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Sample records for subglottal air pressure

  1. A new method to record subglottal pressure waves : potential applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann, K; Gall, [No Value; Schutte, HK; Miller, DG

    Rapid subglottal pressure changes related to the glottal cycles influence the aerodynamics of phonation. Various methods to measure these have been developed, but are not practical for routine phoniatric use. For that reason, a noninvasive measurement tool is necessary. This article presents a

  2. A new method to record subglottal pressure waves: potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Katrin; Gall, Volker; Schutte, Harm K; Miller, Donald G

    2003-06-01

    Rapid subglottal pressure changes related to the glottal cycles influence the aerodynamics of phonation. Various methods to measure these have been developed, but are not practical for routine phoniatric use. For that reason, a noninvasive measurement tool is necessary. This article presents a technique that uses a microphone positioned at the skin of the jugular fossa to record the signal which arises in the subglottal spaces and is transmitted through the soft tissue to the surface of the skin. Using the program Glottal Segmentation of Voice and Speech, jugular microphone recordings from two healthy subjects were compared with simultaneously recorded direct intratracheal measurements during the same phonation. A systematic error arising from the transmission properties of the microphone and the soft tissue leads to phase and amplitude deviations. These must be taken into account and require correction. This correction procedure leads to high correlations and a good agreement between the two signals. Even without this correction the jugular microphone measurements proved to be useful as a diagnostic and a therapeutic tool in cases where chest resonance specific processes appear affected. In addition, they offer material for research purposes. Although based on a small number of subjects, the new method shows a good validity; testing on a larger number of subjects will probably strengthen the validity.

  3. Influence of external subglottic air flow on dysphagic tracheotomized patients with severe brain injury- preliminary findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Bjerrum, Katje; Nielsen, Lars Hedemann

    2017-01-01

    through the standard cuffed suction aid tracheotomy tube which primarily is used to suction residual secretion volume from the subglottic area. Sessions were 150 min and ESAF was provided at 60-65, 90-95 and 120-125 min at 3L/min. Outcome measures included swallowing frequency (swallows/5min) at 0-5 (pre...... and reduction in residual secretion volume may indicate that ESAF influences swallowing parameters in patients with tracheotomy tubes....

  4. Anaesthesia and subglottic airway obstruction | Bulbulia | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stridor was the presenting feature. A good history and careful assessment will reduce the likelihood of erroneous or delayed diagnosis and will improve patient outcome.This case report highlights the use of target-controlled infusions and jet ventilation (high-pressure source ventilation) in the surgical excision of a subglottic ...

  5. Acquired subglottic stenosis : an experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.K. Bean (Jim)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSubglottic (endolaryngeal) injury can cause a subglottic stenosis. Chronic subglottic stenosis is defined as a partial narrowing (to complete obliteration) of the airway bounded by the inferior margin of the cricoid at the caudal side and cranially by the insertion of the fibres of the

  6. Anaesthesia and subglottic airway obstruction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-07-14

    Jul 14, 2009 ... Keywords: shared airway; jet ventilation; TIVA/TCI; laser excision; monitoring. Abstract. In this article, we describe the anaesthetic management and laser excision of a subglottic tumour that caused upper airway obstruction. Stridor was the presenting feature. A good history and careful assessment will ...

  7. Anesthesia for patients with subglottic cysts

    OpenAIRE

    Vo, Daniel N.

    2016-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Acquired subglottic cysts can cause rapid development of respiratory distress. Subglottic cysts are a disease of premature infants and other pathologies of prematurity should be anticipated. Perioperative success is dependent on communication between surgeon and anesthesiologist. Contingency plans for an emergency surgical airway should be in place in the event of total airway obstruction.

  8. Tracheostomy Tube Type and Inner Cannula Selection Impact Pressure and Resistance to Air Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Lee N; Baldwin, Claire E; Ward, Elizabeth C; Cornwell, Petrea L; O'Connor, Stephanie N; Chapman, Marianne J; Bersten, Andrew D

    2016-05-01

    Advancements in tracheostomy tube design now provide clinicians with a range of options to facilitate communication for individuals receiving ventilator assistance through a cuffed tube. Little is known about the impact of these modern design features on resistance to air flow. We undertook a bench model test to measure pressure-flow characteristics and resistance of a range of tubes of similar outer diameter, including those enabling subglottic suction and speech. A constant inspiratory ± expiratory air flow was generated at increasing flows up to 150 L/min through each tube (with or without optional, mandatory, or interchangeable inner cannula). Driving pressures were measured, and resistance was calculated (cm H2O/L/s). Pressures changed with increasing flow (P air flow. The single-lumen reference tube encountered the lowest inspiratory and expiratory pressures compared with all double-lumen tubes (P resistance by a factor of 3. For a tube with interchangeable inner cannulas, the type of cannula altered pressure and resistance differently (P resistance by more than a factor of 4. Tracheostomy tube type and inner cannula selection imposed differing pressures and resistance to air flow during inspiration and expiration. These differences may be important when selecting airway equipment or when setting parameters for monitoring, particularly for patients receiving supported ventilation or during the weaning process. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  9. Correlation of subglottic laryngitis in children and meteorological parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasumovic, Merima

    2010-01-01

    Considering hospitalization as an indicator of the severity of acute subglottic laryngitis (ASL), the aim of this study was to determine the correlation between meteorological parameters and the incidence of ASL in children from the Tuzla area. The study included fifty-nine boys and girls from the Tuzla area, which were referred and hospitalized due to the ASL at the Clinic for diseases of ear, nose, throat, cervical and maxillofacial Surgery, University Clinical Center in Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina, during the period of March 21st 2006 until March 20th 2007. We formed two databases: 1. the database on each hospitalized child included data on Body Mass Index (BMI), sex and age. 2. Meteorology database which included information on humidity, air temperature, wind direction and atmospheric pressure, sorted by day, month and season. The results of this study indicate that the number of hospitalized boys due to ASL was significantly higher than girls (48 boys and 11 girls). Boys with an average BMI of 34.53 kg/m2 and 6.77 years of age suffered more frequently from the ASL (81.35%) than girls (18.64%) with an average BMI of 21.59 kg/m2 and the age of 3.8 years. The largest number of children with ASL was admitted during the period of lowest temperature (Fall-12.27 degrees C; Winter-0.50 degrees C), and the largest value of relative humidity (fall 77.33 mmHg-winter 82.50 mmHg). Therefore, this study indicates that meteorological factors (temperature, humidity, wind direction, atmospheric pressure) increase the risk of ASL with young children, primarily boys.

  10. Anesthesia for subglottic stenosis in pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eid Essam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Any site in the upper airway can get obstructed and cause noisy breathing as well as dyspnea. These include nasal causes such as choanal atresia or nasal stenosis; pharyngeal causes including lingual thyroid; laryngeal causes such as laryngomalacia; tracheobronchial causes such as tracheal stenosis; and subglottic stenosis. Lesions in the oropharynx may cause stertor, while lesions in the laryngotracheal tree will cause stridor. Subglottic stenosis is the third leading cause of congenital stridors in the neonate. Subglottic Stenosis presents challenges to the anesthesiologist. Therefore, It is imperative to perform a detailed history, physical examination, and characterization of the extent and severity of stenosis. Rigid endoscopy is essential for the preoperative planning of any of the surgical procedures that can be used for correction. Choice of operation is dependent on the surgeon′s comfort, postoperative capabilities, and severity of disease. For high-grade stenosis, single-stage laryngotracheal resection or cricotracheal resection are the best options. It has to be borne in mind that the goal of surgery is to allow for an adequate airway for normal activity without the need for tracheostomy. Anesthesia for airway surgery could be conducted safely with either sevofl uraneor propofol-based total intravenous anesthesia.

  11. Monitoring Air Circulation Under Reduced Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygalov, Vadim

    Adequate air circulation is required for controlled environments to maintain uniform temperature and humidity control, and hence the ability to measure air flow accurately is important. Human and associated life support habitats (e.g.,. plant production systems) for future space missions will likely be operated at pressures less than 100 kPa to minimize gas leakage and structural mass. Under such reduced pressures, the outputs from conventional anemometers for monitoring air flow can change and require re-calibration. These effects of atmospheric pressure on different types of air flow measurements are not completely understood; hence we compared the performance of several air flow sensors across a range of hypobaric pressures. Sensors included a propeller type anemometer, a hot-wire anemometer, and a Pitot-tube based device. Theoretical schematics (including mathematical models) underlying these measurements were developed. Results demonstrated that changes in sensor outputs were predictable based on their operating principles, and that corrections could be developed for sensors calibrated under normal Earth atmosphere pressure ( 100 kPa) and then used at different pressures. The potential effects of hypobaric atmospheres and their altered air flows on plant physiology are also discussed.

  12. Air pressures in wood frame walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton. TenWolde; Charles G. Carll; Vyto. Malinauskas

    1998-01-01

    Wind pressures can play an important role in the wetting of exterior walls (driving rain). In response, the rain screen concept, including compartmentalization and air spaces, has been developed to provide pressure equalization and limit water entry into the wall. However, conventional construction such as wood lap siding has not been evaluated as to its ability to...

  13. Tertiary center experience with primary endoscopic laryngoplasty in pediatric acquired subglottic stenosis and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaber Alshammari

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: Our study showed that primary endoscopic management was successful in 82.3% of cases of acquired subglottic stenosis including those with high grade stenosis and long segment of more than 12 mm in terms of the craniocaudal length. CO2 laser was an important tool to convert mature hard stenotic segment into a soft one. The latter yielded to the lateral pressure created by balloon dilatation better.

  14. Effects on Vocal Fold Collision and Phonation Threshold Pressure of Resonance Tube Phonation with Tube End in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enflo, Laura; Sundberg, Johan; Romedahl, Camilla; McAllister, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Resonance tube phonation in water (RTPW) or in air is a voice therapy method successfully used for treatment of several voice pathologies. Its effect on the voice has not been thoroughly studied. This investigation analyzes the effects of RTPW on collision and phonation threshold pressures (CTP and PTP), the lowest subglottal pressure…

  15. IceBridge Paroscientific L0 Pressure Altimeter Raw Air Pressure

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA IceBridge Paroscientific L0 Pressure Altimeter Raw Air Pressure (IAPRS0) data set contains air pressure readings taken over Antarctica using the...

  16. IceBridge Paroscientific L0 Pressure Altimeter Raw Air Pressure, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA IceBridge Paroscientific L0 Pressure Altimeter Raw Air Pressure (IAPRS0) data set contains air pressure readings taken over Antarctica using the...

  17. Endoscopic Management of Idiopathic Subglottic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Sepehr; Hoffman, Matthew R; Brand, William T; Dailey, Seth H

    2017-02-01

    To describe a homogeneous idiopathic subglottic stenosis (ISS) population undergoing endoscopic balloon dilation and evaluate factors affecting inter-dilation interval (IDI). Retrospective review of 37 patients. Co-morbidity prevalence versus normal population was evaluated using chi-square tests. Correlations were evaluated using Pearson product moment tests. Independent samples t tests/rank sum tests assessed differences between groups of interest. All patients were female aged 45.9 ± 15.4 years at diagnosis. Four required a tracheotomy during management. Most prevalent co-morbidity was gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (64.9%; P = .036). Body mass indices (BMI) at first and most recent dilation were 29.8 and 30.8 ( P = .564). Degree of stenosis before first dilation was 53 ± 14%. Patients underwent 3.8 ± 1.8 dilations (range, 1-11). Average IDI was 635 ± 615 days (range, 49-3130 days), including 556 ± 397 days for patients receiving concomitant steroid injection and 283 ± 36 for those who did not ( P = .079). Inter-dilation interval was not correlated with BMI ( r = 0.0486; P = .802) or number of co-morbidities ( r = -0.225, P = .223). Most patients with ISS can be managed endoscopically, and IDI may be increased with steroid injection. Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common co-morbidity. Body mass index did not change over time despite potential effects on exercise tolerance; BMI did not affect IDI. Methods to determine optimal timing for next intervention are warranted.

  18. IceBridge Paroscientific S-1000 L1B Pressure Altimeter Time-Tagged Air Pressure

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA IceBridge Paroscientific S-1000 L1B Pressure Altimeter Time-Tagged Air Pressure (IAPRS1B) data set contains static pressure values for Antarctica using the...

  19. Engineering Model of High Pressure Moist Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyhlík Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the moist air equation of state. There are equations of state discussed in the article, i.e. the model of an ideal mixture of ideal gases, the model of an ideal mixture of real gases and the model based on the virial equation of state. The evaluation of sound speed based on the ideal mixture concept is mentioned. The sound speed calculated by the model of an ideal mixture of ideal gases is compared with the sound speed calculated by using the model based on the concept of an ideal mixture of real gases. The comparison of enthalpy end entropy based on the model of an ideal mixture of ideal gases and the model of an ideal mixture of real gases is performed. It is shown that the model of an ideal mixture of real gases deviates from the model of an ideal mixture of ideal gases only in the case of high pressure. An impossibility of the definition of partial pressure in the mixture of real gases is discussed, where the virial equation of state is used.

  20. Prenatal air pollution exposure and newborn blood pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossem, Lenie|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330805436; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L.; Melly, Steven J.; Kloog, Itai; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike; Zanobetti, Antonella; Coull, Brent A.; Schwartz, Joel D.; Mittleman, Murray A.; Oken, Emily; Gillman, Matthew W.; Koutrakis, Petros; Gold, Diane R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Air pollution exposure has been associated with increased blood pressure in adults. oBjective: We examined associations of antenatal exposure to ambient air pollution with newborn systolic blood pressure (SBP). Methods: We studied 1,131 mother–infant pairs in a Boston, Massachusetts,

  1. Underground storage systems for high-pressure air and gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, B. H.; Giovannetti, A.

    1975-01-01

    This paper is a discussion of the safety and cost of underground high-pressure air and gas storage systems based on recent experience with a high-pressure air system installed at Moffett Field, California. The system described used threaded and coupled oil well casings installed vertically to a depth of 1200 ft. Maximum pressure was 3000 psi and capacity was 500,000 lb of air. A failure mode analysis is presented, and it is shown that underground storage offers advantages in avoiding catastrophic consequences from pressure vessel failure. Certain problems such as corrosion, fatigue, and electrolysis are discussed in terms of the economic life of such vessels. A cost analysis shows that where favorable drilling conditions exist, the cost of underground high-pressure storage is approximately one-quarter that of equivalent aboveground storage.

  2. Simultaneous velocity and pressure quantification using pressure-sensitive flow tracers in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Peterson, Sean; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2017-11-01

    Particle-based measurement techniques for assessing the velocity field of a fluid have advanced rapidly over the past two decades. Full-field pressure measurement techniques have remained elusive, however. In this work, we aim to demonstrate the possibility of direct simultaneous planar velocity and pressure measurement of a high speed aerodynamic flow by employing novel pressure-sensitive tracer particles for particle image velocimetry (PIV). Specifically, the velocity and pressure variations of an airflow through a converging-diverging channel are studied. Polystyrene microparticles embedded with a pressure-sensitive phosphorescent dye-platinum octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP)-are used as seeding particles. Due to the oxygen quenching effect, the emission lifetime of PtOEP is highly sensitive to the oxygen concentration, that is, the partial pressure of oxygen, in the air. Since the partial pressure of oxygen is linearly proportional to the air pressure, we can determine the air pressure through the phosphorescence emission lifetime of the dye. The velocity field is instead obtained using traditional PIV methods. The particles have a pressure resolution on the order of 1 kPa, which may be improved by optimizing the particle size and dye concentration to suit specific flow scenarios. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number CBET-1332204.

  3. Undersedation is a risk factor for the development of subglottic stenosis in intubated children,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Schweiger

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To analyze the level of sedation in intubated children as a risk factor for the development of subglottic stenosis. Methods: All patients between 30 days and 5 years of age who required endotracheal intubation in the pediatric intensive care unit between 2013 and 2014 were included in this prospective study. They were monitored daily and COMFORT-B scores were obtained. Flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy was performed within eight hours of extubation, and repeated seven to ten days later if the first examination showed moderate to severe laryngeal injuries. If these lesions persisted and/or if the child developed symptoms in the follow-up period, microlaryngoscopy under general anesthesia was performed to evaluate for subglottic stenosis. Results: The study included 36 children. Incidence of subglottic stenosis was 11.1%. Children with subglottic stenosis had a higher percentage of COMFORT-B scores between 23 and 30 (undersedated than those who did not develop subglottic stenosis (15.8% vs. 3.65%, p = 0.004. Conclusion: Children who developed subglottic stenosis were less sedated than children who did not develop subglottic stenosis.

  4. [High speed cinematographic analysis of subglottal mucosal vibration during experimentally induced phonation in excised larynges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, H

    1992-08-01

    Twenty-seven excised canine larynges and two excised human larynges fixed on a wall of a specially constructed glass box, were blown on and the subglottal mucosal vibrations were photographed using high speed cinematography from the tracheal side. Each film was repeatedly projected at normal speed and analyzed frame by frame. Mucosal upheaval appeared between the anterior commissure and the vocal process. The mucosal wave or "traveling wave" started from the mucosal upheaval and propagated medially and upward. The mucosal upheaval vibrated with a small amplitude and with an earlier phase than any other portion of the vocal fold. Increase of air flow resulted in increased amplitude of the free edge excursion. The mucosal upheaval seemed to shift more laterally after the increase of air flow. But judging from the positional relations between the mucosal upheaval and markers, the origin of the mucosal upheaval was the same despite the increase of air flow. After the increase of vocal fold tension by cricothyroid approximation, the mucosal wave occurred within the limited area near the vocal edge. The mucosal upheaval was located more medially as compared to the original position. The mucosal upheaval appeared on what was actually the superior portion of the vocal fold. Direct electrical stimulation of the thyroarytenoid muscle (TA) bulged the lower surface of the vocal fold medially, and narrowed the subglottic area surrounded by bilateral mucosal upheavals during vibration. The mucosal upheaval seemed to shift more medially after stimulation of TA, but combined with the movements of the marker, the mucosal upheaval appeared on a more inferior portion of the vocal fold compared to its position before the stimulation. Thus, a more dynamic mucosal wave appeared in the vertical direction. Histological examination revealed that the mucosal upheaval arose on the lower surface of the vocal fold, slightly above the area where the muscular layer came close to the epithelial

  5. Exploration to generate atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzheng, LIU; Chuanlong, MA; Shuai, ZHAO; Xiaozhong, CHEN; Tahan, WANG; Luxiang, ZHAO; Zhiyi, LI; Jiangqi, NIU; Liying, ZHU; Maolin, CHAI

    2018-03-01

    Atmospheric pressure glow discharge (APGD) plasma in air has high application value. In this paper, the methods of generating APGD plasma in air are discussed, and the characteristics of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in non-uniform electric field are studied. It makes sure that APGD in air is formed by DBD in alternating current electric field with using the absorbing electron capacity of electret materials to provide initial electrons and to end the discharge progress. Through designing electric field to form two-dimensional space varying electric field and three-dimensional space varying electric field, the development of electron avalanches in air-gap is suppressed effectively and a large space of APGD plasma in air is generated. Further, through combining electrode structures, a large area of APGD plasma in air is generated. On the other hand, by using the method of increasing the density of initial electrons, millimeter-gap glow discharge in atmospheric pressure air is formed, and a maximum gap distance between electrodes is 8 mm. By using the APGD plasma surface treatment device composed of contact electrodes, the surface modification of high polymer materials such as aramid fiber and polyester are studied and good effect of modifications is obtained. The present paper provides references for the researchers of industrial applications of plasma.

  6. Idiopathic subglottic stenosis in pregnancy: A deceptive laryngoscopic view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John George Karippacheril

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 28-year-old lady with term gestation, pre-eclampsia and a vague history of occasional breathing difficulty, on irregular bronchodilator therapy, was scheduled for category 1 lower segment caesarean section in view of foetal distress. A Cormack-Lehane grade 1 direct laryngoscopic view was obtained following rapid sequence induction. However, it was not possible to insert a 7.0 or 6.0 size styleted cuffed tracheal tube in two attempts. Ventilation with a supraglottic device was inadequate. Airway was secured with a 4.0 size microlaryngeal surgery tube with difficulty. Computed tomography scan of the neck following tracheostomy for failed extubation revealed subglottic stenosis (SGS with asymmetric arytenoid calcification. This report describes the management of a rare case of unrecognised idiopathic SGS in pregnancy.

  7. Experimental Air Pressure Tank Systems for Process Control Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Christopher E.; Holland, Charles E.; Gatzke, Edward P.

    2006-01-01

    In process control education, particularly in the field of chemical engineering, there is an inherent need for industrially relevant hands-on apparatuses that enable one to bridge the gap between the theoretical content of coursework and real-world applications. At the University of South Carolina, two experimental air-pressure tank systems have…

  8. Pneumomediastinum following high pressure air injection to the hand.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennedy, J

    2010-04-01

    We present the case of a patient who developed pneumomediastinum after high pressure air injection to the hand. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of pneumomediastinum where the gas injection site was the thenar eminence. Fortunately the patient recovered with conservative management.

  9. Pneumomediastinum following high pressure air injection to the hand.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennedy, J

    2012-02-01

    We present the case of a patient who developed pneumomediastinum after high pressure air injection to the hand. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of pneumomediastinum where the gas injection site was the thenar eminence. Fortunately the patient recovered with conservative management.

  10. The Jar Magic--Instructional Activities for Teaching Air Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Bing-Hong; Chen, Chyong-Sun

    2013-01-01

    There are a variety of impressive activities designed for teaching the concept of air pressure to junior high school students. Water, glasses, balloons, plastic bottles, and suction cups are some of the items commonly used in these experiments. For example, if we take a glass of water, cover it with a piece of cardboard, and invert the glass,…

  11. Resection of pulmonary nodule in a patient with subglottic stenosis under modified spontaneous ventilation anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Jianfei; Chen, Xuewei; Liang, Lixia

    2017-01-01

    . Here we present a case of pulmonary nodule resection in a patient with subglottic stenosis using uniportal thoracoscopy under spontaneous ventilation anesthesia (SVA). Compared with traditional double lumen endotracheal intubation, we believe this modified technique can significantly reduce airway...

  12. [Subglottic stenosis as the initial manifestation of Wegener's granulomatosis in a teenager. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuestas, Giselle; Rodríguez, Verónica; Doormann, Flavia; Pringe, Alejandra; Bellia Munzón, Patricio; Bellia Munzón, Gastón; Ortega, Carlos; Álvarez, Rubén

    2017-04-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis is a necrotizing granulomatous vasculitis of autoimmune origin that primarily affects the upper and lower airways and kidneys. It is very rare in children and adolescents. When started at a young age it is often associated with subglottic stenosis. Subglottic stenosis is a potentially fatal manifestation of Wegener's granulomatosis. Its diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion since it might develop in the absence of other signs of activity. Occasionally, subglottic stenosis may present as the initial manifestation of the disease. Diagnosis is confirmed by endoscopic visualization of the lesion. The treatment is complex, and it often requires repeated interventions due to restenosis. We present a 13-year-old patient with subglottic stenosis secondary to Wegener's granulomatosis. We describe the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of this rare cause of respiratory distress in the pediatric population. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  13. Generation of subnanosecond electron beams in air at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyrya, I. D.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Rybka, D. V.

    2009-11-01

    Optimum conditions for the generation of runaway electron beams with maximum current amplitudes and densities in nanosecond pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure are determined. A supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) with a current amplitude of ˜30 A, a current density of ˜20 A/cm2, and a pulse full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ˜100 ps has been observed behind the output foil of an air-filled diode. It is shown that the position of the SAEB current maximum relative to the voltage pulse front exhibits a time shift that varies when the small-size collector is moved over the foil surface.

  14. Investigation of the spatial variability and possible origins of wind-induced air pressure fluctuations responsible for pressure pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Manuel; Laemmel, Thomas; Maier, Martin; Zeeman, Matthias; Longdoz, Bernard; Schindler, Dirk

    2017-04-01

    The exchange of greenhouse gases between the soil and the atmosphere is highly relevant for the climate of the Earth. Recent research suggests that wind-induced air pressure fluctuations can alter the soil gas transport and therefore soil gas efflux significantly. Using a newly developed method, we measured soil gas transport in situ in a well aerated forest soil. Results from these measurements showed that the commonly used soil gas diffusion coefficient is enhanced up to 30% during periods of strong wind-induced air pressure fluctuations. The air pressure fluctuations above the forest floor are only induced at high above-canopy wind speeds (> 5 m s-1) and lie in the frequency range 0.01-0.1 Hz. Moreover, the amplitudes of air pressure fluctuations in this frequency range show a clear quadratic dependence on mean above-canopy wind speed. However, the origin of these wind-induced pressure fluctuations is still unclear. Airflow measurements and high-precision air pressure measurements were conducted at three different vegetation-covered sites (conifer forest, deciduous forest, grassland) to investigate the spatial variability of dominant air pressure fluctuations, their origin and vegetation-dependent characteristics. At the conifer forest site, a vertical profile of air pressure fluctuations was measured and an array consisting of five pressure sensors were installed at the forest floor. At the grassland site, the air pressure measurements were compared with wind observations made by ground-based LIDAR and spatial temperature observations from a fibre-optic sensing network (ScaleX Campaign 2016). Preliminary results show that at all sites the amplitudes of relevant air pressure fluctuations increase with increasing wind speed. Data from the array measurements reveal that there are no time lags between the air pressure signals of different heights, but a time lag existed between the air pressure signals of the sensors distributed laterally on the forest floor

  15. AIR SEPARATION BY PRESSURE SWING ADSORPTION USING SUPERIOR ADSORBENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralph T. Yang

    2001-08-31

    Li-X zeolite (Si/Al = 1.0) is currently the best sorbent for use in the separation of air by adsorption processes. In particular, pressure swing adsorption (PSA) using zeolite sorbents is being increasingly used for air separation. Silver is also known to strongly affect the adsorptive properties of zeolites; and it is known that thermal vacuum dehydration of silver zeolites leads to the formation of silver clusters within the zeolite. In this work we have synthesized type X zeolites containing Ag and also varying mixtures of Li and Ag. In this project, we developed the Ag-containing zeolite as the best sorbent for air separation. We have also studied Co-ligand compounds as oxygen-selective sorbents. Syntheses, structural characterization and adsorption properties have been performed on all sorbents. The results are described in detail in 5 chapters.

  16. Active Sensing Air Pressure Using Differential Absorption Barometric Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, B.

    2016-12-01

    Tropical storms and other severe weathers cause huge life losses and property damages and have major impacts on public safety and national security. Their observations and predictions need to be significantly improved. This effort tries to develop a feasible active microwave approach that measures surface air pressure, especially over open seas, from space using a Differential-absorption BArometric Radar (DiBAR) operating at 50-55 GHz O2 absorption band in order to constrain assimilated dynamic fields of numerical weather Prediction (NWP) models close to actual conditions. Air pressure is the most important variable that drives atmospheric dynamics, and currently can only be measured by limited in-situ observations over oceans. Even over land there is no uniform coverage of surface air pressure measurements. Analyses show that with the proposed space radar the errors in instantaneous (averaged) pressure estimates can be as low as 4mb ( 1mb) under all weather conditions. NASA Langley research team has made substantial progresses in advancing the DiBAR concept. The feasibility assessment clearly shows the potential of surface barometry using existing radar technologies. The team has also developed a DiBAR system design, fabricated a Prototype-DiBAR (P-DiBAR) for proof-of-concept, conducted laboratory, ground and airborne P-DiBAR tests. The flight test results are consistent with the instrumentation goals. The precision and accuracy of radar surface pressure measurements are within the range of the theoretical analysis of the DiBAR concept. Observational system simulation experiments for space DiBAR performance based on the existing DiBAR technology and capability show substantial improvements in tropical storm predictions, not only for the hurricane track and position but also for the hurricane intensity. DiBAR measurements will provide us an unprecedented level of the prediction and knowledge on global extreme weather and climate conditions.

  17. Safe balloon sizing for endoscopic dilatation of subglottic stenosis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S D; Gupta, S L; Wyatt, M; Albert, D; Hartley, B

    2017-03-01

    To describe our experience and provide guidelines for maximum safe balloon sizes according to age in children undergoing balloon dilatation. A retrospective review was conducted of children undergoing balloon dilatation for subglottic stenosis in a paediatric tertiary unit between May 2006 and February 2016. A total of 166 patients underwent balloon dilatation. Mean ( ± standard deviation) patient age was 4.5 ± 3.99 years. The median balloon size was 8 mm, the median balloon inflation pressure was 10 atm, and the mean balloon inflation time was 65.1 ± 18.6 seconds. No significant unexpected events occurred. The Pearson correlation co-efficient for the relationship between patient age and balloon size was 0.85 (p = 0.001), suggesting a strongly positive correlation. This study demonstrated that balloon dilatation is a safe procedure for airway stenosis. The results suggest using a balloon diameter that is equal to the outer diameter of the age-appropriate endotracheal tube +1 mm for the larynx and subglottis and +2 mm for the trachea.

  18. A coupled surface/subsurface flow model accounting for air entrapment and air pressure counterflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delfs, Jens Olaf; Wang, Wenqing; Kalbacher, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    the mass exchange between compartments. A benchmark test, which is based on a classic experimental data set on infiltration excess (Horton) overland flow, identified a feedback mechanism between surface runoff and soil air pressures. Our study suggests that air compression in soils amplifies surface runoff......This work introduces the soil air system into integrated hydrology by simulating the flow processes and interactions of surface runoff, soil moisture and air in the shallow subsurface. The numerical model is formulated as a coupled system of partial differential equations for hydrostatic (diffusive...... wave) shallow flow and two-phase flow in a porous medium. The simultaneous mass transfer between the soil, overland, and atmosphere compartments is achieved by upgrading a fully established leakance concept for overland-soil liquid exchange to an air exchange flux between soil and atmosphere. In a new...

  19. Correlation Between Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure and Tracheal Wall Pressure Using Air and Saline Filled Cuffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-31

    Pressures within air-filled tracheal cuffs at altitude--an in vivo study. Anaesthesia . 2004;59(3):252-254. 5. Smith RP, McArdle BH. Pressure in the...cuffs of tracheal tubes at altitude. Anaesthesia . 2002; 57(4):374-378. 6. Britton T, Blakeman TC, Eggert J, Rodriquez D, Ortiz H, Branson RD. Managing...a comparison of three different in vitro techniques. Anaesthesia . 2008; 63(4):418-422. 15. Li Bassi G, Ranzani OT, Marti JD, Giunta V, Luque N, et

  20. Microwave generation of stable atmospheric-pressure fireballs in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Karl D.

    2006-11-01

    The generation of stable buoyant fireballs in a microwave cavity in air at atmospheric pressure without the use of vaporized solids is described. These fireballs have some of the characteristics of ball lightning and resemble those reported by Dikhtyar and Jerby [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 045002 (2006)], although of a different color, and do not require the presence of molten or vaporized material. Mechanisms of microwave plasma formation and fluid dynamics can account for the observed behavior of the fireballs, which do not appear to meet the accepted definition of dusty plasmas in this case. Relevance to models of ball lightning and industrial applications are discussed.

  1. Vandenberg Air Force Base Pressure Gradient Wind Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Jaclyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Warning category winds can adversely impact day-to-day space lift operations at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in California. NASA's Launch Services Program and other programs at VAFB use wind forecasts issued by the 30 Operational Support Squadron Weather Flight (30 OSSWF) to determine if they need to limit activities or protect property such as a launch vehicle. The 30 OSSWF tasked the AMU to develop an automated Excel graphical user interface that includes pressure gradient thresholds between specific observing stations under different synoptic regimes to aid forecasters when issuing wind warnings. This required the AMU to determine if relationships between the variables existed.

  2. A noncontact intraocular pressure measurement device using a micro reflected air pressure sensor for the prediagnosis of glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Hwan; Kim, Byeong Hee; Seo, Young Ho

    2012-03-01

    This study investigates a novel, portable tonometer using a micro reflected air pressure sensor for the prediagnosis of glaucoma. Because glaucoma progresses slowly and is not painful, glaucoma patients require a portable prediagnosis system to periodically measure intraocular pressure at home. Conventionally, intraocular pressure is measured by an air-puff tonometer whereby the cornea is deformed by a short pulse of air pressure and the magnitude of the corneal deformation is measured by optic systems such as a combination of laser- and photodiodes. In this study, a micro reflected air pressure sensor was designed, fabricated, and tested in order to measure the magnitude of corneal deformation without optic systems. In an experimental study, artificial eyes with different internal pressures were fabricated and these pressures were measured by the aforementioned system.

  3. Memory deficits at 0.6 MPa ambient air pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetzlaff, K; Leplow, B; Deistler, I; Ramm, G; Fehm-Wolfsdorf, G; Warninghoff, V; Bettinghausen, E

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the effects of an elevated ambient air pressure of 0.6 MPa on verbal memory performance. Twenty-four experienced divers were compressed in a dry hyperbaric chamber to pressures equivalent to 0.5 meters of seawater (msw) (n = 12) and 50 msw (n = 12). Verbal memory was assessed by free recall and recognition of visually presented word lists. The testing procedure specified learning and testing at surface, learning at surface and testing at depth, learning and testing at depth, and learning at depth and testing at surface. Non-specific stress was assessed by measurement of salivary cortisol, heart rate, and subjective stress before, during, and after the dives. The 50-msw dive group showed a significant decrease of free recall performance when the material was learned at depth (P stressors in the hyperbaric environment contributed to these deficits cannot be eliminated entirely.

  4. Heart-rate monitoring by air pressure and causal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Naoki; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Hata, Yutaka

    2011-06-01

    Among lots of vital signals, heart-rate (HR) is an important index for diagnose human's health condition. For instance, HR provides an early stage of cardiac disease, autonomic nerve behavior, and so forth. However, currently, HR is measured only in medical checkups and clinical diagnosis during the rested state by using electrocardiograph (ECG). Thus, some serious cardiac events in daily life could be lost. Therefore, a continuous HR monitoring during 24 hours is desired. Considering the use in daily life, the monitoring should be noninvasive and low intrusive. Thus, in this paper, an HR monitoring in sleep by using air pressure sensors is proposed. The HR monitoring is realized by employing the causal analysis among air pressure and HR. The causality is described by employing fuzzy logic. According to the experiment on 7 males at age 22-25 (23 on average), the correlation coefficient against ECG is 0.73-0.97 (0.85 on average). In addition, the cause-effect structure for HR monitoring is arranged by employing causal decomposition, and the arranged causality is applied to HR monitoring in a setting posture. According to the additional experiment on 6 males, the correlation coefficient is 0.66-0.86 (0.76 on average). Therefore, the proposed method is suggested to have enough accuracy and robustness for some daily use cases.

  5. Thermal separation of soil particles from thermal conductivity measurement under various air pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sen; Ren, Tusheng; Lu, Yili; Meng, Ping; Zhang, Jinsong

    2017-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of dry soils is related closely to air pressure and the contact areas between solid particles. In this study, the thermal conductivity of two-phase soil systems was determined under reduced and increased air pressures. The thermal separation of soil particles, i.e., the characteristic dimension of the pore space (d), was then estimated based on the relationship between soil thermal conductivity and air pressure. Results showed that under both reduced and increased air pressures, d estimations were significantly larger than the geometrical mean separation of solid particles (D), which suggested that conductive heat transfer through solid particles dominated heat transfer in dry soils. The increased air pressure approach gave d values lower than that of the reduced air pressure method. With increasing air pressure, more collisions between gas molecules and solid surface occurred in micro-pores and intra-aggregate pores due to the reduction of mean free path of air molecules. Compared to the reduced air pressure approach, the increased air pressure approach expressed more micro-pore structure attributes in heat transfer. We concluded that measuring thermal conductivity under increased air pressure procedures gave better-quality d values, and improved soil micro-pore structure estimation.

  6. Complicated pediatric subglottic granular cell tumor with extensive intraluminal and extraluminal invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonik, Nathan J; Zeltsman, David; Smith, Lee P

    2014-09-01

    Subglottic granular cell tumors (GCT) are rare, potentially life threatening benign tumors. Complete resection is necessary, yet care must be taken to preserve laryngeal function. We present the first description of a pediatric subglottic GCT with extensive invasion beyond the confines of the subglottis to include the vocal folds and central neck. Urgent endoscopic debulking avoided tracheotomy and facilitated extubation. Later, complete resection required hemithyroidectomy, laryngofissure and partial cricotracheal resection. We conclude that endoscopic debulking is an appropriate initial treatment. Transmural extension should be suspected in tumors larger than 1cm and warn of the need for tracheal resection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pressurized air cathodes for enhanced stability and power generation by microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    He, Weihua

    2016-09-30

    Large differences between the water and air pressure in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) can deform and damage cathodes. To avoid deformation, the cathode air pressure was controlled to balance pressure differences between the air and water. Raising the air pressures from 0 to 10 kPa at a set cathode potential of −0.3 V (versus Ag/AgCl) enhanced cathode performance by 17%, but pressures ≥25 kPa decreased current and resulted in air leakage into the solution. Matching the air pressure with the water pressure avoided cathode deformation and improved performance. The maximum power density increased by 15%, from 1070 ± 20 to 1230 ± 70 mW m, with balanced air and water pressures of 10–25 kPa. Oxygen partial pressures ≥12.5 kPa in the cathode compartment maintained the oxygen reduction rate to be within 92 ± 1% of that in ambient air. The use of pressurized air flow through the cathode compartments can enable closer spacing of the cathodes compared to passive gas transfer systems, which could make the reactor design more compact. The energy cost of pressurizing the cathodes was estimated to be smaller than the increase in power that resulted from the use of pressurized cathodes.

  8. Management of infantile subglottic hemangioma: Laser vaporization, submucous resection, intubation, or intralesional steroids?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. Hoeve (Hans); G.L.E. Küppers (G. L E); C.D.A. Verwoerd (Carel)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe infantile subglottic hemangioma can be treated in various ways. The results of the treatment used in the Sophia Children's Hospital, intralesional steroids and intubation (IS + I), are discussed and compared with the results of other current treatment methods: CO2 laser vaporization,

  9. Efficacy and rebound rates in propranolol-treated subglottic hemangioma: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Tyler; Faria, John; Pawar, Sachin; Siegel, Dawn; Chun, Robert H

    2017-11-01

    Propranolol has recently become the treatment of choice for management of subglottic and airway hemangiomas. This literature review aimed to determine the success rate of propranolol for managing these lesions as well as the rate of rebound growth following propranolol treatment cessation. Literature search involving MEDLINE and Scopus to identify English-language articles. Studies were identified using hemangioma, subglottic or airway, and propranolol for search terms. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they reported the treatment used, individual deidentified patient data, and contained patients without medical or surgical treatment prior to propranolol therapy RESULTS: Initial review included 107 abstracts. Twenty-four articles including case reports and case series met inclusion criteria and were included in the qualitative analysis. Forty-nine patients were included. Twenty-eight (57%) were treated with propranolol alone, and 20 (41%) were treated with a combination of propranolol and a corticosteroid. Thirty-seven (76%) of patients were treated with a dose of 2 mg/kg/d of propranolol. The initial treatment was successful in 43 (88%) of patients. Rebound growth occurred in four (9%) patients. Overall, six (12%) patients underwent surgical resection. Propranolol is efficacious for treating subglottic hemangiomas. Rebound growth does occur in a small subset of patients during the propranolol wean. Close observation for children during weaning of propranolol therapy for subglottic hemangioma is essential. Adjunctive management strategies need to be used in patients with rebound growth. Laryngoscope, 127:2665-2672, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  10. Effects of pressure on fuel-rich combustion of methane-air under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Noriyuki; Arai, Norio [Nagoya Univ., Research Center for Advanced Energy Conversion, Nagoya (Japan); Tanaka, Tadashi [Chubu Electric Power Co. Inc., Electric Power Research and Development Center, Nagoya (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    We have proposed a new and innovative gas turbine system, named chemical gas turbine system. It would improve the thermal efficiency more than 10% compared to conventional ones. This gas turbine system is based on promising developments in fuel-rich combustors with a carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite (C/C composite) being used as the turbine blades. As one of fundamental researches to develop this system, we designed a 4 MPa-scale combustor with methane-air. Flammability limit, components of combustion gases and combustion temperature were measured between 1.1 and 4.1 MPa in pressure. Results from these measurements were as follows: (1) stable combustion could attain between the equivalence ratio theta= 0.7 and 1.3 at 4 MPa in pressure; (2) there was little effect of the pressure on the components of combustion gases; and (3) flammability limit extended with increasing the pressure on the fuel-rich region while it was almost constant in the fuel-lean one. (Author)

  11. [Aerodynamics study on pressure changes inside pressure-type whole-body plethysmograph produced by flowing air].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei-Hua; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2010-02-25

    When using pressure-type plethysmography to test lung function of rodents, calculation of lung volume is always based on Boyle's law. The precondition of Boyle's law is that perfect air is static. However, air in the chamber is flowing continuously when a rodent breathes inside the chamber. Therefore, Boyle's law, a principle of air statics, may not be appropriate for measuring pressure changes of flowing air. In this study, we deduced equations for pressure changes inside pressure-type plethysmograph and then designed three experiments to testify the theoretic deduction. The results of theoretic deduction indicated that increased pressure was generated from two sources: one was based on Boyle's law, and the other was based on the law of conservation of momentum. In the first experiment, after injecting 0.1 mL, 0.2 mL, 0.4 mL of air into the plethysmograph, the pressure inside the chamber increased sharply to a peak value, then promptly decreased to horizontal pressure. Peak values were significantly higher than the horizontal values (P<0.001). This observation revealed that flowing air made an extra effect on air pressure in the plethysmograph. In the second experiment, the same volume of air was injected into the plethysmograph at different frequencies (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3 Hz) and pressure changes inside were measured. The results showed that, with increasing frequencies, the pressure changes in the chamber became significantly higher (P<0.001). In the third experiment, small animal ventilator and pipette were used to make two types of airflow with different functions of time. The pressure changes produced by the ventilator were significantly greater than those produced by the pipette (P<0.001). Based on the data obtained, we draw the conclusion that, the flow of air plays a role in pressure changes inside the plethysmograph, and the faster the airflow is, the higher the pressure changes reach. Furthermore, the type of airflow also influences the pressure changes.

  12. Field test to study the pressure equilization on air permeable facade elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentum, C.A. van; Kalkman, I.M.; Geurts, C.P.W.

    2014-01-01

    The net wind load on the outer layer of a façade consisting of multiple layers is determined by the external pressure and the cavity pressure. For an air-permeable outer layer, the cavity pressure is dependent on the extent to which the external pressure equalizes over the openings. Minimizing the

  13. Study of short atmospheric pressure dc glow microdischarge in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Bogdanov, Eugene; Chirtsov, Alexander; Emelin, Sergey

    2011-10-01

    The results of experiments and simulations of short (without positive column) atmospheric pressure dc glow discharge in air are presented. We used metal steel electrodes with a gap of 5-100 microns. The experimental voltage-current characteristic's (VAC) have a constant or slightly increasing form at low gap. The most stable microdischarges were burning with a flat cathode and rounded anode, when the length of the discharge is automatically established near the minimum of the Paschen curve by changing their binding on the anode. In this case microdischarge was stable and it had growing VAC. For simulations we used 2D fluid model with kinetic description of electrons. We solved the balance equations for the vibrationally- and the electronically-excited states of a nitrogen and oxygen molecules; nitrogen and oxygen atoms; ozone molecule; and different nitrogen and oxygen ions with different plasmochemical reactions between them. Simulations predicted the main regions of the dc glow discharges including cathode and anode sheath and plasma of negative glow, Faraday dark space and transition region. Gas heating plays an important role in shaping the discharge profiles. The results of experiments and simulations of short (without positive column) atmospheric pressure dc glow discharge in air are presented. We used metal steel electrodes with a gap of 5-100 microns. The experimental voltage-current characteristic's (VAC) have a constant or slightly increasing form at low gap. The most stable microdischarges were burning with a flat cathode and rounded anode, when the length of the discharge is automatically established near the minimum of the Paschen curve by changing their binding on the anode. In this case microdischarge was stable and it had growing VAC. For simulations we used 2D fluid model with kinetic description of electrons. We solved the balance equations for the vibrationally- and the electronically-excited states of a nitrogen and oxygen molecules; nitrogen

  14. Integrated arrays of air-dielectric graphene transistors as transparent active-matrix pressure sensors for wide pressure ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sung-Ho; Ji, Sangyoon; Choi, Seiho; Pyo, Kyoung-Hee; Wan An, Byeong; Park, Jihun; Kim, Joohee; Kim, Ju-Young; Lee, Ki-Suk; Kwon, Soon-Yong; Heo, Jaeyeong; Park, Byong-Guk; Park, Jang-Ung

    2017-03-01

    Integrated electronic circuitries with pressure sensors have been extensively researched as a key component for emerging electronics applications such as electronic skins and health-monitoring devices. Although existing pressure sensors display high sensitivities, they can only be used for specific purposes due to the narrow range of detectable pressure (under tens of kPa) and the difficulty of forming highly integrated arrays. However, it is essential to develop tactile pressure sensors with a wide pressure range in order to use them for diverse application areas including medical diagnosis, robotics or automotive electronics. Here we report an unconventional approach for fabricating fully integrated active-matrix arrays of pressure-sensitive graphene transistors with air-dielectric layers simply formed by folding two opposing panels. Furthermore, this realizes a wide tactile pressure sensing range from 250 Pa to ~3 MPa. Additionally, fabrication of pressure sensor arrays and transparent pressure sensors are demonstrated, suggesting their substantial promise as next-generation electronics.

  15. Double Contact During Drop Impact on a Solid Under Reduced Air Pressure

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Erqiang

    2017-11-20

    Drops impacting on solid surfaces entrap small bubbles under their centers, owing to the lubrication pressure which builds up in the thin intervening air layer. We use ultrahigh-speed interference imaging, at 5 Mfps, to investigate how this air layer changes when the ambient air pressure is reduced below atmospheric. Both the radius and the thickness of the air disc become smaller with reduced air pressure. Furthermore, we find the radial extent of the air disc bifurcates, when the compressibility parameter exceeds similar to 25. This bifurcation is also imprinted onto some of the impacts, as a double contact. In addition to the central air disc inside the first ring contact, this is immediately followed by a second ring contact, which entraps an outer toroidal strip of air, which contracts into a ring of bubbles. We find this occurs in a regime where Navier slip, due to rarefied gas effects, enhances the rate gas can escape from the path of the droplet.

  16. Double Contact During Drop Impact on a Solid Under Reduced Air Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Er Qiang; Langley, Kenneth R.; Tian, Yuan Si; Hicks, Peter D.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2017-11-01

    Drops impacting on solid surfaces entrap small bubbles under their centers, owing to the lubrication pressure which builds up in the thin intervening air layer. We use ultrahigh-speed interference imaging, at 5 Mfps, to investigate how this air layer changes when the ambient air pressure is reduced below atmospheric. Both the radius and the thickness of the air disc become smaller with reduced air pressure. Furthermore, we find the radial extent of the air disc bifurcates, when the compressibility parameter exceeds ˜25 . This bifurcation is also imprinted onto some of the impacts, as a double contact. In addition to the central air disc inside the first ring contact, this is immediately followed by a second ring contact, which entraps an outer toroidal strip of air, which contracts into a ring of bubbles. We find this occurs in a regime where Navier slip, due to rarefied gas effects, enhances the rate gas can escape from the path of the droplet.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of water on a hydrophilic silica surface at high air pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, H.A.; Walther, Jens Honore; Jaffe, R.L.

    2014-01-01

    Wepresent a force field forMolecular Dynamics (MD) simulations ofwater and air in contactwith an amorphous silica surface. We calibrate the interactions of each species present in the systemusing dedicated criteria such as the contact angle of a water droplet on a silica surface, and the solubility...... of air in water at different pressures. Using the calibrated force field, we conduct MD simulations to study the interface between a hydrophilic silica substrate and water surrounded by air at different pressures. We find that the static water contact angle is independent of the air pressure imposed...

  18. Numerical Analyses and Forecasting of Surface Air Temperature and Water Vapor Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Analyses and forecasting of heat exchange, fog probability and visibility over the oceans and a number of other numerical environmental analyses/forecasts require a detailed analysis and forecasting of surface air vapor pressure and temperature. Based on earlier encouraging studies by a few Norwegian researchers, such response computation and numerical analysis/forecasting of surface air vapor pressure and temperature is outlined. It is shown that the changes of surface air properties, and sea- air temperature and vapor pressure differences are mainly determined by

  19. The effect of form pressure on the air void structure of SCC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mikkel Vibæk; Hasholt, Marianne Tange; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2005-01-01

    on the air void structure of hardened, air entrained SCC. The subject was examined through laboratory investigations of SCC with two different amounts of air entrainment. The condition in the form was simulated by using containers making it possible to cure concrete under various pressures corresponding......The high workability of self-compacting concrete (SCC) invites to high casting rates. However, casting walls at high rate may result in large pressure at the bottom of the form and subsequently compression of the air voids. This paper deals with the influence of hydrostatic pressure during setting...... to the bottom of castings of 0, 2, 4, and 6 meters height. The laboratory investigations were supplemented with data from two full-scale wall castings. The air void structure of the hardened concretes was determined on plane sections. The results indicate that the pressure related changes of the air void...

  20. Airway Surgery in Tracheostomised Patients with Wegener Granulomatosis Leading to Subglottic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altun, Demet; Sivrikoz, Nükhet; Çamcı, Emre

    2015-10-01

    Wegener granulomatosis (WG) is a multisystemic disorder characterised by granulomatous inflammation of the respiratory system. The growing of proliferative tissue towards the larynx and trachea may cause airway obstruction on account of subglottic stenosis. In this situation, the surgical goal is to eliminate the airway obstruction by providing natural airway anatomy. While mild lesions do not require surgical intervention, in fixed lesions, surgical intervention is required, such as tracheostomy, laser resection and dilatation. In tracheostomised patients, granuloma formation surrounding the tracheostomy cannula may occur in the trachea. Inflammation and newly formed granulation tissue result in severe stenosis in the airways. During surgical treatment of such patients, airway management is important. In this case report, we will discuss gas exchange and airway management with jet ventilation (JV) during excision of the granulation tissue with endolaryngeal laser surgery, leading to subglottic stenosis in tracheostomised patients in WG.

  1. [Tracheal resection for post-intubation subglottic stenosis in a patient with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Radu; Negru, Irina; Matache, Radu; MirunaTodor

    2014-01-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA or Wegener) is a systemic autoimmune disease with inflammation of small- and medium-size vessels. It can affect practically any organ or system, but renal, respiratory andjoint systems are most frequently damaged. Positive pANCA antibodies can raise the suspicion of diagnosis. Subglottic stenosis is relatively frequent, in a quarter of patients, especially in the third decade women. The case presented is of an 80-year-old woman, recently diagnosed with pulmonary, renal and systemic manifestations of GPA and with a subglottic stenosis rapidly evolving towards endotracheal intubation, tracheostomy with mechanical ventilation and renal failure. Further evolution has been favorable under corticoid therapy. After weaning from the mechanical ventilation and30 days after the suppression of the tracheostomy, the patient developed a tracheal stenosis with mixed etiology, secondary to vasculitis and prolonged intubation with tracheostomy. Tracheal resection with termino-terminal anastomosis was performed in emergency with simple post-operative evolution and without late complications.

  2. Clinical manifestations and treatment of idiopathic and Wegener granulomatosis-associated subglottic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stanford C; Clayburgh, Daniel R; Rosenbaum, James T; Schindler, Joshua S

    2013-01-01

    To compare and contrast the manifestations and surgical management of subglottic stenosis in patients with airway obstruction attributed to granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), previously known as Wegener granulomatosis, and those with idiopathic subglottic stenosis (iSGS). Retrospective medical chart review. Review of subglottic stenosis cases seen in the otolaryngology department of an academic medical center from 2005 through 2010. Data were obtained on disease presentation, operative management. and findings. Tertiary referral center. A total of 24 patients with iSGS and 15 patients with GPA-associated subglottic stenosis (GPA-SGS). All individuals with iSGS were female, and 40% of patients with GPA-SGS were male (P < .01). Patients with iSGS tended to have a higher Myer-Cotton stenosis grade at the time of dilation than those with GPA-SGS (P = .02). Individuals with GPA-SGS were more likely to undergo tracheotomy as a result of disease-related complications than individuals with iSGS (P < .01). No patients with an open airway reconstruction in the iSGS group required follow-up mechanical dilation. In contrast, all patients with open airway reconstructions in the GPA-SGS group underwent more than 1 subsequent airway dilation (P < .01). While surgical utilization is the mainstay of treatment in iSGS and GPA-SGS, iSGS occurs almost exclusively in females and presents with a greater degree of stenosis at the time of endoscopic dilation. In contrast, GPA-SGS is associated with greater rates of tracheotomy. Open airway reconstruction may be used in the treatment of iSGS and GPA-SGS but is much more effective in iSGS.

  3. Subglottic laryngitis--Changes in therapy approach over the past 20 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penezić, Ana; Ivkić, Mirko; Ivkić, Boris; Baudoin, Tomislav

    2015-10-01

    To show changes in the management of subglottic laryngitis over the last twenty years in Croatia. We sent questionnaires to paediatricians and otolaryngologists (ENT) in 9 Croatian hospitals in 1993, 2003 and 2013. In the questionnaire we presented a case of a child with moderately difficult subglottic laryngitis, after which they had to answer questions about the management of this kind of a patient and common therapy practice in their hospitals. All data were categorical, described in absolute frequencies and with relative percentages. The Cochran-Armitage test for trend was used in the analysis of different treatments over the years among ENT and paediatricians. Associations were statistically significant if pepinephrine use (ENT from 3.3% in 1993 to 92.3% in 2013; paediatricians from 17.2% in 1993 to 100.0% in 2013) and downfall of humidification (ENT from 60.0% to 23.3%; paediatricians from 60.0% to 12.0%), antibiotic (ENT from 53.0% to 2.3%; paediatricians from 21.0% to 0.0%) and antihistaminic use (ENT from 67.7% to 0%; paediatricians from 43.2% to 2%), while corticosteroids (both parenteral and nebulized form) remained the cornerstone in treatment of moderately severe subglottic laryngitis. Main novelties included the use of racemic epinephrine and downfall of antibiotic, antihistaminic and humidification therapy use, while corticosteroids remained the cornerstone in the treatment of moderately severe subglottic laryngitis. Differences between approaches among specialities are minimized during 20-year period. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. 78 FR 1735 - Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International Inc. Air Data Pressure Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ... parameter errors. We are issuing this AD to detect and correct inaccuracies of the pressure sensors, which... ; Internet http://www.airbus.com . You may review copies of the referenced service information at the FAA... INFORMATION: ] Discussion We received a report of a pressure measurement error in the air data pressure sensor...

  5. Extramedullary Plasmacytoma of the Larynx: A Case Report of Subglottic Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Ramírez-Anguiano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP is a rare neoplasm of plasma cells, described in soft tissue outside the bone marrow. EMP of the larynx represents 0.04 to 0.45% of malignant tumors of the larynx. A male of 57 years old presented with hoarseness, dyspnea, and biphasic stridor of 2 months. The indirect laryngoscopy (IL revealed severe edema of the posterior commissure and a polypoid mass in the right posterior lateral subglottic wall. A biopsy of the subglottic mass was performed by a direct laryngoscopy (DL. The histopathologic diagnosis was EMP CD138+, therefore radiotherapy was given at 54 Gy in 30 sessions. The patient had an adequate postoperative clinical course and a new biopsy was performed having tumor-free margins. All laryngeal lesions should be biopsied prior to treatment to determine an accurate diagnosis to guide a proper management of the condition. Radiation therapy to the EMP is considered the treatment of choice, having local control rates of 80% to 100%. The subglottis is the least accessible area of view and the least frequent location of a laryngeal mass, nevertheless the otolaryngologist should always do a complete and systematic exam of the larynx when a tumor is suspected, to detect diagnoses such as a subglottic plasmacytoma.

  6. Subglottic stenosis in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's granulomatosis): Report of 4 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta-Baas, Gabriel; Hernández-Cabrera, María Fernanda; Catana, Rocío; Pérez-Cristóbal, Mario; Barile-Fabris, Leonor Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Subglottic stenosis (SGS) in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) may result from active disease or from chronic recurrent inflammation. The objective of the study was to describe the clinical features and treatment of patients with subglottic stenosis. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients with SGS due to GPA diagnosed at Rheumatology deparment between January 2000 and June 2015. We present 4 cases of SGS at our department during a period of 15 years. The interval between the presentation of the GPA and SGS varied between 2 and 144 months. The leading symptoms of SGS were dyspnoea on exertion and stridor. Three patients presented SGS without evidence of systemic activity. Two patients presented SGS grade i and received tracheal dilatation; two recurred and three needed a tracheostomy due to severe airway-limiting stenosis. SGS presents high morbidity. Even though subglottic dilatation provides symptomatic relief, recurrences may present. Severe airway-limiting stenosis often requires tracheostomy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  7. Insect hygroreceptor responses to continuous changes in humidity and air pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichy, H.; Kallina, W.

    2011-01-01

    The most favored model of humidity transduction views the cuticular wall of insect hygroreceptive sensilla as a hygromechanical transducer. Hygroscopic swelling or shrinking alters the geometry of the wall, deforming the dendritic membranes of the moist and dry cells. The small size the sensilla and their position surrounded by elevated structures creates technical difficulties to mechanically stimulate them by direct contact. The present study investigated hygroreceptors on the antennae of the cockroach and the stick insect. Accurately controlled, homogeneous mechanical input was delivered by modulating air pressure. Both the moist and dry cells responded not only to changes in air pressure, but also in the opposite direction, as observed during changes in air humidity. The moist-cell’s excitatory response to increasing humidity and increasing air pressure implies that swelling of the hygroscopic cuticle compresses the dendrites, and the dry-cell’s excitatory response to decreasing humidity and decreasing air pressure implies that shrinking of the hygroscopic cuticle expands the dendrites. The moist and dry cells of the stick insect are more sensitive to pressure changes than those of the cockroach, but the responses to air pressure are generally weaker than to humidity. Therefore, the hygroreceptive sensilla differ in their physical properties and constitutions. Furthermore, the mechanical parameters associated with homogeneous changes in air pressure on the sensillum surface can only partially account for the responses of the moist and dry cells of both species to humidity stimulation. PMID:20375249

  8. Analysis of Air Pressure Fluctuations and Topsoil Gas Concentrations within a Scots Pine Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Mohr

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available High-precision differential air pressure measurements were conducted in the below-canopy space of a Scots pine forest and in the forest soil to investigate small air pressure fluctuations and their effect on soil gas flux. In addition to air pressure measurements, tracer gas concentration in the soil and airflow characteristics above and below the canopy were measured. Results suggest that air pressure fluctuations in the frequency range of 0.01 Hz–0.1 Hz are strongly dependent on above-canopy wind speed. While amplitudes of the observed air pressure fluctuations (<10 Pa increase significantly with increasing above-canopy wind speed, the periods decrease significantly with increasing above-canopy wind speed. These air pressure fluctuations are associated with the pressure-pumping effect in the soil. A pressure-pumping coefficient was defined, which describes the strength of the pressure-pumping effect. During the measurement period, pressure-pumping coefficients up to 0.44 Pa·s−1 were found. The dependence of the pressure-pumping coefficient on mean above-canopy wind speed can be described well with a polynomial fit of second degree. The knowledge of this relation simplifies the quantification of the pressure-pumping effect in a Scots pine forest considerably, since only the mean above-canopy wind speed has to be measured. In addition, empirical modeling revealed that the pressure-pumping coefficient explains the largest fraction of the variance of tracer gas concentration in the topsoil.

