WorldWideScience

Sample records for subgrid scale transport

  1. Evaluation of Subgrid-Scale Transport of Hydrometeors in a PDF-based Scheme using High-Resolution CRM Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, M.; Ovchinnikov, M.; Wang, M.; Larson, V. E.

    2014-12-01

    In current climate models, the model resolution is too coarse to explicitly resolve deep convective systems. Parameterization schemes are therefore needed to represent the physical processes at the sub-grid scale. Recently, an approach based on assumed probability density functions (PDFs) has been developed to help unify the various parameterization schemes used in current global models. In particular, a unified parameterization scheme called the Cloud Layers Unified By Binormals (CLUBB) scheme has been developed and tested successfully for shallow boundary-layer clouds. CLUBB's implementation in the Community Atmosphere Model, version 5 (CAM5) is also being extended to treat deep convection cases, but parameterizing subgrid-scale vertical transport of hydrometeors remains a challenge. To investigate the roots of the problem and possible solutions, we generate a high-resolution benchmark simulation of a deep convection case using a cloud-resolving model (CRM) called System for Atmospheric Modeling (SAM). We use the high-resolution 3D CRM results to assess the prognostic and diagnostic higher-order moments in CLUBB that are in relation to the subgrid-scale transport of hydrometeors. We also analyze the heat and moisture budgets in terms of CLUBB variables from the SAM benchmark simulation. The results from this study will be used to devise a better representation of vertical subgrid-scale transport of hydrometeors by utilizing the sub-grid variability information from CLUBB.

  2. Resolution-dependent behavior of subgrid-scale vertical transport in the Zhang-McFarlane convection parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Heng; Gustafson, William I.; Hagos, Samson M.; Wu, Chien-Ming; Wan, Hui

    2015-06-01

    To better understand the behavior of quasi-equilibrium-based convection parameterizations at higher resolution, we use a diagnostic framework to examine the resolution-dependence of subgrid-scale vertical transport of moist static energy as parameterized by the Zhang-McFarlane convection parameterization (ZM). Grid-scale input to ZM is supplied by coarsening output from cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations onto subdomains ranging in size from 8 × 8 to 256 × 256 km2. Then the ZM-based parameterization of vertical transport of moist static energy for scales smaller than the subdomain size (w'h'>¯ZM) are compared to those directly calculated from the CRM simulations (w'h'>¯CRM) for different subdomain sizes. The ensemble mean w'h'>¯CRM decreases by more than half as the subdomain size decreases from 128 to 8 km across while w'h'>¯ZM decreases with subdomain size only for strong convection cases and increases for weaker cases. The resolution dependence of w'h'>¯ZM is determined by the positive-definite grid-scale tendency of convective available potential energy (CAPE) in the convective quasi-equilibrium (QE) closure. Further analysis shows the actual grid-scale tendency of CAPE (before taking the positive definite value) and w'h'>¯CRM behave very similarly as the subdomain size changes because they are both tied to grid-scale advective tendencies. We can improve the resolution dependence of w'h'>¯ZM significantly by averaging the grid-scale tendency of CAPE over an appropriately large area surrounding each subdomain before taking its positive definite value. Even though the ensemble mean w'h'>¯CRM decreases with increasing resolution, its variability increases dramatically. w'h'>¯ZM cannot capture such increase in the variability, suggesting the need for stochastic treatment of convection at relatively high spatial resolution (8 or 16 km).

  3. Sub-Grid Scale Plume Modeling

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    Greg Yarwood

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Multi-pollutant chemical transport models (CTMs are being routinely used to predict the impacts of emission controls on the concentrations and deposition of primary and secondary pollutants. While these models have a fairly comprehensive treatment of the governing atmospheric processes, they are unable to correctly represent processes that occur at very fine scales, such as the near-source transport and chemistry of emissions from elevated point sources, because of their relatively coarse horizontal resolution. Several different approaches have been used to address this limitation, such as using fine grids, adaptive grids, hybrid modeling, or an embedded sub-grid scale plume model, i.e., plume-in-grid (PinG modeling. In this paper, we first discuss the relative merits of these various approaches used to resolve sub-grid scale effects in grid models, and then focus on PinG modeling which has been very effective in addressing the problems listed above. We start with a history and review of PinG modeling from its initial applications for ozone modeling in the Urban Airshed Model (UAM in the early 1980s using a relatively simple plume model, to more sophisticated and state-of-the-science plume models, that include a full treatment of gas-phase, aerosol, and cloud chemistry, embedded in contemporary models such as CMAQ, CAMx, and WRF-Chem. We present examples of some typical results from PinG modeling for a variety of applications, discuss the implications of PinG on model predictions of source attribution, and discuss possible future developments and applications for PinG modeling.

  4. A priori study of subgrid-scale flux of a passive scalar in isotropic homogeneous turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumakov, Sergei [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We perform a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of forced homogeneous isotropic turbulence with a passive scalar that is forced by mean gradient. The DNS data are used to study the properties of subgrid-scale flux of a passive scalar in the framework of large eddy simulation (LES), such as alignment trends between the flux, resolved, and subgrid-scale flow structures. It is shown that the direction of the flux is strongly coupled with the subgrid-scale stress axes rather than the resolved flow quantities such as strain, vorticity, or scalar gradient. We derive an approximate transport equation for the subgrid-scale flux of a scalar and look at the relative importance of the terms in the transport equation. A particular form of LES tensor-viscosity model for the scalar flux is investigated, which includes the subgrid-scale stress. Effect of different models for the subgrid-scale stress on the model for the subgrid-scale flux is studied.

  5. Advanced subgrid-scale modeling for convection-dominated species transport at fluid interfaces with application to mass transfer from rising bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Andre; Bothe, Dieter

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a novel subgrid scale (SGS) model for simulating convection-dominated species transport at deformable fluid interfaces. One possible application is the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of mass transfer from rising bubbles. The transport of a dissolving gas along the bubble-liquid interface is determined by two transport phenomena: convection in streamwise direction and diffusion in interface normal direction. The convective transport for technical bubble sizes is several orders of magnitude higher, leading to a thin concentration boundary layer around the bubble. A true DNS, fully resolving hydrodynamic and mass transfer length scales results in infeasible computational costs. Our approach is therefore a DNS of the flow field combined with a SGS model to compute the mass transfer between bubble and liquid. An appropriate model-function is used to compute the numerical fluxes on all cell faces of an interface cell. This allows to predict the mass transfer correctly even if the concentration boundary layer is fully contained in a single cell layer around the interface. We show that the SGS-model reduces the resolution requirements at the interface by a factor of ten and more. The integral flux correction is also applicable to other thin boundary layer problems. Two flow regimes are investigated to validate the model. A semi-analytical solution for creeping flow is used to assess local and global mass transfer quantities. For higher Reynolds numbers ranging from Re = 100 to Re = 460 and Péclet numbers between Pe =104 and Pe = 4 ṡ106 we compare the global Sherwood number against correlations from literature. In terms of accuracy, the predicted mass transfer never deviates more than 4% from the reference values.

  6. Modeling lightning-NOx chemistry on a sub-grid scale in a global chemical transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gressent

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available For the first time, a plume-in-grid approach is implemented in a chemical transport model (CTM to parameterize the effects of the nonlinear reactions occurring within high concentrated NOx plumes from lightning NOx emissions (LNOx in the upper troposphere. It is characterized by a set of parameters including the plume lifetime, the effective reaction rate constant related to NOx–O3 chemical interactions, and the fractions of NOx conversion into HNO3 within the plume. Parameter estimates were made using the Dynamical Simple Model of Atmospheric Chemical Complexity (DSMACC box model, simple plume dispersion simulations, and the 3-D Meso-NH (non-hydrostatic mesoscale atmospheric model. In order to assess the impact of the LNOx plume approach on the NOx and O3 distributions on a large scale, simulations for the year 2006 were performed using the GEOS-Chem global model with a horizontal resolution of 2° × 2.5°. The implementation of the LNOx parameterization implies an NOx and O3 decrease on a large scale over the region characterized by a strong lightning activity (up to 25 and 8 %, respectively, over central Africa in July and a relative increase downwind of LNOx emissions (up to 18 and 2 % for NOx and O3, respectively, in July. The calculated variability in NOx and O3 mixing ratios around the mean value according to the known uncertainties in the parameter estimates is at a maximum over continental tropical regions with ΔNOx [−33.1, +29.7] ppt and ΔO3 [−1.56, +2.16] ppb, in January, and ΔNOx [−14.3, +21] ppt and ΔO3 [−1.18, +1.93] ppb, in July, mainly depending on the determination of the diffusion properties of the atmosphere and the initial NO mixing ratio injected by lightning. This approach allows us (i to reproduce a more realistic lightning NOx chemistry leading to better NOx and O3 distributions on the large scale and (ii to focus on other improvements to reduce remaining uncertainties from processes

  7. Statistical dynamical subgrid-scale parameterizations for geophysical flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Kane, T J; Frederiksen, J S [Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, Bureau of Meteorology, 700 Collins St, Docklands, Melbourne, VIC (Australia) and CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, Aspendale, VIC (Australia)], E-mail: t.okane@bom.gov.au

    2008-12-15

    Simulations of both atmospheric and oceanic circulations at given finite resolutions are strongly dependent on the form and strengths of the dynamical subgrid-scale parameterizations (SSPs) and in particular are sensitive to subgrid-scale transient eddies interacting with the retained scale topography and the mean flow. In this paper, we present numerical results for SSPs of the eddy-topographic force, stochastic backscatter, eddy viscosity and eddy-mean field interaction using an inhomogeneous statistical turbulence model based on a quasi-diagonal direct interaction approximation (QDIA). Although the theoretical description on which our model is based is for general barotropic flows, we specifically focus on global atmospheric flows where large-scale Rossby waves are present. We compare and contrast the closure-based results with an important earlier heuristic SSP of the eddy-topographic force, based on maximum entropy or statistical canonical equilibrium arguments, developed specifically for general ocean circulation models (Holloway 1992 J. Phys. Oceanogr. 22 1033-46). Our results demonstrate that where strong zonal flows and Rossby waves are present, such as in the atmosphere, maximum entropy arguments are insufficient to accurately parameterize the subgrid contributions due to eddy-eddy, eddy-topographic and eddy-mean field interactions. We contrast our atmospheric results with findings for the oceans. Our study identifies subgrid-scale interactions that are currently not parameterized in numerical atmospheric climate models, which may lead to systematic defects in the simulated circulations.

  8. Simple subgrid scale stresses models for homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aupoix, B.; Cousteix, J.

    Large eddy simulations employing the filtering of Navier-Stokes equations highlight stresses, related to the interaction between large scales below the cut and small scales above it, which have been designated 'subgrid scale stresses'. Their effects include both the energy flux through the cut and a component of viscous diffusion. The eddy viscosity introduced in the subgrid scale models which give the correct energy flux through the cut by comparison with spectral closures is shown to depend only on the small scales. The Smagorinsky (1963) model can only be obtained if the cut lies in the middle of the inertial range. A novel model which takes the small scales into account statistically, and includes the effects of viscosity, is proposed and compared with classical models for the Comte-Bellot and Corrsin (1971) experiment.

  9. Subgrid-scale models for large-eddy simulation of rotating turbulent channel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvis, Maurits H.; Bae, Hyunji Jane; Trias, F. Xavier; Abkar, Mahdi; Moin, Parviz; Verstappen, Roel

    2017-11-01

    We aim to design subgrid-scale models for large-eddy simulation of rotating turbulent flows. Rotating turbulent flows form a challenging test case for large-eddy simulation due to the presence of the Coriolis force. The Coriolis force conserves the total kinetic energy while transporting it from small to large scales of motion, leading to the formation of large-scale anisotropic flow structures. The Coriolis force may also cause partial flow laminarization and the occurrence of turbulent bursts. Many subgrid-scale models for large-eddy simulation are, however, primarily designed to parametrize the dissipative nature of turbulent flows, ignoring the specific characteristics of transport processes. We, therefore, propose a new subgrid-scale model that, in addition to the usual dissipative eddy viscosity term, contains a nondissipative nonlinear model term designed to capture transport processes, such as those due to rotation. We show that the addition of this nonlinear model term leads to improved predictions of the energy spectra of rotating homogeneous isotropic turbulence as well as of the Reynolds stress anisotropy in spanwise-rotating plane-channel flows. This work is financed by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) under Project Number 613.001.212.

  10. Evapotranspiration and cloud variability at regional sub-grid scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Guerau de Arellano, Jordi; Sikma, Martin; Pedruzo-Bagazgoitia, Xabier; van Heerwaarden, Chiel; Hartogensis, Oscar; Ouwersloot, Huug

    2017-04-01

    In regional and global models uncertainties arise due to our incomplete understanding of the coupling between biochemical and physical processes. Representing their impact depends on our ability to calculate these processes using physically sound parameterizations, since they are unresolved at scales smaller than the grid size. More specifically over land, the coupling between evapotranspiration, turbulent transport of heat and moisture, and clouds lacks a combined representation to take these sub-grid scales interactions into account. Our approach is based on understanding how radiation, surface exchange, turbulent transport and moist convection are interacting from the leaf- to the cloud scale. We therefore place special emphasis on plant stomatal aperture as the main regulator of CO2-assimilation and water transpiration, a key source of moisture source to the atmosphere. Plant functionality is critically modulated by interactions with atmospheric conditions occurring at very short spatiotemporal scales such as cloud radiation perturbations or water vapour turbulent fluctuations. By explicitly resolving these processes, the LES (large-eddy simulation) technique is enabling us to characterize and better understand the interactions between canopies and the local atmosphere. This includes the adaption time of vegetation to rapid changes in atmospheric conditions driven by turbulence or the presence of cumulus clouds. Our LES experiments are based on explicitly coupling the diurnal atmospheric dynamics to a plant physiology model. Our general hypothesis is that different partitioning of direct and diffuse radiation leads to different responses of the vegetation. As a result there are changes in the water use efficiencies and shifts in the partitioning of sensible and latent heat fluxes under the presence of clouds. Our presentation is as follows. First, we discuss the ability of LES to reproduce the surface energy balance including photosynthesis and CO2 soil

  11. Lagrangian scheme to model subgrid-scale mixing and spreading in heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, P. A.; Cortínez, J. M.; Valocchi, A. J.

    2017-04-01

    Small-scale heterogeneity of permeability controls spreading, dilution, and mixing of solute plumes at large scale. However, conventional numerical simulations of solute transport are unable to resolve scales of heterogeneity below the grid scale. We propose a Lagrangian numerical approach to implement closure models to account for subgrid-scale spreading and mixing in Darcy-scale numerical simulations of solute transport in mildly heterogeneous porous media. The novelty of the proposed approach is that it considers two different dispersion coefficients to account for advective spreading mechanisms and local-scale dispersion. Using results of benchmark numerical simulations, we demonstrate that the proposed approach is able to model subgrid-scale spreading and mixing provided there is a correct choice of block-scale dispersion coefficient. We also demonstrate that for short travel times it is only possible to account for spreading or mixing using a single block-scale dispersion coefficient. Moreover, we show that it is necessary to use time-dependent dispersion coefficients to obtain correct mixing rates. On the contrary, for travel times that are large in comparison to the typical dispersive time scale, it is possible to use a single expression to compute the block-dispersion coefficient, which is equal to the asymptotic limit of the block-scale macrodispersion coefficient proposed by Rubin et al. (1999). Our approach provides a flexible and efficient way to model subgrid-scale mixing in numerical models of large-scale solute transport in heterogeneous aquifers. We expect that these findings will help to better understand the applicability of the advection-dispersion-equation (ADE) to simulate solute transport at the Darcy scale in heterogeneous porous media.

  12. Stochastic fields method for sub-grid scale emission heterogeneity in mesoscale atmospheric dispersion models

    OpenAIRE

    M. Cassiani; Vinuesa, J.F.; Galmarini, S.; Denby, B

    2010-01-01

    The stochastic fields method for turbulent reacting flows has been applied to the issue of sub-grid scale emission heterogeneity in a mesoscale model. This method is a solution technique for the probability density function (PDF) transport equation and can be seen as a straightforward extension of currently used mesoscale dispersion models. It has been implemented in an existing mesoscale model and the results are compared with Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) data devised to test specifically the...

  13. Stochastic fields method for sub-grid scale emission heterogeneity in mesoscale atmospheric dispersion models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cassiani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The stochastic fields method for turbulent reacting flows has been applied to the issue of sub-grid scale emission heterogeneity in a mesoscale model. This method is a solution technique for the probability density function (PDF transport equation and can be seen as a straightforward extension of currently used mesoscale dispersion models. It has been implemented in an existing mesoscale model and the results are compared with Large-Eddy Simulation (LES data devised to test specifically the effect of sub-grid scale emission heterogeneity on boundary layer concentration fluctuations. The sub-grid scale emission variability is assimilated in the model as a PDF of the emissions. The stochastic fields method shows excellent agreement with the LES data without adjustment of the constants used in the mesoscale model. The stochastic fields method is a stochastic solution of the transport equations for the concentration PDF of dispersing scalars, therefore it possesses the ability to handle chemistry of any complexity without the need to introduce additional closures for the high order statistics of chemical species. This study shows for the first time the feasibility of applying this method to mesoscale chemical transport models.

  14. Subgrid-scale turbulence in shock-boundary layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jammalamadaka, Avinash; Jaberi, Farhad

    2015-04-01

    Data generated by direct numerical simulation (DNS) for a Mach 2.75 zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer interacting with shocks of different intensities are used for a priori analysis of subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence and various terms in the compressible filtered Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical method used for DNS is based on a hybrid scheme that uses a non-dissipative central scheme in the shock-free turbulent regions and a robust monotonicity-preserving scheme in the shock regions. The behavior of SGS stresses and their components, namely Leonard, Cross and Reynolds components, is examined in various regions of the flow for different shock intensities and filter widths. The backscatter in various regions of the flow is found to be significant only instantaneously, while the ensemble-averaged statistics indicate no significant backscatter. The budgets for the SGS kinetic energy equation are examined for a better understanding of shock-tubulence interactions at the subgrid level and also with the aim of providing useful information for one-equation LES models. A term-by-term analysis of SGS terms in the filtered total energy equation indicate that while each term in this equation is significant by itself, the net contribution by all of them is relatively small. This observation is consistent with our a posteriori analysis.

  15. Modeling Subgrid Scale Droplet Deposition in Multiphase-CFD

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    Agostinelli, Giulia; Baglietto, Emilio

    2017-11-01

    The development of first-principle-based constitutive equations for the Eulerian-Eulerian CFD modeling of annular flow is a major priority to extend the applicability of multiphase CFD (M-CFD) across all two-phase flow regimes. Two key mechanisms need to be incorporated in the M-CFD framework, the entrainment of droplets from the liquid film, and their deposition. Here we focus first on the aspect of deposition leveraging a separate effects approach. Current two-field methods in M-CFD do not include appropriate local closures to describe the deposition of droplets in annular flow conditions. As many integral correlations for deposition have been proposed for lumped parameters methods applications, few attempts exist in literature to extend their applicability to CFD simulations. The integral nature of the approach limits its applicability to fully developed flow conditions, without geometrical or flow variations, therefore negating the scope of CFD application. A new approach is proposed here that leverages local quantities to predict the subgrid-scale deposition rate. The methodology is first tested into a three-field approach CFD model.

  16. Exploring nonlinear subgrid-scale models and new characteristic length scales for large-eddy simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silvis, Maurits H.; Trias, F. Xavier; Abkar, M.; Bae, H.J.; Lozano-Duran, A.; Verstappen, R.W.C.P.; Moin, Parviz; Urzay, Javier

    2016-01-01

    We study subgrid-scale modeling for large-eddy simulation of anisotropic turbulent flows on anisotropic grids. In particular, we show how the addition of a velocity-gradient-based nonlinear model term to an eddy viscosity model provides a better representation of energy transfer. This is shown to

  17. Physical consistency of subgrid-scale models for large-eddy simulation of incompressible turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Silvis, Maurits H; Verstappen, Roel

    2016-01-01

    We study the construction of subgrid-scale models for large-eddy simulation of incompressible turbulent flows. In particular, we aim to consolidate a systematic approach of constructing subgrid-scale models, based on the idea that it is desirable that subgrid-scale models are consistent with the properties of the Navier-Stokes equations and the turbulent stresses. To that end, we first discuss in detail the symmetries of the Navier-Stokes equations, and the near-wall scaling behavior, realizability and dissipation properties of the turbulent stresses. We furthermore summarize the requirements that subgrid-scale models have to satisfy in order to preserve these important mathematical and physical properties. In this fashion, a framework of model constraints arises that we apply to analyze the behavior of a number of existing subgrid-scale models that are based on the local velocity gradient. We show that these subgrid-scale models do not satisfy all the desired properties, after which we explain that this is p...

  18. The subgrid-scale scalar variance under supercritical pressure conditions

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    Masi, Enrica; Bellan, Josette

    2011-08-01

    To model the subgrid-scale (SGS) scalar variance under supercritical-pressure conditions, an equation is first derived for it. This equation is considerably more complex than its equivalent for atmospheric-pressure conditions. Using a previously created direct numerical simulation (DNS) database of transitional states obtained for binary-species systems in the context of temporal mixing layers, the activity of terms in this equation is evaluated, and it is found that some of these new terms have magnitude comparable to that of governing terms in the classical equation. Most prominent among these new terms are those expressing the variation of diffusivity with thermodynamic variables and Soret terms having dissipative effects. Since models are not available for these new terms that would enable solving the SGS scalar variance equation, the adopted strategy is to directly model the SGS scalar variance. Two models are investigated for this quantity, both developed in the context of compressible flows. The first one is based on an approximate deconvolution approach and the second one is a gradient-like model which relies on a dynamic procedure using the Leonard term expansion. Both models are successful in reproducing the SGS scalar variance extracted from the filtered DNS database, and moreover, when used in the framework of a probability density function (PDF) approach in conjunction with the β-PDF, they excellently reproduce a filtered quantity which is a function of the scalar. For the dynamic model, the proportionality coefficient spans a small range of values through the layer cross-stream coordinate, boding well for the stability of large eddy simulations using this model.

  19. Multifractal subgrid-scale modeling within a variational multiscale method for large-eddy simulation of turbulent flow

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    Rasthofer, U.; Gravemeier, V.

    2013-02-01

    Multifractal subgrid-scale modeling within a variational multiscale method is proposed for large-eddy simulation of turbulent flow. In the multifractal subgrid-scale modeling approach, the subgrid-scale velocity is evaluated from a multifractal description of the subgrid-scale vorticity, which is based on the multifractal scale similarity of gradient fields in turbulent flow. The multifractal subgrid-scale modeling approach is integrated into a variational multiscale formulation, which constitutes a new application of the variational multiscale concept. A focus of this study is on the application of the multifractal subgrid-scale modeling approach to wall-bounded turbulent flow. Therefore, a near-wall limit of the multifractal subgrid-scale modeling approach is derived in this work. The novel computational approach of multifractal subgrid-scale modeling within a variational multiscale formulation is applied to turbulent channel flow at various Reynolds numbers, turbulent flow over a backward-facing step and turbulent flow past a square-section cylinder, which are three of the most important and widely-used benchmark examples for wall-bounded turbulent flow. All results presented in this study confirm a very good performance of the proposed method. Compared to a dynamic Smagorinsky model and a residual-based variational multiscale method, improved results are obtained. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the subgrid-scale energy transfer incorporated by the proposed method very well approximates the expected energy transfer as obtained from appropriately filtered direct numerical simulation data. The computational cost is notably reduced compared to a dynamic Smagorinsky model and only marginally increased compared to a residual-based variational multiscale method.

  20. Importance of subgrid-scale parameterization in numerical simulations of lake circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongqi

    Two subgrid-scale modeling techniques--Smagorinsky's postulation for the horizontal eddy viscosity and the Mellor-Yamada level-2 model for the vertical eddy viscosity--are applied as turbulence closure conditions to numerical simulations of resolved-scale baroclinic lake circulations. The use of the total variation diminishing (TVD) technique in the numerical treatment of the advection terms in the governing equations depresses numerical diffusion to an acceptably low level and makes stable numerical performances possible with small eddy viscosities resulting from the turbulence closure parameterizations. The results show that, with regard to the effect of an external wind stress, the vertical turbulent mixing is mainly restricted to the topmost epilimnion with the order of magnitude for the vertical eddy viscosity of 10 -3 m 2 s -1, whilst the horizontal turbulent mixing may reach a somewhat deeper zone with an order of magnitude for the horizontal eddy viscosity of 0.1-1 m 2 s -1. Their spatial and temporal variations and influences on numerical results are significant. A comparison with prescribed constant eddy viscosities clearly shows the importance of subgrid-scale closures on resolved-scale flows in the lake circulation simulation. A predetermination of the eddy viscosities is inappropriate and should be abandoned. Their values must be determined by suitable subgrid-scale closure techniques.

  1. Subgrid-scale stresses and scalar fluxes constructed by the multi-scale turnover Lagrangian map

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Bairmani, Sukaina; Li, Yi; Rosales, Carlos; Xie, Zheng-tong

    2017-04-01

    The multi-scale turnover Lagrangian map (MTLM) [C. Rosales and C. Meneveau, "Anomalous scaling and intermittency in three-dimensional synthetic turbulence," Phys. Rev. E 78, 016313 (2008)] uses nested multi-scale Lagrangian advection of fluid particles to distort a Gaussian velocity field and, as a result, generate non-Gaussian synthetic velocity fields. Passive scalar fields can be generated with the procedure when the fluid particles carry a scalar property [C. Rosales, "Synthetic three-dimensional turbulent passive scalar fields via the minimal Lagrangian map," Phys. Fluids 23, 075106 (2011)]. The synthetic fields have been shown to possess highly realistic statistics characterizing small scale intermittency, geometrical structures, and vortex dynamics. In this paper, we present a study of the synthetic fields using the filtering approach. This approach, which has not been pursued so far, provides insights on the potential applications of the synthetic fields in large eddy simulations and subgrid-scale (SGS) modelling. The MTLM method is first generalized to model scalar fields produced by an imposed linear mean profile. We then calculate the subgrid-scale stress, SGS scalar flux, SGS scalar variance, as well as related quantities from the synthetic fields. Comparison with direct numerical simulations (DNSs) shows that the synthetic fields reproduce the probability distributions of the SGS energy and scalar dissipation rather well. Related geometrical statistics also display close agreement with DNS results. The synthetic fields slightly under-estimate the mean SGS energy dissipation and slightly over-predict the mean SGS scalar variance dissipation. In general, the synthetic fields tend to slightly under-estimate the probability of large fluctuations for most quantities we have examined. Small scale anisotropy in the scalar field originated from the imposed mean gradient is captured. The sensitivity of the synthetic fields on the input spectra is assessed by

  2. A priori study of subgrid-scale features in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbagh, F.; Trias, F. X.; Gorobets, A.; Oliva, A.

    2017-10-01

    At the crossroad between flow topology analysis and turbulence modeling, a priori studies are a reliable tool to understand the underlying physics of the subgrid-scale (SGS) motions in turbulent flows. In this paper, properties of the SGS features in the framework of a large-eddy simulation are studied for a turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC). To do so, data from direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a turbulent air-filled RBC in a rectangular cavity of aspect ratio unity and π spanwise open-ended distance are used at two Rayleigh numbers R a ∈{1 08,1 010 } [Dabbagh et al., "On the evolution of flow topology in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection," Phys. Fluids 28, 115105 (2016)]. First, DNS at Ra = 108 is used to assess the performance of eddy-viscosity models such as QR, Wall-Adapting Local Eddy-viscosity (WALE), and the recent S3PQR-models proposed by Trias et al. ["Building proper invariants for eddy-viscosity subgrid-scale models," Phys. Fluids 27, 065103 (2015)]. The outcomes imply that the eddy-viscosity modeling smoothes the coarse-grained viscous straining and retrieves fairly well the effect of the kinetic unfiltered scales in order to reproduce the coherent large scales. However, these models fail to approach the exact evolution of the SGS heat flux and are incapable to reproduce well the further dominant rotational enstrophy pertaining to the buoyant production. Afterwards, the key ingredients of eddy-viscosity, νt, and eddy-diffusivity, κt, are calculated a priori and revealed positive prevalent values to maintain a turbulent wind essentially driven by the mean buoyant force at the sidewalls. The topological analysis suggests that the effective turbulent diffusion paradigm and the hypothesis of a constant turbulent Prandtl number are only applicable in the large-scale strain-dominated areas in the bulk. It is shown that the bulk-dominated rotational structures of vortex-stretching (and its synchronous viscous dissipative structures) hold

  3. Effects of Implementing Subgrid-Scale Cloud-Radiation Interactions in a Regional Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwehe, J. A.; Alapaty, K.; Otte, T.; Nolte, C. G.

    2012-12-01

    Interactions between atmospheric radiation, clouds, and aerosols are the most important processes that determine the climate and its variability. In regional scale models, when used at relatively coarse spatial resolutions (e.g., larger than 1 km), convective cumulus clouds need to be parameterized as subgrid-scale clouds. Like many groups, our regional climate modeling group at the EPA uses the Weather Research & Forecasting model (WRF) as a regional climate model (RCM). One of the findings from our RCM studies is that the summertime convective systems simulated by the WRF model are highly energetic, leading to excessive surface precipitation. We also found that the WRF model does not consider the interactions between convective clouds and radiation, thereby omitting an important process that drives the climate. Thus, the subgrid-scale cloudiness associated with convective clouds (from shallow cumuli to thunderstorms) does not exist and radiation passes through the atmosphere nearly unimpeded, potentially leading to overly energetic convection. This also has implications for air quality modeling systems that are dependent upon cloud properties from the WRF model, as the failure to account for subgrid-scale cloudiness can lead to problems such as the underrepresentation of aqueous chemistry processes within clouds and the overprediction of ozone from overactive photolysis. In an effort to advance the climate science of the cloud-aerosol-radiation (CAR) interactions in RCM systems, as a first step we have focused on linking the cumulus clouds with the radiation processes. To this end, our research group has implemented into WRF's Kain-Fritsch (KF) cumulus parameterization a cloudiness formulation that is widely used in global earth system models (e.g., CESM/CAM5). Estimated grid-scale cloudiness and associated condensate are adjusted to account for the subgrid clouds and then passed to WRF's Rapid Radiative Transfer Model - Global (RRTMG) radiation schemes to affect

  4. Improving sub-grid scale accuracy of boundary features in regional finite-difference models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panday, Sorab; Langevin, Christian D.

    2012-01-01

    As an alternative to grid refinement, the concept of a ghost node, which was developed for nested grid applications, has been extended towards improving sub-grid scale accuracy of flow to conduits, wells, rivers or other boundary features that interact with a finite-difference groundwater flow model. The formulation is presented for correcting the regular finite-difference groundwater flow equations for confined and unconfined cases, with or without Newton Raphson linearization of the nonlinearities, to include the Ghost Node Correction (GNC) for location displacement. The correction may be applied on the right-hand side vector for a symmetric finite-difference Picard implementation, or on the left-hand side matrix for an implicit but asymmetric implementation. The finite-difference matrix connectivity structure may be maintained for an implicit implementation by only selecting contributing nodes that are a part of the finite-difference connectivity. Proof of concept example problems are provided to demonstrate the improved accuracy that may be achieved through sub-grid scale corrections using the GNC schemes.

  5. Large eddy simulation of flow over a wall-mounted cube: Comparison of different semi dynamic subgrid scale models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Nooroullahi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the ability of different semi dynamic subgrid scale models for large eddy simulation was studied in a challenging test case. The semi dynamic subgrid scale models were examined in this investigation is Selective Structure model, Coherent structure model, Wall Adaptive Large Eddy model. The test case is a simulation of flow over a wall-mounted cube in a channel. The results of these models were compared to structure function model, dynamic models and experimental data at Reynolds number 40000. Results show that these semi dynamic models could improve the ability of numerical simulation in comparison with other models which use a constant coefficient for simulation of subgrid scale viscosity. In addition, these models don't have the instability problems of dynamic models.

  6. Parameterization of subgrid plume dilution for use in large-scale atmospheric simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Naiman

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A new model of plume dynamics has been developed for use as a subgrid model of plume dilution in a large-scale atmospheric simulation. The model uses mean wind, shear, and diffusion parameters derived from the local large-scale variables to advance the plume cross-sectional shape and area in time. Comparisons with a large eddy simulation of aircraft emission plume dynamics, with an analytical solution to the dynamics of a sheared Gaussian plume, and with measurements of aircraft exhaust plume dilution at cruise altitude show good agreement with these previous studies. We argue that the model also provides a reasonable approximation of line-shaped contrail dilution and give an example of how it can be applied in a global climate model.

  7. Numerical dissipation vs. subgrid-scale modelling for large eddy simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dairay, Thibault; Lamballais, Eric; Laizet, Sylvain; Vassilicos, John Christos

    2017-05-01

    This study presents an alternative way to perform large eddy simulation based on a targeted numerical dissipation introduced by the discretization of the viscous term. It is shown that this regularisation technique is equivalent to the use of spectral vanishing viscosity. The flexibility of the method ensures high-order accuracy while controlling the level and spectral features of this purely numerical viscosity. A Pao-like spectral closure based on physical arguments is used to scale this numerical viscosity a priori. It is shown that this way of approaching large eddy simulation is more efficient and accurate than the use of the very popular Smagorinsky model in standard as well as in dynamic version. The main strength of being able to correctly calibrate numerical dissipation is the possibility to regularise the solution at the mesh scale. Thanks to this property, it is shown that the solution can be seen as numerically converged. Conversely, the two versions of the Smagorinsky model are found unable to ensure regularisation while showing a strong sensitivity to numerical errors. The originality of the present approach is that it can be viewed as implicit large eddy simulation, in the sense that the numerical error is the source of artificial dissipation, but also as explicit subgrid-scale modelling, because of the equivalence with spectral viscosity prescribed on a physical basis.

  8. A nonlinear structural subgrid-scale closure for compressible MHD. I. Derivation and energy dissipation properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlaykov, Dimitar G., E-mail: Dimitar.Vlaykov@ds.mpg.de [Institut für Astrophysik, Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Dynamik und Selbstorganisation, Am Faßberg 17, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Grete, Philipp [Institut für Astrophysik, Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Schmidt, Wolfram [Hamburger Sternwarte, Universität Hamburg, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany); Schleicher, Dominik R. G. [Departamento de Astronomía, Facultad Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Concepción, Av. Esteban Iturra s/n Barrio Universitario, Casilla 160-C (Chile)

    2016-06-15

    Compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is ubiquitous in astrophysical phenomena ranging from the intergalactic to the stellar scales. In studying them, numerical simulations are nearly inescapable, due to the large degree of nonlinearity involved. However, the dynamical ranges of these phenomena are much larger than what is computationally accessible. In large eddy simulations (LESs), the resulting limited resolution effects are addressed explicitly by introducing to the equations of motion additional terms associated with the unresolved, subgrid-scale dynamics. This renders the system unclosed. We derive a set of nonlinear structural closures for the ideal MHD LES equations with particular emphasis on the effects of compressibility. The closures are based on a gradient expansion of the finite-resolution operator [W. K. Yeo (CUP, 1993)] and require no assumptions about the nature of the flow or magnetic field. Thus, the scope of their applicability ranges from the sub- to the hyper-sonic and -Alfvénic regimes. The closures support spectral energy cascades both up and down-scale, as well as direct transfer between kinetic and magnetic resolved and unresolved energy budgets. They implicitly take into account the local geometry, and in particular, the anisotropy of the flow. Their properties are a priori validated in Paper II [P. Grete et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 062317 (2016)] against alternative closures available in the literature with respect to a wide range of simulation data of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence.

  9. A new mixed subgrid-scale model for large eddy simulation of turbulent drag-reducing flows of viscoelastic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng-Chen; Wang, Lu; Cai, Wei-Hua

    2015-07-01

    A mixed subgrid-scale (SGS) model based on coherent structures and temporal approximate deconvolution (MCT) is proposed for turbulent drag-reducing flows of viscoelastic fluids. The main idea of the MCT SGS model is to perform spatial filtering for the momentum equation and temporal filtering for the conformation tensor transport equation of turbulent flow of viscoelastic fluid, respectively. The MCT model is suitable for large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent drag-reducing flows of viscoelastic fluids in engineering applications since the model parameters can be easily obtained. The LES of forced homogeneous isotropic turbulence (FHIT) with polymer additives and turbulent channel flow with surfactant additives based on MCT SGS model shows excellent agreements with direct numerical simulation (DNS) results. Compared with the LES results using the temporal approximate deconvolution model (TADM) for FHIT with polymer additives, this mixed SGS model MCT behaves better, regarding the enhancement of calculating parameters such as the Reynolds number. For scientific and engineering research, turbulent flows at high Reynolds numbers are expected, so the MCT model can be a more suitable model for the LES of turbulent drag-reducing flows of viscoelastic fluid with polymer or surfactant additives. Project supported by the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2011M500652), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51276046 and 51206033), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20112302110020).

  10. Convective kinetic energy equation under the mass-flux subgrid-scale parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi

    2015-03-01

    The present paper originally derives the convective kinetic energy equation under mass-flux subgrid-scale parameterization in a formal manner based on the segmentally-constant approximation (SCA). Though this equation is long since presented by Arakawa and Schubert (1974), a formal derivation is not known in the literature. The derivation of this formulation is of increasing interests in recent years due to the fact that it can explain basic aspects of the convective dynamics such as discharge-recharge and transition from shallow to deep convection. The derivation is presented in two manners: (i) for the case that only the vertical component of the velocity is considered and (ii) the case that both the horizontal and vertical components are considered. The equation reduces to the same form as originally presented by Arakwa and Schubert in both cases, but with the energy dissipation term defined differently. In both cases, nevertheless, the energy "dissipation" (loss) term consists of the three principal contributions: (i) entrainment-detrainment, (ii) outflow from top of convection, and (iii) pressure effects. Additionally, inflow from the bottom of convection contributing to a growth of convection is also formally counted as a part of the dissipation term. The eddy dissipation is also included for a completeness. The order-of-magnitude analysis shows that the convective kinetic energy "dissipation" is dominated by the pressure effects, and it may be approximately described by Rayleigh damping with a constant time scale of the order of 102-103 s. The conclusion is also supported by a supplementary analysis of a cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulation. The Appendix discusses how the loss term ("dissipation") of the convective kinetic energy is qualitatively different from the conventional eddy-dissipation process found in turbulent flows.

  11. A scale-aware subgrid model for quasi-geostrophic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Scott D.; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Pearson, Brodie

    2017-02-01

    This paper introduces two methods for dynamically prescribing eddy-induced diffusivity, advection, and viscosity appropriate for primitive equation models with resolutions permitting the forward potential enstrophy cascade of quasi-geostrophic dynamics, such as operational ocean models and high-resolution climate models with O>(25>) km horizontal resolution and finer. Where quasi-geostrophic dynamics fail (e.g., the equator, boundary layers, and deep convection), the method reverts to scalings based on a matched two-dimensional enstrophy cascade. A principle advantage is that these subgrid models are scale-aware, meaning that the model is suitable over a range of grid resolutions: from mesoscale grids that just permit baroclinic instabilities to grids below the submesoscale where ageostrophic effects dominate. Two approaches are presented here using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) techniques adapted for three-dimensional rotating, stratified turbulence. The simpler approach has one nondimensional parameter, Λ, which has an optimal value near 1. The second approach dynamically optimizes Λ during simulation using a test filter. The new methods are tested in an idealized scenario by varying the grid resolution, and their use improves the spectra of potential enstrophy and energy in comparison to extant schemes. The new methods keep the gridscale Reynolds and Péclet numbers near 1 throughout the domain, which confers robust numerical stability and minimal spurious diapycnal mixing. Although there are no explicit parameters in the dynamic approach, there is strong sensitivity to the choice of test filter. Designing test filters for heterogeneous ocean turbulence adds cost and uncertainty, and we find the dynamic method does not noticeably improve over setting Λ = 1.

  12. A dynamic subgrid scale model for Large Eddy Simulations based on the Mori-Zwanzig formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Eric J.; Duraisamy, Karthik

    2017-11-01

    The development of reduced models for complex multiscale problems remains one of the principal challenges in computational physics. The optimal prediction framework of Chorin et al. [1], which is a reformulation of the Mori-Zwanzig (M-Z) formalism of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, provides a framework for the development of mathematically-derived reduced models of dynamical systems. Several promising models have emerged from the optimal prediction community and have found application in molecular dynamics and turbulent flows. In this work, a new M-Z-based closure model that addresses some of the deficiencies of existing methods is developed. The model is constructed by exploiting similarities between two levels of coarse-graining via the Germano identity of fluid mechanics and by assuming that memory effects have a finite temporal support. The appeal of the proposed model, which will be referred to as the 'dynamic-MZ-τ' model, is that it is parameter-free and has a structural form imposed by the mathematics of the coarse-graining process (rather than the phenomenological assumptions made by the modeler, such as in classical subgrid scale models). To promote the applicability of M-Z models in general, two procedures are presented to compute the resulting model form, helping to bypass the tedious error-prone algebra that has proven to be a hindrance to the construction of M-Z-based models for complex dynamical systems. While the new formulation is applicable to the solution of general partial differential equations, demonstrations are presented in the context of Large Eddy Simulation closures for the Burgers equation, decaying homogeneous turbulence, and turbulent channel flow. The performance of the model and validity of the underlying assumptions are investigated in detail.

  13. A nonlinear structural subgrid-scale closure for compressible MHD Part II: a priori comparison on turbulence simulation data

    CERN Document Server

    Grete, P; Schmidt, W; Schleicher, D R G

    2016-01-01

    Even though compressible plasma turbulence is encountered in many astrophysical phenomena, its effect is often not well understood. Furthermore, direct numerical simulations are typically not able to reach the extreme parameters of these processes. For this reason, large-eddy simulations (LES), which only simulate large and intermediate scales directly, are employed. The smallest, unresolved scales and the interactions between small and large scales are introduced by means of a subgrid-scale (SGS) model. We propose and verify a new set of nonlinear SGS closures for future application as an SGS model in LES of compressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). We use 15 simulations (without explicit SGS model) of forced, isotropic, homogeneous turbulence with varying sonic Mach number $\\mathrm{M_s} = 0.2$ to $20$ as reference data for the most extensive \\textit{a priori} tests performed so far in literature. In these tests we explicitly filter the reference data and compare the performance of the new closures against th...

  14. A nonlinear structural subgrid-scale closure for compressible MHD Part I: derivation and energy dissipation properties

    CERN Document Server

    Vlaykov, Dimitar G; Schmidt, Wolfram; Schleicher, Dominik R G

    2016-01-01

    Compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is ubiquitous in astrophysical phenomena ranging from the intergalactic to the stellar scales. In studying them, numerical simulations are nearly inescapable, due to the large degree of nonlinearity involved. However the dynamical ranges of these phenomena are much larger than what is computationally accessible. In large eddy simulations (LES), the resulting limited resolution effects are addressed explicitly by introducing to the equations of motion additional terms associated with the unresolved, subgrid-scale (SGS) dynamics. This renders the system unclosed. We derive a set of nonlinear structural closures for the ideal MHD LES equations with particular emphasis on the effects of compressibility. The closures are based on a gradient expansion of the finite-resolution operator (W.K. Yeo CUP 1993, ed. Galperin & Orszag) and require no assumptions about the nature of the flow or magnetic field. Thus the scope of their applicability ranges from the sub- to ...

  15. Parameterization for subgrid-scale motion of ice-shelf calving fronts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Albrecht

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A parameterization for the motion of ice-shelf fronts on a Cartesian grid in finite-difference land-ice models is presented. The scheme prevents artificial thinning of the ice shelf at its edge, which occurs due to the finite resolution of the model. The intuitive numerical implementation diminishes numerical dispersion at the ice front and enables the application of physical boundary conditions to improve the calculation of stress and velocity fields throughout the ice-sheet-shelf system. Numerical properties of this subgrid modification are assessed in the Potsdam Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM-PIK for different geometries in one and two horizontal dimensions and are verified against an analytical solution in a flow-line setup.

  16. One-equation sub-grid scale (SGS) modelling for Euler-Euler large eddy simulation (EELES) of dispersed bubbly flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niceno, B.; Dhotre, M.T.; Deen, N.G.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we have presented a one-equation model for sub-grid scale (SGS) kinetic energy and applied it for an Euler-Euler large eddy simulation (EELES) of a bubble column reactor. The one-equation model for SGS kinetic energy shows improved predictions over the state-of-the-art dynamic

  17. Impact of Sub-grid Soil Textural Properties on Simulations of Hydrological Fluxes at the Continental Scale Mississippi River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R.; Samaniego, L. E.; Livneh, B.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of soil hydraulic properties such as porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity is required to accurately model the dynamics of near-surface hydrological processes (e.g. evapotranspiration and root-zone soil moisture dynamics) and provide reliable estimates of regional water and energy budgets. Soil hydraulic properties are commonly derived from pedo-transfer functions using soil textural information recorded during surveys, such as the fractions of sand and clay, bulk density, and organic matter content. Typically large scale land-surface models are parameterized using a relatively coarse soil map with little or no information on parametric sub-grid variability. In this study we analyze the impact of sub-grid soil variability on simulated hydrological fluxes over the Mississippi River Basin (≈3,240,000 km2) at multiple spatio-temporal resolutions. A set of numerical experiments were conducted with the distributed mesoscale hydrologic model (mHM) using two soil datasets: (a) the Digital General Soil Map of the United States or STATSGO2 (1:250 000) and (b) the recently collated Harmonized World Soil Database based on the FAO-UNESCO Soil Map of the World (1:5 000 000). mHM was parameterized with the multi-scale regionalization technique that derives distributed soil hydraulic properties via pedo-transfer functions and regional coefficients. Within the experimental framework, the 3-hourly model simulations were conducted at four spatial resolutions ranging from 0.125° to 1°, using meteorological datasets from the NLDAS-2 project for the time period 1980-2012. Preliminary results indicate that the model was able to capture observed streamflow behavior reasonably well with both soil datasets, in the major sub-basins (i.e. the Missouri, the Upper Mississippi, the Ohio, the Red, and the Arkansas). However, the spatio-temporal patterns of simulated water fluxes and states (e.g. soil moisture, evapotranspiration) from both simulations, showed marked

  18. A Physically Based Horizontal Subgrid-scale Turbulent Mixing Parameterization for the Convective Boundary Layer in Mesoscale Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bowen; Xue, Ming; Zhu, Kefeng

    2017-04-01

    Compared to the representation of vertical turbulent mixing through various PBL schemes, the treatment of horizontal turbulence mixing in the boundary layer within mesoscale models, with O(10) km horizontal grid spacing, has received much less attention. In mesoscale models, subgrid-scale horizontal fluxes most often adopt the gradient-diffusion assumption. The horizontal mixing coefficients are usually set to a constant, or through the 2D Smagorinsky formulation, or in some cases based on the 1.5-order turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) closure. In this work, horizontal turbulent mixing parameterizations using physically based characteristic velocity and length scales are proposed for the convective boundary layer based on analysis of a well-resolved, wide-domain large-eddy simulation (LES). The proposed schemes involve different levels of sophistication. The first two schemes can be used together with first-order PBL schemes, while the third uses TKE to define its characteristic velocity scale and can be used together with TKE-based higher-order PBL schemes. The current horizontal mixing formulations are also assessed a priori through the filtered LES results to illustrate their limitations. The proposed parameterizations are tested a posteriori in idealized simulations of turbulent dispersion of a passive scalar. Comparisons show improved horizontal dispersion by the proposed schemes, and further demonstrate the weakness of the current schemes.

  19. Final Report. Evaluating the Climate Sensitivity of Dissipative Subgrid-Scale Mixing Processes and Variable Resolution in NCAR's Community Earth System Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonowski, Christiane [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-12-14

    The goals of this project were to (1) assess and quantify the sensitivity and scale-dependency of unresolved subgrid-scale mixing processes in NCAR’s Community Earth System Model (CESM), and (2) to improve the accuracy and skill of forthcoming CESM configurations on modern cubed-sphere and variable-resolution computational grids. The research thereby contributed to the description and quantification of uncertainties in CESM’s dynamical cores and their physics-dynamics interactions.

  20. Large Eddy Simulations of a Premixed Jet Combustor Using Flamelet-Generated Manifolds: Effects of Heat Loss and Subgrid-Scale Models

    KAUST Repository

    Hernandez Perez, Francisco E.

    2017-01-05

    Large eddy simulations of a turbulent premixed jet flame in a confined chamber were conducted using the flamelet-generated manifold technique for chemistry tabulation. The configuration is characterized by an off-center nozzle having an inner diameter of 10 mm, supplying a lean methane-air mixture with an equivalence ratio of 0.71 and a mean velocity of 90 m/s, at 573 K and atmospheric pressure. Conductive heat loss is accounted for in the manifold via burner-stabilized flamelets and the subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulencechemistry interaction is modeled via presumed probability density functions. Comparisons between numerical results and measured data show that a considerable improvement in the prediction of temperature is achieved when heat losses are included in the manifold, as compared to the adiabatic one. Additional improvement in the temperature predictions is obtained by incorporating radiative heat losses. Moreover, further enhancements in the LES predictions are achieved by employing SGS models based on transport equations, such as the SGS turbulence kinetic energy equation with dynamic coefficients. While the numerical results display good agreement up to a distance of 4 nozzle diameters downstream of the nozzle exit, the results become less satisfactory along the downstream, suggesting that further improvements in the modeling are required, among which a more accurate model for the SGS variance of progress variable can be relevant.

  1. Large Eddy Simulation of an SD7003 Airfoil: Effects of Reynolds number and Subgrid-scale modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlak, Hamid

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents results of a series of numerical simulations in order to study aerodynamic characteristics of the low Reynolds number Selig-Donovan airfoil, SD7003. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) technique is used for all computations at chord-based Reynolds numbers 10,000, 24,000 and 60,000 and simulations have been performed to primarily investigate the role of sub-grid scale (SGS) modeling on the dynamics of flow generated over the airfoil, which has not been dealt with in great detail in the past. It is seen that simulations are increasingly getting influenced by SGS modeling with increasing the Reynolds number, and the effect is visible even at a relatively low chord-Reynolds number of 60,000. Among the tested models, the dynamic Smagorinsky gives the poorest predictions of the flow, with overprediction of lift and a larger separation on airfoils suction side. Among various models, the implicit LES offers closest pressure distribution predictions compared with literature.

  2. Assessment of sub-grid scale dispersion closure with regularized deconvolution method in a particle-laden turbulent jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Zhao, Xinyu; Ihme, Matthias

    2017-11-01

    Particle-laden turbulent flows are important in numerous industrial applications, such as spray combustion engines, solar energy collectors etc. It is of interests to study this type of flows numerically, especially using large-eddy simulations (LES). However, capturing the turbulence-particle interaction in LES remains challenging due to the insufficient representation of the effect of sub-grid scale (SGS) dispersion. In the present work, a closure technique for the SGS dispersion using regularized deconvolution method (RDM) is assessed. RDM was proposed as the closure for the SGS dispersion in a counterflow spray that is studied numerically using finite difference method on a structured mesh. A presumed form of LES filter is used in the simulations. In the present study, this technique has been extended to finite volume method with an unstructured mesh, where no presumption on the filter form is required. The method is applied to a series of particle-laden turbulent jets. Parametric analyses of the model performance are conducted for flows with different Stokes numbers and Reynolds numbers. The results from LES will be compared against experiments and direct numerical simulations (DNS).

  3. Exploring the Limits of the Dynamic Procedure for Modeling Subgrid-Scale Stresses in LES of Inhomogeneous Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, A.-T.; Kim, J.; Coleman, G.

    1996-11-01

    One of the primary reasons dynamic subgrid-scale (SGS) models are more successful than those that are `hand-tuned' is thought to be their insensitivity to numerical and modeling parameters. Jiménez has recently demonstrated that large-eddy simulations (LES) of decaying isotropic turbulence using a dynamic Smagorinsky model yield correct decay rates -- even when the model is subjected to a range of artificial perturbations. The objective of the present study is to determine to what extent this `self-adjusting' feature of dynamic SGS models is found in LES of inhomogeneous flows. The effects of numerical and modeling parameters on the accuracy of LES solutions of fully developed and developing turbulent channel flow are studied, using a spectral code and various dynamic models (including those of Lilly et al. and Meneveau et al.); other modeling parameters tested include the filter-width ratio and the effective magnitude of the Smagorinsky coefficient. Numerical parameters include the form of the convective term and the type of test filter (sharp-cutoff versus tophat). The resulting LES statistics are found to be surprisingly sensitive to the various parameter choices, which implies that more care than is needed for homogeneous-flow simulations must be exercised when performing LES of inhomogeneous flows.

  4. Effect of Considering Sub-Grid Scale Uncertainties on the Forecasts of a High-Resolution Limited Area Ensemble Prediction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, SeHyun; Kim, Hyun Mee

    2017-05-01

    The ensemble prediction system (EPS) is widely used in research and at operation center because it can represent the uncertainty of predicted atmospheric state and provide information of probabilities. The high-resolution (so-called "convection-permitting") limited area EPS can represent the convection and turbulence related to precipitation phenomena in more detail, but it is also much sensitive to small-scale or sub-grid scale processes. The convection and turbulence are represented using physical processes in the model and model errors occur due to sub-grid scale processes that were not resolved. This study examined the effect of considering sub-grid scale uncertainties using the high-resolution limited area EPS of the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA). The developed EPS has horizontal resolution of 3 km and 12 ensemble members. The initial and boundary conditions were provided by the global model. The Random Parameters (RP) scheme was used to represent sub-grid scale uncertainties. The EPSs with and without the RP scheme were developed and the results were compared. During the one month period of July, 2013, a significant difference was shown in the spread of 1.5 m temperature and the Root Mean Square Error and spread of 10 m zonal wind due to application of the RP scheme. For precipitation forecast, the precipitation tended to be overestimated relative to the observation when the RP scheme was applied. Moreover, the forecast became more accurate for heavy precipitations and the longer forecast lead times. For two heavy rainfall cases occurred during the research period, the higher Equitable Threat Score was observed for heavy precipitations in the system with the RP scheme compared to the one without, demonstrating consistency with the statistical results for the research period. Therefore, the predictability for heavy precipitation phenomena that affected the Korean Peninsula increases if the RP scheme is used to consider sub-grid scale uncertainties

  5. Sub-grid scale models for discontinuous Galerkin methods based on the Mori-Zwanzig formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Eric; Duraisamy, Karthk

    2017-11-01

    The optimal prediction framework of Chorin et al., which is a reformulation of the Mori-Zwanzig (M-Z) formalism of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, provides a framework for the development of mathematically-derived closure models. The M-Z formalism provides a methodology to reformulate a high-dimensional Markovian dynamical system as a lower-dimensional, non-Markovian (non-local) system. In this lower-dimensional system, the effects of the unresolved scales on the resolved scales are non-local and appear as a convolution integral. The non-Markovian system is an exact statement of the original dynamics and is used as a starting point for model development. In this work, we investigate the development of M-Z-based closures model within the context of the Variational Multiscale Method (VMS). The method relies on a decomposition of the solution space into two orthogonal subspaces. The impact of the unresolved subspace on the resolved subspace is shown to be non-local in time and is modeled through the M-Z-formalism. The models are applied to hierarchical discontinuous Galerkin discretizations. Commonalities between the M-Z closures and conventional flux schemes are explored. This work was supported in part by AFOSR under the project ''LES Modeling of Non-local effects using Statistical Coarse-graining'' with Dr. Jean-Luc Cambier as the technical monitor.

  6. Simple lattice Boltzmann subgrid-scale model for convectional flows with high Rayleigh numbers within an enclosed circular annular cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; Tölke, Jonas; Krafczyk, Manfred

    2009-08-01

    Natural convection within an enclosed circular annular cavity formed by two concentric vertical cylinders is of fundamental interest and practical importance. Generally, the assumption of axisymmetric thermal flow is adopted for simulating such natural convections and the validity of the assumption of axisymmetric thermal flow is still held even for some turbulent convection. Usually the Rayleigh numbers (Ra) of realistic flows are very high. However, the work to design suitable and efficient lattice Boltzmann (LB) models on such flows is quite rare. To bridge the gap, in this paper a simple LB subgrid-scale (SGS) model, which is based on our recent work [S. Chen, J. Tölke, and M. Krafczyk, Phys. Rev. E 79, 016704 (2009); S. Chen, J. Tölke, S. Geller, and M. Krafczyk, Phys. Rev. E 78, 046703 (2008)], is proposed for simulating convectional flow with high Ra within an enclosed circular annular cavity. The key parameter for the SGS model can be quite easily and efficiently evaluated by the present model. The numerical experiments demonstrate that the present model works well for a large range of Ra and Prandtl number (Pr). Though in the present study a popularly used static Smagorinsky turbulence model is adopted to demonstrate how to develop a LB SGS model for simulating axisymmetric thermal flows with high Ra, other state-of-the-art turbulence models can be incorporated into the present model in the same way. In addition, the present model can be extended straightforwardly to simulate other axisymmetric convectional flows with high Ra, for example, turbulent convection with internal volumetric heat generation in a vertical cylinder, which is an important simplified representation of a nuclear reactor.

  7. Stochastic representation of the Reynolds transport theorem: revisiting large-scale modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Harouna, S Kadri

    2016-01-01

    We explore the potential of a formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations incorporating a random description of the small-scale velocity component. This model, established from a version of the Reynolds transport theorem adapted to a stochastic representation of the flow, gives rise to a large-scale description of the flow dynamics in which emerges an anisotropic subgrid tensor, reminiscent to the Reynolds stress tensor, together with a drift correction due to an inhomogeneous turbulence. The corresponding subgrid model, which depends on the small scales velocity variance, generalizes the Boussinesq eddy viscosity assumption. However, it is not anymore obtained from an analogy with molecular dissipation but ensues rigorously from the random modeling of the flow. This principle allows us to propose several subgrid models defined directly on the resolved flow component. We assess and compare numerically those models on a standard Green-Taylor vortex flow at Reynolds 1600. The numerical simulations, carried out w...

  8. A Dynamic Subgrid Scale Model for Large Eddy Simulations Based on the Mori-Zwanzig Formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Parish, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    The development of reduced models for complex systems that lack scale separation remains one of the principal challenges in computational physics. The optimal prediction framework of Chorin et al., which is a reformulation of the Mori-Zwanzig (M-Z) formalism of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, provides a methodology for the development of mathematically-derived reduced models of dynamical systems. Several promising models have emerged from the optimal prediction community and have found application in molecular dynamics and turbulent flows. In this work, a novel M-Z-based closure model that addresses some of the deficiencies of existing methods is developed. The model is constructed by exploiting similarities between two levels of coarse-graining via the Germano identity of fluid mechanics and by assuming that memory effects have a finite temporal support. The appeal of the proposed model, which will be referred to as the `dynamic-$\\tau$' model, is that it is parameter-free and has a structural form imp...

  9. Sub-grid scale representation of vegetation in global land surface schemes: implications for estimation of the terrestrial carbon sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Melton

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial ecosystem models commonly represent vegetation in terms of plant functional types (PFTs and use their vegetation attributes in calculations of the energy and water balance as well as to investigate the terrestrial carbon cycle. Sub-grid scale variability of PFTs in these models is represented using different approaches with the "composite" and "mosaic" approaches being the two end-members. The impact of these two approaches on the global carbon balance has been investigated with the Canadian Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (CTEM v 1.2 coupled to the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS v 3.6. In the composite (single-tile approach, the vegetation attributes of different PFTs present in a grid cell are aggregated and used in calculations to determine the resulting physical environmental conditions (soil moisture, soil temperature, etc. that are common to all PFTs. In the mosaic (multi-tile approach, energy and water balance calculations are performed separately for each PFT tile and each tile's physical land surface environmental conditions evolve independently. Pre-industrial equilibrium CLASS-CTEM simulations yield global totals of vegetation biomass, net primary productivity, and soil carbon that compare reasonably well with observation-based estimates and differ by less than 5% between the mosaic and composite configurations. However, on a regional scale the two approaches can differ by > 30%, especially in areas with high heterogeneity in land cover. Simulations over the historical period (1959–2005 show different responses to evolving climate and carbon dioxide concentrations from the two approaches. The cumulative global terrestrial carbon sink estimated over the 1959–2005 period (excluding land use change (LUC effects differs by around 5% between the two approaches (96.3 and 101.3 Pg, for the mosaic and composite approaches, respectively and compares well with the observation-based estimate of 82.2 ± 35 Pg C over the same

  10. Assessment of subgrid-scale models with a large-eddy simulation-dedicated experimental database: The pulsatile impinging jet in turbulent cross-flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baya Toda, Hubert; Cabrit, Olivier; Truffin, Karine; Bruneaux, Gilles; Nicoud, Franck

    2014-07-01

    Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) in complex geometries and industrial applications like piston engines, gas turbines, or aircraft engines requires the use of advanced subgrid-scale (SGS) models able to take into account the main flow features and the turbulence anisotropy. Keeping this goal in mind, this paper reports a LES-dedicated experiment of a pulsatile hot-jet impinging a flat-plate in the presence of a cold turbulent cross-flow. Unlike commonly used academic test cases, this configuration involves different flow features encountered in complex configurations: shear/rotating regions, stagnation point, wall-turbulence, and the propagation of a vortex ring along the wall. This experiment was also designed with the aim to use quantitative and nonintrusive optical diagnostics such as Particle Image Velocimetry, and to easily perform a LES involving a relatively simple geometry and well-controlled boundary conditions. Hence, two eddy-viscosity-based SGS models are investigated: the dynamic Smagorinsky model [M. Germano, U. Piomelli, P. Moin, and W. Cabot, "A dynamic subgrid-scale eddy viscosity model," Phys. Fluids A 3(7), 1760-1765 (1991)] and the σ-model [F. Nicoud, H. B. Toda, O. Cabrit, S. Bose, and J. Lee, "Using singular values to build a subgrid-scale model for large eddy simulations," Phys. Fluids 23(8), 085106 (2011)]. Both models give similar results during the first phase of the experiment. However, it was found that the dynamic Smagorinsky model could not accurately predict the vortex-ring propagation, while the σ-model provides a better agreement with the experimental measurements. Setting aside the implementation of the dynamic procedure (implemented here in its simplest form, i.e., without averaging over homogeneous directions and with clipping of negative values to ensure numerical stability), it is suggested that the mitigated predictions of the dynamic Smagorinsky model are due to the dynamic constant, which strongly depends on the mesh resolution

  11. An explicit relaxation filtering framework based upon Perona-Malik anisotropic diffusion for shock capturing and subgrid scale modeling of Burgers turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Maulik, Romit

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a relaxation filtering closure approach to account for subgrid scale effects in explicitly filtered large eddy simulations using the concept of anisotropic diffusion. We utilize the Perona-Malik diffusion model and demonstrate its shock capturing ability and spectral performance for solving the Burgers turbulence problem, which is a simplified prototype for more realistic turbulent flows showing the same quadratic nonlinearity. Our numerical assessments present the behavior of various diffusivity functions in conjunction with a detailed sensitivity analysis with respect to the free modeling parameters. In comparison to direct numerical simulation (DNS) and under-resolved DNS results, we find that the proposed closure model is efficient in the prevention of energy accumulation at grid cut-off and is also adept at preventing any possible spurious numerical oscillations due to shock formation under the optimal parameter choices. In contrast to other relaxation filtering approaches, it...

  12. Subgrid Modeling Geomorphological and Ecological Processes in Salt Marsh Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, F.; Kirby, J. T., Jr.; Wu, G.; Abdolali, A.; Deb, M.

    2016-12-01

    Numerical modeling a long-term evolution of salt marshes is challenging because it requires an extensive use of computational resources. Due to the presence of narrow tidal creeks, variations of salt marsh topography can be significant over spatial length scales on the order of a meter. With growing availability of high-resolution bathymetry measurements, like LiDAR-derived DEM data, it is increasingly desirable to run a high-resolution model in a large domain and for a long period of time to get trends of sedimentation patterns, morphological change and marsh evolution. However, high spatial-resolution poses a big challenge in both computational time and memory storage, when simulating a salt marsh with dimensions of up to O(100 km^2) with a small time step. In this study, we have developed a so-called Pre-storage, Sub-grid Model (PSM, Wu et al., 2015) for simulating flooding and draining processes in salt marshes. The simulation of Brokenbridge salt marsh, Delaware, shows that, with the combination of the sub-grid model and the pre-storage method, over 2 orders of magnitude computational speed-up can be achieved with minimal loss of model accuracy. We recently extended PSM to include a sediment transport component and models for biomass growth and sedimentation in the sub-grid model framework. The sediment transport model is formulated based on a newly derived sub-grid sediment concentration equation following Defina's (2000) area-averaging procedure. Suspended sediment transport is modeled by the advection-diffusion equation in the coarse grid level, but the local erosion and sedimentation rates are integrated over the sub-grid level. The morphological model is based on the existing morphological model in NearCoM (Shi et al., 2013), extended to include organic production from the biomass model. The vegetation biomass is predicted by a simple logistic equation model proposed by Marani et al. (2010). The biomass component is loosely coupled with hydrodynamic and

  13. Recursive renormalization group theory based subgrid modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, YE

    1991-01-01

    Advancing the knowledge and understanding of turbulence theory is addressed. Specific problems to be addressed will include studies of subgrid models to understand the effects of unresolved small scale dynamics on the large scale motion which, if successful, might substantially reduce the number of degrees of freedom that need to be computed in turbulence simulation.

  14. Intercomparison of different subgrid-scale models for the Large Eddy Simulation of the diurnal evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer during the Wangara experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Ozzo, C.; Carissimo, B.; Musson-Genon, L.; Dupont, E.; Milliez, M.

    2012-04-01

    The study of a whole diurnal cycle of the atmospheric boundary layer evolving through unstable, neutral and stable states is essential to test a model applicable to the dispersion of pollutants. Consequently a LES of a diurnal cycle is performed and compared to observations from the Wangara experiment (Day 33-34). All simulations are done with Code_Saturne [1] an open source CFD code. The synthetic eddy method (SEM) [2] is implemented to initialize turbulence at the beginning of the simulation. Two different subgrid-scale (SGS) models are tested: the Smagorinsky model [3],[4] and the dynamical Wong and Lilly model [5]. The first one, the most classical, uses a Smagorinsky constant Cs to parameterize the dynamical turbulent viscosity while the second one relies on a variable C. Cs remains insensitive to the atmospheric stability level in contrary to the parameter C determined by the Wong and Lilly model. It is based on the error minimization of the difference between the tensors of the resolved turbulent stress (Lij) and the difference of the SGS stress tensors at two different filter scales (Mij). Furthermore, the thermal eddy diffusivity, as opposed to the Smagorinsky model, is calculated with a dynamical Prandtl number determination. The results are confronted to previous simulations from Basu et al. (2008) [6], using a locally averaged scale-dependent dynamic (LASDD) SGS model, and to previous RANS simulations. The accuracy in reproducing the experimental atmospheric conditions is discussed, especially regarding the night time low-level jet formation. In addition, the benefit of the utilization of a coupled radiative model is discussed.

