WorldWideScience

Sample records for subjects including smokers

  1. Hidden truth of circulating neutrophils (polymorphonuclear neutrophil function in periodontally healthy smoker subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitra Agarwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Tobacco smoking is considered to be a major risk factor associated with periodontal disease. Smoking exerts a major effect on the protective elements of the immune response, resulting in an increase in the extent and severity of periodontal destruction. Aims: The aim of the present study was to assess viability and phagocytic function of neutrophils in circulating blood of the smokers and nonsmokers who are periodontally healthy. Settings and Design: Two hundred subjects in the mean range of 20–30 years of age were included in the study population. It was a retrospective study carried out for 6 months. Materials and Methods: Two hundred subjects were divided into four groups: 50 nonsmokers, 50 light smokers (15 cigarettes/day. Full mouth plaque index, sulcus bleeding index, and probing depths were measured. Percentage viability of circulating neutrophils and average number of phagocytosed Candida albicans were recorded. Statistical Analysis Used: Means and standard deviations were calculated from data obtained within the groups. Comparison between the smokers and nonsmokers was performed by Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA analysis. Comparison between smoker groups was performed using Mann–Whitney–Wilcoxon test. Results: Percentage viability of neutrophils was significantly less in heavy smokers (66.9 ± 4.0, moderate (76.6 ± 4.2, light smokers (83.1 ± 2.5 as compared to nonsmokers (92.3 ± 2.6 (P < 0.01. The ability of neutrophils to phagocytose, i.e., mean particle number was significantly less in light smokers (3.5 ± 0.5, moderate smokers (2.3 ± 0.5, and heavy smokers (1.4 ± 0.5 compared to nonsmokers (4.9 ± 0.7 (P < 0.01 with evidence of dose-response effect. Conclusions: Smoking significantly affects neutrophils viability and phagocytic function in periodontally healthy population.

  2. Young smokers and non-smokers perceptions of typical users of plain vs. branded cigarette packs: a between-subjects experimental survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Ingeborg; Scheffels, Janne

    2013-10-24

    In an attempt to minimize the pack design avenue of communication between tobacco producers and smokers and potential smokers, several jurisdictions, including Norway, have considered regulations on cigarette pack design. The main aim of the current study was to investigate how package design affects young people's perceptions of typical smokers of some pre-chosen cigarette brands and brand varieties. Based on data from a web survey among 1022 15-22 year-olds, possible effects of plain packaging of cigarettes on adolescents' views about typical cigarette smokers were investigated. The data collection had a between-subjects design, in which participants were allocated to one of three groups, and asked to typify the smokers of selected cigarette packs either in branded, plain or plain with descriptor versions. The sample included boys and girls, and smokers and non-smokers. The smoker characteristics included in the investigation were: gender, glamour, stylishness, popularity, coolness, sophistication and slimness. After creating sum-scores within and across packs and pack versions, analyses indicated that a shift from branded to plain cigarette packaging would result in a reduction in positive user images related to smoking among adolescents and young adults. For girls, this effect held up after controlling for confounders. To the extent that plain packaging contributes to making smoking images less positive, it can potentially be an efficient aid in reducing smoking uptake among adolescents.

  3. Comparison of color discrimination in chronic heavy smokers and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Thiago Monteiro de Paiva; Almeida, Natalia Leandro; Dos Santos, Natanael Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cigarette smoke is probably the most significant source of exposure to toxic chemicals for humans, involving health-damaging components, such as nicotine, hydrogen cyanide and formaldehyde. The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of chronic heavy smoking on color discrimination (CD). Methods: All subjects were free of any neuropsychiatric disorder, identifiable ocular disease and had normal acuity. No abnormalities were detected in the fundoscopic examination and in the optical coherence tomography exam. We assessed color vision for healthy heavy smokers ( n = 15; age range, 20-45 years), deprived smokers ( n = 15, age range 20-45 years) and healthy non-smokers ( n = 15; age range, 20-45 years), using the psychophysical forced-choice method. All groups were matched for gender and education level. In this test, the volunteers had to choose the pseudoisochromatic stimulus containing a test frequency at four directions (e.g., up, down, right and left) in the subtest of Cambridge Colour Test (CCT): Trivector. Results: Performance on CCT differed between groups, and the observed pattern was that smokers had lower discrimination compared to non-smokers. In addition, deprived smokers presented lower discrimination to smokers and non-smokers. Contrary to expectation, the largest differences were observed for medium and long wavelengths. Conclusions: These results suggests that cigarette smoking, chronic exposure to its compounds, and withdrawal from nicotine affect color discrimination. This highlights the importance of understanding the diverse effects of nicotine on attentional bias.

  4. Comparison of color discrimination in chronic heavy smokers and healthy subjects [version 3; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Monteiro de Paiva Fernandes

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cigarette smoke is probably the most significant source of exposure to toxic chemicals for humans, involving health-damaging components, such as nicotine, hydrogen cyanide and formaldehyde. The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of chronic heavy smoking on color discrimination (CD. Methods: All subjects were free of any neuropsychiatric disorder, identifiable ocular disease and had normal acuity. No abnormalities were detected in the fundoscopic examination and in the optical coherence tomography exam. We assessed color vision for healthy heavy smokers (n = 15; age range, 20-45 years, deprived smokers (n = 15, age range 20-45 years and healthy non-smokers (n = 15; age range, 20-45 years, using the psychophysical forced-choice method. All groups were matched for gender and education level. In this test, the volunteers had to choose the pseudoisochromatic stimulus containing a test frequency at four directions (e.g., up, down, right and left in the subtest of Cambridge Colour Test (CCT: Trivector. Results: Performance on CCT differed between groups, and the observed pattern was that smokers had lower discrimination compared to non-smokers. In addition, deprived smokers presented lower discrimination to smokers and non-smokers. Contrary to expectation, the largest differences were observed for medium and long wavelengths. Conclusions: These results suggests that cigarette smoking, chronic exposure to its compounds, and withdrawal from nicotine affect color discrimination. This highlights the importance of understanding the diverse effects of nicotine on attentional bias.

  5. Early Subjective Sensory Experiences with "cigalike" E-cigarettes Among African American Menthol Smokers: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiley, Sabrina L; DeAtley, Teresa; Rubin, Leslie F; Harvey, Emily; Kierstead, Elexis C; Webb Hooper, Monica; Niaura, Raymond S; Abrams, David B; Pearson, Jennifer L

    2017-05-26

    Despite smoker interest in e-cigarettes as a harm reduction or cessation aid, many smokers prematurely discontinue vaping after trying a product. This study explored the role of early subjective sensory experience in vaping persistence and desistence. African American menthol cigarette smokers aged ≥18 years (n=15; M=54.1 years; SD=8.2), motivated to quit smoking, and interested in trying e-cigarettes were recruited in Washington, D.C. Participants were followed for three weeks and provided menthol cigalike e-cigarettes after week one. Participants completed three interviews about their vaping experiences. Thematic analysis of responses was designed to understand the sensory aspects of vaping. During the first two weeks of vaping four participants reported a positive vaping experience while 11 reported decreased satisfaction. Salient sensory attributes of dissatisfaction included poor taste, insufficient throat hit, difficulty pulling, and a lack of "whole body" satisfaction compared to their preferred cigarette brand. The sensory experiences with a specific cigalike e-cigarette were related to vaping persistence and desistence. Although this was a small volunteer sample of African American menthol smokers motivated to quit smoking, 27% of participants with a positive experience continued using the product, while 73% of participants' experience was unsatisfactory across several experiential categories. In future research of e-cigarettes' efficacy as a smoking cessation or reduction aid, both device characteristics and smokers' expectations for these devices should be considered, so vapers do not expect the same taste sensations, throat sensations, and "whole body" satisfaction as they experienced with their menthol cigarettes. The subjective sensory experiences associated with initial e-cigarette product use are associated with use patterns. Subjective sensory experiences may also help understand the differences in the appeal, satisfaction, and harm reduction

  6. COMT Val158Met modulates subjective responses to intravenous nicotine and cognitive performance in abstinent smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Aryeh I.; Jatlow, Peter I.; Gelernter, Joel; Listman, Jennifer B.; Sofuoglu, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    The COMT Val158Met polymorphism may be a risk factor for nicotine addiction. This study examined the influence of the COMT Val158Met polymorphism on subjective, physiological, and cognitive effects of intravenous (IV) nicotine use in African American (AAs) (n=56) and European American (EAs) (n=68) smokers. Overnight abstinent smokers received saline followed by 0.5 and 1.0 mg/70 kg doses of nicotine, administered 30 minutes apart. Smokers with Val/Val genotype, compared to Met carriers, had greater negative subjective effects from IV nicotine and had more severe withdrawal severity following overnight abstinence from smoking. Women with Val/Val genotype reported greater difficulty concentrating and irritability than men with Val/Val or Met carrier genotypes. The Val/Val genotype was associated with better performance on the math task and in AA smokers it was associated with greater systolic blood pressure. These results support the rationale of pharmacologically inhibiting COMT to aid with smoking cessation among Val/Val genotype smokers. PMID:23459442

  7. Including subjectivity in the teaching of Psychopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio Domont de Serpa Junior

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Current psychopathology studies have often been presented in their descriptive dimension. This perspective is important for teaching because it helps the students to recognize and identify the symptomatology of each psychopathology case. However, subjectivity, the experience of suffering and interpersonal aspects are all lost in this perspective. Coming from another psychopathology tradition - existential anthropology - this paper presents practical psychopathology teaching experience which considers such dimensions as being relevant to the understanding of mental suffering. The features and limitations of such traditions are briefly reviewed to support this teaching experience. Two new modalities of practical teaching, used in the discipline of "Special Psychopathology I" offered by the Department of Psychiatry and Forensic Medicine at the medical school of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro for students of psychology, will be presented according to descriptive case study methodology. With these activities we also expect to change the practice of teaching. Traditionally, interviewing of in-patients by a large group of students who observe passively what is happening is the center of this kind of education. We intend to develop a model of teaching which is closer to the proposal of the Brazilian Psychiatric Reform which views mental illness as a complex phenomenon, always involving the relationship that the subject establishes with the world.

  8. Belief about nicotine Modulates subjective craving and insula activity in Deprived smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, X. S.; Lohrenz, Terry; Salas, Ramiro

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the specific neural mechanisms through which cognitive factors influence craving and associated brain responses, despite the initial success of cognitive therapies in treating drug addiction. In this study, we investigated how cognitive factors such as beliefs influence...... subjective craving and neural activities in nicotine-addicted individuals using model-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and neuropharmacology. Deprived smokers (N = 24) participated in a two-by-two balanced placebo design, which crossed beliefs about nicotine (told "nicotine" vs. told "no......, smokers demonstrated significantly reduced craving after smoking when told "nicotine in cigarette" but showed no change in craving when told "no nicotine." Second, neural activity in the insular cortex related to craving was only significant when smokers were told "nicotine" but not when told "no nicotine...

  9. Quantitative computed tomography determined regional lung mechanics in normal nonsmokers, normal smokers and metastatic sarcoma subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiwoong Choi

    Full Text Available Extra-thoracic tumors send out pilot cells that attach to the pulmonary endothelium. We hypothesized that this could alter regional lung mechanics (tissue stiffening or accumulation of fluid and inflammatory cells through interactions with host cells. We explored this with serial inspiratory computed tomography (CT and image matching to assess regional changes in lung expansion.We retrospectively assessed 44 pairs of two serial CT scans on 21 sarcoma patients: 12 without lung metastases and 9 with lung metastases. For each subject, two or more serial inspiratory clinically-derived CT scans were retrospectively collected. Two research-derived control groups were included: 7 normal nonsmokers and 12 asymptomatic smokers with two inspiratory scans taken the same day or one year apart respectively. We performed image registration for local-to-local matching scans to baseline, and derived local expansion and density changes at an acinar scale. Welch two sample t test was used for comparison between groups. Statistical significance was determined with a p value < 0.05.Lung regions of metastatic sarcoma patients (but not the normal control group demonstrated an increased proportion of normalized lung expansion between the first and second CT. These hyper-expanded regions were associated with, but not limited to, visible metastatic lung lesions. Compared with the normal control group, the percent of increased normalized hyper-expanded lung in sarcoma subjects was significantly increased (p < 0.05. There was also evidence of increased lung "tissue" volume (non-air components in the hyper-expanded regions of the cancer subjects relative to non-hyper-expanded regions. "Tissue" volume increase was present in the hyper-expanded regions of metastatic and non-metastatic sarcoma subjects. This putatively could represent regional inflammation related to the presence of tumor pilot cell-host related interactions.This new quantitative CT (QCT method for linking

  10. Substance use, trait measures, and subjective response to nicotine in never-smokers stratified on parental smoking history and sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerleau, Ovide F; Pomerleau, Cynthia S; Snedecor, Sandy M; Finkenauer, Raphaela; Mehringer, Ann M; Langenecker, Scott A; Sirevaag, Erik J

    2009-09-01

    Male and female never-smokers stratified on parental history of smoking were tested for possible differences in susceptibility to the hedonic effects of nicotine. We recruited nicotine-exposed never-smokers with two never-smoking biological parents (PH-) or two ever-smoking biological parents (PH+). After completing a baseline assessment battery focusing on conditions or behaviors associated with smoking, participants were tested for subjective and hedonic effects in response to administration of three different nicotine doses (0.0, 0.5, and 1.0 mg) via nasal spray. Physiological and biochemical reactivity also was monitored. PH+ were significantly more likely to report having experienced a "buzz" upon early smoking experimentation and to have histories of alcohol abuse and alcoholism; they also scored higher on disordered eating. In response to nicotine dosing, PH+ reported an increase in depressed mood, compared with a minimal response in PH-, in keeping with our expectation that nicotine would have more pronounced effects in PH+. Regardless of parental history, women reported experiencing greater anxiety in response to the highest nicotine dose, compared with men. Further exploration in larger samples, using more stringent selection criteria, a wider range of measures, and a less aversive dosing method, may provide a full test of the possible utility of the parental history model for illuminating biobehavioral mechanisms underlying response to nicotine. Also important would be broadening the scope of inquiry to include comparisons with ever-smokers to determine what protected PH+ from becoming smokers, despite the presence of factors that might be expected to decrease resilience and increase susceptibility.

  11. Naltrexone Maintenance Decreases Cannabis Self-Administration and Subjective Effects in Daily Cannabis Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Margaret; Ramesh, Divya; Glass, Andrew; Pavlicova, Martina; Bedi, Gillinder; Cooper, Ziva D

    2015-01-01

    Given that cannabis use is increasing in the United States, pharmacological treatment options to treat cannabis use disorder are needed. Opioid antagonists modulate cannabinoid effects and may offer a potential approach to reducing cannabis use. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled human laboratory study, we assessed the effects of naltrexone maintenance on the reinforcing, subjective, psychomotor, and cardiovascular effects of active and inactive cannabis. Nontreatment-seeking, daily cannabis smokers were randomized to receive naltrexone (50 mg: n=18 M and 5 F) or placebo (0 mg; n=26 M and 2 F) capsules for 16 days. Before, during, and after medication maintenance, participants completed 10 laboratory sessions over 4–6 weeks, assessing cannabis' behavioral and cardiovascular effects. Medication compliance was verified by observed capsule administration, plasma naltrexone, and urinary riboflavin. Relative to placebo, maintenance on naltrexone significantly reduced both active cannabis self-administration and its positive subjective effects (‘good effect'). Participants in the placebo group had 7.6 times (95% CI: 1.1–51.8) the odds of self-administering active cannabis compared with the naltrexone group. This attenuation of reinforcing and positive subjective effects also influenced cannabis use in the natural ecology. Naltrexone had intrinsic effects: decreasing ratings of friendliness, food intake, and systolic blood pressure, and increasing spontaneous reports of stomach upset and headache, yet dropout rates were comparable between groups. In summary, we show for the first time that maintenance on naltrexone decreased cannabis self-administration and ratings of ‘good effect' in nontreatment-seeking daily cannabis smokers. Clinical studies in patients motivated to reduce their cannabis use are warranted to evaluate naltrexone's efficacy as a treatment for cannabis use disorder. PMID:25881117

  12. Subjective cognitive complaints and neuropsychological performance in former smokers with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunette, Amanda M; Holm, Kristen E; Wamboldt, Frederick S; Kozora, Elizabeth; Moser, David J; Make, Barry J; Crapo, James D; Meschede, Kimberly; Weinberger, Howard D; Moreau, Kerrie L; Bowler, Russell P; Hoth, Karin F

    2017-08-02

    This study examined the association of perceived cognitive difficulties with objective cognitive performance in former smokers. We hypothesized that greater perceived cognitive difficulties would be associated with poorer performance on objective executive and memory tasks. Participants were 95 former smokers recruited from the COPDGene study. They completed questionnaires (including the Cognitive Difficulties Scale [CDS] and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS]), neuropsychological assessment, and pulmonary function testing. Pearson correlations and t-tests were conducted to examine the bivariate association of the CDS (total score and subscales for attention/concentration, praxis, delayed recall, orientation for persons, temporal orientation, and prospective memory) with each domain of objective cognitive functioning (memory recall, executive functioning/processing speed, visuospatial processing, and language). Simultaneous multiple linear regression was used to further examine all statistically significant bivariate associations. The following covariates were included in all regression models: age, sex, pack-years, premorbid functioning (WRAT-IV Reading), HADS total score, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) status (yes/no based on GOLD criteria). In regression models, greater perceived cognitive difficulties overall (using CDS total score) were associated with poorer performance on executive functioning/processing speed tasks (b = -0.07, SE = 0.03, p = .037). Greater perceived cognitive difficulties on the CDS praxis subscale were associated with poorer performance on executive functioning/processing speed tasks (b = -3.65, SE = 1.25, p = .005), memory recall tasks (b = -4.60, SE = 1.75, p = .010), and language tasks (b = -3.89, SE = 1.39, p = .006). Clinicians should be aware that cognitive complaints may be indicative of problems with the executive functioning/processing speed and memory of former smokers with

  13. Comparison of salivary calcium level in smokers and non-smokers with chronic periodontitis, aggressive periodontitis, and healthy controls

    OpenAIRE

    Kambalyal, Preeti; Kambalyal, Prabhuraj; Hungund, Shital

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare salivary calcium (Ca) level in smokers and non-smokers with chronic periodontitis, aggressive periodontitis, and healthy controls. Materials and Methods: 56 subjects were included in the study and were grouped as follows: 12 subjects who were periodontally healthy (Group I), 12 subjects having chronic periodontitis who were non-smokers (Group II), 12 non-smokers having aggressive periodontitis (Group III), 12 smokers with chronic periodontit...

  14. Knowledge of risk tobacco in smokers, former-smokers and non-smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Ruiz Mori

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetive: Determine in a population of non-smokers, smokers and former-smokers, the level of knowledge of the health risks that smoking generate. Material and Methods: An epidemiological, observational, descriptive and cross-sectional research, was conducted in September 2015 in the city of Lima and Callao. Asurvey of over 18 was applied. Participants were divided into three groups, smokers, former-smokers and non-smokers. Results: The study included 2270 subjects, 744 were smokers, 752 former-smokers and 774 non-smokers. The group that mostly associated the tobacco to many diseases was the group of former-smokers, 53.8% of them mentioned to lung cancer as the most common disease related to tobacco. The non-smokers was the group that knows less often the risks of smoking. In all three groups, the most tobacco-related disease was the lung cancer, followed by myocardial infarction, while fertility was little associated. Television was the main means of dissemination about the dangers of smoking, while social networks do not have a leading role. For the former-smokers will hit more information about the risks of smoking (p<0.05. Conclusion: Former-smokers had more information on the risk of smoking. In the three groups the most tobacco-related disease was the lung cancer, and there was very little information about fertility and cigarette consumption. Formersmokers do the impacted more risk information cigarette. Television remains the main instrument to fight against smoking.

  15. Knowledge of risk tobacco in smokers, former-smokers and non-smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Ruiz Mori

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetive: Determine in a population of non-smokers, smokers and former-smokers, the level of knowledge of the health risks that smoking generate. Material and Methods: An epidemiological, observational, descriptive and cross-sectional research, was conducted in September 2015 in the city of Lima and Callao. Asurvey of over 18 was applied. Participants were divided into three groups, smokers, former-smokers and non-smokers. Results: The study included 2270 subjects, 744 were smokers, 752 former-smokers and 774 non-smokers. The group that mostly associated the tobacco to many diseases was the group of former-smokers, 53.8% of them mentioned to lung cancer as the most common disease related to tobacco. The non-smokers was the group that knows less often the risks of smoking. In all three groups, the most tobacco-related disease was the lung cancer, followed by myocardial infarction, while fertility was little associated. Television was the main means of dissemination about the dangers of smoking, while social networks do not have a leading role. For the former-smokers will hit more information about the risks of smoking (p<0.05. Conclusion: Former-smokers had more information on the risk of smoking. In the three groups the most tobacco-related disease was the lung cancer, and there was very little information about fertility and cigarette consumption. Formersmokers do the impacted more risk information cigarette. Television remains the main instrument to fight against smoking.

  16. Lipid intolerance in smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsen, M; Eliasson, B; Joheim, E; Lenner, R A; Taskinen, M R; Smith, U

    1995-05-01

    Smokers have recently been shown to be insulin resistant and to exhibit several characteristics of the insulin resistance syndrome (IRS). In this study, we assessed fasting and postprandial lipid levels in healthy, normolipidaemic, chronic smokers and a matched group of non-smoking individuals. A standardized mixed meal (containing 3.78 MJ and 51 g of fat) was given in the morning after an overnight fast. The smokers were either abstinent from tobacco for 48 h or were allowed to smoke freely, including being allowed to smoke six cigarettes during the study. Twenty-two middle-aged, healthy male subjects, nine habitual smokers and 13 non-smoking control subjects, were recruited to the study. The smokers had all been smoking at least 10 cigarettes per day for at least 10 years. The smokers exhibited a lipid intolerance in that their postprandial increase in triglyceride levels was more than 50% higher than in the non-smokers' group. This lipid intolerance could not be discerned in the postabsorptive state because the fasting triglyceride levels were the same in both groups, while the smokers had significantly lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. The peak postprandial triglyceride level correlated closely and negatively with fasting HDL cholesterol, indicating an impaired lipolytic removal capacity in smokers. Healthy, normotriglyceridaemic smokers exhibit an abnormal postprandial lipid metabolism consistent with lipid intolerance. It is suggested that postprandial hyperlipidaemia is a characteristic trait of the insulin resistance syndrome and that the defect in lipid removal is related to the low HDL cholesterol in this syndrome. The insulin resistance syndrome is likely to be an important reason for the increased propensity for cardiovascular disease in smokers.

  17. Comparing Smoking Topography and Subjective Measures of Usual Brand Cigarettes Between Pregnant and Non-Pregnant Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeria, Cecilia L; Heil, Sarah H; Bunn, Janice Y; Sigmon, Stacey C; Higgins, Stephen T

    2017-06-27

    Most pregnant smokers report abruptly reducing their cigarettes per day (CPD) by ~50% after learning of pregnancy and making further smaller reductions over the remainder of their pregnancy. Laboratory and naturalistic studies with non-pregnant smokers have found that these types of reductions often lead to changes in smoking topography (i.e., changes in smoking intensity to maintain a desired blood-nicotine level). If pregnant women smoke more intensely, they may expose themselves and their offspring to similar levels of toxicants despite reporting reductions in CPD. Pregnant and non-pregnant female smokers (n = 20 and 89, respectively) participated. At the experimental session, after biochemical confirmation of acute abstinence, participants smoked one usual brand cigarette ad lib through a Borgwaldt CReSS Desktop Smoking Topography device. Carbon monoxide (CO) and measures of nicotine withdrawal, craving, and reinforcement derived from smoking were also collected. The two groups did not differ on demographic or smoking characteristics at screening, except nicotine metabolism rate, which as expected, was faster in pregnant smokers. Analyses suggest that none of the smoking topography parameters differed between pregnant and non-pregnant smokers, although pregnant smokers had a significantly smaller CO boost. Both groups reported similar levels of relief of withdrawal and craving after smoking, but other subjective effects suggest that pregnant smokers find smoking less reinforcing than non-pregnant smokers. Pregnant smokers do not smoke cigarettes differently than non-pregnant women, but appear to find smoking comparatively less pleasurable. This is the first study to assess smoking topography in pregnant women. Pregnant women appear to be at increased risk for smoking cigarettes with more intensity because of (1) their tendency to make significant abrupt reductions in the number of cigarettes they smoke each day after learning of pregnancy and (2) an increase in

  18. Differences in Subjective Experiences to First Use of Menthol and Non-Menthol Cigarettes in a National Sample of Young Adult Cigarette Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Silva, Joanne; Cohn, Amy M; Johnson, Amanda L; Villanti, Andrea C

    2017-08-17

    Menthol has been hypothesized to ease the harshness of cigarette smoke. Thus, sensory experiences at first cigarette use may be one mechanism by which menthol facilitates progression to regular smoking. This study examined differences in subjective experiences to first use of a menthol vs. non-menthol cigarette among new young adult smokers. Data were drawn from Waves 5-8 of the Truth Initiative Young Adult Cohort Study, a national sample of 18-34 year olds assessed every six months. Analyses included a subset of young adult current smokers (n=251) who initiated smoking in the past six months. Subjective responses to first cigarette use were assessed across menthol and non-menthol initiators in bivariate analyses and adjusted models controlling for smoking correlates. Fifty-two percent of new young adult smokers used a menthol cigarette at first use. First use of a menthol cigarette was higher in those aged 18-24 (vs. 25-34). Most Black smokers (93.1%) were menthol initiators compared to 43.9% of White smokers. More than half of menthol and non-menthol initiates felt relaxed or calm, dizzy, lightheaded, liking the taste and a rush or buzz at first use. Menthol initiators were less likely in bivariate and multivariable analyses to experience feeling nauseated at first use (AOR=0.45; p=.020) compared to non-menthol initiators. While few differences were found between menthol and non-menthol initiators in their subjective experiences, fewer menthol initiates felt nauseated at first cigarette use. Future research needs to identify additional mechanisms linking menthol initiation to smoking progression. Menthol initiators were more likely to be younger (18-24 vs. 25-34) and Black (vs. White) compared to non-menthol initiators. Our finding that menthol initiators were less likely to feel nauseated at first cigarette use compared to non-menthol initiators, suggests that menthol may reduce aversion to early cigarette use among young smokers and thus has the potential to

  19. Association between essential trace and toxic elements in scalp hair samples of smokers rheumatoid arthritis subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afridi, Hassan Imran, E-mail: hassanimranafridi@yahoo.com [Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland. (Ireland); National Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro (Pakistan); Kazi, Tasneem Gul, E-mail: tgkazi@yahoo.com [National Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro (Pakistan); Brabazon, Dermot, E-mail: dermot.brabazon@dcu.ie [Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland. (Ireland); Naher, Sumsun, E-mail: sumsun.naher@dcu.ie [Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland. (Ireland)

    2011-12-15

    The incidence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been increased among people who possess habit of tobacco smoking. In the present study, zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) were determined in scalp hair samples of smokers and nonsmokers RA patients, residents of Dublin, Ireland. For comparison purposes scalp hair samples of age and sex matched healthy smokers and nonsmokers were also analyzed. The concentrations of understudied elements were measured by inductive coupled plasma atomic emission spectrophotometer, prior to microwave assisted acid digestion. The validity and accuracy of methodology was checked using certified reference material (NCS ZC 81002b) and by the conventional wet acid digestion method on the same certified reference material and on real samples. The mean hair Zn, Cu and Mn contents were significantly lower in smokers and nonsmokers RA patients as compared to healthy individuals (p = 0.01-0.001). Whereas the concentrations of Cd and Pb were significantly higher in scalp hair samples of RA patients of both group (p < 0.001). The referent smokers have high level of Cd and Pb in their scalp hair samples as compared to those had not smoking tobacco (p < 0.01). The ratio of Cd and Pb to Zn, Cu and Mn in scalp hair samples was also calculated. The Cd/Zn ratio was higher in smoker RA patients with related to nonsmoker RA and referents. This study is compelling evidence in support of positive associations between toxic elements, cigarette smoking, deficiency of essential trace elements and risk of arthritis.

  20. Coronary risk variables in young asymptomatic smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S B; Dwivedi, S; Prabhu, K M; Singh, G; Kumar, N; Lal, M K

    2005-09-01

    Smoking plays a dominant role in premature atherosclerosis particularly among males in South Asian countries. It initiates and promotes atherosclerosis by altering cardiac haemodynamics, causing dyslipidaemia and producing oxidative damage. Not much information is available from our country. We therefore undertook this study to see the effect of smoking on electrocardiogram (ECG), blood pressure, lipids, apolipoprotein B level and free radical activity in young asymptomatic male smokers. The study included 100 consecutive male subjects (50 smokers and 50 non smokers) aged 30-40 yr. Smoking profile, detailed cardiovascular assessment including ECG and lipid profile were evaluated in each subject. Of the 50 smokers, 22 (44%) had grade I hypertension as against 5 of 50 non smokers. Sinus tachycardia (10%) and P-pulmonale (8%) were the only notable ECG abnormalities. Dyslipidaemia was detected in 92 per cent smokers and 48 per cent non smokers (Plevels were significantly higher (Psmokers compared to non smokers. LDL-cholesterol was > or =135 mg/dl in 94 per cent dyslipidaemic smokers. However, no significant difference was found in high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol. Smokers had significantly higher serum malondialdehyde levels (Pnon smokers. Our data indicate that young asymptomatic male smokers tend to have hypertension, dyslipidaemia and increased production of free oxygen radicals, perhaps by attenuation of oxidative stress by cigarette smoking. This makes them prone for premature coronary artery disease. However, the findings need to be confirmed on a larger sample.

  1. Student Motivation in Science Subjects in Tanzania, Including Students' Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkimbili, Selina Thomas; Ødegaard, Marianne

    2017-12-01

    Fostering and maintaining students' interest in science is an important aspect of improving science learning. The focus of this paper is to listen to and reflect on students' voices regarding the sources of motivation for science subjects among students in community secondary schools with contextual challenges in Tanzania. We conducted a group-interview study of 46 Form 3 and Form 4 Tanzanian secondary school students. The study findings reveal that the major contextual challenges to student motivation for science in the studied schools are limited resources and students' insufficient competence in the language of instruction. Our results also reveal ways to enhance student motivation for science in schools with contextual challenges; these techniques include the use of questioning techniques and discourse, students' investigations and practical work using locally available materials, study tours, more integration of classroom science into students' daily lives and the use of real-life examples in science teaching. Also we noted that students' contemporary life, culture and familiar language can be utilised as a useful resource in facilitating meaningful learning in science in the school. Students suggested that, to make science interesting to a majority of students in a Tanzanian context, science education needs to be inclusive of students' experiences, culture and contemporary daily lives. Also, science teaching and learning in the classroom need to involve learners' voices.

  2. Young smokers and non-smokers perceptions of typical users of plain vs. branded cigarette packs: a between-subjects experimental survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lund, Ingeborg; Scheffels, Janne

    2013-01-01

    ... on cigarette pack design. The main aim of the current study was to investigate how package design affects young people's perceptions of typical smokers of some pre-chosen cigarette brands and brand varieties...

  3. Psychomotor performance, subjective and physiological effects and whole blood Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol concentrations in heavy, chronic cannabis smokers following acute smoked cannabis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwope, David M; Bosker, Wendy M; Ramaekers, Johannes G; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2012-07-01

    Δ⁹-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the illicit drug most frequently observed in accident and driving under the influence of drugs investigations. Whole blood is often the only available specimen collected during such investigations, yet few studies have examined relationships between cannabis effects and whole blood concentrations following cannabis smoking. Nine male and one female heavy, chronic cannabis smokers resided on a closed research unit and smoked ad libitum one 6.8% THC cannabis cigarette. THC, 11-hydroxy-THC and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC were quantified in whole blood and plasma. Assessments were performed before and up to 6 h after smoking, including subjective [visual analog scales (VAS) and Likert scales], physiological (heart rate, blood pressure and respirations) and psychomotor (critical-tracking and divided-attention tasks) measures. THC significantly increased VAS responses and heart rate, with concentration-effect curves demonstrating counter-clockwise hysteresis. No significant differences were observed for critical-tracking or divided-attention task performance in this cohort of heavy, chronic cannabis smokers. The cannabis influence factor was not suitable for quantifying psychomotor impairment following cannabis consumption and was not precise enough to determine recent cannabis use with accuracy. These data inform our understanding of impairment and subjective effects following acute smoked cannabis and interpretation of whole blood cannabinoid concentrations in forensic investigations.

  4. COMT Val158Met modulates subjective responses to intravenous nicotine and cognitive performance in abstinent smokers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Herman, A I; Jatlow, P I; Gelernter, J; Listman, J B; Sofuoglu, M

    2013-01-01

    ...)/Val genotype, compared with methionine (Met) carriers, had greater negative subjective effects from IV nicotine and had more severe withdrawal severity following overnight abstinence from smoking...

  5. Subjective and physiological effects, and expired carbon monoxide concentrations in frequent and occasional cannabis smokers following smoked, vaporized, and oral cannabis administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newmeyer, Matthew N; Swortwood, Madeleine J; Abulseoud, Osama A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2017-06-01

    Although smoking is the most common cannabis administration route, vaporization and consumption of cannabis edibles are common. Few studies directly compare cannabis' subjective and physiological effects following multiple administration routes. Subjective and physiological effects, and expired carbon monoxide (CO) were evaluated in frequent and occasional cannabis users following placebo (0.001% Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol [THC]), smoked, vaporized, and oral cannabis (6.9% THC, ∼54mg). Participants' subjective ratings were significantly elevated compared to placebo after smoking and vaporization, while only occasional smokers' ratings were significantly elevated compared to placebo after oral dosing. Frequent smokers' maximum ratings were significantly different between inhaled and oral routes, while no differences in occasional smokers' maximum ratings between active routes were observed. Additionally, heart rate increases above baseline 0.5h after smoking (mean 12.2bpm) and vaporization (10.7bpm), and at 1.5h (13.0bpm) and 3h (10.2bpm) after oral dosing were significantly greater than changes after placebo, with no differences between frequent and occasional smokers. Finally, smoking produced significantly increased expired CO concentrations 0.25-6h post-dose compared to vaporization. All participants had significant elevations in subjective effects after smoking and vaporization, but only occasional smokers after oral cannabis, indicating partial tolerance to subjective effects with frequent exposure. There were no differences in occasional smokers' maximum subjective ratings across the three active administration routes. Vaporized cannabis is an attractive alternative for medicinal administrations over smoking or oral routes; effects occur quickly and doses can be titrated with minimal CO exposure. These results have strong implications for safety and abuse liability assessments. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Dietary determinants of oxidized-low-density lipoprotein antibodies in a sample of pharmacologically untreated non-smoker subjects: data from the Brisighella heart study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicero, Arrigo F G; Reggi, Alessandra; Tartagni, Elisa; Grandi, Elisa; D'Addato, Sergio; Borghi, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation makes LDL an immunogenic substrate, stimulating the production of specific autoantibodies against oxidized LDL (ox-LDL Ab). The demonstration of ox-LDL Ab presence in serum indicates the existence of a long-term lipid peroxidation in vivo. The aim of the study is to evaluate the influence of a large number of dietary variables on the dosage of ox-LDL Ab in pharmacologically untreated healthy subjects. The Brisighella Heart Study (BHS) is a prospective, population-based longitudinal epidemiological investigation involving 2939 randomly selected adult subjects, resident in the northern Italian rural town of Brisighella. For this study, we analyzed the dietary, clinical and laboratory data of 265 (M: 101, W: 164) pharmacologically untreated non-smoker subjects, evaluating the factors potentially affecting their ox-LDL Ab dosage. In a multivariate analysis, including age, BMI, hemodynamic and laboratory parameters, the only significant predictor of log-ox-LDL Ab level was age (HR -0.19; 95%CI -0.115 - -0.104, p=0.001; adjusted R2=0.581). Including in the analysis the considered nutritional variables, the best model predicting the log-ox-LDL Ab level included age (HR -0.11; 95%CI -0.116 - -0.105, plipids (HR -0.12; 95%CI -0.134 - -0.112, plevel in a clinically relevant manner.

  7. [Nicotine dependence, smoking-related attitude, and subjective norms across the stages of change for smoking cessation among adults smokers in a rural area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Hee; Seo, Nam Sook; Kang, Hae Young

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify nicotine dependence, smoking-related attitude, and subjective norms across the stages of change for smoking cessation among adult smokers in a rural area. The subjects were 276 current smokers (male=243, female=33). There were 3 stages of change for smoking cessation: pre-contemplation, contemplation, and preparation stage. Data was collected by an interview or self-reporting from February 12th to March 5th 2004, and analyzed with frequency, percentage, chi- square-test, Fisher's exact probability test, ANOVA, and Scheffe test using the SPSS-PC program. According to the stages of change, 114(41.3%) current smokers were in pre-contemplation, 110(39.9%) in contemplation, and 52(18.8%) in the preparation stage. There was a higher percentage of males than females (chi- square=8.99, p=.011) in the preparation stage. The mean score of the smoking-related attitude (F=7.43, p=.001) and subjective norm(F=27.41, p=.001) were both lowest in the pre-contemplation stage and increased positively during the stages of change for smoking cessation. Based on these findings, the authors recommend that community-based smoking cessation programs should be developed by considering the intention or motives of current smokers and should be initiated in the preparation stage and primarily for male groups.

  8. [24-hour ambulatory electrocardiographic registry: differences between smokers and non-smokers and habit breaking effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparici, M; Fernández González, A L; Peteiro, J

    1993-01-30

    The purpose of this work was to determine the prevalence of arrhythmias in a group of 90 smokers and to carry out a prospective study on electrocardiographic modifications due to smoking withdrawal. A Holter study was performed to 90 smokers and 30 non-smokers. Afterwards smokers were included in a smoking withdrawal program. One year later all subjects who stopped smoking underwent a new Holter study as well as 10 of the smokers who failed in smoking withdrawal. Initial Holter study revealed that smokers had a significantly higher mean cardiac rate (p < 0.001), prevalence of supraventricular arrhythmias (p < 0.01) and ventricular premature complexes (p < 0.05) than non-smokers. Holter study performed after smoking cessation, showed a statistically significant decrease of mean cardiac rate (p < 0.001) and supraventricular arrhythmias (p < 0.001). Holter study performed to the subjects who failed in smoking withdrawal showed no significant changes in relation to the study made the previous year. Smokers present a higher cardiac rate and prevalence of arrhythmias than non-smokers. From these data it could be suggested that tobacco consumption has an arrhythmogenic effect that can be reverted, at least in part, after smoking withdrawal.

  9. The Potential Explanatory Role of Perceived Stress in Associations Between Subjective Social Status and Health-Related Quality of Life Among Homeless Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garey, Lorra; Reitzel, Lorraine R; Kendzor, Darla E; Businelle, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Homeless individuals smoke at high rates relative to the general population and are at heightened risk of tobacco-related illnesses and poor health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Homeless smokers also report low subjective social status (SSS) or perceived social standing relative to others. SSS may contribute to poor HRQoL, potentially through perceived stress. The current study examined the role of perceived stress in the association of SSS and HRQoL among 227 (70.9% male, Mage = 43.2) homeless smokers. Participants completed self-report measures of SSS, perceived stress, and HRQoL. Perceived stress partially explained the relation between SSS (United States and Community) and HRQoL in covariate-adjusted analyses. Results suggested that perceived stress is a pathway through which SSS contributes to HRQoL among homeless smokers. Findings broaden current understanding of the impact of social disadvantage and perceived stress on HRQoL among homeless smokers. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Reference values of fractional excretion of exhaled nitric oxide among non-smokers and current smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torén, Kjell; Murgia, Nicola; Schiöler, Linus; Bake, Björn; Olin, Anna-Carin

    2017-08-25

    Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FE NO ) is used to assess of airway inflammation; diagnose asthma and monitor adherence to advised therapy. Reliable and accurate reference values for FE NO are needed for both non-smoking and current smoking adults in the clinical setting. The present study was performed to establish reference adult FE NO values among never-smokers, former smokers and current smokers. FE NO was measured in 5265 subjects aged 25-75 years in a general-population study, using a chemiluminescence (Niox ™) analyser according to the guidelines of the American Thoracic Society and the European Respiratory Society. Atopy was based on the presence of immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies to common inhalant allergens (measured using Phadiatop® test). Spirometry without bronchodilation was performed and forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expired volume in 1 s (FEV 1 ) and the ratio of FEV 1 to FVC values were obtained. After excluding subjects with asthma, chronic bronchitis, spirometric airway obstruction and current cold, 3378 subjects remained. Equations for predictions of FE NO values were modelled using nonparametric regression models. FE NO levels were similar in never-smokers and former smokers, and these two groups were therefore merged into a group termed "non-smokers". Reference equations, including the 5th and 95th percentiles, were generated for female and male non-smokers, based on age, height and atopy. Regression models for current smokers were unstable. Hence, the proposed reference values for current smokers are based on the univariate distribution of FE NO and fixed cut-off limits. Reference values for FE NO among respiratory healthy non-smokers should be outlined stratified for gender using individual reference values. For current smokers separate cut-off limits are proposed.

  11. Comparison of daily life habits and health examination data between smokers and ex-smokers suggests that ex-smokers acquire several healthy-lifestyle practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Tomoyuki

    2004-01-01

    The association between smoking and health status including healthful life habits was evaluated in subjects living in a rural Japanese area. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with subjects who were smokers and ex-smokers ranging in age from 40 to 59 years who participated in health examinations in 1993 in 17 towns of Gunma Prefecture, Japan. A total of 4,629 of 6,076 subjects (76.2%) agreed to an interview by our public health nurses. Numbers of smokers and ex-smokers among subjects were 2,681 and 245, respectively. Percentages of subjects in their 40s (p habits. BMI was related only with smoking both in subjects in their 40s (p habits, a follow-up study including factors such as smoking status, pulmonary function, exercise habits, and obesity should be conducted.

  12. Comparison of salivary calcium level in smokers and non-smokers with chronic periodontitis, aggressive periodontitis, and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambalyal, Preeti; Kambalyal, Prabhuraj; Hungund, Shital

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare salivary calcium (Ca) level in smokers and non-smokers with chronic periodontitis, aggressive periodontitis, and healthy controls. 56 subjects were included in the study and were grouped as follows: 12 subjects who were periodontally healthy (Group I), 12 subjects having chronic periodontitis who were non-smokers (Group II), 12 non-smokers having aggressive periodontitis (Group III), 12 smokers with chronic periodontitis (Group IV), and 8 smokers with aggressive periodontitis (Group V). Clinical measurements and non-stimulated whole saliva samples were obtained and analyzed for Ca levels by ion-selective electrolyte analyzer. When salivary Ca values were compared between the groups, they showed statistically significant values (P periodontitis and smokers with aggressive periodontitis, respectively, than in other groups. Between groups II and III also, the mean salivary Ca level was statistically significant (P periodontitis than in non-smokers having aggressive periodontitis. The present study showed that smokers having chronic periodontitis as well as smokers having aggressive periodontitis have higher salivary calcium levels. Also, patients with aggressive periodontitis were found to have lesser salivary calcium level than chronic periodontitis patients by ion-selective electrolyte analyzer.

  13. Change of Taste Sensitivity of Clove Cigarette Smokers in Medan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlina Simamora

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Tongue has taste buds that contain taste receptor which affected by many factors, including smoking habit. Objective: To analyze the differences of sweet and bitter taste sensitivity in the pedicab driver clove cigarette smokers compared to non-smokers in Medan Padang Bulan. Methods: This study was conducted by placing the sweet taste strips and bitter taste strips on four taste receptors of the tongue, with increasing solution concentration in 74 subjects. This was a cross sectional study on pedicab driver population in Medan Padang Bulan. Results: There were differences between clove cigarette smokers and non-smokers on sweet taste examination (p<0.005. There was a difference between clove cigarette smokers and non-smokers on examination bitter taste receptors (p<0.005. On the clove cigarette smokers, there was no significant difference between sweet taste and bitter taste on the receptors itself. Conclusion: Non-smokers are more sensitive to sweet taste than the clove cigarette smokers. Bitter taste sensitivity is greater in cigarettes smokers than in non-smokers. Taste receptors on all location of the tongue could taste sweet and bitter substances, but a certain location of taste receptors were more sensitive compared to others.

  14. No difference in striatal dopamine transporter availability between active smokers, ex-smokers and non-smokers using (123I)FP-CIT (DaTSCAN) and SPECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, G; Knudsen, Gitte Moos; Jensen, PS

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mesolimbic and nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways play important roles in both the rewarding and conditioning effects of drugs. The dopamine transporter (DAT) is of central importance in regulating dopaminergic neurotransmission and in particular in activating the striatal D2-like...... controls was established. We used the database to test the hypothesis that striatal DAT availability is changed in active smokers compared to non-smokers and ex-smokers. METHODS: A total of 129 healthy volunteers were included. Subjects were divided into three categories according to past and present...... tobacco smoking: (1) non-smokers (n = 64), (2) ex-smokers (n = 39) and (3) active smokers (n = 26). For imaging of the DAT availability, we used [123I]FP-CIT (DaTSCAN) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Data were collected in collaboration between 13 SPECT centres located in 10...

  15. Effects of the small molecule SIRT1 activator, SRT2104 on arterial stiffness in otherwise healthy cigarette smokers and subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatasubramanian, Sowmya; Noh, Radzi M; Daga, Shruti; Langrish, Jeremy P; Mills, Nicholas L; Waterhouse, Brian R; Hoffmann, Ethan; Jacobson, Eric W; Lang, Ninian N; Frier, Brian M; Newby, David E

    2016-01-01

    Objective Arterial stiffness increases with age, and is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcome including increased mortality. The effect of the oral small molecule SIRT1 activator, SRT2104, on arterial stiffness was examined in otherwise healthy cigarette smokers and participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods 24 otherwise healthy cigarette smokers and 15 people with stable type 2 diabetes were randomised in a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover trial and received 28 days of oral SRT2104 (2.0 g/day) or matched placebo. Blood pressure was measured using non-invasive oscillatory sphygmomanometry. Pulse wave analysis and velocity were measured using applanation tonometry at baseline and the end of each treatment period. Owing to the small sample size and similar trends for both groups, data for the two groups were pooled (post hoc analysis). Results Compared to placebo, treatment with SRT2104 was associated with a significant reduction in augmentation pressure (p=0.0273) and a trend towards improvement in the augmentation index and corrected augmentation index (p>0.05 for both). However, no changes were observed in pulse wave velocity and time to wave reflection (p>0.05). Systolic and diastolic blood pressures remained unchanged throughout the study. Treatment by cohort interaction was not significant for any of the pulse wave parameters, suggesting that the response to SRT2104 in otherwise healthy smokers and people with diabetes was consistent. Conclusions SRT2104 may improve measures of arterial stiffness in otherwise healthy cigarette smokers and in participants with type 2 diabetes. Definitive conclusions are not possible given the small sample size and exploratory nature of this analysis. Trial registration number NCT01031108. PMID:27239324

  16. [Somatometry and lipid profile in smokers. Modifications after smoking withdrawal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparici, M; Fernández González, A L; Alegría, E

    1991-06-15

    The purpose of this work was to determine the somatometric and lipidic profile in a group of 90 smokers and to carry out a prospective study on modifications due to smoking withdrawal. A somatometric and lipidic profile was performed to 90 smokers and 30 non-smokers. Afterwards smokers were included in a smoking withdrawal program. One year later all subjects who stopped smoking as well as 10 of the smokers who failed in smoking withdrawal underwent a new blood analysis and somatometric study. Initial somatometry showed that smokers had a significantly higher (p less than 0.05) overweight and endomorphic index, based on somatometric characteristics. In addition, smokers showed significant lower level of HDL-cholesterol (high-density lipoprotein) than non-smokers (p less than 0.001). Somatometric and lipidic profile performed one year after smoking cessation showed a statistically significant increase on HDL-cholesterol (p less than 0.05). Somatometric and lipidic profile of the subjects who failed in smoking withdrawal showed no significant changes in relation to the study made the previous year. From these data we suggest that modifications of lipidic profile induced by tobacco consumption can be reverted, at least in part, after smoking cessation. In addition smokers present higher overweight when theoretic weight is based on somatometric characteristics.

  17. Effect of Intensity of Cigarette Smoking on Leukocytes among Adult Men and Women Smokers in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahena Shipa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Smoking is one of the preventable causes of disease in middle and low-income countries. This study was conducted in smokers and non-smokers to observe the changes in total count of leukocytes in cigarette smokers in relation to body mass index (BMI and blood pressure (BP. Methods:The study populations were from different sources including diagnostic center and general hospital, and consisted of 58 smokers and 77 non-smokers, with a broad range of age groups. The variables considered for this study were the smoking status of current smokers and non-smokers, and blood samples of the subject, anthropometric data and also blood pressure data. Results: Total leukocytes in smokers were found to be higher than the non-smokers along with the increasing of lymphocytes. Leukocytes were also found to be increased with intensity of smoking in adult men and women. The BMI of the smokers showed decreasing trend compared to non-smokers. The relation between blood pressure and smoking was not well established, as there were only little changes on systolic blood pressure (SBP of smokers found according to smoking intensity. Conclusion: Cigarette smoking has negative effects on leukocytes both in men and women smokers in terms of certain anthropometric parameters.

  18. COPD in Never Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBurnie, Mary Ann; Vollmer, William M.; Gudmundsson, Gunnar; Welte, Tobias; Nizankowska-Mogilnicka, Ewa; Studnicka, Michael; Bateman, Eric; Anto, Josep M.; Burney, Peter; Mannino, David M.; Buist, Sonia A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Never smokers comprise a substantial proportion of patients with COPD. Their characteristics and possible risk factors in this population are not yet well defined. Methods: We analyzed data from 14 countries that participated in the international, population-based Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) study. Participants were aged ≥ 40 years and completed postbronchodilator spirometry testing plus questionnaires about respiratory symptoms, health status, and exposure to COPD risk factors. A diagnosis of COPD was based on the postbronchodilator FEV1/FVC ratio, according to current GOLD (Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease) guidelines. In addition to this, the lower limit of normal (LLN) was evaluated as an alternative threshold for the FEV1/FVC ratio. Results: Among 4,291 never smokers, 6.6% met criteria for mild (GOLD stage I) COPD, and 5.6% met criteria for moderate to very severe (GOLD stage II+) COPD. Although never smokers were less likely to have COPD and had less severe COPD than ever smokers, never smokers nonetheless comprised 23.3% (240/1,031) of those classified with GOLD stage II+ COPD. This proportion was similar, 20.5% (171/832), even when the LLN was used as a threshold for the FEV1/FVC ratio. Predictors of COPD in never smokers include age, education, occupational exposure, childhood respiratory diseases, and BMI alterations. Conclusion: This multicenter international study confirms previous evidence that never smokers comprise a substantial proportion of individuals with COPD. Our data suggest that, in addition to increased age, a prior diagnosis of asthma and, among women, lower education levels are associated with an increased risk for COPD among never smokers. PMID:20884729

  19. Smoker's Lump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, Albert P.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to review personal experience with digital palpation of the nasopharynx, particularly as it relates to an apparently reversible posterior pharyngeal mass commonly found in patients who are heavy smokers. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:691080

  20. Comparison of Periodontal Conditions Between Smokers and Nonsmokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torkzaban

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background For the last decades, dental researchers have believed that smoking is a major risk factor for periodontal disease, affecting the prevalence, extent, and severity of disease. In addition, smoking adversely affects the clinical outcome of nonsurgical and surgical therapy. This study aims to evaluate the effects of smoking on oral health. In addition, due to the lack of studies that have simultaneously compared the periodontal condition in healthy smokers and smokers with periodontal disorders with healthy nonsmokers and nonsmokers with periodontal disorders, we assessed the periodontal condition in these four groups. Objectives Assess the periodontal condition in healthy smokers and smokers with periodontal disorders and compare these conditions with nonsmokers. Patients and Methods This historical cohort study included four groups: healthy smokers, smokers with periodontal disorders, healthy nonsmokers and nonsmokers with periodontal disorders. Each group consisted of 20 men with an age range of 20 - 30 years, according to the group specifications. The parameters assessed in this study included: plaque control record (PCR, bleeding on probing (BOP, probing depths, clinical attachment level (CAL, gingival color, and gingival consistency. Results There was not a significant difference in the prevalence of isolated microorganisms between the smokers and nonsmokers. However, the cigarette smoking group had adverse effect on other periodontal indices including PCR, CAL, and BOP. The Mean PCR and CAL were significantly higher in the two smoker subgroups than the nonsmokers (P < 0.05. Regarding gingival color, red and bluish-red colors were observed more in those with periodontal disease compared to healthy individuals, regardless of cigarette smoking (P = 0.000. Also, the firm gingival consistency was more frequent in healthy subjects and a spongy pattern was detected more in subjects with periodontal disease, regardless of smoking (P = 0

  1. Nicotine reinforcement in never-smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Angela N; Johnson, Matthew W; Reissig, Chad J; Griffiths, Roland R

    2015-12-01

    Global tobacco-related mortality dwarfs that of all other drugs. Nicotine is believed to be the primary agent responsible for tobacco use and addiction. However, nicotine is a relatively weak and inconsistent reinforcer in nonhumans and nicotine reinforcement has not been demonstrated in never-smokers. This study investigated the discriminative, subjective, and reinforcing effects of nicotine in never-smokers. Eighteen never-smokers (never-smokers.

  2. [Respiratory function tests. Differences between smokers and non-smokers. Effects of withdrawal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparici, M; Fernández González, A L; Alegría, E

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the characteristics of spirometric performance in a group of smokers and to carry out a prospective study of the changes in ventilatory lung function after smoking withdrawal. The ventilatory lung function was studied in 90 smokers and 30 non-smokers. Afterwards the smokers were included in smoking withdrawal program. One year later, the ventilatory function tests were repeated in those individuals who were able to stop smoking. Respiratory function tests were likewise repeated in 10 subjects chosen randomly among those who were not able to stop smoking. The initial study of the ventilatory lung function showed that smokers had significantly lower values of FVC (p < 0.001), FEV1 (p < 0.001), FEVC1/FVC (p < 0.001), FEF25-75 (p < 0.01 and PEF (p < 0.01) compared to non-smokers. Likewise smokers also had a statistically significant higher prevalence rate of obstructive pulmonary disease (p < 0.001). Ventilatory function studies performed one year after smoking withdrawal on those who were able to stop smoking showed a significant improvement of respiratory function parameters compared to studies done one year before. There was also a significant decrease in the prevalence and severity of obstructive pulmonary disease. No differences were observed in the ventilatory function tests performed on the ten subjects who did not stop smoking. From these data we suggest that tobacco consumption produces obstruction of the airways that can be reverted, at least in part, after smoking withdrawal.

  3. Subjective Response to Foot-Fall Noise, Including Localization of the Source Position

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas; Hwang, Ha Dong; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Although an impact noise level is objectively evaluated the same according to current standards, a lightweight floor structure is often subjectively judged more annoying than a heavy homogeneous structure. The hypothesis of the present investigation is that the subjective judgment of impact noise...

  4. Exposure to Nicotine and Selected Toxicants in Cigarette Smokers Who Switched to Electronic Cigarettes: A Longitudinal Within-Subjects Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goniewicz, Maciej L; Gawron, Michal; Smith, Danielle M; Peng, Margaret; Jacob, Peyton; Benowitz, Neal L

    2017-02-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are purported to deliver nicotine aerosol without any toxic combustion products present in tobacco smoke. In this longitudinal within-subjects observational study, we evaluated the effects of e-cigarettes on nicotine delivery and exposure to selected carcinogens and toxicants. We measured seven nicotine metabolites and 17 tobacco smoke exposure biomarkers in the urine samples of 20 smokers collected before and after switching to pen-style M201 e-cigarettes for 2 weeks. Biomarkers were metabolites of 13 major carcinogens and toxicants in cigarette smoke: one tobacco-specific nitrosamine (NNK), eight volatile organic compounds (1,3-butadiene, crotonaldehyde, acrolein, benzene, acrylamide, acrylonitrile, ethylene oxide, and propylene oxide), and four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, and pyrene). Changes in urine biomarkers concentration were tested using repeated measures analysis of variance. In total, 45% of participants reported complete abstinence from cigarette smoking at 2 weeks, while 55% reported continued smoking. Levels of total nicotine and some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolites did not change after switching from tobacco to e-cigarettes. All other biomarkers significantly decreased after 1 week of using e-cigarettes (p e-cigarettes, nicotine exposure remains unchanged, while exposure to selected carcinogens and toxicants is substantially reduced. To our knowledge, this is the first study that demonstrates that substituting tobacco cigarettes with an e-cigarette may reduce user exposure to numerous toxicants and carcinogens otherwise present in tobacco cigarettes. Data on reduced exposure to harmful constituents that are present in tobacco cigarettes and e-cigarettes can aid in evaluating e-cigarettes as a potential harm reduction device. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights

  5. Periodontal Inflammatory Conditions Among Smokers and Never-Smokers With and Without Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Fawad; Al-Kheraif, Abdulaziz A; Salazar-Lazo, Karem; Yanez-Fontenla, Virginia; Aldosary, Khalid M; Alshehri, Mohammed; Malmstrom, Hans; Romanos, Georgios E

    2015-07-01

    There is a dearth of studies regarding the influence of cigarette smoking on periodontal inflammatory conditions among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The aim of the present study is to assess periodontal inflammatory conditions among smokers and never-smokers with and without T2DM. One hundred individuals (50 patients with T2DM [25 smokers and 25 never-smokers] and 50 controls [25 smokers and 25 never-smokers]) were included. Information regarding age, sex, duration and daily frequency of smoking, duration and treatment of diabetes, and oral hygiene was recorded using a questionnaire. Periodontal parameters (plaque index [PI], bleeding on probing [BOP], probing depth [PD], clinical attachment loss [AL], and marginal bone loss [MBL]) were measured. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels were also recorded. Mean age, monthly income status, and education levels were comparable among smokers and never-smokers with and without T2DM. Mean HbA1c levels were significantly higher among patients with T2DM (8.2% ± 0.1%) compared with controls (4.4% ± 0.3%) (P never-smokers with T2DM. Among controls, periodontal parameters (PI [P never-smokers. Never-smokers with T2DM had worse periodontal status than smokers and never-smokers in the control group (P never-smokers with T2DM. Among controls, periodontal inflammation is worse among smokers than never-smokers.

  6. Recruiting Diverse Smokers: Enrollment Yields and Cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodar, Kaitlyn E; Hall, Marissa G; Butler, Eboneé N; Parada, Humberto; Stein-Seroussi, Al; Hanley, Sean; Brewer, Noel T

    2016-12-16

    To help tobacco control research better include vulnerable populations, we sought to identify effective ways to recruit diverse smokers. In 2014-2015, we recruited 2149 adult cigarette smokers in California and North Carolina, United States, to participate in a randomized trial of pictorial cigarette pack warnings. The most effective means of recruiting smokers were the classified advertising website Craigslist (28% of participants), word of mouth (23%), Facebook (16%), and flyers or postcards (14%). Low-income and African American smokers were more likely to respond to interpersonal contact (including staff in-person recruitment and word of mouth) than were high-income and non-African American smokers (all p < 0.05). Hispanic and gay, lesbian, and bisexual smokers were more likely to be recruited by Craigslist than non-Hispanic and straight smokers (both p < 0.05). Of the recruitment methods requiring cost, the cheapest was Craigslist ($3-7 per smoker). The most expensive methods were newspaper ads in California ($375 per smoker) and staff in-person recruiting in North Carolina ($180 per smoker). Successfully recruiting diverse smokers requires using multiple methods including interpersonal, online, and other media. Craigslist and word of mouth are especially useful and low-cost ways to recruit diverse smokers.

  7. Recruiting Diverse Smokers: Enrollment Yields and Cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlyn E. Brodar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To help tobacco control research better include vulnerable populations, we sought to identify effective ways to recruit diverse smokers. In 2014–2015, we recruited 2149 adult cigarette smokers in California and North Carolina, United States, to participate in a randomized trial of pictorial cigarette pack warnings. The most effective means of recruiting smokers were the classified advertising website Craigslist (28% of participants, word of mouth (23%, Facebook (16%, and flyers or postcards (14%. Low-income and African American smokers were more likely to respond to interpersonal contact (including staff in-person recruitment and word of mouth than were high-income and non-African American smokers (all p < 0.05. Hispanic and gay, lesbian, and bisexual smokers were more likely to be recruited by Craigslist than non-Hispanic and straight smokers (both p < 0.05. Of the recruitment methods requiring cost, the cheapest was Craigslist ($3–7 per smoker. The most expensive methods were newspaper ads in California ($375 per smoker and staff in-person recruiting in North Carolina ($180 per smoker. Successfully recruiting diverse smokers requires using multiple methods including interpersonal, online, and other media. Craigslist and word of mouth are especially useful and low-cost ways to recruit diverse smokers.

  8. Verifying the attenuation of earplugs in situ: method validation on human subjects including individualized numerical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockstael, Annelies; Van Renterghem, Timothy; Botteldooren, Dick; D'Haenens, Wendy; Keppler, Hannah; Maes, Leen; Philips, Birgit; Swinnen, Freya; Vinck, Bart

    2009-03-01

    The microphone in real ear (MIRE) protocol allows the assessment of hearing protector's (HPD) attenuation in situ by measuring the difference between the sound pressure outside and inside the ear canal behind the HPD. Custom-made earplugs have been designed with an inner bore to insert the MIRE probe containing two microphones, the reference microphone measuring the sound pressure outside and the measurement microphone registering the sound pressure behind the HPD. Previous research on a head and torso simulator reveals a distinct difference, henceforth called transfer function, between the sound pressure at the MIRE measurement microphone and the sound pressure of interest at the eardrum. In the current study, similar measurements are carried out on humans with an extra microphone to measure the sound pressure at the eardrum. The resulting transfer functions confirm the global frequency dependency found earlier, but also show substantial variability between the ears with respect to the exact frequency and amplitude of the transfer functions' extrema. In addition, finite-difference time-domain numerical models of an ear canal with earplug are developed for each individual ear by including its specific geometrical parameters. This approach leads to a good resemblance between the simulations and their corresponding measurements.

  9. Health behaviors among short- and long- term ex-smokers: results from the Thai National Health Examination Survey IV, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangthong, Rassamee; Wichaidit, Wit; McNeil, Edward; Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Kessomboon, Pattapong; Taneepanichskul, Surasak; Putwatana, Panwadee; Aekplakorn, Wichai

    2012-07-01

    Although numerous studies have shown the health behaviors of ex-smokers to be better than those in regular smokers, the differences in health behaviors among ex-smokers at varying durations of cessation have not been investigated. This study aims to examine the relationship between different durations of smoking cessation and health behaviors. Data on dietary intake, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and smoking behavior from the Thai National Health Examination Survey IV for subjects aged 15-98 years (n=19 371) were included in the analysis. Trends between health behaviors among regular smokers, ex-smokers with different durations of smoking (10 years), and never smokers were tested. Logistic regression models adjusted for sex, age, and economic status were used. The prevalences of regular smoking, ex-smoking, and never smoking were 22.3%, 12% , and 65.7%, respectively. A trend was found for consumption of fruit, beans and meats, dairy and soy milk, whole-grain products, nutritional supplements, and eating habits. Average daily alcohol consumption (g) was lowest among ex-smokers who had quit for>10 years ex-smokers (16.4) followed by 1-10 years ex-smokers (27.2), and <1 year ex-smokers (33.7). A longer duration of smoking cessation correlated with better health behaviors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Inflammatory biomarkers and radiologic measurements in never-smokers with COPD: A cross-sectional study from the CODA cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun; Hong, Yoonki; Lim, Myoung Nam; Bak, So Hyeon; Kim, Min-Ji; Kim, Kyunga; Kim, Woo Jin; Park, Hye Yun

    2017-01-01

    Various biomarkers have emerged as potential surrogates to represent various subgroups of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which manifest with different phenotypes. However, the biomarkers representing never-smokers with COPD have not yet been well elucidated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations of certain serum and radiological biomarkers with the presence of COPD in never-smokers. To explore the associations of serum and radiological biomarkers with the presence of COPD in never-smokers, we conducted a cross-sectional patient cohort study composed of never-smokers from the COPD in Dusty Areas (CODA) cohort, consisting of subjects living in dusty areas near cement plants in South Korea. Of the 131 never-smokers in the cohort, 77 (58.8%) had COPD. There were no significant differences in the number of subjects with high levels of inflammatory biomarkers (>90th percentile of never-smokers without COPD), including white blood cell count, total bilirubin, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and C-reactive protein, or radiologic measurements (including emphysema index and mean wall area percentage) between never-smokers with COPD and those without COPD. However, the number of subjects with high uric acid was significantly higher in never-smokers with COPD than never-smokers without COPD (31.2% (24/77) vs. 11.1% (6/54); p = 0.013). In addition, multivariate analysis revealed that high uric acid was significantly associated with the presence of COPD in never-smokers (adjusted relative risk: 1.63; 95% confidence interval: 1.21, 2.18; p = 0.001). Our study suggests that high serum levels of uric acid might be a potential biomarker for assessing the presence of COPD in never-smokers.

  11. Subjective cognitive complaints included in diagnostic evaluation of dementia helps accurate diagnosis in a mixed memory clinic cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salem, L C; Vogel, Asmus Mejling; Ebstrup, J

    2015-01-01

    functions were assessed with the Mini-mental state examination (MMSE) and Addenbrooke's cognitive examination (ACE), and symptoms of depression were rated with Major Depression Inventory (MDI). All interviews and the diagnostic conclusion were blinded to the SMC score. RESULTS: We found that young patients......OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to examine the quantity and profile of subjective cognitive complaints in young patients as compared with elderly patients referred to a memory clinic. METHODS: Patients were consecutively recruited from the Copenhagen University Hospital Memory Clinic at Rigshospitalet....... In total, 307 patients and 149 age-matched healthy controls were included. Patients were classified in 4 diagnostic groups: dementia, mild cognitive impairment, affective disorders and no cognitive impairment. Subjective memory was assessed with subjective memory complaints (SMC) scale. Global cognitive...

  12. Non-specific interstitial pneumonia in cigarette smokers: a CT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marten, Katharina [Georg August University of Goettingen, Department of Radiology, Goettingen (Germany); Milne, David [Green Lane Hospital, Department of Radiology, Auckland (New Zealand); Antoniou, Katerina M. [University of Crete, Department of Thoracic Medicine, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Nicholson, Andrew G. [Royal Brompton Hospital, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom); Tennant, Rachel C.; Wells, Athol U. [Royal Brompton Hospital, Interstitial Lung Disease Unit, London (United Kingdom); Hansel, Trevor T. [Royal Brompton Hospital, Clinical Trials Unit, London (United Kingdom); Hansell, David M. [Royal Brompton Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-15

    The goal of this study was to seek indirect evidence that smoking is an aetiological factor in some patients with non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP). Ten current and eight ex-smokers with NSIP were compared to controls including 137 current smokers with no known interstitial lung disease and 11 non-smokers with NSIP. Prevalence and extent of emphysema in 18 smokers with NSIP were compared with subjects meeting GOLD criteria for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; group A; n = 34) and healthy smokers (normal FEV{sub 1}; group B; n = 103), respectively. Emphysema was present in 14/18 (77.8%) smokers with NSIP. Emphysema did not differ in prevalence between NSIP patients and group A controls (25/34, 73.5%), but was strikingly more prevalent in NSIP patients than in group B controls (18/103, 17.5%, P < 0.0005). On multiple logistic regression, the likelihood of emphysema increased when NSIP was present (OR = 18.8; 95% CI = 5.3-66.3; P < 0.0005) and with increasing age (OR = 1.04; 95% CI = 0.99-1.11; P = 0.08). Emphysema is as prevalent in smokers with NSIP as in smokers with COPD, and is strikingly more prevalent in these two groups than in healthy smoking controls. The association between NSIP and emphysema provides indirect support for a smoking pathogenesis hypothesis in some NSIP patients. (orig.)

  13. A comparison of oxidative stress in smokers and non-smokers: an in vivo human quantitative study of n-3 lipid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Basant K; Treasaden, Ian H; Cocchi, Massimo; Tsaluchidu, Sofia; Tonello, Lucio; Ross, Brian M

    2008-04-17

    Cigarette smoking is believed to cause oxidative stress by several mechanisms, including direct damage by radical species and the inflammatory response induced by smoking, and would therefore be expected to cause increased lipid peroxidation. The aim was to carry out the first study of the relationship of smoking in humans to the level of n-3 lipid peroxidation indexed by the level of ethane in exhaled breath. Samples of alveolar air were obtained from 11 smokers and 18 non-smokers. The air samples were analyzed for ethane using mass spectrometry. The two groups of subjects were matched with respect to age and gender. The mean cumulative smoking status of the smokers was 11.8 (standard error 2.5) pack-years. The mean level of ethane in the alveolar breath of the group of smokers (2.53 (0.55) ppb) was not significantly different from that of the group of non-smokers (2.59 (0.29) ppb; p = 0.92). With all 29 subjects included, the Spearman rank correlation coefficient between ethane levels and cumulative smoking status was -0.11 (p = 0.58), while an analysis including only the smokers yielded a corresponding correlation coefficient of 0.11 (p = 0.75). Our results show no evidence that cigarette smoking is related to increased n-3 lipid peroxidation as measured by expired ethane.

  14. Sex-effects on smoking cue perception in non-smokers, smokers, and ex-smokers: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Zanchi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionRecent neuroimaging research suggests sex-related brain differences in smoking addiction. In the present pilot study, we assessed gender-related differences in brain activation in response to cigarette-related video cues, investigating non-smokers, smokers and ex-smokers. MethodsFirst, we compared 29 females (28.6±5.3 versus 23 males (31.5±6.4 regardless of current smoking status to assess global gender-related effects. Second, we performed a post-hoc analysis of non-smokers (9 F, 8M, smokers (10F, 8M and ex-smokers (10F, 7M. Participants performed a block-design functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI paradigm contrasting smoking with control cue video exposures. Data analyses included task-related general linear model, voxel-based morphometry (VBM of gray matter, and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS of white matter. ResultsFirst, the global effect regardless of current smoking status revealed higher activation in the bilateral superior frontal gyrus and anterior cingulate cortex for females compared to males. Second, the analysis according to current smoking status demonstrated higher activation in female vs. male smokers vs. non-smokers in the superior frontal gyrus, anterior and posterior cingulate cortex, and precuneus, and higher activation in female vs. male ex-smokers vs. non-smokers in the right precentral gyrus, in the right insula and anterior cingulate cortex. No structural differences were found in grey or white matter.ConclusionThe current study identifies gender-related brain functional differences in smokers and ex-smokers compared to non-smokers. The current work can be considered as a starting point for future investigations into gender differences in brain responses to cigarette-related cues.