  9. Air humidity and water pressure effects on the performance of air-cathode microbial fuel cell cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Yongtae

    2014-02-01

    To better understand how air cathode performance is affected by air humidification, microbial fuel cells were operated under different humidity conditions or water pressure conditions. Maximum power density decreased from 1130 ± 30 mW m-2 with dry air to 980 ± 80 mW m -2 with water-saturated air. When the cathode was exposed to higher water pressures by placing the cathode in a horizontal position, with the cathode oriented so it was on the reactor bottom, power was reduced for both with dry (1030 ± 130 mW m-2) and water-saturated (390 ± 190 mW m-2) air. Decreased performance was partly due to water flooding of the catalyst, which would hinder oxygen diffusion to the catalyst. However, drying used cathodes did not improve performance in electrochemical tests. Soaking the cathode in a weak acid solution, but not deionized water, mostly restored performance (960 ± 60 mW m-2), suggesting that there was salt precipitation in the cathode that was enhanced by higher relative humidity or water pressure. These results showed that cathode performance could be adversely affected by both flooding and the subsequent salt precipitation, and therefore control of air humidity and water pressure may need to be considered for long-term MFC operation. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. An objective definition of air mass types affecting Athens, Greece; the corresponding atmospheric pressure patterns and air pollution levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindosi, O A; Katsoulis, B D; Bartzokas, A

    2003-08-01

    This work aims at defining characteristic air mass types that dominate in the region of Athens, Greece during the cold (November-March) and the warm (May-September) period of the year and also at evaluating the corresponding concentration levels of the main air pollutants. For each air mass type, the mean atmospheric pressure distribution (composite maps) over Europe and the Mediterranean is estimated in order to reveal the association of atmospheric circulation with air pollution levels in Athens. The data basis for this work consists of daily values of thirteen meteorological and six pollutant parameters covering the period 1993-97. The definition of the characteristic air mass types is attempted objectively by using the methods of Factor Analysis and Cluster Analysis. The results show that during the cold period of the year there are six prevailing air mass types (at least 3% of the total number of days) and six infrequent ones. The examination of the corresponding air pollution concentration levels shows that the primary air pollutants appear with increased concentrations when light or southerly winds prevail. This is usually the case when a high pressure system is located over the central Mediterranean or a low pressure system lays over south Italy, respectively. Low levels of the primary pollutants are recorded under northeasterly winds, mainly caused by a high pressure system over Ukraine. During the warm period of the year, the southwestern Asia thermal low and the subtropical anticyclone of the Atlantic Ocean affect Greece. Though these synoptic systems cause almost stagnant conditions, four main air mass types are dominant and ten others, associated with extreme weather, are infrequent. Despite the large amounts of total solar radiation characterizing this period, ozone concentrations remain at low levels in central Athens because of its destruction by nitric oxide.

  11. Firefighter's compressed air breathing system pressure vessel development program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, E. J.

    1974-01-01

    The research to design, fabricate, test, and deliver a pressure vessel for the main component in an improved high-performance firefighter's breathing system is reported. The principal physical and performance characteristics of the vessel which were required are: (1) maximum weight of 9.0 lb; (2) maximum operating pressure of 4500 psig (charge pressure of 4000 psig); (3) minimum contained volume of 280 in. 3; (4) proof pressure of 6750 psig; (5) minimum burst pressure of 9000 psig following operational and service life; and (6) a minimum service life of 15 years. The vessel developed to fulfill the requirements described was completely sucessful, i.e., every category of performence was satisfied. The average weight of the vessel was found to be about 8.3 lb, well below the 9.0 lb specification requirement.

  12. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Quarterly, Barometric (Air) Pressure

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has quarterly Barometric (Air) Pressure data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  13. Sterilization effect of atmospheric pressure non-thermal air plasma on dental instruments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sung, Su-Jin; Huh, Jung-Bo; Yun, Mi-Jung; Chang, Brian Myung W; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Jeon, Young-Chan

    2013-01-01

    .... To develop a dental sterilizer which can sterilize most materials, such as metals, rubbers, and plastics, the sterilization effect of an atmospheric pressure non-thermal air plasma device was evaluated...

  14. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Monthly, Barometric (Air) Pressure

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has monthly Barometric (Air) Pressure data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  15. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, 5-Day, Barometric (Air) Pressure

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has 5-day Barometric (Air) Pressure data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  16. The rate of pressure rise of gaseous propylene-air explosions in spherical and cylindrical enclosures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razus, Domnina; Movileanua, Codina; Oancea, Dumitru

    2007-01-02

    The maximum rates of pressure rise of propylene-air explosions at various initial pressures and various fuel/oxygen ratios in three closed vessels (a spherical vessel with central ignition and two cylindrical vessels with central or with top ignition) are reported. It was found that in explosions of quiescent mixtures the maximum rates of pressure rise are linear functions on total initial pressure, at constant initial temperature and fuel/oxygen ratio. The slope and intercept of found correlations are greatly influenced by vessel's volume and shape and by the position of the ignition source--factors which determine the amount of heat losses from the burned gas in a closed vessel explosion. Similar data on propylene-air inert mixtures are discussed in comparison with those referring to propylene-air, revealing the influence of nature and amount of inert additive. The deflagration index KG of centrally ignited explosions was also calculated from maximum rates of pressure rise.

  17. Effects of oxygen partial pressure on Li-air battery performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuk Jae; Lee, Heung Chan; Ko, Jeongsik; Jung, In Sun; Lee, Hyun Chul; Lee, Hyunpyo; Kim, Mokwon; Lee, Dong Joon; Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Tae Young; Im, Dongmin

    2017-10-01

    For application in electric vehicles (EVs), the Li-air battery system needs an air intake system to supply dry oxygen at controlled concentration and feeding rate as the cathode active material. To facilitate the design of such air intake systems, we have investigated the effects of oxygen partial pressure (≤1 atm) on the performance of the Li-air cell, which has not been systematically examined. The amounts of consumed O2 and evolved CO2 from the Li-air cell are measured with a custom in situ differential electrochemical gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (DEGC-MS). The amounts of consumed O2 suggest that the oxygen partial pressure does not affect the reaction mechanism during discharge, and the two-electron reaction occurs under all test conditions. On the other hand, the charging behavior varies by the oxygen partial pressure. The highest O2 evolution ratio is attained under 70% O2, along with the lowest CO2 evolution. The cell cycle life also peaks at 70% O2 condition. Overall, an oxygen partial pressure of about 0.5-0.7 atm maximizes the Li-air cell capacity and stability at 1 atm condition. The findings here indicate that the appropriate oxygen partial pressure can be a key factor when developing practical Li-air battery systems.

  18. Hilbert-diagnostics of vortex rings induced in air by a pressure pulse on a hole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VA Arbuzov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Formation and evolution of complementary vortical rings induced in air by a pressure pulse on a hole under various boundary conditions are investigated by Hilbert-optics methods and computer modeling. It is experimentally demonstrated that reverse ring-shaped vortices inside the chamber after its depressurization are formed not only in the case with a reduced initial pressure in the chamber as compared with the ambient atmospheric pressure but also in the case with a higher gas pressure in the chamber than the atmospheric pressure. The complementary vortex rings propagating in forward and reverse directions might significantly affect the combustion process in the jets.

  19. Air mass flow estimation in turbocharged diesel engines from in-cylinder pressure measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desantes, J.M.; Galindo, J.; Guardiola, C.; Dolz, V. [CMT - Motores Termicos, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain)

    2010-01-15

    Air mass flow determination is needed for the control of current internal combustion engines. Current methods are based on specific sensors (as hot wire anemometers) or indirect estimation through manifold pressure. With the availability of cylinder pressure sensors for engine control, methods based on them can be used for replacing or complementing standard methods. Present paper uses in cylinder pressure increase during the intake stroke for inferring the trapped air mass. The method is validated on two different turbocharged diesel engines and compared with the standard methods. (author)

  20. Characteristic and follow-up of subglottic hemangiomas in Iranian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ahmad Tabatabaii

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Subglottic hemangiomas are very rare in compare with cutaneous form but can be life-threatening in the proliferating phase of tumor by airway obstruction. It should be considered in any child with recurrent, persistent and/or progressive, inspiratory or biphasic stridor, respiratory distress and feeding difficulties in the first months of life. It should be confirmed by endobronchoscopic evaluation. Affected infants are most likely to experience symptoms between the ages of 6 and 12 weeks. Infants who admitted and referred to our hospital with recurrent stridor, cough and respiratory distress were reviewed.

  1. Granuloma faciale with subglottic eosinophilic angiocentric fibrosis: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Ana; Lisboa, Carmen; Duarte, Ana F; Santos, Paulo; Portugal, Raquel; Canelhas, Aurea; Cardoso, Eduardo; Azevedo, Filomena

    2011-08-01

    Granuloma faciale (GF) is an uncommon inflammatory dermatosis that usually presents on the face as reddish brown or violaceous papules and nodules that may coalesce into plaques. Eosinophilic angiocentric fibrosis (EAF) is a rare fibrosing condition that shares many histologic characteristics with GF and is regarded by some authors as a mucosal counterpart of GF. We present a case of GF with concurrent EAF in a subglottic location with excellent response to an intralesional corticosteroid on the GF lesion, CO2 laser on the EAF lesion, and oral dapsone treatment.

  2. Anesthetic management for an infant undergoing endoscopic resection of a large subglottic papiloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xia; Li, Wenxian

    2009-07-01

    An infant with a large subglottic papilloma that caused severe respiratory distress needed anesthesia during resection of the papilloma. We planned an approach to the airway management this infant that we thought would be successful. We used three main tactics in managing the airway - inhaled sevoflurane, intravenous fentanyl and the patient's resumed spontaneous breathing. We also allowed the otolaryngologist to quickly resect some of the papilloma before intubation. Our patient's airway was managed successfully, and the papilloma was removed. Management of the airway in a small child with obstruction can be aided by inducing anesthesia with sevoflurane, deepening anesthesia with intravenous fentanyl, and allowing the patient to resume spontaneous breathing.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Water Nanodroplets on Silica Surfaces at High Air Pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A; Jaffe, Richard Lawrence; Walther, Jens Honore

    2010-01-01

    Silicon dioxides-water systems are abundant in nature and play fundamental roles in a diversity of novel science and engineering applications. Although extensive research has been devoted to study the nature of the interaction between silica and water a complete understanding of the system has...... e.g., nanobubbles. In the present work we study the role of air on the wetting of hydrophilic systems. We conduct molecular dynamics simulations of a water nanodroplet on an amorphous silica surface at different air pressures. The interaction potentials describing the silica, water, and air...... are obtained from the literature. The silica surface is modeled by a large 32 ⨯ 32 ⨯ 2 nm amorphous SiO2 structure consisting of 180000 atoms. The water consists of 18000 water molecules surrounded by N2 and O2 air molecules corresponding to air pressures of 0 bar (vacuum), 50 bar, 100 bar and 200 bar. We...

  4. Pressure Measurement and Flowfield Characterization of a Two-Dimensional Ideally Expanded, Constant Area, Air/air Ejector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Michael Anthony

    A detailed experimental investigation of a two -dimensional, Mach 1.8 air-primary, Mach 0.3 air-secondary ejector at high Reynolds number has been performed, from which a nonintrusive method for whole-field visualization using turbulent wall-pressure has been developed. The experiments were conducted using mean and time-accurate wall pressure measurements, impact-pressure measurements using a traversing probe, and Schlieren and shadowgraph visualization techniques. The time-accurate pressure measurements were recorded using a sealed Kulite miniature pressure transducer with a 0.7 mm diameter sensing diaphragm. For all except the optical methods, measurements were taken from the initial flow interface to about 13 hydraulic tube-diameters downstream in the constant-area mixing section. From the mean measurements, values of stagnation pressure, density, velocity, static pressure, Mach number, and dynamic pressure were developed and are presented. Using the time-accurate pressure measurements, a color contour plot of the rms pressure was developed that definitively shows the regions of the flow in agreement with the other measurements. Additionally, probability density functions, skewness, and kurtosis were calculated. Peak values of skewness (S) and kurtosis (K) on the centerline at about 2.5 hydraulic diameters are S = 1.85 and K = 11.5. The inlet rms pressure values, normalized by freestream dynamic pressure for the primary (~0.001), were found to be in fair agreement with previous experimental values; however, those in the secondary were much higher (~0.2), apparently due to the acoustic radiation from the primary. Fourier analysis of the time-accurate pressure measurements show that the autospectra contain k ^{-1}, k^{-7/3}, and k^{-11/3} pressure spectrum functions as predicted by prevailing theory for the overlap layer, turbulence-turbulence interaction, and turbulence-mean-shear interaction, respectively. It is believed that this is the first experiment in

  5. Short-term effects of air temperature on blood pressure and pulse pressure in potentially susceptible individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzinger, Stefanie; Hampel, Regina; Breitner, Susanne; Rückerl, Regina; Kraus, Ute; Cyrys, Josef; Geruschkat, Uta; Peters, Annette; Schneider, Alexandra

    2014-09-01

    Only few epidemiological studies have investigated the association between air temperature and blood pressure (BP) or pulse pressure (PP), with inconsistent findings. We examined whether short-term changes in air temperature were associated with changes in BP or PP in three different populations. Between March 2007 and December 2008, 371 systolic and diastolic BP measurements were collected in 30 individuals with type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), 30 persons with impaired glucose tolerance and 42 healthy individuals without a metabolic disorder from Augsburg, Germany. Hourly means of ambient meteorological data were obtained from a fixed measurement station. Personal temperature measurements were conducted using data loggers. Temperature effects were evaluated using additive mixed models adjusting for time trend and relative humidity. Decreases in air temperature were associated with an increase in systolic BP, diastolic BP and PP in individuals with T2D. For example, a 1°C decrease in ambient temperature was associated with an immediate increase in systolic BP of 1.0 mmHg (95%-confidence interval: [0.5;1.4]mmHg). Effects of personally measured air temperature were similar. Temperature effects were modified by age, body mass index, gender, antihypertensive medication and whereabouts, such as being indoors. We observed associations between decreases in air temperature and increases in BP as well as PP in persons with T2D indicating that these people might be potentially more susceptible to changes in air temperature. Our findings may provide a hypothesis for a mechanism between air temperature decreases and short-term increases of cardiovascular events. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Torricelli and the ocean of air: the first measurement of barometric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, John B

    2013-03-01

    The recognition of barometric pressure was a critical step in the development of environmental physiology. In 1644, Evangelista Torricelli described the first mercury barometer in a remarkable letter that contained the phrase, "We live submerged at the bottom of an ocean of the element air, which by unquestioned experiments is known to have weight." This extraordinary insight seems to have come right out of the blue. Less than 10 years before, the great Galileo had given an erroneous explanation for the related problem of pumping water from a deep well. Previously, Gasparo Berti had filled a very long lead vertical tube with water and showed that a vacuum formed at the top. However, Torricelli was the first to make a mercury barometer and understand that the mercury was supported by the pressure of the air. Aristotle stated that the air has weight, although this was controversial for some time. Galileo described a method of measuring the weight of the air in detail, but for reasons that are not clear his result was in error by a factor of about two. Torricelli surmised that the pressure of the air might be less on mountains, but the first demonstration of this was by Blaise Pascal. The first air pump was built by Otto von Guericke, and this influenced Robert Boyle to carry out his classical experiments of the physiological effects of reduced barometric pressure. These were turning points in the early history of high-altitude physiology.

  7. The difficult airway: the use of subglottic jet ventilation for laryngeal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anil; Rubin, John S

    2008-01-01

    High-frequency subglottic jet ventilation was used in 352 cases of adults treated with suspension microlaryngoscopy. Of these, 89 had difficult airways, and these are the subject of this manuscript. All cases were managed by the senior anaesthesiologist (AP) and the senior surgeon (JR), between 2000 and 2004. There were minimal complications associated with this technique in this series. The subglottic catheter never proved impossible to insert, and was used on one occasion in a rescue mode after supraglottic jetting led to oxygen desaturation. Body habitus did not prevent use of the technique in this series. There were only 3 instances in the entire series (n=352) of cases requiring replacement by the supraglottic catheter due to limitation of visualization of the posterior glottis. The technique was used in a wide variety of surgical pathology, from benign hyperfunction-related laryngeal pathology, through paralytic vocal fold conditions, papilloma, granuloma, dysplasia and malignancy. Advantages and disadvantages over traditional intubation techniques and supraglottic jet ventilation are reviewed, including such issues as: ease of intubation/ventilation; surgical exposure/control; maintenance of O(2) and CO(2) levels; use in the limited/borderline airway.

  8. Efficacy and toxicity of (chemo)radiotherapy for primary subglottic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, M.; Koike, I.; Odagiri, K.; Minagawa, Y.; Inoue, T. [Yokohama City Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Taguchi, T.; Nishimura, G.; Takahashi, M.; Komatsu, M.; Sano, D. [Yokohama City Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology

    2013-01-15

    Background and purpose: Primary subglottic cancer is a rare malignancy. We investigated the efficacy and toxicity of radiotherapy for subglottic cancer. Patients and methods: Nineteen patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the subglottis received radiotherapy, 14 of whom also underwent chemotherapy. Of the 19 patients, 15 received definitive radiotherapy to the gross tumors with total doses of 70-70.2 Gy in 35-39 fractions, and 4 underwent preoperative radiotherapy with total doses of 37.8-55.8 Gy in 21-31 fractions, followed by total laryngectomy. Results: Of the 19 patients, 5 developed local progression and 2 developed distant metastasis at the median follow-up period of 5 years. The 5-year local control and disease-free rates were 74 and 63%, respectively. Three patients died of tumor progression, and the 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 80 and 63%, respectively. Regarding acute toxicities, transient mucositis and dermatitis of grade 3 or lower were observed in all patients, but there were no late toxicities of grade 3 or higher. Conclusion: Radiotherapy is a safe and effective treatment for patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the subglottis. The use of chemotherapy together with radiotherapy may enhance treatment efficacy and contribute to larynx preservation through good local control. (orig.)

  9. Air-braked cycle ergometers: validity of the correction factor for barometric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, J P; Maxwell, B F; Withers, R T

    2000-10-01

    Barometric pressure exerts by far the greatest influence of the three environmental factors (barometric pressure, temperature and humidity) on power outputs from air-braked ergometers. The barometric pressure correction factor for power outputs from air-braked ergometers is in widespread use but apparently has never been empirically validated. Our experiment validated this correction factor by calibrating two air-braked cycle ergometers in a hypobaric chamber using a dynamic calibration rig. The results showed that if the power output correction for changes in air resistance at barometric pressures corresponding to altitudes of 38, 600, 1,200 and 1,800 m above mean sea level were applied, then the coefficients of variation were 0.8-1.9% over the range of 160-1,597 W. The overall mean error was 3.0 % but this included up to 0.73 % for the propagated error that was associated with errors in the measurement of: a) temperature b) relative humidity c) barometric pressure d) force, distance and angular velocity by the dynamic calibration rig. The overall mean error therefore approximated the +/- 2.0% of true load that was specified by the Laboratory Standards Assistance Scheme of the Australian Sports Commission. The validity of the correction factor for barometric pressure on power output was therefore demonstrated over the altitude range of 38-1,800 m.

  10. Thermodynamic and Transport Properties of Real Air Plasma in Wide Range of Temperature and Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunlin; Wu, Yi; Chen, Zhexin; Yang, Fei; Feng, Ying; Rong, Mingzhe; Zhang, Hantian

    2016-07-01

    Air plasma has been widely applied in industrial manufacture. In this paper, both dry and humid air plasmas' thermodynamic and transport properties are calculated in temperature 300-100000 K and pressure 0.1-100 atm. To build a more precise model of real air plasma, over 70 species are considered for composition. Two different methods, the Gibbs free energy minimization method and the mass action law method, are used to determinate the composition of the air plasma in a different temperature range. For the transport coefficients, the simplified Chapman-Enskog method developed by Devoto has been applied using the most recent collision integrals. It is found that the presence of CO2 has almost no effect on the properties of air plasma. The influence of H2O can be ignored except in low pressure air plasma, in which the saturated vapor pressure is relatively high. The results will serve as credible inputs for computational simulation of air plasma. supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (973 Program)(No. 2015CB251002), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51521065, 51577145), the Science and Technology Project Funds of the Grid State Corporation (SGTYHT/13-JS-177), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, and State Grid Corporation Project (GY71-14-004)

  11. IceBridge Paroscientific L1B Pressure Altimeter Time-Tagged Air Pressure V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains static pressure values for Antarctica using the Paroscientific Digiquartz Transmitter. The data were collected by scientists working on the...

  12. Analysis of the intraocular jet flows and pressure gradients induced by air and fluid infusion: mechanism of focal chorioretinal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Joon; Jo, Sungkil; Moon, Daruchi; Joo, Youngcheol; Choi, Kyung Seek

    2014-05-01

    To comprehend the mechanism of focal chorioretinal damage by analysis of the pressure distribution and dynamic pressure induced by infused air during fluid-air exchange. A precise simulation featuring a model eye and a fluid circuit was designed to analyze fluid-air exchange. The pressure distribution, flow velocity, and dynamic pressure induced by infusion of air into an air-filled eye were analyzed using an approach based on fluid dynamics. The size of the port and the infusion pressure were varied during simulated iterations. We simulated infusion of an air-filled eye with balanced salt solution (BSS) to better understand the mechanism of chorioretinal damage induced by infused air. Infused air was projected straight toward a point on the retina contralateral to the infusion port (the "vulnerable point"). The highest pressure was evident at the vulnerable point, and the lowest pressure was recorded on most retinal areas. Simulations using greater infusion pressure and a port of larger size were associated with elevations in dynamic pressure and the pressure gradient. The pressure gradients were 2.8 and 5.1 mm Hg, respectively, when infusion pressures of 30 and 50 mm Hg were delivered through a 20-gauge port. The pressure gradient associated with BSS infusion was greater than that created by air, but lasted for only a moment. Our simulation explains the mechanism of focal chorioretinal damage in numerical terms. Infused air induces a prolonged increase in focal pressure on the vulnerable point, and this may be responsible for visual field defects arising after fluid-air exchange. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  13. Influence of air pressure on soliton formation in hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Roberts, Peter John

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Soliton formation during dispersive compression of chirped few-picosecond pulses at the microjoule level in a hollow-core photonic bandgap (HC-PBG) fiber is studied by numerical simulations. Long-pass filtering of the emerging frequency-shifted solitons is investigated with the objective...... of obtaining pedestal-free output pulses. Particular emphasis is placed on the influence of the air pressure in the HC-PBG fiber. It is found that a reduction in air pressure enables an increase in the fraction of power going into the most redshifted soliton and also improves the quality of the filtered pulse...

  14. An Ultra-low Frequency Modal Testing Suspension System for High Precision Air Pressure Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoling YUAN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As a resolution for air pressure control challenges in ultra-low frequency modal testing suspension systems, an incremental PID control algorithm with dead band is applied to achieve high-precision pressure control. We also develop a set of independent hardware and software systems for high-precision pressure control solutions. Taking control system versatility, scalability, reliability, and other aspects into considerations, a two-level communication employing Ethernet and CAN bus, is adopted to complete such tasks as data exchange between the IPC, the main board and the control board ,and the pressure control. Furthermore, we build a single set of ultra-low frequency modal testing suspension system and complete pressure control experiments, which achieve the desired results and thus confirm that the high-precision pressure control subsystem is reasonable and reliable.

  15. Subglottic stenosis and socio-economic deprivation: a 6-year review of the Scottish National Service for Paediatric Complex Airway Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Ahsan; Starritt, Nicola; Park, Julia; Kubba, Haytham; Clement, Andrew

    2013-07-01

    Subglottic stenosis is the third most common cause of stridor in children, and severe cases may need surgical reconstruction. Babies born to parents in high-deprivation areas are at increased risk of prematurity and low birth weight. This may require intensive care admission with prolonged intubation, hence, putting them at increased risk of subglottic stenosis. We aimed to review cases of subglottic stenosis requiring surgical intervention in the Scottish population and its association with socio-economic deprivation. We collected retrospective data on all children who underwent open reconstructive surgery for subglottic stenosis between January 2005 and January 2011 at the Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Yorkhill, which provides the national complex airway reconstruction service for Scotland. The Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) was used to categorise deprivation based on the child's home postal code. Incidence figures were calculated based on the total number of births in each deprivation category over the time period. There were a total of 53 cases of subglottic stenosis undergoing surgery in Scotland over the last 6 years, of which 31 were acquired and 22 were congenital. The most common procedure performed was laryngotracheal reconstruction with cartilage grafts (46 cases). No association was found between deprivation and the incidence of acquired or congenital subglottic stenosis. Our data is the first attempt to review the incidence of subglottic stenosis in the Scottish population and its association with deprivation. Perhaps surprisingly, we found no association. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Numerical simulation of premixed Hydrogen/air combustion pressure in a spherical vessel

    OpenAIRE

    Guo Han-yu; Tao Gang; Zhang Li-jing

    2016-01-01

    In order to study the development process of hydrogen combustion in a closed vessel, an on-line chemical equilibrium calculator and a numerical simulation method would be used to analysis the combustion pressure and flame front of mixed gas, which based on 20L H2/air explosion experiments in spherical vessel (Crowl and Jo,2009). The results showed that, the turbulent model could reflect the process of combustion, and the error of combustion pressure by simulation is smaller than the Chemical ...

  17. Ambient Air Pollution and Increases in Blood Pressure: Role ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Particulate matter (PM) is a complex mixture of extremely small particles and liquid droplets made up of a number of components including elemental carbon, organic chemicals, metals, acids (such as nitrates and sulfates), and soil and dust particles. Epidemiological studies consistently show that exposure to PM in urban areas across the globe is associated with increases in short- and long-term cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, most notably for myocardial infarction, heart failure and ischemic stroke.1 The range in strength of these associations is likely related to variation in PM sources and composition across space and time, and attests to the need to understand the contribution of specific sources to ultimately inform regulatory, public health and clinical strategies to reduce risk. Commentary: In 2014 a systematic review and meta-analysis published in this journal reported a positive association between short-term exposure to PM2.5 and blood pressure.2 The paper discussed potential mechanisms including PM-induced activation of pulmonary nociceptive receptors, pulmonary inflammatory responses and release of endothelin-1, and suggested that activation of pulmonary receptors and vagal afferents could lead to shifts in autonomic balance and vasoconstriction. Other effects including oxidative stress and decreased NO availability, as well as systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction have also been widely reported in association with PM compo

  18. Optimal heat rejection pressure in transcritical carbon dioxide air conditioning and heat pump systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Shengming; Jakobsen, Arne

    1998-01-01

    , the cycles using carbon dioxide as refrigerant will have to operate in the transcritical area. In a transcritical carbon dioxide system, there is an optimal heat rejection pressure that gives a maximum COP. In this paper, it is shown that the value of this optimal heat rejection pressure mainly depends...... on the outlet temperature of the gas cooler, the evaporation temperature and the efficiency of the compressor. General correlations for this optimal heat rejection pressure were derived based on cycle simulations. The correlations presented in this paper provide a basis for designing transcritical carbon...... dioxide air conditioning or heat pump systems and for intelligent controlling such systems....

  19. Air Compressor Pressure Control System Based On Gearshift Integral PID Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAN Chunyue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of gearshift integral PID controller to air compressor pressure control system is introduced, Its kernel is single chip microcomputer PIC16F877.The design of hardware and solfware are introduced too. Practical application shows that this system has many advantages.

  20. 49 CFR 393.51 - Warning signals, air pressure and vacuum gauges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Warning signals, air pressure and vacuum gauges... and vacuum gauges. (a) General Rule. Every bus, truck and truck tractor, except as provided in.... (d) Vacuum brakes. A commercial motor vehicle (regardless of the date it was manufactured) having...

  1. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Electron Beam Air Plasma Properties at Moderate Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yongfeng; Tan, Yonghua; Han, Xianwei

    2014-01-01

    Large size of air plasma at near atmospheric pressure has specific effects in aerospace applications. In this paper, a two dimensional multi-fluid model coupled with Monte Carlo (MC) model is established, and some experiments were carried out to investigate the characteristics of electron beam air plasma at pressure of 100-170 Torr. Based on the model, the properties of electron beam air plasma are acquired. The electron density is of the order of 1016 m-3 and the longitudinal size can exceed 1.2 m. The profiles of charged particles demonstrate that the oxygen molecule is very important for air plasma and its elementary processes play a key role in plasma equilibrium processes. The potential is almost negative and a very low potential belt is observed at the edge of plasma acting as a protection shell. A series of experiments were carried out in a low pressure vacuum facility and the beam plasma densities were diagnosed. The experimental results demonstrate that electron density increased with the electron beam energy, and the relatively low pressure was favorable for gaining high density plasma. Hence in order to achieve high density and large size plasma, it requires the researchers to choose proper discharge parameters.

  2. Improvement of PIXE analytical technique by use of target-chamber with an intermediate air pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymczyk, S.; Kajfosz, J.; Hrynkiewicz, A. (Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland))

    1981-01-01

    The applicability of proton induced X-ray emission for the analysis of insulating targets was improved by the use of low air pressure (ca 10 mm Hg) in the target chamber. The advantages of this modification are discussed and the results obtained with targets of dried plant material are presented.

  3. Spontaneous ignition of methane-air mixtures in a wide range of pressures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhukov, VP; Sechenov, VA; Starikovskii, AY

    2003-01-01

    The ignition delay in methane-air mixtures (phi = 0.5) within the range of temperatures of 1200-1700 K and pressures of 3-450 atm behind reflected shock waves in a shock tube is measured on the basis of emission of the electron-excited OH radical (transition A(2)Sigma(+) - X(2)Pi) at the wavelength

  4. Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering profiles of air at different temperatures and pressures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, Z.; Witschas, B.; van der Water, W.; Ubachs, W.M.G.

    2013-01-01

    Rayleigh-Brillouin (RB) scattering profiles for air have been recorded for the temperature range from 255 to 340 K and the pressure range from 640 to 3300 mbar, covering the conditions relevant for the Earth's atmosphere and for planned atmospheric light detection and ranging (LIDAR) missions. The

  5. Enhancements to the hybrid pressurized air receiver (HPAR) concept in the SUNDISC cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Lukas; Hoffmann, Jaap

    2017-06-01

    A dual-pressure air receiver has previously been proposed as part of a hybrid receiver system preheating pressurized air in a solarized gas turbine and providing hot non-pressurized air to power the bottoming cycle of a combined cycle CSP plant. The receiver, based on a bundle of metallic tubular absorbers, was found to not be able to provide the non-pressurized air at the required temperature. Three enhancements to the basic design are presented and thermally modeled: (a) Finned absorber tubes to increase the convective heat transfer, (b) quartz glass elements to alleviate convective losses and improve the flow inside the tube bundle as well as (c) additional absorber elements behind the tube bundle. It could be shown that finned absorber tubes as well as the additional absorber elements have potential to improve the thermal performance of the receiver while a quartz glass window and flow-enhancing quartz elements could be indispensable additions to either of the other enhancements.

  6. Air pressure pulsation solid state fermentation of feruloyl esterase by Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, W; Chen, H Z

    2009-02-01

    Air pressure pulsation solid state fermentation (APP-SSF) was applied to produce feruloyl esterase (FAE) by Aspergillus niger. With the optimization of some variables by orthogonal design, the optimal condition obtained was 0.2 MPa (gauge pressure) of high pressure intensity, 30 min of low pressure duration and 20s of high pressure duration. Based on the optimized condition, the APP-SSF achieved the reasonable enzyme yield of 881 mU/g at 48 h, which was 58% more than that by static solid state fermentation (static SSF) at 72 h. By comparison of two fermentation methods in temperature, O(2) and CO(2) concentration, and respiration intensity, it was concluded that APP-SSF enhanced heat and mass transfer of fermentation system and strengthened the metabolism of microorganisms. The APP-SSF had a greatly positive effect on FAE production by A. niger, by enhancing mass and heat transfer and activating growth and metabolism.

  7. Progressing subglottic and tracheobronchial stenosis in a patient with CHARGE syndrome diagnosed in adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Mitaka Komatsuzaki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old woman was admitted for a pseudocroup-like cough and wheezing after general anesthesia. Several months ago, she had undergone cardiac re-operation and turbinectomy, both of which had involved difficult intubations. Bronchoscopy indicated a pin-hall-like subglottic stenosis; therefore, emergency tracheotomy was performed. Six years later, a computed tomography scan demonstrated progressive stenosis of the entire circumference of the trachea and main bronchi. She died at 40 years. Her autopsy revealed marked tracheobronchial stenosis. She had many medical histories that had gone undiagnosed and had been clinically ill with only heart defects. She did not have coloboma but had microphthalmos, atresia choanae, retarded growth development, and deafness; thus, we diagnosed CHARGE syndrome that refers to multiple congenital anomalies, including airway abnormalities, which can lead to secondary complications such as traumatic stenosis after intubation. Physicians should have knowledge of this rare disease and should pay special attention to potential airway problems.

  8. Picosecond ballistic imaging of diesel injection in high-temperature and high-pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Sean P.; Porter, Jason M.; Parker, Terence E.

    2015-04-01

    The first successful demonstration of picosecond ballistic imaging using a 15-ps-pulse-duration laser in diesel sprays at temperature and pressure is reported. This technique uses an optical Kerr effect shutter constructed from a CS2 liquid cell and a 15-ps pulse at 532 nm. The optical shutter can be adjusted to produce effective imaging pulses between 7 and 16 ps. This technique is used to image the near-orifice region (first 3 mm) of diesel sprays from a high-pressure single-hole fuel injector. Ballistic imaging of dodecane and methyl oleate sprays injected into ambient air and diesel injection at preignition engine-like conditions are reported. Dodecane was injected into air heated to 600 °C and pressurized to 20 atm. The resulting images of the near-orifice region at these conditions reveal dramatic shedding of the liquid near the nozzle, an effect that has been predicted, but to our knowledge never before imaged. These shedding structures have an approximate spatial frequency of 10 mm-1 with lengths from 50 to 200 μm. Several parameters are explored including injection pressure, liquid fuel temperature, air temperature and pressure, and fuel type. Resulting trends are summarized with accompanying images.

  9. Layers of air in the water beneath the floating fern Salvinia are exposed to fluctuations in pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayser, Matthias J; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2014-12-01

    Superhydrophobic, hierarchically structured, technical surfaces (Lotus-effect) are of high scientific and economic interest because of their remarkable properties. Recently, the immense potential of air-retaining superhydrophobic surfaces, for example, for low-friction transport of fluids and drag-reducing coatings of ships has begun to be explored. A major problem of superhydrophobic surfaces mimicking the Lotus-effect is the limited persistence of the air retained, especially under rough conditions of flow. However, there are a variety of floating or diving plant and animal species that possess air-retaining surfaces optimized for durable water-repellency (Salvinia-effect). Especially floating ferns of the genus Salvinia have evolved superhydrophobic surfaces capable of maintaining layers of air for months. Apart from maintaining stability under water, the layer of air has to withstand the stresses of water pressure (up to 2.5 bars). Both of these aspects have an application to create permanent air layers on ships' hulls. We investigated the effect of pressure on air layers in a pressure cell and exposed the air layer to pressures of up to 6 bars. We investigated the suppression of the air layer at increasing pressures as well as its restoration during decreases in pressure. Three of the four examined Salvinia species are capable of maintaining air layers at pressures relevant to the conditions applying to ships' hulls. High volumes of air per surface area are advantageous for retaining at least a partial Cassie-Baxter-state under pressure, which also helps in restoring the air layer after depressurization. Closed-loop structures such as the baskets at the top of the "egg-beater hairs" (see main text) also help return the air layer to its original level at the tip of the hairs by trapping air bubbles. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions

  10. Balloon Laryngoplasty for Subglottic Stenosis Caused by Orotracheal Intubation at a Tertiary Care Pediatric Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avelino, Melissa Gomes Ameloti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In recent years, there has been a reduction in mortality rates in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs due to the impact of modern technological advances in the perinatal field. As a consequence, prolonged orotracheal intubation is used more frequently, and there has been an increase in acquired subglottic stenosis (SGS in children. Subglottic stenosis is a narrowing of the endolarynx and one of the most common causes of stridor and respiratory distress in children. The laryngoplasty balloon has proven effective in dealing with stenosis both as primary and secondary treatments, after open surgery, with the added advantage of being less invasive and not requiring external access. Materials and Methods This study involved children from pediatric intensive care units or NICUs suffering from respiratory distress and who presented an endoscopic diagnosis of Myer and Cotton grade I to III SGS. These patients underwent balloon laryngoplasty with different numbers of interventions depending on the response in each individual case. Results All the patients responded satisfactorily to the balloon laryngoplasty. None required tracheostomy after treatment and all remained asymptomatic even after 6-month follow-up. One patient required just 1 dilation, 4 required 2, 3 underwent the procedure 3 times, and another had 5 dilations. Conclusion The experience presented here is that of balloon laryngoplasty post–orotracheal intubation SGS with very satisfactory results at a tertiary care pediatric hospital. Although the number of patients is limited, our incidence corroborates other studies that demonstrate the efficacy and safety of balloon dilatation in the treatment of SGS.

  11. Time-resolved diagnostic of an impulse discharge in variable pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo-Martinez, A.; Sobral, H.; Ruiz-Meza, A.

    2008-09-01

    The effect of gas pressure on the characteristics of a short-gap lightning discharge in air was investigated. For the tests, 70 ns front lightning pulses were applied to a short (11 cm) point-plane gap under variable pressure. The diagnostics employed included electric current and field measurements, spectroscopy in the visible and fast-frame photography. We found that the pressure has a clear effect on the electric field at the plane. For low pressures, the high fields measured (~7 kV cm-1) are comparable to the Laplacian field, indicating that very little ionization takes place in the gap at this pressure; at higher pressures the space charge contributes substantially to the field magnitude. The effect of pressure on the current pulse was, in contrast, minimal; its peak amplitude and shape remained largely unaffected by pressure. Time-resolved spectroscopy allowed the determination of the instantaneous electron density and temperature to be made; the latter, for example, was found to reach 33 000 K at t ~ 1 µs for most of the pressures employed. Using the measured temperature and radius we made estimations of the arc's resistance. We found that the Spitzer resistivity model gives values of resistance that are compatible with the experimental data obtained.

  12. Calibrating airborne measurements of airspeed, pressure and temperature using a Doppler laser air-motion sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Cooper

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A new laser air-motion sensor measures the true airspeed with a standard uncertainty of less than 0.1 m s−1 and so reduces uncertainty in the measured component of the relative wind along the longitudinal axis of the aircraft to about the same level. The calculated pressure expected from that airspeed at the inlet of a pitot tube then provides a basis for calibrating the measurements of dynamic and static pressure, reducing standard uncertainty in those measurements to less than 0.3 hPa and the precision applicable to steady flight conditions to about 0.1 hPa. These improved measurements of pressure, combined with high-resolution measurements of geometric altitude from the global positioning system, then indicate (via integrations of the hydrostatic equation during climbs and descents that the offset and uncertainty in temperature measurement for one research aircraft are +0.3 ± 0.3 °C. For airspeed, pressure and temperature, these are significant reductions in uncertainty vs. those obtained from calibrations using standard techniques. Finally, it is shown that although the initial calibration of the measured static and dynamic pressures requires a measured temperature, once calibrated these measured pressures and the measurement of airspeed from the new laser air-motion sensor provide a measurement of temperature that does not depend on any other temperature sensor.

  13. Traffic-related air pollution and noise and children's blood pressure : Results from the PIAMA birth cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilenko, Natalya; van Rossem, Lenie; Brunekreef, Bert; Beelen, Rob; Eeftens, Marloes; Hoek, Gerard; Houthuijs, Danny; de Jongste, Johan C.; van Kempen, Elise; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Meliefste, Kees; Oldenwening, Marieke; Smit, Henriette A.; Wijga, Alet H.; Gehring, Ulrike

    Aims Elevation of a child's blood pressure may cause possible health risks in later life. There is evidence for adverse effects of exposure to air pollution and noise on blood pressure in adults. Little is known about these associations in children. We investigated the associations of air pollution

  14. Traffic-related air pollution and noise and children's blood pressure : Results from the PIAMA birth cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilenko, Natalya; Van Rossem, Lenie|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330805436; Brunekreef, Bert|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067548180; Beelen, Rob; Eeftens, Marloes; Hoek, Gerard; Houthuijs, Danny; De Jongste, Johan C.; Van Kempen, Elise; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Meliefste, Kees; Oldenwening, Marieke; Smit, Henriette A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067730043; Wijga, Alet H.; Gehring, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Elevation of a child's blood pressure may cause possible health risks in later life. There is evidence for adverse effects of exposure to air pollution and noise on blood pressure in adults. Little is known about these associations in children. We investigated the associations of air pollution

  15. A Comparative Study of Sound Speed in Air at Room Temperature between a Pressure Sensor and a Sound Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrani, D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the comparison of sound speed measurements in air using two types of sensor that are widely employed in physics and engineering education, namely a pressure sensor and a sound sensor. A computer-based laboratory with pressure and sound sensors was used to carry out measurements of air through a 60 ml syringe. The fast Fourier…

  16. Refractometry-based air pressure sensing using glass microspheres as high-Q whispering-gallery mode microresonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchetti, Arturo; Federico, Alejandro; Vincent, Serge; Subramanian, Sivaraman; Vollmer, Frank

    2017-07-01

    In this work a refractometric air pressure sensing platform based on spherical whispering-gallery mode microresonators is presented and analyzed. The sensitivity of this sensing approach is characterized by measuring the whispering-gallery mode spectral shifts caused by a change of air refractive index produced by dynamic sinusoidal pressure variations that lie between extremes of ± 1.8 kPa . A theoretical frame of work is developed to characterize the refractometric air pressure sensing platform by using the Ciddor equation for the refractive index of air, and a comparison is made against experimental results for the purpose of performance evaluation.

  17. Calculating osmotic pressure of xylitol solutions from molality according to UNIFAC model and measuring it with air humidity osmometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lan; Zhan, Tingting; Zhan, Xiancheng; Wei, Guocui; Tan, Xiaoying; Wang, Xiaolan; Li, Chengrong

    2014-11-01

    The osmotic pressure of xylitol solution at a wide concentration range was calculated according to the UNIFAC model and experimentally determined by our newly reported air humidity osmometry. The measurements from air humidity osmometry were compared with UNIFAC model calculations from dilute to saturated solution. Results indicate that air humidity osmometry measurements are comparable to UNIFAC model calculations at a wide concentration range by two one-sided test and multiple testing corrections. The air humidity osmometry is applicable to measure the osmotic pressure and the osmotic pressure can be calculated from the concentration.

  18. Daily changes in oxygen saturation and pulse rate associated with particulate air pollution and barometric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockery, D W; Pope, C A; Kanner, R E; Martin Villegas, G; Schwartz, J

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have linked fine particulate air pollution with increases in morbidity and mortality rates from cardiopulmonary complications. Although the underlying biologic mechanisms responsible for this increase remain largely unknown, potential pathways include transient declines in blood oxygenation and changes in pulse rate following exposures to particulate air pollution episodes. This study evaluated potential associations between daily measures of respirable particulate matter (PM) with pulse rate and oxygen saturation of the blood. Pulse rate and oxygen saturation (Spo2) using pulse oximetry were measured daily in 90 elderly subjects living near air pollution monitors during the winter of 1995-96 in Utah Valley. We also evaluated potential associations of oxygen saturation and pulse rate with barometric pressure. Small but statistically significant positive associations between day-to-day changes in Spo2 and barometric pressure were observed. Pulse rate was inversely associated with barometric pressure. Exposure to particulate pollution was not significantly associated with Spo2 except in male participants 80 years of age or older. Increased daily pulse rate, as well as the odds of having a pulse rate 5 or 10 beats per minute (bpm) above normal (normal is defined as the individual's mean pulse rate throughout the study period), were significantly associated with exposure to particulate pollution on the previous 1 to 5 days. The medical or biologic relevance of these increases in pulse rate following exposure to particulate air pollution requires further study.

  19. Experimental Emulation of Air Fluorescence and Study of its Yield at Low Pressure Electrical Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltezos, S.; Drakakis, E.; Fokitis, E.; Geranios, A.; Gika, V.; Karabourniotis, D.; Antonakakis Spyropoylos, N.

    Having high-resolution UV spectra produced from EAS fluorescence, one can determine in a more accurate way the effects of atmospheric attenuation of these signals by including Rayleigh, Mie-scattering as well as resonance absorption inside the atmosphere. For this reason, we developed an experimental setup for emulating the air-fluorescence using high-resolution spectroscopy in the UV range from 300 to 400 nm. We used low pressure electrical discharges in air , as light source, and registered the spectra with high resolution spectrometers of 0.25, 1, 2 and 3 m focal lengths. These pressure and temperature conditions, existing in the low pressure lamp used, are far from the ones existing during EAS fluorescence but such data might be useful for better understanding of the fluorescence emission, and also in allowing to adapt such spectrometers in dedicated fluorescence yield experiments in accelerators, since in the relevant literature there are not available data with such high resolution. In addition, there are very few experimental data taking into account the parameter temperature in space and thus we designed a monochromator for measurements of air-fluorescence yield as a function of pressure and temperature, using spectral lamps in which the above parameters can be controlled, which is presented in this work.

  20. Elevated Plasma Endothelin-1 and Pulmonary Arterial Pressure in Children Exposed to Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Vincent, Renaud; Mora-Tiscareño, Antonieta; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Henríquez-Roldán, Carlos; Barragán-Mejía, Gerardo; Garrido-García, Luis; Camacho-Reyes, Laura; Valencia-Salazar, Gildardo; Paredes, Rogelio; Romero, Lina; Osnaya, Hector; Villarreal-Calderón, Rafael; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Hazucha, Milan J.; Reed, William

    2007-01-01

    Background Controlled exposures of animals and humans to particulate matter (PM) or ozone air pollution cause an increase in plasma levels of endothelin-1, a potent vasoconstrictor that regulates pulmonary arterial pressure. Objectives The primary objective of this field study was to determine whether Mexico City children, who are chronically exposed to levels of PM and O3 that exceed the United States air quality standards, have elevated plasma endothelin-1 levels and pulmonary arterial pressures. Methods We conducted a study of 81 children, 7.9 ± 1.3 years of age, lifelong residents of either northeast (n = 19) or southwest (n = 40) Mexico City or Polotitlán (n = 22), a control city with PM and O3 levels below the U.S. air quality standards. Clinical histories, physical examinations, and complete blood counts were done. Plasma endothelin-1 concentrations were determined by immunoassay, and pulmonary arterial pressures were measured by Doppler echocardiography. Results Mexico City children had higher plasma endothelin-1 concentrations compared with controls (p < 0.001). Mean pulmonary arterial pressure was elevated in children from both northeast (p < 0.001) and southwest (p < 0.05) Mexico City compared with controls. Endothelin-1 levels in Mexico City children were positively correlated with daily outdoor hours (p = 0.012), and 7-day cumulative levels of PM air pollution < 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) before endothelin-1 measurement (p = 0.03). Conclusions Chronic exposure of children to PM2.5 is associated with increased levels of circulating endothelin-1 and elevated mean pulmonary arterial pressure. PMID:17687455

  1. Translational, rotational and vibrational temperatures of a gliding arc discharge at atmospheric pressure air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Gliding arc discharges have generally been used to generate non-equilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure. Temperature distributions of a gliding arc are of great interest both for fundamental plasma research and for practical applications. In the presented studies, translational, rotational...... and vibrational temperatures of a gliding arc generated at atmospheric pressure air are investigated. Translational temperatures (about 1100 K) were measured by laser-induced Rayleigh scattering, and two-dimensional temperature imaging was performed. Rotational and vibrational temperatures (about 3600 K and 6700...

  2. Determination of air and hydrofoil pressure coefficient by laser doppler anemometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Slavica S.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Some results of experiments performed in water cavitation tunnel are presented. Pressure coefficient (Cp was experimentally determined by Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA measurements. Two models were tested: model of airplane G4 (Super Galeb and hydrofoil of high speed axial pump. These models are not prepared for conventional pressure measurements, so that LDA is applied for Cp determination. Numerical results were obtained using a code for average Navier-Stokes equations solutions. Comparisons between computational and experimental results prove the effectiveness of the LDA. The advantages and disadvantages of LDA application are discussed. Flow visualization was made by air bubbles.

  3. The structure of laminar premixed H{sub 2}-air flames at elevated pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Gamal, M. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische Verbrennung; Gutheil, E.; Warnatz, J. [Heidelberg Univ. (DE). Interdisziplinaeres Zentrum fuer Wissenschaftliches Rechnen (IWR)

    2000-07-01

    In high-pressure flames that occur in many practical combustion devices such as industrial furnaces, rocket propulsion and internal engine combustion, the assumption of an ideal gas is not appropriate. The present paper presents a model that includes modifications of the equation of state, transport and thermodynamic properties. The model is implemented into a Fortran program that was developed to simulate numerically one-dimensional planar premixed flames. The influence of the modifications for the real gas behavior on the laminar flame speed and on flame structure is illustrated for stoichiometric H{sub 2}-air flames at initial pressures ranging from 0.1 to 100 MPa. (orig.)

  4. Parameters of a supershort avalanche electron beam generated in atmospheric-pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, V. F.

    2011-05-01

    Conditions under which the number of runaway electrons in atmospheric-pressure air reaches ˜5 × 1010 are determined. Recommendations for creating runaway electron accelerators are given. Methods for measuring the parameters of a supershort avalanche electron beam and X-ray pulses from gas-filled diodes, as well as the discharge current and gap voltage, are described. A technique for determining the instant of runaway electron generation with respect to the voltage pulse is proposed. It is shown that the reduction in the gap voltage and the decrease in the beam current coincide in time. The mechanism of intense electron beam generation in gas-filled diodes is analyzed. It is confirmed experimentally that, in optimal regimes, the number of electrons generated in atmospheric-pressure air with energies T > eU m , where U m is the maximum gap voltage, is relatively small.

  5. Nonlinear Drift of the Spring Gravimeter Caused by Air Pressure from the Kunming GS15 Gravimeters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to monitor and correct the meteorological factors of the spring gravity meter, the characteristics of the time varying gravity changes caused by meteorological factors were analyzed. Kunming GS15 gravity meter from 2007 continuous gravity observation has been carried out with the sampling rate of the pressure observation. In this study, we first compare the effects of 4 types of gravity meter and 3 different types of stations on the gravity observed seasonal gravity signals. It is indicated that the observed seasonal gravity signal of the cave is only 1/10, and there is a constant temperature and constant pressure device. Compared with the same time, the gravity signal of the gravity signal is about 100 times smaller. The influence of the pressure load of the gravity meter is tested by using the theory of pressure. The results show that only the actual value of 2cpd - 3cpd pressure load varies from -0.395 to -0.280×10-8ms-2 , and the 1cpd to 1 cpm periodic partial type gravity meter is also in accordance with the law of gravity and air pressure. And with the characteristics of time lag. In this paper, the nonlinear zero drift parameters of the linear regression model with time lag and the time series of the GS15 gravity meter are used to simulate the nonlinear zero drift parameters of the gravity meter. The results show that the gravity signal contains time lag 35 hours, and the air pressure admittance is 0.8 × 10-8ms-2/mbar. The correlation can reach 79%. The gravity changes signal and satellite gravity as well as the gravity water load signal of the land water model are the same as the gravity water load signal in the autumn as the minimum value, and the seasonal variation of the maximum value of gravity in summer.

  6. Characterization of an atmospheric pressure air plasma source for polymer surface modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shujun; Tang, Jiansheng

    2013-10-01

    An atmospheric pressure air plasma source was generated through dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). It was used to modify polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) surfaces with very high throughput. An equivalent circuit model was used to calculate the peak average electron density. The emission spectrum from the plasma was taken and the main peaks in the spectrum were identified. The ozone density in the down plasma region was estimated by Absorption Spectroscopy. NSF and ARC-ODU

  7. Atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in air : plasma characterisation for skin therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Rajasekaran, Priyadarshini

    2011-01-01

    A pulsed atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) device operating in air is investigated for medical applications such as for skin disinfection and promotion of wound healing. The device ignites plasma on objects of high capacitance such as the human body and with grounded electrodes. Plasma parameters such as electron density and electron distribution function are determined. Plasma chemical kinetics is simulated and the production of biologically-useful molecules...

  8. Micro-controller based air pressure monitoring instrumentation system using optical fibers as sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, D.; Pegu, D. S.

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes a micro-controller based instrumentation system to monitor air pressure using optical fiber sensors. The principle of macrobending is used to develop the sensor system. The instrumentation system consists of a laser source, a beam splitter, two multi mode optical fibers, two Light Dependent Resistance (LDR) based timer circuits and a AT89S8252 micro-controller. The beam splitter is used to divide the laser beam into two parts and then these two beams are launched into two multi mode fibers. One of the multi mode fibers is used as the sensor fiber and the other one is used as the reference fiber. The use of the reference fiber is to eliminate the environmental effects while measuring the air pressure magnitude. The laser beams from the sensor and reference fibers are applied to two identical LDR based timer circuits. The LDR based timer circuits are interfaced to a micro-controller through its counter pins. The micro-controller samples the frequencies of the timer circuits using its counter-0 and counter-1 and the counter values are then processed to provide the measure of air pressure magnitude.

  9. Advancing a smart air cushion system for preventing pressure ulcers using projection Moiré for large deformation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sheng-Lin; Tsai, Tsung-Heng; Lee, Carina Jean-Tien; Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2016-03-01

    A pressure ulcer is one of the most important concerns for wheelchair bound patients with spinal cord injuries. A pressure ulcer is a localized injury near the buttocks that bear ischial tuberosity oppression over a long period of time. Due to elevated compression to blood vessels, the surrounding tissues suffer from a lack of oxygen and nutrition. The ulcers eventually lead to skin damage followed by tissue necrosis. The current medical strategy is to minimize the occurrence of pressure ulcers by regularly helping patients change their posture. However, these methods do not always work effectively or well. As a solution to fundamentally prevent pressure ulcers, a smart air cushion system was developed to detect and control pressure actively. The air cushion works by automatically adjusting a patient's sitting posture to effectively relieve the buttock pressure. To analyze the correlation between the dynamic pressure profiles of an air cell with a patient's weight, a projection Moiré system was adopted to measure the deformation of an air cell and its associated stress distribution. Combining a full-field deformation imaging with air pressure measured within an air cell, the patient's weight and the stress distribution can be simultaneously obtained. By integrating a full-field optical metrology with a time varying pressure sensor output coupled with different active air control algorithms for various designs, we can tailor the ratio of the air cells. Our preliminary data suggests that this newly developed smart air cushion has the potential to selectively reduce localized compression on the tissues at the buttocks. Furthermore, it can take a patient's weight which is an additional benefit so that medical personnel can reference it to prescribe the correct drug dosages.

  10. Evaluation of the Operator Protection Factors Offered by Positive Pressure Air Suits against Airborne Microbiological Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackie A. Steward

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Laboratories throughout the world that perform work with Risk Group 4 Pathogens generally adopt one of two approaches within BSL-4 environments: either the use of positive pressure air-fed suits or using Class III microbiological safety cabinets and isolators for animal work. Within the UK at present, all laboratories working with Risk Group 4 agents adopt the use of Class III microbiological safety cabinet lines and isolators. Operator protection factors for the use of microbiological safety cabinets and isolators are available however; there is limited published data on the operator protection factors afforded by the use of positive pressure suits. This study evaluated the operator protection factors provided by positive pressure air suits against a realistic airborne microbiological challenge. The suits were tested, both intact and with their integrity compromised, on an animated mannequin within a stainless steel exposure chamber. The suits gave operator protection in all tests with an intact suit and with a cut in the leg. When compromised by a cut in the glove, a very small ingress of the challenge was seen as far as the wrist. This is likely to be due to the low airflow in the gloves of the suit. In all cases no microbiological penetration of the respiratory tract was observed. These data provide evidence on which to base safety protocols for use of positive pressure suits within high containment laboratories.

  11. Dynamic Wetting in a Non-Equilibrium Gas: The Effect of Gas Pressure on Air Entrainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprittles, James

    2014-11-01

    Experimentally, it is now well established that lowering the pressure of an ambient gas can suppress wetting failures, or ``air entrainment,'' at a liquid-solid-gas moving contact-line in both coating processes and drop impact dynamics. In this work, we consider the possibility that non-equilibrium effects in the gas are responsible for such phenomena. These can be included into a continuum framework by allowing for slip at both the solid-gas and liquid-gas interfaces, caused by Knudsen layers attached to these boundaries, which is related to the mean free path in the gas, and hence the ambient pressure. This model has been incorporated into a computational framework developed for dynamic wetting phenomena, which resolves all scales in the problem, so that these new effects can be investigated. It is shown that reductions in gas pressure, and hence increases in slip, can dramatically modify the flow field in the gas-film in front of a moving contact-line so that air entrainment is prevented. Specifically, in a dip-coating setup it is shown that the new model (a) describes experimental results for the critical wetting speed at a given gas pressure and (b) allows us to identify new parameters associated with the non-equilibrium gas dynamics which govern the contact-line's motion.

  12. Pressurized Intravenous Fluid Administration in the Professional Football Player: A Unique Setting for Venous Air Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibel, Kenton H; Barnes, Ronnie P; Kinderknecht, James J

    2015-07-01

    Venous air embolism (VAE) is a potentially life-threatening event that is most commonly associated with certain surgical procedures, although this theoretical complication of pressurized rapid infusion of intravenous (IV) fluids has been described. This series of cases describes 4 athletes who presented with continuous coughing and other chest complaints after peripheral IV infusion of normal saline through manual pressurized infusion. Symptoms resolved within 20 minutes, and these incidences did not interfere with resuming athletic competition with no recurrence of symptoms or complications. These cases are most consistent with varying degrees of VAE and reveal the risk of VAE associated with pressurized peripheral IV fluid administration along with the unique clinical presentation of more modest forms of VAE in an awake patient. Becoming more knowledgeable about IV infusion technique and understanding potential pitfalls can be helpful in reducing future incidences of VAE.

  13. Fiber in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer based on an inner air-cavity for high-pressure sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talataisong, W; Wang, D N; Chitaree, R; Liao, C R; Wang, C

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate a fiber in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer based on an inner air-cavity with open micro-channel for high-pressure sensing applications. The inner air-cavity is fabricated by combining femtosecond laser micromachining and the fusion splicing technique. The micro-channel is drilled on the top of the inner air-cavity to allow the high-pressure gas to flow in. The fiber in-line device is miniature, robust, and stable in operation and exhibits a high pressure sensitivity of ∼8,239  pm/MPa.

  14. Effect of shockwave-induced density jump on laser plasma interactions in low-pressure ambient air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Y; Tillack, M S; Harilal, S S; Sequoia, K L; O' Shay, B; Najmabadi, F [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Center for Energy Research, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0438 (United States)

    2006-09-21

    The dynamics of laser-produced plasma (LPP) and its shockwave-induced density jump (SIDJ) were investigated in low-pressure ambient air during the laser pulse using an optical interferometer. A tiny SIDJ could be observed clearly in ambient air with pressure as low as 3 Torr even during the rising edge of a 7 ns laser pulse. It was shown that the density jump and ionization could seed laser-induced ambient air breakdown at a relatively low pressure, which could significantly reduce laser energy deposited in the LPP. The ionization of the density jump was confirmed by dynamic emission imaging.