  15. High-Resolution Global Modeling of the Effects of Subgrid-Scale Clouds and Turbulence on Precipitating Cloud Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogenschutz, Peter [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Moeng, Chin-Hoh [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-10-13

    The PI’s at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Chin-Hoh Moeng and Peter Bogenschutz, have primarily focused their time on the implementation of the Simplified-Higher Order Turbulence Closure (SHOC; Bogenschutz and Krueger 2013) to the Multi-scale Modeling Framework (MMF) global model and testing of SHOC on deep convective cloud regimes.

  16. Impact of an additional radiative CO2 cooling induced by subgrid-scale gravity waves in the middle and upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, A. S.; Yigit, E.; Kutepov, A.; Feofilov, A.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric fluctuations produced by GWs are a substantial source of momentum and energy in the thermosphere (Yigit et al., 2009). These fluctuations also affect radiative transfer and, ultimately, the radiative heating/cooling rates. Recently, Kutepov et al. (2007) developed a methodology to account for radiative effects of subgrid-scale GWs not captured by general circulation models (GCMs). It has been extended by Kutepov et al (2011) to account not only for wave-induced variations of temperature, but also of CO2 and atomic oxygen. It was shown that these GWs can cause additional cooling of up to 3 K/day around mesopause. A key parameter for calculating the additional cooling is the temperature variance associated with GWs, which is a subproduct of conventional GW schemes. In this study, the parameterization of Kutepov et al. (2011) has been implemented into a 3-D comprehensive GCM that incorporates the effects of unresolved GWs via the extended nonlinear scheme of Yigit et al. (2008). Simulated net effects of the additional radiative CO2 cooling on the temperature and wind in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere are presented and discussed for solstice conditions. 1. Kutepov, A. A, A. G. Feofilov, A. S. Medvedev, A. W. A. Pauldrach, and P. Hartogh (2007), Geophys. Res. Lett. 34, L24807, doi:10.1029/2007GL032392. 2. Kutepov, A. A., A. G. Feofilov, A. S. Medvedev, U. Berger, and M. Kaufmann (2011), submitted to Geophys. Res. Letts. 3. Yigit, E., A. D. Aylward, and A. S. Medvedev (2008), J. Geophys. Res., 113, D19106, doi:10.1029/2008JD010135. 4. Yigit, E., A. S. Medvedev, A. D. Aylward, P. Hartogh, and M. J. Harris (2009), J. Geophys. Res., 114, D07101, doi:10.1029/2008JD011132.

  17. Effect of reactions in small eddies on biomass gasification with eddy dissipation concept - Sub-grid scale reaction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juhui; Yin, Weijie; Wang, Shuai; Meng, Cheng; Li, Jiuru; Qin, Bai; Yu, Guangbin

    2016-07-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) approach is used for gas turbulence, and eddy dissipation concept (EDC)-sub-grid scale (SGS) reaction model is employed for reactions in small eddies. The simulated gas molar fractions are in better agreement with experimental data with EDC-SGS reaction model. The effect of reactions in small eddies on biomass gasification is emphatically analyzed with EDC-SGS reaction model. The distributions of the SGS reaction rates which represent the reactions in small eddies with particles concentration and temperature are analyzed. The distributions of SGS reaction rates have the similar trend with those of total reactions rates and the values account for about 15% of the total reactions rates. The heterogeneous reaction rates with EDC-SGS reaction model are also improved during the biomass gasification process in bubbling fluidized bed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Houseworth

    2004-09-22

    The purpose of this model report is to document the drift scale radionuclide transport model, taking into account the effects of emplacement drifts on flow and transport in the vicinity of the drift, which are not captured in the mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport models ''UZ Flow Models and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]), ''Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]), and ''Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Process'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170041]). The drift scale radionuclide transport model is intended to be used as an alternative model for comparison with the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport model ''EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169868]). For that purpose, two alternative models have been developed for drift-scale radionuclide transport. One of the alternative models is a dual continuum flow and transport model called the drift shadow model. The effects of variations in the flow field and fracture-matrix interaction in the vicinity of a waste emplacement drift are investigated through sensitivity studies using the drift shadow model (Houseworth et al. 2003 [DIRS 164394]). In this model, the flow is significantly perturbed (reduced) beneath the waste emplacement drifts. However, comparisons of transport in this perturbed flow field with transport in an unperturbed flow field show similar results if the transport is initiated in the rock matrix. This has led to a second alternative model, called the fracture-matrix partitioning model, that focuses on the partitioning of radionuclide transport between the fractures and matrix upon exiting the waste emplacement drift. The fracture-matrix partitioning model computes the partitioning, between fractures and matrix, of diffusive radionuclide transport from the invert (for drifts without seepage) into the rock water

  19. Predicting the impacts of fishing canals on Floodplain Dynamics in Northern Cameroon using a small-scale sub-grid hydraulic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, A. R.; Durand, M. T.; Fernandez, A.; Hamilton, I.; Kari, S.; Labara, B.; Laborde, S.; Mark, B. G.; Moritz, M.; Neal, J. C.; Phang, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Modeling Regime Shifts in the Logone floodplain (MORSL) is an ongoing interdisciplinary project at The Ohio State University studying the ecological, social and hydrological system of the region. This floodplain, located in Northern Cameroon, is part of the Lake Chad basin. Between September and October the floodplain is inundated by the overbank flow from the Logone River, which is important for agriculture and fishing. Fishermen build canals to catch fish during the flood's recession to the river by installing fishnets at the intersection of the canals and the river. Fishing canals thus connect the river to natural depressions of the terrain, which act as seasonal ponds during this part of the year. Annual increase in the number of canals affect hydraulics and hence fishing in the region. In this study, the Bara region (1 km2) of the Logone floodplain, through which Lorome Mazra flows, is modeled using LISFLOOD-FP, a raster-based model with sub-grid parameterizations of canals. The aim of the study is to find out how the small-scale, local features like canals and fishnets govern the flow, so that it can be incorporated in a large-scale model of the floodplain at a coarser spatial resolution. We will also study the effect of increasing number of canals on the flooding pattern. We use a simplified version of the hydraulic system at a grid-cell size of 30-m, using synthetic topography, parameterized fishing canals, and representing fishnets as trash screens. The inflow at Bara is obtained from a separate, lower resolution (1-km grid-cell) model run, which is forced by daily discharge records obtained from Katoa, located about 25-km to the south of Bara. The model appropriately captures the rise and recession of the annual flood, supporting use of the LISFLOOD-FP approach. Predicted water levels at specific points in the river, the canals, the depression and the floodplain will be compared to field measured heights of flood recession in Bara, November 2014.

  20. Scaling in public transport networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. von Ferber

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyse the statistical properties of public transport networks. These networks are defined by a set of public transport routes (bus lines and the stations serviced by these. For larger networks these appear to possess a scale-free structure, as it is demonstrated e.g. by the Zipf law distribution of the number of routes servicing a given station or for the distribution of the number of stations which can be visited from a chosen one without changing the means of transport. Moreover, a rather particular feature of the public transport network is that many routes service common subsets of stations. We discuss the possibility of new scaling laws that govern intrinsic properties of such subsets.

  1. Birefringent dispersive FDTD subgridding scheme

    OpenAIRE

    De Deckere, B; Van Londersele, Arne; De Zutter, Daniël; Vande Ginste, Dries

    2016-01-01

    A novel 2D finite difference time domain (FDTD) subgridding method is proposed, only subject to the Courant limit of the coarse grid. By making mu or epsilon inside the subgrid dispersive, unconditional stability is induced at the cost of a sparse, implicit set of update equations. By only adding dispersion along preferential directions, it is possible to dramatically reduce the rank of the matrix equation that needs to be solved.

  2. A subgrid parameterization scheme for precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Turner

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available With increasing computing power, the horizontal resolution of numerical weather prediction (NWP models is improving and today reaches 1 to 5 km. Nevertheless, clouds and precipitation formation are still subgrid scale processes for most cloud types, such as cumulus and stratocumulus. Subgrid scale parameterizations for water vapor condensation have been in use for many years and are based on a prescribed probability density function (PDF of relative humidity spatial variability within the model grid box, thus providing a diagnosis of the cloud fraction. A similar scheme is developed and tested here. It is based on a prescribed PDF of cloud water variability and a threshold value of liquid water content for droplet collection to derive a rain fraction within the model grid. Precipitation of rainwater raises additional concerns relative to the overlap of cloud and rain fractions, however. The scheme is developed following an analysis of data collected during field campaigns in stratocumulus (DYCOMS-II and fair weather cumulus (RICO and tested in a 1-D framework against large eddy simulations of these observed cases. The new parameterization is then implemented in a 3-D NWP model with a horizontal resolution of 2.5 km to simulate real cases of precipitating cloud systems over France.

  3. SITE-SCALE SATURATED ZONE TRANSPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. KELLER

    2004-11-03

    This work provides a site-scale transport model for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone (SZ) at Yucca Mountain, for use in the abstractions model in support of ''Total System Performance Assessment for License Application'' (TSPA-LA). The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation for the components of the site-scale SZ transport model in accordance with administrative procedure AP-SIII.10Q, Models. The initial documentation of this model report was conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan For: Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Modeling and Testing'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 163965]). The model report has been revised in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan For: Natural System--Saturated Zone Analysis and Model Report Integration'', Section 2.1.1.4 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171421]) to incorporate Regulatory Integration Team comments. All activities listed in the technical work plan that are appropriate to the transport model are documented in this report and are described in Section 2.1.1.4 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171421]). This report documents: (1) the advection-dispersion transport model including matrix diffusion (Sections 6.3 and 6.4); (2) a description and validation of the transport model (Sections 6.3 and 7); (3) the numerical methods for simulating radionuclide transport (Section 6.4); (4) the parameters (sorption coefficient, Kd ) and their uncertainty distributions used for modeling radionuclide sorption (Appendices A and C); (5) the parameters used for modeling colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport (Table 4-1, Section 6.4.2.6, and Appendix B); and (6) alternative conceptual models and their dispositions (Section 6.6). The intended use of this model is to simulate transport in saturated fractured porous rock (double porosity) and alluvium. The particle-tracking method of simulating radionuclide transport is incorporated in the finite-volume heat and mass transfer numerical

  4. The Sensitivity of Simulated Competition Between Different Plant Functional Types to Subgrid Scale Representation of Vegetation in a Land Surface Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, R. K.; Arora, V.; Melton, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Vegetation is a dynamic component of the earth system that affects weather and climate at hourly to centennial time scales. However, most current dynamic vegetation models do not explicitly simulate competition among Plant Functional Types (PFTs). Here we use the coupled CLASS-CTEM model (Canadian Land Surface Scheme coupled to Canadian Terrestrial Ecosystem Model) to explicitly simulate competition between nine PFTs for available space using a modified version of Lotka - Volterra (LV) predator-prey equations. The nine PFTs include evergreen and deciduous needleleaf trees, evergreen and cold and drought deciduous broadleaf trees and C3 and C4 crops and grasses. The CLASS-CTEM model can be configured either in the composite (single tile) or the mosaic (multiple tiles) mode. Our results show that the model is sensitive to the chosen mode. The simulated fractional coverage of PFTs are similar between two approaches at some locations whereas at the other locations the two approaches yield different results. The simulated fractional coverage of PFTs are also compared with the available observations-based estimates. Simulated results at selected locations across the globe show that the model is able to realistically simulate the fractional coverage of tree and grass PFTs and the bare fraction, as well as the fractional coverage of individual tree and grass PFTs. Along with the observed patterns of vegetation distribution the CLASS-CTEM modelling framework is also able to simulate realistic succession patterns. Some differences remain and these are attributed to the coarse spatial resolution of the model (~3.75°) and the limited number of PFTs represented in the model.

  5. Subgrid Parameterization of the Soil Moisture Storage Capacity for a Distributed Rainfall-Runoff Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijian Guo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Spatial variability plays an important role in nonlinear hydrologic processes. Due to the limitation of computational efficiency and data resolution, subgrid variability is usually assumed to be uniform for most grid-based rainfall-runoff models, which leads to the scale-dependence of model performances. In this paper, the scale effect on the Grid-Xinanjiang model was examined. The bias of the estimation of precipitation, runoff, evapotranspiration and soil moisture at the different grid scales, along with the scale-dependence of the effective parameters, highlights the importance of well representing the subgrid variability. This paper presents a subgrid parameterization method to incorporate the subgrid variability of the soil storage capacity, which is a key variable that controls runoff generation and partitioning in the Grid-Xinanjiang model. In light of the similar spatial pattern and physical basis, the soil storage capacity is correlated with the topographic index, whose spatial distribution can more readily be measured. A beta distribution is introduced to represent the spatial distribution of the soil storage capacity within the grid. The results derived from the Yanduhe Basin show that the proposed subgrid parameterization method can effectively correct the watershed soil storage capacity curve. Compared to the original Grid-Xinanjiang model, the model performances are quite consistent at the different grid scales when the subgrid variability is incorporated. This subgrid parameterization method reduces the recalibration necessity when the Digital Elevation Model (DEM resolution is changed. Moreover, it improves the potential for the application of the distributed model in the ungauged basin.

  6. Influence of Sub-grid-Scale Isentropic Transports on McRAS Evaluations using ARM-CART SCM Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.; Tao, W. K.

    2004-01-01

    In GCM-physics evaluations with the currently available ARM-CART SCM datasets, McRAS produced very similar character of near surface errors of simulated temperature and humidity containing typically warm and moist biases near the surface and cold and dry biases aloft. We argued it must have a common cause presumably rooted in the model physics. Lack of vertical adjustment of horizontal transport was thought to be a plausible source. Clearly, debarring such a freedom would force the incoming air to diffuse into the grid-cell which would naturally bias the surface air to become warm and moist while the upper air becomes cold and dry, a characteristic feature of McRAS biases. Since, the errors were significantly larger in the two winter cases that contain potentially more intense episodes of cold and warm advective transports, it further reaffirmed our argument and provided additional motivation to introduce the corrections. When the horizontal advective transports were suitably modified to allow rising and/or sinking following isentropic pathways of subgrid scale motions, the outcome was to cool and dry (or warm and moisten) the lower (or upper) levels. Ever, crude approximations invoking such a correction reduced the temperature and humidity biases considerably. The tests were performed on all the available ARM-CART SCM cases with consistent outcome. With the isentropic corrections implemented through two different numerical approximations, virtually similar benefits were derived further confirming the robustness of our inferences. These results suggest the need for insentropic advective transport adjustment in a GCM due to subgrid scale motions.

  7. Transport at basin scales: 2. Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rinaldo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the second of a series, we apply the models discussed in Part 1 to a significant case study. The nature of the catchment under study, the transport phenomena investigated (i.e. nitrates moving as solutes within runoff waters and the scales involved in space and time, provide an elaborate test for theory and applications. Comparison of modeling predictions with field data (i.e. fluxes of carrier flow and solute nitrates suggests that the framework proposed for geomorphic transport models is capable to describe well large-scale transport phenomena driven and/or controlled by spatially distributed hydrologic fields (e.g. rainfall patterns in space and time, drainage pathways, soil coverage and type, matter stored in immobile phases. A sample MonteCarlo mode of application of the model is also discussed where hydrologic forcings and external nitrate applications (through fertilization are treated as random processes.

  8. Time Scales, Bedforms and Bedload Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhont, B.

    2015-12-01

    Bedload transport rates in mountain streams may exhibit wide fluctuations even under constant flow conditions. A better understanding of bedload pulses is key to predict natural hazards induced by torrential activity and sediment issues in mountainous areas. Several processes such as bedforms migration, grain sorting and random particles' trajectories are evoked as the driving agents of pulse formation and development. Quantifying the effects of these processes is a difficult task. This work aims to investigate the interactions between bedload transport and bedform dynamics in steep gravel-bed rivers. Experiments are carried out in a 17-m long 60-cm wide flume inclined at an angle of 2.7%. The bed is initially flat and made of homogenous natural gravel with a mean diameter of 6 mm. We imposed 200 identical hydrographs (of 1 hr duration) at the flume inlet (the bed surface was not flattened out during these cycling floods). The input hydrograph and the input sediment discharge are nearly triangular. Bed topography is measured after each flood using ultrasound sensors while the bedload transport rate is steadily monitored at the outlet using accelerometers (accelerometers fixed on metallic plates record the impacts of the grains flowing out of the flume). For the sake of comparison, a similar experiment consisting of 19 floods of 10 hours is carried out under constant supply conditions. We show that accelerometers are a cost effective technique to obtain high-frequency bedload discharge data. Spectral analysis of the bedload timeseries is used to highlight the different time scales corresponding to different bedload transport processes. We show that long timeseries are necessary to capture the different processes that drive bedload transport, including the resilience time after a perturbation of the bed. The alternate bars that develop and migrate along the flume are found to significantly influence bedload transport rate fluctuations.

  9. Cloud-scale model intercomparison of chemical constituent transport in deep convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Barth

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Transport and scavenging of chemical constituents in deep convection is important to understanding the composition of the troposphere and therefore chemistry-climate and air quality issues. High resolution cloud chemistry models have been shown to represent convective processing of trace gases quite well. To improve the representation of sub-grid convective transport and wet deposition in large-scale models, general characteristics, such as species mass flux, from the high resolution cloud chemistry models can be used. However, it is important to understand how these models behave when simulating the same storm. The intercomparison described here examines transport of six species. CO and O3, which are primarily transported, show good agreement among models and compare well with observations. Models that included lightning production of NOx reasonably predict NOx mixing ratios in the anvil compared with observations, but the NOx variability is much larger than that seen for CO and O3. Predicted anvil mixing ratios of the soluble species, HNO3, H2O2, and CH2O, exhibit significant differences among models, attributed to different schemes in these models of cloud processing including the role of the ice phase, the impact of cloud-modified photolysis rates on the chemistry, and the representation of the species chemical reactivity. The lack of measurements of these species in the convective outflow region does not allow us to evaluate the model results with observations.

  10. Implementation Strategies for Large-Scale Transport Simulations Using Time Domain Particle Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, S.; Cvetkovic, V.; Mancillas, J.; Selroos, J.

    2008-12-01

    Time domain particle tracking is an emerging alternative to the conventional random walk particle tracking algorithm. With time domain particle tracking, particles are moved from node to node on one-dimensional pathways defined by streamlines of the groundwater flow field or by discrete subsurface features. The time to complete each deterministic segment is sampled from residence time distributions that include the effects of advection, longitudinal dispersion, a variety of kinetically controlled retention (sorption) processes, linear transformation, and temporal changes in groundwater velocities and sorption parameters. The simulation results in a set of arrival times at a monitoring location that can be post-processed with a kernel method to construct mass discharge (breakthrough) versus time. Implementation strategies differ for discrete flow (fractured media) systems and continuous porous media systems. The implementation strategy also depends on the scale at which hydraulic property heterogeneity is represented in the supporting flow model. For flow models that explicitly represent discrete features (e.g., discrete fracture networks), the sampling of residence times along segments is conceptually straightforward. For continuous porous media, such sampling needs to be related to the Lagrangian velocity field. Analytical or semi-analytical methods may be used to approximate the Lagrangian segment velocity distributions in aquifers with low-to-moderate variability, thereby capturing transport effects of subgrid velocity variability. If variability in hydraulic properties is large, however, Lagrangian velocity distributions are difficult to characterize and numerical simulations are required; in particular, numerical simulations are likely to be required for estimating the velocity integral scale as a basis for advective segment distributions. Aquifers with evolving heterogeneity scales present additional challenges. Large-scale simulations of radionuclide

  11. Scale-free transport in fusion plasmas: theory and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Raul [ORNL; Mier, Jose Angel [Universidad Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Newman, David E [University of Alaska; Carreras, Benjamin A [BACV Solutions, Inc., Oak Ridge; Garcia, Luis [Universidad Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Leboeuf, Jean-Noel [JNL Scientific, Inc., Casa Grande, AZ; Decyk, Viktor [University of California, Los Angeles

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach to detect the existence of scale-free transport in turbulent flows, based on the characterization of its Lagrangian characteristics, is presented and applied to two situations relevant for tokamak plasmas. The first one, radial transport in the presence of near-critical turbulence, has been known for quite some time to yield scale-free, superdiffusive transport. We use it to test the method and illustrate its robustness with respect to other approaches. The second situation, radial transport across radially-sheared poloidal zonal flows driven by turbulence via the Reynold stresses, is examined for the first time in this manner. The result is rather surprising and different from the traditionally assumed diffusive behavior. Instead, radial transport behaves instead in a scale-free, subdiffusive manner, which may have implications for the modeling of transport across transport barriers.

  12. Evaluation of the Transport and Diffusion of Pollutants over an Urban Area Using a Local-Scale Advection-Diffusion Model and a Sub-Grid Street Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salerno, R.; Vignati, E.

    1994-01-01

    Fifth International Conference on the Development and Application of Computer Techniques to Environmental Studies, Envirosoft/94.......Fifth International Conference on the Development and Application of Computer Techniques to Environmental Studies, Envirosoft/94....

  13. Efficient non-hydrostatic modelling of 3D wave-induced currents using a subgrid approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnsdorp, Dirk P.; Smit, Pieter B.; Zijlema, Marcel; Reniers, Ad J. H. M.

    2017-08-01

    Wave-induced currents are an ubiquitous feature in coastal waters that can spread material over the surf zone and the inner shelf. These currents are typically under resolved in non-hydrostatic wave-flow models due to computational constraints. Specifically, the low vertical resolutions adequate to describe the wave dynamics - and required to feasibly compute at the scales of a field site - are too coarse to account for the relevant details of the three-dimensional (3D) flow field. To describe the relevant dynamics of both wave and currents, while retaining a model framework that can be applied at field scales, we propose a two grid approach to solve the governing equations. With this approach, the vertical accelerations and non-hydrostatic pressures are resolved on a relatively coarse vertical grid (which is sufficient to accurately resolve the wave dynamics), whereas the horizontal velocities and turbulent stresses are resolved on a much finer subgrid (of which the resolution is dictated by the vertical scale of the mean flows). This approach ensures that the discrete pressure Poisson equation - the solution of which dominates the computational effort - is evaluated on the coarse grid scale, thereby greatly improving efficiency, while providing a fine vertical resolution to resolve the vertical variation of the mean flow. This work presents the general methodology, and discusses the numerical implementation in the SWASH wave-flow model. Model predictions are compared with observations of three flume experiments to demonstrate that the subgrid approach captures both the nearshore evolution of the waves, and the wave-induced flows like the undertow profile and longshore current. The accuracy of the subgrid predictions is comparable to fully resolved 3D simulations - but at much reduced computational costs. The findings of this work thereby demonstrate that the subgrid approach has the potential to make 3D non-hydrostatic simulations feasible at the scale of a

  14. A Note on Scale Economies in Transport

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tae Hoon Oum; Yimin Zhang

    1997-01-01

    .... Using the results previously obtained by Caves et al. (1984, 1985), and incorporating the estimated link between operating characteristics and scale of outputs, mildly increasing returns for the airline sample in Caves et al. (1984...

  15. Monte Carlo-based subgrid parameterization of vertical velocity and stratiform cloud microphysics in ECHAM5.5-HAM2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tonttila

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A new method for parameterizing the subgrid variations of vertical velocity and cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC is presented for general circulation models (GCMs. These parameterizations build on top of existing parameterizations that create stochastic subgrid cloud columns inside the GCM grid cells, which can be employed by the Monte Carlo independent column approximation approach for radiative transfer. The new model version adds a description for vertical velocity in individual subgrid columns, which can be used to compute cloud activation and the subgrid distribution of the number of cloud droplets explicitly. Autoconversion is also treated explicitly in the subcolumn space. This provides a consistent way of simulating the cloud radiative effects with two-moment cloud microphysical properties defined at subgrid scale. The primary impact of the new parameterizations is to decrease the CDNC over polluted continents, while over the oceans the impact is smaller. Moreover, the lower CDNC induces a stronger autoconversion of cloud water to rain. The strongest reduction in CDNC and cloud water content over the continental areas promotes weaker shortwave cloud radiative effects (SW CREs even after retuning the model. However, compared to the reference simulation, a slightly stronger SW CRE is seen e.g. over mid-latitude oceans, where CDNC remains similar to the reference simulation, and the in-cloud liquid water content is slightly increased after retuning the model.

  16. A Sparse Multi-Scale Algorithm for Dense Optimal Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitzer, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Discrete optimal transport solvers do not scale well on dense large problems since they do not explicitly exploit the geometric structure of the cost function. In analogy to continuous optimal transport, we provide a framework to verify global optimality of a discrete transport plan locally. This allows the construction of an algorithm to solve large dense problems by considering a sequence of sparse problems instead. The algorithm lends itself to being combined with a...

  17. Reactive/Adsorptive transport in (partially-) saturated porous media: from pore scale to core scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raoof, A.

    2011-01-01

    Pore-scale modeling provides opportunities to study transport phenomena in fundamental ways because detailed information is available at the microscopic pore scale. This offers the best hope for bridging the traditional gap that exists between pore scale and macro (lab) scale description of the

  18. Visualization and modeling of smoke transport over landscape scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn P. Forney; William Mell

    2007-01-01

    Computational tools have been developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for modeling fire spread and smoke transport. These tools have been adapted to address fire scenarios that occur in the wildland urban interface (WUI) over kilometer-scale distances. These models include the smoke plume transport model ALOFT (A Large Open Fire plume...

  19. Unsteady Flame Embedding (UFE) Subgrid Model for Turbulent Premixed Combustion Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    El-Asrag, Hossam

    2010-01-04

    We present a formulation for an unsteady subgrid model for premixed combustion in the flamelet regime. Since chemistry occurs at the unresolvable scales, it is necessary to introduce a subgrid model that accounts for the multi-scale nature of the problem using the information available on the resolved scales. Most of the current models are based on the laminar flamelet concept, and often neglect the unsteady effects. The proposed model\\'s primary objective is to encompass many of the flame/turbulence interactions unsteady features and history effects. In addition it provides a dynamic and accurate approach for computing the subgrid flame propagation velocity. The unsteady flame embedding approach (UFE) treats the flame as an ensemble of locally one-dimensional flames. A set of elemental one dimensional flames is used to describe the turbulent flame structure at the subgrid level. The stretched flame calculations are performed on the stagnation line of a strained flame using the unsteady filtered strain rate computed from the resolved- grid. The flame iso-surface is tracked using an accurate high-order level set formulation to propagate the flame interface at the coarse resolution with minimum numerical diffusion. In this paper the solver and the model components are introduced and used to investigate two unsteady flames with different Lewis numbers in the thin reaction zone regime. The results show that the UFE model captures the unsteady flame-turbulence interactions and the flame propagation speed reasonably well. Higher propagation speed is observed for the lower than unity Lewis number flame because of the impact of differential diffusion.

  20. Highly Scalable Trip Grouping for Large Scale Collective Transportation Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gidofalvi, Gyozo; Pedersen, Torben Bach; Risch, Tore

    2008-01-01

    Transportation-related problems, like road congestion, parking, and pollution, are increasing in most cities. In order to reduce traffic, recent work has proposed methods for vehicle sharing, for example for sharing cabs by grouping "closeby" cab requests and thus minimizing transportation cost...... and utilizing cab space. However, the methods published so far do not scale to large data volumes, which is necessary to facilitate large-scale collective transportation systems, e.g., ride-sharing systems for large cities. This paper presents highly scalable trip grouping algorithms, which generalize previous...

  1. Discontinuous Galerkin Subgrid Finite Element Method for Heterogeneous Brinkman’s Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Iliev, Oleg P.

    2010-01-01

    We present a two-scale finite element method for solving Brinkman\\'s equations with piece-wise constant coefficients. This system of equations model fluid flows in highly porous, heterogeneous media with complex topology of the heterogeneities. We make use of the recently proposed discontinuous Galerkin FEM for Stokes equations by Wang and Ye in [12] and the concept of subgrid approximation developed for Darcy\\'s equations by Arbogast in [4]. In order to reduce the error along the coarse-grid interfaces we have added a alternating Schwarz iteration using patches around the coarse-grid boundaries. We have implemented the subgrid method using Deal.II FEM library, [7], and we present the computational results for a number of model problems. © 2010 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  2. A new downscaling method for sub-grid turbulence modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Rottner

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study we explore a new way to model sub-grid turbulence using particle systems. The ability of particle systems to model small-scale turbulence is evaluated using high-resolution numerical simulations. These high-resolution data are averaged to produce a coarse-grid velocity field, which is then used to drive a complete particle-system-based downscaling. Wind fluctuations and turbulent kinetic energy are compared between the particle simulations and the high-resolution simulation. Despite the simplicity of the physical model used to drive the particles, the results show that the particle system is able to represent the average field. It is shown that this system is able to reproduce much finer turbulent structures than the numerical high-resolution simulations. In addition, this study provides an estimate of the effective spatial and temporal resolution of the numerical models. This highlights the need for higher-resolution simulations in order to evaluate the very fine turbulent structures predicted by the particle systems. Finally, a study of the influence of the forcing scale on the particle system is presented.

  3. Field-scale variation in colloid dispersibility and transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard, Trine; Moldrup, P.; Ferre´, T. P A

    2014-01-01

    risk of colloid-facilitated transport. Subsequently, using multiple linear regression (MLR) analyses, soil dispersibility was predicted at all three sample scales from the 24 measured, geo-referenced parameters to produce sets of only a few promising indicator parameters for evaluating soil stability...... and particle mobilization on field scale. The MLR analyses at each scale were separated in predictions using all, only north, and only south locations in the field. We found that different independent variables were included in the regression models when the sample scale increased from aggregate to column...... level. Generally, the predictive power of the regression models was better on the 1-2 mm aggregate scale than on the intact 100 cm3 and 20 cm × 20 cm scales. Overall, results suggested that different drivers controlled soil dispersibility 1 at the three scales and the two sub-areas of the field...

  4. LARGE-SCALE CO2 TRANSPORTATION AND DEEP OCEAN SEQUESTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamid Sarv

    1999-03-01

    Technical and economical feasibility of large-scale CO{sub 2} transportation and ocean sequestration at depths of 3000 meters or grater was investigated. Two options were examined for transporting and disposing the captured CO{sub 2}. In one case, CO{sub 2} was pumped from a land-based collection center through long pipelines laid on the ocean floor. Another case considered oceanic tanker transport of liquid carbon dioxide to an offshore floating structure for vertical injection to the ocean floor. In the latter case, a novel concept based on subsurface towing of a 3000-meter pipe, and attaching it to the offshore structure was considered. Budgetary cost estimates indicate that for distances greater than 400 km, tanker transportation and offshore injection through a 3000-meter vertical pipe provides the best method for delivering liquid CO{sub 2} to deep ocean floor depressions. For shorter distances, CO{sub 2} delivery by parallel-laid, subsea pipelines is more cost-effective. Estimated costs for 500-km transport and storage at a depth of 3000 meters by subsea pipelines and tankers were 1.5 and 1.4 dollars per ton of stored CO{sub 2}, respectively. At these prices, economics of ocean disposal are highly favorable. Future work should focus on addressing technical issues that are critical to the deployment of a large-scale CO{sub 2} transportation and disposal system. Pipe corrosion, structural design of the transport pipe, and dispersion characteristics of sinking CO{sub 2} effluent plumes have been identified as areas that require further attention. Our planned activities in the next Phase include laboratory-scale corrosion testing, structural analysis of the pipeline, analytical and experimental simulations of CO{sub 2} discharge and dispersion, and the conceptual economic and engineering evaluation of large-scale implementation.

  5. Scaling of flow and transport behavior in heterogeneous groundwater systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibe, Timothy; Yabusaki, Steven

    1998-11-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations using a detailed synthetic hydraulic conductivity field developed from geological considerations provide insight into the scaling of subsurface flow and transport processes. Flow and advective transport in the highly resolved heterogeneous field were modeled using massively parallel computers, providing a realistic baseline for evaluation of the impacts of parameter scaling. Upscaling of hydraulic conductivity was performed at a variety of scales using a flexible power law averaging technique. A series of tests were performed to determine the effects of varying the scaling exponent on a number of metrics of flow and transport behavior. Flow and transport simulation on high-performance computers and three-dimensional scientific visualization combine to form a powerful tool for gaining insight into the behavior of complex heterogeneous systems. Many quantitative groundwater models utilize upscaled hydraulic conductivity parameters, either implicitly or explicitly. These parameters are designed to reproduce the bulk flow characteristics at the grid or field scale while not requiring detailed quantification of local-scale conductivity variations. An example from applied groundwater modeling is the common practice of calibrating grid-scale model hydraulic conductivity or transmissivity parameters so as to approximate observed hydraulic head and boundary flux values. Such parameterizations, perhaps with a bulk dispersivity imposed, are then sometimes used to predict transport of reactive or non-reactive solutes. However, this work demonstrates that those parameters that lead to the best upscaling for hydraulic conductivity and head do not necessarily correspond to the best upscaling for prediction of a variety of transport behaviors. This result reflects the fact that transport is strongly impacted by the existence and connectedness of extreme-valued hydraulic conductivities, in contrast to bulk flow which depends more strongly on

  6. A Fast and Accurate Scheme for Sea Ice Dynamics with a Stochastic Subgrid Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seinen, C.; Khouider, B.

    2016-12-01

    Sea ice physics is a very complex process occurring over a wide range of scales; such as local melting or large scale drift. At the current grid resolution of Global Climate Models (GCMs), we are able to resolve large scale sea ice dynamics but uncertainty remains due to subgrid physics and potential dynamic feedback, especially due to the formation of melt ponds. Recent work in atmospheric science has shown success of Markov Jump stochastic subgrid models in the representation of clouds and convection and their feedback into the large scales. There has been a push to implement these methods in other parts of the Earth System and for the cryosphere in particular but in order to test these methods, efficient and accurate solvers are required for the resolved large scale sea-ice dynamics. We present a second order accurate scheme, in both time and space, for the sea ice momentum equation (SIME) with a Jacobian Free Newton Krylov (JFNK) solver. SIME is a highly nonlinear equation due to sea ice rheology terms appearing in the stress tensor. The most commonly accepted formulation, introduced by Hibler, allows sea-ice to resist significant stresses in compression but significantly less in tension. The relationship also leads to large changes in internal stresses from small changes in velocity fields. These non-linearities have resulted in the use of implicit methods for SIME and a JFNK solver was recently introduced and used to gain efficiency. However, the method used so far is only first order accurate in time. Here we expand the JFNK approach to a Crank-Nicholson discretization of SIME. This fully second order scheme is achieved with no increase in computational cost and will allow efficient testing and development of subgrid stochastic models of sea ice in the near future.

  7. Continuous phosphorus measurements reveal catchment-scale transport processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, Y. van der; Rozemeijer, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    A small fraction of the nutrients used for agriculture is transported by rivers and artificial drainage networks to downstream waters. In lakes and coastal seas such as the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Mexico these nutrients cause large-scale algal blooms and hypoxia and thus are a major

  8. Scaling and predicting solute transport processes in streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. González-Pinzón; R. Haggerty; M. Dentz

    2013-01-01

    We investigated scaling of conservative solute transport using temporal moment analysis of 98 tracer experiments (384 breakthrough curves) conducted in 44 streams located on five continents. The experiments span 7 orders of magnitude in discharge (10-3 to 103 m3/s), span 5 orders of magnitude in...

  9. Scaling of geochemical reaction rates via advective solute transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, A G; Ghanbarian, B; Skinner, T E; Ewing, R P

    2015-07-01

    Transport in porous media is quite complex, and still yields occasional surprises. In geological porous media, the rate at which chemical reactions (e.g., weathering and dissolution) occur is found to diminish by orders of magnitude with increasing time or distance. The temporal rates of laboratory experiments and field observations differ, and extrapolating from laboratory experiments (in months) to field rates (in millions of years) can lead to order-of-magnitude errors. The reactions are transport-limited, but characterizing them using standard solute transport expressions can yield results in agreement with experiment only if spurious assumptions and parameters are introduced. We previously developed a theory of non-reactive solute transport based on applying critical path analysis to the cluster statistics of percolation. The fractal structure of the clusters can be used to generate solute distributions in both time and space. Solute velocities calculated from the temporal evolution of that distribution have the same time dependence as reaction-rate scaling in a wide range of field studies and laboratory experiments, covering some 10 decades in time. The present theory thus both explains a wide range of experiments, and also predicts changes in the scaling behavior in individual systems with increasing time and/or length scales. No other theory captures these variations in scaling by invoking a single physical mechanism. Because the successfully predicted chemical reactions include known results for silicate weathering rates, our theory provides a framework for understanding changes in the global carbon cycle, including its effects on extinctions, climate change, soil production, and denudation rates. It further provides a basis for understanding the fundamental time scales of hydrology and shallow geochemistry, as well as the basis of industrial agriculture.

  10. Membranes for nanometer-scale mass fast transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakajin, Olgica [San Leandro, CA; Holt, Jason [Berkeley, CA; Noy, Aleksandr [Belmont, CA; Park, Hyung Gyu [Oakland, CA

    2011-10-18

    Nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material were fabricated for fluid mechanics and mass transfer studies on the nanometer scale and commercial applications. Average pore size can be 2 nm to 20 nm, or seven nm or less, or two nanometers or less. The membrane can be free of large voids spanning the membrane such that transport of material such as gas or liquid occurs exclusively through the tubes. Fast fluid, vapor, and liquid transport are observed. Versatile micromachining methods can be used for membrane fabrication. A single chip can comprise multiple membranes. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  11. A distributed Grid-Xinanjiang model with integration of subgrid variability of soil storage capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-jian Guo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Realistic hydrological response is sensitive to the spatial variability of landscape properties. For a grid-based distributed rainfall-runoff model with a hypothesis of a uniform grid, the high-frequency information within a grid cell will be gradually lost as the resolution of the digital elevation model (DEM grows coarser. Therefore, the performance of a hydrological model is usually scale-dependent. This study used the Grid-Xinanjiang (GXAJ model as an example to investigate the effects of subgrid variability on hydrological response at different scales. With the aim of producing a more reasonable hydrological response and spatial description of the landscape properties, a new distributed rainfall-runoff model integrating the subgrid variability (the GXAJSV model was developed. In this model, the topographic index is used as an auxiliary variable correlated with the soil storage capacity. The incomplete beta distribution is suggested for simulating the probability distribution of the soil storage capacity within the raster grid. The Yaogu Basin in China was selected for model calibration and validation at different spatial scales. Results demonstrated that the proposed model can effectively eliminate the scale dependence of the GXAJ model and produce a more reasonable hydrological response.

  12. Impact of large scale flows on turbulent transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarazin, Y [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC centre de Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Grandgirard, V [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC centre de Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Dif-Pradalier, G [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC centre de Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Fleurence, E [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC centre de Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Garbet, X [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC centre de Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Ghendrih, Ph [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC centre de Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Bertrand, P [LPMIA-Universite Henri Poincare Nancy I, Boulevard des Aiguillettes BP239, 54506 Vandoe uvre-les-Nancy (France); Besse, N [LPMIA-Universite Henri Poincare Nancy I, Boulevard des Aiguillettes BP239, 54506 Vandoe uvre-les-Nancy (France); Crouseilles, N [IRMA, UMR 7501 CNRS/Universite Louis Pasteur, 7 rue Rene Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Sonnendruecker, E [IRMA, UMR 7501 CNRS/Universite Louis Pasteur, 7 rue Rene Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Latu, G [LSIIT, UMR 7005 CNRS/Universite Louis Pasteur, Bd Sebastien Brant BP10413, 67412 Illkirch (France); Violard, E [LSIIT, UMR 7005 CNRS/Universite Louis Pasteur, Bd Sebastien Brant BP10413, 67412 Illkirch (France)

    2006-12-15

    The impact of large scale flows on turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas is explored by means of various kinetic models. Zonal flows are found to lead to a non-linear upshift of turbulent transport in a 3D kinetic model for interchange turbulence. Such a transition is absent from fluid simulations, performed with the same numerical tool, which also predict a much larger transport. The discrepancy cannot be explained by zonal flows only, despite they being overdamped in fluids. Indeed, some difference remains, although reduced, when they are artificially suppressed. Zonal flows are also reported to trigger transport barriers in a 4D drift-kinetic model for slab ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence. The density gradient acts as a source drive for zonal flows, while their curvature back stabilizes the turbulence. Finally, 5D simulations of toroidal ITG modes with the global and full-f GYSELA code require the equilibrium density function to depend on the motion invariants only. If not, the generated strong mean flows can completely quench turbulent transport.

  13. Combination of Lidar Elevations, Bathymetric Data, and Urban Infrastructure in a Sub-Grid Model for Predicting Inundation in New York City during Hurricane Sandy

    CERN Document Server

    Loftis, Jon Derek; Hamilton, Stuart E; Forrest, David R

    2014-01-01

    We present the geospatial methods in conjunction with results of a newly developed storm surge and sub-grid inundation model which was applied in New York City during Hurricane Sandy in 2012. Sub-grid modeling takes a novel approach for partial wetting and drying within grid cells, eschewing the conventional hydrodynamic modeling method by nesting a sub-grid containing high-resolution lidar topography and fine scale bathymetry within each computational grid cell. In doing so, the sub-grid modeling method is heavily dependent on building and street configuration provided by the DEM. The results of spatial comparisons between the sub-grid model and FEMA's maximum inundation extents in New York City yielded an unparalleled absolute mean distance difference of 38m and an average of 75% areal spatial match. An in-depth error analysis reveals that the modeled extent contour is well correlated with the FEMA extent contour in most areas, except in several distinct areas where differences in special features cause sig...

  14. Scaling and predicting solute transport processes in riverine ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Pinzon, R.; Haggerty, R.; Camacho Botero, L. A.

    2012-12-01

    In the last three decades, research on solute transport and nutrient processing has revealed complex interactions between landscapes and stream ecosystems, and numerous attempts to scale and predict these processes have been primarily limited by the difficulty of measuring and extrapolating hydrodynamic and geomorphic characteristics. We hypothesize that there should be predictable patterns in the way that streams interact with their landscapes, because those interactions are in the form of energy, mass and momentum, which are conservative and interrelated properties. Therefore, despite local hydrogeomorphic characteristics define the actual extent of solute transport processes in a given riverine ecosystem, the physical imprints marked-up in breakthrough curves (BTCs) should have scaling properties. To evaluate our hypothesis we created an extensive database that includes 133 BTCs from conservative tracer experiments conducted under different hydrologic conditions (1 lt/s to 1197 m3/s), different experimental conditions (10s of meters to 10s of kilometers), different geographic positions (South and North America, Europe, Australia, Antarctica), and different types of lotic environments, i.e., urban manmade channels, forested headwater streams, desert-like streams, hyporheic wells, and major rivers. We investigated the existence of patterns in conservative solute transport using a model-independent approach, i.e., temporal moments of the histories of tracer experiments. Our results show that the normalized first absolute moment is correlated with the second and third moments with R2>0.99 for all riverine ecosystems. Most importantly, the first central temporal moment of the distributions (mean travel time) is correlated with the second (variance) with an R2>0.93, and the correlation between the second central moment and the third central moment (skewness) takes the form of the coefficient of skewness (CSK) with an R2>0.98, defining a statistically averaged CSK= 1

  15. Scaling behaviour for the water transport in nanoconfined geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavazzo, Eliodoro; Fasano, Matteo; Asinari, Pietro; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2014-04-01

    The transport of water in nanoconfined geometries is different from bulk phase and has tremendous implications in nanotechnology and biotechnology. Here molecular dynamics is used to compute the self-diffusion coefficient D of water within nanopores, around nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes and proteins. For almost 60 different cases, D is found to scale linearly with the sole parameter θ as D(θ)=DB[1+(DC/DB-1)θ], with DB and DC the bulk and totally confined diffusion of water, respectively. The parameter θ is primarily influenced by geometry and represents the ratio between the confined and total water volumes. The D(θ) relationship is interpreted within the thermodynamics of supercooled water. As an example, such relationship is shown to accurately predict the relaxometric response of contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. The D(θ) relationship can help in interpreting the transport of water molecules under nanoconfined conditions and tailoring nanostructures with precise modulation of water mobility.

  16. Cost Overruns in Large-scale Transportation Infrastructure Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantarelli, Chantal C; Flyvbjerg, Bent; Molin, Eric J. E

    2010-01-01

    Managing large-scale transportation infrastructure projects is difficult due to frequent misinformation about the costs which results in large cost overruns that often threaten the overall project viability. This paper investigates the explanations for cost overruns that are given in the literature....... Overall, four categories of explanations can be distinguished: technical, economic, psychological, and political. Political explanations have been seen to be the most dominant explanations for cost overruns. Agency theory is considered the most interesting for political explanations and an eclectic theory...

  17. Two-scale approach to oscillatory singularly perturbed transport equations

    CERN Document Server

    Frénod, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the classical results of the two-scale convergence theory and explains – using several figures – why it works. It then shows how to use this theory to homogenize ordinary differential equations with oscillating coefficients as well as oscillatory singularly perturbed ordinary differential equations. In addition, it explores the homogenization of hyperbolic partial differential equations with oscillating coefficients and linear oscillatory singularly perturbed hyperbolic partial differential equations. Further, it introduces readers to the two-scale numerical methods that can be built from the previous approaches to solve oscillatory singularly perturbed transport equations (ODE and hyperbolic PDE) and demonstrates how they can be used efficiently. This book appeals to master’s and PhD students interested in homogenization and numerics, as well as to the Iter community.

  18. Upscaling of nanoparticle transport in porous media under unfavorable conditions: Pore scale to Darcy scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetha, N.; Raoof, Amir; Mohan Kumar, M. S.; Majid Hassanizadeh, S.

    2017-05-01

    Transport and deposition of nanoparticles in porous media is a multi-scale problem governed by several pore-scale processes, and hence, it is critical to link the processes at pore scale to the Darcy-scale behavior. In this study, using pore network modeling, we develop correlation equations for deposition rate coefficients for nanoparticle transport under unfavorable conditions at the Darcy scale based on pore-scale mechanisms. The upscaling tool is a multi-directional pore-network model consisting of an interconnected network of pores with variable connectivities. Correlation equations describing the pore-averaged deposition rate coefficients under unfavorable conditions in a cylindrical pore, developed in our earlier studies, are employed for each pore element. Pore-network simulations are performed for a wide range of parameter values to obtain the breakthrough curves of nanoparticle concentration. The latter is fitted with macroscopic 1-D advection-dispersion equation with a two-site linear reversible deposition accounting for both equilibrium and kinetic sorption. This leads to the estimation of three Darcy-scale deposition coefficients: distribution coefficient, kinetic rate constant, and the fraction of equilibrium sites. The correlation equations for the Darcy-scale deposition coefficients, under unfavorable conditions, are provided as a function of measurable Darcy-scale parameters, including: porosity, mean pore throat radius, mean pore water velocity, nanoparticle radius, ionic strength, dielectric constant, viscosity, temperature, and surface potentials of the particle and grain surfaces. The correlation equations are found to be consistent with the available experimental results, and in qualitative agreement with Colloid Filtration Theory for all parameters, except for the mean pore water velocity and nanoparticle radius.

  19. Acceleration of inertial particles in wall bounded flows: DNS and LES with stochastic modelling of the subgrid acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamansky, Remi; Vinkovic, Ivana; Gorokhovski, Mikhael, E-mail: ivana.vinkovic@univ-lyonl.fr [Laboratoire de Mecanique des Fluides et d' Acoustique CNRS UMR 5509 Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36, av. Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully Cedex (France)

    2011-12-22

    Inertial particle acceleration statistics are analyzed using DNS for turbulent channel flow. Along with effects recognized in homogeneous isotropic turbulence, an additional effect is observed due to high and low speed vortical structures aligned with the channel wall. In response to those structures, particles with moderate inertia experience strong longitudinal acceleration variations. DNS is also used in order to assess LES-SSAM (Subgrid Stochastic Acceleration Model), in which an approximation to the instantaneous non-filtered velocity field is given by simulation of both, filtered and residual, accelerations. This approach allow to have access to the intermittency of the flow at subgrid scale. Advantages of LES-SSAM in predicting particle dynamics in the channel flow at a high Reynolds number are shown.

  20. Simulation of Flow and Transport at the Micro (Pore) Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trebotich, D; Miller, G H

    2007-04-05

    An important problem in porous media involves the ability of micron and submicron-sized biological particles such as viruses or bacteria to move in groundwater systems through geologic media characterized by rock or mixed gravel, clay and sand materials. Current simulation capabilities require properly upscaled (continuum) models of colloidal filtration and adsorption to augment existing theories of fluid flow and chemical transport. Practical models typically address flow and transport behavior in aquifers over distances of 1 to 10 km where, for example, fluid momentum balance is governed by the simple Darcy's Law as a function of a pressure gradient, elevation gradient and a medium-dependent permeability parameter. In addition to fluid advection, there are multiple transport processes occurring in these systems including diffusion, dispersion and chemical interactions with solids or other aqueous chemical species. Particle transport is typically modeled in the same way as dissolved species, except that additional loss terms are incorporated to model particle filtration (physical interception), adsorption (chemical interception) and inactivation. Proper resolution of these processes at the porous medium continuum scale constitutes an important closure problem in subsurface science. We present a new simulation capability based on enabling technologies developed for microfluidics applications to model transport of colloidal-sized particles at the microscale, with relevance to the pore scale in geophysical subsurface systems. Particulate is represented by a bead-rod polymer model and is fully-coupled to a Newtonian solvent described by Navier-Stokes. Finite differences are used to discretize the interior of the domain; a Cartesian grid embedded boundary/volume-of-fluid method is used near boundaries and interfaces. This approach to complex geometry is amenable to direct simulation on grids obtained from surface extractions of tomographic image data. Short

  1. Synoptic-scale dust transport events in the southern Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchi, R.; Cristofanelli, P.; Marinoni, A.; Bourcier, L.; Laj, P.; Calzolari, F.; Adhikary, B.; Verza, G. P.; Vuillermoz, E.; Bonasoni, P.

    2014-06-01

    The variability of long-range dust transport events observed in the southern Himalaya and its relation with source areas have been studied thanks to five years’ continuous measurements which were carried out at the “Nepal Climate Observatory-Pyramid” (NCO-P, 27°57‧N, 86°48‧E), the highest Northern Hemisphere GAW-WMO global station sited at 5079 m a.s.l. in the high Khumbu valley (Nepal) on the southern Himalaya. During the period March 2006-February 2011, the analyses of the aerosol particle concentrations and LAGRANTO three-dimensional backward trajectories indicated the occurrence of 275 days affected by synoptic-scale dust transport, which account for 22.2% of the investigated period. The frequency of dust transport days (DTDs) showed a clear seasonal cycle, with the highest seasonal value observed during pre-monsoon season (33.5% of the pre-monsoon’s days are DTDs). Large enhancements in coarse aerosol number concentration N1-10 (average: +689%) and mass PM1-10 (average: +1086%) were observed during the dust transport events as compared to the days without dust (dust-free days, DFDs). In addition, the single scattering albedo (SSA) also showed higher values, ranging from 0.87 to 0.90, during DTDs with respect to DFDs (0.80-0.87). The predominant source of mineral dust reaching the measurement site was identified in the arid regions of the north-western Indian subcontinent (Thar desert), which accounted for 41.6% of the trajectories points associated with DTDs. Seasonal analysis also indicated that the winter season was significantly influenced by far western desert regions, such as North Africa and the Arabic Peninsula.

  2. Autonomous Operation of Hybrid Microgrid With AC and DC Subgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang Loh, Poh; Li, Ding; Kang Chai, Yi

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates on power-sharing issues of an autonomous hybrid microgrid. Unlike existing microgrids which are purely ac, the hybrid microgrid studied here comprises dc and ac subgrids interconnected by power electronic interfaces. The main challenge here is to manage power flows among all...... converters. Suitable control and normalization schemes are now developed for controlling them with the overall hybrid microgrid performance already verified in simulation and experiment....

  3. Operational forecasting with the subgrid technique on the Elbe Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehili, Aissa

    2017-04-01

    Modern remote sensing technologies can deliver very detailed land surface height data that should be considered for more accurate simulations. In that case, and even if some compromise is made with regard to grid resolution of an unstructured grid, simulations still will require large grids which can be computationally very demanding. The subgrid technique, first published by Casulli (2009), is based on the idea of making use of the available detailed subgrid bathymetric information while performing computations on relatively coarse grids permitting large time steps. Consequently, accuracy and efficiency are drastically enhanced if compared to the classical linear method, where the underlying bathymetry is solely discretized by the computational grid. The algorithm guarantees rigorous mass conservation and nonnegative water depths for any time step size. Computational grid-cells are permitted to be wet, partially wet or dry and no drying threshold is needed. The subgrid technique is used in an operational forecast model for water level, current velocity, salinity and temperature of the Elbe estuary in Germany. Comparison is performed with the comparatively highly resolved classical unstructured grid model UnTRIM. The daily meteorological forcing data are delivered by the German Weather Service (DWD) using the ICON-EU model. Open boundary data are delivered by the coastal model BSHcmod of the German Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency (BSH). Comparison of predicted water levels between classical and subgrid model shows a very good agreement. The speedup in computational performance due to the use of the subgrid technique is about a factor of 20. A typical daily forecast can be carried out within less than 10 minutes on standard PC-like hardware. The model is capable of permanently delivering highly resolved temporal and spatial information on water level, current velocity, salinity and temperature for the whole estuary. The model offers also the possibility to

  4. Structures, profile consistency, and transport scaling in electrostatic convection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bian, N.H.; Garcia, O.E.

    2005-01-01

    that for interchange modes, profile consistency is in fact due to mixing by persistent large-scale convective cells. This mechanism is not a turbulent diffusion, cannot occur in collisionless systems, and is the analog of the well-known laminar "magnetic flux expulsion" in magneiohydrodynamics. This expulsion process...... involves a "pinch" across closed streamlines and further results in the formation of pressure fingers along the-separatrix of the convective cells. By nature, these coherent structures are dissipative because the mixing process that leads to their formation relies on a finite amount of collisional...... diffusion. Numerical simulations of two-dimensional interchange modes confirm the role of laminar expulsion by convective cells, for profile consistency and structure formation. They also show that the fingerlike pressure structures ultimately control the rate of heat transport across the plasma layer...

  5. The sediment and phosphorus transport in a large scale study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Miroslav; Krása, Josef; Dostál, Tomáš; Jáchymová, Barbora

    2017-04-01

    In the name of the Water framework directive (2000/60/ES), there exists the demand to improve quality of water bodies. Basically, pollution of the flowing or stagnant water bodies comes from point and diffuse sources. To find the balance of point (mainly urban areas) and diffuse sources (drainage - N and soil erosion and sediment transport - P) in the scale of Moldau catchment is the task of the project. The area of interest is Moldau river catchment (29.500 km2) has been modelled with fully distributed approach of the WaTEM/SEDEM model. The model estimates the soil erosion as well as sediment a phosphorus transport through the river network. The results are combined with estimation of bounded nitrogen originated from drainage systems in agricultural landscape. The modelling has been done within three levels of accuracy. The simulation scale itself is defined by 10 m elements resolution with critical points net each approximately 300m in the river net (116.000 points). Subsequently, results were aggregated for sub-catchments of 4th order (ca 5 - 15 km2 each = almost 3000 individual sub-catchments) and sub-catchments of 3rd order = ca 400 sub-catchments). Each water reservoir in the system (larger than 0.25 hectares in the area) has been included, which count more than 12.000 reservoirs. The presented approach will be further use by Moldau river catchment managers for the planning of protection and elimination of the pollution in Moldau river catchment. This will lead to localize 3000 highly endangered hot spots which threaten the water bodies significantly. In this localities a detailed modelling and designing of the protection will be done. The research activities had been supported by QJ330118, SGS14/180/OHK1/3T/11, SGS17/090/OHK1/3T/11 grants.

  6. Riverbank filtration: comparison of pilot scale transport with theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vishal; Johnson, W P; Shafieian, P; Ryu, H; Alum, A; Abbaszadegan, M; Hubbs, S A; Rauch-Williams, T

    2009-02-01

    Pilot-scale column experiments were conducted in this study using natural soil and river water from Ohio river to assess the removal of microbes of size ranging over 2 orders of magnitude, i.e., viruses (0.025-0.065 microm), bacteria (1-2 microm), and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts (4-7 microm) under conditions representing normal operation and flood scour events. Among these different organisms, the bacterial indicators were transported over the longest distances and highest concentrations; whereas much greater retention was observed for smaller (i.e., viral indicators) and larger (i.e., Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts) microbes. These results are in qualitative agreement with colloid filtration theory (CFT) which predicts the least removal for micrometer size colloids, suggesting that the respective sizes of the organisms was a dominant control on their transport despite expected differences in their surface characteristics. Increased fluid velocity coupled with decreased ionic strength (representative of major flood events) decreased colloid retention, also in qualitative agreement with CFT. The retention of organisms occurred disproportionately near the source relative to the log-linear expectations of CFT, and this was true both in the presence and absence of a colmation zone, suggesting that microbial removal by the RBF system is not necessarily vulnerable to flood scour of the colmation zone.

  7. Characterization and scaling of the tokamak edge transport barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Philip Adrian

    2012-04-24

    scaling for {tau} {sub E,ped} are nearly identical to the IPB98 global confinement scaling. This strongly suggests a significant pedestal contribution to the global confinement. The extrapolations result in a global confinement time of 3 s for ITER which is at the lower end of the IPB98 scaling. The pedestal real space gradients show a very strong correlation with the pedestal top values. The trend is particularly pronounced for T{sub e} and shows no deviation due to other parameters. The gradients in {Psi}{sub N} coordinates shows no such correlation. The normalized pressure gradient {alpha}, which is important for the pedestal stability, has a strong correlation with the normalized pressure and with the plasma shape. The plasma shape plays an important role for the pedestal which can have significant impact on the extrapolations. The presented study confirms that the pedestal cannot be described by a unifying theory. The different observations favour various mechanisms. The pedestal top values of electron and ion temperature and density can be individually transport limited, but together they can still reach the peeling-ballooning stability limit. At the same time the pedestal widths of temperature and density scale individually.

  8. How uncertainty in socio-economic variables affects large-scale transport model forecasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manzo, Stefano; Nielsen, Otto Anker; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    time, especially with respect to large-scale transport models. The study described in this paper contributes to fill the gap by investigating the effects of uncertainty in socio-economic variables growth rate projections on large-scale transport model forecasts, using the Danish National Transport...

  9. Large scale Wyoming transportation data: a resource planning tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Michael S.; Fancher, Tammy S.; Freeman, Aaron T.; Ziegler, Abra E.; Bowen, Zachary H.; Aldridge, Cameron L.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Fort Collins Science Center created statewide roads data for the Bureau of Land Management Wyoming State Office using 2009 aerial photography from the National Agriculture Imagery Program. The updated roads data resolves known concerns of omission, commission, and inconsistent representation of map scale, attribution, and ground reference dates which were present in the original source data. To ensure a systematic and repeatable approach of capturing roads on the landscape using on-screen digitizing from true color National Agriculture Imagery Program imagery, we developed a photogrammetry key and quality assurance/quality control protocols. Therefore, the updated statewide roads data will support the Bureau of Land Management’s resource management requirements with a standardized map product representing 2009 ground conditions. The updated Geographic Information System roads data set product, represented at 1:4,000 and +/- 10 meters spatial accuracy, contains 425,275 kilometers within eight attribute classes. The quality control of these products indicated a 97.7 percent accuracy of aspatial information and 98.0 percent accuracy of spatial locations. Approximately 48 percent of the updated roads data was corrected for spatial errors of greater than 1 meter relative to the pre-existing road data. Twenty-six percent of the updated roads involved correcting spatial errors of greater than 5 meters and 17 percent of the updated roads involved correcting spatial errors of greater than 9 meters. The Bureau of Land Management, other land managers, and researchers can use these new statewide roads data set products to support important studies and management decisions regarding land use changes, transportation and planning needs, transportation safety, wildlife applications, and other studies.

  10. Monitoring Large-Scale Sediment Transport Dynamics with Multibeam Sonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, D. R.; Simmons, S. M.; Best, J. L.; Keevil, G. M.; Oberg, K.; Czuba, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    Multibeam Echo-Sounder systems have developed rapidly over recent decades and are routinely deployed to provide high-resolution bathymetric information in and range of environments. Modern data handling and storage technologies now facilitate the logging of the raw acoustic back-scatter information that was previously discarded by these systems. This paper describes methodologies that exploit this logging capability to quantify both the concentration and dynamics of suspended sediment within the water column. This development provides a multi-purpose tool for the holistic surveying of sediment transport dynamics by imaging suspended sediment concentration, the associated flows and providing concurrent high-resolution bathymetry. Results obtained a RESON 7125 MBES are presented from both well constrained dock-side testing and full field deployment over dune bedforms in the Mississippi. The capacity of the system to image suspended sediment structures is demonstrated and a novel methodology for estimating 2D flow velocities, based on frame cross-correlation methods, is introduced. The results demonstrate the capability of MBES systems to successfully map spatial and temporal variations in suspended sediment concentration throughout a 2D swath and application of the velocity estimation algorithms allow real-time holistic monitoring of turbulent flow processes and suspended sediment fluxes at a scale previously unrealisable. Turbulent flow over a natural dune bedform on the Mississippi is used to highlight the process information provided and the insights that can be gleaned for this technical development.

  11. On the development of a subgrid CFD model for fire extinguishment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TIESZEN,SHELDON R.; LOPEZ,AMALIA R.

    2000-02-02

    A subgrid model is presented for use in CFD fire simulations to account for thermal suppressants and strain. The extinguishment criteria is based on the ratio of a local fluid-mechanics time-scale to a local chemical time-scale compared to an empirically-determined critical Damkohler number. Local extinction occurs if this time scale is exceeded, global fire extinguishment occurs when local extinction has occurred for all combusting cells. The fluid mechanics time scale is based on the Kolmogorov time scale and the chemical time scale is based on blowout of a perfectly stirred reactor. The input to the reactor is based on cell averaged temperatures, assumed stoichiometric fuel/air composition, and cell averaged suppressant concentrations including combustion products. A detailed chemical mechanism is employed. The chemical time-scale is precalculated and mixing rules are used to reduce the composition space that must be parameterized. Comparisons with experimental data for fire extinguishment in a flame-stabilizing, backward-facing step geometry indicates that the model is conservative for this condition.

  12. Transport Properties at Different Scales Using Digital Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richa, R.; Mukerji, T.; Mavko, G.

    2007-12-01

    observed the maximum size of subsets chosen was approximately equal to or greater than the REV of the sample. The size of subsets was significantly reduced from the REV sizes in order to study the effect of scales on the transport properties as well as the relationships between these transport properties. Electrical conductivity and single-phase permeability simulations were carried out for the subsets thus obtained. As the size of subsets decreased, the scatter in the computed permeability and resistivity increased although they still followed the expected trends of effective medium relations in each case. Different effective medium relations used to compare with the simulated data in current paper were: (a) For porosity-permeability relation: Kozeny- Carman relation (Carman, 1961), (b) For porosity-formation factor relation: Archie's equation (Archie, 1942) and (c) For permeability-formation factor: Katz and Thompson (Katz and Thompson, 1987). The clouds of the simulated data of different size subsets as well as their corresponding means tended towards a higher value as the size of subsets was decreased though they still fell on the effective medium trend line. However, the computational time required for calculating the bigger subset sizes was far greater than for smaller subset sizes.

  13. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport from Decimeter-Scale Heterogeneity to Plume-Scale Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, Gary P. [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kohler, Matthias [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kannappan, Ramakrishnan [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Briggs, Martin [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Day-Lewis, Fred [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-02-24

    Scientifically defensible predictions of field scale U(VI) transport in groundwater requires an understanding of key processes at multiple scales. These scales range from smaller than the sediment grain scale (less than 10 μm) to as large as the field scale which can extend over several kilometers. The key processes that need to be considered include both geochemical reactions in solution and at sediment surfaces as well as physical transport processes including advection, dispersion, and pore-scale diffusion. The research summarized in this report includes both experimental and modeling results in batch, column and tracer tests. The objectives of this research were to: (1) quantify the rates of U(VI) desorption from sediments acquired from a uranium contaminated aquifer in batch experiments;(2) quantify rates of U(VI) desorption in column experiments with variable chemical conditions, and(3) quantify nonreactive tracer and U(VI) transport in field tests.

  14. Transport upscaling from pore- to Darcy-scale: Incorporating pore-scale Berea sandstone Lagrangian velocity statistics into a Darcy-scale transport CTRW model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puyguiraud, Alexandre; Dentz, Marco; Gouze, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    For the past several years a lot of attention has been given to pore-scale flow in order to understand and model transport, mixing and reaction in porous media. Nevertheless we believe that an accurate study of spatial and temporal evolution of velocities could bring important additional information for the upscaling from pore to higher scales. To gather these pieces of information, we perform Stokes flow simulations on pore-scale digitized images of a Berea sandstone core. First, micro-tomography (XRMT) imaging and segmentation processes allow us to obtain 3D black and white images of the sample [1]. Then we used an OpenFoam solver to perform the Stokes flow simulations mentioned above, which gives us the velocities at the interfaces of a cubic mesh. Subsequently, we use a particle streamline reconstruction technique which uses the Eulerian velocity field previously obtained. This technique, based on a modified Pollock algorithm [2], enables us to make particle tracking simulations on the digitized sample. In order to build a stochastic pore-scale transport model, we analyze the Lagrangian velocity series in two different ways. First we investigate the velocity evolution by sampling isochronically (t-Lagrangian), and by studying its statistical properties in terms of one- and two-points statistics. Intermittent patterns can be observed. These are due to the persistance of low velocities over a characteristic space length. Other results are investigated, such as correlation functions and velocity PDFs, which permit us to study more deeply this persistence in the velocities and to compute the correlation times. However, with the second approach, doing these same analysis in space by computing the velocities equidistantly, enables us to remove the intermittency shown in the temporal evolution and to model these velocity series as a Markov process. This renders the stochastic particle dynamics into a CTRW [3]. [1] Gjetvaj, F., A. Russian, P. Gouze, and M. Dentz (2015

  15. Scaling behavior and transport in bulk heterojunction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Eric; Lombardo, Christopher; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2011-03-01

    A lateral device geometry has been used to study charge transport in P3HT:C71 -PCBM bulk heterojunction devices. Analysis of current-voltage curves have previously been used to study charge transport in these materials. We perform ambipolar field effect transistor measurements on these structures to extract carrier mobilities. We are also able to describe the charge transport and recombination properties of these materials. Assymetric electrodes (Al, Au) separated by 100 nm- 20 μ m enable us to gain considerable insight into transport physics. Photocurrent measruements as a function of channel length, electric field, and illumination intensity (0.1-100 suns) are used to measure the ambipolar mobility-lifetime product and study how this correlates with measured field-effect mobilities at various electric fields. Lateral structures are shown to be a powerful tool to understand transport and the role of carrier mobility on photovoltaic performance.