  15. Subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Vega Encabo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I claim that subjectivity is a way of being that is constituted through a set of practices in which the self is subject to the dangers of fictionalizing and plotting her life and self-image. I examine some ways of becoming subject through narratives and through theatrical performance before others. Through these practices, a real and active subjectivity is revealed, capable of self-knowledge and self-transformation. 

  16. [Aerobic capacity. Differences between smokers and non-smokers. Effects of withdrawal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparici, M; Fernández González, A L; Alegría, E

    1993-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the aerobic capacity in a group of smokers and to carry out a prospective study of the changes in cardiorespiratory and metabolic response to exercise after smoking withdrawal. An aerobic capacity test was performed in 90 smokers and 30 non-smokers. Afterwards, the smokers were included in a smoking withdrawal program. One year later, the aerobic capacity test was repeated in those individuals who were able to stop smoking. The initial study of the aerobic capacity during exercise showed that smokers had significantly lower values of maximal oxygen uptake per kg body weight (VO2 max./kg) (28.7 +/- 8 vs. 35.1 +/- 7 ml/kg/min) (p < 0.001), work time (5.8 +/- 2.6 vs. 7.5 +/- 3.1 min) (p < 0.01) and work load (1.1 +/- 0.3 vs. 1.4 +/- 0.3 W/kg) (p < 0.001) under aerobic conditions. Aerobic capacity test performed one year after smoking withdrawal in those who were able to stop smoking showed a significant increase in VO2 max./kg (35.5 +/- 6.1 vs. 31.1 +/- 5.5) (p < 0.05), work time (8.1 +/- 3.2 vs. 5.8 +/- 3.2 min) (p < 0.05) and work load (1.5 +/- 0.4 vs. 1.1 +/- 0.4 W/kg) (p < 0.01) under aerobic conditions. No differences were observed in the aerobic capacity test performed on the ten subjects who did not stop smoking. From these data we suggest that tobacco consumption produces impairment of the aerobic capacity that can be reverted, at least in part, after smoking withdrawal.

  17. The case for a smoker's license.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Chapman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND TO THE DEBATE: Tobacco continues to kill millions of people around the world each year and its use is increasing in some countries, which makes the need for new, creative, and radical efforts to achieve the tobacco control endgame vitally important. One such effort is discussed in this PLOS Medicine Debate, where Simon Chapman presents his proposal for a "smoker's license" and Jeff Collin argues against. Chapman sets out a case for introducing a smart card license for smokers designed to limit access to tobacco products and encourage cessation. Key elements of the smoker's license include smokers setting daily limits, financial incentives for permanent license surrender, and a test of health risk knowledge for commencing smokers. Collin argues against the proposal, saying that it would shift focus away from the real vector of the epidemic--the tobacco industry--and that by focusing on individuals it would censure victims, increase stigmatization of smokers, and marginalize the poor.

  18. The case against a smoker's license.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Collin

    Full Text Available Tobacco continues to kill millions of people around the world each year and its use is increasing in some countries, which makes the need for new, creative, and radical efforts to achieve the tobacco control endgame vitally important. One such effort is discussed in this PLOS Medicine Debate, where Simon Chapman presents his proposal for a "smoker's license" and Jeff Collin argues against. Chapman sets out a case for introducing a smart card license for smokers designed to limit access to tobacco products and encourage cessation. Key elements of the smoker's license include smokers setting daily limits, financial incentives for permanent license surrender, and a test of health risk knowledge for commencing smokers. Collin argues against the proposal, saying that it would shift focus away from the real vector of the epidemic--the tobacco industry--and that by focusing on individuals it would censure victims, increase stigmatization of smokers, and marginalize the poor.

  19. Electronic cigarette use behaviors and motivations among smokers and non-smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E. Sussan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of electronic cigarettes (EC has risen exponentially over the past decade, including among never smokers, and ECs are now the most popular tobacco product among teenagers in the US. While, EC manufacturers utilize numerous marketing strategies to target both smokers and non-smokers, it is unclear how perceptions and behaviors differ between these two groups. Methods We conducted a survey of 320 adults either via online surveys or in Baltimore vape shops to determine demographics, behaviors, perceptions, and motivations underlying use of ECs. Results Our survey respondents were predominantly young, Caucasian males, 74% of whom identified themselves as former smokers, while 20% identified as current smokers and 6% were never smokers. Former smokers reported a longer history of EC use and higher nicotine concentrations than current smokers. For former and current smokers, the primary motivation for EC use was assistance to quit smoking, and nearly half indicated that they plan to reduce their nicotine concentration and eventually quit using ECs. Among former smokers, self-reports on use and measures of dependence were consistent with nicotine replacement as their primary motivation. The majority of former and current smokers also reported that their respiratory health had improved as a result of EC use, although this effect was stronger for former smokers. Never smokers reported less frequent EC use and dependence compared to former and current smokers. Their motivations for use were more commonly for enjoyment and popularity, and they displayed a reduced desire to eventually quit using ECs. Conclusions These responses provide insight into the underlying thoughts and behaviors of smoking and non-smoking EC users and also suggest that never smoking EC users are an emerging demographic with different motivations and perceptions than those of current and former smokers.

  20. The Effects of 8-Weeks Aerobic Exercise Program on Blood Lipids and Cholesterol Profile of Smokers vs. Non Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taifour, Akef; AL-Shishani, Ahmad; Khasawneh, Aman; AL-Nawaiseh, Ali; Bakeer, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of 8-week aerobic exercise program on blood lipids and cholesterol profile of smoker's vs. non-smokers. A total of 34 male subjects (18 non-smokers and 16 smokers) took part in this study. Both groups were pre- and post tested in their blood-lipids and cholesterol profile before and after the 8-week…

  1. Smokers Show Lower Levels of Psychological Well-Being and Mindfulness than Non-Smokers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víviam Vargas Barros

    Full Text Available Mindfulness is defined as "paying attention in a particular way, on purpose, in the present moment, and nonjudgmentally". Mindfulness is associated with positive affect, life satisfaction, self-esteem, lower negative affect and rumination. Conversely, evidence suggests a relationship between nicotine dependence and psychiatric disorders. This study aimed to compare the levels of Mindfulness and Subjective Well-Being (SWB between smokers and non-smokers. Ninety seven smokers and eighty four non-smokers participated in the study (n = 181. The Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ-BR and the Subjective Well-Being Scale (SWBS were used. In all the factors of SWBS, the total scores in the FFMQ-BR and in the facets of Observing and Non-Reactivity, the non-smokers scored higher than the smokers. This study suggests that smokers present lower levels of Mindfulness and SWB than non-smokers. Consequently, we propose that Mindfulness-Based Interventions (MBI may help smokers deal with treatment and abstinence by increasing their level of SWB.

  2. Risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among never-smokers in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seok Jeong; Kim, Seo Woo; Kong, Kyoung Ae; Ryu, Yon Ju; Lee, Jin Hwa; Chang, Jung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients include those who have never smoked. However, risk factors other than smoking in never-smokers have not been elucidated sufficiently. This study investigated the risk factors for COPD among never-smokers in Korea using population-based data. The data were retrieved from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Survey IV conducted from 2007 to 2009. Among subjects aged 40 years or older who underwent appropriate pulmonary function tests, never-smokers not diagnosed with asthma and not showing a restrictive pattern on pulmonary function tests were enrolled. Risk factors of COPD in never-smokers were analyzed using logistic regression models. Among 24,871 participants in the representative Korean cohort, 3,473 never-smokers were enrolled. COPD patients accounted for 7.6% of the never-smokers. In the logistic regression analysis, low education status (odds ratio [OR]: 2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2-3.2), occupational exposure (OR: 2.6; 95% CI: 1.3-5.3), a history of tuberculosis (OR: 4.5; 95% CI: 2.3-8.7), bronchiectasis (OR: 6.0; 95% CI: 1.4-25.4), male sex (OR: 4.2; 95% CI: 2.6-6.7), advanced age (60-69 years vs 40-49 years; OR: 3.8; 95% CI: 2.0-7.0), and being underweight (body mass index never-smokers.

  3. Non-Smoker Exposure to Secondhand Cannabis Smoke II: Effect of Room Ventilation on the Physiological, Subjective, and Behavioral/Cognitive Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Evan S.; Cone, Edward J; Mitchell, John M.; Bigelow, George E.; LoDico, Charles; Flegel, Ron; Vandrey, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cannabis is the most widely used illicit drug. Many individuals are incidentally exposed to secondhand cannabis smoke, but little is known about the effects of this exposure. This report examines the physiological, subjective, and behavioral/cognitive effects of secondhand cannabis exposure, and the influence of room ventilation on these effects. Methods Non-cannabis-using individuals were exposed to secondhand cannabis smoke from six individuals smoking cannabis (11.3% THC) ad libitum in a specially constructed chamber for one hour. Chamber ventilation was experimentally manipulated so that participants were exposed under unventilated conditions or with ventilation at a rate of 11 air exchanges/hour. Physiological, subjective and behavioral/cognitive measures of cannabis exposure assessed after exposure sessions were compared to baseline measures. Results Exposure to secondhand cannabis smoke under unventilated conditions produced detectable cannabinoid levels in blood and urine, minor increases in heart rate, mild to moderate self-reported sedative drug effects, and impaired performance on the Digit Symbol Substitution Task (DSST). One urine specimen tested positive at using a 50 ng/mL cut-off and several specimens were positive at 20 ng/mL. Exposure under ventilated conditions resulted in much lower blood cannabinoid levels, and did not produce sedative drug effects, impairments in performance, or positive urine screen results. Conclusions Room ventilation has a pronounced effect on exposure to secondhand cannabis smoke. Under extreme, unventilated conditions, secondhand cannabis smoke exposure can produce detectable levels of THC in blood and urine, minor physiological and subjective drug effects, and minor impairment on a task requiring psychomotor ability and working memory. PMID:25957157

  4. Non-smoker exposure to secondhand cannabis smoke II: Effect of room ventilation on the physiological, subjective, and behavioral/cognitive effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Evan S; Cone, Edward J; Mitchell, John M; Bigelow, George E; LoDico, Charles; Flegel, Ron; Vandrey, Ryan

    2015-06-01

    Cannabis is the most widely used illicit drug. Many individuals are incidentally exposed to secondhand cannabis smoke, but little is known about the effects of this exposure. This report examines the physiological, subjective, and behavioral/cognitive effects of secondhand cannabis exposure, and the influence of room ventilation on these effects. Non-cannabis-using individuals were exposed to secondhand cannabis smoke from six individuals smoking cannabis (11.3% THC) ad libitum in a specially constructed chamber for 1h. Chamber ventilation was experimentally manipulated so that participants were exposed under unventilated conditions or with ventilation at a rate of 11 air exchanges/h. Physiological, subjective and behavioral/cognitive measures of cannabis exposure assessed after exposure sessions were compared to baseline measures. Exposure to secondhand cannabis smoke under unventilated conditions produced detectable cannabinoid levels in blood and urine, minor increases in heart rate, mild to moderate self-reported sedative drug effects, and impaired performance on the digit symbol substitution task (DSST). One urine specimen tested positive at using a 50 ng/ml cut-off and several specimens were positive at 20 ng/ml. Exposure under ventilated conditions resulted in much lower blood cannabinoid levels, and did not produce sedative drug effects, impairments in performance, or positive urine screen results. Room ventilation has a pronounced effect on exposure to secondhand cannabis smoke. Under extreme, unventilated conditions, secondhand cannabis smoke exposure can produce detectable levels of THC in blood and urine, minor physiological and subjective drug effects, and minor impairment on a task requiring psychomotor ability and working memory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Free gingival grafts: graft shrinkage and donor-site healing in smokers and non-smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cléverson O; Ribeiro, Erica Del Peloso; Sallum, Antônio Wilson; Tatakis, Dimitris N

    2010-05-01

    This prospective clinical study aims to evaluate the influence of cigarette smoking on free gingival graft (FGG) healing, by assessing FGG dimensional changes and donor-site wound healing. Twelve non-smokers and 10 smokers treatment planned for FGG to augment keratinized tissue dimensions in the mandibular incisor area completed the study. All subjects received standardized FGG of same dimensions. Probing depth, gingival margin position, clinical attachment level, keratinized tissue (KT) width, gingival thickness, and FGG dimensions (width, length, and area) were assessed and recorded before surgery, and 7, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days postoperatively. The palatal donor area was evaluated for immediate bleeding and complete wound epithelialization. Differences between the two groups (smokers and non-smokers) were statistically analyzed. FGG dimensions changed significantly postoperatively. At 90 days postoperatively, FGG width, length, and area were respectively reduced by 31%, 22%, and 44% in non-smokers and by 44%, 25%, and 58% in smokers (no significant differences between groups; P >0.05). Significant KT increases were observed in both non-smokers and smokers (5.4 and 4.8 mm, respectively). Donor-site immediate bleeding was significantly more prevalent in non-smokers (75%) compared to smokers (30%) (P = 0.04). At 15 days postoperatively, donor-site complete epithelialization was much more prevalent in non-smokers (92%) than in smokers (20%) (P FGG donor-site wound healing by reducing immediate bleeding incidence and by delaying epithelialization, although it does not have discernible effects on postoperative FGG dimensional changes.

  6. Adolescents' perceptions about smokers in Karnataka, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Devadasan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevalence of tobacco use among adolescents in India is very high. Despite many epidemiological studies exploring tobacco use among youth, there is no published data on adolescents' perceptions about smokers in Indian society and its implications on tobacco control. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted using a stratified random sampling with probability proportional to school-type (government or private owned. Data was collected using a pretested, self-administered, anonymous questionnaire with a mix of close and open-ended questions from a sample of 1087 students. Chi-square test was used to measure associations. Qualitative data was analysed through inductive coding. Results The response rate for the study was 82.5% and the sample population had a mean age of 16.9 years (SD = 1.9 with 57.8% male students. Majority of respondents (84.6% reported negative perceptions about smokers while 20.4% of respondents reported positive perceptions. Female students reported significantly higher disapproval rate (negative perceptions for smoking compared to male students (89.7% Vs 71.6% in case of male smoker; 81.2% Vs 67.3% in case of female smoker. Dominant themes defining perceptions about smokers included 'hatred/hostility/Intolerance', 'against family values/norms', 'not aware of tobacco harms' and 'under stress/emotional trauma'. Themes like 'culture', 'character' and 'power' specifically described negative social image of female smoker but projected a neutral or sometimes even a positive image of male smoker. There was a significant association between adolescents' positive perceptions of smokers and tobacco use by themselves as well as their close associates. Conclusions Adolescents' stereotypes of smokers, especially female smokers are largely negative. We suggest that tobacco control interventions targeting adolescents should be gender specific, should also involve their peers, family and school personnel, and should go

  7. Adolescents' perceptions about smokers in Karnataka, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhojani, Upendra M; Elias, Maya A; Devadasan, N

    2011-07-14

    Prevalence of tobacco use among adolescents in India is very high. Despite many epidemiological studies exploring tobacco use among youth, there is no published data on adolescents' perceptions about smokers in Indian society and its implications on tobacco control. A cross-sectional study was conducted using a stratified random sampling with probability proportional to school-type (government or private owned). Data was collected using a pretested, self-administered, anonymous questionnaire with a mix of close and open-ended questions from a sample of 1087 students. Chi-square test was used to measure associations. Qualitative data was analysed through inductive coding. The response rate for the study was 82.5% and the sample population had a mean age of 16.9 years (SD = 1.9) with 57.8% male students. Majority of respondents (84.6%) reported negative perceptions about smokers while 20.4% of respondents reported positive perceptions. Female students reported significantly higher disapproval rate (negative perceptions) for smoking compared to male students (89.7% Vs 71.6% in case of male smoker; 81.2% Vs 67.3% in case of female smoker). Dominant themes defining perceptions about smokers included 'hatred/hostility/Intolerance', 'against family values/norms', 'not aware of tobacco harms' and 'under stress/emotional trauma'. Themes like 'culture', 'character' and 'power' specifically described negative social image of female smoker but projected a neutral or sometimes even a positive image of male smoker. There was a significant association between adolescents' positive perceptions of smokers and tobacco use by themselves as well as their close associates. Adolescents' stereotypes of smokers, especially female smokers are largely negative. We suggest that tobacco control interventions targeting adolescents should be gender specific, should also involve their peers, family and school personnel, and should go beyond providing knowledge on harmful effects of smoking to

  8. Increased CYP1A1 expression in human exfoliated urothelial cells of cigarette smokers compared to non-smokers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerrenhaus, Angelika; Roos, Peter H. [Institute for Occupational Physiology at the University Dortmund, Dortmund (Germany); Mueller, Tina [Institute for Occupational Physiology at the University Dortmund, Dortmund (Germany); University Dortmund, Department of Statistics, Mathematical Statistics with Applications in Biometrics, Dortmund (Germany)

    2007-01-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, arylamines and nitrosamines, constituents of cigarette smoke, are known inducers of bladder cancer. The biochemical response of the target tissue, the bladder urothelium, following inhalation of cigarette smoke has not been studied so far. We used exfoliated transitional urothelial cells from human urine samples to analyze effects of smoking on induction of the cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP1A1. Samples of 40 subjects, including male and female smokers and non-smokers, were examined. A prerequisite for the immunofluorescence microscopic analysis of the cells was the enrichment of the urothelial cell population. This was achieved by a new method which is based on magnetic cell sorting exploiting specific binding of immobilized Griffonia simplicifolia lectin to the surface of urothelial cells. Immunostaining of the final cell preparation with a monoclonal antibody to CYP1A1 showed that about 6% of the urothelial cells of non-smokers stained positive for CYP1A1. However, this fraction of positive cells was more than 44% of the urothelial cells in samples from cigarette smokers. In spite of the individual variation, the difference was statistically significant. There were no gender-related differences in the portion of CYP1A1 expressing urothelial cells of smokers and non-smokers. In essence, we show for the first time that human urothelial cells respond to cigarette smoking by induction of CYP1A1. The approach opens new fields of mechanistic and biomarker research with respect to the pathogenetic processes of cancer development in the human bladder. (orig.)

  9. Gingival Crevicular Fluid and Salivary Periostin Levels in Non-Smoker Subjects With Chronic and Aggressive Periodontitis : Periostin Levels in Chronic and Aggressive Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aral, Cüneyt A; Köseoğlu, Serhat; Sağlam, Mehmet; Pekbağrıyanık, Tuğba; Savran, Levent

    2016-06-01

    Periostin, an extracellular matrix protein functioning as an important structural mediator and adhesion molecule, has been shown to be an important regulator of connective tissue integrity. This study aimed to evaluate the levels of periostin in chronic periodontitis (CP) and aggressive periodontitis (AgP) compared to non-periodontitis (NP). Individuals were submitted to gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and saliva sampling. Periodontal examination consisted of plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), probing depth (PD), bleeding on probing (BOP), and clinical attachment level (CAL) measurements. Assays for periostin were performed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Periodontitis patients presented more severe clinical indices compared to the NP group (p aggressive periodontitis. The results suggest that subjects with CP and AgP exhibit a different periostin profile. Periostin in GCF may have a protective role against periodontal disease. Furthermore, salivary periostin concentrations may have a promising diagnostic potential for the aggressive forms of periodontal disease.

  10. Smoker identity and its potential role in young adults' smoking behavior: A meta-ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombor, Ildiko; Shahab, Lion; Herbec, Aleksandra; Neale, Joanne; Michie, Susan; West, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Identity is an important influence on behavior. To identify potential targets for smoking cessation interventions in young adults, we synthesized findings from qualitative studies on smoker identity and potential influences on smoking and smoking cessation. A systematic search of 4 electronic databases up to September 19, 2013, was conducted to identify qualitative studies on smoker identity in smokers and ex-smokers aged 16-34. Key concepts were extracted from individual studies and synthesized into higher-order interpretations by following the principles of meta-ethnography. Seventeen relevant papers were identified. At the highest level of interpretation, we identified 4 types of findings: (a) contributory factors to identity, (b) identity in relation to smoking, (c) contextual and temporal patterning, and (d) behavior in relation to smoking. Contributory factors included the desire to establish aspirational individual and social identities, enact a smoker identity appropriate to the momentary social context, and alter personal nonsmoking rules when consuming alcohol. Smoker identity was multifaceted and incorporated individuals' defensive rationalizations, and both positive and negative feelings attached to it. Smoker identities took time to develop, were subject to change, and were context dependent. Identity was found to play a role in quit attempts. Qualitative research into the identity of young adult smokers has established it as a multifaceted phenomenon serving important functions but also involving conflict and defensive rationalizations. It develops over time and contextual factors influence its expression. The nature of a smoker's identity can play an important role in smoking cessation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Transdermal Nicotine During Cue Reactivity in Adult Smokers With and Without Anxiety Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Morissette, Sandra B.; Gulliver, Suzy Bird; Kamholz, Barbara W.; Spiegel, David A.; Tiffany, Stephen T.; Barlow, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Transdermal nicotine almost doubles tobacco cessation rates; however little is known about what happens to smokers during the quit process when they are wearing the nicotine patch and confronted with high-risk smoking triggers. This is particularly important for smokers with psychological disorders who disproportionately represent today’s smokers and have more trouble quitting. Using a mixed between- and within-subjects design, smokers with anxiety disorders (n = 61) and smokers without any c...

  12. Lung cancer in never-smokers - what are the differences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Margarida; Linhas, Rita; Campainha, Sérgio; Conde, Sara; Barroso, Ana

    2017-07-01

    Characteristics of never-smokers with lung cancer are still not fully clarified. The aim of this study was to compare never-smokers and ever-smokers with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) regarding patient and tumor characteristics. All consecutive newly NSCLC patients with known smoking status diagnosed between 2011 and 2015 were included in this retrospective cohort study. Clinical, histological, and molecular characteristics were compared between ever-smokers and never-smokers. Of the 558 included patients, 125 (22.4%) were never-smokers. These patients were more likely to be female (74% vs. 7%, p Never-smokers took longer to seek medical care after the symptoms onset (3 vs. 2 months, p never-smokers: pleural metastases were more frequent (OR: 2.1 [1.1-4.0]), regardless of the histological type and gender. Never-smokers had a higher prevalence of ALK translocations (26% vs. 4%, p Never-smokers with NSCLC present distinct demographic and clinical characteristics. The characteristics of tumor also differ between never-smokers and ever-smokers, which may suggest different carcinogenic pathways.

  13. An overview of oral mucosa condition of shisha smoker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmi Amtha

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Shisha is a water pipe that tobacco extract and fruit scented burnt using coal. It produces the smoke through the vessel and inhaled using a hose with good taste. The culture of shisha smoking is popular in Midle East country that curently has been also entering Indonesia. The side effect of shisha smoking habit is still very rare reported. Aim of this study is to describe the oral mucosa condition of shisha user. A preliminary observasional study was conducted at several sisha cafe at South Jakarta. Under informed consent, subject with habit of tobacco and shisha smoker were included. Sociodemographic data (age, gender, duration, frequency of smoking, salivary flow rate and oral mucosa changes were documented. Eighteen subjects were recruited into this study. Most of shisha smoker was also tobacco smoker. Shisha was more practiced by male at  age (15-24 years old. The oral mucosa changes such as keratosis, melanosis, leukoedema, coated tongue, gingivitis and xerostomia were found on subject with habit of tobacco smoking habit only or both shisha and tobacco smoking. In conclusion apparently the shisha smoking habit may casue oral mucosa changes almost the same with tobacco smoking habit

  14. Predictors of smoking cessation in smokers with chronic periodontitis: a 24-month study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inoue, Gislene; Rosa, Ecinele F.; Fueta Gomes, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this 24-month study was to identify predictors of smoking cessation in a cohort of smokers with chronic periodontitis, attending a multidisciplinary smoking cessation program. Of the 286 subjects screened, 116 were included and received non-surgical periodontal treatment and smokin...

  15. Airway reactivity to mannitol is similarly increased in chronic cigarette and water pipe smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scherr A

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Andreas Scherr, Jerome Schmidlin, Silvio Albisser, Michael Tamm, Daiana Stolz Clinic for Pneumology and Respiratory Cell Research, University Hospital of Basel, Basel, Switzerland Background: In contrast to cigarette smoking, the association between water pipe smoking and airway hyperresponsiveness remains widely unexplored.Methods: A bronchoprovocation challenge with mannitol was performed in young adults recruited at the University of Basel, Switzerland. Subjects were categorized as acute water pipe smokers (single episode of water pipe smoking, no or <0.5 pack-years cigarette smoking; chronic water pipe smokers (weekly for ≥4 weeks, no or <0.5 pack-years cigarette smoking; cigarette smokers (no water pipe smokers; and never-smokers (no cigarette or water pipe smokers. Primary outcomes were airway reactivity as measured by the response-to-dose ratio (RDR and airway responsiveness measured by the provocation dose to cause a 15% fall in forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV1; PD15.Results: Seventy-four subjects with a mean age of 22.5±2.5 years and FEV1 % predicted 90.1%±8.6% were included. Subgroups were matched in terms of age, gender, and spirometry results. RDR in chronic water pipe smokers and cigarette smokers was similar (0.013%/mg [0.010–0.015] vs 0.023%/mg [0.011–0.051], respectively; p=0.12 but significantly higher than in never-smokers (0.007%/mg [0.005–0.010], p<0.01. Neither a history of asthma (p=0.88 nor a positive skin prick test (p=0.69 was associated with increased airway reactivity to the mannitol challenge test. PD15 differed significantly between cigarette smokers and never-smokers (155 mg [115–395] vs 315 mg [155–475], respectively; p=0.04.Conclusion: Weekly water pipe smoking may increase airway reactivity to a similar extent as cigarette smoking. Keywords: mannitol challenge, airway reactivity, water pipe smoking

  16. Inspiratory Muscle Performance of Former Smokers and Nonsmokers Using the Test of Incremental Respiratory Endurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formiga, Magno F; Campos, Michael A; Cahalin, Lawrence P

    2018-01-01

    Smoking has potential deleterious effects on respiratory muscle function. Smokers may present with reduced inspiratory muscle strength and endurance. We compared inspiratory muscle performance of nonsmokers with that of former smokers without overt respiratory problems via the Test of Incremental Respiratory Endurance. This study was performed on 42 healthy subjects between the ages of 30 and 79 y (mean ± SD of 56.5 ± 14.4 y). Fourteen male and 7 female former smokers were matched to nonsmokers based on sex, age, height, and weight. Subjects completed a questionnaire about their health and current smoking status. Testing included the best of 3 or more consistent trials. The Test of Incremental Respiratory Endurance measurements included maximal inspiratory pressure measured from residual volume as well as sustained maximal inspiratory pressure and inspiratory duration measured from residual volume to total lung capacity during a maximal sustained inhalation. No significant difference in inspiratory performance of the entire group of former smokers compared with nonsmokers was found. However, separate sex analyses found a significant difference in sustained maximal inspiratory pressure between male former smokers and nonsmokers (518.7 ± 205.0 pressure time units vs 676.5 ± 255.2 pressure time units, P = .041). We found similar maximal inspiratory pressure between former smokers and nonsmokers via the Test of Incremental Respiratory Endurance, but the significant difference in sustained maximal inspiratory pressure between male former smokers and nonsmokers suggests that the sustained maximal inspiratory pressure may have greater discriminatory ability in assessing the effects of smoking on inspiratory muscle performance. Further investigation of the effects of smoking on inspiratory performance via the Test of Incremental Respiratory Endurance is warranted. Copyright © 2018 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  17. The comparative evaluation of xanthan gel with chlorhexidine (Chlosite) in smokers and non-smokers: A clinical and microbiological assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Chetan; Valavalkar, Narayan; Vandana, K. L.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Prevention of the periodontal disease progression is the primary goal of periodontal therapy. When conventional therapy is found inadequate to attain periodontal health in chronic periodontitis, local antimicrobial agents have been used as an adjunct with scaling and root planning (SRP) which has reproduced encouraging results. Hence, this study was undertaken to evaluate the new sustained released local drug Chlosite clinically and microbiologically in smokers and non-smokers. Materials and Methods: The patients were grouped into experimental group A treated with SRP plus Chlosite (SRP + CHL), experimental group B treated with Chlosite alone (CHL), and control group C treated only with SRP alone. A total number of 141 sites from six patients (67 sites from three non-smoker patients and 74 sites from three smoker patients) participated in this study. The clinical parameters, Plaque index (PI), Gingival index (GI), Bleeding index (BI), and Relative attachment level (RAL), were recorded and subgingival plaque samples were collected and subjected to microbiological analysis. Results: On comparison of smokers and non-smokers, in SRP group, non-smokers showed a higher reduction in BI and GI and smokers showed a higher reduction in PI. There was no significant gain in RAL of both smokers and non-smokers. In SRP + CHL group, non-smokers showed a higher reduction in relation to BI and GI and smokers showed a higher reduction in relation to PI. There was no significant gain in RAL of both smokers and non-smokers. In CHL group, both smokers and non-smokers showed a nonsignificant reduction in BI, GI, and RAL, but smokers showed a significant reduction in PI as compared with non-smokers. All the groups showed reduction in the microbial count of Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Tannerella forsythia which were found to be statistically not significant when it was compared between non-smokers and smokers. Interpretation and

  18. Smoker Identity and Its Potential Role in Young Adults’ Smoking Behavior: A Meta-Ethnography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Identity is an important influence on behavior. To identify potential targets for smoking cessation interventions in young adults, we synthesized findings from qualitative studies on smoker identity and potential influences on smoking and smoking cessation. Methods: A systematic search of 4 electronic databases up to September 19, 2013, was conducted to identify qualitative studies on smoker identity in smokers and ex-smokers aged 16–34. Key concepts were extracted from individual studies and synthesized into higher-order interpretations by following the principles of meta-ethnography. Results: Seventeen relevant papers were identified. At the highest level of interpretation, we identified 4 types of findings: (a) contributory factors to identity, (b) identity in relation to smoking, (c) contextual and temporal patterning, and (d) behavior in relation to smoking. Contributory factors included the desire to establish aspirational individual and social identities, enact a smoker identity appropriate to the momentary social context, and alter personal nonsmoking rules when consuming alcohol. Smoker identity was multifaceted and incorporated individuals’ defensive rationalizations, and both positive and negative feelings attached to it. Smoker identities took time to develop, were subject to change, and were context dependent. Identity was found to play a role in quit attempts. Conclusions: Qualitative research into the identity of young adult smokers has established it as a multifaceted phenomenon serving important functions but also involving conflict and defensive rationalizations. It develops over time and contextual factors influence its expression. The nature of a smoker’s identity can play an important role in smoking cessation. PMID:25622078

  19. Determination of a saliva cotinine cut-off to distinguish pregnant smokers from pregnant non-smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegaard, Hanne K; Kjaergaard, Hanne; Møller, Lars F

    2007-01-01

    Objective validation of smoking status is necessary. Earlier studies have used saliva cotinine concentrations between 14.2 and 30 ng/ml as cut-off values to distinguish pregnant smokers from non-smokers. However, these cut-offs derive from studies including men and non-pregnant women. This consti....... This constitutes a problem, as recent studies have reported an accelerated metabolism in pregnant smokers. The aim of this study was to determine the optimum cut-off cotinine level distinguishing pregnant smokers from pregnant non-smokers....

  20. Determination of a saliva cotinine cut-off to distinguish pregnant smokers from pregnant non-smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegaard, Hanne K; Kjaergaard, Hanne; Møller, Lars F

    2007-01-01

    Objective validation of smoking status is necessary. Earlier studies have used saliva cotinine concentrations between 14.2 and 30 ng/ml as cut-off values to distinguish pregnant smokers from non-smokers. However, these cut-offs derive from studies including men and non-pregnant women....... This constitutes a problem, as recent studies have reported an accelerated metabolism in pregnant smokers. The aim of this study was to determine the optimum cut-off cotinine level distinguishing pregnant smokers from pregnant non-smokers....

  1. Nasal mucociliary transportability of male and female smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzeloto, Juliana Souza; Ramos, Dionei; C F Freire, Ana Paula; G D Christofaro, Diego; M C Ramos, Ercy

    2017-04-08

    Female smoker's present increased susceptibility to several diseases when compared to the opposite gender. However, there are no studies showing differences in nasal mucociliary transport behavior between male and female smokers. To compare the nasal mucociliary transportability in male and female smokers and non-smokers, taking into consideration age, anthropometric data, smoking load and pulmonary function. The analysis included 139 individuals (33 men and 37 women smokers and 32 men and 37 women non-smokers). All participants answered an initial interview to obtain personal data and smoking load. Anthropometric data and carbon monoxide in the exhaled air were assessed. Individuals also performed pulmonary function test and Saccharin Transit Time test. To compare saccharin transit time values between men and women, smokers and non-smokers, stratification of all independent variables was performed (sociodemographic, smoking and respiratory variables) into two categories: below and above the median values. There was no difference between men and women, smokers and non-smokers, regarding nasal mucociliary transportability. Significant differences were only observed between non-smokers. Among those with less forced vital capacity values (transport faster than men. Moreover, it was observed influence of BMI and COex (women smokers), FCV and FEV1 (men non-smokers) and FEF25-75% (women non-smokers) on saccharin transit time values. Based on the findings of this study, nasal mucociliary transport in male and female adult smokers, apparently healthy, are similar. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Comorbid subjective health complaints in patients with sciatica: a prospective study including comparison with the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grøvle, Lars; Haugen, Anne J; Ihlebaek, Camilla M; Keller, Anne; Natvig, Bård; Brox, Jens I; Grotle, Margreth

    2011-06-01

    Chronic nonspecific low back pain is accompanied by high rates of comorbid mental and physical conditions. The aims of this study were to investigate if patients with specific back pain, that is, sciatica caused by lumbar herniation, report higher rates of subjective health complaints (SHCs) than the general population and if there is an association between change in sciatica symptoms and change in SHCs over a 12-month period. A multicenter cohort study of 466 sciatica patients was conducted with follow-up at 3 months and 1 year. Comorbid SHCs were measured by 27 items of the SHC inventory. Odds ratios (ORs) for each SHC were calculated with comparison to a general population sample (n=928) by logistic regression. The SHC number was calculated by summing all complaints present. At baseline, the ORs for reporting SHCs for the sciatica patients were significantly elevated in 15 of the 27 items with a mean (S.D.) SHC number of 7.5 (4.4), compared to 5.2 (4.4) in the general population (Psciatica, the SHC number was reduced to normal levels. Among those with persisting or worsening sciatica, the number increased to a level almost double that of the general population. Compared to the general population, the prevalence of subjective health complaints in sciatica is increased. During follow-up, the number of health complaints increased in patients with persisting or worsening sciatica. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Decreased peak expiratory flow in pediatric passive smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitri Yanti

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Indonesia ranks fifth among countries with the highest aggregate levels of tobacco consumption in the world. Infants and children exposed to environmental tobacco smoke have increased rates of asthma, respiratory and ear infections, as well as reduced lung function. The effects of tobacco smoke exposure on lung function in children have been reported to be dependent on the source of smoke and the length and dose of exposure. Lung function may also be affected by a child’s gender and asthma status. Objective To compare peak expiratory flow (PEF in pediatric passive smokers to that of children not exposed to second hand smoke, and to define factors that may affect PEF in passive smokers. Methods In August 2009 we conducted a cross-sectional study at an elementary school in the Langkat district. Subjects were aged 6 to 12 years, and divided into two groups: passive smokers and those not exposed to secondhand smoke. Subjects’ PEFs were measured with a Mini-Wright peak flow meter. Measurements were performed in triplicate with the highest value recorded as the PEF. Demographic data including age, sex, weight, height, family income, parental education levels and occupations were obtained through questionnaires. Results Of the 170 participants, 100 were passive smokers and 70 were not exposed to secondhand smoke. Age distribution, weight and height were similar in both groups. We observed a significant difference in PEFs between the group of passive smokers and the group not exposed to secondhand smoke, 211.3 L/minute (SD 61.08 and 242.7 L/minute (SD 77.09, respectively (P < 0.005. The number of years of exposure to smoke (P = 0.079 and the number of cigarettes smoked daily in the household (P = 0.098 did not significantly influence PEF. Conclusion The PEF in pediatric passive smokers was significantly lower than that of children not exposed to secondhand smoke. PEF in passive smokers was not influenced by the number of years of smoke

  4. Effect of number of cigarettes smoked per day on red blood cell, lecocyte and platelet count in adult Indian male smokers – A case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharati Anil Sherke

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of cigarette smoking are fatal. Present study was done to compare cell counts of blood in males smoking different number of cigarettes per day and non smokers of Hyderabad city. 150 consenting subjects of which 30 controls (non-smokers and 120 cases (smokers were studied. Smokers were divided into four groups based on number of cigarettes smoked per day. Blood samples processed using Hematology analyser (ABX Micros60®, HORIBA, Kyoto, Japan. The smokers had significantly different red blood cell counts (p<0.0001, white blood cells counts (p<0.0001 including neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes and eosinophils. This effect was significant irrespective of the number of cigarettes. There was no significant change in the percentage of basophils and platelet counts. Conclusion: Our findings showed that cigarette smoking has a significant effect on hematological cell counts and these counts changed significantly with increasing number of cigarettes smoked per day.

  5. Smoking abstinence and reinstatement effects in adolescent cigarette smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colby, Suzanne M; Leventhal, Adam M; Brazil, Linda; Lewis-Esquerre, Johanna; Stein, L A R; Rohsenow, Damaris J; Monti, Peter M; Niaura, Raymond S

    2010-01-01

    The study objectives were to examine smoking abstinence and reinstatement effects on subjective experience and cognitive performance among adolescent smokers. Adolescents (aged 14-17 years, 60 daily smokers and 32 nonsmokers) participated. Participants completed baseline assessments (Session 1) and returned to the laboratory 1-3 days later to repeat assessments (Session 2); half of the smokers were randomly assigned to 15-17 hr tobacco abstinence preceding Session 2. During Session 2, abstaining smokers reported significantly greater increases in withdrawal symptoms, smoking urges, and negative affect compared with smokers who did not abstain and compared with nonsmokers. Smoking reinstatement reversed abstinence effects, returning to baseline levels for smoking urges and negative affect. Abstaining smokers showed significantly enhanced cognitive performance on two of six tasks (two-letter search compared with nonabstaining smokers; serial reaction time compared with nonsmokers); smoking reinstatement resulted in significant decrements on these two tasks relative to nonabstaining smokers. Effects of smoking abstinence and reinstatement on self-report measures are consistent with earlier research with adolescent as well as adult smokers and may help to elucidate the motivational underpinnings of smoking maintenance among adolescent smokers. Effects found on cognitive performance were contrary to hypotheses; further research is needed to understand better the role of cognitive performance effects in smoking maintenance among adolescents.

  6. [Clinical and radiological characteristics of pulmonary tuberculosis in tobacco smokers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kombila, U D; Mbaye, F B R; Dia Kane, Y; Ka, W; Toure Badiane, N O

    2018-01-27

    Tobacco smoke alters lung defense mechanisms against infections and so increases the risk of mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. To determine the particular clinical features of tuberculosis in smokers and identify risk factors. We conducted a prospective, cross-sectional study over a period of nine months in Dakar, Senegal. The Chi-square test and multiple logistic regression were used to identify differences between smokers and non-smokers and to identify factors associated with clinical outcomes. We included 165 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (59 smokers versus 106 never-smokers). The average age of smokers was 43.8±12.7 versus 32.1±13.1 years (P<0.0001). Smokers were overwhelmingly male (98.3% versus 1.8%, P<0.0001). The average delay to consultation was longer among smokers (90 days [30-120] versus 60 days [30-90] ; P<0.0001). In multivariate analysis, alcohol abuse, increasing age, male sex, and an unknown retroviral status were independent risk factors for pulmonary tuberculosis. Haemoptysis was observed more frequently in smokers (49.1% versus 31.1%, P=0.017). With regards to chest X-ray features, smokers presented with more advanced, bilateral and cavitating lung lesions. Diagnostic delay and haemoptysis are important characteristics of the pulmonary tuberculosis in tobacco smokers. Copyright © 2017 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Periodontal Status and Whole Salivary Cytokine Profile Among Smokers and Never-Smokers With and Without Prediabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Fawad; Al-Kheraif, Abdulaziz A; Al Amri, Mohammad D; Alshehri, Mohammed; Vohra, Fahim; Al-Askar, Mansour; Malmstrom, Hans; Romanos, Georgios E

    2015-07-01

    Whole salivary interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in smokers and never-smokers with prediabetes remains uninvestigated. The aim of this study is to assess the periodontal status and whole salivary IL-1β and IL-6 levels among smokers and never-smokers with and without prediabetes (controls). Ninety-five males (45 with prediabetes and 50 systemically healthy controls) were included. Twenty-seven controls and 29 patients with prediabetes were smokers. Periodontal parameters (plaque index, bleeding on probing, probing depth, clinical attachment loss, and marginal bone loss) were measured, and the number of missing teeth were recorded. Fasting blood glucose (FBG) and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels were recorded. Unstimulated whole saliva samples were collected, unstimulated whole salivary flow rate (UWSFR) was determined, and IL-1β and IL-6 levels were measured. P values never-smokers with prediabetes. Among controls, periodontal parameters and whole salivary IL-1β and IL-6 levels were higher among smokers than never-smokers (P never-smokers. Among patients with prediabetes, periodontal inflammation and whole salivary IL-1β and IL-6 levels were comparable between smokers and never-smokers.

  8. Electronic cigarette use behaviors and motivations among smokers and non-smokers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas E Sussan; Fatima G Shahzad; Eefa Tabassum; Joanna E Cohen; Robert A Wise; Michael J Blaha; Janet T Holbrook; Shyam Biswal

    2017-01-01

    Background The use of electronic cigarettes (EC) has risen exponentially over the past decade, including among never smokers, and ECs are now the most popular tobacco product among teenagers in the US...

  9. Importance to include the term superficial musculoaponeurotic system in medical subject headings and in the international anatomical nomenclature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Lydia Massako; Locali, Rafael Fagionato; Lapin, Guilherme Abbud Franco; Hochman, Bernardo

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the relevance of the term superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) and demonstrate that this term is important enough to be added to the MeSH database and listed in International Anatomical Nomenclature. Terms related to SMAS were selected from original articles retrieved from the ISI Web of Science and MEDLINE (PubMed) databases. Groups of terms were created to define a search strategy with high-sensitivity and restricted to scientific periodicals devoted to plastic surgery. This study included articles between January 1996 and May 2009, whose titles, abstracts, and keywords were searched for SMAS-related terms and all occurrences were recorded. A total of 126 original articles were retrieved from the main periodicals related to plastic surgery in the referred databases. Of these articles, 51.6% had SMAS-related terms in the abstract only, and 25.4% had SMAS-related terms in both the title and abstract. The term 'superficial musculoaponeurotic system' was present as a keyword in 19.8% of the articles. The most frequent terms were 'SMAS' (71.4%) and superficial musculoaponeurotic system (62.7%). The term SMAS refers to a structure relevant enough to start a discussion about indexing it as a keyword and as an official term in Terminologia Anatomica: International Anatomical Terminology.

  10. US smokers' reactions to a brief trial of oral nicotine products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahoney Martin C

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been suggested that cigarette smokers will switch to alternative oral nicotine delivery products to reduce their health risks if informed of the relative risk difference. However, it is important to assess how smokers are likely to use cigarette alternatives before making predictions about their potential to promote individual or population harm reduction. Objectives This study examines smokers' interest in using a smokeless tobacco or a nicotine replacement product as a substitute for their cigarettes. Methods The study included 67 adult cigarette smokers, not currently interested in quitting, who were given an opportunity to sample four alternative oral nicotine products: 1 Camel Snus, 2 Marlboro Snus, 3 Stonewall dissolvable tobacco tablets, and 4 Commit nicotine lozenges. At visit 1, subjects were presented information about the relative benefits/risks of oral nicotine delivery compared to cigarettes. At visit 2, subjects were given a supply of each of the four products to sample at home for a week. At visit 3, subjects received a one-week supply of their preferred product to see if using such products reduced or eliminated cigarette use. Results After multiple product sampling, participants preferred the Commit lozenges over the three smokeless tobacco products (p = 0.011. Following the one week single-product trial experience, GEE models controlling for gender, age, level of education, baseline cigarettes use, and alternative product chosen, indicated a significant decline in cigarettes smoked per day across one week of single-product sampling (p Conclusions Findings from this study show that smokers, who are currently unwilling to make a quit attempt, may be willing to use alternative products in the short term as a temporary substitute for smoking. However, this use is more likely to be for partial substitution (i.e. they will continue to smoke, albeit at a lower rate rather than complete substitution. Of the

  11. Periodontal disease in habitual cigarette smokers and nonsmokers with and without prediabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Fawad; Al-Askar, Mansour; Samaranayake, Lakshman P; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid

    2013-02-01

    : Prediabetes and habitual cigarette smoking are significant risk factors contributing to periodontal disease. The aim was to assess the clinical and radiological markers of periodontal disease in habitual cigarette smokers and nonsmokers with and without prediabetes. Sixty-eight individuals with prediabetes (test group; 34 smokers and 34 nonsmokers) and 68 medically healthy individuals (control group; 34 smokers and 34 nonsmokers) were included. Sociodemographic information, duration of smoking habit and number of cigarettes smoked daily were recorded through a questionnaire. Fasting blood glucose levels and periodontal inflammatory conditions (plaque index [PI], bleeding on probing [BOP] and probing pocket depth [PPD] of 4 to periodontal disease than nonsmokers. In subjects with prediabetes, the severity of periodontal disease seems to be over shadowed by the hyperglycemic state, obscuring the effect of habitual smoking.

  12. Impact of smoking on aerobic capacity in young adult smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdelmoniem Ibrahim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking is a worldwide public health challenge, ,Cigarette smoking is also a strong risk factor for musculoskeletal and cardiovascular disease, It is also well known that low and declining muscle strength is linked to increased smoking .[23]Aims of this study was to examine the chronic effects of smoking on cardiovascular fitness in young and healthy male smokers[13]. This study was carried out in university of hail ,physiotherapy lab, ,30male participant was recruited from university students of hail divided into two group 15 smoker (A ,15 nonsmoker (B .All subjects underwent a sub maximal Bruce treadmill test and their HR was recorded during, at peak, and after termination of exercise. Our study revealed that the resting HR was 5.3 bpm higher in smoker than in non smoker (P:0.0001., data indicated that there was a significant difference found between young smokers and non-smokers regarding their sub-maximal HR values (P:0.0063., where smokers had significantly higher HR values. also there was no difference between both groups regarding to recovery heart rate (P:0.56. Smoking was found to affect young smokers’ increasing HR at rest, slowing of HR increase during exercise, and impairing their ability to reach the age predicted HRmax., Also smoking was associated with an attenuated HR. . also Smokers had a higher resting HR and showed a higher HR response during sub-maximal exercise compared to Non smokers .

  13. [Cough and bronchial obstruction induced by citric acid in smokers, occasional smokers and non-smokers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, F D; Dessanges, J F; Lockhart, A; Prétet, S

    1991-01-01

    We have studied cough and bronchial constriction induced by inhaling citric acid in 15 smokers with baseline airflow obstruction, in 13 occasional smokers and 13 non smokers. The threshold for cough was significantly higher in occasional smokers in relation to smokers and non smokers. Citric acid produced the same degree of bronchial constriction at the same time in smokers and occasional smokers: the maximum fall in forced expired volume (FEV1-VEMS) was recorded five seconds after inhalation of the citric acid (dose threshold) and there was no significant difference between the two groups. In the non smokers, the maximum fall in VEMS was recorded twenty seconds after inhalation of the citric acid and was significantly less in relation to that of the smokers and occasional smokers. In the smokers the degree of smoking could influence the fall of VEMS (% predicted). Cough and bronchial constriction after the inhalation of citric acid are probably related to different physiological mechanisms and are linked to the history of smoking.

  14. Comparison of clinical features between non-smokers with COPD and smokers with COPD: a retrospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang J

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Jing Zhang,* Xin-feng Lin,* Chun-xue Bai Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this paper Background: Smoking is a major risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; however, the similarities and differences in clinical presentation between smokers and nonsmokers are not fully described in patients with COPD. This study was designed to address this issue in a general teaching hospital in the People’s Republic of China. Methods: The medical records of patients hospitalized with a lung mass for further evaluation at Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, from January 2006 to December 2010 were reviewed and the data of interest were collected. The definition of COPD was according to Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD spirometric criteria. Participants who had a previous exacerbation within 4 weeks of admission, airflow limitation due to abnormalities in the large airways, or with other pulmonary diseases were excluded. Included subjects were divided into nonsmokers with COPD and smokers with COPD by a cutoff of a 5 pack-year smoking history. Results: A total of 605 subjects were included in the final analysis. The average age was 64.8±8.5 years and 62.0% (375/605 were smokers. Eighty percent of the patients had mild to moderate disease (GOLD grade 1–2. Age and years with COPD were comparable between the two groups. Compared with smokers with COPD, nonsmokers with COPD were more likely to be female, reported less chronic cough and sputum, have less emphysema on radiologic examination, and higher measures of forced expiratory volume in the first second percent predicted (FEV1, forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC% percent predicted, maximal voluntary ventilation percent predicted, diffusing capacity of lung (DLCO percent predicted, and

  15. [THE INFLUENCE OF SMOKING ON THE LUNG VENTILATION FUNCTION IN YOUNG SUBJECTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, I A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the work was to evaluate effect of smoking on the lung ventilation function in young subjects. The study included 1552 subjects (808 men and 744 women) of the mean age 31.6 ± 4.7 and 29.27 ± 5.3 years respectively divided into 3 groups: smokers (n = 568), ex-smokers (n = 103), and non-smokers (n = 881). A sample of the general population contained 36.6% smokers, 6.6% ex-smokers, and 56.8% non-smokers; it showed significant correlation of smoking habits with the gender and the education level. Functional studies revealed lower spirographic and higher whole-body plethysmographic parameters in the smokers and ex-smokers. Also, they more frequently suffered obstructive disorders. These data suggest negative effect of tobacco smoke on the respiratory system in practically healthy young subjects revealed by the studying external respiratory function with the use of spirographic and whole-body plethysmographic methods.

  16. Severity of dependence modulates smokers' neuronal cue reactivity and cigarette craving elicited by tobacco advertisement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollstädt-Klein, Sabine; Kobiella, Andrea; Bühler, Mira; Graf, Caroline; Fehr, Christoph; Mann, Karl; Smolka, Michael N

    2011-01-01

    Smoking-related cues elicit craving and mesocorticolimbic brain activation in smokers. Severity of nicotine dependence seems to moderate cue reactivity, but the direction and mechanisms of its influence remains unclear. Although tobacco control policies demand a ban on tobacco advertising, cue reactivity studies in smokers so far have not employed tobacco advertisement as experimental stimuli. We investigated whether tobacco advertisement elicits cue reactivity at a behavioral (subjective craving) and a neural level (using functional magnetic resonance imaging) in 22 smokers and 21 never-smokers. Moreover, we studied the influence of severity of dependence on cue reactivity. In smokers, tobacco advertisement elicited substantially more craving than control advertisement whereas never-smokers reported no cue induced craving. Surprisingly, neuronal cue reactivity did not differ between smokers and never-smokers. Moderately dependent smokers' craving increased over the course of the experiment, whereas highly dependent smokers' craving was unaffected. Moderately dependent smokers' brain activity elicited by tobacco advertisement was higher in the amygdala, hippocampus, putamen and thalamus compared with highly dependent smokers. Furthermore, limbic brain activation predicted picture recognition rates after the scanning session, even in never-smokers. Our findings show that tobacco advertisement elicits cigarette craving and neuronal cue reactivity primarily in moderately dependent smokers, indicating that they might be particularly responsive towards external smoking-related cues. On the other hand, neuronal cue reactivity and cigarette craving in highly dependent smokers is more likely triggered by internal cues such as withdrawal symptoms. Tobacco advertisement seems to likewise appeal to smokers and non-smokers, clarifying the potential danger especially for young non-smokers. © 2010 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2010 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  17. Association between anxiety, obesity and periodontal disease in smokers and non-smokers: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhay P. Kolte

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Psychological stress is known to be a relevant risk factor for many inflammatory conditions, including periodontal disease. A few studies have probed the relationship between obesity and periodontal disease. Therefore this cross-sectional study was aimed to examine the relationship between psychological stress and obesity and periodontal disease in smokers and non-smokers. Methods. The participants included 90 patients, equally divided into three groups of non-smokers and periodontally healthy, non-smokers and smokers with untreated moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis. Socioeconomic data, psychosocial measurements, physical parameters and clinical findings of PPD, CAL, PI and GI were recorded. Results. The clinical parameters were assessed for three groups in three different anxiety levels of mild, moderate and se-vere. Intra-group comparison of PPD and CAL in the three anxiety levels showed increased periodontal destruction with an increase in anxiety levels, the results being statistically highly significant for PPD differences in smokers (P < 0.0001. The mean differences in PPD and CAL in severe anxiety levels between smokers and non-smokers were 0.68 mm and 0.70 mm and both the findings were statistically significant. The mean PPD and CAL in smoker and non-smoker groups in obese patients was higher as compared to non-obese patients and the differences were highly significant (P < 0.001. Conclusion. The results of our study indicated a positive and strong correlation between anxiety, obesity and periodontal disease in smokers and non-smokers. Smoking appears to further attenuate this association.

  18. Implant survival and marginal bone loss at turned and oxidized implants in periodontitis-susceptible smokers and never-smokers: a retrospective, clinical, radiographic case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayardoust, Shariel; Gröndahl, Kerstin; Johansson, Eva; Thomsen, Peter; Slotte, Christer

    2013-12-01

    Little is known about the long-term outcome of oxidized surface oral implants, especially in periodontitis-susceptible smokers. The aim of this study is to determine implant survival and marginal bone loss at turned and oxidized implants in smokers and never-smokers with periodontitis. Forty smokers and 40 never-smokers with experience of advanced periodontal disease, treated with implants 5 years previously, are included in this study. Groups were matched for sex, oral hygiene, and implant distribution, and patients were subgrouped by implant surface type (turned or oxidized). The overall implant survival rate was 96.9% in never-smokers and 89.6% in smokers. Compared with oxidized implants, turned implants failed more frequently in smokers. In smokers, mean (standard error of the mean) marginal bone loss at 5 years was 1.54 (0.21) mm at turned and 1.16 (0.24) mm at oxidized implants. In never-smokers, significantly greater bone loss was found at oxidized implants, 1.26 (0.15) mm, than at turned implants, 0.84 (0.14) mm. Oxidized implants demonstrated similar bone loss for both groups. Turned implants lost significantly more bone in smokers. Compared with never-smokers, the smokers' likelihood ratio for implant failure was 4.68, 6.40 for turned and 0.00 for oxidized implants. The results of the study underscore the need for prevention and cessation of smoking. Turned implants failed more frequently and lost more marginal bone in smokers. In contrast, oxidized implants showed similar failure rates and bone loss in smokers and never-smokers. Turned implants displayed less bone loss than oxidized implants in never-smokers. Oxidized surface implants are more suitable for patients susceptible to periodontitis who smoke.

  19. The lifetime prevalence, health services utilization and risk of suicide of bipolar spectrum subjects, including subthreshold categories in the São Paulo ECA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Doris Hupfeld; Andrade, Laura Helena

    2005-08-01

    Identifying the bipolar (BP) spectrum, including the classic Bipolar I subtype (BP-I), Bipolar II (BP-II) and subthreshold bipolar disorders not meeting DSM-IV diagnostic criteria has raised growing interest, as these softer expressions of bipolar spectrum have been underdiagnosed in spite of clinical consequences. Data are from the Sao Paulo Epidemiological Catchment Area Study (N=1464). Non-affective controls were compared to BP spectrum groups, based on DSM-IIIR and on the "clinical significance" criteria: Subsyndromal Hypomania (SSH) and Manic Symptoms (MS). The lifetime prevalence of BP subgroups was 8.3% (N=122). All BP-I and -II and around 75% of SSH and MS subjects had a lifetime depressive syndrome. Compared to controls and MS subjects, BP-I, BP-II and SSH groups searched more medical help and mental health services. SSH group displayed higher rates of clinical significance than BP-I subjects, and suicidality was higher in BP groups compared to controls. Even the softer MS group had higher rate of suicide attempts than SSH subjects. This is a cross-sectional study and interviews were conducted by lay personnel. Replication in bigger community samples using a mood spectrum approach is necessary to confirm these findings. However, our findings were very similar to those obtained by other authors. Softer expressions of BP disorders appear in 6.6% of this community sample and have serious clinical consequences, which supports the importance of including these categories in the BP spectrum.

  20. Subgingival dysbiosis in smoker and non‑smoker patients with chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coretti, Lorena; Cuomo, Mariella; Florio, Ermanno; Palumbo, Domenico; Keller, Simona; Pero, Raffaela; Chiariotti, Lorenzo; Lembo, Francesca; Cafiero, Carlo

    2017-04-01

    Periodontitis is one of the most common oral inflammatory diseases, and results in connective tissue degradation and gradual tooth loss. It manifests with formation of periodontal pockets, in which anaerobic and Gram‑negative bacteria proliferate rapidly. Consequently, alteration of the subgingival microbiota is considered the primary etiologic agent of periodontitis. Previous studies have reported that smokers are at increased risk of periodontal disease, in both prevalence and severity, indicating that smoking is a risk factor for the onset and progression of the pathology. In the present study, 16S rRNA sequencing was employed to assess the subgingival microbiota in 6 smoker patients with chronic periodontitis, 6 non‑smoker patients with chronic periodontitis and 8 healthy controls. The results demonstrated significant alterations in the microbial structure of periodontitis patients. High relative abundance of Parvimonans, Desulfubulbus, Paludibacter, Haemophilus, and Sphaerochaeta genera characterized subgingival microbiota of periodontitis patients, both smokers and non‑smokers. Due to the high precision and sensitivity of the 16S rRNA sequencing method, analysis for low‑abundant genera (including Pedobacter, Granulicatella, Paracoccus, Atopobium, Bifidobacterium, Coprococcus, Oridobacteriu, Peptococcus, Oscillospira and Akkermansia) was feasible, and revealed novel phylotypes associated with periodontitis. Of note, a major microbial community alteration was evident in smoker patients, suggesting an association between smoking and severity of subgingival dysbiosis. The present study confirmed that chronic periodontitis is a polymicrobial disease where changes in the equilibrium of subgingival microbiota contribute to severity of pathology.

  1. Bronchus associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) in human lung: its distribution in smokers and non-smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, I; Pritchard, G E; Ashcroft, T; Avery, A; Corris, P A; Walters, E H

    1993-11-01

    Bronchus associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) is a normal component of the lung's immune system in many animals and may be analogous to gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). This study aimed at assessing the nature and extent of BALT in human lung and determining whether its expression is induced within the human airway in response to smoking. Paraffin embedded, formalin fixed full thickness bronchial wall sections were examined from 31 whole lung specimens derived from both smokers and non-smokers. Samples were taken from throughout the bronchial tree to include main stem bronchi, lobar bronchi and segmental bronchi, as well as first to third generation carinae. Standard 4 microns step sections were stained by haematoxylin and eosin and immunocytochemical methods to show foci of BALT. Examination of 256 airway sites detected 46 foci of BALT. These differed from those described in other mammals in being distributed throughout the bronchial tree, in being found in relation to bronchial glandular epithelium as well as luminal bronchial epithelium, and in lacking any accompanying M cells. Analysis by smoking status showed that the expression of BALT was significantly more common in smokers than non-smokers (82% (14/17) v 14% (2/14) respectively). The findings support the view that BALT in humans is an integral feature in a comparatively small proportion of lungs from non-smokers while being significantly more prominent in lungs from smokers. The tissue shows several important differences from that described in other mammals.

  2. Evaluation of P300 components for emotion-loaded visual event-related potential in elderly subjects, including those with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaumi, Yasue; Morita, Kiichiro; Nakashima, Youko; Muraoka, Akemi; Uchimura, Naohisa

    2014-07-01

    In the present study, the P300 component of the emotion-loaded visual event-related potential in response to photographs of babies crying or smiling was measured to evaluate cognitive function in elderly subjects, including those with dementia. The subjects were 48 elderly people who consulted a memory disorder clinic. The visual event-related potential was measured using oddball tasks. Brain waves were recorded from four sites. We analyzed the P300 amplitude and latency. Subjects were divided into three groups (the dementia with Alzheimer's disease group [ADG]; the intermediate group [MG], and the healthy group [HG]) based on the Revised Hasegawa Dementia Scale, Mini-mental State Examination scores and the Clinical Dementia Rating. For all subjects, there was a significant positive correlation between P300 latency and Z-score of voxel-based specific regional analysis for Alzheimer's disease for crying or smiling faces. There was a negative correlation between P300 amplitude and Z-score for the crying face. MG subjects were divided into two groups (high risk: HRMG, low risk: LRMG) based on Z-scores (HRMG ≥ 2.0). The P300 amplitude of ADG was significantly smaller than that of HG, and the P300 latency of ADG was significantly longer than those of other groups for crying or smiling faces. The P300 latency of HRMG was significantly longer than that of LRMG for the smiling face. Furthermore, the P300 latency for the crying face was significantly shorter than that for the smiling face in HG and ADG. These findings suggest that analysis of P300 components of the emotion-loaded visual event-related potential may be a useful neuropsychological index for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and high-risk subjects. © 2014 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2014 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  3. [Submaximal exercise capacity and quality of life in exclusive water-pipe smokers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Saad, H; Babba, M; Boukamcha, R; Latiri, I; Knani, J; Slama, R; Bougmiza, I; Zbidi, A; Tabka, Z

    2010-05-01

    It is well known that oxidative stress is increased significantly by regular water-pipe smoking (WPS). This could lead to muscle dysfunction and thus to impairments of exercise and quality of life (QOL). Considering the impressive number of WP smokers, we intend to investigate the potential effect of WPS on submaximal exercise capacity and QOL. (1). To evaluate the submaximal exercise capacity by the 6-minutes walking test (6-MWT). (2). To compare the deficiency, incapacity and QOL data of exclusive WPS with those of two control groups (never smokers and exclusive cigarette smokers). (3). To determine the factors influencing the 6-minutes walk distance (6-MWD) of WPS subjects. A multicentre study including 180 exclusive WPS [> or =5 WP-year] men aged > or =40 years. Cigar or cigarette smoking, contraindications to the 6-MWT or cortico-steroid therapy will be exclusion criteria. QOL evaluation, spirometry, electrocardiogram and two 6-MWT will be performed. Signs of exercise impairment will be: 6-MWD or =5/10, haemoglobin saturation fall > or =5 points. Data from WPS subjects will be compared with those from 90 never smoking subjects and 90 exclusives cigarettes smokers. (1). WPS will affect significantly the submaximal exercise capacity. (2). Resting spirometric, 6-MWT and QOL data of exclusive WPS subjects will be significantly reduced compared to never smoking subjects. (3). The 6-MWD's of exclusive WPS subjects will be significantly influenced by cumulative WP consumption, by resting spirometric data, by obesity and by physical activity score. Copyright 2010 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantitative assessment of elemental carbon in the lungs of never smokers, cigarette smokers, and coal miners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, R.K.; McClure, M.E.; Hays, M.D.; Green, F.H.Y.; McPhee, L.J.; Vallyathan, V.; Gilmour, M.I. [US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Inhalation exposure to particulates such as cigarette smoke and coal dust is known to contribute to the development of chronic lung disease. The purpose of this study was to estimate the amount of elemental carbon (EC) deposits from autopsied lung samples from cigarette smokers, miners, and control subjects and explore the relationship between EC level, exposure history, and the extent of chronic lung disease. The samples comprised three subgroups representing never smokers (8), chronic cigarette smokers (26), and coal miners (6). Following the dissolution of lung tissue, the extracted EC residue was quantified using a thermal-optical transmission (TOT) carbon analyzer. Mean EC levels in the lungs of the control group were 56.68 +/- 24.86 (SD) g/g dry lung weight. Respective mean EC values in lung samples from the smokers and coal miners were 449.56 +/- 320.3 g/g and 6678.2 +/- 6162 g/g. These values were significantly higher than those obtained from the never-smoker group. EC levels in the lung and pack-years of cigarette smoking correlated significantly, as did EC levels and the severity of small airway disease. This study provides one of the first quantitative assessments of EC in human lungs from populations at high relative risk for the development of chronic lung disease.

  5. Characteristics of COPD in never-smokers and ever-smokers in the general population: results from the CanCOLD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, W C; Sin, D D; Bourbeau, J; Hernandez, P; Chapman, K R; Cowie, R; FitzGerald, J M; Marciniuk, D D; Maltais, F; Buist, A S; Road, J; Hogg, J C; Kirby, M; Coxson, H; Hague, C; Leipsic, J; O'Donnell, D E; Aaron, S D

    2015-09-01

    There is limited data on the risk factors and phenotypical characteristics associated with spirometrically confirmed COPD in never-smokers in the general population. To compare the characteristics associated with COPD by gender and by severity of airway obstruction in never-smokers and in ever-smokers. We analysed the data from 5176 adults aged 40 years and older who participated in the initial cross-sectional phase of the population-based, prospective, multisite Canadian Cohort of Obstructive Lung Disease study. Never-smokers were defined as those with a lifetime exposure of never-smokers was 6.4%, constituting 27% of all COPD subjects. The common independent predictors of COPD in never-smokers and ever-smokers were older age, self reported asthma and lower education. In never-smokers a history of hospitalisation in childhood for respiratory illness was discriminative, while exposure to passive smoke and biomass fuel for heating were discriminative for women. COPD in never-smokers and ever-smokers was characterised by increased respiratory symptoms, 'respiratory exacerbation' events and increased residual volume/total lung capacity, but only smokers had reduced DLCO/Va and emphysema on chest CT scans. The study confirmed the substantial burden of COPD among never-smokers, defined the common and gender-specific risk factors for COPD in never-smokers and provided early insight into potential phenotypical differences in COPD between lifelong never-smokers and ever-smokers. NCT00920348 (ClinicalTrials.gov); study ID number: IRO-93326. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Predictors of car smoking rules among smokers in France, Germany and the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchman, Sara C; Guignard, Romain; Nagelhout, Gera E; Mons, Ute; Beck, François; van den Putte, Bas; Crone, Mathilde; de Vries, Hein; Hyland, Andrew; Fong, Geoffrey T

    2012-02-01

    As exposure to tobacco smoke pollution (TSP) has been identified as a cause of premature death and disease in non-smokers, and studies have demonstrated that smoking in cars produces high levels of TSP, this study will investigate smokers' rules for smoking in their cars, and predictors of car smoking rules, including potentially modifiable correlates. Data were drawn from nationally representative samples of current smokers from the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project surveys in France (2007), Germany (2007), and the Netherlands (2008). Smokers in France and Germany were asked about smoking rules in their cars, and smokers in the Netherlands were asked about smoking rules in cars carrying children. In France and Germany, 59% and 52% of smokers respectively, allowed smoking in their cars. In the Netherlands, 36% of smokers allowed smoking in cars carrying children. Predictors of allowing smoking in cars included: being a daily vs. non-daily smoker, being younger vs. older age, having no (young) children in the home, being a heavier smoker, and allowing smoking in the home. In the Netherlands, smokers who agreed that TSP is dangerous to non-smokers were less likely to allow smoking in cars carrying children. Overall, a sizeable proportion of smokers allowed smoking in their cars across the three countries. Media campaigns with information about the dangers of TSP may increase the adoption of smoke-free cars. These media campaigns could target smokers who are most likely to allow smoking in cars.