  15. Operational design and pressure response of large-scale compressed air energy storage in porous formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Bauer, Sebastian

    2017-04-01

    With the rapid growth of energy production from intermittent renewable sources like wind and solar power plants, large-scale energy storage options are required to compensate for fluctuating power generation on different time scales. Compressed air energy storage (CAES) in porous formations is seen as a promising option for balancing short-term diurnal fluctuations. CAES is a power-to-power energy storage, which converts electricity to mechanical energy, i.e. highly pressurized air, and stores it in the subsurface. This study aims at designing the storage setup and quantifying the pressure response of a large-scale CAES operation in a porous sandstone formation, thus assessing the feasibility of this storage option. For this, numerical modelling of a synthetic site and a synthetic operational cycle is applied. A hypothetic CAES scenario using a typical anticline structure in northern Germany was investigated. The top of the storage formation is at 700 m depth and the thickness is 20 m. The porosity and permeability were assumed to have a homogenous distribution with a value of 0.35 and 500 mD, respectively. According to the specifications of the Huntorf CAES power plant, a gas turbine producing 321 MW power with a minimum inlet pressure of 43 bars at an air mass flowrate of 417 kg/s was assumed. Pressure loss in the gas wells was accounted for using an analytical solution, which defines a minimum bottom hole pressure of 47 bars. Two daily extraction cycles of 6 hours each were set to the early morning and the late afternoon in order to bypass the massive solar energy production around noon. A two-year initial filling of the reservoir with air and ten years of daily cyclic operation were numerically simulated using the Eclipse E300 reservoir simulator. The simulation results show that using 12 wells the storage formation with a permeability of 500 mD can support the required 6-hour continuous power output of 321MW, which corresponds an energy output of 3852 MWh per

  16. Traffic-related air pollution and noise and children's blood pressure: results from the PIAMA birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilenko, Natalya; van Rossem, Lenie; Brunekreef, Bert; Beelen, Rob; Eeftens, Marloes; Hoek, Gerard; Houthuijs, Danny; de Jongste, Johan C; van Kempen, Elise; Koppelman, Gerard H; Meliefste, Kees; Oldenwening, Marieke; Smit, Henriette A; Wijga, Alet H; Gehring, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Elevation of a child's blood pressure may cause possible health risks in later life. There is evidence for adverse effects of exposure to air pollution and noise on blood pressure in adults. Little is known about these associations in children. We investigated the associations of air pollution and noise exposure with blood pressure in 12-year-olds. Blood pressure was measured at age 12 years in 1432 participants of the PIAMA birth cohort study. Annual average exposure to traffic-related air pollution [NO2, mass concentrations of particulate matter with diameters of less than 2.5 µm (PM2.5) and less than 10 µm (PM10), and PM2.5 absorbance] at the participants' home and school addresses at the time of blood pressure measurements was estimated by land-use regression models. Air pollution exposure on the days preceding blood pressure measurements was estimated from routine air monitoring data. Long-term noise exposure was assessed by linking addresses to modelled equivalent road traffic noise levels. Associations of exposures with blood pressure were analysed by linear regression. Effects are presented for an interquartile range increase in exposure. Long-term exposure to NO2 and PM2.5 absorbance were associated with increased diastolic blood pressure, in children who lived at the same address since birth [adjusted mean difference (95% confidence interval) [mmHg] 0.83 (0.06 to 1.61) and 0.75 (-0.08 to 1.58), respectively], but not with systolic blood pressure. We found no association of blood pressure with short-term air pollution or noise exposure. Long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution may increase diastolic blood pressure in children. © The European Society of Cardiology 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  17. Analysis of an Aircraft Honeycomb Sandwich Panel with Circular Face Sheet/Core Disbond Subjected to Ground-Air Pressurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinker, Martin; Krueger, Ronald; Ratcliffe, James

    2013-01-01

    The ground-air pressurization of lightweight honeycomb sandwich structures caused by alternating pressure differences between the enclosed air within the honeycomb core and the ambient environment is a well-known and controllable loading condition of aerospace structures. However, initial face sheet/core disbonds intensify the face sheet peeling effect of the internal pressure load significantly and can decrease the reliability of the sandwich structure drastically. Within this paper, a numerical parameter study was carried out to investigate the criticality of initial disbonds in honeycomb sandwich structures under ground-air pressurization. A fracture mechanics approach was used to evaluate the loading at the disbond front. In this case, the strain energy release rate was computed via the Virtual Crack Closure Technique. Special attention was paid to the pressure-deformation coupling which can decrease the pressure load within the disbonded sandwich section significantly when the structure is highly deformed.

  18. Lathyrogenic agents as therapy for subglottic stenosis--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, G L; Schild, J A

    1987-11-01

    The surgical repair of subglottic stenosis (SGS) is often unsuccessful because of recurrence of the scar contracture. Over the past few years, two lathyrogenic agents (compounds that inhibit collagen cross-linking) have been shown effective in prevention of stenosis in animal models that have deep caustic esophageal burns. Since the principles of induced lathyrism have not been applied to the treatment of laryngotracheal stenosis, a pilot study using a canine model was conducted to test the efficacy of penicillamine and N-acetyl-L-cysteine in reduction of the rate of reformation of SGS. In all six animals used, a complete, 10 to 15 mm thick, mature SGS was induced experimentally, then opened with a CO2 laser. The dogs that were treated with lathyrogenic agents exhibited a lower rate of re-stenosis (one maintained patency throughout the 5 weeks of treatment) when compared to the two control dogs. Histologic sections of the subglottis in each dog revealed severe cricoid collapse, necrosis, and scarring, and thus demonstrated similarities to SGS in human beings. The two lathyrogenic agents used in this study are already approved for human use and may represent a valuable form of adjunctive therapy in the surgical management of SGS.

  19. Balloon Dilatation of Pediatric Subglottic Laryngeal Stenosis during the Artificial Apneic Pause: Experience in 5 Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lisý

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Balloon dilatation is a method of choice for treatment of laryngeal stenosis in children. The aim of procedure in apneic pause is to avoid new insertion of tracheostomy cannula. Patients and Methods. The authors performed balloon dilatation of subglottic laryngeal strictures (SGS in 5 children (3 girls and 2 boys without tracheotomy. Two of them with traumatic and inflammatory SGS had a tracheal cannula removed in the past. The other 3 children with postintubation SGS had never had a tracheostomy before. The need for tracheostomy due to worsening stridor was imminent for all of them. Results. The total of seven laryngeal dilatations by balloon esophagoplasty catheter in apneic pause was performed in the 5 children. The procedure averted the need for tracheostomy placement in 4 of them (80%. Failure of dilatation in girl with traumatic stenosis and concomitant severe obstructive lung disease led to repeated tracheostomy. Conclusion. Balloon dilatation of laryngeal stricture could be done in the absence of tracheostomy in apneic pause. Dilatation averted threatening tracheostomy in all except one case. Early complication after the procedure seems to be a negative prognostic factor for the outcome of balloon dilatation.

  20. Selective decontamination of subglottic area in mechanically ventilated patients with multiple trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumatikos, Ioannis; Koulouras, Vassilios; Nathanail, Christodoulos; Goe, Diana; Nakos, George

    2002-04-01

    To determine whether selective decontamination locally in the subglottic area (SDSA) reduces tracheal colonization and prevents ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in patients with multiple trauma. A prospective randomized, controlled, clinical study in a 14-bed general intensive care unit of a university hospital. 79 consecutive multiple trauma patients admitted to the ICU who were expected to be mechanically ventilated for more than 5 days; 61 patients completed the protocol. Patients were randomly assigned to receive SDSA using a continuous infusion of a suspension containing three nonabsorbable antibiotics (polymyxin, tombramycin, and amphotericin B; n=30) or placebo ( n=31). The incidence of bronchial and gastric colonization and the number of cases of VAP were recorded. Gastric fluid and tracheal secretion cultures were obtained soon after intubation and thereafter every 4 days. Etiological diagnosis of VAP was based on samples taken by a specific protected double catheter set. VAP developed in 5 of 30 (16.6%) patients receiving SDSA and 16 of 31 (51.6%) patients receiving placebo. Negative bronchial secretion cultures were found in 14 of 30 (46.6%) patients in the SDSA group and in only 3 of 31 (9.6%) patients in the control group. No patient with negative bronchial secretion culture developed VAP. No significant differences in outcome were found. The SDSA is an effective and safe type of chemoprophylaxis against tracheal colonization and can significantly reduce the incidence of VAP in mechanically ventilated patients with multiple trauma.

  1. Design of a MEMS piezoresistive differential pressure sensor with small thermal hysteresis for air data modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jin Woo; Lee, Jang-Sub; An, Jun-Eon; Park, Chan Gook

    2015-06-01

    The design, fabrication, and evaluation results of a MEMS piezoresistive differential pressure sensor fabricated by the dry etching process are described in this paper. The proposed sensor is designed to have optimal performances in mid-pressure range from 0 psi to 20 psi suitable for a precision air data module. The piezoresistors with a Wheatstone bridge structure are implanted where the thermal effects are minimized subject to sustainment of the sensitivity. The rectangular-shaped silicon diaphragm is adopted and its dimension is analyzed for improving pressure sensitivity and linearity. The bridge resistors are driven by constant current to compensate temperature effects on sensitivity. The designed differential pressure sensor is fabricated by using MEMS dry etching techniques, and the fabricated sensing element is attached and packaged in a Kovar package in consideration of leakage and temperature hysteresis. The implemented sensors are tested and evaluated as well. The evaluation results show the static RSS (root sum square) accuracy including nonlinearity, non-repeatability, and pressure hysteresis before temperature compensation is about 0.09%, and the total error band which includes the RSS accuracy, the thermal hysteresis, and other thermal effects is about 0.11%, which confirm the validity of the proposed design process.

  2. Design of air blast pressure sensors based on miniature silicon membrane and piezoresistive gauges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riondet, J.; Coustou, A.; Aubert, H.; Pons, P.; Lavayssière, M.; Luc, J.; Lefrançois, A.

    2017-11-01

    Available commercial piezoelectric pressure sensors are not able to accurately reproduce the ultra-fast transient pressure occurring during an air blast experiment. In this communication a new pressure sensor prototype based on a miniature silicon membrane and piezoresistive gauges is reported for significantly improving the performances in terms of time response. Simulation results demonstrate the feasibility of a pressure transducer having a fundamental resonant frequency almost ten times greater than the commercial piezoelectric sensors one. The sensor uses a 5μm-thick SOI membrane and four P-type silicon gauges (doping level ≅ 1019 at/cm3) in Wheatstone bridge configuration. To obtain a good trade-off between the fundamental mechanical resonant frequency and pressure sensitivity values, the typical dimension of the rectangular membrane is fixed to 30μm x 90μm with gauge dimension of 1μm x 5μm. The achieved simulated mechanical resonant frequency of these configuration is greater than 40MHz with a sensitivity of 0.04% per bar.

  3. The impact of mass flow and masking on the pressure drop of air filter in heavy-duty diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorji-Bandpy Mofid

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD calculation approach to predict and evaluate the impact of the mass-flow inlet on the pressure drop of turbocharger`s air filtfer in heavy-duty diesel engine. The numerical computations were carried out using a commercial CFD program whereas the inlet area of the air filter consisted of several holes connected to a channel. After entering through the channel, the air passes among the holes and enters the air filter. The effect of masking holes and hydraulic diameter is studied and investigated on pressure drop. The results indicate that pressure drop increase with decreasing of hydraulic diameter and masking of the holes has considerable affect on the pressure drop.

  4. Burning Behaviour of High-Pressure CH4-H2-Air Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacopo D'Alessio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental characterization of the burning behavior of gaseous mixtures has been carried out, analyzing spherical expanding flames. Tests were performed in the Device for Hydrogen-Air Reaction Mode Analysis (DHARMA laboratory of Istituto Motori—CNR. Based on a high-pressure, constant-volume bomb, the activity is aimed at populating a systematic database on the burning properties of CH4, H2 and other species of interest, in conditions typical of internal combustion (i.c. engines and gas turbines. High-speed shadowgraph is used to record the flame growth, allowing to infer the laminar burning parameters and the flame stability properties. Mixtures of CH4, H2 and air have been analyzed at initial temperature 293÷305 K, initial pressure 3÷18 bar and equivalence ratio  = 1.0. The amount of H2 in the mixture was 0%, 20% and 30% (vol.. The effect of the initial pressure and of the Hydrogen content on the laminar burning velocity and the Markstein length has been evaluated: the relative weight and mutual interaction has been assessed of the two controlling parameters. Analysis has been carried out of the flame instability, expressed in terms of the critical radius for the onset of cellularity, as a function of the operating conditions.

  5. Filterability of freshly-collected sickle erythrocytes under venous oxygen pressure without exposure to air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Siddharth; Acholonu, Rhonda Graves; Ohene-Frempong, Kwaku; Asakura, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    We previously found that blood samples collected from steady-state patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) without exposure to air contain a new type of reversibly sickled cells (RSCs) with blunt edges at a level of as high as 78%. Since partial oxygenation of once-deoxygenated sickled cells with pointy edges to near venous oxygen pressure generates similar sickled cells with blunt edges in vitro, we named them as partially oxygenated sickled cells (POSCs). On the other hand, partial deoxygenation of once-oxygenated SS cells to venous oxygen pressure generates partially deoxygenated sickled cells (PDSCs) with pointy edges. In this study, we obtained blood samples from 6 steady-state patients with SCD under venous oxygen pressure without exposure to air, subjected them to various oxygenation/deoxygenation/reoxygenation cycles, and studied their filterability through a membrane filter with pore diameter of 3μm, the theoretical minimum diameter of a capillary. Our results indicated that discocytes, POSCs with blunt edges, and irreversibly sickled cells could deform and pass through the filter, while PDSCs with pointy edges were rigid and could not. The filterability of SS cells seems to be related to the length and amount of deoxy-hemoglobin S fibers in the cells. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Analysis of air temperature changes on blood pressure and heart rate and performance of undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Joseana C F; da Silva, Luiz Bueno; Coutinho, Antônio S; Rodrigues, Rafaela M

    2017-01-01

    The increase in air temperature has been associated with human deaths, some of which are related to cardiovascular dysfunctions, and with the reduction of physical and cognitive performance in humans. To analyze the relationship between blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) and the cognitive performance of students who were submitted to temperature changes in classrooms. The university students answered a survey that was adapted from the Battery of Reasoning Tests over 3 consecutive days at different air temperatures while their thermal state and HR were measured. During those 3 days, BP and HR were evaluated before and after the cognitive test. The average and final HR increased at high temperatures; the tests execution time was reduced at high temperatures; and the cognitive tests was related to Mean BP at the beginning of the test, the maximum HR during the test and the air temperature. The cognitive performance of undergraduate students in the field of engineering and technology will increase while performing activities in a learning environment with an air temperature of approximately 23.3°C (according to their thermal perception), if students have an initial MBP of 93.33 mmHg and a 60 bpm HRmax.

  7. Antimicrobial nanoparticle-coated electrostatic air filter with high filtration efficiency and low pressure drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Kyoung Mi; Park, Hyun-Seol; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Jung, Jae Hee

    2015-11-15

    In this study, we demonstrated an antimicrobial nanoparticle-coated electrostatic (ES) air filter. Antimicrobial natural-product Sophora flavescens nanoparticles were produced using an aerosol process, and were continuously deposited onto the surface of air filter media. For the electrostatic activation of the filter medium, a corona discharge electrification system was used before and after antimicrobial treatment of the filter. In the antimicrobial treatment process, the deposition efficiency of S. flavescens nanoparticles on the ES filter was ~12% higher than that on the pristine (Non-ES) filter. In the evaluation of filtration performance using test particles (a nanosized KCl aerosol and submicron-sized Staphylococcus epidermidis bioaerosol), the ES filter showed better filtration efficiency than the Non-ES filter. However, antimicrobial treatment with S. flavescens nanoparticles affected the filtration efficiency of the filter differently depending on the size of the test particles. While the filtration efficiency of the KCl nanoparticles was reduced on the ES filter after the antimicrobial treatment, the filtration efficiency was improved after the recharging process. In summary, we prepared an antimicrobial ES air filter with >99% antimicrobial activity, ~92.5% filtration efficiency (for a 300-nm KCl aerosol), and a ~0.8 mmAq pressure drop (at 13 cm/s). This study provides valuable information for the development of a hybrid air purification system that can serve various functions and be used in an indoor environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Sustained diffusive alternating current gliding arc discharge in atmospheric pressure air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Li, Zhongshan

    2014-01-01

    Rapid transition from glow discharge to thermal arc has been a common problem in generating stable high-power non-thermal plasmas especially at ambient conditions. A sustained diffusive gliding arc discharge was generated in a large volume in atmospheric pressure air, driven by an alternating...... current (AC) power source. The plasma column extended beyond the water-cooled stainless steel electrodes and was stabilized by matching the flow speed of the turbulent air jet with the rated output power. Comprehensive investigations were performed using high-speed movies measured over the plasma column......, synchronized with simultaneously recorded current and voltage waveforms. Dynamic details of the novel non-equilibrium discharge are revealed, which is characterized by a sinusoidal current waveform with amplitude stabilized at around 200 mA intermediate between thermal arc and glow discharge, shedding light...

  9. A Comprehensive Probabilistic Framework to Learn Air Data from Surface Pressure Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Srivastava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of probabilistic techniques has been demonstrated to learn air data parameters from surface pressure measurements. Integration of numerical models with wind tunnel data and sequential experiment design of wind tunnel runs has been demonstrated in the calibration of a flush air data sensing anemometer system. Development and implementation of a metamodeling method, Sequential Function Approximation (SFA, are presented which lies at the core of the discussed probabilistic framework. SFA is presented as a tool capable of nonlinear statistical inference, uncertainty reduction by fusion of data with physical models of variable fidelity, and sequential experiment design. This work presents the development and application of these tools in the calibration of FADS for a Runway Assisted Landing Site (RALS control tower. However, the multidisciplinary nature of this work is general in nature and is potentially applicable to a variety of mechanical and aerospace engineering problems.

  10. Pressure drop correlation for air/water two-phase flow in horizontal helicoidal pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Dong, Z.F.; Awwad, A.; Xin, R.C. [Florida International Univ., Miami, FL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    In this paper, an experimental investigation is reported for air/water two-phase flow in horizontal helicoidal pipes. The helicoidal pipes are constructed of Tygon tubing with varying inside diameters of 12.7 mm, 19.1 mm, 25.4 mm, and 38.1 mm wrapped around two different cylindrical concrete forms with outside diameters of 304.8 mm and 609.6 mm each. Also, the helix angle of each helicoidal pipe varies up to 20 degrees. The experiments are conducted for superficial water velocity in the range of U{sub L} = 0.008 {minus} 2.2 m/s and superficial air velocity in the range of U{sub G} = 0.2 {minus} 50 m/s. The pressure drop of the two-phase flow is measured and the data are correlated. It was found that the Lockhart-Martinelli correlation for a straight pipe can represent the data for a helicoidal pipe only in the cases of a high rate of flow; nevertheless, the pressure drop relates strongly to the superficial air/water velocity when the flow rate is lower. The helix angle has almost no effect on the pressure drop, although the pipe and coil diameters have certain effects in low rates of flow. Correlations for two-phase flow in each of the horizontal helicoidal pipes have been established based on the present data. Helicoidal pipes are used extensively in compact heat exchangers, boilers, refrigerators, nuclear reactors, chemical plants, as well as the food, drug, and cryogenics industries.

  11. Integrated LTCC pressure/flow/temperature multisensor for compressed air diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Yannick; Maeder, Thomas; Boutinard-Rouelle, Grégoire; Barras, Aurélie; Craquelin, Nicolas; Ryser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We present a multisensor designed for industrial compressed air diagnostics and combining the measurement of pressure, flow, and temperature, integrated with the corresponding signal conditioning electronics in a single low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) package. The developed sensor may be soldered onto an integrated electro-fluidic platform by using standard surface mount device (SMD) technology, e.g., as a standard electronic component would be on a printed circuit board, obviating the need for both wires and tubes and thus paving the road towards low-cost integrated electro-fluidic systems. Several performance aspects of this device are presented and discussed, together with electronics design issues.

  12. Energy distribution of runaway electrons generated by a nanosecond discharge in atmospheric-pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Kostyrya, I. D.; Lomaev, M. I.; Petin, V. K.; Rybka, D. V.; Shlyakhtun, S. V.

    2008-12-01

    The spectra of an ultrashort avalanche electron beam generated by a nanosecond discharge in atmospheric-pressure air were investigated. The temporal characteristics of the beam current pulses, gap voltage, and discharge current in a gas diode were measured with a time resolution of ˜0.1 ns. A simple technique was developed for recovering electron spectra from the curves of beam attenuation by aluminum foils. The effect of the cathode design, electrode gap length, and generator parameters on the electron spectra were studied using seven setups. It is shown that generation of electrons with anomalously high energies requires the use of cathodes with increased curvature radius.

  13. An Explosive Range Model Based on the Gas Composition, Temperature, and Pressure during Air Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyu Fan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Air drilling is low cost and effectively improves the penetration rate and causes minimal damage to liquid-sensitive pay zones. However, there is a potential downhole explosion when combustible gas mixed with drilling fluid reaches the combustible condition. In this paper, based on the underground combustion mechanism, an explosive range calculation model is established. This model couples the state equation and the empirical formula method, which considers the inert gas content, pressure, mixed gas component, and temperature. The result shows that increase of the inert gas content narrows the explosive range, while increase of the gas temperature and pressure improves the explosive range. A case in Chongqing, China, is used to validate the explosive range calculation model.

  14. Bifurcation and Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Externally Pressurized Double Air Films Bearing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chi Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the chaotic and nonlinear dynamic behaviors of a rigid rotor supported by externally pressurized double air films (EPDAF bearing system. A hybrid numerical method combining the differential transformation method and the finite difference method is used to calculate pressure distribution of EPDAF bearing system and bifurcation phenomenon of rotor center orbits. The results obtained for the orbits of the rotor center are in good agreement with those obtained using the traditional finite difference approach. The results presented summarize the changes which take place in the dynamic behavior of the EPDAF bearing system as the rotor mass and bearing number are increased and therefore provide a useful guideline for the bearing system.

  15. Two-dimensional modeling of stepped planing hulls with open and pressurized air cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin I. Matveev

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A method of hydrodynamic discrete sources is applied for two-dimensional modeling of stepped planing surfaces. The water surface deformations, wetted hull lengths, and pressure distribution are calculated at given hull attitude and Froude number. Pressurized air cavities that improve hydrodynamic performance can also be modeled with the current method. Presented results include validation examples, parametric calculations of a single-step hull, effect of trim tabs, and performance of an infinite series of periodic stepped surfaces. It is shown that transverse steps can lead to higher lift-drag ratio, although at reduced lift capability, in comparison with a stepless hull. Performance of a multi-step configuration is sensitive to the wave pattern between hulls, which depends on Froude number and relative hull spacing.

  16. Remote Sensing Global Surface Air Pressure Using Differential Absorption BArometric Radar (DiBAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing; Harrah, Steven; Lawrence, Wes; Hu, Yongxiang; Min, Qilong

    2016-01-01

    Tropical storms and severe weathers are listed as one of core events that need improved observations and predictions in World Meteorological Organization and NASA Decadal Survey (DS) documents and have major impacts on public safety and national security. This effort tries to observe surface air pressure, especially over open seas, from space using a Differential-absorption BArometric Radar (DiBAR) operating at the 50-55 gigahertz O2 absorption band. Air pressure is among the most important variables that affect atmospheric dynamics, and currently can only be measured by limited in-situ observations over oceans. Analyses show that with the proposed space radar the errors in instantaneous (averaged) pressure estimates can be as low as approximately 4 millibars (approximately 1 millibar under all weather conditions). With these sea level pressure measurements, the forecasts of severe weathers such as hurricanes will be significantly improved. Since the development of the DiBAR concept about a decade ago, NASA Langley DiBAR research team has made substantial progress in advancing the concept. The feasibility assessment clearly shows the potential of sea surface barometry using existing radar technologies. The team has developed a DiBAR system design, fabricated a Prototype-DiBAR (P-DiBAR) for proof-of-concept, conducted lab, ground and airborne P-DiBAR tests. The flight test results are consistent with the instrumentation goals. Observational system simulation experiments for space DiBAR performance based on the existing DiBAR technology and capability show substantial improvements in tropical storm predictions, not only for the hurricane track and position but also for the hurricane intensity. DiBAR measurements will lead us to an unprecedented level of the prediction and knowledge on global extreme weather and climate conditions.

  17. The lunar semidiurnal air pressure tide in in-situ data and ECMWF reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindelegger, Michael; Dobslaw, Henryk

    2016-04-01

    A gridded empirical model of the lunar semidiurnal air pressure tide L2 is deduced through multiquadric interpolation of more than 2000 globally distributed tidal estimates from land barometers and moored buoys. The resulting climatology serves as an independent standard to validate the barometric L2 oscillations that are present in ECMWF's (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) global atmospheric reanalyses despite the omission of gravitational forcing mechanisms in the involved forecast routines. Inconsistencies between numerical and empirical L2 solutions are found to be small even though the reanalysis models typically underestimate equatorial peak pressures by 10-20% and produce slightly deficient tidal phases in latitudes south of 30°N. Through using a time-invariant reference surface over both land and water and assimilating marine pressure data without accounting for vertical sensor movements due to the M2 ocean tide, ECMWF-based tidal solutions are also prone to strong local artifacts. Additionally, the dependency of the lunar tidal oscillation in atmospheric analysis systems on the meteorological input data is demonstrated based on a recent ECMWF twentieth-century reanalysis (ERA-20C) which draws its all of its observational constraints from in-situ registrations of pressure and surface winds. The L2 signature prior to 1950 is particularly indicative of distinct observing system changes, such as the paucity of marine data during both World Wars or the opening of the Panama Canal in 1914 and the associated adjustment of commercial shipping routes.

  18. Fast step-response settling of micro electrostatic actuators operated at low air pressure using input shaping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, L.; Rocha, L.A.; Cretu, E.; Wolffenbuttel, R.F.

    2009-01-01

    Squeeze-film damping is highly inadequate in low-pressure systems or in systems where air pressure and/or gap dimensions are poorly defined. Input shaping has been used to circumvent the oscillations typically associated with under-damped mass-spring-damper systems and drastically decrease the

  19. Squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx with subglottic extension: is larynx preservation possible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, A.; Blanchard, P.; Lusinchi, A.; Daly-Schveitzer, N.; Tao, Y. [Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiotherapy, Villejuif (France); Temam, S.; Maison, M.M.; Janot, F.; Mirghani, H. [Gustave Roussy, Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Villejuif (France); Bidault, F. [Gustave Roussy, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Villejuif (France); Guigay, J. [Gustave Roussy, Department of Medical Oncology, Villejuif (France); Bourhis, J. [Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiotherapy, Villejuif (France); University Hospital Lausanne, Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-07-15

    Squamous cell carcinoma of larynx with subglottic extension (sSCC) is a rare location described to carry a poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to analyze outcomes and feasibility of larynx preservation in sSCC patients. Between 1996 and 2012, 197 patients with sSCC were treated at our institution and included in the analysis. Stage III-IV tumors accounted for 76 %. Patients received surgery (62 %), radiotherapy (RT) (18 %), or induction chemotherapy (CT) (20 %) as front-line therapy. The 5-year actuarial overall survival (OS), locoregional control (LRC), and distant control rate were 59 % (95 % CI 51-68), 83 % (95 % CI 77-89), and 88 % (95 % CI 83-93), respectively, with a median follow-up of 54.4 months. There was no difference in OS and LRC according to front-line treatments or between primary subglottic cancer and glottosupraglottic cancers with subglottic extension. In the multivariate analysis, age > 60 years and positive N stage were the only predictors for OS (HR 2, 95 % CI 1.2-3.6; HR1.9, 95 % CI 1-3.5, respectively). A lower LRC was observed for T3 patients receiving a larynx preservation protocol as compared with those receiving a front-line surgery (HR 14.1, 95 % CI 2.5-136.7; p = 0.02); however, no difference of ultimate LRC was observed according to the first therapy when including T3 patients who underwent salvage laryngectomy (p = 0.6). In patients receiving a larynx preservation protocol, the 5-year larynx-preservation rate was 55 % (95 % CI 43-68), with 36 % in T3 patients. The 5-year larynx preservation rate was 81 % (95 % CI 65-96) and 35 % (95 % CI 20-51) for patients who received RT or induction CT as a front-line treatment, respectively. Outcomes of sSCC are comparable with other laryngeal cancers when managed with modern therapeutic options. Larynx-preservation protocols could be a suitable option in T1-T2 (RT or chemo-RT) and selected T3 sSCC patients (induction CT). (orig.) [German] Plattenepithelkarzinome des Larynx mit

  20. Extreme Air Pollution Conditions Adversely Affect Blood Pressure and Insulin Resistance: The Air Pollution and Cardiometabolic Disease Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Robert D; Sun, Zhichao; Brook, Jeffrey R; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Ruan, Yanping; Yan, Jianhua; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Rao, Xiaoquan; Duan, Fengkui; Sun, Lixian; Liang, Ruijuan; Lian, Hui; Zhang, Shuyang; Fang, Quan; Gu, Dongfeng; Sun, Qinghua; Fan, Zhongjie; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence supports that fine particulate matter adversely affects cardiometabolic diseases particularly in susceptible individuals; however, health effects induced by the extreme concentrations within megacities in Asia are not well described. We enrolled 65 nonsmoking adults with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in the Beijing metropolitan area into a panel study of 4 repeated visits across 4 seasons since 2012. Daily ambient fine particulate matter and personal black carbon levels ranged from 9.0 to 552.5 µg/m(3) and 0.2 to 24.5 µg/m(3), respectively, with extreme levels observed during January 2013. Cumulative fine particulate matter exposure windows across the prior 1 to 7 days were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure elevations ranging from 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 0.3-3.7) to 2.7 (0.6-4.8) mm Hg per SD increase (67.2 µg/m(3)), whereas cumulative black carbon exposure during the previous 2 to 5 days were significantly associated with ranges in elevations in diastolic blood pressure from 1.3 (0.0-2.5) to 1.7 (0.3-3.2) mm Hg per SD increase (3.6 µg/m(3)). Both black carbon and fine particulate matter were significantly associated with worsening insulin resistance (0.18 [0.01-0.36] and 0.22 [0.04-0.39] unit increase per SD increase of personal-level black carbon and 0.18 [0.02-0.34] and 0.22 [0.08-0.36] unit increase per SD increase of ambient fine particulate matter on lag days 4 and 5). These results provide important global public health warnings that air pollution may pose a risk to cardiometabolic health even at the extremely high concentrations faced by billions of people in the developing world today. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Shuttle Entry Air Data System concepts applied to Space Shuttle Orbiter flight pressure data to determine air data - STS 1-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemers, P. M., III; Wolf, H.; Flanagan, P. F.

    1983-01-01

    The Shuttle Entry Air Data System (SEADS) is the implementation of a new concept in air data systems, with application to entry vehicles. This concept incorporates an array of flush orifices in the nose and forward fuselage of the vehicle and a new flowfield modeling concept for the analysis of flight data and the determination of the required air data parameters. Although the SEADS has not been fully demonstrated, a developmental analysis capability has been assembled and demonstrated. This analytical capability has been used to analyze selected Development Flight Instrumentation (DFI) pressure data from STS-1 through STS-4 and determine angle of attack and freestream dynamic pressure. The results of this study verify the potential of the SEADS as a highly fault tolerant operational air data system. In addition, the transition of SEADS from its present status as an experimental system to an operational system is shown to be readily achievable.

  2. A Novel Constant-Pressure Pumped Hydro Combined with Compressed Air Energy Storage System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erren Yao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As intermittent renewable energy is receiving increasing attention, the combination of intermittent renewable energy with large-scale energy storage technology is considered as an important technological approach for the wider application of wind power and solar energy. Pumped hydro combined with compressed air energy storage system (PHCA is one of the energy storage systems that not only integrates the advantages but also overcomes the disadvantages of compressed air energy storage (CAES systems and pumped hydro energy storage systems to solve the problem of energy storage in China’s arid regions. Aiming at the variable working conditions of PHCA system technology, this study proposes a new constant-pressure PHCA. The most significant characteristics of this system were that the water pump and hydroturbine work under stable conditions and this improves the working efficiency of the equipment without incurring an energy loss. In addition, the constant-pressure PHCA system was subjected to energy and exergy analysis, in expectation of exploring an attractive solution for the large-scale storage of existing intermittent renewable energy.

  3. Diffuse plasma treatment of polyamide 66 fabric in atmospheric pressure air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lee, E-mail: leeli@mail.hust.edu.cn; Peng, Ming-yang; Teng, Yun; Gao, Guozhen

    2016-01-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A cylindrical-electrode nanosecond-pulse diffuse-discharge reactor is presented. • Large-scale non-thermal plasmas were generated steadily in atmospheric air. • Treated PA66 fabric is etched with oxygen-containing group increases. • The hydrophily of treated PA66 fabric improves effectively. • Extending the treatment time is a method to reduce the treatment frequency. - Abstract: The polyamide 66 (PA66) fabrics are hard to be colored or glued in industrial production due to the poor hydrophily. Diffuse plasma is a kind of non-thermal plasma generated at atmospheric pressure in air. This paper proposes that large-scale diffuse plasma generated between wire electrodes can be employed for improving the hydrophily of PA66 fabrics. A repetitive nanosecond-pulse diffuse-discharge reactor using a cylindrical wire electrode configuration is presented, which can generate large-scale non-thermal plasmas steadily at atmospheric pressure without any barrier dielectric. Then the reactor is used to treat PA66 fabrics in different discharge conditions. The hydrophilicity property of modified PA66 is measured by wicking test method. The modified PA66 is also analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to prove the surface changes in physical microstructure and chemical functional groups, respectively. What's more, the effects of treatment time and treatment frequency on surface modification are investigated and discussed.

  4. Influence of wind-induced air pressure fluctuations on topsoil gas concentrations within a Scots pine forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Manuel; Laemmel, Thomas; Maier, Martin; Schindler, Dirk

    2017-04-01

    Commonly it is assumed that soil gas transport is dominated by molecular diffusion. Few recent studies indicate that the atmosphere above the soil triggers non-diffusive gas transport processes in the soil, which can enhance soil gas transport and therefore soil gas efflux significantly. During high wind speed conditions, the so called pressure pumping effect has been observed: the enhancement of soil gas transport through dynamic changes in the air pressure field above the soil. However, the amplitudes and frequencies of the air pressure fluctuations responsible for pressure pumping are still uncertain. Moreover, an in situ observation of the pressure pumping effect is still missing. To investigate the pressure pumping effect, airflow measurements above and below the canopy of a Scots pine forest and high-precision relative air pressure measurements were conducted in the below-canopy space and in the soil over a measurement period of 16 weeks. To monitor the soil gas transport, a newly developed gas measurement system was used. The gas measurement system continuously injects helium as a tracer gas into the soil until a diffusive steady state is reached. With the steady state concentration profile of the tracer gas, it is possible to inversely model the gas diffusion coefficient profile of the soil. If the gas diffusion coefficient profile differed from steady state, we deduced that the soil gas transport is not only diffusive, but also influenced by non-diffusive processes. Results show that the occurrence of small air pressure fluctuations is strongly dependent on the mean above-canopy wind speed. The wind-induced air pressure fluctuations have mean amplitudes up to 10 Pa and lie in the frequency range 0.01-0.1 Hz. To describe the pumping motion of the air pressure field, the pressure pumping coefficient (PPC) was defined as the mean change in pressure per second. The PPC shows a clear quadratic dependence on mean above-canopy wind speed. Empirical modelling of

  5. A Modified Triples Algorithm for Flush Air Data Systems that Allows a Variety of Pressure Port Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millman, Daniel R.

    2017-01-01

    Air Data Systems (FADS) are becoming more prevalent on re-entry vehicles, as evi- denced by the Mars Science Laboratory and the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle. A FADS consists of flush-mounted pressure transducers located at various locations on the fore-body of a flight vehicle or the heat shield of a re-entry capsule. A pressure model converts the pressure readings into useful air data quantities. Two algorithms for converting pressure readings to air data have become predominant- the iterative Least Squares State Estimator (LSSE) and the Triples Algorithm. What follows herein is a new algorithm that takes advantage of the best features of both the Triples Algorithm and the LSSE. This approach employs the potential flow model and strategic differencing of the Triples Algorithm to obtain the defective flight angles; however, the requirements on port placement are far less restrictive, allowing for configurations that are considered optimal for a FADS.

  6. High-pressure refrigeration system with CO2 in automobile air-conditioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wertenbach, J.; Kauf, F. [Daimler-Benz, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    Due to high consumer acceptance of automobile air conditioning systems, the discussion of the effects of refrigerants on global warming is becoming more important to an environmentally-aware public. The consumption of fossil fuels to operate air conditioning systems, combined with refrigerant emissions, contribute to the greenhouse effect. Substitution of conventional refrigerants with CO2 reduces the load on heat-adsorbing gases in our atmosphere by providing an environment-friendly alternative. Because the amount of engine power devoted to air conditioning systems is limited, carbon dioxide makes an attractive substitute for HFC refrigerants in vehicle applications. In this paper, TEWI-figures for a vehicle with A/C System are considered, and the reduction potential due to CO2 as refrigerant as a motive for phasing out current technology is shown. This includes a comparison of COP`s between a conventional cold vapor cycle and the transcritical refrigerant cycle using CO2 to evaluate benefits and disadvantages. The high pressure refrigerant cycle has to be seen in the light of the requirement profile for introduced MACS. Furthermore, assorted results from the European RACE (Refrigeration and Automotive Climate systems under Environmental aspects) project are presented. The theory of the refrigerant cycle, tests results, packaging in a vehicle, and first experiences of component development are discussed, as well as difficulties in adapting this `Green Technology` to a car. 7 refs.

  7. Road, rail, and air transportation noise in residential and workplace neighborhoods and blood pressure (RECORD Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méline, Julie; Van Hulst, Andraea; Thomas, Frederique; Chaix, Basile

    2015-01-01

    Associations between road traffic noise and hypertension have been repeatedly documented, whereas associations with rail or total road, rail, and air (RRA) traffic noise have rarely been investigated. Moreover, most studies of noise in the environment have only taken into account the residential neighborhood. Finally, few studies have taken into account individual/neighborhood confounders in the relationship between noise and hypertension. We performed adjusted multilevel regression analyses using data from the 7,290 participants of the RECORD Study to investigate the associations of outdoor road, rail, air, and RRA traffic noise estimated at the place of residence, at the workplace, and in the neighborhoods around the residence and workplace with systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and hypertension. Associations were documented between higher outdoor RRA and road traffic noise estimated at the workplace and a higher SBP [+1.36 mm of mercury, 95% confidence interval (CI): +0.12, +2.60 for 65-80 dB(A) vs 30-45 dB(A)] and DBP [+1.07 (95% CI: +0.28, +1.86)], after adjustment for individual/neighborhood confounders. These associations remained after adjustment for risk factors of hypertension. Associations were documented neither with rail traffic noise nor for hypertension. Associations between transportation noise at the workplace and blood pressure (BP) may be attributable to the higher levels of road traffic noise at the workplace than at the residence. To better understand why only noise estimated at the workplace was associated with BP, our future work will combine Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking, assessment of noise levels with sensors, and ambulatory monitoring of BP.

  8. Road, rail, and air transportation noise in residential and workplace neighborhoods and blood pressure (RECORD Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Méline

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Associations between road traffic noise and hypertension have been repeatedly documented, whereas associations with rail or total road, rail, and air (RRA traffic noise have rarely been investigated. Moreover, most studies of noise in the environment have only taken into account the residential neighborhood. Finally, few studies have taken into account individual/neighborhood confounders in the relationship between noise and hypertension. We performed adjusted multilevel regression analyses using data from the 7,290 participants of the RECORD Study to investigate the associations of outdoor road, rail, air, and RRA traffic noise estimated at the place of residence, at the workplace, and in the neighborhoods around the residence and workplace with systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, and hypertension. Associations were documented between higher outdoor RRA and road traffic noise estimated at the workplace and a higher SBP [+1.36 mm of mercury, 95% confidence interval (CI: +0.12, +2.60 for 65-80 dB(A vs 30-45 dB(A] and DBP [+1.07 (95% CI: +0.28, +1.86], after adjustment for individual/neighborhood confounders. These associations remained after adjustment for risk factors of hypertension. Associations were documented neither with rail traffic noise nor for hypertension. Associations between transportation noise at the workplace and blood pressure (BP may be attributable to the higher levels of road traffic noise at the workplace than at the residence. To better understand why only noise estimated at the workplace was associated with BP, our future work will combine Global Positioning System (GPS tracking, assessment of noise levels with sensors, and ambulatory monitoring of BP.

  9. Pressure ulcers prevention efficacy of an alternating pressure air mattress in elderly patients: E²MAO a randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvage, P; Touflet, M; Pradere, C; Portalier, F; Michel, J-M; Charru, P; Passadori, Y; Fevrier, R; Hallet-Lezy, A-M; Beauchêne, F; Scherrer, B

    2017-06-02

    Our aim was to compare Axtair One, an alternating pressure air mattress (APAM), with a viscoelastic foam mattress (VFM) in elderly patients at moderate to high risk of developing pressure ulcers (PUs). A randomised, controlled, superiority, parallel-group, open-label, multicentre study, was conducted, between February 2012 and March 2015, in nine French, medium- and long-term stay facilities. Eligible patients were aged 70 and over, had no PUs on enrolment, were bedridden for at least 15 hours per day, had reduced mobility, an absent or minimal positioning capability, a Braden score 12 and a Karnofsky score <40%. The primary endpoint was the appearance of PUs over a 30-day monitoring period. The primary objective was to demonstrate a 50% reduction in instantaneous risk of PUs in the APAM versus the VFM group. Secondary objectives were to determine if preventive care was less frequent in the APAM group, the instantaneous relative risk of PUs (hazard ratio) was constant over time and the comfort experienced was higher in the APAM group and to verify the uniformity of the preventive benefit of an APAM, regardless of the level of exposure to major risk factors for PUs. We randomised 76 patients (39 in the APAM group and 37 in the VFM group). The groups were comparable on enrolment and throughout the study. The cumulative risk of PUs was estimated at 6.46% [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.64; 23.66] in the APAM group and at 38.91% [95% CI: 24.66; 57.59] in the VFM group, p=0.001 (log-rank test). The adjusted hazard ratio according to the Cox model with four prognostic factors for the appearance of PUs was 7.57 [95% CI: 1.67; 34.38, p=0.009]. Preventive care proved to be equivalent in both groups. The only risk factor significantly associated with an increased risk of PUs was the type of mattress (VFM). The comfort and tolerance perceived by the patients were both high and similar in the two groups. The constancy over time of the preventive benefit of an APAM could not

  10. Countercurrent Air-Water Flow in a Scale-Down Model of a Pressurizer Surge Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Futatsugi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Steam generated in a reactor core and water condensed in a pressurizer form a countercurrent flow in a surge line between a hot leg and the pressurizer during reflux cooling. Characteristics of countercurrent flow limitation (CCFL in a 1/10-scale model of the surge line were measured using air and water at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The experimental results show that CCFL takes place at three different locations, that is, at the upper junction, in the surge line, and at the lower junction, and its characteristics are governed by the most dominating flow limitation among the three. Effects of inclination angle and elbows of the surge line on CCFL characteristics were also investigated experimentally. The effects of inclination angle on CCFL depend on the flow direction, that is, the effect is large for the nearly horizontal flow and small for the vertical flow at the upper junction. The presence of elbows increases the flow limitation in the surge line, whereas the flow limitations at the upper and lower junctions do not depend on the presence of elbows.

  11. Use of the Blom Tracheotomy Tube with Suction Inner Cannula to Decontaminate Microorganisms from the Subglottic Space. A Proof of Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabach, Lesley; Siegel, Mark D; Puchalski, Jonathan T; Towle, Dana; Follert, Michelle; Johnson, Kelsey M; Rademaker, Alfred W; Leder, Steven B

    2015-06-01

    Preventing pulmonary complications during mechanical ventilation via tracheotomy is a high priority. To investigate if the Blom tracheotomy tube with suction-above-the-cuff inner cannula reduced the quantity of normal flora and pathogens in supra- versus subglottic spaces. We enrolled 20 consecutive medical ICU adults requiring tracheostomy for mechanical ventilation in this proof-of-concept, prospective, single-center study. All participants received a Blom tracheotomy tube with suction-above-the-cuff inner cannula to decontaminate microorganisms from the supra- and subglottic spaces. Supra- and subglottic sputum samples were obtained for microbiologic analysis while an endotracheal tube was in place before tracheotomy and once per week for up to 4 weeks of mechanical ventilation after tracheotomy. Demographics, duration of endotracheal tube intubation, and duration of mechanical ventilation post-tracheotomy were recorded. There was a significant reduction for supraglottic (2.86 ± 1.11 [mean ± SD]) versus subglottic suction samples (2.48 ± 1.07) (paired t test, P = 0.048; Wilcoxon test, P = 0.045) when all data pairs for normal flora and pathogens were combined across times. There was a significant reduction of normal flora pooled across times in 19 data pairs for supraglottic (3.00 ± 1.05) versus subglottic suction samples (2.00 ± 0.94) (paired t test, P = 0.0004; Wilcoxon test, P = 0.0007). There was no significant reduction of pathogens pooled across times in 25 data pairs for supraglottic (2.76 ± 1.16) versus subglottic suction samples (2.84 ± 1.03) (paired t test, P = 0.75; Wilcoxon test, P = 0.83). Proof-of-concept was confirmed. The Blom tracheotomy tube with disposable suction-above-the-cuff inner cannula decontaminated microorganisms from the subglottic space when normal flora and pathogens were combined. Future research should investigate if decreased quantity of normal flora and pathogens in the subglottic space reduces the incidence of

  12. Aircraft vibration and other factors related to high systolic blood pressure in Indonesian Air Force pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minarma Siagian

    2013-05-01

    Indonesian Air Force pilots doing annual medical check-ups at the Saryanto Institute for Medical and Health Aviation and Aerospace (LAKESPRA from 2003 – 2008. The data extracted from medical records were age, total flight hours, type of aircraft, fasting blood glucose and cholesterol levels, waist circumference, height and weight (Body Mass Index, and blood pressure.Results: Of 336 pilots, there were 16 with systolic pressure  140 mmHg. The pilot who had high vibration than low vibration had 2.8-fold to be high systolic blood pressure [adjusted odds ratio (ORa = 2.83; 95%confidence interval (CI =1.16-22.04. In term of average flight hours, those who had average flight hours of 300-622 hours per year compared to 29-299 hours per year had 5-fold increased risk to be high systolic blood pressure (ORa = 5.05; 95% CI =1.16-22.04]. Furthermore, those who had high than normal resting pulse rate had 2.4 times to be high systolic blood pressure (ORa = 2.37; 95 CI =0.81-6.97; P = 0.115.Conclusion:High aircraft vibration, high average flight hours per year, and high resting pulse rate increase risk high systolic blood pressure in air force pilots.Keywords: systolic blood pressure, aircraft vibration, resting pulse rate, pilots

  13. Prospective evaluation of the self-pressurized air-Q intubating laryngeal airway in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Narasimhan; Sohn, Lisa E; Mankoo, Ravinder; Langen, Kenneth E; Roth, Andrew G; Hall, Steven C

    2011-06-01

    To assess the clinical efficacy of the self-pressurized air-Q ILA™ (ILA-SP).   The purpose of this prospective audit was to evaluate the feasibility of the ILA-SP in clinical practice and generate data for future comparison trials. The ILA-SP is a new first-generation supraglottic airway for children with a self-adjusting cuff and lack of a pilot balloon. Over a 4-month period, 352 children with an ASA physical status of I-III, newborn to 18 years of age, undergoing various procedures were studied. Data points assessed included insertion success rates, airway leak pressures, quality of ventilation, and perioperative complications associated with the use of this device. In 349 of the 352 patients in this study, the ILA-SP was used successfully as a primary supraglottic airway device in a variety of patients. Three patients required conversion to a standard laryngeal mask airway or a tracheal tube. The mean initial airway leak pressure for all patients was 17.8 ± 5.4 cm H(2)O, and 20.4 ± 5.5 cm H(2)O when re-checked at 10 min, which was statistically significant (P device (n = 1). There were no episodes of regurgitation, aspiration, or hoarseness. Acceptable clinical performance was demonstrated with the ILA-SP for a variety of procedures in infants and children with spontaneous and positive pressure ventilation. Future studies comparing this device to other supraglottic airways may provide useful information regarding the safety of the ILA-SP in pediatric clinical practice. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Use of nose cap and fuselage pressure orifices for determination of air data for space shuttle orbiter below supersonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, T. J.; Siemers, P. M., III

    1980-01-01

    Wind tunnel pressure measurements were acquired from orifices on a 0.1 scale forebody model of the space shuttle orbiter that were arranged in a preliminary configuration of the shuttle entry air data system (SEADS). Pressures from those and auxiliary orifices were evaluated for their ability to provide air data at subsonic and transonic speeds. The orifices were on the vehicle's nose cap and on the sides of the forebody forward of the cabin. The investigation covered a Mach number range of 0.25 to 1.40 and an angle of attack range from 4 deg. to 18 deg. An air data system consisting of nose cap and forebody fuselage orifices constitutes a complete and accurate air data system at subsonic and transonic speeds. For Mach numbers less than 0.80 orifices confined to the nose cap can be used as a complete and accurate air data system. Air data systems that use only flush pressure orifices can be used to determine basic air data on other aircraft at subsonic and transonic speeds.

  15. Instabilities and soot formation in spherically expanding, high pressure, rich, iso-octane-air flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockett, R D [School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University, Northampton Square, London EC1V OHB (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    Flame instabilities, cellular structures and soot formed in high pressure, rich, spherically expanding iso-octane-air flames have been studied experimentally using high speed Schlieren cinematography, OH fluorescence, Mie scattering and laser induced incandescence. Cellular structures with two wavelength ranges developed on the flame surface. The larger wavelength cellular structure was produced by the Landau-Darrieus hydrodynamic instability, while the short wavelength cellular structure was produced by the thermal-diffusive instability. Large negative curvature in the short wavelength cusps caused local flame quenching and fracture of the flame surface. In rich flames with equivalence ratio {phi} > 1.8, soot was formed in a honeycomb-like structure behind flame cracks associated with the large wavelength cellular structure induced by the hydrodynamic instability. The formation of soot precursors through low temperature pyrolysis was suggested as a suitable mechanism for the initiation of soot formation behind the large wavelength flame cracks.

  16. Integrated LTCC Pressure/Flow/Temperature Multisensor for Compressed Air Diagnostics†

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Craquelin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a multisensor designed for industrial compressed air diagnostics and combining the measurement of pressure, flow, and temperature, integrated with the corresponding signal conditioning electronics in a single low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC package. The developed sensor may be soldered onto an integrated electro-fluidic platform by using standard surface mount device (SMD technology, e.g., as a standard electronic component would be on a printed circuit board, obviating the need for both wires and tubes and thus paving the road towards low-cost integrated electro-fluidic systems. Several performance aspects of this device are presented and discussed, together with electronics design issues.

  17. Calculation and Experimental Validation of Pressure and Temperature Effects on COG-Air Fuel Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Skrinsky

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available COG have been widely used together with blast furnace gas and blast furnace oxygen gas in the steel industry in Moravian-Silesian region of Czech Republic. COG is a flammable and explosive substance. Most explosion characteristics published so far are valid for pure compounds and limited experimental conditions, mostly ambient. There have been no explosion characteristic exists for COG-air mixtures which cover industrial conditions up to 423 K. Experimental tests have been carried out in a 20-L closed explosion chamber adopted for the explosion tests. The element potential approach in the thermochemical equilibrium calculations applied in the Chemkin subroutine has been used for explosion pressure calculations. Different explosion characteristics have been reported in a range from 298 K up to 423 K and from 0.5 bar(a up to 1.0 bar(a.

  18. Spatiotemporally resolved characteristics of a gliding arc discharge in a turbulent air flow at atmospheric pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    of the glow-type discharge is the same as that of the electronic power dissipated in the plasma column. The glow-type discharge can transfer into a spark discharge characterized by a sharp peak current of several amperes and a sudden increase of the brightness in the plasma column. Transitions can also......A gliding arc discharge was generated in a turbulent air flow at atmospheric pressure driven by a 35 kHz alternating current (AC) electric power. The spatiotemporally resolved characteristics of the gliding arc discharge, including glow-type discharges, spark-type discharges, short-cutting events...... be found to take place from spark-type discharges to glow-type discharges. Short-cutting events were often observed as the intermediate states formed during the spark-glow transition. Three different types of short-cutting events have been observed to generate new current paths between two plasma channel...

  19. Effects of setting under air pressure on the number of surface pores and irregularities of dental investment materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourah, Anita; Moshaverinia, Alireza; Chee, Winston W

    2014-02-01

    Surface roughness and irregularities are important properties of dental investment materials that can affect the fit of a restoration. Whether setting under air pressure affects the surface irregularities of gypsum-bonded and phosphate-bonded investment materials is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of air pressure on the pore size and surface irregularities of investment materials immediately after pouring. Three dental investments, 1 gypsum-bonded investment and 2 phosphate-bonded investments, were investigated. They were vacuum mixed according to the manufacturers' recommendations, then poured into a ringless casting system. The prepared specimens were divided into 2 groups: 1 bench setting and the other placed in a pressure pot at 172 kPa. After 45 minutes of setting, the rings were removed and the investments were cut at a right angle to the long axis with a diamond disk. The surfaces of the investments were steam cleaned, dried with an air spray, and observed with a stereomicroscope. A profilometer was used to evaluate the surface roughness (μm) of the castings. The number of surface pores was counted for 8 specimens from each group and the means and standard deviations were reported. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare the data. Specimens that set under atmospheric air pressure had a significantly higher number of pores than specimens that set under increased pressure (P.05). Specimens set under positive pressure in a pressure chamber presented fewer surface bubbles than specimens set under atmospheric pressure. Positive pressure is effective and, therefore, is recommended for both gypsum-bonded and phosphate-bonded investment materials. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. An air-pressure-free elastomeric valve for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Wooseok; Barrett, Matthew; Brooks, Carla; Rivera, Andrew; Birdsell, Dawn N.; Wagner, David M.; Zenhausern, Frederic

    2015-12-01

    We present a new elastomeric valve for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis. The valve functions include metering to capture a designated volume of biological sample into a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chamber, sealing to preserve the sample during PCR cycling, and transfer of the PCR-products and on-chip formamide post-processing for the analysis of DNA fragments by capillary gel electrophoresis. This new valve differs from prior art polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) valves in that the valve is not actuated externally by air-pressure or vacuum so that it simplifies a DNA analysis system by eliminating the need for an air-pressure or vacuum source, and off-cartridge solenoid valves, control circuit boards and software. Instead, the new valve is actuated by a thermal cycling peltier assembly integrated within the hardware instrument that tightly comes in contact with a microfluidic cartridge for thermal activation during PCR, so that it spontaneously closes the valve without an additional actuator system. The valve has bumps in the designated locations so that it has a self-alignment that does not require precise alignment of a valve actuator. Moreover, the thickness of the new valve is around 600 μm with an additional bump height of 400 μm so that it is easy to handle and very feasible to fabricate by injection molding compared to other PDMS valves whose thicknesses are around 30-100 μm. The new valve provided over 95% of metering performance in filling the fixed volume of the PCR chamber, preserved over 97% of the sample volume during PCR, and showed very comparable capillary electrophoresis peak heights to the benchtop assay tube controls with very consistent transfer volume of the PCR-product and on-chip formamide. The new valve can perform a core function for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis.

  1. Surface treatment of aramid fiber by air dielectric barrier discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia Caixia [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education) and Faculty of Chemical, Environmental and Biological Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Chen Ping, E-mail: chenping_898@126.com [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education) and Faculty of Chemical, Environmental and Biological Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China) and Liaoning Key Laboratory of Advanced Polymer Matrix Composites Manufacturing Technology, Shenyang Aerospace University, Shenyang 110034 (China); Liu Wei [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education) and Faculty of Chemical, Environmental and Biological Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Dalian University of Education, Dalian 116021 (China); Li Bin; Wang Qian [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education) and Faculty of Chemical, Environmental and Biological Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2011-02-15

    Aramid fiber samples are treated by air dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma at atmospheric pressure; the plasma treatment time is investigated as the major parameter. The effects of this treatment on the fiber surface physical and chemical properties are studied by using surface characterization techniques. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is performed to determine the surface morphology changes, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is analyzed to reveal the surface chemical composition variations and dynamic contact angle analysis (DCAA) is used to examine the changes of the fiber surface wettability. In addition, the wetting behavior of a kind of thermoplastic resin, poly(phthalazinone ether sulfone ketone) (PPESK), on aramid fiber surface is also observed by SEM photos. The study shows that there seems to be an optimum treatment condition for surface modification of aramid fiber by the air DBD plasma. In this paper, after the 12 s, 27.6 W/cm{sup 3} plasma treatment the aramid fiber surface roughness is significantly improved, some new oxygen-containing groups such as C-O, C=O and O=C-O are generated on the fiber surface and the fiber surface wettability is greatly enhanced, which results in the better wetting behavior of PPESK resin on the plasma-treated aramid fiber.

  2. Surface treatment of aramid fiber by air dielectric barrier discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Caixia; Chen, Ping; Liu, Wei; Li, Bin; Wang, Qian

    2011-02-01

    Aramid fiber samples are treated by air dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma at atmospheric pressure; the plasma treatment time is investigated as the major parameter. The effects of this treatment on the fiber surface physical and chemical properties are studied by using surface characterization techniques. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is performed to determine the surface morphology changes, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is analyzed to reveal the surface chemical composition variations and dynamic contact angle analysis (DCAA) is used to examine the changes of the fiber surface wettability. In addition, the wetting behavior of a kind of thermoplastic resin, poly(phthalazinone ether sulfone ketone) (PPESK), on aramid fiber surface is also observed by SEM photos. The study shows that there seems to be an optimum treatment condition for surface modification of aramid fiber by the air DBD plasma. In this paper, after the 12 s, 27.6 W/cm3 plasma treatment the aramid fiber surface roughness is significantly improved, some new oxygen-containing groups such as C-O, Cdbnd O and Odbnd C-O are generated on the fiber surface and the fiber surface wettability is greatly enhanced, which results in the better wetting behavior of PPESK resin on the plasma-treated aramid fiber.

  3. High-pressure swing system for measurements of radioactive fission gases in air samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, W. R.; Vives-Battle, J.; Yoon, S. R.; Tobin, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Radionuclides emitted from nuclear reactors, fuel reprocessing facilities and nuclear weapons tests are distributed widely in the atmosphere but have very low concentrations. As part of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), identification and verification of the emission of radionuclides from such sources are fundamental in maintaining nuclear security. To detect underground and underwater nuclear weapons tests, only the gaseous components need to be analyzed. Equipment has now been developed that can be used to collect large volumes of air, separate and concentrate the radioactive gas constituents, such as xenon and krypton, and measure them quantitatively. By measuring xenon isotopes with different half-lives, the time since the fission event can be determined. Developments in high-pressure (3500 kPa) swing chromatography using molecular sieve adsorbents have provided the means to collect and purify trace quantities of the gases from large volumes of air automatically. New scintillation detectors, together with timing and pulse shaping electronics, have provided the low-background levels essential in identifying the gamma ray, X-ray, and electron energy spectra of specific radionuclides. System miniaturization and portability with remote control could be designed for a field-deployable production model.

