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Sample records for subjects born small

  1. Small at Birth: cardiovascular and metabolic health of subjects born SGA and/or preterm and effects of growth hormone treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.H. Willemsen (Ruben)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThis doctoral thesis describes cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors in children and young adults with a small size at birth, either due to preterm or SGA birth. For those born SGA with persistent short stature, the effects of GH treatment on these risk factors were studied. This

  2. Children born small for gestational age (SGA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jancevska, A; Tasic, V; Damcevski, N; Danilovski, D; Jovanovska, V; Gucev, Z

    2012-01-01

    SGA (small for gestational age) is a child born with birth weight and/or length (BW/BL) under two standard deviations (2 SDS) for the gestational age and sex of the population. ~5% of all newborn children are SGA. A broad spectrum of factors are found to be causative: maternal, placental, foetal, metabolic, and genetic. In the newborn period the SGA children are at greater risk of life-threatening conditions: hypoglycaemia, hypercoagulability, necrotic enterocolitis, direct hyperbilirubinemia, hypotension, etc. Approximately 10 percent of SGA children do not achieve catch-up growth and remain short (≥-2 SDS) into adulthood. SGA people have an increased incidence of metabolic syndrome, coronary artery disease, stroke, low bone density and osteoporosis. SGA children aged more than 4 years with no evidence of spontaneous catch-up and with a height≥2.5 SD are considered for growth hormone (GH) treatment.

  3. Cognitive ability in adolescents born small for gestational age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rikke Beck; Juul, Anders; Larsen, Torben

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Small size at birth may be associated with impaired cognitive ability later in life. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of being born small for gestational age (SGA), with or without intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) on cognitive ability in late adolescence. STUDY...... DESIGN: A follow-up study of a former cohort included 123 participants (52 males); 47 born SGA and 76 born appropriate for gestational age (AGA). Fetal growth velocity (FGV) was determined by serial ultrasound measurements during the third trimester. A control group matched for age and birthplace...... was included. The original Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) was administered, and verbal, performance and full-scale Intelligence Quotient (IQ) scores were calculated. RESULTS: There was no difference in IQ between adolescents born SGA and AGA. FGV or IUGR during the third trimester did not influence...

  4. Oral health of children born small for gestational age.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, A C

    2010-10-01

    We sought to evaluate the oral health status of children born small for gestational age (SGA). Children now aged 4-8 years who were born SGA (birth weight < -2 SDS) were examined using standardised criteria. The parents completed a structured oral health questionnaire. Twenty females and 25 males, mean age 72.1 months, and mean birth weight 2.1 kg, participated in the study. Poor appetite was a concern; 32 (71%) children snacked between meals and 14 (30%) used carbonated beverages more than 3 times daily. Erosion was present in 9 (20%) children. Dental decay occurred in 22 (47%) children with 92% being untreated. Eight children had more than 5 decayed teeth. It is essential that clinicians working with children born SGA include oral health within the general health surveillance and refer these children for a dental assessment within the first 2 years to support parents in establishing safe feeding patterns for their children.

  5. Puberty in children born small for gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkauskiene, Rasa; Petraitiene, Indre; Albertsson Wikland, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Small for gestational age (SGA) children are more prone to have precocious pubarche and exaggerated precocious adrenarche, an earlier onset of pubertal development and menarche, and faster progression of puberty than children born of appropriate for gestational age (AGA) size. The majority of studies investigating the onset of puberty in children born SGA and AGA established that, although puberty begins at an appropriate time (based on chronological age and actual height) in SGA children, onset is earlier relative to AGA children. Evaluating pubertal growth in SGA children, a more modest bone age delay from chronological age at the onset of puberty and more rapid bone maturation during puberty compared to AGA children were reported. Peak height velocity in adolescence is reached at an earlier pubertal stage and lasts for a shorter period in children born SGA than in those born AGA. These differences lead to an earlier fusion of the growth plates and a shorter adult height. The pathophysiological mechanism underlying the unique pubertal growth pattern of children born SGA remains unclear. However, it seems that this is not only related to birth weight, gestational age, adiposity or obesity, but that there may also be an influence of rapid weight gain in early childhood on pubertal onset: excess weight gain in childhood may be related to central adiposity, decreased insulin sensitivity, and increased IGF-I levels and might thus predispose to precocious pubarche. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Insulin resistance in young adults born small for gestational age (SGA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzker, Stephanie; Bechtold-Dalla Pozza, Susanne; Kugler, Karl; Schwarz, Hans P; Bonfig, Walter

    2014-03-01

    This work aimed to assess glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity in young adults born small for gestational age (SGA) as well as to measure the body composition and adipocytokines of these subjects. A total of 108 out of 342 SGA-born participants were invited for reexamination from the former Bavarian Longitudinal Study (BLS), in which 7505 risk-newborns of the years 1985 to 1986 were prospectively followed. Of these, 76 (34 female/42 male) participants at the age of 19.7±0.5 years were enrolled. Clinical examination and oral glucose tolerance testing (oGTT) was performed with assessment of insulin resistance indices, HbA1c, body mass index (BMI), adipocytokines, and body composition by bioimpedance analysis (BIA). A total of 25 out of 76 (32.9%) patients had abnormal fasting and/or glucose-stimulated insulin levels. Glucose values measured during oGTT showed no abnormalities, except one participant who had impaired glucose tolerance. Homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) was 1.92±4.2, and insulin sensitivity index by Matsuda (ISI(Matsuda)) showed mean values of 7.85±4.49. HOMA-IR>2.5 was found in 8 patients (10.5%), and 20 patients (26.3%) had an ISI(Matsuda)0.001), but not with adiponectin. Insulin resistance correlated with change in weight-for-height Z-score during the first 3 months of age, indicating that weight gain during that early phase might be a risk factor for the development of insulin resistance in children born SGA. A high percentage of insulin-resistant subjects were reconfirmed in a large German cohort of young adults born SGA. Therefore, regular screening for disturbances in glucose metabolism is recommended in these subjects.

  7. Metabolic syndrome and endothelial dysfunction in a population born small for gestational age relationship to growth and Gh therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arriba, Antonio; Domínguez, Mercedes; Labarta, José I; Domínguez, Manuel; Puga, Beatriz; Mayayo, Esteban; Longás, Angel Ferrández

    2013-01-01

    Being born small for gestational age (SGA) and a rapid increase in weight during early childhood and infancy have been strongly linked to metabolic syndrome. A transversal study was conducted on 167 pre-pubertal and 102 pubertal subjects; auxological parameters, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, laboratory data, and carotid-wall thickness (CA-IMT) were measured. Patients born SGA with spontaneous catch-up growth have higher values of BMI, blood pressure, HOMA index, and CA-IMT than those treated with GH and the appropriate-for-gestational age (AGA) group. In conclusion, subjects born SGA are at high risk of developing chronic diseases, including obesity, hypertension, insulin resistant, and endothelial dysfunction, at an early age, mainly those with good catch-up growth compared with the receiving GH because of negative catch-up growth. Our data is compared with published results.

  8. Neuropsychological deficits in young adults born small-for-gestational age (SGA) at term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østgård, Heidi Furre; Skranes, Jon; Martinussen, Marit; Jacobsen, Geir W; Brubakk, Ann-Mari; Vik, Torstein; Pripp, Are H; Løhaugen, Gro C C

    2014-03-01

    Reduced IQ, learning difficulties and poor school performance have been reported in small-for-gestational-age (SGA) subjects. However, few studies include a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment. Our aim was to study neuropsychological functioning in young adults born SGA at term. A comprehensive neuropsychological test battery was administered to 58 SGA subjects (birth weight SGA controls (birth weight ≥10th centile). The SGA group obtained significantly (p SGA controls and showed higher risk of obtaining scores below -1.5 SD on the memory domain (odds ratio = 13.3, 95% confidence interval: 1.57, 112.47). At a subtest level, the SGA group obtained lower scores on most neuropsychological tests, with significant differences on 6 of 46 measures: the Trail Making Test 3 (letter sequencing), the Wechsler Memory Scale mental control and the auditory immediate memory scale, the Design Fluency, the Stroop 3 (inhibition) and the Visual Motor Integration (VMI) motor coordination subtest. Young adults born SGA score more poorly on neuropsychological tests compared with non-SGA controls. Differences were modest, with more significant differences in the memory domain.

  9. Using fMRI to Investigate Memory in Young Children Born Small for Gestational Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bie, H.M.A.; de Ruiter, M.B.; Ouwendijk, M.; Oostrom, K.J.; Wilke, M.; Boersma, M.; Veltman, D.J.; Delemarre-van de Waal, H.A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) can lead to infants being born small for gestational age (SGA). SGA is associated with differences in brain anatomy and impaired cognition. We investigated learning and memory in children born SGA using neuropsychological testing and functional

  10. Lots of Small Stars Born in Starburst Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    Decisive Study of NGC 3603 with the VLT and ISAAC An international group of astronomers [1] has used the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) at Paranal (Chile) to perform unique observations of an interstellar nebula in which stars are currently being born. Thanks to the excellent imaging properties of the first of the four 8.2-m VLT Unit Telescopes, ANTU, they were able to demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of large numbers of small and relatively light, new-born stars in NGC 3603, a well-known "starburst" region in the Milky Way Galaxy . Until now, it has only been possible to observe brighter and much heavier stars in such nebulae. The new observations show that stars of all masses are being born together in the same starburst event, a fundamental result for our understanding of the very complex process of star formation. Background of the project The present research programme was granted observing time with VLT ANTU in April 1999. Its general aim is to investigate collective, massive star formation, in particular the coalescence of high- and low-mass stars in the violent environments of starburst regions . These are areas in which the processes that lead to the birth of new stars are particularly active just now. Several fundamental questions arise in this context. A very basic one is whether low-mass stars form at all in such environments. And if so, do they form together with the most massive stars in a starburst event or do they form at different times, before or after or perhaps on different timescales? Are low-mass stars born with any "preferred" mass that may possibly give further clues to the ongoing processes? All of this is most important in order to understand the detailed mechanisms of star formation. Most current theoretical scenarios explain how single stars form in an isolated, contracting gas cloud, but most stars in the Universe did not form in that simple way. Once some massive stars have formed in some place and start to shine, they

  11. Subjective Social Status and Self-Reported Health Among US-born and Immigrant Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Jeremiah R; Glenn, Beth A; Mistry, Rashmita S; Ponce, Ninez A; Zimmerman, Frederick J

    2017-02-01

    Subjective social status is associated with a range of health outcomes. Few studies have tested the relevance of subjective social status among Latinos in the U.S.; those that have yielded mixed results. Data come from the Latino subsample of the 2003 National Latino and Asian American Study (N = 2554). Regression models adjusted for socioeconomic and demographic factors. Stratified analyses tested whether nativity status modifies the effect of subjective social status on health. Subjective social status was associated with better health. Income and education mattered more for health than subjective social status among U.S.-born Latinos. However, the picture was mixed among immigrant Latinos, with subjective social status more strongly predictive than income but less so than education. Subjective social status may tap into stressful immigrant experiences that affect one's perceived self-worth and capture psychosocial consequences and social disadvantage left out by conventional socioeconomic measures.

  12. Subjective Expected Utility Theory with "Small Worlds"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyntelberg, Jacob; Hansen, Frank

    We model the notion of a "small world" as a context dependent state space embedded into the "grand world". For each situation the decision maker creates a "small world" reflecting the events perceived to be relevant for the act under consideration. The "grand world" is represented by an event space...

  13. Normal visual evoked potentials in preschool children born small for gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Josefin; Dahlgren, Jovanna; Karlsson, Ann-Katrine; Grönlund, Marita Andersson

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies have shown visual evoked potential (VEP) abnormalities in infants and animals born small for gestational age (SGA) compared with controls. The current exploratory study aims to investigate whether VEP abnormalities persist in older ages. Pattern VEP latencies were obtained in 21 children (11 girls, 10 boys), born SGA and moderately preterm, at an average age of 5 years and 8 months. Fifty-one children (24 girls, 27 boys, mean age of 5 years and 7 months), also born moderately preterm but with normal height and weight at birth, served as controls Visual evoked potential results showed no significant differences in latency between children born SGA and controls born appropriate for gestational age (AGA) for either binocular stimulation, right eye or left eye stimulation. Our findings do not indicate any differences in VEP latency at preschool age for children born SGA compared with children born AGA. The results may support previous studies, suggesting that children born SGA show accelerated neurophysiologic maturation during their first year of life and that previously delayed VEP latencies after catch-up stay unchanged compared with controls. © 2011 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2011 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  14. Endocrine and metabolic diurnal rhythms in young adult men born small vs appropriate for gestational age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Charlotte; Saltbæk, Pernille N; Friedrichsen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Sleep disturbances and alterations of diurnal endocrine rhythms are associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). We previously showed that young men born small for gestational age (SGA) and with increased risk of T2D have elevated fat and decreased glucose oxidation rates...... during nighttime. In this study, we investigated whether SGA men have an altered diurnal profile of hormones, substrates and inflammatory markers implicated in T2D pathophysiology compared with matched individuals born appropriate for gestational age (AGA). METHODS: We collected hourly blood samples...... for 24 h, to measure levels of glucose, free fatty acids (FFA), triglycerides (TG), insulin, C-peptide, leptin, resistin, ghrelin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), incretins (GLP-1 and GIP), and inflammatory markers (TNF-α and IL-6) in 13 young men born SGA and 11 young men born AGA. RESULTS...

  15. Using fMRI to Investigate Memory in Young Children Born Small for Gestational Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bie, Henrica M A; de Ruiter, Michiel B; Ouwendijk, Mieke; Oostrom, Kim J; Wilke, Marko; Boersma, Maria; Veltman, Dick J; Delemarre-van de Waal, Henriette A

    2015-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) can lead to infants being born small for gestational age (SGA). SGA is associated with differences in brain anatomy and impaired cognition. We investigated learning and memory in children born SGA using neuropsychological testing and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). 18 children born appropriate for gestational age (AGA) and 34 SGA born children (18 with and 16 without postnatal catch-up growth) participated in this study. All children were between 4 and 7 years old. Cognitive functioning was assessed by IQ and memory testing (Digit/Word Span and Location Learning). A newly developed fMRI picture encoding task was completed by all children in order to assess brain regions involved in memory processes. Neuropsychological testing demonstrated that SGA children had IQ's within the normal range but lower than in AGA and poorer performances across measures of memory. Using fMRI, we observed memory related activity in posterior parahippocampal gyrus as well as the hippocampus proper. Additionally, activation was seen bilaterally in the prefrontal gyrus. Children born SGA showed less activation in the left parahippocampal region compared to AGA. This is the first fMRI study demonstrating different brain activation patterns in 4-7 year old children born SGA, suggesting that intrauterine growth restriction continues to affect neural functioning in children later-on.

  16. New insights in factors influencing growth in children born small for gestational age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.S. Renes (Judith)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Small for gestational age (SGA) refers to the size of an infant at birth. It is defined as a birth weight and/ or birth length of at least two standard deviation scores (SDS) below the mean for gestational age (1, 2). SGA children can be born full-term or premature.

  17. Bloom syndrome in short children born small for gestational age: A challenging diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.S. Renes (Judith); R.H. Willemsen (Ruben); A. Wagner (Anja); M.J. Finken (Martijn); A.C.S. Hokken-Koelega (Anita)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: GH treatment has become a frequently applied growth-promoting therapy in short children born small for gestational age (SGA). In some disorders GH treatment is contraindicated, eg, chromosomal breakage syndromes. Bloom syndrome is a rare chromosomal breakage syndrome

  18. Brain Development, Intelligence and Cognitive Outcome in Children Born Small for Gestational Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bie, H.M.A.; Oostrom, K.J.; Delemarre-van d Waal, H.A.

    2010-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) can lead to infants being born small for gestational age (SGA). SGA is associated with increased neonatal morbidity and mortality as well as short stature, cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus type 2, dyslipidemia and end-stage renal

  19. Men becoming fathers by intracytoplasmic sperm injection were more often born small for gestational age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Liffner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Being born with nonoptimal birth characteristics decreases the chance of becoming a father. Urogenital malformations as well as metabolic syndrome are more common in men born small for gestational age (SGA and could be contributing factors to the reduced fertility rate seen in these men. It could imply that men becoming fathers by assisted reproductive technology (ART more often are born with low birth weight (LBW, preterm, and/or SGA than men conceiving without treatment and also that men where intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI had to be performed more often are born with nonoptimal birth characteristics than men where conventional in vitro fertilization (IVF successfully could be used. In this retrospective, case-control study using Swedish national registers, we compared the birth characteristics of 1206 men who have become fathers by ART with a control group consisting of age-matched men who became fathers without treatment. The differences in birth characteristics between men becoming fathers by IVF and ICSI were also assessed. For men becoming fathers by ART, OR of being born with LBW was 1.66 (95% CI = 1.17-2.36 compared with fathers who conceived without treatment. OR of being born prematurely was 1.32 (95% CI = 1.00-1.77. Men becoming fathers via ICSI had a doubled increased likelihood of being born SGA compared with men who became fathers via IVF (OR = 2.12; 95% CI = 1.17-3.83. In conclusion, we have found that men becoming fathers by ICSI treatments had more often been born SGA than men becoming fathers by conventional IVF.

  20. The Role of Strategic Partnerships in the Internationalisation of Small Born Global Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Capik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The article discusses motives driving the internationalisation of small born global firms and explores the role strategic partnerships play in the process. It argues that born globals are forced into international markets soon after their foundation due to limited domestic market capacity. Furthermore, they attempt to prevent competition on international markets and secure first mover advantages. Research Design & Methods: Based on primary data gathered in the course of interviews with founders and senior managers of British born globals operating in different industry sectors, the article offers new insights into the role of partnerships during early stages of internationalisation. Findings: The article reveals that beside serendipitous opportunities, the motivation and opportunity recognition of the founder/manager play a vital role in firms’ early internationalisation. Strategic partnerships appear to help born globals in overcoming resource constraints and their liability of newness and smallness. Also other factors, such as increasing brand recognition and the enhancement of the firm’s credibility motivate born globals to engage in strategic partnerships from an early stage. Implications & Recommendations: The research results lead to a conclusion that strategic partnerships are suitable only for a particular period of time, which begins shortly after the firm’s inception and ends when the born global firm becomes more established. Contribution & Value Added: The article provides novel understanding of the role of strategic partnerships play in the early internationalisation of born globals. Furthermore, it adds new insights into the evolution of such partnerships.

  1. Methylphenidate and the response to growth hormone treatment in short children born small for gestational age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith S Renes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Growth hormone (GH treatment has become a frequently applied growth promoting therapy in short children born small for gestational age (SGA. Children born SGA have a higher risk of developing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Treatment of ADHD with methylphenidate (MP has greatly increased in recent years, therefore more children are being treated with GH and MP simultaneously. Some studies have found an association between MP treatment and growth deceleration, but data are contradictory. OBJECTIVE: To explore the effects of MP treatment on growth in GH-treated short SGA children METHODS: Anthropometric measurements were performed in 78 GH-treated short SGA children (mean age 10.6 yr, 39 of whom were also treated with MP (SGA-GH/MP. The SGA-GH/MP group was compared to 39 SGA-GH treated subjects. They were matched for sex, age and height at start of GH, height SDS at start of MP treatment and target height SDS. Serum insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I and IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3 levels were yearly determined. Growth, serum IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels during the first three years of treatment were analyzed using repeated measures regression analysis. RESULTS: The SGA-GH/MP group had a lower height gain during the first 3 years than the SGA-GH subjects, only significant between 6 and 12 months of MP treatment. After 3 years of MP treatment, the height gain was 0.2 SDS (± 0.1 SD lower in the SGA-GH/MP group (P = 0.17. Adult height was not significantly different between the SGA-GH/MP and SGA-GH group (-1.9 SDS and -1.9 SDS respectively, P = 0.46. Moreover, during the first 3 years of MP treatment IGF-I and IGFBP-3 measurements were similar in both groups. CONCLUSION: MP has some negative effect on growth during the first years in short SGA children treated with GH, but adult height is not affected.

  2. Efficacy and safety of growth hormone treatment for children born small for gestational age

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Il Tae

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant growth hormone (GH) is an effective treatment for short children who are born small for gestational age (SGA). Short children born SGA who fail to demonstrate catch-up growth by 2-4 years of age are candidates for GH treatment initiated to achieve catch-up growth to a normal height in early childhood, maintain a normal height gain throughout childhood, and achieve an adult height within the normal target range. GH treatment at a dose of 35-70 µg/kg/day should be considered for tho...

  3. Pituitary-gonadal function in adolescent males born appropriate or small for gestational age with or without intrauterine growth restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rikke Beck; Vielwerth, Signe; Larsen, Torben Kjeldgaard

    2007-01-01

    Being born small for gestational age (SGA) is suggested to influence female pituitary-gonadal axis, but only a few studies have focused on male pituitary-gonadal function.......Being born small for gestational age (SGA) is suggested to influence female pituitary-gonadal axis, but only a few studies have focused on male pituitary-gonadal function....

  4. Growth hormone treatment for short stature in children born small for gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Heike; Rosilio, Myriam; Blum, Werner F; Drop, Stenvert L S

    2008-10-01

    Children born small for gestational age (SGA) who do not show catch-up in the first 2 years generally remain short for life. Although the majority of children born SGA are not growth hormone (GH) deficient, GH treatment is known to improve average growth in these children.Early studies using GH in children born SGA demonstrated increased height velocity, but these effects tended to be short-term with effects decreasing when GH treatment stopped. With refined GH regimens, significant effects on height have been shown, with gains of approximately 1 standard deviation score after 2 years. Studies have also shown that long-term continuous GH therapy can significantly increase final height to within the normal range. GH treatment of children born SGA does not appear to unduly affect bone age or pubertal development. Growth prediction models have been used to identify various factors involved in the response to GH therapy with age at start, treatment duration, and GH dose showing strong effects. Genetic factors such as the exon 3 deletion of the GH receptor may contribute to short stature of children born SGA and may also be involved in the responsiveness to GH treatment, but there remain other unknown genetic and/or environmental factors. No unexpected safety concerns have arisen in GH therapy trials. In particular, no long-term adverse effects have been seen for glucose metabolism, and positive effects have been shown for lipid profiles and blood pressure.GH treatment in short children born SGA has shown a beneficial, growth-promoting effect in both the short-and long-term, and has become a recognized indication in both the US and Europe. Further studies on individualized treatment regimens and long-term safety are ongoing.

  5. Resting-state oscillatory activity in children born small for gestational age: a magnetoencephalographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eBoersma

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Growth restriction in utero during a period that is critical for normal growth of the brain, has previously been associated with deviations in cognitive abilities and brain anatomical and functional changes. We measured magnetoencephalography (MEG in 4-7 year old children to test if children born small for gestational age (SGA show deviations in resting-state brain oscillatory activity. Children born SGA children with postnatally spontaneous catch-up growth (SGA+; 6 boys, 7 girls; mean age 6.3 y (SD=0.9 and children born appropriate for gestational age (AGA; 7 boys, 3 girls; mean age 6.0 y (SD=1.2 participated in a resting-state MEG study. We calculated absolute and relative power spectra and used nonparametric statistics to test for group differences. SGA+ and AGA born children showed no significant differences in absolute and relative power except for reduced absolute gamma band power in SGA children. At time of MEG investigation, SGA+ children showed was significantly lower head circumference (HC and a trend toward lower IQ, however there was no association of HC or IQ with absolute or relative power. Except for reduced absolute gamma band power, our findings suggest normal brain activity patterns at school age in a group of children born SGA in which spontaneous catch-up growth of bodily length after birth occurred. Although previous findings suggest that being born SGA alters brain oscillatory activity early in neonatal life, we show that these neonatal alterations do not persist at early school age when spontaneous postnatal catch-up growth occurs after birth.

  6. Effects of being born small for gestational age on long-term intellectual performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Ester Maria; Tuvemo, Torsten

    2008-06-01

    Size at birth has been associated repeatedly with increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality later in life. However, there is accumulating evidence to suggest an association between being born small for gestational age (SGA) and increased risk of lower intelligence, poor academic performance, low social competence and behavioural problems, compared with individuals born appropriate for gestational age. Crude neurological handicaps, such as cerebral palsy, are extremely rare in children born SGA at term. Such handicaps are more common in very premature children. However, there does appear to be an increase in the risk for non-severe neurological dysfunction in individuals born SGA. Intellectual performance is evaluated in young children in several different ways, including standardized tests such as Weschler's Intelligence Scale - Revised, and teachers and parents' reports. In adulthood, indirect variables such as education and occupation are used in addition to standardized tests. It may be possible to modify the effects of SGA on intellectual development by breast feeding the baby for more than 6 months. Nutrient-enriched formula does not have any advantages when it comes to intellectual development, and induces a risk of rapid weight gain and eventually overweight. Growth hormone treatment may also have some effect on intelligence quotient.

  7. Growth of short children born small for gestational age and their response to growth hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Hemchand Krishna; Khadilkar, Vaman V; Chiplonkar, Shashi A; Khadilkar, Anuradha V

    2013-05-08

    Growth hormone [GH] is licensed for use in children born small for gestational age (SGA) who fail to catch-up. We retrospectively compared the response of twenty children born SGA (who satisfied the auxological criteria) to growth hormone (Group I) versus randomly selected age and sex matched controls from a group of SGA children with growth related complaints, not treated with GH (Group II). After 2 years of GH therapy the HAZ increased from -2.8 to -1.6 in Group I, compared 2.2 to -1.7 in group II (P-value children rose from 55% to 65% in cases versus 60% to 75% in the controls (P>0.05). GH resulted in increase in growth velocity Z-score during the first year and (4.3±0.5 in Group-I versus - 0.5±0.6 in Group-II, Pchildren without accelerating pubertal progression.

  8. Ovarian morphology and function during growth hormone therapy of short girls born small for gestational age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tinggaard, Jeanette; Jensen, Rikke Beck; Sundberg, Karin

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of growth hormone (GH) treatment on ovarian and uterine morphology and function in short, prepubertal small-for-gestational-age (SGA) girls.DESIGN: A multinational, randomized controlled trial on safety and efficacy of GH therapy in short, prepubertal children born...... SGA.SETTING: Not applicable.PATIENT(S): A subgroup of 18 Danish girls born SGA included in North European SGA Study (NESGAS).INTERVENTION(S): One year of GH treatment (67 μg/kg/day) followed by 2 years of randomized GH treatment (67 μg/kg/day, 35 μg/kg/day, or IGF-I titrated).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE...... in SGA girls is prudent. Altogether, the findings are reassuring. However, long-term effects of GH treatment on adult reproductive function remain unknown.CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: EudraCT 2005-001507-19....

  9. Functional Outcomes at Age 7 Years of Moderate Preterm and Full Term Children Born Small for Gestational Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanis, Jozien C; van Braeckel, Koenraad N J A; Kerstjens, Jorien M; Bocca-Tjeertes, Inger F A; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; Bos, Arend F

    OBJECTIVE: To compare functional outcomes of 7-year-old (school-age) children born small for gestational age (SGA; ie, a birth weight z score ≤ -1 SD), with appropriate for gestational age (AGA) peers, born moderately preterm or full term. STUDY DESIGN: Data were collected as part of the

  10. Intelligence and Psychosocial Functioning during Long-Term Growth Hormone Therapy in Children Born Small for Gestational Age

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    van Pareren, Yvonne K; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J; Slijper, Froukje S. M; Koot, Hans M; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C. S

    2004-01-01

    Short stature is not the only problem faced by small for gestational age (SGA) children. Being born SGA has also been associated with lowered intelligence, poor academic performance, low social competence, and behavioral problems...

  11. The role of small rodents and hedgehogs in a natural focus of tick-borne encephalitis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kožuch, O.; Grešíková, M.; Nosek, J.; Lichard, M.; Sekeyová, M.

    1967-01-01

    The role of small rodents and hedgehogs in the circulation of tick-borne encephalitis in natural foci in the Tribeč region of Czechoslovakia has been studied. Isolation of virus from the blood of Apodemus flavicollis, Clethrionomys glareolus and Erinaceus roumanicus, as well as the demonstration of antibodies in the sera of these mammals and of A. sylvaticus, Microtus arvalis and Sciurus vulgaris, showed that these mammals had been in contact with the virus in recent years. The proportion of positive sera was low, ranging from 4% to 11% for A. flavicollis in various parts of the Tribeč region. In a study of the elementary focus at Jarok, it was found that the frequency of antibodies was considerably higher in hedgehogs than in small rodents; this may be due to the longer life-cycle of the former, which makes the probability of reinfection greater. Clearly, the hedgehog and the small rodents studied are important hosts of ticks and reservoirs of tick-borne encephalitis virus in the Tribeč region. PMID:5298543

  12. Design VHF Antennas for Space Borne Receivers for SmallSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Manohar

    2017-01-01

    Space borne microwave remote sensors at VHF/UHF frequencies are important instruments to observe reflective properties of land surfaces through thick and heavy forestation on a global scale. One of the most cost effective ways of measuring land reflectivity at VHF/UHF frequencies is to use signals transmitted by existing communication satellites (operating at VHF/UHF band) as a signal of opportunity (SoOp) signal and passive receivers integrated with airborne/space borne platforms operating in the Low Earth Orbit (LEO). One of the critical components of the passive receiver is two antennas (one to receive only direct signal and other to receive only reflected signal) which need to have ideally high (>30dB) isolation. However, because of small size of host platforms and broad beam width of dipole antennas, achieving adequate isolation between two channels is a challenging problem and need to be solved for successful implementation of space borne SoOp technology for remote sensing. In this presentation a novel enabling VHF antenna technology for Cubesat platforms is presented to receive direct as well as reflected signal with needed isolation. The novel scheme also allows enhancing the gain of individual channels by factor of 2 without use of reflecting ground plane.

  13. Children and young adults born small for gestational age (SGA) : GH-IGF-IGFBP axis, insulin sensitivity, adipocytokines and body composition during and after growth hormone treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Dijk, Marije

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis doctoral thesis gives a detailed account of various studies, performed in short children born small for gestational age (SGA) participating in the third Dutch GH trial (IUGR-3 study), and in young SGA adults previously treated with GH in the first Dutch GH trial (SGA follow-up study). This chapter describes defi nitions of SGA, prevalence and etiology of SGA, and clinical and endocrinological aspects associated with SGA. Also the effects of GH treatment in short SGA subjects ...

  14. Bloom syndrome in short children born small for gestational age: a challenging diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renes, Judith S; Willemsen, Ruben H; Wagner, Anja; Finken, Martijn J J; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C S

    2013-10-01

    GH treatment has become a frequently applied growth-promoting therapy in short children born small for gestational age (SGA). In some disorders GH treatment is contraindicated, eg, chromosomal breakage syndromes. Bloom syndrome is a rare chromosomal breakage syndrome characterized by severe pre- and postnatal growth deficiency, a photosensitive facial erythema, immunodeficiency, mental retardation or learning disabilities, endocrinopathies, and a predisposition to develop a wide variety of cancers. We report 2 patients with Bloom syndrome illustrating the variety in clinical manifestations. They were initially diagnosed with short stature after SGA birth and Silver Russell syndrome and treated with GH. Both patients presented with pre- and postnatal growth failure but no clear other characteristic features associated with Bloom syndrome. Photosensitive skin lesions developed only at a pubertal age and were minimal. Also, both children showed normal immunoglobulin levels, normal development, and no signs of endocrinopathies at start of GH. Dysmorphic features resembling Silver Russell syndrome were observed in both patients. Remarkably, during GH treatment IGF-1 levels increased to values greater than 3.5 SD score, with normal IGF binding protein-3 levels. Short children born SGA comprise a heterogeneous group. Bloom syndrome should be tested for in children with consanguineous parents, dysmorphic features (particularly resembling Silver Russell syndrome), skin abnormalities, and/or IGF-1 levels greater than 2.5 SD score during standard GH treatment with normal IGF binding protein-3 levels.

  15. Metabolic response to 36 hours of fasting in young men born small vs appropriate for gestational age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Sine W; Brøns, Charlotte; Bluck, Les

    2015-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Being born small for gestational age (SGA) is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in an affluent society, but could confer an improved chance of survival during sparse living conditions. We studied whether insulin action and other metabolic responses to prolonged...... fasting differed between 21 young adults born SGA and 18 matched controls born appropriate for gestational age (AGA). METHODS: A frequently sampled IVGTT and indirect calorimetry measurements were performed after a 36 h fast. Endogenous glucose production, insulin sensitivity (SI), first-phase insulin...

  16. Cognitive and psychosocial development concerns in children born small for gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peter A; Houk, Christopher P W

    Outcome information for infants born small for gestational age (SGA), whether term or premature, suggests poorer cognitive function compared with appropriate size for gestational age (AGA) infants. Poorer outcome is associated with smaller size for gestational age and with lack of catch-up growth after birth. Such data have been reported from early childhood to young adulthood. Diminished head circumference at birth and growth thereafter has also been associated with poor outcome. Based on available reports, the impact of SGA birth upon psychosocial development remains unclear. While it has not been shown that growth hormone (GH) therapy impacts either cognitive or psychosocial outcome, increased head circumference standard deviation scores have been shown to occur with GH therapy. These data need to be interpreted with caution since study populations do not define etiology of SGA and definitions of SGA vary. Further, generalized group data are not applicable to individuals.

  17. Brain development, intelligence and cognitive outcome in children born small for gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bie, H M A; Oostrom, K J; Delemarre-van de Waal, H A

    2010-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) can lead to infants being born small for gestational age (SGA). SGA is associated with increased neonatal morbidity and mortality as well as short stature, cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus type 2, dyslipidemia and end-stage renal disease in adulthood. In addition, SGA children have decreased levels of intelligence and cognition, although the effects are mostly subtle. The overall outcome of each child is the result of a complex interaction between intrauterine and extrauterine factors. Animal and human studies show structural alterations in the brains of individuals with IUGR/SGA. The presence of growth hormone (GH) receptors in the brain implies that the brain is also a target for GH. Exogenous GH theoretically has the ability to act on the brain. This is exemplified by the effects of GH on cognition in GH-deficient adults. In SGA children, data on the effect of exogenous GH on intelligence and cognition are scant and contradictory.

  18. Peripheral Nerve Dysfunction in Middle-Aged Subjects Born with Thalidomide Embryopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotra, Alessia; Newman, Claus; Johnson, Martin; Eremin, Oleg; Friede, Tim; Malik, Omar; Nicholas, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background Phocomelia is an extremely rare congenital malformation that emerged as one extreme of a range of defects resulting from in utero exposure to thalidomide. Individuals with thalidomide embryopathy (TE) have reported developing symptoms suggestive of peripheral nervous system dysfunction in the mal-developed limbs in later life. Methods Case control study comparing TE subjects with upper limb anomalies and neuropathic symptoms with healthy controls using standard neurophysiological testing. Other causes of a peripheral neuropathy were excluded prior to assessment. Results Clinical examination of 17 subjects with TE (aged 50.4±1.3 [mean±standard deviation] years, 10 females) and 17 controls (37.9±9.0 years; 8 females) demonstrated features of upper limb compressive neuropathy in three-quarters of subjects. Additionally there were examination findings suggestive of mild sensory neuropathy in the lower limbs (n = 1), L5 radiculopathic sensory impairment (n = 1) and cervical myelopathy (n = 1). In TE there were electrophysiological changes consistent with a median large fibre neuropathic abnormality (mean compound muscle action potential difference -6.3 mV ([-9.3, -3.3], p = 0.0002) ([95% CI], p-value)) and reduced sympathetic skin response amplitudes (-0.8 mV ([-1.5, -0.2], p = 0.0089)) in the affected upper limbs. In the lower limbs there was evidence of sural nerve dysfunction (sensory nerve action potential -5.8 μV ([-10.7, -0.8], p = 0.0232)) and impaired warm perception thresholds (+3.0°C ([0.6, 5.4], p = 0.0169)). Conclusions We found a range of clinical features relevant to individuals with TE beyond upper limb compressive neuropathies supporting the need for a detailed neurological examination to exclude other treatable pathologies. The electrophysiological evidence of large and small fibre axonal nerve dysfunction in symptomatic and asymptomatic limbs may be a result of the original insult and merits further investigation. PMID:27100829

  19. Peripheral Nerve Dysfunction in Middle-Aged Subjects Born with Thalidomide Embryopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Nicotra

    Full Text Available Phocomelia is an extremely rare congenital malformation that emerged as one extreme of a range of defects resulting from in utero exposure to thalidomide. Individuals with thalidomide embryopathy (TE have reported developing symptoms suggestive of peripheral nervous system dysfunction in the mal-developed limbs in later life.Case control study comparing TE subjects with upper limb anomalies and neuropathic symptoms with healthy controls using standard neurophysiological testing. Other causes of a peripheral neuropathy were excluded prior to assessment.Clinical examination of 17 subjects with TE (aged 50.4±1.3 [mean±standard deviation] years, 10 females and 17 controls (37.9±9.0 years; 8 females demonstrated features of upper limb compressive neuropathy in three-quarters of subjects. Additionally there were examination findings suggestive of mild sensory neuropathy in the lower limbs (n = 1, L5 radiculopathic sensory impairment (n = 1 and cervical myelopathy (n = 1. In TE there were electrophysiological changes consistent with a median large fibre neuropathic abnormality (mean compound muscle action potential difference -6.3 mV ([-9.3, -3.3], p = 0.0002 ([95% CI], p-value and reduced sympathetic skin response amplitudes (-0.8 mV ([-1.5, -0.2], p = 0.0089 in the affected upper limbs. In the lower limbs there was evidence of sural nerve dysfunction (sensory nerve action potential -5.8 μV ([-10.7, -0.8], p = 0.0232 and impaired warm perception thresholds (+3.0°C ([0.6, 5.4], p = 0.0169.We found a range of clinical features relevant to individuals with TE beyond upper limb compressive neuropathies supporting the need for a detailed neurological examination to exclude other treatable pathologies. The electrophysiological evidence of large and small fibre axonal nerve dysfunction in symptomatic and asymptomatic limbs may be a result of the original insult and merits further investigation.

  20. Small risk of developing symptomatic tick-borne diseases following a tick bite in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofhuis Agnetha

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In The Netherlands, the incidence of Lyme borreliosis is on the rise. Besides its causative agent, Borrelia burgdorferi s.l., other potential pathogens like Rickettsia, Babesia and Ehrlichia species are present in Ixodes ricinus ticks. The risk of disease associated with these microorganisms after tick-bites remains, however, largely unclear. A prospective study was performed to investigate how many persons with tick-bites develop localized or systemic symptoms and whether these are associated with tick-borne microorganisms. Results In total, 297 Ixodes ricinus ticks were collected from 246 study participants who consulted a general practitioner on the island of Ameland for tick bites. Ticks were subjected to PCR to detect DNA of Borrelia burgdorferi s.l., Rickettsia spp., Babesia spp. or Ehrlichia/Anaplasma spp.. Sixteen percent of the collected ticks were positive for Borrelia burgdorferi s.l., 19% for Rickettsia spp., 12% for Ehrlichia/Anaplasma spp. and 10% for Babesia spp.. At least six months after the tick bite, study participants were interviewed on symptoms by means of a standard questionnaire. 14 out of 193 participants (8.3% reported reddening at the bite site and 6 participants (4.1% reported systemic symptoms. No association between symptoms and tick-borne microorganisms was found. Attachment duration ≥24 h was positively associated with reddening at the bite site and systemic symptoms. Using logistic regression techniques, reddening was positively correlated with presence of Borrelia afzelii, and having 'any symptoms' was positively associated with attachment duration. Conclusion The risk of contracting acute Lyme borreliosis, rickettsiosis, babesiosis or ehrlichiosis from a single tick bite was

  1. Survey for hantaviruses, tick-borne encephalitis virus, and Rickettsia spp. in small rodents in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoboda, Petra; Dobler, Gerhard; Markotić, Alemka; Kurolt, Ivan-Christian; Speck, Stephanie; Habuš, Josipa; Vucelja, Marko; Krajinović, Lidija Cvetko; Tadin, Ante; Margaletić, Josip; Essbauer, Sandra

    2014-07-01

    In Croatia, several rodent- and vector-borne agents are endemic and of medical importance. In this study, we investigated hantaviruses and, for the first time, tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) and Rickettsia spp. in small wild rodents from two different sites (mountainous and lowland region) in Croatia. In total, 194 transudate and tissue samples from 170 rodents (A. flavicollis, n=115; A. agrarius, n=2; Myodes glareolus, n=53) were tested for antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence assays (IIFT) and for nucleic acids by conventional (hantaviruses) and real-time RT-/PCRs (TBEV and Rickettsia spp.). A total of 25.5% (24/94) of the rodents from the mountainous area revealed specific antibodies against hantaviruses. In all, 21.3% (20/94) of the samples from the mountainous area and 29.0% (9/31) from the lowland area yielded positive results for either Puumala virus (PUUV) or Dobrava-Belgrade virus (DOBV) using a conventional RT-PCR. All processed samples (n=194) were negative for TBEV by IIFT or real-time RT-PCR. Serological evidence of rickettsial infection was detected in 4.3% (4/94) rodents from the mountainous region. Another 3.2% (3/94) rodents were positive for Rickettsia spp. by real-time PCR. None of the rodents (n=76) from the lowland area were positive for Rickettsia spp. by real-time PCR. Dual infection of PUUV and Rickettsia spp. was found in one M. glareolus from the mountainous area by RT-PCR and real-time PCR, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first detection of Rickettsia spp. in small rodents from Croatia. Phylogenetic analyses of S- and M-segment sequences obtained from the two study sites revealed well-supported subgroups in Croatian PUUV and DOBV. Although somewhat limited, our data showed occurrence and prevalence of PUUV, DOBV, and rickettsiae in Croatia. Further studies are warranted to confirm these data and to determine the Rickettsia species present in rodents in these areas.

  2. Evaluation of lipid and glucose metabolism and cortisol and thyroid hormone levels in obese appropriate for gestational age (AGA) born and non-obese small for gestational age (SGA) born prepubertal Slovak children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blusková, Zuzana; Koštálová, Ludmila; Celec, Peter; Vitáriušová, Eva; Pribilincová, Zuzana; Maršálková, Marianna; Šemberová, Jana; Kyselová, Tatiana; Hlavatá, Anna; Kovács, László

    2014-07-01

    Obesity is the major determinant of metabolic syndrome. Being born small for gestational age (SGA) may be co-responsible. We aimed at evaluating the association between 1. obesity and 2. being born SGA and the presence of endocrine-metabolic abnormalities in prepubertal Slovak children. The study included 98 children, aged 3-10.9 years: 36 AGA-born obese children (OB), 31 SGA-born children (SGA) and 31 appropriate for gestational age born non-obese children (AGA). Fasting serum levels of glucose, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, triglycerides, fT4, TSH, cortisol and insulin were determined. HOMA-IR was calculated. Personal data about birth weight and length and family history were collected. Actual anthropometric measurement was done. In every group, high prevalence of positive family history of metabolic disorder was found. In comparison with AGA children, OB children were taller (pSGA-born children were shorter (pSGA-born children in comparison with AGA-born children. SGA-born children are more prone to developing endocrine-metabolic abnormalities than non-obese children born AGA, but they are at less risk than obese AGA-born children. We should provide specialized care for obese children already in prepubertal age and pay attention to SGA-born children.

  3. Effect of discontinuation of growth hormone treatment on risk factors for cardiovascular disease in adolescents born small for gestational age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. van Pareren; M. Houdijk; M. Jansen (Maarten); M. Reeser; P.G.H. Mulder (Paul); A.C.S. Hokken-Koelega (Anita)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractHyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus type 2, and coronary heart disease have been associated with being born small for gestational age (SGA). It has been reported that GH treatment induced higher insulin levels, which has led to concern regarding the long-term effect of GH

  4. Adiponectin levels measured in dried blood spot samples from neonates born small and appropriate for gestational age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klamer, A; Skogstrand, Kristin; Hougaard, D M

    2007-01-01

    Adiponectin levels measured in neonatal dried blood spot samples (DBSS) might be affected by both prematurity and being born small for gestational age (SGA). The aim of the study was to measure adiponectin levels in routinely collected neonatal DBSS taken on day 5 (range 3-12) postnatal from...

  5. Serum thyroid hormone levels in healthy children from birth to adulthood and in short children born small for gestational age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Lem (Annemieke); Y.B. de Rijke (Yolanda); H. van Toor (Hans); M.A.J. de Ridder (Maria); T.J. Visser (Theo); A.C.S. Hokken-Koelega (Anita)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractContext: Age-appropriate reference ranges for thyroid hormones are required for detecting pediatric thyroid dysfunction. Data on thyroid hormones and peripheral thyroid metabolism in short children born small for gestational age (SGA) before and during GH treatment are lacking.

  6. Early rapid growth : no association with later cognitive functions in children born not small for gestational age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyerlein, Andreas; Ness, Andrew R.; Streuling, Ina; Hadders-Algra, Mijna; von Kries, Ruediger

    Background: There is an association between rapid growth in early life and overweight in childhood. This adverse association needs to be balanced against potential beneficial effects on cognitive functioning observed in children who are born small for gestational age (SGA). Objective: We examined

  7. Retinal structure assessed by OCT as a biomarker of brain development in children born small for gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueyo, Victoria; Pérez, Teresa; González, Inmaculada; Altemir, Irene; Gimenez, Galadriel; Prieto, Esther; Paules, Cristina; Oros, Daniel; Lopez-Pison, Javier; Fayed, Nicolás; Garcia-Martí, Gracián; Sanz-Requena, Roberto; Marin, Miguel Angel

    2017-09-01

    To identify differences in neuronal tissue from retinal and brain structures in children born small for gestational age (SGA) with no abnormality in neonatal brain ultrasonography and no previous neurological impairment, and to evaluate the relationship between retinal structure and brain changes in school-age children born SGA. Two cohorts of children were recruited: 25 children born SGA and 25 children born with an appropriate birth weight according to gestational age. All the children underwent an ophthalmic examination, which included retinal imaging using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and a brain MRI. MRI images were automatically segmented and global and regional brain volumes were obtained. Although visual function did not differ between both groups, the complex ganglion cell and inner plexiform layers (GCL-IPL) was thinner in SGA children. Total intracranial volume, and global grey and white matter volumes in brain and cerebellum were correlated with birthweight centile, as were certain regional volumes (temporal and parietal lobes, hippocampus and putamen). Abnormal GCL-IPL measurements accurately identified SGA children with the most severe grey and white matter changes in the brain. SGA children, both preterm and term born, showed evidence of structural abnormalities in the retina, which may be an accurate and non-invasive biomarker of neuronal damage in brain tissue. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Using fMRI to Investigate Memory in Young Children Born Small for Gestational Age

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    de Bie, Henrica M. A; de Ruiter, Michiel B; Ouwendijk, Mieke; Oostrom, Kim J; Wilke, Marko; Boersma, Maria; Veltman, Dick J; Delemarre-van de Waal, Henriette A

    2015-01-01

    ...). SGA is associated with differences in brain anatomy and impaired cognition. We investigated learning and memory in children born SGA using neuropsychological testing and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI...

  9. Obesity and diabetes genes are associated with being born small for gestational age: Results from the Auckland Birthweight Collaborative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Angharad R

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individuals born small for gestational age (SGA are at increased risk of rapid postnatal weight gain, later obesity and diseases in adulthood such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Environmental risk factors for SGA are well established and include smoking, low pregnancy weight, maternal short stature, maternal diet, ethnic origin of mother and hypertension. However, in a large proportion of SGA, no underlying cause is evident, and these individuals may have a larger genetic contribution. Methods In this study we tested the association between SGA and polymorphisms in genes that have previously been associated with obesity and/or diabetes. We undertook analysis of 54 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 546 samples from the Auckland Birthweight Collaborative (ABC study. 227 children were born small for gestational age (SGA and 319 were appropriate for gestational age (AGA. Results and Conclusion The results demonstrated that genetic variation in KCNJ11, BDNF, PFKP, PTER and SEC16B were associated with SGA and support the concept that genetic factors associated with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes are more prevalent in those born SGA compared to those born AGA. We have previously determined that environmental factors are associated with differences in birthweight in the ABC study and now we have demonstrated a significant genetic contribution, suggesting that the interaction between genetics and the environment are important.

  10. Obesity and diabetes genes are associated with being born small for gestational age: Results from the Auckland Birthweight Collaborative study

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan Angharad R; Thompson John MD; Murphy Rinki; Black Peter N; Lam Wen-Jiun; Ferguson Lynnette R; Mitchell Ed A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Individuals born small for gestational age (SGA) are at increased risk of rapid postnatal weight gain, later obesity and diseases in adulthood such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Environmental risk factors for SGA are well established and include smoking, low pregnancy weight, maternal short stature, maternal diet, ethnic origin of mother and hypertension. However, in a large proportion of SGA, no underlying cause is evident, and these indivi...

  11. Estimates of burden and consequences of infants born small for gestational age in low and middle income countries with INTERGROWTH-21st standard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Anne Cc; Kozuki, Naoko; Cousens, Simon

    2017-01-01

     CHERG birth cohorts from 14 population based sites in low and middle income countries. Main outcome measures In low and middle income countries in the year 2012, the number and proportion of infants born small for gestational age; number and proportion of neonatal deaths attributable to small...... for gestational age; the number and proportion of neonatal deaths that could be prevented by reducing the prevalence of small for gestational age to 10%. Results  In 2012, an estimated 23.3 million infants (uncertainty range 17.6 to 31.9; 19.3% of live births) were born small for gestational age in low and middle...... deaths were attributable to infants born small for gestational age, 21.9% of all neonatal deaths. The largest burden was in South Asia, where the prevalence was the highest (34%); about 26% of neonatal deaths were attributable to infants born small for gestational age. Reduction of the prevalence...

  12. Oxidative stress in term small for gestational age neonates born to undernourished mothers: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee BD

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to assess the status of oxidative stress in term small for gestational age (SGA newborn infants born to undernourished mothers by estimating levels of erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase, reduced glutathione, and serum malondialdehyde (MDA in cord blood and comparing them to healthy appropriate for gestational age (AGA controls. This was done in a case control design at a tertiary level teaching hospital. Methods We included 20 singleton healthy SGA newborn infants born between 38–40 weeks to undernourished mothers with a post-pregnancy weight Results The activity of MDA was increased (5.33 ± 0.72 vs 2.55 ± 0.22 nmol/mL; P vs. 786.8 ± 79.1 U/g Hb; P vs. 2.31 ± 0.20 U/g Hb; P vs 6.42 ± 0.23 Umol/g Hb, P P Conclusions Intrauterine malnutrition is associated with significant oxidative stress in small for gestational age neonates born at term to malnourished mothers.

  13. Intelligence and psychosocial functioning during long-term growth hormone therapy in children born small for gestational age [IF: 5.9

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pareren, Y.K.; Duivenvoorden, H.; Slijper, F.S.M.; Koot, H.M.; Hokken-Koelega, A.C.S.

    2004-01-01

    Short stature is not the only problem faced by small for gestational age (SGA) children. Being born SGA has also been associated with lowered intelligence, poor academic performance, low social competence, and behavioral problems. Although GH treatment in short children born SGA can result in a

  14. Small-scale shifting mosaics of two dominant grassland species: the possible role of soil-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olff, H; Hoorens, B; de Goede, R G M; van der Putten, W H; Gleichman, J M

    2000-10-01

    We analyzed the dynamics of dominant plant species in a grazed grassland over 17 years, and investigated whether local shifts in these dominant species, leading to vegetation mosaics, could be attributed to interactions between plants and soil-borne pathogens. We found that Festuca rubra and Carex arenaria locally alternated in abundance, with different sites close together behaving out of phase, resulting in a shifting mosaic. The net effect of killing all soil biota on the growth of these two species was investigated in a greenhouse experiment using gamma radiation, controlling for possible effects of sterilization on soil chemistry. Both plant species showed a strong net positive response to soil sterilization, indicating that pathogens (e.g., nematodes, pathogenic fungi) outweighed the effect of mutualists (e.g., mycorrhizae). This positive growth response towards soil sterilization appeared not be due to effects of sterilization on soil chemistry. Growth of Carex was strongly reduced by soil-borne pathogens (86% reduction relative to its growth on sterilized soil) on soil from a site where this species decreased during the last decade (and Festuca increased), while it was reduced much less (50%) on soil from a nearby site where it increased in abundance during the last decade. Similarly, Festuca was reduced more (67%) on soil from the site where it decreased (and Carex increased) than on soil from the site where it increased (55%, the site where Carex decreased). Plant-feeding nematodes showed high small-scale variation in densities, and we related this variation to the observed growth reductions in both plant species. Carex growth on unsterilized soil was significantly more reduced at higher densities of plant-feeding nematodes, while the growth reduction in Festuca was independent of plant-feeding nematode densities. At high plant-feeding nematode densities, growth of Carex was reduced more than Festuca, while at low nematode densities the opposite was found

  15. Chronic Hypertension in Women after Perinatal Exposure to Preeclampsia, Being Born Small for Gestational Age or Preterm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Linda; Skjaerven, Rolv; Bergman, Eva; Lundgren, Maria; Klungsøyr, Kari; Cnattingius, Sven; Wikström, Anna-Karin

    2017-03-01

    There is an established association between adverse events during perinatal life and chronic hypertension in adult life. However, disadvantageous conditions often co-exist in the same pregnancy. We investigated single and joint perinatal exposure to preeclampsia, being born small for gestational age (SGA) or preterm and subsequent risk of chronic hypertension. The study population consisted of 731 008 primiparous women from Norway and Sweden registered in the Medical Birth Registers, both as infants and as first time mothers between 1967-2009 (Norway) and 1973-2010 (Sweden). Risk of chronic hypertension in early pregnancy was calculated in women with perinatal exposures to preeclampsia, born SGA or preterm by log-binominal regression analysis, and adjusted for maternal age and level of education in the first generation. The rate of chronic hypertension was 0.4%. Risk of chronic hypertension was associated with single perinatal exposure to preeclampsia, being born SGA or preterm with adjusted relative risk (95% confidence interval, CI) of 2.2 (95% CI 1.8, 2.7), 1.1 (95% CI 1.0, 1.3), and 1.3 (95% CI 1.0, 1.5) respectively. The risks increased after joint exposures, with an almost fourfold risk increase after perinatal exposure to preeclampsia and preterm birth. Additional adjustment for BMI and smoking in the second generation in a subset of the cohort only had a minor impact on the results. Perinatal exposure to preeclampsia, being born SGA or preterm is independently associated with increased risk of chronic hypertension. The highest risk was seen after exposure to preeclampsia, especially if combined with SGA or preterm birth. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Early growth patterns are associated with intelligence quotient scores in children born small-for-gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varella, Marcia H; Moss, William J

    2015-08-01

    To assess whether patterns of growth trajectory during infancy are associated with intelligence quotient (IQ) scores at 4 years of age in children born small-for-gestational age (SGA). Children in the Collaborative Perinatal Project born SGA were eligible for analysis. The primary outcome was the Stanford-Binet IQ score at 4 years of age. Growth patterns were defined based on changes in weight-for-age z-scores from birth to 4 months and 4 to 12 months of age and consisted of steady, early catch-up, late catch-up, constant catch-up, early catch-down, late catch-down, constant catch-down, early catch-up & late catch-down, and early catch-down & late catch-up. Multivariate linear regression was used to assess associations between patterns of growth and IQ. We evaluated patterns of growth and IQ in 5640 children. Compared with children with steady growth, IQ scores were 2.9 [standard deviation (SD)=0.54], 1.5 (SD=0.63), and 2.2 (SD=0.9) higher in children with early catch-up, early catch-up and later catch-down, and constant catch-up growth patterns, respectively, and 4.4 (SD=1.4) and 3.9 (SD=1.5) lower in children with early catch-down & late catch-up, and early catch-down growth patterns, respectively. Patterns in weight gain before 4 months of age were associated with differences in IQ scores at 4 years of age, with children with early catch-up having slightly higher IQ scores than children with steady growth and children with early catch-down having slightly lower IQ scores. These findings have implications for early infant nutrition in children born SGA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Responses of small mammals to habitat fragmentation: epidemiological considerations for rodent-borne hantaviruses in the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, André V; Ávila-Flores, Rafael; Suzán, Gerardo

    2014-12-01

    Rodent-borne hantaviruses are a group of zoonotic agents that cause hemorrhagic fever in humans. The transmission of hantaviruses among rodent hosts may be higher with the increase of reservoir host abundance in a given area (density-dependent transmission) and with the decrease of small mammal diversity (dilution effect phenomenon). These population and community parameters may be modified by habitat fragmentation; however, studies that focus on fragmentation and its effect on hantavirus infection risk are scarce. To further understanding of this issue, we assessed some population and community responses of rodents that may increase the risk for hantavirus transmission among wildlife hosts in the Americas. We conducted a meta-analysis of published studies to assess the responses of small mammals to fragmentation of native habitats, relative to patch size. Our analyses included five countries and 14 case studies for abundance of reservoir hosts (8 species) and 15 case studies for species richness. We found that a reduction of patch area due to habitat fragmentation is associated with increased reservoir host abundances and decreased small mammal richness, which is mainly due to the loss of non-host small mammals. According to these results, habitat fragmentation in the Americas should be considered as an epidemiological risk factor for hantavirus transmission to humans. These findings are important to assess potential risk of infection when fragmentation of native habitats occurs.

