors that contribute to the high variability of the rates of use of placebo interventions reported in questionnaire surveys, the author investigated the effect of the explicit use of the word "placebo" in questionnaire surveys on placebo use in clinical practice on the results obtained. 190 primary care physicians in Poland were divided randomly into two groups. The groups received a questionnaire in which either the word placebo or the term "nonspecific methods of treatment" was used. The respondents who were asked explicitly about the use of placebo interventions declared that they never used placebo interventions significantly more often than participants asked about the use of nonspecific treatment methods. Moreover, the former reported significantly rarer use of placebo interventions than the latter. The study demonstrates that differences in the wording of questions in questionnaire surveys on placebo use can create statistically significant differences in results.

  5. Implicit versus explicit associative learning and experimentally induced placebo hypoalgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea L Martin-Pichora

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Andrea L Martin-Pichora1,2, Tsipora D. Mankovsky-Arnold3, Joel Katz11Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Centre for Student Development and Counseling, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, CanadaAbstract: The present study examined whether 1 placebo hypoalgesia can be generated through implicit associative learning (ie, conditioning in the absence of conscious awareness and 2 the magnitude of placebo hypoalgesia changes when expectations about pain are made explicit. The temperature of heat pain stimuli was surreptitiously lowered during conditioning trials for the placebo cream and the magnitude of the placebo effect was assessed during a subsequent set of trials when the temperature was the same for both placebo and control conditions. To assess whether placebo hypoalgesia could be generated from an implicit tactile stimulus, a 2 × 2 design was used with direction of cream application as one factor and verbal information about which cream was being applied as the second factor. A significant placebo effect was observed when participants received verbal information about which cream was being applied but not following implicit conditioning alone. However, 87.5% of those who showed a placebo response as the result of implicit conditioning were able to accurately guess the order of cream application during the final trial, despite a lack of awareness about the sensory manipulation and low confidence in their ratings, suggesting implicit learning in some participants. In summary, implicit associative learning was evident in some participants but it was not sufficient to produce a placebo effect suggesting some level of explicit expectation or cognitive mediation may be necessary. Notably, the placebo response was abolished when expectations were made explicit, suggesting a delicate interplay between attention and expectation.Keywords: placebo hypoalgesia

  6. Blueberries improve endothelial function, but not blood pressure, in adults with metabolic syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, April J; Cash, Katherine C; Champagne, Catherine M; Gupta, Alok K; Boston, Raymond; Beyl, Robbie A; Johnson, William D; Cefalu, William T

    2015-05-27

    Blueberry consumption has been shown to have various health benefits in humans. However, little is known about the effect of blueberry consumption on blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity in humans. The present study investigated the role of blueberry consumption on modifying blood pressure in subjects with metabolic syndrome. In addition, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity (secondary measurements) were also assessed. A double-blind and placebo-controlled study was conducted in 44 adults (blueberry, n = 23; and placebo, n = 21). They were randomized to receive a blueberry or placebo smoothie twice daily for six weeks. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity were assessed pre- and post-intervention. The blood pressure and insulin sensitivity did not differ between the blueberry and placebo groups. However, the mean change in resting endothelial function, expressed as reactive hyperemia index (RHI), was improved significantly more in the group consuming the blueberries versus the placebo group (p = 0.024). Even after adjusting for confounding factors, i.e., the percent body fat and gender, the blueberry group still had a greater improvement in endothelial function when compared to their counterpart (RHI; 0.32 ± 0.13 versus -0.33 ± 0.14; p = 0.0023). In conclusion, daily dietary consumption of blueberries did not improve blood pressure, but improved (i.e., increased) endothelial function over six weeks in subjects with metabolic syndrome.

  7. Blueberries Improve Endothelial Function, but Not Blood Pressure, in Adults with Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April J. Stull

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Blueberry consumption has been shown to have various health benefits in humans. However, little is known about the effect of blueberry consumption on blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity in humans. The present study investigated the role of blueberry consumption on modifying blood pressure in subjects with metabolic syndrome. In addition, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity (secondary measurements were also assessed. A double-blind and placebo-controlled study was conducted in 44 adults (blueberry, n = 23; and placebo, n = 21. They were randomized to receive a blueberry or placebo smoothie twice daily for six weeks. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity were assessed pre- and post-intervention. The blood pressure and insulin sensitivity did not differ between the blueberry and placebo groups. However, the mean change in resting endothelial function, expressed as reactive hyperemia index (RHI, was improved significantly more in the group consuming the blueberries versus the placebo group (p = 0.024. Even after adjusting for confounding factors, i.e., the percent body fat and gender, the blueberry group still had a greater improvement in endothelial function when compared to their counterpart (RHI; 0.32 ± 0.13 versus −0.33 ± 0.14; p = 0.0023. In conclusion, daily dietary consumption of blueberries did not improve blood pressure, but improved (i.e., increased endothelial function over six weeks in subjects with metabolic syndrome.

  8. Ulipristal acetate versus placebo for fibroid treatment before surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnez, Jacques; Tatarchuk, Tetyana F; Bouchard, Philippe; Puscasiu, Lucian; Zakharenko, Nataliya F; Ivanova, Tatiana; Ugocsai, Gyula; Mara, Michal; Jilla, Manju P; Bestel, Elke; Terrill, Paul; Osterloh, Ian; Loumaye, Ernest

    2012-02-02

    The efficacy and safety of oral ulipristal acetate for the treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids before surgery are uncertain. We randomly assigned women with symptomatic fibroids, excessive uterine bleeding (a score of >100 on the pictorial blood-loss assessment chart [PBAC, an objective assessment of blood loss, in which monthly scores range from 0 to >500, with higher numbers indicating more bleeding]) and anemia (hemoglobin level of ≤10.2 g per deciliter) to receive treatment for up to 13 weeks with oral ulipristal acetate at a dose of 5 mg per day (96 women) or 10 mg per day (98 women) or to receive placebo (48 women). All patients received iron supplementation. The coprimary efficacy end points were control of uterine bleeding (PBAC score of ulipristal acetate, 92% of those receiving 10 mg of ulipristal acetate, and 19% of those receiving placebo (Pulipristal acetate with placebo). The rates of amenorrhea were 73%, 82%, and 6%, respectively, with amenorrhea occurring within 10 days in the majority of patients receiving ulipristal acetate. The median changes in total fibroid volume were -21%, -12%, and +3% (P=0.002 for the comparison of 5 mg of ulipristal acetate with placebo, and P=0.006 for the comparison of 10 mg of ulipristal acetate with placebo). Ulipristal acetate induced benign histologic endometrial changes that had resolved by 6 months after the end of therapy. Serious adverse events occurred in one patient during treatment with 10 mg of ulipristal acetate (uterine hemorrhage) and in one patient during receipt of placebo (fibroid protruding through the cervix). Headache and breast tenderness were the most common adverse events associated with ulipristal acetate but did not occur significantly more frequently than with placebo. Treatment with ulipristal acetate for 13 weeks effectively controlled excessive bleeding due to uterine fibroids and reduced the size of the fibroids. (Funded by PregLem; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00755755.).

  9. [Theophylline in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu-min; Wang, Xiao-ping; Zeng, Xiang-yi; Qiu, Rong; Xie, Jun-fen; Liu, Sheng-ming; Zheng, Jin-ping; Zhong, Nan-shan; Ran, Pi-xin

    2006-09-01

    To observe the benefits and safety of low-dose, slow-release oral theophylline for long-term treatment of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This was a randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Slow-release theophylline (200 mg/d) twice daily or placebo (matching theophylline) was randomly given to 110 patients with stable COPD in the rural area of Shaoguan, Guangdong Province, for one year. Efficacy measures were spirometry and exacerbations, quality of life, dyspnea scores, satisfaction with treatments and adverse effects. Comparison of benefits was performed using superiority test. Of 110 patients, 85 (42 subjects in theophylline group and 43 subjects in placebo group) completed the study. An analysis for intention-to-treat (ITT) individuals showed that individuals with the treatment of theophylline experienced statistically fewer numbers [(0.8 +/- 1.2) times/year, (1.7 +/- 2.6) times/year, Z = -1.674, P = 0.047] and days of exacerbations [(4.6 +/- 7.9) d, (12.5 +/- 22.8) d, Z = -1.699, P = 0.045] in comparison to subjects receiving placebo, that patients receiving theophylline were less likely than the placebo group to experience moderate exacerbations [(0.4 +/- 1.0) times/year, (1.0 +/- 1.8) times/year, Z = -2.136, P = 0.017], and that more individuals satisfied with treatments in the theophylline group than the placebo group (n = 16, 3, Z = -2.198, P = 0.014), and that statistically greater improvement in pre-bronchodilators FEV(1) [(0.006 +/- 0.180) L, (-0.053 +/- 0.169) L, t = 1.789, P = 0.038] were found in the theophylline group in comparison to the placebo group. The similar results were observed in an analysis for per-protocol (PP) subjects. Statistical improvement on quality of life was observed in the PP subjects of theophylline group than in placebo group (-28 +/- 20, -20 +/- 23, F = 2.893, P = 0.047). Time to the first exacerbation in patients receiving theophylline was also delayed in comparison to

  10. A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of Atomoxetine in Young Children With ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Brigette S.; Stoner, Julie A.; Daughton, Joan M.; Lubberstedt, Brian D.; Murray, Desiree W.; Chrisman, Allan K.; Faircloth, Melissa A.; Itchon-Ramos, Nilda B.; Kollins, Scott H.; Maayan, Lawrence A.; Greenhill, Laurence L.; Kotler, Lisa A.; Fried, Jane; March, John S.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of atomoxetine for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in 5- and 6-year-old children. METHODS: This was an 8-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial of atomoxetine in 101 children with ADHD. Atomoxetine or placebo was flexibly titrated to a maximum dose of 1.8 mg/kg per day. The pharmacotherapist reviewed psychoeducational material on ADHD and behavioral-management strategies with parents during each study visit. RESULTS: Significant mean decreases in parent (P = .009) and teacher (P = .02) ADHD–IV Rating Scale scores were demonstrated with atomoxetine compared with placebo. A total of 40% of children treated with atomoxetine met response criteria (Clinical Global Impression–Improvement Scale indicating much or very much improved) compared with 22% of children on placebo, which was not significant (P = .1). Decreased appetite, gastrointestinal upset, and sedation were significantly more common with atomoxetine than placebo. Although some children demonstrated a robust response to atomoxetine, for others the response was more attenuated. Sixty-two percent of subjects who received atomoxetine were moderately, markedly, or severely ill according to the Clinical Global Impression–Severity Scale at study completion. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this is the first randomized controlled trial of atomoxetine in children as young as 5 years. Atomoxetine generally was well tolerated and reduced core ADHD symptoms in the children on the basis of parent and teacher reports. Reductions in the ADHD-IV Rating Scale scores, however, did not necessarily translate to overall clinical and functional improvement, as demonstrated on the Clinical Global Impression–Severity Scale and the Clinical Global Impression–Improvement Scale. Despite benefits, the children in the atomoxetine group remained, on average, significantly impaired at the end of the study. PMID:21422081

  11. Dexmedetomidine Reduces Shivering during Mild Hypothermia in Waking Subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clifton W Callaway

    Full Text Available Reducing body temperature can prolong tolerance to ischemic injury such as stroke or myocardial infarction, but is difficult and uncomfortable in awake patients because of shivering. We tested the efficacy and safety of the alpha-2-adrenergic agonist dexmedetomidine for suppressing shivering induced by a rapid infusion of cold intravenous fluids.Ten subjects received a rapid intravenous infusion of two liters of cold (4°C isotonic saline on two separate test days, and we measured their core body temperature, shivering, hemodynamics and sedation for two hours. On one test day, fluid infusion was preceded by placebo infusion. On the other test day, fluid infusion was preceded by 1.0 μg/kg bolus of dexmedetomidine over 10 minutes.All ten subjects experienced shivering on placebo days, with shivering beginning at a mean (SD temperature of 36.6 (0.3°C. The mean lowest temperature after placebo was 36.0 (0.3°C (range 35.7-36.5°C. Only 3/10 subjects shivered on dexmedetomidine days, and the mean lowest temperature was 35.7 (0.4°C (range 35.0-36.3°C. Temperature remained below 36°C for the full two hours in 6/10 subjects. After dexmedetomidine, subjects had moderate sedation and a mean 26 (13 mmHg reduction in blood pressure that resolved within 90 minutes. Heart rate declined a mean 23 (11 bpm after both placebo and dexmedetomidine. Dexmedetomidine produced no respiratory depression.Dexmedetomidine decreases shivering in normal volunteers. This effect is associated with decreased systolic blood pressure and sedation, but no respiratory depression.

  12. Placebo and Nocebo Effects in Sexual Medicine: An Experimental Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Tillmann H C; Grob, Carolin; de Boer, Claas; Peschel, Thomas; Hartmann, Uwe; Tenbergen, Gilian; Schedlowski, Manfred

    2016-11-16

    Few studies have investigated placebo and nocebo effects in a human sexuality context. Studying placebo and nocebo responses in this context may provide insight into their potential to modulate sexual drive and function. To examine such effects in sexual medicine, 48 healthy, male heterosexual participants were divided into four groups. Each group received instruction to expect stimulating effects, no effect, or an inhibitory effect on sexual functions. Only one group received the dopamine agonist cabergoline; all other groups received placebo or nocebo. Modulations in sexual experience were examined through an established experimental paradigm of sexual arousal and masturbation-induced orgasm during erotic film sequences with instruction to induce placebo or nocebo effects. Endocrine data, appetitive, consummatory, and refractory sexual behavior parameters were assessed using the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX) and the Acute Sexual Experience Scale (ASES). Results showed increased levels of sexual function after administration of cabergoline with significant effects for several parameters. Placebo effects were induced only to a small degree. No negative effects on sexual parameters in the nocebo condition were noted. This paradigm could induce only small placebo and nocebo effects. This supports the view that healthy male sexual function seems relatively resistant to negative external influences.

  13. Lemborexant, A Dual Orexin Receptor Antagonist (DORA) for the Treatment of Insomnia Disorder: Results From a Bayesian, Adaptive, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Patricia; Moline, Margaret; Mayleben, David; Rosenberg, Russell; Zammit, Gary; Pinner, Kate; Dhadda, Shobha; Hong, Quan; Giorgi, Luigi; Satlin, Andrew

    2017-11-15

    To identify dose(s) of lemborexant that maximize insomnia treatment efficacy while minimizing next-morning residual sleepiness and evaluate lemborexant effects on polysomnography (PSG) measures (sleep efficiency [SE], latency to persistent sleep [LPS], and wake after sleep onset [WASO]) at the beginning and end of treatment. Adults and elderly subjects with insomnia disorder per the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition were enrolled in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, Bayesian, adaptive, parallel-group study, receiving lemborexant (1, 2.5, 5, 10, 15, 25 mg) or placebo for 15 nights. Efficacy assessments included a utility function that combined efficacy (SE) and safety (residual morning sleepiness as measured by Karolinska Sleepiness Scale [KSS]), PSG measures, and sleep diary. Safety assessments included KSS, Digit Symbol Substitution Test, computerized reaction time tests, and adverse events (AEs). A total of 616 subjects were screened; 291 were randomized. Baseline characteristics were similar between lemborexant groups and placebo (∼63% female, median age: 49.0 years). The study was stopped for early success after the fifth interim analysis when the 15-mg dose met utility index/KSS criteria for success; 3 other doses also met the criteria. Compared with placebo, subjects showed significant improvements in SE, subjective SE, LPS, and subjective sleep onset latency at the beginning and end of treatment for lemborexant doses ≥ 5 mg ( P 1 mg. AEs, mostly mild to moderate, included dose-related somnolence. Lemborexant doses ranging from 2.5-10 mg provided efficacy for the treatment of insomnia while minimizing next-morning residual sleepiness. Title: A Multicenter, Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled, Parallel-group, Bayesian Adaptive Randomization Design, Dose Response Study of the Efficacy of E2006 in Adults and Elderly Subjects With Chronic Insomnia; URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show

  14. The effect of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibition on gastric volume, satiation and enteroendocrine secretion in Type 2 diabetes: a double blind, placebo-controlled crossover study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vella, Adrian; Bock, Gerlies; Giesler, Paula D

    2008-01-01

    with type 2 diabetes. Methods: In a double blind, placebo-controlled crossover design, 14 subjects with type 2 diabetes received vildagliptin (50mg bid) or placebo for 10-days in random order separated by a 2-week washout. On day 7, fasting and post-meal gastric volumes were measured by a (99m...... ingested was recorded and symptoms similarly measured using VAS. Results: Vildagliptin raised plasma GLP-1 concentrations. However, fasting (248 + 21 vs. 247 + 19ml, p= 0.98) and fed (746 + 28 vs. 772 + 26ml, p= 0.54) gastric volumes, did not differ when subjects received vildagliptin or placebo. Treatment...... with vildagliptin did not alter the maximum tolerated volume of Ensure((R)) (1657 + 308 vs. 1389 + 197 ml, p= 0.15) or water compared to placebo (1371 + 141 vs. 1172 + 156 ml, p= 0.23). Vildagliptin was associated with decreased PYY concentrations 60 minutes after initiation of the meal (166 +/- 27 vs. 229 +/- 34...

  15. The Effects of High-Frequency Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation for Dental Professionals with Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders: A Single-Blind Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Rim Suh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Work-related musculoskeletal symptom disorders (WMSDs have a significant issue for dental professionals. This study investigated the effects of high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS on work-related pain, fatigue, and the active range of motion in dental professionals. Among recruited 47 dental professionals with WMSDs, 24 subjects received high-frequency TENS (the TENS group, while 23 subjects received placebo stimulation (the placebo group. TENS was applied to the muscle trigger points of the levator scapulae and upper trapezius, while placebo-TENS was administered without electrical stimulation during 60 min. Pain and fatigue at rest and during movement were assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS, pain pressure threshold (PPT, and active range of motion (AROM of horizontal head rotation at six time points: prelabor, postlabor, post-TENS, and at 1 h, 3 h, and 1 day after TENS application. Both groups showed significantly increased pain and fatigue and decreased PPT and AROM after completing a work task. The TENS group showed significantly greater improvements in VAS score, fatigue, PPT, and AROM at post-TENS and at 1 h and 3 h after application (all P < 0.05 as compared to the placebo group. A single session high-frequency TENS may immediately reduce symptoms related to WMSDs in dental professionals.

  16. Tinnitus control by dopamine agonist pramipexole in presbycusis patients: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sziklai, István; Szilvássy, Judit; Szilvássy, Zoltán

    2011-04-01

    Since the concept of tinnitus dopaminergic pathway emerged, studies have been proposed to investigate if dopaminergic agents influence tinnitus. We hypothesized that pramipexole, an agonist on D2/D3 receptors, may antagonize tinnitus in the presbycusis patients (in the frequency range of 250 to 8,000 Hz) in a dose schedule accepted for the treatment of Parkinson's disease in elderly people. We designed a randomized, prospective, placebo-controlled and double-blind trial. Forty presbycusis patients aged 50 years or older with subjective tinnitus were randomized to two groups (20 patients in both). Patients in the drug group took pramipexole over a period of 4 weeks according to a treatment schedule as follows: week 1, 0.088 mg t.i.d.; week 2, 0.18 mg t.i.d.; week 3, 0.7 mg t.i.d.; week 4, 0.18 mg t.i.d. over 3 days and 0.088 mg t.i.d. the rest of the week. Patients in the second group received placebo. Determination of subjective grading of tinnitus perception, the tinnitus handicap inventory (THI) questionnaire and electrocochleography (ECOG) examinations served as the end points. Subjective audiometry was used to produce secondary data. A significant improvement in tinnitus annoyance is found in the group treated with pramipexole versus placebo with respect to inhibition of tinnitus and a decrease of tinnitus loudness greater than 30 dB. However, neither ECOG nor subjective pure-tone threshold audiometry revealed any change in hearing threshold in response to either pramipexole or placebo. Pramipexole is an effective agent against subjective tinnitus associated with presbycusis at a dose schedule used for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. The drug did not change hearing threshold. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. Increasing work-place healthiness with the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri: A randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stan Vlaicu

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Short term illnesses, usually caused by respiratory or gastrointestinal diseases are disruptive to productivity and there is relatively little focus on preventative measures. This study examined the effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri protectis (ATCC55730 on its ability to improve work-place healthiness by reducing short term sick-leave caused by respiratory or gastrointestinal infections. Methods 262 employees at TetraPak in Sweden (day-workers and three-shift-workers that were healthy at study start were randomised in a double-blind fashion to receive either a daily dose of 108 Colony Forming Units of L. reuteri or placebo for 80 days. The study products were administered with a drinking straw. 181 subjects complied with the study protocol, 94 were randomised to receive L. reuteri and 87 received placebo. Results In the placebo group 26.4% reported sick-leave for the defined causes during the study as compared with 10.6% in the L. reuteri group (p L. reuteri group (p L. reuteri group(p

  18. A randomised, placebo-controlled trial of dutasteride in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rhodes, Lindsay E; Kokkinis, Angela D; White, Michelle J; Watts, Charlotte A; Auh, Sungyoung; Jeffries, Neal O; Shrader, Joseph A; Lehky, Tanya J; Li, Li; Ryder, Jennifer E; Levy, Ellen W; Solomon, Beth I; Harris-Love, Michael O; La Pean, Alison; Schindler, Alice B; Chen, CheunJu; Di Prospero, Nicholas A; Fischbeck, Kenneth H

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is caused by polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor, which results in ligand-dependent toxicity. Animal models have a neuromuscular deficit that is mitigated by androgen-reducing treatment. Methods We explored the efficacy and safety of the 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor, dutasteride, in a single-site, two-year, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Physical, neurophysiological, quality of life, and biochemical outcomes were assessed in 50 ambulatory, symptomatic, genetically confirmed, male SBMA subjects randomised to receive dutasteride or placebo (25 in each group). Findings At 24 months, the placebo group showed a decrease of 5% (−0.30 kg/kg) in the primary outcome measure, change in weight-scaled muscle strength as indicated by quantitative muscle assessment (QMA), and the dutasteride group showed an increase in strength of 1% (+0.14 kg/kg); the difference between the groups (6%; CI 18%, −6%) was not significant. Secondary measures of creatine kinase, muscle strength and function, motor and sensory nerve conduction, activities of daily living, and erectile function did not show a significant difference between the study groups in change from baseline. However, quality of life as measured by the SF-36v2 physical component summary favored dutasteride, while the mental component summary favored placebo. The dutasteride group had fewer falls; there were no other significant differences in reported adverse events. Interpretation This study did not show a significant effect of dutasteride on the progression of muscle weakness in SBMA, although there were secondary indications of benefit. A longer trial duration or larger number of subjects may be needed to show an effect on the disease progression. Performance testing, QMA, and quality of life measures were identified as potentially useful endpoints for future therapeutic trials. Funding National Institutes of Health PMID:21216197

  19. A Placebo-Controlled Trial of Riboflavin for Enhancement of Ultramarathon Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Martin D; Valentino, Taylor R; Stuempfle, Kristin J; Hassid, Brandon V

    2017-12-01

    Riboflavin is known to protect tissue from oxidative damage but, to our knowledge, has not been explored as a means to control exercise-related muscle soreness. This study investigated whether acute ingestion of riboflavin reduces muscle pain and soreness during and after completion of a 161-km ultramarathon and improves functional recovery after the event. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, participants of the 2016 161-km Western States Endurance Run were assigned to receive a riboflavin or placebo capsule shortly before the race start and when reaching 90 km. Capsules contained either 100 mg of riboflavin or 95 mg of maltodextrin and 5 mg of 10% ß-carotene. Subjects provided muscle pain and soreness ratings before, during, and immediately after the race and for the 10 subsequent days. Subjects also completed 400-m runs at maximum speed on days 3, 5, and 10 after the race. For the 32 (18 in the riboflavin group, 14 in the placebo group) race finishers completing the study, muscle pain and soreness ratings during and immediately after the race were found to be significantly lower (p = .043) for the riboflavin group. Analysis of the 400-m run times also showed significantly faster (p < .05) times for the riboflavin group than the placebo group at post-race days 3 and 5. Both groups showed that muscle pain and soreness had returned to pre-race levels by 5 days after the race and that 400-m run times had returned to pre-race performance levels by 10 days after the race. This preliminary work suggests that riboflavin supplementation before and during prolonged running might reduce muscle pain and soreness during and at the completion of the exercise and may enhance early functional recovery after the exercise.

  20. The Effect of Low-Dose Marine n-3 Fatty Acids on Plasma Levels of sCD36 in Overweight Subjects: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Berg Schmidt

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available CD36 is a scavenger receptor involved in lipid uptake and inflammation. Recently, non-cell-bound CD36 (sCD36 was identified in plasma and suggested to be a marker of lipid accumulation in the vessel wall. Marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA may have cardioprotective effects. This study evaluated the effect of marine n-3 PUFA on sCD36 levels in overweight subjects. Fifty overweight subjects were randomized to 1.1 g of n-3 PUFA or 2 g of olive oil daily for six weeks. Neutrophils were isolated at baseline and after six weeks of treatment while an adipose tissue biopsy was obtained at baseline. The content of n-3 PUFA in adipose tissue and neutrophils was analyzed by gas chromatography, while plasma levels of sCD36 were determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. After six weeks of supplement plasma sCD36 did not differ between supplements (P = 0.18. There was no significant correlation between plasma sCD36 levels and n-3 PUFA in neutrophils at baseline (r = −0.02, P = 0.88, after six weeks supplement (r = −0.03, P = 0.85 or in adipose tissue (r = 0.14, P = 0.34. This study therefore does not provide evidence for a cardioprotective effect of n-3 PUFA acting through a CD36-dependent mechanism.

  1. Semiotics and the placebo effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Franklin G; Colloca, Luana

    2010-01-01

    Despite substantial progress in elucidating its neurobiological mechanisms, theoretical understanding of the placebo effect is poorly developed. Application of the semiotic theory developed by the American philosopher Charles Peirce offers a promising account of placebo effects as involving the apprehension and response to signs. The semiotic approach dovetails with the various psychological mechanisms invoked to account for placebo effects, such as conditioning and expectation, and bridges the biological and cultural dimensions of this fascinating phenomenon.