  16. Dynamics of polynucleotide transport through nanometre-scale pores

    CERN Document Server

    Meller, A

    2003-01-01

    The transport of biopolymers through large membrane channels is a ubiquitous process in biology. It is central to processes such as gene transfer by transduction and RNA transport through nuclear pore complexes. The transport of polymers through nanoscopic channels is also of interest to physicists and chemists studying the effects of steric, hydrodynamic, and electrostatic interactions between polymers and confining walls. Single-channel ion current measurements have been recently used to study the transport of biopolymers, and in particular single-stranded DNA and RNA molecules, through nanometre-size channels. Under the influence of an electric field, the negatively charged polynucleotides can be captured and drawn through the channel in a process termed 'translocation'. During translocation, the ion current flowing through the channel is mostly blocked, indicating the presence of the polymer inside the channel. The current blockades were found to be sensitive to the properties of the biopolymers such as t...

  17. Soil properties and preferential solute transport at the field scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koestel, J K; Minh, Luong Nhat; Nørgaard, Trine

    An important fraction of water flow and solute transport through soil takes place through preferential flow paths. Although this had been already observed in the nineteenth century, it had been forgotten by the scientific community until it was rediscovered during the 1970s. The awareness...

  18. Super-micron-scale atomistic simulation for electronic transport with atomic vibration: Unified approach from quantum to classical transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizeki, Keisuke; Sasaoka, Kenji; Konabe, Satoru; Souma, Satofumi; Yamamoto, Takahiro

    2017-07-01

    We develop a powerful simulation method that can treat electronic transport in a super-micron-scale open system with atomic vibration at finite temperature. As an application of the developed method to realistic materials, we simulate electronic transport in metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes from nanometer scale to micrometer scale at room temperature. Based on the simulation results, we successfully identify two different crossovers, namely, ballistic to diffusive crossover and coherent to incoherent crossover, simultaneously and with equal footing, from which the mean free path and the phase coherence length can be extracted clearly. Moreover, we clarify the scaling behavior of the electrical resistance and the electronic current in the crossover regime.

  19. Spatially distributed lateral nitrate transport at the catchment scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesser, Fred B; Franko, Uwe; Rode, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In river catchments, N transformation and storage processes during lateral transport are important in controlling N loads of surface waters. There is a lack of approaches which capture lateral flows and associated N transformation in a spatially distributed way. The aim of this paper is to develop a new conceptual N transport and transformation model which simulates the lateral nitrate transport in subsurface flow from the source area to the receiving water body. The developed tool is based on the object modeling system (OMS) framework and consists of the analytical spatially distributed hydrological model J2000, the nitrate recharge model Meta Candy and a new groundwater N routing component. Nitrate degradation in groundwater is calculated stoichiometrically according to a predefined amount on oxidizable substrate. The new modeling approach was tested in a small agricultural lower mountain range catchment of Thuringia, Germany. The calibration of the N model using a 4-yr period showed reasonable results for nitrate load calculations with a Nash and Sutcliff coefficient of 0.78. The 3-yr validation period produced Nash-Sutcliff (NS) values of 0.75. There was a clear relationship of the goodness-of-fit between the hydrological simulations and the nitrate concentration calculations. Due to short residence times of the interflow nitrate degradation was restricted to slow base flow components. The new approach can be used to target N source areas within a catchment and assess the impact of these source areas on the N load of surface waters in a spatially distributed manner.

  20. Cost optimization of biofuel production – The impact of scale, integration, transport and supply chain configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, S.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41200836X; Hoefnagels, E.T.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313935998; Wetterlund, Elisabeth; Pettersson, Karin; Faaij, André; Junginger, H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/202130703

    2017-01-01

    This study uses a geographically-explicit cost optimization model to analyze the impact of and interrelation between four cost reduction strategies for biofuel production: economies of scale, intermodal transport, integration with existing industries, and distributed supply chain configurations

  1. Cost Overruns in Large-scale Transportation Infrastructure Projects: Explanations and Their Theoretical Embeddedness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cantarelli, C.C; Flyvbjerg, B; Molin, E.J.E; Van Wee, B

    2010-01-01

    Managing large-scale transportation infrastructure projects is difficult due to frequent misinformation about the costs which results in large cost overruns that often threaten the overall project viability...

  2. Kansas City Transportation and Local-Scale Air Quality Study (KC-TRAQS) Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    In fall 2017, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the Kansas City Transportation Local-Scale Air Quality Study (KC-TRAQS) to learn more about local community air quality in three neighborhoods in Kansas City, KS.

  3. Resolving terrestrial ecosystem processes along a subgrid topographic gradient for an earth-system model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subin, Z M; Milly, Paul C.D.; Sulman, B N; Malyshev, Sergey; Shevliakova, E

    2014-01-01

    Soil moisture is a crucial control on surface water and energy fluxes, vegetation, and soil carbon cycling. Earth-system models (ESMs) generally represent an areal-average soil-moisture state in gridcells at scales of 50–200 km and as a result are not able to capture the nonlinear effects of topographically-controlled subgrid heterogeneity in soil moisture, in particular where wetlands are present. We addressed this deficiency by building a subgrid representation of hillslope-scale topographic gradients, TiHy (Tiled-hillslope Hydrology), into the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) land model (LM3). LM3-TiHy models one or more representative hillslope geometries for each gridcell by discretizing them into land model tiles hydrologically coupled along an upland-to-lowland gradient. Each tile has its own surface fluxes, vegetation, and vertically-resolved state variables for soil physics and biogeochemistry. LM3-TiHy simulates a gradient in soil moisture and water-table depth between uplands and lowlands in each gridcell. Three hillslope hydrological regimes appear in non-permafrost regions in the model: wet and poorly-drained, wet and well-drained, and dry; with large, small, and zero wetland area predicted, respectively. Compared to the untiled LM3 in stand-alone experiments, LM3-TiHy simulates similar surface energy and water fluxes in the gridcell-mean. However, in marginally wet regions around the globe, LM3-TiHy simulates shallow groundwater in lowlands, leading to higher evapotranspiration, lower surface temperature, and higher leaf area compared to uplands in the same gridcells. Moreover, more than four-fold larger soil carbon concentrations are simulated globally in lowlands as compared with uplands. We compared water-table depths to those simulated by a recent global model-observational synthesis, and we compared wetland and inundated areas diagnosed from the model to observational datasets. The comparisons demonstrate that LM3-TiHy has the

  4. Electronic transport properties of copper and gold at atomic scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadzadeh, Saeideh

    2010-11-23

    The factors governing electronic transport properties of copper and gold atomic-size contacts are theoretically examined in the present work. A two-terminal conductor using crystalline electrodes is adopted. The non-equilibrium Green's function combined with the density functional tight-binding method is employed via gDFTB simulation tool to calculate the transport at both equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. The crystalline orientation, length, and arrangement of electrodes have very weak influence on the electronic characteristics of the considered atomic wires. The wire width is found to be the most effective geometric aspect determining the number of conduction channels. The obtained conductance oscillation and linear current-voltage curves are interpreted. To analyze the conduction mechanism in detail, the transmission channels and their decomposition to the atomic orbitals are calculated in copper and gold single point contacts. The presented results offer a possible explanation for the relation between conduction and geometric structure. Furthermore, the results are in good agreement with available experimental and theoretical studies. (orig.)

  5. A remark on the vertical transport of large-scale temperature fluctuations by smaller-scale convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, D. O.

    2013-12-01

    A simple mixing-length discussion of vertical diffusive transport of a scalar by small-scale turbulent convection is presented, likening it to the microscopic transport in a classical gas. If the scalar is passive, the transport is governed by the well known telegraph equation. Temperature, on the other hand, influences the dynamics of the small-scale motion by modifying the buoyancy that drives the turbulent eddies; it leads to a rather more complicated equation, which, for relatively rapid variation reduces to the same wave equation as for a passive scalar, with maximal propagation speed comparable with the rms vertical eddy velocity; but in the slow diffusive limit it reduces, for good reason, to the classical diffusion equation with a diffusivity enhanced by a factor 3/2 over that pertaining to a passive scalar.

  6. Laminar flow and convective transport processes scaling principles and asymptotic analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Brenner, Howard

    1992-01-01

    Laminar Flow and Convective Transport Processes: Scaling Principles and Asymptotic Analysis presents analytic methods for the solution of fluid mechanics and convective transport processes, all in the laminar flow regime. This book brings together the results of almost 30 years of research on the use of nondimensionalization, scaling principles, and asymptotic analysis into a comprehensive form suitable for presentation in a core graduate-level course on fluid mechanics and the convective transport of heat. A considerable amount of material on viscous-dominated flows is covered.A unique feat

  7. Efficient algorithms for large-scale quantum transport calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brück, Sascha; Calderara, Mauro; Bani-Hashemian, Mohammad Hossein; VandeVondele, Joost; Luisier, Mathieu

    2017-08-01

    Massively parallel algorithms are presented in this paper to reduce the computational burden associated with quantum transport simulations from first-principles. The power of modern hybrid computer architectures is harvested in order to determine the open boundary conditions that connect the simulation domain with its environment and to solve the resulting Schrödinger equation. While the former operation takes the form of an eigenvalue problem that is solved by a contour integration technique on the available central processing units (CPUs), the latter can be cast into a linear system of equations that is simultaneously processed by SplitSolve, a two-step algorithm, on general-purpose graphics processing units (GPUs). A significant decrease of the computational time by up to two orders of magnitude is obtained as compared to standard solution methods.

  8. Pore-to-Darcy Scale Hybrid Multiscale Finite Volume Model for Reactive Flow and Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas-Solano, D. A.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    In the present work we develop a hybrid scheme for the coupling and temporal integration of grid-based, continuum models for pore-scale and Darcy-scale flow and reactive transport. The hybrid coupling strategy consists on applying Darcy-scale and pore-scale flow and reactive transport models over overlapping subdomains Ω C and Ω F, and enforcing continuity of state and fluxes by means of restriction and prolongation operations defined over the overlap subdomain Ω hs ≡ Ω C \\cap Ω F. For the pore-scale model, we use a Multiscale Finite Volume (MsFV) characterization of the pore-scale state in terms of Darcy-scale degrees of freedom and local functions defined as the solution of pore-scale problems. The hybrid MsFV coupling results in a local-global combination of effective mass balance relations for the Darcy-scale degrees of freedom and local problems for the pore-scale degrees of freedom that capture pore-scale behavior. Our scheme allows for the rapid coarsening of pore-scale models and the adaptive enrichment of Darcy-scale models with pore-scale information. Additionally, we propose a strategy for modeling the dynamics of the pore-scale solid-liquid boundary due to precipitation and dissolution phenomena, based on the Diffuse Domain method (DDM), which is incorporated into the MsFV approximation of pore-scale states. We apply the proposed hybrid scheme to a reactive flow and transport problem in porous media subject to heterogeneous reactions and the corresponding precipitation and dissolution phenomena.

  9. Modeling Polymer Stabilized Nano-scale Zero Valent Iron Transport Experiments in Porous Media to Understand the Transport Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, P.; Krol, M.; Sleep, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    A wide variety of groundwater contaminants can be treated with nano-scale zero valent iron (nZVI). However, delivery of nZVI in the subsurface to the treatment zones is challenging as the bare nZVI particles have a higher tendency to agglomerate. The subsurface mobility of nZVI can be enhanced by stabilizing nZVI with polymer, such as carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC). In this study, numerical simulations were conducted to evaluate CMC stabilized nZVI transport behavior in porous media. The numerical simulations were based on a set of laboratory-scale transport experiments that were conducted in a two-dimensional water-saturated glass-walled sandbox (length - 55 cm; height - 45 cm; width - 1.4 cm), uniformly packed with silica sand. In the transport experiments: CMC stabilized nZVI and a non-reactive dye tracer Lissamine Green B (LGB) were used; water specific discharge and CMC concentration were varied; movements of LGB, and CMC-nZVI in the sandbox were tracked using a camera, a light source and a dark box. The concentrations of LGB, CMC, and CMC-nZVI at the sandbox outlet were analyzed. A 2D multiphase flow and transport model was applied to simulate experimental results. The images from LGB dye transport experiments were used to determine the pore water velocities and media permeabilities in various layers in the sand box. These permeability values were used in the subsequent simulations of CMC-nZVI transport. The 2D compositional simulator, modified to include colloid filtration theory (CFT), treated CMC as a solute and nZVI as a colloid. The simulator included composition dependent viscosity to account for CMC injection and mixing, and attachment efficiency as a fitting parameter for nZVI transport modeling. In the experiments, LGB and CMC recoveries were greater than 95%; however, CMC residence time was significantly higher than the LGB residence time and the higher CMC concentration caused higher pressure drops in the sandbox. The nZVI recovery was lower than 40

  10. A Unified Gas Kinetic Scheme for Multi-scale Plasma Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chang

    2016-01-01

    A unified gas kinetic scheme (UGKS) for multi-scale and multi-component plasma transport is constructed. The current scheme is a direct modeling method, where the time evolution solutions from the Vlasov-BGK equations for both electron and ion, and the Maxwell equations are used to construct the scale-dependent plasma simulation. As a result, based on the modeling scales of mesh size and time step, the discretized governing equations for the whole plasma regimes are obtained. The UGKS takes into account the electron inertia, full electromagnetic field equations, and separate electron and ion evolution. The physics recovered in UGKS ranges from the kinetic Vlasov equation to the hydrodynamic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, with a unified treatment in all scales from the collisionless particle transport to the hydrodynamic wave interactions. The UGKS presents a plasma description which is more general than the Vlasov equation in the kinetic scale and all kinds of MHD equations in the hydrodynamic scale, su...

  11. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Derrick [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-12-22

    Experimental work was used to validate modeling studies and develop multicontinuum models of U(VI) transport in a contaminated aquifer. At the bench scale, it has been shown that U(VI) desorption is rate-limited and that rates are dependent on the bicarbonate concentration. Two decimeter-scale experiments were conducted in order to help establish rigorous upscaling approaches that could be tested at the tracer test and plume scales.

  12. Morphological response of a large-scale coastal blowout to a strong magnitude transport event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Fernandez, Irene; Jackson, Derek; Smith, Alexander; Smyth, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Large-scale blowouts are fundamental features of many coastal dune fields in temperate areas around the world. These distinctive erosional (mostly unvegetated) landform features are often characterised by a significant depression area and a connected depositional lobe at their downwind edges. These areas also provide important transport corridors to inland parts of the dune system and can provide ideal habitats for specialist flora and fauna as well as helping to enhance landscape diversity. The actual morphology and shape/size of blowouts can significantly modify the overlying atmospheric boundary layer of the wind, influencing wind flow steering and intensity within the blowout, and ultimately aeolian sediment transport. While investigations of morphological changes within blowouts have largely focused on the medium (months) to long (annual/decadal) temporal scale, studies of aeolian transport dynamics within blowouts have predominantly focused on the short-term (event) scale. Work on wind-transport processes in blowouts is still relatively rare, with ad-hoc studies providing only limited information on airflow and aeolian transport. Large-scale blowouts are characterised by elongated basins that can reach hundreds of meters, potentially resulting in airflow and transport dynamics that are very different from their smaller scale counterparts. This research focuses on a short-term, strong wind event measured at the Devil's Hole blowout (Sefton dunes, NW England), a large-scale blowout feature approximately 300 m in length and 100 m in width. In situ measurements of airflow and aeolian transport were collected during a short-term experiment on the 22nd October 2015. A total of twenty three, 3D ultrasonic anemometers, sand traps, and wenglor sensors were deployed in a spatial grid covering the distal end of the basin, walls, and depositional lobe. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) was used to quantify morphological changes within the blowout before and after the

  13. Quantification of marine aerosol subgrid variability and its correlation with clouds based on high-resolution regional modeling: Quantifying Aerosol Subgrid Variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Guangxing; Qian, Yun; Yan, Huiping; Zhao, Chun; Ghan, Steven J.; Easter, Richard C.; Zhang, Kai

    2017-06-16

    One limitation of most global climate models (GCMs) is that with the horizontal resolutions they typically employ, they cannot resolve the subgrid variability (SGV) of clouds and aerosols, adding extra uncertainties to the aerosol radiative forcing estimation. To inform the development of an aerosol subgrid variability parameterization, here we analyze the aerosol SGV over the southern Pacific Ocean simulated by the high-resolution Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled to Chemistry. We find that within a typical GCM grid, the aerosol mass subgrid standard deviation is 15% of the grid-box mean mass near the surface on a 1 month mean basis. The fraction can increase to 50% in the free troposphere. The relationships between the sea-salt mass concentration, meteorological variables, and sea-salt emission rate are investigated in both the clear and cloudy portion. Under clear-sky conditions, marine aerosol subgrid standard deviation is highly correlated with the standard deviations of vertical velocity, cloud water mixing ratio, and sea-salt emission rates near the surface. It is also strongly connected to the grid box mean aerosol in the free troposphere (between 2 km and 4 km). In the cloudy area, interstitial sea-salt aerosol mass concentrations are smaller, but higher correlation is found between the subgrid standard deviations of aerosol mass and vertical velocity. Additionally, we find that decreasing the model grid resolution can reduce the marine aerosol SGV but strengthen the correlations between the aerosol SGV and the total water mixing ratio (sum of water vapor, cloud liquid, and cloud ice mixing ratios).

  14. Characterization of double continuum formulations of transport through pore-scale information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, G.; Ceriotti, G.; Bijeljic, B.

    2016-12-01

    Information on pore-scale characteristics is becoming increasingly available at unprecedented levels of detail from modern visualization/data-acquisition techniques. These advancements are not completely matched by corresponding developments of operational procedures according to which we can engineer theoretical findings aiming at improving our ability to reduce the uncertainty associated with the outputs of continuum-scale models to be employed at large scales. We present here a modeling approach which rests on pore-scale information to achieve a complete characterization of a double continuum model of transport and fluid-fluid reactive processes. Our model makes full use of pore-scale velocity distributions to identify mobile and immobile regions. We do so on the basis of a pointwise (in the pore space) evaluation of the relative strength of advection and diffusion time scales, as rendered by spatially variable values of local Péclet numbers. After mobile and immobile regions are demarcated, we build a simplified unit cell which is employed as a representative proxy of the real porous domain. This model geometry is then employed to simplify the computation of the effective parameters embedded in the double continuum transport model, while retaining relevant information from the pore-scale characterization of the geometry and velocity field. We document results which illustrate the applicability of the methodology to predict transport of a passive tracer within two- and three-dimensional media upon comparison with direct pore-scale numerical simulation of transport in the same geometrical settings. We also show preliminary results about the extension of this model to fluid-fluid reactive transport processes. In this context, we focus on results obtained in two-dimensional porous systems. We discuss the impact of critical quantities required as input to our modeling approach to obtain continuum-scale outputs. We identify the key limitations of the proposed

  15. Aerosol indirect effects in the ECHAM5-HAM2 climate model with subgrid cloud microphysics in a stochastic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonttila, Juha; Räisänen, Petri; Järvinen, Heikki

    2015-04-01

    Representing cloud properties in global climate models remains a challenging topic, which to a large extent is due to cloud processes acting on spatial scales much smaller than the typical model grid resolution. Several attempts have been made to alleviate this problem. One such method was introduced in the ECHAM5-HAM2 climate model by Tonttila et al. (2013), where cloud microphysical properties, along with the processes of cloud droplet activation and autoconversion, were computed using an ensemble of stochastic subcolumns within the climate model grid columns. Moreover, the subcolumns were sampled for radiative transfer using the Monte Carlo Independent Column Approximation approach. The same model version is used in this work (Tonttila et al. 2014), where 5-year nudged integrations are performed with a series of different model configurations. Each run is performed twice, once with pre-industrial (PI, year 1750) aerosol emission conditions and once with present-day (PD, year 2000) conditions, based on the AEROCOM emission inventories. The differences between PI and PD simulations are used to estimate the impact of anthropogenic aerosols on clouds and the aerosol indirect effect (AIE). One of the key results is that when both cloud activation and autoconversion are computed in the subcolumn space, the aerosol-induced PI-to-PD change in the global-mean liquid water path is up to 19 % smaller than in the reference with grid-scale computations. Together with similar changes in the cloud droplet number concentration, this influences the cloud radiative effects and thus the AIE, which is estimated as the difference in the net cloud radiative effect between PI and PD conditions. Accordingly, the AIE is reduced by 14 %, from 1.59 W m-2 in the reference model version to 1.37 W m-2 in the experimental model configuration. The results of this work explicitly show that careful consideration of the subgrid variability in cloud microphysical properties and consistent

  16. The effects of the sub-grid variability of soil and land cover data on agricultural droughts in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rohini; Samaniego, Luis; Zink, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    Simulated soil moisture from land surface or water balance models is increasingly used to characterize and/or monitor the development of agricultural droughts at regional and global scales (e.g. NLADS, EDO, GLDAS). The skill of these models to accurately replicate hydrologic fluxes and state variables is strongly dependent on the quality meteorological forcings, the conceptualization of dominant processes, and the parameterization scheme used to incorporate the variability of land surface properties (e.g. soil, topography, and vegetation) at a coarser spatial resolutions (e.g. at least 4 km). The goal of this study is to analyze the effects of the sub-grid variability of soil texture and land cover properties on agricultural drought statistics such as duration, severity, and areal extent. For this purpose, a process based mesoscale hydrologic model (mHM) is used to create two sets of daily soil moisture fields over Germany at the spatial resolution of (4 × 4) km2 from 1950 to 2011. These simulations differ from each other only on the manner in which the land surface properties are accounted within the model. In the first set, soil moisture fields are obtained with the multiscale parameter regionalization (MPR) scheme (Samaniego, et. al. 2010, Kumar et. al. 2012), which explicitly takes the sub-grid variability of soil texture and land cover properties into account. In the second set, on the contrary, a single dominant soil and land cover class is used for ever grid cell at 4 km. Within each set, the propagation of the parameter uncertainty into the soil moisture simulations is also evaluated using an ensemble of 100 best global parameter sets of mHM (Samaniego, et. al. 2012). To ensure comparability, both sets of this ensemble simulations are forced with the same fields of meteorological variables (e.g., precipitation, temperature, and potential evapotranspiration). Results indicate that both sets of model simulations, with and without the sub-grid variability of

  17. Unconventional Current Scaling and Edge Effects for Charge Transport through Molecular Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obersteiner, Veronika; Huhs, Georg; Papior, Nick Rübner

    2017-01-01

    -size islands. On the basis of first-principles charge-transport simulations, we explain why the scaling of the conductivity of a junction has to be highly non-linear in the number of molecules it contains. Moreover, transport through molecular clusters is found to be highly inhomogeneous with pronounced edge...... effects determined by molecules in locally different electrostatic environments. These effects are most pronounced for comparably small clusters, but electrostatic considerations show that they prevail also for more extended systems....

  18. Bedload transport flux fluctuations over a wide range of time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H.; Fu, X.; Ancey, C.

    2014-12-01

    Bedload transport is a highly fluctuating process. Our previous study (Ma et al., 2014) demonstrated a three-regime relation of the variance of bedload transport flux across a wide range of sampling time scales. This study further explored the fluctuation spectrum of at-a-point bedload transport flux with different sampling times. We derived out analytical solutions of the third- and fourth-order moments of bedload transport flux, based on a physically-based formulation (Ancey et al., 2008; Ma et al., 2014). A formulation of the probability density function of bedload transport flux was constructed based on the 1st through 4th order moments. Experimental data were used to test against the solutions of both the moments and PDF. Interestingly, the higher order statistical moments were found to exhibit the three-regime pattern as well. This study contributes to a comprehensive understanding of bedload transport flux fluctuation and emphasizes its timescale-dependent features resulting from the discrete nature and correlated motion of bedload material. The correlated structures of bedload transport, such as bed forms and particle clusters, deserve to be further exploration in future studies. Keywords: bedload transport; stochastic theory; high order moment; fluctuation; time scale; PDF. Ancey, C., Davison, A. C., Bohm, T., Jodeau, M., and Frey, P. Entrainment and motion of coarse particles in a shallow water stream down a steep slope, Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 2008, 595, 83-114, doi: 10.1017/S0022112007008774. Ma, H. B., Heyman, J., Fu, X. D., Mettra, F., Ancey, C. and Parker, G. Bedload transport over a broad range of time scales: determination of three regimes of fluctuations. Journal of Geophysical Research-Earth Surface, 2014. (under review)

  19. Sub-Grid Modeling of Electrokinetic Effects in Micro Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. P.

    2005-01-01

    Advances in micro-fabrication processes have generated tremendous interests in miniaturizing chemical and biomedical analyses into integrated microsystems (Lab-on-Chip devices). To successfully design and operate the micro fluidics system, it is essential to understand the fundamental fluid flow phenomena when channel sizes are shrink to micron or even nano dimensions. One important phenomenon is the electro kinetic effect in micro/nano channels due to the existence of the electrical double layer (EDL) near a solid-liquid interface. Not only EDL is responsible for electro-osmosis pumping when an electric field parallel to the surface is imposed, EDL also causes extra flow resistance (the electro-viscous effect) and flow anomaly (such as early transition from laminar to turbulent flow) observed in pressure-driven microchannel flows. Modeling and simulation of electro-kinetic effects on micro flows poses significant numerical challenge due to the fact that the sizes of the double layer (10 nm up to microns) are very thin compared to channel width (can be up to 100 s of m). Since the typical thickness of the double layer is extremely small compared to the channel width, it would be computationally very costly to capture the velocity profile inside the double layer by placing sufficient number of grid cells in the layer to resolve the velocity changes, especially in complex, 3-d geometries. Existing approaches using "slip" wall velocity and augmented double layer are difficult to use when the flow geometry is complicated, e.g. flow in a T-junction, X-junction, etc. In order to overcome the difficulties arising from those two approaches, we have developed a sub-grid integration method to properly account for the physics of the double layer. The integration approach can be used on simple or complicated flow geometries. Resolution of the double layer is not needed in this approach, and the effects of the double layer can be accounted for at the same time. With this

  20. The Storm Surge and Sub-Grid Inundation Modeling in New York City during Hurricane Sandy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry V. Wang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hurricane Sandy inflicted heavy damage in New York City and the New Jersey coast as the second costliest storm in history. A large-scale, unstructured grid storm tide model, Semi-implicit Eulerian Lagrangian Finite Element (SELFE, was used to hindcast water level variation during Hurricane Sandy in the mid-Atlantic portion of the U.S. East Coast. The model was forced by eight tidal constituents at the model’s open boundary, 1500 km away from the coast, and the wind and pressure fields from atmospheric model Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS provided by Weatherflow Inc. The comparisons of the modeled storm tide with the NOAA gauge stations from Montauk, NY, Long Island Sound, encompassing New York Harbor, Atlantic City, NJ, to Duck, NC, were in good agreement, with an overall root mean square error and relative error in the order of 15–20 cm and 5%–7%, respectively. Furthermore, using large-scale model outputs as the boundary conditions, a separate sub-grid model that incorporates LIDAR data for the major portion of the New York City was also set up to investigate the detailed inundation process. The model results compared favorably with USGS’ Hurricane Sandy Mapper database in terms of its timing, local inundation area, and the depth of the flooding water. The street-level inundation with water bypassing the city building was created and the maximum extent of horizontal inundation was calculated, which was within 30 m of the data-derived estimate by USGS.

  1. Beam transport line with scaling fixed field alternating gradient type magnets

    OpenAIRE

    Shinji Machida; Richard Fenning

    2010-01-01

    A scaling fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator provides large momentum acceptance despite the fact that magnetic guiding fields are constant in time. Optical functions are identical over the large momentum range as well. We have designed a straight beam transport line (BTL) using a scaling FFAG type magnet which has a field profile of y^{k}, where y is the horizontal coordinate and k is the magnetic field index. This FFAG-BTL has very large momentum acceptance and optical funct...

  2. Exploring with simulations the transport properties of multi-scale porous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyväluoma, Jari; Mattila, Keijo; Puurtinen, Tuomas; Timonen, Jussi

    2015-04-01

    The internal structure of many natural porous materials such as soils and carbonate rocks involves multiple length scales. This severely hinders the research relating structure and transport properties: typically laboratory experiments cannot distinguish contributions from individual scales while computer simulations cannot capture multiple scales due to limited computational resources. 3D imaging and image-based fluid flow simulations are increasingly used for studying the pore-scale transport processes. Combining imaging with pore-scale flow simulation techniques, e.g. the lattice Boltzmann method, provides direct means to quantify pore-scale transport processes. However, pore-scale computer simulations have not really been able to capture multiple scales due to the limited size of the simulation system. We show here that the current computational resources and software techniques already allow transport simulations in domains beyond the realms of current imaging techniques, and, more importantly, enable numerical experiments in multi-scale porous materials. We were able to simulate single-phase fluid flow with the lattice Boltzmann method in a synthetic x-ray-tomography image taken from the set of world's largest 3D images of a porous material [1]. The used image has 163843 image voxels and porosity of 0.134 (i.e., 5.9 - 1011 pore voxels) and it represents the microstructure of Fontainebleau sandstone. While the modelled sandstone image is rather homogeneous and therefore does not really represent a multiscale porous material, from a computational point of view it serves the purpose of demonstrating the power of contemporary software and hardware techniques. The simulation was executed at the Edinburgh Parallel Computing Centre on the ARCHER supercomputer ranked number 25 among all supercomputers. ARCHER has 3008 computing nodes each of which has two 12-core Ivy Bridge 2.7 GHz CPUs and 64 GB of memory providing 1.67 Petaflops of theoretical peak performance. The

  3. Enhancing Representation of Subgrid Land Surface Characteristics in the Community Land Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Y.; Coleman, A.; Leung, L.; Huang, M.; Li, H.; Wigmosta, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    The Community Land Model (CLM) is the land surface model used in the Community Earth System Model (CESM). In CLM each grid cell is composed of subgrid land units, snow/soil columns and plant functional types (PFTs). In the current version of CLM (CLM4.0), land surface parameters such as vegetated/non-vegetated land cover and surface characteristics including fractional glacier, lake, wetland, urban area, and PFT, and its associated leaf area index (LAI), stem area index (SAI), and canopy top and bottom heights are provided at 0.5° or coarser resolution. This study aims to enhance the representation of the land surface data by (1) creating higher resolution (0.05° or higher) global land surface parameters, and (2) developing an effective and accurate subgrid classification scheme for elevation and PFTs so that variations of land surface processes due to the subgrid distribution of PFTs and elevation can be represented in CLM. To achieve higher-resolution global land surface parameters, MODIS 500m land cover product (MCD12Q1) collected in 2005 was used to generate percentage of glacier, lake, wetland, and urban area and fractional PFTs at 0.05° resolution. Spatially and temporally continuous and consistent global LAI data re-processed and improved from MOD15A2 (http://globalchange.bnu.edu.cn/research/lai), combined with the PFT data, was used to create LAI, SAI, and, canopy top and bottom height data. 30-second soil texture data was obtained from a hybrid 30-second State Soil Geographic Database (STATSGO) and the 5-minute Food and Agriculture Organization two-layer 16-category soil texture dataset. The relationship between global distribution of PFTs and 1-km resolution elevation data is being analyzed to develop a subgrid classification of PFT and elevation. Statistical analysis is being conducted to compare different subgrid classification methods to select a method that explains the highest percentage of subgrid variance in both PFT and elevation distribution

  4. Large-scale transportation network congestion evolution prediction using deep learning theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Ma

    Full Text Available Understanding how congestion at one location can cause ripples throughout large-scale transportation network is vital for transportation researchers and practitioners to pinpoint traffic bottlenecks for congestion mitigation. Traditional studies rely on either mathematical equations or simulation techniques to model traffic congestion dynamics. However, most of the approaches have limitations, largely due to unrealistic assumptions and cumbersome parameter calibration process. With the development of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS and Internet of Things (IoT, transportation data become more and more ubiquitous. This triggers a series of data-driven research to investigate transportation phenomena. Among them, deep learning theory is considered one of the most promising techniques to tackle tremendous high-dimensional data. This study attempts to extend deep learning theory into large-scale transportation network analysis. A deep Restricted Boltzmann Machine and Recurrent Neural Network architecture is utilized to model and predict traffic congestion evolution based on Global Positioning System (GPS data from taxi. A numerical study in Ningbo, China is conducted to validate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method. Results show that the prediction accuracy can achieve as high as 88% within less than 6 minutes when the model is implemented in a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU-based parallel computing environment. The predicted congestion evolution patterns can be visualized temporally and spatially through a map-based platform to identify the vulnerable links for proactive congestion mitigation.

  5. Large-scale transportation network congestion evolution prediction using deep learning theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaolei; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Yunpeng; Wang, Yinhai

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how congestion at one location can cause ripples throughout large-scale transportation network is vital for transportation researchers and practitioners to pinpoint traffic bottlenecks for congestion mitigation. Traditional studies rely on either mathematical equations or simulation techniques to model traffic congestion dynamics. However, most of the approaches have limitations, largely due to unrealistic assumptions and cumbersome parameter calibration process. With the development of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) and Internet of Things (IoT), transportation data become more and more ubiquitous. This triggers a series of data-driven research to investigate transportation phenomena. Among them, deep learning theory is considered one of the most promising techniques to tackle tremendous high-dimensional data. This study attempts to extend deep learning theory into large-scale transportation network analysis. A deep Restricted Boltzmann Machine and Recurrent Neural Network architecture is utilized to model and predict traffic congestion evolution based on Global Positioning System (GPS) data from taxi. A numerical study in Ningbo, China is conducted to validate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method. Results show that the prediction accuracy can achieve as high as 88% within less than 6 minutes when the model is implemented in a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU)-based parallel computing environment. The predicted congestion evolution patterns can be visualized temporally and spatially through a map-based platform to identify the vulnerable links for proactive congestion mitigation.

  6. Scaling theory put into practice: First-principles modeling of transport in doped silicon nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Rurali, R.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2007-01-01

    We combine the ideas of scaling theory and universal conductance fluctuations with density-functional theory to analyze the conductance properties of doped silicon nanowires. Specifically, we study the crossover from ballistic to diffusive transport in boron or phosphorus doped Si nanowires...

  7. CFD MODELING OF FINE SCALE FLOW AND TRANSPORT IN THE HOUSTON METROPOLITAN AREA, TEXAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine scale modeling of flows and air quality in Houston, Texas is being performed; the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is being applied to investigate the influence of morphologic structures on the within-grid transport and dispersion of sources in grid models ...

  8. Cost Overruns in Large-scale Transportation Infrastructure Projects : Explanations and Their Theoretical Embeddedness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cantarelli, C.C.; Flyvbjerg, B.; Molin, E.J.E.; Van Wee, B.

    2010-01-01

    Managing large-scale transportation infrastructure projects is difficult due to frequent misinformation about the costs which results in large cost overruns that often threaten the overall project viability. This paper investigates the explanations for cost overruns that are given in the literature.

  9. Theoretical and Numerical Properties of a Gyrokinetic Plasma: Issues Related to Transport Time Scale Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.W. Lee

    2003-09-17

    Particle simulation has played an important role for the recent investigations on turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas. In this paper, theoretical and numerical properties of a gyrokinetic plasma as well as its relationship with magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are discussed with the ultimate aim of simulating microturbulence in transport time scale using massively parallel computers.

  10. Upscaling of Long-Term U9VI) Desorption from Pore Scale Kinetics to Field-Scale Reactive Transport Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andy Miller

    2009-01-25

    Environmental systems exhibit a range of complexities which exist at a range of length and mass scales. Within the realm of radionuclide fate and transport, much work has been focused on understanding pore scale processes where complexity can be reduced to a simplified system. In describing larger scale behavior, the results from these simplified systems must be combined to create a theory of the whole. This process can be quite complex, and lead to models which lack transparency. The underlying assumption of this approach is that complex systems will exhibit complex behavior, requiring a complex system of equations to describe behavior. This assumption has never been tested. The goal of the experiments presented is to ask the question: Do increasingly complex systems show increasingly complex behavior? Three experimental tanks at the intermediate scale (Tank 1: 2.4m x 1.2m x 7.6cm, Tank 2: 2.4m x 0.61m x 7.6cm, Tank 3: 2.4m x 0.61m x 0.61m (LxHxW)) have been completed. These tanks were packed with various physical orientations of different particle sizes of a uranium contaminated sediment from a former uranium mill near Naturita, Colorado. Steady state water flow was induced across the tanks using constant head boundaries. Pore water was removed from within the flow domain through sampling ports/wells; effluent samples were also taken. Each sample was analyzed for a variety of analytes relating to the solubility and transport of uranium. Flow fields were characterized using inert tracers and direct measurements of pressure head. The results show that although there is a wide range of chemical variability within the flow domain of the tank, the effluent uranium behavior is simple enough to be described using a variety of conceptual models. Thus, although there is a wide range in variability caused by pore scale behaviors, these behaviors appear to be smoothed out as uranium is transported through the tank. This smoothing of uranium transport behavior transcends

  11. Pore-scale simulation of microbial growth using a genome-scale metabolic model: Implications for Darcy-scale reactive transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovsky, G. D.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Scheibe, T. D.; Fang, Y.; Mahadevan, R.; Lovley, D. R.

    2013-09-01

    Recent advances in microbiology have enabled the quantitative simulation of microbial metabolism and growth based on genome-scale characterization of metabolic pathways and fluxes. We have incorporated a genome-scale metabolic model of the iron-reducing bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens into a pore-scale simulation of microbial growth based on coupling of iron reduction to oxidation of a soluble electron donor (acetate). In our model, fluid flow and solute transport is governed by a combination of the Navier-Stokes and advection-diffusion-reaction equations. Microbial growth occurs only on the surface of soil grains where solid-phase mineral iron oxides are available. Mass fluxes of chemical species associated with microbial growth are described by the genome-scale microbial model, implemented using a constraint-based metabolic model, and provide the Robin-type boundary condition for the advection-diffusion equation at soil grain surfaces. Conventional models of microbially-mediated subsurface reactions use a lumped reaction model that does not consider individual microbial reaction pathways, and describe reactions rates using empirically-derived rate formulations such as the Monod-type kinetics. We have used our pore-scale model to explore the relationship between genome-scale metabolic models and Monod-type formulations, and to assess the manifestation of pore-scale variability (microenvironments) in terms of apparent Darcy-scale microbial reaction rates. The genome-scale model predicted lower biomass yield, and different stoichiometry for iron consumption, in comparison to prior Monod formulations based on energetics considerations. We were able to fit an equivalent Monod model, by modifying the reaction stoichiometry and biomass yield coefficient, that could effectively match results of the genome-scale simulation of microbial behaviors under excess nutrient conditions, but predictions of the fitted Monod model deviated from those of the genome-scale model

  12. Pore-scale simulation of microbial growth using a genome-scale metabolic model: Implications for Darcy-scale reactive transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Fang, Yilin; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Lovley, Derek R.

    2013-09-07

    Recent advances in microbiology have enabled the quantitative simulation of microbial metabolism and growth based on genome-scale characterization of metabolic pathways and fluxes. We have incorporated a genome-scale metabolic model of the iron-reducing bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens into a pore-scale simulation of microbial growth based on coupling of iron reduction to oxidation of a soluble electron donor (acetate). In our model, fluid flow and solute transport is governed by a combination of the Navier-Stokes and advection-diffusion-reaction equations. Microbial growth occurs only on the surface of soil grains where solid-phase mineral iron oxides are available. Mass fluxes of chemical species associated with microbial growth are described by the genome-scale microbial model, implemented using a constraint-based metabolic model, and provide the Robin-type boundary condition for the advection-diffusion equation at soil grain surfaces. Conventional models of microbially-mediated subsurface reactions use a lumped reaction model that does not consider individual microbial reaction pathways, and describe reactions rates using empirically-derived rate formulations such as the Monod-type kinetics. We have used our pore-scale model to explore the relationship between genome-scale metabolic models and Monod-type formulations, and to assess the manifestation of pore-scale variability (microenvironments) in terms of apparent Darcy-scale microbial reaction rates. The genome-scale model predicted lower biomass yield, and different stoichiometry for iron consumption, in comparisonto prior Monod formulations based on energetics considerations. We were able to fit an equivalent Monod model, by modifying the reaction stoichiometry and biomass yield coefficient, that could effectively match results of the genome-scale simulation of microbial behaviors under excess nutrient conditions, but predictions of the fitted Monod model deviated from those of the genome-scale model under

  13. A continuous time random walk model for Darcy-scale anomalous transport in heterogeneous porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comolli, Alessandro; Hakoun, Vivien; Dentz, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Achieving the understanding of the process of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media is of crucial importance for several environmental and social purposes, ranging from aquifers contamination and remediation, to risk assessment in nuclear waste repositories. The complexity of this aim is mainly ascribable to the heterogeneity of natural media, which can be observed at all the scales of interest, from pore scale to catchment scale. In fact, the intrinsic heterogeneity of porous media is responsible for the arising of the well-known non-Fickian footprints of transport, including heavy-tailed breakthrough curves, non-Gaussian spatial density profiles and the non-linear growth of the mean squared displacement. Several studies investigated the processes through which heterogeneity impacts the transport properties, which include local modifications to the advective-dispersive motion of solutes, mass exchanges between some mobile and immobile phases (e.g. sorption/desorption reactions or diffusion into solid matrix) and spatial correlation of the flow field. In the last decades, the continuous time random walk (CTRW) model has often been used to describe solute transport in heterogenous conditions and to quantify the impact of point heterogeneity, spatial correlation and mass transfer on the average transport properties [1]. Open issues regarding this approach are the possibility to relate measurable properties of the medium to the parameters of the model, as well as its capability to provide predictive information. In a recent work [2] the authors have shed new light on understanding the relationship between Lagrangian and Eulerian dynamics as well as on their evolution from arbitrary initial conditions. On the basis of these results, we derive a CTRW model for the description of Darcy-scale transport in d-dimensional media characterized by spatially random permeability fields. The CTRW approach models particle velocities as a spatial Markov process, which is

  14. Capturing Scale-Dependent Dispersion in Saturated Soils using both Local and Nonlocal Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrard, R. M.; Zhang, Y.; Sun, H.; Xia, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Conservative tracer transport in saturated soils can exhibit scale-dependent dispersion before reaching a Gaussian asymptote. This is most likely due to increasing flow field heterogeneity or the expansion of local velocity distribution experienced by the tracer particles with travel distance. A time nonlocal transport model, previously developed to capture this non-Fickian transport has exhibited an upscaling, sometimes constant, effective dispersion coefficient D from numerical simulations. However, the efficiency of this model has not been systematically checked against real-world data. This study applies and compares both the traditional advection-dispersion equation (ADE) and the time fractional ADE models to quantify solute dynamics moving through 10-meter-long soil columns, where the spatial trend of D can shed light on the scale-dependency of pre-asymptotic dispersion.

  15. Investigation of Micro- and Macro-Scale Transport Processes for Improved Fuel Cell Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Wenbin [General Motors LLC, Pontiac, MI (United States)

    2014-08-29

    This report documents the work performed by General Motors (GM) under the Cooperative agreement No. DE-EE0000470, “Investigation of Micro- and Macro-Scale Transport Processes for Improved Fuel Cell Performance,” in collaboration with the Penn State University (PSU), University of Tennessee Knoxville (UTK), Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), and University of Rochester (UR) via subcontracts. The overall objectives of the project are to investigate and synthesize fundamental understanding of transport phenomena at both the macro- and micro-scales for the development of a down-the-channel model that accounts for all transport domains in a broad operating space. GM as a prime contractor focused on cell level experiments and modeling, and the Universities as subcontractors worked toward fundamental understanding of each component and associated interface.

  16. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Mehmani, Yashar; Perkins, William A.; Pasquali, Andrea; Schönherr, Martin; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Parks, Michael L.; Trask, Nathaniel; Balhoff, Matthew T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Geier, Martin; Krafczyk, Manfred; Luo, Li-Shi; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2016-09-01

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include 1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing a standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of the first type based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (FVM-based CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and (for capable codes) nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The intercomparison work was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides support for confidence

  17. Highways in the sky: scales of atmospheric transport of plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, David G; Ross, Shane D

    2015-01-01

    Many high-risk plant pathogens are transported over long distances (hundreds of meters to thousands of kilometers) in the atmosphere. The ability to track the movement of these pathogens in the atmosphere is essential for forecasting disease spread and establishing effective quarantine measures. Here, we discuss the scales of atmospheric dispersal of plant pathogens along a transport continuum (pathogen scale, farm scale, regional scale, and continental scale). Growers can use risk information at each of these dispersal scales to assist in making plant disease management decisions, such as the timely application of appropriate pesticides. Regional- and continental-scale atmospheric features known as Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) may shuffle plant pathogens along highways in the sky. A promising new method relying on overlapping turbulent back-trajectories of pathogen-laden parcels of air may assist in localizing potential inoculum sources, informing local and/or regional management efforts such as conservation tillage. The emergence of unmanned aircraft systems (UASs, or drones) to sample plant pathogens in the lower atmosphere, coupled with source localization efforts, could aid in mitigating the spread of high-risk plant pathogens.

  18. Pore-Scale Simulations Of Flow And Heat Transport In Saturated Permeable Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegers, G. R., Sr.; Herrera, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The study of heat transport in porous media is important for applications such as the use of temperature as environmental tracer, geothermal energy, fuel cells, etc. In recent years, there have been several advances in computational techniques that have allowed to investigate different processes in porous media at the pore-scale through detailed numerical simulations that considered synthetic porous media formed by regular grains and pore bodies arranged in different geometrical configurations. The main objective of this research is to investigate the influence of pore configurations on flow velocity and heat transport in 2D saturated porous media. We use OpenFOAM to solve flow and heat transport equations at the pore-scale. We performed detailed pore-scale numerical simulations in synthetic 2D porous media generated from regularly placed and randomly distributed circular solid grains. For each geometrical configuration we performed numerical simulations to compute the flow field in order to calculate properties such as as tortuosity, mean velocity and hydraulic conductivity, and to identify Lagrangian coherent structures to charaterize the velocity fields. We then perform heat transport simulations to relate the properties of the velocity fields and the main heat transport mechanisms. The analysis of the simulations results showed that in all the simulated configurations effective flow properties become valid at scales of 10 to 15 pore bodies. For the same porosity and boundary conditions we obtained that as expected tortuosity in the random structure is higher than in the regular configurations, while hydraulic conductivity is smaller for the random case. The results of heat transport simulations show significant differences in temperature distribution for the regular and random pore structures. For the simulated boundary and initial conditions, heat transport is more efficient in the random structure than in the regular geometry. This result indicates that the

  19. Relay transport of aerosols to Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region by multi-scale atmospheric circulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yucong; Guo, Jianping; Liu, Shuhua; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Gen; Yan, Yan; He, Jing

    2017-09-01

    The Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region experiences heavy aerosol pollution, which is found to have close relationships with the synoptic- and local-scale atmospheric circulations. However, how and to what extent these multi-scale circulations interplay to modulate aerosol transport have not been fully understood. To this end, this study comprehensively investigated the impacts of these circulations on aerosol transport in BTH by focusing on an episode occurred on 1 June 2013 through combining both observations and three-dimensional simulations. It was found that during this episode, the Bohai Sea acted as a transfer station, and the high-pressure system over the Yellow Sea and sea-breeze in BTH took turns to affect the transport of aerosols. In the morning, influenced by the high-pressure system, lots of aerosols emitted from Shandong and Jiangsu provinces were first transported to the Bohai Sea. After then, these aerosols were brought to the BTH region in the afternoon through the inland penetration of sea-breeze, significantly exacerbating the air quality in BTH. The inland penetration of sea-breeze could be identified by the sharp changes in ground-based observed temperature, humidity, and wind when the sea-breeze front (SBF) passed by. Combining observations with model outputs, the SBF was found to be able to advance inland more than ∼150 km till reaching Beijing. This study has important implications for better understanding the aerosol transport in BTH, and improving the forecast of such aerosol pollution.

  20. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Mehmani, Yashar; Perkins, William A.; Pasquali, Andrea; Schönherr, Martin; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Parks, Michael L.; Trask, Nathaniel; Balhoff, Matthew T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Geier, Martin; Krafczyk, Manfred; Luo, Li-Shi; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2016-09-01

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include methods that 1) explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) those that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of class 1, based on direct numerical simulation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes, against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of class 1 based on the immersed-boundary method (IMB), lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of class 2 (a pore-network model or PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results with previously reported experimental observations. Experimental observations are limited to measured pore-scale velocities, so solute transport comparisons are made only among the various models. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations).

  1. Translating chimpanzee personality to humans: Investigating the transportability of chimpanzee-derived personality scales to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latzman, Robert D; Sauvigné, Katheryn C; Hopkins, William D

    2016-06-01

    There is a growing interest in the study of personality in chimpanzees with repeated findings of a similar structure of personality in apes to that found in humans. To date, however, the direct translational value of instruments used to assess chimpanzee personality to humans has yet to be explicitly tested. As such, in the current study we sought to determine the transportability of factor analytically-derived chimpanzee personality scales to humans in a large human sample (N = 301). Human informants reporting on target individuals they knew well completed chimpanzee-derived and human-derived measures of personality from the two most widely studied models of human personality: Big Five and Big Three. The correspondence between informant-reported chimpanzee- and human-derived personality scales was then investigated. Results indicated high convergence for corresponding scales across most chimpanzee- and human-derived personality scales. Findings from the current study provide evidence that chimpanzee-derived scales translate well to humans and operate quite similarly to the established human-derived personality scales in a human sample. This evidence of transportability lends support to the translational nature of chimpanzee personality research suggesting clear relevance of this growing literature to humans. Am. J. Primatol. 78:601-609, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. An investigation of the sub-grid variability of trace gases and aerosols for global climate modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Qian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available One fundamental property and limitation of grid based models is their inability to identify spatial details smaller than the grid cell size. While decades of work have gone into developing sub-grid treatments for clouds and land surface processes in climate models, the quantitative understanding of sub-grid processes and variability for aerosols and their precursors is much poorer. In this study, WRF-Chem is used to simulate the trace gases and aerosols over central Mexico during the 2006 MILAGRO field campaign, with multiple spatial resolutions and emission/terrain scenarios. Our analysis focuses on quantifying the sub-grid variability (SGV of trace gases and aerosols within a typical global climate model grid cell, i.e. 75×75 km2.

    Our results suggest that a simulation with 3-km horizontal grid spacing adequately reproduces the overall transport and mixing of trace gases and aerosols downwind of Mexico City, while 75-km horizontal grid spacing is insufficient to represent local emission and terrain-induced flows along the mountain ridge, subsequently affecting the transport and mixing of plumes from nearby sources. Therefore, the coarse model grid cell average may not correctly represent aerosol properties measured over polluted areas. Probability density functions (PDFs for trace gases and aerosols show that secondary trace gases and aerosols, such as O3, sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate, are more likely to have a relatively uniform probability distribution (i.e. smaller SGV over a narrow range of concentration values. Mostly inert and long-lived trace gases and aerosols, such as CO and BC, are more likely to have broad and skewed distributions (i.e. larger SGV over polluted regions. Over remote areas, all trace gases and aerosols are more uniformly distributed compared to polluted areas. Both CO and O3 SGV vertical profiles are nearly constant within the PBL during daytime, indicating that trace gases

  3. A Proactive Complex Event Processing Method for Large-Scale Transportation Internet of Things

    OpenAIRE

    Yongheng Wang; Kening Cao

    2014-01-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) provides a new way to improve the transportation system. The key issue is how to process the numerous events generated by IoT. In this paper, a proactive complex event processing method is proposed for large-scale transportation IoT. Based on a multilayered adaptive dynamic Bayesian model, a Bayesian network structure learning algorithm using search-and-score is proposed to support accurate predictive analytics. A parallel Markov decision processes model is design...

  4. Harvard Forest regional-scale air mass composition by Patterns in Atmospheric Transport History (PATH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, J. L.; Munger, J. W.; Goldstein, A. H.; Jacob, D. J.; Wofsy, S. C.

    1998-06-01

    We calculated 4 years (1990-1993) of back trajectories arriving at Harvard Forest and used them to define patterns in atmospheric transport history. This information was used to assess the degree to which regional-scale transport modulates the chemical composition of air masses sampled at Harvard Forest. Different seasonal signals in trace-gas concentration are derived for different flow patterns. Throughout the year, high-speed transport of cool, dry, cloud-free air from the north and northwest represents background conditions for the Harvard Forest site. These synoptic conditions describe the atmosphere after passage of a cold front. The most polluted conditions in each season occurred under SW flow, with warmer temperatures, higher water vapor mixing ratios, low mixed-layer depths at the site, and a higher frequency of cloudy conditions. These regional-scale air mass characteristics describe synoptic conditions of warm sector transport. In addition to average air mass characteristics, we have analyzed the covariation of species (e.g., O3 versus NOy-NOx; O3 versus CO) to address chemical processes based on transport history. For summer daytime measurements, we show that relatively fresh pollutants arrive in SW flow while the most aged air masses with higher O3 to NOz slopes arrive with W flow, suggesting a Midwestern contribution to regional high-oxidant episodes. These observations of patterns in chemical characteristics related to patterns in transport are corroborated with probability maps indicating the likelihood of transport from upwind regions using trajectories selected for chemical distribution end-members (10th and 90th percentiles).

  5. Full-Scale Accident Testing in Support of Used Nuclear Fuel Transportation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durbin, Samuel G.; Lindgren, Eric R.; Rechard, Rob P.; Sorenson, Ken B.

    2014-09-01

    The safe transport of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste is an important aspect of the waste management system of the United States. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) currently certifies spent nuclear fuel rail cask designs based primarily on numerical modeling of hypothetical accident conditions augmented with some small scale testing. However, NRC initiated a Package Performance Study (PPS) in 2001 to examine the response of full-scale rail casks in extreme transportation accidents. The objectives of PPS were to demonstrate the safety of transportation casks and to provide high-fidelity data for validating the modeling. Although work on the PPS eventually stopped, the Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future recommended in 2012 that the test plans be re-examined. This recommendation was in recognition of substantial public feedback calling for a full-scale severe accident test of a rail cask to verify evaluations by NRC, which find that risk from the transport of spent fuel in certified casks is extremely low. This report, which serves as the re-assessment, provides a summary of the history of the PPS planning, identifies the objectives and technical issues that drove the scope of the PPS, and presents a possible path for moving forward in planning to conduct a full-scale cask test. Because full-scale testing is expensive, the value of such testing on public perceptions and public acceptance is important. Consequently, the path forward starts with a public perception component followed by two additional components: accident simulation and first responder training. The proposed path forward presents a series of study options with several points where the package performance study could be redirected if warranted.

  6. Local scale structures in Earth's thermospheric winds and their consequences for wind driven transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhadly, Manbharat Singh

    In the traditional picture of Earth's upper thermosphere (~190--300 km), it is widely presumed that its convective stability and enormous kinematic viscosity attenuate wind gradients, and hence smooth out any structure present in the wind over scale size of several hundreds of kilometers. However, several independent experimental studies have shown that observed upper thermospheric wind fields at high latitudes contain stronger than expected local-scale spatial structures. The motivation of this dissertation is to investigate how the resulting local-scale gradients would distort neutral air masses and complicate thermospheric wind transport. To achieve this goal, we examined the behavior of a simple parameter that we refer to as the "distortion gradient". It incorporates all of the wind field's departures from uniformity, and is thus capable of representing all resulting contributions to the distortion or mixing of air masses. Climatological analysis of the distortion gradient using 2010, 2011, and 2012 wind data from the All-sky Scanning Doppler Imager (SDI) located at Poker Flat (65.12N, 147.47W) revealed the diurnal and seasonal trends in distortion of thermospheric masses. Distortion was observed to be dependent on geomagnetic activity and orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field. To understand the time-cumulative influence of these local-scale non-uniformities on thermospheric wind driven transport, time-resolved two-dimensional maps of the thermospheric vector wind fields were used to infer forward and backward air parcel trajectories. Tracing air parcel trajectories through a given geographic location indicates where they came from previously, and where they will go in the future. Results show that wind driven transport is very sensitive to small-scale details of the wind field. Any local-scale spatial wind gradients can significantly complicate air parcel trajectories. Transport of thermospheric neutral species in the presence of the local-scale

  7. Investigating the NCQ scaling of elliptic flow at LHC with a multiphase transport model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Liang [Central China Normal University, Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics (MOE) and Institute of Particle Physics, Wuhan (China); Central China Normal University, School of Mathematics and Statistics, Wuhan (China); Li, Hui; Shou, Qi-Ye; Yin, Zhong-Bao [Central China Normal University, Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics (MOE) and Institute of Particle Physics, Wuhan (China); Qin, Hong [Central China Normal University, School of Mathematics and Statistics, Wuhan (China)

    2017-06-15

    The number of constituent quark (NCQ) scaling behavior of elliptic flow has been systematically studied at the LHC energy within the framework of a multiphase transport model (AMPT) in this work. With the variation of the fragmentation parameters, collision centrality and system energy, we find that the initial conditions of parton dynamics are more important than the final state parton cascade process for the existence of NCQ scaling when the hadronic interaction is off in Pb-Pb collisions. By turning on the hadron interaction process, the impacts of hadronic evolution are found to be responsible for a significant violation to the well established scaling structure. Our study suggests that the interpretation of NCQ scaling is not only subject to the hadronization mechanism but also to the initial conditions of parton evolution as well as the hadronic interactions especially for the LHC experiments. (orig.)

  8. Local transport measurements at mesoscopic length scales using scanning tunneling potentiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weigang; Munakata, Ko; Rozler, Michael; Beasley, Malcolm R

    2013-06-07

    Under mesoscopic conditions, the transport potential on a thin film carrying a current is theoretically expected to bear spatial variation due to quantum interference. Scanning tunneling potentiometry is the ideal tool to investigate such variation, by virtue of its high spatial resolution. We report in this Letter the first detailed measurement of transport potential under mesoscopic conditions. Epitaxial graphene at a temperature of 17 K was chosen as the initial system for study because the characteristic transport length scales in this material are relatively large. Tip jumping artifacts are a major possible contribution to systematic errors; and we mitigate such problems by using custom-made slender and sharp tips manufactured by focused ion beam. In our data, we observe residual resistivity dipoles associated with topographical defects, and local peaks and dips in the potential that are not associated with topographical defects.

  9. Cross-Scale Energy Transport and Kinetic Wave Properties Associated with Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas W.

    In the Earth's magnetosphere, the magnetotail plasma sheet ions are much hotter than in the shocked solar wind. On the dawn-sector, the cold-component ions are more abundant and hotter by 30-40 percent when compared to the dusk sector. Recent statistical studies of the flank magnetopause and magnetosheath have shown that the level of temperature asymmetry of the magnetosheath is unable to account for this (Dimmock et al., 2015), so additional physical mechanisms must be at play, either at the magnetopause or plasma sheet, that contribute to this asymmetry. This thesis focuses on ion heating across the magnetopause boundary separating the magnetosheath and the magnetospheric plasmas, which is driven by mechanisms operating on fluid, ion and electron scales. One of the pending problems in collisionless astrophysical plasmas is to understand the plasma heating and transport across three fundamental scales: fluid, ion and electron. Presented here is evidence of the energy transport between the fluid and ion scales: energy is provided by a velocity shear at the magnetopause generating fluid-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability and their rolled-up vortices, where an ion-scale fast magnetosonic wave packet located in the center of a Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex has sufficient energy to account for observed cold-component ion heating. In addition, a statistical analysis is performed on the ion-scale wave properties in the three main plasma regimes common to flank magnetopause boundary crossings when the boundary is unstable to KHI: hot and tenuous magnetospheric, cold and dense magnetosheath and mixed (H. Hasegawa, Fujimoto, Phan, et al., 2004). The statistical analysis shows that during KH events there is enhanced non-adiabatic heating calculated during ion scale wave intervals when compared to non-KH events. This suggests that during KH events there is more free energy for ion-scale wave generation, which in turn can heat ions more effectively when compared to cases when KH

  10. Emergence of criticality in the transportation passenger flow: scaling and renormalization in the Seoul bus system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segun Goh

    Full Text Available Social systems have recently attracted much attention, with attempts to understand social behavior with the aid of statistical mechanics applied to complex systems. Collective properties of such systems emerge from couplings between components, for example, individual persons, transportation nodes such as airports or subway stations, and administrative districts. Among various collective properties, criticality is known as a characteristic property of a complex system, which helps the systems to respond flexibly to external perturbations. This work considers the criticality of the urban transportation system entailed in the massive smart card data on the Seoul transportation network. Analyzing the passenger flow on the Seoul bus system during one week, we find explicit power-law correlations in the system, that is, power-law behavior of the strength correlation function of bus stops and verify scale invariance of the strength fluctuations. Such criticality is probed by means of the scaling and renormalization analysis of the modified gravity model applied to the system. Here a group of nearby (bare bus stops are transformed into a (renormalized "block stop" and the scaling relations of the network density turn out to be closely related to the fractal dimensions of the system, revealing the underlying structure. Specifically, the resulting renormalized values of the gravity exponent and of the Hill coefficient give a good description of the Seoul bus system: The former measures the characteristic dimensionality of the network whereas the latter reflects the coupling between distinct transportation modes. It is thus demonstrated that such ideas of physics as scaling and renormalization can be applied successfully to social phenomena exemplified by the passenger flow.

  11. Field-scale water flow and solute transport : SWAP model concepts, parameter estimation and case studies = [Waterstroming en transport van opgeloste stoffen op veldschaal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Water flow and solute transport in top soils are important elements in many environmental studies. The agro- and ecohydrological model SWAP (Soil-Water-Plant-Atmosphere) has been developed to simulate simultaneously water flow, solute transport, heat flow and crop growth at field scale

  12. Regional-scale lateral carbon transport and CO2 evasion in temperate stream catchments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Magin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Inland waters play an important role in regional to global-scale carbon cycling by transporting, processing and emitting substantial amounts of carbon, which originate mainly from their catchments. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between terrestrial net primary production (NPP and the rate at which carbon is exported from the catchments in a temperate stream network. The analysis included more than 200 catchment areas in southwest Germany, ranging in size from 0.8 to 889 km2 for which CO2 evasion from stream surfaces and downstream transport with stream discharge were estimated from water quality monitoring data, while NPP in the catchments was obtained from a global data set based on remote sensing. We found that on average 13.9 g C m−2 yr−1 (corresponding to 2.7 % of terrestrial NPP are exported from the catchments by streams and rivers, in which both CO2 evasion and downstream transport contributed about equally to this flux. The average carbon fluxes in the catchments of the study area resembled global and large-scale zonal mean values in many respects, including NPP, stream evasion and the carbon export per catchment area in the fluvial network. A review of existing studies on aquatic–terrestrial coupling in the carbon cycle suggests that the carbon export per catchment area varies in a relatively narrow range, despite a broad range of different spatial scales and hydrological characteristics of the study regions.

  13. Regional-scale lateral carbon transport and CO2 evasion in temperate stream catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Katrin; Somlai-Haase, Celia; Schäfer, Ralf B.; Lorke, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    Inland waters play an important role in regional to global-scale carbon cycling by transporting, processing and emitting substantial amounts of carbon, which originate mainly from their catchments. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between terrestrial net primary production (NPP) and the rate at which carbon is exported from the catchments in a temperate stream network. The analysis included more than 200 catchment areas in southwest Germany, ranging in size from 0.8 to 889 km2 for which CO2 evasion from stream surfaces and downstream transport with stream discharge were estimated from water quality monitoring data, while NPP in the catchments was obtained from a global data set based on remote sensing. We found that on average 13.9 g C m-2 yr-1 (corresponding to 2.7 % of terrestrial NPP) are exported from the catchments by streams and rivers, in which both CO2 evasion and downstream transport contributed about equally to this flux. The average carbon fluxes in the catchments of the study area resembled global and large-scale zonal mean values in many respects, including NPP, stream evasion and the carbon export per catchment area in the fluvial network. A review of existing studies on aquatic-terrestrial coupling in the carbon cycle suggests that the carbon export per catchment area varies in a relatively narrow range, despite a broad range of different spatial scales and hydrological characteristics of the study regions.

  14. Simulating Multi-Scale Mercury Fate and Transport in a Coastal Plain Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knightes, C. D.; Davis, G. M.; Golden, H. E.; Conrads, P. A.; Bradley, P. M.; Journey, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Mercury is the toxicant responsible for the largest number of fish advisories across the United States, with 1.1 million river miles under advisory. The processes governing fate, transport, and transformation of mercury in streams and rivers are not well understood, in large part, because these systems are intimately linked with their surrounding watersheds and are often highly spatially variable. In this study, we applied a linked watershed hydrology and biogeochemical cycling (N, C, and Hg) model (VELMA, Visualizing Ecosystems for Land Management Assessment) to simulate daily flow, fluxes, and soil and stream concentrations of total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) at multiple spatial scales in McTier Creek, a Coastal Plain watershed within the Edisto River basin of South Carolina, USA. Our goals were to (1) calibrate and simulate Hg fate and transport processes at a focused reach scale (0.1 km2) and (2) assess how representative the reach-scale parameters and processes are when multi-scale watershed information is included in Hg cycling simulations. Thus, reach-scale parameterization was applied to multi-scaled watersheds, including two headwater sub-watersheds (28 km2 and 25 km2) nested within the McTier Creek watershed (79 km2), to evaluate model performance and how well reach-scale parameterization and processes characterize nested watersheds with increasing drainage areas. The current VELMA simulations suggest that stream water column THg concentration predictions perform reasonably well at different scales based on reach-scale calibrations, but the model simulations of MeHg reach, sub-watershed, and watershed stream concentrations are out-of-phase with observed MeHg concentrations. This result suggests that processes governing MeHg loading to the main channel may be under-represented in the current model structure and underscores the complexity of simulating MeHg dynamics in watershed models. This work supports the importance of hydrology in

  15. Benchmark Study of 3D Pore-scale Flow and Solute Transport Simulation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibe, T. D.; Yang, X.; Mehmani, Y.; Perkins, W. A.; Pasquali, A.; Schoenherr, M.; Kim, K.; Perego, M.; Parks, M. L.; Trask, N.; Balhoff, M.; Richmond, M. C.; Geier, M.; Krafczyk, M.; Luo, L. S.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include 1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that benchmark study to include additional models of the first type based on the immersed-boundary method (IMB), lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all five approaches (FVM-based CFD, IMB, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The benchmark study was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides support for confidence in a variety of pore-scale modeling methods, and motivates further development and application of pore-scale simulation methods.