  18. Puberty in growth hormone-treated children born small for gestational age (SGA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.H. Boonstra (Venje); Y. van Pareren; P.G.H. Mulder (Paul); A.C.S. Hokken-Koelega (Anita)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractSeventy-five small for gestational age (SGA) children were studied in a randomized, double-blind, dose-response GH trial with either 1 or 2 mg GH/m(2).d. Mean (SD) age at the start of GH therapy was 7.3 (2.2) yr. Data were compared with Dutch reference data. In SGA

  19. Born small, die young: Intrinsic, size-selective mortality in marine larval fish

    KAUST Repository

    Garrido, S.

    2015-11-24

    Mortality during the early stages is a major cause of the natural variations in the size and recruitment strength of marine fish populations. In this study, the relation between the size-at-hatch and early survival was assessed using laboratory experiments and on field-caught larvae of the European sardine (Sardina pilchardus). Larval size-at-hatch was not related to the egg size but was significantly, positively related to the diameter of the otolith-at-hatch. Otolith diameter-at-hatch was also significantly correlated with survival-at-age in fed and unfed larvae in the laboratory. For sardine larvae collected in the Bay of Biscay during the spring of 2008, otolith radius-at-hatch was also significantly related to viability. Larval mortality has frequently been related to adverse environmental conditions and intrinsic factors affecting feeding ability and vulnerability to predators. Our study offers evidence indicating that a significant portion of fish mortality occurs during the endogenous (yolk) and mixed (yolk /prey) feeding period in the absence of predators, revealing that marine fish with high fecundity, such as small pelagics, can spawn a relatively large amount of eggs resulting in small larvae with no chances to survive. Our findings help to better understand the mass mortalities occurring at early stages of marine fish.

  20. Endurance training remodels sperm-borne small RNA expression and methylation at neurological gene hotspots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Lars R; Donkin, Ida; Fabre, Odile

    2018-01-01

    Remodeling of the sperm epigenome by lifestyle factors before conception could account for altered metabolism in the next generation offspring. Here, we hypothesized that endurance training changes the epigenome of human spermatozoa. Using small RNA (sRNA) sequencing and reduced representation...... bisulfite sequencing (RRBS), we, respectively, investigated sRNA expression and DNA methylation in pure fractions of motile spermatozoa collected from young healthy individuals before, after 6 weeks of endurance training and after 3 months without exercise. Expression of 8 PIWI interacting RNA were changed...... by exercise training. RRBS analysis revealed 330 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) after training and 303 DMRs after the detraining period, which were, in both conditions, enriched at close vicinity of transcription start sites. Ontology analysis of genes located at proximity of DMRs returned terms...

  1. National and regional estimates of term and preterm babies born small for gestational age in 138 low-income and middle-income countries in 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Anne C C; Katz, Joanne; Blencowe, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: National estimates for the numbers of babies born small for gestational age and the comorbidity with preterm birth are unavailable. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of term and preterm babies born small for gestational age (term-SGA and preterm-SGA), and the relation to low birthwe...... to increase survival and reduce disability, stunting, and non-communicable diseases. FUNDING: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation by a grant to the US Fund for UNICEF to support the activities of the Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group (CHERG)....

  2. Dose-related carcinogenic effects of water-borne benzo(a)pyrene on livers of two small fish species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkins, W.E.; Walker, W.W.; Overstreet, R.M.; Lytle, T.F.; Lytle, J.S.

    1988-12-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) administered by water-borne exposures caused dose-related carcinogenic effects in livers of two small fish species, the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and the guppy (Poecilia reticulata). Medaka and guppies each were given two 6-h exposures. The first exposure was conducted on 6- to 10-day-old specimens. The second exposure was given 7 days later. The tests incorporated five treatment groups: (1) control, (2) carrier (dimethylformamide) control, (3) low BaP dose (not detectable--4 ppb), (4) intermediate BaP dose (about 8-47 ppb BaP), and (5) high BaP dose (200-270 ppb). Following the high-dose exposure, hepatocellular lesions classified as foci of cellular alteration (altered foci), adenomas, and hepatocellular carcinomas occurred in both species. In medaka, the lesions appeared to develop sequentially with the appearance of altered foci followed by adenomas and then hepatocellular carcinomas. Most lesions in guppies, however, were classified as altered foci although a few adenomas occurred in the early (24-week) sample and hepatocellular carcinomas occurred in the late (52-week) sample. When total lesions were combined, medaka had an 11% incidence at 24 weeks after the initial exposure and 36% incidence at 36 weeks. In guppies, 8% had liver lesions at 24 weeks, 19% at 36 weeks, and 20% at 52 weeks. A single extrahepatic neoplasm, a capillary hemangioma in a gill filament, occurred in a medaka from the 36-week high-dose sample. The results suggest that the medaka and guppy are capable of metabolizing water-borne BaP to carcinogenic metabolites which initiate hepatic tumor development.

  3. Children and young adults born small for gestational age (SGA) : GH-IGF-IGFBP axis, insulin sensitivity, adipocytokines and body composition during and after growth hormone treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Dijk (Marije)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis doctoral thesis gives a detailed account of various studies, performed in short children born small for gestational age (SGA) participating in the third Dutch GH trial (IUGR-3 study), and in young SGA adults previously treated with GH in the first Dutch GH trial (SGA follow-up

  4. Genetic and Environmental Factors in Pre- and Postnatal Growth Disorders: Studies in children born small for gestational age (SGA), with and without postnatal short stature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.A. Ester (Wietske)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTh is thesis describes genetic and environmental factors which are important in pre- and postnatal growth disorders and specifi cally focuses on children born small for gestational age (SGA) with or without postnatal catch-up growth. It also presents a subclassifi cation of short SGA

  5. Metabolic Health in Short Children Born Small for Gestational Age Treated With Growth Hormone and Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Analog : Results of a Randomized, Dose-Response Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Steen, Manouk; Lem, Annemieke J.; van der Kaay, Danielle C. M.; Bakker-van Waarde, Willie M.; van der Hulst, Flip J. P. C. M.; Neijens, Floor S.; Noordam, Cees; Odink, Roelof J.; Oostdijk, Wilma; Schroor, Eelco J.; Westerlaken, Ciska; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Previously we showed that pubertal children born small for gestational age (SGA) with a poor adult height (AH) expectation can benefit from treatment with GH1 mg/m(2) per day (similar to 0.033 mg/kg/d) in combination with 2 years of GnRH analog (GnRHa) and even more so with a double GH

  6. Should short children born small for gestational age with a distance to target height growth hormone treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lem, Annemieke J; de Kort, Sandra W K; de Ridder, Maria A J; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C S

    2010-09-01

    The criteria for starting growth hormone (GH), an approved treatment for short children born small for gestational age (SGA), differ between Europe and the USA. One European requirement for starting GH, a distance to target height (DTH) of > or =1 standard deviation score (SDS), is controversial. To investigate the influence of DTH on growth during GH treatment in short SGA children and to ascertain whether it is correct to exclude children with a DTH children (baseline n = 446; 4 years GH n = 215). We analysed the prepubertal growth response during 4 years of GH. We investigated the influence of the continuous variable DTH SDS on growth response and a possible DTH SDS cut-off level below which point the growth response is insufficient. Height gain SDS during 4 years of GH showed a wide variation at every DTH SDS level. Multiple regression analyses demonstrated that, after correction for other significant variables, an additional DTH of 1 SDS resulted in 0.13 SDS more height gain during 4 years of GH. We found no significant differences in height gain below and above certain DTH SDS cut-off levels. DTH SDS had a weak positive effect on height gain during 4 years of GH, while several other determinants had much larger effects. We found no support for using any DTH cut-off level. Based on our data, excluding children with a DTH <1 SDS from GH treatment is not justified.

  7. Comparative analysis of two different models of swimming applied to pregnant rats born small for pregnant age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SILVANA B. CORVINO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to compare two models of swimming applied to pregnant rats born small for pregnancy age (SPA. Diabetes was chemically induced in adult female rats to develop an inadequate intrauterine environment, leading to birth of a SPA offspring. In adulthood, the female SPA rats were mated and submitted to different swimming programs. The exercise program 1 (Ex1 consisted of swimming for 15 minutes, followed by 15 minutes of rest and another 15 minutes of swimming, 3 days a week before and during pregnancy. Another program (Ex2 was applied during 60 minutes uninterrupted a day, 6 days/week during pregnancy. The pregnant rats presented no interference on body weight and glycemia. The rats submitted to Ex2 model showed decreased insulin and blood glucose levels by oral glucose tolerance test, and reduction in area under curve values. The offspring from dams submitted to both exercise protocols presented an increased rate of newborns SPA. However, the offspring from Ex2 dams showed percentage twice higher of newborns SPA than Ex1 offspring. Our data suggests that continuous exercise of 60 min/day ameliorated the enhanced peripheral insulin sensitivity in growth-restricted females. However, this protocol employed at pregnancy leads to intrauterine growth restriction.

  8. Adrenal, metabolic and cardio‐renal dysfunction develops after pregnancy in rats born small or stressed by physiological measurements during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Jean N.; Cuffe, James S. M.; Jefferies, Andrew J.; Moritz, Karen M.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Women born small are at an increased risk of developing pregnancy complications. Stress may further increase a woman's likelihood for an adverse pregnancy.Adverse pregnancy adaptations can lead to long‐term diseases even after her pregnancy.The current study investigated the effects of stress during pregnancy on the long‐term adrenal, metabolic and cardio‐renal health of female rats that were born small.Stress programmed increased adrenal Mc2r gene expression, a higher insulin secretory response to glucose during intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (+36%) and elevated renal creatinine clearance after pregnancy.Females that were born small had increased homeostatic model assessment‐insulin resistance and elevated systolic blood pressure after pregnancy, regardless of stress exposure.These findings suggest that being born small or being stressed during pregnancy programs long‐term adverse health outcomes after pregnancy. However, stress in pregnancy does not exacerbate the long‐term adverse health outcomes for females that were born small. Abstract Females born small are more likely to experience complications during their pregnancy, including pregnancy‐induced hypertension, pre‐eclampsia and gestational diabetes. The risk of developing complications is increased by stress exposure during pregnancy. In addition, pregnancy complications may predispose the mother to diseases after pregnancy. We determined whether stress during pregnancy would exacerbate the adrenal, metabolic and cardio‐renal dysfunction of growth‐restricted females in later life. Late gestation bilateral uterine vessel ligation was performed in Wistar Kyoto rats to induce growth restriction. At 4 months, growth‐restricted and control female offspring were mated with normal males. Those allocated to the stressed group had physiological measurements [metabolic cage, tail cuff blood pressure, intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT)] conducted during pregnancy

  9. Adrenal, metabolic and cardio-renal dysfunction develops after pregnancy in rats born small or stressed by physiological measurements during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Jean N; Cuffe, James S M; Jefferies, Andrew J; Moritz, Karen M; Wlodek, Mary E

    2016-10-15

    Women born small are at an increased risk of developing pregnancy complications. Stress may further increase a woman's likelihood for an adverse pregnancy. Adverse pregnancy adaptations can lead to long-term diseases even after her pregnancy. The current study investigated the effects of stress during pregnancy on the long-term adrenal, metabolic and cardio-renal health of female rats that were born small. Stress programmed increased adrenal Mc2r gene expression, a higher insulin secretory response to glucose during intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (+36%) and elevated renal creatinine clearance after pregnancy. Females that were born small had increased homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance and elevated systolic blood pressure after pregnancy, regardless of stress exposure. These findings suggest that being born small or being stressed during pregnancy programs long-term adverse health outcomes after pregnancy. However, stress in pregnancy does not exacerbate the long-term adverse health outcomes for females that were born small. Females born small are more likely to experience complications during their pregnancy, including pregnancy-induced hypertension, pre-eclampsia and gestational diabetes. The risk of developing complications is increased by stress exposure during pregnancy. In addition, pregnancy complications may predispose the mother to diseases after pregnancy. We determined whether stress during pregnancy would exacerbate the adrenal, metabolic and cardio-renal dysfunction of growth-restricted females in later life. Late gestation bilateral uterine vessel ligation was performed in Wistar Kyoto rats to induce growth restriction. At 4 months, growth-restricted and control female offspring were mated with normal males. Those allocated to the stressed group had physiological measurements [metabolic cage, tail cuff blood pressure, intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT)] conducted during pregnancy whilst the unstressed groups were

  10. Association between Asian Dust-Borne Air Pollutants and Daily Symptoms on Healthy Subjects: A Web-Based Pilot Study in Yonago, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majbauddin, Abir; Onishi, Kazunari; Otani, Shinji; Kurosaki, Yasunori; Kurozawa, Youichi

    2016-01-01

    During the spring, Asian dust (AD) repeatedly makes its way to Japan, originating from drylands. We evaluated the association between AD-borne air pollutants and daily reported subjective symptoms in healthy subjects. We constructed an Internet questionnaire on daily ocular, nasal, respiratory, and skin symptoms. Forty-two healthy volunteers residents of Yonago (mean age, 33.57) were selected from the self-reporting web-based survey and recorded their symptoms between 1 and 31 of March 2013. We also collected information on levels of suspended particulate matter (SPM), particulate matter < 2.5 µm (PM2.5), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen oxide (NO x ) per hour on each of those days. SPM and PM2.5 were the dominant pollutants recorded throughout the month. A positive correlation was observed between SPM and ocular (r = 0.475, p < 0.01), nasal (r = 0.614, p < 0.001), and skin (r = 0.445, p < 0.05) symptoms. PM2.5 correlations were significant for ocular (r = 0.428, p < 0.05), nasal (r = 0.560, p < 0.01), and skin (r = 0.437, p < 0.05) symptoms. Our findings provide introductory evidence of AD-borne air pollutants and their association with several bodily symptoms in healthy subjects with the implementation of a self-administrated web-based survey application.

  11. Association between Asian Dust-Borne Air Pollutants and Daily Symptoms on Healthy Subjects: A Web-Based Pilot Study in Yonago, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir Majbauddin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During the spring, Asian dust (AD repeatedly makes its way to Japan, originating from drylands. We evaluated the association between AD-borne air pollutants and daily reported subjective symptoms in healthy subjects. We constructed an Internet questionnaire on daily ocular, nasal, respiratory, and skin symptoms. Forty-two healthy volunteers residents of Yonago (mean age, 33.57 were selected from the self-reporting web-based survey and recorded their symptoms between 1 and 31 of March 2013. We also collected information on levels of suspended particulate matter (SPM, particulate matter < 2.5 µm (PM2.5, sulfur dioxide (SO2, and nitrogen oxide (NOx per hour on each of those days. SPM and PM2.5 were the dominant pollutants recorded throughout the month. A positive correlation was observed between SPM and ocular (r=0.475, p<0.01, nasal (r=0.614, p<0.001, and skin (r=0.445, p<0.05 symptoms. PM2.5 correlations were significant for ocular (r=0.428, p<0.05, nasal (r=0.560, p<0.01, and skin (r=0.437, p<0.05 symptoms. Our findings provide introductory evidence of AD-borne air pollutants and their association with several bodily symptoms in healthy subjects with the implementation of a self-administrated web-based survey application.

  12. Intelligence and psychosocial functioning during long-term growth hormone therapy in children born small for gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pareren, Yvonne K; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J; Slijper, Froukje S M; Koot, Hans M; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C S

    2004-11-01

    Short stature is not the only problem faced by small for gestational age (SGA) children. Being born SGA has also been associated with lowered intelligence, poor academic performance, low social competence, and behavioral problems. Although GH treatment in short children born SGA can result in a normalization of height during childhood, the effect of GH treatment on intelligence and psychosocial functioning remains to be investigated. We show the longitudinal results of a randomized, double-blind, GH-dose response study initiated in 1991 to follow growth, intelligence quotient (IQ), and psychosocial functioning in SGA children during long-term GH treatment. Patients were assigned to one of two treatment groups (1 or 2 mg GH/m(2) body surface.d, or approximately 0.035 or 0.07 mg/kg.d). Intelligence and psychosocial functioning were evaluated at start of GH treatment (n = 74), after 2 yr of GH treatment (n = 76), and in 2001 (n = 53). IQ was assessed by a short-form Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised or Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (Block-design and Vocabulary subtests). Behavioral problems were measured by the Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist or Young Adult Behavior Checklist, and self-perception was measured by the Harter Self-Perception Profile. Mean (sem) birth length sd score was -3.6 (0.2), mean age and height at start was 7.4 (0.2) yr and -3.0 (0.1) sd score, respectively, mean duration of GH treatment was 8.0 (0.2) yr, and mean age in 2001 was 16.5 (0.3) yr. After 2 yr of GH treatment, 96% of both GH groups showed a height gain sd score of 1 sd from the start of treatment or more, resulting in a normal height (i.e. height >/= -2.0 sd for age and sex) in 70% of the children. In 2001, 48 (91%) of the 53 children participating in this study had reached a normal height. Block-design s-score and the estimated total IQ significantly increased (P children whose height over time became closer to that of their peers showed less problem behavior.

  13. Prevalence of tick-borne haemoparasites in small ruminants in Turkey and diagnostic sensitivity of single-PCR and RLB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgic, Huseyin Bilgin; Bakırcı, Serkan; Kose, Onur; Unlu, Ahmet Hakan; Hacılarlıoglu, Selin; Eren, Hasan; Weir, William; Karagenc, Tulin

    2017-04-27

    Tick-borne haemoparasitic diseases (TBHDs), caused by Theileria, Babesia, Anaplasma and Ehrlichia, are common in regions of the world where the distributions of host, pathogen and vector overlap. Many of these diseases threaten livestock production and some also represent a concern to human public health. The primary aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of the above-mentioned pathogens in a large number of blood samples (n = 1979) collected from sheep (n = 1727) and goats (n = 252) in Turkey. A secondary aim was to assess the diagnostic sensitivity of a number of species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests and the reverse line blotting (RLB) assay. DNA samples were screened using species-specific PCR for the presence of Theileria ovis, Theileria sp. MK, T. lestoquardi, T. uilenbergi, T. luwenshuni, Babesia ovis, Anaplasma ovis and A. phagocytophilum while RLB was undertaken to test for the presence of all known Theileria, Babesia, Anaplasma and Ehrlichia species. The diagnostic sensitivity of these two approaches was then compared in terms of their ability to detect single species and mixed infections. Overall, 84 and 74.43% of the small ruminants sampled were identified as hosting one or more pathogen(s) by species-specific PCR and RLB respectively. The presence of Theileria sp. OT1, T. luwenshuni and T. uilenbergi in Turkey was revealed for the first time while the presence of Babesia motasi, B. crassa and T. separata in Turkish small ruminants was confirmed using molecular methods. A high prevalence of mixed infection was evident, with PCR and RLB approaches indicating that 52.24 and 35.42% of animals were co-infected with multiple species, respectively. More than 80% of the mixed infections contained T. ovis and/or A. ovis. The RLB approach was found to be capable of detecting mixed infections with species such as Theileria sp. OT1, Theileria sp. OT3, T. separata, B. crassa and Babesia spp. The results indicated that

  14. Long-term clearance from small airways in subjects with ciliary dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hjelte Lena

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this study was to investigate if long-term clearance from small airways is dependent on normal ciliary function. Six young adults with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD inhaled 111 Indium labelled Teflon particles of 4.2 μm geometric and 6.2 μm aerodynamic diameter with an extremely slow inhalation flow, 0.05 L/s. The inhalation method deposits particles mainly in the small conducting airways. Lung retention was measured immediately after inhalation and at four occasions up to 21 days after inhalation. Results were compared with data from ten healthy controls. For additional comparison three of the PCD subjects also inhaled the test particles with normal inhalation flow, 0.5 L/s, providing a more central deposition. The lung retention at 24 h in % of lung deposition (Ret24 was higher (p 24 with slow inhalation flow was 73.9 ± 1.9 % compared to 68.9 ± 7.5 % with normal inhalation flow in the three PCD subjects exposed twice. During day 7–21 the three PCD subjects exposed twice cleared 9 % with normal flow, probably representing predominantly alveolar clearance, compared to 19 % with slow inhalation flow, probably representing mainly small airway clearance. This study shows that despite ciliary dysfunction, clearance continues in the small airways beyond 24 h. There are apparently additional clearance mechanisms present in the small airways.

  15. What Lies Behind NSF Astronomer Demographics? Subjectivities of Women, Minorities and Foreign-born Astronomers within Meshworks of Big Science Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillen, Reynal; Gu, D.; Holbrook, J.; Murillo, L. F.; Traweek, S.

    2011-01-01

    Our current research focuses on the trajectory of scientists working with large-scale databases in astronomy, following them as they strategically build their careers, digital infrastructures, and make their epistemological commitments. We look specifically at how gender, ethnicity, nationality intersect in the process of subject formation in astronomy, as well as in the process of enrolling partners for the construction of instruments, design and implementation of large-scale databases. Work once figured as merely technical support, such assembling data catalogs, or as graphic design, generating pleasing images for public support, has been repositioned at the core of the field. Some have argued that such databases enable a new kind of scientific inquiry based on data exploration, such as the "fourth paradigm" or "data-driven" science. Our preliminary findings based on oral history interviews and ethnography provide insights into meshworks of women, African-American, "Hispanic," Asian-American and foreign-born astronomers. Our preliminary data suggest African-American men are more successful in sustaining astronomy careers than Chicano and Asian-American men. A distinctive theme in our data is the glocal character of meshworks available to and created by foreign-born women astronomers working at US facilities. Other data show that the proportion of Asian to Asian American and foreign-born Latina/o to Chicana/o astronomers is approximately equal. Futhermore, Asians and Latinas/os are represented in significantly greater numbers than Asian Americans and Chicanas/os. Among professional astronomers in the US, each ethnic minority group is numbered on the order of tens, not hundreds. Project support is provided by the NSF EAGER program to University of California, Los Angeles under award 0956589.

  16. Subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Vega Encabo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I claim that subjectivity is a way of being that is constituted through a set of practices in which the self is subject to the dangers of fictionalizing and plotting her life and self-image. I examine some ways of becoming subject through narratives and through theatrical performance before others. Through these practices, a real and active subjectivity is revealed, capable of self-knowledge and self-transformation. 

  17. Population Growth of Small Harmful Rats in Grassland Subjected to Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue-Mei; Li, Zhi-Bing; Xie, Hui-Zhang; Ai, Bao-Quan; Cheng, Xiao-Bo; Liu, Liang-Gang

    2007-07-01

    The population growth of small harmful rats in grassland subjected to environment fluctuation has been modelled in a logistic equation. Two correlated random variables responsible to the fluctuation of the genetic factor and the suppression factor are used. A two-peak structure of the steady probability distribution of rate population is observed in the large fluctuation regime of the genetic factor. With the increase of correlation constant λ, the steady probability distribution can change from two peaks to a single peak. The suppression factor μ and its fluctuation also affect the steady probability distribution and can push it toward a small population.

  18. [Study of the health status of subjects born with medical-assisted reproduction: the connexion between epidemiology and bioethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnolo, A; Meli, P

    1998-01-01

    The knowledge of the newborns' health status from medical assisted procreation techniques represents the main objective of public health in this field. It is not acceptable, in fact, the use of fertilisation and artificial insemination techniques without a correct evaluation of these newborns' health status. As probable risks exist in medical protocols of treatments (mothers' exposition to hormonal drugs, manipulations of gametes, embryo development in growing coculture with different animal cells, cryopreservation, lack of natural selection of spermatozoa in intracytoplasmatic sperm injection techniques), a check of the results of these techniques is extremely necessary. Newborns' health status must be detected not only at delivery time but also in the following period to evaluate the right physical and psychological development. To estimate infertility risk that these children might run after their mothers' hormonal treatment, it is necessary to follow these subjects till adult age.

  19. Small-scale shifting mosaics of two dominant grassland species : the possible role of soil-borne pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olff, H.; Hoorens, B.; Goede, R.G.M. de; Putten, W.H. van der; Gleichman, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed the dynamics of dominant plant species in a grazed grassland over 17 years, and investigated whether local shifts in these dominant species, leading to vegetation mosaics, could be attributed to interactions between plants and soil-borne pathogens. We found that Festuca rubra and Carex

  20. Small-scale shifting mosaics of two dominant grassland species: the possible role of soil-borne pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olff, H.; Hoorens, B.; De Goede, R.G.M.; Van der Putten, W.H.; Gleichman, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed the dynamics of dominant plant species in a grazed grassland over 17 years, and investigated whether local shifts in these dominant species, leading to vegetation mosaics, could be attributed to interactions between plants and soil-borne pathogens. We found that Festuca rubra and Carer

  1. NRP-1 Receptor Expression Mismatch in Skin of Subjects with Experimental and Diabetic Small Fiber Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Acker, Nathalie; Ragé, Michael; Vermeirsch, Hilde; Schrijvers, Dorien; Nuydens, Rony; Byttebier, Geert; Timmers, Maarten; De Schepper, Stefanie; Streffer, Johannes; Andries, Luc; Plaghki, Léon; Cras, Patrick; Meert, Theo

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo cutaneous nerve regeneration model using capsaicin is applied extensively to study the regenerative mechanisms and therapeutic efficacy of disease modifying molecules for small fiber neuropathy (SFN). Since mismatches between functional and morphological nerve fiber recovery are described for this model, we aimed at determining the capability of the capsaicin model to truly mimic the morphological manifestations of SFN in diabetes. As nerve and blood vessel growth and regenerative capacities are defective in diabetes, we focused on studying the key regulator of these processes, the neuropilin-1 (NRP-1)/semaphorin pathway. This led us to the evaluation of NRP-1 receptor expression in epidermis and dermis of subjects presenting experimentally induced small fiber neuropathy, diabetic polyneuropathy and of diabetic subjects without clinical signs of small fiber neuropathy. The NRP-1 receptor was co-stained with CD31 vessel-marker using immunofluorescence and analyzed with Definiens® technology. This study indicates that capsaicin application results in significant loss of epidermal NRP-1 receptor expression, whereas diabetic subjects presenting small fiber neuropathy show full epidermal NRP-1 expression in contrast to the basal expression pattern seen in healthy controls. Capsaicin induced a decrease in dermal non-vascular NRP-1 receptor expression which did not appear in diabetic polyneuropathy. We can conclude that the capsaicin model does not mimic diabetic neuropathy related changes for cutaneous NRP-1 receptor expression. In addition, our data suggest that NRP-1 might play an important role in epidermal nerve fiber loss and/or defective regeneration and that NRP-1 receptor could change the epidermal environment to a nerve fiber repellant bed possibly through Sem3A in diabetes.

  2. Effect of small chain N acyl homoserine lactone quorum sensing signals on biofilms of food-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Jamuna Bai; V, Ravishankar Rai

    2016-09-01

    Quorum sensing or cell to cell communication which includes inter- and intra-cellular communication has been implicated in the production of virulence factor and formation of biofilm in food-borne pathogens. In the present study, the effect of quorum sensing signals on the biofilms of food-borne pathogens has been elucidated. N-butryl homoserine lactone and N-hexanoyl homoserine lactone belonging to acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) family of signaling molecules were investigated for their effect on the biofilm formation (attachment and exopolymeric substance production) in the food-borne pathogens Escherichia coli , Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Vibrio parahemolyticus . The signaling molecules at a concentration of 1 µM were capable of increasing biofilm formation in all the tested pathogens. There was an increase in the attachment of the bacterial cells and biomass as observed by microtiter plate assay and exopolymeric substances production in the biofilms in presence of the AHLs. Further, it needs to be elucidated if the effect of AHLS on the biofilms of E. coli and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium is SdiA dependent.

  3. Postchallenge hyperglycemia in subjects with low body weight: implication for small glucose volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Takahiro; Yamashita, Koh; Miyakoshi, Takahiro; Shimodaira, Masanori; Yokota, Naokazu; Sato, Yuka; Hirabayashi, Kazuko; Koike, Hideo; Yamauchi, Keishi; Shimbo, Takuro; Aizawa, Toru

    2017-12-01

    A hypothesis that postchallenge hyperglycemia in subjects with low body weight (BW) may be due, in part, to small glucose volume (G V ) was tested. We studied 11,411 nondiabetic subjects with a mean BW of 63.3 kg; 5,282 of them were followed for a mean of 5.3 yr. In another group of 1,537 nondiabetic subjects, insulin sensitivity, secretion, and a product of the two (index of whole body insulin action) were determined. Corrected 2 h-plasma glucose (2hPG corr ) during a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test in subjects with BW ≤ 59 kg was calculated as 2hPG corr = δPG 2h · ECW/[16.1 (males) or 15.3 (females)] + fasting PG (FPG), where δPG 2h is plasma glucose increment in 2 h; ECW is extracellular water (surrogate of G V ); FPG is fasting plasma glucose; and 16.1 and 15.3 are ECW of men and women, respectively, with BW = 59 kg. Multivariate analyses for BW with adjustment for age, sex, and percent body fat were undertaken. BW was, across its entire range, positively correlated with FPG ( P glucose metabolism. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Effect of the artificial sweetener, sucralose, on small intestinal glucose absorption in healthy human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Chang, Jessica; Checklin, Helen L; Young, Richard L; Jones, Karen L; Horowitz, Michael; Rayner, Christopher K

    2010-09-01

    It has been reported that the artificial sweetener, sucralose, stimulates glucose absorption in rodents by enhancing apical availability of the transporter GLUT2. We evaluated whether exposure of the proximal small intestine to sucralose affects glucose absorption and/or the glycaemic response to an intraduodenal (ID) glucose infusion in healthy human subjects. Ten healthy subjects were studied on two separate occasions in a single-blind, randomised order. Each subject received an ID infusion of sucralose (4 mM in 0.9% saline) or control (0.9% saline) at 4 ml/min for 150 min (T = - 30 to 120 min). After 30 min (T = 0), glucose (25 %) and its non-metabolised analogue, 3-O-methylglucose (3-OMG; 2.5 %), were co-infused intraduodenally (T = 0-120 min; 4.2 kJ/min (1 kcal/min)). Blood was sampled at frequent intervals. Blood glucose, plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and serum 3-OMG concentrations increased during ID glucose/3-OMG infusion (P sucralose and control infusions. In conclusion, sucralose does not appear to modify the rate of glucose absorption or the glycaemic or incretin response to ID glucose infusion when given acutely in healthy human subjects.

  5. Three-year growth response to growth hormone treatment in very young children born small for gestational age-data from KIGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguszewski, Margaret C S; Lindberg, Anders; Wollmann, Hartmut A

    2014-08-01

    Children born small for gestational age (SGA) with poor growth during the first years of life may remain short in stature during childhood and as adults. To evaluate the 3-year growth response to GH treatment in very young short children born SGA, and to test the existing predictions models for growth response developed for older SGA children. KIGS (The Pfizer International Growth Database). A total of 620 SGA children (birth length and/or weight below -2 SD score [SDS]) on GH treatment, 156 in the 2- to 4-year-old group (100 boys; median age, 3.3 y), and 464 in the 4- to 6-year-old group (284 boys; median age, 4.9 y). Median values and 10th-90th percentiles are presented. Both groups presented a significant increase in height velocity during GH treatment. Median height SDS increased from -3.9 (-5.4 to -2.9) at the start to -2.2 (-3.8 to -1.0) at 3 years in the 2- to 4-year-old group (P growth response could be estimated by the SGA model. Very young children born SGA without spontaneous catch-up growth presented a significant improvement in height and weight during the 3 years of GH treatment. Growth response could be estimated by the SGA model.

  6. Evaluation of growth hormone treatment efficacy in short Japanese children born small for gestational age: Five-year treatment outcome and impact on puberty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, Reiko; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Nishinaga, Hiromi; Ogawa, Yoshihisa; Yokoya, Susumu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract. Some children born small for gestational age (SGA) have short stature and are at an increased risk of developing psychosocial or behavioral problems. Here we evaluated the efficacy of GH and its effects on the timing of pubertal onset in a 3-yr extension of our previous 2-yr (total 5 yr) multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group clinical trial of 65 short Japanese children born SGA. Patients received low or high doses of GH (0.033 or 0.067 mg/kg/day, respectively). Age at onset of puberty was not statistically different for male and female patients receiving high- or low-dose GH. After the onset of puberty, no difference in height gain was observed between the two GH dose groups. At the onset of puberty, height standard deviation scores for chronological age of boys and girls improved significantly in both dose groups with evidence of a dose-response effect. Mean bone age/chronological age ratios in the low- and high-dose groups were significantly increased compared with baseline, being significantly greater in the high-dose group at 5 yr after treatment initiation. Delayed bone age at baseline was close to chronological age following GH treatment. GH treatment, especially high-dose GH, induced advanced bone age in short children born SGA. PMID:28458458

  7. Cats are not small dogs: is there an immunological explanation for why cats are less affected by arthropod-borne disease than dogs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Michael J

    2016-09-20

    It is widely recognized that cats appear to be less frequently affected by arthropod-borne infectious diseases than dogs and share fewer zoonotic pathogens with man. This impression is supported by the relative lack of scientific publications related to feline vector-borne infections. This review explores the possible reasons for the difference between the two most common small companion animal species, including the hypothesis that cats might have a genetically-determined immunological resistance to arthropod vectors or the microparasites they transmit. A number of simple possibilities might account for the lower prevalence of these diseases in cats, including factors related to the lifestyle and behaviour of the cat, lesser spend on preventative healthcare for cats and reduced opportunities for research funding for these animals. The dog and cat have substantially similar immune system components, but differences in immune function might in part account for the markedly distinct prevalence and clinicopathological appearance of autoimmune, allergic, idiopathic inflammatory, immunodeficiency, neoplastic and infectious diseases in the two species. Cats have greater genetic diversity than dogs with much lower linkage disequilibrium in feline compared with canine breed groups. Immune function is intrinsically related to the nature of the intestinal microbiome and subtle differences between the canine and feline microbial populations might also impact on immune function and disease resistance. The reasons for the apparent lesser susceptibility of cats to arthropod-borne infectious diseases are likely to be complex, but warrant further investigation.

  8. Vector-borne diseases of small companion animals in Namibia: Literature review, knowledge gaps and opportunity for a One Health approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce H. Noden

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Namibia has a rich history in veterinary health but little is known about the vector-borne diseases that affect companion dogs and cats. The aim of this review is to summarise the existing published and available unpublished literature, put it into a wider geographical context, and explore some significant knowledge gaps. To date, only two filarial pathogens (Dirofilaria repens and Acanthocheilonema dracunculoides and three tick-borne pathogens (Babesia canis vogeli, Hepatozoon canis and Ehrlichia canis have been reported. Most studies have focused solely on dogs and cats in the urban Windhoek and surrounding areas, with almost nothing reported in rural farming areas, in either the populous northern regions or the low-income urban areas where animal owners have limited access to veterinary services. With the development of several biomedical training programmes in the country, there is now an excellent opportunity to address zoonotic vector-borne diseases through a One Health approach so as to assess the risks to small companion animals as well as diseases of public health importance.

  9. Two-Year Data from a Long-Term Phase IV Study of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone in Short Children Born Small for Gestational Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Hans-Peter; Walczak, Mieczysław; Birkholz-Walerzak, Dorota; Szalecki, Mieczyslaw; Nanu, Michaela; Woehling, Heike; Schuck, Ellen

    2016-03-01

    This ongoing, prospective, open-label, non-comparative, multicenter phase IV study is evaluating the safety and efficacy of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH; Omnitrope(®), Sandoz GmbH) in short children born small for gestational age (SGA). Here we report data from patients who have completed 2 years' treatment. Eligibility criteria included prepubertal children born SGA with growth disturbances defined as current height standard deviation score (HSDS) growth [height velocity (HV) SDS 126 or >200 mg/dL, respectively. No adverse alterations in body mass were noted. Treatment-emergent AEs were experienced by 211 (76.2%) children; most of these were of mild-to-moderate intensity (99.3%) and considered unrelated to study medication (97.6%). Treatment with Omnitrope was effective; mean HSDS was -3.39 at baseline, -2.57 at 1 year and -2.15 at 2 years of treatment. Mean HVSDS (peak-centered) also improved, from -2.13 at baseline to +4.16 at 1 year and +2.23 at 2 years. In this second interim analysis, short children born SGA were safely and effectively treated with rhGH (Omnitrope), and 2 years' treatment had no major adverse impact on carbohydrate metabolism or body mass. Sandoz.

  10. Vector-borne diseases of small companion animals in Namibia: Literature review, knowledge gaps and opportunity for a One Health approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noden, Bruce H; Soni, Minty

    2015-11-06

    Namibia has a rich history in veterinary health but little is known about the vector-borne diseases that affect companion dogs and cats. The aim of this review is to summarise the existing published and available unpublished literature, put it into a wider geographical context, and explore some significant knowledge gaps. To date, only two filarial pathogens (Dirofilaria repens and Acanthocheilonema dracunculoides) and three tick-borne pathogens (Babesia canis vogeli, Hepatozoon canis and Ehrlichia canis) have been reported. Most studies have focused solely on dogs and cats in the urban Windhoek and surrounding areas, with almost nothing reported in rural farming areas, in either the populous northern regions or the low-income urban areas where animal owners have limited access to veterinary services. With the development of several biomedical training programmes in the country, there is now an excellent opportunity to address zoonotic vector-borne diseases through a One Health approach so as to assess the risks to small companion animals as well as diseases of public health importance.

  11. Adiposity in Children Born Small for Gestational Age Is Associated With β-Cell Function, Genetic Variants for Insulin Resistance, and Response to Growth Hormone Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thankamony, Ajay; Jensen, Rikke Beck; O'Connell, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    secretion, and response to GH treatment in short children born small for gestational age (SGA). METHODS: In 89 short prepubertal SGA children (age, 6.2 ± 1.6 y; 55 boys) treated with GH for 1 year in a multicenter study, body fat percentage was estimated at baseline and 1 year using dual-energy x......). CONCLUSIONS: Adiposity in SGA children has favorable effects on GH sensitivity and glucose metabolism. The associations with multiallele scores support a causal role of insulin resistance in linking lesser body fat to reduced sensitivity to exogenous GH....

  12. Hypertriglyceridemic subjects exhibit an accumulation of small dense chylomicron particles in the fasting state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irawati, Deasy; Mamo, John C L; Soares, Mario J; Slivkoff-Clark, Karin M; James, Anthony P

    2015-11-01

    Normocholesterolemic subjects with elevated fasting plasma triglycerides are at increased risk of atherosclerosis through mechanisms that are not yet delineated. We hypothesized that elevated plasma triglyceride is associated with increased vascular exposure to pro-atherogenic lipoprotein remnants. To test this hypothesis, the abundance, and size distribution of chylomicron particles were determined in individuals with and without hypertriglyceridemia. Twelve hypertriglyceridemic subjects (HTG group, triglyceride concentration ≥1.7 mmol/L) and twelve normotriglyceridemic subjects (NTG group) matched for age and gender were studied. The distribution of chylomicron particles was assessed by determining the fasting concentration of apo B-48 in serum lipoprotein fractions with Svedberg flotation rates of (Sf) > 400, Sf 20-400 and Sf HTG was almost twice that observed in NTG controls with ∼80% of the increase residing in the Sf HTG: 8.7 ± 1.0 μg/mL vs NTG: 5.0 ± 0.6 μg/mL; P = 0.016). Significantly greater concentrations of apo B-48 were also observed in the less dense Sf 20-400 (HTG: 1.1 ± 0.2 μg/mL vs NTG: 0.4 ± 0.07 μg/mL; P 400 (HTG: 1.1 ± 0.3 μg/mL vs NTG: 0.3 ± 0.04 μg/mL; P HTG subjects compared to NTG (Sf 400 & Sf 20-400: P < 0.001 and Sf < 20: P = 0.013). Normocholesterolemic, moderately hypertriglyceridemic subjects are at increased atherogenic risk due to greater apo B-48 concentration in the small, dense lipoprotein fraction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cerebral small-resistance artery structure and cerebral blood flow in normotensive subjects and hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ciuceis, Carolina; Cornali, Claudio; Porteri, Enzo; Mardighian, Dikran; Pinardi, Chiara; Fontanella, Marco M; Rodella, Luigi F; Rezzani, Rita; Rizzoni, Damiano; Boari, Gianluca E M; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Gasparotti, Roberto

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate whether the structure of cerebral small-resistance arteries is related to cerebral perfusion parameters as measured with dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) in a selected cohort of hypertensive and normotensive patients. Ten hypertensive and 10 normotensive patients were included in the study. All patients underwent neurosurgical intervention for an intracranial tumor and were investigated with DSC-MRI at 1.5 T. Cerebral small-resistance arteries were dissected from a small portion of morphologically normal cerebral tissue and mounted on an isometric myograph for the measurement of the media-to-lumen (M/L) ratio. A quantitative assessment of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and volume (CBV) was performed with a region-of-interest approach. Correlation coefficients were calculated for normally distributed variables. The institutional review board approved the study, and informed consent was obtained from all patients. Compared with normotensive subjects, hypertensive patients had significantly lower regional CBF (mL/100 g/min) in the cortical grey matter (55.63 ± 1.90 vs 58.37 ± 2.19, p cerebral arteries and CBF in the cortical grey matter (r = -0.516, p microvascular structure might play a role in controlling CBF, with possible clinical consequences.

  14. Behavioural symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in preterm and term children born small and appropriate for gestational age: A longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajantie Eero

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It remains unclear whether it is more detrimental to be born too early or too small in relation to symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Thus, we tested whether preterm birth and small body size at birth adjusted for gestational age are independently associated with symptoms of ADHD in children. Methods A longitudinal regional birth cohort study comprising 1535 live-born infants between 03/15/1985 and 03/14/1986 admitted to the neonatal wards and 658 randomly recruited non-admitted infants, in Finland. The present study sample comprised 828 children followed up to 56 months. The association between birth status and parent-rated ADHD symptoms of the child was analysed with multiple linear and logistic regression analyses. Results Neither prematurity (birth Conclusions Intrauterine growth restriction, reflected in SGA status and lower birth weight, rather than prematurity or lower gestational age per se, may increase risk for symptoms of ADHD in young children.

  15. A randomised controlled trial evaluating IGF1 titration in contrast to current GH dosing strategies in children born small for gestational age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rikke Beck; Thankamony, Ajay; O'Connell, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Short children born small for gestational age (SGA) are treated with a GH dose based on body size, but treatment may lead to high levels of IGF1. The objective was to evaluate IGF1 titration of GH dose in contrast to current dosing strategies. METHODS: In the North European Small......-for-Gestational-Age Study (NESGAS), 92 short pre-pubertal children born SGA were randomised after 1 year of high-dose GH treatment (67 μg/kg per day) to three different regimens: high dose (67 μg/kg per day), low dose (35 μg/kg per day) or IGF1 titration. RESULTS: The average dose during the second year of the randomised...... trial did not differ between the IGF1 titration group (38 μg/kg per day, s.d. 0.019) and the low-dose group (35 μg/kg per day, s.d. 0.002; P=0.46), but there was a wide variation in the IGF1 titration group (range 10-80 μg/kg per day). The IGF1 titration group had significantly lower height gain (0...

  16. Hospitalization in adolescence and young adulthood among twins and singletons: a Swedish cohort study of subjects born between 1973 and 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladh, Marie; Carstensen, John; Josefsson, Ann; Finnström, Orvar; Sydsjö, Gunilla

    2013-06-01

    Children born with non-optimal birth characteristics - that is, are small for gestational age and/or preterm - have an increased risk for several long-term effects such as neurological sequelae and chronic disease. The purpose of this study was to examine whether twins exhibited a different outcome, compared with singletons, in terms of hospitalization during adolescence and early adulthood, and to what extent differences remain when considering the divergence in birth characteristics between singletons and twins. Persons born between 1973 and 1983 in Sweden and surviving until age 13 were included and followed until the end of 2006. Data on birth characteristics, parental socio-demographic factors, and hospitalizations were collected from national registers. Adjusting for parental socio-demographic factors, twins had a higher risk of being hospitalized than singletons (odds ratio, OR = 1.17, 95% confidence interval, CI = 1.10-1.25) and more often due to 'Congenital anomalies' (OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.06-1.28), 'Infections' (OR = 1.14; 95% CI = 1.08-1.20), 'External causes of illness' (OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.06-1.15), and 'Diseases of the nervous system' (OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.10-1.26). Stratifying for birth characteristics, this difference diminishes, and for some diagnoses non-optimal twins seem to do slightly better than non-optimal singletons. Thus, twins with non-optimal birth characteristics had a lower risk of hospitalization than non-optimal singletons on, for example, 'Congenital anomalies' and 'Diseases of the nervous system' (OR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.77-0.96; OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.81-0.97, respectively) and Total (any) hospitalization (OR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.83-0.92). Among those with optimal birth characteristics, twins had an increased hospitalization due to 'External causes of illness' (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.02-1.13) compared with optimal singletons. Twins have higher hospitalization rates than singletons. In stratifying for birth characteristics, this

  17. The cost-effectiveness of somatropin treatment for short children born small for gestational age (SGA) and children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Torsten; Fidler, Carrie; Bentley, Anthony; Djurhuus, Christian

    2010-03-01

    Reduction in health-related quality of life is common in children born small for gestational age (SGA) or children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD). Growth hormone treatment with somatropin in these children leads to normalisation of height. The aim of this study was to determine whether somatropin is a cost-effective treatment option for short children born SGA and GHD children in Sweden. A Markov decision-tree model was used to calculate the relative costs and health benefits associated with somatropin treatment over the lifetime of SGA and GHD children, compared with no treatment. The analysis was undertaken from a Swedish Health Service perspective. As quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) data were not obtained directly in the clinical studies, a degree of uncertainty is related to these results. Sensitivity analyses assessed the degree of uncertainty surrounding central parameters. For short children born SGA, somatropin treatment was associated with an additional 3.29 QALYs at an incremental cost of 792,489 SEK (Swedish Krona), compared with no treatment. For GHD, somatropin treatment resulted in 3.25 additional QALYs at an incremental cost of 391,291 SEK. This equates to an incremental cost per QALY of 240,831 SEK and 120,494 SEK for SGA and GHD, respectively, below a cost-effectiveness threshold of 500,000-600,000 SEK/QALY. Somatropin is a cost-effective treatment strategy in Sweden for children with GHD and SGA. To overcome present study limitations future clinical research should incorporate appropriate quality of life questionnaires.

  18. Association between height and weight catch-up growth with insulin resistance in pre-pubertal Chinese children born small for gestational age at two different ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hong-Zhu; Li, Yan-Hong; Su, Zhe; Ma, Hua-Mei; Huang, Yue-Fang; Chen, Hong-Shan; Du, Min-Lian

    2011-01-01

    This study was performed to test whether children born small for gestational age (SGA) with catch-up growth (CUG) could be associated with the early development of insulin resistance and the β-cell dysfunction and to explore the impacts of height CUG and weight CUG on the insulin resistance in a Chinese population. A total of 30 children born SGA with CUG, 37 non-CUG (NCUG), and 42 born appropriate for gestational age (AGA) with normal height were recruited. Their fasting serum insulin, fasting glucose, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) concentrations, and the homeostasis assessment model for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and β-cell function (HOMA%) were evaluated. The values of HOMA-IR in CUG SGA were significantly higher than that in NCUG SGA (P = 0.002) and AGA children (P = 0.036), respectively. Correlation analysis revealed that the concentrations of fasting serum insulin were positively correlated with IGF-1 (r = 0.443, P = 0.001) and Δheight standard deviation score (SDS; r = 0.500, P = 0.002) in ≤ 6-year-old SGA children, but only with Δweight SDS (r = 0.496, P = 0.030) in >6-year-old children. In conclusion, SGA children with CUG in height and a higher body mass index are prone to the development of insulin resistance. Higher levels of insulin were closely correlated with the postnatal height CUG in young SGA children and with the weight CUG in old children.

  19. Cerebral small-resistance artery structure and cerebral blood flow in normotensive subjects and hypertensive patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Ciuceis, Carolina; Porteri, Enzo; Rizzoni, Damiano; Boari, Gianluca E.M.; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti [University of Brescia, Clinica Medica, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Brescia (Italy); Cornali, Claudio; Mardighian, Dikran; Fontanella, Marco M. [University of Brescia, Section of Neurosurgery, Department of Medical and Surgical Specialties, Radiological Sciences and Public Health, Brescia (Italy); Pinardi, Chiara [Spedali Civili, Medical Physics Unit, Brescia (Italy); University of Brescia, Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Medical and Surgical Specialties, Radiological Sciences and Public Health, Brescia (Italy); Rodella, Luigi F.; Rezzani, Rita [University of Brescia, Section of Anatomy, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Brescia (Italy); Gasparotti, Roberto [University of Brescia, Section of Neurosurgery, Department of Medical and Surgical Specialties, Radiological Sciences and Public Health, Brescia (Italy); University of Brescia, Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Medical and Surgical Specialties, Radiological Sciences and Public Health, Brescia (Italy)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate whether the structure of cerebral small-resistance arteries is related to cerebral perfusion parameters as measured with dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) in a selected cohort of hypertensive and normotensive patients. Ten hypertensive and 10 normotensive patients were included in the study. All patients underwent neurosurgical intervention for an intracranial tumor and were investigated with DSC-MRI at 1.5 T. Cerebral small-resistance arteries were dissected from a small portion of morphologically normal cerebral tissue and mounted on an isometric myograph for the measurement of the media-to-lumen (M/L) ratio. A quantitative assessment of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and volume (CBV) was performed with a region-of-interest approach. Correlation coefficients were calculated for normally distributed variables. The institutional review board approved the study, and informed consent was obtained from all patients. Compared with normotensive subjects, hypertensive patients had significantly lower regional CBF (mL/100 g/min) in the cortical grey matter (55.63 ± 1.90 vs 58.37 ± 2.19, p < 0.05), basal ganglia (53.34 ± 4.39 vs 58.22. ± 4.33, p < 0.05), thalami (50.65 ± 3.23 vs 57.56 ± 4.45, p < 0.01), subcortical white matter (19.32 ± 2.54 vs 22.24 ± 1.9, p < 0.05), greater M/L ratio (0.099 ± 0.013 vs 0.085 ± 0.012, p < 0.05), and lower microvessel density (1.66 ± 0.67 vs 2.52 ± 1.28, p < 0.05). A statistically significant negative correlation was observed between M/L ratio of cerebral arteries and CBF in the cortical grey matter (r = -0.516, p < 0.05), basal ganglia (r = -0.521, p < 0.05), thalami (r = -0.527 p < 0.05), and subcortical white matter (r = -0.612, p < 0.01). Our results indicate that microvascular structure might play a role in controlling CBF, with possible clinical consequences. (orig.)

  20. Optimization of growth hormone dosing in children born small for gestational age: an open-label, randomized study of children during the fourth year of therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelain, P; Colle, M; Nako, J-P; Le Luyer, B; Wagner, K; Berlier, P; Tauber, M

    2012-01-01

    Optimal dosage for growth hormone (GH) therapy in short, prepubertal children born small for gestational age (SGA) is controversial. SGA OPTIMIS (NCT00249821) is a multicenter, open-label, parallel-group, pilot study of short children born SGA who had received recombinant human GH (r-hGH) (57 μg/kg/day) for 3 years. Children were randomized 1:1 to receive either 57 or 35 μg/kg/day r-hGH during year 4. The primary endpoint was height gain during year 4. 22 children were randomized (57 μg/kg/day, n = 10; 35 μg/kg/day, n = 12) and 21 completed the fourth year of therapy; 22 were included in efficacy analyses. During year 4, mean [standard deviation (SD)] height velocity was 6.4 (1.4) and 4.4 (1.2) cm/year (p = 0.001) and height velocity SD score (SDS) was 0.3 (0.3) and -0.1 (0.2) (p = 0.002) in the 57 and 35 μg/kg/day groups, respectively. The 57 μg/kg/day group continued with catch-up growth, had a significantly higher mean weight gain (p = 0.015) and significantly higher insulin-like growth factor-I levels at 12 months (p = 0.038). Five treatment-emergent adverse events were reported; none was serious or caused study withdrawal. Children who continued receiving 57 μg/kg/day r-hGH in year 4 had significantly greater height gain than those receiving 35 μg/kg/day r-hGH. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Growth in small-for-gestational-age preterm-born children from 0 to 4 years: the role of both prematurity and SGA status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocca-Tjeertes, Inger F A; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; Kerstjens, Jorien M; de Winter, Andrea F; Bos, Arend F

    2013-01-01

    Fullterm small-for-gestational-age children (SGAs) are known for their ability to catch up on growth. Nevertheless, increased risk of growth restriction remains. Evidence on preterm SGA children's growth is lacking. To determine absolute gains in height and weight, relative growth, and growth restriction in preterm SGAs from 0 to 4 years and how prematurity and SGA status affect these measures. Community-based cohort study, n = 1,648 preterm-born (gestational age SGA) and 605 term-born (12 SGA). We defined SGA as a birth weight less than -2 SD (P 2.3) compared to counterparts matched for gestational age. Height, weight, and head circumference were obtained from medical records and translated to z-scores. We defined growth restriction as height or weight less than -2 SD compared to fullterm appropriate-for-gestational-age children (AGAs). Absolute height and weight gains were similar, but the relative growth of preterms and fullterms differed. Preterm AGAs and fullterm SGAs, although not reaching it, caught up towards the fullterm AGA median (z-scores at 4 years: -0.3 to -1.0). By contrast, preterm SGA children's z-scores were still -1.4 to -1.7. Head circumference growth was less affected by prematurity and SGA birth (z-scores at 1 year: 0.1 to -0.7). Catch-up growth mainly took place during infancy. 30-39% of all preterm SGAs showed growth restriction at 4 years. Growth in preterm SGAs is affected considerably by the joint effects of preterm birth and SGA status, resulting in a high proportion of growth restriction. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Thyroid function in short children born small-for-gestational age (SGA) before and during GH treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kort, S W K; Willemsen, R H; van der Kaay, D C M; van Dijk, M; Visser, T J; Hokken-Koelega, A C S

    2008-08-01

    Disturbances in thyroid function have been described in small-for-gestational age (SGA) children but the influence of prematurity is unclear. In addition, the effect of GH treatment on thyroid function has not been studied in short SGA children. To determine whether short SGA children have higher TSH levels compared to age-matched controls and evaluate the influence of gestational age. To investigate whether GH treatment alters thyroid function. A total of 264 short SGA children (116 preterm), prepubertal and non-GH deficient. Serum FT4 and TSH at baseline and after 6, 12 and 24 months of GH treatment. Baseline mean TSH was higher in preterm short SGA children than in age-matched controls (P SGA children and controls. Baseline FT4 or TSH did not correlate with gestational age, or SDS for birth weight, birth length, height, body mass index, IGF-I or IGFBP-3. Mean FT4 decreased significantly during the first 6 months of GH treatment, but remained within the normal range. TSH did not change during treatment. The change in FT4 did not correlate with the change in height SDS during 24 months of GH treatment. Preterm short SGA children have higher, although within the normal range, TSH levels than controls. The level of TSH does not correlate with gestational age, birth weight SDS or birth length SDS. FT4 decreases during GH treatment, but is neither associated with an increase in TSH nor does it affect the response to GH treatment. As these mild alterations in thyroid function do not appear clinically relevant, frequent monitoring of thyroid function during GH therapy is not warranted in short SGA children.

  3. Small specimen test technology and methodology of IFMIF/EVEDA and the further subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakai, E.; Nogami, S.; Kasada, R.; Kimura, A.; Kurishita, H.; Saito, M.; Ito, Y.; Takada, F.; Nakamura, K.; Molla, J.; Garin, P.

    2011-10-01

    About one thousands of small size specimens will be irradiated in the High Flux Test Module (HFTM) with a limited irradiation volume of 0.5 l in the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF). It is necessary to verify that the experimental data of these small specimens mechanical characterization can be safely extrapolated to standard specimen data, enabling a sound dimensioning of DEMO reactor. The program of small specimen test technique (SSTT) in IFMIF/EVEDA (Engineering Validation and Engineering Design Activity) phase for fatigue, fracture toughness and crack growth measurement is summarized, and recent progress and some analysis of the experiments for small size specimens have been shown.