  2. Modafinil, d-amphetamine and placebo during 64 hours of sustained mental work. I. Effects on mood, fatigue, cognitive performance and body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigeau; Naitoh; Buguet; McCann; Baranski; Taylor; Thompson; MacK

    1995-12-01

    Modafinil is an alerting substance that is considered safer than amphetamine with fewer side effects. Although modafinil has been used successfully to treat narcolepsy, relatively little is known about its ability to ameliorate fatigue and declines in mental performance due to sleep deprivation (SD) in a normal population. Forty-one military subjects received either 300 mg of modafinil, 20 mg of d-amphetamine, or placebo on 3 separate occasions during 64 hours of continuous cognitive work and sleep loss. Three drug treatments were given: at 23.30 hours and 05.30 hours during the first and second SD nights, respectively, and once at 15.30 hours during the third day of continuous work. Subjective estimates of mood, fatigue and sleepiness, as well as objective measures of reaction time, logical reasoning and short-term memory clearly showed better performance with both modafinil and amphetamine relative to placebo. Both modafinil and amphetamine maintained or increased body temperature compared to the natural circadian cycle observed in the placebo group. Also, from subject debriefs at the end of the study, modafinil elicited fewer side-effects than amphetamine, although more than the placebo group. Modafinil appears to be a good alternative to amphetamine for counteracting the debilitating mood and cognitive effects of sleep loss during sustained operations.

  3. Organ-specificity of placebo effects on blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Karin; Ziep, Dagmar

    2011-10-28

    There is increasing evidence that verbal suggestions accompanying placebo interventions can alter autonomic functions. The underlying mechanisms of these changes are not well understood. However, previous studies point at the specificity of such effects. The aim of the experiment was to lower blood pressure by a placebo intervention and to investigate the specificity of autonomic changes. Forty-five healthy participants received a single administration of an active drug (a homeopathic remedy), an identically-looking placebo drug, or no drug. Active drugs and placebo drugs were administered in a double-blind design and were accompanied by verbal suggestions of a blood-pressure lowering effect. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure, the electrocardiogram, electrodermal activity, and the electrogastrogram were recorded during 30min before and after the intervention, and changes in situational anxiety were assessed. Results indicated a decrease of systolic blood pressure in the placebo group, as compared to the control group. Diastolic blood pressure levels, heart rate, respiratory sinus arrhythmia, skin conductance, gastric slow-wave frequency and situational anxiety did not change differentially between groups. In conclusion, the reduction in systolic blood pressure following the placebo intervention could not be attributed to stress relief or anxiety reduction. Rather, results suggest that the placebo intervention specifically reduced systolic blood pressure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Better than sham? A double-blind placebo-controlled neurofeedback study in primary insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabus, Manuel; Griessenberger, Hermann; Gnjezda, Maria-Teresa; Heib, Dominik P J; Wislowska, Malgorzata; Hoedlmoser, Kerstin

    2017-04-01

    See Thibault et al. (doi:10.1093/awx033) for a scientific commentary on this article.Neurofeedback training builds upon the simple concept of instrumental conditioning, i.e. behaviour that is rewarded is more likely to reoccur, an effect Thorndike referred to as the 'law of effect'. In the case of neurofeedback, information about specific electroencephalographic activity is fed back to the participant who is rewarded whenever the desired electroencephalography pattern is generated. If some kind of hyperarousal needs to be addressed, the neurofeedback community considers sensorimotor rhythm neurofeedback as the gold standard. Earlier treatment approaches using sensorimotor-rhythm neurofeedback indicated that training to increase 12-15 Hz sensorimotor rhythm over the sensorimotor cortex during wakefulness could reduce attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and epilepsy symptoms and even improve sleep quality by enhancing sleep spindle activity (lying in the same frequency range). In the present study we sought to critically test whether earlier findings on the positive effect of sensorimotor rhythm neurofeedback on sleep quality and memory could also be replicated in a double-blind placebo-controlled study on 25 patients with insomnia. Patients spent nine polysomnography nights and 12 sessions of neurofeedback and 12 sessions of placebo-feedback training (sham) in our laboratory. Crucially, we found both neurofeedback and placebo feedback to be equally effective as reflected in subjective measures of sleep complaints suggesting that the observed improvements were due to unspecific factors such as experiencing trust and receiving care and empathy from experimenters. In addition, these improvements were not reflected in objective electroencephalographic-derived measures of sleep quality. Furthermore, objective electroencephalographic measures that potentially reflected mechanisms underlying the efficacy of neurofeedback such as spectral electroencephalographic

  5. Lack of efficacy of dextromethorphan in managing alcohol withdrawal: a preliminary report of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Chyi; Chen, Chun-Hsin; Pan, Chun-Hung; Lin, Shih-Ku

    2014-02-01

    Alcohol withdrawal syndrome is associated with increased central N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate transmission. Medications that reduce glutamate release or block NMDA overactivation have shown efficacy for treating alcohol withdrawal syndrome. Dextromethorphan (DXM), a widely used antitussive drug, is a low-affinity, noncompetitive NMDA antagonist with potential neuroprotective properties. This study, using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study design, examined the benefit of DXM in the management of acute alcohol withdrawal. Alcohol-dependent patients admitted for detoxification treatment and experiencing moderate alcohol withdrawal, as measured by a score greater than 10 on the revised Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment for Alcohol (CIWA-Ar), were randomly assigned to receive either DXM 360 mg/d or an identical placebo for 7 days in a double-blind manner. All subjects received a concurrent dose of lorazepam 2 mg along with the initial administration of DXM or placebo and were given additional lorazepam (1 mg) as a rescue medication according to the symptom-triggered detoxification protocol. Outcome measures consisted of the mean total dose of lorazepam received, the sequential scores on the CIWA-Ar, and craving assessed by the Obsessive-Compulsive Drinking Scale. Forty subjects completed the study, 18 in the DXM group and 22 in the placebo group. We found that compared with placebo, DXM use was not associated with lower lorazepam doses to control alcohol withdrawal symptoms. The progression in CIWA-Ar and Obsessive-Compulsive Drinking Scale scores was also comparable between the 2 groups. Our preliminary results do not support the efficacy of high-dose DXM in reducing the need of benzodiazepines to treat withdrawal symptoms in alcohol-dependent patients.

  6. Experimental cardiac arrest treatment with adrenaline, vasopressin, or placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palácio, Manoel Ângelo Gomes; Paiva, Edison Ferreira de; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes de; Timerman, Ari

    2013-12-01

    The effect of vasoconstrictors in prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has not been fully clarified. To evaluate adrenaline and vasopressin pressure effect, and observe the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). A prospective, randomized, blinded, and placebo-controlled study. After seven minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation, pigs received two minutes cycles of CPR. Defibrillation was attempted (4 J/kg) once at 9 minutes, and after every cycle if a shockable rhythm was present, after what CPR was immediately resumed. At 9 minutes and every five minutes intervals, 0.02 mg/kg (n = 12 pigs) adrenaline, or 0.4 U/kg (n = 12) vasopressin, or 0.2 mL/kg (n = 8) 0.9% saline solution was administered. CPR continued for 30 minutes or until the ROSC. Coronary perfusion pressure increased to about 20 mmHg in the three groups. Following vasoconstrictors doses, pressure level reached 35 mmHg versus 15 mmHg with placebo (p adrenaline or placebo. ROSC rate differed (p = 0.031) among adrenaline (10/12), vasopressin (6/12), and placebo (2/8). Time-to-ROSC did not differ (16 minutes), nor the number of doses previously received (one or two). There was no difference between vasoconstrictors, but against placebo, only adrenaline significantly increased the ROSC rate (p = 0.019). The vasoconstrictors initial pressure effect was equivalent and vasopressin maintained a late effect at prolonged resuscitation. Nevertheless, when compared with placebo, only adrenaline significantly increased the ROSC rate.

  7. Comparison of steady-state plasma concentrations of armodafinil and modafinil late in the day following morning administration: post hoc analysis of two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple-dose studies in healthy male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Mona; Kirby, Mary; Hellriegel, Edward T

    2009-01-01

    Armodafinil, the R- and longer-lasting isomer of modafinil, may maintain higher plasma drug concentrations compared with racemic modafinil because of stereospecific differences in elimination of its isomers. This analysis set out to compare the steady-state pharmacokinetic profiles of armodafinil and modafinil on a milligram-to-milligram basis following once-daily administration. A post hoc analysis of two multiple-dose pharmacokinetic studies in healthy male subjects aged 18-50 years was conducted to compare dose-normalized (200 mg/day) plasma drug concentration and pharmacokinetic data for subjects in each study who completed 7 days of once-daily (morning) administration of armodafinil (n = 34) or modafinil (n = 18). Dose-normalized plasma concentrations of armodafinil on day 7 were higher than those of modafinil, with the greatest differences being observed later in the day. Across the 24-hour dose interval, plasma drug concentration fluctuation and swing were 28% and 42% less, respectively, with armodafinil than with modafinil. In addition, average late-day (3 pm to 7 pm after an 8 am dosing) plasma drug concentrations and partial values for the area under the plasma concentration versus time curve for 7-11 hours after dosing were both 44% higher with armodafinil. At steady state, armodafinil produces consistently higher plasma drug concentrations late in the day than modafinil when compared on a milligram-to-milligram basis. The distinct pharmacokinetic profile of armodafinil compared with that of the racemate may result in fundamentally different durations of action. These differences between the two medications cannot be made equivalent by increasing the dose of the racemate without introducing potential safety concerns.

  8. Evaluation of a Crataegus-Based Multiherb Formula for Dyslipidemia: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Weiwei; Tomlinson, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Background. We for the first time examined the effects of a multiherb formula containing Crataegus pinnatifida (1 g daily), Alisma orientalis, Stigma maydis, Ganoderma lucidum, Polygonum multiflorum, and Morus alba on plasma lipid and glucose levels in Chinese patients with dyslipidemia. Methods. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 42 patients were randomized at a ratio of 1 : 1 to receive the herbal formula or placebo for 12 weeks and 40 patients completed the study. Lipid profiles, glucose, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), and laboratory safety parameters were performed before and after treatment. Results. The difference in the changes in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels between placebo and active treatment (−9%) was significantly (P < 0.05) better with active treatment. HbA1c levels significantly decreased by −3.9% in the active treatment group, but the change was not significantly different from that with placebo (−1.1%) (P = 0.098). There were no apparent adverse effects or changes in laboratory safety parameters with either treatment. Conclusions. The multiherb formula had mild beneficial effects on plasma LDL-C after 12-weeks treatment in subjects with dyslipidemia without any noticeable adverse effects. PMID:24834096

  9. Evaluation of a Crataegus-Based Multiherb Formula for Dyslipidemia: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We for the first time examined the effects of a multiherb formula containing Crataegus pinnatifida (1 g daily, Alisma orientalis, Stigma maydis, Ganoderma lucidum, Polygonum multiflorum, and Morus alba on plasma lipid and glucose levels in Chinese patients with dyslipidemia. Methods. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 42 patients were randomized at a ratio of 1 : 1 to receive the herbal formula or placebo for 12 weeks and 40 patients completed the study. Lipid profiles, glucose, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c, and laboratory safety parameters were performed before and after treatment. Results. The difference in the changes in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C levels between placebo and active treatment (−9% was significantly (P<0.05 better with active treatment. HbA1c levels significantly decreased by −3.9% in the active treatment group, but the change was not significantly different from that with placebo (−1.1% (P=0.098. There were no apparent adverse effects or changes in laboratory safety parameters with either treatment. Conclusions. The multiherb formula had mild beneficial effects on plasma LDL-C after 12-weeks treatment in subjects with dyslipidemia without any noticeable adverse effects.

  10. THE USE OF SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE IN ACCELERATING SYMPTOM RELIEF IN ASTHMATIC AND HOUSE DUST MITE ALLERGIC CHILDREN RECEIVING HOUSE DUST MITE IMMUNOTHERAPY: DOUBLE BLIND RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anang Endaryanto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of superoxide dismutase (SOD in lung function (FEV1 reversibility and respiratory symptoms (drug scores, symptoms scores in asthmatic and house dust mite allergic children receiving house dust mites immunotherapy. Methods: Forty subjects aged 6–17 years old with asthma, tested positive for house dust mite allergy on skin prick test, and received immunotherapy were enrolled in this study. All subjects completed clinical based assessments and diary-based assessments for drug and symptom scores. Following a four-week baseline assessment, all subjects were randomized to receive SOD or placebo. Respiratory symptoms (drug and symptoms score and FEV1 were evaluated at the end of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th weeks after randomization. Drug score, symptoms score, and FEV1 reversibility test results were analyzed using a Paired t test and repeated measure of ANOVA. Results: There was a significant difference in drug scores, symptoms score, and FEV1 reversibility test outcomes between SOD and placebo. SOD group showed a significant decrease in all outcome measures compared to those in placebo group. Conclusions: The use of SOD as antioxidants is effective in accelerating symptom relief for children with asthma and house dust mite allergy receiving house dust mite immunotherapy.

  11. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of fluoride varnish in preventing dental caries of Sjogrens syndrome patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weini Xin; Katherine Chiu Man Leung; Edward Chin Man Lo; Mo Yin Mok; Moon Ho Leung

    2016-01-01

    .... Topical fluoride is commonly prescribed for caries prevention. Methods In this 24-month randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, SS patients were randomly assigned to receive either fluoride varnish or placebo gel quarterly...

  12. Radiochromium (chromium-51) evaluation of gastrointestinal blood loss associated with placebo, aspirin, and nabumetone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lussier, A.; LeBel, E.

    1987-10-30

    Gastrointestinal blood loss is one of the most serious clinical events induced by drugs. To date, almost no nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug has been shown to be devoid of that side effect in a strictly controlled study. The objective of this study was to assess quantitatively, by use of radioactive chromium (chromium-51)-labeled red blood cells, gastrointestinal blood loss associated with nabumetone (1000 mg daily), aspirin (3.6 g daily), and placebo. A total of 37 normal subjects, divided among the three treatment groups and a fourth group that received no treatment, were assessed clinically and quantitatively for gastrointestinal blood loss over a period of 28 days of active treatment. The results with chromium-51, analyzed on a logarithmic scale, revealed no statistically significant differences between the nabumetone, placebo, and control groups. Gastrointestinal blood loss in the aspirin group, however, was elevated when compared with all other groups at a high level of statistical significance (p less than 0.001). It is concluded that, under conditions in which aspirin causes substantial gastrointestinal microbleeding, nabumetone is not significantly different from placebo.

  13. Topiramate for the treatment of methamphetamine addiction: a multi-center placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkashef, Ahmed; Kahn, Roberta; Yu, Elmer; Iturriaga, Erin; Li, Shou-Hua; Anderson, Ann; Chiang, Nora; Ait-Daoud, Nassima; Weiss, David; McSherry, Frances; Serpi, Tracey; Rawson, Richard; Hrymoc, Mark; Weis, Dennis; McCann, Michael; Pham, Tony; Stock, Christopher; Dickinson, Ruth; Campbell, Jan; Gorodetzky, Charles; Haning, William; Carlton, Barry; Mawhinney, Joseph; Li, Ming D; Johnson, Bankole A

    2012-07-01

      Topiramate has shown efficacy at facilitating abstinence from alcohol and cocaine abuse. This double-blind, placebo-controlled out-patient trial tested topiramate for treating methamphetamine addiction.   Participants (n = 140) were randomized to receive topiramate or placebo (13 weeks) in escalating doses from 25 mg/day [DOSAGE ERROR CORRECTED] to the target maintenance of 200 mg/day in weeks 6-12 (tapered in week 13). Medication was combined with weekly brief behavioral compliance enhancement treatment.   The trial was conducted at eight medical centers in the United States.   One hundred and forty methamphetamine-dependent adults took part in the trial.   The primary outcome was abstinence from methamphetamine during weeks 6-12. Secondary outcomes included use reduction versus baseline, as well as psychosocial variables.   In the intent-to-treat analysis, topiramate did not increase abstinence from methamphetamine during weeks 6-12. For secondary outcomes, topiramate reduced weekly median urine methamphetamine levels and observer-rated severity of dependence scores significantly. Subjects with negative urine before randomization (n = 26) had significantly greater abstinence on topiramate versus placebo during study weeks 6-12. Topiramate was safe and well tolerated.   Topiramate does not appear to promote abstinence in methamphetamine users but can reduce the amount taken and reduce relapse rates in those who are already abstinent. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  14. Double blind placebo controlled exposure to molds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, H W; Jensen, K A; Nielsen, K F

    2005-01-01

    The objective was to develop an experimental setup for human exposure to mold spores, and to study the clinical effect of this exposure in sensitive subjects who had previously experienced potentially building-related symptoms (BRS) at work. From three water-damaged schools eight employees....... In conclusion this is, to our knowledge, the first study to successfully conduct a human exposure to a highly controlled dose of fungal material aerosolized directly from wet building materials. This short-term exposure to high concentrations of two different molds induced no more reactions than exposure...... to placebo in eight sensitive school employees. However, a statistical type II error cannot be excluded because of the small sample size. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: In this double blind, placebo controlled study of mold exposure changes in symptoms, objective measurements and blood samples were small and mostly...

  15. Genetics and the Placebo Effect: the Placebome

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Kathryn T.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Kaptchuk, Ted J.

    2015-01-01

    Placebos are indispensable controls in randomized clinical trials (RCTs), and placebo responses significantly contribute to routine clinical outcomes. Recent neurophysiological studies reveal neurotransmitter pathways that mediate placebo effects. Evidence that genetic variations in these pathways can modify placebo effects raises the possibility of using genetic screening to identify placebo responders and thereby increase RCT efficacy and improve therapeutic care. Furthermore, the possibili...

  16. Women's sexual function improves when partners are administered vardenafil for erectile dysfunction: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Irwin; Fisher, William A; Sand, Michael; Rosen, Raymond C; Mollen, Martin; Brock, Gerald; Karlin, Gary; Pommerville, Peter; Bangerter, Keith; Bandel, Tiemo-Joerg; Derogatis, Leonard R

    2005-11-01

    There are limited data concerning the sexual function of women whose male partners receive pharmacological treatment for erectile dysfunction (ED). One objective of this research was to prospectively compare the efficacy of vardenafil vs. placebo administered to men with ED in improving men's and women partners' sexual function and satisfaction. Another goal was to assess the relationship of erectile function changes in men with ED receiving treatment with sexual function changes in women partners not directly receiving treatment. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-institutional comparison of vardenafil vs. placebo was performed in 229 couples (treated man with ED>6 months and untreated woman partner). Co-primary outcomes for which this research was statistically powered were Sexual Encounter Profile (SEP3) (treated man with ED) and Sexual Life Quality Questionnaire (mSLQQ-QOL) (untreated woman partner). Erectile function changes in men with ED receiving vardenafil vs. placebo were compared at last observation carried forward (LOCF) in SEP3, International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-EF) and Erection Quality Scale (EQS). Sexual function at LOCF in women partners was determined by mSLQQ-QOL and Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Compared with placebo at LOCF, vardenafil significantly increased least square (LS) mean scores in: (i) overall per-treated male SEP3 success rate, IIEF-EF, and EQS; and (ii) mSLQQ-QOL, total FSFI and sexual desire, subjective arousal, lubrication, orgasm and satisfaction FSFI domains in untreated women partners. Treatment-related improvement in erectile function as assessed by IIEF-EF and EQS was correlated reliably with improvement in women partners' FSFI total and individual domain scores. Vardenafil is an effective ED treatment in men that also significantly improves sexual function/satisfaction in untreated women partners. Women partners' sexual function improvements relate significantly and consistently to

  17. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study evaluating the effect of paliperidone extended-release tablets on sleep architecture in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthringer, Remy; Staner, Luc; Noel, Nadine; Muzet, Muriel; Gassmann-Mayer, Cristiana; Talluri, Krishna; Cleton, Adriaan; Eerdekens, Marielle; Battisti, Wendy P; Palumbo, Joseph M

    2007-09-01

    The effects of paliperidone extended-release on sleep architecture in patients with schizophrenia-related insomnia were evaluated in this multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Patients received paliperidone extended-release 9 mg/day or matching placebo during the 14-day double-blind phase. Sleep architecture and sleep continuity were evaluated using polysomnograms. Subjective sleep measures were evaluated daily using the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire. Efficacy and safety were also assessed. Thirty-six patients (17 on paliperidone extended-release, 19 on placebo; mean age 32.2 years) completed the study. Paliperidone extended-release treatment vs. placebo resulted in clinically and statistically significant differences in sleep measurements from baseline to endpoint including a reduction in: persistent sleep latency (41 min), sleep onset latency (35 min), number of awakenings after sleep onset (7), time awake in bed (50 min), and stage 1 sleep duration (12 min); prolongation in: total sleep time (53 min), sleep period time (42 min), stage 2 sleep duration (51 min), and rapid eye movement sleep duration (18 min); and an increase in sleep efficiency index (11%). Paliperidone extended-release, compared with placebo, did not exacerbate daytime somnolence and improved symptoms of schizophrenia. Paliperidone extended-release was well tolerated and improved sleep architecture and sleep continuity in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and concomitant insomnia.

  18. Continuation of growth hormone therapy versus placebo in transition-phase patients with growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jens; Nørrelund, Helene; Vahl, Nina

    2002-01-01

    In a placebo-controlled, parallel study of 18 patients with a mean age of 20 years who had confirmed growth hormone (GH) deficiency, we evaluated body composition, insulin sensitivity, and glucose turnover at baseline (when all were receiving GH replacement); after 12 months of continued GH therapy...... or placebo; and after a 12-month open phase of GH therapy. In the placebo group, insulin sensitivity and fat mass increased and lipid oxidation decreased, whereas glucose oxidation increased (p...

  19. The effectiveness of fermented turmeric powder in subjects with elevated alanine transaminase levels: a randomised controlled study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous animal studies have shown that Curcuma longa (turmeric) improves liver function. Turmeric may thus be a promising ingredient in functional foods aimed at improving liver function. The purpose of the study is to investigate the hepatoprotective effect of fermented turmeric powder (FTP) on liver function in subjects with elevated alanine transaminase (ALT) levels. Methods A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted between November 2010 and April 2012 at the clinical trial center for functional foods of the Chonbuk National University Hospital. The trial included 60 subjects, 20 years old and above, who were diagnosed mild to moderate elevated ALT levels between 40 IU/L and 200 IU/L. Sixty subjects were randomised to receive FTP 3.0 g per day or placebo 3.0 g per day for 12 weeks. The treatment group received two capsules of FTP three times a day after meals, for 12 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was change in the ALT levels in the two groups. The secondary efficacy endpoints included its effect on aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), total bilirubin (TB), and lipid profiles. Safety was assessed throughout the study using ongoing laboratory tests. Adverse events (AEs) were also recorded. Results Sixty subjects were randomised in the study (30 into the FTP group, 30 into the placebo group), and among them, twelve subjects were excluded from the analysis for protocol violation, adverse events or consent withdrawal. The two groups did not differ in baseline characteristics. After 12 weeks of treatment, 48 subjects were evaluated. Of the 48 subjects, 26 randomly received FTP capsules and 22 received placebo. The FTP group showed a significant reduction in ALT levels after 12 weeks of treatment compared with the placebo group (p = 0.019). There was also observed that the serum AST levels were significantly reduce in the FTP group than placebo group (p = 0.02). The GGT levels

  20. Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor: Enbrel (Etanercept) for the Treatment of Idiopathic Pneumonia Syndrome after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation: Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanik, Gregory A.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Logan, Brent R.; Ho, Vincent T.; Soiffer, Robert J.; Carter, Shelly L.; Wu, Juan; Wingard, John R.; Difronzo, Nancy L.; Ferrara, James L.; Giralt, Sergio; Madtes, David K.; Drexler, Rebecca; White, Eric S.; Cooke, Kenneth R.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pneumonia syndrome (IPS) is a diffuse, noninfectious lung injury that occurs acutely after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). IPS-related mortality has been historically high (>50%) despite treatment with systemic corticosteroids and supportive care measures. We have now examined the role of tumor necrosis factor inhibition in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of corticosteroids with etanercept or placebo. Thirty-four subjects (≥18 years) with IPS after HCT were randomized to receive meth-ylprednisolone (2 mg/kg/day) plus etanercept (0.4 mg/kg twice weekly ≥ 4 weeks; n = 16) or placebo (n = 18). No active infections and a pathogen-negative bronchoscopy were required at study entry. Response (alive, with complete discontinuation of supplemental oxygen support) and overall survival were examined. This study, originally planned to accrue 120 patients, was terminated prematurely due to slow accrual. In the limited number of patients examined, there were no differences in response rates at day 28 of study. Ten of 16 patients (62.5% [95% confidence interval {CI}, 35.4% to 84.8%]) receiving etanercept and 12 of 18 patients (66.7% [95% CI, 41.0% to 86.7%]) receiving placebo met the day 28 response definition (P = 1.00). The median survival was 170 days (95% CI, 11 to 362) with etanercept versus 64 days (95% CI, 26 to 209) with placebo (P = .51). Among responders, the median time to discontinuation of supplemental oxygen was 9 days (etanercept) versus 7 days (placebo). Therapy was well tolerated, with 1 toxicity-related death from infectious pneumonia in the placebo arm. The treatment of IPS with corticosteroids in adult HCT recipients was associated with high early response rates (>60%) compared with historical reports, with poor overall survival. The addition of etanercept did not lead to further increases in response, although the sample size of this truncated trial preclude a definitive conclusion. PMID:24607553

  1. Beyond the placebo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Frede

    2015-01-01

    potentiale, som kunne skåne mange patienter for sygdomsforværring og unødvendig medicinsk behandling. Artiklen peger på tre faktorer, som særligt udgør forhindringer for i øget grad præcist at bruge placebo i betydningen den samlede kontekst og ”the doctor drug”: negative videnskabelige tanker knyttet til...... termen ”placebo”, manglende viden om kontekstens rolle i det kliniske møde (herunder betydningen af lægens evne til at skabe tillid og relation til patienten) og manglen på translationel forskning fra videnskab til daglig klinik i, hvordan biologiske processer i hjernen påvirkes af kulturelle aspekter...

