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Sample records for subject gift acceptance

  1. Peer Acceptance of Highly Gifted Children in Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, James J.

    2015-01-01

    The variables associated with peer acceptance and rejection have been the subject of considerable investigation over the past few years, therefore, the present study was designed to answer three questions: (1) How socially accepted are highly gifted children in the elementary-school classroom? (2) What is the intellectual level of the children…

  2. 10 CFR 1050.202 - Allowable acceptance of gifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and retain gifts from foreign governments where the gift is tendered or received as a souvenir or mark... part, an employee may accept gifts of more than minimal value, tendered as a souvenir or mark of...

  3. The ethics of accepting gifts from pharmaceutical companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, L H

    1991-12-01

    How physicians respond to the promotional activities of the pharmaceutical industry is the subject of ongoing debate and controversy. This paper postulates that the acceptance of gifts in virtually any form violates fundamental duties of the physician of nonmaleficence, fidelity, justice, and self-improvement. The medical community must articulate this position clearly, and it should act accordingly.

  4. Single-Subject Research in Gifted Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Brandi; Little, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Single-subject research (SSR) is an experimental research tradition that is well established in other fields (e.g., special education, behavior analysis) but has rarely been applied to topics in gifted education. In this Methodological Brief, Brandi Simonsen and Catherine A. Little from the University of Connecticut highlight the key features of…

  5. 41 CFR 102-75.1155 - May an acceptable gift of property be converted to money?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of property be converted to money? 102-75.1155 Section 102-75.1155 Public Contracts and Property...-75.1155 May an acceptable gift of property be converted to money? GSA can determine whether or not a gift of property can and should be converted to money. After conversion, GSA must deposit the funds...

  6. Journalism ethics and acceptance of gifts: a view from Madrid journalists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Herrera Damas

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to present the partial results of a larger research project on journalistic ethics from the point of view of the professionals themselves. Specifically, the following pages analyze the perception of Madrid journalists with respect to the legitimacy of accepting various gifts when carrying out their work. The results of 30 in-depth interviews and 410 surveys of newspaper, radio, television, online and press office journalists who carry out their professional activity in the Autonomous Community of Madrid show that this group is very reluctant to accept gifts with a monetary value of over €200, or to carry out activities financed by a news source. Fewer problems arise regarding acceptance of presents of nominal value of a promotional merchandising nature, free tickets to shows and exhibitions, or paid meals and trips.

  7. Evaluating Interventions for Young Gifted Children Using Single-Subject Methodology: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Rosalind L.; Kemp, Coral

    2013-01-01

    Single-subject experimental designs have long been used in special education to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions for exceptional children. However, the design has not been used widely in gifted education. In this article, an overview of the main features of single-subject design is presented, and its potential for application in gifted…

  8. Freedom Reconsidered: Heteronomy, Open Subjectivity, and the "Gift of Teaching"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guoping

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes the entanglement of the modern concepts of freedom, autonomy, and the modern notion of the subject and how a passion for and insistence on freedom has undermined the reconstruction of human subjectivity in Heidegger and Foucault, and how such passion has also limited the educational effort at addressing the problems brought to…

  9. Creative attitude in a group of youths gifted in the domain of science subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Monika Sztolpa; Aleksandra Lewandowska-Walter; Małgorzata Lipowska

    2016-01-01

    Background We attempted to assess whether students identified by their teachers as gifted in the domain of science are characterised by significantly higher levels of intelligence and creativity than other students. We investigated the features of their personalities that are indicators of their exhibited creative or reproductive attitude in the cognitive and the motivational domains. As a consequence, criteria will be developed for identifying gifted students. Participants and...

  10. Creative attitude in a group of youths gifted in the domain of science subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Sztolpa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background We attempted to assess whether students identified by their teachers as gifted in the domain of science are characterised by significantly higher levels of intelligence and creativity than other students. We investigated the features of their personalities that are indicators of their exhibited creative or reproductive attitude in the cognitive and the motivational domains. As a consequence, criteria will be developed for identifying gifted students. Participants and procedure Ninety-seven students, aged 13-17, took part in the study. The students were previously identified by their teachers as gifted. Levels of intellectual functioning were assessed using a battery of tests for diagnosing intelligence (APIS-P and Raven’s Standard Progressive Matrices (SPM. Creativity was estimated using the Test for Creative Thinking – Drawing Production (TCT-DP, and creative attitude was assessed using the KANH questionnaire. Results Analysis of the results revealed that students nominated by their teachers scored significantly higher than their peers in general intelligence and creativity tests. Moreover, they were characterised by a more frequent choice of heuristic behaviours in the cognitive domain and nonconformity in the motivational domain. Additionally, there was a statistical trend a general creative attitude among the nominated students. Conclusions We found that gifted students scored high on general intelligence and creativity tests. Consistency between the teachers’ nominations and our results indicates that the criteria for identifying gifted students are appropriate. Moreover, instructing teachers about a creative attitude helped them to also identify gifted students with higher levels of nonconformity and who create their own heuristics for behaviour. These characteristics are valuable for innovative activity, which is what programmes for gifted students try to encourage.

  11. Gifted Education in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyringer, Sieglinde

    2013-01-01

    In Austria, gifted education and the education of highly gifted and talented children have been receiving an increasing public awareness and social acceptance over the past decade. The article highlights the existing ideas of giftedness in Austria, and it presents several initiatives having triggered and influenced this positive development. The…

  12. An empirical research on relationships between subjective judgement, technology acceptance tendency and knowledge transfer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yu-Hsi Yuan; Sang-Bing Tsai; Chien-Yun Dai; Hsiao-Ming Chen; Wan-Fei Chen; Chia-Huei Wu; Guodong Li; Jiangtao Wang

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among employees' usage intention pertaining to mobile information devices, focusing on subjective judgement, technology acceptance tendency...

  13. Does prompting for revision influence subjects' offers in willingness to accept - willingness to pay lab experiments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    David C. Kingsley; Thomas C. Brown

    2012-01-01

    The willingness to accept - willingness to pay disparity raises questions about accepted economic theory. Plott and Zeiler (2005) have suggested that the disparity is the result of subject misconception about experimental procedures and, in an experiment designed to control for subject misconception, they show that the disparity can be turned on and off. This paper...

  14. The Gift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komter, Aafke E.

    1996-01-01

    What moves us to give gifts to other people? The Gift brings together perspectives on gift exchange and reciprocity from different social scientific disciplines. The first part of this book contains anthropological and sociological 'classics' on gift giving and reciprocity. In the second part the

  15. Towards the Achievement of a Unified, Uniform and Socially-Just ‘Gifted Education’ Policy Acceptable on a Global Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. CHOWDHURY

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article examines socio-economic and political influences on gifted education. It highlights the widespread disparity between advantaged and disadvantaged ‘gifted and talented’ students in terms of the extent to which they benefit from gifted education. Negative perceptions of social egalitarianism and societal misconceptions in giftedness are critically analysed. Cultural aspects related to gifted education are emphasized with a particular focus on the specific ‘science’ domain of giftedness. The article proposes and outlines future research in gifted education to address the issues of ‘cultural-clashes’ and ‘cross-cultural border crossing’ encountered by gifted and other students in their daily lives. Future outcomes from the proposed research might help teachers adapting their teaching styles and pedagogies to address the needs of gifted students, and assist future longitudinal research related to their cognitive, affective and social development.

  16. The Gifted Black Child: Problems and Promise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, John R.

    In this paper, it is noted that there are three reasons for studying the black gifted child. First, black destiny has in part been shaped by talented blacks--for example, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King. Second, the black gifted are a minority within a minority. The gifted black female, subject to sexism, is even more of a minority. Third,…

  17. Subjective acceptability of various regular twelve-tone tuning systems in two-part musical fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, J

    1988-06-01

    Musically trained subjects rated the overall acceptability of the performance of two-part musical fragments. With the help of a computer these fragments were produced with intonations according to various regular 12-tone tuning systems: Pythagorean tuning (tempering T of the fifths equal to 0.0 cent), equal temperament (T = -2.0 cents), Silbermann (T = -3.9 cents), mean-tone (T = -5.4 cents), and Salinas tuning (T = -7.2 cents). In experiment 1, two systems in which T = 2.0 or T = -10.0 cents were also included. In both the lower and the higher parts of the fragments we used complex tones with a spectral-envelope slope of -6 dB/oct. Mean acceptability ratings were about the same for -5.4 less than or equal to T less than or equal to 0.0 cent, whereas for T greater than 0.0 and T less than -5.4 cents the ratings strongly decreased. This effect of tuning system was also found when acceptability was determined by means of the method of paired comparisons. The specific effect of tuning system was not affected by the tempo of the fragments. The perception of beats in the harmonic intervals was manipulated in experiment 2 by varying the spectral content of the tones. The condition in which the interference of the nearly coinciding harmonics was canceled resulted in higher acceptability. The effect of tuning system was the same as in experiment 1. In both experiments overall acceptability could be accurately predicted from a linear combination of the purity ratings of the isolated harmonic fifths and major thirds. It is not precluded, however, that for T greater than 0.0 and T less than -5.4 cents, the subjects based their acceptability ratings partly on the subjective purity of the melodic intervals.

  18. The effect of Group Hope Therapy on subjective wellbeing, acceptance and rumination in HIV+ patients

    OpenAIRE

    Roghayeh Ataie Moghanloo; Vahid Ataie Moghanloo; Jalil Babapour -Kheiroddin; Hamid Poursharifi; Maliheh Pishvaei

    2014-01-01

    Background: Women and men afflicted with HIV bear specific physical, mental and social problems. The aim of this research was to determine the effects of group hope therapy on subjective wellbeing, acceptance and rumination in HIV+ patients. Methods: The present study was a randomized clinical trial research with a pretest-posttest and control group. The study population included all the people infected with AIDS virus (HIV+) who referred to counseling and treatment center of behavioral di...

  19. The effect of Group Hope Therapy on subjective wellbeing, acceptance and rumination in HIV+ patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roghayeh Ataie Moghanloo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Women and men afflicted with HIV bear specific physical, mental and social problems. The aim of this research was to determine the effects of group hope therapy on subjective wellbeing, acceptance and rumination in HIV+ patients. Methods: The present study was a randomized clinical trial research with a pretest-posttest and control group. The study population included all the people infected with AIDS virus (HIV+ who referred to counseling and treatment center of behavioral disorders in Tabriz. The samples were selected through convenience sampling method. Total of 30 participants with the criteria for inclusion in the study were selected and randomly placed in one of the two groups (control and experimental groups. The research tools consisted of Reef Psychological Wellbeing Scale and acceptance and focus on thinking subscales of Emotion Regulation Strategies Questionnaire. The experimental group received 8 sessions of group hope therapy (independent variable. Data were analyzed by SPSS-19 software using multivariable covariance analysis (MANCOVA. Results: Results of multivariate covariance analysis (MANCOVA showed that group hope therapy positively affected the subjective wellbeing, acceptance and rumination in HIV+ patients (P<0.001. Conclusion: It seems hope therapy could be useful as a new treatment in domains of supportive psychological therapies in patients infected with HIV.

  20. Multicenter study of subjective acceptance during magnetic resonance imaging at 7 and 9.4 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschenberg, Jaane; Nagel, Armin M; Ladd, Susanne C; Theysohn, Jens M; Ladd, Mark E; Möller, Harald E; Trampel, Robert; Turner, Robert; Pohmann, Rolf; Scheffler, Klaus; Brechmann, André; Stadler, Jörg; Felder, Jörg; Shah, N Jon; Semmler, Wolfhard

    2014-05-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the subjective discomfort and sensory side effects during ultrahigh field (UHF) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations in a large-scale study and to evaluate differences between magnetic resonance (MR) sites. Four MR sites with a 7-T MR system and 2 MR sites with a 9.4-T MR system participated in this multicenter study with a total number of 3457 completed questionnaires on causes of discomfort and sensations during the examination. For a pooled retrospective analysis of the results from the partially different questionnaires, all data were adapted to an answer option with a 4-point scale (0 = no discomfort/side effect, 3 = very unpleasant/very strong sensation). To differentiate effects evoked by the low-frequency time-varying magnetic fields due to movement through the static magnetic field, most questionnaires separated the manifestation of sensory side effects during movement on the patient table from manifestation while lying still in the isocenter. In general, a high acceptance of UHF examinations was found, where in 82% of the completed questionnaires, the subjects stated the examination to be at least tolerable. Although in 7.6% of the questionnaires, subjects felt discomfort during the examination, only 0.9% of the image acquisitions had to be terminated prematurely. No adverse events occurred in any of the examinations. Only 1% of the subjects were unwilling to undergo further UHF MRI examinations. Examination duration was the most complained cause of discomfort, followed by acoustic noise and lying still. All magnetic-field-related sensations were more pronounced when moving the patient table versus the isocenter position (19%/2% of the subjects felt unpleasant vertigo during the moving/stationary state). In general, vertigo was the most often stated sensory side effect and was more pronounced at 9.4 T compared with 7 T. However, the results varied substantially among the different sites. The high levels

  1. Acceptance of background noise, working memory capacity, and auditory evoked potentials in subjects with normal hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brännström, K Jonas; Zunic, Edita; Borovac, Aida; Ibertsson, Tina

    2012-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) test is a method for quantifying the amount of background noise that subjects accept when listening to speech. Large variations in ANL have been seen between normal-hearing subjects and between studies of normal-hearing subjects, but few explanatory variables have been identified. To explore a possible relationship between a Swedish version of the ANL test, working memory capacity (WMC), and auditory evoked potentials (AEPs). ANL, WMC, and AEP were tested in a counterbalanced order across subjects. Twenty-one normal-hearing subjects participated in the study (14 females and 7 males; aged 20-39 yr with an average of 25.7 yr). Reported data consists of age, pure-tone average (PTA), most comfortable level (MCL), background noise level (BNL), ANL (i.e., MCL - BNL), AEP latencies, AEP amplitudes, and WMC. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was calculated between the collected variables to investigate associations. A principal component analysis (PCA) with Varimax rotation was conducted on the collected variables to explore underlying factors and estimate interactions between the tested variables. Subjects were also pooled into two groups depending on their results on the WMC test, one group with a score lower than the average and one with a score higher than the average. Comparisons between these two groups were made using the Mann-Whitney U-test with Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. A negative association was found between ANL and WMC but not between AEP and ANL or WMC. Furthermore, ANL is derived from MCL and BNL, and a significant positive association was found between BNL and WMC. However, no significant associations were seen between AEP latencies and amplitudes and the demographic variables, MCL, and BNL. The PCA identified two underlying factors: One that contained MCL, BNL, ANL, and WMC and another that contained latency for wave Na and amplitudes for waves V and Na-Pa. Using the variables in the first factor

  2. Is Being Gifted a Social Handicap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Laurence J.; Cross, Tracy L.

    2014-01-01

    The paper explores the question of how gifted and talented adolescents experience being gifted in high school. Fifteen subjects were interviewed twice while attending a special summer program in order to answer this general question. The data were analyzed and interpreted using a set of research questions which postulated that the subjects would…

  3. Loss, uncertainty, or acceptance: subjective experience of changes to fertility after breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perz, J; Ussher, J; Gilbert, E

    2014-07-01

    This qualitative study examines the subjective experience of infertility in a large sample of Australian women with breast cancer. Participants were 1830 women, average age 54, who responded to an email invitation to complete an online survey on sexual well-being and fertility concerns after breast cancer. 24.6% (n = 452) reported that cancer had affected their fertility; 21.3% (n = 391) did not know their fertility status. In thematic analysis of open-ended responses provided by 381 women about changes to fertility status, reactions to infertility, and experiences of information and interventions to assist fertility, five themes were identified: 'Negative responses to infertility and early menopause'; 'Sexual changes associated with menopause and infertility'; 'Uncertainty and anxiety about fertility status'; 'Information and fertility preservation'; 'Acceptance of the end of fertility'. These findings confirm previous reports that infertility and premature menopause are a significant cause of anxiety for many women with breast cancer. However, some women closer to natural menopause, or who had completed their families, reported acceptance of changed fertility status. Accounts of deficits in information provision and fertility counselling suggest an urgent need for accessible and comprehensive information about fertility and cancer to be developed and evaluated, as well as education and training of health professionals in addressing fertility concerns following cancer. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Tolerability and cosmetic acceptability of a body wash in atopic dermatitis-prone subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Staci; Meckfessel, Matthew H; Lio, Peter A

    2014-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common skin disease characterized by eczematous eruptions and impaired skin barrier function. Patients, as well as their families, frequently report reductions in quality of life. Pruritus, lack of sleep, and impaired social functioning all contribute to this reduction. A skincare regimen of gentle cleansing and daily moisturization is integral to managing atopic dermatitis. While there are a multitude of reports supporting the use of moisturizers, there is a paucity regarding the use of cleansers, especially cleansers formulated with ingredients known to improve skin hydration. A clinical study was conducted to assess the tolerability and cosmetic acceptability of a body wash formulated with the filaggrin break-down products arginine and pyrrolidone carboxylic acid in subjects with atopic dermatitis-prone skin (Cetaphil® RestoraDerm® Body Wash). The results of this study indicate that Cetaphil RestoraDerm Body Wash was well tolerated, reduced itch, improved quality of life, and was well-liked by subjects with atopic dermatitis-prone skin.

  5. Is Being Gifted Always an Advantage? Peer Relations and Self-Concept of Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Košir, Katja; Horvat, Marina; Aram, Urška; Jurinec, Nina

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences between identified gifted adolescents and adolescents not identified as gifted in terms of social acceptance and self-concept (peer relations, academic, and general). In addition, we aimed to investigate the differences between two groups of students identified according to different…

  6. An empirical research on relationships between subjective judgement, technology acceptance tendency and knowledge transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chien-Yun; Chen, Hsiao-Ming; Chen, Wan-Fei; Wu, Chia-Huei; Li, Guodong; Wang, Jiangtao

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among employees' usage intention pertaining to mobile information devices, focusing on subjective judgement, technology acceptance tendency, information sharing behavior and information transfer. A research model was established to verify several hypotheses. The research model based on integrated concepts of knowledge management and technology acceptance modeling. Participants were employees of enterprises in Taiwan, selected by combining snowball and convenience sampling. Data obtained from 779 e-surveys. Multiple-regression analysis was employed for hypothesis verification. The results indicate that perceived ease-of-use of mobile devices was affected by computer self-efficacy and computer playfulness directly; meanwhile, perceived ease-of-use directly affects perceived usefulness. In addition, perceived ease-of-use and perceived usefulness can predict information-sharing behavior in a positive manner, and impact knowledge transfer as well. Based on the research findings, it suggested that enterprises should utilize mobile information devices to create more contact with customers and enrich their service network. In addition, it is recommended that managers use mobile devices to transmit key information to their staff and that they use these devices for problem-solving and decision-making. Further, the staff’s skills pertaining to the operation of mobile information devices and to fully implement their features are reinforced in order to inspire the users' knowledge transfer. Enhancing the playfulness of the interface is also important. In general, it is useful to promote knowledge transfer behavior within an organization by motivating members to share information and ideas via mobile information devices. In addition, a well-designed interface can facilitate employees' use of these devices. PMID:28886088

  7. An empirical research on relationships between subjective judgement, technology acceptance tendency and knowledge transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yu-Hsi; Tsai, Sang-Bing; Dai, Chien-Yun; Chen, Hsiao-Ming; Chen, Wan-Fei; Wu, Chia-Huei; Li, Guodong; Wang, Jiangtao

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among employees' usage intention pertaining to mobile information devices, focusing on subjective judgement, technology acceptance tendency, information sharing behavior and information transfer. A research model was established to verify several hypotheses. The research model based on integrated concepts of knowledge management and technology acceptance modeling. Participants were employees of enterprises in Taiwan, selected by combining snowball and convenience sampling. Data obtained from 779 e-surveys. Multiple-regression analysis was employed for hypothesis verification. The results indicate that perceived ease-of-use of mobile devices was affected by computer self-efficacy and computer playfulness directly; meanwhile, perceived ease-of-use directly affects perceived usefulness. In addition, perceived ease-of-use and perceived usefulness can predict information-sharing behavior in a positive manner, and impact knowledge transfer as well. Based on the research findings, it suggested that enterprises should utilize mobile information devices to create more contact with customers and enrich their service network. In addition, it is recommended that managers use mobile devices to transmit key information to their staff and that they use these devices for problem-solving and decision-making. Further, the staff's skills pertaining to the operation of mobile information devices and to fully implement their features are reinforced in order to inspire the users' knowledge transfer. Enhancing the playfulness of the interface is also important. In general, it is useful to promote knowledge transfer behavior within an organization by motivating members to share information and ideas via mobile information devices. In addition, a well-designed interface can facilitate employees' use of these devices.

  8. Subjective Well-Being of Gifted American College Students: An Examination of Psychometric Properties of the PWI-A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayler, Micheal F.; Boazman, Janette; Natesan, Prathiba; Periathiruvadi, Sita

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Personal Well-being Index for Adults (PWI-A), a measure of subjective well-being. The study used data from 533 high-ability American college students: honors students and participants in an early college entrance program. In earlier studies using the PWI-A, the instrument appeared to show…

  9. Wandering in the Shadow of Egalitarianism and Equity: A Social and Cultural Explanation to the Underdeveloped Gifted Education in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tian

    2017-01-01

    Today it is accepted that the development of gifted and talented children is important to enable a nation to compete successfully. In China, though the estimated number of gifted children reaches 20 million (Chu, 2012), gifted education has seldom received sufficient support. The objections to gifted education always suppress suggestions that…

  10. 78 FR 12664 - Human Subject Protection; Acceptance of Data From Clinical Studies for Medical Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ... regulations on acceptance of data from clinical studies for medical devices. We are proposing to require that... Medical Devices B. Reasons for Proposing To Revise the Regulations II. Description of the Proposed Rule A... regulations for PMA of medical devices in part 814 (21 CFR part 814) permit the acceptance of data from...

  11. Is It Good to Be Gifted? The Social Construction of the Gifted Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Jane

    2012-01-01

    There is growing evidence that children labelled as academically gifted are subjected to negative attitudes from others and that this impacts on their self-esteem and motivation to succeed. Through an analysis of British newspaper stories about gifted children, this article explores the socially constructed nature of the concept of the "gifted…

  12. The Elephant Gift: How to Reach the At Risk Gifted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Miller, Gae

    2007-01-01

    Some gifts with which children are born are not all that great. There are many categories of at risk gifted children, each with a separate set of needs. Among these categories are profoundly gifted, gifted with LD, gifted and emotionally disabled, and an increasing number of gifted youngsters who try unrealistically to be perfect. In what ways can…

  13. Evaluation of performance, safety, subject acceptance, and compliance of a disposable autoinjector for subcutaneous injections in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berteau, Cecile; Schwarzenbach, Florence; Donazzolo, Yves; Latreille, Mathilde; Berube, Julie; Abry, Herve; Cotten, Joël; Feger, Celine; Laurent, Philippe E

    2010-10-05

    A disposable autoinjector was developed for subcutaneous (SC) self-injection by patients with chronic diseases. To verify its performance and evaluate its acceptance, a clinical study was conducted in healthy volunteers, comparing SC injections performed by subjects using the autoinjector with SC injections performed by nurses using a syringe. This was a randomized, single-center, crossover study comparing SC self-injection using an autoinjector with SC nurse-administered injection using a syringe. Two volumes (0.2 mL and 1 mL) were injected into healthy volunteers. Study objectives included assessment of the accuracy and consistency of the volume injected by the injection systems, and skin reaction and pain associated with the injection. The fluid depot in the SC tissue layer was evaluated by ultrasound. Subject acceptance was evaluated using questionnaires on attitudes and emotions towards the injection technique, and challenged by seeking the subjects' preferred system for a final study injection or future treatment. A total of 960 injections (480 with autoinjector, 480 with syringe) were performed in 40 subjects. There were no significant differences in mean fluid leakage and injected volumes between the systems. Pain associated with the injection was significantly lower with the auto-injector than with the syringe. Local skin reaction at the injection site was overall satisfactory. Injections were appropriately performed by all subjects. At study end, all 40 subjects preferred the autoinjector for a final study injection and for future treatment. This study indicated that the autoinjector used by the subject was similar to a syringe used by a nurse in terms of performance and safety in administering the injections, and better in terms of pain, overall acceptance, and preference.

  14. Evaluation of performance, safety, subject acceptance, and compliance of a disposable autoinjector for subcutaneous injections in healthy volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Berteau, Cecile; Schwarzenbach, Florence; Donazzolo, Yves; Latreille, Mathilde; Berube, Julie; Abry, Herve; Cotten, Jo?l; Feger, Celine; Laurent, Philippe E

    2010-01-01

    Objective: A disposable autoinjector was developed for subcutaneous (SC) self-injection by patients with chronic diseases. To verify its performance and evaluate its acceptance, a clinical study was conducted in healthy volunteers, comparing SC injections performed by subjects using the autoinjector with SC injections performed by nurses using a syringe. Methods: This was a randomized, single-center, crossover study comparing SC self-injection using an autoinjector with SC nurse-administered ...

  15. School Readiness for Gifted Children: Considering the Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porath, Marion

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses issues relevant to gifted children's readiness for school. It raises a number of questions that challenge thinking about what is meant by school readiness. Gifted children can often be ready for school entrance before the age traditionally considered appropriate. Their complex developmental profiles challenge accepted notions…

  16. Parenting Young Gifted Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Linda Kreger

    1986-01-01

    Provides information on the following for parents and care-givers of gifted children: (1) recognizing giftedness; (2) dealing with nongifted children in the family; (3) effect of chronic early ear infection on IQ; (4) introversion; (5) "normalizing" gifted children; (6) need for gifted peers; and (7) responsive parenting. A list of guidelines for…

  17. U.S. Naval Academy Officials Did Not Adhere to Contracting and Gift Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    our monetary donations and in- kind gift testing through December 31, 2010, to determine the effects from changes the USNA implemented because of our...on the contract. In addition, they allowed the acceptance of in- kind gifts without proper authorization, did not properly record all in- kind gifts...3 1, 2010, USNA received 381 monetary g ifts, totaling $5.7 million, and 153 in- kind gift donations, valued at $25.1 million. What We Found USNA

  18. [Usability and acceptability of portable exoskeletons for gait training in subjects with spinal cord injury: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardomingo-Medialdea, H; Fernandez-Gonzalez, P; Molina-Rueda, F

    2018-01-16

    Spinal cord injury limits severely life expectancy and it causes in a restriction in the activities of the daily life of the subjects who suffer it. Training the gait with portable exoskeletons in subjects with spinal cord injury is a new approach to rehabilitation. To examine the usability and acceptability of these devices for gait training in subjects with spinal cord injury. A literature search was conducted until February 2017 in the databases: Medline (PubMed, EBSCO), PEDro, Scopus and Web of Science. The methodological quality, the level of scientific evidence and the strength of recommendation were evaluated. Finally, eight studies were considered recruiting a total of 45 patients. The training programs had an average of 35 sessions and a duration 60 minutes approximately. In general, no adverse events and no relevant increases in pain, blood pressure, heart rate or fatigue were reported. In addition, the satisfaction with the intervention and the perception of quality of life of the participants were quite high. The rehabilitation of the gait with portable exoskeletons seems to be a safe intervention that generates acceptance and satisfaction among patients with spinal cord injury.

  19. Relationship between Objective and Subjective Atmospheric Visibility and Its Influence on Willingness to Accept or Pay in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangkang Yu

    Full Text Available This study is to distinguish the objective and subjective measures of atmospheric visibility, and investigate the relationship between the two measures as well as the effect on the people's behavioral intentions on air pollution in China. A mixed method was adopted in this study combining both lab experiments to measure objective atmospheric visibility and a questionnaire survey to measure subjective atmospheric visibility. The regression results show that: (a The people's perception of atmospheric visibility is based on objective information about the ambient air (Relative Humidity, PM2.5, Atmospheric Visibility and there are some turning points that could enable people to distinguish good and poor air quality; (b The people's perception of visibility has a significant effect on either their willingness-to-accept (WTA the visibility or on their willingness-to-pay (WTP for improving the air quality;

  20. An acceptance-based intervention for children and adolescents with cancer experiencing acute pain - a single-subject study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsell Cederberg, Jenny; Dahl, JoAnne; von Essen, Louise; Ljungman, Gustaf

    2017-01-01

    Children and adolescents with cancer report pain as one of their most recurrent and troublesome symptoms throughout the cancer trajectory. Pain evokes psychological distress, which in turn has an amplifying effect on the pain experience. Acceptance-based interventions for experimentally induced acute pain predict increased pain tolerance, decreased pain intensity and decreased discomfort of pain. The aim of this study was to preliminarily evaluate an acceptance-based intervention for children and adolescents with cancer experiencing acute pain, with regard to feasibility and effect on pain intensity and discomfort of pain. This is a single-subject study with an AB design with a nonconcurrent multiple baseline. Children and adolescents aged four to 18 years undergoing cancer treatment at the Children's University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden, reporting sustained acute pain were offered participation. Pain intensity and discomfort of pain were measured during baseline and at post-intervention. The intervention consisted of a pain exposure exercise lasting approximately 15 minutes. Five children participated in the study. All participants completed the intervention and reported that it had helped them to cope with the pain in the moment. All participants reported decreased discomfort of pain at post-measurement, three of whom also reported decreased pain intensity. The results suggest that an acceptance-based intervention may help children and adolescents with cancer to cope with the pain that is often associated with cancer treatment in spite of pharmacological pain management. The results are tentative but promising and warrant further investigation.

  1. SUBJECTIVE ACCEPTANCE OF PEDIATRIC PATIENTS DURING CAVITY PREPARATION WITH Er:YAG LASER AND CONVENTIONAL ROTARY INSTRUMENTS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Belcheva

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the present study is to evaluate and compare the subjective acceptance in children during hard dental tissue therapy using Er:YAG laser 2940nm and conventional rotary instruments. Methods and materials: The study included ninety 6-12-years-old children with matched carious lesions (D3 threshold, WHO system, divided into two equal treatment groups. In the intervention group the cavities were prepared with Erbium:YAG laser 2940nm and in the control group with conventional rotary instruments, without anaesthesia. After cavity preparation patient’s subjective acceptance was assessed by a questionnaire concerning primary stress triggers. Results: The annoyance factor (vibration was found as a stress trigger in the majority of control children (86.7%, while in the intervention group it was found in 2.2% of cases. The most anxiety provoking items in the intervention group were smell (67.7% and taste (42.2%. The sound was found to be a stress trigger in more than half of control children (62.2% and less than one-fifth of the children in the intervention group (15.6%. The study results showed significant difference in these items between two groups (p< 0.001. Conclusions: The Erbium:YAG lasers reduce three of four stress triggers in `4S` principle - vibration, sight and sound. They are a good treatment option for fearful children since they have acceptable efficiency in treatment of pediatric anxiety disorders compared to the mechanical preparation.

  2. Attitudes of physicians and public to pharmaceutical industry 'gifts'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macneill, P U; Kerridge, I H; Newby, D; Stokes, B J; Doran, E; Henry, D A

    2010-05-01

    Few studies have reported the attitudes of both individual doctors and members of the public toward the appropriateness of 'gifts' from pharmaceutical companies. To investigate the attitudes of both doctors and members of the public toward the appropriateness of receiving particular 'gifts' from pharmaceutical companies, and to consider whether public acceptability is a suitable criterion for determining the ethical appropriateness of 'gifts'. A survey questionnaire of medical specialists in Australia and a survey questionnaire of members of the public itemized 23 'gifts' (valued between AU$10 and AU$2500) and asked whether or not each was appropriate. Both medical specialists and members of the public believe certain 'gifts' from pharmaceutical companies are appropriate but not others. There was a tendency for members of the public to be more permissive than medical specialists. Although some professional guidelines place importance on the attitudes of the general public to 'gift' giving, and other guidelines give importance to a need for transparency and public accountability, we question whether public acceptability is a suitable criterion for determining the ethical appropriateness of 'gifts'. We suggest that more weight be given to the need for independence of clinical decision making, with empirical evidence indicating that even small 'gifts' can bias clinicians' judgments, and to important values such as the primacy of patient welfare, autonomy and social justice. We conclude that it is time to eliminate giving and receiving of promotional items between the pharmaceutical industry and members of health professions.

  3. Why do males of the spider Pisaura mirabilis wrap their nuptial gifts in silk: Female preference or male control?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tina; Bollerup, Kristine; Toft, Søren

    2008-01-01

    the female maternal care instinct and not her foraging motivation in a sexual context. The shape of the gift (round) and appearance (white) should then increase female acceptance of males. We tested these predictions experimentally and found that neither gift shape (round or oblong) nor silk wrapping...... of wrapping the nuptial gift: to reduce the risk of losing the gift to females without copulation, and make it possible to reshape an oblong prey into a round gift that facilitates the male's access to the female's genitalia. Our results suggest that the male gift wrapping trait may be selected though sexual......Males of the spider Pisaura mirabilis present a nuptial prey gift to the female during courtship as a mating effort. The gift is usually round and wrapped in white silk. It was suggested that the wrapped gift functions as a sensory trap by mimicking the female's eggsac implying that males exploit...

  4. An acceptance-based intervention for children and adolescents with cancer experiencing acute pain – a single-subject study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsell Cederberg, Jenny; Dahl, JoAnne; von Essen, Louise; Ljungman, Gustaf

    2017-01-01

    Background Children and adolescents with cancer report pain as one of their most recurrent and troublesome symptoms throughout the cancer trajectory. Pain evokes psychological distress, which in turn has an amplifying effect on the pain experience. Acceptance-based interventions for experimentally induced acute pain predict increased pain tolerance, decreased pain intensity and decreased discomfort of pain. The aim of this study was to preliminarily evaluate an acceptance-based intervention for children and adolescents with cancer experiencing acute pain, with regard to feasibility and effect on pain intensity and discomfort of pain. Methods This is a single-subject study with an AB design with a nonconcurrent multiple baseline. Children and adolescents aged four to 18 years undergoing cancer treatment at the Children’s University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden, reporting sustained acute pain were offered participation. Pain intensity and discomfort of pain were measured during baseline and at post-intervention. The intervention consisted of a pain exposure exercise lasting approximately 15 minutes. Results Five children participated in the study. All participants completed the intervention and reported that it had helped them to cope with the pain in the moment. All participants reported decreased discomfort of pain at post-measurement, three of whom also reported decreased pain intensity. Conclusion The results suggest that an acceptance-based intervention may help children and adolescents with cancer to cope with the pain that is often associated with cancer treatment in spite of pharmacological pain management. The results are tentative but promising and warrant further investigation. PMID:28919815

  5. 12 CFR 264b.5 - Gifts of more than minimal value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) Travel or travel expenses. Board employees may accept gifts of travel or expenses for travel taking place entirely outside the United States (such as transportation, food, and lodging) of more than minimal value... paragraph (b)(1) or (b)(2) of this section. (1) Board employees may accept gifts of travel or expenses for...