  4. Height, muscle, fat and bone response to growth hormone in short children with very low birth weight born appropriate for gestational age and small for gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Cornelia; Schweizer, Roland; Ranke, Michael B; Binder, Gerhard; Martin, David D

    2014-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) treatment is approved for short children born SGA but not for AGA. Our aim was to study the effect of GH in short VLBW SGA and AGA children. The study group comprised 44 prepubertal short children with a birth weight Growth, muscle and fat mass are similarly impaired in short prepubertal AGA and SGA VLBW children. The children born AGA show a similar or better response to GH compared to those born SGA. These results reveal the arbitrary nature of using the criterion 'SGA' for eligibility to GH treatment in children born with a birth weight <1,500 g. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Adult height after long-term, continuous growth hormone (GH) treatment in short children born small for gestational age: results of a randomized, double-blind, dose-response GH trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. van Pareren; M. Houdijk; M. Jansen (Maarten); M. Reeser; P.G.H. Mulder (Paul); A.C.S. Hokken-Koelega (Anita)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe GH dose-response effect of long-term continuous GH treatment on adult height (AH) was evaluated in 54 short children born small for gestational age (SGA) who were participating in a randomized, double-blind, dose-response trial. Patients were randomly and blindly

  6. Insulin sensitivity modulates the growth response during the first year of high-dose growth hormone treatment in short prepubertal children born small for gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gies, Inge; Thomas, Muriel; Tenoutasse, Sylvie; De Waele, Kathleen; Lebrethon, Marie-Christine; Beckers, Dominique; Francois, Inge; Maes, Marc; Rooman, Raoul; de Beaufort, Carine; Massa, Guy; De Schepper, Jean

    2012-01-01

    To study the relationship between insulin sensitivity and growth response in short children born small for gestational age (SGA) treated with growth hormone (GH). Randomized, open-label, 24-month intervention study in 40 short prepubertal SGA children [age (mean ± SD) 5.3 ± 1.5 years], who either remained untreated (n = 20) or were treated with GH (66 µg/kg/day; n = 20). Changes in fasting glucose, insulin, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), IGF-1 and leptin after 1 and 2 years were studied. Mean height SDS increased from -3.3 ± 0.7 to -2.3 ± 0.7 after 1 year, and to -1.9 ± 0.7 after 2 years of treatment. QUICKI decreased significantly (p = 0.008) in the first year of GH treatment and stabilized in the second year. Baseline QUICKI was positively associated (r = 0.40; p growth response to GH, and could be a promising parameter in selecting prepubertal short SGA children for GH treatment. However, this finding needs to be confirmed in larger studies. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Evolution of IGF-1 in children born small for gestational age and with growth retardation, treated by growth hormone adapted to IGF-1 levels after 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrol, S; Perin, L; Colle, M; Coutant, R; Jésuran-Perelroizen, M; Le Bouc, Y; Czernichow, P

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to estimate the percentage of growth hormone (GH)-treated children born small for gestational age (SGA), with serum IGF-1 >2 SDS before and after GH dose adaptation. SGA boys aged 4-9 and girls aged 4-7 with a height growth rate below the mean received a subcutaneous GH dose of 57 μg/kg/day for 2 years. The GH dose was to be decreased by 30% in children with serum IGF-1 >2 SDS at 12 months and on the previous sample. The GH dose could be reduced a second time to 35 μg/kg·day. IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 dosages were centralized. Among the 49 (21 boys) children included in the study, 8 (16.3%) had an IGF-1 >2 SDS consecutively at 9 and 12 months (95% CI 7.3, 29.7). The GH dose was decreased in 6/8 children. However, IGF-1 levels were elevated at several nonconsecutive determinations in 45% (95% CI 28.4, 56.6) of the patients. A high IGF-1 level is observed in 45% of the GH SGA-treated children with a relatively high dose of GH. A 30% reduction in the GH dose causes a decrease in IGF-1 below 2 SDS in most children. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. The Auxological and Biochemical Continuum of Short Children Born Small for Gestational Age (SGA) or with Normal Birth Size (Idiopathic Short Stature).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliebe, Janina; Martin, David D; Ranke, Michael B; Wit, Jan M

    2010-01-01

    Objective. Retrospective single-centre analysis of growth characteristics in 182 healthy short children born small for gestational age (SGA) or appropriate for gestational age (idiopathic short stature, ISS). Methods. Birth size references from the USA and Sweden were compared, and for the classification as SGA or ISS the Swedish reference was chosen. Height, target height (TH), bone age (BA), predicted adult height (PAH), IGF-I and IGFBP-3 values were compared between SGA and ISS. Results. In the combined group, birth weight and length showed a symmetric Gaussian distribution. The American reference overestimates the percentage of short birth length and underestimates that of low birth weight. In childhood, SGA children were shorter than ISS (-3.1 versus -2.6 SDS, P SGA children represent the left tail of the Gaussian distribution of birth size in short children. The distinction between SGA and ISS depends on birth size reference. Childhood height of SGA is lower than of ISS, but the other auxological features are similar.

  9. Molecular evidence of tick-borne hemoprotozoan-parasites (Theileria ovis and Babesia ovis) and bacteria in ticks and blood from small ruminants in Northern Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouadi, Atef; Leulmi, Hamza; Boucheikhchoukh, Mehdi; Benakhla, Ahmed; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    Using qPCR, standard PCR and/or sequencing, we investigated the presence of tick-associated microorganisms in ticks and blood from sheep and goats from Souk Ahras, Algeria. Borrelia theileri, was detected in (7/120, 5.8%) blood from sheep and (13/120, 10.8%) goats. Anaplasma ovis was screened in (38/73, 52%) Rhipicephalus bursa and (5/22, 22.7%) R. turanicus and in (74/120, 61.7%), (65/120, 54.2%) blood of sheep and goats respectively. Coxiella burnetii tested positive in R. bursa (4/73, 5.5%) and (7/120, 5.8%) blood of sheep and (2/120, 1.7%) goats. Theileria ovis was detected in (50/147, 34%) R. bursa and (3/22, 13.6%) R. turanicus and in (64/120, 53.3%) blood of sheep and (25/120, 20.8%) goats. Babesia ovis was screened positive in (23/147, 15.6%) R. bursa and (7/48, 14.6%) R. turanicus. Our findings expand knowledge about the repertoire of tick-borne microorganisms present in ectoparasites and/or the blood of small ruminants in Algeria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevalence of small for gestational age (SGA) and short stature in children born SGA who qualify for growth hormone treatment at 3 years of age: Population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Kaori; Nagasaka, Miwako; Iwatani, Sota; Koda, Tsubasa; Kurokawa, Daisuke; Yamana, Keiji; Nishida, Kosuke; Taniguchi-Ikeda, Mariko; Uchino, Eiko; Shirai, Chika; Iijima, Kazumoto; Morioka, Ichiro

    2016-05-01

    To treat children born small for gestational age (SGA) with severe short stature, treatment with growth hormone (GH) has been approved in the USA, Europe, and Japan, but no population-based studies have reported their prevalence. The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of SGA and short stature in children born SGA who qualify for GH treatment at 3 years of age in a Japanese population. A population-based study was conducted in Kobe, Japan with 27 228 infants who were born between 2006 and 2008 and followed until 3 years of age. Prevalence of birthweight (BW) or birth length (BL) ≤ -2.0 standard deviation scores (SDS) for gestational age (GA; definition of SGA) was calculated. Short children born SGA who qualify for GH treatment at 3 years of age were estimated using the following criteria: BW and BL below the 10th percentile for GA, BW or BL ≤ -2.0 SDS for GA, and 2.5 SDS below the mean height for age. The prevalence of SGA was 3.5%. The estimated prevalence of short stature in children born SGA who met the criteria for GH treatment was 0.06%. The prevalence in infants born SGA and short stature in children born SGA who qualify for GH treatment is approximately 1 of 30 infants and 1 of 1800 children, respectively. The risk is increased when children are born <34 weeks GA. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  11. Postural control of small for gestational age infants born at term Controle postural de lactentes nascidos a termo pequenos para a idade gestacional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Campos

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study compared the postural control of small (SGA and appropriate (AGA for gestational age infants born at term, at the ages of 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. METHOD: This was a cohort study of infants born at term, with birth weight less than the 10th percentile for the SGA group and between the 10th and 90th percentiles for the AGA group. Infants with genetic syndromes, malformations, congenital infections and internment in neonatal intensive care unit were excluded. The evaluation instrument was the Alberta Infant Motor Scale. RESULTS: Comparison of the SGA and AGA groups did not show any significant differences (p>0.05 at the assessment times. However, the postural control of the SGA group was influenced by the gestational age (r=-0.83; p= 0.006 and 5th minute Apgar (r= 0.79; p= 0.01 in the 3rd month, and by maternal occupation (r= 0.67; p= 0.01 in the 6th month. CONCLUSION: It was concluded that the postural control was similar in the groups. However, the postural control of the SGA group was influenced by biological and environmental factors.OBJETIVO: Este estudo teve por objetivo comparar o controle postural de lactentes nascidos a termo, pequenos (PIG e adequados para a idade gestacional (AIG nos 3º, 6º, 9º e 12º meses. MÉTODO: Estudo longitudinal de lactentes nascidos a termo, com peso de nascimento menor que o percentil 10 para o grupo PIG e entre o percentil 10 e 90 para o grupo AIG. Síndromes genéticas, más-formações, infecções congênitas e internados em unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal foram excluídos. O instrumento de avaliação foi Alberta Infant Motor Scale. RESULTADOS: A comparação do grupo PIG e AIG não mostrou diferença significativa (p> 0,05 nos meses avaliados. Entretanto, o controle postural do grupo PIG foi influenciado pela idade gestacional (r= -0,83/p= 0,006 e Apgar de 5' (r= 0,79/p= 0,01 no 3º mês; e pela ocupação materna (r= 0,67/p= 0,01 no 6º mês. CONCLUSÃO: Concluiu-se que o

  12. Farm-level risk factors for fish-borne zoonotic trematode infection in integrated small-scale fish farms in northern Vietnam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Thi Phan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Northern Vietnam is an endemic region for fish-borne zoonotic trematodes (FZT, including liver and intestinal flukes. Humans acquire the FZT infection by eating raw or inadequately cooked fish. The production of FZT-free fish in aquaculture is a key component in establishing a sustainable program to prevent and control the FZT transmission to humans. Interventions in aquaculture should be based on knowledge of the main risk factors associated with FZT transmission. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A longitudinal study was carried out from June 2006 to May 2007 in Nam Dinh province, Red River Delta to investigate the development and risk factors of FZT infections in freshwater cultured fish. A total of 3820 fish were sampled six times at two-month intervals from 96 fish farms. Logistic analysis with repeated measurements was used to evaluate potential risk factors based on information collected through questionnaire interviews with 61 fish farm owners. The results showed that the FZT infections significantly increased from first sampling in June to July 2006 (65% to sixth sampling in April to May, 2007 (76%. The liver fluke, Clonorchis sinensis and different zoonotic intestinal flukes including Haplochis pumilio, H. taichui, H. yokogawai, Centrocestus formosanus and Procerovum varium were found in sampled fish. Duration of fish cultured (sampling times, mebendazole drug self-medication of household members, presence of snails in the pond, and feeding fish with green vegetation collected outside fish farms all had a significant effect on the development of FZT prevalence in the fish. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The FZT prevalence in fish increased by 11 percentage points during a one-year culture period and the risk factors for the development of infection were identified. Results also highlight that the young fish are already highly infected when stocked into the grow-out systems. This knowledge should be incorporated into control

  13. Health-related quality of life in short children born small for gestational age: effects of growth hormone treatment and postponement of puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lem, Annemieke J; Jobse, Inge; van der Kaay, Danielle C M; de Ridder, Maria A J; Raat, Hein; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C S

    2012-01-01

    To investigate health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in short children born small for gestational age (SGA) during growth hormone (GH) treatment and additional postponement of puberty by gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue (GnRHa). HRQoL was studied longitudinally during 2 years of treatment in 97 short SGA children (mean age 11.6 years at start). The children were divided into three groups: prepubertal GH-treated (prep-GH) children, pubertal GH-treated (pub-GH) children, and pubertal GH-treated children with additional GnRHa treatment (pub-GH/GnRHa). HRQoL was measured by generic (TACQOL) and short stature-specific (TACQOL-S) questionnaires. The TACQOL-S showed that prep-GH children experienced significant HRQoL improvement on the subscales 'contact with adults', 'body image' and 'vitality', and pub-GH/GnRHa children on the subscales 'contact with adults', 'contact with peers' and 'physical abilities'. Parents of prep-GH and pub-GH/GnRHa children reported significant HRQoL improvement on most TACQOL-S scales, whereas HRQoL improvement in pub-GH children reached significance for 'future prospects' only. The HRQoL gain was similar in the three groups, also after correction for confounders. The generic questionnaire TACQOL did not reveal any changes. HRQoL improved in prepubertal and pubertal short SGA children during GH treatment. Additional GnRHa treatment had no adverse effect on the HRQoL gain. Disorder-specific questionnaires were particularly appropriate to evaluate HRQoL in children treated for short stature. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Mechanisms affecting neuroendocrine and epigenetic regulation of body weight and onset of puberty: potential implications in the child born small for gestational age (SGA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Christian L; Sathyanarayana, Sheela

    2012-06-01

    Signaling peptides produced in peripheral tissues such as gut, adipose tissue, and pancreas communicate with brain centers, such as hypothalamus and hindbrain to manage energy homeostasis. These regulatory mechanisms of energy intake and storage have evolved during long periods of hunger in the evolution of man to protect the species from extinction. It is now clear that these circuitries are influenced by prenatal and postnatal environmental factors including endocrine disruptive chemicals. Hypothalamic appetite regulatory systems develop and mature in utero and early infancy, and involve signaling pathways that are important also for the regulation of puberty onset. Recent studies in humans and animals have shown that metabolic pathways involved in regulation of growth, body weight gain and sexual maturation are largely affected by epigenetic programming that can impact both current and future generations. In particular, intrauterine and early infantile developmental phases of high plasticity are susceptible to factors that affect metabolic programming that therefore, affect metabolic function throughout life. In children born small for gestational age, poor nutritional conditions during gestation can modify metabolic systems to adapt to expectations of chronic undernutrition. These children are potentially poorly equipped to cope with energy-dense diets and are possibly programmed to store as much energy as possible, leading to later obesity, metabolic syndrome, disturbed regulation of normal puberty and early onset of cardiovascular disease. Most cases of disturbed energy balance are likely a result of a combination of genetics, epigenetics and environment. This review will discuss potential mechanisms linking intrauterine growth retardation with changes in growth, energy homeostasis and sexual maturation.

  15. Objective and subjective methods for quantifying training load in wheelchair basketball small-sided games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturricastillo, Aitor; Granados, Cristina; Los Arcos, Asier; Yanci, Javier

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyse the training load in wheelchair basketball small-sided games and determine the relationship between heart rate (HR)-based training load and perceived exertion (RPE)-based training load methods among small-sided games bouts. HR-based measurements of training load included Edwards' training load and Stagno's training impulses (TRIMP MOD ) while RPE-based training load measurements included cardiopulmonary (session RPEres) and muscular (session RPEmus) values. Data were collected from 12 wheelchair basketball players during five consecutive weeks. The total load for the small-sided games sessions was 67.5 ± 6.7 and 55.3 ± 12.5 AU in HR-based training load (Edwards' training load and TRIMP MOD ), while the RPE-based training loads were 99.3 ± 26.9 (session RPEres) and 100.8 ± 31.2 AU (session RPEmus). Bout-to-bout analysis identified greater session RPEmus in the third [P training loads. It is suggested that HR-based and RPE-based training loads provide different information, but these two methods could be complementary because one method could help us to understand the limitations of the other.

  16. A randomised controlled trial evaluating IGF1 titration in contrast to current GH dosing strategies in children born small for gestational age: the North European Small-for-Gestational-Age Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Rikke Beck; Thankamony, Ajay; O'Connell, Susan M; Kirk, Jeremy; Donaldson, Malcolm; Ivarsson, Sten-A; Söder, Olle; Roche, Edna; Hoey, Hilary; Dunger, David B; Juul, Anders

    2014-10-01

    Short children born small for gestational age (SGA) are treated with a GH dose based on body size, but treatment may lead to high levels of IGF1. The objective was to evaluate IGF1 titration of GH dose in contrast to current dosing strategies. In the North European Small-for-Gestational-Age Study (NESGAS), 92 short pre-pubertal children born SGA were randomised after 1 year of high-dose GH treatment (67 μg/kg per day) to three different regimens: high dose (67 μg/kg per day), low dose (35 μg/kg per day) or IGF1 titration. The average dose during the second year of the randomised trial did not differ between the IGF1 titration group (38 μg/kg per day, s.d. 0.019) and the low-dose group (35 μg/kg per day, s.d. 0.002; P=0.46), but there was a wide variation in the IGF1 titration group (range 10-80 μg/kg per day). The IGF1 titration group had significantly lower height gain (0.17 SDS, s.d. 0.18) during the second year of the randomised trial compared with the high-dose group (0.46 SDS, s.d. 0.25), but not significantly lower than the low-dose group (0.23 SDS, s.d. 0.15; P=0.17). The IGF1 titration group had lower IGF1 levels after 2 years of the trial (mean 1.16, s.d. 1.24) compared with both the low-dose (mean 1.76, s.d. 1.48) and the high-dose (mean 2.97, s.d. 1.63) groups. IGF1 titration of GH dose in SGA children proved less effective than current dosing strategies. IGF1 titration resulted in physiological IGF1 levels with a wide range of GH dose and a poorer growth response, which indicates the role of IGF1 resistance and highlights the heterogeneity of short SGA children. © 2014 European Society of Endocrinology.

  17. Simulation modelling analysis for small sets of single-subject data collected over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borckardt, Jeffrey J; Nash, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    The behavioural data yielded by single subjects in naturalistic and controlled settings likely contain valuable information to scientists and practitioners alike. Although some of the properties unique to this data complicate statistical analysis, progress has been made in developing specialised techniques for rigorous data evaluation. There are no perfect tests currently available to analyse short autocorrelated data streams, but there are some promising approaches that warrant further development. Although many approaches have been proposed, and some appear better than others, they all have some limitations. When data sets are large enough (∼30 data points per phase), the researcher has a reasonably rich pallet of statistical tools from which to choose. However, when the data set is sparse, the analytical options dwindle. Simulation modelling analysis (SMA; described in this article) is a relatively new technique that appears to offer acceptable Type-I and Type-II error rate control with short streams of autocorrelated data. However, at this point, it is probably too early to endorse any specific statistical approaches for short, autocorrelated time-series data streams. While SMA shows promise, more work is needed to verify that it is capable of reliable Type-I and Type-II error performance with short serially dependent streams of data.

  18. Small amygdala-high aggression? The role of the amygdala in modulating aggression in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthies, Swantje; Rüsch, Nicolas; Weber, Matthias; Lieb, Klaus; Philipsen, Alexandra; Tuescher, Oliver; Ebert, Dieter; Hennig, Jürgen; van Elst, Ludger Tebartz

    2012-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest an association between the amygdala and the modulation of aggressive behaviour. Previous morphometric brain imaging studies have focused on the role of the amygdala in the context of pathologic neuropsychiatric conditions like depression, personality disorders, and dysphoric and aggressive behaviour in epilepsy. In order to better understand the physiological role of the amygdala in modulating aggressive behaviour we investigated the relationship between amygdala volumes and lifetime aggression in healthy subjects. Morphometric brain scans were obtained in 20 healthy volunteers. Amygdala volumes were measured by manually outlining the boundaries of the structure following a well established and validated protocol. Careful psychiatric and psychometric assessment was done to exclude any psychiatric disorder and to assess lifetime aggressiveness with an established and validated psychometric instrument (i.e., Life History of Aggression Assessment (LHA)). All volunteers scored in the normal range of lifetime aggression. Volunteers with higher aggression scores displayed a 16-18% reduction of amygdala volumes. There was a highly significant negative correlation between amygdala volumes and trait aggression. The extent of volumetric differences in this study is remarkable and suggests that amygdala volumes might be a surrogate marker for the personality property of aggressiveness in healthy human beings.

  19. Short-term objective and subjective evaluation of small-diameter implants used to support and retain mandibular prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Robert; Hollis, Scott; Ahuja, Swati; Adatrow, Pradeep; Balanoff, William

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of small-diameter implants has provided dentists the means of providing edentulous and partially edentulous patients with immediate functioning transitional prostheses while definitive restorations are being fabricated. The successful use of these small-diameter implants for temporary stabilization of prostheses has led many clinicians to explore the option of using them as a definitive alternative, especially as the technique requires minimal time and also is economical for the patients. To date, there has been no study with multiple patients looking at both the subjective and objective outcomes of these small-diameter implants. Twenty-seven edentulous patients were enrolled in this study, seven of them were smokers. One-hundred and eight small-diameter (2.0 mm, MDL) implants were surgically placed in 24 edentulous mandibles. All implants were immediately loaded. The patients filled out a screening questionnaire and four subsequent questionnaires to test their satisfaction with the altered prosthesis at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. The survival of the implants was also noted. Smokers had an implant survival of 79%. Non-smokers had an implant survival of 100%. The results of the questionnaire indicated an overall satisfaction with the implant-supported prosthesis.

  20. Impact of ghosts on the viscoelastic response of gelatinized corn starch dispersions subjected to small strain deformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Navas, H; Avila-de la Rosa, G; Gómez-Luría, D; Meraz, M; Alvarez-Ramirez, J; Vernon-Carter, E J

    2014-09-22

    Corn starch dispersions (5.0% w/w) were gelatinized by heating at 90°C for 20 min using gentle stirring. Under these conditions, ghosts, which are insoluble material with high amylopectin content, were detected by optical microscopy. Strain sweep tests showed that the gelatinized starch dispersions (GSD) exhibited a loss modulus (G″) overshoot at relatively low strains (∼1%). In order to achieve a greater understanding as to the mechanisms giving rise to this uncharacteristic nonlinear response at low strains, very small constant torques (from 0.05 to 0.5 μN m) were applied in the bulk of the GSD with a rotating biconical disc. This resulted in small deformations exhibiting torque-dependent inertio-elastic damped oscillations which were subjected to phenomenological modelling. Inertial effects played an important role in the starch mechanical response. The model parameters varied with the magnitude of constant small applied torque and could be related to microstructural changes of ghosts and to the viscoelastic response of GSD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. New single-subject and Small-n design in occupational therapy: application to weight loss in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman-Miller, Deborah; Shotwell, Mary P; Miller, Rosalie J

    2012-01-01

    Ottenbacher (1986) showed the usefulness of single-subject design (SSD) in occupational therapy. However, SSD methodology is not regarded by the wider research community as providing statistically reliable and valid evidence of effectiveness of treatment partly because of its observational nature. Although statistical estimations can also be made from least squares regression or by a trend line, a new methodology has great potential to influence research in occupational therapy. The new model enables the use of initial client data from the beginning of treatment (for single subjects or small groups) to determine a point in the linear regression at which predictions can be made for the number of treatments needed for stability or improvement. This model is invaluable for third-party payment as well as for client motivation. The purpose of this article is to present this new methodology, the semiparametric ratio estimator (SPRE), illustrated by case application to treatment of obesity. Copyright © 2012 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  2. Comparison of response to 2-years' growth hormone treatment in children with isolated growth hormone deficiency, born small for gestational age, idiopathic short stature, or multiple pituitary hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Peter A; Sävendahl, Lars; Oliver, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have compared the response to growth hormone (GH) treatment between indications such as isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD), born small for gestational age (SGA), idiopathic short stature (ISS), and multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (MPHD). The aim of this analysis of data......, collected from two large ongoing observational outcome studies, was to evaluate growth and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) response data for children of short stature with IGHD, MPHD, SGA, or ISS following two years of treatment with the recombinant GH product Norditropin® (Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsværd...

  3. Short children with low birth weight born either small for gestational age or average for gestational age show similar growth response and changes in insulin-like growth factor-1 to growth hormone treatment during the first prepubertal year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranke, M B; Martin, D D; Ehehalt, S; Schwarze, C P; Serra, F; Wollmann, H A; Schweizer, R

    2011-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is an accepted treatment for short children born small for gestational age (SGA). The aim of this analysis was to compare the growth response to GH in children with low birth weight born SGA or appropriate for gestational age (AGA). This retrospective observational study is from one center. Of all the children with a birth weight growth hormone deficiency ([A] SGA, n = 26; [B] AGA, n = 24) and 138 were originally diagnosed SGA or AGA (reclassified: [C] SGA, n = 102; [D] AGA, n = 36). [Median; A, B, C, D]: at an age of 4.9, 5.2, 5.8, 5.8 years, a height of -2.9, -2.4, -2.8, -2.9 SDS and a GH dose of 27, 28, 41, 39 μg/kg/day, the children grew 0.9, 0.9, 0.8, 0.9 SDS in height, respectively. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) at GH start was, respectively, -2.1, -2.2, -0.4, -0.9 SDS and rose to (delta IGF-1) 1.8, 2.0, 1.7, 1.5 SDS during the first year on GH. All differences were not significant. We show for the first time that short stature children with low birth weight born AGA experience the same increase in height and IGFs to GH treatment as those born SGA irrespective of actual GH secretory status. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Growth and development are similar in VLBW children born appropriate and small for gestational age: an interim report on 97 preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranke, Michael B; Vollmer, Brigitte; Traunecker, Richard; Wollmann, Hartmut A; Goelz, Rangmar R; Seibold-Weiger, Karin; Speer, Christian P; Krägeloh-Mann, Ingeborg

    2007-09-01

    To investigate growth and development in a cohort of children born with very low birth weight (VLBW) treated at a single tertiary neonatal unit. We studied 97 children born between January 1995 and July 1997 with BW height children were short, had a smaller head circumference (-1.9 vs -0.8 SDS), were lighter at birth (BW -1.3 vs -0.7 SDS), and had a higher rate of broncho-pulmonary dysplasia (BPD) (28 vs 12); no differences in neonatal characteristics or neurological status were evident. A higher frequency of motor delay occurred in the 'short' group. Short children also had a smaller head circumference (HC) (-1.6 vs -0.7). Short SGA children had a higher frequency of BPD, smaller HC (-2.1 vs -1.0), and a slightly higher proportion of suspicious neurological findings, motor delay, and speech and language delay (n.s.). Preterm VLBW infants, whether AGA or SGA at birth, face the risk of being short at preschool age. Height outcome is probably influenced by postnatal factors. Our data also suggest that short stature is associated with developmental difficulties in this population.

  5. Trunk position in supine of infants born preterm and at term: an assessment using a computerized pressure mat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusing, Stacey; Mercer, Vicki; Yu, Bing; Reilly, Marie; Thorpe, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    Trunk position may influence motor, cognitive, and social development during infancy and early childhood and has not been quantitatively assessed. The purpose of this study was to assess the trunk positions of infants born at term and preterm in supine using a computerized pressure mat. Trunk position was represented as a ratio of head and pelvis to trunk pressure. Eighteen healthy infants born preterm with a mean gestational age of 31.9 weeks (25.0-34.6) and fifteen healthy infants born at term with a mean gestational age of 38.9 weeks (37.3-40.6) were assessed at 38 to 43 weeks gestational age. Infants born at term spent more than two-thirds of the time in either flexed or neutral trunk positions. No significant differences were found between infants born preterm and those born at term in total duration of flexion or extension or in flexion event duration. This study provides evidence that infants born preterm may not exhibit greater trunk extension tendencies in supine than infants born at term. Results should be interpreted with caution, however, because of the small sample size and large variability observed within the subject groups. Infants born at less than 30 weeks of gestation may demonstrate greater extension tendencies than those born at more than 30 weeks of gestation.

  6. Fully differential cross sections for singly ionizing 1-MeV p +He collisions at small momentum transfer: Beyond the first Born approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuluunbaatar, O.; Zaytsev, S. A.; Kouzakov, K. A.; Galstyan, A.; Shablov, V. L.; Popov, Yu. V.

    2017-10-01

    We present calculations of the electron angular distributions in the single ionization of helium by 1-MeV proton impact at momentum transfer of 0.75 a.u. and ejected-electron energy of 6.5 eV. The results using the first and second Born approximations and the 3C model with different trial helium functions are compared to the experimental data. A good agreement between theory and experiment is found in the case of the 3C final state and a strongly correlated helium wave function. The electron-electron correlations in the He atom are found to influence the ratio of the binary and recoil peak intensities.

  7. Alterations in Functional Connectivity for Language in Prematurely Born Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Robin J.; Lacadie, Cheryl; Vohr, Betty; Kesler, Shelli R.; Katz, Karol H.; Schneider, Karen C.; Pugh, Kenneth R.; Makuch, Robert W.; Reiss, Allan L.; Constable, R. Todd; Ment, Laura R.

    2009-01-01

    Recent data suggest recovery of language systems but persistent structural abnormalities in the prematurely born. We tested the hypothesis that subjects who were born prematurely develop alternative networks for processing language. Subjects who were born prematurely (n = 22; 600-1250 g birth weight), without neonatal brain injury on neonatal…

  8. Prediction models for short children born small for gestational age (SGA) covering the total growth phase. Analyses based on data from KIGS (Pfizer International Growth Database).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranke, Michael B; Lindberg, Anders

    2011-06-01

    Mathematical models can be developed to predict growth in short children treated with growth hormone (GH). These models can serve to optimize and individualize treatment in terms of height outcomes and costs. The aims of this study were to compile existing prediction models for short children born SGA (SGA), to develop new models and to validate the algorithms. Existing models to predict height velocity (HV) for the first two and the fourth prepubertal years and during total pubertal growth (TPG) on GH were applied to SGA children from the KIGS (Pfizer International Growth Database)--1st year: N = 2340; 2nd year: N = 1358; 4th year: N = 182; TPG: N = 59. A new prediction model was developed for the 3rd prepubertal year based upon 317 children by means of the all-possible regression approach, using Mallow's C(p) criterion. The comparison between the observed and predicted height velocity showed no significant difference when the existing prediction models were applied to new cohorts. A model for predicting HV during the 3rd year explained 33% of the variability with an error SD of 1.0 cm/year. The predictors were (in order of importance): HV previous year; chronological age; weight SDS; mid-parent height SDS and GH dose. Models to predict growth to GH from prepubertal years to adult height are available for short children born SGA. The models utilize easily accessible predictors and are accurate. The overall explained variability in SGA is relatively low, due to the heterogeneity of the disorder. The models can be used to provide patients with a realistic expectation of treatment, and may help to identify compliance problems or other underlying causes of treatment failure.

  9. Prediction models for short children born small for gestational age (SGA covering the total growth phase. Analyses based on data from KIGS (Pfizer International Growth Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindberg Anders

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mathematical models can be developed to predict growth in short children treated with growth hormone (GH. These models can serve to optimize and individualize treatment in terms of height outcomes and costs. The aims of this study were to compile existing prediction models for short children born SGA (SGA, to develop new models and to validate the algorithms. Methods Existing models to predict height velocity (HV for the first two and the fourth prepubertal years and during total pubertal growth (TPG on GH were applied to SGA children from the KIGS (Pfizer International Growth Database - 1st year: N = 2340; 2nd year: N = 1358; 4th year: N = 182; TPG: N = 59. A new prediction model was developed for the 3rd prepubertal year based upon 317 children by means of the all-possible regression approach, using Mallow's C(p criterion. Results The comparison between the observed and predicted height velocity showed no significant difference when the existing prediction models were applied to new cohorts. A model for predicting HV during the 3rd year explained 33% of the variability with an error SD of 1.0 cm/year. The predictors were (in order of importance: HV previous year; chronological age; weight SDS; mid-parent height SDS and GH dose. Conclusions Models to predict growth to GH from prepubertal years to adult height are available for short children born SGA. The models utilize easily accessible predictors and are accurate. The overall explained variability in SGA is relatively low, due to the heterogeneity of the disorder. The models can be used to provide patients with a realistic expectation of treatment, and may help to identify compliance problems or other underlying causes of treatment failure.

  10. Baseline IGF-I Levels Determine Insulin Secretion and Insulin Sensitivity during the First Year on Growth Hormone Therapy in Children Born Small for Gestational Age. Results from a North European Multicentre Study (NESGAS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rikke Beck; Thankamony, Ajay; O'Connell, Susan M

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Developmental programming alters growth and metabolic outcome in children born small for gestational age (SGA). We explored insulin and glucose metabolism in SGA children treated with a fixed GH dose over 1 year. Methods: In the North European Small for Gestational Age Study (NESGAS......), 110 short SGA children received GH at 67 µg/kg/day for 1 year. Insulin secretion was assessed by acute insulin response (AIR), insulin sensitivity (IS) by HOMA and disposition index (DI) by insulin secretion adjusted for IS. Results: First-year GH therapy led to increases in height and IGF-I standard...... after 1 year were positively related to AIR (r = 0.30, p = 0.007) and DI (r = 0.29, p = 0.005). Conclusion: In SGA children treated with a high GH dose for 1 year, baseline IGF-I levels were related to IS whilst gains in height and IGF-I responses were associated with insulin secretion. Defining...

  11. The enzootic life-cycle of Borrelia burgdorferi (sensu lato) and tick-borne rickettsiae: an epidemiological study on wild-living small mammals and their ticks from Saxony, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiegala, Anna; Król, Nina; Oltersdorf, Carolin; Nader, Julian; Pfeffer, Martin

    2017-03-13

    Borrelia burgdorferi (sensu lato) and rickettsiae of the spotted fever group are zoonotic tick-borne pathogens. While small mammals are confirmed reservoirs for certain Borrelia spp., little is known about the reservoirs for tick-borne rickettsiae. Between 2012 and 2014, ticks were collected from the vegetation and small mammals which were trapped in Saxony, Germany. DNA extracted from ticks and the small mammals' skin was analyzed for the presence of Rickettsia spp. and B. burgdorferi (s.l.) by qPCR targeting the gltA and p41 genes, respectively. Partial sequencing of the rickettsial ompB gene and an MLST of B. burgdorferi (s.l.) were conducted for species determination. In total, 673 small mammals belonging to eight species (Apodemus agrarius, n = 7; A. flavicollis, n = 214; Microtus arvalis, n = 8; Microtus agrestis, n = 1; Mustela nivalis, n = 2; Myodes glareolus, n = 435; Sorex araneus, n = 5; and Talpa europaea, n = 1) were collected and examined. In total, 916 questing ticks belonging to three species (Ixodes ricinus, n = 741; Dermacentor reticulatus, n = 174; and I. trianguliceps, n = 1) were collected. Of these, 474 ticks were further investigated. The prevalence for Rickettsia spp. and B. burgdorferi (s.l.) in the investigated small mammals was 25.3 and 31.2%, respectively. The chance of encountering Rickettsia spp. in M. glareolus was seven times higher for specimens infested with D. reticulatus than for those which were free of D. reticulatus (OR: 7.0; 95% CI: 3.3-14.7; P < 0.001). In total, 11.4% of questing I. ricinus and 70.5% of D. reticulatus were positive for Rickettsia spp. DNA of B. burgdorferi (s.l.) was detected only in I. ricinus (5.5%). Sequence analysis revealed 9 R. helvetica, 5 R. raoultii, and 1 R. felis obtained from 15 small mammal samples. Small mammals may serve as reservoirs for Rickettsia spp. and B. burgdorferi (s.l.). While the prevalence for Rickettsia spp. in M. glareolus is most

  12. Does small-volume resuscitation with crystalloids or colloids influence hemostasis and survival of rabbits subjected to lethal uncontrolled hemorrhage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirabadi, Bijan Shams; Miranda, Nahir; Terrazas, Irasema B; Gonzales, Mary D; Grimm, Rose C; Dubick, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    Prehospital, small-volume resuscitation of combat casualties with a synthetic colloid (6% hydroxyethyl starch [HES] 670/0.75) has been recommended when blood or blood components are unavailable. We studied hemostatic effects of a newer synthetic colloid (6% HES, 130/0.4) compared with either a natural colloid (albumin) or to crystalloids in an uncontrolled hemorrhage model. Spontaneously breathing New Zealand white rabbits (3.4 ± 0.1 kg) were anesthetized, instrumented, and subjected to a splenic injury with uncontrolled bleeding. Fifteen minutes after injury, rabbits were in shock (mean arterial pressure [MAP] = 26 ± 1.3 mm Hg, and received colloids (6% HES, 130/0.4 or 5% albumin at 15 mL/kg), or crystalloids (normal saline at 30 mL/kg or 5% hypertonic saline at 7.5 mL/kg) for resuscitation in two intravenous bolus injections (15 minutes apart) to raise their MAP to 65 mm Hg, n = 9/group. Animals were monitored for 2.5 hours or until death, and blood losses were measured. Blood samples were analyzed for arterial blood gas, complete blood count, and coagulation measures. There were no differences among groups in baseline measures and initial hemorrhage volume (11.9 ± 0.6 mL/kg) at 15 minutes postinjury. Twenty minutes after fluid resuscitation (1 hour postinjury), MAP was higher, shock indices were lower, and blood pH was higher in colloids versus. crystalloids groups (p colloid produced the largest hemodilution (54% decrease in hematocrit, p < 0.05 vs. hypertonic saline). Activated partial thromboplastin time increased approximately 35% above baseline in all groups except in 6% HES 130/0.4 group in which it doubled. Clot strength was reduced (15%) only in the 6% HES 130/0.4 group. 6% HES 130/0.4 resuscitation produced the largest blood loss and 33% survival rate that was not different than the crystalloid groups. Albumin produced the best hemostatic and survival outcomes (78%). Small-volume resuscitation with crystalloids appeared inadequate to treat

  13. Serum insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-2 levels and metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors in young adults and children born small for gestational age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.K. de Kort (Sandra); J. van Doorn (Jaap); A.G.M. van de Sande (Ad); R.W.J. Leunissen (Ralph); A.C.S. Hokken-Koelega (Anita)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-2 might protect against cardiovascular disease. Small for gestational age (SGA) birth could be associated with a higher risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease in later life. No data are available on the relationship between

  14. Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering from thin polymer films with lamellar structures - the scattering cross section in the distorted-wave Born approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posselt, Dorthe; Busch, Peter; Rauscher, Markus

    2006-01-01

    Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray or neutron scattering of thin polymer films reveals information about the ordering and preferential orientations of the phase-separated microdomains within the films. The grazing-incidence geometry enhances the surface sensitivity; however, the scattering has t...

  15. Structural and functional development of small intestine in intrauterine growth retarded porcine offspring born to gilts fed diets with differing protein ratios throughout pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mickiewicz, M; Zabielski, R; Grenier, B

    2012-01-01

    Protein level in the maternal diet plays a crucial role in fetal programming during pregnancy. Low or high protein level increases the risk of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). The aim of this study was to investigate the structural and functional development of the small intestine in pigle...

  16. A 2-year multicentre, open-label, randomized, controlled study of growth hormone (Genotropin®) treatment in very young children born small for gestational age: Early Growth and Neurodevelopment (EGN) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schepper, Jean; Vanderfaeillie, Johan; Mullis, Primus-E; Rooman, Raoul; Robertson, Anna; Dilleen, Maria; Gomez, Roy; Wollmann, Hartmut A

    2016-03-01

    In Europe, growth hormone (GH) treatment for children born small for gestational age (SGA) can only be initiated after 4 years of age. However, younger age at treatment initiation is a predictor of favourable response. To assess the effect of GH treatment on early growth and cognitive functioning in very young (aged 19-29 months diagnosed as SGA at birth, and for whom sufficient early growth data were available, were eligible. Patients were randomized (1:1) to GH treatment (Genotropin®, Pfizer Inc.) at a dose of 0·035 mg/kg/day by subcutaneous injection, or no treatment. The primary objective was to assess the change from baseline in height standard deviation score (SDS) after 24 months of GH treatment. Change from baseline in height SDS was significantly greater in the GH treatment vs control group at both month 12 (1·03 vs 0·14) and month 24 (1·63 vs 0·43; both P < 0·001). Growth velocity SDS was significantly higher in the GH treatment vs control group at 12 months (P < 0·001), but not at 24 months. There was no significant difference in mental or psychomotor development indices between the two groups. GH treatment for 24 months in very young short-stature children born SGA resulted in a significant increase in height SDS compared with no treatment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Improving Middle School Students' Subjective Well-Being: Efficacy of a Multicomponent Positive Psychology Intervention Targeting Small Groups of Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Rachel A.; Suldo, Shannon M.; Ferron, John M.

    2017-01-01

    Most interventions intended to improve subjective well-being, termed "positive psychology interventions" (PPIs), have neglected to include relevant stakeholders in youth's lives and have not included booster sessions intended to maintain gains in subjective well-being. The current study investigated the impact of a multitarget,…

  18. Tick-Borne Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH TICK-BORNE DISEASES Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Tick-borne ... viruses, or parasites. Some of the most common tick-borne diseases in the United States include: Lyme disease, babesiosis, ...

  19. Role of 5-hydroxytryptamine mechanisms in mediating the effects of small intestinal glucose on blood pressure and antropyloroduodenal motility in older subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gentilcore, Diana; Little, Tanya J.; Feinle-Bisset, Christine; Samsom, Melvin; Smout, Andre J. P. M.; Horowitz, Michael; Jones, Karen L.

    2007-01-01

    5-hydroxytryptamine mechanisms in mediating the effects of small intestinal glucose on blood pressure and antropyloroduodenal motility in older subjects. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 293: G692-G698, 2007. First published August 9, 2007; doi:10.1152/ajpgi.00199.2007.-Postprandial

  20. Delayed gastric emptying and reduced postprandial small bowel water content of equicaloric whole meal bread versus rice meals in healthy subjects: novel MRI insights

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marciani, L; Pritchard, S E; Hellier-Woods, C; Costigan, C; Hoad, C L; Gowland, P A; Spiller, R C

    2013-01-01

    ... kJ WMB or an equicaloric RP meal. Subjects underwent serial MRI scans every 45 min up to 270 min to assess gastric volumes and small bowel water content, and completed a GI symptom questionnaire...

  1. MijnBorne2030: evaluatie van een democratisch experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denters, Sebastianus A.H.; Klok, Pieter J.

    2015-01-01

    This article is about one of the experiments in local democratic renewal: MyBorne2030 (in Dutch ‘MijnBorne2030’). The aim of the project was to develop a communal vision for Borne (a relatively small suburban municipality of 20.000 inhabitants in the East of the Netherlands) for the year 2030. A

  2. Baseline IGF-I levels determine insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity during the first year on growth hormone therapy in children born small for gestational age. Results from a North European Multicentre Study (NESGAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Rikke Beck; Thankamony, Ajay; O'Connell, Susan M; Salgin, Burak; Kirk, Jeremy; Donaldson, Malcolm; Ivarsson, Sten-A; Söder, Olle; Roche, Edna; Hoey, Hilary; Dunger, David B; Juul, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Developmental programming alters growth and metabolic outcome in children born small for gestational age (SGA). We explored insulin and glucose metabolism in SGA children treated with a fixed GH dose over 1 year. In the North European Small for Gestational Age Study (NESGAS), 110 short SGA children received GH at 67 µg/kg/day for 1 year. Insulin secretion was assessed by acute insulin response (AIR), insulin sensitivity (IS) by HOMA and disposition index (DI) by insulin secretion adjusted for IS. First-year GH therapy led to increases in height and IGF-I standard deviation score (SDS), and reductions in IS (p Children in the highest IGF-I SDS tertile at baseline were the least insulin sensitive at baseline (p = 0.024) and 1 year (p = 0.006). IGF-I responses after 1 year were positively related to AIR (r = 0.30, p = 0.007) and DI (r = 0.29, p = 0.005). In SGA children treated with a high GH dose for 1 year, baseline IGF-I levels were related to IS whilst gains in height and IGF-I responses were associated with insulin secretion. Defining heterogeneity in IGF-I in SGA children may be useful in predicting growth and metabolic response. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Small-for-gestational age and large-for-gestational age thresholds to predict infants at risk of adverse delivery and neonatal outcomes: are current charts adequate? An observational study from the Born in Bradford cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, T; Johnson, W; Farrar, D; Tuffnell, D; Wright, J; Cameron, N

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Construct an ethnic-specific chart and compare the prediction of adverse outcomes using this chart with the clinically recommended UK-WHO and customised birth weight charts using cut-offs for small-for-gestational age (SGA: birth weight 90th centile). Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Born in Bradford (BiB) study, UK. Participants 3980 White British and 4448 Pakistani infants with complete data for gestational age, birth weight, ethnicity, maternal height, weight and parity. Main outcome measures Prevalence of SGA and LGA, using the three charts and indicators of diagnostic utility (sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC)) of these chart-specific cut-offs to predict delivery and neonatal outcomes and a composite outcome. Results In White British and Pakistani infants, the prevalence of SGA and LGA differed depending on the chart used. Increased risk of SGA was observed when using the UK-WHO and customised charts as opposed to the ethnic-specific chart, while the opposite was apparent when classifying LGA infants. However, the predictive utility of all three charts to identify adverse clinical outcomes was poor, with only the prediction of shoulder dystocia achieving an AUROC>0.62 on all three charts. Conclusions Despite being recommended in national clinical guidelines, the UK-WHO and customised birth weight charts perform poorly at identifying infants at risk of adverse neonatal outcomes. Being small or large may increase the risk of an adverse outcome; however, size alone is not sensitive or specific enough with current detection to be useful. However, a significant amount of missing data for some of the outcomes may have limited the power needed to determine true associations. PMID:25783424

  4. Small-size effect on wrinkle and fracture of monolayer graphene subjected to in-plane shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianzhong; Guo, Xingming; Lu, Lu

    2017-11-01

    Controlling surface patterns are useful in a wide range of applications including flexible electronics, biological templates, microelectromechanical systems and device fabrication. The present paper investigates the wrinkling and fracture of graphene subjected to in-plane shear. It is found that the size of a graphene sheet has significant effect on the wrinkle and fracture based on both molecular dynamics simulation and nonlocal plate theory. The analytical expressions for wrinkle amplitude and wavelength are deduced. The nonlocal parameter of nonlocal plate theory is evaluated. Furthermore, the higher aspect ratio has enhanced the wrinkle resistance and shear strength of graphene. Temperature and chirality have insignificant impact on the wrinkling, but significantly influence the fracture of the graphene sheet. This work is expected to provide a better understanding of the mechanism of nanometer scale wrinkles.

  5. Single subject design: Use of time series analyses in a small cohort to understand adherence with a prescribed fluid restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Carolyn Miller; Higgins, Melinda; Smith, Andrew; Culler, Steven D; Dunbar, Sandra B

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a secondary in-depth analysis of five persons with heart failure randomized to receive an education and behavioral intervention on fluid restriction as part of a larger study. Using a single subject analysis design, time series analyses models were constructed for each of the five patients for a period of 180 days to determine correlations between daily measures of patient reported fluid intake, thoracic impedance, and weights, and relationships between patient reported outcomes of symptom burden and health related quality of life over time. Negative relationships were observed between fluid intake and thoracic impedance, and between impedance and weight, while positive correlations were observed between daily fluid intake and weight. By constructing time series analyses of daily measures of fluid congestion, trends and patterns of fluid congestion emerged which could be used to guide individualized patient care or future research endeavors. Employment of such a specialized analysis technique allows for the elucidation of clinically relevant findings potentially disguised when only evaluating aggregate outcomes of larger studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. RESULTS OF INTRODUCTION OF A PROCESS APPROACH TO MANAGEMENT OF SUBJECTS OF SMALL BUSINESS (on an example of logistic service of the construction enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Folomeev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to subjects of small business of construction branch, their place in branch and to problems of management by them. The question of need of introduction of the most effective methods of management by the construction organization, in particular, a process approach is brought up. In article the characteristic of separate elements of this approach is given, methods and ways of their realization at the enterprise from the point of view of allocation and optimization of costs of the enterprise from the logistical point of view are considered and results of its introduction on an example of logistic service of the construction enterprise are given..

  7. Ocular manifestations of tick-borne diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Harish; Starr, Matthew R; Bakri, Sophie J

    Tick-borne illnesses are a significant disease burden worldwide. Diagnosis is challenging and requires a high level of clinical suspicion. Ocular manifestations reported in association with tick-borne disease are mostly as case reports and small case series because of the relative infrequency with which they occur; however, given the global nature of health care and increase in travel in the 21st century, it is important for ophthalmologists to be aware of ocular manifestations of these diseases because early diagnosis may reduce morbidity and mortality. Here, we review of the literature of tick-borne diseases with reported ophthalmic findings. All known human tick-borne diseases are discussed, including a brief description of the causative agent, region of endemicity, vector, systemic symptoms, and any reported eye findings. When possible, we also address the strength of the evidence for these ocular associations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of response to 2-years’ growth hormone treatment in children with isolated growth hormone deficiency, born small for gestational age, idiopathic short stature, or multiple pituitary hormone deficiency: combined results from two large observational studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Peter A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have compared the response to growth hormone (GH treatment between indications such as isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD, born small for gestational age (SGA, idiopathic short stature (ISS, and multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (MPHD. The aim of this analysis of data, collected from two large ongoing observational outcome studies, was to evaluate growth and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I response data for children of short stature with IGHD, MPHD, SGA, or ISS following two years of treatment with the recombinant GH product Norditropin® (Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsværd, Denmark. Methods Analysis of auxologic data from two ongoing prospective observational studies, NordiNet® International Outcomes Study (NordiNet® IOS and NovoNet®/American Norditropin® Studies: Web-enabled Research (ANSWER Program®. Results 4,582 children aged p = 0.047; p  0.001 vs. IGHD, respectively. Height gain was comparable between IGHD and MPHD. In pre-pubertal children vs. total population, height SDS change after two years was: IGHD, +1.24 vs. +0.97; SGA, +1.17 vs. +1.03; ISS, +1.04 vs. +0.84; and MPHD, +1.16 vs. +0.99 (all p  Conclusions After two years’ GH treatment, change in height SDS was greater in SGA and less in ISS, compared with IGHD; the discrepancy in responses may be due to the disease nature or confounders (i.e. age. Height SDS increase was greatest in pre-pubertal children, supporting early treatment initiation to optimize growth outcomes.

  9. Comparison of the Thorax Dynamic Responses of Small Female and Midsize Male Post Mortem Human Subjects in Side and Forward Oblique Impact Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudrit, Pascal; Petitjean, Audrey; Potier, Pascal; Trosseille, Xavier; Vallencien, Guy

    2014-11-01

    Despite the increasing knowledge of the thorax mechanics in impact loadings, the effects of inter-individual differences on the mechanical response are difficult to take into account. For example, the biofidelity corridors for the small female or large male are extrapolated from the midsize male corridors. The present study reports on the results of new tests performed on small female Post Mortem Human Subjects (PMHS), and compares them with test results on midsize male PMHS. Three tests in pure side impact and three tests in forward oblique impact were performed on the thorax of small female specimens. The average weight and stature were 43 kg and 1.58 m for the small female specimens. The initial speed of the impactor was 4.3 m/s. The mass and the diameter of the impactor face were respectively 23.4 kg and 130 mm. The instrumentation and methodology was the same as for the tests published in 2008 by Trosseille et al. on midsize male specimens. The rib cages were instrumented with accelerometers on the T1, T4 and T12 vertebrae, upper and lower sternum, and the ribs were instrumented with up to 110 strain gauges. A force transducer and an accelerometer were mounted on the impactor in order to record the force applied onto the thorax. Targets fixed on vertebrae were tracked using high speed cameras in order to estimate the thoracic deflection. For the six midsize males, the test conditions were exactly the same as for the small female specimens, except for the diameter of the impactor face which was 152 mm. The average weight and stature were 70.3 kg and 1.70 m for the midsize male specimens. The force and thoracic deflection time-histories and the injury assessments are given for each specimen. The thorax force magnitude varied from 1.05 to 1.45 kN and from 1.63 to 2.34 kN, respectively for the small female and midsize male groups. The maximum deflection varied from 51 to 117 mm and from 59 to 81 mm, respectively for the small female and midsize male groups. The

  10. Real-Time Classification of Patients with Balance Disorders vs. Normal Subjects Using a Low-Cost Small Wireless Wearable Gait Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhargava Teja Nukala

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Gait analysis using wearable wireless sensors can be an economical, convenient and effective way to provide diagnostic and clinical information for various health-related issues. In this work, our custom designed low-cost wireless gait analysis sensor that contains a basic inertial measurement unit (IMU was used to collect the gait data for four patients diagnosed with balance disorders and additionally three normal subjects, each performing the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI tests while wearing the custom wireless gait analysis sensor (WGAS. The small WGAS includes a tri-axial accelerometer integrated circuit (IC, two gyroscopes ICs and a Texas Instruments (TI MSP430 microcontroller and is worn by each subject at the T4 position during the DGI tests. The raw gait data are wirelessly transmitted from the WGAS to a near-by PC for real-time gait data collection and analysis. In order to perform successful classification of patients vs. normal subjects, we used several different classification algorithms, such as the back propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN, support vector machine (SVM, k-nearest neighbors (KNN and binary decision trees (BDT, based on features extracted from the raw gait data of the gyroscopes and accelerometers. When the range was used as the input feature, the overall classification accuracy obtained is 100% with BP-ANN, 98% with SVM, 96% with KNN and 94% using BDT. Similar high classification accuracy results were also achieved when the standard deviation or other values were used as input features to these classifiers. These results show that gait data collected from our very low-cost wearable wireless gait sensor can effectively differentiate patients with balance disorders from normal subjects in real time using various classifiers, the success of which may eventually lead to accurate and objective diagnosis of abnormal human gaits and their underlying etiologies in the future, as more patient data are being collected.

  11. Real-Time Classification of Patients with Balance Disorders vs. Normal Subjects Using a Low-Cost Small Wireless Wearable Gait Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nukala, Bhargava Teja; Nakano, Taro; Rodriguez, Amanda; Tsay, Jerry; Lopez, Jerry; Nguyen, Tam Q; Zupancic, Steven; Lie, Donald Y C

    2016-11-29

    Gait analysis using wearable wireless sensors can be an economical, convenient and effective way to provide diagnostic and clinical information for various health-related issues. In this work, our custom designed low-cost wireless gait analysis sensor that contains a basic inertial measurement unit (IMU) was used to collect the gait data for four patients diagnosed with balance disorders and additionally three normal subjects, each performing the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI) tests while wearing the custom wireless gait analysis sensor (WGAS). The small WGAS includes a tri-axial accelerometer integrated circuit (IC), two gyroscopes ICs and a Texas Instruments (TI) MSP430 microcontroller and is worn by each subject at the T4 position during the DGI tests. The raw gait data are wirelessly transmitted from the WGAS to a near-by PC for real-time gait data collection and analysis. In order to perform successful classification of patients vs. normal subjects, we used several different classification algorithms, such as the back propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN), support vector machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbors (KNN) and binary decision trees (BDT), based on features extracted from the raw gait data of the gyroscopes and accelerometers. When the range was used as the input feature, the overall classification accuracy obtained is 100% with BP-ANN, 98% with SVM, 96% with KNN and 94% using BDT. Similar high classification accuracy results were also achieved when the standard deviation or other values were used as input features to these classifiers. These results show that gait data collected from our very low-cost wearable wireless gait sensor can effectively differentiate patients with balance disorders from normal subjects in real time using various classifiers, the success of which may eventually lead to accurate and objective diagnosis of abnormal human gaits and their underlying etiologies in the future, as more patient data are being collected.

  12. Tick-borne encephalitis virus, Kyrgyzstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Benjamin J; Atkinson, Barry; Czechowski, Donna M; Larsen, Peter A; Meeks, Heather N; Carrera, Juan P; Duplechin, Ryan M; Hewson, Roger; Junushov, Asankadyr T; Gavrilova, Olga N; Breininger, Irena; Phillips, Carleton J; Baker, Robert J; Hay, John

    2011-05-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is an emerging pathogen in Europe and Asia. We investigated TBEV in Kyrgyzstan by collecting small mammals and ticks from diverse localities and analyzing them for evidence of TBEV infection. We found TBEV circulating in Kyrgyzstan much farther south and at higher altitudes than previously reported.

  13. Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus, Kyrgyzstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Barry; Czechowski, Donna M.; Larsen, Peter A.; Meeks, Heather N.; Carrera, Juan P.; Duplechin, Ryan M.; Hewson, Roger; Junushov, Asankadyr T.; Gavrilova, Olga N.; Breininger, Irena; Phillips, Carleton J.; Baker, Robert J.; Hay, John

    2011-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is an emerging pathogen in Europe and Asia. We investigated TBEV in Kyrgyzstan by collecting small mammals and ticks from diverse localities and analyzing them for evidence of TBEV infection. We found TBEV circulating in Kyrgyzstan much farther south and at higher altitudes than previously reported. PMID:21529400

  14. Better Diet Quality during Pregnancy Is Associated with a Reduced Likelihood of an Infant Born Small for Gestational Age: An Analysis of the Prospective New Hampshire Birth Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emond, Jennifer A; Karagas, Margaret R; Baker, Emily R; Gilbert-Diamond, Diane

    2018-01-01

    Birth weight has a U-shaped relation with chronic disease. Diet quality during pregnancy may impact fetal growth and infant birth weight, yet findings are inconclusive. We examined the relation between maternal diet quality during pregnancy and infant birth size among women enrolled in a prospective birth cohort. Women 18-45 y old with a singleton pregnancy were recruited at 24-28 wk of gestation from prenatal clinics in New Hampshire. Women completed a validated food frequency questionnaire at enrollment. Diet quality was computed as adherence to the Alternative Healthy Eating Index. Infant birth outcomes (sex, head circumference, weight, and length) were extracted from medical records. Weight-for-length z scores, low birth weight, macrosomia, and size for gestational age [small for gestational age (SGA) or large for gestational age (LGA)] were computed. Multivariable regression models fit each outcome on quartiles of diet quality, adjusted for covariates. Models were computed overall and stratified by smoking status. Analyses included 862 women and infants with complete data. Lower diet quality was associated with lower maternal education, being a smoker, prepregnancy obesity status, and lack of exercise during pregnancy. Overall, 3.4% of infants were born with a low birth weight, 12.1% with macrosomia, 4.6% were SGA, and 8.7% were LGA. In an adjusted model, increased diet quality appeared linearly associated with a reduced likelihood of SGA (P-trend = 0.03), although each quartile comparison did not reach statistical significance. Specifically, ORs for SGA were 0.89 (95% CI: 0.37, 2.15), 0.73 (95% CI: 0.28, 1.89), and 0.35 (95% CI: 0.11, 1.08) for each increasing quartile of diet quality compared to the lowest quartile. Similar trends for SGA were observed among non-smokers (n = 756; P-trend = 0.07). Also among non-smokers, increased diet quality was associated with lower infant birth weight (P-trend = 0.03) and a suggested reduction in macrosomia (P-trend = 0

  15. Innovative Born Globals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, Sascha; Brem, Alexander; Muench, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    propose hypotheses about the influence of efficiency-centered and novelty-entered business model design on international firm performance. To test these hypotheses, we performed a quantitative survey with 252 founders of international companies in Germany, Switzerland and Liechtenstein. Additionally, we...... gained further insights through a case study analysis of 11 Born Globals. The results show that business model design matters to international firm performance and the business model design of Born Globals tends to be more efficiency-centered. Based on a multiple case study, we analyzed business models...