  4. Influence of the Steam Addition on Premixed Methane Air Combustion at Atmospheric Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Steam-diluted combustion in gas turbine systems is an effective approach to control pollutant emissions and improve the gas turbine efficiency. The primary purpose of the present research is to analyze the influence of steam dilution on the combustion stability, flame structures, and CO emissions of a swirl-stabilized gas turbine model combustor under atmospheric pressure conditions. The premixed methane/air/steam flame was investigated with three preheating temperatures (384 K/434 K/484 K and the equivalence ratio was varied from stoichiometric conditions to the flammability limits where the flame was physically blown out from the combustor. In order to represent the steam dilution intensity, the steam fraction Ω defined as the steam to air mass flow rate ratio was used in this work. Exhaust gases were sampled with a water-cooled emission probe which was mounted at the combustor exit. A 120 mm length quartz liner was used which enabled the flame visualization and optical measurement. Time-averaged CH chemiluminescence imaging was conducted to characterize the flame location and it was further analyzed with the inverse Abel transform method. Chemical kinetics calculation was conducted to support and analyze the experimental results. It was found that the LBO (lean blowout limits were increased with steam fraction. CH chemiluminescence imaging showed that with a high steam fraction, the flame length was elongated, but the flame structure was not altered. CO emissions were mapped as a function of the steam fraction, inlet air temperature, and equivalence ratios. Stable combustion with low CO emission can be achieved with an appropriate steam fraction operation range.

  5. Afterglow chemistry of atmospheric-pressure helium-oxygen plasmas with humid air impurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Niemi, Kari; Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah; Graham, William G.

    2014-04-01

    The formation of reactive species in the afterglow of a radio-frequency-driven atmospheric-pressure plasma in a fixed helium-oxygen feed gas mixture (He+0.5%O2) with humid air impurity (a few hundred ppm) is investigated by means of an extensive global plasma chemical kinetics model. As an original objective, we explore the effects of humid air impurity on the biologically relevant reactive species in an oxygen-dependent system. After a few milliseconds in the afterglow environment, the densities of atomic oxygen (O) decreases from 1015 to 1013 cm-3 and singlet delta molecular oxygen (O2(1D)) of the order of 1015 cm-3 decreases by a factor of two, while the ozone (O3) density increases from 1014 to 1015 cm-3. Electrons and oxygen ionic species, initially of the order of 1011 cm-3, recombine much faster on the time scale of some microseconds. The formation of atomic hydrogen (H), hydroxyl radical (OH), hydroperoxyl (HO2), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric oxide (NO) and nitric acid (HNO3) resulting from the humid air impurity as well as the influence on the afterglow chemistry is clarified with particular emphasis on the formation of dominant reactive oxygen species (ROS). The model suggests that the reactive species predominantly formed in the afterglow are major ROS O2(1D) and O3 (of the order of 1015 cm-3) and rather minor hydrogen- and nitrogen-based reactive species OH, H2O2, HNO3 and NO2/NO3, of which densities are comparable to the O-atom density (of the order of 1013 cm-3). Furthermore, the model quantitatively reproduces the experimental results of independent O and O3 density measurements.

  6. Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering profiles of air at different temperatures and pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ziyu; Witschas, Benjamin; van de Water, Willem; Ubachs, Wim

    2013-07-01

    Rayleigh-Brillouin (RB) scattering profiles for air have been recorded for the temperature range from 255 to 340 K and the pressure range from 640 to 3300 mbar, covering the conditions relevant for the Earth's atmosphere and for planned atmospheric light detection and ranging (LIDAR) missions. The measurements performed at a wavelength of λ=366.8 nm detect spontaneous RB scattering at a 90° scattering angle from a sensitive intracavity setup, delivering scattering profiles at a 1% rms noise level or better. The experimental results have been compared to a kinetic line-shape model, the acclaimed Tenti S6 model, considered to be most appropriate for such conditions, under the assumption that air can be treated as an effective single-component gas with temperature-scaled values for the relevant macroscopic transport coefficients. The elusive transport coefficient, the bulk viscosity η(b), is effectively derived by a comparing the measurements to the model, yielding an increased trend from 1.0 to 2.5×10(-5) kg·m(-1)·s(-1) for the temperature interval. The calculated (Tenti S6) line shapes are consistent with experimental data at the level of 2%, meeting the requirements for the future RB-scattering LIDAR missions in the Earth's atmosphere. However, the systematic 2% deviation may imply that the model has a limit to describe the finest details of RB scattering in air. Finally, it is demonstrated that the RB scattering data in combination with the Tenti S6 model can be used to retrieve the actual gas temperatures.

  7. Comparison of a standard CO2 pressure pneumoperitoneum insufflator versus AirSeal™: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Luketina, Ruzica Rosalia; Knauer, Michael; Köhler, Gernot; Koch, Oliver Owen; Strasser, Klaus; Egger, Margot; Emmanuel, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background AirSeal™ is a novel class of valve-free insufflation system that enables a stable pneumoperitoneum with continuous smoke evacuation and carbon dioxide (CO2) recirculation during laparoscopic surgery. Comparison data to standard CO2 pressure pneumoperitoneum insufflators is scarce. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential advantages of AirSeal™ compared to a standard CO2 insufflator. Methods/Design This is a single center randomized controlled trial comparing elective lapa...

  8. Etching of polymers, proteins and bacterial spores by atmospheric pressure DBD plasma in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzminova, A.; Kretková, T.; Kylián, O.; Hanuš, J.; Khalakhan, I.; Prukner, V.; Doležalová, E.; Šimek, M.; Biederman, H.

    2017-04-01

    Many studies proved that non-equilibrium discharges generated at atmospheric pressure are highly effective for the bio-decontamination of surfaces of various materials. One of the key processes that leads to a desired result is plasma etching and thus the evaluation of etching rates of organic materials is of high importance. However, the comparison of reported results is rather difficult if impossible as different authors use diverse sources of atmospheric plasma that are operated at significantly different operational parameters. Therefore, we report here on the systematic study of the etching of nine different common polymers that mimic the different structures of more complicated biological systems, bovine serum albumin (BSA) selected as the model protein and spores of Bacillus subtilis taken as a representative of highly resistant micro-organisms. The treatment of these materials was performed by means of atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) sustained in open air at constant conditions. All tested polymers, BSA and spores, were readily etched by DBD plasma. However, the measured etching rates were found to be dependent on the chemical structure of treated materials, namely on the presence of oxygen in the structure of polymers.

  9. Interaction of Atmospheric-Pressure Air Microplasmas with Amino Acids as Fundamental Processes in Aqueous Solution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renwu Zhou

    Full Text Available Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that investigates potential applications of cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas in bioengineering, such as for bacterial inactivation and degradation of organic molecules in water. In order to enunciate mechanisms of bacterial inactivation at molecular or atomic levels, we investigated the interaction of atmospheric-pressure air microplasmas with amino acids in aqueous solution by using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS. Results show that the oxidation effect of plasma-induced species on the side chains of the amino acids can be categorized into four types, namely hydroxylation, nitration, dehydrogenation and dimerization. In addition, relative activities of amino acids resulting from plasma treatment come in descending order as follows: sulfur-containing carbon-chain amino acids > aromatic amino acids > five-membered ring amino acids > basic carbon-chain amino acids. Since amino acids are building blocks of proteins vital to the growth and reproduction of bacteria, these results provide an insight into the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by plasma.

  10. Dual-pump CARS of Air in a Heated Pressure Vessel up to 55 Bar and 1300 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, Luca; Gallo, Emanuela; Cutler, Andrew D.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Dual-pump Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) measurements have been performed in a heated pressure vessel at NASA Langley Research Center. Each measurement, consisting of 500 single shot spectra, was recorded at a fixed location in dry air at various pressures and temperatures, in a range of 0.03-55×10(exp 5) Pa and 300-1373 K, where the temperature was varied using an electric heater. The maximum output power of the electric heater limited the combinations of pressures and temperatures that could be obtained. Charts of CARS signal versus temperature (at constant pressure) and signal versus pressure (at constant temperature) are presented and fit with an empirical model to validate the range of capability of the dual-pump CARS technique; averaged spectra at different conditions of pressure and temperature are also shown.

  11. Flow patterns and pressure drop in air/water two-phase flow in horizontal helicoidal pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awwad, A.; Xin, R.C.; Dong, Z.F.; Ebadian, M.A. [Florida International Univ., Miami, FL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Soliman, H.M. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1995-12-01

    An experimental investigation is conducted for air/water two-phase flow in horizontal helicoidal pipes. The helicoidal pipes are constructed of 25.4 mm I.D. Tygon tubing wrapped around cylindrical concrete forms with outside diameters of 62 cm and 124 cm. The helix angles of the helicoidal pipes vary from 1 to 20 deg. The experiments are performed for superficial water velocity in a range of U{sub L} = 0.008 {approximately} 2.2 m/s and for superficial air velocity in a range of U{sub G} = 0.2 {approximately} 50 m/s. The flow patterns are discerned and recorded photographically. The pressure drop of the air/water two-phase flow in the coils is measured and the Lockhart-Martinelli approach is used to analyze the data. The results are presented in the form of frictional pressure drop multipliers versus the Lockhart-Martinelli parameter. It was found that the flow patterns differ greatly from those of the straight pipe, and that the frictional pressure drop multipliers depend on both the Lockhart-Martinelli parameter and the flow rates. The correlation of the frictional pressure drop has been provided based on the current data. Furthermore, it was also found that the helix angle of the helicoidal pipe had almost no effect on the air/water two-phase flow pressure drop in the present experimental ranges.

  12. Do sudden air temperature and pressure changes affect cardiovascular morbidity and mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavcová, E.; Davídkovová, H.; Kyselý, J.

    2012-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that sudden changes in weather (usually represented by air temperature and/or pressure) are associated with increases in daily mortality. Little is understood about physiological mechanisms responsible for the impacts of weather changes on mortality, and whether similar patterns appear for morbidity as well. Relatively little is known also about differences in the magnitude of the mortality response in provincial regions and in cities, where the impacts may be exacerbated by air pollution effects and/or heat island. The present study examines the effects of sudden air temperature and pressure changes on morbidity (represented by hospital admissions) and mortality due to cardiovascular diseases in the population of the Czech Republic (approx. 10 million inhabitants) and separately in the city of Prague (1.2 million inhabitants). The events are selected from data covering 1994-2009 using the methodology introduced by Plavcová and Kyselý (2010), and they are compared with the datasets on hospital admissions and daily mortality (both standardized to account for long-term changes and the seasonal and weekly cycles). Relative deviations of morbidity/mortality from the baseline were averaged over the selected events for days D-2 (2 days before a change) up to D+7 (7 days after), and their statistical significance was tested by means of the Monte Carlo method. The study aims at (i) identifying those weather changes associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity/mortality, separately in summer and winter, (ii) comparing the effects of weather changes on morbidity and mortality, (iii) identifying whether urban population of Prague is more/less vulnerable in comparison to the population of the whole Czech Republic, (iv) comparing the effects for different cardiovascular diseases (ischaemic heart diseases, ICD-10 codes I20-I25; cerebrovascular diseases, I60-I69; hypertension, I10; atherosclerosis, I70) and individual population groups (by age

  13. Stability and Agreement of a Microtransducer and an Air-Filled Balloon Esophageal Catheter in the Monitoring of Esophageal Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusto, Renan Maloni; Albuquerque, André Luis Pereira; Jaeger, Thomas; de Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro; Caruso, Pedro

    2017-02-01

    The use of esophageal catheters with microtransducer promises advantages over traditional catheters with air-filled balloons. However, performance comparisons between these 2 types of catheters are scarce and incomplete. A catheter with a 9.5-cm air-filled balloon at the distal tip and a catheter with a microtransducer mounted within a flexible silicone rubber were tested in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, the response times of both catheters were compared, and the drift of the baseline pressure of the microtransducer catheter was evaluated over a 6-h period. In vivo, 11 healthy volunteers had both catheters inserted, and the drift of the baseline esophageal pressure was measured over a 3-h period. Also, the correlation and agreement of the baseline and changes in the esophageal pressure of both catheters were evaluated. In vitro, the microtransducer catheter had a response time significantly higher (262 × 114 Hz, P pressure stability, with a mean baseline pressure drift of 1.4 cm H2O. In vivo, both catheters presented a small and similar baseline esophageal pressure drift (P = 0.08). For measurements of baseline and changes in esophageal pressure, the correlation and agreement between the catheters were poor, with a large bias between them. The catheter with the microtransducer had a small baseline pressure drift, similar to the air-filled balloon catheter. The low agreement between the catheters does not allow the microtransducer catheter to be used as a surrogate for the traditional air-filled balloon catheter. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  14. Performance of a hydrogen burner to simulate air entering scramjet combustors. [simulation of total temperature, total pressure, and volume fraction of oxygen of air at flight conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russin, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the performance of a hydrogen burner used to produce a test gas that simulates air entering a scramjet combustor at various flight conditions. The test gas simulates air in that it duplicates the total temperature, total pressure, and the volume fraction of oxygen of air at flight conditions. The main objective of the tests was to determine the performance of the burner as a function of the effective exhaust port area. The conclusions were: (1) pressure oscillations of the chugging type were reduced in amplitude to plus or minus 2 percent of the mean pressure level by proper sizing of hydrogen, oxygen, and air injector flow areas; (2) combustion efficiency remained essentially constant as the exhaust port area was increased by a factor of 3.4; (3) the mean total temperature determined from integrating the exit radial gas property profiles was within plus or minus 5 percent of the theoretical bulk total temperature; (4) the measured exit total temperature profile had a local peak temperature more than 30 percent greater than the theoretical bulk total temperature; and (5) measured heat transfer to the burner liner was 75 percent of that predicted by theory based on a flat radial temperature profile.

  15. Room-Temperature Pressure-Induced Optically-Actuated Fabry-Perot Nanomechanical Resonator with Multilayer Graphene Diaphragm in Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated a miniature and in situ ~13-layer graphene nanomechanical resonator by utilizing a simple optical fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P interferometric excitation and detection scheme. The graphene film was transferred onto the endface of a ferrule with a 125-μm inner diameter. In contrast to the pre-tension induced in membrane that increased quality (Q factor to ~18.5 from ~3.23 at room temperature and normal pressure, the limited effects of air damping on resonance behaviors at 10−2 and 105 Pa were demonstrated by characterizing graphene F-P resonators with open and micro-air-gap cavities. Then in terms of optomechanical behaviors of the resonator with an air micro-cavity configuration using a polished ferrule substrate, measured resonance frequencies were increased to the range of 509–542 kHz from several kHz with a maximum Q factor of 16.6 despite the lower Knudsen number ranging from 0.0002 to 0.0006 in damping air over a relative pressure range of 0–199 kPa. However, there was the little dependence of Q on resonance frequency. Note that compared with the inferior F-P cavity length response to applied pressures due to interfacial air leakage, the developed F-P resonator exhibited a consistent fitted pressure sensitivity of 1.18 × 105 kHz3/kPa with a good linearity error of 5.16% in the tested range. These measurements shed light on the pre-stress-dominated pressure-sensitive mechanisms behind air damping in in situ F-P resonant sensors using graphene or other 2D nanomaterials.

  16. Diode laser absorption measurement and analysis of HCN in atmospheric-pressure, fuel-rich premixed methane/air flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gersen, Sander; Mokhov, A. V.; Levinsky, H. B.

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of HCN in flat, fuel-rich premixed methane/air flames at atmospheric pressure are reported. Quartz-microprobe sampling followed by wavelength modulation absorption spectroscopy with second harmonic detection was used to obtain an overall measurement uncertainty of better than 20% for

  17. Plasma-assisted combustion in lean, high-pressure, preheated air-methane mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerer, Timothy; Herbon, John; Saddoughi, Seyed; Deminsky, Maxim; Potapkin, Boris

    2013-09-01

    We combine a simplified physical model with a detailed plasma-chemical reaction mechanism to analyze the use of plasmas to improve flame stability in a gas turbine used for electric power generation. For this application the combustion occurs in a lean mixture of air and methane at high pressure (18.6 atm) and at ``preheat'' temperature 700 K, and the flame zone is both recirculating and turbulent. The system is modeled as a sequence of reactors: a pulsed uniform plasma (Boltzmann), an afterglow region (plug-flow), a flame region (perfectly-stirred), and a downstream region (plug-flow). The plasma-chemical reaction mechanism includes electron-impact on the feedstock species, relaxation in the afterglow to neutral molecules and radicals, and methane combustion chemistry (GRI-Mech 3.0), with extensions to properly describe low-temperature combustion 700-1000 K [M Deminsky et al., Chem Phys 32, 1 (2013)]. We find that plasma treatment of the incoming air-fuel mixture can improve the stability of lean flames, expressed as a reduction in the adiabatic flame temperature at lean blow-out, but that the plasma also generates oxides of nitrogen at the preheat temperature through the reactions e + N2 --> N + N and N + O2 --> NO + O. We find that flame stability is improved with less undesirable NOx formation when the plasma reduced-electric-field E/ N is smaller. A portion of this work was supported by the US Dept of Energy under Award Number DE-FC26-08NT05868.

  18. Gas heating dynamics during leader inception in long air gaps at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lipeng; Becerra, Marley

    2017-08-01

    The inception of leader discharges in long air gaps at atmospheric pressure is simulated with a thermo-hydrodynamic model and a detailed kinetic scheme for N2/O2/H2O mixtures. In order to investigate the effect of humidity, the kinetic scheme includes the most important reactions with the H2O molecule and its derivatives, resulting in a scheme with 45 species and 192 chemical reactions. The heating of a thin plasma channel in front of an anode electrode during the streamer to leader transition is evaluated with a detailed 1D radial model. The analysis includes the simulation of the corresponding streamer bursts, dark periods and aborted leaders that may occur prior to the inception of a propagating leader discharge. The simulations are performed using the time-varying discharge current in two laboratory discharge events of positive polarity reported in the literature as input. Excellent agreement between the simulated and the experimental time variation of the thermal radius for a 1 m rod-plate air gap discharge event reported in the literature has been found. The role of different energy transfer and loss mechanisms prior to the inception of a stable leader is also discussed. It is found that although a small percentage of water molecules can accelerate the vibrational-translational relaxation to some extent, this effect leads to a negligible temperature increase during the streamer-to-leader transition. It is also found that the gas temperature should significantly exceed 2000 K for the transition to lead to the inception of a propagating leader. Otherwise, the strong convection loss produced by the gas expansion during the transition causes a drop in the translational temperature below 2000 K, aborting the incepted leader. Furthermore, it is shown that the assumptions used by the widely-used model of Gallimberti do not hold when evaluating the streamer-to-leader transition.

  19. Association between blood pressure changes during self-paced outdoor walking and air temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Takeshi; Ishii, Nanako

    2017-03-01

    Exaggerated elevation of systolic blood pressure (SBP) during exercise is a risk factor for future cardiovascular disease. Although there are differences between the outdoor exercise and exercise tests in the laboratory setting, there is little information regarding SBP changes during practical outdoor exercise. We investigated SBP changes during self-paced outdoor walking and the relationship to air temperature. Subjects (n = 109, 47-83 years) walked outdoors at their own pace wearing a blood pressure monitor on their wrist. SBP increased during walking compared to rest, but was higher at the 1 km mark than both the 2 and 3 km marks (rest, 124 ± 14 mmHg; 1 km, 140 ± 16 mmHg; 2 km, 136 ± 18 mmHg; 3 km, 135 ± 18 mmHg). SBP at rest, air temperature, body mass index (BMI) and walking intensity during the first 1 km were identified as predictors of SBP at the 1 km mark in the stepwise regression analysis, independent of other confounders (R(2)  = 0·606). SBP at the 1 km mark was higher in the lower temperature group (11·6-14·3°C, 145 ± 14 mmHg) than in the intermediate (15·1-16·7°C, 140 ± 18 mmHg) and higher (17·0-19·6°C, 136 ± 16 mmHg) temperature groups, independent of SBP at rest, BMI and walking intensity. These results suggest that increases in SBP are higher on lower temperature days and are greater at 1 km than at 2 and 3 km. It is therefore recommended that measures are taken against the cold on lower temperature days to attenuate the SBP response during onset of walking. © 2015 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Subglottic Chondrosarcoma Presenting Only Mild Acute-Onset Dyspnea: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-wei Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondrosarcoma is categorized as a malignant cartilaginous tumor, which occurs rarely in the craniofacial region. We report the case of a 68-year-old man with chondrosarcoma in the subglottic area. His chief symptoms were hoarseness and mild dysphagia. A computed tomography scan revealed a lesion with expansion of the cricoid cartilage and marked reduction of the airway. After biopsy, histological inspection showed that chondrocytes are multi-nucleus, their size does not differ much and mitosis is not obvious. These are all characteristics of a low-grade chondrosarcoma. We performed an organ-preserving operation by debulking the low-grade malignant tumor in order to keep a patent airway. No further metastasis or airway compromise was evident during the 1-year follow-up visit.

  1. Study of heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of air heat exchanger using PCM for free cooling applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalaiselvam Sivakumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Free cooling is the process of storing the cool energy available in the night ambient air and using it during the day. The heat exchanger used in this work is a modular type which is similar to the shell and tube heat exchanger. The shell side is filled with Phase Change Materials (PCM and air flow is through the tubes in the module. The modules of the heat exchanger are arranged one over other with air spacers in between each module. The air space provided in between the module in-creases the retention time of the air for better heat transfer. Transient Computational Fluid Dynamics modeling is carried out for single air passage in a modular heat exchanger. It shows that the PCM phase transition time in the module in which different shape of fins is adopted. The module with rectangular fins has 17.2 % reduction in solidification compared with the plain module. Then steady state numerical analysis is accomplished to the whole module having the fin of high heat transfer, so that pressure drop, flow and thermal characteristics across the module and the air spacers are deter-mined for various air inlet velocities of 0.4 to 1.6 m/s. To validate the computational results, experiments are carried out and the agreement was found to be good.

  2. Pressure Relief, Visco-Elastic Foam with Inflated Air? A Pilot Study in a Dutch Nursing Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Van Leen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There is still little evidence regarding the type of mattress that is the best for preventing pressure ulcers (PUs. In a Dutch nursing home, a new type of overlay mattress (air inflated visco-elastic foam was tested to analyze the opportunity for replacement of the normally used static air overlay mattress in its three-step PU prevention protocol In this small pilot the outcome measures were: healing of a category one pressure ulcer, new development or deterioration of a category one PU and need for repositioning. Methods: We included 20 nursing home residents with a new category one pressure ulcer, existing for no longer than 48 h following a consecutive sampling technic. All residents were staying for more than 30 days in the nursing home and were lying on a visco-elastic foam mattress without repositioning (step one of the 3-step protocol at the start of the pilot study. They had not suffered from a PU in the month before. The intervention involved use of an air inflated foam overlay instead of a static air overlay (normally step 2 of the 3-step protocol. At the start; the following data were registered: age; gender; main diagnosis and presence of incontinence. Thereafter; all participating residents were checked weekly for PU healing tendency; deterioration of PUs; new PUs and need of repositioning. Only when residents showed still a category one PU after 48 h or deterioration of an existing pressure ulcer or if there was development of a new pressure ulcer, repositioning was put into practice (step 3 of the PU protocol. All residents participated during 8 weeks. Results: Seven residents developed a new pressure ulcer category one and still had a category one pressure ulcer at the end of the study period. One resident developed a pressure ulcer category 2. Fifteen residents needed repositioning from one week after start of the study until the end of the study. Conclusions: Overall 40% of the residents developed a pressure ulcer

  3. High pressure air jet in the endoscopic preparation room: risk of noise exposure on occupational health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, King-Wah; Lu, Lung-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-Kun

    2015-01-01

    After high-level disinfection of gastrointestinal endoscopes, they are hung to dry in order to prevent residual water droplets impact on patient health. To allow for quick drying and clinical reuse, some endoscopic units use a high pressure air jet (HPAJ) to remove the water droplets on the endoscopes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the excessive noise exposure with the use of HPAJ in endoscopic preparation room and to investigate the risk to occupational health. Noise assessment was taken during 7 automatic endoscopic reprocessors (AERs) and combined with/without HPAJ use over an 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA). Analytical procedures of the NIOSH and the ISO for noise-induced hearing loss were estimated to develop analytic models. The peak of the noise spectrum of combined HPAJ and 7 AERs was significantly higher than that of the 7 AERs alone (108.3 ± 1.36 versus 69.3 ± 3.93 dBA, P  2.5 dB) was 2.15% at 90 dBA, 11.6% at 95 dBA, and 51.3% at 100 dBA. The odds ratio was 49.1 (95% CI: 11.9 to 203.6). The noise generated by the HPAJ to work over TWA seriously affected the occupational health and safety of those working in an endoscopic preparation room.

  4. HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Loucks; Steve Ruppel; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jon Olsen; Deanna Combs; Dhiraj Dembla; Leonel Gomez

    2003-12-10

    The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company have assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The characterization phase of the project is utilizing geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. This model will be used to define a field deployment plan that Goldrus, a small independent oil company, will implement by drilling both vertical and horizontal wells during the demonstration phase of the project. Additional reservoir data are being gathered during the demonstration phase to improve the accuracy of the reservoir model. The results of the demonstration will being closely monitored to provide a basis for improving the design of the HPAI field deployment plan. The results of the reservoir characterization field demonstration and monitoring program will be documented and widely disseminated to facilitate adoption of this technology by oil operators in the Permian Basin and elsewhere in the U.S.

  5. Atmospheric pressure He-air plasma jet: Breakdown process and propagation phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Begum

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper He-discharge (plasma jet/bullet in atmospheric pressure air and its progression phenomenon has been studied experimentally using ICCD camera, optical emission spectroscopy (OES and calibrated dielectric probe measurements. The repetitive nanosecond pulse has applied to a plasma pencil to generate discharge in the helium gas channel. The discharge propagation speed was measured from the ICCD images. The axial electric field distribution in the plasma jet is inferred from the optical emission spectroscopic data and from the probe measurement. The correlation between the jet velocities, jet length with the pulse duration is established. It shows that the plasma jet is not isolated from the input voltage along its propagation path. The discharge propagation speed, the electron density and the local and average electric field distribution along the plasma jet axis predicted from the experimental results are in good agreement with the data predicted by numerical simulation of the streamer propagation presented in different literatures. The ionization phenomenon of the discharge predicts the key ionization parameters, such as speed, peak electric field in the front, and electron density. The maximum local electric field measured by OES is 95 kV/cm at 1.3 cm of the jet axis, and average EF measured by probe is 24 kV/cm at the same place of the jet. The average and local electron density estimated are in the order of 1011 cm-3 and it reaches to the maximum of 1012 cm-3.

  6. Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed Discharges in Air at Atmospheric Pressure -- Experiment and Theory of Regime Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, David; Lacoste, Deanna; Laux, Christophe

    2009-10-01

    In atmospheric pressure air preheated from 300 to 1000 K, the Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed (NRP) method has been used to generate corona, glow, and spark discharges. Experiments have been performed to determine the parameter space (applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, ambient gas temperature, and inter-electrode gap distance) of each discharge regime. Notably, there is a minimum gap distance for the existence of the glow regime that increases with decreasing gas temperature. A theory is developed to describe the Corona-to-Glow (C-G) and Glow-to-Spark (G-S) transitions for NRP discharges. The C-G transition is shown to depend on the Avalanche-to-Streamer Transition (AST) as well as the electric field strength in the positive column. The G-S transition is due to the thermal ionization instability. The minimum gap distance for the existence of the glow regime can be understood by considering that the applied voltage of the AST must be lower than that of the thermal ionization instability. This is a previously unknown criterion for generating glow discharges, as it does not correspond to the Paschen minimum or to the Meek-Raether criterion.

  7. The Feasibility of Detecting a Burner-Can Burn-Through by Means of CO, CO2, Pressure, and Air Temperature Levels in a Jet Engine Nacelle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    feasibility of detecting a burn-through by monitoring the carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), a pressure level, or air temperature in the nacelle...before, during, and after engine case rupture. Results of the tests indicated that CO, CO2, pressure, and air temperature in the nacelle cannot be

  8. Global analysis of the pressure adjustment mechanism over sea surface temperature fronts using AIRS/Aqua data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Teruhisa; Minobe, Shoshiro

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the signatures of atmospheric pressure adjustment mechanism for surface wind convergence/divergence over major sea surface temperature (SST) frontal regions using global observations of satellite sounding and scatterometer. Lower tropospheric air thickness, which includes a sea-level pressure component modified by air temperature in the marine atmospheric boundary layer, is analyzed, and the relation between the Laplacian of the thickness and wind convergence are examined. Among four SST frontal regions in mid-latitudes, correlation between the thickness Laplacian and wind convergence is the largest over the Gulf Stream followed by those for the Agulhas Return Current and for the Brazil/Malvinas Current, and relatively small but still significant over the Kuroshio-Oyashio Extension. These correlations strongly suggest that the pressure adjustment mechanism ubiquitously plays an important role in air-sea interaction over the global SST frontal regions. Furthermore, air temperatures in the first two regions exhibit SST-relating signatures even in the mid-troposphere.

  9. Liquid- and air-filled catheters without balloon as an alternative to the air-filled balloon catheter for measurement of esophageal pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Beda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Measuring esophageal pressure (Pes using an air-filled balloon catheter (BC is the common approach to estimate pleural pressure and related parameters. However, Pes is not routinely measured in mechanically ventilated patients, partly due to technical and practical limitations and difficulties. This study aimed at comparing the conventional BC with two alternative methods for Pes measurement, liquid-filled and air-filled catheters without balloon (LFC and AFC, during mechanical ventilation with and without spontaneous breathing activity. Seven female juvenile pigs (32-42 kg were anesthetized, orotracheally intubated, and a bundle of an AFC, LFC, and BC was inserted in the esophagus. Controlled and assisted mechanical ventilation were applied with positive end-expiratory pressures of 5 and 15 cmH2O, and driving pressures of 10 and 20 cmH2O, in supine and lateral decubitus. MAIN RESULTS: Cardiogenic noise in BC tracings was much larger (up to 25% of total power of Pes signal than in AFC and LFC (<3%. Lung and chest wall elastance, pressure-time product, inspiratory work of breathing, inspiratory change and end-expiratory value of transpulmonary pressure were estimated. The three catheters allowed detecting similar changes in these parameters between different ventilation settings. However, a non-negligible and significant bias between estimates from BC and those from AFC and LFC was observed in several instances. CONCLUSIONS: In anesthetized and mechanically ventilated pigs, the three catheters are equivalent when the aim is to detect changes in Pes and related parameters between different conditions, but possibly not when the absolute value of the estimated parameters is of paramount importance. Due to a better signal-to-noise ratio, and considering its practical advantages in terms of easier calibration and simpler acquisition setup, LFC may prove interesting for clinical use.

  10. Correlation of surface pressure and hue of planarizable push-pull chromophores at the air/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Frederik; Zobi, Fabio; Brezesinski, Gerald; Dal Molin, Marta; Matile, Stefan; Zumbuehl, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    It is currently not possible to directly measure the lateral pressure of a biomembrane. Mechanoresponsive fluorescent probes are an elegant solution to this problem but it requires first the establishment of a direct correlation between the membrane surface pressure and the induced color change of the probe. Here, we analyze planarizable dithienothiophene push-pull probes in a monolayer at the air/water interface using fluorescence microscopy, grazing-incidence angle X-ray diffraction, and infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy. An increase of the lateral membrane pressure leads to a well-packed layer of the 'flipper' mechanophores and a clear change in hue above 18 mN/m. The fluorescent probes had no influence on the measured isotherm of the natural phospholipid DPPC suggesting that the flippers probe the lateral membrane pressure without physically changing it. This makes the flipper probes a truly useful addition to the membrane probe toolbox.

  11. Correlation of surface pressure and hue of planarizable push–pull chromophores at the air/water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Frederik; Zobi, Fabio; Brezesinski, Gerald; Dal Molin, Marta; Matile, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    It is currently not possible to directly measure the lateral pressure of a biomembrane. Mechanoresponsive fluorescent probes are an elegant solution to this problem but it requires first the establishment of a direct correlation between the membrane surface pressure and the induced color change of the probe. Here, we analyze planarizable dithienothiophene push–pull probes in a monolayer at the air/water interface using fluorescence microscopy, grazing-incidence angle X-ray diffraction, and infrared reflection–absorption spectroscopy. An increase of the lateral membrane pressure leads to a well-packed layer of the ‘flipper’ mechanophores and a clear change in hue above 18 mN/m. The fluorescent probes had no influence on the measured isotherm of the natural phospholipid DPPC suggesting that the flippers probe the lateral membrane pressure without physically changing it. This makes the flipper probes a truly useful addition to the membrane probe toolbox. PMID:28684989

  12. Effect of Soret diffusion on lean hydrogen/air flames at normal and elevated pressure and temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Zhen

    2017-04-12

    The influence of Soret diffusion on lean premixed flames propagating in hydrogen/air mixtures is numerically investigated with a detailed chemical and transport models at normal and elevated pressure and temperature. The Soret diffusion influence on the one-dimensional (1D) flame mass burning rate and two-dimensional (2D) flame propagating characteristics is analysed, revealing a strong dependency on flame stretch rate, pressure and temperature. For 1D flames, at normal pressure and temperature, with an increase of Karlovitz number from 0 to 0.4, the mass burning rate is first reduced and then enhanced by Soret diffusion of H2 while it is reduced by Soret diffusion of H. The influence of Soret diffusion of H2 is enhanced by pressure and reduced by temperature. On the contrary, the influence of Soret diffusion of H is reduced by pressure and enhanced by temperature. For 2D flames, at normal pressure and temperature, during the early phase of flame evolution, flames with Soret diffusion display more curved flame cells. Pressure enhances this effect, while temperature reduces it. The influence of Soret diffusion of H2 on the global consumption speed is enhanced at elevated pressure. The influence of Soret diffusion of H on the global consumption speed is enhanced at elevated temperature. The flame evolution is more affected by Soret diffusion in the early phase of propagation than in the long run due to the local enrichment of H2 caused by flame curvature effects. The present study provides new insights into the Soret diffusion effect on the characteristics of lean hydrogen/air flames at conditions that are relevant to practical applications, e.g. gas engines and turbines.

  13. Static pressure and wall shear stress distributions in air flow in a seven wire-wrapped rod bundle

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez y Fernandez, Elói; Carajilescov, Pedro

    2000-01-01

    An experimental investigation is performed in a turbulent flow in a seven wire-wrapped rod bundle, mounted in an open air facility. Static pressure distributions are measured on central and peripheral rods. By using a Preston tube, the wall shear stress profiles are experimentally obtained along the perimeter of the rods. The geometric parameters of the test section are P/D=1.20 and H/D=15. The measuring section is located at L/D=40 from the air inlet. It is observed that the dimensionless st...

  14. Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and your health: Green living Sun Water Air Health effects of air pollution How to protect yourself from air pollution Chemicals Noise Quizzes Links to more information girlshealth glossary girlshealth. ...

  15. Electric wind produced by a surface dielectric barrier discharge operating in air at different pressures: aeronautical control insights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benard, N; Balcon, N; Moreau, E [Laboratoire d' Etudes Aerodynamiques (LEA), Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, CNRS Bld Marie et Pierre Curie, Teleport 2, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France)

    2008-02-21

    The effects of the ambient air pressure level on the electric wind produced by a single dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) have been investigated by Pitot velocity measurements. Pressures from 1 down to 0.2 atm were tested with a 32 kV{sub p-p} 1 kHz excitation. This preliminary study confirms the effectiveness of surface DBD at low pressure. Indeed, the induced velocity is strongly dependent on the ambient air pressure level. Quite surprisingly the produced airflow presents a local maximum at 0.6 atm. The measured velocities at 1 atm and 0.2 atm are 2.5 m s{sup -1} and 3 m s{sup -1}, respectively while 3.5 m s{sup -1} is reached at 0.6 atm. The position of the maximal velocity always coincides with the plasma extension. Mass flow rate calculations indicate that the DBD is effective in real flight pressure conditions. (fast track communication)

  16. Fast step-response settling of micro electrostatic actuators operated at low air pressure using input shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mol, L.; Rocha, L. A.; Cretu, E.; Wolffenbuttel, R. F.

    2009-07-01

    Squeeze-film damping is highly inadequate in low-pressure systems or in systems where air pressure and/or gap dimensions are poorly defined. Input shaping has been used to circumvent the oscillations typically associated with under-damped mass-spring-damper systems and drastically decrease the settling time. The proposed method does not rely on feedback but solely on the system dynamics. The required input signal is derived analytically from the differential equation describing the system. The resulting device response is simulated and experimentally verified on an electrostatically actuated microstructure. Settling occurs even faster than for an equivalent critically damped system.

  17. Atmospheric pressure He-air plasma jet: Breakdown process and propagation phenomenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begum, Asma [Independent University, Bangladesh, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Bashundhara, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Laroussi, Mounir [Old Dominion University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Norfolk, Virginia (United States); Pervez, Mohammad Rasel [Master Mind College, Department of Physics, Dhanmondi, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2013-06-15

    In this paper He-discharge (plasma jet/bullet) in atmospheric pressure air and its progression phenomenon has been studied experimentally using ICCD camera, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and calibrated dielectric probe measurements. The repetitive nanosecond pulse has applied to a plasma pencil to generate discharge in the helium gas channel. The discharge propagation speed was measured from the ICCD images. The axial electric field distribution in the plasma jet is inferred from the optical emission spectroscopic data and from the probe measurement. The correlation between the jet velocities, jet length with the pulse duration is established. It shows that the plasma jet is not isolated from the input voltage along its propagation path. The discharge propagation speed, the electron density and the local and average electric field distribution along the plasma jet axis predicted from the experimental results are in good agreement with the data predicted by numerical simulation of the streamer propagation presented in different literatures. The ionization phenomenon of the discharge predicts the key ionization parameters, such as speed, peak electric field in the front, and electron density. The maximum local electric field measured by OES is 95 kV/cm at 1.3 cm of the jet axis, and average EF measured by probe is 24 kV/cm at the same place of the jet. The average and local electron density estimated are in the order of 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} and it reaches to the maximum of 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}.

  18. Long-term urban particulate air pollution, traffic noise, and arterial blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuks, Kateryna; Moebus, Susanne; Hertel, Sabine; Viehmann, Anja; Nonnemacher, Michael; Dragano, Nico; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Jakobs, Hermann; Kessler, Christoph; Erbel, Raimund; Hoffmann, Barbara

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have shown an association of short-term exposure to fine particulate matter (PM) with transient increases in blood pressure (BP), but it is unclear whether long-term exposure has an effect on arterial BP and hypertension. We investigated the cross-sectional association of residential long-term PM exposure with arterial BP and hypertension, taking short-term variations of PM and long-term road traffic noise exposure into account. We used baseline data (2000-2003) on 4,291 participants, 45-75 years of age, from the Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study, a population-based prospective cohort in Germany. Urban background exposure to PM with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM(2.5)) and ≤ 10 μm (PM(10)) was assessed with a dispersion and chemistry transport model. We used generalized additive models, adjusting for short-term PM, meteorology, traffic proximity, and individual risk factors. An interquartile increase in PM2.5 (2.4 μg/m(3)) was associated with estimated increases in mean systolic and diastolic BP of 1.4 mmHg [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.5, 2.3] and 0.9 mmHg (95% CI: 0.4, 1.4), respectively. The observed relationship was independent of long-term exposure to road traffic noise and robust to the inclusion of many potential confounders. Residential proximity to high traffic and traffic noise exposure showed a tendency toward higher BP and an elevated prevalence of hypertension. We found an association of long-term exposure to PM with increased arterial BP in a population-based sample. This finding supports our hypothesis that long-term PM exposure may promote atherosclerosis, with air-pollution-induced increases in BP being one possible biological pathway.

  19. Liquid Steel at Low Pressure: Experimental Investigation of a Downward Water Air Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumfart, Maria

    2016-07-01

    In the continuous casting of steel controlling the steel flow rate to the mould is critical because a well-defined flow field at the mould level is essential for a good quality of the cast product. The stopper rod is a commonly used device to control this flow rate. Agglomeration of solid material near the stopper rod can lead to a reduced cross section and thus to a decreased casting speed or even total blockage (“clogging”). The mechanisms causing clogging are still not fully understood. Single phase considerations of the flow in the region of the stopper rod result in a low or even negative pressure at the smallest cross section. This can cause degassing of dissolved gases from the melt, evaporation of alloys and entrainment of air through the porous refractory material. It can be shown that the degassing process in liquid steel is taking place mainly at the stopper rod tip and its surrounding. The steel flow around the stopper rod tip is highly turbulent. In addition refractory material has a low wettability to liquid steel. So the first step to understand the flow situation and transport phenomena which occur near the stopper is to understand the behaviour of this two phase (steel, gas) flow. To simulate the flow situation near the stopper rod tip, water experiments are conducted using a convergent divergent nozzle with three different wall materials and three different contact angles respectively. These experiments show the high impact of the wettability of the wall material on the actual flow structure at a constant gas flow rate.

  20. Effect of pressure on the lean limit flames of H2-CH4-air mixture in tubes

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Zhen

    2017-05-25

    The lean limit flames of H2-CH4-air mixtures stabilized inside tubes in a downward flow are experimentally and numerically investigated at elevated pressures ranging from 2 to 5 bar. For the shapes of lean limit flames, a change from ball-like flame to cap-like flame is experimentally observed with the increase of pressure. This experimentally observed phenomenon is qualitatively predicted by numerical simulations. The structure of ball-like and cap-like lean limit flames at all tested pressures is analysed in detail based on the numerical predictions. The results show that the lean limit flames are located inside a recirculation zone at all tested pressures. For the leading edges of the lean limit flames at all tested pressures, the fuel transport is controlled by both convection and diffusion. For the trailing edge of the ball-like lean limit flame at 2 bar, the fuel transport is dominated by diffusion. However, with increasing pressure, the transport contribution caused by convection in the trailing edges of the lean limit flames increases. Finally, the influence of transport and chemistry on the predicted ultra lean flames and lean flammability limit is analysed at elevated pressures.

  1. Study of nanosecond discharges in different H2 air mixtures at atmospheric pressure for plasma-assisted applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdon, Anne; Kobayashi, Sumire; Bonaventura, Zdenek; Tholin, Fabien; Popov, Nikolay

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents 2D simulations of nanosecond pulsed discharges between two point electrodes in different H2/air mixtures and in air at atmospheric pressure. A fluid model is coupled with detailed kinetic schemes for air and different H2/air mixtures to simulate the discharge dynamics. First, as the positive and negative ionization waves propagate in the interelectrode gap, it has been observed that in H2/air mixtures with equivalence ratios between 0.3 and 2, major positive ions produced by the nanosecond discharge are N2+,O2+and HN2+.The discharge dynamics is shown to vary only slightly for equivalence ratios of the H2/air mixture between 0.3 and 2. Then, as the discharge transits to a nanosecond spark discharge, we have studied the different chemical reactions that lead to fast gas heating and to the production of radicals, as O,H and OH. Both thermal and chemical effects of the nanosecond spark discharge are of interest for plasma assisted combustion applications. This work has been supported by the project DRACO (Grant No. ANR-13-IS09-0004) and the french russian LIA Kappa.

  2. Optimal frequency selection of multi-channel O2-band different absorption barometric radar for air pressure measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing; Min, Qilong

    2017-02-01

    Through theoretical analysis, optimal selection of frequencies for O2 differential absorption radar systems on air pressure field measurements is achieved. The required differential absorption optical depth between a radar frequency pair is 0.5. With this required value and other considerations on water vapor absorption and the contamination of radio wave transmission, frequency pairs of present considered radar system are obtained. Significant impacts on general design of differential absorption remote sensing systems are expected from current results.

  3. Experimental and numerical study of the propagation of a discharge in a capillary tube in air at atmospheric pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Jánský, Jaroslav; Le Delliou, Pierre; Tholin, Fabien; Tardiveau, Pierre; Bourdon, Anne; Pasquiers, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents an experimental and numerical study of a pulsed air plasma discharge at atmospheric pressure propagating in a capillary glass tube. In this work, we have compared the discharge structures and the axial propagation velocities of discharges. First, we have studied a needle-to-plane configuration without tube. For applied voltages in the range 7 ? 18 kV, we have observed in experiments and in simulations that a plasma ball starts to develop around the needle tip. ...

  4. Transitions between corona, glow, and spark regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Pai, David,; Lacoste, Deanna,; Laux, C.

    2010-01-01

    International audience; In atmospheric pressure air preheated from 300 to 1000 K, the nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) method has been used to generate corona, glow, and spark discharges. Experiments have been performed to determine the parameter space (applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, ambient gas temperature, and interelectrode gap distance) of each discharge regime. In particular, the experimental conditions necessary for the glow regime of NRP discharges have been determine...

  5. Surface treatment of polypropylene (PP) film by 50 Hz dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ujjwal Man; Subedi, Deepak Prasad

    2015-07-01

    Thin films of polypropylene (PP) are treated for improving hydrophilicity using non-thermal plasma generated by 50 Hz line frequency dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure. PP samples before and after the treatments are studied using contact angle measurements, surface free energy calculations and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Distilled water (H2O), glycerol (C3H8O3) and diiodomethane (CH2I2) are used as test liquids. The contact angle measurements between test liquids and PP samples are used to determine total surface free energy using sessile drop technique. PP films show a remarkable increase in surface free energy after plasma treatment. SEM analysis of the plasma-treated PP films shows that plasma treatment introduces greater roughness on the surface leading to the increased surface free energy. Furthermore, it is found that introducing a small quantity of argon can enhance the surface treatment remarkably.

  6. Oxygen-Rich Lithium Oxide Phases Formed at High Pressure for Potential Lithium-Air Battery Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenge; Kim, Duck Young; Yang, Liuxiang; Li, Nana; Tang, Lingyun; Amine, Khalil; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2017-09-01

    The lithium-air battery has great potential of achieving specific energy density comparable to that of gasoline. Several lithium oxide phases involved in the charge-discharge process greatly affect the overall performance of lithium-air batteries. One of the key issues is linked to the environmental oxygen-rich conditions during battery cycling. Here, the theoretical prediction and experimental confirmation of new stable oxygen-rich lithium oxides under high pressure conditions are reported. Three new high pressure oxide phases that form at high temperature and pressure are identified: Li2O3, LiO2, and LiO4. The LiO2 and LiO4 consist of a lithium layer sandwiched by an oxygen ring structure inherited from high pressure ε-O8 phase, while Li2O3 inherits the local arrangements from ambient LiO2 and Li2O2 phases. These novel lithium oxides beyond the ambient Li2O, Li2O2, and LiO2 phases show great potential in improving battery design and performance in large battery applications under extreme conditions.

  7. Oxygen‐Rich Lithium Oxide Phases Formed at High Pressure for Potential Lithium–Air Battery Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liuxiang; Li, Nana; Tang, Lingyun; Amine, Khalil; Mao, Ho‐Kwang

    2017-01-01

    The lithium–air battery has great potential of achieving specific energy density comparable to that of gasoline. Several lithium oxide phases involved in the charge–discharge process greatly affect the overall performance of lithium–air batteries. One of the key issues is linked to the environmental oxygen‐rich conditions during battery cycling. Here, the theoretical prediction and experimental confirmation of new stable oxygen‐rich lithium oxides under high pressure conditions are reported. Three new high pressure oxide phases that form at high temperature and pressure are identified: Li2O3, LiO2, and LiO4. The LiO2 and LiO4 consist of a lithium layer sandwiched by an oxygen ring structure inherited from high pressure ε‐O8 phase, while Li2O3 inherits the local arrangements from ambient LiO2 and Li2O2 phases. These novel lithium oxides beyond the ambient Li2O, Li2O2, and LiO2 phases show great potential in improving battery design and performance in large battery applications under extreme conditions. PMID:28932656

  8. Effect of pressure on high Karlovitz number lean turbulent premixed hydrogen-enriched methane-air flames using LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicoria, David; Chan, C. K.

    2017-07-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) is employed to investigate the effect of pressure on lean CH4-H2-air turbulent premixed flames at high Karlovitz number for mixtures up to 60% of hydrogen in volume. The subfilter combustion term representing the interaction between turbulence and chemistry is modelled using the PaSR model, along with complex chemistry using a skeletal mechanism based on GRI-MECH3.0. The influence of pressure at high turbulence levels is studied by means of the local flame structure, and the assessment of species formation inside the flame. Results show that the ratio of turbulent flame thickness to laminar flame thickness δt/δu increases faster with pressure, and increases with the fraction of hydrogen in the mixture, leading to higher ratio of turbulent to laminar flame speed. The flame displays smaller structures and higher degree of wrinkling at higher pressure. Final species of CO2 and H2O formation is almost independent of pressure. For intermediate species CO and OH, an increase in pressure at constant volume fraction of hydrogen β leads to a decrease of emission of these species.

  9. Standard Test Method for Water Penetration of Flat Plate Solar Collectors by Uniform Static Air Pressure Difference

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1986-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the resistance of flat plate solar collectors to water penetration when water is applied to their outer surfaces with a static air pressure at the outer surface higher than the pressure at the interior of the collector. 1.2 This test method is applicable to any flat plate solar collector. 1.3 The proper use of this test method requires a knowledge of the principles of pressure and deflection measurement. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. Specific precautionary information is contained in Section 6.

  10. An Analytical Explanation for the X-43A Flush Air Data Sensing System Pressure Mismatch Between Flight and Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Joel C.

    2010-01-01

    Following the successful Mach 7 flight test of the X-43A, unexpectedly low pressures were measured by the aft set of the onboard Flush Air Data Sensing System s pressure ports. These in-flight aft port readings were significantly lower below Mach 3.5 than was predicted by theory. The same lower readings were also seen in the Mach 10 flight of the X-43A and in wind-tunnel data. The pre-flight predictions were developed based on 2-dimensional wedge flow, which fails to predict some of the significant 3-dimensional flow features in this geometry at lower Mach numbers. Using Volterra s solution to the wave equation as a starting point, a three-dimensional finite wedge approximation to flow over the X-43A forebody is presented. The surface pressures from this approximation compare favorably with the measured wind tunnel and flight data at speeds of Mach 2.5 and 3.

  11. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Contrasting characteristics of sub-microsecond pulsed atmospheric air and atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen glow discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, J. L.; Liu, D. X.; Iza, F.; Rong, M. Z.; Kong, M. G.

    2010-01-01

    Glow discharges in air are often considered to be the ultimate low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas for numerous chamber-free applications. This is due to the ubiquitous presence of air and the perceived abundance of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in air plasmas. In this paper, sub-microsecond pulsed atmospheric air plasmas are shown to produce a low concentration of excited oxygen atoms but an abundance of excited nitrogen species, UV photons and ozone molecules. This contrasts sharply with the efficient production of excited oxygen atoms in comparable helium-oxygen discharges. Relevant reaction chemistry analysed with a global model suggests that collisional excitation of O2 by helium metastables is significantly more efficient than electron dissociative excitation of O2, electron excitation of O and ion-ion recombination. These results suggest different practical uses of the two oxygen-containing atmospheric discharges, with air plasmas being well suited for nitrogen and UV based chemistry and He-O2 plasmas for excited atomic oxygen based chemistry.

  12. Influence of ambient air on the flowing afterglow of an atmospheric pressure Ar/O2 radiofrequency plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Duluard, C Y; Hubert, J; Reniers, F

    2016-01-01

    The influence of ambient air on the flowing afterglow of an atmospheric pressure Ar/O2 radiofrequency plasma has been investigated experimentally. Spatially resolved mass spectrometry and laser induced fluorescence on OH radicals were used to estimate the intrusion of air in between the plasma torch and the substrate as a function of the torch-to-substrate separation distance. No air is detected, within the limits of measurement uncertainties, for separation distances smaller than 5 mm. For larger distances, the effect of ambient air can no longer be neglected, and radial gradients in the concentrations of species appear. The Ar 4p population, determined through absolute optical emission spectroscopy, is seen to decrease with separation distance, whereas a rise in emission from the N2(C--B) system is measured. The observed decay in Ar 4p and N2(C) populations for separation distances greater than 9mm is partly assigned to the increasing collisional quenching rate by N2 and O2 molecules from the entrained air....

  13. The Prevalence of Air Regurgitation and Its Consequences After Conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy and Dacryocystorhinostomy in Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicinanzo, Matthew G; Allamneni, Chaitanya; Compton, Christopher J; Long, John A; Nabavi, Cameron B

    2015-01-01

    To describe the prevalence of air regurgitation into the periocular region in continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) patients with a history of conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy with a Lester Jones tube and a dacryocystorhinostomy with silicone intubation, as well as problems caused by this regurgitation and methods to cope. A retrospective chart review of patients who either underwent a conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy or dacryocystorhinostomy was performed. Patients were contacted via phone interview. Demographic information, history of sleep apnea, use of CPAP, and presence of air regurgitation and associated complications were recorded. Institutional review board/ethics committee approval was obtained. Two patients who underwent a conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy with Lester Jones tube and were on CPAP were identified. Both complained of air regurgitation, sensation of Lester Jones tube moving due to regurgitation, and periodic eye pain. Twenty-two patients who underwent a dacryocystorhinostomy with silicone stent and used CPAP were identified. Of these, 16 (72.7%) complained of air regurgitation. Difficulty sleeping (56.2%), dry eye symptoms upon waking (68.8%), eye pain upon waking (31.3%), and blurry vision upon waking (12.5%) were the commonest complaints due to air regurgitation. A total of 7 (43.7%) patients had to discontinue their CPAP at some point due to symptoms. This study brings to light the prevalence of air regurgitation in dacryocystorhinostomy procedures, and its associated symptoms. Given that this procedure is much more common than conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy, surgeons should consider asking patients before performing surgery whether they use CPAP. Patients should be consented regarding the risk of air regurgitation and associated dry eye, foreign body sensation, and eye pain.

  14. Influence of surface emission processes on a fast-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in air at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechereau, François; Bonaventura, Zdeněk; Bourdon, Anne

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents simulations of an atmospheric pressure air discharge in a point-to-plane geometry with a dielectric layer parallel to the cathode plane. Experimentally, a discharge reignition in the air gap below the dielectrics has been observed. With a 2D fluid model, it is shown that due to the fast rise of the high voltage applied and the sharp point used, a first positive spherical discharge forms around the point. Then this discharge propagates axially and impacts the dielectrics. As the first discharge starts spreading on the upper dielectric surface, in the second air gap with a low preionization density of {{10}4}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , the 2D fluid model predicts a rapid reignition of a positive discharge. As in experiments, the discharge reignition is much slower, a discussion on physical processes to be considered in the model to increase the reignition delay is presented. The limit case with no initial seed charges in the second air gap has been studied. First, we have calculated the time to release an electron from the cathode surface by thermionic and field emission processes for a work function φ \\in ≤ft[3,4\\right] eV and an amplification factor β \\in ≤ft[100,220\\right] . Then a 3D Monte Carlo model has been used to follow the dynamics of formation of an avalanche starting from a single electron emitted at the cathode. Due to the high electric field in the second air gap, we have shown that in a few nanoseconds, a Gaussian cloud of seed charges is formed at a small distance from the cathode plane. This Gaussian cloud has been used as the initial condition of the 2D fluid model in the second air gap. In this case, the propagation of a double headed discharge in the second air gap has been observed and the reignition delay is in rather good agreement with experiments.

  15. Development of fuel-rich combustor of methane-air under high pressure for chemical gas turbine system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Noriyuki; Arai, Norio [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    A new turbine system, called Chemical gas turbine system, is based on promising developments in fuel-rich combustor with a carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite (C/C composite) being used as the turbine blades. It would improve the thermal efficiency of more than 10% compared to conventional ones. As one of fundamental researches to develop this system, we designed a 4MPa-scale combustor with methane-air. Flammability limit and components of combustion gases were measured between 1.1 and 4.1 MPa in pressure. Temperature distributions of combustion gases were also measured by the thermocouple. Furthermore, simultaneous measurements of the intensity of OH fluorescence and the combustion temperature were made to clarify instant planar-distributions of these quantities under high pressure by a Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) system. Results from these measurements were as follows: (1) Stable combustion could attain between the equivalence ratio 0=0.7 and 1.3 at 4MPa in pressure, (2) Flammability limit extended with increasing the pressure in the fuel-rich region while it was almost constant in the fuel-lean one, (3) There was little effect of the pressure on the components of combustion gases, and (4 )Simultaneous measurements of the instant of OH fluorescence and the combustion temperature could be successfully made by a PLIF system. 2 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Negative pressure of the environmental air in the cleaning area of the materials and sterilization center: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Lopes Ciofi-Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to analyze the scientific evidence on aerosols generated during cleaning activities of health products in the Central Service Department (CSD and the impact of the negative pressure of the ambient air in the cleaning area to control the dispersion of aerosols to adjacent areas. Method: for this literature systematic review the following searches were done: search guidelines, manuals or national and international technical standards given by experts; search in the portal and databases PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL and Web of Science; and a manual search of scientific articles. Results: the five technical documents reviewed recommend that the CSD cleaning area should have a negative differential ambient air pressure, but scientific articles on the impact of this intervention were not found. The four articles included talked about aerosols formed after the use of a ultrasonic cleaner (an increased in the contamination especially during use and pressurized water jet (formation of smaller aerosols 5μm. In a study, the aerosols formed from contaminated the hot tap water with Legionella pneumophila were evaluated. Conclusions: there is evidence of aerosol formation during cleanup activities in CSD. Studies on occupational diseases of respiratory origin of workers who work in CSD should be performed.

  17. Define and Quantify the Physics of Air Flow, Pressure Drop and Aerosol Collection in Nuclear Grade HEPA Filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Murray E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-23

    Objective: Develop a set of peer-review and verified analytical methods to adjust HEPA filter performance to different flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. Experimental testing will measure HEPA filter flow rate, pressure drop and efficiency to verify the analytical approach. Nuclear facilities utilize HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filters to purify air flow for workspace ventilation. However, the ASME AG-1 technical standard (Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment) does not adequately describe air flow measurement units for HEPA filter systems. Specifically, the AG-1 standard does not differentiate between volumetric air flow in ACFM (actual cubic feet per minute)compared to mass flow measured in SCFM (standard cubic feet per minute). More importantly, the AG-1 standard has an overall deficiency for using HEPA filter devices at different air flow rates, temperatures, and altitudes. Technical Approach: The collection efficiency and pressure drops of 18 different HEPA filters will be measured over a range of flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. The experimental results will be compared to analytical scoping calculations. Three manufacturers have allocated six HEPA filters each for this effort. The 18 filters will be tested at two different flow rates, two different temperatures and two different altitudes. The 36 total tests will be conducted at two different facilities: the ATI Test facilities (Baltimore MD) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos NM). The Radiation Protection RP-SVS group at Los Alamos has an aerosol wind tunnel that was originally designed to evaluate small air samplers. In 2010, modifications were started to convert the wind tunnel for HEPA filter testing. (Extensive changes were necessary for the required aerosol generators, HEPA test fixtures, temperature control devices and measurement capabilities.) To this date, none of these modification activities have been funded through a specific DOE or NNSA program. This is

  18. Surface modification of polyester fabrics by atmospheric-pressure air/He plasma for color strength and adhesion enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chunming, E-mail: zcm1229@126.com [College of Textiles and Clothing, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Sunvim Grp Co Ltd, Gaomi 261500 (China); Zhao, Meihua; Wang, Libing; Qu, Lijun [College of Textiles and Clothing, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Men, Yajing [Sunvim Grp Co Ltd, Gaomi 261500 (China)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Air/He plasma gave hydrophilicity on polyester surface and decreased contact angle to 18°. • The roughness of polyester increased and pit-like structures appeared on the surface after plasma treatment. • XPS confirmed the generation of new functional groups on polyester fabric. • The improved pigment color yield and anti-bleeding performance were contributed by the alteration of pigment adhesion. • The air/He plasma was more effective than air plasma at the same treatment time. - Abstract: Surface properties of water-based pigmented inks for ink-jet printed polyester fabrics were modified with atmospheric-pressure air/He plasma to improve the color strength and pigment adhesion of the treated surfaces. The influence of various parameters, including the surface morphology, chemical compositions, surface energy and dynamic contact angles of the control and plasma treated samples was studied. Color strength and edge definition were used to evaluate the ink-jet printing performance of fabrics. The change in pigment adhesion to polyester fibers was analyzed by SEM (scanning electron microscopy). AFM (Atomic force microscope) and XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) analyses indicated the increase in surface roughness and the oxygen-containing polar groups(C=O, C−OH and COOH) reinforced the fixation of pigments on the fiber surface. The result from this study suggested that the improved pigment color yield was clearly affected by alteration of pigment adhesion enhanced by plasma surface modification. Polyester fabrics exhibited better surface property and ink-jet printing performance after the air/He mixture plasma treatment comparing with those after air plasma treatment.