  6. Vaccination against hepatitis A and B in persons subject to homelessness in inner Sydney: vaccine acceptance, completion rates and immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulos, Roslyn G; Ferson, Mark J; Orr, Karen J; McCarthy, Michele A; Botham, Susan J; Stern, Jerome M; Lucey, Adrienne

    2010-04-01

    To determine acceptance, completion rates and immunogenicity of the standard vaccination schedule for hepatitis A (HAV) and B (HBV) in persons subject to homelessness. A convenience sample of clients (n=201) attending a medical clinic for homeless and disadvantaged persons in Sydney was enrolled. Serological screening for HAV and HBV was undertaken. An appropriate vaccination program was instituted. Post-vaccination serology determined serological response. Although many clients had serological evidence of past infection, at least 138 (69%) clients had the potential to benefit from vaccination. For hepatitis A and B vaccinations, completion rates were 73% (73 of 100 clients) and 75% (69 of 92 clients), respectively; after vaccination, protective antibody was found in 98.2% (56 of 57) and 72% (36 of 50) of clients, respectively. A successful vaccination program can be mounted with a vulnerable population. We consider a clinic with a well-established history of acceptance and utilisation by the target group; a low staff turnover and regular clientele; inclusion of vaccination as part of routine client care; and counselling (part of pre- and post-serological testing) essential components in achieving good vaccination completion rates. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 Public Health Association of Australia.

  7. Peer acceptance, parent-child fantasy play interactions, and subjective experience of the self-in-relation : a study of 4- to 5-year-old children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeyer, E.L. de

    2001-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigating direct links between peer acceptance and parent-child interactions, and exploring whether subjective experience of the self-in-relation would function as a mediator. A central assumption was that better accepted children are more capable of

  8. The notion of gift-giving and organ donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrand, Nicole

    1994-04-01

    The analogy between gift-giving and organ donation was first suggested at the beginning of the transplantation era, when policy makers and legislators were promoting voluntary organ donation as the preferred procurement procedure. It was believed that the practice of gift-giving had some features which were also thought to be necessary to ensure that an organ procurement procedure would be morally acceptable, namely voluntarism and altruism. Twenty-five years later, the analogy between gift-giving and organ donation is still being made in the literature and used in organ donation awareness campaigns. In this paper I want to challenge this analogy. By examining a range of circumstances in which gift-giving occurs, I argue that the significant differences between the various types of gift-giving and organ donation makes any analogy between the two very general and superficial, and I suggest that a more appropriate analogy can be found elsewhere.

  9. Gifted Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigandi, Carla B.; Siegle, Del; Weiner, Jennie M.; Gubbins, E. Jean; Little, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Grounded in the Enrichment Triad and Achievement Orientation Models, this qualitative case study builds understanding of the relationship between participation in Type III Enrichment and the achievement orientation attitude of goal valuation in gifted secondary school students. Participants included 10 gifted secondary school students, their…

  10. Bibliotherapy for Gifted Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Kyung-Won

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents bibliotherapy as a feasible method for preventing or curing problems of gifted and talented youngsters. It describes stages in bibliotherapy, examines who can benefit from bibliotherapy, discusses ways in which bibliotherapy may benefit gifted students, and outlines steps in implementing a bibliotherapy program. (JDD)

  11. Gifted Education in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Paromita

    2017-01-01

    In the backdrop of India's growing population of 1.21 billion people with diverse, multicultural and multilingual backgrounds, gifted education is yet to be part of a formal educational policy in the country. Research on giftedness in India spans across 50 years, but lacks systematic and empirical grounding. The term "gifted" in the…

  12. Gifted Education in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngara, Constantine

    2017-01-01

    Despite making tremendous progress in education since independence to become a leader in literacy in Africa, Zimbabwe lags behind other nations in providing special programming for its gifted children and youths. Not only do gifted and talented students exist in Zimbabwean schools and colleges, giftedness has also been confirmed in research on…

  13. Is Giftedness Truly a Gift?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Janet E.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines whether giftedness is actually a gift for those who receive it. The following attributes of a true gift are described as: (1) an understanding of what the gift is and who owns it; (2) realizing that it needs maintenance; (3) knowing what to do with the gift; (4) the giver expects nothing in return; and (5) the receiver…

  14. Opening the gift: social inclusion, professional codes and gift-giving in long-term mental healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ootes, S T C; Pols, A J; Tonkens, E H; Willems, D L

    2013-03-01

    Deinstitutionalisation has not only made the social inclusion of clients a key objective in long-term mental healthcare, it may also affect the role of the care professional. This article investigates whether the social inclusion objective clashes with other long-standing professional values, specifically when clients give gifts to care professionals. In making a typology of gifts, we compare the literature on gift-giving with professional codes for gifts and relate both to the objective of social inclusion of clients. Our typology draws on an analysis of ethnographic fieldwork carried out in 2007/2008 at a Dutch mental healthcare centre. We identify four types of gifts for professionals in long-term mental healthcare, each relating individually to professional codes and the objective of social inclusion of clients. Only the 'personal gift' directly supports social inclusion, by fostering personal relationships between professionals and clients. Acceptance of this type of gift is advocated only for long-term care professionals. We suggest that professional codes need to consider this typology of gifts, and we advocate promoting reflexivity as a means of accounting for professional behaviour in deinstitutionalised care settings.

  15. Chronic pain acceptance questionnaire: confirmatory factor analysis, reliability, and validity in Italian subjects with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticone, Marco; Ferrante, Simona; Rocca, Barbara; Nava, Tiziana; Parini, Chiara; Cerri, Cesare

    2013-06-01

    Cross-sectional evaluation of the psychometric properties of a translated questionnaire. To validate the Italian version of the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ) to allow its use with Italian-speaking patients with chronic low back pain (LBP). Growing attention is being given to cognitive-behavioral measures to improve interventions for LBP. The CPAQ has never been validated in Italian subjects with chronic LBP. The psychometric testing included confirmatory factor analysis, reliability by internal consistency (Cronbach α), test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient), sensitivity to change by calculating the smallest detectable change, and construct validity by comparing CPAQ with a pain numerical rating scale, the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire Scale, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (Pearson correlations). Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were computed to further investigate construct validity of the CPAQ subscales. The questionnaire was administered to 142 subjects with chronic LBP. Factor analysis confirmed a 2-factor (viz., Activities Engagement and Pain Willingness) 20-item solution, achieving a good data-model fit. Internal consistency (α = 0.88) and test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.86) were good. The smallest detectable change was 22. Construct validity showed a moderate correlation between the CPAQ and numerical rating scale (r = -0.485), Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire Scale (r = -0.594), and Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (r = -0.595), and a close correlation with Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (r = -0.610 for the Anxiety score and r = -0.659 for the Depression score) and Pain Catastrophizing Scale (r = -0.658). The standardized regression coefficients for Activity Engagement were significant in all of the equations, and those for Pain Willingness were significant in the anxiety

  16. The Naive Expert and the Gifted Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpson, William M.; Jones, Christine

    1989-01-01

    Mentorship programs are described which involve gifted students and subject experts with no prior knowledge about students' personalities or preconceptions about their abilities, known as "naive experts." The students are challenged by the experts' high expectations and respond to the experts' enthusiasm for sharing their knowledge and…

  17. Limits of the Gift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bill, Frederic; Olaison, Lena

    2011-01-01

    This article is based on an ongoing organisational ethnography of antiquarian bookshops. It argues that studying the exchange of antiquarian books offers new insight on the phenomenon of gift-giving. First, the general tendency in the literature on gifts (i.e. Bourdieu and Derrida) is how gifts...... is necessary either to evaluate the gift or to make it possible. However, in the antiquarian bookshop this situation is different since such a debt is directed towards the book rather than the giver. The receiver is indeed indebted but the debt takes the form of a responsibility to care for the book....... In analysing our material, we argue that every meeting between antiquarian and bookshop visitor results in liminal ceremonies that produce a space (what we, adopted from Lefebvre, call a representational space) for their interaction. Such analysis suggests that the interactions are taking place somewhere...

  18. A randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study on acceptability, safety and efficacy of oral administration of sacha inchi oil (Plukenetia volubilis L.) in adult human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Gustavo F; Gonzales, Carla

    2014-03-01

    The study was designed to assess acceptability and side-effects of consumption of sacha inchi oil, rich in α-linolenic acid and sunflower oil, rich in linoleic acid, in adult human subjects. Thirty subjects received 10 or 15ml daily of sacha inchi or sunflower oil for 4months. Acceptability was assessed with daily self-report and with a Likert test at the end of the study. Safety was assessed with self- recording of side-effects and with hepatic and renal markers. Primary efficacy variables were the change in lipid profile. Subjects reported low acceptability of sacha inchi oil at week-1 (37.5%). However, since week-6, acceptability was significantly increased to 81.25-93.75%. No differences were observed in acceptability with respect to sex or oil volume (P>0.05). Most frequent adverse effects during first weeks of consuming sacha inchi oil or sunflower oil were nauseas. The side-effects were reduced with time. Biochemical markers of hepatic and kidney function were maintained unchanged. Serum total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels and arterial blood pressure were lowered with both oils (P<0.05). Higher HDL-cholesterol was observed with sacha inchi oil at month-4. In conclusion, sacha inchi oil consumed has good acceptability after week-1 of consumption and it is safety. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. What’s in Your Gift Closet?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uth Thomsen, Thyra; Zaichkowsky, Judith

    associated with gift closets, we describe the content of gift closets, the intended recipients of the stored potential gifts, and perception of gift closet owners actions. Finally, we theorize how the perception of gift closets may affect the value creation process in gift giving rituals....

  20. Mere Gifting: Liking a Gift More Because It Is Shared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polman, Evan; Maglio, Sam J

    2017-11-01

    We investigated a type of mere similarity that describes owning the same item as someone else. Moreover, we examined this mere similarity in a gift-giving context, whereby givers gift something that they also buy for themselves (a behavior we call "companionizing"). Using a Heiderian account of balancing unit-sentiment relations, we tested whether gift recipients like gifts more when gifts are companionized. Akin to mere ownership, which describes people liking their possessions more merely because they own them, we tested a complementary prediction: whether people like their possessions more merely because others own them too. Thus, in a departure from previous work, we examined a type of similarity based on two people sharing the same material item. We find that this type of sharing causes gift recipients to like their gifts more, and feel closer to gift givers.

  1. Mathematically gifted adolescents have deficiencies in social valuation and mentalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyongsik Yun

    Full Text Available Many mathematically gifted adolescents are characterized as being indolent, underachieving and unsuccessful despite their high cognitive ability. This is often due to difficulties with social and emotional development. However, research on social and emotional interactions in gifted adolescents has been limited. The purpose of this study was to observe differences in complex social strategic behaviors between gifted and average adolescents of the same age using the repeated Ultimatum Game. Twenty-two gifted adolescents and 24 average adolescents participated in the Ultimatum Game. Two adolescents participate in the game, one as a proposer and the other as a responder. Because of its simplicity, the Ultimatum Game is an apt tool for investigating complex human emotional and cognitive decision-making in an empirical setting. We observed strategic but socially impaired offers from gifted proposers and lower acceptance rates from gifted responders, resulting in lower total earnings in the Ultimatum Game. Thus, our results indicate that mathematically gifted adolescents have deficiencies in social valuation and mentalization.

  2. Subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Vega Encabo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I claim that subjectivity is a way of being that is constituted through a set of practices in which the self is subject to the dangers of fictionalizing and plotting her life and self-image. I examine some ways of becoming subject through narratives and through theatrical performance before others. Through these practices, a real and active subjectivity is revealed, capable of self-knowledge and self-transformation. 

  3. Distant education of gifted children in the USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogozhkina I. B.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Distant teaching which helps to realize the main principles of contemporary education: «teaching throughout» and «lifelong teaching» becomes more and more indemand. The possibility to get education for the residents of remote districts, excess to contemporary data bases, scientific libraries and learning materials of high quality, possibility to study at a time convenient for a student and in a tempo acceptable to the one makes distant education one of the most effective form of work with gifted children. System of distant education in the USA which is one of the most sophisticated one involves a big variety of programs and courses for both ordinary and gifted students. The article analyzes the existing in the USA on-line programs for gifted children, reveals their advantages and disadvantages, discusses the distant forms of work applicable to teaching of gifted children in Russia.

  4. Relationships between gifted selection criteria and performance in sixth-grade gifted science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Roxanne Greitz

    This study examined the relationships between gifted selection criteria used in the Dade County Public Schools of Miami, Florida and performance in sixth grade gifted science classes. The goal of the study was to identify significant predictors of performance in sixth grade gifted science classes. Group comparisons of performance were also made. Performance in sixth grade gifted science was defined as the numeric average of nine weeks' grades earned in sixth grade gifted science classes. The sample consisted of 100 subjects who were formerly enrolled in sixth grade gifted science classes over two years at a large, multiethnic public middle school in Dade County. The predictors analyzed were I.Q. score (all scales combined), full scale I.Q. score, verbal scale I.Q. score, performance scale I.Q. score, combined Stanford Achievement Test (SAT) score (Reading Comprehension plus Math Applications), SAT Reading Comprehension score, and SAT Math Applications score. Combined SAT score and SAT Math Applications score were significantly positively correlated to performance in sixth grade gifted science. Performance scale I.Q. score was significantly negatively correlated to performance in sixth grade gifted science. The other predictors examined were not significantly correlated to performance. Group comparison results showed the mean average of nine weeks grades for the full scale I.Q. group was greater than the verbal and performance scale I.Q. groups. Females outperformed males to a highly significant level. Mean g.p.a. for ethnic groups was greatest for Asian students, followed by white non-Hispanic, Hispanic, and black. Students not receiving a lunch subsidy outperformed those receiving subsidies. Comparisons of performance based on gifted qualification plan showed the mean g.p.a. for traditional plan and Plan B groups were not different. Mean g.p.a. for students who qualified for gifted using automatic Math Applications criteria was highest, followed by automatic

  5. The Politics of Gifted Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Lawrence

    2003-01-01

    About 30 states have statutes on educating the gifted and talented. Identifying and teaching gifted children are a challenge. With states in a growing fiscal crisis and the costs of tests mandated by the No Child Left Behind Act, gifted education will struggle to maintain what it has rather than build. (MLF)

  6. The Gifted Learning Disabled Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994

    This collection of articles on gifted learning disabled students begins with an explanation of the philosophy of the Center for Talented Youth at Johns Hopkins University (Maryland), a list of characteristics of gifted disabled students, and three definitions of learning disabilities. The following papers are then provided: "Gifted but…

  7. Faces presenting sadness enhance self-control abilities in gifted adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urben, Sébastien; Camos, Valérie; Habersaat, Stéphanie; Stéphan, Philippe

    2018-02-23

    Self-regulation skills refer to processes allowing emotional and cognitive adaptation of the individual. Some gifted adolescents are known for their imbalance between high intellectual abilities and low emotional skills. Thus, this study aimed at examining the interplay between emotion and cognition in gifted and non-gifted adolescents. A stop-signal task, a response inhibition task including neutral, happy, or sad faces as signal triggering inhibition, was administered to 19 gifted and 20 typically developing male adolescents (12-18 years old). Gifted adolescents showed lower response inhibition abilities than non-gifted adolescents in the neutral and happy face conditions. Sad faces in gifted adolescents were associated with higher response inhibition compared to happy condition. In typically developing adolescents, emotional information (happy or sad faces) was related to lower response inhibition compared to neutral face condition. This study highlights that gifted adolescents present different self-regulation skills than their typically developing peers. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Some gifted adolescents present higher intellectual abilities alongside with lower socio-emotional skills. Self-regulation skills refer to processes allowing emotional and cognitive adaptation. Self-regulation skills might help to understand gifted adolescents, but remain scarcely studied. What does this study adds? Task-relevant emotional information impaired cognitive control in typically developing adolescents. Gifted adolescents are able to use sad faces to enhance their cognitive control abilities. © 2018 The British Psychological Society.

  8. Wandering in the Shadow of Egalitarianism and Equity: A Social and Cultural Explanation to the Underdeveloped Gifted Education in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Fu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Today it is accepted that the development of gifted and talented children is important to enable a nation to compete successfully. In China, though the estimated number of gifted children reaches 20 million (Chu, 2012, gifted education has seldom received sufficient support. The objections to gifted education always suppress suggestions that support programs for gifted students when educational policy is drafted. Starting with a historical review of the gifted education programs and policies in China since 1978, this paper discusses the main reasons for lack of support for gifted education in China from social and cultural perspectives. I conclude that the long-lasting ideology of egalitarianism, the overwhelming pursuit of educational equity and the dominant ideology of socialism have significantly hindered the development of gifted education. Driven by such beliefs and ideologies, the concept of giftedness and gifted education, the relationship between egalitarianism and elitism, and between equity and equality, are often severely misunderstood, which not only harms existing gifted education programs, but suppresses the potential for open discussion about the implementation of gifted education. Finally, I propose how gifted education should be framed in the future educational reform scheme in China and other countries with similar cultural and social environments.

  9. CERN Holiday Gift Guide

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Do you have last-minute gifts to get? Stuck for ideas? The CERN Shop and the ATLAS and CMS secretariats have some wonderfully unique gifts and stocking-fillers for sale this year - perfect for the physics fanatics in your life. Let's take a look...   1. CERN Notebook, 10 CHF - 2. CERN Pop-up book, 30 CHF - 3. USB Stick 8GB, 25 CHF - 4. CERN Tumbler, 12 CHF 5. ATLAS 3D Viewer, 5 CHF - 6. ATLAS Puzzle, 15 CHF - 7. CMS Umbrella, 25 CHF   These gifts are all available at the CERN Shop, with the exception of the ATLAS 3D Viewer and the CMS umbrella, which are only available from the respective secretariats. Don’t forget! If you’re from CERN, you still have time to take advantage of a 10% off discount at the CERN shop. Offer ends 20 December.

  10. Teaching English Activities for the Gifted And Talented Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigdem CELIK-SAHIN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the literature and recommends activities that can be used to teach English to gifted and talented students. It includes the responsibilities that teachers of the gifted and talented have in teaching the English language. Strategies for teaching the language in a natural and flowing way to increase intake and usage are also presented. Also discussed are the pressures on gifted and talented students when they are learning a new subject such as the English language and how these pressures occur because of beliefs about giftedness and how gifted learners learn. Teachers need to also be aware of the linguistic and cultural backgrounds of their students. This information can be used to help students speak English more naturally during informal talks/discussions in class about their different lifestyles and/or cultural features. The special and different learning characteristics of gifted students are important for their teachers to know. Teachers of gifted students should then use that knowledge when they differentiate curriculum. To be a teacher of these special children means being open to ongoing professional development and always focusing on the learner rather than the learning. Finally, the teachers of the gifted need to shift their approaches in order to become counsellors and guides more than instructors and directors of learning.

  11. Profiles of the Gifted and Talented.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, George T.; Neihart, Maureen

    1988-01-01

    Six profiles of theoretical types of gifted and talented children are offered including (1) the successful gifted, (2) the divergently gifted, (3) the "underground" gifted (who want to hide their giftedness), (4) the dropouts, (5) the double-labeled (with physical or emotional handicaps) gifted student, and (6) the autonomous learner. (DB)

  12. A Follow-Up Study of the Edith Bowen Gifted Program

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Richard Alan

    1984-01-01

    Former participants of an elementary-level gifted program were followed into junior high to determine the impact of the gifted program on their academic achievement and extracurricular participation. Parent and student perceptions of the gifted program were also determined. Academic achievement was measured by the variables grades in specific academic subjects, grade point averages, and achievement test scores. Extracurricular participation patterns were determined by response to a questionna...

  13. Gifted Education Quarterly, 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Maurice, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    These four issues of "Gifted Education Quarterly" include the following articles: (1) "Using Test Results To Support Clinical Judgment" (Linda Kreger Silverman), which discusses some of the difficulties in obtaining accurate indications of a child's level of giftedness and the importance of using professional judgment in…

  14. Gifted Students and Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsh, John; Karnes, Frances; Eiers, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors emphasize that good sleep health is essential if gifted children are to gain the greatest benefit from opportunities to grow intellectually, socially, and spiritually while maintaining good psychological and physical health. The outstanding abilities that characterize these children and enable high levels of…

  15. Gifted Children and Divorce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, John; Karnes, Frances A.

    2011-01-01

    Divorce is often a contentious process with multiple issues to decide, especially in cases in which there are children involved. Divorce raises several legal issues when considering the well-being of children, including those who are gifted. In this article, the authors discuss these issues which include school choice, child support, and custody…

  16. Gifted Education in Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Colm

    2013-01-01

    This article will outline the current status of gifted education in Ireland. To fully understand the picture, one needs to look at the history of the Irish education system and how educational decisions are made in the country. Political climate is often an important factor in how people view special education programs and Ireland is no different…

  17. Gifted Education in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irueste, Paula

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we review the advancement of gifted education in Argentina which has been scarce and discontinuous, particularly, in the public sphere. About the primary conception of giftedness and/or talent, we mention the obsolete struggle between those who only consider a high intellectual coefficient (IQ) versus a more comprehensive…

  18. Subjective study of thermal acceptability of novel enhanced displacement ventilation system and implication of occupants' personal control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Weimeng; Cheong, K.W.D.; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2012-01-01

    A novel air distribution principle of cooler air near the floor level being propelled upward via four fans mounted at each corner of a chair was developed to enhance the performance of conventional displacement ventilation (DV) system. Experiments were conducted in a well-controlled climate chamber...... with DV and constant heat load at different supply air temperatures, namely 20, 22, and 24 °C and room air temperatures, 22, 24, and 26 °C. Subjective assessments were carried out with 32 tropically-acclimatized college students who were given the choice to adjust the fan speed. Subjects' thermal comfort...... of 22 and 24 °C when the fans were in operation. It was also found that the Whole Body Thermal Sensation (WBTS) reported by the subjects was correlated with the Local Thermal Sensation (LTS) at the waist, the arms, the calf and the feet when the novel DV system was employed. An expression which allows...

  19. A reading enrichment program for gifted adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Morales Silva

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This descriptive research examines the performance on reading comprehension of four gifted adolescents participating in a reading enrichment program. This performance is related to the variables associated to the gifted performance following the model developed by Mönks: motivation, creativity, high ability, school, peers and family. Results showed that school does not satisfy the cognitive needs of these students and it does not offer the required social support either. The family provides the main social support. The motivation, creativity, the high level of language and concentration of the participants facilitate learning. The reading program is described by the participants as motivating due to the subject-matters and methodology; furthermore, due to the opportunity to deal with peers who have a similar cognitive level.

  20. Gifted 101: Unlocking the Mystery of Academically Gifted Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Councill, Kimberly H.; Fiedler, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Academically gifted learners can both thrive and struggle in our music classrooms. This article offers a detailed approach to defining, recognizing, and meaningfully teaching gifted learners in the music classroom while providing differentiation ideas that can benefit all learners. In-depth discussion and examples of contracts, tiered instruction,…

  1. Assessment of acceptability and ease of use of atovaquone/proguanil medication in subjects undergoing malaria prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Nicosia

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available V Nicosia1, Giorgio Colombo2, M Consentino1, S Di Matteo2, F Mika1, S De Sanctis1, S Ratti2, Marta Vinci21Saipem Medical Dept. San Donato Milanese, Italy; 2S.A.V.E. Studi Analisi Valutazioni Economiche, Milano, ItalyObjective: International travelers from non-endemic areas are at high risk of contracting malaria due to their lack of immunity. Prevention is therefore of outmost importance and is achieved through effective and safe chemoprophylaxis, which reduces the risk of fatal disease. Among the various antimalarial drugs available, the synergistic combination of atovaquone and proguanil (A/P (Malarone®; Glaxo-SmithKline has proven a valuable option in terms of effective protection against chloroquine and multi-drug resistant falciparum malaria, safety, tolerability, and ease of use, thus favoring compliance. The purpose of the present study was to assess acceptability and ease of use of A/P chemoprophylaxis in a population of employees of the oil industry bound to malarious areas. Particular attention was paid to treatment adherence.Methods: A survey was conducted on a sample of 700 employees on A/P chemoprophylaxis. Demographic data and specific information on A/P treatment were collected by means of a 16-item questionnaire administered immediately before departure. All questionnaires returned were then entered into a database and statistically analyzed.Results: Both habitual and first-time travelers showed good adherence to A/P chemoprophylactic regimen. In general, only few adverse side-effects were reported, none of which were serious. Travelers with previous experience of other antimalarials stated A/P prophylaxis had proven advantageous due to fewer adverse reactions, better condition of administration, and better sense of protection compared with other available treatments.Keywords: atovaquone and proguanil, Malarone, malaria prophylaxis, prevention, compliance

  2. Reliability of different facial measurements for determination of vertical dimension of occlusion in edentulous using accepted facial dimensions recorded from dentulous subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Abhishek; Parkash, Hari; Bhargava, Akshay; Chittaranjan, B

    2014-09-01

    The study was undertaken to evaluate the reliability of different facial measurements for determination of vertical dimension of occlusion in edentulous subjects using accepted facial dimensions recorded from dentulous subjects. The hypothesis was that facial measurements can be used to obtain the vertical dimension of occlusion for edentulous patients where no pre-extraction records exist. A total of 180 subjects were selected in the age groups of 50-60 years, consisting of 75 dentate male and 75 dentate female subjects for whom different facial measurements were recorded including vertical dimension of occlusion and rest, and 15 edentulous male and 15 edentulous female subjects for whom all the facial measurements were recorded including the vertical dimension of rest and occlusion following construction of upper and lower complete dentures. The left outer canthus of eye to angle of mouth distance and the right Ear-Eye distance were found to be as valuable adjuncts in the determination of occlusal vertical dimension. The Glabella-Subnasion distance, the Pupil-Stomion distance, the Pupil-Rima Oris distance and the distance between the two Angles of the Mouth did not have a significant role in the determination of the occlusal vertical dimension. The vertical dimension can be determined with reasonable accuracy by utilizing other facial measurements for patients for whom no pre-extraction records exist.

  3. Labour Disputes of Gifted Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Waal, Ido; Nauta, Noks; Lindhout, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a study on labour disputes of gifted people. Fifty-five gifted people, who have had one or more labour disputes, which resulted in their staying at home and filling out an online survey. Face-to-face interviews were held with seven respondents with more than two labour disputes. In this article, we describe the results of…

  4. Stress Management and Gifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vidisha A.

    2009-01-01

    Stress can affect anyone, and gifted children are no exception. Giftedness can sometimes be the cause of the stress. Perfectionism, sensitivity, and intensity are characteristics of gifted children that may exacerbate stress. Stress can be constructive. Prolonged stress, however, with no time to recover becomes detrimental. Continued stress upsets…

  5. Emotional Intelligence in Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidner, Moshe; Matthews, Gerald

    2017-01-01

    This article aims at shedding light on the emotional intelligence (EI) of gifted and high ability students. We begin by presenting a brief overview of EI theory and research and its relevance to gifted education. We then present theoretical considerations bearing on the nature of the relationship between cognitive and EI. This is followed by a…

  6. The Gifted/Learning Disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Vivienne

    Identification and programing are central topics in the discussion of gifted learning disabled (LD) students. Characteristics of gifted LD students are described, including talent in the creative arts. Reasons for overlooking this population are noted, including their ability to compensate for their problems. The degree of giftedness and of…

  7. Inquiry Learning for Gifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eysink, Tessa H. S.; Gersen, Loes; Gijlers, Hannie

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of support on knowledge acquisition of gifted learners and their flow and mood during inquiry learning. Sixty-four gifted primary school children were randomly assigned to one of three conditions differing in support given in an inquiry task. Results showed that learners who were allowed to…

  8. Gifted Children's Perception of Divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Carolyn

    1987-01-01

    The perceptions of divorce in 41 gifted and regular students (grades 5-8) were compared through interviews, writing samples, and the Defining Issues test. Gifted students gave longer stories, more readily took the perspective of adults, showed a stronger desire to understand reasons for divorce, and displayed more advanced moral reasoning.…

  9. Identifying Stressors and Reactions to Stressors in Gifted and Non-Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Marzieh

    2005-01-01

    Using the Student Life Stress Inventory and the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory, stressors and reactions to stressors were identified in gifted high school students and compared with non-gifted students. Altogether, 340 boys and girls (156 gifted and 184 non-gifted students) from four high schools in Shiraz (two high schools for gifted and two…

  10. Giving and receiving of gifts between pharmaceutical companies and medical specialists in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, P M; Kerridge, I H; Henry, D A; Stokes, B; Hill, S R; Newby, D; Macdonald, G J; Day, R O; Maguire, J; Henderson, K M

    2006-09-01

    This study investigated the 'gift-relationship' between pharmaceutical companies and doctors. The study was based on a survey questionnaire of 823 medical specialists from across Australia. The aim of this study was to investigate gifts offered to medical specialists in Australia by pharmaceutical companies, financial support actively sought by medical specialists for activities other than research and to consider what is ethically appropriate. A high percentage of specialists received offers of food (96%), items for the office (94%), personal gifts (51%) and journals or textbooks (50%). Most specialists were invited to product launches, symposia or educational events (75-84%) and 52% received offers of travel to conferences. A high proportion of offers were accepted (66-79%) except invitations to product launches (49%), sponsored symposia (53%) and offers of travel that included partners (27%). Fifteen per cent of specialists requested financial support from pharmaceutical companies for activities and items, including conferences, travel, educational activities, salaries and donations to specific funds. The study outlined guidelines on gifts from pharmaceutical companies and differing standards applying to gifts and grants for travel. We found that, although most gifts and requests for support complied with professional and pharmaceutical industry guidelines, some--including personal gifts, tickets to sporting events, entertainment and travel expenses for specialists' partners--did not. To ensure that physicians' judgements are free from real or perceived influence from industry and to maintain public trust, we support a shift towards more conservative standards on gifts and support for travel evident in recent guidelines.

  11. PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF GIFTED CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Nikola Stankovska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Giftedness is a multidimensional phenomenon that despite numerous studies and different approaches remains underexplored. It is known that there is different views about gifted children in psychological theory and practice. Giftedness represents general intellectual ability, general creative ability, productive and creative ability, the sum of specific skills, the ability of thinking, specific area of intelligence and creativity.Gifted child is a child who has above average skills and specific characteristics, which play an important role in the growth, development and education of these children. Researchers confirm the importance of early socialization, family and the primary teachers in the continually development of the gifted child on intellectual, social, emotional and somatic plan.It is known that e gifted child has specific characteristics and properties, such as originality, individuality, emotional stability, a high degree of intellectual capacity, independence, verbal fluency, perfectionism.Development and manifestation of creativity in gifted children depends of their cognitive component, personality traits, motivation. Gifted child early showed a specific interest in a particular area.This kind of child has a positive self-image, high self-esteem, self-confidence, high goals, a sense of self-worth, greater independence which manifests across the non-conformism and initiative.Every child deserves the special attention of parents, school and society, especially a gifted child which is a child with special needs about their average ability and special educational needs.

  12. Suggestions for Christmas gifts.

    CERN Document Server

    Connie Potter; Markus Nordberg

    Have you been working long hours lately? Stuck in meetings too long to make it in time before the shops close? No need to worry. The ATLAS secretariat has plenty of items that will make great Christmas gifts for friends and family. Here are some of the items in stock. Note that you can negotiate a good price for bulk order. ATLAS caps (new item), 12 chf ATLAS t-shirts designed by Alan Alda, 20 chf ATLAS fleece jackets in several sizes and colors, 30 chf grey or dark blue in men's sizes pale blue for women's sizes (limited quantity) red for children (limited quantity) ATLAS puzzles with 500 pieces made by the Ravensburger company 15 chf for 1 box (price is less when purchasing more boxes) 50 chf for 5 boxes or more can also be purchased in boxes of 24, ready to ship to your institute ATLAS 3-D viewers, 5 chf ATLAS DVD, 5 chf CERN playing cards, 2 chf Make sure to get several boxes of the ATLAS puzzle for Christmas gifts. Offer hours of entertainement to friends and family! We tak...

  13. Layanan Pendidikan Bagi Anak Gifted

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Idrus

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Many gifted children are not receiving appropriate educational services for them. By neglecting to give them the proper education which they should received, will making gifted children can not growing and developing aspects of their giftedness.Monks proposed the concept of “Triadic model of giftedness” which proposed by Renzulli by adding elements of family, school and peers (milieu or the environment, to furnish the Renzulli concept which consists of creative, task commitment, and ability above average. Monks concepts consider the proper education for gifted children to develop their giftedness, such as special classes, accelerated classes or enrichment classes.

  14. A randomized controlled trial of two simple mind-body programs, Kirtan Kriya meditation and music listening, for adults with subjective cognitive decline: Feasibility and acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, Kim E; Selfe, Terry Kit; Khalsa, Dharma Singh; Kandati, Sahiti

    2016-06-01

    In this randomized controlled trial (RCT), we assessed the feasibility and acceptability of two simple home-based relaxation programs in adults experiencing subjective cognitive decline, a strong predictor of Alzheimer's disease. Sixty participants were randomized to a beginner Kirtan Kriya meditation (KK) program or a music listening (ML) program. Participants were asked to practice 12min daily for the first 12 weeks, then as often as they liked for the following 3 months. Participants underwent assessments at baseline, 12 weeks, and 6 months to evaluate changes in key outcomes. Feasibility and acceptability were evaluated by measuring recruitment and retention rates, assessment visit attendance, practice adherence, and treatment expectancy; exit questionnaires completed at 12 weeks and 6 months provided additional data regarding participant experience with the study, perceived barriers to and facilitators of practice, reasons for drop-out, and views regarding the assigned intervention. Fifty-three participants (88%) completed the 6 month study. Adherence in both groups was excellent, with participants completing 93% (91% KK, 94% ML) of sessions on average in the first 12 weeks, and 71% (68% KK, 74% ML) during the 3 month, practice-optional, follow-up period. At week 12, over 80% of participants indicated they were likely to continue practicing following study completion. Responses to both structured and open-ended exit questionnaire items also suggested high satisfaction with both programs. Findings of this RCT of a beginner meditation practice and a simple ML program suggest that both programs were well accepted and the practices are feasible in adults with early memory loss. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Gift Relationship: Discovering Gift Exchange in Interpersonal Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christopher Basil

    2016-03-01

    Encountering the deeper flows of human experience and glimpsing the touch of the divine on the human soul offer guides and companions rich reflective content for their ongoing formation. This is a precious gift which pilgrims constantly place before their companions, though at times it remains 'unwrapped'. Through offering a supervision narrative, this paper provides a phenomenological description of such a gift exchange. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Edutainment: Gifted Education and the Perils of Misusing Multiple Intelligences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, David A.; Breen, Maureen

    1998-01-01

    Raises concerns about the concept and application of Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences to gifted children. Stresses the importance of practical wisdom, subject-matter content, and intelligent time-utilization. Warns against "edutainment", the ungrounded appeals to fun or entertainment based on supposedly neglected forms…

  17. Intellectually Gifted Learning Disabled Students: A Special Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansford, Susan J.; And Others

    The Intellectually Gifted/Learning Disabled Project investigated characteristics of this population and implications for educational programming. Twenty-three children, aged 7 to 16 years old, were identified through a referral process involving schools and parents. Only two subjects were female. A detailed analysis of school records; individual…

  18. "Communication Skills for the Gifted"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisk, Dorothy A.

    1975-01-01

    A teacher training coordinator stresses the importance of developing gifted children's communication abilities and briefly describes two group dynamics activities ("Circle Partners" and "Think Pink") for building listening, interpretation and discussion skills. (LH)

  19. THE GIFTS AT HOLIDAYS IN THE ROMANIAN COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria MOISUC

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Medieval Society was conformed to hierarchy, symbol, faith, rituals in which each gesture, word, object or phenomenon had to have an significance. During this epoch dominated by etiquette and rules, ceremonies played an important part. They were organized at the big holidays (Chrismas, The New Year, Twelfth Day, Easter or when a new ruler was appointed. These celebrations were meant to enhance the communication between ruler and his vassals and this bond between the sovereign and his court was made by the exchange of gifts. According to the context they were offered, the gifts signified different aspects: the generosity of the ruler, his wish to get closer to his subjects, even interest or friendship. Although the circumstances were not the same, the gifts were individualized, depending on the social status of the recipient.Our paper analyses the diversity of the forms which are covered by this practice and also the social and symbolical values it is associated with.