  16. Structure-borne sound and vibration from building-mounted wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhouse, Andy; Elliott, Andy; Eastwick, Graham; Evans, Tomos; Ryan, Andy; von Hunerbein, Sabine; le Bescond, Valentin; Waddington, David

    2011-07-01

    Noise continues to be a significant factor in the development of wind energy resources. In the case of building-mounted wind turbines (BMWTs), in addition to the usual airborne sound there is the potential for occupants to be affected by structure-borne sound and vibration transmitted through the building structure. Usual methods for prediction and evaluation of noise from large and small WTs are not applicable to noise of this type. This letter describes an investigation aiming to derive a methodology for prediction of structure-borne sound and vibration inside attached dwellings. Jointly funded by three UK government departments, the work was motivated by a desire to stimulate renewable energy generation by the removal of planning restrictions where possible. A method for characterizing BMWTs as sources of structure-borne sound was first developed during a field survey of two small wind turbines under variable wind conditions. The 'source strength' was established as a function of rotor speed although a general relationship to wind speed could not be established. The influence of turbulence was also investigated. The prediction methodology, which also accounts for the sound transmission properties of the mast and supporting building, was verified in a field survey of existing installations. Significant differences in behavior and subjective character were noted between the airborne and structure-borne noise from BMWTs.

  17. Population Health Vulnerabilities to Vector-borne Diseases ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    People in the drylands of sub-Saharan Africa suffer from poverty, food insecurity, a fragile economy, and social vulnerability. With climate change, they may also face increasing threats from vector-borne diseases. Vector-borne diseases, such as West Nile Virus and malaria, are spread through the bites of small organisms ...

  18. Small Amounts of Gluten in Subjects With Suspected Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Cross-Over Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sabatino, Antonio; Volta, Umberto; Salvatore, Chiara; Biancheri, Paolo; Caio, Giacomo; De Giorgio, Roberto; Di Stefano, Michele; Corazza, Gino R

    2015-09-01

    There is debate over the existence of nonceliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms in response to ingestion of gluten-containing foods by people without celiac disease or wheat allergy. We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial to determine the effects of administration of low doses of gluten to subjects with suspected NCGS. We enrolled 61 adults without celiac disease or a wheat allergy who believed ingestion of gluten-containing food to be the cause of their intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms. Participants were assigned randomly to groups given either 4.375 g/day gluten or rice starch (placebo) for 1 week, each via gastrosoluble capsules. After a 1-week gluten-free diet, participants crossed over to the other group. The primary outcome was the change in overall (intestinal and extraintestinal) symptoms, determined by established scoring systems, between gluten and placebo intake. A secondary outcome was the change in individual symptom scores between gluten vs placebo. According to the per-protocol analysis of data from the 59 patients who completed the trial, intake of gluten significantly increased overall symptoms compared with placebo (P = .034). Abdominal bloating (P = .040) and pain (P = .047), among the intestinal symptoms, and foggy mind (P = .019), depression (P = .020), and aphthous stomatitis (P = .025), among the extraintestinal symptoms, were significantly more severe when subjects received gluten than placebo. In a cross-over trial of subjects with suspected NCGS, the severity of overall symptoms increased significantly during 1 week of intake of small amounts of gluten, compared with placebo. Clinical trial no: ISRCTN72857280. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Born, Prof. Max

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1937 Honorary. Born, Prof. Max Nobel Laureate (Physics) - 1954. Date of birth: 11 December 1882. Date of death: 5 January 1970. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science ...

  20. Vector-borne Infections

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-18

    This podcast discusses emerging vector-borne pathogens, their role as prominent contributors to emerging infectious diseases, how they're spread, and the ineffectiveness of mosquito control methods.  Created: 4/18/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/27/2011.

  1. A born dreamer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lawrence

    But that was my only opportunity to impress my father with my progress in studies. He was keen to keep track of my education, and I passed class four with impressive marks. My father worked for the government. Although a bril- liant student, financial constraints prevented him from pursuing. A born dreamer. Chitra Mandal.

  2. [Food-borne trematodiases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruithof, Remco; Erard, Véronique

    2017-10-11

    Food-borne trematodiases (flukes) are transmitted through the consumption of contaminated undercooked aquatic food. Infections are most prevalent in Southeast Asia and Latin America, but might occur anywhere due to food trade, international travel, human migration. Clinical manifestations are hepatobiliary, intestinal, and pleuropulmonary. The worse complication is development of cholangiocarcinoma. Efficacious drug therapy are available, however prevention control measures are essential to avoid transmission. Since 2015, trematodiases are included in the WHO program implemented to fight neglected tropical diseases.

  3. Tick-borne encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Lars; Vapalahti, Olli

    2008-05-31

    We review the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of tick-borne encephalitis, and summarise biological and virological aspects that are important for understanding the life-cycle and transmission of the virus. Tick-borne encephalitis virus is a flavivirus that is transmitted by Ixodes spp ticks in a vast area from western Europe to the eastern coast of Japan. Tick-borne encephalitis causes acute meningoencephalitis with or without myelitis. Morbidity is age dependent, and is highest in adults of whom half develop encephalitis. A third of patients have longlasting sequelae, frequently with cognitive dysfunction and substantial impairment in quality of life. The disease arises in patchy endemic foci in Europe, with climatic and ecological conditions suitable for circulation of the virus. Climate change and leisure habits expose more people to tick-bites and have contributed to the increase in number of cases despite availability of effective vaccines. The serological diagnosis is usually straightforward. No specific treatment for the disease exists, and immunisation is the main preventive measure.

  4. Where was Joseph Babinski born?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teive, Hélio A G; Munhoz, Renato P; de Souza, Leonardo Cruz

    2011-01-01

    There is controversy in the neurological literature about where Joseph Babinski was born, including a myth propounded by various important authors that he was born in Lima, Peru. However, according to the most consistent biographical data, he was in fact born in Paris, France, and became a medical celebrity there and in Poland as well as around the world.

  5. Where was Joseph Babinski born?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H A G Teive

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is controversy in the neurological literature about where Joseph Babinski was born, including a myth propounded by various important authors that he was born in Lima, Peru. However, according to the most consistent biographical data, he was in fact born in Paris, France, and became a medical celebrity there and in Poland as well as around the world.

  6. Phenotypic Differences in Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder Born Preterm and at Term Gestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Katherine; Wink, Logan K.; Pottenger, Amy; McDougle, Christopher J.; Erickson, Craig

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to characterize the phenotype of males and females with autism spectrum disorder born preterm versus those born at term. Descriptive statistical analyses identified differences between male and female autism spectrum disorder subjects born preterm compared to term for several phenotypic characteristics and…

  7. Foreign-Born Instructors in the U.S.: Intercultural Competence, Teaching Strategies, and Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilik, Oksana

    2011-01-01

    This study examines intercultural competence, teaching strategies, and job satisfaction of foreign-born instructors in a small U.S. higher education institution. The research questions addressed by this study are: (1) How do foreign-born instructors score on intercultural competence? (2) How do foreign-born instructors' teaching strategies differ…

  8. School performance of adolescents born preterm: neuropsychological and background correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavalainen, Pia M; Luoma, Laila; Laukkanen, Eila; M Bowler, Dermot; Määttä, Sara; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Herrgård, Eila

    2008-05-01

    In this longitudinal study the development of preterm and control children was followed from infancy until adolescence. School performance at the age of 16 in subjects born very preterm with a gestational age (GA) of foreign language and the native language (Finnish). Subjects in the preterm group achieved significantly higher grade points in the first foreign language than control subjects. In particular, the difference was evident between the preterm and control boys. The extremely preterm group with a GA importance in predicting school success in adolescence. The results suggest a good outcome, measured by school grade scores at 16 years of age, of the subjects born very preterm.

  9. Children Born Preterm at the Turn of the Millennium Had Better Lung Function Than Children Born Similarly Preterm in the Early 1990s.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vollsæter

    Full Text Available Compare respiratory health in children born extremely preterm (EP or with extremely low birthweight (ELBW nearly one decade apart, hypothesizing that better perinatal management has led to better outcome.Fifty-seven (93% of 61 eligible 11-year old children born in Western Norway in 1999-2000 with gestational age (GA <28 weeks or birthweight <1000 gram (EP1999-2000 and matched term-controls were assessed with comprehensive lung function tests and standardized questionnaires. Outcome was compared with data obtained at 10 years of age from all (n = 35 subjects born at GA <29 weeks or birthweight <1001 gram within a part of the same region in 1991-92 (EP1991-1992 and their matched term-controls.EP1999-2000 had significantly reduced forced expiratory flow in 1 second (FEV1, FEV1 to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC and forced expiratory flow between 25-75% of FVC (FEF25-75, with z-scores respectively -0.34, -0.50 and -0.61 below those of the term-control group, and more bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine (dose-response-slope 13.2 vs. 3.5; p<0.001, whereas other outcomes did not differ. Low birthweight z-scores, but not neonatal bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD or low GA, predicted poor outcome. For children with neonatal BPD, important lung-function variables were better in EP1999-2000 compared to EP1991-1992. In regression models, improvements were related to more use of antenatal corticosteroids and surfactant treatment in the EP1999-2000.Small airway obstruction and bronchial hyperresponsiveness were still present in children born preterm in 1999-2000, but outcome was better than for children born similarly preterm in 1991-92, particularly after neonatal BPD. The findings suggest that better neonatal management not only improves survival, but also long-term pulmonary outcome.

  10. Mosquito-borne viruses in Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hubálek, Zdeněk

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 103, Suppl. 1 (2008), S29-S43 ISSN 0932-0113. [Vector- borne disease s: impact of climate change on vectors and rodent reservoirs. Berlin, 27.09.2007-28.09.2007] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600930611 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : moboviruses * epidemiology Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.473, year: 2008

  11. Bergamot Reduces Plasma Lipids, Atherogenic Small Dense LDL, and Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Subjects with Moderate Hypercholesterolemia: a 6 Months Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter P. eToth

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some patients experience statin-induced side effects or prefer nutraceutical approaches for the treatment of dyslipidemia. This has led to a search for alternative therapeutic approaches for dyslipidemia management. In recent studies Citrus bergamia (known as Bergamot juice was able to reduce serum levels of lipids. Such benefit may be attributed to high amounts of flavonoids contained in Bergamot fruit juice (neoeriocitrin, neohesperidin, naringin. The aim of the present study was to fully investigate the effects of a Bergamot extract on cardio-metabolic parameters, including plasma lipids, atherogenic lipoproteins and subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods: Eighty subjects (42 men and 38 women, mean age: 55±13 years with moderate hypercholesterolemia (e.g., with plasma LDL-cholesterol concentrations between 160 and 190 mg/dl [between 4.1 and 4.9 mmol/l] were included. A Bergamot-derived extract (Bergavit® was given at a fixed dose daily (150 mg of flavonoids, with 16% of neoeriocitrin, 47% of neohesperidin and 37% of naringin for 6 months. Lipoprotein subfractions were assessed by gel electrophoresis. With this methodology low density lipoprotein (LDL subclasses are distributed as seven bands (LDL-1 and -2 as large LDL, and LDL-3 to -7 as atherogenic small, dense LDL. Subclinical atherosclerosis was assessed by carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT using B-mode ultrasound. Results: After 6 months, Bergavit® reduced total cholesterol (from 6.6±0.4 to 5.8±1.1 mmol/l, p<0.0001, triglycerides (from 1.8±0.6 to 1.5±0.9 mmol/l, p=0.0020, and LDL-cholesterol (from 4.6±0.2 to 3.7±1.0 mmol/l, p<0.0001, while HDL- cholesterol increased (from 1.3±0.2 to 1.4±0.4 mmol/l, p<0.0007. In addition, a significant increase in LDL-1 (from 41.2±0.2 to 49.6±0.2 %, p<0.0001 was accompanied by decreased small, dense LDL-3, -4 and 5 particles (from 14.5±0.1% to 9.0±0.1% p<0.0001; 3.2±0.1% to 1.5±0.1% p=0.0053; 0.3±0.0% to 0.1±0.0 % p=0

  12. Born Level Bound States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Paul

    2017-05-01

    Bound state poles in the S-matrix of perturbative QED are generated by the divergence of the expansion in α . The perturbative corrections are necessarily singular when expanding around free, {O}( α ^0 ) in and out states that have no overlap with finite-sized atomic wave functions. Nevertheless, measurables such as binding energies do have well-behaved expansions in powers of α (and log α ). It is desirable to formulate the concept of "lowest order" for gauge theory bound states such that higher order corrections vanish in the α → 0 limit. This may allow to determine a lowest order term for QCD hadrons which incorporates essential features such as confinement and chiral symmetry breaking, and thus can serve as the starting point of a useful perturbative expansion. I discuss a "Born" (no loop, lowest order in \\hbar ) approximation. Born level states are bound by gauge fields which satisfy the classical field equations. Gauss' law determines a distinct field A^0({\\varvec{x}}) for each instantaneous position of the charges. A Poincaré covariant boundary condition for the gluon field leads to a confining potential for q\\bar{q} and qqq states. In frames where the bound state is in motion the classical gauge field is obtained by a Lorentz boost of the rest frame field.

  13. Small Ubiquitin-Like Modifier 4 (SUMO4 Gene M55V Polymorphism and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-analysis Including 6,823 Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-yan Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMany studies suggest that the small ubiquitin-like modifier 4 (SUMO4 M55V gene polymorphism (rs237025 may be associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. However, due to other conflicting results, a clear consensus is lacking in the matter.Objective and methodsA meta-analysis consisting of 6,823 subjects from 10 studies was conducted to elucidate relationship between the SUMO4 M55V gene polymorphism and T2DM. Depending on the heterogeneity of the data, either a fixed or random-effects model would be used to assess the combined odds ratio (ORs and their corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI.ResultsSUMO4 gene M55V polymorphism was significantly associated with T2DM in the whole population under allelic (OR: 1.18, 95% CI: 1.10–1.28, P = 1.63 × 10−5, recessive (OR: 1.59, 95% CI: 1.14–2.23, P = 0.006, dominant (OR: 0.815, 95% CI: 0.737–0.901, P = 6.89 × 10−5, homozygous (OR: 1.415, 95% CI: 1.170–1.710, P = 0.0003, heterozygous (OR: 1.191, 95% CI: 1.072–1.323, P = 0.001, and additive genetic models (OR: 1.184, 95% CI: 1.097–1.279, P = 1.63 × 10−5. In our subgroup analysis, a significant association was found again in the Chinese population, but not in Japanese or Iranian population.ConclusionSUMO4 gene M55V polymorphism may correlate with increased T2DM risk. Chinese carriers of the V allele of the SUMO4 gene M55V polymorphism may be predisposed to developing T2DM.

  14. Tick-Borne Relapsing Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... recreation, are at higher risk of getting any tick-borne disease. Diagnosis & TestsWhat can I do if I have ... can test your blood for TBRF or other tick-borne diseases. TreatmentWhat can I do if I have TBRF? ...

  15. Ventilatory Efficiency in Children and Adolescents Born Extremely Preterm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hestnes, Julie; Hoel, Hedda; Risa, Ole J.; Romstøl, Hanna O.; Røksund, Ola; Frisk, Bente; Thorsen, Einar; Halvorsen, Thomas; Clemm, Hege H.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Children and adolescents born extremely preterm (EP) have lower dynamic lung volumes and gas transfer capacity than subjects born at term. Most studies also report lower aerobic capacity. We hypothesized that ventilatory efficiency was poorer and that breathing patterns differed in EP−born compared to term−born individuals. Methods: Two area−based cohorts of participants born with gestational age ≤28 weeks or birth weight ≤1000 g in 1982−85 (n = 46) and 1991–92 (n = 35) were compared with individually matched controls born at term. Mean ages were 18 and 10 years, respectively. The participants performed an incremental treadmill exercise test to peak oxygen uptake with data averaged over 20 s intervals. For each participant, the relationship between exhaled minute ventilation (V˙E) and carbon dioxide output (V˙CO2) was described by a linear model, and the relationship between tidal volume (VT) and V˙E by a quadratic model. Multivariate regression analyses were done with curve parameters as dependent variables, and the categories EP vs. term−born, sex, age, height, weight and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) as independent variables. Results: In adjusted analyses, the slope of the V˙E−V˙CO2 relationship was significantly steeper in the EP than the term-born group, whereas no group difference was observed for the breathing pattern, which was related to FEV1 only. Conclusion: EP-born participants breathed with higher V˙E for any given CO2 output, indicating lower ventilatory efficiency, possibly contributing to lower aerobic capacity. The breathing patterns did not differ between the EP and term−born groups when adjusted for FEV1. PMID:28751866

  16. Ventilatory Efficiency in Children and Adolescents Born Extremely Preterm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Hestnes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Children and adolescents born extremely preterm (EP have lower dynamic lung volumes and gas transfer capacity than subjects born at term. Most studies also report lower aerobic capacity. We hypothesized that ventilatory efficiency was poorer and that breathing patterns differed in EP−born compared to term−born individuals.Methods: Two area−based cohorts of participants born with gestational age ≤28 weeks or birth weight ≤1000 g in 1982−85 (n = 46 and 1991–92 (n = 35 were compared with individually matched controls born at term. Mean ages were 18 and 10 years, respectively. The participants performed an incremental treadmill exercise test to peak oxygen uptake with data averaged over 20 s intervals. For each participant, the relationship between exhaled minute ventilation (V˙E and carbon dioxide output (V˙CO2 was described by a linear model, and the relationship between tidal volume (VT and V˙E by a quadratic model. Multivariate regression analyses were done with curve parameters as dependent variables, and the categories EP vs. term−born, sex, age, height, weight and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 as independent variables.Results: In adjusted analyses, the slope of the V˙E−V˙CO2 relationship was significantly steeper in the EP than the term-born group, whereas no group difference was observed for the breathing pattern, which was related to FEV1 only.Conclusion: EP-born participants breathed with higher V˙E for any given CO2 output, indicating lower ventilatory efficiency, possibly contributing to lower aerobic capacity. The breathing patterns did not differ between the EP and term−born groups when adjusted for FEV1.

  17. Early Recollections of First-Borns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakouri, M. Ebrahim; Hafner, James L.

    1984-01-01

    Compared the early recollections of 50 first-borns and 98 later-borns. The first-borns mentioned significantly more nonfamily members, illness/injury, hospital/doctor's office. Later-borns mentioned significantly more siblings than did first-borns. Findings were discussed in the context of Adler's personality theory. (JAC)

  18. Pain tolerance and pain perception in adolescents born extremely preterm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vederhus, Bente Johanne; Eide, Geir Egil; Natvig, Gerd Karin; Markestad, Trond; Graue, Marit; Halvorsen, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    Neonatal pain experiences have been associated with altered processing and perception of pain in later life, but findings tend to vary among studies. We have compared experimental pain tolerance and subjective health complaints in a population-based cohort of adolescents born extremely preterm to that of matched term controls. Subjects performed a standardized cold pressor task (hand in ice water) and completed validated questionnaires regarding current subjective health complaints, including pain issues. Thirty-one (89%) of 35 eligible preterm subjects (mean gestational age 26.8 weeks) and 28 (80%) term controls participated in this follow-up study at mean age 17.8 years. Ten (32%) subjects born preterm versus 17 (61%) born at term reached the ceiling time of 180 seconds immersion time in the ice water, a hazard ratio for early withdrawal of 2.05 (95% confidence interval, 1.72 to 2.44), with males explaining most of the difference. For subjects born preterm, the risk of early withdrawal decreased significantly with more days of mechanical ventilation, more pain events, and more doses of morphine during the newborn period. Subjective pain ratings during the cold pressor task as well as health-related complaints and pain issues reported in the questionnaires were similar in the preterm and term groups. Despite reduced tolerance to experimental pain, subjects born preterm scored their pain experiences similarly to those of term controls. Surprisingly, preterm subjects exposed to most painful and invasive neonatal experiences and also to most doses of morphine had a pain response at follow-up most closely resembling that of the control group. Copyright © 2012 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Free/dissociable insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, not total IGF-I, correlates with growth response during growth hormone treatment in children born small for gestational age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bannink, Ellen M. N.; van Doorn, Jaap; Mulder, Paul G. H.; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C. S.

    Context: IGF-I plays an important role in pre- and postnatal growth. Its serum levels are regulated by metabolic and genetic factors. Mean total IGF-I in short, small for gestational age (SGA) children is reduced, but within the normal range. Free/dissociable IGF-I is the bioactive form of IGF-I.

  20. Insulin-like growth factor 1 gene (CA)n repeats and a variable number of tandem repeats of the insulin gene in Brazilian children born small for gestational age

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coletta, Rocio R D; Jorge, Alexander A L; D'Alva, Catarina Brasil; Pinto, Emília M; Billerbeck, Ana Elisa C; Pachi, Paulo R; Longui, Carlos A; Garcia, Ricardo M; Boguszewski, Margaret; Arnhold, Ivo J P; Mendonca, Berenice B; Costa, Elaine M F

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the influence of (CA)n repeats in the insulin-like growth factor 1 gene and a variable number of tandem repeats of the insulin gene on birth size in children who are small or adequate-sized for gestational age...

  1. Genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from foreign-born and Japan-born residents in Tokyo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato-Miyazawa, M; Miyoshi-Akiyama, T; Kanno, Y; Takasaki, J; Kirikae, T; Kobayashi, N

    2015-03-01

    Sequences of the full genomes of 259 clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, obtained from foreign-born and Japan-born patients in Tokyo, Japan, were determined, and a phylogenetic tree constructed by concatenated single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sequences. The 259 isolates were clustered into four clades: Lineage 2 (East Asian or "Beijing" genotype; n = 182, 70.3%), Lineage 4 (Euro-American, n = 46, 17.8%), Lineage 1 (Indo-Oceanic, n = 23, 8.9%), and Lineage 3 (East African-Indian, n = 8, 3.1%). Of the 259, 36 (13.9%) were resistant to at least one drug. There was no multi-drug-resistant isolate. Drug resistance was greater for the strains in Lineage 2 than the non-Lineage 2. The proportion of Lineage 2 isolates was significantly smaller in foreign-born (n = 43/91, 47.3%) than in Japan-born (n = 139/168, 82.7%) patients, whereas the proportion of Lineage 1 isolates was significantly larger in foreign-born (n = 19/91, 20.9%) than in Japan-born (n = 4/168, 2.4%) patients. We also found eight SNPs specific to the typical Beijing sub-genotype in Lineage 2, including 4 non-synonymous SNPs. Of the 259 isolates, 244 had strain-specific SNP(s) and small (1-30-bp) insertions and deletions (indels). The numbers of strain-specific SNPs and indels per isolate were significantly larger from foreign-born (median 89, range 0-520) than from Japan-born (median 23, range 0-415) (p 3.66E-15) patients. These results suggested that M. tuberculosis isolates from foreign-born patients had more genetic diversity than those from Japan-born patients. Copyright © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Adverse birth outcomes among native-born and foreign-born mothers in Taiwan: A population-based birth cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiao Laura

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of children born to foreign-born mothers in Taiwan has significantly increased since the 1990s. These foreign-born mothers are mainly from China and Southeast Asia. Children born to foreign-born mothers, according to media reports, are subject to inferior health. This study sought to determine whether socioeconomic disparities in birth outcomes exist between native and foreign-born mothers in Taiwan. Methods Analysis data were obtained from the Taiwan Birth Cohort Study of 20,090 nationally representative 6-month-old babies, born in 2005. The data on the babies were divided into two groups, those of foreign-born mothers and those of Taiwanese mothers. The health outcome variables that were examined included two adverse birth outcomes: low birth weight and preterm birth. Multiple logistic regression was used to examine the association between income and foreign-born status, as well as birth outcomes among both groups. Results Children of native Taiwanese mothers had a higher prevalence of low birth weight (6.9% than did children of China-born (4.7% and Southeast Asia-born mothers (5.2%. The prevalence of preterm birth was also higher among children of native Taiwanese mothers (8.4% than among children of Southeast Asia-born (7.2% and China-born mothers (6.3%. Foreign-born status was associated with lower odds of low birth weight among families with a monthly family income p p p p p Conclusion Foreign-born mothers from China and Southeast Asia did not experience worse birth outcomes than native Taiwanese mothers did, regardless of the disadvantaged socioeconomic position of their families.

  3. Born : vastutustundlikud tulevikus edukad / Kerstin Born ; interv. Kristo Kiviorg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Born, Kerstin

    2007-01-01

    Vastutustundliku ettevõtluse Euroopa organisatsiooni CSR Europe'i juht Kerstin Born vastab küsimustele ettevõtete vastutustundlikkuse kohta ühiskonnas. Vt. samas: Käivitus vastutustundliku ettevõtluse indeks

  4. Effects of Phase Difference and Mean Stress on the Fatigue Strength of Small-Hole-Containing Specimens Subjected to Combined Load

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    ENDO, Masahiro; ISHIMOTO, Isao

    2007-01-01

    .... Combined axial and torsional fatigue tests were conducted using annealed JIS S35C steel and quenched/tempered JIS SCM435 steel specimens containing a small hole of either 100 μm or 500 μm in diameter...

  5. Analysis of Small Ischemic Lesions in the Examinees of a Brain Dock and Neurological Examination of Animals Subjected to Cortical or Basal Ganglia Photothrombotic Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Tabata, Hitoshi; Xi, Guohua; Hua, Ya; Schallert, Timothy; Keep, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed cases of small brain ischemic lesions found in examinees of a brain dock (neurological health screening center). Small cerebral infarction was found in 17 % of the examinees (733 cases). White matter lesions were found in 24 %. Infarctions were located in the cortex or subcortical white matter in 31 % and in the basal ganglia in 44 % of cases. Infratentorial infarction was found in 1.6 %. We have developed an animal model of small infarction in the cortex or basal ganglia induced by photothrombosis in rodents. Sprague-Dawley rats or Mongolian gerbils were anesthetized and photothrombotic infarction was induced in the left caudate nucleus or parietal cortex by light exposure via an optic fiber and intravenous Rose Bengal dye injection. Histological examination revealed development of a small spherical infarction surrounding the tip of the optic fiber. The lesion turned to a cyst by 6 weeks after lesioning. Neurological deficits were found in animals both with cortical and caudate infarction. Behavioral changes in an open field test differed with the lesion site. Neurological deficits were sustained longer in animals with larger infarctions. Thus, photothrombotic infarction is useful for analyzing location-dependent and size-dependent neurological and neuropathological changes after cerebral infarction.

  6. SUBJECT INDEX

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amery Ice Shelf. Study of inter-annual variations in surface melting over. Amery Ice Shelf, East Antarctica, using space-borne scatterometer data. 329. Ammonium. Measurement of marine productivity using 15N and 13C tracers: Some methodological aspects. 99. Anabatic and katabatic wind. Study of vertical wind profiles in ...

  7. Effects of the small molecule SIRT1 activator, SRT2104 on arterial stiffness in otherwise healthy cigarette smokers and subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatasubramanian, Sowmya; Noh, Radzi M; Daga, Shruti; Langrish, Jeremy P; Mills, Nicholas L; Waterhouse, Brian R; Hoffmann, Ethan; Jacobson, Eric W; Lang, Ninian N; Frier, Brian M; Newby, David E

    2016-01-01

    Objective Arterial stiffness increases with age, and is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcome including increased mortality. The effect of the oral small molecule SIRT1 activator, SRT2104, on arterial stiffness was examined in otherwise healthy cigarette smokers and participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods 24 otherwise healthy cigarette smokers and 15 people with stable type 2 diabetes were randomised in a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover trial and received 28 days of oral SRT2104 (2.0 g/day) or matched placebo. Blood pressure was measured using non-invasive oscillatory sphygmomanometry. Pulse wave analysis and velocity were measured using applanation tonometry at baseline and the end of each treatment period. Owing to the small sample size and similar trends for both groups, data for the two groups were pooled (post hoc analysis). Results Compared to placebo, treatment with SRT2104 was associated with a significant reduction in augmentation pressure (p=0.0273) and a trend towards improvement in the augmentation index and corrected augmentation index (p>0.05 for both). However, no changes were observed in pulse wave velocity and time to wave reflection (p>0.05). Systolic and diastolic blood pressures remained unchanged throughout the study. Treatment by cohort interaction was not significant for any of the pulse wave parameters, suggesting that the response to SRT2104 in otherwise healthy smokers and people with diabetes was consistent. Conclusions SRT2104 may improve measures of arterial stiffness in otherwise healthy cigarette smokers and in participants with type 2 diabetes. Definitive conclusions are not possible given the small sample size and exploratory nature of this analysis. Trial registration number NCT01031108. PMID:27239324

  8. Assesment of the water quality and prevalence of water borne ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The chemical and microbiological properties were investigated at the bank and midstream of the Ammassoma River used for domestic water consumption. Also, retrospective study was conducted at Amassoma General Hospital to ascertain the extent of water borne diseases by studying the case notes of 100 subjects from ...

  9. Risk factors and adverse perinatal outcomes among term and preterm infants born small-for-gestational-age: secondary analyses of the WHO Multi-Country Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Ota

    Full Text Available Small for gestational age (SGA is not only a major indicator of perinatal mortality and morbidity, but also the morbidity risks in later in life. We aim to estimate the association between the birth of SGA infants and the risk factors and adverse perinatal outcomes among twenty-nine countries in Africa, Latin America, the Middle East and Asia in 359 health facilities in 2010-11.We analysed facility-based, cross-sectional data from the WHO Multi-country Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health. We constructed multilevel logistic regression models with random effects for facilities and countries to estimate the risk factors for SGA infants using country-specific birthweight reference standards in preterm and term delivery, and SGA's association with adverse perinatal outcomes. We compared the risks and adverse perinatal outcomes with appropriate for gestational age (AGA infants categorized by preterm and term delivery.A total of 295,829 singleton infants delivered were analysed. The overall prevalence of SGA was highest in Cambodia (18.8%, Nepal (17.9%, the Occupied Palestinian Territory (16.1%, and Japan (16.0%, while the lowest was observed in Afghanistan (4.8%, Uganda (6.6% and Thailand (9.7%. The risk of preterm SGA infants was significantly higher among nulliparous mothers and mothers with chronic hypertension and preeclampsia/eclampsia (aOR: 2.89; 95% CI: 2.55-3.28 compared with AGA infants. Higher risks of term SGA were observed among sociodemographic factors and women with preeclampsia/eclampsia, anaemia and other medical conditions. Multiparity (> = 3 (AOR: 0.88; 95% CI: 0.83-0.92 was a protective factor for term SGA. The risk of perinatal mortality was significantly higher in preterm SGA deliveries in low to high HDI countries.Preterm SGA is associated with medical conditions related to preeclampsia, but not with sociodemographic status. Term SGA is associated with sociodemographic status and various medical conditions.

  10. Seed-borne fungi of Ornithopus sativus during a twenty year storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Narkiewicz-Jodko

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Subject to analysis were seed-borne fungi of serradella during a long term storage. The agents causing a significant reduction of seed-borne fungi were: the storage conditions and time (very low seed moisture, approx. 5.5%. no oxygen.

  11. Seed-borne fungi of Ornithopus sativus during a twenty year storage

    OpenAIRE

    Małgorzata Narkiewicz-Jodko

    2014-01-01

    Subject to analysis were seed-borne fungi of serradella during a long term storage. The agents causing a significant reduction of seed-borne fungi were: the storage conditions and time (very low seed moisture, approx. 5.5%. no oxygen).

  12. Study of biological communities subject to imperfect detection: Bias and precision of community N-mixture abundance models in small-sample situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaura, Yuichi; Kery, Marc; Royle, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Community N-mixture abundance models for replicated counts provide a powerful and novel framework for drawing inferences related to species abundance within communities subject to imperfect detection. To assess the performance of these models, and to compare them to related community occupancy models in situations with marginal information, we used simulation to examine the effects of mean abundance (λ¯: 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5), detection probability (p¯: 0.1, 0.2, 0.5), and number of sampling sites (n site : 10, 20, 40) and visits (n visit : 2, 3, 4) on the bias and precision of species-level parameters (mean abundance and covariate effect) and a community-level parameter (species richness). Bias and imprecision of estimates decreased when any of the four variables (λ¯, p¯, n site , n visit ) increased. Detection probability p¯ was most important for the estimates of mean abundance, while λ¯ was most influential for covariate effect and species richness estimates. For all parameters, increasing n site was more beneficial than increasing n visit . Minimal conditions for obtaining adequate performance of community abundance models were n site  ≥ 20, p¯ ≥ 0.2, and λ¯ ≥ 0.5. At lower abundance, the performance of community abundance and community occupancy models as species richness estimators were comparable. We then used additive partitioning analysis to reveal that raw species counts can overestimate β diversity both of species richness and the Shannon index, while community abundance models yielded better estimates. Community N-mixture abundance models thus have great potential for use with community ecology or conservation applications provided that replicated counts are available.

  13. Jesus: Born Poor or Rich?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First Lady

    Abstract. Over the centuries in Christendom, the clergy has consistently drummed it into the ears and consciousness of the laity that Jesus was born poor; this has been phenomenal and the adherents of Christian religion have accepted and imbibed it without question. Drawing from anecdotes and accounts that.

  14. Vector-borne disease intelligence: strategies to deal with disease burden and threats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Braks, M.; Medlock, J. M.; Hubálek, Zdeněk; Hjertqvist, M.; Perrin, Y.; Lancelot, R.; Duchyene, E.; Hendrickx, G.; Stroo, A.; Heyman, P.; Sprong, H.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 280 (2014), s. 280 ISSN 2296-2565 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : disease burden * emerging diseases * one health * surveillance * threat * vector-borne diseases Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  15. Expanding subjectivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda; Soldz, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A major theme in recent psychoanalytic thinking concerns the use of therapist subjectivity, especially “countertransference,” in understanding patients. This thinking converges with and expands developments in qualitative research regarding the use of researcher subjectivity as a tool to understa...

  16. ACAN Gene Mutations in Short Children Born SGA and Response to Growth Hormone Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Steen, Manouk; Pfundt, Rolph; Maas, Stephan J W H; Bakker-van Waarde, Willie M; Odink, Roelof J; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C S

    2017-05-01

    Some children born small for gestational age (SGA) show advanced bone age (BA) maturation during growth hormone (GH) treatment. ACAN gene mutations have been described in children with short stature and advanced BA. To determine the presence of ACAN gene mutations in short SGA children with advanced BA and assess the response to GH treatment. BA assessment in 290 GH-treated SGA children. ACAN sequencing in 29 children with advanced BA ≥0.5 years compared with calendar age. Four of 29 SGA children with advanced BA had an ACAN gene mutation (13.8%). Mutations were related to additional characteristics: midface hypoplasia (P = 0.003), joint problems (P = 0.010), and broad great toes (P = 0.003). Children with one or fewer additional characteristic had no mutation. Of children with two additional characteristics, 50% had a mutation. Of children with three additional characteristics, 100% had a mutation. All GH-treated children with a mutation received gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRHa) treatment for 2 years from onset of puberty. At adult height, one girl was 5 cm taller than her mother and one boy was 8 cm taller than his father with the same ACAN gene mutation. This study expands the differential diagnosis of genetic variants in children born SGA and proposes a clinical scoring system for identifying subjects most likely to have an ACAN gene mutation. ACAN sequencing should be considered in children born SGA with persistent short stature, advanced BA, and midface hypoplasia, joint problems, or broad great toes. Our findings suggest that children with an ACAN gene mutation benefit from GH treatment with 2 years of GnRHa.

  17. Is leadership born or made?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifer, W R

    1997-01-01

    Is leadership born or made? By profiling three colleagues who made the transition from clinician to top-flight executive in a health care organization, the author provides case studies from which to discuss leadership issues. An evolutionary pattern has developed with respect to physicians changing careers: The first model was the medical director, followed by the vice president for medical affairs, and finally the move to managing the health care system, group practice, or managed care organization. Are physician executives fundamentally different from clinicians in terms of leadership characteristics? What are the essential qualities needed to lead health care organizations? These questions are explored in-depth.

  18. Generalization of the Born rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, Bruno

    2008-10-01

    An alternative formulation of quantum mechanics is proposed based on a principle that can be considered a generalization of the Born rule. The principle is composed of a mathematical expression and an associated interpretation, and establishes a correlation between the positions of a particle at two different times. Under reasonable conditions for the wave function, this correlation implies that the particles follow quasiclassical trajectories. It is also shown that the Born rule is equivalent to a particular case of the evolved principle. These features allow the principle to provide a unified explanation of the results of the statistical experiments and of the quasiclassical macroscopic evolution. There is a strong analogy between the quantum principle and a probabilistic principle which is necessary to derive empirical predictions from the mathematical formalism of probability theory. This principle is referred to by some authors as Cournot’s principle, while other authors use the equivalent notion of typicality. In this paper probability theory and quantum mechanics are formulated in such a way as to explicitly include the two principles and to emphasize the very similar conceptual structure of the two theories.

  19. [Children born with ambiguous genitalia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseth, Trond H

    2008-02-28

    For 10 - 12 children born with ambiguous genitalia in Norway annually, the sex cannot be decided directly after birth. The condition is now termed "Disorders of Sex Development" (DSD). Severely undervirilised chromosomal and gonadal boys (46,XY DSD) represent the greatest challenge; the sex assignment has traditionally been female. This review focuses on challenges within diagnostics and treatment and provides an update on the scientific basis for sex assignment in 46,XY DSD children. The article is based on articles retrieved from Pub Med and own clinical experience. During the last decade the scientific basis for sex assignment in children born with ambiguous genitalia has been increasingly questioned. The traditional DSD management has been dominated by the belief that DSD children will develop into the assigned sex regardless of the underlying cause as long as the external genitalia are "normalised" before two years of age. The most severely undervirilised 46,XY DSD children were surgically assigned as females, based on an emphasis of the size and functionality of the phallus being important for later psychosexual development into men. New guidelines for DSD management are now being developed based on recent knowledge about prenatal cerebral exposure to critical sex chromosome genes and hormones that influence foetal brain predisposition for later psychosexual development. Assignment of a sex should be based on a precise diagnosis of the condition's underlying cause and thereby a best possible prediction of future gender identity.

  20. Cancer risk in children born after donor ART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C L; Bunch, K J; Murphy, M F G; Stiller, C A; Botting, B J; Wallace, W H; Davies, M C; Sutcliffe, A G

    2018-01-01

    Do children born after donor ART have an increased risk of developing childhood cancer in comparison to the general population? This study showed no overall increased risk of childhood cancer in individuals born after donor ART. Most large population-based studies have shown no increase in overall childhood cancer incidence after non-donor ART; however, other studies have suggested small increased risks in specific cancer types, including haematological cancers. Cancer risk specifically in children born after donor ART has not been investigated to date. This retrospective cohort study utilized record linkage to determine the outcome status of all children born in Great Britain (1992-2008) after donor ART. The cohort included 12 137 members who contributed 95 389 person-years of follow-up (average follow-up 7.86 years). Records of all children born in Great Britain (England, Wales, Scotland) after all forms of donor ART (1992-2008) were linked to the UK National Registry of Childhood Tumours (NRCT) to determine the number who subsequently developed cancer by 15 years of age, by the end of 2008. Rates of overall and type specific cancer (selected a priori) were compared with age, sex and calendar year standardized population-based rates, stratifying for potential mediating/moderating factors including sex, age at diagnosis, birth weight, multiple births, maternal previous live births, assisted conception type and fresh/ cryopreserved cycles. In our cohort of 12 137 children born after donor ART (52% male, 55% singleton births), no overall increased risk of cancer was identified. There were 12 cancers detected compared to 14.4 expected (standardized incidence ratio (SIR) 0.83; 95% CI 0.43-1.45; P = 0.50). A small, significant increased risk of hepatoblastoma was found, but the numbers and absolute risks were small (study includes a large number of children born after donor ART, the rarity of specific diagnostic subgroups of childhood cancer results in few cases and

  1. SUBJECT INDEX

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subject Index. Variation of surface electric field during geomagnetic disturbed period at Maitri, Antarctica. 1721. Geomorphology. A simple depression-filling method for raster and irregular elevation datasets. 1653. Decision Support System integrated with Geographic. Information System to target restoration actions in water-.

  2. Tick borne encephalitis without cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Stupica, Daša; Strle, Franc; Avšič-Županc, Tatjana; Logar, Mateja; Pečavar, Blaž; Bajrović, Fajko F

    2014-01-01

    Background Tick borne encephalitis is the most frequent vector-transmitted infectious disease of the central nervous system in Europe and Asia. The disease caused by European subtype of tick borne encephalitis virus has typically a biphasic clinical course with the second phase presenting as meningitis, meningoencephalitis, or meningoencephalomyelitis. Cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis is considered a condition sine qua non for the diagnosis of neurologic involvement in tick borne encephalitis,...

  3. Conceptualizing Innovation in Born Global Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zijdemans, Erik; Tanev, Stoyan

    2014-01-01

    This research provides insights from recent literature on innovativeness in the environment of born globals. This article will be relevant to researchers interested in born globals and their business environments and, more specifically, the role that innovation plays in their foundation and devel...... of knowledge acquisition, networking capabilities and the lean startup approach in born global innovation. Finally, the article addresses the issue of quantifying and measuring innovativeness....

  4. Young adult born neurons enhance hippocampal dependent performance via influences on bilateral networks

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuo, Jia-Min; Tseng, Hua-an; Desai, Mitul; Bucklin, Mark E; Mohammed, Ali I.; Robinson, Nick TM; Boyden, Edward S.; Rangel, Lara M; Jasanoff, Alan P; Gritton, Howard J.; Han, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis supports performance in many hippocampal dependent tasks. Considering the small number of adult-born neurons generated at any given time, it is surprising that this sparse population of cells can substantially influence behavior. Recent studies have demonstrated that heightened excitability and plasticity may be critical for the contribution of young adult-born cells for certain tasks. What is not well understood is how these unique biophysical and synaptic properties may t...

  5. Las Born Global: Empresas de Acelerada Internacionalización

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grettel Brenes Leiva

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Las born global son un grupo de pequeñas y medianasempresas emprendedoras que presentan unproceso de internacionalización acelerado, es decir,inician sus actividades comerciales en el mercadomundial justo apenas nacen o en un periodo muycercano a su nacimiento. Estas empresas ingresana los nuevos mercados obviando o se brincándosealgunas de las etapas del proceso tradicional de internacionalización,gradual o por etapas, conocidocomo “modelo Uppsala”. Son entes dinamizadoresde las economías que contribuyen en el desarrolloeconómico de los países, siempre y cuando se creael clima, las condiciones y la infraestructura indispensablepara que puedan alcanzar un desarrollosostenido de sus exportaciones. Este artículo intentacaracterizar a las born global partiendo de las definiciones,características, sostenibilidad y la selección ymodo de ingreso a los mercados globales.   ABSTRACT The born global is a group of small andmedium sized entrepreneurial companies that showan accelerated internationalization process, thatis, they start their commercial activity in worldmarkets just as they are born or in a period veryclose to their conception. These companies enternew markets paying no attention to, or disregardingsome of the steps of the traditional gradual orstepwise internationalization process known as the“Uppsala model”. They are dynamizing entities oftheir economies that contribute to the economicdevelopment of their countries, as long as the essentialoperating climate, conditions and infrastructure arecreated to allow them attain a sustained developmentin their exports. This article attempts to characterizethe born global companies starting from thedefinitions, characteristics, sustainability and theirchoice of ingress mode to global markets.

  6. The neonate was born with holoprosencephaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    reza saeidi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available holoprosencephaly is a rare congenital brain malformation resulting from failure of diverticulation and cleavage of primitive prosencephalon which occurs at 4 - 8th week of gestation and is usually associated with multiple midline facial anomalies. it is the most common forebrain developmental anomaly in humans with prevalence of 1/16,000 in live borns, an incidence as high as 1:250 in conceptuses, and a worldwide distribution6. The etiology of HPE is very heterogeneous. First, this pathology can be caused by environmental or metabolic factors. The only formally recognized environmental factors are insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (1% risk of HPE and maternal alcoholism with a risk that cumulates with smoking . Clinical expression is variable, extending in unbroken sequence from a small brain with a single cerebral ventricle and cyclopia to clinically unaffected carriers in familial holoprosencephaly. Here. we report a boy 39 weeks neonatal case of holoprosencephaly with Antenatal ultrasonographic diagnosis, with microcephaly, hypotelorism, flat nose, a single nostril, a midline cleft lip and palate microcephaly.

  7. Psychosocial outcome in adult men born with hypospadias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örtqvist, L; Andersson, M; Strandqvist, A; Nordenström, A; Frisén, L; Holmdahl, G; Nordenskjöld, A

    2017-02-01

    Hypospadias, which is a surgically treated congenital malformation of the male urethra, may have a negative impact on quality of life. This aspect has previously been subject to limited research. This study examined the long-term psychosocial outcome of a large cohort of adult males born with hypospadias. The purpose of this case-control study was to assess a possible negative influence on the psychosocial outcome in adult males with hypospadias. Males with hypospadias treated in Sweden and aged ≥18 years old participated in this follow-up study. Age-matched men and university students were recruited as controls. The participants answered a questionnaire designed to reflect the subjective quality of life, social factors, need of support and follow-up, and the perceived impact of the disease upon upbringing. It also looked at the validated Psychological General Well-Being (PGWB) questionnaire and Relationship Questionnaire (RQ). A total of 167 patients (median age 34 years, 63% distal, 24% mid, and 13% proximal hypospadias) and 169 controls (median age 33 years) participated in the study. Patients had their first operation at 4 years of age (median) and the median follow-up time was 29 years following the first surgery. Men with hypospadias had a comparable total quality of life level with a mean total PGWB score of 82 (normal range 78-83) compared with 85.6 in controls. Scores on wellbeing and vitality were lower, even if the differences were small. Hypospadias did not affect marital status, presence of children in the family, frequency of employment or experience of bullying. These men more often lived at home with their parents (P=0.001) and had a lower level of education (P=0.004), even if the educational level in both patients and controls was high compared with the general Swedish population. Patients with proximal hypospadias were shorter compared with controls (P=0.003), which was consistent with the prenatal growth restriction associated with hypospadias

  8. The what, why, and how of born-open data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouder, Jeffrey N

    2016-09-01

    Although many researchers agree that scientific data should be open to scrutiny to ferret out poor analyses and outright fraud, most raw data sets are not available on demand. There are many reasons researchers do not open their data, and one is technical. It is often time consuming to prepare and archive data. In response, my laboratory has automated the process such that our data are archived the night they are created without any human approval or action. All data are versioned, logged, time stamped, and uploaded including aborted runs and data from pilot subjects. The archive is GitHub, github.com, the world's largest collection of open-source materials. Data archived in this manner are called born open. In this paper, I discuss the benefits of born-open data and provide a brief technical overview of the process. I also address some of the common concerns about opening data before publication.

  9. Ticks and Tick-borne diseases in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zintl, Annetta; Moutailler, Sara; Stuart, Peter; Paredis, Linda; Dutraive, Justine; Gonzalez, Estelle; O'Connor, Jack; Devillers, Elodie; Good, Barbara; OMuireagain, Colm; De Waal, Theo; Morris, Fergal; Gray, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    Throughout Europe interest in tick-borne agents is increasing, particularly with regard to those that can cause human disease. The reason for this is the apparent rise in the incidence of many tick-borne diseases (TBD's). While there has never been a national survey of ticks or TBD's in Ireland, the trend here appears to be the reverse with a decline in the incidence of some agents seemingly associated with decreasing tick numbers particularly on agricultural land. In the absence of robust baseline data, however, this development cannot be confirmed. This review collates the limited information available from several dated published records on tick species and a small number of studies focused on certain TBD's. Some pilot data on tick density and TBD agents collected in 2016 are also presented. The aim is to explore the particular situation in Ireland with regard to ticks and TBD's and to provide a reference for future workers in the field.

  10. Literacy Skills of Children Born Preterm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Alison; Crosbie, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Most children born preterm are considered neurologically normal and free of disability. However in follow-up studies at school age, preterm children, born without major impairment, have been shown to have lower cognitive abilities and associated academic, social and behavioural difficulties. This study investigated the literacy, phonological…

  11. Jesus: Born Poor or Rich?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First Lady

    Jesus and his brand of message of salvation have been subjected to various analyses ... Herod's intention to hill the newborn king and 7) the missing years, which have been a ..... people of means who, generally, went to purchase essential commodities as ..... ―In His Image and Likeness: Ponderings over Creation and.

  12. Epidemiology of tuberculosis in a low-incidence Italian region with high immigration rates: differences between not Italy-born and Italy-born TB cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odone, Anna; Riccò, Matteo; Morandi, Matteo; Borrini, Bianca M; Pasquarella, Cesira; Signorelli, Carlo

    2011-05-23

    Emilia Romagna, a northern Italian region, has a population of 4.27 million, of which 9.7% are immigrants. The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of tuberculosis (TB) during the period 1996-2006 in not Italy-born compared to Italy-born cases. Data was obtained from the Regional TB surveillance system, from where personal data, clinical features and risk factors of all notified TB cases were extracted. 5377 TB cases were reported. The proportion of immigrants with TB, over the total number of TB cases had progressively increased over the years, from 19.1% to 53.3%. In the not Italy-born population, TB incidence was higher than in Italians (in 2006: 100.7 cases per 100,000 registered not Italy-born subjects and 83.9/100,000 adding 20% of estimated irregular presences to the denominators. TB incidence among Italians was 6.5/100,000 Italians). A progressive rise in the not Italy-born incident cases was observed but associated with a decline in TB incidence. Not Italy-born cases were younger compared to the Italy-born cases, and more frequently classified as "new cases" (OR 2.0 95%CI 1.61-2.49 for age group 20-39); 60.7% had pulmonary TB, 31.6% extra pulmonary and 7.6% disseminated TB. Risk factors for TB in this population group were connected to lower income status (homeless: OR 149.9 95%CI 20.7-1083.3 for age group 40-59). In low-incidence regions, prevention and control of TB among sub-groups at risk such as the foreign-born population is a matter of public health concern. In addition, increasing immigration rates may affect TB epidemiology. TB among immigrants is characterized by particular clinical features and risk factors, which should be analyzed in order to plan effective action.

  13. [Climate- and vector-borne diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygbjerg, I.C.; Schioler, K.L.; Konradsen, F.

    2009-01-01

    The predicted changes in climate have raised concerns that vector-borne diseases may emerge or expand in tempered regions. Malaria, leishmaniasis and tick-borne illnesses are discussed in terms of climate change and their endemic potential, especially in Denmark. While climate may play an important...... role in disease patterns, it is evident that transmission potential is governed by a complex of factors, including socio-economy, health-care capacity and ecology. In Denmark, malaria and leishmaniasis are unlikely to become public health problems, whereas the potential for tick-borne illnesses may...

  14. The Emergence of `Power with': The Case of a Born Global Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lin; Panteli, Niki

    Thanks to the advancement of Information and Communications Technologies, the past decade has seen the rise of Born Global organizations (Rennie, 1993; Oviatt and McDougall, 1994; Karra and Philips, 2004; Zahra, 2005). Broadly defined as ‘business organizations that, right from inception, seek to derive significant competitive advantages from the use of resources and the sales of outputs in multiple countries’ (Oviatt and McDougall, 1994: 49), Born Global organizations are small, young, and internationally dispersed. While sharing the characteristics of ‘smallness’ and ‘newness’ of Small- and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs), Born Global organizations also bear ‘foreignness’, similar to that of Multinational Corporations (Zahra, 2005). Born Globals therefore need to strike a balance between ‘global reach’ and ‘local touch’ as in Multinational Corporations (Bartlett and Ghoshal, 1989); yet they have to do so with scare resources and organizational uncertainty similar to SMEs, and with ‘lean’ and ‘mean’ communications afforded by ICT (e.g. Sproull and Kiesler, 1986). This study is an initial attempt to untangle the combined challenges in Born Globals’ innovative way of management. Through a longitudinal case study, we aim to explore the issue of power in a Born Global’s endeavour to manage its global knowledge via technology mediation.

  15. A framework to classify error in animal-borne technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zackory eBurns

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The deployment of novel, innovative, and increasingly miniaturized devices on fauna, especially otherwise difficult to observe taxa, to collect data has steadily increased. Yet, every animal-borne technology has its shortcomings, such as limitations in its precision or accuracy. These shortcomings, here labelled as ‘error’, are not yet studied systematically and a framework to identify and classify error does not exist. Here, we propose a classification scheme to synthesize error across technologies, discussing basic physical properties used by a technology to collect data, conversion of raw data into useful variables, and subjectivity in the parameters chosen. In addition, we outline a four-step framework to quantify error in animal-borne devices: to know, to identify, to evaluate, and to store. Both the classification scheme and framework are theoretical in nature. However, since mitigating error is essential to answer many biological questions, we believe they will be operationalized and facilitate future work to determine and quantify error in animal-borne technologies. Moreover, increasing the transparency of error will ensure the technique used to collect data moderates the biological questions and conclusions.

  16. Neuronal apoptosis in the neonates born to preeclamptic mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosar, Hese; Ozer, Erdener; Topel, Hande; Kahramaner, Zelal; Turkoglu, Ebru; Erdemir, Aydin; Sutcuoglu, Sumer; Bagriyanik, Alper; Ozer, Esra Arun

    2013-07-01

    Preeclampsia may result in uteroplacental insufficiency and chronic intrauterine fetal distress. The aim of this study is to address this issue investigating neuronal apoptosis in an experimental model of preeclampsia and to evaluate the neurological outcome of the perinatal asphyxia in the neonates born to preeclamptic mother. Two out of four pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats (preeclamptic group) were given water containing 1.8% NaCl on gestation day 15 and 22 in order to establish the model of preeclampsia whereas other two (non-preeclamptic group) received normal diet. A model of perinatal asphyxia was established on the postnatal 7th day to one preeclamptic and one non-preeclamptic dam. Overall 23 pups born to overall four dams were decapitated to assess neuronal apoptosis by the TUNEL assay. The number of apoptotic neuronal cells was significantly higher in the preeclampsia groups in comparison with the control group (p = 0.006 and p = 0.006, respectively). It was also significantly higher in the asphyctic/non-preeclamptic group than the count in the control group (p = 0.01). There was also significant difference between both asphyctic groups (p = 0.003). We conclude that preeclampsia causes small babies for the gestational age and cerebral hypoplasia. Both preeclampsia and perinatal asphyxia can cause increased neuronal apoptosis in the neonatal brains. However, the prognosis for neurological outcome is much worse when the perinatal asphyxia occurs in newborns born to preeclamptic mothers.

  17. Foreign-born nurses in the US labor market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Edward J

    2011-03-01

    This paper examines immigration and the wages of foreign and native nurses in the US labor market. Data from the Current Population Survey identifies a worker's country of birth and the National Survey of Registered Nurses (NSRN) identifies nurses who received their basic training outside the US. In 2004 about 3.1% of the registered nurse (RN) workforce is foreign-born non-US citizens, and 3.3% received their basic education elsewhere. The principal countries of origin are the Philippines, Canada, India, and England. Regression results show a 4.5% lower wage for non-citizen nurses born outside of the US (Canadian nurses are an exception). The wage disadvantage is concentrated on foreign-born nurses new to the US; once a nurse has been in the US for 6 years there is no longer a significant penalty. Results from the NSRN show relatively little overall wage differences between RNs who received their basic training outside versus inside the US, but there is a significant wage disadvantage for those new to the US market. The presence of foreign-trained nurses appears to decrease earnings for native RNs, but the effects are small. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. MANAGEMENT OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Growth and growth hormone therapy in short children born preterm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguszewski, Margaret Cristina da Silva; Cardoso-Demartini, Adriane de Andre

    2017-03-01

    Approximately 15 million babies are born preterm across the world every year, with less than 37 completed weeks of gestation. Survival rates increased during the last decades with the improvement of neonatal care. With premature birth, babies are deprived of the intense intrauterine growth phase, and postnatal growth failure might occur. Some children born prematurely will remain short at later ages and adult life. The risk of short stature increases if the child is also born small for gestational age. In this review, the effects of being born preterm on childhood growth and adult height and the hormonal abnormalities possibly associated with growth restriction are discussed, followed by a review of current information on growth hormone treatment for those who remain with short stature during infancy and childhood. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  19. Classicality versus quantumness in Born's probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shunlong

    2017-11-01

    Born's rule, which postulates the probability of a measurement outcome in a quantum state, is pivotal to interpretations and applications of quantum mechanics. By exploiting the departure of the product of two Hermitian operators in Born's rule from Hermiticity, we prescribe an intrinsic and natural scheme to decompose Born's probability into a classical part and a quantum part, which have significant implications in quantum information theory. The classical part constitutes the information compatible with the associated measurement operator, while the quantum part represents the quantum coherence of the state with respect to the measurement operator. Fundamental properties of the decomposition are revealed. As applications, we establish several trade-off relations for the classicality and quantumness in Born's probability, which may be interpreted as alternative realizations of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. The results shed physical lights on related issues concerning quantification of complementarity, coherence, and uncertainty, as well as the classical-quantum interplay.

  20. Risk based surveillance for vector borne diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Rene

    an increasing trend in transmission potential over the last 25 years. However the model suggested that the climate in the Baltic See Region has always permitted transmission of these diseases. The model therefore suggests that a presently unknown factor until recently prevented introduction and spread......Increased temperatures and changes in rainfall pattern are likely to facilitate the spread and establishment of new vector borne diseases in the Baltic See Region. There are a large number of potential vector borne threats to the area. Existing endemic vector borne diseases are likely to increase...... and new exotic diseases like Usutu and West Nile Virus may lead to outbreaks in the region. In the worst case the combined effect of climate change and globalization may potentially lead to European outbreaks of important zoonotic mosquito borne infections like Rift Valley Fever in cattle and Japanese...