  16. Final report of the TRUE Block Scale project. 4. Synthesis of flow, transport and retention in the block scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winberg, Anders [Conterra AB (Sweden); Andersson, Peter; Byegaard, Johan [Geosigma AB (Sweden)] [and others

    2003-03-01

    The TRUE Block Scale project was performed at the Aespoe Hard Rock laboratory as an international partnership funded by ANDRA, ENRESA, JNC, Nirex, Posiva and SKB. The project, initiated mid 1996, was divided in a series of defined stages; Scoping Stage, Preliminary Characterisation Stage, Detailed Characterisation Stage, Tracer Test Stage and the Evaluation and Reporting Stage. The specific objectives were to: 1) increase understanding of tracer transport in a fracture network and improve predictive capabilities, 2) assess the importance of tracer retention mechanisms (diffusion and sorption) in a fracture network, and 3) assess the link between flow and transport data as a means for predicting transport phenomena. Characterisation in included drilling, core logging, borehole imaging, borehole radar, 3D seismic surveys, hydraulic tests (flow logging, single hole tests, cross-hole interference tests), tracer dilution tests, hydrogeochemical analyses of groundwater samples and various types of mineralogical, geochemical and petrophysical measurements on drill core samples. Drilling and characterisation of each new borehole was followed by analysis and decision with regards to need and geometry of a subsequent borehole. The main set of tools for determining the conductive geometry and the hydro-structural model was a combination of borehole television (BIPS), high resolution flow logging and pressure responses from drilling and cross-hole interference tests. The constructed hydro-structural model was made up of a set of deterministic sub-vertical structures mainly oriented northwest. Hydraulic features not part of the deterministic set were included in a stochastic background fracture population. Material properties and boundary conditions were also assigned to the developed model. Characteristics and properties measured in the laboratory were integrated in generalised microstructural models. Hypotheses formulated in relation to defined basic questions were addressed

  17. THE IMPORTANCE OF LIMIT SOLUTIONS & TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL SCALES IN THE TEACHING OF TRANSPORT PHENOMENA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SÁVIO LEANDRO BERTOLI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the engineering courses the field of Transport Phenomena is of significant importance and it is in several disciplines relating to Fluid Mechanics, Heat and Mass Transfer. In these disciplines, problems involving these phenomena are mathematically formulated and analytical solutions are obtained whenever possible. The aim of this paper is to emphasize the possibility of extending aspects of the teaching-learning in this area by a method based on time scales and limit solutions. Thus, aspects relative to the phenomenology naturally arise during the definition of the scales and / or by determining the limit solutions. Aspects concerning the phenomenology of the limit problems are easily incorporated into the proposed development, which contributes significantly to the understanding of physics inherent in the mathematical modeling of each limiting case studied. Finally the study aims to disseminate the use of the limit solutions and of the time scales in the general fields of engineering.

  18. Core-scale solute transport model selection using Monte Carlo analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Malama, Bwalya; James, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    Model applicability to core-scale solute transport is evaluated using breakthrough data from column experiments conducted with conservative tracers tritium (H-3) and sodium-22, and the retarding solute uranium-232. The three models considered are single-porosity, double-porosity with single-rate mobile-immobile mass-exchange, and the multirate model, which is a deterministic model that admits the statistics of a random mobile-immobile mass-exchange rate coefficient. The experiments were conducted on intact Culebra Dolomite core samples. Previously, data were analyzed using single- and double-porosity models although the Culebra Dolomite is known to possess multiple types and scales of porosity, and to exhibit multirate mobile-immobile-domain mass transfer characteristics at field scale. The data are reanalyzed here and null-space Monte Carlo analysis is used to facilitate objective model selection. Prediction (or residual) bias is adopted as a measure of the model structural error. The analysis clearly shows ...

  19. Scaling and transport analysis of divertor conditions on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBombard, B.; Goetz, J.; Kurz, C.; Jablonski, D.; Lipschultz, B.; McCracken, G.; Niemczewski, A.; Boivin, R.L.; Bombarda, F.; Christensen, C.; Fairfax, S.; Fiore, C.; Garnier, D.; Graf, M.; Golovato, S.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Horne, S.; Hubbard, A.; Hutchinson, I.; Irby, J.; Kesner, J.; Luke, T.; Marmar, E.; May, M.; O`Shea, P.; Porkolab, M.; Reardon, J.; Rice, J.; Schachter, J.; Snipes, J.; Stek, P.; Takase, Y.; Terry, J.; Tinios, G.; Watterson, R.; Welch, B.; Wolfe, S. [Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Detailed measurements and transport analysis of divertor conditions in Alcator C-Mod [Phys. Plasmas {bold 1}, 1511 (1994)] are presented for a range of line-averaged densities, 0.7{lt}{ital {bar n}}{sub {ital e}}{lt}2.2{times}10{sup 20} m{sup {minus}3}. Three parallel heat transport regimes are evident in the scrape-off layer: sheath-limited conduction, high-recycling divertor, and detached divertor, which can coexist in the same discharge. {ital Local} cross-field pressure gradients are found to scale simply with a {ital local} electron temperature. This scaling is consistent with classical electron parallel conduction being balanced by anomalous cross-field transport ({chi}{sub {perpendicular}}{similar_to}0.2 m{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1}) proportional to the local pressure gradient. A 60%--80% of divertor power is radiated in attached discharges, approaching 100% in detached discharges. Detachment occurs when the heat flux to the plate is low and the plasma pressure is high ({ital T}{sub {ital e}}{similar_to}5 eV). High neutral pressures in the divertor are nearly always present (1--20 mTorr), sufficient to remove parallel momentum via ion--neutral collisions.

  20. A global data set of soil hydraulic properties and sub-grid variability of soil water retention and hydraulic conductivity curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montzka, Carsten; Herbst, Michael; Weihermüller, Lutz; Verhoef, Anne; Vereecken, Harry

    2017-07-01

    Agroecosystem models, regional and global climate models, and numerical weather prediction models require adequate parameterization of soil hydraulic properties. These properties are fundamental for describing and predicting water and energy exchange processes at the transition zone between solid earth and atmosphere, and regulate evapotranspiration, infiltration and runoff generation. Hydraulic parameters describing the soil water retention (WRC) and hydraulic conductivity (HCC) curves are typically derived from soil texture via pedotransfer functions (PTFs). Resampling of those parameters for specific model grids is typically performed by different aggregation approaches such a spatial averaging and the use of dominant textural properties or soil classes. These aggregation approaches introduce uncertainty, bias and parameter inconsistencies throughout spatial scales due to nonlinear relationships between hydraulic parameters and soil texture. Therefore, we present a method to scale hydraulic parameters to individual model grids and provide a global data set that overcomes the mentioned problems. The approach is based on Miller-Miller scaling in the relaxed form by Warrick, that fits the parameters of the WRC through all sub-grid WRCs to provide an effective parameterization for the grid cell at model resolution; at the same time it preserves the information of sub-grid variability of the water retention curve by deriving local scaling parameters. Based on the Mualem-van Genuchten approach we also derive the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity from the water retention functions, thereby assuming that the local parameters are also valid for this function. In addition, via the Warrick scaling parameter λ, information on global sub-grid scaling variance is given that enables modellers to improve dynamical downscaling of (regional) climate models or to perturb hydraulic parameters for model ensemble output generation. The present analysis is based on the ROSETTA PTF

  1. A global data set of soil hydraulic properties and sub-grid variability of soil water retention and hydraulic conductivity curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Montzka

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Agroecosystem models, regional and global climate models, and numerical weather prediction models require adequate parameterization of soil hydraulic properties. These properties are fundamental for describing and predicting water and energy exchange processes at the transition zone between solid earth and atmosphere, and regulate evapotranspiration, infiltration and runoff generation. Hydraulic parameters describing the soil water retention (WRC and hydraulic conductivity (HCC curves are typically derived from soil texture via pedotransfer functions (PTFs. Resampling of those parameters for specific model grids is typically performed by different aggregation approaches such a spatial averaging and the use of dominant textural properties or soil classes. These aggregation approaches introduce uncertainty, bias and parameter inconsistencies throughout spatial scales due to nonlinear relationships between hydraulic parameters and soil texture. Therefore, we present a method to scale hydraulic parameters to individual model grids and provide a global data set that overcomes the mentioned problems. The approach is based on Miller–Miller scaling in the relaxed form by Warrick, that fits the parameters of the WRC through all sub-grid WRCs to provide an effective parameterization for the grid cell at model resolution; at the same time it preserves the information of sub-grid variability of the water retention curve by deriving local scaling parameters. Based on the Mualem–van Genuchten approach we also derive the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity from the water retention functions, thereby assuming that the local parameters are also valid for this function. In addition, via the Warrick scaling parameter λ, information on global sub-grid scaling variance is given that enables modellers to improve dynamical downscaling of (regional climate models or to perturb hydraulic parameters for model ensemble output generation. The present analysis is based

  2. Meso-Scale Stochastic Model for Flow and Transport in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovsky, A. M.; Tartakovsky, D. M.; Meakin, P.

    2008-12-01

    In a homogeneous porous medium, dispersive mixing is the result of a combination of molecular diffusion (diffusive mixing) and spreading due to variations in the fluid velocity (advective mixing). In traditional Darcy(continuum)-scale models this combination is treated as a Fickian diffusion process with a macro-scale effective diffusion coefficient (the dispersion coefficient). However, dispersive mixing is very different from purely diffusive mixing and there is ample evidence that the advection-dispersion equations significantly over-predict the extent of reactions in mixing induced chemical transformations. We have developed a new meso-scale stochastic Lagrangian particle model that treats advective mixing and diffusive mixing separately. We assume that fluid flow in homogeneous porous media is governed by a stochastic Langevin equation that is obtained by adding white noise fluctuations to the momentum conservation equation. The noise represents the random interactions between the fluid and the disordered porous medium, which forces fluid flow paths to deviate from the smooth flow paths predicted by the Darcy scale continuum flow equations. The molecular diffusion of solutes carried by the fluid is governed by the classical advection-diffusion equation, which becomes stochastic due to random advection. The stochastic meso-scale model and deterministic advection-dispersion theory were used to simulate the reactive mixing of two solutions injected in parallel into a flow domain. IN the stochastic model, the transport equations were numerically solved using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), a Lagrangian particle method that has been previously applied to both deterministic and stochastic transport problems. Comparison of the two solutions revealed that the Langevin model gives better estimates of concentrations than the Darcy scale advection-dispersion model, and that the Darcy scale model significantly overestimates the amount of product in mixing induced

  3. Autonomous Operation of Hybrid Microgrid with AC and DC Sub-Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loh, Poh Chiang; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates on the active and reactive power sharing of an autonomous hybrid microgrid. Unlike existing microgrids which are purely ac, the hybrid microgrid studied here comprises dc and ac sub-grids, interconnected by power electronic interfaces. The main challenge here is to manage...... the power flow among all the sources distributed throughout the two types of sub-grids, which certainly is tougher than previous efforts developed for only either ac or dc microgrid. This wider scope of control has not yet been investigated, and would certainly rely on the coordinated operation of dc...... sources, ac sources and interlinking converters. Suitable control and normalization schemes are therefore developed for controlling them with results presented for showing the overall performance of the hybrid microgrid....

  4. A Two-Stage Approach for Medical Supplies Intermodal Transportation in Large-Scale Disaster Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Junhu; Wang, Xuping; Shi, Yan

    2014-01-01

    We present a two-stage approach for the “helicopters and vehicles” intermodal transportation of medical supplies in large-scale disaster responses. In the first stage, a fuzzy-based method and its heuristic algorithm are developed to select the locations of temporary distribution centers (TDCs) and assign medial aid points (MAPs) to each TDC. In the second stage, an integer-programming model is developed to determine the delivery routes. Numerical experiments verified the effectiveness of the approach, and observed several findings: (i) More TDCs often increase the efficiency and utility of medical supplies; (ii) It is not definitely true that vehicles should load more and more medical supplies in emergency responses; (iii) The more contrasting the traveling speeds of helicopters and vehicles are, the more advantageous the intermodal transportation is. PMID:25350005

  5. A Two-Stage Approach for Medical Supplies Intermodal Transportation in Large-Scale Disaster Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhu Ruan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a two-stage approach for the “helicopters and vehicles” intermodal transportation of medical supplies in large-scale disaster responses. In the first stage, a fuzzy-based method and its heuristic algorithm are developed to select the locations of temporary distribution centers (TDCs and assign medial aid points (MAPs to each TDC. In the second stage, an integer-programming model is developed to determine the delivery routes. Numerical experiments verified the effectiveness of the approach, and observed several findings: (i More TDCs often increase the efficiency and utility of medical supplies; (ii It is not definitely true that vehicles should load more and more medical supplies in emergency responses; (iii The more contrasting the traveling speeds of helicopters and vehicles are, the more advantageous the intermodal transportation is.

  6. Pore-scale analysis on the effects of compound-specific dilution on transient transport and solute breakthrough

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolle, Massimo; Kitanidis, Peter

    breakthrough curves. Such dilution breakthrough curves allow capturing the compound-specific mixing of the different solutes and provide useful insights on the interplay between advective and diffusive processes, mass transfer limitations, and incomplete mixing in the heterogeneous pore-scale domains......Compound-specific diffusivities significantly impact solute transport and mixing at different scales. Although diffusive processes occur at the small pore scale, their effects propagate and remain important at larger macroscopic scales [1]. In this pore-scale modeling study in saturated porous...... media we show that compound-specific effects are important not only at steady-state and for the lateral displacement of solutes with different diffusivities but also for transient transport and solute breakthrough [2]. We performed flow and transport simulations in two-dimensional pore-scale domains...

  7. Multi-Scale Microstructural Thermoelectric Materials: Transport Behavior, Non-Equilibrium Preparation, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xianli; Wei, Ping; Li, Han; Liu, Wei; Yan, Yonggao; Li, Peng; Su, Chuqi; Xie, Changjun; Zhao, Wenyu; Zhai, Pengcheng; Zhang, Qingjie; Tang, Xinfeng; Uher, Ctirad

    2017-05-01

    Considering only about one third of the world's energy consumption is effectively utilized for functional uses, and the remaining is dissipated as waste heat, thermoelectric (TE) materials, which offer a direct and clean thermal-to-electric conversion pathway, have generated a tremendous worldwide interest. The last two decades have witnessed a remarkable development in TE materials. This Review summarizes the efforts devoted to the study of non-equilibrium synthesis of TE materials with multi-scale structures, their transport behavior, and areas of applications. Studies that work towards the ultimate goal of developing highly efficient TE materials possessing multi-scale architectures are highlighted, encompassing the optimization of TE performance via engineering the structures with different dimensional aspects spanning from the atomic and molecular scales, to nanometer sizes, and to the mesoscale. In consideration of the practical applications of high-performance TE materials, the non-equilibrium approaches offer a fast and controllable fabrication of multi-scale microstructures, and their scale up to industrial-size manufacturing is emphasized here. Finally, the design of two integrated power generating TE systems are described-a solar thermoelectric-photovoltaic hybrid system and a vehicle waste heat harvesting system-that represent perhaps the most important applications of thermoelectricity in the energy conversion area. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Analysis of subgrid models of heat convection by symmetry group theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razafindralandy, Dina; Hamdouni, Aziz

    2007-04-01

    Symmetries, i.e. transformations which leave the set of the solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations unchanged, play an important role in turbulence (conservation laws, wall laws, …). They should not be destroyed by turbulence models. The symmetries of the heat convection equations are then presented, for a non-isothermal fluid. Next, common subgrid stress tensor and flux models are analyzed, using the symmetry approach. To cite this article: D. Razafindralandy, A. Hamdouni, C. R. Mecanique 335 (2007).

  9. Biomass Energy for Transport and Electricity: Large scale utilization under low CO2 concentration scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luckow, Patrick; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.

    2010-01-25

    This paper examines the potential role of large scale, dedicated commercial biomass energy systems under global climate policies designed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO2 at 400ppm and 450ppm. We use an integrated assessment model of energy and agriculture systems to show that, given a climate policy in which terrestrial carbon is appropriately valued equally with carbon emitted from the energy system, biomass energy has the potential to be a major component of achieving these low concentration targets. The costs of processing and transporting biomass energy at much larger scales than current experience are also incorporated into the modeling. From the scenario results, 120-160 EJ/year of biomass energy is produced by midcentury and 200-250 EJ/year by the end of this century. In the first half of the century, much of this biomass is from agricultural and forest residues, but after 2050 dedicated cellulosic biomass crops become the dominant source. A key finding of this paper is the role that carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies coupled with commercial biomass energy can play in meeting stringent emissions targets. Despite the higher technology costs of CCS, the resulting negative emissions used in combination with biomass are a very important tool in controlling the cost of meeting a target, offsetting the venting of CO2 from sectors of the energy system that may be more expensive to mitigate, such as oil use in transportation. The paper also discusses the role of cellulosic ethanol and Fischer-Tropsch biomass derived transportation fuels and shows that both technologies are important contributors to liquid fuels production, with unique costs and emissions characteristics. Through application of the GCAM integrated assessment model, it becomes clear that, given CCS availability, bioenergy will be used both in electricity and transportation.

  10. Model Validation for Propulsion - On the TFNS and LES Subgrid Models for a Bluff Body Stabilized Flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wey, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    With advances in computational power and availability of distributed computers, the use of even the most complex of turbulent chemical interaction models in combustors and coupled analysis of combustors and turbines is now possible and more and more affordable for realistic geometries. Recent more stringent emission standards have enticed the development of more fuel-efficient and low-emission combustion system for aircraft gas turbine applications. It is known that the NOx emissions tend to increase dramatically with increasing flame temperature. It is well known that the major difficulty, when modeling the turbulence-chemistry interaction, lies in the high non-linearity of the reaction rate expressed in terms of the temperature and species mass fractions. The transport filtered density function (FDF) model and the linear eddy model (LEM), which both use local instantaneous values of the temperature and mass fractions, have been shown to often provide more accurate results of turbulent combustion. In the present, the time-filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) approach capable of capturing unsteady flow structures important for turbulent mixing in the combustion chamber and two different subgrid models, LEM-like and EUPDF-like, capable of emulating the major processes occurring in the turbulence-chemistry interaction will be used to perform reacting flow simulations of a selected test case. The selected test case from the Volvo Validation Rig was documented by Sjunnesson.

  11. Crash response data system for the controlled impact demonstration (CID) of a full scale transport aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calloway, Raymond S.; Knight, Vernie H., Jr.

    NASA Langley's Crash Response Data System (CRDS) which is designed to acquire aircraft structural and anthropomorphic dummy responses during the full-scale transport CID test is described. Included in the discussion are the system design approach, details on key instrumentation subsystems and operations, overall instrumentation crash performance, and data recovery results. Two autonomous high-environment digital flight instrumentation systems, DAS 1 and DAS 2, were employed to obtain research data from various strain gage, accelerometer, and tensiometric sensors installed in the B-720 test aircraft. The CRDS successfully acquired 343 out of 352 measurements of dynamic crash data.

  12. Stochastic Modeling Of Field-Scale Water And Solute Transport Through The Unsaturated Zone Of Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loll, Per

    were previously thought not to pose a leaching threat. Thus, a reevaluation of our understanding of the mechanisms governing chemical fate in the unsaturated zone of soils has been necessary, in order for us to make better decisions regarding widely different issues such as agricultural management...... of pesticides and nutrients, and risk identification and assessment at polluted (industrial) sites. One of the key factors requiring our attention when we are trying to predict field-scale chemical leaching is spatial variability of the soil and the influence it exerts on both water and chemical transport...

  13. Modular, object-oriented redesign of a large-scale Monte Carlo neutron transport program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskowitz, B.S.

    2000-02-01

    This paper describes the modular, object-oriented redesign of a large-scale Monte Carlo neutron transport program. This effort represents a complete 'white sheet of paper' rewrite of the code. In this paper, the motivation driving this project, the design objectives for the new version of the program, and the design choices and their consequences will be discussed. The design itself will also be described, including the important subsystems as well as the key classes within those subsystems.

  14. Biogeochemical Signatures of Contaminant Transport at the Watershed Scale: Spectral and Wavelet Analysis (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, K.; Harman, C. J.; Basu, N. B.; Rao, S. S.; Sivapalan, M.; Kalita, P. K.; Packman, A. I.

    2009-12-01

    Agricultural watersheds are intensely managed systems, and consist of a large number of dynamic components that interact non-linearly to create emergent patterns in space and time. These systems can be conceptualized as input signals (“drivers”) that cascade through a hierarchy of non-linear “filters” to create the modulated spatial and temporal responses (“signatures”). The coupling between flow and transport (“hydrologic filter”) and transformations (“biogeochemical filter”) control the cascading processes from precipitation through stream flow, and finally to chemical concentrations and loads, at various nested spatial and temporal scales. To detect important “signatures”, we applied spectral analysis and wavelet coherence to the 10-year dataset (at daily resolution) collected from Little Vermillion River watershed (Illinois, USA), an agricultural watershed (~400 km2), drained by an extensive network of subsurface tiles, surface ditches, and streams. Watershed monitoring data includes hydrologic measurements (flow and stage), and concentrations of chemical constituents (nitrate, phosphate, and pesticides) across different spatial scales, from tile-flow stations (drainage area ~ 0.05 km2) to river stations (drainage area ~400 km2). We find that a power-law scaling behavior exists in all the smoothed power spectra for precipitation, stream flow, nitrate concentration and load. The slopes of power spectra increase from precipitation to stream flow to nitrate concentration, demonstrating the cascading effect of the filters. The spectral analysis further shows that the filters retain the major characteristics of long-term response (annual and sub-annual cycle), but smooth (or filter) the short-term responses. Steeper slopes are observed at larger spatial scales, indicating a stronger filtering effect due to greater averaging (buffering) with increasing residence time. Further data analysis using wavelet coherence suggests that at small spatial

  15. Non-Fickian dispersive transport of strontium in laboratory-scale columns: Modelling and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongxu; Jivkov, Andrey P.; Wang, Lichun; Si, Gaohua; Yu, Jing

    2017-06-01

    In the context of environmental remediation of contaminated sites and safety assessment of nuclear waste disposal in the near-surface zone, we investigate the leaching and non-Fickian dispersive migration with sorption of strontium (mocking strontium-90) through columns packed with sand and clay. Analysis is based on breakthrough curves (BTCs) from column experiments, which simulated rainfall infiltration and source term release scenario, rather than applying constant tracer solution at the inlet as commonly used. BTCs are re-evaluated and transport parameters are estimated by inverse modelling using two approaches: (1) equilibrium advection-dispersion equation (ADE); and (2) continuous time random walk (CTRW). Firstly, based on a method for calculating leach concentration, the inlet condition with an exponential decay input is identified. Secondly, the results show that approximately 39%-58% of Br- and 16%-49% of Sr2+ are eluted from the columns at the end of the breakthrough experiments. This suggests that trapping mechanisms, including diffusion into immobile zones and attachment of tracer on mineral surfaces, are more pronounced for Sr2+ than for Br-. Thirdly, we demonstrate robustness of CTRW-based truncated power-law (TPL) model in capturing non-Fickian reactive transport with 0 2. The non-Fickian dispersion observed experimentally is explained by variations of local flow field from preferential flow paths due to physical heterogeneities. Particularly, the additional sorption process of strontium on clay minerals contributes to the delay of the peak concentration and the tailing features, which leads to an enhanced non-Fickian transport for strontium. Finally, the ADE and CTRW approaches to environmental modelling are evaluated. It is shown that CTRW with a sorption term can describe non-Fickian dispersive transport of strontium at laboratory scale by identifying appropriate parameters, while the traditional ADE with a retardation factor fails to reproduce

  16. Basin-scale transport of hydrothermal dissolved metals across the South Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resing, Joseph A; Sedwick, Peter N; German, Christopher R; Jenkins, William J; Moffett, James W; Sohst, Bettina M; Tagliabue, Alessandro

    2015-07-09

    Hydrothermal venting along mid-ocean ridges exerts an important control on the chemical composition of sea water by serving as a major source or sink for a number of trace elements in the ocean. Of these, iron has received considerable attention because of its role as an essential and often limiting nutrient for primary production in regions of the ocean that are of critical importance for the global carbon cycle. It has been thought that most of the dissolved iron discharged by hydrothermal vents is lost from solution close to ridge-axis sources and is thus of limited importance for ocean biogeochemistry. This long-standing view is challenged by recent studies which suggest that stabilization of hydrothermal dissolved iron may facilitate its long-range oceanic transport. Such transport has been subsequently inferred from spatially limited oceanographic observations. Here we report data from the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect (EPZT) that demonstrate lateral transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron, manganese, and aluminium from the southern East Pacific Rise (SEPR) several thousand kilometres westward across the South Pacific Ocean. Dissolved iron exhibits nearly conservative (that is, no loss from solution during transport and mixing) behaviour in this hydrothermal plume, implying a greater longevity in the deep ocean than previously assumed. Based on our observations, we estimate a global hydrothermal dissolved iron input of three to four gigamoles per year to the ocean interior, which is more than fourfold higher than previous estimates. Complementary simulations with a global-scale ocean biogeochemical model suggest that the observed transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron requires some means of physicochemical stabilization and indicate that hydrothermally derived iron sustains a large fraction of Southern Ocean export production.

  17. Development of a remote sensing network for time-sensitive detection of fine scale damage to transportation infrastructure : [final report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-23

    This research project aimed to develop a remote sensing system capable of rapidly identifying fine-scale damage to critical transportation infrastructure following hazard events. Such a system must be pre-planned for rapid deployment, automate proces...

  18. Modeling watershed-scale solute transport using an integrated, process-based hydrologic model with applications to bacterial fate and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jie; Phanikumar, Mantha S.

    2015-10-01

    Distributed hydrologic models that simulate fate and transport processes at sub-daily timescales are useful tools for estimating pollutant loads exported from watersheds to lakes and oceans downstream. There has been considerable interest in the application of integrated process-based hydrologic models in recent years. While the models have been applied to address questions of water quantity and to better understand linkages between hydrology and land surface processes, routine applications of these models to address water quality issues are currently limited. In this paper, we first describe a general process-based watershed-scale solute transport modeling framework, based on an operator splitting strategy and a Lagrangian particle transport method combined with dispersion and reactions. The transport and the hydrologic modules are tightly coupled and the interactions among different hydrologic components are explicitly modeled. We test transport modules using data from plot-scale experiments and available analytical solutions for different hydrologic domains. The numerical solutions are also compared with an analytical solution for groundwater transit times with interactions between surface and subsurface flows. Finally, we demonstrate the application of the model to simulate bacterial fate and transport in the Red Cedar River watershed in Michigan and test hypotheses about sources and transport pathways. The watershed bacterial fate and transport model is expected to be useful for making near real-time predictions at marine and freshwater beaches.

  19. First-principles electron transport with phonon coupling: Large scale at low cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunst, Tue; Markussen, Troels; Palsgaard, Mattias L. N.; Stokbro, Kurt; Brandbyge, Mads

    2017-10-01

    Phonon-assisted tunneling plays a crucial role for electronic device performance and even more so with future size down-scaling. We show how one can include this effect in large-scale first-principles calculations using a single "special thermal displacement" (STD) of the atomic coordinates at almost the same cost as elastic transport calculations, by extending the recent method of Zacharias et al. [Phys. Rev. B 94, 075125 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.94.075125] to the important case of Landauer conductance. We apply the method to ultrascaled silicon devices and demonstrate the importance of phonon-assisted band-to-band and source-to-drain tunneling. In a diode the phonons lead to a rectification ratio suppression in good agreement with experiments, while in an ultrathin body transistor the phonons increase off currents by four orders of magnitude, and the subthreshold swing by a factor of 4, in agreement with perturbation theory.

  20. A Multiblock Approach to Pore-Scale Modeling of Reactive Transport with Applications to Carbon Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    mehmani, Y.; Sun, T.; Balhoff, M.; Bryant, S. L.; Eichhubl, P.

    2012-12-01

    In order to safely store CO2 in depleted reservoirs and deep saline aquifers, a better understanding of the storage mechanisms of CO2 is required. Reaction of CO2 with minerals to form precipitate in the subsurface helps to securely store CO2 over geologic time periods, but a concern is the formation of localized channels through which CO2 could travel at large, localized rates. Pore-scale network modeling is an attractive option for modeling and understanding this inherently pore-level process, but the relatively small domains of network models may prevent capturing of any such "emergent phenomena" and more importantly their study. Here, we develop a transient, single-phase, reactive pore-network model that includes reduction of throat conductivity as a result of precipitation. The novelty of this work is the implementation of a new Mortar/Transport method for coupling pore networks together at model interfaces that ensure continuity of pressures, species concentrations, and fluxes. Coupled sub-domains are solved separately in parallel and information is effectively communicated between them via the coupling process. The multiscale method can be further applied to modeling of multi-species/multiphase transport phenomena in highly heterogeneous media arising in various subsurface applications, and may potentially be applied to the seamless inclusion of pore-scale models in continuum simulators. The coupling allows for modeling at larger scales which may lead to more accurate upscaling approaches. Here, we couple pore-scale models with large variation in permeability and porosity which results initial preferential pathways for flow. Our simulation results suggest that the preferential pathways close in time due to precipitation, but are not redirected at late times.

  1. Multiphase Carbon-14 Transport in a Near-Field-Scale Unsaturated Column of Natural Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. T. Fox; Mitchell A. Plummer; Larry C. Hull; D. Craig Cooper

    2004-03-01

    Wastes buried at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory include activated metals that release radioactive carbon-14 (14C) as they corrode. To better understand 14C phase partitioning and transport in the SDA sediments, we conducted a series of transport experiments using 14C (radio-labeled sodium carbonate) and nonreactive gas (sulfur hexafluoride) and aqueous (bromide and tritiated water) tracers in a large (2.6-m high by 0.9-m diameter) column of sediments similar to those used as cover material at the SDA. We established steady-state unsaturated flow prior to injecting tracers into the column. Tracer migration was monitored using pore-water and pore-gas samples taken from co-located suction lysimeters and gas ports inserted at ~0.3-m intervals along the column’s length. Measurements of 14C discharged from the sediment to the atmosphere (i.e., 14CO2 flux) indicate a positive correlation between CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) in the column and changes in 14CO2 flux. Though 14CO2 diffusion is expected to be independent of pCO2, changes of pCO2 affect pore water chemistry sufficiently to affect aqueous/gas phase 14C partitioning and consequently 14C2 flux. Pore-water and -gas 14C activity measurements provide an average aqueous/gas partitioning ratio, Kag, of 4.5 (±0.3). This value is consistent with that calculated using standard carbonate equilibrium expressions with measured pH, suggesting the ability to estimate Kag from carbonate equilibrium. One year after the 14C injection, the column was cored and solid-phase 14C activity was measured. The average aqueous/solid partition coefficient, Kd, (1.6 L kg-1) was consistent with those derived from small-scale and short-term batch and column experiments using SDA sediments, suggesting that bench-scale measurements are a valid means of estimating aqueous/solid partitioning at the much larger spatial scale considered in these meso-scale experiments. However

  2. Nano iron particles transport in fractured rocks: laboratory and field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Meirav; Weisbrod, Noam

    2017-04-01

    Our study deals with the transport potential of nano iron particles (NIPs) in fractured media. Two different systemswere used to investigate transport on two scales: (1 )a laboratory flow system of a naturally discrete fractured chalk core, 0.43 and 0.18 m in length and diamater, respectively; and (2) a field system of hydraulically connected boreholes located 47 m apart which penetrate a fractured chalk aquifer. We started by testing the transport potential of various NIPs under different conditions. Particle stability experiments were conducted using various NIPs and different stabilizersat two ionic strengths. Overall, four different NIPs and three stabilizers were tested. Particles and solution properties (stability, aggregate/particle size, viscosity and density) were tested in batch experiments, and transport experiments (breakthrough curves (BTCs) and recovery) were conduted in the fractured chalk core. We have learned that the key parameters controlling particle transport are the particle/aggregate size and stability, which govern NIP settling rates and ultimately their migration distance. The governing mechanism controlling NIP transport was found to be sedimentation, and to a much lesser extent, processes such as diffusion, straining or interception. On the basis of these experiments, Carbo-Iron® particles ( 800 nm activated carbon particles doped with nano zero valent iron particles) and Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) stabilizer were selected for the field test injection. In the field, Carbo-Iron particles were initially injected into the fractured aquifer using an excess of stabilizer in order to ensure maximum recovery. This resulted in high particle recovery and fast arrival time, similar to the ideal tracer (iodide). The high recovery of the stable particle solution emphasized the importance of particle stability for transport in fractures. To test mobility manipulation potential of the particles and simulate more realistic scenarios, a second field

  3. Site-to-canister scale flow and transport in Haestholmen, Kivetty, Olkiluoto and Romuvaara

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poteri, A.; Laitinen, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-05-01

    Radioactive waste is originating from production of electricity in nuclear power plants. Most of the waste has only low or intermediate levels of radioactivity. However, the spent nuclear fuel is highly radioactive and it has to be isolated from the biosphere. The current nuclear waste management plan in Finland is based on direct disposal of the spent nuclear fuel deep underground. The only feasible mechanism for the radionuclides to escape from an underground repository is to be carried by the groundwater flow after the failure of waste containers. The scope of this study is to examine the groundwater flow situation and transport properties in the vicinity of the disposal canister and along the potential release paths from the repository into the biosphere. The results of this study are further applied in the site specific safety analysis of a spent fuel repository. Synthesis is made of the porous medium estimates of the groundwater flow in the regional and site scales and the detailed fracture network analysis of the flow in the canister scale. This synthesis includes estimation of the transport properties from the canister into the biosphere and flow rates around the deposition holes of the waste canisters. The modelling has been carried out for four different sites: Hastholmen, Kivetty, Olkiluoto and Romavaara. According to the simulations groundwater flow rate around the deposition holes is less than about 1 litre/a for about 75 % of the deposition holes. For about 5 % of the deposition holes the flow rates are a few litres per year or higher. The highest flow rates resulted at Hastholmen, in fresh water conditions 10 000 years after present, and at Kivetty. The transport resistances were calculated for the `worst` flow paths that might have impact on the safety of the repository. The total transport resistances from the repository into the biosphere along those flow paths varied between about 40 000 a/m and 5-10{sup 6} a/m. Most of the total transport

  4. Improving representation of convective transport for scale-aware parameterization: 2. Analysis of cloud-resolving model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Chin; Fan, Jiwen; Zhang, Guang J.; Xu, Kuan-Man; Ghan, Steven J.

    2015-04-01

    Following Part I, in which 3-D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations of a squall line and mesoscale convective complex in the midlatitude continental and the tropical regions are conducted and evaluated, we examine the scale dependence of eddy transport of water vapor, evaluate different eddy transport formulations, and improve the representation of convective transport across all scales by proposing a new formulation that more accurately represents the CRM-calculated eddy flux. CRM results show that there are strong grid-spacing dependencies of updraft and downdraft fractions regardless of altitudes, cloud life stage, and geographical location. As for the eddy transport of water vapor, updraft eddy flux is a major contributor to total eddy flux in the lower and middle troposphere. However, downdraft eddy transport can be as large as updraft eddy transport in the lower atmosphere especially at the mature stage of midlatitude continental convection. We show that the single-updraft approach significantly underestimates updraft eddy transport of water vapor because it fails to account for the large internal variability of updrafts, while a single downdraft represents the downdraft eddy transport of water vapor well. We find that using as few as three updrafts can account for the internal variability of updrafts well. Based on the evaluation with the CRM simulated data, we recommend a simplified eddy transport formulation that considers three updrafts and one downdraft. Such formulation is similar to the conventional one but much more accurately represents CRM-simulated eddy flux across all grid scales.

  5. Multi-dimensional upwinding-based implicit LES for the vorticity transport equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, Daniel; Duraisamy, Karthik

    2017-11-01

    Complex turbulent flows such as rotorcraft and wind turbine wakes are characterized by the presence of strong coherent structures that can be compactly described by vorticity variables. The vorticity-velocity formulation of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is employed to increase numerical efficiency. Compared to the traditional velocity-pressure formulation, high order numerical methods and sub-grid scale models for the vorticity transport equation (VTE) have not been fully investigated. Consistent treatment of the convection and stretching terms also needs to be addressed. Our belief is that, by carefully designing sharp gradient-capturing numerical schemes, coherent structures can be more efficiently captured using the vorticity-velocity formulation. In this work, a multidimensional upwind approach for the VTE is developed using the generalized Riemann problem-based scheme devised by Parish et al. (Computers & Fluids, 2016). The algorithm obtains high resolution by augmenting the upwind fluxes with transverse and normal direction corrections. The approach is investigated with several canonical vortex-dominated flows including isolated and interacting vortices and turbulent flows. The capability of the technique to represent sub-grid scale effects is also assessed. Navy contract titled ``Turbulence Modelling Across Disparate Length Scales for Naval Computational Fluid Dynamics Applications,'' through Continuum Dynamics, Inc.

  6. Large-scale simulation of flow and transport in reconstructed HPLC-microchip packings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khirevich, Siarhei; Höltzel, Alexandra; Ehlert, Steffen; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2009-06-15

    Flow and transport in a particle-packed microchip separation channel were investigated with quantitative numerical analysis methods, comprising the generation of confined, polydisperse sphere packings by a modified Jodrey-Tory algorithm, 3D velocity field calculations by the lattice-Boltzmann method, and modeling of convective-diffusive mass transport with a random-walk particle-tracking approach. For the simulations, the exact conduit cross section, the particle-size distribution of the packing material, and the respective average interparticle porosity (packing density) of the HPLC-microchip packings was reconstructed. Large-scale simulation of flow and transport at Peclet numbers of up to Pe = 140 in the reconstructed microchip packings (containing more than 3 x 10(5) spheres) was facilitated by the efficient use of supercomputer power. Porosity distributions and fluid flow velocity profiles for the reconstructed microchip packings are presented and analyzed. Aberrations from regular geometrical conduit shape are shown to influence packing structure and, thus, porosity and velocity distributions. Simulated axial dispersion coefficients are discussed with respect to their dependence on flow velocity and bed porosity. It is shown by comparison to experimental separation efficiencies that the simulated data genuinely reflect the general dispersion behavior of the real-life HPLC-microchip packings. Differences between experiment and simulation are explained by differing morphologies of real and simulated packings (intraparticle porosity, packing structure in the corner regions).

  7. Multi-scale nitrate transport in a sandstone aquifer system under intensive agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Daniel; Ballard, Jean-Marc; Lefebvre, René; Savard, Martine M.

    2017-09-01

    Nitrate transport in heterogeneous bedrock aquifers is influenced by mechanisms that operate at different spatial and temporal scales. To understand these mechanisms in a fractured sandstone aquifer with high porosity, a groundwater-flow and nitrate transport model—reproducing multiple hydraulic and chemical targets—was developed to explain the actual nitrate contamination observed in groundwater and surface water in a study area on Prince Edward Island, Canada. Simulations show that nitrate is leached to the aquifer year-round, with 61% coming from untransformed and transformed organic sources originating from fertilizers and manure. This nitrate reaches the more permeable shallow aquifer through fractures in weathered sandstone that represent only 1% of the total porosity (17%). Some of the nitrate reaches the underlying aquifer, which is less active in terms of groundwater flow, but most of it is drained to the main river. The river-water quality is controlled by the nitrate input from the shallow aquifer. Groundwater in the underlying aquifer, which has long residence times, is also largely influenced by the diffusion of nitrate in the porous sandstone matrix. Consequently, following a change of fertilizer application practices, water quality in domestic wells and the river would change rapidly due to the level of nitrate found in fractures, but a lag time of up to 20 years would be necessary to reach a steady level due to diffusion. This demonstrates the importance of understanding nitrate transport mechanisms when designing effective agricultural and water management plans to improve water quality.

  8. Transport on intermediate time scales in flows with cat's eye patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöschke, Patrick; Sokolov, Igor M.; Zaks, Michael A.; Nepomnyashchy, Alexander A.

    2017-12-01

    We consider the advection-diffusion transport of tracers in a one-parameter family of plane periodic flows where the patterns of streamlines feature regions of confined circulation in the shape of "cat's eyes," separated by meandering jets with ballistic motion inside them. By varying the parameter, we proceed from the regular two-dimensional lattice of eddies without jets to the sinusoidally modulated shear flow without eddies. When a weak thermal noise is added, i.e., at large Péclet numbers, several intermediate time scales arise, with qualitatively and quantitatively different transport properties: depending on the parameter of the flow, the initial position of a tracer, and the aging time, motion of the tracers ranges from subdiffusive to superballistic. We report on results of extensive numerical simulations of the mean-squared displacement for different initial conditions in ordinary and aged situations. These results are compared with a theory based on a Lévy walk that describes the intermediate-time ballistic regime and gives a reasonable description of the behavior for a certain class of initial conditions. The interplay of the walk process with internal circulation dynamics in the trapped state results at intermediate time scales in nonmonotonic characteristics of aging not captured by the Lévy walk model.

  9. Physical scales and spatial predictability of transport processes in the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baveye, Philippe; Boast, Charles W.

    A significant research effort has been devoted in the last four decades to the development of computer models able to describe the watershed- and regional-scale transport of water and chemicals. A vigorous and constructive debate has opposed the partisans of simple lumped models, like BIM, to the proponents of very detailed and data-intensive, distributed models like MIKE SHE. The latter models are often termed "physically-based", indicating that, because of the upscaling they perform from local to watershed scale, they are generally considered to provide a better account of the physics of transport processes in watersheds. In the present chapter, it is argued that this perception is misguided. Analysis of two historical and familiar cases of theory development suggests that there is at this stage no theoretical framework to guide upscaling efforts toward an unknown dynamical level, like the alleged "watershed level", and that direct experimentation at the higher dynamical level is required to obtain a physical representation of processes. From this perspective, "physics" no longer appears to be on the side of the "physically-based" watershed models. The consequences of this conclusion are discussed, particularly with respect to further research needs and to a number of practical aspects of watershed management.

  10. Release of aged contaminants from weathered sediments: Effects of sorbate speciation on scaling of reactive transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chorover, Jon; Perdrial, Nico; Mueller, Karl; Strepka, Caleb; O’Day, Peggy; Rivera, Nelson; Um, Wooyong; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Steefel, Carl; Thompson, Aaron

    2012-11-05

    Hanford sediments impacted by hyperalkaline high level radioactive waste have undergone incongruent silicate mineral weathering concurrent with contaminant uptake. In this project, we studied the impact of background pore water (BPW) on strontium, cesium and iodine desorption and transport in Hanford sediments that were experimentally weathered by contact with simulated hyperalkaline tank waste leachate (STWL) solutions. Using those lab-weathered Hanford sediments (HS) and model precipitates formed during nucleation from homogeneous STWL solutions (HN), we (i) provided thorough characterization of reaction products over a matrix of field-relevant gradients in contaminant concentration, partial pressure of carbon dioxide, and reaction time; (ii) improved molecular-scale understanding of how sorbate speciation controls contaminant desorption from weathered sediments upon removal of caustic sources; and (iii) developed a mechanistic, predictive model of meso- to field-scale contaminant reactive transport under these conditions. In this final report, we provide detailed descriptions of our results from this three-year study, completed in 2012 following a one-year no cost extension.

  11. Release of Aged Contaminants from weathered sediments: Effects of sorbate speciation on scaling of reactive transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chorover, Jon [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Perdrial, Nico [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Mueller, Karl [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Strepka, Caleb [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); O' Day, Peggy [Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Rivera, Nelson [Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Um, Wooyong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chang, Hyun-Shik [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Steefel, Carl [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Thompson, Aaron [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2012-08-14

    Hanford sediments impacted by hyperalkaline high level radioactive waste have undergone incongruent silicate mineral weathering concurrent with contaminant uptake (Chorover et al., 2008). In this project, we studied the impact of background pore water (BPW) on strontium, cesium and iodine desorption and transport in Hanford sediments that were experimentally weathered by contact with simulated hyperalkaline tank waste leachate (STWL) solutions. Using those lab-weathered Hanford sediments (HS) and model precipitates formed during nucleation from homogeneous STWL solutions (HN), we (i) provided thorough characterization of reaction products over a matrix of field-relevant gradients in contaminant concentration, PCO2, and reaction time; (ii) improved molecular-scale understanding of how sorbate speciation controls contaminant desorption from weathered sediments upon removal of caustic sources; and (iii) developed a mechanistic, predictive model of meso- to field-scale contaminant reactive transport under these conditions. Below, we provide some detailed descriptions of our results from this three year study, recently completed following a one-year no cost extension.

  12. Anomalous particle pinch and scaling of vin/D based on transport analysis and multiple regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, G.; Kardaun, O.

    2007-01-01

    Predictions of density profiles in current tokamaks and ITER require a validated scaling relation for vin/D where vin is the anomalous inward drift velocity and D is the anomalous diffusion coefficient. Transport analysis is necessary for determining the anomalous particle pinch from measured density profiles and for separating the impact of particle sources. A set of discharges in ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D, JET and ASDEX is analysed using a special version of the 1.5-D BALDUR transport code. Profiles of ρsvin/D with ρs the effective separatrix radius, five other dimensionless parameters and many further quantities in the confinement zone are compiled, resulting in the dataset VIND1.dat, which covers a wide parameter range. Weighted multiple regression is applied to the ASDEX Upgrade subset which leads to a two-term scaling \\rho _sv_in ({x'}) /D ({x'}) =0.0432 [ { ({L_{T_{\\rme}} ({ \\bar {x}'}) / \\rho _s}) ^{-2.58}+7.13 \\, U_L^{1.55} \

  13. Direct pore-scale reactive transport modelling of dynamic wettability changes induced by surface complexation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Julien; Geiger, Sebastian

    2018-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have shown that oil production from sandstone and carbonate reservoirs by waterflooding could be significantly increased by manipulating the composition of the injected water (e.g. by lowering the ionic strength). Recent studies suggest that a change of wettability induced by a change in surface charge is likely to be one of the driving mechanism of the so-called low-salinity effect. In this case, the potential increase of oil recovery during waterflooding at low ionic strength would be strongly impacted by the inter-relations between flow, transport and chemical reaction at the pore-scale. Hence, a new numerical model that includes two-phase flow, solute reactive transport and wettability alteration is implemented based on the Direct Numerical Simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations and surface complexation modelling. Our model is first used to match experimental results of oil droplet detachment from clay patches. We then study the effect of wettability change on the pore-scale displacement for simple 2D calcite micro-models and evaluate the impact of several parameters such as water composition and injected velocity. Finally, we repeat the simulation experiments on a larger and more complex pore geometry representing a carbonate rock. Our simulations highlight two different effects of low-salinity on oil production from carbonate rocks: a smaller number of oil clusters left in the pores after invasion, and a greater number of pores invaded.

  14. Fluid Flow and Heat Transport Computation for Power-Law Scaling Poroperm Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Leary

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In applying Darcy’s law to fluid flow in geologic formations, it is generally assumed that flow variations average to an effectively constant formation flow property. This assumption is, however, fundamentally inaccurate for the ambient crust. Well-log, well-core, and well-flow empirics show that crustal flow spatial variations are systematically correlated from mm to km. Translating crustal flow spatial correlation empirics into numerical form for fluid flow/transport simulation requires computations to be performed on a single global mesh that supports long-range spatial correlation flow structures. Global meshes populated by spatially correlated stochastic poroperm distributions can be processed by 3D finite-element solvers. We model wellbore-logged Dm-scale temperature data due to heat advective flow into a well transecting small faults in a Hm-scale sandstone volume. Wellbore-centric thermal transport is described by Peclet number Pe ≡ a0φv0/D (a0 = wellbore radius, v0 = fluid velocity at a0, φ = mean crustal porosity, and D = rock-water thermal diffusivity. The modelling schema is (i 3D global mesh for spatially correlated stochastic poropermeability; (ii ambient percolation flow calibrated by well-core porosity-controlled permeability; (iii advection via fault-like structures calibrated by well-log neutron porosity; (iv flow Pe ~ 0.5 in ambient crust and Pe ~ 5 for fault-borne advection.

  15. Multi-Component Reactive Transport Modeling of Field-Scale Bioremediation: The Schoolcraft Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phanikumar, M.; Hyndman, D. W.; Dybas, M. J.

    2003-12-01

    This paper describes three-dimensional multi-component reactive transport modeling for bioremediation of a carbon tetrachloride (CT) contaminated plume at the Schoolcraft site in Western Michigan. The denitrifying bacterium Pseudomonas Stutzeri Strain KC is used to mediate cometabolic reactions that degrade CT to harmless end products. CT contamination at this site occurred due its use in the past as a fumigant in grain silos. The goal of the field bioremediation design was to inoculate a transect perpendicular to the natural gradient flow of a CT plume with microbes that could effectively remediate the CT contamination through a series of pulsed nutrient injections. The final design consisted of fifteen wells spaced one meter apart in which each well can operate either as an injection or an extraction well depending on the event. This design allowed us to operate in a semi-passive mode of operation with only 6 hours of pumping per week. Our modeling approach integrates information from laboratory-scale studies aimed at understanding the relevant rates and processes under controlled conditions with plume-scale modeling in the presence of a high degree of hydraulic control and significant heterogeneity to delineate the important differences in processes/rates as we proceed from the laboratory to the field. We describe the development of a seven component reactive transport model that includes the transport of aqueous and sorbed-phase CT, mobile and immobile bacteria, acetate (electron donor), nitrate (electron acceptor) and tracer (bromide) and show detailed comparisons of observed and simulated concentrations at a number of wells and at different depths. Processes simulated in the model include advection, dispersion, degradation, two-site sorption, microbial attachment, detachment, growth and decay. We describe the influence of several modeling decisions (e.g., effects of dynamic partitioning, bioavailability and sorption) on the predictions of the model. Most

  16. Using molecular-scale tracers to investigate transport of agricultural pollutants in soil and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, C.; Michaelides, K.; Chadwick, D.; Dungait, J.; Evershed, R. P.

    2012-12-01

    We explore the use of molecular-scale tracers to investigate the transport of potential pollutants due to the application of slurry to soil. The molecular-scale approach allows us to separate the pollutants which are moved to water bodies through sediment-bound and dissolved transport pathways. Slurry is applied to agricultural land to as a soil-improver across a wide-range of topographic and climatic regimes, hence a set of experiments were designed to assess the effect of changing slope gradient and rainfall intensity on the transport of pollutants. The experiments were carried out using University of Bristol's TRACE (Test Rig for Advancing Connectivity Experiments) facility. The facility includes a dual axis soil slope (6 x 2.5 x 0.3 m3) and 6-nozzle rainfall simulator, which enables the manipulation of the slope to simulate different slope gradient and rainfall scenarios. Cattle slurry was applied to the top 1 metre strip of the experimental soil slope followed by four rainfall simulations, where the gradient (5° & 10°) and the rainfall intensity (60 & 120 mm hr-1) were co-varied. Leachate was sampled from different flow pathways (surface, subsurface and percolated) via multiple outlets on the slope throughout the experiments and soil cores were taken from the slope after each experiment. Novel tracers were used to trace the pollutants in both dissolved and sediment-bound forms. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to trace dissolved slurry-derived material via water flow pathways, as the slurry was found to have a distinct signature compared with the soil. The fluorescence signatures of the leachates were compared with those of many organic compounds in order to characterise the origin of the signal. This allowed the assessment of the longevity of the signal in the environment to establish if it could be used as a robust long-term tracer of slurry material in water or if would be subject to transform processes through time. 5-βstanols, organic compounds

  17. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy of Scale Dependent Transport Phenomena and Bioactivity in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, J. D.; Codd, S. L.; Romanenko, K. V.; Hornemann, J. A.; Brosten, T. R.

    2008-05-01

    Magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) provides the ability to obtain data on the pore scale via imaging and the sample scale by bulk measurement, allowing for connection between microscale dynamics and macroscale transport phenomena. This has led to MRM techniques becoming a preeminent method for characterization of dynamics in porous media. A significant question in modeling transport in porous media is definition of the porous media structure as homogeneous (ordered) or heterogeneous (disordered)[1]. One means of defining the 'complexity' of a porous media is based on the dynamics of the system[2]. The ability of MRM to measure the time dependent statistics of the dynamics [3,4,5] provides quantification of the pre-asymptotic dynamics. The transition from preasymptotic to Gaussian transport consistent with models of homogeneous porous media is clearly visualized. Biological activity in porous media, such as microbial growth, typically manifests itself as biofilms or colonies of microbes that adhere to surfaces and are surrounded by a hydrogel of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS). The biofilm growth introduces complexity into the system structure in generation of physical pore blocking, trapping within the EPS gel, elastic interfaces due to the EPS and generation of channels in which faster flow occur. The hierarchy of length and time scales and multiple physical processes which are introduced by the biofilm growth impacts the porous media transport as reflected in the change in dynamics [6]. The transition can be modeled using statistical mechanical approaches based on continuous time random walk (CTRW) processes that generate fractional differential equations[7]. The bioactivity alters the structure of the porous media from homogeneous to heterogeneous resulting in the transition from a Gaussian to a non Gaussian subdiffusive dispersion process. References 1. M. Quintard and S. Whitaker, Transport in ordered and disordered porous media: Volume averaged

  18. Addressing the Safety of Transportation Cyber-Physical Systems: Development and Validation of a Verbal Warning Utility Scale for Intelligent Transportation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiqi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As an important application of Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS, advances in intelligent transportation systems (ITS improve driving safety by informing drivers of hazards with warnings in advance. The evaluation of the warning effectiveness is an important issue in facilitating communication of ITS. The goal of the present study was to develop a scale to evaluate the warning utility, namely, the effectiveness of a warning in preventing accidents in general. A driving simulator study was conducted to validate the Verbal Warning Utility Scale (VWUS in a simulated driving environment. The reliability analysis indicated a good split-half reliability for the VWUS with a Spearman-Brown Coefficient of 0.873. The predictive validity of VWUS in measuring the effectiveness of the verbal warnings was verified by the significant prediction of safety benefits indicated by variables, including reduced kinetic energy and collision rate. Compared to conducting experimental studies, this scale provides a simpler way to evaluate overall utility of verbal warnings in communicating associated hazards in intelligent transportation systems. This scale can be further applied to improve the design of warnings of ITS in order to improve transportation safety. The applications of the scale in nonverbal warning situations and limitations of the current scale are also discussed.

  19. Quantum transport and dielectric response of nanometer scale transistors using empirical pseudopotentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jingtian

    As transistors, the most basic component of central processing units (CPU) in all electronic products, are scaling down to the nanometer scale, quantum mechanical effects must be studied to investigate their performance. A formalism to treat quantum electronic transport at the nanometer scale based on empirical pseudopotentials is presented in this dissertation. We develop the transport equations and show the expressions to calculate the device characteristics, such as device current and charge density. We apply this formalism to study ballistic transport in a gate-all-around (GAA) silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (FET) with a body-size of 0.39 nm, a gate length of 6.52 nm, and an effective oxide thickness of 0.43 nm. Simulation results show that this device exhibits a subthreshold slope (SS) of ˜66 mV/decade and a drain-induced barrier-lowering of ~2.5 mV/V. This formalism is also applied to assess the ballistic performance of FETs with armchair-edge graphene nanoribbon (aGNRs) and silicon nanowire (SiNWs) channels and with gate lengths ranging from 5 nm to 15 nm. The device characteristics of the transistors with a 5 nm gate length are compared. Source-to-drain tunneling effects are investigated for SiNWFETs and GNRFETs by comparing the I-V characteristics of each respective transistor with different channel lengths. While a uniform dielectric constant is assumed in solving Poisson equation for the devices simulated above, the knowledge of the atomistic (i.e., local) dielectric permittivity that considers the atomistic electron distribution and quantum-confinement effect is necessary to treat the electrostatic properties accurately. The local permittivity can also provide information about the dielectric property at the interfaces. We use the random-phase approximation, first-order perturbation theory, and empirical pseudopotentials to calculate the static polarizability, susceptibility, and dielectric response function in graphene and GNRs. While the

  20. Scaling analysis in modeling transport and reaction processes a systematic approach to model building and the art of approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Krantz, William B

    2007-01-01

    This book is unique as the first effort to expound on the subject of systematic scaling analysis. Not written for a specific discipline, the book targets any reader interested in transport phenomena and reaction processes. The book is logically divided into chapters on the use of systematic scaling analysis in fluid dynamics, heat transfer, mass transfer, and reaction processes. An integrating chapter is included that considers more complex problems involving combined transport phenomena. Each chapter includes several problems that are explained in considerable detail. These are followed by several worked examples for which the general outline for the scaling is given. Each chapter also includes many practice problems. This book is based on recognizing the value of systematic scaling analysis as a pedagogical method for teaching transport and reaction processes and as a research tool for developing and solving models and in designing experiments. Thus, the book can serve as both a textbook and a reference boo...

  1. USING CMAQ FOR EXPOSURE MODELING AND CHARACTERIZING THE SUB-GRID VARIABILITY FOR EXPOSURE ESTIMATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmospheric processes and the associated transport and dispersion of atmospheric pollutants are known to be highly variable in time and space. Current air quality models that characterize atmospheric chemistry effects, e.g. the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ), provide vo...

  2. Solution approach for a large scale personnel transport system for a large company in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo-Arturo Garzón-Garnica

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present paper focuses on the modelling and solution of a large-scale personnel transportation system in Mexico where many routes and vehicles are currently used to service 525 points. The routing system proposed can be applied to many cities in the Latin-American region. Design/methodology/approach: This system was modelled as a VRP model considering the use of real-world transit times, and the fact that routes start at the farthest point from the destination center. Experiments were performed on different sized sets of service points. As the size of the instances was increased, the performance of the heuristic method was assessed in comparison with the results of an exact algorithm, the results remaining very close between both.  When the size of the instance was full-scale and the exact algorithm took too much time to solve the problem, then the heuristic algorithm provided a feasible solution. Supported by the validation with smaller scale instances, where the difference between both solutions was close to a 6%, the full –scale solution obtained with the heuristic algorithm was considered to be within that same range. Findings: The proposed modelling and solving method provided a solution that would produce significant savings in the daily operation of the routes. Originality/value: The urban distribution of the cities in Latin America is unique to other regions in the world. The general layout of the large cities in this region includes a small town center, usually antique, and a somewhat disordered outer region. The lack of a vehicle-centered urban planning poses distinct challenges for vehicle routing problems in the region. The use of a heuristic VRP combined with the results of an exact VRP, allowed the obtention of an improved routing plan specific to the requirements of the region.

  3. Large scale density perturbations from a uniform distribution by wave transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieu, Richard

    2017-11-01

    It has long been known that a uniform distribution of matter cannot produce a Poisson distribution of density fluctuations on very large scales 1/k > ct by the motion of discrete particles over timescale t. The constraint is part of what is sometimes referred to as the Zel'dovich bound. We investigate in this paper the transport of energy by the propagation of waves emanating incoherently from a regular and infinite lattice of oscillators, each having the same finite amount of energy reserve initially. The model we employ does not involve the expansion of the Universe; indeed there is no need to do so, because although the scales of interest are all deeply sub-horizon the size of regions over which perturbations are evaluated do far exceed ct, where t is the time elapsed since a uniform array of oscillators started to emit energy by radiation (it is assumed that t greatly exceeds the duration of emission). We find that to lowest order, when only wave fields propto 1/r are included, there is exact compensation between the energy loss of the oscillators and the energy emitted into space, which means P(0)=0 for the power spectrum of density fluctuations on the largest scales. This is consistent with the Zel'dovich bound; it proves that the model employed is causal, has finite support, and energy is strictly conserved. To the next order when near fields propto r‑2 are included, however, P(0) settles at late times to a positive value that depends only on time, as t‑2 (the same applies to an excess (non-conserving) energy term). We further observe that the behavior is peculiar to near fields. Even though this effect may give the impression of superluminal energy transport, there is no violation of causality because the two-point function vanishes completely for r>t if the emission of each oscillator is sharply truncated beyond some duration. The result calls to question any need of enlisting cosmic inflation to seed large scale density perturbations in the early

  4. Scaling Behavior for Ionic Transport and its Fluctuations in Individual Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secchi, Eleonora; Niguès, Antoine; Jubin, Laetitia; Siria, Alessandro; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-04-15

    In this Letter, we perform an experimental study of ionic transport and current fluctuations inside individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The conductance exhibits a power law behavior at low salinity, with an exponent close to 1/3 versus the salt concentration in this regime. This behavior is rationalized in terms of a salinity dependent surface charge, which is accounted for on the basis of a model for hydroxide adsorption at the (hydrophobic) carbon surface. This is in contrast to boron nitride nanotubes which exhibit a constant surface conductance. Further, we measure the low frequency noise of the ionic current in CNTs and show that the amplitude of the noise scales with the surface charge, with data collapsing on a master curve for the various studied CNTs at a given pH.

  5. Numerical Dissipation and Subgrid Scale Modeling for Separated Flows at Moderate Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadieux, Francois; Domaradzki, Julian Andrzej

    2014-11-01

    Flows in rotating machinery, for unmanned and micro aerial vehicles, wind turbines, and propellers consist of different flow regimes. First, a laminar boundary layer is followed by a laminar separation bubble with a shear layer on top of it that experiences transition to turbulence. The separated turbulent flow then reattaches and evolves downstream from a nonequilibrium turbulent boundary layer to an equilibrium one. In previous work, the capability of LES to reduce the resolution requirements down to 1 % of DNS resolution for such flows was demonstrated (Cadieux et al., JFE 136-6). However, under-resolved DNS agreed better with the benchmark DNS than simulations with explicit SGS modeling because numerical dissipation and filtering alone acted as a surrogate SGS dissipation. In the present work numerical viscosity is quantified using a new method proposed recently by Schranner et al. and its effects are analyzed and compared to turbulent eddy viscosities of explicit SGS models. The effect of different SGS models on a simulation of the same flow using a non-dissipative code is also explored. Supported by NSF.

  6. Accounting for subgrid scale topographic variations in flood propagation modeling using MODFLOW

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milzow, Christian; Kinzelbach, W.

    2010-01-01

    To be computationally viable, grid-based spatially distributed hydrological models of large wetlands or floodplains must be set up using relatively large cells (order of hundreds of meters to kilometers). Computational costs are especially high when considering the numerous model runs or model time...

  7. On the Effect of an Anisotropy-Resolving Subgrid-Scale Model on Turbulent Vortex Motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-19

    expression coincides with the modified Leonard stress proposed by Ger- mano et al. (1991). In this model, the SGS turbulence energy kSGS may be evaluated as... mano subgridscale closure method. Phys. Fluids A, Vol. 4, pp. 633-635. Morinishi, Y. and Vasilyev, O.V. (2001), A recommended modification to the

  8. Final Report: Systematic Development of a Subgrid Scaling Framework to Improve Land Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickinson, Robert Earl [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2016-07-11

    We carried out research to development improvements of the land component of climate models and to understand the role of land in climate variability and change. A highlight was the development of a 3D canopy radiation model. More than a dozen publications resulted.

  9. Cumulative Relative Reactivity: A Concept for Modeling Aquifer-Scale Reactive Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loschko, M.; Cirpka, O. A.; Wöhling, T.; Rudolph, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Quantitative understanding of pollutant fluxes from diffuse input and turnover of pollutants at catchment scale requires process-based numerical models that can explain observed time series of heads, fluxes, and concentrations. To deal with the high level of uncertainty a probabilistic framework is necessary. Due to the high computational effort, such evaluations cannot be done with a spatially explicit reactive-transport model. Conceptual simplifications are needed. The proposed approach is based on travel times and relative reactivity. The latter quantifies the intensity of the chemical reaction relative to a reference reaction rate and can be interpreted as the strength of electron-donor (or electron-acceptor) released by the matrix. In general, the relative reactivity is a spatially variable property reflecting the geology of the formation. In this approach, the paths of individual water parcels are tracked through the aquifer, the age of the water parcels is evaluated, and the relative reactivity is integrated along their trajectories. By switching from space-time discretization to cumulative relative reactivity, advective-reactive transport can be simulated by solving a single system of ordinary differential equations for each combination of concentrations in the inflow. In comparison to solving the advection-dispersion-reaction equation in a spatially explicit way, solving a limited number of ordinary differential equations is computationally significantly less costly. This permits the application of Monte-Carlo methods within a stochastic framework. The validity of the approach was tested in a two-dimensional test case, where the errors introduced by neglecting dispersive mixing were analyzed. The applicability of the approach is demonstrated in a synthetic case study of aerobic respiration and denitrification in the saturated zone using a three-dimensional steady-state groundwater flow model combined with the simplified reactive transport approach.

  10. Reactive transport in porous media: Pore-network model approach compared to pore-scale model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varloteaux, Clément; Vu, Minh Tan; Békri, Samir; Adler, Pierre M.

    2013-02-01

    Accurate determination of three macroscopic parameters governing reactive transport in porous media, namely, the apparent solute velocity, the dispersion, and the apparent reaction rate, is of key importance for predicting solute migration through reservoir aquifers. Two methods are proposed to calculate these parameters as functions of the Péclet and the Péclet-Dahmköhler numbers. In the first method called the pore-scale model (PSM), the porous medium is discretized by the level set method; the Stokes and convection-diffusion equations with reaction at the wall are solved by a finite-difference scheme. In the second method, called the pore-network model (PNM), the void space of the porous medium is represented by an idealized geometry of pore bodies joined by pore throats; the flow field is computed by solving Kirchhoff's laws and transport calculations are performed in the asymptotic regime where the solute concentration undergoes an exponential evolution with time. Two synthetic geometries of porous media are addressed by using both numerical codes. The first geometry is constructed in order to validate the hypotheses implemented in PNM. PSM is also used for a better understanding of the various reaction patterns observed in the asymptotic regime. Despite the PNM approximations, a very good agreement between the models is obtained, which shows that PNM is an accurate description of reactive transport. PNM, which can address much larger pore volumes than PSM, is used to evaluate the influence of the concentration distribution on macroscopic properties of a large irregular network reconstructed from microtomography images. The role of the dimensionless numbers and of the location and size of the largest pore bodies is highlighted.

  11. Small scale laboratory studies of flow and transport phenonmena in pores and fractures, Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, J.L.

