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  1. Reducing allergic symptoms through eliminating subgingival plaque

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    Haryono Utomo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elimination of subgingival plaque for prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases through scaling is a routine procedure. It is also well-known that periodontal disease is related to systemic diseases. Nevertheless, the idea how scaling procedures also able to reduce allergic symptoms i.e. eczema and asthma, is not easily accepted, because it is contradictory to the “hygiene hypothesis”. However, since allergic symptoms also depend on variable factors such as genetic, environmental and infection factors; every possible effort to eliminate or avoid from these factors had to be considered. Subgingival plaque is a source of infection, especially the Gram-negative bacteria that produced endotoxin (lipopolysaccharides, LPS, a potential stimulator of immunocompetent cells, which may also related to allergy, such as mast cells and basophils. In addition, it also triggers the “neurogenic switching” mechanism which may be initiated from chronic gingivitis. Objective: This case report may explain the possible connection between subgingival plaque and allergy based on evidence-based cases. Case: Two adult siblings who suffered from chronic gingivitis also showed different manifestations of allergy that were allergic dermatitis and asthma for years. They were also undergone unsuccessful medical treatment for years. Oral and topical corticosteroids were taken for dermatitis and inhalation for asthma. Case Management: Patients were conducted deep scaling procedures, allergic symptoms gradually diminished in days even though without usual medications. Conclusion: Concerning to the effectiveness of scaling procedures which concomitantly eliminate subgingival plaque in allergic patients, it concluded that this concept is logical. Nevertheless, further verification and collaborated study with allergic expert should be done.

  2. Reducing allergic symptoms through eliminating subgingival plaque

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    Utomo, Haryono; Prahasanti, Chiquita; Ruhadi, Iwan

    2008-01-01

    Background: Elimination of subgingival plaque for prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases through scaling is a routine procedure. It is also well-known that periodontal disease is related to systemic diseases. Nevertheless, the idea how scaling procedures also able to reduce allergic symptoms i.e. eczema and asthma, is not easily accepted, because it is contradictory to the “hygiene hypothesis”. However, since allergic symptoms also depend on variable factors such as genetic, environ...

  3. [Using DGGE to analyze bacteria community structure changes in subgingival plaque after periodontal initial therapy].

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    Zhou, Yan-bin; Shu, Rong; Liu, Da-li

    2012-02-01

    To analyze bacteria community structure changes in subgingival plaque after initial therapy, and to provide experimental evidences for clinical decision. Six patients with chronic periodontitis were chosen. Subgingival plaque samples, as well as clinical indexes, were collected at baseline and six weeks after initial therapy. The generated two different 16S rDNA fragments of subgingival plaque samples were separated by denaturing gel, creating bands patterns representative of community structure. Subsequent cluster analysis was made. The clinical indexes were improved significantly. The diversity of population of clinical subgingival samples was not significantly different between baseline and 6 weeks after initial therapy. Through cluster analysis, it was confirmed that same patient got similar subgingival plaque between baseline and 6 weeks after treatment. Same patient tend to get similar subgingival plaque between baseline and after initial therapy. DGGE can detect the microbial composition of subgingival plaque.

  4. Immediate effect of instrumentation on the subgingival microflora in deep inflamed pockets under strict plaque control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhemrev, GE; Timmerman, MF; Veldkamp, A; Van Winkelhoff, AJ; Van der Velden, U

    Objective: To investigate (1) reduction in the number of microorganisms obtained directly after subgingival instrumentation, (2) rate of bacterial re-colonization during 2 weeks, under supragingival plaque-free conditions. Materials and Method: Effects of subgingival instrumentation were measured at

  5. Ribotyping on small-sized spirochetes isolated from subgingival plaque

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    Fiehn, N E; Bangsborg, J M; Colding, H

    1995-01-01

    In the present study DNA restriction patterns and corresponding ribotypes of 17 subgingival small-sized spirochetes (1:2:1 and 2:4:2 isolates), 2 Treponema socranskii strains and two Treponema denticola strains were examined. Purified chromosomal DNA was digested by BamHI, HindIII, PstI and ClaI....

  6. Representation of microorganisms of subgingival plaque at different degrees of periodontium tissue inflamation and destruction

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    Staletović Danijela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Parodontopathy is an inflammatory reaction to gram negative anaerobic bacterial infectious agents that attacks the supporting dental apparatus including gingiva, periodontal ligament, cement and alveolar bone. The aim of the survey was to identify quantitative qualitative structure of microorganisms of subgingival plaque in patients suffering from chronic and aggressive parodontopathy using the PCR method, and then evaluate the correlation of different degrees of inflammation and destruction of periodontium tissue with the presence and concentration of these microorganisms. The survey involved 70 patients, 16 to 65 years old. The identification of microorganisms in subgingival plaque was set by the PCR method (Polymerase Chain Reaction. Towards diagnosing and defining the destruction degree of periodontal tissue, standard epidemiological criteria were used: plaque index (Silness-Löe, gingival index (Löe-Silness, SBI index (Mühleman-Son and PDDZ. The presence of periodontal pathogens in subgingival plaque showed the statistical link with clinical parameters of the severeness of parodontopathy and gingival inflammation. The test result of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans statistically was significantly more frequent in patients with medium and severe type of parodontopathy compared to the average depth of periodontal pockets. The detection of P.g. and A.a. statistically was significantly more frequent in persons with mild and intensive gingival inflammation.

  7. Comparison of real-time PCR and culture for detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis in subgingival plaque samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutaga, Khalil; van Winkelhoff, Arie Jan; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Savelkoul, Paul H. M.

    2003-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major pathogen in destructive periodontal disease in humans. Detection and quantification of this microorganism are relevant for diagnosis and treatment planning. The prevalence and quantity of P. gingivalis in subgingival plaque samples of periodontitis patients were

  8. Tracking of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in subgingival plaque of aggressive periodontitis patients

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    Supriya Kheur

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is thought to be one of the etiological agents in aggressive periodontitis as well as indicated in various systemic diseases. Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of A. actinomycetemcomitans in the subgingival plaque of aggressive periodontitis patients. Study Design: Initially, under the selective growth conditions, the isolates were picked from the plaques and their identification was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction using primers specific for A. actinomycetemcomitans subgingival plaque of 15 patients diagnosed clinically and on radiographic criteria as aggressive periodontitis was inoculated on the Tryptic Soy agar with Bacitracin and Vancomycin culture media for 3-5 days under microaerophilic conditions. The positive colonies were selected based on biochemical tests for further analysis using reported primers for A. actinomycetemcomitans. Results: The results showed that 66.67% of aggressive periodontitis patients and 6.67% of control group of normal patients showed evidence of presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans in the subgingival microflora. Conclusion: This is the first study of its kind in an Indian population whereby almost all aggressive periodontitis patients showed evidence of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  9. Microbial Profile of Supragingival and Subgingival Plaque of Patients With Glycogen Storage Disease

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    Chealsea E. Garcia DDS, MS

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients with glycogen storage disease (GSD are either orally fed (ORF or gastronomy-tube fed (GTF with cornstarch to maintain normal glucose levels. It is not known whether the use of cornstarch affects the microbiological oral profile of patients with GSD. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare supragingival and subgingival plaque samples collected from 53 participants with GSD (2-56 years—29 ORF and 24 GTF. The 16S sequence bacterial profiles of plaque DNA were obtained and a total of 768 probes were detected across the plaque groups. Orally fed patients showed higher means of cariogenic species and periodontal health-associated species, whereas GTF patients showed higher means of periopathogenic species ( P < .05. Orally fed patients exhibited high levels of caries pathogens and lower levels of periodontal pathogens possibly due to the acidic environment created by their cornstarch diet, when compared to GTF patients.

  10. Comparative evaluation of subgingival plaque microflora in pregnant and non-pregnant women: A clinical and microbiologic study

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    Rishi Emmatty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Gingival changes in pregnancy have been attributed to changes in the subgingival biofilm related to hormonal variations. Aims: To evaluate the subgingival plaque microflora in pregnant and nonpregnant women to determine if pregnancy induces any alterations in the subgingival plaque and to associate these changes with changes in periodontal status. Settings and Design: Thirty pregnant and 10 nonpregnant women within the age group of 20-35 years having a probing pocket depth (PPD of 3-4 mm were included in the study. The pregnant women were equally divided into 3 groups of 10, each belonging to I, II, and III trimester. Materials and Methods: Plaque index, gingival index, PPD, and microbiologic evaluation for specific bacterial counts for Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Parvimonas micra, and Fusobacterium nucleatum were carried out for all subjects. Statistical Analysis: Mann-Whitney U test. Results: Increase in gingival inflammation was observed in II and III trimester as compared with I trimester and control. Plaque scores did not show any significant difference between pregnant and nonpregnant women. Specific bacterial examination revealed an increase in proportion of P. intermedia in pregnant women of both II and III trimester as compared with I trimester and nonpregnant women. Conclusions: A definite increase in proportions of P. intermedia occurs in subgingival plaque microflora in pregnancy that may be responsible for the exaggerated gingival response.

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF SURFACE-FREE ENERGY ON SUPRAGINGIVAL AND SUBGINGIVAL PLAQUE MICROBIOLOGY - AN IN-VIVO STUDY ON IMPLANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    QUIRYNEN, M; VANDERMEI, HC; BOLLEN, CML; VANDENBOSSCHE, LH; DOORNBUSCH, GI; VANSTEENBERGHE, D; BUSSCHER, HJ

    THE INFLUENCE OF SURFACE FREE ENERGY on supra- and subgingival plaque microbiology was examined in 9 patients with functional fixed prostheses supported by endosseous titanium implants. Two abutments (trans-mucosal part of the 2 stage implant) were replaced by either a new titanium abutment or a

  12. Evaluation of Subgingival Dental Plaque Microbiota Changes In Fixed Orthodontic Patients with Syber Green Real Time PCR

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    Naser Sargolzaie

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the most common problems we confront in orthodontic therapy is periodontal diseases. Initial factor which causes these diseases is colonization of anaerobic microorganisms in subgingival plaque. Technically, local environmental changes related to orthodontic band and brackets may influence the bacterial species in periodontal plaque. However, it seems necessary to assess variations in subgingival plaque caused by orthodontic appliances. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in subgingival microbiota and clinical parameters before and after bracket placement. Methods: Clinical parameters including probing depth (PD, plaque index (PI, clinical attachment level (CAL, bleeding on probing (BOP and gingival index (GI were recorded and subgingival microbial samples were collected in 30 people aged between 13 and 25. As a control group, 15 persons getting matched as to their age and sex with no need to orthodontic treatment were opted using specific primers, SYBER Green Real-Time PCR was carried out in order to determine bacterial flora in stored samples. All mentioned procedures were reassessed in experimental group and in control group three months after band and bracket bonding. A descriptive analysis was conducted, and paired t test and Wilcoxon test were used for differences between groups (P

  13. Use of the Syrian golden hamster for the induction of intraoral abscesses by sutures contaminated with human subgingival plaque.

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    Wasfy, M O; McMahon, K T; Santos, A C; Minah, G E; Falkler, W A; Lloyd, D R

    1994-02-01

    Analysis of normal oral flora in 150 cheek pouches of hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) defined the microbial working environment and demonstrated the absence of human oral black-pigmented bacteria. Silk sutures saturated with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia or subgingival plaque were used to close wounds made in hamster's cheek pouches. Abscesses were formed when sutures had solitary P. gingivalis or other bacteria mixed with P. gingivalis or when P. intermedia was mixed with other bacteria besides P. gingivalis. A concentration of black-pigmented bacteria emanating from 3 x 10(5) colony-forming units/inoculum was required for abscess formation. Six abscesses (14.3%) were developed in association with the presence of other odontopathic bacteria, primarily Fusobacterium nucleatum and Actinomyces viscosus. The hamster cheek pouch with iatrogenic wounds closed with plaque-impregnated sutures is a novel and effective model to study the pathology of wound infections and virulence of human subgingival organisms.

  14. Evaluation of a novel immunochromatographic device for rapid and accurate clinical detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis in subgingival plaque.

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    Imamura, K; Takayama, S; Saito, A; Inoue, E; Nakayama, Y; Ogata, Y; Shirakawa, S; Nagano, T; Gomi, K; Morozumi, T; Akiishi, K; Watanabe, K; Yoshie, H

    2015-10-01

    An important goal for the improved diagnosis and management of infectious and inflammatory diseases, such as periodontitis, is the development of rapid and accurate technologies for the decentralized detection of bacterial pathogens. The aim of this prospective multicenter study was to evaluate the clinical use of a novel immunochromatographic device with monoclonal antibodies for the rapid point-of-care detection and semi-quantification of Porphyromonas gingivalis in subgingival plaque. Sixty-three patients with chronic periodontitis and 28 periodontally healthy volunteers were subjected to clinical and microbiological examinations. Subgingival plaque samples were analyzed for the presence of P. gingivalis using a novel immunochromatography based device DK13-PG-001, designed to detect the 40k-outer membrane protein of P. gingivalis, and compared with a PCR-Invader method. In the periodontitis group, a significant strong positive correlation in detection results was found between the test device score and the PCR-Invader method (Spearman rank correlation, r=0.737, pgingivalis, whereas 76% (n=48) of periodontitis subjects were tested positive. There was a significant positive correlation between device scores for P. gingivalis and periodontal parameters including probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level (r=0.317 and 0.281, respectively, pgingivalis in subgingival plaque. UMIN Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN-CTR) UMIN000011943. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Relative proportions of pathogen-related oral spirochetes (PROS) and Treponema denticola in supragingival and subgingival plaque from patients with periodontitis.

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    Riviere, G R; Elliot, K S; Adams, D F; Simonson, L G; Forgas, L B; Nilius, A M; Lukehart, S A

    1992-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to use monoclonal antibodies to enumerate spirochetes in dental plaque, including the newly recognized pathogen-related oral spirochete (PROS) and specific serovars of Treponema denticola. Plaque was collected from control subjects with no apparent periodontal disease and from sites of moderate to severe chronic periodontitis in patients with inflammatory periodontal disease. Individual monoclonal antibodies were used to determine whether spirochetes were present and then a double-staining protocol was employed to count total spirochetes and specific treponemes in individual microscopic fields. Results indicate that spirochetes are more common at diseased sites and in subgingival plaque than at healthy sites or in supragingival plaque. Together PROS and T. denticola comprised the majority of all spirochetes in all samples and PROS and T. denticola serovars "B" and D were most numerous in plaque from patients with periodontitis. PROS were the majority of all spirochetes in supragingival plaque (76.2% +/- 23.8%) and subgingival plaque (60.9% +/- 19.1%) from periodontitis patients, significantly larger than the percentage of T. denticola serovar "B" (P less than .001 for both supragingival and subgingival plaque) and serovar D (P less than .01 for supragingival and P less than .001 for subgingival plaque). These observations indicate that PROS are the predominant spirochete in plaque from sites of patients with periodontitis, but other analytical approaches are necessary to determine if PROS or T. denticola are pathogenic.

  16. Relationship between expression of human gingival beta-defensins and levels of periodontopathogens in subgingival plaque.

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    Wang, P; Duan, D; Zhou, X; Li, X; Yang, J; Deng, M; Xu, Y

    2015-02-01

    Human beta-defensins (hBDs) are a group of antimicrobial peptides important in epithelial innate immunity, and their differential expression is associated with periodontal diseases. The aim of this study was to explore relationships among hBDs, total subgingival bacteria and periodontopathogens in healthy subjects and in patients with chronic periodontitis. The periodontal clinical parameters of 29 healthy subjects and 25 patients with chronic periodontitis were recorded. The relative expression of hBD1, hBD2 and hBD3 genes in gingival biopsies was measured using real-time PCR. The numbers of total bacteria and of Treponema denticola, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Tannerella forsythia in subgingival plaque were quantified by real-time PCR. Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U-test and Spearman's rank correlation test. No significant differences in expression of the hBD genes were found between the group of healthy subjects and the group of patients with chronic periodontitis. Total bacteria and T. denticola were detected in all participants. F. nucleatum and T. forsythia were detected in all patients with chronic periodontitis and in 86.21% and 51.72%, respectively, of healthy volunteers. P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans were detected in 24.14% and 17.24%, respectively, of the healthy group and in 84.00% and 12.00%, respectively, of the chronic periodontitis group. The prevalence of all bacteria, except A. actinomycetemcomitans, was significantly higher in the group of patients with chronic periodontitis than in the group of healthy subjects (p analyzing the data in different groups, total bacteria and hBD-2 were significantly correlated (r = -0.492, p = 0.026) only in the group of healthy subjects. The negative correlations between hBD-2 and total bacteria, especially in the group of healthy subjects, indicate that hBDs may play an important role by limiting an increase of

  17. The profile of Porphyromonas gingivalis kgp biotype and fimA genotype mosaic in subgingival plaque samples.

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    Nadkarni, Mangala A; Chhour, Kim-Ly; Chapple, Cheryl C; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Hunter, Neil

    2014-12-01

    Combined analysis of allelic variation of the virulence-associated, strain-specific lys-gingipain gene (kgp) and major fimbrial gene (fimA) of Porphyromonas gingivalis was undertaken in 116 subgingival plaque samples to understand the kgp biotype and fimA genotype profile in a subject-specific manner. Allelic variation in the polyadhesin domain of kgp from P. gingivalis strains 381 (ATCC 33277), HG66 and W83 generated four isoforms corresponding to four biotypes of P. gingivalis. Similarly, variation in the fimA subunit of the fimA gene cluster of P. gingivalis resulted in six fimA genotypes. Strain-specific differential PCR was performed for kgp and fimA using DNA isolated from subgingival plaque samples. Our findings demonstrate that all of the P. gingivalis kgp biotypes detected in this study were predominantly associated with the fimA II genotype. Dominance of kgp biotypes 381 or HG66 combined with fimA II fimbriae could imply an adaptive strategy by P. gingivalis to generate the fittest strains for survival in the host environment. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Relative abundance of total subgingival plaque-specific bacteria in salivary microbiota reflects the overall periodontal condition in patients with periodontitis.

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    Kageyama, Shinya; Takeshita, Toru; Asakawa, Mikari; Shibata, Yukie; Takeuchi, Kenji; Yamanaka, Wataru; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2017-01-01

    Increasing attention is being focused on evaluating the salivary microbiota as a promising method for monitoring oral health; however, its bacterial composition greatly differs from that of dental plaque microbiota, which is a dominant etiologic factor of oral diseases. This study evaluated the relative abundance of subgingival plaque-specific bacteria in the salivary microbiota and examined a relationship between the abundance and severity of periodontal condition in patients with periodontitis. Four samples (subgingival and supragingival plaques, saliva, and tongue coating) per each subject were collected from 14 patients with a broad range of severity of periodontitis before periodontal therapy. The bacterial composition was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing using Ion PGM. Of the 66 species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) representing the mean relative abundance of ≥ 1% in any of the four niches, 12 OTUs corresponding to known periodontal pathogens, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, were characteristically predominant in the subgingival plaque and constituted 37.3 ± 22.9% of the microbiota. The total relative abundance of these OTUs occupied only 1.6 ± 1.2% of the salivary microbiota, but significantly correlated with the percentage of diseased sites (periodontal pocket depth ≥ 4 mm; r = 0.78, P microbiota (r = 0.61, P = 0.02). After periodontal therapy, the total relative abundance of these 12 OTUs was evaluated as well as before periodontal therapy and reductions of the abundance through periodontal therapy were strongly correlated in saliva and subgingival plaque (r = 0.81, P microbiota might be a promising target for the evaluation of subgingival plaque-derived bacteria representing the present condition of periodontal health.

  19. The microbial community shifts of subgingival plaque in patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis following non-surgical periodontal therapy: a pilot study.

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    Han, Jing; Wang, Peng; Ge, Shaohua

    2017-02-07

    The object of this study is to characterize the bacterial community of subgingival plaque of two subjects with generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP) pre- and post-treatment. We picked two patients with GAgP and used high-throughput 16S rDNA sequencing. V4 hypervariable region was picked for PCR amplification of subgingival samples. Then, the PCR products were sequenced through Illumina MiSeq platform. One month after therapy, both the clinical features and periodontal parameters improved obviously. Moreover, the composition and structure of subgingival bacterial community changed after initial periodontal therapy. Also, the composition of the subgingival microbiota was highly individualized among different patients. Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetes and Fusobacteria were related to pathogenicity of GAgP while Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria seemed associated with clinical symptoms resolution. In this study, we found the subgingival bacterial community was high in species richness but dominated by a few species or phylotypes, with significant shifts of microbiota that occurred after treatment. This study demonstrated the shift of the subgingival bacterial community before and after treatment by high-throughput 16S rDNA sequencing, and provided a concise method for analysis of microbial community for periodontal diseases.

  20. Presence of Helicobacter pylori in subgingival plaque of periodontitis patients with and without dyspepsia, detected by polymerase chain reaction and culture

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    Agarwal, Sangita; Jithendra, K. D.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori is an important gastrointestinal pathogen that is strongly associated with gastritis as well as peptic ulcer disease. Antimicrobial therapy frequently fails to cure H. pylori infection, which suggests there may be sanctuary sites where the organism resides. This study was aimed to assess the role of oral cavity as a reservoir of H. pylori by evaluating the occurrence of the organism in subgingival plaque of dyspeptic patients by polymerase chain reaction as wel...

  1. Co-localized or randomly distributed? Pair cross correlation of in vivo grown subgingival biofilm bacteria quantified by digital image analysis.

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    Claudia Schillinger

    Full Text Available The polymicrobial nature of periodontal diseases is reflected by the diversity of phylotypes detected in subgingival plaque and the finding that consortia of suspected pathogens rather than single species are associated with disease development. A number of these microorganisms have been demonstrated in vitro to interact and enhance biofilm integration, survival or even pathogenic features. To examine the in vivo relevance of these proposed interactions, we extended the spatial arrangement analysis tool of the software daime (digital image analysis in microbial ecology. This modification enabled the quantitative analysis of microbial co-localization in images of subgingival biofilm species, where the biomass was confined to fractions of the whole-image area, a situation common for medical samples. Selected representatives of the disease-associated red and orange complexes that were previously suggested to interact with each other in vitro (Tannerella forsythia with Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis with Prevotella intermedia were chosen for analysis and labeled with specific fluorescent probes via fluorescence in situ hybridization. Pair cross-correlation analysis of in vivo grown biofilms revealed tight clustering of F. nucleatum/periodonticum and T. forsythia at short distances (up to 6 µm with a pronounced peak at 1.5 µm. While these results confirmed previous in vitro observations for F. nucleatum and T. forsythia, random spatial distribution was detected between P. gingivalis and P. intermedia in the in vivo samples. In conclusion, we successfully employed spatial arrangement analysis on the single cell level in clinically relevant medical samples and demonstrated the utility of this approach for the in vivo validation of in vitro observations by analyzing statistically relevant numbers of different patients. More importantly, the culture-independent nature of this approach enables similar quantitative analyses for "as

  2. Co-localized or randomly distributed? Pair cross correlation of in vivo grown subgingival biofilm bacteria quantified by digital image analysis.

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    Schillinger, Claudia; Petrich, Annett; Lux, Renate; Riep, Birgit; Kikhney, Judith; Friedmann, Anton; Wolinsky, Lawrence E; Göbel, Ulf B; Daims, Holger; Moter, Annette

    2012-01-01

    The polymicrobial nature of periodontal diseases is reflected by the diversity of phylotypes detected in subgingival plaque and the finding that consortia of suspected pathogens rather than single species are associated with disease development. A number of these microorganisms have been demonstrated in vitro to interact and enhance biofilm integration, survival or even pathogenic features. To examine the in vivo relevance of these proposed interactions, we extended the spatial arrangement analysis tool of the software daime (digital image analysis in microbial ecology). This modification enabled the quantitative analysis of microbial co-localization in images of subgingival biofilm species, where the biomass was confined to fractions of the whole-image area, a situation common for medical samples. Selected representatives of the disease-associated red and orange complexes that were previously suggested to interact with each other in vitro (Tannerella forsythia with Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis with Prevotella intermedia) were chosen for analysis and labeled with specific fluorescent probes via fluorescence in situ hybridization. Pair cross-correlation analysis of in vivo grown biofilms revealed tight clustering of F. nucleatum/periodonticum and T. forsythia at short distances (up to 6 µm) with a pronounced peak at 1.5 µm. While these results confirmed previous in vitro observations for F. nucleatum and T. forsythia, random spatial distribution was detected between P. gingivalis and P. intermedia in the in vivo samples. In conclusion, we successfully employed spatial arrangement analysis on the single cell level in clinically relevant medical samples and demonstrated the utility of this approach for the in vivo validation of in vitro observations by analyzing statistically relevant numbers of different patients. More importantly, the culture-independent nature of this approach enables similar quantitative analyses for "as

  3. Changes in antimicrobial susceptibility profile and prevalence of quinolone low-sensitive strains in subgingival plaque from acute periodontal lesions after systemic administration of sitafloxacin.

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    Tomita, Sachiyo; Kasai, Shunsuke; Imamura, Kentaro; Ihara, Yuichiro; Kita, Daichi; Ota, Koki; Sekino, Jin; Nakagawa, Taneaki; Saito, Atsushi

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to assess changes in antimicrobial susceptibilities of subgingival bacteria in acute periodontal lesions following systemic administration of a new-generation fluoroquinolone, sitafloxacin and to monitor the occurrence and fate of quinolone low-sensitive strains. Patients with acute phase of chronic periodontitis were subjected to microbiological assessment of their subgingival plaque samples at baseline (A1). Sitafloxacin was then administered systemically (100 mg/day for 5 days). The microbiological examinations were repeated one week after administration (A2). Susceptibilities of clinical isolates from acute sites to various antimicrobials were determined using broth and agar dilution methods. At A2, subgingival bacteria with low sensitivity to levofloxacin were identified in four patients, and they were subjected to a follow-up microbiological examination at on the average 12 months after sitafloxacin administration (A3). The patients received initial and supportive periodontal therapy during the period A2 to A3. From the examined subgingival sites, 8 and 19 clinical isolates were obtained at A2 and A3, respectively. Some Streptococcus strains isolated at A2 were found to be resistant to levofloxacin (MIC 16-64 μg/ml), azithromycin (MIC 2->128 μg/ml) or clarithromycin (MIC 1->32 μg/ml). At A3, isolated streptococci were highly susceptible to levofloxacin (MIC 0.5-2 μg/ml), while those resistant to azithromycin or clarithromycin were still isolated. It is suggested that the presence of the quinolone low-sensitive strains in initially acute lesions after sitafloxacin administration was transient, and they do not persist in the subgingival milieu during the periodontal therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Presence of Helicobacter pylori in subgingival plaque of periodontitis patients with and without dyspepsia, detected by polymerase chain reaction and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Sangita; Jithendra, K D

    2012-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important gastrointestinal pathogen that is strongly associated with gastritis as well as peptic ulcer disease. Antimicrobial therapy frequently fails to cure H. pylori infection, which suggests there may be sanctuary sites where the organism resides. This study was aimed to assess the role of oral cavity as a reservoir of H. pylori by evaluating the occurrence of the organism in subgingival plaque of dyspeptic patients by polymerase chain reaction as well as culture. Thirty chronic periodontitis patients whose biopsy specimens were found to be H. pylori positive with rapid urease test and histopathologic examination were considered as cases and 20 chronic periodontitis patients who never had any symptoms of gastritis or peptic ulcer were taken as controls. Subgingival plaque samples were collected and sent to microbiological laboratory for detection of H. pylori by 16S rRNA based polymerase chain reaction as well as culture. 60% of the samples were found to be positive with polymerase chain reaction in the case group when compared to 15% in the controls. Also, 30% of the cases were found to be positive with culture compared to none in controls. A higher frequency of detection of H. pylori in those patients with positive antral biopsy report was seen. Also, polymerase chain reaction was found to be more sensitive than culture for detection. Thus, we conclude that detection of H. pylori in dental plaque of dyspeptic patients cannot be neglected and might represent a risk factor for recolonization of stomach after systemic eradication therapy.

  5. Investigation of the Effect of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus on Subgingival Plaque Microbiota by High-Throughput 16S rDNA Pyrosequencing

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    Munro, Daniel; Zhu, Chunxia; Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Qi; Dong, Qunfeng

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for chronic periodontitis. We investigated the effects of type 2 diabetes on the subgingival plaque bacterial composition by applying culture-independent 16S rDNA sequencing to periodontal bacteria isolated from four groups of volunteers: non-diabetic subjects without periodontitis, non-diabetic subjects with periodontitis, type 2 diabetic patients without periodontitis, and type 2 diabetic patients with periodontitis. A total of 71,373 high-quality sequences were produced from the V1-V3 region of 16S rDNA genes by 454 pyrosequencing. Those 16S rDNA sequences were classified into 16 phyla, 27 classes, 48 orders, 85 families, 126 genera, and 1141 species-level OTUs. Comparing periodontally healthy samples with periodontitis samples identified 20 health-associated and 15 periodontitis-associated OTUs. In the subjects with healthy periodontium, the abundances of three genera (Prevotella, Pseudomonas, and Tannerella) and nine OTUs were significantly different between diabetic patients and their non-diabetic counterparts. In the subjects carrying periodontitis, the abundances of three phyla (Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Bacteriodetes), two genera (Actinomyces and Aggregatibacter), and six OTUs were also significantly different between diabetics and non-diabetics. Our results show that type 2 diabetes mellitus could alter the bacterial composition in the subgingival plaque. PMID:23613868

  6. The Effect of Pistacia atlantica Var. mutica Mouthwash on Dental Plaque Bacteria and Subgingival Microorganisms: a Randomized and Controlled Triple-blind Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arami, S; Mojaddadi, M A; Pourabbas, R; Chitsaz, M T; Delazar, A; Mobayen, H

    2015-09-01

    Dental plaque is a well-documented etiologic factor for periodontal diseases. While chlorhexidine (CHX) is the gold-standard agent for treating dental plaques, undesirable side effects are often found after continuous use of the mouthwash. Therefore, this single-center, randomized, triple-blinded and clinical trial was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of Pistacia atlantica Var. mutica extract mouthwash on de novo dental plaque bacteria and subgingival microorganisms compared to CHX on a total of 28 patients. The mean aerobic plaque bacterial count of patients at baseline was 2.17 × 10(6). After 4 days of treatment, there were statistically significant decreases in the mean aerobic bacteria in the patients who received P. atlantica and/or CHX (7.25 × 10(4), p = 0.006) and (9.91 × 10(3), p = 0.002), respectively, compared to the patients who received the placebo (6.26 × 10(5)). This study showed that P. atlantica mouthwash is effective against gingival microorganisms. Because of its reduced side effects, P. atlantica mouthwash may be a good alternative choice for patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Medición de cambios cuantitativos de la microbiota subgingival posterior a la remoción de placa bacteriana supragingival Measurement of quantitative changes of the microbiota subgingival after to removal of bacterial plaque supragingival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Godoy

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Uno de los campos de interés en el estudio de la microbiología periodontal para muchos investigadores ha sido identificar si es posible que los microorganismos responsables del origen y progresión de la enfermedad periodontal que habitan sobre el margen gingival (supragingival y bajo este (subgingival tengan una relación directa que permita mantener interacciones influyentes en el crecimiento y desarrollo de las diferentes especies bacterianas que habitan en los tejidos periodontales. Por lo tanto, al remover los microorganismos que se ubican supragingivalmente sería posible encontrar cambios en el medio subgingival al no existir un intercambio entre los ambientes aerobios (supragingival y anaerobios (subgingival una vez desorganizada la placa bacteriana supragingival. Para demostrar esta relación se seleccionaron 7 individuos con diagnóstico de periodontitis crónica moderada y severa a los cuales se les realizó un destartraje supragingival de boca completa para lograr desorganizar la placa bacteriana supragingival. A su vez se tomaron muestras microbiológicas de los sacos periodontales más profundos de cada cuadrante de estos individuos, siendo la primera muestra tomada previo al destartraje supragingival considerada como muestra basal (día 0, luego se tomaron a las 24 horas, a los 7 y 21 días de removida la placa bacteriana supragingival. De los resultados del presente estudio pudimos concluir que al desorganizar el biofilm supragingival se observa una disminución en la cantidad total de microorganismos subgingivales, así como también disminuye de manera considerable la proporción de Porphyoromona gingivalis presente en el medio subgingival. Lo cual permitiría establecer la existencia de una relación directa y dependiente entre los microorganismos que habitan el medio supragingival y subgingival.One of the fields of interest in the study of the microbiology periodontal for many investigators has been to identify if it is

  8. Medición de cambios cuantitativos de la microbiota subgingival posterior a la remoción de placa bacteriana supragingival Measurement of quantitative changes of the microbiota subgingival after to removal of bacterial plaque supragingival

    OpenAIRE

    C Godoy; C Melej; N Silva

    2010-01-01

    Uno de los campos de interés en el estudio de la microbiología periodontal para muchos investigadores ha sido identificar si es posible que los microorganismos responsables del origen y progresión de la enfermedad periodontal que habitan sobre el margen gingival (supragingival) y bajo este (subgingival) tengan una relación directa que permita mantener interacciones influyentes en el crecimiento y desarrollo de las diferentes especies bacterianas que habitan en los tejidos periodontales. Por l...

  9. Microbial profile comparisons of saliva, pooled and site-specific subgingival samples in periodontitis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Sembler-Møller, Maria Lynn; Grande, Maria Anastasia

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to compare microbial profiles of saliva, pooled and site-specific subgingival samples in patients with periodontitis. We tested the hypotheses that saliva can be an alternative to pooled subgingival samples, when screening for presence of periopathogens....... DESIGN: Site specific subgingival plaque samples (n = 54), pooled subgingival plaque samples (n = 18) and stimulated saliva samples (n = 18) were collected from 18 patients with generalized chronic periodontitis. Subgingival and salivary microbiotas were characterized by means of HOMINGS (Human Oral...... to an AUC of 0.76 (sensitivity: 0.56, specificity: 0.94) in pooled subgingival samples. CONCLUSIONS: Site-specific presence of periodontal pathogens was detected with comparable accuracy in stimulated saliva samples and pooled subgingival plaque samples. Consequently, saliva may be a reasonable surrogate...

  10. Characteristics of subgingival calculus detection by multiphoton fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Oi-Hong; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Lai, Yu-Lin; Chen, How-Foo

    2011-06-01

    Subgingival calculus has been recognized as a major cause of periodontitis, which is one of the main chronic infectious diseases of oral cavities and a principal cause of tooth loss in humans. Bacteria deposited in subgingival calculus or plaque cause gingival inflammation, function deterioration, and then periodontitis. However, subgingival calculus within the periodontal pocket is a complicated and potentially delicate structure to be detected with current dental armamentaria, namely dental x-rays and dental probes. Consequently, complete removal of subgingival calculus remains a challenge to periodontal therapies. In this study, the detection of subgingival calculus employing a multiphoton autofluorescence imaging method was characterized in comparison with a one-photon confocal fluorescence imaging technique. Feasibility of such a system was studied based on fluorescence response of gingiva, healthy teeth, and calculus with and without gingiva covered. The multiphoton fluorescence technology perceived the tissue-covered subgingival calculus that cannot be observed by the one-photon confocal fluorescence method.

  11. Microbial profile comparisons of saliva, pooled and site-specific subgingival samples in periodontitis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Sembler-Møller, Maria Lynn; Grande, Maria Anastasia

    2017-01-01

    . DESIGN: Site specific subgingival plaque samples (n = 54), pooled subgingival plaque samples (n = 18) and stimulated saliva samples (n = 18) were collected from 18 patients with generalized chronic periodontitis. Subgingival and salivary microbiotas were characterized by means of HOMINGS (Human Oral......OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to compare microbial profiles of saliva, pooled and site-specific subgingival samples in patients with periodontitis. We tested the hypotheses that saliva can be an alternative to pooled subgingival samples, when screening for presence of periopathogens...... by pooled subgingival samples. Presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Prevotella intermedia, Filifactor alocis, Tannerella forsythia and Parvimona micra in site-specific subgingival samples were detected in saliva with an AUC of 0.79 (sensitivity: 0.61, specificity: 0.94), compared...

  12. The effect of iron plaque on uptake and translocation of norfloxacin in rice seedlings grown in paddy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dafang; Ma, Wei; Song, Xiaojing; Bao, Yanyu

    2017-03-01

    Although the role of iron plaque on rice root surface has been investigated in recent years, its effect on antibiotic uptake remains uncertain. In the study, pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of iron plaque on uptake and translocation of norfloxacin (adding 10 and 50 mg·kg(-1) treatments) in rice seedlings grown in paddy soil. Iron plaque was induced by adding different amounts of Fe(II) in soil. The results showed that the presence of norfloxacin can decrease the amount of iron plaque induced. After rice with iron plaque induced, norfloxacin was mainly accumulated in iron plaque on root surface, followed by inside root, but its translocation from root to other rice tissues is not observed. Iron plaque played the role of a barrier for norfloxacin uptake into rice roots under high norfloxacin concentration of 50 mg·kg(-1), however not that under low concentration of 10 mg·kg(-1). And the barrier function was the most strongest with adding Fe(II) of 30 mg·kg(-1) as combined action of iron plaque and rhizosphere effect. Fluorescence microscope analysis showed that norfloxacin mainly distributed in the outside of root cell, which showed its translocation as apoplastic pathway in rice. Comparing with non-rhizosphere, more norfloxacin was accumulated in rhizosphere soil. Maybe, strong root oxidization (high Eh values) induced more iron oxide formation in rhizosphere and on root surface, which led to norfloxacin's mobility towards to rhizosphere through its strong adsorption of iron oxides and then promoted its uptake by rice on root surface.

  13. Effect of cigarette smoking on subgingival bacteria in healthy subjects and patients with chronic periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Karasneh, Jumana,; Al Habashneh, Rola ,; Marzouka, Nour Aldain,; Thornhill, Martin,

    2016-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking is known to increase the risk of periodontal destruction and developing chronic periodontitis (CP). It is also reported to affect the subgingival bacterial profile among CP patients. However, studies on the effect of smoking on the bacterial profile among healthy subjects are still limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the impact of smoking on the subgingival bacterial profile in both healthy adults and CP patients. Methods Subgingival plaqu...

  14. Periodontopathogens in the saliva and subgingival dental plaque of a group of mothers Periodontopatógenos na saliva e placa subgengival de um grupo de mães

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odila Pereira da Silva Rosa

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the periodontal condition and the presence of putative periodontal pathogens in 30 Brazilian mothers, aging 21-40 years (28.4 ± 4.49 years, and in their children, aging 5-6 years, since mothers can be a source of pathogens and, thus, influence their children's bacteriological and clinical condition. Besides assessing the plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI and pocket probing depth (PD, the survey analyzed four subgingival dental plaque samples from mothers and children, as well as a sample of stimulated saliva from mothers. Those samples were analyzed by means of the slot immunoblot (SIB technique, in order to determine the presence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Aa, Prevotella nigrescens (Pn, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg and Treponema denticola (Td. The mean values and standard deviations of the evaluated clinical variables for mothers and children were, respectively: 1.86 ± 0.67 and 1.64 ± 0.68 for PI, and 1.24 ± 0.67 and 0.82 ± 0.37, for GI. Only for mothers, the total PD was 1.81 ± 0.69 mm, and the PD of four sites was 4.03 ± 1.40 mm. The Wilcoxon test revealed significant difference (p Procurou-se avaliar a condição periodontal e a presença de periodontopatógenos em 30 mães brasileiras, com idades entre 21-40 anos (28,4 ± 4,49 anos e seus filhos, com 5-6 anos de idade, considerando que elas possam ser fonte de transmissão para seus filhos e influenciar suas condições clínicas e bacteriológicas. Além de determinar o índice de placa (IP, índice gengival (IG de mães e filhos, e a profundidade de sondagem periodontal (PS, apenas das mães, avaliaram-se quatro amostras de placa dental subgengival de mães e filhos e uma amostra de saliva total estimulada das mães para a presença de Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Aa, Prevotella nigrescens (Pn, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg e Treponema denticola (Td, pela técnica de "slot immunoblot" (SIB. As médias e desvios

  15. Subgingival irrigation in the maintenance phase of periodontal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlagenhauf, U; Stellwag, P; Fiedler, A

    1990-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of subgingival scaling versus subgingival pocket irrigation with 0.1% chlorhexidine or saline controls on the repopulation of subgingival periodontal sites with disease-associated micro-organisms following a single procedure of scaling and root planing. Additionally, pertinent clinical parameters (attachment level, plaque index, bleeding on probing) were also recorded. 375 sites in 30 individuals with previously untreated periodontal disease were thoroughly scaled and subsequently either rescaled, irrigated, or not treated at all for the following 6 months at 1-month intervals. The results show that the initial scaling and root planing procedure led to significant clinical and microbiological improvements in all experimental groups. These improvements were maintained in all but the untreated sites. Based on the observed clinical and microbiological changes, subgingival irrigation of periodontal pockets at 1-month intervals was equally effective as scaling and root planing performed at the same pace. 0.1% chlorhexidine however, being used as test irrigant, was not more effective than saline controls.

  16. Subgingival Human Cytomegalovirus and Epstein Barr Virus in Patients with Aggressive Periodontitis in Ahwaz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jahangirnezhad

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Assessment of subgingival human cytomegalovirus (HCMV and Epstein Barr virus (EBV-1 in subjects with aggressive periodontitis.Materials and Methods: Samples were obtained from plaques formed in subgingival regions of 26 aggressive periodontitis patients. All specimens were submitted to polymerase chain reaction in order to detect HCMV and EBV-1.Results: HCMV and EBV-1 were observed in 27% and 25% of the participants respectively.Coinfection with both viruses was found in 52% of the patients.Conclusion: Within the limitations of the present study, it can be suggested that HCMV and EBV-1 in subgingival plaques may be associated with aggressive periodontitis. Additionally,concomitant occurrence of these viruses may negatively affect the wellbeing ofperiodontal tissues.

  17. Effects of root anatomy and Fe plaque on arsenic uptake by rice seedlings grown in solution culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Dan [Department of Environmental Sciences, East China Normal University, Shanghai (China); Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, and Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University (Hong Kong); Wu Shengchun; Wu Fuyong [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, and Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University (Hong Kong); Deng Hong, E-mail: lilac_deng@yahoo.com.c [Department of Environmental Sciences, East China Normal University, Shanghai (China); Tiantong National Station of Forest Ecosystem, Key Laboratory of Urbanization and Ecological Restoration, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Wong Minghung, E-mail: mhwong@hkbu.edu.h [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, and Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University (Hong Kong)

    2010-08-15

    Hydroponic experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of root anatomy, induced by aeration and stagnation, and Fe plaque on arsenic (III and V) uptake and translocation by rice plants. The results showed that As uptake in rice plants (Gui Chao-2) treated by aeration was decreased due to lower root specific surface area. Rice roots with larger specific surface area tended to form more Fe plaque, and Fe plaque affected As uptake kinetics by changing As influx curves from linear to hyperbolic for As(III) and from hyperbolic to S-curve for As(V). Fe plaque increased As(III and V) adsorption and minimized the effects of root anatomy characteristics on As uptake into roots and subsequently translocation to shoots. Fe plaque increased As(III) uptake rate at As(III) concentrations of 0.5{approx}8 mg L{sup -1}, reduced As(V) uptake rate at low As(V) concentrations (<2 mg L{sup -1}), but increased As uptake rate at high As(V) concentrations (>6 mg L{sup -1}). - Rice root anatomy and Fe plaque affect As uptake.

  18. Effects of root anatomy and Fe plaque on arsenic uptake by rice seedlings grown in solution culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dan; Wu, Sheng-Chun; Wu, Fu-Yong; Deng, Hong; Wong, Ming-Hung

    2010-08-01

    Hydroponic experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of root anatomy, induced by aeration and stagnation, and Fe plaque on arsenic (III&V) uptake and translocation by rice plants. The results showed that As uptake in rice plants (Gui Chao-2) treated by aeration was decreased due to lower root specific surface area. Rice roots with larger specific surface area tended to form more Fe plaque, and Fe plaque affected As uptake kinetics by changing As influx curves from linear to hyperbolic for As(III) and from hyperbolic to S-curve for As(V). Fe plaque increased As(III&V) adsorption and minimized the effects of root anatomy characteristics on As uptake into roots and subsequently translocation to shoots. Fe plaque increased As(III) uptake rate at As(III) concentrations of 0.5 to approximately 8 mg L(-1), reduced As(V) uptake rate at low As(V) concentrations (6 mg L(-1)). Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Subgingival Microbial Communities in Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency and Their Relationship with Local Immunopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutsopoulos, Niki M.; Abusleme, Loreto; Greenwell-Wild, Teresa; Dutzan, Nicolas; Paster, Bruce J.; Munson, Peter J.; Fine, Daniel H.; Uzel, Gulbu; Holland, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency I (LAD-I) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by single gene mutations in the CD18 subunit of β2 integrins which result in defective transmigration of neutrophils into the tissues. Affected patients suffer from recurrent life threatening infections and severe oral disease (periodontitis). Microbial communities in the local environment (subgingival plaque) are thought to be the triggers for inflammatory periodontitis, yet little is known regarding the microbial communities associated with LAD-I periodontitis. Here we present the first comprehensive characterization of the subgingival communities in LAD-I, using a 16S rRNA gene-based microarray, and investigate the relationship of this tooth adherent microbiome to the local immunopathology of periodontitis. We show that the LAD subgingival microbiome is distinct from that of health and Localized Aggressive Periodontitits. Select periodontitis-associated species in the LAD microbiome included Parvimonas micra, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Eubacterium brachy and Treponema species. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a bacterium not typically found in subgingival plaque is detected in LAD-I. We suggest that microbial products from LAD-associated communities may have a role in stimulating the local inflammatory response. We demonstrate that bacterial LPS translocates into the lesions of LAD-periodontitis potentially triggering immunopathology. We also show in in vitro assays with human macrophages and in vivo in animal models that microbial products from LAD-associated subgingival plaque trigger IL-23-related immune responses, which have been shown to dominate in patient lesions. In conclusion, our current study characterizes the subgingival microbial communities in LAD-periodontitis and supports their role as triggers of disease pathogenesis. PMID:25741691

  20. Subgingival bacterial colonization profiles correlate with gingival tissue gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handfield Martin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by the microbiota of the periodontal pocket. We investigated the association between subgingival bacterial profiles and gene expression patterns in gingival tissues of patients with periodontitis. A total of 120 patients undergoing periodontal surgery contributed with a minimum of two interproximal gingival papillae (range 2-4 from a maxillary posterior region. Prior to tissue harvesting, subgingival plaque samples were collected from the mesial and distal aspects of each tissue sample. Gingival tissue RNA was extracted, reverse-transcribed, labeled, and hybridized with whole-genome microarrays (310 in total. Plaque samples were analyzed using checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridizations with respect to 11 bacterial species. Random effects linear regression models considered bacterial levels as exposure and expression profiles as outcome variables. Gene Ontology analyses summarized the expression patterns into biologically relevant categories. Results Wide inter-species variation was noted in the number of differentially expressed gingival tissue genes according to subgingival bacterial levels: Using a Bonferroni correction (p -7, 9,392 probe sets were differentially associated with levels of Tannerella forsythia, 8,537 with Porphyromonas gingivalis, 6,460 with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, 506 with Eikenella corrodens and only 8 with Actinomyces naeslundii. Cluster analysis identified commonalities and differences among tissue gene expression patterns differentially regulated according to bacterial levels. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the microbial content of the periodontal pocket is a determinant of gene expression in the gingival tissues and provide new insights into the differential ability of periodontal species to elicit a local host response.

  1. [Subgingival irrigation combined with scaling and root planing. Results of a study with chlorhexidine and sodium hypochlorite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamagate, A; Kone, D; Coulibaly, N T; Ahnoux, A

    2005-03-01

    Scaling and root planning is more and more associated with subgingival irrigation in chronics periodontal treatment. It is unreasonable to expect to control periodontal infections by mechanical treatment alone. Most patients do not achieve the necessary level of manual dexterity or motivation to control their plaque at home. It is rather better to deliver antimicrobial agents directly into the periodontal pocket. The aim of this study is to evaluate the action of subgingival irrigation associated to periodontal scaling on the clinical parameters and to compare the effects of chlorhexidine (Eludril) and sodium hypochlorite (Dakin Cooper) on adult's chronics periodontitis treatment. At the level of Plaque Index, Gingival Index and Bleeding on Probing, the results show that Eludril irrigation associated to scaling is lightly efficacious than Dakin cooper irrigation associated to scaling. And, the last one also is lightly efficacious than scaling alone. However, at the level of pocket depth, scaling alone has been also effective than scaling associated with subgingival irrigation.

  2. Subgingival microbiota dysbiosis in systemic lupus erythematosus: association with periodontal status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Jôice Dias; Calderaro, Débora Cerqueira; Ferreira, Gilda Aparecida; Mendonça, Santuza Maria Souza; Fernandes, Gabriel R; Xiao, E; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio; Leys, Eugene J; Graves, Dana T; Silva, Tarcília Aparecida

    2017-03-20

    Periodontitis results from the interaction between a subgingival biofilm and host immune response. Changes in biofilm composition are thought to disrupt homeostasis between the host and subgingival bacteria resulting in periodontal damage. Chronic systemic inflammatory disorders have been shown to affect the subgingival microbiota and clinical periodontal status. However, this relationship has not been examined in subjects with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The objective of our study was to investigate the influence of SLE on the subgingival microbiota and its connection with periodontal disease and SLE activity. We evaluated 52 patients with SLE compared to 52 subjects without SLE (control group). Subjects were classified as without periodontitis and with periodontitis. Oral microbiota composition was assessed by amplifying the V4 region of 16S rRNA gene from subgingival dental plaque DNA extracts. These amplicons were examined by Illumina MiSeq sequencing. SLE patients exhibited higher prevalence of periodontitis which occurred at a younger age compared to subjects of the control group. More severe forms of periodontitis were found in SLE subjects that had higher bacterial loads and decreased microbial diversity. Bacterial species frequently detected in periodontal disease were observed in higher proportions in SLE patients, even in periodontal healthy sites such as Fretibacterium, Prevotella nigrescens, and Selenomonas. Changes in the oral microbiota were linked to increased local inflammation, as demonstrated by higher concentrations of IL-6, IL-17, and IL-33 in SLE patients with periodontitis. SLE is associated with differences in the composition of the microbiota, independently of periodontal status.

  3. Subgingival Microbiota in White Patients With Desquamative Gingivitis: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduino, Paolo G; Romano, Federica; Sasia, Danilo; Broccoletti, Roberto; Ricceri, Fulvio; Barbui, Anna Maria; Brossa, Silvia; Cipriani, Raffaella; Cricenti, Luca; Cabras, Marco; Aimetti, Mario

    2017-07-01

    Presence of epithelial desquamation, erythema, and erosions on gingival tissue is usually described in the literature as desquamative gingivitis (DG). A wide range of autoimmune/dermatologic disorders can manifest as DG, although the two more common are oral lichen planus and mucous membrane pemphigoid. The aim of this study is to investigate prevalence of 11 periodontopathogenic microorganisms in patients with DG and to compare it with the microbiologic status of individuals affected by plaque-induced gingivitis (pGI). Cross-sectional clinical and microbiologic data were obtained from 66 patients (33 in each group). Subgingival plaque samples were analyzed using semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. Statistically significant difference, but with little clinical significance, was observed in gingival conditions between the two groups, probably due to the worse home control hygiene of patients with DG. Prevalence and levels of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens, and Fusobacterium nucleatum/periodonticum were statistically higher in samples from patients with DG than in those with pGI. In multivariate regression models, subgingival colonization of A. actinomycetemcomitans and F. nucleatum/periodonticum was not statistically associated with DG, whereas, high levels of E. corrodens were associated with 13-fold increased odds for DG. Microbiologic differences were found in subgingival plaque for patients with DG and pGI. This may suggest possible association between periodontal pathogens and DG.

  4. Plaque mineralisation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, L

    1998-03-01

    Dental calculus is plaque mineralised by deposition of calcium and phosphate resulting from interactions between the oral microbial plaque flora and components of oral fluids. An artificial-mouth microcosm dental plaque culture system has been developed to study aspects of plaque mineralisation, including pH control. Five plaques were grown from saliva under simulated oral conditions in a mucin-containing medium, and sucrose was applied to mimic meals. The plaques were mineralised with a urea-based, calcium-phosphate-monofluorophosphate-urea (CPMU) mineralising solution. Alkaline pH oscillations were generated by the plaques in response to CPMU applications, and an acidic oscillation followed sucrose applications. Plaque mineralisation by the CPMU procedure was almost totally dependent on the urea present in the mineralising solution, but total mineralisation also increased as the resting pH increased as a result of urea in the medium. Following four CPMU applications with a sucrose application every 12 hours improved plaque viability and mineralisation. The plaque mineral formed resembled a carbonated hydroxyapatite; other potential calcium phosphate minerals were undetectable except for calcium carbonate. A wide range of mineral deposition patterns in plaque were seen by electron microscopy.

  5. Effect of cigarette smoking on subgingival bacteria in healthy subjects and patients with chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasneh, Jumana A; Al Habashneh, Rola A; Marzouka, Nour Aldain S; Thornhill, Martin H

    2017-03-21

    Cigarette smoking is known to increase the risk of periodontal destruction and developing chronic periodontitis (CP). It is also reported to affect the subgingival bacterial profile among CP patients. However, studies on the effect of smoking on the bacterial profile among healthy subjects are still limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the impact of smoking on the subgingival bacterial profile in both healthy adults and CP patients. Subgingival plaque samples were collected from CP patients (30 nonsmokers and 9 smokers) and healthy subjects (37 non-smokers and 18 smokers). Genomic DNA was extracted and 25 bacterial species were detected using PCR of 16S rRNA. Comparing smokers to non-smokers from each group was conducted using chi2 and binary logistic regression analysis. After correcting for confounding factors, the odds of having Slackia exigua, Selenomonas sputigena and Campylobacter rectus was higher among healthy smokers (ORadj = 10.1, 6.62 and 5.62 respectively). While for CP group, the highest odds were observed for Treponema amylovorum, Treponema medium, Slackia exigua and Treponema vincentii (ORadj = 20.7, 7.97, 6.37 and 5.37 respectively) and the increase in Treponema amylovorum was statistically significant (p = 0.05). Smoking affects the subgingival bacterial profile in healthy individuals and is responsible for the depletion of beneficial bacteria and the increase in periodontopathogenic bacteria. In the CP patient group, our study suggests that subgingival bacteria (particularly Treponema species) make a more substantial contribution in the etiology of CP among non-smokers. Further studies using a larger sample set and more sensitive and quantitative techniques (such as real -time PCR) are needed to enhance our understanding of the exact effect of smoking on subgingival biofilm.