  1. Prospects for infrasound bolide detections from balloon-borne platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Eliot; Bowman, Daniel; Arrowsmith, Stephen; Boslough, Marc; Klein, Viliam; Ballard, Courtney; Lees, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    We report on an experiment to assess whether balloon-borne instruments can improve sensitivities to bolides exploding in the Earth's atmosphere (essentially using the atmosphere as a witness plate to characterize the small end of the NEO (Near Earth Object) population). The CTBTO's infrasound network regularly detects infrasound disturbances caused by bolides, including the 15-FEB-2013 Chelybinsk impact. Balloon-borne infrasound sensors should have two important advantages over ground-based infrasound stations: there should be virtually no wind noise on a free-floating platform, and a sensor in the stratosphere should benefit from its location within the stratospheric duct. Balloon-borne sensors also have the disadvantage that the amplitude of infrasound waves will decrease as they ascend with altitude. To test the performance of balloon-borne sensors, we conducted an experiment on a NASA high altitude (35 km) balloon launched from Ft Sumner, NM on 28-SEP-2016. We were able to put two independent infrasound payloads on this flight. We arranged for three 3000-lb ANFO explosions to be detonated from Socorro, NM at 12:00, 14:00 and 16:29:59 MST. The first two explosions were detected from the NASA balloon, with the first explosion showing three separate waveforms arriving within a 25-s span. The peak-to-peak amplitude of the waveforms was about 0.06 Pa, and the cleanest microphone channel detected this waveform with an SNR greater than 20. A second balloon at 15 km altitude also detected the second explosion. We have signals from a dozen ground stations at various positions from Socorro to Ft Sumner. We will report on wave propagation models and how they compare with observations from the two balloons and the various ground-stations.

  2. Flea-borne rickettsioses: ecologic considerations.

    OpenAIRE

    Azad, A. F.; Radulovic, S.; Higgins, J. A.; Noden, B. H.; Troyer, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    Ecologic and economic factors, as well as changes in human behavior, have resulted in the emergence of new and the reemergence of existing but forgotten infectious diseases during the past 20 years. Flea-borne disease organisms (e.g., Yersinia pestis, Rickettsia typhi, R. felis, and Bartonella henselae) are widely distributed throughout the world in endemic-disease foci, where components of the enzootic cycle are present. However, flea-borne diseases could reemerge in epidemic form because of...

  3. Prevention of tick-borne diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piesman, Joseph; Eisen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Tick-borne diseases are on the rise. Lyme borreliosis is prevalent throughout the Northern Hemisphere, and the same Ixodes tick species transmitting the etiologic agents of this disease also serve as vectors of pathogens causing human babesiosis, human granulocytic anaplasmosis, and tick-borne encephalitis. Recently, several novel agents of rickettsial diseases have been described. Despite an explosion of knowledge in the fields of tick biology, genetics, molecular biology, and immunology, transitional research leading to widely applied public health measures to combat tick-borne diseases has not been successful. Except for the vaccine against tick-borne encephalitis virus, and a brief campaign to reduce this disease in the former Soviet Union through widespread application of DDT, success stories in the fight against tick-borne diseases are lacking. Both new approaches to tick and pathogen control and novel ways of translating research findings into practical control measures are needed to prevent tick-borne diseases in the twenty-first century.

  4. Foreign-born Peers and Academic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, Dylan

    2015-04-01

    The academic performance of foreign-born youth in the United States is well studied, yet little is known about whether and how foreign-born students influence their classmates. In this article, I develop a set of expectations regarding the potential consequences of immigrant integration across schools, with a distinction between the effects of sharing schools with immigrants who are designated as English language learners (ELL) and those who are not. I then use administrative data on multiple cohorts of Florida public high school students to estimate the effect of immigrant shares on immigrant and native-born students' academic performance. The identification strategy pays careful attention to the selection problem by estimating the effect of foreign-born peers from deviations in the share foreign-born across cohorts of students attending the same school in different years. The assumption underlying this approach is that students choose schools based on the composition of the entire school, not on the composition of each entering cohort. The results of the analysis, which hold under several robustness checks, indicate that foreign-born peers (both those who are ELL and those who are non-ELL) have no effect on their high school classmates' academic performance.

  5. Peak Bone Mass and Bone Microarchitecture in Adults Born With Low Birth Weight Preterm or at Term: A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasuriya, Chandima N D; Evensen, Kari Anne I; Mosti, Mats P; Brubakk, Ann-Mari; Jacobsen, Geir W; Indredavik, Marit S; Schei, Berit; Stunes, Astrid Kamilla; Syversen, Unni

    2017-07-01

    Peak bone mass (PBM) is regarded as the most important determinant of osteoporosis. Growing evidence suggests a role of intrauterine programming in skeletal development. We examined PBM and trabecular bone score (TBS) in adults born preterm with very low birth weight (VLBW) or small for gestational age (SGA) at term compared with term-born controls. This follow-up cohort study included 186 men and women (25 to 28 years); 52 preterm VLBW (≤1500 g), 59 term-born SGA (10th percentile). Main outcome was bone mineral density (BMD) by dual x-ray absorptiometry. Secondary outcomes were bone mineral content (BMC), TBS, and serum bone markers. VLBW adults had lower BMC and BMD vs controls, also when adjusted for height, weight, and potential confounders, with the following BMD Z-score differences: femoral neck, 0.6 standard deviation (SD) (P = 0.003); total hip, 0.4 SD (P = 0.01); whole body, 0.5 SD (P = 0.007); and lumbar spine, 0.3 SD (P = 0.213). The SGA group displayed lower spine BMC and whole-body BMD Z-scores, but not after adjustment. Adjusted odds ratios for osteopenia/osteoporosis were 2.4 and 2.0 in VLBW and SGA adults, respectively. TBS did not differ between groups, but it was lower in men than in women. Serum Dickkopf-1 was higher in VLBW subjects vs controls; however, it was not significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons. Both low-birth-weight groups displayed lower PBM and higher frequency of osteopenia/osteoporosis, implying increased future fracture risk. The most pronounced bone deficit was seen in VLBW adults.

  6. Good occlusal practice in the provision of implant borne prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, S J; Gray, R J M; Young, M P J

    2002-01-26

    The increased use of endosseous dental implants means that many dentists will encounter patients with dental implants in their everyday practice. Dental practitioners might be actively involved in the provision of implant borne prostheses at both the surgical and restorative phases, or only at the restorative stage. This section is written for all dentists and aims to examine the subject of occlusion within implantology. It aims to provide guidelines of good occlusal practice to be used in the design of the prosthesis that is supported or retained by one or more implants. As implantology is a 'new' discipline of dentistry, there are fewer standard texts and this section, therefore, is much more extensively referenced than the subjects that have been considered to date.

  7. Life satisfaction and health-related quality of life in immigrants and native-born Germans: the role of immigration-related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterko, Yuriy; Braehler, Elmar; Grande, Gesine; Glaesmer, Heide

    2013-06-01

    There is a lack of population-based studies on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and satisfaction with life (SWL) of immigrants compared to the native populations. Findings of previous research are inconclusive. Our study compares HRQoL and SWL in immigrants and native-born Germans, investigating immigration-related factors as suspected determinants of HRQoL and SWL in immigrants. In the German Socio-economic panel from 2006, HRQoL (measured with the SF-12v2) and SWL as well as immigration-related factors were assessed in 21,079 subjects (including 2,971 immigrants). Analyses of variance were applied as statistical tests in our study. Native-born Germans report a higher amount of SWL and of HRQoL on the physical health component compared to the immigrants. With effect sizes ranging from E² = 0.001 to 0.111, these findings are of minimal practical relevance. In immigrants, the physical health component of HRQoL is significantly associated with younger age at migration and with country of origin. As the effect sizes are extremely low, these findings have limited practical relevance. There are small differences in SWL and HRQoL of immigrants and native-born Germans. Some immigration-related factors are related to HRQoL, but not to SWL. As immigrants are a quite heterogeneous group, it seems useful to focus on immigration-related factors, not simply comparing immigrants and the native-born. Our findings suggest that research on the association of immigration-related factors with quality of life in immigrants seems a promising approach to better identify subgroups of immigrants with lower levels of quality of life.

  8. Balloon-Borne Infrasound Detection of Energetic Bolide Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Eliot F.; Ballard, Courtney; Klein, Viliam; Bowman, Daniel; Boslough, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Infrasound is usually defined as sound waves below 20 Hz, the nominal limit of human hearing. Infrasound waves propagate over vast distances through the Earth's atmosphere: the CTBTO (Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization) has 48 installed infrasound-sensing stations around the world to detect nuclear detonations and other disturbances. In February 2013, several CTBTO infrasound stations detected infrasound signals from a large bolide that exploded over Chelyabinsk, Russia. Some stations recorded signals that had circumnavigated the Earth, over a day after the original event. The goal of this project is to improve upon the sensitivity of the CTBTO network by putting microphones on small, long-duration super-pressure balloons, with the overarching goal of studying the small end of the NEO population by using the Earth's atmosphere as a witness plate.A balloon-borne infrasound sensor is expected to have two advantages over ground-based stations: a lack of wind noise and a concentration of infrasound energy in the "stratospheric duct" between roughly 5 - 50 km altitude. To test these advantages, we have built a small balloon payload with five calibrated microphones. We plan to fly this payload on a NASA high-altitude balloon from Ft Sumner, NM in August 2016. We have arranged for three large explosions to take place in Socorro, NM while the balloon is aloft to assess the sensitivity of balloon-borne vs. ground-based infrasound sensors. We will report on the results from this test flight and the prospects for detecting/characterizing small bolides in the stratosphere.

  9. Wavefield separation by energy norm Born scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Bingbing

    2017-08-17

    In Reflection Based Waveform Inversion, the gradient is computed by cross-correlating the direct and Born scattered wavefield with their adjoints applied to the data residuals. In this case, the transmitted part of the Born scattered wavefield produces high wavenumber artifacts, which would harm the convergence of the inversion process. We propose an efficient Energy Norm Born Scattering (ENBS) to attenuate the transmission components of the Born modeling, and allow it to produce only reflections. ENBS is derived from the adjoint of the Energy Norm (inverse scattering) imaging condition and in order to get deeper insights of how this method works, we show analytically that given an image, in which reflectivity is represented by a Dirac delta function, ENBS attenuates transmission energy perfectly. We use numerical examples to demonstrate that ENBS works in both the time and the frequency domain. We also show that in reflection waveform inversion (RWI) the wave path constructed by ENBS would be cleaner and free of high wavenumber artifacts associated with conventional Born scattering.

  10. Control of vector-borne infectious diseases by human immunity against α-Gal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cabezas-Cruz, A.; Valdés, James J.; de la Fuente, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 8 (2016), s. 953-955 ISSN 1476-0584 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 278976 - ANTIGONE Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : microbiota * probiotics * vaccine * α-Gal * vector-borne diseases Subject RIV: FN - Epidemiology, Contagious Diseases ; Clinical Immunology Impact factor: 3.555, year: 2016

  11. ANTIDotE: anti-tick vaccines to prevent tick-borne diseases in Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sprong, H.; Trentelman, J.; Seemann, I.; Grubhoffer, Libor; Rego, Ryan O. M.; Hajdušek, Ondřej; Kopáček, Petr; Šíma, Radek; Nijhof, A.M.; Anguita, J.; Winter, P.; Rotter, B.; Havlíková, S.; Klempa, B.; Schetters, T.P.; Hovius, J.W.R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 7, FEB 2014 (2014), s. 77 ISSN 1756-3305 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Ixodes ricinus * vaccine * Lyme borreliosis * tick-borne encephalitis * babesiosis * public health Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.430, year: 2014

  12. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) status in newborns born to HCV positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Group one: 30 women HCV antibody (Ab) positive/HCV RNA negative. Group two: 30 women HCV Ab positive/ HCV RNA positive. Newborn sera were subjected to HCV antibody testing, and detection of HCV viral RNA by PCR. Results: None of the newborns born to PCR negative females undergoing ICSI cycles showed ...

  13. Anaemia and iron deficiency in peri-urban school children born in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of anaemia, iron deficiency and iron deficiency anaemia in school children who were born in a national HIV prevention programme. Design: This was a community based cross-sectional study. Setting: A resource poor peri-urban setting with high prevalence of HIV infection. Subjects: ...

  14. Corneal diameters in infants born in two hospitals in Ibadan, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To measure the horizontal corneal diameters in infants at birth and compare with values reported in other studies. Design: A cross-sectional hospital based study. Subjects: All the healthy infants born within the period of one month in these hospitals were eligible for enrolment into the study. Horizontal corneal ...

  15. A 3D CZT hard x-ray polarimeter for a balloon-borne payload

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caroli, E.; Alvarez, J. M.; Auricchio, N.

    2012-01-01

    be optimized also for this type of measurement. In this framework, we present the concept of a small high-performance spectrometer designed for polarimetry between 100 and 1000 keV suitable as a stratospheric balloon-borne payload dedicated to perform an accurate and reliable measurement of the polarization...

  16. COMPARATIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE NEUROLOGICAL STATUS OF INFANTS BORN IN THE I AND II PHYSIOLOGICAL POSITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Morozova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to provide the comparative characteristics of neurological impairments in infants born in the I and II obstetric positions and to follow them up in the neonatal period.Subjects and methods. A total of 133 infants born by vaginal delivery at 38–41 weeks» gestation in 2014 to 2016 were followed up. All the examinees were divided into 2 groups: 1 71 neonates born in the I obstetric position; 2 62 babies born in the II position. Their clinical examination encompassed an analysis of the course of delivery, neurological examination of the newborn in the first hours of life with a subsequent follow-up evaluation at the time of his/her discharge from the maternity unit.Results and discussion. The examined groups were comparatively analyzed in terms of a number of indicators. The data of objective neurological examination showed a significant difference in some symptoms: cephalohematoma and torticollis were more common in the group of infants born in the II position. Comparison of the frequency of neurological impairments at different follow-up stages (at birth and at discharge from the maternity unit revealed their statistically significant reduction in both groups. However, the frequency of neurological symptoms among Group 1 infants (born in the I position at their discharge from the maternity unit was significantly reduced (from 77.5 to 38.0 %; p < 0.001, and those in Group 2 infants (born in the II position substantially unchanged (from 87.1 to 79.0 %; p = 0.125. The slight regression of neurological symptoms in Group 2 suggests that intranatal nervous system damage is more severe in the infants born in the II position.Conclusion. To define the position of a fetus during labor is an important component in the prevention of intranatal injuries

  17. Calibrating animal-borne proximity loggers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutz, Christian; Morrissey, Michael B; Burns, Zackory T; Burt, John; Otis, Brian; St Clair, James J H; James, Richard

    2015-06-01

    Growing interest in the structure and dynamics of animal social networks has stimulated efforts to develop automated tracking technologies that can reliably record encounters in free-ranging subjects. A particularly promising approach is the use of animal-attached 'proximity loggers', which collect data on the incidence, duration and proximity of spatial associations through inter-logger radio communication. While proximity logging is based on a straightforward physical principle - the attenuation of propagating radio waves with distance - calibrating systems for field deployment is challenging, since most study species roam across complex, heterogeneous environments.In this study, we calibrated a recently developed digital proximity-logging system ('Encounternet') for deployment on a wild population of New Caledonian crows Corvus moneduloides. Our principal objective was to establish a quantitative model that enables robust post hoc estimation of logger-to-logger (and, hence, crow-to-crow) distances from logger-recorded signal-strength values. To achieve an accurate description of the radio communication between crow-borne loggers, we conducted a calibration exercise that combines theoretical analyses, field experiments, statistical modelling, behavioural observations, and computer simulations.We show that, using signal-strength information only, it is possible to assign crow encounters reliably to predefined distance classes, enabling powerful analyses of social dynamics. For example, raw data sets from field-deployed loggers can be filtered at the analysis stage to include predominantly encounters where crows would have come to within a few metres of each other, and could therefore have socially learned new behaviours through direct observation. One of the main challenges for improving data classification further is the fact that crows - like most other study species - associate across a wide variety of habitats and behavioural contexts, with different signal

  18. Multiplex Detection of Food-Borne Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamizar-Rodríguez, Germán; Lombó, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    Detection of food-borne pathogens is traditionally carried out by plating out techniques in selective or differential media using Petri agar dishes or other culture-dependent methods, usually designed for each pathogen to be detected. These classical methods are time and personnel consuming and also may last for up to 5 days in the case of final confirmation of some specific pathogens.Here we describe a method for fast multiplex detection of nine food-borne pathogens (all species usually required under most countrylegislations) by means of a single multiplex PCR reaction coupled to a capillary electrophoresis detection, in just 2-2.5 h and with a minimum cost of around 2 € per sample and nine pathogens. This method saves consumables and personnel time and allows a faster detection of any possible contaminated food batches at industrial level, therefore helping to prevent future food-borne outbreaks at clinical level.

  19. Born-Infeld strings in brane worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Brihaye, Y; Brihaye, Yves; Hartmann, Betti

    2004-01-01

    We study Born-Infeld strings in a six dimensional brane world scenario recently suggested by Giovannini, Meyer and Shaposhnikov (GMS). In the limit of the Einstein-Abelian-Higgs model, we classify the solutions found by GMS. Especially, we point out that the warped solutions, which lead to localisation of gravity, are the - by the presence of the cosmological constant - deformed inverted string solutions. Further, we construct the Born-Infeld analogues of the anti-warped solutions, while a analytic argument leads us to a "no-go'' hypothesis: solutions which localise gravity do NOT exist in a 6 dimensional Einstein-Born-Infeld-Abelian-Higgs (EBIAH) brane world scenario. This latter hypothesis is confirmed by our numerical results.

  20. [Conflicts and vector-borne diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    2010-01-11

    Based on literature and personal experiences, vector-borne diseases and conflicts are reviewed. Simple rapid diagnostic tests for three important parasitoses are available. Resort is often made to case definitions and to presumptive treatment. Resistance is an emerging problem. Vaccines are still not available for most diseases. Promising preventive methods, including long-lasting impregnated bed-nets and tents, are available. War has been an impetus for disclosing life-cycles of vector-borne diseases and for control methods; peace, reconciliation and poverty reduction are required to achieve lasting control.

  1. Pap Tests and Foreign-Born Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-26

    Foreign-born women living in the U.S. are less likely to have Pap tests to detect cervical cancer than women born in this country. The problem is worse for women from certain countries or regions. Find out why this is a disturbing trend, who these women are and why they are less likely to get a Pap test, and what CDC is doing about it.  Created: 11/26/2007 by National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program.   Date Released: 12/7/2007.

  2. Supergravity solutions for Born-Infeld dyons

    CERN Document Server

    Youm, D

    1999-01-01

    We construct partially localized supergravity counterpart solutions to the 1/2 supersymmetric nonthreshold and the 1/4 supersymmetric threshold bound state BI dyons in the D3-brane Dirac-Born-Infeld theory. Such supergravity solutions have all the parameters of the BI dyons. By applying the type-IIA-type-IIB T-duality transformations to these supergravity solutions, we obtain the supergravity counterpart solutions to 1/2 and 1/4 supersymmetric bions carrying electric and magnetic charges of the world volume U(1) gauge field in the Dirac- Born-Infeld theory in other dimensions. (70 refs).

  3. Extension of Ixodes ricinus ticks and agents of tick-borne diseases to mountain areas in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Danielová, V.; Rudenko, Natalia; Daniel, M.; Holubová, J.; Materna, J.; Golovchenko, Maryna; Schwarzová, L.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 296, Suppl. 1 (2006), s. 48-53 ISSN 1438-4221. [International Potsdam Symposium on Tick-borne Diseases /8./. Potsdam, 10.03.2005-12.03.2005] Grant - others:WHO/EC(CZ) cCASHh-EVK2-2000-0070 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : ticks * tick-borne pathogens * mountain areas Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.760, year: 2006

  4. Mathematics difficulties in children born very preterm: current research and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Victoria; Cragg, Lucy; Gilmore, Camilla; Marlow, Neil; Johnson, Samantha

    2013-09-01

    Children born very preterm have poorer attainment in all school subjects, and a markedly greater reliance on special educational support than their term-born peers. In particular, difficulties with mathematics are especially common and account for the vast majority of learning difficulties in this population. In this paper, we review research relating to the causes of mathematics learning difficulties in typically developing children, and the impact of very preterm birth on attainment in mathematics. Research is needed to understand the specific nature and origins of mathematics difficulties in very preterm children to target the development of effective intervention strategies.

  5. Individual- and Neighbourhood-Level Indicators of Subjective Well-Being in a Small and Poor Eastern Cape Township: The Effect of Health, Social Capital, Marital Status, and Income

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, J. M.; Moller, V.; Nieboer, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    Our study used multilevel regression analysis to identify individual- and neighbourhood-level factors that determine individual-level subjective well-being in Rhini, a deprived suburb of Grahamstown in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa. The Townsend index and Gini coefficient were used to investigate whether contextual neighbourhood-level…

  6. [Conflicts and vector-borne diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    2010-01-01

    not available for most diseases. Promising preventive methods, including long-lasting impregnated bed-nets and tents, are available. War has been an impetus for disclosing life-cycles of vector-borne diseases and for control methods; peace, reconciliation and poverty reduction are required to achieve lasting...

  7. Health economics of tick-borne diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and Lyme borreliosis (LB) present an increasing burden and threat to public health. Only vaccines against TBE are available but vaccination is likely too low for optimally reducing the TBE burden at the European level. Vaccines for LB are still in the process

  8. Laterality in Prematurely-Born Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segalwitz, Sidney J.; Chapman, Jacqueline S.

    The study examined the relationship between perinatal stress and decreased right handedness and decreased left cerebral dominance for speech with 215 children born prematurely, followed from birth, and tested at age 5. Results indicated that neither hand preference nor hand performance correlated with degree of perinatal stress and that eye…

  9. Suppression of soil-borne plant pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agtmaal, van M.

    2015-01-01

    Soil borne plant pathogens considerably reduce crop yields worldwide and are difficult to control due to their ”masked” occurrence  in the heterogeneous soil environment. This hampers the efficacy of chemical - and microbiological control agents.   Outbreaks of crop

  10. Odor processing by adult-born neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livneh, Yoav; Adam, Yoav; Mizrahi, Adi

    2014-03-05

    The adult mammalian brain is continuously supplied with adult-born neurons in the olfactory bulb (OB) and hippocampus, where they are thought to be important for circuit coding and plasticity. However, direct evidence for the actual involvement of these neurons in neural processing is still lacking. We recorded the spiking activity of adult-born periglomerular neurons in the mouse OB in vivo using two-photon-targeted patch recordings. We show that odor responsiveness reaches a peak during neuronal development and then recedes at maturity. Sensory enrichment during development enhances the selectivity of adult-born neurons after maturation, without affecting neighboring resident neurons. Thus, in the OB circuit, adult-born neurons functionally integrate into the circuit, where they acquire distinct response profiles in an experience-dependent manner. The constant flow of these sensitive neurons into the circuit provides it with a mechanism of long-term plasticity, wherein new neurons mature to process odor information based on past demands. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. ACTUAL TICK-BORNE INFECTIONS IN CRIMEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Gorovenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Crimean Peninsula is located in the Northern part of the Black sea, from the East it is washed by the Sea of Azov, to the South and West by the Black Sea. The unique geographical and climatic conditions facilitate leptospirosis, tularemia, tick-borne encephalitis, Lyme disease, intestinal yersiniosis, pseudotuberculosis, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, Mediterranean fever, Q-fever and other infectious diseases natural foci formation on the territory of Crimea Republic. Tick-borne natural focal infections have the most significance due to favorable epidemiologic conditions especially on the background of high raid ticks attacks on people. A leading role in the epizootology and epidemiology of tick-borne natural-focal infections of the Crimea are playing Ixodidae that occur in different landscape-climatic zones, with the greatest their species diversity is observed in mountain-foothill, forest and forest-steppe regions. There are about 30 species in Ixodidae fauna of the Crimean Peninsula. Ticks species composition identification shows that over 50% of people attacks episodes in the Crimea on recent years is caused by Ixodes ricinus ticks species, the remaining are associated with Haemophisalis punctata, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Hyalomma marginatum, Dermacentor marginatus and other. Refusal of treatment in medical institutions of the people affected by tick bites, and the possibility of an attack on people subtle phases of mites are lubricates the real picture of the frequency of contacts of the population with ticks and complicates the forecasting of the epidemiological situation. This review summarizes the available information about spreading of tick-borne encephalitis, Lyme disease, Mediterranean and Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fevers on the territory of Crimea Republic and demonstrates the modern trends and manifestations of epidemic process of these nosological forms. The results

  12. THE ROLE OF INTERNET IN THE BORN GLOBAL COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius de Oliveira Brasil

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of internationalization of global companies occurs connected to the high integration through the nets of computers, especially the Internet. The technological advances have revolutionized the forms of transacting products and services. Innovation becomes the key word for this new phase established in the economy by the computer science in which the Internet is able to establish a larger integration among the enterprises, consumers and suppliers. How can the Internet contribute to the process of Internationalization of Born Globals? This theoretical paper aims to discuss the role of innovations with internet in Born Globals firms to the process of internationalization. The literature review on the subject shows that the advances of technology will require new studies about the internationalization’s process. In spite of that, the influence of the electronic business has progressed in commercial transactions. The global world requires workers who are more and more prepared to face such reality. The enterprises will have to adapt, otherwise they may fail to reduce costs and to improve their logistics. The consumers can have personalized products, while their needs are met in a more comfortable, immediate way and with less intermediates. The electronic markets revolutionize the economy by meeting old needs in a more modern and practical way.

  13. Analysing the ocular biometry of new-born infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozema, Jos J; Herscovici, Zvi; Snir, Moshe; Axer-Siegel, Ruth

    2017-12-29

    To model and analyse the ocular biometry of new-born infants. This work is based on previously published data of a cohort of 66 new-born infants aged 0-3 days. After exclusion of seven myopic subjects, the available retinoscopy, keratometry and ultrasound biometry data were analysed, along with calculated parameters such as lens power and whole eye power. Male infants have significantly flatter corneas that female infants (Mann-Whitney U test, p  0.05), suggesting scaled eye growth during the last weeks before birth. Multivariate Gaussian analysis demonstrated that a statistical eye model can be defined that generates synthetic data that is significantly equal to the original data (non-parametric Mann-Whitney test for equality; all p Levene test; all p > 0.05). The eye undergoes a scaled growth until birth, at which time male and female infants have similar values. The models presented may serve as an early biometry reference. © 2017 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2017 The College of Optometrists.

  14. On the mathematical treatment of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jecko, Thierry, E-mail: thierry.jecko@u-cergy.fr [AGM, UMR 8088 du CNRS, Université de Cergy-Pontoise, Département de mathématiques, site de Saint Martin, 2 avenue Adolphe Chauvin, F-95000 Pontoise (France)

    2014-05-15

    Motivated by the paper by Sutcliffe and Woolley [“On the quantum theory of molecules,” J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A544 (2012)], we present the main ideas used by mathematicians to show the accuracy of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for molecules. Based on mathematical works on this approximation for molecular bound states, in scattering theory, in resonance theory, and for short time evolution, we give an overview of some rigorous results obtained up to now. We also point out the main difficulties mathematicians are trying to overcome and speculate on further developments. The mathematical approach does not fit exactly to the common use of the approximation in Physics and Chemistry. We criticize the latter and comment on the differences, contributing in this way to the discussion on the Born-Oppenheimer approximation initiated by Sutcliffe and Woolley. The paper neither contains mathematical statements nor proofs. Instead, we try to make accessible mathematically rigourous results on the subject to researchers in Quantum Chemistry or Physics.

  15. Differences in the self-reported racism experiences of US-born and foreign-born Black pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Tyan Parker; Strong, Emily Ficklin; Krieger, Nancy; Gillman, Matthew W; Rich-Edwards, Janet W

    2009-07-01

    Differential exposure to minority status stressors may help explain differences in United States (US)-born and foreign-born Black women's birth outcomes. We explored self-reports of racism recorded in a survey of 185 US-born and 114 foreign-born Black pregnant women enrolled in Project Viva, a prospective cohort study of pregnant women in Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Self-reported prevalence of personal racism and group racism was significantly higher among US-born than foreign-born Black pregnant women, with US-born women having 4.1 and 7.8 times the odds, respectively, of childhood exposure. In multivariate analyses, US-born women's personal and group racism exposure also was more pervasive across the eight life domains we queried. Examined by immigrant subgroups, US-born women were more similar in their self-reports of racism to foreign-born women who moved to the US before age 18 than to women who immigrated after age 18. Moreover, US-born women more closely resembled foreign-born women from the Caribbean than those from Africa. Differential exposure to self-reported racism over the life course may be a critically important factor that distinguishes US-born Black women from their foreign-born counterparts.

  16. Differences in the self-reported racism experiences of US-born and foreign-born Black pregnant women

    OpenAIRE

    Dominguez, Tyan Parker; Strong, Emily Ficklin; Krieger, Nancy; Gillman, Matthew W.; Rich-Edwards, Janet W.

    2009-01-01

    Differential exposure to minority status stressors may help explain differences in United States (US)-born and foreign-born Black women’s birth outcomes. We explored self-reports of racism recorded in a survey of 185 US-born and 114 foreign-born Black pregnant women enrolled in Project Viva, a prospective cohort study of pregnant women in Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Self-reported prevalence of personal racism and group racism was significantly higher among US-born than foreign-born Black preg...

  17. Young adult born neurons enhance hippocampal dependent performance via influences on bilateral networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Jia-Min; Tseng, Hua-An; Desai, Mitul; Bucklin, Mark E; Mohammed, Ali I; Robinson, Nick Tm; Boyden, Edward S; Rangel, Lara M; Jasanoff, Alan P; Gritton, Howard J; Han, Xue

    2016-12-03

    Adult neurogenesis supports performance in many hippocampal dependent tasks. Considering the small number of adult-born neurons generated at any given time, it is surprising that this sparse population of cells can substantially influence behavior. Recent studies have demonstrated that heightened excitability and plasticity may be critical for the contribution of young adult-born cells for certain tasks. What is not well understood is how these unique biophysical and synaptic properties may translate to networks that support behavioral function. Here we employed a location discrimination task in mice while using optogenetics to transiently silence adult-born neurons at different ages. We discovered that adult-born neurons promote location discrimination during early stages of development but only if they undergo maturation during task acquisition. Silencing of young adult-born neurons also produced changes extending to the contralateral hippocampus, detectable by both electrophysiology and fMRI measurements, suggesting young neurons may modulate location discrimination through influences on bilateral hippocampal networks.

  18. Epidemiology of tuberculosis in a low-incidence Italian region with high immigration rates: differences between not Italy-born and Italy-born TB cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Emilia Romagna, a northern Italian region, has a population of 4.27 million, of which 9.7% are immigrants. The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of tuberculosis (TB) during the period 1996-2006 in not Italy-born compared to Italy-born cases. Methods Data was obtained from the Regional TB surveillance system, from where personal data, clinical features and risk factors of all notified TB cases were extracted. Results 5377 TB cases were reported. The proportion of immigrants with TB, over the total number of TB cases had progressively increased over the years, from 19.1% to 53.3%. In the not Italy-born population, TB incidence was higher than in Italians (in 2006: 100.7 cases per 100 000 registered not Italy-born subjects and 83.9/100 000 adding 20% of estimated irregular presences to the denominators. TB incidence among Italians was 6.5/100 000 Italians). A progressive rise in the not Italy-born incident cases was observed but associated with a decline in TB incidence. Not Italy-born cases were younger compared to the Italy-born cases, and more frequently classified as "new cases" (OR 2.0 95%CI 1.61-2.49 for age group 20-39); 60.7% had pulmonary TB, 31.6% extra pulmonary and 7.6% disseminated TB. Risk factors for TB in this population group were connected to lower income status (homeless: OR 149.9 95%CI 20.7-1083.3 for age group 40-59). Conclusions In low-incidence regions, prevention and control of TB among sub-groups at risk such as the foreign-born population is a matter of public health concern. In addition, increasing immigration rates may affect TB epidemiology. TB among immigrants is characterized by particular clinical features and risk factors, which should be analyzed in order to plan effective action. PMID:21605460

  19. Epidemiology of tuberculosis in a low-incidence Italian region with high immigration rates: differences between not Italy-born and Italy-born TB cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borrini Bianca M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emilia Romagna, a northern Italian region, has a population of 4.27 million, of which 9.7% are immigrants. The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of tuberculosis (TB during the period 1996-2006 in not Italy-born compared to Italy-born cases. Methods Data was obtained from the Regional TB surveillance system, from where personal data, clinical features and risk factors of all notified TB cases were extracted. Results 5377 TB cases were reported. The proportion of immigrants with TB, over the total number of TB cases had progressively increased over the years, from 19.1% to 53.3%. In the not Italy-born population, TB incidence was higher than in Italians (in 2006: 100.7 cases per 100 000 registered not Italy-born subjects and 83.9/100 000 adding 20% of estimated irregular presences to the denominators. TB incidence among Italians was 6.5/100 000 Italians. A progressive rise in the not Italy-born incident cases was observed but associated with a decline in TB incidence. Not Italy-born cases were younger compared to the Italy-born cases, and more frequently classified as "new cases" (OR 2.0 95%CI 1.61-2.49 for age group 20-39; 60.7% had pulmonary TB, 31.6% extra pulmonary and 7.6% disseminated TB. Risk factors for TB in this population group were connected to lower income status (homeless: OR 149.9 95%CI 20.7-1083.3 for age group 40-59. Conclusions In low-incidence regions, prevention and control of TB among sub-groups at risk such as the foreign-born population is a matter of public health concern. In addition, increasing immigration rates may affect TB epidemiology. TB among immigrants is characterized by particular clinical features and risk factors, which should be analyzed in order to plan effective action.

  20. Investigations regarding control of emissions from small and domestic firings not subject to licensing of less than 1 MW capacity. Final report. Untersuchungen zur Emissionsminderung bei nicht genehmigungspflichtigen Klein- und Haushaltsfeuerungen im Leistungsbereich unter 1 MW. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, E.; Schmidt, D.; Pape, B.

    1990-12-01

    This research project aimed to establish the emission characteristics of different domestic firings as a function of operating parameters and to point out and test measures for controlling pollution from the angle of their technical and economic feasibility. The investigations were carried through at two modern low-temperature boilers for gas and oil and at two firings for solid fuels. - The measurements and experiments permitted to complement emission data already known and established elsewhere regarding small and domestic firings. Important is, further, that simple and practicable methods for reducing emissions could be pointed out also for solid fuel firings and including for households. (orig./BWI).

  1. Geometrical dynamics of Born-Infeld objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordero, Ruben [Departamento de Fisica, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas del I.P.N., Unidad Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edificio 9, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Molgado, Alberto [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Colima, Bernal DIaz del Castillo 340, Col. Villas San Sebastian, Colima (Mexico); Rojas, Efrain [Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Universidad Veracruzana, 91000 Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2007-03-21

    We present a geometrically inspired study of the dynamics of Dp-branes. We focus on the usual non-polynomial Dirac-Born-Infeld action for the worldvolume swept out by the brane in its evolution in general background spacetimes. We emphasize the form of the resulting equations of motion which are quite simple and resemble Newton's second law, complemented with a conservation law for a worldvolume bicurrent. We take a closer look at the classical Hamiltonian analysis which is supported by the ADM framework of general relativity. The constraints and their algebra are identified as well as the geometrical role they play in phase space. In order to illustrate our results, we review the dynamics of a D1-brane immersed in a AdS{sub 3} x S{sup 3} background spacetime. We exhibit the mechanical properties of Born-Infeld objects paving the way to a consistent quantum formulation.

  2. Scalar geons in Born-Infeld gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, V. I.; Olmo, Gonzalo J.; Rubiera-Garcia, D.

    2017-08-01

    The existence of static, spherically symmetric, self-gravitating scalar field solutions in the context of Born-Infeld gravity is explored. Upon a combination of analytical approximations and numerical methods, the equations for a free scalar field (without a potential term) are solved, verifying that the solutions recover the predictions of General Relativity far from the center but finding important new effects in the central regions. We find two classes of objects depending on the ratio between the Schwarzschild radius and a length scale associated to the Born-Infeld theory: massive solutions have a wormhole structure, with their throat at r≈ 2M, while for the lighter configurations the topology is Euclidean. The total energy density of these solutions exhibits a solitonic profile with a maximum peaked away from the center, and located at the throat whenever a wormhole exists. The geodesic structure and curvature invariants are analyzed for the various configurations considered.

  3. Approximated solutions to Born-Infeld dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraro, Rafael [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE, CONICET-UBA),Casilla de Correo 67, Sucursal 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires,Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Nigro, Mauro [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires,Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-02-01

    The Born-Infeld equation in the plane is usefully captured in complex language. The general exact solution can be written as a combination of holomorphic and anti-holomorphic functions. However, this solution only expresses the potential in an implicit way. We rework the formulation to obtain the complex potential in an explicit way, by means of a perturbative procedure. We take care of the secular behavior common to this kind of approach, by resorting to a symmetry the equation has at the considered order of approximation. We apply the method to build approximated solutions to Born-Infeld electrodynamics. We solve for BI electromagnetic waves traveling in opposite directions. We study the propagation at interfaces, with the aim of searching for effects susceptible to experimental detection. In particular, we show that a reflected wave is produced when a wave is incident on a semi-space containing a magnetostatic field.

  4. The Escherichia coli divisome: born to divide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Paolo; Pazos, Manuel; Vicente, Miguel

    2013-12-01

    Septation in Escherichia coli involves complex molecular mechanisms that contribute to the accuracy of bacterial division. The proto-ring, a complex made up by the FtsZ, FtsA and ZipA proteins, forms at the beginning of the process and directs the assembly of the full divisome. Central to this complex is the FtsZ protein, a GTPase able to assemble into a ring-like structure that responds to several modulatory inputs including mechanisms to position the septum at midcell. The connection with the cell wall synthesising machinery stabilizes the constriction of the cytoplasmic membrane. Although a substantial amount of evidence supports this description, many details on how individual divisome elements are structured or how they function are subjected to controversial interpretations. We discuss these discrepancies arising from incomplete data and from technical difficulties imposed by the small size of bacteria. Future work, including more powerful imaging and reconstruction technologies, will help to clarify the missing details on the architecture and function of the bacterial division machinery. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Distribution of tick-borne diseases in China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Xian-Bo; Na, Ren-Hua; Wei, Shan-Shan; Zhu, Jin-Song; Peng, Hong-Juan

    2013-01-01

    As an important contributor to vector-borne diseases in China, in recent years, tick-borne diseases have attracted much attention because of their increasing incidence and consequent significant harm...

  6. Born too soon: care for the preterm baby

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lawn, Joy E; Davidge, Ruth; Paul, Vinod K; von Xylander, Severin; de Graft Johnson, Joseph; Costello, Anthony; Kinney, Mary V; Segre, Joel; Molyneux, Liz

    2013-01-01

    .... An estimated 15 million babies are born preterm, and the survival gap between those born in high and low income countries is widening, with one million deaths a year due to direct complications...

  7. DIGESTIVE DISORDERS IN PREMATURELY BORN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Belyaeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article contains data on functional digestive disorders in newborns, mainly on the problem of lactase (disaccharidase insufficiency. The information on the prevalence of this condition, modern classification of hypolactasia, diagnostic techniques and dietary as well as medicinal correction is given. Treatment of lactase insufficiency has an increased significance in prematurely born children due to their excess demands in energy and plastic substances. The appropriateness of lactase for the treatment of this disorder is proved.

  8. Dynamics of Born-Infeld membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordero, R [Departamento de Fisica, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas del I.P.N., Unidad Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edificio 9, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Molgado, A [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Colima, Bernal DIaz del Castillo 340, Col. Villas San Sebastian, Colima (Mexico); Rojas, E [Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Universidad Veracruzana, 91000 Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2007-11-15

    We present a geometrical inspired study of the dynamics of Dp-branes. We focus on the usual nonpolynomial Dirac-Born-Infeld action for the worldvolume swept out by the brane in its evolution in general background spacetimes. We emphasize the form of the resulting equations of motion which are quite simple and resemble Newton's second law, complemented with a conservation law for a worldvolume bicurrent.

  9. Teenagers born at extremely low birth weight

    OpenAIRE

    Whitfield, Michael F.; Grunau, Ruth E.

    2006-01-01

    Adolescence constitutes a major transition for extremely low birth weight (ELBW) teenagers. Recent studies of ELBW teenagers born in the 1980s have provided information about the growth and developmental characteristics of these individuals in adolescence and in early adulthood. ELBW teenagers are shorter and lighter than their full-term peers, and have a smaller head circumference. Cognitive and academic vulnerabilities documented during the school years, particularly difficulties with nonve...

  10. The classical wormhole solution and wormhole wavefunction with a nonlinear Born-Infeld scalar field

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, H. Q.; Shen, L. M.; Ji, P.; Ji, G. F.; Sun, N. J.

    2002-01-01

    On this paper we consider the classical wormhole solution of the Born-Infeld scalar field. The corresponding classical wormhole solution can be obtained analytically for both very small and large $\\dot{\\phi}$. At the extreme limits of small $\\dot{\\phi}$ the wormhole solution has the same format as one obtained by Giddings and Strominger[10]. At the extreme limits of large $\\dot{\\phi}$ the wormhole solution is a new one. The wormhole wavefunctions can also be obtained for both very small and l...

  11. Blocking transmission of vector-borne diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorderet-Weber, Sandra; Noack, Sandra; Selzer, Paul M; Kaminsky, Ronald

    2017-04-01

    Vector-borne diseases are responsible for significant health problems in humans, as well as in companion and farm animals. Killing the vectors with ectoparasitic drugs before they have the opportunity to pass on their pathogens could be the ideal way to prevent vector borne diseases. Blocking of transmission might work when transmission is delayed during blood meal, as often happens in ticks. The recently described systemic isoxazolines have been shown to successfully prevent disease transmission under conditions of delayed pathogen transfer. However, if the pathogen is transmitted immediately at bite as it is the case with most insects, blocking transmission becomes only possible if ectoparasiticides prevent the vector from landing on or, at least, from biting the host. Chemical entities exhibiting repellent activity in addition to fast killing, like pyrethroids, could prevent pathogen transmission even in cases of immediate transfer. Successful blocking depends on effective action in the context of the extremely diverse life-cycles of vectors and vector-borne pathogens of medical and veterinary importance which are summarized in this review. This complexity leads to important parameters to consider for ectoparasiticide research and when considering the ideal drug profile for preventing disease transmission. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. [Food borne infectious outbreaks, Austria 2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Much, Peter; Pichler, Juliane; Allerberger, Franz

    2007-01-01

    In Austria, a total of 606 food borne outbreaks, affecting 1,910 people altogether (including 368 hospitalized patients and 1 fatal outcome) were documented in 2005. Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp. accounted for 99% of all reported outbreaks. Fortysix (8%) of the 606 outbreaks were acquired abroad. Bacteria caused all but one of the 560 domestically acquired food borne outbreaks: 427 (76%) were due to Salmonella spp., 128 (23%) due to Campylobacter spp. and two outbreaks each due to enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli and Yersinia enterocolitica. Norovirus caused an outbreak affecting 22 persons. The respective hospitalization rate for domestically acquired Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp. infections was 20% and 16%. Of those outbreaks where information as to the source was provided, eggs were implicated in 57%, meat products (especially poultry) in 30% and milk or dairy products (especially raw milk) in 4%. The ratio between family outbreaks and general outbreaks was 89% to 11%. For general outbreaks the following locations of exposure were given: commercial food suppliers (incl. restaurants, cafeterias) 34 x, family celebrations 14 x, nursery schools 4 x, festivities (e.g. fairs) 3 x, nursing homes twice and once a mixed outbreak involving commercial food suppliers plus homes (Austria-wide S. Enteritidis PT19 outbreak). In our opinion, the relatively high number of family outbreaks merely reflects the still insufficient quality of epidemiological outbreak investigation in Austria, i.e. lack of consolidating individual clusters into larger food borne outbreaks which exceed district or provincial borders.

  13. Community knowledge, attitudes and practices related to tick-borne ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Tick-borne Relapsing Fever (TBRF) is a vector-borne disease of humans which causes serious illness, primarily for children under ... Key words: tick-borne relapsing fever, knowledge, transmission, symptoms, prevention, Tanzania. * Correspondence: Dr. ..... Zoonotic Diseases, 1(4): 331 – 338. Kengeya-Kayondo ...

  14. The wild life of tick-borne pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmeester, Tim R.

    2016-01-01

    Diseases that are transmitted by arthropod vectors from animal hosts to humans – so called zoonotic vector-borne diseases – have increased in incidence in the last decades. In North America and Europe, tick-borne pathogens cause the majority of vector-borne diseases, including Lyme

  15. The Lived Experiences of Canadian-Born and Foreign-Born Chinese Canadian Post-Secondary Students in Northern Ontario

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fei Wang

    2016-01-01

    ... and (d) the effect of Canadian education on career options. The study revealed that Canadian-born Chinese students differed from their foreign-born counterparts in their viewpoints on ethnic identity...

  16. Born energy, acid-base equilibrium, structure and interactions of end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nap, R. J.; Tagliazucchi, M.; Szleifer, I.

    2014-01-01

    This work addresses the effect of the Born self-energy contribution in the modeling of the structural and thermodynamical properties of weak polyelectrolytes confined to planar and curved surfaces. The theoretical framework is based on a theory that explicitly includes the conformations, size, shape, and charge distribution of all molecular species and considers the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte. Namely, the degree of charge in the polymers is not imposed but it is a local varying property that results from the minimization of the total free energy. Inclusion of the dielectric properties of the polyelectrolyte is important as the environment of a polymer layer is very different from that in the adjacent aqueous solution. The main effect of the Born energy contribution on the molecular organization of an end-grafted weak polyacid layer is uncharging the weak acid (or basic) groups and consequently decreasing the concentration of mobile ions within the layer. The magnitude of the effect increases with polymer density and, in the case of the average degree of charge, it is qualitatively equivalent to a small shift in the equilibrium constant for the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte monomers. The degree of charge is established by the competition between electrostatic interactions, the polymer conformational entropy, the excluded volume interactions, the translational entropy of the counterions and the acid-base chemical equilibrium. Consideration of the Born energy introduces an additional energetic penalty to the presence of charged groups in the polyelectrolyte layer, whose effect is mitigated by down-regulating the amount of charge, i.e., by shifting the local-acid base equilibrium towards its uncharged state. Shifting of the local acid-base equilibrium and its effect on the properties of the polyelectrolyte layer, without considering the Born energy, have been theoretically predicted previously. Account of the Born energy leads

  17. Born energy, acid-base equilibrium, structure and interactions of end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nap, R J; Tagliazucchi, M; Szleifer, I

    2014-01-14

    This work addresses the effect of the Born self-energy contribution in the modeling of the structural and thermodynamical properties of weak polyelectrolytes confined to planar and curved surfaces. The theoretical framework is based on a theory that explicitly includes the conformations, size, shape, and charge distribution of all molecular species and considers the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte. Namely, the degree of charge in the polymers is not imposed but it is a local varying property that results from the minimization of the total free energy. Inclusion of the dielectric properties of the polyelectrolyte is important as the environment of a polymer layer is very different from that in the adjacent aqueous solution. The main effect of the Born energy contribution on the molecular organization of an end-grafted weak polyacid layer is uncharging the weak acid (or basic) groups and consequently decreasing the concentration of mobile ions within the layer. The magnitude of the effect increases with polymer density and, in the case of the average degree of charge, it is qualitatively equivalent to a small shift in the equilibrium constant for the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte monomers. The degree of charge is established by the competition between electrostatic interactions, the polymer conformational entropy, the excluded volume interactions, the translational entropy of the counterions and the acid-base chemical equilibrium. Consideration of the Born energy introduces an additional energetic penalty to the presence of charged groups in the polyelectrolyte layer, whose effect is mitigated by down-regulating the amount of charge, i.e., by shifting the local-acid base equilibrium towards its uncharged state. Shifting of the local acid-base equilibrium and its effect on the properties of the polyelectrolyte layer, without considering the Born energy, have been theoretically predicted previously. Account of the Born energy leads

  18. Small Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Pemberton (Steven)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractThe term “Open Data” often goes hand in hand with the term “Big Data”, where large data sets get released allowing for analysis, but the Cinderella of the Open Data ball is Small Data, small amounts of data, nonetheless possibly essential, that are too small to be put in some database or

  19. Lagrangian formulation of Born-Infeld electrodynamics in fractional space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosropour, B.

    2017-07-01

    In this work, after a brief review of the Euler-Lagrange equations of motion in fractional space and Lagrangian formulation of Born-Infeld electrodynamics, we obtain the inhomogeneous and homogeneous Born-Infeld equations in fractional space. A fractional generalization of the Born-Infeld electrodynamics in vector form is found. Then, corresponding to fractal Born-Infeld equations we obtain the Laplace and Poisson equations in fractional space. Also, Faraday's law and Amper's law of Born-Infeld electrodynamics in fractional space are derived.

  20. Electronic structure, lattice energies and Born exponents for alkali halides from first principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Gopikrishnan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available First principles calculations based on DFT have been performed on crystals of halides (X = F, Cl, Br and I of alkali metals (M = Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs. The calculated lattice energies (U0 are in good agreement with the experimental lattice enthalpies. A new exact formalism is proposed to determine the Born exponent (n for ionic solids. The values of the Born exponent calculated through this ab-initio technique is in good agreement with previous empirically derived results. Band Structure calculations reveal that these compounds are wide-gap insulators that explains their optical transparency. Projected density of states (PDOS calculations reveal that alkali halides with small cations and large anions, have small band gaps due to charge transfer from X → M. This explains the onset of covalency in ionic solids, which is popularly known as the Fajans Rule.

  1. Correlations of subjectively assessed fleece and conformation traits ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data used for this study were collected on the Carnarvon Afrino flock from 1986 to 1998, and include data records on several subjectively assessed traits, body weight and fleece traits of 3291 animals, the progeny of 127 sires and 772 dams. Reproduction data of 686 ewes born from 1986 to 1997 were also included.

  2. Integrated vector management: a critical strategy for combating vector-borne diseases in South Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, Emmanuel; Govere, John M; Macdonald, Michael B; Lako, Richard L; Haque, Ubydul; Baba, Samson P; Mnzava, Abraham

    2013-10-25

    Integrated vector management (IVM) based vector control is encouraged by the World Health Organization (WHO). However, operational experience with the IVM strategy has mostly come from countries with relatively well-established health systems and with malaria control focused programmes. Little is known about deployment of IVM for combating multiple vector-borne diseases in post-emergency settings, where delivery structures are less developed or absent. This manuscript reports on the feasibility of operational IVM for combating vector-borne diseases in South Sudan. A methodical review of published and unpublished documents on vector-borne diseases for South Sudan was conducted via systematic literature search of online electronic databases, Google Scholar, PubMed and WHO, using a combination of search terms. Additional, non-peer reviewed literature was examined for information related to the subject. South Sudan is among the heartlands of vector-borne diseases in the world, characterized by enormous infrastructure, human and financial resource constraints and a weak health system against an increasing number of refugees, returnees and internally displaced people. The presence of a multiplicity of vector-borne diseases in this post-conflict situation presents a unique opportunity to explore the potential of a rational IVM strategy for multiple disease control and optimize limited resource utilization, while maximizing the benefits and providing a model for countries in a similar situation. The potential of integrating vector-borne disease control is enormous in South Sudan. However, strengthened coordination, intersectoral collaboration and institutional and technical capacity for entomological monitoring and evaluation, including enforcement of appropriate legislation are crucial.

  3. MRI in tick-borne encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkadhi, H.; Kollias, S.S. [Institute of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of Zurich (Switzerland)

    2000-10-01

    The tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus gives rise to epidemic encephalitis. Mild forms usually manifest as influenza-like episodes or are clinically silent. MRI is usually normal in TBE. We describe severe TBE in a patient who presented with fever and altered mental status after a tick bite and a specific antibody response to TBE. MRI revealed pronounced signal abnormalities in the basal ganglia and thalamus, without contrast enhancement. These findings coincide well with neuropathological studies of severe nerve cell degeneration with inflammatory cell infiltrates, neuronophagia and reactive astrocytosis in the deep grey matter. We review the literature and discuss the relevant differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  4. Wormholes in Einstein-Born-Infeld Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Park, Mu-In

    2018-01-01

    We introduce a new approach to construct wormholes without introducing exotic matters in Einstein-Born-Infeld gravity with a cosmological constant. Contary to the conventional approach, the throat is located at the place where the solutions can be joined smoothly. The metric and its derivatives are continuous so that the exotic matters are not needed there. The exoticity of the energy-momentum tensor is not essential to sustain the wormhole. We also present a method to check the stability of wormholes in the new approach.

  5. Wormholes in Einstein-Born-Infeld Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jin Young

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a new approach to construct wormholes without introducing exotic matters in Einstein-Born-Infeld gravity with a cosmological constant. Contary to the conventional approach, the throat is located at the place where the solutions can be joined smoothly. The metric and its derivatives are continuous so that the exotic matters are not needed there. The exoticity of the energy-momentum tensor is not essential to sustain the wormhole. We also present a method to check the stability of wormholes in the new approach.

  6. Microbial control of arthropod-borne disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A Saldaña

    Full Text Available Arthropods harbor a diverse array of microbes that profoundly influence many aspects of host biology, including vector competence. Additionally, symbionts can be engineered to produce molecules that inhibit pathogens. Due to their intimate association with the host, microbes have developed strategies that facilitate their transmission, either horizontally or vertically, to conspecifics. These attributes make microbes attractive agents for applied strategies to control arthropod-borne disease. Here we discuss the recent advances in microbial control approaches to reduce the burden of pathogens such as Zika, Dengue and Chikungunya viruses, and Trypanosome and Plasmodium parasites. We also highlight where further investigation is warranted.

  7. N=2 Born-Infeld Attractors

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrara, S.; Sagnotti, A.

    2014-01-01

    We derive new types of $U(1)^n$ Born-Infeld actions based on N=2 special geometry in four dimensions. As in the single vector multiplet (n=1) case, the non--linear actions originate, in a particular limit, from quadratic expressions in the Maxwell fields. The dynamics is encoded in a set of coefficients $d_{ABC}$ related to the third derivative of the holomorphic prepotential and in an SU(2) triplet of N=2 Fayet-Iliopoulos charges, which must be suitably chosen to preserve a residual N=1 supersymmetry.

  8. Born with Protection against Whooping Cough

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-01-22

    This podcast provides information about whooping cough, a disease that can be deadly for babies, and CDC’s recommendation that all women receive the Tdap vaccine during the third trimester of every pregnancy so their babies can be born with protection from this serious disease.  Created: 1/22/2015 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), Meningitis and Vaccine Preventable Diseases Branch (MVPDB).   Date Released: 1/22/2015.

  9. Sensibility and Subjectivity: Levinas’ Traumatic Subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmika Pandya

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The importance of Levinas’ notions of sensibility and subjectivity are evident in the revision of phenomenological method by current phenomenologists such as Jean-Luc Marion and Michel Henry. The criticisms of key tenants of classical phenomenology, intentionality and reduction, are of a particular note. However, there are problems with Levinas’ characterization of subjectivity as essentially sensible. In “Totality and Infinity” and “Otherwise than Being”, Levinas criticizes and recasts a traditional notion of subjectivity, particularly the notion of the subject as the first and foremost rational subject. The subject in Levinas’ works is characterized more by its sensibility and affectedness than by its capacity to reason or affect its world. Levinas ties rationality to economy and suggests an alternative notion of reason that leads to his analysis of the ethical relation as the face-to-face encounter. The ‘origin’ of the social relation is located not in our capacity to know but rather in a sensibility that is diametrically opposed to the reason understood as economy. I argue that the opposition in Levinas’ thought between reason and sensibility is problematic and essentially leads to a self-conflicted subject. In fact, it would seem that violence characterizes the subject’s self-relation and, thus, is also inscribed at the base of the social relation. Rather than overcoming a problematic tendency to dualistic thought in philosophy Levinas merely reverses traditional hierarchies of reason/emotion, subject/object and self/other. 

  10. Characterizing early detection of language difficulties in children born preterm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Julie; Flamant, Cyril; Boussicault, Gerald; Berlie, Isabelle; Gascoin, Géraldine; Branger, Bernard; N'Guyen The Tich, Sylvie; Rozé, Jean-Christophe

    2014-06-01

    The optimal age for assessing language difficulties in premature children remains unclear. To determine the most predictive and earliest screening tool for later language difficulties on children born preterm. A prospective population-based study in the Loire Infant Follow-up Team LIFT SUBJECTS: All children born Lezine test at 24months, and the "Epreuves de Repérage des Troubles du Langage" (ERTL) at 4years. After 5years, the kindergarten teacher evaluated the vocabulary, grammar and pronunciation capacities of the child in comparison with the classroom performances. Among 1957 infants enrolled at discharge, 947 were assessed by their teacher with 12.2% (n=116) of language difficulties. Full data at all time points were available for 426 infants. The area under curve of the receiver operator characteristic curve obtained for the ASQ communication scale at 18months was significantly lower (0.65±0.09) than that obtained at 24months (0.77±0.08) and the languages items of Brunet Lezine test at 24months (0.77±0.08), and the ERTL at 4years (0.76±0.09). The optimal cut-off value for ASQ communication at 24months is ≤45 [sensitivity of 0.79 (95%CI: 0.70-0.86); specificity of 0.63 (95%CI: 0.59-0.66)]. The Ages & Stages Questionnaire communication scale at 24 corrected months appears as an acceptable test at an early time point to identify preterm children at risk of later language difficulties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The risk of psychiatric disorders in individuals born prematurely in Denmark from 1974 to 1996

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, René; Hansen, Bo Mølholm; Forman, Julie Lyng

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the risk of developing psychiatric disorders in individuals born prematurely (born before 37 weeks of gestation).......To investigate the risk of developing psychiatric disorders in individuals born prematurely (born before 37 weeks of gestation)....