  7. An exploration of the Facebook social networks of smokers and non-smokers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luella Fu

    Full Text Available Social networks influence health behavior, including tobacco use and cessation. To date, little is known about whether and how the networks of online smokers and non-smokers may differ, or the potential implications of such differences with regards to intervention efforts. Understanding how social networks vary by smoking status could inform public health efforts to accelerate cessation or slow the adoption of tobacco use.These secondary analyses explore the structure of ego networks of both smokers and non-smokers collected as part of a randomized control trial conducted within Facebook.During the trial, a total of 14,010 individuals installed a Facebook smoking cessation app: 9,042 smokers who were randomized in the trial, an additional 2,881 smokers who did not meet full eligibility criteria, and 2,087 non-smokers. The ego network for all individuals was constructed out to second-degree connections. Four kinds of networks were constructed: friendship, family, photo, and group networks. From these networks we measured edges, isolates, density, mean betweenness, transitivity, and mean closeness. We also measured diameter, clustering, and modularity without ego and isolates. Logistic regressions were performed with smoking status as the response and network metrics as the primary independent variables and demographics and Facebook utilization metrics as covariates.The four networks had different characteristics, indicated by different multicollinearity issues and by logistic regression output. Among Friendship networks, the odds of smoking were higher in networks with lower betweenness (p = 0.00, lower transitivity (p = 0.00, and larger diameter (p = 0.00. Among Family networks, the odds of smoking were higher in networks with more vertices (p = .01, less transitivity (p = .04, and fewer isolates (p = .01. Among Photo networks, none of the network metrics were predictive of smoking status. Among Group networks, the odds of smoking were higher

  8. An exploration of the Facebook social networks of smokers and non-smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Luella; Jacobs, Megan A; Brookover, Jody; Valente, Thomas W; Cobb, Nathan K; Graham, Amanda L

    2017-01-01

    Social networks influence health behavior, including tobacco use and cessation. To date, little is known about whether and how the networks of online smokers and non-smokers may differ, or the potential implications of such differences with regards to intervention efforts. Understanding how social networks vary by smoking status could inform public health efforts to accelerate cessation or slow the adoption of tobacco use. These secondary analyses explore the structure of ego networks of both smokers and non-smokers collected as part of a randomized control trial conducted within Facebook. During the trial, a total of 14,010 individuals installed a Facebook smoking cessation app: 9,042 smokers who were randomized in the trial, an additional 2,881 smokers who did not meet full eligibility criteria, and 2,087 non-smokers. The ego network for all individuals was constructed out to second-degree connections. Four kinds of networks were constructed: friendship, family, photo, and group networks. From these networks we measured edges, isolates, density, mean betweenness, transitivity, and mean closeness. We also measured diameter, clustering, and modularity without ego and isolates. Logistic regressions were performed with smoking status as the response and network metrics as the primary independent variables and demographics and Facebook utilization metrics as covariates. The four networks had different characteristics, indicated by different multicollinearity issues and by logistic regression output. Among Friendship networks, the odds of smoking were higher in networks with lower betweenness (p = 0.00), lower transitivity (p = 0.00), and larger diameter (p = 0.00). Among Family networks, the odds of smoking were higher in networks with more vertices (p = .01), less transitivity (p = .04), and fewer isolates (p = .01). Among Photo networks, none of the network metrics were predictive of smoking status. Among Group networks, the odds of smoking were higher when diameter

  9. Insights into the Smoker's Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jerome L.

    1970-01-01

    The Smoking Control Research Project showed that most smokers wish to quit and that many of them can. It is necessary to present these smokers with the opportunities to quit, and then make the environment supportive of nonsmoking. Presented at the University of California Extension Course, "Cigarette Smoking: Insight into a Perplexing Problem,"…

  10. COPD: recognizing the susceptible smoker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoonhorst, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Smoking is the main cause of COPD, a chronic non-curable lung disease. Not all smokers develop COPD and it is still unclear why COPD is only manifested in a small subset of smokers (15-20%). Probably their genetic background makes the difference. We investigated whether young individuals (18-40

  11. Lung cancer in never smokers Epidemiology and risk prediction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, William J.; Meza, Rafael; Jeon, Jihyoun; Moolgavkar, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter we review the epidemiology of lung cancer incidence and mortality among never smokers/ nonsmokers and describe the never smoker lung cancer risk models used by CISNET modelers. Our review focuses on those influences likely to have measurable population impact on never smoker risk, such as secondhand smoke, even though the individual-level impact may be small. Occupational exposures may also contribute importantly to the population attributable risk of lung cancer. We examine the following risk factors in this chapter: age, environmental tobacco smoke, cooking fumes, ionizing radiation including radon gas, inherited genetic susceptibility, selected occupational exposures, preexisting lung disease, and oncogenic viruses. We also compare the prevalence of never smokers between the three CISNET smoking scenarios and present the corresponding lung cancer mortality estimates among never smokers as predicted by a typical CISNET model. PMID:22882894

  12. Association of Xerostomia and Assessment of Salivary Flow Using Modified Schirmer Test among Smokers and Healthy Individuals: A Preliminutesary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyasanoor, Sujatha; Saddu, Shweta Channavir

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Several oral diseases such as dental caries, periodontitis and oral infections can be a major concern in patients suffering from mouth dryness. Whole mouth salivary flow is affected by many factors which may include habits like smoking. The aim of the present study was to investigate the incidence of xerostomia and hyposalivation among smokers. Materials and Methods: The study groups included 60 smokers and 60 healthy non-tobacco users as case and control groups respectively. A questionnaire was used to collect the smoking habits and symptoms associated with xerostomia. Measurement of unstimulated whole mouth salivary flow for 3 minutesutes was performed using modified Schirmer test. The results were subjected to statistical analysis. Results: The prevalence of xerostomia symptom was 37% in smokers and it was 13% in non-smokers, with a statistically significant difference between groups (p=0.003). The prevalence of hyposalivation was 43% in smokers, whereas it was only 8% in the control group (p< 0.001). Conclusion: Xerostomia symptoms with significant reduction in unstimulated whole mouth salivary flow were associated with long term smoking. PMID:24596777

  13. "Hardcore" definitions and their application to a population-based sample of smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Michelle L; Cohen, Joanna E; Chaiton, Michael O; Ip, David; McDonald, Paul; Ferrence, Roberta

    2010-08-01

    As smoking prevalence declines, some suggest that so-called "hardcore" smokers will come to represent a growing and irreducible proportion of current smokers ("hardening hypothesis"). Different definitions of a "hardcore" smoker have been used in the literature. This paper describes population-based definitions of "hardcore" smokers and compares estimates of the prevalence of "hardcore" smokers derived using these definitions. Definitions identified in a comprehensive literature search were reduced to their component constructs. We estimated the prevalence of "hardcore" smokers as a proportion of all current adult smokers in Ontario, Canada, using data from the Ontario Tobacco Survey (2005-2008; N = 4,130). Definition concordance was examined using bivariate cross-tabulations. Six definitions were identified in the literature. Five definitions included constructs of quit intentions and quit attempts, four included nicotine dependence, three included long-term use, and one included a measure of smoker knowledge about smoking hazards and confronting substantial societal disapprobation of smoking. Estimates of "hardcore" smoker prevalence in Ontario based on these definitions ranged from 0.03% to 13.77%. Estimates of the prevalence of "hardcore" smokers in Ontario varied considerably between the six definitions of the "hardcore" smokers found in the population-based literature. This study underscores the need for consensus on the best definition of "hardcore" smoker.

  14. Assessing blood brain barrier dynamics or identifying or measuring selected substances, including ethanol or toxins, in a subject by analyzing Raman spectrum signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A non-invasive method for analyzing the blood-brain barrier includes obtaining a Raman spectrum of a selected portion of the eye and monitoring the Raman spectrum to ascertain a change to the dynamics of the blood brain barrier.Also, non-invasive methods for determining the brain or blood level of an analyte of interest, such as glucose, drugs, alcohol, poisons, and the like, comprises: generating an excitation laser beam at a selected wavelength (e.g., at a wavelength of about 400 to 900 nanometers); focusing the excitation laser beam into the anterior chamber of an eye of the subject so that aqueous humor, vitreous humor, or one or more conjunctiva vessels in the eye is illuminated; detecting (preferably confocally detecting) a Raman spectrum from the illuminated portion of the eye; and then determining the blood level or brain level (intracranial or cerebral spinal fluid level) of an analyte of interest for the subject from the Raman spectrum. In certain embodiments, the detecting step may be followed by the step of subtracting a confounding fluorescence spectrum from the Raman spectrum to produce a difference spectrum; and determining the blood level and/or brain level of the analyte of interest for the subject from that difference spectrum, preferably using linear or nonlinear multivariate analysis such as partial least squares analysis. Apparatus for carrying out the foregoing methods are also disclosed.

  15. Understanding college students' salient attitudes and beliefs about smoking: distinctions between smokers, nonsmokers, and ex-smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Kelly; Banas, John; Burke, Michael

    2003-01-01

    This research examines the salient attitudes and beliefs that college students hold about cigarette smoking. An exploratory survey was employed that contained a combination of semantic differential items and open-ended questions. The data indicated that smoking status (i.e., whether a student is a nonsmoker, smoker, or ex-smoker) was related to attitudes about the attractiveness, riskiness, and intelligence of cigarette smoking. Additionally, salient beliefs about smoking include that nonsmokers report never smoking due to health reasons, smokers and ex-smokers both report peer pressure as the primary reason for starting to smoke, and the main reason smokers continue to smoke is because they are addicted. The best thing reported about smoking was that it relieves stress, and the worst thing reported about smoking was the smell. Several suggestions are made for future interventions targeted toward college students.

  16. [Smoking cessation in older smokers. A retrospective study in 181 older smokers managed in a smoking cessation clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croizet, A; Perriot, J; Merson, F; Aublet-Cuvelier, B

    2016-03-01

    Smoking is a factor associated with premature death, including in older people. Stopping smoking reduces related mortality even after the age of 60. The aim of this study, conducted in a smoking cessation clinic, was to describe the characteristics of these older smokers and their quit attempts. A retrospective study was performed from the patient files of a smoking cessation clinic between 1999/01/01 and 2009/12/31; "older" smokers (≥60 years; n=181) were compared to "young" smokers (<60 years; n=1425). Compared to young smokers, older smokers had a higher frequency of cardio-pulmonary diseases (82.3 % vs. 46.7 %; P<0.0001) and current depressions (45.3% vs. 35.7%; P=0.012); their abstinence rate at 12 months was higher (44.2% vs. 32.9%; P=0.0025). An age over 60 years was associated with a higher success rate (OR=1.83; CI 95%: 1.29-2.59). Cessation smoking attempts are as likely to be successful in older smokers as in younger smokers. Physicians should advise and assist older smokers to quit and if necessary refer them to smoking cessation clinics. Smoking cessation guidelines therefore will apply without reserve in seniors. Copyright © 2015 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. [Effect of postmenopausal hormone substitution on the lipid profile and coagulation factors in female smokers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatović-Babić, Danijela; Beljić, Teodora; Drezgić, Milka; Trpković, Draginja; Balint-Perić, Ljiljana; Babić, Darko; Nikolić, Jagoda

    2002-01-01

    Postmenopause and smoking impair lipid profile, induce hypercoagulability and reduce fibrinolytic capacity [1, 2]. Postmenopause induced lipid changes can be reversed by oestrogen replacement [3]. Oestrogens also reduce fibrinogen level [4] and have beneficial effects on endothelium [5]. Although several studies showed that hormone replacement therapy may increase the risk of thromboembolic diseases, procoagulant oestrogen activity has not clearly been demonstrated. It is well known that smoking accelerates oestrogen metabolism [6, 7], which may attenuate its beneficial effects. The present study was undertaken to determine if there is difference in beneficial effects of oestrogens between smokers and non-smokers in terms of coagulation process and lipids. The examination was a longitudinal, one-year, before/after therapeutic study, which included healthy postmenopausal women (FSH levels at least 40 U/l), 30 smokers and 32 non-smokers who were under 55 years of age and postmenopausal period shorter than 5 years. Women with surgically induced menopause received unopposed oral oestrogens, while those with spontaneous menopause were treated with combined oral oestrogen/progestogen therapy. Before entering the study and in three-months intervals total LDL, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides and VLDL were determined, as well as plasma fibrinogen, prothrombin time, and activated partial thromboplastin time. Neither beneficial nor adverse effects of oestrogens on lipids and coagulation were observed during one-year follow-up in smokers, although subjects with longer smoking history had higher triglycerides levels after 12 months of therapy. On the contrary, oestrogen replacement reduced total and LDL cholesterol, and increased HDL cholesterol in non-smokers, with no change in triglycerides and VLDL level. A decrease in fibrinogen levels and coagulation activity, expressed by prothrombin time and partial thromboplastin time, were also observed in hormone replacement therapy in

  18. Tumor necrosis factor-α serum levels in healthy smokers and nonsmokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Petrescu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Florin Petrescu1, Sebastian Cosmin Voican1, Isabela Silosi21Department of Internal Medicine, University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Craiova, Craiova, Romania; 2Department of Immunology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Craiova, Craiova, RomaniaBackground: Tobacco smoking is the most important risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD development. Inhaled cigarette smoke can induce tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a production by alveolar macrophages, which in turn may enhance the production of metalloproteinases (MMPs. MMPs have been involved in mediating airway inflammation and lung destruction.Objectives: We aimed to measure the TNF-a serum levels in healthy heavy smokers and healthy nonsmokers to determine the dose-response relationship based on the cigarette smoke exposure.Subjects and methods: We included in our study 43 healthy heavy smokers and 19 healthy nonsmokers (the control group. The smokers group was classified as less than one pack, one pack, and more than one pack per day. A clinical and paraclinical evaluation was performed in both groups, without any evidence of infection or COPD. The serum levels of TNF-a were assessed by ELISA.Results: The TNF-a serum levels were significantly higher for the group of smokers compared to the group of nonsmokers (P < 0.004. We also noticed an increased TNF-a concentration in the serum of smokers with more than one pack per day compared with those with less than one pack per day (P < 0.03. There was a positive correlation between the serum level of TNF-a and tobacco smoke exposure.Conclusions: The high levels of TNF-a in the serum of smokers suggest an imbalance between the proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory factors as a result of tobacco smoke exposure. The concentration of TNF-a is elevated in the serum of healthy heavy smokers in a cigarette dose-dependent manner. We speculate that the serum level of TNF-a might be a useful biomarker for the selection of heavy smokers

  19. Risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among never-smokers in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee SJ

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Seok Jeong Lee,1 Seo Woo Kim,1 Kyoung Ae Kong,2 Yon Ju Ryu,1 Jin Hwa Lee,1 Jung Hyun Chang1 1Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Clinical Trial Center, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients include those who have never smoked. However, risk factors other than smoking in never-smokers have not been elucidated sufficiently. This study investigated the risk factors for COPD among never-smokers in Korea using population-based data. Methods: The data were retrieved from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Survey IV conducted from 2007 to 2009. Among subjects aged 40 years or older who underwent appropriate pulmonary function tests, never-smokers not diagnosed with asthma and not showing a restrictive pattern on pulmonary function tests were enrolled. Risk factors of COPD in never-smokers were analyzed using logistic regression models. Results: Among 24,871 participants in the representative Korean cohort, 3,473 never-smokers were enrolled. COPD patients accounted for 7.6% of the never-smokers. In the logistic regression analysis, low education status (odds ratio [OR]: 2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2–3.2, occupational exposure (OR: 2.6; 95% CI: 1.3–5.3, a history of tuberculosis (OR: 4.5; 95% CI: 2.3–8.7, bronchiectasis (OR: 6.0; 95% CI: 1.4–25.4, male sex (OR: 4.2; 95% CI: 2.6–6.7, advanced age (60–69 years vs 40–49 years; OR: 3.8; 95% CI: 2.0–7.0, and being underweight (body mass index <18.5 vs 18.0–24.9 kg/m2; OR: 3.1; 95% CI: 1.0–9.4 were associated with the development of COPD. Conclusion: Low education status, manual labor, a history of tuberculosis and bronchiectasis, as well as male sex, advanced age and being underweight were risk factors for COPD in Korean never-smokers. Keywords: socioeconomic status, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, never-smoker

  20. Effect of hormone replacement therapy on lipids and coagulation factors in postmenopausal women smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatović-Babić Danijela

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Postmenopause and smoking impair lipid profile, induce hypercoagulability and reduce fibrinolytic capacity [1, 2]. Postmenopause induced lipid changes can be reversed by oestrogen replacement [3]. Oestrogens also reduce fibrino-gen level [4] and have beneficial effects on endothelium [5]. Although several studies showed that hormone replacement therapy may increase the risk of thromboembolic diseases, procoagulant oestrogen activity has not clearly been demonstrated. It is well known that smoking accelerates oestrogen metabolism [6, 7], which may attenuate its beneficial effects. The present study was undertaken to determine if there is difference in beneficial effects of oestrogens between smokers and non-smokers in terms of coagulation process and lipids. The examination was a longitudinal one-year, before/after therapeutic study, which included healthy postmenopausal women (FSH levels at least 40 U/l, 30 smokers and 32 non-smokers who were under 55 years of age and postmenopausal period shorter than 5 years. Women with surgically induced menopause received unopposed oral oestrogens, while those with spontaneous menopause were treated with combined oral oestrogen/progestogen therapy. Before entering the study and in three-months intervals total LDL, HDL cholesterol, triglycérides and VLDL were determined, as well School of Medicine, Belgrade as plasma fibrinogen prothrombin time, and activated partial thromboplastin time. Neither beneficial nor adverse effects of oestrogens on lipids and coagulation were observed during one-year follow-up in smokers, although subjects with longer smoking history had higher triglycérides levels after 12 months of therapy. On the contrary, oestrogen replacement reduced total and LDL cholesterol and increased HDL cholesterol in non-smokers, with no change in triglycérides and VLDL level. A decrease in fibrinogen levels and coagulation activity, expressed by protrombin time and partial thromboplastin time, were

  1. Response perseveration and ventral prefrontal sensitivity to reward and punishment in male problem gamblers and smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Michiel B; Veltman, Dick J; Goudriaan, Anna E; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Sjoerds, Zsuzsika; van den Brink, Wim

    2009-03-01

    Pathological gambling (PG) is associated with maladaptive perseverative behavior, but the underlying mechanism and neural circuitry is not completely clear. Here, the hypothesis was tested that PG is characterized by response perseveration and abnormalities in reward and/or punishment sensitivity in the ventral frontostriatal circuit. Executive functioning was assessed to verify if these effects are independent of the dorsal frontostriatal circuit. A group of smokers was also included to examine whether impairments in PG generalize to substance use disorders. Response perseveration and reward/punishment sensitivity were measured with a probabilistic reversal-learning task, in which subjects could win and lose money. Executive functioning was measured with a planning task, the Tower of London. Performance and fMRI data were acquired in 19 problem gamblers, 19 smokers, and 19 healthy controls. Problem gamblers showed severe response perseveration, associated with reduced activation of right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex in response to both monetary gain and loss. Results did not fully generalize to smokers. Planning performance and related activation of the dorsal frontostriatal circuit were intact in both problem gamblers and smokers. PG is related to response perseveration and diminished reward and punishment sensitivity as indicated by hypoactivation of the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex when money is gained and lost. Moreover, intact planning abilities and normal dorsal frontostriatal responsiveness indicate that this deficit is not due to impaired executive functioning. Response perseveration and ventral prefrontal hyporesponsiveness to monetary loss may be markers for maladaptive behavior seen in chemical and nonchemical addictions.

  2. Emotion differentiation and intensity during acute tobacco abstinence: A comparison of heavy and light smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Erin S; Bujarski, Spencer; Leventhal, Adam M; Ray, Lara A

    2015-08-01

    The ability to recognize and label discrete emotions, termed emotion differentiation, is particularly pertinent to overall emotion regulation abilities. Patterns of deficient emotion differentiation have been associated with mood and anxiety disorders but have yet to be examined in relation to nicotine dependence. This study employed ecological momentary assessment to examine smokers' subjective experience of discrete emotions during 24-h of forced tobacco abstinence. Thirty daily smokers rated their emotions up to 23 times over the 24-hour period, and smoking abstinence was biologically verified. From these data, we computed individual difference measures of emotion differentiation, overall emotion intensity, and emotional variability. As hypothesized, heavy smokers reported poorer negative emotion differentiation than light smokers (d=0.55), along with more intense negative emotion (d=0.97) and greater negative emotion variability (d=0.97). No differences were observed in positive emotion differentiation. Across the sample, poorer negative emotion differentiation was associated with greater endorsement of psychological motives to smoke, including negative and positive reinforcement motives, while positive emotion differentiation was not. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Human papilloma virus in non-small cell lung cancer in never smokers: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yoshikazu; Ando, Masahiko; Kubo, Akihito; Isa, Shun-Ichi; Yamamoto, Satomi; Tsujino, Kazuyuki; Kurata, Takayasu; Ou, Sai-Hong I; Takada, Minoru; Kawaguchi, Tomoya

    2014-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in never smokers has emerged as a global public health issue. The cause is still unclear, and few studies have focused on the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the never smokers. We performed a systematic search of PubMed for articles of HPV infection in human subjects with NSCLC up to September 2012. Although smoking status was not fully reported in all studies, we contacted the authors by e-mail to supplement this information. Differences in the distribution of patients with and without HPV infection were tested with the Chi squared test. We identified 46 eligible articles, including 23 from Asian countries (N=2337 NSCLC cases), 19 from European countries (N=1553) and 4 from North and South America (N=160). The HPV prevalence was 28.1% (95% confidence interval (CI) 26.6-30.3%), 8.4% (95% CI 7.1-9.9%) and 21.3% (95% CI 15.2-28.4%), respectively. Eleven studies from East Asia (N=1110) and 4 from Europe (N=569) provided information on smoking status. The number of never smoker was 392 patients (33.9%) in East Asia and 54 patients (14.8%) in Europe. The HPV prevalence in East Asian countries was similar between never and ever smokers (33.9% vs 39.2%, P=0.080). Based on the literature confirming the presence of HPV in lung cancer in never smokers, the virus plays a role in carcinogenesis in the disease. There were different patterns of HPV prevalence between Asian and European countries in the never smokers as well as in ever smokers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Withdrawal in adolescent light smokers following 24-hour abstinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benowitz, Neal L.; Auerback, Glenna M.; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Withdrawal is one of the most important symptoms of nicotine addiction. We examined the extent to which adolescent light smokers experienced withdrawal symptoms when deprived of nicotine for a 24-hr period. Methods: A total of 20 adolescents aged 13–17 years who smoked 1–5 cigarettes/day (CPD) refrained from smoking for a 24-hr period. Withdrawal scales were administered, and heart rate was measured at baseline, 12, and 24 hr. Neuropsychological testing was performed at baseline and 24 hr. Participants were divided into two groups: very light smokers (1–3 CPD) and light smokers (4–5 CPD). Results: At 12 hr, very light smokers experienced a decrease in withdrawal symptoms versus light smokers, who reported an increase in symptoms (−2.9 vs. 2.8, p = .02). Similarly, at 24 hr, very light smokers experienced a mean decrease in withdrawal score compared with a mean increase for the light smoker group (–2.2 vs. 5.8, p = .04). We did not find a significant change in heart rate or any differences in participants’ scores on the memory or concentration tasks. Discussion: Based on our findings in this controlled laboratory experiment, adolescent very light smokers did not appear to have significant withdrawal symptoms following abstinence from nicotine. Adolescent light smokers who smoke 4–5 CPD experienced subjective withdrawal symptoms but did not have objective signs of nicotine withdrawal. The stage of smoking in which adolescents are smoking 5 CPD or fewer appears to be a crucial time for studying development of nicotine addiction in teens as they may be transitioning from social smoking to early addiction. PMID:19246428

  5. Sex differences in emphysema and airway disease in smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Camp, Pat G; Coxson, Harvey O; Levy, Robert D

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The authors of previous reports have suggested that women are more susceptible to cigarette smoke and to an airway-predominant COPD phenotype rather than an emphysema-predominant COPD phenotype. The purpose of this study was to test for sex differences in COPD phenotypes by using high......-resolution CT (HRCT) scanning in male and female smokers with and without COPD. METHODS: All subjects completed spirometry and answered an epidemiologic respiratory questionnaire. Inspiratory HRCT scans were obtained on 688 smokers enrolled in a family-based study of COPD. Emphysema was assessed by using......-years of smoking, current smoking status, center of enrollment, and FEV(1) percent predicted; p = 0.0006). Women had a smaller SQRTWA and WA% after adjusting for covariates (p emphysema than female smokers, but female smokers do not show increased wall thickness...

  6. Flexible emotion-based decision-making behavior varies in current and former smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Zoe; O'Connor, Martin; Jollans, Emily K; O'Halloran, Laura; Dymond, Simon; Whelan, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Suboptimal decision-making is a feature in the initiation and maintenance of substance use, often manifested in choosing for short-term benefits rather than long-term gain, and the failure to display cognitive flexibility, respectively. Studies of nicotine users typically focus on characterizing those who are already addicted; less is known about decision-making in former smokers. Non- (n=21), former daily- (n=23) and current daily smokers (n=24), completed the contingency-shifting variant Iowa Gambling Task (csIGT), in which the reward and punishment contingencies of the decks are systematically varied after 100 trials of the 'standard' IGT. Scores on the standard blocks of the csIGT provided an index of emotion-based decision-making, while the contingency-shifting blocks assessed flexible decision-making. Subjective ratings were also recorded at 20-trial intervals. Both current and former smokers showed significantly impaired performance relative to non-smokers when making decisions during the standard blocks of the csIGT. Both former and non-smokers' awareness of the reward/punishment contingencies was significantly higher than those of current smokers at the end of the standard IGT. Both former and non-smokers had significantly better performance on the contingency shifting blocks, relative to current smokers. The findings indicate that both current and former smokers display a suboptimal pattern of decision-making than non-smokers during the standard IGT. However, with respect to the ability to change behavior following reversed contingencies, former smokers are more similar to non-smokers than to current smokers. Former smokers were also more aware of the contingencies than current smokers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparative study of smokers, ex-smokers, and nonsmokers who have experienced myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nozawa Diogo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of smoking on in-hospital morbidity and mortality in patients who have experienced acute myocardial infarction and to assess the association between smoking and other cardiovascular risk factors and clinical data. METHODS: A prospective cohort study analyzed 121 patients, including 54 smokers, 35 ex-smokers, and 32 nonsmokers. RESULTS: Using the chi-square test (P<0.05, an association between smoking and the risk factors sex, age, and diabetes was documented. Among the morbidity and mortality variables, only acute pulmonary edema showed a statistically significant difference (OR=9.5; 95% CI, which was greater in the ex-smoker group than in the nonsmoker group. CONCLUSION: An association between smoking and some cardiovascular risk factors was observed, but no statistical difference in morbidity and mortality was observed in the groups studied, except for the variable acute pulmonary edema.

  8. Stereotyping the smoker: adolescents' appraisals of smokers in film

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCool, J; Cameron, L; Petrie, K

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the relation between demographic factors and film smoking stereotypes in adolescents and the potential influence of smoker stereotypes on smoking susceptibility. Design: A cross sectional questionnaire survey of school students (n = 3041) aged 12–13 and 16–17 years who were asked to describe the personal characteristics of female and male smokers in films. Setting: 15 primary or intermediate schools and 10 secondary schools in Auckland, New Zealand. Results: Appraisals of smokers in film were strongly influenced by age and sex with younger adolescents and males more likely to see female smokers as sexy, intelligent and healthy whereas older students and females more often appraised female smokers as stressed bored and depressed. Overall, image stereotypes (sexy, stylish) were more likely to be significantly associated with smoking susceptibility than emotional sensitivity stereotypes (stressed, depressed etc). Conclusions: Adolescents differ significantly in their appraisal of smokers in films; however, image based stereotypes, rather than emotional sensitivity stereotypes, are significantly associated with smoking susceptibility. PMID:15333889

  9. Correlations between supra- and subgingival clinical parameters in smokers and individuals who have never smoked

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Righi Alves

    Full Text Available Introduction Smoking is a risk factor for prevalence, severity and progression of periodontal disease and appears to suppress marginal periodontium inflammatory response. Purpose To correlate Visible Plaque Index (VPI and Gingival Bleeding Index (GBI in smokers and never-smokers, as well as GBI and bleeding on probing (BOP in these groups. Material and method We used baseline data of one quasi-experimental study in which 11 smokers and 14 subjects who never smoked were submitted to clinical periodontal examinations between September 2010 and October 2011. Result The correlation between VPI and GBI was positive for both groups, it was strong and statistically significant in subjects who had never smoked and moderate in smokers. Regarding GBI and BOP correlations were moderate for smokers and weaker for individuals who had never smoked. Conclusion Smokers have lower strength correlation between VPI and GBI compared to individuals who had never smoked resulting in a less pronounced marginal gingival bleeding.

  10. Smokers' reactions to interpersonal interaction and presentation of smoking cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niaura, R; Abrams, D B; Pedraza, M; Monti, P M; Rohsenow, D J

    1992-01-01

    This study examined smokers' reactions to smoking cues and interpersonal interaction. Fifty-six smokers were assigned at random to the six cells of a factorial design which varied the level of interpersonal interaction (role play with a confederate vs. confederate absent) and the level of exposure to smoking cues (no cues vs. visual cues vs. visual plus olfactory cues). Measures of reactivity included changes from resting baseline on blood pressure, heart rate, self-reported smoking urge, and a measure of ad lib smoking behavior obtained after exposure to the experimental procedures. Results showed that blood pressure responses increased significantly from baseline only during the role play situation where the confederate manipulated an unlit cigarette or smoked a cigarette in view of the subjects. Although not significant, heart rate changes paralleled blood pressure changes, but urge ratings showed a different pattern of response to the manipulations. The latency to smoking a cigarette after the experimental manipulations was unaffected by the cues. The results suggest that modelling of smoking by others and exposure to some kinds of smoking cues may increase cardiovascular activation.

  11. Predictors, Indicators, and Validated Measures of Dependence in Menthol Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad-Kah, Raheema; Rimmer, Lonnie; Liang, Qiwei

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a comprehensive review of the menthol cigarette dependence-related literature and results from an original analysis of the Total Exposure Study (TES), which included 1,100 menthol and 2,400 nonmenthol adult smokers. The substantial scientific evidence available related to age of first cigarette, age of regular use, single-item dependence indicators (smoking frequency, cigarettes per day, time to first cigarette, night waking to smoke), smoking duration, numerous validated and widely accepted measures of nicotine/cigarette dependence, and our analysis of the TES do not support that menthol smokers are more dependent than nonmenthol smokers or that menthol increases dependence. PMID:24738914

  12. Correlations between supra- and subgingival clinical parameters in smokers and individuals who have never smoked

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Carolina Righi; Berlt, Fernanda Abbadie; Mário, Ticiane de Góes; Sfreddo, Camila Silveira; Maier, Juliana; Moreira, Carlos Heitor Cunha

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Smoking is a risk factor for prevalence, severity and progression of periodontal disease and appears to suppress marginal periodontium inflammatory response. Purpose To correlate Visible Plaque Index (VPI) and Gingival Bleeding Index (GBI) in smokers and never-smokers, as well as GBI and bleeding on probing (BOP ) in these groups. Material and method We used baseline data of one quasi-experimental study in which 11 smokers and 14 subjects who never smoked were submitted to clinic...

  13. Assessment of five different guideline indication criteria for spirometry, including modified GOLD criteria, in order to detect COPD: data from 5,315 subjects in the PLATINO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luize, Ana P; Menezes, Ana Maria B; Perez-Padilla, Rogelio; Muiño, Adriana; López, Maria Victorina; Valdivia, Gonzalo; Lisboa, Carmem; Montes de Oca, Maria; Tálamo, Carlos; Celli, Bartolomé; Nascimento, Oliver A; Gazzotti, Mariana R; Jardim, José R

    2014-10-30

    Spirometry is the gold standard for diagnosing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although there are a number of different guideline criteria for deciding who should be selected for spirometric screening, to date it is not known which criteria are the best based on sensitivity and specificity. Firstly, to evaluate the proportion of subjects in the PLATINO Study that would be recommended for spirometry testing according to Global initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD)-modified, American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), National Lung Health Education Program (NLHEP), GOLD and American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) criteria. Secondly, we aimed to compare the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive and negative predictive values, of these five different criteria. Data from the PLATINO study included information on respiratory symptoms, smoking and previous spirometry testing. The GOLD-modified spirometry indication criteria are based on three positive answers out of five questions: the presence of cough, phlegm in the morning, dyspnoea, age over 40 years and smoking status. Data from 5,315 subjects were reviewed. Fewer people had an indication for spirometry (41.3%) according to the GOLD-modified criteria, and more people had an indication for spirometry (80.4%) by the GOLD and ATS/ERS criteria. A low percentage had previously had spirometry performed: GOLD-modified (14.5%); ACCP (13.2%); NLHEP (12.6%); and GOLD and ATS/ERS (12.3%). The GOLD-modified criteria showed the least sensitivity (54.9) and the highest specificity (61.0) for detecting COPD, whereas GOLD and ATS/ERS criteria showed the highest sensitivity (87.9) and the least specificity (20.8). There is a considerable difference in the indication for spirometry according to the five different guideline criteria. The GOLD-modified criteria recruit less people with the greatest sum of sensitivity and specificity.

  14. Oral tobacco products: preference and effects among smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatsukami, Dorothy K.; Jensen, Joni; Anderson, Amanda; Broadbent, Berry; Allen, Sharon; Zhang, Yan; Severson, Herb

    2011-01-01

    Background Recently, oral tobacco products have been marketed specifically towards cigarette smokers. These products come in different nicotine doses and formulations (snus vs. lozenge). To date, little research has been conducted to determine how smokers respond to these products. The goal of this study was to examine if smokers prefer certain oral tobacco products based on their specific characteristics. Methods Smokers interested in quitting underwent a sampling phase and a treatment phase. The sampling phase consisted of testing five different products varying in nicotine dose (high vs. moderate vs. low) and formulation (snus vs. lozenge): General Snus, Camel Snus, Marlboro Snus, Stonewall and Ariva. Each product was sampled in the natural environment on separate days. At the end of the sampling period, subjects chose which product they would use during the 2-week cigarette abstinence phase. Results General Snus (high nicotine) was not preferred by any smoker. No significant differences in preferences were observed across the other tobacco products. During the smoking cessation phase, Camel Snus was generally associated with greater craving relief and satisfaction, reduced use of cigarettes, and greater abstinence during follow-up compared to other products. Conclusion There were no differences in preferences for four of the five oral tobacco products but higher nicotine oral tobacco products were associated with better cessation outcomes among smokers who chose these products. PMID:21515003

  15. Individualized real-time fMRI neurofeedback to attenuate craving in nicotine-dependent smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, Karen J.; Hanlon, Colleen A.; Li, Xingbao; Borckardt, Jeffrey J.; Canterberry, Melanie; Prisciandaro, James J.; Moran-Santa Maria, Megan M.; LeMatty, Todd; George, Mark S.; Brady, Kathleen T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cue-induced craving plays an important role in relapse, and the neural correlates of cue-induced craving have been elucidated using fMRI. This study examined the utility of real-time fMRI (rtfMRI) neurofeedback to strengthen self-regulation of craving-related neural activation and cue-reactivity in cigarette smokers. Methods Nicotine-dependent smokers were randomized to rtfMRI neurofeedback or to a no-feedback control group. Participants completed 3 neuroimaging visits. Within each visit, an initial run during which smoking-related cues were used to provoke craving, an individualized craving-related region of interest (ROI) in the prefrontal cortex or anterior cingulate cortex was identified. In the rtfMRI group, activity from the ROI was fed back via a visual display during 3 subsequent runs while participants were instructed to reduce craving during cue exposure. The control group had an identical experience with no feedback provided. Results Forty-four nicotine-dependent smokers were recruited to participate in our study; data from the 33 participants who completed a 1-week follow-up visit were included in the analysis. Subjective craving ratings and cue-induced brain activation were lower in the rtfMRI group than in the control group. Limitations As participants were not seeking treatment, clinical outcomes are lacking. Conclusion Nicotine-dependent smokers receiving rtfMRI feedback from an individualized ROI attenuated smoking cue–elicited neural activation and craving, relative to a control group. Further studies are needed in treatment-seeking smokers to determine if this intervention can translate into a clinically meaningful treatment modality. PMID:26505139

  16. Wood Smoke Exposure and Gene Promoter Methylation Are Associated with Increased Risk for COPD in Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Akshay; Petersen, Hans; Blanchette, Christopher M.; Meek, Paula; Picchi, Maria A.; Belinsky, Steven A.; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Wood smoke–associated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is common in women in developing countries but has not been adequately described in developed countries. Objectives: Our objective was to determine whether wood smoke exposure was a risk factor for COPD in a population of smokers in the United States and whether aberrant gene promoter methylation in sputum may modify this association. Methods: For this cross-sectional study, 1,827 subjects were drawn from the Lovelace Smokers' Cohort, a predominantly female cohort of smokers. Wood smoke exposure was self-reported. Postbronchodilator spirometry was obtained, and COPD outcomes studied included percent predicted FEV1, airflow obstruction, and chronic bronchitis. Effect modification of wood smoke exposure with current cigarette smoke, ethnicity, sex, and promoter methylation of lung cancer-related genes in sputum on COPD outcomes were separately explored. Multivariable logistic and poisson regression models were used for binary and rate-based outcomes, respectively. Measurements and Main Results: Self-reported wood smoke exposure was independently associated with a lower percent predicted FEV1 (point estimate [± SE] −0.03 ± 0.01) and a higher prevalence of airflow obstruction and chronic bronchitis (odds ratio, 1.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.52–2.52 and 1.64 (95% confidence interval, 1.31–2.06, respectively). These associations were stronger among current cigarette smokers, non-Hispanic whites, and men. Wood smoke exposure interacted in a multiplicative manner with aberrant promoter methylation of the p16 or GATA4 genes on lower percent predicted FEV1. Conclusions: These studies identify a novel link between wood smoke exposure and gene promoter methylation that synergistically increases the risk for reduced lung function in cigarette smokers. PMID:20595226

  17. Smoking cessation treatment for COPD smokers: the role of counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Ruiz, C A; Fagerström, K O

    2013-03-01

    Smoking cessation is the only therapeutic intervention that can prevent COPD smokers from the chronic progression of their disorder. The most important intervention for helping these smokers to quit is a combination of counseling plus pharmacological treatment. The characteristics of the counseling should be different depending if this intervention is offered to smokers with a previous diagnosis of COPD or if the intervention is offered to smokers who have been recently diagnoses with COPD. The counseling of patients who have been recently diagnosed should include: a) explanation of the direct relationship between smoking and COPD, b) encouraging these patients to quit and c) using of spirometry and measurements of CO as a motivational tools. The counseling of patients who have been previously diagnosed should include: a) encouragement to make a serious quit attempt, b) an intervention that increases motivation, self-efficacy and self-esteem, c) and the intervention should also control depression and be directed to weight gain control.

  18. Delay and probability discounting of multiple commodities in smokers and never-smokers using multiple-choice tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltavski, Dmitri V; Weatherly, Jeffrey N

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate temporal and probabilistic discounting in smokers and never-smokers, across a number of commodities, using a multiple-choice method. One hundred and eighty-two undergraduate university students, of whom 90 had never smoked, 73 were self-reported light smokers (choice format. In addition to cigarettes, monetary rewards, and health outcomes, the tasks included novel commodities such as ideal dating partner and retirement income. The results showed that heavy smokers probability discounted commodities at a significantly shallower rate than never-smokers, suggesting greater risk-taking. No effect of smoking status was observed for delay discounting questions. The only commodity that was probability discounted significantly less than others was 'finding an ideal dating partner'. The results suggest that probability discounting tasks using the multiple-choice format can discriminate between non-abstaining smokers and never-smokers and could be further explored in the context of behavioral and drug addictions.

  19. Carboxyhemoglobin Levels Induced by Cigarette Smoking Outdoors in Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmel, Jonathan; George, Naomi; Schwarz, John; Yousif, Sami; Suner, Selim; Hack, Jason B

    2017-12-28

    Non-invasive screening of carboxyhemoglobin saturation (SpCO) in the emergency department to detect occult exposure is increasingly common. The SpCO threshold to consider exposure in smokers is up to 9%. The literature supporting this cutoff is inadequate, and the impact of active smoking on SpCO saturation remains unclear. The primary objective was to characterize baseline SpCO in a cohort of smokers outdoors. Secondary objectives were to explore the impact of active smoking on SpCO and to compare SpCO between smokers and non-smokers. This was a prospective cohort pilot study in two outdoor urban public areas in the USA, in a convenience sample of adult smokers. SpCO saturations were assessed non-invasively before, during, and 2 min after cigarette smoking with pulse CO-oximetry. Analyses included descriptive statistics, correlations, and a generalized estimating equation model. Eighty-five smokers had mean baseline SpCO of 2.7% (SD 2.6) and peak of 3.1% (SD 2.9), while 15 controls had SpCO 1.3% (SD 1.3). This was a significant difference. Time since last cigarette was associated with baseline SpCO, and active smoking increased mean SpCO. There was correlation among individual smokers' SpCO levels before, during, and 2 min after smoking, indicating smokers tended to maintain their baseline SpCO level. This study is the first to measure SpCO during active smoking in an uncontrolled environment. It suggests 80% of smokers have SpCO ≤ 5%, but potentially lends support for the current 9% as a threshold, depending on clinical context.

  20. DNA damage and repair activity after broccoli intake in young healthy smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riso, Patrizia; Martini, Daniela; Møller, Peter

    2010-01-01

    compounds, including smokers. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of broccoli intake on biomarkers of DNA damage and repair. Twenty-seven young healthy smokers consumed a portion of steamed broccoli (250 g/day) or a control diet for 10 days each within a crossover design with a washout period...... mRNA expression levels of repair and defence enzymes: 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1), nucleoside diphosphate linked moiety X-type motif 1 (NUDT1) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). After broccoli consumption, the level of oxidised DNA lesions decreased by 41% (95% confidence interval: 10%, 72......%) and the resistance to H(2)O(2)-induced DNA strand breaks increased by 23% (95% CI: 13%, 34%). Following broccoli intake, a higher protection was observed in subjects with glutathione S-transferase (GST) M1-null genotype. The expression level and activity of repair enzymes was unaltered. In conclusion, broccoli...

  1. COMPARISON OF MICRONUCLEATED CELL IN BUCCAL SMEARS AMONG SMOKERS AND NON-SMOKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vani Dayanand

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The health complexities caused due to tobacco smoking has not been restricted to any geographic region and has spread worldwide. As the oral mucosal cells, which line the oral cavity are the first barrier, they represent the preferred target site for the early genotoxic events. Tobacco use is one of the most important aetiological factors in initiation of oral cancer as it increases the risk of cancer by exposing the buccal mucosal to the carcinogenic chemicals either through inhalation or by ingestion. Micronuclei are round to oval cytoplasmic chromatin mass, which occurs as a result of segregation defects due to chromosomal instability causing chromatin to be excluded from the reformed nucleus. Micronuclei assay in exfoliated buccal cells is a useful and less invasive method for monitoring genetic damage. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 100 male subjects (50 smokers, 50 non-smokers were examined. Buccal smears were wet fixed and stained with pap stain. 100 cells per slide were counted and assessed for micronuclei count. T-test and Pearson correlation was used as a statistical tool for analysis. RESULTS Significantly, smokers had higher percentage of micronucleated cells (T-5.865; P (0.000, total number of micronuclei (T- 6.713; P (0.000 and mean micronuclei count (T-5.865; P (0.000 than non-smokers. Pack years correlated significantly and positively with mean micronuclei count. However, pack year did not have significant relation with percentage of micronucleated cells and total number of micronuclei. CONCLUSION The genotoxic effects of tobacco smoke cause chromosomal damage in the epithelial cells of buccal mucosa and are reflected in the increased micronuclei in smokers. Micronuclei assay can be used as a simple and reliable marker for genotoxic evaluation.

  2. Nicotine intake and smoking topography in smokers with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jill M; Gandhi, Kunal K; Lu, Shou-En; Steinberg, Marc L; Benowitz, Neal L

    2012-09-01

    Cigarette smoking behavior in bipolar disorder (BPD), including the effects of mood-stabilizing medications, has not been well characterized. We compared serum nicotine, nicotine metabolite levels, and smoking topography in 75 smokers with BPD to 86 control smokers (CON). For some comparisons, an additional control group of 75 smokers with schizophrenia (SCZ) were included. There were no differences between the BPD and CON groups in baseline smoking characteristics or serum nicotine or cotinine levels. Fifty-one smokers with BPD (68.9%) were taking one of the following mood stabilizers: valproic acid, lamotrigine, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, lithium, or topiramate. The 3-hydroxycotinine-to-cotinine ratio, a marker of cytochrome P450 2A6 (CYP2A6) metabolic activity, was significantly higher in BPD versus CON and versus SCZ (0.68 versus 0.49 versus 0.54; p =0.002). The difference between groups, however, was no longer significant when the analysis was repeated with those taking hepatic enzyme-inducing drugs (carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, and topiramate) included as a covariate. The time between puffs, or interpuff interval (IPI), was shorter in BPD versus CON by an average of 3.0sec (p<0.05), although this was no longer significant when we removed smokers from the analysis of those taking hepatic enzyme inducers. Smokers with BPD are not different from CON on most measures of nicotine intake and smoking topography. We found an increased rate of nicotine metabolism in smokers taking mood stabilizers that are hepatic enzyme inducers, including carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, and topiramate. Smokers with rapid nicotine metabolism might be expected to smoke more intensely to compensate for the more rapid disappearance of nicotine from the blood and brain, and may have more difficulty in quitting smoking, although this requires further study. © 2012 John Wiley and Sons A/S.

  3. Characteristics of Adolescent Intermittent and Daily Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Mark L.; Rait, Michelle A.; Sen, Saunak; Shiffman, Saul

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Intermittent smoking is common among adolescent smokers, but little is known about adolescent intermittent smokers (ITS). This study describes a cohort of adolescent ITS and compares them to adolescent daily smokers (DS) for the purpose of providing a more detailed characterization of adolescent ITS, specifically patterns of smoking, level of selfreported addiction, and experience with essation METHODS Participants were 124 ITS and 55 DS. ITS were defined as smoking at least monthly but smoking daily. Participants completed demographic, smoking and addiction surveys including the HONC and mFTQ. RESULTS ITS started smoking at an older age, smoked fewer cigarettes per day and scored significantly lower on addiction scales, but had similar difficulty to DS in quitting smoking with similar numbers of reported quit attempts. These differences remained after adjusting for years of smoking. ITS were more likely to smoke in social situations, while DS were more likely to smoke when angry. Both groups were equally likely to report smoking when drinking alcohol. CONCLUSIONS We documented significant differences in smoking related behaviors between adolescent ITS and DS. Importantly, we also found that, despite low level infrequent smoking, ITS reported difficulty quitting smoking. Given the risks from light and intermittent smoking, it is essential that we develop a greater understanding of adolescent ITS, including their difficulty quitting and the contextual factors influencing their smoking, so that we may develop new targeted interventions. PMID:24837757

  4. Reduced expression IRF7 in nasal epithelial cells from smokers as a potential mechanism mediating enhanced susceptibility to influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Smokers are more susceptible to viral infections, including influenza virus, yet the mechanisms mediating this effect are not known. Methods: We have established an in vitro model of differentiated nasal epithelial cells from smokers, which maintain enhanced levels...

  5. Comparison of responses of salivary antioxidant markers to exhaustive aerobic exercise in smoker and non-smoker young girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arazi, Hamid; Simaei, Esmat; Taati, Behzad

    2016-10-01

    Smoking is known as a serious global public health problem, and is also an important risk factor for oral diseases and cause of oxidative stress and cellular damage. Saliva is the first biological medium encountered during inhalation of cigarette smoke. Additionally, previous studies demonstrated that exhaustive aerobic exercise could increase oxidative stress and cellular damage. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to compare the response of salivary antioxidants (peroxides (POX), uric acid (UA), 1-1dipheny l-2-picrylhydrazyl hydrate (DPPH) of exhaustive aerobic exercise between healthy smoker and non-smoker young girls. Ten smokers and 10 non-smokers were enrolled for this study. Subjects performed a progressive cycle ergometer with an initial load of 50 W that was increased 50Wevery 3 minutes at the speed of 60rpm, until exhaustion. Un-stimulated saliva samples were collected before, immediately and 1 hour after exercise. The results showed that POX activity and UA concentration significantly increased immediately after exercise in both groups when compared to the pre exercise values (Plevel of salivary POX of non-smokers were greater than smokers immediately after exercise (Pexercise caused a decrease in salivary DPPH activity immediately and 1 h after exercise in both groups (Pexercise (Pexercise was induced oxidative stress in both groups but oxidative stress in smoking females was greater.

  6. Reduced Bone Density and Vertebral Fractures in Smokers. Men and COPD Patients at Increased Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Joshua D; Wilson, Carla; Stinson, Douglas S; Stinson, Douglas J; Lynch, David A; Bowler, Russell P; Lutz, Sharon; Bon, Jessica M; Arnold, Ben; McDonald, Merry-Lynn N; Washko, George R; Wan, Emily S; DeMeo, Dawn L; Foreman, Marilyn G; Soler, Xavier; Lindsay, Sarah E; Lane, Nancy E; Genant, Harry K; Silverman, Edwin K; Hokanson, John E; Make, Barry J; Crapo, James D; Regan, Elizabeth A

    2015-05-01

    Former smoking history and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are potential risk factors for osteoporosis and fractures. Under existing guidelines for osteoporosis screening, women are included but men are not, and only current smoking is considered. To demonstrate the impact of COPD and smoking history on the risk of osteoporosis and vertebral fracture in men and women. Characteristics of participants with low volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) were identified and related to COPD and other risk factors. We tested associations of sex and COPD with both vBMD and fractures adjusting for age, race, body mass index (BMI), smoking, and glucocorticoid use. vBMD by calibrated quantitative computed tomography (QCT), visually scored vertebral fractures, and severity of lung disease were determined from chest CT scans of 3,321 current and ex-smokers in the COPDGene study. Low vBMD as a surrogate for osteoporosis was calculated from young adult normal values. Male smokers had a small but significantly greater risk of low vBMD (2.5 SD below young adult mean by calibrated QCT) and more fractures than female smokers. Low vBMD was present in 58% of all subjects, was more frequent in those with worse COPD, and rose to 84% among subjects with very severe COPD. Vertebral fractures were present in 37% of all subjects and were associated with lower vBMD at each Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage of severity. Vertebral fractures were most common in the midthoracic region. COPD and especially emphysema were associated with both low vBMD and vertebral fractures after adjustment for steroid use, age, pack-years of smoking, current smoking, and exacerbations. Airway disease was associated with higher bone density after adjustment for other variables. Calibrated QCT identified more subjects with abnormal values than the standard dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in a subset of subjects and correlated well with prevalent fractures. Male smokers, with or

  7. Predictors of the Perception of Smoking Health Risks in Smokers With or Without Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, William J; Wehring, Heidi J; Burton, George; Raley, Heather; Feldman, Stephanie; Heishman, Stephen J; Kelly, Deanna L

    2017-01-01

    This study sought to examine the predictors of health risk perception in smokers with or without schizophrenia. The health risk subscale from the Smoking Consequences Questionnaire was dichotomized and used to measure health risk perception in smokers with (n = 67) and without schizophrenia (n = 100). A backward stepwise logistic regression was conducted using variables associated at the bivariate level to determine multivariate predictors. Overall, 62.5% of smokers without schizophrenia and 40.3% of smokers with schizophrenia completely recognize the health risks of smoking (p ≤ .01). Multivariate predictors for smokers without schizophrenia included: sex (Exp (B) = .3; p Smoking Consequences Questionnaire state enhancement (Exp (B) = .69; p Smoking Consequences Questionnaire craving relief (Exp (B) = 1.8; p health consequences of cigarettes may work in smokers with schizophrenia, but intervention efforts specifically tailored to smokers with schizophrenia might be more efficacious.

  8. Olfactory bulb volume in smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriever, Valentin A; Reither, Nicole; Gerber, Johannes; Iannilli, Emilia; Hummel, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    The study aimed to investigate the volume of the olfactory bulb in smokers. Specifically, we wanted to see whether environmental influences may exert a negative influence on OB structure. Twenty-one smokers and 59 non-smokers, matched for age and sex, underwent olfactory testing by means of the Sniffin' Sticks testing device (measurement of odor threshold and identification abilities). In addition, they underwent an MR scan with 2-mm-thick T2-weighted fast spin-echo images without interslice gap in the coronal plane covering the anterior and middle segments of the base of the skull. Olfactory function was not different between the 2 groups; however, olfactory bulb volumes were smaller in smokers than in non-smokers (p = 0.006). The deficit seen at the level of the OB did not correlate with the duration of smoking. The current data indicate that smoking may have a negative effect on the olfactory system before this becomes obvious in terms of a decreased olfactory function.

  9. Social Smoking among Intermittent Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, Saul; Li, Xiaoxue; Dunbar, Michael S.; Ferguson, Stuart G.; Tindle, Hilary A.; Scholl, Sarah M.

    2015-01-01

    Background “Social smoking” - smoking mostly or even only with others – may be an important pattern that implies smoking motivated extrinsically by social influences. Non-daily smokers (intermittent smokers; ITS) are often assumed to be social smokers, with some authors even assuming that all ITS are social smokers (SS+). We sought to identify and characterize social smokers in a sample of ITS. Methods 204 adult ITS (smoking 4–27 days/month) recorded the circumstances of smoking in their natural settings using Ecological Momentary Assessment, while also recording their circumstances in nonsmoking moments. SS+ were defined as ITS who were with others when they smoked most of their cigarettes, and who were ≥ 50% more likely to be with others when smoking than when not. Results Only 13% of ITS were SS+. Although defined solely on the basis of presence of others, SS+ showed a distinct pattern of smoking across multiple dimensions: Compared to other ITS (who were significantly less likely to smoke when with others), SS+ smoking was more associated with socializing, being with friends and acquaintances, drinking alcohol, weekends, evening or nighttime, being in other people’s homes, but not their own home. SS+ smoking was low in the morning and increased in the evening. SS+ smoked fewer days/week and were less dependent, but did not differ demographically. Conclusions Social smoking does constitute a highly distinct smoking pattern, but is not common among adult ITS. PMID:26205313

  10. Bronchial diverticula in smokers on thin-section CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sverzellati, Nicola; Ingegnoli, Anna [University of Parma, Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Radiology, Parma (Italy); Calabro, Elisa; Pastorino, Ugo [National Cancer Institute, Division of Thoracic Surgery, Milan (Italy); Randi, Giorgia; La Vecchia, Carlo [Mario Negri Institute, Department of Epidemiology, Milan (Italy); University of Milano, Institute of Medical Statistics and Biometry ' ' G. A. Maccacaro' ' , Milan (Italy); Marchiano, Alfonso [National Cancer Institute, Division of Radiology, Milan (Italy); Kuhnigk, Jan-Martin [Fraunhofer MEVIS - Institute for Medical Image Computing, Bremen (Germany); Hansell, David M. [Royal Brompton Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Zompatori, Maurizio [S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bologna (Italy)

    2010-01-15

    The objective was to determine the prevalence of bronchial diverticula in smokers on thin-section CT and the relationship to clinical and other morphological features on CT. Thin-section CT images of 503 cigarette smokers were assessed for the profusion and location of diverticula in the major airways. The extent of the bronchial diverticula was recorded as follows: grade 0, none; grade 1, one to three diverticula; grade 2, more than three diverticula. The extent of emphysema, bronchial wall thickness, clinical features, and pulmonary function were compared in the sub-groups stratified according to the extent of bronchial diverticula. A total of 229/503 (45.5%) smokers had bronchial diverticula, with 168/503 (33.3%) and 61/503 (12.2%) having grade 1 and 2 bronchial diverticula respectively. Subjects with grade 2 bronchial diverticula were heavier smokers, reported a history of coughing more frequently, and showed more severe functional impairment, greater extent of emphysema and more severe bronchial wall thickening compared with subjects with grade 1 and those individuals without bronchial diverticula (P<0.05). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that only bronchial wall thickness predicted the extent of the bronchial diverticula (P<0.0001). Bronchial diverticula are a frequent finding in the major airways of smokers, and they are associated with other markers of smoking-related damage. (orig.)

  11. Comparison of Bone Mineral Density Levels in Maraş Powder (Smokeless Tobacco Users and Smokers in Healthy Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül Bakan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Smoking and smokeless tobacco use are two recognized risk factors for low bone mineral density (BMD and osteoporosis. Maras powder (MP, a kind of smokeless tobacco, has a lot of addicts in the city of Kahramanmaraş and its surroundings, Turkey. This is the study investigating the effects of MP on BMD and comparing with smoking. Meterial and Methods: A total of 120 healthy male subjects (60 MP users, 60 smoker from Maras City, Turkey were included in the study. All subjects information on demographics, health history, alcohol and tobacco use and medication use were obtained by an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Subjects who had any pathology that might affect BMD, were excluded from the study. Measurements of bone mineral density were obtained by phalangeal radiographic absorptiometry of the nondominant hand. BMD values (g/cm2 of MP users were compared with those of smokers. Results: The mean duration of MP use and the mean age of MP users were 30.6±14.4 years and 64.4±9.8 years, respectively. The mean duration of smoking and the mean age of smokers were 33.7±11.0 years and 61.6±10.4 years, respectively. The mean phalangeal BMD in MP users (0.31±0.04 g/cm2 was signi cantly lower than that in the smokers (0.33±0.03 g/cm2, p=0.004. Conclusion: In MP user males, BMD is lower compared to the smoker males. If our results are supported by other studies, it may be claimed that MP use is a very strong risk factor for low BMD value compared to cigarette smoking. (Turkish Journal of Osteoporosis 2013;19: 12-6

  12. Virtual Reality Cue Reactivity Assessment: A Comparison of Treatment- vs. Nontreatment-Seeking Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordnick, Patrick S.; Yoon, Jin H.; Kaganoff, Eili; Carter, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The cue-reactivity paradigm has been widely used to assess craving among cigarette smokers. Seeking to replicate and expand on previous virtual reality (VR) nicotine cue-reactivity research on nontreatment-seeking smokers, the current study compared subjective reports of craving for cigarettes when exposed to smoking (proximal and…

  13. Effect of ammonia in cigarette tobacco on nicotine absorption in human smokers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amsterdam, van J.; Sleijffers, A.; Spiegel, van P.; Blom, R.; Witte, M.; Kassteele, van de J.; Blokland, M.H.; Steerenberg, P.; Opperhuizen, A.

    2011-01-01

    The function of ammonia as tobacco additive is subject of scientific debate. It is argued that ammonia, by increasing the proportion of free nicotine, increases the absorption of nicotine in smokers. As a result of the addition of ammonia to cigarettes, smokers get exposed to higher internal

  14. Smoked Cannabis' Psychomotor and Neurocognitive Effects in Occasional and Frequent Smokers

    OpenAIRE

    Desrosiers, Nathalie A.; Ramaekers, Johannes G.; Chauchard, Emeline; Gorelick, David A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive constituent in cannabis, impairs psychomotor performance, cognition and driving ability; thus, driving under the influence of cannabis is a public safety concern. We documented cannabis' psychomotor, neurocognitive, subjective and physiological effects in occasional and frequent smokers to investigate potential differences between these smokers. Fourteen frequent (≥4x/week) and 11 occasional (

  15. Cigarette smoking substantially alters plasma microRNA profiles in healthy subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Kei; Yokota, Shin-ichi; Tatsumi, Naoyuki; Fukami, Tatsuki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Miki, E-mail: nmiki@p.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2013-10-01

    Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) are receiving attention as potential biomarkers of various diseases, including cancers, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cardiovascular disease. However, it is unknown whether the levels of circulating miRNAs in a healthy subject might vary with external factors in daily life. In this study, we investigated whether cigarette smoking, a habit that has spread throughout the world and is a risk factor for various diseases, affects plasma miRNA profiles. We determined the profiles of 11 smokers and 7 non-smokers by TaqMan MicroRNA array analysis. A larger number of miRNAs were detected in smokers than in non-smokers, and the plasma levels of two-thirds of the detected miRNAs (43 miRNAs) were significantly higher in smokers than in non-smokers. A principal component analysis of the plasma miRNA profiles clearly separated smokers and non-smokers. Twenty-four of the miRNAs were previously reported to be potential biomarkers of disease, suggesting the possibility that smoking status might interfere with the diagnosis of disease. Interestingly, we found that quitting smoking altered the plasma miRNA profiles to resemble those of non-smokers. These results suggested that the differences in the plasma miRNA profiles between smokers and non-smokers could be attributed to cigarette smoking. In addition, we found that an acute exposure of ex-smokers to cigarette smoke (smoking one cigarette) did not cause a dramatic change in the plasma miRNA profile. In conclusion, we found that repeated cigarette smoking substantially alters the plasma miRNA profile, interfering with the diagnosis of disease or signaling potential smoking-related diseases. - Highlights: • Plasma miRNA profiles were unambiguously different between smokers and non-smokers. • Smoking status might interfere with the diagnosis of disease using plasma miRNAs. • Changes of plasma miRNA profiles may be a signal of smoking-related diseases.

  16. Computerised respiratory sounds can differentiate smokers and non-smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana; Sen, Ipek; Kahya, Yasemin P; Afreixo, Vera; Marques, Alda

    2017-06-01

    Cigarette smoking is often associated with the development of several respiratory diseases however, if diagnosed early, the changes in the lung tissue caused by smoking may be reversible. Computerised respiratory sounds have shown to be sensitive to detect changes within the lung tissue before any other measure, however it is unknown if it is able to detect changes in the lungs of healthy smokers. This study investigated the differences between computerised respiratory sounds of healthy smokers and non-smokers. Healthy smokers and non-smokers were recruited from a university campus. Respiratory sounds were recorded simultaneously at 6 chest locations (right and left anterior, lateral and posterior) using air-coupled electret microphones. Airflow (1.0-1.5 l/s) was recorded with a pneumotachograph. Breathing phases were detected using airflow signals and respiratory sounds with validated algorithms. Forty-four participants were enrolled: 18 smokers (mean age 26.2, SD = 7 years; mean FEV1 % predicted 104.7, SD = 9) and 26 non-smokers (mean age 25.9, SD = 3.7 years; mean FEV1 % predicted 96.8, SD = 20.2). Smokers presented significantly higher frequency at maximum sound intensity during inspiration [(M = 117, SD = 16.2 Hz vs. M = 106.4, SD = 21.6 Hz; t(43) = -2.62, p = 0.0081, d z  = 0.55)], lower expiratory sound intensities (maximum intensity: [(M = 48.2, SD = 3.8 dB vs. M = 50.9, SD = 3.2 dB; t(43) = 2.68, p = 0.001, d z  = -0.78)]; mean intensity: [(M = 31.2, SD = 3.6 dB vs. M = 33.7,SD = 3 dB; t(43) = 2.42, p = 0.001, d z  = 0.75)] and higher number of inspiratory crackles (median [interquartile range] 2.2 [1.7-3.7] vs. 1.5 [1.2-2.2], p = 0.081, U = 110, r = -0.41) than non-smokers. Significant differences between computerised respiratory sounds of smokers and non-smokers have been found. Changes in respiratory sounds are often the earliest sign of disease. Thus, computerised respiratory sounds might

  17. Should nonalcoholic fatty liver disease be included in the definition of metabolic syndrome? A cross-sectional comparison with Adult Treatment Panel III criteria in nonobese nondiabetic subjects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Musso, Giovanni; Gambino, Roberto; Bo, Simona; Uberti, Barbara; Biroli, Giampaolo; Pagano, Gianfranco; Cassader, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    The ability of the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) criteria of metabolic syndrome to identify insulin-resistant subjects at increased cardiovascular risk is suboptimal, especially in the absence of obesity and diabetes...

  18. [Self-medication in smoking cessation among smokers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kałucka, Sylwia

    2015-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization defines self-medication by using OTC (over-the-counter) to treatment diseases or symptoms recognized by yourself without pay a visit to the doctor's office. Increasing availability of OTC medicines cause that Poles are more and more willing to take self-medication, even when they want to smoking cessation. The aim of the study was to investigate what nicotine replacement therapy for smoking cessation without prescription were chosen by smokers, who wanted without help to smoking cessation. The study included 323 people (68.1% were men and 31.9% women). The average age of respondents was 49 +/-11 years. The average pack-years in the study group was 17. The research tool was the author's questionnaire, which was distributed among patients for self- fulfillment. Subjects were divided into three groups: group I up to 10 pack-years (average 7.5 pack-year), group II between-11-20 pack-years (average 15.5 pack-year), group III--between 21-35 pack-year (average 28.5 pack-year). All subjects, at least once in their lives, bought OTC for self-medication nicotine addiction. Among the respondents in I and II group the most often chose the nicotine replacement therapy in the form of chewing gum, and in III group Cytisine tablets and pills nicotine (pself-medication. A strong self-motivation to smoking cessation was declared by 78.3% of respondents. On the other hand, Schneider test was positive in only 5% of patients. Smokers want to own attempt to smoking cessation by using nicotine preparations without a prescription, should be aware that self-assessment of readiness to smoking cessation is not a real preparation to quit smoking addiction. All the more should consult a doctor if subsequent attempts fail.

  19. Lipid and lipoprotein profiles among middle aged male smokers: a study from southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendiran Chinnasamy

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives The objectives were to investigate into the relationship between lipid profile including Apolipoprotein-A1 (Apo-A1 and Apolipoprotein-B (Apo-B and smokers and to relate them with smoking pack years. Materials and Methods A total of 274 active male smokers without any other illnesses and age matched male healthy control subjects (78 with similar socio-cultural background were assessed for clinical details, dietary habits, physical activities, smoking and alcohol consumption. Standard methods were adopted to check the lipid levels. The data were analyzed statistically. Results Their ages ranged from 40 to 59 years, systolic BP from 110 to 130 mmHg, and diastolic BP from 76 to 88 mmHg. All of them had similar pattern of diet (vegetarianism with occasional meat. None was on any medication influences lipid level. Their physical activity was moderate. Number of pack years varied from 10 to 14 (mild, 15 to 19 (moderate and 20 and above (heavy among 69, 90 and 115 cases, whose mean ages were 43, 44 and 49 respectively. The mean (+SD values in mg/dl of total cholesterol (TC, Triglyceride (TGL, Apo-B, low density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol and Apo-A1 in mg/dl among mild/ moderate/ heavy smokers and control subjects were 198 (30.6/ 224 (27.2/ 240 (24.3 and 160 (20.4; 164(42.6/ 199 (39.5/ 223(41.7 and 124 (31.6; 119 (24.9/ 121 (27/ 127 (28.3 and 116 (21.4; 94 (19.7/ 104 (21.8/ 120 (20.5 and 82 (17.6; 42 (5.9/ 39 (3.1/ 35(4.4 and 48 (5.3; and 120 (17/ 119 (21/ 115 (25 and 126 (19, respectively. In smokers, there was a rise in TC, TGL, LDL, Apo-B and fall in HDL and Apo-A; these changes were significant (P Conclusion Number of pack years was directly proportional to abnormal lipid profile. It is also concluded that changes in Apo-A1 and Apo-B were more significant when compared to HDL and LDL cholesterol among smokers. In the view of double risk for smokers (smoking and altered lipid profile

  20. Pulmonary functions of narghile smokers compared to cigarette ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-12-30

    Dec 30, 2013 ... age (ELA) when compared to chronological-lung-age. (CLA) (18). The majority of these studies (10Á18) used limited methodology such as low sample sizes (12, 14, 17) or inclusion of mixed cigarette and narghile smokers (10) or inclusion of elderly subjects aged more than 60, who probably suffer from ...

  1. The menthol smoker: tobacco industry research on consumer sensory perception of menthol cigarettes and its role in smoking behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreslake, Jennifer M; Wayne, Geoffrey Ferris; Connolly, Gregory N

    2008-04-01

    The use of menthol in cigarettes is actively promoted by the tobacco industry for its perceived sensory benefits, and smokers of menthol cigarettes commonly differ from nonmenthol smokers in markers of smoking behavior and addiction. In this study, we analyzed internal tobacco industry documents to describe the relationships between sensory perception and the attitudes, preferences, and patterns of cigarette use among menthol smokers. Two unique types of menthol smoker emerged from this analysis: those who cannot tolerate the harshness and irritation associated with smoking nonmenthol cigarettes, and those who seek out the specific menthol flavor and associated physical sensation. Among the first segment of menthol smokers, menthol reduces negative sensory characteristics associated with smoking. This segment of smokers may include a large proportion of occasional smokers or young people, as well as smokers who have "traded down" to a less strong cigarette because of perceived harshness or negative health effects. Some established menthol smokers, on the other hand, appear to be tolerant of and even actively seek stronger sensory attributes, including higher menthol levels. Smokers of these "stronger" menthols have traditionally been disproportionately Black and male. Some beginning or occasional smokers may adopt menthols for their mild properties and to cover up the taste of tobacco, but then develop a stronger desire for the menthol taste over time. Future research measuring smoking behavior and evaluating cessation outcomes of menthol smokers should consider the duration of menthol use and differentiate smokers according to their reasons for using menthols.

  2. Prevention of urinary tract infections with vitamin D supplementation 20,000 IU per week for five years. Results from an RCT including 511 subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorde, Rolf; Sollid, Stina T; Svartberg, Johan; Joakimsen, Ragnar M; Grimnes, Guri; Hutchinson, Moira Y S

    2016-01-01

    In observational studies vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased risk of infections, whereas the effect of vitamin D supplementation in randomized controlled trials is non-conclusive. Five hundred and eleven subjects with prediabetes were randomized to vitamin D3 (20,000 IU per week) versus placebo for five years. Every sixth month, a questionnaire on respiratory tract infections (RTI) (common cold, bronchitis, influenza) and urinary tract infection (UTI) was filled in. Mean baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) level was 60 nmol/L. Two hundred and fifty-six subjects received vitamin D and 255 placebo. One hundred and sixteen subjects in the vitamin D and 111 in the placebo group completed the five-year study. Eighteen subjects in the vitamin D group and 34 subjects in the placebo group reported UTI during the study (p vitamin D on UTI was unrelated to baseline serum 25(OH)D level. Supplementation with vitamin D might prevent UTI, but confirmatory studies are needed.

  3. Systemic signs of neutrophil mobilization during clinically stable periods and during exacerbations in smokers with obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andelid K

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Kristina Andelid,1 Anders Andersson,1 Shigemi Yoshihara,2 Christina Åhrén,4 Pernilla Jirholt,3 Ann Ekberg-Jansson,1 Anders Lindén1,51Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; 2Department of Pediatrics, Dokkyo Medical University, Japan; 3Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, Institute of Medicine, 4Department of Bacteriology, Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg; 5Unit for Lung and Airway Research, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, SwedenBackground: It is still unclear whether signs of neutrophil mobilization in the blood of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease represent true systemic events and how these relate to bacterial colonization in the airways. In this study, we evaluated these issues during clinically stable periods and during exacerbations in smokers with obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic bronchitis (OPD-CB.Methods: Over a period of 60 weeks for each subject, blood samples were repeatedly collected from 60 smokers with OPD-CB during clinically stable periods, as well as during and after exacerbations. Myeloperoxidase (MPO and neutrophil elastase (NE protein and mRNA, growth of bacteria in sputum, and clinical parameters were analyzed. Ten asymptomatic smokers and ten never-smokers were included as controls.Results: We found that, during clinically stable periods, neutrophil and NE protein concentrations were increased in smokers with OPD-CB and in the asymptomatic smokers when compared with never-smokers. During exacerbations, neutrophil and MPO protein concentrations were further increased in smokers with OPD-CB, without a detectable increase in the corresponding mRNA during exacerbations. However, MPO and NE protein and mRNA displayed positive correlations. During exacerbations, only increased neutrophil

  4. Neural reward and punishment sensitivity in cigarette smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, Geoffrey F; Bloom, Erika L; Evans, David E; Drobes, David J

    2014-11-01

    Nicotine addiction remains a major public health problem but the neural substrates of addictive behavior remain unknown. One characteristic of smoking behavior is impulsive choice, selecting the immediate reward of smoking despite the potential long-term negative consequences. This suggests that drug users, including cigarette smokers, may be more sensitive to rewards and less sensitive to punishment. We used event-related potentials (ERPs) to test the hypothesis that smokers are more responsive to reward signals and less responsive to punishment, potentially predisposing them to risky behavior. We conducted two experiments, one using a reward prediction design to elicit a Medial Frontal Negativity (MFN) and one using a reward- and punishment-motivated flanker task to elicit an Error Related Negativity (ERN), ERP components thought to index activity in the cortical projection of the dopaminergic reward system. The smokers had a greater MFN response to unpredicted rewards, and non-smokers, but not smokers, had a larger ERN on punishment motivated trials indicating that smokers are more reward sensitive and less punishment sensitive than nonsmokers, overestimating the appetitive value and underestimating aversive outcomes of stimuli and actions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of end tidal carbon monoxide (eCO) levels in shisha (water pipe) and cigarette smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Saima; Ali Warraich, Usman; Rizvi, Nadeem; Idrees, Nusrat; Zaina, Fatima

    2014-01-01

    Measuring eCo is rapid, non-invasive and inexpensive tool and correlate correctly with carboxyhemoglobin levels in blood. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the increase in end tidal carbon monoxide (eCO) levels in exhaled breath of passive smokers and healthy smokers after cigarette and shisha smoking. In a cross sectional study eCO levels were measured in 70 subjects (24 cigarette smokers, 20 shisha smoker, 26 passive smokers) by use of portable device. Smokers were asked to smoke shisha for 30 mins in shisha cafe or to smoke 5 cigarettes in 30 mins in a restaurant. eCo levels were measured at baseline (30 mins), 35 mins, 60 mins and 90 mins in all groups after entry to the venue. The baseline mean eCO level among cigarette smokers was 3.5 +/- 0.6 ppm (part per million), passive cigarette smokers 3.7+/-1.0 ppm, shisha smokers 27.7+/-4.9 ppm and passive shisha smokers 18.3+/-8.4 ppm .The mean increase in eCO after 90 min among smokers was 9.4+/-4.6 (p < 0.005), passive cigarette smokers 3.5+/-2.5 (p < 0.05), shisha smokers 57.9+/-27.4 (p <0.005) and passive shisha smokers 13.3+/-4.6 (p = 0.03). Exposure to shisha smoke is a cause of elevated eCO in smokers and passive smokers and due to in-door pollution, sitting in shisha bar causes significant increase in eCO levels.