  6. Vulnerable Plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center > Vulnerable Plaque Menu Topics Topics FAQs Vulnerable Plaque Article Info En español Swelling (inflammation) is your ... aging, including coronary artery disease . What is vulnerable plaque? For many years, doctors have thought that the ...

  7. [Study on Microbial Diversity of Peri-implantitis Subgingival by High-throughput Sequencing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-jie; Wang, Shao-guo; Li, Yue-hong; Tu, Dong-xiang; Liu, Shi-yun; Nie, Hong-bing; Li, Zhi-qiang; Zhang, Ju-mei

    2015-07-01

    To study microbial diversity of peri-implantitis subgingival with high-throughput sequencing, and investigate microbiological etiology of peri-implantitis. Subgingival plaques were sampled from the patients with peri-implantitis (D group) and non-peri-implantitis subjects (N group). The microbiological diversity of the subgingival plaques was detected by sequencing V4 region of 16S rRNA with Illumina Miseq platform. The diversity of the community structure was analyzed using Mothur software. A total of 156 507 gene sequences were detected in nine samples and 4 402 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were found. Selenomonas, Pseudomonas, and Fusobacterium were dominant bacteria in D group, while Fusobacterium, Veillonella and Streptococcus were dominant bacteria in N group. Differences between peri-implantitis and non-peri-implantitis bacterial communities were observed at all phylogenetic levels by LEfSe, which was also found in PcoA test. The occurrence of peri-implantitis is not only related to periodontitis pathogenic microbe, but also related with the changes of oral microbial community structure. Treponema, Herbaspirillum, Butyricimonas and Phaeobacte may be closely related to the occurrence and development of peri-implantitis.

  8. Subgingival microbiome in smokers and non-smokers in Korean chronic periodontitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, J-H; Lee, J-H; Lee, J-Y

    2015-06-01

    Smoking is a major environmental factor associated with periodontal diseases. However, we still have a very limited understanding of the relationship between smoking and subgingival microflora in the global population. Here, we investigated the composition of subgingival bacterial communities from the pooled plaque samples of smokers and non-smokers, 134 samples in each group, in Korean patients with moderate chronic periodontitis using 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing. A total of 17,927 reads were analyzed and classified into 12 phyla, 126 genera, and 394 species. Differences in bacterial communities between smokers and non-smokers were examined at all phylogenetic levels. The genera Fusobacterium, Fretibacterium, Streptococcus, Veillonella, Corynebacterium, TM7, and Filifactor were abundant in smokers. On the other hand, Prevotella, Campylobacter, Aggregatibacter, Veillonellaceae GQ422718, Haemophilus, and Prevotellaceae were less abundant in smokers. Among species-level taxa occupying > 1% of whole subgingival microbiome of smokers, higher abundance (≥ 2.0-fold compared to non-smokers) of seven species or operational taxonomic units (OTUs) was found: Fusobacterium nucleatum, Neisseria sicca, Neisseria oralis, Corynebacterium matruchotii, Veillonella dispar, Filifactor alocis, and Fretibacterium AY349371. On the other hand, lower abundance of 11 species or OTUs was found in smokers: Neisseria elongata, six Prevotella species or OTUs, Fusobacterium canifelinum, Aggregatibacter AM420165, Selenomonas OTU, and Veillonellaceae GU470897. Species richness and evenness were similar between the groups whereas diversity was greater in smokers than non-smokers. Collectively, the results of the present study indicate that differences exist in the subgingival bacterial community between smoker and non-smoker patients with chronic moderate periodontitis in Korea, suggesting that cigarette smoking considerably affects subgingival bacterial ecology. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons

  9. Microbiological Effect of Essential Oils in Combination with Subgingival Ultrasonic Instrumentation and Mouth Rinsing in Chronic Periodontitis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiya Morozumi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty chronic periodontitis patients were randomly assigned to 3 groups: control, saline, and essential oil-containing antiseptic (EO. Subgingival plaque was collected from a total of 90 pockets across all subjects. Subsequently, subgingival ultrasonic instrumentation (SUI was performed by using EO or saline as the irrigation agent. After continuous mouth rinsing at home with EO or saline for 7 days, subgingival plaques were sampled again. Periodontopathic bacteria were quantified using the modified Invader PLUS assay. The total bacterial count in shallow pockets (probing pocket depth (PPD = 4-5 mm was significantly reduced in both saline (P<0.05 and EO groups (P<0.01. The total bacterial count (P<0.05 and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P<0.01 and Tannerella forsythia (P<0.05 count in deep pockets (PPD ≥6 mm were significantly reduced only in the EO group. In comparisons of the change ratio relative to baseline value of total bacteria counts across categories, both the saline and EO groups for PPD 4-5 mm and the EO group for PPD 6 mm showed a significantly low ratio (P<0.05. The adjunctive use of EO may be effective in reducing subgingival bacterial counts in both shallow and deep pockets. This trial is registered with UMIN Clinical Trials Registry UMIN000007484.

  10. Effect of triclosan on the subgingival microbiota of periodontitis-susceptible subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosling, B; Dahlén, G; Volpe, A; Furuichi, Y; Ramberg, P; Lindhe, J

    1997-12-01

    The present study evaluated the long-term effect of (i) meticulous self-performed, supragingival plaque control and (ii) the use of a triclosan/copolymer containing dentifrice in adult subjects susceptible to destructive periodontitis. 40 individuals were recruited into the trial. 3-5 years prior to the baseline examination, they had all been treated by nonsurgical means- for advanced periodontal disease. During the subsequent maintenance phase, all subjects had at different time intervals exhibited sites with recurrent periodontitis. At a baseline examination, 6 surfaces per tooth were examined regarding bleeding on probing, probing pocket depth, and probing attachment level. The deepest pocket site in each quadrant (i.e. 4 sites per subject) was selected and samples of the subgingival bacteria were taken. At baseline, all volunteers received detailed information on proper oral hygiene techniques. This information was repeated on an individual need basis during the course of the subsequent 36-months. No professional subgingival therapy was delivered between the baseline and the 36-month examinations. The subjects were randomly distributed into 2 equal groups of 20 individuals each, 1 test and 1 control group. The members of the test group were supplied with a fluoridated dentifrice containing triclosan/copolymer (Total, Colgate), while the controls received a corresponding dentifrice but without triclosan/copolymer. The findings demonstrated that in subjects with advanced and recurrent periodontitis, carefully practiced supragingival plaque control had some effects on the subgingival microbiota, but also that this was insufficient to prevent disease progression. In a corresponding group of subjects, however, who used a triclosan/copolymer dentifrice, the subgingival microbiota was reduced in both quantitative and qualitative terms and recurrent periodontitis was almost entirely prevented.

  11. Changes in subgingival microflora after placement and removal of fixed orthodontic appliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković-Sandić Marija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The placement of fixed orthodontic appliances may lead to increased plaque accumulation and changes in subgingival microflora. Objective. The aim of this study was to examine the changes in frequency of subgingival microflora that occur after placement and removal of fixed orthodontic appliance using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Methods. This study included 33 orthodontic patients, who were divided into two groups. Subgingival plaque samples were collected from the right upper incisor (U1 and right upper first molar (U6. In group A, the samples were taken three times: before placement appliance (T1, after one month (T2, and after 3 months (T3. In group B the samples were also taken three times: before appliance removal (T1, after one month (T2, and after three months (T3. PCR method was used to determine the presence of P. gingivalis, A. actinomycetemcomitans, T. forsythia, and P. intermedia. Results. In group A the frequency of P. gingivalis showed statistically significant decrease at U1 (p=0.049 and U6 (p=0.008, from T1 to T2, and at U1 (p=0.048 from T1 to T3. In group B only the frequency of T. forsythia showed a statistically significant decrease, at U6 (T1 vs. T2, p=0.004; T1 vs. T3, p=0.0003. Regarding other analyzed bacteria, changes in the presence were noticed but no statistical significance was found. Conclusion. Placement of fixed appliances may have an impact on subgingival microflora, but in the first months after the placement and removal of the appliance changes were not significant, probably due to good oral hygiene. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175075

  12. Subgingival microbiome in smokers and non-smokers in periodontitis: an exploratory study using traditional targeted techniques and a next-generation sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bizzarro, S.; Loos, B.G.; Laine, M.L.; Crielaard, W.; Zaura, E.

    2013-01-01

    Aim To compare the results of two targeted techniques to an open-ended technique in periodontitis patients, differentiated on the basis of smoking habit. Materials & Methods Thirty periodontitis patients (15 smokers and 15 non-smokers) provided subgingival plaque samples for 16S rRNA gene amplicon

  13. Smoking affects the subgingival microflora in periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Winkelhoff, AJ; Bosch-Tijhof, CJ; Winkel, EG; van der Reijden, WA

    Background: Tobacco smoking has been identified as one major risk factor for destructive periodontal disease. Scaling and root planing have been shown to be less effective in smokers with periodontitis. The aim of the present study was to compare the subgingival microbial flora of treated and

  14. Subgingival bacteria in a case of prepubertal periodontitis, before and one year after extractions of the affected primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, D; Bimstein, E

    1994-01-01

    The treatment of children with prepubertal periodontitis (PP), may be complicated by the extent of the lesions and the possibility of tetracycline stain of the developing permanent dentition. Therefore, with the purpose of preventing the infection of permanent teeth during the mixed dentition, it has been recommended that the treatment of children with PP, should include the early extraction of the primary teeth affected with alveolar bone loss (ABL). Still, there is little evidence which confirms that extraction of the affected primary teeth do in fact reduce the periodonto-pathogens load of the subgingival plaque. The present study reports values of colony forming units (CFU) of total anaerobic bacteria, Actinobacillus actynomicetemcomitans (Aa) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) from the subgingival plaque from a child with PP, collected immediately before and 1 year after extractions of the primary teeth affected with ABL. CFU of Aa and Pg developed only from the subgingival plaque collected before the extraction of the primary teeth affected with ABL. These findings suggest that in cases of PP, extraction of the affected primary teeth may reduce the possibility of infection of the periodontum of the permanent teeth during the mixed dentition period.

  15. Alterations of the Subgingival Microbiota in Pediatric Crohn's Disease Studied Longitudinally in Discovery and Validation Cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Judith; Bittinger, Kyle; Pauly-Hubbard, Helen; Posivak, Leah; Grunberg, Stephanie; Baldassano, Robert; Lewis, James D; Wu, Gary D; Bushman, Frederic D

    2015-12-01

    Oral manifestations are common in Crohn's disease (CD). Here we characterized the subgingival microbiota in pediatric patients with CD initiating therapy and after 8 weeks to identify microbial community features associated with CD and therapy. Pediatric patients with CD were recruited from The Children's Hospital of Pennsylvania. Healthy control subjects were recruited from primary care or orthopedics clinic. Subgingival plaque samples were collected at initiation of therapy and after 8 weeks. Treatment exposures included 5-ASAs, immunomodulators, steroids, and infliximab. The microbiota was characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The study was repeated in separate discovery (35 CD, 43 healthy) and validation cohorts (43 CD, 31 healthy). Most subjects in both cohorts demonstrated clinical response after 8 weeks of therapy (discovery cohort 88%, validation cohort 79%). At week 0, both antibiotic exposure and disease state were associated with differences in bacterial community composition. Seventeen genera were identified in the discovery cohort as candidate biomarkers, of which 11 were confirmed in the validation cohort. Capnocytophaga, Rothia, and TM7 were more abundant in CD relative to healthy controls. Other bacteria were reduced in abundance with antibiotic exposure among CD subjects. CD-associated genera were not enriched compared with healthy controls after 8 weeks of therapy. Subgingival microbial community structure differed with CD and antibiotic use. Results in the discovery cohort were replicated in a separate validation cohort. Several potentially pathogenic bacterial lineages were associated with CD but were not diminished in abundance by antibiotic treatment, suggesting targets for additional surveillance.

  16. Microbial diversity similarities in periodontal pockets and atheromatous plaques of cardiovascular disease patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Serra e Silva Filho

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The immune and infectious alterations occurring in periodontitis have been shown to alter the development and severity of cardiovascular disease. One of these relationships is the translocation of oral bacteria to atheroma plaques, thereby promoting plaque development. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess, by 16s cloning and sequencing, the microbial diversity of the subgingival environment and atheroma plaques of patients concomitantly suffering from periodontitis and obstructive coronary artery atherosclerosis (OCAA. METHODS: Subgingival biofilm and coronary balloons used in percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty were collected from 18 subjects presenting with generalized moderate to severe periodontitis and OCAA. DNA was extracted and the gene 16S was amplified, cloned and sequenced. RESULTS: Significant differences in microbial diversity were observed between both environments. While subgingival samples mostly contained the phylum Firmicutes, in coronary balloons, Proteobacteria (p<0.05 was predominant. In addition, the most commonly detected genera in coronary balloons were Acinetobacter, Alloprevotella, Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Sphingomonas and Moraxella, while in subgingival samples Porphyromonas, Filifactor, Veillonella, Aggregatibacter and Treponema (p<0.05 were found. Interestingly, 17 identical phylotypes were found in atheroma and subgingival samples, indicating possible bacterial translocation between periodontal pockets and coronary arteries. CONCLUSION: Periodontal pockets and atheromatous plaques of cardiovascular disease patients can present similarities in the microbial diversity.

  17. Efficacy of a triclosan formula in controlling early subgingival biofilm formation: a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto ANDRADE

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of rinses with slurries of a dentifrice containing triclosan (TCS, as compared with rinses with slurries from a control dentifrice, in controlling early subgingival biofilm formation. A double-blind, randomized and cross-over clinical trial was designed, and 26 dental students were included. In the first period, participants were randomized to rinse with a TCS slurry or a control slurry, in a 12 h interval, and to refrain from mechanical cleaning. A Plaque Free Zone Index was assessed at 24 h, 48 h, 72 h and 96 h. After a washout period of 10 days, the second experimental period was conducted, following the same protocol as the first period, except that the slurry groups were switched. Use of the TCS slurry resulted in a significantly higher percentage of plaque-free surfaces, both at 24 h and at 72 h (p < 0.01. In the of 48-72 h interval, the triclosan slurry showed a lower percentage of sites converted to a score of 2 (38.1% for the testversus 40% for the control product, p = 0.015. In conclusion, rinsing with slurries of dentifrice containing TCS retards the down growth of bacterial biofilms from the supra- to the subgingival environment.

  18. Effect of smoking on subgingival microflora of patients with periodontitis in Japan

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    Yamada Satoru

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smoking is a risk factor for periodontitis. To clarify the contribution of smoking to periodontitis, it is essential to assess the relationship between smoking and the subgingival microflora. The aim of this study was to gain an insight into the influence of smoking on the microflora of Japanese patients with periodontitis. Methods Sixty-seven Japanese patients with chronic periodontitis (19 to 83 years old, 23 women and 44 men were enrolled in the present study. They consisted of 30 smokers and 37 non-smokers. Periodontal parameters including probing pocket depth (PPD and bleeding on probing (BOP and oral hygiene status were recorded. Detection of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia, Fusobacterium nucleatum/periodonticum, Treponema denticola and Campylobacter rectus in subgingival plaque samples was performed by polymerase chain reaction. Association between the detection of periodontopathic bacteria and smoking status was analyzed by multiple logistic regression analysis and chi-square test. Results A statistically significant association was found between having a PPD ≥ 4 mm and detection of T. denticola, P. intermedia, T. forsythia, or C. rectus, with odds ratios ranging from 2.17 to 3.54. A significant association was noted between BOP and the detection of C. rectus or P. intermedia, and smoking, with odds ratios ranging from 1.99 to 5.62. Prevalence of C. rectus was higher in smokers than non-smokers, whereas that of A. actinomycetemcomitans was lower in smokers. Conclusions Within limits, the analysis of the subgingival microbial flora in smokers and non-smokers with chronic periodontitis suggests a relevant association between smoking and colonization by the specific periodontal pathogens including C. rectus.

  19. Effect of smoking on subgingival microflora of patients with periodontitis in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Michiya; Tanno-Nakanishi, Mariko; Yamada, Satoru; Okuda, Katsuji; Ishihara, Kazuyuki

    2011-01-05

    Smoking is a risk factor for periodontitis. To clarify the contribution of smoking to periodontitis, it is essential to assess the relationship between smoking and the subgingival microflora. The aim of this study was to gain an insight into the influence of smoking on the microflora of Japanese patients with periodontitis. Sixty-seven Japanese patients with chronic periodontitis (19 to 83 years old, 23 women and 44 men) were enrolled in the present study. They consisted of 30 smokers and 37 non-smokers. Periodontal parameters including probing pocket depth (PPD) and bleeding on probing (BOP) and oral hygiene status were recorded. Detection of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia, Fusobacterium nucleatum/periodonticum, Treponema denticola and Campylobacter rectus in subgingival plaque samples was performed by polymerase chain reaction. Association between the detection of periodontopathic bacteria and smoking status was analyzed by multiple logistic regression analysis and chi-square test. A statistically significant association was found between having a PPD ≥ 4 mm and detection of T. denticola, P. intermedia, T. forsythia, or C. rectus, with odds ratios ranging from 2.17 to 3.54. A significant association was noted between BOP and the detection of C. rectus or P. intermedia, and smoking, with odds ratios ranging from 1.99 to 5.62. Prevalence of C. rectus was higher in smokers than non-smokers, whereas that of A. actinomycetemcomitans was lower in smokers. Within limits, the analysis of the subgingival microbial flora in smokers and non-smokers with chronic periodontitis suggests a relevant association between smoking and colonization by the specific periodontal pathogens including C. rectus.

  20. Subgingival microflora and treatment in prepubertal periodontitis associated with chronic idiopathic neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamma, J J; Lygidakis, N A; Nakou, M

    1998-09-01

    Prepubertal periodontitis affects both primary and permanent dentition. The purpose of this study was to examine the composition of subgingival microflora of the permanent dentition in an 11-year-old Caucasian female, who had premature exfoliation of her deciduous teeth on her 5th year of age, and the response of this condition to the antibiotic therapy and supportive periodontal care. Gingival tissues were highly inflamed and alveolar bone loss was detected radiographically. The girl had experienced frequent upper respiratory tract infections, tonsilitis and recurrent otitis media. Her mother had history of early onset periodontitis associated with chronic idiopathic neutropenia. Blood chemistry tests and immunological examinations were also performed. Subgingival plaque samples were collected from the proximal sites of permanent molars, incisors, canines and maxillary premolars. 27 different microbial species were isolated from the subgingival microflora. Among the predominant species were Porphyromonas gingivalis (17.6%-7.3%), Prevotella intermedia (12.4%-4.7%), Capnocytophaga sputigena (14.4%-10.4%), Capnocytophaga ochracea (13.2%-6.9%) and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (9.3%-5.5%). Periodontal treatment consisted of scaling, root planing in conjunction with antibiotic administration of Augmentin 312.5 mg and Flagyl 200 mg, each t.i.d. for 10 days. 3 weeks after the antibiotic therapy, bacterial samples were collected from the same sites. All the periodontal pathogens were recovered in lower levels and A.actinomycetemcomitans was almost eliminated in the 3-week period. The evaluation of clinical indices at 3, 6 and 12 months showed that periodontal treatment in conjunction with antibiotics was effective and rapidly followed by marked clinical improvement. The microbiological monitoring at 3, 6 and 12 months after antibiotic treatment and each time prior to supportive periodontal care, revealed that the periodontal pathogens fluctuated in low levels even

  1. Alterations of the Subgingival Microbiota in Pediatric Crohn's Disease Studied Longitudinally in Discovery and Validation Cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Judith; Bittinger, Kyle; Pauly-Hubbard, Helen; Posivak, Leah; Grunberg, Stephanie; Baldassano, Robert; Lewis, James D; Wu, Gary D; Bushman, Frederic D

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral manifestations are common in Crohn's disease (CD). Here we characterized the subgingival microbiota in pediatric CD patients initiating therapy and after 8 weeks to identify microbial community features associated with CD and therapy. Methods Pediatric CD patients were recruited from The Children's Hospital of Pennsylvania. Healthy control subjects were recruited from primary care or orthopedics clinic. Subgingival plaque samples were collected at initiation of therapy and after 8 weeks. Treatment exposures included 5-ASAs, immunomodualtors, steroids, and infliximab. The microbiota was characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The study was repeated in separate discovery (35 CD, 43 healthy) and validation cohorts (43 CD, 31 healthy). Results A majority of subjects in both cohorts demonstrated clinical response after 8 weeks of therapy (discovery cohort 88%, validation cohort 79%). At week 0, both antibiotic exposure and disease state were associated with differences in bacterial community composition. Seventeen genera were identified in the discovery cohort as candidate biomarkers, of which 11 were confirmed in the validation cohort. Capnocytophaga, Rothia, and TM7 were more abundant in CD relative to healthy controls. Other bacteria were reduced in abundance with antibiotic exposure among CD subjects. CD-associated genera were not enriched compared to healthy controls after 8 weeks of therapy. Conclusions Subgingival microbial community structure differed with CD and antibiotic use. Results in the discovery cohort were replicated in a separate validation cohort. Several potentially pathogenic bacterial lineages were associated with CD but were not diminished in abundance by antibiotic treatment, suggesting targets for additional surveillance. PMID:26288001

  2. Análise microbiológica da placa bacteriana da doença periodontal em cães e o efeito da antibioticoterapia sobre ela Microbiological analysis of bacterial plaque of periodontal disease on dogs and effects of antibioticotherapy on it

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stella Alves da Fonseca; Paula Diniz Galera; Daiana Lima Brito; Simone Perecmanis; Anahí Souza Silva; Larissa Borges Cardoso; Tatiana Guerrero Marçola; Vinícius Oliveira Drummond; Concepta McManus Pimentel

    2011-01-01

    ... clindamicina, seguido da espiramicina; todos os microrganismos foram resistentes ao metronidazol.The objective was to determine microbiote of the subgingival bacterial plaque of dogs with periodontal disease (PD...

  3. Microbiota in the oral subgingival biofilm is associated with obesity in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, Cecilia C; Persson, G Rutger; Wondimu, Biniyam; Marcus, Claude; Sobko, Tanja; Modéer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    To test the hypothesis whether microbiota in oral biofilm is linked with obesity in adolescents we designed this cross-sectional study. Obese adolescents (n = 29) with a mean age of 14.7 years and normal weight subjects (n = 58) matched by age and gender were examined with respect to visible plaque index (VPI%) and gingival inflammation (bleeding on probing (BOP%)). Stimulated saliva was collected. They answered a questionnaire concerning medical history, medication, oral hygiene habits, smoking habits, and sociodemographic background. Microbiological samples taken from the gingival crevice was analyzed by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique. The sum of bacterial cells in subgingival biofilm was significantly associated with obesity (P obesity was not confounded by any of the studied variables (chronic disease, medication, VPI%, BOP%, flow rate of whole saliva, or meal frequency). Totally 23 bacterial species were present in approximately threefold higher amounts, on average, in obese subjects compared with normal weight controls. Of the Proteobacteria phylum, Campylobacter rectus and Neisseria mucosa were present in sixfold higher amounts among obese subjects. The association between obesity and sum of bacterial cells in oral subgingival biofilm indicates a possible link between oral microbiota and obesity in adolescents.

  4. [Comparison of subgingival debridement efficacy of air polishing and manual scaling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Cong-jiao; Yin, Yuan-zheng; Guan, Dan-ping

    2015-10-01

    To assess the efficacy of subgingival air polishing and traditional manual scaling in 3-6 mm pockets. Patients with chronic periodontitis who were in the maintenance phase were randomly assigned to receive subgingival air polishing (experimental group) and manual scaling (control group) in 4 teeth with probing depths of 3 to 6 mm. Clinical variables including plaque index (PI), probing depth (PD), probing on bleeding (BOP) and gingival recession (GR) were recorded at baseline, 7 and 30 days post-treatment. "Pocket closure" [PD ≤ 4 mm and BOP⁻] was also calculated as supplementary data. The data of the 2 groups were compared using paired t test with SAS 8.2 software package. Thirty-one patients were enrolled and PI was 0.8 during the study. Both treatment procedures resulted in significant reductions of PD at day 7 (Pmanual scaling are both effective for improving clinical variables during supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) in teeth with probing depths of 3 to 6 mm. But the results reveal no significant difference between the 2 modalities.

  5. Effects of systemic administration of sitafloxacin on subgingival microflora and antimicrobial susceptibility profile in acute periodontal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Sachiyo; Kasai, Shunsuke; Ihara, Yuichiro; Imamura, Kentaro; Kita, Daichi; Ota, Koki; Kinumatsu, Takashi; Nakagawa, Taneaki; Saito, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect(s) of systemic administration of sitafloxacin on subgingival microbial profiles of acute periodontal lesions. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates was also investigated. Patients with acute phases of chronic periodontitis were subjected to clinical examination and microbiological assessment of their subgingival plaque samples by culture technique. Sitafloxacin was then administered (100 mg/day for 5 days) systemically. The clinical and microbiological examinations were repeated 6-8 days after administration. Susceptibilities of clinical isolates to various antimicrobials were determined using the broth and agar dilution methods. From the sampled sites in 30 participants, a total of 355 clinical isolates (34 different bacterial species) were isolated and identified. Parvimonas micra, Prevotella intermedia and Streptococcus mitis were the most prevalent cultivable bacteria in acute sites. Systemic administration of sitafloxacin yielded a significant improvement in clinical and microbiological parameters. Among the antimicrobials tested, sitafloxacin was the most potent against the clinical isolates with an MIC90 of 0.12 μg/ml at baseline. After administration, most clinical isolates were still highly susceptible to sitafloxacin although some increase in MICs was observed. The results suggest that systemic administration of sitafloxacin is effective against subgingival bacteria isolated from acute periodontal lesions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Oral biofilm models for mechanical plaque removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, Martinus J.; Busscher, Henk J.; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; Slomp, Anje M.; Abbas, Frank; van der Mei, Henny C.

    In vitro plaque removal studies require biofilm models that resemble in vivo dental plaque. Here, we compare contact and non-contact removal of single and dual-species biofilms as well as of biofilms grown from human whole saliva in vitro using different biofilm models. Bacteria were adhered to a

  7. Detection and comparison of Selenomonas sputigena in subgingival biofilms in chronic and aggressive periodontitis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Disha Nagpal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the advent of DNA-based culture-independent techniques, a constantly growing number of Selenomonas phylotypes have been detected in patients with destructive periodontal diseases. However, the prevalence levels that have been determined in different studies vary considerably. Aim: The present study was undertaken to detect and compare the presence of Selenomonas sputigena in the subgingival plaque samples from generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP, chronic generalized periodontitis, and periodontally healthy patients using conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR technique. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 patients were categorized as periodontally healthy individuals (Group I, n = 30, chronic generalized periodontitis (Group II, n = 30, and GAP (Group III, n = 30. The clinical parameters were recorded and subgingival plaque samples were collected. These were then subjected to conventional PCR analysis.Statistical Analysis Used: Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA test was used for multiple group comparisons followed by Mann–Whitney U-test for pairwise comparison. Results: On comparison between three groups, all the clinical parameters were found to be statistically highly significant. Comparing Groups I-II and I-III, the difference in detection was found to be statistically highly significant whereas in Groups II-III, it was statistically nonsignificant. On comparison of S. sputigena detected and undetected patients to clinical parameters in various study groups, the difference was found to be nonsignificant. Conclusion:S. sputigena was found to be significantly associated with chronic and aggressive periodontitis. Although the difference in its detection frequency in both groups was statistically nonsignificant when compared clinically, S. sputigena was more closely associated with the GAP.

  8. Long-term evaluation of the antimicrobial susceptibility and microbial profile of subgingival biofilms in individuals with aggressive periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Talita Gomes Baêta; Heller, Débora; do Souto, Renata Martins; Silva-Senem, Mayra Xavier e; Varela, Victor Macedo; Torres, Maria Cynesia Barros; Feres-Filho, Eduardo Jorge; Colombo, Ana Paula Vieira

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the antimicrobial susceptibility and composition of subgingival biofilms in generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP) patients treated using mechanical/antimicrobial therapies, including chlorhexidine (CHX), amoxicillin (AMX) and metronidazole (MET). GAP patients allocated to the placebo (C, n = 15) or test group (T, n = 16) received full-mouth disinfection with CHX, scaling and root planning, and systemic AMX (500 mg)/MET (250 mg) or placebos. Subgingival plaque samples were obtained at baseline, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months post-therapy from 3–4 periodontal pockets, and the samples were pooled and cultivated under anaerobic conditions. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of AMX, MET and CHX were assessed using the microdilution method. Bacterial species present in the cultivated biofilm were identified by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. At baseline, no differences in the MICs between groups were observed for the 3 antimicrobials. In the T group, significant increases in the MICs of CHX (p < 0.05) and AMX (p < 0.01) were detected during the first 3 months; however, the MIC of MET decreased at 12 months (p < 0.05). For several species, the MICs significantly changed over time in both groups, i.e., Streptococci MICs tended to increase, while for several periodontal pathogens, the MICs diminished. A transitory increase in the MIC of the subgingival biofilm to AMX and CHX was observed in GAP patients treated using enhanced mechanical therapy with topical CHX and systemic AMX/MET. Both protocols presented limited effects on the cultivable subgingival microbiota. PMID:26273264

  9. The effect of smoking on inflammatory and bone remodeling markers in gingival crevicular fluid and subgingival microbiota following periodontal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunaes, D F; Mustafa, M; Mohamed, H G; Lie, S A; Leknes, K N

    2017-08-01

    Periodontal health is mediated by suppressing microorganisms inducing a local inflammatory host response. Smoking may impair this process. This study compares gingival crevicular fluid levels of inflammatory and bone remodeling markers in heavy smokers and non-smokers following active and supportive periodontal therapy in patients with chronic periodontitis. Gingival crevicular fluid and subgingival plaque were collected from the deepest periodontal pocket in 50 patients, 25 smokers and 25 non-smokers, at baseline (T0), following active (T1) and 12 mo of supportive periodontal therapy (T2). Smoking status was validated measuring serum cotinine levels. Gingival crevicular fluid levels of 27 inflammatory and two bone remodeling markers were analyzed using multiplex and singleplex micro-bed immunoassays, and subgingival plaque samples using checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. Amounts of markers in smokers and non-smokers were compared calculating the effect size. Expression of inflammatory and bone-remodeling markers in smokers demonstrated an overall reduced effect size at T0 and T2 (p periodontal therapy (p periodontal microbial species. Except for an upregulation of interleukin-8, smokers exhibited reduced gingival crevicular fluid levels of several inflammatory markers at baseline and following active and supportive periodontal therapy. Only inflammatory responses in non-smokers adapted to periodontal therapy. Apparently, there seems to be an immunosuppressant effect of smoking regulating the local inflammatory response and bone remodeling markers captured in gingival crevicular fluid following periodontal therapy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Endoscopic vs. tactile evaluation of subgingival calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Joy B; Lenton, Patricia A; Lunos, Scott A; Blue, Christine M

    2014-08-01

    Endoscopic technology has been developed to facilitate imagery for use during diagnostic and therapeutic phases of periodontal care. The purpose of this study was to compare the level of subgingival calculus detection using a periodontal endoscope with that of conventional tactile explorer in periodontitis subjects. A convenience sample of 26 subjects with moderate periodontitis in at least 2 quadrants was recruited from the University of Minnesota School of Dentistry to undergo quadrant scaling and root planing. One quadrant from each subject was randomized for tactile calculus detection alone and the other quadrant for tactile detection plus the Perioscope ™ (Perioscopy Inc., Oakland, Cali). A calculus index on a 0 to 3 score was performed at baseline and at 2 post-scaling and root planing visits. Sites where calculus was detected at visit 1 were retreated. T-tests were used to determine within-subject differences between Perioscope™ and tactile measures, and changes in measures between visits. Significantly more calculus was detected using the Perioscope™ vs. tactile explorer for all 3 subject visits (pcalculus detection from baseline to visit 1 were statistically significant for both the Perioscope™ and tactile quadrants (pcalculus detection from visit 1 to visit 2 was only significant for the Perioscope™ quadrant (pcalculus at this visit. It was concluded that the addition of a visual component to calculus detection via the Perioscope™ was most helpful in the re-evaluation phase of periodontal therapy. Copyright © 2014 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  11. Levels of Candidate Periodontal Pathogens in Subgingival Biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, R.R.D.S.; Fermiano, D.; Feres, M.; Figueiredo, L.C.; Teles, F.R.F.; Soares, G.M.S.; Faveri, M.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, several new periodontal taxa have been associated with the etiology of periodontitis. A recent systematic review provides further support for the pathogenic role of 17 species/phylotypes. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and levels of these species in subjects with generalized chronic periodontitis (GChP; n = 30), generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP; n = 30), and periodontal health (PH; n = 30). All subjects underwent clinical and microbiological assessment. Nine subgingival plaque samples were collected from each subject and analyzed for their content of 20 bacterial species/phylotypes through the RNA-oligonucleotide quantification technique. Subjects from the GChP and GAgP groups presented the highest mean values for all clinical parameters in comparison with the PH group (P < 0.05). Subjects with GChP and GAgP showed significantly higher mean levels of Bacteroidetes sp. human oral taxon (HOT) 274, Fretibacterium sp. HOT 360, and TM7 sp. HOT 356 phylotypes, as well as higher mean levels of Filifactor alocis, Fretibacterium fastidiosum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Selenomonas sputigena species than PH subjects (P < 0.05). GAgP subjects presented higher mean levels of TM7 sp. HOT 356 and F. alocis than GChP subjects (P < 0.05). A significantly higher mean prevalence of Bacteroidales sp. HOT 274, Desulfobulbus sp. HOT 041, Fretibacterium sp. HOT 360, and Fretibacterium sp. HOT 362 was found in subjects with GChP and GAgP than in PH subjects. Mean levels of P. gingivalis (r = 0.68), T. forsythia (r = 0.62), F. alocis (r = 0.51, P = 0.001), and Fretibacterium sp. HOT 360 (r = 0.41) were correlated with pocket depth (P < 0.001). In conclusion, Bacteroidales sp. HOT 274, Desulfobulbus sp. HOT 041, Fretibacterium sp. HOT 360, Fretibacterium sp. HOT 362, and TM7 sp. HOT 356 phylotypes, in addition to F. alocis, F. fastidiosum, and S. sputigena, seem to be associated with periodontitis, and their role

  12. Relationship of periodontal clinical parameters with bacterial composition in human dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujinaka, Hidetake; Takeshita, Toru; Sato, Hirayuki; Yamamoto, Tetsuji; Nakamura, Junji; Hase, Tadashi; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2013-06-01

    More than 600 bacterial species have been identified in the oral cavity, but only a limited number of species show a strong association with periodontitis. The purpose of the present study was to provide a comprehensive outline of the microbiota in dental plaque related to periodontal status. Dental plaque from 90 subjects was sampled, and the subjects were clustered based on bacterial composition using the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism of 16S rRNA genes. Here, we evaluated (1) periodontal clinical parameters between clusters; (2) the correlation of subgingival bacterial composition with supragingival bacterial composition; and (3) the association between bacterial interspecies in dental plaque using a graphical Gaussian model. Cluster 1 (C1) having high prevalence of pathogenic bacteria in subgingival plaque showed increasing values of the parameters. The values of the parameters in Cluster 2a (C2a) having high prevalence of non-pathogenic bacteria were markedly lower than those in C1. A cluster having low prevalence of non-pathogenic bacteria in supragingival plaque showed increasing values of the parameters. The bacterial patterns between subgingival plaque and supragingival plaque were significantly correlated. Chief pathogens, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, formed a network with other pathogenic species in C1, whereas a network of non-pathogenic species, such as Rothia sp. and Lautropia sp., tended to compete with a network of pathogenic species in C2a. Periodontal status relates to non-pathogenic species as well as to pathogenic species, suggesting that the bacterial interspecies connection affects dental plaque virulence.

  13. Saliva as the Sole Nutritional Source in the Development of Multispecies Communities in Dental Plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubovics, Nicholas S

    2015-06-01

    Dental plaque is a polymicrobial biofilm that forms on the surfaces of teeth and, if inadequately controlled, can lead to dental caries or periodontitis. Nutrient availability is the fundamental limiting factor for the formation of dental plaque, and for its ability to generate acid and erode dental enamel. Nutrient availability is also critical for bacteria to grow in subgingival biofilms and to initiate periodontitis. Over the early stages of dental plaque formation, micro-organisms acquire nutrients by breaking down complex salivary substrates such as mucins and other glycoproteins. Once dental plaque matures, dietary carbohydrates become more important for supragingival dental plaque, and gingival crevicular fluid forms the major nutrient source for subgingival microorganisms. Many species of oral bacteria do not grow in laboratory monocultures when saliva is the sole nutrient source, and it is now clear that intermicrobial interactions are critical for the development of dental plaque. This chapter aims to provide an overview of the key metabolic requirements of some well-characterized oral bacteria, and the nutrient webs that promote the growth of multispecies communities and underpin the pathogenicity of dental plaque for both dental caries and periodontitis.

  14. Changes in the subgingival biofilm composition after coronally positioned flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadson Almeida Lima

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the effects of coronally positioned flap (CPF on the subgingival biofilm composition. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-two subjects with gingival recessions were treated with CPF. Clinical parameters were assessed before and at 6 months after surgery. Subgingival biofilms were analyzed by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique for 40 bacterial species. RESULTS: Recession height, clinical attachment level and bleeding on probing improved significantly (p<0.05 at 6 months post-CPF. The proportions of 10 periodontal pathogens and the proportions of red and orange complexes decreased at 6 months. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, CPF can induce beneficial effects on the composition of the subgingival microbiota after 6 months.

  15. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in dental plaque of children and their parents: is it related to their periodontal status and oral hygiene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsami, A; Petropoulou, P; Kafritsa, Y; Mentis, Y A; Roma-Giannikou, E

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the possible presence of H. pylori in subgingival dental plaque of children with upper gastrointestinal symptoms, as well as of their parents' and to detect any association between the presence of H. pylori and oral hygiene together with the periodontal status of children and their parents. The study comprised of 35 children with upper gastrointestinal symptoms, aged 4 to 14 years and 45 family members (mothers and/or fathers). Gastric biopsies were collected from all children for CLO-test, histology and culture. Serology was used to assess the H. pylori infection status of their parents. Before endoscopy, subgingival dental plaque from children and their parents were collected from 4 healthy and 4 diseased sites, and the clinical indices (gingival index, plaque index, bleeding on probing, pocket depth, loss of clinical attachment) after plaque collection were recorded. The Chi-square test was performed to investigate possible differences between children and their parents and logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association of parental infection status with that of children. 15 out of 35 children (42.86%) were found H. pylori-positive. In 6 out of the 15 infected children (40%) H. pylori was also identified in their subgingival plaque samples, as well as in one among the 20 non infected children. The presence of H. pylori in dental plaque was significantly associated with its presence in the gastric antrum (p=0.0274). H. pylori was identified in the dental plaque of 7 mothers corresponding to children with positive PCR in their dental plaque and of 4 fathers (one corresponding with his child found H. pylori positive in dental plaque). Children who had H. pylori identified in their dental plaque belonged to families with members also having H. pylori in dental plaque. No significant relationship between periodontal clinical parameters and detection of H. pylori in dental plaque in both children and their parents was found. However

  16. Supragingival treatment as an aid to reduce subgingival needs: a 450-day investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Carvalho Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the clinical effects of using a supragingival biofilm control regimen (SUPRA as a step prior to scaling and root planing (SRP. A split-mouth clinical trial was performed in which 25 subjects with periodontitis (47.2 ± 6.5 years underwent treatment (days 0-60 and monitoring (days 90-450 phases. At Day 0 (baseline treatments were randomly assigned per quadrant: SUPRA, SRP and S30SRP (SUPRA 30 days before SRP. The full-mouth visible plaque index (VPI, gingival bleeding index (GBI, periodontal probing depth (PPD, bleeding on probing (BOP, and clinical attachment loss (CAL were examined on days 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 270, and 450. Baseline data were similar among all groups. From days 0 to 60, the groups showed similar significant decreases in VPI and GBI. Reductions in PPD for the SRP (3.39 ± 0.17 to 2.42 ± 0.16 mm and S30SRP (3.31 ± 0.11 to 2.40 ± 0.07 mm groups were greater (p < 0.05 than those for the SUPRA group. This pattern was also observed for BOP. Attachment gain was similar and greater for the SRP (3.34 ± 0.28 to 2.58 ± 0.26 mm and S30SRP (3.25 ± 0.21 to 2.54 ± 0.19 mm groups compared to the SUPRA group. Results were maintained from day 90 forward. Overall, the S30SRP treatment reduced the subgingival treatment needs in 48.16%. Performance of a SUPRA step before SRP decreased subgingival treatment needs and maintained the periodontal stability over time.

  17. Microbial dynamics during conversion from supragingival to subgingival biofilms in an in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurnheer, T; Bostanci, N; Belibasakis, G N

    2016-04-01

    The development of dental caries and periodontal diseases result from distinct shifts in the microbiota of the tooth-associated biofilm. This in vitro study aimed to investigate changes in biofilm composition and structure, during the shift from a 'supragingival' aerobic profile to a 'subgingival' anaerobic profile. Biofilms consisting of Actinomyces oris, Candida albicans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus mutans and Veillonella dispar were aerobically grown in saliva-containing medium on hydroxyapatite disks. After 64 h, Campylobacter rectus, Prevotella intermedia and Streptococcus anginosus were further added along with human serum, while culture conditions were shifted to microaerophilic. After 96 h, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola were finally added and the biofilm was grown anaerobically for another 64 h. At the end of each phase, biofilms were harvested for species-specific quantification and localization. Apart from C. albicans, all other species gradually increased during aerobic and microaerophilic conditions, but remained steady during anaerobic conditions. Biofilm thickness was doubled during the microaerophilic phase, but remained steady throughout the anaerobic phase. Extracellular polysaccharide presence was gradually reduced throughout the growth period. Biofilm viability was reduced during the microaerophilic conversion, but was recovered during the anaerobic phase. This in vitro study has characterized the dynamic structural shifts occurring in an oral biofilm model during the switch from aerobic to anaerobic conditions, potentially modeling the conversion of supragingival to subgingival biofilms. Within the limitations of this experimental model, the findings may provide novel insights into the ecology of oral biofilms. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Impact of supragingival therapy on subgingival microbial profile in smokers versus non-smokers with severe chronic periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Meulman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess subgingival microbiological changes in smokers versus non-smokers presenting severe chronic periodontitis after supragingival periodontal therapy (ST.Non-smokers (n=10 and smokers (n=10 presenting at least nine teeth with probing pocket depth (PPD (≥5 mm, bleeding on probing (BoP, and no history of periodontal treatment in the last 6 months were selected. Clinical parameters assessed were plaque index (PI, BoP, PPD, relative gingival margin position (rGMP and relative clinical attachment level (rCAL. Subgingival biofilm was collected before and 21 days after ST. DNA was extracted and the 16S rRNA gene was amplified with the universal primer pair, 27F and 1492R. Amplified genes were cloned, sequenced, and identified by comparison with known 16S rRNA sequences. Statistical analysis was performed by Student's t and Chi-Square tests (α=5%.Clinically, ST promoted a significant reduction in PI and PPD, and gain of rCAL for both groups, with no significant intergroup difference. Microbiologically, at baseline, data analysis demonstrated that smokers harbored a higher proportion of Porphyromonas endodontalis, Bacteroidetes sp., Fusobacterium sp. and Tannerella forsythia and a lower number of cultivated phylotypes (p<0.05. Furthermore, non-smokers featured significant reductions in key phylotypes associated with periodontitis, whereas smokers presented more modest changes.Within the limits of the present study, ST promoted comparable clinical improvements in smokers and non-smokers with severe chronic periodontitis. However, in smokers, ST only slightly affected the subgingival biofilm biodiversity, as compared with non-smokers.

  19. Avaliação da porosidade e placa férrica de raízes de arroz cultivado em hipoxia Evaluation of porosity and iron plaque on rice roots grown under hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marquel Jonas Holzschuh

    2010-10-01

    servir como estimativa da formação de aerênquima no arroz. O método de obtenção de raízes foi eficiente em promover a eliminação de O2 do saco de vinil para estudar a formação do aerênquima.The high oxygen diffusion in different materials makes the establishment and maintenance of oxygen-free environments difficult. The techniques used to obtain oxygen-free environments are little efficient and not representative of flooded soil conditions. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for obtaining roots in a hypoxic environment to evaluate iron plaque and aerenchyma formation in rice plants. A hypoxic condition similar to that of flooded soils was created in 50 L tanks, based on the oxygen diffusion capacity through vinyl plastic in contact with flooded soil. Each tank was filled with soil (Gley soil, five vinyl bags and then flooded. Rice plants of the genotypes IRGA 423 and IRGA 424 grown in the field were collected, the roots cut at the stem, washed and 1/3 of the leaves removed. Each bag was filled with 12 plants of each genotype and nutrient solution. After seven days, the new adventitious roots were used to determine the iron plaque and aerenchyma formation in the segments 0-2, 2-4 and 4-6 cm from the root tips. The roots were exposed the solution of a flooded soil for 4 hours. The iron plaque was determined in the root segments after iron extraction with HCl 0.5 mol L-1. Porosity was determined in vacuum cycles applied with a syringe. The weight difference before and after vacuum treatment and water entrance was assumed as estimate of the magnitude of the aerenchyma of the roots. The method was tested with the production of new adventitious roots in vinyl bags under aerated and hypoxic conditions. Root porosity was higher in the hypoxic than in the aerated environment. Porosity was higher near plant base and as porosity increased, iron increased near the root surface, indicating the iron plaque as a parameter to estimate aerenchyma formation in

  20. Clinical and microbiological effects of topical subgingival application of hyaluronic acid gel adjunctive to scaling and root planing in the treatment of chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yi; Höfling, K; Fimmers, R; Frentzen, M; Jervøe-Storm, P M

    2004-08-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) has shown anti-inflammatory effects in gingivitis therapy. The potential benefits of local subgingival application of HA adjunctive to scaling and root planing (SRP) were evaluated in this study. Twenty patients with chronic periodontitis were included in this split-mouth study. Sulcus fluid flow rate (SFFR) and sulcus bleeding index were monitored at baseline and after 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 12 weeks; probing depth and clinical attachment level were monitored at baseline and 6 and 12 weeks. Subgingival plaque samples were also taken at these same three appointments to determine the presence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythensis, and Treponema denticola. All patients were treated with full-mouth scaling and root planing (SRP); in addition, an HA gel was administered subgingivally in the test sites every week for 6 weeks. An improvement of all clinical variables was observed (P Clinically, no difference between test and control sites could be found. No difference between test and control sites was seen in the tested microorganisms. No clinical or microbiological improvement was achieved by the adjunctive use of HA gel compared to SRP alone. Only SFFR was affected by the use of HA in terms of a more rapid reduction of SFFR in the test sites.

  1. Mutans streptococci in subgingival plaque of treated and untreated patients with periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Reijden, WA; Dellemijn-Kippuw, N; Stijne-van Nes, AM; de Soet, JJ; van Winkelhoff, AJ

    Background: The etiology of root caries is thought to be identical to coronal caries, though root caries seem to be more complicated because of the higher susceptibility of exposed roots (dentin) by periodontal therapy to demineralization than intact enamel. This implies that mutans streptococci are

  2. Plaquing procedure for infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, J.A.; Mulcahy, D.

    1980-01-01

    A single overlay plaque assay was designed and evaluated for infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus. Epithelioma papillosum carpio cells were grown in normal atmosphere with tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane- or HEPES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid)-buffered media. Plaques were larger and formed more quickly on 1- to 3-day-old cell monolayers than on older monolayers. Cell culture medium with a 10% addition of fetal calf serum (MEM 10) or without serum (MEM 0) were the most efficient virus diluents. Dilution with phosphate-buffered saline, saline, normal broth, or deionized water reduced plaque numbers. Variations in the pH (7.0 to 8.0) of a MEM 0 diluent did not affect plaque numbers. Increasing the volume of viral inoculum above 0.15 ml (15- by 60-mm plate) decreased plaquing efficiency. Significantly more plaques occurred under gum tragacanth and methylcellulose than under agar or agarose overlays. Varying the pH (6.8 to 7.4) of methylcellulose overlays did not significantly change plaque numbers. More plaques formed under the thicker overlays of both methylcellulose and gum tragacanth. Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and HEPES performed equally well, buffering either medium or overlay. Plaque numbers were reduced when cells were rinsed after virus adsorption or less than 1 h was allowed for adsorption. Variation in adsorption time between 60 and 180 min did not change plaque numbers. The mean plaque formation time was 7 days at 16 degrees C. The viral dose response was linear when the standardized assay was used.

  3. The Effect of Apically Repositioned Flap Surgery on Clinical Parameters and the Composition of the Subgingival Microbiota: 12-Month Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Rustin M.; Giannobile, William V.; Feres, Magda; Haffajee, Anne D.; Smith, Claire; Socransky, Sigmund S.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the clinical and microbiologic effects of apically repositioned flap surgery. Eighteen patients with chronic periodontitis received initial preparation (IP) including scaling and root planing, followed at 3 months by apically repositioned flap surgery at sites with pocket depth > 4 mm. Subjects were monitored clinically and microbiologically at baseline, 3 months after IP, and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months postsurgery. Clinical assessments of plaque accumulation, gingival redness, suppuration, bleeding on probing, pocket depth, and attachment level were made at six sites per tooth. Subgingival plaque samples were taken from the mesial aspect of each tooth, and the presence and levels of 40 subgingival taxa were determined using checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. Significant reductions were seen in mean pocket depth and percentage of sites exhibiting gingival redness and bleeding on probing in both sites that received IP only and in sites receiving IP followed by surgery. Mean attachment level increased significantly for both sets of sites, but the increase was greater at the surgically treated sites. The total DNA probe counts were significantly reduced at sites in both treatment groups. At surgically treated sites, 19 of 40 taxa were significantly reduced posttherapy. At sites receiving IP only, 16 species were significantly reduced over time. While there were some reductions in mean counts after IP in this site group, the major reductions occurred after the surgical phase in these patients, even though these particular sites did not receive surgical therapy. The reduction in pocket depth by surgical means and the associated decrease in reservoirs of periodontal pathogens may be important in achieving sustained periodontal stability. PMID:12186343

  4. Detection of EBV, CMV and HSV-1 in subgingival samples of HIV positive and negative patients with chronic periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Escalona

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To detect the presence of infection by EBV (Epstein-Barr Virus, CMV (Cytomegalovirus and HSV-1 (Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 in subgingival samples from HIV- positive patients under HAART (High Activity Antiretroviral Therapy, HIV- positive patients without HAART, HIV-negative patients with chronic periodontitis and healthy controls. Methodology: Crevicular fluid samples of 11 HIV+ patients on therapy were evaluated, 6 without antiretroviral therapy, 7 HIV- negative subjects with chronic periodontitis and 7 periodontally-healthy controls. PI (Plaque index, GI (Gingival Index, PD (probing depth and CAL (Clinical Attachment Loss were registered at six sites per each tooth in all teeth and subgingival plaque samples of a tooth were collected per quadrant. Nested PCR was used to detect EBV and endpoint PCR to detect infection by CMV and HSV-1. Results: Clinical parameters showed statistically significant differences between HIV-positive patients and subjects with chronic periodontitis compared with the control group (p<0.05. DNA of EBV was detected mainly in HIV-positive patients under HAART, 91% (10/11. DNA of CMV was detected mainly in patients without HAART, 67% (4/6, while HSV-1 was observed in 27% (3/11 of patients under HAART. In the control group no virus was detected. Coinfection was observed in 50% of HIV patients without HAART, 36% of HIV patients with HAART and 14% of HIV-negative with chronic periodontitis. Conclusion: Viral infection was prevalent in HIV patients under HAART and EBV was the primary viral infection detected in HIV-positive patients with chronic periodontitis.

  5. Age-dependent changes in Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella species/phylotypes in healthy gingiva and inflamed/diseased sub-gingival sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Mangala A; Chhour, Kim-Ly; Browne, Gina V; Byun, Roy; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Chapple, Cheryl C; Jacques, Nicholas A; Hunter, Neil

    2015-05-01

    Early colonisation of oral surfaces by periodontal pathogens presents a significant risk factor for subsequent development of destructive disease affecting tissues that support the dentition. The aims of the present study were to establish the age-dependent relationship between sub-gingival profiles of 22 Prevotella species/phylotypes in children, adolescents and adults from an isolated Aboriginal community and, further, to use this information to identify Prevotella species that could serve as microbial risk indicators. DNA isolated from sub-gingival plaque samples (three healthy sites and three inflamed/diseased sites) from adults, adolescents and children was screened for Porphyromonas gingivalis load and 22 Prevotella species/phylotypes by species-specific PCR. A noticeable feature in adolescents was the marked increase in colonisation by P. gingivalis across all test sites. The mean number of Prevotella species/phylotypes colonising inflamed/diseased sub-gingival sites increased with age. Progressive partitioning of selected Prevotella species/phylotypes to healthy or inflamed/diseased sites was evident. Prevalence of Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella oral clone P4PB_24 and Prevotella oris increased significantly with age in diseased sites. Similarly, significant age-dependent increase in colonisation of healthy as well as inflamed/diseased sub-gingival sites was apparent for Prevotella oralis, Prevotella multiformis, Prevotella denticola, Prevotella strain P4P_53 and Prevotella oral clone BR014. Early colonisation of children by P. gingivalis, P. intermedia and Prevotella oral clone P4PB_24 provides indication of risk for subsequent development of periodontal disease. In the present study, the complexity of Prevotella species within gingival sites is explored as a basis for evaluating contribution of Prevotella species to disease.