  2. The many meanings of placebo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bugel, P

    1998-01-01

    Physicians throughout medical history knew three possible ways to explain the association between treatment and cure: 1. the beneficial effect of the treatment itself, 2. the healing power of nature, and 3. the placebo effect. In the modern definition by Grunbaum, a treatment is a placebo when the

  3. The placebo effect in sports performance: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beedie, Christopher J; Foad, Abigail J

    2009-01-01

    The placebo effect, with its central role in clinical trials, is acknowledged as a factor in sports medicine, although until recently little has been known about the likely magnitude and extent of the effect in any specific research setting. Even less is known about the prevalence of the effect in competitive sport. The present paper reviews 12 intervention studies in sports performance. All examine placebo effects associated with the administration of an inert substance believed by subjects to be an ergogenic aid. Placebo effects of varying magnitudes are reported in studies addressing sports from weightlifting to endurance cycling. Findings suggest that psychological variables such as motivation, expectancy and conditioning, and the interaction of these variables with physiological variables, might be significant factors in driving both positive and negative outcomes. Programmatic research involving the triangulation of data, and investigation of contextual and personality factors in the mediation of placebo responses may help to advance knowledge in this area.

  4. Use of placebo interventions in primary care in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bąbel, Przemysław

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the behavior, beliefs and attitudes of Polish primary care physicians concerning the use of placebo interventions. A total of 220 Polish primary care physicians (internists, specialists in family medicine and pediatricians) were asked to participate in a questionnaire survey and 171 agreed to do so. The questionnaire was a self-report of the behavior, beliefs and attitudes of physicians concerning the use of placebo interventions in clinical practice. The percentages are based on the actual number of respondents to each question. Of 169 respondents, 135 (80%) declared that they used or prescribed placebo interventions, with 20/169 (12%) doing so almost every day, 51/169 (30%) once a week and 44/169 (26%) once a month. The most common placebos used were vitamins (86/135, 66%) and homeopathy (73/135, 56%). Among the participants, 114/129 (84%) reported that the placebos were effective, with only 10/129 (8%) considering them rarely effective; 75/139 (54%) of the physicians considered placebo interventions to be effective only in patients with subjective symptoms, 116/139 (73%) indicated that individual traits of patients were decisive factors in the effectiveness of placebo interventions, and 103/159 (65%) thought that the expectations of patients were of importance. A total of 128/170 (75%) respondents thought that the mechanism of placebo effects was purely psychological. The use and prescription of placebo interventions seemed to be very common among Polish primary care physicians studied and they generally had positive attitudes towards their use and effectiveness. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Reduced peak, but no diurnal variation, in thrombin generation upon melatonin supplementation in tetraplegia. A randomised, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Per Ole; Dahm, Anders; Skretting, Grethe; Mowinckel, Marie-Christine; Stranda, Annicke; Østerud, Bjarne; Sandset, Per Morten; Kostovski, Emil

    2015-11-01

    Tetraplegic patients have increased risk of venous thrombosis despite anti-thrombotic prophylaxis. Moreover, they have blunted plasma variations in melatonin and altered diurnal variation of several haemostatic markers, compared with able-bodied. However, whether healthy individuals and tetraplegic patients, with or without melatonin, display abnormalities in thrombin generation during a 24-hour (h) cycle, is unknown. We therefore used the Calibrated Automated Thrombogram (CAT) assay to examine diurnal variations and the possible role of melatonin in thrombin generation. Six men with long-standing complete tetraplegia were included in a randomised placebo-controlled cross-over study with melatonin supplementation (2 mg, 4 consecutive nights), whereas six healthy, able-bodied men served as controls. Ten plasma samples were collected frequently during a 24-h awake/sleep cycle. No significant diurnal variation of any of the measured CAT indices was detected in the three study groups. Whereas endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) was independent (p > 0.05) of whether the tetraplegic men received melatonin or placebo, melatonin decreased (p = 0.005) peak values in tetraplegia compared with those given placebo. Able-bodied men had lower (p = 0.019) ETP and Lag-Time (p = 0.018) compared with tetraplegics receiving placebo. Neither the Time-to-Peak nor the Start-Tail was affected (p > 0.05) by melatonin in tetraplegia. In conclusion, indices of thrombin generation are not subjected to diurnal variation in healthy able-bodied or tetraplegia, but peak thrombin generation is reduced in tetraplegic men receiving oral melatonin.

  6. Single-dose, placebo-controlled, randomized study of AMG 785, a sclerostin monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhi, Desmond; Jang, Graham; Stouch, Brian; Fang, Liang; Posvar, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Sclerostin, an osteocyte-secreted protein, negatively regulates osteoblasts and inhibits bone formation. In this first-in-human study, a sclerostin monoclonal antibody (AMG 785) was administered to healthy men and postmenopausal women. In this phase I, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, ascending, single-dose study, 72 healthy subjects received AMG 785 or placebo (3:1) subcutaneously (0.1, 0.3, 1, 3, 5, or 10 mg/kg) or intravenously (1 or 5 mg/kg). Depending on dose, subjects were followed for up to 85 days. The effects of AMG 785 on safety and tolerability (primary objectives) and pharmacokinetics, bone turnover markers, and bone mineral density (secondary objectives) were evaluated. AMG 785 generally was well tolerated. One treatment-related serious adverse event of nonspecific hepatitis was reported and was resolved. No deaths or study discontinuations occurred. AMG 785 pharmacokinetics were nonlinear with dose. Dose-related increases in the bone-formation markers procollagen type 1 N-propeptide (P1NP), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), and osteocalcin were observed, along with a dose-related decrease in the bone-resorption marker serum C-telopeptide (sCTx), resulting in a large anabolic window. In addition, statistically significant increases in bone mineral density of up to 5.3% at the lumbar spine and 2.8% at the total hip compared with placebo were observed on day 85. Six subjects in the higher-dose groups developed anti-AMG 785 antibodies, 2 of which were neutralizing, with no discernible effect on the pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics. In summary, single doses of AMG 785 generally were well tolerated, and the data support further clinical investigation of sclerostin inhibition as a potential therapeutic strategy for conditions that could benefit from increased bone formation. © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  7. Placebo effect in the acute treatment of migraine: subcutaneous placebos are better than oral placebos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Craen, A. J.; Tijssen, J. G.; de Gans, J.; Kleijnen, J.

    2000-01-01

    We carried out a meta-analysis of 22 trials to determine the comparative placebo effect of (a) subcutaneous vs. oral and (b) in-hospital vs. at-home administration in the treatment of migraine. The headache relief rates were combined from the placebo arms of these randomised clinical trials

  8. An evaluation of the hypolipidemic effect of an extract of Hibiscus Sabdariffa leaves in hyperlipidemic Indians: a double blind, placebo controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Rajendran

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hibiscus sabdariffa is used regularly in folk medicine to treat various conditions. Methods The study was a double blind, placebo controlled, randomized trial. Sixty subjects with serum LDL values in the range of 130-190 mg/dl and with no history of coronary heart disease were randomized into experimental and placebo groups. The experimental group received 1 gm of the extract for 90 days while the placebo received a similar amount of maltodextrin in addition to dietary and physical activity advice for the control of their blood lipids. Anthropometry, blood biochemistry, dietary and physical activity were assessed at baseline, day 45 and day 90. Results While body weight, serum LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels decreased in both groups, there were no significant differences between the experimental and placebo group. Conclusions It is likely that the observed effects were as a result of the patients following the standard dietary and physical activity advice. At a dose of 1 gm/day, hibiscus sabdariffa leaf extract did not appear to have a blood lipid lowering effect. Trial Registration REFCTRI2009000472

  9. An evaluation of the hypolipidemic effect of an extract of Hibiscus Sabdariffa leaves in hyperlipidemic Indians: a double blind, placebo controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Hibiscus sabdariffa is used regularly in folk medicine to treat various conditions. Methods The study was a double blind, placebo controlled, randomized trial. Sixty subjects with serum LDL values in the range of 130-190 mg/dl and with no history of coronary heart disease were randomized into experimental and placebo groups. The experimental group received 1 gm of the extract for 90 days while the placebo received a similar amount of maltodextrin in addition to dietary and physical activity advice for the control of their blood lipids. Anthropometry, blood biochemistry, dietary and physical activity were assessed at baseline, day 45 and day 90. Results While body weight, serum LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels decreased in both groups, there were no significant differences between the experimental and placebo group. Conclusions It is likely that the observed effects were as a result of the patients following the standard dietary and physical activity advice. At a dose of 1 gm/day, hibiscus sabdariffa leaf extract did not appear to have a blood lipid lowering effect. Trial Registration REFCTRI2009000472 PMID:20553629

  10. The effect of placebo and neurophysiological involvements

    OpenAIRE

    Galli, Federica; Riccio, Barbara; Guidetti, Vincenzo

    2004-01-01

    Placebo and placebo effect are important issues related to the drug therapy for clinical and scientific meanings. The rates of placebo may get as many as 50% for analgesic drugs in headache. The high answer to placebo brings questions on pathophysiology of headache. Answers may offer a new strategy in the implementation of trials and new insight in neurophysiology of headache. Current knowledge on placebo and placebo effect will be analysed and dicussed looking for new direction in headache f...

  11. Concept of true and perceived placebo effects.

    OpenAIRE

    Ernst, E.; Resch, K. L.

    1995-01-01

    We often and wrongly equate the response seen in the placebo arm of a clinical trial with the placebo effect. In order to obtain the true placebo effect, other non-specific effects can be identified by including an untreated control group in clinical trials. A review of the literature shows that most authors confuse the perceived placebo effect with the true placebo effect. The true placebo effect is highly variable, depending on several factors that are not fully understood. A distinction be...

  12. Double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of risperidone plus amantadine in children with autism: a 10-week randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mohammad-Reza; Yadegari, Nourrollah; Hassanzadeh, Elmira; Farokhnia, Mehdi; Yekehtaz, Habibeh; Mirshafiee, Omid; Akhondzadeh, Shahin

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of adding amantadine to risperidone for treatment of autism. Forty outpatients aged 4 to12 years, who were diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision criteria, were assigned to this double-blind clinical trial. The subjects were divided randomly into 2 groups. One group received risperidone plus amantadine, and the other group received risperidone plus placebo. The dose of risperidone was titrated between 1 and 2.0 mg/d, and the dose of amantadine was 100 or 150 mg/d for patients less than 30 kg or more than 30 kg, respectively. The patients were assessed using the Aberrant Behavioral Checklist-Community (ABC-C) and adverse effects checklist as well as clinical global impression-improvement (CGI-I) at2 checkpoints of 5-week intervals after the baseline. Informed consentwas obtained from the parents of each participant. Among ABC-C subscales, Hyperactivity and Irritability showed significantly greater reduction in the amantadine group than the placebo group. There was no significant difference in adverse effects between the 2 groups. The CGI-I scores show significant improvement in the amantadine group compared to the placebo group. The present study suggests that amantadine may be a potential adjunctive treatment strategy for autism and it was generally well tolerated.

  13. A randomized double-blind study of testosterone replacement therapy or placebo in testicular cancer survivors with mild Leydig cell insufficiency (Einstein-intervention)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandak, Mikkel; Jørgensen, Niels; Juul, Anders

    2017-01-01

    with low grade inflammation and increased risk of metabolic syndrome. However, so far, no studies have evaluated whether testosterone substitution improves metabolic dysfunction in TC survivors with mild Leydig cell insufficiency. Methods/design: This is a single-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo......Background: Elevated serum levels of luteinizing hormone and slightly decreased serum levels of testosterone (mild Leydig cell insufficiency) is a common hormonal disturbance in testicular cancer (TC) survivors. A number of studies have shown that low serum levels of testosterone is associated......-controlled study, designed to evaluate the effect of testosterone replacement therapy in TC survivors with mild Leydig cell insufficiency. Seventy subjects will be randomized to receive either testosterone replacement therapy or placebo. The subjects will be invited for an information meeting where informed...

  14. A phase II placebo-controlled study of tralokinumab in moderate-to-severe asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Edward; Brightling, Christopher; Niven, Robert; Oh, Chad; Faggioni, Raffaella; Poon, Kwai; She, Dewei; Kell, Chris; May, Richard D; Geba, Gregory P; Molfino, Nestor A

    2013-02-01

    Pre-clinical data demonstrate a pivotal role for interleukin (IL)-13 in the development and maintenance of asthma. This study assessed the effects of tralokinumab, an investigational human IL-13-neutralising immunoglobulin G4 monoclonal antibody, in adults with moderate-to-severe uncontrolled asthma despite controller therapies. 194 subjects were randomised to receive tralokinumab (150, 300 or 600 mg) or placebo subcutaneously every 2 weeks. Primary end-point was change from baseline in mean Asthma Control Questionnaire score (ACQ-6; ACQ mean of six individual item scores) at week 13 comparing placebo and combined tralokinumab dose groups. Secondary end-points included pre-bronchodilator lung function, rescue β(2)-agonist use and safety. Numerical end-points are reported as mean±sd. At week 13, change from baseline in ACQ-6 was -0.76±1.04 for tralokinumab versus -0.61±0.90 for placebo (p=0.375). Increases from baseline in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) were 0.21±0.38 L versus 0.06±0.48 L (p=0.072), with a dose-response observed across the tralokinumab doses tested. β(2)-agonist use (puffs per day) was decreased for tralokinumab -0.68±1.45 versus placebo -0.10±1.49 (p=0.020). The increase in FEV(1) following tralokinumab treatment remained evident 12 weeks after the final dose. Safety profile was acceptable with no serious adverse events related to tralokinumab. No improvement in ACQ-6 was observed, although tralokinumab treatment was associated with improved lung function.

  15. Omega 3/6 fatty acids for reading in children: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 9-year-old mainstream schoolchildren in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mats; Fransson, Gunnar; Östlund, Sven; Areskoug, Björn; Gillberg, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has shown positive effects of Omega 3/6 fatty acids in children with inattention and reading difficulties. We aimed to investigate if Omega 3/6 improved reading ability in mainstream schoolchildren. We performed a 3-month parallel, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial followed by 3-month active treatment for all subjects. Mainstream schoolchildren aged 9-10 years were randomized 1:1 to receive three Omega 3/6 capsules twice daily or identical placebo. Assessments were made at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. The primary outcome measure was the Logos test battery for evaluating reading abilities. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02557477. The study enrolled 154 children (active n = 78; placebo n = 76), of whom 122 completed the first 3 months (active n = 64; placebo n = 58) and 105 completed the whole study (active/active n = 55; placebo/active n = 50). Outcomes were assessed by per protocol (PP) and intention-to-treat (ITT) analyses. Active treatment was superior to placebo at 3 months for improvement in phonologic decoding time (PP active/placebo difference -0.16; 95% CI -0.03, -0.29; effect size (ES) .44; p = .005; and ITT ES .37; p = .036), in visual analysis time (PP active/placebo difference -0.19; 95% CI -0.05, -0.33; ES .49; p = .013; and ITT ES .40; p = .01), and for boys in phonologic decoding time (PP -0.22; 95% CI -0.03, -0.41; ES .62; p = .004). Children with ADHD-RS scores above the median showed treatment benefits in visual analysis time (PP ES .8, p = .009), reading speed per word (PP ES .61, p = .008), and phonologic decoding time per word (PP ES .85, p = .006). Adverse events were rare and mild, mainly stomach pain/diarrhea (active n = 9, placebo n = 2). Compared with placebo, 3 months of Omega 3/6 treatment improved reading ability - specifically the clinically relevant 'phonologic decoding time' and 'visual analysis time' - in mainstream

  16. A double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trial on probiotics in small bowel bacterial overgrowth in children treated with omeprazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegar, Badriul; Hutapea, Esther I; Advani, Najid; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of small bowel bacterial overgrowth (SBBO) in children treated with omeprazole, and to test whether probiotics influence the incidence. A double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial was performed in 70 children treated orally during four weeks with 20mg omeprazole per day. Lactobacillus rhamnosus R0011 (1.9×10(9) cfu) and Lactobacillus acidophilus R0052 (0.1×10(9) cfu) were simultaneously given daily to 36 subjects (probiotic group), while 34 subjects received placebo (placebo group). The diagnosis of SBBO was based on the development of suggestive symptoms, in combination with a positive glucose breath test. After one month of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment, 30% (21/70) had a positive breath test suggesting SBBO; of these 62% were symptomatic. Five children developed SBBO-like symptoms, but had a negative breath test; and 44 (63%) were symptom free and had a negative breath test. There was no difference in the incidence of positive breath tests in the probiotic versus the placebo group (33% vs 26.5%; p=0.13). Since symptoms suggesting SBBO developed in 26% of PPI-treated children, and since the glucose breath test was abnormal in 72% of these, this side-effect should be more frequently considered. The probiotic tested did not decrease the risk to develop SBBO. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Antiobesity Effect of Caraway Extract on Overweight and Obese Women: A Randomized, Triple-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Kazemipoor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Caraway (Carum carvi L., a potent medicinal plant, is traditionally used for treating obesity. This study investigates the weight-lowering effects of caraway extract (CE on physically active, overweight and obese women through a randomized, triple-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Seventy overweight and obese, healthy, aerobic-trained, adult females were randomly assigned to two groups (n=35 per group. Participants received either 30 mL/day of CE or placebo without changing their diet or physical activity. Subjects were examined at baseline and after 90 days for changes in body composition, anthropometric indices, and clinical and paraclinical variables. The treatment group, compared with placebo, showed a significant reduction of weight, body mass index, body fat percentage, and waist-to-hip ratio. No changes were observed in lipid profile, urine-specific gravity, and blood pressure of subjects. The results suggest that a dietary CE with no restriction in food intake, when combined with exercise, is of value in the management of obesity in women wishing to lower their weight, BMI, body fat percentage, and body size, with no clinical side effects. In conclusion, results of this study suggest a possible phytotherapeutic approach for caraway extract in the management of obesity. This trial is registered with NCT01833377.

  18. REFINE-1, a Multicenter, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Phase 3 Trial With ATX-101, an Injectable Drug for Submental Fat Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Derek H; Carruthers, Jean; Joseph, John H; Callender, Valerie D; Walker, Patricia; Lee, Daniel R; Subramanian, Meenakshi; Lizzul, Paul F; Gross, Todd M; Beddingfield, Frederick C

    2016-01-01

    ATX-101, an injectable form of deoxycholic acid, is approved in the United States and Canada for submental fat (SMF) reduction. To report results of REFINE-1, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, Phase 3 trial investigating the efficacy and safety of ATX-101. Subjects dissatisfied with their moderate or severe SMF received ATX-101 (2 mg/cm) or placebo. Coprimary outcome measures were composite ≥1-grade and ≥2-grade improvements in clinician-assessed and subject-assessed SMF severity using validated scales at 12 weeks after last treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provided an objective measure of submental volume reduction. Patient-reported outcomes were assessed. Among 256 ATX-101-treated and 250 placebo-treated subjects, a ≥1-grade composite response was achieved in 70.0% and 18.6%, and a ≥2-grade composite response in 13.4% and 0%, respectively (p ATX-101 than placebo (46.3% vs 5.3%; p ATX-101-treated subjects reported improvement in the psychological impact of SMF and satisfaction with treatment (p ATX-101-treated subjects reported 1-grade improvement in clinician-assessed SMF after 2 and 4 treatments, respectively. Adverse events (primarily localized to the injection site) were mostly mild or moderate, and transient. Marginal mandibular nerve paresis reported in 4.3% of ATX-101-treated subjects (1.0% of all ATX-101 treatment sessions) was mostly mild, transient, and resolved without sequelae. ATX-101 is a safe and efficacious, first-in-class, injectable drug for SMF reduction.

  19. Compreendendo o Efeito Placebo / Understanding the Placebo Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elayne Vieira Dias

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Placebo é definido em termos farmacológicos como uma substância inerte, sem propriedades farmacológicas intrínsecas. No entanto, essa definição é superficial, visto que o placebo pode gerar efeitos terapêuticos que dependem de diversos fatores como palavras, rituais, símbolos e significados que acompanham seu uso. Assim, o efeito placebo não diz respeito apenas a uma substância, mas, envolve fatores cognitivos, genéticos e mecanismos de aprendizagem implícita e explícita. Nessa revisão nós abordamos os aspectos gerais do efeito placebo apoiados em diversos estudos com diferentes enfoques, visando uma melhor compreensão desse fenômeno que pode se somar ao tratamento ativo e otimizar os resultados na prática médica. Placebo is pharmacologically defined as an inert substance, with nointrinsic pharmacological properties. However, this is a superficial definition, since placebo may trigger therapeutic effects and its effectiveness depends on various factors such as words, rituals, symbols and meanings following its use. Thus, placebo effect does not refer just to the substance, but it also involves cognitive and genetic factors and learning mechanisms. Here, we review general aspects of the placebo effect supported by several studies with different approaches, to better understand this phenomenon which may contribute to active treatment as well as optimize the results in the clinical practice.

  20. Pharmacodynamic Modelling of Placebo and Buprenorphine Effects on Event-Related Potentials in Experimental Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Rasmus V; Foster, David J R; Upton, Richard N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate placebo and buprenorphine effects on event-related potentials (ERPs) in experimental pain and the potential benefit of population pharmacodynamic modelling in data analysis. Nineteen healthy volunteers received transdermal placebo and buprenorphine......-effects modelling implemented in NONMEM (V7.2.0.). Pharmacodynamic models were developed to adequately describe both placebo and buprenorphine ERP data. Models predicted significant placebo effects, but did not predict significant effects related to buprenorphine concentration. Models revealed that ERPs varied both...

  1. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study of the efficacy and safety of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: novel findings using a simulated adult workplace environment design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Joseph

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duration of efficacy and safety of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX was assessed in adults (18-55 years with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD using the simulated adult workplace environment. Methods After open-label dose optimization (4-week with LDX, 30-70 mg/d, subjects entered a 2-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover phase. Efficacy assessments included the Permanent Product Measure of Performance (PERMP total score (attempted+correct measured predose and from 2 to 14 hours postdose, averaged across postdose sessions (primary and at each time point vs placebo (secondary, and ADHD Rating Scale IV (ADHD-RS-IV with adult prompts at baseline and crossover visits. Safety assessments included treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs, vital signs, and electrocardiograms. Results Of 127 randomized subjects, 105 were in the intention-to-treat population and 103 completed the study. While receiving LDX vs placebo, adults had greater improvement (P P ≤ .0017 for each time point and change from predose (P P Conclusions LDX significantly improved PERMP scores vs placebo and maintained improvement throughout the day from the first (2 hours to last (14 hours postdose time point vs placebo in adults with ADHD. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00697515 Safety and Efficacy Workplace Environment Study of Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate (LDX in Adults With Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00697515?term=NCT00697515&rank=1

  2. Effectiveness of a new non-hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent after single use - a double-blind placebo-controlled short-term study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgan Bizhang

    Full Text Available Abstract Tooth whitening represents perhaps the most common aesthetic procedure in dentistry worldwide. The efficacy of bleaching depends on three aspects: bleaching agent, bleaching method, and tooth color. Objective: This in vivo study aimed to examine whitening effects on frontal teeth of the upper and lower jaws using an over-the-counter (OTC non-hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent in comparison to a placebo after one single use. Material and methods: Forty subjects (25 female; 15 male participated in this double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial. The subjects were randomly allocated to two groups (n=20. The test group received the OTC product (iWhite Instant and the placebo group received an identically composed product except for the active agents. Each subject was treated with a prefilled tray containing iWhite Instant or the placebo for 20 minutes. The tooth shade of the front teeth (upper and lower jaws was assessed before (E_0, immediately after (E_1 and 24 h after treatment (E_2, using a shade guide (VITA classical. Statistical testing was accomplished using the Mann-Whitney U test (p<0.001. The dropout rate was 0%. Results: There were no significant differences at E_0 between placebo and test groups regarding the tooth color. Differences in tooth color changes immediately after (ΔE1_0 and 24 h after treatment (ΔE2_0 were calculated for both groups. The mean values (standard deviations of tooth color changes for ΔE1_0 were 2.26 (0.92 in the test group and 0.01 (0.21 in the placebo group. The color changes for ΔE2_0 showed mean values of 2.15 (1.10 in the test group and 0.07 (0.35 in the placebo group. For ΔE1_0 and ΔE2_0 significant differences were found between the groups. Conclusion: In this short-term study, the results showed that a non-hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent has significant whitening effects immediately and 24 h after a single-use treatment.

  3. Efficacy of Myofascial Trigger Point Dry Needling in the Prevention of Pain after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayoral, Orlando; Salvat, Isabel; Martín, María Teresa; Martín, Stella; Santiago, Jesús; Cotarelo, José; Rodríguez, Constantino

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) is superior to placebo in the prevention of pain after total knee arthroplasty. Forty subjects were randomised to a true dry needling group (T) or to a sham group (S). All were examined for MTrPs by an experienced physical therapist 4–5 hours before surgery. Immediately following anesthesiology and before surgery started, subjects in the T group were dry needled in all previously diagnosed MTrPs, while the S group received no treatment in their MTrPs. Subjects were blinded to group allocation as well as the examiner in presurgical and follow-up examinations performed 1, 3, and 6 months after arthroplasty. Subjects in the T group had less pain after intervention, with statistically significant differences in the variation rate of the visual analogue scale (VAS) measurements 1 month after intervention and in the need for immediate postsurgery analgesics. Differences were not significant at 3- and 6-month follow-up examinations. In conclusion, a single dry needling treatment of MTrP under anaesthesia reduced pain in the first month after knee arthroplasty, when pain was the most severe. Results show a superiority of dry needling versus placebo. An interesting novel placebo methodology for dry needling, with a real blinding procedure, is presented. PMID:23606888

  4. Efficacy of myofascial trigger point dry needling in the prevention of pain after total knee arthroplasty: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayoral, Orlando; Salvat, Isabel; Martín, María Teresa; Martín, Stella; Santiago, Jesús; Cotarelo, José; Rodríguez, Constantino

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) is superior to placebo in the prevention of pain after total knee arthroplasty. Forty subjects were randomised to a true dry needling group (T) or to a sham group (S). All were examined for MTrPs by an experienced physical therapist 4-5 hours before surgery. Immediately following anesthesiology and before surgery started, subjects in the T group were dry needled in all previously diagnosed MTrPs, while the S group received no treatment in their MTrPs. Subjects were blinded to group allocation as well as the examiner in presurgical and follow-up examinations performed 1, 3, and 6 months after arthroplasty. Subjects in the T group had less pain after intervention, with statistically significant differences in the variation rate of the visual analogue scale (VAS) measurements 1 month after intervention and in the need for immediate postsurgery analgesics. Differences were not significant at 3- and 6-month follow-up examinations. In conclusion, a single dry needling treatment of MTrP under anaesthesia reduced pain in the first month after knee arthroplasty, when pain was the most severe. Results show a superiority of dry needling versus placebo. An interesting novel placebo methodology for dry needling, with a real blinding procedure, is presented.