  6. INFLUENCE OF ACUTE EXERCISE ON OXIDATIVE STRESS IN CHRONIC SMOKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Serdar

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The relative oxidative insult caused by exercise and smoking on biological systems are well documented, however, their cumulative influence needs to be clarified. In order to examine the collective effects of exercise and smoking on oxidant and antioxidant parameters, young male smokers (n=10 and non-smokers (n=10 made to perform a negative slope (10% cycling exercise for 30 minutes at individual load equivalent to 60% maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max. Pre- and post-exercise (post-ex haematocrit, haemoglobin, white blood cells, plasma malondialdehyde (MDA levels, protein carbonyl formation and non-HDL oxidation, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPX activities, serum ceruloplasmin (CER and urinary cotinine concentrations were evaluated. Pre-ex CER and urinary cotinine concentrations of smokers were significantly higher (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively compared to that of non-smokers and pre-ex CER concentrations were significantly correlated with cotinine levels in all subjects (p<0.05. Significant (p<0.01 increases were observed in non-HDL oxidation following the exercise in both groups and the elevations were more pronounced in smokers. Pre-ex SOD and GPX activities were not different between the two groups, however post-ex enzyme activities were significantly reduced in smokers (p<0.05. MDA and protein carbonyl concentrations were not different between the two groups and there were not any significant changes due to exercise.In conclusion, according to the results of the present study, we suggest that erythrocyte antioxidants SOD and GPX and plasma non-HDL are more prone to the possible oxidant damage of acute physical exercise in chronic smokers.

  7. Smoker Identity Development among Adolescents who Smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, Andrew W.; Mermelstein, Robin J.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents who smoke are more likely to escalate their smoking frequency if they believe smoking is self-defining. Knowing factors that are associated with development of a smoker identity among adolescents who smoke may help to identify who will become a regular smoker. We investigated whether smoker identity development is associated with internal and external motives for smoking. For comparison, we also investigated whether social smoker identity development is associated with internal and external motives for smoking. Adolescents who smoke (n = 292) completed measures of smoker and social smoker identity, internal motives for smoking (negative affect coping, positive affect enhancement), and external motives for smoking (social fit) at baseline, 6-, 15-, and 24-month assessments of an ongoing longitudinal study of smoking patterns. We examined whether change in smoker and social smoker identity from 6 to 24 months was associated with change in motives at earlier assessment waves. We also explored whether gender moderated these relationships. Increases in negative affect coping motives were associated with smoker identity development among both males and females. Increases in social motives were associated with smoker identity development among males, and increases in negative affect coping motives were associated with social smoker identity development among females. Smoker and social smoker identities are signaled by negative affect coping as well as social motives for smoking. PMID:27136374

  8. Characteristics and outcomes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in never smokers in Denmark: a prospective population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Mette; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Vestbo, Jørgen; Lange, Peter

    2013-09-01

    A substantial proportion of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have never smoked. We tested the hypothesis that, in individuals with COPD, never smokers have different characteristics and less severe outcomes of the disease than smokers do. We included individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study, a prospective population study. We identified individuals with COPD spirometrically; that is, as the ratio between forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) under the lower limit of normal (LLN), excluding individuals with self-reported asthma. We examined general characteristics, symptoms, disease severity, and levels of inflammatory biomarkers and α1-antitrypsin at baseline. We assessed risk of lung-related hospital admissions, cardiovascular comorbidities, and all-cause mortality during a median follow-up of 4 years (IQR 2.5-5.6). Between Nov 26, 2003, and July 29, 2010, 68,501 participants from the Copenhagen General Population Study had lung function measurements and complete information on smoking habits available. Of those, we identified 6623 with COPD and no asthma. Of these, 1476 (22%) were never smokers, 2696 (41%) former smokers, and 2451 (37%) current smokers. For comparison we included 24,529 never smokers without COPD. Never smokers with COPD had different clinical characteristics, fewer symptoms, milder disease, and lower levels of inflammatory biomarkers than did current and former smokers with COPD. During follow-up, HRs for hospital admission due to COPD were 8.6 (95% CI 5.3-14) in never smokers, 30 (22-41) in former smokers, and 43 (32-59) in current smokers compared with never smokers without COPD. HRs for hospital admission due to pneumonia were 1.9 (1.4-2.6) in never smokers, 2.8 (2.3-3.4) in former smokers, and 3.4 (2.9-4.2) in current smokers. For hospital admission due to lung cancer, HRs were 11 (5.7-23) in former smokers and 18 (9.2-35) in current smokers, whereas no cases were

  9. Should nonalcoholic fatty liver disease be included in the definition of metabolic syndrome? A cross-sectional comparison with Adult Treatment Panel III criteria in nonobese nondiabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Giovanni; Gambino, Roberto; Bo, Simona; Uberti, Barbara; Biroli, Giampaolo; Pagano, Gianfranco; Cassader, Maurizio

    2008-03-01

    The ability of the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) criteria of metabolic syndrome to identify insulin-resistant subjects at increased cardiovascular risk is suboptimal, especially in the absence of obesity and diabetes. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with insulin resistance and is emerging as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. We compared the strength of the associations of ATP III criteria and of NAFLD to insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction in nonobese nondiabetic subjects. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) >2, oxidative stress (nitrotyrosine), soluble adhesion molecules (intracellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and E-selectin), and circulating adipokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha, leptin, adiponectin, and resistin) were cross-sectionally correlated to ATP III criteria and to NAFLD in 197 unselected nonobese nondiabetic subjects. NAFLD more accurately predicted insulin resistance than ATP III criteria: sensitivity 73 vs. 38% (P = 0.0001); positive predictive value: 81 vs. 62% (P = 0.035); negative predictive value 87 vs. 74% (P = 0.012); positive likelihood ratio 4.39 vs. 1.64 (P = 0.0001); and negative likelihood ratio 0.14 vs. 0.35 (P = 0.0001). Adding NAFLD to ATP III criteria significantly improved their diagnostic accuracy for insulin resistance. Furthermore, NAFLD independently predicted HOMA-IR, nitrotyrosine, and soluble adhesion molecules on logistic regression analysis; the presence of NAFLD entailed more severe oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, independent of adiposity or any feature of the metabolic syndrome in insulin-resistant subjects. NAFLD is more tightly associated with insulin resistance and with markers of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction than with ATP III criteria in nonobese nondiabetic subjects and may help identify individuals with increased cardiometabolic risk in this population.

  10. Spirometry screening for airway obstruction in asymptomatic smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisnivesky, Juan; Skloot, Gwen; Rundle, Andrew; Revenson, Tracey A; Neugut, Alfred

    2014-07-01

    Screening spirometry might help identify patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) at an earlier stage. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of airway obstruction in a cohort of asymptomatic smokers who underwent spirometry as part of a routine health maintenance examination. The study cohort consisted of a consecutive sample of 386 asymptomatic smokers (≥5 pack-years) without a history of COPD or asthma, who completed spirometry testing as part of a routine health maintenance examination. Overall, 9 study subjects (2.3%, 95% confidence interval: 1.1-4.4%) had evidence of airway obstruction on spirometry. Univariate and multiple regression analyses showed that the risk of airway obstruction was not significantly associated with age, sex, race, smoking history or past history of respiratory symptoms. Spirometry screening of asymptomatic smokers may help detect a small number of patients with airway obstruction who are at high risk for COPD.

  11. PLAUR polymorphisms and lung function in UK smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connolly Martin J

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously identified Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (PLAUR as an asthma susceptibility gene. In the current study we tested the hypothesis that PLAUR single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs determine baseline lung function and contribute to the development of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD in smokers. Methods 25 PLAUR SNPs were genotyped in COPD subjects and individuals with smoking history (n = 992. Linear regression was used to determine the effects of polymorphism on baseline lung function (FEV1, FEV1/FVC in all smokers. Genotype frequencies were compared in spirometry defined smoking controls (n = 176 versus COPD cases (n = 599 and COPD severity (GOLD stratification using logistic regression. Results Five SNPs showed a significant association (p 1 respectively. rs740587(-22346, rs11668247(-20040 and rs344779(-3666 in the 5'region were associated with increased FEV1/FVC ratio. rs740587 was also protective for COPD susceptibility and rs11668247 was protective for COPD severity although no allele dose relationship was apparent. Interestingly, several of these associations were driven by male smokers not females. Conclusion This study provides tentative evidence that the asthma associated gene PLAUR also influences baseline lung function in smokers. However the case-control analyses do not support the conclusion that PLAUR is a major COPD susceptibility gene in smokers. PLAUR is a key serine protease receptor involved in the generation of plasmin and has been implicated in airway remodelling.

  12. Including indigestible carbohydrates in the evening meal of healthy subjects improves glucose tolerance, lowers inflammatory markers, and increases satiety after a subsequent standardized breakfast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Anne C; Ostman, Elin M; Holst, Jens Juul

    2008-01-01

    tolerance and related variables after a subsequent standardized breakfast in healthy subjects (n = 15). At breakfast, blood was sampled for 3 h for analysis of blood glucose, serum insulin, serum FFA, serum triacylglycerides, plasma glucagon, plasma gastric-inhibitory peptide, plasma glucagon-like peptide-1...... (GLP-1), serum interleukin (IL)-6, serum IL-8, and plasma adiponectin. Satiety was subjectively rated after breakfast and the gastric emptying rate (GER) was determined using paracetamol as a marker. Breath hydrogen was measured as an indicator of colonic fermentation. Evening meals with barley kernel......-kernel bread compared with WWB. Breath hydrogen correlated positively with satiety (r = 0.27; P metabolic risk variables at breakfast...

  13. Effect of Abstinence on Audio-Visual Reaction Time in Chronic Smokers Pursuing a Professional Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallath, Aditya Lal; Joshi, Anuradha Rajiv; Vaidya, Savita Madhukar

    2015-12-01

    It has now been proven that tobacco abuse is the leading cause for various carcinomas such as oral, lung and oesophageal. It also leads to atherosclerosis of major vessels, development of hypertension, autoimmune disorders, COPD, bronchitis, asthma, bronchiectasis, etc. Most smokers are dependent on nicotine and abstinence from smoking results in tobacco withdrawal and craving. It also affects cognitive skills and reaction time. Many students in professional college have the habit of smoking. In spite of awareness programmes carried out in schools, colleges and having ban on smoking, prevalence of smoking is rising in India. To observe the effect of abstinence on audiovisual reaction time and to note the cause for reverting to smoking by the students pursing professional course. Sixty male volunteers in the age group of 18-25 years participated in the study. The volunteers were divided in to two groups (control group and study group). Cigarette smokers consuming at least 10-19 cigarettes per day for more than 2-3 years were included as subjects in study group. The study was conducted using a audiovisual reaction time apparatus in a quiet and bright lit room. All volunteers were subjected to baseline readings after demonstrating working of the apparatus. Auditory (high pitched and low pitched sound) and visual (red light and green light) reaction time was recorded. Thirty students in study group were subjected to these tests immediately after smoking and after 12 hours of abstinence. After all the individuals were tested, the recorded values were compared by Student's t-test. Statistically significant difference was recorded in auditory and visual reaction time in study group subjects immediately after smoking and after 12 hours of abstinence as compared to base line readings. It was observed that auditory and visual reaction time was prolonged in chronic smokers after 12 hours of abstinence.

  14. Identity change among smokers and ex-smokers: Findings from the ITC Netherlands Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Eline; van Laar, Colette; Gebhardt, Winifred A; Fokkema, Marjolein; van den Putte, Bas; Dijkstra, Arie; Fong, Geoffrey T; Willemsen, Marc C

    2017-06-01

    Successful smoking cessation appears to be facilitated by identity change, that is, when quitting or nonsmoking becomes part of smokers' and ex-smokers' self-concepts. The current longitudinal study is the first to examine how identity changes over time among smokers and ex-smokers and whether this can be predicted by socioeconomic status (SES) and psychosocial factors (i.e., attitude, perceived health damage, social norms, stigma, acceptance, self-evaluative emotions, health worries, expected social support). We examined identification with smoking (i.e., smoker self-identity) and quitting (i.e., quitter self-identity) among a large sample of smokers (n = 742) and ex-smokers (n = 201) in a cohort study with yearly measurements between 2009 and 2014. Latent growth curve modeling was used as an advanced statistical technique. As hypothesized, smokers perceived themselves more as smokers and less as quitters than do ex-smokers, and identification with smoking increased over time among smokers and decreased among ex-smokers. Furthermore, psychosocial factors predicted baseline identity and identity development. Socioeconomic status (SES) was particularly important. Specifically, lower SES smokers and lower SES ex-smokers identified more strongly with smoking, and smoker and quitter identities were more resistant to change among lower SES groups. Moreover, stronger proquitting social norms were associated with increasing quitter identities over time among smokers and ex-smokers and with decreasing smoker identities among ex-smokers. Predictors of identity differed between smokers and ex-smokers. Results suggest that SES and proquitting social norms should be taken into account when developing ways to facilitate identity change and, thereby, successful smoking cessation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Ventral Striatum Connectivity During Reward Anticipation in Adolescent Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jollans, Lee; Zhipeng, Cao; Icke, Ilknur; Greene, Ciara; Kelly, Clare; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bokde, Arun L.W.; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Cattrell, Anna; Conrod, Patricia J.; Desrivières, Sylvane; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Artiges, Eric; Nees, Frauke; Orfanos, Dimitri Papadopoulos; Paus, Tomáš; Smolka, Michael N.; Walter, Henrik; Schumann, Gunter; Whelan, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Substance misusers, including adolescent smokers, often have reduced reward system activity during processing of non-drug rewards. Using a psychophysiological interaction approach, we examined functional connectivity with the ventral striatum during reward anticipation in a large (n=206) sample of adolescent smokers. Increased smoking frequency was associated with 1) increased connectivity with regions involved in saliency and valuation, including the orbitofrontal cortex; 2) reduced connectivity between the ventral striatum and regions associated with inhibition and risk aversion, including the right inferior frontal gyrus. These results demonstrate that functional connectivity during reward processing is relevant to adolescent addiction. PMID:27074029

  16. Driver Mutations Determine Survival in Smokers and Never Smokers with Stage IIIB/IV Lung Adenocarcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Paul K.; Johnson, Melissa L.; D’Angelo, Sandra P.; Sima, Camelia S.; Ang, Daphne; Dogan, Snjezana; Miller, Vincent A.; Ladanyi, Marc; Kris, Mark G.; Riely, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously demonstrated that stage IIIB/IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) never smokers lived 50% longer than former/current smokers. This observation persisted after adjusting for age, performance status, and gender. We hypothesized that smoking-dependent differences in the distribution of driver mutations might explain differences in prognosis between these subgroups. Methods We reviewed 293 never smokers and 382 former/current smokers with lung adenocarcinoma who underwent testing for EGFR and KRAS mutations and rearrangements in ALK between 2009 and 2010. Clinical outcomes and patient characteristics were collected. Survival probabilities were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Group comparison was performed with log-rank tests and Cox proportional hazards methods. Results While the overall incidence of these mutations was nearly identical (55% never smokers vs. 57% current/former smokers, p=0.48), there were significant differences in the distribution of mutations between these groups: EGFR mutations- 37% never smokers vs. 14% former/current smokers (pnever smokers vs. 43% former/current smokers (pnever smokers vs. 2% former/current smokers (pnever smokers and former/current smokers, prognosis differed significantly by genotype. Patients harboring KRAS mutations demonstrated the poorest survival. Smoking status, however, had no influence on survival within each genotype. Conclusion Never smokers and former/current smokers with lung adenocarcinomas are not homogeneous subgroups. Each is made up of individuals whose tumors have a unique distribution of driver mutations which are associated with different prognoses, irrespective of smoking history. PMID:22605530

  17. Cancer screening behaviors among smokers and non-smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Margaret M; Davila, Evelyn P; Zhao, Wei; Parker, Dorothy; Hooper, Monica Webb; Caban-Martinez, Alberto; Dietz, Noella; Huang, Youjie; Messiah, Antoine; Lee, David J

    2010-10-01

    We explored whether smoking is associated with cancer screening behaviors. We used data from the 2007 Florida Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and the Florida Tobacco Callback Survey to examine screening behaviors related to four cancer types (breast, cervical, prostate, and colorectal). Using multiple logistic regression analyses, we examined the association between smoking status and health screening behaviors. For 10 of the 11 cancer screening variables, being a current smoker was significantly associated with being less likely to ever have been screened and also less likely to be compliant with screening guidelines. For breast and cervical cancer, level of nicotine dependence was also significantly related to compliance with screening recommendations; women with higher levels of dependence were less likely to be compliant. Our results support the notion that individuals' actions related to their health are consistent across different types of behaviors. We found that smokers were less likely to engage in cancer screening behaviors. In addition, among smokers, individuals with greater nicotine dependence had lower compliance with some screening tests. Physicians should ensure that their patients who smoke are receiving appropriate and adequate screening for cancer. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Impact of smoking on microalbuminuria and urinary albumin creatinine ratio in non-diabetic normotensive smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Smoking is associated with an excessive morbidity and mortality from a variety of diseases. The aim of this study was to find out the effects of smoking on renal function study in non-diabetic, normotensive subjects. A community-based, prospective, cross-sectional cohort study was conducted on 120 subjects; 80 (66.66% were smokers and 40 (33.33% age matched non-smokers; with age range of 30 to 70 years. Measurement of fasting sugar, urea, creatinine, lipids and one time screening of urinary albumin and urinary creatinine was done. Smokers had significantly higher urinary albumin and albumin creatinine ratio (ACR (52.84 ± 46.42 mg/L, 93.98 ± 78.68 μg/mg than non-smokers (19.25 ± 7.77 mg/L, 18.99 ± 6.65 μg/mg, respectively (P =20 mg/L and 64 (80% had increased urinary ACR (>30 μg/mg. Smoker had significantly lower high-density lipoprotein level (36.66 ± 10.28 mg/dl compared to non-smokers (41.22 ± 11.72 mg/dl (P = 0.031. Urea, creatinine, creatinine clearance, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein, triglyceride levels were comparable (p = NS. In conclusion, smokers have a 4-fold higher prevalence of microalbuminuria than non-smokers.

  19. Differences in happiness between smokers, ex-smokers and never smokers: cross-sectional findings from a national household survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahab, Lion; West, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Happiness has become established as an important psychological dimension and not merely the obverse of depression and anxiety. Ex-smokers report that they are happier than when they were smoking but this could reflect biased recall. To date, no studies have examined happiness as a function of smoking status in ex-smokers of varying length of abstinence compared with current and never smokers. A cross-sectional household study of a nationally representative sample of adults examined the association between smoking status (never smoker, smoker, ex-smokerhappiness adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics (N=6923). After adjusting for age, gender and social grade, ex-smokers of ≥ 1 year reported higher levels of happiness than smokers (phappiness among current smokers. Ex-smokers who have stopped for a year or more are happier than current smokers and similar to never smokers. Whilst these results are cross-sectional and have to be interpreted with caution, this adds to the evidence that smoking may decrease happiness and stopping may increase it. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Smokers with CT detected emphysema and no airway obstruction have decreased plasma levels of EGF, IL-15, IL-8 and IL-1ra.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan P de-Torres

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Low-grade inflammation and emphysema have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. However, the systemic inflammatory response in patients with emphysema is still unknown. OBJECTIVE: TO COMPARE THE PLASMA CYTOKINE PROFILES IN TWO GROUPS OF CURRENT OR FORMER SMOKERS WITHOUT AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION: a control group of individuals without computed tomography (CT detected emphysema vs. a study group of individuals with CT detected emphysema. METHODS: Subjects underwent a chest CT, spirometry, and determination of EGF, IL-15, IL-1ra, IL-8, MCP-1, MIP-1β, TGFα, TNFα, and VEGF levels in plasma. Cytokine levels in each group were compared adjusting for confounding factors. RESULTS: 160 current smokers and former smokers without airway obstruction participated in the study: 80 without emphysema and 80 subjects with emphysema. Adjusted group comparisons revealed significant reductions in EGF (-0.317, p = 0.01, IL-15 (-0.21, p = 0.01, IL-8 (-0.180, p = 0.02 and IL-1ra (-0.220, p = 0.03 in subjects with emphysema and normal spirometry. CONCLUSIONS: Current or former smokers expressing a well-defined disease characteristic such as emphysema, has a specific plasma cytokine profile. This includes a decrease of cytokines mainly implicated in activation of apoptosis or decrease of immunosurveillance. This information should be taken into account when evaluated patients with tobacco respiratory diseases.

  1. Including indigestible carbohydrates in the evening meal of healthy subjects improves glucose tolerance, lowers inflammatory markers, and increases satiety after a subsequent standardized breakfast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Anne C; Ostman, Elin M; Holst, Jens J; Björck, Inger M E

    2008-04-01

    Low-glycemic index (GI) foods and foods rich in whole grain are associated with reduced risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We studied the effect of cereal-based bread evening meals (50 g available starch), varying in GI and content of indigestible carbohydrates, on glucose tolerance and related variables after a subsequent standardized breakfast in healthy subjects (n = 15). At breakfast, blood was sampled for 3 h for analysis of blood glucose, serum insulin, serum FFA, serum triacylglycerides, plasma glucagon, plasma gastric-inhibitory peptide, plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), serum interleukin (IL)-6, serum IL-8, and plasma adiponectin. Satiety was subjectively rated after breakfast and the gastric emptying rate (GER) was determined using paracetamol as a marker. Breath hydrogen was measured as an indicator of colonic fermentation. Evening meals with barley kernel based bread (ordinary, high-amylose- or beta-glucan-rich genotypes) or an evening meal with white wheat flour bread (WWB) enriched with a mixture of barley fiber and resistant starch improved glucose tolerance at the subsequent breakfast compared with unsupplemented WWB (P carbohydrates of the evening meal may affect glycemic excursions and related metabolic risk variables at breakfast through a mechanism involving colonic fermentation. The results provide evidence for a link between gut microbial metabolism and key factors associated with insulin resistance.

  2. Effects of wages on smoking decisions of current and past smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Leigh, J Paul

    2015-08-01

    We used longitudinal data and instrumental variables (IVs) in a prospective design to test for the causal effects of wages on smoking prevalence among current and past smokers. Nationally representative U.S. data were drawn from the 1999-2009 waves of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Our overall sample was restricted to full time employed persons, aged 21-65 years. We excluded part time workers and youths because smoking and wage correlations would be complicated by labor supply decisions. We excluded adult never smokers because people rarely begin smoking after the age of 20 years. IVs were created with state-level minimum wages and unionization rates. We analyzed subsamples of men, women, the less educated, the more educated, quitters, and backsliders. Validity and strength of instruments within the IV analysis were conducted with the Sargan-Hansen J statistic and F tests. We found some evidence that low wages lead to more smoking in the overall sample and substantial evidence for men, persons with high school educations or less (wages lead to 5.5 and 4.6 percentage point decreases in smoking for men and the less educated; they also increased the average chance of quitting among base-year smokers from 17.0% to 20.4%. Statistical tests suggested that IVs were strong and valid in most samples. Subjects' other family income, including spouses' wages, was entered as a control variable. Increases in an individual's wages, independent of other income, decreased the prevalence of smoking among current and past smokers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Postprandial effects of test meals including concentrated arabinoxylan and whole grain rye in subjects with the metabolic syndrome: a randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartvigsen, M L; Lærke, H N; Overgaard, A; Holst, J J; Bach Knudsen, K E; Hermansen, K

    2014-05-01

    Prospective studies have shown an inverse relationship between whole grain consumption and the risk of type 2 diabetes, where short chain fatty acids (SCFA) may be involved. Our objective was to determine the effect of isolated arabinoxylan alone or in combination with whole grain rye kernels on postprandial glucose, insulin, free fatty acids (FFA), gut hormones, SCFA and appetite in subjects with the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Fifteen subjects with MetS participated in this acute, randomised, cross-over study. The test meals each providing 50 g of digestible carbohydrate were as follows: semolina porridge added concentrated arabinoxylan (AX), rye kernels (RK) or concentrated arabinoxylan combined with rye kernels (AXRK) and semolina porridge as control (SE). A standard lunch was served 4 h after the test meals. Blood samples were drawn during a 6-h period, and appetite scores and breath hydrogen were assessed every 30 min. The AXRK meal reduced the acute glucose (P=0.005) and insulin responses (P<0.001) and the feeling of hunger (P=0.005; 0-360 min) compared with the control meal. The AX and AXRK meals increased butyrate and acetate concentrations after 6 h. No significant differences were found for the second meal responses of glucose, insulin, FFA, glucagon-like peptide-1 or ghrelin. Our results indicate a stimulatory effect of arabinoxylan on butyrate and acetate production, however, with no detectable effect on the second meal glucose response. It remains to be tested in a long-term study if a beneficial effect on the glucose response of the isolated arabinoxylan will be related to the SCFA production.

  4. Laryngeal findings and acoustic changes in hubble-bubble smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Abdul-latif; Sibai, Abla; Oubari, Dima; Ashkar, Jihad; Fuleihan, Nabil

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of our investigation was to evaluate the laryngeal findings and acoustic changes in hubble-bubble smokers. A total of 42 subjects with history of hubble-bubble smoking were recruited for this study. A corresponding group with a history of cigarette smoking and controls were matched. All subjects underwent laryngeal video-endostroboscopic evaluation and acoustic analysis. In the hubble-bubble smoking group, 61.9% were males. The average age was 30.02 +/- 9.48 years and the average number of years of smoking was 8.09 +/- 6.45 years. Three subjects had dysphonia at the time of examination. The incidence of benign lesions of the vocal folds in the hubble-bubble group was 21.5%, with edema being the most common at 16.7% followed by cyst at 4.8%. The incidence of laryngeal findings was significantly higher in the hubble-bubble group compared to controls. In the cigarette-smoking group, the most common finding was vocal fold cyst in 14.8% followed by polyps in 7.4%, and edema, sulcus vocalis and granuloma. These findings were not significantly different from the hubble-bubble group except for the thick mucus, which was significantly higher in the latter. There were no significant changes in any of the acoustic parameters between hubble-bubble smokers and controls except for the VTI and MPT, which were significantly lower in the hubble-bubble group. In comparison with the cigarette-smoking group, hubble-bubble smokers had significantly higher Fundamental frequency and habitual pitch (p value 0.042 and 0.008, respectively). The laryngeal findings in hubble-bubble smokers are comparable to cigarette smokers. These laryngeal findings are not translated acoustically, as all the acoustic parameters are within normal range compared to controls.

  5. Leukokeratosis nicotina glossi-smokers' tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farman, A G; Van Wyk, C W

    1977-12-01

    "Leukokeratosis nicotina glossi" or "smokers' tongue" is a homogeneous leukoplakia with evenly distributed pin-point hemispherical depressions. Histologically, there is a loss of glossal papillae, hyperkeratosis, acanthosis and the formation of large drop-shaped rete pegs with central clefting and occasional parakeratotic plugging. Mitotic activity and atypia are not marked and there is no evidence of Candida species infection. In some respects the lesion histologically resembles verrucous carcinoma but, unlike that condition, papillomatosis is not clinically noticeable and an invasive "leading edge" is not apparent. All but one of the subjects in which the lesion was seen were men, all had concurrent leukokeratosis nicotina palati and two gave histories of laryngeal carcinoma.

  6. Comparison of Bone Mineral Density Levels in Maraş Powder (Smokeless Tobacco) Users and Smokers in Healthy Men

    OpenAIRE

    Betül Bakan; Mustafa Haki Sucaklı; Fuat Özkan; Ökkeş Bilal

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Smoking and smokeless tobacco use are two recognized risk factors for low bone mineral density (BMD) and osteoporosis. Maras powder (MP), a kind of smokeless tobacco, has a lot of addicts in the city of Kahramanmaraş and its surroundings, Turkey. This is the study investigating the effects of MP on BMD and comparing with smoking. Meterial and Methods: A total of 120 healthy male subjects (60 MP users, 60 smoker) from Maras City, Turkey were included in the study. All subjects...

  7. Expiratory CT in cigarette smokers: correlation between areas of decreased lung attenuation, pulmonary function tests and smoking history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verschakelen, J.A.; Scheinbaum, K.; Bogaert, J.; Baert, A.L. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Demedts, M.; Lacquet, L.L. [Department of Pneumology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium)

    1998-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between cigarette-smoke-related bronchial disease and air trapping as assessed by expiratory high-resolution CT (HRCT) scans. Thirty healthy subjects (11 non-smokers, 7 ex-smokers for > 2 years, 12 current smokers; age range 35-55 years) with a smoking history between 0 and 28.5 pack-years underwent pulmonary function tests (PFT) and HRCT in inspiration and expiration in supine and prone position. The extent of air trapping was scored in ventral and dorsal aspects of the upper, middle and lower lung portions. In 24 subjects (7 non-smokers, 7 ex-smokers, 10 current smokers) areas of focal air trapping were found, and were present significantly more often in dependent lung portions (p < 0.05) compared with non-dependent portions. No significant differences were found between apical and basal lung zones. Scores of focal air trapping were not significantly different between smokers and ex-smokers, but were significantly lower (p < 0.05) in non-smokers and showed a significant (p < 0.0005) correlation with pack-years. The degree of air trapping was also associated with several lung function tests, especially RV, DLCO, FRC, FEV1 and FEV1/VC. Air trapping is seen in smokers with normal PFT and correlates with the severity of the smoking history, independently of current smoking status. (orig.) (orig.) With 4 figs., 4 tabs., 59 refs.

  8. Crossing the smoking divide for young adults: expressions of stigma and identity among smokers and nonsmokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCool, Judith; Hoek, Janet; Edwards, Richard; Thomson, George; Gifford, Heather

    2013-02-01

    Denormalizing campaigns reframe smoking as an unappealing behavior, more likely to lead to social exclusion than inclusion. Social identity theory suggests this strategy will reinforce smoke-free norms and, as these become mainstream, decrease smoking prevalence. However, little is known about how these campaigns affect perceptions of smoking among young adult smokers and nonsmokers, or behavior toward smokers. A qualitative study was conducted to a) explore how smokers and smoking were perceived in an environment where smoking has become an increasingly unacceptable social behavior and b) examine whether and how this environment stigmatized smokers. About 14 group discussions and 4 in-depth interviews involving 86 participants, aged between 18 and 24 and of Māori, Pacific, and NZ European ethnicities, were conducted as part of a wider study examining young adults' responses to tobacco branding and plain packaging. The themes identified illustrated how nonsmokers' perception of smoking as illogical and self-destructive supported harsh reactions, including stigmatizing behaviors that antagonized smokers. Nonsmokers, who recognized smoking's addictiveness, were more empathic and less judgmental of smokers. Including empathic content in smoking denormalizing campaigns may reduce judgmental reactions that inadvertently create a gulf between status of young adult smokers and nonsmokers. A supportive/empathic tobacco-control denormalization approach could enhance young adult smokers' willingness to make the transition from smoker to smoke free and elicit stronger support for their efforts from nonsmokers.

  9. Changes in Biomarkers of Exposure and Subjective Effects When Smokers Switch to Dual Use of Cigarettes and Either Snus or a Dissolvable Tobacco Product: A Summary of Three Clinical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Round Elaine K.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Une série d'études cliniques ambulatoires furent menées en vue d'évaluer les variations des biomarqueurs d'exposition au tabac et de l'appréciation subjective des produits lorsque des fumeurs adultes passent à une consommation combinée composée de cigarettes associées à des bandelettes Camel (bandelettes, des bâtonnets Camel (bâtonnets ou du tabac à sucer Camel (tabac à sucer. Dans toutes les études, les sujets furent invités à fumer ad libitum durant une semaine (période de référence. Ensuite, ils reçurent pour instruction de réduire progressivement, durant les trois semaines suivantes, leur consommation journalière de cigarettes (CJC d'au-moins 75% et d'inclure la consommation d'un type de produit de tabac sans fumée (PTSF. Les données relatives à la consommation des produits furent consignées chaque jour par les sujets, des questionnaires furent remplis, les filtres des cigarettes fumées ainsi que les pochettes usagées de tabac à sucer furent récoltés chaque semaine et des échantillons d'urine furent prélevés toutes les 24 heures durant la période de référence ainsi qu'à la fin de la période de consommation combinée en vue de mesurer les biomarqueurs d'exposition au tabac. Au total, 100 sujets furent inclus et 88 menèrent les études à terme. A la fin de la période de consommation combinée, des réductions moyennes de la CJC avoisinant 60% furent observées dans toutes les études. Les valeurs médianes des biomarqueurs que sont la cétone de nitrosamine dérivée de la nicotine (4- (méthylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone et l'acroléine ne présentèrent soit aucun changement statistiquement significatif soit des diminutions statistiquement significatives, toutes études confondues. Les biomarqueurs de la nicotine dans le sang et dans l'urine ne présentèrent aucune modification significative. Vingt-cinq biomarqueurs furent exclusivement mesurés lors de l'étude portant sur le tabac à sucer

  10. A preliminary experimental investigation of peer influence on risk-taking among adolescent smokers and non-smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalca, Eleonora; Kong, Grace; Liss, Thomas; Reynolds, Elizabeth K; Schepis, Ty S; Lejuez, C W; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra

    2013-04-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that peer influence plays a significant role in a variety of adolescent risk-taking behaviors, including tobacco use. We attempted to establish this relationship in a controlled laboratory setting. We modified the Balloon Analog Risk Task (BART) task to include a peer component to investigate whether peer influences alter risk-taking behaviors. Thirty-nine adolescents (22 smokers, 17 non-smokers) completed one experimental session during which the standard and peer BART were presented in counterbalanced order, with the dependent measures being adjusted mean number of pumps and explosions. We also examined the relationship of changes in the BART (standard-peer) to personality measures of impulsivity (BIS-11) and resistance to peer influence (RPI). A significant interaction of BART type and smoking status was present (p=.05); specifically smokers had a greater increase in the number of explosions by 2.27 (SD=3.12) compared to an increase of .29 (SD=2.87) by non-smokers. BIS-11 scores were related to peer-influenced BART changes: those who were more impulsive experienced greater changes in risk-taking, but no similar relationships were observed for the RPI. These results suggest that peer influences enhance risk-taking among adolescents, and that smokers may be more susceptible to these influences. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Different Resting-State Functional Connectivity Alterations in Smokers and Nonsmokers with Internet Gaming Addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated changes in resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC of posterior cingulate cortex (PCC in smokers and nonsmokers with Internet gaming addiction (IGA. Twenty-nine smokers with IGA, 22 nonsmokers with IGA, and 30 healthy controls (HC group underwent a resting-state fMRI scan. PCC connectivity was determined in all subjects by investigating synchronized low-frequency fMRI signal fluctuations using a temporal correlation method. Compared with the nonsmokers with IGA, the smokers with IGA exhibited decreased rsFC with PCC in the right rectus gyrus. Left middle frontal gyrus exhibited increased rsFC. The PCC connectivity with the right rectus gyrus was found to be negatively correlated with the CIAS scores in the smokers with IGA before correction. Our results suggested that smokers with IGA had functional changes in brain areas related to motivation and executive function compared with the nonsmokers with IGA.

  12. Small Ubiquitin-Like Modifier 4 (SUMO4 Gene M55V Polymorphism and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-analysis Including 6,823 Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-yan Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMany studies suggest that the small ubiquitin-like modifier 4 (SUMO4 M55V gene polymorphism (rs237025 may be associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. However, due to other conflicting results, a clear consensus is lacking in the matter.Objective and methodsA meta-analysis consisting of 6,823 subjects from 10 studies was conducted to elucidate relationship between the SUMO4 M55V gene polymorphism and T2DM. Depending on the heterogeneity of the data, either a fixed or random-effects model would be used to assess the combined odds ratio (ORs and their corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI.ResultsSUMO4 gene M55V polymorphism was significantly associated with T2DM in the whole population under allelic (OR: 1.18, 95% CI: 1.10–1.28, P = 1.63 × 10−5, recessive (OR: 1.59, 95% CI: 1.14–2.23, P = 0.006, dominant (OR: 0.815, 95% CI: 0.737–0.901, P = 6.89 × 10−5, homozygous (OR: 1.415, 95% CI: 1.170–1.710, P = 0.0003, heterozygous (OR: 1.191, 95% CI: 1.072–1.323, P = 0.001, and additive genetic models (OR: 1.184, 95% CI: 1.097–1.279, P = 1.63 × 10−5. In our subgroup analysis, a significant association was found again in the Chinese population, but not in Japanese or Iranian population.ConclusionSUMO4 gene M55V polymorphism may correlate with increased T2DM risk. Chinese carriers of the V allele of the SUMO4 gene M55V polymorphism may be predisposed to developing T2DM.

  13. Non-small cell lung cancer in never smokers: a clinical entity to be identified

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Ilka Lopes; Ramos, Roberta Pulcheri; Franceschini, Juliana; Jamnik, Sergio; Fernandes, Ana Luisa Godoy

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: It has been recognized that patients with non-small cell lung cancer who are lifelong never-smokers constitute a distinct clinical entity. The aim of this study was to assess clinical risk factors for survival among never-smokers with non-small cell lung cancer. METHODS: All consecutive non-small cell lung cancer patients diagnosed (n = 285) between May 2005 and May 2009 were included. The clinical characteristics of never-smokers and ever-smokers (former and current) were compared using chi-squared or Student's t tests. Survival curves were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and log-rank tests were used for survival comparisons. A Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was evaluated by adjusting for age (continuous variable), gender (female vs. male), smoking status (never- vs. ever-smoker), the Karnofsky Performance Status Scale (continuous variable), histological type (adenocarcinoma vs. non-adenocarcinoma), AJCC staging (early vs. advanced staging), and treatment (chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy vs. the best treatment support). RESULTS: Of the 285 non-small cell lung cancer patients, 56 patients were never-smokers. Univariate analyses indicated that the never-smoker patients were more likely to be female (68% vs. 32%) and have adenocarcinoma (70% vs. 51%). Overall median survival was 15.7 months (95% CI: 13.2 to 18.2). The never-smoker patients had a better survival rate than their counterpart, the ever-smokers. Never-smoker status, higher Karnofsky Performance Status, early staging, and treatment were independent and favorable prognostic factors for survival after adjusting for age, gender, and adenocarcinoma in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Epidemiological differences exist between never- and ever-smokers with lung cancer. Overall survival among never-smokers was found to be higher and independent of gender and histological type. PMID:22086516

  14. Cell recovery in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in smokers is dependent on cumulative smoking history.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Karimi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Smoking is a risk factor for various lung diseases in which BAL may be used as a part of a clinical investigation. Interpretation of BAL fluid cellularity is however difficult due to high variability, in particular among smokers. In this study we aimed to evaluate the effect of smoking on BAL cellular components in asymptomatic smokers. The effects of smoking cessation, age and gender were also investigated in groups of smokers and exsmokers. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of BAL findings, to our knowledge the largest single center investigation, in our department from 1999 to 2009. One hundred thirty two current smokers (48 males and 84 females and 44 ex-smokers (16 males and 28 females were included. A group of 295 (132 males and 163 females never-smokers served as reference. RESULT: The median [5-95 pctl] total number of cells and cell concentration in current smokers were 63.4 [28.6-132.1]×10(6 and 382.1 [189.7-864.3]×10(6/L respectively and correlated positively to the cumulative smoking history. Macrophages were the predominant cell type (96.7% [90.4-99.0] followed by lymphocytes (2% [0.8-7.7] and neutrophils (0.6% [0-2.9]. The concentration of all inflammatory cells was increased in smokers compared to never smokers and ex-smokers. BAL fluid recovery was negatively correlated with age (p<0.001. Smoking men had a lower BAL fluid recovery than smoking women. CONCLUSION: Smoking has a profound effect on BAL fluid cellularity, which is dependent on smoking history. Our results performed on a large group of current smokers and ex-smokers in a well standardized way, can contribute to better interpretation of BAL fluid cellularity in clinical context.

  15. Water-pipe (narguile) smokers in Lebanon: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waked, M; Salameh, P; Aoun, Z

    2009-01-01

    We carried out a comparative study to assess the demographic and social characteristics of water pipe (WP) smokers, the association with cigarette smoking and chronic respiratory diseases and the dependence profile on 4 groups: exclusive WP smokers, exclusive cigarette smokers, mixed smokers and absolute non-smokers. Cigarette smoking was statistically significantly higher in WP smokers than non-WP smokers; 36.5% of exclusive WP smokers smoked > or =7 WPs/week. Chronic respiratory disease and chronic bronchitis were reported more frequently in exclusive WP smokers than absolute non-smokers. WP smoking seems to be as great a risk factor as cigarette smoking for chronic respiratory disease.

  16. Autoreactivity to glucose regulated protein 78 links emphysema and osteoporosis in smokers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Bon

    Full Text Available Emphysema and osteoporosis are epidemiologically associated diseases of cigarette smokers. The causal mechanism(s linking these illnesses is unknown. We hypothesized autoimmune responses may be involved in both disorders.To discover an antigen-specific autoimmune response associated with both emphysema and osteoporosis among smokers.Replicate nonbiased discovery assays indicated that autoimmunity to glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78, an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone and cell surface signaling receptor, is present in many smokers. Subject assessments included spirometry, chest CT scans, dual x-ray absorptiometry, and immunoblots for anti-GRP78 IgG. Anti-GRP78 autoantibodies were isolated from patient plasma by affinity chromatography, leukocyte functions assessed by flow cytometry, and soluble metabolites and mediators measured by immunoassays.Circulating anti-GRP78 IgG autoantibodies were detected in plasma specimens from 86 (32% of the 265 smoking subjects. Anti-GRP78 autoantibodies were singularly prevalent among subjects with radiographic emphysema (OR 3.1, 95%CI 1.7-5.7, p = 0.003. Anti-GRP78 autoantibodies were also associated with osteoporosis (OR 4.7, 95%CI 1.7-13.3, p = 0.002, and increased circulating bone metabolites (p = 0.006. Among emphysematous subjects, GRP78 protein was an autoantigen of CD4 T-cells, stimulating lymphocyte proliferation (p = 0.0002 and IFN-gamma production (p = 0.03. Patient-derived anti-GRP78 autoantibodies had avidities for osteoclasts and macrophages, and increased macrophage NFkB phosphorylation (p = 0.005 and productions of IL-8, CCL-2, and MMP9 (p = 0.005, 0.007, 0.03, respectively.Humoral and cellular GRP78 autoimmune responses in smokers have numerous biologically-relevant pro-inflammatory and other deleterious actions, and are associated with emphysema and osteoporosis. These findings may have relevance for the pathogenesis of smoking-associated diseases, and development

  17. The human placenta from heavy smokers: evaluation of vasoactive peptides by immunohistochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, H V; Larsen, L Grupe; Jørgensen, A

    2007-01-01

    from pregnancies from otherwise healthy women smoking 15 or more cigarettes per day (heavy smokers) and term placentas from a matching group of non-smokers were included. The antibodies for Et-1 and e-NOS are recommended for cryostat sections. We evaluated the antibodies on paraffin-embedded tissue...

  18. Targeting hardcore smokers : The effects of an online tailored intervention, based on motivational interviewing techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bommelé, J.; Schoenmakers, T.M.; Kleinjan, M.; Peters, G.J.Y.; Dijkstra, A.; van de Mheen, H.

    Hardcore smokers have smoked for many years and do not intend to quit. They also seem unreceptive to information about smoking cessation. We developed a 30-min, tailored web-based intervention that includes motivational interviewing principles. It aims to increase hardcore smokers' intention to quit

  19. Neural activity related to the processing of increasing monetary reward in smokers and nonsmokers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin-Soelch, C; Missimer, J; Leenders, KL; Schultz, W

    This study investigated the processing of increasing monetary reward in nonsmoking and smoking subjects. The choice of the subject populations has been motivated by the observation of differences between nonsmokers and smokers in response to rewarding stimuli in a previous study. Subjects performed

  20. BMI change is associated with fracture incidence, but only in non-smokers. The Tromsø Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsgaard, T; Jacobsen, B K; Ahmed, L A; Joakimsen, R M; Størmer, J; Jørgensen, L

    2011-04-01

    Few studies have examined the association between body mass index (BMI) change and fracture in a general population. We observed that BMI loss was associated with increased fracture risk in non-smoking men and women, but not in smokers. BMI gain was associated with decreased fracture risk in women. Weight loss has been associated with increased fracture risk, but few studies have included men. The aim of this study was to examine the association between BMI change and fracture risk in both genders. A population-based cohort study in Tromsø, Norway, of adults, aged 20 to 54 years in 1979, who participated in two or three health surveys in 1979-1980, 1986-1987, and 1994-1995. Weight and height were measured at each survey. Information about lifestyle was obtained by questionnaires. Poisson regression was used to estimate incidence rates and Cox proportional hazards regression model to assess the association between fracture risk and BMI change. Fractional polynomials were used to accommodate non-linear associations. A total of 5,549 men and 5,428 women participated. There were 1,135 fractures during 10 years of follow-up. Reduction in BMI was associated with increased non-vertebral fracture risk in non-smokers, but not in smokers. The hazard ratio in male and female non-smokers per 10-year BMI decrease of 2 kg/m(2) versus a BMI increase of 1 kg/m(2) was 1.79 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.17-2.75) and 1.60 (95% CI, 1.28-1.99), respectively. The association was not significantly modified by initial BMI or age or by exclusion of subjects with cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, or cancer. In female non-smokers, weight gain was inversely associated with fracture risk. In a general Norwegian population, reduction in BMI was significantly associated with increased fracture risk in male and female non-smokers, but not in smokers. These findings could not be explained by preexisting disease.

  1. Serum Cotinine Levels and Prehypertension in Never Smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omayma Alshaarawy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Few studies have shown that self-reported secondhand smoke exposure in never smokers is associated with high blood pressure. However, there are no studies investigating the relationship between secondhand smoke exposure, measured objectively by serum cotinine levels, and high blood pressure in never smokers. Methods. We examined never smokers (n=2027 from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005–2008. Our exposure of interest was the secondhand smoke exposure estimated by serum cotinine level and our outcome was prehypertension (n=734, defined as a systolic blood pressure of 120–139 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure of 80–89 mmHg. Results. We found that, in never smokers, serum cotinine levels were positively associated with prehypertension. Compared to those with cotinine levels in the lowest quartile (≤0.024 ng/mL, the multivariable odds ratio (95% confidence interval of prehypertension among those with cotinine levels in the highest quartile (≥0.224 ng/mL was 1.45(1.00, 2.11; P trend =0.0451. In subsequent subgroup analyses, the positive association was found to be stronger among men, non-Whites, and non-obese subjects. Conclusion. Higher secondhand smoke exposure measured objectively by serum cotinine levels was found to be associated with prehypertension in certain subgroups of a representative sample of the US population.

  2. Smokers' hair: Does smoking cause premature hair graying?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayed, Ayman A; Shahait, Awni D; Ayoub, Musa N; Yousef, Al-Motassem

    2013-04-01

    To determine if there is a significant association between premature hair graying and cigarette smoking. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted in a nonclinical setting on 207 participants on August 24 until 25, 2010. Participants were classified into two groups [premature hair graying (PHG) and normal hair graying]. PHG was defined as the first appearance of gray hair before the age of 30. Data were collected using an interview questionnaire and measurements of body mass index, waist circumference, fasting blood glucose and blood pressure. Collected data were statistically analyzed using SPSS 16, Chicago, IL. Of the 207 subjects, 104 (50.2%) had first appearance of gray hair before the age of 30 (PHG group) while the other 103 (49.8%) were considered normal hair graying group. The prevalence of smokers in the "PHG" group was higher (40.2% vs. 24.7%, P = 0.031). Smokers had earlier onset of hair graying (smokers: 31 (7.4) vs. nonsmokers: 34 (8.6), P = 0.034). Using multiple logistic regression with conditional likelihood, smokers were two and half times (95% CI: 1.5-4.6) more prone to develop PHG. This study suggests that there is a significant relation (with adjusted odds ratio of two and half) between onset of gray hair before the age of 30 and cigarette smoking.

  3. Pulmonary ventilation defects in older never-smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Khadija; Paulin, Gregory A; Svenningsen, Sarah; Kirby, Miranda; Paterson, Nigel A M; McCormack, David G; Parraga, Grace

    2014-08-01

    Hyperpolarized (3)He MRI previously revealed spatially persistent ventilation defects in healthy, older compared with healthy, younger never-smokers. To understand better the physiological consequences and potential relevance of (3)He MRI ventilation defects, we evaluated (3)He-MRI ventilation-defect percent (VDP) and the effect of deep inspiration (DI) and salbutamol on VDP in older never-smokers. To identify the potential determinants of ventilation defects in these subjects, we evaluated dyspnea, pulmonary function, and cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) measurements, as well as occupational and second-hand smoke exposure. Fifty-two never-smokers (71 ± 6 yr) with no history of chronic respiratory disease were evaluated. During a single visit, pulmonary function tests, CPET, and (3)He MRI were performed and the Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease questionnaire administered. For eight of 52 subjects, there was spirometry evidence of airflow limitation (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease-Unclassified, I, and II), and occupational exposure was reported in 13 of 52 subjects. In 13 of 52 (25%) subjects, there were no ventilation defects and in 39 of 52 (75%) subjects, ventilation defects were observed. For those subjects with ventilation defects, six of 39 showed a VDP response to DI/salbutamol. Ventilation heterogeneity and VDP were significantly greater, and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1)/forced vital capacity was significantly lower (P ventilation defects with a response to DI/salbutamol than subjects with ventilation defects without a response to DI/salbutamol and subjects without ventilation defects. In a step-wise, forward multivariate model, FEV1, inspiratory capacity, and airway resistance significantly predicted VDP (R(2) = 0.45, P ventilation defects not reversed by DI/salbutamol; such ventilation defects were likely related to irreversible airway narrowing/collapse but not to dyspnea and decreased exercise capacity. Copyright

  4. Effects of tiotropium on lung function in current smokers and never smokers with bronchial asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Makoto; Kaneko, Yasuko; Ishimatsu, Akiko; Komori, Masashi; Iwanaga, Tomoaki; Inoue, Hiromasa

    2017-02-01

    The effects of tiotropium, an inhaled long-acting muscarinic antagonist, on lung function were investigated in current smokers and nonsmokers with asthma treated with inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) and other asthma controllers: inhaled long-acting β2 agonists, leukotriene receptor antagonists, and/or theophylline. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of an inhaled single dose of tiotropium in 9 asthmatics currently smoking and 9 asthmatics who have never smoked in a crossover manner. Lung function was measured before and 1, 3, and 24 h after inhalation of 18 μg of tiotropium or a placebo. The primary outcome was a change in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) from the baseline, and the secondary outcomes were changes in peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), V˙50, and V˙25. At baseline, asthmatics with and without a smoking history had a mean FEV1 of 2590 ml and 2220 ml and were taking a mean dose of ICSs of 1208 and 1000 μg/day, respectively. The increase from the baseline FEV1 was 169 ml and 105 ml higher at 3 h after tiotropium than after the placebo in current smokers and nonsmokers, respectively. PEFR, V˙50, and V˙25 were also significantly increased after tiotropium as compared with the placebo in both study groups. Changes in FEV1 and PEFR tended to be greater in asthmatics currently smoking than in subjects who have never smoked, although there were no statistical differences at any time points. Tiotropium resulted in improved lung function and symptoms both in current smoker and nonsmoker asthmatics. These findings suggest that tiotropium will provide a new strategy for the treatment of bronchial asthma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The perceived risks and benefits of quitting in smokers diagnosed with severe mental illness participating in a smoking cessation intervention: gender differences and comparison to smokers without mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filia, Sacha L; Baker, Amanda L; Gurvich, Caroline T; Richmond, Robyn; Kulkarni, Jayashri

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the perceived risks and benefits of quitting in smokers diagnosed with psychosis, including potential gender differences and comparisons to smokers in the general population. Data were collected from 200 people diagnosed with psychosis participating in a randomised controlled trial testing the effectiveness of a multi-component intervention for smoking cessation and cardiovascular disease risk reduction in people with severe mental illness. Results were compared with both treatment and non-treatment seeking smokers in the general population. Male and female smokers with psychosis generally had similar perceived risks and benefits of quitting. Females rated it significantly more likely that they would experience weight gain and negative affect upon quitting than males diagnosed with psychosis. Compared with smokers in the general population also seeking smoking cessation treatment, this sample of smokers with psychosis demonstrated fewer gender differences and lower ratings of perceived risks and benefits of quitting. The pattern of risk and benefit ratings in smokers diagnosed with psychosis was similar to those of non-treatment seeking smokers in the general population. These results increase our understanding of smoking in people with severe mental illness, and can directly inform smoking interventions to maximise successful abstinence for this group of smokers. For female smokers with psychosis, smoking cessation interventions need to address concerns regarding weight gain and negative affect. Intervention strategies aimed at enhancing beliefs about the benefits of quitting smoking for both male and female smokers with psychosis are necessary. © 2013 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  6. Influence of air pollution on exhaled carbon monoxide levels in smokers and non-smokers. A prospective cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maga, Mikołaj; Janik, Maciej K; Wachsmann, Agnieszka; Chrząstek-Janik, Olga; Koziej, Mateusz; Bajkowski, Mateusz; Maga, Paweł; Tyrak, Katarzyna; Wójcik, Krzysztof; Gregorczyk-Maga, Iwona; Niżankowski, Rafał

    2017-01-01

    The poor air quality and cigarette smoking are the most important reasons for increased carbon monoxide (CO) level in exhaled air. However, the influence of high air pollution concentration in big cities on the exhaled CO level has not been well studied yet. To evaluate the impact of smoking habit and air pollution in the place of living on the level of CO in exhaled air. Citizens from two large cities and one small town in Poland were asked to complete a survey disclosing their place of residence, education level, work status and smoking habits. Subsequently, the CO level in their exhaled air was measured. Air quality data, obtained from the Regional Inspectorates of Environmental Protection, revealed the differences in atmospheric CO concentration between locations. 1226 subjects were divided into 4 groups based on their declared smoking status and place of living. The average CO level in exhaled air was significantly higher in smokers than in non-smokers (p<0.0001) as well as in non-smokers from big cities than non-smokers from small ones (p<0.0001). Created model showed that non-smokers from big cities have odds ratio of 125.3 for exceeding CO cutoff level of 4ppm compared to non-smokers from small towns. The average CO level in exhaled air is significantly higher in smokers than non-smokers. Among non-smokers, the average exhaled CO level is significantly higher in big city than small town citizens. These results suggest that permanent exposure to an increased concentration of air pollution and cigarette smoking affect the level of exhaled CO. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A qualitative investigation of South African cigarette smokers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cigarette smoking continuesto pose a global health risk, including in developing countries. Fear appeal messages have been widely employed in health communication to reduce cigarette smoking, but studies provide confl icting results on their effi cacy. The present qualitative study explores smokers' perceptions of fear ...

  8. Exposure to welding fumes increases lung cancer risk among light smokers but not among heavy smokers: evidence from two case-control studies in Montreal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallières, Eric; Pintos, Javier; Lavoué, Jérôme; Parent, Marie-Élise; Rachet, Bernard; Siemiatycki, Jack

    2012-08-01

    We investigated relationships between occupational exposure to gas and arc welding fumes and the risk of lung cancer among workers exposed to these agents throughout the spectrum of industries. Two population-based case-control studies were conducted in Montreal. Study I (1979-1986) included 857 cases and 1066 controls, and Study II (1996-2001) comprised 736 cases and 894 controls. Detailed job histories were obtained by interview and evaluated by an expert team of chemist-hygienists to estimate degree of exposure to approximately 300 substances for each job. Gas and arc welding fumes were among the agents evaluated. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of lung cancer using logistic regression, adjusting for smoking history and other covariates. The two studies provided similar results, so a pooled analysis was conducted. Among all subjects, no significant association was found between lung cancer and gas welding fumes (OR = 1.1; 95% CI = 0.9-1.4) or arc welding fumes (OR = 1.0; 95% CI = 0.8-1.2). However, when restricting attention to light smokers, there was an increased risk of lung cancer in relation to gas welding fumes (OR = 2.9; 95% CI = 1.7-4.8) and arc welding fumes (OR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.3-3.8), with even higher OR estimates among workers with the highest cumulative exposures. In conclusion, there was no detectable excess risk of lung cancer due to welding fumes among moderate to heavy smokers; but among light smokers we found an excess risk related to both types of welding fumes.

  9. Exposure to welding fumes increases lung cancer risk among light smokers but not among heavy smokers: evidence from two case–control studies in Montreal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallières, Eric; Pintos, Javier; Lavoué, Jérôme; Parent, Marie-Élise; Rachet, Bernard; Siemiatycki, Jack

    2012-01-01

    We investigated relationships between occupational exposure to gas and arc welding fumes and the risk of lung cancer among workers exposed to these agents throughout the spectrum of industries. Two population-based case–control studies were conducted in Montreal. Study I (1979–1986) included 857 cases and 1066 controls, and Study II (1996–2001) comprised 736 cases and 894 controls. Detailed job histories were obtained by interview and evaluated by an expert team of chemist–hygienists to estimate degree of exposure to approximately 300 substances for each job. Gas and arc welding fumes were among the agents evaluated. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of lung cancer using logistic regression, adjusting for smoking history and other covariates. The two studies provided similar results, so a pooled analysis was conducted. Among all subjects, no significant association was found between lung cancer and gas welding fumes (OR = 1.1; 95% CI = 0.9–1.4) or arc welding fumes (OR = 1.0; 95% CI = 0.8–1.2). However, when restricting attention to light smokers, there was an increased risk of lung cancer in relation to gas welding fumes (OR = 2.9; 95% CI = 1.7–4.8) and arc welding fumes (OR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.3–3.8), with even higher OR estimates among workers with the highest cumulative exposures. In conclusion, there was no detectable excess risk of lung cancer due to welding fumes among moderate to heavy smokers; but among light smokers we found an excess risk related to both types of welding fumes. PMID:23342253

  10. Lifestyle, health characteristics and alcohol abuse in young adults who are non-daily smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Izabel de Ugalde Marques da Rocha

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVES: Despite the decline in the prevalence of tobacco use in many countries, including Brazil, there are growing numbers of smokers who continue to smoke at a low daily rate, or less frequently (non-daily smokers. This group needs to be better characterized in order to direct preventive actions and public health policies. The aim here was to compare lifestyle, health characteristics and alcoholism problems among young adult smokers, non-daily smokers and non-smokers. DESIGN AND SETTING: This was a cross-sectional study in which volunteers from the university community and its surrounds in Santa Maria, State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, were included between October 2007 and January 2008. METHODS: Out of 1240 volunteers initially contacted in a university cafeteria, a total of 728 participants of mean age 22.45 ± 3.32 years were selected for final analysis. Data were collected using structured questionnaires. RESULTS: In general, it was observed that the non-daily smokers showed intermediate characteristics in relation to the smokers and non-smokers. However, there was a significant association between non-daily smoking and alcohol abuse. The non-daily smokers presented an odds ratio of 2.4 (95% confidence interval: 1.10-5.48 in relation to the daily smokers and an odds ratio of 3.3 (confidence interval: 1.7-6.5 in relation to the non-smokers, with regard to presenting a positive CAGE test, thereby indicating alcohol abuse or dependence. CONCLUSION: The study suggested that non-daily smoking and alcohol consumption were concomitant behaviors.

  11. Lung function profiles and aerobic capacity of adult cigarette and hookah smokers after 12 weeks intermittent training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdessalem Koubaa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pulmonary function is compromised in most smokers. Yet it is unknown whether exercise training improves pulmonary function and aerobic capacity in cigarette and hookah smokers and whether these smokers respond in a similar way as do non-smokers. Aim: To evaluate the effects of an interval exercise training program on pulmonary function and aerobic capacity in cigarette and hookah smokers. Methods: Twelve cigarette smokers, 10 hookah smokers, and 11 non-smokers participated in our exercise program. All subjects performed 30 min of interval exercise (2 min of work followed by 1 min of rest three times a week for 12 weeks at an intensity estimated at 70% of the subject's maximum aerobic capacity (VO2max. Pulmonary function was measured using spirometry, and maximum aerobic capacity was assessed by maximal exercise testing on a treadmill before the beginning and at the end of the exercise training program. Results: As expected, prior to the exercise intervention, the cigarette and hookah smokers had significantly lower pulmonary function than the non-smokers. The 12-week exercise training program did not significantly affect lung function as assessed by spirometry in the non-smoker group. However, it significantly increased both forced expiratory volume in 1 second and peak expiratory flow (PEF in the cigarette smoker group, and PEF in the hookah smoker group. Our training program had its most notable impact on the cardiopulmonary system of smokers. In the non-smoker and cigarette smoker groups, the training program significantly improved VO2max (4.4 and 4.7%, respectively, v VO2max (6.7 and 5.6%, respectively, and the recovery index (7.9 and 10.5%, respectively. Conclusions: After 12 weeks of interval training program, the increase of VO2max and the decrease of recovery index and resting heart rate in the smoking subjects indicated better exercise tolerance. Although the intermittent training program altered pulmonary function only

  12. Lung function profiles and aerobic capacity of adult cigarette and hookah smokers after 12 weeks intermittent training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koubaa, Abdessalem; Triki, Moez; Trabelsi, Hajer; Masmoudi, Liwa; Zeghal, Khaled N; Sahnoun, Zouhair; Hakim, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary function is compromised in most smokers. Yet it is unknown whether exercise training improves pulmonary function and aerobic capacity in cigarette and hookah smokers and whether these smokers respond in a similar way as do non-smokers. To evaluate the effects of an interval exercise training program on pulmonary function and aerobic capacity in cigarette and hookah smokers. Twelve cigarette smokers, 10 hookah smokers, and 11 non-smokers participated in our exercise program. All subjects performed 30 min of interval exercise (2 min of work followed by 1 min of rest) three times a week for 12 weeks at an intensity estimated at 70% of the subject's maximum aerobic capacity (VO2max). Pulmonary function was measured using spirometry, and maximum aerobic capacity was assessed by maximal exercise testing on a treadmill before the beginning and at the end of the exercise training program. As expected, prior to the exercise intervention, the cigarette and hookah smokers had significantly lower pulmonary function than the non-smokers. The 12-week exercise training program did not significantly affect lung function as assessed by spirometry in the non-smoker group. However, it significantly increased both forced expiratory volume in 1 second and peak expiratory flow (PEF) in the cigarette smoker group, and PEF in the hookah smoker group. Our training program had its most notable impact on the cardiopulmonary system of smokers. In the non-smoker and cigarette smoker groups, the training program significantly improved VO2max (4.4 and 4.7%, respectively), v VO2max (6.7 and 5.6%, respectively), and the recovery index (7.9 and 10.5%, respectively). After 12 weeks of interval training program, the increase of VO2max and the decrease of recovery index and resting heart rate in the smoking subjects indicated better exercise tolerance. Although the intermittent training program altered pulmonary function only partially, both aerobic capacity and life quality were improved

  13. Effect of young barley leaf extract and adlay on plasma lipids and LDL oxidation in hyperlipidemic smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ya-Mei; Chang, Weng-Cheng; Liu, Chu-Sun; Tsai, Ching-Min

    2004-06-01

    Forty hyperlipidemic patients, smokers and non-smokers, were studied. Subjects received 15 g young barley leaf extract (BL) or 60 g adlay daily for four weeks. Overnight fasting blood samples were drawn immediately prior to and after four weeks of supplementation. Blood samples were analyzed for plasma lipid profiles and their susceptibility to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation. The plasma total and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels were reduced following treatment with either BL or adlay; furthermore, the lag phase of LDL oxidation increased after either supplementation. However, it seemed that BL had stronger antioxidative effect on the prevention of LDL oxidation than adlay. Our results also indicated that the antioxidative effect was less pronounced in smokers than in non-smokers. Therefore, supplementation with BL or adlay can decrease plasma lipids and inhibit LDL oxidation in hyperlipidemic smokers and/or non-smokers.

  14. Progression of periodontal disease in a maintenance population of smokers and non-smokers: a 3-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Sean; Kells, Leah; Picard, Jean-Pierre; Gelskey, Shirley C; Singer, David L; Lix, Lisa; Scott, David A

    2008-03-01

    Cigarette smoking is accepted as an important factor that increases the risk for the initiation and progress of chronic periodontitis. However, the effect of cigarette smoking on the recurrence of disease in patients undergoing regular maintenance therapy is less understood. Therefore, we set out to assess disease progression longitudinally in smoking and non-smoking subjects with chronic periodontitis undergoing periodontal maintenance therapy every 3 to 4 months. A total of 108 subjects undergoing regular maintenance therapy for chronic periodontitis were followed over a 3-year period. Self-reports of smoking status were confirmed by analysis of exhaled carbon monoxide concentrations. Clinical parameters (plaque index [PI], bleeding on probing [BOP], clinical attachment loss [CAL], probing depth [PD], and tooth loss) were recorded at yearly reevaluation visits. The study was carried out in a university hospital setting. Longitudinal measurements were obtained from 81 (75%) subjects. There were no differences in inflammatory indices at baseline or over time (PI and BOP; both P >0.05) between smokers (N = 16; age: 54 +/- 6 years) and non-smokers (N = 65; age: 59 +/- 14 years). Likewise, there was no difference between the smoking groups with respect to disease progression (measured as changes in prevalence [number] and proportion [percentage] of progressing sites and as mean CAL, PD, and tooth loss; all P >0.05). In this small population, regular maintenance treatment in a cross-section of highly motivated subjects with chronic periodontitis seemed to be equally successful in preventing progressive periodontal tissue destruction in current smokers and current non-smokers.

  15. Changes in volume-corrected whole-lung density in smokers and former smokers during the ITALUNG screening trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascalchi, Mario; Sverzellati, Nicola; Falchini, Massimo; Favilli, Giuditta; Lombardo, Simone; Macconi, Letizia; Paci, Eugenio; Pegna, Andrea Lopes; Falaschi, Fabio; Zompatori, Maurizio; Diciotti, Stefano

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate with a volume-corrected whole-lung approach changes in lung density over 2 years consistent with progression of pulmonary emphysema in smokers and former smokers enrolled in the ITALUNG trial of lung cancer screening using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT). A total of 103 subjects (mean age 63±4 y with a pack-year history of at least 20) underwent 2 whole-lung LDCT examinations 2 years apart. Visual assessment was made independently by 2 experienced observers on the initial LDCT examination with a 0 to 4 grading system for each of 6 regions (right and left upper, mid, and lower lung). The whole-lung 15th percentile of attenuation coefficient and relative area (RA) at -910 HU, both corrected to the individual lung volume (Perc15v and RA910v), were measured on the 2 LDCT examinations. The intrasubject variability of Perc15v and RA910v was previously determined in 32 other subjects of the trial examined using the same scanner and technique twice over a 3-month interval for suspicious nodules. The 2 operators agreed on the presence of mild to severe emphysema (visual score ≥1 in at least 1 region) at initial LDCT examination in 24 (23%) of the 103 subjects. Fifteen subjects (15%) showed a Perc15v change between the 2 examinations exceeding the lower 95% limit of agreement, indicating progression of emphysema with a mean difference in lung density of -14.7%±2.6%. Ten of the 15 were identified as showing emphysema progression by RA910v as well. No association was observed between progression of emphysema and visual evidence of emphysema at initial LDCT examination, smoking status, or pack-years at baseline, or intervening changes in smoking habits. Once variations in inspiratory lung volumes are taken into account, changes in lung density over 2 years consistent with progression of pulmonary emphysema in elderly smokers and former smokers are uncommon.