  6. Genetic analysis of Porphyromonas gingivalis (fimA), Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and red complex in coronary plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendra, Jaideep; Mahendra, Little; Felix, John; Romanos, Georgios E

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to detect the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis (fimA), Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and red complex in the coronary plaque of patients with coronary artery disease. The study population consisted of 51 patients with chronic periodontitis undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. DNA was extracted from subgingival and coronary atherosclerotic plaque samples. Polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify the part of 16S rRNA gene to detect the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis (fimA), Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas gingivalis (fimA), and Treponema denticola were detected in 0%, 31.4%, 45.1%, 39.2%, and 51% of the atherosclerotic plaque samples, respectively. In both subgingival and coronary atherosclerotic plaque samples, Tannerella forsythia was detected in 19.6%, Porphyromonas gingivalis in 39.2%, Porphyromonas gingivalis (fimA) in 33.3%, and Treponema denticola in 35.3% of the samples. The study confirmed the detection of red complex bacteria in coronary plaque samples. However Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans could not be detected in these samples. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. The subgingival periodontal microbiota in the aging mouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    FERES, Magda; TELES, Flavia; TELES, Ricardo; FIGUEIREDO, Luciene Cristina; FAVERI, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Different mechanisms have been hypothesized to explain the increase in prevalence and severity of periodontitis in older adults, including shifts in the periodontal microbiota. However, the actual impact of aging in the composition of subgingival biofilms remains unclear. In the present article, we provide an overview of the composition of the subgingival biofilm in older adults and the potential effects of age on the oral microbiome. In particular, this review covers the following topics: (i) the oral microbiota of an aging mouth, (ii) the effects of age and time on the human oral microbiome, (iii) the potential impact of inflammaging and immunosenescence in the host-oral microbiota interactions, and (iv) the relationship of the aging oral microbiota and Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, in order to explore in greater breadth the potential effects of aging on the periodontal microbiota, we present analyses of data compiled from large clinical studies that evaluated the subgingival microbiota of periodontally healthy subjects and periodontitis patients from a wide age spectrum (20–83 years old). Those studies were conducted at Guarulhos University (São Paulo, SP, Brazil) and at The Forsyth Institute (Cambridge, USA), from 1999 to 2014. PMID:27501490

  8. The subgingival periodontal microbiota of the aging mouth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feres, Magda; Teles, Flavia; Teles, Ricardo; Figueiredo, Luciene Cristina; Faveri, Marcelo

    2016-10-01

    Different mechanisms have been hypothesized to explain the increase in prevalence and severity of periodontitis in older adults, including shifts in the periodontal microbiota. However, the actual impact of aging on the composition of subgingival biofilms remains unclear. In the present article, we provide an overview of the composition of the subgingival biofilm in older adults and the potential effects of age on the oral microbiome. In particular, this review covers the following topics: (i) the oral microbiota of an aging mouth; (ii) the effects of age and time on the human oral microbiome; (iii) the potential impact of inflammaging and immunosenescence in the host-oral microbiota interactions; and (iv) the relationship of the aging oral microbiota and Alzheimer's disease. Finally, we present analyses of data compiled from large clinical studies that evaluated the subgingival microbiota of periodontally healthy subjects and patients with periodontitis from a wide age spectrum (20-83 years of age). © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Sampling Modification Effects in the Subgingival Microbiome Profile of Healthy Children

    OpenAIRE

    Santigli, Elisabeth; Trajanoski, Slave; Eberhard, Katharina; Klug, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Background: Oral microbiota are considered major players in the development of periodontal diseases. Thorough knowledge of intact subgingival microbiomes is required to elucidate microbial shifts from health to disease. Aims: This comparative study investigated the subgingival microbiome of healthy children, possible inter- and intra-individual effects of modified sampling, and basic comparability of subgingival microprints. Methods: In five 10-year-old children, biofilm was collected from th...

  10. Comparison of the efficacy of subgingival irrigation with 2% povidone-iodine and tetracycline HCl in subjects with chronic moderate periodontitis: A clinico microbiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perayil, Jayachandran; Menon, Keerthy S; Biswas, Raja; Fenol, Angel; Vyloppillil, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate and compare the clinical and antimicrobial efficacy of subgingival irrigation with tetracycline and povidone-iodine as an adjunct to nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Twenty subjects with chronic moderate periodontitis were recruited in this split-mouth study with probing pocket depth of >3 and ≤5 mm and clinical attachment loss of 3-4 mm in relation to 16, 36, and 46. In each subject, three selected periodontal pockets were assigned to receive one out of three irrigants (1) sterile water (control) in 16; (2) tetracycline at 10 mg/ml in 36; (3) 2% povidone-iodine in 46, and these sites were designated as Group A, Group B, and Group C, respectively. Plaque score, gingival score, pocket probing depth, and clinical attachment level were evaluated before treatment and at 1 and 3 months posttreatment. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction was used to detect Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythensis which have been implicated as the major risk factors for periodontal disease. Subgingival plaque collected before treatment and at 1 and 3 months posttreatment. Data were analysed using ANOVA and repeated measure ANOVA. Results were considered significant if P < 0.05. Clinical and microbiological parameters were reduced posttreatment, the reduction being significantly higher in Group B compared to Group C. It can be concluded that chemical and mechanical therapies were of slight benefit in the treatment of chronic moderate periodontitis, and there was an adjunctive effect of significance when scaling and root planing was combined with a single subgingival irrigation with tetracycline or povidone-iodine in lower concentration.

  11. The sociodemographic characteristics, periodontal health status, and subgingival microbiota of patients with chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus: a case-control study in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Liu, Jingbo; Tan, Lisi; Yu, Ning; Lin, Li; Geng, Fengxue; Zhang, Dongmei; Pan, Yaping

    2013-08-01

    In China, chronic periodontitis (CP) is common in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The purpose of this study is to identify the sociodemographic characteristics associated with such patients and to assess the periodontal health status and subgingival microbiota of patients with CP and T2DM (T2DMCP) in the Chinese population. A total of 150 patients with T2DMCP and 306 patients with CP without any systemic disease completed questionnaires, underwent clinical periodontal examinations and participated in diabetes-related parameter examinations. Subgingival plaques were obtained to determine the prevalence and amounts of selected oral bacterial species using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR, respectively. The income level and mean body mass index (BMI) of the patients with T2DMCP were significantly higher than those of the patients with CP. Additionally, the patients with T2DMCP were more likely to be urban residents, and they had significantly more severe periodontitis than did the patients with CP. In the patients with T2DMCP, the prevalence and amounts of Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia were significantly higher than those in the patients with CP. Finally, compared with the patients with CP, the patients with T2DMCP had a significantly lower prevalence and amount of Prevotella intermedia. Compared with the patients with CP, the patients with T2DMCP were more likely to be urban residents and generally had higher incomes, higher mean BMI, and poorer periodontal health status. Higher levels of T. denticola and T. forsythia and lower levels of P. intermedia were identified in the subgingival plaque of the patients with T2DMCP.

  12. Comparison of the efficacy of subgingival irrigation with 2% povidone-iodine and tetracycline HCl in subjects with chronic moderate periodontitis: A clinico microbiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayachandran Perayil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was performed to evaluate and compare the clinical and antimicrobial efficacy of subgingival irrigation with tetracycline and povidone-iodine as an adjunct to nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Materials and Methods: Twenty subjects with chronic moderate periodontitis were recruited in this split-mouth study with probing pocket depth of >3 and ≤5 mm and clinical attachment loss of 3-4 mm in relation to 16, 36, and 46. In each subject, three selected periodontal pockets were assigned to receive one out of three irrigants (1 sterile water (control in 16; (2 tetracycline at 10 mg/ml in 36; (3 2% povidone-iodine in 46, and these sites were designated as Group A, Group B, and Group C, respectively. Plaque score, gingival score, pocket probing depth, and clinical attachment level were evaluated before treatment and at 1 and 3 months posttreatment. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction was used to detect Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythensis which have been implicated as the major risk factors for periodontal disease. Subgingival plaque collected before treatment and at 1 and 3 months posttreatment. Data were analysed using ANOVA and repeated measure ANOVA. Results were considered significant if P < 0.05. Results: Clinical and microbiological parameters were reduced posttreatment, the reduction being significantly higher in Group B compared to Group C. Conclusion: It can be concluded that chemical and mechanical therapies were of slight benefit in the treatment of chronic moderate periodontitis, and there was an adjunctive effect of significance when scaling and root planing was combined with a single subgingival irrigation with tetracycline or povidone-iodine in lower concentration.

  13. Initial effect of controlled release chlorhexidine on subgingival microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshmand, Nazanin; Jorgensen, Michael G; Nowzari, Hessam; Morrison, John L; Slots, Jørgen

    2002-10-01

    Little or no data exist on the ability of subgingival application of PerioChip (2.5 mg chlorhexidine gluconate in a biodegradable chip; Astra Pharmaceuticals, Westborough, MA, USA) to suppress periodontopathic microorganisms. The present study compared the subgingival microbiota of periodontitis sites receiving the chlorhexidine chip plus scaling and root planing (Sc/Rp) or Sc/Rp alone. Seven males and six females, mean age 49 years, with moderate to advanced periodontitis participated in the study. In each patient, two bilateral pockets probing 6-7 mm were randomly assigned to treatment by chlorhexidine chip + Sc/Rp, or by Sc/Rp alone. Subgingival placement of chlorhexidine chips was carried out according to the manufacturer's instructions. Sc/Rp was performed with hand instruments for at least 10 min in each study tooth. Subgingival samples were collected by paper-points at baseline, at 2 weeks and at 4 weeks post-treatment. Anaerobic culture methods were used for microbial isolation and identification. The microbiologic examination was carried out blindly. Microbiological data were evaluated by a repeated measures analysis of variance. No statistical difference was found in total colony counts between subgingival sites treated with chlorhexidine chip + Sc/Rp and those treated with Sc/Rp alone. Also, the percentage of major periodontal pathogens (Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Bacteroides forsythus) and the percentage of total periodontal pathogens (A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, B. forsythus, Prevotella intermedia-group, Fusobacterium, Eubacterium, Campylobacter rectus, Peptostreptococcus micros, Eikenella corrodens, enteric rods) were not significantly different between the chlorhexidine chip + Sc/Rp group and the Sc/Rp group. At baseline, A. actinomycetemcomitans was recovered from 4 chlorhexidine chip + Sc/Rp sites and 2 Sc/Rp sites, P. gingivalis from 5 chlorhexidine chip + Sc/Rp sites and 4 Sc/Rp sites, and B

  14. Reliability of recordings of subgingival calculus detected using an ultrasonic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corraini, Priscila; López, Rodrigo

    2015-04-01

    To assess the intra-examiner reliability of recordings of subgingival calculus detected using an ultrasonic device, and to investigate the influence of subject-, tooth- and site-level factors on the reliability of these subgingival calculus recordings. On two occasions, within a 1-week interval, 147 adult periodontitis patients received a full-mouth clinical periodontal examination by a single trained examiner. Duplicate subgingival calculus recordings, in six sites per tooth, were obtained using an ultrasonic device for calculus detection and removal. Agreement was observed in 65 % of the 22,584 duplicate subgingival calculus recordings, ranging 45 % to 83 % according to subject. Using hierarchical modeling, disagreements in the subgingival calculus duplicate recordings were more likely in all other sites than the mid-buccal, and in sites harboring supragingival calculus. Disagreements were less likely in sites with PD ≥  4 mm and with furcation involvement  ≥  degree 2. Bleeding on probing or suppuration did not influence the reliability of subgingival calculus. At the subject-level, disagreements were less likely in patients presenting with the highest and lowest extent categories of the covariate subgingival calculus. The reliability of subgingival calculus recordings using the ultrasound technology is reasonable. The results of the present study suggest that the reliability of subgingival calculus recordings is not influenced by the presence of inflammation. Moreover, subgingival calculus can be more reliably detected using the ultrasound device at sites with higher need for periodontal therapy, i.e., sites presenting with deep pockets and premolars and molars with furcation involvement.

  15. Comparative evaluation of two subgingival irrigating solutions in the management of periodontal disease: A clinicomicrobial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhara Jayesh Pandya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Local administration of antimicrobial agents offer a “site-specific” approach to the periodontal therapy and it has several benefits. Aim: The present study was aimed to assess the clinical and microbial changes by subgingival irrigation using different subgingival irrigants in periodontitis patients and also to assess the mechanical effect of different local irrigation devices; if any. Settings and Design: Split-mouth design was employed on ten individuals. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 10 individuals in whom full-mouth scaling and root planing was performed and subgingival irrigation therapy was instituted for an experimental period of 30 days. The clinical as well as microbiological parameters were evaluated. Statistical Analysis Used: To calculate baseline data with day thirty data,paired t-test was used. Intergroup comparison was carried out using one-way ANOVA. Multiple comparisons among groups were carried out using post hoc Tamhane's T2 test. Results: Among the different subgingival irrigants used, 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate is most effective followed by ozonated water, whereas saline was found to be ineffective when compared to the other two subgingival irrigants. Subgingival irrigation using pulsated device may not have any additive effect in alteration of the subgingival microflora. Conclusion: Within the limits and scope of the study, it can be safely concluded that 0.2% chlorhexidine may be used as an adjunct to mechanical therapy for achieving a significant reduction in inflammatory periodontal changes and also reduction in periodontopathogenic microflora.

  16. Plaque Type Eryrhema Nodosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha Mittal

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Three young females developed plaque type erythema nodosum. The underlying causes in them were tuberculosis chest, recurrent furunculosis and malaria respectively. All the three cases were under treatment at the time of development of erythema nodosum plaques and the onset was acute.

  17. Impact of early colonizers on in vitro subgingival biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Ammann

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of early colonizing species on the structure and the composition of the bacterial community developing in a subgingival 10-species biofilm model system. The model included Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus anginosus, Actinomycesoris, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucleatum, Veillonella dispar, Campylobacter rectus, Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola. Based on literature, we considered Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus anginosus, and Actinomyces oris as early colonizers and examined their role in the biofilms by either a delayed addition to the consortium, or by not inoculating at all the biofilms with these species. We quantitatively evaluated the resulting biofilms by real-time quantitative PCR and further compared the structures using confocal laser scanning microscopy following fluorescence in situ hybridisation. The absence of the early colonizers did not hinder biofilm formation. The biofilms reached the same total counts and developed to normal thickness. However, quantitative shifts in the abundances of individual species were observed. In the absence of streptococci, the overall biofilm structure appeared looser and more dispersed. Moreover, besides a significant increase of P. intermedia and a decrease of P. gingivalis , P. intermedia appeared to form filamented long chains that resembled streptococci. A. oris, although growing to significantly higher abundance in absence of streptococci, did not have a visible impact on the biofilms. Hence, in the absence of the early colonizers, there is a pronounced effect on P. intermedia and P. gingivalis that may cause distinct shifts in the structure of the biofilm. Streptococci possibly facilitate the establishment of P. gingivalis into subgingival biofilms, while in their absence P. intermedia became more dominant and forms elongated chains.

  18. 16S rDNA-based metagenomic analysis of dental plaque and lung bacteria in patients with severe acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, L; Wang, H; Li, C; Pan, Y

    2014-12-01

    Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AE-COPD) are leading causes of mortality in hospital intensive care units. We sought to determine whether dental plaque biofilms might harbor pathogenic bacteria that can eventually cause lung infections in patients with severe AE-COPD. Paired samples of subgingival plaque biofilm and tracheal aspirate were collected from 53 patients with severe AE-COPD. Total bacterial DNA was extracted from each sample individually for polymerase chain reaction amplification and/or generation of bacterial 16S rDNA sequences and cDNA libraries. We used a metagenomic approach, based on bacterial 16S rDNA sequences, to compare the distribution of species present in dental plaque and lung. Analysis of 1060 sequences (20 clones per patient) revealed a wide range of aerobic, anaerobic, pathogenic, opportunistic, novel and uncultivable bacterial species. Species indistinguishable between the paired subgingival plaque and tracheal aspirate samples (97-100% similarity in 16S rDNA sequence) were dental plaque pathogens (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Capnocytophaga sputigena, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola) and lung pathogens (Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae). Real-time polymerase chain reaction of 16S rDNA indicated lower levels of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Porphyromonas gingivalis colonizing the dental plaques compared with the paired tracheal aspirate samples. These results support the hypothesis that dental bacteria may contribute to the pathology of severe AE-COPD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. 16S rRNA-based detection of oral pathogens in coronary atherosclerotic plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahendra Jaideep

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atherosclerosis develops as a response of the vessel wall to injury. Chronic bacterial infections have been associated with an increased risk for atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease. The ability of oral pathogens to colonize in coronary atheromatous plaque is well known. Aim: The aim of this study was to detect the presence of Treponema denticola, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Campylobacter rectus in the subgingival and atherosclerotic plaques of patients with coronary artery disease. Materials and Methods: Fifty-one patients in the age group of 40-80 years with coronary artery disease were selected for the study. DNA was extracted from the plaque samples. The specific primers for T. denticola, C. rectus and P. gingivalis were used to amplify a part of the 16S rRNA gene by polymerase chain reaction. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square analysis, correlation coefficient and prevalence percentage of the microorganisms were carried out for the analysis. Results: Of the 51 patients, T. denticola, C. rectus and P. gingivalis were detected in 49.01%, 21.51% and 45.10% of the atherosclerotic plaque samples. Conclusions: Our study revealed the presence of bacterial DNA of the oral pathogenic microorganisms in coronary atherosclerotic plaques. The presence of the bacterial DNA in the coronary atherosclerotic plaques in significant proportion may suggest the possible relationship between periodontal bacterial infection and genesis of coronary atherosclerosis.

  20. Detection of Helicobacter pylori using PCR in dental plaque of patients with and without gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, Amir; Mahmoudpour, Ali; Abolfazli, Nader; Lafzi, Ardeshir

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) accounts for gastritis, peptic ulcer and is a probable cause of gastric cancer. Since its detection in the oral cavity, concerns have been raised about dental plaque as a reservoir for reinfection. The aim of this study was to detect the organism in the dental plaque and to determine the association, if any, between H. pylori gastritis and dental plaque contamination causing H.pylori. A polymerase chain reaction-based method was used for detection of H. pylori in clinical specimens. Supra and subgingival samples were collected from 67 patients with chronic periodontitis, 23 of whom were also suffering from gastritis. The data were analyzed with Chi square and Fisher exact test and the statistical significance was set to 0.05. H.pylori was scarce in patients with periodontitis(5.9%). There was a significant association between the presence of H.pylori in the dental plaque and gastritis (p=0.012). Although rarely seen, H.pylori infected dental plaque may be a source for reinfection. It is therefore suggested that professional plaque removal and oral hygiene procedures be performed, along with the antibiotic treatment of H.pylori.

  1. Evaluation of the incidence of periodontitis-associated bacteria in the atherosclerotic plaque of coronary blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaremba, Maciej; Górska, Renata; Suwalski, Piotr; Kowalski, Jan

    2007-02-01

    Unstable atherosclerotic plaque is a dangerous clinical condition, possibly leading to acute coronary deficiency resulting in cardiac infarction. Questions about the role of inflammatory factors in the formation of pathological lesions in the endothelium of coronary vessels have often been raised. This condition may be caused by bacteria that are able to initiate clot formation in a blood vessel, destabilizing an atherosclerotic plaque that is already present. The sources of these pathogens are chronic inflammatory processes occurring in the host, including periodontal disease, which is one of the most frequent conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of selected anaerobic bacteria in subgingival and atherosclerotic plaque in patients treated surgically because of coronary vessel obliteration. The study was performed on 20 individuals with chronic periodontitis. Subgingival plaque was collected from periodontal pockets >5 mm. DNA testing was used to identify eight pathogens responsible for periodontal tissue destruction. Material from atherosclerotic plaques was collected from the same patients during bypass surgery, and DNA testing by the same method was performed. In 13 of 20 patients, the pathogens most frequently found in severe chronic periodontitis were also found in coronary vessels. In 10 cases, those species of bacteria were also present in atherosclerotic plaque. The most frequently identified bacteria were Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola. In patients with the severe form of chronic periodontitis, it seems that clinical attachment loss is not associated with bacterial permeability into coronary vessels. What is important is the presence of an active inflammatory process expressed by a significantly higher bleeding index in those patients in whom the examined bacterial species were found in atherosclerotic plaque.

  2. EFEKTIFITAS SKELING-PENGHALUSAN AKAR DENGAN DAN TANPA APLIKASI SUBGINGIVAL POVIDON-IODIN 10% PADA POKET 5-7mm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Ervina

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In deep periodontal lesions, scaling and root planning (SRP failed to complete elimination of periodontal bacteria, so chemical antimicrobial agents are used topically to destroy microorganism. Povidon-iodin 10% is one of antimicrobial agents that can be applied topically and directly in the pocket. The aim of the research were evaluated the efficacy of povidon-iodin 10% as chemical antimicrobial agents locally applied into periodontal pocket. The data are obtained from patients with chronic adult periodontitis, baseline periodontal pocket depth (PPD are 5-7 mm. The teeth are scaled and root planed after clinical examinations (plaque index, papilla bleeding index and periodontal pocket depth and test sites or control sites are assigned randomly. Topically application of povidon-iodin 10% at test sites and aquabides at control sites is applied at day 1st and day 7th. The clinical parameters are assessed at day 14th. The results of the research showed that application of povidon-iodin 10% after SRP provide statistically significant more favorable papilla bleeding index reduction than SRP + aquabides after 14 day. The pocket depth reduction at test sites are greater than control cites (baseline PPD=6 and 7 mm. The conclusions of the research showed that application subgingival povidon-iodin 10% as adjuctive to SRP significantly reduce PBI and PPD (6 & 7 mm than without application povidon-iodin 10%.

  3. High Field Atherosclerotic Plaque MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Chun; Wang, Jinnan; Balu, Niranjan

    2012-01-01

    Manifestations of atherosclerotic plaque in different arterial beds range from perfusion deficits to overt ischemia such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Atherosclerotic plaque composition is known to be associated with its propensity to rupture and cause vascular events. MRI of atherosclerotic plaque using clinical 1.5T scanners can detect plaque composition. Plaque MRI at higher field strengths offers both opportunities and challenges to improving the high spatial-resolution and contras...

  4. Is the presence of Helicobacter pylori in dental plaque of patients with chronic periodontitis a risk factor for gastric infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Asqah, M; Al Hamoudi, N; Anil, S; Al Jebreen, A; Al-Hamoudi, W K

    2009-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori is considered to be a pathogen responsible for gastritis and peptic ulcers, and a risk factor for gastric cancer. A periodontal pocket in the teeth of individuals with chronic periodontitis may function as a reservoir for H pylori. The present study was undertaken to evaluate whether the presence of H pylori in the dental plaque of patients with and without periodontitis correlates with gastric involvement. A total of 101 patients with dyspepsia were included in the present study. Subjects were divided into periodontitis and nonperiodontitis groups. For the detection of H pylori in dental plaque, samples were collected from two teeth using a periodontal curette. Subgingival plaque was obtained by inserting two sterile paper points into periodontal pockets for 20 s. This was followed by an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and antral biopsies. Sixty-five per cent of patients had dental plaque positive for H pylori and more than 50% harboured the bacteria in their stomach. Periodontitis patients had a significantly higher percentage of H pylori in their dental plaque (79% versus 43%; Pperiodontitis. Additionally, 78% of patients from the periodontitis group versus only 30% from the nonperiodontitis group had a positive test result for the coexistence of H pylori in both dental plaque and the stomach. Patients with poor oral hygiene have a higher prevalence of H pylori in dental plaque and in the stomach. This finding suggests that the oral cavity may be a reservoir for H pylori, and potentially a source of transmission or reinfection.

  5. Relationship between quantitative measurement of Porphyromonas gingivalis on dental plaque with periodontal status of patients with coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwiyanti, Stephani; Soeroso, Yuniarti; Sunarto, Hari; Radi, Basuni

    2017-02-01

    Coronary heart disease is a narrowing of coronary artery due to plaque build-up. [1] Chronic periodontitis increases risk of cardiovascular disease. P.gingivalis is linked to both diseases. Objective: to analyse quantitative difference of P.gingivalis on dental plaque and its relationship with periodontal status of CHD patient and control. Methods: Periodontal status of 66 CHD patient and 40 control was checked. Subgingival plaque was isolated and P.gingivalis was measured using real-time PCR. Result: P.gingivalis of CHD patient differs from control. P.gingivalis is linked to pocket depth of CHD patient. Conclusion: P.gingivalis count of CHD patient is higher than control. P.gingivalis count is not linked to any periodontal status, except for pocket depth of CHD patient.

  6. Subgingival dysbiosis in smoker and non‑smoker patients with chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coretti, Lorena; Cuomo, Mariella; Florio, Ermanno; Palumbo, Domenico; Keller, Simona; Pero, Raffaela; Chiariotti, Lorenzo; Lembo, Francesca; Cafiero, Carlo

    2017-04-01

    Periodontitis is one of the most common oral inflammatory diseases, and results in connective tissue degradation and gradual tooth loss. It manifests with formation of periodontal pockets, in which anaerobic and Gram‑negative bacteria proliferate rapidly. Consequently, alteration of the subgingival microbiota is considered the primary etiologic agent of periodontitis. Previous studies have reported that smokers are at increased risk of periodontal disease, in both prevalence and severity, indicating that smoking is a risk factor for the onset and progression of the pathology. In the present study, 16S rRNA sequencing was employed to assess the subgingival microbiota in 6 smoker patients with chronic periodontitis, 6 non‑smoker patients with chronic periodontitis and 8 healthy controls. The results demonstrated significant alterations in the microbial structure of periodontitis patients. High relative abundance of Parvimonans, Desulfubulbus, Paludibacter, Haemophilus, and Sphaerochaeta genera characterized subgingival microbiota of periodontitis patients, both smokers and non‑smokers. Due to the high precision and sensitivity of the 16S rRNA sequencing method, analysis for low‑abundant genera (including Pedobacter, Granulicatella, Paracoccus, Atopobium, Bifidobacterium, Coprococcus, Oridobacteriu, Peptococcus, Oscillospira and Akkermansia) was feasible, and revealed novel phylotypes associated with periodontitis. Of note, a major microbial community alteration was evident in smoker patients, suggesting an association between smoking and severity of subgingival dysbiosis. The present study confirmed that chronic periodontitis is a polymicrobial disease where changes in the equilibrium of subgingival microbiota contribute to severity of pathology.

  7. The vulnerable plaque: From plaque instability towards thrombus instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.

    2014-01-01

    Acuut coronair syndroom wordt meestal veroorzaakt door het scheuren van een atherosclerotische plaque in combinatie met (afsluitende) trombusvorming in de kransslagader. Plaque ruptuur en trombotische occlusie treden vaak niet gelijktijdig op, en het tijdstip van het ontstaan van klinische klachten

  8. [Evaluation of clinical efficacy of casting pure titanium ring on reparation of subgingival residual root].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Wang, Peng

    2013-10-01

    To explore treatment regime and curative effect of the casting pure titanium ring on reparation of subgingival residual root. Thirty-two teeth were selected for reparation of subgingival residual root after root canal therapy in our department during 2008-2010. The teeth were restored with casting pure titanium ring, glass fiber post and all-ceramic crown. The patients were recalled 12 and 24 months after placement of the pure titanium ring. Gingival crevicular fluid(GCF) samples were collected by filter paper strips. Then the weight of GCF was detected and the gingival index was recorded. The data was analyzed for paired samples t test by SPSS17.0 software package. There was no significant difference in the weight of GCF and the gingival index before and after placement of pure titanium ring (P<0.05). By using pure titanium ring, most subgingival residual root after root canal therapy can be rehabilitated and function well for long time.

  9. Dental plaque identification at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003426.htm Dental plaque identification at home To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Plaque is a sticky substance that collects around and ...

  10. Revisiting Randall's plaque

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    N. Abrol

    Abstract. Kidney stones have probably affected mankind for ages with early reports in an Egyptian mummy. While prevalence of stone disease is increasing, its pathogenesis remains elusive. Randall, after his study on more than 1100 cadaver kidneys, gave hypothesis of subepithelial plaque acting as a nucleation site for ...

  11. EAMJ March- Plaque

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    iMac User

    2008-03-01

    Mar 1, 2008 ... 3 March 2008. PLAQUE AND GROWTH CHARACTERISTICS OF DIFFERENT POLIOVIRUSES ISOLATED FROM ACUTE FLACCID. PARALYSIS IN NORTHERN NIGERIA. W. F. Sule, DVM, MSc, Lecturer, O. I. Oyedele, PhD, ..... John, T.J., Vaccine-associated paralytic polio in India. Bull. WHO. 2002; 80: 917.

  12. Efecto del tratamiento periodontal sobre la microbiota subgingival en pacientes con preeclampsia

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Jaramillo; Roger Arce; Adolfo Contreras; Julián A. Herrera

    2012-01-01

    Introducción. Pocos estudios han descrito la microbiota subgingival en mujeres embarazadas con preeclampsia leve. Objetivo. Identificar cambios periodontales y de la microbiota subgingival en mujeres embarazadas con preeclampsia, después del tratamiento periodontal. Materiales y métodos. En un análisis secundario de un ensayo clínico de asignación aleatoria, se estudiaron 57 pacientes con preeclampsia en el Hospital Universitario del Valle de Cali. Se asignaron al azar 31 al grupo de ...

  13. Effects of extracellular plaque components on the chlorhexidine sensitivity of strains of Streptococcus mutans and human dental plaque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolinsky, L.E.; Hume, W.R.

    1985-08-01

    An in vitro study was undertaken to determine the effects of sucrose-derived extracellular plaque components on the sensitivity of selected oral bacteria to chlorhexidine (CX). Cultures of Streptococcus mutans HS-6, OMZ-176, Ingbritt C, 6715-wt13, and pooled human plaque were grown in trypticase soy media with or without 1% sucrose. The sensitivity to CX of bacteria grown in each medium was determined by fixed-time exposure to CX and subsequent measurement of /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake. One-hour exposure to CX at concentrations of 10(-4) M (0.01% w/v) or greater substantially inhibited subsequent cellular division among all the S. mutans strains and human plaque samples tested. An IC50 (the CX concentration which depressed /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation to 50% of control level) of close to 10(-4) M was noted for S. mutans strains HS-6, OMZ-176, and 6715-wt13 when grown in the presence of sucrose. The same strains grown in cultures without added sucrose showed about a ten-fold greater sensitivity to CX (IC50 close to 10(-5) M). A three-fold difference was noted for S. mutans Ingbritt C. Only a slight increase in the IC50 was noted for the plaque samples cultured in sucrose-containing media, but their threshold for depression of /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake by CX was lower than that for the sucrose-free plaque samples. The study showed that extracellular products confer some protection against CX to the bacteria examined, and provided an explanation for the disparity between clinically-recommended concentrations for plaque suppression and data on in vitro susceptibility.

  14. Molecular analysis of oral bacteria in dental biofilm and atherosclerotic plaques of patients with vascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Clarissa Pessoa; Oliveira, Francisco Artur Forte; Silva, Paulo Goberlânio de Barros; Alves, Ana Paula Negreiros Nunes; Mota, Mário Rogério Lima; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Burbano, Rommel Mario Rodriguez; Seabra, Aline Damasceno; Lobo Filho, José Glauco; Lima, Danilo Lopes Ferreira; Soares Filho, Antônio Wilon Evelin; Sousa, Fabrício Bitu

    2014-07-01

    Oral bacteria have been detected in atherosclerotic plaques at a variable frequency; however, the connection between oral health and vascular and oral bacterial profiles of patients with vascular disease is not clearly established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of oral bacterial DNA in the mouth and atherosclerotic plaques, in addition to assessing the patients' caries and periodontal disease history. Thirty samples of supragingival and subgingival plaque, saliva and atherosclerotic plaques of 13 patients with carotid stenosis or aortic aneurysm were evaluated, through real-time polymerase chain reaction, for the presence of Streptococcus mutans (SM), Prevotella intermedia (PI), Porphyromonas gingivalis (PG) and Treponema denticola (TD). All patients were submitted to oral examination using the DMFT (decayed, missing and filled teeth) and PSR (Periodontal Screening and Recording) indexes. Histopathological analysis of the atherosclerotic plaques was performed. Most of the patients were edentulous (76.9%). SM, PI, PG and TD were detected in 100.0%, 92.0%, 15.3% and 30.7% of the oral samples, respectively. SM was the most prevalent targeted bacteria in atherosclerotic plaques, detected in 100% of the samples, followed by PI (7.1%). The vascular samples were negative for PG and TD. There was a statistically significant difference (p<0.05) between the presence of PG and TD in the oral cavity and vascular samples. SM was found at a high frequency in oral and vascular samples, even in edentulous patients, and its presence in atherosclerotic plaques suggests the possible involvement of this bacterium in the disease progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Atherosclerotic plaque rupture: local or systemic process?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutgens, Esther; van Suylen, Robert-Jan; Faber, Birgit C.; Gijbels, Marion J.; Eurlings, Petra M.; Bijnens, Ann-Pascale; Cleutjens, Kitty B.; Heeneman, Sylvia; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.

    2003-01-01

    It is generally established that the unstable plaque is the major cause of acute clinical sequelae of atherosclerosis. Unfortunately, terms indicating lesions prone to plaque instability, such as "vulnerable plaque," and the different phenotypes of unstable plaques, such as plaque rupture, plaque

  16. A Critical Role for Extracellular DNA in Dental Plaque Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, N; Shields, R C; Yassin, S A; Hawkins, A R; Bowen, L; Luo, T L; Rickard, A H; Holliday, R; Preshaw, P M; Jakubovics, N S

    2017-02-01

    Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has been identified in the matrix of many different monospecies biofilms in vitro, including some of those produced by oral bacteria. In many cases, eDNA stabilizes the structure of monospecies biofilms. Here, the authors aimed to determine whether eDNA is an important component of natural, mixed-species oral biofilms, such as plaque on natural teeth or dental implants. To visualize eDNA in oral biofilms, approaches for fluorescently stained eDNA with either anti-DNA antibodies or an ultrasensitive cell-impermeant dye, YOYO-1, were first developed using Enterococcus faecalis, an organism that has previously been shown to produce extensive eDNA structures within biofilms. Oral biofilms were modelled as in vitro "microcosms" on glass coverslips inoculated with the natural microbial population of human saliva and cultured statically in artificial saliva medium. Using antibodies and YOYO-1, eDNA was found to be distributed throughout microcosm biofilms, and was particularly abundant in the immediate vicinity of cells. Similar arrangements of eDNA were detected in biofilms on crowns and overdenture abutments of dental implants that had been recovered from patients during the restorative phase of treatment, and in subgingival dental plaque of periodontitis patients, indicating that eDNA is a common component of natural oral biofilms. In model oral biofilms, treatment with a DNA-degrading enzyme, NucB from Bacillus licheniformis, strongly inhibited the accumulation of biofilms. The bacterial species diversity was significantly reduced by treatment with NucB and particularly strong reductions were observed in the abundance of anaerobic, proteolytic bacteria such as Peptostreptococcus, Porphyromonas and Prevotella. Preformed biofilms were not significantly reduced by NucB treatment, indicating that eDNA is more important or more exposed during the early stages of biofilm formation. Overall, these data demonstrate that dental plaque eDNA is

  17. Psoriasis (chronic plaque).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naldi, Luigi; Rzany, Berthold

    2009-01-09

    Psoriasis affects 1-3% of the population, in some people causing changes to the nails and joints in addition to skin lesions. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of systemic drug treatments, topical drug treatments, and non-drug treatments (other than ultraviolet light) for chronic plaque psoriasis? What are the effects of ultraviolet light treatments for chronic plaque psoriasis? What are the effects of combined treatment with drugs plus ultraviolet light on chronic plaque psoriasis? What are the effects of combined systemic plus topical drug treatments for chronic plaque psoriasis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2007 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 122 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, adding calcipotriol (topical) to psoralen plus ultraviolet light A or ultraviolet light B, adding oral retinoids to psoralen plus ultraviolet A (PUVA), alefacept, balneotherapy, ciclosporin, dithranol, T cell-targeted therapies, cytokine blocking agents, emollients (alone or plus ultraviolet light B), etanercept, fish oil supplementation, fumaric acid derivatives, Goeckerman treatment, heliotherapy, infliximab, Ingram regimen, keratolytics (salicylic acid, urea), leflunomide, methotrexate, oral pimecrolimus, phototherapy plus balneotherapy, psoralen plus ultraviolet A, psychotherapy, oral retinoids (alone or with

  18. Subgingival microflora and antibody responses against periodontal bacteria of young Japanese patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, K; Nishimura, F; Kurihara, M; Iwamoto, Y; Takashiba, S; Miyata, T; Murayama, Y

    2001-10-01

    Periodontal disease is a complication of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), although the mechanisms responsible for this relationship remain unclear. The aim of this study was to examine oral manifestations and the prevalence of periodontal pathogens from subgingival plaque samples and serum IgG antibody levels against them in young Japanese type 1 diabetic subjects. One hundred and seventeen Japanese T1DM subjects (53 male, 64 female, mean age +/- SD, 16 +/- 6.5 years) participated in this study. Thirty-nine periodontally healthy, age-matched nondiabetics served as controls. T1DM subjects were clinically assigned into three groups: 12 periodontitis, 32 gingivitis and 73 periodontally healthy. Microbiological tests for four periodontal pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Prevotella intermedia and Capnocytophaga ochracea were performed using 16S ribosomal RNA-based polymerase chain reaction methods. Serum IgG antibody levels against 12 periodontal bacteria including the four species assessed by polymerase chain reaction were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the T1DM subjects, the Periodontitis group had a significantly longer mean duration of diabetes and a higher percentages of subjects harbouring P. gingivalis and P. intermedia than the Periodontally Healthy group. Serum IgG antibody levels against P. gingivalis were significantly elevated in the Periodontitis group compared with Gingivitis and Periodontally Healthy groups. These results indicate that Japanese T1DM subjects are a high-risk group for periodontal disease and both P. gingivalis infection and duration of T1DM are risk factors for the progression of periodontitis in patients with T1DM.

  19. Molecular detection and corelation of Helicobacter pylori in dental plaque and gastric biopsies of dyspeptic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharath, T Sreenivasa; Reddy, M Sesha; Dhanapal, Raghu; Raj Kumar, N Govind; Neeladri Raju, PV; Saraswathi, TR

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a microaerophilic organism, which colonizes in the gastric mucosa. Its role in etiology and development of acute and chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer diseases is scientifically proved. Oral cavity especially supragingival, subgingival plaque and so forth simulate the same microaerophilic environment favorable for the growth of this bacterium. Aim: Detection of H. pylori simultaneously in the oral cavity and gastric mucosa of patients suffering from gastric pathologies. Objectives: To detect H. pylori in the oral cavity and gastric mucosa using endoscopy, urease test and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (urease A gene). Determining its association and corelation with patient demographics, oral hygiene maintenance and periodontal disease status. Materials and Methods: Endoscopic examination, oral findings oral hygiene index-simplified (OHI-S) and community periodontal index and treatment needs (CPITN) indices were recorded. Antral biopsies and supragingival plaque samples were taken from 56 dyspeptic adult patients. The collected samples were subjected to histological examination, urease broth test and urease A gene amplification using real-time PCR. Result: H. pylori was detected in the supragingival plaque of individuals with H. pylori-induced gastric diseases using rapid urease test and real-time PCR analysis. Occurrence of same strain of H. pylori simultaneously in plaque and gastric mucosa was observed. Positive correlation was obtained between the collected indices and quantity of H. pylori colonization. PMID:24959032

  20. Subgingival debridement of periodontal pockets by air polishing in comparison with ultrasonic instrumentation during maintenance therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennström, Jan L; Dahlén, Gunnar; Ramberg, Per

    2011-09-01

    The objective was to determine clinical and microbiological effects and perceived treatment discomfort of root debridement by subgingival air polishing compared with ultrasonic instrumentation during supportive periodontal therapy (SPT). The trial was conducted as a split-mouth designed study of 2-month duration including 20 recall patients previously treated for chronic periodontitis. Sites with probing pocket depth (PPD) of 5-8 mm and bleeding on probing (BoP+) in two quadrants were randomly assigned to subgingival debridement by (i) glycine powder/air polishing applied with a specially designed nozzle or (ii) ultrasonic instrumentation. Clinical variables were recorded at baseline, 14 and 60 days post-treatment. Primary clinical efficacy variable was PPD reduction. Microbiological analysis of subgingival samples was performed immediately before and after debridement, 2 and 14 days post-treatment. Both treatment procedures resulted in significant reductions of periodontitis-associated bacterial species immediately and 2 days after treatment, and in significant reduction in BoP, PPD and relative attachment level at 2 months. There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment procedures at any of the examinations intervals. Perceived treatment discomfort was lower for air polishing than ultrasonic debridement. This short-term study revealed no pertinent differences in clinical or microbiological outcomes between subgingival air polishing and ultrasonic debridement of moderate deep pockets in SPT patients. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Near-ultraviolet removal rates for subgingival dental calculus at different irradiation angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenly, Joshua E.; Seka, Wolf D.; Rechmann, Peter

    2011-07-01

    The laser ablation rate of subgingival dental calculus irradiated at a 400-nm-wavelength, 7.4-mJ pulse energy, and 85- and 20-deg irradiation angles is measured using laser triangulation. Three-dimensional images taken before and after irradiation create a removal map with 6-μm axial resolution. Fifteen human teeth with subgingival calculus are irradiated in vitro under a cooling water spray with an ~300-μm-diam, tenth-order super-Gaussian beam. The average subgingival calculus removal rates for irradiation at 85 and 20 deg are 11.1+/-3.6 and 11.5+/-5.9 μm/pulse, respectively, for depth removal and 4.5+/-1.7×105 and 4.8+/-2.3×105 μm3/pulse, respectively, for volume removal. The ablation rate is constant at each irradiation site but varies between sites because of the large differences in the physical and optical properties of calculus. Comparison of the average depth- and volume-removal rates does not reveal any dependence on the irradiation angle and is likely due to the surface topology of subgingival calculus samples that overshadows any expected angular dependence.

  2. Distinguishing the Signals of Gingivitis and Periodontitis in Supragingival Plaque: a Cross-Sectional Cohort Study in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Liam; Harjunmaa, Ulla; Doyle, Ronan; Mulewa, Simeon; Charlie, Davie; Maleta, Ken; Callard, Robin; Walker, A Sarah; Balloux, Francois; Ashorn, Per; Klein, Nigel

    2016-10-01

    Periodontal disease ranges from gingival inflammation (gingivitis) to the inflammation and loss of tooth-supporting tissues (periodontitis). Previous research has focused mainly on subgingival plaque, but supragingival plaque composition is also known to be associated with disease. Quantitative modeling of bacterial abundances across the natural range of periodontal severities can distinguish which features of disease are associated with particular changes in composition. We assessed a cross-sectional cohort of 962 Malawian women for periodontal disease and used 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing (V5 to V7 region) to characterize the bacterial compositions of supragingival plaque samples. Associations between bacterial relative abundances and gingivitis/periodontitis were investigated by using negative binomial models, adjusting for epidemiological factors. We also examined bacterial cooccurrence networks to assess community structure. The main differences in supragingival plaque compositions were associated more with gingivitis than periodontitis, including higher bacterial diversity and a greater abundance of particular species. However, even after controlling for gingivitis, the presence of subgingival periodontitis was associated with an altered supragingival plaque. A small number of species were associated with periodontitis but not gingivitis, including members of Prevotella, Treponema, and Selenomonas, supporting a more complex disease model than a linear progression following gingivitis. Cooccurrence networks of periodontitis-associated taxa clustered according to periodontitis across all gingivitis severities. Species including Filifactor alocis and Fusobacterium nucleatum were central to this network, which supports their role in the coaggregation of periodontal biofilms during disease progression. Our findings confirm that periodontitis cannot be considered simply an advanced stage of gingivitis even when only considering supragingival plaque

  3. Distinguishing the Signals of Gingivitis and Periodontitis in Supragingival Plaque: a Cross-Sectional Cohort Study in Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harjunmaa, Ulla; Doyle, Ronan; Mulewa, Simeon; Charlie, Davie; Maleta, Ken; Callard, Robin; Walker, A. Sarah; Balloux, Francois; Ashorn, Per; Klein, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Periodontal disease ranges from gingival inflammation (gingivitis) to the inflammation and loss of tooth-supporting tissues (periodontitis). Previous research has focused mainly on subgingival plaque, but supragingival plaque composition is also known to be associated with disease. Quantitative modeling of bacterial abundances across the natural range of periodontal severities can distinguish which features of disease are associated with particular changes in composition. We assessed a cross-sectional cohort of 962 Malawian women for periodontal disease and used 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing (V5 to V7 region) to characterize the bacterial compositions of supragingival plaque samples. Associations between bacterial relative abundances and gingivitis/periodontitis were investigated by using negative binomial models, adjusting for epidemiological factors. We also examined bacterial cooccurrence networks to assess community structure. The main differences in supragingival plaque compositions were associated more with gingivitis than periodontitis, including higher bacterial diversity and a greater abundance of particular species. However, even after controlling for gingivitis, the presence of subgingival periodontitis was associated with an altered supragingival plaque. A small number of species were associated with periodontitis but not gingivitis, including members of Prevotella, Treponema, and Selenomonas, supporting a more complex disease model than a linear progression following gingivitis. Cooccurrence networks of periodontitis-associated taxa clustered according to periodontitis across all gingivitis severities. Species including Filifactor alocis and Fusobacterium nucleatum were central to this network, which supports their role in the coaggregation of periodontal biofilms during disease progression. Our findings confirm that periodontitis cannot be considered simply an advanced stage of gingivitis even when only considering supragingival plaque

  4. Managing sub-gingival fracture by multi-disciplinary approach: Endodontics-forced orthodontic extrusion and prosthetic rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Mittal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatized anterior teeth with sub-gingival crown fractures are a challenge to treat. The management of sub-gingival fractures includes exposing the cervical margin followed by appropriate coronal restoration. The treatment modalities, which involve exposing the cervical margin, are surgical crown lengthening and orthodontic extrusion. This paper reports a case of fractured maxillary anterior tooth at the sub-gingival level that was managed by forced orthodontic extrusion after endodontic treatment followed by esthetic rehabilitation, a much forgotten technique not utilized routinely yet conservative and cost-effective.

  5. Comparison of visual-tactile, radiographic, and histologic diagnoses of subgingival crown margin caries- an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittneben, Julia-Gabriela; Zöllner, Axel; Wright, Axel F; Weber, Hans-Peter

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of diagnosing interproximal subgingival caries at crown margins. A total of 32 subgingival interproximal crown margin areas were examined by 10 clinicians (n = 320) using conventional diagnostic methods on extracted, crowned teeth mounted in a specially designed cast. Crown margins were located 1.5 mm below the level of the artificial gingiva. Clinical and radiographic diagnoses were compared to the histopathologic findings for each site. Both visual-tactile and radiographic evaluations revealed a weak diagnostic accuracy for interproximal subgingival crown margin caries.

  6. The antibacterial effect of photodynamic therapy in dental plaque-derived biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, C. R.; Abernethy, A. D.; Som, S.; Ruggiero, K.; Doucette, S.; Marcantonio, R. C.; Boussios, C. I.; Kent, R.; Goodson, J. M.; Tanner, A. C. R.; Soukos, N. S.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objective Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been advocated as an alternative to antimicrobial agents to suppress subgingival species and treat periodontitis. Bacteria located within dense biofilms, such as those encountered in dental plaques, have been found to be relatively resistant to antimicrobial therapy. In the present study, we investigated the ability of PDT to affect bacteria resistant in biofilms by comparing the photodynamic effects of methylene blue (MB) on human dental plaque microorganisms in planktonic phase and in biofilms. Material and Methods Dental plaque samples were obtained from 10 subjects with chronic periodontitis. Suspensions of plaque microorganisms from 5 subjects were sensitized with MB (25 μg/ml) for 5 minutes followed by exposure to red light. Multi-species microbial biofilms developed from the same plaque samples were also exposed to MB (25 μg/ml) and the same light conditions as their planktonic counterparts. In a second set of experiments, biofilms were developed with plaque bacteria from 5 subjects and sensitized with 25 and 50 μg/ml MB followed by exposure to light as above. After PDT, survival fractions were calculated from colony-forming unit counts. Results In suspension, PDT produced approximately 63% killing of bacteria. In biofilms, the effect of PDT resulted in much lower reductions of microorganisms (32% maximal killing). Conclusion Oral bacteria in biofilms are less affected by PDT than bacteria in planktonic phase. The antibacterial effect of PDT is reduced in biofilm bacteria but not to the same degree as has been reported for treatment with antibiotics under similar conditions. PMID:19602126

  7. Advancement of the 10-species subgingival Zurich biofilm model by examining different nutritional conditions and defining the structure of the in vitro biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, Thomas W; Gmür, Rudolf; Thurnheer, Thomas

    2012-10-05

    Periodontitis is caused by a highly complex consortium of bacteria that establishes as biofilms in subgingival pockets. It is a disease that occurs worldwide and its consequences are a major health concern. Investigations in situ are not possible and the bacterial community varies greatly between patients and even within different loci. Due to the high complexity of the consortium and the availability of samples, a clear definition of the pathogenic bacteria and their mechanisms of pathogenicity are still not available. In the current study we addressed the need of a defined model system by advancing our previously described subgingival biofilm model towards a bacterial composition that reflects the one observed in diseased sites of patients and analysed the structure of these biofilms. We further developed the growth media by systematic variation of key components resulting in improved stability and the firm establishment of spirochetes in the 10-species subgingival Zurich biofilm model. A high concentration of heat-inactivated human serum allowed the best proliferation of the used species. Therefore we further investigated these biofilms by analysing their structure by confocal laser scanning microscopy following fluorescence in situ hybridisation. The species showed mutual interactions as expected from other studies. The abundances of all organisms present in this model were determined by microscopic counting following species-specific identification by both fluorescence in situ hybridisation and immunofluorescence. The newly integrated treponemes were the most abundant organisms. The use of 50% of heat-inactivated human serum used in the improved growth medium resulted in significantly thicker and more stable biofilms, and the quantitative representation of the used species represents the in vivo community of periodontitis patients much closer than in biofilms grown in the two media with less or no human serum. The appearance of T. denticola, P. gingivalis, and

  8. Subgingival microbiota in health compared to periodontitis and the influence of smoking.

    OpenAIRE

    Camelo-Castillo, A. J.; Mira, A.; Pico, A.; Nibali, L.; Henderson, B.; Donos, N.; Tomás, I.

    2015-01-01

    The etiology of periodontitis has traditionally been associated to a consortium of three bacterial species-the so-called "red-complex" of periodontal disease-which has been the target for most diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. However, other species have also been found to correlate with disease severity. In addition, the influence of smoking on periodontal microbiota is poorly understood. In the current manuscript, the composition of the subgingival microbiota in healthy individuals vs....

  9. Effect of smoking on subgingival microflora of patients with periodontitis in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Kubota, Michiya; Tanno-Nakanishi, Mariko; Yamada, Satoru; Okuda, Katsuji; Ishihara, Kazuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Smoking is a risk factor for periodontitis. To clarify the contribution of smoking to periodontitis, it is essential to assess the relationship between smoking and the subgingival microflora. The aim of this study was to gain an insight into the influence of smoking on the microflora of Japanese patients with periodontitis. Methods Sixty-seven Japanese patients with chronic periodontitis (19 to 83 years old, 23 women and 44 men) were enrolled in the present study. They con...

  10. Shifts of subgingival bacterial population after nonsurgical and pharmacological therapy of localized aggressive periodontitis, followed for 1 year by Ion Torrent PGM platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisciano, Giuseppina; Toschetti, Annamaria; Comar, Manola; Taranto, Rosanna Di; Berton, Federico; Stacchi, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    The possibility of targeting the hypervariable region V3 of the 16S rRNA gene using Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) could provide a complete analysis of subgingival plaque samples, potentially able to identify microbiological species missed by culture-based methods. A 16-year-old female smoker patient, affected by localized aggressive periodontitis, underwent a full-mouth disinfection protocol and was inserted in a 3-month recall program. Microbiological samples were collected at baseline and at 30, 100, 365 days follow-up and analyzed by Ion Torrent PGM. Capnocytophaga, Fusobacterium, Prevotella, and Treponema were the most represented pathogens at baseline. Nonsurgical treatment and systemic antibiotics drastically lowered the anaerobic species, and their presence remained limited after 100 days, while a consistent recolonization by anaerobic bacteria was detected at 365 days. The patient showed a general improvement of periodontal conditions. Differently from polymerase chain reaction and other microarray techniques, Ion Torrent performs a quantitative analysis of the microbiota, irrespective of the searched species. An accurate definition of the shifts of the bacterial community might help periodontal researchers for a better understanding of the impact of different treatment approaches or in intercepting nonresponsive conditions.