  20. Emotional intelligence in gifted children

    OpenAIRE

    Simončič, Ana

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to present the link between the two constructs, namely emotional intelligence and gifted students. At the beginning the basic concepts, namely what are emotions and what is intelligence are explained. Both are combined in the phrase emotional intelligence. Each of the authors, who is dealing with emotional intelligence, sees focus somewhere else. Also the tools that can measure emotional intelligence in individuals are presented. Further work focuses on gifted st...

  1. Guardians of 'the gift'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anja M. B.

    2017-01-01

    . They must take the difficult decisions of whether to admit critically ill patients onto the organ waiting list; face the distress of post-transplant sufferings and deaths; and deal with organ recipients who do not behave according to post-transplant recommendations. Drawing on a familiar metaphor...... for donated organs, it is suggested that transplant doctors and nurses are ‘guardians of the gift’. Attention to the emotional burdens and rewards of this particular position enables new understandings of the practices of transplant medicine, of gift exchange theory, and of the role of emotion in medical......This paper deals with the emotional challenges encountered by doctors and nurses caring for heart and lung transplant patients. Organ transplantation enables body parts from the dead to become usable in patients with no other life-saving option. These exchanges are not possible without transplant...

  2. Analysis of the variability of the pharmacokinetics of multiple drugs in young adult and elderly subjects and its implications for acceptable daily exposures and cleaning validation limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streeter, Anthony J; Faria, Ellen C

    2017-06-01

    The elderly constitute a significant, potentially sensitive, subpopulation within the general population, which must be taken into account when performing risk assessments including determining an acceptable daily exposure (ADE) for the purpose of a cleaning validation. Known differences in the pharmacokinetics of drugs between young adults (who are typically the subjects recruited into clinical trials) and the elderly are potential contributors affecting the interindividual uncertainty factor (UFH) component of the ADE calculation. The UFH values were calculated for 206 drugs for young adult and elderly groups separately and combined (with the elderly assumed to be a sensitive subpopulation) from published studies where the pharmacokinetics of the young adult and elderly groups were directly compared. Based on the analysis presented here, it is recommended to use a default UFH value of 10 for worker populations (which are assumed to be approximately equivalent to the young adult groups) where no supporting pharmacokinetic data exist, while it is recommended to use a default UFH value of 15 for the general population, to take the elderly into consideration when calculating ADE values. The underlying reasons for the large differences between the exposures in the young adult and elderly subjects for the 10 compounds which show the greatest separation are different in almost every case, involving the OCT2 transporter, glucuronidation, hydrolysis, CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP3A4 or CYP3A5. Therefore, there is no consistent underlying mechanism which appears responsible for the largest differences in pharmacokinetic parameters between young adult and elderly subjects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Titmuss and the gift relationship: altruism revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapport, F L; Maggs, C J

    2002-12-01

    This paper revisits Richard Titmuss' 1970s blood donation model in the light of its 1997 reprint in order to consider whether we are justified in continuing to accept that the main reason for blood donation (and other donation types) is an altruistic desire to help others. This paper explores how others have examined the notion of altruism, before concentrating on two major elements of Titmuss' work: blood donors' motives to donate and the social implications of gift-giving in relation to the uniqueness of blood donation. Donor motivation is discussed in detail with particular reference to questions 4 and 5 of Titmuss' blood donor survey and through a critical appraisal approach to his work. Methodological inconsistencies are revealed in the design and implementation of the survey, as well as in Titmuss' list of blood donation's unique attributes, bringing into question the rigour of his findings. It may be that blood donors are altruistically motivated, but such conclusions cannot be drawn from this work. It is also unclear if 'altruism' can be shown in the example of blood donation or other donation types. We should reconsider the motivation behind gifting in health care in the light of these findings and ensure that evidence-based practice is consistent with methodological rigour. Nurses and other health professionals need to have a clearer understanding of concepts such as altruism in order to appreciate why people seek to donate.

  4. Helping Gifted Adolescents Cope with Social Stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiatek, Mary Ann

    1998-01-01

    Examines ways of helping gifted adolescents cope with a perceived stigma. Research is cited showing that many gifted adolescents believe they are treated differently because of their abilities and behave differently because of this belief, including denial of one's giftedness. The school's role, ability grouping, and special needs of gifted girls…

  5. The Young Gifted Girl: A Contemporary View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeper, Annemarie

    2003-01-01

    In this reprint of an article published in 1978, the role of women in society and its impact on gifted girls is discussed. It is argued that gender stereotypes work against gifted girls and that the women's movement has helped gifted girls develop a new image and concept of womanhood. (CR)

  6. The Gifted/Learning Disabled Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderson, Cheryl Walker; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This article discusses the identification of learning-disabled and gifted students as well as the characteristics of the gifted learning-disabled. The reasons for failure to identify gifted learning-disabled students are examined, and procedures to help ensure identification of this group are outlined. (Author/JDD)

  7. Leadership: A Social Paradigm for the Gifted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisk, Dorothy

    Provisions for gifted student identification and educational programming in Australia, the USSR, Venezuela, Brazil, Indonesia, Israel, and the Peoples Republic of China, and the United Kingdom are discussed. Concern for locating and serving the gifted is apparent in all these countries. Issues and program efforts in gifted education are quite…

  8. Exploring Changes in Valued Action in the Presence of Chronic Debilitating Pain in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Youth - A Single-Subject Design Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemani, Mike K; Olsson, Gunnar L; Holmström, Linda; Wicksell, Rikard K

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to improve the understanding of processes of change in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for youth with chronic debilitating pain by exploring the relation between individual change patterns in pain intensity and valued activities. Method: A single-subject design across three adolescents suffering from longstanding debilitating pain was utilized. Pain intensity and participation in valued activities were rated daily. Visual analysis of the graphed data was performed to evaluate the effects of the intervention, and the relationship between pain intensity and values-based activity. Results: The graphed data illustrated that pain levels did not decrease from the baseline period to the follow-up period. In contrast, compared to baseline ratings values oriented behaviors increased from the start of treatment to the follow-up period. Conclusion: Results illustrate that increases in values-based behavior may occur without corresponding decreases in pain, and warrant further research on change processes in ACT for youth suffering from chronic pain.

  9. Are gifted adolescents more satisfied with their lives than their non-gifted peers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergold, Sebastian; Wirthwein, Linda; Rost, Detlef H; Steinmayr, Ricarda

    2015-01-01

    Studies investigating the life satisfaction of intellectually gifted and non-gifted students are scarce and often suffer from methodological shortcomings. We examined the life satisfaction of gifted and non-gifted adolescents using a rather unselected sample of N = 655 German high-school students (n = 75 gifted), adequate comparison groups of non-gifted students, and a clear definition of giftedness (general intelligence g > 2 SD above the mean). There was no difference in life satisfaction between gifted and non-gifted adolescents (d giftedness but was instead found across the entire sample. Thus, gifted girls were not found to be especially unsatisfied with their lives. Our findings support previous research showing that giftedness is not a risk factor for impaired psycho-social well-being of boys or girls.

  10. Metacognitive Awareness and Math Anxiety in Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saricam, Hakan; Ogurlu, Üzeyir

    2015-01-01

    The basic purpose of this study has been to examine the relationships between metacognitive awareness and maths anxiety in gifted students. The second aim was to compare with gifted and non-gifted students' metacognitive awareness and maths anxiety levels. The participants were 300 (150 gifted, 150 non-gifted) volunteer secondary school students…

  11. A study on determining the needs of gifted individuals based on parental views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eda Gürlen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ensuring that gifted individuals receive differentiated and enhanced education, which is suitable for their areas of skills and developmental characteristics, will contribute to revealing their skills and developing their multiple developmental areas to bring them to upper levels. The purpose of this study is to determine the needs of gifted individuals by developing a curriculum which considers their educational needs. In the scope of this study, interviews were made with ten parents using the Snowball Sapling Method. The questionnaires used in the interviews were prepared in a semi-structured manner in light of variables determined from the literature on the subject . Interviews were made by two researchers. The two researchers assessed data obtained separately; and thus, codes of study were obtained. Themes were formed according to common components of the codes. Three main themes were formed on needs analysed in light of data obtained from the literature on the topic. These themes were “Characteristics of Gifted Individuals”; “School and Expectations from It”; and “Being Parents of Gifted Individuals”. These themes were separated into sub-themes. The parents explained “different behaviour patterns of their gifted children”, “characteristic of their children” and “situations their gifted children like/do not like” in the “Characteristics of Gifted Individuals” theme.The “School and Expectations from It” theme consisted of two sub-themes, which were “satisfaction of parents with school”, and “expectations of parents from school”. In the “Being Parents of Gifted Individuals” theme, the parents explained, “their concerns ”, “their regrets”, “the difficulties they have with their children”, and “their complaints”. Results of this study led to initialising a curriculum development study for gifted children which is based on their characteristics and needs.

  12. The Rage of Gifted Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Tracy L.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses the rage gifted students feel because of the treatment they receive in the school. It argues that the mixed messages they receive, along with normal developmental issues and the repetitious images of adolescents engaging in homicides, suicide, and other undesirable behavior, all contribute to the rage. (Contains references.)…

  13. Political Issues in Gifted Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, James J.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, James J. Gallagher proposes that understanding the political issues and the debate surrounding the education of gifted students is based on the recognition that education policy (including rules, regulations, financial allocations, etc.) reflects social policy. Hence, society prioritizes needs so that the most important of these…

  14. Creative Education for Gifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piske, Fernanda Hellen Ribeiro; Stoltz, Tania; Machado, Jarci

    2014-01-01

    Creativity is an essential attribute for the development of creative potential. However, it is not always developed properly in the school context, especially when it is about gifted students education. Because these children need a specialized service to attend their special needs. In this sense, this study aims to contribute in order that…

  15. An evaluation of a behavioural parenting intervention for parents of gifted children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawska, Alina; Sanders, Matthew

    2009-06-01

    Parents of gifted children identify a need for tailored parenting support, and gifted children have unique requirements and vulnerabilities. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a tailored behavioural parenting intervention, for enhancing the parenting skills of parents of gifted children and to assess the effect of these changes on the behavioural and emotional adjustment of their gifted child. A randomised controlled trial of tailored Group Triple P - Positive Parenting Program was conducted with 75 parents of children identified as gifted. Results indicated significant intervention effects for the number and frequency of parent reported child behaviour problems, as well as hyperactivity in the intervention group, relative to a waitlist control. Parents also reported significant improvements in their own parenting style, including less permissiveness, harshness, and verbosity when disciplining their child. No intervention effects were evident for teacher reports, except for a trend in relation to hyperactivity. This study demonstrated that a tailored behavioural parenting intervention is effective and acceptable for parents of gifted children, and thus has clinical implications for the delivery of parenting interventions for this population.

  16. A Gift for the Gifted: School Counselor Advocacy for Representation of Latino Students in Gifted Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessman, Lisa; Carr, Rosylia; Grimes, Lee Edmondson

    2013-01-01

    Many children from the Latino community require support from school counselors to achieve greatness in academics. Barriers preventing accurate gifted and talented nominations for Latino ELL students presently exist in school systems. Existing barriers can be broken down for student success. This study explored current literature to examine issues…

  17. Examining the Influence of Subjective Norm and Facilitating Conditions on the Intention to Use Technology among Pre-Service Teachers: A Structural Equation Modeling of an Extended Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    This study examined pre-service teachers' self-reported behavioral intentions to use technology. Three hundred and fourteen participants completed a survey questionnaire measuring their responses to six constructs from a research model that extends the technology acceptance model (TAM) by including facilitating conditions and subjective norm.…

  18. Creativity in the regular classroom: perceptions of gifted and non-gifted students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda do Carmo Gonçalves

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare the perception of gifted and non-gifted students with respect to the climate for creativity in the classroom, in the disciplines of Mathematics and Portuguese Language, and to investigate the relationship between creativity and perception of classroom climate for creativity. Twenty-one gifted and 27 non-gifted 6th grade students who attended a public school in Brazil participated in the study. The gifted students evaluated teacher’s support to the students’ expression of ideas in Mathematics in a more satisfactory way compared to non-gifted, and they also showed greater interest in learning Mathematics in comparison to Portuguese Language. A positive correlation between creativity and perception of classroom climate was found for gifted students, and negative correlation for non-gifted students.

  19. Ethical Dimensions of Education for the Gifted: How Do We Determine Which Gifts to "Unwrap"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Charles R.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the increasing interest in education for the "gifted and talented" and analyzes the implications of Joseph Renzulli's definition of "gifted" for educational policymakers and federal funding sources. (CJM)

  20. Gender Differences in Gifted Students' Advice on Solving the World's Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Jenessa; Makel, Matthew C.

    2012-01-01

    Gender differences in interests and preferences are among the currently accepted potential explanations for the underrepresentation of women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. In an attempt to analyze the development of such preferences, gender differences expressed in essays written by gifted elementary students…

  1. Early College Entrance for Gifted High-School Students: Experiences and Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayler, Micheal F.

    This paper on early college entrance for gifted high-school students considers the advantages of early college entrance, the willingness of colleges and universities to accept early entrants, special programs developed to assist early entrants, and potential difficulties with early entrance. Guidelines are presented for maximizing the chances of…

  2. Selection and Training of Teachers of the Gifted in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, Linda

    1983-01-01

    The author examines characteristics of effective teachers of gifted students in the United States by reviewing research on topics of mentorship, trait theory, behaviorism, creativity, change agents, and leadership; cites accepted teacher competencies; describes a model teacher education program; and notes federal, state, and local efforts to…

  3. 45 CFR 73.735-506 - Gifts and decorations from foreign governments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... a foreign government gifts of travel or expenses for travel (such as transportation, food and... acceptance is consistent with the interests of the United States and is approved by the travel approving authority in accordance with the Department's Travel Manual. See General Administration Manual, Chapter 20...

  4. Teacher Perceptions of Overexcitabilities in Secondary Gifted Students: Implications for Practice in Gifted Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Marianne Morgan

    2013-01-01

    During the last two decades of the twentieth century, some researchers and practitioners in gifted education adopted the belief that overexcitabilities (OEs), from Dabrowski's Theory of Positive Disintegration, are more prevalent in gifted adolescents that in other adolescents. This belief led to recommendations for gifted education, including the…

  5. Gifted and Maladjusted? Implicit Attitudes and Automatic Associations Related to Gifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preckel, Franzis; Baudson, Tanja Gabriele; Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine; Glock, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    The disharmony hypothesis (DH) states that high intelligence comes at a cost to the gifted, resulting in adjustment problems. We investigated whether there is a gifted stereotype that falls in line with the DH and affects attitudes toward gifted students. Preservice teachers (N = 182) worked on single-target association tests and affective priming…

  6. Promoting promotions: Does showcasing free gifts backfire?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raghubir, Priya; Celly, Kirti Sawhney

    2011-01-01

    ..., Raghubir, 2005 , Study 2), and even a multiple of the price that a consumer needs to pay to buy a product to get the free gift. The question is: Is there a drawback to showcasing a free gift rather than a company product in a free gift promotion? This paper attempts to answer this question, starting with the simple model: P r o m o t i o n P e ...

  7. Gifts and exchanges problems, frustrations, and triumphs

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Linda S; Denning, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    This important book explores the many questions challenging librarians who work with gifts and exchanges (G&E) as part of their daily responsibilities. Too often, because of shrinking library budgets, library gifts are considered burdensome and unprofitable drains on both financial and personnel resources. However, Gifts and Exchanges: Problems, Frustrations, . . . and Triumphs gives you solutions that will allow you to embrace your library's gifts as rewards. In this book, you will discover the latest ways of disposing unwanted materials, planning and holding book sales and auctions, and oper

  8. Spiritual gifts for biblical church growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian A. DeVries

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the use of spiritual gifts for church growth, particularly in relation to the sovereign work of the Holy Spirit. The article begins with a definition of spiritual gifts and by highlighting their purpose for growing the church. This is followed by two practical considerations: How should Christian believers use spiritual gifts for church growth, and how should church leaders motivate gift use for this purpose? Since the Holy Spirit works though believers to build up the body of Christ, advocates of biblical church growth should seek to employ his means to motivate spiritual giftedness in the church.

  9. Spiritual gifts for biblical church growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian A. DeVries

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the use of spiritual gifts for church growth, particularly in relation to the sovereign work of the Holy Spirit. The article begins with a definition of spiritual gifts and by highlighting their purpose for growing the church. This is followed by two practical considerations: How should Christian believers use spiritual gifts for church growth, and how should church leaders motivate gift use for this purpose? Since the Holy Spirit works though believers to build up the body of Christ, advocates of biblical church growth should seek to employ his means to motivate spiritual giftedness in the church.

  10. Gifts from orthodontists to general dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mahdi, Ammar; Firestone, Allen R; Beck, Frank; Fischbach, Henry

    2017-03-01

    To determine how often general dentists receive gifts from orthodontists, the value and number of the gifts they receive, and how they perceive the motivation behind the gift. This was a questionnaire-based study. A questionnaire was constructed and tested for validity and reliability. An electronic version of survey was sent via email to 1300 general dentists. The validity and reliability of the survey was confirmed. Two hundred fifty-four valid responses were received (20%). Eighty-five percent of responding general practitioners reported that they received gifts from an orthodontist. Almost 100% reported that they referred patients to orthodontists. About one-third of the responding general practitioners reported that their office provided orthodontic care. There were statistically significant correlations between the number of annual patient referrals the general practitioners reported making and the number and value of the gifts they received from the orthodontists. Female general practitioners reported receiving a higher number of gifts of greater total value than male practitioners. General practitioners who reported providing orthodontic treatment did not differ from those who did not in the number of referrals they made annually and the number and value of the gifts they received. Quality of care was the most common reason general practitioners reported for their referral to an orthodontist. Forty-four percent of the responders reported that they received discounted orthodontic treatment. General practitioners refer patients to orthodontists and receive gifts from them. The number and value of the gifts reflects the number of referrals they make.

  11. The Impact of Subjective Norm and Facilitating Conditions on Pre-Service Teachers' Attitude toward Computer Use: A Structural Equation Modeling of an Extended Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    This study examined pre-service teachers' self-report on their attitude toward computer use. Participants were 285 pre-service teachers at a teacher training institution in Singapore. They completed a survey questionnaire measuring their responses to five constructs which formed a research model using the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) as a…

  12. [Gifted children and dysharmonious development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheline-Antipoff, N; Poinso, F

    1994-11-01

    Gifted children are exposed to psychological disturbances. How much this psychological fragility is of a constitutional origin or is acquired, resulted from their intellectual precocity, is unclear. Nevertheless it justifies an early recognition of these children, knowing that psychological disturbances may be present early in life and mask the intellectual precocity. This is illustrated by the case of a three-year-old girl. Psychometric tests should be performed on an individual basis in order to avoid the negative effects of affective and emotional factors; an IQ above 140 characterizes gifted children. However, creativity tests are equally important allowing to identify their high capacity of originality and creativity. Uneven development of intelligence, affectivity and psychomotricity is frequent, which may induce anxiety disorders, obsessional behaviour and personality disorders. It appears that the higher the IQ is, the greater the psychological fragility, this fragility usually being important for an IQ above 170. The education of gifted children should be concentrated on the development of creativity and reflection, avoiding the tediousness of learning mainly based on memorizing and the acquisition of mechanisms. Early intervention is recommended in the case of psychological and behavioural disturbances, as an attempt to prevent the risk of pathological psychological organization.

  13. Gifted Programs Cannot Be Successful without Gifted Research and Theory: Evidence From Practice With Gifted Students of Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the educational provision for mathematically gifted students offered in primary (elementary) schools in England (United Kingdom) just before the abandonment of the government's Gifted and Talented (G&T) program. Through a questionnaire within five Educational Authorities and four in-depth case studies in different…

  14. Acceptable noise level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Holme; Lantz, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) is used to quantify the amount of background noise that subjects can accept while listening to speech, and is suggested for prediction of individual hearing-aid use. The aim of this study was to assess the repeatability of the ANL measured in normal-hearing subjec...

  15. An fMRI Study of Nonverbally Gifted Reading Disabled Adults: Has Deficit Compensation Effected Gifted Potential?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W Gilger

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuroscience has advanced our understanding of the neurological basis of reading disability. Yet, no functional imaging work has been reported on the twice-exceptional dyslexic: individuals exhibiting both nonverbal-giftedness and reading disability (RD. We compared groups of reading-disabled (RD, nonverbally-gifted (G, nonverbally-gifted-RD (GRD, and control (C adults on validated word-rhyming and spatial visualization fMRI tasks, and standardized psychometric tests, to ascertain if the neurological functioning of GRD subjects was similar to that of typical RD or G subjects, or perhaps some unique RD subtype. Results demonstrate that GRD adults resemble non-gifted reading disabled (RD adults in performance on paper-and-pencil reading, math and spatial tests, and in patterns of functional activation during rhyming and spatial processing. Data are consistent with what may be a shared etiology of reading disability and giftedness in GRD individuals that yields a lifespan interaction with reading compensation effects, modifying how their adult brain processes text and spatial stimuli.

  16. An fMRI study of nonverbally gifted reading disabled adults: has deficit compensation effected gifted potential?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilger, Jeffrey W; Talavage, Thomas M; Olulade, Olumide A

    2013-01-01

    Neuroscience has advanced our understanding of the neurological basis of reading disability (RD). Yet, no functional imaging work has been reported on the twice-exceptional dyslexic: individuals exhibiting both non-verbal-giftedness and RD. We compared groups of reading-disabled (RD), non-verbally-gifted (G), non-verbally-gifted-RD (GRD), and control (C) adults on validated word-rhyming and spatial visualization fMRI tasks, and standardized psychometric tests, to ascertain if the neurological functioning of GRD subjects was similar to that of typical RD or G subjects, or perhaps some unique RD subtype. Results demonstrate that GRD adults resemble non-gifted RD adults in performance on paper-and-pencil reading, math and spatial tests, and in patterns of functional activation during rhyming and spatial processing. Data are consistent with what may be a shared etiology of RD and giftedness in GRD individuals that yields a lifespan interaction with reading compensation effects, modifying how their adult brain processes text and spatial stimuli.

  17. Gambling-Related Attitudes and Behaviors in Adolescents Having Received Instant (Scratch) Lottery Tickets as Gifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Priya V.; Pilver, Corey E.; Desai, Rani A.; Steinberg, Marvin A.; Rugle, Loreen; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; Potenza, Marc N.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Instant (scratch) lottery ticket gambling is popular among adolescents. Prior research has not determined whether adolescents’ gambling behavior and attitudes toward gambling are influenced by the receipt of scratch lottery tickets as gifts. Method Cross-sectional survey data from 2,002 Connecticut high school students with past-year gambling were analyzed using bivariate approaches and logistic regression analyses. Interactions between gambling-problem severity and lottery-gift status were examined in relation to multiple outcomes. Results Adolescents who received a scratch lottery ticket as a gift compared with those who did not were more likely to report features of problem gambling, buy scratch lottery tickets for themselves, and buy and receive other types of lottery tickets; they were also less likely to report parental disapproval of gambling and to see gambling prevention efforts as important. Later (≥15 years) age-at-gambling-onset was inversely linked to gambling-problem severity in the lottery gift group (odds ratio [OR] = .38) but not in the nongift group (OR = .91), yielding a significant severity by gift status interaction. Other academic, health, and gambling-related correlates of gambling-problem severity were similar in the gift and nongift groups. Conclusions For adolescents, the receipt of scratch lottery tickets as gifts during childhood or adolescence was associated with risky/problematic gambling and with gambling-related attitudes, behaviors, and views suggesting greater gambling acceptability. The extent to which the receipt of scratch lottery tickets may promote gambling behaviors and the development of gambling problems warrants consideration. Education, prevention, and treatment strategies should incorporate findings relating to receipt of gambling products by underage individuals. PMID:23299004

  18. Gambling-related attitudes and behaviors in adolescents having received instant (scratch) lottery tickets as gifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Priya V; Pilver, Corey E; Desai, Rani A; Steinberg, Marvin A; Rugle, Loreen; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; Potenza, Marc N

    2013-04-01

    Instant (scratch) lottery ticket gambling is popular among adolescents. Prior research has not determined whether adolescents' gambling behavior and attitudes toward gambling are influenced by the receipt of scratch lottery tickets as gifts. Cross-sectional survey data from 2,002 Connecticut high school students with past-year gambling were analyzed using bivariate approaches and logistic regression analyses. Interactions between gambling-problem severity and lottery-gift status were examined in relation to multiple outcomes. Adolescents who received a scratch lottery ticket as a gift compared with those who did not were more likely to report features of problem gambling, buy scratch lottery tickets for themselves, and buy and receive other types of lottery tickets; they were also less likely to report parental disapproval of gambling and to see gambling prevention efforts as important. Later (≥15 years) age-at-gambling-onset was inversely linked to gambling-problem severity in the lottery gift group (odds ratio [OR] = .38) but not in the nongift group (OR = .91), yielding a significant severity by gift status interaction. Other academic, health, and gambling-related correlates of gambling-problem severity were similar in the gift and nongift groups. For adolescents, the receipt of scratch lottery tickets as gifts during childhood or adolescence was associated with risky/problematic gambling and with gambling-related attitudes, behaviors, and views suggesting greater gambling acceptability. The extent to which the receipt of scratch lottery tickets may promote gambling behaviors and the development of gambling problems warrants consideration. Education, prevention, and treatment strategies should incorporate findings relating to receipt of gambling products by underage individuals. Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.

  19. 45 CFR 73.735-507 - Acceptance of travel and subsistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... official travel under these circumstances, such acceptance and the basis for it must be reported in writing... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Acceptance of travel and subsistence. 73.735-507... OF CONDUCT Gifts, Entertainment, and Favors § 73.735-507 Acceptance of travel and subsistence. (a...

  20. 45 CFR 73.735-505 - Acceptance of awards and prizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Acceptance of awards and prizes. 73.735-505 Section 73.735-505 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION STANDARDS OF CONDUCT Gifts, Entertainment, and Favors § 73.735-505 Acceptance of awards and prizes. (a) Employees may accept awards, including cash awards,...

  1. Acceptable noise level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Holme; Lantz, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) is used to quantify the amount of background noise that subjects can accept while listening to speech, and is suggested for prediction of individual hearing-aid use. The aim of this study was to assess the repeatability of the ANL measured in normal-hearing subjects...... using running Danish and non-semantic speech materials as stimuli and modulated speech-spectrum and multi-talker babble noises as competing stimuli....

  2. How the Gifted Cope with Their Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeper, Annemarie

    1982-01-01

    Six personality types are characteristic of gifted children: the perfectionist, the child/adult (with a need to be in charge), the winner of the competition, the exception, the self-critic, and finally, the well-integrated child. The gifted child's emotional development should be considered in his/her education. (CL)

  3. Gifted Students' Metaphor Images about Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Elif Esra; Unal, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the metaphors images of gifted students about mathematics. The sample of the study consists of 82 gifted students, which are 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 graders, from Istanbul. Data were collected by asking students to complete the sentence: "Mathematics is as …, because…". In the study content analysis was…

  4. Diagnosis of the Gifted in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Many parents of gifted, talented and high-ability children seek counseling in the belief that a "diagnosis" of their child as "gifted" will solve the problems they and their child are encountering. In Israel, most children are screened for giftedness using the Szold examinations in grade 2 or 3 between the ages of 7 and 9…

  5. What Are/Do Gifted Teenagers Like?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Phyllis, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This journal presents four articles on gifted adolescents. The first is "Gifted and Gay: A Study of the Adolescent Experience" (Jean Sunde Peterson and Heather Rischar). This paper reports on a retrospective study of the experiences of 18 gay, lesbian, or bisexual young adults with high ability, finding themes of danger, isolation, depression, and…

  6. The Gifted Learning Disabled: Identification and Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoruk, Genevieve; Yewchuk, Carolyn

    1986-01-01

    Examines how programs and educational alternatives for the gifted can be modified for learning disabled students. Reviews difficulties in identifying gifted learning disabled through teacher nomination, group achievement scores, group intelligence tests, and previously demonstrated accomplishments and placement in mainstreaming, resource room,…

  7. Gifted Education and Talent Support in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Christian; Müller, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    While the focus in Germany was initially on disabled children only, the promotion of gifted and talented children has become increasingly important. Different organisations and institutions, ranging from parents' associations to foundations, offer a large variety of measures catering for the special demands of gifted and talented children,…

  8. Gifted Education in German-Speaking Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Anna; Nevo, Baruch

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide the reader with a comprehensive yet detailed account of the current giftedness and gifted education situation in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland. It is concerned with four main research questions: (1) How is "giftedness" defined in German-speaking countries? (2) How are gifted children…

  9. Illinois Association for Gifted Children Journal, 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smutny, Joan Franklin, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This issue of the Illinois Association for Gifted Children (IAGC) Journal focuses on curriculum. Featured articles include: (1) "Curriculum: What Is It? How Do You Know if It Is Quality?" (Sally Walker); (2) "Tiered Lessons: What Are Their Benefits and Applications?" (Carol Ann Tomlinson); (3) "Do Gifted and Talented Youth Get Counseling, Models,…

  10. The Scenario of Gifted Education in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechsler, Solange Muglia; Fleith, Denise de Souza

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of gifted education in Brazil. A scenario of the education of the gifted is presented, including the official concept of giftedness as well as programs and services available to emphasize important contributions to the area. Although there are considerable advances regarding policies, practices,…

  11. Homeschooling the Gifted: A Parent's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Jennifer L.; Matthews, Michael S.; Nester, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Homeschooling has witnessed a dramatic growth over the past decade. Included in this population are gifted and talented students, yet despite this growth there has been no appreciable increase in the research literature. To better understand the gifted homeschooling family, researchers interviewed 13 parents of homeschooled children their parents…

  12. Giftedness and Subjective Well-Being: A Study with Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirthwein, Linda; Rost, Detlef H.

    2011-01-01

    Studies on the well-being of gifted adults are rare, and the available studies are often limited by methodological shortcomings. In a longitudinal project 101 intellectually gifted adults (mean IQ = 136) were compared to 91 adults of average intelligence (mean IQ = 103). Subjective well-being was operationalized by positive and negative…

  13. Broad and narrow bracketing in gift certificate spending

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felso, Flora A.; Soetevent, Adriaan R.

    We survey 1050 consumers who have just redeemed one or more open loop gift certificates to learn whether they view gift certificate income, cash gifts and non-gift income as substitutes. We find that the majority (83%) of recipients spend the certificates in the same way as cash. The other

  14. Broad and narrow bracketing in gift certificate spending

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felsö, F.Á.; Soetevent, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    We survey 1050 consumers who have just redeemed one or more open loop gift certificates to learn whether they view gift certificate income, cash gifts and non-gift income as substitutes. We find that the majority (83%) of recipients spend the certificates in the same way as cash. The other

  15. Simple and Complex Gift Exchange in the Laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, E.C.M.; Nelissen, J.H.M.; Potters, J.J.M.; Verbon, H.A.A.

    1999-01-01

    We examine an experimental gift exchange game in which the players can improve upon the unique no-gifts equilibrium through cooperative gift giving. The main feature of the study is that there are two different types of gift exchange, which we call simple and complex exchange, respectively. Complex

  16. Level of Depression in Intellectually Gifted Secondary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Salman; Begume, Nasreen

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present research was to investigate the difference in depression between intellectually gifted and non-gifted secondary school children. After a detailed review of literature the following hypothesis was formulated; there would be a significant difference between intellectually gifted and non-gifted secondary school children on…

  17. Gifted Students With Disabilities: Are We Finding Them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnes, Frances A.; Shaunessy, Elizabeth; Bisland, Amy

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the number of gifted students with disabilities identified and served in gifted education programs in the state of Mississippi. Four categories of giftedness are set forth in the regulations for gifted programs are: (1) Intellectually gifted children refers to children and youth who are found to…

  18. Korean Gifted Education: Domain-Specific Developmental Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seokhee; Suh, Yewon

    2016-01-01

    The current Korean gifted education system is designed to help gifted children have a balance between excellence and emotional and social wellbeing. In this article, the current status of Korean gifted education is presented, reflecting on the history, purpose, theoretical foundation, infrastructure, and state of art of gifted education with…

  19. Cortical morphometry in frontoparietal and default mode networks in math-gifted adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-Sánchez, Francisco J; Carmona, Susana; Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Sánchez-González, Javier; Guzmán-de-Villoria, Juan; Franco, Carolina; Robles, Olalla; Arango, Celso; Desco, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Math-gifted subjects are characterized by above-age performance in intelligence tests, exceptional creativity, and high task commitment. Neuroimaging studies reveal enhanced functional brain organization and white matter microstructure in the frontoparietal executive network of math-gifted individuals. However, the cortical morphometry of these subjects remains largely unknown. The main goal of this study was to compare the cortical morphometry of math-gifted adolescents with that of an age- and IQ-matched control group. We used surface-based methods to perform a vertex-wise analysis of cortical thickness and surface area. Our results show that math-gifted adolescents present a thinner cortex and a larger surface area in key regions of the frontoparietal and default mode networks, which are involved in executive processing and creative thinking, respectively. The combination of reduced cortical thickness and larger surface area suggests above-age neural maturation of these networks in math-gifted individuals. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1893-1902, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Metacognitive awareness and math anxiety in gifted students

    OpenAIRE

    Hakan Sarıcam; Üzeyir Ogurlu

    2015-01-01

    The basic purpose of this study has been to examine the relationships between metacognitive awareness and maths anxiety in gifted students. The second aim was to compare with gifted and non-gifted students’ metacognitive awareness and maths anxiety levels. The participants were 300 (150 gifted, 150 non-gifted) volunteer secondary school students in Turkey. The mean age of the participants was 12.56 years ranging from 12 to 13 years. For gathering data, the Maths Anxiety Scale for Elementary S...

  1. Half a Gift Is Not Half-Hearted: A Giver-Receiver Asymmetry in the Thoughtfulness of Partial Gifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupor, Daniella; Flynn, Frank; Norton, Michael I

    2017-12-01

    Four studies document an asymmetry in givers' and receivers' evaluations of gifts: Givers underestimate the extent to which receivers perceive partial (but more desirable) gifts to be thoughtful, valuable, and worthy of appreciation. Study 1 documents this asymmetry and suggests that givers underestimate the extent to which partial gifts signal thoughtfulness to receivers. Study 2 replicates this asymmetry in the context of a real gift exchange among friends. Study 3 shows that this asymmetry arises because givers believe that purchasing partial gifts is a greater violation of gift-giving norms than do receivers, leading givers to expect that partial gifts will damage receivers' perceptions of a gift's value. Study 4 offers an intervention that induces givers to select the (partial) gifts that receivers prefer more than givers expect: framing a gift's separate components as complete units.

  2. Gift-giving and network structure in rural China: utilizing long-term spontaneous gift records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi

    2014-01-01

    The tradition of keeping written records of gift received during household ceremonies in many countries offers researchers an underutilized means of data collection for social network analysis. This paper first summarizes unique features of the gift record data that circumvent five prevailing sampling and measurement issues in the literature, and we discuss their advantages over existing studies at both the individual level and the dyadic link level using previous data sources. We then document our research project in rural China that implements a multiple wave census-type household survey and a long-term gift record collection. The pattern of gift-giving in major household social events and its recent escalation is analyzed. There are significantly positive correlations between gift network centrality and various forms of informal insurance. Finally, economic inequality and competitive marriage market are among the main demographic and socioeconomic determinants of the observed gift network structure.