  16. Neural responses to smoking stimuli are influenced by smokers' attitudes towards their own smoking behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastian Stippekohl

    Full Text Available An important feature of addiction is the high drug craving that may promote the continuation of consumption. Environmental stimuli classically conditioned to drug-intake have a strong motivational power for addicts and can elicit craving. However, addicts differ in the attitudes towards their own consumption behavior: some are content with drug taking (consonant users whereas others are discontent (dissonant users. Such differences may be important for clinical practice because the experience of dissonance might enhance the likelihood to consider treatment. This fMRI study investigated in smokers whether these different attitudes influence subjective and neural responses to smoking stimuli. Based on self-characterization, smokers were divided into consonant and dissonant smokers. These two groups were presented smoking stimuli and neutral stimuli. Former studies have suggested differences in the impact of smoking stimuli depending on the temporal stage of the smoking ritual they are associated with. Therefore, we used stimuli associated with the beginning (BEGIN-smoking-stimuli and stimuli associated with the terminal stage (END-smoking-stimuli of the smoking ritual as distinct stimulus categories. Stimulus ratings did not differ between both groups. Brain data showed that BEGIN-smoking-stimuli led to enhanced mesolimbic responses (amygdala, hippocampus, insula in dissonant compared to consonant smokers. In response to END-smoking-stimuli, dissonant smokers showed reduced mesocortical responses (orbitofrontal cortex, subcallosal cortex compared to consonant smokers. These results suggest that smoking stimuli with a high incentive value (BEGIN-smoking-stimuli are more appetitive for dissonant than consonant smokers at least on the neural level. To the contrary, smoking stimuli with low incentive value (END-smoking-stimuli seem to be less appetitive for dissonant smokers than consonant smokers. These differences might be one reason why dissonant

  17. Quitting motives and barriers among older smokers. The 1986 Adult Use of Tobacco Survey revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orleans, C T; Jepson, C; Resch, N; Rimer, B K

    1994-10-01

    Adults aged 50-74 years comprise more than 20% of the population and more than 22% of all smokers. Smoking is a risk factor for 7 of the 14 major causes of death for older adults, including cancer, heart disease, and lung disease. Moreover, older smokers can experience significant dramatic health benefits from quitting, including improvements in circulation and pulmonary function and declines in risks for heart disease, heart attacks, and stroke. Smoking patterns, quitting motives, and barriers among older smokers were examined by comparing responses of older smokers (aged 50-74 years) and younger smokers (aged 21-49 years) who took part in the 1986 Adult Use of Tobacco Survey. Older and younger smokers differed little in current smoking patterns or in past quit attempts, motives, and methods. Survey results show that older smokers are far less likely to accept smoking health harms and more likely to view smoking as a beneficial coping and weight control tactic. Motivational strategies should be tailored to the unique health beliefs and cultural history of older smokers.

  18. Evaluation of clinical periodontal conditions in smokers and non-smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinara Ignez Tavares Luzzi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Given that tobacco smoking habit is a risk factor for periodontal diseases, the aim of this study was to compare clinical periodontal aspects between smokers and non-smokers. The clinical status were assessed in 55 patients, 29 smokers and 26 non-smokers, aged 30 to 50 years, with mean age of 40. The clinical parameters used were: probing depth (PD, plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI, clinical attachment level (CAL, gingival recession (GR and gingival bleeding index (GBI for arches (upper and lower and teeth (anterior and posterior. Tooth loss was also evaluated in both groups. Multiple regression analysis showed: tendency of greater probing depth and clinical attachment level means for smokers; greater amount of plaque in smokers in all regions; greater gingival index means for non-smokers with clinical significance (p<0.05 in all regions. Although, without statistical significance, the analysis showed greater gingival bleeding index means almost always for non-smokers; similar gingival recession means in both groups and tendency of upper tooth loss in smokers and lower tooth loss in non-smokers. The findings of this study showed that clinical periodontal parameters may be different in smokers when compared to non-smokers and that masking of some periodontal signs can be a result of nicotine's vasoconstrictor effect.

  19. Survival among Never-Smokers with Lung Cancer in the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément-Duchêne, Christelle; Stock, Shannon; Xu, Xiangyan; Chang, Ellen T; Gomez, Scarlett Lin; West, Dee W; Wakelee, Heather A; Gould, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Differences in patient characteristics and outcomes have been observed among current, former, and never-smokers with lung cancer, but most prior studies included few never-smokers and were not prospective. We used data from a large, prospective study of lung cancer care and outcomes in the United States to compare characteristics of never-smokers and smokers with lung cancer and to examine survival among the never-smokers. Smoking status at diagnosis was determined by self-report and survival was determined from medical records and cancer registries, with follow-up through June 2010 or later. Cox regression was used to examine the association between smoking and survival, and to identify predictors of survival among never-smokers. Among 3,410 patients with lung cancer diagnosed between September 1, 2003 and October 14, 2005 who completed a baseline patient survey, there were 274 never-smokers (8%), 1,612 former smokers (47%), 1,496 current smokers or smokers who quit recently (44%), and 28 with missing information about smoking status (Never-smokers appeared more likely than former and current/recent smokers to be female and of Asian or Hispanic race/ethnicity, and to have adenocarcinoma histology, fewer comorbidities, private insurance, and higher income and education. Compared with never-smokers, the adjusted hazard of death from any cause was 29% higher among former smokers (hazard ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.55), and 39% higher among current/recent smokers (hazard ratio, 1.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-1.67). Factors predicting worse overall survival among never-smokers included Hispanic ethnicity, severe comorbidity, undifferentiated histology, and regional or distant stage. Never-smoking Hispanics appeared more likely to have regional or advanced disease at diagnosis and less likely to undergo surgical resection, although these differences were not statistically significant. Never-smokers with lung cancer are more likely than ever-smokers

  20. Exploring socio-contextual factors associated with male smoker's intention to quit smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minsoo

    2016-05-13

    Programs to encourage smokers to quit smoking tobacco have been implemented worldwide and are generally viewed as an effective public health intervention program. However, few studies have examined the social factors that influence a smoker's intention to quit smoking. This study investigated the socio-contextual factors that are associated with the intention to quit smoking among male smokers in South Korea. Data were obtained from a 2014 nationally representative panel that examined the influences of mass media on the health of the Korean population. Members of this panel were recruited using a mixed-method sampling and a combination of random digit dial and address-based sampling designs. Survey questions were based on those used in previous studies that assessed the effects of social context, including mass media and social capital, on health. Multivariate logistic regression analyses of the answers of 313 male smokers were undertaken. Male smokers who participated in community-based activities were 2.45 times more likely to intend to quit smoking compared to male smokers in general (95 % confidence interval [CI]: 1.25-6.82). In addition, male smokers who participated in informal social gathering networks were 2.38 times more likely to intend to quit smoking compared to male smokers in general (95 % CI: 1.11-5.10). Moreover, male smokers with high smartphone use were 1.93 times more likely than smokers with low smartphone use to intend to quit smoking within one year (95 % CI: 1.07-3.46). A supportive environment that enables male smokers to access beneficial health information and that encourages them to quit smoking is necessary for a stop-smoking program to be effective. The result of this study contribute to establishing a new smoking control policy by identifying socio-contextual factors related to the intention to quit smoking.

  1. The Influence of Puff Characteristics, Nicotine Dependence, and Rate of Nicotine Metabolism on Daily Nicotine Exposure in African American Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kathryn C; Dempsey, Delia A; St Helen, Gideon; Delucchi, Kevin; Benowitz, Neal L

    2016-06-01

    African American (AA) smokers experience greater tobacco-related disease burden than Whites, despite smoking fewer cigarettes per day (CPD). Understanding factors that influence daily nicotine intake in AA smokers is an important step toward decreasing tobacco-related health disparities. One factor of interest is smoking topography, or the study of puffing behavior. (i) to create a model using puff characteristics, nicotine dependence, and nicotine metabolism to predict daily nicotine exposure, and (ii) to compare puff characteristics and nicotine intake from two cigarettes smoked at different times to ensure the reliability of the puff characteristics included in our model. Sixty AA smokers smoked their preferred brand of cigarette at two time points through a topography device. Plasma nicotine, expired CO, and changes in subjective measures were measured before and after each cigarette. Total nicotine equivalents (TNE) was measured from 24-hour urine collected during ad libitum smoking. In a model predicting daily nicotine exposure, total puff volume, CPD, sex, and menthol status were significant predictors (R(2) = 0.44, P < 0.001). Total puff volume was significantly greater and inter-puff intervals were significantly shorter after ad lib smoking compared with the first cigarette of the day, but puffing behaviors for both cigarettes were highly correlated (r range = 0.69-0.89, P < 0.001) within-subjects. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to show that puff characteristics of individual cigarettes are predictive of daily nicotine intake. These findings enhance our understanding of the relationship between smoking behavior and nicotine intake in AA smokers. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(6); 936-43. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Impact of smoking on microalbuminuria and urinary albumin creatinine ratio in non-diabetic normotensive smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, R K; Gupta, R; Maheshwari, V D; Mawliya, M

    2014-03-01

    Smoking is associated with an excessive morbidity and mortality from a variety of diseases. The aim of this study was to find out the effects of smoking on renal function study in non-diabetic, normotensive subjects. A community-based, prospective, cross-sectional cohort study was conducted on 120 subjects; 80 (66.66%) were smokers and 40 (33.33%) age matched non-smokers; with age range of 30 to 70 years. Measurement of fasting sugar, urea, creatinine, lipids and one time screening of urinary albumin and urinary creatinine was done. Smokers had significantly higher urinary albumin and albumin creatinine ratio (ACR) (52.84 ± 46.42 mg/L, 93.98 ± 78.68 μg/mg) than non-smokers (19.25 ± 7.77 mg/L, 18.99 ± 6.65 μg/mg), respectively (P =level were directly related to the amount of smoking (pack-years). Among smokers, 73 (91.25%) had microalbuminuria (>20 mg/L) and 64 (80%) had increased urinary ACR (>30 μg/mg). Smoker had significantly lower high-density lipoprotein level (36.66 ± 10.28 mg/dl) compared to non-smokers (41.22 ± 11.72 mg/dl) (P = 0.031). Urea, creatinine, creatinine clearance, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein, triglyceride levels were comparable (p = NS). In conclusion, smokers have a 4-fold higher prevalence of microalbuminuria than non-smokers.

  3. Smoking and suicidality in subjects with major depressive disorder: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Ji Hyun; Eisner, Lori R; Nierenberg, Andrew A

    2013-09-25

    Detailed characteristics of depressive smokers and its association with suicidality were still less investigated. The aim of this study was to delineate characteristics of smokers with major depressive disorder (MDD) and examine the relationship between these characteristics and suicidality using an epidemiologic database, the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). A total of 5695 subjects with MDD, defined by the DSM-IV criteria, were included in our analysis. Current smokers, former smokers, and lifetime nonsmokers were compared in terms of demographic, clinical characteristics, and functional level. Suicidality, evaluated by history of suicide ideation and attempts while in a low mood was evaluated and compared among the groups. Current smokers with MDD showed a greater number of DSM-IV symptoms while in acute episodes, a higher rate of alcohol and drug-use disorders, and poorer functional levels than nonsmokers. Previous smokers displayed intermediate characteristics between current smokers and nonsmokers. The logistic regression analysis revealed that both current and former smoking status predicted the risk of having a history of attempted suicide (current smokers: odds ratio 1.62, 95% C.I. 1.42-1.86; former smokers: odds ratio 1.37, 95% C.I. 1.13-1.66) after adjusting for demographic data, a history of subthreshold hypomania, and a lifetime axis II/anxiety/alcohol use/substance-use disorder. Retrospective, cross-sectional evaluation; suicidality assessed only in the most severe depressive episode. The present study corroborates that smokers with MDD showed distinct clinical characteristics, and cigarette smoking can predict attempted suicide in a community representative sample of people with MDD. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Smoking patterns and stimulus control in intermittent and daily smokers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saul Shiffman

    Full Text Available Intermittent smokers (ITS - who smoke less than daily - comprise an increasing proportion of adult smokers. Their smoking patterns challenge theoretical models of smoking motivation, which emphasize regular and frequent smoking to maintain nicotine levels and avoid withdrawal, but yet have gone largely unexamined. We characterized smoking patterns among 212 ITS (smoking 4-27 days per month compared to 194 daily smokers (DS; smoking 5-30 cigarettes daily who monitored situational antecedents of smoking using ecological momentary assessment. Subjects recorded each cigarette on an electronic diary, and situational variables were assessed in a random subset (n=21,539 smoking episodes; parallel assessments were obtained by beeping subjects at random when they were not smoking (n=26,930 non-smoking occasions. Compared to DS, ITS' smoking was more strongly associated with being away from home, being in a bar, drinking alcohol, socializing, being with friends and acquaintances, and when others were smoking. Mood had only modest effects in either group. DS' and ITS' smoking were substantially and equally suppressed by smoking restrictions, although ITS more often cited self-imposed restrictions. ITS' smoking was consistently more associated with environmental cues and contexts, especially those associated with positive or "indulgent" smoking situations. Stimulus control may be an important influence in maintaining smoking and making quitting difficult among ITS.

  5. Smoking Patterns and Stimulus Control in Intermittent and Daily Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, Saul; Dunbar, Michael S.; Li, Xiaoxue; Scholl, Sarah M.; Tindle, Hilary A.; Anderson, Stewart J.; Ferguson, Stuart G.

    2014-01-01

    Intermittent smokers (ITS) – who smoke less than daily – comprise an increasing proportion of adult smokers. Their smoking patterns challenge theoretical models of smoking motivation, which emphasize regular and frequent smoking to maintain nicotine levels and avoid withdrawal, but yet have gone largely unexamined. We characterized smoking patterns among 212 ITS (smoking 4–27 days per month) compared to 194 daily smokers (DS; smoking 5–30 cigarettes daily) who monitored situational antecedents of smoking using ecological momentary assessment. Subjects recorded each cigarette on an electronic diary, and situational variables were assessed in a random subset (n = 21,539 smoking episodes); parallel assessments were obtained by beeping subjects at random when they were not smoking (n = 26,930 non-smoking occasions). Compared to DS, ITS' smoking was more strongly associated with being away from home, being in a bar, drinking alcohol, socializing, being with friends and acquaintances, and when others were smoking. Mood had only modest effects in either group. DS' and ITS' smoking were substantially and equally suppressed by smoking restrictions, although ITS more often cited self-imposed restrictions. ITS' smoking was consistently more associated with environmental cues and contexts, especially those associated with positive or “indulgent” smoking situations. Stimulus control may be an important influence in maintaining smoking and making quitting difficult among ITS. PMID:24599056

  6. Masticatory Changes as a Result of Oral Disorders in Smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rech, Rafaela Soares

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction For chewing to occur properly, it is necessary that all oral structures are present and of normal standard. Objectives The aim of this study is to verify the presence of oral changes in smokers and the impact of the changes on masticatory function compared with individuals who never smoked. Methods Forty-eight subjects were evaluated, split into two study groups (24 subjects each of current tobacco users and individuals who have never smoked. The variables halitosis, presence of lesions suggestive of caries and periodontal problems, number of teeth, classification of malocclusions according to angle, standard grinding food, chewing pattern, and speed of chewing were evaluated. Results There was no statistically significant difference in tooth loss between the groups, but the smokers had more losses manifesting malocclusion. Most smokers had halitosis and lesions suggestive of caries and periodontal problems; the halitosis was associated with the latter variable. Masticatory speed was also reduced significantly in these individuals compared with the control group when associated with occlusal alterations, in addition to grinding food with the tongue. No difference was observed regarding the chewing pattern. The presence of halitosis and periodontal problems were more common in those who smoke more than 20 years. Conclusion There is an association between smoking and dental changes, which cause increased masticatory changes.

  7. Health education pamphlets about smoking-their benefit to smokers and non-smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meillier, Lucette Kirsten; Osler, M; Sabroe, Svend

    1999-01-01

    in 1994. Of these 71% also participated in a telephone interview enquiring about the use of health education material, smoking status and socio-demographic variables, 39% of readers of household-delivered anti-smoking pamphlets reported having gained information from them and 22% reported having made...... health education materials from other places. Non-smokers received (3 49%) and read pamphlets about smoking as frequently as did smokers who did not intend to quit. In conclusion, written health education material was well received by readers, but, when distributed in a more open setting it needs...... to be targeted towards smokers who are considering stopping smoking. In general practice, smokers not thinking of stopping were open to health education, and pamphlets used in this setting should also target this group. Non-smokers contribute indirectly to smokers quitting by providing support to smokers...

  8. Nicotine metabolism and addiction among adolescent smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Mark L; Shiffman, Saul; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Rait, Michelle A; Sen, Saunak; Benowitz, Neal L

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the association between the nicotine metabolic rate and smoking behavior, including addiction, in adolescent smokers. Baseline data from a prospective study of adolescent smoking behaviors and nicotine metabolism. The setting was an out-patient university hospital in San Francisco. Adolescent smokers (n = 164) aged 13-17 years old. Participants completed self-report measures of smoking behavior and nicotine dependence (modified Fagerström Tolerance Questionnaire: mFTQ). The nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR), a phenotypic marker of the rate of nicotine metabolism, was calculated using the ratio of concentrations of deuterium-labeled 3'-hydroxycotinine to cotinine-d(4) . Participants reported smoking a mean of 2.86 cigarettes per day (CPD) [median = 1.78, standard deviation (SD) = 3.35] for 1.37 years (median = 1.0, SD = 1.36). Results from multivariate analyses accounting for age, race/ethnicity, gender and duration of smoking indicated that slower metabolizers smoked more CPD than faster metabolizers (the NMR was inversely related to CPD; P = 0.02). Slower metabolizers also showed greater dependence on the mFTQ (NMR was negatively associated with the mFTQ; P = 0.02). In adolescence, slower clearance of nicotine may be associated with greater levels of addiction, perhaps mediated by a greater number of cigarettes smoked. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  9. Prevalence and correlates of pulmonary emphysema in smokers and former smokers. A densitometric study of participants in the ITALUNG trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camiciottoli, Gianna [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento Area Critica, Firenze (Italy); Cavigli, Edoardo; Grassi, Luca; Orlandi, Ilaria; Picozzi, Giulia; Mascalchi, Mario [Universita di Firenze, Radiodiagnostica, Dipartimento Fisiopatologia Clinica, Firenze (Italy); Diciotti, Stefano [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni, Firenze (Italy); Zappa, Marco; Paci, Eugenio [Centro di Studio e Prevenzione Oncologica, Firenze (Italy); Pegna, Andrea Lopes [Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria di Careggi, Pneumologia, Firenze (Italy); Falaschi, Fabio [Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria Pisana, Radiodiagnostica II, Pisa (Italy)

    2009-01-15

    We assessed with computed tomography (CT) densitometry the prevalence of emphysema in 266 (175 men and 91 women; mean age 64{+-}4 years) smokers and former smokers enrolled in the ITALUNG trial of lung cancer screening with low-dose thin-slice CT. Whole-lung volume and the relative area at -950 Hounsfield units (RA{sub 950}) and mean lung attenuation (MLA) in 1 of every 10 slices (mean, 24 slices per subject) were measured. Lung volume, MLA and RA950 significantly correlated each other and with age. Average RA950>6.8% qualifying for emphysema was present in 71(26.6%) of 266 subjects, with a higher prevalence in men than in women (30.3% vs 19.8%; p=0.003). Only in smokers was a weak (r=0.18; p=0.05) correlation between RA950 and packs/year observed. In multiple regression analysis, the variability of RA950 (R2=0.24) or MLA (R2=0.34) was significantly, but weakly explained by age, lung volume and packs/year. Other factors besides smoking may also have a significant role in the etiopathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema. (orig.)

  10. Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and high-frequency cells (HFC) in peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy Tunisian smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salah, Ghada; Kamoun, Hassen; Rebai, Ahmed; Ben Youssef, Achraf; Ayadi, Hajer; Belghith-Mahfoudh, Neila; Fourati, Amine; Ayadi, Hamadi; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2011-02-03

    Cigarette smoking is a major public health problem in Tunisia as it concerns up to 30-35% of the adult population, raising important national issues on tobacco-related disease. The aim of this study was to establish whether cigarette smoking increases sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in peripheral blood lymphocytes of smokers (n=14) compared with non-smokers (n=15) in Sfax, Tunisia. The smokers were subdivided in two subgroups according to the duration of the smoking habit: heavy smokers (>10 years) and light smokers (≤10 years). After signing a consent form, volunteers provided a blood sample (5ml) to establish cell cultures during 72h. For SCE analysis, 30 second-division metaphases were examined from each subject. We determined the frequency of SCE, the percentage of high-frequency cells (HFC) and that of the high-frequency cell individual (HFI). The results show a significantly higher SCE frequency in smokers (8.65±1.43) than in non-smokers (7.16±1.3; p0.05). The percentages of HFC and HFI were significantly higher in smokers (11.2±7.8% and 78.6%, respectively) than in non-smokers (4±2.2% and 20%, respectively, pscientific evidence to urge the prevention of tobacco consumption. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of smoked marijuana in healthy and HIV + marijuana smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Margaret

    2002-11-01

    This article presents data from two avenues of marijuana research. First, the author shows that daily marijuana smoking in healthy individuals produces dependence, as demonstrated by withdrawal symptoms such as increased irritability and depression and decreased food intake. In addition, two antidepressant medications were evaluated to assess their potential effectiveness in the treatment of marijuana withdrawal symptoms: (1) sustained-release bupropion (0, 300 mg/day) and (2) nefazodone (0, 450 mg/day). Research participants were regular marijuana smokers who lived in a residential laboratory in groups of two to four. While inpatients, participants smoked active marijuana (2.8%-3.1% THC) repeatedly for 4 days, followed by 8 to 12 days of placebo marijuana (0.0% THC). Results show that during marijuana abstinence, (1) bupropion increased ratings of irritability, depression, and stomach pain and decreased food intake and sleep quality compared to placebo maintenance, and (2) nefazodone decreased anxiety during marijuana withdrawal but did not alter ratings of irritability and misery. Thus, neither medication showed promise as potential treatments for symptoms of marijuana withdrawal. The second avenue of research focused on the effect of cannabinoids in individuals with muscle mass loss, an indicator of wasting in HIV illness. Given that there are little scientific data contributing to the debates concerning medical marijuana, this study directly compared the effects of oral delta9-THC (0, 10, 20, 30 mg PO) to smoked marijuana (0.0%, 1.8%, 2.8%, 3.9% THC) in HIV + marijuana smokers with muscle mass loss (< 90% body cell mass/height). Multiple dimensions of human behavior were measured, including food intake, mood, and cognitive performance. Drugs were administered using a within-subject, double-blind, staggered, double-dummy design. Participants were free to self-select from a variety of foods throughout most of the session. Preliminary data (n = 9) suggest that

  12. Interventions for recruiting smokers into cessation programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcano Belisario, José S; Bruggeling, Michelle N; Gunn, Laura H; Brusamento, Serena; Car, Josip

    2012-12-12

    Tobacco control is a top public health priority around the globe due to the high prevalence of cigarette smoking and its associated morbidity and mortality. Much effort has been focused on establishing the effectiveness of different smoking cessation strategies. This review, however, aims to address the initial challenge faced by smoking cessation programmes: recruitment of smokers. The primary objective of this review was to determine the effectiveness of different strategies for recruiting smokers into cessation programmes. The secondary objective was to determine the impact that these strategies had on smoking cessation rates at least six months after enrolment into a cessation programme. We searched the specialised register of the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group using a search strategy which included the terms ('recruit$', 'invit$', 'enter', 'entry', 'enrolment') combined with ('smok$', 'cigarette', 'smoking cessation', 'tobacco') in the title, abstract or keyword fields. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and registers of current and ongoing trials. We also searched the reference lists of included studies. We included randomised controlled trials and cluster randomised controlled trials that compared at least two different methods of recruiting current smokers into a smoking cessation programme. We also included those studies which focused on the effectiveness of a smoking cessation programme as long as the study involved multiple recruitment methods and reported results of the recruitment phase. From each included study, we extracted data on the type of participants, type of recruitment strategies (i.e., setting, mode of communication used, intensity and duration) and comparisons, and on randomisation, allocation concealment, and blinding procedures.Our primary outcome was the proportion of smokers successfully recruited to each cessation programme compared to alternative modalities of recruitment. Our

  13. Diet and the risk of head-and-neck cancer among never-smokers and smokers in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Carrie; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Li, Shuang; Li, Qian; Chen, Chien-Jen; Hsu, Wan-Lun; Lou, Pen-Jen; Zhu, Cairong; Pan, Jian; Shen, Hongbing; Ma, Hongxia; Cai, Lin; He, Baochang; Wang, Yu; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Ji, Qinghai; Zhou, Baosen; Wu, Wei; Ma, Jie; Boffetta, Paolo; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Dai, Min; Hashibe, Mia

    2017-02-01

    Few studies have been conducted in China to investigate the association between diet and the risk of head-and-neck cancer (HNC). The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between diet and HNC risk in the Chinese population and to examine whether smoking status has any effect on the risk. Our multicenter case-control study included 921 HNC cases and 806 controls. We obtained information on the frequency of both animal- and plant-based food consumption. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs). The risk of HNC increased with more frequent consumption of processed meat and fermented foods but decreased with frequent consumption of fruits and vegetables. There was a significant increasing P for trend of 0.006 among smokers who consumed meat and an increased OR among smokers who consumed processed meat (OR 2.95, 95%CI 1.12-7.75). Protective odds ratios for vegetable consumption were observed among smokers only. We also observed protective odds ratios for higher egg consumption among never-smokers (P for trend=0.0.003). Reduced HNC risks were observed for high fruit and vegetable intake, a finding consistent with the results of previous studies. Processed meat intake was associated with an increased risk. The role of dietary factors in HNC in the East Asian population is similar to that in European populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Health care costs and work absenteeism in smokers: study in an urban community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Bonel, María Pilar; Villaverde-Royo, María Victoria; Nerín, Isabel; Sanz-Andrés, Concepción; Mezquida-Arno, Julia; Córdoba-García, Rodrigo

    2015-12-01

    Higher morbidity caused by smoking-related diseases could increase health costs. We analyzed differences in the use of healthcare resources, healthcare costs and days of work absenteeism among smokers and non-smokers. Cross-sectional study in smokers and non-smokers, aged between 45 and 74 years, from one urban health area. The variables studied were: age, sex, alcohol intake, physical activity, obesity, diseases, attendance at primary care clinics and hospital emergency rooms, days of hospitalization, prescription drug consumption and work absenteeism (in days). Annual cost according to the unit cost of each service (direct costs), and indirect costs according to the number of days missed from work was calculated. Crude and adjusted risks were calculated using logistic regression. Five hundred patients were included: 50% were smokers, 74% (372) men and 26% (128) women. Smokers used more healthcare resources, consumed more prescription drugs and had more days off work than non-smokers. Respective direct and indirect costs in smokers were 848.64 euros (IQ 25-75: 332.65-1517.10) and 2253.90 euros (IQ 25-75: 1024.50-13113.60), and in non-smokers were 474.71 euros (IQ 25-75: 172.88-979.59) and 1434.30 euros (IQ 25-75: 614.70-4712.70). The likelihood of generating high healthcare costs was more than double for smokers (OR=2.14; 95% CI: 1.44-3.19). More investment in programs for the prevention and treatment of smoking, as a health policy priority, could help to reduce the health and social costs of smoking. Copyright © 2015 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. A qualitative analysis of smokers' perceptions about lung cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressard, Lindsay; DeGroff, Amy S; Richards, Thomas B; Melillo, Stephanie; Kish-Doto, Julia; Heminger, Christina L; Rohan, Elizabeth A; Allen, Kristine Gabuten

    2017-06-21

    In 2013, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) began recommending lung cancer screening for high risk smokers aged 55-80 years using low-dose computed tomography (CT) scan. In light of these updated recommendations, there is a need to understand smokers' knowledge of and experiences with lung cancer screening in order to inform the design of patient education and tobacco cessation programs. The purpose of this study is to describe results of a qualitative study examining smokers' perceptions around lung cancer screening tests. In 2009, prior to the release of the updated USPSTF recommendations, we conducted 12 120-min, gender-specific focus groups with 105 current smokers in Charlotte, North Carolina and Cincinnati, Ohio. Focus group facilitators asked participants about their experience with three lung cancer screening tests, including CT scan, chest x-ray, and sputum cytology. Focus group transcripts were transcribed and qualitatively analyzed using constant comparative methods. Participants were 41-67 years-old, with a mean smoking history of 38.9 pack-years. Overall, 34.3% would meet the USPSTF's current eligibility criteria for screening. Most participants were unaware of all three lung cancer screening tests. The few participants who had been screened recalled limited information about the test. Nevertheless, many participants expressed a strong desire to pursue lung cancer screening. Using the social ecological model for health promotion, we identified potential barriers to lung cancer screening at the 1) health care system level (cost of procedure, confusion around results), 2) cultural level (fatalistic beliefs, distrust of medical system), and 3) individual level (lack of knowledge, denial of risk, concerns about the procedure). Although this study was conducted prior to the updated USPSTF recommendations, these findings provide a baseline for future studies examining smokers' perceptions of lung cancer screening. We recommend clear and patient

  16. Subgingival microbiome in smokers and non-smokers in Korean chronic periodontitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, J-H; Lee, J-H; Lee, J-Y

    2015-06-01

    Smoking is a major environmental factor associated with periodontal diseases. However, we still have a very limited understanding of the relationship between smoking and subgingival microflora in the global population. Here, we investigated the composition of subgingival bacterial communities from the pooled plaque samples of smokers and non-smokers, 134 samples in each group, in Korean patients with moderate chronic periodontitis using 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing. A total of 17,927 reads were analyzed and classified into 12 phyla, 126 genera, and 394 species. Differences in bacterial communities between smokers and non-smokers were examined at all phylogenetic levels. The genera Fusobacterium, Fretibacterium, Streptococcus, Veillonella, Corynebacterium, TM7, and Filifactor were abundant in smokers. On the other hand, Prevotella, Campylobacter, Aggregatibacter, Veillonellaceae GQ422718, Haemophilus, and Prevotellaceae were less abundant in smokers. Among species-level taxa occupying > 1% of whole subgingival microbiome of smokers, higher abundance (≥ 2.0-fold compared to non-smokers) of seven species or operational taxonomic units (OTUs) was found: Fusobacterium nucleatum, Neisseria sicca, Neisseria oralis, Corynebacterium matruchotii, Veillonella dispar, Filifactor alocis, and Fretibacterium AY349371. On the other hand, lower abundance of 11 species or OTUs was found in smokers: Neisseria elongata, six Prevotella species or OTUs, Fusobacterium canifelinum, Aggregatibacter AM420165, Selenomonas OTU, and Veillonellaceae GU470897. Species richness and evenness were similar between the groups whereas diversity was greater in smokers than non-smokers. Collectively, the results of the present study indicate that differences exist in the subgingival bacterial community between smoker and non-smoker patients with chronic moderate periodontitis in Korea, suggesting that cigarette smoking considerably affects subgingival bacterial ecology. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons

  17. Morphological characteristics of potentially malignant pulmonary nodules in high-risk male smokers detected in lung cancer screening trial in Cracow, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiszka, K; Rudnicka-Sosin, L; Tomaszewska, R; Urbańczyk-Zawadzka, M; Krupiński, M; Pikul, P; Podsiadło, K; Pasowicz, M; Vliegenthart, R; Oudkerk, M; Miszalski-Jamka, T

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this paper was to present morphological characteristics of potentially malignant nodules revealed in a group of male smokers aged 50-74 with a very high risk for developing lung cancer estimated in the study for lung cancer screening in Cracow (Poland). Nine hundred male smokers aged 50 to 74 years were invited to the study and were asked in questionnaires about e.g. smoking exposure history. Exclusion criteria included e.g. positive cancer history and chest computed tomography (CT) examination in the previous year. Based on CT results and characteristics of pulmonary nodules subjects were classified to group A (low risk), group B (indeterminate) and group C (high-risk individuals - required work-up). Final diagnosis was based on pathological results of postoperative material. Thirty-nine males of mean age 63.4 (standard deviation (SD): 6.69 years) revealed 41 potentially malignant pulmonary nodules in baseline screening. In 14 subjects 16 type C pulmonary nodules were histologically proved. Nine nodules were found to be benign lesions, while 7 nodules revealed malignant lung cancer: 5 cases of adenocarcinoma and 2 cases of adenosquamous carcinoma. We determined morphological characteristics of potentially malignant pulmonary nodules in 39 high-risk male smokers and proved lung cancer in 7 subjects.

  18. Shorter interpuff interval is associated with higher nicotine intake in smokers with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jill M; Gandhi, Kunal K; Lu, Shou-En; Kumar, Supriya; Steinberg, Marc L; Cottler, Brett; Benowitz, Neal L

    2011-11-01

    People with schizophrenia are frequent and heavy smokers. The objective of this study was to measure serum nicotine levels and ad libitum smoking behavior for 24+2h using the CReSS micro topography device in 75 smokers with schizophrenia (SCZ) and compare these to 86 control smokers (CON) without mental illness. Mean values of repeatedly measured topography variables were compared using three-level nested linear models to adjust for between subject differences and the double nested data. Smokers with SCZ smoked more cigarettes in the 24h period and took an average of 2.8 more puffs per cigarette than CON (p<0.001). The time between puffs, or interpuff interval (IPI), was shorter in SCZ by an average of 6.5s (p<0.001). The peak flow rate was higher in SCZ by an average of 4.9 ml/s (p<0.05). Smokers with SCZ spent an average of 1.0 min less time smoking a single cigarette vs. CON (p<0.001). Smokers with SCZ also had shorter IPI and more puffs per cigarette in an analysis of first cigarette of the day. For all subjects, a decrease in IPI by 1s was associated with an increase in serum nicotine of 0.19 ng/ml and in cotinine of 5.01 ng/ml (both p<0.05). After controlling for diagnosis group, higher craving scores on QSU Factor 2 (urgent desire to smoke) were associated with shorter IPI. Smokers with schizophrenia demonstrate more intense cigarette puffing that is associated with greater nicotine intake. This pattern may provide insight into other heavily dependent smokers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Why do smokers try to quit without medication or counselling? A qualitative study with ex-smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrea L; Carter, Stacy M; Chapman, Simon; Dunlop, Sally M; Freeman, Becky

    2015-04-30

    When tobacco smokers quit, between half and two-thirds quit unassisted: that is, they do not consult their general practitioner (GP), use pharmacotherapy (nicotine-replacement therapy, bupropion or varenicline), or phone a quitline. We sought to understand why smokers quit unassisted. Qualitative grounded theory study (in-depth interviews, theoretical sampling, concurrent data collection and data analysis). 21 Australian adult ex-smokers (aged 28-68 years; 9 males and 12 females) who quit unassisted within the past 6 months to 2 years. 12 participants had previous experience of using assistance to quit; 9 had never previously used assistance. Community, Australia. Along with previously identified barriers to use of cessation assistance (cost, access, lack of awareness or knowledge of assistance, including misperceptions about effectiveness or safety), our study produced new explanations of why smokers quit unassisted: (1) they prioritise lay knowledge gained directly from personal experiences and indirectly from others over professional or theoretical knowledge; (2) their evaluation of the costs and benefits of quitting unassisted versus those of using assistance favours quitting unassisted; (3) they believe quitting is their personal responsibility; and (4) they perceive quitting unassisted to be the 'right' or 'better' choice in terms of how this relates to their own self-identity or self-image. Deep-rooted personal and societal values such as independence, strength, autonomy and self-control appear to be influencing smokers' beliefs and decisions about quitting. The reasons for smokers' rejection of the conventional medical model for smoking cessation are complex and go beyond modifiable or correctable problems relating to misperceptions or treatment barriers. These findings suggest that GPs could recognise and respect smokers' reasons for rejecting assistance, validate and approve their choices, and modify brief interventions to support their preference

  20. Exposure and kinetics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in cigarette smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Helen, Gideon; Goniewicz, Maciej L; Dempsey, Delia; Wilson, Margaret; Jacob, Peyton; Benowitz, Neal L

    2012-04-16

    Our study objectives were (1) to investigate the selectivity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolites for tobacco smoke exposure and (2) to determine half-lives of PAH metabolites in smokers. There were 622 participants from the United States (US) and Poland, and of these, 70% were smokers. All subjects provided spot urine samples, and 125 smokers provided blood samples. Urinary PAH metabolite half-lives were determined in 8 smokers. In controlled hospital studies of 18 smokers, the associations between various measures of nicotine intake and urinary excretion of PAH metabolites were investigated. Plasma nicotine was measured by GC. LC-MS/MS was used to measure the plasma levels of cotinine and trans-3'-hydroxycotinine, and urine levels of nicotine and its metabolites, total 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) and PAH metabolites (2-naphthol, 1-, 2-, and 3-hydroxyfluorenes, 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-hydroxyphenanthrenes, and 1-hydroxypyrene). Regardless of smoking status, PAH metabolite excretion was higher in Polish subjects than in US subjects (p-values <0.001). 1-Hydroxyfluorene exhibited the greatest difference between smokers and nonsmokers, with a 5-fold difference in Polish subjects and a 25-fold difference in US subjects, followed by 3- and 2-hydroxyfluorenes, 2-naphthol, and 1-hydroxypyrene. The differences for hydroxyphenanthrenes were small or nonsignificant. 1-Hydroxyfluorene had the highest correlation with urine nicotine equivalents (r = 0.77) and urine NNAL (r = 0.64). While the half-lives of PAH metabolites were <10 h in smokers, 1-hydroxyfluorene had the largest ratio of initial to terminal urine concentration (58.4 ± 38.6, mean ± SD) after smoking. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis of PAHs among Polish and US subjects further showed that hydroxyfluorenes are most highly discriminative of smokers from nonsmokers followed by 2-naphthol and 1-hydroxypyrene. In conclusion, hydroxyfluorenes, particularly 1

  1. Comparison of Spermatozoa Quality in Male Smokers and Nonsmokers of Iranian Infertile Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryanpur, Mahshid; Tarahomi, Majid; Sharifi, Hooman; Heydari, Gholamreza; Hessami, Zahra; Akhoundi, Mohamadmehdi; Masjedi, Mohamad Reza

    2011-01-01

    Background Smoking has a negative effect on fertility and sperm quality. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of smoking on sperm quality and the related parameters such as sperm concentration, morphology and motility. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 180 infertile men with at least one year history of idiopathic infertility, who admitted to the Avicenna Infertility Center, Tehran, Iran. A complete history including smoking habits and other diseases was obtained and semen analysis was performed for all participants. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software version 16 and t test and Mann-whitney tests with a significance level of α= 0.05. Results Comparison of sperm parameters in the two groups of smoker and nonsmoker subjects showed that active smoking (p=0.04) and cigarette consumption even in small amounts (p=0.03) decreased sperm concentration, However, no significant correlation was detected between smoking status and morphology or motility of sperms. Conclusion This study failed to find a significant correlation between sperm analysis and smoking status except for sperm concentration, which was significantly decreased in the active smokers ,even in those consuming small amounts of tobacco. This finding propounds that tobacco consumption may negatively affect fertility. PMID:25101159

  2. Beliefs, Experience, and Interest in Pharmacotherapy among Smokers with HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, Amy; Shacham, Enbal; Sumner, Walton; Overton, E. Turner

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine beliefs, prior use, and interest in using pharmacotherapy among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Methods Cross-sectional survey of smokers in a midwestern HIV clinic. Results The sample (N = 146) included 69% men, 82% African American, 45% were in precontemplation for quitting, and 46% were interested in using pharmacotherapy. Primary reasons for non-use included cost and a belief that they would be able to quit on their own. Physician’s assistance was the strongest correlate of prior use. Perceived benefits and self-efficacy were the strongest correlates of willingness to use pharmacotherapy. Conclusions Future interventions should address misconceptions, perceived benefits, and self-efficacy for using cessation aids. Physicians should offer pharmacotherapy to all smokers. PMID:24629557

  3. Cigarette litter: smokers' attitudes and behaviors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rath, Jessica M; Rubenstein, Rebecca A; Curry, Laurel E; Shank, Sarah E; Cartwright, Julia C

    2012-01-01

    .... In addition, tobacco waste may be detrimental to our natural environment. The tobacco industry has conducted or funded numerous studies on smokers' littering knowledge and behavior, however, non-industry sponsored research is rare...

  4. Comparison of Indicators of Metabolic Syndrome in Iranian Smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Jamshidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Worldwide non communicable diseases are increasingly recognized as a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The metabolic syndrome is a common metabolic disorder that results from the increasing prevalence of obesity.The disorder is defined in various ways. This study determine the 6Tcomparison of indicators of metabolic syndrome in Iranian smokers population. Materials and Methods: A total of 1,024 Iranian subjects aged 30 to 70 participated in this cross sectional study. Standard questionnaire was completing regarding smoking habits, medications, past medical history, physical activity, blood pressure, fasting blood suger, total cholestrol HDL and triglycerides. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was based on the IDF criteria. Results: As defined by the modified IDF criteria, (45.9% had the MS at baseline assessment. The risk of incidence of the metabolic syndrome among smokers was9T 6T9Tsignificantly6T9T 6T9T(p<0.008 greater6T than nonsmokers. Among men without the MS at entry, body weight gain, compared with never smokers, was significantly6T (p<0.007 6Thigher in smokers who had quit smoking. It is important for the prevention of the MS not only to quit smoking but also to prevent weight gain after smoking cessation. Conclusion: Although many cardiovascular diseases (CVDs can be treated or prevented many people die from CVDs. Reducing the rate of cigarette smoking, body weight, blood pressure, blood cholesterol, and blood glucose all have a benefit impact on major biological cardiovascular risk factors. Behaviors such as stopping smoking, taking regular physical activity and eating a healthy diet promote health and have no known harmful effects.

  5. A Proactive Smoking Cessation Intervention for Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Smokers: The Role of Smoking-Related Stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammett, Patrick; Fu, Steven S; Nelson, David; Clothier, Barbara; Saul, Jessie E; Widome, Rachel; Danan, Elisheva R; Burgess, Diana J

    2017-04-08

    Smoking de-normalization has been paralleled by reduced smoking prevalence, but smoking rates among socioeconomically disadvantaged populations remain high. The social unacceptability of smoking has also led to increased perceptions of smoking-related stigma. By examining how smoking stigma influences cessation intervention effectiveness, we can better tailor interventions to socioeconomically disadvantaged smokers. Data are from a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of a proactive cessation intervention on abstinence. Current smokers enrolled in Minnesota Health Care Programs were randomized to proactive outreach (n=1200) or usual care (n=1206). The intervention included mailings, telephone outreach, counseling, and access to free cessation treatments. Using baseline measurements, groups with lower (n=1227) and higher (n=1093) perceived stigma were formed. Intervention, stigma, and their interaction term were added to a logistic regression modeling abstinence at 12-months. Lower perceived smoking-related stigma was associated with less support for quitting, lower rates of physician quitting advice, and less motivation for quitting. A logistic regression modeling abstinence found a significant intervention x stigma interaction. The proactive intervention was more effective among smokers with lower perceived smoking-related stigma (OR 1.94, 95% CI, 1.29-2.92) than those with higher perceived smoking-related stigma (OR 1.04, 95% CI, 0.70-1.55). Smokers with lower perceived smoking-related stigma had social environments that were conducive to smoking, received less physician advice to quit and were less motivated to quit than higher stigma smokers. Despite these barriers, the intervention was more effective for lower stigma smokers, suggesting that proactive outreach is an efficient treatment for these hard-to-reach smokers. Smoking de-normalization has led to increased perceptions of smoking-related stigma among many smokers; however, little is

  6. Detection of Peripheral Ventilation Inhomogeneity in Smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DJ Cotton

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In smokers, ‘small airways’ narrowing alters the conventional, vital capacity single breath washout (SBWVC. Although, in some studies, the test predicts smokers at risk of developing chronic airflow limitation, its wide variability partly explains its poor positive predictive value. An alternative explanation for the test’s poor predictive value is that it may not accurately reflect small airway narrowing in the lung periphery.

  7. Lung cancer incidence in never-smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakelee, Heather A.; Chang, Ellen T.; Gomez, Scarlett L.; Keegan, Theresa H. M.; Feskanich, Diane; Clarke, Christina A.; Holmberg, Lars; Yong, Lee C.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Gould, Michael K.; West, Dee W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. While smoking remains the predominant cause of lung cancer, lung cancer in never-smokers is an increasingly prominent public health issue. Data on this topic, particularly lung cancer incidence rates in never-smokers, however, are limited. Methods We review the existing literature on lung cancer incidence and mortality rates among never-smokers and present new data regarding rates in never-smokers from large, population-based cohorts: 1) Nurses’ Health Study, 2) Health Professionals Follow-up Study, 3) California Teachers Study, 4) Multiethnic Cohort Study, 5) Swedish Lung Cancer Register in the Uppsala/Örebro region, and the 6) First National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Epidemiologic Follow-up Study. Results Truncated age-adjusted incidence rates of lung cancer among never-smokers aged 40 to 79 years in these six cohorts ranged from 14.4 to 20.8 per 100,000 person-years in women and 4.8 to 13.7 per 100,000 person-years in men, supporting earlier observations that women are more likely than men to have non-smoking-associated lung cancer. The distinct biology of lung cancer in never-smokers is apparent in differential responses to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors and an increased prevalence of adenocarcinoma histology in never-smokers. Conclusion Lung cancer in never-smokers is an important public health issue needing further exploration of its incidence patterns, etiology, and biology. PMID:17290054

  8. Smokers' recall of Australian graphic cigarette packet warnings & awareness of associated health effects, 2005-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quester Pascale G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2006, Australia introduced graphic cigarette packet warnings. The new warnings include one of 14 pictures, many depicting tobacco-related pathology. The warnings were introduced in two sets; Set A in March and Set B from November. This study explores their impact on smokers' beliefs about smoking related illnesses. This study also examines the varying impact of different warnings, to see whether warnings with visceral images have greater impact on smokers' beliefs than other images. Methods Representative samples of South Australian smokers were interviewed in four independent cross-sectional omnibus surveys; in 2005 (n = 504, 2006 (n = 525, 2007 (n = 414 and 2008 (n = 464. Results Unprompted recall of new graphic cigarette warnings was high in the months following their introduction, demonstrating that smokers' had been exposed to them. Smokers also demonstrated an increase in awareness about smoking-related diseases specific to the warning messages. Warnings that conveyed new information and had emotive images demonstrated greater impact on recall and smokers' beliefs than more familiar information and less emotive images. Conclusions Overall graphic pack warnings have had the intended impact on smokers. Some have greater impact than others. The implications for policy makers in countries introducing similar warnings are that fresh messaging and visceral images have the greatest impact.

  9. The effect of social anxiety on urge and craving among smokers with and without anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbrel, Nathan A; Morissette, Sandra B; Gulliver, Suzy B; Langdon, Kirsten J; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2014-02-01

    Despite the often social nature of smoking, relatively little research has been conducted on the relationship between smoking and social anxiety disorder (SAD). Participants (N=99) included 34 smokers without current mental health disorders, 37 smokers with SAD, and 28 smokers who met criteria for other anxiety disorder diagnoses (e.g., panic disorder or generalized anxiety disorder, but not SAD). Nicotine and placebo patches were administered to participants in a counterbalanced manner across two assessment days. Urge and craving were assessed before and after a 5-h nicotine absorption/deprivation period. Compared to smokers without current mental health disorders, smokers with SAD did not report greater nicotine dependence, but did endorse greater motivation to use nicotine to avoid negative outcomes. In addition, after controlling for demographic variables, smoking characteristics, pre-deprivation urge and craving, and other anxiety/depression symptoms, social anxiety symptoms uniquely predicted urge and craving in the placebo patch condition; however, social anxiety had no influence on urge and craving in the nicotine patch condition. These findings suggest that one potential reason that smokers with SAD may have worse cessation outcomes is that they may experience higher levels of craving and urge to smoke during quit attempts. Thus, during a quit attempt, particularly in the absence of nicotine replacement therapy, smokers with SAD are likely to benefit from additional treatment aimed at managing or reducing their social anxiety symptoms. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  10. Expression of Nitric Oxide Synthase Isoenzyme in Lung Tissue of Smokers with and without Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ting Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been demonstrated that only 10%-20% cigarette smokers finally suffer chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The underlying mechanism of development remains uncertain so far. Nitric oxide (NO has been found to be closely associated with the pathogenesis of COPD, the alteration of NO synthase (NOS expression need to be revealed. The study aimed to investigate the alterations of NOS isoforms expressions between smokers with and without COPD, which might be helpful for identifying the susceptibility of smokers developing into COPD. Methods: Peripheral lung tissues were obtained from 10 nonsmoker control subjects, 15 non-COPD smokers, and 15 smokers with COPD. Neuronal NOS (nNOS, inducible NOS (iNOS, and endothelial NOS (eNOS mRNA and protein levels were measured in each sample by using real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Results: INOS mRNA was significantly increased in patients with COPD compared with nonsmokers and smokers with normal lung function (P < 0.001, P = 0.001, respectively. iNOS protein was also higher in COPD patients than nonsmokers and smokers with normal lung function (P < 0.01 and P = 0.01, respectively. However, expressions of nNOS and eNOS did not differ among nonsmokers, smokers with and without COPD. Furthermore, there was a negative correlation between iNOS protein level and lung function parameters forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 (% predicted (r = −0.549, P = 0.001 and FEV 1 /forced vital capacity (%, r = −0.535, P = 0.001. Conclusions: The expression of iNOS significantly increased in smokers with COPD compared with that in nonsmokers or smokers without COPD. The results suggest that iNOS might be involved in the pathogenesis of COPD, and may be a potential marker to identify the smokers who have more liability to suffer COPD.

  11. Cytogenetical analysis in blood lymphocytes of cigarette smokers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comet assay showed increased percentage of abnormalities in smokers (light, medium and heavy) than non-smokers. Conclusion: The frequencies of MN in buccal epithelial and blood lymphocytes are high in smokers; particularly heavy smoker group showed significantly increased results. Among them, the lymphocytic ...

  12. Peak Expiratory Flow Rate In Cigarette Smokers | Ukoli | Highland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To compare lung function between smokers and non-smokers using Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR). Methods: This study examines the peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) of three hundred and forty cigarette smokers, age and sex-matched with PEFR of equal number of non-smokers. Results: The mean PEFR of ...

  13. Hookah smoking and cancer: carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA levels in exclusive/ever hookah smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaouachi Kamal

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently published some work on CEA levels in hookah (also called narghile, shisha elsewhere and cigarette smokers. Hookah smokers had higher levels of CEA than non-smokers although mean levels were low compared to cigarette smokers. However some of them were also users of other tobacco products (cigarettes, bidis, etc.. Objectives To find serum CEA levels in ever/exclusive hookah smokers, i.e. those who smoked only hookah (no cigarettes, bidis, etc., prepared between 1 and 4 times a day with a quantity of up to 120 g of a tobacco-molasses mixture each (i.e. the tobacco weight equivalent of up to 60 cigarettes of 1 g each and consumed in 1 to 8 sessions. Methods Enhanced chemiluminescent immunometric technique was applied to measure CEA levels in serum samples from 59 exclusive male smokers with age ranging from 20–80 years (mean = 58.8 ± 14.7 years and 8–65 years of smoking (mean = 37.7 ± 16.8. 36 non-smokers served as controls. Subjects were divided into 3 groups according to the number of preparations; the number of sessions and the total daily smoking time: Light (1; 1; ≤ 20 minutes; Medium (1–3; 1–3; >20 min to ≤ 2 hrs and Heavy smokers (2–4; 3–8; >2 hrs to ≤ 6 hrs. Because of the nature of distribution of CEA levels among our individuals, Wilcoxon's rank sum two-sample test was applied to compare the variables. Results The overall CEA levels in exclusive hookah smokers (mean: 3.58 ± 2.61 ng/ml; n = 59 were not significantly different (p ≤ 0.0937 from the levels in non-smokers (2.35 ± 0.71 ng/ml. Mean levels in light, medium and heavy smokers were: 1.06 ± 0.492 ng/ml (n = 5; 2.52 ± 1.15 ng/ml (n = 28 and 5.11 ± 3.08 ng/ml (n = 26 respectively. The levels in medium smokers and non-smokers were also not significantly different (p ≤ 0.9138. In heavy smokers, the CEA levels were significantly higher than in non-smokers (p ≤ 0.0001567. Conclusion Overall CEA levels in exclusive hookah

  14. Altered spontaneous activity in young chronic cigarette smokers revealed by regional homogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Jinsong

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have been previously published about the resting state brain activity in young chronic smokers, although many previous fMRI studies have shown that the task-related activity pattern is altered in chronic smokers. Methods In the present study, forty-five healthy smokers (age: 27.9 ± 5.6 year and forty-four healthy non-smoking control subjects (age: 26.3 ± 5.8 year have been imaged with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and analyzed with the regional homogeneity (ReHo approach. Results Compared with healthy controls, decreased ReHo was found in smokers in the right inferior frontal cortex and increased ReHo was found in the left superior parietal lobe (P  Conclusions Our data suggested that, during resting state, neural function is less synchronized in the right inferior frontal cortex and more synchronized in the left superior parietal lobe in chronic smokers compared to non-smokers. The decreased synchronization in the right inferior frontal cortex may reflect lacking of control over reward-related behavior, and the increased synchronization may reflect smoking urges.

  15. How does increasingly plainer cigarette packaging influence adult smokers' perceptions about brand image? An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, M A; Germain, D; Durkin, S J

    2008-12-01

    Cigarette packaging is a key marketing strategy for promoting brand image. Plain packaging has been proposed to limit brand image, but tobacco companies would resist removal of branding design elements. A 3 (brand types) x 4 (degree of plain packaging) between-subject experimental design was used, using an internet online method, to expose 813 adult Australian smokers to one randomly selected cigarette pack, after which respondents completed ratings of the pack. Compared with current cigarette packs with full branding, cigarette packs that displayed progressively fewer branding design elements were perceived increasingly unfavourably in terms of smokers' appraisals of the packs, the smokers who might smoke such packs, and the inferred experience of smoking a cigarette from these packs. For example, cardboard brown packs with the number of enclosed cigarettes displayed on the front of the pack and featuring only the brand name in small standard font at the bottom of the pack face were rated as significantly less attractive and popular than original branded packs. Smokers of these plain packs were rated as significantly less trendy/stylish, less sociable/outgoing and less mature than smokers of the original pack. Compared with original packs, smokers inferred that cigarettes from these plain packs would be less rich in tobacco, less satisfying and of lower quality tobacco. Plain packaging policies that remove most brand design elements are likely to be most successful in removing cigarette brand image associations.

  16. Poor health among smokers obtaining colonoscopy screening: making the case for cessation intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, J L; Pomeranz, J L; Barnett, T E; King-Marshall, E; Nguyen, J; Curbow, B

    2015-05-01

    Assess differences in perceived health status among individuals receiving colonoscopy screening based on smoking status. Cross-sectional data were collected as part of a larger study investigating whether verbal and non-verbal communication and behaviors of gastroenterologists and nurses. Data for this study were collected between 2011 and 2013 among receiving colonoscopy screenings. Data were collected as part of a study assessing patients (n = 1785) undergoing colonoscopy screenings about their expectations, concerns, understanding of the procedure, and perceived health status. Differences between current, former and never smokers were analyzed using a one-way between subjects ANOVA, with a Scheffe post hoc. Post hoc analyses revealed that current smokers were significantly different from former or never smokers on the following variables: days their physical health was not good, days their mental health was not good, days health influenced their activities, days pain influenced their ability to perform activities, perceived general health, and current anxiety. This study looked at perceived health among individuals receiving colonoscopy screening by on smoking status, a relevant population based on the recent Surgeon Generals link. Former smokers reported similar health status across all variables as never smokers, suggesting the effect of quitting smoking on self-perceived health. With this link, tailored smoking cessation messages to smokers receiving colonoscopy screenings may be an excellent vantage point for a smoking cessation intervention. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Menstrual cycle and cue reactivity in women smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kevin M; DeSantis, Stacia M; Carpenter, Matthew J; Saladin, Michael E; LaRowe, Steven D; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P

    2010-02-01

    Emerging research suggests potential effects of the menstrual cycle on various aspects of smoking behavior in women, but results to date have been mixed. The present study sought to explore the influence of menstrual cycle phase on reactivity to smoking in vivo and stressful imagery cues in a sample of non-treatment-seeking women smokers. Via a within-subjects design, nicotine-dependent women (N = 37) participated in a series of four cue reactivity sessions, each during a distinct biologically verified phase of the menstrual cycle (early follicular [EF], mid-follicular [MF], mid-luteal [ML], and late luteal [LL]). Subjective (Questionnaire of Smoking Urges-Brief; QSU-B) and physiological (skin conductance and heart rate) measures of craving and reactivity were collected and compared across phases. Subjective reactive craving (QSU-B) to smoking in vivo cues varied significantly across the menstrual cycle (p = .02) and was higher in both EF and MF phases versus ML and LL phases, but this finding was not sustained when controlling for reactivity to neutral cues. Heart rate reactivity to stressful imagery cues (p = .01) and skin conductance reactivity to smoking in vivo cues (p = .05) varied significantly across the menstrual cycle upon controlling for reactivity to neutral cues, with highest reactivity during the MF phase. Menstrual cycle phase may have an effect on reactivity to smoking-related and stressful cues among women smokers. These findings contribute to an expanding literature, suggesting menstrual cycle effects on smoking behaviors in women.

  18. Examining of Thallium in Cigarette Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Amir; NasehGhafoori, Payam; Rasouli-Azad, Morad; Sehat, Mojtaba; Mehrzad, Fateme; Nekuei, Mina; Aaseth, Jan; Banafshe, Hamid Reza; Mehrpour, Omid

    2017-08-01

    Smoking is one of the sources of thallium which is considered as a toxic heavy metal. The aim of this study was to determine urinary thallium levels and related variables in smokers, compared to a control group. The study was conducted on 56 participants who had smoked continuously during the year before they were referred to Kashan Smoking Cessation Clinic. Fifty-three nonsmokers who were family members or friends of the smokers were selected as the control group. Urinary thallium was measured in both groups (n = 109) using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The mean value (with SD) for urinary thallium in the smokers (10.16 ± 1.82 μg/L) was significantly higher than in the control group (2.39 ± 0.63 μg/L). There was a significant relationship between smoking duration and urinary thallium levels (P = 0.003). In a subgroup of smokers who was addicted to opium and opium residues (n = 9), the mean level of thallium (37.5 ± 13.09 μg/L) was significantly higher than in the other smokers (4.93 ± 4.45; P = 0.001). Multiple regression analysis showed opioid abuse, insomnia, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), together were strong predictors of urinary thallium levels in smokers. There was no significant difference in thallium level in hookah smokers (P = 0.299) or in those with COPD compared to other smokers (P = 0.375). Urinary thallium levels of smokers with clinical signs of depression, sleep disorders, memory loss, and sweating were higher than those of smokers without these signs. Since thallium, as other toxic metals is accumulated in the body, and cigarette smoking also involves carcinogenic exposures and health hazards for passively exposed people, the need for cigarette control policies is emphasized.

  19. The transtheoretical model of smoking: comparison of pregnant and nonpregnant smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, L; Tsoh, J Y; Everett, K; Fava, J L; Guise, B J

    2000-01-01

    Pregnant smokers represent a special population of women smokers. Since smoking affects both the mother and the unborn child, it might be hypothesized that pregnant women should be highly motivated to quit smoking during pregnancy. Results from both naturalistic studies and intervention studies have generally shown only modest changes in smoking during pregnancy. To help design more effective interventions tailored for this special population of smokers, more information is needed on how they differ from other smokers. The current study was designed to examine patterns and differences on constructs of the Transtheoretical Model between low-income culturally diverse pregnant and nonpregnant female smokers. Groups were compared on the distribution of the stages of change. In addition, stage and group comparisons were conducted for the pros and cons of smoking, situational temptations to smoke, and the processes of change. The sample included 103 economically disadvantaged, culturally diverse pregnant women and a matched group of 103 nonpregnant women smokers. Pregnant smokers as a group were similar to their nonpregnant peers on their readiness for quitting. In general, the patterns observed across the stages of change were consistent with those seen in other populations of smokers. The primary difference found between the groups were on the cons of smoking, habit-related temptations to smoke, and experiential processes of change. Specifically, pregnant women perceived a less negative attitude toward their smoking, were more tempted in habit-related situations, and made less use of important experiential processes of change. The implications of these findings for designing interventions tailored for this special group of smokers are discussed.

  20. The measurement of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA pulmonary clearance in normals, asymptomatic smokers and diabetic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Ju; Kim, Seong Jang; Kim, Yong Ki; Kim, Yun Seong; Lee, Min Ki; Park, Soon Kew [College of Medicine, Pusan National Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-01

    We measured pulmonary epithelial permeability by {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA radioaerosol clearance in patients with diabetes and correlated with the presence of microangiopathy to understand the pathophysiology of pulmonary microangiopathy and evaluate {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA radioaerosol clearance as a diagnostic test to assess pulmonary microangiopathy. We performed {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA radioaerosol scan in 10 normal subjects, 10 asymptomatic smokers, 20 diabetic patients without history of smoking (10 with microangiopathy, 10 without microangiopathy). {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA clearance half-time (T{sub 1/2}) was calculated, then compared with the result of chest radiography and pulmonary function test. Chest radiography and pulmonary function test were normal in all subjects. There were no significant difference of clinical or laboratory characteristics between these groups except age. The diabetic patients with microangiophaty were significantly older (p<0.05). The T{sub 1/2} of normal subjects and asymptomatic smokers were significantly different (65.2{+-}23.7 min vs 39.6{+-}9.8 min, p<0.05). For diabetic patients with microangiopathy, the T{sub 1/2} was 90.5{+-}46.5 min and significantly delayed when compared with those of normals and asymptomatic smokers (p<0.05). However, the T{sub 1/2} of diabetic patients without microangiopathy, 70.0{+-}12.7 min, was not significantly different from those of normals or asymptomatic smokers (p>0.05). No significant correlation was found between the T{sub 1/2} and spirometric parameters including DLco, FVC, FEV{sub 1}, FEV{sub 1}/FVC (%) and FEF{sub 25-75%} in all subjects, and between the T{sub 1/2} and duration of diabetes in diabetic patients. Eventhough the influence of age can't be excluded, delayed {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA clearance half-time (T{sub 1/2}) in diabetic patients with microangiopathy indicates decreased pulmonary capillary permeability as one of the pathophysiologic results of pulmonary microangiopaththy. Further studies are needed in

  1. Blackened bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in crack smokers. A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenebaum, E; Copeland, A; Grewal, R

    1993-11-01

    A retrospective study was performed on heavily pigmented pulmonary cytologic specimens from 14 hospital patients to determine the clinical features distinguishing these cases. The lavage fluid or sputum in each case was turbid and gray or black, exceeding the blackness usually seen in heavy tobacco smokers dwelling in the same urban environment. Excessive carbonaceous material was observed in the cytoplasm of pulmonary alveolar macrophages or the extracellular compartment of the smears. The latter feature is not seen in cigarette smokers. Many other pigmentary sources were ruled out, including melanin, hemosiderin, medicinal charcoal, India ink, and hematoxylin crystals. The common feature of the patients was that they recently or currently smoked the crack form of cocaine heavily; five patients also had positive toxicologic results for cocaine at admission. The authors suggest that blackened bronchoalveolar lavage fluid indicates the possibility of crack cocaine smoking and the associated sequelae, particularly when the carbonaceous material is present in the extracellular compartment.

  2. No intention to comply with influenza and pneumococcal vaccination : behavioural determinants among smokers and non-smokers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looijmans-van den Akker, I; van den Heuvel, P.M.; Verheij, Th J M; van Delden, J J M; van Essen, G A; Hak, E

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Smoking increases the risk for influenza and pneumococcal disease, but vaccination uptake is lower among smokers than non-smokers. We therefore aimed to determine reasons for not complying with vaccination among smokers and non-smokers. METHOD: In 2005 a self-administered questionnaire

  3. Attitudes to smoking cessation and triggers to relapse among Chinese male smokers

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher K John; Yang Tingzhong; Li Fuzhong; Danaher Brian G

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Smoking is related to many diseases, and the relapse to smoking after cessation in China is noticeable. We examined the attitudes of Chinese male smokers regarding smoking cessation and reasons for relapse. Methods We interviewed 201 male smokers in Hangzhou City, Zhejiang province, China who had tried to quit smoking at least once in order to identify reasons for quitting and situations triggering relapse. Results The most significant reported reasons for quitting include...

  4. Dimensions of impulsive behavior and treatment outcomes for adolescent smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Millie; Penfold, Robert B; Hawkins, Ariane; Maccombs, Jared; Wallace, Bryan; Reynolds, Brady

    2014-02-01

    Adolescent cigarette smoking rates remain a significant public health concern, and as a result there is a continued need to understand factors that contribute to an adolescent's ability to reduce or quit smoking. Previous research suggests that impulsive behavior may be associated with treatment outcomes for smoking. The current research (N = 81) explored 3 dimensions of impulsive behavior as predictors of treatment response from a social-cognitive type program for adolescent smokers (i.e., Not On Tobacco; N-O-T). Measures included laboratory assessments of delay discounting, sustained attention, and behavioral disinhibition. A self-report measure of impulsivity was also included. Adolescent smokers who had better sustained attention were more likely to reduce or quit smoking by the end of treatment. No other measures of impulsivity were significantly associated with treatment response. From these findings, an adolescent smoker's ability to sustain attention appears to be an important behavioral attribute to consider when implementing smoking cessation programs such as N-O-T.

  5. Acute Exacerbations and Lung Function Loss in Smokers with and without Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dransfield, Mark T; Kunisaki, Ken M; Strand, Matthew J; Anzueto, Antonio; Bhatt, Surya P; Bowler, Russell P; Criner, Gerard J; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Hanania, Nicola A; Nath, Hrudaya; Putcha, Nirupama; Roark, Sarah E; Wan, Emily S; Washko, George R; Wells, J Michael; Wendt, Christine H; Make, Barry J

    2017-02-01

    Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) increase the risk of death and drive healthcare costs, but whether they accelerate loss of lung function remains controversial. Whether exacerbations in subjects with mild COPD or similar acute respiratory events in smokers without airflow obstruction affect lung function decline is unknown. To determine the association between acute exacerbations of COPD (and acute respiratory events in smokers without COPD) and the change in lung function over 5 years of follow-up. We examined data on the first 2,000 subjects who returned for a second COPDGene visit 5 years after enrollment. Baseline data included demographics, smoking history, and computed tomography emphysema. We defined exacerbations (and acute respiratory events in those without established COPD) as acute respiratory symptoms requiring either antibiotics or systemic steroids, and severe events by the need for hospitalization. Throughout the 5-year follow-up period, we collected self-reported acute respiratory event data at 6-month intervals. We used linear mixed models to fit FEV 1 decline based on reported exacerbations or acute respiratory events. In subjects with COPD, exacerbations were associated with excess FEV 1 decline, with the greatest effect in Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage 1, where each exacerbation was associated with an additional 23 ml/yr decline (95% confidence interval, 2-44; P = 0.03), and each severe exacerbation with an additional 87 ml/yr decline (95% confidence interval, 23-151; P = 0.008); statistically significant but smaller effects were observed in Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage 2 and 3 subjects. In subjects without airflow obstruction, acute respiratory events were not associated with additional FEV 1 decline. Exacerbations are associated with accelerated lung function loss in subjects with established COPD, particularly those with mild disease

  6. The role of impulse oscillometry in assessment of airway obstruction in smokers and ex-smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taher El-Naggar

    2012-10-01

    Conclusion: IOS is an effective, easy to perform, and a non invasive method for the assessment of airway obstruction in obstructive pulmonary disorders. Although, there is no significant difference between impulse oscillometry and spirometry parameters in early detection of airway obstruction in smokers and ex-smokers groups.

  7. Non-smokers' responses when smokers light up: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Daniella; Wakefield, Melanie; Durkin, Sarah

    2007-07-01

    This study examines the extent to which the 'common courtesy approach' is adopted by non-smokers when in the presence of smokers, in the state of Victoria, Australia, where restrictions on smoking in public places are relatively comprehensive. 4,765 non-smokers aged 18 years and over were surveyed over two representative population telephone-administered surveys of randomly sampled Victorians conducted in 2004 and 2005. Only 5.5% of non-smokers said they would ask a person to stop smoking if they lit up a cigarette nearby. The majority of non-smokers (74.7%) reported they would move away and 16.4% said they would do nothing. When asked what they would do if, in a public place, someone next to them asked if they minded whether they smoked, 48.8% of non-smokers reported they would say they would prefer it if they didn't smoke, while 28.0% reported that they would tell the person they don't mind when they would prefer that person not smoke. Overall, 46.7% of non-smokers indicated they would consent to be exposed to second-hand smoke if someone asked them this question. Our findings underline the importance of smoke-free policies in protecting a significant proportion of the non-smoker population, who remain unlikely to protect themselves individually.