  5. Selenium supplementation improves the nutritional status of hemodialysis patients: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Moosa; Sohrabi, Zahra; Ekramzadeh, Maryam; Fallahzadeh, Mohammad Kazem; Ayatollahi, Maryam; Geramizadeh, Bita; Hassanzadeh, Jafar; Sagheb, Mohammad Mahdi

    2013-03-01

    Malnutrition is highly prevalent in hemodialysis (HD) patients. These patients have high levels of oxidative stress and inflammation which can subsequently induce malnutrition. Selenium levels have been found to be decreased in HD patients. As selenium deficiency leads to oxidative stress and inflammatory response, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of selenium supplementation on oxidative and inflammatory markers and the nutritional status of HD patients. In this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial, 80 patients on stable HD for at least 3 months without any acute illness or active infections were randomly allocated to two equal groups to receive one selenium (200 µg) or placebo capsule daily for 12 weeks. Serum levels of lipoproteins, malondialdehyde (MDA), interleukin-6 (IL-6), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HSCRP), homocysteine, ferritin and transferrin as well as the subjective global assessment (SGA) score, malnutrition-inflammation score (MIS) and hemoglobin (Hb) levels were measured at the baseline and at the end of the treatment phase. The primary outcome was a change in the nutritional status measured by the SGA score from the baseline towards the end of the treatment phase of the study. The SGA score and MIS decreased significantly in the selenium group compared to the placebo group (P supplementation also hindered an increase in IL-6 levels compared with the placebo group (P = 0.016). There were no significant differences between the selenium and placebo groups in terms of changes in serum levels of lipoproteins, HSCRP, homocysteine, ferritin and transferrin or Hb levels. This study shows that selenium may be an effective complementary supplement for reducing the severity of malnutrition in HD patients through alleviating oxidative stress and inflammation.

  6. Double-blind, placebo-controlled study of risperidone for the treatment of disruptive behaviors in children with subaverage intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Michael G; De Smedt, Goedele; Derivan, Albert; Lyons, Ben; Findling, Robert L

    2002-08-01

    The short-term efficacy and safety of risperidone in the treatment of disruptive behaviors was examined in a well-characterized cohort of children with subaverage intelligence. In this 6-week, multicenter, double-blind, parallel-group study of 118 children (aged 5-12 years) with severely disruptive behaviors and subaverage intelligence (IQ between 36 and 84, inclusive), the subjects received 0.02-0.06 mg/kg per day of risperidone oral solution or placebo. The a priori primary efficacy measure was the change in score from baseline to endpoint on the conduct problem subscale of the Nisonger Child Behavior Rating Form. The risperidone group showed significantly greater improvement than did the placebo group on the conduct problem subscale of the Nisonger Child Behavior Rating Form from week 1 through endpoint (change in score of -15.2 and -6.2, respectively). Risperidone was also associated with significantly greater improvement than placebo on all other Nisonger Child Behavior Rating Form subscales at endpoint, as well as on the Aberrant Behavior Checklist subscales for irritability, lethargy/social withdrawal, and hyperactivity; the Behavior Problems Inventory aggressive/destructive behavior subscale; a visual analogue scale of the most troublesome symptom; and the Clinical Global Impression change score. The most common adverse effects reported during risperidone treatment were headache and somnolence. The extrapyramidal symptom profile of risperidone was comparable to that of placebo. Mean weight increases of 2.2 kg. and 0.9 kg occurred in the risperidone and placebo groups, respectively. Risperidone was effective and well tolerated for the treatment of severely disruptive behaviors in children with subaverage IQ.

  7. Vitamin B-12-fortified toothpaste improves vitamin status in vegans: a 12-wk randomized placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Anne-Kathrin; Obeid, Rima; Weder, Stine; Awwad, Hussain M; Sputtek, Andreas; Geisel, Juergen; Keller, Markus

    2017-03-01

    Background: The oral application of vitamin B-12 may prevent its deficiency if the vitamin is absorbed via the mucosal barrier. Objectives: We studied the effect of the use of a vitamin B-12-fortified toothpaste on vitamin-status markers in vegans and assessed the efficiency of markers in the identification of vitamin-augmentation status. Design: In this 12-wk, double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled study, 76 vegans received either a placebo ( n = 34) or vitamin B-12 ( n = 42) toothpaste. Sixty-six subjects ( n = 30 in the placebo arm; n = 36 in the vitamin B-12 arm) completed the intervention. Serum and plasma concentrations of vitamin B-12, holotranscobalamin, total homocysteine (tHcy), and methylmalonic acid (MMA) were measured before and after the intervention. Results: Both postintervention concentrations of vitamin B-12 and holotranscobalamin and their changes over 12 wk were higher in the vitamin B-12 group (mean ± SD change: 81 ± 135 pmol/L for vitamin B-12 and 26 ± 34 pmol/L for holotranscobalamin) than in the placebo group (-27 ± 64 and -5 ± 17 pmol/L, respectively) after adjustment for baseline concentrations. Postintervention concentrations of MMA and their changes differed significantly between groups (MMA changes: -0.169 ± 0.340 compared with -0.036 ± 0.544 μmol/L in vitamin B-12 and placebo groups, respectively; P vegans who reported that they had not taken vitamin B-12 supplements. Conclusion: Vitamin B-12 that is applied to the oral cavity via toothpaste enters the circulation and corrects the vitamin B-12 markers in the blood of vegans who are at higher risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02679833. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  8. Results from a pooled analysis of two European, randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 3 studies of ATX-101 for the pharmacologic reduction of excess submental fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDiarmid, James; Ruiz, Jesus Benito; Lee, Daniel; Lippert, Susanne; Hartisch, Claudia; Havlickova, Blanka

    2014-10-01

    The injectable adipocytolytic drug ATX-101 is the first nonsurgical treatment for the reduction of submental fat (SMF) to undergo comprehensive clinical evaluation. This study aimed to confirm the efficacy and safety of ATX-101 for SMF reduction through a post hoc pooled analysis of two large phase 3 studies. Patients with unwanted SMF were randomized to receive 1 or 2 mg/cm(2) of ATX-101 or a placebo injected into their SMF during a maximum of four treatment sessions spaced approximately 28 days apart, with a 12-week follow-up period. The proportions of patients with reductions in SMF of one point or more on the Clinician-Reported SMF Rating Scale (CR-SMFRS) and the proportions of patients satisfied with the appearance of their face and chin [Subject Self-Rating Scale (SSRS) score ≥4] were reported overall and in subgroups. Other efficacy measures included improvements in the Patient-Reported SMF Rating Scale (PR-SMFRS), calliper measurements of SMF thickness, and assessment of skin laxity [Skin Laxity Rating Scale (SLRS)]. Adverse events and laboratory test results were recorded. Significantly greater proportions of the patients had improvements in clinician-reported measures (≥1-point improvement in CR-SMFRS: 58.8 and 63.8 % of the patients who received ATX-101 1 and 2 mg/cm(2), respectively, and 28.6 % of the placebo recipients; p ATX-101 doses vs. placebo) and patient-reported measures (≥1-point improvement in PR-SMFRS: 60.0 and 63.1 % of the patients who received ATX-101 1 and 2 mg/cm(2), respectively, vs. 34.3 % of the placebo recipients; p ATX-101 versus placebo. These improvements correlated moderately with patient satisfaction regarding face and chin appearance (SSRS score ≥4: 60.8 and 65.4 % of the patients who received ATX-101 1 and 2 mg/cm(2), respectively, vs. 29.0 % of the placebo recipients; p ATX-101 was effective irrespective of gender, age, or body mass index. Reduction in SMF with ATX-101 was confirmed by calliper measurements (p ATX-101

  9. Effect of melatonin on depressive symptoms and anxiety in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Melissa V; Andersen, Lærke T; Madsen, Michael T; Hageman, Ida; Rasmussen, Lars S; Bokmand, Susanne; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2014-06-01

    Depression, anxiety and sleep disturbances are known problems in patients with breast cancer. The effect of melatonin as an antidepressant in humans with cancer has not been investigated. We investigated whether melatonin could lower the risk of depressive symptoms in women with breast cancer in a three-month period after surgery and assessed the effect of melatonin on subjective parameters: anxiety, sleep, general well-being, fatigue, pain and sleepiness. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial undertaken from July 2011 to December 2012 at a department of breast surgery in Copenhagen, Denmark. Women, 30-75 years, undergoing surgery for breast cancer and without signs of depression on Major Depression Inventory (MDI) were included 1 week before surgery and received 6 mg oral melatonin or placebo for 3 months. The primary outcome was the incidence of depressive symptoms measured by MDI. The secondary outcomes were area under the curve (AUC) for the subjective parameters. 54 patients were randomized to melatonin (n = 28) or placebo (n = 26) and 11 withdrew from the study (10 placebo group and 1 melatonin group, P = 0.002). The risk of developing depressive symptoms was significantly lower with melatonin than with placebo (3 [11 %] of 27 vs. 9 [45 %] of 20; relative risk 0.25 [95 % CI 0.077-0.80]), giving a NNT of 3.0 [95 % CI 1.7-11.0]. No significant differences were found between AUC for the subjective parameters. No differences in side effects were found (P = 0.78). Melatonin significantly reduced the risk of depressive symptoms in women with breast cancer during a three-month period after surgery.

  10. Beneficial effects of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota on academic stress-induced sleep disturbance in healthy adults: a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, M; Nishida, K; Gondo, Y; Kikuchi-Hayakawa, H; Ishikawa, H; Suda, K; Kawai, M; Hoshi, R; Kuwano, Y; Miyazaki, K; Rokutan, K

    2017-04-26

    The present study examined whether Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (LcS) improves sleep quality under psychological stress. A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in healthy 4 th year medical students exposed to academic examination stress. The trial was repeated over two consecutive years in different groups of students, and the data were pooled. For 8 weeks prior to and 3 weeks after a national standardised examination, a total of 48 and 46 subjects received a daily dose of 100 ml of LcS-fermented milk or non-fermented placebo milk, respectively. Study measures included subjective anxiety, overnight single-channel electroencephalography (EEG) recordings, and the Oguri-Shirakawa-Azumi (OSA) sleep inventory scores of subjective sleep quality. Total OSA scores were significantly lower than baseline on the day before the exam and recovered after the exam, indicating a stress-induced decline in sleep quality. There was a significant positive effect of LcS treatment on OSA factors for sleepiness on rising and sleep length. Sleep latency measured by EEG lengthened as the exam approached in the placebo group but was significantly suppressed in the LcS group. The percentage of stage 3 non-REM (N3) sleep decreased in the placebo group as the exam approached, whereas it was maintained in the LcS group throughout the trial. Delta power during the first sleep cycle, measured as an index of sleep intensity, increased as the exam approached in the LcS group and was significantly higher than in the placebo group. These findings suggest that daily consumption of LcS may help to maintain sleep quality during a period of increasing stress. The observed retention of N3 sleep and increased delta power in the LcS group may have contributed to higher perceived sleep satisfaction.

  11. Widespread use of pure and impure placebo interventions by GPs in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Karin; Höfner, Lisa; Fässler, Margrit; Linde, Klaus

    2012-02-01

    To collect data on the use of placebo interventions by GPs in Germany. A questionnaire was mailed to 400 randomly selected GPs in Bavaria. Non-responders were reminded by telephone after 4 weeks and were given a second copy of the questionnaire after a further 3 weeks. In all, 208 completed questionnaires were returned. The majority of GPs (88%) have used a placebo at least once in their practice; 45% have used pure placebos, such as saline injections and sugar pills, at least once last year; the median frequency of use was 5 [interquartile range (IQR), 2-10]. The use of impure placebos during the past year was more common: 76% of GPs have used impure placebos, i.e. medical interventions that have pharmacological or physical activity but have no intrinsic effect (e.g. pharmacological or physical action) on the patient's disease or its symptoms, with a median frequency of 20 times per year (IQR, 10-50). The main reason for the use of placebo was a possible psychological effect, followed by the expectation of patients to receive a treatment. For the majority of GPs placebo interventions were ethically justified if they were used for a possible psychological effect. Placebo interventions are a widely accepted part of medical treatment in German general practices and are used primarily for their psychological effects. Impure placebos are used much more frequently than pure placebos.

  12. Is placebo useful in the treatment of major depression in clinical practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchesi C

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Carlo Marchesi, Chiara De Panfilis, Matteo Tonna, Paolo Ossola University of Parma, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatric Unit, Parma, Italy Background: For many years, placebo has been defined by its inert content and use in clinical trials. In recent years, several studies have demonstrated its effect in the treatment of major depression. The aim of this paper is to present the conclusions of recent meta-analyses of the placebo effect in major depression, to explain the mechanism by which placebo exerts its effect, and to discuss whether placebo can be used in the treatment of patients with major depression in clinical practice. Recent meta-analyses have demonstrated that the placebo effect is estimated to account for 67% of the treatment effect in patients receiving antidepressants, and furthermore that placebo is as effective as antidepressants in patients with mild to moderate major depression (reporting a Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score lower than 25, whereas placebo is less effective than antidepressants in severely depressed patients. However, several limitations make the translation of these conclusions into clinical practice impracticable. Clinicians should learn from the "placebo lesson" to maximize the nonspecific effects of treatment when they prescribe an antidepressant, particularly in less severely depressed patients, who show a higher placebo response in randomized controlled trials. This strategy can increase the antidepressant effect and may reduce nonadherence with treatment. Keywords: placebo effect, major depressive disorder, subthreshold depressive disorder, antidepressants

  13. Low Intensity laser therapy in patients with burning mouth syndrome: a randomized, placebo-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norberto Nobuo SUGAYA

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of low intensity laser therapy in patients with Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS. Thirty BMS subjects were randomized into two groups – Laser (LG and Placebo (CG. Seven patients dropped out, leaving 13 patients in LG and 10 patients in CG. Each patient received 4 irradiations (laser or placebo twice a week, for two consecutive weeks (blinded to the type of irradiation received. Infrared laser (AsGaAI irradiations were applied to the affected mucosa in scanning mode, wavelength of 790 nm, output power of 20 mW and fluence of 6 J/cm2. A visual analogue scale (VAS was used to assess the therapeutic effect before and after each irradiation, and at all the control time periods: 7, 14, 30, 60 and 90 days after the last irradiation. One researcher delivered irradiation and another recorded the results. Both researchers were blinded, the first to the results, and the second to the type of radiation applied. The results were categorized according to the percentage of symptom level variation, and showed a statistically better response in LG in only two categories of the control checkpoints (p=0.02; Fisher’s Exact Test. According to the protocol used in this study, low intensity laser therapy is as beneficial to patients with BMS as placebo treatment, indicating a great emotional component of involvement in BMS symptomatology. Nevertheless, there were positive results in some statistical analyses, thus encouraging further research in BMS laser therapy with other irradiation parameters.

  14. Placebo and deception: a commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhill, Anne; Miller, Franklin G

    2015-02-01

    In a recent article in this Journal, Shlomo Cohen and Haim Shapiro (2013) introduce the concept of "comparable placebo treatments" (CPTs)--placebo treatments with biological effects similar to the drugs they replace--and argue that doctors are not being deceptive when they prescribe or administer CPTs without revealing that they are placebos. We critique two of Cohen and Shapiro's primary arguments. First, Cohen and Shapiro argue that offering undisclosed placebos is not lying to the patient, but rather is making a self-fulfilling prophecy--telling a "lie" that, ideally, will become true. We argue that offering undisclosed placebos is not a "lie" but is a straightforward case of deceptively misleading the patient. Second, Cohen and Shapiro argue that offering undisclosed CPTs is not equivocation. We argue that it typically is equivocation or deception of another sort. If justifiable, undisclosed placebo use will have to be justified as a practice that is deceptive in most instances. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy, Inc. 2014.

  15. Cannabis induces a clinical response in patients with Crohn's disease: a prospective placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftali, Timna; Bar-Lev Schleider, Lihi; Dotan, Iris; Lansky, Ephraim Philip; Sklerovsky Benjaminov, Fabiana; Konikoff, Fred Meir

    2013-10-01

    The marijuana plant Cannabis sativa has been reported to produce beneficial effects for patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, but this has not been investigated in controlled trials. We performed a prospective trial to determine whether cannabis can induce remission in patients with Crohn's disease. We studied 21 patients (mean age, 40 ± 14 y; 13 men) with Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI) scores greater than 200 who did not respond to therapy with steroids, immunomodulators, or anti-tumor necrosis factor-α agents. Patients were assigned randomly to groups given cannabis, twice daily, in the form of cigarettes containing 115 mg of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or placebo containing cannabis flowers from which the THC had been extracted. Disease activity and laboratory tests were assessed during 8 weeks of treatment and 2 weeks thereafter. Complete remission (CDAI score, 100) was observed in 10 of 11 subjects in the cannabis group (90%; from 330 ± 105 to 152 ± 109) and 4 of 10 in the placebo group (40%; from 373 ± 94 to 306 ± 143; P = .028). Three patients in the cannabis group were weaned from steroid dependency. Subjects receiving cannabis reported improved appetite and sleep, with no significant side effects. Although the primary end point of the study (induction of remission) was not achieved, a short course (8 weeks) of THC-rich cannabis produced significant clinical, steroid-free benefits to 10 of 11 patients with active Crohn's disease, compared with placebo, without side effects. Further studies, with larger patient groups and a nonsmoking mode of intake, are warranted. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01040910. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of Irvingia gabonensis seeds on body weight and blood lipids of obese subjects in Cameroon

    OpenAIRE

    Minka Samuel R; Oben Julius E; Ngondi Judith L

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Dietary fibres are frequently used for the treatment of obesity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Irvingia gabonensis seeds in the management of obesity. This was carried out as a double blind randomised study involving 40 subjects (mean age 42.4 years). Twenty-eight subjects received Irvingia gabonensis (IG) (1.05 g three time a day for one month) while 12 were on placebo (P) and the same schedule. During the one-month study period all subjects were on a normoca...

  17. Testing Public Anxiety Treatments against a Credible Placebo Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Desiree C.; Levine, Timothy R.; Beatty, Michael J.; Woolbright, Jessica; Park, Hee Sun

    2007-01-01

    Research investigating public speaking anxiety treatments is subject to demand effects. This study tests the relative effectiveness of systematic desensitization (SD) and multiple treatment method (MT) containing visualization therapy against no-treatment and credible placebo controls. Data (N = 238) were collected at six points in a public…

  18. Placebo Effects: Biological, Clinical and Ethical Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptchuk, Ted J; Miller, Franklin; Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2010-01-01

    For many years, placebos have been conceptualised by their inert content and their use as controls in clinical trials and treatments in clinical practice. Recent research demonstrates that placebo effects are genuine psychobiological phenomenon attributable to the overall therapeutic context, and that placebo effects can be robust in both laboratory and clinical settings. Evidence has also emerged that placebo effects can exist in clinical practice, even if no placebo is given. Further promotion and integration of laboratory and clinical research will allow advances in the ethical harnessing of placebo mechanisms that are inherent in routine clinical care and the potential use of treatments to primarily promote placebo effects. PMID:20171404

  19. Are treatments more effective than placebos? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howick, Jeremy; Friedemann, Claire; Tsakok, Maria; Watson, Robert; Tsakok, Teresa; Thomas, Jennifer; Perera, Rafael; Fleming, Susannah; Heneghan, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Placebos are widely used in clinical practice in spite of ethical restrictions. Whether such use is justified depends in part on the relative benefit of placebos compared to 'active' treatments. A direct test for differences between placebo and 'active' treatment effects has not been conducted. We aimed to test for differences between treatment and placebo effects within similar trial populations. A Cochrane Review compared placebos with no treatment in three-armed trials (no treatment, placebo, and treatment). We added an analysis of treatment and placebo differences within the same trials. SYNTHESIS METHODS: For continuous outcomes we compared mean differences between placebo and no treatment with mean differences between treatment and placebo. For binary outcomes we compared the risk ratio for treatment benefit (versus placebo) with the risk ratio for placebo benefit (versus no treatment). We conducted several preplanned subgroup analyses: objective versus subjective outcomes, conditions tested in three or more trials, and trials with varying degrees of bias. In trials with continuous outcomes (n = 115) we found no difference between treatment and placebo effects (MD = -0.29, 95% CI -0.62 to 0.05, P = 0.10). In trials with binary outcomes (n = 37) treatments were significantly more effective than placebos (RRR = 0.72, 95%CI = 0.61 to 0.86, P = 0.0003). Treatment and placebo effects were not different in 22 out of 28 predefined subgroup analyses. Of the six subgroups with differences treatments were more effective than placebos in five. However when all criteria for reducing bias were ruled out (continuous outcomes) placebos were more effective than treatments (MD = 1.59, 95% CI = 0.40 to 2.77, P = 0.009). Placebos and treatments often have similar effect sizes. Placebos with comparatively powerful effects can benefit patients either alone or as part of a therapeutic regime, and trials involving such placebos must be

  20. Impure placebo is a useless concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louhiala, Pekka; Hemilä, Harri; Puustinen, Raimo

    2015-08-01

    Placebos are allegedly used widely in general practice. Surveys reporting high level usage, however, have combined two categories, 'pure' and 'impure' placebos. The wide use of placebos is explained by the high level usage of impure placebos. In contrast, the prevalence of the use of pure placebos has been low. Traditional pure placebos are clinically ineffective treatments, whereas impure placebos form an ambiguous group of diverse treatments that are not always ineffective. In this paper, we focus on the impure placebo concept and demonstrate problems related to it. We also show that the common examples of impure placebos are not meaningful from the point of view of clinical practice. We conclude that the impure placebo is a scientifically misleading concept and should not be used in scientific or medical literature. The issues behind the concept, however, deserve serious attention in future research.

  1. Olanzapine plus dialectical behavior therapy for women with high irritability who meet criteria for borderline personality disorder: a double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linehan, Marsha M; McDavid, Joshua D; Brown, Milton Z; Sayrs, Jennifer H R; Gallop, Robert J

    2008-06-01

    This double-blind study examined whether olanzapine augments the efficacy of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) in reducing anger and hostility in borderline personality disorder patients. Twenty-four women with borderline personality disorder (DSM-IV criteria) and high levels of irritability and anger received 6 months of DBT. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive either low-dose olanzapine or placebo and were assessed with standardized measures in a double-blind manner. The study was conducted from September 2000 to December 2002. Intent-to-treat analyses indicated that both treatment conditions resulted in significant improvement in irritability, aggression, depression, and self-inflicted injury (p personality disorder. Effect sizes were moderate to large, with the small sample size likely limiting the ability to detect significant results. Overall, there were large and consistent reductions in irritability, aggression, depression, and self-injury for both groups of subjects receiving DBT.

  2. Orlistat in clozapine- or olanzapine-treated patients with overweight or obesity: a 16-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, Grigori; Takala, Pirjo; Tchoukhine, Evgueni; Hakko, Helinä; Raidma, Mirjam; Putkonen, Hanna; Eronen, Markku; Räsänen, Pirkko

    2008-05-01

    Undesirable metabolic effects of modern antipsychotics, especially clozapine and olanzapine, merit development of new weight-control strategies, including pharmacologic ones. We investigated the feasibility of treatment with orlistat, a weight-control drug with no central effects, for overweight/obesity in clozapine- or olanzapine-treated male and female patients. Add-on orlistat was prescribed for 16 weeks in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial to patients who were receiving stable clozapine or olanzapine medication and were aged 18 to 65 years, with no compliance with nonpharmacologic programs or hypocaloric diet required. The primary efficacy variable was body weight change. The study was conducted from 2004 through 2005. Of 71 randomly assigned subjects, 63 were eligible for modified intent-to-treat analysis. While no statistically significant effect was observed in the whole population, male (but not female) patients benefited from treatment with orlistat (-2.36 kg vs. 0.62 kg on placebo, p = .011). There were 5 responders (16.1%) (those with >or= 5% weight loss) that received orlistat versus 2 responders (6.3%) that received placebo (number needed to treat = 11), but the difference was not statistically significant. Without a hypocaloric diet, the effect of orlistat in overweight/obese clozapine-or olanzapine-treated patients is modest and may only be seen in men. More studies should define the optimal length of treatment and feasibility of combination of orlistat with behavioral programs in this population.