  11. Sampling Modification Effects in the Subgingival Microbiome Profile of Healthy Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santigli, Elisabeth; Trajanoski, Slave; Eberhard, Katharina; Klug, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oral microbiota are considered major players in the development of periodontal diseases. Thorough knowledge of intact subgingival microbiomes is required to elucidate microbial shifts from health to disease. Aims: This comparative study investigated the subgingival microbiome of healthy children, possible inter- and intra-individual effects of modified sampling, and basic comparability of subgingival microprints. Methods: In five 10-year-old children, biofilm was collected from the upper first premolars and first molars using sterilized, UV-treated paper-points inserted into the subgingival sulcus at eight sites. After supragingival cleaning using an electric toothbrush and water, sampling was performed, firstly, excluding (Mode A) and, secondly, including (Mode B) cleansing with sterile cotton pellets. DNA was extracted from the pooled samples, and primers targeting 16S rRNA hypervariable regions V5 and V6 were used for 454-pyrosequencing. Wilcoxon signed rank test and t -test were applied to compare sampling modes. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and average agglomerative hierarchical clustering were calculated with unweighted UniFrac distance matrices. Sample grouping was tested with permutational MANOVA (Adonis). Results: Data filtering and quality control yielded 67,218 sequences with an average sequence length of 243bp (SD 6.52; range 231-255). Actinobacteria (2.8-24.6%), Bacteroidetes (9.2-25.1%), Proteobacteria (4.9-50.6%), Firmicutes (16.5-57.4%), and Fusobacteria (2.2-17.1%) were the five major phyla found in all samples. Differences in microbial abundances between sampling modes were not evident. High sampling numbers are needed to achieve significance for rare bacterial phyla. Samples taken from one individual using different sampling modes were more similar to each other than to other individuals' samples. PCoA and hierarchical clustering showed a grouping of the paired samples. Permutational MANOVA did not reveal sample grouping by

  12. Sampling Modification Effects in the Subgingival Microbiome Profile of Healthy Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santigli, Elisabeth; Trajanoski, Slave; Eberhard, Katharina; Klug, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Background: Oral microbiota are considered major players in the development of periodontal diseases. Thorough knowledge of intact subgingival microbiomes is required to elucidate microbial shifts from health to disease. Aims: This comparative study investigated the subgingival microbiome of healthy children, possible inter- and intra-individual effects of modified sampling, and basic comparability of subgingival microprints. Methods: In five 10-year-old children, biofilm was collected from the upper first premolars and first molars using sterilized, UV-treated paper-points inserted into the subgingival sulcus at eight sites. After supragingival cleaning using an electric toothbrush and water, sampling was performed, firstly, excluding (Mode A) and, secondly, including (Mode B) cleansing with sterile cotton pellets. DNA was extracted from the pooled samples, and primers targeting 16S rRNA hypervariable regions V5 and V6 were used for 454-pyrosequencing. Wilcoxon signed rank test and t-test were applied to compare sampling modes. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and average agglomerative hierarchical clustering were calculated with unweighted UniFrac distance matrices. Sample grouping was tested with permutational MANOVA (Adonis). Results: Data filtering and quality control yielded 67,218 sequences with an average sequence length of 243bp (SD 6.52; range 231–255). Actinobacteria (2.8–24.6%), Bacteroidetes (9.2–25.1%), Proteobacteria (4.9–50.6%), Firmicutes (16.5–57.4%), and Fusobacteria (2.2–17.1%) were the five major phyla found in all samples. Differences in microbial abundances between sampling modes were not evident. High sampling numbers are needed to achieve significance for rare bacterial phyla. Samples taken from one individual using different sampling modes were more similar to each other than to other individuals' samples. PCoA and hierarchical clustering showed a grouping of the paired samples. Permutational MANOVA did not reveal sample

  13. A cross-sectional survey of bacterial species in plaque from client owned dogs with healthy gingiva, gingivitis or mild periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian J Davis

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is the most widespread oral disease in dogs which if left untreated results in significant pain to the pet and loss of dentition. The objective of this study was to identify bacterial species in canine plaque that are significantly associated with health, gingivitis and mild periodontitis (<25% attachment loss. In this survey subgingival plaque samples were collected from 223 dogs with healthy gingiva, gingivitis and mild periodontitis with 72 to 77 samples per health status. DNA was extracted from the plaque samples and subjected to PCR amplification of the V1-V3 region of the 16S rDNA. Pyrosequencing of the PCR amplicons identified a total of 274 operational taxonomic units after bioinformatic and statistical analysis. Porphyromonas was the most abundant genus in all disease stages, particularly in health along with Moraxella and Bergeyella. Peptostreptococcus, Actinomyces, and Peptostreptococcaceae were the most abundant genera in mild periodontitis. Logistic regression analysis identified species from each of these genera that were significantly associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis. Principal component analysis showed distinct community profiles in health and disease. The species identified show some similarities with health and periodontal disease in humans but also major differences. In contrast to human, healthy canine plaque was found to be dominated by Gram negative bacterial species whereas Gram positive anaerobic species predominate in disease. The scale of this study surpasses previously published research and enhances our understanding of the bacterial species present in canine subgingival plaque and their associations with health and early periodontal disease.

  14. Intraplaque Hemorrhage and the Plaque Surface in Carotid Atherosclerosis: The Plaque At RISK Study (PARISK)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, A. C.; Truijman, M. T. B.; Hussain, B.; Zadi, T.; Saiedie, G.; de Rotte, A. A. J.; Liem, M. I.; van der Steen, A. F. W.; Daemen, M. J. A. P.; Koudstaal, P. J.; Nederkoorn, P. J.; Hendrikse, J.; Kooi, M. E.; van der Lugt, A.

    2015-01-01

    An important characteristic of vulnerable plaque, intraplaque hemorrhage, may predict plaque rupture. Plaque rupture can be visible on noninvasive imaging as a disruption of the plaque surface. We investigated the association between intraplaque hemorrhage and disruption of the plaque surface. We

  15. Subgingival air-polishing with erythritol during periodontal maintenance: randomized clinical trial of twelve months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Nada; Moëne, Raphaël; Cancela, José A; Mombelli, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate repeated subgingival air-polishing in residual pockets with a new erythritol powder containing 0.3% chlorhexidine. Single-centre, examiner masked, randomized clinical trial of 12 months with a two-arm, within-subject parallel design. Fifty patients in periodontal maintenance were monitored in 3-month intervals. At months 0, 3, 6 and 9, all sites presenting with a probing depth (PD) >4 mm were subject to subgingival air-polishing (test side) or ultrasonic debridement (control side). The primary endpoint was presence/absence of PD >4 mm after 12 months. Totally 6918 sites were monitored at baseline, 457 of them had a PD >4 mm (range 5-9 mm). The number of pockets >4 mm per subject, PD and bleeding on probing were significantly lower at month 12. Differences between test and control were not significant. There was a significant difference in favour of air-polishing for the perception of pain/discomfort. Differences of frequencies at >1000 and >100,000 cells/ml of six microorganisms between baseline and month 12 were not significant. At month 12, test sites were less frequently positive for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans at >1000 cells/ml than controls, and counts never exceeded 100,000 cells/ml. Repeated subgingival air-polishing reduced the number of pockets >4 mm similar to ultrasonic debridement. It was safe and induced less pain. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Clinical Periodontology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Comparison of subgingival bacterial sampling with oral lavage for detection and quantification of periodontal pathogens by real-time polymerase chain reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutaga, Khalil; Savelkoul, Paul H. M.; Winkel, Edwin G.; van Winkelhoff, Arie J.

    Background: Saliva has been studied for the presence of subgingival pathogens in periodontitis patients. With the anaerobic culture technique, the discrepancy between salivary recovery and subgingival presence has been significant, which makes this approach not suitable for practical use in the

  17. Toothbrush efficacy for plaque removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, K J; Chinta, S K; Agarwal, P; Nemelivsky, M; Frisina, A C; Cao, Z; Norman, R G; Fisch, G S; Corby, P

    2014-11-01

    To determine the effectiveness of a novel sonic toothbrush in reducing plaque and in maintenance of gingival health when compared to a standard manual brush. This study was a block-randomized, examiner-blind, two-treatment, parallel group, single centre clinical investigation. A total of 84 subjects were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive either the Panasonic EW-DL90 or an American Dental Association-endorsed manual toothbrush. Subjects were instructed to follow a twice-daily brushing regimen without flossing. Plaque levels and gingival health were assessed at baseline and after 1 and 3 weeks of treatment using the Turesky Modification of the Quigley-Hein Plaque Index and the Papillary Bleeding Score. Subjects assigned to the EW-DL90 group had significantly lower plaque levels after 1 and 3 weeks of treatment than those in the manual group (P = 0.003 and 0.0035, respectively). Both groups showed a reduction in plaque levels at Week 3 relative to baseline. The EW-DL90 group had significantly lower gingival inflammation scores after 1 week of treatment (P = 0.0293), but there was no difference between groups after 3 weeks of treatment. The EW-DL90 toothbrush safely and effectively removes more plaque than a standard manual toothbrush. Improvement in gingival inflammation was observed after 1 week of treatment. There was no difference in Papillary Bleeding Score between the two groups after 3 weeks of treatment. The newly developed sonic brush (Panasonic EW-DL90) tested in this study was found to be more effective than a manual toothbrush at plaque removal. The papillary bleeding scores were significantly lower in the sonic brush group after 1 week of product use. After 3 weeks of product use, both treatment groups had similar papillary bleeding scores almost returning to baseline values. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Efecto del tratamiento periodontal sobre la microbiota subgingival en pacientes con preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Jaramillo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. Pocos estudios han descrito la microbiota subgingival en mujeres embarazadas con preeclampsia leve. Objetivo. Identificar cambios periodontales y de la microbiota subgingival en mujeres embarazadas con preeclampsia, después del tratamiento periodontal. Materiales y métodos. En un análisis secundario de un ensayo clínico de asignación aleatoria, se estudiaron 57 pacientes con preeclampsia en el Hospital Universitario del Valle de Cali. Se asignaron al azar 31 al grupo de intervención periodontal (detartraje y alisado subgingival ultrasónico y manual durante su embarazo y otras 26 al grupo control (profilaxis supragingival. Se determinaron los parámetros clínicos periodontales y la microbiota subgingival a la inclusión al estudio y en el posparto. Se evaluaron 8 bacterias periodontopáticas y 2 virus herpes por reacción en cadena de la polimerasa. Se usaron las pruebas de ji al cuadrado, test de McNemar o t de Student, con un nivel de significancia de p≤0,05. Resultados. Los grupos fueron comparables en las variables clínicas y microbiológicas al inicio del estudio. El tratamiento periodontal redujo el promedio de la profundidad de bolsa en el grupo de intervención de 2,44±0,31 a 2,31±0,24 mm (p=0,000 y en el grupo control de 2,58±0,37 a 2,44±0,39 mm (p=0,000,y el índice de sangrado, de 16,4±1,5 a 7,9±0,7 % en el primero (p=0,000, y de 17,1±1,8 a 10±0,9 %, en el segundo (p=0,002. La frecuencia de detección de microorganismos no varió de manera significativa entre los grupos. Conclusión. El raspaje y alisado radicular, así como la profilaxis supragingival, redujeron de manera significativa la profundidad a la sonda y el índice de sangrado gingival. El tratamiento periodontal no fue más efectivo que la profilaxis para reducir los organismos periodontopáticos o los virus herpes.   doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7705/biomedica.v32i2.661

  19. Denitrification in human dental plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verstraete Willy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial denitrification is not considered important in human-associated microbial communities. Accordingly, metabolic investigations of the microbial biofilm communities of human dental plaque have focused on aerobic respiration and acid fermentation of carbohydrates, even though it is known that the oral habitat is constantly exposed to nitrate (NO3- concentrations in the millimolar range and that dental plaque houses bacteria that can reduce this NO3- to nitrite (NO2-. Results We show that dental plaque mediates denitrification of NO3- to nitric oxide (NO, nitrous oxide (N2O, and dinitrogen (N2 using microsensor measurements, 15N isotopic labelling and molecular detection of denitrification genes. In vivo N2O accumulation rates in the mouth depended on the presence of dental plaque and on salivary NO3- concentrations. NO and N2O production by denitrification occurred under aerobic conditions and was regulated by plaque pH. Conclusions Increases of NO concentrations were in the range of effective concentrations for NO signalling to human host cells and, thus, may locally affect blood flow, signalling between nerves and inflammatory processes in the gum. This is specifically significant for the understanding of periodontal diseases, where NO has been shown to play a key role, but where gingival cells are believed to be the only source of NO. More generally, this study establishes denitrification by human-associated microbial communities as a significant metabolic pathway which, due to concurrent NO formation, provides a basis for symbiotic interactions.

  20. Angiogenesis in the atherosclerotic plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Camaré

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a multifocal alteration of the vascular wall of medium and large arteries characterized by a local accumulation of cholesterol and non-resolving inflammation. Atherothrombotic complications are the leading cause of disability and mortality in western countries. Neovascularization in atherosclerotic lesions plays a major role in plaque growth and instability. The angiogenic process is mediated by classical angiogenic factors and by additional factors specific to atherosclerotic angiogenesis. In addition to its role in plaque progression, neovascularization may take part in plaque destabilization and thromboembolic events. Anti-angiogenic agents are effective to reduce atherosclerosis progression in various animal models. However, clinical trials with anti-angiogenic drugs, mainly anti-VEGF/VEGFR, used in anti-cancer therapy show cardiovascular adverse effects, and require additional investigations.

  1. Plaque control and oral hygiene methods

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harrison, Peter

    2017-06-01

    The experimental gingivitis study of Löe et al.1 demonstrated a cause and effect relationship between plaque accumulation and gingival inflammation, and helped to establish plaque\\/biofilm as the primary risk factor for gingivitis. When healthy individuals withdrew oral hygiene efforts, gingival inflammation ensued within 21 days in all subjects. Once effective plaque removal was recommenced, clinical gingival health was quickly re-established – indicating that plaque-associated inflammation is modifiable by plaque control. As current consensus confirms that gingivitis and periodontitis may be viewed as a continuum of disease,2 the rationale for achieving effective plaque control is clear.

  2. The effect of sucrose application frequency and basal nutrient conditions on the calcium and phosphate content of experimental dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, E I F; Sissons, C H; Coleman, M; Wang, X; Anderson, S A; Wong, L

    2002-01-01

    A reduced pool of calcium in dental plaque would be expected to increase the ability of plaque fluid to dissolve the underlying enamel when the pH falls during sugar exposure. We have examined the relationship between frequency of sugar application and Ca and P(i) concentrations in artificial mouth plaque microcosm biofilms. Ten plaques were grown simultaneously from a human saliva inoculum using a continuous flow of simulated saliva, DMM, supplemented with either urea or glucose to modulate the resting pH. In addition the plaques received sucrose applications of varying frequency: 12-, 8-, 6-, or 4-hourly, or not at all. After 15 days the plaques were sampled by taking 4 full-thickness specimens of each, and acid-extractable Ca and P(i), and alkali-soluble protein and carbohydrate were determined. Ca and P(i) concentrations were in a range comparable with those in human plaque, except in the DMM + urea plaque receiving no sucrose, when concentrations were higher. Plaque Ca concentration decreased significantly as sucrose application frequency increased. Increasing sucrose application frequency also reduced the protein, i.e. the cell biomass, content of the plaques and, in the case of DMM + urea plaques, increased the water-insoluble hexose content, presumably extracellular polysaccharide. Reduced biomass was partly due to the bulking of plaque with extracellular polysaccharide, but the marked effect of urea on polysaccharide formation is not understood. This study shows that increasing frequency of sugar application alters dental plaque by reducing its mineral protection capacity. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. Gingival changes during pregnancy: II. Influence of hormonal variations on the subgingival biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-de-Albornoz, Ana; Figuero, Elena; Herrera, David; Bascones-Martínez, Antonio

    2010-03-01

    To determine whether the exacerbated gingival inflammation that develops in pregnant women is related to a change in the subgingival biofilm induced by the increase in hormone levels during pregnancy. This open cohort study included 48 pregnant and 28 non-pregnant women without periodontitis. Pregnant women were evaluated in the first, second and third trimester and at 3 months after delivery. Non-pregnant women were evaluated twice, with a 6-month interval, assessing microbiological, clinical and hormonal variables at each visit. Total anaerobic counts and frequency of detection and proportions were calculated. The Friedman test with the Bonferroni correction was used for intra-group comparisons and Mann-Whitney U-tests for inter-group assessment. Correlations were analysed by means of Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Proportions of the subgingival periodontal pathogens did not differ throughout pregnancy, although significant differences were found for all the pathogens after delivery. Porphyromonas gingivalis-positive patients presented an increase in gingival inflammation (phormone levels and P. gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia. Qualitative differences in periodontal pathogens were found from pregnancy to post-partum. Patients harbouring P. gingivalis presented and increased gingival inflammatory status.

  4. Differential reflectometry versus tactile sense detection of subgingival calculus in dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibaie, Fardad; Walsh, Laurence J.

    2012-10-01

    Detecting dental calculus is clinically challenging in dentistry. This study used typodonts with extracted premolar and molar teeth and simulated gingival tissue to compare the performance of differential reflectometry and periodontal probing. A total of 30 extracted teeth were set in an anatomical configuration in stone to create three typodonts. Clear polyvinyl siloxane impression material was placed to replicate the periodontal soft tissues. Pocket depths ranged from 10 to 15 mm. The three models were placed in a phantom head, and an experienced dentist assessed the presence of subgingival calculus first using the DetecTar (differential reflectometry) and then a periodontal probe. Scores from these two different methods were compared to the gold standard (direct examination of the root surface using 20× magnification) to determine the accuracy and reproducibility. Differential reflectometry was more accurate than tactile assessment (79% versus 60%), and its reproducibility was also higher (Cohen kappa 0.54 versus 0.39). Both methods performed better on single rooted premolar teeth than on multirooted teeth. These laboratory results indicate that differential reflectometry allows more accurate and reproducible detection of subgingival calculus than conventional probing, and supports its use for supplementing traditional periodontal examination methods in dental practice.

  5. The Impact of Residual Subgingival Cement on Biological Complications Around Dental Implants: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Alessandro; Lim, Zhuo Wei; Tang, Joyce; Perrotti, Vittoria; Leichter, Jonathan

    2017-06-01

    To perform a systematic review on the impact of residual subgingival cement on peri-implant diseases and crestal bone loss. MEDLINE, SCOPUS, ISI Web of Knowledge and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) databases were used to identify articles published without time limits. A total of 6 articles were selected for a total of 389 patients (687 implants). The studies were heterogeneous and had a moderate-to-high risk of bias, but met the inclusion criteria. Four of 6 studies were published by the same research group and assessed similar populations over time. A positive relationship between residual cement and peri-implant inflammation was observed. Data on peri-implant probing depths and crestal bone loss were reported in 1 study. Residual subgingival cement seems to be strongly associated with peri-implant mucositis which is a risk factor for increased probing depths crestal bone loss and peri-implantitis. Zinc oxide eugenol cements should be preferred to resin cements especially in patients with a history of periodontitis.

  6. Amyloid plaque formation precedes dendritic spine loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Tobias; Burgold, Steffen; Dorostkar, Mario M; Fuhrmann, Martin; Wegenast-Braun, Bettina M; Schmidt, Boris; Kretzschmar, Hans; Herms, Jochen

    2012-12-01

    Amyloid-beta plaque deposition represents a major neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. While numerous studies have described dendritic spine loss in proximity to plaques, much less is known about the kinetics of these processes. In particular, the question as to whether synapse loss precedes or follows plaque formation remains unanswered. To address this question, and to learn more about the underlying kinetics, we simultaneously imaged amyloid plaque deposition and dendritic spine loss by applying two-photon in vivo microscopy through a cranial window in double transgenic APPPS1 mice. As a result, we first observed that the rate of dendritic spine loss in proximity to plaques is the same in both young and aged animals. However, plaque size only increased significantly in the young cohort, indicating that spine loss persists even many months after initial plaque appearance. Tracking the fate of individual spines revealed that net spine loss is caused by increased spine elimination, with the rate of spine formation remaining constant. Imaging of dendritic spines before and during plaque formation demonstrated that spine loss around plaques commences at least 4 weeks after initial plaque formation. In conclusion, spine loss occurs, shortly but with a significant time delay, after the birth of new plaques, and persists in the vicinity of amyloid plaques over many months. These findings hence give further hope to the possibility that there is a therapeutic window between initial amyloid plaque deposition and the onset of structural damage at spines.

  7. Characterizing vulnerable plaque features with intravascular elastography.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaar, J.A.; Korte, C.L. de; Mastik, F.; Strijder, C.; Pasterkamp, G.; Boersma, E.; Serruys, P.W.; Steen, A.F.W. van der

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In vivo detection of vulnerable plaques is presently limited by a lack of diagnostic tools. Intravascular ultrasound elastography is a new technique based on intravascular ultrasound and has the potential to differentiate between different plaques phenotypes. However, the predictive

  8. Mechanical Stresses in Carotid Plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuel, Samuel Alberg

    simulationer, som tillod beregning af longitudinelle stress-niveauer i den fibrøse kappe. Afhandlingen indeholder tre artikler, som beskriver denne metode. Den første; “Mechanical Stresses in Carotid Plaques using MRI-Based Fluid Structure Interaction Models”, beskriver i detaljer metoden til at danne de...

  9. Osteoblast integration of dental implant materials after challenge by sub-gingival pathogens : a co-culture study in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Bingran; van der Mei, Henny C; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; Busscher, Henk J; Ren, Yijin

    2015-01-01

    Sub-gingival anaerobic pathogens can colonize an implant surface to compromise osseointegration of dental implants once the soft tissue seal around the neck of an implant is broken. In vitro evaluations of implant materials are usually done in monoculture studies involving either tissue integration

  10. Ultrasound Tissue Characterization of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Picano

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A thrombotic occlusion of the vessel fed by ruptured coronary atherosclerotic plaque may result in unstable angina, myocardial infarction or death, whereas embolization from a plaque in carotid arteries may result in transient ischemic attack or stroke. The atherosclerotic plaque prone to such clinical events is termed high-risk or vulnerable plaque, and its identification in humans before it becomes symptomatic has been elusive to date. Ultrasonic tissue characterization of the atherosclerotic plaque is possible with different techniques—such as vascular, transesophageal, and intravascular ultrasound—on a variety of arterial segments, including carotid, aorta, and coronary districts. The image analysis can be based on visual, video-densitometric or radiofrequency methods and identifies three distinct textural patterns: hypo-echoic (corresponding to lipid- and hemorrhage-rich plaque, iso- or moderately hyper-echoic (fibrotic or fibro-fatty plaque, and markedly hyperechoic with shadowing (calcific plaque. Hypoechoic or dishomogeneous plaques, with spotty microcalcification and large plaque burden, with plaque neovascularization and surface irregularities by contrast-enhanced ultrasound, are more prone to clinical complications than hyperechoic, extensively calcified, homogeneous plaques with limited plaque burden, smooth luminal plaque surface and absence of neovascularization. Plaque ultrasound morphology is important, along with plaque geometry, in determining the atherosclerotic prognostic burden in the individual patient. New quantitative methods beyond backscatter (to include speed of sound, attenuation, strain, temperature, and high order statistics are under development to evaluate vascular tissues. Although not yet ready for widespread clinical use, tissue characterization is listed by the American Society of Echocardiography roadmap to 2020 as one of the most promising fields of application in cardiovascular ultrasound imaging

  11. Red autofluorescence of dental plaque bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, M. H.; Thomas, R. Z.; Huysmans, M. C. D. N. J. M.; de Soet, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Red autofluorescence of plaque and its relation to fluorescence of a single species in the biofilm was studied. Fluorescence images of non-disclosed and disclosed plaque of 28 first-year students were captured. The plaque samples were assessed by culture methods and studied for red autofluorescence.

  12. Matrix-Gla Protein rs4236 [A/G] gene polymorphism and serum and GCF levels of MGP in patients with subgingival dental calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Gülnihal Emrem; Demir, Turgut; Aksoy, Hülya; Sağlam, Ebru; Laloğlu, Esra; Yildirim, Abdulkadir

    2016-10-01

    Matrix-Gla Protein (MGP) is one of the major Gla-containing protein associated with calcification process. It also has a high affinity for Ca 2+ and hydroxyapatite. In this study we aimed to evaluate the MGP rs4236 [A/G] gene polymorphism in association with subgingival dental calculus. Also a possible relationship between MGP gene polymorphism and serum and GCF levels of MGP were examined. MGP rs4236 [A/G] gene polymorphism was investigated in 110 patients with or without subgingival dental calculus, using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) techniques. Additionally, serum and GCF levels of MGP of the patients were compared according to subgingival dental calculus. Comparison of patients with and without subgingival dental calculus showed no statistically significant difference in MGP rs4236 [A/G] gene polymorphism (p=0.368). MGP concentrations in GCF of patients with subgingival dental calculus were statistically higher than those without subgingival dental calculus (p=0.032). However, a significant association was not observed between the genotypes of AA, AG and GG of the MGP rs4236 gene and the serum and GCF concentrations of MGP in subjects. In this study, it was found that MGP rs4236 [A/G] gene polymorphism was not to be associated with subgingival dental calculus. Also, that GCF MGP levels were detected higher in patients with subgingival dental calculus than those without subgingival dental calculus independently of polymorphism, may be the effect of adaptive mechanism to inhibit calculus formation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Is the presence of Helicobacter pylori in the dental plaque of patients with chronic periodontitis a risk factor for gastric infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asqah, Mohammed Al; Hamoudi, Nawaf Al; Anil, Sukumaran; Al jebreen, Abdulrahman; Al-hamoudi, Waleed Khalid

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Helicobacter pylori is considered to be a pathogen responsible for gastritis and peptic ulcers, and a risk factor for gastric cancer. A periodontal pocket in the teeth of individuals with chronic periodontitis may function as a reservoir for H pylori. OBJECTIVE: The present study was undertaken to evaluate whether the presence of H pylori in the dental plaque of patients with and without periodontitis correlates with gastric involvement. METHODS: A total of 101 patients with dyspepsia were included in the present study. Subjects were divided into periodontitis and non-periodontitis groups. For the detection of H pylori in dental plaque, samples were collected from two teeth using a periodontal curette. Subgingival plaque was obtained by inserting two sterile paper points into periodontal pockets for 20 s. This was followed by an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and antral biopsies. RESULTS: Sixty-five per cent of patients had dental plaque positive for H pylori and more than 50% harboured the bacteria in their stomach. Periodontitis patients had a significantly higher percentage of H pylori in their dental plaque (79% versus 43%; Pperiodontitis. Additionally, 78% of patients from the periodontitis group versus only 30% from the nonperiodontitis group had a positive test result for the coexistence of H pylori in both dental plaque and the stomach. CONCLUSION: Patients with poor oral hygiene have a higher prevalence of H pylori in dental plaque and in the stomach. This finding suggests that the oral cavity may be a reservoir for H pylori, and potentially a source of transmission or reinfection. PMID:19319381

  14. The effect of patient-centered plaque control and periodontal maintenance therapy on adverse outcomes of periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastagia, Julie; Nicoara, Pamela; Robertson, Paul B

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate systematic reviews that addressed the effectiveness of periodontal maintenance therapy for the management of patients with periodontitis. Recent surveys of dental care patterns suggest a marked increase in preventive and maintenance periodontal care in populations that retain the dentition for an increasingly longer lifetime. A considerable body of clinical investigation concludes that a multitherapy periodontal maintenance approach is effective in improving periodontal outcomes in patients treated for periodontitis. Individual components of such maintenance therapy were assessed, including the effects of an oral examination, personal oral hygiene instructions, supragingival scaling and polishing, subgingival scaling and root planing, adjunctive procedures, and maintenance frequency. There is much controversy about improvement in oral health that may accrue from the placebo effect of an examination and the maintenance ritual. Improved plaque control by the patient in anticipation of a forthcoming examination alone might be reflected in decreased measurements for plaque accumulation and gingival inflammation but the role of placebo effects on periodontitis remains unclear. There are insufficient randomized controlled trials to reach conclusions regarding the individual beneficial effects of repeated oral hygiene instructions or routine scaling/polishing on the recurrence of periodontitis. While subgingival root planing seems an effective component of periodontal maintenance, neither clinical investigations nor randomly controlled trial evidence have established an ideal maintenance frequency based on individual patient risk for periodontitis. The adjunctive beneficial effects of both locally and systemically administered antimicrobial agents were statistically significant for some formulations, and may be particularly useful clinically in patients who are resistant to mechanical therapy. We conclude that few clinical or

  15. Bacteria and bacterial DNA in atherosclerotic plaque and aneurysmal wall biopsies from patients with and without periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Armingohar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have reported an association between chronic periodontitis (CP and cardiovascular diseases. Detection of periodontopathogens, including red complex bacteria (RCB, in vascular lesions has suggested these bacteria to be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysms. Objective: In this study, we investigate bacteria and their DNA in vascular biopsies from patients with vascular diseases (VD; i.e. abdominal aortic aneurysms, atherosclerotic carotid, and common femoral arteries, with and without CP. Methods: DNA was extracted from vascular biopsies selected from 40 VD patients: 30 with CP and 10 without CP. The V3-V5 region of the 16S rDNA (V3-V5 was polymerase chain reaction (PCR-amplified, and the amplicons were cloned into Escherichia coli, sequenced, and classified (GenBank and the Human Oral Microbiome database. Species-specific primers were used for the detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis. In addition, 10 randomly selected vascular biopsies from the CP group were subjected to scanning electron microscopy (SEM for visualization of bacteria. Checkerboard DNA–DNA hybridization was performed to assess the presence of RCB in 10 randomly selected subgingival plaque samples from CP patients. Results: A higher load and mean diversity of bacteria were detected in vascular biopsies from VD patients with CP compared to those without CP. Enterobacteriaceae were frequently detected in vascular biopsies together with cultivable, commensal oral, and not-yet-cultured bacterial species. While 70% of the subgingival plaque samples from CP patients showed presence of RCB, only P. gingivalis was detected in one vascular biopsy. Bacterial cells were seen in all 10 vascular biopsies examined by SEM. Conclusions: A higher bacterial load and more diverse colonization were detected in VD lesions of CP patients as compared to patients without CP. This indicated that a multitude of bacterial species both

  16. Multidisciplinary management of subgingival crown-root fracture of an immature permanent maxillary central incisor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Zahedpasha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the multidisciplinary management of subgingival horizontal crown-root fracture of an immature permanent maxillary central incisor in a 10-year-old boy. After removal of the fractured fragment, pulpotomy was performed within 48 h from the injury to promote apexogenesis. The tooth was orthodontically extruded until the fracture line was located above the alveolar bone level. Frenectomy, supracrestal fiberotomy, and crown lengthening were performed after adequate stabilization of the extruded tooth for 5 months. Finally, the tooth was restored with composite resin by using the acid etch technique. This report highlights that a multidisciplinary treatment approach with strict cooperation among specialists to manage a complicated crown-root fracture can save and restore a traumatized immature permanent tooth.

  17. Subgingival bacteria in Ghanaian adolescents with or without progression of attachment loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Dahlén

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study describes subgingival bacterial profiles associated with clinical periodontal status in Ghanaian adolescents with or without progression of attachment loss. Materials and methods: Among 500 adolescents included in a cohort study, 397 returned 2 years later for a periodontal re-examination, including full-mouth CAL measurements. At follow-up, a subgroup of 98 adolescents was also subjected to bacterial sampling with paper points at four periodontal sites (mesial aspect of 11, 26, 31, and 46 and analyzed with the checkerboard DNA–DNA hybridization technique against DNA-probes from nine periodontitis-associated bacterial species. Results: The 98 Ghanaian adolescents examined in the present study were similar to the entire group examined at the 2-year follow-up with respect to age, gender, and CAL ≥3 mm. A high detection frequency of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Prevotella intermedia (>99% using checkerboard analysis was found, while for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans the detection frequency was <50%. A strong correlation was found at the individual level between the presence of P. intermedia and the total CAL change, and P. intermedia and Porphyromonas gingivalis were strongly correlated with a change in CAL and probing pocket depth (PPD at the sampled sites. In a linear regression model, a significant discriminating factor for the total CAL change in the dentition during the 2-year follow-up period was obtained for P. intermedia and public school. Conclusion: This study indicates that subgingival bacterial species other than A. actinomycetemcomitans, for example, P. intermedia, have a significant association with periodontal breakdown (change in CAL in Ghanaian adolescents with progression of periodontal attachment loss.

  18. Stickland reactions of dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, M A; Kemp, C W; Robrish, S A; Bowen, W H

    1983-01-01

    Dental plaque samples from monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were shown to contain proline reduction activity in coupled Stickland reactions with other amino acids and also with certain end products of bacterial glucose metabolism. The unusually high concentration of bound and free proline in the oral environment may be of importance in both the production of base and in the removal of acid from the tooth surface after dietary carbohydrate ingestion. PMID:6618673

  19. A cross-sectional survey of bacterial species in plaque from client owned dogs with healthy gingiva, gingivitis or mild periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ian J; Wallis, Corrin; Deusch, Oliver; Colyer, Alison; Milella, Lisa; Loman, Nick; Harris, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal disease is the most widespread oral disease in dogs which if left untreated results in significant pain to the pet and loss of dentition. The objective of this study was to identify bacterial species in canine plaque that are significantly associated with health, gingivitis and mild periodontitis (gingivitis and mild periodontitis with 72 to 77 samples per health status. DNA was extracted from the plaque samples and subjected to PCR amplification of the V1-V3 region of the 16S rDNA. Pyrosequencing of the PCR amplicons identified a total of 274 operational taxonomic units after bioinformatic and statistical analysis. Porphyromonas was the most abundant genus in all disease stages, particularly in health along with Moraxella and Bergeyella. Peptostreptococcus, Actinomyces, and Peptostreptococcaceae were the most abundant genera in mild periodontitis. Logistic regression analysis identified species from each of these genera that were significantly associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis. Principal component analysis showed distinct community profiles in health and disease. The species identified show some similarities with health and periodontal disease in humans but also major differences. In contrast to human, healthy canine plaque was found to be dominated by Gram negative bacterial species whereas Gram positive anaerobic species predominate in disease. The scale of this study surpasses previously published research and enhances our understanding of the bacterial species present in canine subgingival plaque and their associations with health and early periodontal disease.

  20. Bacterial sex in dental plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingar Olsen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Genes are transferred between bacteria in dental plaque by transduction, conjugation, and transformation. Membrane vesicles can also provide a mechanism for horizontal gene transfer. DNA transfer is considered bacterial sex, but the transfer is not parallel to processes that we associate with sex in higher organisms. Several examples of bacterial gene transfer in the oral cavity are given in this review. How frequently this occurs in dental plaque is not clear, but evidence suggests that it affects a number of the major genera present. It has been estimated that new sequences in genomes established through horizontal gene transfer can constitute up to 30% of bacterial genomes. Gene transfer can be both inter- and intrageneric, and it can also affect transient organisms. The transferred DNA can be integrated or recombined in the recipient's chromosome or remain as an extrachromosomal inheritable element. This can make dental plaque a reservoir for antimicrobial resistance genes. The ability to transfer DNA is important for bacteria, making them better adapted to the harsh environment of the human mouth, and promoting their survival, virulence, and pathogenicity.

  1. Differences in the composition of the subgingival microbiota of two periodontitis populations of different geographical origin. A comparison between Spain and The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanz, M; van Winkelhoff, AJ; Herrera, D; Dellemijn-Kippuw, N; Simon, R; Winkel, E

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the subgingival microbiota of two geographically distinct patient populations using identical clinical and bacteriological methods. Adult patients with a diagnosis of periodontitis were consecutively selected according to pre-defined clinical criteria.

  2. Vulnerable Plaques, Inflammation and Newer Imaging Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatia V

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, inflammation is considered to be the central player in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. It leads to the formation of multiple plaques in the arterial beds including coronary vasculature. Recent studies using the latest imaging techniques have shown that in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS multiple plaques are ruptured and have thrombus formation on them. Various factors make these plaques unstable, these include structural components of plaque like thin fibrous cap, high lipid content of the plaque core and inflammation, both localized and generalized. It has been shown that most of the ACS are caused by plaques causing non-critical stenosis as seen on traditional X-ray angiography. Also, the phenomenon of remodelling makes angiography a poor technique for plaque visualization. Hence newer modalities are required to identify these 'vulnerable plaques'. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS, thermography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI are a few such promising techniques. Here we review the invasive and non-invasive modalities that can be helpful in the identification of these plaques before they become unstable and cause ACS, and also the available therapies to stabilize these plaques.

  3. Análise microbiológica da placa bacteriana da doença periodontal em cães e o efeito da antibioticoterapia sobre ela Microbiological analysis of bacterial plaque of periodontal disease on dogs and effects of antibioticotherapy on it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Alves da Fonseca

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se determinar a microbiota da placa bacteriana subgengival de cães com doença periodontal (DP e estabelecer o efeito da antibioticoterapia. Avaliaram-se 20 cães com graus variados de DP e coletaram-se amostras da placa bacteriana subgengival antes e após antibioticoterapia. Preconizou-se antibioticoterapia distinta em dois grupos, com 10 animais cada: clindamicina (G1 e metronidazol + espiramicina (G2. Observou-se crescimento bacteriano subgengival na maioria dos cães com DP e correlação entre a severidade da DP e a idade dos animais. Houve redução significativa no crescimento bacteriano após a antibioticoterapia e o antibiograma demonstrou maior sensibilidade à clindamicina, seguido da espiramicina; todos os microrganismos foram resistentes ao metronidazol.The objective was to determine microbiote of the subgingival bacterial plaque of dogs with periodontal disease (PD and establish the effect of antibioticotherapy on its reduction. Twenty dogs with varied stages of PD were evaluated and samples of their subgingival bacterial plaque were collected. Distinct antibiotic protocols were used in two groups with ten animals each: clindamycin (G1 and metronidazole + espiramycin (G2. New subgingival samples were collected 15 days after antibiotic therapy started. There were observed subgingival bacterial culture on most dogs with PD and correlation between severity of PD and age. There was reduction of bacterial growth in 20% of the samples after treatment and antibiogram showed higher sensibility to clindamycin, followed by espiramycin - all microorganisms were resistant to metronidazole.

  4. Computed Tomography Biomarkers of Vulnerable Coronary Plaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyulas Tiberiu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An unstable plaque has a high risk of thrombosis and at the same time for a fast progression of the stenosis degree. Also, “high-risk plaque” and “thrombosis-prone plaque” are used as synonym terms for characterization of a vulnerable plaque. The imaging biomarkers for vulnerable coronary plaques are considered to be spotty calcifications, active remodeling, low-density atheroma and the presence of a ring-like attenuation pattern, also known as the napkin-ring sign. Computed cardiac tomography can determine the plaque composition by assessing the plaque density, which is measured in Hounsfield units (HU. The aim of this manuscript was to provide an update about the most frequently used biomarkers of vulnerability in a vulnerable plaque with the help of computed cardiac tomography.

  5. Effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on the subgingival microbiota of patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilana Paula Carillo Artese

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on the composition of subgingival microbiota of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. Sixteen CKD pre-dialysis individuals (CKD and 14 individuals without clinical evidence of kidney disease (C presenting chronic periodontitis were treated by scaling and root planing. Subgingival samples were collected from each patient and analyzed for their composition by checkerboard at baseline and 3 months post-therapy. Significant differences between groups at baseline were sought by the Mann-Whitney and χ² tests. Changes over time were examined by the Wilcoxon test. At baseline, the CKD group had significantly lower counts of E. faecalis compared to the C group (p < 0.05. After treatment, the levels of a greater number of species were reduced in the C group. Higher levels of A. israelii, C. rectus, F. periodonticum, P. micra, P. nigrescens, T. forsythia, N. mucosa, and S. anginosus (p < 0.05 were found in the CKD group compared to the C group. Also, non-responsive sites in CKD individuals harbored significantly higher levels of pathogenic species (T. forsythia, P. gingivalis, T. denticola, Fusobacterium spp., D. pneumosintes, E. faecalis and S. aureus; p < 0.05 than sites that responded to therapy, as well as non-responsive sites in the C group. The periodontitis-associated subgingival microbiota of CKD and systemically healthy individuals was similar in composition. However, high levels of pathogenic species persisted in the subgingival microbiota of patients with CKD after treatment.

  6. Microbial diversity of supra- and subgingival biofilms on freshly colonized titanium implant abutments in the human mouth

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Supra- and subgingival biofilm formation is considered to be mainly responsible for early implant failure caused by inflammations of periimplant tissues. Nevertheless, little is known about the complex microbial diversity and interindividual similarities around dental implants. An atraumatic assessment was made of the diversity of microbial communities around titanium implants by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the 16S rRNA gene amplicons as well...

  7. The combined and individual impact of diabetes and smoking on key subgingival periodontal pathogens in patients with chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joaquim, C R; Miranda, T S; Marins, L M; Silva, H D P; Feres, M; Figueiredo, L C; Duarte, P M

    2017-11-06

    Comprehension of the similarities and differences in the composition of the subgingival microbiota of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), smokers or smokers with DM is an important step in developing therapies specific for these groups at risk for periodontitis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the combined and individual effects of DM and smoking on the levels and prevalence of key subgingival periodontal pathogens in patients with chronic periodontitis. One hundred patients with generalized chronic periodontitis were allocated into one of the following groups: DM (n = 25, non-smokers with type 2 DM); S (n = 25, non-diabetic smokers); SDM (n = 25, smokers with type 2 DM); and control (n = 25, non-diabetic non-smokers). Two subgingival biofilm samples from healthy sites (probing depth and clinical attachment level ≤3 mm and no bleeding) and 2 from diseased sites (probing depth and clinical attachment level ≥5 mm and bleeding on probing) were analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction for Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, Eubacterium nodatum, Parvimonas micra, Fusobacterium nucleatum ssp. and Prevotella intermedia. There were no differences among groups in the mean counts of the bacterial species studied, considering all sampled sites (healthy plus diseased sites). There were also no differences among groups regarding the prevalence of any bacteria species in healthy and diseased sites (P > .05). The mean P. micra count was significantly higher in the healthy sites of both smoking groups, than in those of the control group (P periodontitis presenting DM, smokers or smokers with DM. In addition, DM and smoking, jointly and individually, do not considerably affect the subgingival levels of target periodontal pathogens in patients with chronic periodontitis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Orthodontic extrusion of subgingivally fractured tooth using a removable appliance: An alternative treatment to reestablish biological width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanika Gupta Verma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of a traumatically injured tooth presents a clinical challenge for a predictable aesthetic outcome. This case report describes a multidisciplinary approach of a subgingivally fractured permanent maxillary central incisor. A removable orthodontic appliance was used for orthodontic extrusion of root, and surgical gingival recontouring was done with electrocautery to reestablish the biological width. Form and function were restored establishing biological width and esthetics was repaired with porcelain fused to metal crown.

  9. Vascular Plaque Determination for Stroke Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0608 TITLE: Vascular Plaque Determination for Stroke Risk Assessment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Vince, David Geoffrey...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Vascular Plaque Determination for Stroke Risk Assessment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0608 5c. PROGRAM... plaques at high risk for initiating a cerebrovascular accident. The core of the current research project is a pilot clinical study to enroll 100 subjects

  10. Accuracy of coronary plaque detection and assessment of interobserver agreement for plaque quantification using automatic coronary plaque analysis software on coronary CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laqmani, A.; Quitzke, M.; Creder, D.D.; Adam, G.; Lund, G. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclearmedicine; Klink, T. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2016-10-15

    To evaluate the accuracy of automatic plaque detection and the interobserver agreement of automatic versus manually adjusted quantification of coronary plaques on coronary CT angiography (cCTA) using commercially available software. 10 cCTA datasets were evaluated using plaque software. First, the automatically detected plaques were verified. Second, two observers independently performed plaque quantification without revising the automatically constructed plaque contours (automatic approach). Then, each observer adjusted the plaque contours according to plaque delineation (adjusted approach). The interobserver agreement of both approaches was analyzed. 32 of 114 automatically identified findings were true-positive plaques, while 82 (72 %) were false-positive. 20 of 52 plaques (38 %) were missed by the software (false-negative). The automatic approach provided good interobserver agreement with relative differences of 0.9 ± 16.0 % for plaque area and -3.3 ± 33.8 % for plaque volume. Both observers independently adjusted all contours because they did not represent the plaque delineation. Interobserver agreement decreased for the adjusted approach with relative differences of 25.0 ± 24.8 % for plaque area and 20.0 ± 40.4 % for plaque volume. The automatic plaque analysis software is of limited value due to high numbers of false-positive and false-negative plaque findings. The automatic approach was reproducible but it necessitated adjustment of all constructed plaque contours resulting in deterioration of the interobserver agreement.

  11. Microbial diversity of supra- and subgingival biofilms on freshly colonized titanium implant abutments in the human mouth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, W; Stiesch, M; Abraham, W R

    2011-02-01

    Supra- and subgingival biofilm formation is considered to be mainly responsible for early implant failure caused by inflammations of periimplant tissues. Nevertheless, little is known about the complex microbial diversity and interindividual similarities around dental implants. An atraumatic assessment was made of the diversity of microbial communities around titanium implants by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the 16S rRNA gene amplicons as well as subsequent sequence analysis. Samples of adherent supra- and subgingival periimplant biofilms were collected from ten patients. Additionally, samples of sulcusfluid were taken at titanium implant abutments and remaining teeth. The bacteria in the samples were characterized by SSCP and sequence analysis. A high diversity of bacteria varying between patients and within one patient at different locations was found. Bacteria characteristic for sulcusfluid and supra- and subgingival biofilm communities were identified. Sulcusfluid of the abutments showed higher abundance of Streptococcus species than from residual teeth. Prevotella and Rothia species frequently reported from the oral cavity were not detected at the abutments suggesting a role as late colonizers. Different niches in the human mouth are characterized by specific groups of bacteria. Implant abutments are a very valuable approach to study dental biofilm development in vivo.

  12. Noninvasive characterization of carotid plaque strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Amir A; Sikdar, Siddhartha; Hatsukami, Thomas; Cebral, Juan; Jones, Michael; Huston, John; Howard, George; Lal, Brajesh K

    2017-06-01

    Current risk stratification of internal carotid artery plaques based on diameter-reducing percentage stenosis may be unreliable because ischemic stroke results from plaque disruption with atheroembolization. Biomechanical forces acting on the plaque may render it vulnerable to rupture. The feasibility of ultrasound-based quantification of plaque displacement and strain induced by hemodynamic forces and their relationship to high-risk plaques have not been determined. We studied the feasibility and reliability of carotid plaque strain measurement from clinical B-mode ultrasound images and the relationship of strain to high-risk plaque morphology. We analyzed carotid ultrasound B-mode cine loops obtained in patients with asymptomatic ≥50% stenosis during routine clinical scanning. Optical flow methods were used to quantify plaque motion and shear strain during the cardiac cycle. The magnitude (maximum absolute shear strain rate [MASSR]) and variability (entropy of shear strain rate [ESSR] and variance of shear strain rate [VSSR]) of strain were combined into a composite shear strain index (SSI), which was assessed for interscan repeatability and correlated with plaque echolucency. Nineteen patients (mean age, 70 years) constituting 36 plaques underwent imaging; 37% of patients (n = 7) showed high strain (SSI ≥0.5; MASSR, 2.2; ESSR, 39.7; VSSR, 0.03) in their plaques; the remaining clustered into a low-strain group (SSI <0.5; MASSR, 0.58; ESSR, 21.2; VSSR, 0.002). The area of echolucent morphology was greater in high-strain plaques vs low-strain plaques (28% vs 17%; P = .018). Strain measurements showed low variability on Bland-Altman plots with cluster assignment agreement of 76% on repeated scanning. Two patients developed a stroke during 2 years of follow-up; both demonstrated high SSI (≥0.5) at baseline. Carotid plaque strain is reliably computed from routine B-mode imaging using clinical ultrasound machines. High plaque strain correlates with known

  13. A Novel Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) Method for Detection of the JP2 Clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in Subgingival Plaque

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seki, M; Poulsen, Knud; Haubek, Dorte

    2008-01-01

    We developed a LAMP method that detects the JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, which induces aggressive periodontitis in adolescents of North- and West-African descents. Being independent of special equipment this specific and sensitive method offers significant advantages...

  14. OSA and coronary plaque characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Adeline; Hau, William; Ho, Hee-Hwa; Ghaem Maralani, Haleh; Loo, Germaine; Khoo, See-Meng; Tai, Bee-Choo; Richards, A Mark; Ong, Paul; Lee, Chi-Hang

    2014-02-01

    Virtual histology intravascular ultrasound (VH-IVUS) is an intravascular imaging technique that enables the characterization of coronary plaques. We sought to determine the association between OSA and coronary plaque characteristics in patients presenting with coronary artery disease. We prospectively recruited patients with angiographically proven coronary artery disease for a VH-IVUS examination and home-based sleep study. The total atheroma volume of the entire target coronary artery and the incidence of thin cap fibroatheroma of patients with no to mild and moderate to severe OSA were compared. One hundred eighteen patients were recruited from two university-affiliated centers. Among the 93 patients who completed the study, 32 (34.4%) had newly diagnosed moderate to severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index > 15). Compared with patients with no to mild OSA, those with moderate to severe OSA had a larger total atheroma volume (461.3 ± 250.4 mm³ vs 299.2 ± 135.6 mm³, P OSA and no to mild OSA regarding the prevalence of thin cap fibroatheroma in the culprit lesion (53.1% vs 54.2%, P = .919). In patients presenting with coronary artery disease, moderate to severe OSA was independently associated with a larger total atheroma volume in the target coronary artery. Further studies on the effects of CPAP on total atheroma volume are warranted. ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT01306526; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov.

  15. Current status of vulnerable plaque detection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sharif, Faisal

    2012-02-01

    Critical coronary stenoses have been shown to contribute to only a minority of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and sudden cardiac death. Autopsy studies have identified a subgroup of high-risk patients with disrupted vulnerable plaque and modest stenosis. Consequently, a clinical need exists to develop methods to identify these plaques prospectively before disruption and clinical expression of disease. Recent advances in invasive and noninvasive imaging techniques have shown the potential to identify these high-risk plaques. The anatomical characteristics of the vulnerable plaque such as thin cap fibroatheroma and lipid pool can be identified with angioscopy, high frequency intravascular ultrasound, intravascular MRI, and optical coherence tomography. Efforts have also been made to recognize active inflammation in high-risk plaques using intravascular thermography. Plaque chemical composition by measuring electromagnetic radiation using spectroscopy is also an emerging technology to detect vulnerable plaques. Noninvasive imaging with MRI, CT, and PET also holds the potential to differentiate between low and high-risk plaques. However, at present none of these imaging modalities are able to detect vulnerable plaque neither has been shown to definitively predict outcome. Nevertheless in contrast, there has been a parallel development in the physiological assessment of advanced atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. Thus recent trials using fractional flow reserve in patients with modest non flow-limiting stenoses have shown that deferral of PCI with optimal medical therapy in these patients is superior to coronary intervention. Further trials are needed to provide more information regarding the natural history of high-risk but non flow-limiting plaque to establish patient-specific targeted therapy and to refine plaque stabilizing strategies in the future.

  16. Carotid plaque thickness and carotid plaque burden predict future cardiovascular events in asymptomatic adult Americans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Henrik; Sartori, Samantha; Sandholt, Benjamin

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Prediction of cardiovascular events improves using imaging, i.e. coronary calcium score and ultrasound assessment of carotid plaque. This study analysed the predictive value of two ultrasound measures of carotid plaque size: carotid plaque thickness and carotid and intima......-media thickness (IMT). Methods and results: A total of 6102 asymptomatic persons underwent assessment of conventional risk factors and imaging by carotid ultrasound. Carotid plaque burden (cPB) and maximum carotid plaque thickness (cPTmax) were measured from 'cross-sectional sweep' video acquisition...

  17. Microvasculature of carotid atheromatous plaques: hemorrhagic plaques have dense microvessels with fenestrations to the arterial lumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Mie; Nose, Masato; Shimazu, Yoshihito; Aoba, Takaaki; Kohada, Yuki; Yorioka, Soichiro; Suehiro, Satomi; Fukuoka, Erina; Matsumoto, Shirabe; Watanabe, Hideaki; Kumon, Yoshiaki; Okura, Takafumi; Higaki, Jitsuo; Masumoto, Junya

    2014-07-01

    Microvessels in atheromatous plaques are well known to play a role in plaque vulnerability associated with intraplaque hemorrhage, but their architecture remains unclear. The morphometry of the microvasculature and hemorrhage of human carotid atheromatous plaques (CAPs) were evaluated, and 3-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the microvessels was performed. CAPs were obtained by endarterectomy in 42 patients. The specimens were analyzed using light microscopy. Plaque hemorrhage was defined as an area-containing red blood cells (>1 mm2). To determine the histopathologic features of plaque hemorrhage, the plaque area was divided into 4 regions: cap, shoulder, lipid/necrotic core, and media. Then, the density of microvessels and macrophages in each region was quantified. Two representative lesions with either hemorrhagic or nonhemorrhagic plaque were cut into 90 serial sections. The sections were double stained with anti-CD34 and anti-α smooth muscle actin antibodies, scanned using a digital microscope, and reconstructed using TRI-SRF2 software. The hemorrhagic plaques showed a higher density of microvessels than nonhemorrhagic plaques in the shoulder, cap, and lipid/necrotic core (P=.03, .009, and .001, respectively), and there was positive correlations between its density and macrophages in each regions (Pmicrovasculature of plaques with intraplaque hemorrhage was dense, some of which fenestrated to the arterial lumen. The pathologic 3D imaging revealed precise architecture of microvasculature of plaques. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nonculprit Plaque Characteristics in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome Caused by Plaque Erosion vs Plaque Rupture: A 3-Vessel Optical Coherence Tomography Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Tomoyo; Yamamoto, Erika; Bryniarski, Krzysztof; Xing, Lei; Lee, Hang; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Libby, Peter; Jang, Ik-Kyung

    2018-02-07

    Patients with culprit plaque rupture are known to have pancoronary plaque vulnerability. However, the characteristics of nonculprit plaques in patients with acute coronary syndromes caused by plaque erosion are unknown. To investigate the nonculprit plaque phenotype in patients with acute coronary syndrome according to culprit plaque pathology (erosion vs rupture) by 3-vessel optical coherence tomography imaging. In this observational cohort study, between August 2010 and May 2014, 82 patients with ACS who underwent preintervention optical coherence tomography imaging of all 3 major epicardial coronary arteries were enrolled at the Massachusetts General Hospital Optical Coherence Tomography Registry database. Analysis of the data was conducted between November 2016 and July 2017. Patients were classified into 2 groups based on the culprit lesion pathology: 17 patients with culprit plaque erosion and 34 patients with culprit plaque rupture. Thirty-one patients with the absence of culprit rupture or erosion were excluded from further analysis. Preintervention 3-vessel optical coherence tomography imaging. Plaque characteristics at the culprit and nonculprit lesions evaluated by optical coherence tomography. In 51 patients (37 men; mean age, 58.7 years), the characteristics of 51 culprit plaques and 216 nonculprit plaques were analyzed. In patients with culprit erosion, the mean (SD) number of nonculprit plaques per patient was smaller (3.4 [1.9] in erosion vs 4.7 [2.1] in rupture, P = .05). Patient-based analysis showed that none of 17 patients with culprit plaque erosion had nonculprit plaque rupture, whereas 26% of the patients (9 of 34) with culprit plaque rupture had nonculprit plaque rupture (P = .02). Plaque-based analysis showed that, compared with the culprit rupture group (n = 158), the culprit erosion group (n = 58) had lower prevalence of plaque rupture (0% vs 8%; P erosion had a smaller number of nonculprit plaques and the lower levels

  19. The effects of periodontal therapy on serum antibody (IgG) levels to plaque microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aukhil, I; Lopatin, D E; Syed, S A; Morrison, E C; Kowalski, C J

    1988-10-01

    The influence of periodontal therapy on serum antibody titers to selected periodontal disease-associated microorganisms was assessed in 23 patients having chronic inflammatory periodontal disease (CIPD). The immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers were determined by the microELISA technique in serum samples obtained prior to treatment; following a hygienic phase which included scaling, root planing, and oral hygiene instruction; following surgical treatment; and one year and two years following hygienic phase (maintenance phase). Considerable individual variability existed in the magnitude of immune response to specific bacterial preparations. Significant reductions in the mean antibody titers were seen to A. viscosus, S. sanguis, F. nucleatum, S. sputigena, B. gingivalis, B. intermedius, B. melaninogenicus, T. vincentii, and T. denticola by the end of the second year of maintenance. There was no consistent response to Capnocytophaga. When individual patient responses were examined, 6 of the 23 were found to have elevated titers to at least one of the microorganisms in the interval between pretreatment and the end of the hygienic phase; however, in all but one case, the titers at the end of the second year of maintenance were below pretreatment levels. Antibody levels to bacteria such as S. sanguis were modified during therapy. This would indicate that immune responses to microbes not generally considered to be "periodontal pathogens" may be modified by adjuvant activity associated with subgingival plaque or changes in the environment of the sulcus and that subsequent changes in titer do not necessarily reflect a role of that microorganism in the disease process.