  3. Gift-giving and network structure in rural China: utilizing long-term spontaneous gift records.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Chen

    Full Text Available The tradition of keeping written records of gift received during household ceremonies in many countries offers researchers an underutilized means of data collection for social network analysis. This paper first summarizes unique features of the gift record data that circumvent five prevailing sampling and measurement issues in the literature, and we discuss their advantages over existing studies at both the individual level and the dyadic link level using previous data sources. We then document our research project in rural China that implements a multiple wave census-type household survey and a long-term gift record collection. The pattern of gift-giving in major household social events and its recent escalation is analyzed. There are significantly positive correlations between gift network centrality and various forms of informal insurance. Finally, economic inequality and competitive marriage market are among the main demographic and socioeconomic determinants of the observed gift network structure.

  4. Czech teachers’ attitudes toward typical characteristics of intellectually gifted learners with dyslexia and the issue of identifying and educating them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šárka Portešová

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The presented study deals with the issue of basic school teachers’ attitudestowards selected behavioral and cognitive characteristics of intellectually gifted lear-ners with dyslexia and the issue of identifying and educating these learners. Researchis being conducted at the time as a Greek-Czech intercultural study. However, in thepresented contribution only Czech research data are analyzed and interpreted. In theresearch, we used Attitudes Toward Giftedness/Learning disability – Dyslexia Scale byGreek authors Gari, Panagiota, Nikolopoulou (2006. This method was administeredto 158 teachers from all over the Czech Republic. Based on statistical analysis, thepresented empirical examination reached some important conclusions. It became clearthat Czech teachers are good at identifying characteristics related to manifestations ofa “gifted learner” and a “learner with a learning disability”. Moreover, they are able toidentify also the so-called duality in learning abilities, i.e. the simultaneousness of abi-lity and handicap in the learning process manifested in a particular cognitive domain.However, they identify this duality especially within Czech language. The most proble-matic appears to be the accepting of the existence of this typical characteristic of thegiven population of learners in other academic subjects, for example in mathematics.It is here in particular where teachers tend to expect nothing but exceptional perfor-mance, without a possibility of partial failure (they derive it from giftedness. It seemsthat due to the refusal of the existence of duality in learning ability intervening in allacademic subjects, it can lead to a wrong identification of this minority group of thegifted. Nevertheless, this fact must be confirmed in further empiric research.

  5. Independent Curriculum Enrichment Studies: Learning Packages for the Gifted. Table of Contents; Teachers' Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafayette School District, CA.

    The looseleaf binder contains a series of 268 learning packages for gifted and talented elementary school students, divided into 13 subject area sections, including art, chess, general, health, language arts, literature, mathematics, perception, reading, science, social studies, study skills, and thinking skills. Two additional sections include…

  6. A Psychological Autopsy of the Suicide of an Academically Gifted Student: Researchers' and Parents' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Tracy L.; Gust-Brey, Karyn; Ball, P. Bonny

    2002-01-01

    A case study of an academically gifted college student who committed suicide resulted in three sets of findings: those that reflected exclusively on the subject's life, those that compared his life with 3 previous psychological autopsies conducted, and those that reflected the parents' observations and experiences of his life. (Contains…

  7. Social skills of gifted and talented children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luiza Pontes de França-Freitas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a clear lack of empirical studies about the socio-emotional characteristics of gifted and talented children, especially in the context of social skills. This study aimed to characterize the social skills of such children, identifying similarities and differences in the skill repertoire in comparison with non-gifted children. The sample contained 394 children from 8 to 12 years old, of which 269 children were identified as gifted. All participants answered the Social Skills Rating System and Socio-demographic Questionnaire. The results indicate a more elaborate social skills repertoire for gifted children in all categories with the exception of empathic skills. The implications of these results for the planning of educational programs are discussed and future research directions are identified.

  8. Nurturing gifted learners in Mainland China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Jiannong; Zhang, X.; Chen, N.

    2013-01-01

    -socio-intellectual model, illustrated the nature of human being and the nature of gifted learners. From the perspective of the BSI model, the authors suggested three aspects are very critical to curriculum design to meet the needs of gifted education: physical maturation or physical development, social maturation...... or social and interpersonal development, and mental maturation or intellectual development. It was proved that BSI model has its theoretical rationality and practical validity in Mainland China......In this article, based on the previous researches on the development of gifted learners, the authors summarized the problems in nurturing gifted learners due to lacking of the appropriate educational philosophy and educational methodology in Mainland China. The authors proposed the Bio...

  9. Centering Activities for Gifted/Talented Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisk, Dorothy

    1978-01-01

    Reviewed are centering techniques to help gifted and talented students stimulate and further develop the ability to incubate, or to pay attention to the imagery continuously going on in the brain's right hemisphere. (CL)

  10. Long latency event-related potentials (P300) in gifted children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, F; Delpont, E; Suisse, G; Richelme, C; Dolisi, C

    1993-01-01

    In children, P3 latency decreases with increasing age. This decrease could be linked with the maturation of cognitive processes. According to this hypothesis, event-related potentials P3 were recording in gifted children to research an electrophysiological correlation with the mental precocity. Auditory long latency event-related potentials were recorded in 10 gifted children (IQs over 140) and 23 control subjects. The part of variance related to age was extracted by comparing deviations from regression line as a function of age. Stimulus-evoked N1 component latency was not statistically different in the two populations. Event-related P3 component latency was significantly shorter in the gifted children at Cz (P children.

  11. Preliminary Design and Analysis of the GIFTS Instrument Pointing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomkowski, Paul P.

    2003-01-01

    The Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) Instrument is the next generation spectrometer for remote sensing weather satellites. The GIFTS instrument will be used to perform scans of the Earth s atmosphere by assembling a series of field-of- views (FOV) into a larger pattern. Realization of this process is achieved by step scanning the instrument FOV in a contiguous fashion across any desired portion of the visible Earth. A 2.3 arc second pointing stability, with respect to the scanning instrument, must be maintained for the duration of the FOV scan. A star tracker producing attitude data at 100 Hz rate will be used by the autonomous pointing algorithm to precisely track target FOV s on the surface of the Earth. The main objective is to validate the pointing algorithm in the presence of spacecraft disturbances and determine acceptable disturbance limits from expected noise sources. Proof of concept validation of the pointing system algorithm is carried out with a full system simulation developed using Matlab Simulink. Models for the following components function within the full system simulation: inertial reference unit (IRU), attitude control system (ACS), reaction wheels, star tracker, and mirror controller. With the spacecraft orbital position and attitude maintained to within specified limits the pointing algorithm receives quaternion, ephemeris, and initialization data that are used to construct the required mirror pointing commands at a 100 Hz rate. This comprehensive simulation will also aid in obtaining a thorough understanding of spacecraft disturbances and other sources of pointing system errors. Parameter sensitivity studies and disturbance analysis will be used to obtain limits of operability for the GIFTS instrument. The culmination of this simulation development and analysis will be used to validate the specified performance requirements outlined for this instrument.

  12. The Hi-Tech Gift Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Barbrook, Richard

    1998-01-01

    During the Sixties, the New Left created a new form of radical politics: anarcho-communism. Above all, the Situationists and similar groups believed that the tribal gift economy proved that individuals could successfully live together without needing either the state or the market. From May 1968 to the late Nineties, this utopian vision of anarcho-communism has inspired community media and DIY culture activists. Within the universities, the gift economy already was the primary method of socia...

  13. Patterns of computer use amoung gifted children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sesko, S.C.

    1998-03-20

    This study investigated patterns of computer interaction by gifted children who use computers extensively. There were two objectives: (a) To examine how these particular children came to learn various computer applications and programming, where they began, and how; and (b) To explore the number and variety of uses these gifted children have for their various computer interactions. The study led to several conjectures about the interactions of gifted children and computers. There is evidence that schools do not well serve gifted children regarding computer use. As a result, many gifted children learn what they know about computers and computer applications at home or elsewhere. Further evidence indicates that, without formal instruction in school, these children have constructed their own ideas of what computers are for and what they are able to do with them. Though many of these uses are no different from the ones that other children and adults have discovered, the study found some idiosyncratic uses and meanings. Along with the `what` of research, there is the question of `why` it is important and worth pursuing. This research has the promise of contributing to knowledge in the area of gifted and talented education, in that by understanding better how gifted children come to learn various computer applications and computer programming, and by understanding better the uses they have for these interactions, educators may be able to develop curricula, environments, and instruction to enhance these learning experiences in technology. This study establishes, to the best of the my knowledge, a precedent in the field of research into gifted and talented children and their use of computers.

  14. Self-Concept Changes in Multiple Self-Concept Domains of Gifted Students Participating in a Summer Residential School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preckel, Franzis; Rach, Hannah; Scherrer, Vsevolod

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated changes in self-esteem, academic self-concept, intellectual self-concept, and social self-concepts of acceptance, assertion, relations with same-sex peers and relations with other-sex peers with 177 gifted students participating in a 16-day summer school in Germany. Students were assessed three times by self-report…

  15. 78 FR 31713 - Office of the Chief of Protocol; Gifts to Federal Employees from Foreign Government Sources...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ... accepting on behalf of the U.S. the gift on behalf of the U.S. Government., estimated Identity of foreign.... cylindrical ``Franz Jintao, President of cause embarrassment to Collection'' vase the People's Republic donor... Government. with a decorative Mexican States. ceramic design on the front and silver bells on each side. Rec...

  16. Gifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, Shirley H.

    2003-01-01

    This article presents what one college president did when presented with an unexpected grant--she gave it away. This action served as a catalyst for more support, resulting in new grants totaling more than $3 million. (GCP)

  17. Gifted Education and Talent Support in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Fischer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available While the focus in Germany was initially on disabled children only, the promotion of gifted and talented children has become increasingly important. Different organisations and institutions, ranging from parents’ associations to foundations, offer a large variety of measures catering for the special demands of gifted and talented children, enabling the exchange of information on giftedness and the cooperation of different institutions. Talented children are also provided with access to scholarships as well as to special academies and competitions on different topics. Furthermore, educators and researches involved in the promotion of giftedness can attend conferences as well as gaining qualifications as specialists in gifted education and talent support. In addition to these nationwide, extracurricular measures, the individual federal states offer various acceleration and enrichment activities for children with high abilities at school. Overall, this leads to a diverse system of gifted education and talent support in Germany. It does, however, mean that Germany lacks a common national strategy of gifted education and talent support due to the lack of networking of the individual federal states. By exchanging ideas and information on their applied concepts of ability promotion, the federal states could benefit from each other’s expertise and experiences. Further improvement could be achieved if concepts of gifted education and talent support were to become an integral part of various discussions, such as those on inclusive education or on the results of international comparative studies (e.g., PISA, PIRLS or TIMSS.

  18. The gifted underachiever in school: A student who has a problem or a 'rebel' making problems?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Vitomir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this research was to study the correlates of school underachievement and to sketch the possible profile of the gifted underachiever. The study was conducted on a sample of high school students in Belgrade (N = 434. The subjects were administered a battery of ability tests and asked to self-estimate their intelligence. On the basis of ability test and school achievement data, the subjects were classified into three groups: gifted underachievers (N1 = 26, gifted students (N2 = 81, and others (N3 = 332. The results of ANOVAs indicate that these three groups differ significantly on the dimensions of Attitudes towards school: academic self-perception, attitudes toward teachers, assessment goals, and motivation and self-regulation. Also, significant between-group differences emerge on the following dimensions of self-concept: assessment of ability, assessment of achievement, and academic self-confidence. These dimensions show the highest correlation with the canonical function that efficiently discriminates between underachievers and gifted students (canonical correlation coefficient = .70, performance of classification = 91.6%. Students who do not realize their potential in school, although they consider themselves to be equally intelligent as gifted students, do not draw their confidence and self-esteem from academic achievement. Gifted underachievers evaluate educational goals as less important and are not motivated to make an effort in school. Also, they are likely to come into conflict with teachers in order to challenge their authority. These results suggest that being an underachiever is a 'choice of will', rather than the unwilling result of difficulties in the environment, psychological problems or underdeveloped meta-cognitive skills, but an alternative interpretation is also plausible. The roots of this hypothetical choice are examined with reference to the educational system and its possible effects of 'normalization'.

  19. Gifted & Green: Sustainability/Environmental Science Investigations That Promote Gifted Children's Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroth, Stephen T.; Helfer, Jason A.

    2017-01-01

    Environmental studies provide an ideal opportunity for gifted children of any age to build critical and creative-thinking skills while also building skills in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) areas. Exploring issues related to sustainability and environmental concerns permits gifted learners to identify problems, develop…

  20. Gifted, LD, and Gifted/LD Children's Understanding of Temporal Sequencing on Television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelman, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the conceptualization of television viewing as a learned activity by highlighting the interrelatedness of children's linguistic, cognitive, and perceptual skills for accurate comprehension of temporal sequencing based on a study of five-year-old gifted, learning disabled (LD), and gifted/LD students. (references) (LRW)

  1. Gifted and Learning-Disabled Gifted Students' Knowledge and Use of Mathematical Problem-Solving Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Marjorie

    1991-01-01

    Three gifted and three learning-disabled gifted students (ages 13-15) viewed themselves on videotape solving mathematical problems and responded to questions pertaining to their problem-solving strategies. The non-learning-disabled students applied substantially more cognitive and metacognitive knowledge to the problem-solving task. (Author/DB)

  2. Advantage: Disadvantaged Gifted. Presentations from the Third National Conference on Disadvantaged Gifted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivlin, Harry N.; And Others

    The presentations in this volume deal with various aspects of education for the gifted disadvantaged. Maija Blaubergs describes disadvantages experienced by gifted and talented girls in obtaining access to opportunities for achievement congruent with their potentialities. Some of the topics examined are sexist barriers, marriage, institutional and…

  3. The Opinions of Students Training in Department of Gifted Education towards Education of Gifted Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Deniz; Zaroglu, Leyla

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the opinions of students training in department of gifted education towards education of gifted individuals. The research was formed and conducted in quantitative design. This study was achieved in spring term in 2014-2015 academic year in Near East University. Twenty-six teacher candidates training in the…

  4. Analysis on the effectiveness of gifted education by studying perceptions of science gifted education recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyun-Chul; Ryu, Chun-Ryol; Choi, Jinsu; Park, Kyeong-Jin

    2016-04-01

    The necessity of science gifted education is persistently emphasized in the aspect of developing individuals' potential abilities and enhancing national competitiveness. In the case of Korea, gifted education has been conducted on a national level ever since the country established legal and institutional strategies for gifted education in 2000. Even though 15 years has passed since a full-scale implementation of gifted education has started, there are few researches on the effectiveness of gifted education. Therefore, considering the splashdown effect, that a long period of time is needed to obtain reliable assessments on education effectiveness, this research surveyed gifted education recipients to study the effectiveness of gifted education. For this cause, we developed an questionnaire and conducted a survey of university students who had experience of receiving science gifted education. We deduced the following from the analysis. First, generally the recipients were satisfied with their gifted education experiences, but thought that not enough opportunities were provided on problem solving ability enhancement and career related aspects. Second, schools considered 'experiments' as the most effective teaching method, regardless to the stage of education. In addition, they perceived 'discussions and presentations' as effective education methods for elementary school students; 'theme investigating classes' for middle school students; and lectures for high school students. It could be seen that various experiences were held important for elementary school students and as students went into high school education, more emphasis was placed on the importance of understanding mathematical and scientific facts. Third, on gifted education teaching staffs, satisfaction of professionalism on specialities were high but satisfaction of variety of teaching methods were relatively low. In this research, to encourage science gifted students to meet their potentials, we propose

  5. Gifts, talismans and tokens in analysis: symbolic enactments or sinister acts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaverien, Joy

    2011-04-01

    Analysis is nuanced with many non-verbal cues and interactions. This is vividly illustrated when gifts are presented to the analyst. Their physical presence transcends the symbolic frame of analysis because, although their meaning may be metaphorical, their presence is real. Unlike other material objects and pictures, the gift may seem to invite the analyst to receive it personally. It may apparently demand some form of action. A gift may be consciously given as a token, or it may be magically invested as a talisman. On the surface, it might appear to be an expression of love; it may be a communication of a wish for acceptance; but it may have more 'sinister', unconscious intent. It may embody the wish to expel unwanted affect, ward off evil or control the analyst. Therefore disposal, that is the resolution and settling of the object, is significant. The case with which this paper is illustrated traces the meaning of a series of gifts in a single analysis. It is hoped that this will enhance a wider understanding of this common analytic phenomenon. © 2011, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  6. 5 CFR 2634.304 - Gifts and reimbursements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... reported. See also exclusions specified in the definitions of gift and reimbursement, at § 2634.105(h) and... motivation behind the gift are personal; and (ii) No countervailing public purpose requires public disclosure...

  7. Giftedness and Gifted Education: The Need for a Paradigm Change

    OpenAIRE

    Ziegler, Albert; Stöger, Heidrun; Vialle, Wilma

    2012-01-01

    This commentary addresses Subotnik et al.’s target article from the perspective of researchers active in the field of giftedness. First, we self-critically examine the current standing of giftedness research within the scientific community. Second, the authors’ critique of gifted education is sharpened in three respects: (a) gifted identification, (b) effectiveness of gifted education, and (c) credentials of gifted education. Finally, four necessary and productive lines for future research ar...

  8. Monitoring study of the quality of work with gifted schoolchildren in the Russian Federation regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Vyacheslavovich Chegodaev

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of research into the quality of work with talented schoolchildren in the Russian Federation subjects. It shows that it is the regional and municipal levels that should be most actively involved in the identification and development of such children. The author suggests his methodology of calculating the integral index of the quality of work with gifted schoolchildren in the regional educational systems. The article shows that Russia’s territories differ considerably according to this indicator. The highest value of the index is registered in the Volga Federal District (average rating is 0.499 and the Central (0.480 Federal District. The constituent entities of the North Caucasian (0.303 and Far Eastern (0.358 federal districts have the lowest average rating. The regions were divided into five groups by the index of quality of work with gifted schoolchildren. The Vologda Oblast joined the group in which the level of quality of work with gifted schoolchildren was above average; the Oblast ranked 22nd in the country and 5th in the Northwestern Federal District. The Oblast has the greatest progress by the set of indicators “Olympiad movement” (6th place among Russian regions. According to some indicators, the Oblast’s results were below the threshold indicators. The dynamics of the integral index of the quality of work with gifted students for 2012–2013 was analysed by the cross grouping of the regions according to the level and rate of growth (decline of the integral index. The Vologda Oblast was included in the group of regions with low growth rates of the integral index (94%, which creates the risk of decrease in the quality of work with gifted students. The article states the main reasons for the integral index decline; it also suggests certain measures for the improvement of the quality of work with gifted schoolchildren

  9. From motivation to acceptability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordfalk, Francisca; Olejaz, Maria; Jensen, Anja M. B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Over the past three decades, public attitudes to organ donation have been a subject of numerous studies focusing on donor motivation. Here, we present a fresh approach. We suggest focusing on public acceptability instead of motivation. The point is to understand public attitudes well...

  10. 50 CFR 20.40 - Gift of migratory game birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gift of migratory game birds. 20.40... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Possession § 20.40 Gift of migratory game birds. No person may receive, possess, or give to another, any freshly killed migratory game birds as a gift...

  11. High Reading Skills Mask Dyslexia in Gifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Viersen, Sietske; Kroesbergen, Evelyn H.; Slot, Esther M.; de Bree, Elise H.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated how gifted children with dyslexia might be able to mask literacy problems and the role of possible compensatory mechanisms. The sample consisted of 121 Dutch primary school children that were divided over four groups (typically developing [TD] children, children with dyslexia, gifted children, gifted children with…

  12. Comparison of Trained and Untrained Teachers of Gifted Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jan B.; Feldhusen, John F.

    1994-01-01

    This study of 82 teachers of gifted students showed that teachers trained in gifted education demonstrated greater teaching skills and developed more positive classroom climates than did teachers who had no training in gifted education. Students of trained teachers reported greater emphasis on higher level thinking skills and on discussion and…

  13. Raising Champions: A Parents' Guide for Nurturing Their Gifted Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayler, Micheal

    This guide for parents of gifted children in Texas is intended to provide general information and sources of additional help. Section 1 examines the meaning of being gifted and talented and provides the Texas definition of giftedness, lists of characteristics and concomitant problems of gifted and talented children, and a discussion of the highly…

  14. Gifted and Average Children's Relations with Their Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksic, Slavica

    1997-01-01

    Used questionnaires to investigate quality of and satisfaction with parent-child relationships among gifted and average adolescents in Yugoslavia. Found no significant differences in relations, but pupils in special programs and gifted males were less satisfied than pupils in regular programs and gifted females. Also found that older adolescents…

  15. Academic Dishonesty among Gifted and High-Achieving Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, Kimberly A.

    2011-01-01

    Gifted high school students are essentially absent in the research concerning academic integrity; however, over the past few years, educators of gifted students have noticed an increase in the occurrences of academic dishonesty among students in gifted classrooms (Abilock, 2009). This research may be analyzed to provide some insight into the…

  16. How to Develop Innovators? Innovation Education for the Gifted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavinina, Larisa

    2013-01-01

    Many people correctly believe that a majority of innovators come from the population of gifted and talented children. If we want to develop innovative abilities of the gifted, then a special, new direction in gifted education is needed: innovation education. This article introduces innovation education, which refers to a wide range of educational…

  17. Gifted English Language Learners: Global Understandings and Australian Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Aranzazu M.; Cornish, Linley; Smith, Susen

    2016-01-01

    Current research on gifted English language learners (gifted ELLs) is broadly centered on identification issues and investigations of underrepresentation in gifted programs mainly in schools in the United States and referencing predominantly Spanish-speaking students. Australia presents itself as a multicultural nation, yet limited research exists…

  18. Academic Programs for Gifted and Talented/Learning Disabled Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinfeld, Rich; Barnes-Robinson, Linda; Jeweler, Sue; Shevitz, Betty

    2002-01-01

    This article discusses a comprehensive program for gifted students with learning disabilities in Maryland's Montgomery Country Public Schools (MCPS). MCPS has developed special self-contained classes for gifted students with severe learning disabilities while those with moderate and mild disabilities receive gifted instruction and services in…

  19. The Challenge of Identifying Gifted/Learning Disabled Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krochak, Linda A.; Ryan, Thomas G.

    2007-01-01

    The following contemporary review illuminates several of the "best methods" to accurately identify gifted/learning disabled (GLD) students? Explanations which clearly define what it means to be gifted, learning disabled (LD) and gifted/learning disabled (GLD) are included and incorporated into a typology of three identities of GLD…

  20. Issues in Identification of Gifted/Learning Disabled Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yewchuck, C.

    1986-01-01

    Six issues relating to assessment of gifted/learning disabled (GLD) students are discussed: (1) incidence; (2) cut-off IQ scores; (3) barriers to identification; (4) use of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children--Revised; (5) differentiation between GLD and underachieving gifted; (6) qualitative differences between GLD, gifted, and learning…

  1. Teachers' Implicit Personality Theories about the Gifted: An Experimental Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudson, Tanja Gabriele; Preckel, Franzis

    2013-01-01

    The implicit theories teachers hold about the gifted influence their perception of and behavior toward highly able students, thus impacting the latter's educational opportunities. Two persistent stereotypes about the gifted can be distinguished: the harmony hypothesis (gifted students are superior in almost all domains) and the disharmony…

  2. Why Are Economists Evaluating the Impact of Gifted Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettler, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Bui, Craig, and Imberman assessed the impact of gifted and talented programs on student achievement using regression discontinuity and random assignment to gifted magnet schools. In both analyses, they found minimal impact of the gifted and talented programs on student achievement. This commentary addresses two concerns associated with the study.…

  3. Considerations and Strategies for Parenting the Gifted Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvino, James

    This monograph offers practical suggestions for interacting with gifted children at home. Section 1, "Parenting Styles Make a Difference," discusses a study on the differences in parenting styles of parents of gifted and nongifted students, describes four parental personality types that can cause or exacerbate problems in gifted children, and…

  4. The Mind/Brain Relationship of the Gifted Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdy, Waymon L.,

    This paper reviews three studies which examine cognitive processes and brain electrical activity in gifted children. The studies concentrated on mathematically gifted children and/or their sleep patterns. All three studies used the interhemispheric electroencephalogram to examine the gifted child's ability to harness right hemisphere capacities…

  5. The peculiarities of pedagogical search of gifted seniors

    OpenAIRE

    Melnyk, Maryna

    2017-01-01

    The author examines the question of identification of high school students as gifted.Discusses the psychological and pedagogical criteria of giftedness. The results of an empiricalstudy of gifted high school students search for pedagogical criteria are presented.Key words: giftedness, gifted students, criterion of giftedness.

  6. Gifted Male Readers: Current Understandings and Suggestions for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnani, Alexander R.

    2013-01-01

    Research literature concerning gifted male readers relies primarily on more extensive bodies of work regarding gifted males and male readers. Studied as a whole, the two halves portray a worrisome state of affairs for gifted male readers, who lag behind their female counterparts in the same patterns found across the ability spectrum. This literacy…

  7. Gifted Children in Israel: Theory, Practice, and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgram, Roberta M.

    Informal and formal programing for gifted children in grades 4 through 12 in Israel are described. After school and summer enrichment programs, special classes and special schools for the gifted are discussed; and a number of programs for gifted children from disadvantaged backgrounds are presented. The author reports on her own research studies…

  8. Academically Gifted Students' Perceived Interpersonal Competence and Peer Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seon-Young; Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula; Thomson, Dana Turner

    2012-01-01

    Perceptions of the interpersonal competence and peer relationships of 1,526 gifted adolescents who had previously participated in academic gifted programs at the Center for Talent Development were examined, using an online survey. Major findings included that the gifted students had generally positive perceptions of their abilities to initiate,…

  9. Investigating the Preschool Training for Gifted and Talented Students on Gifted School Teachers’ View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizem COSAR

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it was aimed to investigate the view of gifted school teachers on educating the preschool-aged gifted and talented students. Study is grounded as a case-study which is a method in qualitative research area. Data is collected with semi-structured interview questions from 10 different gifted school teachers working in Balikesir, Turkey. Three different questions were posed during semi-structured interviews to clearly introduce the view of teachers. According to analysis results; it was achieved that all participants believe the necessity of an education for gifted and talented students starting from the preschool age. Beside this necessity, teachers were emphasized that given education should be supported with a proper curriculum, physical structure (buildings & classes, science & art materials etc. and improved knowledge (in the field of educating preschool aged gifted and talented students of the teachers. When the responses of teachers for 3 different questions were assessed, teachers which are working for the education of gifted and talented students(out of preschool age are affirming their opinions that the education for the gifted and talented students should be started to given in preschool age.

  10. 26 CFR 301.7477-1 - Declaratory judgments relating to the value of certain gifts for gift tax purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... issues involving the interpretation and application of the gift tax law. (d) Requirements for declaratory... of tax imposed by chapter 12 means the last gift tax return (Form 709, “United States Gift (and... reported in a manner that constitutes adequate disclosure within the meaning of § 301.6501(c)-1(e) or (f...

  11. Identification of Gifted Students in Oman: Gender and Grade Differences on the Gifted Rating Scales-School Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Ahmed Hassan Hemdan; Kazem, Ali Mahdi; Pfeiffer, Steven; Alzubaidi, Abdul-Qawi; Elwan, Reda Abu; Ambosaidi, Abdullah; Al-Washahi, Mariam; Al-Kharosi, Tarek

    2017-01-01

    Research suggests that teacher-completed gifted screening scales can reduce undernomination of students with culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of the Gifted Rating Scales-School Form (GRS-S) in the identification of gifted students in Oman. The participants of the study represented…

  12. The Challenge of Providing Gifted Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Dole

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction to Volume 4, No of Global Education Review Although there is a lack of universal consensus on a definition of giftedness there is some agreement that giftedness involves multiple qualities, not just intellectual ones. Gifted education programs vary both among and within countries and who is served in these programs depends largely on the definitions used. The topics explored in this issue include perceptions and policies of gifted education in cultures and countries across the globe; the presumed dichotomy of equity and excellence in countries as different in ideologies as the United States and China; underrepresentation of culturally diverse students, a problem that has plagued the field for decades; gifted education in rural communities; and using a virtual environment for students to pose and share mathematical problems.

  13. Gifted and Talented Students’ Images of Scientists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sezen Camcı-Erdoğan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate gifted students’ images of scientists. The study involved 25 students in grades 7 and 8. The Draw-a-Scientist Test (DAST (Chamber, 183 was used to collect data. Drawings were eval-uated using certain criterion such as a scien-tist’s appearance and investigation, knowledge and technology symbols and gender and working style, place work, expressions, titles-captions-symbols and alternative images and age. The results showed that gifted students’ perceptions about scientists were stereotypical, generally with glasses and laboratory coats and working with experiment tubes, beakers indoors and using books, technological tools and dominantly lonely males. Most gifted stu-dents drew male scientists. Although females drew male scientists, none of the boys drew female scientist.

  14. [Self-esteem, self-centeredness and social-emotional adjustment of gifted children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostogianni, N; Andronikof, A

    2009-10-01

    There is an ongoing debate of how giftedness affects social-emotional adjustment. Self-esteem may be an indicator of social-emotional adjustment but insufficient in its explanatory capacity, especially high self-esteem which tends to produce opposite responses in regards to adjustment. A distinction between defensive and genuine high self-esteem could account for these results. In order to understand how self-esteem operates on social-emotional adjustment, it should be associated with other measurements relating to self-concern. In the Rorschach comprehensive system (CS), egocentricity index measures self-centeredness, which can be defined as the balance between self-concern and concern for others. High self-concern is associated with a neglect of the others. Operationalized here, as the interaction of high self-esteem and excessive self-concern, defensive high self-esteem should predict maladaptive outcomes. Participants were aged from 9 to 15 years old, with an IQ greater or equal to 130 on the WISC-III. They were attending regular classes and were not in counseling or psychotherapy. Children and adolescents were administrated the Rorschach CS and the Coopersmith self-esteem inventory. Parents completed the child behaviour checklist (CBCL) which assesses general psychopathology. Seventy-eight subjects' data satisfy the conditions of validity of the instruments used. Gifted boys present more behavior and emotional problems than gifted girls in this study. Self-esteem predicts social-emotional adjustment. There is an interaction between self-esteem and self-concern on psychopathology only for high values of self-esteem. Gifted with high self-esteem associated with high self-concern are more vulnerable to maladjustment than high self-esteem associated with low self-concern. Gifted children and adolescents with low self-esteem experience more problems anyhow. These findings reinforce the view that the gifted are a diverse group in terms of social-emotional adjustment

  15. Examining of the Gifted Students’ Teacher Preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feyzullah SAHIN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gifted students differ from their peers in terms of motivations, learning, social and emotional needs. Because of these differences, it is indispensible that their teachers have to have a number of different characteristics. Because, teachers’ personality tratis and professional qualifications affects gifted students’ academic, cognitive and affective development. The main aim of this study is to examine that whether gifted students’ preferences of characteristics that teachers should have, differs according to type of educational institution, student's gender and level of meeting their educational needs or not. The study was designed as descriptive, one of the survey models. The study group consists of 1077 gifted students who are enrolled at five Science High School state schools, a private gifted school and three Science and Art Centers in Thracia Region in Turkey. As a means of data collection, Gifted Students’ Teacher Preferences Scale (GSTPS developed by Sahin & Tortop (2013 was used. In the calculation of internal consistency reliability of research data, Cronbach's α value was calculated. Cronbach alfa realibity cofficients were found to be .92 for Personality Traits sub-scale, .89 Professional Qualification sub-scale and .94 GSTPS, respectively. Besides, it was seen that based on the gender of participants, there was no difference in the characteristics they want to see in teachers and the opinions of students in High Schools and at SACs differed from the ones who were in the private school. Moreover, it was determined that the scores of the ones who thought the schools met their educational needs fully and the ones who thought the schools met their educational needs partially varied significantly.

  16. A 35-year comparison of children labelled as gifted, unlabelled as gifted and average-ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Freeman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/1984686X14273Why are some children seen as gifted while others of identical ability are not?  To find out why and what the consequences might be, in 1974 I began in England with 70 children labelled as gifted.  Each one was matched for age, sex and socio-economic level with two comparison children in the same school class. The first comparison child had an identical gift, and the second taken at random.  Investigation was by a battery of tests and deep questioning of pupils, teachers and parents in their schools and homes which went on for 35 years. A major significant difference was that those labelled gifted had significantly more emotional problems than either the unlabelled but identically gifted or the random controls.  The vital aspects of success for the entire sample, whether gifted or not, have been hard work, emotional support and a positive personal outlook.  But in general, the higher the individual’s intelligence the better their chances in life. 

  17. Computer Connections for Gifted Children and Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazzaro, Jean N., Ed.

    Written by computer specialists, teachers, parents, and students, the 23 articles emphasize the role computers play in the development of thinking, problem solving, and creativity in gifted and talented students. Articles have the following titles and authors: "Computers and Computer Cultures" (S. Papert); "Classroom Computers--Beyond the 3 R's"…

  18. Programs for Gifted Children in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Blanka

    1988-01-01

    Education of the gifted in Israel is described, focusing on its historical background, aims, definitions, pupil identification, programs, curriculum, and teachers. Programs consist of special classes, morning and afternoon enrichment groups, and two associations: The Institute for the Promotion of Arts and Science, and Programs for the Promotion…

  19. Gifted Education in German-Speaking Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Albert; Stoeger, Heidrun; Harder, Bettina; Balestrini, Daniel Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The authors first briefly describe how the concepts of talents and giftedness found in German-speaking Europe have evolved in the school system and in general over the past two centuries, and how the variety of gifted-education efforts found within and beyond schools as well as counseling efforts attest to these changes. They then discuss four…

  20. Developing Gifted Children in Hungarian Preschool Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Iren; Papp, Irene

    2013-01-01

    At a conference, a secondary school teacher was very surprised when she heard about the idea of talent development in preschool education. "What does it mean?" she asked. In this paper we answer the above question with a model created by joint research. We describe our method of developing gifted children with the involvement of…

  1. Audiobook Gifts that Keep Giving Pleasure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casbergue, Renee; Harris, Karen

    1997-01-01

    Audiobooks are a lasting pleasure for children. This article discusses what to consider when choosing audiobooks for gifts: quality of story, quality of narration, and appeal to the child and the rest of the family. Includes an annotated bibliography of realistic fiction, fantasy, short stories, and nonfiction audiobooks for grades 1-12. (PEN)

  2. Parenting Styles and Adjustment in Gifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilarinos, Vassiliki; Solomon, C. R.