  3. Effect of Placebo Conditions on Polysomnographic Parameters in Primary Insomnia: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Alexander; Rief, Winfried

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Little is known about the role of placebo response in the pharmacotherapy of primary insomnia, especially about the effect of placebo intake on objectively assessed outcome variables. Our aim was therefore to conduct an effect-size analysis of placebo conditions in randomized controlled drug trials addressing primary insomnia also including polysomnography. Design: We conducted a comprehensive literature search using PubMed, PsycINFO, PSYNDEX, PQDT OPEN, OpenGREY, ISI Web of Knowledge, Cochrane Clinical Trials, and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. The meta-analysis used a random effects model and was based on 32 studies reporting 82 treatment conditions covering a total of 3,969 participants. Special emphasis was given to the comparison of objective and subjective outcomes and the proportion of the placebo response to the drug response. Measurements and Results: Effect sizes estimates (Hedges g) suggest that there is a small to moderate yet significant and robust placebo response reducing the symptoms of insomnia in terms of sleep onset latency (−0.35), total sleep time (0.42), wake after sleep onset (−0.29), sleep efficiency (0.31), subjective sleep onset latency (−0.29), subjective total sleep time (0.43), subjective wake after sleep onset (−0.32), subjective sleep efficiency (0.25) and sleep quality (0.31). Thus, the placebo response was also evident in objective, physiological (polysomnographic) variables. Our results indicate that 63.56% of the drug responses are achieved even in the placebo groups. Conclusions: In light of these strong placebo responses, future studies should investigate how to exploit placebo mechanisms in clinical practice. Citation: Winkler A, Rief W. Effect of placebo conditions on polysomnographic parameters in primary insomnia: a meta-analysis. SLEEP 2015;38(6):925–931. PMID:25515108

  4. Electronic warfare receivers and receiving systems

    CERN Document Server

    Poisel, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Receivers systems are considered the core of electronic warfare (EW) intercept systems. Without them, the fundamental purpose of such systems is null and void. This book considers the major elements that make up receiver systems and the receivers that go in them.This resource provides system design engineers with techniques for design and development of EW receivers for modern modulations (spread spectrum) in addition to receivers for older, common modulation formats. Each major module in these receivers is considered in detail. Design information is included as well as performance tradeoffs o

  5. Study of the ketogenic agent AC-1202 in mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garvin Fiona

    2009-08-01

    administered AC-1202 had a significant 4.77 point difference in mean change from Baseline in ADAS-Cog scores at Day 45 (p = 0.0005 and a 3.36 point difference at Day 90 (p = 0.0148 compared to Placebo. In the per protocol population, E4(- participants receiving AC-1202 (N = 37 differed from placebo by 5.73 points at Day 45 (p = 0.0027 and by 4.39 points at Day 90 (p = 0.0143. In the dosage compliant population, E4(- participants receiving AC-1202 differed from placebo by 6.26 points at Day 45 (p = 0.0011, N = 38 and 5.33 points at Day 90 (p = 0.0063, N = 35. Furthermore, a significant pharmacologic response was observed between serum β-hydroxybutyrate levels and change in ADAS-Cog scores in E4(- subjects at Day 90 (p = 0.008. Adverse events occurred more frequently in AC-1202 subjects, were primarily restricted to the gastrointestinal system, and were mainly mild to moderate in severity and transient in nature. Conclusion AC-1202 rapidly elevated serum ketone bodies in AD patients and resulted in significant differences in ADAS-Cog scores compared to the Placebo. Effects were most notable in APOE4(- subjects who were dosage compliant.

  6. Prevention of urinary tract infections with vitamin D supplementation 20,000 IU per week for five years. Results from an RCT including 511 subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorde, Rolf; Sollid, Stina T; Svartberg, Johan; Joakimsen, Ragnar M; Grimnes, Guri; Hutchinson, Moira Y S

    2016-01-01

    In observational studies vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased risk of infections, whereas the effect of vitamin D supplementation in randomized controlled trials is non-conclusive. Five hundred and eleven subjects with prediabetes were randomized to vitamin D3 (20,000 IU per week) versus placebo for five years. Every sixth month, a questionnaire on respiratory tract infections (RTI) (common cold, bronchitis, influenza) and urinary tract infection (UTI) was filled in. Mean baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) level was 60 nmol/L. Two hundred and fifty-six subjects received vitamin D and 255 placebo. One hundred and sixteen subjects in the vitamin D and 111 in the placebo group completed the five-year study. Eighteen subjects in the vitamin D group and 34 subjects in the placebo group reported UTI during the study (p vitamin D on UTI was unrelated to baseline serum 25(OH)D level. Supplementation with vitamin D might prevent UTI, but confirmatory studies are needed.

  7. Effects of an inhaled β2-agonist on cardiovascular function and sympathetic activity in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Eric M; Wong, Eric C; Foxx-Lupo, William T; Wheatley, Courtney M; Cassuto, Nicholas A; Patanwala, Asad E

    2011-08-01

    To determine the effect of a short-acting, inhaled β(2)-adrenergic receptor agonist, albuterol sulfate, administered by nebulization, on cardiovascular function and sympathetic activity in healthy individuals. Prospective, placebo-controlled, single-blind, crossover study. University research center. Seventeen healthy subjects. After a screening visit to rule out cardiovascular abnormalities and anemia, each subject participated in two more separate visits. At the second visit, they were administered a single dose of either nebulized albuterol sulfate 2.5 mg diluted in 3 ml of normal saline or placebo (3 ml of normal saline). One week later, subjects returned for their third visit and received the other treatment. At the two study visits, before and 30, 60, and 90 minutes after administration of albuterol or placebo, we measured plasma catecholamine levels (epinephrine and norepinephrine), cardiac output, heart rate, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and we calculated stroke volume, mean arterial pressure, and systemic vascular resistance (SVR). Inhaled placebo resulted in no significant change overall in any of the measured or calculated cardiovascular parameters. Compared with baseline values, albuterol administration after 30, 60, and 90 minutes, increased cardiac output (mean ± SD 4.2 ± 1.1, 4.4 ± 1.3, and 4.3 ± 1.1 L/min, respectively, vs 3.6 ± 1.0 L/min) and stroke volume (51 ± 15, 56 ± 14, and 56 ± 13 ml, respectively, vs 46 ± 12 ml), did not significantly change blood pressure, and decreased SVR (1401 ± 432, 1393 ± 424, and 1384 ± 391 dynes•sec/cm(5), respectively, vs 1661 ± 453 dynes•sec/cm(5)) (pnebulized β(2)-agonist resulted in enhanced ventricular function and a decrease in SVR, suggesting peripheral vasodilation. In addition, the increase in norepinephrine level with albuterol, but not placebo, may have important implications in patients with known cardiovascular disease.

  8. A Double-Blind, Randomised, Placebo-Controlled Trial of EMLA® Cream (Eutectic Lidocaine/Prilocaine Cream) for Analgesia Prior to Cryotherapy of Plantar Warts in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Siew Hui; Pakdeethai, Janthorn; Toh, Matthias P H S; Aw, Derrick C W

    2014-10-01

    Cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen is an effective, safe and convenient form of treatment for plantar warts. EMLA® cream (eutectic mixture of lidocaine 2.5% and prilocaine 2.5%) is a topical local anaesthetic agent that has proven to be effective and well tolerated in the relief of pain associated with various minor interventions in numerous clinical settings. In a single-centre, double-blind, randomised placebo-controlled study, 64 subjects were randomised into 2 groups. The subjects had a thick layer of EMLA® cream or placebo cream applied to pared plantar wart(s) and onto the surrounding margin of 1 mm to 2 mm under occlusion for 60 minutes prior to receiving cryotherapy. The pain of cryotherapy was evaluated by the subjects using a self-administered Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) immediately after the cryotherapy. There was no statistical difference between the mean VAS score for EMLA® cream (47.0 ± 21.4 mm) and placebo (48.9 ± 22.0 mm). Those with more than 1 wart had a significantly higher VAS score than those with only 1 wart (59.1 ± 21.8 vs. 44.3 ± 20.4, P cryotherapy. We conclude that the application of EMLA® cream prior to cryotherapy does not reduce the pain associated with cryotherapy.

  9. Milk containing probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and respiratory illness in children: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpu, M; Kekkonen, R A; Kautiainen, H; Järvenpää, S; Kristo, A; Huovinen, P; Pitkäranta, A; Korpela, R; Hatakka, K

    2012-09-01

    To determine whether long-term daily consumption of milk containing probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (GG) decreases respiratory illness in children. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted with 523 children aged 2-6 years attending day care centers in Finland. Subjects received either normal milk or the same milk with GG on three daily meals for 28 weeks. Daily recording of children' symptoms was done by parents. Primary outcome data from 501 subjects were available for analysis, and data from 128 subjects were analyzed as completed cases in terms of recovery of GG in fecal samples. Number of days with at least one respiratory symptom in all subjects was 5.03/month (95% confidence interval (CI): 4.92-5.15) in the GG group and 5.17/month (95% CI: 5.05-5.29) in the placebo group incidence rate ratio (IRR) 0.97; 95% CI: 0.94-1.00; P=0.098). In the completed cases, the figures were 4.71 days/month (95% CI: 4.52-4.90) in the GG group and 5.67 days/month (95% CI: 5.40-5.94) in the placebo group (IRR 0.83; 95% CI: 0.78-0.88; PGG reduced the occurrence of respiratory illness in children attending day care centers in the completed cases subgroup, but not in the total population. Thus, future clinical trials are warranted to clarify the association between fecal recovery of a probiotic and the symptom prevalence.

  10. Informed consent and placebo effects: a content analysis of information leaflets to identify what clinical trial participants are told about placebos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Felicity L; Adams, Alison E M; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Lewith, George T

    2012-01-01

    Placebo groups are used in randomised clinical trials (RCTs) to control for placebo effects, which can be large. Participants in trials can misunderstand written information particularly regarding technical aspects of trial design such as randomisation; the adequacy of written information about placebos has not been explored. We aimed to identify what participants in major RCTs in the UK are told about placebos and their effects. We conducted a content analysis of 45 Participant Information Leaflets (PILs) using quantitative and qualitative methodologies. PILs were obtained from trials on a major registry of current UK clinical trials (the UKCRN database). Eligible leaflets were received from 44 non-commercial trials but only 1 commercial trial. The main limitation is the low response rate (13.5%), but characteristics of included trials were broadly representative of all non-commercial trials on the database. 84% of PILs were for trials with 50:50 randomisation ratios yet in almost every comparison the target treatments were prioritized over the placebos. Placebos were referred to significantly less frequently than target treatments (7 vs. 27 mentions, pplacebo treatment was either undesirable or ineffective. PILs from recent high quality clinical trials emphasise the benefits and adverse effects of the target treatment, while largely ignoring the possible effects of the placebo. Thus they provide incomplete and at times inaccurate information about placebos. Trial participants should be more fully informed about the health changes that they might experience from a placebo. To do otherwise jeopardises informed consent and is inconsistent with not only the science of placebos but also the fundamental rationale underpinning placebo controlled trials.

  11. Experimental Cardiac Arrest Treatment with Adrenaline, Vasopressin, or Placebo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palácio, Manoel Ângelo Gomes; de Paiva, Edison Ferreira; de Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes; Timerman, Ari

    2013-01-01

    Background The effect of vasoconstrictors in prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has not been fully clarified. Objectives To evaluate adrenaline and vasopressin pressure effect, and observe the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Methods A prospective, randomized, blinded, and placebo-controlled study. After seven minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation, pigs received two minutes cycles of CPR. Defibrillation was attempted (4 J/kg) once at 9 minutes, and after every cycle if a shockable rhythm was present, after what CPR was immediately resumed. At 9 minutes and every five minutes intervals, 0.02 mg/kg (n = 12 pigs) adrenaline, or 0.4 U/kg (n = 12) vasopressin, or 0.2 mL/kg (n = 8) 0.9% saline solution was administered. CPR continued for 30 minutes or until the ROSC. Results Coronary perfusion pressure increased to about 20 mmHg in the three groups. Following vasoconstrictors doses, pressure level reached 35 mmHg versus 15 mmHg with placebo (p < 0.001). Vasopressin effect remained at 15-20 mmHg after three doses versus zero with adrenaline or placebo. ROSC rate differed (p = 0.031) among adrenaline (10/12), vasopressin (6/12), and placebo (2/8). Time-to-ROSC did not differ (16 minutes), nor the number of doses previously received (one or two). There was no difference between vasoconstrictors, but against placebo, only adrenaline significantly increased the ROSC rate (p = 0.019). Conclusion The vasoconstrictors initial pressure effect was equivalent and vasopressin maintained a late effect at prolonged resuscitation. Nevertheless, when compared with placebo, only adrenaline significantly increased the ROSC rate. PMID:24173134

  12. Clinical Pattern of Tolvaptan-Associated Liver Injury in Subjects with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: Analysis of Clinical Trials Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Paul B; Lewis, James H; Kaplowitz, Neil; Alpers, David H; Blais, Jaime D; Smotzer, Dan M; Krasa, Holly; Ouyang, John; Torres, Vicente E; Czerwiec, Frank S; Zimmer, Christopher A

    2015-11-01

    Subjects with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) who were taking tolvaptan experienced aminotransferase elevations more frequently than those on placebo in the TEMPO 3:4 (Tolvaptan Efficacy and Safety in Management of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease and its Outcomes) clinical trial. An independent, blinded, expert Hepatic Adjudication Committee re-examined data from TEMPO 3:4 and its open-label extension TEMPO 4:4, as well as from long-term (>14 months) non-ADPKD tolvaptan trials, using the 5-point Drug-Induced Liver Injury Network classification. In TEMPO 3:4, 1445 subjects were randomized 2:1 (tolvaptan vs. placebo) and 1441 had post-baseline assessments of hepatic injury. Sixteen patients on tolvaptan and one on placebo had significant aminotransferase elevations judged to be at least probably related to study drug. No association with dose or systemic exposure was found. Two of 957 subjects taking tolvaptan (0.2 %) and zero of 484 taking placebo met the definition of a Hy's Law case. One additional Hy's Law case was identified in a TEMPO 4:4 subject who had received placebo in the lead study. The onset of a hepatocellular injury occurred between 3 and 18 months after starting tolvaptan, with gradual resolution over the subsequent 1-4 months. None of the events were associated with liver failure or chronic liver injury/dysfunction. No imbalance in hepatic events was observed between tolvaptan and placebo in lower-dose clinical trials of patients with hyponatremia, heart failure, or cirrhosis. Although hepatocellular injury following long-term tolvaptan treatment in ADPKD subjects was infrequent and reversible, the potential for serious irreversible injury exists. Regular monitoring of transaminase levels is warranted in this patient population.

  13. A multicentre study comparing mazindol and placebo in obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, B R; Ballard, I M; Gold, J A

    1977-01-01

    Mazindol is chemically unrelated to the phenethylamines and has not shown the side-effects or abuse potential of the amphetamine anorectics. To further define its potential for causing weight loss, a six-week double-blind placebo controlled study was undertaken in four centres. A common protocol was used except in one centre, behavioural modification also was employed, whereas in the other centres, no additional measures were used to cause weight loss. Two hundred and forty-five obese patients were assigned randomly to two mazindol groups and one placebo group in each centre. Ninety-eight and forty patients receiving mazindol and placebo respectively completed the protocol. The conclusions were: (a) no significant clinical or laboratory abnormalities occurred from mazindol therapy, (b) the placebo therapy patients did not lose weight without behavioural modification, (c) the placebo therapy group had a higher drop-out rate compared to the mazindol therapy group attributable to the patients' dissatisfaction with failure to lose weight, (d) mazindol therapy without behavioural modification and behavioural modification alone both resulted in a statistically significant mean weight loss of 1 pound/patient/week and (e) mazindol plus behavioural modification resulted in a greater mean weight loss of 1/2 pound/patient/week than with behavioural modification alone. Hence, mazindol is of value in the initial therapy of obesity.

  14. Levodopa, placebo and rotigotine change biomarker levels for oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlack, Siegfried; Kinkel, Manuel; Herrman, Lennard; Müller, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Homocysteine increase and glutathione derivative cysteinyl-glycine fall are indirect biomarkers for oxidative stress, for instance due to dopamine D1 receptor stimulation. To investigate the influence of the D1 receptor agonists levodopa and rotigotine compared with placebo on homocysteine and cysteinyl-glycine in plasma of patients with Parkinson's disease. Patients received 100 mg levodopa, 4 mg rotigotine or placebo. Cysteinyl-glycine and homocysteine were measured every 30 min over three hours. Homocysteine rose during levodopa- and placebo administration. Rotigotine had no effect. Cysteine-glycine only increased after placebo- but not after levodopa- or rotigotine. Homocysteine elevation results from hepatic and gastrointestinal methylation processes. Transdermal rotigotine circumvents these methylation locations. Turnover of segregated alkyl residuals from rotigotine serves as methyl group donors, which counteract homocysteine increment. The placebo-related cysteinyl-glycine increase results from reduced free radical exposure. Low levodopa dosing and antioxidants in the rotigotine patch matrix prevented cysteinyl-glycine fall.

  15. Randomised comparison of thalidomide versus placebo in toxic epidermal necrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkenstein, P; Latarjet, J; Roujeau, J C; Duguet, C; Boudeau, S; Vaillant, L; Maignan, M; Schuhmacher, M H; Milpied, B; Pilorget, A; Bocquet, H; Brun-Buisson, C; Revuz, J

    1998-11-14

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is associated with a 30% death rate. Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of TEN. Thalidomide is a potent inhibitor of TNF-alpha action. We did a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled study of thalidomide in TEN. The patients received a 5-day course of thalidomide 400 mg daily or placebo. The main endpoint was the progression of skin detachment after day 7. Secondary endpoints were the severity of the disease, evaluated with the simplified acute physiology score (SAPS), and the mortality. TNF-alpha and interleukin 6 were measured. The study was stopped because there was excess mortality in the thalidomide group--ten of 12 patients died compared with three of ten in the placebo group (Fisher's exact test with Katz's approximation, relative risk=2.78, p=0.03). After adjustment for SAPS, mortality remained significantly higher in the thalidomide group than in the placebo group (exact logistic regression mid-p=0.007; 95% CI for odds ratio 2.7 to infinity). Plasma TNF-alpha concentration was higher in the thalidomide group than the placebo group on day 2, though the difference was not significant (Wilcoxon rank-sum test p=0.07). Even though few patients were included, our data suggest that thalidomide is detrimental in TEN, possibly because of a paradoxical enhancement of TNF-alpha production.

  16. Kinesiology taping does not alter shoulder strength, shoulder proprioception, or scapular kinematics in healthy, physically active subjects and subjects with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Karen A; Akins, Jonathan S; Varnell, Michelle; Abt, John; Lovalekar, Mita; Lephart, Scott; Sell, Timothy C

    2017-03-01

    To examine the effect of kinesiology tape (KT) on shoulder strength, proprioception, and scapular kinematics in healthy and Subacromial Impingement Syndrome (SAIS) subjects. Placebo-controlled quasi-experimental study. Research laboratory. A total of 30 physically active subjects participated. Ten healthy subjects with no previous history of shoulder pathology received KT on the dominant shoulder. Twenty subjects with shoulder pain for a minimum of two weeks and presenting with clinical signs of impingement were allotted to receive KT (n = 10) or placebo taping (PT, n = 10) on the involved shoulder. All participants were tested pre- and post-application. Shoulder internal/external rotation (IR/ER) strength was assessed with isokinetic dynamometry (average peak torque/body weight). Shoulder IR/ER proprioception was assessed through threshold to detect passive motion (mean absolute error in degrees). Scapular position at 90° and 120° of shoulder abduction during arm raising/lowering were assessed using a 3D motion analysis system. No significant within group or between group differences were demonstrated for any measure. Taping does not appear to aid/impair shoulder strength, shoulder proprioception, or scapular kinematics. Future research should explore if the effects of KT are time-dependent and similar in other pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Lubiprostone Decreases the Small Bowel Transit Time by Capsule Endoscopy: An Exploratory, Randomised, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled 3-Way Crossover Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizue Matsuura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of lubiprostone for bowel preparation and as a propulsive agent in small bowel endoscopy. Six healthy male volunteers participated in this randomized, 3-way crossover study. The subjects received a 24 μg tablet of lubiprostone 60 minutes prior to the capsule ingestion for capsule endoscopy (CE and a placebo tablet 30 minutes before the capsule ingestion (L-P regimen, a placebo tablet 60 minutes prior to CE and a 24 μg tablet of lubiprostone 30 minutes prior to CE (P-L regimen, or a placebo tablet 60 minutes prior to r CE and a placebo tablet again 30 minutes prior to CE (P-P regimen. The quality of the capsule endoscopic images and the amount of water in the small bowel were assessed on 5-point scale. The median SBTT was 178.5 (117–407 minutes in the P-P regimen, 122.5 (27–282 minutes in the L-P regimen, and 110.5 (11–331 minutes in the P-L regimen (P=0.042. This study showed that the use of lubiprostone significantly decreased the SBTT. We also confirmed that lubiprostone was effective for inducing water secretion into the small bowel during CE.

  18. Lubiprostone decreases the small bowel transit time by capsule endoscopy: an exploratory, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled 3-way crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Mizue; Inamori, Masahiko; Endo, Hiroki; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Kanoshima, Kenji; Inoh, Yumi; Fujita, Yuji; Umezawa, Shotaro; Fuyuki, Akiko; Uchiyama, Shiori; Higurashi, Takuma; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Sakai, Eiji; Iida, Hiroshi; Nonaka, Takashi; Futagami, Seiji; Kusakabe, Akihiko; Maeda, Shin; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of lubiprostone for bowel preparation and as a propulsive agent in small bowel endoscopy. Six healthy male volunteers participated in this randomized, 3-way crossover study. The subjects received a 24 μg tablet of lubiprostone 60 minutes prior to the capsule ingestion for capsule endoscopy (CE) and a placebo tablet 30 minutes before the capsule ingestion (L-P regimen), a placebo tablet 60 minutes prior to CE and a 24 μg tablet of lubiprostone 30 minutes prior to CE (P-L regimen), or a placebo tablet 60 minutes prior to r CE and a placebo tablet again 30 minutes prior to CE (P-P regimen). The quality of the capsule endoscopic images and the amount of water in the small bowel were assessed on 5-point scale. The median SBTT was 178.5 (117-407) minutes in the P-P regimen, 122.5 (27-282) minutes in the L-P regimen, and 110.5 (11-331) minutes in the P-L regimen (P = 0.042). This study showed that the use of lubiprostone significantly decreased the SBTT. We also confirmed that lubiprostone was effective for inducing water secretion into the small bowel during CE.

  19. Homeopathic medicine for acute cough in upper respiratory tract infections and acute bronchitis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanasi, Alessandro; Mazzolini, Massimiliano; Tursi, Francesco; Morselli-Labate, Antonio Maria; Paccapelo, Alexandro; Lecchi, Marzia

    2014-02-01

    Cough is a frequent symptom associated to upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) and, although being self-limiting, it might deeply affect the quality of life. Homeopathic products are often employed by patients to treat cough, but the evidence on their efficacy is scarce. Thus, we tested the efficacy of a homeopathic syrup in treating cough arising from URTIs with a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled clinical trial. Patients were treated with either the homeopathic syrup or a placebo for a week, and recorded cough severity in a diary by means of a verbal category-descriptive score for two weeks. Sputum viscosity was assessed with a viscosimeter before and after 4 days of treatment; patients were also asked to provide a subjective evaluation of viscosity. Eighty patients were randomized to receive placebo (n = 40) or the homeopathic syrup (n = 40). All patients completed the study. In each group cough scores decreased over time, however, after 4 and 7 days of treatment, cough severity was significantly lower in the homeopathic group than in the placebo one (p acute cough induced by URTIs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Efficacy of topical chamomile oil for mild and moderate carpal tunnel syndrome: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashempur, Mohammad Hashem; Ghasemi, Mohammad Sadegh; Daneshfard, Babak; Ghoreishi, Parissa Sadat; Lari, Zeinab Nasiri; Homayouni, Kaynoosh; Zargaran, Arman

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of topical chamomile oil in patients with mild and moderate carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Eighty six patients with electrodiagnostic criteria of mild and moderate CTS were enrolled in this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial and received wrist splint plus topical chamomile oil or placebo for 4 weeks. They were evaluated at the baseline and end of the study regarding functional and symptomatic scores, dynamometry, and electrodiagnostic indexes. Dynamometry, functionality, and symptom severity scores of the patients were significantly improved in the chamomile oil group compared with the placebo group (P = 0.040, P = 0.0001, P = 0.017, respectively). Additionally, compound latency of the median nerve in the chamomile oil group significantly decreased (P = 0.035) compared to the placebo group. Other electerodiagnostic measurements did not change significantly. Complementary treatment with topical chamomile oil may have some benefits for patients with mild and moderate CTS, both subjectively and objectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Conditioned placebo dose reduction: a new treatment in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Adrian D; Glesne, Corrine E; Bodfish, James W

    2010-06-01

    This study examined if pairing a placebo with stimulant medication produces a placebo response that allows children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be maintained on a lower dose of stimulant medication. The primary aim was to determine the efficacy, side effects, and acceptability of a novel conditioned placebo dose reduction procedure. Participants included 99 children ages 6 to 12 years with ADHD. After an initial double-blind dose finding to identify optimal dose of mixed amphetamine salts, subjects were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatments of 8-week duration: (a) conditioned placebo dose reduction condition (50% reduced dose/placebo [RD/P]) or (b) a dose reduction only condition (RD) or (c) a no reduction condition (full dose). The innovative conditioned placebo dose reduction procedure involved daily pairing of mixed amphetamine salts dose with a visually distinctive placebo capsule administered in open label, with full disclosure of placebo use to subjects and parents. Seventy children completed the study. There were no differences in subject retention among the 3 groups. Most subjects in the RD/P group remained stable during the treatment phase, whereas most in the RD group deteriorated. There was no difference in control of ADHD symptoms between the RD/P group and the full dose group, and both RD/P and full dose groups showed better ADHD control than the RD group. Treatment emergent side effects were lowest in the RD/P group. Pairing placebos with stimulant medication elicits a placebo response that allows children with ADHD to be effectively treated on 50% of their optimal stimulant dose.

  2. Effects of sea buckthorn berries on infections and inflammation: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmo, P; Alin, J; Salminen, E; Kallio, H; Tahvonen, R

    2008-09-01

    To study the effect of sea buckthorn berries on the number and duration of common cold (CC) infections. As secondary objectives the effects on digestive and urinary tract infections (DTI, UTI), and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations were also investigated. A total of 254 healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to receive sea buckthorn or placebo product during the study, which 233 of them completed. There were no significant differences in the number or duration of CC or DTI between groups (CC: relative risks (sea buckthorn vs placebo) for the number and duration were 1.15 (95% CI 0.90-1.48) and 1.05 (95% CI 0.87-1.27), respectively). In the sea buckthorn group, as compared to the placebo, the serum CRP concentrations decreased significantly (difference in median change -0.059 mg/l, P=0.039). The number of UTI was too small to draw solid conclusions, but the results indicate the subject merits further investigation. Sea buckthorn berries did not prevent CC or DTI. However, a reductive effect on CRP, a marker of inflammation, and a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, was detected.