  20. Dental plaque bacteria with reduced susceptibility to chlorhexidine are multidrug resistant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Hafiz Ghulam Murtaza; Seers, Christine Ann; Sabri, Anjum Nasim; Reynolds, Eric Charles

    2016-09-15

    Chlorhexidine (CHX) is used in oral care products to help control dental plaque. In this study dental plaque bacteria were grown on media containing 2 μg/ml chlorhexidine gluconate to screen for bacteria with reduced CHX susceptibility. The isolates were characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and antibiotic resistance profiles were determined using the disc diffusion method. The isolates were variably resistant to multiple drugs including ampicillin, kanamycin, gentamicin and tetracycline. Two species, Chryseobacterium culicis and Chryseobacterium indologenes were able to grow planktonically and form biofilms in the presence of 32 μg/ml CHX. In the CHX and multidrug resistant C. indologenes we demonstrated a 19-fold up-regulation of expression of the HlyD-like periplasmic adaptor protein of a tripartite efflux pump upon exposure to 16 μg/ml CHX suggesting that multidrug resistance may be mediated by this system. Exposure of biofilms of these resistant species to undiluted commercial CHX mouthwash for intervals from 5 to 60 s indicated that the mouthwash was unlikely to eliminate them from dental plaque in vivo. The study highlights the requirement for increased vigilance of the presence of multidrug resistant bacteria in dental plaque and raises a potential risk of long-term use of oral care products containing antimicrobial agents for the control of dental plaque.

  1. Presencia de Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola y Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans en el biofilm subgingival de pacientes diabéticos tipo 2: estudio transversal Presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in the subgingival biofilm of diabetic mellitus 2 patients: a cross sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    AJ Quintero; P Prada; CM Inostroza; Chaparro,A; AF Sanz; VL Ramírez; HC Morales

    2011-01-01

    Antecedentes: La investigación de la microflora subgingival en pacientes diabéticos tipo 2 con periodontitis ha presentado resultados contradictorios. Objetivo: Determinar la presencia de Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forshytia, Treponema denticola y Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, en el biofilm subgingival de pacientes diabéticos tipo 2 y relacionarlo con el grado de control metabólico. Método: Estudio descriptivo transversal, en el cual se analizaron 23 pacientes diabéticos de...

  2. PCR detection of four periodontopathogens from subgingival clinical samples Detecção por PCR de quatro periodontopatógenos de pacientes com doença periodontal e de indivíduos sadios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Julio Avila-Campos

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, A. actinomycetemcomitans, B. forsythus, P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum were identified from subgingival plaque from 50 periodontal patients and 50 healthy subjects. Subgingival clinical samples were collected with sterilized paper points and transported in VMGA III. From all the diluted clinical samples (1:10, DNA was obtained by boiling, and after centrifugation the supernatant was used as template. Specific primers for each bacterial species were used in PCR. PCR amplification was sensitive to identify these organisms. PCR products from each species showed a single band and can be used to identify periodontal organisms from clinical specimens. PCR detection odds ratio values for A. actinomycetemcomitans and B. forsythus were significantly associated with disease showing a higher OR values for B. forsythus (2.97, 95% CI 1.88 - 4.70. These results suggest a strong association among the studied species and the periodontal lesion.Em nosso estudo quatro periodontopatógenos foram isolados e identificados de placas subgengivais de 50 pacientes com doença periodontal e de 50 indivíduos sadios. As placas subgengivais foram coletadas com pontas de papel e transportadas em VMGA III. Foram realizadas diluições seriadas das amostras clínicas (1:10, e os DNA foram obtidos por fervura. Iniciadores específicos para cada bactéria foram usados no PCR. As amplificações mostraram-se sensíveis na identificação de A. actinomycetemcomitans, B. forsythus, P. gingivalis e F. nucleatum. As reações de PCR produziram bandas específicas para cada espécie e podem ser usadas na identificação desses organismos periodontais diretamente das amostras clínicas. Os valores de odds ratio para a detecção de A. actinomycetemcomitans e B. forsythus foram significativamente associados com a doença periodontal mostrando altos valores de OR para B. forsythus (2,97, 95% CI 1,88 - 4,70. Esses resultados sugerem uma forte associação entre os

  3. Correlations between supra- and subgingival clinical parameters in smokers and individuals who have never smoked

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Carolina Righi; Berlt, Fernanda Abbadie; Mário, Ticiane de Góes; Sfreddo, Camila Silveira; Maier, Juliana; Moreira, Carlos Heitor Cunha

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Smoking is a risk factor for prevalence, severity and progression of periodontal disease and appears to suppress marginal periodontium inflammatory response. Purpose To correlate Visible Plaque Index (VPI) and Gingival Bleeding Index (GBI) in smokers and never-smokers, as well as GBI and bleeding on probing (BOP ) in these groups. Material and method We used baseline data of one quasi-experimental study in which 11 smokers and 14 subjects who never smoked were submitted to clinic...

  4. Fibrillar amyloid plaque formation precedes microglial activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Christian K E; Keppler, Kevin; Steinbach, Sonja; Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Herms, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), hallmark β-amyloid deposits are characterized by the presence of activated microglia around them. Despite an extensive characterization of the relation of amyloid plaques with microglia, little is known about the initiation of this interaction. In this study, the detailed investigation of very small plaques in brain slices in AD transgenic mice of the line APP-PS1(dE9) revealed different levels of microglia recruitment. Analysing plaques with a diameter of up to 10 μm we find that only the half are associated with clear morphologically activated microglia. Utilizing in vivo imaging of new appearing amyloid plaques in double-transgenic APP-PS1(dE9)xCX3CR1+/- mice further characterized the dynamic of morphological microglia activation. We observed no correlation of morphological microglia activation and plaque volume or plaque lifetime. Taken together, our results demonstrate a very prominent variation in size as well as in lifetime of new plaques relative to the state of microglia reaction. These observations might question the existing view that amyloid deposits by themselves are sufficient to attract and activate microglia in vivo.

  5. A simple immunoperoxidase plaque assay to detect and quantitate Marek's disease virus plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, R F; Calvert, J G; Lee, L F

    1997-01-01

    We report an immunoperoxidase-based staining technique that can be used to rapidly and accurately detect and quantitate Marek's disease virus (MDV) plaques. Monolayer cultures were fixed and incubated with a monoclonal antibody specific for MDV. After washing, a second antibody of horseradish peroxidase-conjugated goat anti-mouse IgG was applied, incubated for 1 hr, and washed with phosphate-buffered saline. After the cultures were incubated with diaminobenzidine, CoCl2, and H2O2, the plaques appeared as black spots and were easily seen and counted. Significantly more immunoperoxidase-stained serotype 1 MDV plaques could be counted at 4 days postinoculation than were seen in unstained cultures. With serotype 2 MDV-infected cells, the difference in plaque counts was less dramatic. Nevertheless, at 3 days postinoculation, significantly more stained serotype 2 plaques were seen than unstained plaques. Immunoperoxidase staining of turkey herpesvirus plaques did not increase the sensitivity of viewing plaques. Similar numbers of stained and unstained plaques were seen at 2 days postinoculation. We also demonstrated that we could count serotype-specific MDV plaques in a mixed infection that contained all three serotypes.

  6. Usefulness of real time PCR for the differentiation and quantification of 652 and JP2 Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans genotypes in dental plaque and saliva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piras Vincenzo

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of our study is to describe a fast molecular method, able to distinguish and quantize the two different genotypes (652 and JP2 of an important periodontal pathogen: Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. The two genotypes show differences in the expression of an important pathogenic factor: the leukotoxin (ltx. In order to evidence this, we performed a real time PCR procedure on the ltx operon, able to recognize Aa clinical isolates with different leukotoxic potentials. Methods The specificity of the method was confirmed in subgingival plaque and saliva specimens collected from eighty-one Italian (Sardinian subjects with a mean age of 43.9, fifty five (68 % of whom had various clinical forms of periodontal disease. Results This procedure showed a good sensitivity and a high linear dynamic range of quantization (107-102 cells/ml for all genotypes and a good correlation factor (R2 = 0.97–0.98. Compared with traditional cultural methods, this real time PCR procedure is more sensitive; in fact in two subgingival plaque and two positive saliva specimens Aa was only detected with the molecular method. Conclusion A low number of Sardinian patients was found positive for Aa infections in the oral cavity, (just 10 positive periodontal cases out of 81 and two of these were also saliva positive. The highly leukotoxic JP2 strain was the most representative (60 % of the positive specimens; the samples from periodontal pockets and from saliva showed some ltx genotype for the same patient. Our experience suggests that this approach is suitable for a rapid and complete laboratory diagnosis for Aa infection.

  7. Rapid identification of oral Actinomyces species cultivated from subgingival biofilm by MALDI-TOF-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stingu, Catalina S.; Borgmann, Toralf; Rodloff, Arne C.; Vielkind, Paul; Jentsch, Holger; Schellenberger, Wolfgang; Eschrich, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background Actinomyces are a common part of the residential flora of the human intestinal tract, genitourinary system and skin. Isolation and identification of Actinomyces by conventional methods is often difficult and time consuming. In recent years, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) has become a rapid and simple method to identify bacteria. Objective The present study evaluated a new in-house algorithm using MALDI-TOF-MS for rapid identification of different species of oral Actinomyces cultivated from subgingival biofilm. Design Eleven reference strains and 674 clinical strains were used in this study. All the strains were preliminarily identified using biochemical methods and then subjected to MALDI-TOF-MS analysis using both similarity-based analysis and classification methods (support vector machine [SVM]). The genotype of the reference strains and of 232 clinical strains was identified by sequence analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Results The sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene of all references strains confirmed their previous identification. The MALDI-TOF-MS spectra obtained from the reference strains and the other clinical strains undoubtedly identified as Actinomyces by 16S rRNA sequencing were used to create the mass spectra reference database. Already a visual inspection of the mass spectra of different species reveals both similarities and differences. However, the differences between them are not large enough to allow a reliable differentiation by similarity analysis. Therefore, classification methods were applied as an alternative approach for differentiation and identification of Actinomyces at the species level. A cross-validation of the reference database representing 14 Actinomyces species yielded correct results for all species which were represented by more than two strains in the database. Conclusions Our results suggest that a combination of MALDI-TOF-MS with powerful

  8. High-Resolution Taxonomic Profiling of the Subgingival Microbiome for Biomarker Discovery and Periodontitis Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szafranski, Szymon P.; Wos-Oxley, Melissa L.; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Jáuregui, Ruy; Plumeier, Iris; Klawonn, Frank; Tomasch, Jürgen; Meisinger, Christa; Kühnisch, Jan; Sztajer, Helena; Pieper, Dietmar H.

    2014-01-01

    The oral microbiome plays a key role for caries, periodontitis, and systemic diseases. A method for rapid, high-resolution, robust taxonomic profiling of subgingival bacterial communities for early detection of periodontitis biomarkers would therefore be a useful tool for individualized medicine. Here, we used Illumina sequencing of the V1-V2 and V5-V6 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene. A sample stratification pipeline was developed in a pilot study of 19 individuals, 9 of whom had been diagnosed with chronic periodontitis. Five hundred twenty-three operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained from the V1-V2 region and 432 from the V5-V6 region. Key periodontal pathogens like Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia could be identified at the species level with both primer sets. Principal coordinate analysis identified two outliers that were consistently independent of the hypervariable region and method of DNA extraction used. The linear discriminant analysis (LDA) effect size algorithm (LEfSe) identified 80 OTU-level biomarkers of periodontitis and 17 of health. Health- and periodontitis-related clusters of OTUs were identified using a connectivity analysis, and the results confirmed previous studies with several thousands of samples. A machine learning algorithm was developed which was trained on all but one sample and then predicted the diagnosis of the left-out sample (jackknife method). Using a combination of the 10 best biomarkers, 15 of 17 samples were correctly diagnosed. Training the algorithm on time-resolved community profiles might provide a highly sensitive tool to detect the onset of periodontitis. PMID:25452281

  9. Rapid identification of oral Actinomyces species cultivated from subgingival biofilm by MALDI-TOF-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina S. Stingu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Actinomyces are a common part of the residential flora of the human intestinal tract, genitourinary system and skin. Isolation and identification of Actinomyces by conventional methods is often difficult and time consuming. In recent years, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS has become a rapid and simple method to identify bacteria. Objective: The present study evaluated a new in-house algorithm using MALDI-TOF-MS for rapid identification of different species of oral Actinomyces cultivated from subgingival biofilm. Design: Eleven reference strains and 674 clinical strains were used in this study. All the strains were preliminarily identified using biochemical methods and then subjected to MALDI-TOF-MS analysis using both similarity-based analysis and classification methods (support vector machine [SVM]. The genotype of the reference strains and of 232 clinical strains was identified by sequence analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA. Results: The sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene of all references strains confirmed their previous identification. The MALDI-TOF-MS spectra obtained from the reference strains and the other clinical strains undoubtedly identified as Actinomyces by 16S rRNA sequencing were used to create the mass spectra reference database. Already a visual inspection of the mass spectra of different species reveals both similarities and differences. However, the differences between them are not large enough to allow a reliable differentiation by similarity analysis. Therefore, classification methods were applied as an alternative approach for differentiation and identification of Actinomyces at the species level. A cross-validation of the reference database representing 14 Actinomyces species yielded correct results for all species which were represented by more than two strains in the database. Conclusions: Our results suggest that a combination of MALDI

  10. Haemodynamical stress in mouse aortic arch with atherosclerotic plaques: Preliminary study of plaque progression

    OpenAIRE

    Assemat, P.; Siu, K.K.; Armitage, J.A.; Hokke, S.N.; Dart, A; Chin-Dusting, J; Hourigan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic plaques develop at particular sites in the arterial tree, and this regional localisation depends largely on haemodynamic parameters (such as wall shear stress; WSS) as described in the literature. Plaque rupture can result in heart attack or stroke and hence understanding the development and vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaques is critically important. The purpose of this study is to characterise the haemodynamics of blood flow in the mouse aortic arch using numerical mode...

  11. Sticky Brain 'Plaques' Implicated in Alzheimer's Again

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_166550.html Sticky Brain 'Plaques' Implicated in Alzheimer's Again Researchers believe these substances form in early ... in the brain signals an early stage of Alzheimer's disease. It's been known for years that in ...

  12. Magnetic force microscopy of atherosclerotic plaque

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    T A Alexeeva; S V Gorobets; O Yu Gorobets; I V Demianenko; O M Lazarenko

    2014-01-01

    In this work by methods of scanning probe microscopy, namely by atomic force microscopy and magnetic force microscopy the fragments of atherosclerotic plaque section of different nature were investigated...

  13. Evaluation of the Navy Plaque Control Program, at Great Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    I 0 Individual clinicians who practice plaque control with their patients receive great reward and sense of accomplishment when dental caries is...Navy Dental Corps (43). The program requirements included plaque control instruction given through individual or small group sessions. The sessions... plaque removal techniques; demonstration of sulcular methods of tooth cleansing with the toothbrush ; and instruction in the use of plaque disclosing

  14. [Is regression of atherosclerotic plaque possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páramo, José A; Civeira, Fernando

    As it is well-known, a thrombus evolving into a disrupted/eroded atherosclerotic plaque causes most acute coronary syndromes. Plaque stabilization via reduction of the lipid core and/or thickening of the fibrous cap is one of the possible mechanisms accounted for the clinical benefits displayed by different anti-atherosclerotic strategies. The concept of plaque stabilization was developed to explain how lipid-lowering agents could decrease adverse coronary events without substantial modifications of the atherosclerotic lesion ('angiographic paradox'). A number of imaging modalities (vascular ultrasound and virtual histology, MRI, optical coherence tomography, positron tomography, etc.) are used for non-invasive assessment of atherosclerosis; most of them can identify plaque volume and composition beyond lumen stenosis. An 'aggressive' lipid-lowering strategy is able to reduce the plaque burden and the incidence of cardiovascular events; this may be attributable, at least in part, to plaque-stabilizing effects. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in subgingival biofilm and saliva of subjects with chronic periodontal infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto, Renata; Silva-Boghossian, Carina M.; Colombo, Ana Paula Vieira

    2014-01-01

    P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. are important pathogens associated with late nosocomial pneumonia in hospitalized and institutionalized individuals. The oral cavity may be a major source of these respiratory pathogens, particularly in the presence of poor oral hygiene and periodontal infection. This study investigated the prevalence of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in subgingival biofilm and saliva of subjects with periodontal disease or health. Samples were obtained from 55 periodontally healthy (PH) and 169 chronic periodontitis (CP) patients. DNA was obtained from the samples and detection of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. was carried out by multiplex and nested PCR. P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. were detected in 40% and 45% of all samples, respectively. No significant differences in the distribution of these microorganisms between men and women, subgingival biofilm and saliva samples, patients ≤ 35 and > 35 years of age, and smokers and non-smokers were observed regardless periodontal status (p > 0.05). In contrast, the frequencies of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in saliva and biofilm samples were significantly greater in CP than PH patients (p oral microbiota of CP. Poor oral hygiene, smoking and the presence of P. aeruginosa are strongly associated with periodontitis. PMID:25242933

  16. Detection of Mogibacterium timidum in subgingival biofilm of aggressive and non-diabetic and diabetic chronic periodontitis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Corrêa Viana Casarin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of detection of Mogibacterium timidum in subgingival samples of subjects with generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP and uncontrolled diabetic and non-diabetic subjects with generalized chronic periodontitis (GChP. 48 patients with GAgP, 50 non-diabetic and 39 uncontrolled (glycated hemoglobin >7% type 2 diabetic subjects with GChP were enrolled in this study. Subgingival biofilm were collected from deep pockets (probing depth > 7 mm. After DNA extraction, M. timidum was detected by Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction and chi-square test was used to data analysis (p>0.05. There were no differences in the frequency of detection of M. timidum between subjects with GAgP (35% and non-diabetic subjects with GChP (40% (p>0.05. The frequency of detection of M. timidum was significantly higher in deep pockets of diabetic subjects with GChP (56% when compared to GAgP (p0.05. The frequency of detection of M. timidum was higher in subjects GChP presenting uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus, when compared to GAgP subjects.

  17. Prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in subgingival biofilm and saliva of subjects with chronic periodontal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto, Renata; Silva-Boghossian, Carina M; Colombo, Ana Paula Vieira

    2014-01-01

    P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. are important pathogens associated with late nosocomial pneumonia in hospitalized and institutionalized individuals. The oral cavity may be a major source of these respiratory pathogens, particularly in the presence of poor oral hygiene and periodontal infection. This study investigated the prevalence of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in subgingival biofilm and saliva of subjects with periodontal disease or health. Samples were obtained from 55 periodontally healthy (PH) and 169 chronic periodontitis (CP) patients. DNA was obtained from the samples and detection of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. was carried out by multiplex and nested PCR. P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. were detected in 40% and 45% of all samples, respectively. No significant differences in the distribution of these microorganisms between men and women, subgingival biofilm and saliva samples, patients ≤ 35 and > 35 years of age, and smokers and non-smokers were observed regardless periodontal status (p > 0.05). In contrast, the frequencies of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in saliva and biofilm samples were significantly greater in CP than PH patients (p Acinetobacter spp. are frequently detected in the oral microbiota of CP. Poor oral hygiene, smoking and the presence of P. aeruginosa are strongly associated with periodontitis.

  18. Aggregation of plaque disclosing agent in a dentifrice

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Débora Dias da; Gonçalo, Camila da Silva; Sousa, Maria da Luz Rosário de; Wada,Ronaldo Seichi

    2004-01-01

    Dental plaque removal is an important issue in health promotion. Toothbrushing is one of the main methods employed for such purpose, since it can prevent dental caries by means of the fluoride present in the dentifrice. Dentifrices might contain plaque disclosing agents and thus allow dental plaque observation. The aim of this study was to assess whether utilization of a plaque disclosing agent interfered with plaque removal among adolescents, as well as the difference between utilization of ...

  19. A Pyrosequencing Investigation of Differences in the Feline Subgingival Microbiota in Health, Gingivitis and Mild Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Stephen; Croft, Julie; O’Flynn, Ciaran; Deusch, Oliver; Colyer, Alison; Allsopp, Judi; Milella, Lisa; Davis, Ian J.

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is the most frequently diagnosed health problem in cats yet little is known about the bacterial species important for the disease. The objective of this study was to identify bacterial species associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis (periodontitis. Pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 region of the 16S rDNA from these plaque samples generated more than one million reads and identified a total of 267 operational taxonomic units after bioinformatic and statistical analysis. Porphyromonas was the most abundant genus in all gingival health categories, particularly in health along with Moraxella and Fusobacteria. The Peptostreptococcaceae were the most abundant family in gingivitis and mild periodontitis. Logistic regression analysis identified species from various genera that were significantly associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis. The species identified were very similar to those observed in canine plaque in the corresponding health and disease states. Such similarities were not observed between cat and human at the bacterial species level but with disease progression similarities did emerge at the phylum level. This suggests that interventions targeted at human pathogenic species will not be effective for use in cats but there is more potential for commonalities in interventions for cats and dogs. PMID:26605793

  20. A Pyrosequencing Investigation of Differences in the Feline Subgingival Microbiota in Health, Gingivitis and Mild Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Stephen; Croft, Julie; O'Flynn, Ciaran; Deusch, Oliver; Colyer, Alison; Allsopp, Judi; Milella, Lisa; Davis, Ian J

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is the most frequently diagnosed health problem in cats yet little is known about the bacterial species important for the disease. The objective of this study was to identify bacterial species associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis (gingivitis or mild periodontitis. Pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 region of the 16S rDNA from these plaque samples generated more than one million reads and identified a total of 267 operational taxonomic units after bioinformatic and statistical analysis. Porphyromonas was the most abundant genus in all gingival health categories, particularly in health along with Moraxella and Fusobacteria. The Peptostreptococcaceae were the most abundant family in gingivitis and mild periodontitis. Logistic regression analysis identified species from various genera that were significantly associated with health, gingivitis or mild periodontitis. The species identified were very similar to those observed in canine plaque in the corresponding health and disease states. Such similarities were not observed between cat and human at the bacterial species level but with disease progression similarities did emerge at the phylum level. This suggests that interventions targeted at human pathogenic species will not be effective for use in cats but there is more potential for commonalities in interventions for cats and dogs.

  1. Chemical agents for the control of plaque and plaque microflora: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffar, A; Afflitto, J; Nabi, N

    1997-10-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the technologies available for the chemical control of plaque. It is generally accepted that the formation of dental plaque at the interfaces of tooth/gingiva is one of the major causes of gingival inflammation and dental caries. Several therapeutic approaches have been used to control dental plaque and supragingival infections. These include fluoride preparations such as stannous fluoride, oxygenating agents, anti-attachment agents, and cationic and non-cationic antibacterial agents. Among the fluoride preparations, stable stannous fluoride pastes and gels have been shown to reduce supragingival plaque, gingivitis, hypersensitivity and caries. The effect of the oxygenating agents on the supragingival plaque has been equivocal, but recent data indicate that a stable agent which provides sustained active oxygen release is effective in controlling plaque. A polymer, PVPA, which reduced attachment of bacteria to teeth was shown to significantly reduce plaque formation in humans. A new generation of antibacterials includes non-ionics such as triclosan, which in combination with a special polymer delivery system, has been shown to reduce plaque, gingivitis, supragingival calculus and dental caries in long-term studies conducted around the world. Unlike the first generation of agents, the triclosan/copolymer/sodium fluoride system is effective in long-term clinicals and does not cause staining of teeth, increase in calculus, or disturbance in the oral microbial ecology.

  2. Decreased cathepsin K levels in human atherosclerotic plaques are associated with plaque instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huiying; Qin, Xiujiao; Wang, Shuai; Sun, Xiwei; Dong, Bin

    2017-10-01

    Investigating the determinants and dynamics of atherosclerotic plaque instability is a key area of current cardiovascular research. Extracellular matrix degradation from excessive proteolysis induced by enzymes such as cathepsin K (Cat K) is implicated in the pathogenesis of unstable plaques. The current study assessed the expression of Cat K in human unstable atherosclerotic plaques. Specimens of popliteal arteries with atherosclerotic plaques were classified as stable (K and cystatin C (Cys C) were assessed by immunohistochemical examination and levels of Cat K mRNA were detected by semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Morphological changes including a larger lipid core, endothelial proliferation with foam cells and destruction of internal elastic lamina were observed in unstable atherosclerotic plaques. In unstable plaques, the expression of Cat K protein and mRNA was upregulated, whereas Cys C protein expression was downregulated. The interplay between Cat K and Cys C may underlie the progression of plaques from stable to unstable and the current study indicated that Cat K and Cys C are potential targets for preventing and treating vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque ruptures.

  3. Molecular analysis of 16S rRNA genes identifies potentially periodontal pathogenic bacteria and archaea in the plaque of partially erupted third molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, J M; Campbell, J H; Bhandari, A R; Jesionowski, A M; Vickerman, M M

    2012-07-01

    Small subunit rRNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis were used to identify cultivable and uncultivable microorganisms present in the dental plaque of symptomatic and asymptomatic partially erupted third molars to determine the prevalence of putative periodontal pathogens in pericoronal sites. Template DNA prepared from subgingival plaque collected from partially erupted symptomatic and asymptomatic mandibular third molars and healthy incisors was used in polymerase chain reaction with broad-range oligonucleotide primers to amplify 16S rRNA bacterial and archaeal genes. Amplicons were cloned, sequenced, and compared with known nucleotide sequences in online databases to identify the microorganisms present. Two thousand three hundred two clones from the plaque of 12 patients carried bacterial sequences from 63 genera belonging to 11 phyla, including members of the uncultivable TM7, SR1, and Chloroflexi, and difficult-to-cultivate Synergistetes and Spirochaetes. Dialister invisus, Filifactor alocis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Prevotella denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola, which have been associated with periodontal disease, were found in significantly greater abundance in pericoronal compared with incisor sites. Dialister invisus and F nucleatum were found in greater abundance in sites exhibiting clinical symptoms. The archaeal species, Methanobrevibacter oralis, which has been associated with severe periodontitis, was found in 3 symptomatic patients. These findings have provided new insights into the complex microbiota of pericoronitis. Several bacterial and archaeal species implicated in periodontal disease were recovered in greater incidence and abundance from the plaque of partially erupted third molars compared with incisors, supporting the hypothesis that the pericoronal region may provide a favored niche for periodontal pathogens in otherwise healthy mouths. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and

  4. DECT evaluation of noncalcified coronary artery plaque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravanfar Haghighi, Rezvan [Medical Imaging Research Center and Colorectal Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Science, Shiraz 719 363 5899 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chatterjee, S. [BGVS Chemical Engineering Building (Old), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Tabin, Milo; Singh, Rishi P.; Sharma, Munish; Krishna, Karthik [Department of Forensic Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029 (India); Sharma, Sanjiv; Jagia, Priya [Department of Cardiac-Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029 (India); Ray, Ruma; Arava, Sudhir [Department of Pathology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029 (India); Yadav, Rakesh [Department of Cardiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029 (India); Vani, V. C. [Department of Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Lakshmi, R.; Kumar, Pratik, E-mail: drpratikkumar@gmail.com [Department of Cardiac-Biochemistry, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029 (India); Mandal, Susama R. [Department of Medical Physics Unit IRCH, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029 (India)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Composition of the coronary artery plaque is known to have critical role in heart attack. While calcified plaque can easily be diagnosed by conventional CT, it fails to distinguish between fibrous and lipid rich plaques. In the present paper, the authors discuss the experimental techniques and obtain a numerical algorithm by which the electron density (ρ{sub e}) and the effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) can be obtained from the dual energy computed tomography (DECT) data. The idea is to use this inversion method to characterize and distinguish between the lipid and fibrous coronary artery plaques. Methods: For the purpose of calibration of the CT machine, the authors prepare aqueous samples whose calculated values of (ρ{sub e}, Z{sub eff}) lie in the range of (2.65 × 10{sup 23} ≤ ρ{sub e} ≤ 3.64 × 10{sup 23}/cm{sup 3}) and (6.80 ≤ Z{sub eff} ≤ 8.90). The authors fill the phantom with these known samples and experimentally determine HU(V{sub 1}) and HU(V{sub 2}), with V{sub 1},V{sub 2} = 100 and 140 kVp, for the same pixels and thus determine the coefficients of inversion that allow us to determine (ρ{sub e}, Z{sub eff}) from the DECT data. The HU(100) and HU(140) for the coronary artery plaque are obtained by filling the channel of the coronary artery with a viscous solution of methyl cellulose in water, containing 2% contrast. These (ρ{sub e}, Z{sub eff}) values of the coronary artery plaque are used for their characterization on the basis of theoretical models of atomic compositions of the plaque materials. These results are compared with histopathological report. Results: The authors find that the calibration gives ρ{sub e} with an accuracy of ±3.5% while Z{sub eff} is found within ±1% of the actual value, the confidence being 95%. The HU(100) and HU(140) are found to be considerably different for the same plaque at the same position and there is a linear trend between these two HU values. It is noted that pure lipid type plaques

  5. Simulation of human atherosclerotic femoral plaque tissue: the influence of plaque material model on numerical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to the limited number of experimental studies that mechanically characterise human atherosclerotic plaque tissue from the femoral arteries, a recent trend has emerged in current literature whereby one set of material data based on aortic plaque tissue is employed to numerically represent diseased femoral artery tissue. This study aims to generate novel vessel-appropriate material models for femoral plaque tissue and assess the influence of using material models based on experimental data generated from aortic plaque testing to represent diseased femoral arterial tissue. Methods Novel material models based on experimental data generated from testing of atherosclerotic femoral artery tissue are developed and a computational analysis of the revascularisation of a quarter model idealised diseased femoral artery from a 90% diameter stenosis to a 10% diameter stenosis is performed using these novel material models. The simulation is also performed using material models based on experimental data obtained from aortic plaque testing in order to examine the effect of employing vessel appropriate material models versus those currently employed in literature to represent femoral plaque tissue. Results Simulations that employ material models based on atherosclerotic aortic tissue exhibit much higher maximum principal stresses within the plaque than simulations that employ material models based on atherosclerotic femoral tissue. Specifically, employing a material model based on calcified aortic tissue, instead of one based on heavily calcified femoral tissue, to represent diseased femoral arterial vessels results in a 487 fold increase in maximum principal stress within the plaque at a depth of 0.8 mm from the lumen. Conclusions Large differences are induced on numerical results as a consequence of employing material models based on aortic plaque, in place of material models based on femoral plaque, to represent a diseased femoral vessel. Due to these large

  6. Growth of Necrotic Cores in Vulnerable Plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Pak-Wing

    2011-03-01

    Plaques are fatty deposits that grow mainly in arteries and develop as a result of a chronic inflammatory response. Plaques are called vulnerable when they are prone to mechanical rupture. Vulnerable Plaques (VPs) are characterized by lipid-rich, necrotic cores that are heavily infiltrated with macrophages. The rupture of VPs releases thrombogenic agents into the bloodstream, usually resulting in myocardial infarctions. We propose a quantitative model to predict the development of a plaque's necrotic core. By solving coupled reaction-diffusion equations for macrophages and dead cells, we explore the joint effects of hypoxic cell death and chemo-attraction to Ox-LDL, a molecule that is strongly linked to atherosclerosis. Our model predicts cores that have approximately the right size and shape. Normal mode analysis and subsequent calculation of the smallest eigenvalues allow us to compute the times required for the system to reach its steady state. This study allows us to make quantitative predictions for how quickly vulnerable plaques develop and how their growth depends on system parameters such as chemotactic coefficients and cell death rates.

  7. Functional Expression of Dental Plaque Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Norman Peterson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries remains a significant public health problem and is considered pandemic worldwide. The prediction of dental caries based on profiling of microbial species involved in disease and equally important, the identification of species conferring dental health has proven more difficult than anticipated due to high interpersonal and geographical variability of dental plaque microbiota. We have used RNA-Seq to perform global gene expression analysis of dental plaque microbiota derived from 19 twin pairs that were either concordant (caries-active or caries-free or discordant for dental caries. The transcription profiling allowed us to define a functional core microbiota consisting of nearly 60 species. Similarities in gene expression patterns allowed a preliminary assessment of the relative contribution of human genetics, environmental factors and caries phenotype on the microbiota’s transcriptome. Correlation analysis of transcription allowed the identification of numerous functional networks, suggesting that inter-personal environmental variables may co-select for groups of genera and species. Analysis of functional role categories allowed the identification of dominant functions expressed by dental plaque biofilm communities, that highlight the biochemical priorities of dental plaque microbes to metabolize diverse sugars and cope with the acid and oxidative stress resulting from sugar fermentation. The wealth of data generated by deep sequencing of expressed transcripts enables a greatly expanded perspective concerning the functional expression of dental plaque microbiota.

  8. Corneal plaque containing levofloxacin in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Woo; Kang, Byung-Jae; Lim, Jae Hyun; Ahn, Jung-Mo; Lim, Hyun Sook

    2015-11-01

    A 13-year-old castrated male Yorkshire terrier developed a corneal ulcer 2 weeks after intracapsular lens extraction (ICLE) in the right eye. The corneal ulcer was treated with levofloxacin eye drops. A plaque with a white luster developed in the central cornea 2 weeks after treatment with levofloxacin eye drops. The corneal plaque was surgically removed under inhalant anesthesia. The corneal plaque displayed antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. Furthermore, levofloxacin content in the plaque was confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). The corneal ulcer completely resolved 2 weeks after the surgical removal of the corneal lesion and replacement of levofloxacin eye drops with tobramycin eye drops. Although the topical use of levofloxacin is unlikely to lead to corneal chemical deposits due to the high water solubility of the drug compared to other topical fluoroquinolones, this patient developed corneal plaque of the antibiotic drop. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  9. Functional expression of dental plaque microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Scott N; Meissner, Tobias; Su, Andrew I; Snesrud, Erik; Ong, Ana C; Schork, Nicholas J; Bretz, Walter A

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries remains a significant public health problem and is considered pandemic worldwide. The prediction of dental caries based on profiling of microbial species involved in disease and equally important, the identification of species conferring dental health has proven more difficult than anticipated due to high interpersonal and geographical variability of dental plaque microbiota. We have used RNA-Seq to perform global gene expression analysis of dental plaque microbiota derived from 19 twin pairs that were either concordant (caries-active or caries-free) or discordant for dental caries. The transcription profiling allowed us to define a functional core microbiota consisting of nearly 60 species. Similarities in gene expression patterns allowed a preliminary assessment of the relative contribution of human genetics, environmental factors and caries phenotype on the microbiota's transcriptome. Correlation analysis of transcription allowed the identification of numerous functional networks, suggesting that inter-personal environmental variables may co-select for groups of genera and species. Analysis of functional role categories allowed the identification of dominant functions expressed by dental plaque biofilm communities, that highlight the biochemical priorities of dental plaque microbes to metabolize diverse sugars and cope with the acid and oxidative stress resulting from sugar fermentation. The wealth of data generated by deep sequencing of expressed transcripts enables a greatly expanded perspective concerning the functional expression of dental plaque microbiota.

  10. Approach To Unstable Plaque In Carotid Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojdeh Ghabaee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Risk of cerebral infarction due to thrombo emboli originating  from carotid artery disease estimated to be near 15%, and this risk  is closely associated with the severity of luminal stenosis. But at the same time characteristics  of the plaque should be taken into account for therapeutic planning when the patient is asymptomatic and the diameter of the stenosis does not reach the threshold of 70%. Search for markers of plaque vulnerability, instability, or thromboembolic potential as complementary to the degree of the luminal stenosis in stroke risk prediction should be considered .These morphologic features of carotid plaques are increasingly believed to be one of those markers that could carry further prognostic information, and early recognition of these plaques features may identify a high-risk subgroup of patients who might particularly benefit from aggressive interventions with aggressive medical treatment. Color and duplex Doppler sonography  evaluates both  morphologic and hemodynamic   abnormalitie of carotid. Echogensity, degree of stenosis and plaque surface features are essential parameters of morphological abnormality.

  11. Correlations between supra- and subgingival clinical parameters in smokers and individuals who have never smoked

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Righi Alves

    Full Text Available Introduction Smoking is a risk factor for prevalence, severity and progression of periodontal disease and appears to suppress marginal periodontium inflammatory response. Purpose To correlate Visible Plaque Index (VPI and Gingival Bleeding Index (GBI in smokers and never-smokers, as well as GBI and bleeding on probing (BOP in these groups. Material and method We used baseline data of one quasi-experimental study in which 11 smokers and 14 subjects who never smoked were submitted to clinical periodontal examinations between September 2010 and October 2011. Result The correlation between VPI and GBI was positive for both groups, it was strong and statistically significant in subjects who had never smoked and moderate in smokers. Regarding GBI and BOP correlations were moderate for smokers and weaker for individuals who had never smoked. Conclusion Smokers have lower strength correlation between VPI and GBI compared to individuals who had never smoked resulting in a less pronounced marginal gingival bleeding.

  12. Plaque rupture in humans and mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, Stephen M; Galis, Zorina S; Rosenfeld, Michael E

    2007-01-01

    Despite the many studies of murine atherosclerosis, we do not yet know the relevance of the natural history of this model to the final events precipitated by plaque disruption of human atherosclerotic lesions. The literature has become particularly confused because of the common use of terms...... such as "instability", "vulnerable", "rupture", or even "thrombosis" for features of plaques in murine model systems not yet shown to rupture spontaneously and in an animal surprisingly resistant to formation of thrombi at sites of atherosclerosis. We suggest that use of conclusory terms like "vulnerable" and "stable...... that various forms of data have implicated in plaque progression. For example, formation of the fibrous cap, protease activation, and cell death in the necrotic core can be well described and have all been modeled in well-defined experiments. The relevance of such well-defined, objective, descriptive...

  13. Inactivation of the gbpA gene of Streptococcus mutans alters structural and functional aspects of plaque biofilm which are compensated by recombination of the gtfB and gtfC genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazlett, K R; Mazurkiewicz, J E; Banas, J A

    1999-08-01

    Inactivation of the gbpA gene of Streptococcus mutans increases virulence in a gnotobiotic rat model and also promotes in vivo accumulation of organisms in which gtfB and gtfC have recombined to reduce virulence (K. R. O. Hazlett, S. M. Michalek, and J. A. Banas, Infect. Immun. 66:2180-2185, 1998). These changes in virulence were hypothesized to result from changes in plaque structure. We have utilized an in vitro plaque model to test the hypothesis that the absence of GbpA alters S. mutans plaque structure and that the presence of gtfBC recombinant organisms within a gbpA background restores a wild-type (wt)-like plaque structure. When grown in the presence of sucrose within hydroxyapatite-coated wells, the wt S. mutans plaque consisted primarily of large aggregates which did not completely coat the hydroxyapatite surface, whereas the gbpA mutant plaque consisted of a uniform layer of smaller aggregates which almost entirely coated the hydroxyapatite. If 25% of the gbpA mutants used as inoculum were also gtfBC recombinants (gbpA/25%gtfBC), a wt-like plaque was formed. These changes in plaque structure correlated with differences in susceptibility to ampicillin; gbpA plaque organisms were more susceptible than organisms in either the wt or gbpA/25%gtfBC plaques. These data allow the conclusion that GbpA contributes to S. mutans plaque biofilm development. Since the changes in plaque structure detailed in this report correlate well with previously observed changes in virulence, it seems likely that S. mutans biofilm structure influences virulence. A potential model for this influence, which can account for the gtfBC recombination compensating gbpA inactivation, is that the ratio of glucan to glucan-binding protein is a critical factor in plaque development.

  14. Cobalt60 plaques in recurrent retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fass, D.; McCormick, B.; Abramson, D.; Ellsworth, R. (Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (USA))

    1991-08-01

    Cobalt60 plaque irradiation is one treatment option for patients with recurrent retinoblastoma following conventional external beam irradiation (ERT). Tumorocidal doses can be delivered without excessive risk of normal tissue injury. In patients not considered candidates for xenon arc or cryotherapy, 60Co is an alternative to enucleation. Between 1968 and 1987, 85 patients were treated with 60Co plaques, 72 of whom had failed prior ERT. Age at diagnosis ranged from 1 week to 4 years. There are 37 males and 35 females. Seventy-one patients had bilateral disease and one had unilateral. Three patients had both eyes plaqued. Prior ERT ranged from 30 to 70 Gy (mean 4200 Gy). Time from initial therapy to failure ranged from 13 to 60 months. Cobalt plaques of 10 mm, 15 mm, or 10 {times} 15 mm were used depending on tumor size and location. Dose prescribed to the apex of the tumor ranged from 30 to 50 Gy (median 40 Gy) given over 3 to 8 days. Twelve patients had two plaque applications; three patients had three plaque applications. All patients were followed with routine ophthalmoscopic examinations. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 22 years (mean 8.7). Seven patients died of metastatic disease; 10 patients developed non-ocular second tumors. Thirty patients required enucleation. Twenty-two patients had clear tumor progression, two patients had radiation complications, and six patients had a combination of tumor growth and complications. Cobalt60 can salvage eyes in retinoblastoma patients failing ERT. Currently, the authors are using I125 in an attempt to spare normal ocular tissue and reduce subsequent complications.

  15. Dobesilate in the treatment of plaque psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Pedro; Arrazola, Jose M

    2005-09-12

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-mediated pathways participate in many of the cellular events implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Thus, targeting FGF signals may be potentially therapeutic in the treatment of psoriasis. We report for the first time on a 43-year-old man with chronic-type plaque psoriasis with a daily topical treatment of dobesilate, a new FGF inhibitor. As early as at day 14, the patient had cleared or achieved excellent improvement of psoriatic skin lesions. Topical dobesilate offers the potential for treatment of plaque psoriasis without atrophy or other local side effects associated with the use of topical corticosteroids.

  16. A modified COMS plaque for iris melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Scanderbeg

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma of the iris is a rare condition compared to posterior ocular tumors and in this case report we presenta 51-year-old female patient with diffuse iris melanoma. Traditional COMS (Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Studyplaques are used at our institution for radiation therapy, so a novel modification of the traditional plaque was requiredto allow better conformance with placement on the cornea. The usual silastic insert was machined to dimensions incompliance with the cornea, placed without incident, and treatment delivered with excellent patient tolerance of themodified plaque.

  17. Effectiveness of Electric Toothbrushes on Plaque Removal

    OpenAIRE

    佐藤, 悦子; 高見沢, 恵; 奥田, 一博; 原, 耕二; 新井, 文子; 藤野, 仁; Satoh, Etsuko; Takamizawa, Megumi; Okuda, Kazuhiro; Hara, Kohji; Arai, Humiko; Fujino, Hitoshi

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the plaque removal efficiency of two types of toothbrushes, one with a rotary combined with horizontal movement (brush 1) and the other with a rotary movement (brush 2) on 13 volunteers. They stopped all oral hygiene procedures for 48 houres, after which the subjects were instructed to brush their teeth for two minutes with each of the respective electric toothbrushes using the split-mouth technique twice a day and continued to brush for 1week. Plaque ...

  18. is plaque removal efficacy of toothbrush related to bristle flaring?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2013-11-03

    Nov 3, 2013 ... subsequently they brought the habit back home which gave momentum for ... of microbial plaque on teeth and supporting .... plaque assessment, the toothbrushes were ..... toothbrush (23,24) decreasing the functional ability of ...

  19. The clinical value of histological femoral artery plaque analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, W.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis showed that the dissected femoral atherosclerotic plaque contains a predictive value for clinical outcome after femoral endarterectomy. Plaque histology analysis should be incorporated in clinical practice to help predict the patient at risk for restenosis or secondary cardiovascular

  20. Image Analysis for Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound Carotid Plaque Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Akkus (Zeynettin)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Intraplaque neovascularization (IPN) has been presented as an important biomarker for progressive atherosclerotic disease and plaque vulnerability in several pathological studies. Therefore, quantification of IPN may allow early prediction of plaque at risk of rupture

  1. Mathematical models for atherosclerotic plaque evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulelzai, M.A.K.

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a disease in which low density lipoproteins (LDL) accumulate in the arterial wall due to an inflammatory response, which is triggered by the oxidation of LDL molecules that are already present in the arterial wall. Progression of atherosclerotic plaques involves many components

  2. Modulography: elasticity imaging of atherosclerotic plaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Baldewsing (Radj)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractModulography is an experimental elasticity imaging method. It has potential to become an all-in-one in vivo tool (a) for detecting vulnerable atherosclerotic coronary plaques, (b) for assessing information related to their rupture-proneness and (c) for imaging their elastic material

  3. Vaporization of atherosclerotic plaques by spark erosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Slager (Cornelis); C.E. Essed; J.C.H. Schuurbiers (Johan); N. Bom (Klaas); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); G.T. Meester (Geert)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractAn alternative to the laser irradiation of atherosclerotic lesions has been developed. A pulsed electrocardiogram R wave-triggered electrical spark erosion technique is described. Controlled vaporization of fibrous and lipid plaques with minimal thermal side effects was achieved and

  4. The high-risk plaque initiative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Erling; Sillesen, Henrik; Muntendam, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    The High-Risk Plaque (HRP) Initiative is a research and development effort to advance the understanding, recognition, and management of asymptomatic individuals at risk for a near-term atherothrombotic event such as myocardial infarction or stroke. Clinical studies using the newest technologies...

  5. Intracoronary Thermography: a vulnerable Plaque Detection Technique?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G. ten Have (Anna)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe studies reported in this thesis were performed to answer the central question: can intracoronary thermography be used for vulnerable plaque detection? To answer this question, we have identified parameters that influence intracoronary thermography measurements, and have studied to

  6. 3.0 T plaque imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton-Yates, Denise P; Cury, Ricardo C; Wald, Lawrence L; Wiggins, Graham C; Keil, Boris; Seethmaraju, Ravi; Gangadharamurthy, Dakshinamurthy; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Dai, Guangping; Houser, Stuart L; Stone, James R; Furie, Karen L

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this article is to evaluate 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging for characterization of vessel morphology and plaque composition. Emphasis is placed on early and moderate stages of carotid atherosclerosis, where increases in signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios compared with 1.5 T are sought. Comparison of in vivo 3.0 T imaging to histopathology is performed for validation. Parallel acceleration methods applied with an 8-channel carotid array are investigated as well as higher field ex vivo imaging to explore even further gains. The overall endeavor is to improve prospective assessment of atherosclerosis stage and stability for reduction of atherothrombotic event risk. A total of 10 male and female subjects ranging in age from 22 to 72 years (5 healthy and 5 with cardiovascular disease) participated. Custom-built array coils were used with endogenous and exogenous multicontrast bright and black-blood protocols for 3.0 T carotid imaging. Comparisons were performed to 1.5 T, and ex vivo plaque was stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histology. Imaging (9.4 T) was also performed on intact specimens. The factor of 2 gain in signal-to-noise SNR is realized compared with 1.5 T along with improved wall-lumen and plaque component CNR. Post-contrast black-blood imaging within 5-10 minutes of gadolinium injection is optimal for detection of the necrotic lipid component. In a preliminary 18-month follow-up study, this method provided measurement of a 50% reduction in lipid content with minimal change in plaque size in a subject receiving aggressive statin therapy. Parallel imaging applied with signal averaging further improves 3.0 T black-blood vessel wall imaging. The use of 3.0 T for carotid plaque imaging has demonstrated increases in SNR and CNR compared with 1.5 T. Quantitative prospective studies of moderate and early plaques are feasible at 3.0 T. Continued improvements in coil arrays, 3-dimensional pulse sequences, and the use of novel

  7. Tensile and compressive properties of fresh human carotid atherosclerotic plaques.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maher, Eoghan

    2009-12-11

    Accurate characterisation of the mechanical properties of human atherosclerotic plaque is important for our understanding of the role of vascular mechanics in the development and treatment of atherosclerosis. The majority of previous studies investigating the mechanical properties of human plaque are based on tests of plaque tissue removed following autopsy. This study aims to characterise the mechanical behaviour of fresh human carotid plaques removed during endarterectomy and tested within 2h. A total of 50 radial compressive and 17 circumferential tensile uniaxial tests were performed on samples taken from 14 carotid plaques. The clinical classification of each plaque, as determined by duplex ultrasound is also reported. Plaques were classified as calcified, mixed or echolucent. Experimental data indicated that plaques were highly inhomogeneous; with variations seen in the mechanical properties of plaque obtained from individual donors and between donors. The mean behaviour of samples for each classification indicated that calcified plaques had the stiffest response, while echolucent plaques were the least stiff. Results also indicated that there may be a difference in behaviour of samples taken from different anatomical locations (common, internal and external carotid), however the large variability indicates that more testing is needed to reach significant conclusions. This work represents a step towards a better understanding of the in vivo mechanical behaviour of human atherosclerotic plaque.

  8. Review: Mechanical Characterization of Carotid Arteries and Atherosclerotic Plaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, C.L. de; Fekkes, S.; Nederveen, A.J.; Manniesing, R.; Hansen, H.R.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of death and is in the majority of cases due to the formation of atherosclerotic plaques in arteries. Initially, thickening of the inner layer of the arterial wall occurs. Continuation of this process leads to plaque formation. The risk of a plaque to

  9. Detection of six novel papillomavirus sequences within canine pigmented plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luff, Jennifer A.; Affolter, Verena K.; Yeargan, Bret; Moore, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    In dogs, papillomaviruses are thought to cause oral and cutaneous papillomas and pigmented plaques. Eight canine papillomaviruses have been fully sequenced to date. Four of these canine papillomaviruses, including Canis familiaris papillomavirus (CPV)-3, CPV-4, CPV-5, and CPV-8, were amplified from pigmented plaques. Given this recent identification of several different canine papillomaviruses within pigmented plaques, it is likely that there are additional papillomavirus sequences that have not been previously identified. The aim of this study was to detect papillomavirus DNA sequences from pigmented plaques and identify potentially novel PV sequences through nucleotide sequence analysis. Polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify DNA sequences of the papillomavirus L1 gene from 27 pigmented plaques. Identification of novel papillomavirus sequences was based upon less than 90% shared DNA homology to any known papillomavirus. Ten different papillomaviruses were detected within the pigmented plaques, including 6 novel PV sequences. CPV-4 was detected within 41% (11/27) of the pigmented plaques, while CPV-5 was identified within 2 pigmented plaques and CPV-3 within a single pigmented plaque. A previously identified novel papillomavirus sequence was identified within 2 pigmented plaques in this study. The remaining 11 pigmented plaques contained 6 papillomavirus DNA sequences that have not been previously reported. These novel PV sequences were most similar to papillomaviruses that have been detected within canine pigmented plaques. PMID:22529129

  10. Determining carotid plaque vulnerability using ultrasound center frequency shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlöv, Tobias; Cinthio, Magnus; Edsfeldt, Andreas; Segstedt, Simon; Dias, Nuno; Nilsson, Jan; Gonçalves, Isabel

    2016-03-01

    The leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide is atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, most commonly caused by rupture of a high-risk plaque and subsequent thrombosis resulting in stroke, myocardial infarction or sudden death depending on the affected arterial territory. Accurate, non-invasive methods to identify such lesions known as vulnerable or high-risk plaques are currently sub-optimal. Our aim was to validate a new non-invasive ultrasound method to identify high-risk carotid plaques. We evaluated a new method based on the center frequency shift (CFS) of the ultrasound radio frequency data obtained from carotid plaques compared to a reference phantom. We evaluated the method both ex vivo, on 157 sections from 18 plaques, and in vivo, in 39 patients 1-day prior to carotid plaque removal, and correlated the data with histology. The CFS correlated with a plaque vulnerability index based on histological areas stained for lipids, macrophages, hemorrhage, smooth muscle cells and collagen (r = -0.726, P = 1.7 × 10(-8)). Plaques with CFS below median had larger cores, more macrophages and were less rich in collagen in agreement with the definition of rupture-prone plaques. The accuracy to detect plaques with high vulnerability index was 78% (confidence interval (CI) 61-89%), with sensitivity 77% (CI 61-89%) and specificity 78% (CI 62-89%). Our method is the first to characterize atherosclerotic plaque components that affect plaque vulnerability using CFS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Animal models for plaque rupture: a biomechanical assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heiden, Kim; Hoogendoorn, Ayla; Daemen, Mat J.; Gijsen, Frank J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of atherosclerotic plaques is the main cause of acute cardiovascular events. Animal models of plaque rupture are rare but essential for testing new imaging modalities to enable diagnosis of the patient at risk. Moreover, they enable the design of new treatment strategies to prevent plaque

  12. Subependymal plaques in scrapie-affected hamster brains--why are they so different from compact kuru plaques?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorska, Beata; Liberski, Paweł P; Brown, Paul

    2008-01-01

    We report here routine thin-section and immunogold electron microscopic studies on diffuse plaques in scrapie-affected hamster brains. These plaques were not discernible by routine HE staining. Ultrastructurally, plaques were recognized as areas of low electron density containing haphazardly-oriented fibrils, but not as stellate compact structures typical of mouse scrapie models; hence we labelled them "loose plaques". Following immunohistochemistry at the electron microscopy level, fibrils within plaques were heavily decorated with PrP-conjugated gold particles. Loose plaques were located beneath the basal border of the ependymal cells and around blood vessels in the adjacent subependymal neuropil. When dystrophic neurites containing electron-dense inclusion bodies, some of them autophagic vacuoles [59], were seen within the plaque perimeter, they always remained PrP-negative. Some microglial cells were observed in close contact with PrP-positive plaques, and secondary lysosomes within these cells were heavily decorated with gold particles.