    1993-04-01

    Small scale laboratory experiments, equipped with an ability to actually observe behavior on the pore level using microscopy, provide an economical and easily understood scientific tool to help us validateconcepts and assumptions about the transport of contaminants, and offers the propensity to discover heretofore unrecognized phenomena or behavior. The main technique employs etched glass micromodels, composed of two etched glass plates, sintered together, to form a two dimensional network of three dimensional pores. Flow and transport behavior is observed on a pore or pore network level, and recorded on film and video tape. This technique is coupled with related column studies. Specifically we're examining multiphase flow behavior of relevance, for example, to liquid-liquid mass transfer (solubilization of capillary trapped organic liquids); liquid-gas mass transfer (in situ volatilization); colloid movement, attachment and detachment in the presence of fluid-fluid interfaces; bacteria colonization and motility in porous systems; and heterogeneity effects on multi-phase flow, colloid movement and bacteria behavior.

  12. An investigation on platelet transport during thrombus formation at micro-scale stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Tovar-Lopez

    Full Text Available This paper reports on an investigation of mass transport of blood cells at micro-scale stenosis where local strain-rate micro-gradients trigger platelet aggregation. Using a microfluidic flow focusing platform we investigate the blood flow streams that principally contribute to platelet aggregation under shear micro-gradient conditions. We demonstrate that relatively thin surface streams located at the channel wall are the primary contributor of platelets to the developing aggregate under shear gradient conditions. Furthermore we delineate a role for red blood cell hydrodynamic lift forces in driving enhanced advection of platelets to the stenosis wall and surface of developing aggregates. We show that this novel microfluidic platform can be effectively used to study the role of mass transport phenomena driving platelet recruitment and aggregate formation and believe that this approach will lead to a greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying shear-gradient dependent discoid platelet aggregation in the context of cardiovascular diseases such as acute coronary syndromes and ischemic stroke.

  13. Field-scale Variation in Colloid Dispersibility and Transport: Multiple Linear Regressions to Soil Physico-Chemical and Structural Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgaard, Trine; Moldrup, P; Ferré, T P A; Katuwal, S; Olsen, P; de Jonge, L W

    2014-09-01

    Water-dispersible soil colloids (WDC) act as carriers for sorbing chemicals in macroporous soils and hence constitute a significant risk for the aquatic environment. The prediction of WDC readily available for facilitated chemical transport is an unsolved challenge. This study identifies key parameters and predictive indicators for assessing field-scale variation of WDC. Samples representing three measurement scales (1- to 2-mm aggregates, intact 100-cm rings, and intact 6283 cm columns) were retrieved from the topsoil of a 1.69-ha agricultural field in a 15-m by 15-m grid to determine colloid dispersibility, mobilization, and transport. The amount of WDC was determined using (i) a laser diffraction method on 1- to 2-mm aggregates and (ii) an end-over-end shaking method on 100-cm intact rings. The accumulated amount of colloids leached from 20-cm by 20-cm intact columns was determined as a measure of the integrated colloid mobilization and transport. The WDC and the accumulated colloid transport were higher in samples from the northern part of the field. Using multiple linear regression (MLR) analyses, WDC or amount of colloids transported were predicted at the three measurement scales from 24 measured, geo-referenced parameters to identify parameters that could serve as indicator parameters for screening for colloid dispersibility, mobilization, and transport. The MLR analyses were performed at each sample scale using all, only northern, and only southern field locations. Generally, the predictive power of the regression models was best on the smallest 1- to 2-mm aggregate scale. Overall, our results suggest that different drivers controlled colloid dispersibility and transport at the three measurement scales and in the two subareas of the field. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  14. Hydrogeologic Framework Model for the Saturated Zone Site Scale flow and Transport Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Miller

    2004-11-15

    The purpose of this report is to document the 19-unit, hydrogeologic framework model (19-layer version, output of this report) (HFM-19) with regard to input data, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results in accordance with AP-SIII.10Q, Models. The HFM-19 is developed as a conceptual model of the geometric extent of the hydrogeologic units at Yucca Mountain and is intended specifically for use in the development of the ''Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]). Primary inputs to this model report include the GFM 3.1 (DTN: MO9901MWDGFM31.000 [DIRS 103769]), borehole lithologic logs, geologic maps, geologic cross sections, water level data, topographic information, and geophysical data as discussed in Section 4.1. Figure 1-1 shows the information flow among all of the saturated zone (SZ) reports and the relationship of this conceptual model in that flow. The HFM-19 is a three-dimensional (3-D) representation of the hydrogeologic units surrounding the location of the Yucca Mountain geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The HFM-19 represents the hydrogeologic setting for the Yucca Mountain area that covers about 1,350 km2 and includes a saturated thickness of about 2.75 km. The boundaries of the conceptual model were primarily chosen to be coincident with grid cells in the Death Valley regional groundwater flow model (DTN: GS960808312144.003 [DIRS 105121]) such that the base of the site-scale SZ flow model is consistent with the base of the regional model (2,750 meters below a smoothed version of the potentiometric surface), encompasses the exploratory boreholes, and provides a framework over the area of interest for groundwater flow and radionuclide transport modeling. In depth, the model domain extends from land surface to the base of the regional groundwater flow model (D'Agnese et al. 1997 [DIRS 100131], p 2). For the site-scale

  15. Flux-corrected transport principles, algorithms, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzmin, Dmitri; Turek, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Addressing students and researchers as well as CFD practitioners, this book describes the state of the art in the development of high-resolution schemes based on the Flux-Corrected Transport (FCT) paradigm. Intended for readers who have a solid background in Computational Fluid Dynamics, the book begins with historical notes by J.P. Boris and D.L. Book. Review articles that follow describe recent advances in the design of FCT algorithms as well as various algorithmic aspects. The topics addressed in the book and its main highlights include: the derivation and analysis of classical FCT schemes with special emphasis on the underlying physical and mathematical constraints; flux limiting for hyperbolic systems; generalization of FCT to implicit time-stepping and finite element discretizations on unstructured meshes and its role as a subgrid scale model for Monotonically Integrated Large Eddy Simulation (MILES) of turbulent flows. The proposed enhancements of the FCT methodology also comprise the prelimiting and '...

  16. The influence of decadal scale climactic events on the transport of larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmuson, L. K.; Edwards, C. A.; Shanks, A.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the processes that influence larval transport remains an important, yet difficult, task. This is especially true as more studies demonstrate that biological and physical oceanographic processes vary at long (e.g. decadal+) time scales. We used individual based biophysical models to study transport of Dungeness crab larvae (the most economically valuable fishery on the West Coast of the Continental United States) over a 10-year period; during both positive and negative phases of the Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO). A physical oceanographic model of the California current was developed using the Regional Ocean Modeling System with 1/30-degree resolution. Measured and modeled PDO indices were positively correlated. The biological model was implemented using the Lagrangian Transport Model, and modified to incorporate temperature dependent development and stage specific behaviors. Super individuals were used to scale production and incorporate mortality. Models were validated using time series statistics to compare measured and modeled daily recruitment. More larvae recruited, in both our measured and modeled time series, during negative PDOs. Our work suggests larvae exhibit a vertically migratory behavior too or almost too the bottom each day. During positive PDO years larvae were competent to settle earlier than negative PDO years, however, pelagic larval durations did not differ. The southern end of the population appears to be a sink population, which likely explains the decline in commercial catch. Ultimately, the population is much more demographically closed than previously thought. We hypothesize the stronger flow in the California current during negative PDO's enhances membership of larvae in the current. Further, migrating almost too the bottom causes larvae to enter the benthic boundary layer on the continental shelf and the California undercurrent on the continental slope, both, which decrease net alongshore advection. These factors result

  17. Multi-scale MHD analysis incorporating pressure transport equation for beta-increasing LHD plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiguchi, Katsuji; Carreras, Benjamin A.

    2011-05-01

    A multi-scale MHD numerical scheme is developed for analysis of nonlinear evolution of a beta-increasing plasma. The scheme is based on iterative calculations of nonlinear dynamics based on the reduced MHD (RMHD) equations and three-dimensional static equilibrium. The equation for average pressure in the RMHD equations plays the role of a transport equation that involves a heat source term and background pressure diffusion terms. The heat source term is controlled so that the beta value should be increased at a constant rate. The scheme is applied to a Large Helical Device (LHD) plasma up to average beta of 1.05%, which is unstable against linear ideal interchange modes while beta values much higher than the stability limit are obtained in the experiments. The result with the multi-scale scheme indicates that many local flat regions are generated in the background pressure profile in the nonlinear evolution of the interchange modes. This structure of the pressure profile suppresses disruptive phenomena because it reduces the driving force of the modes at higher beta value. Such self-organization in the pressure profile is considered to be the stabilizing mechanism in the plasma.

  18. Modeling Water Flow and Bromide Transport in a Two-Scale-Structured Lignitic Mine Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, J.; Gerke, H. H.; Vogel, T.; Maurer, T.; Buczko, U.

    2008-12-01

    Two-dimensional single- and dual-permeability simulations are used to analyze water and solute fluxes in heterogeneous lignitic mine soil at a forest-reclaimed mine spoil heap. The soil heterogeneity on this experimental site "Barenbrucker Hohe" resulted from inclined dumping structures and sediment mixtures that consist of sand with lignitic dust and embedded lignitic fragments. Observations on undisturbed field suction- cell lysimeters including tracer experiments revealed funneling-type preferential flow with lateral water and bromide movement along inclined sediment structures. The spatial distribution of soil structures and fragment distributions was acquired by a digital camera and identified by a supervised classification of the digital profile image. First, a classical single-domain modeling approach was proposed with spatially variable scaling factors inferred from image analyses. In the next step, a two-continuum scenario was constructed to examine additional effects of nonequilibrium on the flow regime. The scaling factors used for the preferential flow domain are here obtained from the gradient of the grayscale images. So far, the single domain scenarios failed to predict the bromide leaching patterns although water effluent could be described. Dual-permeability model allows the incorporation of structural effects and can be used as a tool to further testing other approaches that account for structure effects. The numerical study suggests that additional experiments are required to obtain better understanding of the highly complex transport processes on this experimental site.

  19. Groundwater quality across scales: impact on nutrient transport to large water bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürr, Hans; Moosdorf, Nils; Mallast, Ulf

    2017-04-01

    High concentrations of dissolved nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in groundwater are an increasing concern in many areas of the world. Especially regions with high agriculture impact see widespread declining groundwater quality, with considerable uncertainty mainly regarding the impact of phosphorus (P). Implications reach from direct impacts on different water users to discharge of nutrient-rich groundwater to rivers, lakes and coastal areas, where it can contribute to eutrophication, hypoxia or harmful algal blooms. While local-scale studies are abundant and management options exist, quantitative approaches at regional to continental scales are scarce and frequently have to deal with data inconsistencies or are temporally sparse. Here, we present the research framework to combine large databases of local groundwater quality to data sets of climatical, hydrological, geological or landuse parameters. Pooling of such information, together with robust methods such as water balances and groundwater models, can provide constraints such as upper boundaries and likely ranges of nutrient composition in various settings, or for the nutrient transport to large water bodies. Remote Sensing can provide spatial information on the location of groundwater seepage. Results will eventually help to identify focus areas and lead to improved understanding of the role of groundwater in the context of global biogeochemical cycles.

  20. Experimental Exploration of Particle-Scale Bed Load Transport and Near-Bed Fluid Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathel, S. L.; Furbish, D. J.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2016-12-01

    Bed load sediment particles move as complex motions over the surface of a stream bed, accelerating and decelerating in response to the near-bed turbulence and due to particle-bed interactions. Using high-speed imagery of coarse sand particles on a planer bed surface, we track individual particle motions from start to stop, combined with measurements of near-bed fluid velocities to better characterize the relationship between these properties. These simultaneous measurements provide an initial step towards describing the dynamic relationship between the fluid and particle entrainment on the grain-scale. We start with an Eulerian a priori method wherein we grid the analyzed area and compare the fluid velocity time series to the entrainment time series within each grid space. We progressively increase the size of the grids and monitor the correlation between the two time series. We then use an a posteriori method that focuses on the fluid velocities in the vicinity of entrained particles both at the moment of entrainment and prior to the initiation of motion. We further our analysis of the relationship between particle motions and the near-bed fluid using detailed measurements of particle motions to calibrate estimates of the sediment load using a pixel differencing method. This allows us to examine connections between the fluid and particle activity over many frames rather than over the limited, manually tracked time period. Furthermore, this allows us to empirically define a distribution of particle wait times, or the duration of time between successive entrainment events over a set area, which acts to determine the transport intensity. Preliminary results suggest that there is not a clear correlation between near-bed fluid velocities and particle entrainment. In absence of a correlation we find that (1) we must think more deeply about collective entrainment and how it 'works', and (2) we must consider how the microstructure of the particles on the bed act to set up

  1. Evaluation of a Sub-Grid Topographic Drag Parameterizations for Modeling Surface Wind Speed During Storms Over Complex Terrain in the Northeast U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frediani, M. E.; Hacker, J.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Hopson, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    This study aims at improving regional simulation of 10-meter wind speed by verifying PBL schemes for storms at different scales, including convective storms, blizzards, tropical storms and nor'easters over complex terrain in the northeast U.S. We verify a recently proposed sub-grid topographic drag scheme in stormy conditions and compare it with two PBL schemes (Mellor-Yamada and Yonsei University) from WRF-ARW over a region in the Northeast U.S. The scheme was designed to adjust the surface drag over regions with high subgrid-scale topographic variability. The schemes are compared using spatial, temporal, and pattern criteria against surface observations. The spatial and temporal criteria are defined by season, diurnal cycle, and topography; the pattern, is based on clusters derived using clustering analysis. Results show that the drag scheme reduces the positive bias of low wind speeds, but over-corrects the high wind speeds producing a magnitude-increasing negative bias with increasing speed. Both other schemes underestimate the most frequent low-speed mode and overestimate the high-speeds. Error characteristics of all schemes respond to seasonal and diurnal cycle changes. The Topo-wind experiment shows the best agreement with the observation quantiles in summer and fall, the best representation of the diurnal cycle in these seasons, and reduces the bias of all surface stations near the coast. In more stable conditions the Topo-wind scheme shows a larger negative bias. The cluster analysis reveals a correlation between bias and mean speed from the Mellor-Yamada and Yonsei University schemes that is not present when the drag scheme is used. When the drag scheme is used the bias correlates with wind direction; the bias increases when the meridional wind component is negative. This pattern corresponds to trajectories with more land interaction with the highest biases found in northwest circulation clusters.

  2. Links between soil properties and steady-state solute transport through cultivated topsoil at the field scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koestel, J. K.; Nørgaard, Trine; Loung, N. M.

    2013-01-01

    , and tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs) at the field scale for the inert solute transport under a steady-state irrigation rate which produced near-saturated conditions. Sixty-five undisturbed soil columns approximately 20 cm in height and diameter were sampled from the loamy topsoil of an agricultural field...... to larger water saturation and the activation of larger macropores. Our study provides further evidence that it should be possible to estimate solute transport properties from soil properties such as soil texture or bulk density. We also demonstrated that estimation approaches established for the column......It is known that solute transport through soil is heterogeneous at all spatial scales. However, little data are available to allow quantification of these heterogeneities at the field scale or larger. In this study, we investigated the spatial patterns of soil properties, hydrologic state variables...

  3. Experimental and Computational Studies of Temperature Gradient Driven Molecular Transport in Gas Flows through Nano/Micro-Scale Channels

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Yen-Lin; Alexeenko, Alina A; Young, Marcus; Muntz, Eric Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Studies at the University of Southern California have shown that an unconventional solid-state device, the Knudsen Compressor, can be operated as a micro-scale pump or compressor. The critical components of Knudsen Compressors are gas transport membranes, which can be formed from porous materials or densely packed parallel arrays of channels. An applied temperature gradient across a transport membrane creates a thermal creep pumping action. Experimental and computational techniques that have ...

  4. Improving Representation of Convective Transport for Scale-Aware Parameterization, Part II: Analysis of Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yi-Chin; Fan, Jiwen; Zhang, Guang J.; Xu, Kuan-Man; Ghan, Steven J.

    2015-04-27

    Following Part I, in which 3-D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations of a squall line and mesoscale convective complex in the mid-latitude continental and the tropical regions are conducted and evaluated, we examine the scale-dependence of eddy transport of water vapor, evaluate different eddy transport formulations, and improve the representation of convective transport across all scales by proposing a new formulation that more accurately represents the CRM-calculated eddy flux. CRM results show that there are strong grid-spacing dependencies of updraft and downdraft fractions regardless of altitudes, cloud life stage, and geographical location. As for the eddy transport of water vapor, updraft eddy flux is a major contributor to total eddy flux in the lower and middle troposphere. However, downdraft eddy transport can be as large as updraft eddy transport in the lower atmosphere especially at the mature stage of 38 mid-latitude continental convection. We show that the single updraft approach significantly underestimates updraft eddy transport of water vapor because it fails to account for the large internal variability of updrafts, while a single downdraft represents the downdraft eddy transport of water vapor well. We find that using as few as 3 updrafts can account for the internal variability of updrafts well. Based on evaluation with the CRM simulated data, we recommend a simplified eddy transport formulation that considers three updrafts and one downdraft. Such formulation is similar to the conventional one but much more accurately represents CRM-simulated eddy flux across all grid scales.

  5. Application of the Geophysical Scale Multi-Block Transport Modeling System to Hydrodynamic Forcing of Dredged Material Placement Sediment Transport within the James River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. C.; Hayter, E. J.; Pruhs, R.; Luong, P.; Lackey, T. C.

    2016-12-01

    The geophysical scale circulation of the Mid Atlantic Bight and hydrologic inputs from adjacent Chesapeake Bay watersheds and tributaries influences the hydrodynamics and transport of the James River estuary. Both barotropic and baroclinic transport govern the hydrodynamics of this partially stratified estuary. Modeling the placement of dredged sediment requires accommodating this wide spectrum of atmospheric and hydrodynamic scales. The Geophysical Scale Multi-Block (GSMB) Transport Modeling System is a collection of multiple well established and USACE approved process models. Taking advantage of the parallel computing capability of multi-block modeling, we performed one year three-dimensional modeling of hydrodynamics in supporting simulation of dredged sediment placements transport and morphology changes. Model forcing includes spatially and temporally varying meteorological conditions and hydrological inputs from the watershed. Surface heat flux estimates were derived from the National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB). The open water boundary condition for water level was obtained from an ADCIRC model application of the U. S. East Coast. Temperature-salinity boundary conditions were obtained from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Chesapeake Bay Program (CBP) long-term monitoring stations database. Simulated water levels were calibrated and verified by comparison with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) tide gage locations. A harmonic analysis of the modeled tides was performed and compared with NOAA tide prediction data. In addition, project specific circulation was verified using US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) drogue data. Salinity and temperature transport was verified at seven CBP long term monitoring stations along the navigation channel. Simulation and analysis of model results suggest that GSMB is capable of resolving the long duration, multi-scale processes inherent to practical engineering problems such as dredged material

  6. Multi-length and time scale thermal transport using the lattice Boltzmann method with application to electronics cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, Rodrigo A.; Amon, Cristina H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Institute for Complex Engineered Systems, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Ghai, Sartaj S.; Jhon, Myung S. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Institute for Complex Engineered Systems, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2006-01-15

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to investigate one-dimensional, multi-length and -time scale transient heat conduction in crystalline semiconductor solids, in which sub-continuum effects are important. The implementation of this method and its application to electronic devices are described. A silicon-on-insulator transistor subject to Joule heating conditions is used as a case study to illustrate the essence of the LBM. We compare our LBM results, for the diffusive to the ballistic transport regimes, with various hierarchical methodologies of heat transport such as the Fourier, Cattaneo, and ballistic-diffusive transport equations. (author)

  7. Reactive Transport in Porous Media: Pore-scale Mass Exchange between Aqueous Phase and Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanizadeh, S.; Qin, C.

    2013-12-01

    and biofilms is empirically introduced which lacks somewhat physical fundamentals. Therefore, to better characterize the mass exchange between aqueous phase and biofilms, in this work we start with the local descriptions of solute transport in porous media with biofilms. Then, the upscaled average equations of solute transport in both aqueous phase and biofilms are obtained by averaging the local equations over a domain of interest, like a pore throat or a typical REV of porous media. Based on some assumptions, we can reach a general form of first-order kinetic mass exchange model. As a first attempt, we limit investigates of solute mass exchange to the pore scale. The dependence of pore-scale mass exchange coefficient on a number of pore-scale parameters (such as pore structure, Damköhler number and volume fraction of biofilms) is investigated. Our studies show that this coefficient strongly depends on pore geometry, volume fraction of biofilms, Damköhler number and diffusivity ratio. Particularly, our results can be key inputs to the pore-network modeling of bioclogging.

  8. The influence of bedrock hydrogeology on catchment-scale nitrate fate and transport in fractured aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orr, Alison [Arup, 50 Ringsend Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast (United Kingdom); Nitsche, Janka [RPS, West Pier Business Campus, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin (Ireland); School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast (United Kingdom); Archbold, Marie [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast (United Kingdom); Environmental Protection Agency, Richview, Clonskeagh Road, Dublin 14 (Ireland); Deakin, Jenny [Environmental Protection Agency, Richview, Clonskeagh Road, Dublin 14 (Ireland); Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland); Ofterdinger, Ulrich; Flynn, Raymond [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-01

    Characterising catchment scale biogeochemical processes controlling nitrate fate in groundwater constitutes a fundamental consideration when applying programmes of measures to reduce risks posed by diffuse agricultural pollutants to water quality. Combining hydrochemical analyses with nitrate isotopic data and physical hydrogeological measurements permitted characterisation of biogeochemical processes influencing nitrogen fate and transport in the groundwater in two fractured bedrock aquifers with contrasting hydrogeology but comparable nutrient loads. Hydrochemical and isotopic analyses of groundwater samples collected from moderately fractured, diffusely karstified limestone indicated nitrification controlled dissolved nitrogen fate and delivery to aquatic receptors. By contrast nitrate concentrations in groundwater were considerably lower in a low transmissivity highly lithified sandstone and pyrite-bearing shale unit with patchy subsoil cover. Geophysical and hydrochemical investigations showed shallower intervals contained hydraulically active fractures where denitrification was reflected through lower nitrogen levels and an isotopic enrichment ratio of 1.7 between δ{sup 15}N and δ{sup 18}O. Study findings highlight the influence of bedrock hydrogeological conditions on aqueous nitrogen mobility. Investigation results demonstrate that bedrock conditions need to be considered when implementing catchment management plans to reduce the impact of agricultural practices on the quality of groundwater and baseflow in receiving rivers. Nitrate isotopic signatures in the groundwater of a freely draining catchment underlain by a karstified aquifer and a poorly draining aquifer with a low transmissivity aquifer. - Graphical abstract: Contrasting nitrate isotope signatures of groundwater in a free draining catchment underlain by a karstified aquifer and a poorly drained catchment underlain by a low transmissivity aquifer. - Highlights: • Comparison of N fate and

  9. Measurement of Large-Scale Sediment Transport Dynamics Using Multibeam Sonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, S. M.; Parsons, D. R.; Best, J. L.; Malzone, C.; Keevil, G.

    2007-12-01

    results demonstrate the ability of MBES systems to obtain large sets of data across a two-dimensional swath: this enables the real-time monitoring of suspended sediment transport and related flow processes on a scale previously unrealisable with single-beam acoustic back-scatter systems.

  10. Modelling transport and deposition of caesium and iodine from the Chernobyl accident using the DREAM model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brandt

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A tracer model, DREAM (the Danish Rimpuff and Eulerian Accidental release Model, has been developed for modelling transport, dispersion and deposition (wet and dry of radioactive material from accidental releases, as the Chernobyl accident. The model is a combination of a Lagrangian model, that includes the near source dispersion, and an Eulerian model describing the long-range transport. The performance of the transport model has previously been tested within the European Tracer Experiment, ETEX, which included transport and dispersion of an inert, non-depositing tracer from a controlled release. The focus of this paper is the model performance with respect to the total deposition of  137Cs, 134Cs and 131I from the Chernobyl accident, using different relatively simple and comprehensive parameterizations for dry- and wet deposition. The performance, compared to measurements, of using different combinations of two different wet deposition parameterizations and three different parameterizations of dry deposition has been evaluated, using different statistical tests. The best model performance, compared to measurements, is obtained when parameterizing the total deposition combined of a simple method for dry deposition and a subgrid-scale averaging scheme for wet deposition based on relative humidities. The same major conclusion is obtained for all the three different radioactive isotopes and using two different deposition measurement databases. Large differences are seen in the results obtained by using the two different parameterizations of wet deposition based on precipitation rates and relative humidities, respectively. The parameterization based on subgrid-scale averaging is, in all cases, performing better than the parameterization based on precipitation rates. This indicates that the in-cloud scavenging process is more important than the below cloud scavenging process for the submicron particles and that the precipitation rates are

  11. MHD Modeling of the Solar Wind with Turbulence Transport and Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Usmanov, A. V.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Breech, B.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a magnetohydrodynamic model that describes the global axisymmetric steady-state structure of the solar wind near solar minimum with account for transport of small-scale turbulence associated heating. The Reynolds-averaged mass, momentum, induction, and energy equations for the large-scale solar wind flow are solved simultaneously with the turbulence transport equations in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU. The large-scale equations include subgrid-scale terms due to turbulence and the turbulence (small-scale) equations describe the effects of transport and (phenomenologically) dissipation of the MHD turbulence based on a few statistical parameters (turbulence energy, normalized cross-helicity, and correlation scale). The coupled set of equations is integrated numerically for a source dipole field on the Sun by a time-relaxation method in the corotating frame of reference. We present results on the plasma, magnetic field, and turbulence distributions throughout the heliosphere and on the role of the turbulence in the large-scale structure and temperature distribution in the solar wind.

  12. Effect of Pore-scale Velocity on the Biodegradation of Contaminants during Transport in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Sanchez, I.; Autenrieth, R. L.; McDonald, T. J.; Cunningham, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Column experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of pore velocity on the extent of biodegradation of cis- dichloroethene (cis-DCE) during transport in porous media. The columns were filled with homogeneous glass beads and inoculated with the KB-1 culture (provided by SiREM, Guelph, Ontario, Canada), which is capable of complete dechlorination of perchloroethene to ethene. The columns were fed continuously with a synthetic groundwater containing a constant concentration of cis-DCE. Three different pore flow velocities (0.03, 0.08, and 0.51 m/day) were tested in duplicate, subjecting each column to a constant velocity for the entire experiment. Dechlorination of cis-DCE to vinyl chloride and ethene was monitored over time and space within the columns. Protein concentrations, also measured over time and space, were used to relate cell growth to biodegradation efficiency. At the end of the experiment, microbial DNA was harvested from the columns, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to determine differences in the microbial communities that had developed in the columns subjected to different flow rates. The results show that the pore velocity has a strong influence on the microbial population and the degree of dechlorination. At high flow velocity (0.51 m/day), the degradation of cis-DCE to ethene was complete, and the organism capable of cis-DCE dechlorination ({Dehalococcoides sp.}) was present at the end of the experiment. In contrast, at medium and low flow velocities (0.08 and 0.03 m/day), incomplete dechlorination was observed with an absence or low concentration of {Dehalococcoides sp}. These results suggest that it is important for field-scale groundwater remediation to understand the interaction between physical and biological processes on the scale of single pores.

  13. Coordination between water transport capacity, biomass growth, metabolic scaling and species stature in co-occurring shrub and tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Duncan D; Sperry, John S

    2014-12-01

    The significance of xylem function and metabolic scaling theory begins from the idea that water transport is strongly coupled to growth rate. At the same time, coordination of water transport and growth seemingly should differ between plant functional types. We evaluated the relationships between water transport, growth and species stature in six species of co-occurring trees and shrubs. Within species, a strong proportionality between plant hydraulic conductance (K), sap flow (Q) and shoot biomass growth (G) was generally supported. Across species, however, trees grew more for a given K or Q than shrubs, indicating greater growth-based water-use efficiency (WUE) in trees. Trees also showed slower decline in relative growth rate (RGR) than shrubs, equivalent to a steeper G by mass (M) scaling exponent in trees (0.77-0.98). The K and Q by M scaling exponents were common across all species (0.80, 0.82), suggesting that the steeper G scaling in trees reflects a size-dependent increase in their growth-based WUE. The common K and Q by M exponents were statistically consistent with the 0.75 of ideal scaling theory. A model based upon xylem anatomy and branching architecture consistently predicted the observed K by M scaling exponents but only when deviations from ideal symmetric branching were incorporated. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Evaluation of the Second Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT 2) Full Scale Crash Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, Martin; Littell, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Two Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) full-scale tests were performed at NASA Langley Research Center's Landing and Impact Research Facility in 2013 and 2014. Two CH-46E airframes were impacted at 33-ft/s forward and 25-ft/s vertical combined velocities onto soft soil, which represents a severe, but potentially survivable impact scenario. TRACT 1 provided a baseline set of responses, while TRACT 2 included retrofits with composite subfloors and other crash system improvements based on TRACT 1. For TRACT 2, a total of 18 unique experiments were conducted to evaluate ATD responses, seat and restraint performance, cargo restraint effectiveness, patient litter behavior, and activation of emergency locator transmitters and crash sensors. Combinations of Hybrid II, Hybrid III, and ES-2 Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs) were placed in forward and side facing seats and occupant results were compared against injury criteria. The structural response of the airframe was assessed based on accelerometers located throughout the airframe and using three-dimensional photogrammetric techniques. Analysis of the photogrammetric data indicated regions of maximum deflection and permanent deformation. The response of TRACT 2 was noticeably different in the longitudinal direction due to changes in the cabin configuration and soil surface, with higher acceleration and damage occurring in the cabin. Loads from ATDs in energy absorbing seats and restraints were within injury limits. Severe injury was likely for ATDs in forward facing passenger seats.

  15. Overview of the Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) Full Scale Crash Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, Martin; Littell, Justin

    2015-01-01

    The Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) full-scale tests were performed at NASA Langley Research Center's Landing and Impact Research Facility in 2013 and 2014. Two CH-46E airframes were impacted at 33-ft/s forward and 25-ft/s vertical combined velocities onto soft soil, which represents a severe, but potentially survivable impact scenario. TRACT 1 provided a baseline set of responses, while TRACT 2 included retrofits with composite subfloors and other crash system improvements based on TRACT 1. For TRACT 2, a total of 18 unique experiments were conducted to evaluate Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATD) responses, seat and restraint performance, cargo restraint effectiveness, patient litter behavior, and activation of emergency locator transmitters and crash sensors. Combinations of Hybrid II, Hybrid III, and ES-2 ATDs were placed in forward and side facing seats and occupant results were compared against injury criteria. The structural response of the airframe was assessed based on accelerometers located throughout the airframe and using three-dimensional photogrammetric techniques. Analysis of the photogrammetric data indicated regions of maximum deflection and permanent deformation. The response of TRACT 2 was noticeably different in the horizontal direction due to changes in the cabin configuration and soil surface, with higher acceleration and damage occurring in the cabin. Loads from ATDs in energy absorbing seats and restraints were within injury limits. Severe injury was likely for ATDs in forward facing passenger seats.

  16. Reactive Transport Modeling and Geophysical Monitoring of Bioclogging at Reservoir Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surasani, V.; Commer, M.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Li, L.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    In Microbial-Enhanced-Hydrocarbon-Recovery (MEHR), preferential bioclogging targets the growth of the biofilms (def. immobilized biopolymers with active cells embodied in it) in highly permeable thief zones to enhance sweep efficiency in oil reservoirs. During MEHR, understanding and controlling bioclogging is hindered by the lack of advanced modeling and monitoring tools; these deficiencies contribute to suboptimal performance. Our focus in this study was on developing a systematic approach to understand and monitor bioclogging at the reservoir scale using a combination of reactive transport modeling and geophysical imaging tools (EM & seismic). In this study, we created a realistic reservoir model from a heterogeneous gas reservoir in the Southern Sacramento basin, California; the model well (Citizen Green #1) was characterized using sonic, electrical, nuclear, and NMR logs for hydrologic and geophysical properties. From the simplified 2D log data model, a strip of size 150m x75m with several high permeability streaks is identified for bioclogging simulation experiments. From the NMR log data it is observed that a good linear correlation exist between logarithmic permeability (0.55- 3.34 log (mD)) versus porosity (0.041-0.28). L. mesenteroides was chosen as the model bacteria. In the presence of sucrose, it enzymatically catalyzes the production of dextran, a useful bioclogging agent. Using microbial kinetics from our laboratory experiment and reservoir heterogeneity, a reactive transport model (RTM) is established for two kinds of bioclogging treatments based on whether microbes are present in situ or are supplied externally. In both cases, sucrose media (1.5 M) is injected at the rate of 1 liter/s for 20 days into the center of high permeable strip to stimulate microbes. Simulations show that the high dextran production was deep into the formation from the injection well. This phenomenon can be explained precisely with bacterial kinetics and injection rate. In

  17. Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    container. It now permits free transit of shipping containers from their western ports, if transported by rail directly to the U.S. ( Mireles , 2005, p...Transportation Industry Study Seminar. Mireles , Richard, Castillo. (2005, January). A Cure for West Coast Congestion. Logistics Today, Vol. 46, Issue 1. 1

  18. Bayesian estimation of the hydraulic and solute transport properties of a small-scale unsaturated soil column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreira, Paulo H S; Van Genuchten, Martinus Th|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31481518X; Orlande, Helcio R B; Cotta, Renato M.

    2016-01-01

    In this study the hydraulic and solute transport properties of an unsaturated soil were estimated simultaneously from a relatively simple small-scale laboratory column infiltration/outflow experiment. As governing equations we used the Richards equation for variably saturated flow and a physical

  19. Shear zone liquefaction in mass transport deposit emplacement : A multi-scale integration of seismic reflection and outcrop data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogata, K.; Mountjoy, J. J.; Pini, Gian Andrea; Festa, A.; Tinterri, R.

    2014-01-01

    We present the integrated outcrop-geophysical study of two mass transport complexes, the exhumed Specchio unit in the Northern Apennines of Italy and the Holocene Poverty unit in the Hikurangi margin of New Zealand. The combination of micro- to meso-scale structural, stratigraphic and sedimentologic

  20. RANS-VOF modeling of hydrodynamics and sand transport under full-scale non-breaking and breaking waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez Mora, Maria de Los Angeles; Ribberink, Jan S.; van der Zanden, Joep; van der Werf, Jebbe J.; Jacobsen, N.G.; Lynett, P.; Lynett, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    A 2D RANS-VOF model is used to simulate the flow and sand transport for two different full-scale laboratory experiments: i) non-breaking waves over a horizontal sand bed (Schretlen et al., 2011) and ii) plunging breaking waves over a barred mobile bed profile (Van der Zanden et al., 2016). For the

  1. Microbially driven fracture sealing for inhibiting contaminant transport at the field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Lindsay; Cuthbert, Mark; Riley, Michael; Handley-Sidhu, Stephanie; Tobler, Dominique; Phoenix, Vernon

    2013-04-01

    Successful implementation of subsurface carbon storage and nuclear waste containment schemes relies on transmissivity reduction through the sealing of fractures in the surrounding rocks. Effective transmissivity reduction in fine scale features is difficult to achieve using traditional high viscosity cement grouts injected at high pressures. However, laboratory scale studies suggest microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) can provide a low-viscosity alternative. The first field trials of MICP in fractured hard rock were carried out in a multiple borehole array by using the ureolytic bacterium Sporosarcina pasteurii. Flow at depth at the experimental site is dominated by a single fracture. Injection of the bacteria in parallel with a 'cementing fluid' of urea and calcium chloride was used to fix the bacteria in the subsurface. Subsequent flushing with the cementing fluid alone drove further ureolysis and calcite precipitation. Calcite precipitation is eventually limited by crystal growth preventing interaction of the accumulated bacteria with the cementing fluid; repeated bacteria injections are necessary. Coupled equations for bacterial and urea transport, bacterial accumulation, and calcite production were used to model the field trial numerically and gave excellent agreement with field data. While a significant reduction in the transmissivity of the fracture was achieved over several m2 the modelling results suggest challenges remain in encouraging aperture reduction at a distance from the injection borehole due primarily to cementation and clogging around the bacteria injection hole. A further borehole array at the same site provides the opportunity for additional experiments informed by the promising initial results. Models of a number of alternative bacteria and cementing fluid injection schemes have been created using the geometry of the new borehole array. These models have been parameterised using the calibrated model from the initial field trial

  2. The effect of changing micro-scale physical environmental factors on an environment's invitingness for transportation cycling in adults: an exploratory study using manipulated photographs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mertens, Lieze; Van Holle, Veerle; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Deforche, Benedicte; Salmon, Jo; Nasar, Jack; Van de Weghe, Nico; Van Dyck, Delfien; Van Cauwenberg, Jelle

    2014-01-01

    .... The present mixed-methods study used manipulated photographs to determine causal relationships between micro-scale environmental factors and the environment's invitingness for transportation cycling...

  3. Test program of the drop tests with full scale and 1/2.5 scale models of spent nuclear fuel transport and storage cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuri, S.; Matsuoka, T.; Kishimoto, J.; Ishiko, D.; Saito, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, LTD., Kobe Shipyard and Machinery Works, Hyogo (Japan); Kimura, T. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, LTD., Takasago Research and Dept. Center, Hyogo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    MHI have been developing 5 types of spent nuclear fuel transport and storage cask (MSF cask fleet) as a cask line-up. In order to demonstrate their safety, a representative cask model for the cask fleet have been designed for drop test regulated in IAEA TS-R-1. The drop test with a full and a 1/2.5 scale models are to be performed. It describes the test program of the drop test and manufacturing process of the scale models used for the tests.

  4. Testing the {rho}* scaling of thermal transport models: predicted and measured temperatures in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor dimensionless scaling experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, D.R.; Scott, S.D. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Dorland, W. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies

    1997-04-01

    Theoretical predictions of ion and electron thermal diffusivities are tested by comparing calculated and measured temperatures in low (L) mode plasmas from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [D. J. Grove and D. M. Meade, Nucl. Fusion 25 , 1167 (1985)] nondimensional scaling experiments. The DIII-D [J. L. Luxon and L. G. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8 , 441 (1985)] L-mode {rho}* scalings, the transport models of Rebut-Lallia-Watkins (RLW), Boucher`s modification of RLW, and the Institute for Fusion Studies-Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (IFS-PPPL) model for transport due to ion temperature gradient modes are tested. The predictions use the measured densities in order to include the effects of density profile shape variations on the transport models. The uncertainties in the measured and predicted temperatures are discussed. The predictions based on the DIII- D scalings are within the measurement uncertainties. All the theoretical models predict a more favorable {rho}* dependence for the ion temperatures than is seen. Preliminary estimates indicate that sheared ow stabilization is important for some discharges, and that inclusion of its effects may bring the predictions of the IFS-PPPL model into agreement with the experiments.

  5. Modelling sub-grid wetland in the ORCHIDEE global land surface model: evaluation against river discharges and remotely sensed data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ringeval

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The quality of the global hydrological simulations performed by land surface models (LSMs strongly depends on processes that occur at unresolved spatial scales. Approaches such as TOPMODEL have been developed, which allow soil moisture redistribution within each grid-cell, based upon sub-grid scale topography. Moreover, the coupling between TOPMODEL and a LSM appears as a potential way to simulate wetland extent dynamic and its sensitivity to climate, a recently identified research problem for biogeochemical modelling, including methane emissions. Global evaluation of the coupling between TOPMODEL and an LSM is difficult, and prior attempts have been indirect, based on the evaluation of the simulated river flow. This study presents a new way to evaluate this coupling, within the ORCHIDEE LSM, using remote sensing data of inundated areas. Because of differences in nature between the satellite derived information – inundation extent – and the variable diagnosed by TOPMODEL/ORCHIDEE – area at maximum soil water content, the evaluation focuses on the spatial distribution of these two quantities as well as on their temporal variation. Despite some difficulties in exactly matching observed localized inundated events, we obtain a rather good agreement in the distribution of these two quantities at a global scale. Floodplains are not accounted for in the model, and this is a major limitation. The difficulty of reproducing the year-to-year variability of the observed inundated area (for instance, the decreasing trend by the end of 90s is also underlined. Classical indirect evaluation based on comparison between simulated and observed river flow is also performed and underlines difficulties to simulate river flow after coupling with TOPMODEL. The relationship between inundation and river flow at the basin scale in the model is analyzed, using both methods (evaluation against remote sensing data and river flow. Finally, we discuss the potential of

  6. Evaluation of the First Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT 1) Full-Scale Crash Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, Martin S.; Littell, Justin D.; Jackson, Karen E.; Bark, Lindley W.; DeWeese, Rick L.; McEntire, B. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, the NASA Rotary Wing Crashworthiness Program initiated the Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) research program by obtaining two CH-46E helicopters from the Navy CH-46E Program Office (PMA-226) at the Navy Flight Readiness Center in Cherry Point, North Carolina. Full-scale crash tests were planned to assess dynamic responses of transport-category rotorcraft under combined horizontal and vertical impact loading. The first crash test (TRACT 1) was performed at NASA Langley Research Center's Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR), which enables the study of critical interactions between the airframe, seat, and occupant during a controlled crash environment. The CH-46E fuselage is categorized as a medium-lift rotorcraft with fuselage dimensions comparable to a regional jet or business jet. The first TRACT test (TRACT 1) was conducted in August 2013. The primary objectives for TRACT 1 were to: (1) assess improvements to occupant loads and displacement with the use of crashworthy features such as pre-tensioning active restraints and energy absorbing seats, (2) develop novel techniques for photogrammetric data acquisition to measure occupant and airframe kinematics, and (3) provide baseline data for future comparison with a retrofitted airframe configuration. Crash test conditions for TRACT 1 were 33-ft/s forward and 25-ft/s vertical combined velocity onto soft soil, which represent a severe, but potentially survivable impact scenario. The extraordinary value of the TRACT 1 test was reflected by the breadth of meaningful experiments. A total of 8 unique experiments were conducted to evaluate ATD responses, seat and restraint performance, cargo restraint effectiveness, patient litter behavior, and photogrammetric techniques. A combination of Hybrid II, Hybrid III, and ES-2 Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs) were placed in forward and side facing seats and occupant results were compared against injury criteria. Loads from ATDs in energy

  7. Final report of the TRUE Block Scale project. 3. Modelling of flow and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poteri, Antti [VTT Processes, Helsinki (Finland); Billaux, Daniel [Itasca Consultants SA, Ecully (France); Dershowitz, William [Golder Associates Inc., Redmond, WA (United States); Gomez-Hernandez, J. Jaime [Univ. Politecnica de Valencia (Spain). Dept. of Hydrahulic and Environmental Engineering; Cvetkovic, Vladimir [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Water Resources Engineering; Hautojaervi, Aimo [Posiva Oy, Olkiluoto (Finland); Holton, David [Serco Assurance, Harwell (United Kingdom); Medina, Agustin [UPC, Barcelona (Spain); Winberg, Anders (ed.) [Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2002-12-01

    A series of tracer experiments were performed as part of the TRUE Block Scale experiment over length scales ranging from 10 to 100 m. The in situ experimentation was preceded by a comprehensive iterative characterisation campaign - the results from one borehole was used to update descriptive models and provide the basis for continued characterisation. Apart from core drilling, various types of laboratory investigations, core logging, borehole TV imaging and various types of hydraulic tests (single hole and cross-hole) were performed. Based on the characterisation data a hydro structural model of the investigated rock volume was constructed including deterministic structures and a stochastic background fracture population, and their material properties. In addition, a generic microstructure conceptual model of the investigated structures was developed. Tracer tests with radioactive sorbing tracers performed in three flow paths were preceded by various pre-tests including tracer dilution tests, which were used to select suitable configurations of tracer injection and pumping in the established borehole array. The in situ experimentation was preceded by formulation of basic questions and associated hypotheses to be addressed by the tracer tests and the subsequent evaluation. The hypotheses included address of the validity of the hydro structural model, the effects of heterogeneity and block scale retention. Model predictions and subsequent evaluation modelling was performed using a wide variety of model concepts. These included stochastic continuum, discrete feature network and channel network models formulated in 3D, which also solved the flow problem. In addition, two 'single channel' approaches (Posiva Streamtube and LaSAR extended to the block scale) were employed. A common basis for transport was formulated. The difference between the approaches was found in how heterogeneity is accounted for, both in terms of number of different types of immobile zones

  8. Structure and transport at grain boundaries in polycrystalline olivine: An atomic-scale perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantisi, Boris; Sator, Nicolas; Guillot, Bertrand

    2017-12-01

    Structure and transport properties at grain boundaries in polycrystalline olivine have been investigated at the atomic scale by molecular dynamics simulation (MD) using an empirical ionocovalent interaction potential. On the time scale of the simulation (a few tens of nanoseconds for a system size of ∼650,000 atoms) grain boundaries and grain interior were identified by mapping the atomic displacements along the simulation run. In the investigated temperature range (1300-1700 K) the mean thickness of the grain boundary phase is evaluated between 0.5 and 2 nm, a value which depends on temperature and grain size. The structure of the grain boundary phase is found to be disordered (amorphous-like) and is different from the one exhibited by the supercooled liquid. The self-diffusion coefficients of major elements in the intergranular region range from ∼10-13 to 10-10 m2/s between 1300 and 1700 K (with DSigb < DOgb < DFegb < DMggb) and are only one order of magnitude smaller than those evaluated in the supercooled melt. In using a newly derived expression for the bulk self-diffusion coefficient it is concluded that the latter one is driven by the grain boundary contribution as long as the grain size is smaller than a centimeter. In assuming that the electrical conduction at grain boundaries is purely ionic, the macroscopic grain boundary conductivity is found to be two orders of magnitude lower than in molten olivine, and one order of magnitude higher than the lattice conductivity. A consequence is that the conductivity of the olivine polycrystal is dominated by the grain interior contribution as soon as the grain size is larger than a micrometer or so. The grain boundary viscosity has been evaluated from the Green-Kubo relation expressing the viscosity as function of the stress tensor time correlation function. In spite of a slow convergence of the calculation by MD, the grain boundary viscosity was estimated about ∼105 Pa s at 1500 K, a value in agreement with

  9. Liquid transportation fuels via large-scale fluidised-bed gasification of lignocellulosic biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannula, I.; Kurkela, E.

    2013-04-15

    With the objective of gaining a better understanding of the system design trade-offs and economics that pertain to biomass-to-liquids processes, 20 individual BTL plant designs were evaluated based on their technical and economic performance. The investigation was focused on gasification-based processes that enable the conversion of biomass to methanol, dimethyl ether, Fischer-Tropsch liquids or synthetic gasoline at a large (300 MWth of biomass) scale. The biomass conversion technology was based on pressurised steam/O2-blown fluidised-bed gasification, followed by hot-gas filtration and catalytic conversion of hydrocarbons and tars. This technology has seen extensive development and demonstration activities in Finland during the recent years and newly generated experimental data has also been used in our simulation models. Our study included conceptual design issues, process descriptions, mass and energy balances and production cost estimates. Several studies exist that discuss the overall efficiency and economics of biomass conversion to transportation liquids, but very few studies have presented a detailed comparison between various syntheses using consistent process designs and uniform cost database. In addition, no studies exist that examine and compare BTL plant designs using the same front-end configuration as described in this work. Our analysis shows that it is possible to produce sustainable low-carbon fuels from lignocellulosic biomass with first-law efficiency in the range of 49.6-66.7% depending on the end-product and process conditions. Production cost estimates were calculated assuming Nth plant economics and without public investment support, CO2 credits or tax assumptions. They are 58-65 euro/MWh for methanol, 58-66 euro/MWh for DME, 64-75 euro/MWh for Fischer-Tropsch liquids and 68-78 euro/MWh for synthetic gasoline. (orig.)

  10. Pseudopotential-based electron quantum transport: Theoretical formulation and application to nanometer-scale silicon nanowire transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Jingtian, E-mail: jingtian.fang@utdallas.edu; Vandenberghe, William G.; Fu, Bo; Fischetti, Massimo V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2016-01-21

    We present a formalism to treat quantum electronic transport at the nanometer scale based on empirical pseudopotentials. This formalism offers explicit atomistic wavefunctions and an accurate band structure, enabling a detailed study of the characteristics of devices with a nanometer-scale channel and body. Assuming externally applied potentials that change slowly along the electron-transport direction, we invoke the envelope-wavefunction approximation to apply the open boundary conditions and to develop the transport equations. We construct the full-band open boundary conditions (self-energies of device contacts) from the complex band structure of the contacts. We solve the transport equations and present the expressions required to calculate the device characteristics, such as device current and charge density. We apply this formalism to study ballistic transport in a gate-all-around (GAA) silicon nanowire field-effect transistor with a body-size of 0.39 nm, a gate length of 6.52 nm, and an effective oxide thickness of 0.43 nm. Simulation results show that this device exhibits a subthreshold slope (SS) of ∼66 mV/decade and a drain-induced barrier-lowering of ∼2.5 mV/V. Our theoretical calculations predict that low-dimensionality channels in a 3D GAA architecture are able to meet the performance requirements of future devices in terms of SS swing and electrostatic control.

  11. An efficient strategy for small-scale screening and production of archaeal membrane transport proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Pikyee; Varela, Filipa; Magoch, Malgorzata; Silva, Ana Rita; Rosário, Ana Lúcia; Brito, José; Oliveira, Tânia Filipa; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Pessanha, Miguel; Stelter, Meike; Kletzin, Arnulf; Henderson, Peter J F; Archer, Margarida

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins play a key role in many fundamental cellular processes such as transport of nutrients, sensing of environmental signals and energy transduction, and account for over 50% of all known drug targets. Despite their importance, structural and functional characterisation of membrane proteins still remains a challenge, partially due to the difficulties in recombinant expression and purification. Therefore the need for development of efficient methods for heterologous production is essential. Fifteen integral membrane transport proteins from Archaea were selected as test targets, chosen to represent two superfamilies widespread in all organisms known as the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) and the 5-Helix Inverted Repeat Transporter superfamily (5HIRT). These proteins typically have eleven to twelve predicted transmembrane helices and are putative transporters for sugar, metabolite, nucleobase, vitamin or neurotransmitter. They include a wide range of examples from the following families: Metabolite-H(+)-symporter; Sugar Porter; Nucleobase-Cation-Symporter-1; Nucleobase-Cation-Symporter-2; and neurotransmitter-sodium-symporter. Overproduction of transporters was evaluated with three vectors (pTTQ18, pET52b, pWarf) and two Escherichia coli strains (BL21 Star and C43 (DE3)). Thirteen transporter genes were successfully expressed; only two did not express in any of the tested vector-strain combinations. Initial trials showed that seven transporters could be purified and six of these yielded quantities of ≥ 0.4 mg per litre suitable for functional and structural studies. Size-exclusion chromatography confirmed that two purified transporters were almost homogeneous while four others were shown to be non-aggregating, indicating that they are ready for up-scale production and crystallisation trials. Here, we describe an efficient strategy for heterologous production of membrane transport proteins in E. coli. Small-volume cultures (10 mL) produced sufficient

  12. Discrete Network Modeling for Field-Scale Flow and Transport Through Porous Media

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Howington, Stacy

    1997-01-01

    .... Specifically, a stochastic, high-resolution, discrete network model is developed and explored for simulating macroscopic flow and conservative transport through macroscopic porous media Networks...

  13. New Approaches to Quantifying Transport Model Error in Atmospheric CO2 Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, L.; Pawson, S.; Zhu, Z.; Nielsen, J. E.; Collatz, G. J.; Gregg, W. W.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, much progress has been made in observing CO2 distributions from space. However, the use of these observations to infer source/sink distributions in inversion studies continues to be complicated by difficulty in quantifying atmospheric transport model errors. We will present results from several different experiments designed to quantify different aspects of transport error using the Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM). In the first set of experiments, an ensemble of simulations is constructed using perturbations to parameters in the model s moist physics and turbulence parameterizations that control sub-grid scale transport of trace gases. Analysis of the ensemble spread and scales of temporal and spatial variability among the simulations allows insight into how parameterized, small-scale transport processes influence simulated CO2 distributions. In the second set of experiments, atmospheric tracers representing model error are constructed using observation minus analysis statistics from NASA's Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA). The goal of these simulations is to understand how errors in large scale dynamics are distributed, and how they propagate in space and time, affecting trace gas distributions. These simulations will also be compared to results from NASA's Carbon Monitoring System Flux Pilot Project that quantified the impact of uncertainty in satellite constrained CO2 flux estimates on atmospheric mixing ratios to assess the major factors governing uncertainty in global and regional trace gas distributions.

  14. Study of Uranium Transport Utilizing Reactive Numerical Modeling and Experimental Data from Heterogeneous Intermediate-Scale Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, D.; Miller, A.; Honeyman, B.

    2007-12-01

    The study of the transport of contaminants in groundwater is critical in order to mitigate risks to downstream receptors from sites where past releases of these contaminants has resulted in the degradation of the water quality of the underlying aquifer. In most cases, the fate and transport of these contaminants occurs in a chemically and physically heterogeneous environment; thereby making the prediction of the ultimate fate of these contaminants difficult. In order to better understand the fundamental processes that have the greatest effect on the transport of these contaminants, careful laboratory study must be completed in a controlled environment. Once the experimental data has been generated, the validation of numerical models may then be achieved. Questions on the management of contaminated sites may center on the long-term release (e.g., desorption, dissolution) behavior of contaminated geomedia. Data on the release of contaminants is often derived from bench-scale experiments or, in rare cases, through field-scale experiments. A central question, however, is how molecular-scale processes (e.g., bond breaking) are expressed at the macroscale. This presentation describes part of a collaborative study between the Colorado School of Mines, the USGS and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab on upscaling pore-scale processes to understanding field-scale observations. In the work described here, two experiments were conducted in two intermediate-scale tanks (2.44 m x 1.22 m x 7.6 cm and 2.44 m x 0.61 m x 7.6 cm) to generate data to quantify the processes of uranium dissolution and transport in fully saturated conditions, and to evaluate the ability of two reactive transport models to capture the relevant processes and predict U behavior at the intermediate scale. Each tank was designed so that spatial samples could be collected from the side of the tank, as well as samples from the effluent end of the tank. The larger tank was packed with a less than 2mm fraction of a

  15. Meso-scale structures and anomalous convective transport at the edge of magnetic confinement devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasheninnikov, S.; Yu, G. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Smolyakov, A.I. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada); Soboleva, T.K. [UNAM, Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2006-04-15

    We review the mechanisms of convective cross-field plasma transport in fusion related devices. We discuss the models of convective transport caused by the effective plasma gravity, as well as by the {nabla}T{sub e} and parallel shear of ExB drift instabilities.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Flow Over Battlefield-scale Complex Terrain: Surface Fluxes From Resolved and Subgrid Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-06

    Grimmond, 2015: Proc. 9th International Conference on Urban Climate , Paris, France. Anderson W, Li Q, Bou-Zeid E, 2014: Proc. of American...represen- tative information is known about the macroscale attributes of these coher- ent motions, we have developed a sim- ple, semi -empirical model to...dust from arid landscapes on the Llano Estacado in west Texas and eastern New Mexico. • Under Review: National Science Foundation, Fluid Dynamics Program

  17. Scale-Dependent Fracture-Matrix Interactions and Their Impact on Radionuclide Transport: Development of efficient particle-tracking methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajaram, Harihar [University of Colorado, Boulder; Brutz, Michael [University of Colorado, Boulder; Klein, Dylan R [University of Colorado, Boulder; Mallikamas, Wasin [University of Colorado, Boulder

    2014-09-18

    Matrix Diffusion and Adsorption within a rock matrix are important mechanisms for retarding transport of radionuclides in fractured rock. Due to computational limitations and difficulties in characterizing complex subsurface systems, diffusive exchange between a fracture network and surrounding rock matrix is often modeled using simplified conceptual representations. There is significant uncertainty in “effective” parameters used in these models, such as the “effective matrix diffusivity”. Often, these parameters are estimated by fitting sparse breakthrough data, and estimated values fall outside meaningful ranges, because simplified interpretive models do not consider complex three-dimensional flow. There is limited understanding of the relationship between the effective parameters and rock mass characteristics including network structure and matrix properties. There is also evidence for an apparent scale-dependence in “effective matrix diffusion” coefficients. These observations raise questions on whether fracture-matrix interaction parameters estimated from small-scale tracer tests can be used for predicting radionuclide fate and transport at the scale of DOE field sites. High-resolution three-dimensional Discrete-Fracture-Network-Matrix (DFNM) models based on well-defined local scale transport equations can help to address some of these questions. Due to tremendous advances in computational technology over the last 10 years, DFNM modeling in relatively large domains is now feasible. The overarching objective of our research is to use DFNM modeling to improve fundamental understanding of how effective parameters in conceptual models are related to fracture network structure and matrix properties. An advanced three-dimensional DFNM model is being developed, which combines upscaled particle-tracking algorithms for fracture-matrix interaction and a parallel fracture-network flow simulator. The particle-tracking algorithms allow complexity in flow fields

  18. A variational multi-scale method with spectral approximation of the sub-scales: Application to the 1D advection-diffusion equations

    KAUST Repository

    Chacón Rebollo, Tomás

    2015-03-01

    This paper introduces a variational multi-scale method where the sub-grid scales are computed by spectral approximations. It is based upon an extension of the spectral theorem to non necessarily self-adjoint elliptic operators that have an associated base of eigenfunctions which are orthonormal in weighted L2 spaces. This allows to element-wise calculate the sub-grid scales by means of the associated spectral expansion. We propose a feasible VMS-spectral method by truncation of this spectral expansion to a finite number of modes. We apply this general framework to the convection-diffusion equation, by analytically computing the family of eigenfunctions. We perform a convergence and error analysis. We also present some numerical tests that show the stability of the method for an odd number of spectral modes, and an improvement of accuracy in the large resolved scales, due to the adding of the sub-grid spectral scales.

  19. Catchment scale modelling of pesticide fate and transport using a simple parsimonious process-based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullan, Stephanie; Whelan, Mick; Holman, Ian

    2013-04-01

    Pesticides continue to be detected in surface water resources around the world. In the UK to ensure the safety of drinking water supplies, water companies are required to create drinking water safety plans, which take a catchment risk management approach. Models can be used to predict peak pesticide concentrations in raw surface water supplies, these predictions can then be utilised in risk assessments. There is therefore a need to model pesticide fate and transport from agricultural land to surface water resources at the catchment scale. We present a simple soil water balance model linked with a pesticide fate and transport model to predict hydrological response and pesticide exposures at the catchment outlet which is intended for use in risk assessment of raw drinking water resources. The model considers two soil water stores (a topsoil store and a subsoil store) for each soil type in the catchment. It employs a daily time-step and simulates changes in soil water content, actual evapotranspiration, overland flow, drainflow, lateral throughflow and potential recharge to a groundwater store which contributes to baseflow. The model is semi-lumped (not spatially explicit). Calculations are performed for soil type and crop combinations which are weighted by their proportion within the catchment. The model utilises soil properties from the national soil database and can, therefore, be applied to any catchment in England and Wales. The pesticide fate model assumes first-order degradation kinetics, a linear sorption isotherm and leaching at the rate of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. Following application the pesticide is assumed to diffuse into the soil and be evenly distributed in the "non-excluded" pore water (pesticides are assumed to be unable to diffuse into the very small pores). Pesticide concentrations and loads to surface water resources are calculated for rainfall events that generate a hydrological response, assuming that a proportion of the most

  20. Transportes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidalgo Fernández-Cano, Amalio

    1960-01-01

    Full Text Available El movimiento de materiales dentro de la Factoría está atendido por tres principales medios de transporte, en consonancia con las características del material y de los desplazamientos. Así se han establecido: sistemas de cintas transportadoras, una red ferroviaria de ancho normal y una completa malla de caminos enlazando funcionalmente las instalaciones.

  1. Bayesian estimation of the hydraulic and solute transport properties of a small-scale unsaturated soil column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreira Paulo H. S.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study the hydraulic and solute transport properties of an unsaturated soil were estimated simultaneously from a relatively simple small-scale laboratory column infiltration/outflow experiment. As governing equations we used the Richards equation for variably saturated flow and a physical non-equilibrium dual-porosity type formulation for solute transport. A Bayesian parameter estimation approach was used in which the unknown parameters were estimated with the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC method through implementation of the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Sensitivity coefficients were examined in order to determine the most meaningful measurements for identifying the unknown hydraulic and transport parameters. Results obtained using the measured pressure head and solute concentration data collected during the unsaturated soil column experiment revealed the robustness of the proposed approach.

  2. Large-scale calculations of thermoelectric transport coefficients: a case study of γ-graphyne with point defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jinghua; Liu, Huijun; Fan, Dengdong; Jiang, Peiheng

    2017-11-01

    Defects such as vacancies and impurities could have profound effects on the transport properties of thermoelectric materials. However, it is usually quite difficult to directly calculate the thermoelectric properties of defect-containing systems via first-principles methods since a very large supercell is required. In this work, based on the linear response theory and the kernel polynomial method, we present an efficient approach that can help to calculate the thermoelectric transport coefficients of a large system containing millions of atoms at arbitrary chemical potential and temperature. As a prototype example, we consider dilute vacancies and hydrogen impurities in a large-scale γ-graphyne sheet and discuss their effects on the thermoelectric transport properties.

  3. Final Project Report: Release of aged contaminants from weathered sediments: Effects of sorbate speciation on scaling of reactive transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Chorover, University of Arizona; Peggy O' €™Day, University of California, Merced; Karl Mueller, Penn State University; Wooyong Um, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Carl Steefel, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2012-10-01

    Hanford sediments impacted by hyperalkaline high level radioactive waste have undergone incongruent silicate mineral weathering concurrent with contaminant uptake. In this project, we studied the impact of background pore water (BPW) on strontium, cesium and iodine desorption and transport in Hanford sediments that were experimentally weathered by contact with simulated hyperalkaline tank waste leachate (STWL) solutions. Using those lab-weathered Hanford sediments (HS) and model precipitates formed during nucleation from homogeneous STWL solutions (HN), we (i) provided detailed characterization of reaction products over a matrix of field-relevant gradients in contaminant concentration, PCO2, and reaction time; (ii) improved molecular-scale understanding of how sorbate speciation controls contaminant desorption from weathered sediments upon removal of caustic sources; and (iii) developed a mechanistic, predictive model of meso- to field-scale contaminant reactive transport under these conditions.

  4. Regional modeling of groundwater flow and arsenic transport in the Bengal Basin: challenges of scale and complexity (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, H. A.; Voss, C. I.

    2009-12-01

    Widespread arsenic poisoning is occurring in large areas of Bangladesh and West Bengal, India due to high arsenic levels in shallow groundwater, which is the primary source of irrigation and drinking water in the region. The high-arsenic groundwater exists in aquifers of the Bengal Basin, a huge sedimentary system approximately 500km x 500km wide and greater than 15km deep in places. Deeper groundwater (>150m) is nearly universally low in arsenic and a potential source of safe drinking water, but evaluation of its sustainability requires understanding of the entire, interconnected regional aquifer system. Numerical modeling of flow and arsenic transport in the basin introduces problems of scale: challenges in representing the system in enough detail to produce meaningful simulations and answer relevant questions while maintaining enough simplicity to understand controls on processes and operating within computational constraints. A regional groundwater flow and transport model of the Bengal Basin was constructed to assess the large-scale functioning of the deep groundwater flow system, the vulnerability of deep groundwater to pumping-induced migration from above, and the effect of chemical properties of sediments (sorption) on sustainability. The primary challenges include the very large spatial scale of the system, dynamic monsoonal hydrology (small temporal scale fluctuations), complex sedimentary architecture (small spatial scale heterogeneity), and a lack of reliable hydrologic and geologic data. The approach was simple. Detailed inputs were reduced to only those that affect the functioning of the deep flow system. Available data were used to estimate upscaled parameter values. Nested small-scale simulations were performed to determine the effects of the simplifications, which include treatment of the top boundary condition and transience, effects of small-scale heterogeneity, and effects of individual pumping wells. Simulation of arsenic transport at the large

  5. Timetable-based simulation method for choice set generation in large-scale public transport networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Kjær; Anderson, Marie Karen; Nielsen, Otto Anker

    2016-01-01

    The composition and size of the choice sets are a key for the correct estimation of and prediction by route choice models. While existing literature has posed a great deal of attention towards the generation of path choice sets for private transport problems, the same does not apply to public...... transport problems. This study proposes a timetable-based simulation method for generating path choice sets in a multimodal public transport network. Moreover, this study illustrates the feasibility of its implementation by applying the method to reproduce 5131 real-life trips in the Greater Copenhagen Area...

  6. Natural spatial and temporal variations in groundwater chemistry in fractured, sedimentary rocks: scale and implications for solute transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoven, Stephen J. van der [Department of Geography-Geology, Illinois State University, Campus Box 4400, Normal, IL 61761 (United States)]. E-mail: vanderhoven@ilstu.edu; Kip Solomon, D. [Department of Geology and Geophyics, University of Utah, 135 S. 1460 E., Room 719, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Moline, Gerilynn R. [10 Victorian Heights, Thackeray Road, London SW8 3TD (United Kingdom)

    2005-05-15

    Natural tracers (major ions, {delta} {sup 18}O, and O{sub 2}) were monitored to evaluate groundwater flow and transport to a depth of 20 m below the surface in fractured sedimentary (primarily shale and limestone) rocks. Large temporal variations in these tracers were noted in the soil zone and the saprolite, and are driven primarily by individual storm events. During nonstorm periods, an upward flow brings water with high TDS, constant {delta} {sup 18}O, and low dissolved O{sub 2} to the water table. During storm events, low TDS, variable {delta} {sup 18}O, and high dissolved O{sub 2} water recharges through the unsaturated zone. These oscillating signals are rapidly transmitted along fracture pathways in the saprolite, with changes occurring on spatial scales of several meters and on a time scale of hours. The variations decreased markedly below the boundary between the saprolite and less weathered bedrock. Variations in the bedrock units occurred on time scales of days and spatial scales of at least 20 m. The oscillations of chemical conditions in the shallow groundwater are hypothesized to have significant implications for solute transport. Solutes and colloids that adsorb onto aquifer solids can be released into solution by decreases in ionic strength and pH. The decreases in ionic strength also cause thermodynamic undersaturation of the groundwater with respect to some mineral species and may result in mineral dissolution. Redox conditions are also changing and may result in mineral dissolution/precipitation. The net result of these chemical variations is episodic transport of a wide range of dissolved solutes or suspended particles, a phenomenon rarely considered in contaminant transport studies.

  7. Link between hopping models and percolation scaling laws for charge transport in mixtures of small molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Gwang Ha

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mixed host compositions that combine charge transport materials with luminescent dyes offer superior control over exciton formation and charge transport in organic light emitting devices (OLEDs. Two approaches are typically used to optimize the fraction of charge transport materials in a mixed host composition: either an empirical percolative model, or a hopping transport model. We show that these two commonly-employed models are linked by an analytic expression which relates the localization length to the percolation threshold and critical exponent. The relation is confirmed both numerically and experimentally through measurements of the relative conductivity of Tris(4-carbazoyl-9-ylphenylamine (TCTA :1,3-bis(3,5-dipyrid-3-yl-phenylbenzene (BmPyPb mixtures with different concentrations, where the TCTA plays a role as hole conductor and the BmPyPb as hole insulator. The analytic relation may allow the rational design of mixed layers of small molecules for high-performance OLEDs.