  12. Social Trust and Children Born of War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voicu Bogdan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers two assumptions commonly used in analyzing the formation of social trust. They stress the importance of early socialization, on one hand, and of life events, on the other. We consider birth as a major life event for anyone and focus on the situation of Children Born of War. This group, even if lesser visible in some societies, has the peculiar characteristic to be born and socialized in very specific conditions. Typically, these people are the offspring of foreign soldiers, and local women. They may bear stigma, might be marginalized in family, school and society, and might develop a low level of generalized trust even if they may have lived all life in a culture rich in social trust. We explore at theoretical level their case, bring in a few statistics, and suggest a research direction that may be fruitful in learning about both such hidden populations and about social trust. In the end, we argue upon the importance of the topic for post-conflict societies.

  13. Advanced sleep phase in adolescents born preterm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbs, Anna Maria; Storfer-Isser, Amy; Rosen, Carol; Ievers-Landis, Carolyn E; Taveras, Elsie M; Redline, Susan

    2014-09-03

    The objective of this article is to evaluate whether sleep patterns and quality differed between adolescents born preterm and term, and to further explore whether differences in sleep patterns were explained by differences in mediating factors such as mood, behavior, or socioeconomic status. Five hundred and one 16- to 19-year-old children in the longitudinal Cleveland Children's Sleep and Health Study cohort underwent overnight polysomnography (PSG), wore wrist actigraphs, and completed sleep logs for 1 week. The modified Epworth Sleepiness Scale, the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale, and the Adolescent Sleep-Wake Scale were used to further assess sleep. Adolescents born preterm demonstrated significantly (p sleep midpoints (approximately 22 min after adjusting for demographic and psychosocial factors) by actigraphy. They also had significantly fewer arousals (by PSG), and reported being more rested and alert in the morning, as well as less sleepiness and fatigue. These findings support a growing body of evidence that perinatal factors may influence sleep phenotypes later in life. These factors may reflect developmental influences, as well as the influence of parenting styles on children's sleep.

  14. Health of children born after ovulation induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemetti, Reija; Sevón, Tiina; Gissler, Mika; Hemminki, Elina

    2010-03-01

    To study the health of children born after ovulation induction (OI). Nationwide register-based study. The OI children were followed up to the age of 4 years and compared with other children. The OI children (N = 4,467). Two control groups: all other children (excluding children born after IVF, N = 190,398) and a random sample of those children (n = 26,877). Ovulation induction treatment in ordinary practice. Mortality rates and adjusted odds ratios for perinatal outcomes, hospitalizations, health-related benefits, and long-term medication use. A total of 12% of OI and 2% of control children were multiples. Even after stratifying for multiplicity and adjusting for the available confounding factors (region, smoking, maternal age, socioeconomic position, and parity for perinatal health and mother's socioeconomic position for other indicators), most indicators showed worse health among OI children compared with control children. The OI children had poorer perinatal health and more episodes of long hospitalization than the control children. Singleton OI children had more long-term illnesses in childhood, as measured by child disability allowance, long-term medication use, and hospital care episodes. Either OI treatment or the reasons for the treatment increase the risk of health problems in early childhood. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. On multifield Born and Born-Infeld theories and their non-Abelian generalizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerchiai, Bianca L. [Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi,P.zza del Viminale 1, I-00184 Roma (Italy); DISAT, Politecnico di Torino,Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, I-10129 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Torino,via P. Giuria, 1, 20125 Torino (Italy); Trigiante, Mario [DISAT, Politecnico di Torino,Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, I-10129 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Torino,via P. Giuria, 1, 20125 Torino (Italy)

    2016-10-28

    Starting from a recently proposed linear formulation in terms of auxiliary fields, we study n-field generalizations of Born and Born-Infeld theories. In this description the Lagrangian is quadratic in the vector field strengths and the symmetry properties (including the characteristic self-duality) of the corresponding non-linear theory are manifest as on-shell duality symmetries and depend on the choice of the (homogeneous) manifold spanned by the auxiliary scalar fields and the symplectic frame. By suitably choosing these defining properties of the quadratic Lagrangian, we are able to reproduce some known multi-field Born-Infeld theories and to derive new non-linear models, such as the n-field Born theory. We also discuss non-Abelian generalizations of these theories obtained by choosing the vector fields in the adjoint representation of an off-shell compact global symmetry group K and replacing them by non-Abelian, K-covariant field strengths, thus promoting K to a gauge group.

  16. Distribution of tick-borne diseases in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xian-Bo; Na, Ren-Hua; Wei, Shan-Shan; Zhu, Jin-Song; Peng, Hong-Juan

    2013-04-23

    As an important contributor to vector-borne diseases in China, in recent years, tick-borne diseases have attracted much attention because of their increasing incidence and consequent significant harm to livestock and human health. The most commonly observed human tick-borne diseases in China include Lyme borreliosis (known as Lyme disease in China), tick-borne encephalitis (known as Forest encephalitis in China), Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (known as Xinjiang hemorrhagic fever in China), Q-fever, tularemia and North-Asia tick-borne spotted fever. In recent years, some emerging tick-borne diseases, such as human monocytic ehrlichiosis, human granulocytic anaplasmosis, and a novel bunyavirus infection, have been reported frequently in China. Other tick-borne diseases that are not as frequently reported in China include Colorado fever, oriental spotted fever and piroplasmosis. Detailed information regarding the history, characteristics, and current epidemic status of these human tick-borne diseases in China will be reviewed in this paper. It is clear that greater efforts in government management and research are required for the prevention, control, diagnosis, and treatment of tick-borne diseases, as well as for the control of ticks, in order to decrease the tick-borne disease burden in China.

  17. Extremely prematurely born adolescents self-report of anxiety symptoms, and the mothers' reports on their offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sømhovd, M J; Esbjørn, B H; Hansen, B M

    2017-01-01

    -born participants reported higher social anxiety symptoms than did mothers of controls (51.7 versus 46.8, p = 0.001). The relative risk for being above a threshold indicating distressing anxiety was small from self-reports (1.39; p = 0.60). From mother-reports, the relative risk was noticeable but not significant...... (4.58; p = 0.14). Cross-informant scores correlated significant for total anxiety and social anxiety for the preterm-born (rτ = 0.2, p = 0.001; rτ = 0.3, p ≤ 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Self-reports did not clearly indicate more anxiety in the preterm group, although confidence intervals supported......AIM: To compare anxiety symptoms in adolescents born extremely prematurely to term-born controls. METHODS: We had 96 preterm-born adolescents and 40 term-born controls from Denmark, and their mothers score the adolescents on the Revised Children Anxiety and Depression scale. We analysed group...

  18. Socio-economic factors in the differential upsurge of tick-borne encephalitis in Central and Eastern Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šumilo, D.; Bormane, A.; Asokliene, L.; Vasilenko, V.; Golovljova, I.; Avsic-Zupanc, T.; Hubálek, Zdeněk; Randolph, S. E.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 2 (2008), s. 81-95 ISSN 1052-9276 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 10284 - EDEN Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : tick-borne encephalitis * Europe Subject RIV: FN - Epidemiology, Contagious Diseases ; Clinical Immunology Impact factor: 7.130, year: 2008

  19. Targeting a global health problem: Vaccine design and challenges for the control of tick-borne diseases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    de la Fuente, J.; Contreras, M.; Estrada-Peňa, A.; Cabezas Cruz, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 38 (2017), s. 5089-5094 ISSN 0264-410X Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : tick * vaccine * immunology * tick-borne diseases * risk * omics Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.235, year: 2016

  20. Ticks and Tick-Borne Pathogens of the Caribbean: Current Understanding and Future Directions for More Comprehensive Surveillance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gondard, M.; Cabezas Cruz, Alejandro; Charles, R. A.; Vayssier-Taussat, M.; Albina, E.; Moutailler, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7 (2017), č. článku 490. ISSN 2235-2988 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : tick-borne pathogens * ticks * Caribbean * epidemiology * newhigh-throughput technologies * surveillance Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.300, year: 2016

  1. The association between the early motor repertoire and language development in term children born after normal pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salavati, Sahar; Einspieler, Christa; Vagelli, Giulia; Zhang, Dajie; Pansy, Jasmin; Burgerhof, Johannes G. M.; Marschik, Peter B.; Bos, Arend F.

    Background: The assessment of the early motor repertoire is a widely used method for assessing the infant's neurological status. Aim: To determine the association between the early motor repertoire and language development. Study design: Prospective cohort study. Subjects: 22 term children born

  2. A signal-substrate match in the substrate-borne component of a multimodal courtship display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian O. ELIAS, Andrew C. MASON, Eileen A. HEBETS

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The environment can impose strong limitations on the efficacy of signal transmission. In particular, for vibratory communication, the signaling environment is often extremely heterogeneous at very small scales. Nevertheless, natural selection is expected to select for signals well-suited to effective transmission. Here, we test for substrate-dependent signal efficacy in the wolf spider Schizocosa stridulans Stratton 1991. We first explore the transmission characteristics of this important signaling modality by playing recorded substrate-borne signals through three different substrates (leaf litter, pine litter, and red clay and measuring the propagated signal. We found that the substrate-borne signal of S. stridulans attenuates the least on leaf litter, the substrate upon which the species is naturally found. Next, by assessing mating success with artificially muted and non-muted males across different signaling substrates (leaf litter, pine litter, and sand, we explored the relationship between substrate-borne signaling and substrate for mating success. We found that muted males were unsuccessful in obtaining copulations regardless of substrate, while mating success was dependent on the signaling substrate for non-muted males. For non-muted males, more males copulated on leaf litter than any other substrate. Taken together, these results confirm the importance of substrate-borne signaling in S. stridulans and suggest a match between signal properties and signal efficacy – leaf litter transmits the signal most effectively and males are most successful in obtaining copulations on leaf litter [Current Zoology 56 (3: 370–378, 2010].

  3. Health outcomes of children born to mothers with chronic kidney disease: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrani Banerjee

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to study the health of children born to mothers with chronic kidney disease. Twenty-four children born to mothers with chronic kidney disease were compared with 39 matched control children born to healthy mothers without kidney disease. The well-being of each child was individually assessed in terms of physical health, neurodevelopment and psychological health. Families participating with renal disease were more likely to be from lower socio-economic backgrounds. Significantly fewer vaginal deliveries were reported for mothers with renal disease and their infants were more likely to experience neonatal morbidity. Study and control children were comparable for growth parameters and neurodevelopment as assessed by the Griffiths scales. There was no evidence of more stress amongst mothers with renal disease or of impaired bonding between mother and child when compared to controls. However, there was evidence of greater externalizing behavioral problems in the group of children born to mothers with renal disease. Engaging families in such studies is challenging. Nonetheless, families who participated appreciated being asked. The children were apparently healthy but there was evidence in this small study of significant antenatal and perinatal morbidity compared to controls. Future larger multi-center studies are required to confirm these early findings.

  4. Design and Development of VHF Antennas for Space Borne Signal of Opportunity Receivers for Cubesat Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Manohar; Piepmeier, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Design and Development of VHF Antennas for Space Borne Signal of Opportunity Receivers for Cubesat Platforms. Space borne microwave remote sensors at VHF/UHF frequencies are important instruments to observe reflective properties of land surfaces through thick and heavy forestation on a global scale. One of the most cost effective ways of measuring land reflectivity at VHF/UHF frequencies is to use signals transmitted by existing communication satellites (operating at VHF/UHF band) as a signal of opportunity (SoOp) signal and passive receivers integrated with airborne/space borne platforms operating in the Low Earth Orbit (LEO). One of the critical components of the passive receiver is two antennas (one to receive only direct signal and other to receive only reflected signal) which need to have ideally high (>30dB) isolation. However, because of small size of host platforms and broad beam width of dipole antennas, achieving adequate isolation between two channels is a challenging problem and need to be solved for successful implementation of space borne SoOp technology for remote sensing. In this presentation a novel enabling VHF antenna technology for Cubesat platforms is presented to receive direct as well as reflected signal with needed isolation. The novel scheme also allows enhancing the gain of individual channels by factor of 2 without use of reflecting ground plane

  5. Rapid Internationalization of SMEs: Evidence from Born Global Firms in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian A. Cancino

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The literature on born global firms in developed countries has revealed some factors that influence the rapid internationalization of Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs, such as the technological level of the sector in which the firm participates, psychological and geographical distances from the target markets, and the existence of contact networks. To date, little research has been carried out on this topic for Latin American countries. This paper explores how certain determinants influence Chilean born global firms. A logistic regression model is used to analyze 112 SMEs with regular export activities. The results show that Chilean born global firms are influenced by national and international contact networks that their founders are able to generate. The psychological distance between Chilean SMEs and developed countries in Asia, North America and Europe also influences the internationalization of Chilean SMEs. The principal characteristic of Chilean born global firms is their lack of participation in highly technological sectors, with these SMEs instead being involved in sectors that actively exploit natural resources. The results of this study permit certain public policy recommendations to be made that might boost the development of export SMEs.

  6. Long-term impact of GH treatment during childhood on body composition and fat distribution in young adults born SGA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.E. Breukhoven (Petra); G.F. Kerkhof (Gerthe); M. van Dijk (Marije); A.C.S. Hokken-Koelega (Anita)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractContext: GH treatment of short children born small for gestational age (SGA) results in a decline in fat mass (FM) and an increase in lean body mass (LBM). It is, however, unknown whether these changes persist into adulthood. Objective: Our objective was to assess the long-term impact of

  7. Metabolic Health of Children Born SGA: Influence of parental health, prematurity, genetic polymorphisms and growth hormone treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.K. de Kort (Sandra)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractSince 1991 our research group and others have investigated children with short stature who were born small for gestational age (SGA), both before and during treatment with biosynthetic growth hormone (GH). Because of these efforts and the positive results, GH treatment was licensed for

  8. Small Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Walter

    Recommendations from the first annual Utah Small Schools Conference resulted in several specific actions. After studying certification requirements to determine if greater flexibility could be attained to remedy some of the restrictive rules that burdened small schools, the Utah State Board made it possible to move administrators and supervisors…

  9. Small game

    Science.gov (United States)

    John C. Kilgo

    2005-01-01

    Although small game currently is not harvested on the Savannah river Site(SRS) soutside of the Crackerneck Wildlife Management area and logical Reserve (CWMA), several species of small game occur on SRS. these include snipe (Gallinago gallinago), American woodcock (Scolopax minor), morning dove (Zenaida macroura...

  10. Landscape epidemiology of vector-borne diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisen, William K

    2010-01-01

    Landscape epidemiology describes how the temporal dynamics of host, vector, and pathogen populations interact spatially within a permissive environment to enable transmission. The spatially defined focus, or nidus, of transmission may be characterized by vegetation as well as by climate, latitude, elevation, and geology. The ecological complexity, dimensions, and temporal stability of the nidus are determined largely by pathogen natural history and vector bionomics. Host populations, transmission efficiency, and therefore pathogen amplification vary spatially, thereby creating a heterogeneous surface that may be defined by remote sensing and statistical tools. The current review describes the evolution of landscape epidemiology as a science and exemplifies selected aspects by contrasting the ecology of two different recent disease outbreaks in North America caused by West Nile virus, an explosive, highly virulent mosquito-borne virus producing ephemeral nidi, and Borrelia burgdorferi, a slowly amplifying chronic pathogen producing semipermanent nidi.

  11. Tick-borne lymphadenopathy, an emerging disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Pinto, André; Santos, Maria de Lurdes; Sarmento, António

    2014-10-01

    Tick-borne lymphadenopathy (TIBOLA) is a spotted fever group disease characterized by an eschar and pronounced enlarged lymph nodes after a scalp tick bite. The goal of this synopsis is to review the TIBOLA literature published until May 2013: Forty-one articles (reporting 537 cases) were included. There was a predominance of cases in females and young people. Spain, France, and Hungary reported the majority of cases, and they were mainly reported in the colder seasons. The involved tick bite was frequently on the scalp. Rickettsia slovaca was the most frequent identified bacterium and Dermacentor marginatus the most frequently identified vector. The most prescribed antibiotic was doxycycline. TIBOLA has the potential to emerge outside Europe: improving knowledge of TIBOLA may promote early symptoms recognition and may allow early treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Born-Jordan quantization theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    de Gosson, Maurice A

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive mathematical study of the operators behind the Born–Jordan quantization scheme. The Schrödinger and Heisenberg pictures of quantum mechanics are equivalent only if the Born–Jordan scheme is used. Thus, Born–Jordan quantization provides the only physically consistent quantization scheme, as opposed to the Weyl quantization commonly used by physicists. In this book we develop Born–Jordan quantization from an operator-theoretical point of view, and analyze in depth the conceptual differences between the two schemes. We discuss various physically motivated approaches, in particular the Feynman-integral point of view. One important and intriguing feature of Born-Jordan quantization is that it is not one-to-one: there are infinitely many classical observables whose quantization is zero.

  13. Quality of Cancer Care Among Foreign-Born and US-Born Patients With Lung or Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Smith; He, Yulei; Ayanian, John Z.

    2010-01-01

    of care (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 0.80; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.65-1.00), a difference partly explained by the language of the survey, an indicator of English proficiency. Rates of recommended therapies ranged from 64% to 85%; foreign-born patients were less likely to receive chemotherapy......  BACKGROUND: Disparities in care have been documented for foreign-born cancer patients in the United States. However, few data are available regarding patients with lung and colorectal cancer. In the current study, the authors assessed whether patient-reported quality and receipt of recommended...... care differed between US-born and foreign-born cancer patients. METHODS: The authors collected surveys and medical records for a population-based cohort including white, Hispanic, and Asian adults (2205 US-born and 890 foreign-born individuals) with lung or colorectal cancer diagnosed in California...

  14. Analysis of meteorological effects on the incidence of tick-borne encephalitis in the Czech Republic over a thirty-year period

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brabec, Marek; Daniel, M.; Malý, Marek; Danielová, V.; Kříž, B.; Kott, I.; Beneš, Č.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2017), č. článku March 13. ISSN 2514-4138 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NT11425 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : tick-borne encephalitis incidence * Ixodes ricinus * ambient temperature * poisson model * generalized additive model * seasonal trends Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research https://oatext.com/Analysis-of-meteorological-effects-on-the-incidence-of-tick-borne-encephalitis-in-the-Czech-Republic-over-a-thirty-year-period.php#Article

  15. Radar sensing via a Micro-UAV-borne system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapano, Ilaria; Ludeno, Giovanni; Gennarelli, Gianluca; Soldovieri, Francesco; Rodi Vetrella, Amedeo; Fasano, Giancarmine

    2017-04-01

    -equipped drone. The system is made by a commercial radar system, whose mass, size, power and cost budgets is compatible with the installation on micro-UAV. The radar system has been mounted on a DJI 550 UAV, a flexible hexacopter allowing both complex flight operations and static flight, and has been equipped with small size log-periodic antennas, having a 6 dB gain over the frequency range from 2 GHz to 11 GHz. An ad-hoc signal processing chain has been adopted to process the collected raw data and obtain an image of the investigated scenario providing an accurate target detection and localization. This chain involves a SVD-based noise filter procedure and an advanced data processing approach, which assumes a linear model of the underlying scattering phenomenon. REFERENCES [1] K. Whitehead, C. H. Hugenholtz, "Remote sensing of the environment with small unmanned aircraft systems (UASs), part 1: a review of progress and challenges", J. Unmanned Vehicle Systems, vol.2, pp. 69-85, 2014. [2] K. Ouchi, Recent trend and advance of synthetic aperture radar with selected topics, Remote Sens, vol.5, pp.716-807, 2013. [3] D. Altdor et al., UAV-borne electromagnetic induction and ground-penetrating radar measurements: a feasibility test, 74th Annual Meeting of the Deutsche Geophysikalische Gesellschaft in Karlsruhe, Germany, March 9 - 13, 2014.

  16. Comparison of the temperature-mortality relationship in foreign born and native born died in France between 2000 and 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercereau, Luc; Todd, Nicolas; Rey, Gregoire; Valleron, Alain-Jacques

    2017-10-01

    The daily temperature-mortality relationship is typically U shaped. The temperature of minimum mortality (MMT) has been shown to vary in space (higher at lower latitudes) and time (higher in recent periods). This indicates human populations adapt to their local environment. The pace of this adaptation is unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate the differences in the temperature-mortality relationship in continental France between foreign born and natives. Source data were the 5,273,005 death certificates of individuals living in continental France between 2000 and 2009 at the time of their death. Foreign-born deaths ( N = 573,384) were matched 1:1 with a native-born death based on date of birth, sex, and place of death. Four regions of France based on similarity of their temperatures profiles were defined by unsupervised clustering. For each of these four regions, variations of all causes mortality with season and temperature of the day were modeled and compared between four groups of foreign born (Maghreb, sub-Saharan Africa, Southern Europe, and Northern Europe) and matched groups of natives. Overall, the temperature-mortality relationship and MMT were close in foreign born and in native born: The only difference between foreign born and native born concerned the attributable mortality to cold, found in several instances larger in foreign born. There are little differences in France between the temperature-mortality relationships in native born and in foreign born. This supports the hypothesis of an adaptation of these populations to the temperature patterns of continental France, which for those born in Africa differ markedly from the climatic pattern of their birth country.

  17. Prevalence of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen in US-Born and Foreign-Born Asian/Pacific Islander College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quang, Yen N.; Vu, Joanne; Yuk, Jihey; Li, Chin-Shang; Chen, Moon; Bowlus, Christopher L.

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic hepatitis B (HBV) among college-age US-born Asian and Pacific Islanders (A/PI) is not well known. Objectives: To compare the prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) seropositivity in US-born to A/PI-born students at a public university. Participants: Undergraduate who self-identified themselves as A/PI. Results:…

  18. Differences in sleep habits, study time, and academic performance between US-born and foreign-born college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, Arne H; Eliasson, Arn H; Lettieri, Christopher J

    2017-05-01

    To inform the design of a sleep improvement program for college students, we assessed academic performance, sleep habits, study hours, and extracurricular time, hypothesizing that there would be differences between US-born and foreign-born students. Questionnaires queried participants on bedtimes, wake times, nap frequency, differences in weekday and weekend sleep habits, study hours, grade point average, time spent at paid employment, and other extracurricular activities. Comparisons were made using chi square tests for categorical data and t tests for continuous data between US-born and foreign-born students. Of 120 participants (55 % women) with racial diversity (49 whites, 18 blacks, 26 Hispanics, 14 Asians, and 13 other), 49 (41 %) were foreign-born. Comparisons between US-born and foreign-born students showed no differences in average age or gender though US-born had more whites. There were no differences between US-born and foreign-born students for grade point averages, weekday bedtimes, wake times, or total sleep times. However, US-born students averaged 50 min less study time per day (p = 0.01), had almost 9 h less paid employment per week (14.5 vs 23.4 h per week, p = 0.001), and stayed up to socialize more frequently (63 vs 43 %, p = 0.03). Foreign-born students awakened an hour earlier and averaged 40 min less sleep per night on weekends. Cultural differences among college students have a profound effect on sleep habits, study hours, and extracurricular time. The design of a sleep improvement program targeting a population with diverse cultural backgrounds must factor in such behavioral variations in order to have relevance and impact.

  19. Prevalence of troublesome symptoms related to temporomandibular disorders and awareness of bruxism in 65- and 75-year-old subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unell, Lennart; Johansson, Anders; Ekbäck, Gunnar; Ordell, Sven; Carlsson, Gunnar E

    2012-06-01

    To assess the prevalence of three troublesome temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms and awareness of bruxism in two cohorts of subjects aged 65 and 75 years. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated varying prevalence of TMD symptoms. The results concerning elderly people are inconclusive. In 2007 identical questionnaires were sent to all subjects born in 1942 and 1932 living in two Swedish counties. The response rate was 73.1% for the 65- and 71.9% for the 75-year-old subjects, totally 9093 subjects. The great majority reported no or only a few TMD problems. Less than 4% considered their TMD symptoms to be rather great or severe. The mean prevalence of TMD-related symptoms and bruxism was greater in women than in men in both age groups. The 75-year-old women reported a marked lower prevalence of TMD symptoms and bruxism than the 65-year-old women, whereas the age differences were small among the men. Self-reported bruxism was associated with a higher prevalence of TMD symptoms. The great majority of the subjects did not report any troublesome TMD related symptoms. However, 5.4% of the 65-year-old women and 3.8% of the 75-year-old women considered their symptoms severe or rather severe. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. A subjective scheduler for subjective dedicated networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suherman; Fakhrizal, Said Reza; Al-Akaidi, Marwan

    2017-09-01

    Multiple access technique is one of important techniques within medium access layer in TCP/IP protocol stack. Each network technology implements the selected access method. Priority can be implemented in those methods to differentiate services. Some internet networks are dedicated for specific purpose. Education browsing or tutorial video accesses are preferred in a library hotspot, while entertainment and sport contents could be subjects of limitation. Current solution may use IP address filter or access list. This paper proposes subjective properties of users or applications are used for priority determination in multiple access techniques. The NS-2 simulator is employed to evaluate the method. A video surveillance network using WiMAX is chosen as the object. Subjective priority is implemented on WiMAX scheduler based on traffic properties. Three different traffic sources from monitoring video: palace, park, and market are evaluated. The proposed subjective scheduler prioritizes palace monitoring video that results better quality, xx dB than the later monitoring spots.

  1. Scanning electron microscopy applied to seed-borne fungi examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Marcelo de Carvalho; Pozza, Edson Ampélio

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to test the standard scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as a potential alternative to study seed-borne fungi in seeds, by two different conditions of blotter test and water restriction treatment. In the blotter test, seeds were subjected to conditions that enabled pathogen growth and expression, whereas the water restriction method consisted in preventing seed germination during the incubation period, resulting in the artificial inoculation of fungi. In the first condition, seeds of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), maize (Zea mays L.), and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) were submitted to the standard blotter test and then prepared and observed with SEM. In the second condition, seeds of cotton (G. hirsutum), soybean (Glycine max L.), and common bean (P. vulgaris L.) were, respectively, inoculated with Colletotrichum gossypii var. cephalosporioides, Colletotrichum truncatum, and Colletotrichum lindemuthianum by the water restriction technique, followed by preparation and observation with SEM. The standard SEM methodology was adopted to prepare the specimens. Considering the seeds submitted to the blotter test, it was possible to identify Fusarium sp. on maize, C. gossypii var. cephalosporioides, and Fusarium oxysporum on cotton, Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium sp., Rhizopus sp., and Mucor sp. on common bean. Structures of C. gossypii var. cephalosporioides, C. truncatum, and C. lindemuthianum were observed in the surface of inoculated seeds. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Kinetic theory of Jean instability in Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, Ivan de [University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Department of Theoretical Physics and History of Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Leioa (Spain); Capolupo, Antonio [Universita di Salerno, Dipartimento di Fisica E.R. Caianiello, Fisciano (Italy); INFN Gruppo Collegato di Salerno, Fisciano (Italy)

    2017-10-15

    We analyze the stability of self-gravitating systems which dynamics is investigated using the collisionless Boltzmann equation, and the modified Poisson equation of Eddington-inspired Born-Infield gravity. These equations provide a description of the Jeans paradigm used to determine the critical scale above which such systems collapse. At equilibrium, the systems are described using the time-independent Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution function f{sub 0}(v). Considering small perturbations to this equilibrium state, we obtain a modified dispersion relation, and we find a new characteristic scale length. Our results indicate that the dynamics of self-gravitating astrophysical systems can be fully addressed in the Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld gravity. The latter modifies the Jeans instability in high densities environments, while its effects become negligible in star formation regions. (orig.)

  3. Robust and Rapid Air-Borne Odor Tracking without Casting1,2,3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Urvashi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Casting behavior (zigzagging across an odor stream) is common in air/liquid-borne odor tracking in open fields; however, terrestrial odor localization often involves path selection in a familiar environment. To study this, we trained rats to run toward an odor source in a multi-choice olfactory arena with near-laminar airflow. We find that rather than casting, rats run directly toward an odor port, and if this is incorrect, they serially sample other sources. This behavior is consistent and accurate in the presence of perturbations, such as novel odors, background odor, unilateral nostril stitching, and turbulence. We developed a model that predicts that this run-and-scan tracking of air-borne odors is faster than casting, provided there are a small number of targets at known locations. Thus, the combination of best-guess target selection with fallback serial sampling provides a rapid and robust strategy for finding odor sources in familiar surroundings. PMID:26665165

  4. Community knowledge, attitudes and practices related to tick-borne ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tick-borne Relapsing Fever (TBRF) is a vector-borne disease of humans which causes serious illness, primarily for children under five years old and pregnant women. Understanding people's knowledge, attitude and practices on the disease is important in designing appropriate interventions. This study was conducted to ...

  5. An investigation into the prevalence of water borne diseases in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water-borne diseases are the most prevalent infectious diseases in the developing countries especially in new settlements along the river. The present investigation was carried out to assess the prevalence rate of water-borne diseases among people residing near the left bank of River Ravi. This study has a descriptive ...

  6. Vector-borne disease surveillance in livestock populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dórea, Fernanda C.; Elbers, A.R.W.; Hendrikx, P.; Enoe, Claes; Kirkeby, Karsten; Hoinville, Linda; Lindberg, A.

    2016-01-01

    Preparedness against vector-borne threats depends on the existence of a long-term, sustainable surveillance of vector-borne disease and their relevant vectors. This work reviewed the availability of such surveillance systems in five European countries (Denmark, France, The Netherlands, Sweden and

  7. Comparison of vaccination status of children born i

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    Background: The Expanded Programme of Immunisation schedule starts at birth, yet a significant number of child births in Uganda occur at home, where there are no vaccines. A child born at home may therefore have less chances of being vaccinated than a child born in a health unit. Objectives: To investigate vaccination ...

  8. Equine tick-borne infections in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butler, C.M.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the emergence and establishment of equine tick-borne infections in the Netherlands, with particular attention to their diagnosis, clinical relevance and treatment. Four tick-borne agents (Borrelia burgdorferi, Theileria equi, Babesia caballi and Anaplasma phagocytophilum)

  9. louse-borne relapsing fever profile at jimma hospital, ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    ABSTRACT. Background: Louse-borne relapsing fever has been restricted to countries with poor socio economic status, the most important foci being Burundi, Rwanda and Ethiopia. Borrelia recurrentis is the etiologic agent for louse-borne relapsing fever and occurs as epidemic under conditions of overcrowding, poverty, ...

  10. Human to human transmission of arthropod-borne pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martina, Byron E.; Barzon, Luisa; Pijlman, Gorben P.; Fuente, de la José; Rizzoli, Annapaola; Wammes, Linda J.; Takken, Willem; Rij, van Ronald P.; Papa, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Human-to-human (H2H) transmitted arthropod-borne pathogens are a growing burden worldwide, with malaria and dengue being the most common mosquito-borne H2H transmitted diseases. The ability of vectors to get infected by humans during a blood meal to further propel an epidemic depends on complex

  11. Human to human transmission of arthropod-borne pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martina, B.E.; Barzon, L.; Pijlman, G.P.; Fuente, J. de la; Rizzoli, A.; Wammes, L.J.; Takken, W.; Rij, R.P. van; Papa, A.

    2017-01-01

    Human-to-human (H2H) transmitted arthropod-borne pathogens are a growing burden worldwide, with malaria and dengue being the most common mosquito-borne H2H transmitted diseases. The ability of vectors to get infected by humans during a blood meal to further propel an epidemic depends on complex

  12. The second Born approximation of electron–argon elastic scattering ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We evaluate the S-matrix elements numerically. The dependence of differential cross-section on the relative phase between the two laser components is presented. The results obtained in the first and second Born approximations are compared and analysed. Keywords. Second Born approximation; free–free transition; ...

  13. Type specimens of Pectinidae (Bivalvia) described by Ignaz von Born

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, H.H.

    2009-01-01

    Born described in two publications (1778, 1780) the molluscs in the collection of Empress Maria Theresa (1717-1780), now in the Natural History Museum at Vienna. In this paper the Pectinidae type material is described. Ten new species were introduced of which Argopecten nucleus (Born, 1778) and

  14. Perinatal outcomes in 375 children born after oocyte donation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malchau, Sara S; Loft, Anne; Larsen, Elisabeth C

    2013-01-01

    To describe perinatal outcomes in children born after oocyte donation (OD) compared with in vitro fertilization (IVF), intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), and spontaneous conception (SC).......To describe perinatal outcomes in children born after oocyte donation (OD) compared with in vitro fertilization (IVF), intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), and spontaneous conception (SC)....

  15. The growth and development of children born to adolescent mothers in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei-Ya; Li, Chi-Rong; Kuo, Ching-Pyng; Chiang, Yi-Chen; Lee, Meng-Chih

    2016-08-31

    Adolescent pregnancy carries a higher risk of adverse birth outcomes. Currently, there are very few longitudinal studies that have investigated the growth of children born to adolescents. This study explores the birth outcomes and determinants in adolescent pregnancies with subjects enrolled from the Taiwan Birth Cohort Study (TBCS). Using the data of Wave I (6 months old), II (18 months old), and III (36 months old) of TBCS, a national sample of 19,381 pairs of mothers and their children were included for analysis. Out of these subjects, therewere560 pairs of adolescent mothers and children. Through completed field interviews with structured questionnaires, surveys with mothers or other family members, and with references to each child's birth certificate and Passport of Well-baby Care, the differences in birth outcomes, personal, pregnancy, and social profiles of the mothers were analyzed. A total of 560 adolescent mothers (development. The numbers (proportions) of failure in milestones at 3 years old in gross motor functions, fine motor function, language, and social/personal development of children born to adolescent mothers are 13(2.32), 34(6.07), 10(1.79), and 24(4.29 %), respectively; while there are 392(2.08), 1015(5.39), 308(1.64) and 512(2.72 %) for those born to adult mothers, respectively. The risk factors of failure in children development were identified as "the mother isn't the night-time caregiver" and "family dysfunction". There was no significant difference in development at 3 years old among children born to adolescent and adult mothers.

  16. Impact of anthropogenic environmental alterations on vector-borne diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Neil

    2008-01-01

    The spread of infectious vector-borne diseases involves at least 3 organisms: a parasite, a vector, and a host. Alterations to the natural environment may change the context within which these entities interact, thus potentially affecting vector-borne disease epidemiology. In this review, examples are presented in which human-driven ecological changes may be contributing to the spread of vector-borne diseases. Such changes include deforestation, agriculture and animal husbandry, water control projects, urbanization, loss of biodiversity, introduction of alien species, and climate change. The global environment is currently being degraded at an alarming pace, potentially placing human populations at increasing risk for unnecessary and preventable outbreaks of vector-borne diseases. Further research is needed to improve our ability to predict and prevent emergence and reemergence of vector-borne diseases from environmental alterations.

  17. Atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäderberg, Ida; Thomsen, Simon F; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2012-01-01

    Jäderberg I, Thomsen SF, Kyvik KO, Skytthe A, Backer V. Atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology 2012; 26: 140-145. We examined the risk of atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction. Data on atopic diseases and assisted...... reproduction in 9694 twin pairs, 3-20 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry were collected via multidisciplinary questionnaires. The risk of atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction was compared with the risk in twins born after spontaneous conception using logistic regression...... and variance components analysis. Children born after assisted reproduction did not have a different risk of atopic outcomes (adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence intervals] for asthma: 0.95 [0.85, 1.07], P = 0.403; hay fever: 1.01 [0.86, 1.18], P = 0.918; and atopic dermatitis: 1.02 [0.81, 1.11], P = 0...

  18. A Clinical Review of Tick-Borne Diseases in Arkansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montales, Maria Theresa; Beebe, Alexandria; Chaudhury, Arun; Haselow, Dirk; Patil, Sowmya; Weinstein, Sue; Taffner, Richard; Patil, Naveen

    2016-05-01

    Tick-borne diseases are illnesses transmitted by ticks harboring wide variety of pathogens. Arkansas is reported as one of the states with a high incidence of tick-borne diseases. In Arkansas the four most frequently occurring tick-borne diseases are Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF, also known as Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis), Ehrlichiosis, Tularemia and Anaplasmosis. Lyme disease, on the other hand, is not acquired in Arkansas and is only acquired by traveling to states where Lyme disease is endemic. The majority of tick-borne diseases are diagnosed based on a history of tick bite or exposure and the individual's clinical presentation. The recognition of specific symptoms requires prompt treatment to prevent long-term sequelae. Hence, knowledge of tick-borne diseases and preventive measures can help reduce the risks associated with the infection.

  19. Born-Kothari Condensation for Fermions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnab Ghosh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the spirit of Bose–Einstein condensation, we present a detailed account of the statistical description of the condensation phenomena for a Fermi–Dirac gas following the works of Born and Kothari. For bosons, while the condensed phase below a certain critical temperature, permits macroscopic occupation at the lowest energy single particle state, for fermions, due to Pauli exclusion principle, the condensed phase occurs only in the form of a single occupancy dense modes at the highest energy state. In spite of these rudimentary differences, our recent findings [Ghosh and Ray, 2017] identify the foregoing phenomenon as condensation-like coherence among fermions in an analogous way to Bose–Einstein condensate which is collectively described by a coherent matter wave. To reach the above conclusion, we employ the close relationship between the statistical methods of bosonic and fermionic fields pioneered by Cahill and Glauber. In addition to our previous results, we described in this mini-review that the highest momentum (energy for individual fermions, prerequisite for the condensation process, can be specified in terms of the natural length and energy scales of the problem. The existence of such condensed phases, which are of obvious significance in the context of elementary particles, have also been scrutinized.

  20. BAT-BORNE RABIES IN LATIN AMERICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E. Escobar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The situation of rabies in America is complex: rabies in dogs has decreased dramatically, but bats are increasingly recognized as natural reservoirs of other rabies variants. Here, bat species known to be rabies-positive with different antigenic variants, are summarized in relation to bat conservation status across Latin America. Rabies virus is widespread in Latin American bat species, 22.5%75 of bat species have been confirmed as rabies-positive. Most bat species found rabies positive are classified by the International Union for Conservation of Nature as “Least Concern”. According to diet type, insectivorous bats had the most species known as rabies reservoirs, while in proportion hematophagous bats were the most important. Research at coarse spatial scales must strive to understand rabies ecology; basic information on distribution and population dynamics of many Latin American and Caribbean bat species is needed; and detailed information on effects of landscape change in driving bat-borne rabies outbreaks remains unassessed. Finally, integrated approaches including public health, ecology, and conservation biology are needed to understand and prevent emergent diseases in bats.

  1. Dirac Born Infeld (DBI) Cosmic Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Babichev, Eugeny; Caprini, Chiara; Martin, Jerome; Steer, Daniele A

    2009-01-01

    Motivated by brane physics, we consider the non-linear Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) extension of the Abelian-Higgs model and study the corresponding cosmic string configurations. The model is defined by a potential term, assumed to be of the mexican hat form, and a DBI action for the kinetic terms. We show that it is a continuous deformation of the Abelian-Higgs model, with a single deformation parameter depending on a dimensionless combination of the scalar coupling constant, the vacuum expectation value of the scalar field at infinity, and the brane tension. By means of numerical calculations, we investigate the profiles of the corresponding DBI-cosmic strings and prove that they have a core which is narrower than that of Abelian-Higgs strings. We also show that the corresponding action is smaller than in the standard case suggesting that their formation could be favoured in brane models. Moreover we show that the DBI-cosmic string solutions are non-pathological everywhere in parameter space. Finally, in the lim...

  2. Visual born Witnesses: Zeugenschaften der visiblen Kamera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Bächler

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Maja Bächler beschreibt die Filmspuren der Geschichte von Natural Born Killers (1994, indem sie von dieser Quelle ausgehend die Rolle und Funktion der visiblen Kamera untersucht. Sie zeichnet nach, welche Rolle die Filmkamera im Film hat, wenn sie selbst als vergegenständlichtes und objektiviertes Ding auf der Leinwand erscheint. Die "sichtbare Kamera" hat eine spezifische Rolle in der Filmgeschichte und auch in der Geschichte des mordenden Liebespärchens Mickey und Mallory Knox, das selbst unter häuslicher und medialer Gewalt gelitten hat. Die Analyse widmet sich also auch sozialgeschichtlichen Fragen der "symbolischen Gewalt", wobei die visible Kamera – und d. h. oft die Handkamera – jene Funktion übernimmt, die traditionell dem Zeugen und der Zeugenschaft zugeordnet ist. Denn die von Bächler des Weiteren untersuchten Filme handeln alle von Kriminalfällen, weshalb die visible Kamera Beweisverfahren wie in einem Strafprozess abbildet und gleichzeitig produziert. Sie wird dabei auch zum richterlichen "Auge des Publikums" und setzt so als technische Bedingung ein juristisches Feld in Gang.

  3. Tick-Borne Relapsing Fever in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccione, J; Levine, G J; Duff, C A; Kuhlman, G M; Scott, K D; Esteve-Gassent, M D

    2016-07-01

    In the United States, Tick-Borne Relapsing Fever (TBRF) in dogs is caused by the spirochete bacteria Borrelia turicatae and Borrelia hermsii, transmitted by Ornithodoros spp. ticks. The hallmark diagnostic feature of this infection is the visualization of numerous spirochetes during standard blood smear examination. Although the course of spirochetemia has not been fully characterized in dogs, in humans infected with TBRF the episodes of spirochetemia and fever are intermittent. To describe TBRF in dogs by providing additional case reports and reviewing the disease in veterinary and human medicine. Five cases of privately-owned dogs naturally infected with TBRF in Texas are reviewed. Case series and literature review. All dogs were examined because of lethargy, inappetence, and pyrexia. Two dogs also had signs of neurologic disease. All dogs had thrombocytopenia and spirochetemia. All cases were administered tetracyclines orally. Platelet numbers improved and spirochetemia and pyrexia resolved in 4 out of 5 dogs, where follow-up information was available. TBRF is likely underdiagnosed in veterinary medicine. In areas endemic to Ornithodoros spp. ticks, TBRF should be considered in dogs with thrombocytopenia. Examination of standard blood smears can provide a rapid and specific diagnosis of TBRF when spirochetes are observed. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  4. Born-Infeld inspired modifications of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán Jiménez, Jose; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Olmo, Gonzalo J.; Rubiera-Garcia, Diego

    2018-01-01

    General Relativity has shown an outstanding observational success in the scales where it has been directly tested. However, modifications have been intensively explored in the regimes where it seems either incomplete or signals its own limit of validity. In particular, the breakdown of unitarity near the Planck scale strongly suggests that General Relativity needs to be modified at high energies and quantum gravity effects are expected to be important. This is related to the existence of spacetime singularities when the solutions of General Relativity are extrapolated to regimes where curvatures are large. In this sense, Born-Infeld inspired modifications of gravity have shown an extraordinary ability to regularise the gravitational dynamics, leading to non-singular cosmologies and regular black hole spacetimes in a very robust manner and without resorting to quantum gravity effects. This has boosted the interest in these theories in applications to stellar structure, compact objects, inflationary scenarios, cosmological singularities, and black hole and wormhole physics, among others. We review the motivations, various formulations, and main results achieved within these theories, including their observational viability, and provide an overview of current open problems and future research opportunities.

  5. Born Pupils? Natural Pedagogy and Cultural Pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2016-03-01

    The theory of natural pedagogy is an important focus of research on the evolution and development of cultural learning. It proposes that we are born pupils; that human children genetically inherit a package of psychological adaptations that make them receptive to teaching. In this article, I first examine the components of the package-eye contact, contingencies, infant-directed speech, gaze cuing, and rational imitation-asking in each case whether current evidence indicates that the component is a reliable feature of infant behavior and a genetic adaptation for teaching. I then discuss three fundamental insights embodied in the theory: Imitation is not enough for cumulative cultural inheritance, the extra comes from blind trust, and tweaking is a powerful source of cognitive change. Combining the results of the empirical review with these insights, I argue that human receptivity to teaching is founded on nonspecific genetic adaptations for social bonding and social learning and acquires its species- and functionally specific features through the operation of domain-general processes of learning in sociocultural contexts. We engage, not in natural pedagogy, but in cultural pedagogy. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Adam Small

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    oudste dogter (MOOC 29304). Jan Small (vroeër: Jan Dampies) het ek as Oupa Jan geken en Fatimah was vir my Ouma Tiema. Uncle erken ruiterlik sy ma se sterk invloed op sy verbeelding en lewensbenadering, soos hy dit ietwat enigmaties gestel het: 'My skryfwerk lê iewers.' In sy huldeblyk,. “Onaf gedig”, wat hy tydens ...

  7. Differences in contributing factors to tuberculosis incidence in U.S. -born and foreign-born persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, D P; DeRiemer, K; Small, P M; de Leon, A P; Steinhart, R; Schecter, G F; Daley, C L; Moss, A R; Paz, E A; Jasmer, R M; Agasino, C B; Hopewell, P C

    1998-12-01

    To determine the factors contributing to tuberculosis incidence in the U.S.-born and foreign-born populations in San Francisco, California, and to assess the effectiveness of tuberculosis control efforts in these populations, we performed a population-based molecular epidemiologic study using 367 patients with strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis recently introduced into the city. IS6110-based and PGRS-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses were performed on M. tuberculosis isolates. Patients whose isolates had identical RFLP patterns were considered a cluster. Review of public health and medical records, plus patient interviews, were used to determine the likelihood of transmission between clustered patients. None of the 252 foreign-born cases was recently infected (within 2 yr) in the city. Nineteen (17%) of 115 U. S.-born cases occurred after recent infection in the city; only two were infected by a foreign-born patient. Disease from recent infection in the city involved either a source or a secondary case with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, homelessness, or drug abuse. Failure to identify contacts accounted for the majority of secondary cases. In San Francisco, disease from recent transmission of M. tuberculosis has been virtually eliminated from the foreign-born but not from the U.S.-born population. An intensification of contact tracing and screening activities among HIV-infected, homeless, and drug-abusing persons is needed to further control tuberculosis in the U.S.-born population. Elimination of tuberculosis in both the foreign-born and the U.S. -born populations will require widespread use of preventive therapy.

  8. Postnatal growth of preterm born children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claas, M. J.; de Vries, L. S.; Koopman, C.; Venema, M. M. A. Uniken; Eijsermans, M. J. C.; Bruinse, H. W.; Stuart, A. A. Verrijn

    Background: Extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants are at risk of impaired postnatal growth. Impaired postnatal growth has been reported to be associated with delayed cognitive and motor development. Aims: To describe postnatal growth patterns of appropriate and small for gestational age (AGA and

  9. Body image and eating behavior in young adults born preterm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matinolli, Hanna-Maria; Männistö, Satu; Sipola-Leppänen, Marika; Tikanmäki, Marjaana; Heinonen, Kati; Lahti, Jari; Lahti, Marius; Wehkalampi, Karoliina; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Andersson, Sture; Lano, Aulikki; Vartia, Timo; Wolke, Dieter; Eriksson, Johan G; Vääräsmäki, Marja; Räikkönen, Katri; Kajantie, Eero

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have suggested that people born preterm have increased rates of eating disorders (ED). However, a recent study suggested lower levels of ED-related symptoms in the extreme group of adults born preterm with very low birth weight (Body Dissatisfaction (BD), and Bulimia (B). Group differences were examined by linear regression. Young women born early preterm scored 4.1 points (95% CI -8.0, -0.2, P =.04) lower in summed EDI subscale scores than women born at term, when adjusted for age and cohort. This difference was observed also in DT and BD but not for B subscales. The differences persisted after adjustments for current, pre- and neonatal characteristics. We did not observe differences in EDI scores among men or women born late preterm when compared to controls. Women born early preterm have significantly fewer symptoms related to EDs in early adulthood when compared to their peers born at term, which may protect from developing an ED. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:572-580). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Estimating Subjective Probabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Fountain, John; Harrison, Glenn W.

    Subjective probabilities play a central role in many economic decisions, and act as an immediate confound of inferences about behavior, unless controlled for. Several procedures to recover subjective probabilities have been proposed, but in order to recover the correct latent probability one must...

  11. Estimating Subjective Probabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Fountain, John; Harrison, Glenn W.

    2014-01-01

    Subjective probabilities play a central role in many economic decisions and act as an immediate confound of inferences about behavior, unless controlled for. Several procedures to recover subjective probabilities have been proposed, but in order to recover the correct latent probability one must ...

  12. Subjective meaning: an introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijnbergen-Huitink, Janneke; van Wijbergen-Huitink, Janneke; Meier, Cécile

    This introductory chapter traces some of the considerations on the basis of which relativistic approaches to subjective meaning became en vogue. In doing so, the chapter provides an overview of the relevant linguistic and philosophical issues when developing a treatment of subjectivity. In addition,

  13. Subjective safety in traffic.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    The term ‘subjective safety in traffic’ refers to people feeling unsafe in traffic or, more generally, to anxiety regarding being unsafe in traffic for oneself and/or others. Subjective safety in traffic can lead to road users limiting their mobility and social activities, which is one of the

  14. Subjective poverty line definitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Flik; B.M.S. van Praag (Bernard)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we will deal with definitions of subjective poverty lines. To measure a poverty threshold value in terms of household income, which separates the poor from the non-poor, we take into account the opinions of all people in society. Three subjective methods will be discussed

  15. First-born siblings show better second language skills than later born siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Karin; Troesch, Larissa M; Grob, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We examined the extent to which three sibling structure variables number of siblings, birth order, and presence of an older sibling at school age are linked to the second language skills of bilingual children. The research questions were tested using an ethnically heterogeneous sample of 1209 bilingual children with German as a second language. Controlling for children's age, sex, nationality, number of children's books at home, family language and parental German language skills, hierarchical regression analyses showed an inverse relationship between the number of siblings and second language skills: the more siblings a child had, the lower was his/her second language proficiency. This relationship was mediated by attendance in early education institutions. Moreover, first-born siblings showed better second language skills than later born siblings. The current study revealed that the resource dilution model, i.e., the decrease in resources for every additional sibling, holds for second language acquisition. Moreover, the results indicate that bilingual children from families with several children benefit from access to early education institutions.

  16. First-born siblings show better second language skills than later born siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin eKeller

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We examined the extent to which three sibling structure variables number of siblings, birth order and presence of an older sibling at school age are linked to the second language skills of bilingual children. The research questions were tested using an ethnically heterogeneous sample of 1209 bilingual children with German as a second language. Controlling for children’s age, sex, nationality, number of children’s books at home, family language and parental German language skills, hierarchical regression analyses showed an inverse relationship between the number of siblings and second language skills: The more siblings a child had, the lower was his/her second language proficiency. This relationship was mediated by attendance in early education institutions. Moreover, first-born siblings showed better second language skills than later born siblings.The current study revealed that the resource dilution model, i.e., the decrease in resources for every additional sibling, holds for second language acquisition. Moreover, the results indicate that bilingual children from families with several children benefit from access to early education institutions.

  17. First-born siblings show better second language skills than later born siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Karin; Troesch, Larissa M.; Grob, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We examined the extent to which three sibling structure variables number of siblings, birth order, and presence of an older sibling at school age are linked to the second language skills of bilingual children. The research questions were tested using an ethnically heterogeneous sample of 1209 bilingual children with German as a second language. Controlling for children’s age, sex, nationality, number of children’s books at home, family language and parental German language skills, hierarchical regression analyses showed an inverse relationship between the number of siblings and second language skills: the more siblings a child had, the lower was his/her second language proficiency. This relationship was mediated by attendance in early education institutions. Moreover, first-born siblings showed better second language skills than later born siblings. The current study revealed that the resource dilution model, i.e., the decrease in resources for every additional sibling, holds for second language acquisition. Moreover, the results indicate that bilingual children from families with several children benefit from access to early education institutions. PMID:26089806

  18. BORN FREES’, NEGOTIATING THE TERRAIN TOWARDS SELFHOOD AND WELLNESS: A LIFE ORIENTATION PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meahabo Dinah Magano

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was contextualised within the Life Orientation subject of ‘Self in Society’. It acknowledges that the present time is uniquely significant in South African history as the generation of youth leaving school are now considered ‘born frees’. This generation is considered to be free from the first-hand trauma that was experienced in the past; they supposedly live in a society free from the shackles of apartheid, and enjoy equality and human rights that affect their entire well-being. ‘Born frees’, it appears, are still negotiating the journey towards a new identity and freedom. The sample size was nine Grade 11 female learners who attend an urban school in Gauteng Province. The school was purposefully chosen because it had a good track record of class attendance and the learners are proficient in English. Questions revolved around the multiple aspects of self and well-being in society. Focus group sessions were held after which six of the learners completed a questionnaire with open-ended questions based on the sub-topics. All ethical considerations were observed. Findings revealed that these youths are in fact traversing a far more complex political, social, psychological, spiritual and economic landscape than that captured in the phrase ‘born frees’.

  19. Determining the size of retinal features in prematurely born children by fundus photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaapi, Laura; Lehtonen, Tuomo; Vesti, Eija; Leinonen, Markku T

    2015-06-01

    The purpose was to study the effect of prematurity on the macula-disc centre distance and whether it could be used as a reference tool for determining the size of retinal features in prematurely born children by fundus photography. The macula-disc centre distance of the left eye was measured in pixels from digital fundus photographs taken from 27 prematurely born children aged 10-11 years with Topcon fundus camera. A conversion factor for Topcon fundus camera (194.98 pixel/mm for a 50° lens) was used to convert the results in pixels into metric units. The macula-disc centre distance was 4.74 mm, SD 0.29. No correlation between ametropia and the macula-disc centre distance was found (r = -0.07, p > 0.05). One child (subject 20) had high myopia and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), and the macula-disc centre distance was longer than average (6.35 mm). The macula-disc centre distance in prematurely born children at the age of 10-11 years provides an easy-to-use reference tool for evaluating the size of retinal features on fundus photographs. However, if complications of ROP, for example temporal macular dragging or high ametropia, are present, the macula-disc centre distance is potentially altered and a personal macula-disc centre distance should be determined and used as a refined reference tool. © 2014 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Molecular survey of hard ticks in endemic areas of tick-borne diseases in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xin; Lin, Xian-Dan; Wang, Jian-Bo; Qin, Xin-Cheng; Tian, Jun-Hua; Guo, Wen-Ping; Fan, Fei-Neng; Shao, Renfu; Xu, Jianguo; Zhang, Yong-Zhen

    2013-06-01

    Over the past several years, there was a substantial increase in the number of cases of known and novel tick-borne infections in humans in China. To better understand the ticks associated with these infections, we collected hard ticks from animals or around livestock shelters in 29 localities in 5 provinces (Beijing, Henan, Hubei, Inner Mongolia, and Zhejiang) where cases of tick-borne illness were reported. We collected 2950 hard ticks representing 7 species of 4 genera (Dermacentor sinicus, Haemaphysalis flava, Haemaphysalis longicornis, Ixodes granulatus, Ixodes persulcatus, Rhipicephalus microplus, and Rhipicephalus sanguineus). These ticks were identified to species using morphological characters initially. We then sequenced the mitochondrial small subunit rRNA (12S rRNA) gene, cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene, and the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) gene of these ticks, and conducted phylogenetic analyses. Our analyses showed that the molecular and morphological data are consistent in the identification of the 7 tick species. Furthermore, all these 7 tick species from China were genetically closely related to the same species or related species found outside China. Rapid and accurate identification and long-term monitoring of these ticks will be of significance to the prevention and control of tick-borne diseases in China. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Spanking of young children: do immigrant and U.S.-born Hispanic parents differ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shawna J; Altschul, Inna

    2015-02-01

    Building on prior research showing fewer parenting risk behaviors and lower levels of harsh punishment among less acculturated Hispanic parents, we tested the hypothesis that foreign-born (FB; immigrant) Hispanic parents use less spanking toward children at 3 years and 5 years of age than U.S.-born Hispanic parents. We also examined whether other indicators of acculturation-endorsement of traditional gender norms and religiosity-showed any direct or indirect effects in explaining the hypothesized association. Path model analyses were conducted with a sample of Hispanic mothers (n = 1,089) and fathers (n = 650). Cross-sectional and time lagged path models controlling for a wide range of psychosocial and demographic confounds indicated that, when compared with U.S.-born Hispanic parents, FB Hispanic mothers and fathers used less spanking toward their young children. In cross-sectional analysis only, mothers' greater endorsement of traditional gender norms had small protective effects on spanking. Although fathers' endorsement of traditional gender norms was not a significant direct predictor of spanking, there was a significant indirect effect of nativity status on spanking mediated by endorsement of traditional gender norms. Religiosity showed no relation to spanking for either mothers or fathers. Immigrant status may be an important protective factor that is associated with lower levels of parenting aggression among Hispanic mothers and fathers living in the United States. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Addressing cancer control needs of African-born immigrants in the US: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Song, Minna; Kigen, Ocla; Jennings, Yvonne; Nwabukwu, Ify; Sheppard, Vanessa B

    2014-10-01

    Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, African immigrants have worse cancer outcomes. However, there is little research about cancer behaviors and/or interventions in this growing population as they are generally grouped with populations from America or the Caribbean. This systematic review examines cancer-related studies that included African-born participants. We searched PsycINFO, Ovid Medline, Pubmed, CINHAL, and Web of Science for articles focusing on any type of cancer that included African-born immigrant participants. Twenty articles met study inclusion criteria; only two were interventions. Most articles focused on one type of cancer (n=11) (e.g., breast cancer) and were conducted in disease-free populations (n=15). Studies included African participants mostly from Nigeria (n=8) and Somalia (n=6). However, many papers (n=7) did not specify nationality or had small percentages (immigrants (n=5). Studies found lower screening rates in African immigrants compared to other subpopulations (e.g. US-born). Awareness of screening practices was limited. Higher acculturation levels were associated with higher screening rates. Barriers to screening included access (e.g. insurance), pragmatic (e.g. transportation), and psychosocial barriers (e.g. shame). Interventions to improve cancer outcomes in African immigrants are needed. Research that includes larger samples with diverse African subgroups including cancer survivors is necessary to inform future directions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. POLITICAL AFFINITIES OF POLISH-BORN GREEKS AND THE LEGACY OF COMMUNIST POLAND

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Mycielska-Środoń

    2011-01-01

    After the Greek civil war in the late 1940s and early 1950s around 15,000 communist partisans were brought to Poland and granted the status of political refugees. Most lived in Poland through the late 1970s, when returning to Greece became a possibility. The article analyzes political preferences of the children of partisans(persons born in the 1950s of two Greek parents). I propose possible factors explaining variation in the political affinities of my subjects, such as perception of family ...