  13. Topographic association of angioscopic yellow plaques with coronary atherosclerotic plaque: assessment with quantitative colorimetry in human coronary artery autopsy specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Fumiyuki; Lisauskas, Jennifer B; Kawamura, Akio; Waxman, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    Yellow plaques seen during coronary angioscopy are thought to be the surrogates for superficial intimal lipids in coronary plaque. Given diffuse and heterogeneous nature of atherosclerosis, yellow plaques in coronaries may be seen as several yellow spots on diffuse coronary plaque. We examined the topographic association of yellow plaques with coronary plaque. In 40 non-severely stenotic ex-vivo coronary segments (average length: 52.2 +/- 3.1 mm), yellow plaques were examined by angioscopy with quantitative colorimetry. The segments were cut perpendicular to the long axis of the vessel at 2 mm intervals, and 1045 slides with 5 microm thick tissue for whole segments were prepared. To construct the plaque surface, each tissue slice was considered to be representative of the adjacent 2 mm. The circumference of the lumen and the lumen border of plaque were measured in each slide, and the plaque surface region was constructed. Coronary plaque was in 37 (93%) of 40 segments, and consisted of a single mass [39.9 +/- 3.9 (0-100) mm, 311.3 +/- 47.4 (0.0-1336.2) mm2]. In 30 (75%) segments, multiple (2-9) yellow plaques were detected on a mass of coronary plaque. The number of yellow plaques correlated positively with coronary plaque surface area (r = 0.77, P colorimetry, some of them are associated with lipid cores underneath thin fibrous caps, may be used to assess the extent of coronary plaque. Further research using angioscopy could be of value to study the association of high-risk coronaries with acute coronary syndromes.

  14. Quantitative coronary plaque analysis predicts high-risk plaque morphology on coronary computed tomography angiography: results from the ROMICAT II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Maurovich-Horvat, Pál; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Puchner, Stefan B; Lu, Michael T; Ghemigian, Khristine; Kitslaar, Pieter H; Broersen, Alexander; Pursnani, Amit; Hoffmann, Udo; Ferencik, Maros

    2018-02-01

    Semi-automated software can provide quantitative assessment of atherosclerotic plaques on coronary CT angiography (CTA). The relationship between established qualitative high-risk plaque features and quantitative plaque measurements has not been studied. We analyzed the association between quantitative plaque measurements and qualitative high-risk plaque features on coronary CTA. We included 260 patients with plaque who underwent coronary CTA in the Rule Out Myocardial Infarction/Ischemia Using Computer Assisted Tomography (ROMICAT) II trial. Quantitative plaque assessment and qualitative plaque characterization were performed on a per coronary segment basis. Quantitative coronary plaque measurements included plaque volume, plaque burden, remodeling index, and diameter stenosis. In qualitative analysis, high-risk plaque was present if positive remodeling, low CT attenuation plaque, napkin-ring sign or spotty calcium were detected. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association between quantitative and qualitative high-risk plaque assessment. Among 888 segments with coronary plaque, high-risk plaque was present in 391 (44.0%) segments by qualitative analysis. In quantitative analysis, segments with high-risk plaque had higher total plaque volume, low CT attenuation plaque volume, plaque burden and remodeling index. Quantitatively assessed low CT attenuation plaque volume (odds ratio 1.12 per 1 mm 3 , 95% CI 1.04-1.21), positive remodeling (odds ratio 1.25 per 0.1, 95% CI 1.10-1.41) and plaque burden (odds ratio 1.53 per 0.1, 95% CI 1.08-2.16) were associated with high-risk plaque. Quantitative coronary plaque characteristics (low CT attenuation plaque volume, positive remodeling and plaque burden) measured by semi-automated software correlated with qualitative assessment of high-risk plaque features.

  15. Recent advances in plaque, gingivitis, tartar and caries prevention technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffar, A; Afflitto, J; Nabi, N; Herles, S; Kruger, I; Olsen, S

    1994-02-01

    A dentifrice containing triclosan/PVM/MA, copolymer/NaF (Total) combination was compared with dentifrices containing triclosan without the copolymer system. A variety of laboratory, animal and human studies indicated that Total provided higher uptake and retention of triclosan on teeth, and was more effective in reducing plaque in chemostat and flow cell models. The retention of triclosan in dental plaque was significantly higher with Total as compared with other dentifrices 2 hours post brushing. The triclosan retained in the plaque after using Total was effective against plaque bacteria for up to 12 hours. Other dentifrices did not provide a sustained antibacterial effect against plaque. The results indicated that the delivery system with the copolymer significantly enhanced the efficacy of triclosan against plaque, gingivitis and plaque related diseases in vivo.

  16. 18FDG PET and ultrasound echolucency in carotid artery plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graebe, Martin; Pedersen, Sune F; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective was to evaluate inflammation in echolucent carotid artery plaques. BACKGROUND: Ultrasound echolucency of carotid artery plaques has been proven to differentiate patients at high risk of stroke. On the other hand, positron emission tomography (PET) of plaques with the use...... for ultrasound and PET imaging. Plaque standardized gray scale medians (GSM) were measured in longitudinal ultrasound images to quantitate echolucency, and GSM values were compared with FDG PET uptake quantified by maximum standardized uptake values (SUV). Symptomatic plaques were compared with contralateral...... plaques ranged from high to low inflammatory activity, as depicted with PET. Quantitative FDG SUV differentiated asymptomatic from symptomatic plaques, whereas GSM values did not. There was a positive correlation between CD68 expression and FDG uptake (r = 0.50, p = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Our results...

  17. Reliability and discriminatory power of methods for dental plaque quantification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Prócida Raggio

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This in situ study evaluated the discriminatory power and reliability of methods of dental plaque quantification and the relationship between visual indices (VI and fluorescence camera (FC to detect plaque. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Six volunteers used palatal appliances with six bovine enamel blocks presenting different stages of plaque accumulation. The presence of plaque with and without disclosing was assessed using VI. Images were obtained with FC and digital camera in both conditions. The area covered by plaque was assessed. Examinations were done by two independent examiners. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Kappa tests to compare different conditions of samples and to assess the inter-examiner reproducibility. RESULTS: Some methods presented adequate reproducibility. The Turesky index and the assessment of area covered by disclosed plaque in the FC images presented the highest discriminatory powers. CONCLUSION: The Turesky index and images with FC with disclosing present good reliability and discriminatory power in quantifying dental plaque.

  18. New dimensions in mechanical plaque control: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnab Mandal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Plaque control is the daily removal of dental plaque, oral biofilm and also prevention of their accumulation on the teeth and other parts of oral cavity. Dental plaque is the major etiology of maximum gingival and periodontal diseases. It is also related with various dental problems. Mechanical plaque control is a very effective method to get rid of plaque accumulation in oral cavity. In 3000 BC there was the first toothbrush invented by human beings. With time several modifications came in toothbrushes to make mechanical plaque control more effective in day to day oral hygiene practice. This article emphasizes on the advanced and emerging tools in mechanical plaque control methods in attaining an optimal level of oral hygiene standards and maintenance of oral health.

  19. Three-dimensional carotid ultrasound plaque texture predicts vascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Engelen, Arna; Wannarong, Thapat; Parraga, Grace

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Carotid ultrasound atherosclerosis measurements, including those of the arterial wall and plaque, provide a way to monitor patients at risk of vascular events. Our objective was to examine carotid ultrasound plaque texture measurements and the change in carotid plaque...... texture during 1 year in patients at risk of events and to compare these with measurements of plaque volume and other risk factors as predictors of vascular events. METHODS: We evaluated 298 patients with carotid atherosclerosis using 3-dimensional (3D) ultrasound at baseline and after 1 year and measured...... carotid plaque volume and 376 measures of plaque texture. Patients were followed up to 5 years (median [range], 3.12 [0.77-4.66]) for myocardial infarction, transient ischemic attack, and stroke. Sparse Cox regression was used to select the most predictive plaque texture measurements in independent...

  20. Microbial diversity of the supra- and subgingival biofilm of healthy individuals after brushing with chlorhexidine- or silver-coated toothbrush bristles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Cássio; Paulo, Diana Ferreira; Pita, Murillo Sucena; Pedrazzi, Vinícius; de Albuquerque Junior, Rubens Ferreira

    2015-02-01

    Nanoparticulate silver has recently been reported as an effective antimicrobial agent. The aim of this clinical study was to investigate the potential changes on the oral microbiota of healthy individuals after controlled brushing with chlorhexidine- or silver-coated toothbrush bristles. Twenty-four healthy participants were enrolled in this investigation and randomly submitted to 3 interventions. All the participants received, in a crossover format, the following toothbrushing interventions: (i) chlorhexidine-coated bristles, (ii) silver-coated bristles, and (iii) conventional toothbrush (Control). All the interventions had a duration of 30 days. The DNA checkerboard hybridization method was used to identify and quantify up to 43 microbial species colonizing the supra- and subgingival biofilm. The supragingival samples presented higher genome counts than the subgingival samples (p < 0.0001). The total genome counts from the Control group showed the highest values, followed by the silver and chlorhexidine groups (p < 0.0001). After 4 weeks of brushing, the silver-coated and chlorhexidine-coated bristles were capable of reducing or maintaining lower levels of the bacterial counts of the putative periodontal pathogens Tanerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Other major periodontal pathogens, such as Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella nigrescens, and Parvimonas micra, were also detected at lower levels. The toothbrush bristles impregnated with silver nanoparticles reduced the total and individual genome count in the supra- and subgingival biofilm after 4 weeks of brushing. Chlorhexidine was not effective in reducing the total genome counts in both supra- or subgingival biofilm after 4 weeks of brushing. Chlorhexidine reduced the individual genome counts in the supragingival biofilm for most of the target species, including putative periodontal pathogens.

  1. Influence of glycemic control on the levels of subgingival periodontal pathogens in patients with generalized chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Tamires Szeremeske; Feres, Magda; Retamal-Valdés, Belén; Perez-Chaparro, Paula Juliana; Maciel, Suellen Silva; Duarte, Poliana Mendes

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of glycemic control on the levels and frequency of subgingival periodontal pathogens in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and generalized chronic periodontitis (ChP). Fifty-six patients with generalized ChP and type 2 DM were assigned according to the levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) into one of the following groups: HbA1ctype 2 DM and ChP.

  2. Oculocutaneous albinism complicated with an ulcerated plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokanatha Keshavalu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A 32-year-old male with a history of albinism and farmer by occupation presented with an ulcerated plaque on the right wrist. The patient had light eyes, hair, and skin. Physical examination showed extensive photodamage. A skin biopsy specimen from the plaque revealed a well-differentiated squamous-cell carcinoma. Wide surgical excision was done. The most common types of oculocutaneous albinism (OCA, OCA 1 and OCA 2, are autosomal recessive disorders of pigmentation that commonly affect the skin, hair and eyes. Photodamage and skin cancers plague patients with albinism. Albinos face a myriad of social and medical issues. Importance of photoprotection, skin cancer surveillance and treatment has been stressed upon in this report.

  3. Vaporization of atherosclerotic plaques by spark erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Slager, Cornelis J.; Essed, Catharina E.; Schuurbiers, Johan C.H.; Bom, Nicolaas; Serruys, Patrick W.; Meester, Geert T.

    1985-01-01

    textabstractAn alternative to the laser irradiation of atherosclerotic lesions has been developed. A pulsed electrocardiogram R wave-triggered electrical spark erosion technique is described. Controlled vaporization of fibrous and lipid plaques with minimal thermal side effects was achieved and documented histologically in vitro from 30 atherosclerotic segments of six human aortic autopsy specimens. Craters with a constant area and a depth that varied according to the duration of application ...

  4. Trans-corporal incision of Peyronie's plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaeer, Osama

    2011-02-01

    Patients presenting with Peyronie's disease (PD) curvature and erectile dysfunction (ED) can achieve straightening and rigidity through penile prosthesis implantation and manual modeling and, if necessary, a relaxing tunical incision with or without grafting. Unfortunately, this maneuver will not correct PD-induced shortening. In addition, incision and grafting after the prosthesis has already been implanted adds to operative time and risk, and may indicate mobilization of the neurovascular bundle and, possibly, a secondary skin incision. This work describes trans-corporal incision (TCI), a minimally invasive endoscopic approach for plaque incision from within the corpora cavernosa, restoring straightness and length to the penis, before calibration of the corpora cavernosa, allowing implantation of a longer prosthesis in a straight penis, with neither mobilizing the neurovascular bundle nor a secondary incision. Sixteen patients with PD deformity and refractory ED were operated upon. Intra-operative artificial erection demonstrated the deformity. Through a penoscrotal incision, the corpora were dilated. TCI was performed to incise Peyronie's plaques at the point of maximum deformity. Artificial erection was re-induced and correction of curvature evaluated. Length was measured before and after TCI. Implantation proceeded as usual. Penile straightness and length. Following implantation, the penis was straight in all cases. Pre-TCI length of the corpora was unequal on either side. Post-TCI, both corpora were of equal length with an average increase of 2.5 cm (11.9%) on the right side and 1.9 (9.1%) on the left. TCI; corporoscopic incision of Peyronie's plaques upon implantation of penile prosthesis is a minimally invasive approach that restores both straightness and length to patients with PD and ED, with neither mobilization of the neurovascular bundle nor plaque incision and grafting. © 2010 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  5. Ex vivo killing of Enterococcus faecalis and mixed plaque bacteria in planktonic and biofilm culture by modified photoactivated disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojicic, S; Amorim, H; Shen, Y; Haapasalo, M

    2013-07-01

    To compare the efficacy of conventional and modified photoactivated disinfection (PAD) against Enterococcus faecalis and mixed plaque bacteria in suspension and biofilms. Enterococcus faecalis (four strains) and mixed plaque bacteria from three adult volunteers were suspended in water, added to methylene blue (MB, 15 μmol L⁻¹), MB mixed with 0.5% hydrogen peroxide and 0.05% chlorhexidine (CHX), MB mixed with 0.5% hydrogen peroxide and 0.05% EDTA or MB mixed with 0.05% EDTA and 0.05% CHX and exposed to laser irradiation from 10 s to 5 min. After exposure, samples were taken, serially diluted and grown aerobically and anaerobically on Tryptic Soy Agar plates or on blood agar plates for 24 and 72 h, respectively. For biofilm experiments, E. faecalis and mixed plaque biofilms were grown on sterile hydroxyapatite (HA) discs coated overnight with bovine dermal collagen type I for 3 weeks. After exposure to MB or MB and low concentration of EDTA with either hydrogen peroxide or CHX, the percentage of killed bacteria by PAD was evaluated using viability staining and confocal laser scanning microscope. For statistical analysis, one-way analysis of variance was performed. Conventional PAD killed from 90.76% to 100% E. faecalis for 3 min, but failed to kill all plaque bacteria even after 5 min of laser irradiation. In modified PAD, up to 100% of suspended E. faecalis and mixed plaque bacteria were killed after 1 min and 30 s of irradiation. Up to twenty times more biofilm bacteria were killed by modified PAD than by conventional PAD with 15 μmol L⁻¹ MB (P times more than 2% CHX (P PAD was superior to conventional PAD against planktonic and biofilm bacteria. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Helicobacter pylori in dental plaque; is it related to brushing frequency, plaque load and oral health status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Saima; Khan, Ayyaz Ali; Butt, Arshad Kamal; Idrees, Muhammad; Izhar, Mateen; Iqbal, Hafiz Aamer

    2011-10-01

    To determine the relation between presence of H. pylori in supra-gingival dental plaque with oral hygiene habits and oral health status of patients suffering from symptomatic dyspepsia. Descriptive study. The Department of Oral Health Sciences, Shaikh Zayed FPGMI, Lahore, from September 2008 to August 2009. One hundred and fifty dyspeptic subjects with dental plaque were enrolled. After recording brushing frequency, oral health status and plaque load, the supra-gingival dental plaque samples were collected by sterile curettes. Helicobacter pylori were detected in dental plaque samples through PCR assay. Presence of H. pylori in dental plaque was found to be 37.5% in the sample. Most of the subjects brushed once daily, had plaque index score of 1 and had fair to poor oral hygiene status. Approximately 35% of the individuals who brushed once or twice a day harbored the bacterium in their dental plaque. There was no difference between bacterial detection rates among different categories of plaque index and oral health status of the study subjects. Presence of H. pylori in dental plaque was found to be associated with neither brushing frequency nor with the plaque load nor with the oral health status of individuals suffering from symptomatic dyspepsia.

  7. Ghrelin inhibits atherosclerotic plaque angiogenesis and promotes plaque stability in a rabbit atherosclerotic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Chen, Qingwei; Ke, Dazhi; Li, Guiqiong

    2017-04-01

    Intraplaque angiogenesis associates with the instability of atherosclerotic plaques. In the present study, we investigated the effects of ghrelin on intraplaque angiogenesis and plaque instability in a rabbit model of atherosclerosis. The rabbits were randomly divided into three groups, namely, the control group, atherosclerotic model group, and ghrelin-treated group, with treatments lasting for 4 weeks. We found that the thickness ratio of the intima to media in rabbits of the ghrelin-treated group was significantly lower than that in rabbits of the atherosclerotic model group. The number of neovessels and the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) decreased dramatically in rabbits of the ghrelin-treated group compared to those of the atherosclerotic model group. Ghrelin significantly decreased the plaque content of macrophages, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9, in a rabbit model of atherosclerosis. In addition, the level of the pro-inflammatory factor monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 was significantly lower in rabbits of the ghrelin-treated group than in rabbits of the atherosclerotic model group. In summary, ghrelin can inhibit intraplaque angiogenesis and promote plaque stability by down-regulating VEGF and VEGFR2 expression, inhibiting the plaque content of macrophages, and reducing MCP-1 expression at an advanced stage of atherosclerosis in rabbits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Graphic Grown Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ann

    2009-01-01

    It's no secret that children and YAs are clued in to graphic novels (GNs) and that comics-loving adults are positively giddy that this format is getting the recognition it deserves. Still, there is a whole swath of library card-carrying grown-up readers out there with no idea where to start. Splashy movies such as "300" and "Spider-Man" and their…

  9. Photoinactivation Using Visible Light Plus Water-Filtered Infrared-A (vis+wIRA and Chlorine e6 (Ce6 eradicates Planktonic Periodontal Pathogens and Subgingival Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Al-Ahmad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Alternative treatment methods for pathogens and microbial biofilms are required due to the widespread rise in antibiotic resistance. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT has recently gained attention as a novel method to eradicate pathogens. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of a novel aPDT method using visible light (vis and water infiltrated infrared A (wIRA in combination with chlorine e6 (Ce6 against different periodontal pathogens in planktonic form and within in situ subgingival oral biofilms. Eight different periodontal pathogens were exposed to aPDT using vis+wIRA and 100 µg/ml Ce6 in planktonic culture. Additionally, pooled subgingival dental biofilm was also treated by aPDT and the number of viable cells determined as colony forming units (CFU. Live/dead staining was used in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM to visualize and quantify antimicrobial effects within the biofilm samples. Untreated negative controls as well as 0.2 % chlorhexidine (CHX-treated positive controls were used. All eight tested periodontal pathogens including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Eikenella corrodens, Actinomyces odontolyticus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra, Slackia exigua and Atopopium rimae and the aPDT-treated subgingival biofilm were eliminated over the ranges of 3.43 - 8.34 and 3.91 - 4.28 log10 CFU in the log10 scale, respectively. Thus, aPDT showed bactericidal effects on the representative pathogens as well as on the in situ subgingival biofilm. The live/dead staining also revealed a significant reduction (33.45 % of active cells within the aPDT-treated subgingival biofilm. Taking the favorable tissue healing effects of vis+wIRA into consideration, the significant antimicrobial effects revealed in this study highlight the potential of aPDT using this light source in combination with Ce6 as an adjunctive method to treat periodontitis as well as

  10. Effect of repeated adjunctive antimicrobial photodynamic therapy on subgingival periodontal pathogens in the treatment of chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petelin, Milan; Perkič, Katja; Seme, Katja; Gašpirc, Boris

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of subgingival ultrasonic scaling followed by repeated (three times) antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT), ultrasonic scaling alone (US), and scaling and root planing with hand instruments (SRP) for initial periodontal treatment. Twenty-seven non-smoking systemically healthy chronic periodontitis patients were included. Residual pockets ≥4 mm deep and bleeding on probing were debrided either with SRP, US alone, or US followed by a single episode of PDT during supportive periodontal treatment. Probing pocket depth (PPD), bleeding on probing (BOP), and clinical attachment level (CAL) were monitored over 12 months. The presence of five periodontal pathogens in the pockets was determined by a commercially available micro-IDent test. Intergroup and intragroup statistical analysis was performed. All three treatments resulted in a significant clinical improvement. Additional application of PDT to US failed to result in further improvement in terms of PPD reduction and CAL gain. However, it resulted in a higher reduction of BOP at 3 and 12 months comparing to US alone or SRP (PDT from 25 to 13 and to 9%, US from 23 to 16 and to 12%, and SRP from 17 to 10 and to 9%, respectively). PDT reduced the proportion of positive sites after 6 months for Treponema denticola (TD) significantly more effectively than US or SRP (p 6 mm) compared to mechanical debridement alone (p < 0.05).

  11. Micro-analysis of plaque fluid from single-site fasted plaque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, G.L.; Carey, C.M.; Chow, L.C.; Tatevossian, A. (American Dental Association Health Foundation, Gaithersburg, MD (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Despite the site-specific nature of caries, nearly all data on the concentration of ions relevant to the level of saturation of plaque fluid with respect to calcium phosphate minerals or enamel are from studies that used pooled samples. A procedure is described for the collection and analysis of inorganic ions relevant to these saturation levels in plaque fluid samples collected from a single surface on a single tooth. Various methods for examining data obtained by this procedure are described, and a mathematical procedure employing potential plots is recommended.

  12. Plaque complement activation and cognitive loss in Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, David A; Camp, Dianne M; Bennett, David A

    2008-01-01

    Background Complement activation is increased in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but its significance is unclear. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between complement activation and cognition during the development of AD. Methods iC3b, C9, Bielschowsky, and Gallyas staining was performed on aged normal (n = 17), mild cognitively impaired (n = 12), and AD (n = 17–18) inferior temporal gyrus specimens. Plaques were counted in 10× fields with high numbers of Bielschowsky-stained plaques. One-way ANOVA was used to determine between-group differences for plaque counts and measures of cognitive function, and linear regression was used to evaluate global cognition as a function of Bielschowsky-stained plaques. Terms for iC3b- and C9-stained plaques were then added sequentially as additional predictors in a "mediation analysis" model. Results Complement was detected on plaques in all groups, and on neurofibrillary tangles only in AD specimens. iC3b, C9, and Bielschowsky-stained plaque counts increased 2.5- to 3-fold in AD vs. other groups (all p ≤ 0.01). C9 staining was present on some diffuse plaques, as well as on neuritic plaques. Bielschowsky-stained and complement-stained plaque counts were highly correlated, and were negatively correlated with cognitive measures. When the Bielschowsky plaque count was used as a predictor, its correlations with cognitive measures were statistically significant, but when iC3b and C9 plaque counts were added as additional predictors, these correlations were no longer significant. This loss of significance was attributed to multicollinearity, i.e., high correlations between Bielschowsky-stained and complement-stained plaque counts. Conclusion Both early-stage (iC3b) and late-stage (C9) complement activation occurs on neocortical plaques in subjects across the cognitive spectrum; contrary to previous reports, C9 is present on some diffuse plaques. Because of high correlations between complement-stained and

  13. Familial influence on plaque formation in the beagle brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, M J; White, R; Patel, E; Markesbery, W R; Watson, C R; Geddes, J W

    1992-12-01

    Aged canines exhibit central neuropathological changes strikingly similar to those seen in patients with Alzheimer's disease. In this study, brain tissue from pure bred beagles raised in a controlled environment were examined for Alzheimer-like pathology. The mean age of the animals was 15.6 years. The incidence of plaques among these 29 dogs was 65.5%. Of the 19 samples that demonstrated Alzheimer-like pathology, 18 were characterized as diffuse and one as neuritic. Plaque density was found to be independent of age. Plaque numbers were highest in the perirhinal cortex and the adjacent temporal cortex. Familial influence on plaque development is supported by congruence within 15 of the 16 litters examined (p < 0.001). In this environmentally controlled group the diffuse plaques were rarely converted to the dense neuritic plaques found in Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Dosimetric Benefit of a New Ophthalmic Radiation Plaque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marwaha, Gaurav, E-mail: marwahg2@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Wilkinson, Allan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Bena, James [Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Macklis, Roger [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Singh, Arun D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Department of Ophthalmic Oncology, Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the computed dosimetry of a new ophthalmic plaque, EP917, when compared with the standard Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) plaques, could reduce radiation exposure to vision critical structures of the eye. Methods and Materials: One hundred consecutive patients with uveal melanoma treated with COMS radiation plaques between 2007 and 2010 were included in this study. These treatment plans were generated with the use of Bebig Plaque Simulator treatment-planning software, both for COMS plaques and for EP917 plaques using I-125. Dose distributions were calculated for a prescription of 85 Gy to the tumor apex. Doses to the optic disc, opposite retina, lens, and macula were obtained, and differences between the 2 groups were analyzed by standard parametric methods. Results: When compared with the COMS plaques, the EP917 plaques used fewer radiation seeds by an average difference of 1.94 (P<.001; 95% confidence interval [CI], -2.8 to -1.06) and required less total strength of radiation sources by an average of 17.74 U (air kerma units) (P<.001; 95% CI, -20.16 to -15.32). The total radiation doses delivered to the optic disc, opposite retina, and macula were significantly less by 4.57 Gy, 0.50 Gy, and 11.18 Gy, respectively, with the EP917 plaques vs the COMS plaques. Conclusion: EP917 plaques deliver less overall radiation exposure to critical vision structures than COMS treatment plaques while still delivering the same total therapeutic dose to the tumor.

  15. Prophylaxis for infective endocarditis: antibiotic sensitivity of dental plaque.

    OpenAIRE

    MacFarlane, T W; McGowan, D A; Hunter, K; MacKenzie, D.

    1983-01-01

    The antibiotic sensitivity pattern of bacteria isolated from bacteraemia after dental extraction was compared with that of bacteria isolated from dental plaque samples from the same patient. The results supported the current practice of using penicillin and erythromycin empirically for prophylaxis. The prediction of the most appropriate antibiotic for prophylaxis using dental plaque samples was most accurate when the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of plaque isolates were used. It appe...

  16. Plaque-removal efficacy of four types of dental floss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terézhalmy, Géza T; Bartizek, Robert D; Biesbrock, Aaron R

    2008-02-01

    Effective plaque removal is essential for gingival health, and dental floss is used to augment plaque removal achieved with a toothbrush. This randomized, controlled, examiner-masked, five-period crossover study examined plaque removal in 25 subjects following single use with an American Dental Association reference manual toothbrush alone and in combination with four floss products: three traditional (unwaxed, woven, and shred-resistant) and one powered flosser. Plaque was scored before and after brushing for 1 minute. The Rustogi modified Navy plaque index was used to focus scores on tooth areas contacted during the proper use of dental floss. Mean plaque reductions (baseline minus postbrushing) in floss contact areas were as follows: 0.181 with the toothbrush alone; 0.228, 0.217, and 0.210 for the toothbrush in combination with the three traditional flosses, unwaxed, woven, and shred-resistant, respectively; and 0.252 for the toothbrush plus powered flosser. No statistically significant differences were found between the three traditional floss treatments. All four floss treatments showed greater (P plaque removal than the toothbrush alone. Mean plaque removal with the powered flosser combination was greater than for the woven combination and shred-resistant combination (both P toothbrush removed plaque significantly better than the toothbrush alone. Among floss types, there was evidence of superiority for the powered flosser, but there were no significant treatment differences between the three traditional floss products.

  17. Stress analysis of fracture of atherosclerotic plaques: crack propagation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani-Sharif, Alireza; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Kazemi-Saleh, Davood; Sotoudeh-Anvari, Maryam

    2017-08-01

    Traditionally, the degree of luminal obstruction has been used to assess the vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaques. However, recent studies have revealed that other factors such as plaque morphology, material properties of lesion components and blood pressure may contribute to the fracture of atherosclerotic plaques. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of fracture of atherosclerotic plaques based on the mechanical stress distribution and fatigue analysis by means of numerical simulation. Realistic models of type V plaques were reconstructed based on histological images. Finite element method was used to determine mechanical stress distribution within the plaque. Assuming that crack propagation initiated at the sites of stress concentration, crack propagation due to pulsatile blood pressure was modeled. Results showed that crack propagation considerably changed the stress field within the plaque and in some cases led to initiation of secondary cracks. The lipid pool stiffness affected the location of crack formation and the rate and direction of crack propagation. Moreover, increasing the mean or pulse pressure decreased the number of cycles to rupture. It is suggested that crack propagation analysis can lead to a better recognition of factors involved in plaque rupture and more accurate determination of vulnerable plaques.

  18. Association of Streptococcus with Plaque Type of Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Akram Hossain

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Guttate psoriasis has a well-known association with streptococcal throat infections, but the effects of these infections in patients with chronic plaque type of psoriasis remains to be evaluated. In Bangladesh several studies were done on psoriasis but no data about association between streptococcal throat infection and plaque type psoriasis are available so far. Considering the co-morbidities of psoriasis patients, it might be justifiable to find out the events that provoke the initiation or exacerbation of psoriatic disease process. Objective: To observe the association of streptococcus with plaque type of psoriasis. Materials and Methods: This observational study was conducted in the department of Dermatology and Venereology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka. Forty seven patients clinically and histopathologically diagnosed as having plaque psoriasis were selected as cases and patients with skin diseases other than psoriasis were selected as controls. Results: In this study majority of subjects (55% were diagnosed as chronic plaque psoriasis. Among the subjects with guttate flare of chronic plaque psoriasis 64.2% gave a positive history of sore throat. ASO titer was raised (>200 IU/mL in 28 (59.5% patients of chronic plaque psoriasis and 7 (17.9% patients of non-psoriatic respondents. The difference between two groups was significant (p0.05. Conclusion: This study shows that streptococcal throat infections are associated with plaque psoriasis and early treatment of throat infections may be beneficial for plaque type of psoriasis patients.

  19. The Lipid-Rich Plaque Study of vulnerable plaques and vulnerable patients: Study design and rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waksman, Ron; Torguson, Rebecca; Spad, Mia-Ashley; Garcia-Garcia, Hector; Ware, James; Wang, Rui; Madden, Sean; Shah, Priti; Muller, James

    2017-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that the outcome post-PCI could be improved by the detection and subsequent treatment of vulnerable patients and lipid-rich vulnerable coronary plaques (LRP). A near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) catheter capable of detecting LRP is being evaluated in The Lipid-Rich Plaque Study. The LRP Study is an international, multicenter, prospective cohort study conducted in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) who underwent cardiac catheterization with possible ad hoc PCI for an index event. Patient level and plaque level events were detected by follow-up in the subsequent 2 years. Enrollment began in February 2014 and was completed in March 2016; a total of 1,562 patients were enrolled. Adjudication of new coronary event occurrence and de novo culprit lesion location during the 2-year follow-up is performed by an independent clinical end-points committee (CEC) blinded to NIRS-IVUS findings. The first analysis of the results will be performed when at least 20 de novo events have occurred for which follow-up angiographic data and baseline NIRS-IVUS measurements are available. It is expected that results of the study will be announced in 2018. The LRP Study will test the hypotheses that NIRS-IVUS imaging to detect LRP in patients can identify vulnerable patients and vulnerable plaques. Identification of vulnerable patients will assist future studies of novel systemic therapies; identification of localized vulnerable plaques would enhance future studies of possible preventive measures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Modeling of Experimental Atherosclerotic Plaque Delamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Xiaochang; Chen, Xin; Deng, Xiaomin; Sutton, Michael A; Lessner, Susan M

    2015-12-01

    A cohesive zone model (CZM) approach is applied to simulate atherosclerotic plaque delamination experiments in mouse abdominal aorta specimens. A three-dimensional finite element model is developed for the experiments. The aortic wall is treated as a fiber-reinforced, highly deformable, incompressible material, and the Holzapfel-Gasser-Ogden (HGO) model is adopted for the aortic bulk material behavior. Cohesive elements are placed along the plaque-media interface along which delamination occurs. The 3D specimen geometry is created based on images from the experiments and certain simplifying approximations. A set of HGO and CZM parameter values is determined based on values suggested in the literature and through matching simulation predictions of the load vs. load-point displacement curve with experimental measurements for one loading-delamination-unloading cycle. Using this set of parameter values, simulation predictions for four other loading-delamination-unloading cycles are obtained, which show good agreement with experimental measurements. The findings of the current study demonstrate the applicability of the CZM approach in arterial tissue failure simulations.

  1. Lipids and carotid plaque in the Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacco Ralph L

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipids, particularly low-density (LDL and high-density (HDL lipoproteins, are associated with increased risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease, probably due to atherosclerosis. The objective of this cross-sectional analysis was to investigate the relation between blood lipids and carotid plaque. Methods As part of a prospective population-based study to determine the incidence and risk factors of stroke in a multiethnic population, we evaluated 1804 participants with lipid measurements and B-mode ultrasound of carotid arteries (mean age 69 +/- 10 years; 40% men; 51% Hispanic, 26% black, 23% white. The association between lipid parameters and carotid plaque was analyzed by multiple logistic regression. Results Plaque was present in 61% of participants. Mean total cholesterol was 202 +/- 41 mg/dl. After controlling for other lipid parameters, demographics, and risk factors, the only cholesterol subfraction associated with carotid plaque was LDL (OR per standard deviation (SD = 1.14, 95% CI 1.02-1.27. Neither HDL nor triglycerides independently predicted carotid plaque. Apolipoprotein B (ApoB was also associated with risk of plaque (OR per SD = 1.29, 95% CI 1.03-1.60. Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-1 was associated with a decrease in multiple plaques (OR per SD = 0.76, 95% CI 0.60-0.97, while lipoprotein a was associated with an increased risk of multiple plaques (OR per SD = 1.31, 95% CI 1.03-1.66. ApoB:ApoA-I had the strongest relation with carotid plaque (OR per SD = 1.35, 95% CI 1.08-1.69. Conclusions Among the common lipid parameters, LDL has the strongest relation with carotid plaque. Other lipid precursor proteins such as ApoB and ApoA-I may be stronger predictors of subclinical atherosclerosis, however, and better targets for treatment to reduce plaque formation and risk of cerebrovascular disease.

  2. Release of mineral ions in dental plaque following acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, M; Margolis, H C

    1999-03-01

    The release of appreciable amounts of calcium, phosphate and fluoride found in whole plaque into the plaque-fluid phase, following bacterial acid production, can potentially reduce the driving force for tooth demineralization. However, limited information is available on this topic, particularly on the release of fluoride. This study sought to determine the change in calcium, phosphate and fluoride concentrations in plaque fluid after sucrose exposure. 48 h overnight-fasted supragingival plaque samples were collected from all tooth surfaces (with the exception of the lower lingual anterior teeth) of one half of an individual mouth, following a 1 min water rinse. Plaque samples were then collected from the other half of the same mouth, following a 292 mM sucrose rinse. Plaque fluid was isolated by centrifugation and analysed for total calcium and phosphate (ion chromatography) and for free fluoride (ion-specific electrode). Samples were collected from seven individuals. Following sucrose exposure, plaque-fluid pH decreased significantly from 6.5+/- 0.3 to 5.4+/-0.2; calcium concentrations (mmol/l) also increased significantly (p phosphate concentrations in plaque fluid, however, did not increase significantly after sucrose exposure: mean concentrations (mmol/l) of fluoride after the water and sucrose rinses were 0.006+/-0.003 and 0.005+/-0.002, respectively, and mean phosphate concentrations (mmol/l) were 11.0+/-2.0 and 12.0+/-3.0, respectively. When results were expressed per wet plaque weight, phosphate concentrations were also found to increase significantly. The same trends were observed when additional plaque samples were treated in vitro with sucrose: fluoride-ion activity did not increase in plaque under in vivo-like conditions.

  3. Plaque removal efficacy of Colgate 360 toothbrush: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nageshwar Iyer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this clinical study was to confirm the plaque removal efficacy of the Colgate 360 Whole Mouth Clean Toothbrush. Study Design: This was a single-center, monadic, case-controlled study with the 7 days duration. Materials and Methods: A total of eighty participants (56 male and 24 female aged between 18 and 45 years with a minimum of 20 permanent teeth (excluding the third molars without any prosthetic crowns and an initial plaque score of minimum 1.5 as determined by Modified Quigley-Hein Plaque Index (1970 participated in the study. There were two dropouts during the study duration, one male and one female. The participants were instructed to brush for 1 min, after which plaque index was recorded again. They were then instructed to brush their teeth twice a day for 1 min with the assigned toothbrush (Colgate 360 Whole Mouth Clean Toothbrush and a commercially available fluoride toothpaste for the next 7 days. On the 7 th day, all the participants were recalled for follow-up and plaque examination. The plaque index scores (pre- and post-brushing were recorded, tabulated, and analyzed statistically. Results: The mean plaque indices reduced after brushing both on day 1 and day 7. There was also a reduction in mean plaque indices from day 1 to day 7. All these reductions were statistically significant (P < 0.001. The reduction in plaque scores was independent of the gender of the participants however female participants showed lower scores as compared to male participants (P < 0.001. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated a significant reduction in plaque scores with the use of Colgate 360 Whole Mouth Clean Soft Toothbrush throughout the study period. Continued use resulted in a further significant reduction in plaque scores irrespective of the gender of participants.

  4. Low gray scale values of computerized images of carotid plaques associated with increased levels of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and with increased plaque lipid content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønholdt, Marie-Louise M.; Nordestgaard, Børge; Weibe, Britt M.

    1997-01-01

    Relatioin between low gray scale values in computerized images of carotid plaques and 1) plasma levels of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and 2) plaque lipid content......Relatioin between low gray scale values in computerized images of carotid plaques and 1) plasma levels of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and 2) plaque lipid content...

  5. Clinical efficacy of subgingival debridement with adjunctive erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser treatment in patients with chronic periodontitis: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Sánchez, Ignacio; Ortiz-Vigón, Alberto; Matos, Rita; Herrera, David; Sanz, Mariano

    2015-04-01

    The efficacy of erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser application as an adjunct to subgingival debridement in the treatment of chronic periodontitis (CP) is controversial. This study assesses the efficacy of combining full-mouth subgingival debridement with Er:YAG laser application in the treatment of patients with CP. In this 12-month, single-masked, parallel-group clinical trial, 40 patients with moderate CP were selected and randomly assigned to a test group (one session of full-mouth ultrasonic subgingival debridement followed 1 week later by Er:YAG application in sites with initial probing depths [PDs] of ≥4.5 mm) and a control group (two sessions of ultrasonic debridement within 1 week). The main outcome variable was change in PD; the secondary outcomes were change in clinical attachment level and proportion of sites with bleeding on probing. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and after 3, 6, and 12 months. Data were analyzed as intention to treat using analysis of variance to assess intergroup differences. Both treatments resulted in significant clinical improvements. The test group achieved, in comparison with the control, a significantly lower percentage of sites with PD ≥4.5 mm (17.44% versus 22.83%, respectively; P = 0.004) and a tendency for a lower percentage of sites with PD ≥4.5 mm and bleeding on probing (9.78% versus 12.69%; P = 0.052). This limited added clinical effect may justify the use of a protocol combining full-mouth ultrasonic debridement with laser therapy in the treatment of initial moderate CP.

  6. Uptake of 11C-choline in mouse atherosclerotic plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Iina E K; Luoto, Pauliina; Någren, Kjell

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility of (11)C-choline in the assessment of the degree of inflammation in atherosclerotic plaques.......The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility of (11)C-choline in the assessment of the degree of inflammation in atherosclerotic plaques....

  7. Complement factor C5a induces atherosclerotic plaque disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wezel, Anouk; de Vries, Margreet R; Lagraauw, H Maxime; Foks, Amanda C; Kuiper, Johan; Quax, Paul HA; Bot, Ilze

    2014-01-01

    Complement factor C5a and its receptor C5aR are expressed in vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques; however, a causal relation between C5a and plaque rupture has not been established yet. Accelerated atherosclerosis was induced by placing vein grafts in male apoE−/− mice. After 24 days, when advanced plaques had developed, C5a or PBS was applied locally at the lesion site in a pluronic gel. Three days later mice were killed to examine the acute effect of C5a on late stage atherosclerosis. A significant increase in C5aR in the plaque was detectable in mice treated with C5a. Lesion size and plaque morphology did not differ between treatment groups, but interestingly, local treatment with C5a resulted in a striking increase in the amount of plaque disruptions with concomitant intraplaque haemorrhage. To identify the potential underlying mechanisms, smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells were treated in vitro with C5a. Both cell types revealed a marked increase in apoptosis after stimulation with C5a, which may contribute to lesion instability in vivo. Indeed, apoptosis within the plaque was seen to be significantly increased after C5a treatment. We here demonstrate a causal role for C5a in atherosclerotic plaque disruptions, probably by inducing apoptosis. Therefore, intervention in complement factor C5a signalling may be a promising target in the prevention of acute atherosclerotic complications. PMID:25124749

  8. Vulnerable plaque detection: The role of 18-fluorine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT) is a combined functional and structural multi modality imaging tool that can be utilized to detect vulnerable and atherosclerotic plaques. In this study we observe the prevalence of active and calcified plaques in selected arteries during whole-body 18F-FDG ...

  9. Chronic plaque psoriasis | Luba | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chronic plaque psoriasis, the most common form of psoriasis, is a papulosquamous disease defined by erythematous plaques with a silvery scale. The diagnosis usually is clinical, but occasionally a biopsy is necessary. Psoriasis affects 0.6 to 4.8 percent of the U.S. population, and about 30 percent of affected patients have ...

  10. Characterization of bacteriophage communities and CRISPR profiles from dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Mayuri; Robles-Sikisaka, Refugio; Abeles, Shira R; Boehm, Tobias K; Pride, David T

    2014-06-30

    Dental plaque is home to a diverse and complex community of bacteria, but has generally been believed to be inhabited by relatively few viruses. We sampled the saliva and dental plaque from 4 healthy human subjects to determine whether plaque was populated by viral communities, and whether there were differences in viral communities specific to subject or sample type. We found that the plaque was inhabited by a community of bacteriophage whose membership was mostly subject-specific. There was a significant proportion of viral homologues shared between plaque and salivary viromes within each subject, suggesting that some oral viruses were present in both sites. We also characterized Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) in oral streptococci, as their profiles provide clues to the viruses that oral bacteria may be able to counteract. While there were some CRISPR spacers specific to each sample type, many more were shared across sites and were highly subject specific. Many CRISPR spacers matched viruses present in plaque, suggesting that the evolution of CRISPR loci may have been specific to plaque-derived viruses. Our findings of subject specificity to both plaque-derived viruses and CRISPR profiles suggest that human viral ecology may be highly personalized.

  11. Red fluorescent dental plaque: An indicator of oral disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volgenant, C.M.C.

    2016-01-01

    Oral diseases are worldwide the most common diseases, with dental caries and periodontal inflammatory diseases as most frequently occurring diseases. Both are strongly associated with dental plaque, which is the mass of bacteria (biofilm) that grows on surfaces in the mouth. Some dental plaque

  12. Atherosclerotic carotid plaque assessment with multidetector computed tomography angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.T. de Weert (Thomas)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis evaluates the role of MDCT angiography in 1) the depiction of atherosclerotic disease and subsequent luminal stenosis in the arteries that supplies the brain with blood, and 2) the assessment of atherosclerotic plaque features that have been related to plaque vulnerability.

  13. Bacterial colonization of psoriasis plaques. Is it relevant?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Marcus

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial colonization was investigated retrospectively in patients with plaque psoriasis (n=98 inpatient treatments, n=73 patients. At least one pathogen was found in 46% of all cases. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent bacterium. Bacterial colonization of psoriasis plaques could be relevant in individual cases.

  14. Prevalencia de Cándida y asociación con periodontopatógenos presentes en placa subgingival de pacientes con periodontitis crónica

    OpenAIRE

    C.M. Ardila Medina; M.E. López Gaviria; I.C. Guzmán Zuluaga

    2014-01-01

    Introducción: Pocos estudios han descrito la presencia de levaduras en placa subgingival de pacientes con periodontitis crónica desconociéndose las implicaciones que puede tener su presencia sobre el tratamiento periodontal. Objetivo: El propósito de esta investigación fue evaluar la prevalencia de levaduras en las bolsas periodontales, su influencia sobre los parámetros clínicos y su asociación con otros periodontopatógenos presentes en periodontitis crónica. Materiales y métodos: Se examina...

  15. Differential Recovery of Candida Species from Subgingival Sites in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive and Healthy Children from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portela, M. B.; Souza, I. P. R.; Costa, E. M. M. B.; Hagler, A. N.; Soares, R. M. A.; Santos, A. L. S.

    2004-01-01

    The prevalence of subgingival Candida species was studied in 52 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and 42 HIV-negative children. Candida was cultured from 22 (42.3%) and 3 (7.1%) HIV-infected and control children, respectively. C. albicans was the most common Candida species isolated from HIV-infected children, followed by C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, and C. tropicalis. In the HIV-positive group, the prevalence of Candida isolation was significantly higher in children who presented with low CD4+-T-lymphocyte counts, elevated viral loads, and gingivitis. PMID:15583343

  16. Lysophosphatidic acid triggers mast cell-driven atherosclerotic plaque destabilization by increasing vascular inflammation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, M.; , van, Berkel T.J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive lysophospholipid, accumulates in the atherosclerotic plaque. It has the capacity to activate mast cells, which potentially exacerbates plaque progression. In this study, we thus aimed to investigate whether LPA contributes to plaque destabilization by

  17. Collagenase matrix metalloproteinase-8 expressed in atherosclerotic carotid plaques is associated with systemic cardiovascular outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, W.; Moll, F.L.; Vink, A.; Spek, P.J. van der; Kleijn, D.P.V. de; Vries, J.-P.P.M. de; Verheijen, J.H.; Newby, A.C.; Pasterkamp, G.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Atherosclerotic plaque rupture and subsequent thrombus formation are the major cause of acute cardiovascular events. Local plaque markers may facilitate detection of the vulnerable plaque and help identify the patient at risk for cardiovascular events. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are

  18. Compressive mechanical properties of atherosclerotic plaques - Indentation test to characterise the local anisotropic behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.-K. Chai (Chen-Ket); L. Speelman (Lambert); C.W.J. Oomens (Cees); F.P.T. Baaijens (Frank)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAccurate material models and associated parameters of atherosclerotic plaques are crucial for reliable biomechanical plaque prediction models. These biomechanical models have the potential to increase our understanding of plaque progression and failure, possibly improving risk assessment

  19. Carotid plaque, intima-media thickness, and incident aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsson, Andreas; Östling, Gerd; Persson, Margaretha

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Aortic stenosis (AS) shares risk factors with atherosclerotic vascular disease. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and plaque may reflect the cumulative damage from exposure to different atherosclerotic risk factors. We examined the relationship of carotid IMT and plaque with incident...... AS in a prospective population-based study. APPROACH AND RESULTS: A random sample of participants (age, 45-68 years) in the population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer Study underwent B-mode ultrasound with measurements of IMT and the presence of plaque in the common carotid artery (n=5079). Potential risk factors......-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, C-reactive protein, plaque, and IMT. In contrast, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, height, and leukocyte count were not significantly associated with AS (P>0.05). After adjustments, IMT, plaque, age, smoking, C...

  20. Imaging Modalities to Identity Inflammation in an Atherosclerotic Plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Sunny; Miller, Avraham; Agarwal, Chirag; Zakin, Elina; Acholonu, Michael; Gidwani, Umesh; Sharma, Abhishek; Kulbak, Guy; Shani, Jacob; Chen, On

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, multifocal arterial wall disease caused by local and systemic inflammation responsible for major cardiovascular complications such as myocardial infarction and stroke. With the recent understanding that vulnerable plaque erosion and rupture, with subsequent thrombosis, rather than luminal stenosis, is the underlying cause of acute ischemic events, there has been a shift of focus to understand the mechanisms that make an atherosclerotic plaque unstable or vulnerable to rupture. The presence of inflammation in the atherosclerotic plaque has been considered as one of the initial events which convert a stable plaque into an unstable and vulnerable plaque. This paper systemically reviews the noninvasive and invasive imaging modalities that are currently available to detect this inflammatory process, at least in the intermediate stages, and discusses the ongoing studies that will help us to better understand and identify it at the molecular level.

  1. Imaging Modalities to Identity Inflammation in an Atherosclerotic Plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunny Goel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, multifocal arterial wall disease caused by local and systemic inflammation responsible for major cardiovascular complications such as myocardial infarction and stroke. With the recent understanding that vulnerable plaque erosion and rupture, with subsequent thrombosis, rather than luminal stenosis, is the underlying cause of acute ischemic events, there has been a shift of focus to understand the mechanisms that make an atherosclerotic plaque unstable or vulnerable to rupture. The presence of inflammation in the atherosclerotic plaque has been considered as one of the initial events which convert a stable plaque into an unstable and vulnerable plaque. This paper systemically reviews the noninvasive and invasive imaging modalities that are currently available to detect this inflammatory process, at least in the intermediate stages, and discusses the ongoing studies that will help us to better understand and identify it at the molecular level.

  2. Automated coronary CT angiography plaque-lumen segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, Harvey E.; Krishnan, Karthik; Napel, Sandy; Rubin, Geoffrey D.; Turner, Wesley D.; Avila, Ricardo S.

    2009-02-01

    We are investigating the feasibility of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system to assist radiologists in diagnosing coronary artery disease in ECG gated cardiac multi-detector CT scans having calcified plaque. Coronary artery stenosis analysis is challenging if calcified plaque or the iodinated blood pool hides viable lumen. The research described herein provides an improved presentation to the radiologist by removing obscuring calcified plaque and blood pool. The algorithm derives a Gaussian estimate of the point spread function (PSF) of the scanner responsible for plaque blooming by fitting measured CTA image profiles. An initial estimate of the extent of calcified plaque is obtained from the image evidence using a simple threshold. The Gaussian PSF estimate is then convolved with the initial plaque estimate to obtain an estimate of the extent of the blooming artifact and this plaque blooming image is subtracted from the CT image to obtain an image largely free of obscuring plaque. In a separate step, the obscuring blood pool is suppressed using morphological operations and adaptive region growing. After processing by our algorithm, we are able to project the segmented plaque-free lumen to form synthetic angiograms free from obstruction. We can also analyze the coronary arteries with vessel tracking and centerline extraction to produce cross sectional images for measuring lumen stenosis. As an additional aid to radiologists, we also produce plots of calcified plaque and lumen cross-sectional area along selected blood vessels. The method was validated using digital phantoms and actual patient data, including in one case, a validation against the results of a catheter angiogram.

  3. 3D Isotropic MR Culprit Plaque Visualization of Carotid Plaque Edema and Hemorrhage with Motion Sensitized Blood Suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søvsø Szocska Hansen, Esben; Pedersen, Steen Fjord; Bloch, Lars Ø.

    2014-01-01

    hemorrhage and plaque edema may represent advanced stages of atherosclerosis[1, 2]. In this study, we present a novel multi-contrast 3D motion sensitized black-blood CMR imaging sequence, which detects both plaque edema and hemorrhage with positive contrast. Subjects and Methods The 3D imaging sequence...... formatting in all three dimensions was possible to provide a comprehensive and exhaustive evaluation of the vessel wall. For the symptomatic carotid artery plaque, hyperintensive signal intensity was detected with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that was significantly higher compared to the vessel wall...... proximal to the bifurcation (43.36±8.01 versus 16.91±3.49, respectively P plaque compared to the proximal carotid vessel wall was 26.45±4.60 and CNR plaque...