  8. The Diversity and Scale Matter: Ubiquitous Transportation Mode Detection using Single Cell Tower Information

    OpenAIRE

    AbdelAziz, Ali Mohamed; Youssef, Moustafa

    2015-01-01

    Detecting the transportation mode of a user is important for a wide range of applications. While a number of recent systems addressed the transportation mode detection problem using the ubiquitous mobile phones, these studies either leverage GPS, the inertial sensors, and/or multiple cell towers information. However, these different phone sensors have high energy consumption, limited to a small subset of phones (e.g. high-end phones or phones that support neighbouring cell tower information),...

  9. Multi-physics and multi-scale deterioration modelling of reinforced concrete part I: Coupling transport and corrosion at the material scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Geiker, Mette Rica; Stang, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    models are sketched to describe (i) transport of heat and matter in porous media as well as phase assemblage in hardened Portland cement, (ii) corrosion of reinforcement, and (iii) material performance including corrosion-induced damages on the meso and macro scale. The presented modelling framework...... is fully coupled, i.e. information, such as temperature and moisture distribution, phase assemblage, corrosion current density, damage state of concrete cover, etc., are continuously exchanged between the models. Although not explicitly outlined in this paper, such an analysis may be further integrated...

  10. Modeling transport of a mixture of natural organic molecules: Effects of dynamic competitive sorption from particle to aquifer scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Weerd, H.; van Riemsdijk, W. H.; Leijnse, A.

    2002-08-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) can act as a carrier for contaminants. Therefore it is of great importance to understand its adsorption/desorption and transport behavior. NOM is a mixture of molecules varying from simple small molecules like citric acid to complicated large molecules like humic acid. To simulate sorption and transport of NOM in aquifer material, we used a previously developed model (NOMADS) describing the dynamic competitive sorption of NOM fractions. We calibrated NOMADS using independent batch adsorption data and incorporated it in a transport code. Sorption and transport of NOM in laboratory column experiments and a field experiment were well simulated using the calibrated model, indicating that the process descriptions used are valid over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales and mass-to-volume ratios. Simulation results provided insights into the influence of pore water velocity and NOM concentration history on the shape of breakthrough curves of NOM fractions. The heterogeneity of NOM appears to be essential to understanding its adsorption and transport behavior.

  11. Model Validation of an RSRM Transporter Through Full-scale Operational and Modal Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillhart, Ralph; Davis, Joshua; Allred, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    The Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) segments, which are part of the current Space Shuttle system and will provide the first stage of the Ares launch vehicle, must be transported from their manufacturing facility in Promontory, Utah, to a railhead in Corinne, Utah. This approximately 25-mile trip on secondary paved roads is accomplished using a special transporter system which lifts and conveys each individual segment. ATK Launch Systems (ATK) has recently obtained a new set of these transporters from Scheuerle, a company in Germany. The transporter is a 96-wheel, dual tractor vehicle that supports the payload via a hydraulic suspension. Since this system is a different design than was previously used, computer modeling with validation via test is required to ensure that the environment to which the segment is exposed is not too severe for this space-critical hardware. Accurate prediction of the loads imparted to the rocket motor is essential in order to prevent damage to the segment. To develop and validate a finite element model capable of such accurate predictions, ATA Engineering, Inc., teamed with ATK to perform a modal survey of the transport system, including a forward RSRM segment. A set of electrodynamic shakers was placed around the transporter at locations capable of exciting the transporter vehicle dynamics. Forces from the shakers with varying phase combinations were applied using sinusoidal sweep excitation. The relative phase of the shaker forcing functions was adjusted to match the shape characteristics of each of several target modes, thereby customizing each sweep run for exciting a particular mode. The resulting frequency response functions (FRF) from this series of sine sweeps allowed identification of all target modes and other higher-order modes, allowing good comparison to the finite element model. Furthermore, the survey-derived modal frequencies were correlated with peak frequencies observed during road-going operating tests. This

  12. Role of Inelastic Electron–Phonon Scattering in Electron Transport through Ultra-Scaled Amorphous Phase Change Material Nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jie; Xu, Xu; Anantram, M.P.

    2014-09-01

    The electron transport through ultra-scaled amorphous phase change material (PCM) GeTe is investigated by using ab initio molecular dynamics, density functional theory, and non-equilibrium Green’s function, and the inelastic electron–phonon scattering is accounted for by using the Born approximation. It is shown that, in ultra-scaled PCM device with 6 nm channel length, < 4 % of the energy carried by the incident electrons from the source is transferred to the atomic lattice before reaching the drain, indicating that the electron transport is largely elastic. Our simulation results show that the inelastic electron–phonon scattering, which plays an important role to excite trapped electrons in bulk PCM devices, exerts very limited influence on the current density value and the shape of current–voltage curve of ultra-scaled PCM devices. The analysis reveals that the Poole–Frenkel law and the Ohm’s law, which are the governing physical mechanisms of the bulk PCM devices, cease to be valid in the ultra-scaled PCM devices.

  13. Scaling Theory for Pulsed Jet Mixed Vessels, Sparging, and Cyclic Feed Transport Systems for Slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, William L.; Rector, David R.; Rassat, Scot D.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Minette, Michael J.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Josephson, Gary B.; Wells, Beric E.; Berglin, Eric J.

    2013-09-27

    This document is a previously unpublished work based on a draft report prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) in 2012. Work on the report stopped when WTP’s approach to testing changed. PNNL is issuing a modified version of the document a year later to preserve and disseminate the valuable technical work that was completed. This document establishes technical bases for evaluating the mixing performance of Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) pretreatment process tanks based on data from less-than-full-scale testing, relative to specified mixing requirements. The technical bases include the fluid mechanics affecting mixing for specified vessel configurations, operating parameters, and simulant properties. They address scaling vessel physical performance, simulant physical performance, and “scaling down” the operating conditions at full scale to define test conditions at reduced scale and “scaling up” the test results at reduced scale to predict the performance at full scale. Essentially, this document addresses the following questions: • Why and how can the mixing behaviors in a smaller vessel represent those in a larger vessel? • What information is needed to address the first question? • How should the information be used to predict mixing performance in WTP? The design of Large Scale Integrated Testing (LSIT) is being addressed in other, complementary documents.

  14. The impact of benthic fauna on fluvial bed load transport: Challenges of upscaling laboratory experiments to river and landscape scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, S. P.

    2012-04-01

    The impact on sediment transport processes and channel morphology of several relatively large, iconic animals including beaver and salmon is increasingly well understood. However, many other aquatic fauna are important zoogeomorphic agents and ecosystem engineers. These somewhat overlooked "Cinderella" species include benthic aquatic insect larvae, freshwater crustaceans and many species of fish. Despite relatively modest individual effects, the ubiquity, abundance and cumulative impact of these organisms makes them a potentially significant agency, with as yet undiscovered and unquantified impacts on channel morphology and sediment fluxes. Their actions (digging, foraging, moving, burrowing), constructions and secretions modify bed sediment characteristics (grain size distribution, interlock, imbrication, protrusion), alter bed topography (thence hydraulic roughness) and contribute to biogenic restraints on grain movement. In turn, they can affect the distribution of surface particle entrainment thresholds and bed shear stresses, with implications for bed load transport. Flume experiments have measured some of these impacts and provided direct observations of the mechanisms involved, but many of the most interesting research questions pertain to the impact of these animals at reach, catchment and even landscape scales: Not least, what is the impact of small aquatic animals on bed load flux and yield? This presentation will consider some of the challenges involved in answering this question; that is, of scaling up experimental understanding of how aquatic animals affect bed load transport processes to river scales. Pertinent themes include: (1) the potential impacts of experimental arrangements on the behaviours and activities that affect hydraulic or geomorphological processes; (2) field coincidence of the spatial and temporal distributions of (a) the animals and their behaviours with (b) the physical conditions (substrates, flows) under which those animals are

  15. Scaled-Up Production and Transport Applications of Graphitic Carbon Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saviers, Kimberly R.

    Graphitic carbon nanomaterials enhance the performance of engineered systems for energy harvesting and storage. However, commercial availability remains largely cost-prohibitive due to technical barriers to mass production. This thesis examines both the scaled-up production and energy transport applications of graphitic materials. Cost driven-production of graphitic petals is developed, carbon nanotube array thermal interface materials enhance waste heat energy harvesting, and microsupercapacitors are visually examined using a new electroreflectance measurement method. Graphitic materials have previously been synthesized using batch-style processing methods with small sample sizes, limiting their commercial viability. In order to increase production throughput, a roll-to-roll radio-frequency plasma chemical vapor deposition method is employed to continuously deposit graphitic petals on carbon fiber tow. In consideration of a full production framework, efficient and informative characterization methods in the form of electrical resistance and electrochemical capacitance are highlighted. To co-optimize the functional characteristics of the material, the processing conditions are comprehensively varied using a data-driven predictive design of experiments method. Repeatable and reliable production of graphitic materials will enable a host of creative graphene-based devices to emerge into the marketplace. Two such applications are discussed in the remaining chapters. Waste heat is most efficiently harvested at high temperatures, such as vehicle exhaust systems near 600°C. However, the resistance to heat flux at the interfaces between the harvesting device and its surroundings is detrimental to the system-level performance. To study the performance of thermal interface materials up to 700°C, a reference bar measurement method was designed. Design considerations are discussed and compared to past implementations, particularly regarding radiation heat flux and thermal

  16. Linking atomic and mesoscopic scales for the modelling of the transport properties of uranium dioxide under irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolus, Marjorie, E-mail: marjorie.bertolus@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DEC/SESC, Centre de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Freyss, Michel; Dorado, Boris; Martin, Guillaume; Hoang, Kiet; Maillard, Serge; Skorek, Richard; Garcia, Philippe; Valot, Carole [CEA, DEN, DEC/SESC, Centre de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Chartier, Alain; Van Brutzel, Laurent; Fossati, Paul [CEA, DEN, DPC/SCCME, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Grimes, Robin W.; Parfitt, David C.; Bishop, Clare L.; Murphy, Samuel T.; Rushton, Michael J.D. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Staicu, Dragos; Yakub, Eugen; Nichenko, Sergii [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); and others

    2015-07-15

    This article presents a synthesis of the investigations at the atomic scale of the transport properties of defects and fission gases in uranium dioxide, as well as of the transfer of results from the atomic scale to models at the mesoscopic scale, performed during the F-BRIDGE European project (2008–2012). We first present the mesoscale models used to investigate uranium oxide fuel under irradiation, and in particular the cluster dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo methods employed to model the behaviour of defects and fission gases in UO{sub 2}, as well as the parameters of these models. Second, we describe briefly the atomic scale methods employed, i.e. electronic structure calculations and empirical potential methods. Then, we show the results of the calculation of the data necessary for the mesoscale models using these atomic scale methods. Finally, we summarise the links built between the atomic and mesoscopic scale by listing the data calculated at the atomic scale which are to be used as input in mesoscale modelling. Despite specific difficulties in the description of fuel materials, the results obtained in F-BRIDGE show that atomic scale modelling methods are now mature enough to obtain precise data to feed higher scale models and help interpret experiments on nuclear fuels. These methods bring valuable insight, in particular the formation, binding and migration energies of point and extended defects, fission product localization, incorporation energies and migration pathways, elementary mechanisms of irradiation induced processes. These studies open the way for the investigation of other significant phenomena involved in fuel behaviour, in particular the thermochemical and thermomechanical properties and their evolution in-pile, complex microstructures, as well as of more complex fuels.

  17. Environmental Transport of Plutonium: Biogeochemical Processes at Femtomolar Concentrations and Nanometer Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersting, Annie B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-10-05

    The major challenge in predicting the mobility and transport of plutonium (Pu) is determining the dominant geochemical processes that control its behavior in the subsurface. The reaction chemistry of Pu (i.e., aqueous speciation, solubility, sorptivity, redox chemistry, and affinity for colloidal particles, both abiotic and microbially mediated) is particularly complicated. It is generally thought that due to its low solubility and high sorptivity, Pu migration in the environment occurs only when facilitated by transport on particulate matter (i.e., colloidal particles). Despite the recognized importance of colloid-facilitated transport of Pu, very little is known about the geochemical and biochemical mechanisms controlling Pu-colloid formation and association, particularly at femtomolar Pu concentrations observed at DOE sites.

  18. Study of number of constituent quark scaling of elliptic flow in heavy-ion collisions using transport model

    CERN Document Server

    Singha, Subhash

    2016-01-01

    We studied the number of constituent quark scaling (NCQ) behaviour of elliptic flow ($v_{2}$) under the framework of A Multi-Phase Transport model (AMPT) at both top-RHIC and LHC energies. The NCQ-scaling in $v_{2}$ holds at top-RHIC energy with AMPT string melting version, while it breaks in Pb+Pb collisions at LHC energy using the same framework. The breaking of NCQ-scaling at LHC energy has been studied by varying the magnitude of parton-parton scattering cross-section and lifetime of hadronic cascade as implemented in AMPT. We find that the breaking of NCQ scaling in Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ =2.76 TeV is independent of the magnitude of parton-parton cross-section and the later stage hadronic interactions. Further we observed that scaling holds in a small collision system like Si+Si at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV. We discussed that the breaking of NCQ scaling is possibly due to high phase-space density of constituents quarks in Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV.

  19. Large-scale Flow and Transport of Magnetic Flux in the Solar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Abstract. Horizontal large-scale velocity field describes horizontal displacement of the photospheric magnetic flux in zonal and meridian directions. The flow systems of solar plasma, constructed according to the velocity field, create the large-scale cellular-like patterns with up-flow in the center and the down-flow on the ...

  20. An efficient strategy for small-scale screening and production of archaeal membrane transport proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pikyee Ma

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins play a key role in many fundamental cellular processes such as transport of nutrients, sensing of environmental signals and energy transduction, and account for over 50% of all known drug targets. Despite their importance, structural and functional characterisation of membrane proteins still remains a challenge, partially due to the difficulties in recombinant expression and purification. Therefore the need for development of efficient methods for heterologous production is essential.Fifteen integral membrane transport proteins from Archaea were selected as test targets, chosen to represent two superfamilies widespread in all organisms known as the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS and the 5-Helix Inverted Repeat Transporter superfamily (5HIRT. These proteins typically have eleven to twelve predicted transmembrane helices and are putative transporters for sugar, metabolite, nucleobase, vitamin or neurotransmitter. They include a wide range of examples from the following families: Metabolite-H(+-symporter; Sugar Porter; Nucleobase-Cation-Symporter-1; Nucleobase-Cation-Symporter-2; and neurotransmitter-sodium-symporter. Overproduction of transporters was evaluated with three vectors (pTTQ18, pET52b, pWarf and two Escherichia coli strains (BL21 Star and C43 (DE3. Thirteen transporter genes were successfully expressed; only two did not express in any of the tested vector-strain combinations. Initial trials showed that seven transporters could be purified and six of these yielded quantities of ≥ 0.4 mg per litre suitable for functional and structural studies. Size-exclusion chromatography confirmed that two purified transporters were almost homogeneous while four others were shown to be non-aggregating, indicating that they are ready for up-scale production and crystallisation trials.Here, we describe an efficient strategy for heterologous production of membrane transport proteins in E. coli. Small-volume cultures (10 mL produced

  1. Learning Traffic as Images: A Deep Convolutional Neural Network for Large-Scale Transportation Network Speed Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaolei; Dai, Zhuang; He, Zhengbing; Ma, Jihui; Wang, Yong; Wang, Yunpeng

    2017-04-10

    This paper proposes a convolutional neural network (CNN)-based method that learns traffic as images and predicts large-scale, network-wide traffic speed with a high accuracy. Spatiotemporal traffic dynamics are converted to images describing the time and space relations of traffic flow via a two-dimensional time-space matrix. A CNN is applied to the image following two consecutive steps: abstract traffic feature extraction and network-wide traffic speed prediction. The effectiveness of the proposed method is evaluated by taking two real-world transportation networks, the second ring road and north-east transportation network in Beijing, as examples, and comparing the method with four prevailing algorithms, namely, ordinary least squares, k-nearest neighbors, artificial neural network, and random forest, and three deep learning architectures, namely, stacked autoencoder, recurrent neural network, and long-short-term memory network. The results show that the proposed method outperforms other algorithms by an average accuracy improvement of 42.91% within an acceptable execution time. The CNN can train the model in a reasonable time and, thus, is suitable for large-scale transportation networks.

  2. Large-scale analysis of membrane transport in yeast using invertase reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Lauren; Davey, Michael; Conibear, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Transport of membrane proteins between cellular organelles requires the concerted action of many regulatory factors, which aid in cargo recognition and vesicle formation, targeting, and fusion. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a useful model system for studying such regulators, due to the availability of genome-wide mutant collections and reporter proteins that provide sensitive biochemical readouts of individual transport pathways. Here, we describe an enzymatic invertase assay for evaluating endocytic recycling using a chimeric GFP-Snc1-Suc2 reporter. Cell surface levels of this reporter can be measured by a colorimetric assay that monitors sucrose hydrolysis at the plasma membrane, using two different methods. The first is a semiquantitative agar overlay assay followed by image densitometry that is suitable for high-throughput screening of arrayed yeast colonies. In the second, more quantitative assay, an enzymatic solution is added to yeast cultures in a multi-well plate and the absorbance is assessed by a plate reader. Furthermore, the modular nature of the chimeric reporter allows alternate transport signals to be introduced, thereby expanding the range of transport pathways that can be evaluated by this method. Together these techniques can be used to explore the function of genes involved in a variety of cellular trafficking pathways.

  3. Relationship between application scale and maximum time latency in intelligent transport solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoop, V.L.; Van Lint, J.W.C.; Kester, L.; Passchier, I.; Vries, J.

    2012-01-01

    Congestion is a major problem in large urbanised areas. Intelligent Transport Solutions aim to reduce this problem. Generally, traffic is monitored using sensors, this data is processed, a traffic state is estimated and a control measure is computed and implemented. The availability and quality of

  4. Scaling up methodology for CO2 emissions in ICT applications in traffic and transport in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mans, D.; Jonkers, E.; Giannelos, I.; Palanciuc, D.

    2013-01-01

    The Amitran project aims to define a reference methodology for evaluating the effects of ICT measures in trafäc and transport on energy efficiency and consequently CO2 emissions. This methodology can be used as a reference by future projects and will address different modes for both passenger and

  5. Biogas infrastructures from farm to regional scale, prospects of biogas transport grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    prof. dr. Wim van Gemert; A.A. Broekhuis; Drs. E.J. Hengeveld; Ir. J. Bekkering

    2016-01-01

    The volume of biogas produced in agricultural areas is expected to increase in coming years. An increasing number of local and regional initiatives show a growing interest in decentralized energy production, wherein biogas can play a role. Biogas transport from production sites to user, i.e. a

  6. Biogas infrastructures from farm to regional scale, prospects of biogas transport grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengeveld, E. J.; Bekkering, J.; van Gemert, W. J. T.; Broekhuis, A. A.

    The volume of biogas produced in agricultural areas is expected to increase in coming years. An increasing number of local and regional initiatives show a growing interest in decentralized energy production, wherein biogas can play a role. Biogas transport from production sites to user, i.e. a CHP,

  7. Intermediate-Scale Laboratory Experiments of Subsurface Flow and Transport Resulting from Tank Leaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.

    2014-09-30

    Washington River Protection Solutions contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to conduct laboratory experiments and supporting numerical simulations to improve the understanding of water flow and contaminant transport in the subsurface between waste tanks and ancillary facilities at Waste Management Area C. The work scope included two separate sets of experiments: •Small flow cell experiments to investigate the occurrence of potential unstable fingering resulting from leaks and the limitations of the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator to predict flow patterns and solute transport behavior under these conditions. Unstable infiltration may, under certain conditions, create vertically elongated fingers potentially transporting contaminants rapidly through the unsaturated zone to groundwater. The types of leak that may create deeply penetrating fingers include slow release, long duration leaks in relatively permeable porous media. Such leaks may have occurred below waste tanks at the Hanford Site. •Large flow experiments to investigate the behavior of two types of tank leaks in a simple layered system mimicking the Waste Management Area C. The investigated leaks include a relatively large leak with a short duration from a tank and a long duration leak with a relatively small leakage rate from a cascade line.

  8. Modeling methane fluxes in wetlands with gas-transporting plants. 3. Plot scale.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, R.; Leffelaar, P.A.

    2001-01-01

    A process model based on kinetic principles was developed for methane fluxes from wetlands with gas-transporting plants and a fluctuating water table. Water dynamics are modeled with the 1-D Richards equation. For temperature a standard diffusion equation is used. The depth-dependent dynamics of

  9. Relationship between application scale and maximum time latency in intelligent transport solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoop, V.; Lint, J. van; Vries, J.; Kester, L.J.H.M.; Passchier, I.

    2013-01-01

    Congestion is a major problem in large, urbanized areas. Intelligent transport solutions aim to reduce this problem. In general, traffic is monitored with the use of sensors, the resulting data are processed, a traffic state is estimated, and a control measure is computed and implemented. The

  10. Time line cell tracking for the approximation of lagrangian coherent structures with subgrid accuracy

    KAUST Repository

    Kuhn, Alexander

    2013-12-05

    Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) have become a widespread and powerful method to describe dynamic motion patterns in time-dependent flow fields. The standard way to extract LCS is to compute height ridges in the finite-time Lyapunov exponent field. In this work, we present an alternative method to approximate Lagrangian features for 2D unsteady flow fields that achieve subgrid accuracy without additional particle sampling. We obtain this by a geometric reconstruction of the flow map using additional material constraints for the available samples. In comparison to the standard method, this allows for a more accurate global approximation of LCS on sparse grids and for long integration intervals. The proposed algorithm works directly on a set of given particle trajectories and without additional flow map derivatives. We demonstrate its application for a set of computational fluid dynamic examples, as well as trajectories acquired by Lagrangian methods, and discuss its benefits and limitations. © 2013 The Authors Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Geometry-coupled reactive fluid transport at the fracture scale -Application to CO 2 geologic storage

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Seunghee

    2015-08-19

    Water acidification follows CO2 injection and leads to reactive fluid transport through pores and rock fractures, with potential implications to reservoirs and wells in CO2 geologic storage and enhanced oil recovery. Kinetic rate laws for dissolution reactions in calcite and anorthite are combined with Navier-Stokes law and advection-diffusion transport to perform geometry-coupled numerical simulations in order to study the evolution of chemical reactions, species concentration and fracture morphology. Results are summarized as a function of two dimensionless parameters: the Damköhler number Da which is the ratio between advection and reaction times, and the transverse Peclet number Pe defined as the ratio between the time for diffusion across the fracture and the time for advection along the fracture. Reactant species are readily consumed near the inlet in a carbonate reservoir when the flow velocity is low (low transverse Peclet number and Da>10-1). At high flow velocities, diffusion fails to homogenize the concentration field across the fracture (high transverse Peclet number Pe>10-1). When the reaction rate is low as in anorthite reservoirs (Da<10-1) reactant species are more readily transported towards the outlet. At a given Peclet number, a lower Damköhler number causes the flow channel to experience a more uniform aperture enlargement along the length of the fracture. When the length-to-aperture ratio is sufficiently large, say l/d>30, the system response resembles the solution for 1-D reactive fluid transport. A decreased length-to-aperture ratio slows the diffusive transport of reactant species to the mineral fracture surface, and analyses of fracture networks must take into consideration both the length and slenderness of individual fractures in addition to Pe and Da numbers.

  12. Scaling of swim speed and stroke frequency in geometrically similar penguins: they swim optimally to minimize cost of transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Katsufumi; Shiomi, Kozue; Watanabe, Yuuki; Watanuki, Yutaka; Takahashi, Akinori; Ponganis, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    It has been predicted that geometrically similar animals would swim at the same speed with stroke frequency scaling with mass−1/3. In the present study, morphological and behavioural data obtained from free-ranging penguins (seven species) were compared. Morphological measurements support the geometrical similarity. However, cruising speeds of 1.8–2.3 m s−1 were significantly related to mass0.08 and stroke frequencies were proportional to mass−0.29. These scaling relationships do not agree with the previous predictions for geometrically similar animals. We propose a theoretical model, considering metabolic cost, work against mechanical forces (drag and buoyancy), pitch angle and dive depth. This new model predicts that: (i) the optimal swim speed, which minimizes the energy cost of transport, is proportional to (basal metabolic rate/drag)1/3 independent of buoyancy, pitch angle and dive depth; (ii) the optimal speed is related to mass0.05; and (iii) stroke frequency is proportional to mass−0.28. The observed scaling relationships of penguins support these predictions, which suggest that breath-hold divers swam optimally to minimize the cost of transport, including mechanical and metabolic energy during dive. PMID:19906666

  13. Atmospheric forcing of the upper ocean transport in the Gulf of Mexico: From seasonal to diurnal scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judt, Falko; Chen, Shuyi S.; Curcic, Milan

    2016-06-01

    The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) was an environmental disaster, which highlighted the urgent need to predict the transport and dispersion of hydrocarbon. Although the variability of the atmospheric forcing plays a major role in the upper ocean circulation and transport of the pollutants, the air-sea interaction on various time scales is not well understood. This study provides a comprehensive overview of the atmospheric forcing and upper ocean response in the GoM from seasonal to diurnal time scales, using climatologies derived from long-term observations, in situ observations from two field campaigns, and a coupled model. The atmospheric forcing in the GoM is characterized by striking seasonality. In the summer, the time-average large-scale forcing is weak, despite occasional extreme winds associated with hurricanes. In the winter, the atmospheric forcing is much stronger, and dominated by synoptic variability on time scales of 3-7 days associated with winter storms and cold air outbreaks. The diurnal cycle is more pronounced during the summer, when sea breeze circulations affect the coastal regions and nighttime wind maxima occur over the offshore waters. Realtime predictions from a high-resolution atmosphere-wave-ocean coupled model were evaluated for both summer and winter conditions during the Grand LAgrangian Deployment (GLAD) in July-August 2012 and the Surfzone Coastal Oil Pathways Experiment (SCOPE) in November-December 2013. The model generally captured the variability of atmospheric forcing on all scales, but suffered from some systematic errors.

  14. Evaluating the impact of field-scale management strategies on sediment transport to the watershed outlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerlot, Andrew R; Pouyan Nejadhashemi, A; Woznicki, Sean A; Prohaska, Michael D

    2013-10-15

    Non-point source pollution from agricultural lands is a significant contributor of sediment pollution in United States lakes and streams. Therefore, quantifying the impact of individual field management strategies at the watershed-scale provides valuable information to watershed managers and conservation agencies to enhance decision-making. In this study, four methods employing some of the most cited models in field and watershed scale analysis were compared to find a practical yet accurate method for evaluating field management strategies at the watershed outlet. The models used in this study including field-scale model (the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation 2 - RUSLE2), spatially explicit overland sediment delivery models (SEDMOD), and a watershed-scale model (Soil and Water Assessment Tool - SWAT). These models were used to develop four modeling strategies (methods) for the River Raisin watershed: Method 1) predefined field-scale subbasin and reach layers were used in SWAT model; Method 2) subbasin-scale sediment delivery ratio was employed; Method 3) results obtained from the field-scale RUSLE2 model were incorporated as point source inputs to the SWAT watershed model; and Method 4) a hybrid solution combining analyses from the RUSLE2, SEDMOD, and SWAT models. Method 4 was selected as the most accurate among the studied methods. In addition, the effectiveness of six best management practices (BMPs) in terms of the water quality improvement and associated cost were assessed. Economic analysis was performed using Method 4, and producer requested prices for BMPs were compared with prices defined by the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP). On a per unit area basis, producers requested higher prices than EQIP in four out of six BMP categories. Meanwhile, the true cost of sediment reduction at the field and watershed scales was greater than EQIP in five of six BMP categories according to producer requested prices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All

  15. Impacts of large-scale atmospheric circulation changes in winter on black carbon transport and deposition to the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pozzoli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Winter warming and sea-ice retreat observed in the Arctic in the last decades may be related to changes of large-scale atmospheric circulation pattern, which may impact the transport of black carbon (BC to the Arctic and its deposition on the sea ice, with possible feedbacks on the regional and global climate forcing. In this study we developed and applied a statistical algorithm, based on the maximum likelihood estimate approach, to determine how the changes of three large-scale weather patterns associated with increasing temperatures in winter and sea-ice retreat in the Arctic impact the transport of BC to the Arctic and its deposition. We found that two atmospheric patterns together determine a decreasing winter deposition trend of BC between 1980 and 2015 in the eastern Arctic while they increase BC deposition in the western Arctic. The increasing BC trend is mainly due to a pattern characterized by a high-pressure anomaly near Scandinavia favouring the transport in the lower troposphere of BC from Europe and North Atlantic directly into to the Arctic. Another pattern with a high-pressure anomaly over the Arctic and low-pressure anomaly over the North Atlantic Ocean has a smaller impact on BC deposition but determines an increasing BC atmospheric load over the entire Arctic Ocean with increasing BC concentrations in the upper troposphere. The results show that changes in atmospheric circulation due to polar atmospheric warming and reduced winter sea ice significantly impacted BC transport and deposition. The anthropogenic emission reductions applied in the last decades were, therefore, crucial to counterbalance the most likely trend of increasing BC pollution in the Arctic.

  16. Impacts of large-scale atmospheric circulation changes in winter on black carbon transport and deposition to the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzoli, Luca; Dobricic, Srdan; Russo, Simone; Vignati, Elisabetta

    2017-10-01

    Winter warming and sea-ice retreat observed in the Arctic in the last decades may be related to changes of large-scale atmospheric circulation pattern, which may impact the transport of black carbon (BC) to the Arctic and its deposition on the sea ice, with possible feedbacks on the regional and global climate forcing. In this study we developed and applied a statistical algorithm, based on the maximum likelihood estimate approach, to determine how the changes of three large-scale weather patterns associated with increasing temperatures in winter and sea-ice retreat in the Arctic impact the transport of BC to the Arctic and its deposition. We found that two atmospheric patterns together determine a decreasing winter deposition trend of BC between 1980 and 2015 in the eastern Arctic while they increase BC deposition in the western Arctic. The increasing BC trend is mainly due to a pattern characterized by a high-pressure anomaly near Scandinavia favouring the transport in the lower troposphere of BC from Europe and North Atlantic directly into to the Arctic. Another pattern with a high-pressure anomaly over the Arctic and low-pressure anomaly over the North Atlantic Ocean has a smaller impact on BC deposition but determines an increasing BC atmospheric load over the entire Arctic Ocean with increasing BC concentrations in the upper troposphere. The results show that changes in atmospheric circulation due to polar atmospheric warming and reduced winter sea ice significantly impacted BC transport and deposition. The anthropogenic emission reductions applied in the last decades were, therefore, crucial to counterbalance the most likely trend of increasing BC pollution in the Arctic.

  17. Using coarse GPS data to quantify city-scale transportation system resilience to extreme events

    CERN Document Server

    Donovan, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes a method to quantitatively measure the resilience of transportation systems using GPS data from taxis. The granularity of the GPS data necessary for this analysis is relatively coarse; it only requires coordinates for the beginning and end of trips, the metered distance, and the total travel time. The method works by computing the historical distribution of pace (normalized travel times) between various regions of a city and measuring the pace deviations during an unusual event. This method is applied to a dataset of nearly 700 million taxi trips in New York City, which is used to analyze the transportation infrastructure resilience to Hurricane Sandy. The analysis indicates that Hurricane Sandy impacted traffic conditions for more than five days, and caused a peak delay of two minutes per mile. Practically, it identifies that the evacuation caused only minor disruptions, but significant delays were encountered during the post-disaster reentry process. Since the implementation of this me...

  18. Scale Dependency of Convective Momentum Transport as Diagnosed from Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation with Spectral-bin Microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y. C.; Fan, J.; Zhang, G. J.; Xu, K. M.; Ghan, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Convective momentum transport (CMT) has been demonstrated to have a large impact on global atmospheric circulation in both observational and numerical studies. In General Circulation Models (GCMs) CMT is often parameterized in a simple way by assuming that in-cloud horizontal momentum depends only on lateral entrainment and detrainment rates [Schneider and Lindzen, 1976]. In addition to lateral entrainment and detrainment rates the effect of perturbation pressure gradient force induced by convection (Pc) on momentum transport is significant. Because it is the most complicated term to be parameterized, a very simple form of products among a constant coefficient, mass flux, and environment vertical wind shear was employed to parameterize it [Gregory et al., 1997]. In addition, none of these CMT parameterizations deal with the scale problems. Thus, the goal of this study is to evaluate the past CMT parameterizations and explore the scale dependencies of Pc and CMT using Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) simulations from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) coupled with the most sophisticated spectral-bin microphysics. Our preliminary results show that the parameterized CMT from the top-hat approach is underestimated especially at the gray zone scale (~4-50 km); using the simplified 3-updraft and 1-downdraft formulation proposed in our previous study for eddy transport of moisture, the CMT can be represented well. The formulation also produced a more accurate mass flux compared to the top-hat approach, which can potentially improve the parameterization of Pc. We investigate the relative contributions from linear and nonlinear forcing to Pc at different model grid spacing (dx). Our results show that the assumption that non-linear forcing is much smaller than linear force is valid only at dx > 128 km and dx < 8 km. At the dx = 32~16 km, linear and nonlinear forcings become compatible, suggesting a more sophisticated formula for Pc might be needed.

  19. Multiscale modelling of dual-porosity porous media; a computational pore-scale study for flow and solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Enno T.; Raoof, Amir; van Genuchten, Martinus Th.

    2017-07-01

    Many environmental and agricultural applications involve the transport of water and dissolved constituents through aggregated soil profiles, or porous media that are structured, fractured or macroporous in other ways. During the past several decades, various process-based macroscopic models have been used to simulate contaminant transport in such media. Many of these models consider advective-dispersive transport through relatively large inter-aggregate pore domains, while exchange with the smaller intra-aggregate pores is assumed to be controlled by diffusion. Exchange of solute between the two domains is often represented using a first-order mass transfer coefficient, which is commonly obtained by fitting to observed data. This study aims to understand and quantify the solute exchange term by applying a dual-porosity pore-scale network model to relatively large domains, and analysing the pore-scale results in terms of the classical dual-porosity (mobile-immobile) transport formulation. We examined the effects of key parameters (notably aggregate porosity and aggregate permeability) on the main dual-porosity model parameters, i.e., the mobile water fraction (ϕm) and the mass transfer coefficient (α). Results were obtained for a wide range of aggregate porosities (between 0.082 and 0.700). The effect of aggregate permeability was explored by varying pore throat sizes within the aggregates. Solute breakthrough curves (BTCs) obtained with the pore-scale network model at several locations along the domain were analysed using analytical solutions of the dual-porosity model to obtain estimates of ϕm and α. An increase in aggregate porosity was found to decrease ϕm and increase α, leading to considerable tailing in the BTCs. Changes in the aggregate pore throat size affected the relative flow velocity between the intra- and inter-aggregate domains. Higher flow velocities within the aggregates caused a change in the transport regime from diffusion dominated to more

  20. Reactive Chemical Transport Simulation to Study Geothermal Production with Mineral Recovery and Silica Scaling

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten; Pham, Minh; Klein, Christopher; Sanyal, Subir

    2001-01-01

    There are vast reserves of dissolved minerals in the hypersaline brines of geothermal fields in the Imperial Valley of California. Recovery of zinc from geothermal brines is being practiced in this area, and recovery of silica, manganese, silver, lead and lithium has been or is being considered. Therefore, the ability to model mineral recovery is very significant in terms of economic development and resource utilization. The reactive geochemical transport simulator TOUGHREACT has been used to...

  1. Dimensionless scalings of confinement, heat transport and pedestal stability in JET-ILW and comparison with JET-C

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frassinetti, L.; Saarelma, S.; Lomas, P.; Nunes, I.; Rimini, F.; Beurskens, M.N.A.; Bílková, Petra; Boom, J.E.; De La Luna, E.; Delabie, E.; Drewelow, P.; Flanagan, J.; Garzotti, L.; Giroud, C.; Hawks, N.; Joffrin, E.; Kempenaars, M.; Kim, H.-T.; Kruezi, U.; Loarte, A.; Lomanowski, B.; Lupelli, I.; Meneses, L.; Maggi, C.F.; Menmuir, S.; Peterka, Matěj; Rachlew, E.; Romanelli, M.; Stefanikova, E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 1 (2017), č. článku 014014. ISSN 0741-3335. [EPS 2016: Conference on Plasma Physics/43./. Leuven, 04.07.2016-08.07.2016] EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : JET-ILW * dimensionless scaling * pedestal * confinement * pedestal stability * heat transport Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.392, year: 2016 http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0741-3335/59/1/014014

  2. Use of fundamental condensation heat transfer experiments for the development of a sub-grid liquid jet condensation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buschman, Francis X., E-mail: Francis.Buschman@unnpp.gov; Aumiller, David L.

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Direct contact condensation data on liquid jets up to 1.7 MPa in pure steam and in the presence of noncondensable gas. • Identified a pressure effect on the impact of noncondensables to suppress condensation heat transfer not captured in existing data or correlations. • Pure steam data is used to develop a new correlation for condensation heat transfer on subcooled liquid jets. • Noncondensable data used to develop a modification to the renewal time estimate used in the Young and Bajorek correlation for condensation suppression in the presence of noncondensables. • A jet injection boundary condition, using a sub-grid jet condensation model, is developed for COBRA-IE which provides a more detailed estimate of the condensation rate on the liquid jet and allows the use of jet specific closure relationships. - Abstract: Condensation on liquid jets is an important phenomenon for many different facets of nuclear power plant transients and analyses such as containment spray cooling. An experimental facility constructed at the Pennsylvania State University, the High Pressure Liquid Jet Condensation Heat Transfer facility (HPLJCHT), has been used to perform steady-state condensation heat transfer experiments in which the temperature of the liquid jet is measured at different axial locations allowing the condensation rate to be determined over the jet length. Test data have been obtained in a pure steam environment and with varying concentrations of noncondensable gas. This data extends the available jet condensation data from near atmospheric pressure up to a pressure of 1.7 MPa. An empirical correlation for the liquid side condensation heat transfer coefficient has been developed based on the data obtained in pure steam. The data obtained with noncondensable gas were used to develop a correlation for the renewal time as used in the condensation suppression model developed by Young and Bajorek. This paper describes a new sub-grid liquid jet

  3. Chaotic advection at the pore scale: Mechanisms, upscaling and implications for macroscopic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, D. R.; Trefry, M. G.; Metcalfe, G.

    2016-11-01

    The macroscopic spreading and mixing of solute plumes in saturated porous media is ultimately controlled by processes operating at the pore scale. Whilst the conventional picture of pore-scale mechanical dispersion and molecular diffusion leading to persistent hydrodynamic dispersion is well accepted, this paradigm is inherently two-dimensional (2D) in nature and neglects important three-dimensional (3D) phenomena. We discuss how the kinematics of steady 3D flow at the pore scale generate chaotic advection-involving exponential stretching and folding of fluid elements-the mechanisms by which it arises and implications of microscopic chaos for macroscopic dispersion and mixing. Prohibited in steady 2D flow due to topological constraints, these phenomena are ubiquitous due to the topological complexity inherent to all 3D porous media. Consequently 3D porous media flows generate profoundly different fluid deformation and mixing processes to those of 2D flow. The interplay of chaotic advection and broad transit time distributions can be incorporated into a continuous-time random walk (CTRW) framework to predict macroscopic solute mixing and spreading. We show how these results may be generalised to real porous architectures via a CTRW model of fluid deformation, leading to stochastic models of macroscopic dispersion and mixing which both honour the pore-scale kinematics and are directly conditioned on the pore-scale architecture.

  4. Spatial variability of herbicide mobilisation and transport at catchment scale: insights from a field experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Doppler

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available During rain events, herbicides can be transported from their point of application to surface waters, where they may harm aquatic organisms. Since the spatial pattern of mobilisation and transport is heterogeneous, the contributions of different fields to the herbicide load in the stream may vary considerably within one catchment. Therefore, the prediction of contributing areas could help to target mitigation measures efficiently to those locations where they reduce herbicide pollution the most.

    Such spatial predictions require sufficient insight into the underlying transport processes. To improve the understanding of the process chain of herbicide mobilisation on the field and the subsequent transport through the catchment to the stream, we performed a controlled herbicide application on corn fields in a small agricultural catchment (ca. 1 km2 with intensive crop production in the Swiss Plateau. Water samples were collected at different locations in the catchment (overland flow, tile drains and open channel for two months after application in 2009, with a high temporal resolution during rain events. We also analysed soil samples from the experimental fields and measured discharge, groundwater level, soil moisture and the occurrence of overland flow at several locations. Several rain events with varying intensities and magnitudes occurred during the study period. Overland flow and erosion were frequently observed in the entire catchment. Infiltration excess and saturation excess overland flow were both observed. However, the main herbicide loss event was dominated by infiltration excess.

    Despite the frequent and wide-spread occurrence of overland flow, most of this water did not reach the channel directly, but was retained in small depressions in the catchment. From there, it reached the stream via macropores and tile drains. Manholes of the drainage system and storm drains for road and farmyard runoff acted as

  5. Field scale variability of solute transport parameters and related soil properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Lennartz

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatial variability of transport parameters has to be taken into account for a reliable assessment of solute behaviour in natural field soils. Two field sites were studied by collecting 24 and 36 small undisturbed soil columns at an uniform grid of 15 m spacing. Displacement experiments were conducted in these columns with bromide traced water under unsaturated steady state transport conditions. Measured breakthrough curves (BTCs were evaluated with the simple convective-dispersive equation (CDE. The solute mobility index (MI calculated as the ratio of measured to fitted pore water velocity and the dispersion coefficient (D were used to classify bromide breakthrough behaviour. Experimental BTCs were classified into two groups: type I curves expressed classical solute behaviour while type II curves were characterised by the occurrence of a bromide concentration maximum before 0.35 pore volumes of effluent (MI<0.35 resulting from preferential flow conditions. Six columns from site A and 8 from site B were identified as preferential. Frequency distributions of the transport parameters (MI and D of both sites were either extremely skewed or bimodal. Log-transformation did not lead to a normal distribution in any case. Contour maps of bromide mass flux at certain time steps indicated the clustering of preferential flow regions at both sites. Differences in the extent of preferential flow between sites seemed to be governed by soil structure. Linear cross correlations among transport parameters and independently measured soil properties revealed relations between solute mobility and volumetric soil water content at time of sampling, texture and organic carbon content. The volumetric field soil water content, a simple measure characterising the soil hydraulic behaviour at the sampling location, was found to be a highly sensitive parameter with respect to solute mobility and preferential flow situations. Almost no relation was found between solute

  6. Spatial variability of herbicide mobilisation and transport at catchment scale: insights from a field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppler, T.; Camenzuli, L.; Hirzel, G.; Krauss, M.; Lück, A.; Stamm, C.

    2012-07-01

    During rain events, herbicides can be transported from their point of application to surface waters, where they may harm aquatic organisms. Since the spatial pattern of mobilisation and transport is heterogeneous, the contributions of different fields to the herbicide load in the stream may vary considerably within one catchment. Therefore, the prediction of contributing areas could help to target mitigation measures efficiently to those locations where they reduce herbicide pollution the most. Such spatial predictions require sufficient insight into the underlying transport processes. To improve the understanding of the process chain of herbicide mobilisation on the field and the subsequent transport through the catchment to the stream, we performed a controlled herbicide application on corn fields in a small agricultural catchment (ca. 1 km2) with intensive crop production in the Swiss Plateau. Water samples were collected at different locations in the catchment (overland flow, tile drains and open channel) for two months after application in 2009, with a high temporal resolution during rain events. We also analysed soil samples from the experimental fields and measured discharge, groundwater level, soil moisture and the occurrence of overland flow at several locations. Several rain events with varying intensities and magnitudes occurred during the study period. Overland flow and erosion were frequently observed in the entire catchment. Infiltration excess and saturation excess overland flow were both observed. However, the main herbicide loss event was dominated by infiltration excess. Despite the frequent and wide-spread occurrence of overland flow, most of this water did not reach the channel directly, but was retained in small depressions in the catchment. From there, it reached the stream via macropores and tile drains. Manholes of the drainage system and storm drains for road and farmyard runoff acted as additional shortcuts to the stream. Although fast

  7. First-principles electron transport with phonon coupling: Large scale at low cost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunst, Tue; Markussen, Troels; Palsgaard, Mattias L. N.

    2017-01-01

    Phonon-assisted tunneling plays a crucial role for electronic device performance and even more so with future size down-scaling. We show how one can include this effect in large-scale first-principles calculations using a single "special thermal displacement" (STD) of the atomic coordinates......-to-band and source-to-drain tunneling. In a diode the phonons lead to a rectification ratio suppression in good agreement with experiments, while in an ultrathin body transistor the phonons increase off currents by four orders of magnitude, and the subthreshold swing by a factor of 4, in agreement with perturbation...

  8. Theoretical study of electromagnetic transport in Lepidoptera Danaus plexippus wing scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sackey

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the electromagnetic energies developed in the scales of the Lepidoptera Danaus plexippus. The Green tensor method was used to calculate and simulate the energies at specific wavelengths. Scattering of electromagnetic waves within the scales was simulated at different wavelengths (λ with the corresponding maximum energy occurred at λ = 0.45 μm. The study shows that the design of wing’s cross-ribs maximizes the eigenmode of electromagnetic energy. This shows promising applications in bio-sensors of Solar light and likewise in waveguide for photonic transmission.

  9. A three-scale model for ionic solute transport in swelling clays incorporating ion-ion correlation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tien Dung; Moyne, Christian; Murad, Marcio A.

    2015-01-01

    A new three-scale model is proposed to describe the movement of ionic species of different valences in swelling clays characterized by three separate length scales (nano, micro, and macro) and two levels of porosity (nano- and micropores). At the finest (nano) scale the medium is treated as charged clay particles saturated by aqueous electrolyte solution containing monovalent and divalent ions forming the electrical double layer. A new constitutive law is constructed for the disjoining pressure based on the numerical resolution of non-local problem at the nanoscale which, in contrast to the Poisson-Boltzmann theory for point charge ions, is capable of capturing the short-range interactions between the ions due to their finite size. At the intermediate scale (microscale), the two-phase homogenized particle/electrolyte solution system is represented by swollen clay clusters (or aggregates) with the nanoscale disjoining pressure incorporated in a modified form of Terzaghi's effective principle. At the macroscale, the electro-chemical-mechanical couplings within clay clusters is homogenized with the ion transport in the bulk fluid lying in the micro pores. The resultant macroscopic picture is governed by a three-scale model wherein ion transport takes place in the bulk solution strongly coupled with the mechanics of the clay clusters which play the role of sources/sinks of mass to the bulk fluid associated with ion adsorption/desorption in the electrical double layer at the nanoscale. Within the context of the quasi-steady version of the multiscale model, wherein the electrolyte solution in the nanopores is assumed at instantaneous thermodynamic equilibrium with the bulk fluid in the micropores, we build-up numerically the ion-adsorption isotherms along with the constitutive law of the retardation coefficients of monovalent and divalent ions. In addition, the constitutive law for the macroscopic swelling pressure is reconstructed numerically showing patterns of

  10. Meso-scale kinematic indicators in exhumed mass transport deposits: Definitions and implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogata, Kei; Pini, Gian Andrea; Festa, Andrea; Poga??nik, Z??ljko; Lucente, Claudio Corrado

    2016-01-01

    In this study we combine observations and analytical data from large-scale (10–100s of m-thick and 100 m 2 -extensive), siliciclastic and carbonate MTD/MTCs belonging to the Oligocene – Miocene foredeep and wedge-top suc-cessions of the Northern Apennines and the Paleocene – Eocene Friuli basin of

  11. Modelling of Temperature Profiles and Transport Scaling in Auxiliary Heated Tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callen, J.D.; Christiansen, J.P.; Cordey, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    -mode) scaling with input power, . The constant heat pinch or excess temperature gradient model leads to the offset linear law for the total stored energy W with Pin, W = τinc Pin + W(0), which describes JET auxiliary heating data quite well. It also provides definitions for the incremental energy confinement...

  12. Suspended sediment transport around a large-scale laboratory breaker bar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zanden, Joep; van der A, D.A.; Hurther, D.; Caceres, I.; O' Donoghue, T.; Ribberink, Jan S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents novel insights into suspended sediment concentrations and fluxes under a large-scale laboratory plunging wave. Measurements of sediment concentrations and velocities were taken at 12 locations around an evolving breaker bar, covering the complete breaking region from shoaling to

  13. Interpersonal Transport of Expiratory Aerosols among Three Manikins in a Full-Scale Test Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on occupants’ exposure of aerosols exhaled by one susceptible in a full-scale test room. Three breathing thermal manikins are standing in the middle of room and both the process in the microenvironment and in the macroenvironment are considered. A diffusive ceiling has been ins...

  14. Rapid atmospheric transport and large-scale deposition of recently synthesized plant waxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Daniel B.; Ladd, S. Nemiah; Schubert, Carsten J.; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2018-02-01

    Sedimentary plant wax 2H/1H ratios are important tools for understanding hydroclimate and environmental changes, but large spatial and temporal uncertainties exist about transport mechanisms from ecosystem to sediments. To assess atmospheric pathways, we collected aerosol samples for two years at four locations within a ∼60 km radius in northern Switzerland. We measured n-alkane distributions and 2H/1H ratios in these samples, and from local plants, leaf litter, and soil, as well as surface sediment from six nearby lakes. Increased concentrations and 2H depletion of long odd chain n-alkanes in early summer aerosols indicate that most wax aerosol production occurred shortly after leaf unfolding, when plants synthesize waxes in large quantities. During autumn and winter, aerosols were characterized by degraded n-alkanes lacking chain length preferences diagnostic of recent biosynthesis, and 2H/1H values that were in some cases more than 100‰ higher than growing season values. Despite these seasonal shifts, modeled deposition-weighted average 2H/1H values of long odd chain n-alkanes primarily reflected summer values. This was corroborated by n-alkane 2H/1H values in lake sediments, which were similar to deposition-weighted aerosol values at five of six sites. Atmospheric deposition rates for plant n-alkanes on land were ∼20% of accumulation rates in lakes, suggesting a role for direct deposition to lakes or coastal oceans near similar production sources, and likely a larger role for deposition on land and transport in river systems. This mechanism allows mobilization and transport of large quantities of recently produced waxes as fine-grained material to low energy sedimentation sites over short timescales, even in areas with limited topography. Widespread atmospheric transfer well before leaf senescence also highlights the importance of the isotopic composition of early season source water used to synthesize waxes for the geologic record.

  15. Ultrafine particle transport and deposition in a large scale 17-generation lung model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad S; Saha, Suvash C; Sauret, Emilie; Gemci, Tevfik; Yang, Ian A; Gu, Y T

    2017-11-07

    To understand how to assess optimally the risks of inhaled particles on respiratory health, it is necessary to comprehend the uptake of ultrafine particulate matter by inhalation during the complex transport process through a non-dichotomously bifurcating network of conduit airways. It is evident that the highly toxic ultrafine particles damage the respiratory epithelium in the terminal bronchioles. The wide range of in silico available and the limited realistic model for the extrathoracic region of the lung have improved understanding of the ultrafine particle transport and deposition (TD) in the upper airways. However, comprehensive ultrafine particle TD data for the real and entire lung model are still unavailable in the literature. Therefore, this study is aimed to provide an understanding of the ultrafine particle TD in the terminal bronchioles for the development of future therapeutics. The Euler-Lagrange (E-L) approach and ANSYS fluent (17.2) solver were used to investigate ultrafine particle TD. The physical conditions of sleeping, resting, and light activity were considered in this modelling study. A comprehensive pressure-drop along five selected path lines in different lobes was calculated. The non-linear behaviour of pressure-drops is observed, which could aid the health risk assessment system for patients with respiratory diseases. Numerical results also showed that ultrafine particle-deposition efficiency (DE) in different lobes is different for various physical activities. Moreover, the numerical results showed hot spots in various locations among the different lobes for different flow rates, which could be helpful for targeted therapeutical aerosol transport to terminal bronchioles and the alveolar region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Scaling of phloem structure and optimality of photoassimilate transport in conifer needles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Liesche, Johannes; Jensen, Kaare Hartvig

    2015-01-01

    The phloem vascular system facilitates transport of energy-rich sugar and signalling molecules in plants, thus permitting long-range communication within the organism and growth of non-photosynthesizing organs such as roots and fruits. The flow is driven by osmotic pressure, generated...... by differences in sugar concentration between distal parts of the plant. The phloem is an intricate distribution system, and many questions about its regulation and structural diversity remain unanswered. Here, we investigate the phloem structure in the simplest possible geometry: a linear leaf, found...... are more important than translocation speed at the leaf level....

  17. The fusion code XGC: Enabling kinetic study of multi-scale edge turbulent transport in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Azevedo, Eduardo [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Abbott, Stephen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Koskela, Tuomas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Worley, Patrick [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ku, Seung-Hoe [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Ethier, Stephane [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Yoon, Eisung [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Shephard, Mark [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Hager, Robert [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Lang, Jianying [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Intel Corporation, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Choi, Jong [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Podhorszki, Norbert [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Klasky, Scott [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Parashar, Manish [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Chang, Choong-Seock [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The XGC fusion gyrokinetic code combines state-of-the-art, portable computational and algorithmic technologies to enable complicated multiscale simulations of turbulence and transport dynamics in ITER edge plasma on the largest US open-science computer, the CRAY XK7 Titan, at its maximal heterogeneous capability, which have not been possible before due to a factor of over 10 shortage in the time-to-solution for less than 5 days of wall-clock time for one physics case. Frontier techniques such as nested OpenMP parallelism, adaptive parallel I/O, staging I/O and data reduction using dynamic and asynchronous applications interactions, dynamic repartitioning.

  18. Solute transport in periodical heterogeneous porous media: Importance of observation scale and experimental sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdalani, S.; Chazarin, J. P.; Delenne, C.; Guinot, V.

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the effects of the observation scale and sampling on the dispersion of tracers in periodical heterogeneous porous media. A Model Heterogeneous Porous Medium (MHPM) with a high degree of heterogeneity was built. It consists of a preferential flow path surrounded by glass beads. 44 tracer experiments were carried out on several series of periodic MHPM to investigate the effect of the observation scale on solute dispersion. Each series was replicated several times, allowing for a statistical description of the unit transfer function of the MHPM. No significant trend was found for the dispersion coefficient as a function of the size of the MHPM. However, given the variability of the breakthrough curves from one experiment replicate to another, under-sampling might easily lead to conclude that the dispersion coefficient is variable with distance. Depending on the samples used, it would be as easy to (wrongly) detect an increasing trend as to detect a decreasing one. A confidence interval analysis of the experimental breakthrough curves in the Laplace space shows that (i) there exists a model with scale independent parameters that can describe the experimental breakthrough curves within the limits of experimental uncertainty, (ii) this model is not the advection-dispersion (AD) model, (iii) the modelling error of the AD model decreases with the number of periods, (iv) the size of the Reference Elementary Volume for the dispersion coefficient is between 10 and 20 periods. The effects of sampling prove to override those of scaling. This, with the invalidity of the AD model, leads to question attempts to calibrate and/or identify trends in the dispersion coefficient at intermediate scales from a limited number of experiment replicates.

  19. Direct numerical simulation of reactive flow and modeling of pore-scale transport phenomena in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomeli, Mohammad; Riaz, Amir

    2017-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of reactive flow and a long-term geochemical modeling of CO2 sequestration is carried out in a fractured media to investigate its impact on CO2 transport and storage capacity. The fracture is modeled by considering flow of CO2 between finite plates. We study the physics and the critical time of blockage for a fracture to interpret the results. To this end, we employ direct numerical simulation tools and algorithms to simulate incompressible flow along with necessary transport equations that capture the kinetics of relevant chemical reactions. The numerical model is based on a finite volume method using a sequential non-iterative approach. It is found that the reactive transport of minerals has an important effect on reservoir porosity and permeability. According to the simulations, the flow of injected CO2 in the fracture is controlled by changes in the pore-scale permeability. The fracture ceases to be a fluid channel due to geochemical reactions of minerals. In addition, using parameter analysis we also determine the effect of various reaction kinetics on permeability of porous media.

  20. Transport and Zonal Flows at Ion and Electron scales in the MST Reversed-Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Zachary; Duff, James; Pueschel, M. J.; Terry, Paul; University of Wisconsin-Madison Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    Reversed-field pinches (RFPs) operating in an improved-confinement regime, Pulsed Poloidal Current Drive (PPCD), exhibit microturbulence that contributes to heat and particle transport. Gyrokinetic simulations are used to characterize various PPCD discharges with differing values of η ≡ dlnT / dlnn . Zonal flows play an important role in regulating ITG, TEM, and ETG transport in these discharges. Residual magnetic fluctuations from tearing modes in RFPs degrade zonal flows, setting flux levels and critical gradients. In the absence of such fluctuations, RFPs can generate very large zonal flow amplitudes, resulting in negligibly small fluxes. Potential mechanisms for this strong zonal flow generation are addressed here, including zonal flow residuals, secondary instability, and strong density gradients. Beyond fluxes, comparisons between simulation and the experiment are sought out through the study of carbon impurities. Additionally, longer-term plans for experimental comparison are introduced here through the investigation of fast ion dynamics, with a focus on particle diffusivity to assess NBI heating for RFPs.

  1. Sub-grid combustion modeling for compressible two-phase reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Vaidyanathan

    2003-06-01

    A generic formulation for modeling the turbulent combustion in compressible, high Reynolds number, two-phase; reacting flows has been developed and validated. A sub-grid mixing/combustion model called Linear Eddy Mixing (LEM) model has been extended to compressible flows and used inside the framework of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) in this LES-LEM approach. The LES-LEM approach is based on the proposition that the basic mechanistic distinction between the convective and the molecular effects should be preserved for accurate prediction of complex flow-fields such as those encountered in many combustion systems. Liquid droplets (represented by computational parcels) are tracked using the Lagrangian approach wherein the Newton's equation of motion for the discrete particles are integrated explicitly in the Eulerian gas field. The gas phase LES velocity fields are used to estimate the instantaneous gas velocity at the droplet location. Drag effects due to the droplets on the gas phase and the heat transfer between the gas and the liquid phase are explicitly included. Thus, full coupling is achieved between the two phases in the simulation. Validation of the compressible LES-LEM approach is conducted by simulating the flow-field in an operational General Electric Aircraft Engines combustor (LM6000). The results predicted using the proposed approach compares well with the experiments and a conventional (G-equation) thin-flame model. Particle tracking algorithms used in the present study are validated by simulating droplet laden temporal mixing layers. Quantitative and qualitative comparison with the results of spectral DNS exhibits good agreement. Simulations using the current LES-LEM for freely propagating partially premixed flame in a droplet-laden isotropic turbulent field correctly captures the flame structure in the partially premixed flames. Due to the strong spatial variation of equivalence ratio a broad flame similar to a premixed flame is realized. The current

  2. Decentralised fault diagnosis of large-scale systems: Application to water transport networks

    OpenAIRE

    Puig, Vicenç; Ocampo-Martinez, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a decentralised fault diagnosis approach for large-scale systems is proposed. This approach is based on obtaining a set of local diagnosers using the analytical redundancy relation (ARRs) approach. The proposed approach starts with obtaining the set of ARRs of the system yielding into an equivalent graph. From that graph, the graph partitioning problem is solved obtaining a set of ARRs for each local diagnoser. Finally, a decentralised fault diagnosis strategy is proposed an...

  3. RISK MANAGEMENT IN A LARGE-SCALE NEW RAILWAY TRANSPORT SYSTEM PROJECT

    OpenAIRE

    SUH, Sunduck D.

    2000-01-01

    Risk management experiences of the Korean Seoul-Pusan high-speed railway (KTX) project since the planning stage are evaluated. One can clearly see the interplay of engineering and construction risks, financial risks and political risks in the development of the KTX project, which is the peculiarity of large-scale new railway system projects. A brief description on evaluation methodology and overview of the project is followed by detailed evaluations on key differences in risks between convent...

  4. Small-scale sediment transport patterns and bedform morphodynamics: New insights from high resolution multibeam bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Erikson, Li H.; Rubin, David M.; Kvitek, Rikk G.

    2011-01-01

    New multibeam echosounder and processing technologies yield sub-meter-scale bathymetric resolution, revealing striking details of bedform morphology that are shaped by complex boundary-layer flow dynamics at a range of spatial and temporal scales. An inertially aided post processed kinematic (IAPPK) technique generates a smoothed best estimate trajectory (SBET) solution to tie the vessel motion-related effects of each sounding directly to the ellipsoid, significantly reducing artifacts commonly found in multibeam data, increasing point density, and sharpening seafloor features. The new technique was applied to a large bedform field in 20–30 m water depths in central San Francisco Bay, California (USA), revealing bedforms that suggest boundary-layer flow deflection by the crests where 12-m-wavelength, 0.2-m-amplitude bedforms are superimposed on 60-m-wavelength, 1-m-amplitude bedforms, with crests that often were strongly oblique (approaching 90°) to the larger features on the lee side, and near-parallel on the stoss side. During one survey in April 2008, superimposed bedform crests were continuous between the crests of the larger features, indicating that flow detachment in the lee of the larger bedforms is not always a dominant process. Assessment of bedform crest peakedness, asymmetry, and small-scale bedform evolution between surveys indicates the impact of different flow regimes on the entire bedform field. This paper presents unique fine-scale imagery of compound and superimposed bedforms, which is used to (1) assess the physical forcing and evolution of a bedform field in San Francisco Bay, and (2) in conjunction with numerical modeling, gain a better fundamental understanding of boundary-layer flow dynamics that result in the observed superimposed bedform orientation.

  5. Parameter Uniqueness And Uncertainty Associated For Multirate Transport Models Applied To Core-Scale Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, K. L.; Malama, B.; James, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    Breakthrough data collected in a set of laboratory tracer experiments are used to constrain the multirate mass transport model STAMMT-L. The uniqueness and variance of the estimated parameters are explored using both Gauss-Marquardt-Levenberg (PEST) and Markov-Chain Monte Carlo (DREAM) algorithms. The efficacy and uniqueness of different multirate distribution types (e.g., lognormal, beta, gamma) for a given dataset are compared. The information content of the different portions of the breakthrough curve (i.e., rising limb, peak, tail) is also explored with this forward model and these inverse modeling tools. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Production of lightning NOx and its vertical distribution calculated from three-dimensional cloud-scale chemical transport model simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Ott, Lesley E.

    2010-02-18

    A three-dimensional (3-D) cloud-scale chemical transport model that includes a parameterized source of lightning NOx on the basis of observed flash rates has been used to simulate six midlatitude and subtropical thunderstorms observed during four field projects. Production per intracloud (PIC) and cloud-to-ground (PCG) flash is estimated by assuming various values of PIC and PCG for each storm and determining which production scenario yields NOx mixing ratios that compare most favorably with in-cloud aircraft observations. We obtain a mean PCG value of 500 moles NO (7 kg N) per flash. The results of this analysis also suggest that on average, PIC may be nearly equal to PCG, which is contrary to the common assumption that intracloud flashes are significantly less productive of NO than are cloud-to-ground flashes. This study also presents vertical profiles of the mass of lightning NOx after convection based on 3-D cloud-scale model simulations. The results suggest that following convection, a large percentage of lightning NOx remains in the middle and upper troposphere where it originated, while only a small percentage is found near the surface. The results of this work differ from profiles calculated from 2-D cloud-scale model simulations with a simpler lightning parameterization that were peaked near the surface and in the upper troposphere (referred to as a “C-shaped” profile). The new model results (a backward C-shaped profile) suggest that chemical transport models that assume a C-shaped vertical profile of lightning NOx mass may place too much mass near the surface and too little in the middle troposphere.

  7. In silico multi-scale model of transport and dynamic seeding in a bone tissue engineering perfusion bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, T J; Hidalgo-Bastida, L A; Cartmell, S H; Halliday, I; Care, C M

    2013-04-01

    Computer simulations can potentially be used to design, predict, and inform properties for tissue engineering perfusion bioreactors. In this work, we investigate the flow properties that result from a particular poly-L-lactide porous scaffold and a particular choice of perfusion bioreactor vessel design used in bone tissue engineering. We also propose a model to investigate the dynamic seeding properties such as the homogeneity (or lack of) of the cellular distribution within the scaffold of the perfusion bioreactor: a pre-requisite for the subsequent successful uniform growth of a viable bone tissue engineered construct. Flows inside geometrically complex scaffolds have been investigated previously and results shown at these pore scales. Here, it is our aim to show accurately that through the use of modern high performance computers that the bioreactor device scale that encloses a scaffold can affect the flows and stresses within the pores throughout the scaffold which has implications for bioreactor design, control, and use. Central to this work is that the boundary conditions are derived from micro computed tomography scans of both a device chamber and scaffold in order to avoid generalizations and uncertainties. Dynamic seeding methods have also been shown to provide certain advantages over static seeding methods. We propose here a novel coupled model for dynamic seeding accounting for flow, species mass transport and cell advection-diffusion-attachment tuned for bone tissue engineering. The model highlights the timescale differences between different species suggesting that traditional homogeneous porous flow models of transport must be applied with caution to perfusion bioreactors. Our in silico data illustrate the extent to which these experiments have the potential to contribute to future design and development of large-scale bioreactors. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Derrick [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-12-22

    Two decimeter-scale 2D experiments were conducted in the proposed research. To the extent possible, the first experiment (2.44 m x 0.61 m x 10 cm) was be packed to reproduce the observed distributions of sediment size fractions in the subsurface at the tracer test site. Four size fractions of sediment (<125m, 125-250m, 250m to 2 mm, >2mm) were packed in the tank and the size fractions were placed in a sediment structure imitating pattern rather than the block pattern used in the previous experiments conducted with Naturita sediment. The second tank used the same total amount of sediment and proportions of the three size fractions used in the first experiment but was packed at larger geostatistical correlation lengths to evaluate how the scale of heterogeneity affects the upscaling results. This experiment was conducted with the goal of trying to determine how the upscaling would be affected by the diffusion path length associated with low permeability zones. The initial conditions in the tanks were based on observed field conditions. The influent was a synthetic groundwater that mimicked uncontaminated groundwater observed at the Naturita site. Samples were collected from side and end ports of the tank and were analyzed for U(VI), alkalinity, pH and major ions as was done in previous experiments. Each decimeter scale experiment was run for approximately 6 months and the experiments were run in parallel. Extensive premodeling occurred for both tanks and lasted the first year of the project.