  4. Risk perception and water purification practices for water-borne parasitic infections in remote Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalsky, Adrienne N; Lacey, Steven E; Kaphle, Upendra Raj; Vaughn, James M

    2008-10-01

    This study assesses water-borne infection risk perception and water boiling habits in a remote Sankhuwasava region of Nepal using a brief interview-style questionnaire. All subjects were aware of the risks associated with drinking unpurified water, but a majority (65%) reported they did not boil water regularly, and almost 60% of villagers interviewed had history of infection despite their boiling practices. In contrast to reports from other communities in Nepal, risk awareness was sufficient in this region. Water boiling alone did not confer protection. Future efforts should target sanitation, screening, and other sources of contamination.

  5. Mucinous Cystadenoma in the Lung of a Captive-born Moustached Tamarin (Saguinus mystax)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, C. R.; Ragland, D. R.; St Claire, M. C.; Elkins, W. R.; Gozalo, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary A 2-year-old captive-born male moustached tamarin was subjected to necropsy examination after a fatal head trauma. A solitary, circumscribed, subpleural mass (0.6 cm diameter) was found in the right caudal lung lobe. The mass was diagnosed as a mucinous cystadenoma. Histochemical and immunohistochemical tests were performed to further characterize the tumour. Surfactant proteins A, B, C and D were not found in the neoplastic cells, suggesting that the tumour arose from a non-surfactant producing alveolar lining cell. Pulmonary mucinous cystadenomas are uncommon benign tumours in man and have not been reported previously in animals. PMID:23356933

  6. Perinatal outcomes in 6,338 singletons born after intrauterine insemination in Denmark, 2007 to 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malchau, Sara Sofia; Loft, Anne; Henningsen, Anna-Karina Aaris

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study perinatal outcomes in singletons born after intrauterine insemination (IUI) compared with children born after in vitro fertilization (IVF), intracytoplasmic sperm injection, and spontaneous conception (SC), and to assess predictors of poor outcome in singletons born after IUI...

  7. Unifying Subjectivity and Objectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murugesan Chandrasekaran

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of modern science to the progress of civilization is immeasurable. Even its tendency toward exclusive concentration on the objective world has had salutary effects of great value. Modern science has wiped away much that was merely superstitious or speculative. Its rejection of unfounded opinions and prejudices has helped the thinking mind question conventional beliefs, shed preferences and prejudices, and challenge established authority. But modern systems thinking inherited from natural science is the suppression of the subjective dimension of reality. Many complex systems are an attempt to define and represent all subjective experience in physical terms. The modern man has a bias towards objectivity. The powerful influence of sense impressions on his mind and thinking makes him ignore the subjective experience and consider only objective facts as a valid, legitimate and representation of reality. Observing objective factors that are physical is easier than observing subjective factors that are subtle. The mechanistic view of reality has led to the rejection of the role of the individual in social development as insignificant. The individuals determine the development of society. Their social power has its roots both in subjective factors and objective factors. Economy, politics, society, and culture are inseparable dimensions of a single integrated reality. Subject and object constitute an integrated whole. The mind sees them as separate and independent. Or it views one as completely subordinate to the other. Unbiased approach to the study of all human experiences may prove that subject and object are interdependent dimensions or elements of reality.

  8. Catch-up growth up to ten years of age in children born very preterm or with very low birth weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wit Jan-Maarten

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improved survival due to advances in neonatal care has brought issues such as postnatal growth and development more to the focus of our attention. Most studies report stunting in children born very preterm and/or small for gestational age. In this article we study the growth pattern of these children and aim to identify factors associated with postnatal catch-up growth. Methods 1338 children born with a gestational age Results At 10 years the AGA children had attained normal height, whereas the SGA group demonstrated stunting, even after correction for target height (AGA: 0.0 SDS; SGA Conclusion At 10 years of age, children born very preterm AGA show no stunting. However, many children born SGA, especially the very preterm, show persistent stunting. Early weight gain seems an important prognostic factor in predicting childhood growth.

  9. Relationship Between Competitive Strategies and the Success Perception of Polish Born Globals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baranowska-Prokop Ewa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The key objective of this paper is to describe and evaluate the competitive strategies applied by Polish born global enterprises. To reveal these strategies, two competitive models developed by M.E. Porter are applied to an original data set obtained from 256 small and medium Polish enterprises through a survey employing the CATI technique. The outcomes of these strategies, as perceived by the companies applying them, are also evaluated against two hypotheses. We conclude that Polish firms apply both basic strategies of competition, i.e. cost leadership strategies and differentiation strategies and that a substantial majority of companies perceive themselves to have succeeded on the market.

  10. RUSSIAN LAW SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.N. Bakhrakh

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The question about the subjects of law branches is concerning the number of most important and difficult in law science. Its right decision influences on the subject of law regulation, precise definition of addressees of law norms, the volume of their rights and duties, the limits of action of norms of Main part of the branch, its principles. Scientific investigations, dedicated to law subjects system, promote the development of recommendations for the legislative and law applying activity; they are needed for scientific work organization and student training, for preparing qualified lawyers.

  11. Born small, die young: Intrinsic, size-selective mortality in marine larval fish

    OpenAIRE

    Garrido, S.; R. Ben-Hamadou; Santos, A. M. P.; Ferreira, S.; Teodósio, M. A.; U. Cotano; Irigoien, X.; Peck, M A; Saiz, E.; Ré, P.

    2015-01-01

    Mortality during the early stages is a major cause of the natural variations in the size and recruitment strength of marine fish populations. In this study, the relation between the size-at-hatch and early survival was assessed using laboratory experiments and on field-caught larvae of the European sardine (Sardina pilchardus). Larval size-at-hatch was not related to the egg size but was significantly, positively related to the diameter of the otolith-at-hatch. Otolith diameter-at-hatch was a...

  12. Resting-state oscillatory activity in children born small for gestational age: an MEG study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, M.; de Bie, H.M.A.; Oostrom, K.J.; van Dijk, B.W.; Hillebrand, A.; van Wijk, B.C.M.; de Waal, H.; Stam, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    Growth restriction in utero during a period that is critical for normal growth of the brain, has previously been associated with deviations in cognitive abilities and brain anatomical and functional changes. We measured magnetoencephalography (MEG) in 4- to 7-year-old children to test if children

  13. Regulation of fetal growth: consequences and impact of being born small.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullis, Primus-E; Tonella, Paolo

    2008-02-01

    The first trimester of pregnancy is the time during which organogenesis takes place and tissue patterns and organ systems are established. In the second trimester the fetus undergoes major cellular adaptation and an increase in body size, and in the third trimester organ systems mature ready for extrauterine life. In addition, during that very last period of intrauterine life there is a significant increase in body weight. In contrast to the postnatal endocrine control of growth, where the principal hormones directly influencing growth are growth hormone (GH) and the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) via the GH-IGF axis, fetal growth throughout gestation is constrained by maternal factors and placental function and is coordinated by growth factors. In general, growth disorders only become apparent postnatally, but they may well be related to fetal life. Thus, fetal growth always needs to be considered in the overall picture of human growth as well as in its metabolic development.

  14. Inactivation of soil-borne plant pathogens during small-scale composting of crop residues.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollen, G.J.; Volker, D.; Wijnen, A.P.

    1989-01-01

    Monsters van hevig aangetaste gewasresten werden aangebracht in composthopen van het Indore-type. De temperatuur liep op tot 50-70 graden Celsius binnen 6 dagen na het opzetten van de hopen, afhankelijk van de aard van de gewasresten en de plaats in de hoop. De warmtefase duurde 2-3 weken en werd

  15. A ship-borne meteorological station for ground truth measurements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, R.G.P.; Desa, B.A.E.

    Oceanographic upwelling studies required ground truth measurements of meteorological parameters and sea surface temperature to be made from a research vessel which did not have the necessary facilities. A ship-borne station was therefore designed...

  16. Gamma Radiation Processing of Clam (Galatea Paradoxa Born ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Clam (Galatea paradoxa Born 1778) is a dermesal dweller of riverine water and filter feed by passing water through gut concentrating particulate matter ... Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Flavobacterium, Klebsiella, Mi-crococcus, Morganella, Proteus, Pseudomonas, Salmonella, Serratia, Staphylococcus, ...

  17. Surface-Borne Time-of-Reception Measurements (STORM) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Invocon proposes the Surface-borne Time-Of-Reception Measurements (STORM) system as a method to locate the position of lightning strikes on aerospace vehicles....

  18. Seed Borne fungi Castor Oil ( Ricinus cummunis ): Effect of Their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Benlate], mancozeb [Dithan M45] and thiran [Fernasan D] at three different concentrations all significantly controlled seed-borne fungi and increased seed germination. Benomyl proved to be the most effective in controlling mycoflora and increasing ...

  19. Update on tick-borne bacterial diseases in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Socolovschi C.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the prevalence of tick-borne bacterial diseases has significantly increased in European countries. The emergence and reemergence of these illnesses are attributed to changes in the environment and human behavior. Several diseases are caused by bacteria initially isolated from ticks and subsequently considered pathogenic. It is necessary to consider the bacteria found in arthropods capable of biting humans as potential human pathogens. Here we review the clinical and epidemiological data on bacterial tick-borne diseases in European countries. We focus on the epidemiological and clinical aspects of tick-borne rickettsioses and give an overview of other tick-borne illnesses as well as the emergence and re-emergence of these diseases.

  20. Association of water-borne diseases morbidity pattern and water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Association of water-borne diseases morbidity pattern and water quality in ... due to unsafe water, inadequate sanitation and poor hygiene among human population. ... Provision of adequate potable water remains the most important tool for ...

  1. Seed-borne fungi, especially pathogens, of spring wheat

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dawood, Mahamed K

    .... In relation of seed-borne fungi to the health stale of plants developing, results of pot experiments showed the possibility of spread certain pathogens of Fusarium from seed to stem of the developing plant...

  2. Extremal Einstein-Born-Infeld black holes in dilaton gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Masoud Sepehri; Hendi, Seyed Hossein; Matsuno, Ken; Sheykhi, Ahmad

    2015-12-01

    Motivated by considerable interests of Myers-Perry black holes, we employ the perturbative method to obtain a family of extremal charged rotating black hole solutions in odd dimensional Einstein-Born-Infeld-dilaton gravity. We start with an extremal Myers-Perry black hole with equal angular momenta, and then by adding the dilaton field and the nonlinear Born-Infeld electrodynamics, we find an extremal nonlinearly charged rotating black holes. The perturbative parameter is assumed to be the electric charge q and the perturbations are performed up to the third order. We then study the physical properties of these Born-Infeld-dilaton black holes. In particular, we show that the perturbative parameter, q, the dilaton coupling constant, α, and the Born-Infeld parameter, β, modify the Smarr formula and the values of the gyromagnetic ratio of the extremal charged rotating black holes.

  3. Developmental milestones in post-term born children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Annette Wind; Olsen, Jørn; Zhu, Jinliang

    DEVELOPMENTAL MILESTONES IN POST-TERM BORN CHILDREN Annette Wind Olesen (1), Jorn Olsen (2), Jinliang Zhu (2) (1)Institute of Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, (2)The Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Aarhus University Objective: To examine the timing of reaching...... developmental milestones in children born post-term. Design: Cohort study. Material: The Danish National Birth Cohort; children born between 1997 and 2003. Data was obtained from a cohort of 92,892 pregnancies participating in the first pregnancy interview. All singletons born in gestational week 39-45 were...... identified. The study was then restricted to children who participated in an interview at age of approximately 18 months and had information on at least one developmental milestone, e.g. sitting without support, using two word sentences. We excluded children of mothers with chronic diseases from the final...

  4. Frequency and characterization of DNA methylation defects in children born SGA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bens, Susanne; Haake, Andrea; Richter, Julia; Leohold, Judith; Kolarova, Julia; Vater, Inga; Riepe, Felix G; Buiting, Karin; Eggermann, Thomas; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Platzer, Konrad; Prawitt, Dirk; Caliebe, Almuth; Siebert, Reiner

    2013-08-01

    Various genes located at imprinted loci and regulated by epigenetic mechanisms are involved in the control of growth and differentiation. The broad phenotypic variability of imprinting disorders suggests that individuals with inborn errors of imprinting might remain undetected among patients born small for gestational age (SGA). We evaluated quantitative DNA methylation analysis at differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of 10 imprinted loci (PLAGL1, IGF2R DMR2, GRB10, H19 DMR, IGF2, MEG3, NDN, SNRPN, NESP, NESPAS) by bisulphite pyrosequencing in 98 patients born SGA and 50 controls. For IGF2R DMR2, methylation patterns of additional 47 parent pairs and one mother (95 individuals) of patients included in the SGA cohort were analyzed. In six out of 98 patients born SGA, we detected DNA methylation changes at single loci. In one child, the diagnosis of upd(14)mat syndrome owing to an epimutation of the MEG3 locus in 14q32 could be established. The remaining five patients showed hypomethylation at GRB10 (n=2), hypomethylation at the H19 3CTCF-binding site (n=1), hypermethylation at NDN (n=1) and hypermethylation at IGF2 (n=1). IGF2R DMR2 hypermethylation was detected in five patients, six parents of patients in the SGA cohort and two controls. We conclude that aberrant methylation at imprinted loci in children born SGA exists but seems to be rare if known imprinting syndromes are excluded. Further investigations on the physiological variations and the functional consequences of the detected aberrant methylation are necessary before final conclusions on the clinical impact can be drawn.

  5. Reproductive patterns among twins - a Swedish register study of men and women born 1973-1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background During the last decades there has been a steady increase of twin births. A combination of improved medical treatment of preterm and small-for-gestational age children has contributed to a higher number of surviving twins. Prematurity is known to affect reproduction in a negative way. Few studies have focused on the potential effect twinning may have on future reproduction. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of being born a twin compared to being born a singleton have on future reproduction. Methods In a national population-based register study, all individuals born between 1973–1983 who were alive and living in Sweden at 13 years of age (n = 1 016 908) constituted the sample. Data on each study subject’s own birth as well as the birth of their first offspring, and parental socio-demographic factors were collected from Swedish population based registers. Hazard ratios and corresponding 95% CI was calculated using Cox proportional hazards model. Results Twins, both men and women, had a reduced likelihood of reproducing compared to singletons (women: HR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.86-0.93; men: HR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.87-0.97). This difference in birth rates can only partly be explained by diverging birth characteristics. Amongst men and women born very preterm, twins had an increased likelihood of reproducing compared to singletons (women: HR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.02-1.62; men: HR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.01-1.78). Conclusions Twins have lower reproduction rates compared to singletons, which only to a certain degree can be explained by diverging birth characteristics. PMID:23324566

  6. Do children born to teenage parents have lower adult intelligence? A prospective birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatun, Mohsina; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Scott, James; William, Gail M; Clavarino, Alexandra; Najman, Jake M

    2017-01-01

    Teenage motherhood has been associated with a wide variety of negative offspring outcomes including poorer cognitive development. In the context of limitations of previous research, this paper assesses the contemporary relevance of this finding. In this study we investigate the long-term cognitive status (IQ) among 21 year adult offspring born to teenage parents using the Mater University Study of Pregnancy- a prospective birth cohort study, which recruited all pregnant mothers attending a large obstetrical hospital in Brisbane, Australia, from 1981 to 1983. The analyses were restricted to a sub-sample of 2643 mother-offspring pair. Offspring IQ was measured using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test at 21 year. Parental age was reported at first clinic visit. Offspring born to teenage mothers (parental socioeconomic status, maternal IQ, maternal smoking and binge drinking in pregnancy, birthweight, breastfeeding and parenting style attenuates the association, though the effect remains statistically significant (-1.4 IQ points; 95% CI: -2.8,-0.1). Similarly the risk of offspring having low IQ remained marginally significantly higher in those born to teenage mothers (OR 1.3; 95% CI: 1.0, 1.9). In contrast, teenage fatherhood is not associated with adult offspring IQ, when adjusted for maternal age. Although the reduction in IQ is quantitatively small, it is indicative of neurodevelopmental disadvantage experienced by the young adult offspring of teenage mothers. Our results suggest that public policy initiatives should be targeted not only at delaying childbearing in the population but also at supporting early life condition of children born to teenage mothers to minimize the risk for disadvantageous outcomes of the next generation.

  7. SUBJECT AND AUTHOR INDEXS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IJBE Volume 2

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available SUBJECT INDEX IJBE VOLUME 2access credit, 93acquisition, 177AHP, 61, 82, 165arena simulation,43BMC, 69Bojonegoro, 69brand choice, 208brand image, 208brand positioning, 208bullwhip effect, 43burger buns, 1business synergy and financial reports, 177capital structure, 130cluster, 151coal reserves, 130coffee plantation, 93competitiveness, 82consumer behaviour, 33consumer complaint behavior, 101cooking spices, 1crackers, 1cross sectional analytical, 139crosstab, 101CSI, 12direct selling, 122discriminant analysis, 33economic value added, 130, 187employee motivation, 112employee performance, 112employees, 139EOQ, 23farmer decisions, 93farmer group, 52financial performance evaluation, 187financial performance, 52, 177financial ratio, 187financial report, 187fiva food, 23food crops, 151horticulture, 151imports, 151improved capital structure, 177IPA, 12leading sector, 151life insurance, 165LotteMart, 43main product, 61marketing mix, 33, 165matrix SWOT, 69MPE, 61multiple linear regression, 122muslim clothing, 197Ogun, 139Pangasius fillet, 82Pati, 93pearson correlation, 101perceived value, 208performance suppy chain, 23PLS, 208POQ, 23portfolio analyzing, 1product, 101PT SKP, 122pulp and papers, 187purchase decision, 165purchase intention, 33remuneration, 112re-purchasing decisions, 197sales performance, 122sawmill, 52SCOR, 23sekolah peternakan rakyat, 69SEM, 112SERVQUAL, 12Sido Makmur farmer groups, 93SI-PUHH Online, 12small and medium industries (IKM, 61socio-demographic, 139sport drink, 208stress, 139supply chain, 43SWOT, 82the mix marketing, 197Tobin’s Q, 130trade partnership, 52uleg chili sauce, 1 AUTHOR INDEX IJBE VOLUME 2Achsani, Noer Azam, 177Andati, Trias, 52, 177Andihka, Galih, 208Arkeman, Yandra, 43Baga, Lukman M, 69Cahyanugroho, Aldi, 112Daryanto, Arief, 12David, Ajibade, 139Djoni, 122Fahmi, Idqan, 1Fattah, Muhammad Unggul Abdul, 61Hakim, Dedi Budiman, 187Harianto, 93Hartoyo, 101Homisah, 1Hubeis, Musa, 112Hutagaol, M. Parulian, 93Jaya, Stevana

  8. The Data Subject

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blume, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This article considers whether it is fortunate that data protection rules, as a starting point, apply to all physical persons as data subjects, or whether it would be better to differentiate between kinds of persons on grounds of their ability to act as a data subject. In order to protect all...... persons, it is argued that a principle of care should be part of data protection law....

  9. Mulches reduce aphid-borne viruses and whiteflies in cantaloupe

    OpenAIRE

    Summers, Charles G.; Mitchell, Jeffrey P.; Stapleton, James J.

    2005-01-01

    We compared reflective plastic and wheat straw mulches with conventional bare soil for managing aphid-borne virus diseases and silverleaf whitefly in cantaloupe. The occurrence of aphid-borne virus diseases was significantly reduced with both mulches as opposed to bare soil, and reflective plastic performed better than wheat straw. Silverleaf whitefly numbers, both adults and nymphs, were reduced equally by plastic mulch and wheat straw, and were significantly lower than with bare soil. Refle...

  10. Impact of climate trends on tick-borne pathogen transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Agustin eEstrada-Pena; Nieves eAyllon; Jose eDe La Fuente

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in climate research together with a better understanding of tick–pathogen interactions, the distribution of ticks and the diagnosis of tick-borne pathogens raise questions about the impact of environmental factors on tick abundance and spread and the prevalence and transmission of tick-borne pathogens. While undoubtedly climate plays a role in the changes in distribution and seasonal abundance of ticks, it is always difficult to disentangle factors impacting on the abundance o...

  11. Control of seed borne diseasees in organic seed propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Borgen, Anders

    2004-01-01

    Introduction The key control measure of plant diseases in organic agriculture is crop rotation, mixed cropping and moderate fertilization. A wide range of plant diseases can be controlled or minimized in this way. However, at least one group of plant diseases, the seed borne diseases, cannot. The seed borne diseases are not transmitted through the soil, and crop rotation is therefore an insufficient tool. Mixed cropping is impractical in seed propagation, where seed purity according to the...

  12. Generalized Born--Infeld Actions and Projective Cubic Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrara, S; Sagnotti, A; Stora, R; Yeranyan, A

    2015-01-01

    We investigate $U(1)^{\\,n}$ supersymmetric Born-Infeld Lagrangians with a second non-linearly realized supersymmetry. The resulting non-linear structure is more complex than the square root present in the standard Born-Infeld action, and nonetheless the quadratic constraints determining these models can be solved exactly in all cases containing three vector multiplets. The corresponding models are classified by cubic holomorphic prepotentials. Their symmetry structures are associated to projective cubic varieties.

  13. Do mother's education and foreign born status interact to influence birth outcomes? Clarifying the epidemiological paradox and the healthy migrant effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, N; Luo, Z-C; Platt, R W; Daniel, M

    2008-05-01

    The unresolved "epidemiological paradox" concerns the association between low socioeconomic status and unexpectedly favourable birth outcomes in foreign born mothers. The "healthy migrant" effect concerns the association between foreign born status per se and birth outcomes. The epidemiological paradox and healthy migrant effect were analysed for newborns in a favourable sociopolitical environment. 98,330 live births to mothers in Montreal, Canada from 1997 to 2001 were analysed. Mothers were categorised as foreign born versus Canadian born. Outcomes were: small for gestational age (SGA) birth; low birth weight (LBW) and preterm birth (PTB). Multilevel logistic regression was used to examine the interaction between maternal education and foreign born status, adjusting for covariates. Not having a high school diploma was associated with LBW in Canadian (odds ratio (OR) 3.20; 95% CI 2.61 to 3.91) but not foreign born (OR 1.14; 95% CI 0.99 to 2.10) mothers and was more strongly associated with SGA birth in Canadian (OR 2.03; 95% CI 1.84 to 2.22) than in foreign born (OR 1.26; 95% CI 1.07 to 1.49) mothers. Foreign born status was associated with SGA birth (OR 1.37; 95% CI 1.28 to 1.47), LBW (OR 1.51; 95% CI 1.27 to 1.79) and PTB (OR 1.12; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.22) in university-educated mothers only. The epidemiological paradox associated with low educational attainment was present for SGA birth and LBW but not PTB. Foreign born status was associated with adverse birth outcomes in university-educated mothers, the opposite of the healthy migrant effect.

  14. Is the prevalence of ER-negative breast cancer in the US higher among Africa-born than US-born black women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemal, Ahmedin; Fedewa, Stacey A

    2012-10-01

    Previous studies have reported that the prevalence of ER-negative tumors in breast cancer patients is much higher in black women than in white women in the US. Herein, we examine whether the proportion (prevalence) in Africa-born black breast cancer patients residing in the US is similar to those in US-born black patients. We obtained information on invasive female breast cancers diagnosed during 1996-2008 in 17 Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results cancer registries according to select place of birth: Western-Africa-born, Eastern-Africa-born, Jamaica-born, and US-born blacks and US-born whites. The majority of Western-Africa-born and Eastern-Africa-born blacks were from Nigeria (64 %) and Ethiopia (74 %), respectively. We examined group variations in ER status using Chi-squared tests and the prevalence of ER-negative tumors in Africa-born blacks compared to US-born blacks, expressed as prevalence ratio (PRR), using multivariable regression models. The prevalence of ER-negative tumors significantly varied from 22.0 % (n = 41/186) in Eastern-Africa-born to 32.9 % (n = 47/143) in Western-Africa-born blacks. After adjustment for differences in age at diagnosis and other covariates, compared to US-born blacks, the prevalence was similar in Western-Africa-born (PRR = 0.87; 95 % CI 0.70-1.08) and Jamaica-born blacks (PRR = 0.88; 95 % CI 0.74-1.03), but significantly lower in Eastern-Africa-born blacks (PRR = 0.58; 95 % CI 0.44-0.75). Notably, the ER-negative prevalence in Eastern-Africa-born black was comparable to the US-born whites with breast cancer. Our findings highlight the heterogeneity of breast cancer among black women in the US, which should be considered in future studies of hormone receptor status in these women.

  15. Air travel and vector-borne disease movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatem, A J; Huang, Z; Das, A; Qi, Q; Roth, J; Qiu, Y

    2012-12-01

    Recent decades have seen substantial expansions in the global air travel network and rapid increases in traffic volumes. The effects of this are well studied in terms of the spread of directly transmitted infections, but the role of air travel in the movement of vector-borne diseases is less well understood. Increasingly however, wider reaching surveillance for vector-borne diseases and our improving abilities to map the distributions of vectors and the diseases they carry, are providing opportunities to better our understanding of the impact of increasing air travel. Here we examine global trends in the continued expansion of air transport and its impact upon epidemiology. Novel malaria and chikungunya examples are presented, detailing how geospatial data in combination with information on air traffic can be used to predict the risks of vector-borne disease importation and establishment. Finally, we describe the development of an online tool, the Vector-Borne Disease Airline Importation Risk (VBD-Air) tool, which brings together spatial data on air traffic and vector-borne disease distributions to quantify the seasonally changing risks for importation to non-endemic regions. Such a framework provides the first steps towards an ultimate goal of adaptive management based on near real time flight data and vector-borne disease surveillance.

  16. Magic moment? Maternal marriage for children born out of wedlock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson-Davis, Christina

    2014-08-01

    To test the existence of the "magic moment" for parental marriage immediately post-birth and to inform policies that preferentially encourage biological over step parent marriage, this study estimates the incidence and stability of maternal marriage for children born out of wedlock. Data came from the National Survey of Family Growth on 5,255 children born non maritally. By age 15, 29 % of children born non maritally experienced a biological-father marriage, and 36 % experienced a stepfather marriage. Stepfather marriages occurred much later in a child's life-one-half occurred after the child turned age 7-and had one-third higher odds of dissolution. Children born to black mothers had qualitatively different maternal marriage experiences than children born to white or Hispanic mothers, with less biological-parent marriage and higher incidences of divorce. Findings support the existence of the magic moment and demonstrate that biological marriages were more enduring than stepfather marriages. Yet relatively few children born out of wedlock experienced stable, biological-parent marriages as envisioned by marriage promotion programs.

  17. Balance in children born prematurely currently aged 6–7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dziuba Ewa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: Premature birth is one of the major problems of obstetrics, leading to numerous complications that are associated with prematurity, for instance balance disorders. The aim of the study was to assess the impact of premature birth on the ability to maintain balance in children commencing their school education. Material and methods: The study included children aged 6-7 years. The study group consisted of 59 children (31 girls and 28 boys, mean age 6.38 ± SD 0.73 born prematurely between 24 and 35 weeks of gestation. The control group consisted of 61 children (28 girls and 33 boys, mean age 6.42 ± 0.58 born at term. The research utilized standardized test tools - one-leg open-eyed and closed-eyed standing test, one-leg jumping test - and an original questionnaire survey. Results: The children born at term achieved better results in the majority of tests. The comparison of girls and boys born pre­maturely and at term showed no statistically significant difference between them in terms of dynamic balance, static balance or total balance control. The comparison of the tests performed on the right and left lower limb in prematurely born children showed no statistically significant differences. Conclusion: Premature birth affects the ability to maintain body balance. The results of the study indicate the need to develop coordination skills that shape body balance in prematurely born children.

  18. [Socioeconomic costs of food-borne disease using the cost-of-illness model: applying the QALY method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hosung; Lee, Suehyung; Kim, Jong Soo; Kim, Jinsuk; Han, Kyu Hong

    2010-07-01

    This study estimated the annual socioeconomic costs of food-borne disease in 2008 from a societal perspective and using a cost-of-illness method. Our model employed a comprehensive set of diagnostic disease codes to define food-borne diseases with using the Korea National Health Insurance (KNHI) reimbursement data. This study classified the food borne illness as three types of symptoms according to the severity of the illness: mild, moderate, severe. In addition to the traditional method of assessing the cost-of-illness, the study included measures to account for the lost quality of life. We estimated the cost of the lost quality of life using quality-adjusted life years and a visual analog scale. The direct cost included medical and medication costs, and the non-medical costs included transportation costs, caregiver's cost and administration costs. The lost productivity costs included lost workdays due to illness and lost earnings due to premature death. The study found the estimated annual socioeconomic costs of food-borne disease in 2008 were 954.9 billion won (735.3 billion won-996.9 billion won). The medical cost was 73.4 - 76.8% of the cost, the lost productivity cost was 22.6% and the cost of the lost quality of life was 26.0%. Most of the cost-of-illness studies are known to have underestimated the actual socioeconomic costs of the subjects, and these studies excluded many important social costs, such as the value of pain, suffering and functional disability. The study addressed the uncertainty related to estimating the socioeconomic costs of food-borne disease as well as the updated cost estimates. Our estimates could contribute to develop and evaluate policies for food-borne disease.

  19. Challenges to Born Global SMEs : A study on overcoming the challenges that are faced by born global SMEs

    OpenAIRE

    Hamza, Aziz; Zulfiqar, Salman

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to explore the challenges that are faced by born global SMEs and how they overcome these challenges. Method: For literature review and secondary research, data and information has been gathered from disciplines of international entrepreneurship. Primary research has been done on four born global firms; two from Sweden and two from Pakistan. Qualitative research and analysis has been used in the study. Originality: This study contributes to literature by co...

  20. Small Composers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holgersen, Sven-Erik; Bruun, Peter; Tjagvad, Mette

    2018-01-01

    The present chapter discusses roles and responsibilities of the collaborating partners in a creative music workshop called Small Composers. The aim is to be attentive to a number of potential alterations implicated by the collaborating partners’ different backgrounds. The following questions guid...... and responsibilities of the collaborating partners become visible through the practice? How do the professional identities of the teacher and the musicians become visible and what are the implications for the workshop as a musical community of practice?...... the study: What expectations do the class teacher and the professional musicians have to the creative practice, i.e. to the collaboration and to the musical outcome? To which extent do the collaborating partners share a common understanding of the aim, content and method of the workshop? How do the roles...

  1. Small talk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Przybylski

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The poem Small talk conjures up a communicative situation in which the main character, a newcomer from Poland, answers conventional questions related to their country. Bearing in mind the fact that this poem is set during a military dictatorship, superficial interest in his homeland may trigger a feeling of impatience. This is at least the impression formed if we adopt the perspective defined within the romantic tradition, and when taking into account the conventional poetry of martial law in Poland. Nevertheless, Barańczak retains an ironic distance towards such communicative situations and, as a consequence, does not create poetry that meets most readersʼ expectations. His poetic imperative for verbal art to be the expression of mistrust remains valid.

  2. A comparison of the incidence of undiagnosed congenital heart disease in hospital born and home born children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, J D; Haight, D; Reich, Z S

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of otherwise undiagnosed congenital heart disease (CHD) in a population of children born in a hospital with routine pulse oximetry (RPO) screening compared to children born at home. We reviewed 15 years of births at 2 hospitals for incidence of undiagnosed CHD with RPO. The Health Department reviewed the same data for out of hospital births. A total of 50,545 hospital births were screened and 1,274 children were born outside the hospital. There were 28 hospital-born babies diagnosed with cyanotic CHD prior to nursery discharge. Only one of these babies would not have been diagnosed without RPO. Three children were missed and there were 3 false positives. Sensitivity and positive predictive value of RPO was 25%, specificity and negative predictive value of RPO exceed 99%. The incidence of CHD requiring RPO diagnosis was roughly one birth per 50,000. Two children born at home with undiagnosed CHD were missed. One of these children presented with neonatal demise. RPO screening is still valuable in diagnosing CHD only diagnosable with RPO. However, the incidence of CHD requiring RPO to diagnose is similar to other congenital diseases which are not mandated national screening tests. In our limited experience a patient is roughly 25 times more likely to have undiagnosed CHD if they are born outside of a hospital.

  3. Differential ethnic associations between maternal flexibility and play sophistication in toddlers born very low birth weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Sarah J.; Montague, Erica Q.; Maclean, Peggy C.; Bancroft, Mary E.; Lowe, Jean R.

    2013-01-01

    Children born very low birth weight (Play is an important developmental outcome to the extent that child’s play and social communication are related to later development of self-regulation and effective functional skills, and play serves as an important avenue of early intervention. The current study investigated associations between maternal flexibility and toddler play sophistication in Caucasian, Spanish speaking Hispanic, English speaking Hispanic, and Native American toddlers (18-22 months adjusted age) in a cross-sectional cohort of 73 toddlers born VLBW and their mothers. We found that the association between maternal flexibility and toddler play sophistication differed by ethnicity (F(3,65) = 3.34, p = .02). In particular, Spanish speaking Hispanic dyads evidenced a significant positive association between maternal flexibility and play sophistication of medium effect size. Results for Native Americans were parallel to those of Spanish speaking Hispanic dyads: the relationship between flexibility and play sophistication was positive and of small-medium effect size. Findings indicate that for Caucasians and English speaking Hispanics, flexibility evidenced a non-significant (negative and small effect size) association with toddler play sophistication. Significant follow-up contrasts revealed that the associations for Caucasian and English speaking Hispanic dyads were significantly different from those of the other two ethnic groups. Results remained unchanged after adjusting for the amount of maternal language, an index of maternal engagement and stimulation; and after adjusting for birth weight, gestational age, gender, test age, cognitive ability, as well maternal age, education, and income. Our results provide preliminary evidence that ethnicity and acculturation may mediate the association between maternal interactive behavior such as flexibility and toddler developmental outcomes, as indexed by play sophistication. Addressing these association

  4. Subject (of documents)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2017-01-01

    such as concepts, aboutness, topic, isness and ofness are also briefly presented. The conclusion is that the most fruitful way of defining “subject” (of a document) is the documents informative or epistemological potentials, that is, the documents potentials of informing users and advance the development......This article presents and discuss the concept “subject” or subject matter (of documents) as it has been examined in library and information science (LIS) for more than 100 years. Different theoretical positions are outlined and it is found that the most important distinction is between document......-oriented views versus request-oriented views. The document-oriented view conceive subject as something inherent in documents, whereas the request-oriented view (or the policy based view) understand subject as an attribution made to documents in order to facilitate certain uses of them. Related concepts...

  5. Science of the subjective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, R G; Dunne, B J

    2007-01-01

    Over the greater portion of its long scholarly history, the particular form of human observation, reasoning, and technical deployment we properly term "science" has relied at least as much on subjective experience and inspiration as it has on objective experiments and theories. Only over the past few centuries has subjectivity been progressively excluded from the practice of science, leaving an essentially secular analytical paradigm. Quite recently, however, a compounding constellation of newly inexplicable physical evidence, coupled with a growing scholarly interest in the nature and capability of human consciousness, are beginning to suggest that this sterilization of science may have been excessive and could ultimately limit its epistemological reach and cultural relevance. In particular, an array of demonstrable consciousness-related anomalous physical phenomena, a persistent pattern of biological and medical anomalies, systematic studies of mind/brain relationships and the mechanics of human creativity, and a burgeoning catalogue of human factors effects within contemporary information processing technologies, all display empirical correlations with subjective aspects that greatly complicate, and in many cases preclude, their comprehension on strictly objective grounds. However, any disciplined re-admission of subjective elements into rigorous scientific methodology will hinge on the precision with which they can be defined, measured, and represented, and on the resilience of established scientific techniques to their inclusion. For example, any neo-subjective science, while retaining the logical rigor, empirical/theoretical dialogue, and cultural purpose of its rigidly objective predecessor, would have the following requirements: acknowledgment of a proactive role for human consciousness; more explicit and profound use of interdisciplinary metaphors; more generous interpretations of measurability, replicability, and resonance; a reduction of ontological

  6. ELENA’s International Collaboration is born

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    On 13 June, ten institutes signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) for the construction of the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA). Allowing the further deceleration of antiprotons from the Antimatter Decelerator, ELENA will significantly increase the number of particles trapped downstream in the experimental set-ups. This will give an important boost to antimatter research in the years to come.   Electrostatic triplet lenses - a device that will transport antiprotons from ELENA to the experiments. The electrostatic device was successfully tested with the ASACUSA experiment two weeks ago. ELENA - an upgrade of the existing Antiproton Decelerator (AD) - was approved by the CERN Council last year under the condition that external user institutions would contribute to its construction. On 13 June, the foundation stone of the new international collaboration was laid with the signature of the MoU. ELENA is a small magnetic decelerator ring 30 m in circumference that will fit inside the ...

  7. The Subjectivity of Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Morten

    What is a 'we' – a collective – and how can we use such communal self-knowledge to help people? This book is about collectivity, participation, and subjectivity – and about the social theories that may help us understand these matters. It also seeks to learn from the innovative practices and ideas...... practices. Through this dialogue, it develops an original trans-disciplinary critical theory and practice of collective subjectivity for which the ongoing construction and overcoming of common sense, or ideology, is central. It also points to ways of relating discourse with agency, and fertilizing insights...... from interactionism and ideology theories in a cultural-historical framework....

  8. Body Posture Asymmetry in Prematurely Born Children at Six Years of Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Walicka-Cupryś

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. The purpose of the study was to assess body posture asymmetries in the standing and sitting position in prematurely born children at six years of age. Study Design and Subjects. We measured trunk symmetry in coronal plane. The study was carried out in a group of 101 children, aged 6-7 years, mean age of 6.63, including 50 preterm children born at gestational age <32 weeks (preterm group and 51 full-term children (control group. Outcome Measures. Trunk symmetry in coronal plane was measured using photogrammetric technique with Mora 4G CQ Elektronik. The subjects were examined in standing and sitting position. Statistical analyses were carried out using Shapiro-Wilk W-test, Student’s t-test, Mann–Whitney U test, and Pearson’s chi-squared test. Statistical significance was assumed at p<0.05. Results. No significant differences were found between the groups in the asymmetries identified in the relevant anthropometric points, relative to the position assumed during the examination or to the subjects’ sex. Conclusions. There are no significant differences in body posture in the coronal plane, between preterm children and full-term children. Premature birth does not have adverse effects related to body posture asymmetry in preterm children at the age of six.

  9. Interacting effects of land use and climate on rodent-borne pathogens in central Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Hillary S; McCauley, Douglas J; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Nunn, Charles L; Campana, Michael G; Agwanda, Bernard; Otarola-Castillo, Erik R; Castillo, Eric R; Pringle, Robert M; Veblen, Kari E; Salkeld, Daniel J; Stewardson, Kristin; Fleischer, Robert; Lambin, Eric F; Palmer, Todd M; Helgen, Kristofer M

    2017-06-05

    Understanding the effects of anthropogenic disturbance on zoonotic disease risk is both a critical conservation objective and a public health priority. Here, we evaluate the effects of multiple forms of anthropogenic disturbance across a precipitation gradient on the abundance of pathogen-infected small mammal hosts in a multi-host, multi-pathogen system in central Kenya. Our results suggest that conversion to cropland and wildlife loss alone drive systematic increases in rodent-borne pathogen prevalence, but that pastoral conversion has no such systematic effects. The effects are most likely explained both by changes in total small mammal abundance, and by changes in relative abundance of a few high-competence species, although changes in vector assemblages may also be involved. Several pathogens responded to interactions between disturbance type and climatic conditions, suggesting the potential for synergistic effects of anthropogenic disturbance and climate change on the distribution of disease risk. Overall, these results indicate that conservation can be an effective tool for reducing abundance of rodent-borne pathogens in some contexts (e.g. wildlife loss alone); however, given the strong variation in effects across disturbance types, pathogen taxa and environmental conditions, the use of conservation as public health interventions will need to be carefully tailored to specific pathogens and human contexts.This article is part of the themed issue 'Conservation, biodiversity and infectious disease: scientific evidence and policy implications'. © 2017 The Authors.

  10. Small for gestational age and perinatal mortality at term : An audit in a Dutch national cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eskes, Martine; Waelput, Adja J. M.; Scherjon, Sicco A.; Bergman, Klasien A.; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Ravelli, Anita C. J.

    Objective: To assess the underlying risk factors for perinatal mortality in term born small for gestational age infants. Study design: We performed a population based nationwide cohort study in the Netherlands of 465,532 term born infants from January 2010 to January 2013. Logistic regression

  11. Paying Hypertension Research Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarett, David; Karlawish, Jason; Asch, David A

    2002-01-01

    CONTEXT Cash payments are often used to compensate subjects who participate in research. However, ethicists have argued that these payments might constitute an undue inducement. OBJECTIVES To determine whether potential subjects agree with theoretical arguments that a payment could be an undue inducement. DESIGN/SETTING/PARTICIPANTS Survey of 350 prospective jurors. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Belief that a $500 payment for research participation would impair their own, and others' ability to think carefully about the risks and benefits of a clinical trial. RESULTS Two hundred sixty-one jurors (74.6%) believed that a $500 payment would impair subjects' ability to think carefully about the risks and benefits of research. Ninety-six of 120 (80%) expressed this concern about subjects with a low income ($50,000). In contrast, only 69 (19.7%) of jurors believed that a $500 payment would influence them. Jurors who believed that this payment would influence them reported lower incomes and less education. CONCLUSION Members of the general public share ethical concerns about the influence of payments for research, although they believe that these concerns are more applicable to others than to themselves.

  12. Subjects, Models, Languages, Transformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, Arend; Bézivin, J.; Heckel, R.

    2005-01-01

    Discussions about model-driven approaches tend to be hampered by terminological confusion. This is at least partially caused by a lack of formal precision in defining the basic concepts, including that of "model" and "thing being modelled" - which we call subject in this paper. We propose a minimal

  13. Subjective Duration and Psychophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisler, Hannes

    1975-01-01

    Three models are proposed to describe the strategy applied by a subject when he is confronted with two successive time intervals and is required to deal with some relation between them, for example, by telling which was the longer by adjusting the second to match the first. (Author)

  14. Barron's SAT subject test

    CERN Document Server

    Jansen, MA, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Includes one diagnostic test and three complete tests, all questions answered and explained, self-assessment guides, and subject reviews. Also features test strategies, QR codes to short instructional videos, and a detailed appendix with equations, physical constants, and a basic math review.

  15. Blood-Borne Markers of Fatigue in Competitive Athletes - Results from Simulated Training Camps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Hecksteden

    Full Text Available Assessing current fatigue of athletes to fine-tune training prescriptions is a critical task in competitive sports. Blood-borne surrogate markers are widely used despite the scarcity of validation trials with representative subjects and interventions. Moreover, differences between training modes and disciplines (e.g. due to differences in eccentric force production or calorie turnover have rarely been studied within a consistent design. Therefore, we investigated blood-borne fatigue markers during and after discipline-specific simulated training camps. A comprehensive panel of blood-born indicators was measured in 73 competitive athletes (28 cyclists, 22 team sports, 23 strength at 3 time-points: after a run-in resting phase (d 1, after a 6-day induction of fatigue (d 8 and following a subsequent 2-day recovery period (d 11. Venous blood samples were collected between 8 and 10 a.m. Courses of blood-borne indicators are considered as fatigue dependent if a significant deviation from baseline is present at day 8 (Δfatigue which significantly regresses towards baseline until day 11 (Δrecovery. With cycling, a fatigue dependent course was observed for creatine kinase (CK; Δfatigue 54±84 U/l; Δrecovery -60±83 U/l, urea (Δfatigue 11±9 mg/dl; Δrecovery -10±10 mg/dl, free testosterone (Δfatigue -1.3±2.1 pg/ml; Δrecovery 0.8±1.5 pg/ml and insulin linke growth factor 1 (IGF-1; Δfatigue -56±28 ng/ml; Δrecovery 53±29 ng/ml. For urea and IGF-1 95% confidence intervals for days 1 and 11 did not overlap with day 8. With strength and high-intensity interval training, respectively, fatigue-dependent courses and separated 95% confidence intervals were present for CK (strength: Δfatigue 582±649 U/l; Δrecovery -618±419 U/l; HIIT: Δfatigue 863±952 U/l; Δrecovery -741±842 U/l only. These results indicate that, within a comprehensive panel of blood-borne markers, changes in fatigue are most accurately reflected by urea and IGF-1 for cycling

  16. Small-for-gestational age, ponderal index and neonatal polycythaemia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Objective: To examine the influence of maternal hypertension on rate of delivery of small-for-gestation age (SGA) infants, incidence of neonatal polycythaemia and mean ponderal indices of the resultant newborn infants. Methods:From the birth weights and lengths, the ponderal indices of SGA infants born to ...

  17. Do children born to teenage parents have lower adult intelligence? A prospective birth cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsina Khatun

    Full Text Available Teenage motherhood has been associated with a wide variety of negative offspring outcomes including poorer cognitive development. In the context of limitations of previous research, this paper assesses the contemporary relevance of this finding. In this study we investigate the long-term cognitive status (IQ among 21 year adult offspring born to teenage parents using the Mater University Study of Pregnancy- a prospective birth cohort study, which recruited all pregnant mothers attending a large obstetrical hospital in Brisbane, Australia, from 1981 to 1983. The analyses were restricted to a sub-sample of 2643 mother-offspring pair. Offspring IQ was measured using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test at 21 year. Parental age was reported at first clinic visit. Offspring born to teenage mothers (<20 years have -3.0 (95% Confidence Interval (CI: -4.3, -1.8 points lower IQ compared to children born to mothers ≥20 years and were more likely to have a low IQ (Odds Ratio (OR 1.7; 95% CI: 1.3, 2.3. Adjustment for a range of confounding and mediating factors including parental socioeconomic status, maternal IQ, maternal smoking and binge drinking in pregnancy, birthweight, breastfeeding and parenting style attenuates the association, though the effect remains statistically significant (-1.4 IQ points; 95% CI: -2.8,-0.1. Similarly the risk of offspring having low IQ remained marginally significantly higher in those born to teenage mothers (OR 1.3; 95% CI: 1.0, 1.9. In contrast, teenage fatherhood is not associated with adult offspring IQ, when adjusted for maternal age. Although the reduction in IQ is quantitatively small, it is indicative of neurodevelopmental disadvantage experienced by the young adult offspring of teenage mothers. Our results suggest that public policy initiatives should be targeted not only at delaying childbearing in the population but also at supporting early life condition of children born to teenage mothers to minimize the risk

  18. Atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäderberg, Ida; Thomsen, Simon F; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Skytthe, Axel; Backer, Vibeke

    2012-03-01

    We examined the risk of atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction. Data on atopic diseases and assisted reproduction in 9694 twin pairs, 3-20 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry were collected via multidisciplinary questionnaires. The risk of atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction was compared with the risk in twins born after spontaneous conception using logistic regression and variance components analysis. Children born after assisted reproduction did not have a different risk of atopic outcomes (adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence intervals] for asthma: 0.95 [0.85, 1.07], P = 0.403; hay fever: 1.01 [0.86, 1.18], P = 0.918; and atopic dermatitis: 1.02 [0.81, 1.11], P = 0.773 respectively) compared with children born after spontaneous conception. Assisted reproduction did not modify the heritability of atopic diseases. This study does not support an association between assisted reproduction and development of atopic diseases. This result must be confirmed in subsequent studies, preferably of singleton populations. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Management of soil-borne diseases of organic vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafique Hafiza Asma

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available With the rising awareness of the adverse effects of chemical pesticides, people are looking for organically grown vegetables. Consumers are increasingly choosing organic foods due to the perception that they are healthier than those conventionally grown. Vegetable crops are vulnerable to a range of pathogenic organisms that reduce yield by killing the plant or damaging the product, thus making it unmarketable. Soil-borne diseases are among the major factors contributing to low yields of organic produce. Apart from chemical pesticides there are several methods that can be used to protect crops from soil-borne pathogens. These include the introduction of biocontrol agents against soil-borne plant pathogens, plants with therapeutic effects and organic soil amendments that stimulate antagonistic activities of microorganisms to soil-borne diseases. The decomposition of organic matter in soil also results in the accumulation of specific compounds that may be antifungal or nematicidal. With the growing interest in organic vegetables, it is necessary to find non chemical means of plant disease control. This review describes the impact of soil-borne diseases on organic vegetables and methods used for their control.

  20. Growth and development in children born very low birthweight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Rebecca J; Stroustrup, Annemarie; Conaway, Mark R; DeBoer, Mark D

    2016-09-01

    To examine the relationships between growth (birth to age 2 years) and developmental outcomes in children born with very low birthweight (VLBW). Motor and mental development in children born with VLBW were regressed on anthropometric measurements at birth, 9 months and 2 years using multivariable regression. The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort, a longitudinal cohort, community sample, designed to be representative of children born across the USA. 950 children born with VLBW (growth, with length-for-age z-scores -2, children with growth shortfalls in head circumference, length and weight had a higher adjusted OR (aOR) of low Bayley motor scores at 9 months and 2 years (aOR ranging from 1.8 to 3.3, all pgrowth were linked to current and future neurodevelopmental outcomes in children born with VLBW. While careful length measures may be a particularly useful marker, deficits in all anthropometric measures were risk factors for developmental delays. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Vector-borne diseases in Haiti: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Chetrit, Eli; Schwartz, Eli

    2015-01-01

    Haiti lies on the western third of the island of Hispaniola in the Caribbean, and is one of the poorest nations in the Western hemisphere. Haiti attracts a lot of medical attention and support due to severe natural disasters followed by disastrous health consequences. Vector-borne infections are still prevalent there with some unique aspects comparing it to Latin American countries and other Caribbean islands. Although vector-borne viral diseases such as dengue and recently chikungunya can be found in many of the Caribbean islands, including Haiti, there is an apparent distinction of the vector-borne parasitic diseases. Contrary to neighboring Carribbean islands, Haiti is highly endemic for malaria, lymphatic filariasis and mansonellosis. Affected by repeat natural disasters, poverty and lack of adequate infrastructure, control of transmission within Haiti and prevention of dissemination of vector-borne pathogens to other regions is challenging. In this review we summarize some aspects concerning diseases caused by vector-borne pathogens in Haiti. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Proteomics offers insight to the mechanism behind Pisum sativum L. response to pea seed-borne mosaic virus (PSbMV)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černá, H.; Černý, M.; Habanová, H.; Šafářová, D.; Abushamsiya, K.; Navrátil, M.; Brzobohatý, Břetislav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 153, FEB2017 (2017), s. 78-88 ISSN 1874-3919 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Proteome * Pea seed-borne mosaic virus PSbMV * Potyvirus Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.914, year: 2016

  3. A comparative analysis on the physicochemical properties of tick-borne encephalitis virus envelope protein residues that affect its antigenic properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bukin, Y. S.; Dzhioev, Y.; Tkachev, S. E.; Kozlova, I.; Paramonov, A. I.; Růžek, Daniel; Qu, Z.; Zlobin, V. I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 238, JUN 15 (2017), s. 124-132 ISSN 0168-1702 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : tick-borne encephalitis virus * E protein * physicochemical properties amino acid residue * antigen * antibody Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.628, year: 2016

  4. [Neonates born to drug-addicted mothers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, M L; Nascimento, O; Nunes, M T; Almeida, J P; De Almeida, J M

    1995-01-01

    A test was carried out involving 94 newborn babies whose birth occurred in Alfredo da Costa Maternity between November 1991 and February 1994. The aims of this study were to find out the frequency of social and obstetric risks, to assess the neonatal, mobility, namely as regards the withdrawal syndrome, and also the repercussion of drug-addiction in the children's development. The frequency was 1 newborn baby of a drug-addicted mother for 106 pregnant women. In 67 out of 94 cases there was pre-natal follow-up. In such cases, the frequency of prematurity, of the withdrawal syndrome, and the possibility of preventive treatment of sexually contagious illnesses (Syphilis, hepatitis B, and aids) decreased. 8.5% of the 94 newborn babies were handed over to relatives or for adoption. Only in a small number of cases was it possible to keep the babies under regular observation. However, all of them showed hypertony and bulimia, which disappeared between the 8th and 9th months.

  5. [Water-borne disease outbreaks in Norway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygård, Karin; Gondrosen, Bjørn; Lund, Vidar

    2003-12-04

    The drinking water in Norway has traditionally been considered being of good quality. However, outbreaks related to drinking water are reported every year. We review waterborne outbreaks in Norway over the last 15 years, and describe the aetiology of and contributory factors in these outbreaks. We compiled data on waterborne outbreaks reported to the Norwegian Institute of Public Health and Norwegian Food Control Authority during 1988-2002. We included all events in which two or more people fell ill and water was the suspected source of infection. Over the 15-year period. 72 outbreaks were reported, affecting a total of 10 616 persons. Campylobacter was the cause in 26% (19/72) of the outbreaks, norovirus in 18% (13/72). The causative organism was unknown in 46% (33/72). The water came from public waterworks in 32 of the 54 outbreaks for which this information was available (59%); from a private supply in the remaining 22. For 62% (16/26) of the outbreaks related to waterworks, the water was not disinfected before distribution. None of the private water supplies were disinfected. Over the last five years, there were more outbreaks related to private supplies. The most important contributory factor to waterborne outbreaks in Norway is contamination of the raw water combined with missing or faulty disinfecting procedures. To prevent future outbreaks, a continuous upgrading of small and private water supplies is needed. Reporting of outbreaks is important for the implementation of targeted and effective preventive measures.

  6. Catch-up growth up to ten years of age in children born very preterm or with very low birth weight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knops, N.B.B.; Sneeuw, K.C.A.; Brand, R.; Hille, E.T.M.; Ouden, A.L. den; Wit, J.M.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Improved survival due to advances in neonatal care has brought issues such as postnatal growth and development more to the focus of our attention. Most studies report stunting in children born very preterm and/or small for gestational age. In this article we study the growth pattern of

  7. Monte Carlo evaluation of a CZT 3D spectrometer suitable for a Hard X- and soft-γ rays polarimetry balloon borne experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caroli, E.; De Cesare, G.; Curado da Silva, R. M.

    2015-01-01

    will be to provide high sensitivity for polarimetric measurements. In this framework, we have presented the concept of a small high-performance imaging spectrometer optimized for polarimetry between 100 and 600 keV suitable for a stratospheric balloon-borne payload and as a pathfinder for a future satellite mission...

  8. Molecular detection and phylogenetic analysis of tick-borne encephalitis virus in rodents captured in the transdanubian region of Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintér, Réka; Madai, Mónika; Horváth, Győző; Németh, Viktória; Oldal, Miklós; Kemenesi, Gábor; Dallos, Bianka; Bányai, Krisztián; Jakab, Ferenc

    2014-08-01

    Abstract Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) infection is a common zoonotic disease affecting humans in Europe and Asia. To determine whether TBEV is present in small mammalian hosts in Hungary, liver samples of wild rodents were tested for TBEV RNA. Over a period of 7 years, a total of 405 rodents were collected at five different geographic locations of the Transdanubian region. TBEV nucleic acid was identified in four rodent species: Apodemus agrarius, A. flavicollis, Microtus arvalis, and Myodes glareolus. Out of the 405 collected rodents, 17 small mammals (4.2%) were positive for TBEV. The present study provides molecular evidence and sequence data of TBEV from rodents in Hungary.