  19. Tribological behavior of aeronautical steel under oil–air lubrication containing extreme-pressure and anti-wear additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Guan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available If the lubrication system of a helicopter reducer is compromised, its gears and bearings will be in a working state without lubricating oil, which causes the reducer to be damaged in a very short time. Various 2% additives of T307, T321, T202, and T391 were injected and mixed with DOD-L-85734 aeronautical oil to produce 45-min oil–air lubrication experiments performed upon 12Cr2Ni4A aeronautical steel tribo-pairs. The results show that the best anti-wear effect is produced by oil–air lubrication containing T391: its wear width under jetting oil–air just three times and quantity of oil used only 0.015 mL in 45 min was only 421.32 µm but that of dry friction for 48 s was 629.20 µm. The technology of oil–air lubrication that contains an extreme-pressure and anti-wear additive is thus a feasible way to improve the operational ability of a helicopter transmission system that is out of oil.

  20. Two-dimensional electron density measurement of pulsed positive primary streamer discharge in atmospheric-pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Yuki; Aono, Kaiho; Ono, Ryo; Kumada, Akiko; Hidaka, Kunihiko; Maeyama, Mitsuaki

    2017-05-01

    Elucidating the electron density of streamer discharges propagating in atmospheric-pressure air is critical for achieving a systematic understanding of the production mechanisms of reactive species. Using Shack-Hartmann-type laser wavefront sensors with a temporal resolution of 2 ns, we carried out single-shot two-dimensional electron density measurements for positive primary streamers generated in a 13 mm air gap between pin-to-plate electrodes. The electron density over the positive primary streamers decayed from 1015 to {{10}14}\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} during the propagation. The decay time constant of the electron density in the primary streamer channels was estimated to be  ˜2 ns. The distribution widths of the electron density were in good agreement with those of the light emission, typically ranging from 0.8 to 1.5 mm.

  1. The reconstruction of air pressure in Gdańsk in the period of instrumental observations, 1739-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipiak, Janusz

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the paper is to characterise the details of reconstruction of air pressure in Gdańsk in the whole period of regular instrumental records spanning the period 1739-2012. Gdańsk pressure series has been reconstructed by joining air pressure observations of 15 local shorter series. The entire instrumental series can be divided into three sub-periods: the Early Observers period, lasting to 1806, the First Meteorological Networks, covering the years from 1807 to 1875 and Modern Measurements begun in 1876. During the first period, observations were made from two to four times per day, sometimes even at midnight. In the 19th century and up to 1945 thrice-daily barometer readings were a standard, in the last few decades the density of data is much denser. A serious gap in the original daily data exists for the period 1849-1875, where it appears that no original source of data have survived. Selected data are presented in the form of five-day or monthly averages. Numerous errors made probably during the re-writing of original observers' data by their assistants were discovered during digitalization. Despite this the quality of observations can be regarded as good. Data have been corrected to provide a monthly-mean measure of atmospheric pressure in the unit of hPa at standard conditions, i.e. standard gravity, 0 °C and at sea level. Some inconsistencies may still arise as the procedure of the homogenization of air temperature is not completed and in case of a few oldest series air temperature was estimated. Numerous breakpoints were identified in the homogenisation of the series and they cannot be always linked to known causes. A reasonably detailed station history has been compiled by incorporating metadata contained in various written sources. These metadata have facilitated the homogenisation of the data series. Mean annual atmospheric pressure in Gdańsk in period 1739-2012 calculated on the basis of homogenized series was 1014.9 hPa. Mean seasonal

  2. Determination of air and hydrofoil pressure coefficient by laser doppler anemometry

    OpenAIRE

    Ristić Slavica S.; Puharić Mirjana A.; Kutin Marina M.; Matić Dušan R.

    2010-01-01

    Some results of experiments performed in water cavitation tunnel are presented. Pressure coefficient (Cp) was experimentally determined by Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) measurements. Two models were tested: model of airplane G4 (Super Galeb) and hydrofoil of high speed axial pump. These models are not prepared for conventional pressure measurements, so that LDA is applied for Cp determination. Numerical results were obtained using a code for average Navier-Stokes equations solutions. Compari...

  3. The Effect of Heat Loss on Methane/Air Lean Premixed Combustion at High Pressure

    OpenAIRE

    瀬尾, 健彦; 澤中, 裕介; 林, 潤; 赤松, 史光; Takehiko, Seo; Yusuke, SAWANAKA; Jun, HAYASHI; Fumiteru, AKAMATSU; 東京工業大学大学院理工学研究科; 大阪大学大学院工学研究科; Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Osaka University

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify the effect of the heat loss in the wall to the lean premixed combustion in a combustion chamber under high-pressure. Then, the interaction of the flame and the combustion chamber wall was changed by changing the ignition position in the combustion chamber. The flame propagation and pressure in the combustion chamber were measured. A thermodynamic analysis was done based on those results. As a result, the interaction with the flame and the wall obtained the influenc...

  4. Ultrasound enhanced plasma treatment of glass-fibre-reinforced polyester in atmospheric pressure air for adhesion improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Singh, Shailendra Vikram; Norrman, Kion

    2011-01-01

    A glass-fibre-reinforced polyester (GFRP) plate was treated with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure in air for adhesion improvement. The effects of ultrasonic irradiation using a high-power gas-jet generator during the treatment were investigated. The optical emission...... of the surface energy increased due to the simultaneous ultrasonic irradiation, indicating that the adhesive property would be further improved. This result shows a good agreement with surface characterization by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry ion images show...

  5. Impact of Spatial Resolution on Wind Field Derived Estimates of Air Pressure Depression in the Hurricane Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linwood Jones

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the near surface horizontal wind field in a hurricane with spatial resolution of order 1–10 km are possible using airborne microwave radiometer imagers. An assessment is made of the information content of the measured winds as a function of the spatial resolution of the imager. An existing algorithm is used which estimates the maximum surface air pressure depression in the hurricane eye from the maximum wind speed. High resolution numerical model wind fields from Hurricane Frances 2004 are convolved with various HIRAD antenna spatial filters to observe the impact of the antenna design on the central pressure depression in the eye that can be deduced from it.

  6. Numerical Modelling of Soot Formation in Laminar Axisymmetric Ethylene-Air Coflow Flames at Atmospheric and Elevated Pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelgadir, Ahmed

    2015-03-30

    A set of coflow diffusion flames are simulated to study the formation, growth, and oxidation of soot in flames of diluted hydrocarbon fuels, with focus on the effects of pressure. Firstly, we assess the ability of a high performance CFD solver, coupled with detailed transport and kinetic models, to reproduce experimental measurements of a series of ethylene-air coflow flames. Detailed finite rate chemistry describing the formation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydro-carbons is used. Soot is modeled with a moment method and the resulting moment transport equations are solved with a Lagrangian numerical scheme. Numerical and experimental results are compared for various pressures. Finally, a sensitivity study is performed assessing the effect of the boundary conditions and kinetic mechanisms on the flame structure and stabilization properties.

  7. Effect of air-drying pressure and distance on microtensile bond strength of a self-etching adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Askary, Farid S; Van Noort, Richard

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the effect of pressure and distance during air drying on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of a single-step self-etching adhesive to bovine dentin. A total of 36 bovine molars was used in this study. Twenty-seven teeth were used for μTBS testing and 9 teeth for the evaluation of the resin/dentin interface. The teeth were divided into 9 groups according to the variation in solvent evaporation pressure and the distance from the dentin surface. The adhesive was applied according to the manufacturer's instructions. The pressure was adjusted using a pressure regulator and the distance was fixed by measuring the distance from the tip of the syringe to the flat dentin surface. Each tooth was restored with a composite crown 6 mm in height and was cut to produce composite/dentin rectangular sticks with a cross-sectional area approximately 1 mm2 and 12 mm in length. The sticks were tested in tension until failure at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The fracture pattern was evaluated using a stereomicroscope under 40X magnification. For the resin/dentin interface, the samples were gold sputtered and examined using SEM operated at 20 kV. Two-way ANOVA showed that both pressure and distance from the dentin surface significantly affect the μTBS of the single-step self-etching adhesive (p = 0.001). The interaction of the two independent variables (pressure and distance from dentin surface) showed a significant difference (p = 0.001). On the basis of the μTBS data generated in this study, the single-step self-etching adhesive used proved to be technique sensitive.

  8. Local distribution of wall static pressure and heat transfer on a rough flat plate impinged by a slot air jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meda, Adimurthy; Katti, Vadiraj V.

    2017-08-01

    The present work experimentally investigates the local distribution of wall static pressure and the heat transfer coefficient on a rough flat plate impinged by a slot air jet. The experimental parameters include, nozzle-to-plate spacing (Z /D h = 0.5-10.0), axial distance from stagnation point ( x/D h ), size of detached rib ( b = 4-12 mm) and Reynolds number ( Re = 2500-20,000). The wall static pressure on the surface is recorded using a Pitot tube and a differential pressure transmitter. Infrared thermal imaging technique is used to capture the temperature distribution on the target surface. It is observed that, the maximum wall static pressure occurs at the stagnation point ( x/D h = 0) for all nozzle-to-plate spacing ( Z/D h ) and rib dimensions studied. Coefficient of wall static pressure ( C p ) decreases monotonically with x/D h . Sub atmospheric pressure is evident in the detached rib configurations for jet to plate spacing up to 6.0 for all ribs studied. Sub atmospheric region is stronger at Z/D h = 0.5 due to the fluid accelerating under the rib. As nozzle to plate spacing ( Z/D h ) increases, the sub-atmospheric region becomes weak and vanishes gradually. Reasonable enhancement in both C p as well as Nu is observed for the detached rib configuration. Enhancement is found to decrease with the increase in the rib width. The results of the study can be used in optimizing the cooling system design.

  9. Electron properties and air mixing in radio frequency driven argon plasma jets at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gessel, Bram van; Bruggeman, Peter [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Brandenburg, Ronny [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP Greifswald), Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2013-08-05

    A time modulated radio frequency (RF) plasma jet operated with an Ar mixture is investigated by measuring the electron density and electron temperature using Thomson scattering. The measurements have been performed spatially resolved for two different electrode configurations and as a function of the plasma dissipated power and air concentration admixed to the Ar. Time resolved measurements of electron densities and temperatures during the RF cycle and after plasma power switch-off are presented. Furthermore, the influence of the plasma on the air entrainment into the effluent is studied using Raman scattering.

  10. Atmospheric pressure as a force that fills developing bones with marrow and air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbel, Sven; Radić, Radivoje; Kristek, Branka; Ivezić, Zdravko; Selthofer, Robert; Kotromanović, Zeljko

    2004-01-01

    Many theories try to explain the existence and function of paranasal sinuses. This paper is an attempt to correlate process of paranasal sinus development in human with bone pneumatization processes in animals. It is here proposed that this mechanism starts in utero and continues after birth. During endochondral development, a solid hyaline cartilage model transforms into long bones. Central chondrocytes hypertrophy and their lacunae become confluent. Dissolving of the cartilage intercellular matrix forms a primitive marrow cavity. It is soon invaded by the periostal bud. Once circulation is established in the developing bone, the dissolved hyaline matrix can be slowly washed away from the bone cavity. Circulation in the bone cavity can develop slight subatmospheric pressures, similar to negative interstitial pressures in subcutaneous tissues. The amniotic fluid conducts atmospheric pressure to the fetal body. The pressure is trying to fill enlarging bone cavities through the existing vascular openings, or to create new openings. Bone walls of developing paranasal bones are to weak to resist the pressure gradient on their walls. New openings form on the weakest spots allowing airway mucosa to form initial paranasal sinuses. The enlarging cavities of long bones that are remote from the body surface and airway also develop a slightly subatmospheric pressure that fills them with cellular elements. These elements enter bone through the feeding vessels and form bone marrow. During after birth skeletal growth, bone remodeling shapes paranasal sinuses in a process of slow evolution that do not require measurable pressure gradients. When two sinuses come in vicinity, their growth rate declines, since the remaining thin and fragile bone lamella between them does not retract anymore.

  11. The Oxidation of Fe(II) in Acidic Sulfate Solutions with Air at Elevated Pressures : Part 2. Influence of H2SO4 and Fe(III)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wermink, Wouter N.; Versteeg, Geert F.

    2017-01-01

    The oxidation of ferrous ions in acidic sulfate solutions at elevated air pressures was investigated. The effect of the Fe2+ concentration, Fe3+ concentration H2SO4 concentration, and partial oxygen pressure on the reaction rate were determined at three different temperatures, that is, T = 90, 70,

  12. The Oxidation of Fe(II) in Acidic Sulfate Solutions with Air at Elevated Pressures : Part 1. Kinetics above 1 M H2SO4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wermink, Wouter N.; Versteeg, Geert F.

    2017-01-01

    The oxidation of ferrous ions in acidic sulfate solutions at elevated air pressures was investigated. The effect of the Fe2+ concentration, initial H2SO4 concentration and partial oxygen pressure on the reaction rate were determined at three different temperatures, that is, T = 90, 70, and 50

  13. The Oxidation of Fe(II) in Acidic Sulfate Solutions with Air at Elevated Pressures. Part 1. Kinetics above 1 M H2SO4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wermink, Wouter N.; Versteeg, Geert F.

    2017-01-01

    The oxidation of ferrous ions in acidic sulfate solutions at elevated air pressures was investigated. The effect of the Fe2+ concentration, initial H2SO4 concentration and partial oxygen pressure on the reaction rate were determined at three different temperatures, that is, T = 90, 70, and 50

  14. The Oxidation of Fe(II) in Acidic Sulfate Solutions with Air at Elevated Pressures. Part 2. Influence of H2SO4 and Fe(III)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wermink, Wouter N.; Versteeg, Geert F.

    2017-01-01

    The oxidation of ferrous ions in acidic sulfate solutions at elevated air pressures was investigated. The effect of the Fe2+ concentration, Fe3+ concentration H2SO4 concentration, and partial oxygen pressure on the reaction rate were determined at three different temperatures, that is, T = 90, 70,

  15. Spontaneous Raman measurements of acetylene in atmospheric-pressure methane/air flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokhov, AV; Gersen, S; Levinsky, HB

    2005-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectra of native acetylene in a premixed CH4/air flat flame are reported. Spectra were obtained using a kHz-pulsed Nd:YLF laser, and absolute concentrations of acetylene are determined from the frequency-integrated Raman intensity of the nu(2) band and associated hot bands. The

  16. OH and O radicals production in atmospheric pressure air/Ar/H2O gliding arc discharge plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    N, C. ROY; M, R. TALUKDER; A, N. CHOWDHURY

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure air/Ar/H2O gliding arc discharge plasma is produced by a pulsed dc power supply. An optical emission spectroscopic (OES) diagnostic technique is used for the characterization of plasmas and for identifications of {{OH}} and {{O}} radicals along with other species in the plasmas. The OES diagnostic technique reveals the excitation T x ≈ 5550–9000 K, rotational T r ≈ 1350–2700 K and gas T g ≈ 850–1600 K temperatures, and electron density {n}{{e}}≈ ({1.1-1.9})× {10}14 {{{cm}}}-3 under different experimental conditions. The production and destruction of {{OH}} and {{O}} radicals are investigated as functions of applied voltage and air flow rate. Relative intensities of {{OH}} and {{O}} radicals indicate that their production rates are increased with increasing {{Ar}} content in the gas mixture and applied voltage. {n}{{e}} reveals that the higher densities of {{OH}} and {{O}} radicals are produced in the discharge due to more effective electron impact dissociation of {{{H}}}2{{O}} and {{{O}}}2 molecules caused by higher kinetic energies as gained by electrons from the enhanced electric field as well as by enhanced {n}{{e}}. The productions of {{OH}} and {{O}} are decreasing with increasing air flow rate due to removal of Joule heat from the discharge region but enhanced air flow rate significantly modifies discharge maintenance properties. Besides, {T}{{g}} significantly reduces with the enhanced air flow rate. This investigation reveals that {{Ar}} plays a significant role in the production of {{OH}} and {{O}} radicals.

  17. Effect of electrode configuration on the uniformity of atmospheric pressure surface dielectric barrier air micro-discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yang; Bi, Zhenhua; Qi, Zhihua; Ji, Longfei; Zhao, Yao; Chang, Xuewei; Wang, Wenchun; Liu, Dongping

    2018-02-01

    The electrode configuration of atmospheric pressure air discharge is one of the key elements that have significant effects on the discharge properties. In this study, double-sided printed circuit boards with square-shaped lattice structure are used to generate surface dielectric barrier air micro-discharge (SDBAMD) at atmospheric pressure. The effects of the lattice width on the discharge properties are reported. The uniformity of the SDBAMD is evaluated by adopting the digital image processing method. Our measurements show that the power and ignition voltage of the SDBAMD significantly depended on the configuration of the grounded electrode. The digital image processing results show that the uniformity of the SDBAMD is severely affected by the lattice width, and the most uniform discharge is achieved at the lattice width of 2.0 mm. The numerical model based on COMSOL demonstrated that increasing the lattice width can lead to an increase in the electric field in the vicinity of the grounded electrode and a decrease in the lattice center. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that the different electrode configurations can change the interaction between the space charges during the discharge, which ultimately affects the uniformity of the SDBAMD.

  18. Direct measurement of methyl radicals in a methane/air flame at atmospheric pressure by radar REMPI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue; Bottom, Andrew; Zhang, Zhili; Ombrello, Timothy M; Katta, Viswanath R

    2011-11-21

    We report the direct measurements of methyl radicals (CH(3)) in methane/air flames at atmospheric pressure by using coherent microwave Rayleigh scattering (Radar) from Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization (REMPI), also known as the Radar REMPI technique. A tunable dye laser was used to selectively induce the (2 + 1) REMPI ionization of methyl radicals (CH(3), 3p(2)A(2)('')0(0)(0) band) in a near adiabatic and premixed laminar methane/air flame, generated by a Hencken burner. In situ measurements of the REMPI electrons were made by non-intrusively using a microwave homodyne transceiver detection system. The REMPI spectrum of the CH(3) radical was obtained and a spatial distribution of the radicals limited by focused laser beam geometry, approximately 20 µm normal to the flame front and 2.4 mm parallel to the flame, was determined. The measured CH(3) was in good agreement with numerical simulations performed using the detailed kinetic mechanism of GRI-3.0. To the authors' knowledge, these experiments represent the first directly-measured spatially-resolved CH(3) in a flame at atmospheric pressure. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  19. Estimation of Flow Channel Parameters for Flowing Gas Mixed with Air in Atmospheric-pressure Plasma Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Saito, Hidetoshi

    2017-12-01

    When the working gas of an atmospheric-pressure non-equilibrium (cold) plasma flows into free space, the diameter of the resulting flow channel changes continuously. The shape of the channel is observed through the light emitted by the working gas of the atmospheric-pressure plasma. When the plasma jet forms a conical shape, the diameter of the cylindrical shape, which approximates the conical shape, defines the diameter of the flow channel. When the working gas flows into the atmosphere from the inside of a quartz tube, the gas mixes with air. The molar ratio of the working gas and air is estimated from the corresponding volume ratio through the relationship between the diameter of the cylindrical plasma channel and the inner diameter of the quartz tube. The Reynolds number is calculated from the kinematic viscosity of the mixed gas and the molar ratio. The gas flow rates for the upper limit of laminar flow and the lower limit of turbulent flow are determined by the corresponding Reynolds numbers estimated from the molar ratio. It is confirmed that the plasma jet length and the internal plasma length associated with strong light emission increase with the increasing gas flow rate until the rate for the upper limit of laminar flow and the lower limit of turbulent flow, respectively. Thus, we are able to explain the increasing trend in the plasma lengths with the diameter of the flow channel and the molar ratio by using the cylindrical approximation.

  20. Influence of gas flow velocity on the transport of chemical species in an atmospheric pressure air plasma discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, M. I.; Walsh, J. L.

    2017-03-01

    This paper reports on a numerical study of the transport of reactive chemical species generated in an atmospheric-pressure air plasma discharge under the influence of a high velocity flowing gas. Using a 1D air plasma model, it is shown that the reactive species transported downstream of the discharge region can be categorized into three distinct groups based on their spatial distribution: (i) decaying downstream species, (ii) increasing downstream species and (iii) variable density species, where the density is a function of both spatial position and gas flow velocity. It is demonstrated that the gas flow velocity influences the dominant chemical reactions downstream of the discharge region, noticeably altering the composition of several key reactive chemical species transported to a given downstream location. As many emerging applications of atmospheric pressure plasma are driven by the flux of reactive chemical species, this study highlights the importance of gas flow velocity, not only as a means to enhance mass transport but also as a means to manipulate the very nature of the reactive plasma chemistry arriving at a given location.

  1. Surface treatment of polypropylene (PP) film by 50 Hz dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Ujjwal Man, E-mail: umjoshi@gmail.com; Subedi, Deepak Prasad, E-mail: deepaksubedi2001@yahoo.com [Department of Natural Sciences (Physics), School of Science, Kathmandu University P. O. Box No. 6250, Dhulikhel, Kathmandu, Nepal (India)

    2015-07-31

    Thin films of polypropylene (PP) are treated for improving hydrophilicity using non-thermal plasma generated by 50 Hz line frequency dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure. PP samples before and after the treatments are studied using contact angle measurements, surface free energy calculations and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Distilled water (H{sub 2}O), glycerol (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}O{sub 3}) and diiodomethane (CH{sub 2}I{sub 2}) are used as test liquids. The contact angle measurements between test liquids and PP samples are used to determine total surface free energy using sessile drop technique. PP films show a remarkable increase in surface free energy after plasma treatment. SEM analysis of the plasma-treated PP films shows that plasma treatment introduces greater roughness on the surface leading to the increased surface free energy. Furthermore, it is found that introducing a small quantity of argon can enhance the surface treatment remarkably.

  2. Liquid Pressure Amplification and Liquid Injection in Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    pressure amplification and liquid injection are two patented methods of decreasing compressor energy comsumption and increasing condenser capacity in an...gas. Flash gas is vapor refrig- Table 1. Initial Capital Cost for an LPA Pump periods of peak electrical demand, further savings may be possible. LPA

  3. A randomized comparison of the i-gel with the self-pressurized air-Q intubating laryngeal airway in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Soo; Lee, Jae Hoon; Han, Sang Won; Im, Young Jae; Kang, Hyo Jong; Lee, Jeong-Rim

    2015-04-01

    Supraglottic airway devices with noninflatable cuff have advantages in omitting the cuff pressure monitoring and reducing potential pharyngolaryngeal complications. Typical devices without cuff inflation available in children are the i-gel and the self-pressurized air-Q intubating laryngeal airway (air-Q SP). To date, there is no comparative study between these devices in pediatric patients. The purpose of this randomized study was to compare the i-gel(™) and the self-pressurized air-Q(™) intubating laryngeal airway (air-Q SP) in children undergoing general anesthesia. Eighty children, 1-108 months of age, 7-30 kg of weight, and scheduled for elective surgery in which supraglottic airway devices would be suitable for airway management, were randomly assigned to either the i-gel or the air-Q SP. Oropharyngeal leak pressure and fiberoptic view were assessed three times as follows: after insertion and fixation of the device, 10 min after initial assessment, and after completion of surgery. We also assessed insertion parameters and complications. Insertion of the i-gel was regarded as significantly easier compared to the air-Q SP (P = 0.04). Compared to the air-Q SP group, the i-gel group had significantly higher oropharyngeal leak pressures at all measurement points and significantly lower frequencies of gastric insufflation at 10 min after initial assessment and completion of surgery. The air-Q SP group had better fiberoptic views than the i-gel group at all measurement points. Our results showed that the i-gel had easier insertion and better sealing function, and the air-Q SP provided improved fiberoptic views in children requiring general anesthesia. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Vapour-liquid equilibrium of nitrogen-oxygen mixtures and air at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainwater, J. C.; Jacobsen, R. T.

    1988-01-01

    The vapor-liquid equilibrium surface of the binary mixture nitrogen-oxygen is correlated over an extended critical region with the Leung-Griffiths model as modified by Rainwater and Moldover (1983). No single comprehensive experimental measurement of the coexistence surface is available. However, several different experiments along isopleths, isotherms, and isobars collectively provide enough data to make possible the development of a reasonable correlation. The model is optimized to modern data and is shown to be consistent with pioneering measurements done before 1930, to within experimental and temperature-scale uncertainties. It is shown that air in the critical region can be accurately modeled as a nitrogen-oxygen binary mixture by including the small argon component with oxygen. Ancillary equations for the saturation properties of air as functions of temperature are also constructed.

  5. Glucose changes and working memory in individuals with type 1 diabetes during air pressure changes simulating skydiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Mohammad; Westman, Anton; Lindberg, Ann; de Lacerda, Cecilia; Jendle, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Several countries restrict individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) from skydiving because of concerns over possible alterations in consciousness. To our knowledge, glucose levels and working memory in individuals with T1DM during skydiving have not been assessed earlier. The objective of this study was to investigate changes in glucose levels and working memory in selected subjects with T1DM compared with control subjects without diabetes mellitus (DM) during ambient air pressure changes as those anticipated during standard skydiving. Six subjects with T1DM and six controls were included. Using a hypobaric chamber, the ambient air pressure was changed to simulate a standard skydive from 4,000 m (13,000 feet) above mean sea level. The procedure was repeated six times to mimic a day of skydiving activity with a median of 8.7 h/day (5(th), 95(th) percentile: 8.1, 9.8 h). All subjects carried a continuous glucose monitor (CGM). Capillary glucose tests were taken in order to calibrate the CGM. Hemoglobin oxygen saturation, heart rate, and working memory, evaluated through digit span, were monitored regularly. No subject experienced documented symptomatic hypoglycemia with impaired working memory during the simulations. One asymptomatic hypoglycemia episode with a plasma glucose level of glucose levels. Interstitial glucose levels of working memory between the T1DM patients and the controls. This study of interstitial glucose levels and working memory could not show the activity-specific risk factor (i.e., repetitive rapid-onset hypobaric hypoxia exposures) to be a greater safety concern for selected subjects with T1DM compared with subjects without DM during a simulated day of skydiving. Further studies are needed to clarify the suitability of subjects with T1DM to participate in this air sport.

  6. Blood pressure changes and chemical constituents of particulate air pollution: results from the healthy volunteer natural relocation (HVNR) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaowei; Deng, Furong; Huang, Jing; Wang, Hongyi; Shima, Masayuki; Wang, Xin; Qin, Yu; Zheng, Chanjuan; Wei, Hongying; Hao, Yu; Lv, Haibo; Lu, Xiuling; Guo, Xinbiao

    2013-01-01

    Elevated blood pressure (BP) has been associated with particulate matter (PM) air pollution, but associations with PM chemical constituents are still uncertain. We investigated associations of BP with various chemical constituents of fine PM (PM2.5) during 460 repeated visits among a panel of 39 university students. Resting BP was measured using standardized methods before and after the university students relocated from a suburban campus to an urban campus with different air pollution contents in Beijing, China. Air pollution data were obtained from central monitors close to student residences. We used mixed-effects models to estimate associations of various PM2.5 constituents with systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), and pulse pressure. An interquartile range increase of 51.2 μg/m3 in PM2.5 was associated with a 1.08-mmHg (95% CI: 0.17, 1.99) increase in SBP and a 0.96-mmHg (95% CI: 0.31, 1.61) increase in DBP on the following day. A subset of PM2.5 constituents, including carbonaceous fractions (organic carbon and elemental carbon), ions (chloride and fluoride), and metals/metalloid elements (nickel, zinc, magnesium, lead, and arsenic), were found to have robust positive associations with different BP variables, though robust negative associations of manganese, chromium, and molybdenum with SBP or DBP also were observed. Our results support relationships between specific PM2.5 constituents and BP. These findings have potential implications for the development of pollution abatement strategies that maximize public health benefits.

  7. Validation of New Crack Monitoring Technique for Victoria Class High-Pressure Air Bottles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    croissance d’éventuelles fissures de fatigue. Les résultats permettront d’assurer une gestion plus efficace des bouteilles d’air à haute pression... software was used in these exper- iments. The use of two cameras recording at different angles enables differentiation between rigid body motion and...Figure 8. Figure 9 shows the DIC cameras, lights, and tripod with the computer running the DIC software in the background. DRDC-RDDC-2014-R81 9 Figure 7

  8. DC Flashover Performance of Various Types of Ice-Covered Insulator Strings under Low Air Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lichun Shu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, icing flashover performance tests of typical DC porcelain, glass, and composite insulators are systematically carried out in a multifunction artificial climate chamber. The DC icing flashover voltages of seven typical insulators under various conditions of icing thickness, pollution severity before icing, string length, and atmospheric pressure are obtained. The relationships between icing thickness, salt deposit density as well as atmospheric pressure and the 50% icing flashover voltage are analyzed, and the formulas are obtained by regression method. In addition, the DC icing flashover voltage correction method of typical porcelain, glass, and composite insulator in the coexisting condition of high altitude, contamination, and icing is proposed.

  9. Investigation of Ozone Yield of Air Fed Ozonizer by High Pressure Homogeneous Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    around 2 ms and 12 ms in this figure, and during the discharge period, the current was continuous without any pulse . Once a discharge generated in...electron avalanches [10]. Fig. 1. High pressure ozone generator. (a) Top view (b) Side view Fig. 2. Barrier discharge device. Table 1... discharge N. Osawa P1 P, UY. Yoshioka UP2 P, R. Hanaoka P1 P 1 Center for Electric, Optic and Energy applications, Department of Electric and

  10. Equilibrium based analytical model for estimation of pressure magnification during deflagration of hydrogen air mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karanam, Aditya; Sharma, Pavan K.; Ganju, Sunil; Singh, Ram Kumar [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai (India). Reactor Safety Div.

    2016-12-15

    During postulated accident sequences in nuclear reactors, hydrogen may get released from the core and form a flammable mixture in the surrounding containment structure. Ignition of such mixtures and the subsequent pressure rise are an imminent threat for safe and sustainable operation of nuclear reactors. Methods for evaluating post ignition characteristics are important for determining the design safety margins in such scenarios. This study presents two thermo-chemical models for determining the post ignition state. The first model is based on internal energy balance while the second model uses the concept of element potentials to minimize the free energy of the system with internal energy imposed as a constraint. Predictions from both the models have been compared against published data over a wide range of mixture compositions. Important differences in the regions close to flammability limits and for stoichiometric mixtures have been identified and explained. The equilibrium model has been validated for varied temperatures and pressures representative of initial conditions that may be present in the containment during accidents. Special emphasis has been given to the understanding of the role of dissociation and its effect on equilibrium pressure, temperature and species concentrations.

  11. Effects of air temperature and water vapor pressure deficit on storage of the predatory mite Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazy, Noureldin Abuelfadl; Suzuki, Takeshi; Amano, Hiroshi; Ohyama, Katsumi

    2012-10-01

    To determine the optimum air temperature and water vapor pressure deficit (VPD) for the storage of the predatory mite, Neoseiulus californicus, 3-day-old mated females were stored at air temperatures of 0, 5, 10, or 15 °C and VPDs of 0.1, 0.3, or 0.5 kPa for 10, 20, or 30 days. At 10 °C and 0.1 kPa, 83 % of females survived after 30 days of storage; this percentage was the highest among all conditions. VPDs of 0.3 and 0.5 kPa regardless of air temperature, and an air temperature of 0 °C regardless of VPD were detrimental to the survival of the females during storage. Since the highest survival was observed at 10 °C and 0.1 kPa, the effect of the storage duration on the post-storage quality of the stored females and their progeny was investigated at 25 °C to evaluate the effectiveness of the storage condition. The oviposition ability of the stored females, hatchability, and sex ratio of their progeny were not affected even when the storage duration was extended to 30 days. Although a slight decrease in the survival during the immature stages of progeny was observed when the storage duration was ≥20 days, the population growth of N. californicus may not be affected when individuals stored in these conditions are applied to greenhouses and agricultural fields. The results indicate that mated N. californicus females can be stored at 10 °C and 0.1 kPa VPD for at least 30 days.

  12. Numerical Modelling of Soot Formation in Laminar Axisymmetric Ethylene-Air Coflow Flames at Atmospheric and Elevated Pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Rakha, Ihsan Allah

    2015-05-01

    The steady coflow diffusion flame is a widely used configuration for studying combustion kinetics, flame dynamics, and pollutant formation. In the current work, a set of diluted ethylene-air coflow flames are simulated to study the formation, growth, and oxidation of soot, with a focus on the effects of pressure on soot yield. Firstly, we assess the ability of a high performance CFD solver, coupled with detailed transport and kinetic models, to reproduce experimental measurements, like the temperature field, the species’ concentrations and the soot volume fraction. Fully coupled conservation equations for mass, momentum, energy, and species mass fractions are solved using a low Mach number formulation. Detailed finite rate chemistry describing the formation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons up to cyclopenta[cd]pyrene is used. Soot is modeled using a moment method and the resulting moment transport equations are solved with a Lagrangian numerical scheme. Numerical and experimental results are compared for various pressures. Reasonable agreement is observed for the flame height, temperature, and the concentrations of various species. In each case, the peak soot volume fraction is predicted along the centerline as observed in the experiments. The predicted integrated soot mass at pressures ranging from 4-8 atm, scales as P2.1, in satisfactory agreement with the measured integrated soot pressure scaling (P2.27). Significant differences in the mole fractions of benzene and PAHs, and the predicted soot volume fractions are found, using two well-validated chemical kinetic mechanisms. At 4 atm, one mechanism over-predicts the peak soot volume fraction by a factor of 5, while the other under-predicts it by a factor of 5. A detailed analysis shows that the fuel tube wall temperature has an effect on flame stabilization.

  13. Relationship between heart rate variability, blood pressure and arterial wall properties during air and oxygen breathing in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Beata; Szyndler, Anna; Czechowicz, Krzysztof; Kucharska, Wiesława; Graff, Grzegorz; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Laurent, Stephane; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies reported that normobaric hyperoxia influences heart rate, arterial pressure, cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance, but the mechanisms underlying these changes are still not fully understood. Several factors are considered including degeneration of endothelium-derived nitric oxide by reactive oxygen species, the impact of oxygen-free radicals on tissues and alterations of autonomic nervous system function. Recently, new devices for the detailed non-invasive assessment of large and small arteries have been developed. Therefore, the aim of our study was to assess heart rate variability (HRV) as a potential indicator of autonomic balance and its relation to blood pressure and vascular properties during medical air (MAB) and 100% oxygen breathing (OXB) in healthy volunteers. In 12 healthy subjects we assessed heart rate and blood pressure variability, baroreflex sensitivity, respiratory frequency, common carotid artery diameter and its wall distensibility, as well as changes in the digital artery pulse waveform, stroke index and systemic vascular resistance during MAB and OXB. Mean and systolic blood pressure have increased significantly while digital pulse amplitude and carotid artery diameter were significantly lower during hyperoxia. Heart rate variability measures did not differ during MAB and OXB. However, the correlations between spectral HRV components and those hemodynamic parameters which have changed due to hyperoxia varied substantially during MAB (correlated significantly) and OXB (no significant correlations were noted). Our findings suggest that autonomic nervous system might not be the main mediator of the cardiovascular changes during 100% oxygen breathing in healthy subjects. It seems that the direct vascular responses are initial consequences of hyperoxia and other cardiovascular parameter alterations are secondary to them. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Fluctuating Pressure Analysis of a 2-D SSME Nozzle Air Flow Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Darren; Hidalgo, Homero

    1996-01-01

    To better understand the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) startup/shutdown tansients, an airflow test of a two dimensional nozzle was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center's trisonic wind tunnel. Photographic and other instrumentation show during an SSME start large nozzle shell distortions occur as the Mach disk is passing through the nozzle. During earlier develop of the SSME, this startup transient resulted in low cycle fatigue failure of one of the LH2 feedlines. The two dimensional SSME nozzle test was designed to measure the static and fluctuating pressure environment and color Schlieren video during the startup and shutdown phases of the run profile.

  15. Reliability and Maintainability Analysis of a High Air Pressure Compressor Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safie, Fayssal M.; Ring, Robert W.; Cole, Stuart K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses a Reliability, Availability, and Maintainability (RAM) independent assessment conducted to support the refurbishment of the Compressor Station at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The paper discusses the methodologies used by the assessment team to derive the repair by replacement (RR) strategies to improve the reliability and availability of the Compressor Station (Ref.1). This includes a RAPTOR simulation model that was used to generate the statistical data analysis needed to derive a 15-year investment plan to support the refurbishment of the facility. To summarize, study results clearly indicate that the air compressors are well past their design life. The major failures of Compressors indicate that significant latent failure causes are present. Given the occurrence of these high-cost failures following compressor overhauls, future major failures should be anticipated if compressors are not replaced. Given the results from the RR analysis, the study team recommended a compressor replacement strategy. Based on the data analysis, the RR strategy will lead to sustainable operations through significant improvements in reliability, availability, and the probability of meeting the air demand with acceptable investment cost that should translate, in the long run, into major cost savings. For example, the probability of meeting air demand improved from 79.7 percent for the Base Case to 97.3 percent. Expressed in terms of a reduction in the probability of failing to meet demand (1 in 5 days to 1 in 37 days), the improvement is about 700 percent. Similarly, compressor replacement improved the operational availability of the facility from 97.5 percent to 99.8 percent. Expressed in terms of a reduction in system unavailability (1 in 40 to 1 in 500), the improvement is better than 1000 percent (an order of magnitude improvement). It is worthy to note that the methodologies, tools, and techniques used in the LaRC study can be used to evaluate

  16. Low pressure premixed CH4/air flames with forced periodic mixture fraction oscillations: experimental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ax, H.; Kutne, P.; Meier, W.; König, K.; Maas, U.; Class, A.; Aigner, M.

    2009-03-01

    An experimental setup for the generation and investigation of periodic equivalence ratio oscillations in laminar premixed flames is presented. A special low-pressure burner was developed which generates stable flames in a wide pressure range down to 20 mbar and provides the possibility of rapid mixture fraction variations. The technical realization of the mixture fraction variations and the characteristics of the burner are described. 1D laser Raman scattering was applied to determine the temperature and concentration profiles of the major species through the flame front in correlation to the phase-angle of the periodic oscillation. OH* chemiluminescence was detected to qualitatively analyze the response of the flame to mixture fraction variations by changing shape and position. Exemplary results from a flame at p=69 mbar, forced at a frequency of 10 Hz, are shown and discussed. The experiments are part of a cooperative research project including the development of kinetic models and numerical simulation tools with the aim of a better understanding and prediction of periodic combustion instabilities in gas turbines. The focus of the current paper lies on the presentation of the experimental realization and the measuring techniques.

  17. Resection of the innominate artery to prevent an impending tracheoinnominate fistula and to permit tracheotomy in a patient with subglottic stenosis and high-riding innominate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokita, Joshua; Kung, Raymond; Parekh, Kalpaj; Hoffman, Henry

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the long-term viability of innominate artery resection and tracheotomy for a patient at high risk of developing a tracheoinnominate fistula (TIF) in the setting of subglottic stenosis and a high-riding innominate artery. Chart review with 2-year follow-up. A 45-year-old diabetic man with obstructive sleep apnea and multiple admissions for coma and delirium tremens associated with alcohol abuse developed subglottic stenosis. He was found to have a palpable supraclavicular pulse during preoperative examination for a tracheotomy. Computed tomography examination revealed a high-riding innominate artery at the level of stenosis along with granulation tissue and disruption of the cartilaginous trachea, suggesting a high risk of impending TIF. The patient underwent a sternotomy-approach resection of the innominate artery with closure of the distal stump with a sternohyoid muscle flap. Intraoperatively, a plane of adhesions between the posterior innominate artery and trachea was dissected. The anterior tracheal wall appeared calcified but without evidence of erosion of either the trachea or the artery. Six weeks later, a tracheotomy was performed. Follow-up at 27 months did not identify complications from the innominate artery resection. Resection of the innominate artery is an option for some patients either to address the warning signs of TIF or to permit a tracheotomy to be performed in the presence of a high innominate artery. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. The influence of a low air pressure environment on human metabolic rate during short-term (< 2 h) exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, W; Wang, H; Wu, T; Ouyang, Q; Hu, S; Zhu, Y

    2017-03-01

    Passengers in aircraft cabins are exposed to low-pressure environments. One of the missing links in the research on thermal comfort under cabin conditions is the influence of low air pressure on the metabolic rate. In this research, we simulated the cabin pressure regime in a chamber in which the pressure level could be controlled. Three pressure levels (101/85/70 kPa) were tested to investigate how metabolic rate changed at different pressure levels. The results show that as pressure decreased, the respiratory flow rate (RFR) at standard condition (STPD: 0°C, 101 kPa) significantly decreased. Yet the oxygen (O 2 ) consumption and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) production significantly increased, as reflected in the larger concentration difference between inhaled and exhaled air. A significant increase in the respiratory quotient (RQ) was also observed. For metabolic rate, no significant increase (P > 0.05) was detected when pressure decreased from 101 kPa to 85 kPa; however, the increase associated with a pressure decrease from 85 kPa to 70kPa was significant (P < 0.05). Empirical equations describing the above parameters are provided, which can be helpful for thermal comfort assessment in short-haul flights. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Air-activated chemical warming devices: effects of oxygen and pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raleigh, G; Rivard, R; Fabus, S

    2005-01-01

    Air-activated chemical warming devices use an exothermic chemical reaction of rapidly oxidizing iron to generate heat for therapeutic purposes. Placing these products in a hyperbaric oxygen environment greatly increases the supply of oxidant and thus increases the rate of reaction and maximum temperature. Testing for auto-ignition and maximum temperatures attained by ThermaCare Heat Wraps, Playtex Heat Therapy, and Heat Factory disposable warm packs under ambient conditions and under conditions similar to those encountered during hyperbaric oxygen treatments in monoplace and multiplace hyperbaric chambers (3 atm abs and > 95% oxygen) revealed a maximum temperature of 269 degrees F (132 degrees C) with no spontaneous ignition. The risk of thermal burn injury to adjacent skin may be increased significantly if these devices are used under conditions of hyperbaric oxygen.

  20. Asymmetric surface dielectric barrier discharge in air at atmospheric pressure: electrical properties and induced airflow characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pons, Jerome; Moreau, Eric; Touchard, Gerard [LEA, University of Poitiers/CNRS/ENSMA, Bd. Curie, Teleport 2, BP 30179, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France)

    2005-10-07

    The electrical properties of an asymmetric surface dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric air have been investigated experimentally. The discharge is used for airflow production close to the dielectric surface, and the time-averaged flow velocity spatial profiles have been measured. Velocities of up to 3.5 m s{sup -1} at heights of 1-2 mm are reached when filamentary discharges with current peaks up to 20 mA are produced along the surface. In terms of powers, mechanical powers (output) of a few milliwatts are obtained for electrical powers (input) up to 10 W. Variation laws or behaviour with several discharge parameters (applied voltage waveform, distance between electrodes, dielectric thickness and permittivity) have been experimentally determined.

  1. A switchable positive and negative air pressure device for efficient and gentle handling of nanofiber scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotaling, Nathan A.; Khristov, Vladimir; Maminishkis, Arvydas; Bharti, Kapil; Simon, Carl G.

    2017-10-01

    A scaffold handling device (SHD) has been designed that can switch from gentle suction to positive pressure to lift and place nanofiber scaffolds. In tissue engineering laboratories, delicate fibrous scaffolds, such as electrospun nanofiber scaffolds, are often used as substrates for cell culture. Typical scaffold handling procedures include lifting the scaffolds, moving them from one container to another, sterilization, and loading scaffolds into cell culture plates. Using tweezers to handle the scaffolds can be slow, can damage the scaffolds, and can cause them to wrinkle or fold. Scaffolds may also acquire a static charge which makes them difficult to put down as they cling to tweezers. An SHD has been designed that enables more efficient, gentle lifting, and placement of delicate scaffolds. Most of the parts to make the SHD can be purchased, except for the tip which can be 3D-printed. The SHD enables more reliable handling of nanofiber scaffolds that may improve the consistency of biomanufacturing processes.

  2. Magnetic Ignition of Pulsed Gas Discharges in Air of Low Pressure in a Coaxial Plasma Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Karlheinz; Norwood, Joseph, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    The effect of an axial magnetic field on the breakdown voltage of a coaxial system of electrodes has been investigated by earlier workers. For low values of gas pressure times electrode spacing, the breakdown voltage is decreased by the application of the magnetic field. The electron cyclotron radius now assumes the role held by the mean free path in nonmagnetic discharges and the breakdown voltage becomes a function of the magnetic flux density. In this paper the dependence of the formative time lag as a function of the magnetic flux density is established and the feasibility of using a magnetic field for igniting high-voltage, high-current discharges is shown through theory and experiment. With a 36 microfarad capacitor bank charged to 48,000 volts, a peak current of 1.3 x 10( exp 6) amperes in a coaxial type of plasma gun was achieved with a current rise time of only 2 microseconds.

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Interference of Spontaneous Raman Scattering in High-Pressure Fuel-Rich H2-Air Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Jun; Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    2004-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the spectral interferences in the spontaneous Raman scattering spectra of major combustion products in 30-atm fuel-rich hydrogen-air flames. An effective methodology is introduced to choose an appropriate line-shape model for simulating Raman spectra in high-pressure combustion environments. The Voigt profile with the additive approximation assumption was found to provide a reasonable model of the spectral line shape for the present analysis. The rotational/vibrational Raman spectra of H2, N2, and H2O were calculated using an anharmonic-oscillator model using the latest collisional broadening coefficients. The calculated spectra were validated with data obtained in a 10-atm fuel-rich H2-air flame and showed excellent agreement. Our quantitative spectral analysis for equivalence ratios ranging from 1.5 to 5.0 revealed substantial amounts of spectral cross-talk between the rotational H2 lines and the N2 O-/Q-branch; and between the vibrational H2O(0,3) line and the vibrational H2O spectrum. We also address the temperature dependence of the spectral cross-talk and extend our analysis to include a cross-talk compensation technique that removes the nterference arising from the H2 Raman spectra onto the N2, or H2O spectra.

  4. Cellular attachment and differentiation on titania nanotubes exposed to air- or nitrogen-based non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Yeon Seo

    Full Text Available The surface topography and chemistry of titanium implants are important factors for successful osseointegration. However, chemical modification of an implant surface using currently available methods often results in the disruption of topographical features and the loss of beneficial effects during the shelf life of the implant. Therefore, the aim of this study was to apply the recently highlighted portable non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAPPJ, elicited from one of two different gas sources (nitrogen and air, to TiO2 nanotube surfaces to further improve their osteogenic properties while preserving the topographical morphology. The surface treatment was performed before implantation to avoid age-related decay. The surface chemistry and morphology of the TiO2 nanotube surfaces before and after the NTAPPJ treatment were determined using a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a surface profiler, a contact angle goniometer, and an X-ray photoelectron spectroscope. The MC3T3-E1 cell viability, attachment and morphology were confirmed using calcein AM and ethidium homodimer-1 staining, and analysis of gene expression using rat mesenchymal stem cells was performed using a real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results indicated that both portable nitrogen- and air-based NTAPPJ could be used on TiO2 nanotube surfaces easily and without topographical disruption. NTAPPJ resulted in a significant increase in the hydrophilicity of the surfaces as well as changes in the surface chemistry, which consequently increased the cell viability, attachment and differentiation compared with the control samples. The nitrogen-based NTAPPJ treatment group exhibited a higher osteogenic gene expression level than the air-based NTAPPJ treatment group due to the lower atomic percentage of carbon on the surface that resulted from treatment. It was concluded that NTAPPJ treatment of TiO2 nanotube surfaces results in an increase in

  5. Sensory feedback from a prosthetic hand based on air-mediated pressure from the hand to the forearm skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antfolk, Christian; Björkman, Anders; Frank, Sven-Olof; Sebelius, Fredrik; Lundborg, Göran; Rosen, Birgitta

    2012-07-01

    Lack of sensory feedback is a drawback in today's hand prostheses. We present here a non-invasive simple sensory feedback system, which provides the user of a prosthetic hand with sensory feedback on the arm stump. It is mediated by air in a closed loop system connecting silicone pads on the prosthetic hand with pads on the amputation stump. The silicone pads in a "tactile display" on the amputation stump expand when their corresponding sensor-bulb in the prosthesis is touched, evoking an experience of "real touch". Twelve trans-radial amputees and 20 healthy non-amputees participated in the study. We investigated the capacity of the system to mediate detection of touch, discrimination between different levels of pressure and, on the amputees also, the ability to locate touch. The results showed a median touch threshold of 80 and 60 g in amputees and non-amputees, respectively, and 90% and 80% correct answers, respectively, in discrimination between 2 levels of pressure. The amputees located touch (3 sites) correctly in 96% of trials. This simple sensory feedback system has the potential to restore sensory feedback in hand amputees and thus it could be a useful tool to enhance prosthesis use.

  6. Cross-correlation spectroscopy study of the transient spark discharge in atmospheric pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janda, Mário; Hoder, Tomáš; Sarani, Abdollah; Brandenburg, Ronny; Machala, Zdenko

    2017-05-01

    A streamer-to-spark transition in a self-pulsing transient spark (TS) discharge of positive polarity in air was investigated using cross-correlation spectroscopy. The entire temporal evolution of the TS was recorded for several spectral bands and lines: the second positive system of N2 (337.1 nm), the first negative system of {{{{N}}}2}+ (391.4 nm), and atomic oxygen (777.1 nm). The results enable the visualization of the different phases of discharge development including the primary streamer, the secondary streamer, and the transition to the spark. The spatio-temporal distribution of the reduced electric field strength during the primary streamer phase of the TS was determined and discussed. The transition from the streamer to the spark proceeds very fast within about 10 ns for the TS with a current pulse repetition rate in the range 8-10 kHz. This is attributed to memory effects, leading to a low net electron attachment rate and faster propagation of the secondary streamer. Gas heating, accumulation of species such as oxygen atoms from the previous TS pulses, as well as generation of charged particles by stepwise ionization seem to play important roles contributing to this fast streamer-to-spark transition.

  7. Effect of aviation fuel type and fuel injection conditions on the spray characteristics of pressure swirl and hybrid air blast fuel injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feddema, Rick

    Feddema, Rick T. M.S.M.E., Purdue University, December 2013. Effect of Aviation Fuel Type and Fuel Injection Conditions on the Spray Characteristics of Pressure Swirl and Hybrid Air Blast Fuel Injectors. Major Professor: Dr. Paul E. Sojka, School of Mechanical Engineering Spray performance of pressure swirl and hybrid air blast fuel injectors are central to combustion stability, combustor heat management, and pollutant formation in aviation gas turbine engines. Next generation aviation gas turbine engines will optimize spray atomization characteristics of the fuel injector in order to achieve engine efficiency and emissions requirements. Fuel injector spray atomization performance is affected by the type of fuel injector, fuel liquid properties, fuel injection pressure, fuel injection temperature, and ambient pressure. Performance of pressure swirl atomizer and hybrid air blast nozzle type fuel injectors are compared in this study. Aviation jet fuels, JP-8, Jet A, JP-5, and JP-10 and their effect on fuel injector performance is investigated. Fuel injector set conditions involving fuel injector pressure, fuel temperature and ambient pressure are varied in order to compare each fuel type. One objective of this thesis is to contribute spray patternation measurements to the body of existing drop size data in the literature. Fuel droplet size tends to increase with decreasing fuel injection pressure, decreasing fuel injection temperature and increasing ambient injection pressure. The differences between fuel types at particular set conditions occur due to differences in liquid properties between fuels. Liquid viscosity and surface tension are identified to be fuel-specific properties that affect the drop size of the fuel. An open aspect of current research that this paper addresses is how much the type of aviation jet fuel affects spray atomization characteristics. Conventional aviation fuel specifications are becoming more important with new interest in alternative

  8. 42 CFR 84.163 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes; test requirements. 84.163 Section 84.163 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF...

  9. Associations between Long-Term Air Pollutant Exposures and Blood Pressure in Elderly Residents of Taipei City: A Cross-Sectional Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Szu-Ying; Wu, Chang-Fu; Lee, Jui-Huan; Hoffmann, Barbara; Peters, Annette; Brunekreef, Bert; Chu, Da-Chen; Chan, Chang-Chuan

    BACKGROUND: Limited information is available regarding long-term effects of air pollution on blood pressure (BP) and hypertension. OBJECTIVE: We studied whether 1-year exposures to particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) were correlated with BP and hypertension in the elderly. METHODS: We

  10. Low Pressure Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy With the AirSeal System at OLV Hospital: Results From a Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Falce, Sabrina; Novara, Giacomo; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Umari, Paolo; De Naeyer, Geert; D'Hondt, Frederiek; Beresian, Jean; Carette, Rik; Penicka, Martin; Mo, Yujiing; Vandenbroucke, Geert; Mottrie, Alexandre

    2017-12-01

    Limited studies examined effects of pneumoperiotneum during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) and with AirSeal. The aim of this study was to assess the effect on hemodynamics of a lower pressure pneumoperitoneum (8 mmHg) with AirSeal, during RARP in steep Trendelenburg 45° (ST). This is an institutional review board-approved, prospective, interventional, single-center study including patients treated with RARP at OLV Hospital by one extremely experienced surgeon (July 2015-February 2016). Intraoperative monitoring included: arterial pressure, central venous pressure, cardiac output, heart rate, stroke volume, systemic vascular resistance, intrathoracic pressure, airways pressures, left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic areas/volumes and ejection fraction, by transesophageal echocardiography, an esophageal catheter, and FloTrac/Vigileo system. Measurements were performed after induction of anesthesia with patient in horizontal (T0), 5 minutes after 8 mmHg pneumoperitoneum (TP), 5 minutes after ST (TT1) and every 30 minutes thereafter until the end of surgery (TH). Parameters modification at the prespecified times was assessed by Wilcoxon and Friedman tests, as appropriate. All analyses were performed by SPSS v. 23.0. A total of 53 consecutive patients were enrolled. The mean patients age was 62.6 ± 6.9 years. Comorbidity was relatively limited (51% with Charlson Comorbidity Index as low as 0). Despite the ST, working always at 8 mmHg with AirSeal, only central venous pressure and mean airways pressure showed a statistically significant variation during the operative time. Although other significant hemodynamic/respiratory changes were observed adding pneumoperitoneum and then ST, all variables remained always within limits safely manageable by anesthesiologists. The combination of ST, lower pressure pneumoperitoneum and extreme surgeon's experience enables to safely perform RARP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. High intensity interior aircraft noise increases the risk of high diastolic blood pressure in Indonesian Air Force pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minarma Siagian

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To analyze the effects of aircraft noise, resting pulse rate, and other factors on the risk of high diastolic blood pressure (DBP in Indonesian Air Force pilots.Methods: A nested case-control study was conducted using data extracted from annual medical check-ups indoctrination aerophysiologic training records at the Saryanto Aviation and Aerospace Health Institute (LAKESPRA in Jakarta from January 2003 – September 2008. For analysis of DBP: the case group with DBP ≥ 90 mmHg were compared with contral group with DBP < 79 mmHG. One case matched to 12 controls.Results: Out of 567 pilots, 544 (95.9% had complete medical records. For this analysis there were 40 cases of high DBP and 480 controls for DBP. Pilots exposed to aircraft noise 90-95 dB rather than 70-80 dB had a 2.7-fold increase for high DBP [adjusted odds ratio (ORa = 2.70; 95% confi dence interval (CI = 1.05-6.97]. Pilots with resting pulse rates of ≥ 81/minute rather than ≤ 80/minute had a 2.7-fold increase for high DBP (ORa = 2.66; 95% CI = 1.26-5.61. In terms of total fl ight hours, pilots who had 1401-11125 hours rather than 147-1400 hours had a 3.2-fold increase for high DBP (ORa = 3.18; 95% CI = 1.01-10.03.Conclusion: High interior aircraft noise, high total flight hours,  and high resting pulse rate, increased risk for high DBP. Self assessment of resting pulse rate can be used to control the risk of high DBP. (Med J Indones 2009; 276: 276-82Keywords: diastolic blood pressure, aircraft noise, resting pulse rate, military pilots

  12. On the physical processes ruling an atmospheric pressure air glow discharge operating in an intermediate current regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prevosto, L., E-mail: prevosto@waycom.com.ar; Mancinelli, B.; Chamorro, J. C.; Cejas, E. [Grupo de Descargas Eléctricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecánica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto (2600), Santa Fe (Argentina); Kelly, H. [Grupo de Descargas Eléctricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecánica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto (2600), Santa Fe (Argentina); Instituto de Física del Plasma (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (UBA) Ciudad Universitaria Pab. I, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-02-15

    Low-frequency (100 Hz), intermediate-current (50 to 200 mA) glow discharges were experimentally investigated in atmospheric pressure air between blunt copper electrodes. Voltage–current characteristics and images of the discharge for different inter-electrode distances are reported. A cathode-fall voltage close to 360 V and a current density at the cathode surface of about 11 A/cm{sup 2}, both independent of the discharge current, were found. The visible emissive structure of the discharge resembles to that of a typical low-pressure glow, thus suggesting a glow-like electric field distribution in the discharge. A kinetic model for the discharge ionization processes is also presented with the aim of identifying the main physical processes ruling the discharge behavior. The numerical results indicate the presence of a non-equilibrium plasma with rather high gas temperature (above 4000 K) leading to the production of components such as NO, O, and N which are usually absent in low-current glows. Hence, the ionization by electron-impact is replaced by associative ionization, which is independent of the reduced electric field. This leads to a negative current-voltage characteristic curve, in spite of the glow-like features of the discharge. On the other hand, several estimations show that the discharge seems to be stabilized by heat conduction; being thermally stable due to its reduced size. All the quoted results indicate that although this discharge regime might be considered to be close to an arc, it is still a glow discharge as demonstrated by its overall properties, supported also by the presence of thermal non-equilibrium.

  13. Comparison of predicted and experimental real-gas pressure distributions on space shuttle orbiter nose for shuttle entry air data system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental investigation of inviscid real-gas effects on the pressure distribution along the Space Shuttle Orbiter nose center line up to an angle of attack of 32 deg was performed in support of the Shuttle Entry Air Data System (SEADS). Free-stream velocities from 4.8 to 6.6 kn/s were generated at hypersonic conditions with helium, air, and CO2, resulting in normal-shock density ratios from 3.7 to 18.4. The experimental results for pressure distribution agreed closely with numerical results. Modified Newtonian theory deviates from both experiment and the numerical results as angle of attack increases or shock density ratio decreases. An evaluation of the use of modified Newtonian theory for predicting SEADS pressure distributions in actual flight conditions was made through comparison with numerical predictions.