  3. Double-blind clonazepam vs placebo in panic disorder treatment

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    VALENÇA ALEXANDRE MARTINS

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of clonazepam, in a fixed dose (2 mg/day, compared with placebo in the treatment of panic disorder patients. METHOD: 24 panic disorder patients with agoraphobia were randomly selected. The diagnosis was obtained using the structured clinical interview for DSM-IV . All twenty-four subjects were randomly assigned to either treatment with clonazepam (2 mg/day or placebo, during 6 weeks. Efficacy assessments included: change from baseline in the number of panic attacks; CGI scores for panic disorder; Hamilton rating scale for anxiety; and panic associated symptoms scale. RESULTS: At the therapeutic endpoint, only one of 9 placebo patients (11.1% were free of panic attacks, compared with 8 of 13 (61.5% clonazepam patients (Fisher exact test; p=0,031. CONCLUSION: the results provide evidence for the efficacy of clonazepam in panic disorder patients.

  4. Expectation, the placebo effect and the response to treatment.

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    Brown, Walter A

    2015-05-01

    What we believe we will experience from a treatment--our expectation--has a substantial impact on what we actually experience. Expectation has been established as a key process behind the placebo effect. Studies in both laboratory and clinical settings consistently show that when people ingest a pharmacologically inert substance (placebo) but believe that it is an active substance, they experience both the subjective sensations and physiologic effects expected from that active substance. Expectation has an important place in the response to "real" treatment as well. This paper provides an overview of the data which point to the role of expectation in both the placebo effect and the response to treatment. These data suggest that clinicians might enhance the benefit of all treatments by promoting patients' positive expectations.

  5. Creatine fails to augment the benefits from resistance training in patients with HIV infection: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

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    Giorgos K Sakkas

    Full Text Available Progressive resistance exercise training (PRT improves physical functioning in patients with HIV infection. Creatine supplementation can augment the benefits derived from training in athletes and improve muscle function in patients with muscle wasting. The objective of this study was to determine whether creatine supplementation augments the effects of PRT on muscle strength, energetics, and body composition in HIV-infected patients.This is a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, clinical research center-based, outpatient study in San Francisco. 40 HIV-positive men (20 creatine, 20 placebo enrolled in a 14-week study. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive creatine monohydrate or placebo for 14 weeks. Treatment began with a loading dose of 20 g/day or an equivalent number of placebo capsules for 5 days, followed by maintenance dosing of 4.8 g/day or placebo. Beginning at week 2 and continuing to week 14, all subjects underwent thrice-weekly supervised resistance exercise while continuing on the assigned study medication (with repeated 6-week cycles of loading and maintenance. The main outcome measurements included muscle strength (one repetition maximum, energetics ((31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy, composition and size (magnetic resonance imaging, as well as total body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Thirty-three subjects completed the study (17 creatine, 16 placebo. Strength increased in all 8 muscle groups studied following PRT, but this increase was not augmented by creatine supplementation (average increase 44 vs. 42%, difference 2%, 95% CI -9.5% to 13.9% in creatine and placebo, respectively. There were no differences between groups in changes in muscle energetics. Thigh muscle cross-sectional area increased following resistance exercise, with no additive effect of creatine. Lean body mass (LBM increased to a significantly greater extent with creatine. CONCLUSIONS / SIGNIFICANCE: Resistance exercise improved

  6. Is placebo useful in the treatment of major depression in clinical practice?

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    Marchesi, Carlo; De Panfilis, Chiara; Tonna, Matteo; Ossola, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Background For many years, placebo has been defined by its inert content and use in clinical trials. In recent years, several studies have demonstrated its effect in the treatment of major depression. The aim of this paper is to present the conclusions of recent meta-analyses of the placebo effect in major depression, to explain the mechanism by which placebo exerts its effect, and to discuss whether placebo can be used in the treatment of patients with major depression in clinical practice. Recent meta-analyses have demonstrated that the placebo effect is estimated to account for 67% of the treatment effect in patients receiving antidepressants, and furthermore that placebo is as effective as antidepressants in patients with mild to moderate major depression (reporting a Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score lower than 25), whereas placebo is less effective than antidepressants in severely depressed patients. However, several limitations make the translation of these conclusions into clinical practice impracticable. Clinicians should learn from the “placebo lesson” to maximize the nonspecific effects of treatment when they prescribe an antidepressant, particularly in less severely depressed patients, who show a higher placebo response in randomized controlled trials. This strategy can increase the antidepressant effect and may reduce nonadherence with treatment. PMID:23836976

  7. Efficacy and Safety of IncobotulinumtoxinA in Subjects Previously Treated with Botulinum Toxin versus Toxin-Naïve Subjects with Cervical Dystonia

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    Hubert Fernandez

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: To determine whether botulinum toxin treatment history affected the outcomes of a study comparing the safety and efficacy of incobotulinumtoxinA with placebo in subjects with cervical dystonia (CD.Methods: This was a prospective, double‐blind, randomized, placebo‐controlled, multicenter trial in botulinum toxin‐treated or toxin‐naïve CD subjects. Subjects received a fixed dose of either 120 U or 240 U of incobotulinumtoxinA or placebo. The primary outcome measure was change from baseline to Week 4 in the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS total score. Treatment‐emergent adverse events (TEAEs were also evaluated. This report represents a subgroup analysis of botulinum toxin‐treated or toxin‐naïve subjects.Results: Participants (N = 233; 38.6% toxin‐naïve had a mean age of 52.8 years. IncobotulinumtoxinA significantly improved TWSTRS total scores from baseline to Week 4 in both dose groups versus placebo, and the improvement persisted through the end of the study (≤20 weeks. Both the previously toxin‐treated and toxin‐naïve subjects demonstrated significant improvements in TWSTRS total scores at Week 4 compared to baseline. The most frequent TEAEs in the incobotulinumtoxinA groups were dysphagia, neck pain, and muscular weakness, which were generally mild. TEAEs were more common in the 240 U group and toxin‐naïve subjects. Discussion: Overall, incobotulinumtoxinA was safe and effective in CD, regardless of toxin therapy history. A lower starting dose may be better tolerated among toxin‐naïve subjects without sacrificing efficacy.

  8. Add-on fesoterodine for residual storage symptoms suggestive of overactive bladder in men receiving α-blocker treatment for lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Steven A; Roehrborn, Claus G; Gong, Jason; Sun, Franklin; Guan, Zhonghong

    2012-06-01

    Study Type - Therapy (RCT) Level of Evidence 1b What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Male lower urinary tract symptoms are often attributed to bladder outlet obstruction secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia and treated with drugs targeting the prostate. However, many men with storage lower urinary tract symptoms may not respond adequately to these agents. Antimuscarinics, with or without an α-blocker, may be effective for the treatment of the storage symptoms of overactive bladder in some men. Flexible-dose fesoterodine as an add-on treatment significantly improved urinary frequency and symptom bother, but not urgency episodes (primary endpoint), versus add-on placebo and was well tolerated in men with persistent overactive bladder symptoms despite receiving α-blocker. • To evaluate flexible-dose fesoterodine vs placebo in men with persistent overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms despite receiving α-blocker treatment • This was a double-blind, 12-week, flexible-dose trial. • Men with persistent storage symptoms (≥ 8 micturitions and ≥ 3 urgency episodes per 24 h) after receiving an α-blocker for ≥ 6 weeks were randomized to add-on fesoterodine 4 mg or placebo, with optional dose escalation to 8 mg at week 4 and reduction back to 4 mg at week 8 (or matching placebo adjustments). • Subjects completed 3-day diaries, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), Overactive Bladder Questionnaire (OAB-q), Patient Perception of Bladder Condition (PPBC), and Urgency Perception Scale (UPS) at baseline and weeks 4 and 12. • A total of 943 men were randomized and received at least one dose of study treatment (fesoterodine, n= 471; placebo, n= 472). • Among these, 251 (53%) in the fesoterodine group and 300 (64%) in the placebo group requested dose escalation at week 4 and 35 (7%) and 15 (3%) requested dose reduction at week 8. Changes from baseline to week 12 in urgency episodes (primary endpoint) in the fesoterodine (-3.2) and

  9. The effectiveness of using misoprostol with and without letrozole for successful medical abortion: A randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial

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    Elham Naghshineh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In developing countries it is important to the exploration of available and safe regimens for medical abortion. The present study was designed to assess the effect of letrozole compared to placebo pretreatment followed by sublingual misoprostol for therapeutic abortion in eligible women with gestational age less than 17 weeks. Materials and Methods: In this randomized control trail, 130 women eligible for legal abortions were randomly divided into two groups of case and controls. Cases received daily oral dose of 10 mg letrozole 10 mg letrozole for three days followed by sublingual misoprostol. Controls received daily oral dose of placebo followed by sublingual misoprostol. The dose of misoprostol was administrated according to ACOG guidelines based on patients′ gestational age. The rate of complete abortion, induction-of-abortion time, and side-effects were assessed as main outcomes. Results: Complete abortion was observed in 46 (76.7% letrozole group and 26 (42.6% controls (P < 0.0001. Also, in 14 subjects of letrozole group and 35 subjects in placebo group, the placenta was not delivered during follow-up and curettage was performed. The mean interval induction-to-abortion was 5.1 h in letrozole group and 8.9 h in control (P < 0.0001. The cumulative rates of the induction-of-abortion time were a significant difference between the two groups (P < 0.0001. The incidence and severity of side-effects was comparable for the two groups (P = 0.9. Conclusion: Letrozole could be a quite beneficial adjuvant to misoprostol for induction of complete abortion in those who are candidates for legal medical abortion.

  10. Placebo response rate in clinical trials of fistulizing Crohn's disease: systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Ford, Alexander C; Luthra, Pavit; Hanauer, Stephen B; Travis, Simon P; Harris, M Scott; Reinisch, Walter

    2014-12-01

    It is important to determine the magnitude and identify modifiers of the rate of response to placebo in clinical trials of fistulizing Crohn's disease (CD), to understand disease progression, and to calculate sample size. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of rates of response to placebo in trials of patients with fistulizing CD. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, EMBASE CLASSIC, and the Cochrane central register of controlled trials for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing pharmacologic agents with placebo in adults with fistulizing CD. We identified studies that reported complete fistula closure, partial closure, or response. Data were extracted as intention-to-treat analyses and pooled by using a random-effects model. Proportions of patients who received placebo and had complete or partial fistula(e) closure were calculated, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The effects of trial characteristics on the magnitude of response to placebo were examined. Thirteen RCTs were eligible for our analysis; these included 579 patients assigned to placebo groups. The pooled rate of response to placebo, among all RCTs, for complete fistula closure was 15.6% (95% CI, 10.9%-20.9%), with significant heterogeneity (I(2) = 62.5%, P = .001). The pooled rate of response to placebo for partial fistula closure or response in 9 trials, comprising 423 patients, was 18.3% (95% CI, 14.8%-22.1%). Rates of response to placebo were significantly lower in trials with shorter durations of therapy and shorter intervals to assessment of fistula closure. Neither exposure to the pharmacologic agent during the induction phase of the same (or related) RCT nor concomitant medications had any effect. In a meta-analysis of rate of response to placebo in patients with fistulizing CD, we found that fistulae closed in almost 1/6 patients given placebo in RCTs of pharmacologic agents. Future research should identify characteristics of patients that predict response to placebo. Copyright

  11. A survey of patient preferences for a placebo orodispersible tablet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wade AG

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Alan G Wade1, Gordon M Crawford1, David Young21CPS Research, Glasgow, UK; 2Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland, UKAim: To assess the attitudes and preferences of patients currently being treated for depression or anxiety disorders with traditional oral antidepressants relative to a placebo orodispersible (ODT formulation of escitalopram.Methods: This was an open study collecting patient-reported outcome data from patients with anxiety or depression that were treated with oral antidepressant medication on Day 0 before and after receiving a single placebo ODT, and on Day 3 or 4 after receiving two further daily doses of placebo ODT. Patients aged 18–80 years who were currently receiving treatment with oral antidepressants were recruited from general practice and by advertising. Patients with significant symptoms of anxiety or depression (scoring ≥9 on either the depression or anxiety subscales of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were included in the study.Results: A total of 150 patients were enrolled in and completed the study. About 37% of the patients had had trouble with swallowing tablets, and patients with higher depression scores reported more general swallowing problems than those with lower scores (P = 0.002. Most patients (75.3% believed that an ODT might work faster but that it would make no difference to the effectiveness of the medication (63.1% or the number of side effects (81.3%. About 96% of the patients reported experiencing a pleasant taste following the placebo ODT, although seven patients did not like its taste or aftertaste. This study found that 80.7% of patients reported that the tablets were easy or very easy to get out of the packaging.Conclusion: Based on the results of the placebo version of escitalopram ODT, the escitalopram ODT is likely to be well accepted by patients suffering from anxiety or depressive symptoms.Keywords: ODT, swallowing difficulties

  12. A placebo-controlled trial of itopride in functional dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtmann, Gerald; Talley, Nicholas J; Liebregts, Tobias; Adam, Birgit; Parow, Christopher

    2006-02-23

    The treatment of patients with functional dyspepsia remains unsatisfactory. We assessed the efficacy of itopride, a dopamine D2 antagonist with anti-acetylcholinesterase [corrected] effects, in patients with functional dyspepsia. Patients with functional dyspepsia were randomly assigned to receive either itopride (50, 100, or 200 mg three times daily) or placebo. After eight weeks of treatment, three primary efficacy end points were analyzed: the change from baseline in the severity of symptoms of functional dyspepsia (as assessed by the Leeds Dyspepsia Questionnaire), patients' global assessment of efficacy (the proportion of patients without symptoms or with marked improvement), and the severity of pain or fullness as rated on a five-grade scale. We randomly assigned 554 patients; 523 had outcome data and could be included in the analyses. After eight weeks, 41 percent of the patients receiving placebo were symptom-free or had marked improvement, as compared with 57 percent, 59 percent, and 64 percent receiving itopride at a dose of 50, 100, or 200 mg three times daily, respectively (Pitopride). Although the symptom score improved significantly in all four groups, an overall analysis revealed that itopride was significantly superior to placebo, with the greatest symptom-score improvement in the 100- and 200-mg groups (-6.24 and -6.27, vs. -4.50 in the placebo group; P=0.05). Analysis of the combined end point of pain and fullness showed that itopride yielded a greater rate of response than placebo (73 percent vs. 63 percent, P=0.04). Itopride significantly improves symptoms in patients with functional dyspepsia. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00272103.). Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Medical Society.

  13. Single- and multiple-ascending-dose studies of the NS3 protease inhibitor asunaprevir in subjects with or without chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquinelli, Claudio; McPhee, Fiona; Eley, Timothy; Villegas, Criselda; Sandy, Katrina; Sheridan, Pamela; Persson, Anna; Huang, Shu-Pang; Hernandez, Dennis; Sheaffer, Amy K; Scola, Paul; Marbury, Thomas; Lawitz, Eric; Goldwater, Ronald; Rodriguez-Torres, Maribel; Demicco, Michael; Wright, David; Charlton, Michael; Kraft, Walter K; Lopez-Talavera, Juan-Carlos; Grasela, Dennis M

    2012-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease inhibitors combined with pegylated alfa interferon-ribavirin have demonstrated improved efficacy compared with pegylated alfa interferon-ribavirin alone for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Asunaprevir (BMS-650032), a novel HCV NS3 protease inhibitor in clinical development, was evaluated for safety, antiviral activity, and resistance in four double-blind, placebo-controlled, sequential-panel, single- and multiple-ascending-dose (SAD and MAD) studies in healthy subjects or subjects with chronic HCV genotype 1 infection. In SAD studies, subjects (healthy or with chronic HCV infection) were randomized to receive asunaprevir in dose groups of 10 to 1,200 mg or a placebo. In MAD studies, healthy subjects were randomized to receive asunaprevir in dose groups of 10 to 600 mg twice daily or a placebo for 14 days; subjects with HCV infection received asunaprevir in dose groups of 200 to 600 mg twice daily, or a placebo, for 3 days. Across all four studies, headache and diarrhea were the most frequent adverse events in asunaprevir recipients. Asunaprevir at doses of 200 to 600 mg resulted in rapid HCV RNA decreases from the baseline; maximal mean changes in HCV RNA over time were 2.7 and 3.5 log(10) IU/ml in the SAD and MAD studies, respectively. No enrichment of signature asunaprevir-resistant viral variants was detected. In conclusion, the novel NS3 protease inhibitor asunaprevir, when administered at single or multiple doses of 200 to 600 mg twice daily, is generally well tolerated, achieving rapid and substantial decreases in HCV RNA levels in subjects chronically infected with genotype 1 HCV.

  14. Effects of varenicline in adult smokers: a multinational, 24-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolliger, Chris T; Issa, Jaqueline S; Posadas-Valay, Rodolfo; Safwat, Tarek; Abreu, Paula; Correia, Eurico A; Park, Peter W; Chopra, Pravin

    2011-04-01

    Prevalence rates of smoking are rising in developing countries. Previous trials evaluating the efficacy and tolerability of the smoking-cessation medication varenicline have used largely participants of Caucasian origin. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of varenicline in populations of participants from Latin America, Africa, and the Middle East to investigate potential differences in the therapeutic response to varenicline. This multinational, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted at 42 centers in 11 countries (Latin America: Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Mexico, and Venezuela; Africa: Egypt and South Africa; Middle East: Jordan, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates). Participants were male and female smokers aged 18 to 75 years who were motivated to stop smoking; smoked ≥10 cigarettes/d, with no cumulative period of abstinence >3 months in the previous year; and who had no serious or unstable disease within the previous 6 months. Subjects were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive varenicline 1 mg or placebo, BID for 12 weeks, with a 12-week nontreatment follow-up. Brief smoking-cessation counseling was provided. The main outcome measures were carbon monoxide-confirmed continuous abstinence rate (CAR) at weeks 9 to 12 and weeks 9 to 24. Adverse events (AEs) were recorded for tolerability assessment. Overall, 588 subjects (varenicline, 390; placebo, 198) were randomized and treated. The mean (SD) ages of subjects in the varenicline and placebo groups were 43.1 (10.8) and 43.9 (10.8) years, respectively; 57.7% and 65.7% were male; and the mean (SD) weights were 75.0 (16.0) and 76.7 (16.3) kg (range, 40.0-130.0 and 45.6-126.0 kg). CAR at weeks 9 to 12 was significantly higher with varenicline than with placebo (53.59% vs 18.69%; odds ratio [OR] = 5.76; 95% CI, 3.74-8.88; P vs 13.13%; OR = 4.78; 95% CI, 2.97-7.68; P < 0.0001). Nausea, headache, and insomnia were the most commonly reported

  15. Relative utility of a visual analogue scale vs. a six-point Likert scale in the measurement of global subject outcome in patients with low back pain receiving physiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harland, N J; Dawkin, M J; Martin, D

    2015-03-01

    Patients' subjective impression of change is an important construct to measure following physiotherapy, but little evidence exists about the best type of measure to use. To compare the construct validity and utility of two forms of a global subjective outcome scale (GSOS) in patients with back pain: Likert and visual analogue scale (VAS) GSOS. Two samples of patients attending physiotherapy for back pain completed a questionnaire battery at discharge from physiotherapy including either a Likert or VAS GSOS. One hundred and eighty-seven {79 males, mean age 52.1 [standard deviation (SD) 15.5] years} patients completed the Likert GSOS and a separate sample of 144 patients [62 males, mean age 55.7 (SD 15.9) years] completed the VAS GSOS upon discharge from physiotherapy. The two versions of the GSOS were compared using pre- and post-treatment changes in scores using a VAS (pain), Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (18-item version) and catastrophising subscale of the Coping Strategies Questionnaire 24. Both versions of the GSOS showed significant (PPhysiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Balanced placebo design with marijuana: pharmacological and expectancy effects on impulsivity and risk taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metrik, Jane; Kahler, Christopher W; Reynolds, Brady; McGeary, John E; Monti, Peter M; Haney, Margaret; de Wit, Harriet; Rohsenow, Damaris J

    2012-10-01

    Marijuana is believed to increase impulsivity and risk taking, but the processes whereby it affects such behaviors are not understood. Indeed, either the pharmacologic effect of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or the expectancy of receiving it may lead to deficits in cognitive processing and increases in risk taking. We examined the relative effects of expecting to receive active marijuana and the pharmacological drug effects using a balanced placebo design. Young adult regular marijuana users (N = 136) were randomly assigned into one of four groups in a two × two instructional set (Told THC vs. Told no THC) by drug administration (smoked marijuana with 2.8 % THC vs. placebo) design. Dependent measures included subjective intoxication, behavioral impulsivity, and decision-making related to risky behaviors. Active THC, regardless of expectancy, impaired inhibition on the Stop Signal and Stroop Color-Word tasks. Expectancy of having smoked THC, regardless of active drug, decreased impulsive decision-making on a delay discounting task among participants reporting no deception and increased perception of sexual risk among women, consistent with a compensatory effect. Expectancy of smoking THC in combination with active THC increased negative perceptions from risky alcohol use. Active drug and expectancy independently increased subjective intoxication. Results highlight the importance of marijuana expectancy effects as users believing they are smoking marijuana may compensate for expected intoxication effects when engaged in deliberate decision-making by making less impulsive and risky decisions. Effects of marijuana on impulsive disinhibition, by contrast, reflect direct pharmacologic effects for which participants did not compensate.

  17. Pidotimod for the prevention of acute respiratory infections in healthy children entering into daycare: A double blind randomized placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mameli, Chiara; Pasinato, Angela; Picca, Marina; Bedogni, Giorgio; Pisanelli, Stefania; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo

    2015-07-01

    Acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) are very common in pediatric age and reach a peak in the first 4 years of life, especially in children attending daycare. Pidotimod, a synthetic immunostimulant, may reduce the incidence of ARTIs in children with predisposing risk factors. Nevertheless studies on healthy children are presently lacking. We performed a double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled trial study to assess the efficacy of Pidotimod in a population of 3-year-old healthy children who just entered kindergarten. The main outcome was the incidence of respiratory infections in this population and the secondary outcome was the prescription of antibiotics. The study group consisted of healthy 3-year-old children who had not yet attended day-care centers. Patients were enrolled by a convenience sample of 17 family pediatricians (FP). Children were randomized to receive either Pidotimod 400 mg per os or placebo twice daily for the last 10 days of each month from October 2013 to April 2014. Any time a child presented to his/her FP with fever and ARTI was diagnosed, clinical and therapeutic data were collected. A total of 800 children were pre-screened, 733 did not meet the inclusion criteria and 10 refused to participate. Of the 67 eligible subjects, 57 were successfully enrolled within the study recruitment period and randomized to receive Pidotimod (n = 29) or placebo (n = 28). Eight children were lost to follow-up. In the final analysis were thus included 24 children who received Pidotimod and 25 who received placebo. The incidence rate ratio for respiratory infections was 0.78 (95%CI 0.53 to 1.15, p = 0.211) for Pidotimod vs. placebo. The corresponding risk ratio for antibiotic usage was 0.56 (95%CI 0.27 to 1.16, p = 0.120). In our trial, Pidotimod did not prove to be statistically superior to placebo for the prevention of ARTI in a population of healthy children who entered kindergarten. However, Pidotimod showed some potential as a means for reducing

  18. Coaches' attitudes towards placebo interventions in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Attila; Müller, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Placebo-induced performance enhancement is a new controversial issue in competitive sports. Coaches have control over the use of placebos, but their practices and attitudes were barely studied to date. In this survey 96 coaches from regional, national and international levels were asked about their practices and attitudes concerning placebo use in sports. Results revealed that 90% of the respondents were aware of placebo effects. Many (44%) coaches admitted to administering a placebo to their athletes. Those working at international level have administered placebos more often than the others (P = .02). Two thirds of the coaches agreed to the wider use of placebos in sport. Respondents who have used placebos in the past reported improved athletic performance. They also agreed more to the wider use of placebos than the coaches who previously did not use a placebo (P = .001). Team sport coaches use more often placebos than coaches working with individual athletes (P = .05). Only 10% of the sample thought that their athletes would refuse a hypothetical performance enhancer supplied by them. After a successful placebo intervention, only 15% of the coaches would administer it again without consulting the athlete. Overall, the coaches are optimistic about placebo use in sports. Close to half of them, especially those coaching at higher levels of competition, may use it regularly while achieving positive results.

  19. Placebo Sleep Affects Cognitive Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draganich, Christina; Erdal, Kristi

    2014-01-01

    The placebo effect is any outcome that is not attributed to a specific treatment but rather to an individual's mindset (Benson & Friedman, 1996). This phenomenon can extend beyond its typical use in pharmaceutical drugs to involve aspects of everyday life, such as the effect of sleep on cognitive functioning. In 2 studies examining whether…

  20. A randomised, controlled, crossover study to investigate the pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and safety of 1R,2S-methoxamine hydrochloride (NRL001) in healthy elderly subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, D; Duffin, A; Gruss, H J; Pediconi, C; Jacobs, A

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of a single dose of 10 mg NRL001 (the 1R,2S stereoisomer of methoxamine hydrochloride) in a 2 g suppository on pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic (PK) variables, and safety, in a healthy elderly population. This was a Phase I, single-centre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study during which subjects received a single 2 g suppository of 10 mg NRL001 and a matching placebo in two separate treatment periods. The main outcome measures were Holter-, vital signs- and electrocardiogram-derived cardiovascular variables; plasma PK analysis; and safety assessments. Twenty-six subjects were dosed with study medication. Statistically significant reductions in Holter-derived heart rate (HR), vital signs-derived HR and diastolic blood pressure (BP) were observed comparing NRL001 with placebo treatment, and also with increasing NRL001 plasma concentration. No statistically significant relationships were observed between NRL001 concentration and systolic BP, mean arterial pressure or QTC interval (both Bazett's and Fridericia's correction). Thirty-nine adverse events were reported in 20 (76.9%) subjects, mostly after dosing with NRL001. Administration of NRL001 suppositories led to decreases in HR when compared with placebo data. NRL001 was well tolerated with a good safety profile during the study. Healthy elderly subjects did not show significantly different biological responses to NRL001 suppositories compared with younger healthy volunteers in previous studies. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  1. [The placebo trap].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reck, R

    1998-04-20

    Monodisciplinary orthopaedic pain therapy no longer measures up to international standards. In cases of chronic back pain, in particular, there is such a gulf between the clinical findings and the patient's subjective assessment that the symptoms cannot be attributed solely to so-called degenerative changes. Back pain patients are in great danger of becoming fixated on somatic symptoms due to an excess of diagnostic procedures or incorrect diagnoses, of being treated purely somatically on the basis of associated findings, and of suffering irreversible damage from invasive management of such findings. Despite the wealth of empirical evidence, it remains difficult to expand the everyday concept of illness and its causes to include not only physical and biological factors but also social and emotional disturbances. Particularly physicians with a purely biological concept of pain have not learned to take note of affective relational factors and incorporate them into their diagnostic assessment. The decision to undertake invasive diagnostic or therapeutic procedures then frequently represents the doctor's reaction to feelings of irritation or helplessness. If this situation is to change, an interdisciplinary concept of pain must be made a part of medical training, and scientific findings must be presented in such a way that they can be integrated into routine daily practice.