  9. Screening and Scale-Up of GLUT Transporter Constructs Suitable for Biochemical and Structural Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon, Grégory; Kang, Hae Joo; Drew, David

    2018-01-01

    Identifying membrane proteins that can be produced and isolated in homogenous form in detergent is a lengthy trial-and-error process that can be facilitated by fluorescence-based screening approaches. We describe (1) the strategy and protocol of cloning by homologous recombination, (2) whole-cell and in-gel fluorescence measurements to estimate GLUT-GFP fusion protein yields, (3) use of size-exclusion chromatography monitored by fluorescence (FSEC) for assessing the homogeneity of the GLUT-GFP fusion proteins, and (4) the protocol for large-scale production and purification of the Bos taurus GLUT5 construct that enabled its crystal structure determination.

  10. Impact of Resolution Aware Moist Physics on Constituent Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molod, Andrea; Colarco, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The current version of the Goddard Earth Observing System Atmospheric General Circulation Model (GEOS-5 AGCM) of the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center was designed to function seamlessly across many different resolutions and applications. The GEOS-5 AGCM moist physics parameterizations include "resolution aware" parameters that resulted in improved behavior of the GEOS-5 AGCM high resolution simulations and more uniformity of model mean state across resolutions and applications. The two governing parameters that are specified a priori as a function of horizontal resolution are the critical relative humidity used for large scale condensation, and a parameter which governs the minimum allowable entrainment used for the "stochastic Tokioka trigger" of the convective parameterization. The overarching motivation for the implementation of the resolution aware behavior was the expectation that as resolution increases, subgrid scale variability decreases and the AGCM dynamics resolves some of the convective motions. At high resolution, therefore, the convective mass flux is partially inhibited, and more of the AGCMs precipitation is due to grid scale processes. Results will be shown to demonstrate that these two changes at high resolution have a profound impact on the behavior of the GEOS-5 Chemistry Climate Model (GEOS-5 CCM). Convective transport of passive tracers, gases and aerosols is inhibited, and the hydrostatic dynamical transport does not completely compensate. In addition, the rates of aerosol scavenging are currently different for convective and grid scale sources of precipitation, and so the total scavenging rates at high resolution were affected. These results demonstrate the need for the implementation of extensions of the resolution aware behavior to constituent transport.

  11. Ion-scale turbulence in MAST: anomalous transport, subcritical transitions, and comparison to BES measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wyk, F.; Highcock, E. G.; Field, A. R.; Roach, C. M.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Parra, F. I.; Dorland, W.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the effect of varying the ion temperature gradient (ITG) and toroidal equilibrium scale sheared flow on ion-scale turbulence in the outer core of MAST by means of local gyrokinetic simulations. We show that nonlinear simulations reproduce the experimental ion heat flux and that the experimentally measured values of the ITG and the flow shear lie close to the turbulence threshold. We demonstrate that the system is subcritical in the presence of flow shear, i.e., the system is formally stable to small perturbations, but transitions to a turbulent state given a large enough initial perturbation. We propose that the transition to subcritical turbulence occurs via an intermediate state dominated by low number of coherent long-lived structures, close to threshold, which increase in number as the system is taken away from the threshold into the more strongly turbulent regime, until they fill the domain and a more conventional turbulence emerges. We show that the properties of turbulence are effectively functions of the distance to threshold, as quantified by the ion heat flux. We make quantitative comparisons of correlation lengths, times, and amplitudes between our simulations and experimental measurements using the MAST BES diagnostic. We find reasonable agreement of the correlation properties, most notably of the correlation time, for which significant discrepancies were found in previous numerical studies of MAST turbulence.

  12. Variational Multi-Scale method with spectral approximation of the sub-scales.

    KAUST Repository

    Dia, Ben Mansour

    2015-01-07

    A variational multi-scale method where the sub-grid scales are computed by spectral approximations is presented. It is based upon an extension of the spectral theorem to non necessarily self-adjoint elliptic operators that have an associated base of eigenfunctions which are orthonormal in weighted L2 spaces. We propose a feasible VMS-spectral method by truncation of this spectral expansion to a nite number of modes.

  13. Spreading of the Western Mediterranean Deep Water after winter 2005: Time scales and deep cyclone transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuvier, J.; BéRanger, K.; Lebeaupin Brossier, C.; Somot, S.; Sevault, F.; Drillet, Y.; Bourdallé-Badie, R.; Ferry, N.; Lyard, F.

    2012-07-01

    This work is dedicated to the study of the propagation of the Western Mediterranean Deep Water (WMDW) formed in the Gulf of Lions during the exceptional winter 2005. A simulation of the 1998-2008 period has been carried out with an eddy-resolving Ocean General Circulation Model of the Mediterranean Sea, driven by interannual high-resolution air-sea fluxes. This study first presents a validation of the recently improved model configuration against satellite observations. Then, we assess the ability of the model to reproduce the particularly intense deep convection event of winter 2005 in the Gulf of Lions. A huge volume of very dense water is formed in the simulation at that time (annual formation rate higher than 3 Sv). The thermohaline characteristics of the new WMDW allow a monitoring of its deep propagation. We identify several deep cyclones as mainly responsible of the fast spreading of the WMDW southwards in the Western Mediterranean. By comparing Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches, we estimate different transport times of the WMDW by these cyclonic eddies and compare them to those deduced from several observations. Finally, we argue that these cyclones favor the propagation of the WMDW thermohaline characteristics toward the Channel of Sardinia and decrease the volume of WMDW which can reach the Strait of Gibraltar.

  14. Scaling of phloem structure and optimality of photoassimilate transport in conifer needles

    CERN Document Server

    Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Jensen, Kaare H; Holbrook, N Michele; Schulz, Alexander; Katifori, Eleni

    2014-01-01

    The phloem vascular system facilitates transport of energy-rich sugar and signaling molecules in plants, thus permitting long range communication within the organism and growth of non-photosynthesizing organs such as roots and fruits. The flow is driven by osmotic pressure, generated by differences in sugar concentration between distal parts of the plant. The phloem is an intricate distribution system, and many questions about its regulation and structural diversity remain unanswered. Here, we investigate the phloem structure in the simplest possible geometry: a linear leaf, found, for example, in the needles of conifer trees. We measure the phloem structure in four tree species representing a diverse set of habitats and needle sizes, from 1 cm (\\textit{Picea omorika}) to 35 cm (\\textit{Pinus palustris}). We show that the phloem shares common traits across these four species and find that the size of its conductive elements obeys a power law. We present a minimal model that accounts for these common traits an...

  15. Pore-Scale Transport of Strontium During Dynamic Water Content Changes in the Unsaturated Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, W.; Kibbey, T. C. G.; Papelis, C.

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic water content changes in the unsaturated zone caused by natural and manmade processes, such as evaporation, rainfall, and irrigation, have an effect on contaminant mobility. In general, in the unsaturated zone, evaporation causes an increase in contaminant concentrations, potentially leading to sorption of contaminants on aquifer materials or precipitation of crystalline or amorphous phases. On the other hand, increase of water content may result in dissolution of precipitated phases and increased mobility of contaminants. The objective of this study was to develop a quantitative model for the transport of strontium through sand under dynamic water content conditions, as a function of strontium concentration, pH, and ionic strength. Strontium was selected as a surrogate for strontium-90, a by-product of nuclear reactions. The dynamic water content was determined using an automated device for rapidly measuring the hysteretic capillary pressure—saturation relationship, followed by ambient air evaporation, and gravimetric water content measurement. Strontium concentrations were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Flow interruption experiments were conducted to determine whether equilibrium conditions existed for a given flowrate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to visualize the treated quartz sand particles and the distribution of strontium on sand grains was determined using elemental maps created by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Strontium behavior appears to be pH dependent as well as ionic strength dependent under these conditions.

  16. Watershed-scale modeling on the fate and transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligaray, Mayzonee; Baek, Sang Soo [School of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, UNIST-gil 50, Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hye-Ok [Disaster Scientific Investigation Division, National Disaster Management Research Institute, 365 Jongga-ro Jung-gu, Ulsan 44538 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sung-Deuk, E-mail: sdchoi@unist.ac.kr [School of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, UNIST-gil 50, Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyung Hwa, E-mail: khcho@unist.ac.kr [School of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, UNIST-gil 50, Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    PAHs are potentially carcinogenic substances that are persistent in the environment. Increasing concentrations of PAHs were observed due to rapid urbanization, thus; monitoring PAHs concentrations is necessary. However, it is expensive to conduct intensive monitoring activities of a large number of PAHs. This study addressed this issue by developing a multimedia model coupled with a hydrological model (i.e., Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT)) for Taehwa River (TR) watershed in Ulsan, the industrial capital of South Korea. The hydrologic module of the SWAT was calibrated, and further used to simulate the fate and transport of PAHs in soil and waterbody. The model demonstrated that the temporal or seasonal variation of PAHs in soil and waterbody can be well reproduced. Meanwhile, the spatial distribution of PAHs showed that urban areas in TR watershed have the highest PAH loadings compared to rural areas. Sensitivity analyses of the PAH soil and PAH water parameters were also able to determine the critical processes in TR watershed: degradation, deposition, volatilization, and wash off mechanism. We hope that this model will be able to aid the stakeholders in: regulating PAH concentrations emitted by various sources; and also apply the model to other Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs).

  17. RISK MANAGEMENT IN A LARGE-SCALE NEW RAILWAY TRANSPORT SYSTEM PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunduck D. SUH, Ph.D., P.E.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Risk management experiences of the Korean Seoul-Pusan high-speed railway (KTX project since the planning stage are evaluated. One can clearly see the interplay of engineering and construction risks, financial risks and political risks in the development of the KTX project, which is the peculiarity of large-scale new railway system projects. A brief description on evaluation methodology and overview of the project is followed by detailed evaluations on key differences in risks between conventional railway system and high-speed railway system, social and political risks, engineering and construction risks, and financial risks. Risks involved in system procurement process, such as proposal solicitation, evaluation, selection, and scope of solicitation are separated out and evaluated in depth. Detailed events resulting from these issues are discussed along with their possible impact on system risk. Lessons learned and further possible refinements are also discussed.

  18. Interpersonal Transport of Droplet Nuclei among Three Manikins in a Full-Scale Test Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on occupants’ exposure of droplet nuclei exhaled by one susceptible in a full-scale test room. Three breathing thermal manikins are standing in the middle of room and both the process in the microenvironment and in the macroenvironment are considered. A diffusive ceiling has been...... installed to induce fresh air without generating sensible drafts in an occupied zone with fully mixing flow. The exposures of two target manikins to the droplet nuclei exhaled by one susceptible manikin were measured. Tracer gas N2O was used to simulate droplet nuclei. Comparisons on different mutual...... that instant high exposure exists even the average exposure is low. Two symmetrically located target manikins have different exposures of droplet nuclei exhaled by one susceptible manikin. The exposures of two target manikins are compared between mutual distances 0.5 m [1.6 ft.] and 0.8 m [2.6 ft...

  19. Sensitivity of the scale partition for variational multiscale large-eddy simulation of channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmen, J.; Hughes, T.J.R.; Oberai, A.A.; Wells, G.N.

    2004-01-01

    The variational multiscale method has been shown to perform well for large-eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flows. The method relies upon a partition of the resolved velocity field into large- and small-scale components. The subgrid model then acts only on the small scales of motion, unlike

  20. Sediment transport in steep forested catchments - An assessment of scale and disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, G. R.; Hugo, J.; Webb, A. A.; Turner, L.

    2017-04-01

    Stream sediment loads (both bedload and suspended sediment) are problematic to measure due to the time and equipment needed. There is a dearth of such data sets globally let alone for Australia. However, such data are needed to quantify sediment transport type and rates, landscape evolution, effect of human disturbance as well as patterns and temporal response. Here we present the findings from 8 steepslope forested catchments dominated by headwater streams (size range 15-100 ha) in south-eastern Australia where both bedload and suspended load have been measured over multiple years. The results demonstrate that suspended load is the dominant component and there is no consistent suspended to bedload ratio for the catchments. The suspended sediment to bedload ratio appears to be catchment specific. There was no relationship between total load (or bedload/suspended load) and average catchment slope, stream length, shape or any geomorphic descriptor. However catchment total load was found to be significantly related to catchment area. Of the 8 catchments examined here, 6 had been harvested for timber in previous decades (with large areas of forest removed) while 2 catchments had minimal disturbance (Control catchments). There was no difference in sediment loads from the harvested and Control catchments. The results demonstrate that although land disturbance had previously occurred the management practices employed in each catchment were effective in the long term. This provides confidence that the forest harvesting and subsequent management do not produce detrimental effects in the medium to long term. An assessment of erosion rates and likely soil production rates suggests that the catchments are eroding soil at the rate it is being produced.

  1. From Detailed Description of Chemical Reacting Carbon Particles to Subgrid Models for CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulze S.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to the development and validation of a sub-model for the partial oxidation of a spherical char particle moving in an air/steam atmosphere. The particle diameter is 2 mm. The coal particle is represented by moisture- and ash-free nonporous carbon while the coal rank is implemented using semi-global reaction rate expressions taken from the literature. The submodel includes six gaseous chemical species (O2, CO2, CO, H2O, H2, N2. Three heterogeneous reactions are employed, along with two homogeneous semi-global reactions, namely carbon monoxide oxidation and the water-gas-shift reaction. The distinguishing feature of the subgrid model is that it takes into account the influence of homogeneous reactions on integral characteristics such as carbon combustion rates and particle temperature. The sub-model was validated by comparing its results with a comprehensive CFD-based model resolving the issues of bulk flow and boundary layer around the particle. In this model, the Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the energy and species conservation equations were used to solve the problem by means of the pseudo-steady state approach. At the surface of the particle, the balance of mass, energy and species concentration was applied including the effect of the Stefan flow and heat loss due to radiation at the surface of the particle. Good agreement was achieved between the sub-model and the CFD-based model. Additionally, the CFD-based model was verified against experimental data published in the literature (Makino et al. (2003 Combust. Flame 132, 743-753. Good agreement was achieved between numerically predicted and experimentally obtained data for input conditions corresponding to the kinetically controlled regime. The maximal discrepancy (10% between the experiments and the numerical results was observed in the diffusion-controlled regime. Finally, we discuss the influence of the Reynolds number, the ambient O2 mass fraction and the ambient

  2. Co-evolution of intelligent socio-technical systems modelling and applications in large scale emergency and transport domains

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    As the interconnectivity between humans through technical devices is becoming ubiquitous, the next step is already in the making: ambient intelligence, i.e. smart (technical) environments, which will eventually play the same active role in communication as the human players, leading to a co-evolution in all domains where real-time communication is essential. This topical volume, based on the findings of the Socionical European research project, gives equal attention to two highly relevant domains of applications: transport, specifically traffic, dynamics from the viewpoint of a socio-technical interaction and evacuation scenarios for large-scale emergency situations. Care was taken to investigate as much as possible the limits of scalability and to combine the modeling using complex systems science approaches with relevant data analysis.

  3. Airframe noise measurements on a small-scale model of a supersonic transport concept in an anechoic flow facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preisser, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    Airframe noise has been measured on a .015 scale model of an advanced supersonic transport concept (AST-100) in an anechoic flow facility. The model was equipped with leading- and trailing-edge flaps, nose and main landing gears, and engine nacelles. Each of these components was deployed, individually and collectively, to determine their contribution to the noise field. Results are presented which show that in the clean configuration the aircraft displays a symmetric dipole directivity, whereas in the more complex landing-approach configuration the directivity peaks in the forward quadrant. It was found that the landing-approach noise was due chiefly to the landing gear, the trailing edge flaps, and the aeroacoustic interaction between the two

  4. Full-Scale Model of Subionospheric VLF Signal Propagation Based on First-Principles Charged Particle Transport Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouznetsov, A.; Cully, C. M.; Knudsen, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    Changes in D-Region ionization caused by energetic particle precipitation are monitored by the Array for Broadband Observations of VLF/ELF Emissions (ABOVE) - a network of receivers deployed across Western Canada. The observed amplitudes and phases of subionospheric-propagating VLF signals from distant artificial transmitters depend sensitively on the free electron population created by precipitation of energetic charged particles. Those include both primary (electrons, protons and heavier ions) and secondary (cascades of ionized particles and electromagnetic radiation) components. We have designed and implemented a full-scale model to predict the received VLF signals based on first-principle charged particle transport calculations coupled to the Long Wavelength Propagation Capability (LWPC) software. Calculations of ionization rates and free electron densities are based on MCNP-6 (a general-purpose Monte Carlo N- Particle) software taking advantage of its capability of coupled neutron/photon/electron transport and novel library of cross-sections for low-energetic electron and photon interactions with matter. Cosmic ray calculations of background ionization are based on source spectra obtained both from PAMELA direct Cosmic Rays spectra measurements and based on the recently-implemented MCNP 6 galactic cosmic-ray source, scaled using our (Calgary) neutron monitor measurement results. Conversion from calculated fluxes (MCNP F4 tallies) to ionization rates for low-energy electrons are based on the total ionization cross-sections for oxygen and nitrogen molecules from the National Institute of Standard and Technology. We use our model to explore the complexity of the physical processes affecting VLF propagation.

  5. Small scale laboratory studies of flow and transport phenonmena in pores and fractures, Phase II. Second yearly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, J.L.

    1993-04-01

    Small scale laboratory experiments, equipped with an ability to actually observe behavior on the pore level using microscopy, provide an economical and easily understood scientific tool to help us validateconcepts and assumptions about the transport of contaminants, and offers the propensity to discover heretofore unrecognized phenomena or behavior. The main technique employs etched glass micromodels, composed of two etched glass plates, sintered together, to form a two dimensional network of three dimensional pores. Flow and transport behavior is observed on a pore or pore network level, and recorded on film and video tape. This technique is coupled with related column studies. Specifically we`re examining multiphase flow behavior of relevance, for example, to liquid-liquid mass transfer (solubilization of capillary trapped organic liquids); liquid-gas mass transfer (in situ volatilization); colloid movement, attachment and detachment in the presence of fluid-fluid interfaces; bacteria colonization and motility in porous systems; and heterogeneity effects on multi-phase flow, colloid movement and bacteria behavior.

  6. Basin-scale wind transport during the MILAGRO field campaign and comparison to climatology using cluster analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. de Foy

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The MILAGRO field campaign was a multi-agency international collaborative project to evaluate the regional impacts of the Mexico City air pollution plume as a means of understanding urban impacts on the global climate. Mexico City lies on an elevated plateau with mountains on three sides and has complex mountain and surface-driven wind flows. This paper asks what the wind transport was in the basin during the field campaign and how representative it was of the climatology. Surface meteorology and air quality data, radiosondes and radar wind profiler data were collected at sites in the basin and its vicinity. Cluster analysis was used to identify the dominant wind patterns both during the campaign and within the past 10 years of operational data from the warm dry season. Our analysis shows that March 2006 was representative of typical flow patterns experienced in the basin. Six episode types were identified for the basin-scale circulation providing a way of interpreting atmospheric chemistry and particulate data collected during the campaign. Decoupling between surface winds and those aloft had a strong influence in leading to convection and poor air quality episodes. Hourly characterisation of wind circulation during the MILAGRO, MCMA-2003 and IMADA field campaigns enables the comparisons of similar air pollution episodes and the evaluation of the impact of wind transport on measurements of the atmospheric chemistry taking place in the basin.

  7. Pore-Scale Investigation of Micron-Size Polyacrylamide Elastic Microspheres (MPEMs) Transport and Retention in Saturated Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Chuanjin

    2014-05-06

    Knowledge of micrometer-size polyacrylamide elastic microsphere (MPEM) transport and retention mechanisms in porous media is essential for the application of MPEMs as a smart sweep improvement and profile modification agent in improving oil recovery. A transparent micromodel packed with translucent quartz sand was constructed and used to investigate the pore-scale transport, surface deposition-release, and plugging deposition-remigration mechanisms of MPEMs in porous media. The results indicate that the combination of colloidal and hydrodynamic forces controls the deposition and release of MPEMs on pore-surfaces; the reduction of fluid salinity and the increase of Darcy velocity are beneficial to the MPEM release from pore-surfaces; the hydrodynamic forces also influence the remigration of MPEMs in pore-throats. MPEMs can plug pore-throats through the mechanisms of capture-plugging, superposition-plugging, and bridge-plugging, which produces resistance to water flow; the interception with MPEM particulate filters occurring in the interior of porous media can enhance the plugging effect of MPEMs; while the interception with MPEM particulate filters occurring at the surface of low-permeability layer can prevent the low-permeability layer from being damaged by MPEMs. MPEMs can remigrate in pore-throats depending on their elasticity through four steps of capture-plugging, elastic deformation, steady migration, and deformation recovery. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  8. Detecting and modelling structures on the micro and the macro scales: Assessing their effects on solute transport behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslauer, C. P.; Bárdossy, A.; Sudicky, E. A.

    2017-09-01

    This paper demonstrates quantitative reasoning to separate the dataset of spatially distributed variables into different entities and subsequently characterize their geostatistical properties, properly. The main contribution of the paper is a statistical based algorithm that matches the manual distinction results. This algorithm is based on measured data and is generally applicable. In this paper, it is successfully applied at two datasets of saturated hydraulic conductivity (K) measured at the Borden (Canada) and the Lauswiesen (Germany) aquifers. The boundary layer was successfully delineated at Borden despite its only mild heterogeneity and only small statistical differences between the divided units. The methods are verified with the more heterogeneous Lauswiesen aquifer K data-set, where a boundary layer has previously been delineated. The effects of the macro- and the microstructure on solute transport behaviour are evaluated using numerical solute tracer experiments. Within the microscale structure, both Gaussian and non-Gaussian models of spatial dependence of K are evaluated. The effects of heterogeneity both on the macro- and the microscale are analysed using numerical tracer experiments based on four scenarios: including or not including the macroscale structures and optimally fitting a Gaussian or a non-Gaussian model for the spatial dependence in the micro-structure. The paper shows that both micro- and macro-scale structures are important, as in each of the four possible geostatistical scenarios solute transport behaviour differs meaningfully.

  9. Micro-Scale Simulation of Water Transport in Porous Media Coupled with Phase Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemad, Sahand; Behrang, Arash; Mohammadmoradi, Peyman; Hejazi, Hossein; Kantzas, Apostolos

    2015-11-01

    Sub-pore scale modeling of flow in porous media is gaining momentum. The concept of Digital Core Analysis deals with measurements of virtual core and the purpose of such modeling is to replace conventional and special core analysis when the latter are not feasible. Single phase flow phenomena are nowadays fairly easy to model given a good representation of the porous medium by its digital counterpart. Two phase flow modeling has proven more difficult to represent due to the complexities introduced by the insert of interfaces. These problems were at least partially overcome by the implementation of the ``Volume of Fluid'' method. OpenFOAM is the CFD package of choice in this work. The aforementioned approach is currently being extended in the modeling of phase change within a porous medium. Surface roughness is introduced by the incorporation of wedges of variable density and amplitude on the pore surface. A further introduced complication is that the individual grains are of different mineralogy and thus of different wettability. The problem of steam condensation in such media is addressed. It is observed that steam condenses first in the smallest of wedges, which act a nucleation sites. Water spreads on water-wet surfaces. Snap-off is observed in several cases leading to temporary trapping of vapor. Grid size effects are also addressed. The application of this modeling effort is the condensation of steam in thermal recovery methods.

  10. Time lags in watershed-scale nutrient transport: an exploration of dominant controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meter, K. J.; Basu, N. B.

    2017-08-01

    Unprecedented decreases in atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition together with increases in agricultural N-use efficiency have led to decreases in net anthropogenic N inputs in many eastern US and Canadian watersheds as well as in Europe. Despite such decreases, N concentrations in streams and rivers continue to increase, and problems of coastal eutrophication remain acute. Such a mismatch between N inputs and outputs can arise due to legacy N accumulation and subsequent lag times between implementation of conservation measures and improvements in water quality. In the present study, we quantified such lag times by pairing long-term N input trajectories with stream nitrate concentration data for 16 nested subwatersheds in a 6800 km2, Southern Ontario watershed. Our results show significant nonlinearity between N inputs and outputs, with a strong hysteresis effect indicative of decadal-scale lag times. The mean annual lag time was found to be 24.5 years, with lags varying seasonally, likely due to differences in N-delivery pathways. Lag times were found to be negatively correlated with both tile drainage and watershed slope, with tile drainage being a dominant control in fall and watershed slope being significant during the spring snowmelt period. Quantification of such lags will be crucial to policy-makers as they struggle to set appropriate goals for water quality improvement in human-impacted watersheds.

  11. Transport and deposition of carbon at catchment scale: stabilization mechanisms approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Mena, María; Almagro, María; Díaz-Pereira, Elvira; García-Franco, Noelia; Boix-Fayos, Carolina

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial sedimentation buries large amounts of organic carbon (OC) annually, contributing to the terrestrial carbon sink. The temporal significance of this sink will strongly depend on the attributes of the depositional environment, but also on the characteristics of the OC reaching these sites and its stability upon deposition. The fate of the redistributed OC will ultimately depend on the mechanisms of its physical and chemical protection against decomposition, its turnover rates and the conditions under which the OC is stored in sedimentary settings. This framework is more complex in Mediterranean river basins where sediments are often redistributed under a range of environmental conditions in ephemeral, intermittent and perennial fluvial courses, sometimes within the same catchment. The OC stabilization mechanisms and their relations with aggregation at different transport and sedimentary deposits is under those conditions highly uncertain. The main objective of this work was to characterize the stabilization and mineralization of OC in sediments in transit (suspended load), at a range of depositional settings (alluvial bars, reservoir sediments) and soils from the source areas in a sub-catchment (111 km2) at the headwaters of the Segura catchment in South East Spain. In order to obtain a deeper knowledge on the predominant stabilization mechanism corresponding to each erosional phase, the following organic carbon fractionation method was carried out: Four aggregate size classes were distinguished by sieving (large and small macroaggregates, free microaggregates, and free silt plus clay fraction), and the microaggregates occluded within macroaggregates (SMm) were isolated. As a further step, an oxidation of the OC occluded in silt plus clay fraction and that of the free silt plus clay fraction was performed to estimate the oxidant resistant OC pool. Measured OC in these fractions can be related to three functional pools: active (free particulate organic

  12. Numerical modeling of watershed-scale radiocesium transport coupled with biogeochemical cycling in forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, K.; Tada, K.; Tawara, Y.; Tosaka, H.; Ohno, K.; Asami, M.; Kosaka, K.

    2015-12-01

    Since the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, intensive monitoring and modeling works on radionuclide transfer in environment have been carried out. Although Cesium (Cs) concentration has been attenuating due to both physical and environmental half-life (i.e., wash-off by water and sediment), the attenuation rate depends clearly on the type of land use and land cover. In the Fukushima case, studying the migration in forest land use is important for predicting the long-term behavior of Cs because most of the contaminated region is covered by forests. Atmospheric fallout is characterized by complicated behavior in biogeochemical cycle in forests which can be described by biotic/abiotic interactions between many components. In developing conceptual and mathematical model on Cs transfer in forest ecosystem, defining the dominant components and their interactions are crucial issues (BIOMASS, 1997-2001). However, the modeling of fate and transport in geosphere after Cs exports from the forest ecosystem is often ignored. An integrated watershed modeling for simulating spatiotemporal redistribution of Cs that includes the entire region from source to mouth and surface to subsurface, has been recently developed. Since the deposited Cs can migrate due to water and sediment movement, the different species (i.e., dissolved and suspended) and their interactions are key issues in the modeling. However, the initial inventory as source-term was simplified to be homogeneous and time-independent, and biogeochemical cycle in forests was not explicitly considered. Consequently, it was difficult to evaluate the regionally-inherent characteristics which differ according to land uses, even if the model was well calibrated. In this study, we combine the different advantages in modeling of forest ecosystem and watershed. This enable to include more realistic Cs deposition and time series of inventory can be forced over the land surface. These processes are integrated

  13. Implications of heterogeneity on transport simulations at large scale: the Morroa aquifer case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anibal Jose Pérez-García

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available El acuífero Morroa, localizado en el departamento de Sucre (Colombia, representa la única fuente de suministro de agua potable de cerca de 500.000 habitantes que incluyen la totalidad de los habitantes de la capital del departamento Sincelejo. Aunque se han desarrollado muchos estudios en esta zona que incluyen la recolección de gran cantidad de información relacionada con niveles piezométricos, información estratigráfica, pruebas de bombeo, esta información es difusa, heterogénea y fraccionada. La incertidumbre asociada a esta información afecta cualquier intento de cuantificar la respuesta del acuífero, por esta razón el punto de partida de esta investigación es el desarrollo de una metodología capaz de integrar todas las variables en un modelo conceptual. Para considerar la incertidumbre se generaron múltiples realizaciones del acuífero de tal manera que todas respetan las propiedades estadísticas de la información disponible. Para generar estas realizaciones se utilizaron dos metodologías: (1 SISIM, que es un método basado en estadísticas de dos puntos (semivariograma, y (2 SNESIM, que es un algoritmo basado en el concepto de imágenes de entrenamiento (estadística de puntos múltiples. Resultados de las simulaciones muestran la gran capacidad de este último para reproducir geometrías curvilíneas complejas. En una segunda fase, se desarrollaron simulaciones de flujo y transporte de contaminantes de una manera integrada usando los dos modelos conceptuales obtenidos a través de las dos aproximaciones geoestadísticas. Condiciones de flujo estacionario y un contaminante conservativo fueron asumidos para todas las simulaciones. Los resultados obtenidos muestran una influencia notable de la heterogeneidad en general, así como una gran sensibilidad al método geoestadístico usado para generar la heterogeneidad. Las diferencias observadas tendrían un gran efecto en el diseño de políticas de manejo integral del recurso

  14. A scale invariance criterion for LES parametrizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs Schaefer-Rolffs

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbulent kinetic energy cascades in fluid dynamical systems are usually characterized by scale invariance. However, representations of subgrid scales in large eddy simulations do not necessarily fulfill this constraint. So far, scale invariance has been considered in the context of isotropic, incompressible, and three-dimensional turbulence. In the present paper, the theory is extended to compressible flows that obey the hydrostatic approximation, as well as to corresponding subgrid-scale parametrizations. A criterion is presented to check if the symmetries of the governing equations are correctly translated into the equations used in numerical models. By applying scaling transformations to the model equations, relations between the scaling factors are obtained by demanding that the mathematical structure of the equations does not change.The criterion is validated by recovering the breakdown of scale invariance in the classical Smagorinsky model and confirming scale invariance for the Dynamic Smagorinsky Model. The criterion also shows that the compressible continuity equation is intrinsically scale-invariant. The criterion also proves that a scale-invariant turbulent kinetic energy equation or a scale-invariant equation of motion for a passive tracer is obtained only with a dynamic mixing length. For large-scale atmospheric flows governed by the hydrostatic balance the energy cascade is due to horizontal advection and the vertical length scale exhibits a scaling behaviour that is different from that derived for horizontal length scales.

  15. Urban Freight Management with Stochastic Time-Dependent Travel Times and Application to Large-Scale Transportation Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shichao Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addressed the vehicle routing problem (VRP in large-scale urban transportation networks with stochastic time-dependent (STD travel times. The subproblem which is how to find the optimal path connecting any pair of customer nodes in a STD network was solved through a robust approach without requiring the probability distributions of link travel times. Based on that, the proposed STD-VRP model can be converted into solving a normal time-dependent VRP (TD-VRP, and algorithms for such TD-VRPs can also be introduced to obtain the solution. Numerical experiments were conducted to address STD-VRPTW of practical sizes on a real world urban network, demonstrated here on the road network of Shenzhen, China. The stochastic time-dependent link travel times of the network were calibrated by historical floating car data. A route construction algorithm was applied to solve the STD problem in 4 delivery scenarios efficiently. The computational results showed that the proposed STD-VRPTW model can improve the level of customer service by satisfying the time-window constraint under any circumstances. The improvement can be very significant especially for large-scale network delivery tasks with no more increase in cost and environmental impacts.

  16. 2D dual permeability modeling of flow and transport in a two-scale structured lignitic mine soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, J.; Gerke, H. H.; Vogel, T.; Maurer, T.; Buczko, U.

    2009-04-01

    Two-dimensional single- and dual-permeability simulations are used to analyze water and solute fluxes in heterogeneous lignitic mine soil at a forest-reclaimed mine spoil heap. The soil heterogeneity on this experimental site "Bärenbrücker Höhe" resulted from inclined dumping structures and sediment mixtures that consist of sand with lignitic dust and embedded lignitic fragments. Observations on undisturbed field suction-cell lysimeters including tracer experiments revealed funneling-type preferential flow with lateral water and bromide movement along inclined sediment structures. The spatial distribution of soil structures and fragment distributions was acquired by a digital camera and identified by a supervised classification of the digital profile image. First, a classical single-domain modeling approach was used, with spatially variable scaling factors inferred from image analyses. In the next step, a two-continuum scenario was constructed to examine additional effects of nonequilibrium on the flow regime. The scaling factors used for the preferential flow domain are here obtained from the gradient of the grayscale images. So far, the single domain scenarios failed to predict the bromide leaching patterns although water effluent could be described. Dual-permeability model allows the incorporation of structural effects and can be used as a tool to further testing other approaches that account for structure effects. The numerical study suggests that additional experiments are required to obtain better understanding of the highly complex transport processes on this experimental site.

  17. A mechanistic modeling system for estimating large scale emissions and transport of pollen and co-allergens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstathiou, Christos; Isukapalli, Sastry

    2011-01-01

    Allergic airway diseases represent a complex health problem which can be exacerbated by the synergistic action of pollen particles and air pollutants such as ozone. Understanding human exposures to aeroallergens requires accurate estimates of the spatial distribution of airborne pollen levels as well as of various air pollutants at different times. However, currently there are no established methods for estimating allergenic pollen emissions and concentrations over large geographic areas such as the United States. A mechanistic modeling system for describing pollen emissions and transport over extensive domains has been developed by adapting components of existing regional scale air quality models and vegetation databases. First, components of the Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (BEIS) were adapted to predict pollen emission patterns. Subsequently, the transport module of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system was modified to incorporate description of pollen transport. The combined model, CMAQ-pollen, allows for simultaneous prediction of multiple air pollutants and pollen levels in a single model simulation, and uses consistent assumptions related to the transport of multiple chemicals and pollen species. Application case studies for evaluating the combined modeling system included the simulation of birch and ragweed pollen levels for the year 2002, during their corresponding peak pollination periods (April for birch and September for ragweed). The model simulations were driven by previously evaluated meteorological model outputs and emissions inventories for the eastern United States for the simulation period. A semi-quantitative evaluation of CMAQ-pollen was performed using tree and ragweed pollen counts in Newark, NJ for the same time periods. The peak birch pollen concentrations were predicted to occur within two days of the peak measurements, while the temporal patterns closely followed the measured profiles of overall tree pollen

  18. Time Lags in Watershed-Scale Nutrient Transport: An Exploration of Dominant Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, N. B.; Van Meter, K. J.

    2016-12-01

    With agricultural intensification, rivers and streams flowing through managed catchments have become delivery channels for excess nutrients, leading to problems of eutrophication and posing risks to drinking water safety. In watersheds around the world, major policy goals have been set to improve water quality, including those in the Water Framework Directive in Europe and the Clean Water Act in the United States. Location-specific water quality goals have also been set by regional working groups, including the Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force, the Chesapeake Bay Program, and the Great Lakes Commission. In almost all cases, however, deadlines for achieving water quality goals have been missed, and insufficient improvements have been observed in receiving water bodies. Such apparent failures can be blamed on a variety of factors, including institutional inertia and a lack of funding for needed changes in management. It is our hypothesis, however, that repeated failures to meet water quality-related policy goals are in many cases due to sometimes long lag times between changes in nutrient management and improvements in water quality, and that these lag times can be attributed to the presence of biogeochemical and hydrologic nutrient legacies within the landscape. In the present work we have used the Grand River Watershed (GRW), a heavily agricultural 6800 km2 watershed in Southern Ontario, Canada, as a case study to explore long-term N dynamics and the potential impact of N legacies on water quality. In this work, we developed a 70-year dataset of nitrogen (N) inputs to the GRW and use it to quantify spatial and temporal patterns of legacy nutrient accumulation within the catchment. We then link these patterns of accumulation with 3 decades of stream nutrient concentration data at multiple scales. Results demonstrate a clear decoupling between nutrient inputs and outputs that is suggestive of watershed lag times. A statistical approach

  19. Large-scale public transcriptomic data mining reveals a tight connection between the transport of nitrogen and other transport processes in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei He

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Movement of nitrogen to the plant tissues where it is needed for growth is an important contribution to nitrogen use efficiency. However, we have very limited knowledge about the mechanisms of nitrogen transport. Loading of nitrogen into the xylem and/or phloem by transporter proteins is likely important, but there are several families of genes that encode transporters of nitrogenous molecules (collectively referred to as N transporters here, each comprised of many gene members. In this study, we leveraged publicly available microarray data of Arabidopsis to investigate the gene networks of N transporters to elucidate their possible biological roles. First, we showed that tissue-specificity of nitrogen (N transporters was well reflected among the public microarray data. Then, we built coexpression networks of N transporters, which showed relationships between N transporters and particular aspects of plant metabolism, such as phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism. Furthermore, genes associated with several biological pathways were found to be tightly coexpressed with N transporters in different tissues. Our coexpression networks provide information at the systems-level that will serve as a resource for future investigation of nitrogen transport systems in plants, including candidate gene clusters that may work together in related biological roles.

  20. Large-Scale Public Transcriptomic Data Mining Reveals a Tight Connection between the Transport of Nitrogen and Other Transport Processes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fei; Karve, Abhijit A; Maslov, Sergei; Babst, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    Movement of nitrogen to the plant tissues where it is needed for growth is an important contribution to nitrogen use efficiency. However, we have very limited knowledge about the mechanisms of nitrogen transport. Loading of nitrogen into the xylem and/or phloem by transporter proteins is likely important, but there are several families of genes that encode transporters of nitrogenous molecules (collectively referred to as N transporters here), each comprised of many gene members. In this study, we leveraged publicly available microarray data of Arabidopsis to investigate the gene networks of N transporters to elucidate their possible biological roles. First, we showed that tissue-specificity of nitrogen (N) transporters was well reflected among the public microarray data. Then, we built coexpression networks of N transporters, which showed relationships between N transporters and particular aspects of plant metabolism, such as phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism. Furthermore, genes associated with several biological pathways were found to be tightly coexpressed with N transporters in different tissues. Our coexpression networks provide information at the systems-level that will serve as a resource for future investigation of nitrogen transport systems in plants, including candidate gene clusters that may work together in related biological roles.

  1. Transition from non-Fickian to Fickian longitudinal transport through 3-D rough fractures: Scale-(in)sensitivity and roughness dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lichun; Bayani Cardenas, M.

    2017-03-01

    Understanding transport in rough fractures from non-Fickian to Fickian regimes and the prediction of non-Fickian transport is critical for the development of new transport theories and many practical applications. Through computational experiments that fall within the macrodispersion regime, we first simulated and analyzed solute transport through synthetic rough fractures with stationary geometrical properties (i.e., fracture roughness σb/ and correlation length λ, where b refers to aperture with its standard deviation σb and arithmetic mean ) across increasing fracture longitudinal transport domain length L, with L/λ ranging from 2.5 to 50. The results were used to determine how solute transport behavior evolves with increasing scale in the longitudinal direction. Moreover, a set of correlated fractures with aperture fields following normal and log-normal distributions was created to further identify and quantify the dependence of non-Fickian transport on roughness. We found that although persistent intermittent velocity structures were present, the breakthrough curves (BTCs) and residence time distributions showed diminishing early arrival and tailing, features of non-Fickian transport, with increasing longitudinal L/λ, ultimately converging to a Fickian transport regime given σb/ remained constant. Inverse analysis of the experimental BTCs with the advection-dispersion equation (ADE) model showed that the dispersion coefficient (D) was non-trivially scale-dependent. Simulation results for rough fractures with varying σb/ and L/λ indicated that the ratio of fluid velocity to transport velocity fitted to the ADE model depends on σb/ and L/λ. The continuous time random walk (CTRW) performed much better across all transport scales, and resulted in scale-independent fitted parameters, i.e., β in the memory function. The fitted β is proportional to σb/but is insensitive to L/λ. Therefore, bulk longitudinal solute transport across the pre-asymptotic and

  2. Large Eddy Simulation of an SD7003 Airfoil: Effects of Reynolds number and Subgrid-scale modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarlak Chivaee, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents results of a series of numerical simulations in order to study aerodynamic characteristics of the low Reynolds number Selig-Donovan airfoil, SD7003. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) technique is used for all computations at chord-based Reynolds numbers 10,000, 24,000 and 60...

  3. Inside pyroclastic density currents - uncovering the enigmatic flow structure and transport behaviour in large-scale experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breard, Eric C. P.; Lube, Gert

    2017-01-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are the most lethal threat from volcanoes. While there are two main types of PDCs (fully turbulent, fully dilute pyroclastic surges and more concentrated pyroclastic flows encompassing non-turbulent to turbulent transport) pyroclastic flows, which are the subject of the present study, are far more complex than dilute pyroclastic surges and remain the least understood type despite their far greater hazard, greater runout length and ability to transport vast quantities of material across the Earth's surface. Here we present large-scale experiments of natural volcanic material and gas in order to provide the missing quantitative view of the internal structure and gas-particle transport mechanisms in pyroclastic flows. We show that the outer flow structure with head, body and wake regions broadly resembles current PDC analogues of dilute gravity currents. However, the internal structure, in which lower levels consist of a concentrated granular fluid and upper levels are more dilute, contrasts significantly with the internal structure of fully dilute gravity currents. This bipartite vertical structure shows strong analogy to current conceptual models of high-density turbidity currents, which are responsible for the distribution of coarse sediment in marine basins and of great interest to the hydrocarbon industry. The lower concentrated and non-turbulent levels of the PDC (granular-fluid basal flow) act as a fast-flowing carrier for the more dilute and turbulent upper levels of the current (ash-cloud surge). Strong kinematic coupling between these flow parts reduces viscous dissipation and entrainment of ambient air into the lower part of the ash-cloud surge. This leads to a state of forced super-criticality whereby fast and destructive PDCs can endure even at large distances from volcanoes. Importantly, the basal flow/ash-cloud surge coupling yields a characteristically smooth rheological boundary across the non

  4. Reactive transport in porous media for CO2 sequestration: Pore scale modeling using the lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinfang; Xing, Huilin; Tian, Zhiwei; Pearce, Julie K.; Sedek, Mohamed; Golding, Suzanne D.; Rudolph, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Injection of CO2 subsurface may lead to chemical reactivity of rock where CO2 is dissolved in groundwater. This process can modify pore networks to increase or decrease porosity through mineral dissolution and precipitation. A lattice Boltzmann (LB) based computational model study on the pore scale reactive transport in three dimensional heterogeneous porous media (sandstone consisting of both reactive and non-reactive minerals) is described. This study examines how fluid transport in porous materials subject to reactive conditions is affected by unsteady state local reactions and unstable dissolution fronts. The reaction of a calcite cemented core sub-plug from the Hutton Sandstone of the Surat Basin, Australia, is used as a study case. In particular, the work studies the interaction of acidic fluid (an aqueous solution with an elevated concentration of carbonic acid) with reactive (e.g. calcite) and assumed non-reactive (e.g. quartz) mineral surfaces, mineral dissolution and mass transfer, and resultant porosity change. The proposed model is implemented in our custom LBM code and suitable for studies of multiple mineral reactions with disparate reaction rates. A model for carbonic acid reaction with calcite cemented sandstone in the CO2-water-rock system is verified through laboratory experimental data including micro-CT characterization before and after core reaction at reservoir conditions. The experimentally validated model shows: (1) the dissolution of calcite cement forms conductive channels at the pore scale, and enables the generation of pore throats and connectivity; (2) the model is able to simulate the reaction process until the reaction equilibrium status is achieved (around 1440 days); (3) calcite constituting a volume of around 9.6% of the whole core volume is dissolved and porosity is consequently increased from 1.1% to 10.7% on reaching equilibrium; (4) more than a third of the calcite (constituting 7.4% of the total core volume) is unaffected

  5. A conceptual cross-scale approach for linking empirical discharge measurements and regional groundwater models with application to legacy nitrogen transport and coastal nitrogen management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, J. R.; Helton, A. M.; Starn, J. J.; Briggs, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    Despite years of management, seasonal hypoxia from excess nitrogen (N) is a pervasive problem in many coastal waters. Current approaches to managing coastal eutrophication in the United States (USA) focus on surface runoff and river transport of nutrients, and often assume that groundwater N is at steady state. This is not necessarily the case, as terrestrial N inputs are affected by changing land use and nutrient management practices. Furthermore, approximately 70% of surface water in the USA is derived from groundwater and there is widespread N contamination in many of our nation's aquifers. Nitrogen export via groundwater discharge to streams during baseflow may be the reason many impaired coastal systems show little improvement. There is a critical need to develop approaches that consider the effects of groundwater transport on N loading to surface waters. Aquifer transport times, which can be decades or even centuries longer than surface water transport times, introduce lags between changes in terrestrial management and reductions in coastal loads. Ignoring these lags can lead to overly ambitious and unrealistic load reduction goals, or incorrect conclusions regarding the effectiveness of management strategies. Additionally, regional groundwater models typically have a coarse resolution that makes it difficult to incorporate fine-scale processes that drive N transformations, such as groundwater-surface water exchange across steep redox gradients at stream bed interfaces. Despite this challenge, representing these important fine-scale processes well is essential to modeling groundwater transport of N across regional scales and to making informed management decisions. We present 1) a conceptual approach to linking regional models and fine-scale empirical measurements, and 2) preliminary groundwater flow and transport model results for the Housatonic and Farmington Rivers in Connecticut, USA. Our cross-scale approach utilizes thermal infrared imaging and vertical

  6. Unraveling the Formation of Large Amounts of Calcite Scaling in Geothermal Wells in the Bavarian Molasse Basin: A Reactive Transport Modeling Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Wanner, Christoph; Eichinger, Florian; Jahrfeld, Thomas; Diamond, Larryn W.

    2017-01-01

    Results from reactive transport simulations performed for the geothermal plant in Kirchstockach, located in the Bavarian Molasse Basin in southern Germany, are presented to unravel the formation of calcite scaling. Simulation results successfully predict the calcite scaling profile observed along the production well if supersaturation with respect to calcite is specified for the model water leaving the pump at 800 m depth. This observation is in good agreement with a previous study suggesting...

  7. A numerical model of continental-scale topographic evolution integrating thin sheet tectonics, river transport, and orographic precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Castellanos, Daniel; Jimenez-Munt, Ivone

    2014-05-01

    How much does the erosion and sedimentation at the crust's surface influence on the patterns and distribution of tectonic deformation? This question has been mostly addressed from a numerical modelling perspective, at scales ranging from local to orogenic. Here we present a model that aims at constraining this phenomenon at the continental scale. With this purpose, we couple a thin-sheet viscous model of continental deformation with a stream-power surface transport model. The model also incorporates flexural isostatic compensation that permits the formation of large sedimentary foreland basins and a precipitation model that reproduces basic climatic effects such as continentality and orographic rainfall and rain shadow. We quantify the feedbacks between these 4 processes in a synthetic scenario inspired by the India-Asia collision. The model reproduces first-order characteristics of the growth of the Tibetan Plateau as a result of the Indian indentation. A large intramountain basin (comparable to the Tarim Basin) develops when predefining a hard inherited area in the undeformed foreland (Asia). The amount of sediment trapped in it is very sensitive to climatic parameters, particularly to evaporation, because it crucially determines its endorheic/exorheic drainage. We identify some degree of feedback between the deep and the surface processes occurs, leading locally to a <20% increase in deformation rates if orographic precipitation is account for (relative to a reference model with evenly-distributed precipitation). These enhanced thickening of the crust takes place particularly in areas of concentrated precipitation and steep slope, i.e., at the upwind flank of the growing plateau. This effect is particularly enhanced at the corners of the indenter (syntaxes). We hypothesize that this may provide clues for better understanding the mechanisms underlying the intriguing tectonic aneurisms documented in the syntaxes of the Himalayas.

  8. Modeling fate and transport of fecally-derived microorganisms at the watershed scale: State of the science and future opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyung Hwa; Pachepsky, Yakov A; Oliver, David M; Muirhead, Richard W; Park, Yongeun; Quilliam, Richard S; Shelton, Daniel R

    2016-09-01

    Natural waters serve as habitat for a wide range of microorganisms, a proportion of which may be derived from fecal material. A number of watershed models have been developed to understand and predict the fate and transport of fecal microorganisms within complex watersheds, as well as to determine whether microbial water quality standards can be satisfied under site-specific meteorological and/or management conditions. The aim of this review is to highlight and critically evaluate developments in the modeling of microbial water quality of surface waters over the last 10 years and to discuss the future of model development and application at the watershed scale, with a particular focus on fecal indicator organisms (FIOs). In doing so, an agenda of research opportunities is identified to help deliver improvements in the modeling of microbial water quality draining through complex landscape systems. This comprehensive review therefore provides a timely steer to help strengthen future modeling capability of FIOs in surface water environments and provides a useful resource to complement the development of risk management strategies to reduce microbial impairment of freshwater sources. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. A 3D, cross-scale, baroclinic model with implicit vertical transport for the Upper Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fei; Zhang, Yinglong J.; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Wang, Harry V.; Irby, Isaac D.; Shen, Jian; Wang, Zhengui

    2016-11-01

    We develop a new vertically implicit transport solver, based on two total variation diminishing (TVD) limiters in space and time, inside a 3D unstructured-grid model (SCHISM), and apply it to the Upper Chesapeake Bay (UCB), which has complex geometry and sharp pycnocline. We show that the model is able to accurately and efficiently capture the elevation, velocity, salinity and temperature in both the deep and shallow regions of UCB. Compared with all available CTD casts, the overall model skills have the mean absolute error of 1.08 PSU and 0.85 °C, and correlation coefficient of 0.97 and 0.99 for salinity and temperature respectively. More importantly, the new implicit solver better captures the density stratification, which has great implications on biogeochemistry in this estuarine system. The cross-scale capability of the model is demonstrated by extending the high-resolution grids into a tributary (Chester River) and its sub-tributary (Corsica River), with minimal impact on the model efficiency. The model is also able to capture complex 3D structures at the transition zone between the main bay and the tributary, including the three-layered circulation in Baltimore Harbor. As more and more attention is being paid to the productive shallows in the Chesapeake Bay and other estuaries, the model can serve as a very powerful management tool to understand the impact of both local and remote forcing functions.

  10. Mechanisms of along-channel sediment transport in the North Passage of the Yangtze Estuary and their response to large-scale interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, C.; de Swart, H.E.; Liu, G.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of large-scale interventions in the North Passage of the Yangtze Estuary (the Deep Waterway Project, DWP) on the along-channel flow structure, suspended sediment distribution and its transport along the main channel of this passage are investigated. The focus is explaining the changes in

  11. Reactive Transport at the Pore Scale with Applications to the Dissolution of Carbonate Rocks for CO2 Sequestration Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boek, E.; Gray, F.; Welch, N.; Shah, S.; Crawshaw, J.

    2014-12-01

    In CO2 sequestration operations, CO2 injected into a brine aquifer dissolves in the liquid to create an acidic solution. This may result in dissolution of the mineral grains in the porous medium. Experimentally, it is hard to investigate this process at the pore scale. Therefore we develop a new hybrid particle simulation algorithm to study the dissolution of solid objects in a laminar flow field, as encountered in porous media flow situations. First, we calculate the flow field using a multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann (LB) algorithm implemented on GPUs, which demonstrates a very efficient use of the GPU device and a considerable performance increase over CPU calculations. Second, using a stochastic particle approach, we solve the advection-diffusion equation for a single reactive species and dissolve solid voxels according to our reaction model. To validate our simulation, we first calculate the dissolution of a solid sphere as a function of time under quiescent conditions. We compare with the analytical solution for this problem [1] and find good agreement. Then we consider the dissolution of a solid sphere in a laminar flow field and observe a significant change in the sphericity with time due to the coupled dissolution - flow process. Second, we calculate the dissolution of a cylinder in channel flow in direct comparison with corresponding dissolution experiments. We discuss the evolution of the shape and dissolution rate. Finally, we calculate the dissolution of carbonate rock samples at the pore scale in direct comparison with micro-CT experiments. This work builds on our recent research on calculation of multi-phase flow [2], [3] and hydrodynamic dispersion and molecular propagator distributions for solute transport in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media using LB simulations [4]. It turns out that the hybrid simulation model is a suitable tool to study reactive flow processes at the pore scale. This is of great importance for CO2 storage and

  12. Field-scale sulfur hexafluoride tracer experiment to understand long distance gas transport in the deep unsaturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walvoord, Michelle Ann; Andraski, Brian J.; Green, Christopher T.; Stonestrom, David A.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    A gas-tracer test in a deep arid unsaturated zone demonstrates that standard estimates of effective diffusivity from sediment properties allow a reasonable first-cut assessment of gas contaminant transport. Apparent anomalies in historic transport behavior at this and other waste disposal sites may result from factors other than nonreactive gas transport properties.

  13. Modelling the urban air quality in Hamburg with the new city-scale chemistry transport model CityChem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Matthias; Ramacher, Martin; Aulinger, Armin; Matthias, Volker; Quante, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Air quality modelling plays an important role by providing guidelines for efficient air pollution abatement measures. Currently, most urban dispersion models treat air pollutants as passive tracer substances or use highly simplified chemistry when simulating air pollutant concentrations on the city-scale. The newly developed urban chemistry-transport model CityChem has the capability of modelling the photochemical transformation of multiple pollutants along with atmospheric diffusion to produce pollutant concentration fields for the entire city on a horizontal resolution of 100 m or even finer and a vertical resolution of 24 layers up to 4000 m height. CityChem is based on the Eulerian urban dispersion model EPISODE of the Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU). CityChem treats the complex photochemistry in cities using detailed EMEP chemistry on an Eulerian 3-D grid, while using simple photo-stationary equilibrium on a much higher resolution grid (receptor grid), i.e. close to industrial point sources and traffic sources. The CityChem model takes into account that long-range transport contributes to urban pollutant concentrations. This is done by using 3-D boundary concentrations for the city domain derived from chemistry-transport simulations with the regional air quality model CMAQ. For the study of the air quality in Hamburg, CityChem was set-up with a main grid of 30×30 grid cells of 1×1 km2 each and a receptor grid of 300×300 grid cells of 100×100 m2. The CityChem model was driven with meteorological data generated by the prognostic meteorology component of the Australian chemistry-transport model TAPM. Bottom-up inventories of emissions from traffic, industry, households were based on data of the municipality of Hamburg. Shipping emissions for the port of Hamburg were taken from the Clean North Sea Shipping project. Episodes with elevated ozone (O3) were of specific interest for this study, as these are associated with exceedances of the World

  14. A Subgrid Parameterization for Wind Turbines in Weather Prediction Models with an Application to Wind Resource Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. H. Fiedler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A subgrid parameterization is offered for representing wind turbines in weather prediction models. The parameterization models the drag and mixing the turbines cause in the atmosphere, as well as the electrical power production the wind causes in the wind turbines. The documentation of the parameterization is complete; it does not require knowledge of proprietary data of wind turbine characteristics. The parameterization is applied to a study of wind resource limits in a hypothetical giant wind farm. The simulated production density was found not to exceed 1 W m−2, peaking at a deployed capacity density of 5 W m−2 and decreasing slightly as capacity density increased to 20 W m−2.

  15. Effects of Spatial Variability in Flow and Sediment Transport on Benthic Invertebrates During Runoff Events: Patch and Reach-Scale Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenworthy, S.

    2005-05-01

    The short-term impact of streamflow increases on benthic populations depends on spatial patterns of organism dispersal and mortality that are difficult to observe and quantify in the field. Laboratory and field experiments suggest that the size distribution, structure, and stability of streambed sediment play critical roles in mediating the effects of flow increases on dispersal and mortality of organisms. I present the results of laboratory flume experiments in which flow and sediment transport were progressively increased and the resulting displacement of aquatic insect larvae was quantified. These and other experiments demonstrate that the displacement and mortality of benthic organisms scales with streambed entrainment and sediment transport, but that bed structure and the physical and behavioral traits of the biota can strongly influence this relationship. Application of these patch-scale experimental results to understanding the hydrogeomorphic determinants of reach-scale flood impacts involves important scientific challenges and uncertainties. Reliable estimation of the spatial variability of streambed mobilization and sediment transport as a function of channel and substrate characteristics, flow history and sediment supply is necessary to compare the effects of different events or among different stream reaches. Also needed is a better appreciation of the spatial scales of organism dispersal during flow events and the physical and biological controls on patterns of dispersal at various scales.

  16. Micron-scale mapping of megagauss magnetic fields using optical polarimetry to probe hot electron transport in petawatt-class laser-solid interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Gourab; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Robinson, A P L; Blackman, D; Booth, N; Culfa, O; Dance, R J; Gizzi, L A; Gray, R J; Green, J S; Koester, P; Kumar, G Ravindra; Labate, L; Lad, Amit D; Lancaster, K L; Pasley, J; Woolsey, N C; Rajeev, P P

    2017-08-21

    The transport of hot, relativistic electrons produced by the interaction of an intense petawatt laser pulse with a solid has garnered interest due to its potential application in the development of innovative x-ray sources and ion-acceleration schemes. We report on spatially and temporally resolved measurements of megagauss magnetic fields at the rear of a 50-μm thick plastic target, irradiated by a multi-picosecond petawatt laser pulse at an incident intensity of ~1020 W/cm2. The pump-probe polarimetric measurements with micron-scale spatial resolution reveal the dynamics of the magnetic fields generated by the hot electron distribution at the target rear. An annular magnetic field profile was observed ~5 ps after the interaction, indicating a relatively smooth hot electron distribution at the rear-side of the plastic target. This is contrary to previous time-integrated measurements, which infer that such targets will produce highly structured hot electron transport. We measured large-scale filamentation of the hot electron distribution at the target rear only at later time-scales of ~10 ps, resulting in a commensurate large-scale filamentation of the magnetic field profile. Three-dimensional hybrid simulations corroborate our experimental observations and demonstrate a beam-like hot electron transport at initial time-scales that may be attributed to the local resistivity profile at the target rear.

  17. Evaluation of Surface and Transport Limitations to the Rate of Calcite Dissolution Using Pore Scale Modeling of a Capillary Tube Experiment at pCO2 4 bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molins, S.; Trebotich, D.; Yang, L.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Ligocki, T.; Shen, C.; Steefel, C. I.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral trapping is generally considered to account for most of the long-term trapping of CO2 in the subsurface. Prediction of mineral trapping at the reservoir scale requires knowledge of continuum-scale mineral dissolution and precipitation rates. However, processes that take place at the pore scale (e.g., transport limitation to reactive surfaces) affect rates applicable at the continuum scale. To explore the pore scale processes that result in the discrepancy between rates measured in laboratory experiments and those calibrated from continuum-scale models, we have developed a high-resolution pore scale model of a capillary tube experiment. The capillary tube (L=0.7-cm, D=500-μm) is packed with crushed calcite (Iceland spar) and the resulting 3D pore structure is imaged by X-ray computed microtomography (XCMT) at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source at a 0.899-μm resolution. A solution in equilibrium with a partial pressure of CO2 of 4 bars is injected at a rate of 5 microliter/min and the effluent concentrations of calcium are measured to ensure steady state conditions are achieved. A simulation domain is constructed from the XCMT image using implicit functions to represent the mineral surface locally on a grid. The pore-scale reactive transport model is comprised of high performance simulation tools and algorithms for incompressible Navier-Stokes flow, advective-diffusive transport and multicomponent geochemical reactions. Simulations are performed using 6,144 processors on NERSC's Cray XE6 Hopper to achieve a grid resolution of 2.32 μm. Equivalent continuum scale simulations are also performed to evaluate the effect of pore scale processes. Comparison of results is performed based on flux-averaged effluent calcium concentrations, which are used as indicator of effective rates in the capillary tube. Results from both pore- and continuum-scale simulations overestimate the calcium effluent concentrations, suggesting that the TST rate expression parameters

  18. Large-scale flow structures and heat transport of turbulent forced and mixed convection in a closed rectangular cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmeling, D., E-mail: Daniel.Schmeling@dlr.de [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Aerodynamics and Flow Technology, Bunsenstrasse 10, D-37073 Goettingen (Germany); Westhoff, A.; Kuehn, M.; Bosbach, J.; Wagner, C. [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Aerodynamics and Flow Technology, Bunsenstrasse 10, D-37073 Goettingen (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: > Superposition of forced and thermal convection is studied in a rectangular cavity. > For pure forced convection the mean wind exhibits a solid body rotation. > Four buoyancy induced convection rolls are formed for mixed convection at Ar {approx} 3.3. > The enthalpy flux difference between out- and inflowing air has a maximum at Ar {approx} 0.6. - Abstract: Results of an experimental study of flow structure formation and heat transport in turbulent forced and mixed convection are presented. The experiments were conducted in a rectangular cavity with a square cross section, which has an aspect ratio between length and height of {Gamma}{sub xz} = 5. Air at atmospheric pressure was used as working fluid. The air inflow was supplied through a slot below the ceiling, while exhausting was provided by another slot, which is located directly above the floor. Both vents extend over the whole length of the cell. In order to induce thermal convection the bottom of the cell is heated while the ceiling is maintained at a constant temperature. This configuration allows to generate and study mixed convection under well defined conditions. Results of forced convection at Re = 1.07 x 10{sup 4} as well as mixed convection at 1.01 x 10{sup 4} {<=} Re {<=} 3.4 x 10{sup 4} and Ra = 2.4 x 10{sup 8} (3.3 {>=} Ar {>=} 0.3), which were obtained by means of Particle Image Velocimetry and local temperature measurements, are presented. For purely forced convection a 2D mean wind, which can be approximated by a solid body rotation, is found. With increasing Archimedes number this structure becomes unstable, leading to a transition of the solid body rotation into additional smaller convection rolls. Proper orthogonal decomposition of the instantaneous velocity fields has been performed for further analysis of these coherent large-scale structures. Their fingerprint is found in the spatial temperature distribution of the out flowing air at the end of the outlet channel, which

  19. Reactive transport of CO2-rich fluids in simulated wellbore interfaces: Experiments and models exploring behaviour on length scales of 1 to 6 m

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolterbeek, T. K. T.; Raoof, A.; Peach, C. J.; Spiers, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Defects present at casing-cement interfaces in wellbores constitute potential pathways for CO2 to migrate from geological storage systems. It is essential to understand how the transport properties of such pathways evolve when penetrated by CO2-rich fluids. While numerous studies have explored this problem at the decimetre length-scale, the 1-10-100 m scales relevant for real wellbores have received little attention. The present work addresses the effects of long-range reactive transport on a length scale of 1-6 m. This is done by means of a combined experimental and modelling study. The experimental work consisted of flow-through tests, performed on cement-filled steel tubes, 1-6 m in length, containing artificially debonded cement-interfaces. Four tests were performed, at 60-80 °C, imposing flow-through of CO2-rich fluid at mean pressures of 10-15 MPa, controlling the pressure difference at 0.12-4.8 MPa, while measuring flow-rate. In the modelling work, we developed a numerical model to explore reactive transport in CO2-exposed defects on a similar length scale. The formulation adopted incorporates fluid flow, advective and diffusive solute transport, and CO2-cement chemical reactions. Our results show that long-range reactive transport strongly affects the permeability evolution of CO2-exposed defects. In the experiments, sample permeability decreased by 2-4 orders, which microstructural observations revealed was associated with downstream precipitation of carbonates, possibly aided by migration of fines. The model simulations show precipitation in initially open defects produces a sharp decrease in flow rate, causing a transition from advection to diffusion-dominated reactive transport. While the modelling results broadly reproduce the experimental observations, it is further demonstrated that non-uniformity in initial defect aperture has a profound impact on self-sealing behaviour and system permeability evolution on the metre scale. The implication is that

  20. Wildfire particulate matter in Europe during summer 2003: meso-scale modeling of smoke emissions, transport and radiative effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hodzic

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates effects of wildfire emissions on air quality in Europe during an intense fire season that occurred in summer 2003. A meso-scale chemistry transport model CHIMERE is used, together with ground based and satellite aerosol optical measurements, to assess the dispersion of fire emissions and to quantify the associated radiative effects. The model has been improved to take into account a MODIS-derived daily smoke emission inventory as well as the injection altitude of smoke particles. The simulated aerosol optical properties are put into a radiative transfer model to estimate (off-line the effects of smoke particles on photolysis rates and atmospheric radiative forcing. We have found that the simulated wildfires generated comparable amounts of primary aerosol pollutants (130 kTons of PM2.5, fine particles to anthropogenic sources during August 2003, and caused significant changes in aerosol optical properties not only close to the fire source regions, but also over a large part of Europe as a result of the long-range transport of the smoke. Including these emissions into the model significantly improved its performance in simulating observed aerosol concentrations and optical properties. Quantitative comparison with MODIS and POLDER data during the major fire event (3–8 August 2003 showed the ability of the model to reproduce high aerosol optical thickness (AOT over Northern Europe caused by the advection of the smoke plume from the Portugal source region. Although there was a fairly good spatial agreement with satellite data (correlation coefficients ranging from 0.4 to 0.9, the temporal variability of AOT data at specific AERONET locations was not well captured by the model. Statistical analyses of model-simulated AOT data at AERONET ground stations showed a significant decrease in the model biases suggesting that wildfire emissions are responsible for a 30% enhancement in mean AOT values during the heat

  1. Flux-corrected transport principles, algorithms, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Löhner, Rainald; Turek, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Many modern high-resolution schemes for Computational Fluid Dynamics trace their origins to the Flux-Corrected Transport (FCT) paradigm. FCT maintains monotonicity using a nonoscillatory low-order scheme to determine the bounds for a constrained high-order approximation. This book begins with historical notes by J.P. Boris and D.L. Book who invented FCT in the early 1970s. The chapters that follow describe the design of fully multidimensional FCT algorithms for structured and unstructured grids, limiting for systems of conservation laws, and the use of FCT as an implicit subgrid scale model. The second edition presents 200 pages of additional material. The main highlights of the three new chapters include: FCT-constrained interpolation for Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian methods, an optimization-based approach to flux correction, and FCT simulations of high-speed flows on overset grids. Addressing students and researchers, as well as CFD practitioners, the book is focused on computational aspects and contains m...