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between parenting styles and the psychosocial adjustment of 48 children aged 7 to 11 years, each of whom had been identified as gifted on the basis of a score of 130 or above on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children--Fourth Edition. Parenting styles and child psychosocial adjustment were measured…

  3. Dangerous Myths about "Gifted" Mathematics Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Linda Jensen

    2017-01-01

    A number of myths about mathematically gifted students, mathematics itself, and programs designed to serve these students tend to inhibit educators, parents and students themselves from developing students' mathematical creativity, expertise and enjoyment. This paper discusses some of the myths that can discourage students' mathematical…

  4. Achievement Difficulties for the Academically Gifted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Robert R.

    1998-01-01

    Identifies, in a case study, a gifted student who, in consideration of previous academic achievement, should be performing exceptionally well, but has a four-year history of withdrawing from and failing courses, avoids studying, and occasionally rallies at the 11th hour for an average performance. Proposes a learner-centered intervention, in a…

  5. Marital and Life Satisfaction among Gifted Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone-McGovern, Kristin M.; Boo, Jenelle N.; Vannatter, Aarika

    2012-01-01

    Spousal giftedness, dual-career status, and gender were studied in relation to marital and life satisfaction among gifted adults. The data for the present study were collected twice over a 5-year period in order to examine the stability of the findings over time. Results indicated that marital satisfaction was significantly related to life…

  6. Some Thoughts on Gifted Education and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    This article serves as commentary on the papers featured in the issue. Accordingly, these papers and the questions raised in them form the basis of its discussion. The papers, in turn, are addressing numerous aspects of creativity and working with the mathematically gifted, an area of study that has attracted considerable scholarly attention in…

  7. The academically gifted female student in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Paula R.

    The protocol of this study was designed to investigate the factors three gifted, young women perceived as influencing their successful transition from an accelerated science high school program to three accelerated university science programs. The research design was a mixed methods study involving three gifted women as they maneuvered through a high school magnet program for science and matriculated into separate university honors programs for science majors. As high school graduates, these women also achieved honors and citations for academic excellence. During their initial years of college, these students maintained outstanding grades in rigorous programs for science majors. These criteria yielded three, gifted female students who proved to be resilient and committed to meeting the demands of an academic program of science. In an attempt to understand the influential factors in the academic lives of these students, a narrative inquiry as well as a quantitative component comprised of three inventories for descriptive data were selected. The impetus for this research resided in the need to better understand the factors contributing to the shaping of the self-identity of the gifted female student as she achieved academic success in the typically, male dominated science classrooms; subsequently, the guidance by parents and educators may prove influential in developing the achievement orientation within the self-identity of the young woman.

  8. Gifted Kids Can't Always Spell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordell, Antoinette S.; Cannon, Terry

    1985-01-01

    Case studies of three learning disabled gifted students are offered to illustrate apperantly contradictory characteristics and neuropsychological functioning patterns as demonstrated on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised. Techniques are suggested, including avoiding open-ended activities, providing enrichment alternatives along…

  9. Learning Disabled and Gifted: Success or Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Joan; Gygi, Janice

    1981-01-01

    Many gifted learning disabled (LD) students are identified by their handicapping condition rather than by their giftedness. Some suggestions for dealing with these students include providing opportunities for concentration on strengths as well as weaknesses and finding ways to circumvent the specific disability so that enrichment can take place.…

  10. Psychological Types of Academically Gifted Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Tracy L.; Neumeister, Kristie L. Speirs; Cassady, Jerrell C.

    2007-01-01

    This study provides descriptive information about the psychological types of a sample of 931 gifted adolescents who attended a public residential academy. Psychological types are assessed with the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). The MBTI reports on four pairs of personality types: Extraversion/Introversion (E/I), Sensing/Intuition (S/N),…

  11. Developing Leadership Skills in Young Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisland, Amy

    2004-01-01

    As society grows more cooperative, the importance of finding emerging leaders has become incrasingly crucial. Not only should these potential leaders be identified, but their talents need the opportunity to develop. Leadership education continues to be a concern in gifted education but remains an abstract concept that is often ignored in school…

  12. Communication Skills among Gifted Students in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfarah, Yacoub Fareed

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the communication skills among gifted students in Jordan and to investigate the effect of gender and the level of students in acquiring these communication skills. A questionnaire was distributed among the sample of the study which comprised of (240) tenth, eleventh, and twelfth grade students from Al…

  13. Teaching the Gifted Visual Spatial Learner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    In working with right-brained or visual spatial children for the past 20 years, the author has noticed that they all learn in a similar manner. He has also noticed that a high percentage of gifted children are visual spatial learners. The more visual spatial a child is, the higher the potential for school difficulties. Since most teachers are…

  14. Systemic Gifted Education: A Theoretical Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Albert; Stoeger, Heidrun

    2017-01-01

    Over the past few decades, systemic thinking has gained in popularity in developmental and learning sciences. The trend has, however, shown up in gifted education research only occasionally. The aim of this article is to introduce systemic thinking to the field of giftedness and explore possibilities for its application. In the first part, a…

  15. Gifted Education: Changing Conceptions, Emphases and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Dona J.; Dai, David Yun

    2014-01-01

    Gifted education is leading an interdisciplinary paradigm shift moving education out of its historic role of entrenching systemic inequities. It is a crucible for pioneering investigations of optimal human development and provides a vehicle for increasing social equity. We review changing conceptions of intelligence, motivation and creativity, and…

  16. Metacognitive awareness and math anxiety in gifted students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Sarıcam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The basic purpose of this study has been to examine the relationships between metacognitive awareness and maths anxiety in gifted students. The second aim was to compare with gifted and non-gifted students’ metacognitive awareness and maths anxiety levels. The participants were 300 (150 gifted, 150 non-gifted volunteer secondary school students in Turkey. The mean age of the participants was 12.56 years ranging from 12 to 13 years. For gathering data, the Maths Anxiety Scale for Elementary School Students and The Metacognitive Awareness Inventory for Children were used. For analysing the data, Spearman correlation analysis, the Mann Whitney U test, and linear regression analysis were used. According to the findings: firstly, gifted students’ metacognitive awareness scores were higher than those of non-gifted students. On the other hand, non-gifted students’ maths anxiety levels were higher than those of gifted students. Secondly, there was negative correlation between metacognitive awareness and math anxiety. Finally, the findings of linear regression analysis indicated that metacognitive awareness is explained by 48% total variance of maths anxiety in gifted students.

  17. Practical-oriented teaching of gifted youth in the field of natural sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalikova, F. D.; Gilmanshina, S. I.

    2017-09-01

    In the article it is presenteds the author’s concept of practice-oriented teaching of gifted adolescents to natural-science subjects on the example of chemistry. The main provisions of the concept are substantiated, on the basis of which individual educational trajectories have been developed. The essence of practice-oriented learning is revealed. Particular emphasis is placed on the formation of practical experience in applying theoretical knowledge to solve specific problems.

  18. Book Review: Gift & Giver: The Holy Spirit for Today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Paul Lathrop

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Craig Keener has established himself as a highly respected New Testament scholar. Over the years he has written a number of very significant commentaries including works on the gospels of Matthew and John, and the book of Acts. His highly acclaimed IVP Bible Background Commentary: New Testament is one of his best known works. In addition, he has produced books devoted to specific biblical topics such as miracles, women in marriage and ministry, and divorce and remarriage. He is not one to shy away from controversial subjects. In this present volume Keener writes about the Holy Spirit including the sometimes controversial charismatic aspects of His ministry. Gift & Giver was first published in theUnited States in 2001. More recently it has been translated into Indonesian and published inIndonesia.

  19. Singaporean gifted adolescents under scrutiny: The gender factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Patrick C. F.

    1993-05-01

    Research on the sex-role problems of gifted adolescents rarely lifts its sight beyond Western developed countries, making generalizations to the Third World suspect. The present study, by exploring the relationship between gender and adjustment among gifted adolescents in Singapore, hopes to extend the consideration of developmental sex-role issues to a society different from the West. Specifically, it reports that Singaporean gifted girls, like some of their Western counterparts, had difficulty in reconciling their giftedness with societal notions of femininity. Conceivably, this conflict placed them on the threshold of stress, leaving them more vulnerable than the gifted boys to adjustment problems. In addition, having internalized the gender stereotypic view that academic excellence was less important to them than to the boys, the gifted girls might inadvertently put ceilings on their own achievements. The paper concludes with several remedies for educators, counsellors, and parents to help gifted girls embark upon their road to self-fulfilment.

  20. Genetic polymorphisms related to testosterone metabolism in intellectually gifted boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celec, Peter; Tretinárová, Denisa; Minárik, Gabriel; Ficek, Andrej; Szemes, Tomáš; Lakatošová, Silvia; Schmidtová, Eva; Turňa, Ján; Kádaši, Ľudevít; Ostatníková, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Prepubertal testosterone levels are lower in intellectually gifted boys. The aim of this pilot study was to analyze potential genetic factors related to testosterone metabolism in control and gifted boys. Intellectually gifted (IQ>130; n = 95) and control (n = 67) boys were genotyped. Polymorphisms of interests were chosen in genes including androgen and estrogen receptors, 5-alpha reductase, aromatase and sex hormone binding globulin. Significant differences between control and gifted boys in genotype distributions were found for ESR2 (rs928554) and SHBG (rs1799941). A significantly lower number of CAG repeats in the AR gene were found in gifted boys. Our results support the role of genetic factors related to testosterone metabolism in intellectual giftedness. Increased androgen signaling might explain previous results of lower testosterone levels in intellectually gifted boys and add to the understanding of variability in cognitive abilities.

  1. What is the role of teachers in education of gifted and talented?

    OpenAIRE

    Jovanova-Mitkovska, Snezana; Hristovska, Dijana

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present theoretical expectation of the problem of teacher’s role in education of the gifted and talented. We try to answer several question like: to define the term gifted and talented children, to answer the questions what is the role of teachers of gifted and talented, what qualifications are needed to work with gifted students, what can regular classroom teachers do for gifted students, how can regular classroom teachers and gifted/talented program teachers work together… ...

  2. Acceptability, Safety, and Efficacy of Oral Administration of Extracts of Black or Red Maca (Lepidium meyenii in Adult Human Subjects: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Gonzales-Arimborgo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The plant maca, grown at 4000 m altitude in the Peruvian Central Andes, contains hypocotyls that have been used as food and in traditional medicine for centuries. The aim of this research was to provide results on some health effects of oral administration of spray-dried extracts of black or red maca (Lepidium meyenii in adult human subjects living at low (LA and high altitude (HA. A total of 175 participants were given 3 g of either placebo, black, or red maca extract daily for 12 weeks. Primary outcomes were changes in sexual desire, mood, energy, health-related quality of life score (HRQL, and chronic mountain sickness (CMS score, or in glycaemia, blood pressure, and hemoglobin levels. Secondary outcomes were acceptability and safety, assessed using the Likert test and side effect self-recording, respectively, and the effect of altitude. At low altitude, 32, 30, and 32 participants started the study receiving placebo, red maca, or black maca, respectively. At high altitudes, 33, 35, and 31 participants started the study receiving placebo, red maca, and black maca, respectively. Consumption of spray-dried extracts of red and black maca resulted in improvement in mood, energy, and health status, and reduced CMS score. Fatty acids and macamides were higher in spray-dried extracts of black maca than in red maca. GABA predominated in spray-dried extracts of red maca. Effects on mood, energy, and CMS score were better with red maca. Black maca and, in smaller proportions, red maca reduced hemoglobin levels only in highlanders with abnormally high hemoglobin levels; neither variety of maca reduced hemoglobin levels in lowlanders. Black maca reduced blood glucose levels. Both varieties produced similar responses in mood, and HRQL score. Maca extracts consumed at LA or HA had good acceptability and did not show serious adverse effects. In conclusion, maca extract consumption relative to the placebo improved quality of life parameters. Differences in

  3. Acceptability, Safety, and Efficacy of Oral Administration of Extracts of Black or Red Maca (Lepidium meyenii) in Adult Human Subjects: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales-Arimborgo, Carla; Yupanqui, Irma; Montero, Elsa; Alarcón-Yaquetto, Dulce E; Zevallos-Concha, Alisson; Caballero, Lidia; Gasco, Manuel; Zhao, Jianping; Khan, Ikhlas A; Gonzales, Gustavo F

    2016-08-18

    The plant maca, grown at 4000 m altitude in the Peruvian Central Andes, contains hypocotyls that have been used as food and in traditional medicine for centuries. The aim of this research was to provide results on some health effects of oral administration of spray-dried extracts of black or red maca (Lepidium meyenii) in adult human subjects living at low (LA) and high altitude (HA). A total of 175 participants were given 3 g of either placebo, black, or red maca extract daily for 12 weeks. Primary outcomes were changes in sexual desire, mood, energy, health-related quality of life score (HRQL), and chronic mountain sickness (CMS) score, or in glycaemia, blood pressure, and hemoglobin levels. Secondary outcomes were acceptability and safety, assessed using the Likert test and side effect self-recording, respectively, and the effect of altitude. At low altitude, 32, 30, and 32 participants started the study receiving placebo, red maca, or black maca, respectively. At high altitudes, 33, 35, and 31 participants started the study receiving placebo, red maca, and black maca, respectively. Consumption of spray-dried extracts of red and black maca resulted in improvement in mood, energy, and health status, and reduced CMS score. Fatty acids and macamides were higher in spray-dried extracts of black maca than in red maca. GABA predominated in spray-dried extracts of red maca. Effects on mood, energy, and CMS score were better with red maca. Black maca and, in smaller proportions, red maca reduced hemoglobin levels only in highlanders with abnormally high hemoglobin levels; neither variety of maca reduced hemoglobin levels in lowlanders. Black maca reduced blood glucose levels. Both varieties produced similar responses in mood, and HRQL score. Maca extracts consumed at LA or HA had good acceptability and did not show serious adverse effects. In conclusion, maca extract consumption relative to the placebo improved quality of life parameters. Differences in the level of

  4. Neuropsychological characteristics of learning disabled/gifted children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, D E; Dunham, M D; Dean, R S; Kundert, D K

    1995-11-01

    The neuropsychological characteristics of 68 learning-disabled/gifted children (LD/Gifted) were studied using the Halstead-Reitan Neuropsychological Test Battery for Children (HRNB-C). The proportion of LD/Gifted children identified as impaired was low compared to previous research that has examined the proportion of school-identified learning-disabled students who scored within the impaired range on the HRNB-C. Consistent with previous research, the results of this study indicated that LD/Gifted children were also more likely to demonstrate impairment on the Tactual Performance Test-Memory, Tactual Performance Test-Localization, and Trails B-Errors components of the HRNB-C.

  5. Interview with Albert Ziegler about Gifted Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilena Z. Leana-Tascilar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prof. Albert Ziegler is the chair of Educational Psychology and Research on Excellence at the Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nurnberg and one of the most productive and cited academicians in gifted education in Europe and also all over the world. Prof. Ziegler has contributed different theories about gifted education and education in general. One of his well-known theories is The Actiotope Model of Giftedness and the 7-Step-Cycle of Self-Regulated Learning. Since last year I had the chance to be with him and his colleagues in Germany, thus I decided to share with you the interview that we had about his theories and his recommendations for Turkey.

  6. Coupons from Deal Sites as Gifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlicek, Antonin; Sudzina, Frantisek

    2017-01-01

    There already exist studies on what influences use of deal sites. But there is a gap in literature when it comes to purchasing coupons from deal sites and then using them as gifts. The paper analyzes whether gender, age and personality traits influence such behavior. Big Five Inventory traits and...... and narcissism were used. The impact of age was significant. Significance of agreeableness and of narcissism were somewhat above cutoff value 0.05, therefore borderline significant. All of them have positive effect....

  7. LONGITUDINAL STUDIES OF MUSICALLY GIFTED SCHOOLGIRLS

    OpenAIRE

    Svetlana N. Loseva

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the article is to consider the empirical aspects of the development of musical gifted schoolgirls in vocal and choral activities.Methods. Scientific methods of research (observation, questionnaire, interview, formative experiment, longitude, testing) are used. Data are analyzed using a complex of psychodiagnostic techniques: culture and free intelligence test by R. Cattell; the modified creative test by F. Williams; personal multifactorial questionnaire by R. Cattell. The reliabili...

  8. Identifying Young Gifted Children Using the Gifted Rating Scales–Preschool/Kindergarten Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Steven I.; Petscher, Yaacov

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on an analysis of the diagnostic accuracy of a new teacher rating scale designed to assist in the identification of gifted preschool and kindergarten students. The Gifted Rating Scales–Preschool/Kindergarten Form (GRS-P) is based on a multidimensional model of giftedness. An examination of the standardization sample using diagnostic efficiency statistics provides support for the diagnostic accuracy of the GRS-P Intellectual Ability and Academic Ability scales identifying intellectual giftedness, irrespective of the IQ cut score used to demarcate giftedness. The present findings extend the analysis of the standardization sample reported in the test manual and provide additional support for the GRS-P as a gifted screening tool. PMID:26347054

  9. Identifying Young Gifted Children Using the Gifted Rating Scales-Preschool/Kindergarten Form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Steven I; Petscher, Yaacov

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on an analysis of the diagnostic accuracy of a new teacher rating scale designed to assist in the identification of gifted preschool and kindergarten students. The Gifted Rating Scales-Preschool/Kindergarten Form (GRS-P) is based on a multidimensional model of giftedness. An examination of the standardization sample using diagnostic efficiency statistics provides support for the diagnostic accuracy of the GRS-P Intellectual Ability and Academic Ability scales identifying intellectual giftedness, irrespective of the IQ cut score used to demarcate giftedness. The present findings extend the analysis of the standardization sample reported in the test manual and provide additional support for the GRS-P as a gifted screening tool.

  10. Adapting Curriculum for Gifted Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessling, Suki

    2012-01-01

    When the author started homeschooling, she would listen jealously as other parents discussed curriculum for reading and math, two subjects that her daughter never needed any instruction in as a young child. She was eager to try out curriculum, but her visual spatial daughter was not quite ready for learning on paper. She found out that searching…

  11. Gifted Children's Education and a Glance to Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgili, Bengi; Çalik, Basak

    2013-01-01

    The paper provides a critical overview about teaching children in regular classrooms, designing and enriching curricula for gifted children and using multiple intelligence theory as teaching mathematics by giving several examples. Teaching mathematics or science to gifted children doesn't seem easy because every student is different than each…

  12. A Reflective Conversation with Ugur Sak: Gifted Education in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.; Sak, Ugur

    2015-01-01

    In this reflective conversation, Ugur Sak discusses the current "state of the art" of gifted education in Turkey. He reviews the use of enrichment, discusses acceleration and reviews curricular procedures in Turkey. He responds to questions about the identification of gifted students and discusses the age old debate of talent versus…

  13. Gifted Students' Characteristics, Persistence, and Difficulties in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conejeros-Solar, M. Leonor; Gómez-Arízaga, María P.

    2015-01-01

    This study is about persistence and perceived difficulties of gifted students in college explored through sociodemographic and academic characteristics. Two hundred and nine nongifted and 45 gifted participated in the study. A persistence scale along with sociodemographic variables were used to compare both groups. The groups shared many…

  14. Imagery: An Over-Looked Ability among the Gifted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roodin, Paul

    1983-01-01

    Although frequently discounted, imagery plays an important role in the intellectual development of gifted students. It can be useful in helping students remember, create (in the arts and in sports), and develop flexibility in thinking. Imagery may also be involved in gifted adolescents' career and life decisions. (CL)

  15. The Sound of Silence: A Nation Responds to Its Gifted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    This article discusses signs that America has adopted a negative view of gifted children, including the undermining of the Jacob Javits Act, grade inflation, and a shift in funding and legal mandates from the gifted toward students with disabilities or low achievement. Reasons for this trend and suggestions for responsive action are discussed. (PB)

  16. Mathematically Gifted Adolescent Females' Mixed Sentiment toward Gender Stereotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chen-yao

    2015-01-01

    There has been a paucity of research on gifted individuals' perceptions of gender stereotypes. The purpose of this study was to explore mathematically gifted adolescent females' perceptions of gender stereotypes through a research design of the qualitative multiple case study involving the constant comparison and the Three C's analysis scheme.…

  17. Enigmatic Qualities of the Gifted That Transcend Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Connie

    2012-01-01

    In "A Quality of Giftedness," Professor Joan Freeman reflects upon her long career working as a psychologist in England with gifted children. She gives particular attention to observations gained during the most recent analysis of her longitudinal study that was published in 2010 as Gifted Lives. This work provides an in-depth look at 20…

  18. The University and the Gift: A Problem Definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Emelianov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors suggest introducing the notion of the gift into the theory and practice of the University life. They believe that the relationship of gift in transmission of knowledge is immanent to the management organization of the University. If knowledge is given as a gift and in the situation of gift-giving, then the University milieu should have the relationship of gift. The gift is described here as a theological and anthropological category and then juxtaposed with educational concepts of certain theologians and with ideas of modern economists. Proceeding from the notion of gift, the authors formulate the problem of today’s University which consists in its economical conditionality and in the penetration of market ideology into the scholarly milieu. Transfer of knowledge, which is considered as an absolute value, when circulating within the process of gift-giving, in practice is often identified with utilitarian exchange: the knowledge acquires its price, what inevitably reflects the relationship between professors, students and University’s administration.

  19. ADHD and Children Who Are Gifted. ERIC Digest #522.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, James T.; Latimer, Diane

    This fact sheet summarizes information on children who have an attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity (ADHD), are gifted, or are both ADHD and gifted. Fourteen diagnostic criteria for ADHD from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders III are listed. A comparison of behaviors associated with ADHD and with giftedness is…

  20. Moral Frameworks for Leaders of Gifted Programs and Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Elissa F.; Rinko-Gay, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Given the complexities of being an educational leader and, specifically, an educational leader of a gifted program or school, should there be a moral guide or framework that can inform the daily practices of leaders within an ever-changing educational context of competing demands? Should leaders of gifted programs employ the same ethos as any…

  1. Charlie's Words: Supporting Gifted Male Athletes Using Athletes' Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Richard

    2012-01-01

    A gifted student-athlete, Charlie Bloomfield is introduced to athlete's journals by his coaches at Burke Mountain Academy (Vermont), an elite American ski school. Used by Olympians and professionals alike, journals provide athletes with ways to organize and reflect on training and competitions. Athlete's journals help gifted male athletes address…

  2. Creative Home Schooling for Gifted Children: A Resource Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Lisa

    This book is intended to be a comprehensive guide to home schooling the gifted child. Part 1 focuses on how giftedness affects the choice to home school and how being gifted shapes a child's personality, behavior, and education. It also examines the parent's dual roles of parent and teacher and suggests keeping a Home School Journal. Part 2…

  3. Bright Not Broken: Gifted Kids, ADHD, and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Diane M.; Banks, Rebecca S.; Grandin, Temple

    2011-01-01

    The future of our society depends on our gifted children--the population in which we'll find our next Isaac Newton, Albert Einstein, or Virginia Woolf. Yet the gifts and talents of some of our most brilliant kids may never be recognized because these children fall into a group known as twice exceptional, or "2e." Twice exceptional kids are both…

  4. Sharing Images of the Future: Futuristics and Gifted Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahe, Lillian

    1985-01-01

    Futuristics shares several features with gifted education--higher level thinking skills, creativity, learning outside the classroom, enrichment, and affective needs. Futuristics promotes a positive image of the future, an important aspect for gifted students who have been found to have a rather pessimistic view of the future. (CL)

  5. Language Learning of Gifted Individuals: A Content Analysis Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokaydin, Beria; Baglama, Basak; Uzunboylu, Huseyin

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to carry out a content analysis of the studies on language learning of gifted individuals and determine the trends in this field. Articles on language learning of gifted individuals published in the Scopus database were examined based on certain criteria including type of publication, year of publication, language, research…

  6. Growth Mindset of Gifted Seventh Grade Students in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza, Julie; Shumow, Lee; Schmidt, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Through secondary analysis of data collected in middle school science classrooms, this study (a) compared gifted and regular students' beliefs about the malleability of intelligence in science; (b) investigated whether teaching gifted and talented middle-school students about malleability of the brain and study skills helped them to develop a…

  7. The Finnish Public Discussion of Giftedness and Gifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Sonja

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the results of research in which the Finnish public discussion of giftedness and gifted children, and conceptions of giftedness and gifted children presented in it, were examined. The research was conducted by analyzing articles from the Finnish newspaper "Helsingin Sanomat" and the teachers'…

  8. Contemporary Identification and Program Models for Gifted Third World Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, Clifford J.

    The author maintains that IQ testing developed in a political context and still serves to descriminate against minority group gifted children; he suggests a method of identifying potentially gifted disadvantaged children by using culturally familiar experiences. The discriminatory aspects of intelligence testing are evidenced by quotes from L.…

  9. Effects of Parenting Classes on Anxiety Reduction in Gifted Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaranas-Sittler, Natividad; Stapleton, Rosalind

    1988-01-01

    To determine whether increased parental understanding of their gifted children would facilitate adjustment and reduce the children's anxiety, parents of 10 gifted children in a New Mexico elementary school participated in parenting classes. No differences were found in the students' anxiety scores between the experimental and control groups.…

  10. Drawing out Understanding: Arts-Based Learning and Gifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiserman, Jennifer; Lai, Heather; Rushton, Chelsea

    2017-01-01

    Dabrowski recognized that the creative process is important in the personality development of the gifted and talented. Given the intrinsically creative nature of learning in an arts-infused context, we hypothesize that interdisciplinary approaches to curriculum address the unique needs of the gifted. First, we will summarize Dabrowski's theory of…

  11. Gifted Education: Robin Hood or the Sheriff of Nottingham?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    This article looks at the issue of gifted and talented education from the perspective of public policy. It asserts that the underachievement of gifted children is a national concern, as these children may someday benefit society in ways that are disproportionate to their share of the population. Perhaps more importantly, it concludes that gifted…

  12. The Gifted Can't Weigh That Giraffe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassermann, Selma

    1982-01-01

    A professor's one-time observation of gifted and low-achieving students at one school leads to a startling conclusion. The gifted students were excessively anxious and unable to think creatively in the face of new problems; the low-achievers demonstrated high levels of creative problem-solving. (Author/WD)

  13. Meeting the Needs of Learning Disabled Gifted Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Susan

    1984-01-01

    Intended to provide information about learning disabled gifted students, the article discusses a rationale for providing enrichment activities within the framework of a program for the gifted. Identification strategies are discussed and program ideas using the enrichment triad model are offered. (Author/CL)

  14. Gifted Learning Disabilities: Is It Such a Bright Idea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Sharon

    1989-01-01

    Literature related to the definition, identification, characteristics, and intervention for gifted learning-disabled students is reviewed. Under-researched areas revealed include identification of characteristics and effectiveness of specific interventions. Issues in gifted/learning-disabled education and suggestions for future research are…

  15. The Education of the Gifted Child in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Chris, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Fourteen articles on the education of the gifted child in Canada are presented. Topics addressed include the giftedness construct, Canadian law and policy, integrative program policy, program planning and evaluation, teacher training, disabled gifted students, psychosocial dimensions of giftedness, the Ontario experience, innovative and…

  16. Gifted and Learning Disabled Students: Practical Considerations for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrum, Timothy J.

    1989-01-01

    The article provides practical suggestions for teachers working with gifted learning-disabled students. It includes a discussion of whether students can be both gifted and learning disabled, and reviews service options, methods of identification, and programing for this population. (DB)

  17. Critical Readings on Diversity and Gifted Students. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Tracy L., Ed.; Coleman, Laurence J., Ed.; Cross, Jennifer Riedl, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The field associated with educating students with gifts and talents has grappled for years with issues associated with locating and appropriately serving diverse students. As our schools have become more diverse, educators have struggled to effectively deal with the diversity of student backgrounds. Consequently, diversity among the gifted child…

  18. Setting Up SHOP: A Program for Gifted Learning Disabled Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, Loisann B.

    1990-01-01

    SHOP, or Search Handicapped Outreach Program, identifies gifted/learning-disabled students, develops enrichment activities using J. Renzulli's Triad Model, and implements effective delivery models to provide an environment in which the students can utilize their strengths and interact with gifted peers. (JDD)

  19. Social-Perspective Coordination and Gifted Adolescents' Friendship Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masden, Catherine A.; Leung, Olivia N.; Shore, Bruce M.; Schneider, Barry H.; Udvari, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    This research examined links among academic ability, social-perspective coordination, and friendship quality, within the context of gifted adolescents' friendships. The sample consisted of 120 early adolescents (59 girls, 61 boys), 81 of whom were identified as gifted. Academic ability, sex, and grade significantly predicted social-perspective…

  20. Gifted Students in Transition: A Grounded Theory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Jodi J.

    2017-01-01

    Gifted students in transition to college may be at risk for underachievement, difficult transition, or even attrition. Giftedness by itself is not always sufficient for academic success in college. The purpose of this grounded theory study was to construct a theory regarding the process of transition to college for high-achieving gifted high…

  1. Gifted Adults: A Systematic Review and Analysis of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinn, Anne N.; Bishop, James

    2015-01-01

    What happens when a gifted child grows up? Despite a slew of provocative book titles regarding gifted adults in the mainstream media, and the inclusion of the notion of giftedness among adults in the definition of giftedness proposed by Subotnik, Olszewski-Kubilius, and Worrell, there is a limited amount of research that has examined the gifted…

  2. Giftedness and Gifted Education: The Need for a Paradigm Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Albert; Stoeger, Heidrun; Vialle, Wilma

    2012-01-01

    This commentary addresses Subotnik et al.'s target article from the perspective of researchers active in the field of giftedness. First, we self-critically examine the current standing of giftedness research within the scientific community. Second, the authors' critique of gifted education is sharpened in three respects: (a) gifted identification,…

  3. Teachers' implicit personality theories about the gifted: an experimental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudson, Tanja Gabriele; Preckel, Franzis

    2013-03-01

    The implicit theories teachers hold about the gifted influence their perception of and behavior toward highly able students, thus impacting the latter's educational opportunities. Two persistent stereotypes about the gifted can be distinguished: the harmony hypothesis (gifted students are superior in almost all domains) and the disharmony hypothesis (giftedness implies maladaptive social behavior and emotional problems). The present study investigated whether teachers' implicit personality theories about the gifted are in line with the harmony or the disharmony hypothesis. Using an experimental vignette approach, we examined 321 prospective and practicing teachers' implicit personality theories (based on the big five personality framework) about students described along three dimensions (ability level, gender, and age, resulting in 8 different vignettes), controlling for teachers' age, gender, experience with gifted students, and knowledge about giftedness. Ability level had the strongest effect on teachers' ratings (partial η² = .60). Students described as gifted were perceived as more open to new experiences, more introverted, less emotionally stable, and less agreeable (all ps < .001). No differences were found for conscientiousness. Gender and its interaction with ability level had a small effect (partial η²s = .04 and .03). Thus, teachers' implicit personality theories about the gifted were in line with the disharmony hypothesis. Possible consequences for gifted identification and education are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Identifying learning characteristics of the gifted Students in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The failure of schools, teachers and counsellors to identify gifted students as well as responding to their unique characteristics and learning needs give rise to this paper. Gifted learners possess high level of intelligence than their peers, but are disadvantaged in the sense that they are not given the opportunity to reach their ...

  5. Providing For The Gifted And Talented Children With Disability In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper focuses attention on the education of gifted and talented children with one form of disability or the other. It discusses the major problems facing the education of gifted children with disability in Nigeria. It also points to the need for a way forward in assisting this category of children to measure up with other children ...

  6. Current Perspectives on the Identification and Assessment of Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Steven I.

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary thinking challenges the view that giftedness and high IQ are synonymous. Contemporary thinking also challenges the view that being gifted is something real. A number of authorities in the gifted field advocate a paradigm shift; moving away from emphasizing categorical definitions of giftedness and adopting a talent development…

  7. An Integrated Identification and Intervention Model for Intellectually Gifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellisch, Mimi; Brown, Jac

    2012-01-01

    Gifted children who do not achieve often have problems with motivation and socioemotional adjustment and may also have learning disabilities. This article examines factors such as attachment difficulties and maternal depression as these may contribute to underachievement. The article reviews past and current practices of gifted identification and…

  8. Student-Created Public Relations for Gifted Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisland, Amy

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the benefits of student participation in a gifted public relations campaign, including creating public support for gifted programming and developing leadership skills. Steps for developing a formal unit of instruction on public relations are described, along with ideas for public relations activities. (Contains references.)…

  9. Perfectionism in Gifted Adolescents: A Replication and Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margot, Kelly C.; Rinn, Anne N.

    2016-01-01

    To provide further generalizability for the results garnered by two previous studies, the authors conducted a methodological replication. In addition to adding to the body of replication research done with gifted students, the purpose of this study was to examine perfectionism differences among gifted adolescents in regards to gender, birth order,…

  10. Understanding Adolescent Gifted Girls with ADHD: Motivated and Achieving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugate, C. Matthew; Gentry, Marcia

    2016-01-01

    The manifestation of ADHD in girls who are gifted can place strains on motivation and academic performance as they enter their middle school years. The purpose of this collective case study research was to examine the lived experiences of five girls who are gifted with ADHD in order to gain an understanding of the array of coping mechanisms used…

  11. Creative Performances and Gifted Education: Studies from Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kerry

    2017-01-01

    This paper acknowledges that there is widespread support in Gifted Education for students' creative aptitudes to be identified as a domain that includes imagination, originality, fluency, and problem solving. I explore where and when these concepts originated and briefly identify how they are represented in Gifted Education. Then various…

  12. The New Challenge: A Relevant Program for the Disadvantaged Gifted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertz, Mary Jean; Phemister, Linda

    Programs for disadvantaged gifted students require teachers with a number of positive characteristics and a relevant curriculum. The New Challenge Program created by the University of Texas Pan-American College of Education is a Saturday morning enrichment program for disadvantaged gifted children. Students select from classes such as Basic and…

  13. A Comparative Analysis of Social Behaviors of Gifted and Non-Gifted Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, William H.; Lessany-Abdi, Deborah K.

    The study examined social behaviors of 19 gifted and 19 nongifted preschool children. A social behavioral inventory was developed from repeated observations of interactions collected during an 8 week pilot study. Four general categories of behavior were observed and analyzed: verbal positive (greeting, conversation, compliment, concern, laughing,…

  14. Metacognition and High Intellectual Ability: Insights from the Study of Learning-Disabled Gifted Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, C. Lynne; Shore, Bruce M.