  8. Cigarette Smokers, Never-Smokers, and Transitions: Implications for Successful Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruchno, Rachel; Hahn, Sarah; Wilson-Genderson, Maureen

    2012-01-01

    One of the social identities held by people is defined by whether or not they smoke cigarettes. Although this identity can and does change for many people over the course of their lives, most research has not examined the effects of transitioning from a smoker to a non-smoker. Using a life span perspective, our analyses contrasted the extent to…

  9. Multiple analytical approaches reveal distinct gene-environment interactions in smokers and non smokers in lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhshan Ihsan

    Full Text Available Complex disease such as cancer results from interactions of multiple genetic and environmental factors. Studying these factors singularly cannot explain the underlying pathogenetic mechanism of the disease. Multi-analytical approach, including logistic regression (LR, classification and regression tree (CART and multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR, was applied in 188 lung cancer cases and 290 controls to explore high order interactions among xenobiotic metabolizing genes and environmental risk factors. Smoking was identified as the predominant risk factor by all three analytical approaches. Individually, CYP1A1*2A polymorphism was significantly associated with increased lung cancer risk (OR = 1.69;95%CI = 1.11-2.59,p = 0.01, whereas EPHX1 Tyr113His and SULT1A1 Arg213His conferred reduced risk (OR = 0.40;95%CI = 0.25-0.65,p<0.001 and OR = 0.51;95%CI = 0.33-0.78,p = 0.002 respectively. In smokers, EPHX1 Tyr113His and SULT1A1 Arg213His polymorphisms reduced the risk of lung cancer, whereas CYP1A1*2A, CYP1A1*2C and GSTP1 Ile105Val imparted increased risk in non-smokers only. While exploring non-linear interactions through CART analysis, smokers carrying the combination of EPHX1 113TC (Tyr/His, SULT1A1 213GG (Arg/Arg or AA (His/His and GSTM1 null genotypes showed the highest risk for lung cancer (OR = 3.73;95%CI = 1.33-10.55,p = 0.006, whereas combined effect of CYP1A1*2A 6235CC or TC, SULT1A1 213GG (Arg/Arg and betel quid chewing showed maximum risk in non-smokers (OR = 2.93;95%CI = 1.15-7.51,p = 0.01. MDR analysis identified two distinct predictor models for the risk of lung cancer in smokers (tobacco chewing, EPHX1 Tyr113His, and SULT1A1 Arg213His and non-smokers (CYP1A1*2A, GSTP1 Ile105Val and SULT1A1 Arg213His with testing balance accuracy (TBA of 0.6436 and 0.6677 respectively. Interaction entropy interpretations of MDR results showed non-additive interactions of tobacco chewing with

  10. Antibiotic uptake by alveolar macrophages of smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, W L; Boozer, R M; King-Thompson, N L

    1985-01-01

    Cigarette smoking, particularly when associated with chronic pulmonary disease, increases the risk of respiratory tract infection. Thus, we elevated the uptake of antibiotics by alveolar macrophages (AM) obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage from persons who smoke and have associated pulmonary abnormalities, circumstances which adversely affect certain macrophage functions. The entry of radiolabeled drugs into AM was determined by a velocity-gradient centrifugation technique, and uptake was expressed as the ratio of cellular to extracellular antibiotic concentration (C/E). Cefamandole and penicillin G were taken up poorly by the AM obtained from smokers (C/E less than or equal to 1). Cellular levels of isoniazid, gentamicin, and tetracycline were similar to their extracellular concentrations. The lipid-soluble drugs lincomycin, chloramphenicol, and rifampin were concentrated severalfold by the AM from smokers (C/E = 3 to 11). Ethambutol also entered macrophages readily (C/E = 11). Erythromycin and clindamycin were massively concentrated by the AM from smokers (C/E = 23 to 56). The AM of smokers accumulated a lipid-soluble antibiotic (rifampin) and actively transported agents (erythromycin propionate, clindamycin) more avidly than did the AM of nonsmokers. Augmented uptake of these antibiotics by the AM of smokers may be related to structural and functional alterations induced by smoking. PMID:3985596

  11. The use of planned behavior theory in predicting cigarette smoking among Waterpipe smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanazi, Naif H; Lee, Jerry W; Dos Santos, Hildemar; Job, Jayakaran S; Bahjri, Khaled

    2017-01-01

    Waterpipe and cigarette smoking have been found to be associated with each other as cigarette smokers were more likely to be waterpipe users than non-cigarette smokers. Also, waterpipe smokers were likely to be former daily cigarette users. The aim of this study is to examine the likelihood of waterpipe use leading to cigarette use among current waterpipe users using theory of planned behavior. Four hundred six current waterpipe smokers who initially had started tobacco use with the waterpipe were recruited from 15 waterpipe lounges in 2015. From a total of 70 waterpipe lounges in Riyadh, the 15 waterpipe lounges were selected randomly and participants were also selected randomly inside each waterpipe lounge based on the table or section number. The survey was developed using the Qualtrics Online Survey Software and participants completed a survey using iPad tablets. Cigarette smoking and intention to smoke cigarettes were predicted by attitude and perceived behavioral control. There was no direct effect of subjective norm on the cigarette use behavior, yet subjective norm had a statistically significant indirect effect on intentions through attitude and perceived behavioral control. The findings of this study could be useful in prevention/intervention programs aimed at reducing tobacco smoking behaviors among waterpipe users. Intervention programs might be directed at the attitude and perceived behavioral control by targeting underlying behavioral and control beliefs. The theory of planned behavior provided solid explanations of intention to use cigarettes among waterpipe smokers.

  12. PULMONARY AND BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SMOKER AND NON-SMOKER MODERN DANCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Agopyan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Although the harmful effects of smoking on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems have been established for a long time, the effect on physiological and physical parameters in modern female dancers is not well documented. Objective: To determine differences in selected pulmonary functions, biochemical parameters, and body composition in female smoker and non-smoker modern dancers who are university or graduate students. Methods: A total of twenty-two female modern dancers (mean age of 24.6 ± 4.3 years, who were non-smokers (n = 11 and smokers (n = 11, voluntarily participated in the study. The smokers had been smoking 1 to 20 cigarettes per day for an average period of seven years. The pulmonary function test Mir Spirobank Spirometer, (Italy was applied; selected biochemical parameters were tested, and various anthropometric measurements (height, weight and seven skinfold thickness were performed. The results of body composition were evaluated using Jackson-Pollock equations. Intergroup comparisons were performed using the Mann-Whitney U test. Result: No significant differences were found between smoker and non-smoker dancers in terms of body composition (body fat, % body fat, lean body fat and selected biochemical parameters (p > 0.05. However, non-smokers had prediction values of forced expiratory volume during the first second (FEV1 and peak expiratory flow (PEF significantly better (p < 0.05. The effect of smoking on the performance of female modern dancers should be examined in a longitudinal study, with a higher number of participants. Conclusion: It was observed that smoking reduces lung pulmonary capacity at a certain rate, although the biochemical parameters and body composition of the female smoker and non-smoker dancers were similar.

  13. Impact of Norm Perceptions and Guilt on Audience Response to Anti-Smoking Norm PSAs: The Case of Korean Male Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyegyu; Paek, Hye-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine how norm appeals and guilt influence smokers' behavioural intention. Design: Quasi-experimental design. Setting: South Korea. Method: Two hundred and fifty-five male smokers were randomly assigned to descriptive, injunctive, or subjective anti-smoking norm messages. After they viewed the norm messages, their norm perceptions,…

  14. Smoking topography and abstinence in adult female smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Erin A; Saladin, Michael E; Baker, Nathaniel L; Carpenter, Matthew J; Gray, Kevin M

    2013-12-01

    Preliminary evidence, within both adults and adolescents, suggests that the intensity with which cigarettes are smoked (i.e., smoking topography) is predictive of success during a cessation attempt. These reports have also shown topography to be superior compared to other variables, such as cigarettes per day, in the prediction of abstinence. The possibility that gender may influence this predictive relationship has not been evaluated but may be clinically useful in tailoring gender-specific interventions. Within the context of a clinical trial for smoking cessation among women, adult daily smokers completed a laboratory session that included a 1-hour ad libitum smoking period in which measures of topography were collected (N=135). Participants were then randomized to active medication (nicotine patch vs. varenicline) and abstinence was monitored for 4weeks. Among all smoking topography measures and all abstinence outcomes, a moderate association was found between longer puff duration and greater puff volume and continued smoking during the active 4-week treatment phase, but only within the nicotine patch group. Based on the weak topography-abstinence relationship among female smokers found in the current study, future studies should focus on explicit gender comparisons to examine if these associations are specific to or more robust in male smokers. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. PREP advertisement features affect smokers' beliefs regarding potential harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, A A; Tang, K Z; Tuller, M D; Cappella, J N

    2008-09-01

    The Institute of Medicine report on potential reduced exposure products (PREPs) recommends that advertising and labelling be regulated to prevent explicitly or implicitly false or misleading claims. Belief that a product is less harmful may increase use or prevent smoking cessation. To determine the effect of altering advertisement features on smokers' beliefs of the harm exposure from a PREP. A Quest advertisement was digitally altered using computer software and presented to participants using web-based television recruitment contracted through a survey company. 500 current smokers completed demographic and smoking history questions, were randomised to view one of three advertisement conditions, then completed eight items assessing their beliefs of the harmfulness of the product. Advertisement conditions included the original, unaltered advertisement; a "red" condition where the cigarette packages were digitally altered to the colour red, implying increased harm potential; and a "no text" condition where all text was removed to reduce explicit product information. Polytomous logistic regression, using "incorrect," "unsure" and "correct" as outcomes, and advertisement type and covariates as predictors, was used for analyses. Participants randomised to the "no text" advertisement were less likely to be incorrect in their beliefs that Quest cigarettes are lower in tar, less addictive, less likely to cause cancer, have fewer chemicals, are healthier and make smoking safer. Smokers can form false beliefs about the harmfulness of PREP products based on how the PREPs are marketed. Careful examination must be undertaken to provide empirical evidence to better formulate regulatory principles of PREP advertising.

  16. Small cell lung cancer in never-smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Durán, María; Ruano-Ravina, Alberto; Kelsey, Karl T; Parente-Lamelas, Isaura; Provencio, Mariano; Leiro-Fernández, Virginia; Abal-Arca, José; Montero-Martínez, Carmen; Vidal-Garcia, Iria; Pena, Carolina; Castro-Añón, Olalla; Golpe-Gómez, Antonio; Martínez, Cristina; Guzmán-Taveras, Rosirys; Mejuto-Martí, María José; Fernández-Villar, Alberto; Barros-Dios, Juan Miguel

    2016-03-01

    Our aim was to describe the characteristics of a case-series of never-smoker small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cases.Cases of SCLC were selected from a prospective, multicenter, hospital-based case-control study performed in Spain. Participants were never-smokers older than 30 years with an anatomo-pathological confirmation of primary lung cancer. We collected clinical and epidemiological variables according to the study's protocol.We included 19 SCLC cases, 18 females (94.7%), median age 75 years (interquartile range (IQR) 70-80 years). Median residential radon concentration was 195 Bq·m(-3) (IQR 130-229 Bq·m(-3)). 10 patients had limited disease and nine had extended disease. Median survival was 242 days (IQR 94-496 days); 1- and 2-year survival were 36.8% and 17.6%, respectively. Survival was much higher for individuals with limited disease than for those with extended disease (median 336 versus 235 days; 1-year survival 50% versus 22.2% and 2-year survival 27% versus 0%, respectively). Performance status at diagnosis was closely related to survival.SCLC is an infrequent, highly aggressive disease in never-smokers. Survival is poor, even for limited disease. Age at diagnosis in SCLC is higher than that observed for never-smokers with adenocarcinoma. Residential radon exposure is higher than the action levels recommended by the World Health Organization. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  17. Cigarette constituent health communications for smokers: impact of chemical, imagery, and source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitt, Sarah; Sheeran, Paschal; Jarman, Kristen L; Ranney, Leah M; Schmidt, Allison M; Noar, Seth M; Huang, Li-Ling; Goldstein, Adam O

    2017-10-03

    Communication campaigns are incorporating tobacco constituent messaging to reach smokers, yet there is a dearth of research on how such messages should be constructed or will be received by smokers. In a 2x2x2 experiment, we manipulated three cigarette constituent message components: (1) the toxic constituent of tobacco (arsenic vs. lead) with a corresponding health effect, (2) the presence or absence of an evocative image, and (3) the source of the message (FDA vs. no source). We recruited smokers (N = 1,669, 55.4% women) via an online platform and randomized them to 1 of the 8 message conditions. Participants viewed the message and rated its believability and perceived effectiveness, the credibility of the message source, and action expectancies (i.e., likelihood of seeking additional information and help with quitting as a result of seeing the message). We found significant main effects of image, constituent, and source on outcomes. The use of arsenic as the constituent, the presence of an evocative image, and the FDA as the source increased the believability, source credibility, and perceived effectiveness of the tobacco constituent health message. Multiple elements of a constituent message, including type of constituent, imagery, and message source, impact their reception among smokers. Specifically, communication campaigns targeting smokers that utilize arsenic as the tobacco constituent, visual imagery, and the FDA logo may be particularly effective in changing key outcomes that are associated with subsequent attitude and behavioral changes. This paper describes how components of communication campaigns about cigarette constituents are perceived. Multiple elements of a tobacco constituent message, including type of constituent, image, and message source may influence the reception of messages among current smokers. Communication campaigns targeting smokers that utilize arsenic as the tobacco constituent, visual imagery, and the FDA logo may be particularly

  18. Predictors of smoking cessation in smokers with chronic periodontitis: a 24-month study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Gislene; Rosa, Ecinele Francisca; Gomes, Elaine Fueta; Guglielmetti, Mariana Rocha; Corraini, Priscila; Takano, Ricardo Koji; Ferreira, Viviane Lé; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre; Lotufo, João Paulo Becker; Souza, Edinalva Tanajura Cruz; Pannuti, Cláudio Mendes

    2016-10-10

    The purpose of this 24-month study was to identify predictors of smoking cessation in a cohort of smokers with chronic periodontitis, attending a multidisciplinary smoking cessation program. Of the 286 subjects screened, 116 were included and received non-surgical periodontal treatment and smoking cessation therapy, which consisted of lectures, cognitive behavioral therapy, and pharmacotherapy, according to their individual needs. During initial periodontal treatment, dentists actively motivated the study subjects to stop smoking, using motivational interviewing techniques. Further smoking cessation counseling and support were also provided by the dentists, during periodontal maintenance sessions at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months of follow-up. Smoking status was assessed by means of a structured questionnaire, and was validated by exhaled carbon monoxide (CO) measurements. The Fagerström Test for Cigarette Dependence was used to assess smoking dependence. Of the 61 individuals that remained up to the 24-month examination, 31, 21 and 18 declared that they were not smoking at 3, 12 and 24 months, respectively. Smoking cessation after 24 months was associated with the male gender (OR = 3.77, 95%CI = 1.16-12.30), baseline CO levels less than 10ppm (OR = 5.81, 95%CI 1.76-19.23), not living or working with another smoker (OR = 7.38, 95%CI 1.76-30.98) and a lower mean Fagerström test score (OR = 5.63, 95%CI 1.55-20.43). We concluded that smoking cessation was associated with demographic, smoking history and cigarette dependence variables.

  19. Predictors of smoking cessation in smokers with chronic periodontitis: a 24-month study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gislene INOUE

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this 24-month study was to identify predictors of smoking cessation in a cohort of smokers with chronic periodontitis, attending a multidisciplinary smoking cessation program. Of the 286 subjects screened, 116 were included and received non-surgical periodontal treatment and smoking cessation therapy, which consisted of lectures, cognitive behavioral therapy, and pharmacotherapy, according to their individual needs. During initial periodontal treatment, dentists actively motivated the study subjects to stop smoking, using motivational interviewing techniques. Further smoking cessation counseling and support were also provided by the dentists, during periodontal maintenance sessions at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months of follow-up. Smoking status was assessed by means of a structured questionnaire, and was validated by exhaled carbon monoxide (CO measurements. The Fagerström Test for Cigarette Dependence was used to assess smoking dependence. Of the 61 individuals that remained up to the 24-month examination, 31, 21 and 18 declared that they were not smoking at 3, 12 and 24 months, respectively. Smoking cessation after 24 months was associated with the male gender (OR = 3.77, 95%CI = 1.16–12.30, baseline CO levels less than 10ppm (OR = 5.81, 95%CI 1.76–19.23, not living or working with another smoker (OR = 7.38, 95%CI 1.76–30.98 and a lower mean Fagerström test score (OR = 5.63, 95%CI 1.55–20.43. We concluded that smoking cessation was associated with demographic, smoking history and cigarette dependence variables.

  20. Effects of acute cigarette smoking on total blood count and markers of oxidative stress in active and passive smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymperaki, E; Makedou, K; Iliadis, S; Vagdatli, E

    2015-01-01

    Free radicals, as a product of cigarette smoke, are considered to have deleterious effects causing oxidative stress. Acute active smoking seems to be followed by transient leukocytosis and delayed increase in neutrophil activation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the oxidative status of smokers and passive non-smokers, as well as the impact that acute cigarette smoking has on hematological parameters. Thirty-two healthy volunteers, 16 active smokers (Group A) aged 20-23 years and 16 age-matched, non-smokers (Group B), 18 women and 14 men in total, participated voluntarily in the study. All subjects did not have any food, drink, or cigarette smoking for eight hours before the study. Each time, two active smokers and two non-smokers were exposed simultaneously for half an hour to the smoke of two cigarettes smoked consecutively by the smokers. Blood was drawn before and after the exposure to cigarette smoke. Whole blood was analyzed immediately for total blood count parameters and serum was stored in -70(◦)C until serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and vitamin E (VitE), and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were determined. No statistical significant difference was observed in the values of white blood cells and their subpopulations between the two groups and within the same group before and after exposure to cigarette smoke. In the group of smokers, granulocyte/lymphocyte ratio increased significantly, MDA levels showed significant elevation and protective VitE serum levels decreased significantly, whereas TAC was reduced, but not significantly, after the exposure. In the group of passive, non-smokers the results of the blood count parameters, MDA and VitE were similar to Group A, and there was a significant decrease in TAC, as well. Between the two groups, only hematocrit values and MDA levels differed significantly before the exposure to smoke, and no other significant difference was detected before or after the exposure, between active and

  1. Cigarette smokers' classification of tobacco products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casseus, M; Garmon, J; Hrywna, M; Delnevo, C D

    2016-11-01

    Cigarette consumption has declined in the USA. However, cigar consumption has increased. This may be due in part to some cigarette smokers switching to filtered cigars as a less expensive substitute for cigarettes. Additionally, some cigarette smokers may perceive and consume little filtered cigars as cigarettes. The purpose of this study was to determine how cigarette smokers classify tobacco products when presented with photographs of those products. An online survey was conducted with a sample of 344 self-identified cigarette smokers. Respondents were presented with pictures of various types of tobacco products, both with and without packaging, and then asked to categorise them as either a cigarette, little cigar, cigarillo, cigar or machine-injected roll-your-own cigarette (RYO). Respondents were also asked about their tobacco use and purchasing behaviour. Overall, respondents had difficulty distinguishing between cigarettes, little cigars, cigarillos and RYO. When presented with images of the products without packaging, 93% of respondents identified RYO as a cigarette, while 42% identified a little cigar as a cigarette. Additionally, respondents stated that they would consider purchasing little cigars as substitutes for cigarettes because of the price advantage. The results of this survey suggest that when presented with photographs of tobacco products, large proportions of current smokers were unable to differentiate between cigarettes, little cigars, cigarillos, RYO and cigars. Findings have implications for existing public health efforts targeting cigarette smokers, and underscore the need to review current definitions of tobacco products and federal excise taxes on such products. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. An uncommon cause of progressive visual loss in a heavy smoker ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Loss of vision due to eye metastasis is generally uncommon, representing an ophthalmological diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. We here report a case of a smoker patient finally diagnosed with lung cancer, whose initial symptom was visual loss due to choroidal metastasis. Given that the majority of subjects ...

  3. Symptoms in smokers trying to quit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helgason Asgeir R

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims To describe the prevalence and intensity of different symptoms in relation to tobacco abstinence. To explore latent dimensions between symptoms in smokers trying to quit. Design A cross sectional study using a questionnaire to retrospectively assess symptoms over a period of 12 months. Setting Swedish telephone quitline, a nationwide free of charge service. Participants All 741 individuals who had called the quitline and signed up for smoking cessation treatment between February 2000 to November 2001 and reported to have been smoke free for at least 24 hours during the previous 12 month period from first contact. Measurements Assessments were made by self-report, and abstinence was defined as "not a single puff of smoke during the last week". A factor analysis approach where individual items aggregate into factors was used to explore the relationship between the different symptoms. Findings High intensity of symptoms related to unsuccessful quitting attempts and included craving, irritability, apprehension/anxiety, difficulties concentrating, restlessness, depression/depressed mood, and insomnia. The factor loadings of all 17 symptoms resulted in three factors with factor 1, psychological being the most important. High scores on this factor relates to unsuccessful quitting attempts. Using Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT for 5 weeks or longer, reduced symptoms included in factor 1. The other two factors were factor 2 physiological and factor 3 neurological. Conclusion Symptoms that are psychological and/or neurological in nature are interrelated and appear to be the most significant obstacles for successful quitting attempts in a population-based setting. These symptoms may be successfully treated with NRT.

  4. Differential gene expression patterns between smokers and non‐smokers: cause or consequence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Rick; Brooks, Andy; Willemsen, Gonneke; van Grootheest, Gerard; de Geus, Eco; Smit, Jan H.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The molecular mechanisms causing smoking‐induced health decline are largely unknown. To elucidate the molecular pathways involved in cause and consequences of smoking behavior, we conducted a genome‐wide gene expression study in peripheral blood samples targeting 18 238 genes. Data of 743 smokers, 1686 never smokers and 890 ex‐smokers were available from two population‐based cohorts from the Netherlands. In addition, data of 56 monozygotic twin pairs discordant for ever smoking were used. One hundred thirty‐two genes were differentially expressed between current smokers and never smokers (P expression of these 132 genes was classified into reversible (94 genes), slowly reversible (31 genes), irreversible (6 genes) or inconclusive (1 gene). Expression of 6 of the 132 genes (three reversible and three slowly reversible) was confirmed to be reactive to smoking as they were differentially expressed in monozygotic pairs discordant for smoking. Cis‐expression quantitative trait loci for GPR56 and RARRES3 (downregulated in smokers) were associated with increased number of cigarettes smoked per day in a large genome‐wide association meta‐analysis, suggesting a causative effect of GPR56 and RARRES3 expression on smoking behavior. In conclusion, differential gene expression patterns in smokers are extensive and cluster in several underlying disease pathways. Gene expression differences seem mainly direct consequences of smoking, and largely reversible after smoking cessation. However, we also identified DNA variants that may influence smoking behavior via the mediating gene expression. PMID:26594007

  5. CT screening for lung cancer: Importance of emphysema for never smokers and smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henschke, Claudia I; Yip, Rowena; Boffetta, Paolo; Markowitz, Steven; Miller, Albert; Hanaoka, Takaomi; Wu, Ning; Zulueta, Javier J; Yankelevitz, David F

    2015-04-01

    To address the prevalence of lung cancer in high and low-risk people according to their smoking history, age, and CT findings of emphysema. We reviewed the baseline low-dose CT scans of 62,124 current, former and never smokers, aged 40-90 to determine the prevalence of lung cancer. We performed logistic regression analysis of the prevalence of lung cancer to determine the odds ratio (OR) for emphysema, conditionally on age, female gender, and ethnicity. The prevalence of lung cancer was 1.4% (95% CI: 1.3-1.6) for current smokers, 1.1% (95% CI: 1.0-1.2) for former smokers, and 0.4% (95% CI: 0.3-0.6) for never smokers. Emphysema was identified in 28.5% (6,684), 20.6% (5,422), and 1.6% (194) of current, former, and never smokers, respectively. The prevalence of lung cancer among current smokers was 1.1% for those without emphysema vs. 2.3% for those with emphysema (odds ratio [OR] 1.8; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4-2.2) and the corresponding difference for former smokers was 0.9% vs. 1.8% (OR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.3-2.2), and for never smokers, it was 0.4% vs. 2.6% (OR: 6.3; 95% CI: 2.4-16.9). Identification of emphysema in low-dose CT scans increases the risk of lung cancer and is important in determining follow-up of current, former, and never smokers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Motivating the unmotivated for health behavior change: a randomized trial of cessation induction for smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Matthew J; Alberg, Anthony J; Gray, Kevin M; Saladin, Michael E

    2010-04-01

    Many smokers remain unwilling or unable to make a quit attempt. For these smokers, novel strategies to induce quit attempts are necessary to achieve further reductions in smoking prevalence. This article describes the design and methods of an ongoing nationwide telephone-based clinical trial for cessation induction, the principal aim of which is to test the hypothesis that samples of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), can induce quit attempts among smokers otherwise unmotivated to quit. Smokers are recruited proactively through online channels. A 'behavioral filter' is used to identify and separate motivated versus unmotivated smokers, the latter of whom (N = 750) are formally entered into the clinical trial. Participants are randomized to one of two treatment conditions designed to promote self-efficacy and motivation to quit: (1) practice quit attempt (PQA) or (2) PQA plus NRT sampling. The primary outcome measure tested over a 6-month follow-up is the incidence of additional quit attempts as well as hypothesized mediators of treatment effects. This study details the challenges of identifying and treating smokers who are unmotivated to quit. Strengths include a novel treatment approach, tested among a group of proactively recruited smokers nationwide, with a unique method of identifying cessation-resistant smokers. The omission of a true control group, testing the effect of the PQA itself, is an inherent limitation to the study design. Online recruitment presents additional study challenges, all of which are discussed in detail. The study has translational potential to guide both clinical and policy recommendations for cessation induction. Further, while the focus is on smoking, this trial may serve as an example to researchers and clinicians who focus on other health behaviors, and who themselves are challenged with motivating people who are unmotivated for change.

  7. Aiming at Tobacco Harm Reduction: A survey comparing smokers differing in readiness to quit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarafidou Jasmin-Olga

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Greece has the highest smoking rates (in the 15-nation bloc in Europe. The purpose of this study was to investigate Greek smokers' intention and appraisal of capability to quit employing the theoretical frameworks of Decisional Balance (DB and Cognitive Dissonance (CD. Methods A cross-sectional study including 401 Greek habitual smokers (205 men and 195 women, falling into four groups according to their intention and self-appraised capability to quit smoking was carried out. Participants completed a questionnaire recording their attitude towards smoking, intention and self appraised capability to quit smoking, socio-demographic information, as well as a DB and a CD scale. Results The most numerous group of smokers (38% consisted of those who neither intended nor felt capable to quit and these smokers perceived more benefits of smoking than negatives. DB changed gradually according to smokers' "readiness" to quit: the more ready they felt to quit the less the pros of smoking outnumbered the cons. Regarding relief of CD, smokers who intended but did not feel capable to quit employed more "excuses" compared to those who felt capable. Additionally smokers with a past history of unsuccessful quit attempts employed fewer "excuses" even though they were more frequently found among those who intended but did not feel capable to quit. Conclusion Findings provide support for the DB theory. On the other hand, "excuses" do not appear to be extensively employed to reduce the conflict between smoking and concern for health. There is much heterogeneity regarding smokers' intention and appraised capability to quit, reflecting theoretical and methodological problems with the distinction among stages of change. Harm reduction programs and interventions designed to increase the implementation of smoking cessation should take into account the detrimental effect of past unsuccessful quit attempts.

  8. What is behind smoker support for new smokefree areas? National survey data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Nick

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some countries have started to extend indoor smokefree laws to cover cars and various outdoor settings. However, policy-modifiable factors around smoker support for these new laws are not well described. Methods The New Zealand (NZ arm of the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Survey (ITC Project derives its sample from the NZ Health Survey (a national sample. From this sample we surveyed adult smokers (n = 1376. Results For the six settings considered, 59% of smokers supported at least three new completely smokefree areas. Only 2% favoured smoking being allowed in all the six new settings. Support among Maori, Pacific and Asian smokers relative to European smokers was elevated in multivariate analyses, but confidence intervals often included 1.0. Also in the multivariate analyses, "strong support" by smokers for new smokefree area laws was associated with greater knowledge of the second-hand smoke (SHS hazard, and with behaviours to reduce SHS exposure towards others. Strong support was also associated with reporting having smokefree cars (aOR = 1.68, 95% CI = 1.21 - 2.34; and support for tobacco control regulatory measures by government (aOR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.32 - 2.01. There was also stronger support by smokers with a form of financial stress (not spending on household essentials. Conclusions Smokers from a range of population groups can show majority support for new outdoor and smokefree car laws. Some of these findings are consistent with the use of public health strategies to support new smokefree laws, such as enhancing public knowledge of the second-hand smoke hazard.

  9. Cross-Sectional Study of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Prevalence Among Smokers, Ex-Smokers, and Never-Smokers in Almaty, Kazakhstan: Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, Almaz; Zhussupov, Baurzhan; Sharman, Dana; Stambekova, Assel; Yeraliyev, Sattar

    2017-07-25

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is significantly underdiagnosed in Kazakhstan, and there is no previously conducted study on COPD prevalence in the country. The purpose of this study is to assess the prevalence of COPD among individuals aged 40 to 59 years based on results of spirometry before and after bronchodilator, presence of structural changes in the lungs (emphysema, inflammatory changes, and thickening of the walls of the large and small airways) detected by computer tomography, and the symptoms of COPD. The study has 3 study groups: smokers of conventional cigarettes, those who had quit smoking 1 to 5 years ago, and those who haven't smoked cigarettes. This is an observational study with a cross-sectional design among individuals aged 40 to 59 years in Almaty, Kazakhstan. The sample of 900 individuals of both sexes contains 500 smokers, 200 ex-smokers, and 200 never-smokers. Study measures include spirometry, chest computed tomography, electrocardiography, physical exams, laboratory testing of serum, anthropometry, and 6-minute walk test. Data are collected by computer-assisted personal interviewing with tablets. The questionnaire was designed to explore possible COPD risk factors including history of smoking, current smoking, level of smoking exposure (in pack-years), passive smoking, occupational and environmental hazards, and covariates: age, gender, ethnicity, education, occupation, and self-reported morbidity. COPD Assessment Test (CAT) is used to collect information about COPD symptoms. We have completed the participant recruitment and study procedures. Currently, we are working on data processing and data analysis. The authors anticipate the preliminary results should be available by September 2017. Study results will be published in peer-reviewed scientific journals. This is the first study in Kazakhstan that assesses prevalence of COPD and its comorbidities in the adult population aged 40 to 59 years. The results of the study will be

  10. Is snus the same as dip? Smokers' perceptions of new smokeless tobacco advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahreinifar, Sareh; Sheon, Nicolas M; Ling, Pamela M

    2013-03-01

    Since 2006, leading US cigarette companies have been promoting new snus products as line extensions of popular cigarette brands. These promotional efforts include direct mail marketing to consumers on cigarette company mailing lists. This study examines smokers' reactions to this advertising and perceptions of the new snus products. Eight focus groups (n=65 participants) were conducted in San Francisco and Los Angeles in 2010 with smokers who received tobacco direct mail advertising. The focus group discussions assessed smokers' perceptions of the new snus products. Focus group videos were transcribed and coded using Transana software to identify common themes. Most participants were aware of snus advertising and many had tried free samples. Most were aware that snus was supposed to be 'different' from traditional chewing tobacco but consistently did not know why. Participants willing to try snus still identified strongly as smokers, and for some participants, trying snus reinforced their preference for smoking. Snus' major benefits were use in smoke-free environments and avoiding social stigma related to secondhand smoke. Participants were sceptical of the idea that snus was safer than cigarettes and did not see it as an acceptable substitute for cigarettes or as a cessation aid. Smokers repeated some messages featured in early snus advertising. Snus was not seen as an acceptable substitute for smoking or way to quit cigarettes. Current smoker responses to snus advertising are not consistent with harm reduction.

  11. Adolescent smokers show decreased brain responses to pleasurable food images compared with nonsmokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Mark L; Luks, Tracy L; Dryden, Wendy Y; Rait, Michelle A; Simpson, Gregory V

    2011-08-01

    Nicotine acts on the mesocorticolimbic circuits of the brain leading to the release of dopamine. Repeated elevations of dopamine in the brain may cause smokers to become less sensitive to "natural reinforcers." To test the theory that adolescents with low nicotine exposure may already have decreased activation when exposed to a natural reinforcer, we looked at the effect of visual cues representing "pleasurable" food on light adolescent smokers compared with nonsmokers. Twelve adolescent light smokers (aged 13-17 years, smoked 1-5 cigarettes/day) and 12 nonsmokers (aged 13-17 years, never smoked a cigarette) from the San Francisco Bay Area underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning. During scanning, they viewed blocks of photographic images representing pleasurable foods (sweet, high fat, and salty foods) and control cues. Smokers reported smoking a mean of 3.6 cigarettes/day. There was no difference in body mass index between groups (24.1 vs. 24.0, respectively, p = .99). Food images elicited greater activations in nonsmokers in multiple areas including the insula (T = 4.38, p food versus neutral images. The finding of decreased activation to pleasurable food among adolescent light smokers supports the theory that these adolescents are displaying decreased sensitivity to at least one natural reinforcer. This also supports the theory that nicotine may affect the brain early in the trajectory of smoking, thus underscoring the need for early intervention among adolescent smokers.

  12. Smoked cannabis' psychomotor and neurocognitive effects in occasional and frequent smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosiers, Nathalie A; Ramaekers, Johannes G; Chauchard, Emeline; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-05-01

    Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive constituent in cannabis, impairs psychomotor performance, cognition and driving ability; thus, driving under the influence of cannabis is a public safety concern. We documented cannabis' psychomotor, neurocognitive, subjective and physiological effects in occasional and frequent smokers to investigate potential differences between these smokers. Fourteen frequent (≥4x/week) and 11 occasional (cannabis smokers entered a secure research unit ∼19 h prior to smoking one 6.8% THC cigarette. Cognitive and psychomotor performance was evaluated with the critical tracking (CTT), divided attention (DAT), n-back (working memory) and Balloon Analog Risk (BART) (risk-taking) tasks at -1.75, 1.5, 3.5, 5.5 and 22.5 h after starting smoking. GLM (General Linear Model) repeated measures ANOVA was utilized to compare scores. Occasional smokers had significantly more difficulty compensating for CTT tracking error compared with frequent smokers 1.5 h after smoking. Divided attention performance declined significantly especially in occasional smokers, with session × group effects for tracking error, hits, false alarms and reaction time. Cannabis smoking did not elicit session × group effects on the n-back or BART. Controlled cannabis smoking impaired psychomotor function, more so in occasional smokers, suggesting some tolerance to psychomotor impairment in frequent users. These data have implications for cannabis-associated impairment in driving under the influence of cannabis cases. Published by Oxford University Press 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. Smoker, ex-smoker or non-smoker? The validity of routinely recorded smoking status in UK primary care: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Louise; Carpenter, James R; Walters, Kate R; Morris, Richard W; Nazareth, Irwin; White, Ian R; Petersen, Irene

    2014-04-23

    To investigate how smoking status is recorded in UK primary care; to evaluate whether appropriate multiple imputation (MI) of smoking status yields results consistent with health surveys. UK primary care and a population survey conducted in the community. We identified 354 204 patients aged 16 or over in The Health Improvement Network (THIN) primary care database registered with their general practice 2008-2009 and 15 102 individuals aged 16 or over in the Health Survey for England (HSE). Age-standardised and age-specific proportions of smokers, ex-smokers and non-smokers in THIN and the HSE before and after MI. Using information on time since quitting in the HSE, we estimated when ex-smokers are typically recorded as non-smokers in primary care records. In THIN, smoking status was recorded for 84% of patients within 1 year of registration. Of these, 28% were smokers (21% in the HSE). After MI of missing smoking data, the proportion of smokers was 25% (missing at random) and 20% (missing not at random). With increasing age, more were identified as ex-smokers in the HSE than THIN. It appears that those who quit before age 30 were less likely to be recorded as an ex-smoker in primary care than people who quit later. Smoking status was relatively well recorded in primary care. Misclassification of ex-smokers as non-smokers is likely to occur in those quitting smoking at an early age and/or a long time ago. Those with no smoking status information are more likely to be ex-smokers or non-smokers than smokers.

  14. Cigarette Mouth Insertion Depths Among Chinese Smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Q

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Vent blocking - where filter ventilation holes are intentionally or unintentionally, partly or completely covered by smokers’ lips during smoking - is an aspect of smoking behavior which can alter mainstream smoke yields. This study was designed to determine if, and to what extent ventilation holes were blocked by smokers’ lips in two cohorts of Chinese smokers. In this study, two groups of samples were collected. One group (1742 butts was collected randomly from public places in six chosen cities. Another (1037 butts was obtained by collecting the butts from identified smokers in Kunming. In this paper, the mouth insertion depth among Chinese smokers was studied for the first time by a staining method employing ninhydrin in ethanol. The results indicate that Chinese smokers exhibit a mouth insertion depth ranging from 1 to 17 mm with an average value of 7.5 AA± 2 mm. In this study, 95% of the ventilated filters examined showed that the vent zone was neither completely nor partially covered by smokers’ lips.

  15. Lessons learned from the London Exercise and Pregnant (LEAP) Smokers randomised controlled trial process evaluation: implications for the design of physical activity for smoking cessation interventions during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giatras, Nikoletta; Wanninkhof, Elisabeth; Leontowitsch, Miranda; Lewis, Beth; Taylor, Adrian; Cooper, Sue; Ussher, Michael

    2017-01-17

    The challenges of delivering interventions for pregnant smokers have been poorly documented. Also, the process of promoting a physical activity intervention for pregnant smokers has not been previously recorded. This study describes the experiences of researchers conducting a randomised controlled trial of physical activity as an aid to smoking cessation during pregnancy and explores how the effectiveness of future interventions could be improved. Two focus groups, with independent facilitators, were conducted with six researchers who had enrolled pregnant smokers in the LEAP trial, provided the interventions, and administered the research measures. Topics included recruitment, retention and how the physical activity intervention for pregnant smokers was delivered and how it was adapted when necessary to suit the women. The focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and subjected to thematic analysis. Five themes emerged related to barriers or enablers to intervention delivery: (1) nature of the intervention; (2) personal characteristics of trial participants; (3) practical issues; (4) researchers' engagement with participants; (5) training and support needs. Researchers perceived that participants may have been deterred by the intensive and generic nature of the intervention and the need to simultaneously quit smoking and increase physical activity. Women also appeared hampered by pregnancy ailments, social deprivation, and poor mental health. Researchers observed that their status as health professionals was valued by participants but it was challenging to maintain contact with participants. Training and support needs were identified for dealing with pregnant teenagers, participants' friends and family, and post-natal return to smoking. Future exercise interventions for smoking cessation in pregnancy may benefit by increased tailoring of the intervention to the characteristics of the women, including their psychological profile, socio

  16. Basement membrane and vascular remodelling in smokers and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muller H Konrad

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about airway remodelling in bronchial biopsies (BB in smokers and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. We conducted an initial pilot study comparing BB from COPD patients with nonsmoking controls. This pilot study suggested the presence of reticular basement membrane (Rbm fragmentation and altered vessel distribution in COPD. Methods To determine whether Rbm fragmentation and altered vessel distribution in BB were specific for COPD we designed a cross-sectional study and stained BB from 19 current smokers and 14 ex-smokers with mild to moderate COPD and compared these to 15 current smokers with normal lung function and 17 healthy and nonsmoking subjects. Results Thickness of the Rbm was not significantly different between groups; although in COPD this parameter was quite variable. The Rbm showed fragmentation and splitting in both current smoking groups and ex-smoker COPD compared with healthy nonsmokers (p Conclusions Airway remodelling in smokers and mild to moderate COPD is associated with fragmentation of the Rbm and altered distribution of vessels in the airway wall. Rbm fragmentation was also present to as great an extent in ex-smokers with COPD. These characteristics may have potential physiological consequences.

  17. Happiness as a Buffer of the Association Between Dependence and Acute Tobacco Abstinence Effects in African American Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liautaud, Madalyn M; Leventhal, Adam M; Pang, Raina D

    2017-09-27

    African-American (AA) smokers are at disproportionate risk of tobacco dependence, utilizing smoking to regulate stress, and poor cessation outcomes. Positive emotional traits may function as coping factors that buffer the extent to which dependence increases vulnerability to adverse responses to acute tobacco abstinence (i.e., tobacco withdrawal). This laboratory study examined subjective happiness (SH; dispositional orientation towards frequent and intense positive affect [PA] and life satisfaction) as a moderator of the relation between tobacco dependence and subjective and behavioral abstinence effects among AA smokers. AA smokers (N=420, 39.0% female) completed self-report measures of tobacco dependence and SH followed by two counterbalanced experimental sessions (non-abstinent vs. 16-hr abstinent) involving self-report measures of composite withdrawal, urge to smoke, and mood, and a behavioral smoking task in which participants could: (a) earn money to delay smoking reinstatement, and (b) subsequently purchase cigarettes to smoke. Tobacco dependence was positively associated with increased abstinence effects in composite withdrawal, urge to smoke, PA, and latency to smoking reinstatement (pspsychological construct within tobacco research-subjective happiness-that may suppress the extent to which more severe tobacco dependence increases risk for subjective withdrawal-related distress during acute smoking abstinence in African American smokers. In doing so, the study provides a primer for future targeting of subjective happiness and other positive emotional traits as means to understand and treat acute tobacco abstinence effects among dependent African American smokers.

  18. Menthol Smokers: Metabolomic Profiling and Smoking Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ping-Ching; Lan, Renny S; Brasky, Theodore M; Marian, Catalin; Cheema, Amrita K; Ressom, Habtom W; Loffredo, Christopher A; Pickworth, Wallace B; Shields, Peter G

    2017-01-01

    The use of menthol in cigarettes and marketing is under consideration for regulation by the FDA. However, the effects of menthol on smoking behavior and carcinogen exposure have been inconclusive. We previously reported metabolomic profiling for cigarette smokers, and novelly identified a menthol-glucuronide (MG) as the most significant metabolite directly related to smoking. Here, MG is studied in relation to smoking behavior and metabolomic profiles. This is a cross-sectional study of 105 smokers who smoked two cigarettes in the laboratory one hour apart. Blood nicotine, MG, and exhaled carbon monoxide (CO) boosts were determined (the difference before and after smoking). Spearman correlation, χ 2 , and ANCOVA adjusted for gender, race, and cotinine levels for menthol smokers assessed the relationship of MG boost, smoking behavior, and metabolic profiles. Multivariate metabolite characterization using supervised partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was carried out for the classification of metabolomics profiles. MG boost was positively correlated with CO boost, nicotine boost, average puff volume, puff duration, and total smoke exposure. Classification using PLS-DA, MG was the top metabolite discriminating metabolome of menthol versus nonmenthol smokers. Among menthol smokers, 42 metabolites were significantly correlated with MG boost, which linked to cellular functions, such as of cell death, survival, and movement. Plasma MG boost is a new smoking behavior biomarker that may provide novel information over self-reported use of menthol cigarettes by integrating different smoking measures for understanding smoking behavior and harm of menthol cigarettes. These results provide insight into the biological effect of menthol smoking. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(1); 51-60. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. A Cohort Study of 1,205 Secondary School Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laoye, Joseph A.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    Important findings of the study indicate that regular cigarette smokers yield less to any smoking behavior changes than do the occasional smokers and well organized and executed anti smoking education programs should start as early as the eighth grade. (Author)

  20. Perceptions of smokers influence nonsmoker attitudes and preferences for interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillard, Amanda J; Magnan, Renee E; Köblitz, Amber R; McCaul, Kevin D

    2013-04-01

    In two studies, we examined nonsmokers' perceptions of smokers and consequences of the perceptions. In Study 1, smokers answered questions about their sense of self, dependence on smoking, and motivation to quit. Nonsmokers answered questions about their perceptions of these characteristics. Differences between smokers' self-descriptions and nonsmokers' perceptions were observed. Study 2 asked nonsmokers to judge two types of smokers for which the descriptions were based on Study 1 findings. Results showed that nonsmokers held a more negative attitude about and were less willing to engage in different close relationships with the smoker who was described in terms of nonsmokers' perceptions rather than smokers' reports. Attitude mediated the relationship between type of smoker and willingness to date a smoker.

  1. Regional distribution of pulmonary epithelial permeability in normal subjects and patients with asbestosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Gellert, A R; Lewis, C. A.; Langford, J A; Tolfree, S E; Rudd, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    The overall and regional clearance of an inhaled isotope labelled solute from the lungs was examined on the basis of a 15 minute period of data collection, for which a technique was developed that does not require intravenous injection to correct for blood-tissue background activity. The technique was applied to 52 normal subjects (31 non-smokers and 21 smokers) and to 37 patients with asbestosis (21 non-smokers and 16 smokers). In normal smokers solute clearance was faster in the upper and m...

  2. Similar DNA methylation pattern in lung tumours from smokers and never-smokers with second-hand tobacco smoke exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scesnaite, Asta; Jarmalaite, Sonata; Mutanen, Pertti; Anttila, Sisko; Nyberg, Fredrik; Benhamou, Simone; Boffetta, Paolo; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti

    2012-07-01

    Tobacco smoke causes lung cancer in smokers and in never-smokers exposed to second-hand tobacco smoke (SHS). Nonetheless, molecular mechanisms of lung cancer in SHS-exposed never-smokers are still elusive. We studied lung cancers from current smokers (n = 109), former smokers (n = 56) and never-smokers (n = 47) for promoter hypermethylation of five tumour suppressor genes--p16, RARB, RASSF1, MGMT and DAPK1--using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Lung tumours from ever-smokers suggested an increased risk of p16 hypermethylation as compared to never-smokers (P = 0.073), with former smokers having the highest frequency of p16 hypermethylation (P = 0.044 versus current smokers and P = 0.009 versus never-smokers). In the never-smoking group, p16 hypermethylation was seen in lung tumours from SHS-exposed individuals (4/33; 12%) but in none of the non-exposed individuals (0/9). The overall occurrence of hypermethylation (measured both as methylation index and as number of genes affected) was similar in those ever exposed to tobacco smoke (smokers, SHS-exposed never-smokers) and differed from non-exposed never-smokers. In multivariate analysis, p16 hypermethylation was more prevalent in lung tumours from male than female patients (P = 0.018) and in squamous cell carcinomas than in adenocarcinomas (P = 0.025). Occurrence of TP53 mutation in the tumour was associated with hypermethylation of at least one gene (P = 0.027). In all, our data suggest that promoter hypermethylation pattern in SHS-exposed never-smokers resembles that observed in smokers. Association between TP53 mutation, a hallmark of smokers' lung cancer, and methylation of one or more of the lung cancer-related genes studied, provides further evidence for common tobacco smoke-related origin for both types of molecular alterations.

  3. Marijuana’s Dose-Dependent Effects in Daily Marijuana Smokers

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh, Divya; Haney, Margaret; Cooper, Ziva D

    2013-01-01

    Active marijuana produces significant subjective, psychomotor, and physiological effects relative to inactive marijuana, yet demonstrating that these effects are dose-dependent has proven difficult. This within-subject, double-blind study was designed to develop a smoking procedure to obtain a marijuana dose–response function. In four outpatient laboratory sessions, daily marijuana smokers (N = 17 males, 1 female) smoked six 5-s puffs from 3 marijuana cigarettes (2 puffs/cigarette). The numbe...

  4. Altered antigenic profiling and infectivity of Porphyromonas gingivalis in smokers and non-smokers with periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Iris; Hutcherson, Justin A; Lamont, Richard J; Demuth, Donald R; Gumus, Pinar; Nizam, Nejat; Buduneli, Nurcan; Scott, David A

    2014-06-01

    Cigarette smokers are more susceptible to periodontal diseases and are more likely to be infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis than non-smokers. Furthermore, smoking is known to alter the expression of P. gingivalis surface components and compromise immunoglobulin (Ig)G generation. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether the overall IgG response to P. gingivalis is suppressed in smokers in vivo and whether previously established in vitro tobacco-induced phenotypic P. gingivalis changes would be reflected in vivo. The authors examined the humoral response to several P. gingivalis strains as well as specific tobacco-regulated outer membrane proteins (FimA and RagB) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in biochemically validated (salivary cotinine) smokers and non-smokers with chronic periodontitis (CP: n = 13) or aggressive periodontitis (AgP: n = 20). The local and systemic presence of P. gingivalis DNA was also monitored by polymerase chain reaction. Smoking was associated with decreased total IgG responses against clinical (10512, 5607, and 10208C; all P Smoking did not influence IgG produced against specific cell-surface proteins, although a non-significant pattern toward increased total FimA-specific IgG in patients with CP, but not AgP, was observed. Seropositive smokers were more likely to be infected orally and systemically with P. gingivalis (P Smoking alters the humoral response against P. gingivalis and may increase P. gingivalis infectivity, strengthening the evidence that mechanisms of periodontal disease progression in smokers may differ from those of non-smokers with the same disease classification.

  5. Adolescent cigarette smokers' and non-cigarette smokers' use of alternative tobacco products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Charles; Geletko, Karen

    2012-08-01

    This study uses the most recent data from the nationally representative National Youth Tobacco Survey (NYTS) to examine the use of alternative tobacco products among U.S. cigarette smokers and non-cigarette smokers aged 14-17. Alternative tobacco product use is defined as use of one or more of the following products: smokeless tobacco, cigars, pipes, bidis, or kreteks. Using the results from the 2004, 2006, and 2009 NYTS, multivariate logistic regressions were used to investigate separately the extent of alternative tobacco product use in current cigarette smokers and in those who reported not smoking cigarettes controlling for demographic and other independent influences. The results indicate that for adolescent smokers and nonsmokers, the use of one type of alternative tobacco product made it much more likely the individual would use one or more of the other alternative tobacco products. Non-cigarette smokers using these tobacco products appeared to exhibit symptoms of nicotine dependence comparable to those of cigarette smokers. More information on adolescent use of alternative tobacco products is needed. Current cigarette use declined 3.4% annually over 2004-2009 for the NYTS 14- to 17-year-old population, but this cohort's use of alternative tobacco products was unchanged. The number of adolescents aged 14-17 who did not smoke cigarettes but used alternative tobacco products increased 5.9% per year over the same period. Current surveillance measures need to be expanded in order to gain a more comprehensive understanding of adolescent alternative tobacco use.

  6. Deadly Attraction - Attentional Bias toward Preferred Cigarette Brand in Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domaradzka, Ewa; Bielecki, Maksymilian

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that biases in visual attention might be evoked by affective and personally relevant stimuli, for example addiction-related objects. Despite the fact that addiction is often linked to specific products and systematic purchase behaviors, no studies focused directly on the existence of bias evoked by brands. Smokers are characterized by high levels of brand loyalty and everyday contact with cigarette packaging. Using the incentive-salience mechanism as a theoretical framework, we hypothesized that this group might exhibit a bias toward the preferred cigarette brand. In our study, a group of smokers (N = 40) performed a dot probe task while their eye movements were recorded. In every trial a pair of pictures was presented - each of them showed a single cigarette pack. The visual properties of stimuli were carefully controlled, so branding information was the key factor affecting subjects' reactions. For each participant, we compared gaze behavior related to the preferred vs. other brands. The analyses revealed no attentional bias in the early, orienting phase of the stimulus processing and strong differences in maintenance and disengagement. Participants spent more time looking at the preferred cigarettes and saccades starting at the preferred brand location had longer latencies. In sum, our data shows that attentional bias toward brands might be found in situations not involving choice or decision making. These results provide important insights into the mechanisms of formation and maintenance of attentional biases to stimuli of personal relevance and might serve as a first step toward developing new attitude measurement techniques.

  7. Human Mu Opioid Receptor (OPRM1A118G) polymorphism is associated with brain mu- opioid receptor binding potential in smokers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, R.; Logan, J.; Ray, R.; Ruparel, K.; Newberg, A.; Wileyto, E.P.; Loughead, J.W.; Divgi, C.; Blendy, J.A.; Logan, J.; Zubieta, J.-K.; Lerman, C.

    2011-04-15

    Evidence points to the endogenous opioid system, and the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) in particular, in mediating the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, including nicotine. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the human MOR gene (OPRM1 A118G) has been shown to alter receptor protein level in preclinical models and smoking behavior in humans. To clarify the underlying mechanisms for these associations, we conducted an in vivo investigation of the effects of OPRM1 A118G genotype on MOR binding potential (BP{sub ND} or receptor availability). Twenty-two smokers prescreened for genotype (12 A/A, 10 */G) completed two [{sup 11}C] carfentanil positron emission tomography (PET) imaging sessions following overnight abstinence and exposure to a nicotine-containing cigarette and a denicotinized cigarette. Independent of session, smokers homozygous for the wild-type OPRM1 A allele exhibited significantly higher levels of MOR BP{sub ND} than smokers carrying the G allele in bilateral amygdala, left thalamus, and left anterior cingulate cortex. Among G allele carriers, the extent of subjective reward difference (denicotinized versus nicotine cigarette) was associated significantly with MOR BP{sub ND} difference in right amygdala, caudate, anterior cingulate cortex, and thalamus. Future translational investigations can elucidate the role of MORs in nicotine addiction, which may lead to development of novel therapeutics.

  8. A Critical Evaluation of Nicotine Replacement Therapy for Teenage Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Christi A.

    2000-01-01

    Evaluates the appropriateness and feasibility of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) in teenage smokers. Available forms of NRT, theoretical rationale and efficacy of NRT, ethical considerations, and the feasibility of NRT in teenage smokers are addressed. Several characteristics similar to adult nicotine dependent smokers have been found in teen…

  9. Comparative analysis of the effects of hubble-bubble (Sheesha) and cigarette smoking on respiratory and metabolic parameters in hubble-bubble and cigarette smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mutairi, Sana S; Shihab-Eldeen, Aida A; Mojiminiyi, Olusegun A; Anwar, Alia Aisha

    2006-07-01

    Hazard of smoking tobacco is believed to be minimized by smoking hubble-bubble (HB) instead of cigarettes. Our aims were to (i) develop an assay for estimating nicotine and cotinine; and (ii) evaluate the effect of smoking on respiratory and metabolic parameters in cigarette and HB smokers. Urine samples were collected from 152 volunteer smokers (75 cigarette and 77 HB) as well as from 16 healthy controls. We optimized an HPLC method for the determination of nicotine and cotinine. Subjects were asked to complete a chronic respiratory symptoms questionnaire and to undergo spirometry. Fasting blood samples were collected for the determination of their lipid profile. The intra-assay coefficients of variation for nicotine and cotinine were 16.6% and 6.6%, respectively. The mean of cotinine in cigarette smokers (1321.4 ng/mL) was significantly (P = 0.008) higher than the mean cotinine (677.6 ng/mL) in HB smokers. The mean nicotine level in cigarette smokers (1487.3 ng/mL) was significantly (P < 0.0001) higher than the mean nicotine (440.5 ng/mL) in HB smoker. The urinary cotinine and nicotine levels of the control subjects were lower than the detection levels of the assay. The mean high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was lower in cigarette smokers (0.99 mmol/L) compared with HB smoker smokers (1.02 mmol/L) but this was not significant (P = 0.28). Spirometric values were comparable among the three groups but the chronic respiratory symptoms in the smoking groups appeared at an earlier age in the HB smokers compared with the cigarettes smokers (P < 0.05). Smoking HB does not reduce the risk of tobacco exposure and it's potentially harmful metabolites on health.

  10. Reduced coenzyme Q10 in female smokers and its association with lipid profile in a young healthy adult population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bazi, Maha M.; Elshal, Mohamed F.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Cigarette smoking has a negative effect on body reserve of antioxidants and cholesterol metabolism. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), a potent antioxidant synthesized as part of the cholesterol pathway, is a potential biomarker for systemic oxidative stress. We aimed to investigate gender variation in plasma lipid profile and CoQ10 concentrations in healthy non-smokers and in smokers. Material and methods The study included 55 cigarette smokers (25 females and 30 males) and 51 non-smokers (25 females and 26 males) with the age range from 21 to 45 years, and who had no history of alcohol abuse or chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus or obesity. Coenzyme Q10 plasma concentrations were measured by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet detection. Fasting plasma glucose and lipid levels were determined by standard colorimetric methods. Results Our results showed that CoQ10 concentrations were significantly decreased in smokers, especially in females, than their non-smoker counterparts. Female smokers also exhibited a significant decrease in plasma concentrations of total cholesterol (TC), HDL-C, LDL-C, and atherogenic ratios HDL-C/TC and CoQ10/LDL-C than male counterparts. Plasma triglyceride concentrations were increased in smokers irrespective of gender. Plasma CoQ10 was relatively more associated with TC and LDL-C in female smokers than male smokers. Conclusions The adverse effects of smoking on body reserve of antioxidants and cholesterol metabolism are greater in females than in males, partially as a result of decreased CoQ10 plasma concentrations, HDL-C and total-cholesterol and abnormal atherogenicity indices. PMID:22328876

  11. Impaired sleep quality and sleep duration in smokers-results from the German Multicenter Study on Nicotine Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohrs, Stefan; Rodenbeck, Andrea; Riemann, Dieter; Szagun, Bertram; Jaehne, Andreas; Brinkmeyer, Jürgen; Gründer, Gerhard; Wienker, Thomas; Diaz-Lacava, Amalia; Mobascher, Arian; Dahmen, Norbert; Thuerauf, Norbert; Kornhuber, Johannes; Kiefer, Falk; Gallinat, Jürgen; Wagner, Michael; Kunz, Dieter; Grittner, Ulrike; Winterer, Georg

    2014-05-01

    Cigarette smoking is a severe health burden being related to a number of chronic diseases. Frequently, smokers report about sleep problems. Sleep disturbance, in turn, has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathophysiology of several disorders related to smoking and may be relevant for the pathophysiology of nicotine dependence. Therefore, determining the frequency of sleep disturbance in otherwise healthy smokers and its association with degree of nicotine dependence is highly relevant. In a population-based case-control study, 1071 smokers and 1243 non-smokers without lifetime Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Axis I disorder were investigated. Sleep quality (SQ) of participants was determined by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. As possible confounders, age, sex and level of education and income, as well as depressiveness, anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity, alcohol drinking behaviour and perceived stress, were included into multiple regression analyses. Significantly more smokers than non-smokers (28.1% versus 19.1%; P sleep latency, sleep duration and global SQ were found significantly more often in smokers than non-smokers. Consistently, higher degrees of nicotine dependence and intensity of smoking were associated with shorter sleep duration. This study demonstrates for the first time an elevated prevalence of sleep disturbance in smokers compared with non-smokers in a population without lifetime history of psychiatric disorders even after controlling for potentially relevant risk factors. It appears likely that smoking is a behaviourally modifiable risk factor for the occurrence of impaired SQ and short sleep duration. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  12. Patterns of Longitudinal Transitions in Menthol Use Among US Young Adult Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Jessica M; Villanti, Andrea C; Williams, Valerie F; Richardson, Amanda; Pearson, Jennifer L; Vallone, Donna M

    2015-07-01

    Menthol is the only characterizing flavor in cigarettes that was not banned as part of the 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act. This longitudinal study explores the role of menthol in smoking initiation and progression. Purpose (a) to examine young adult patterns of menthol cigarette use including switching between menthol and non-menthol and (b) to describe associations between these patterns of menthol use and cessation related intentions and behaviors. Additional data on the role of menthol in cigarettes on smoking uptake and maintenance is needed to inform proposed policy making at the local, state, and national levels. Using 3 time points from a longitudinal national sample of young adults aged 18-34 years (N = 267 smokers), patterns of menthol use over 1 year were defined among smokers as: (a) remained menthol smoker; (b) remained non-menthol smoker; (c) switched from menthol to non-menthol; and (d) switched from non-menthol to menthol. Associations were assessed between current menthol cigarette use and cessation intentions and behaviors. Significant predictors of current menthol cigarette use at 1 year included initiation with menthol (OR = 8.26), Black race (OR = 23.60), and higher scores on the Allen menthol taste subscale (OR = 1.53). Menthol smokers were more likely to report intention to quit but no differences existed between menthol and non-menthol users in ever making a quit attempt. Most young adults stay with the product that they start smoking with. Menthol smokers were interested in quitting, but less interested in next 30-day action than non-menthol smokers. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. The Effects of a Multilingual Telephone Quitline for Asian Smokers: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Sharon E.; Wong, Shiushing; Gamst, Anthony C.; Tedeschi, Gary J.; Reyes-Nocon, Jasmine

    2012-01-01

    Background Although telephone counseling services (quitlines) have become a popular behavioral intervention for smoking cessation in the United States, such services are scarce for Asian immigrants with limited English proficiency. In this study, we tested the effects of telephone counseling for smoking cessation in Chinese-, Korean-, and Vietnamese-speaking smokers. Methods A culturally tailored counseling protocol was developed in English and translated into Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese. We conducted a single randomized trial embedded in the California quitline service. Smokers who called the quitline’s Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese telephone lines between August 2, 2004, and April 4, 2008, were recruited to the trial. Subjects (N = 2277) were stratified by language and randomly assigned to telephone counseling (self-help materials and up to six counseling sessions; n = 1124 subjects) or self-help (self-help materials only; n = 1153 subjects) groups: 729 Chinese subjects (counseling = 359, self-help = 370), 848 Korean subjects (counseling = 422, self-help = 426), and 700 Vietnamese subjects (counseling = 343, self-help = 357). The primary outcome was 6-month prolonged abstinence. Intention-to-treat analysis was used to estimate prolonged abstinence rates for all subjects and for each language group. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results In the intention-to-treat analysis, counseling increased the 6-month prolonged abstinence rate among all smokers compared with self-help (counseling vs self-help, 16.4% vs 8.0%, difference = 8.4%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 5.7% to 11.1%, P Counseling also increased the 6-month prolonged abstinence rate for each language group compared with self-help (counseling vs self-help, Chinese, 14.8% vs 6.0%, difference = 8.8%, 95% CI = 4.4% to 13.2%, P counseling was effective for Chinese-, Korean-, and Vietnamese-speaking smokers. This protocol should be incorporated into existing quitlines, with possible extension to

  14. Driver mutations determine survival in smokers and never-smokers with stage IIIB/IV lung adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Paul K; Johnson, Melissa L; D'Angelo, Sandra P; Sima, Camelia S; Ang, Daphne; Dogan, Snjezana; Miller, Vincent A; Ladanyi, Marc; Kris, Mark G; Riely, Gregory J

    2012-12-01

    The authors previously demonstrated that never-smokers with stage IIIB/IV nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) lived 50% longer than former/current smokers. This observation persisted after adjusting for age, performance status, and sex. In this study, the authors hypothesized that smoking-dependent differences in the distribution of driver mutations may explain differences in prognosis between these subgroups. In total, 293 never-smokers and 382 former/current smokers with lung adenocarcinoma who underwent testing for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations and rearrangements in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) between 2009 and 2010 were investigated. Clinical outcomes and patient characteristics were collected. Survival probabilities were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Group comparison was performed with log-rank tests and Cox proportional hazards methods. Although the overall incidence of these mutations was nearly identical (55% never-smokers vs 57% current/former smokers; P = .48), there were significant differences in the distribution of mutations between these groups for EGFR mutations (37% never-smokers vs 14% former/current smokers; P never-smokers vs 43% former/current smokers; P never-smokers vs 2% former/current smokers; P never-smokers and former/current smokers, the prognosis differed significantly by genotype. Patients who had KRAS mutations had the poorest survival. Smoking status, however, had no influence on survival within each genotype. Never-smokers and former/current smokers with lung adenocarcinomas were not homogeneous subgroups. Each was made up of individuals whose tumors had a unique distribution of driver mutations, which were associated with different prognoses, irrespective of smoking history. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society.

  15. Tobacco harm reduction: an alternative cessation strategy for inveterate smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godshall William T

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 45 million Americans continue to smoke, even after one of the most intense public health campaigns in history, now over 40 years old. Each year some 438,000 smokers die from smoking-related diseases, including lung and other cancers, cardiovascular disorders and pulmonary diseases. Many smokers are unable – or at least unwilling – to achieve cessation through complete nicotine and tobacco abstinence; they continue smoking despite the very real and obvious adverse health consequences. Conventional smoking cessation policies and programs generally present smokers with two unpleasant alternatives: quit, or die. A third approach to smoking cessation, tobacco harm reduction, involves the use of alternative sources of nicotine, including modern smokeless tobacco products. A substantial body of research, much of it produced over the past decade, establishes the scientific and medical foundation for tobacco harm reduction using smokeless tobacco products. This report provides a description of traditional and modern smokeless tobacco products, and of the prevalence of their use in the United States and Sweden. It reviews the epidemiologic evidence for low health risks associated with smokeless use, both in absolute terms and in comparison to the much higher risks of smoking. The report also describes evidence that smokeless tobacco has served as an effective substitute for cigarettes among Swedish men, who consequently have among the lowest smoking-related mortality rates in the developed world. The report documents the fact that extensive misinformation about ST products is widely available from ostensibly reputable sources, including governmental health agencies and major health organizations. The American Council on Science and Health believes that strong support of tobacco harm reduction is fully consistent with its mission to promote sound science in regulation and in

  16. Tobacco harm reduction: an alternative cessation strategy for inveterate smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodu, Brad; Godshall, William T

    2006-12-21

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 45 million Americans continue to smoke, even after one of the most intense public health campaigns in history, now over 40 years old. Each year some 438,000 smokers die from smoking-related diseases, including lung and other cancers, cardiovascular disorders and pulmonary diseases. Many smokers are unable--or at least unwilling--to achieve cessation through complete nicotine and tobacco abstinence; they continue smoking despite the very real and obvious adverse health consequences. Conventional smoking cessation policies and programs generally present smokers with two unpleasant alternatives: quit, or die. A third approach to smoking cessation, tobacco harm reduction, involves the use of alternative sources of nicotine, including modern smokeless tobacco products. A substantial body of research, much of it produced over the past decade, establishes the scientific and medical foundation for tobacco harm reduction using smokeless tobacco products. This report provides a description of traditional and modern smokeless tobacco products, and of the prevalence of their use in the United States and Sweden. It reviews the epidemiologic evidence for low health risks associated with smokeless use, both in absolute terms and in comparison to the much higher risks of smoking. The report also describes evidence that smokeless tobacco has served as an effective substitute for cigarettes among Swedish men, who consequently have among the lowest smoking-related mortality rates in the developed world. The report documents the fact that extensive misinformation about ST products is widely available from ostensibly reputable sources, including governmental health agencies and major health organizations. The American Council on Science and Health believes that strong support of tobacco harm reduction is fully consistent with its mission to promote sound science in regulation and in public policy, and to assist

  17. Tobacco harm reduction: an alternative cessation strategy for inveterate smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodu, Brad; Godshall, William T

    2006-01-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 45 million Americans continue to smoke, even after one of the most intense public health campaigns in history, now over 40 years old. Each year some 438,000 smokers die from smoking-related diseases, including lung and other cancers, cardiovascular disorders and pulmonary diseases. Many smokers are unable – or at least unwilling – to achieve cessation through complete nicotine and tobacco abstinence; they continue smoking despite the very real and obvious adverse health consequences. Conventional smoking cessation policies and programs generally present smokers with two unpleasant alternatives: quit, or die. A third approach to smoking cessation, tobacco harm reduction, involves the use of alternative sources of nicotine, including modern smokeless tobacco products. A substantial body of research, much of it produced over the past decade, establishes the scientific and medical foundation for tobacco harm reduction using smokeless tobacco products. This report provides a description of traditional and modern smokeless tobacco products, and of the prevalence of their use in the United States and Sweden. It reviews the epidemiologic evidence for low health risks associated with smokeless use, both in absolute terms and in comparison to the much higher risks of smoking. The report also describes evidence that smokeless tobacco has served as an effective substitute for cigarettes among Swedish men, who consequently have among the lowest smoking-related mortality rates in the developed world. The report documents the fact that extensive misinformation about ST products is widely available from ostensibly reputable sources, including governmental health agencies and major health organizations. The American Council on Science and Health believes that strong support of tobacco harm reduction is fully consistent with its mission to promote sound science in regulation and in public policy, and to assist

  18. Correlates of NNAL levels among nondaily and daily smokers in the college student population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Carla J; Schauer, Gillian L; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S; Benowitz, Neal L

    2012-10-15

    Recent simultaneous increases in nondaily smoking and decreases in daily smoking make the identification of nondaily smokers through biomarker measures as well as the relationship of biomarker levels to smoking behaviors important topics. However, little is known about biochemical identification and carcinogen exposure of nondaily smokers. One tobacco-specific nitrosamine, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL), has a long half-life, making it a useful marker for long-term and intermittent tobacco exposure. Thus, we examined correlates of urine NNAL levels among nondaily and daily smokers. In 2011, we obtained urine samples from 64 current cigarette smokers (37 nondaily; 27 daily) in the Southeastern US and assessed participants' sociodemographics, smoking-related information, and other tobacco use. Our sample included 14 participants concurrently using other combustible tobacco products and eight concurrently using smokeless tobacco. Of six participants smoking for only one day in the past 30, four had detectable NNAL levels; thus, two nondaily smokers were excluded from the remainder of the analyses. In multivariate analysis, average cigarettes per day on smoking days (B = 23.00, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 13.81, 32.20, P < 0.001) and number of days of smokeless tobacco use (B = 17.11, CI 13.53, 20.70, P < 0.001) were associated with NNAL levels among nondaily smokers (R(2) = 0.234). Multivariate analysis indicated that average cigarettes per day (B = 15.83, CI 2.89, 28.76, P = 0.02) was the only significant correlate of NNAL levels among daily smokers. We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses to identify a potential urinary NNAL (normalized for creatinine) cutoff point of 81.6 pg/mL/g creatinine (88.9% sensitivity, 80.0% specificity) to discriminate nondaily from daily smokers. Excluding polytobacco-product users from these analyses provided similar results. Different correlates of NNAL levels exist among nondaily and daily

  19. Parent smoker role conflict and planning to quit smoking: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friebely, Joan; Rigotti, Nancy A; Chang, Yuchiao; Hall, Nicole; Weiley, Victoria; Dempsey, Janelle; Hipple, Bethany; Nabi-Burza, Emara; Murphy, Sybil; Woo, Heide; Winickoff, Jonathan P

    2013-02-22

    conflict. Factors that were significantly associated with parent/smoker role conflict in the multivariable model included: being non-Hispanic white, allowing home smoking, the child being seen that day for a sick visit, parents receiving any assistance for their smoking, and planning to quit in the next 30 days. In a separate multivariable logistic regression model, parent/smoker role conflict was independently associated with intention to quit in the next 30 days [AOR 2.25 (95% CI 1.80-2.18)]. This study demonstrated an association between parent/smoker role conflict and readiness to quit. Interventions that increase parent/smoker role conflict might act to increase readiness to quit among parents who smoke.

  20. Behavioural therapy for smoking cessation: the effectiveness of different intervention types for disadvantaged and affluent smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiscock, Rosemary; Murray, Susan; Brose, Leonie S; McEwen, Andy; Bee, Jo Leonardi; Dobbie, Fiona; Bauld, Linda

    2013-11-01

    Disadvantaged smokers are less likely to be successful when trying to stop smoking than more affluent smokers. In the UK, NHS Stop Smoking Services (SSS) provide a range of pharmacotherapy and behavioural support, delivered by advisors with a range of backgrounds. Whether the types of support provided and who provides it influence differences in quit rates amongst low SES smokers compared with high SES smokers has not previously been examined. 202,084 records of smokers in England who attended a NHS Stop Smoking Service between July 2010 and June 2011 were acquired. Smokers were followed-up by services at four weeks post quit date. Multilevel logistic regression models of CO validated quits were employed. Disadvantage was explored through the National Statistics Socio-Economic Classification (NS-SEC) and by eligibility for free prescriptions, an indicator of low income amongst adults aged between 19 and 59 in England. Affluent smokers were more likely to quit than disadvantaged smokers (OR 1.38 (1.35 to 1.42) for clients who paid for prescriptions compared to those eligible for free prescriptions). 80% of service clients received one-to-one counselling but open group forms of behavioural therapy were more successful (main effect OR 1.26 (1.12 to 1.41)) except amongst some of the most disadvantaged clients (long-term unemployed and prisoners). Closed groups were little deployed and they were not significantly more successful than one-to-one behavioural therapy after controls. Who delivered treatment did make a difference for some clients, with all but the most affluent less likely to be successful if they had been treated by a nurse compared with other types of advisers, including smoking cessation specialists (main effect OR 0.73 (0.65 to 0.83)). This study provides further evidence that disadvantaged smokers find quitting more difficult even when they have attended a smoking cessation programme. The findings suggest that open groups should be promoted, although

  1. Ibuprofen inhibits adhesiveness of monocytes to endothelium and reduces cellular oxidative stress in smokers and non-smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapolska-Downar, D; Naruszewicz, M; Zapolski-Downar, A; Markiewski, M; Bukowska, H; Millo, B

    2000-11-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor in atherosclerosis and a useful model from which to study chronic inflammation. We compared monocyte function, lipid profiles and inflammatory markers in smokers and non-smokers, before and after oral ibuprofen intake. The adhesion of freshly isolated monocytes to native and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), as well as superoxide anion (O2-) levels and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production in resting and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulated monocytes were determined. A group of nine smokers without any other coronary risk factor was compared with an age-matched group of 9 non-smokers. Tests were performed before and after a two-week course of oral ibuprofen (600 mg day-1). In smokers before ibuprofen, monocyte adhesion to native and TNFalpha-stimulated HUVEC was increased (P levels in native and PMA-stimulated monocytes (P smokers and non-smokers (P levels in smokers (P non-smokers (P level of triglycerides in smokers (P levels in smokers and non-smokers.