  2. Observations of mesoscale and boundary-layer scale circulations affecting dust transport and uplift over the Sahara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Marsham

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Observations of the Saharan boundary layer, made during the GERBILS field campaign, show that mesoscale land surface temperature variations (which were related to albedo variations induced mesoscale circulations. With weak winds along the aircraft track, land surface temperature anomalies with scales of greater than 10 km are shown to significantly affect boundary-layer temperatures and winds. Such anomalies are expected to affect the vertical mixing of the dusty and weakly stratified Saharan Residual Layer (SRL. Mesoscale variations in winds are also shown to affect dust loadings in the boundary layer.

    Using the aircraft observations and data from the COSMO model, a region of local dust uplift, with strong along-track winds, was identified in one low-level flight. Large eddy model (LEM simulations based on this location showed linearly organised boundary-layer convection. Calculating dust uplift rates from the LEM wind field showed that the boundary-layer convection increased uplift by approximately 30%, compared with the uplift rate calculated neglecting the convection. The modelled effects of boundary-layer convection on uplift are shown to be larger when the boundary-layer wind is decreased, and most significant when the mean wind is below the threshold for dust uplift and the boundary-layer convection leads to uplift which would not otherwise occur.

    Both the coupling of albedo features to the atmosphere on the mesoscale, and the enhancement of dust uplift by boundary-layer convection are unrepresented in many climate models, but may have significant impacts on the vertical transport and uplift of desert dust. Mesoscale effects in particular tend to be difficult to parametrise.

  3. Modelling nanoparticle transport in porous media across the scales: from pore network models to simulation of filed injection

    OpenAIRE

    Bianco, Carlo; Sethi, Rajandrea; Tosco, Tiziana Anna Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Transport and deposition of colloidal particles in saturated porous media are of great importance in many fields of science and engineering. A thorough understanding of particle filtration processes is essential for predicting the transport and fate of colloidal particles in the subsurface environment. Particles migrating through a porous medium can remain in suspension and be transported due to advection and dispersion phenomena, or be retained due to filtration and deposition onto the porou...

  4. Influence of large-scale motion on turbulent transport for confined coaxial jets. Volume 2: Navier-Stokes calculations of swirling and nonswirling confined coaxial jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, B. C.; Mcdonald, H.

    1986-01-01

    The existence of large scale coherent structures in turbulent shear flows has been well documented. Discrepancies between experimental and computational data suggest a necessity to understand the roles they play in mass and momentum transport. Using conditional sampling and averaging on coincident two-component velocity and concentration velocity experimental data for swirling and nonswirling coaxial jets, triggers for identifying the structures were examined. Concentration fluctuation was found to be an adequate trigger or indicator for the concentration-velocity data, but no suitable detector was located for the two-component velocity data. The large scale structures are found in the region where the largest discrepancies exist between model and experiment. The traditional gradient transport model does not fit in this region as a result of these structures. The large scale motion was found to be responsible for a large percentage of the axial mass transport. The large scale structures were found to convect downstream at approximately the mean velocity of the overall flow in the axial direction. The radial mean velocity of the structures was found to be substantially greater than that of the overall flow.

  5. Simulation of subgrid orographic precipitation with an embedded 2-D cloud-resolving model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Joon-Hee; Arakawa, Akio

    2016-03-01

    By explicitly resolving cloud-scale processes with embedded two-dimensional (2-D) cloud-resolving models (CRMs), superparameterized global atmospheric models have successfully simulated various atmospheric events over a wide range of time scales. Up to now, however, such models have not included the effects of topography on the CRM grid scale. We have used both 3-D and 2-D CRMs to simulate the effects of topography with prescribed "large-scale" winds. The 3-D CRM is used as a benchmark. The results show that the mean precipitation can be simulated reasonably well by using a 2-D representation of topography as long as the statistics of the topography such as the mean and standard deviation are closely represented. It is also shown that the use of a set of two perpendicular 2-D grids can significantly reduce the error due to a 2-D representation of topography.

  6. Gram-scale solution-phase synthesis of selective sodium bicarbonate Co-transport Inhibitor S0859

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ann Møller; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Niels; Lauritzen, Gitte

    2012-01-01

    Na+-coupled HCO3- transporters (NBCs) mediate the transport of bicarbonate ions across cell membranes and are thus ubiquitous regulators of intracellular pH. NBC dysregulation is associated with a range of diseases; for instance, NBCn1 is strongly up-regulated in a model of ErbB2-dependent breast...

  7. Renormalization-group theory for the eddy viscosity in subgrid modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, YE; Vahala, George; Hossain, Murshed

    1988-01-01

    Renormalization-group theory is applied to incompressible three-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence so as to eliminate unresolvable small scales. The renormalized Navier-Stokes equation now includes a triple nonlinearity with the eddy viscosity exhibiting a mild cusp behavior, in qualitative agreement with the test-field model results of Kraichnan. For the cusp behavior to arise, not only is the triple nonlinearity necessary but the effects of pressure must be incorporated in the triple term. The renormalized eddy viscosity will not exhibit a cusp behavior if it is assumed that a spectral gap exists between the large and small scales.

  8. Thermodynamics, maximum power, and the dynamics of preferential river flow structures at the continental scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kleidon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The organization of drainage basins shows some reproducible phenomena, as exemplified by self-similar fractal river network structures and typical scaling laws, and these have been related to energetic optimization principles, such as minimization of stream power, minimum energy expenditure or maximum "access". Here we describe the organization and dynamics of drainage systems using thermodynamics, focusing on the generation, dissipation and transfer of free energy associated with river flow and sediment transport. We argue that the organization of drainage basins reflects the fundamental tendency of natural systems to deplete driving gradients as fast as possible through the maximization of free energy generation, thereby accelerating the dynamics of the system. This effectively results in the maximization of sediment export to deplete topographic gradients as fast as possible and potentially involves large-scale feedbacks to continental uplift. We illustrate this thermodynamic description with a set of three highly simplified models related to water and sediment flow and describe the mechanisms and feedbacks involved in the evolution and dynamics of the associated structures. We close by discussing how this thermodynamic perspective is consistent with previous approaches and the implications that such a thermodynamic description has for the understanding and prediction of sub-grid scale organization of drainage systems and preferential flow structures in general.

  9. Predictions of dynamic changes in reaction rates as a consequence of incomplete mixing using pore scale reactive transport modeling on images of porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhashmi, Z; Blunt, M J; Bijeljic, B

    2015-08-01

    We present a pore scale model capable of simulating fluid/fluid reactive transport on images of porous media from first principles. We use a streamline-based particle tracking method for simulating flow and transport, while for reaction to occur, both reactants must be within a diffusive distance of each other during a time-step. We assign a probability of reaction (Pr), as a function of the reaction rate constant (kr) and the diffusion length. Firstly, we validate our model for reaction against analytical solutions for the bimolecular reaction (A+B→C) in a free fluid. Then, we simulate transport and reaction in a beadpack to validate the model through predicting the fluid/fluid reaction experimental results provided by Gramling et al. (2002). Our model accurately predicts the experimental data, as it takes into account the degree of incomplete mixing present at the sub-pore (image voxel) level, in contrast to advection-dispersion-reaction equation (ADRE) model that over-predicts pore scale mixing. Finally, we show how our model can predict dynamic changes in the reaction rate accurately accounting for the local geometry, topology and flow field at the pore scale. We demonstrate the substantial difference between the predicted early-time reaction rate in comparison to the ADRE model. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Sensitivity of the scale partition for variational multiscale large-eddy simulation of channel flow

    OpenAIRE

    Holmen, J; Hughes, T.J.R; Oberai, A.A.; Wells, G. N.

    2004-01-01

    The variational multiscale method has been shown to perform well for large-eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flows. The method relies upon a partition of the resolved velocity field into large- and small-scale components. The subgrid model then acts only on the small scales of motion, unlike conventional LES models which act on all scales of motion. For homogeneous isotropic turbulence and turbulent channel flows, the multiscale model can outperform conventional LES formulations. An issue in...

  11. A New Approach to Validate Subgrid Models in Complex High Reynolds Number Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    data are also shown. These figures show the characteristic decrease in correla- tion when the grid is coarsened with the scale similarity model showing...passmms sogbe .iului by a Pus* dll- apWaishmalm ass" immp to bpssm do af sepia abdas h bell pufai aftg a pmiuayomd NO P) emd a smA amedidg of do @*M

  12. Management-oriented sensitivity analysis for pesticide transport in watershed-scale water quality modeling using SWAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Yuzhou [University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Zhang Minghua, E-mail: mhzhang@ucdavis.ed [University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China)

    2009-12-15

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was calibrated for hydrology conditions in an agricultural watershed of Orestimba Creek, California, and applied to simulate fate and transport of two organophosphate pesticides chlorpyrifos and diazinon. The model showed capability in evaluating pesticide fate and transport processes in agricultural fields and instream network. Management-oriented sensitivity analysis was conducted by applied stochastic SWAT simulations for pesticide distribution. Results of sensitivity analysis identified the governing processes in pesticide outputs as surface runoff, soil erosion, and sedimentation in the study area. By incorporating sensitive parameters in pesticide transport simulation, effects of structural best management practices (BMPs) in improving surface water quality were demonstrated by SWAT modeling. This study also recommends conservation practices designed to reduce field yield and in-stream transport capacity of sediment, such as filter strip, grassed waterway, crop residue management, and tailwater pond to be implemented in the Orestimba Creek watershed. - Selected structural BMPs are recommended for reducing loads of OP pesticides.

  13. Pore‐scale modeling of vapor transport in partially saturated capillary tube with variable area using chemical potential

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Addassi, Mouadh; Schreyer, Lynn; Johannesson, Björn; Lin, Hai

    2016-01-01

    .... We demonstrate that isothermal vapor transport can be accurately modeled without modeling the details of the contact angle, microscale temperature fluctuations, or pressure fluctuations using a modification of the Fick‐Jacobs equation...

  14. Application of the INES Scale at radioactive facilities and in transport; Aplicacion de la Escala INES en instalaciones radiactivas y transporte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, M. L.; Zamora, F.

    2012-11-01

    In 2009 the CSN approved the changes introduced by the 2008 edition of the Manual of the International Nuclear and Radiological Events Scale. This is a tool that facilitates communications between the technical community, the media and the public. (Author) 2 refs.

  15. Insights about transport mechanisms and fracture flow channeling from multi-scale observations of tracer dispersion in shallow fractured crystalline rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guihéneuf, N; Bour, O; Boisson, A; Le Borgne, T; Becker, M W; Nigon, B; Wajiduddin, M; Ahmed, S; Maréchal, J-C

    2017-11-01

    In fractured media, solute transport is controlled by advection in open and connected fractures and by matrix diffusion that may be enhanced by chemical weathering of the fracture walls. These phenomena may lead to non-Fickian dispersion characterized by early tracer arrival time, late-time tailing on the breakthrough curves and potential scale effect on transport processes. Here we investigate the scale dependency of these processes by analyzing a series of convergent and push-pull tracer experiments with distance of investigation ranging from 4m to 41m in shallow fractured granite. The small and intermediate distances convergent experiments display a non-Fickian tailing, characterized by a -2 power law slope. However, the largest distance experiment does not display a clear power law behavior and indicates possibly two main pathways. The push-pull experiments show breakthrough curve tailing decreases as the volume of investigation increases, with a power law slope ranging from -3 to -2.3 from the smallest to the largest volume. The multipath model developed by Becker and Shapiro (2003) is used here to evaluate the hypothesis of the independence of flow pathways. The multipath model is found to explain the convergent data, when increasing local dispersivity and reducing the number of pathways with distance which suggest a transition from non-Fickian to Fickian transport at fracture scale. However, this model predicts an increase of tailing with push-pull distance, while the experiments show the opposite trend. This inconsistency may suggest the activation of cross channel mass transfer at larger volume of investigation, which leads to non-reversible heterogeneous advection with scale. This transition from independent channels to connected channels when the volume of investigation increases suggest that both convergent and push-pull breakthrough curves can inform the existence of characteristic length scales. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Insights about transport mechanisms and fracture flow channeling from multi-scale observations of tracer dispersion in shallow fractured crystalline rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guihéneuf, N.; Bour, O.; Boisson, A.; Le Borgne, T.; Becker, M. W.; Nigon, B.; Wajiduddin, M.; Ahmed, S.; Maréchal, J.-C.

    2017-11-01

    In fractured media, solute transport is controlled by advection in open and connected fractures and by matrix diffusion that may be enhanced by chemical weathering of the fracture walls. These phenomena may lead to non-Fickian dispersion characterized by early tracer arrival time, late-time tailing on the breakthrough curves and potential scale effect on transport processes. Here we investigate the scale dependency of these processes by analyzing a series of convergent and push-pull tracer experiments with distance of investigation ranging from 4 m to 41 m in shallow fractured granite. The small and intermediate distances convergent experiments display a non-Fickian tailing, characterized by a -2 power law slope. However, the largest distance experiment does not display a clear power law behavior and indicates possibly two main pathways. The push-pull experiments show breakthrough curve tailing decreases as the volume of investigation increases, with a power law slope ranging from - 3 to - 2.3 from the smallest to the largest volume. The multipath model developed by Becker and Shapiro (2003) is used here to evaluate the hypothesis of the independence of flow pathways. The multipath model is found to explain the convergent data, when increasing local dispersivity and reducing the number of pathways with distance which suggest a transition from non-Fickian to Fickian transport at fracture scale. However, this model predicts an increase of tailing with push-pull distance, while the experiments show the opposite trend. This inconsistency may suggest the activation of cross channel mass transfer at larger volume of investigation, which leads to non-reversible heterogeneous advection with scale. This transition from independent channels to connected channels when the volume of investigation increases suggest that both convergent and push-pull breakthrough curves can inform the existence of characteristic length scales.

  17. Constraining the relative importance of raindrop- and flow-driven sediment transport mechanisms in postwildfire environments and implications for recovery time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Luke; Kean, Jason W.; Staley, Dennis M.; Rengers, Francis; Wasklewicz, Thad A.

    2016-01-01

    Mountain watersheds recently burned by wildfire often experience greater amounts of runoff and increased rates of sediment transport relative to similar unburned areas. Given the sedimentation and debris flow threats caused by increases in erosion, more work is needed to better understand the physical mechanisms responsible for the observed increase in sediment transport in burned environments and the time scale over which a heightened geomorphic response can be expected. In this study, we quantified the relative importance of different hillslope erosion mechanisms during two postwildfire rainstorms at a drainage basin in Southern California by combining terrestrial laser scanner-derived maps of topographic change, field measurements, and numerical modeling of overland flow and sediment transport. Numerous debris flows were initiated by runoff at our study area during a long-duration storm of relatively modest intensity. Despite the presence of a well-developed rill network, numerical model results suggest that the majority of eroded hillslope sediment during this long-duration rainstorm was transported by raindrop-induced sediment transport processes, highlighting the importance of raindrop-driven processes in supplying channels with potential debris flow material. We also used the numerical model to explore relationships between postwildfire storm characteristics, vegetation cover, soil infiltration capacity, and the total volume of eroded sediment from a synthetic hillslope for different end-member erosion regimes. This study adds to our understanding of sediment transport in steep, postwildfire landscapes and shows how data from field monitoring can be combined with numerical modeling of sediment transport to isolate the processes leading to increased erosion in burned areas.

  18. Physics and dynamics coupling across scales in the next generation CESM: Meeting the challenge of high resolution. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Vincent E.

    2015-02-21

    This is a final report for a SciDAC grant supported by BER. The project implemented a novel technique for coupling small-scale dynamics and microphysics into a community climate model. The technique uses subcolumns that are sampled in Monte Carlo fashion from a distribution of subgrid variability. The resulting global simulations show several improvements over the status quo.

  19. Numerical Methods for the Optimization of Nonlinear Residual-Based Sungrid-Scale Models Using the Variational Germano Identity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maher, G.D.; Hulshoff, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    The Variational Germano Identity [1, 2] is used to optimize the coefficients of residual-based subgrid-scale models that arise from the application of a Variational Multiscale Method [3, 4]. It is demonstrated that numerical iterative methods can be used to solve the Germano relations to obtain

  20. Statistical atmospheric inversion of local gas emissions by coupling the tracer release technique and local-scale transport modelling: a test case with controlled methane emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ars

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a new concept for estimating the pollutant emission rates of a site and its main facilities using a series of atmospheric measurements across the pollutant plumes. This concept combines the tracer release method, local-scale atmospheric transport modelling and a statistical atmospheric inversion approach. The conversion between the controlled emission and the measured atmospheric concentrations of the released tracer across the plume places valuable constraints on the atmospheric transport. This is used to optimise the configuration of the transport model parameters and the model uncertainty statistics in the inversion system. The emission rates of all sources are then inverted to optimise the match between the concentrations simulated with the transport model and the pollutants' measured atmospheric concentrations, accounting for the transport model uncertainty. In principle, by using atmospheric transport modelling, this concept does not strongly rely on the good colocation between the tracer and pollutant sources and can be used to monitor multiple sources within a single site, unlike the classical tracer release technique. The statistical inversion framework and the use of the tracer data for the configuration of the transport and inversion modelling systems should ensure that the transport modelling errors are correctly handled in the source estimation. The potential of this new concept is evaluated with a relatively simple practical implementation based on a Gaussian plume model and a series of inversions of controlled methane point sources using acetylene as a tracer gas. The experimental conditions are chosen so that they are suitable for the use of a Gaussian plume model to simulate the atmospheric transport. In these experiments, different configurations of methane and acetylene point source locations are tested to assess the efficiency of the method in comparison to the classic tracer release technique in coping

  1. Proteome scale census of major facilitator superfamily transporters in Trichoderma reesei using protein sequence and structure based classification enhanced ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Nitika; Kumari, Indu; Sandhu, Padmani; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Akhter, Yusuf

    2016-07-01

    Trichoderma spp. have been acknowledged as potent bio-control agents against microbial pathogens and also as plant growth promoters. Various secondary metabolites are attributed for these beneficial activities. Major facilitator superfamily (MFS) includes the large proportion of efflux-pumps which are linked with membrane transport of these secondary metabolites. We have carried out a proteome-wide identification of MFS transporters using protein sequence and structure based hierarchical method in Trichoderma reesei. 448 proteins out of 9115 were detected to carry transmembrane helices. MFS specific intragenic gene duplication and its context with transport function have been presented. Finally, using homology based techniques, domains and motifs of MFS families have been identified and utilized to classify them. From query dataset of 448 transmembrane proteins, 148 proteins are identified as potential MFS transporters. Sugar porter, drug: H(+) antiporter-1, monocarboxylate porter and anion: cation symporter emerged as major MFS families with 51, 35, 17 and 11 members respectively. Representative protein tertiary structures of these families are homology modeled for structure-function analysis. This study may help to understand the molecular basis of secretion and transport of agriculturally valuable secondary metabolites produced by these bio-control fungal agents which may be exploited in future for enhancing its biotechnological applications in eco-friendly sustainable development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Modeling watershed-scale 137Cs transport in a forested catchment affected by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lezhang; Kinouchi, Tsuyoshi; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Velleux, Mark L

    2017-05-01

    The Fukushima nuclear accident in 2011 resulted in 137Cs contamination of large areas in northeast Japan. A watershed-scale 137Cs transport model was developed and applied to a forested catchment in Fukushima area. This model considers 137Cs wash-off from vegetation, movement through soils, and transport of dissolved and particulate 137Cs adsorbed to clay, silt and sand. Comparisons between measurements and simulations demonstrated that the model well reproduced 137Cs concentrations in the stream fed from the catchment. Simulations estimated that 0.57 TBq of 137Cs was exported from the catchment between June, 2011 and December, 2014. Transport largely occurred with eroded sediment particles at a ratio of 17:70:13 of clay, silt, and sand. The overall 137Cs reduction ratio by rainfall-runoff wash-off was about 1.6%. Appreciable 137Cs remained in the catchment at the end of 2014. The largest rate of 137Cs reduction by wash-off was simulated to occur in subwatersheds of the upper catchment. However, despite relatively low initial deposition, middle portions of the watershed exported proportionately more 137Cs by rainfall-runoff processes. Simulations indicated that much of the transported 137Cs originates from erosion over hillsides and river banks. These results suggested that areas where 137Cs accumulates with redeposited sediments can be targeted for decontamination and also provided insight into 137Cs transport at the watershed scale to assess risk management and decontamination planning efforts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Simulating stream transport of nutrients in the eastern United States, 2002, using a spatially-referenced regression model and 1:100,000-scale hydrography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoos, Anne B.; Moore, Richard B.; Garcia, Ana Maria; Noe, Gregory B.; Terziotti, Silvia E.; Johnston, Craig M.; Dennis, Robin L.

    2013-01-01

    Existing Spatially Referenced Regression on Watershed attributes (SPARROW) nutrient models for the northeastern and southeastern regions of the United States were recalibrated to achieve a hydrographically consistent model with which to assess nutrient sources and stream transport and investigate specific management questions about the effects of wetlands and atmospheric deposition on nutrient transport. Recalibrated nitrogen models for the northeast and southeast were sufficiently similar to be merged into a single nitrogen model for the eastern United States. The atmospheric deposition source in the nitrogen model has been improved to account for individual components of atmospheric input, derived from emissions from agricultural manure, agricultural livestock, vehicles, power plants, other industry, and background sources. This accounting makes it possible to simulate the effects of altering an individual component of atmospheric deposition, such as nitrate emissions from vehicles or power plants. Regional differences in transport of phosphorus through wetlands and reservoirs were investigated and resulted in two distinct phosphorus models for the northeast and southeast. The recalibrated nitrogen and phosphorus models account explicitly for the influence of wetlands on regional-scale land-phase and aqueous-phase transport of nutrients and therefore allow comparison of the water-quality functions of different wetland systems over large spatial scales. Seven wetland systems were associated with enhanced transport of either nitrogen or phosphorus in streams, probably because of the export of dissolved organic nitrogen and bank erosion. Six wetland systems were associated with mitigating the delivery of either nitrogen or phosphorus to streams, probably because of sedimentation, phosphate sorption, and ground water infiltration.

  4. Multi-Scale Transport Properties of Fine-Grained Rocks: A Case Study of the Kirtland Formation, San Juan Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, J. E.; Dewers, T. A.; McPherson, B. J.; Wilson, T. H.; Flach, T.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding and characterizing transport properties of fine-grained rocks is critical in development of shale gas plays or assessing retention of CO2 at geologic storage sites. Difficulties arise in that both small scale (i.e., ~ nm) properties of the rock matrix and much larger scale fractures, faults, and sedimentological architecture govern migration of multiphase fluids. We present a multi-scale investigation of sealing and transport properties of the Kirtland Formation, which is a regional aquitard and reservoir seal in the San Juan Basin, USA. Sub-micron dual FIB/SEM imaging and reconstruction of 3D pore networks in core samples reveal a variety of pore types, including slit-shaped pores that are co-located with sedimentary structures and variations in mineralogy. Micron-scale chemical analysis and XRD reveal a mixture of mixed-layer smectite/illite, chlorite, quartz, and feldspar with little organic matter. Analysis of sub-micron digital reconstructions, mercury capillary injection pressure, and gas breakthrough measurements indicate a high quality sealing matrix. Natural full and partially mineralized fractures observed in core and in FMI logs include those formed from early soil-forming processes, differential compaction, and tectonic events. The potential impact of both fracture and matrix properties on large-scale transport is investigated through an analysis of natural helium from core samples, 3D seismic data and poro-elastic modeling. While seismic interpretations suggest considerable fracturing of the Kirtland, large continuous fracture zones and faults extending through the seal to the surface cannot be inferred from the data. Observed Kirtland Formation multi-scale transport properties are included as part of a risk assessment methodology for CO2 storage. Acknowledgements: The authors gratefully acknowledge the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory for sponsoring this project. The DOE’s Basic Energy Science

  5. Pore-scale modeling of vapor transport in partially saturated capillary tube with variable area using chemical potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Addassi, Mouadh; Schreyer, Lynn; Johannesson, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Here we illustrate the usefulness of using the chemical potential as the primary unknown by modeling isothermal vapor transport through a partially saturated cylindrically symmetric capillary tube of variable cross-sectional area using a single equation. There are no fitting parameters and the nu......Here we illustrate the usefulness of using the chemical potential as the primary unknown by modeling isothermal vapor transport through a partially saturated cylindrically symmetric capillary tube of variable cross-sectional area using a single equation. There are no fitting parameters...... and the numerical solutions to the equation are compared with experimental results with excellent agreement. We demonstrate that isothermal vapor transport can be accurately modeled without modeling the details of the contact angle, microscale temperature fluctuations, or pressure fluctuations using a modification...

  6. Effects of regional-scale and convective transports on tropospheric ozone chemistry revealed by aircraft observations during the wet season of the AMMA campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancellet, G.; Leclair de Bellevue, J.; Mari, C.; Nedelec, P.; Kukui, A.; Borbon, A.; Perros, P.

    2009-01-01

    The African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) fourth airborne campaign was conducted in July-August 2006 to study the chemical composition of the middle and upper troposphere in West Africa with the major objective to better understand the processing of chemical emissions by the West African Monsoon (WAM) and its associated regional-scale and vertical transports. In particular, the french airborne experiment was organized around two goals. The first was to characterize the impact of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs) on the ozone budget in the upper troposphere and the evolution of the chemical composition of these convective plumes as they move westward toward the Atlantic Ocean. The second objective was to discriminate the impact of remote sources of pollution over West Africa, including transport from the middle east, Europe, Asia and from southern hemispheric fires. Observations of O3, CO, NOx, H2O and hydroperoxide above West Africa along repeated meridional transects were coupled with transport analysis based on the FLEXPART lagrangian model. The cross analysis of trace gas concentrations and transport pathways revealed 5 types of air masses: convective uplift of industrial and urban emissions, convective uplift of biogenic emissions, slow advection from Cotonou polluted plumes near the coast, meridional transport of upper tropospheric air from the subtropical barrier region, and meridional transport of Southern Hemisphere (SH) biomass burning emissions. O3/CO correlation plots and the correlation plots of H2O2 with a OH proxy revealed not only a control of the trace gas variability by transport processes but also significant photochemical reactivity in the mid- and upper troposphere. The study of four MCSs outflow showed contrasted chemical composition and air mass origins depending on the MCSs lifetime and latitudinal position. Favorables conditions for ozone production were found for MCSs with increased MCS lifetime (>1.5 days), which allowed for

  7. Effects of regional-scale and convective transports on tropospheric ozone chemistry revealed by aircraft observations during the wet season of the AMMA campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ancellet

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA fourth airborne campaign was conducted in July–August 2006 to study the chemical composition of the middle and upper troposphere in West Africa with the major objective to better understand the processing of chemical emissions by the West African Monsoon (WAM and its associated regional-scale and vertical transports. In particular, the french airborne experiment was organized around two goals. The first was to characterize the impact of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs on the ozone budget in the upper troposphere and the evolution of the chemical composition of these convective plumes as they move westward toward the Atlantic Ocean. The second objective was to discriminate the impact of remote sources of pollution over West Africa, including transport from the middle east, Europe, Asia and from southern hemispheric fires. Observations of O3, CO, NOx, H2O and hydroperoxide above West Africa along repeated meridional transects were coupled with transport analysis based on the FLEXPART lagrangian model. The cross analysis of trace gas concentrations and transport pathways revealed 5 types of air masses: convective uplift of industrial and urban emissions, convective uplift of biogenic emissions, slow advection from Cotonou polluted plumes near the coast, meridional transport of upper tropospheric air from the subtropical barrier region, and meridional transport of Southern Hemisphere (SH biomass burning emissions. O3/CO correlation plots and the correlation plots of H2O2 with a OH proxy revealed not only a control of the trace gas variability by transport processes but also significant photochemical reactivity in the mid- and upper troposphere. The study of four MCSs outflow showed contrasted chemical composition and air mass origins depending on the MCSs lifetime and latitudinal position. Favorables conditions for ozone

  8. Why PUB needs scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, S.; Schertzer, D.; Hubert, P.; Mouchel, J. M.; Benjoudhi, H.; Tchigurinskaya, Y.; Gaume, E.; Vesseire, J.-M.

    2003-04-01

    Hydrological fields display an extreme variability over a wide range of space-time scales. This variability is beyond the scope of classical mathematical and modeling methods which are forced to combine homogeneity assumptions with scale truncations and subgrid parameterizations. These ad hoc procedures nevertheless lead to complex numerical codes: they are difficult to transfer from one basin to another one, or even to verify with data at a different scale. Tuning the model parameters is hazardous: “predictions” are often reduced to fitting existing observations and are in any case essentially limited to the narrow range of space-time scales over which the parameters have been estimated. In contrast, in recent scaling approaches heterogeneity and uncertainty at all scales are no longer obstacles. The variability is viewed as a consequence of a scale symmetry which must first be elucidated and then exploited: small scale homogeneity assumptions are replaced by small scale heterogeneity assumptions which are verified from data covering wide ranges of scale. PUB provides an unprecedented opportunity not only to test scaling concepts and techniques, but also to development them further. Indeed, PUB can be restated in the following manner: given a partial knowledge on the input (atmospheric states, dynamics and fluxes) and of the media (basin) over a given range of scales, what can we predict for the output (steamflow and water quality) and over which range of scales? We illustrate this state of the art with examples taken from various projects involving precipitation and stream flow collectively spanning the range of scales from centimeters to planetary scales in space, from seconds to tens of years in time.

  9. Using pore-scale imaging and modeling to provide new insights in multi-phase flow, transport and reaction phenomena in porous media (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijeljic, B.; Andrew, M. G.; Menke, H. P.; Blunt, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Advances in X ray imaging techniques made it possible not only to accurately describe solid and fluid(s) distributions in the pore space but also to study dynamics of multi-phase flow and reactive transport in-situ. This has opened up a range of new opportunities to better understand fundamental physics at the pore scale by experiment, and test and validate theoretical models in order to develop predictive tools at the pore scale and use it for upscaling. Firstly, we illustrate this concept by describing a new methodology for predicting non-Fickian transport in millimeter-sized three-dimensional micro-CT images of a beadpack, a sandstone, and a carbonate, representing porous media with an increasing degree of pore-scale complexity. The key strategy is to retain the full information on flow and transport signature of a porous medium by using probability distribution functions (PDFs) of voxel velocities for flow, and both PDFs of particle displacements and PDFs of particle transit times between voxels for transport. For this purpose, direct-simulation flow and transport model is used to analyse the relationship between pore structure, velocity, and the dynamics of the evolving plume. The model predictions for PDFs of particle displacements obtained by the model are in excellent agreement with those measured on similar cores in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. A key determinant for non-Fickian transport is the spread in velocity distribution in the pore space. Further, we present micro-CT imaging of capillary trapping of scCO2 at reservoir conditions in a range of carbonates and sandstones having different pore structure and demonstrate that substantial quantities of scCO2 can be trapped in the pore space. Higher residual scCO2 saturations are found in sandstones compared to carbonates. The trapped ganglia exhibit different distribution of size, related to the inherent structure of pore space. Pore structures with large, open pores that are well connected lead

  10. A random walk solution for modeling solute transport with network reactions and multi-rate mass transfer in heterogeneous systems: Impact of biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henri, Christopher V.; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    The interplay between the spatial variability of the aquifer hydraulic properties, mass transfer due to sub-grid heterogeneity and chemical reactions often complicates reactive transport simulations. It is well documented that hydro-biochemical properties are ubiquitously heterogeneous and that diffusion and slow advection at the sub-grid scale typically leads to the conceptualization of an aquifer as a multi-porosity system. Within this context, chemical reactions taking place in mobile/immobile water regions can be substantially different between each other. This paper presents a particle-based method that can efficiently simulate heterogeneity, network reactions and multi-rate mass transfer. The approach is based on the development of transition probabilities that describe the likelihood that particles belonging to a given species and mobile/immobile domain at a given time will be transformed into another species and mobile/immobile domain afterwards. The joint effect of mass transfer and sequential degradation is shown to be non-trivial. A characteristic rebound of degradation products can be observed. This late rebound of concentrations is not driven by any change in the flow regime (e.g., pumping ceases in the pump-and-treat remediation strategy) but due to the natural interplay between mass transfer and chemical reactions. To illustrate that the method can simultaneously represent mass transfer, spatially varying properties and network reactions without numerical problems, we have simulated the degradation of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in a three-dimensional fully heterogeneous aquifer subjected to rate-limited mass transfer. Two types of degradation modes were considered to compare the effect of an active biofilm with that of clay pods present in the aquifer. Results of the two scenarios display significantly differences. Biofilms that promote the degradation of compounds in an immobile region are shown to significantly enhance degradation, rapidly producing

  11. COSIMA-DSS Evaluation System: A new Decision Support System for Large-Scale Transport Infrastructure Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salling, Kim Bang; Jensen, Anders Vestergaard; Leleur, Steen

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new decision support model COSIMA-DSS that examines socio-economic feasibility risks involved in the implementation of transport infrastructure projects. The model makes use of conventionally cost-benefit analysis embedded within a wider multi-criteria analysis. The basic...

  12. Modeling of transport processes through large-scale discrete fracture networks using conforming meshes and open-source software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Tri Dat; Fourno, André; Noetinger, Benoit

    2017-11-01

    Most industrial and field studies of transport processes in Discrete Fracture Networks (DFNs) involve strong simplifying assumptions, especially at the meshing stage. High-accuracy simulations are therefore required for validating these simplified models and their domain of validity. The present paper proposes an efficient workflow based on open-source software to obtain transport simulations. High-quality computational meshes for DFNs are first generated using the conforming meshing approach FraC. Then, a tracer transport model implemented in the open-source code DuMux is used for simulating tracer transport driven by the advection-dispersion equation. We adopt the box method, a vertex-centered finite volume scheme for spatial discretization, which ensures concentration continuity and mass conservation at intersections between fractures. Numerical results on simple networks for validation purposes and on complex realistic DFNs are presented. An a-posteriori convergence study of the discretization method shows an order of convergence O(h) for tracer concentration with h the mesh size.

  13. Flow, Transport, and Reaction in Porous Media: Percolation Scaling, Critical-Path Analysis, and Effective Medium Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Allen G.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2017-12-01

    We describe the most important developments in the application of three theoretical tools to modeling of the morphology of porous media and flow and transport processes in them. One tool is percolation theory. Although it was over 40 years ago that the possibility of using percolation theory to describe flow and transport processes in porous media was first raised, new models and concepts, as well as new variants of the original percolation model are still being developed for various applications to flow phenomena in porous media. The other two approaches, closely related to percolation theory, are the critical-path analysis, which is applicable when porous media are highly heterogeneous, and the effective medium approximation—poor man's percolation—that provide a simple and, under certain conditions, quantitatively correct description of transport in porous media in which percolation-type disorder is relevant. Applications to topics in geosciences include predictions of the hydraulic conductivity and air permeability, solute and gas diffusion that are particularly important in ecohydrological applications and land-surface interactions, and multiphase flow in porous media, as well as non-Gaussian solute transport, and flow morphologies associated with imbibition into unsaturated fractures. We describe new applications of percolation theory of solute transport to chemical weathering and soil formation, geomorphology, and elemental cycling through the terrestrial Earth surface. Wherever quantitatively accurate predictions of such quantities are relevant, so are the techniques presented here. Whenever possible, the theoretical predictions are compared with the relevant experimental data. In practically all the cases, the agreement between the theoretical predictions and the data is excellent. Also discussed are possible future directions in the application of such concepts to many other phenomena in geosciences.

  14. A Priori Direct Numerical Simulation Modelling of the Curvature Term of the Flame Surface Density Transport Equation for Nonunity Lewis Number Flames in the Context of Large Eddy Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Katragadda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS database of freely propagating statistically planar turbulent premixed flames with Lewis numbers Le ranging from 0.34 to 1.2 has been used to analyse the statistical behaviours of the curvature term of the generalised Flame surface Density (FSD transport equation, in the context of the Large Eddy Simulation (LES. Lewis number is shown to have significant influences on the statistical behaviours of the resolved and sub-grid parts of the FSD curvature term. It has been found that the existing models for the sub-grid curvature term Csg do not capture the qualitative behaviour of this term extracted from the DNS database for flames with Le<<1. The existing models of Csg only predict negative values, whereas the sub-grid curvature term is shown to assume positive values within the flame brush for the Le=0.34 and 0.6 flames. Here the sub-grid curvature terms arising from combined reaction and normal diffusion and tangential diffusion components of displacement speed are individually modelled, and the new model of the sub-grid curvature term has been found to capture Csg extracted from DNS data satisfactorily for all the different Lewis number flames considered here for a wide range of filter widths.

  15. Discrete-fracture-model of multi–scale time-splitting two–phase flow including nanoparticles transport in fractured porous media

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2017-11-23

    In this article, we consider a two-phase immiscible incompressible flow including nanoparticles transport in fractured heterogeneous porous media. The system of the governing equations consists of water saturation, Darcy’s law, nanoparticles concentration in water, deposited nanoparticles concentration on the pore-wall, and entrapped nanoparticles concentration in the pore-throat, as well as, porosity and permeability variation due to the nanoparticles deposition/entrapment on/in the pores. The discrete-fracture model (DFM) is used to describe the flow and transport in fractured porous media. Moreover, multiscale time-splitting strategy has been employed to manage different time-step sizes for different physics, such as saturation, concentration, etc. Numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed multi-scale time splitting approach.

  16. A field-scale reactive transport model for U(VI) migration influenced by coupled multirate mass transfer and surface complexation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, R.; Zheng, C.; Prommer, H.; Greskowiak, J.; Liu, C.; Zachara, J.; Rockhold, M.

    2010-05-01

    This study explores field-scale modeling of U(VI) reactive transport through incorporation of laboratory and field data. A field-scale reactive transport model was developed on the basis of laboratory-characterized U(VI) surface complexation reactions (SCRs) and multirate mass transfer processes, as well as field-measured hydrogeochemical conditions at the U.S. Department of Energy, Hanford 300 Area (300 A), Washington. The model was used to assess the importance of multirate mass transfer processes on U(VI) reactive transport and to evaluate the effect of variable geochemical conditions caused by dynamic river water-groundwater interactions on U(VI) plume migration. Model simulations revealed complex spatiotemporal relationships between groundwater composition and U(VI) speciation, adsorption, and plume migration. In general, river water intrusion enhances uranium adsorption and lowers aqueous uranium concentration because river water dilution increases pH and decreases aqueous bicarbonate concentration, leading to overall enhanced U(VI) surface complexation. Strong U(VI) retardation was computed for the field-measured hydrogeochemical conditions, suggesting a slow dissipation of the U(VI) plume, a phenomenon consistent with field observations. The simulations also showed that SCR-retarded U(VI) migration becomes more dynamic and synchronous with the groundwater flow field when multirate mass transfer processes are involved. Breakthrough curves at selected locations and the temporal changes in the calculated mass during the 20 year simulation period indicated that uranium adsorption/desorption never attained steady state because of the dynamic flow field and groundwater composition variations caused by river water intrusion. Thus, the multirate SCR model appears to be a crucial consideration for future reactive transport simulations of uranium contaminants at the Hanford 300 A site and elsewhere under similar hydrogeochemical conditions.

  17. Sustainable transportation stage of change, decisional balance, and self-efficacy scale development and validation in two university samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Colleen A; Mundorf, Norbert; Kobayashi, Hisanori; Brick, Leslie; Horiuchi, Satoshi; Paiva, Andrea L; Prochaska, James O

    2015-01-01

    Single occupancy vehicle (SOV) transportation is a key contributor to climate change and air pollution. Sustainable transportation (ST), commuting by any means other than SOV, could both slow climate change and enhance public health. The transtheoretical model (TTM) provides a useful framework for examining how people progress towards adopting ST. Short valid and reliable measures for ST decisional balance, self-efficacy, and climate change doubt were developed and their relationship with stages of change was examined. Two large university-based volunteer samples participated in measurement studies. Using multiple procedures, three brief internally consistent measures were developed: decisional balance, self-efficacy, and climate change doubt. The stages of change correctly discriminated both decisional balance and self-efficacy, as well as replicated hypothesized relationships. Climate change doubt did not vary by stages; however, it may prove useful in future studies. Results support the validation of these measures and the application of the TTM to ST.

  18. Large-scale transport of PM2.5 in the lower troposphere during winter cold surges in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianjun; Zhang, Meigen; Bai, Xiaolin; Tan, Hongjian; Li, Sabrina; Liu, Jiping; Zhang, Rui; Wolters, Mark A; Qin, Xiuyuan; Zhang, Miming; Lin, Hongmei; Li, Yuenan; Li, Jonathan; Chen, Liqi

    2017-10-16

    A comprehensive investigation using the air quality network and meteorological data of China in 2015 showed that PM2.5 driven by cold surges from the ground level could travel up to 2000 km from northern to southern China within two days. Air pollution is more severe and prominent during the winter in north China due to seasonal variations in energy usage, trade wind movements, and industrial emissions. In February 2015, two cold surges traveling from north China caused a temporary increase in the concentration of PM2.5 in Shanghai. Subsequently, the concentration of PM2.5 in Xiamen increased to a high of 80 µg/m(3), which is double the average PM2.5 concentration in Xiamen during the winter. This finding is a new long-range transport mechanism comparing to the well-established mechanism, with long-range transport more likely to occur in the upper troposphere than at lower levels. These observations were validated by results from the back trajectory analysis and the RAMS- CMAQ model. While wind speed was found to be a major facilitator in transporting PM2.5 from Beijing to Xiamen, more investigation is required to understand the complex relationship between wind speed and PM2.5 and how it moderates air quality in Beijing, Shanghai, and Xiamen.

  19. Impacts of large-scale introduction of hydrogen in the road transport sector on urban air pollution and human exposure in Copenhagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, S.S.; Ketzel, M.; Brandt, J.; Frohn, L.M.; Winther, M.; Nielsen, O.K. (Aarhus Univ.. National Environmental Research Institute, Roskilde (Denmark)); Joergensen, K.; Karlsson, K. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy. Dept. of System Analysis, Roskilde (Denmark))

    2011-07-15

    The aim of the project 'Environmental and Health Impact Assessment of Scenarios for Renewable Energy Systems with Hydrogen' (HYSCENE) is to improve modelling of the environmental impacts and related socio-cultural and welfare economic impacts of a proposed hydrogen/renewable energy system with focus on large-scale introduction of hydrogen as energy carrier in the road transport sector (http://hyscene.dmu.dk). This extended abstract will focus on the impacts on urban air pollution and human exposure. (Author)

  20. Large scale finite element solvers for the large eddy simulation of incompressible turbulent flows

    OpenAIRE

    Colomés Gené, Oriol

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we have developed a path towards large scale Finite Element simulations of turbulent incompressible flows. We have assessed the performance of residual-based variational multiscale (VMS) methods for the large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent incompressible flows. We consider VMS models obtained by different subgrid scale approximations which include either static or dynamic subscales, linear or nonlinear multiscale splitting, and different choices of the subscale space. W...

  1. Simulating Pre-Asymptotic, Non-Fickian Transport Although Doing Simple Random Walks - Supported By Empirical Pore-Scale Velocity Distributions and Memory Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, S.; Jia, N.; Bijeljic, B.; Nowak, W.

    2016-12-01

    Pre-asymptotic characteristics are almost ubiquitous when analyzing solute transport processes in porous media. These pre-asymptotic aspects are caused by spatial coherence in the velocity field and by its heterogeneity. For the Lagrangian perspective of particle displacements, the causes of pre-asymptotic, non-Fickian transport are skewed velocity distribution, statistical dependencies between subsequent increments of particle positions (memory) and dependence between the x, y and z-components of particle increments. Valid simulation frameworks should account for these factors. We propose a particle tracking random walk (PTRW) simulation technique that can use empirical pore-space velocity distributions as input, enforces memory between subsequent random walk steps, and considers cross dependence. Thus, it is able to simulate pre-asymptotic non-Fickian transport phenomena. Our PTRW framework contains an advection/dispersion term plus a diffusion term. The advection/dispersion term produces time-series of particle increments from the velocity CDFs. These time series are equipped with memory by enforcing that the CDF values of subsequent velocities change only slightly. The latter is achieved through a random walk on the axis of CDF values between 0 and 1. The virtual diffusion coefficient for that random walk is our only fitting parameter. Cross-dependence can be enforced by constraining the random walk to certain combinations of CDF values between the three velocity components in x, y and z. We will show that this modelling framework is capable of simulating non-Fickian transport by comparison with a pore-scale transport simulation and we analyze the approach to asymptotic behavior.

  2. Transport coefficients and validity of the Stokes-Einstein relation in metallic melts: From excess entropy scaling laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Ruchi; Mishra, Raj Kumar

    2017-08-01

    Using the pair correlation function obtained via square well (SW) model [Mishra et al., 2015 Chem. Phys. 457 13], we calculate the pair excess entropy of liquid metals and determined the diffusion coefficients via Dzugutov's excess entropy-diffusivity scaling relation. Further, the applicability of the Stokes-Einstein relation for SW potential is validated by comparing the computed shear viscosity coefficients (ηV) of liquid metals with the available experimental data. Reduced ηV of considered systems has been derived and scaled with the excess entropy. We compute isothermal compressibility, surface tension and surface entropy of the investigated liquids by using diffusion coefficient data obtained from excess entropy scaling law. It is found that the computed values are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data. Thus, we demonstrate that the Dzugutov scheme can be applied successfully to SW liquid metals to correlate their microscopic structural functions with their surface and thermodynamic properties.

  3. Cumulus parameterizations in chemical transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahowald, Natalie M.; Rasch, Philip J.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    1995-12-01

    Global three-dimensional chemical transport models (CTMs) are valuable tools for studying processes controlling the distribution of trace constituents in the atmosphere. A major uncertainty in these models is the subgrid-scale parametrization of transport by cumulus convection. This study seeks to define the range of behavior of moist convective schemes and point toward more reliable formulations for inclusion in chemical transport models. The emphasis is on deriving convective transport from meteorological data sets (such as those from the forecast centers) which do not routinely include convective mass fluxes. Seven moist convective parameterizations are compared in a column model to examine the sensitivity of the vertical profile of trace gases to the parameterization used in a global chemical transport model. The moist convective schemes examined are the Emanuel scheme [Emanuel, 1991], the Feichter-Crutzen scheme [Feichter and Crutzen, 1990], the inverse thermodynamic scheme (described in this paper), two versions of a scheme suggested by Hack [Hack, 1994], and two versions of a scheme suggested by Tiedtke (one following the formulation used in the ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting) and ECHAM3 (European Centre and Hamburg Max-Planck-Institut) models [Tiedtke, 1989], and one formulated as in the TM2 (Transport Model-2) model (M. Heimann, personal communication, 1992). These convective schemes vary in the closure used to derive the mass fluxes, as well as the cloud model formulation, giving a broad range of results. In addition, two boundary layer schemes are compared: a state-of-the-art nonlocal boundary layer scheme [Holtslag and Boville, 1993] and a simple adiabatic mixing scheme described in this paper. Three tests are used to compare the moist convective schemes against observations. Although the tests conducted here cannot conclusively show that one parameterization is better than the others, the tests are a good measure of the

  4. Risk of the residents, infrastructure and water bodies by flash floods and sediment transport - assessment for scale of the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostál, Tomáš; Krása, Josef; Bauer, Miroslav; Strouhal, Luděk; Jáchymová, Barbora; Devátý, Jan; David, Václav; Koudelka, Petr; Dočkal, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Pluvial and flash floods, related to massive sediment transport become phenomenon nowadays, under conditions of climate changes. Storm events, related to material damages appear at unexpected places and their effective control is only possible in form of prevention. To apply preventive measures, there have to be defined localities with reasonable reliability, which are endangered by surface runoff and sediment transport produced in the subcatchments, often at agriculturally used landscape. Classification of such localities, concerning of potential damages and magnitude of sediment transport shall be also included within the analyses, to design control measures effectively. Large scale project for whole territory of the Czech Republic (ca 80.000 km2) has therefore been granted b the Ministry of Interior of the Czech Republic, with the aim to define critical points, where interaction between surface runoff connected to massive sediment transport and infrastructure or vulnerable water bodies can occur and to classify them according to potential risk. Advanced GIS routines, based on analyses of land use, soil conditions and morphology had been used to determine the critical points - points, where significant surface runoff occurs and interacts with infrastructure and vulnerable water bodies, based exclusively on the contributing area - flow accumulation. In total, ca 150.000 critical points were determined within the Czech Republic. For each of critical points, its subcatchment had then been analyzed in detail, concerning of soil loss and sediment transport, using simulation model WATEM/SEDEM. The results were used for classification of potential risk of individual critical points, based on mean soil loss within subcatchment, total sediment transport trough the outlet point and subcatchment area. The classification has been done into 5 classes. The boundaries were determined by calibration survey and statistical analysis, performed at three experimental catchments area

  5. From transport and storage to control of the process: the challenge of biodigestion from drawings of swine in agroindustrial scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Souza Oliveira

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this article is to analyze some factors that represent challenges to the application of biodigestion process for energy generation from swine waste on an agroindustrial scale, thus contributing to important reflection on the design and installation of biodigesters in agroindustrial activities.

  6. Interaction between breaking/broken waves and infragravity-scale phenomena to control sediment suspension transport in the surf zone

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smith, GG

    2002-07-30

    Full Text Available 0025-3227 / 02 / $ ^ see front matter C223 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. PII: S0025-3227(02)00385-7 * Corresponding author. E-mail address: gsmith@csir.co.za (G.G. Smith). MARGO 3183 24-7-02 Marine Geology 187 (2002) 329^345 www....G. Smith, G.P. Mocke/ Marine Geology 187 (2002) 329^345 wave breaking processes, which interact with in- fragravity motions. Possible examples of the inter- action of wave breaking and infragravity sediment suspension and transport phenomena are (1) more...

  7. Evidence of non-Darcy flow and non-Fickian transport in fractured media at laboratory scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Cherubini

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available During a risk assessment procedure as well as when dealing with cleanup and monitoring strategies, accurate predictions of solute propagation in fractured rocks are of particular importance when assessing exposure pathways through which contaminants reach receptors. Experimental data obtained under controlled conditions such as in a laboratory allow to increase the understanding of the fundamental physics of fluid flow and solute transport in fractures. In this study, laboratory hydraulic and tracer tests have been carried out on an artificially created fractured rock sample. The tests regard the analysis of the hydraulic loss and the measurement of breakthrough curves for saline tracer pulse inside a rock sample of parallelepiped shape (0.60 × 0.40 × 0.08 m. The convolution theory has been applied in order to remove the effect of the acquisition apparatus on tracer experiments. The experimental results have shown evidence of a non-Darcy relationship between flow rate and hydraulic loss that is best described by Forchheimer's law. Furthermore, in the flow experiments both inertial and viscous flow terms are not negligible. The observed experimental breakthrough curves of solute transport have been modeled by the classical one-dimensional analytical solution for the advection–dispersion equation (ADE and the single rate mobile–immobile model (MIM. The former model does not properly fit the first arrival and the tail while the latter, which recognizes the existence of mobile and immobile domains for transport, provides a very decent fit. The carried out experiments show that there exists a pronounced mobile–immobile zone interaction that cannot be neglected and that leads to a non-equilibrium behavior of solute transport. The existence of a non-Darcian flow regime has showed to influence the velocity field in that it gives rise to a delay in solute migration with respect to the predicted value assuming linear flow. Furthermore, the

  8. Simulated Transport and Mixing of Anthropogenic and Biogenic Aerosol and Their Entrainment into Clouds during the Goamazon Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, J. D.; Shrivastava, M. B.; Fan, J.; Berg, L. K.; Chand, D.; Fortner, E.; Mei, F.; Pekour, M. S.; Shilling, J. E.; Springston, S. R.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Wang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Several recent studies have suggested that anthropogenic emissions enhance the production of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Because Manaus, Brazil is an isolated large city within the Amazon rainforest, measurements collected within and outside of the downwind urban plume during the 2014 Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon) campaign (supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation and Measurement program) will provide valuable information needed by regional and global models to evaluate parameterizations of SOA. The isolated urban plume should also provide distinct patterns of mixing with biogenic emissions and eliminate complications of multiple anthropogenic sources found in most other regions of the world. The objective of this study is to evaluate the performance of preliminary simulations of the transport, mixing, and chemical evolution of the Manaus urban plume from the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) using the available surface and aircraft measurements collected during the first intensive observation period (IOP) of GoAmazon. Simulations are performed using both a 10 km or 2 km grid spacing as well as a newly developed treatment that couples a sectional aerosol model and its parameterization of SOA using a volatility basis set approach with resolved clouds and a sub-grid scale cloud parameterization. Since the first IOP of GoAmazon was conducted during the wet season, shallow and deep convection were observed on most days and likely impacts the transport and vertical mixing of the Manaus plume. Therefore, we are using the available field campaign cloud measurements to evaluate the impact of sub-grid scale clouds on the horizontal and vertical distribution of aerosols. Satellite data is also used to assess the regional variability in simulated clouds and precipitation. Analyses of the simulations during the first IOP will be presented. Simulations with and without anthropogenic emissions will

  9. Building-Resolved CFD Simulations for Greenhouse Gas Transport and Dispersion over Washington DC / Baltimore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, K.; Lopez-Coto, I.; Ghosh, S.; Mueller, K.; Whetstone, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The North-East Corridor project aims to use a top-down inversion methodology to quantify sources of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions over urban domains such as Washington DC / Baltimore with high spatial and temporal resolution. Atmospheric transport of tracer gases from an emission source to a tower mounted receptor are usually conducted using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. For such simulations, WRF employs a parameterized turbulence model and does not resolve the fine scale dynamics generated by the flow around buildings and communities comprising a large city. The NIST Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) is a computational fluid dynamics model that utilizes large eddy simulation methods to model flow around buildings at length scales much smaller than is practical with WRF. FDS has the potential to evaluate the impact of complex urban topography on near-field dispersion and mixing difficult to simulate with a mesoscale atmospheric model. Such capabilities may be important in determining urban GHG emissions using atmospheric measurements. A methodology has been developed to run FDS as a sub-grid scale model within a WRF simulation. The coupling is based on nudging the FDS flow field towards that computed by WRF, and is currently limited to one way coupling performed in an off-line mode. Using the coupled WRF / FDS model, NIST will investigate the effects of the urban canopy at horizontal resolutions of 10-20 m in a domain of 12 x 12 km. The coupled WRF-FDS simulations will be used to calculate the dispersion of tracer gases in the North-East Corridor and to evaluate the upwind areas that contribute to tower observations, referred to in the inversion community as influence functions. Results of this study will provide guidance regarding the importance of explicit simulations of urban atmospheric turbulence in obtaining accurate estimates of greenhouse gas emissions and transport.

  10. Mineralization associated with scale and altered rock and pipe fragments from the Berlín geothermal field, El Salvador; implications for metal transport in natural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Jasmin; Williams-Jones, Anthony E.; Clark, James R.

    2005-07-01

    Composite fragments sampled at solid collectors and drains of two-phase, re-injection, and vapour pipelines of the Berlín geothermal field, El Salvador, consist mainly of sulphide- and electrum-bearing aluminium-rich amorphous silica scale, sulphide- and electrum-bearing saponitic/vermiculitic clay from the reservoir, and altered metallic pipe linings containing As-S-bearing iron oxide-oxyhydroxide grains. Siliceous and clay-rich precipitates contain concentrations of gold and silver in excess of 180 and 8000 ppm, respectively, and appreciable concentrations of copper, lead, zinc, and antimony. Altered iron fragments contain substantial arsenic. Copper, lead, and zinc occur mainly as chalcopyrite, galena, and sphalerite, respectively, in amorphous silica and clay; near the surface, chalcopyrite transported from depth alters to bornite. Gold and silver occur mainly as electrum, which deposited with base metal sulphides in the clay precipitates, and amorphous silica at higher levels in the well. Electrum precipitates in the wells due to the rapid drop in temperature and loss of H 2S associated with boiling. The concentration of gold in vapour is ˜4 times greater than that in water from associated wellheads. This suggests that gold can be transported efficiently by vapour, and implies that such transport may be important in the formation of some hydrothermal ore deposits.

  11. Genesis, Pathways, and Terminations of Intense Global Water Vapor Transport in Association with Large-Scale Climate Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellars, S. L.; Kawzenuk, B.; Nguyen, P.; Ralph, F. M.; Sorooshian, S.

    2017-12-01

    The CONNected objECT (CONNECT) algorithm is applied to global Integrated Water Vapor Transport data from the NASA's Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications - Version 2 reanalysis product for the period of 1980 to 2016. The algorithm generates life-cycle records in time and space evolving strong vapor transport events. We show five regions, located in the midlatitudes, where events typically exist (off the coast of the southeast United States, eastern China, eastern South America, off the southern tip of South Africa, and in the southeastern Pacific Ocean). Global statistics show distinct genesis and termination regions and global seasonal peak frequency during Northern Hemisphere late fall/winter and Southern Hemisphere winter. In addition, the event frequency and geographical location are shown to be modulated by the Arctic Oscillation, Pacific North American Pattern, and the quasi-biennial oscillation. Moreover, a positive linear trend in the annual number of objects is reported, increasing by 3.58 objects year-over-year.

  12. Transport of selenium oxyanions through TiO2porous media: column experiments and multi-scale modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsir, K; Svecova, L; Sardin, M; Simonnot, M O

    2014-05-01

    The present work deals with the modeling of selenium oxyanion (selenite/selenate) retention in TiO2 rutile porous media. A set of chemical interactions was elaborated from spectroscopic measurements and adsorption experiments in batch and column reactors, and a model of transient transport of the selenium species through laboratory column was developed. The adsorption model considered that both forms of selenium (Se) compete for the same sorption sites, hydroxyl groups, allowing taking into account a competitive adsorption. Stoichiometry and equilibrium constants of adsorption reactions were determined on the basis of spectrometric measurement and adsorption isotherm curve fitting. This approach led to a model of Sips type isotherm including a pH-dependence. It offers an excellent fitting compared to the classical Langmuir equation and provides a unique set of parameters for both oxyanions. IMPACT code and associated modeling method were then used to couple transport and chemical reactions. The obtained numerical results showed a reasonable prediction of the shape and the time location of selenium oxyanions and pH breakthrough curves. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Insights into the role of wettability in cathode catalyst layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cell; pore scale immiscible flow and transport processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, H.; Raoof, A.; Mansouri, S. H.

    2017-05-01

    The production of liquid water in cathode catalyst layer, CCL, is a significant barrier to increase the efficiency of proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Here we present, for the first time, a direct three-dimensional pore-scale modelling to look at the complex immiscible two-phase flow in CCL. After production of the liquid water at the surface of CCL agglomerates due to the electrochemical reactions, water spatial distribution affects transport of oxygen through the CCL as well as the rate of reaction at the agglomerate surfaces. To explore the wettability effects, we apply hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties using different surface contact angles. Effective diffusivity is calculated under several water saturation levels. Results indicate larger diffusive transport values for hydrophilic domain compared to the hydrophobic media where the liquid water preferentially floods the larger pores. However, hydrophobic domain showed more available surface area and higher oxygen consumption rate at the reaction sites under various saturation levels, which is explained by the effect of wettability on pore-scale distribution of water. Hydrophobic domain, with a contact angle of 150, reveals efficient water removal where only 28% of the pore space stays saturated. This condition contributes to the enhanced available reaction surface area and oxygen diffusivity.

  14. Thermal-chemical-mechanical feedback during fluid-rock interactions: Implications for chemical transport and scales of equilibria in the crust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutrow, Barbara

    2008-08-13

    Our research evaluates the hypothesis that feedback amongst thermal-chemical-mechanical processes operative in fluid-rock systems alters the fluid flow dynamics of the system which, in turn, affects chemical transport and temporal and spatial scales of equilibria, thus impacting the resultant mineral textural development of rocks. Our methods include computational experimentation and detailed analyses of fluid-infiltrated rocks from well-characterized terranes. This work focuses on metamorphic rocks and hydrothermal systems where minerals and their textures are utilized to evaluate pressure (P), temperature (T), and time (t) paths in the evolution of mountain belts and ore deposits, and to interpret tectonic events and the timing of these events. Our work on coupled processes also extends to other areas where subsurface flow and transport in porous media have consequences such as oil and gas movement, geothermal system development, transport of contaminants, nuclear waste disposal, and other systems rich in fluid-rock reactions. Fluid-rock systems are widespread in the geologic record. Correctly deciphering the products resulting from such systems is important to interpreting a number of geologic phenomena. These systems are characterized by complex interactions involving time-dependent, non-linear processes in heterogeneous materials. While many of these interactions have been studied in isolation, they are more appropriately analyzed in the context of a system with feedback. When one process impacts another process, time and space scales as well as the overall outcome of the interaction can be dramatically altered. Our goals to test this hypothesis are: to develop and incorporate algorithms into our 3D heat and mass transport code to allow the effects of feedback to be investigated numerically, to analyze fluid infiltrated rocks from a variety of terranes at differing P-T conditions, to identify subtle features of the infiltration of fluids and/or feedback, and

  15. Atmospheric Transport Modeling with 3D Lagrangian Dispersion Codes Compared with SF6 Tracer Experiments at Regional Scale

    OpenAIRE

    François Van Dorpe; Bertrand Iooss; Vladimir Semenov; Olga Sorokovikova; Alexey Fokin; Yves Margerit

    2007-01-01

    The results of four gas tracer experiments of atmospheric dispersion on a regional scale are used for the benchmarking of two atmospheric dispersion modeling codes, MINERVE-SPRAY (CEA), and NOSTRADAMUS (IBRAE). The main topic of this comparison is to estimate the Lagrangian code capability to predict the radionuclide atmospheric transfer on a large field, in the case of risk assessment of nuclear power plant for example. For the four experiments, the results of...

  16. Small-scale sediment transport patterns and bedform morphodynamics: New insights from high-resolution multibeam bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, P.L.; Erikson, L.H.; Kvitek, R.G.

    2011-01-01

    New multibeam echosounder and processing technologies yield sub-meter-scale bathymetric resolution, revealing striking details of bedform morphology that are shaped by complex boundary-layer flow dynamics at a range of spatial and temporal scales. An inertially aided post processed kinematic (IAPPK) technique generates a smoothed best estimate trajectory (SBET) solution to tie the vessel motion-related effects of each sounding directly to the ellipsoid, significantly reducing artifacts commonly found in multibeam data, increasing point density, and sharpening seafloor features. The new technique was applied to a large bedform field in 20-30 m water depths in central San Francisco Bay, California (USA), revealing bedforms that suggest boundary-layer flow deflection by the crests where 12-m-wavelength, 0.2-m-amplitude bedforms are superimposed on 60-m-wavelength, 1-m-amplitude bedforms, with crests that often were strongly oblique (approaching 90??) to the larger features on the lee side, and near-parallel on the stoss side. During one survey in April 2008, superimposed bedform crests were continuous between the crests of the larger features, indicating that flow detachment in the lee of the larger bedforms is not always a dominant process. Assessment of bedform crest peakedness, asymmetry, and small-scale bedform evolution between surveys indicates the impact of different flow regimes on the entire bedform field. This paper presents unique fine-scale imagery of compound and superimposed bedforms, which is used to (1) assess the physical forcing and evolution of a bedform field in San Francisco Bay, and (2) in conjunction with numerical modeling, gain a better fundamental understanding of boundary-layer flow dynamics that result in the observed superimposed bedform orientation. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag (outside the USA).

  17. Development and application of a catchment scale pesticide fate and transport model for use in drinking water risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullan, S P; Whelan, M J; Rettino, J; Filby, K; Eyre, S; Holman, I P

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the development and application of IMPT (Integrated Model for Pesticide Transport), a parameter-efficient tool for predicting diffuse-source pesticide concentrations in surface waters used for drinking water supply. The model was applied to a small UK headwater catchment with high frequency (8h) pesticide monitoring data and to five larger catchments (479-1653km(2)) with sampling approximately every 14days. Model performance was good for predictions of both flow (Nash Sutcliffe Efficiency generally >0.59 and PBIAS catchments is likely to mask the true episodic nature of exposure. The computational efficiency of the model, along with the fact that most of its parameters can be derived from existing national soil property data mean that it can be used to rapidly predict pesticide exposure in multiple surface water resources to support operational and strategic risk assessments. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Impacts of transported background ozone on California air quality during the ARCTAS-CARB period – a multi-scale modeling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Huang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Multi-scale tracer and full-chemistry simulations with the STEM atmospheric chemistry model are used to analyze the effects of transported background ozone (O3 from the eastern Pacific on California air quality during the ARCTAS-CARB experiment conducted in June, 2008. Previous work has focused on the importance of long-range transport of O3 to North America air quality in springtime. However during this summer experiment the long-range transport of O3 is also shown to be important. Simulated and observed O3 transport patterns from the coast to inland northern California are shown to vary based on meteorological conditions and the O3 profiles over the oceans, which are strongly episodically affected by Asian inflows. Analysis of the correlations of O3 at various altitudes above the coastal site at Trinidad Head and at a downwind surface site in northern California, show that under long-range transport events, high O3 air-masses (O3>60 ppb at altitudes between about 2 and 4 km can be transported inland and can significantly influence surface O3 20–30 h later. These results show the importance of characterizing the vertical structure of the lateral boundary conditions (LBC needed in air quality simulations. The importance of the LBC on O3 prediction during this period is further studied through a series of sensitivity studies using different forms of LBC. It is shown that the use of the LBC downscaled from RAQMS global model that assimilated MLS and OMI data improves the model performance. We also show that the predictions can be further improved through the use of LBC based on NASA DC-8 airborne observations during the ARCTAS-CARB experiment. These results indicate the need to develop observational strategies to provide information on the three-dimensional nature of pollutant distributions, in order to improve our capability to predict

  19. Role of the Analytic Element Method in regional-scale GIS-based modeling of groundwater flow and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, I.

    2003-12-01

    The basic principle of the Analytic Element Method (AEM) is the superposition: complex regional-scale flows are simulated by adding the influences of individual analytic elements. Each analytic element contains geographic information and mathematical functions that describe its influence on regional groundwater flow. The main AEM advantage, relevant to GIS-based modeling, is a direct correspondence of analytic elements and hydrologic aquifer features (such as lakes, rivers, water-supply wells). The flow solution (water table elevation and fluxes) is created without discretization by including all relevant elements (or features). Several regional-scale groundwater models have been developed using the AEM include NAGROM (the National Groundwater Model of The Netherlands) and the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area Groundwater Model (Metro Model). The one-to-one correspondence of elements to hydrologic features allows for elegant integration of groundwater modeling and GIS software. This simplifies both model development and management. In contrast to finite-difference and finite-element based methods, the AEM does not require any grid-based data; all input data are vector-based. This representational style coincides well with the strengths of Geographic Information Systems. This presentation will focus on both the practical aspects of the AEM relevant to GIS-based modeling and the development of a new GIS-based user interface for AEM modeling. Recent computational advances related to regional-scale mo