  14. Development, validity and reliability of a new pressure air biofeedback device (PAB) for measuring isometric extension strength of the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pienaar, Andries W; Barnard, Justhinus G

    2017-04-01

    This study describes the development of a new portable muscle testing device, using air pressure as a biofeedback and strength testing tool. For this purpose, a pressure air biofeedback device (PAB®) was developed to measure and record the isometric extension strength of the lumbar multifidus muscle in asymptomatic and low back pain (LBP) persons. A total of 42 subjects (age 47.58 years, ±18.58) participated in this study. The validity of PAB® was assessed by comparing a selected measure, air pressure force in millibar (mb), to a standard criterion; calibrated weights in kilograms (kg) during day-to-day tests. Furthermore, clinical trial-to-trial and day-to-day tests of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of L5 lumbar multifidus were done to compare air pressure force (mb) to electromyography (EMG) in microvolt (μV) and to measure the reliability of PAB®. A highly significant relationship were found between air pressure output (mb) and calibrated weights (kg). In addition, Pearson correlation calculations showed a significant relationship between PAB® force (mb) and EMG activity (μV) for all subjects (n = 42) examined, as well as for the asymptomatic group (n = 24). No relationship was detected for the LBP group (n = 18). In terms of lumbar extension strength, we found that asymptomatic subjects were significantly stronger than LBP subjects. The results of the PAB® test differentiated between LBP and asymptomatic subject's lumbar isometric extension strength without any risk to the subjects and also indicate that the lumbar isometric extension test with the new PAB® device is reliable and valid.

  15. Granulomatose de Wegener e estenose subglótica: descrição de caso Wegener's granulomatosis and subglottic stenosis: case description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Guidolin

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Descreve-se o caso de um paciente com Granulomatose de Wegener, em tratamento com esteróides e ciclofosfamida, que, apesar do tratamento, evoluiu com dispnéia progressiva e rouquidão. A investigação mostrou tratar-se de uma estenose subglótica, sendo a dispnéia prontamente aliviada com a traqueostomia. São discutidos diagnósticos diferenciais e modalidades de tratamentos de estenose subglótica em portadores de Wegener.We describe a patient with Wegener Granulomatosis being treated with steroids and cyclofosfamide that developed progressive dyspnea and hoarseness despite of treatment. Investigation showed a subglotic stenosis. The dyspnea was relieved by tracheotomy. We discuss the differential diagnosis as well as a number of treatment modalities in patients with Wegener granulomatosis and subglottic stenosis.

  16. REVIVING ABANDONED RESERVOIRS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Loucks; Steve Ruppel; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jon Olsen; Deanna Combs; Dhiraj Dembla; Leonel Gomez

    2003-06-01

    The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company have assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The characterization phase of the project is utilizing geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. This model will be used to define a field deployment plant that Goldrus, a small independent oil company, will implement by drilling both vertical and horizontal wells during the demonstration phase of the project. Additional reservoir data are being gathered during the demonstration phase to improve the accuracy of the reservoir model. The results of the demonstration are being closely monitored to provide a basis for improving the design of the HPAI field deployment plan. The results of the reservoir characterization field demonstration and monitoring program will be documented and widely disseminated to facilitate adoption of this technology by oil operators in the Permian Basin and elsewhere in the US.

  17. Low Pressure DC Glow Discharge Air Plasma Surface Treatment of Polyethylene (PE) Film for Improvement of Adhesive Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnasamy Navaneetha, Pandiyaraj; Vengatasamy, Selvarajan; Rajendrasing, R. Deshmukh; Paramasivam, Yoganand; Suresh, Balasubramanian; Sundaram, Maruthamuthu

    2013-01-01

    The present work deals with the change in surface properties of polyethylene (PE) film using DC low pressure glow discharge air plasma and makes it useful for technical applications. The change in hydrophilicity of the modified PE film surface was investigated by measuring contact angle and surface energy as a function of exposure time. Changes in the morphological and chemical composition of PE films were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The improvement in adhesion was studied by measuring T-peel and lap-shear strength. The results show that the wettability and surface energy of the PE film has been improved due to the introduction of oxygen-containing polar groups and an increase in surface roughness. The XPS result clearly shows the increase in concentration of oxygen content and the formation of polar groups on the polymer surface. The AFM observation on PE film shows that the roughness of the surface increased due to plasma treatment. The above morphological and chemical changes enhanced the adhesive properties of the PE film surfaces, which was confirmed by T-peel and lap-shear tests.

  18. Simulation Analysis of Sludge Disposal and Volatile Fatty Acids Production from Gravity Pressure Reactor via Wet Air Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gwon Woo [Biomass and Waste Energy Laboratory, KIER, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Tae Wan; Lee, Hong-Cheol; Hwang, In-Ju [Environmental and Plant Engineering Research Institute, KICT, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Efficacious wastewater treatment is essential for increasing sewage sludge volume and implementing strict environmental regulations. The operation cost of sludge treatment amounts up to 50% of the total costs for wastewater treatment plants, therefore, an economical sludge destruction method is crucially needed. Amid several destruction methods, wet air oxidation (WAO) can efficiently treat wastewater containing organic pollutants. It can be used not only for sludge destruction but also for useful by-product production. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs), one of many byproducts, is considered to be an important precursor of biofuel and chemical materials. Its high reaction condition has instituted the study of gravity pressure reactor (GPR) for an economical process of WAO to reduce operation cost. Simulation of subcritical condition was conducted using Aspen Plus with predictive Soave-Redlich-Kwong (PSRK) equation of state. Conjointly, simulation analysis for GPR depth, oxidizer type, sludge flow rate and oxidizer injection position was carried out. At GPR depth of 1000m and flow rate of 2 ton/h, the conversion and yield of VFAs were 92.02% and 0.17g/g, respectively.

  19. Numerical Analysis on the Influence of Thermal Effects on Oil Flow Characteristic in High-Pressure Air Injection (HPAI Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Jia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In previous laboratory study, we have shown the thermal behavior of Keke Ya light crude oil (Tarim oilfield, branch of CNPC for high-pressure air injection (HPAI application potential study. To clarify the influences of thermal effects on oil production, in this paper, we derived a mathematical model for calculating oil flow rate, which is based on the heat conduction property in porous media from the combustion tube experiment. Based on remarkably limited knowledge consisting of very global balance arguments and disregarding all the details of the mechanisms in the reaction zone, the local governing equations are formulated in a dimensionless form. We use finite difference method to solve this model and address the study by way of qualitative analysis. The time-space dimensionless oil flow rate (qD profiles are established for comprehensive studies on the oil flow rate characteristic affected by thermal effects. It also discusses how these findings will impact HPAI project performances, and several guidelines are suggested.

  20. Transitions between corona, glow, and spark regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, David Z.; Lacoste, Deanna A.; Laux, Christophe O.

    2010-05-01

    In atmospheric pressure air preheated from 300 to 1000 K, the nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) method has been used to generate corona, glow, and spark discharges. Experiments have been performed to determine the parameter space (applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, ambient gas temperature, and interelectrode gap distance) of each discharge regime. In particular, the experimental conditions necessary for the glow regime of NRP discharges have been determined, with the notable result that there exists a minimum and maximum gap distance for its existence at a given ambient gas temperature. The minimum gap distance increases with decreasing gas temperature, whereas the maximum does not vary appreciably. To explain the experimental results, an analytical model is developed to explain the corona-to-glow (C-G) and glow-to-spark (G-S) transitions. The C-G transition is analyzed in terms of the avalanche-to-streamer transition and the breakdown field during the conduction phase following the establishment of a conducting channel across the discharge gap. The G-S transition is determined by the thermal ionization instability, and we show analytically that this transition occurs at a certain reduced electric field for the NRP discharges studied here. This model shows that the electrode geometry plays an important role in the existence of the NRP glow regime at a given gas temperature. We derive a criterion for the existence of the NRP glow regime as a function of the ambient gas temperature, pulse repetition frequency, electrode radius of curvature, and interelectrode gap distance.

  1. Experimental study on the flow regimes and pressure gradients of air-oil-water three-phase flow in horizontal pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hadhrami, Luai M; Shaahid, S M; Tunde, Lukman O; Al-Sarkhi, A

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to study the flow regimes and pressure gradients of air-oil-water three-phase flows in 2.25 ID horizontal pipe at different flow conditions. The effects of water cuts, liquid and gas velocities on flow patterns and pressure gradients have been studied. The experiments have been conducted at 20 °C using low viscosity Safrasol D80 oil, tap water and air. Superficial water and oil velocities were varied from 0.3 m/s to 3 m/s and air velocity varied from 0.29 m/s to 52.5 m/s to cover wide range of flow patterns. The experiments were performed for 10% to 90% water cuts. The flow patterns were observed and recorded using high speed video camera while the pressure drops were measured using pressure transducers and U-tube manometers. The flow patterns show strong dependence on water fraction, gas velocities, and liquid velocities. The observed flow patterns are stratified (smooth and wavy), elongated bubble, slug, dispersed bubble, and annular flow patterns. The pressure gradients have been found to increase with the increase in gas flow rates. Also, for a given superficial gas velocity, the pressure gradients increased with the increase in the superficial liquid velocity. The pressure gradient first increases and then decreases with increasing water cut. In general, phase inversion was observed with increase in the water cut. The experimental results have been compared with the existing unified Model and a good agreement has been noticed.

  2. Limitations of the effective field approximation for fluid modeling of high frequency discharges in atmospheric pressure air: Application in resonant structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtzanidis, Konstantinos; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2017-11-01

    We study analytically and demonstrate numerically that the local effective field approximation (LEFA) for plasma fluid modeling of high-frequency (GHz-THz) discharges in atmospheric pressure air is not valid in regions where the time scale for electron energy transfer to heavy particles is less than the time-period of the electromagnetic (EM) wave. Greater than 50% modulation of the electron temperature around its mean value is found for frequencies around and under 10 GHz for atmospheric pressure air discharges. This modulation decreases significantly as the EM wave frequency increases. Fully coupled numerical simulation of a resonant metallic cut-array illuminated by high frequency EM waves demonstrates that the LEFA can lead to significant errors on both temporal and spatial evolution of the plasma, in cases where this modulation is significant. The LEFA for high pressure air discharges is found to be valid when the EM wave frequency is around or higher than 100 GHz. For lower frequencies or when the reduced electric fields are high enough, the Local Energy Approximation should be used for an accurate description of the plasma development. For low gas pressures, the modulation is very low rendering the LEFA valid over a large EM wave frequency range.

  3. Negative pressure of the environmental air in the cleaning area of the materials and sterilization center: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofi-Silva, Caroline Lopes; Hansen, Lisbeth Lima; Almeida, Alda Graciele Claudio Dos Santos; Kawagoe, Julia Yaeko; Padoveze, Maria Clara; Graziano, Kazuko Uchikawa

    2016-09-01

    to analyze the scientific evidence on aerosols generated during cleaning activities of health products in the Central Service Department (CSD) and the impact of the negative pressure of the ambient air in the cleaning area to control the dispersion of aerosols to adjacent areas. for this literature systematic review the following searches were done: search guidelines, manuals or national and international technical standards given by experts; search in the portal and databases PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL and Web of Science; and a manual search of scientific articles. the five technical documents reviewed recommend that the CSD cleaning area should have a negative differential ambient air pressure, but scientific articles on the impact of this intervention were not found. The four articles included talked about aerosols formed after the use of a ultrasonic cleaner (an increased in the contamination especially during use) and pressurized water jet (formation of smaller aerosols 5μm). In a study, the aerosols formed from contaminated the hot tap water with Legionella pneumophila were evaluated. there is evidence of aerosol formation during cleanup activities in CSD. Studies on occupational diseases of respiratory origin of workers who work in CSD should be performed. analisar as evidências científicas sobre aerossóis gerados durante atividades de limpeza dos produtos para saúde no Centro de Material e Esterilização (CME) e o impacto da pressão negativa do ar ambiente na área de limpeza para controle da dispersão de aerossóis para áreas adjacentes. para essa revisão sistemática de literatura foram realizadas: busca de diretrizes, manuais ou normas técnicas nacionais e internacionais indicadas por especialistas; busca no portal e bases de dados PUBMED, SCOPUS, Cinahl e Web of Science; e busca manual de artigos científicos. Os cinco documentos técnicos analisados preconizam que na área de limpeza do CME haja diferencial negativo de pressão do ar ambiente

  4. 42 CFR 84.157 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.157 Airflow resistance... feet) per minute. (c) The exhalation resistance to a flow of air at a rate of 85 liters (3 cubic feet...

  5. Changes in the electro-physical properties of MCT epitaxial films affected by a plasma volume discharge induced by an avalanche beam in atmospheric-pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryev, D. V.; Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Lozovoy, K. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Shulepov, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper the influence of the plasma volume discharge of nanosecond duration formed in a non-uniform electric field at atmospheric pressure on samples of epitaxial films HgCdTe (MCT) films are discussed. The experimental data show that the action of pulses of nanosecond volume discharge in air at atmospheric pressure leads to changes in the electrophysical properties of MCT epitaxial films due to formation of a near-surface high- conductivity layer of the n-type conduction. The preliminary results show that it is possible to use such actions in the development of technologies for the controlled change of the properties of MCT.

  6. Optimization of Sensing and Feedback Control for Vibration/Flutter of Rotating Disk by PZT Actuators via Air Coupled Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingfeng Ju

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a feedback control mechanism and its optimization for rotating disk vibration/flutter via changes of air-coupled pressure generated using piezoelectric patch actuators are studied. A thin disk rotates in an enclosure, which is equipped with a feedback control loop consisting of a micro-sensor, a signal processor, a power amplifier, and several piezoelectric (PZT actuator patches distributed on the cover of the enclosure. The actuator patches are mounted on the inner or the outer surfaces of the enclosure to produce necessary control force required through the airflow around the disk. The control mechanism for rotating disk flutter using enclosure surfaces bonded with sensors and piezoelectric actuators is thoroughly studied through analytical simulations. The sensor output is used to determine the amount of input to the actuator for controlling the response of the disk in a closed loop configuration. The dynamic stability of the disk-enclosure system, together with the feedback control loop, is analyzed as a complex eigenvalue problem, which is solved using Galerkin’s discretization procedure. The results show that the disk flutter can be reduced effectively with proper configurations of the control gain and the phase shift through the actuations of PZT patches. The effectiveness of different feedback control methods in altering system characteristics and system response has been investigated. The control capability, in terms of control gain, phase shift, and especially the physical configuration of actuator patches, are also evaluated by calculating the complex eigenvalues and the maximum displacement produced by the actuators. To achieve a optimal control performance, sizes, positions and shapes of PZT patches used need to be optimized and such optimization has been achieved through numerical simulations.

  7. Aerosol size distributions measured in urban, rural and high-alpine air with an electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, A.; Zerrath, A.; McKeon, U.; Fehrenbach, T.; Niessner, R.; Plass-Dülmer, C.; Kaminski, U.; Berresheim, H.; Pöschl, U.

    An electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI) was used to study atmospheric aerosol particle number, surface, and mass concentrations and size distributions over a diameter range of 7 nm-10 μm at urban, rural and high-alpine locations along an alpine altitude transect across Southern Germany. The measurements were performed in the city of Munich and at the global atmosphere watch (GAW) stations Hohenpeißenberg and Zugspitze in the years 2001-2004. To minimize particle bounce effects and enable chemical analysis of the collected particles without disturbance by grease on the impaction substrates, the sample flow was conditioned to about 75% relative humidity. The performance of the ELPI instrument was evaluated by comparison with well-established aerosol measurement techniques including condensation particle counters, scanning and differential mobility particle sizers, filter sampling, and gravimetric determination of particulate mass. In general, particle number concentrations, size distributions, and PM2.5 concentrations determined with the ELPI were in good agreement with alternative techniques (rank correlation coefficients ρ = 0.70-0.95). The ELPI filter stage data for the particle diameter range of 7-30 nm, however, appeared to be strongly biased towards high values. Long-term measurements at the rural site (Hohenpeißenberg) revealed distinct seasonal patterns with the highest number concentrations in summer (median daily average: 3100 cm -3) and the highest mass concentrations in spring and fall (median daily average PM2.5 and PM10: 21-25 and 27-35 μg m -3, respectively). In spring and fall we also observed pronounced maxima of particle surface and mass concentration in the coarse mode (peak at ˜3 μm), which are most likely due to primary biological material. Relatively clean air (PM10 = 10 μg m -3).

  8. Model for Predicting DC Flashover Voltage of Pre-Contaminated and Ice-Covered Long Insulator Strings under Low Air Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijin Zhang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, a multi-arc predicting model for DC critical flashover voltage of iced and pre-contaminated long insulator strings under low atmospheric pressure is developed. The model is composed of a series of different polarity surface arcs, icicle-icicle air gap arcs, and residual layer resistance. The calculation method of the residual resistance of the ice layer under DC multi-arc condition is established. To validate the model, 7-unit and 15-unit insulator strings were tested in a multi-function artificial climate chamber under the coexistent conditions of low air pressure, pollution, and icing. The test results showed that the values calculated by the model satisfactorily agreed with those experimentally measured, with the errors within the range of 10%, validating the rationality of the model.

  9. Effect of Initial Moisture Content on the in-Vessel Composting Under Air Pressure of Organic Fraction of MunicipalSolid Waste in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhadi Makan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effect of initial moisture content on the in-vessel composting under air pressure of organic fraction of municipal solid waste in Morocco in terms of internal temperature, produced gases quantity, organic matter conversion rate, and the quality of the final composts.For this purpose, in-vessel bioreactor was designed and used to evaluate both appropriate initial air pressure and appropriate initial moisture content for the composting process. Moreover, 5 experiments were carried out within initial moisture content of 55%, 65%, 70%, 75% and 85%. The initial air pressure and the initial moisture content of the mixture showed a significant effect on the aerobic composting. The experimental results demonstrated that for composting organic waste, relatively high moisture contents are better at achieving higher temperatures and retaining them for longer times.This study suggested that an initial moisture content of around 75%, under 0.6 bar, can be considered as being suitable for efficient composting of organic fraction of municipal solid waste. These last conditions, allowed maximum value of temperature and final composting product with good physicochemical properties as well as higher organic matter degradation and higher gas production. Moreover, final compost obtained showed good maturity levels and can be used for agricultural applications.

  10. Effects of air-abrasion pressure on the resin bond strength to zirconia: a combined cyclic loading and thermocycling aging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Z. Al-Shehri,

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To determine the combined effect of fatigue cyclic loading and thermocycling (CLTC on the shear bond strength (SBS of a resin cement to zirconia surfaces that were previously air-abraded with aluminum oxide (Al2O3 particles at different pressures. Materials and Methods Seventy-two cuboid zirconia specimens were prepared and randomly assigned to 3 groups according to the air-abrasion pressures (1, 2, and 2.8 bar, and each group was further divided into 2 groups depending on aging parameters (n = 12. Panavia F 2.0 was placed on pre-conditioned zirconia surfaces, and SBS testing was performed either after 24 hours or 10,000 fatigue cycles (cyclic loading and 5,000 thermocycles. Non-contact profilometry was used to measure surface roughness. Failure modes were evaluated under optical and scanning electron microscopy. The data were analyzed using 2-way analysis of variance and χ2 tests (α = 0.05. Results The 2.8 bar group showed significantly higher surface roughness compared to the 1 bar group (p < 0.05. The interaction between pressure and time/cycling was not significant on SBS, and pressure did not have a significant effect either. SBS was significantly higher (p = 0.006 for 24 hours storage compared to CLTC. The 2 bar-CLTC group presented significantly higher percentage of pre-test failure during fatigue compared to the other groups. Mixed-failure mode was more frequent than adhesive failure. Conclusions CLTC significantly decreased the SBS values regardless of the air-abrasion pressure used.

  11. Space and time analysis of the nanosecond scale discharges in atmospheric pressure air: II. Energy transfers during the post-discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, A.; Cessou, A.; Vervisch, P.

    2014-03-01

    The better understanding of nanosecond scale discharges under atmospheric pressure and the validation of plasmachemical models, require an increasing need for reliable data. This paper presents, in the first time to our knowledge, spatiotemporal description of the gas number densities of major species including O atoms, the hydrodynamic expansion and the relative distribution of the energy deposited in the specific molecular modes of N2(X) and O2(X) following a nanosecond pulsed air discharge at atmospheric pressure. These data are obtained from phase-locked average profiles of the ground states of N2 and O2 probed by spontaneous Raman scattering. The results complete part I of this investigation dedicated to the gas temperature and the vibrational distribution function of N2 and O2 and show that half of the total energy deposited is loaded on the vibrational mode (48% for N2 and 2% for O2). The energy released into fast gas heating represents 19% of the energy deposited. This fast gas heating (up to 1000 K) observed in tens of nanoseconds after the current rise leads to a shock wave propagation shown with the pressure measurements. These processes combined with vibration-vibration/translation energy transfers and convective transports induced by the shock wave propagation are spatiotemporally studied. The experimental data of this study provide space and time database for the validation of plasmachemical models of nanosecond pulsed discharges in atmospheric pressure air.

  12. Air/Liquid-pressure and heartbeat-driven flexible fiber nanogenerators as a micro/nano-power source or diagnostic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zetang; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2011-01-04

    We present a new approach for fabricating flexible fiber nanogenerators (FNGs) that can be used for smart shirts, flexible electronics, and medical applications. These FNGs are based on carbon fibers that are covered cylindrically by textured zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films. Once subjected to uni-compression by applying a pressure, the cylindrical ZnO thin film is under a compressive strain, resulting in a macroscopic piezopotential across its inner and exterior surfaces owing to the textured structure of the film, which is the driving force for generating an electric current in the external load. Using such a structure, an output peak voltage of 3.2 V and average current density of 0.15 μA cm(-2) are demonstrated. The FNGs rely on air pressure, so that it can work in a non-contact mode in cases of rotating tires, flowing air/liquid, and even in blood vessels. Pressure-driven FNGs added to a syringe show potential to harvest energy in blood vessels, gas pipes, and oil pipes, as long as there is a fluctuation in pressure (or turbulence). Heart-pulse driven FNGs can serve as ultrasensitive sensors for monitoring the behavior of the human heart, which may possibly be applied to medical diagnostics as sensors and measurement tools.

  13. High blood pressure and long-term exposure to indoor noise and air pollution from road traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foraster, Maria; Künzli, Nino; Aguilera, Inmaculada; Rivera, Marcela; Agis, David; Vila, Joan; Bouso, Laura; Deltell, Alexandre; Marrugat, Jaume; Ramos, Rafel; Sunyer, Jordi; Elosua, Roberto; Basagaña, Xavier

    2014-11-01

    Traffic noise has been associated with prevalence of hypertension, but reports are inconsistent for blood pressure (BP). To ascertain noise effects and to disentangle them from those suspected to be from traffic-related air pollution, it may be essential to estimate people's noise exposure indoors in bedrooms. We analyzed associations between long-term exposure to indoor traffic noise in bedrooms and prevalent hypertension and systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) BP, considering long-term exposure to outdoor nitrogen dioxide (NO2). We evaluated 1,926 cohort participants at baseline (years 2003-2006; Girona, Spain). Outdoor annual average levels of nighttime traffic noise (Lnight) and NO2 were estimated at postal addresses with a detailed traffic noise model and a land-use regression model, respectively. Individual indoor traffic Lnight levels were derived from outdoor Lnight with application of insulations provided by reported noise-reducing factors. We assessed associations for hypertension and BP with multi-exposure logistic and linear regression models, respectively. Median levels were 27.1 dB(A) (indoor Lnight), 56.7 dB(A) (outdoor Lnight), and 26.8 μg/m3 (NO2). Spearman correlations between outdoor and indoor Lnight with NO2 were 0.75 and 0.23, respectively. Indoor Lnight was associated both with hypertension (OR = 1.06; 95% CI: 0.99, 1.13) and SBP (β = 0.72; 95% CI: 0.29, 1.15) per 5 dB(A); and NO2 was associated with hypertension (OR = 1.16; 95% CI: 0.99, 1.36), SBP (β = 1.23; 95% CI: 0.21, 2.25), and DBP (β⊇= 0.56; 95% CI: -0.03, 1.14) per 10 μg/m3. In the outdoor noise model, Lnight was associated only with hypertension and NO2 with BP only. The indoor noise-SBP association was stronger and statistically significant with a threshold at 30 dB(A). Long-term exposure to indoor traffic noise was associated with prevalent hypertension and SBP, independently of NO2. Associations were less consistent for outdoor traffic Lnight and likely affected by

  14. Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel; Dembla Dhiraj; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jeff Kane; Jon Olson; John A. Jackson; Katherine G. Jackson

    2006-09-30

    Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the United States contain vast volumes of remaining oil that is not being effectively recovered. This oil resource constitutes a huge target for the development and application of modern, cost-effective technologies for producing oil. Chief among the barriers to the recovery of this oil are the high costs of designing and implementing conventional advanced recovery technologies in these mature, in many cases pressure-depleted, reservoirs. An additional, increasingly significant barrier is the lack of vital technical expertise necessary for the application of these technologies. This lack of expertise is especially notable among the small operators and independents that operate many of these mature, yet oil-rich, reservoirs. We addressed these barriers to more effective oil recovery by developing, testing, applying, and documenting an innovative technology that can be used by even the smallest operator to significantly increase the flow of oil from mature U.S. reservoirs. The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The Permian Basin, the largest oil-bearing basin in North America, contains more than 70 billion barrels of remaining oil in place and is an ideal venue to validate this technology. We have demonstrated the potential of HPAI for oil-recovery improvement in preliminary laboratory tests and a reservoir pilot project. To more completely test the technology, this project emphasized detailed characterization of reservoir properties, which were integrated to access the effectiveness and economics of HPAI. The characterization phase of the project utilized geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum

  15. Numerical study on the influence of entrapped air bubbles on the time-dependent pore pressure distribution in soils due to external changes in water level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ausweger Georg M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In practical geotechnical engineering soils below the groundwater table are usually regarded as a two-phase medium, consisting of solids and water. The pore water is assumed to be incompressible. However, under certain conditions soils below the groundwater table may exhibit a liquid phase consisting of water and air. The air occurs in form of entrapped air bubbles and dissolved air. Such conditions are named quasi-saturated and the assumption of incompressibility is no longer justified. In addition the entrapped air bubbles influence the hydraulic conductivity of soils. These effects are usually neglected in standard problems of geotechnical engineering. However, sometimes it is required to include the pore fluid compressibility when modelling the hydraulic behaviour of soils in order to be able to explain certain phenomena observed in the field. This is for example true for fast fluctuating water levels in reservoirs. In order to study these phenomena, numerical investigations on the influence of the pore fluid compressibility on the pore water pressure changes in a soil layer beneath a reservoir with fast fluctuating water levels were performed. Preliminary results of this study are presented and it could be shown that numerical analysis and field data are in good agreement.

  16. Evidence for age-dependent air-space enlargement contributing to loss of lung tissue elastic recoil pressure and increased shear modulus in older age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, K; Kumar, H; Tawhai, M H

    2017-07-01

    As a normal part of mature aging, lung tissue undergoes microstructural changes such as alveolar air-space enlargement and redistribution of collagen and elastin away from the alveolar duct. The older lung also experiences an associated decrease in elastic recoil pressure and an increase in specific tissue elastic moduli, but how this relates mechanistically to microstructural remodeling is not well-understood. In this study, we use a structure-based mechanics analysis to elucidate the contributions of age-related air-space enlargement and redistribution of elastin and collagen to loss of lung elastic recoil pressure and increase in tissue elastic moduli. Our results show that age-related geometric changes can result in reduction of elastic recoil pressure and increase in shear and bulk moduli, which is consistent with published experimental data. All elastic moduli were sensitive to the distribution of stiffness (representing elastic fiber density) in the alveolar wall, with homogenous stiffness near the duct and through the septae resulting in a more compliant tissue. The preferential distribution of elastic proteins around the alveolar duct in the healthy young adult lung therefore provides for a more elastic tissue.NEW & NOTEWORTHY We use a structure-based mechanics analysis to correlate air-space enlargement and redistribution of elastin and collagen to age-related changes in the mechanical behavior of lung parenchyma. Our study highlights that both the cause (redistribution of elastin and collagen) and the structural effect (alveolar air-space enlargement) contribute to decline in lung tissue elastic recoil with age; these results are consistent with published data and provide a new avenue for understanding the mechanics of the older lung. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Estimation of the in-cylinder air/fuel ratio of an internal combustion engine by the use of pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunestaal, Per

    2000-03-01

    This thesis investigates the use of cylinder pressure measurements for estimation of the in-cylinder air/fuel ratio in a spark ignited internal combustion engine. An estimation model which uses the net heat release profile for estimating the cylinder air/fuel ratio of a spark ignition engine is developed. The net heat release profile is computed from the cylinder pressure trace and quantifies the conversion of chemical energy of the reactants in the charge into thermal energy. The net heat release profile does not take heat- or mass transfer into account. Cycle-averaged air/fuel ratio estimates over a range of engine speeds and loads show an RMS error of 4.1% compared to measurements in the exhaust. A thermochemical model of the combustion process in an internal combustion engine is developed. It uses a simple chemical combustion reaction, polynominal fits of internal energy as function of temperature, and the first law of thermodynamics to derive a relationship between measured cylinder pressure and the progress of the combustion process. Simplifying assumptions are made to arrive at an equation which relates the net heat release to the cylinder pressure. Two methods for estimating the sensor offset of a cylinder pressure transducer are developed. Both methods fit the pressure data during the pre-combustion phase of the compression stroke to a polytropic curve. The first method assumes a known polytropic exponent, and the other estimates the polytropic exponent. The first method results in a linear least-squares problem, and the second method results in a nonlinear least-squares problem. The nonlinear least-squares problem is solved by separating out the nonlinear dependence and solving the single-variable minimization problem. For this, a finite difference Newton method is derived. Using this method, the cost of solving the nonlinear least-squares problem is only slightly higher than solving the linear least-squares problem. Both methods show good statistical

  18. Association of partial pressure of carbon dioxide in expired gas and arterial blood at three different ventilation states in apneic chickens (Gallus domesticus) during air sac insufflation anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paré, Monique; Ludders, John W; Erb, Hollis N

    2013-05-01

    To test whether partial pressure of CO2 in expired gas (PĒCO2) predicts the partial pressure of CO2 in arterial blood (PaCO2) in apneic chickens during air sac insufflation anesthesia at three different ventilation states. To determine the PĒCO2 at which apnea occurs during air sac insufflation anesthesia. Randomized cross-over study. Twenty-three healthy male white leghorn chickens. Chickens were anesthetized via mask with isoflurane in oxygen and an air sac cannula was placed in the right abdominal air sac. Delivery of isoflurane in O2 was transferred from the mask to the air sac cannula. The birds were maintained at a surgical plane of anesthesia and apnea was induced by adjusting gas flow; the PĒCO2 at apnea was recorded. The birds were then paralyzed and gas flow was adjusted to achieve three different PĒCO2 s in random order: 43 mmHg (5.6 kPa) [hypoventilation]; 33 mmHg (4.3 kPa) [normoventilation]; and 23 mmHg (3.0 kPa) [hyperventilation]. After maintaining the target expired isoflurane concentration (EIso; 1.85 or 1.90%) and PĒCO2 for 15 minutes, arterial blood gas analysis was performed to determine the PaCO2 . The chickens were euthanized at the end of the experiment. Based on Bland-Altman comparisons, PĒCO2 was not strongly associated with PaCO2 during the three ventilation states. The PĒCO2 at which apnea occurred varied {median (minimum, maximum): 35 (30, 48) mmHg [4.6 (3.9, 6.2) kPa]}. Measured PĒCO2 cannot be used in a simple linear fashion to predict PaCO2 in birds during air sac insufflation anesthesia. The PĒCO2 at which apnea occurs during air sac insufflation anesthesia is not predictable. Arterial blood gases should be used to monitor CO2 during air sac insufflation anesthesia to verify appropriate patient ventilation. © 2013 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  19. Positive association between short-term ambient air pollution exposure and children blood pressure in China-Result from the Seven Northeast Cities (SNEC) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiao-Wen; Qian, Zhengmin Min; Vaughn, Michael G; Nelson, Erik J; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Bowatte, Gayan; Perret, Jennifer; Chen, Duo-Hong; Ma, Huimin; Lin, Shao; de Foy, Benjamin; Hu, Li-Wen; Yang, Bo-Yi; Xu, Shu-Li; Zhang, Chuan; Tian, Yan-Peng; Nian, Min; Wang, Jia; Xiao, Xiang; Bao, Wen-Wen; Zhang, Ya-Zhi; Dong, Guang-Hui

    2017-05-01

    The impact of ambient air pollution on health causes concerns in China. However, little is known about the association of short-term air pollution exposure with blood pressure (BP) in children. The goal of present study was to assess the association between short-term air pollution and BP in children from a highly polluted area in China. This study enrolled 9354 children in 24 elementary and middle schools (aged 5-17 years) from the Seven Northeast Cities (SNEC) study, respectively, during the period of 2012-2013. Ambient air pollutants, including particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of ≤10 μm (PM 10 ), sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) and ozone (O 3 ) on the days (1-5 days) preceding BP examination were collected from local air monitoring stations. Generalized additive models and two-level regression analyses were used to evaluate the relationship between air pollution and BP after adjusting for other covariates. Results showed that with an interquartile range (IQR) increase in PM 10 (50.0 μg/m 3 ) and O 3 (53.0 μg/m 3 ) level during the 5-day mean exposure, positive associations with elevated BP were observed, with an odds ratio of 2.17 (95% CI, 1.61-2.93) for PM 10 and 2.77 (95% CI, 1.94-3.95) for O 3 . Both systolic BP and diastolic BP levels were positively associated with an IQR increase of four air pollutants at different lag times. Specifically, an IQR increase in the 5-day mean of PM 10 and O 3 was associated with elevation of 2.07 mmHg (95% CI, 1.71-2.44) and 3.29 mmHg (95% CI, 2.86-3.72) in systolic BP, respectively. When stratified by sex, positive relationships were observed for elevated BP with NO 2 exposure only in males. This is the first report on the relationship between ambient short-term air pollution exposure and children BP in China. Findings indicate a need to control air pollutants and protect children from heavy air pollution exposure in China. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Air/delta/sea surface temperature, pressure, and other data from MISS GAIL in a world-wide distribution from 21 October 1957 to 18 April 1961 (NODC Accession 0000366)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Air/delta/sea surface temperature, pressure, and other data were collected from the MISS GAIL in a world-wide distribution from October 21, 1957 to April 18, 1961....

  1. Intraoral Pressure in Ethnic Wind Instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Goss, Clinton F

    2013-01-01

    High intraoral pressure generated when playing some wind instruments has been linked to a variety of health issues. Prior research has focused on Western classical instruments, but no work has been published on ethnic wind instruments. This study measured intraoral pressure when playing six classes of ethnic wind instruments (N = 149): Native American flutes (n = 71) and smaller samples of ethnic duct flutes, reed instruments, reedpipes, overtone whistles, and overtone flutes. Results are presented in the context of a survey of prior studies, providing a composite view of the intraoral pressure requirements of a broad range of wind instruments. Mean intraoral pressure was 8.37 mBar across all ethnic wind instruments and 5.21 +/- 2.16 mBar for Native American flutes. The range of pressure in Native American flutes closely matches pressure reported in other studies for normal speech, and the maximum intraoral pressure, 20.55 mBar, is below the highest subglottal pressure reported in other studies during singing...

  2. Indoor air pollution and its association with poor lung function, microalbuminuria and variations in blood pressure among kitchen workers in India: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amarnath; Kesavachandran, Chandrasekharan Nair; Kamal, Ritul; Bihari, Vipin; Ansari, Afzal; Azeez, Parappurath Abdul; Saxena, Prem Narain; Ks, Anil Kumar; Khan, Altaf Hussain

    2017-04-04

    The present study is an attempt to explore the association between kitchen indoor air pollutants and physiological profiles in kitchen workers with microalbuminuria (MAU) in north India (Lucknow) and south India (Coimbatore). The subjects comprised 145 control subjects, 233 kitchen workers from north India and 186 kitchen workers from south India. Information related to the personal and occupational history and health of the subjects at both locations were collected using a custom-made questionnaire. Worker lung function was measured using a spirometer. Blood pressure was monitored using a sphygmomanometer. Urinary MAU was measured using a urine analyzer. Indoor air monitoring in kitchens for particulate matter (PM), total volatile organic compounds (TVOC), carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and carbon monoxide (CO) was conducted using indoor air quality monitors. The size and shape of PM in indoor air was assessed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to detect organic or inorganic compounds in the air samples. Particulate matter concentrations (PM 2.5 and PM 1 ) were significantly higher in both north and south Indian kitchens than in non-kitchen areas. The concentrations of TVOC, CO and CO 2 were higher in the kitchens of north and south India than in the control locations (non-kitchen areas). Coarse, fine and ultrafine particles and several elements were also detected in kitchens in both locations by SEM and elemental analysis. The FTIR spectra of kitchen indoor air at both locations show the presence of organic chemicals. Significant declines in systolic blood pressure and lung function were observed in the kitchen workers with MAU at both locations compared to those of the control subjects. A higher prevalence of obstruction cases with MAU was observed among the workers in the southern region than in the controls (p indoor air pollutants (ultrafine particles, PM 2.5 , PM 1 , TVOC, CO, CO 2 ) and FTIR

  3. Laser-based air data system for aircraft control using Raman and elastic backscatter for the measurement of temperature, density, pressure, moisture, and particle backscatter coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraczek, Michael; Behrendt, Andreas; Schmitt, Nikolaus

    2012-01-10

    Flight safety in all weather conditions demands exact and reliable determination of flight-critical air parameters. Air speed, temperature, density, and pressure are essential for aircraft control. Conventional air data systems can be impacted by probe failure caused by mechanical damage from hail, volcanic ash, and icing. While optical air speed measurement methods have been discussed elsewhere, in this paper, a new concept for optically measuring the air temperature, density, pressure, moisture, and particle backscatter is presented, being independent on assumptions on the atmospheric state and eliminating the drawbacks of conventional aircraft probes by providing a different measurement principle. The concept is based on a laser emitting laser pulses into the atmosphere through a window and detecting the signals backscattered from a fixed region just outside the disturbed area of the fuselage flows. With four receiver channels, different spectral portions of the backscattered light are extracted. The measurement principle of air temperature and density is based on extracting two signals out of the rotational Raman (RR) backscatter signal of air molecules. For measuring the water vapor mixing ratio-and thus the density of the moist air-a water vapor Raman channel is included. The fourth channel serves to detect the elastic backscatter signal, which is essential for extending the measurements into clouds. This channel contributes to the detection of aerosols, which is interesting for developing a future volcanic ash warning system for aircraft. Detailed and realistic optimization and performance calculations have been performed based on the parameters of a first prototype of such a measurement system. The impact and correction of systematic error sources, such as solar background at daytime and elastic signal cross talk appearing in optically dense clouds, have been investigated. The results of the simulations show the high potential of the proposed system for

  4. Effects of low-pressure air on oxygen contamination and lithium corrosion of a tantalum alloy, T-111, at 980 and 1260 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahn, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    The effects were studied of low-pressure air on contamination and corrosion in the tantalum alloy T-111/lithium system at 980 and 1260 C. Capsules of T-111 containing lithium were exposed to six vacuum levels between 1 x 10 to the 8th power and 0.0003 torr by controlled air leakage into a vacuum system. Capsules exposed at 980 C and 0.0002 torr failed from intragranular oxidation. The remainder of the capsules completed the 96-hour tests. The depth of oxygen contamination was greater at 980 C than at 1260 C. Tests made at 0.0001 and 0.00001 torr levels caused large increases in the oxygen content of the T-111. Tests at 0.000001 torr or less produced no significant contamination. No lithium corrosion of the T-111 was observed under any of the conditions.

  5. Space and time analysis of the nanosecond scale discharges in atmospheric pressure air: I. Gas temperature and vibrational distribution function of N2 and O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, A.; Cessou, A.; Boubert, P.; Vervisch, P.

    2014-03-01

    Reliable experimental data on nanosecond discharge plasmas in air become more and more crucial considering their interest in a wide field of applications. However, the investigations on such nonequilibrium plasmas are made difficult by the spatial non-homogeneities, in particular under atmospheric pressure, the wide range of time scales, and the complexity of multi-physics processes involved therein. In this study, we report spatiotemporal experimental analysis on the gas temperature and the vibrational excitation of N2 and O2 in their ground electronic state during the post-discharge of an overvoltage nanosecond-pulsed discharge generated in a pin-to-plane gap of air at atmospheric pressure. The gas temperature during the pulsed discharge is measured by optical emission spectroscopy related to the rotational bands of the 0-0 vibrational transition N2(C 3 Πu, v = 0) → N2(B3 Πg, v = 0) of nitrogen. The results show a rapid gas heating up to 700 K in tens of nanoseconds after the current rise. This fast gas heating leads to a high gas temperature up to 1000 K measured at 150 ns in the first stages of the post-discharge using spontaneous Raman scattering (SRS). The spatiotemporal measurements of the gas temperature and the vibrational distribution function of N2 and O2, also obtained by SRS, over the post-discharge show the spatial expansion of the high vibrational excitation of N2, and the gas heating during the post-discharge. The present measurements, focused on thermal and energetic aspect of the discharge, provide a base for spatiotemporal analysis of gas number densities of N2, O2 and O atoms and hydrodynamic effects achieved during the post-discharge in part II of this investigation. All these results provide space and time database for the validation of plasma chemical models for nanosecond-pulsed discharges at atmospheric pressure air.

  6. Comparison of the Effect of 1-MCP and Low-Pressure Air on Shelflife of Strawberry Fruit (Fragaria ananassa cv. Camarossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Modares

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa has tasteful, fragrant and nutritious fruits. But, because of delicate texture and high metabolic activities of the fruits at maturity, are very sensitive and easily decayed, and thus have short shelflife. Ethylene is one of the main causes of postharvest fruit losses, which could reduce the shelflife of strawberry. Therefore, an experiment was carried out to examine the effect of 1 µL/L 1-MCP treatment and low-pressure air pretreatment at 0.2 atm in 2 hours on apparent and physicochemical characteristics of strawberry fruit, cultivar Camarossa, during storage in cold store. The study was performed as split plots in time, based on complete randomized design with 3 replications. The results showed that the highest marketability (90%, fruit firmness (7.95 N, titrable organic acids (1.15 g/100 cc, vitamin C (78.13 mg/100 cc and total soluble solids (10.48 % and the lowest amount of apparent decay (13.3 %, acidity (3.63 and taste index (9.04 were obtained in 1-MCP and low-pressure air treatments, which shows the effect of treatments on reducing the rate of biochemical variations in fruit texture. Correlation coefficients between all treatments were significant (P≤0.01. Meanwhile, the positive effect of 1-MCP on appearance and studied physicochemical characteristics was more than low-pressure air pretreatment. Even, the combination of these two treatments had no significant difference with 1-MCp treatment alone. In general, this observation depicts the more positive and significant effect of 1-MCP treatment in delaying the maturity and improving the qualitative traits of strawberry fruits after being stored in cold storage.

  7. Peak expiratory flow, breath rate and blood pressure in adults with changes in particulate matter air pollution during the Beijing Olympics: a panel study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Lina; Deng, Furong; Tian, Lili; Li, Yanli; Swanson, Mya; Ying, Jingjing; Browne, Richard W; Rittenhouse-Olson, Kate; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Bonner, Matthew R

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to examine whether changes in short-term exposures to particulate matter are associated with changes in lung function, breath rate, and blood pressure among healthy adults and whether smoking status modifies the association. We took advantage of the artificially controlled changes in air pollution levels that occurred during the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, China and conducted a panel study of 201 Beijing residents. Data were collected before, during, and after the Olympics, respectively. Linear mixed-effect models and generalized estimating equation models were used to compare measurements of peak expiratory flow, breath rate and blood pressure across three time points. The mean values of peak expiratory flow were 346.0 L/min, 399.3 L/min, and 364.1L/min over the three study periods. Peak expiratory flow levels increased in 78% of the participants when comparing the during- with pre- Olympics time points, while peak expiratory flow levels decreased in 80% of participants for the post- and during-Olympic periods comparison. In subgroup analyses comparing the during-Olympic to pre-Olympic time points, we found a larger percentage change in peak expiratory flow (+17%) among female, younger and non-smoking participants than among male, elderly and smoking participants (+12%). The percentage of participants with a fast breath rate (>20/min) changed from 9.7% to 4.9% to 30.1% among females, and from 7.9% to 2.6% to 27.3% among males over the three time points. The changes in blood pressure over the three study periods were not very clear, although there is an increase in diastolic pressure and a decrease in pulse pressure among males during the games. The results suggest that exposure to different air pollution levels has significant effects on respiratory function. Smoking, age and gender appear to modify participants' biological response to changes in air quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Incremental Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion and Multihole Pressure Probes for Disturbance Rejection Control of Fixed-wing Micro Air Vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeur, E.J.J.; Remes, B.D.W.; de Wagter, C.; Chu, Q.P.; J.-M. Moschetta G. Hattenberger, H. de Plinval

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining stable flight during high turbulence intensities is challenging for fixed-wing micro air vehicles (MAV). Two methods are proposed
    to improve the disturbance rejection performance of the MAV: incremental nonlinear dynamic inversion (INDI) control and phaseadvanced pitch probes. INDI

  9. Reversible self-association of ovalbumin at air-water interfaces and the consequences for the exerted surface pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kudryashova, E.V.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Jongh, H.H.J.de

    2005-01-01

    In this study the relation between the ability of protein self-association and the surface properties at air-water interfaces is investigated using a combination of spectroscopic techniques. Three forms of chicken egg ovalbumin were obtained with different self-associating behavior: native

  10. Air ejector augmented compressed air energy storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Frederick W.; Kartsounes, George T.

    1980-01-01

    Energy is stored in slack demand periods by charging a plurality of underground reservoirs with air to the same peak storage pressure, during peak demand periods throttling the air from one storage reservoir into a gas turbine system at a constant inlet pressure until the air pressure in the reservoir falls to said constant inlet pressure, thereupon permitting air in a second reservoir to flow into said gas turbine system while drawing air from the first reservoir through a variable geometry air ejector and adjusting said variable geometry air ejector, said air flow being essentially at the constant inlet pressure of the gas turbine system.

  11. Accuracy of Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Grading of Subglottic Stenosis in Patients with Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis: Correlation with Pulmonary Function Tests and Laryngoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henes, Frank O; Laudien, Martin; Linsenhoff, Laura; Bremer, Jan P; Oqueka, Tim; Adam, Gerhard; Schön, Gerhard; Bannas, Peter

    2017-08-03

    To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based and laryngoscopy-based subglottic stenosis (SGS) grading with pulmonary function tests (PFT) in patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). In this retrospective study we included 118 examinations of 44 patients with GPA and suspected SGS. All patients underwent MRI, laryngoscopy, and PFT. Stenosis was graded on a 4-point scale by endoscopy and MRI using the Meyer-Cotton (MC)-Score (score1: ≤50%; 2: 51-70%; 3: 71-99%; 4: 100%) and as percentage by MRI. Results were compared with peak expiratory flow (PEF) and maximum inspiratory flow (MIF) from PFT, serving as objective functional reference. In MRI, 112/118 examinations (95%) were rated positive for SGS (n=82: grade1; n=26: grade2; n=4: grade3) whereas in laryngoscopy 105/118 examinations (89%) were rated positive for SGS (n=73: grade1; n=24: grade2; n=8: grade3). MRI and laryngoscopy agreed in 75 of 118 examinations (64%). MRI determined higher scores in 20 (17%) and lower scores in 23 (19%) examinations compared to laryngoscopy. MC-scores as determined by both MRI and laryngoscopy showed comparable correlations with PEF (r=-0.363, p=0.016 and r=-0.376, p=0.012, respectively) and MIF (r=-0.340, p=0.024 and r=-0.320, p=0.034, respectively). Highest correlation was found between MRI-based stenosis grading in percentage with PEF (r=-0.441, p=0.003) and MIF (r=-0.413, p=0.005). MRI and laryngoscopy provide comparable results for grading of SGS in GPA and correlate well with PFT. MRI is an attractive non-invasive and radiation free alternative for monitoring the severity of SGS in patients with GPA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Multispectrum Analysis of 12CH4 in the v4 Band: I. Air-Broadened Half Widths, Pressure-Induced Shifts, Temperature Dependences and Line Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, MaryAnn H.; Benner, D. Chris; Predoi-Cross, Adriana; Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2009-01-01

    Lorentz air-broadened half widths, pressure-induced shifts and their temperature dependences have been measured for over 430 transitions (allowed and forbidden) in the v4 band of (CH4)-12 over the temperature range 210 to 314 K. A multispectrum non linear least squares fitting technique was used to simultaneously fit a large number of high-resolution (0.006 to 0.01/cm) absorption spectra of pure methane and mixtures of methane diluted with dry air. Line mixing was detected for pairs of A-, E-, and F-species transitions in the P- and R-branch manifolds and quantified using the off-diagonal relaxation matrix elements formalism. The measured parameters are compared to air- and N2-broadened values reported in the literature for the v4 and other bands. The dependence of the various spectral line parameters upon the tetrahedral symmetry species and rotational quantum numbers of the transitions is discussed. All data used in the present work were recorded using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer located at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak.

  13. Associations of air pollution exposure with blood pressure and heart rate variability are modified by oxidative stress genes: A repeated-measures panel among elderly urban residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kim, Jin Hee; Jung, Kweon; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2016-03-25

    Oxidative stress has been suggested as a major cause of elevated blood pressure (BP) and reduced heart rate variability (HRV) due to air pollution. We hypothesized that the associations of air pollution exposure with BP and HRV are modified by oxidative stress gene polymorphisms. Between 2008 and 2010, we conducted up to 5 surveys of 547 elderly participants, measured their BP and HRV, and genotyped 47 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 18 oxidative stress genes. Linear mixed models were constructed to evaluate the associations of particulate matter ≤10 μm, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide with BP and HRV, as well as the modifications of these associations by the genotyped SNPs. Single-SNP analyses revealed interactions between air pollution and 15 SNPs (for BP) and 33 SNPs (for HRV) (all, P for interaction pollution exposure with BP and HRV were modified by the genetic risk scores (P for interaction pollution with BP and HRV are mediated by oxidative stress pathways.

  14. At the Fulcrum of Air Force Identity: Balancing the Internal and External Pressures of Image and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    and Money, (web log, 27 February 2008), downloaded from LexisNexis Academic http://www.lexisnexis.com/. 77 Col Susan Strednansky, director, USAFE... LexisNexis Academic http://www.lexisnexis.com/. 79 Idea City, ―Air Force Public Awareness Campaign‖ (program briefing to SAF/PA, 20 November 2007). 80...Appropriations Committee, 109th Cong., 2nd sess., 2008. downloaded from LexisNexis Academic http://www.lexisnexis.com/. Idea City. Above All Campaign

  15. Study of air entrainment in high pressure spray: optics diagnostics and application to the Diesel injection; Etude de l'entrainement d'air dans un spray haute pression: diagnostics optiques et application a l'injection diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbeau, A.

    2004-12-15

    The actual development of the engine must reply to a will of fuel consumption reduction and to norms more and more strict concerning the pollutant emissions. Although the Diesel engines are efficient, the NO{sub x} and particle emissions mainly come from the existence of wealthy fuel zone preventing an optimal combustion. Therefore, the air / fuel mixing preparation, highly controlled by the air entrainment in spray, is essential. In this context, we have developed metrological tools in order to analyse the air entrainment mechanism in a dense spray. The Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique is first applied to a conical spray with an injection pressure less than 100 bars to study the air entrainment in spray. A transfer of the methodologies allows then the characterisation and the understanding of the air entrainment mechanism in high pressure full spray (injection pressure less than 1600 bars) type Diesel one. The influence of injection parameters (injection pressure and back pressure) on the mixing rate is studied. The increase of the injection pressure from 800 to 1600 bars implies an increase of the mixing rate of 60 %. Moreover, the thermodynamic conditions of the ambient air, simulated by the chamber back pressure, widely favours the mixing rate. Actually, this latter increases of 350 % when the chamber back pressure varies from 1 to 7 bars. The experimental results do not follow classical laws of air entrainment in one-phase flow jet with variable density, but are in good agreement with an integral model for air entrainment in an axisymmetric full spray. Finally, the Fluorescence Particle Image Velocimetry (FPIV) is introduced in order to extend the PIV application field in dense two-phase flows. (author)

  16. Pressure distribution and aerodynamic coefficients associated with heat addition to supersonic air stream adjacent to two-dimensional supersonic wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkel, I Irving; Serafini, John S; Gregg, John L

    1952-01-01

    The modifications in the pressure distributions and the aerodynamic coefficients associated with additions of heat to the two-dimensional supersonic in viscid flow field adjacetnt to the lower surface of of a 5-percent-thickness symmetrical circular-arc wing are presented in this report. The pressure distributions are obtained by the use of graphical method which gives the two-dimensional supersonic inviscid flow field obtained with moderate heat addition. The variation is given of the lift-drag ratio and of the aerodynamic coefficients of lift, drag, and moment with free stream Mach number, angle of attack, and parameters defining extent and amount of heat addition. The six graphical solutions used in this study included Mach numbers of 3.0 and 5.0 and angles of attack of 0 degrees and 2 degrees.

  17. Air ejector augmented compressed air energy storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, F.W.; Kartsounes, G.T.

    Energy is stored in slack demand periods by charging a plurality of underground reservoirs with air to the same peak storage pressure, during peak demand periods throttling the air from one storage reservoir into a gas turbine system at a constant inlet pressure until the air presure in the reservoir falls to said constant inlet pressure, thereupon permitting air in a second reservoir to flow into said gas turbine system while drawing air from the first reservoir through a variable geometry air ejector and adjusting said variable geometry air ejector, said air flow being essentially at the constant inlet pressure of the gas turbine system.

  18. Cold-air annular-cascade investigation of aerodynamic performance of core-engine-cooled turbine vanes. 2: Pressure surface trailing edge ejection and split trailing edge ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclallin, K. L.; Goldman, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of two trailing edge ejection cooling configurations of a core-engine stator vane were experimentally determined in an ambient inlet-air full-annular cascade where three-dimensional effects could be obtained. The tests were conducted at the design mean-radius ideal aftermixed critical velocity ratio of 0.778. Overall vane aftermixed thermodynamic and primary efficiencies were obtained over a range of coolant flows to about 10 percent of the primary flow at a primary to coolant total temperature ratio of 1.0. The radial variation in efficiency and the circumferential and radial variations in vane-exit total pressure were determined. Comparisons are made with the solid (uncooled) vane.

  19. Nanosecond surface dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric pressure air: I. measurements and 2D modeling of morphology, propagation and hydrodynamic perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yifei; Shcherbanev, Sergey; Baron, Brian; Starikovskaia, Svetlana

    2017-12-01

    A parallel 2D code for modeling nanosecond surface dielectric barrier discharge (nSDBD), combining a discharge description, detailed kinetics and hydrodynamics, is developed and validated. A series of experiments and numerical modeling for a single pulse nSDBD in atmospheric pressure air at a voltage amplitude of 24 kV have been performed. The measured and calculated velocity of the discharge front, electrical current, 2D map of N2 ({{{C}}}3{{{\\Pi }}}u)\\to {{{N}}}2({{{B}}}3{{{\\Pi }}}g) emission and hydrodynamic perturbations caused by the discharge on the time scale 0.2{--}5 μs are compared. The data are presented and analyzed for the negative and positive polarity of the streamers. A set of parametric calculations with different dielectric permittivities and different dielectric thicknesses is presented.

  20. Smooth- and enhanced-tube heat transfer and pressure drop : Part I. Effect of Prandtl number with air, water, and glycol/water mixtures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obot, N. T.; Das, L.; Rabas, T. J.

    2000-11-14

    An extensive experimental investigation was carried out to determine the pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics in laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow through one smooth tube and twenty-three enhanced tubes. The working fluids for the experiments were air, water, ethylene glycol, and ethylene glycol/water mixtures; Prandtl numbers (Pr) ranged from 0.7 to 125.3. The smooth-tube experiments were carried out with Pr values of 0.7, 6.8, 24.8, 39.1, and 125.3; Pr values of 0.7, 6.8, and 24.8 were tested with enhanced tubes. Reynolds number (Re) range (based on the maximum internal diameter of a tube) was 200 to 55,000, depending on Prandtl number and tube geometry. The results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  1. Uniform, stable, and efficient planar-heterojunction perovskite solar cells by facile low-pressure chemical vapor deposition under fully open-air conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Paifeng; Liu, Zhaofan; Xia, Wei; Yuan, Chenchen; Cheng, Jigui; Lu, Yingwei

    2015-02-04

    Recently, hybrid perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have attracted extensive attention due to their high efficiency and simple preparing process. Herein, a facile low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) technology is first developed to fabricate PSCs, which can effectively reduce the over-rapid intercalating reaction rate and easily overcome this blocking issue during the solution process. As a result, the prepared uniform perovskite films exhibit good crystallization, strong absorption, and long carrier diffusion length. More strikingly, CH3NH3PbI3 absorbers by LPCVD demonstrate excellent moisture-resistant feature even under laser illumination and high-temperature conditions, which indicates that our proprietary method is very suitable for the future low-cost, nonvacuum production of the new generation photovoltaic devices. Finally, high efficiency of 12.73% is successfully achieved under fully open-air conditions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of efficient PSCs with such a high humidity above 60%.

  2. Experimental assessment of the surface temperature of copper electrodes submitted to an electric arc in air at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landfried, R; Leblanc, T; Andlauer, R; Teste, Ph, E-mail: teste@lgep.supelec.fr [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique de Paris : SUPELEC - CNRS - Universites Paris VI et Paris XI - Plateau de Moulon - 91192 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2011-01-01

    This paper concerns the assessment of the surface temperature of copper electrodes submitted to an electric arc in a non stationary regime in air. An infrared camera is used to measure the decrease of the temperature surface just after a controlled and very fast arc extinction. In the first part, the experimental method is described. In the second part, results are presented for 60-70 A with an electric arc duration in the range 3-4 ms. The temperature decrease after the arc extinction allows to reach an assessment of the surface temperature just at the arc switching off. In the present experimental conditions the mean temperatures reached for copper cathodes and anodes are in the range 750-850 deg. C.

  3. Turbulent and Stable/Unstable Laminar Burning Velocity Measurements from Outwardly Propagating Spherical Hydrogen-Air Flames at Elevated Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallbone, Andrew; Tsuneyoshi, Kousaku; Kitagawa, Toshiaki

    The laminar burning velocity of pre-mixed hydrogen-air mixtures was measured in a fan stirred combustion bomb. Unstretched laminar burning velocities and Markstein lengths were obtained at 0.10MPa for equivalence ratios of 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 using high speed flame imaging. The difficulties which arose whilst obtaining similar measurements at 0.25MPa and 0.50MPa are outlined. The turbulent burning velocity was measured at equivalence ratios of 0.4 and 0.8 from explosions carried out at 0.10MPa with turbulence intensities of 0.8 and 1.6m/s. Higher turbulent burning velocity ratios were observed for mixtures which yielded lower Markstein lengths in the laminar combustion experiments.