  4. Acidogenicity and acidurance of dental plaque and saliva sediment from adults in relation to caries activity and chlorhexidine exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreadis Georgios

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ecological plaque hypothesis for the etiopathogenesis of caries implies a microbial shift towards a more aciduric dental plaque microbiota, due to a frequent carbohydrate intake. Acid tolerance has been suggested as an important property of the caries-associated bacteria and several in vitro studies with mixed cultures indicated that a low pH rather than the carbohydrate availability is responsible for microbiota shifts associated with the development of dental caries. Objective: To examine 1 the acidogenic potential (amount lactate produced per mg plaque and minute, at pH 7.0 or pH 5.5 and the aciduric potential (acidogenic potential at pH 5.5/acidogenic potential at pH 7.0 of dental plaque and salivary sediment taken from caries-active or caries-free adults, and 2 the effect of a short-term chlorhexidine treatment on these potentials. Design: Dental plaque and saliva sediment samples were taken from caries-free and caries-active subjects and suspended in Ringer's solution containing 1% sucrose and buffered with 0.5 M 3-[N-morpholino]propanesulfonic acid (MOPS, pH 7.0, or 3-[N-morpholino]ethanesulfonic acid (MES, pH 5.5. After incubation at 37°C for 10–20 min, the concentration of lactic acid in the suspension was determined by an enzymatic assay. The acid production of dental plaque was also determined after a period of mouth rinsing with 0.2% chlorhexidine. Results: Both dental plaque and salivary sediment from caries-free subjects exhibited significantly lower acidogenic potentials at both pHs compared to caries-active volunteers. The opposite was observed with the aciduric potential. Chlorhexidine treatment significantly reduced all three potentials but had no effect on the relative proportion of bacteria grown on acidic agar. Conclusions: Caries-active adults have an oral microbiota characterised by an increased catabolic velocity for sugar. The increase is more pronounced at neutral than acidic pH. Exposure to

  5. Acidogenicity and acidurance of dental plaque and saliva sediment from adults in relation to caries activity and chlorhexidine exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgios, Andreadis; Vassiliki, Topitsoglou; Sotirios, Kalfas

    2015-01-01

    The ecological plaque hypothesis for the etiopathogenesis of caries implies a microbial shift towards a more aciduric dental plaque microbiota, due to a frequent carbohydrate intake. Acid tolerance has been suggested as an important property of the caries-associated bacteria and several in vitro studies with mixed cultures indicated that a low pH rather than the carbohydrate availability is responsible for microbiota shifts associated with the development of dental caries. To examine 1) the acidogenic potential (amount lactate produced per mg plaque and minute, at pH 7.0 or pH 5.5) and the aciduric potential (acidogenic potential at pH 5.5/acidogenic potential at pH 7.0) of dental plaque and salivary sediment taken from caries-active or caries-free adults, and 2) the effect of a short-term chlorhexidine treatment on these potentials. Dental plaque and saliva sediment samples were taken from caries-free and caries-active subjects and suspended in Ringer's solution containing 1% sucrose and buffered with 0.5 M 3-[N-morpholino]propanesulfonic acid (MOPS), pH 7.0, or 3-[N-morpholino]ethanesulfonic acid (MES), pH 5.5. After incubation at 37°C for 10-20 min, the concentration of lactic acid in the suspension was determined by an enzymatic assay. The acid production of dental plaque was also determined after a period of mouth rinsing with 0.2% chlorhexidine. Both dental plaque and salivary sediment from caries-free subjects exhibited significantly lower acidogenic potentials at both pHs compared to caries-active volunteers. The opposite was observed with the aciduric potential. Chlorhexidine treatment significantly reduced all three potentials but had no effect on the relative proportion of bacteria grown on acidic agar. Caries-active adults have an oral microbiota characterised by an increased catabolic velocity for sugar. The increase is more pronounced at neutral than acidic pH. Exposure to chlorhexidine, through mouthwash, temporarily decreases the acidogenicity of

  6. Influence of plaque biofilm removal on reestablishment of the biocompatibility of contaminated titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Frank; Papanicolau, Pascal; Rothamel, Daniel; Beck, Brigitte; Herten, Monika; Becker, Jürgen

    2006-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of plaque biofilm removal on the mitochondrial activity of human SaOs-2 osteoblasts grown on titanium surfaces. Volunteers wore acrylic splints with structured titanium discs for 72 h to build up plaque biofilms (n = 30). Specimens were randomly instrumented using either (1) an ultrasonic system at two power settings (EMS1, EMS2) + chlorhexidine (CHX), or (2) plastic curettes + CHX. Untreated (NC, n = 10) and sterile (C, n = 10) titanium discs served as controls. Specimens were incubated with SaOs-2 cells for 6 days. Treatment time (T), residual plaque biofilm (RPB)/clean implant surface areas (%), mitochondrial cell activity (MA) (counts/second), and cell morphology (SEM) were assessed. Statistical analysis revealed the following mean scores (+/-SD): RPB areas: P (58.5 +/- 4.9) > EMS1 (38.4 +/- 4.1) > EMS2 (28.3 +/- 2.0); T: PC (292 +/- 30) = EMS1 (244 +/- 24) > EMS2 (199 +/- 25); MA: C (1.544.661 +/- 203.442) > PC (597.559 +/- 566.984) = EMS2 (389.875 +/- 409.300) = EMS1 (356.653 +/- 293.863; n.s.) > NC (138.676 +/- 86.666). In NC and PC groups, cells were predominantly rounded in shape. However, in the EMS groups, some cells had started to spread, showing complete cytoplasmatic extensions of the cell body on the titanium surface. A monolayer of flattened cells was generally observed in the C group. Within the limits of the present study, it was concluded that MA seemed to be impaired by the presence of RPB areas. However, its removal alone might not be the crucial step in the reestablishment of the biocompatibility of titanium surfaces.

  7. The effect of delmopinol and fluoride on acid adaptation and acid production in dental plaque biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilands, Jessica; Troedsson, Ulrika; Sjödin, Torgny; Davies, Julia R

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the effect of delmopinol and fluoride alone or in combination on acid adaptation and acid production in plaque biofilm bacteria in vitro. The effect of delmopinol and fluoride on acid adaptation was tested by exposing the biofilm bacteria, grown in a mini-flow cell system under static conditions, to pH 5.5 overnight in the presence of 0.16 mM delmopinol, 1 mF NaF or a combination of both. The following day, acid adaptation was evaluated by exposing the cells to an acid challenge for 2h at a pH known to kill non-adapted cells (pH 2.5). The cells were stained using LIVE/DEAD BacLight Viability stain and the number of viable (acid tolerant) cells was determined using confocal scanning laser microscopy. Control cells were treated in the same manner but without the exposure to delmopinol or fluoride. How delmopinol and fluoride affected acid production was assessed by measuring the pH-drop after glucose pulsing in the presence of delmopinol and/or different concentrations of fluoride. Fluoride alone or in combination with delmopinol affected the acid adaptation and significantly reduced the acid tolerance of the plaque biofilm. This effect was more pronounced when the two compounds were combined. Delmopinol alone did not affect acid adaptation. A combination of delmopinol and fluoride also reduced acid production at concentrations where neither of the compounds in isolation had an effect. Fluoride and delmopinol can work synergistically to affect acid adaptation and acid production in plaque biofilm bacteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Grown on Novel Microcarriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Falk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE cells have been tested as a cell-based therapy for Parkinson’s disease but will require additional study before further clinical trials can be planned. We now show that the long-term survival and neurotrophic potential of hRPE cells can be enhanced by the use of FDA-approved plastic-based microcarriers compared to a gelatin-based microcarrier as used in failed clinical trials. The hRPE cells grown on these plastic-based microcarriers display several important characteristics of hRPE found in vivo: (1 characteristic morphological features, (2 accumulation of melanin pigment, and (3 high levels of production of the neurotrophic factors pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF and vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A. Growth of hRPE cells on plastic-based microcarriers led to sustained levels (>1 ng/ml of PEDF and VEGF-A in conditioned media for two months. We also show that the expression of VEGF-A and PEDF is reciprocally regulated by activation of the GPR143 pathway. GPR143 is activated by L-DOPA (1 μM which decreased VEGF-A secretion as opposed to the previously reported increase in PEDF secretion. The hRPE microcarriers are therefore novel candidate delivery systems for achieving long-term delivery of the neuroprotective factors PEDF and VEGF-A, which could have a value in neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson’s disease.

  9. Atherosclerotic Plaque Destabilization in Mice: A Comparative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Hartwig

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis-associated diseases are the main cause of mortality and morbidity in western societies. The progression of atherosclerosis is a dynamic process evolving from early to advanced lesions that may become rupture-prone vulnerable plaques. Acute coronary syndromes are the clinical manifestation of life-threatening thrombotic events associated with high-risk vulnerable plaques. Hyperlipidemic mouse models have been extensively used in studying the mechanisms controlling initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. However, the understanding of mechanisms leading to atherosclerotic plaque destabilization has been hampered by the lack of proper animal models mimicking this process. Although various mouse models generate atherosclerotic plaques with histological features of human advanced lesions, a consensus model to study atherosclerotic plaque destabilization is still lacking. Hence, we studied the degree and features of plaque vulnerability in different mouse models of atherosclerotic plaque destabilization and find that the model based on the placement of a shear stress modifier in combination with hypercholesterolemia represent with high incidence the most human like lesions compared to the other models.

  10. Vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque detection by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng-hui; Boydston-White, Susie; Weisberg, Arel; Wang, Wubao; Sordillo, Laura A.; Perotte, Adler; Tomaselli, Vincent P.; Sordillo, Peter P.; Pei, Zhe; Shi, Lingyan; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-12-01

    A clear correlation has been observed between the resonance Raman (RR) spectra of plaques in the aortic tunica intimal wall of a human corpse and three states of plaque evolution: fibrolipid plaques, calcified and ossified plaques, and vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques (VPs). These three states of atherosclerotic plaque lesions demonstrated unique RR molecular fingerprints from key molecules, rendering their spectra unique with respect to one another. The vibrational modes of lipids, cholesterol, carotenoids, tryptophan and heme proteins, the amide I, II, III bands, and methyl/methylene groups from the intrinsic atherosclerotic VPs in tissues were studied. The salient outcome of the investigation was demonstrating the correlation between RR measurements of VPs and the thickness measurements of fibrous caps on VPs using standard histopathology methods, an important metric in evaluating the stability of a VP. The RR results show that VPs undergo a structural change when their caps thin to 66 μm, very close to the 65-μm empirical medical definition of a thin cap fibroatheroma plaque, the most unstable type of VP.

  11. Urease and Dental Plaque Microbial Profiles in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morou-Bermudez, Evangelia; Rodriguez, Selena; Bello, Angel S; Dominguez-Bello, Maria G

    2015-01-01

    Urease enzymes produced by oral bacteria generate ammonia, which can have a significant impact on the oral ecology and, consequently, on oral health. To evaluate the relationship of urease with dental plaque microbial profiles in children as it relates to dental caries, and to identify the main contributors to this activity. 82 supragingival plaque samples were collected from 44 children at baseline and one year later, as part of a longitudinal study on urease and caries in children. DNA was extracted; the V3-V5 region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced using 454 pyrosequencing. Urease activity was measured using a spectrophotometric assay. Data were analyzed with Qiime. Plaque urease activity was significantly associated with the composition of the microbial communities of the dental plaque (Baseline P = 0.027, One Year P = 0.012). The bacterial taxa whose proportion in dental plaque exhibited significant variation by plaque urease levels in both visits were the family Pasteurellaceae (Baseline Pplaque. Further studies are needed to establish the role of urease-associated bacteria in the acid/base homeostasis of the dental plaque, and in the development and prediction of dental caries in children.

  12. Clinical plaque removing efficacy of a new power toothbrush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, C P; Nauth, C; Willershausen, B; Warren, P R

    1998-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of adding a pulsating bristle action to the established oscillating/rotating action of the Braun Oral-B Ultra Plaque Remover (D9) on plaque removal. Plaque removal was evaluated using the modified Quigley-Hein Plaque Index in a double blind randomized, crossover study involving 32 healthy volunteers without any dental training. After 2 weeks use of the D9 during which time subjects received training in its use, subjects abstained from oral hygiene for 48 hours. They were then assessed for plaque after which they brushed their teeth using an experimental toothbrush randomly set to either the D9 oscillating/rotating action or to the new 3D action with an additional pulsating movement of the brush head in the direction of the long axis of the bristles. After brushing, plaque was again evaluated. Following a further 2 weeks of normal home use of the D9, subjects returned and the procedure was repeated using the brush set in the second mode. Both toothbrush actions were found to be effective at removing plaque from all sites and surfaces in the mouth. The 3D action was consistently more effective than that of the D9, the difference being statistically significant for the whole mouth, the upper jaw, the lingual surfaces and for all interproximal sites, in particular in the upper jaw.

  13. Atherosclerotic plaque detection by confocal Brillouin and Raman microscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Basagaoglu, Berkay; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2015-02-01

    Atherosclerosis, the development of intraluminal plaque, is a fundamental pathology of cardiovascular system and remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Biomechanical in nature, plaque rupture occurs when the mechanical properties of the plaque, related to the morphology and viscoelastic properties, are compromised, resulting in intraluminal thrombosis and reduction of coronary blood flow. In this report, we describe the first simultaneous application of confocal Brillouin and Raman microscopies to ex-vivo aortic wall samples. Such a non-invasive, high specific approach allows revealing a direct relationship between the biochemical and mechanical properties of atherosclerotic tissue.

  14. Clear Plaque Mutants of Lactococcal Phage TP901-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kot, Witold; Kilstrup, Mogens; Vogensen, Finn K.

    2016-01-01

    We report a method for obtaining turbid plaques of the lactococcal bacteriophage TP901-1 and its derivative TP901-BC1034. We have further used the method to isolate clear plaque mutants of this phage. Analysis of 8 such mutants that were unable to lysogenize the host included whole genome...... protein involved in the DNA binding. The conclusion is that cI is the only gene involved in clear plaque formation i.e. the CI protein is the determining factor for the lysogenic pathway and its maintenance in the lactococcal phage TP901-1....

  15. Thiocyanate supplementation decreases atherosclerotic plaque in mice expressing human myeloperoxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan, P E; Laura, R P; Maki, R A

    2015-01-01

    the curve (AUC). Mean serum SCN(-) concentrations were elevated in the supplemented mice (200-320 μM) relative to controls (plaque areas at sacrifice were 26% lower in the SCN(-)-supplemented mice compared with controls (P = 0.0417), but plaque morphology...... was not appreciably altered. Serum MPO levels steadily increased in mice on the high-fat diet, however, comparison of SCN(-)-supplemented versus control mice showed no significant changes in MPO protein, cholesterol, or triglyceride levels; thiol levels were decreased in supplemented mice at one time-point. Plaque...

  16. Atherosclerotic plaque delamination: Experiments and 2D finite element model to simulate plaque peeling in two strains of transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merei, Bilal; Badel, Pierre; Davis, Lindsey; Sutton, Michael A; Avril, Stéphane; Lessner, Susan M

    2017-03-01

    Finite element analyses using cohesive zone models (CZM) can be used to predict the fracture of atherosclerotic plaques but this requires setting appropriate values of the model parameters. In this study, material parameters of a CZM were identified for the first time on two groups of mice (ApoE(-/-) and ApoE(-/-) Col8(-/-)) using the measured force-displacement curves acquired during delamination tests. To this end, a 2D finite-element model of each plaque was solved using an explicit integration scheme. Each constituent of the plaque was modeled with a neo-Hookean strain energy density function and a CZM was used for the interface. The model parameters were calibrated by minimizing the quadratic deviation between the experimental force displacement curves and the model predictions. The elastic parameter of the plaque and the CZM interfacial parameter were successfully identified for a cohort of 11 mice. The results revealed that only the elastic parameter was significantly different between the two groups, ApoE(-/-) Col8(-/-) plaques being less stiff than ApoE(-/-) plaques. Finally, this study demonstrated that a simple 2D finite element model with cohesive elements can reproduce fairly well the plaque peeling global response. Future work will focus on understanding the main biological determinants of regional and inter-individual variations of the material parameters used in the model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Insulin decreases atherosclerotic plaque burden and increases plaque stability via nitric oxide synthase in apolipoprotein E-null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yusaku; Chiang, Simon; Bendeck, Michelle P; Giacca, Adria

    2016-08-01

    It has been argued whether insulin accelerates or prevents atherosclerosis. Although results from in vitro studies have been conflicting, recent in vivo mice studies demonstrated antiatherogenic effects of insulin. Insulin is a known activator of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS), leading to increased production of NO, which has potent antiatherogenic effects. We aimed to examine the role of NOS in the protective effects of insulin against atherosclerosis. Male apolipoprotein E-null mice (8 wk old) fed a high-cholesterol diet (1.25% cholesterol) were assigned to the following 12-wk treatments: control, insulin (0.05 U/day via subcutaneous pellet), N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME, via drinking water at 100 mg/l), and insulin plus l-NAME. Insulin reduced atherosclerotic plaque burden in the descending aorta by 42% compared with control (plaque area/aorta lumen area: control, 16.5 ± 1.9%; insulin, 9.6 ± 1.3%, P < 0.05). Although insulin did not decrease plaque burden in the aortic sinus, macrophage accumulation in the plaque was decreased by insulin. Furthermore, insulin increased smooth muscle actin and collagen content and decreased plaque necrosis, consistent with increased plaque stability. In addition, insulin treatment increased plasma NO levels, decreased inducible NOS staining, and tended to increase phosphorylated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein staining in the plaques of the aortic sinus. All these effects of insulin were abolished by coadministration of l-NAME, whereas l-NAME alone showed no effect. Insulin also tended to increase phosphorylated endothelial NOS and total neuronal NOS staining, effects not modified by l-NAME. In conclusion, we demonstrate that insulin treatment decreases atherosclerotic plaque burden and increases plaque stability through NOS-dependent mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Assessment of dental plaque by optoelectronic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrutiu, Meda-Lavinia; Sinescu, Cosmin; Bortun, Cristina Maria; Levai, Mihaela-Codrina; Topala, Florin Ionel; Crǎciunescu, Emanuela Lidia; Cojocariu, Andreea Codruta; Duma, Virgil Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2016-03-01

    The formation of dental biofilm follows specific mechanisms of initial colonization on the surface, microcolony formation, development of organized three dimensional community structures, and detachment from the surface. The structure of the plaque biofilm might restrict the penetration of antimicrobial agents, while bacteria on a surface grow slowly and display a novel phenotype; the consequence of the latter is a reduced sensitivity to inhibitors. The aim of this study was to evaluate with different optoelectronic methods the morphological characteristics of the dental biofilm. The study was performed on samples from 25 patients aged between 18 and 35 years. The methods used in this study were Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) working at 870 nm for in vivo evaluations and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for validations. For each patient a sample of dental biofilm was obtained directly from the vestibular surface of the teeth's. SD-OCT produced C- and B-scans that were used to generate three dimensional (3D) reconstructions of the sample. The results were compared with SEM evaluations. The biofilm network was dramatically destroyed after the professional dental cleaning. OCT noninvasive methods can act as a valuable tool for the 3D characterization of dental biofilms.

  19. The antimicrobial effect of 0.1 ppm ozonated water on 24-hour plaque microorganisms in situ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Sadatullah

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ozone is a known oxidant present in the atmosphere and is commercially produced by simple ozonizer machines. It is a powerful antimicrobial agent in its gaseous and aqueous forms. Ozone readily dissolves in water and retains its antimicrobial property even in the dissolved state. In this study, the effect of 0.1 ppm ozonated water was analyzed on 24-hour supragingival plaque (SP samples in situ. SP was collected from the two most posterior teeth in the contra-lateral quadrants before and after a 30-second rinse with either distilled water (control group or 0.1 ppm ozonated water (test group. The plaque was used to count the number of total bacteria, total anaerobic bacteria, Streptococcus mutans, and Candida albicans on selective agar media. The statistical analysis of the number of colony forming units (CFUs obtained demonstrated a significant antimicrobial effect of ozonated water on the total bacteria (p = 0.01 and anaerobes (p = 0.02. A reduction in the post-rinse CFU count for Streptococcus mutans was also observed, but the effect was not statistically significant (p = 0.07. The Candida species was only grown from one sample. Ozonated water at the 0.1 ppm concentration was effective in reducing the load of 24-hour plaque bacteria, but it did not eliminate them completely.

  20. Vulnerable plaque detection: The role of 18-fluorine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shazreen Shaharuddin

    2013-07-22

    Jul 22, 2013 ... fluorodeoxyglucose in identifying high risk patients. Shazreen ... total occlusion.2 Histologically, cross sectional atheromatous pla- que reveals .... Family history .... Plaque characterization is tabulated in Table 3. Majority of.

  1. In silico analyses of metagenomes from human atherosclerotic plaque samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, Suparna; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I; Alhede, Morten

    2015-01-01

    a challenge. RESULTS: To investigate microbiome diversity within human atherosclerotic tissue samples, we employed high-throughput metagenomic analysis on: (1) atherosclerotic plaques obtained from a group of patients who underwent endarterectomy due to recent transient cerebral ischemia or stroke. (2......) Presumed stabile atherosclerotic plaques obtained from autopsy from a control group of patients who all died from causes not related to cardiovascular disease. Our data provides evidence that suggest a wide range of microbial agents in atherosclerotic plaques, and an intriguing new observation that shows...... these microbiota displayed differences between symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques as judged from the taxonomic profiles in these two groups of patients. Additionally, functional annotations reveal significant differences in basic metabolic and disease pathway signatures between these groups. CONCLUSIONS: We...

  2. SPECT Imaging Agents for Detecting Cerebral β-Amyloid Plaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Ono

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of radiotracers for use in vivo to image β-amyloid (Aβ plaques in cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD is an important, active area of research. The presence of Aβ aggregates in the brain is generally accepted as a hallmark of AD. Since the only definitive diagnosis of AD is by postmortem staining of affected brain tissue, the development of techniques which enable one to image Aβ plaques in vivo has been strongly desired. Furthermore, the quantitative evaluation of Aβ plaques in the brain could facilitate evaluation of the efficacy of antiamyloid therapies currently under development. This paper reviews the current situation in the development of agents for SPECT-based imaging of Aβ plaques in Alzheimer's brains.

  3. Correlation between aortic/carotid atherosclerotic plaques and cerebral infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baojun; Sun, Shaoli; Liu, Guorong; Li, Yuechun; Pang, Jiangxia; Zhang, Jingfen; Yang, Lijuan; Li, Ruiming; Zhang, Hui; Jiang, Changchun; Li, Xiue

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between aortic/carotid atherosclerotic plaques and cerebral infarction. We examined 116 cases of cerebral infarction using transcranial Doppler ultrasound in order to exclude cerebrovascular stenosis. Transesophageal echocardiography and color Doppler ultrasound were used to detect aortic atherosclerotic plaques (AAPs) and carotid atherosclerotic plaques (CAPs). AAPs were detected in a total of 70 of the 116 cases (60.3%), including 56 with moderate/severe atherosclerotic changes (48.3%). The difference in the incidence of various types of infarction between APP severity levels was significant (PCAPs (55.2%), including 46 with unstable plaque (39.7%). The difference in the incidence of various types of infarction between CAP stability levels was significant (PCAP are significant causes of embolic infarction without stenosis in the internal carotid arteries.

  4. Pleural plaques and cigarette smoking in asbestos workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, W; Levin, R; Goodman, L

    1981-06-01

    In a survey of 45 men aged 40 or over who had worked five years or more in an asbestos manufacturing plant, the prevalence of pleural plaques was studied with respect to age, duration of asbestos exposure, estimated cumulative asbestos dose, and smoking habit. Plaques were found in 38 to 53% of the men, depending on the interpretation of the chest film reader. Cigarette habit appeared to be the most important factor; the prevalence was lowest in non-smokers, intermediate in current smokers, and particularly high in exsmokers. There was some confounding of this relationship by estimated cumulative asbestos dose but such confounding did not seem to be sufficient to explain fully the relationship between the prevalence of plaques and smoking habit. Both factors must be considered in studies of the risk of pleural plaques in asbestos workers.

  5. Argonne National Laboratory research offers clues to Alzheimer's plaques

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Researchers from Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago have developed methods to directly observe the structure and growth of microscopic filaments that form the characteristic plaques found in the brains of those with Alzheimer's Disease (1 page).

  6. Evidence for xylitol 5-P production in human dental plaque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waaler, S.M. (Department of Preclinical Techniques and Material Sciences and Department of Pedodontics, Dental Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway))

    1992-01-01

    The Turku sugar studies indicated that xylitol may possess a caries-therapeutic effect. More recent data show that xylotol exhibits a bacteriostatic activity on a wide range of bacteria based on uptake and expulsion of xylitol. Intracellular xylitol 5-P appears to be a key substance associated with inhibition of bacterial metabolism by xylitol. This has been shown in studies with pure strains of bacteria, mainly Streptococcus mutans. The aim of the present study was to examine if production of xylitol 5-P occurs in freshly collected dental plaque which is exposed to labeled xylitol. Plaque extracts were analyzed by thin-layer chromatography combined with autoradiography and high performance liquid chromatography. Strong indications were obtained that xylitol 5-P is readily produced by dental plaque. No other significant xylitol metabolites were identified. The bacteriostatic properties of xylitol in plaque are a mechanism which may well account for the caries-therapeutic effect of xylitol. (au).

  7. Comparative professional plaque removal study using 8 branded toothbrushes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claydon, N; Addy, M; Scratcher, C; Ley, F; Newcombe, R

    2002-04-01

    Considerable interest has been shown in the plaque removal properties of modern toothbrush designs. The primary aim of the study was to compare the plaque removal properties of 8 relatively recent designs of manual toothbrush using a professional tooth brusher and within a commonly used time frame. A secondary aim was established to utilise the data to observationally appraise plaque accumulation together with the patterns of removal as a consequence of using the timed professional tooth brusher. The method was an 8-period, single-examiner, randomized, blind cross-over study involving 24 healthy volunteers, balanced for residual effects. Subjects accumulated plaque over a 4 day no oral hygiene period. On day 4, the accumulated plaque was scored by plaque index at the mesial, mid and distal sites of each of the buccal and lingual surfaces of the assessed teeth. Subjects were then removed from the assessment area where they received a professional brushing timed to last 48 s. Brushing was completed according to pre-study training without toothpaste and was followed by a re-scoring of the remaining plaque. A washout period of 3 days was then allowed prior to the next period during which normal oral hygiene was resumed. Similar quantities of plaque accumulated in each arch, although the difference between the buccal and lingual surfaces was of the order of 30%. The professional toothbrusher removed approximately 40% of the accumulated plaque in the 48 s allocated. The buccal surfaces were most effectively cleaned (approximately 45%) compared with the lingual (approximately 25%), with the plaque removal in the mesial and mid sections approaching 40% and 60% respectively. The difference in performance between the test brushes corresponded to 5% of the residual plaque values with none being significantly more efficient overall. Pair wise site comparisons did produce differences of the order of 10% (p=0.004) at the mesio-buccal, and 8% (p=0.030) at the mid-buccal sites

  8. Serial changes of coronary atherosclerotic plaque: Assessment with 64-slice multi-detector computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Young; Kang, Doo Kyoung; Sun, Joo Sung; Choi, So Yeon [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Evaluate the progression of coronary atherosclerotic plaque during follow-up, and its association with cardiovascular risk factors. Fifty-six atherosclerotic patients with plaque were enrolled in this retrospective study. Patient's plaque was detected on repeat 64-slice multidetector CT scans with a mean interval of 25 ± 10 months changes in calcified and non-calcified plaque volumes and cardiovascular risk factors were assessed over time. Absolute and relative changes in plaque volume were compared, and the association between rapid progression and cardiovascular risk factors was determined. Diameter of the stenosis, length, calcified and non-calcified lesion plaque volumes increased significantly on follow-up CT. Absolute and relative annual changes in plaque volumes were significantly greater in non-calcified plaque (median, 22.7 mm{sup 3}, 90.4%) than in calcified plaque (median, 0.7 mm{sup 3}, 0%). Obesity, smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and low high-density lipoprotein were significant predictors of progression of non-calcified plaque. Progression of calcified plaque was not associated with any cardiovascular risk factors. Coronary plaque volume increased significantly on follow-up CT. The rate of progression is related to non-calcified plaque than to calcified plaque. Cardiovascular risk factors are independently associated with the rapid progression of non-calcified plaque volume, but not associated with the progression of calcified plaque.

  9. High shear stress relates to intraplaque haemorrhage in asymptomatic carotid plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuenter, A.; Selwaness, M.; Arias Lorza, A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Carotid artery plaques with vulnerable plaque components are related to a higher risk of cerebrovascular accidents. It is unknown which factors drive vulnerable plaque development. Shear stress, the frictional force of blood at the vessel wall, is known to influence plaque...

  10. Lipid-Rich Plaque Masquerading as a Coronary Thrombus

    OpenAIRE

    Rezkalla, Shereif H.; Holmes, David R.

    2006-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented with exertional chest pressure. Right coronary angiography showed a clear filling defect. Intravascular ultrasound revealed a plaque with 80% stenosis and a large lipid pool. Therefore, a stent was placed, and the patient became angina-free. Lipid-rich plaques are a cause of angiographic filling defects. Intravascular ultrasound is an integral part of coronary artery evaluation.

  11. Imaging Modalities to Identity Inflammation in an Atherosclerotic Plaque

    OpenAIRE

    Goel, Sunny; Miller, Avraham; Agarwal, Chirag; Zakin, Elina; Acholonu, Michael; Gidwani, Umesh; Sharma, Abhishek; Kulbak, Guy; Shani, Jacob; Chen, On

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, multifocal arterial wall disease caused by local and systemic inflammation responsible for major cardiovascular complications such as myocardial infarction and stroke. With the recent understanding that vulnerable plaque erosion and rupture, with subsequent thrombosis, rather than luminal stenosis, is the underlying cause of acute ischemic events, there has been a shift of focus to understand the mechanisms that make an atherosclerotic plaque unstabl...

  12. Carotid plaque burden as a measure of subclinical atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Henrik; Muntendam, Pieter; Adourian, Aram

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare carotid plaque burden, carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), ankle-brachial index (ABI), and abdominal aortic diameter (AAD) to coronary artery calcium score (CACS) in people without known cardiovascular disease.......The purpose of this study was to compare carotid plaque burden, carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), ankle-brachial index (ABI), and abdominal aortic diameter (AAD) to coronary artery calcium score (CACS) in people without known cardiovascular disease....

  13. Complement factor C5a induces atherosclerotic plaque disruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wezel, Anouk; de Vries, Margreet R; Lagraauw, H Maxime; Foks, Amanda C; Kuiper, Johan; Quax, Paul H A; Bot, Ilze

    2014-10-01

    Complement factor C5a and its receptor C5aR are expressed in vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques; however, a causal relation between C5a and plaque rupture has not been established yet. Accelerated atherosclerosis was induced by placing vein grafts in male apoE(-/-) mice. After 24 days, when advanced plaques had developed, C5a or PBS was applied locally at the lesion site in a pluronic gel. Three days later mice were killed to examine the acute effect of C5a on late stage atherosclerosis. A significant increase in C5aR in the plaque was detectable in mice treated with C5a. Lesion size and plaque morphology did not differ between treatment groups, but interestingly, local treatment with C5a resulted in a striking increase in the amount of plaque disruptions with concomitant intraplaque haemorrhage. To identify the potential underlying mechanisms, smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells were treated in vitro with C5a. Both cell types revealed a marked increase in apoptosis after stimulation with C5a, which may contribute to lesion instability in vivo. Indeed, apoptosis within the plaque was seen to be significantly increased after C5a treatment. We here demonstrate a causal role for C5a in atherosclerotic plaque disruptions, probably by inducing apoptosis. Therefore, intervention in complement factor C5a signalling may be a promising target in the prevention of acute atherosclerotic complications. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  14. The effect of chewing gum on dental plaque accumulation

    OpenAIRE

    Karami Nogourani M.; Banihashemi M

    2010-01-01

    "nBackground and Aims: Studies show that sucrose containing chewing gums are cariogenic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two commercial chewing gums with and without sucrose on dental plaque accumulation compared with the control group. "nMaterials and Methods: In this clinical study, plaque accumulation during three 7-day periods (with two weeks interval) was recorded (Sillness & Loe Index) in a group of 23 volunteer male dental students who chewed in th...

  15. Supragingival Plaque Microbial Community Analysis of Children with Halitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wen; Zhang, Qun; Liu, Xuenan; Zheng, Shuguo; Ma, Lili; Chen, Feng; Xu, Tao; Xu, Baohua

    2016-12-28

    As one of the most complex human-associated microbial habitats, the oral cavity harbors hundreds of bacteria. Halitosis is a prevalent oral condition that is typically caused by bacteria. The aim of this study was to analyze the microbial communities and predict functional profiles in supragingival plaque from healthy individuals and those with halitosis. Ten preschool children were enrolled in this study; five with halitosis and five without. Supragingival plaque was isolated from each participant and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing was used to identify the microbes present. Samples were primarily composed of Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria, and Candidate phylum TM7. The α and β diversity indices did not differ between healthy and halitosis subjects. Fifteen operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified with significantly different relative abundances between healthy and halitosis plaques, and included the phylotypes of Prevotella sp., Leptotrichia sp., Actinomyces sp., Porphyromonas sp., Selenomonas sp., Selenomonas noxia, and Capnocytophaga ochracea. We suggest that these OTUs are candidate halitosis-associated pathogens. Functional profiles were predicted using PICRUSt, and nine level-3 KEGG Orthology groups were significantly different. Hub modules of co-occurrence networks implied that microbes in halitosis dental plaque were more highly conserved than microbes of healthy individuals' plaque. Collectively, our data provide a background for the oral microbiota associated with halitosis from supragingival plaque, and help explain the etiology of halitosis.

  16. Imaging the event-prone coronary artery plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Benz, Dominik C; Gräni, Christoph; Buechel, Ronny R

    2017-07-06

    Acute coronary events, the dreaded manifestation of coronary atherosclerosis, remain one of the main contributors to mortality and disability in the developed world. The majority of those events are associated with atherosclerotic plaques-related thrombus formation following an acute disruption, that being rupture or erosion, of an event-prone lesion. These historically termed vulnerable plaques have been the target of numerous benchtop and clinical research endeavors, yet to date without solid results that would allow for early identification and potential treatment. Technological leaps in cardiovascular imaging have provided novel insights into the formation and role of the event-prone plaques. From intracoronary optical coherence tomography that has enhanced our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of plaque disruption, over coronary computed tomography angiography that enables non-invasive serial plaque imaging, and positron emission tomography poised to be rapidly implemented into clinical practice to the budding field of plaque imaging with cardiac magnetic resonance, we summarize the invasive and non-invasive imaging modalities currently available in our armamentarium. Finally, the current status and potential future imaging directions are critically appraised.

  17. Chlorhexidine mouthwash plaque levels and gingival health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Derek

    2017-06-23

    Data sourcesCochrane Oral Health's Trials Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) Medline; clinicaltrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. There were no language or date restrictions on searches.Study selectionRandomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of chlorhexidine mouthrinse used as an adjunct to mechanical oral hygiene procedures for at least four weeks on gingivitis in children and adults.Data extraction and synthesisTwo reviewers independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Mean and standardised mean differences were used for continuous outcomes and risk ratios for dichotomous outcomes. Meta-analysis was carried out where studies of similar comparisons reported the same outcomes at the same time interval.ResultsFifty-one RCTs involving a total of 5,345 patients were included. Only one study was at low risk of bias, the other 50 were at high risk. For patients with mild gingivitis (gingival index [GI] 0 to 3 scale) four to six weeks' use of chlorhexidine mouthrinse reduced gingivitis by 0.21 (95% CI; 0.11 to 0.31) with a similar effect at six months. There were insufficient data to assess the effect on patients with moderate or severe gingival inflammation. For plaque there was a larger effect in favour of chlorhexidine mouthrinse at four to six weeks, SMD (standardised mean difference) = -1.45 (95% CI; -1.90 to -1.00), with a similarly large reduction at six months. A large increase in extrinsic tooth staining was seen with chlorhexidine use at four to six weeks, SMD = 1.07 (95%CI; 0.80 to 1.34) and seven to twelve weeks and six months. A range of other adverse effects were reported including taste disturbance/alteration, oral mucosa symptoms including soreness, irritation, mild desquamation and mucosal ulceration/erosions, and a general burning sensation or a burning tongue or both.ConclusionsThere is high quality evidence from studies that reported

  18. The effect of pH, temperature and plaque thickness on the hydrolysis of monofluorophosphate in experimental dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, E I F; Dibdin, G H

    2003-01-01

    Monofluorophosphate (MFP), an anti-caries agent commonly used in toothpaste, is known to be degraded to fluoride and orthophosphate by bacterial phosphatases in dental plaque. We have examined the effect of pH, temperature, plaque thickness and some ions on this process. Both natural plaque and artificial microcosm plaque incubated with purified MFP at pH 4-10 showed an optimum pH of approximately 8 for hydrolysis. Diffusion and concomitant hydrolysis were examined in an apparatus in which artificial plaque was held between rigid membranes separating two chambers. When MFP diffused through a plaque of 0.51-mm thickness over 4 h it was almost completely hydrolysed at pH 8, but hydrolysis on diffusion decreased as the pH deviated from 8. MFP in toothpaste extract showed a similar pH susceptibility to hydrolysis, according to the inherent pH of the toothpaste. Hydrolysis of MFP in the toothpaste was reduced by no more than 10% when compared with a matched-pH control, suggesting that other toothpaste ingredients had no major influence on hydrolysis. Transport was slower and hydrolysis at pH 6 more complete the thicker the plaque, but hydrolysis was not significantly slower at 23 degrees C than at 37 degrees C. The addition of various potential activating or inhibiting ions at 0.1 and 1.0 mmol/l had small and non-significant effects on hydrolysis. The results suggest that MFP toothpaste should be formulated and used to maximise enzymic hydrolysis of this complex anion, and that plaque pH control is probably the most important factor. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. Macrophage-targeted photodynamic detection of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; Tawakol, Ahmed; Castano, Ana P.; Gad, Faten; Zahra, Touqir; Ahmadi, Atosa; Stern, Jeremy; Ortel, Bernhard; Chirico, Stephanie; Shirazi, Azadeh; Syed, Sakeena; Muller, James E.

    2003-06-01

    Rupture of a vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque (VP) leading to coronary thrombosis is the chief cause of sudden cardiac death. VPs are angiographically insignificant lesions, which are excessively inflamed and characterized by dense macrophage infiltration, large necrotic lipid cores, thin fibrous caps, and paucity of smooth muscle cells. We have recently shown that chlorin(e6) conjugated with maleylated albumin can target macrophages with high selectivity via the scavenger receptor. We report the potential of this macrophage-targeted fluorescent probe to localize in VPs in a rabbit model of atherosclerosis, and allow detection and/or diagnosis by fluorescence spectroscopy or imaging. Atherosclerotic lesions were induced in New Zealand White rabbit aortas by balloon injury followed by administration of a high-fat diet. 24-hours after IV injection of the conjugate into atherosclerotic or normal rabbits, the animals were sacrificed, and aortas were removed, dissected and examined for fluorescence localization in plaques by fiber-based spectrofluorimetry and confocal microscopy. Dye uptake within the aortas was also quantified by fluorescence extraction of samples from aorta segments. Biodistribution of the dye was studied in many organs of the rabbits. Surface spectrofluorimetry after conjugate injection was able to distinguish between plaque and adjacent aorta, between atherosclerotic and normal aorta, and balloon-injured and normal iliac arteries with high significance. Discrete areas of high fluorescence (up to 20 times control were detected in the balloon-injured segments, presumably corresponding to macrophage-rich plaques. Confocal microscopy showed red ce6 fluorescence localized in plaques that showed abundant foam cells and macrophages by histology. Extraction data on aortic tissue corroborated the selectivity of the conjugate for plaques. These data support the strategy of employing macrophage-targeted fluorescent dyes to detect VP by intravascular

  20. Eosinophil Cationic Protein, Carotid Plaque, and Incidence of Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundström, Johannes; Söderholm, Martin; Borné, Yan; Nilsson, Jan; Persson, Margaretha; Östling, Gerd; Melander, Olle; Orho-Melander, Marju; Engström, Gunnar

    2017-10-01

    ECP (eosinophil cationic protein) is a marker of eosinophil activity and degranulation, which has been linked to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. We examined the relationship between ECP, carotid plaque, and incidence of stroke in a prospective population-based cohort. The subjects participated in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study between 1991 and 1994. A total of 4706 subjects with no history of stroke were included (40% men; mean age, 57.5 years). Carotid plaque was determined by B-mode ultrasound of the right carotid artery. Incidence of stroke was followed up during a mean period of 16.5 years in relation to plasma ECP levels. Subjects in the third tertile (versus first tertile) of ECP tended to have higher prevalence of carotid plaque (odds ratio: 1.18; 95% confidence interval: 1.003-1.39; P =0.044 after multivariate adjustments). A total of 258 subjects were diagnosed with ischemic stroke (IS) during follow-up. ECP was associated with increased incidence of IS after risk factor adjustment (hazard ratio, 1.57; 95% confidence interval: 1.13-2.18; for third versus first tertile; P =0.007). High ECP was associated with increased risk of IS in subjects with carotid plaque. The risk factor-adjusted hazard ratio for IS was 1.86 (95% confidence interval: 1.32-2.63) in subjects with carotid plaque and ECP in the top tertile, compared with those without plaque and ECP in the first or second tertiles. High ECP is associated with increased incidence of IS. The association between ECP and IS was also present in the subgroup with carotid plaque. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Acid production in dental plaque after exposure to probiotic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keller Mette K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing interest in probiotic lactobacilli in health maintenance has raised the question of potential risks. One possible side effect could be an increased acidogenicity in dental plaque. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of probiotic lactobacilli on plaque lactic acid (LA production in vitro and in vivo. Methods In the first part (A, suspensions of two lactobacilli strains (L. reuteri DSM 17938, L. plantarum 299v were added to suspensions of supragingival dental plaque collected from healthy young adults (n=25. LA production after fermentation with either xylitol or fructose was analyzed. In the second part (B, subjects (n=18 were given lozenges with probiotic lactobacilli (L. reuteri DSM 17938 and ATCC PTA 5289 or placebo for two weeks in a double-blinded, randomized cross-over trial. The concentration of LA in supragingival plaque samples was determined at baseline and after 2 weeks. Salivary counts of mutans streptococci (MS and lactobacilli were estimated with chair-side methods. Results Plaque suspensions with L. reuteri DSM 17938 produced significantly less LA compared with L. plantarum 299v or controls (p Conclusion Lactic acid production in suspensions of plaque and probiotic lactobacilli was strain-dependant and the present study provides no evidence of an increase in plaque acidity by the supply of selected probiotic lactobacilli when challenged by fructose or xylitol. The study protocol was approved by The Danish National Committee on Biomedical Research Ethics (protocol no H-2-2010-112. Trial registration NCT01700712

  2. Effect of essential oil mouthwashes on plaque and gingivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Derek

    2017-06-23

    Data sourcesMedline, Embase, LILACS and Scopus database.Study selectionStudies were screened independently by three reviewers. Randomised controlled trials with a minimum of six months follow-up of daily use of essential oils-containing (EO) mouthwashes compared with placebo, flossing or cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) as adjuncts to mechanical plaque control were considered.Data extraction and synthesisData were abstracted by two reviewers and study quality assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Dental plaque was summarised using the Turesky modification of the Quigley-Hein Index (QHI), gingivitis using three indices; the Gingival Index (GI) by Loe and Silness, the Modified Gingival Index (MGI) and bleeding upon probing. Mean and standard deviations were reported and meta-analysis conducted. Sources of effect modification were investigated using meta-regression.ResultsSixteen trials were included involving 4016 patients in total. Study quality was considered to be moderate to low. Compared with placebo meta-analysis of 14 studies showed statistically significant differences in favour of EO mouthwashes for plaque and gingival indices. Meta-analysis of four studies also demonstrated statistically lower levels of plaque and gingivitis for EO mouthwashes compared with cetylpyridium chloride (CPC). Meta-regression indicated that heterogeneity observed in plaque scores was mainly explained by the percentage of males in a trial and supervision of the mouthwash use.ConclusionsIn patients with gingivitis, EO-containing mouthwashes are more efficacious for the reduction of plaque and gingival inflammation than mechanical plaque control either alone (placebo) or in combination with mouthwashes with CPC. The expected benefits may be clinically relevant and may be also observed in the interproximal area.

  3. Review: Mechanical Characterization of Carotid Arteries and Atherosclerotic Plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Korte, Chris L; Fekkes, Stein; Nederveen, Aart J; Manniesing, Rashindra; Hansen, Hendrik Rik H G

    2016-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of death and is in the majority of cases due to the formation of atherosclerotic plaques in arteries. Initially, thickening of the inner layer of the arterial wall occurs. Continuation of this process leads to plaque formation. The risk of a plaque to rupture and thus to induce an ischemic event is directly related to its composition. Consequently, characterization of the plaque composition and its proneness to rupture are of crucial importance for risk assessment and treatment strategies. The carotid is an excellent artery to be imaged with ultrasound because of its superficial position. In this review, ultrasound-based methods for characterizing the mechanical properties of the carotid wall and atherosclerotic plaque are discussed. Using conventional echography, the intima media thickness (IMT) can be quantified. There is a wealth of studies describing the relation between IMT and the risk for myocardial infarction and stroke. Also the carotid distensibility can be quantified with ultrasound, providing a surrogate marker for the cross-sectional mechanical properties. Although all these parameters are associated with CVD, they do not easily translate to individual patient risk. Another technique is pulse wave velocity (PWV) assessment, which measures the propagation of the pressure pulse over the arterial bed. PWV has proven to be a marker for global arterial stiffness. Recently, an ultrasound-based method to estimate the local PWV has been introduced, but the clinical effectiveness still needs to be established. Other techniques focus on characterization of plaques. With ultrasound elastography, the strain in the plaque due to the pulsatile pressure can be quantified. This technique was initially developed using intravascular catheters to image coronaries, but recently noninvasive methods were successfully developed. A high correlation between the measured strain and the risk for rupture was established. Acoustic

  4. Antiinflammatory actions of inorganic nitrate stabilize the atherosclerotic plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khambata, Rayomand S.; Ghosh, Suborno M.; Rathod, Krishnaraj S.; Thevathasan, Tharssana; Filomena, Federica; Xiao, Qingzhong; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2017-01-01

    Reduced bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) plays a key role in the enhanced leukocyte recruitment reflective of systemic inflammation thought to precede and underlie atherosclerotic plaque formation and instability. Recent evidence demonstrates that inorganic nitrate (NO3−) through sequential chemical reduction in vivo provides a source of NO that exerts beneficial effects upon the cardiovascular system, including reductions in inflammatory responses. We tested whether the antiinflammatory effects of inorganic nitrate might prove useful in ameliorating atherosclerotic disease in Apolipoprotein (Apo)E knockout (KO) mice. We show that dietary nitrate treatment, although having no effect upon total plaque area, caused a reduction in macrophage accumulation and an elevation in smooth muscle accumulation within atherosclerotic plaques of ApoE KO mice, suggesting plaque stabilization. We also show that in nitrate-fed mice there is reduced systemic leukocyte rolling and adherence, circulating neutrophil numbers, neutrophil CD11b expression, and myeloperoxidase activity compared with wild-type littermates. Moreover, we show in both the ApoE KO mice and using an acute model of inflammation that this effect upon neutrophils results in consequent reductions in inflammatory monocyte expression that is associated with elevations of the antiinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10. In summary, we demonstrate that inorganic nitrate suppresses acute and chronic inflammation by targeting neutrophil recruitment and that this effect, at least in part, results in consequent reductions in the inflammatory status of atheromatous plaque, and suggest that this effect may have clinical utility in the prophylaxis of inflammatory atherosclerotic disease. PMID:28057862

  5. Statins, atherosclerosis regression and HDL: Insights from within the plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feig, Jonathan E; Feig, Jessica L; Kini, Annapoorna S

    2015-06-15

    The idea that atheroma can regress is no longer a dream. We and others have discovered that decreasing the lipid content can directly lead to macrophage egress and plaque healing. The question, however, has remained as to how to translate these findings to the bedside. Taking advantage of imaging modalities such as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), we demonstrated in the YELLOW (Reduction in Yellow Plaque by Intensive Lipid Lowering Therapy) trial that short term treatment of high dose rosuvastatin treatment can lead to a decrease in lipid content in plaques. It is important to note that optical coherence tomography (OCT), a high resolution imaging modality, was not performed during the first study and therefore, only a very limited assessment of the effect of statin therapy on measures of plaque stabilization could be made. The YELLOW II trial is the first to our knowledge to determine whether these data can be extrapolated and how it relates to HDL function, alterations in macrophage gene expression, and plaque morphology. While tremendous progress has been made, our research serves as a reminder that angiography is simply luminography and it is features such as thin cap fibroatheroma and lipid burden, for example, that likely modulate the syndromes seen in clinical practice. Ongoing studies such as ours may provide novel pathways for diagnosis and therapy, with the ultimate goal of reducing the burden of cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Early dental plaque formation on toothbrushed titanium implant surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarante, Evandro Scligliano; Chambrone, Leandro; Lotufo, Roberto Fraga Moreira; Lima, Luiz A

    2008-10-01

    To evaluate the qualitative and quantitative differences on dental plaque formation on two different roughness titanium implant surfaces, i.e. machined and titanium plasma sprayed, as well as the amount of plaque removal by regular toothbrushing after 72-hour plaque accumulation. Eight systemically healthy subjects were recruited from the patient pool of a private dental practice. All patients underwent oral hygiene instruction and full mouth prophylaxis. Subsequently, maxillary casts from all patients were obtained and removable 0.7 mm-thick acetate stents without occlusal contact points were fabricated to support four titanium specimens of 4 x 2 x 2 mm divided into two groups (machined and plasma sprayed). Subjects were instructed to wear the stents for 72 hours, full time, removing them only during regular oral hygiene. Subsequently, the appliances were immediately repositioned and then the test side was brushed for 20 seconds. At the end of the 72-hour period, the stents were removed and prepared for microbiological analysis. Both machined and plasma sprayed brushed surfaces presented statistically significant fewer bacteria than non-brushed surfaces. Similarly, regarding surface roughness, machined surfaces presented a total number of bacteria significantly smaller than those presented by plasma sprayed surfaces (P dental plaque than polished surfaces. Both brushed surfaces presented less plaque accumulation, however, implant brushing was more effective on machined surfaces.

  7. Uniaxial tensile testing approaches for characterisation of atherosclerotic plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, M T; Cunnane, E M; Mulvihill, J J; Akyildiz, A C; Gijsen, F J H; Holzapfel, G A

    2014-03-03

    The pathological changes associated with the development of atherosclerotic plaques within arterial vessels result in significant alterations to the mechanical properties of the diseased arterial wall. There are several methods available to characterise the mechanical behaviour of atherosclerotic plaque tissue, and it is the aim of this paper to review the use of uniaxial mechanical testing. In the case of atherosclerotic plaques, there are nine studies that employ uniaxial testing to characterise mechanical behaviour. A primary concern regarding this limited cohort of published studies is the wide range of testing techniques that are employed. These differing techniques have resulted in a large variance in the reported data making comparison of the mechanical behaviour of plaques from different vasculatures, and even the same vasculature, difficult and sometimes impossible. In order to address this issue, this paper proposes a more standardised protocol for uniaxial testing of diseased arterial tissue that allows for better comparisons and firmer conclusions to be drawn between studies. To develop such a protocol, this paper reviews the acquisition and storage of the tissue, the testing approaches, the post-processing techniques and the stress-strain measures employed by each of the nine studies. Future trends are also outlined to establish the role that uniaxial testing can play in the future of arterial plaque mechanical characterisation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Arsenic rich iron plaque on macrophyte roots - an ecotoxicological risk?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taggart, M.A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Bld, St Machar Drive, Aberdeen, AB24 3UU (United Kingdom); Instituto de Investigacion en Recursos Cinegeticos, IREC (CSIC-UCLM-JCCM), Ronda de Toledo s/n, 13005 Ciudad Real (Spain)], E-mail: mark.taggart@uclm.es; Mateo, R. [Instituto de Investigacion en Recursos Cinegeticos, IREC (CSIC-UCLM-JCCM), Ronda de Toledo s/n, 13005 Ciudad Real (Spain); Charnock, J.M.; Bahrami, F. [Synchrotron Radiation Department, CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Green, A.J. [Department of Wetland Ecology, Estacion Biologica de Donana, CSIC, Pabellon del Peru, Avenida Maria Luisa s/n, 41013 Seville (Spain); Meharg, A.A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Bld, St Machar Drive, Aberdeen, AB24 3UU (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-15

    Arsenic is known to accumulate with iron plaque on macrophyte roots. Three to four years after the Aznalcollar mine spill (Spain), residual arsenic contamination left in seasonal wetland habitats has been identified in this form by scanning electron microscopy. Total digestion has determined arsenic concentrations in thoroughly washed 'root + plaque' material in excess of 1000 mg kg{sup -1}, and further analysis using X-ray absorption spectroscopy suggests arsenic exists as both arsenate and arsenite. Certain herbivorous species feed on rhizomes and bulbs of macrophytes in a wide range of global environments, and the ecotoxicological impact of consuming arsenic rich iron plaque associated with such food items remains to be quantified. Here, greylag geese which feed on Scirpus maritimus rhizome and bulb material in areas affected by the Aznalcollar spill are shown to have elevated levels of arsenic in their feces, which may originate from arsenic rich iron plaque. - Accumulation of metals with iron plaque on macrophyte roots in wetlands poses an ecotoxicological risk to certain herbivores.