    1995-01-01

    This study compared metacognitive performance of gifted, gifted learning-disabled, learning-disabled, and average males in grades 5 and 6 and grades 11 and 12. For metacognitive knowledge, skill on think-aloud error detection reading, and comprehension, the performance of gifted learning-disabled students resembled that of gifted students more…

  15. Üstün Zekâlı Öğrencilerin Bakış  Açısıyla Üstün Zekâ Etiketinin Öğrencilerin Çeşitli Algıları Üzerindeki Etkileri (Effects of Gifted Label on Gifted Students' Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ercan Öpengin

    2012-06-01

    Label Effects-Scale (GLE-S during their applications. The gifted group included 28 students who were identified to be gifted among the 415 students by the identification system of the EPTS. These students were accepted to the EPTS programs. Because two of them dropped out the program before the posttest was administered, the research group included 26 gifted students. The comparative group included 387 non-labeled students who applied to the EPTS but not identified to be gifted. Of the gifted sample 23.1% was female and 76.9% were male. As a posttest the GLE-S was administered to the gifted students after they attended the EPTS programs for 4 months. We had such a time period between the pretest and posttest because we hypothesized that labeling effects did not appear soon after the identification; instead a reasonable time period was necessary for the emergence of the effects. GLE-S is composed of 3 subscales. They measure self-perceptions, perceptions of parental attitudes and perceptions of friends’ attitudes (see Appendix A. Each subscale includes 8 items, of which 4 are related to positive perceptions and the other 4 are related to negative perceptions. In total, the scale includes twenty-four items, half of which are negative perceptions and the other half are positive perceptions. A four point likert-type scale is used for scoring the items in the scale. Each item is scored from “0” to “3” (“0” = It does not suit me, “1” = It suits me slightly, “2” = It suits me mostly, “3” = It suits me completely. The items related to negative perceptions are coded in reverse. Total score on the scale can range from 0 to 72. Scores closer to “0” mean negative perceptions whereas those closer to “72” mean positive perceptions. Cronbach alpha coefficient for the reliability of the GLE-S for 24 items was found to be .72.Pretest and posttest scores were compared at total score, subtest score and item level since each item in the scale was supposed

  16. A Comparison between Gifted Students and Non-Gifted Students' Learning Styles and their Motivation Styles towards Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahyaoglu, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the gifted students and nongifted students' learning styles and their motivation styles toward science learning. In accordance with this purpose, this research was based upon thirty gifted students, who were selected by a specially-designed exam throughout Turkey and have been educated in ASTC (Art and Science Training Center…

  17. Gifted and at Risk: A Cross-District Comparison of Gifted Student Growth and Solutions for Urban Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Layla J.; Chenault, Krystel H.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the researchers highlight differences in district level value-added growth data of gifted students in urban and suburban districts, as categorized by the Ohio Department of Education. In addition to analyzing the difference between the academic growth of urban and suburban gifted students, the researchers sought to synthesize…

  18. Gifted and Non-Gifted Lebanese Adolescents: Gender Differences in Self-Concept, Self-Esteem and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarouphim, Ketty M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate gender differences in self-concept, self-esteem, and depression among gifted (n = 68) and non-gifted (n = 174) adolescents in Lebanon. Participants were 242 adolescents (110 males and 132 females), with a mean age of 13.9 years. Four measures were used: DISCOVER assessment, Piers-Harris 2 self-concept…

  19. Assessing Emotional Intelligence in Gifted and Non-Gifted High School Students: Outcomes Depend on the Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidner, Moshe; Shani-Zinovich, Inbal; Matthews, Gerald; Roberts, Richard D.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined academically gifted (N=83) and non-gifted (N=125) high school students from Israel to compare mean emotional intelligence (EI) scores, various assessment procedures, and relations between EI and ability, across different populations. Participants completed the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT), the…

  20. On systems of relations “gifted student – teacher” and "teacher – gifted student" in secondary school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Meshkova

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider socio-psychological aspects of specific relationships in the systems “teacher – gifted student” and “gifted student – teacher”. We consistently argue the need to consider actual socio-psychological requirements to the personality and the role of “special teacher for the gifted” with a targeted selection and training of teachers for developing work with gifted students in secondary schools. We reveal the peculiarities of relationship and mutual importance of teacher and gifted student, depending on the age characteristics of the latter. The fundamentally important position, stated in the article, is the idea based on the basic concept of personalization, that creativity and personal teachers’ “creativeness” is not only his individual psychological trait, but also an effective channel of transferring individual-specific approaches of that particular teacher to the problems of life in general, and to the problematic areas of interest of his gifted students in particular.

  1. Effect of University Entrance Exam on Gifted High School Students’ Motivation Scrutinized: An Iranian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Kazemi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Passing University Entrance Exams (UEE successfully has long been a major concern for Iranian high school students. High Schools for the Gifted admit highly intelligent and hardworking students, who reportedly form a remarkable proportion of students admitted in best universities of Iran, through hard entrance exams. This study aimed to investigate attitudes of students educating in High Schools for the Gifted towards learning English, their dominant motivation type (instrumental or integrative, and the likely effect Iranian University Entrance Exam has on their motivation.  For the purpose of this investigation, 166 male and female participants educating in the four grades of high school were selected through Stratified Random Sampling Method from both boys’ and girls’ High Schools for the Gifted. A 26-item questioner previously developed by the researchers, investigating the participants’ attitudes towards English learning, their dominant motivation type, and the likely effect of Iranian UEE on their motivation was administered to them. Descriptive statistics and the analysis of variance were used to analyze the data, and the results revealed that all participants educating in the four grades of high school showed positive attitudes towards English learning, and that 1st and 2nd grade subjects were both instrumentally and integratively motivated, whereas 3rd and 4th graders were instrumentally motivated. The degree of subjects’ concern about the Iranian UEE significantly affected their motivational orientations and prioritization.

  2. Testosterone metabolism: a possible biological underpinning of non-verbal IQ in intellectually gifted girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdiaková, Jaroslava; Celec, Peter; Laznibatová, Jolana; Minárik, Gabriel; Ostatníková, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The extraordinary giftedness is apparently a unique manifestation of a mutual interconnection between genes and environment. One of the possible etiological factors of intellectual giftedness is testosterone which is believed to affect the brain organization and function. The aim of our study was to analyze associations between 2D:4D digit ratio (a proxy of prenatal testosterone) and/or salivary testosterone levels with non-verbal IQ in intellectually gifted girls. Fifty-one girls with an age range of 10 to18 years and IQ scores higher than 130 were tested. Saliva samples were collected to obtain levels of salivary testosterone. 2D:4D digit ratio was measured on both hands as an indicator of prenatal testosterone. IQ parameters were assessed employing standardized set of tests. The CAG repeat polymorphism in exon 1 of the androgen receptor gene was analyzed to assess the sensitivity of androgen receptor. Testing of between-subjects effects proved significant interactions between right and left 2D:4D ratio, genetic variability in androgen receptor, and also salivary testosterone level with non-verbal IQ in gifted girls. Our results point out that the variability in parameters of androgenicity contributes to the variability of nonverbal IQ in gifted girls. However, the exact molecular mechanism of how testosterone acts on the brain and affects this cognitive domain remains still unclear.

  3. Optimized gamma synchronization enhances functional binding of fronto-parietal cortices in mathematically gifted adolescents during deductive reasoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eZhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available As enhanced fronto-parietal network has been suggested to support reasoning ability of math-gifted adolescents, the main goal of this EEG source analysis is to investigate the temporal binding of the gamma-band (30-60Hz synchronization between frontal and parietal cortices in adolescents with exceptional mathematical ability, including the functional connectivity of gamma neurocognitive network, the temporal dynamics of fronto-parietal network (phase-locking durations and network lability in time domain, and the self-organized criticality of synchronizing oscillation. Compared with the average-ability subjects, the math-gifted adolescents show a highly integrated fronto-parietal network due to distant gamma phase-locking oscillations, which is indicated by lower modularity of the global network topology, more connector bridges between the frontal and parietal cortices and less connector hubs in the sensorimotor cortex. The time-domain analysis finds that, while maintaining more stable phase dynamics of the fronto-parietal coupling, the math-gifted adolescents are characterized by more extensive fronto-parietal connection reconfiguration. The results from sample fitting in the power-law model further find that the phase-locking durations in the math-gifted brain abides by a wider interval of the power-law distribution. This phase-lock distribution mechanism could represent a relatively optimized pattern for the functional binding of frontal-parietal network, which underlies stable fronto-parietal connectivity and increases flexibility of timely network reconfiguration.

  4. [Acceptance and commitment therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducasse, D; Fond, G

    2015-02-01

    Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is a third generation of cognitive-behavioral therapies. The point is to help patients to improve their psychological flexibility in order to accept unavoidable private events. Thus, they have the opportunity to invest energy in committed actions rather than struggle against their psychological events. (i) To present the ACT basic concepts and (ii) to propose a systematic review of the literature about effectiveness of this kind of psychotherapy. (i) The core concepts of ACT come from Monestès (2011), Schoendorff (2011), and Harris (2012); (ii) we conducted a systematic review of the literature using the PRISMA's criteria. The research paradigm was « acceptance and commitment therapy AND randomized controlled trial ». The bases of the MEDLINE, Cochrane and Web of science have been checked. Overall, 61 articles have been found, of which, after reading the abstracts, 40 corresponded to the subject of our study. (I) Psychological flexibility is established through six core ACT processes (cognitive defusion, acceptance, being present, values, committed action, self as context), while the therapist emphasizes on experiential approach. (II) Emerging research shows that ACT is efficacious in the psychological treatment of a wide range of psychiatric problems, including psychosis, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, trichotillomania, generalized anxiety disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, borderline personality disorder, eating disorders. ACT has also shown a utility in other areas of medicine: the management chronic pain, drug-dependence, smoking cessation, the management of epilepsy, diabetic self-management, the management of work stress, the management of tinnitus, and the management of multiple sclerosis. Meta-analysis of controlled outcome studies reported an average effect size (Cohen's d) of 0.66 at post-treatment (n=704) and 0.65 (n=580) at follow-up (on average 19.2 weeks later). In studies involving

  5. Creativity in the regular classroom: perceptions of gifted and non-gifted students/Creatividad en el aula: percepciones de alumnos superdotados y no-superdotados

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    do Carmo Goncalves, Fernanda; de Souza Fleith, Denise

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the perception of gifted and non-gifted students with respect to the climate for creativity in the classroom, in the disciplines of Mathematics and Portuguese Language, and...

  6. Talented Students' Satisfaction with the Performance of the Gifted Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail Mamoud Al–Zoubi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to identify talented students' levels of satisfaction with the performance of the gifted centers. The sample of the study consisted of (142 gifted and talented students enrolled in the Najran Centers for Gifted in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire was developed and distributed to the sample of the study. The results revealed that talented students were highly satisfied with the administration and teachers, whereas they were only moderately satisfied with enrichment activities, teaching methods, student relationships and facilities and equipment. Moreover, results also showed that there were no significant differences could be attributed to gender or to the level of schooling.

  7. Subject Sensitive Invariantism: In Memoriam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauw, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Subject sensitive invariantism is the view that whether a subject knows depends on what is at stake for that subject: the truth-value of a knowledge-attribution is sensitive to the subject's practical interests. I argue that subject sensitive invariantism cannot accept a very plausible principle for

  8. 9 CFR 203.2 - Statement of general policy with respect to the giving by meat packers of meat and other gifts to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Animals and Animal Products GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARDS ADMINISTRATION (PACKERS AND STOCKYARDS PROGRAMS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY UNDER THE PACKERS AND STOCKYARDS... by investigation, that a number of packers subject to the Packers and Stockyards Act have made gifts...

  9. Rethinking the Issues Regarding the Culturally Disadvantaged Gifted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasier, Mary M.

    1979-01-01

    Aspects covered include definitions, identification, and appropriate educational programing. Several programing strategies are briefly described, and attention is given to the problem of creating an effective learning environment for the disadvantaged gifted child. (DLS)

  10. Motivating the Gifted: An Untapped Source of Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Martha R.

    1984-01-01

    The professor of a graduate gifted education course invited three high school football coaches for a panel on motivation techniques. The techniques included sermons, appeals, rise of emotion, attention-getting devices, intimidation, and competition. (MC)

  11. Beijing Model of Gifted Education and Talent Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Zhongxiong; Zhang, Yi; Du, Xiangyun

    In China, talent development has been one of the key points in national plans for the development of science and technology, education, and other areas over the last three decades and is especially emphasized in the national outline for medium- and long-term educational reform and development....... Beijing is the leading city in educational reform, especially in the area of gifted education in mainland China. Over the past 35 years, through constant exploration and research, a comprehensive gifted education system called the Beijing Model of Gifted Education and Talent Development (BMGETD) has...... gradually been developed. This book is a summary of the educational practices used in and research done on the BMGETD over the decades. These include several patterns for gifted education, such as acceleration in special classes, special classes without acceleration, enrichment within regular classes...

  12. LEAP: A Computer Course for Gifted Students. Manila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scruggs, Patricia; Johnson, Paul

    1985-01-01

    Learning Enrichment Activities Program (LEAP) is designed to offer intellectually challenging computer activities for gifted and talented children (grades 7-12) in Manila. Computer enrichment activities were designed according to an adaptation of the Enrichment Triad model. (CL)

  13. Should Dogs and Cats be Given as Gifts?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Hong

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Policies that state dogs and cats should not be adopted as gifts are prevalent at animal welfare organizations, despite the fact that this belief is unfounded. Denying adopters who intend to give the animals as gifts may unnecessarily impede the overarching goal of increasing the rate of live-releases of dogs and cats from our nations’ shelter system. The results of this brief survey show that receiving a dog or cat as a gift was neither significantly associated with impact on self-perceived love/attachment, nor was it associated with whether or not respondents still had the dog or cat in the home. The results from this survey add to a growing body of literature that suggests there is no increased risk of relinquishment for dogs and cats received as a gift.

  14. Guidance Needs of Gifted and Talented Children’s Parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Üzeyir Ogurlu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Gifted children can face some social and emo-tional difficulties resulting from their unique characteristics. Gifted children’s high intellec-tual functioning sometimes can camouflage their social and emotional problems and be-cause these problems are nor recognized their guidance and counseling needs can be over-looked too during their psychosocial develop-ment. The aim of this study was to determine gifted children’s parents’ beliefs about their children’s counseling needs. A counseling needs questionnaire was conducted to 133 par-ents of gifted children (1st-5th grade. Research results showed that counseling areas were over-sensitivity, perfectionism, lack of talent devel-opment programs, participation in too many ac-tivities, disorganized in life and adherence to rules. Besides these findings, some counseling needs differed according to children’s gender and parents’ sex.

  15. Gifted education in the United States: Perspectives of gender equity

    OpenAIRE

    Pierson, Melinda R.

    2014-01-01

    An overview of education for gifted and talented children and adolescents in the United States will be presented. Issues of gender equity will be discussed and suggestions for creating equal opportunities for all students will be outlined.

  16. 22 CFR 1203.735-202 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the gift with the hope or expectation of obtaining advantage or preferment in dealing with the U.S... on a special occasion such as marriage, illness, or retirement. (f) Neither this section nor § 1203...

  17. Examining of Perceptions of Gifted Students toward Mathematics Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut ÖZTÜRK

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study bring out owned intellectual image interested in mathematics concept of gifted students. Participant of twenty-eight gifted students that they selected via WISC-R intelligent test. A phenomenology design that one of qualitative research methods was adopted and data collection focus group interview. Data analysis consisted of content analysis. Students who participant made up different sixteen metaphor. The most widely used of them kainite. When examined justifications lie behind of metaphor gifted students have different three perception such as affected with people of math, influence toward math of the nature, the nature of math. The result of examine of math perception according to grade level when grade level increased, gifted students more interested the nature of math whereas depended on needed of people more interested math concept.

  18. Let us in: Latino underrepresentation in Gifted and Talented Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Emily

    2010-01-01

    This paper articulates the necessity of improving identification protocols for inclusion of low-socioeconomic gifted Latino students in Gifted and Talented Programs in all levels of education ranging from elementary and continuing on to the college level. Non-verbal tests, observation instruments, grade-to-grade portfolios, performance projects, and extensive interviewing are suggested in lieu of biased standardized tests as identification variables. In addition, teacher professional development opportunities as well as the inclusion of multicultural curriculum will promote an appreciation of Latino culture as well as encourage and include intellectually gifted Hispanic students. Reference to collectivistic societal constructs impacting on positive Latino student engagement is discussed. This article will appeal specifically to those individuals entrusted with recruitment for elementary and secondary Gifted and Talented Programs as well as College Honors Programs. In addition, the notion that the identification of giftedness is culture dependent is of importance to the general public in our endeavor to become a multicultural globalist society.

  19. Perspectives of best Practices for Learning Gender-Inclusive Science: Influences of Extracurricular Science for Gifted Girls and Electrical Engineering for Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Shaunda L.

    Gifted girls in elementary school must follow the set curriculum, but their choices of extracurricular activities may indicate future subject preferences. This study attempted to explore the perceptions of gifted girls regarding how the family, home, and school environments influenced their choices to take extracurricular science classes. A mixed methodology was adopted: qualitative, to understand the girls' perceptions of influence, and quantitative, to measure their attitudes toward science. Influential factors identified in this study highlight fun as occurring with the highest frequency and four emergent factors: doubt, traditional sex roles, boredom, and group work. In addition, findings from a focused case study of a graduate electrical engineer are interwoven with the girls' perspectives of science. The varying ages and experiences with science of the participants provide interesting views. This study adds knowledge to the field of science education, specifically on withingender differences of gifted girls and women in engineering.

  20. Depression In Gifted Intelligence As Compared With Normal Persons

    OpenAIRE

    Raeisi F; Mohammad B

    2004-01-01

    Background: Depression is a common problem and reduces function of persons. Evaluation of this matter in Gifted Intelligence– because superior their beneficial ness– have more importance. Our aim in this study is to determine relative frequency of depression in Gifted Intelligence as compared with Normal persons. Materials and Methods: In the context of a case – control study 90 Normal volunteers and 56 very superior volunteers – aged between 20 and 30 years, so that matched in respect of gen...

  1. Risk and protective factors in gifted children with dyslexia

    OpenAIRE

    van Viersen, S.; de Bree, E.H.; Kroesbergen, E.H.; Slot, E.M.; de Jong, P.F.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated risk and protective factors associated with dyslexia and literacy development, both at the group and individual level, to gain more insight in underlying cognitive profiles and possibilities for compensation in high-IQ children. A sample of 73 Dutch primary school children included a dyslexic group, a gifted-dyslexic group, and a borderline-dyslexic group (i.e., gifted children with relative literacy problems). Children were assessed on literacy, phonology, language, a...

  2. ACCEL: A New Model for Identifying the Gifted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    Serious identification of the gifted started with the work of Lewis Terman early in the 20th century. Terman's model, based largely on IQ, may have made sense in the early 20th century, but it no longer makes sense today. The problems that society needs its gifted individuals to solve in the 21st century require much more than IQ--in addition to…

  3. Gifted education and talent development for all

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph S. Renzulli

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditional methods of schooling can fail to bring about schools as places for developing the broadest and richest experiences for creating talent in the young. The field of gifted education has put forward many innovations that have become mainstays of the American educational system. The Schoolwide Enrichment Model comprises strategies for increasing student effort, enjoyment, and performance, and for integrating a range of advanced-level learning experiences and thinking skills into all curricular areas. Every school has students within it who possess the highest potential for advanced-level learning, creative problem solving, and the motivation to pursue rigorous and rewarding work. Rather than being sources for the acquisition of information, schools should be places for developing the talents of all students.

  4. Depression In Gifted Intelligence As Compared With Normal Persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raeisi F

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression is a common problem and reduces function of persons. Evaluation of this matter in Gifted Intelligence– because superior their beneficial ness– have more importance. Our aim in this study is to determine relative frequency of depression in Gifted Intelligence as compared with Normal persons. Materials and Methods: In the context of a case – control study 90 Normal volunteers and 56 very superior volunteers – aged between 20 and 30 years, so that matched in respect of gender – were investigated by Beck Depression Inventory. IQ identification was performed by both Wechsler Adult Intelligence scaling and Ravens progressive Matrices. Results: out of 90 Normal persons, 36 were depressed (40% and among 56 Gifted Intelligence, 35 were depressed. (62.5% In other words relative frequency of depression in Gifted Intelligence– with significant differences– is more.(P<0.05. Conclusion: Although Gifted Intelligence have more ability in opposition to stress- because higher level of IQ-but in this study was observed that prevalence of depression in Gifted Intelligence is more. This finding may be by reason of higher perception of them and the result of it– actually– more meeting of stress.

  5. High Reading Skills Mask Dyslexia in Gifted Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Viersen, Sietske; Kroesbergen, Evelyn H; Slot, Esther M; de Bree, Elise H

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated how gifted children with dyslexia might be able to mask literacy problems and the role of possible compensatory mechanisms. The sample consisted of 121 Dutch primary school children that were divided over four groups (typically developing [TD] children, children with dyslexia, gifted children, gifted children with dyslexia). The test battery included measures of literacy (reading/spelling) and cognitive abilities related to literacy and language (phonological awareness [PA], rapid automatized naming [RAN], verbal short-term memory [VSTM], working memory [WM], grammar, and vocabulary). It was hypothesized that gifted children with dyslexia would outperform children with dyslexia on literacy tests. In addition, a core-deficit model including dyslexia-related weaknesses and a compensational model involving giftedness-related strengths were tested using Bayesian statistics to explain their reading/spelling performance. Gifted children with dyslexia performed on all literacy tests in between children with dyslexia and TD children. Their cognitive profile showed signs of weaknesses in PA and RAN and strengths in VSTM, WM, and language skills. Findings indicate that phonology is a risk factor for gifted children with dyslexia, but this is moderated by other skills such as WM, grammar, and vocabulary, providing opportunities for compensation of a cognitive deficit and masking of literacy difficulties. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2014.

  6. Nuptial gifts and female fecundity in the neotropical katydid Conocephalus ictus (Orthoptera: Tettigonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortíz-Jiménez, Isabel; Cueva del Castillo, Raúl

    2015-02-01

    In general, female fitness is greatly increased in gift-giving insects. In katydids, this nuptial gift consists of a gelatinous mass produced by accessory glands: the spermatophylax, which is attached to the ampulla. During mating, males of the neotropical katydid Conocephalus ictus transfer a spermatophylax that is ingested by the females. Fecundity, egg-laying rate and longevity were higher in females that consumed the spermatophylax than in those that did not. Also, female receptivity turned off after mating. Females actively rejected other males by hitting them with their forelegs and moving away. Their refractory period lasted as long as 17 d. Only a few females accepted a 2nd mating and died a few days later. In C. ictus, spermatophylax consumption can be beneficial for both males and females. On one hand, the compounds in the spermatophylax or the ejaculate could prevent or delay females from copulating with rivals, thus avoiding sperm competition. On the other hand, such compounds can improve the females' opportunity to increase their lifespan and fecundity. Moreover, a rise in egg-laying rate may lower the risk of female prereproductive death caused by rapid oviposition. In any case, the boost in female egg laying might also be beneficial for males because their number of offspring increases. © 2014 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  7. Why Be Normal? The Search for Identity and Acceptance in the Gifted Adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaeser, Chuck

    2003-01-01

    Provides a framework for thinking about issues of adolescence and identity in the English classroom. Presents an adaptable plan for preparing a thematic unit on identity in literature. Concludes that an English teacher should operate as a conduit between the stories that are taught and the stories of students' experiences, providing students with…

  8. Responsible technology acceptance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Madeleine Broman; Schuitema, Geertje; Thøgersen, John

    2014-01-01

    in terms of a positive impact for society and the environment. Therefore, we expect that Smart Grid technology acceptance can be better explained when the well-known technology acceptance parameters included in the Technology Acceptance Model are supplemented by moral norms as suggested by the Norm...... on private consumers’ acceptance of having Smart Grid technology installed in their home. We analyse acceptance in a combined framework of the Technology Acceptance Model and the Norm Activation Model. We propose that individuals are only likely to accept Smart Grid technology if they assess usefulness...... Activation Model. We tested this proposition by means of an online survey of Danish (N=323), Norwegian (N=303) and Swiss (N=324) private consumers. The study confirms that adding personal norms to the independent variables of the Technology Acceptance Model leads to a significant increase in the explained...

  9. Social and Emotional Education of the Gifted: The Discoveries of Leta Hollingworth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Linda Kreger

    1990-01-01

    This article synthesizes the writings of psychologist and educator, Leta Hollingworth (1886-1939), on the unique adjustment problems of gifted children and presents her program for "emotional education" of the gifted. (Author/DB)

  10. Geosciences Information for Teachers (GIFT) in Catalonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerlenghi, Angelo; Cacho, Isabel; Calvo, Eva; Demol, Ben; Sureda, Catalina; Artigas, Carme; Vilaplana, Miquel; Porbellini, Danilo; Rubio, Eduard

    2010-05-01

    CATAGIFT is the acronym of the project supported by the Catalan Government (trough the AGAUR agency) to support the activities of the EGU Committee on Education in Catalonia. The objective of this project is two-fold: 1) To establish a coordinated action to support the participation of three Catalan science teachers of primary and secondary schools in the GIFT Symposium, held each year during the General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union (EGU). 2) To produce a video documentary each year on hot topics in geosciences. The documentary is produced in Catalan, Spanish and English and is distributed to the Catalan science teachers attending the annual meeting organized by the Institute of Education Sciences and the Faculty of Geology of the University together with the CosmoCaixa Museum of Barcelona, to the international teachers attending the EGU GIFT Workshop, and to other schools in the Spanish territory. In the present-day context of science dissemination through documentaries and television programs there is a dominance of products of high technical quality and very high costs sold and broadcasted world wide. The wide spread of such products tends to standardize scientific information, not only in its content, but also in the format used for communicating science to the general public. In the field of geosciences in particular, there is a scarcity of products that combine high scientific quality and accessible costs to illustrate aspects of the natural life of our planet Earth through the results of the work of individual researchers and / or research groups. The scientific documentaries produced by CATAGIFT pursue the objective to support primary and secondary school teachers to critically interpret scientific information coming from the different media (television, newspapers, magazines, audiovisual products), in a way that they can transmit to their students. CataGIFT has created a series of documentaries called MARENOSTRUM TERRANOSTRA designed and

  11. Black males' self-perceptions of academic ability and gifted potential in advanced science classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascoe, Barbara Jean

    The purpose of this study was to examine gifted Black males' self-perceptions of academic ability and gifted potential in science. Major concerns were to determine how these self-perceptions of academic ability and gifted potential influenced gifted Black males' capacity to compete in advanced science classes and to determine how science teachers may have influenced participants' self-perceptions of academic ability and gifted potential. This study required an approach that would allow an interpretive aspect for the experiences of gifted Black males in advanced science classes. An intrinsic qualitative case study design with a critical theory framework was used. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews, which were audiotaped and transcribed. Each participant was interviewed twice and each interview averaged 45 minutes. The purposeful sample consisted of nine gifted high school Black males between the ages of fourteen and eighteen. The constant comparative method was used to analyze the data. The categories of gifted Black males' self-perceptions of academic ability and gifted potential included gifted high achievers, gifted 'could do better' high achievers, gifted 'could do better' situational nonachievers, and gifted 'could do better' underachievers. Gifted Black male participants' perceptions regarding their science teachers' influence on their self-perceptions of academic ability and gifted potential included validation, reinforcement, and enhancement. These participants' perceptions regarding how science teachers' influenced their academic performance in science included science teachers' content knowledge, science teachers' skills to make science challenging and engaging, and a safe learning environment. The conclusions of this study described competing power dynamics of science teachers and gifted Black males' interactions in the science learning environment. The discussion also included a summary of relationships among the emergent themes

  12. Successful Gifting Strategies in China : Analysis of the Millennials in the Food Market

    OpenAIRE

    Balass, Julie

    2017-01-01

    China holds many marketing opportunities that are yet untapped. Among those, the cultural phenomenon of gift exchange endorses a major economic and cultural role. Under the influence of Confucianism, the Chinese rely on their social networks (guanxi) rather than on institutional laws for protection. The best way to develop their network (guanxi) is through gifts. Although guanxi activities are one of the main reasons to offer gifts among the working Chinese, the millennials think that a gift ...

  13. The Relationships between Critical Thinking Skills and Learning Styles of Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilekli, Yalçin

    2017-01-01

    The current study investigates the relationship between critical thinking skills and learning styles of mentally gifted students. The participants were 225 gifted students in Turkey attending Science and Art Centres which are after-school activity centers for mentally gifted students. Participants were 9-15 years old and were attending secondary…

  14. Deference and différance : judicial review and the perfect gift

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    The gift,146 similar to the other normative concepts Derrida analyses (such as forgiveness147 and hospitality)148 is pulled in two directions at once. On the one hand, the gift gives rise to indebtedness, to an obligation to reciprocate, usually within a certain time-period.149 "Gifts" thus tend to create a circular economy. A.

  15. Counseling Gifted Children in Singapore: Implications for Evidence-Based Treatment with a Multicultural Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Lay See; Pfeiffer, Steven I.

    2018-01-01

    Gifted education (GE) in Singapore is entering its third decade. However, local research into the gifted is typically undertaken by graduate students and left as unpublished data. Internationally, there is also very little if any research on counseling models that have been empirically validated for use with gifted children irrespective of their…

  16. Performance-Based Assessment: The Road to Authentic Learning for the Gifted

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanTassel-Baska, Joyce

    2014-01-01

    Performance-based assessment clearly represents an indispensable approach for assessing gifted student learning. Challenging performance tasks allow gifted learners to reveal their considerable intellectual capacity and energy. Through performance tasks, teachers gain insights into a gifted student's true level of capability in a domain of…

  17. 25 CFR 39.111 - What does the term gifted and talented mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... term gifted and talented mean? The term gifted and talented means students, children, or youth who: (a... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What does the term gifted and talented mean? 39.111 Section 39.111 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL...

  18. NAGC-CEC Teacher Preparation Standards in Gifted and Talented Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association for Gifted Children, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC), in collaboration with the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC), and the Association for the Gifted (CEC-TAG), has developed national standards for teacher preparation programs in gifted and talented education. Typically, these programs are at the masters level, but they may also be endorsement…

  19. A Rationale for Reexamining Definition, Identification, and Programs for the Gifted-Disabled/Disadvantaged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremins, Mary Ann

    Definitions and identification practices are examined in light of special problems facing gifted disabled and gifted disadvantaged students. Research is reviewed on a variety of gifted subgroups, including physical disabilities, diverse cultures and ethnic groups, underachievement, and learning disabilities. Differences in definitions of gifted…

  20. 14 CFR 300.8 - Gifts and hospitality and other conduct affecting DOT employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Gifts and hospitality and other conduct... CHAPTER § 300.8 Gifts and hospitality and other conduct affecting DOT employees. (a) No person, otherwise... for persons interested in the business of DOT to provide hospitality, gifts, entertainment, or favors...

  1. Investigating Gifted Middle School Students' Images about Scientists: A Cultural Similarity Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayri, N.; Koksal, M. S.; Ertekin, P.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate gifted middle school students' images about scientists in terms of cultural similarity. Sample of the study is 64 gifted middle school students taking courses from a formal school for gifted students. The data were collected by using Draw-a-scientist (DAST) instrument and was analysed by two researchers…

  2. Cinematherapy in Gifted Education Identity Development: Integrating the Arts through STEM-Themed Movies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangas, Timothy C.; Cook, Michelle; Rule, Audrey C.

    2017-01-01

    Gifted students, because of their advanced development compared to peers, have emotional needs that require differentiated education programs. Asynchronous social and emotional development of gifted students often leads to identity issues. Cinematherapy can be used to help gifted students explore their identities through analysis of the actions of…

  3. An Interview with Abraham J. Tannenbaum: Innovative Programs for the Gifted and Talented.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Sandra I.

    2002-01-01

    In this interview, Dr. Abraham Tannenbaum, an author and leader of numerous research projects concerning gifted and talented students, discusses homeschooling, the impact of charter schools, magnet schools, and school choice on gifted education, the Ganiech psychosocial definition of giftedness, and the development of gifted programs. (Contains 7…

  4. The Autistic Savant: Recognizing and Serving the Gifted Student with Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Julie A.; Altman, Reuben

    1994-01-01

    This article focuses attention on the underserved population of gifted students with autism. The article examines savant abilities in the autistic population, needs of the gifted student with autism, similarities between the gifted autistic and other populations, and implications for treatment. (JDD)

  5. Exaggerated, Mispredicted, and Misplaced: When "It's the Thought That Counts" in Gift Exchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Epley, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Gift-giving involves both the objective value of a gift and the symbolic meaning of the exchange. The objective value is sometimes considered of secondary importance as when people claim, "It's the thought that counts." We evaluated when and how mental state inferences count in gift exchanges. Because considering another's thoughts requires…

  6. An Examination of Articles in Gifted Education and Multicultural Education Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    An analysis of gifted education and multicultural education journals was performed to identify the number of multicultural education articles in gifted education journals and the number of gifted education articles in multicultural education journals. Journals reviewed were "Multicultural Education", "Multicultural Perspectives," "Urban…

  7. Sports Participation Among Academically Gifted Adolescents: Relationship to the Multidimensional Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinn, Anne N.; Wininger, Steven R.

    2007-01-01

    This study compares academically gifted students who engage in sports to academically gifted students who do not engage in sports on measures of the multidimensional self-concept. Participants include 264 gifted adolescents who had completed the 6th through 10th grade during the previous academic year. Sports participation was measured by asking…

  8. Identifying and Dealing with Exceptionally Gifted Children: The Half-Blind Leading the Sighted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Richard M.

    1986-01-01

    The author argues that intelligence testing is an invaluable and irreplaceable tool for identifying gifted children and obtaining a measure of the urgency of their special educational needs. He also offers ideas for how parents of exceptionally gifted children can create an environment in which their children's gifts can flourish. (Author/CL)

  9. Inquiry-Based Instruction within a Community of Practice for Gifted-ADHD College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Olivia; Shore, Bruce M.; Makarova, Evgeniya

    2014-01-01

    A number of characteristics are shared between attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and gifted populations. They include issues with sustaining attention, following directions, and completing tasks. When an individual is both gifted and has ADHD (gifted-ADHD) he has unique educational needs that may put him at risk for underachievement.…

  10. 31 CFR 500.554 - Gifts of North Korean, North Vietnamese, Cambodian, or South Vietnamese origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gifts of North Korean, North... § 500.554 Gifts of North Korean, North Vietnamese, Cambodian, or South Vietnamese origin. (a) Except as... importation of North Korean, North Vietnamese, Cambodian, or South Vietnamese origin goods sent as gifts to...

  11. Educating Parents of Gifted Children: Designing Effective Workshops for Changing Parent Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Christine L.; Stanley, Laurel

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a series of free workshops for parents of gifted children. The parent education workshops provided research-based information as recognized by experts in the field of counseling gifted children. Content areas include the characteristics of gifted children, identification, appropriate…

  12. Leadership, organization and spiritual gifts in the church

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Inge Jenssen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we discuss whether leadership and organisational structure can influence and facilitate the use of spiritual gifts in congregations. The purpose is to substantiate a link and give some examples of what this relationship may be like. We argue that leaders contribute to the design of organisational structures and that they apply different leadership styles, which may have implications for the development of spiritual gifts. For instance, we try to show that proactive construction of various arenas; the size and composition of the group of participants at these arenas; and strong relational and change orientation within a transformational leadership style, will contribute positively to the development and practise of various gifts developed in the congregation.

  13. Creativity in gifted identification: increasing accuracy and diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, Sarah R; O'Brien, Rebecca L; Kaufman, James C

    2016-08-01

    Many federal definitions and popular theories of giftedness specify creativity as a core component. Nevertheless, states rely primarily on measures of intelligence for giftedness identification. As minority and culturally diverse students continue to be underrepresented in gifted programs, it is reasonable to ask if increasing the prominence of creativity in gifted identification may help increase balance and equity. In this paper, we explore both layperson and psychometric conceptions of bias and suggest that adding creativity measures to the identification process alleviates both perceptions and the presence of bias. We recognize, however, the logistic and measurement-related challenges to including creativity assessments. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  14. Gift-giving in the medical student--patient relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamri, Yassar Abdullah S

    2012-08-01

    There is paucity in the published literature that provides any ethical guidance guiding gift-giving within the student--patient relationship. This is perhaps because the dynamics of the medical student--patient relationship have not yet been explored as extensively as the doctor--patient relationship. More importantly, however, gift--giving in the doctor-patient relationship has traditionally been from the patient to the doctor and not vice versa. This article examines the literature published in this vicinity reflecting on an encounter with a patient.

  15. ARC Code TI: ACCEPT

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ACCEPT consists of an overall software infrastructure framework and two main software components. The software infrastructure framework consists of code written to...