  2. Extent and prevalence of cognitive dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic non-obstructive bronchitis, and in asymptomatic smokers, compared to normal reference values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Negro, Roberto W; Bonadiman, Luca; Tognella, Silvia; Bricolo, Fernanda P; Turco, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can affect cognition. The effects of other less severe chronic airway disorders on cognition remain to be clarified. This study aimed to measure and compare cognitive deterioration in subjects with COPD, subjects with chronic non-obstructive bronchitis (CNOB), and asymptomatic smokers (AS), and to relate the corresponding prevalence to several demographic and clinical variables and to normal reference values. Four hundred and two subjects (COPD n=229, CNOB n=127, and AS n=46) of comparable age were included in the study. Cognitive impairment was assessed using the Mini Mental Status test, the Clock Drawing test, and the Trail Making test A and B. The extent and prevalence of cognitive deterioration was greater in COPD subjects, followed by CNOB subjects and AS (PCOPD Assessment test scores, forced expiratory volume in the first second predicted, and arterial partial pressure of O2 and of CO2 were related to the extent and the prevalence of cognitive deterioration. COPD subjects, CNOB subjects, and AS aged 40-69 years showed the greatest cognitive impairment (PCOPD subjects. Cognitive impairment may start at the early stages of chronic airway damage and progress with a worsening of the respiratory condition. Indeed, the greatest cognitive deterioration was seen in COPD subjects. Cognition impairment may contribute to explaining the insufficient adherence to therapeutic plans and strategies, and the increasing social costs in respiratory subjects.

  3. Genetic and Pharmacokinetic Determinants of Response to Transdermal Nicotine in White, Black and Asian Non-Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Delia A.; St Helen, Gideon; Jacob, Peyton; Tyndale, Rachel F.; Benowitz, Neal L.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine genetic, pharmacokinetic and demographic factors that influence sensitivity to nicotine in never smokers. Sixty never smokers, balanced for gender and race (Caucasian, Blacks and Asian), wore 7 mg nicotine skin patches for up to 8 hours. Serial plasma nicotine concentrations and subjective and cardiovascular effects were measured, and genetic variation in the CYP2A6 gene, the primary enzyme responsible for nicotine metabolism, was assessed. Nicotine toxicity requiring patch removal developed in 9 subjects and was strongly associated with rate of rise and peak concentrations of plasma nicotine. Toxicity, subjective and cardiovascular effects of nicotine were associated with the presence of reduced function CYP2A6 alleles, presumably reflecting slow nicotine metabolic inactivation. This study has implications for understanding individual differences in responses to nicotine medications, particularly when the latter are used for treating medical conditions in non-smokers, and possibly in vulnerability to developing nicotine dependence. PMID:23933970

  4. Smokers' and ex-smokers' understanding of electronic cigarettes: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooke, Catriona; Cunningham-Burley, Sarah; Amos, Amanda

    2016-04-01

    To explore among a diverse range of smokers and recent ex-smokers, particularly those from disadvantaged groups, how nicotine-containing products, particularly electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), are understood and experienced. Qualitative study of 64 smokers and ex-smokers in Central Scotland. Twelve focus groups and 11 individual interviews were carried out with a range of purposively selected groups. Nicotine replacement therapies and e-cigarettes were regarded as being very different products. Nicotine replacement therapies were viewed as medical products for smokers who want to quit, while e-cigarettes emerged as an ambiguous product whose meanings are still being negotiated. Participants' attitudes and intentions about smoking and quitting were especially important in shaping their understanding of these products. Four main interpretations of e-cigarettes were identified: a more satisfying replacement for smoking, an ambiguous but potentially useful device, a less desirable cigarette and a threat to smoking cessation. The acceptability of continued nicotine addiction and the similarity of e-cigarettes to conventional cigarettes were central themes on which participants held conflicting views. There was considerable uncertainty among participants around the constituents and safety of e-cigarettes. Different groups of smokers bring diverse expectations, requirements and concerns to their evaluations and therefore to the potential use of nicotine-containing products. The ambiguity around e-cigarettes in public health debates and medical practice is reflected in the positions and concerns of smokers. There is a need for both clear, up-to-date trustworthy information about their benefits and risks, and stronger regulation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Lung Cancer Screening with Low-Dose CT in Female Never Smokers: Retrospective Cohort Study with Long-Term National Data Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyae Young; Jung, Kyu-Won; Lim, Kun Young; Lee, Soo-Hyun; Jun, Jae Kwan; Kim, Jeongseon; Hwangbo, Bin; Lee, Jin Soo

    2017-07-17

    Because of growing concerns about lung cancer in female never smokers, low-dose chest CT (LDCT) screening is often performed although it has never shown clinical benefits. We examine whether or not female never smokers really need annual LDCT screening when the initial LDCT showed negative findings. This retrospective cohort study included 4,365 female never smokers aged 40 to 79 years who performed initial LDCT from Aug 2002 to Dec 2007. Lung cancer diagnosis was identified from the Korea Central Cancer Registry Database registered until Dec 31st, 2013. We calculated the incidence, cumulative probability, and standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of lung cancer by Lung Imaging Reporting and Data System (Lung-RADS) categories showed on initial LDCT. After median follow-up of 9.69 years, 22 (0.5%) had lung cancer. Lung cancer incidence for Lung-RADS category 4 was 1848.4 (95% CI 1132.4-3017.2) per 100,000 person-years and 16.4 (7.4-36.4) for categories 1, 2, and 3 combined. The cumulative probability of lung cancer for category 4 was 10.6% at 5 years and 14.8% at 10 years while they were 0.07% and 0.17% when categories 1, 2, and 3 were combined. The SIR for subjects with category 4 was 43.80 (25.03 -71.14), which was much higher than 0.47 (0.17-1.02) for categories 1, 2 and 3 combined. Considering the low risk of lung cancer development in female never smokers, it seems unnecessary to repeat annual LDCT screening for at least 5 years or even longer unless the initial LDCT showed Lung-RADS category 4 findings.

  6. Workplace smoking ban effects on unhappy smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Chaisemartin, Clément; Geoffard, Pierre-Yves; le Faou, Anne-Laurence

    2011-09-01

    Economists usually draw a distinction between smokers. They distinguish 'happy addicts' à la Becker-Murphy from 'unhappy addicts' who state that smoking is a mistake and call for some help to quit. When evaluating tobacco control policies, it might be important to distinguish their effects on those two types of population. Indeed, such policies are welfare improving only if they help unhappy addicts to quit. We investigate the effect of the French workplace smoking ban on a sample of presumably 'unhappy addicts', smokers who consult tobacco cessation services. We show that the ban caused an increase in the demand for such services, and that this increase was larger in cold and rainy areas. It also induced an increase in the percentage of successful attempts to quit. Workplace smoking bans might be welfare improving since they seem to help 'unhappy addicts' to reconcile their behavior with their preferences. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Cross-sectional study identifying forms of tobacco used by Shisha smokers in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sameer-ur-Rehman; Sadiq, Mohammed Ali; Parekh, Maria Adnan; Zubairi, Ali Bin Sarwar; Frossard, Philippe M; Khan, Javaid Ahmed

    2012-02-01

    To estimate the frequency of different forms of tobacco intake such as smoker's tobacco, chewable tobacco and snuff tobacco among shisha smoker's and to study the patterns and predictors of shisha smoking affecting youth from different cities of Pakistan. A cross-sectional study was conducted including youth from four cities. Participants were asked to fill out a data collection tool at shisha cafes, shopping malls and restaurants. Data was analyzed using SPSSv.18. A total of 406 participants, 296 (73%) males and 110 (27%) females were included in the study. There were 163 (40%) cigarette smokers; 65 (16%) chewed tobacco and 33 (8%) snuffed it. The median age at initiation of Shisha smoking was 20 years. 280 (69%) considered Shisha smoking to be less deleterious to health than cigarettes. Respiratory disease was the most commonly cited health effect reported. Most 248 (61%) of the participants were infrequent shisha smokers. There is high frequency of tobacco usage in the form of cigarettes, chewable tobacco and snuff tobacco among shisha smokers of Pakistan. The highest frequency is for cigarette smoking. The rise in Shisha smoking as a trendy social habit appears to be occurring despite emerging scientific evidence of its potential health risks.

  8. Anxiety sensitivity risk reduction in smokers: A randomized control trial examining effects on panic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Norman B; Raines, Amanda M; Allan, Nicholas P; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    Empirical evidence has identified several risk factors for panic psychopathology, including smoking and anxiety sensitivity (AS; the fear of anxiety-related sensations). Smokers with elevated AS are therefore a particularly vulnerable population for panic. Yet, there is little knowledge about how to reduce risk of panic among high AS smokers. The present study prospectively evaluated panic outcomes within the context of a controlled randomized risk reduction program for smokers. Participants (N = 526) included current smokers who all received a state-of-the-art smoking cessation intervention with approximately half randomized to the AS reduction intervention termed Panic-smoking Program (PSP). The primary hypotheses focus on examining the effects of a PSP on panic symptoms in the context of this vulnerable population. Consistent with prediction, there was a significant effect of treatment condition on AS, such that individuals in the PSP condition, compared to those in the control condition, demonstrated greater decreases in AS throughout treatment and the follow-up period. In addition, PSP treatment resulted in lower rates of panic-related symptomatology. Moreover, mediation analyses indicated that reductions in AS resulted in lower panic symptoms. The present study provides the first empirical evidence that brief, targeted psychoeducational interventions can mitigate panic risk among smokers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Smoke and Mirrors: The Perceived Benefits of Continued Tobacco use Among Current Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Hugh; Sterk, Claire E; Elifson, Kirk W

    2014-04-26

    Despite 50+ years of public health efforts to reduce smoking rates in the United States, approximately one-fifth of the adults living in this country continue to smoke cigarettes. Previous studies have examined smokers' risk perceptions of cigarette smoking, as well as the perceived benefits of quitting smoking. Less research has focused on the perceived benefits of smoking among current cigarette smokers. The latter is the main focus of the present paper. Questionnaire-based interviews were conducted with a community-based sample of 485 adult current cigarette smokers recruited from the Atlanta, Georgia, metropolitan area between 2004 and 2007. Active and passive recruiting approaches were used, along with a targeted sampling strategy. Results revealed that most current cigarette smokers perceive themselves to experience benefits as a result of their cigarette use, including (among others) increased relaxation, diminished nervousness in social situations, enjoyment of the taste of cigarettes when smoking, and greater enjoyment of parties when smoking. Perceiving benefits from cigarette smoking was associated with a variety of tobacco use measures, such as smoking more cigarettes, an increased likelihood of chain smoking, and overall negative attitude toward quitting smoking, among others. Several factors were associated with the extent to which smokers perceived themselves to benefit from their tobacco use, including education attainment, the age of first purchasing cigarettes, the proportion of friends who smoked, hiding smoking from others, being internally-oriented regarding locus of control, and self-esteem.

  10. Teens' images of smoking and smokers.

    OpenAIRE

    Luke, D.; Allen, P; Arian, G.; Crawford, M.; Headen, S.; Spigner, A. C.; Tassler, P.; Ureda, J.

    2001-01-01

    The authors used qualitative and quantitative data to identify and interpret specific images teens have about smoking and smokers. Qualitative data were collected in 1996 from 793 teenagers participating in 125 focus groups at eight different sites across the United States. Most focus groups were homogeneous with respect to gender, ethnicity, and smoking status. Ages ranged from 12 to 18 years, and about half of the participants were female. The majority of participants (62%) were white and A...

  11. Smoking cessation in smokers who smoke menthol and non-menthol cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stevens S; Fiore, Michael C; Baker, Timothy B

    2014-12-01

    To assess the relations of menthol cigarette use with measures of cessation success in a large comparative effectiveness trial (CET). Participants were randomized to one of six medication treatment conditions in a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. All participants received six individual counseling sessions. Community-based smokers in two communities in Wisconsin, USA. A total of 1504 adult smokers who smoked at least 10 cigarettes per day during the past 6 months and reported being motivated to quit smoking. The analysis sample comprised 1439 participants: 814 white non-menthol smokers, 439 white menthol smokers and 186 African American (AA) menthol smokers. There were too few AA non-menthol smokers (n = 16) to be included in the analyses. Nicotine lozenge, nicotine patch, bupropion sustained release, nicotine patch + nicotine lozenge, bupropion + nicotine lozenge and placebo. Biochemically confirmed 7-day point-prevalence abstinence assessed at 4, 8 and 26 weeks post-quit. In longitudinal abstinence analyses (generalized estimating equations) controlling for cessation treatment, menthol smoking was associated with reduced likelihood of smoking cessation success relative to non-menthol smoking [model-based estimates of abstinence = 31 versus 38%, respectively; odds ratio (OR) = 0.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.59, 0.86]. In addition, among menthol smokers, AA women were at especially high risk of cessation failure relative to white women (estimated abstinence = 17 versus 35%, respectively; OR = 2.63, 95% CI = 1.75, 3.96; estimated abstinence rates for AA males and white males were both 30%, OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.60, 1.66). In the United States, smoking menthol cigarettes appears to be associated with reduced cessation success compared with non-menthol smoking, especially in African American females. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  12. Surgery for Herniated Lumbar Disc in Daily Tobacco Smokers: A Multicenter Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsbu, Mattis A; Salvesen, Øyvind; Werner, David A T; Franssen, Eric; Weber, Clemens; Nygaard, Øystein P; Solberg, Tore K; Gulati, Sasha

    2018-01-01

    To compare clinical outcomes at 1 year following single-level lumbar microdiscectomy in daily tobacco smokers and nonsmokers. Data were collected through the Norwegian Registry for Spine Surgery. The primary endpoint was a change in the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) at 1 year. Secondary endpoints were change in quality of life measured with EuroQol 5 Dimensions (EQ-5D), leg and back pain measured with a numerical rating scale (NRS), and rates of surgical complications. A total of 5514 patients were enrolled, including 3907 nonsmokers and 1607 smokers. A significant improvement in ODI was observed for the entire cohort (mean, 31.1 points; 95% confidence interval [CI], 30.4-31.8; P < 0.001). Nonsmokers experienced a greater improvement in ODI at 1 year compared with smokers (mean, 4.1 points; 95% CI, 2.5-5.7; P < 0.001). Nonsmokers were more likely to achieve a minimal important change (MIC), defined as an ODI improvement of ≥10 points, compared with smokers (85.5% vs. 79.5%; P < 0.001). Nonsmokers experienced greater improvements in EQ-5D (mean difference, 0.068; 95% CI, 0.04-0.09; P < 0.001), back pain NRS (mean difference, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.21-0.66; P < 0.001), and leg pain NRS (mean difference, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.31-0.77; P < 0.001). There was no difference between smokers and nonsmokers in the overall complication rate (6.2% vs. 6.7%; P = 0.512). Smoking was identified as a negative predictor for ODI change in a multiple regression analysis (P < 0.001). Nonsmokers reported a greater improvement in ODI at 1 year following microdiscectomy, and smokers were less likely to experience an MIC. Nonetheless, significant improvement was also found among smokers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Intent to Quit among Daily and Non-Daily College Student Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsker, E. A.; Berg, C. J.; Nehl, E. J.; Prokhorov, A. V.; Buchanan, T. S.; Ahluwalia, J. S.

    2013-01-01

    Given the high prevalence of young adult smoking, we examined (i) psychosocial factors and substance use among college students representing five smoking patterns and histories [non-smokers, quitters, native non-daily smokers (i.e. never daily smokers), converted non-daily smokers (i.e. former daily smokers) and daily smokers] and (ii) smoking…

  14. Prevalence and Frequency of mHealth and eHealth Use Among US and UK Smokers and Differences by Motivation to Quit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Yvonne Kiera; Tooley, Erin; Armitage, Christopher J; Wearden, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Background Both mHealth and eHealth interventions for smoking cessation are rapidly being developed and tested. There are no data on use of mHealth and eHealth technologies by smokers in general or by smokers who are not motivated to quit smoking. Objective The aims of our study were to (1) assess technology use (eg, texting, social media, Internet) among smokers in the United States and United Kingdom, (2) examine whether technology use differs between smokers who are motivated to quit and smokers who are not motivated to quit, (3) examine previous use of technology to assist with smoking cessation, and (4) examine future intentions to use technology to assist with smoking cessation. Methods Participants were 1000 adult smokers (54.90%, 549/1000 female; mean age 43.9, SD 15.5 years; US: n=500, UK: n=500) who were recruited via online representative sampling strategies. Data were collected online and included demographics, smoking history, and frequency and patterns of technology use. Results Among smokers in general, there was a high prevalence of mobile and smartphone ownership, sending and receiving texts, downloading and using apps, using Facebook, and visiting health-related websites. Smokers who were unmotivated to quit were significantly less likely to own a smartphone or handheld device that connects to the Internet than smokers motivated to quit. There was a significantly lower prevalence of sending text messages among US smokers unmotivated to quit (78.2%, 179/229) versus smokers motivated to quit (95.0%, 229/241), but no significant differences between the UK groups (motivated: 96.4%, 239/248; unmotivated: 94.9%, 223/235). Smokers unmotivated to quit in both countries were significantly less likely to use a handheld device to read email, play games, browse the Web, or visit health-related websites versus smokers motivated to quit. US smokers had a high prevalence of app downloads regardless of motivation to quit, but UK smokers who were motivated to quit

  15. A serving of blueberry (V. corymbosum) acutely improves peripheral arterial dysfunction in young smokers and non-smokers: two randomized, controlled, crossover pilot studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bo', Cristian; Deon, Valeria; Campolo, Jonica; Lanti, Claudia; Parolini, Marina; Porrini, Marisa; Klimis-Zacas, Dorothy; Riso, Patrizia

    2017-11-15

    following BS (35.2 ± 7.5% RHI; p = 0.02) and CS treatments (34.6 ± 11.9% RHI; p = 0.02) when compared to only smoking treatment. No difference between BS and CS was detected. In conclusion, the intake of blueberry and control treatments acutely improved peripheral arterial dysfunction both in smoker and in non-smoker subjects. Further studies should be performed to confirm the results obtained and reveal the potential mechanisms of blueberry in the improvement of endothelial function.

  16. Transitions in Smokers' Social Networks After Quit Attempts: A Latent Transition Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Bethany C; Smith, Rachel A; Piper, Megan E; Roberts, Linda J; Baker, Timothy B

    2016-12-01

    Smokers' social networks vary in size, composition, and amount of exposure to smoking. The extent to which smokers' social networks change after a quit attempt is unknown, as is the relation between quitting success and later network changes. Unique types of social networks for 691 smokers enrolled in a smoking-cessation trial were identified based on network size, new network members, members' smoking habits, within network smoking, smoking buddies, and romantic partners' smoking. Latent transition analysis was used to identify the network classes and to predict transitions in class membership across 3 years from biochemically assessed smoking abstinence. Five network classes were identified: Immersed (large network, extensive smoking exposure including smoking buddies), Low Smoking Exposure (large network, minimal smoking exposure), Smoking Partner (small network, smoking exposure primarily from partner), Isolated (small network, minimal smoking exposure), and Distant Smoking Exposure (small network, considerable nonpartner smoking exposure). Abstinence at years 1 and 2 was associated with shifts in participants' social networks to less contact with smokers and larger networks in years 2 and 3. In the years following a smoking-cessation attempt, smokers' social networks changed, and abstinence status predicted these changes. Networks defined by high levels of exposure to smokers were especially associated with continued smoking. Abstinence, however, predicted transitions to larger social networks comprising less smoking exposure. These results support treatments that aim to reduce exposure to smoking cues and smokers, including partners who smoke. Prior research has shown that social network features predict the likelihood of subsequent smoking cessation. The current research illustrates how successful quitting predicts social network change over 3 years following a quit attempt. Specifically, abstinence predicts transitions to networks that are larger and afford

  17. Chronic Bronchitis and Current Smoking Are Associated with More Goblet Cells in Moderate to Severe COPD and Smokers without Airflow Obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Victor; Oros, Michelle; Durra, Heba; Kelsen, Steven; Aksoy, Mark; Cornwell, William D.; Rogers, Thomas J.; Criner, Gerard J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Goblet cell hyperplasia is a classic but variable pathologic finding in COPD. Current literature shows that smoking is a risk factor for chronic bronchitis but the relationship of these clinical features to the presence and magnitude of large airway goblet cell hyperplasia has not been well described. We hypothesized that current smokers and chronic bronchitics would have more goblet cells than nonsmokers or those without chronic bronchitis (CB), independent of airflow obstruction. Methods We recruited 15 subjects with moderate to severe COPD, 12 healthy smokers, and 11 healthy nonsmokers. Six endobronchial mucosal biopsies per subject were obtained by bronchoscopy and stained with periodic acid Schiff-Alcian Blue. Goblet cell density (GCD) was quantified as goblet cell number per millimeter of basement membrane. Mucin volume density (MVD) was quantified as volume of mucin per unit area of basement membrane. Results Healthy smokers had a greater GCD and MVD than nonsmokers and COPD subjects. COPD subjects had a greater GCD than nonsmokers. When current smokers (healthy smokers and COPD current smokers, n = 19) were compared with all nonsmokers (nonsmoking controls and COPD ex-smokers, n = 19), current smokers had a greater GCD and MVD. When those with CB (n = 12) were compared to those without CB (n = 26), the CB group had greater GCD. This finding was also seen in those with CB in the COPD group alone. In multivariate analysis, current smoking and CB were significant predictors of GCD using demographics, lung function, and smoking pack years as covariates. All other covariates were not significant predictors of GCD or MVD. Conclusions Current smoking is associated with a more goblet cell hyperplasia and number, and CB is associated with more goblet cells, independent of the presence of airflow obstruction. This provides clinical and pathologic correlation for smokers with and without COPD. PMID:25646735

  18. Chronic bronchitis and current smoking are associated with more goblet cells in moderate to severe COPD and smokers without airflow obstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Kim

    Full Text Available Goblet cell hyperplasia is a classic but variable pathologic finding in COPD. Current literature shows that smoking is a risk factor for chronic bronchitis but the relationship of these clinical features to the presence and magnitude of large airway goblet cell hyperplasia has not been well described. We hypothesized that current smokers and chronic bronchitics would have more goblet cells than nonsmokers or those without chronic bronchitis (CB, independent of airflow obstruction.We recruited 15 subjects with moderate to severe COPD, 12 healthy smokers, and 11 healthy nonsmokers. Six endobronchial mucosal biopsies per subject were obtained by bronchoscopy and stained with periodic acid Schiff-Alcian Blue. Goblet cell density (GCD was quantified as goblet cell number per millimeter of basement membrane. Mucin volume density (MVD was quantified as volume of mucin per unit area of basement membrane.Healthy smokers had a greater GCD and MVD than nonsmokers and COPD subjects. COPD subjects had a greater GCD than nonsmokers. When current smokers (healthy smokers and COPD current smokers, n = 19 were compared with all nonsmokers (nonsmoking controls and COPD ex-smokers, n = 19, current smokers had a greater GCD and MVD. When those with CB (n = 12 were compared to those without CB (n = 26, the CB group had greater GCD. This finding was also seen in those with CB in the COPD group alone. In multivariate analysis, current smoking and CB were significant predictors of GCD using demographics, lung function, and smoking pack years as covariates. All other covariates were not significant predictors of GCD or MVD.Current smoking is associated with a more goblet cell hyperplasia and number, and CB is associated with more goblet cells, independent of the presence of airflow obstruction. This provides clinical and pathologic correlation for smokers with and without COPD.

  19. The influence ofKIRgene presence/absence polymorphisms on the development of periodontal disease in smokers and non-smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek-Mochol, Małgorzata; Majorczyk, Edyta; Banach, Jadwiga; Dembowska, Elżbieta; Kuśnierczyk, Piotr; Safranow, Krzysztof; Pawlik, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are highly prevalent inflammatory, multifactorial diseases. Smoking is one of the most important environmental risk factors for the development and severity of periodontal disease. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are members of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily and play an essential role in the regulation of NK cell activity, allowing natural killer (NK) cells to sense and respond to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of KIR gene presence/absence polymorphisms on the development of periodontal disease in smokers and non-smokers. This study enrolled 400 Caucasian subjects (age range 25-69 years) from the West Pomeranian region of Poland. The subjects were categorized into four subgroups (smoking and non-smoking patients with periodontal disease; smoking and non-smoking subjects without periodontal disease - control subjects). The differences of KIR gene frequencies between non-smoking patients and non-smoking control subjects as well as smoking patients and control subjects were not statistically significant. In multivariate regression analysis advanced age of patients and smoking were independent factors associated with increased frequency of periodontal disease. The results of this study suggest that the main factor associated with increased risk of periodontal disease is smoking, whereas KIR presence/absence polymorphism is not a significant factor involved in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease.

  20. An 18-month follow-up study on the influence of smoking on blood antioxidant status of teenage girls in comparison with adult male smokers in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun H; Ensunsa, Jodi L; Zhu, Qin Yan; Kim, Jung S; Shin, Ho S; Keen, Carl L

    2004-05-01

    The influence of cigarette smoking on blood antioxidant status in teenage girls with a history of short-term smoking was followed over 18 mo. Data obtained from female senior high school students (ages 14 to 18 y) in Korea were compared with data obtained from adult male smokers (ages 36 to 51 y) with a long history of smoking and living in the same geographic areas as the teenage subjects. A smoker was a person who had smoked at least three cigarettes a day for at least 1 y for teenagers (n = 35) or at least 10 cigarettes a day for at least 13 y for adults (n = 20). Serum, urine, and anthropometric data were obtained from teenagers every 6 mo over an 18-mo period. Samples were collected once from adults. Data were analyzed by Student's t test and Fisher's protected least significant difference test for comparing smokers and non-smokers and for analyzing period effects in each group. Serum nicotine and cotinine concentrations were higher in smokers than in non-smokers. Blood pressures were higher in teenage (at 0 and 12 mo) and adult smokers than in non-smokers. Extracellular superoxide dismutase activities and concentrations of serum vitamin C and folate were lower in smokers in the teenage (at 0, 12, or 18 mo) and adult groups. Serum ceruloplasmin activities and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance production were not influenced by smoking. In adults, serum copper concentrations were higher in smokers than in non-smokers. This parameter for teenagers did not change consistently throughout the study. Similar to adults, cigarette smoking by teenagers has a negative effect on oxidant defense systems.

  1. Effects of 6-Week Use of Reduced-Nicotine Content Cigarettes in Smokers With and Without Elevated Depressive Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidey, Jennifer W; Pacek, Lauren R; Koopmeiners, Joseph S; Vandrey, Ryan; Nardone, Natalie; Drobes, David J; Benowitz, Neal L; Dermody, Sarah S; Lemieux, Andrine; Denlinger, Rachel L; Cassidy, Rachel; al'Absi, Mustafa; Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Donny, Eric C

    2017-01-01

    The FDA recently acquired regulatory authority over tobacco products, leading to renewed interest in whether reducing the nicotine content of cigarettes would reduce tobacco dependence in the United States. Given the association between depressive symptoms and cigarette smoking, it is important to consider whether smokers with elevated depressive symptoms experience unique benefits or negative consequences of nicotine reduction. In this secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial that examined the effects of cigarettes varying in nicotine content over a 6-week period in non-treatment-seeking smokers, we used linear regression to examine whether baseline depressive symptom severity (scores on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale [CES-D]) moderated the effects of reduced-nicotine content (RNC) cigarettes, relative to normal-nicotine content (NNC) cigarettes, on smoking rates, depressive symptom severity, and related subjective and physiological measures. Of the 717 participants included in this analysis, 109 (15.2%) had CES-D scores ≥ 16, indicative of possible clinical depression. Relative to NNC cigarettes, RNC cigarettes reduced smoking rates, nicotine dependence, and cigarette craving, and these effects were not significantly moderated by baseline CES-D score. A significant interaction between baseline CES-D score and cigarette condition on week 6 CES-D score was observed (p nicotine content conditions, biochemically confirmed compliance with the RNC cigarettes was associated with an increase in CES-D score for those with baseline CES-D scores nicotine standard for cigarettes may reduce smoking, without worsening depressive symptoms, among smokers with elevated depressive symptoms. This secondary analysis of a recent clinical trial examined whether depressive symptom severity moderated the effects of reduced-nicotine cigarettes on smoking and depressive symptoms. Results indicate that, regardless of baseline depressive symptoms

  2. Comparison of cyanide exposure markers in the biofluids of smokers and non-smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnakota, Chakravarthy V; Peetha, Naga S; Perrizo, Mitch G; Ferris, David G; Oda, Robert P; Rockwood, Gary A; Logue, Brian A

    2012-11-01

    Cyanide is highly toxic and is present in many foods, combustion products (e.g. cigarette smoke), industrial processes, and has been used as a terrorist weapon. In this study, cyanide and its major metabolites, thiocyanate and 2-amino-2-thiazoline-4-carboxylic acid (ATCA), were analyzed from various human biofluids of smokers (low-level chronic cyanide exposure group) and non-smokers to gain insight into the relationship of these biomarkers to cyanide exposure. The concentrations of each biomarker tested were elevated for smokers in each biofluid. Significant differences (p cyanide exposure, and other statistical methods were performed to better understand the relationship between cyanide and its metabolites. Of the markers studied, the results indicate plasma ATCA, in particular, showed excellent promise as a biomarker for chronic low-level cyanide exposure.

  3. The social support and social network characteristics of smokers in methadone maintenance treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dios, Marcel Alejandro; Stanton, Cassandra A; Caviness, Celeste M; Niaura, Raymond; Stein, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown social support and social network variables to be important factors in smoking cessation treatment. Tobacco use is highly prevalent among individuals in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). However, smoking cessation treatment outcomes in this vulnerable subpopulation have been poor and social support and social network variables may contribute. The current study examined the social support and social network characteristics of 151 MMT smokers involved in a randomized clinical trial of smoking cessation treatments. Participants were 50% women and 78% Caucasian. A high proportion (57%) of MMT smokers had spouses or partners who smoke and over two-thirds of households (68.5%) included at least one smoker. Our sample was characterized by relatively small social networks, but high levels of general social support and quitting support. The number of cigarettes per day was found to be positively associated with the number of smokers in the social network (r = .239, p < .05) and quitting self-efficacy was negatively associated with partner smoking (r = -.217, p < .001). Findings are discussed in the context of developing smoking cessation interventions that address the influential role of social support and social networks of smokers in MMT.

  4. Increased levels of serum and gingival crevicular fluid monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in smokers with periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anil, Sukumaran; Preethanath, R S; Alasqah, Mohammed; Mokeem, Sameer A; Anand, Pradeep S

    2013-09-01

    Smoking alters the host response, including vascular function, neutrophil/monocyte activities, adhesion molecule expression, antibody production, and cytokine and inflammatory mediator release. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is involved in the activation and recruitment of inflammatory and immune cells to infected sites, thereby mediating a variety of pathophysiologic conditions. Estimation of serum and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) MCP levels could be a reliable indicator of periodontal disease activity. Hence, the objective of this study is to analyze the serum and GCF MCP-1 levels of smokers and never-smokers with periodontitis and compare them with those in periodontally healthy individuals. A total of 90 participants (30 periodontally healthy individuals, 30 non-smoking individuals with periodontitis, and 30 smokers with periodontitis) formed the study group. Serum and GCF samples were collected, and MCP-1 levels were estimated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Mean MCP-1 levels in serum and GCF were found to be highest in smokers with periodontitis, followed by the periodontitis group, and then by the healthy controls. The values were statistically significant (P periodontitis in smokers. More longitudinal, prospective studies will help to verify the observations of the present study. Further research in this direction could reveal reliable markers to forecast the progression of periodontitis in high-risk groups.

  5. Price-Minimizing Behaviors in a Cohort of Smokers before and after a Cigarette Tax Increase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzner, Anne; Boyle, Raymond G; St Claire, Ann W

    2016-06-17

    Cigarette tax increases result in a reduced demand for cigarettes and increased efforts by smokers to reduce their cost of smoking. Less is known about how smokers think about their expenditures for cigarettes and the possible mechanisms that underlie price-minimizing behaviors. In-depth longitudinal interviews were conducted with Minnesota smokers to explore the factors that influence smokers' decisions one month prior to a $1.75 cigarette tax increase and again one and three months after the increase. A total of 42 were sampled with 35 completed interviews at all three time points, resulting in 106 interviews across all participants at all time points. A qualitative descriptive approach examined smoking and buying habits, as well as reasons behind these decisions. A hierarchy of ways to save money on cigarettes included saving the most money by changing to roll your own pipe tobacco, changing to a cheaper brand, cutting down or quitting, changing to cigarillos, and buying online. Using coupons, shopping around, buying by the carton, changing the style of cigarette, and stocking up prior to the tax increase were described as less effective. Five factors emerged as impacting smokers' efforts to save money on cigarettes after the tax: brand loyalty, frugality, addiction, stress, and acclimation.

  6. Effects of smoking cues and argument strength of antismoking advertisements on former smokers' self-efficacy, attitude, and intention to refrain from smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungkyoung; Cappella, Joseph N; Lerman, Caryn; Strasser, Andrew A

    2013-02-01

    This study examines the impact of smoking cues employed in antismoking advertisements on former smokers. Previous findings indicate that visual smoking cues in antismoking advertisements with weak antismoking arguments can elicit smoking urges in smokers and undermine message effectiveness. This study extends these observations to former smokers asking whether smoking cues in antismoking advertisements influence former smokers' self-efficacy, attitudes, and intention to refrain from smoking, along with smoking urges and perceived message effectiveness. The study was a mixed 2 (smoking cues; present vs. absent) × 2 (argument strength [AS]; high vs. low) design where smoking cue was a between-subject factor and AS was a within-subject factor. Potential participants recruited via online ads were screened in a phone interview for their eligibility. A total of 105 former smokers (aged 21-65) participated in the study, which was conducted in a laboratory setting. Repeated measure ANOVA and MANOVA were used for the analyses. The results showed that the presence of smoking cues in antismoking ads undermines former smokers' behavioral self-efficacy, attitude, and intention about smoking abstinence, which increased as AS for the ads increased. Former smokers' reports of smoking urge were not affected by smoking cues or AS. However, consistent with previous findings for smokers, the presence of cues weakened perceived message effectiveness of antismoking ads rated by former smokers. The effect of smoking cues on former smokers' self-efficacy, attitude, and intention to refrain from smoking is problematic. Inclusion of smoking cues in antismoking ads should be undertaken only when accompanied by strong arguments.

  7. Impulsivity and cigarette craving among adolescent daily and occasional smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Amanda R; Burris, Jessica L; Froeliger, Brett; Saladin, Michael E; Carpenter, Matthew J

    2015-06-01

    Impulsivity is a multi-dimensional construct that is robustly related to cigarette smoking. While underlying factors that account for this relation are not well understood, craving has been proposed as a central mechanism linking impulsivity to smoking. In order to further refine our understanding of associations between impulsivity and cigarette craving, the current study examined the association between impulsivity and tonic and cue-elicited craving among a sample of adolescent smokers. We expected trait impulsivity would be positively associated with both tonic and cue-elicited craving, and that this relationship would be stronger among daily vs. occasional smokers. 106 smokers (ages 16-20) completed the questionnaires and reported their cigarette craving prior to and immediately following presentation of each of three counterbalanced cue types: (a) in vivo smoking, (b) alcohol, and (c) neutral cue. Impulsivity was positively associated with tonic craving for daily smokers (β=.38; p=.005), but not occasional smokers (β=.01; p=.95), with a significant impulsivity x smoker group interaction (β=1.31; p=.03). Impulsivity was unrelated to craving following smoking or alcohol cue, regardless of smoker group (all p's>.16). Results suggest a moderated effect in which impulsivity is positively associated with tonic craving for daily smokers, but not occasional smokers. Tonic craving may serve as a mechanism linking impulsivity, smoking persistence, and nicotine dependence among daily smokers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Somatotype, physical growth, and sexual maturation in young male smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lall, K B; Singhi, S; Gurnani, M; Singhi, P; Garg, O P

    1980-01-01

    One thousand school boys aged 8 to 16 were examined for their somatotype, physical growth, sexual maturation, and smoking habits. Fifty-two boys were found to be smokers, of whom 30 were regularly smoking between two and 20 bidis or cigarettes a day for a mean duration of 2.5 years. The mean height and weight of the smokers was significantly lower than that of the non-smokers at all ages, more so in regular than occasional smokers. Sixty-nine per cent of the smokers had mesomorphic type of body build; about 65% of the non-smokers had ectomorphic somatotype (P less than 0.001). Onset of puberty occurred significantly earlier among smokers compared with non-smokers, as was evident from the early appearance of genital stage 2, and an early and rapid increase in testicular size. Genital stage 2 appeared at a mean age of 11 years in smokers and 11.6 years in non-smokers. However, the appearance of pubic, axillary, and facial hair was delayed. The possible significance of this is discussed. PMID:7241030

  9. Qualitative exploration of public and smoker understanding of, and reactions to, an endgame solution to the tobacco epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Richard; Peace, Jo; Russell, Marie; Gifford, Heather; Thomson, George; Wilson, Nick

    2012-09-13

    There is increasing interest in ending the tobacco epidemic and in applying 'endgame' solutions to achieve that goal at national levels. We explored the understanding of, and reactions to, a tobacco-free vision and an endgame approach to tobacco control among New Zealand smokers and non-smokers. We recruited participants in four focus groups held in June 2009: Māori (indigenous people) smokers (n=7); non-Māori smokers (n=6); Māori non-smokers (n=7); and non-Māori non-smokers (n=4). Participants were from the city of Whanganui, New Zealand. We introduced to them the vision of a tobacco-free New Zealand and the concept of a semi-autonomous agency (Tobacco-Free Commission [TFC]) that would control the tobacco market as part of an endgame approach. There was mostly strong support for the tobacco-free New Zealand vision among all groups of participants. The reason most commonly given for supporting the vision was to protect children from tobacco. Most participants stated that they understood the TFC concept and reacted positively to it. Nevertheless, rather than focusing on organisational or structural arrangements, participants tended to focus on supporting the specific measures which a future TFC might facilitate such as plain packaging of tobacco products. Various concerns were also raised around the TFC, particularly around the feasibility of its establishment. We were able to successfully communicate a complex and novel supply-side focused tobacco control policy intervention to smokers and non-smokers. The findings add to the evidence from national surveys that there is public support, including from smokers, for achieving a tobacco-free vision and using regulatory and policy measures to achieve it. Support for such measures may be enhanced if they are clearly communicated and explained with a rationale which stresses protecting children and future generations from tobacco smoking.

  10. Qualitative exploration of public and smoker understanding of, and reactions to, an endgame solution to the tobacco epidemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards Richard

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing interest in ending the tobacco epidemic and in applying ‘endgame’ solutions to achieve that goal at national levels. We explored the understanding of, and reactions to, a tobacco-free vision and an endgame approach to tobacco control among New Zealand smokers and non-smokers. Methods We recruited participants in four focus groups held in June 2009: Māori (indigenous people smokers (n=7; non-Māori smokers (n=6; Māori non-smokers (n=7; and non-Māori non-smokers (n=4. Participants were from the city of Whanganui, New Zealand. We introduced to them the vision of a tobacco-free New Zealand and the concept of a semi-autonomous agency (Tobacco-Free Commission [TFC] that would control the tobacco market as part of an endgame approach. Results There was mostly strong support for the tobacco-free New Zealand vision among all groups of participants. The reason most commonly given for supporting the vision was to protect children from tobacco. Most participants stated that they understood the TFC concept and reacted positively to it. Nevertheless, rather than focusing on organisational or structural arrangements, participants tended to focus on supporting the specific measures which a future TFC might facilitate such as plain packaging of tobacco products. Various concerns were also raised around the TFC, particularly around the feasibility of its establishment. Conclusions We were able to successfully communicate a complex and novel supply-side focused tobacco control policy intervention to smokers and non-smokers. The findings add to the evidence from national surveys that there is public support, including from smokers, for achieving a tobacco-free vision and using regulatory and policy measures to achieve it. Support for such measures may be enhanced if they are clearly communicated and explained with a rationale which stresses protecting children and future generations from tobacco smoking.

  11. Toll-like receptor 2 expression is decreased on alveolar macrophages in cigarette smokers and COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabel Peter

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backround Cigarette smoke exposure including biologically active lipopolysaccharide (LPS in the particulate phase of cigarette smoke induces activation of alveolar macrophages (AM and alveolar epithelial cells leading to production of inflammatory mediators. This represents a crucial mechanism in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Respiratory pathogens are a major cause of exacerbations leading to recurrent cycles of injury and repair. The interaction between pathogen-associated molecular patterns and the host is mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRR's. In the present study we characterized the expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR- 2, TLR4 and CD14 on human AM compared to autologous monocytes obtained from patients with COPD, healthy smokers and non-smokers. Methods The study population consisted of 14 COPD patients without evidence for acute exacerbation, 10 healthy smokers and 17 healthy non-smokers stratified according to age. The expression of TLR2, TLR4 and CD14 surface molecules on human AM compared to autologous monocytes was assessed ex vivo using FACS analysis. In situ hybridization was performed on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL cells by application of the new developed HOPE-fixative. Results The expression of TLR2, TLR4 and CD14 on AM from COPD patients, smokers and non-smokers was reduced as compared to autologous monocytes. Comparing AM we detected a reduced expression of TLR2 in COPD patients and smokers. In addition TLR2 mRNA and protein expression was increased after LPS stimulation on non-smokers AM in contrast to smokers and COPD patients. Conclusion Our data suggest a smoke related change in the phenotype of AM's and the cellular response to microbial stimulation which may be associated with impairment of host defenses in the lower respiratory tract.

  12. Does smoking habit increase the micronuclei frequency in the oral mucosa of adults compared to non-smokers? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Geus, Juliana Larocca; Wambier, Letícia Maíra; Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Kossatz, Stella; Reis, Alessandra

    2018-01-01

    A systematic review of clinical studies to evaluate the frequency of micronuclei in the oral mucosa of smokers and non-smokers in adult patients was performed. A comprehensive search was carried out on MEDLINE via PubMeb, Scopus, Web of Science, LILACS, BBO, and Cochrane Library and SIGLE without restrictions. Dissertations and thesis were searched using the ProQuest Dissertations and Periodicos Capes Thesis Databases. We included only cross-sectional clinical trials that compared the frequency of micronuclei in the oral mucosa of smokers and non-smokers in adult patients. After the removal of duplicates, 1338 articles were identified. After title and abstract screening, 35 studies remained. Eighteen studies were further excluded, whereas 17 studies remained for qualitative analysis and 16 for the meta-analysis of the primary and secondary outcomes. A significant difference in the frequency of micronuclei in smokers when compared to non-smokers was observed in the present study. Despite the high variation in the methodology of the assessed studies, this study showed a higher frequency of micronuclei in exfoliated cells of smokers compared to non-smokers. The use of tobacco is associated with cytotoxic and genotoxic effects because a higher frequency of micronuclei in exfoliated cells of smokers was observed.

  13. Sub-epithelial connective tissue graft for root coverage in nonsmokers and smokers: A pilot comparative clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chini Doraswamy Dwarakanath

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gingival recession is a common condition and is more prevalent in smokers. It is widely believed that root coverage procedures in smokers result in less desirable outcome compared to nonsmokers', and there are few controlled studies in literature to support this finding. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the outcome of root coverage with sub-epithelial connective tissue graft (SCTG in nonsmokers and smokers. Materials and Methods: A sample of twenty subjects, 10 nonsmokers and 10 smokers were selected each with at least 1 Miller's Class I or II recession on a single rooted tooth. Clinical measurements of probing depth, clinical attachment level (CAL, gingival recession total surface area (GRTSA, depth of recession (RD, width of recession (RW, and width of keratinized tissue were determined at baseline, 3, and 6 months after surgery. Results: The treatment of gingival recession with SCTG and coronally advanced flap showed a decrease in the GRTSA, RD, RW, and an increase in CAL and width of keratinized gingiva in both the groups. However, the intergroup comparison of the clinical parameters showed no statistical significance. About 6 out of 10 nonsmokers (60% and 3 smokers (30% showed complete root coverage. The mean percentage of root coverage of 71.2% in nonsmokers and 38% in smokers was observed. Conclusion: The results of the present study suggest that smoking may negatively influence gingival recession reduction and CAL gain. In addition, smokers may exhibit fewer chances of complete root coverage. Overall, nonsmokers showed better improvements in all the parameters compared to smokers at the end of 6 months.

  14. Sub-epithelial connective tissue graft for root coverage in nonsmokers and smokers: A pilot comparative clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwarakanath, Chini Doraswamy; Divya, Bheemavarapu; Sruthima, Gottumukkala Naga Venkata Satya; Penmetsa, Gautami Subadra

    2016-01-01

    Gingival recession is a common condition and is more prevalent in smokers. It is widely believed that root coverage procedures in smokers result in less desirable outcome compared to nonsmokers', and there are few controlled studies in literature to support this finding. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the outcome of root coverage with sub-epithelial connective tissue graft (SCTG) in nonsmokers and smokers. A sample of twenty subjects, 10 nonsmokers and 10 smokers were selected each with at least 1 Miller's Class I or II recession on a single rooted tooth. Clinical measurements of probing depth, clinical attachment level (CAL), gingival recession total surface area (GRTSA), depth of recession (RD), width of recession (RW), and width of keratinized tissue were determined at baseline, 3, and 6 months after surgery. The treatment of gingival recession with SCTG and coronally advanced flap showed a decrease in the GRTSA, RD, RW, and an increase in CAL and width of keratinized gingiva in both the groups. However, the intergroup comparison of the clinical parameters showed no statistical significance. About 6 out of 10 nonsmokers (60%) and 3 smokers (30%) showed complete root coverage. The mean percentage of root coverage of 71.2% in nonsmokers and 38% in smokers was observed. The results of the present study suggest that smoking may negatively influence gingival recession reduction and CAL gain. In addition, smokers may exhibit fewer chances of complete root coverage. Overall, nonsmokers showed better improvements in all the parameters compared to smokers at the end of 6 months.

  15. Resistin may be an independent predictor of subclinical atherosclerosis formale smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ying; Bai, Xiao-Jun; Li, Fen-Xia; Fan, Li-Hong; Ren, Jie; Liang, Qi; Li, Hong-Bing; Bai, Ling; Tian, Hong-Yan; Fan, Fen-Ling; Tian, Gang; Ma, Ai-Qun; Chen, Jinghong

    To investigate whether resistin is associated with early atherosclerosis in male smokers. The present study consecutively enrolled 50 male smokers. Their serum resistin contents were detected with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and subclinical atherosclerosis indices, including carotid inner middle thickness (IMT) and arterial elasticity indices (C1 and C2), were measured. The association between serum resistin levels and IMT, C1 and C2 were respectively evaluated with the Pearson's correlation coefficient method. The results showed that the serum resistin level had a positive association with IMT (r = 0.307, p = .030), but were both inversely associated with C1 (r = -0.440, p = .001) and C2 (r = -0.381, p = .006). These associations remained significant even after adjustment for cardiovascular confounders. In conclusion, serum resistin concentration was independently associated with early atherosclerosis in male smokers.

  16. Two-step stool aerobic training for smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Manuel; Saavedra, Pedro; Martin, Nieves; Lantarón, Ev M; Polu, Elisabeth; Bach, John Robert

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze subjective, physical, and physiologic responses to a standardized incremental 30-min two-step stool test to create an individualized 45-min maximally intensive two-step stool endurance exercise regimen for home training. This is a longitudinal study on 26 consecutively referred male smokers aged 39-66 yrs. Each performed the two-step stool test on two 15-cm steps at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 climbs per minute. Exertional dyspnea, oxygen consumption per unit time, ventilation, respiratory rate, tidal volume, heart rate, capillary oxyhemoglobin saturation, physiologic cost index, and oxygen pulse were recorded and compared with those observed during incremental cycle exercise (30 W per 3 mins). Multivariate analysis for each parameter was undertaken as a mixed model. All subjects attained 60 climbs per minute on the two-step stool test and performed 38-42 mins of two-step stool endurance. All parameters reached 80%-96% of cycle maximum oxygen consumption. The subjects found the two-step stool endurance simple and practical to perform at home. There were no complications. The incremental two-step stool test is a simple, cost-effective way to establish a 45-min maximally intensive endurance exercise training program practical for use in the home.

  17. Ultrastructural analysis of oral exfoliated epithelial cells of tobacco smokers and betel nut chewers: A scanning electron microscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    Sameera Shamim Khan; Balasundari Shreedhar; Mala Kamboj

    2016-01-01

    Background: The study was undertaken to correlate epithelial surface pattern changes of oral exfoliated cells of tobacco smokers and betel nut chewers and also to compare them with patients of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and healthy individuals. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a total of fifty persons were included in the study, out of which thirty formed the study group (15 each tobacco smokers and betel nut chewers) and twenty formed the control group (ten each...

  18. Comparison of circulating tumour necrosis factor superfamily cytokines in periodontitis patients undergoing supportive therapy: a case-controlled cross-sectional study comparing smokers and non-smokers in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nile, Christopher J; Sherrabeh, Sakhr; Ramage, Gordon; Lappin, David F

    2013-09-01

    B-cells are prominent immune cells in established periodontitis lesions. Tumour necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) cytokines play roles in supporting B-cell function as well as bone re-modelling. The influence of smoking on factors that support B-cell function in periodontitis remains unclear. To investigate plasma concentrations of TNF (TNSF1A), soluble receptor activator of nuclear-factor Kappa-B ligand (sRANKL/TNFSF11), a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL/TNFSF13), B-cell activating factor (BAFF/TNFSF13B) and Osteoprotegerin (OPG/TNFRSF11B) in smokers and non-smokers with and without chronic periodontitis Plasma concentrations of TNFSF and OPG were evaluated in 200 systemically healthy subjects divided into four groups: non-smokers with periodontitis (n = 101), smokers with periodontitis (n = 55), healthy non-smokers (n = 27) and healthy smokers (n = 17). Periodontitis patients had significantly higher plasma sRANKL, TNF, APRIL and BAFF and lower OPG than healthy subjects (p < 0.01). TNF and sRANKL were significantly greater in smokers with periodontitis (p = 0.011, p = 0.001) and OPG concentrations significantly lower (p = 0.001), whereas APRIL or BAFF were little changed. Plasma APRIL, BAFF, sRANKL and TNF correlated with probing depth and clinical attachment loss. TNFSF cytokines correlate with periodontitis disease severity. However, only TNF, sRANKL and OPG levels were altered by cigarette smoking. APRIL and BAFF appear as good indicators of disease severity. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Exposure to residential radon and lung cancer in never-smokers: the preliminary results of the LCRINS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano-Ravina, Alberto; Prini-Guadalupe, Luciana; Barros-Dios, Juan Miguel; Abal-Arca, José; Leiro-Fernández, Virginia; González-Silva, Ana Isabel; Golpe-Gómez, Antonio; González-Barcala, Francisco Javier; Pena, Carolina; Montero-Martínez, Carmen; Martínez-González, Cristina; Mejuto-Martí, María José; Veres-Racamonde, Alejandro

    2012-11-01

    Residential radon is the second most important risk factor for lung cancer and the first among never-smokers. The objective of this study is to report the concentrations of residential radon in a series of never-smoker cases recruited in a multicenter study of cases and controls in northwestern Spain. In this study, all the hospitals in the Spanish province of Galicia and one from Asturias participated. The present article includes a series of cases with residential radon measurements. All the subjects were personally interviewed, 3 ml of blood were taken from each, and they were each given instructions about how to place a residential radon detector in their homes. Sixty-nine case subjects were recruited, 84% of whom were women with a mean age of 71, and 81% of whom had adenocarcinoma. The average concentration of residential radon in the cases was 237 Bq/m(3), while the average concentration in the Galician population is 79 Bq/m(3). No relationship was observed between the concentration of residential radon and either sex or age at the time of diagnosis of the cases, but there was a tendency towards having a greater concentration in those diagnosed with small-cell and large-cell carcinoma. The concentrations of residential radon in the cases included are very high at about three times the average concentration of residential radon to which the general population of Galicia is exposed. Copyright © 2012 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. An investigation of a personal norm of condom-use responsibility among African American crack cocaine smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M; Bowen, A; Ross, M; Timpson, S; Pallonen, U; Amos, C

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the unique contribution of a personal norm of condom-use responsibility to the formation of intentions to use male condoms during vaginal sex. Data were collected from 402 male and 157 female heterosexual African American crack cocaine smokers in Houston, Texas, US. Two structural equation models of the intention to use a condom with the last sex partner were estimated. One model included measures of condom-use attitudes, subjective norms and condom-use self-efficacy. A second model included these three measures and a fourth measure of a personal norm of condom-use responsibility. Separate models were estimated for men and women. The addition of a personal norm of condom-use responsibility provided a significantly better fit to the data than did models including only outcome expectations, subjective norms and self-efficacy. Results also showed distinctly different underlying cognitive structures of condom-use intention for men and women. A personal norm of condom-use responsibility had a strong direct effect on men's intentions to use condoms with the last sex partner. Other variables appeared to have no direct effect on men's intentions. Women's intentions were strongly influenced by a personal norm and social subjective norms. Situational self-efficacy and outcome expectations had weaker, yet significant, effects on women's intentions. Given the strong effect of personal norms on men's intentions to use condoms, further research should be undertaken.

  1. Genetic polymorphisms in antioxidative enzymes are associated to FEV(1) in smokers independently of asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malling, T H; Sigsgaard, Torben; Andersen, Charlotte Brasch

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that the genotypes coding for low antioxidative enzyme activity are associated with asthma and reduced lung function. Using the ECRHS protocol, we enlisted 1,091 Danish subjects in this cross-sectional study. Asthma phenotypes were defined as asthma symptoms......), GSTT1 (gene copy number), and GSTM1 (gene copy number). We found no associations between these genotypes and the asthma phenotypes. For the 201 subjects identified as current smokers and recruited via random sampling, an association was seen between increasing number of genotypes coding for high...... of genotypes coding for low antioxidative enzyme activity. The present study does not support the hypothesis that asthma is associated with genotypes of these major antioxidative enzymes. However, we speculate that since we see an impact of these genotypes on lung function in young adult smokers, polymorphisms...

  2. Validity of subjective smoking status in orthopedic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bender D

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Bender,* Patrick Haubruck,* Sonja Boxriker, Sebastian Korff, Gerhard Schmidmaier, Arash Moghaddam Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Center for Orthopedics, Trauma Surgery and Spinal Cord Injury, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: In this level 1 diagnostic study, we analyzed the validity of subjective smoking status and, as secondary research question, the smoking cessation adherence in orthopedic patients during a routine hospital stay of nonunion patients by measuring serum cotinine.  Methods: We included patients undergoing revision surgery due to nonunion of long bones. Patients were interviewed about their smoking status. Blood samples were taken from all the patients prior to surgery and for an additional 6 weeks following surgery. Serum levels of cotinine were measured, and coherence between subjective smoking status and objective cotinine analysis was evaluated.  Results: Between March 2012 and August 2014, we enrolled 136 patients. Six of the 26 “previous smokers” (23% and four of the 65 “nonsmokers” (6% had serum cotinine above cutoff levels. In self-labeled smokers, serum cotinine levels averaged at 2,367.4±14,885.9 ng/mL (with a median of 100 ng/mL, whereas in previous smokers the levels averaged at 4,270±19,619.4 ng/mL (with a median of 0 ng/mL and in the nonsmokers group the levels averaged at 12±53.9 ng/mL (with a median of 0.03 ng/mL. Overall, the subjective smoking status matched serum cotinine testing in 88% of the cases. Sensitivity was 79.6% and specificity was 93.1%. Ninety-one percent of the patients with preoperative positive serum values were still positive at follow-up.  Conclusion: In this study, we could show that subjective smoking status in orthopedic patients is predominantly reliable as validated by objective cotinine measurements; however, patients who declare themselves as “previous smokers” are at elevated risk

  3. Lessons learned from the London Exercise and Pregnant (LEAP Smokers randomised controlled trial process evaluation: implications for the design of physical activity for smoking cessation interventions during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikoletta Giatras

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The challenges of delivering interventions for pregnant smokers have been poorly documented. Also, the process of promoting a physical activity intervention for pregnant smokers has not been previously recorded. This study describes the experiences of researchers conducting a randomised controlled trial of physical activity as an aid to smoking cessation during pregnancy and explores how the effectiveness of future interventions could be improved. Methods Two focus groups, with independent facilitators, were conducted with six researchers who had enrolled pregnant smokers in the LEAP trial, provided the interventions, and administered the research measures. Topics included recruitment, retention and how the physical activity intervention for pregnant smokers was delivered and how it was adapted when necessary to suit the women. The focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and subjected to thematic analysis. Results Five themes emerged related to barriers or enablers to intervention delivery: (1 nature of the intervention; (2 personal characteristics of trial participants; (3 practical issues; (4 researchers’ engagement with participants; (5 training and support needs. Researchers perceived that participants may have been deterred by the intensive and generic nature of the intervention and the need to simultaneously quit smoking and increase physical activity. Women also appeared hampered by pregnancy ailments, social deprivation, and poor mental health. Researchers observed that their status as health professionals was valued by participants but it was challenging to maintain contact with participants. Training and support needs were identified for dealing with pregnant teenagers, participants’ friends and family, and post-natal return to smoking. Conclusions Future exercise interventions for smoking cessation in pregnancy may benefit by increased tailoring of the intervention to the characteristics of the

  4. Transcranial direct current stimulation reduces negative affect but not cigarette craving in overnight abstinent smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiansong eXu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS can enhance cognitive control functions including attention and top-down regulation over negative affect and substance craving in both healthy and clinical populations, including early abstinent (~1.5 h smokers. The aim of this study was to assess whether tDCS modulates negative affect, cigarette craving, and attention of overnight abstinent tobacco dependent smokers. In this study, 24 smokers received a real and a sham session of tDCS after overnight abstinence from smoking on two different days. We applied anode to the left dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and cathode to the right supra orbital area for 20min with a current of 2.0mA. We used self-report questionnaires Profile of Mood State (POMS to assess negative affect and Urge to Smoke (UTS Scale to assess craving for cigarette smoking, and a computerized visual target identification task to assess attention immediately before and after each tDCS. Smokers reported significantly greater reductions in POMS scores of total mood disturbance and scores of tension-anxiety, depression-dejection, and confusion-bewilderment subscales after real relative to sham tDCS. Furthermore, this reduction in negative affect positively correlated with the level of nicotine dependence as assessed by Fagerström scale. However, reductions in cigarette craving after real vs. sham tDCS did not differ, nor were there differences in reaction time or hit rate change on the visual task. Smokers did not report significant side effects of tDCS. This study demonstrates the safety of tDCS and its promising effect in ameliorating negative affect in overnight abstinent smokers. Its efficacy in treating tobacco dependence deserves further investigation.

  5. Pulmonary tuberculosis and lung cancer risk in current smokers: the Seoul Male Cancer Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jong-Myon; Li, Zhong-Min; Shin, Myung-Hee; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Moo-Song; Ahn, Yoon-Ok

    2013-06-01

    Authors evaluated pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) history as a risk factor for lung cancer in current male smokers in a prospective, population-based cohort study. The subjects were the 7,009 males among the participants in the Seoul Male Cancer Cohort Study for whom there was full information on PTB history and smoking habits. With a 16-yr follow-up, 93 cases of lung cancer occurred over the 99,965 person-years of the study. The estimated relative risk (RR) of PTB history of current smokers in lung cancer after adjusting for three confounders - intake of coffee and tomatoes, and age at entry - was 1.85 (95% CI: 1.08-3.19). The observed joint RRs and attributable risks (ARs) across strata of three confounders were greater than the expected, indicating a positive interaction. Thus a history of PTB in current smokers may be another risk factor for lung cancer. Based on a synergic interaction, a heavy male smoker with a PTB history would be expected to belong to the group at high risk of lung cancer.

  6. Effects of At-home Bleaching in Smokers: 30-month Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Geus, J L; Fernández, E; Kossatz, S; Loguercio, A D; Reis, A

    This clinical study evaluated the color longevity after 30 months of at-home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) in smokers and nonsmokers. Sixty patients, 30 smokers and 30 nonsmokers, were subjected to bleaching with 10% CP (Whiteness Perfect-FGM) for three hours daily for three weeks. The color was measured at baseline and at one month and 30 months after the completion of dental bleaching using the shade guide Vita classical organized by value (ΔSGU) and the shade guide Vita Bleachedguide 3D-MASTER. At the 30-month recall, the color was assessed before and after dental prophylaxis. Data from color evaluation were analyzed by two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance and Tukey test for the contrast of means (α=0.05). Twenty-one smokers and 22 nonsmokers attended the 30 month recall. For both shade guides, only the main factor of assessment time was statistically significant (p<0.001). Effective whitening was observed in both groups at the baseline, which was stable at one month. However, color rebound was observed after 30 months for both groups of participants when color was measured before and after dental prophylaxis. Thirty months after at-home bleaching with 10% CP gel, dental darkening was detected in both groups, which cannot be solely attributed to stains caused by extrinsic staining from daily food, drinks, and smoke (in smokers).

  7. Electronic Cigarette Use among Current Smokers: A Pilot Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Ban A; Stanton, Cassandra A; Dube, Shanta R; Sterling, Kymberle L; Burns, Joy D; Eriksen, Michael P

    2016-11-01

    This pilot study explored psychosocial influences of e-cigarette use among dual users. Two focus groups among adult current smokers who had ever used e-cigarettes were conducted in Georgia. Discussions were audio-recorded. Principles of grounded theory and thematic analysis were employed. Reasons for initial use included curiosity and social influence. Themes related to regular use included enjoyment of sensory experiences and perception of reduced harm. Nicotine craving, social image, and convenience were reasons for initial and regular dual use. Two patterns of use emerged - (1) using e-cigarettes to supplement combustible cigarettes; and (2) to replace combustible cigarettes. Reasons for dual use were related to nicotine dependence, social influence, product appeal, and perception of reduced harm. Understanding contextual nuances of dual use can inform policy and communication.

  8. Targeting hardcore smokers: the effects of an online tailored intervention, based on motivational interviewing techniques.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bommelé, J.; Schoenmakers, T.M.; Kleinjan, M.; Peters, G.J.Y.; Dijkstra, A.; Mheen, D. van de

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Hardcore smokers have smoked for many years and do not intend to quit. They also seem unreceptive to information about smoking cessation. We developed a 30-min, tailored web-based intervention that includes motivational interviewing principles. It aims to increase hardcore smokers’

  9. Phase separation, brine formation, and salinity variation at Black Smoker hydrothermal systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coumou, D.; Driesner, T.; Weis, P.; Heinrich, C. A.

    2009-01-01

    We present the first fully transient 2-D numerical simulations of black smoker hydrothermal systems using realistic fluid properties and allowing for all phase transitions possible in the system H2O-NaCl, including phase separation of convecting seawater into a low-salinity vapor and high-salinity

  10. Attributions for Smoking Behavior: Comparing Smokers with Nonsmokers and Predicting Smokers' Cigarette Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinke, Chris L.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Compared smokers' (214) and nonsmokers' (220) explanations for cigarette smoking behavior to determine predictors of cigarette consumption. Results showed addiction and affective smoking were the most important motives predicting consumption. Presented at the meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association, Washington, DC, 1980. (WAS)

  11. Quantitative assessment of elemental carbon in the lungs of never smokers, cigarette smokers and coal miners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhalation exposure to particulates such as cigarette smoke and coal dust is known to contribute to the development of chronic lung disease. The purpose of this study was to estimate the amount of elemental carbon (EC) deposits from autopsied lung samples from cigarette smokers, ...

  12. Perceptions of smokers influence nonsmoker attitudes and preferences for interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Dillard, Amanda J.; Magnan, Renee E.; Köblitz, Amber R.; McCaul, Kevin D

    2013-01-01

    In two studies, we examined nonsmokers’ perceptions of smokers and consequences of the perceptions. In Study 1, smokers answered questions about their sense of self, dependence on smoking, and motivation to quit. Nonsmokers answered questions about their perceptions of these characteristics. Differences between smokers’ self-descriptions and nonsmokers’ perceptions were observed. Study 2 asked nonsmokers to judge two types of smokers for which the descriptions were based on Study 1 findings. ...

  13. Young adult smokers' neural response to graphic cigarette warning labels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam E. Green

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: In this sample of young adult smokers, GWLs promoted neural activation in brain regions involved in cognitive and affective decision-making and memory formation and the effects of GWLs did not differ on branded or plain cigarette packaging. These findings complement other recent neuroimaging GWL studies conducted with older adult smokers and with adolescents by demonstrating similar patterns of neural activation in response to GWLs among young adult smokers.

  14. Urinary cotinine in narguila or chicha tobacco smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaron, C; Macaron, Z; Maalouf, M T; Macaron, N; Moore, A

    1997-01-01

    Urinary levels of nicotine metabolites were measured in nonsmokers and smokers of tobacco either as cigarettes or as the Middle-Eastern water pipes (narguila). Levels of urinary cotinine were similar for the smokers of cigarettes (median 30 cigarettes per day) and narguila (median 2 pipes per day, or around 40 grams of tobacco). Use of water pipes may remove a small amount of nicotine, but smokers appear to titrate dose to effect. It is unlikely that narguila smoking confers any less risk.

  15. Oral exfoliative cytology in female reverse smokers having stomatitis nicotina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, C R; Sarma, P R; Kameswari, V R

    1975-01-01

    1. The Karyopyknotic index of the palatal and lingual mucosa is increased in female reverse smokers when compared to non-smoking females. 2. The Karyopyknotic index of the buccal mucosa did not show any change in female reverse smokers when compared to non-smoking females. 3. The Karyopyknotic index did not show any change with age in the non-smoking females. 4. Very few cases show epithelial atypia in palatal smears from female reverse smokers having stomatitis nicotina.

  16. Association Between Oral Hygiene Status and Halitosis Among Smokers and Nonsmokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiun, Iris Liew Ee; Siddik, Siti Nur'Ain Abu Bakar; Malik, Shan Nawaz; Tin-Oo, Mon Mon; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Khan, Mohammad Mobarak Hossain

    2015-01-01

    To study the association of smoking with poor oral hygiene status and halitosis in a comparative cross-sectional study. 100 smokers and 100 nonsmokers ages 18-50 years were recruited for this study in Kota Bharu, Malaysia. Oral hygiene (good/fair vs poor) was determined using the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index, and the halitosis level was measured using a Halimeter. Subjects were instructed to refrain from consuming foods containing garlic, onions, strong spices, alcohol and using mouthwashes 48 h prior to the examination. The halitosis levels were quantified by recording volatile sulphur compounds (VSCs) three times at 3-min intervals, resulting in a mean halitosis score. Various statistical analyses were performed, ranging from simple frequency analysis to multivariable modelling. The proportions of subjects with poor oral hygiene and high halitosis were 24.0% and 41.5%, respectively. According to bivariate analyses, both problems were significantly less frequent among younger adults (halitosis), females, subjects with higher education, those with adequate habits to maintain good oral hygiene, those who had recent dental visits and those self-reporting fewer health problems. The percentages of poor oral hygiene and high halitosis were significantly higher in smokers (p halitosis, education for poor oral hygiene, and age, self-reported health problems and time since the previous dental visit for halitosis. These findings demonstrate a significantly higher level of halitosis and poorer oral hygiene in smokers than nonsmokers.

  17. The destructive index and early lung destruction in smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidelman, D H; Ghezzo, H; Kim, W D; Cosio, M G

    1991-07-01

    The destructive index (DI), a measure of alveolar septal damage and emphysema, has been proposed as a sensitive index of lung destruction that closely reflects functional abnormalities, especially loss of elastic recoil. To better understand the progression of lung destruction in smokers, we studied the contribution of its principal components: breaks in the alveolar septa (DIb) and the presence of emphysematous spaces (DIe), and compared them to the mean linear intercept (Lm) and DI as originally described. To do this we employed lungs obtained at autopsy from non-smokers and smokers. Lungs were selected by emphysema score (ES) so that all cases were emphysema free (nonsmokers and seven smokers) or had minimal emphysema (nine smokers; ES = 5). Of these indices, only DIb was significantly increased in the lungs of smokers: 17.8 +/- 1.2 versus 12.4 +/- 1.6, p less than 0.05. We also investigated the regional distribution of destruction by comparing results in upper and lower lobes. DIe, but not DIb, was significantly increased in upper lobes of smokers. These data support the notion that increases in DI in the lungs of smokers that occur before increases in Lm or ES reflect the presence of alveolar septal breaks and highlight the importance of alveolar septal destruction as a precursor to the development of airspace enlargement in the lungs of cigarette smokers.

  18. Higher lipid peroxidation in former-smokers vs. never-smokers - study in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, Dorota; Stępniak, Jan; Gesing, Adam; Lewinski, Andrzej; Karbownik-Lewinska, Malgorzata

    2015-12-01

    One of the most spectacular exogenous prooxidative agents is cigarette smoking, constituting a well documented risk factor for several diseases. In turn it is suggested that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in postmenopausal women can contribute to oxidative status. The aim of the study was to evaluate the level of oxidative damage to membrane lipids in blood serum collected from never-smokers and former-smokers. The study was performed in postmenopausal women, who were or were not HRT users. Ninety (90) female volunteers, aged from 46 to 67 years, were enrolled. Two major groups were considered, i.e. never-smokers (n=44) and formersmokers (n=46), which were additionally subgrouped to HRT users (HRT+) and HRT non-users (HRT-). Anthropometric parameters related to obesity were also calculated. The main groups were well matched at baseline in terms of age. The level of malondialdehyde+4-hydroxyalkenals (MDA+4-HDA), as the index of LPO, was measured spectrophotometrically. The level of LPO was higher in former-smokers than in never-smokers, regardless of HRT use. The level of LPO did constitute the only independent factor associated with past smoking in the entire examined group, as well as after stratification to HRT users and HRT non-users. LPO level was not associated with HRT treatment. No positive correlations were found between LPO level and anthropometric parameters. Past smoking is independently associated with the increased damage to membrane lipids regardless of the use of HRT in postmenopausal women. Smoking cessation is not always associated with complete reversion of excessive oxidative damage to all biological macromolecules.