  2. The moral case for the clinical placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Azgad; Lichtenberg, Pesach

    2014-04-01

    Placebos are arguably the most commonly prescribed drug, across cultures and throughout history. Nevertheless, today many would consider their use in the clinic unethical, since placebo treatment involves deception and the violation of patients' autonomy. We examine the placebo's definition and its clinical efficacy from a biopsychosocial perspective, and argue that the intentional use of the placebo and placebo effect, in certain circumstances and under several conditions, may be morally acceptable. We highlight the role of a virtue-based ethical orientation and its implications for the beneficent use of the placebo. In addition, the definitions of lying and deception are discussed, clarified and applied to the clinical placebo dilemma. Lastly, we suggest that concerns about patient autonomy, when invoked as a further argument against administering placebos, are extended beyond their reasonable and coherent application.

  3. Placebo versus "standard" hypnosis rationale: attitudes, expectancies, hypnotic responses, and experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardi, Michelle; Cleere, Colleen; Lynn, Steven Jay; Kirsch, Irving

    2013-10-01

    In this study participants were provided with either the standard rationale that accompanies the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility: A (Shor & Orne, 1962) or a rationale that presented hypnosis as a nondeceptive placebo, consistent with Kirsch's (1994) sociocognitive perspective of hypnosis. The effects of the placebo and standard rationales were highly comparable with respect to hypnotic attitudes; prehypnotic expectancies; objective, subjective, and involuntariness measures of hypnotic responding; as well as a variety of subjective experiences during hypnosis, as measured by the Phenomenology of Consciousness Inventory (Pekala, 1982). Differences among correlations were not evident when measures were compared across groups. However, indices of hypnotic responding were correlated with attitudes in the hypnosis but not the placebo condition, and, generally speaking, the link between subjective experiences during hypnosis and measures of hypnotic responding were more reliable in the placebo than the hypnosis group. Researcher findings are neutral with respect to providing support for altered state versus sociocognitive models of hypnosis.

  4. Dose titration of BAF312 attenuates the initial heart rate reducing effect in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legangneux, Eric; Gardin, Anne; Johns, Donald

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies have shown transient decreases in heart rate (HR) following administration of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor modulators including BAF312. This study was conducted to determine whether dose titration of BAF312 reduces or eliminates these effects. Fifty-six healthy subjects were randomized 1:1:1:1 to receive BAF312 in one of two dose titration (DT) regimens (DT1 and DT2: 0.25-10 mg over 9-10 days), no titration (10 mg starting dose) or placebo. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed. Neither DT1 nor DT2 resulted in clinically significant bradycardia or atrioventricular conduction effects. Both titration regimens showed a favourable difference on each of days 1-12 vs. the non-titration regimen on day 1 for HR effects (P titration was 1.18 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13, 1.23) and 1.14 (95% CI 1.09, 1.18) for DT2 (both P titration HRs showed considerable separation from placebo throughout the study. There was no statistically significant reduction in HR vs. placebo on day 1 in either titration regimen. On days 3-7 subjects in DT1 and DT2 experienced minor reductions in HR vs. placebo (approximately 5 beats min⁻¹; P ≤ 0.0001). From days 9-12, HRs in both titration regimens were comparable with placebo. Both titration regimens effectively attenuated the initial bradyarrhythmia observed on day 1 of treatment with BAF312 10 mg. © 2012 Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research (NIBIR). British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  5. A randomized, placebo-controlled, single-blinded, split-faced clinical trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of KLOX-001 gel formulation with KLOX light-emitting diode light on facial rejuvenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolis, Andreas; Bernstein, Steven; Kinney, Brian; Scuderi, Nicolo; Rastogi, Shipra; Sampalis, John S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Many treatment modalities exist to counteract the effects of cutaneous aging. Ablative methods have been the mainstay for nonsurgical facial rejuvenation. In recent years, nonablative techniques have been developed with the aim of achieving facial rejuvenation without epidermal damage. Light-emitting diode (LED) photorejuvenation is a novel nonablative technique that induces collagen synthesis through biophotomodulatory pathways. Materials and methods A single-center, randomized, single-blinded, placebo-controlled, split-faced clinical trial was designed. Thirty-two patients were enrolled for a 12-week study. Patients were randomized into one of four groups: Group A, treatment with KLOX-001 gel formulation and white LED (placebo) light; Group B, treatment with a placebo/base gel (no active chromophore) formulation and KLOX LED light; Group C, treatment with KLOX-001 gel formulation and KLOX LED light; and Group D, treatment with the standard skin rejuvenating treatment (0.1% retinol-based cream). Patients received treatment at weeks 0, 1, 2, and 3, and returned to the clinic at weeks 4, 8, and 12 for clinical assessments performed by an independent, blinded committee of physicians using subjective clinician assessment scales. Tolerability, adverse outcomes, and patient satisfaction were also assessed. Results Analysis demonstrated that the KLOX LED light with KLOX placebo/base gel and the KLOX LED light + KLOX-001 gel formulation groups were superior to standard of care and KLOX-001 gel formulation with placebo light on subjective clinical assessment and multiple wrinkle scales, with statistically significant results obtained for brow positioning, perioral wrinkling, and total wrinkle score. Conclusion The study results show that KLOX LED light with KLOX-001 gel formulation and KLOX LED light with KLOX placebo/base gel are effective, safe, well-tolerated, and painless treatment modalities for skin rejuvenation. PMID:27257391

  6. Induced fear reduces the effectiveness of a placebo intervention on pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyby, Peter Solvoll; Forsberg, June Thorvaldsen; Asli, Ole; Flaten, Magne Arve

    2012-05-01

    Fear was induced by the anticipation of electric shock in order to investigate whether fear reduced the effectiveness of a placebo intervention on reported pain and the acoustic startle reflex. Thirty-three subjects participated in a 3 Condition (Natural History [NH], Placebo [P], Placebo+Fear [PF])×3 Test (Pretest, Posttest 1, Posttest 2) within-subject design, tested on 3 separate days. Measures of fear were fear of pain (FOP), measured by the Fear of Pain Questionnaire (FPQ-III); fear-potentiated startle; and a self-report measure that assessed the effectiveness of the fear induction procedure. In the pain intensity data, there was a trend towards a placebo effect. This trend was abolished by induced fear, and was most pronounced in subjects who were highest in measures of fear. The placebo manipulation also caused a reduction in startle reflex amplitude. This effect was abolished by induced fear, and was strongest amongst high FOP subjects. In conclusion, induced fear abolished placebo analgesia, and this effect was strongest in subjects who had high scores on measures of fear. Copyright © 2012 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The top-down influence of ergogenic placebos on muscle work and fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollo, Antonella; Carlino, Elisa; Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2008-07-01

    Placebos have been shown to induce powerful effects in a variety of medical conditions, such as pain and movement disorders, as well as to increase physical performance and endurance in healthy subjects. Here we investigated the effects of an ergogenic placebo on the performance of the quadriceps muscle, which is responsible for the extension of the leg relative to the thigh. In a first experiment, a placebo was administered along with the suggestion that it was caffeine at high dose. This resulted in a significant increase in mean muscle work across subjects, which, however, was not accompanied by a decrease of perceived muscle fatigue. In a second experiment, the placebo caffeine was administered twice in two different sessions. Each time, the weight to be lifted with the quadriceps was reduced surreptitiously so as to make the subjects believe that the 'ergogenic agent' was effective. After this conditioning procedure, the load was restored to the original weight, and both muscle work and perceived fatigue assessed after placebo administration. Compared with the first experiment, the placebo effect was larger, with a significant increase in muscle work and decrease in perceived muscle fatigue. Within the context of the role of peripheral and/or central mechanisms in muscle performance, the present findings suggest a central mechanism of top-down modulation of muscle fatigue. In addition, the difference between the first and second experiment underscores the role of learning in increasing muscle performance with placebos.

  8. Dopamine D3 receptor-preferring agonist enhances the subjective effects of cocaine in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Thomas F.; Haile, Colin N.; Mahoney, James J.; Shah, Ravi; Verrico, Christopher D.; De La Garza, Richard; Kosten, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Pramipexole is a D3 dopamine receptor-preferring agonist indicated for the treatment of Parkinson disease. Studies associate pramipexole with pathological gambling and impulse control disorders suggesting a role for D3 receptors in reinforcement processes. Clinical studies showed pramipexole decreased cocaine craving and reversed central deficits in individuals with cocaine use disorder. Preclinical studies have shown acute administration of pramipexole increases cocaine’s reinforcing effects whereas other reports suggest chronic pramipexole produces tolerance to cocaine. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study we examined the impact of pramipexole treatment on the subjective effects produced by cocaine in volunteers with cocaine use disorder. Volunteers received pramipexole titrated up to 3.0 mg/d or placebo over 15 days. Participants then received intravenous cocaine (0, 20 and 40 mg) on day 15. Cardiovascular and subjective effects were obtained with visual analog scales at time points across the session. Pramipexole alone increased peak heart rate following saline and diastolic blood pressure following cocaine. Pramipexole produced upwards of two-fold increases in positive subjective effects ratings following cocaine. These results indicate that chronic D3 receptor activation increases the subjective effects of cocaine in humans. Caution should be used when prescribing pramipexole to patients that may also use cocaine. PMID:26239766

  9. Effects of D-cycloserine on extinction of mesolimbic cue reactivity in alcoholism: a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Falk; Kirsch, Martina; Bach, Patrick; Hoffmann, Sabine; Reinhard, Iris; Jorde, Anne; von der Goltz, Christoph; Spanagel, Rainer; Mann, Karl; Loeber, Sabine; Vollstädt-Klein, Sabine

    2015-07-01

    Mesocorticolimbic reactivity to alcohol-associated cues has been shown to be associated with relapse to renewed drinking and to be decreased by cue-exposure-based extinction training (CET). Evidence from preclinical studies suggests that the extinction of conditioned alcohol-seeking behavior might be facilitated by drugs increasing N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-associated memory consolidation. In this study, we assessed the efficacy of CET treatment supplemented with the partial NMDA-receptor agonist D-cycloserine (DCS) at reducing mesolimbic cue reactivity (CR), craving, and relapse risk in alcoholism. In a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study, we recruited 76 recently detoxified abstinent alcohol-dependent patients. Thirty-two (16 DCS, 16 placebo) patients showed cue-induced ventral-striatal activation measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) prior to treatment and were thus included in the efficacy analyses. After inpatient detoxification, patients underwent nine sessions of CET spaced over 3 weeks, receiving either 50 mg DCS or placebo 1 h prior to each CET session. FMRI was conducted before treatment and 3 weeks after treatment onset. Following treatment with CET plus DCS, cue-induced brain activation in the ventral and dorsal striatum was decreased compared to treatment with CET plus placebo. Elevated posttreatment ventral striatal CR and increased craving (assessed using the Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale) were associated with increased relapse risk. DCS was shown to augment the effect of CET for alcohol-dependent subjects. The interaction between craving and ventral-striatal CR on treatment outcome suggests that CET might be especially effective in patients exhibiting both high craving and elevated CR.

  10. A randomized placebo-controlled trial of an omega-3 fatty acid and vitamins E+C in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentsen, H; Osnes, K; Refsum, H; Solberg, D K; Bøhmer, T

    2013-12-17

    Membrane lipid metabolism and redox regulation may be disturbed in schizophrenia. We examined the clinical effect of adding an omega-3 fatty acid and/or vitamins E+C to antipsychotics. It was hypothesized that lower baseline levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) would predict more benefit from the add-on treatment. The trial had a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 2 × 2 factorial design. Patients aged 18-39 years with schizophrenia or related psychoses were consecutively included at admission to psychiatric departments in Norway. They received active or placebo ethyl-eicosapentaenoate (EPA) 2 g day⁻¹ and active or placebo vitamin E 364 mg day⁻¹+vitamin C 1000 mg day⁻¹ (vitamins) for 16 weeks. The main outcome measures were Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total and subscales scores, analyzed by linear mixed models. Ninety-nine patients were included. At baseline, erythrocyte PUFA were measured in 97 subjects. Given separately, EPA and vitamins increased drop-out rates, whereas when combined they did not differ from placebo. In low PUFA patients, EPA alone impaired the course of total PANSS (Cohen's d=0.29; P=0.03) and psychotic symptoms (d=0.40; P=0.003), especially persecutory delusions (d=0.48; P=0.0004). Vitamins alone impaired the course of psychotic symptoms (d= 0.37; P=0.005), especially persecutory delusions (d=0.47; P=0.0005). Adding vitamins to EPA neutralized the detrimental effect on psychosis (interaction d=0.31; P=0.02). In high PUFA patients, there were no significant effects of trial drugs on PANSS scales. In conclusion, given separately during an acute episode, EPA and vitamins E+C induce psychotic symptoms in patients with low levels of PUFA. Combined, these agents seem safe.

  11. Dexamethasone facilitates fear extinction and safety discrimination in PTSD: A placebo-controlled, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michopoulos, Vasiliki; Norrholm, Seth D; Stevens, Jennifer S; Glover, Ebony M; Rothbaum, Barbara O; Gillespie, Charles F; Schwartz, Ann C; Ressler, Kerry J; Jovanovic, Tanja

    2017-09-01

    Psychophysiological hallmarks of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) include exaggerated fear responses, impaired inhibition and extinction of conditioned fear, and decreased discrimination between safety and fear cues. This increased fear load associated with PTSD can be a barrier to effective therapy thus indicating the need for new treatments to reduce fear expression in people with PTSD. One potential biological target for reducing fear expression in PTSD is the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which is dysregulated in PTSD. Recent translational rodent studies and cross-sectional clinical studies have shown that dexamethasone administration and the resulting suppression of cortisol in individuals with PTSD leads to a decrease in the fear responses characteristic of PTSD. These data, taken together, suggest that dexamethasone may serve as a novel pharmacologic intervention for heightened fear responses in PTSD. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to test our hypothesis that dexamethasone administration and the concomitant suppression of HPA axis hyperactivity would attenuate fear expression and enhance fear extinction in individuals with PTSD. Study participants (n=62) were recruited from Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta, GA. Participants were randomized to receive dexamethasone or placebo prior to fear conditioning and extinction, in a counterbalanced design (treatments separated by a week). Both PTSD- (n=37) and PTSD+ (n=25) participants showed significant startle increases in the presence of the danger signal during placebo and dexamethasone treatments (all p<0.05). However, only PTSD- control participants showed decreases in fear-potentiated startle across extinction blocks during both conditions (p's≤0.001), with PTSD+ participants showing deficits in fear extinction and safety discrimination in the placebo condition. Notably, extinction and discrimination deficits in PTSD+ subjects were markedly reversed with dexamethasone

  12. The effect of cetirizine in dogs with chronic atopic dermatitis: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsiao, Yun-Hsia; Chen, Charles; Willemse, Ton

    2016-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to evaluate the effect of cetirizine in dogs with atopic dermatitis (AD), fulfilling Favrot's diagnostic clinical criteria. In a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled study, the dogs received either 3 mg/kg cetirizine orally once daily (n=27), or a placebo (n=23)

  13. Placebo reactions in double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlieg-Boerstra, B. J.; van der Heide, S.; Bijleveld, C. M. A.; Kukler, J.; Duiverman, E. J.; Dubois, A. E. J.

    2007-01-01

    A cardinal feature of the double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) is that placebo administration is included as a control. To date, the occurrence and diagnostic significance of placebo events have not extensively been documented. To analyse the occurrence and features of placebo

  14. Subjective aggression during alcohol and cannabis intoxication before and after aggression exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sousa Fernandes Perna, E B; Theunissen, E L; Kuypers, K P C; Toennes, S W; Ramaekers, J G

    2016-09-01

    Alcohol and cannabis use have been implicated in aggression. Alcohol consumption is known to facilitate aggression, whereas a causal link between cannabis and aggression has not been clearly demonstrated. This study investigated the acute effects of alcohol and cannabis on subjective aggression in alcohol and cannabis users, respectively, following aggression exposure. Drug-free controls served as a reference. It was hypothesized that aggression exposure would increase subjective aggression in alcohol users during alcohol intoxication, whereas it was expected to decrease subjective aggression in cannabis users during cannabis intoxication. Heavy alcohol (n = 20) and regular cannabis users (n = 21), and controls (n = 20) were included in a mixed factorial study. Alcohol and cannabis users received single doses of alcohol and placebo or cannabis and placebo, respectively. Subjective aggression was assessed before and after aggression exposure consisting of administrations of the point-subtraction aggression paradigm (PSAP) and the single category implicit association test (SC-IAT). Testosterone and cortisol levels in response to alcohol/cannabis treatment and aggression exposure were recorded as secondary outcome measures. Subjective aggression significantly increased following aggression exposure in all groups while being sober. Alcohol intoxication increased subjective aggression whereas cannabis decreased the subjective aggression following aggression exposure. Aggressive responses during the PSAP increased following alcohol and decreased following cannabis relative to placebo. Changes in aggressive feeling or response were not correlated to the neuroendocrine response to treatments. It is concluded that alcohol facilitates feelings of aggression whereas cannabis diminishes aggressive feelings in heavy alcohol and regular cannabis users, respectively.

  15. A double-blind, randomized and placebo-controlled trial of Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) in the treatment of anxiety and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazidi, Mohsen; Shemshian, Maryam; Mousavi, Seyed Hadi; Norouzy, Abdolreza; Kermani, Tayebe; Moghiman, Toktam; Sadeghi, Akram; Mokhber, Naghme; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Ferns, Gordon A A

    2016-06-01

    Depression and anxiety are prevalent serious psychiatric disorders. Several drugs are used to treat these conditions but these are often associated with serious side effects. For this reason alternative therapies, including herbal medication such as saffron, have been proposed. We aimed to assess the effects of saffron extract for the treatment of anxiety and depression using a 12-week double-blind, placebo-controlled trial design. Sixty adult patients with anxiety and depression were randomized to receive a 50 mg saffron capsule (Crocus sativus L. stigma) or a placebo capsule twice daily for 12 weeks. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) questionnaires were used at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks after initiating medication. 54 subjects completed the trial. Saffron supplements had a significant effect on the BDI and BAI scores of subjects in comparison to placebo at the 12 week time-point (pSaffron appears to have a significant impact in the treatment of anxiety and depression disorder. Side effects were rare.

  16. Analysis of Clinical Predictors of Resolution of Sleep Disturbance Related to Frequent Nighttime Heartburn and Acid Regurgitation Symptoms in Individuals Taking Esomeprazole 20 mg or Placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David A; Le Moigne, Anne; Li, Jing; Pollack, Charles; Nagy, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Sleep disturbances related to reflux symptoms have a significant impact on the daily lives of affected individuals. These analyses identified clinical factors related to resolution of reflux-related sleep disturbance in subjects treated with esomeprazole 20 mg for 14 days. Data from the first 14 days of 2 similar randomized, double-blind studies were pooled for subjects experiencing frequent heartburn and related sleep disturbances receiving esomeprazole 20 mg (n = 357) or placebo (n = 346). A stepwise logistic regression analysis was performed with pooled and individual study data to evaluate relationships between clinical factors [treatment (esomeprazole vs. placebo), run-in sleep disturbance frequency, occurrence (yes/no) of 24-h, daytime, and nighttime heartburn (yes: ≥1 episode in 14-day treatment period)] and complete sleep disturbance resolution (no disturbances for 7 consecutive days). Absence of daytime (p = 0.0018) or nighttime (p Esomeprazole treatment was an independent significant predictor of improvement across all endpoints (p esomeprazole in subgroups with higher run-in symptom frequency. Lower run-in sleep disturbance frequency, no occurrence of daytime or nighttime heartburn during therapy, and esomeprazole treatment predicted complete reflux-related sleep disturbance resolution. The magnitude of therapeutic benefit for esomeprazole 20 mg over placebo increased with increasing baseline sleep disturbance.

  17. Effect of Uric Acid-Lowering Agents on Endothelial Function: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgi, Lea; McMullan, Ciaran; Wohlhueter, Ann; Curhan, Gary C; Fisher, Naomi D; Forman, John P

    2017-02-01

    Higher levels of serum uric acid are independently associated with endothelial dysfunction, a mechanism for incident hypertension. Overweight/obese individuals are more prone to endothelial dysfunction than their lean counterparts. However, the effect of lowering serum uric acid on endothelial dysfunction in these individuals has not been examined thoroughly. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of nonhypertensive, overweight, or obese individuals with higher serum uric acid (body mass index ≥25 kg/m 2 and serum uric acid ≥5.0 mg/dL), we assigned subjects to probenecid (500-1000 mg/d), allopurinol (300-600 mg/d), or matching placebo. The primary outcome was endothelium-dependent vasodilation measured by brachial artery ultrasound at baseline and 8 weeks. By the end of the trial, 47, 49, and 53 participants had been allocated to receive probenecid, allopurinol, and placebo, respectively. Mean serum uric acid levels significantly decreased in the probenecid (from 6.1 to 3.5 mg/dL) and allopurinol groups (from 6.1 to 2.9 mg/dL) but not in the placebo group (6.1 to 5.6 mg/dL). None of the interventions produced any significant change in endothelium-dependent vasodilation (probenecid, 7.4±5.1% at baseline and 8.3±5.1% at 8 weeks; allopurinol, 7.6±6.0% at baseline and 6.2±4.8% at 8 weeks; and placebo, 6.5±3.8% at baseline and 7.1±4.9% at 8 weeks). In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, uric acid lowering did not affect endothelial function in overweight or obese nonhypertensive individuals. These data do not support the hypothesis that uric acid is causally related to endothelial dysfunction, a potential mechanism for development of hypertension. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Efficacy and safety of Ginkgo biloba standardized extract in the treatment of vascular cognitive impairment: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarin, Vida; Bašić Kes, Vanja; Trkanjec, Zlatko; Budišić, Mislav; Bošnjak Pašić, Marija; Črnac, Petra; Budinčević, Hrvoje

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was to determine the efficacy and safety of Ginkgo biloba extract in patients diagnosed with vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Methods A total of 90 patients (aged 67.1±8.0 years; 59 women) were randomly allocated (1:1:1) to receive G. biloba 120 mg, G. biloba 60 mg, or placebo during a 6-month period. Assessment was made for efficacy indicators, including neuropsychological tests scores (Sandoz Clinical Assessment Geriatric Scale, Folstein Mini-Mental State Examination, Mattis Dementia Rating Scale, and Clinical Global Impression) and transcranial Doppler ultrasound findings. Safety indicators included laboratory findings, reported adverse reactions, and clinical examination. Results At the end of 6-month study period, G. biloba 120 and 60 mg showed a statistically significant positive effect in comparison with placebo only on the Clinical Global Impression score (2.6±0.8 vs 3.1±0.7 vs 2.8±0.7, respectively; P=0.038). The Clinical Global Impression score showed a significant deterioration from the baseline values in the placebo group (−0.3±0.5; P=0.021) as opposed to G. biloba groups. No significant differences were found in the transcranial Doppler ultrasound findings. Adverse reactions were significantly more common and serious in the placebo group (16 subjects) than in either of the two G. biloba extract groups (eight and nine subjects, respectively), whereas laboratory findings and clinical examinations revealed no differences between the groups receiving G. biloba extract and placebo. Conclusion According to our results, G. biloba seemed to slow down the cognitive deterioration in patients with VCI, but the effect was shown in only one of the four neuropsychological tests administered. However, because of this mild effect in combination with a few adverse reactions, we cannot say that it is ineffective or unsafe either. Further studies are still needed to provide

  19. Pharmacokinetics and safety of single and multiple doses of ACHN-490 injection administered intravenously in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cass, Robert T; Brooks, Carter D; Havrilla, Nancy A; Tack, Kenneth J; Borin, Marie T; Young, Don; Bruss, Jon B

    2011-12-01

    ACHN-490 is an aminoglycoside with activity against multidrug-resistant pathogens, including those resistant to currently used aminoglycosides. Two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical studies investigated the pharmacokinetics (PK), safety, and tolerability of ACHN-490 injection in healthy subjects. Study 1 used a parallel-group design with escalating single (SD) and multiple doses (MD). Study 2 explored a longer duration of the highest dose tolerated in the first study. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive either ACHN-490 injection or a placebo administered by a 10-min intravenous infusion. Study 1 enrolled 39 subjects (30 active and 9 placebo) and consisted of a single dose of 1 mg/kg body weight followed by ascending SD and MD cohorts of 4, 7, 11, and 15 mg/kg for 10, 10, 5, and 3 days, respectively. Study 2 enrolled 8 subjects (6 active and 2 placebo) who received 15 mg/kg for 5 days. Safety was assessed from adverse event (AE) reporting, standard clinical laboratory procedures, and testing for renal, cochlear, and vestibular function. ACHN-490 exhibited linear and dose-proportional PK, with agreement between the studies for PK parameters assessed. The 15-mg/kg dose did not accumulate with repeated dosing over 5 days. Mean steady-state (±standard deviation) area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC(0-24)), maximum concentration of drug in serum (C(max)), half-life (t(1/2)), clearance, and volume of distribution at steady state (V(ss)) for the 15-mg/kg, day 5 dose were 239 ± 45 h·mg/liter, 113 ± 17 mg/liter, 3 ± 0.3 h, 1.1 ± 0.1 ml/min/kg, and 0.24 ± 0.04 liters/kg, respectively. AEs were mild to moderate and rapidly resolved. No evidence of nephrotoxicity or ototoxicity was observed.