  16. Identifying Twice-Exceptional Children and Three Gifted Styles in the Japanese Primary Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, Manabu

    2010-10-01

    Children with mild developmental disorders sometimes show giftedness. In this study, an original checklist was developed to identify gifted characteristics specific to science learning among twice-exceptional primary school children in Japan. The checklist consisted of 60 items on Attitudes, Thinking, Skills, and Knowledge/Understanding. A total of 86 children from eight primary schools in an urban area in Japan, 50% of whom had Learning Disabilities (LD), Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and/or High-functioning Autism (HA), were observed using the checklist. Factor analysis revealed three factors. A cluster analysis with the subscale points of each factor identified three "gifted styles" in science. These were: (1) Spontaneous Style; (2) Expert Style; and (3) Solid Style. LD/ADHD/HA children characteristically displayed a Spontaneous Style while the non- LD/ADHD/HA children were characterized by the Solid Style. In both subject groups, the number of Expert Style children was the lowest with no significant difference in their numbers. Based on the results of this research, this paper discusses the implications of the findings for teaching science to twice-exceptional children and argues the benefits of inclusive science education for children with and without mild developmental disorders.

  17. The gifts we keep on giving: documenting and destigmatizing the regifting taboo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Gabrielle S; Flynn, Francis J; Norton, Michael I

    2012-10-01

    Five studies examined whether the practice of regifting--a social taboo--is as offensive to the original givers as potential regifters assume. Participants who imagined regifting a gift (receivers) thought that the original giver would be more offended than participants who imagined that their gifts were regifted (givers) reported feeling. Specifically, receivers viewed regifting as similar in offensiveness to throwing gifts away, yet givers clearly preferred the former. This asymmetry in emotional reactions to regifting was driven by an asymmetry in beliefs about entitlement. Givers believed that the act of gift giving passed title to the gift on to receivers, so that receivers were free to decide what to do with the gift; in contrast, receivers believed that givers retained some say in how their gifts were used. Finally, an intervention designed to destigmatize regifting by introducing a different normative standard (i.e., National Regifting Day) corrected the asymmetry in beliefs about entitlement and increased regifting.

  18. Consumer acceptance of irradiated food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loaharanu, P. [Head, Food Preservation Section, Joint FAO/ IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Wagramerstr. 5, A-1400, Vienna (Austria)

    1997-12-31

    There was a widely held opinion during the 1970`s and 1980`s that consumers would be reluctant to purchase irradiated food, as it was perceived that consumers would confuse irradiated food with food contaminated by radionuclides. Indeed, a number of consumer attitude surveys conducted in several western countries during these two decades demonstrated that the concerns of consumers on irradiated food varied from very concerned to seriously concerned.This paper attempts to review parameters conducting in measuring consumer acceptance of irradiated food during the past three decades and to project the trends on this subject. It is believed that important lessons learned from past studies will guide further efforts to market irradiated food with wide consumer acceptance in the future. (Author)

  19. TO LEARN FROM TEACHERS AT SCHOOL, IDEAL TEACHER OR E-LEARNING APPLICATIONS FROM THE PERSPECTIVES OF GIFTED STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahadir ERISTI,

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study, aimed at revealing the views of elementary school gifted students about the roles and behaviors of their teachers in class as well as about the in-class roles and behaviors that they expect from an ideal teacher with respect to different variables. Another question in the study was directed to determine students’ views about learning academic subjects via e-learning applications instead of at teachers. The participants of the study were 46 gifted students identified with the diagnosis system of “Education program for the gifted” executed in the Department of Gifted Education at the Education Faculty of Anadolu University. The research data were collected via a five-point Likert-type scale developed and tested by the researcher for its validity and reliability. For the analysis of the research data, paired sample t-test, one of descriptive parametrical statistical techniques, was applied. The findings obtained in the study revealed that according to gifted students, the in-class behaviors demonstrated by the course teachers were mostly those related to their roles of guidance for students. The behaviors of the course teachers within the scope of this role were followed by those related to providing information and maintaining the discipline, respectively. The behaviors least demonstrated by the teachers were those related to the role of supporting the students and those related to being a model for them. According to the students, an ideal teacher should at most demonstrate behaviors in class regarding the role of guiding the students and those regarding the role of providing information. According to the gifted students, the roles and behaviors of their teachers in class are quite different from the behaviors expected from an ideal teacher. Students do not regard e-learning applications as an alternative to learning from teachers. Rather, they prefer learning from their teachers to technology-aided learning environments

  20. Tutoring a Gifted High School Student (Research into Practice).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Mary W., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    Relates the process of tutoring a gifted high school student. Asserts that his problems are not unique: bright students often have the same difficulty learning from expository text as average or below average students, and they can be as disorganized as everyone else. Suggests that high schools should offer instruction in content area reading.…

  1. Television and Gifted Children: What the Research Says.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelman, Robert

    1992-01-01

    This review of communication research on television viewing by intellectually gifted children examines the number of hours such children spend watching television, types of programing they watch, their capacity to process and comprehend program content, appropriate child role models in television programing, and mediation of television viewing by…

  2. Creativity in Gifted Education: Contributions from Vygotsky and Piaget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltz, Tania; Piske, Fernanda Hellen Ribeiro; de Fátima Quintal de Freitas, Maria; D'Aroz, Marlene Schüssler; Machado, Járci Maria

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to highlight the importance of developing creativity in the school environment by promoting quality education to gifted students, with contributions from Vygotsky and Piaget. For Vygotsky creativity is inherent in the human condition, and it is the most important activity because it is the expression of consciousness, thought…

  3. Freedom and Responsibility: Existentialism, Gifted Students, and Philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, David A.

    2001-01-01

    This article uses excerpts from Jean-Paul Sartre to examine the meaning of being human and also what it means to be free as a human being. It discusses how Sartre's thoughts on freedom and responsibilities may be usefully applied in science and social studies instruction for gifted students. (CR)

  4. Multiple Intelligence Theory for Gifted Education: Criticisms and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calik, Basak; Birgili, Bengi

    2013-01-01

    This paper scrutinizes giftedness and gifted learners under the implications of multiple intelligence theory with regard to coaching young scientists. It is one of the pluralistic theories toward intelligence while supporting to view individuals as active participants during teaching and learning processes which correspond with the applications of…

  5. The psychological well-being of early identified gifted children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroesbergen, E.H.; Hooijdonk, M.; van Viersen, S.; Middel-Lalleman, M.M.N.; Reijnders, J.J.W.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the psychological well-being of gifted primary school children. From a screening sample of 233 children in Grades 1 and 2 across five schools in the Netherlands, 35 children achieving high scores on two out of three selection criteria (teacher nomination, creativity, and

  6. Gifted Education as a Vehicle for Enhancing Social Equality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Jennifer Riedl

    2013-01-01

    Considering the benefits that accrue in countries having low levels of social inequality and the harm that accompanies wide disparities in income, it is important to examine any practices or traditions that contribute to inequality. Under some circumstances, gifted education does confer advantages that are not available to all students,…

  7. Understanding Gender Differences in Thinking Styles of Gifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohan-Mass, Judy

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to characterize gender patterns regarding ways of thinking and learning among 242 fifth- and sixth-grade young gifted students in Israel. A written questionnaire was developed to assess ways of thinking as either connected (empathic) or separate (critical, detached). Findings showed that boys consistently rated…

  8. Can Innovation Save Gifted Education? 2010 NAGC Presidential Address

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Connecting innovation with gifted education is a necessity not only in the current political climate but also because it is a field with deeply held beliefs about the importance of problem solving, creativity, imagination, and invention--all critical components of innovation. In this address, the author focuses on three key ideas. First, she…

  9. Is Homeschooling Right for You and Your Highly Gifted Child?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Karen

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses home schooling for gifted children and describes the most common teaching strategies or pedagogical approaches that home schoolers have successfully used, including: classical, lifestyle of learning, schooling at home, structured/mastery learning, unit studies, unschooling, worldview, and curriculum-based. The benefits of…

  10. At Home in Maine: Gifted Children and Homeschooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Katheryn

    1984-01-01

    Parents of two gifted children are interviewed about their decision to teach their children at home. The parents describe their reasons for taking the children out of school and the benefits of home schooling and offer suggestions for other parents contemplating the idea. (CL)

  11. Bullying by Exclusion: Gifted Students and "Maslow's Paradox"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder-Davis, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In this column the author explores the middle school nexus of asynchronicity, Maslow's hierarchy of needs and bullying as they apply to gifted students in secondary schools, with an emphasis on the middle school student. The premise is typically referred to as "achievement vs. affiliation," (Ford, 2004; Neihart, 2006, 2008) and concerns the…

  12. Intellectual Patterns of Young Gifted Children on the WPPSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, Sandra Kelly; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Patterns of Verbal and Performance Intelligence Quotients (IQ) and subtest scores of young gifted children (N=306) were identified on the Weschler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence (WPPSI). Most students had higher verbal than performance IQs, and the verbal IQ mean was significantly higher than the performance IQ mean. (Author/CB)

  13. Where Are They? Gifted Disadvantaged Children in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    India is a pluralistic, multicultural, and multilingual society. Cultural differences within India make it impossible to adopt a common approach to the identification of potentially gifted children. We need a program that is locally driven and culturally appropriate to be able to make a real difference in the future life of young potentially able…

  14. Enrique: A case study of a gifted computer user

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sesko, S C

    2000-03-17

    The author has been investigating the affective and intellectual views that gifted children have about computers. These studies have used various methodological approaches in order to develop a broad perspective on the issues involved in this topic. The author has used survey instruments (Sesko, 1998) and interview techniques (Sesko, 1999) to capture both statistical and narrative data. The objective of this study is to explore in depth the interactions that one student has with the machine and its applications. The driver for this and the previous studies was the paucity of research in the area of gifted and talented children and their involvement with what has become the primary intellectual tool of the century (Turkel, 1984). The second reason is that it has been posited that the intellectual characteristics of gifted children should enable those who are interested in computers to achieve a high level of proficiency with either computer applications or programming. Further, the ability to learn things at a young age should allow gifted children who use computers to develop a large variety of computer-based activities. The author has shown evidence to support these ideas in previous work. Finally, as Hausman (1985) claims, facilities with computers should allow these children to create new activities for using computers. The author found no published research to demonstrate whether they do; but still believes the results of this case study strongly support Hausman's contentions.

  15. Risk and Protective Factors in Gifted Children with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Viersen, Sietske; de Bree, Elise H.; Kroesbergen, Evelyn H.; Slot, Esther M.; de Jong, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated risk and protective factors associated with dyslexia and literacy development, both at the group and individual level, to gain more insight in underlying cognitive profiles and possibilities for compensation in high-IQ children. A sample of 73 Dutch primary school children included a dyslexic group, a gifted-dyslexic group,…

  16. Exploring "Gift" Theories for New Immigrants' Literacy Education in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chueh, Ho-Chia

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses "the gift" as the central concept in a discussion about the literacy education for new immigrants that has been developing in Taiwan since the early 1990s. The point of departure for this discussion is the advent of international marriages that are the consequence of new arrivals from Southeast Asia and China, and…

  17. Guidelines for Identification. Educational Programs for Gifted and Talented Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drons, Michael T.

    This publication provides Maine school administrative unit personnel with guidelines to implement procedures for identifying gifted and talented children. Legislative requirements are presented on the left-hand pages and suggested guidelines for implementing the requirements are on the right-hand pages. Requirements and guidelines are organized…

  18. Preschool Gifted Education: Perceived Challenges Associated with Program Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettler, Todd; Oveross, Mattie E.; Salman, Rania C.

    2017-01-01

    This descriptive study investigated the challenges related to implementing gifted education services in preschool centers. Participants were 254 licensed preschool center directors in a southern state. Participants completed a researcher-created survey including both selected response items and constructed response items to examine the perceived…

  19. Teacher Training Programs for Gifted Education with Focus on Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Eva; Horváthová, Božena

    2016-01-01

    Scholars, psychologists, and teachers from around the world have been dealing with the topic of giftedness for many years. Also in Slovakia, development of giftedness is a highly topical issue and gifted education has earned its place in the current curricular documents issued by the Ministry of Education. The national curriculum specifies…

  20. Verbal Interaction Behaviors of Teachers of the Gifted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasca, Donald; Davis, Hilarie Bryce

    Trained and untrained teachers (N=37) of gifted students (grades 2 through 6) were observed and compared in the areas of individualization, cognitive quality of interaction, response patterns, and overall differentiation. Teachers were trained in applying B. Bloom's taxonomy to questioning techniques and in using management strategies for…

  1. Mathematically Gifted Third Graders--A Challenge in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfle, Jane A.

    1988-01-01

    The third-grade classroom teacher can identify mathematically gifted students and can provide them with opportunities for extending their understanding and enjoyment of mathematics through use of such techniques as content sophistication, enrichment, peer tutoring, curriculum compacting, puzzles, and math centers. (Author/JDD)

  2. Visual Processing in Generally Gifted and Mathematically Excelling Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Baruch, Nurit; Leikin, Roza; Leikin, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Little empirical data are available concerning the cognitive abilities of gifted individuals in general and especially those who excel in mathematics. We examined visual processing abilities distinguishing between general giftedness (G) and excellence in mathematics (EM). The research population consisted of 190 students from four groups of 10th-…

  3. Programs for the Gifted - Site Management. Revised 1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppell, Helen M.

    The manual is designed to help educational personnel handle day-to-day responsibilities and managment of programs for the gifted in the San Diego City schools. The first section explores program maintenance and describes services, identifies departmental sources, and offers suggestions for optimum use of services. The second and third sections…

  4. Blazing New Trails: Strengthening Policy Research in Gifted Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plucker, Jonathan A.; Makel, Matthew C.; Matthews, Michael S.; Peters, Scott J.; Rambo-Hernandez, Karen E.

    2017-01-01

    Policy research in gifted education has occurred at much lower rates than other areas of research within the field, such as identification and talent development. However, without changes and implementation of these policies, systematic change is unlikely to occur. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to argue that policy research should be a…

  5. Comparisons and Analyses of Gifted Students' Characteristics and Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiamei; Li, Daqi; Stevens, Carla; Ye, Renmin

    2017-01-01

    Using PISA 2009, an international education database, this study compares gifted and talented (GT) students in three groups with normal (non-GT) students by examining student characteristics, reading, schooling, learning methods, and use of strategies for understanding and memorizing. Results indicate that the GT and non-GT gender distributions…

  6. Exploring the Relationship between Mood Disorders and Gifted Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missett, Tracy C.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers of the gifted have traditionally advanced the theory, though they are often without data to support it, that an association between intellectual and/or creative giftedness and mood disorders exists. This assumed association is often referred to as the "mad genius theory." This article explores the origins and development of…

  7. Hooked: The Two Way Seduction of Working with Gifted Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Sally

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses strategies for differentiating the curriculum for gifted students by using a creative approach to language teaching. It provides suggestions for co-operative and creative classroom language activities, including making a syllable pie, starting a dictionary of sub-cult words, cryptic crosswords, poetry, and tracing language…

  8. Effects of Gifted Peers Tutoring Struggling Reading Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Christopher D.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a peer tutoring program that used a Direct Instruction (DI) reading curriculum. Students identified as gifted and talented delivered instruction, using the DI reading program, to their struggling reading peers. The students used a cross-skill peer tutoring instructional format. The results indicated that all of…

  9. Overexcitabilities and ADHD in the Gifted: An Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinn, Anne N.; Reynolds, Marilyn J.

    2012-01-01

    Gifted children and adolescents can display behavioral characteristics similar to those exhibited by children and adolescents who have been diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), leading to potential issues with misdiagnosis. The overlapping characteristics between giftedness and ADHD are often seen as anecdotal or to only…

  10. Parenting the Gifted Young Scientist: Mrs. Wizard at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karges-Bone, Linda

    1993-01-01

    Suggestions are provided for encouraging and nurturing gifted young scientists (ages 4-10), such as subscribing to a science magazine, making science a natural part of family life, and linking sciences to the arts. Young children are characterized as perceiving their world through the acronym SCIENCE (Sensory, Classify, Inquisitive, Experiment,…

  11. Martial Arts and Critical Thinking in the Gifted Education Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Lay Hiok; Jewell, Paul D.

    This paper examines similarities between the goals of Aikido, a martial art, and critical thinking and argues that Aikido promotes the development of thinking in its training and practice. It applies these ideas to the gifted education curriculum. First the paper introduces characteristics of Aikido, Aikido movement and techniques. It equates…

  12. High reading skills mask dyslexia in gifted children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Viersen, Sietske; Kroesbergen, Evelyn|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/241607949; Slot, Esther; de Bree, Elise|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/292748868

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated how gifted children with dyslexia might be able to mask literacy problems and the role of possible compensatory mechanisms. The sample consisted of 121 Dutch primary school children that were divided over four groups (typically developing [TD] children, children with

  13. External Barriers Experienced by Gifted and Talented Girls and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Sally M.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses current statistics about women and work and external barriers to achievement. Barriers include parental influences, media stereotypes, stereotyping in school, sexism in colleges and universities, and the burden of responsibilities females shoulder at home. Recommendations to help gifted girls address external barriers are…

  14. Javits 7+ Gifted and Talented Program: Kindergarten Assessment Model. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Community School District 18, Brooklyn, NY.

    This packet contains a set of assessment activities to identify gifted and talented children at the kindergarten level, based on Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences. The six assessments measure linguistic, logical-mathematical, spatial, musical, bodily-kinesthetic, and interpersonal/intrapersonal intelligence. For each assessment,…

  15. External Factors Affecting Gifted Girls' Academic and Career Achievements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Mary Ann; Smith, Stephen W.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses the unique position that teachers have for observing the environmental influences affecting the career choices of gifted girls. It suggests ways for teachers to educate parents on the family's role in education and career achievement and to create an educational environment that promotes the development of talent. (Contains…

  16. Appropriate Uses of Intelligence Tests with Gifted Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Nancy M.; Chamrad, Diana L.

    1986-01-01

    The article suggests that intelligence testing effectively serves the purpose for which it was created and that it can yield a wealth of valuable information about a gifted child. The authors note that acknowledging that other measures are needed does not invalidate those measures currently used. (Author/CL)

  17. "Contact Us Next Year": Tracing Teachers' Use of Gifted Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashion, Marie; Sullenger, Karen

    2000-01-01

    This study followed up teachers two years after they had attended a summer institute on gifted education to identify changes teachers made in their classrooms. It identified factors that either supported (student success, personal challenge, and increasing self confidence) or impeded (feelings of isolation, school bureaucracy, large class size,…

  18. Academically Gifted Undergraduate Students: Their Preferred Teaching Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Khayat, Majed M.; AL-Hrout, Mosa A.; Hyassat, Mizyed A.

    2017-01-01

    Much attention is being paid to the students who give evidence of high achievement capability in specific academic fields. This interest includes choosing sufficient teaching strategies that suit their characteristics. However, this study aims at identifying what teaching strategies are preferred by academically gifted students in Princess Rahma…

  19. High reading skills mask dyslexia in gifted children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Viersen, S.; Kroesbergen, E.H.; Slot, E.M.; de Bree, E.H.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated how gifted children with dyslexia might be able to mask literacy problems and the role of possible compensatory mechanisms. The sample consisted of 121 Dutch primary school children that were divided over four groups (typically developing [TD] children, children with

  20. Preparing Teachers of Gifted Students to Solve Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Theresa M.; Georgiades, William Den Hartog

    1986-01-01

    Teachers have successfully used three Principles of Teacher Training (Curry Sato, 1984) as guidelines for identifying and solving instructional problems with gifted students. Teaching styles were changed through training, which was (1) reinforced through appropriate materials; (2) attempted to meet participants' specific needs; and (3) was…

  1. Nurturing Young Gifted and Talented Children: Teachers Generating Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshy, Valsa; Welham, Cathryn

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a set of Action Research projects carried out by practitioners in 14 Local Education Districts in collaboration with a team of university tutors over a period of three years. The aim of the project was to explore ways of nurturing the gifts and talents of children aged 4-7 years. The project was funded by the…

  2. Necessary Losses: Helping Gifted Kids Cope with the "Unpreventable"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Ellen D.; Kane, Michele

    2009-01-01

    Losses come in all shapes and sizes. However, because of their intensity, sensitivity, and depth of thinking and feeling, gifted kids often have far more difficulty coping with losses. Dealing with loss can be a powerful means of personal transformation, and it helps one clarify which aspects of life are important. Regardless of the type of loss,…

  3. Teaching Techniques for the Learning Disabled/Gifted Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Karen A.

    1991-01-01

    Through a review of the literature, recent research, and implementation results, this article explores teaching methods for use with gifted students with learning disabilities. Methods for application in regular and special classrooms are discussed, including establishment of relationships between home and school life, individualized intervention…

  4. An Enrichment Program for Gifted Learning Disabled Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Susan

    1988-01-01

    A pilot program was developed for gifted learning-disabled students, based on the Enrichment Triad Model. Learning behaviors, time on task, and motivation showed marked improvement as the grade four-five students completed individual creative projects. Described are procedures for identifying program participants, program activities, and program…

  5. Perceptual and academic patterns of learning-disabled/gifted students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, K A; Saphire, D G

    1992-04-01

    This research explored ways gifted children with learning disabilities perceive and recall auditory and visual input and apply this information to reading, mathematics, and spelling. 24 learning-disabled/gifted children and a matched control group of normally achieving gifted students were tested for oral reading, word recognition and analysis, listening comprehension, and spelling. In mathematics, they were tested for numeration, mental and written computation, word problems, and numerical reasoning. To explore perception and memory skills, students were administered formal tests of visual and auditory memory as well as auditory discrimination of sounds. Their responses to reading and to mathematical computations were further considered for evidence of problems in visual discrimination, visual sequencing, and visual spatial areas. Analyses indicated that these learning-disabled/gifted students were significantly weaker than controls in their decoding skills, in spelling, and in most areas of mathematics. They were also significantly weaker in auditory discrimination and memory, and in visual discrimination, sequencing, and spatial abilities. Conclusions are that these underlying perceptual and memory deficits may be related to students' academic problems.

  6. Developing Assessment Profiles for Gifted Learning Disabled Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Belinda Davis

    1989-01-01

    Case studies are presented for 4 gifted learning-disabled students, ages 8-16. The students received a multidisciplinary assessment which indicated that psychometric test scores need to be supplemented with informal assessments; historical data; direct student observation; task analysis of permanent products; and information from parents,…

  7. A Learning Paradox: Students Who Are Gifted and Learning Disabled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Cecilia Rose

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this generic qualitative study was to determine how and to what extent educational programming affects the success of middle school students experiencing the contemporary phenomenon identified as gifted learning disabled (GLD). The research took place within the real-life context of the middle school these GLD students attended.…

  8. Mentoring Empowers Gifted/Learning Disabled Students To Soar!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevitz, Betty; Weinfeld, Rich; Jeweler, Sue; Barnes-Robinson, Linda

    2003-01-01

    This article describes the Wings Mentor Program in Maryland, a program developed to provide additional support to students with gifts who also have learning disabilities and highly able students who were not succeeding in the classroom. Students realize their creative and intellectual potential when paired with mentors who nurture them. (Contains…

  9. High reading skills mask dyslexia in gifted children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viersen, S. van; Kroesbergen, E.H.; Slot, E.M.; Bree, E.H. de

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated how gifted children with dyslexia might be able to mask literacy problems and the role of possiblecompensatory mechanisms. The sample consisted of 121 Dutch primary school children that were divided over fourgroups (typically developing [TD] children, children with dyslexia,

  10. From Overexcitabilities to Openness: Informing Gifted Education with Psychological Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuyk, M. Alexandra; Kerr, Barbara A.; Krieshok, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    In the theory of positive disintegration (TPD), Dabrowski described overexcitabilities (OEs), manifestations of inner energy with a developmental purpose that appear more common in gifted individuals. Unfortunately, most studies present OEs outside of the context of the original theory as if they were standalone traits applicable to gifted…

  11. [Pregnancy following gamete intra-fallopian transfer (GIFT)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzanowski, A; Fliess, F R; Scheunemann, P; Vökler, T; Bernt, W D; Kunkel, S

    1988-01-01

    In the present paper we will report on a pregnancy following a Gamete Intra Fallopian Transfer (GIFT). This is a 26 years old female, treated in our sterility dispensaire for a secondary sterility since 1982. All basic hormone levels were normal. The andrological examination of her husband showed an oligozoospermia stage 2. A following hormone treatment was unsuccessful. Stimulation, monitoring and laparoscopy are demonstrated.

  12. Why We Blog: Homeschooling Mothers of Gifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Jennifer L.; Matthews, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Blogs have become a go-to information resource for members of online communities. In this qualitative study we applied uses and gratifications theory (U>) to analyze the experiences and perceptions of four mothers of gifted children who maintain blogs about their homeschooling experiences. Data suggest that this novel context and population…

  13. Gifted Students and Philosophy: Technology--Servant or Destroyer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, David A.

    2002-01-01

    The tenth in a series of articles designed to facilitate philosophical discussions with gifted students, this article explores whether technology is the savior of humanity or the tool of humanity's ultimate destruction. It draws from essays by Martin Heidegger to examine the benefits and disadvantages of technological advancement. (Contains 2…

  14. Statistical Methods Used in Gifted Education Journals, 2006-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warne, Russell T.; Lazo, Maria; Ramos, Tammy; Ritter, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the statistical methods used in quantitative and mixed methods articles between 2006 and 2010 in five gifted education research journals. Results indicate that the most commonly used statistical methods are means (85.9% of articles), standard deviations (77.8%), Pearson's "r" (47.8%), X[superscript 2] (32.2%), ANOVA (30.7%),…

  15. Gifted Kids, Social Issues, and the Works of Dr. Seuss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granada, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Gifted students often share a sense of justice and a concern for the welfare of mankind and the planet. This humanitarian feeling may sometimes be overlooked, given today's academic focus. The author has taken an in-depth look at the works of Theodor Geisel, popularly known as Dr. Seuss, and moved beyond his whimsical illustrations and wordplay to…

  16. Methods and Procedures in Screening Gifted Mayan Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo, Pedro Sanchez

    2008-01-01

    Instruments, procedures, and criteria for the screening of Mayan students in Yucatan, Mexico are depicted and evaluated by analyzing the results of their use on 242 students in five different regions of Yucatan. These 242, 8th grade students were selected from a pool of 1,530 potentially gifted students. Participants responded to a variety of…

  17. 7 CFR 927.121 - Pears for gift purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pears for gift purposes. 927.121 Section 927.121 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEARS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Rules and Regulations...

  18. Is Your Gifted Child Ready for Online Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, Jessica Alison; Potts, Skip

    2017-01-01

    Virtual classrooms, which have grown at an unprecedented rate in recent years, represent a unique opportunity for gifted students who do not have appropriate educational options in their brick-and-mortar schools. Students who are engaged in online learning have access to flexible, high quality curricula and can be grouped with their intellectual…

  19. Frontiers of the Mind: Serving Gifted Children in Rural Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Susan; Gage, Jim

    A summer institute trained 18 teachers to identify and plan curriculum for gifted minority and disadvantaged young children from culturally different and remote rural areas. Theory and practicum emphases were included in the program. Teachers were trained in the Structure of the Intellect (SOI) model. Sixty-eight children from the Alpine (Texas)…

  20. Literature as a Process: An Approach for the Gifted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Warren L.

    1983-01-01

    Foregrounding, an approach to systematically analyzing the uses made of language, is advocated as a way to investigate process in the study of literature for gifted secondary students. The technique is illustrated in analysis of T.S. Elliot's "Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" and William Faulkner's "Light in August." (CL)

  1. A Gifted Child Is More than Just a Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Terry

    2002-01-01

    The parent of a gifted child provides the following recommendations for parents: encourage learning and growth in areas of the child's passion; explain to the child that the way he feels is normal for him; make available resources written for children that explain giftedness; and educate yourself. (Contains 3 references.) (CR)

  2. Including the gifted learner: perceptions of South African teachers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report the findings of a qualitative study embedded in an interpretive paradigm to determine the perceptions of South African primary school teachers and principals regarding the inclusion of learners considered gifted. Eight principals and 16 classroom teachers in the Foundation Phase (Grades 1–3) in public primary ...

  3. Talent Development as a Framework for Gifted Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula; Thomson, Dana

    2015-01-01

    When used informally, talent development refers to the deliberate cultivation of ability or giftedness in a specific domain. However, recent discussions have used talent development to refer to a particular framework for viewing giftedness and the education of gifted children. In this article, the authors will present their views on the meaning of…

  4. My Response to the Systemic Approach to Gifted Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seon-Young

    2012-01-01

    As an alternative to the current paradigm of gifted education, Ziegler and Phillipson proposed a systemic approach and argued that factors in the current mechanistic model of giftedness are not good predictors for exceptionality. They pinpointed that a single factor identified as an indicator of giftedness, ineffective measures, inappropriate…

  5. Risk and protective factors in gifted children with dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Viersen, Sietske; de Bree, Elise H; Kroesbergen, Evelyn H; Slot, Esther M; de Jong, Peter F

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated risk and protective factors associated with dyslexia and literacy development, both at the group and individual level, to gain more insight in underlying cognitive profiles and possibilities for compensation in high-IQ children. A sample of 73 Dutch primary school children included a dyslexic group, a gifted-dyslexic group, and a borderline-dyslexic group (i.e., gifted children with relative literacy problems). Children were assessed on literacy, phonology, language, and working memory. Competing hypotheses were formulated, comparing the core-deficit view to the twice-exceptionality view on compensation with giftedness-related strengths. The results showed no indication of compensation of dyslexia-related deficits by giftedness-related strengths in gifted children with dyslexia. The higher literacy levels of borderline children compared to gifted children with dyslexia seemed the result of both fewer combinations of risk factors and less severe phonological deficits in this group. There was no evidence for compensation by specific strengths more relevant to literacy development in the borderline group. Accordingly, the findings largely supported the core-deficit view, whereas no evidence for the twice-exceptionality view was found. Besides practical implications, the findings also add to knowledge about the different manifestations of dyslexia and associated underlying cognitive factors at the higher end of the intelligence spectrum.

  6. Nurturing young gifted and talented children: Teachers generating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The project was funded by the Department of Education and Skills as part of the government's gifted and talented programme in the United Kingdom (UK). Two specific outcomes of the project are presented in this article. The project helped to develop teachers' understanding of both the identification of and provision for ...

  7. The Place of Special / Gifted Children in the Universal Basic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. This paper examined the fact that many special/gifted children are left to roam the street without any form of education. The schools have no place for such children, because even the normal children have not been properly catered for as regards spaces. The. UBE is intended to ensure, that all children irrespective ...

  8. Gifted Students' Implicit Beliefs about Intelligence and Giftedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makel, Matthew C.; Snyder, Kate E.; Thomas, Chandler; Malone, Patrick S.; Putallaz, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Growing attention is being paid to individuals' implicit beliefs about the nature of intelligence. However, implicit beliefs about giftedness are currently underexamined. In the current study, we examined academically gifted adolescents' implicit beliefs about both intelligence and giftedness. Overall, participants' implicit beliefs about…

  9. Case Study of a Gifted and Talented Catholic Dominican Nun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, Angela

    2017-01-01

    The case of a gifted and talented Catholic Dominican nun is described and analysed in the context of Renzulli's Three-Ring Conception of Giftedness and Gagne's Differentiated Model of Giftedness and Talent. Using qualitative methods, semi-structured interviews of relevant individuals were conducted and analysed. Based on the conclusions of this…

  10. Motivating the Gifted, Talented, Creative. A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    The main theories of motivation are reviewed in an effort to help teachers discern various tactics and techniques that they can use with gifted, talented, and creative students. Among the theories examined are Ivan Pavlov's respondent conditioning; Albert Ellis's rational-emotive approach; Abraham Maslow's triangular approach to growth and…

  11. Too Cool for School?: Gifted Children and Homeschooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstanley, Carrie

    2009-01-01

    Homeschooling can be a last resort for frustrated families where gifted children are not having their complex needs met through mainstream schooling. Unlike many other groups of homeschoolers, parents of highly able children take this option for pragmatic reasons rather than as a kind of moral stance. This article explores some of the ways that…

  12. Gifted Children and Erikson's Theory of Psychosocial Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Tracy L.

    2001-01-01

    After presenting an overview of Erik Erikson's theory of psychosocial development, the theory is applied to the development of gifted children. The psychosocial crisis experienced by children when they are infants, toddlers, preschoolers, elementary-aged, and during adolescence are examined, along with ways parents and teachers can help at each…

  13. 18 CFR 706.202 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gifts, entertainment, and favors. 706.202 Section 706.202 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL... loans from banks or other financial institutions on customary terms to finance proper and usual...

  14. Gifted Sixth-Graders and Primary Source Philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, David A.; Schlaggar, Sheila

    1993-01-01

    A sixth-grade gifted class studied the history of philosophy, including selections from such philosophers as Plato, Confucius, Buddha, Marcus Aurelius, and Moses Maimonides. Readings drew on fundamental features of child experience, such as their sense of justice, concern for moral values, and questions about reality. The paper describes classroom…

  15. Motivation and Gifted Students: Implications of Theory and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinkenbeard, Pamela R.

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of contemporary motivation theories reveals implications for gifted and talented students. The expectancy-value framework, intrinsic-extrinsic motivation theories, goal orientations, self-efficacy and other self-perceptions, and attribution theory are described and discussed with respect to implications for the psychology and education…

  16. LONGITUDINAL STUDIES OF MUSICALLY GIFTED SCHOOLGIRLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana N. Loseva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to consider the empirical aspects of the development of musical gifted schoolgirls in vocal and choral activities.Methods. Scientific methods of research (observation, questionnaire, interview, formative experiment, longitude, testing are used. Data are analyzed using a complex of psychodiagnostic techniques: culture and free intelligence test by R. Cattell; the modified creative test by F. Williams; personal multifactorial questionnaire by R. Cattell. The reliability of the results and the validity of the findings is provided by the use of reliable and proven in the domestic and foreign psychology methods and techniques, using different statistical methods of data processing, the definition of parametric and non-parametric statistical tests (Student’s t-criterion, Spearman’s rank correlation, criterion U-Mann – Whitney, criterion T-Wilcoxon, L-criterion trends Page.Results and scientific novelty. Results of longitudinal research of development of musical aptitude are presented. Experimental work in which schoolgirls of 8–15 years participated, was carried out on the basis of creative choral collectives of Irkutsk within three years. Features of development of the pupils who are engaged in singing are revealed. It is established that in process of development of specially developed program (comprehension of emotional and semantic aspects of perception of a piece of music, finding of ability to distinguish musical timbres and the general coloring of sounding etc. analytical and intonation hearing improves under pupils’ age. Regular long singing trainings promote formation of cogitative operations: active development of divergent, rational and logical thinking and intelligence in general, and also acquisition of skills of a self-assessment. Besides, such occupations dispose children and teenagers to emotional responsiveness and spiritual self-improvement.Practical significance. The research

  17. Social and Emotional Development of Gifted Students: The Role of Contagion in Suicidal Behavior among Students With Gifts and Talents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Tracy L.

    2016-01-01

    This column offers a perspective on suicidal behavior among gifted students that moves away from a wholly psychological perspective to more of a community-based perspective. This model does not undervalue the role of the field of psychology in explaining suicidal behavior, but speaks instead to the importance of the salient influences of culture,…

  18. The Relationship between Superintendents' Perceptions about Gifted Education and the Content of Local Academically or Intellectually Gifted Education Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kaye B.