  19. Community-acquired pneumonia among smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almirall, Jordi; Blanquer, José; Bello, Salvador

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have left absolutely no doubt that tobacco increases susceptibility to bacterial lung infection, even in passive smokers. This relationship also shows a dose-response effect, since the risk reduces spectacularly 10 years after giving up smoking, returning to the level of non-smokers. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the causative microorganism responsible for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) most frequently associated with smoking, particularly in invasive pneumococcal disease and septic shock. It is not clear how it acts on the progress of pneumonia, but there is evidence to suggest that the prognosis for pneumococcal pneumonia is worse. In CAP caused by Legionella pneumophila, it has also been observed that smoking is the most important risk factor, with the risk rising 121% for each pack of cigarettes smoked a day. Tobacco use may also favor diseases that are also known risk factors for CAP, such as periodontal disease and upper respiratory viral infections. By way of prevention, while giving up smoking should always be proposed, the use of the pneumococcal vaccine is also recommended, regardless of the presence of other comorbidities. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Evidence for reduced arterial plasma input, prolonged lung retention and reduced lung monoamine oxidase in smokers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, Jean [Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)]. E-mail: logan@bnl.gov; Fowler, Joanna S. [Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2005-07-15

    -compartment irreversible model, we estimated the ratio of MAO subtypes A and B in normal lung tissue to be on the order of 3 to 1 (MAO A to B) and that smokers have reduced MAO levels for both subtypes as measured by the model parameter, k {sub 3}. The values of k {sub 3} are insensitive to model assumptions of variations in air and tissue fraction in the PET voxel. Most of the effects of changes in these fractions are absorbed into the parameter K {sub 1}, which governs the plasma-to-tissue transfer of tracer and is a function of blood flow. K {sub 1} was found to be larger in smokers, although the values depend upon model assumptions of air and tissue fractions. k {sub 3} was found to be significantly lower in smokers; for CLG, a 50% reduction in MAO A for both CLG and D CLG was observed. For DEP, k {sub 3} was also significantly lower in smokers with a reduction of {approx}80% in lung MAO B, although there was a very large coefficient of variation in the smoker's k {sub 3}. We also found larger values of {lambda} (K {sub 1}/k {sub 2}) for smokers relative to nonsmokers for all tracers consistent with a longer lung retention of the nonenzyme-bound tracer, which explains the slower decline in uptake from peak radioactivity for smokers. Conclusions: The measured arterial input function values for smokers and nonsmokers are significantly different for these two tracer pairs for nonsmokers and smokers particularly for the first few minutes after radiotracer injection. Model estimates of k {sub 3} that indicate that smokers have lower lung MAO A and B activity than nonsmokers are robust and insensitive to variations in model assumptions for relative fractions of lung tissue, blood and air in the PET voxel. Although we have only investigated the behavior of [{sup 11}C]clorgyline and [{sup 11}C]L-deprenyl and their deuterium-substituted analogs in this report, the extent to which reduced arterial input and longer lung retention also hold for other tracers for subjects who smoke merits

  1. Cigarette smoking cessation attempts among current US smokers who also use smokeless tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, Karen; Vijayaraghavan, Maya; White, Martha M.; Shi, Yuyan; Chang, Cindy; Conway, Kevin P.; Hartman, Anne; Schroeder, Megan J.; Compton, Wilson M.; Pierce, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Concurrent use of cigarettes and smokeless tobacco is common, but little is known regarding the association of smokeless tobacco use with cigarette smoking cessation. Dual users may have lower cigarette consumption levels, which may also play a role in smoking cessation. Methods The 2010–2011 Tobacco Use Supplement to the Current Population Survey included 26,760 current cigarette smokers, of which 675 concurrently used smokeless tobacco. We compared characteristics of the most recent cigarette smoking quit attempt of the past year between dual users and exclusive smokers, using multivariate regression. Results Dual users (45%) were more likely than exclusive smokers (37%) to have made a cigarette smoking quit attempt during the previous year (pcigarette dependence levels (ORadj 1.33, 95% CI 1.15–1.53). Half (48%) of dual users who made a quit attempt tried to quit “by switching to smokeless tobacco”. However, once in a quit attempt, dual users relapsed more quickly than exclusive smokers (Cox regression HRadj 1.13, 95% CI 1.02–1.26). There was no difference in 30-day abstinence rates on the most recent quit attempt (ORadj 1.09, 95% CI 0.88–1.37). For both groups, the best predictor of past 30-day abstinence was cigarette consumption level. Conclusions Current cigarette smokers who also use smokeless tobacco are more likely to have tried to quit, but relapse more quickly than exclusive smokers, and are not more likely to have attained 30 day smoking cessation. Prospective studies at the population level are needed. PMID:26253939

  2. Modeling mood variation and covariation among adolescent smokers: application of a bivariate location-scale mixed-effects model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugach, Oksana; Hedeker, Donald; Richmond, Melanie J; Sokolovsky, Alexander; Mermelstein, Robin

    2014-05-01

    Ecological momentary assessments (EMAs) are useful for understanding both between- and within-subject dynamic changes in smoking and mood. Modeling 2 moods (positive affect [PA] and negative affect [NA], PA and NA) simultaneously will better enable researchers to explore the association between mood variables and what influences them at both the momentary and subject level. The EMA component of a natural history study of adolescent smoking was analyzed with a bivariate location-scale mixed-effects model. The proposed model separately estimates the between- and within-subject variances and jointly models the 2 mood constructs. A total of 461 adolescents completed the baseline EMA wave, which resulted in 14,105 random prompts. Smoking level, represented by the number of smoking events on EMA, entered the model as 2 predictors: one that compared nonsmokers during the EMA week to 1-cigarette smokers, and the second one that estimated the effect of smoking level on mood among smokers. Results suggest that nonsmokers had more consistent positive and negative moods compared to 1-cigarette smokers. Among those who smoked, both moods were more consistent at higher smoking levels. The effects of smoking level were greater for NA than for PA. The within-subject association between mood constructs was negative and strongest among 1-cigarette smokers; the within-subject association between positive and negative moods was negatively associated with smoking. Mood variation and association between mood constructs varied across smoking levels. The most infrequent smokers were characterized with more inconsistent moods, whereas mood was more consistent for subjects with higher smoking levels.

  3. Consumption patterns and biomarkers of exposure in cigarette smokers switched to Snus, various dissolvable tobacco products, Dual use, or tobacco abstinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautter, George R; Chen, Peter X; Borgerding, Michael F

    2015-03-01

    The objectives of this clinical study were to evaluate changes in tobacco product use behavior and levels of selected biomarkers of exposure (BOEs) for smokers who switched to one of six conditions during clinical confinement: exclusive use of; Camel Snus, Sticks, Strips or Orbs, controlled Dual use of cigarettes and Camel Snus, or tobacco abstinence. The controlled Dual use (DU) condition mandated a 60% reduction in cigarettes smoked per day (CPD). 167 healthy U.S. male and female smokers were randomized to the six groups (n=25-30/group). Subjects smoked their usual brand of cigarette for 1 day prior to switching to their designated intervention condition. Levels of thirty-two BOEs in plasma, whole blood, urine and feces were determined before and after switching. Questionnaires that scored nicotine dependence and withdrawal discomfort were also administered. After 5 days, exclusive Snus, Sticks, Strips, or Orbs use averaged 6.1, 5.9, 13.5, and 8.5 units/day, respectively. DU subjects smoked 7.6 CPD and used 3.2 Snus pouches/day, on average. After 5 days, substantial reductions of most biomarkers, including nicotine, were observed in all groups. Toxicant exposures were similar to being tobacco abstinent after switching exclusively to Camel Snus, Sticks, Strips or Orbs. DU reductions were more modest. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in respiratory complex-I in never-smoker lung cancer patients contribute to lung cancer progression and associated with EGFR gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Santanu; Soudry, Ethan; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai; Shao, Chunbo; Yee, John; Lam, Stephan; Lam, Wan; Zhang, Wei; Gazdar, Adi F; Fisher, Paul B; Sidransky, David

    2012-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations were reported in different cancers. However, the nature and role of mtDNA mutation in never-smoker lung cancer patients including patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and KRAS gene mutation are unknown. In the present study, we sequenced entire mitochondrial genome (16.5 kb) in matched normal and tumors obtained from 30 never-smoker and 30 current-smoker lung cancer patients, and determined the mtDNA content. All the patients' samples were sequenced for KRAS (exon 2) and EGFR (exon 19 and 21) gene mutation. The impact of forced overexpression of a respiratory complex-I gene mutation was evaluated in a lung cancer cell line. We observed significantly higher (P = 0.006) mtDNA mutation in the never-smokers compared to the current-smoker lung cancer patients. MtDNA mutation was significantly higher (P = 0.026) in the never-smoker Asian compared to the current-smoker Caucasian patients' population. MtDNA mutation was significantly (P = 0.007) associated with EGFR gene mutation in the never-smoker patients. We also observed a significant increase (P = 0.037) in mtDNA content among the never-smoker lung cancer patients. The majority of the coding mtDNA mutations targeted respiratory complex-I and forced overexpression of one of these mutations resulted in increased in vitro proliferation, invasion, and superoxide production in lung cancer cells. We observed a higher prevalence and new relationship between mtDNA alterations among never-smoker lung cancer patients and EGFR gene mutation. Moreover, a representative mutation produced strong growth effects after forced overexpression in lung cancer cells. Signature mtDNA mutations provide a basis to develop novel biomarkers and therapeutic strategies for never-smoker lung cancer patients. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Never smokers with resected lung cancer: different demographics, similar survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Brendon M; Rahouma, Mohamed; Hussein, Mohamed Kamel; Nasar, Abu; Nguyen, Andrew B; Harrison, Sebron; Lee, Benjamin; Port, Jeffrey L; Altorki, Nasser K

    2017-11-22

    We sought to examine changes over time in the proportion of never smokers among surgical lung cancer patients and to determine whether smoking history affected survival. We performed a retrospective review of a prospective database. Among never smokers and smokers, demographic and pathological data were compared. Disease-free survival (DFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were analysed. Propensity matching was performed for further comparison of survival in a matched cohort. Among 3232 patients, we identified 718 never smokers (22%), 993 smokers with never smokers increased over time, comprising 26.6% of the cohort after 2007 compared with 16.1% prior thereto (P ≤ 0.001). Never smokers were younger, more likely to be women and Asian, more frequently had adenocarcinoma and lower lobe tumours and were more likely to have pStage I disease. In pStage-matched cohorts, there were no differences in DFS or CSS. Similarly, in propensity-matched groups (498 patients each), there was no difference in 5-year DFS (66% vs 67%, P = 0.661) or in CSS (84% vs 81%, P = 0.350). On univariate analysis of the matched cohort, never smoking status had no effect on DFS (hazard ratio 1.05, P = 0.661) or CSS (hazard ratio 1.16, P = 0.350). The proportion of never smokers undergoing resections for lung cancer is increasing. Never smokers have distinct demographic patterns and tend to be younger women with adenocarcinoma. Despite these differences, stage and propensity-matched never smokers have the same survival as smokers and remain at equal risk for recurrence and death.

  6. High cotinine levels are persistent during the first days of life in newborn second hand smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivorra, Carmen; García-Vicent, Consuelo; Ponce, Francisco; Ortega-Evangelio, Graciela; Fernández-Formoso, José Antonio; Lurbe, Empar

    2014-01-01

    Despite the adverse effects of maternal smoking during pregnancy on the newborn's health are well-known, in the pediatric population, a high prevalence exists that is very much affected by second hand smoke (SHS). This study aims to investigate the impact of maternal smoking habits during pregnancy on cotinine levels in newborns during the first days of life. The high association between cotinine concentration in maternal and umbilical cord blood (UCB) has been previously reported, but the levels of blood cotinine that remain in infants born to smokers is unknown. Cotinine concentration was measured in UCB, in maternal and newborn peripheral blood. Data from UCB sample dyads of ninety mothers and from seventy-one newborns were analyzed. Cotinine levels were significantly different among non-smokers (9.9 ± 5.9 ng/ml), moderate (67.3 ± 7.4 ng/ml), and heavy smokers (137.7 ± 19.5 ng/ml) (psmokers exposed their infants to cotinine with a median of 31.7 ± 8.6 ng/ml (moderate) or 59.1 ± 13.3 ng/ml (heavy smokers) until at least, 48 h after birth. Reduced birth weight and length were significantly related with UCB cotinine levels. A positive association between UCB and plasmatic cotinine in newborns was found. The high cotinine levels detected in newborns from smoker mothers indicates that their infants are subjected to elevated SHS from birth. These results can help to reinforce the awareness of the adverse effects of smoking during pregnancy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Reference interval and subject variation in excretion of urinary metabolites of nicotine from non-smoking healthy subjects in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, A M; Garde, A H; Christensen, J M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Passive smoking has been found to be a respiratory health hazard in humans. The present study describes the calculation of a reference interval for urinary nicotine metabolites calculated as cotinine equivalents on the basis of 72 non-smokers exposed to tobacco smoke less than 25......% of the day. METHODS: Twenty subjects (passive smokers) exposed to tobacco smoke more than 25% of the day (subjectively assessed) and 32 smokers were used to validate the estimated reference interval. Urine samples were collected three times during the day approximately at 06.30, 17.00 and 22.45 h. RESULTS....... Parametric reference interval for excretion of nicotine metabolites in urine from non-smokers was established according to International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) and International Federation for Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) for use of risk assessment of exposure to tobacco smoke...

  8. ["How does smoker really smoke?"--preliminary report on smoking topography among Polish smokers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czogała, Jan; Goniewicz, Maciej Łukasz; Czubek, Agnieszka; Koszowski, Bartosz; Sobczak, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Levels of toxic substances in tobacco smoke are undeniably influenced by temperature-oxygen conditions in which the smoke is generated. These conditions depend on the way the cigarette is smoked (smoking topography). Smoking topography may be characterized by such factors as: puff volume and its velocity, intervals between puffs and a number of puffs per cigarette. Vast majority of formerly published papers on tobacco smoke composition present data obtained in accordance with ISO (International Standard Organization) and FTC (Federal Trade Commission) standards concerning conditions of tobacco smoke production. Currently, the standard methods for tobacco smoke generation in lab conditions are frequently questioned by researchers, since such methods do not give reliable results as far as toxic substances delivery to smokers' bodies is concerned. To determine the real doses a tobacco smoker is exposed to, first of all smoking topography should be measured in a given population. The aim of this study was to characterize smoking topography among Poles and its statistical assessment. 129 volunteers were involved in the research. To assure representativeness of the group of smokers, in the first step of the study a demographic structure analysis of smokers' population in Poland was carried out (the authors used data provided by GUS (Central Statistical Office). Smokers were divided into study groups in terms of their sex and age and also detailed information on tobacco addiction (number of cigarettes smoked, its brand and type etc.). Smoking topography was measured using a portable CreSSmicro device (Plowshare Technologies, USA). Mean puff volume in the examined group was 60 ml and was 78% higher than the puff volume used for tobacco smoke control according to the ISO method (35 ml). Mean measured puff velocity (48 ml/ sec.) was as much as 120% higher comparing to ISO (17.5 ml/sec.). Mean duration time of puff in the examined group was 1.7 sec. (2 sec. in the ISO

  9. Characteristics of smokers who have never tried to quit: evidence from the British Opinions and Lifestyle Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Aarohi; Szatkowski, Lisa

    2014-04-11

    An understanding of the characteristics of smokers who have never tried to quit may be useful to help identify and target these individuals and encourage them to attempt to give up smoking. Using national survey data we investigated variables associated with smokers reporting never having tried to quit. Using data from the 2007 and 2009 UK Office for National Statistics Opinions and Lifestyle Survey we identified all self-reported current smokers aged 16+. The primary outcome was response to the question 'have you ever tried to quit smoking?' Univariable and multivariable logistic regression quantified the association between this outcome and several potential explanatory variables, including age, sex, socioeconomic status, health status, smoking behaviour, and knowledge of the dangers of smoking. Desire to quit was the most significant independent predictor of whether a smoker reported never having tried to quit. Smokers who reported that their health was good or very good were more likely to report never having tried to quit than those whose health was fair, bad or very bad (OR 1.59, 95% CI 1.05-2.41). Smokers who reported that no family members, friends or colleagues had been trying to get them to quit smoking in the last year were more likely to report never having tried to quit than those who reported that someone was trying to persuade them (OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.09-2.28). Smokers who hadn't received any cessation advice from a health professional in the last five years which they considered to be helpful were also more likely to report never having tried to quit. Smokers who do not want to quit, who are in good health, whose friends and family are not trying to get them to quit, and who do not report receiving helpful advice to quit from a health professional, are more likely to report never having tried to quit.

  10. A cross-sectional survey investigating the desensitisation of graphic health warning labels and their impact on smokers, non-smokers and patients with COPD in a London cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratneswaran, Culadeeban; Chisnall, Ben; Drakatos, Panagis; Sivakumar, Sukhanthan; Sivakumar, Bairavie; Barrecheguren, Miriam; Douiri, Abdel; Steier, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There is a lack of evidence regarding the effectiveness of graphic health warning labels (GHWL) in different individuals, including patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Investigating knowledge and attitudes may allow better implementation of future public health policies. We hypothesised that differences in the impact of GHWL exist between non-smokers, smokers and patients with COPD, with decreased efficacy in those groups who are longer and more frequently exposed to them. Participants and setting 163 participants (54% male, aged 21–80) including 60 non-smokers, 53 smokers and 50 patients with COPD (Gold stage II–IV), attending London respiratory outpatient clinics, participated in case-controlled surveys (50 items). Outcome measures Ten different GHWL were shown and demographics, smoking history, plans to quit, smoking-risk awareness, emotional response, processing and impact of GHWL on behaviour were recorded. Patients were further asked to prioritise the hypothetical treatment or prevention of five specific smoking-related diseases. Results Smokers, in particular those with COPD, were less susceptible to GHWL than non-smokers; 53.4% of all participants expressed fear when looking at GHWL, non-smokers (71.9%) more so than smokers (39.8%, p<0.001). COPD participants were less aware of the consequences than non-COPD participants (p<0.001), including an awareness of lung cancer (p=0.001). Lung cancer (95%), oral cancer (90.2%), heart disease (84.7%) and stroke (71.2%) were correctly associated with smoking, whereas blindness was least associated (23.9%). However, blindness was prioritised over oral cancer, stroke and in patients with COPD also over heart disease when participants were asked about hypothetical treatment or prevention. Conclusions GHWL are most effective in non-smokers and a desensitisation effect was observed in smokers and patients with COPD. As a consequence, a tailored and concerted public health approach to

  11. Recruiting women smokers: the engineering of consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, A M

    1996-01-01

    A range of social forces contributed to the effective recruitment of women to cigarette smoking in the crucial period between 1900 and 1940. Cigarette advertisers and public relations experts recognized the significance of women's changing roles and the rising culture of consumption, and worked to create specific meanings for the cigarette to make it appeal to women. The cigarette was a flexible symbol, with a remarkably elastic set of meanings; for women, it represented rebellious independence, glamour, seduction, and sexual allure, and served as a symbol for both feminists and flappers. The industry, with the help of advertisers and public relations experts, effectively engineered consent for women as smokers. The "engineering of consent" has a role to play in smoking cessation, since negative meanings for the cigarette can be engineered as well.

  12. Optimistic Bias and Perceived Control among Cigarette Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltenbaugh, Adam W.; Zagummy, Matthew J.

    2004-01-01

    Studies have shown that cigarette smokers are generally aware of increased health risks associated with smoking, but that smokers tend to underestimate their own susceptibility to disease. In general, optimistic bias has been shown to increase with greater perceived control over an event or behavior; however, this phenomenon has not been examined…

  13. Neural correlates of performance monitoring in daily and intermittent smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rass, Olga; Fridberg, Daniel J; O'Donnell, Brian F

    2014-07-01

    Despite efforts that have increased smoking regulation, cigarette taxation, and social stigma, cigarette smoking remains the leading cause of preventable death worldwide, and a significant personal and public economic burden. In the U.S., intermittent smokers comprise approximately 22% of all smokers and represent a stable, non-dependent group that may possess protective factors that prevent the transition to dependence. One possibility is that intermittent smokers have intact CNS frontal regulatory and control mechanisms that enable resistance to nicotine-induced changes. The present study measured inhibitory control using a flanker task and a go-nogo continuous performance tasks in daily dependent smokers, intermittent non-dependent smokers, and nonsmokers. Event-related potential (ERP) measures of were concurrently recorded to measure performance monitoring via Event-Related Negativity (ERN) and error positivity (Pe) components during error trials for each task. In both tasks, behavioral and ERN measures did not differ between groups; however, amplitude of the Pe component was largest among intermittent smokers. Thus, intermittent smokers differed from both daily smokers and nonsmokers on error processing, potentially revealing neuroprotective cognitive processes in nicotine dependence. A better understanding of factors that mediate behavioral regulation may provide novel treatment approaches that help individuals achieve controlled smoking or cessation. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Smoking cessation and smokers' perceptions of their addiction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eiser, J.R.; van der Pligt, J.

    1986-01-01

    Investigated whether cigarette smokers' views of their own smoking and their attributions for why smokers generally often fail to quit were related to ratings of confidence in their own ability to quit, and their intention to do so by analyzing responses to 3 postal questionnaires. One year later,

  15. Tracheobronchial and Alveolar Particle Surface Area Doses in Smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Carmen Fuoco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoke is the main cause of lung cancer events. Mainstream cigarette smoke (MSS is a direct concern for smokers, but also the secondhand smoke (SHS contributes to the smoker exposure. In addition, smoker exposure is affected by the “free-smoke” particle exposure (B, related to the micro-environments where smokers spend time. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the daily alveolar and tracheobronchial deposited fractions of airborne particles for smokers as the sum of these three contributions: MSS, SHS, and B. Measurements of particle surface area distributions in the MSS were performed through a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer, an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer, and a Thermo-dilution system on five types of conventional cigarettes. A Monte Carlo method was then applied to evaluate the most probable value of dose received during the inhalation of MSS by smokers. Measurements of particle concentrations in SHS and at the “free-smoke” particle background (B were performed through 24-h monitoring at a personal scale of adult smoker through hand-held devices. This paper found that the total daily deposited dose for typical smokers was 1.03 × 105 mm2·day−1. The main contribution of such a huge daily dose was addressable to the MSS (98% while SHS contributed 1.1%, increasing up to 2% for people smoking only while traveling in a car.

  16. Treating Depressed and Anxious Smokers in Smoking Cessation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, C. Steven; Cohen, Lee M.; Morrell, Holly E. R.; Watson, Noreen L.; Low, Blakely E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States. In addition, smoking rates among depressed and anxious smokers are higher than in the population at large. Furthermore, treating depressed and anxious smokers effectively is particularly challenging because of their significant negative affect,…

  17. Educating Smokers about Their Cigarettes and Nicotine Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal-Travers, Maansi; Cummings, K. Michael; Hyland, Andrew; Brown, Anthony; Celestino, Paula

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the efficacy of specially designed educational materials to correct misperceptions held by smokers about nicotine, nicotine medications, low tar cigarettes, filters and product ingredients. To accomplish this, 682 New York State Smokers' Quitline callers were randomized to one of two groups: control group…

  18. Long-term smoking causes more advanced coronary endothelial dysfunction in middle-aged smokers compared to young smokers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naya, Masanao; Goto, Daisuke; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Morita, Koichi; Manabe, Osamu; Hirata, Kenji; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Yoshinaga, Keiichiro [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Molecular Imaging, Sapporo (Japan); Katoh, Chietsugu [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Health Science, Sapporo (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    Smoking cessation has been shown to normalize the coronary endothelial dysfunction in healthy young smokers. However, its effect has not been explored in middle-aged smokers with a longer history of smoking. Therefore, we compared the effects of smoking cessation on coronary vasomotor response between both young and middle-aged smokers and identified the predictor for its improvement. This study investigated 14 young healthy smokers (age 25.2 {+-} 2.3 years), 13 middle-aged smokers (age 42.0 {+-} 6.5 years) and 10 non-smokers. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was measured by using {sup 15}O-water positron emission tomography (PET). At baseline, the ratio of MBF during the cold pressor test (CPT) to that at rest (MBF{sub CPT/rest}), the index of coronary endothelial function, was significantly decreased in both young and middle-aged smokers compared to non-smokers (1.24 {+-} 0.20 and 1.10 {+-} 0.39 vs 1.53 {+-} 0.18, p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively). The ratio of MBF during adenosine triphosphate infusion to that at rest was significantly decreased in middle-aged smokers compared to young smokers and non-smokers (3.34 {+-} 1.52 vs 4.43 {+-} 0.92 and 4.69 {+-} 1.25, p < 0.05, respectively). MBF{sub CPT/rest} at 1 month after smoking cessation significantly increased in young smokers, but not in middle-aged smokers. By multivariate analysis, baseline serum malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein (MDA-LDL) was an independent predictor for the changes in MBF{sub CPT/rest} after smoking cessation ({beta} = -0.45, p < 0.05). Coronary endothelial dysfunction was reversible by short-term smoking cessation in young smokers, but not in middle-aged smokers, which was associated with serum MDA-LDL levels. Long-term smoking exposure could lead to more advanced coronary endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis possibly via oxidative stress. (orig.)

  19. Impact of supragingival therapy on subgingival microbial profile in smokers versus non-smokers with severe chronic periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Meulman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess subgingival microbiological changes in smokers versus non-smokers presenting severe chronic periodontitis after supragingival periodontal therapy (ST.Non-smokers (n=10 and smokers (n=10 presenting at least nine teeth with probing pocket depth (PPD (≥5 mm, bleeding on probing (BoP, and no history of periodontal treatment in the last 6 months were selected. Clinical parameters assessed were plaque index (PI, BoP, PPD, relative gingival margin position (rGMP and relative clinical attachment level (rCAL. Subgingival biofilm was collected before and 21 days after ST. DNA was extracted and the 16S rRNA gene was amplified with the universal primer pair, 27F and 1492R. Amplified genes were cloned, sequenced, and identified by comparison with known 16S rRNA sequences. Statistical analysis was performed by Student's t and Chi-Square tests (α=5%.Clinically, ST promoted a significant reduction in PI and PPD, and gain of rCAL for both groups, with no significant intergroup difference. Microbiologically, at baseline, data analysis demonstrated that smokers harbored a higher proportion of Porphyromonas endodontalis, Bacteroidetes sp., Fusobacterium sp. and Tannerella forsythia and a lower number of cultivated phylotypes (p<0.05. Furthermore, non-smokers featured significant reductions in key phylotypes associated with periodontitis, whereas smokers presented more modest changes.Within the limits of the present study, ST promoted comparable clinical improvements in smokers and non-smokers with severe chronic periodontitis. However, in smokers, ST only slightly affected the subgingival biofilm biodiversity, as compared with non-smokers.

  20. The role of dorsal anterior cingulate cortex in the regulation of craving by reappraisal in smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Yan; Tian, Jie; Wang, Wei; Qin, Wei; Shi, Jie; Li, Qiang; Yuan, Kai; Dong, Ming-Hao; Yang, Wei-Chuang; Wang, Ya-Rong; Sun, Li-Li; Lu, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Drug cues can induce craving for drugs of abuse. Dysfunctional regulation of emotion and motivation regarding rewarding objects appears to be an integral part of addiction. It has been found that cognitive strategies decreased the intensity of craving in addicts. Reappraisal strategy is a type of cognitive strategy that requires participants to reinterpret the meaning of an emotional situation. In addition, studies have found that activation of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) is associated with the selection and application of cognitive reappraisal. In present study, we sought to determine whether such cognitive regulation engages the dACC and improves inhibition of craving in smokers. Sixteen smokers underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during performance of a cigarette reward-conditioning procedure with cognitive reappraisal. We focused our analyses on the dACC as a key structure of cognitive control of craving. Cue induced craving under different conditions was obtained. Correlational analysis between the functional response in the dACC and the subjective craving was performed. We found that using a cognitive reappraisal was successful in decreasing the conditioned craving. Right dACC (BA 24/32) engaged in the cognitive reappraisal. In addition, the individual's subjective craving was negatively correlated with the right dACC activation. These findings suggest that the dACC are important substrates of Inhibition of cue induced craving in smokers. Cognitive regulation by cognitive reappraisal may help addicted individuals avoid the anticipated situations where they are exposed to conditioned cues.

  1. Effect of Stress and Bupropion on Craving, Withdrawal Symptoms, and Mood in Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drone, David; Thuras, Paul; Hatsukami, Dorothy K.; Brauer, Lisa; Adson, David E.; al’Absi, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Studies suggest that in smokers attempting to quit smoking, the occurrence of stressful events is associated with smoking relapse. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of bupropion (an agent known to increase smoking cessation rates) on the craving, withdrawal, and mood response to stressful tasks administered in a laboratory setting. Methods: Response to three tasks (a speech, math, and cold pressor task) was measured in 65 smokers during ad libitum smoking. Smokers were then randomized to either bupropion or placebo. Fourteen days after starting medication, 43 subjects (28 receiving bupropion and 15 receiving placebo) quit smoking and laboratory procedures were repeated on the third day of abstinence. Results: Prior to cessation, stressors presented in a laboratory setting increased craving, nicotine withdrawal symptoms, and subjective distress but decreased positive affect. Thirty minutes of relaxation after the stressors did not result in these measures returning to prestress levels. During the nicotine withdrawal period, stress-induced responses were generally smaller than during the precessation period. Bupropion (relative to placebo) reduced overall levels of craving and withdrawal symptoms but did not have significant effects on response to stress during the nicotine withdrawal period. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that stress results in sustained increases in craving and withdrawal symptoms and changes in mood symptoms and that bupropion affects overall levels of these symptoms. Further research is needed to determine if modifying response to stress is predictive of an effective treatment for facilitating smoking cessation. PMID:21378081

  2. Similar Squamous Cell Carcinoma Epithelium microRNA Expression in Never Smokers and Ever Smokers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Kolokythas

    Full Text Available The incidence of oral tumors in patients who never used mutagenic agents such as tobacco is increasing. In an effort to better understand these tumors we studied microRNA (miRNA expression in tumor epithelium of never tobacco users, tumor epithelium of ever tobacco users, and nonpathological control oral epithelium. A comparison of levels among 372 miRNAs in 12 never tobacco users with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC versus 10 healthy controls was made using the reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. A similar analysis was done with 8 ever tobacco users with OSCC. These comparisons revealed miR-10b-5p, miR-196a-5p, and miR-31-5p as enriched in the tumor epithelium in OSCC of both never and ever tobacco users. Examination of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA project miRNA data on 305 OSCCs and 30 controls revealed 100% of those miRNAs enriched in never smoker OSCCs in this patient group were also enriched in ever smoker OSCCs. Nonsupervised clustering of TCGA OSCCs was suggestive of two or four subgroups of tumors based on miRNA levels with limited evidence for differences in tobacco exposure among the groups. Results from both patient groups together stress the importance of miR196a-5p in OSCC malignancy in both never and ever smokers, and emphasize the overall similarity of miRNA expression in OSCCs in these two risk groups. It implies that there may be great similarity in etiology of OSCC in never and ever smokers and that classifying OSCC based on tobacco exposure may not be helpful in the clinic.

  3. Similar Squamous Cell Carcinoma Epithelium microRNA Expression in Never Smokers and Ever Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolokythas, Antonia; Zhou, Yalu; Schwartz, Joel L; Adami, Guy R

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of oral tumors in patients who never used mutagenic agents such as tobacco is increasing. In an effort to better understand these tumors we studied microRNA (miRNA) expression in tumor epithelium of never tobacco users, tumor epithelium of ever tobacco users, and nonpathological control oral epithelium. A comparison of levels among 372 miRNAs in 12 never tobacco users with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) versus 10 healthy controls was made using the reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. A similar analysis was done with 8 ever tobacco users with OSCC. These comparisons revealed miR-10b-5p, miR-196a-5p, and miR-31-5p as enriched in the tumor epithelium in OSCC of both never and ever tobacco users. Examination of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project miRNA data on 305 OSCCs and 30 controls revealed 100% of those miRNAs enriched in never smoker OSCCs in this patient group were also enriched in ever smoker OSCCs. Nonsupervised clustering of TCGA OSCCs was suggestive of two or four subgroups of tumors based on miRNA levels with limited evidence for differences in tobacco exposure among the groups. Results from both patient groups together stress the importance of miR196a-5p in OSCC malignancy in both never and ever smokers, and emphasize the overall similarity of miRNA expression in OSCCs in these two risk groups. It implies that there may be great similarity in etiology of OSCC in never and ever smokers and that classifying OSCC based on tobacco exposure may not be helpful in the clinic.

  4. Gene expression subtraction of non-cancerous lung from smokers and non-smokers with adenocarcinoma, as a predictor for smokers developing lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bar Ilan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer is the commonest cause of cancer death in developed countries. Adenocarcinoma is becoming the most common form of lung cancer. Cigarette smoking is the main risk factor for lung cancer. Long-term cigarettes smoking may be characterized by genetic alteration and diffuse injury of the airways surface, named field cancerization, while cancer in non-smokers is usually clonally derived. Detecting specific genes expression changes in non-cancerous lung in smokers with adenocarcinoma may give us instrument for predicting smokers who are going to develop this malignancy. Objectives We described the gene expression in non-cancerous lungs from 21 smoker patients with lung adenocarcinoma and compare it to gene expression in non-cancerous lung tissue from 10 non-smokers with primary lung adenocarcinoma. Methods Total RNA was isolated from peripheral non-cancerous lung tissue. The cDNA was hybridized to the U133A GeneChip array. Hierarchical clustering analysis on genes obtained from smokers and non-smokers, after subtracting were exported to the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software for further analysis. Results The genes subtraction resulted in disclosure of 36 genes with high score. They were subsequently mapped and sorted based on location, cellular components, and biochemical activity. The gene functional analysis disclosed 20 genes, which are involved in cancer process (P = 7.05E-5 to 2.92E-2. Conclusion Detected genes may serve as a predictor for smokers who may be at high risk of developing lung cancer. In addition, since these genes originating from non-cancerous lung, which is the major area of the lungs, a sample from an induced sputum may represent it.

  5. Cerebral monoamine oxidase A inhibition in tobacco smokers confirmed with PET and [{sup 11}C]Befloxatone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroy, C.; Bragulat, V.; Penttila, J.; Artiges, E.; Martinot, J.L.; Trichard, Ch. [INSERM U797, Research Unit ' Neuroimaging and Psychiatry' , Orsay (France); Leroy, C.; Bragulat, V.; Penttila, J.; Artiges, E.; Martinot, J.L.; Trichard, Ch. [CEA, ' Neuroimaging and Psychiatry, U797 Unit, Hospital Department Frederic Joliot and Neurospin (France); Leroy, C.; Bragulat, V.; Penttila, J.; Artiges, E.; Martinot, J.L.; Trichard, Ch. [Paris sud University - Paris Descartes University, UMR U797 (France); Berlin, I. [Service de Pharmacologie, Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere - Universite Paris6 - INSERM U677, Paris (France); Gregoire, M.C.; Bottlaender, M.; Roumenov, D.; Dolle, F.; Bourgeois, S. [CEA, DSV, I2BM, Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Orsay (France); Artiges, E.; Trichard, Ch. [Psychiatry Department, Orsay Hospital, Orsay (France)

    2009-07-01

    The inhibition of cerebral monoamine oxidases (MAOs) by cigarette smoke components could participate to the tobacco addiction. However, the actual extent of this inhibition in vivo in smokers is still poorly known. We investigated cerebral MAO-A availability in 7 tobacco-dependent subjects and 6 healthy nonsmokers, using positron emission tomography (PET) and the MAO-A selective radioligand [{sup 11}C]befloxatone. In comparison to nonsmokers, smokers showed a significant overall reduction of [{sup 11}C]befloxatone binding potential (BP) in cortical areas (average reduction, -60%) and a similar trend in caudate and thalamus (-40%). Our findings confirm a widespread inhibition of cerebral MAO-A in smokers. This mechanism may contribute to tobacco addiction and for a possible mood-modulating effect of tobacco. (authors)

  6. Pulmonary function tests and respiratory symptoms among smokers in the city of Mashhad (north east of Iran).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskabady, M H; Mahmoodinia, M; Boskabady, M; Heydari, G R

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of smoking was studied using a questionnaire. Pulmonary function tests and respiratory symptoms were evaluated in 176 smokers. The total studied population with family and co-workers were 13289. The number of smokers among studied population was 11.7%. The rate of smoking among male subjects was 17.2% and in female 2.5%. All values of PFTs in smokers were significantly lower (pprevalence of smoking in population of Mashhad city was shown. The prevalence of smoking was higher among male than females. Smoking leads to increased respiratory symptoms and reduction of PFTs values. Copyright © 2010 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of caffeine on cue exposure responses in ex-smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepple, J; Robson, P

    1996-02-01

    The responses of ex-smokers to an experimental cue exposure trial, and the effect of caffeine on these responses, were compared with those of a matched group of control subjects in a placebo controlled single-blind cross-over design. In contrast to placebo, caffeine protected the ex-smokers from a surge of anxiety and rise in blood pressure associated with exposure to smoking-related cues. Caffeine had no significant effects on the control group at this dose (equivalent to a single cup of strong coffee). The results are discussed with reference to Stewart's conditioned appetitive motivational model of addiction. It is suggested that further work may identify caffeine as an adjunct to smoking relapse prevention measures.

  8. Exhaled breath condensate pH as a biomarker of COPD severity in ex-smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alchanatis Manos

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Endogenous airway acidification, as assessed by exhaled breath condensate (EBC pH, is present in patients with stable COPD. The aim of this study was to measure EBC pH levels in a large cohort of COPD patients and to evaluate associations with functional parameters according to their smoking status. EBC was collected from 161 patients with stable COPD and 112 controls (current and ex-smokers. EBC pH was measured after Argon deaeration and all subjects underwent pulmonary function testing. EBC pH was lower in COPD patients compared to controls [7.21 (7.02, 7.44 vs. 7.50 (7.40, 7.66; p Endogenous airway acidification is related to disease severity and to parameters expressing hyperinflation and air trapping in ex-smokers with COPD. The possible role of EBC pH in COPD needs to be further evaluated in longitudinal studies.

  9. Cross-Sectional Analysis of the Utility of Pulmonary Function Tests in Predicting Emphysema in Ever-Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselbacher, Sean E.; Ross, Robert; Schabath, Matthew B.; Smith, E. O’Brian; Perusich, Sarah; Barrow, Nadia; Smithwick, Pamela; Mammen, Manoj J.; Coxson, Harvey; Krowchuk, Natasha; Corry, David B.; Kheradmand, Farrah

    2011-01-01

    Emphysema is largely an under-diagnosed medical condition that can exist in smokers in the absence of airway obstruction. We aimed to determine the sensitivity and specificity of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in assessing emphysema using quantitative CT scans as the reference standard. We enrolled 224 ever-smokers (current or former) over the age of 40. CT of thorax was used to quantify the low attenuation area (% emphysema), and to measure the standardized airway wall thickness. PFTs were used individually and in combination to predict their ability to discriminate radiographic emphysema. Significant emphysema (>7%) was detected in 122 (54%) subjects. Twenty six (21%) emphysema subjects had no evidence of airflow obstruction (FEV1/FVC ratio 23% emphysema showed airflow obstruction. The sensitivity and specificity of spirometry for detecting radiographic emphysema were 79% and 75%, respectively. Standardized airway wall thickness was increased in subjects with airflow obstruction, but did not correlate with emphysema severity. In this cohort of lifetime ever-smokers, PFTs alone were inadequate for diagnosing emphysema. Airway wall thickness quantified by CT morphometry was associated with airflow limitation, but not with emphysema indicating that the heterogeneous nature of lung disease in smokers may represent distinct phenotypes. PMID:21655122

  10. Cross-Sectional Analysis of the Utility of Pulmonary Function Tests in Predicting Emphysema in Ever-Smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrah Kheradmand

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Emphysema is largely an under-diagnosed medical condition that can exist in smokers in the absence of airway obstruction. We aimed to determine the sensitivity and specificity of pulmonary function tests (PFTs in assessing emphysema using quantitative CT scans as the reference standard. We enrolled 224 ever-smokers (current or former over the age of 40. CT of thorax was used to quantify the low attenuation area (% emphysema, and to measure the standardized airway wall thickness. PFTs were used individually and in combination to predict their ability to discriminate radiographic emphysema. Significant emphysema (>7% was detected in 122 (54% subjects. Twenty six (21% emphysema subjects had no evidence of airflow obstruction (FEV1/FVC ratio 23% emphysema showed airflow obstruction. The sensitivity and specificity of spirometry for detecting radiographic emphysema were 79% and 75%, respectively. Standardized airway wall thickness was increased in subjects with airflow obstruction, but did not correlate with emphysema severity. In this cohort of lifetime ever-smokers, PFTs alone were inadequate for diagnosing emphysema. Airway wall thickness quantified by CT morphometry was associated with airflow limitation, but not with emphysema indicating that the heterogeneous nature of lung disease in smokers may represent distinct phenotypes.

  11. Does exercise have an acute effect on desire to smoke, mood and withdrawal symptoms in abstaining adolescent smokers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everson, Emma S; Daley, Amanda J; Ussher, Michael

    2006-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that exercise acutely reduces desire to smoke and withdrawal symptoms among adult smokers; however, no study has examined these effects in younger smokers. This study investigated the impact of a short bout of moderate intensity exercise on desire to smoke, withdrawal symptoms and exercise-induced affect in temporarily abstinent adolescent smokers. Thirty-seven low-active male and female smokers aged 16-19 years, abstained from smoking overnight and were assigned to either (i) 10 min of moderate intensity cycle ergometry (n=18) or (ii) a placebo control condition that involved very light intensity cycle ergometry (n=19). Measures of desire to smoke, the Mood and Physical Symptoms Scale (MPSS) and Subjective Exercise Experience Scale (SEES) were administered at baseline, 5 min during, 5 min after and 30 min after both conditions. A significant interaction effect for group by time was recorded for psychological distress scores, when the baseline value was covaried. Follow-up tests indicated that the exercise group reported significantly higher PD scores than the placebo control during exercise, but not at any other time point. No other significant effects were found for any other variables. Unlike research involving adult populations, a short bout of moderate intensity exercise did not alter desire to smoke among abstaining adolescent smokers and may negatively impact affective responses during exercise.

  12. Severe obstructive disease: Similarities and differences between smoker and non-smoker patients with COPD and/or bronchiectasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rezende Gonçalves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Poorly reversible airflow obstruction may or may not be related to smoking. Objectives: To describe patients with severe obstructive lung disease including etiology, imaging, functional aspects, systemic manifestations, and the pattern of bronchodilator response. Methods: Sixty-eight patients (age 55.9 ± 13.7 years, FEV1 [forced expiratory volume in one second] 31.9 ± 10.2% predicted underwent spirometry, evaluation of body mass composition, 6-minute walk test, X-ray, thorax high-resolution CT scanning, and clinical evaluation. Results: Of 68 patients enrolled, 37 had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and 31, extensive bronchiectasis. Among COPD patients the CT scans showed emphysema in 78.4%, and bronchiectasis in 48.6%. There were no significant differences between smokers and non-smokers, except for vital capacity, significantly smaller in non-smokers (p  1 = flow responder or 1= respondedor de fluxo, se > 1 respondedor de volume, e 20 RV pelos criterios da ATS/ERS. De acordo com os critérios de Paré et al., existiam 18 pacientes com FEV1< 30% previsto entre os 29 RV, e 12 com FEV1 < 30% previsto entre os 39 sem resposta a uma prova de volume (p = 0,0101. Conclusões: Em pacientes com obstrução grave, o tabagismo não parece ser relevante na determinação de diferenças funcionais ou sistémicas, e os critérios de Paré et al. podem detetar mais RV. A bronquietasia é uma descoberta comum em DPOC grave. Keywords: Airway obstruction, Respiratory function tests, Bronchitis, Bronchiectasis, Bronchodilator tests, Computed tomography of the thorax, Palavras-chave: Obstrução das Vias Respiratórias, Testes de Função Respiratória, Bronquite, Bronquiectasia, Testes de Broncodilatador, Tomografia de tórax

  13. Severe obstructive disease: Similarities and differences between smoker and non-smoker patients with COPD and/or bronchiectasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rezende Gonçalves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Poorly reversible airflow obstruction may or may not be related to smoking. Objectives: To describe patients with severe obstructive lung disease including etiology, imaging, functional aspects, systemic manifestations, and the pattern of bronchodilator response. Methods: Sixty-eight patients (age 55.9 ± 13.7 years, FEV1 [forced expiratory volume in one second] 31.9 ± 10.2% predicted underwent spirometry, evaluation of body mass composition, 6-minute walk test, X-ray, thorax high-resolution CT scanning, and clinical evaluation. Results: Of 68 patients enrolled, 37 had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and 31, extensive bronchiectasis. Among COPD patients the CT scans showed emphysema in 78.4%, and bronchiectasis in 48.6%. There were no significant differences between smokers and non-smokers, except for vital capacity, significantly smaller in non-smokers (p  1 = flow responder or 1= respondedor de fluxo, se > 1 respondedor de volume, e 20 RV pelos criterios da ATS/ERS. De acordo com os critérios de Paré et al., existiam 18 pacientes com FEV1< 30% previsto entre os 29 RV, e 12 com FEV1 < 30% previsto entre os 39 sem resposta a uma prova de volume (p = 0,0101. Conclusões: Em pacientes com obstrução grave, o tabagismo não parece ser relevante na determinação de diferenças funcionais ou sistémicas, e os critérios de Paré et al. podem detetar mais RV. A bronquiectasias é uma descoberta comum em DPOC grave. Keywords: Airway obstruction, Respiratory function tests, Bronchitis, Bronchiectasis, Bronchodilator tests, Computed tomography of the thorax, Palavras-chave: Obstrução das Vias Respiratórias, Testes de Função Respiratória, Bronquite, Bronquiectasias, Testes de Broncodilatador, Tomografia de tórax

  14. Effects of intravenous nicotine on prepulse inhibition in smokers and non-smokers: relationship with familial smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobes, David J; MacQueen, David A; Blank, Melissa D; Saladin, Michael E; Malcolm, Robert J

    2013-09-01

    The reinforcing properties of nicotine may be, in part, derived from its ability to enhance certain forms of cognitive processing. Several animal and human studies have shown that nicotine increases prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle reflex. However, it remains unclear whether these effects are related to smoking susceptibility. The current study examined the effects of intravenously delivered nicotine on PPI in smokers and non-smokers, as well as its association with a quantitative index of familial smoking. The sample consisted of 30 non-smokers and 16 smokers, who completed an initial assessment, followed on a separate day by a laboratory assessment of PPI prior to and following each of two intravenous nicotine infusions. Separate doses were used in smoker and non-smoker samples. Analyses indicated that both nicotine infusions acutely enhanced PPI among non-smokers, and this enhancement was positively related to the degree of smoking among first and second-degree relatives. Smokers also displayed PPI enhancement after receiving the first infusion, but this effect was unrelated to familial smoking. These data suggest that the PPI paradigm may have utility as an endophenotype for cognitive processes which contribute to smoking risk.

  15. "I Smoke but I Am Not a Smoker": Phantom Smokers and the Discrepancy between Self-Identity and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Youjin; Choi, Sejung Marina; Rifon, Nora

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This article presents the development of a new smoking status, the "phantom smokers," who do not view themselves as smokers but report smoking cigarettes. Participants: Students from 2 universities in Michigan (N = 899; October 2005) and Florida (N = 1,517; May 2006) participated in surveys. Methods: Respondents in Michigan…

  16. The Relationship Between Pulmonary Emphysema and Kidney Function in Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Divay; Stamm, Jason A.; Palevsky, Paul M.; Leader, Joseph K.; Fuhrman, Carl R.; Zhang, Yingze; Bon, Jessica; Duncan, Steven R.; Branch, Robert A.; Weissfeld, Joel; Gur, David; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: It has been reported that the prevalence of kidney dysfunction may be increased in patients exposed to tobacco with airflow obstruction. We hypothesized that kidney dysfunction would associate with emphysema rather than with airflow obstruction measured by the FEV1. Methods: Five hundred eight current and former smokers completed a chest CT scan, pulmonary function tests, medical questionnaires, and measurement of serum creatinine. Glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs) were estimated using the method of the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration. Quantitative determinants of emphysema and airway dimension were measured from multidetector chest CT scans. Results: The mean age was 66 ± 7 years, and mean eGFR was 101 ± 22 mL/min/1.73 m2. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed a significant association between radiographically measured emphysema and eGFR: Participants with 10% more emphysema had an eGFR that was lower by 4.4 mL/min/1.73 m2 (P = .01), independent of airflow obstruction (FEV1), age, sex, race, height, BMI, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, coronary artery disease, patient-reported dyspnea, pack-years of smoking, and current smoking. There was no association between eGFR and either FEV1 or quantitative CT scan measures of airway dimension. Conclusions: More severe emphysema, rather than airflow obstruction, is associated with kidney dysfunction in tobacco smokers, independent of common risk factors for kidney disease. This finding adds to recent observations of associations between emphysema and comorbidities of COPD, including osteoporosis and lung cancer, which are independent of the traditional measure of reduced FEV1. The mechanisms and clinical implications of kidney dysfunction in patients with emphysema need further investigation. PMID:22459775

  17. Age at Smoking Initiation and Subsequent Smoking Among Korean Adolescent Smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hyun Hwang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between age at cigarette smoking initiation and smoking level among adolescent current smokers. Methods: In 2007, students from one or two classes of the 10th or 11th grade were randomly selected using the probability proportional to size sampling method. In total, 743 current smokers were included. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine the association between age at smoking initiation and smoking level as either frequent, daily, or heavy smokers. Results: The adjusted odds ratios for each smoking level were significantly higher for younger ages of smoking initiation than those for older ages of initiation were (p for trend <0.001. Compared with the students who started smoking in grades 10 to 11, the adjusted odds ratios for frequent, daily, and heavy smokers increased from 2.24 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.30 to 3.87 to 3.90 (95% CI, 2.02 to 7.56, from 1.56 (95% CI, 0.92 to 2.62 to 3.17 (95% CI, 1.70 to 5.92, and from 2.56 (95% CI, 1.21 to 5.42 to 5.67 (95% CI, 2.61 to 12.30 with younger ages of smoking initiation. Conclusions: Smoking frequency and amount were closely associated with age at smoking initiation. Therefore, smoking prevention programs should be initiated from the young adolescent period.

  18. Differences in dietary patterns of nonsmoking adults married to smokers vs. nonsmokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampl, J S; Taylor, C A; Booth, C L

    2001-01-01

    To compare dietary intakes of nonsmoking adults married to smokers or nonsmokers. Respondents to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals (CSFII), 1994 to 1996 (response rate = 76.1% for 2 days of dietary intake). Nonsmoking adults aged 18 and older were grouped according to the smoking status of their spouse. In-home interviews in all 50 states and Washington, D.C. The selected sample included 757 men and 754 women who were married to nonsmokers, and 197 men and 262 women who were married to smokers. Selected demographic variables, food group servings, food energy, and densities of selected nutrients were compared using chi 2 and analysis of covariance. Men and women married to smokers had greater (p coffee, and soft drinks; women married to smokers consumed significantly less water (p = .014) but more cheese and table sweeteners (p diets due to elevated intakes of fat and cholesterol and low intakes of vitamin A, calcium, and fiber. Health professionals should continue to provide tobacco cessation instruction and dietary guidance, but also be aware of at-risk patients' immediate family members who likely share an increased risk of disease because of poor diet quality and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke.

  19. The consequences of high cigarette excise taxes for low-income smokers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C Farrelly

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To illustrate the burden of high cigarette excise taxes on low-income smokers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using data from the New York and national Adult Tobacco Surveys from 2010-2011, we estimated how smoking prevalence, daily cigarette consumption, and share of annual income spent on cigarettes vary by annual income (less than $30,000; $30,000-$59,999; and more than $60,000. The 2010-2011 sample includes 7,536 adults and 1,294 smokers from New York and 3,777 adults and 748 smokers nationally. Overall, smoking prevalence is lower in New York (16.1% than nationally (22.2% and is strongly associated with income in New York and nationally (P<.001. Smoking prevalence ranges from 12.2% to 33.7% nationally and from 10.1% to 24.3% from the highest to lowest income group. In 2010-2011, the lowest income group spent 23.6% of annual household income on cigarettes in New York (up from 11.6% in 2003-2004 and 14.2% nationally. Daily cigarette consumption is not related to income. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although high cigarette taxes are an effective method for reducing cigarette smoking, they can impose a significant financial burden on low-income smokers.

  20. Elevated Behavioral Economic Demand for Alcohol in a Community Sample of Heavy Drinking Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amlung, Michael; MacKillop, James; Monti, Peter M; Miranda, Robert

    2017-05-01

    Cigarette smokers are more likely to consume alcohol at higher levels and experience poorer response to treatment for alcohol problems than are nonsmokers. One previous study in university students suggests that a potential reason for the high overlap between alcohol and tobacco use is that concurrent smoking is associated with overvaluation of alcohol, as reflected in elevated behavioral economic demand. The present study sought to extend these initial findings in a community sample with heavier levels of alcohol and tobacco use. Participants were 111 non-treatment-seeking heavy drinkers(defined as 18+/14+ drinks per week for men/women) from a larger study on alcohol pharmacotherapy mechanisms. Forty-nine participants (44%) reported regular smoking (≥5 cigarettes/day). Participants completed a hypothetical alcohol purchase task assessing alcohol consumption at escalating levels of price. Covariates included demographics, drinking quantity, alcohol use disorder severity, depression, and delay discounting. In covariate-adjusted models, smokers reported significantly higher maximum alcohol expenditures (Omax) and breakpoint price (first price suppressing consumption to zero) compared with nonsmokers. Elevated alcohol demand correlated with drinking quantity and severity in the entire sample, but not with smoking frequency or nicotine dependence among smokers only. This study offers further evidence of increased reinforcing value of alcohol among smokers in a sample of heavy drinkers from the community. Clinical implications and potential mechanisms underlying this relationship are discussed.

  1. Association between salivary sialic acid and periodontal health status among smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawzali, Jwan Ibrahim

    2016-07-01

    Smoking is an environmental risk factor causing poor dental health. Sialic acid is a salivary marker of oxidative stress for research of periodontal diseases. To identify diagnostic sialic acid fraction and its scavenger effect for periodontal diseases among smokers and periodental health status. This study carried out in the Khanzad specialized dental center - Erbil city. The study population is composed of 62 convenient samples. A structured interview questionnaire form was used to collect data about socio-demographic properties and smoking history. Clinical measurements were carried out to measure periodontal health status. Un-stimulated whole saliva samples were collected for measuring sialic acid fractions. Statistical package for social science (SPSS, version 18), was used for analysis and odds ratio. Risk of smoking increased significantly in young to mid ages, which included most of the current smokers, with periodontal diseases, and high total free sialic acid. Risk of periodontitis and teeth missing increased significantly by long duration of smoking, bad tooth brushing, and poor eating habits. Risk of teeth mobility and loss decreased significantly by early smoking cessation and low income. High levels of free sialic acid correlated significantly in current smokers with medium and deep pocket depth. Salivary free sialic acid may be used as a diagnostic oxidative stress biomarker for periodontal diseases among young current smokers. Cumulative destructive effect of long duration of smoking on the periodontum can be controlled by smoking cessation, good oral hygiene and diet habit in early old ages.

  2. Effects of short-term treatment with atorvastatin in smokers with asthma - a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lloyd Suzanne M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The immune modulating properties of statins may benefit smokers with asthma. We tested the hypothesis that short-term treatment with atorvastatin improves lung function or indices of asthma control in smokers with asthma. Methods Seventy one smokers with mild to moderate asthma were recruited to a randomized double-blind parallel group trial comparing treatment with atorvastatin (40 mg per day versus placebo for 4 weeks. After 4 weeks treatment inhaled beclometasone (400 μg per day was added to both treatment arms for a further 4 weeks. The primary outcome was morning peak expiratory flow after 4 weeks treatment. Secondary outcome measures included indices of asthma control and airway inflammation. Results At 4 weeks, there was no improvement in the atorvastatin group compared to the placebo group in morning peak expiratory flow [-10.67 L/min, 95% CI -38.70 to 17.37, p = 0.449], but there was an improvement with atorvastatin in asthma quality of life score [0.52, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.87 p = 0.005]. There was no significant improvement with atorvastatin and inhaled beclometasone compared to inhaled beclometasone alone in outcome measures at 8 weeks. Conclusions Short-term treatment with atorvastatin does not alter lung function but may improve asthma quality of life in smokers with mild to moderate asthma. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00463827

  3. Stability of the nicotine metabolite ratio in smokers of progressively reduced nicotine content cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Helen, Gideon; Jacob, Peyton; Benowitz, Neal L

    2013-11-01

    The nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR), the ratio of trans-3'-hydroxycotinine (3-HC) to cotinine, has been used as a biomarker of the rate of CYP2A6-mediated nicotine metabolism. While stable in smokers who maintain constant smoking consumption, since smoking has been shown to inhibit nicotine metabolism and this inhibition could be mediated by the nicotine in the smoke, NMR could change during nicotine reduction. The objective of this study was to determine the reproducibility (or stability) of plasma NMR in smokers of progressively reduced nicotine content (RNC) cigarettes. We analyzed data from subjects in a clinical trial of smoking progressively RNC cigarettes. Plasma NMR in 30 smokers whose plasma cotinine levels had decreased by at least 50% from the use of the first test cigarette (12mg nicotine content) to the final test cigarette (1mg nicotine content) was measured on 4 occasions over a period of 24 weeks. Plasma cotinine and 3-HC decreased by an average of 85% and 84%, respectively, following the use of the first type of RNC cigarette to the last type. Plasma NMR had an average absolute change of 28.5% over the same period. Using repeated measures analysis, changes in plasma NMR over time were not significant with or without controlling for the effects of age, body mass index, gender, and race (p = .24 and p = .23, respectively). The reliability coefficient for repeated measurements of plasma NMR was .72. The average within-subject coefficient of variation for plasma NMR was 21.6% (SD = 12.0%). The plasma NMR is relatively stable over time as nicotine levels decline in smokers of progressively RNC cigarettes.

  4. Regional distribution of pulmonary epithelial permeability in normal subjects and patients with asbestosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellert, A R; Lewis, C A; Langford, J A; Tolfree, S E; Rudd, R M

    1985-10-01

    The overall and regional clearance of an inhaled isotope labelled solute from the lungs was examined on the basis of a 15 minute period of data collection, for which a technique was developed that does not require intravenous injection to correct for blood-tissue background activity. The technique was applied to 52 normal subjects (31 non-smokers and 21 smokers) and to 37 patients with asbestosis (21 non-smokers and 16 smokers). In normal smokers solute clearance was faster in the upper and middle zones, with a mean ratio of T1/2 LB (half time solute clearance from lungs to blood) in the upper two thirds to the lower one third of the lungs of 0.66 (0.28-1.33), compared with 1.24 (0.43-2.77) in normal non-smokers (p less than 0.002). In patients with asbestosis solute clearance was accelerated throughout the lungs even though radiographic abnormalities were limited to lower or lower to middle zones. Regional distribution of clearance was not affected by posture in normal subjects. Overall solute clearance was significantly faster in normal current smokers and in patients with asbestosis than in normal non-smokers (p less than 0.001 respectively). Among patients with asbestosis, smokers had faster overall clearance than non-smokers (p less than 0.01). Among normal non-smokers T1/2 LB was not significantly different between those who had never smoked and ex-smokers. Regional abnormalities in pulmonary epithelial permeability may offer insight into the pathogenesis of interstitial lung diseases and smoking related disorders.

  5. Smartphone Ownership Among US Adult Cigarette Smokers: 2014 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mull, Kristin E

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite increasing interest in smartphone apps as a platform for delivery of tobacco cessation interventions, no previous studies have evaluated the prevalence and characteristics of smokers who can access smartphone-delivered interventions. Objective To guide treatment development in this new platform and to evaluate disparities in access to smartphone-delivered interventions, we examined associations of smartphone ownership with demographics, tobacco use and thoughts about quitting, other health behaviors, physical and mental health, health care access, and Internet and technology utilization using a nationally representative sample of US adult smokers. Methods Data were from the National Cancer Institute’s 2014 Health Information National Trends Survey 4 (HINTS 4), Cycle 4. This mailed survey targeted noninstitutionalized individuals aged 18 years or older using two-stage stratified random sampling. For this analysis, we restricted the sample to current smokers with complete data on smartphone ownership (n=479). Results Nearly two-thirds (weighted percent=63.8%, 248/479) of smokers reported owning a smartphone. Those who were younger (PSmartphone owners did not differ from nonowners on frequency of smoking, recent quit attempts, or future plans to quit smoking, although they reported greater belief in the benefits of quitting (P=.04). Despite being equally likely to be overweight or obese, smartphone owners reported greater fruit and vegetable consumption (P=.03) and were more likely to report past-year efforts to increase exercise (P=.001) and to lose weight (P=.02). No differences in health care access and utilization were found. Smartphone owners reported better physical and mental health in several domains and higher access to and utilization of technology and the Internet, including for health reasons. Conclusions Smartphone ownership among smokers mirrors many trends in the general population, including the overall rate of ownership and the

  6. Smartphone Ownership Among US Adult Cigarette Smokers: 2014 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffner, Jaimee L; Mull, Kristin E

    2017-08-31

    Despite increasing interest in smartphone apps as a platform for delivery of tobacco cessation interventions, no previous studies have evaluated the prevalence and characteristics of smokers who can access smartphone-delivered interventions. To guide treatment development in this new platform and to evaluate disparities in access to smartphone-delivered interventions, we examined associations of smartphone ownership with demographics, tobacco use and thoughts about quitting, other health behaviors, physical and mental health, health care access, and Internet and technology utilization using a nationally representative sample of US adult smokers. Data were from the National Cancer Institute's 2014 Health Information National Trends Survey 4 (HINTS 4), Cycle 4. This mailed survey targeted noninstitutionalized individuals aged 18 years or older using two-stage stratified random sampling. For this analysis, we restricted the sample to current smokers with complete data on smartphone ownership (n=479). Nearly two-thirds (weighted percent=63.8%, 248/479) of smokers reported owning a smartphone. Those who were younger (PSmartphone owners did not differ from nonowners on frequency of smoking, recent quit attempts, or future plans to quit smoking, although they reported greater belief in the benefits of quitting (P=.04). Despite being equally likely to be overweight or obese, smartphone owners reported greater fruit and vegetable consumption (P=.03) and were more likely to report past-year efforts to increase exercise (P=.001) and to lose weight (P=.02). No differences in health care access and utilization were found. Smartphone owners reported better physical and mental health in several domains and higher access to and utilization of technology and the Internet, including for health reasons. Smartphone ownership among smokers mirrors many trends in the general population, including the overall rate of ownership and the association with younger age and higher socioeconomic

  7. Efficacy and safety of pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation among pregnant smokers: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, S-K; Ju, W; Jung, H-S; Park, C-H; Oh, S-W; Seo, Hg; Kim, Hs

    2012-08-01

    The efficacy and safety of pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation among pregnant smokers has not yet been established. To investigate the efficacy and safety of pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation among pregnant smokers. A search was made of PubMed, Embase and CENTRAL in June 2011. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTs and retrospective or prospective controlled studies were included. The main analyses were designed to examine the efficacy of pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation among pregnant smokers based on the longest follow-up data available and from data obtained at the latest available time-point in pregnancy in each study. Of 74 articles identified from the databases, seven studies (five RCTs, one quasi-RCT and one prospective study) involving a total of 1386 pregnant smokers, 732 in the intervention groups and 654 in the control groups, were included in the final analyses. In a fixed-effects meta-analysis of all seven studies based on the longest follow-up data available, pharmacotherapy had a significant effect on smoking cessation (relative risk [RR] 1.80; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.32-2.44). Subgroup meta-analysis by type of study design also showed similar findings for RCTs (RR 1.48; 95% CI 1.04-2.09) and other types of studies (RR 3.25; 95% CI 1.65-6.39). The abstinence rate at late pregnancy in the intervention ranged from 7 to 22.6% (mean abstinence rate 13.0%; 95% CI 10.9-15.2%). A few minor adverse effects and serious adverse effects were reported in several studies. This study indicates that there may be clinical evidence to support the use of pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation among pregnant smokers. Further RCTs are needed. © 2012 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2012 RCOG.

  8. Exposure to nicotine and carcinogens among Southwestern Alaskan Native cigarette smokers and smokeless tobacco users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benowitz, Neal L; Renner, Caroline C; Lanier, Anne P; Tyndale, Rachel F; Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Lindgren, Bruce; Stepanov, Irina; Watson, Clifford H; Sosnoff, Connie S; Jacob, Peyton

    2012-06-01

    The prevalence of tobacco use, both cigarette smoking and smokeless, including iqmik (homemade smokeless tobacco prepared with dried tobacco leaves mixed with alkaline ash), and of tobacco-related cancer is high in Alaskan Native people (AN). To investigate possible mechanisms of increased cancer risk we studied levels of nicotine and tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNA) in tobacco products and biomarkers of tobacco toxicant exposure in Southwestern AN people. Participants included 163 cigarette smokers, 76 commercial smokeless tobacco, 20 iqmik, 31 dual cigarette smokers and smokeless tobacco, and 110 nontobacco users. Tobacco use history, samples of tobacco products used, and blood and urine samples were collected. Nicotine concentrations were highest in cigarette tobacco and TSNAs highest in commercial smokeless tobacco products. The AN participants smoked on average 7.8 cigarettes per day. Nicotine exposure, assessed by several biomarker measures, was highest in iqmik users, and similar in smokeless tobacco and cigarette smokers. TSNA exposure was highest in smokeless tobacco users, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure was highest in cigarette smokers. Despite smoking fewer cigarettes per day, AN cigarette smokers had similar daily intake of nicotine compared to the general U.S. population. Nicotine exposure was greatest from iqmik, likely related to its high pH due to preparation with ash, suggesting high addiction potential compared to other smokeless tobacco products. TSNA exposure was much higher with smokeless tobacco than other product use, possibly contributing to the high rates of oral cancer. Our data contribute to an understanding of the high addiction risk of iqmik use and of the cancer-causing potential of various forms of tobacco use among AN people.

  9. A Comparison of Oral Sensory Effects of Three TRPA1 Agonists in Young Adult Smokers and Non-smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Ø. Hansen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study profiled intra-oral somatosensory and vasomotor responses to three different transient receptor potential (TRP channels, subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1 agonists (menthol, nicotine, and cinnamaldehyde in smoking and non-smoking young adults. Healthy non-smokers (N = 30 and otherwise healthy smokers (N = 25 participated in a randomized, double-blinded, cross-over study consisting of three experimental sessions in which they received menthol (30 mg, nicotine (4 mg, or cinnamaldehyde (25 mg chewing gum. Throughout a standardized 10 min chewing regime, burning, cooling, and irritation intensities, and location were recorded. In addition, blood pressure, heart rate and intra-oral temperature were assessed before, during, and after chewing. Basal intra-oral temperature was lower in smokers (35.2°C ± 1.58 as compared to non-smokers (35.9°C ± 1.61 [F(1, 52 = 8.5, P = 0.005, post hoc, p = 0.005]. However, the increase in temperature, heart rate, and blood pressure in response to chewing menthol, nicotine, and cinnamaldehyde gums were similar between smokers and non-smokers. Although smoking status did not influence the intensity of burning, cooling, and irritation, smokers did report nicotine burn more often (92% than non-smokers (63% [χ(1, N=552 = 6.208, P = 0.013]. Reports of nicotine burn consistently occurred at the back of the throat and cinnamaldehyde burn on the tongue. The cooling sensation of menthol was more widely distributed in the mouth of non-smokers as compared to smokers. Smoking alters thermoregulation, somatosensory, and possibly TRPA1 receptor responsiveness and suggests that accumulated exposure of nicotine by way of cigarette smoke alters oral sensory and vasomotor sensitivity.

  10. Grading obstructive lung disease using tomographic pulmonary scintigraphy in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and long-term smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajc, Marika; Markstad, Hanna; Jarenbäck, Linnea; Tufvesson, Ellen; Bjermer, Leif; Jögi, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    The severity of chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) is defined by the degree of flow limitation measured as forced expiratory volume in 1 s, which mainly reflects impairment of large and intermediate airways. However, COPD is primarily a small airways disease. Therefore, better diagnostic tools are needed. Ventilation-Perfusion (V/P) SPECT is a sensitive method to detect obstructive lung changes but criteria for staging airway obstruction are missing. To define and validate criteria to stage COPD using V/P SPECT. 74 subjects (healthy non-smokers, healthy smokers or with stable COPD) were included. All were examined with V/P SPECT in a hybrid SPECT/CT system. Spirometry was performed and patients were evaluated with the clinical COPD questionnaire (CCQ). V/P SPECT was interpreted independently. Preserved lung function (%) was evaluated. The degree of airway obstruction on V/P SPECT was graded according to newly-developed grading criteria. The degree of airway obstruction was graded from normal (0) to severe (3). The airway obstructivity-grade and degree of preserved lung function were compared to GOLD, CCQ and LDCT emphysema extent. Obstructivity-grade (r = 0.66, P obstructivity-grade (P = 0.001) and preserved lung function (P obstructivity-grade and preserved lung function, respectively). However, patients in GOLD 1 differed in obstructivity-grade from non-smoking controls (P = 0.02). Functional imaging with V/P SPECT enables standardized grading of airway obstruction as well as reduced lung function, both of which correlate with GOLD stage. V/P SPECT shows that long-term smokers in most cases have signs of ventilatory impairment and airway obstruction not shown by spirometry.

  11. Smoking behavior characteristics of non-selected smokers with childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) history: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fond, Guillaume; Loundo