  4. Nanoporous TiO{sub 2} electrode grown by laser ablation of titanium in air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Białous, Anna [Polish Academy of Sciences, The Szewalski Institute, Photophysics Dept., 14 Fiszera St, 80-231 Gdańsk (Poland); Gazda, Maria [Gdańsk University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Physics and Mathematics, 11/12 Narutowicza St, 80-233 Gdańsk (Poland); Grochowska, Katarzyna [Polish Academy of Sciences, The Szewalski Institute, Photophysics Dept., 14 Fiszera St, 80-231 Gdańsk (Poland); Atanasov, Petar; Dikovska, Anna; Nedyalkov, Nikolay [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko Shouse 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Reszczyńska, Joanna; Zaleska-Medynska, Adriana [University of Gdańsk, Faculty of Chemistry, 63 W. Stwosza St, 80-308 Gdańsk (Poland); Śliwiński, Gerard, E-mail: gerards@imp.gda.pl [Polish Academy of Sciences, The Szewalski Institute, Photophysics Dept., 14 Fiszera St, 80-231 Gdańsk (Poland)

    2016-02-29

    Recently, fabrication of the nanoporous TiO{sub 2} photoelectrode on metal foils by means of sputtering of the Ti film on preheated metal substrate followed by the TiO{sub 2} deposition (doctor blade technique) and sintering represents the frequently applied technique. This is despite the relatively complicated procedure and number of parameters to be controlled in order to fabricate films of required properties. In this work an approach is applied and discussed in which the nanoporous TiO{sub 2} electrode is fabricated under conditions similar to pulsed laser deposition but with the deposit formed directly on the ablated target at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The titanium dioxide thin film is grown by ablation of the Ti foil with the nanosecond UV laser (266 nm) at fluence up to 1.5 J/cm{sup 2}. The rutile–anatase phase transformation takes place during this one-step process and no thermal pre-and post-treatment of the deposit is needed. In samples produced in air, the presence of mixed phases of the non-stoichiometric anatase (> 70%), rutile and negligible amount of TiN is consistently confirmed by the X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray and Raman spectra. For applications of the reported films as electrode material in the third generation photovoltaic cells, the use of industrial lasers could significantly improve the process efficiency. - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} films via laser ablation of Ti in air under standard temperature and pressure conditions • Nanoporous crystalline structure from one-step process • Anatase content > 70% in the mixed phase film.

  5. Air atmospheric-pressure plasma-jet treatment enhances the attachment of human gingival fibroblasts for early peri-implant soft tissue seals on titanium dental implant abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hee; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2015-01-01

    Although dental implants are commonly used for tooth restoration, there is a lack of studies of treatment regimens for preventing extra-oral infection and decreasing osseointegration failures by establishing early peri-implant soft tissue seals on titanium dental implant abutments. In this study, air atmospheric-pressure plasma-jet (AAPPJ) treatment was applied to titanium disks to assay the potential for early peri-implant soft tissue seals on titanium dental implant abutment. After titanium disks were treated with AAPPJ for 10 s at 250, 500, 1000 and 1500 sccm, surface analysis was performed; the control group received air only or no treatment. Human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) were seeded onto the specimens for evaluating cell attachment and proliferation and adherent-cell morphology was visualized via confocal microscopy. In AAPPJ-treated specimens, the water contact angle decreased according to increased flow rate. Oxygen composition increased in XPS, but no topographical changes were detected. The effect of AAPPJ treatment at 1000 sccm was apparent 2 mm from the treated spot, with a 20% increase in early cell attachment and proliferation. Adherent HGF on AAPPJ-treated specimens displayed a stretched phenotype with more vinculin formation than the control group. Within the limitations of this study, the results indicate that AAPPJ treatment may enhance the early attachment and proliferation of HGF for establishing early peri-implant soft tissue seals on titanium dental implant abutments with possible favorable effects of osseointegration of dental implant.

  6. Chaboche-based cyclic material hardening models for 316 SS–316 SS weld under in-air and pressurized water reactor water conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish, E-mail: smohanty@anl.gov; Soppet, William K.; Majumdar, Saurindranath; Natesan, Krishnamurti

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • 316 SS–316 SS weld cyclically harden/soften while undergoing fatigue loading. • Cyclic hardening/softening creates cycle dependent stress-strain curves. • This necessitate to estimate the cycle dependence of material properties. • Cyclic evolution of Chaboche parameters are estimated under different conditions. - Abstract: This paper discusses a material hardening models for welds made from 316 stainless steel (SS) to 316 SS. The model parameters were estimated from the strain-versus-stress curves obtained from tensile and fatigue tests conducted under different conditions (air at room temperature, air at 300 °C, and primary loop water conditions for a pressurized water reactor). These data were used to check the fatigue cycle dependency of the material hardening parameters (yield stress, parameters related to Chaboche-based linear and nonlinear kinematic hardening models, etc.). The details of the experimental results, material hardening models, and associated calculated results are published in an Argonne report (ANL/LWRS-15/2). This paper summarizes the reported material parameters for 316 SS–316 SS welds and their dependency on fatigue cycles and other test conditions.

  7. In-Line Ozonation for Sensitive Air-Monitoring of a Mustard-Gas Simulant by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akihiko

    2015-09-01

    A highly sensitive method for real-time air-monitoring of mustard gas (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, HD), which is a lethal blister agent, is proposed. Humidified air containing a HD simulant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2CEES), was mixed with ozone and then analyzed by using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometer. Mass-spectral ion peaks attributable to protonated molecules of intact, monooxygenated, and dioxygenated 2CEES (MH+, MOH+, and MO2H+, respectively) were observed. As ozone concentration was increased from zero to 30 ppm, the signal intensity of MH+ sharply decreased, that of MOH+ increased once and then decreased, and that of MO2H+ sharply increased until reaching a plateau. The signal intensity of MO2H+ at the plateau was 40 times higher than that of MH+ and 100 times higher than that of MOH+ in the case without in-line ozonation. Twenty-ppm ozone gas was adequate to give a linear calibration curve for 2CEES obtained by detecting the MO2H+ signal in the concentration range up to 60 μg/m3, which is high enough for hygiene management. In the low concentration range lower than 3 μg/m3, which is equal to the short-term exposure limit for HD, calibration plots unexpectedly fell off the linear calibration curve, but 0.6-μg/m3 vapor was actually detected with the signal-to-noise ratio of nine. Ozone was generated from instrumentation air by using a simple and inexpensive home-made generator. 2CEES was ozonated in 1-m extended sampling tube in only 1 s.

  8. Exergy analysis and performance of a counter flow Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube having various nozzle numbers at different inlet pressures of oxygen and air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirmaci, Volkan [Bartin University, Faculty of Engineering, Mechanical Engineering Department, 74100 Bartin (Turkey)

    2009-11-15

    An experimental investigation is made to determine the effects of the orifice nozzle number and the inlet pressure on the heating and cooling performance of the counter flow Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube when air and oxygen used as a fluid. The orifices used at these experiments are made of the polyamide plastic material. The thermal conductivity of polyamide plastic material is 0.25 W/m C. Five orifices with nozzle numbers of 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 have been manufactured and used during the experiments. For each one of the orifices (nozzle numbers) when used with two different fluids, inlet pressures were adjusted from 150 kPa to 700 kPa with 50 kPa increments, and the exergy efficiency was determined. During the experiments, a vortex tube is used with an L/D ratio of 15, and cold mass fraction is held constant at 0.5. As a result of the experimental study, it is determined that the temperature gradient between the hot and cold fluid is decreased with increasing of the orifice nozzle number. (author)

  9. Vapour pressures, aqueous solubility, Henry's law constants and air/water partition coefficients of 1,8-dichlorooctane and 1,8-dibromooctane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarraute, Sabine; Mokbel, Ilham; Costa Gomes, Margarida F; Majer, Vladimir; Delepine, Hervé; Jose, Jacques

    2006-09-01

    New data on the vapour pressures and aqueous solubility of 1,8-dichlorooctane and 1,8-dibromooctane are reported as a function of temperature between 20 degrees C and 80 degrees C and 1 degrees C and 40 degrees C, respectively. For the vapour pressures, a static method was used during the measurements which have an estimated uncertainty between 3% and 5%. The aqueous solubilities were determined using a dynamic saturation column method and the values are accurate to within +/-10%. 1,8-Dichlorooctane is more volatile than 1,8-dibromooctane in the temperature range covered (p(sat) varies from 3 to 250 Pa and from 0.53 to 62 Pa, respectively) and is also approximately three times more soluble in water (mole fraction solubilities at 25 degrees C of 5.95 x 10(-7) and 1.92 x 10(-7), respectively). A combination of the two sets of data allowed the calculation of the Henry's law constants and the air water partition coefficients. A simple group contribution concept was used to rationalize the data obtained.

  10. Degradation of cationic red GTL by catalytic wet air oxidation over Mo-Zn-Al-O catalyst under room temperature and atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yin; Li, Xiaoyi; Cheng, Xiang; Sun, Dezhi; Wang, Xueye

    2012-03-06

    To overcome the drawback of catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) with high temperature and high pressure, the catalytic activity of Mo-Zn-Al-O catalyst for degradation of cationic red GTL under room temperature and atmospheric pressure was investigated. Mo-Zn-Al-O catalyst was prepared by coprecipitation and impregnation. XRD, TG-DTG, and XPS were used to characterize the resulting sample. Central composition design using response surface methodology was employed to optimize correlation of factors on the decolorization of cationic red GTL. The results show that the optimal conditions of pH value, initial concentration of dye and catalyst dosage were found to be 4.0, 85 mg/L and 2.72 g/L, respectively, for maximum decolorization of 80.1% and TOC removal of 50.9%. Furthermore, the reaction on the Mo-Zn-Al-O catalyst and degradation mechanism of cationic red GTL was studied by Electron spin resonance (ESR) and GC-MS technique. The possible reaction mechanism was that the Mo-Zn-Al-O catalyst can efficiently react with adsorbed oxygen/H(2)O to produce ·OH and (1)O(2) and finally induce the degradation of cationic red GTL. GC-MS analysis of the degradation products indicates that cationic red GTL was initiated by the cleavage of -N ═ N- and the intermediates were further oxidized by ·OH or (1)O(2).

  11. Normal impingement loads due to small air jets issuing from a base plate and reflecting off a platform for various jet Mach numbers, separation distances, and ambient pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, S.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in a 12.5-meter-diameter vacuum sphere to determine the impingement loads due to air jets issuing from and perpendicular to a circular base and reflecting off a square platform, that is, a simulation of rendezvous maneuvering, docking, launch, impact dampers etc. The nozzles had exit Mach numbers of 1, 3, 5, and 7. The ambient pressures were 0.0006, 5, 225, and 760 torr. Under near-field separation distances and at 0.0006 torr, reflections were significant; and ratios of the impingement force to thrust on both plates in the biplane arrangement varied from about 750 for exit Mach number 1 to 120 for exit Mach number 7. The far-field force ratios were near unity for the platform and zero for the base and indicated few, if any, reflections. Some reversals and rapid changes in loads were obtained at transition distances between the near and far fields. In general, increasing the exit Mach number or ambient pressure reduced the impingement loads.

  12. Improving anti-felting characteristics of Merino wool fiber by 2.5 MHz atmosphere pressure air plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandwani, Nisha; Dave, Purvi; Jain, Vishal; Nema, Sudhir; Mukherjee, Subroto

    2017-04-01

    The present work investigates the effect of high frequency (2.5 MHz) Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) in air on surface characteristics of Merino wool as a function of plasma exposure time (5s to 15s). The FE-SEM (Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy), EDS (Energy Dispersive X-ray spectrum) and Derivative ATR-FTIR (Attenuated Total Reflection- Fourier Transform Infrared) Spectroscopy are used to study physio-chemical changes induced by plasma. These physio-chemical properties of fibers can be co-related with the felting behaviour of the wool fiber, which leads to shrinkage and pilling of garments while laundering. Felting occurs mainly because of presence of outermost hydrophobic cuticle layer having sharp scales. The FE-SEM analysis of wool fiber surface reveals that cuticle scales on wool fiber become blunt after plasma processing. The ATR-FTIR analysis along with second order derivative spectroscopy demonstrates the cleavage of di-sulphide bonds of cuticle and formation of sulphur-oxygen groups such as Cystine Sulphonate (-S-SO3-), cysteic acid (-SO3-), cystine monoxide(-SO-S-), cysteine di-oxide (-SO2-S-). A possible explanation about how the combined effect of morphological and chemical changes induced by plasma results in minimizing the felting of wool fibers is discussed.

  13. Comparative study of zeolite 5A and zeolite 13X in air separation by pressure swing adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokroo, Ehsan Javadi; Meymandi, Hadiseh Khalilpour; Yadollahi, Nadia [PART-SHIMI Knowledge Based Company, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farsani, Danial Jafari [Bidboland Refining Co., NIGC, Bidboland (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The performance of zeolites 5A and 13X is numerically investigated in oxygen separation from air by a two-bed PSA system. The effect of operating variables such as adsorption step time, PH/PL ratio and cycle time was investigated on product purity and recovery. The simulation results showed that nitrogen adsorption capacity on zeolite 13X was slightly more than the one on zeolite 5A. In the completely same operating conditions, zeolite 5A had a larger mass transfer zone than zeolite 13X. Therefore, the adsorption and desorption rate of nitrogen on zeolite 5A is less than zeolite 13X. Moreover, for the equal volume of adsorbed nitrogen on both adsorbents, zeolite 5A is more capable rather than zeolite 13X to desorb much more volume of nitrogen at certain time. Furthermore, for achieving oxygen with purity of 96%, utilizing zeolite 5A is more economical than zeolite 13X, when 5.5

  14. 14 CFR 29.1325 - Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static pressure and pressure altimeter...: Installation § 29.1325 Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case... between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not...

  15. The associations between traffic-related air pollution and noise with blood pressure in children: results from the GINIplus and LISAplus studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuang; Fuertes, Elaine; Tiesler, Carla M T; Birk, Matthias; Babisch, Wolfgang; Bauer, Carl-Peter; Koletzko, Sibylle; von Berg, Andrea; Hoffmann, Barbara; Heinrich, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Although traffic emits both air pollution and noise, studies jointly examining the effects of both of these exposures on blood pressure (BP) in children are scarce. We investigated associations between land-use regression modeled long-term traffic-related air pollution and BP in 2368 children aged 10 years from Germany (1454 from Munich and 914 from Wesel). We also studied this association with adjustment of long-term noise exposure (defined as day-evening-night noise indicator "Lden" and night noise indicator "Lnight") in a subgroup of 605 children from Munich inner city. In the overall analysis including 2368 children, NO2, PM2.5 mass (particles with aerodynamic diameters below 2.5μm), PM10 mass (particles with aerodynamic diameters below 10μm) and PM2.5 absorbance were not associated with BP. When restricting the analysis to the subgroup of children with noise information (N=605), a significant association between NO2 and diastolic BP was observed (-0.88 (95% confidence interval: -1.67, -0.08)). However, upon adjusting the models for noise exposure, only noise remained independently and significantly positively associated with diastolic BP. Diastolic BP increased by 0.50 (-0.03, 1.02), 0.59 (0.05, 1.13), 0.55 (0.03, 1.07), and 0.58 (0.05, 1.11)mmHg for every five decibel increase in Lden and by 0.59 (-0.05, 1.22), 0.69 (0.04, 1.33), 0.64 (0.02, 1.27), and 0.68 (0.05, 1.32)mmHg for every five decibel increase in Lnight, in different models of NO2, PM2.5 mass, PM10 mass and PM2.5 absorbance as the main exposure, respectively. In conclusion, air pollution was not consistently associated with BP with adjustment for noise, noise was independently and positively associated with BP in children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of air pressure, humidity, solar radiation, temperature, and wind speed on ambulatory visits due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Bavaria, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Uta; Exner, Teresa; Wanka, Eva R.; Bergemann, Christoph; Meyer-Arnek, Julian; Hildenbrand, Beate; Tufman, Amanda; Heumann, Christian; Huber, Rudolf M.; Bittner, Michael; Fischer, Rainald

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. The disease is often aggravated by periods of increased symptoms requiring medical attention. Among the possible triggers for these exacerbations, meteorological factors are under consideration. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of various meteorological factors on the health status of patients with COPD. For this purpose, the daily number of ambulatory care visits due to COPD was analysed in Bavaria, Germany, for the years 2006 and 2007. The meteorological factors were provided by the model at the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). For the multivariate analysis, a generalised linear model was used. In Bavaria, an increase of 1% of daily consultations (about 103 visits per day) was found to be associated with a change of 0.72 K temperature, 209.55 of log air surface pressure in Pa, and a decrease of 1% of daily consultations with 1,453,763 Ws m2 of solar radiation. There also seem to be regional differences between north and south Bavaria; for instance, the effect of wind speed and specific humidity with a lag of 1 day were only significant in the north. This study could contribute to a tool for the prevention of exacerbations. It also serves as a model for the further evaluation of the impact of meteorological factors on health, and could easily be applied to other diseases or other regions.

  17. LIBS Analysis of Geomaterials: Comparative Study of Basalt Plasma Induced by TEA CO2 and Nd:YAG Laser in Air at Atmospheric Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Savovic

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a study of the plasma generated by transversely excited atmospheric (TEA CO2 laser irradiation of a basalt sample. The plasma was induced in air at atmospheric pressure. The same sample was also analyzed using a commercial LIBS system based on Nd:YAG laser and time-gated detection. The main plasma parameters, temperature, and electron number density were determined and analytical capabilities of the two systems compared. Despite differences in laser wavelength, pulse duration, applied fluence, and signal detection scheme, the two systems are comparable in terms of element detectability and limits of detection. In both cases, all elements usually present in geological samples were identified. The estimated limits of detection for most elements were below 100 ppm, while for Cu, Cr, and Sr they were around or below 10 ppm. The obtained results led to the conclusion that simple, cost-effective TEA CO2 LIBS system can find applications for geological explorations.

  18. Evaluation of browning ratio in an image analysis of apple slices at different stages of instant controlled pressure drop-assisted hot-air drying (AD-DIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Kun; Zhou, Linyan; Bi, Jinfeng; Yi, Jianyong; Wu, Xinye; Zhou, Mo; Wang, Xueyuan; Liu, Xuan

    2017-06-01

    Computer vision-based image analysis systems are widely used in food processing to evaluate quality changes. They are able to objectively measure the surface colour of various products since, providing some obvious advantages with their objectivity and quantitative capabilities. In this study, a computer vision-based image analysis system was used to investigate the colour changes of apple slices dried by instant controlled pressure drop-assisted hot air drying (AD-DIC). The CIE L* value and polyphenol oxidase activity in apple slices decreased during the entire drying process, whereas other colour indexes, including CIE a*, b*, ΔE and C* values, increased. The browning ratio calculated by image analysis increased during the drying process, and a sharp increment was observed for the DIC process. The change in 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) and fluorescent compounds (FIC) showed the same trend with browning ratio due to Maillard reaction. Moreover, the concentrations of 5-HMF and FIC both had a good quadratic correlation (R2  > 0.998) with the browning ratio. Browning ratio was a reliable indicator of 5-HMF and FIC changes in apple slices during drying. The image analysis system could be used to monitor colour changes, 5-HMF and FIC in dehydrated apple slices during the AD-DIC process. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Direct numerical simulations of the ignition of a lean biodiesel/air mixture with temperature and composition inhomogeneities at high pressure and intermediate temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Luong, Minhbau

    2014-11-01

    The effects of the stratifications of temperature, T, and equivalence ratio, φ{symbol}, on the ignition characteristics of a lean homogeneous biodiesel/air mixture at high pressure and intermediate temperature are investigated using direct numerical simulations (DNSs). 2-D DNSs are performed at a constant volume with the variance of temperature and equivalence ratio (T′ and φ{symbol}′) together with a 2-D isotropic velocity spectrum superimposed on the initial scalar fields. In addition, three different T s(-) φ{symbol} correlations are investigated: (1) baseline cases with T′ only or φ{symbol}′ only, (2) uncorrelated T s(-) φ{symbol} distribution, and (3) negatively-correlated T s(-) φ{symbol} distribution. It is found that the overall combustion is more advanced and the mean heat release rate is more distributed over time with increasing T′ and/or φ{symbol}′ for the baseline and uncorrelated T s(-) φ{symbol} cases. However, the temporal advancement and distribution of the overall combustion caused by T′ or φ{symbol}′ only are nearly annihilated by the negatively-correlated T s(-) φ{symbol} fields. The chemical explosive mode and Damköhler number analyses verify that for the baseline and uncorrelated T s(-) φ{symbol} cases, the deflagration mode is predominant at the reaction fronts for large T′ and/or φ{symbol}′. On the contrary, the spontaneous ignition mode prevails for cases with small T′ or φ{symbol}′, especially for cases with negative T s(-) φ{symbol} correlations, and hence, simultaneous auto-ignition occurs throughout the entire domain, resulting in an excessive rate of heat release. It is also found that turbulence with large intensity, u′, and a short time scale can effectively smooth out initial thermal and compositional fluctuations such that the overall combustion is induced primarily by spontaneous ignition. Based on the present DNS results, the generalization of the effects of T′, φ{symbol}′, and u

  20. Photosynthetic traits of five neotropical rainforest tree species: interactions between light response curves and leaf-to-air vapour pressure deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Schramm Mielke

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of leaf gas exchange at different photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD levels were conducted in order to compare the photosynthetic traits of five neotropical rainforest tree species, with a special emphasis on empirical mathematical models to estimate the light response curve parameters incorporating the effects of leaf-to-air vapour pressure deficit (D on the saturated photosynthetic rate (Amax. All empirical mathematical models seemed to provide a good estimation of the light response parameters. Comparisons of the leaf photosynthetic traits between different species needed to select an appropriate model and indicated the microenvironmental conditions when the data were collected. When the vapour pressure deficit inside the chamber was not controlled, the incorporation of linear or exponencial functions that explained the effects of D on leaf gas exchange, was a very good method to enhance the performance of the models.Medições das trocas gasosas foliares em diferentes níveis do densidade de fluxo de fótons fotossintéticamente ativos (PPFD foram realizadas com o objetivo de comparar as características fotossintéticas de cinco espécies arbóreas de florestas úmidas neotropicais, com especial ênfase em modelos matemáticos empíricos para estimativa de parâmetros derivados das curvas de resposta à radiação luminosa e dos efeitos da diferença de pressão de vapor entre a folha e o ar (D na taxa fotossintética em saturação luminosa (Amax. Os modelos analisados proporcionaram boas estimativas para os parâmetros derivados das curvas de resposta à radiação luminosa. Comparações entre as características fotossintéticas de diferentes espécies devem sempre considerar os modelos utilizados, seguidas de indicações pormenorizadas das condições microambientais no momento em que os dados foram coletados. Quando a diferença de pressão de vapor não for controlada artificialmente durante as medições, a

  1. Surface modification of biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds by non-thermal atmospheric pressure nitrogen and air plasma treatment for improving osteoblast attachment and proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yu-Ri [Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Research Center for Orofacial Hard Tissue Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Jae-Sung [Research Center for Orofacial Hard Tissue Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Doo-Hoon [Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Research Center for Orofacial Hard Tissue Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Ha [Plasma Bioscience Research Center Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139-701, 447-1 Wokgye-Dong, Nowon-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong-Keun [Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyoung-Nam [Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Research Center for Orofacial Hard Tissue Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang-Mahn, E-mail: kmkim@yuhs.ac [Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Research Center for Orofacial Hard Tissue Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-29

    Surface modifications induced by non-thermal plasma have been used extensively in biomedical applications. The attachment and proliferation of osteoblast cells are important in bone tissue engineering using scaffolds. Hence the effect of non-thermal plasma on hydroxyapatite/β-tri-calcium phosphate (HA/β-TCP) scaffolds in terms of improving osteoblast attachment and proliferation was investigated. Experimental groups were treated with non-thermal plasma for 10 min and 20 min and a control group was not treated with non-thermal plasma. For surface chemistry analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was carried out. The hydrophilicity was determined from contact angle measurement on the surface. Atomic force microscopy analysis (AFM) was used to test the change in surface roughness and cell attachment and proliferation were evaluated using MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells. XPS spectra revealed a decreased amount of carbon on the surface of the plasma-treated sample. The contact angle was also decreased following plasma treatment, indicating improved hydrophilicity of plasma-treated surfaces compared to the untreated disc. A significant increase in MC3T3E-1 cell attachment and proliferation was noted on plasma-treated samples as compared to untreated specimens. The results suggest that non-thermal atmospheric pressure nitrogen and air plasma treatments provide beneficial surface characteristics on HA/β-TCP scaffolds. - Highlights: ► Non-thermal plasma increased OH- and decreased C on biphasic scaffold. ► Non-thermal plasma had no effect on surface roughness. ► Non-thermal plasma resulted in hydrophilic surface. ► Non-thermal plasma resulted in better cell attachment and proliferation. ► Non-thermal plasma treatment on biphasic scaffold is useful for tissue engineering.

  2. Pressure distributions obtained on a 0.04-scale and 0.02-scale model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter's forward fuselage in the Langley 20-inch Mach 6 air tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, P. F.; Siemers, P. M., III; Flanagan, P. F.; Henry, M. W.

    1983-01-01

    Results from pressure distribution tests on 0.04-scale and 0.02-scale models of the forward fuselage of the Space Shuttle Orbier are presented without analysis. The tests were completed in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel. The 0.04-scale model was tested at angles of attack from 0 to 35 and angles of sideslip from 0 to -4. The 0.02-scale model was tested at angles of attack from -10 to 45 and angles of sideslip from 0 to -4. The tests were conducted in support of the development of the Shuttle Entry Air Data System (SEADS). In addition to modeling the 20 SEADS pressure orifices, the wind-tunnel to models were also instrumented with orifices to match Development Flight Instrumentation (DFI) port locations currently existing on the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia (OV-102). This DFI simulation had provided a means for comparisons between reentry flight pressure data and wind-tunnel data.

  3. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lee; Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  4. Quantile Regression Analysis of the Distributional Effects of Air Pollution on Blood Pressure, Heart Rate Variability, Blood Lipids, and Biomarkers of Inflammation in Elderly American Men: The Normative Aging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bind, Marie-Abele; Peters, Annette; Koutrakis, Petros; Coull, Brent; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have observed associations between air pollution and heart disease. Susceptibility to air pollution effects has been examined mostly with a test of effect modification, but little evidence is available whether air pollution distorts cardiovascular risk factor distribution. This paper aims to examine distributional and heterogeneous effects of air pollution on known cardiovascular biomarkers. A total of 1,112 men from the Normative Aging Study and residents of the greater Boston, Massachusetts, area with mean age of 69 years at baseline were included in this study during the period 1995-2013. We used quantile regression and random slope models to investigate distributional effects and heterogeneity in the traffic-related responses on blood pressure, heart rate variability, repolarization, lipids, and inflammation. We considered 28-day averaged exposure to particle number, PM2.5 black carbon, and PM2.5 mass concentrations (measured at a single monitor near the site of the study visits). We observed some evidence suggesting distributional effects of traffic-related pollutants on systolic blood pressure, heart rate variability, corrected QT interval, low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglyceride, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). For example, among participants with LDL cholesterol below 80 mg/dL, an interquartile range increase in PM2.5 black carbon exposure was associated with a 7-mg/dL (95% CI: 5, 10) increase in LDL cholesterol, while among subjects with LDL cholesterol levels close to 160 mg/dL, the same exposure was related to a 16-mg/dL (95% CI: 13, 20) increase in LDL cholesterol. We observed similar heterogeneous associations across low versus high percentiles of the LDL distribution for PM2.5 mass and particle number. These results suggest that air pollution distorts the distribution of cardiovascular risk factors, and that, for several outcomes, effects may be greatest among individuals who are already at high risk

  5. 46 CFR 154.345 - Air locks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... mechanically ventilated to make the pressure in the space greater than that in the air lock; and (2) Has a... when the pressure in the space falls to or below the pressure in the air lock. ... a gas-safe space. (b) Each air lock must: (1) Consist of two steel doors, at least 1.5 m (4.9 ft...

  6. A change in the electro-physical properties of narrow-band CdHgTe solid solutions acted upon by a volume discharge induced by an avalanche electron beam in the air at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Grigor'ev, D. V.; Korotaev, A. G.; Kokhanenko, A. P.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Shulepov, M. A.

    2012-03-01

    The effect of a nanosecond volume discharge forming in an inhomogeneous electrical field at atmospheric pressure on the CdHgTe (MCT) epitaxial films of the p-type conduction with the hole concentration 2·1016 cm3 and mobility 500 cm2·V-1·s-1 is studied. The measurement of the electrophysical parameters of the MCT specimens upon irradiation shows that a layer exhibiting the n-type conduction is formed in the near-surface region of the epitaxial films. After 600 pulses and more, the thickness and the parameters of the layer are such that the measured field dependence of the Hall coefficient corresponds to the material of the n-type conduction. Analysis of the preliminary results reveals that the foregoing nanosecond volume discharge in the air at atmospheric pressure is promising for modification of electro-physical MCT properties.

  7. Prenatal Air Pollution Exposures, DNA Methyl Transferase Genotypes, and Associations with Newborn LINE1 and Alu Methylation and Childhood Blood Pressure and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in the Children's Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Carrie V; Yao, Jin; Millstein, Josh; Gao, Lu; Siegmund, Kimberly D; Mack, Wendy; Whitfield-Maxwell, Lora; Lurmann, Fred; Hodis, Howard; Avol, Ed; Gilliland, Frank D

    2016-12-01

    Although exposure to ambient air pollutants increases cardiovascular disease risk in adults little is known about the effects of prenatal exposure. Genetic variation and epigenetic alterations are two mechanisms that may influence the effects of early-life exposures on cardiovascular phenotypes. We investigated whether genetic and epigenetic variation modify associations between prenatal air pollution on markers of cardiovascular risk in childhood. We used linear regression analysis to investigate the associations between prenatal pollutants (PM2.5, PM10, NO2, O3), long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE1) and AluYb8 DNA methylation levels measured in newborn blood spot tests, and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and blood pressure (BP) in 459 participants as part of the Children's Health Study. Interaction terms were also included to test for effect modification of these associations by genetic variation in methylation reprogramming genes. Prenatal exposure to NO2 in the third trimester of pregnancy was associated with higher systolic BP in 11-year-old children. Prenatal exposure to multiple air pollutants in the first trimester was associated with lower DNA methylation in LINE1, whereas later exposure to O3 was associated with higher LINE1 methylation levels in newborn blood spots. The magnitude of associations with prenatal air pollution varied according to genotype for 11 SNPs within DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), DNA methyltransferase 3 Beta (DNMT3B), Tet methylcytosine dioxygenase 2 (TET2), and Thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) genes. Although first-trimester O3 exposure was not associated with CIMT and systolic BP overall, associations within strata of DNMT1 or DNMT3B were observed, and the magnitude and the direction of these associations depended on DNMT1 genotypes. Genetic and epigenetic variation in DNA methylation reprogramming genes and in LINE1 retrotransposons may play important roles in downstream cardiovascular consequences of prenatal air

  8. Thermodynamic Properties of Air and Mixtures of Nitrogen, Argon, and Oxygen From 60 to 2000 K at Pressures to 2000 MPa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lemmon, Eric W; Jacobsen, Richard T; Penoncello, Steven G; Friend, Daniel G

    2000-01-01

    ...–T, heat capacity, speed of sound, and vapor–liquid equilibrium data is presented. This formulation is valid for liquid, vapor, and supercritical air at temperatures from the solidification point on the bubble-point curve (59.75 K...

  9. Case Study regarding the test of the new screw compressor with high delivery pressure - 45 bara - on the test bench (with air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin PETRESCU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Screw compressors, which are part of positive displacement compressors, can find an increasing use in gas industry and beyond due to their advantages. Maximal parameters of these devices, done by Comoti under GHH-Rand license stop at a maximum flow of 3000 Nm3/hour and 26 bara discharge pressure. The needs of potential beneficiaries have imposed the necessity to design and manufacture a new family of screw compressors and oil injection able to develop a discharge pressure of 45 bara with flow rates up to 5000 Nm3/hour. This paper presents the design and experimental test phases – for the first screw compressor with discharge of pressure up to 45 bara – CU90 HP. Continue research and development have allowed to this type of screw-compressor – to find a market position, diversifying its size range in the last decade in a manner more explosive, if we refer to other types of compressors.

  10. Connectable solar air collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oestergaard Jensen, S.; Bosanac, M.

    2002-02-01

    The project has proved that it is possible to manufacture solar air collector panels, which in an easy way can be connected into large collector arrays with integrated ducting without loss of efficiency. The developed connectable solar air collectors are based on the use of matrix absorbers in the form of perforated metal sheets. Three interconnected solar air collectors of the above type - each with an transparent area of approx. 3 m{sup 2} - was tested and compared with parallel tests on two single solar air collectors also with a transparent area of approx. 3 m{sup 2} One of the single solar air collectors has an identical absorber as the connectable solar air collectors while the absorber of the other single solar air collector was a fibre cloth. The efficiency of the three solar air collectors proved to be almost identical in the investigated range of mass flow rates and temperature differences. The solar air collectors further proved to be very efficient - as efficient as the second most efficient solar air collectors tested in the IEA task 19 project Solar Air Systems. Some problems remain although to be solved: the pressure drop across especially the connectable solar air collectors is too high - mainly across the inlets of the solar air collectors. It should, however, be possible to considerably reduce the pressure losses with a more aerodynamic design of the inlet and outlet of the solar air collectors; The connectable solar air collectors are easy connectable but the air tightness of the connections in the present form is not good enough. As leakage leads to lower efficiencies focus should be put on making the connections more air tight without loosing the easiness in connecting the solar air collectors. As a spin off of the project a simple and easy way to determine the efficiency of solar, air collectors for pre-heating of fresh air has been validated. The simple method of determining the efficiency has with success been compared with an advance method

  11. High Precision Pressure Measurement with a Funnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Arias, T.; Gratton, L. M.; Oss, S.

    2008-01-01

    A simple experimental device for high precision differential pressure measurements is presented. Its working mechanism recalls that of a hydraulic press, where pressure is supplied by insufflating air under a funnel. As an application, we measure air pressure inside a soap bubble. The soap bubble is inflated and connected to a funnel which is…

  12. Determinação de volumes e pressões de balonetes de tubos traqueais insuflados com ar ambiente ou óxido nitroso Determinación de volúmenes y presiones de balones de tubos traqueales insuflados con aire ambiente u óxido nitroso Volume and pressure of tracheal tube cuffs filled with air or nitrous oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Leonardo Cárpio Peña

    2004-06-01

    balanceada con entubación orotraqueal. El balón fue insuflado conforme criterios clínicos. Las medidas de base fueron realizadas después de 15 minutos del inicio de la anestesia con un manómetro aneróide calibrado en cm de H2O y dieron los valores iniciales de presión y volumen. Los pacientes fueron divididos en dos grupos: balón reinsuflado con aire ambiente, grupo A, o con óxido nitroso, grupo B. Las medidas de presión fueron obtenidas en intervalos hasta la primera hora y los resultados comparados. RESULTADOS: Los grupos se mostraron comparables para edad y sexo. En ambos grupos los valores basales medios para presión fueron próximos de 40 cmH2O con 8 ml de volumen. En el grupo con aire ambiente, las presiones aumentaron hasta 36 cmH2O en una hora. En el grupo de balón insuflado con N2O, las presiones cayeron abajo de 20 cmH2O entre 20 y 30 minutos de anestesia. CONCLUSIONES: El uso de N2O a 100% para insuflación del balón de sonda traqueal no constituye método seguro, acarreando progresiva pérdida de la capacidad de vedación. El uso de aire ambiente promueve aumento de volumen y de presión en el balón, aumentando la posibilidad de lesión de la mucosa traqueal.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Tracheal tube cuff pressure against tracheal wall should to prevent air leaked or pulmonary aspiration, allowing adequate capillary blood flow. This study aimed at determining pressure variations of tracheal tube cuffs filled with air or 100% nitrous oxide. METHODS: Participated in this study 30 patients submitted to balanced general anesthesia with tracheal intubation. Cuff was inflated according to clinical criteria. The intracuff pressure measurements were undertaken after 15 minutes of anesthesia by means of an aneroid manometer gaged in cm of H2O and have provided initial pressure and volume values. The patients was allocated in two groups: cuff inflated with air, group A, and with nitrous oxide, group B. Measurements were recorded during one hour and results were

  13. Air Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's air research provides the critical science to develop and implement outdoor air regulations under the Clean Air Act and puts new tools and information in the hands of air quality managers and regulators to protect the air we breathe.

  14. Mechanics of Pressurized Plain-Woven Fabric Structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cavallaro, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Pressurized fabric tubes, pressure-stabilized beams (known as air beams), and air-inflated structures are all considered to be valuable technologies for use in lightweight, rapidly deployable systems...

  15. In-air and pressurized water reactor environment fatigue experiments of 316 stainless steel to study the effect of environment on cyclic hardening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish, E-mail: smohanty@anl.gov; Soppet, William K., E-mail: soppet@anl.gov; Majumdar, Saurindranath, E-mail: majumdar@anl.gov; Natesan, Krishnamurti, E-mail: natesan@anl.gov

    2016-05-15

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), under the sponsorship of Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program, is trying to develop a mechanistic approach for more accurate life estimation of LWR components. In this context, ANL has conducted many fatigue experiments under different test and environment conditions on type 316 stainless steel (316 SS) material which is widely used in the US reactors. Contrary to the conventional S ∼ N curve based empirical fatigue life estimation approach, the aim of the present DOE sponsored work is to develop an understanding of the material ageing issues more mechanistically (e.g. time dependent hardening and softening) under different test and environmental conditions. Better mechanistic understanding will help develop computer-based advanced modeling tools to better extrapolate stress-strain evolution of reactor components under multi-axial stress states and hence help predict their fatigue life more accurately. Mechanics-based modeling of fatigue such as by using finite element (FE) tools requires the time/cycle dependent material hardening properties. Presently such time-dependent material hardening properties are hardly available in fatigue modeling literature even under in-air conditions. Getting those material properties under PWR environment, are even harder. Through this work we made preliminary attempt to generate time/cycle dependent stress-strain data both under in-air and PWR water conditions for further study such as for possible development of material models and constitutive relations for FE model implementation. Although, there are open-ended possibility to further improve the discussed test methods and related material estimation techniques we anticipate that the data presented in this paper will help the metal fatigue research community particularly, the researchers who are dealing with mechanistic modeling of metal fatigue such as using FE tools. In this paper the fatigue

  16. Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — VIP Sensors proposes to develop a Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor Array System for measuring air flow pressure at multiple points on the skin of aircrafts for Flight...

  17. Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — VIP Sensors proposes to develop a Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor Array for measuring air flow pressure at multiple points on the skin of aircrafts for Flight Load Test...

  18. Automatic control of tracheal tube cuff pressure in ventilated patients in semirecumbent position: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Mauricio; Ferrer, Miquel; Farre, Ramon; Navajas, Daniel; Badia, Joan Ramon; Nicolas, Josep Maria; Torres, Antoni

    2007-06-01

    The aspiration of subglottic secretions colonized by bacteria pooled around the tracheal tube cuff due to inadvertent deflation (automatic, validated device for the continuous regulation of tracheal tube cuff pressure in preventing ventilator-associated pneumonia. Prospective randomized controlled trial. Respiratory intensive care unit and general medical intensive care unit. One hundred and forty-two mechanically ventilated patients (age, 64 +/- 17 yrs; Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, 18 +/- 6) without pneumonia or aspiration at admission. Within 24 hrs of intubation, patients were randomly allocated to undergo continuous regulation of the cuff pressure with the automatic device (n = 73) or routine care of the cuff pressure (control group, n = 69). Patients remained in a semirecumbent position in bed. The primary end point variable was the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia. Main causes for intubation were decreased consciousness (43, 30%) and exacerbation of chronic respiratory diseases (38, 27%). Cuff pressure control than the automatic group (45.3 vs. 0.7% determinations, p automatic and control groups, respectively. Cuff pressure is better controlled with the automatic device. However, it did not result in additional benefits to the semirecumbent position in preventing ventilator-associated pneumonia.

  19. Diseño en cosmosfloworks del conducto experimental para la medición de la caída de presión del aire al paso de bandejas metálicas Cosmosfloworks design of an experimental duct for measurement of the drop in air pressure after its passage through metal trays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Escalante

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available En el siguiente artículo se presenta el proceso de desarrollo de diseño del conducto experimental que facilita la medición de la caída de presión del aire tras su paso por bandejas metálicas. El diseño se fundamenta en los resultados arrojados por las simulaciones realizadas a diferentes disposiciones en la etapa inicial del conducto, y la validación de los datos de la simulación más representativa con un prototipo del conducto real con esta misma distribución. Para este estudio se usó software Cosmosfloworks [1], con el cual se analizaron las líneas de corriente y la caída de presión del fluido en el conducto.The following article presents the development’s process of designing an experimental duct which facilitates the measurement of the drop in air pressure after its going through metal trays. The design is based on the results of simulations conducted at various provisions of the duct, and validation of data from the most representative simulation through actual prototype with the same distribution. For this study, we used [1], with which curves of fluid and pressure drop of the fluid were analyzed.

  20. Estenose subglótica como manifestação clínica da granulomatose de Wegener em adolescentes: relato de caso e revisão de literatura Subglottic stenosis as a clinical manifestation of Wegener's granulomatosis in adolescents: report of a case and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia C. Machado

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available A Granulomatose de Wegener é uma patologia caracterizada por vasculite sistêmica e inflamação granulomatosa necrotizante que compromete o trato respiratório alto, pulmões e rins, cujas manifestações iniciais, na maioria das vezes, ocorre em maiores de 20 anos de idade. As queixas clínicas otorrinolaringológicas estão, com freqüência, presentes nas fases iniciais da doença, sendo rinite, sinusopatia de repetição e epistaxe as mais comuns. A estenose subglógica parece estar correlacionada com a Granulomatose de Wegener em adolescentes. Relatamos o caso de uma paciente portadora de Granulomatose de Wegener cujo início dos sintomas foi na infância, tendo evoluído com estenose laríngea durante o curso da doença.Wegener's Granulomatosis is a well-characterized systemic vasculitis and necrotising granulomatous inflammation of the upper, lower respiratory tracts and the kidneys. The initial manifestations of the disease usually occur in patients over than twenty years old. The otolaryngologic symptoms like rhinorrhea, recurrent sinusitis and epistaxis are commonly present in early course of the disease. It seems that subglottic stenosis is correlated to Wegener's granumatosis in adolescents. We describe a case of a patient that developed subglottic stenosis associated with Wegener's granulomatosis in childhood during the course of the disease.

  1. Pressurized Vessel Slurry Pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pound, C.R.

    2001-09-17

    This report summarizes testing of an alternate ''pressurized vessel slurry pumping'' apparatus. The principle is similar to rural domestic water systems and ''acid eggs'' used in chemical laboratories in that material is extruded by displacement with compressed air.

  2. Generation of large-scale, barrier-free diffuse plasmas in air at atmospheric pressure using array wire electrodes and nanosecond high-voltage pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Yun; Li, Lee; Liu, Yun-Long; Liu, Lun; Liu, Minghai

    2014-10-01

    This paper introduces a method to generate large-scale diffuse plasmas by using a repetition nanosecond pulse generator and a parallel array wire-electrode configuration. We investigated barrier-free diffuse plasmas produced in the open air in parallel and cross-parallel array line-line electrode configurations. We found that, when the distance between the wire-electrode pair is small, the discharges were almost extinguished. Also, glow-like diffuse plasmas with little discharge weakening were obtained in an appropriate range of line-line distances and with a cathode-grounding cross-electrode configuration. As an example, we produced a large-scale, stable diffuse plasma with volumes as large as 18 × 15 × 15 cm3, and this discharge region can be further expanded. Additionally, using optical and electrical measurements, we showed that the electron temperature was higher than the gas temperature, which was almost the same as room temperature. Also, an array of electrode configuration with more wire electrodes had helped to prevent the transition from diffuse discharge to arc discharge. Comparing the current waveforms of configurations with 1 cell and 9 cells, we found that adding cells significantly increased the conduction current and the electrical energy delivered in the electrode gaps.

  3. Fluid flow separation in a reactor pressure vessel during an ECC injection. Single phase flow and two phase flow (air-water) experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thierry Bichet; Alain Martin [EDF - Research and Development Division - Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfert 6, quai Watier - B.P. 49 - 78401 Chatou CEDEX 01 (France); Frederic Beaud [EDF/ Industry - Basic Design Department., 12-14, Avenue Dutrievoz 69628 Villeurbanne CEDEX (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Within the framework of the nuclear power plant lifetime issue, the assessment of the French 900 MWe (3-loops) series reactor pressure vessel (RPV) integrity has been performed. A simplified analysis has shown that the most severe loading conditions are given by the small break loss of coolant accidents due to the pressurized injection of cold water (9 deg. C) into the cold leg and down comer of the RPV. During these transient scenarios, single or two-phase (uncovered cold leg) flows have been shown in the cold leg, depending on the crack size and RPV model (900 MWe or 1300 MWe). An experimental study has been carried out, on the one hand, to consolidate the numerical results obtained with CFD home code (Code-Saturne) which mainly showed the stratified flow in the cold leg and the fluid flow separation and its oscillations in the down comer during a single phase scenario. These physical phenomena are important for the thermal RPV loading assessment. On the other hand, the absence of experimental two-phase data necessitated to carry out an experimental study around the mixing area behavior (free surface, stratified flow) during an ECC injection with an uncovered cold leg. The new EDF R and D mock up, called HYBISCUS, is a facility which is made out of Plexiglas (atmosphere pressure) and represents a half scale CP0 geometry with one cold leg and part of the down comer. The mock up modularity allows us to insert representative ECC nozzles and a thermal shield. In reference to the reactor scenarios, the experimental operating conditions are derived from the conservation of the density effects (Froude number). For that, a heated salted water flow is used to represent the ECC injection whereas water represents the cold leg fluid. This mock up has been defined in order to represent single phase flow (cold leg and down comer full of water) or two-phase flow (uncovered cold leg) ECC scenarios. This paper reports experimental results

  4. Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, dust, ... a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  5. 14 CFR 27.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 27.1325 Section 27... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented so that the influence... located in such manner that the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true...

  6. 14 CFR 25.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 25.1325 Section 25... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented to the outside... or other foreign matter, and that the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system...

  7. Released air during vapor and air cavitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonská, Jana, E-mail: jana.jablonska@vsb.cz; Kozubková, Milada, E-mail: milada.kozubkova@vsb.cz [VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Hydromechanics and Hydraulic Equipment, 17. listopadu 15, 708 33 Ostrava-Poruba (Czech Republic)

    2016-06-30

    Cavitation today is a very important problem that is solved by means of experimental and mathematical methods. The article deals with the generation of cavitation in convergent divergent nozzle of rectangular cross section. Measurement of pressure, flow rate, temperature, amount of dissolved air in the liquid and visualization of cavitation area using high-speed camera was performed for different flow rates. The measurement results were generalized by dimensionless analysis, which allows easy detection of cavitation in the nozzle. For numerical simulation the multiphase mathematical model of cavitation consisting of water and vapor was created. During verification the disagreement with the measurements for higher flow rates was proved, therefore the model was extended to multiphase mathematical model (water, vapor and air), due to release of dissolved air. For the mathematical modeling the multiphase turbulence RNG k-ε model for low Reynolds number flow with vapor and air cavitation was used. Subsequently the sizes of the cavitation area were verified. In article the inlet pressure and loss coefficient depending on the amount of air added to the mathematical model are evaluated. On the basis of the approach it may be create a methodology to estimate the amount of released air added at the inlet to the modeled area.

  8. Air filtration and indoor air quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekö, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    . Usually, increasing the ventilation rate improves the air quality, however in the case of used ventilation filters the benefits from increasing the airflow are smaller than usual. Moreover, the ever-increasing pressure drop of bag filters tends to raise energy costs of ventilation systems......Demands for better indoor air quality are increasing, since we spend most of our time indoors and we are more and more aware of indoor air pollution. Field studies in different parts of the world have documented that high percentage of occupants in many offices and buildings find the indoor air...... quality (IAQ) unacceptable and suffer from Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) symptoms (e.g. respiratory, headache, fatigue, etc.). In addition, prevalence of asthma and other respiratory and allergic diseases have increased during the past decades. The effect is most likely related to the environment. Without...

  9. High-Compression-Ratio; Atkinson-Cycle Engine Using Low-Pressure Direct Injection and Pneumatic-Electronic Valve Actuation Enabled by Ionization Current and Foward-Backward Mass Air Flow Sensor Feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harold Schock; Farhad Jaberi; Ahmed Naguib; Guoming Zhu; David Hung

    2007-12-31

    This report describes the work completed over a two and one half year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy. The goal was to demonstrate the technology needed to produce a highly efficient engine enabled by several technologies which were to be developed in the course of the work. The technologies included: (1) A low-pressure direct injection system; (2) A mass air flow sensor which would measure the net airflow into the engine on a per cycle basis; (3) A feedback control system enabled by measuring ionization current signals from the spark plug gap; and (4) An infinitely variable cam actuation system based on a pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation These developments were supplemented by the use of advanced large eddy simulations as well as evaluations of fuel air mixing using the KIVA and WAVE models. The simulations were accompanied by experimental verification when possible. In this effort a solid base has been established for continued development of the advanced engine concepts originally proposed. Due to problems with the valve actuation system a complete demonstration of the engine concept originally proposed was not possible. Some of the highlights that were accomplished during this effort are: (1) A forward-backward mass air flow sensor has been developed and a patent application for the device has been submitted. We are optimistic that this technology will have a particular application in variable valve timing direct injection systems for IC engines. (2) The biggest effort on this project has involved the development of the pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation system. This system was originally purchased from Cargine, a Swedish supplier and is in the development stage. To date we have not been able to use the actuators to control the exhaust valves, although the actuators have been successfully employed to control the intake valves. The reason for this is the additional complication associated with variable back pressure on the exhaust valves when

  10. Vocal Hoarseness and a Subglottic Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sassan Rafizadeh PhD

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient with tracheopathia osteoplastica (TPO, a rare or perhaps underrecognized disorder, detected in approximately 1 in every 2000 to 5000 patients who undergo bronchoscopy. TPO is marked by proliferation of bony and cartilaginous spurs leading to airway stenosis. Multiple submucosal cartilaginous and osseous nodules can develop in the respiratory tract and may involve the entire trachea and mainstem bronchi. Symptoms may range from a completely silent condition to life-threatening respiratory failure and diagnosis is made based on radiological and bronchoscopic findings. Although the etiology has not been established, TPO can be familial and is sometimes associated with chronic inflammation, such as seen with rheumatic diseases. This case highlights the need for understanding TPO so that it can be differentiated from potentially serious conditions such as necrotizing granulomatous diseases, invasive infections, and cancer.

  11. In situ built-up air collector with glass cover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Finn Harken; Engelmark, Jesper

    1998-01-01

    as an absorber. Efficiency and aair pressure drop were measured. The efficiency of the two air solar collectors was almost similar and at the same level as other corresponding air solar collectors. The air pressure drop was somewhat larger in the case of the solar collector where the air flows behind...

  12. Air Leakage and Air Transfer Between Garage and Living Space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, A.

    2014-09-01

    This research project focused on evaluation of air transfer between the garage and living space in a single-family detached home constructed by a production homebuilder in compliance with the 2009 International Residential Code and the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. The project gathered important information about the performance of whole-building ventilation systems and garage ventilation systems as they relate to minimizing flow of contaminated air from garage to living space. A series of 25 multi-point fan pressurization tests and additional zone pressure diagnostic testing characterized the garage and house air leakage, the garage-to-house air leakage, and garage and house pressure relationships to each other and to outdoors using automated fan pressurization and pressure monitoring techniques. While the relative characteristics of this house may not represent the entire population of new construction configurations and air tightness levels (house and garage) throughout the country, the technical approach was conservative and should reasonably extend the usefulness of the results to a large spectrum of house configurations from this set of parametric tests in this one house. Based on the results of this testing, the two-step garage-to-house air leakage test protocol described above is recommended where whole-house exhaust ventilation is employed. For houses employing whole-house supply ventilation (positive pressure) or balanced ventilation (same pressure effect as the Baseline condition), adherence to the EPA Indoor airPLUS house-to-garage air sealing requirements should be sufficient to expect little to no garage-to-house air transfer.

  13. Pressure ulcers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reddy, Madhuri

    2011-01-01

    Unrelieved pressure or friction of the skin, particularly over bony prominences, can lead to pressure ulcers in up to one third of people in hospitals or community care, and one fifth of nursing home residents...

  14. Barometric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of alterations in barometric pressure on human beings are described. Human tolerances for gaseous environments and low and high barometric pressure are discussed, including effects on specific areas, such as the ear, lungs, teeth, and sinuses. Problems due to trapped gas within the body, high dynamic pressures on the body, and blasts are also considered.

  15. Pressurized solid oxide fuel cell testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basel, R.A.; Pierre, J.F.

    1995-08-01

    The goals of the SOFC pressurized test program are to obtain cell voltage versus current (VI) performance data as a function of pressure; to evaluate the effects of operating parameters such as temperature, air stoichiometry, and fuel utilization on cell performance, and to demonstrate long term stability of the SOFC materials at elevated pressures.

  16. Basic Studies on High Pressure Air Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-30

    AOM is screwed to its mounting system, whereas the visible AOM is just glued using nail polish . noplasnoir2. phas- royenne aur :50 soua-dom Decim...part of the plasma near- UV emission spectrum for a 3 mm gap and a 20 mA current. Molecular bands can be identified: NO (y system, 200-260 nm), OH (0...200 210 220 230 240 250 260 300 310 320 330 340 350 360 Wavelength (nm) Wavelength (nm) Figure 9. Plasma UV emission spectrum A simulation of the

  17. Air Leakage and Air Transfer Between Garage and Living Space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, Armin [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This research project focused on evaluation of air transfer between the garage and living space in a single-family detached home constructed by a production homebuilder in compliance with the 2009 International Residential Code and the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. The project gathered important information about the performance of whole-building ventilation systems and garage ventilation systems as they relate to minimizing flow of contaminated air from garage to living space. A series of 25 multi-point fan pressurization tests and additional zone pressure diagnostic testing characterized the garage and house air leakage, the garage-to-house air leakage, and garage and house pressure relationships to each other and to outdoors using automated fan pressurization and pressure monitoring techniques. While the relative characteristics of this house may not represent the entire population of new construction configurations and air tightness levels (house and garage) throughout the country, the technical approach was conservative and should reasonably extend the usefulness of the results to a large spectrum of house configurations from this set of parametric tests in this one house. Based on the results of this testing, the two-step garage-to-house air leakage test protocol described above is recommended where whole-house exhaust ventilation is employed.

  18. Air void structure and frost resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Marianne Tange

    2014-01-01

    are conducted. Results were not originally presented in a way, which made comparison possible. Here the amount of scaled material is depicted as function of air voids parameters: total air content, specific surface, spacing factor, and total surface area of air voids. The total surface area of air voids...... is proportional to the product of total air content and specific surface. In all 4 cases, the conclusion is concurrent that the parameter of total surface area of air voids performs equally well or better than the spacing factor when linking air void characteristics to frost resistance (salt frost scaling...... will take place in the air void, being feed from the capillary, but without pressure build-up in the capillary. If the capillary is not connected to an air void, ice formation will take place in the capillary pore, where it can generate substantial pressure. Like this, frost resistance depends...

  19. Air bag restraint device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marts, D.J.; Richardson, J.G.

    1995-10-17

    A rear-seat air bag restraint device is disclosed that prevents an individual, or individuals, from continuing violent actions while being transported in a patrol vehicle`s rear seat without requiring immediate physical contact by the law enforcement officer. The air bag is activated by a control switch in the front seat and inflates to independently restrict the amount of physical activity occurring in the rear seat of the vehicle while allowing the officer to safely stop the vehicle. The air bag can also provide the officer additional time to get backup personnel to aid him if the situation warrants it. The bag is inflated and maintains a constant pressure by an air pump. 8 figs.

  20. Air bag restraint device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marts, Donna J.; Richardson, John G.

    1995-01-01

    A rear-seat air bag restraint device is disclosed that prevents an individual, or individuals, from continuing violent actions while being transported in a patrol vehicle's rear seat without requiring immediate physical contact by the law enforcement officer. The air bag is activated by a control switch in the front seat and inflates to independently restrict the amount of physical activity occurring in the rear seat of the vehicle while allowing the officer to safely stop the vehicle. The air bag can also provide the officer additional time to get backup personnel to aid him if the situation warrants it. The bag is inflated and maintains a constant pressure by an air pump.

  1. Pressure management in compartment fires

    OpenAIRE

    Hostikka, Simo; Kallada Janardhan, Rahul

    2017-01-01

    Fire-induced pressure has not been considered a threat for structural or occupant safety in apartment fires. The situation may be changing as the building envelopes are becoming much more air-tight due to the energy efficiency requirements and the construction of high-rise buildings. In this project, we investigated the effects of the building's air-tightness, ventilation configuration and the fire growth rate on the peak overpressures inside the fire compartment and smoke spread within the m...

  2. Air pocket removal from downward sloping pipes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pothof, I.W.M.; Clemens, F.H.L.R.

    2012-01-01

    Air-water flow is an undesired condition in water pipelines and hydropower tunnels. Water pipelines and wastewater pressure mains in particular are subject to air pocket accumulation in downward sloping reaches, such as inverted siphons or terrain slopes. Air pockets cause energy losses and an

  3. 29 CFR 1926.803 - Compressed air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ventilated, and there shall be no pockets of dead air. Outlets may be required at intermediate points along the main low-pressure air supply line to the heading to eliminate such pockets of dead air... of structures of wood over or near shafts. (6) Tunnels shall be provided with a 2-inch minimum...

  4. Space Derived Air Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    COPAMS, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Air Monitoring System, derives from technology involved in building unmanned spacecraft. The Nimbus spacecraft carried experimental sensors to measure temperature, pressure, ozone, and water vapor, and instruments for studying solar radiation and telemetry. The process which relayed these findings to Earth formed the basis for COPAMS. The COPAMS system consists of data acquisition units which measure and record pollution level, and sense wind speed and direction, etc. The findings are relayed to a central station where the information is computerized. The system is automatic and supplemented by PAQSS, PA Air Quality Surveillance System.

  5. Using Dalton's Law of Partial Pressures to Determine the Vapor Pressure of a Volatile Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgeman, Fred R.; Bertrand, Gary; Wilson, Brent

    2007-01-01

    This experiment, designed for a general chemistry laboratory, illustrates the use of Dalton's law of partial pressures to determine the vapor pressure of a volatile liquid. A predetermined volume of air is injected into a calibrated tube filled with a liquid whose vapor pressure is to be measured. The volume of the liquid displaced is greater than…

  6. Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is air pollution linked to climate change? While climate change is a global process, it has very local impacts that can profoundly affect communities, not the least of which is air pollution. Increasing temperatures are directly linked to poor air quality which, in turn, can affect the ...

  7. Pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee, David K.; Ripley, Edward B.; Nienstedt, Zachary C.; Nienstedt, Alex W.; Howell, Jr., Layton N.

    2015-09-29

    Disclosed is a passive, in-situ pressure sensor. The sensor includes a sensing element having a ferromagnetic metal and a tension inducing mechanism coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The tension inducing mechanism is operable to change a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal based on a change in pressure in the sensing element. Changes in pressure are detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal when subjected to an alternating magnetic field caused by the change in the tensile stress. The sensing element is embeddable in a closed system for detecting pressure changes without the need for any penetrations of the system for power or data acquisition by detecting changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  8. Modelling of air resistance during drying of wood-chips

    OpenAIRE

    Karaj, S.; Barfuss, Isabel; Schalk, J.; Reisinger, G.; Pude, R.; Müller, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the parameters that affect the drying process of wood chips at low air flow conditions. This objective was determined by measuring the air pressure resistance being produced by wood chips by examining different variables such as: air flow rate, air velocity, wood chip size, bulk density, bulk height and porosity. The air flow resistance was measured inside a 3 meter high cylindrical air duct constructed at University of Hohenheim. Physical proper...

  9. Pressure difference receiving ears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Axel; Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    2007-01-01

    waves behave in the air spaces leading to the interior surfaces of eardrums. A linear mathematical model with well-defined inputs is used for exploring how the directionality varies with the binaural directional cues and the amplitude and phase gain of the sound pathway to the inner surface...... of such pressure difference receiving ears have been hampered by lack of suitable experimental methods. In this review, we review the methods for collecting reliable data on the binaural directional cues at the eardrums, on how the eardrum vibrations depend on the direction of sound incidence, and on how sound...