    2016-01-01

    A public school superintendent, as the chief executive officer in a district, is in a unique position to influence the programs addressing the needs of gifted students in that district. A superintendent's beliefs could impact program content, resource allocation, and priority status. This study looked at superintendents' perceptions of the North…

  19. The Psychoeducative Success Factors Within Differentiated Special Education for Gifted Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Gifted special education experiences a broader development. Differentiated centers, such as German Federal School for Highly Gifted, the Gifted Hong Kong School, Davidson Academy, Mexican School for Gifted Students, and Talent Attention Center, are an evidence of gifted education development. Academic and psychological results of these centers are well documented. It is not known which non-quantitative factors of differentiated education are the causes of better academic and psychological results in comparison with average education. The study was performed with 27 people, consisting of 15 gifted students (aged 4-15) from 10 countries who take classes at one of the Mexican Alliance for Giftedness schools, l0 professors or teachers of the gifted, and two directors of these institutions. The research was qualitative, using interviews and field observation for obtaining data regarding educational and psychological activities within gifted instruction. Social and psychological factors that characterize differentiated programs for the gifted were found in this study. Teachers in gifted education field have active roles in the education of gifted students becoming educational leaders. Professors showed educational strategies and worked differently from average. Intrinsic and extrinsic factors that affect differentiated education results were also found, such as professor-student empathy and psychological-social strategies. In addition, the results unveiled the true gifted student academic experience in differentiated education, characterized by intensive academic schedules with regular breaks for socialization, exercise, and arts classes. Furthermore, this study undermined the myths about gifted special education as it showed holistically the non-quantitative factors contributing to its success.

  20. Analysis of Scrum acceptance

    OpenAIRE

    Vončina, Bojan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the thesis was to analyse the acceptance of Scrum methodology, which has become one of the leading agile methodologies, and to find out which were the key factors that influenced the acceptance. The analysis was conducted in Comtrade, which is one of the largest Slovenian software development companies. The First part (theoretical part) contains an introduction chapter, a detailed presentation of Scrum methodology and the presentation of theoretical models, on which practical ...

  1. User Acceptance Determinants of Information Technology Innovation in Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Mumtaz Abdul Hameed; Steve Counsell

    2014-01-01

    Several models have been developed for understanding and predicting user acceptance of IT. Research examining the factors influencing IT user acceptance has produced contradictory outcomes. The study presents a meta-analysis of past findings for five determinants of user acceptance of IT. We analysed the relative strength and impact of the relationship between perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, subjective norms, facilitating conditions and computer self-efficacy for user acceptance ...

  2. Nuptial gifts of male spiders: sensory exploitation of the female's maternal care instinct or foraging motivation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilde, T.; Tuni, Cristina; Elsayed, Rehab

    2007-01-01

    by producing a nuptial gift that resembles the female's eggsac. In mating experiments we examined whether males exploit the female's foraging motivation or the female's maternal care instinct. We carried out a gift-switching experiment, where males presented an eggsac, a wrapped fly or an unwrapped fly...... as nuptial gifts. Females fed on eggsacs as well as on prey gifts. Mating success was similar for males with both wrapped and unwrapped gifts, indicating that wrapping per se does not increase male mating success. In a food manipulation experiment, we investigated the effect of the female's hunger level......Nuptial feeding can evolve as sensory traps where the male exploits the female's foraging motivation in a sexual context. The nuptial prey gift of the nursery-web spider Pisaura mirabilis is wrapped in white silk, and it has been suggested that males initially exploit the maternal care instinct...

  3. The Gift Network: Dave Eggers and the Circulation of Second Editions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline O’Dell

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article argues for a view of the gift as an affective network and investigates how Dave Eggers’s practice of publishing second editions works to produce this network. Framing my discussion of the gift with Sara Ahmed’s work on affective economies, I suggest that the gift, like affect, is best understood as a surplus effect of circulation. I argue that Eggers negotiates the gift’s double bind by emphasizing the impossibility of identifying a “pure” gift or an authoritative “original” edition; his double editions show how the gift survives through the surplus values generated by their ongoing circulation. Eggers's symbolic and material gift network ultimately depends on the uncertainty and mystification emblematic of Eggers’s anxious aesthetic and mode of recirculation, adding to critical conversations that position Eggers’s aesthetic within movements of new sincerity or post-irony.

  4. Inattentional Blindness in 9- to 10-Year-Old Intellectually Gifted Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Xingli; He, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Researchers suggest that while intellectually gifted children might not always display adequate focus on their general life, they perform very well on experimental attentional tasks. The current study used inattentional blindness (IB) paradigm to understand better the attentional abilities...... of intellectually gifted children. Specifically, we examined whether intellectually gifted children were more able to avoid IB while performing well on certain attentional tasks. An experiment was carried out that involved 44 intellectually gifted and 45 average children. Results showed that intellectually gifted...... children, whose IB rate was 18.6%, were less susceptible to IB than average children, whose IB rate was 46.5%, χ2 (1) = 7.626, p = .006. Intellectually gifted children performed better on the primary attentional tasks than average children when unexpected stimuli occurred. Findings suggest...

  5. Hanna David`s Book: The Gifted Arab Child In Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre KOMEK

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, it was examined Hanna David’s Book: The Gifted Arab Child in Israel. The book focuses on Arab gifted children living in Israel. In Israel three Arab groups are living: Muslim, Christian and Druze. This book contains 7 sections. First Section: A Brief History of Education of Arabs In The State of Israel, Second Section: Characteristics of the Arab Gifted Child in Israel, Third Section: Education of the Arab Gifted Child, Fourth Section: Enrichment Programs for the Gifted in the Arab Sector, Fifth section: Description of Various Kinds of Enrichment Program for the Arab Sector, Sixth section: A Minority within a Minority: Gifted Students in the Christian, Druze and Bedouin Sectors, Seventh Section: The talented Arab Girl: Between Tradition and Modernism. In this book, author gives some suggestions to reveal potential of Arab girls. Some of them are; family support, financial aid etc.

  6. THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS AND LEARNING STYLES OF GIFTED STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Yalçın Dilekli

    2017-01-01

    The current study investigates the relationship between critical thinking skills and learning styles of mentally gifted students. The participants were 225 gifted students in Turkey attending Science and Art Centres which are after-school activity centres for mentally gifted students. Participants were 9 -15 years old and were attending secondary schools and high schools. The data were gathered using the Kolb Learning Style Inventory and the Critical Thinking Scale and analysed using Chi-Squa...

  7. An Examination of Mathematically Gifted Students' Learning Styles by Decision Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Aksoy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine mathematically gifted students' learning styles through data mining method. ‘Learning Style Inventory’ and ‘Multiple Intelligences Scale’ were used to collect data. The sample included 234 mathematically gifted middle school students. The construct decision tree was examined predicting mathematically gifted students’ learning styles according to their multiple intelligences and gender and grade level. Results showed that all the variables used in the study had a significant effect on mathematically gifted students’ learning styles, but the most effective attribute found was intelligence type.

  8. Gift-Giving in the Podiatric Medical Student-Patient Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Daniel López; Pazo, Paula Torreiro; Iglesias, Marta E Losa; de Bengoa Vallejo, Ricardo Becerro

    2016-09-02

    We sought to explore the relationship between the podiatric medical student and the patient as it relates to the act of gift-giving as a sign of gratefulness for the services provided. This article presents the clinical case of a man who visited a podiatric medical student because of pain in his feet and subsequently presented the student with several gifts. Philanthropy, empathy, a positive attitude, treatment instructions, and the time devoted to the patient are some of the reasons why patients offer gifts to podiatric medical students. The relationship between the podiatric medical student and the patient and the act of gift-giving by patients are of ethical concern.

  9. Effects of Enrichment Programs on the Academic Achievement of Gifted and Talented Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail Mahmoud AL-ZOUBI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to explore the effect of enrichment programs on the academic achievement of gifted and talented students. The sample of the study consisted of (30 gifted and talented students studying at Al-Kourah Pioneer Center for gifted and talented students (APCGTS, Jordan. An achievement test was developed and applied on the sample of the study as a pretest and posttest. The results showed the effects of enrichment programs at APCGTS on improving the academic achievement of gifted and talented students.

  10. A Comparative Investigation of Environmental Behaviors of Gifted Students and Their Peers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan Sontay

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to compare gifted and non-gifted students’ behaviors towards environment. The sample of the study consisted of 364 sixth, seventh and eighth graders attending six different middle schools in the city of Amasya and 34 gifted sixth, seventh and eighth graders attending the Amasya Science and Art Center in Turkey. Data was collected through a 12-item “Environmental Behavior Scale (EBS” developed by the researchers. Independent samples t-test was used to compare scores. The findings showed that gifted students were superior to their peers in terms of showing positive environmental behaviors.

  11. Robustness - acceptance criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzuto, Enrico; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Kroon, Inger B.

    2010-01-01

    This factsheet describes the general framework on the bases of which acceptance criteria for requirements on the robustness of structures can be set. Such framework is based on the more general concept of risk-based assessment of engineering systems. The present factsheet is to be seen in conjunc......This factsheet describes the general framework on the bases of which acceptance criteria for requirements on the robustness of structures can be set. Such framework is based on the more general concept of risk-based assessment of engineering systems. The present factsheet is to be seen...

  12. Philanthro-metrics: Mining multi-million-dollar gifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The Million Dollar List (MDL, online at http://www.milliondollarlist.org) is a compilation of publicly announced charitable donations of $1 million or more from across the United States since 2000; as of December 2016, the database contains close to 80,000 gifts made by U.S. individuals, corporations, foundations, and other grant-making nonprofit organizations. This paper discusses the unique value of the Million Dollar List and provides unique insights to key questions such as: How does distance affect giving? How do networks impact million-dollar-plus gifts? Understanding the geospatial and temporal dimensions of philanthropy can assist researchers and policymakers to better understand the role of private funding in innovation and discovery. Moreover, the results from the paper emphasize the importance of philanthropy for fueling research and development in science, the arts, environment, and health. The paper also includes the limitations of the presented analyses and promising future work. PMID:28552937

  13. Philanthro-metrics: Mining multi-million-dollar gifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osili, Una O; Ackerman, Jacqueline; Kong, Chin Hua; Light, Robert P; Börner, Katy

    2017-01-01

    The Million Dollar List (MDL, online at http://www.milliondollarlist.org) is a compilation of publicly announced charitable donations of $1 million or more from across the United States since 2000; as of December 2016, the database contains close to 80,000 gifts made by U.S. individuals, corporations, foundations, and other grant-making nonprofit organizations. This paper discusses the unique value of the Million Dollar List and provides unique insights to key questions such as: How does distance affect giving? How do networks impact million-dollar-plus gifts? Understanding the geospatial and temporal dimensions of philanthropy can assist researchers and policymakers to better understand the role of private funding in innovation and discovery. Moreover, the results from the paper emphasize the importance of philanthropy for fueling research and development in science, the arts, environment, and health. The paper also includes the limitations of the presented analyses and promising future work.

  14. Philanthro-metrics: Mining multi-million-dollar gifts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Una O Osili

    Full Text Available The Million Dollar List (MDL, online at http://www.milliondollarlist.org is a compilation of publicly announced charitable donations of $1 million or more from across the United States since 2000; as of December 2016, the database contains close to 80,000 gifts made by U.S. individuals, corporations, foundations, and other grant-making nonprofit organizations. This paper discusses the unique value of the Million Dollar List and provides unique insights to key questions such as: How does distance affect giving? How do networks impact million-dollar-plus gifts? Understanding the geospatial and temporal dimensions of philanthropy can assist researchers and policymakers to better understand the role of private funding in innovation and discovery. Moreover, the results from the paper emphasize the importance of philanthropy for fueling research and development in science, the arts, environment, and health. The paper also includes the limitations of the presented analyses and promising future work.

  15. Invitation to Physics not Only for Gifted Pupils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenda, Stanislav

    In Talnet-we create new opportunities for gifted pupils in science. We suppose any level of giftedness or interest must have practical opportunities to be found and developed. We focus on study, research, inquiry, collaborative and modeling activities where the learning itself is not a primary goal. The activities combine online with face to face and are designed for 13-19 years old pupils. More than 1,000 pupils has participated in 28 different yearlong courses, more then 500 pupils in tens of different "T-excursions" and collaborative research activities. Gifted pupils involved such systemic and authentic activities can play an important role on the pupils' side of communication with "physics".

  16. Specific and diversive curiosity in gifted elementary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L; Beer, J

    1992-10-01

    Twenty-nine gifted students in Grades 2 to 6 from the small school districts in north central Kansas completed the Maze test and the Which-to-Discuss test. Background information such as age, sex, grade, and marital status of parents was also collected. There were no significant differences between boys and girls or for students from divorced and nondivorced parents on either the Which-to-Discuss test (specific curiosity) or the Maze test scores (diversive curiosity). The students scored significantly higher on the former test than chance guessing which suggests the students were displaying specific curiosity. Scores of these gifted students on these two tests of curiosity were significantly and positively correlated.

  17. Lincoln in Scotland: A Gift of the Gilded Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Hurley

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available On August 21, 1893, a bronze stature of Abraham Lincoln was erected in the heart of Edinburgh, Scotland. This article examines the story of this monument and the motivations of the men who erected it, as a way of understanding Lincoln’s legacy on Scottish shores. Further, this gift from America to Scotland can be understood as a symbol of Gilded Age transatlantic relations.

  18. Multiple Intelligences and Perfectionism in Middle School Gifted Students

    OpenAIRE

    Süleyman KAHRAMAN; Şenay BULUT BEDÜK

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the perfectionism levels of 181 sixth, seventh, and eighth grade gifted students’ were investigated in terms of multiple intelligences. In the study a relational screening model, Survey of Positive and Negative Perfectionism, developed by Kırdök (2004), was used to assess the level of the students’ positive and negative perfectionism. The Multiple Intelligences Inventory, developed by Saban (2001), was used to determine the students’ multiple intelligences, and a personal infor...

  19. From gift to waste: changing policies in biobanking practices

    OpenAIRE

    Aaro Tupasela

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally the analysis of biomedical discourses surrounding biobanking has focused on the role of donation and gift giving as central aspects related to the procurement and use of tissue samples. More recently, studies have looked at the political underpinnings of building national collections of tissue samples. These national projects draw increasingly on a discourse of waste and efficiency as a way of legitimising activities. This paper draws attention to the way new arguments draw from...

  20. Gifted students with a coexisting disability: The twice exceptional

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeiffer, Steven I.

    2015-01-01

    The twice exceptional are students who have both high ability and a disability or disorder. The ability can be in any culturally-valued domain, including high intelligence, academics, the visual or performing arts, and athletics. The co-existing disability can be physical, medical, or psychological. There is a growing literature of scholarly opinion about twice exceptionality; however, there are few well-designed empirical investigations of gifted students with anxiety, depression, bipolar di...

  1. When Lightning Strikes Twice: Profoundly Gifted, Profoundly Accomplished.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makel, Matthew C; Kell, Harrison J; Lubinski, David; Putallaz, Martha; Benbow, Camilla P

    2016-07-01

    The educational, occupational, and creative accomplishments of the profoundly gifted participants (IQs ⩾ 160) in the Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth (SMPY) are astounding, but are they representative of equally able 12-year-olds? Duke University's Talent Identification Program (TIP) identified 259 young adolescents who were equally gifted. By age 40, their life accomplishments also were extraordinary: Thirty-seven percent had earned doctorates, 7.5% had achieved academic tenure (4.3% at research-intensive universities), and 9% held patents; many were high-level leaders in major organizations. As was the case for the SMPY sample before them, differential ability strengths predicted their contrasting and eventual developmental trajectories-even though essentially all participants possessed both mathematical and verbal reasoning abilities far superior to those of typical Ph.D. recipients. Individuals, even profoundly gifted ones, primarily do what they are best at. Differences in ability patterns, like differences in interests, guide development along different paths, but ability level, coupled with commitment, determines whether and the extent to which noteworthy accomplishments are reached if opportunity presents itself. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Desirable characteristics for teachers of High Ability/Gifted students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra da Costa Souza Martins

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the desirable educational background for a teacher to work with high ability/gifted students, desirable characteristics these teachers should present and conceptions on high ability/giftedness. The participants were 20 public school teachers from a city surrounding Brasilia. Of this group, ten were elementary school teachers working with initial grades and ten were undergraduate Pedagogy teachers. A qualitative approach was used and data were collected by means of a semi-structured interview. A content analysis was then conducted. In relation to the desirable educational background for a teach of high ability/gifted students, participants indicated the need of continuous training, under graduation curriculum adapted to the theme and graduation courses in the area. The desirable features for teachers of high ability/gifted students were related to personological attributes (personality traits and intellectual ability, as well as professional characteristics. The conceptions on high ability/giftedness presented by the participants were, in general, close to those found in the literature and used as reference for this study. However, there was lack of information on how to apply the theory into real practice, as well as several wrong ideas on the topic.

  3. Why was Relativity Accepted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brush, S. G.

    Historians of science have published many studies of the reception of Einstein's special and general theories of relativity. Based on a review of these studies, and my own research on the role of the light-bending prediction in the reception of general relativity, I discuss the role of three kinds of reasons for accepting relativity (1) empirical predictions and explanations; (2) social-psychological factors; and (3) aesthetic-mathematical factors. According to the historical studies, acceptance was a three-stage process. First, a few leading scientists adopted the special theory for aesthetic-mathematical reasons. In the second stage, their enthusiastic advocacy persuaded other scientists to work on the theory and apply it to problems currently of interest in atomic physics. The special theory was accepted by many German physicists by 1910 and had begun to attract some interest in other countries. In the third stage, the confirmation of Einstein's light-bending prediction attracted much public attention and forced all physicists to take the general theory of relativity seriously. In addition to light-bending, the explanation of the advance of Mercury's perihelion was considered strong evidence by theoretical physicists. The American astronomers who conducted successful tests of general relativity became defenders of the theory. There is little evidence that relativity was `socially constructed' but its initial acceptance was facilitated by the prestige and resources of its advocates.

  4. Displacement compressors - acceptance tests

    CERN Document Server

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    1996-01-01

    ISO 1217:2009 specifies methods for acceptance tests regarding volume rate of flow and power requirements of displacement compressors. It also specifies methods for testing liquid-ring type compressors and the operating and testing conditions which apply when a full performance test is specified.

  5. Approaches to acceptable risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whipple, C.

    1997-04-30

    Several alternative approaches to address the question {open_quotes}How safe is safe enough?{close_quotes} are reviewed and an attempt is made to apply the reasoning behind these approaches to the issue of acceptability of radiation exposures received in space. The approaches to the issue of the acceptability of technological risk described here are primarily analytical, and are drawn from examples in the management of environmental health risks. These include risk-based approaches, in which specific quantitative risk targets determine the acceptability of an activity, and cost-benefit and decision analysis, which generally focus on the estimation and evaluation of risks, benefits and costs, in a framework that balances these factors against each other. These analytical methods tend by their quantitative nature to emphasize the magnitude of risks, costs and alternatives, and to downplay other factors, especially those that are not easily expressed in quantitative terms, that affect acceptance or rejection of risk. Such other factors include the issues of risk perceptions and how and by whom risk decisions are made.

  6. Is Piaget's epistemic subject dead?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Anton E.

    Niaz (1990) presents arguments in favor of the retention of Piaget's epistemic subject as a theoretical construct to guide research and practice in science education and psychology. The intent of this article is to point out the weaknesses of those arguments and to suggest that the weight of evidence argues against the existence of the logical thinker postulated by Piaget. Therefore, contrary to Niaz's conclusion that the acceptance of Piaget's epistemic subject will facilitate the development of cognitive theories with greater explanatory power, the conclusion is reached that Piaget's epistemic subject is dead and that continued acceptance of this aspect of Piagetian theory would be counterproductive.

  7. Oestrogen supplementation in gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    2005-02-06

    Feb 6, 2005 ... follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and recombinant luteinising hormone (LH) as first-line treatment for induction of superovulation. Not much is known about oestrogen supplementation for endometrial support. Prospective randomised studies on this subject mostly investigated oestrogen supplementation.

  8. [Link between depression and academic self-esteem in gifted children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénony, H; Van Der Elst, D; Chahraoui, K; Bénony, C; Marnier, J-P

    2007-01-01

    Studies of the psychology of gifted children frequently refer to their relatively immature affective development in terms of their intellectual capacities and the relational difficulties they experience with regard to their peers, teachers, close acquaintances and sometimes their parents. From a psychopathological viewpoint, various types of problem have been observed such as depressive symptoms, motor instability coupled with hyperactivity, attentional deficits, impulsivity and a fall in self-esteem. In this study, we wished to verify the links between self-esteem and psychopathological symptoms in these children. The total population studied consisted of 58 pupils taken from two teaching establishments in Dijon who were subdivided into two groups (gifted children and adolescents versus control children and adolescents). Of these 58 subjects who took part in the tests, 8 were eliminated either due to their results on the "lie" scale of the self-esteem scale (score greater than or equal to 5) or to their age. In effect, a high score on this scale implies that the subjects want to show themselves in a better light than is actually correct. It is then assumed that the subjects had sought the examiner's approval by presenting the best possible image of themselves; 23 gifted children, referred to as GC (10 girls, 13 boys) aged between 9 and 13 years (mean age=11 years 3 months or 135 months, standard deviation=14) took part in the study. The selection criteria required the subjects to possess an Intelligence Quotient (IQ) calculated using one of the Weschler tests (WPPSI or WISC III depending on age) greater than or equal to 130 (mean IQ=145.23, standard deviation=7.93); 20 were attending private schools and 3 were in the state education system. They were all attending special "GC" classes to which they had been admitted solely on the basis of an IQ test conducted by a psychologist. Their teachers had volunteered to take these classes and had received appropriate

  9. The Acceptability of Speech with Radio Interference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baykaner, K.; Hummersone, H.; Mason, R.

    2014-01-01

    A listening test was conducted to investigate the acceptability of audio-on-audio interference for radio programs featuring speech as the target. Twenty-one subjects, including naïve and expert listeners, were presented with 200 randomly assigned pairs of stimuli and asked to report, for each tri...

  10. Measuring Acceptance of Sleep Difficulties: The Development of the Sleep Problem Acceptance Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothelius, Kristoffer; Jernelöv, Susanna; Fredrikson, Mats; McCracken, Lance M; Kaldo, Viktor

    2015-11-01

    Acceptance may be an important therapeutic process in sleep medicine, but valid psychometric instruments measuring acceptance related to sleep difficulties are lacking. The purpose of this study was to develop a measure of acceptance in insomnia, and to examine its factor structure as well as construct validity. In a cross-sectional design, a principal component analysis for item reduction was conducted on a first sample (A) and a confirmatory factor analysis on a second sample (B). Construct validity was tested on a combined sample (C). Questionnaire items were derived from a measure of acceptance in chronic pain, and data were gathered through screening or available from pretreatment assessments in four insomnia treatment trials, administered online, via bibliotherapy and in primary care. Adults with insomnia: 372 in sample A and 215 in sample B. Sample C (n = 820) included sample A and B with another 233 participants added. Construct validity was assessed through relations with established acceptance and sleep scales. The principal component analysis presented a two-factor solution with eight items, explaining 65.9% of the total variance. The confirmatory factor analysis supported the solution. Acceptance of sleep problems was more closely related to subjective symptoms and consequences of insomnia than to diary description of sleep, or to acceptance of general private events. The Sleep Problem Acceptance Questionnaire (SPAQ), containing the subscales "Activity Engagement" and "Willingness", is a valid tool to assess acceptance of insomnia. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  11. Relating Life-Span Research to the Development of Gifted and Talented Children. Abstracts of Selected Papers [from] The Annual Esther Katz Rosen Symposium on the Psychological Development of Gifted Children (3rd, Lawrence, Kansas, February 19-20, 1993).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansas Univ., Lawrence.

    This monograph presents abstracts of 29 papers that relate life-span research to the development of gifted and talented children. Sample topics include: attitudes about rural schools and programs for the gifted; social competence, self-esteem, and parent-child time and interaction in an advantaged subculture; helping families of gifted children…

  12. Expanding subjectivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda; Soldz, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A major theme in recent psychoanalytic thinking concerns the use of therapist subjectivity, especially “countertransference,” in understanding patients. This thinking converges with and expands developments in qualitative research regarding the use of researcher subjectivity as a tool to understa...

  13. Marketing for Acceptance

    OpenAIRE

    Tina L. Johnston, Ph.D.

    2009-01-01

    Becoming a researcher comes with the credentializing pressure to publish articles in peer-reviewed journals (Glaser, 1992; Glaser, 2007; Glaser, 2008). The work intensive process is exacerbated when the author’s research method is grounded theory. This study investigated the concerns of early and experienced grounded theorists to discover how they worked towards publishing research projects that applied grounded theory as a methodology. The result was a grounded theory of marketing for accept...

  14. 77 FR 65361 - Folding Gift Boxes From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of the Second Sunset...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ...\\ On May 2, 2012, pursuant to 19 CFR 351.218(d)(3), The Folding Gift Boxes Fair Trade Coalition...'') Review, 77 FR 19643 (April 2, 2012). \\4\\ The Folding Gift Boxes Fair Trade Coalition is comprised of... International Trade Administration Folding Gift Boxes From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results...

  15. 77 FR 45337 - Folding Gift Boxes From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limits for Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ... Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (``the Act'').\\1\\ The Folding Gift Boxes Fair Trade Coalition,\\2\\ a group... Five-Year (``Sunset'') Review, 77 FR 19643 (April 2, 2012). \\2\\ The Folding Gift Boxes Fair Trade... International Trade Administration Folding Gift Boxes From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

  16. Chill Out! Helping Gifted Youth Deal with Stress: What Are Some Specific, Practical Ways to Teach Stress Management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Terry

    2006-01-01

    What causes stress in gifted youth and what specific skills do they need to manage it? Although stress is a real presence in all people's lives, it can be more intense for the gifted because they are usually more sensitive, introspective, and emotional. Growing up gifted is a qualitatively different experience, which can manifest itself in the…

  17. A Comparison of Multiple Facets of Self-Concept in Gifted vs. Non-Identified Israeli Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidner, Moshe; Shani-Zinovich, Inbal

    2015-01-01

    This study compares facets of self-concept in gifted and non-identified Israeli adolescent students. The self-concept mean score profile of gifted vs. non-selected Israeli students was significantly different, with gifted students reporting higher mean levels of academic self-concept, but lower mean levels of social, personal, and physical…

  18. The Relationship between Gifted Students’ Attitudes towards Science and Technology and their Learning and Motivation Styles (Üstün Yetenekli Öğrencilerin Fen ve Teknolojiye Yönelik Tutumları, Öğrenme ve Motivasyon Stilleri Arasındaki İlişki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Kahyaoğlu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the re-lationship between gifted students’ learning and motivation styles towards science learn-ing and their attitudes towards science and technology courses. Participants included 30 gifted students who were identified by a spe-cial exam and were accepted to the Science and Art Centers for special education. In the research, Learning Style Scales, Motivation to-ward Science Learning Questionnaire and At-titude towards Science Courses Scales were used to collect data. The results showed that there was a significant relationship between gifted students’ attitude towards science and technology courses and their learning and motivation styles towards science learning.

  19. Order acceptance with reinforcement learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mainegra Hing, M.; van Harten, Aart; Schuur, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Order Acceptance (OA) is one of the main functions in a business control framework. Basically, OA involves for each order a 0/1 (i.e., reject/accept) decision. Always accepting an order when capacity is available could unable the system to accept more convenient orders in the future. Another

  20. Age and Acceptance of Euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Russell A.

    1980-01-01

    Study explores relationship between age (and sex and race) and acceptance of euthanasia. Women and non-Whites were less accepting because of religiosity. Among older people less acceptance was attributable to their lesser education and greater religiosity. Results suggest that quality of life in old age affects acceptability of euthanasia. (Author)

  1. The Young Gifted/Talented Child: Programs at the University of Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnes, Merle B.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Discusses (1) rationale for early identification and programing for gifted/talented children, (2) issues in developing a program for young children, (3) procedures for identifying the young gifted child, (4) guidelines for program evaluation, and (5) principles for program development. Two university programs, one for identifying gifted…

  2. Creation Process during Learning of Gifted Students: Contributions from Jean Piaget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro Piske, Fernanda Hellen; Stoltz, Tania; de Camargo, Denise; Blum Vestena, Carla Luciane; Machado, Jarci Maria; de Freitas, Samarah Perszel; Dias, Carmen Lúcia; dos Reis Taucei, Joulilda

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to highlight the importance of Creativity in education of gifted students. Recent education focuses exclusively on the development of intellectuality; it starts at an earlier age and stimulates mainly rational thinking, sometimes leaving aside other important dimensions. For gifted children, this fact can mean the desire to…

  3. The Philosophy of French Funetics: An Essay in Applied Gifted Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Maureen; White, David

    1996-01-01

    This article describes Funetics, a game for teaching introductory French to gifted students that uses cartoon logos to represent words. The principles of logo formation and implementation are discussed. The article also reviews the psychological theory embodied in the game, how gifted students process the game, and the game's pedagogical value.…

  4. Creativity and Complex Thoughts of Gifted Students from Contributions of Edgar Morin and Rudolf Steiner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piske, Fernanda Hellen Ribeiro; Stoltz, Tania; Guérios, Ettiène; de Freitas, Samarah Perszel

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to highlight the importance of creativity in education of gifted children. Gifted students are generally individuals that talk with uncertainty because they are always looking for solutions and discoveries for their varied researches in their area of interest. These students need educational practices that develop creativity and…

  5. Counseling Gifted and Talented Students in Jordanian Inclusive Schools: Conclusion and Implication

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Zraigat, Ibrahim A.

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to review counseling services for students who are gifted and talented at Jordanian inclusive schools in relation to theoretical counseling literature. The present study is considered a theoretical study. Gifted and talented students exhibit a wide range of characteristics, among of which are intellectual…

  6. Regular Classroom Teachers' Recognition and Support of the Creative Potential of Mildly Gifted Mathematics Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhlolo, Michael Kainose

    2017-01-01

    Post independent reforms in South Africa moved from separate education for the gifted learners to inclusive education in regular classrooms. A specific concern that has been totally ignored since then is whether or not the regular classroom would expand or limit the gifted child's creativity. This study aimed at investigating the extent to which…

  7. The Psychology of Gifted Adolescents as Measured by the MMPI-A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Tracy L.; Cassady, Jerrell C.; Dixon, Felicia A.; Adams, Cheryll M.

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this study is an examination of gifted students' responses on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) in relation to the adolescent norming sample. The comparisons on clinical, content, and Harris-Lingoes scales provide evidence that gifted adolescent boys' and girls' responses do not differ from one…

  8. Enhancing Gifted Education for Underrepresented Students: Promising Recruitment and Programming Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker-Lyster, Meghan; Niileksela, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    For decades, our educational system has been criticized for the limited recruitment and retention of minority students in gifted education programs. Unfortunately, relatively little progress has been made to alleviate these concerns. An examination of the literature on gifted education for underrepresented students reveals a dearth of information…

  9. Designing Instruction and Learning for Cognitively Gifted Pupils in Preschool and Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooij, Ton

    2013-01-01

    Young gifted children perform in the top 10% in assessments of cognitive, social, expressive or other abilities. The study first considers why, and how, cognitively gifted pupils in particular may face enforced underachievement as early as in preschool. A longitudinal multilevel model is developed to represent various types of interaction between…

  10. Combining Emotion Appraisal Dimensions and Individual Differences to Understand Emotion Effects on Gift Giving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooge, De I.E.

    2017-01-01

    Multiple studies have revealed that emotion appraisal dimensions can predict the effects of emotions on decision making. For example, givers' intention to buy gifts depends on whether they feel positive or negative (valence) and on whether the feeling is caused by the givers themselves or by gift

  11. Depression, Anxiety, Stress, and Adjustments among Malaysian Gifted Learners: Implication towards School Counseling Provision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Bakar, Abu Yazid; Ishak, Noriah Mohd

    2014-01-01

    Gifted learners have special characteristics which make them unique individuals. However, just like their normative group, gifted learners experience some psychological issues that hinder their ability to adjust in new environments. This study aims to examine levels of depression, anxiety, stress, and adjustments (psychological, social and…

  12. The Social Cognition of Gifted Adolescents in Schools: Managing the Stigma of Giftedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Tracy L.; Coleman, Laurence J.; Terhaar-Yonkers, Marge

    2014-01-01

    A study of the effects of schooling on the social cognition of gifted adolescents is reported. A student attitude questionnaire (SAQ) exploring the cognitive behavioral strategies utilized to manage the stigma of giftedness was developed after conducting phenomenological interviews of fifteen gifted adolescents attending the Tennessee Governor's…

  13. Mentorship: Mutual Benefits for ASL Students and Gifted Students (Part 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buisson, Gerald J.; Salgo, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Postsecondary American Sign Language (ASL) students are capable of teaching short lessons related to sign language and Deaf culture to gifted students in elementary school. College students who work as "interest-area mentors" benefit gifted students while building their own academic discipline and professional skills. In Part 1 of a 2-part series…

  14. Characteristics Leading Teachers to Nominate Secondary Students as Gifted in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Torrano, Daniel; Prieto, Maria Dolores; Ferrandiz, Carmen; Bermejo, Rosario; Sainz, Marta

    2013-01-01

    What are the characteristics leading teachers to nominate gifted students in Spain? To answer this question, several demographic (i.e., gender, grade) and psychological (i.e., multiple intelligences, emotional intelligence, intellectual aptitude, and divergent thinking) characteristics of 563 secondary students nominated as gifted by their…

  15. Motivation Levels of Gifted Students and Their Metaphorical Perceptions of School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erisen, Yavuz; Sahin, Mehmet; Birben, Fazilet Y.; Yalin, Hatun S.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the school motivation levels of gifted students and their metaphorical perception of school. For this purpose, quantitative and qualitative approach was used as the mixed method. The sample for both methods consisted of 96 gifted students at secondary school level. For quantitative data, School Motivation Scale…

  16. 41 CFR 109-43.307-4 - Conditional gifts to reduce the public debt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conditional gifts to reduce the public debt. 109-43.307-4 Section 109-43.307-4 Public Contracts and Property Management....307-4 Conditional gifts to reduce the public debt. The Director, Office of Administrative Services and...

  17. The Heterogeneity of Self-Portraits of Gifted Students in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtinat-Camps, Amélie; Massé, Line; de Léonardis, Myriam; Capdevielle-Mougnibas, Valérie

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this research is to understand the diversity of gifted students' self-representations through self-portrait analysis. Two hundred twenty-seven French gifted students (intelligence quotient = 130; 45 girls, 182 boys), aged from 9 to 15 years completed the GPS instrument ("Genèse des Perceptions de Soi" [Genesis of the…

  18. Interactions of Chemistry Teachers with Gifted Students in a Regular High-School Chemistry Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benny, Naama; Blonder, Ron

    2018-01-01

    Regular high-school chemistry teachers view gifted students as one of several types of students in a regular (mixed-ability) classroom. Gifted students have a range of unique abilities that characterize their learning process: mostly they differ in three key learning aspects: their faster learning pace, increased depth of understanding, and…

  19. Should Rural Gifted Education Be Different? A Survey of Teacher Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Kay Sather; Fishkin, Anne

    1987-01-01

    Presents results of survey of 53 representatives of teacher-training institutions offering gifted education programs. Reports over 60 percent believed differentiation of education for rural gifted teachers was necessary, with greatest need being in areas of program development, curriculum development, and identification. (NEC)

  20. Status of Gifted Students in Vocational Agriculture Classes in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Himanshu S.; Curtis, Samuel M.

    Gifted students have been enrolling in high school vocational agriculture courses in increasing numbers in recent years, according to a mailed survey of 100 randomly selected schools in 10 randomly selected states, plus Pennsylvania. During the 1974-80 time period, enrollment of identified gifted students in the surveyed vocational agriculture…