  20. A systematic review found no consistent difference in effect between more and less intensive placebo interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fässler, Margrit; Meissner, Karin; Kleijnen, Jos; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Linde, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    It has been suggested that some placebo interventions might be associated with larger clinical effects than others. In a systematic review, we investigated whether there is evidence from direct comparisons in randomized clinical trials including two or more placebo groups supporting this hypothesis. Eligible trials were identified through electronic database searches and citation tracking up to February 2013. Placebo interventions in a trial were categorized into a more intense and a less intense intervention based on complexity, invasiveness, or route of administration and time needed for application. Twelve studies with 1,059 patients receiving placebo met the eligibility criteria. Studies were highly heterogeneous regarding patients, interventions, outcomes, and risk of bias. Seven studies did not find any significant differences between the more intense and the less intense placebo intervention, four studies found differences for single outcomes, and one study consistently reported significantly larger effects of the more intense placebo. An explorative meta-analysis yielded a standardized mean difference -0.22 (95% confidence interval: -0.46, 0.02; P = 0.07; I(2) = 68%). In the studies included in this review, more intense placebos were not consistently associated with larger effects than less intense placebos. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Classical conditioning without verbal suggestions elicits placebo analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bąbel, Przemysław; Bajcar, Elżbieta A; Adamczyk, Wacław; Kicman, Paweł; Lisińska, Natalia; Świder, Karolina; Colloca, Luana

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationships among classical conditioning, expectancy, and fear in placebo analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia. A total of 42 healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to three groups: placebo, nocebo, and control. They received 96 electrical stimuli, preceded by either orange or blue lights. A hidden conditioning procedure, in which participants were not informed about the meaning of coloured lights, was performed in the placebo and nocebo groups. Light of one colour was paired with pain stimuli of moderate intensity (control stimuli), and light of the other colour was paired with either nonpainful stimuli (in the placebo group) or painful stimuli of high intensity (in the nocebo group). In the control group, both colour lights were followed by control stimuli of moderate intensity without any conditioning procedure. Participants rated pain intensity, expectancy of pain intensity, and fear. In the testing phase, when both of the coloured lights were followed by identical moderate pain stimuli, we found a significant analgesic effect in the placebo group, and a significant hyperalgesic effect in the nocebo group. Neither expectancy nor fear ratings predicted placebo analgesia or nocebo hyperalgesia. It appears that a hidden conditioning procedure, without any explicit verbal suggestions, elicits placebo and nocebo effects, however we found no evidence that these effects are predicted by either expectancy or fear. These results suggest that classical conditioning may be a distinct mechanism for placebo and nocebo effects.

  2. Classical conditioning without verbal suggestions elicits placebo analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Bąbel

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the relationships among classical conditioning, expectancy, and fear in placebo analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia. A total of 42 healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to three groups: placebo, nocebo, and control. They received 96 electrical stimuli, preceded by either orange or blue lights. A hidden conditioning procedure, in which participants were not informed about the meaning of coloured lights, was performed in the placebo and nocebo groups. Light of one colour was paired with pain stimuli of moderate intensity (control stimuli, and light of the other colour was paired with either nonpainful stimuli (in the placebo group or painful stimuli of high intensity (in the nocebo group. In the control group, both colour lights were followed by control stimuli of moderate intensity without any conditioning procedure. Participants rated pain intensity, expectancy of pain intensity, and fear. In the testing phase, when both of the coloured lights were followed by identical moderate pain stimuli, we found a significant analgesic effect in the placebo group, and a significant hyperalgesic effect in the nocebo group. Neither expectancy nor fear ratings predicted placebo analgesia or nocebo hyperalgesia. It appears that a hidden conditioning procedure, without any explicit verbal suggestions, elicits placebo and nocebo effects, however we found no evidence that these effects are predicted by either expectancy or fear. These results suggest that classical conditioning may be a distinct mechanism for placebo and nocebo effects.

  3. Correlates of Placebo Response in the Treatment of Sexual Dysfunction in Women: A Preliminary Report

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    Bradford, Andrea; Meston, Cindy

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Placebo responses have been large across a number of clinical trials for treatment of women’s sexual dysfunction. Studying placebo responses may elucidate predictors of symptom reduction and responsiveness to intervention. Aim To determine the correlates of placebo response in participants enrolled in a clinical trial for female sexual dysfunction. Methods We analyzed data from 16 women with sexual arousal and orgasmic dysfunction who were randomized to receive 8 weeks of placebo treatment within a larger randomized controlled trial. Using nonparametric correlations, we tested whether age, length of relationship, psychological symptoms, and scores on self-report measures predicted change in sexual function with placebo treatment. Main Outcome Measure Female Sexual Function Index. Results Consistent with findings from other studies, we found a significant improvement in sexual function scores after 8 weeks of treatment with placebo. We also found that age and length of relationship predicted the magnitude of change in sexual function across treatment. Changes in relationship adjustment, but not relationship adjustment at baseline, predicted the magnitude of improvement in sexual function scores. We observed no relationship between psychological symptom severity and change in sexual function. Conclusions Participant age and length of relationship predicted subsequent magnitude of change in sexual function scores during treatment with placebo. In addition, relationship adjustment covaried with changes in sexual function. Our findings suggest that “placebo effects” may represent underlying factors that influence the way in which women respond to the process of treatment. PMID:17666035

  4. Can pill placebo augment cognitive-behavior therapy for panic disorder?

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    Churchill Rachel

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a number of drug and psychotherapy comparative trials, psychotherapy-placebo combination has been assumed to represent psychotherapy. Whether psychotherapy plus pill placebo is the same as psychotherapy alone is an empirical question which however has to date never been examined systematically. Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs that directly compared cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT alone against CBT plus pill placebo in the treatment of panic disorder. Results Extensive literature search was able to identify three relevant RCTs. At the end of the acute phase treatment, patients who received CBT plus placebo had 26% (95%CI: 2 to 55% increased chances of responding than those who received CBT alone. At follow-up the difference was no longer statistically significant (22%, 95%CI: -10% to 64%. Conclusion The act of taking a pill placebo may enhance the placebo effect already contained in the effective psychotherapeutic intervention during the acute phase treatment. Theoretically this is an argument against the recently claimed null hypothesis of placebo effect in general and clinically it may point to some further room for enhancing the psychotherapeutic approach for panic disorder.

  5. Melphalan and prednisone plus thalidomide or placebo in elderly patients with multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waage, Anders; Gimsing, Peter; Fayers, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 363 patients with untreated multiple myeloma were randomized to receive either melphalan-prednisone and thalidomide (MPT) or melphalan-prednisone and placebo (MP). The dose of melphalan was 0.25 mg/kg and prednisone was 100 mg given daily for 4 days...... every 6 weeks until plateau phase. The dose of thalidomide/placebo was escalated to 400 mg daily until plateau phase and thereafter reduced to 200 mg daily until progression. A total of 357 patients were analyzed. Partial response was 34% and 33%, and very good partial response or better was 23% and 7...

  6. Family physicians believe the placebo effect is therapeutic but often use real drugs as placebos.

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    Kermen, Rachel; Hickner, John; Brody, Howard; Hasham, Irma

    2010-10-01

    Few national data exist on physicians' use of and beliefs about placebos in routine health care. We mailed a 22-question, confidential survey about placebo use and beliefs to a random sample of 1,000 members of the American Academy of Family Physicians. A total of 412 of 970 (43%) eligible physicians responded, and 56% of respondents said they had used a placebo in clinical practice. Forty percent of respondents had used an antibiotic as a placebo, and 11% had used inert substances. The most common reason for prescribing placebos was "after unjustified demand for medication." Eighty-five percent of respondents believed placebos can have both psychological and physical benefits. The majority (61%) recommended a placebo over offering no treatment, while 8% said clinical placebo use should be categorically prohibited. Nearly all respondents believed a number of routine clinical practices promote the placebo effect. Many US family physicians use placebos and generally believe the placebo effect has both psychological and physical benefits. Physicians recognize the broader application of the placebo effect but they commonly use active medication as placebos. The responses to this survey raise important questions about the appropriate use of placebos and the therapeutic value of the placebo effect in clinical practice.

  7. Liraglutide in an Adolescent Population with Obesity: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled 5-Week Trial to Assess Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Liraglutide in Adolescents Aged 12-17 Years.

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    Danne, Thomas; Biester, Torben; Kapitzke, Kerstin; Jacobsen, Sanja H; Jacobsen, Lisbeth V; Petri, Kristin C Carlsson; Hale, Paula M; Kordonouri, Olga

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of liraglutide in adolescents with obesity. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Twenty-one subjects, aged 12-17 years and Tanner stage 2-5, with obesity (body mass index [BMI] corresponding to both a BMI ≥95th percentile for age and sex and to a BMI of ≥30 kg/m2 for adults; additionally, BMI was ≤45 kg/m2) were randomized (2:1) to receive 5 weeks of treatment with liraglutide (0.6 mg with weekly dose increase to a maximum of 3.0 mg for the last week) (n = 14) or placebo (n = 7). The primary endpoint was number of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs). Secondary endpoints included safety measures, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic endpoints. All participants receiving liraglutide, and 4 receiving placebo (57.1%), had at least 1 TEAE. The most common TEAEs were gastrointestinal disorders. No severe TEAEs, TEAE-related withdrawals, or deaths occurred. Twelve hypoglycemic episodes occurred in 8 participants receiving liraglutide and 2 in 1 participant receiving placebo. No severe hypoglycemic episodes were reported. Liraglutide exposure in terms of trough concentration increased with dose, although dose proportionality was confounded by unexpectedly low trough concentration values at the 2.4 mg dose. Exposure in terms of model-derived area under the plasma concentration time curve from 0 to 24 hours after dose in steady state was similar to that in adults with obesity. Liraglutide had a similar safety and tolerability profile compared with adults when administered to adolescents with obesity, with no unexpected safety/tolerability issues. Results suggest that the dosing regimen approved for weight management in adults may be appropriate for use in adolescents. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01789086. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Two Phase 3 Trials of Dupilumab versus Placebo in Atopic Dermatitis.

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    Simpson, Eric L; Bieber, Thomas; Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Beck, Lisa A; Blauvelt, Andrew; Cork, Michael J; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Deleuran, Mette; Kataoka, Yoko; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Kingo, Külli; Worm, Margitta; Poulin, Yves; Wollenberg, Andreas; Soo, Yuhwen; Graham, Neil M H; Pirozzi, Gianluca; Akinlade, Bolanle; Staudinger, Heribert; Mastey, Vera; Eckert, Laurent; Gadkari, Abhijit; Stahl, Neil; Yancopoulos, George D; Ardeleanu, Marius

    2016-12-15

    Dupilumab, a human monoclonal antibody against interleukin-4 receptor alpha, inhibits signaling of interleukin-4 and interleukin-13, type 2 cytokines that may be important drivers of atopic or allergic diseases such as atopic dermatitis. In two randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trials of identical design (SOLO 1 and SOLO 2), we enrolled adults with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis whose disease was inadequately controlled by topical treatment. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive, for 16 weeks, subcutaneous dupilumab (300 mg) or placebo weekly or the same dose of dupilumab every other week alternating with placebo. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients who had both a score of 0 or 1 (clear or almost clear) on the Investigator's Global Assessment and a reduction of 2 points or more in that score from baseline at week 16. We enrolled 671 patients in SOLO 1 and 708 in SOLO 2. In SOLO 1, the primary outcome occurred in 85 patients (38%) who received dupilumab every other week and in 83 (37%) who received dupilumab weekly, as compared with 23 (10%) who received placebo (P<0.001 for both comparisons with placebo). The results were similar in SOLO 2, with the primary outcome occurring in 84 patients (36%) who received dupilumab every other week and in 87 (36%) who received dupilumab weekly, as compared with 20 (8%) who received placebo (P<0.001 for both comparisons). In addition, in the two trials, an improvement from baseline to week 16 of at least 75% on the Eczema Area and Severity Index was reported in significantly more patients who received each regimen of dupilumab than in patients who received placebo (P<0.001 for all comparisons). Dupilumab was also associated with improvement in other clinical end points, including reduction in pruritus and symptoms of anxiety or depression and improvement in quality of life. Injection-site reactions and conjunctivitis were more frequent in the dupilumab groups than in the placebo

  9. Placebo response: relevance to the rheumatic diseases.

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    Pollo, Antonella; Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2008-05-01

    Recent interest in the neurobiology of the placebo effect has brought about a new awareness of its potential exploitation for patient benefit, framing it as a positive context effect with the power to influence therapy outcome. Among the different placebo effects described in clinical conditions and experimental settings, placebo analgesia is of particular relevance to the rheumatologist. Placebo analgesia is the field that has most contributed to our understanding of the multiple mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. The possible clinical applications of placebo studies range from the design of clinical trials incorporating specific recommendations and minimizing the use of placebo arms to the optimization of the context surrounding the patient so that the placebo component in any treatment is maximized.

  10. Reduction of unwanted submental fat with ATX-101 (deoxycholic acid), an adipocytolytic injectable treatment: results from a phase III, randomized, placebo-controlled study.

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    Rzany, B; Griffiths, T; Walker, P; Lippert, S; McDiarmid, J; Havlickova, B

    2014-02-01

    Unwanted submental fat (SMF) is aesthetically unappealing, but methods of reduction are either invasive or lack evidence for their use. An injectable approach with ATX-101 (deoxycholic acid) is under investigation. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ATX-101 for the reduction of unwanted SMF. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III study, 363 patients with moderate/severe SMF were randomized to receive ATX-101 (1 or 2 mg cm(-2) ) or placebo injections into their SMF at up to four treatment sessions ~28 days apart, with a 12-week follow-up. The co-primary efficacy endpoints were the proportions of treatment responders [patients with ≥ 1-point improvement in SMF on the 5-point Clinician-Reported Submental Fat Rating Scale (CR-SMFRS)] and patients satisfied with their face and chin appearance on the Subject Self-Rating Scale (SSRS). Secondary endpoints included skin laxity, calliper measurements and patient-reported outcomes. Adverse events were monitored. Significantly more ATX-101 recipients met the primary endpoint criteria vs. placebo: on the clinician scale, 59·2% and 65·3% of patients treated with ATX-101 1 and 2 mg cm(-2) , respectively, were treatment responders vs. 23·0% for placebo (CR-SMFRS; P ATX-101 vs. placebo. Most adverse events were transient and associated with the treatment area. ATX-101 was effective and well tolerated for nonsurgical SMF reduction. © 2013 The Authors. British Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Association of Dermatologists.

  11. Randomized expectancy-enhanced placebo-controlled trial of the impact of Quantum BioEnergetic distant healing and paranormal belief on mood disturbance: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Adam J; Permezel, Fiona E; Storm, Lance

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated the effects of ostensible subtle energy on physical systems and subjective experience. However, one subtle energy technique that has been neglected, despite anecdotal support for its efficacy, is Quantum BioEnergetics (QBE). Furthermore, the influence of paranormal belief and experience (either real belief/experience or suggested belief/experience) on subtle energy effects remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate experimentally the effects of distant QBE healing, and paranormal belief/experience, on mood. A randomized expectancy-enhanced placebo-controlled design was used. Data were collected at the QBE Centre, Melbourne. Participants were students from Deakin University and from the general public. Snowball sampling (ie, word-of-mouth) and convenience sampling using a ballot box placed in the university library. Profile of Mood States-Short Form was used to quantify positive and negative mood states. The QBE condition was associated with (1) significantly less Tension-Anxiety compared with the placebo and control condition; and (2) significantly less Anger-Hostility and Total Mood Disturbance compared with the control condition (but not the placebo condition). Furthermore, there was an interaction of condition and paranormal belief/experience with regard to Depression-Dejection, with believers assigned to the placebo condition scoring lowest on this Mood variable. Findings suggest that the use of QBE by an experienced practitioner reduces mood disturbance. In addition, the placebo condition may have evoked suggestibility effects in believers, which would mean that they may be more likely than nonbelievers to believe that they were receiving healing, thus resulting in lower Depression-Dejection scores. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The effects of selenium supplementation on biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in patients with diabetic nephropathy: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmani, Fereshteh; Kia, Mahsa; Soleimani, Alireza; Mohammadi, Ali Akbar; Asemi, Zatollah

    2016-10-01

    This study was carried out to assess the effects of Se supplementation on biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN). This randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted among sixty patients with DN. Patients were randomly divided into two groups to take either 200 µg/d Se supplements as Se yeast (n 30) or placebo (n 30) for 12 weeks. In unadjusted analyses, compared with the placebo, Se supplementation led to a significant reduction in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) (-1069·2 (sd 1752·2) v. -135·3 (sd 1258·9) ng/ml, P=0·02), matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) (-612·3 (sd 679·6) v. +76·0 (sd 309·1) ng/ml, Pplacebo. Subjects who received Se supplements experienced a borderline statistically significant decrease in serum protein carbonyl (PCO) levels (P=0·06) compared with the placebo. When we adjusted the analysis for baseline values of biochemical parameters, age and BMI, serum hs-CRP (P=0·14) and MDA levels (P=0·16) became non-significant, whereas plasma nitric oxide (NO) (P=0·04) and glutathione (GSH) (Peffect on NO, transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), advanced glycation end products (AGE), PCO and GSH compared with the placebo. Overall, our study demonstrated that Se supplementation among DN patients had favourable effects on serum MMP-2, plasma NO, TAC and GSH, but did not affect hs-CRP, TGF-β, AGE, PCO and MDA.

  13. How Classical Conditioning Shapes Placebo Analgesia: Hidden versus Open Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babel, Przemyslaw; Adamczyk, Waclaw; Swider, Karolina; Bajcar, Elzbieta A; Kicman, Pawel; Lisinska, Natalia

    2017-07-22

    To investigate the influence of expectancy of pain intensity, fear of pain (trait), and fear (state) on the effectiveness of hidden and open conditioning to produce placebo analgesia. A total of 90 healthy female volunteers were randomly assigned to three groups (hidden conditioning, open conditioning, and control) that received electrical stimuli preceded by either orange or blue lights. One color was paired with painful stimuli (control stimuli) and the other color was paired with nonpainful stimuli (conditioned stimuli) in both the hidden and open conditioning groups. Only participants in the open conditioning group were informed about this association. In the control group, both color lights were followed by control stimuli. In the testing phase, both colored lights were followed by identical control stimuli. Participants rated pain intensity, expectancy of pain intensity, fear, and fear of pain. A significant analgesic effect was found only in the hidden conditioning group, where no explicit verbal suggestions were provided. Hidden conditioning had an effect on expectancy and fear-participants in the hidden conditioning group expected less pain and experienced less fear in relation to conditioned stimuli. Fear was the only predictor of placebo analgesia in the hidden conditioning group. Neither expectancy of pain intensity nor fear of pain predicted placebo analgesia. Fear seems to be a more important factor than expectancy in producing placebo analgesia induced by hidden conditioning.

  14. The effect of elective sham dose escalation on the placebo response during an antimuscarinic trial for overactive bladder symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staskin, David R.; Michel, Martin C.; Sun, Franklin; Guan, Zhonghong; Morrow, Jon D.

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the effects of baseline symptom severity and placebo response magnitude on the decision to dose escalate in a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, flexible dose antimuscarinic trial of subjects with overactive bladder symptoms. Data from the placebo arm of the trial were used for this post

  15. Effects of the flavonol quercetin and α-linolenic acid on n-3 PUFA status in metabolically healthy men and women: a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burak, Constanze; Wolffram, Siegfried; Zur, Berndt; Langguth, Peter; Fimmers, Rolf; Alteheld, Birgit; Stehle, Peter; Egert, Sarah

    2017-03-01

    Increased dietary intake and tissue status of the long-chain n-3 PUFA, EPA and DHA, is associated with cardiovascular benefits. Epidemiological and animal studies suggest that concomitant nutritive intake of flavonoids may increase the conversion of α-linolenic acid (ALA) to longer-chain n-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA. We investigated the effects of increased ALA intake on fatty acid composition of serum phospholipids and erythrocytes in metabolically healthy men and women and whether fatty acid profiles and ALA conversion were affected by regular quercetin intake or sex. Subjects (n 74) were randomised to receive at least 3·3 g/d ALA with either 190 mg/d quercetin (ALA+quercetin) or placebo (ALA+placebo) in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover trial with 8-week intervention periods separated by an 8-week washout period. A total of seven subjects dropped out for personal reasons. Data from the remaining sixty-seven subjects (thirty-four males and thirty-three females) were included in the analysis. Both interventions significantly increased serum phospholipid ALA (ALA+placebo: +69·3 %; ALA+quercetin: +55·8 %) and EPA (ALA+placebo: +37·3 %; ALA+quercetin: +25·5 %). ALA + quercetin slightly decreased DHA concentration by 9·3 %. Erythrocyte ALA and EPA significantly increased with both interventions, whereas DHA decreased. Fatty acid composition did not differ between sexes. We found no effect of quercetin. Intake of 3·6 g/d ALA over an 8-week period resulted in increased ALA and EPA, but not DHA, in serum phospholipids and erythrocytes. Neither quercetin supplementation nor sex affected the increment of ALA and relative proportions of n-3 PUFA in serum phospholipids and erythrocytes.

  16. The Efficacy of Crotalidae Polyvalent Immune Fab (Ovine) Antivenom Versus Placebo Plus Optional Rescue Therapy on Recovery From Copperhead Snake Envenomation: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardo, Charles J; Quackenbush, Eugenia; Lewis, Brandon; Rose, S Rutherfoord; Greene, Spencer; Toschlog, Eric A; Charlton, Nathan P; Mullins, Michael E; Schwartz, Richard; Denning, David; Sharma, Kapil; Kleinschmidt, Kurt; Bush, Sean P; Ryan, Samantha; Gasior, Maria; Anderson, Victoria E; Lavonas, Eric J

    2017-08-01

    Copperhead snake (Agkistrodon contortrix) envenomation causes limb injury resulting in pain and disability. It is not known whether antivenom administration improves limb function. We determine whether administration of antivenom improves recovery from limb injury in patients envenomated by copperhead snakes. From August 2013 through November 2015, we performed a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial to evaluate the effect of ovine Crotalidae polyvalent immune Fab (ovine) (CroFab; FabAV) antivenom therapy on recovery of limb function in patients with copperhead snake envenomation at 14 days postenvenomation. The study setting was 18 emergency departments in regions of the United States where copperhead snakes are endemic. Consecutive patients aged 12 years or older with mild- to moderate-severity envenomation received either FabAV or placebo. The primary outcome was limb function 14 days after envenomation, measured by the Patient-Specific Functional Scale. Additional outcomes included the Patient-Specific Functional Scale at other points; the Disorders of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand, Lower Extremity Functional Scale, and Patient's Global Impression of Change instruments; grip strength; walking speed; quality of life (Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Physical Fucntion-10); pain; and analgesic use. Seventy-four patients received study drug (45 FabAV, 29 placebo). Mean age was 43 years (range 12 to 86 years). Fifty-three percent were men, 62% had lower extremity envenomation, and 88% had mild initial severity. The primary outcome, the least square mean Patient-Specific Functional Scale score at 14 days postenvenomation, was 8.6 for FabAV-treated subjects and 7.4 for placebo recipients (difference 1.2; 95% confidence interval 0.1 to 2.3; P=.04). Additional outcome assessments generally favored FabAV. More FabAV-treated subjects experienced treatment-emergent adverse events (56% versus 28%), but few were

  17. Amelioration of acute sequelae of blast induced mild traumatic brain injury by N-acetyl cysteine: a double-blind, placebo controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Hoffer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI secondary to blast exposure is the most common battlefield injury in Southwest Asia. There has been little prospective work in the combat setting to test the efficacy of new countermeasures. The goal of this study was to compare the efficacy of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC versus placebo on the symptoms associated with blast exposure mTBI in a combat setting. METHODS: This study was a randomized double blind, placebo-controlled study that was conducted on active duty service members at a forward deployed field hospital in Iraq. All symptomatic U.S. service members who were exposed to significant ordnance blast and who met the criteria for mTBI were offered participation in the study and 81 individuals agreed to participate. Individuals underwent a baseline evaluation and then were randomly assigned to receive either N-acetyl cysteine (NAC or placebo for seven days. Each subject was re-evaluated at 3 and 7 days. Outcome measures were the presence of the following sequelae of mTBI: dizziness, hearing loss, headache, memory loss, sleep disturbances, and neurocognitive dysfunction. The resolution of these symptoms seven days after the blast exposure was the main outcome measure in this study. Logistic regression on the outcome of 'no day 7 symptoms' indicated that NAC treatment was significantly better than placebo (OR = 3.6, p = 0.006. Secondary analysis revealed subjects receiving NAC within 24 hours of blast had an 86% chance of symptom resolution with no reported side effects versus 42% for those seen early who received placebo. CONCLUSION: This study, conducted in an active theatre of war, demonstrates that NAC, a safe pharmaceutical countermeasure, has beneficial effects on the severity and resolution of sequelae of blast induced mTBI. This is the first demonstration of an effective short term countermeasure for mTBI. Further work on long term outcomes and the potential use of NAC in civilian m

  18. Safety and pharmacokinetics of oral delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in healthy older subjects: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Amir I A; van den Elsen, Geke A H; Colbers, Angela; van der Marck, Marjolein A; Burger, David M; Feuth, Ton B; Rikkert, Marcel G M Olde; Kramers, Cornelis

    2014-09-01

    There is a great concern about the safety of THC-based drugs in older people (≥65 years), as most of THC-trials did not include such group. In this phase 1, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial, we evaluated the safety and pharmacokinetics of three oral doses of Namisol(®), a novel THC in tablet form, in older subjects. Twelve healthy older subjects (6 male; mean age 72±5 years) randomly received a single oral dose of 3mg, 5mg, or 6.5mg of THC or matching placebo, in a crossover manner, on each intervention day. The data for 11 subjects were included in the analysis. The data of 1 subject were excluded due to non-compliance to study medication. THC was safe and well tolerated. The most frequently reported adverse events (AEs) were drowsiness (27%) and dry mouth (11%). Subjects reported more AEs with THC 6.5mg than with 3mg (p=0.048), 5mg (p=0.034) and placebo (p=0.013). There was a wide inter-individual variability in plasma concentrations of THC. Subjects for whom the Cmax fell within the sampling period (over 2h), Cmax was 1.42-4.57ng/mL and Tmax was 67-92min. The AUC0-2h (n=11) was 1.67-3.51ng/mL. Overall, the pharmacodynamic effects of THC were smaller than effects previously reported in young adults. In conclusion, THC appeared to be safe and well tolerated by healthy older individuals