  10. Why ambulatory blood pressure monitoring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punzi, H A

    1998-11-15

    Factors that affect the reliability and accuracy of blood pressure measurements are reviewed, and new technologies for measuring blood pressure are discussed. Blood pressure measurements obtained in an office, hospital, or clinic are subject to variation and error. Reasons for variations include the wrong cuff size, improper inflation or deflation technique, and patient apprehension ("white-coat syndrome"). Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) involves the use of a fully automated standard arm cuff that is inflated at predetermined intervals by a small battery-powered pump unit. The most reliable ABPM method is the oscillometric method, which detects subtle changes in air pressure within the cuff system caused by fluctuations of the brachial artery. The process for interpreting 24-hour ABPM data is still evolving. Twenty-four-hour ABPM has been shown to eliminate white-coat hypertension and is also useful for assessing patients whose blood pressure is inappropriately high in the absence of end organ damage, monitoring persons at risk of developing hypertension because of their race or family history, determining a medication's 24-hour effect on blood pressure, and assessing the early-morning rapid rise in blood pressure, which has been linked to an increased risk of nonembolic stroke and myocardial infarction. ABPM enables identification of patients whose blood pressure is elevated in the office but normal at home, allows more appropriate screening of patients for clinical trials, gives reproducible values, and enables evaluation of drug duration and action.

  11. Air Gauge Characteristics Linearity Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cz. J. Jermak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses calibration uncertainty and linearity issues of the typical back-pressure air gauge. In this sort of air gauge, the correlation between the measured dimension (represented by the slot width and the air pressure in the measuring chamber is used in a proportional range. However, when high linearity is required (e.g., nonlinearity less than 1%, the measuring range should be shortened. In the proposed method, based on knowledge of the static characteristics of air gauges, the measuring range is kept unchanged but the nonlinearity is decreased. The static characteristics may be separated into two sections, each of them approximated with a different linear function. As a result, the nonlinearity is reduced from 5% down to 1% and even below.

  12. ISLSCP II Air-Sea Carbon Dioxide Gas Exchange

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains the calculated net ocean-air carbon dioxide (CO2) flux and sea-air CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) difference. The estimates are based on...

  13. ISLSCP II Air-Sea Carbon Dioxide Gas Exchange

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains the calculated net ocean-air carbon dioxide (CO2) flux and sea-air CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) difference. The estimates are based...

  14. Blood pressure measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reading; Measuring blood pressure; Hypertension - blood pressure measurement; High blood pressure - blood pressure measurement ... High blood pressure has no symptoms so you may not know if you have this problem. High blood pressure ...

  15. 46 CFR 108.457 - Pressure release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... Each air tight or vapor tight space, such as a paint locker, that is protected by a CO2 system must have a means for releasing pressure that accumulates within the space if CO2 is discharged into the... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure release. 108.457 Section 108.457 Shipping COAST...

  16. On air entrainment in coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpkins, P G; Kuck, V J

    2003-07-15

    A series of experiments that clarify how air bubbles become entrained into coatings are described. The contact line dynamics at the air-liquid interface surrounding a fiber is characterized for a typical coating die operating under atmospheric and pressurized conditions. Glycerin and other viscous liquids are used to reveal that a critical fiber speed exists at which air entrainment begins. The observations confirm that the critical capillary number Ca(c) depends on the physical properties of the coating material, in the form of the Morton number. When the liquid supply is pressurized, the experiments show that adjusting the pressure can stabilize the displaced free surface interface at a prescribed location. Controlling the meniscus location in this way eliminates air entrainment. The threshold occurs when the applied pressure balances the shear exerted on the coating by the moving fiber. Using this approach it is possible to eliminate air entrainment and attain stable wetting at very large values of the capillary number, e.g., Ca congruent with 50.

  17. Air Cleaning Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    zoster, whereas close contact is required for the direct transmission of infectious diseases transmitted by droplets, such as influenza (the flu) and SARS. The Technology In-room air cleaners are supplied as portable or fixed devices. Fixed devices can be attached to either a wall or ceiling and are preferred over portable units because they have a greater degree of reliability (if installed properly) for achieving adequate room air mixing and airflow patterns, which are important for optimal effectiveness. Through a method of air recirculation, an in-room air cleaner can be used to increase room ventilation rates and if used to exhaust air out of the room it can create a negative-pressure room for airborne infection isolation (AII) when the building’s HVAC system cannot do so. A negative-pressure room is one where clean air flows into the room but contaminated air does not flow out of it. Contaminated room air is pulled into the in-room air cleaner and cleaned by passing through a series of filters, which remove the airborne infectious pathogens. The cleaned air is either recirculated into the room or exhausted outside the building. By filtering contaminated room air and then recirculating the cleaned air into the room, an in-room air cleaner can improve the room’s ventilation. By exhausting the filtered air to the outside the unit can create a negative-pressure room. There are many types of in-room air cleaners. They vary widely in the airflow rates through the unit, the type of air cleaning technology used, and the technical design. Crucial to maximizing the efficiency of any in-room air cleaner is its strategic placement and set-up within a room, which should be done in consultation with ventilation engineers, infection control experts, and/or industrial hygienists. A poorly positioned air cleaner may disrupt airflow patterns within the room and through the air cleaner, thereby compromising its air cleaning efficiency. The effectiveness of an in-room air cleaner

  18. BOREAS AFM-02 Wyoming King Air 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Parameters include wind direction, wind speed, west wind component (u), south wind component (v), static pressure, air dry bulb temperature, potential temperature,...

  19. BOREAS AFM-02 Wyoming King Air 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Parameters include wind direction, wind speed, west wind component (u), south wind component (v), static pressure, air dry bulb temperature, potential...

  20. 49 CFR 570.57 - Air brake system and air-over-hydraulic brake subsystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... revolutions per minute with the compressor governor in the cut-off position, in not more than 30 seconds for... Motor Vehicle Safety Standard No. 121, the low-pressure indicator shall be activated when air pressure is lowered to an activating level that is not less than 60 psi. (4) The governor cut-in pressure...

  1. Development of energy-efficient comfortable ventilation systems with air quality guided volume flow control and continuous monitoring of the window opening status. Part 2. Theoretical investigations of the pressure difference method. Research project; Entwicklung energieeffizienter Komfortlueftungsanlagen mit luftqualitaetsgefuehrter Volumenstromregelung und kontinuierlicher Erfassung des Fensteroeffnungszustandes. Teilbericht 2. Theoretische Untersuchungen zur Druckdifferenz-Methode. Forschungsprojekt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knissel, Jens; Grossklos, Marc [Institut Wohnen und Umwelt GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Werner, Johannes [Ingenieurbuero fuer Energieberatung, Haustechnik und Oekologische Konzepte GbR (eboek), Tuebingen (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    In energy-efficient buildings with mechanical ventilation and heat recovery, the heat losses of ventilation of a building can be influenced by additional open windows. This causes a significant rise in the heating demand. The Drd method (pressure difference method) assumes that the negative pressure in a building after switching off the supply air fan will depend on whether all windows are closed, or at least one window is open. In the research project under consideration the determination of the position of the window aperture using the Drd method shall be developed further. The operating conditions of the Drd method is investigated theoretically. Questions of the required building tightness and plant characteristics are clarified.

  2. Plasma Air Decontamination System (PADS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed Plasma Air Decontamination System (PADS) is a trace contaminant control device based on non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma technology. Compared to...

  3. Plasma Air Decontamination System (PADS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed Plasma Air Decontamination System (PADS) is a trace contaminant control device based on non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma technology that operates...

  4. Turbine airfoil cooling system with cooling systems using high and low pressure cooling fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jan H.; Messmann, Stephen John; Scribner, Carmen Andrew

    2017-10-25

    A turbine airfoil cooling system including a low pressure cooling system and a high pressure cooling system for a turbine airfoil of a gas turbine engine is disclosed. In at least one embodiment, the low pressure cooling system may be an ambient air cooling system, and the high pressure cooling system may be a compressor bleed air cooling system. In at least one embodiment, the compressor bleed air cooling system in communication with a high pressure subsystem that may be a snubber cooling system positioned within a snubber. A delivery system including a movable air supply tube may be used to separate the low and high pressure cooling subsystems. The delivery system may enable high pressure cooling air to be passed to the snubber cooling system separate from low pressure cooling fluid supplied by the low pressure cooling system to other portions of the turbine airfoil cooling system.

  5. Air permeability of polyester nonwoven fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Guocheng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Air permeability is one of the most important properties of non-woven fabrics in many applications. This paper aims to investigate the effects of thickness, porosity and density on the air permeability of needle-punched non-woven fabrics and compare the experimental values with two models which are based on hydraulic radius theory and drag theory, respectively. The air permeability of the samples was measured by an air permeability tester FX3300. The results showed that the air permeability of non-woven fabrics decreased with the increase in thickness and density of samples, increased with the increase of porosity, and the air permeability was not directly proportional to the pressure gradient. Meanwhile, the prediction model based on hydraulic radius theory had a better agreement with experimental values than the model based on drag theory, but the values were much higher than the experimental results, especially for higher porosity and higher pressure gradient.

  6. Air lasing

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Ya

    2018-01-01

    This book presents the first comprehensive, interdisciplinary review of the rapidly developing field of air lasing. In most applications of lasers, such as cutting and engraving, the laser source is brought to the point of service where the laser beam is needed to perform its function. However, in some important applications such as remote atmospheric sensing, placing the laser at a convenient location is not an option. Current sensing schemes rely on the detection of weak backscattering of ground-based, forward-propagating optical probes, and possess limited sensitivity. The concept of air lasing (or atmospheric lasing) relies on the idea that the constituents of the air itself can be used as an active laser medium, creating a backward-propagating, impulsive, laser-like radiation emanating from a remote location in the atmosphere. This book provides important insights into the current state of development of air lasing and its applications.

  7. Air void analyzer for plastic concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    The two main test methods that measure the air content in plastic concrete are the pressure method and the volumetric : or roll-a-meter method. Although these methods report the total air in the concrete, they do not distinguish between : entrained a...

  8. Ambient pressure fuel cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    2000-01-01

    An ambient pressure fuel cell system is provided with a fuel cell stack formed from a plurality of fuel cells having membrane/electrode assemblies (MEAs) that are hydrated with liquid water and bipolar plates with anode and cathode sides for distributing hydrogen fuel gas and water to a first side of each one of the MEAs and air with reactant oxygen gas to a second side of each one of the MEAs. A pump supplies liquid water to the fuel cells. A recirculating system may be used to return unused hydrogen fuel gas to the stack. A near-ambient pressure blower blows air through the fuel cell stack in excess of reaction stoichiometric amounts to react with the hydrogen fuel gas.

  9. Cerebral Air Embolism in a Patient with a Tuberculous-Destroyed Lung during Commercial Air Travel: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hyun Seok; Jeong, Hae Woong; In, Hyun Sin [Dept. of Radiology, Pusan Paik Hospital, Inje University School of Medicine, Pusdan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    A cerebral air embolism is a rare cause of stroke, but may occur in patients undergoing invasive cardiac and pulmonary procedures, as well as in divers suffering pulmonary barotrauma from rapid ascent. A cerebral air embolism due to other causes, especially a change of air pressure from air travel, is particularly rare. Here, we report a case of cerebraenr embolism during commercial air travel in a patient with an tuberculous-destroyed lung.

  10. Skin perfusion pressure measured with a photo sensor in an air-filled plastic balloon: validity and reproducibility on the lower leg in normal subjects and patients suspected of obliterative arterial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Steen Levin; Nielsen, Anne Lerberg; Vind, Susanne Haase

    2011-01-01

    An inflatable small plastic bag including a photo sensor was constructed for measurement of skin perfusion pressure avoiding the rim of the photo sensor over bony and tendineous surfaces of the tibia below the knee, at the ankle, and on the dorsal forefoot. Compression was obtained using a conical...

  11. The results of air treatment process modeling at the location of the air curtain in the air suppliers and ventilation shafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaev Aleksandr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the existing shaft air heater installations (AHI, that heat the air for air suppliers in cold seasons, a heater channel is used. Some parts of the air from the heater go to the channel, other parts are sucked through a pithead by the general shaft pressure drawdown formed by the main ventilation installation (MVI. When this happens, a mix of two air flows leads to a shaft heat regime violation that can break pressurization of intertubular sealers. The problem of energy saving while airing underground mining enterprises is also very important. The proposed solution of both tasks due to the application of an air curtain is described in the article. In cold seasons the air treatment process should be used and it is offered to place an air curtain in the air suppliers shaft above the place of interface of the calorifer channel to a trunk in order to avoid an infiltration (suction of air through the pithead. It’s recommended to use an air curtain in a ventilation shaft because it reduces external air leaks thereby improving energy efficiency of the MVI work. During the mathematical modeling of ventilation and air preparation process (in SolidWorks Flowsimulation software package it was found out that the use of the air curtain in the air supply shaft can increase the efficiency of the AHI, and reduce the electricity consumption for ventilation in the ventilation shaft.

  12. Air conditioning system and component therefore distributing air flow from opposite directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obler, H. D.; Bauer, H. B. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The air conditioning system comprises a plurality of separate air conditioning units coupled to a common supply duct such that air may be introduced into the supply duct in two opposite flow directions. A plurality of outlets such as registers or auxiliary or branch ducts communicate with the supply duct and valve means are disposed in the supply duct at at least some of the outlets for automatically channelling a controllable amount of air from the supply duct to the associated outlet regardless of the direction of air flow within the supply duct. The valve means comprises an automatic air volume control apparatus for distribution within the air supply duct into which air may be introduced from two opposite directions. The apparatus incorporates a freely swinging movable vane in the supply duct to automatically channel into the associated outlet only the deflected air flow which has the higher relative pressure.

  13. 14 CFR 23.1325 - Static pressure system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static pressure system. 23.1325 Section 23.1325 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static...

  14. Laringoplastia com balão em crianças com estenose subglótica em evolução: experiência de um hospital terciário Balloon laryngoplasty in children with acute subglottic stenosis: experience of a tertiary-care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Schweiger

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O manejo da estenose subglótica (ESG em crianças continua sendo um desafio para os otorrinolaringologistas. A laringoplastia com balão (LPB consiste num procedimento endoscópico, descrito inicialmente em 1984, para tratamento de estenoses da via aérea alta, apresentando várias vantagens em relação a outras técnicas cirúrgicas e com resultados promissores. OBJETIVO: Apresentar a nossa experiência com a realização de LPB em pacientes pediátricos com ESG. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo prospectivo de pacientes pediátricos com diagnóstico de ESG pós-extubação em evolução (ainda com tecido de granulação. Realizou-se laringoscopia direta sob anestesia geral e dilatação do segmento estenótico com cateter de angioplastia. Os pacientes foram acompanhados e nova laringoscopia foi realizada uma semana após o procedimento inicial. RESULTADOS: Foram incluídas no estudo oito crianças no período de junho de 2009 a outubro de 2010. Destas, quatro apresentavam ESG Grau 3, três apresentavam ESG Grau 2 e uma, ESG Grau 1. Na laringoscopia direta de revisão, apenas duas apresentavam ESG residual assintomática (Grau 1, sendo que as outras seis apresentavam via aérea normal e estavam assintomáticas. CONCLUSÃO: A LPB parece ser um tratamento efetivo para ESG em evolução. Necessitamos mais estudos para sabermos a eficácia, a segurança e as indicações deste procedimento.Management of subglottic stenosis (SGS in children is still a challenge to Otorhinolaryngologists. Balloon laryngoplasty (BLP is an endoscopic procedure, first described in 1984 for the treatment of airway stenosis. It shows promising results and seems to be more effective than other procedures. AIM: To present our experience with BLP in children with SGS. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Prospective study of children diagnosed with acute subglottic stenosis, i.e., stenosis with granulation tissue. They underwent direct laryngoscopy under general anesthesia and dilatation of the

  15. Air surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patton, G.W.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the air surveillance and monitoring programs currently in operation at that Hanford Site. Atmospheric releases of pollutants from Hanford to the surrounding region are a potential source of human exposure. For that reason, both radioactive and nonradioactive materials in air are monitored at a number of locations. The influence of Hanford emissions on local radionuclide concentrations was evaluated by comparing concentrations measured at distant locations within the region to concentrations measured at the Site perimeter. This section discusses sample collection, analytical methods, and the results of the Hanford air surveillance program. A complete listing of all analytical results summarized in this section is reported separately by Bisping (1995).

  16. Field mapping of ballistic pressure pulse sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rad Abtin Jamshidi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ballistic pressure pulse sources are used since late 1990s for the extracorporeal treatment of chronic Enthesitis. Newly indications are found in trigger-point-therapy for the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. In both applications excellent results without relevant side effects were found in clinical trials. The technical principle of pressure pulse source is based on the same techniques used in air guns. A projectile is accelerated by pressurized air and hits the applicator with high kinetic energy. By this a compression wave travels through the material and induces a fast (4..5μs, almost singular pressure pulse of 2..10 MPa, which is followed by an equally short rarefaction phase of about the same amplitude. It is assumed that the pressure pulse accounts for the biomedical effects of the device. The slower inertial motion of the waveguide is damped by elastic stoppers, but still can be measured several micro seconds after the initial pressure pulse. In order to characterize the pressure pulse devices, field mapping is performed on several radial pressure pulse sources using the fiber optic hydrophone and a polyvinylidenfluorid (PVDF piezoelectric hydrophone. It could be shown that the current standard (IEC 61846 is not appropriate for characterization of ballistic pressure pulse sources.

  17. Monitoring the levels of toxic air pollutants in the ambient air of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Key words: Air pollution, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, suspended particulate matter, carbon monoxide, .... 215 Switzerland), in a water bath at temperature of 55°C and pressure of 180 Torr. ...... Texas, USA, Atmos. Environ., 35: ...

  18. Technology Solutions Case Study: Air Leakage and Air Transfer Between Garage and Living Space, Waldorf, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-11-01

    In this project, Building Science Corporation worked with production homebuilder K. Hovnanian to evaluate air transfer between the garage and living space in a single-family detached home constructed by a production homebuilder in compliance with the 2009 International Residential Code and the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. The project gathered important information about the performance of whole-building ventilation systems and garage ventilation systems as they relate to minimizing flow of contaminated air from garage to living space. A series of 25 multipoint fan pressurization tests and additional zone pressure diagnostic testing measured the garage and house air leakage, the garage-to-house air leakage, and garage and house pressure relationships to each other and to outdoors using automated fan pressurization and pressure monitoring techniques. While the relative characteristics of this house may not represent the entire population of new construction configurations and air tightness levels (house and garage) throughout the country, the technical approach was conservative and should reasonably extend the usefulness of the results to a large spectrum of house configurations from this set of parametric tests in this one house. Based on the results of this testing, the two-step garage-to-house air leakage test protocol described above is recommended where whole-house exhaust ventilation is employed. For houses employing whole-house supply ventilation (positive pressure) or balanced ventilation (same pressure effect as the baseline condition), adherence to the EPA Indoor airPLUS house-to-garage air sealing requirements should be sufficient to expect little to no garage-to-house air transfer.

  19. Blood Pressure Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... several blood pressure readings at home. Tracking your blood pressure readings It can be helpful in diagnosing or ... medication options might work best for you. Low blood pressure Low blood pressure that either doesn't cause ...

  20. Low Blood Pressure (Hypotension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lowest at night and rises sharply on waking. Blood pressure: How low can you go? What's considered low ... low blood pressure. Medications that can cause low blood pressure Some medications can cause low blood pressure, including: ...

  1. Self-balancing air riding seal for a turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Jacob A.

    2017-08-15

    A turbine of a gas turbine engine has an air riding seal that forms a seal between a rotor and a stator of the turbine, the air riding seal including an annular piston movable in an axial direction under the influence of a pressure on one side with a pressure acting on an opposite side that self-balances the air riding seal during the steady state condition of the engine and lifts off the seal during engine transients.

  2. SpaceX Dragon Air Circulation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Brenda; Piatrovich, Siarhei; Prina, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    The Dragon capsule is a reusable vehicle being developed by Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) that will provide commercial cargo transportation to the International Space Station (ISS). Dragon is designed to be a habitable module while it is berthed to ISS. As such, the Dragon Environmental Control System (ECS) consists of pressure control and pressure equalization, air sampling, fire detection, illumination, and an air circulation system. The air circulation system prevents pockets of stagnant air in Dragon that can be hazardous to the ISS crew. In addition, through the inter-module duct, the air circulation system provides fresh air from ISS into Dragon. To utilize the maximum volume of Dragon for cargo packaging, the Dragon ECS air circulation system is designed around cargo rack optimization. At the same time, the air circulation system is designed to meet the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) inter-module and intra-module ventilation requirements and acoustic requirements. A flight like configuration of the Dragon capsule including the air circulation system was recently assembled for testing to assess the design for inter-module and intra-module ventilation and acoustics. The testing included the Dragon capsule, and flight configuration in the pressure section with cargo racks, lockers, all of the air circulation components, and acoustic treatment. The air circulation test was also used to verify the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of the Dragon capsule. The CFD model included the same Dragon internal geometry that was assembled for the test. This paper will describe the Dragon air circulation system design which has been verified by testing the system and with CFD analysis.

  3. Air resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Hogg, David W.

    2006-01-01

    Most introductory physics textbooks ask students to ignore air resistance but include no analysis of the appropriateness of that approximation. Indeed the approximation is inappropriate in many textbook problems. This short supplementary handout, appropriate for majors and non-majors alike, is designed to make up for this pervasive shortcoming (see also arXiv:physics/0412107).

  4. Adiabatic Liquid Piston Compressed Air Energy Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Tage; Elmegaard, Brian; Pedersen, Allan Schrøder

    This project investigates the potential of a Compressed Air Energy Storage system (CAES system). CAES systems are used to store mechanical energy in the form of compressed air. The systems use electricity to drive the compressor at times of low electricity demand with the purpose of converting...... the mechanical energy into electricity at times of high electricity demand. Two such systems are currently in operation; one in Germany (Huntorf) and one in the USA (Macintosh, Alabama). In both cases, an underground cavern is used as a pressure vessel for the storage of the compressed air. Both systems...... are in the range of 100 MW electrical power output with several hours of production stored as compressed air. In this range, enormous volumes are required, which make underground caverns the only economical way to design the pressure vessel. Both systems use axial turbine compressors to compress air when charging...

  5. Air-water flow in subsurface systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, A.; Mishra, P.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater traces its roots to tackle challenges of safe and reliable drinking water and food production. When the groundwater level rises, air pressure in the unsaturated Vadose zone increases, forcing air to escape from the ground surface. Abnormally high and low subsurface air pressure can be generated when the groundwater system, rainfall, and sea level fluctuation are favorably combined [Jiao and Li, 2004]. Through this process, contamination in the form of volatile gases may diffuse from the ground surface into residential areas, or possibly move into groundwater from industrial waste sites. It is therefore crucial to understand the combined effects of air-water flow in groundwater system. Here we investigate theoretically and experimentally the effects of air and water flow in groundwater system.

  6. How to distinguish an active air leak from a pleural space effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Rita Daniela; Giudice, Gabriella; Lequaglie, Cosimo

    2012-12-01

    We aimed to distinguish a pleural space effect from an active air leak, using a digital chest drain system that provided continuous air flow and pleural pressure checks. between March 2010 and October 2011, we employed 144 digital drains for 138 thoracic surgical procedures. We observed 18 (12.5%) active air leaks, among which 4 (2.8%) were prolonged air leaks characterized by high differential pleural pressure due to increased mean expiratory pressure (>1 cm H(2)O; pair leaks, all long-lasting (ppressure curve divergence before the air flow appearance. We also reported 25 (17.4%) pleural space effects characterized by a high differential pleural pressure, but mainly due to a lower mean inspiratory pressure (air flow and pleural pressure measurement, could clearly identify a pleural space effect, avoiding the frequent misinterpretation of an active air leak, and allowing safe removal of the chest tube at the right time.

  7. Pressurized waterproof case for electronic device

    KAUST Repository

    Berumen, Michael L.

    2013-01-31

    The pressurized waterproof case for an electronic device is particularly adapted for the waterproof containment and operation of a touch-screen computer or the like therein at some appreciable water depth. The case may be formed as an enclosure having an open top panel or face covered by a flexible, transparent membrane or the like for the operation of the touch-screen device within the case. A pressurizing system is provided for the case to pressurize the case and the electronic device therein to slightly greater than ambient in order to prevent the external water pressure from bearing against the transparent membrane and pressing it against the touch screen, thereby precluding operation of the touch screen device within the case. The pressurizing system may be a small gas cartridge (e.g., CO2), or may be provided from an external source, such as the diver\\'s breathing air. A pressure relief valve is also provided.

  8. Influence of the outlet air temperature on the thermohydraulic behaviour of air coolers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Emila M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The determination of the optimal process conditions for the operation of air coolers demands a detailed analysis of their thermohydraulic behaviour on the one hand, and the estimation of the operating costs, on the other. One of the main parameters of the thermohydraulic behaviour of this type of equipment, is the outlet air temperature. The influence of the outlet air temperature on the performance of air coolers (heat transfer coefficient overall heat transfer coefficient, required surface area for heat transfer air-side pressure drop, fan power consumption and sound pressure level was investigated in this study. All the computations, using AirCooler software [1], were applied to cooling of the process fluid and the condensation of a multicomponent vapour mixture on two industrial devices of known geometries.

  9. Calculating and parametric analysis of the work of the air single-stage medium pressure reciprocating compressor of on the basis of the oil-free long-stroke slow-speed stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusha, V. L.; Busarov, S. S.; Vasil'ev, V. K.; Gromov, A. Yu.; Nedovenchanyj, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    The computational and parametric analysis of the of the operating process efficiency in an airless, slow-speed, long-stroke stage of a medium-pressure compressor unit was carried out. The influence on the discharge temperature, the indicator efficiency and the feed rate of the main structural and mode parameters of the stage are considered. It is shown that cycle time, cylinder diameter and stroke have significant influence on the economical efficiency of the operating process and the temperature mode of the stage and can be regarded as optimization parameters while developing a reciprocating stage of such type.

  10. Measuring Blast-Related Intracranial Pressure Within the Human Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    4 Pressure sensors Commercially available sensors from Endevco (models 8515C and 8530C), FISO Technologies (FOP-MIV model) and PCB...monitoring of the ambient overpressure at the target was provided by a pressure probe that contained two Endevco sensors placed frontally and sideon with...pressure sensor measuring the static component of the shock wave in air along the tube; (B) pressure sensor using Endevco sensor to measure static and

  11. Explosive Processes on Cathode while Forming Nanosecond Pulsed Discharge of High Pressure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A. Hashimov; R. Mekhtizadeh; А. Bondyakov; Sh. Kazimov

    2012-01-01

    ...) while forming nanosecond pulsed discharge in dense air. Influence of field and air pressure heterogeneity rate in gas gap on size of micro-craters being formed on working cathode surface after pulsed effect has been shown in the paper...

  12. Analysis of Trunk Flutter in an Air Cushion Landing System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    perpendicular to the lines joining the lumped masses). The pressure forces acting on each link between the masses are divided between the adjacent masses...head. b. The flow through the orifices is incompressible, that is, the pressure drop is small compraed to the total pressure, and the air density is

  13. Estimating Vocal Effort from the Aerodynamics of Labial Fricatives: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meynadier, Yohann; El Hajj, Anita; Pitermann, Michel; Legou, Thierry; Giovanni, Antoine

    2017-09-12

    Vocal effort in loud voice is produced with increased subglottal pressure during vowels and increased supraglottal pressure during consonants. In the paper, our main objective is to check whether it was supported by a parallel increase in the airflow resistance of the laryngeal articulator and of the supralaryngeal articulator, here the lips. For this comparison, our choice fell on the fricative consonants, as their production allows perfectly synchronous air pressure and airflow measurements. Also, the calculation of the real instantaneous aerodynamic resistance is possible with fricatives-as it is with vowels-whereas it is not possible with plosives. The present feasibility study on a healthy subject is based on direct subglottal and intraoral pressures and airflow measured for /f/ or /v/ and from the contiguous vowel produced in VCVCV nonsense words at different levels of intensity. The results support that the airflow resistances at the lips and that at the larynx are quite parallel. The airflow resistance at the lips during labial fricative production could provide a good picture of the laryngeal resistance during the production of continuous speech. This suggests clinical applications using both noninvasive inferred measurements of subglottal pressure variation and direct noninferred airflow measurements from more natural speech production tasks. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects on the glottal voice source of vocal loudness variation in untrained female and male voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Johan; Fahlstedt, Ellinor; Morell, Anja

    2005-02-01

    Subglottal pressure is one of the main voice control factors, controlling vocal loudness. In this investigation the effects of subglottal pressure variation on the voice source in untrained female and male voices phonating at a low, a middle, and a high fundamental frequency are analyzed. The subjects produced a series of /pae/ syllables at varied degrees of vocal loudness, attempting to keep pitch constant. Subglottal pressure was estimated from the oral pressure during the /p/ occlusion. Ten subglottal pressure values, approximately equidistantly spaced within the pressure range used, were identified, and the voice source of the vowels following these pressure values was analyzed by inverse filtering the airflow signal as captured by a Rothenberg mask. The maximum flow declination rate (MFDR) was found to increase linearly with subglottal pressure, but a given subglottal pressure produced lower values for female than for male voices. The closed quotient increased quickly with subglottal pressure at low pressures and slowly at high pressures, such that the relationship can be approximated by a power function. For a given subglottal pressure value, female voices reached lower values of closed quotient than male voices. .

  15. Air Policing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    media construct, employing the doctrine of the Inverted Blockade would yield a quick path to failure .6970 Described by Air-Commodore Portal during...military leaders will often be placed in the position of justifying military action to the press and the public.” Given the presupposition that the...response would yield a strategic failure .73 Interference Examined If applied in a restricted manner to achieve very deliberate and limited goals

  16. Managing Air Quality - Air Pollutant Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Describes the types of air pollutants, including common or criteria pollutants, and hazardous air pollutants and links to additional information. Also links to resources on other air pollution issues.

  17. Air filtration and indoor air quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekö, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    Demands for better indoor air quality are increasing, since we spend most of our time indoors and we are more and more aware of indoor air pollution. Field studies in different parts of the world have documented that high percentage of occupants in many offices and buildings find the indoor air...... decent ventilation and air cleaning/air filtration, high indoor air quality cannot be accomplished. The need for effective air filtration has increased with increasing evidence on the hazardous effects of fine particles. Moreover, the air contains gaseous pollutants, removal of which requires various air...... cleaning techniques. Supply air filter is one of the key components in the ventilation system. Studies have shown that used ventilation filters themselves can be a significant source of indoor air pollution with consequent impact on perceived air quality, sick building syndrome symptoms and performance...

  18. Development of a Blood Pressure Measurement Instrument with Active Cuff Pressure Control Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsien Kuo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an oscillometric blood pressure (BP measurement approach based on the active control schemes of cuff pressure. Compared with conventional electronic BP instruments, the novelty of the proposed BP measurement approach is to utilize a variable volume chamber which actively and stably alters the cuff pressure during inflating or deflating cycles. The variable volume chamber is operated with a closed-loop pressure control scheme, and it is activated by controlling the piston position of a single-acting cylinder driven by a screw motor. Therefore, the variable volume chamber could significantly eliminate the air turbulence disturbance during the air injection stage when compared to an air pump mechanism. Furthermore, the proposed active BP measurement approach is capable of measuring BP characteristics, including systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP, during the inflating cycle. Two modes of air injection measurement (AIM and accurate dual-way measurement (ADM were proposed. According to the healthy subject experiment results, AIM reduced 34.21% and ADM reduced 15.78% of the measurement time when compared to a commercial BP monitor. Furthermore, the ADM performed much consistently (i.e., less standard deviation in the measurements when compared to a commercial BP monitor.

  19. The effects of the false vocal fold gaps on intralaryngeal pressure distributions and their effects on phonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng; Wan, Mingxi; Wang, Supin

    2008-11-01

    Human phonation does not merely depend on the vibration of the vocal folds. Research by clinical and computer simulations has demonstrated that the false vocal fold (FVF) is an important laryngeal constriction that plays a vital role during human voice production. This study explored the effects of the FVF gaps using both the three-dimensional Plexiglas model and the numerical computation methods. Twelve FVF gaps (ranging from 0.02 to 2.06 cm) were used in this study at three glottal angles (uniform and convergent/divergent 40 degrees ), two minimal glottal diameters (D (g)) (0.04 cm and 0.06 cm) separately, and the constant subglottal pressure (8 cm H(2)O). The results suggested that (1) the intralaryngeal pressure was the lowest and the flow was the highest (least flow resistance) when the FVF gap was 1.5-2 times greater than D (g); (2) the divergent glottal angle gave lower pressure and greater flow than the convergent and uniform glottal angle as there were no FVF conditions; (3) the presence of the FVF decreased the effects of the glottal angle to a certain extent; and more importantly, (4) the presence of the FVF also moved the separation points downstream, straightened the glottal jet for a longer distance, decreased the overall laryngeal resistance, and reduced the energy dissipation, suggesting the significance of FVF in efficient voice production. These results may be incorporated in the phonatory models (physical or computational) for better understanding of vocal mechanics. The results might also be helpful in exploring the surgical and rehabilitative intervention of related voice problems.

  20. An underwater blood pressure measuring device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, Arne; Kuch, Benjamin; L'abbate, Antonio; Wagner, Matthias; Dario, Paolo; Bedini, Remo

    2008-09-01

    Measurement of arterial blood pressure is an important vital sign for monitoring the circulation. However, up to now no instrument has been available that enables the measurement of blood pressure underwater. The present paper details a novel, oscillometric, automatic digital blood pressure (BP) measurement device especially designed for this purpose. It consists mainly of analogue and digital electronics in a lexan housing that is rated to a depth of up to 200 metres' sea water, a cuff and a solenoid for inflation of the cuff with air supplied from a scuba tank. An integrated differential pressure sensor, exposed to the same ambient pressure as the cuff, allows accurate BP measurement. Calculation of systolic and diastolic pressures is based on the analysis of pressure oscillations recorded during the deflation. In hyperbaric chamber tests to pressures up to 405 kPa, BP measurements taken with the prototype were comparable to those obtained with established manual and automated methods. Swimming pool tests confirmed the correct functioning of the system underwater. The quality of the recorded pressure oscillations was very good even at 10 metres' fresh water, and allowed determination of diastolic and systolic pressure values. Based on these results we envisage that this device will lead to a better understanding of human cardiovascular physiology in underwater and hyperbaric environments.

  1. Based on Artificial Neural Network to Realize K-Parameter Analysis of Vehicle Air Spring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, San-Shan; Hsu, Chia-Ning; Hwang, Chang-Chou; Chen, Wen-Jan

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, because of the air-spring control technique is more mature, that air- spring suspension systems already can be used to replace the classical vehicle suspension system. Depend on internal pressure variation of the air-spring, thestiffnessand the damping factor can be adjusted. Because of air-spring has highly nonlinear characteristic, therefore it isn’t easy to construct the classical controller to control the air-spring effectively. The paper based on Artificial Neural Network to propose a feasible control strategy. By using offline way for the neural network design and learning to the air-spring in different initial pressures and different loads, offline method through, predict air-spring stiffness parameter to establish a model. Finally, through adjusting air-spring internal pressure to change the K-parameter of the air-spring, realize the well dynamic control performance of air-spring suspension.

  2. Over-pressurized bioreactors: application to microbial cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Marlene; Belo, Isabel; Mota, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    In industrial biotechnology, microbial cultures are exposed to different local pressures inside bioreactors. Depending on the microbial species and strains, the increased pressure may have detrimental or beneficial effects on cellular growth and product formation. In this review, the effects of increased air pressure on various microbial cultures growing in bioreactors under moderate total pressure conditions (maximum, 15 bar) will be discussed. Recent data illustrating the diversity of increased air pressure effects at different levels in microbial cells cultivation will be presented, with particular attention to the effects of oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures on cellular growth and product formation, and the concomitant effect of oxygen pressure on antioxidant cellular defense mechanisms. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  3. Air Quality System (AQS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Air Quality System (AQS) database contains measurements of air pollutant concentrations from throughout the United States and its territories. The measurements include both criteria air pollutants and hazardous air pollutants.

  4. AirData

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The AirData site provides access to yearly summaries of United States air pollution data, taken from EPA's air pollution databases. AirData has information about...

  5. California Air Basins

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Air ResourcesCalifornia Air Resources BoardThe following datasets are from the California Air Resources Board: * arb_california_airbasins - California Air BasinsThe...

  6. Working Characteristics of Variable Intake Valve in Compressed Air Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qihui Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new camless compressed air engine is proposed, which can make the compressed air energy reasonably distributed. Through analysis of the camless compressed air engine, a mathematical model of the working processes was set up. Using the software MATLAB/Simulink for simulation, the pressure, temperature, and air mass of the cylinder were obtained. In order to verify the accuracy of the mathematical model, the experiments were conducted. Moreover, performance analysis was introduced to design compressed air engine. Results show that, firstly, the simulation results have good consistency with the experimental results. Secondly, under different intake pressures, the highest output power is obtained when the crank speed reaches 500 rpm, which also provides the maximum output torque. Finally, higher energy utilization efficiency can be obtained at the lower speed, intake pressure, and valve duration angle. This research can refer to the design of the camless valve of compressed air engine.

  7. Heat and Pressure Seal for Doors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed tubular gasket for doors performs dual function: seals in pressure, and seals out heat. Composed of quartz fabric filled with alumina matting, gasket is bonded with room-temperature-vulcanizing material to periphery of door. When door is closed, gasket is compressed like O-ring: fills gap between door and frame; and prevents leakage of air and heat.

  8. psychrometry: from partial pressures to mole fractions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    1980-03-01

    Mar 1, 1980 ... ABSTRACT. This study uses the viria1 and interaction coefficients of the normal air components in deriving compressibility factors and thereafter a simple iterative formulation for mole fractions. Conversion from partial pressures to mole fractions now becomes tractable by means of determinate multipliers.

  9. High-pressure oxidation of methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob M.; Gersen, Sander; Levinsky, Howard; Klippenstein, Stephen J.; Glarborg, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Methane oxidation at high pressures and intermediate temperatures was investigated in a laminar flow reactor and in a rapid compression machine (RCM). The flow-reactor experiments were conducted at 700–900 K and 100 bar for fuel-air equivalence ratios (Φ) ranging from 0.06 to 19.7, all highly

  10. Air Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-01

    to a halt in its usual medium of travel. A certain minimum of speed is essen- tial to sustentation , for the whole phenomenon of flight 36 AIR WARFARE...3,000 pounds, has a wing area of 287 square feet, while the bomber with its weight of 12,000 pounds requires some 1,121 square feet for its sustentation ...the resistance offered by the other parts of the airplane, which, since they play no part in sustentation , are known as “parasite” resistances. But the

  11. Oscillation of large air bubble cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Y.Y.; Kim, H.Y.; Park, J.K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    The behavior of a large air bubble cloud, which is generated by the air discharged from a perforated sparger, is analyzed by solving Rayleigh-Plesset equation, energy equations and energy balance equation. The equations are solved by Runge-Kutta integration and MacCormack finite difference method. Initial conditions such as driving pressure, air volume, and void fraction strongly affect the bubble pressure amplitude and oscillation frequency. The pool temperature has a strong effect on the oscillation frequency and a negligible effect on the pressure amplitude. The polytropic constant during the compression and expansion processes of individual bubbles ranges from 1.0 to 1.4, which may be attributed to the fact that small bubbles oscillated in frequencies different from their resonance. The temperature of the bubble cloud rapidly approaches the ambient temperature, as is expected from the polytropic constants being between 1.0 and 1.4. (authors)

  12. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has high ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  13. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 ... with a spinal cord injury to do to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow Why is pressure relief ...

  14. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... know about pressure sores? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to do to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow What role does diet and hydration play in preventing pressure ...

  15. Royal Danish Air Force. Air Operations Doctrine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørby, Søren

    of during the latter part of the 1990s. The ideas generated by the Danish Air Force later came to good use when Danish air force officers participated in the work that led to the formulation of the NATO Air Power Doctrine (AJP 3.3). During the latter part of the 2000s, the Danish Air Force found...

  16. Optimizing the Air Dissolution Parameters in an Unpacked Dissolved Air Flotation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Dassey

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the various parameters that influence air solubility and microbubble production in dissolved air flotation (DAF, a multitude of values that cover a large range for these parameters are suggested for field systems. An unpacked saturator and an air quantification unit were designed to specify the effects of power, pressure, temperature, hydraulic retention time, and air flow on the DAF performance. It was determined that a pressure of 621 kPa, hydraulic retention time of 18.2 min, and air flow of 8.5 L/h would be the best controlled parameters for maximum efficiency in this unit. A temperature of 7 °C showed the greatest microbubble production, but temperature control would not be expected in actual application. The maximum microbubble flow from the designed system produced 30 mL of air (±1.5 per L of water under these conditions with immediate startup. The maximum theoretical dissolved air volume of 107 mL (±6 was achieved at a retention time of 2 h and a pressure of 621 kPa. To isolate and have better control over the various DAF operational parameters, the DAF unit was operated without the unsaturated flow stream. This mode of operation led to the formation of large bubbles at peak bubble production rates. In a real-world application, the large bubble formation will be avoided by mixing with raw unsaturated stream and by altering the location of dissolved air output flow.

  17. Air riding seal with purge cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sexton, Thomas D; Mills, Jacob A

    2017-08-15

    An air riding seal for a turbine in a gas turbine engine, where an annular piston is axial moveable within an annular piston chamber formed in a stator of the turbine and forms a seal with a surface on the rotor using pressurized air that forms a cushion in a pocket of the annular piston. A purge cavity is formed on the annular piston and is connected to a purge hole that extends through the annular piston to a lower pressure region around the annular piston or through the rotor to an opposite side. The annular piston is sealed also with inner and outer seals that can be a labyrinth seal to form an additional seal than the cushion of air in the pocket to prevent the face of the air riding seal from overheating.

  18. Cryogenic Cooling System for Zero-Venting Storage of Supercritical Air Packs Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Supercritical air at cryogenic temperature is an attractive source of breathing air because of its very high density and low pressure. However, heat leak into the...

  19. Effect of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment on Health-Related Quality of Life and Sleepiness in High Cardiovascular Risk Individuals With Sleep Apnea: Best Apnea Interventions for Research (BestAIR) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying Y; Wang, Rui; Gleason, Kevin J; Lewis, Eldrin F; Quan, Stuart F; Toth, Claudia M; Morrical, Michael; Rueschman, Michael; Weng, Jia; Ware, James H; Mittleman, Murray A; Redline, Susan

    2017-04-01

    The long-term effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with high cardiovascular disease risk and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) without severe sleepiness is uncertain. We aimed to determine the effect of CPAP treatment on HRQOL in individuals with moderate or severe OSA and cardiovascular disease (CVD) or multiple CVD risk factors without severe sleepiness. In this randomized, controlled, parallel group study, 169 participants were assigned to treatment with CPAP or the control group (conservative medical therapy [CMT] or CMT with sham CPAP). Analyses were based on an intention-to-treat approach. Linear mixed effect models were fitted to compare the changes in the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (SF-36) and in subjective sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale [ESS]) between groups from baseline to the average of 6- and 12-month measurements. CPAP improved several domains of HRQOL including bodily pain (treatment effect 9.7 [95% confidence interval, CI 3.9 to 15.4]; p = .001), vitality (5.7 [95% CI 1.5 to 9.9]; p = .008), general health (8.2 [95% CI 3.7 to 12.7]; p < .001), physical functioning (5.5 [95% CI 1.1 to 10.0]; p = .016), and the physical health summary score (3.3 [95% CI 1.4 to 5.3]; p = .001). CPAP also resulted in less daytime sleepiness (mean change in ESS -1.0 point [95% CI -2.0 to -0.0]; p = .040). In patients with moderate-severe OSA at high risk of cardiovascular events and without severe sleepiness, CPAP improved daytime sleepiness and multiple domains of HRQOL over 6 to 12 months of follow-up, with the largest improvement observed for bodily pain.

  20. Research study of pressure instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, L.; Hull-Allen, G.

    1984-01-01

    To obtain a more vibration resistant pressure sensor for use on the Space Shuttle Main Engine, a proximity probe based, diaphragm type pressure sensor breadboard was developed. A fiber optic proximity probe was selected as the sensor. In combination with existing electronics, a thermal stability evaluation of the entire probe system was made. Based upon the results, a breadboard design of the pressure sensor and electronics was made and fabricated. A brief series of functional experiments was made with the breadboard to calibrate, thermally compensate, and linearize its response. In these experiments, the performance obtained in the temperature range of -320 F (liquid N2) to +200 F was comparable to that of the strain gage based sensor presently in use on the engine. In tests at NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), after some time at or near liquid nitrogen temperatures, the sensor output varied over the entire output range. These large spurious signals were attributed to condensation of air in the sensing gap. In the next phase of development of this sensor, an evaluation of fabrication techniques toward greater thermal and mechanical stability of the fiber probe assembly must be made. In addition to this, a positive optics to metal seal must be developed to withstand the pressure that would result from a diaphragm failure.

  1. Ammonia Synthesis at Low Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cussler, Edward; McCormick, Alon; Reese, Michael; Malmali, Mahdi

    2017-08-23

    Ammonia can be synthesized at low pressure by the use of an ammonia selective absorbent. The process can be driven with wind energy, available locally in areas requiring ammonia for synthetic fertilizer. Such wind energy is often called "stranded," because it is only available far from population centers where it can be directly used. In the proposed low pressure process, nitrogen is made from air using pressure swing absorption, and hydrogen is produced by electrolysis of water. While these gases can react at approximately 400 °C in the presence of a promoted conventional catalyst, the conversion is often limited by the reverse reaction, which makes this reaction only feasible at high pressures. This limitation can be removed by absorption on an ammine-like calcium or magnesium chloride. Such alkaline metal halides can effectively remove ammonia, thus suppressing the equilibrium constraints of the reaction. In the proposed absorption-enhanced ammonia synthesis process, the rate of reaction may then be controlled not by the chemical kinetics nor the absorption rates, but by the rate of the recycle of unreacted gases. The results compare favorably with ammonia made from a conventional small scale Haber-Bosch process.

  2. Pressure Dynamic Characteristics of Pressure Controlled Ventilation System of a Lung Simulator

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Shi; Shuai Ren; Maolin Cai; Weiqing Xu; Qiyou Deng

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation is an important life support treatment of critically ill patients, and air pressure dynamics of human lung affect ventilation treatment effects. In this paper, in order to obtain the influences of seven key parameters of mechanical ventilation system on the pressure dynamics of human lung, firstly, mechanical ventilation system was considered as a pure pneumatic system, and then its mathematical model was set up. Furthermore, to verify the mathematical model, a prototyp...

  3. Reducing cyclone pressure drop with evasés

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyclones are widely used to separate particles from gas flows and as air emissions control devices. Their cost of operation is proportional to the fan energy required to overcome their pressure drop. Evasés or exit diffusers potentially could reduce exit pressure losses without affecting collection...

  4. Effect of Nitrous Oxide Anaesthesia on Endotracheal Cuff Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Koşar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: When N2Ois used for general anaesthesia, it diffuses into the air-filled endotracheal cuff causing the cuff pressure to rise by over inflating the cuff, which results in tracheal damage. This study aimed to estimate changes in the endotracheal-cuff pressure with time during oxygen-air- and oxygen-N2O -induced anaesthesia and to determine its sore throat and hoarseness incidence. Methods: Fifty patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1-2, aged 18-60 years were icluded to our study. Orotracheal intubation was performed using polyvinyl chloride high volume-low pressure endotracheal tubes. The AIR group 40% O2/60% air and N2O group 40% O2/60% N2O was used. The endotracheal cuff pressure at 5, 10, 15, 20 minutes immediately after intubation and at 10-minute intervals were recorded. When the cuff pressure reached 45 cm H2O, was attenuated to 25-30-cm H2O. At the post operative first and the 24th hour, the patients were queried for sore throat and hoarseness. Results: The N2O -group cuff pressure rose from the fifth minute onwards. Also, the N2O group had a higher incidence of sore throat and hoarseness. Conclusion: N2O results in elevated cuff pressure and tracheal morbidities. Cuff-pressure should be routinely monitored during anaesthesia using N2O.

  5. Effect of applying positive pressure with or without endotracheal suctioning during extubation: a laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu, Mauro F; Salvati, Iris G; Donnianni, Mariana C; Ibañez, Belén; Cotignola, Mariana; Bezzi, Marco

    2014-12-01

    During invasive mechanical ventilation, secretions accumulate in the subglottic space; consequently, there is a risk of aspiration of these secretions into the airway during cuff deflation and extubation. To minimize this risk, 2 extubation methods are used. The first consists of introducing a suction catheter into the endotracheal tube (ETT) and the trachea. After initiating suctioning, the cuff is deflated and the ETT is removed together with the suction catheter. The second technique involves applying positive pressure to the ETT using a resuscitation bag. Once the manual breath is delivered, the ETT cuff is deflated and the ETT is removed without suction. The aim of this laboratory study is to determine the existence and magnitude of differences in leak volume during cuff deflation and extubation using various combinations of positive pressure with or without endotracheal suctioning. An ETT connected to a ventilator was placed in a model trachea. Colored water was instilled in the space above the cuff. To measure the leak volume, a collection chamber was attached to the distal end of the model. Nine procedures were defined, based on the delivery of different positive pressure levels with or without endotracheal suctioning during extubation. The volume of leakage, in milliliters, was the unit of analysis. Procedures yielding values lower than 1 mL were assessed by the Friedman test, and a P value of less than .05 was considered significant. Post hoc comparisons were performed with a Wilcoxon test, followed by a Bonferroni correction. The application of CPAP 15, pressure support ventilation (PSV)15/10, and PSV 20/5 produced 0.4, 0.2, and 0.1 mL of leak volume, respectively. Statistically significant differences were found between CPAP 15 and PSV 15/10 (P = .003) and between CPAP 15 and PSV 20/5 (P = .01), but not between PSV 15/10 and PSV 20/5 (P = .30). The addition of suctioning increased leak volume, with statistically significant differences between CPAP 15

  6. Control methods and valve arrangement for start-up and shutdown of pressurized combustion and gasification systems integrated with a gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provol, Steve J.; Russell, David B.; Isaksson, Matti J.

    1994-01-01

    A power plant having a system for converting coal to power in a gas turbine comprises a coal fed pressurized circulating bed for converting coal to pressurized gases, a gas turbine having a compressor for pressurizing air for the pressurized circulating bed and expander for receiving and expanding hot combustion gases for powering a generator, a first fast acting valve for controlling the pressurized air, a second fast acting valve means for controlling pressurized gas from the compressor to the expander.

  7. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Situations Talking to Your Parents - or Other Adults Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) Print ... rest temperature diet emotions posture medicines Why Is High Blood Pressure Bad? High blood pressure means a person's heart ...

  8. Sitting: pressure ulcer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, F

    Seating is a major factor in pressure ulcer development, but it is frequently overlooked in the literature on pressure area management. Pressure ulcers are largely preventable and nurses are integral to the promotion of good practice. The author examines how implementing careful patient assessment, correct positioning and providing optimum seating equipment can help to reduce the risk of pressure ulcer development.

  9. Clean Air Corridors: A Geographic and.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Mark C; Gebhart, Kristi A

    1997-03-01

    Meteorological factors, pollutant emissions, and geographic regions related to transport of low optical extinction coefficient air to Grand Canyon National Park were examined. Back trajectories were generated by two models, the Atmospheric Transport and Dispersion Model (ATAD) and an approach using the Nested Grid Model output for a Lagrangian particle transport model (NGM/ CAPITA). Meteorological information along the trajectories was analyzed for its relationship to visibility at the Grand Canyon. Case studies considered days with anomalously clean air from the southwest and dirty air from the northwest. Clean air was most frequently from the north and northwest, rarely from the south. Low emissions, high ventilation and washout by precipitation was associated with clean air. All clean days with transport from the Los Angeles area had upper-level low pressure over the region with high ventilation and usually abundant precipitation. The dirtiest days with transport from the northwest were affected by forest fires.

  10. Relating Water and Air Flow Characteristics in Coarse Granular Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Rune Røjgaard; Canga, Eriona; Kjærgaard, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    from air flow data. The objective of this study was, therefore, to investigate if this approach is valid 8 also for coarse granular biofilter media which usually consists of much larger particles than soils. In 9 this paper the connection between the pressure drop – velocity relationships for air...... and water flow was 10 investigated using a common biofilter medium, Leca® consisting of rounded porous particles of 2 – 16 11 mm diameter. Pressure drop – velocity relations for water flow were measured for 14 different Leca ® 12 particle size fractions and compared to measurements of the pressure drop...... – velocity relations for air 13 flow in 36 different Leca® particle size fractions (including the 14 used for water flow). The 14 measurements showed that it is indeed possible to predict the pressure drop – velocity relationship for 15 water flow from the corresponding relationship for air flow not only...

  11. Air flotation treatment of salmon processing waste water

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This paper discusses methods for the reduction of the pollution strength of salmon processing waste water. Past research has indicated the success of air pressure...

  12. SAFARI 2000 Modeled Tropospheric Air Mass Trajectories, Dry Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The ETA Forecast Trajectory Model was used to produce forecasts of air-parcel trajectories twice a day at three pressure levels over seven sites in...

  13. SAFARI 2000 Modeled Tropospheric Air Mass Trajectories, Dry Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ETA Forecast Trajectory Model was used to produce forecasts of air-parcel trajectories twice a day at three pressure levels over seven sites in Southern Africa...

  14. Laryngeal Chondrosarcoma as a Rare Cause of Subglottic Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerem Kökoğlu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laryngeal chondrosarcoma (CS is a very rare entity. It is usually seen in 50–80-year olds. It is developed from cricoid cartilage largely. Patients have laryngeal CS complaint of respiratuvar distress, dysphonia, and dysphagia generally. A submucous mass is usually seen in physical examination with an intact mucosa. Distant metastasis is rare in CSs. Main treatment is surgical excision. An 82-year-old patient who has respiratuvar distress is presented in this paper and laryngeal CS is reviewed in the light of the literature.

  15. A Cabin Air Separator for EVA Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Presently, the Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVAs) conducted from the Quest Joint Airlock on the International Space Station use high pressure, high purity oxygen that is delivered to the Space Station by the Space Shuttle. When the Space Shuttle retires, a new method of delivering high pressure, high purity oxygen to the High Pressure Gas Tanks (HPGTs) is needed. One method is to use a cabin air separator to sweep oxygen from the cabin air, generate a low pressure/high purity oxygen stream, and compress the oxygen with a multistage mechanical compressor. A main advantage to this type of system is that the existing low pressure oxygen supply infrastructure can be used as the source of cabin oxygen. ISS has two water electrolysis systems that deliver low pressure oxygen to the cabin, as well as chlorate candles and compressed gas tanks on cargo vehicles. Each of these systems can feed low pressure oxygen into the cabin, and any low pressure oxygen source can be used as an on-board source of oxygen. Three different oxygen separator systems were evaluated, and a two stage Pressure Swing Adsorption system was selected for reasons of technical maturity. Two different compressor designs were subjected to long term testing, and the compressor with better life performance and more favorable oxygen safety characteristics was selected. These technologies have been used as the basis of a design for a flight system located in Equipment Lock, and taken to Preliminary Design Review level of maturity. This paper describes the Cabin Air Separator for EVA Oxygen (CASEO) concept, describes the separator and compressor technology trades, highlights key technology risks, and describes the flight hardware concept as presented at Preliminary Design Review (PDR)

  16. The effect of a photocatalytic air purifier on indoor air quality quantified using different measuring methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolarik, Barbara; Wargocki, Pawel; Skorek-Osikowska, A.

    2010-01-01

    The effect on indoor air quality of an air purifier based on photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) was determined by different measuring techniques: sensory assessments of air quality made by human subjects, Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and chromatographic methods (Gas...... Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry and High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography with UV detection). The experiment was conducted in a simulated office, ventilated with 0.6 h(-1), 2.5 h(-1) and 6 h(-1), in the presence of additional pollution sources (carpet, chipboard and linoleum). At the lowest air change rate...... air quality, as documented by sensory assessments made by human subjects. It also reduces concentrations of many chemical compounds present in the air as documented by the PTR-MS technique. For the lowest ventilation, results from measurements using the chromatographic methods have similar tendency...

  17. Tracking air-related health should be an integrated part of air quality management in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wright, CY

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available and reduced lung function to cardiovascular symptoms such as high blood pressure and lung cancer. There is also a statistically-significant association between air pollution and mortality (death) from respiratory and cardiovascular illnesses. To ascertain...

  18. Pressure Dome for High-Pressure Electrolyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Timothy; Schmitt, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    A high-strength, low-weight pressure vessel dome was designed specifically to house a high-pressure [2,000 psi (approx. = 13.8 MPa)] electrolyzer. In operation, the dome is filled with an inert gas pressurized to roughly 100 psi (approx. = 690 kPa) above the high, balanced pressure product oxygen and hydrogen gas streams. The inert gas acts to reduce the clamping load on electrolyzer stack tie bolts since the dome pressure acting axially inward helps offset the outward axial forces from the stack gas pressure. Likewise, radial and circumferential stresses on electrolyzer frames are minimized. Because the dome is operated at a higher pressure than the electrolyzer product gas, any external electrolyzer leak prevents oxygen or hydrogen from leaking into the dome. Instead the affected stack gas stream pressure rises detectably, thereby enabling a system shutdown. All electrical and fluid connections to the stack are made inside the pressure dome and require special plumbing and electrical dome interfaces for this to be accomplished. Further benefits of the dome are that it can act as a containment shield in the unlikely event of a catastrophic failure. Studies indicate that, for a given active area (and hence, cell ID), frame outside diameter must become ever larger to support stresses at higher operating pressures. This can lead to a large footprint and increased costs associated with thicker and/or larger diameter end-plates, tie-rods, and the frames themselves. One solution is to employ rings that fit snugly around the frame. This complicates stack assembly and is sometimes difficult to achieve in practice, as its success is strongly dependent on frame and ring tolerances, gas pressure, and operating temperature. A pressure dome permits an otherwise low-pressure stack to operate at higher pressures without growing the electrolyzer hardware. The pressure dome consists of two machined segments. An O-ring is placed in an O-ring groove in the flange of the bottom

  19. Computer program for obtaining thermodynamic and transport properties of air and products of combustion of ASTM-A-1 fuel and air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippensteele, S. A.; Colladay, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program for determining desired thermodynamic and transport property values by means of a three-dimensional (pressure, fuel-air ratio, and either enthalpy or temperature) interpolation routine was developed. The program calculates temperature (or enthalpy), molecular weight, viscosity, specific heat at constant pressure, thermal conductivity, isentropic exponent (equal to the specific heat ratio at conditions where gases do not react), Prandtl number, and entropy for air and a combustion gas mixture of ASTM-A-1 fuel and air over fuel-air ratios from zero to stoichiometric, pressures from 1 to 40 atm, and temperatures from 250 to 2800 K.

  20. High-pressure oxidation of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Gersen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    Methane oxidation at high pressures and intermediate temperatures was investigated in a laminar flow reactor and in a rapid compression machine (RCM). The flow-reactor experiments were conducted at 700–900 K and 100 bar for fuel-air equivalence ratios (Φ) ranging from 0.06 to 19.7, all highly...... diluted in nitrogen. It was found that under the investigated conditions, the onset temperature for methane oxidation ranged from 723 K under reducing conditions to 750 K under stoichiometric and oxidizing conditions. The RCM experiments were carried out at pressures of 15–80 bar and temperatures of 800......–1250 K under stoichiometric and fuel-lean (Φ=0.5) conditions. Ignition delays, in the range of 1–100 ms, decreased monotonically with increasing pressure and temperature. A chemical kinetic model for high-pressure methane oxidation was established, with particular emphasis on the peroxide chemistry...