  9. [Subjective cognition in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, S; Aubin, G; Stip, E

    2017-02-01

    Given the extent, magnitude and functional significance of the neurocognitive deficits of schizophrenia, growing attention has been paid recently to patients' self-awareness of their own deficits. Thus far, the literature has shown either that patients fail to recognize their cognitive deficits or that the association between subjective and objective cognition is weak in schizophrenia. The reasons for this lack of consistency remain unexplained but may have to do, among others, with the influence of potential confounding clinical variables and the choice of the scale used to measure self-awareness of cognitive deficits. In the current study, we sought to examine the relationships between subjective and objective cognitive performance in schizophrenia, while controlling for the influence of sociodemographic and psychiatric variables. Eighty-two patients with a schizophrenia-spectrum disorder (DSM-IV criteria) were recruited. Patients' subjective cognitive complaints were evaluated with the Subjective Scale to Investigate Cognition in Schizophrenia (SSTICS), the most frequently used scale to measure self-awareness of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Neurocognition was evaluated with working memory, planning and visual learning tasks taken from Cambridge Neuropsychological Tests Automated Battery. The Stroop Color-Word test was also administered. Psychiatric symptoms were evaluated with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia. The relationships between subjective and objective cognition were evaluated with multivariate hierarchic linear regression analyses, taking into consideration potential confounders such as sociodemographic and psychiatric variables. Finally, a factor analysis of the SSTICS was performed. For the SSTICS total score, the regression analysis produced a model including two predictors, namely visual learning and Stoop interference performance, explaining a moderate portion of the variance

  10. Firms' degree of born-globalness, international entrepreneurial orientation and export performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Servais, Per; Kuivalainen, Olli; Sundqvist, Sanna

    2007-01-01

    Despite the recent increase in 'born-global' studies, there has been little research on how the scale and scope of being a born-global firm affects performance: most of the earlier research takes no account either the number of or the distances between the countries on firm or export performance....... This article begins with a review of the existing literature on born-globals, and subsequently explores the relationship between entrepreneurial orientation (EO) and two different born-global strategies, namely true born-global and apparently born-global (born-international), and the effectiveness of these two...

  11. Heat engines for dilatonic Born-Infeld black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhamidipati, Chandrasekhar; Yerra, Pavan Kumar

    2017-08-01

    In the context of dilaton coupled Einstein gravity with a negative cosmological constant and a Born-Infeld field, we study heat engines where a charged black hole is the working substance. Using the existence of a notion of thermodynamic mass and volume (which depend on the dilaton coupling), the mechanical work takes place via the pdV terms present in the first law of extended gravitational thermodynamics. The efficiency is analyzed as a function of dilaton and Born-Infeld couplings, and the results are compared with analogous computations in the related conformal solutions in the Brans-Dicke-Born-Infeld theory and black holes in anti-de Sitter space-time.

  12. Quantum probabilities from quantum entanglement: experimentally unpacking the Born rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jérémie; Bouchard, Frédéric; Santamato, Enrico; Zurek, Wojciech H.; Boyd, Robert W.; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2016-05-01

    The Born rule, a foundational axiom used to deduce probabilities of events from wavefunctions, is indispensable in the everyday practice of quantum physics. It is also key in the quest to reconcile the ostensibly inconsistent laws of the quantum and classical realms, as it confers physical significance to reduced density matrices, the essential tools of decoherence theory. Following Bohr’s Copenhagen interpretation, textbooks postulate the Born rule outright. However, recent attempts to derive it from other quantum principles have been successful, holding promise for simplifying and clarifying the quantum foundational bedrock. A major family of derivations is based on envariance, a recently discovered symmetry of entangled quantum states. Here, we identify and experimentally test three premises central to these envariance-based derivations, thus demonstrating, in the microworld, the symmetries from which the Born rule is derived. Further, we demonstrate envariance in a purely local quantum system, showing its independence from relativistic causality.

  13. Black hole solutions in mimetic Born-Infeld gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Che-Yu; Bouhmadi-López, Mariam; Chen, Pisin

    2018-01-01

    The vacuum, static, and spherically symmetric solutions in the mimetic Born-Infeld gravity are studied. The mimetic Born-Infeld gravity is a reformulation of the Eddington-inspired-Born-Infeld (EiBI) model under the mimetic approach. Due to the mimetic field, the theory contains non-trivial vacuum solutions different from those in Einstein gravity. We find that with the existence of the mimetic field, the spacelike singularity inside a Schwarzschild black hole could be altered to a lightlike singularity, even though the curvature invariants still diverge at the singularity. Furthermore, in this case, the maximal proper time for a timelike radially-infalling observer to reach the singularity is found to be infinite.

  14. Born Globals - Is there Fire Behind the Smoke?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choquette, Eliane; Rask, Morten; Sala, Davide

    2017-01-01

    in light of rapid ICT progress. However, we find that Born Globals have significantly higher turnover and employment levels as well as job growth rates. Moreover, they show a considerably wider market reach, but little to no productivity advantage compared to firms with less or later internationalization......Are Born Globals really different from firms with other start-up histories? We address this question based on a unique longitudinal data set that tracks all Danish manufacturing start-ups founded between 1994 and 2008 (23,201 firms). This novel application of register data allows us to provide...... the first detailed account of Born Globals compared to proper control groups of other start-ups. Chiefly we investigate firm performance, which in turn permits interference on socioeconomic impact. We find that the occurrence of BGs is not specific to certain sectors, nor does their frequency change...

  15. Anaplasma phagocytophilum: An emerging but unrecognized tick-borne pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. EL HAMIANI KHATAT

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Several vector-borne pathogens are considered to be emerging or re-emerging. Among these agents, Anaplasma phagocytophilum is a tick-borne rickettsiale bacterium of worldwide distribution. This bacterium is increasingly detected in several parts of the world in both ticks and hosts, including animals and humans. A. phagocytophilum is the causal agent of a zoonotic disease called ‘granulocytic anaplasmosis’ and described in several domestic animals and humans. Currently, human granulocytic anaplasmosis is considered to be the third most important vector-borne disease in both the USA and Europe and is also increasingly diagnosed in some Asian countries. However, in many parts of the world, this disease is unknown and no data are available on its epidemiology.

  16. Heat engines for dilatonic Born-Infeld black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhamidipati, Chandrasekhar; Yerra, Pavan Kumar [Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, School of Basic Sciences, Bhubaneswar (India)

    2017-08-15

    In the context of dilaton coupled Einstein gravity with a negative cosmological constant and a Born-Infeld field, we study heat engines where a charged black hole is the working substance. Using the existence of a notion of thermodynamic mass and volume (which depend on the dilaton coupling), the mechanical work takes place via the pdV terms present in the first law of extended gravitational thermodynamics. The efficiency is analyzed as a function of dilaton and Born-Infeld couplings, and the results are compared with analogous computations in the related conformal solutions in the Brans-Dicke-Born-Infeld theory and black holes in anti-de Sitter space-time. (orig.)

  17. Nordic climate change: data for modeling vector borne diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Birgit; Bødker, Rene

    The distribution of vector species is generally restricted by a range of different climatic and geographical factors, while the development and spread of the vector-borne diseases (veterinary and zoonotic) is often primarily temperature driven. Thus temperature and its derivatives are key factors...... derivatives were calculated in order to assess the geographical and seasonal variation in the area. In order to evaluate the response of vector borne diseases to possible future climate changes and the subsequent potential spread into new areas, daily temperature predictions (mean, min and max) for three 20...... in the modelling of vector-borne diseases. This puts a high demand on the quality and accuracy of the temperature data to be used as input in such models. In order to best capture the local temporal and spatial variation in the temperature surfaces, accurate daily temperature data were used in the present project...

  18. Born too soon: accelerating actions for prevention and care of 15 million newborns born too soon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawn, Joy E; Kinney, Mary V; Belizan, José M; Mason, Elizabeth Mary; McDougall, Lori; Larson, Jim; Lackritz, Eve; Friberg, Ingrid K; Howson, Christopher P

    2013-01-01

    Preterm birth complication is the leading cause of neonatal death resulting in over one million deaths each year of the 15 million babies born preterm. To accelerate change, we provide an overview of the comprehensive strategy required, the tools available for context-specifi c health system implementation now, and the priorities for research and innovation. There is an urgent need for action on a dual track: (1) through strategic research to advance the prevention of preterm birth and (2) improved implementation and innovation for care of the premature neonate. We highlight evidence-based interventions along the continuum of care, noting gaps in coverage, quality, equity and implications for integration and scale up. Improved metrics are critical for both burden and tracking programmatic change. Linked to the United Nation’s Every Women Every Child strategy, a target was set for 50% reduction in preterm deaths by 2025. Three analyses informed this target: historical change in high income countries, recent progress in best performing countries, and modelling of mortality reduction with high coverage of existing interventions. If universal coverage of selected interventions were to be achieved, then 84% or more than 921,000 preterm neonatal deaths could be prevented annually, with antenatal corticosteroids and Kangaroo Mother Care having the highest impact. Everyone has a role to play in reaching this target including government leaders, professionals, private sector, and of course families who are aff ected the most and whose voices have been critical for change in many of the countries with the most progress.

  19. Interaction, transference, and subjectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Fieldwork is one of the important methods in educational, social, and organisational research. In fieldwork, the researcher takes residence for a shorter or longer period amongst the subjects and settings to be studied. The aim of this is to study the culture of people: how people seem to make...... sense of their lives and which moral, professional, and ethical values seem to guide their behaviour and attitudes. In fieldwork, the researcher has to balance participation and observation in her attempts at representation. Consequently, the researcher’s academic and life-historical subjectivity...... are important filters for fieldwork. In general, fieldwork can be understood as processes where field reports and field analysis are determined by how the researcher interacts with and experiences the field, the events and informants in it, and how she subsequently develops an ethnography. However, fieldwork...

  20. Writing and the 'Subject'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Charlotte

    /reading subject) manifests itself in the material mark on the page. The study shows how this indexical reference to a ‘subject’ is manipulated and used as a mask through which a writer/painter can perform a certain ‘subject’. Through analyses of the various levels on which the ‘subject’ is represented...... in the early as well as the contemporary avant-garde, it becomes clear that the ‘subject’ is an unstable category that can be exposed to manipulation and play. Handwriting is performing as a signature (as an index), but is at the same time similar to the signature of a subject (an icon) and a verbal construct...

  1. ASTERIA: A Balloon-Borne Experiment for Infrasound Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Eliot; Wahl, Kerry; Ballard, Courtney; Daugherty, Emily; Dullea, Connor; Garner, Kyle; Heaney, Martin; Thom, Ian; Von Hendy, Michael; Young, Emma; Diller, Jed; Dischner, Zach; Drob, Douglas; Boslough, Mark; Brown, Peter

    2015-04-01

    ASTERIA (Aloft Stratospheric Testbed for Experimental Research on Infrasonic Activity) is a small (designed to measure infrasound disturbances from a balloon-borne platform at altitudes near 60,000 ft (~20 km). A balloon platform is expected to have two advantages over ground-based infrasound stations: a relatively benign wind environment and exposure to higher signal strengths within a stratospheric duct. ASTERIA's nominal sensitivity requirements are to measure waves between 0.1 to 20 Hz at the 0.1 Pa level with signal-to-noise ratios of 5 or better. At the time of this writing, we have tested wave sensors based on the differential pressure transducers recently flown by Bowman et al. (2014) on a NASA/HASP (High Altitude Student Payload); our modified pressure sensor was tested in a NOAA piston-bellows facility in Boulder, CO. Our goal of characterizing 0.1 Pa amplitude waves requires that combined noise sources are below the the 0.02 Pa rms level. ASTERIA carries five differential transducers with port inlets arranged a diamond-like pattern (one zenith- and one nadir-facing port, plus three horizontal ports equally spaced in azimuth). Baffling for these sensors is a hybrid of perforated tubing and porous barriers, as described in Hedlin (2014). Other noise sources of concern include the electronic amplification of the transducer voltages and low-frequency pressure waves caused by pendulum or twisting modes of the payload. We will report on our plans to characterize and reduce these noise sources. The ASTERIA payload is intended to fly on long-duration super-pressure balloons for intervals of ~100 days. We plan to conduct an experiment in the summer or fall of 2015 in which a calibrated disturbance is set off and detected simultaneously from stratospheric ASTERIA payloads and ground-based stations. References: 1) Bowman et al. 2014, "Balloons over Volcanoes Scientific Report," HASP 2014 final report. 2) Hedlin 2003, "Infrasonic Wind-noise Reduction by Barriers and

  2. Self-esteem of adolescents who were born prematurely.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigal, Saroj; Lambert, Michael; Russ, Chad; Hoult, Lorraine

    2002-03-01

    To determine whether there are any differences between the self-esteem of a cohort of adolescents who were extremely low birth weight (ELBW) in comparison with term controls (Cs); and to test the associations between self-esteem and several predefined predictor variables. Self-esteem is considered to play a significant role in psychological adjustment and scholastic success. Little information exists on how adolescents who were ELBW regard themselves. Longitudinal follow-up of a regional cohort of 132/169 (78%) ELBW survivors and 127/145 (88%) sociodemographically matched Cs, born between 1977 and 1982. Harter Adolescent Self-Perception Profile (1988) with 9 dimensions, including Global Self-Worth, socioeconomic status (Hollingshead), height-for-age and weight-for-age z scores, and Wide Range Achievement Test---Revised (WRAT-R; Reading, Spelling, and Arithmetic). General linear model multiple analyses of covariance were performed to determine whether significant relationships existed between the 9 self-esteem dimensions and the independent variables of birth weight status and gender, and the covariates of age, socioeconomic status, physical development, and academic achievement. Global Self Worth was similar for ELBW and Cs (means: 3.1 and 3.2). Multivariate effects revealed no interactions, but significant main effects emerged for birth weight status, gender, weight-for-age z scores, age in months, and for all 3 WRAT-R subtests, all effect sizes medium to large. Follow-up analysis of covariance revealed medium-size gender effects for athletic competence (means: 3.1 and 2.6), and physical appearance (means: 2.9 and 2.5), where boys rated themselves significantly higher on both domains; and age effects, where older teens rated themselves better for job competence. Significant but small effect sizes emerged for the following: 1) weight-for-age z scores, where heavier youth rated themselves higher on close friendships, 2) gender, where girls had higher ratings for

  3. [Testing of seed-borne fungi of Glycyrrihiza seed and disinfection effect of several fungicides on seed-borne fungi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Hong-Mei; Li, Jing; Li, Xian-En; Li, Jian-Qiang

    2006-04-01

    To study the dominant seed-borne fungi of Glycyrrihiza seeds which were from different producing area and compare the disinfection effect of several fungicides on seed-borne fungi of Glycyrrihiza seed. Petri-dish testing was used to determine the external and internal seed-borne fungi and the disinfection effect of fungicides. The result showed that the amount of spore on the surface of one Glycyrrihiza seed varied from 0.3% to 37.0% among samples. Penicillium spp. and Aspergillus spp. were the two major dominant fungi and there was few differences in the type of the fungi among producing areas but differences in the isolation frequency of the furgi; Penicillium spp. , Rhizopus spp. , Aspergillus spp. and Alternaria spp. were the internally dominant seed-borne fungi, including seed capsule and the internal tissue of seed and their fungi-carrying percentage was 8.0%-48.3% and 3.5%-42.0% respectively. There were differences in fungi percentage and dominant seed borne fungi among different producing areas. The disinfection effect of both mancozeb and thriam was up to 89.0%, so it is suggested to use them to disinfect Glycyrrihiza seed.

  4. Work Disability Among Native-born and Foreign-born Americans: On Origins, Health, and Social Safety Nets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelman, Michal; Kestenbaum, Bert M; Zuelsdorff, Megan L; Mehta, Neil K; Lauderdale, Diane S

    2017-12-01

    Public debates about both immigration policy and social safety net programs are increasingly contentious. However, little research has explored differences in health within America's diverse population of foreign-born workers, and the effect of these workers on public benefit programs is not well understood. We investigate differences in work disability by nativity and origins and describe the mix of health problems associated with receiving Social Security Disability Insurance benefits. Our analysis draws on two large national data sources-the American Community Survey and comprehensive administrative records from the Social Security Administration-to determine the prevalence and incidence of work disability between 2001 and 2010. In sharp contrast to prior research, we find that foreign-born adults are substantially less likely than native-born Americans to report work disability, to be insured for work disability benefits, and to apply for those benefits. Overall and across origins, the foreign-born also have a lower incidence of disability benefit award. Persons from Africa, Northern Europe, Canada, and parts of Asia have the lowest work disability benefit prevalence rates among the foreign-born; persons from Southern Europe, Western Europe, the former Soviet Union, and the Caribbean have the highest rates.

  5. Excessive Daytime Sleepiness among Hypertensive US-Born Blacks and Foreign-Born Blacks: Analysis of the CAATCH Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Williams

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Evidence shows that blacks exhibit greater daytime sleepiness compared with whites, based on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. In addition, sleep complaints might differ based on individuals’ country of origin. However, it is not clear whether individuals’ country of origin has any influence on excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS. Study Objectives. We tested the hypothesis that US-born blacks would show a greater level of EDS compared with foreign-born blacks. The potential effects of sociodemographic and medical risk were also determined. Design. We used the Counseling African-Americans to Control Hypertension (CAATCH data. CAATCH is a group randomized clinical trial that was conducted among 30 community healthcare centers in New York, yielding baseline data for 1,058 hypertensive black patients. Results. Results of univariate logistic regression analysis indicated that US-born blacks were nearly twice as likely as their foreign-born black counterparts to exhibit EDS (OR=1.87, 95% CI: 1.30–2.68, P<0.001. After adjusting for effects of age, sex, education, employment, body mass index, alcohol consumption, and smoking habit, US-born blacks were 69% more likely than their counterparts to exhibit EDS (OR=1.69, 95% CI: 1.11–2.57, P<0.01. Conclusion. Findings demonstrate the importance of considering individuals’ country of origin, in addition to their race and ethnicity, when analyzing epidemiologic sleep data.

  6. Impact of climate trends on tick-borne pathogen transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustin eEstrada-Pena

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in climate research together with a better understanding of tick-pathogen interactions, the distribution of ticks and the diagnosis of tick-borne pathogens raise questions about the impact of environmental factors on tick abundance and spread and the prevalence and transmission of tick-borne pathogens. While undoubtedly climate plays a role in the changes in distribution and seasonal abundance of ticks, it is always difficult to disentangle factors impacting on the abundance of tick hosts from those exerted by human habits. All together, climate, host abundance and social factors may explain the upsurge of epidemics transmitted by ticks to humans. Herein we focused on tick-borne pathogens that affect humans with pandemic potential. Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. (Lyme disease, Anaplasma phagocytophilum (human granulocytic anaplasmosis and tick-borne encephalitis virus (tick-borne encephalitis are transmitted by Ixodes spp. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever is transmitted by Hyalomma spp. In this review, we discussed how vector tick species occupy the habitat as a function of different climatic factors, and how these factors impact on tick survival and seasonality. How molecular events at the tick-pathogen interface impact on pathogen transmission is also discussed. Results from statistically and biologically derived models are compared to show that while statistical models are able to outline basic information about tick distributions, biologically derived models are necessary to evaluate pathogen transmission rates and understand the effect of climatic variables and host abundance patterns on pathogen transmission. The results of these studies could be used to build early alert systems able to identify the main factors driving the subtle changes in tick distribution and seasonality and the prevalence of tick-borne pathogens.

  7. Mathematics ability and related skills in preschoolers born very preterm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, Holly M; Akshoomoff, Natacha

    2017-12-12

    Children born very preterm (VPT) are at risk for academic, behavioral, and/or emotional problems. Mathematics is a particular weakness and better understanding of the relationship between preterm birth and early mathematics ability is needed, particularly as early as possible to aid in early intervention. Preschoolers born VPT (n = 58) and those born full term (FT; n = 29) were administered a large battery of measures within 6 months of beginning kindergarten. A multiple-mediation model was utilized to characterize the difference in skills underlying mathematics ability between groups. Children born VPT performed significantly worse than FT-born children on a measure of mathematics ability as well as full-scale IQ, verbal skills, visual-motor integration, phonological awareness, phonological working memory, motor skills, and executive functioning. Mathematics was significantly correlated with verbal skills, visual-motor integration, phonological processing, and motor skills across both groups. When entered into the mediation model, verbal skills, visual-motor integration, and phonological awareness were significant mediators of the group differences. This analysis provides insights into the pre-academic skills that are weak in preschoolers born VPT and their relationship to mathematics. It is important to identify children who will have difficulties as early as possible, particularly for VPT children who are at higher risk for academic difficulties. Therefore, this model may be used in evaluating VPT children for emerging difficulties as well as an indicator that if other weaknesses are found, an assessment of mathematics should be conducted.

  8. "New" food-borne pathogens of public health significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryser, E T; Marth, E H

    1989-07-01

    Recent work by epidemiologists and microbiologists has uncovered several hitherto unrecognized food-borne bacterial pathogens of public health significance. One of these, Listeria monocytogenes, has attracted considerable attention because of two major cheese-related outbreaks of listeriosis that were characterized by cases of meningitis, abortion, and perinatal septicemia. Thus far, L. monocytogenes has been responsible for well over 300 reported cases of food-borne listeriosis, including about 100 deaths, and has cost the dairy industry alone more than 66 million dollars as a result of product recalls. The ability of L. monocytogenes to grow at refrigeration temperatures, coupled with appearance of the pathogen in raw and processed meats, as well as poultry, vegetables, and seafood, makes this bacterium a serious threat to susceptible consumers and to the entire food industry. Yersinia enterocolitica, another psychrotrophic food-borne pathogen of recent concern, was linked to several outbreaks of yersiniosis associated with consumption of both raw and pasteurized milk, as well as contaminated water. Food-borne infections involving Y. enterocolitica typically result in enterocolitis, which may be mistaken for acute appendicitis. Unfortunately, inadvertent removal of healthy appendixes from victims of food-borne yersiniosis is all too common. Although known for many years, Campylobacter jejuni has only recently been recognized as a food-borne pathogen and a leading cause of gastroenteritis in the United States. Notable outbreaks of campylobacteriosis linked to consumption of raw milk, cake icing, eggs, poultry, and beef have underscored the need for thorough cooking and proper handling of raw products.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Impact of Climate Trends on Tick-Borne Pathogen Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada-Peña, Agustín; Ayllón, Nieves; de la Fuente, José

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in climate research together with a better understanding of tick–pathogen interactions, the distribution of ticks and the diagnosis of tick-borne pathogens raise questions about the impact of environmental factors on tick abundance and spread and the prevalence and transmission of tick-borne pathogens. While undoubtedly climate plays a role in the changes in distribution and seasonal abundance of ticks, it is always difficult to disentangle factors impacting on the abundance of tick hosts from those exerted by human habits. All together, climate, host abundance, and social factors may explain the upsurge of epidemics transmitted by ticks to humans. Herein we focused on tick-borne pathogens that affect humans with epidemic potential. Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. (Lyme disease), Anaplasma phagocytophilum (human granulocytic anaplasmosis), and tick-borne encephalitis virus (tick-borne encephalitis) are transmitted by Ixodes spp. Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever) is transmitted by Hyalomma spp. In this review, we discussed how vector tick species occupy the habitat as a function of different climatic factors, and how these factors impact on tick survival and seasonality. How molecular events at the tick–pathogen interface impact on pathogen transmission is also discussed. Results from statistically and biologically derived models are compared to show that while statistical models are able to outline basic information about tick distributions, biologically derived models are necessary to evaluate pathogen transmission rates and understand the effect of climatic variables and host abundance patterns on pathogen transmission. The results of these studies could be used to build early alert systems able to identify the main factors driving the subtle changes in tick distribution and seasonality and the prevalence of tick-borne pathogens. PMID:22470348

  10. Emerging vector borne diseases – incidence through vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara eSavic

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Vector borne diseases use to be a major public health concern only in tropical and subtropical areas, but today they are an emerging threat for the continental and developed countries also. Nowdays, in intercontinetal countries, there is a struggle with emerging diseases which have found their way to appear through vectors. Vector borne zoonotic diseases occur when vectors, animal hosts, climate conditions, pathogens and susceptible human population exist at the same time, at the same place. Global climate change is predicted to lead to an increase in vector borne infectious diseases and disease outbreaks. It could affect the range and popultion of pathogens, host and vectors, transmission season, etc. Reliable surveilance for diseases that are most likely to emerge is required. Canine vector borne diseases represent a complex group of diseases including anaplasmosis, babesiosis, bartonellosis, borreliosis, dirofilariosis, erlichiosis, leishmaniosis. Some of these diseases cause serious clinical symptoms in dogs and some of them have a zoonotic potential with an effect to public health. It is expected from veterinarians in coordination with medical doctors to play a fudamental role at primeraly prevention and then treatment of vector borne diseases in dogs. The One Health concept has to be integrated into the struggle against emerging diseases.During a four year period, from 2009-2013, a total number of 551 dog samples were analysed for vector borne diseases (borreliosis, babesiosis, erlichiosis, anaplasmosis, dirofilariosis and leishmaniasis in routine laboratory work. The analysis were done by serological tests – ELISA for borreliosis, dirofilariosis and leishmaniasis, modified Knott test for dirofilariosis and blood smear for babesiosis, erlichiosis and anaplasmosis. This number of samples represented 75% of total number of samples that were sent for analysis for different diseases in dogs. Annually, on avarege more then half of the samples

  11. Emerging Vector-Borne Diseases - Incidence through Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savić, Sara; Vidić, Branka; Grgić, Zivoslav; Potkonjak, Aleksandar; Spasojevic, Ljubica

    2014-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases use to be a major public health concern only in tropical and subtropical areas, but today they are an emerging threat for the continental and developed countries also. Nowadays, in intercontinental countries, there is a struggle with emerging diseases, which have found their way to appear through vectors. Vector-borne zoonotic diseases occur when vectors, animal hosts, climate conditions, pathogens, and susceptible human population exist at the same time, at the same place. Global climate change is predicted to lead to an increase in vector-borne infectious diseases and disease outbreaks. It could affect the range and population of pathogens, host and vectors, transmission season, etc. Reliable surveillance for diseases that are most likely to emerge is required. Canine vector-borne diseases represent a complex group of diseases including anaplasmosis, babesiosis, bartonellosis, borreliosis, dirofilariosis, ehrlichiosis, and leishmaniosis. Some of these diseases cause serious clinical symptoms in dogs and some of them have a zoonotic potential with an effect to public health. It is expected from veterinarians in coordination with medical doctors to play a fundamental role at primarily prevention and then treatment of vector-borne diseases in dogs. The One Health concept has to be integrated into the struggle against emerging diseases. During a 4-year period, from 2009 to 2013, a total number of 551 dog samples were analyzed for vector-borne diseases (borreliosis, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis, dirofilariosis, and leishmaniasis) in routine laboratory work. The analysis was done by serological tests - ELISA for borreliosis, dirofilariosis, and leishmaniasis, modified Knott test for dirofilariosis, and blood smear for babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, and anaplasmosis. This number of samples represented 75% of total number of samples that were sent for analysis for different diseases in dogs. Annually, on average more then half of the samples

  12. A double vacuum window mechanism for space-borne applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilic, K.; Aboobaker, A.; Aubin, F.; Geach, C.; Hanany, S.; Jarosik, N.; Milligan, M.; Sagiv, I.

    2017-04-01

    We present a vacuum window mechanism that is useful for applications requiring two different vacuum windows in series, with one of them movable and resealable. Such applications include space borne instruments that can benefit from a thin vacuum window at low ambient pressures but must also have an optically open aperture at atmospheric pressures. We describe the implementation and successful operation with the E and B experiment balloon-borne payload, a millimeter-wave instrument designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  13. Spacecraft-borne long life cryogenic refrigeration: Status and trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    The status of cryogenic refrigerator development intended for, or possibly applicable to, long life spacecraft-borne application is reviewed. Based on these efforts, the general development trends are identified. Using currently projected technology needs, the various trends are compared and evaluated. The linear drive, non-contacting bearing Stirling cycle refrigerator concept appears to be the best current approach that will meet the technology projection requirements for spacecraft-borne cryogenic refrigerators. However, a multiply redundant set of lightweight, moderate life, moderate reliability Stirling cycle cryogenic refrigerators using high-speed linear drive and sliding contact bearings may possibly suffice.

  14. EBEX: A Balloon-Borne CMB Polarization Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Daniel; Aboobaker, A. M.; Ade, P.; Aubin, F.; Baccigalupi, C.; Bandura, K.; Bao, C.; Borrill, J.; Didier, J.; Dobbs, M.; Gold, B.; Grain, J.; Grainger, W.; Hanany, S.; Helson, K.; Hillbrand, S. N.; Hilton, G.; Hubmayr, H.; Irwin, K.; Johnson, B.; Jaffe, A.; Jones, T. J.; Kisner, T.; Klein, J.; Korotkov, A.; Leach, S.; Lee, A. T.; Levinson, L.; Limon, M.; MacDermid, K.; Miller, A. D.; Milligan, M.; Pascale, E.; Raach, K.; Reichborn-Kjennerud, B.; Sagiv, I.; Smecher, G.; Stompor, R.; Tristram, M.; Tucker, G. S.; Westbrook, B.; Zilic, K.

    2014-01-01

    The E and B Experiment (EBEX) is a balloon-borne telescope designed to probe polarization signals in the CMB resulting from primordial gravitational waves, gravitational lensing, and Galactic dust emission. EBEX is the first balloon-borne astrophysical polarimeter to use a continuously rotating achromatic half-wave plate on a superconducting magnetic bearing and over 1000 transition edge sensor bolometers read out with SQUID amplifiers. The instrument completed an 11 day flight over Antarctica in January 2013 and data analysis is underway. We will provide an overview of the experiment and the Antarctic flight, and give an update on the analysis.

  15. Ticks and Tick-borne diseases in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Moutailler, Sara; Stuart, Peter; Paredis, Linda; Dutraive, Justine; Gonzalez, Estelle; O'Connor, Jack; Devillers, Elodie; Good, Barbara; OMuireagain, Colm; de Waal, Theo; Morris, Fergal; Gray, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    Throughout Europe interest in tick-borne agents is increasing, particularly with regard to those that can cause human disease. The reason for this is the apparent rise in the incidence of many tick-borne diseases (TBD's). While there has never been a national survey of ticks or TBD's in Ireland, the trend here appears to be the reverse with a decline in the incidence of some agents seemingly associated with decreasing tick numbers particularly on agricultural land. In the absence of robust ba...

  16. Primordial cosmology in mimetic born-infeld gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhmadi-López, Mariam; Chen, Che-Yu; Chen, Pisin

    2017-11-01

    The Eddington-inspired-Born-Infeld (EiBI) model is reformulated within the mimetic approach. In the presence of a mimetic field, the model contains non-trivial vacuum solutions which could be free of spacetime singularity because of the Born-Infeld nature of the theory. We study a realistic primordial vacuum universe and prove the existence of regular solutions, such as primordial inflationary solutions of de Sitter type or bouncing solutions. Besides, the linear instabilities present in the EiBI model are found to be avoidable for some interesting bouncing solutions in which the physical metric as well as the auxiliary metric are regular at the background level.

  17. Born Global Sourcers – buying internationally right from the inception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Morten; Servais, Per

    This article focuses on a particular type of international New Ventures (INV) the so-called Born Global Sourcers. Through the research development of the INV and by studying overview articles in the field it is concluded that nearly all research is centered on INV’s outward activities. At the same...... time researchers has identified various types of INV’s and based on the empirical work by Rasmussen et al (2010) a particular type of international new venture is isolated. The Born Global sourcers which is firms who conducts international purchasing from or near their establishment but who only...

  18. The Space-Borne SBAS-DInSAR Technique as a Supporting Tool for Sustainable Urban Policies: The Case of Istanbul Megacity, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Calò

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In today’s urbanizing world, home of 28 megacities, there is a growing need for tools to assess urban policies and support the design and implementation of effective development strategies. Unsustainable practices of urbanization bring major implications for land and environment, and cause a dramatic increase of urban vulnerability to natural hazards. In Istanbul megacity, disaster risk reduction represents a challenging issue for urban managers. In this paper, we show the relevance of the space-borne Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR technique as a tool for supporting risk management, and thus contributing to achieve the urban sustainability. To this aim, we use a dataset of high resolution SAR images collected by the TerraSAR-X satellite that have been processed through the advanced (multi-temporal Small BAseline Subset (SBAS—DInSAR technique, thus producing spatially-dense deformation velocity maps and associated time-series. Results allow to depict an up-to-date picture of surface deformations occurring in Istanbul, and thus to identify urban areas subject to potential risk. The joint analysis of remotely sensed measurements and ancillary data (geological and urban development information provides an opportunity for city planners and land professionals to discuss on the mutual relationship between urban development policies and natural/man-made hazards.

  19. Subject Sensitive Invariantism: In Memoriam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauw, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Subject sensitive invariantism is the view that whether a subject knows depends on what is at stake for that subject: the truth-value of a knowledge-attribution is sensitive to the subject's practical interests. I argue that subject sensitive invariantism cannot accept a very plausible principle for

  20. Escape of Tick-Borne Flavivirus from 2'-C-Methylated Nucleoside Antivirals Is Mediated by a Single Conservative Mutation in NS5 That Has a Dramatic Effect on Viral Fitness

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eyer, Luděk; Kondo, H.; Zouharová, D.; Hirano, M.; Valdés, James J.; Muto, M.; Kastl, T.; Kobayashi, S.; Haviernik, J.; Igarashi, K.; Kariwa, H.; Vaculovicova, M.; Černý, Jiří; Kizek, R.; Kroeger, A.; Lienenklaus, S.; Dejmek, Milan; Nencka, Radim; Palus, Martin; Salát, J.; De Clercq, E.; Yoshii, K.; Růžek, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 21 (2017), č. článku e01028-17. ISSN 0022-538X R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV16-34238A Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : antiviral agents * antiviral therapy * escape mutant * tick-borne * encephalitis virus * tick-borne pathogens Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.663, year: 2016

  1. HIV and sexual health knowledge and sexual experience among Australian-born and overseas-born students in Sydney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Angela; Richters, Juliet; Crawford, June; Kippax, Sue

    2005-09-01

    To examine differences between Australian-born and Asian-born first-year university students in Sydney in their sexual behavior and knowledge about the prevention and transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmissible infections (STIs). Students were recruited from a stall during the student Orientation Week in both 2002 and 2003 at the University of New South Wales. A short questionnaire was completed and returned anonymously. Data on age, gender, country of birth, sexual behavior, and sexual health knowledge were collected. A score was calculated based on the sum of the correct answers given to 12 HIV/STI transmission and prevention questions. The students were then divided into three groups according to their country of birth (Australia, Asia, and elsewhere) and their knowledge scores were compared. Students born in certain Asian countries were also asked their perception of the HIV epidemic in their home country compared with Australia. A total of 1185 first-year students completed the questionnaire. Although older on average, Asian-born students were less likely to have had sexual intercourse and had had fewer sexual partners. They also had consistently poorer HIV/STI knowledge scores than Australian-born students. Students born in China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore but not Thailand underestimated the prevalence of HIV in their country of birth in comparison with Australia. The combination of poorer knowledge, apparent misconception of the extent of HIV epidemic in their home country (or Australia), and potential later frequent travel indicates a potential risk for later transmission of HIV/STIs. The university is an underused setting for prevention health education.

  2. Bone Mineral Density After Cessation of GH Treatment in Young Adults Born SGA: A 5-Year Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Carolina C J; van der Steen, Manouk; Renes, Judith S; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C S

    2017-09-01

    Short children born small for gestational age (SGA) have below-average bone mineral density (BMD). Growth hormone (GH) treatment improves height and BMD in short SGA children. Longitudinal data on BMD in adults born SGA, after GH cessation (GH-stop), are lacking. To determine BMD in young adults born SGA during 5 years after GH-stop. In 173 GH-treated adults born SGA (SGA-GH), BMD of total body (BMDTB) and bone mineral apparent density of lumbar spine (BMADLS) were measured longitudinally at adult height (AH) and 6 months, 2 years, and 5 years thereafter. At 5 years after GH-stop (age 21 years), data were compared with 45 untreated short SGA adults (SGA-S), 59 SGA adults with spontaneous catch-up (SGA-CU), and 81 adults born appropriate for gestational age (AGA). At GH-stop (mean age 16.4 years), estimated mean (standard error) BMDTB standard deviation score (SDS) was -0.40 (0.1) in males and -0.51 (0.1) in females, followed by a trend toward a decrease of BMDTB in males to -0.59 (0.1) at 5 years after GH-stop (P = 0.06), whereas it remained stable in females [-0.57 (0.1); P = 0.33]. At GH-stop, BMADLS SDS was -0.01 (0.1) in males and -0.29 (0.1) in females, followed by a decrease in males and females to -0.38 and -0.55, respectively, at 5 years after GH-stop (P SGA-GH were similar compared with SGA-S, SGA-CU, and AGA. After GH-stop, there is a gradual decline of BMADLS, but at the age of 21 years, BMDTB and BMADLS are similar as in untreated short SGA adults.

  3. Subjective Writing in Contemporary Chinese Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Siyan, Jin

    2008-01-01

    In twentieth century Chinese literature, we find writers expressing several forms of subjectivity characterised as “ziwo” (I), “xiaowo” (small I), “dawo” (capital I),“wangwo” (I to be forgotten), as well as “wuwo” (no I). The “capital I” and the “I to be forgotten” are characteristic of the “art for life” school of authors, which had its zenith in the 1950s and 1960s. The “ziwo” and “xiaowo” are both expressions of the “art for art’s sake” and the “ziwo de zhutixing” (the subjectivity of the ...

  4. The Development of Effortful Control in Children Born Preterm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poehlmann, Julie; Schwichtenberg, A. J. Miller; Shah, Prachi E.; Shlafer, Rebecca J.; Hahn, Emily; Maleck, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    This prospective longitudinal study examined emerging effortful control skills at 24- and 36-months postterm in 172 children born preterm (less than 36 weeks gestation). Infant (neonatal health risks), family (sociodemographic risks), and maternal risk factors (depressive symptoms, anger expressions during play interactions) were assessed at six…

  5. Effect Of Ecosystem Changes On Air-Borne And Vegetation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For the vegetation-dwelling arthropods, 6 insect species and 6 spider species were dominant in the sites that had undergone environmental changes while 1 insect species and 3 spider species were dominant in the forest. For theair-borne fauna, no species was found in the forest while 7 insect species weedominant in the ...

  6. COMMUNITY LEVEL ANALYSIS OF VECTOR-BORNE DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecological community structure is particularly important in vector-borne zoonotic diseases with complex life cycles. Single population models, such as the so-called Ross-Macdonald model (Baily, 1982), have been important in developing and characterizing our current understanding...

  7. Climate change, vector-borne diseases and working population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonesch, Nicoletta; D'Ovidio, Maria Concetta; Melis, Paola; Remoli, Maria Elena; Ciufolini, Maria Grazia; Tomao, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Risks associated with climate change are increasing worldwide and the global effects include altered weather and precipitation patterns, rising temperatures and others; human health can be affected directly and indirectly. This paper is an overview of literature regarding climate changes, their interaction with vector-borne diseases and impact on working population. Articles regarding climate changes as drivers of vector-borne diseases and evidences of occupational cases have been picked up by public databank. Technical documents were also included in the study. Evidences regarding the impact of climate changes on vector-borne diseases in Europe, provided by the analysis of the literature, are presented. Climate-sensitive vector-borne diseases are likely to be emerging due to climate modifications, with impacts on public and occupational health. However, other environmental and anthropogenic drivers such as increasing travelling and trade, deforestation and reforestation, altered land use and urbanization can influence their spread. Further studies are necessary to better understand the phenomenon and implementation of adaptation strategies to protect human health should be accelerated and strengthened.

  8. Risk assessment framework for emerging vector-borne livestock diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de C.J.; Hoek, M.R.; Fischer, E.A.J.; Koeijer, de A.A.; Bremmer, J.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a framework for risk assessment of introduction, establishment, spread and persistence of vector-borne livestock diseases by integrating the essential elements of different approaches. This framework will help risk analysts to assess the risk of

  9. Impact of climate variability on vector-borne disease transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    We will discuss the impact of climate variability on vector borne diseases and demonstrate that global climate teleconnections can be used to anticipate and forecast, in the case of Rift Valley fever, epidemics and epizootics. In this context we will examine significant worldwide weather anomalies t...

  10. Genetic Characterization of the Tick-Borne Orbiviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjunatha N. Belaganahalli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The International Committee for Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV recognizes four species of tick-borne orbiviruses (TBOs: Chenuda virus, Chobar Gorge virus, Wad Medani virus and Great Island virus (genus Orbivirus, family Reoviridae. Nucleotide (nt and amino acid (aa sequence comparisons provide a basis for orbivirus detection and classification, however full genome sequence data were only available for the Great Island virus species. We report representative genome-sequences for the three other TBO species (virus isolates: Chenuda virus (CNUV; Chobar Gorge virus (CGV and Wad Medani virus (WMV. Phylogenetic comparisons show that TBOs cluster separately from insect-borne orbiviruses (IBOs. CNUV, CGV, WMV and GIV share low level aa/nt identities with other orbiviruses, in ‘conserved’ Pol, T2 and T13 proteins/genes, identifying them as four distinct virus-species. The TBO genome segment encoding cell attachment, outer capsid protein 1 (OC1, is approximately half the size of the equivalent segment from insect-borne orbiviruses, helping to explain why tick-borne orbiviruses have a ~1 kb smaller genome.

  11. Tick-borne agents in rodents, China, 2004-2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Zhan (Lin); W.C. Cao (Wu Chun); C.Y. Chu (Chen); B.G. Jiang; F. Zhang (Fang); L.J. Liu (Wei); J.S. Dumler (Stephen); X-M. Wu (Xiao-Ming); S-Q. Zuo (Shu-Qing); H.N. Huang; Q.M. Zhao; N. Jia (Na); H. Yang (Hong); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik); J.D.F. Habbema (Dik)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractA total of 705 rodents from 6 provinces and autonomous regions of mainland People's Republic of China were tested by PCRs for tick-borne agents (Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, spotted fever group rickettsiae, and Francisella tularensis). Infection rates were

  12. Quality Determination of Pipe-Borne Water in Sokoto Metropolis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The quality of the pipe-borne water supplied to Sokoto metropolis was determined in this study. The total bacterial count was carried out using surface plating method of inoculation. The coliforms were enumerated using multiple tube fermentation technique (Most Probable Number Method). Some physicochemical ...

  13. Growth through internationalization : an online perspective on Born Globals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dennis Nevels

    2013-01-01

    Summary: The traditional landscape in international business has changed, for decades the Uppsala model of internationalization has been key-instrument for foreign success. Since McKinsey (1993) made notice of the term Born Global times have changed. More rapidly and in increasing numbers throughout

  14. Acrylic polymer nanocomposite resins for water borne coating applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nobel, M.L.

    2007-01-01

    Due to environmental and safety regulations the use of volatile organic components (VOC's) containing lacquers for exterior automotive purposes is under growing pressure. As a consequence there is a demand for more environmentally friendly alternatives like water borne coatings, high solid coatings,

  15. Interventions for Infants Born Affected by Drugs and Alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajicek, Marilyn

    This examination of interventions for infants born affected by drugs and alcohol defines the issue, identifies alternative solutions, and notes barriers to provision of appropriate services. These infants, especially those with fetal alcohol syndrome, are seen at high risk for health-related behavioral and developmental problems. A list of 14…

  16. Work Satisfaction: Critical Factors for Foreign-Born Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Susan G.

    2017-01-01

    Many higher education institutions seek to attract and retain diverse faculty in an effort to intentionally diversify campuses and make their college campuses more inclusive. The development of a diverse faculty body that matches the diversity of the student body is crucial, but the representation of foreign-born with doctoral degrees that are…

  17. Arthropod Borne Diseases in Imposed War during 1980-88

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Khoobdel

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Personnel of military forces have close contact with natural habitat and usually encounter with bite of arthropods and prone to be infected with arthropod borne diseases. The imposed war against Iran was one of the most important and the longest war in the Middle East and even in the world and military people faced various diseases. The aim of this study was to review prevalence of arthropod borne diseases and to collect relevant information and valuable experiences during the imposed war. Methods: The present survey is a historical research and cross-sectional study, focused on arthropod fauna, situation of different arthropod borne diseases and also the ways which military personnel used to protect themselves against them. The information was adopted from valid military health files and also interviewing people who participated in the war. Results: Scabies, cutaneous leishmaniasis, sandfly fever and pediculosis were more prevalent among other arthropod -borne diseases in Iran-Iraq war. Measures to control arthropods and diseases at wartime mainly included: scheduled spraying of pesticides, leishmanization and treatment of patients. Conclusion: Although measures used during the war to control arthropods were proper, however, due to needs and importance of military forces to new equipment and technologies, it is recommended to use deltamethrin-impreg­nated bed net, permethrin treated military uniforms and various insect repellents in future.

  18. Microbial Flora and Food Borne Pathogens on Minced Meat and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Food-borne pathogens are the leading cause of illness and death in developing countries. Changes in eating habits, mass catering, unsafe food storage conditions and poor hygiene practices are major contributing factors to food associated illnesses. In Ethiopia, the widespread habit of raw beef ...

  19. Assessment of awareness on food borne zoonosis and its relation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey qualitative survey was conducted to assess the awareness on food borne zoonosis and its relation with Veterinary Public Health Services in Addis Ababa and its surrounding districts from November 2008 to May 2009. Structured questionnaire was used in the study. Questionnaires were distributed to 384 ...

  20. Diseases from North America: focus on tick-borne infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathavitharana, Ruvandhi R; Mitty, Jennifer A

    2015-02-01

    Tick-borne infections are seen throughout the United States, with varying geographical locations. Many of these infections are also increasingly seen in Europe. Certain ticks (eg Ixodes) can transmit more than one infection. Diagnosis, particularly in early infection, can be challenging and therefore knowledge of the distinguishing clinical features and epidemiology of these diseases is important. Testing for Lyme disease often causes confusion for patients and medical providers, as serological tests may be negative in early infection and conversely may be positive for years after infection. Newer tests, such as the C6 ELISA, may play a role in Lyme diagnosis. Additionally, the value of a simple blood film should not be underestimated for diagnosing babesiosis and anaplasmosis. In certain situations, empiric therapy may be required for tick-borne infections as severe illness with multiorgan failure can occur, particularly in older and immunocompromised hosts. This review describes the more commonly seen tick-borne infections: Lyme, babesiosis, anaplasmosis and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. More recently identified tick-borne infections, such as southern tick-associated rash illness and Borrelia miyamotoi, are also covered. © 2015 Royal College of Physicians.

  1. Tick vaccines and the control of tick-borne pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Octavio; Alberdi, Pilar; Pérez de la Lastra, José M.; de la Fuente, José

    2013-01-01

    Ticks are obligate hematophagous ectoparasites that transmit a wide variety of pathogens to humans and animals. The incidence of tick-borne diseases has increased worldwide in both humans and domestic animals over the past years resulting in greater interest in the study of tick-host-pathogen interactions. Advances in vector and pathogen genomics and proteomics have moved forward our knowledge of the vector-pathogen interactions that take place during the colonization and transmission of arthropod-borne microbes. Tick-borne pathogens adapt from the vector to the mammalian host by differential gene expression thus modulating host processes. In recent years, studies have shown that targeting tick proteins by vaccination can not only reduce tick feeding and reproduction, but also the infection and transmission of pathogens from the tick to the vertebrate host. In this article, we review the tick-protective antigens that have been identified for the formulation of tick vaccines and the effect of these vaccines on the control of tick-borne pathogens. PMID:23847771

  2. Tick vaccines and the control of tick-borne pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio eMerino

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ticks are obligate hematophagous ectoparasites that transmit a wide variety of pathogens to humans and animals. The incidence of tick-borne diseases has increased worldwide in both humans and domestic animals over the past years resulting in greater interest in the study of tick–host–pathogen interactions. Advances in vector and pathogen genomics and proteomics have moved forward our knowledge of the vector-pathogen interactions that take place during the colonization and transmission of arthropod-borne microbes. Tick-borne pathogens adapt from the vector to the mammalian host by differential gene expression thus modulating host processes. In recent years, studies have shown that targeting tick proteins by vaccination can not only reduce tick feeding and reproduction, but also the infection and transmission of pathogens from the tick to the vertebrate host. In this article, we review the tick-protective antigens that have been identified for the formulation of tick vaccines and the effect of these vaccines on the control of tick-borne pathogens.

  3. Management of ticks and tick-borne diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, H.S.; Stafford, K.C.; Goodman, J.L.; Dennis, D.T.; Sonenshine, D .E.

    2005-01-01

    The mainstays of tick management and protection from tick-borne diseases have traditionally been personal precautions and the application of acaricides. These techniques maintain their value, and current innovations hold considerable promise for future improvement in effective targeting of materials for tick control. Furthermore, an explosion of research in the past few decades has resulted in the development and expansion of several novel and potentially valuable approaches to tick control, including vaccination against tick-borne pathogen transmission and against tick attachment, host management, use of natural enemies (especially entomopathogenic fungi), and pheromone-based techniques. The situations that require tick management are diverse, and occur under varied ecological conditions. Therefore, the likelihood of finding a single ?magic bullet? for tick management is low. In practical terms, the approach to tick management or to management of tick-borne disease must be tailored to the specific conditions at hand. One area that needs increased attention is the decision-making process in applying IPM to tick control. Further development of novel tick control measures, and increased efficiency in their integration and application to achieve desired goals, holds great promise for effective future management of ticks and tick-borne diseases.

  4. Jesus: Born Poor or Rich? | Osai | African Research Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... result of the fact that there were no vacancies hence he took his wife to the manger; that Jesus journeyed far and wide internationally and had privileged education and, in view of the foregoing, the paper posits that Joseph Carpenter was a wealthy professional and that his son, Jesus of Nazareth, was, therefore, born rich.

  5. Rapid Identification of Vector-Borne Flaviviruses by Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    acterized samples that have been tested on other diagnostic plat - forms, the detection of viruses such as Tembusu and Langat viruses demonstrates the...Bennett A, Briese T, Ian Lipkin W. Assessment of poly- microbial infections in ticks in New York State. Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis; 2009. [34] Turell

  6. Awareness about feeding options for infants born to HIV positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Objective: To assess awareness of prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV. Methods: A cross-sectional .... This gives 99% power of detecting the difference in odds ratio of 2 in .... Figure 2: Feeding options fro infants below 6 months born to HIV positive mothers as reported by the study participants categorized by ...

  7. Selected food-borne parasites associated with cockroaches and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Selected food-borne parasites associated with cockroaches and houseflies in Ignatius Ajuru University of Education, Port Harcourt. ... The supernatant were decanted and the residue viewed under microscope for parasites. Data were analysis with analysis of variance, measures of central tendency and least square ...

  8. Ubiquity of the water-borne pathogens, Cryptosporidium and Giardia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of the diarrhoea disease caused by the water-borne pathogens Cryptosporidium and Giardia in KwaZulu-Natal, was determined from pathology laboratory data. Cryptosporidium and Giardia were found to be endemic in KwaZulu-Natal with laboratory-confirmed incidences ranging from 2.9 to 3.7% and 2.9 to ...

  9. Balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope with nuclear emulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Satoru; Group, for the Emulsion Gamma-ray Telescope

    2010-01-01

    By detecting the beginning of electron pairs with nuclear emulsion, precise gamma-ray direction and gamma-ray polarization can be detected. With recent advancement in emulsion scanning system, emulsion analyzing capability is becoming powerful. Now we are developing the balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope with nuclear emulsion. Overview and status of our telescope is described.

  10. Recent characterization of cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Woodiness disease is the most important disorder of passion fruit worldwide. The causal agent in Brazil is the Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV), and despite the economic relevance of passion fruit for agriculture there have been recently very few studies about this virus in Brazil and worldwide. This work reveals ...

  11. Women doctors have a rougher time – new association born

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medical Women's Association to tackle such issues – and collectively help advance caring, effective healthcare delivery. Born of a query to Ramakgopa by a Nigerian colleague at the World Health Assembly in Geneva early last year, the association will be formally launched in Pretoria on. 9 August, National Women's Day.

  12. Lung function and exercise capacity in young adults born prematurely

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijlandt, EJLE; Gerritsen, J; Boezen, HM; Grevink, RG; Duiverman, EJ

    2006-01-01

    Rationale: Limited information is available about the long-term outcome of lung function and exercise capacity in young adults born prematurely. Objective: To determine long-term effects of prematurity on lung function (volumes, diffusing capacity) and exercise capacity in expreterms compared with

  13. Genetic Characterization of the Tick-Borne Orbiviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaganahalli, Manjunatha N.; Maan, Sushila; Maan, Narender S.; Brownlie, Joe; Tesh, Robert; Attoui, Houssam; Mertens, Peter P. C.

    2015-01-01

    The International Committee for Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) recognizes four species of tick-borne orbiviruses (TBOs): Chenuda virus, Chobar Gorge virus, Wad Medani virus and Great Island virus (genus Orbivirus, family Reoviridae). Nucleotide (nt) and amino acid (aa) sequence comparisons provide a basis for orbivirus detection and classification, however full genome sequence data were only available for the Great Island virus species. We report representative genome-sequences for the three other TBO species (virus isolates: Chenuda virus (CNUV); Chobar Gorge virus (CGV) and Wad Medani virus (WMV)). Phylogenetic comparisons show that TBOs cluster separately from insect-borne orbiviruses (IBOs). CNUV, CGV, WMV and GIV share low level aa/nt identities with other orbiviruses, in ‘conserved’ Pol, T2 and T13 proteins/genes, identifying them as four distinct virus-species. The TBO genome segment encoding cell attachment, outer capsid protein 1 (OC1), is approximately half the size of the equivalent segment from insect-borne orbiviruses, helping to explain why tick-borne orbiviruses have a ~1 kb smaller genome. PMID:25928203

  14. Born Free: An Assessment of Political Identity Formation and Party ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa's first post-apartheid generation was eligible to vote for the first time in the 2014 general elections. Born in 1994, this generation never lived under an institutionalised system of apartheid, yet they continue to grapple with the legacies of the apartheid system in contemporary South Africa. This paper presents ...

  15. An Early Intervention Guide to Infants Born with Clefts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Hallie E.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the goals of early intervention for infants born with a cleft or craniofacial anomaly, which include facilitating feeding, counseling the family regarding expectations for growth and development, and identifying the nature and extent of family resources required. Program features of effective intervention are described. (Author/CR)

  16. Seed-borne mycoflora of local and improved wheat ( Triticum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three varieties each of local and improved wheat (Triticum sativum) cultivars were investigated for seed-borne pathogenic mycoflora using the plate technique and laid on completely randomized design. A total 99 fungal isolate grouped into five fungal species namely; Rhizopus nigricans, Mucor spp, Penillium jenseni, ...

  17. Structures of fifteen oligosaccharides isolated from new-born meconium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Herlant-Peers, M.-C.; Montreuil, J.; Strecker, G.; Dorland, L.; Halbeek, H. van; Veldink, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    New born meconium contains at least a hundred oTigosaccharides. In this study the isolation and characterization of the major constituents is described. The structure elucidation of 15 neutral and acidic oligosaccharides was carried out by methylation analysis, mass spectrometry and 360-MHz 1H-NMR

  18. The second Born approximation of electron–argon elastic scattering ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study the elastic scattering of atomic argon by electron in the presence of a bichromatic laser field in the second Born approximation. The target atom is approximated by a simple screening potential and the continuum states of the impinging and emitting electrons are described as Volkov states. We evaluate the S-matrix ...

  19. Arthropod Borne Diseases in Imposed War during 1980-88

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Khoobdel

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Personnel of military forces have close contact with natural habitat and usually encounter with bite of arthropods and prone to be infected with arthropod borne diseases. The imposed war against Iran was one of the most important and the longest war in the Middle East and even in the world and military people faced various diseases. The aim of this study was to review prevalence of arthropod borne diseases and to collect relevant information and valuable experiences during the imposed war.Methods: The present survey is a historical research and cross-sectional study, focused on arthropod fauna, situation of different arthropod borne diseases and also the ways which military personnel used to protect themselves against them. The information was adopted from valid military health files and also interviewing people who participated in the war.Results: Scabies, cutaneous leishmaniasis, sandfly fever and pediculosis were more prevalent among other arthropod -borne diseases in Iran-Iraq war. Measures to control arthropods and diseases at wartime mainly included: scheduled spraying of pesticides, leishmanization and treatment of patients.Conclusion: Although measures used during the war to control arthropods were proper, however, due to needs and importance of military forces to new equipment and technologies, it is recommended to use deltamethrin-impreg­nated bed net, permethrin treated military uniforms and various insect repellents in future.

  20. Photosensitized inactivation of infectious blood-borne human parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judy, Millard M.; Sogandares-Bernal, Franklin M.; Matthews, James Lester

    1995-05-01

    Blood-borne viruses and protozoan parasites that are infectious to humans pose risk world-wide of infection transmission through blood and blood product transfusion. Blood-borne infectious viruses include human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-I), which causes AIDS; hepatitis C virus, which can cause chronic hepatitis; and cytomegalovirus, which can be dangerous to immunocompromised patients, e.g., the newborn, transplant recipients, and AIDS patients. Infectious blood-borne protozoan parasites include Trypanosoma cruzi, which causes Chagas' disease, endemic throughout Central and South America; the Trypanosoma species causing African sleeping sickness endemic in Central Africa; and Plasmodium falciparum, which causes malignant and increasingly drug- resistant human malaria prevalent throughout the tropics. Some researchers have focused on using photosensitizers to inactivate HIV-I and other viruses in whole blood, packed red cells, and platelet concentrates without compromising blood product function. Our group previously has reported photosensitized in vitro inactivation of P. falciparum and the mouse malaria organism Plasmodium berghei in whole blood using hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) and of T. cruzi using benzoporphyrin derivatives BPDMA and BPDDA, dihematoporphyrin ether (DHE), and hydroxyethylvinyldeuteroporphyrin (HEVD). These results suggest that continued investigation is warranted to evaluate the potential for photosensitized inactivation of blood-borne parasites in blood banking.