  9. Infliximab in the treatment of plaque type psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosita Saraceno

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Rosita Saraceno, Andrea Saggini, Lucia Pietroleonardo, Sergio ChimentiDepartment of Dermatology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Viale Oxford 81, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Psoriasis is a chronic and immunomediated skin disease characterized by erythematous scaly plaques. Psoriasis affects approximately 1% to 3% of the Caucasian population. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α is a proinflammatory cytokine that plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Infliximab is an anti-TNF-α drug widely used for the treatment of plaque type psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Controlled clinical trials demonstrated that infliximab is characterized by a high degree of clinical response in moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. Moreover infliximab showed rapid efficacy in nail psoriasis which represents a therapeutic challenge for dermatologists and a relevant source of distress for patients with plaque psoriasis. This anti-TNF-α has an encouraging safety profile, especially as long as physicians are watchful in prevention and early diagnosis of infections and infuse reactions. The efficacy, tolerability and safety profiles suggest infliximab as a suitable anti-psoriatic drug in the long-term treatment of a chronic disease such as plaque-type psoriasis.Keywords: psoriasis, nail psoriasis, infliximab, long-term treatment

  10. Neuronal activity and amyloid plaque pathology: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsepian, Saak V; O'Leary, Valerie B

    2016-01-01

    A breakthrough in Alzheimer's disease (AD) research came with the discovery of the link between activity-dependent release of amyloid-β (Aβ) from neurons and formation of amyloid plaques. Along with elucidating the cellular basis of behavioral-dependent fluctuations in Aβ levels in the brain, insights have been gained toward understanding the mechanisms that warrant selective vulnerability of various forebrain circuits to amyloid pathology. The notion of elevated activity as a source of excessive Aβ production and plaque formation is, however, in conflict with ample electrophysiological data, which demonstrate exceedingly intense activity (both intrinsic and synaptic) of neurons in several brain regions that are spared or marginally affected by amyloid plaques of AD. Thus, the link between the functional load of brain circuits and their vulnerability to amyloidosis, while evident, is also complex and remains poorly understood. Here, we discuss emerging data suggestive of a major role for super-intense synchronous activity of cortical and limbic networks in excessive Aβ production and plaque formation. It is proposed that dense recurrent wiring of associative areas prone to epileptic seizures might be of critical relevance to their higher susceptibility to plaque pathology and related functional impairments.

  11. Clinicomicrobiological Evaluation of 2% Chitosan Mouthwashes on Dental Plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhaske, Sheetal P; Ambiti, Rajesh; Jagga, Umang; Paul, Uttam; Shanmukappa, Shruthi M; Iska, Divya

    2018-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate microbiological and clinical effects of a chitosan chlorhexidine (CH) mouthrinse on plaque control. Subjects were divided into three groups. Group I included 15 subjects who used 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), group II included 15 subjects who used 2% chitosan (CH) solution, and group III involves 15 subjects who used 0.2% chlorhexidine/2% CH combination. Plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), and probing depth (PD) were recorded at the baseline, on day 0, and after 4 days. Supragingival plaque samples were subjected for microbiological evaluation. Statistical analysis was done using statistical software IBM Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS), version 21. Plaque index was lowest in group I at day 0, while it was highest in group III. At day 4, PI was highest in group II, while lowest in group III. Gingival index was lowest in group I and highest in group II at day 0, and lowest in group I and highest in group III at day 4. There was no statistical difference in Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) count between groups at any time interval. Both chitosan and CH were found to be effective in controlling plaque. However, a combination of both provides even better results. The present study showed that chitosan can be used as an antiplaque agent.

  12. The effect of chewing gum on dental plaque accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karami Nogourani M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: Studies show that sucrose containing chewing gums are cariogenic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two commercial chewing gums with and without sucrose on dental plaque accumulation compared with the control group. "nMaterials and Methods: In this clinical study, plaque accumulation during three 7-day periods (with two weeks interval was recorded (Sillness & Loe Index in a group of 23 volunteer male dental students who chewed in the first two periods sugar-free or sugar-containing chewing gums (Olips and Orbit, respectively and in the last period did not chew any gum. Participants were asked to chew daily five gum sticks after meals for about twenty minutes. The data were statistically analyzed using Repeated Measure ANOVA and paired-T test. "nResults: The results showed that chewing any gum even sucrose-containing gum decreased the level of dental plaque accumulation (P<0.001. However, the decreasing effect of sugar-free gums was significantly higher (P<0.001. "nConclusion: Although sugar free gum was more effective than sugar containing gum on reducing dental plaque accumulation, chewing even sugar containing gums could decrease the level of dental plaque.

  13. Low copper and high manganese levels in prion protein plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Gilbert, P.U.P.A.; Abrecth, Mike; Baldwin, Katherine L.; Russell, Robin E.; Pedersen, Joel A.; McKenzie, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of aggregates rich in an abnormally folded form of the prion protein characterize the neurodegeneration caused by transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). The molecular triggers of plaque formation and neurodegeneration remain unknown, but analyses of TSE-infected brain homogenates and preparations enriched for abnormal prion protein suggest that reduced levels of copper and increased levels of manganese are associated with disease. The objectives of this study were to: (1) assess copper and manganese levels in healthy and TSE-infected Syrian hamster brain homogenates; (2) determine if the distribution of these metals can be mapped in TSE-infected brain tissue using X-ray photoelectron emission microscopy (X-PEEM) with synchrotron radiation; and (3) use X-PEEM to assess the relative amounts of copper and manganese in prion plaques in situ. In agreement with studies of other TSEs and species, we found reduced brain levels of copper and increased levels of manganese associated with disease in our hamster model. We also found that the in situ levels of these metals in brainstem were sufficient to image by X-PEEM. Using immunolabeled prion plaques in directly adjacent tissue sections to identify regions to image by X-PEEM, we found a statistically significant relationship of copper-manganese dysregulation in prion plaques: copper was depleted whereas manganese was enriched. These data provide evidence for prion plaques altering local transition metal distribution in the TSE-infected central nervous system.

  14. Effect of baking soda in dentifrices on plaque removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Srinivas R

    2017-11-01

    The prevention of dental caries and periodontal diseases targets control of dental plaque biofilm. In this context, chemical agents could represent a valuable complement to mechanical plaque control by reducing and controlling biofilm formation. The literature on the effectiveness of different dentifrices has not, however, been carefully categorized. A lack of consensus exists among dental professionals on a recommendation for a universal dentifrice for plaque control. The authors reviewed the scientific data on the different properties of sodium bicarbonate (baking soda)-containing dentifrices and their effectiveness in plaque removal. The results of the literature search show that baking soda-containing dentifrices are ideal candidates to be considered as a universal dentifrice because baking soda is inexpensive, abundant in supply, highly biocompatible, exhibits specific antibacterial properties to oral microorganisms, has low abrasivity, and is effective in plaque biofilm removal. Although some patients may benefit from desensitizing or high fluoride-containing dentifrices, those with routine needs may find using dentifrices containing baking soda and fluoride effective. Baking soda and fluoride dentifrices, therefore, may perhaps be considered as a criterion standard for patients with routine oral hygiene needs. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prevalence of "non-oral" pathogenic bacteria in subgingival biofilm of subjects with chronic periodontitis Prevalência de bactérias patogênicas "não-orais" no biofilme dental subgengival de pacientes com periodontite crônica

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Renata Souto; Arnaldo Feitosa B. de Andrade; Milton Uzeda; Ana Paula Vieira Colombo

    2006-01-01

    .... Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and levels of pathogenic bacteria in the subgingival biofilm of chronic periodontitis lesions and healthy periodontal sites using...

  16. Gene expression and 18FDG uptake in atherosclerotic carotid plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sune Folke; Græbe, Martin; Hag, Anne Mette Fisker

    2010-01-01

    by carotid endarterectomy. The gene expression of markers of vulnerability - CD68, IL-18, matrix metalloproteinase 9, cathepsin K, GLUT-1, and hexokinase type II (HK2) - were measured in plaques by quantitative PCR. RESULTS: In a multivariate linear regression model, GLUT-1, CD68, cathepsin K, and HK2 gene......) and an additional ipsilateral internal carotid artery stenosis of greater than 60% were recruited. FDG uptake in the carotids was determined by PET/computed tomography and expressed as mean and maximal standardized uptake values (SUVmean and SUVmax). The atherosclerotic plaques were subsequently recovered...... destabilization. Accordingly, FDG-PET could prove to be an important predictor of cerebrovascular events in patients with carotid plaques....

  17. Apremilast for the management of moderate to severe plaque psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangipuram, Ramya; Alikhan, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by erythematous plaques on extensor surfaces, scalp, and back. Current therapies for psoriasis are limited by route of administration, side effects, and cost. Apremilast is the first oral phosphodiesterase inhibitor approved for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. It is a small molecule inhibitor of phosphodiesterase-4, and decreases the inflammatory activity associated with psoriasis. Areas covered: This review will discuss the pharmacology of apremilast, mechanism of action, results from key clinical trials, and its use in managing psoriasis. Currently approved treatments are also discussed. Expert commentary: The advantages of apremilast include convenient oral administration and dosing, a favorable safety and tolerability profile, and significant efficacy in moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis.

  18. Radiation regression patterns after cobalt plaque insertion for retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buys, R.J.; Abramson, D.H.; Ellsworth, R.M.; Haik, B.

    1983-08-01

    An analysis of 31 eyes of 30 patients who had been treated with cobalt plaques for retinoblastoma disclosed that a type I radiation regression pattern developed in 15 patients; type II, in one patient, and type III, in five patients. Nine patients had a regression pattern characterized by complete destruction of the tumor, the surrounding choroid, and all of the vessels in the area into which the plaque was inserted. This resulting white scar, corresponding to the sclerae only, was classified as a type IV radiation regression pattern. There was no evidence of tumor recurrence in patients with type IV regression patterns, with an average follow-up of 6.5 years, after receiving cobalt plaque therapy. Twenty-nine of these 30 patients had been unsuccessfully treated with at least one other modality (ie, light coagulation, cryotherapy, external beam radiation, or chemotherapy).

  19. Tools for improving the diagnosis of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Søren Kragh

    1997-01-01

    , named ``XTRA'', has been designed, implemented, tested, and subsequently used for \\emph{in vitro} investigation of the MACI technique. The MACI method has been investigated on various tissue mimicking phantoms, on porcine tissue samples and on human carotid plaque specimens. Generally, the results show....... An increase of 30% in the axial width and 10% in the lateral width of the PSF was found, thus, the point resolution capability is only reduced marginally. Visualization of tissue interfaces was investigated using rubber tube phantoms, porcine aorta, and human plaque specimens. The MACI images show improved...... of eight regions were detectable when using MACI, compared to only three out of eight when using conventional B-mode imaging. Finally, two human carotid plaque specimens were scanned in 3D (by mechanical movement of the transducer in one direction). The MACI images were subjectively found to give a more...

  20. Reproducibility of Two 3-D Ultrasound Carotid Plaque Quantification Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graebe, Martin; Entrekin, Robert; Collet-Billon, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Compared with single 2-D images, emerging 3-D ultrasound technologies hold the promise of reducing variability and increasing sensitivity in the quantification of carotid plaques for individual cardiovascular risk stratification. Inter- and intra-observer agreement between a manual, cross......-sectional, 2-D freehand sweep and a mechanical 3-D ultrasound investigation of 62 carotid artery plaques is reported with intra-class correlation coefficients (with 95% confidence intervals). Inter-observer agreement was 0.60 (0.29-0.77) for the freehand method and 0.89 (0.83-0.93) for the mechanical 3-D...... acquisition. The use of semi-automated computerized planimetric measurements of plaque burden has high intra-observer repeatability, but is vulnerable to systematic inter-observer differences. For the 2-D freehand sweep, a considerable contribution to variation is introduced by the scanning procedure itself...

  1. Regression of posterior uveal melanomas following cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruess, A.F.; Augsburger, J.J.; Shields, J.A.; Brady, L.W.; Markoe, A.M.; Day, J.L.

    1984-12-01

    A method has been devised for evaluating the rate and extent of regression of the first 100 consecutive patients with a posterior uveal melanoma that had been managed by Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy at Wills Eye Hospital. It was found that the average posterior uveal melanoma in the series did not regress rapidly to a flat, depigmented scar but shrank slowly and persisted as a residual mass approximately 50% of the thickness of the original tumor at 54 months following Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy. The authors also found that the rate and extent of regression of the tumors in patients who subsequently developed metastatic melanoma were not appreciably different from the rate and extent of regression of the tumors in patients who remained well systemically. These observations indicate that the rate and extent of regression of posterior uveal melanomas following Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy are poor indicators of the prognosis of the affected patients for subsequent development of clinical metastatic disease.

  2. The prognostic role of carotid plaque ultrasonography in cardiac damage after carotid endarterectomy: carotid plaque and cardiac risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galyfos, George; Toutouzas, Konstantinos P; Benetos, George; Konstadoulakis, Manousos; Theodorou, Dimitrios; Katsaragakis, Stilianos; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Zografos, Georgios; Filis, Konstantinos

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluates the correlation of ultrasound determined carotid plaque morphology with coronary risk and cardiac damage after carotid endarterectomy. Fifty patients (in a series of 162) scheduled for carotid endarterectomy had the indication for coronary CT-angiography preoperatively and were included in this study. Patients were classified according to ultrasonographic characteristics of carotid plaque. The Duke Criteria were used to assess the degree of coronary risk (low, medium and high risk). Cardiac damage after carotid endarterectomy was evaluated based on symptoms, cardiac Troponin I measurement and electrocardiographic findings. There were no deaths, strokes or symptomatic myocardial infarctions postoperatively (30-day results). Ten patients (20%) showed asymptomatic cardiac damage postoperatively. Cardiac damage after surgery did not show any difference between the three cardiac risk groups. Echogenic and specifically Type IV carotid artery plaques (Gray-Weale Criteria) were associated with high cardiac risk preoperatively and with postoperative cardiac damage. The degree of carotid artery stenosis, and echolucent carotid plaques were not associated with postoperative cardiac damage. Asymptomatic postoperative cardiac damage occurs often after carotid endarterectomy and presents independently from coronary risk. Carotid plaques of higher echogenicity are associated with severity of coronary artery disease and cardiac damage after carotid endarterectomy.

  3. Short-term consumption of probiotic lactobacilli has no effect on acid production of supragingival plaque

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marttinen, Aino; Haukioja, Anna; Karjalainen, Sára

    2011-01-01

    analysis of plaque revealed the presence of LGG in four and L. reuteri in six subjects after the use of the probiotic. The use of the lactobacilli did not affect the acidogenicity or MS levels of plaque. Short-term consumption of LGG and L. reuteri appeared not to influence the acidogenicity of plaque....... of probiotics to the plaque was assessed using PCR techniques. No probiotic-induced changes were found in the acidogenicity of plaque. Also, MS counts remained at the original level. The number of subjects with lactobacilli in plaque increased in the L. reuteri group (p¿=¿0.011) but not in the LGG group. PCR...

  4. Plaque and gingivitis in the deciduous and permanent dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramberg, P W; Lindhe, J; Gaffar, A

    1994-08-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to monitor de novo plaque formation and associated alterations of the gingival conditions in the deciduous, mixed and permanent dentition in man. 31 volunteers, divided into 3 study groups participated in the trial. Group 1 was made up of 11 subjects, 4-6 years of age (deciduous dentition), group 2 comprised of 10 subjects, 8-9 years of age (mixed dentition) and group 3 included 10 subjects, 14-16 years of age (permanent dentition). After a screening examination, each participant received detailed instruction in a proper oral hygiene technique and was subjected to professional tooth cleaning. The professional debridement and the oral hygiene instruction were repeated after 1 week. After another week, a given day was termed Day 0 and a baseline examination was performed. This examination included assessments of plaque and gingivitis. Each subject received an additional, comprehensive professional tooth cleaning and was asked to abstain from all mechanical oral hygiene measures. Re-examinations were performed after 3 and 7 days. The findings demonstrated that: (i) during a 7-day period of no active oral hygiene, subjects with a mixed or a permanent dentition formed visible amounts of plaque and developed modest signs of gingivitis; (ii) during the 7 days of the trial, young subjects with a fully erupted deciduous dentition formed less plaque than the older subjects, and failed to respond to de novo plaque formation with enhanced signs of gingivitis; (iii) in subjects with a mixed dentition, the amount of plaque formed during the 7 days of experiment and the matching gingivitis development were similar in the deciduous and permanent tooth segments of the dentition.

  5. Genetic susceptibility for Alzheimer disease neuritic plaque pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Joshua M; Chen, Kewei; Keenan, Brendan T; Chibnik, Lori B; Fleisher, Adam; Thiyyagura, Pradeep; Roontiva, Auttawut; McCabe, Cristin; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A; Corneveaux, Jason J; Yu, Lei; Huentelman, Matthew J; Evans, Denis A; Schneider, Julie A; Reiman, Eric M; De Jager, Philip L; Bennett, David A

    2013-09-01

    While numerous genetic susceptibility loci have been identified for clinical Alzheimer disease (AD), it is important to establish whether these variants are risk factors for the underlying disease pathology, including neuritic plaques. To investigate whether AD susceptibility loci from genome-wide association studies affect neuritic plaque pathology and to additionally identify novel risk loci for this trait. Candidate analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and genome-wide association study in a joint clinicopathologic cohort, including 725 deceased subjects from the Religious Orders Study and the Rush Memory and Aging Project (2 prospective, community-based studies), followed by targeted validation in an independent neuroimaging cohort, including 114 subjects from multiple clinical and research centers. A quantitative measure of neuritic plaque pathologic burden, based on assessments of silver-stained tissue averaged from multiple brain regions. Validation based on β-amyloid load by immunocytochemistry, and replication with fibrillar β-amyloid positron emission tomographic imaging with Pittsburgh Compound B or florbetapir. Besides the previously reported APOE and CR1 loci, we found that the ABCA7 (rs3764650; P = .02) and CD2AP (rs9349407; P = .03) AD susceptibility loci are associated with neuritic plaque burden. In addition, among the top results of our genome-wide association study, we discovered a novel variant near the amyloid precursor protein gene (APP, rs2829887) that is associated with neuritic plaques (P = 3.3 × 10-6). This polymorphism was associated with postmortem β-amyloid load as well as fibrillar β-amyloid in 2 independent cohorts of adults with normal cognition. These findings enhance understanding of AD risk factors by relating validated susceptibility alleles to increased neuritic plaque pathology and implicate common genetic variation at the APP locus in the earliest, presymptomatic stages of AD.

  6. Multispectral optoacoustic tomography resolves smart probe activation in vulnerable plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razansky, Daniel; Harlaar, Niels J.; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Taruttis, Adrian; Herzog, Eva; Zeebregts, Clark; van Dam, Goitzen; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2011-03-01

    In this work, we show, for the first time to our knowledge, that multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT) can deliver high resolution images of activatable molecular probe's distribution, sensitive to matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), deep within optically scattering human carotid specimen. It is further demonstrated that this method can be used in order to provide accurate maps of vulnerable plaque formations in atherosclerotic disease. Moreover, optoacoustic images can simultaneously show the underlining plaque morphology for accurate localization of MMP activity in three dimensions. This performance directly relates to small animal screening applications and to clinical potential as well.

  7. Atherosclerotic disease in axial spondyloarthritis: increased frequency of carotid plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Gotor, Javier; Corrales, Alfonso; Blanco, Ricardo; Fuentevilla, Patricia; Portilla, Virginia; Expósito, Rosa; Mata, Cristina; Pina, Trinitario; González-Juanatey, Carlos; Llorca, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    To establish whether subclinical atherosclerosis is increased in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (ax-SpA). A set of 149 consecutive patients with no history of cardiovascular disease that fulfilled the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society classification criteria for ax-SpA was studied by carotid ultrasonography. Carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and plaques were assessed. A series of 181 community-based controls with no cardiovascular disease were studied for comparison. To establish whether ax-SpA might have a direct effect on the risk of carotid plaques or an indirect effect via its putative influence on hypertension, dyslipidaemia or obesity, we obtained adjusted odds ratios (OR) for each clinical factor by the development of adjusted models. cIMT was increased in patients (0.621±0.123 mm) when compared to controls (0.607±0.117 mm) but the difference was not significant (p=0.30). Nevertheless, carotid plaques were more commonly observed in patients with ax-SpA than in controls (41.6% vs. 26.4%; p=0.003). Patients with plaques had longer duration of the disease than those without plaques (20.5±11.2 years vs. 12.0±8.6 years; p<0.001). Plaques were more frequent in patients with hip involvement (crude odds ratio 3.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-9.75; p=0.05), syndesmophytes (crude OR 4.94, 95% CI 2.14-11.4; p<0.001), in patients with higher functional limitation and mobility index measured by BASFI (crude OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.02-1.33; p=0.03) and BASMI (crude OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.19-1.77; p<0.001), and in those with psoriasis (crude OR 3.94, 95% CI 1.31-11.84; p=0.02. However, except for psoriasis that continued being a strong risk factor for plaques after adjustment, the relationship between other clinical features of ax-SpA and carotid plaques disappeared in the adjusted models. Our results confirm the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with ax-SpA.

  8. Research Progress on the Risk Factors and Outcomes of Human Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiang-Dong; Xiong, Wei-Dong; Xiong, Shang-Shen; Chen, Gui-Hai

    2017-03-20

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory process that results in complex lesions or plaques that protrude into the arterial lumen. Carotid atherosclerotic plaque rupture, with distal atheromatous debris embolization, causes cerebrovascular events. This review aimed to explore research progress on the risk factors and outcomes of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques, and the molecular and cellular mechanisms of human carotid atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability for therapeutic intervention. We searched the PubMed database for recently published research articles up to June 2016, with the key words of "risk factors", "outcomes", "blood components", "molecular mechanisms", "cellular mechanisms", and "human carotid atherosclerotic plaques". The articles, regarding the latest developments related to the risk factors and outcomes, atherosclerotic plaque composition, blood components, and consequences of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques, and the molecular and cellular mechanisms of human carotid atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability for therapeutic intervention, were selected. This review described the latest researches regarding the interactive effects of both traditional and novel risk factors for human carotid atherosclerotic plaques, novel insights into human carotid atherosclerotic plaque composition and blood components, and consequences of human carotid atherosclerotic plaque. Carotid plaque biology and serologic biomarkers of vulnerability can be used to predict the risk of cerebrovascular events. Furthermore, plaque composition, rather than lesion burden, seems to most predict rupture and subsequent thrombosis.

  9. Efficacy of three toothbrushes on established gingivitis and plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowinski, Joseph; Petrone, Dolores M; Wachs, Gerald N; Chaknis, Patricia; Kemp, James; Sprosta, Al A; Devizio, William

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of three toothbrushes [Colgate 3600 Deep Clean (AFT version), the Colgate 3600 Deep Clean (stapled version) and the Oral B Indicator] on the removal of established gingivitis and plaque. This examiner-blind, three-treatment, parallel clinical research study assessed plaque removal via the comparison of pre-to- post-brushing and 4-week plaque removal measured by the Rustogi Modification of the Modified Navy Plaque Index. This study also assessed gingivitis using the Löe & Silness Gingival Index. Qualifying adult male and female subjects from the Northern New Jersey area reported to the study site after refraining from any oral hygiene procedures for 12 hours; and from eating, drinking, or smoking for 4 hours. Following an examination for gingivitis and plaque (pre-brushing), they were randomized into three balanced groups, each group using one of the three study toothbrushes in the order specified by a pre-determined randomization plan. Subjects were instructed to brush their teeth for 1 minute under supervision with their assigned toothbrush and a commercially-available toothpaste (Colgate Cavity Protection), after which they were once again evaluated for plaque (post-brushing). Subjects were then dismissed from the study site with the toothpaste and their assigned toothbrush to use at home twice daily for the next 4 weeks. They again reported to the study site at which time they were evaluated for plaque and gingivitis. 109 subjects complied with the protocol and completed the clinical study. For plaque removal, comparisons were made for whole mouth, at the gingival margin and at interproximal sites. The results of the study indicated that all three test toothbrushes provided statistically significantly reductions in pre- to post-brushing plaque index scores of up to 44.0%, 38.6% and 23.6% respectively, after a single toothbrushing. Relative to the Oral B Indicator toothbrush, the Colgate 360 degree Deep Clean toothbrush (AFT version) and

  10. Efficacy of 3 toothbrush treatments on plaque removal in orthodontic patients assessed with digital plaque imaging: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbe, Christina; Klukowska, Malgorzata; Tsaknaki, Iris; Timm, Hans; Grender, Julie; Wehrbein, Heinrich

    2013-06-01

    Good oral hygiene is a challenge for orthodontic patients because food readily becomes trapped around the brackets and under the archwires, and appliances are an obstruction to mechanical brushing. The purpose of this study was to compare plaque removal efficacy of 3 toothbrush treatments in orthodontic subjects. This was a replicate-use, single-brushing, 3-treatment, examiner-blind, randomized, 6-period crossover study with washout periods of approximately 24 hours between visits. Forty-six adolescent and young adult patients with fixed orthodontics from a university clinic in Germany were randomized, based on computer-generated randomization, to 1 of 3 treatments: (1) oscillating-rotating electric toothbrush with a specially designed orthodontic brush head (Oral-B Triumph, OD17; Procter & Gamble, Cincinnati, Ohio); (2) the same electric toothbrush handle with a regular brush head (EB25; Procter & Gamble); and (3) a regular manual toothbrush (American Dental Association, Chicago, Ill). The primary outcome was the plaque score change from baseline, which we determined using digital plaque image analysis. Forty-five subjects completed the study. The differences in mean plaque removal (95% confidence interval) between the electric toothbrush with an orthodontic brush head (6% [4.4%-7.6%]) or a regular brush head (3.8% [2.2%-5.3%]) and the manual toothbrush were significant (P Plaque removal with the electric toothbrush with the orthodontic brush head was superior (2.2%; P = 0.007) to the regular brush head. No adverse events were seen. The electric toothbrush, with either brush head, demonstrated significantly greater plaque removal over the manual brush. The orthodontic brush head was superior to the regular head. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Neovascularization of the atherosclerotic plaque: interplay between atherosclerotic lesion, adventitia-derived microvessels and perivascular fat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hinsbergh, Victor W. M.; Eringa, Etto C.; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.

    2015-01-01

    Neovascularization is a prominent feature in advanced human atherosclerotic plaques. This review surveys recent evidence for and remaining uncertainties regarding a role of neovascularization in atherosclerotic plaque progression. Specific emphasis is given to hypoxia, angiogenesis inhibition, and

  12. Gene expression levels of matrix metalloproteinases in human atherosclerotic plaques and evaluation of radiolabeled inhibitors as imaging agents for plaque vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Adrienne; Krämer, Stefanie D; Meletta, Romana; Beck, Katharina; Selivanova, Svetlana V; Rancic, Zoran; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Vos, Bernhard; Meding, Jörg; Stellfeld, Timo; Heinrich, Tobias K; Bauser, Marcus; Hütter, Joachim; Dinkelborg, Ludger M; Schibli, Roger; Ametamey, Simon M

    2014-08-01

    Atherosclerotic plaque rupture is the primary cause for myocardial infarction and stroke. During plaque progression macrophages and mast cells secrete matrix-degrading proteolytic enzymes, such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). We studied levels of MMPs and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-3 (TIMP-3) in relation to the characteristics of carotid plaques. We evaluated in vitro two radiolabeled probes targeting active MMPs towards non-invasive imaging of rupture-prone plaques. Human carotid plaques obtained from endarterectomy were classified into stable and vulnerable by visual and histological analysis. MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-8, MMP-9, MMP-10, MMP-12, MMP-14, TIMP-3, and CD68 levels were investigated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemistry was used to localize MMP-2 and MMP-9 with respect to CD68-expressing macrophages. Western blotting was applied to detect their active forms. A fluorine-18-labeled MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitor and a tritiated selective MMP-9 inhibitor were evaluated by in vitro autoradiography as potential lead structures for non-invasive imaging. Gene expression levels of all MMPs and CD68 were elevated in plaques. MMP-1, MMP-9, MMP-12 and MMP-14 were significantly higher in vulnerable than stable plaques. TIMP-3 expression was highest in stable and low in vulnerable plaques. Immunohistochemistry revealed intensive staining of MMP-9 in vulnerable plaques. Western blotting confirmed presence of the active form in plaque lysates. In vitro autoradiography showed binding of both inhibitors to stable and vulnerable plaques. MMPs differed in their expression patterns among plaque phenotypes, providing possible imaging targets. The two tested MMP-2/MMP-9 and MMP-9 inhibitors may be useful to detect atherosclerotic plaques, but not the vulnerable lesions selectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Topical tazarotene vs. coal tar in stable plaque psoriasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, U.; Kaur, I.; Dogra, S.; De, D.; Kumar, B. [Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research, Chandigarh (India)

    2010-07-15

    The efficacy of topical tazarotene has not previously been compared with the conventional topical treatment of crude coal tar (CCT) in stable plaque psoriasis. In this nonblinded side-to-side comparison study, patients with chronic stable plaque psoriasis, who had bilaterally symmetrical plaques on the limbs, applied 0.1% tazarotene gel on the right side and 5% CCT ointment on the left side once daily for 12 weeks followed by an 8-week treatment-free follow up period. Severity of psoriatic lesions and response to treatment was evaluated by scoring erythema, scaling and induration (ESI). Of 30 patients recruited, 27 could be assessed. In the per-protocol analysis, the mean percentage reduction in ESI score at the end of the treatment period was 74.15% {+-} 9.43 and 77.37% {+-} 10.93 with tazarotene and CCT, respectively (P {gt} 0.05). A reduction in ESI score of {gt} 75% was seen in 11 (40.74%) and 16 (59.26%) patients with tazarotene and CCT, respectively, at the end of 12 weeks. Side-effects were seen in 48.14% of patients treated with tazarotene, but in no patient treated with CCT. Tazarotene 0.1% gel has comparable clinical efficacy to CCT 5% ointment. CCT ointment remains a cost-effective therapy for plaque psoriasis.

  14. Flexural versus plaque lesions in psoriasis: an immunohistochemical differentiation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, W.H.P.M.; Roelofzen, J.H.J.; Jong, E.M.G.J. de; Erp, P.E.J. van; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de

    2005-01-01

    Clinical presentation, therapeutic options, micro-environment and HLA-typing have been reported to be different in flexural psoriasis as compared to plaque psoriasis. We were interested in any difference concerning the pathogenesis of both conditions. By analysing T-cell subsets, NK-T cells and

  15. HDL-mimetic PLGA nanoparticle to target atherosclerosis plaque macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Fay, Francois; Lobatto, Mark E.; Tang, Jun; Ouimet, Mireille; Kim, Yongtae; van der Staay, Susanne E. M.; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Priem, Bram; Zhang, Liangfang; Fisher, Edward A.; Moore, Kathryn J.; Langer, Robert; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2015-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a natural nanoparticle that exhibits an intrinsic affinity for atherosclerotic plaque macrophages. Its natural targeting capability as well as the option to incorporate lipophilic payloads, e.g., imaging or therapeutic components, in both the hydrophobic core and

  16. Does dentifrice use help to remove plaque? A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenburg, Cees; Slot, Dagmar E.; Bakker, Eric W. P.; van der Weijden, Fridus A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to establish the efficacy of brushing with and without a dentifrice for dental plaque removal. MEDLINE-PubMed, Cochrane-CENTRAL, EMBASE and other electronic databases were searched. The inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials and controlled clinical

  17. Development of Tc-99m Imaging Agents for Abeta Plaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhi-Ping, Zhuang; Mei-Ping Kung; Catherihne Hou; Hank F. Kung

    2008-09-26

    Development of SPECT imaging agents based on Tc-99m targeting Aβ plaques is useful for diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A stilbene derivative, [11C]SB-13, showing promise in detecting senile plaques present in AD patients has been reported previously1,2. Based on the 4’-amino-stilbene core structure we have added substituted groups through which a chelating group, N2S2, was conjugated. We report herein a series of Tc-99m labeled stilbene derivative conjugated with a TcO[N2S2] core. The syntheses of stilbenes containing a N2S2 chelating ligand are achieved by a scheme shown. Lipophilic 99mTc stilbene complexes were successfully prepared and purified through HPLC. Preliminary results of in vitro labeling of brain sections from transgenic mice showed very promising plaque labeling. These 99mTc stilbene derivatives are warranted for further evaluations as potential imaging agents targeting amyloid plaques.

  18. Intravascular palpography for high-risk vulnerable plaque assessment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaar, J.A.; Korte, C.L. de; Mastik, F.; Baldewsing, R.A.; Regar, E.; Feyter, P. de; Slager, C.J.; Steen, A.F.W. van der; Serruys, P.W.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The composition of an atherosclerotic plaque is considered more important than the degree of stenosis. An unstable lesion may rupture and cause an acute thrombotic reaction. Most of these lesions contain a large lipid pool covered by an inflamed thin fibrous cap. The stress in the cap

  19. Cryotherapy increases features of plaque stability in atherosclerotic rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheye, Stefan; Roth, Lynn; De Meyer, Inge; Van Hove, Cor E; Nahon, Daniel; Santoianni, Domenic; Yianni, John; Martinet, Wim; Buchbinder, Maurice; De Meyer, Guido R Y

    2016-08-20

    In the last 10 years, cryotherapy has been investigated as a new technology to treat vascular disease. The efficiency of cryotherapy in stabilising atherosclerotic plaques has never been described. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of catheter-based cryotherapy on atherosclerotic plaque composition in a rabbit model of atherosclerosis. Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits were fed a 0.3% cholesterol-supplemented diet for 24 weeks. At two predefined sites of the atherosclerotic thoracic aorta, catheter-based cryotherapy, applying either single-dose, double-dose cryotherapy or control inflation, was performed after randomisation. Rabbits were continued on a cholesterol-supplemented diet for one day (acute) or four weeks (chronic). One day after cryotherapy, apoptotic cell death of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) was observed, whereas macrophages were unaffected. Four weeks later, the amount of SMCs was restored, the EC layer was regenerated, and a subendothelial macrophage-free layer was formed, indicative of a more stable plaque. In addition, both the thickness and the type I collagen content of the fibrous cap were increased. The present study demonstrated that cryotherapy is feasible and appears to stabilise atherosclerotic plaques in a rabbit model.

  20. Symptomatic Plaque Form Gastric Candidiasis in a Patient with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed diffuse whitish candida plaque deposits over the gastric antrum with no ulceration or concomitant oesophageal involvement. She responded well to antifungal therapy with resolution of symptoms. This case demonstrates the occurrence of gastric candidiasis in CKD patient on ...

  1. Can chemical mouthwash agents achieve plaque/gingivitis control?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Weijden, F.A.; Van der Sluijs, E.; Ciancio, S.G.; Slot, D.E.

    2015-01-01

    Key points • Oral health is important since the mouth is the gateway to the human body. Bacteria are always present in the oral cavity and when not frequently removed the dental plaque biofilm leads to the development of oral disease. • Over the past decades, the use of mouthwashes has become

  2. Plaque And Growth Characteristics Of Different Polioviruses Isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine some virulent trait-related properties of poliovirus isolates from children with acute flaccid paralysis following vaccination with oral polio vaccine (OPV). Design: Six polioviruses earlier characterised into wild, vaccine-derived and OPV-like were studied using the plaque morphology and growth ...

  3. Vulnerable plaque detection: The role of 18-fluorine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shazreen Shaharuddin

    2013-07-22

    Jul 22, 2013 ... Vulnerable plaque detection: The role of 18-fluorine fluorodeoxyglucose in identifying high risk patients. Shazreen Shaharuddin a,b. , Ahmad Zaid Fattah Azman a,b. , Katiza Haida Ali c. ,. Abdul Latif Mohamad d. , Fathinul Fikri Ahmad Saad a. , Abdul Jalil Nordin a,. * a Centre for Diagnostic Nuclear Imaging ...

  4. Microbial profiling of dental plaque from mechanically ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Kirsty M; Twigg, Joshua A; Lewis, Michael A O; Wise, Matt P; Marchesi, Julian R; Smith, Ann; Wilson, Melanie J; Williams, David W

    2016-02-01

    Micro-organisms isolated from the oral cavity may translocate to the lower airways during mechanical ventilation (MV) leading to ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Changes within the dental plaque microbiome during MV have been documented previously, primarily using culture-based techniques. The aim of this study was to use community profiling by high throughput sequencing to comprehensively analyse suggested microbial changes within dental plaque during MV. Bacterial 16S rDNA gene sequences were obtained from 38 samples of dental plaque sampled from 13 mechanically ventilated patients and sequenced using the Illumina platform. Sequences were processed using Mothur, applying a 97% gene similarity cut-off for bacterial species level identifications. A significant 'microbial shift' occurred in the microbial community of dental plaque during MV for nine out of 13 patients. Following extubation, or removal of the endotracheal tube that facilitates ventilation, sampling revealed a decrease in the relative abundance of potential respiratory pathogens and a compositional change towards a more predominantly (in terms of abundance) oral microbiota including Prevotella spp., and streptococci. The results highlight the need to better understand microbial shifts in the oral microbiome in the development of strategies to reduce VAP, and may have implications for the development of other forms of pneumonia such as community-acquired infection.

  5. Effect of fluoride and chlorhexidine digluconate mouthrinses on plaque biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabe, Per; Twetman, Svante; Kinnby, Bertil

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a model in which to investigate the architecture of plaque biofilms formed on enamel surfaces in vivo and to compare the effects of anti-microbial agents of relevance for caries on biofilm vitality. Materials and Methodology : Enamel discs mounted on healing abutments...

  6. Paraclinical Effects of Miswak Extract on Dental Plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Poureslami

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Persian toothbrush tree or Miswak (Salvadora Persica L. has been used as a brushing stick for more than 1,300 years. Pharmacological studies indicated antibacterial and antiinflammatory activities of Miswak extract. The present study was performed to determine antibacterial effects of Miswak extract.Material and Methods: The present experimental research involved three in vitro studies including: 1 in vitro testing of the effect of Miswak extract on selected bacteria; 2 comparing the paraclinical effects of Iranian toothpaste containing Miswak extract and placebo toothpaste on dental plaque; and 3 comparing the antibacterial effect of Iranian toothpaste with Swiss toothpaste(Quail Miswak on dental plaque. The disc diffusion method was used to test bacterial sensitivity of toothpastes. Data were analyzed by paired t-test and ANOVA.Results: In the first study, Miswak extract inhibited the growth of some dental plaque bacteria. In the second study, antibacterial effect of the herbal toothpaste was significantly greater than that of the placebo (P =0.002. In the third study, four samples of dental plaque bacteria were used and there was no difference between the antibacterial effects of Swiss and Iranian herbal toothpastes (P =0.66.Conclusion: Due to antimicrobial effects of Miswak extract, its use in mouth rinses and toothpastes is highly recommended.

  7. Mast cells mediate neutrophil recruitment during atherosclerotic plaque progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wezel, Anouk; Lagraauw, H Maxime; van der Velden, Daniël; de Jager, Saskia C A; Quax, Paul H A; Kuiper, Johan; Bot, Ilze

    AIMS: Activated mast cells have been identified in the intima and perivascular tissue of human atherosclerotic plaques. As mast cells have been described to release a number of chemokines that mediate leukocyte fluxes, we propose that activated mast cells may play a pivotal role in leukocyte

  8. Comparative Plaque Removal Efficacy of Three Manual Toothbrushes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemi, A; Vorwerk, L; Hooper, W; Kwang, M; Naji, M; Goyal, C R; Qaqish, J

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and plaque-reducing effectiveness of a newly designed manual toothbrush compared to that of a leading marketed toothbrush and a reference standard manual toothbrush control. This examiner-blind, randomized, single-use study used a cross-over design. Sixty-eight qualifying male and female subjects were randomly assigned either an Arm & Hammer™ Truly Radiant™ Deep Clean manual toothbrush (TR), a Colgate® Extra Clean manual toothbrush (C), or an ADA reference standard manual toothbrush (SM) according to one of three computer-generated sequences. Following instruction in the use of their assigned brush, subjects brushed at home with a standard fluoride toothpaste twice daily for two minutes during a one-week familiarization period. At the end of this period, the subjects returned to the study site after refraining from oral hygiene for 12-16 hours and from eating and drinking for four hours. Plaque was disclosed and scored using the Rustogi Modification of the Navy Plaque Index (RMNPI). Subjects brushed under supervision with their assigned toothbrush for two minutes in a room without mirrors and apart from the dental examiner, after which plaque was disclosed and rescored. They were then given one of the alternate toothbrushes according to their assigned sequence, and the familiarization routine and evaluations were repeated until each of the subjects used each of the three brushes. Within-treatment and between-treatment whole mouth RMNPI scores and scores at each of twelve subsets of sites were analyzed using paired t-tests and appropriate ANCOVA models, respectively. Within-group analyses showed that all three toothbrushes produced statistically significant reductions from the pre-brushing baseline in whole mouth RMNPI scores (p toothbrushes produced significant supragingival plaque reductions with a single use, the Truly Radiant Deep Clean brush was significantly more effective than the Colgate Extra Clean

  9. Microflora and chemical composition of dental plaque from subjects with hereditary fructose intolerance.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoover, C I; Newbrun, E; Mettraux, G; Graf, H

    1980-01-01

    We compared the microbiological and chemical composition of dental plaque from subjects with hereditary fructose intolerance who restrict their dietary sugar intake with that of control subjects who do not. The two groups showed no significant differences in chemical composition of plaque: the mean protein, carbohydrate, calcium, magnesium, and phosphate contents were similar. Dental plaque from both groups contained similar numbers of total colony-forming units per microgram of plaque protei...

  10. Plaque characterization in ex vivo MRI evaluated by dense 3D correspondence with histology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Engelen, Arna; de Bruijne, Marleen; Klein, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Automatic quantification of carotid artery plaque composition is important in the development of methods that distinguish vulnerable from stable plaques. MRI has shown to be capable of imaging different components noninvasively. We present a new plaque classification method which uses 3D....... Histological slices of human atherosclerotic plaques were manually segmented into necrotic core, fibrous tissue and calcification. Classification of these three components was voxelwise evaluated. As features the intensity, gradient magnitude and Laplacian in four MRI sequences after different degrees...

  11. Diode-light transillumination for ophthalmic plaque localization around juxtapapillary choroidal melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, P T; Iezzi, R; Esteveo, M L; Szechter, A; Rosen, R B; Berson, A

    1999-07-01

    An evaluation of plaque-mounted diode-light transillumination (DLT) for localization of episcleral plaques beneath juxtapapillary tumors. Two patients scheduled for radiotherapy for juxtapapillary melanomas were offered DLT as an additional method of ophthalmic plaque localization. Plaques were constructed by affixing 4 non-heat producing, light-emitting diodes with their apertures flush with the episcleral outer surface of the plaque's rim. Bio-implantable epoxy was used to encapsulate the electronic components. Then the plaques were loaded with 103Pd seeds. After the eye-plaques were sewn to the episclera covering the base of the intraocular tumors; the diode-lights were illuminated, viewed and recorded. Photodocumentation of the relative position of the 4 lights around tumor's base was obtained in both cases. Digital images of plaque-mounted diode retro-transillumination were obtained. No evidence of diode-light toxicity was noted. Both tumors were found to be covered by the ophthalmic plaques. Juxtapapillary tumors are often difficult or impossible to visualize with standard transillumination techniques and have been associated with poor local control rates. We have developed plaque-mounted DLT in an effort to improve ophthalmic plaque localization. Retrobulbar transillumination was viewed by indirect ophthalmoscopy and recorded with video-imaging. This technique provides unique photographic documentation of episcleral plaque localization beneath juxtapapillary tumors.

  12. Dynamics of red fluorescent dental plaque during experimental gingivitis-A cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, M.H.; Volgenant, C.M.C.; Keijser, B.; ten Cate, J.M.; Crielaard, W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The dynamics of red fluorescent plaque (RFP) in comparison to clinical plaque and bleeding scores were studied during an experimental gingivitis protocol in a cohort of healthy participants. Methods: Forty-one participants were monitored for RFP before (24 h plaque), during 14 days

  13. How radiation influences atherosclerotic plaque development: a biophysical approach in ApoE⁻/⁻ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloosterman, Astrid; Dillen, Teun van; Bijwaard, Harmen; Heeneman, Sylvia; Hoving, Saske; Stewart, Fiona A; Dekkers, Fieke

    2017-11-01

    Atherosclerosis is the development of lipid-laden plaques in arteries and is nowadays considered as an inflammatory disease. It has been shown that high doses of ionizing radiation, as used in radiotherapy, can increase the risk of development or progression of atherosclerosis. To elucidate the effects of radiation on atherosclerosis, we propose a mathematical model to describe radiation-promoted plaque development. This model distinguishes itself from other models by combining plaque initiation and plaque growth, and by incorporating information from biological experiments. It is based on two consecutive processes: a probabilistic dose-dependent plaque initiation process, followed by deterministic plaque growth. As a proof of principle, experimental plaque size data from carotid arteries from irradiated ApoE[Formula: see text] mice was used to illustrate how this model can provide insight into the underlying biological processes. This analysis supports the promoting role for radiation in plaque initiation, but the model can easily be extended to include dose-related effects on plaque growth if available experimental data would point in that direction. Moreover, the model could assist in designing future biological experiments on this research topic. Additional biological data such as plaque size data from chronically-irradiated mice or experimental data sets with a larger variety in biological parameters can help to further unravel the influence of radiation on plaque development. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first biophysical model that combines probabilistic and mechanistic modeling which uses experimental data to investigate the influence of radiation on plaque development.

  14. How radiation influences atherosclerotic plaque development. A biophysical approach in ApoE{sup -/-} mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloosterman, Astrid; Dillen, Teun van; Dekkers, Fieke [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Centre for Environmental Safety and Security, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Bijwaard, Harmen [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Centre for Environmental Safety and Security, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Inholland University of Applied Sciences, Medical Technology Research Group, Haarlem (Netherlands); Heeneman, Sylvia [Maastricht University Medical Center, Experimental Vascular Pathology group, Department of Pathology, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht (Netherlands); Hoving, Saske; Stewart, Fiona A. [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Division of Biological Stress Response (H3), Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-11-15

    Atherosclerosis is the development of lipid-laden plaques in arteries and is nowadays considered as an inflammatory disease. It has been shown that high doses of ionizing radiation, as used in radiotherapy, can increase the risk of development or progression of atherosclerosis. To elucidate the effects of radiation on atherosclerosis, we propose a mathematical model to describe radiation-promoted plaque development. This model distinguishes itself from other models by combining plaque initiation and plaque growth, and by incorporating information from biological experiments. It is based on two consecutive processes: a probabilistic dose-dependent plaque initiation process, followed by deterministic plaque growth. As a proof of principle, experimental plaque size data from carotid arteries from irradiated ApoE{sup -/-} mice was used to illustrate how this model can provide insight into the underlying biological processes. This analysis supports the promoting role for radiation in plaque initiation, but the model can easily be extended to include dose-related effects on plaque growth if available experimental data would point in that direction. Moreover, the model could assist in designing future biological experiments on this research topic. Additional biological data such as plaque size data from chronically-irradiated mice or experimental data sets with a larger variety in biological parameters can help to further unravel the influence of radiation on plaque development. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first biophysical model that combines probabilistic and mechanistic modeling which uses experimental data to investigate the influence of radiation on plaque development. (orig.)

  15. Ultrasonic mirror image from ruthenium plaque facilitates calculation of uveal melanoma treatment dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espensen, Charlotte Alfast; Jensen, Peter Koch; Fog, Lotte Stubkjær

    2017-01-01

    to illustrate the effects on radiation dose to apex of the tumour when the dose depth was incorrectly determined. Doses to apex of the tumour were determined using Plaque Simulator. Results The intraobserver variation in dose depth measurement with plaque was significantly lower than for measures without plaque...

  16. Stable Size Distribution of Amyloid Plaques Over the Course of Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Mielke, Matthew L.; Muzitansky, Alona; Gómez-Isla, Teresa; Growdon, John H.; Bacskai, Brian J.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Hyman, Bradley T.

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid-β plaques are a key pathological feature of Alzheimer disease (AD), but whether plaque sizes increase or stabilize over the course of AD is unknown. We measured the size distribution of total immunoreactive (10D5-positive) and dense-core (Thioflavine-S-positive) plaques in the temporal neocortex of a large group of AD and plaque-bearing age-matched non-demented subjects to test the hypothesis that amyloid plaques continue to grow along with the progression of the disease. The size of amyloid-β (10D5)-positive plaques did not differ between groups whereas dense-core plaques from the AD group were slightly larger than those in the non-demented group (~25%–30%, p = 0.01). Within the AD group, dense-core plaque size did not independently correlate with duration of clinical disease (from 4 to 21 years, p = 0.68), whereas 10D5-positive plaque size correlated negatively with disease duration (p = 0.01). By contrast, an earlier age of symptom onset strongly predicted a larger postmortem plaque size; this effect was independent of disease duration and the presence of the APOEε4 allele (p = 0.0001). We conclude that plaques vary in size among patients, with larger size distributions correlating with an earlier age of onset, but plaques do not substantially increase in size over the clinical course of the disease. PMID:22805771

  17. Intravascular Ultrasound Elastography: A Clinician's Tool for Assessing Vulnerability and Material Composition of Plaques.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldewsing, R.A.; Schaar, J.A.; Korte, C.L. de; Mastik, F.; Serruys, P.W.; Steen, A.F.W. van der

    2005-01-01

    The material composition and morphology of the atherosclerotic plaque components are considered to be more important determinants of acute coronary ischemic syndromes than the degree of stenosis. When a vulnerable plaque ruptures it causes an acute thrombotic reaction. Rupture prone plaques contain

  18. Lectin Pathway of Complement Activation Is Associated with Vulnerability of Atherosclerotic Plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fumagalli, Stefano; Perego, Carlo; Zangari, Rosalia

    2017-01-01

    to plaque vulnerability. Ficolins and MBL were found both in plaques' necrotic core and tunica media. Patients with vulnerable plaques showed decreased plasma levels and intraplaque deposition of ficolin-2. Symptomatic patients experiencing a transient ischemic attack had lower plasma levels of ficolin-1...

  19. MRI-based biomechanical parameters for carotid artery plaque vulnerability assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelman, Lambert; Teng, Zhongzhao; Nederveen, Aart J.; van der Lugt, Aad; Gillard, Jonathan H.

    2016-01-01

    Carotid atherosclerotic plaques are a major cause of ischaemic stroke. The biomechanical environment to which the arterial wall and plaque is subjected to plays an important role in the initiation, progression and rupture of carotid plaques. MRI is frequently used to characterize the morphology of a

  20. 21 CFR 872.5580 - Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque... adhesion of dental plaque. (a) Identification. The device is assigned the generic name oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque and is identified as a device intended to reduce the presence of...

  1. 76 FR 66307 - Scientific Information Request on Phototherapy for Treatment of Chronic Plaque Psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ... for Treatment of Chronic Plaque Psoriasis AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ... Phototherapy medical devices for treatment of chronic plaque psoriasis. Scientific information is being... Phototherapy for Treatment of Chronic Plaque Psoriasis, which is currently being conducted by the Evidence...

  2. Spiral computed tomographic imaging related to computerized ultrasonographic images of carotid plaque morphology and histology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønholdt, Marie-Louise; Wagner, A; Wiebe, B M

    2001-01-01

    Echolucency of carotid atherosclerotic plaques, as evaluated by computerized B-mode ultrasonographic images, has been associated with an increased incidence of brain infarcts on cerebral computed tomographic scans. We tested the hypotheses that characterization of carotid plaques on spiral computed...... tomographic images correlates with that on computerized B-mode ultrasonographic images and that spiral computed tomographic imaging predicts the histomorphometric plaque content....

  3. The unstable plaque: a diagnostic challenge in cardiology; Diagnostische Herausforderung in der Kardiologie: Die instabile arteriosklerotische Plaque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levkau, B. [Inst. fuer Pathophysiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany); Schaefers, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany)

    2004-09-01

    Atherosclerotic plaque rupture still accounts for one third of all deaths worldwide and constitutes a major source of disability and health care costs. Dysregulation of MMPs in the atherosclerotic lesion may result in mechanical destabilization and rupture of the atherosclerotic plaque, potentially leading to thrombosis and vessel occlusion with life-threatening clinical complications. Therefore, identifying individual patients at high risk of plaque rupture is an important challenge in clinical medicine. We have used the broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor CGS 27023A to develop the radioligand [{sup 123}I]I-HO-CGS 27023A for in vivo imaging of MMP activity. Using this radioligand, we were able to specifically image MMP activity by scintigraphy in vivo in the MMP-rich vascular lesions that develop after carotid artery ligation and cholesterol-rich diet in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. Thus, imaging of MMP activity in vivo is feasible using radiolabelled MMP inhibitors. In combination with the high-resolution morphological imaging techniques such as MRI and CT, the molecular imaging of individual disease parameters such as MMP activity in lesions of atherosclerosis may help design approaches for the prediction and prevention of coronary events due to plaque rupture of an individual lesion in an individual patient. (orig.)

  4. Presencia de Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola y Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans en el biofilm subgingival de pacientes diabéticos tipo 2: estudio transversal Presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in the subgingival biofilm of diabetic mellitus 2 patients: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AJ Quintero

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes: La investigación de la microflora subgingival en pacientes diabéticos tipo 2 con periodontitis ha presentado resultados contradictorios. Objetivo: Determinar la presencia de Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forshytia, Treponema denticola y Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, en el biofilm subgingival de pacientes diabéticos tipo 2 y relacionarlo con el grado de control metabólico. Método: Estudio descriptivo transversal, en el cual se analizaron 23 pacientes diabéticos derivados consecutivamente del Policlínico de Especialidades de la Universidad de los Andes. Previo consentimiento informado, se realizó un examen clínico periodontal que incluyó mediciones de profundidad al sondaje, nivel de inserción clínica y sangrado gingival. Fueron clasificados según severidad de periodontitis y control metabólico de la diabetes determinado por un promedio de 3 exámenes de hemoglobina glicosilada. La detección microbiológica se realizó mediante la técnica de reacción en cadena de la polimerasa. Resultados: En el grupo de pacientes estudiados, Treponema denticola y Tannerella forsythia fueron las bacterias más prevalentes (65.2%, seguida por Porphyromonas gingivalis (17.3% y Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (13%. Los pacientes con peor control glicémico tuvieron una mayor presencia de Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, Porphyromonas gingivalis y Agreggatibacter actinomycetemcomitans y un aumento en el índice de sangrado al sondaje. Conclusiones: En el grupo de pacientes diabéticos estudiado, las bacterias más prevalentes fueron Treponema denticola y Tannerella forsythia. Los pacientes diabéticos tipo 2 con moderado y mal control glicémico presentaron mayor presencia de los microorganismos estudiados, comparado con los grupos con mejores niveles de control glicémico.Background: The investigation of subgingival microflora in type 2 diabetic patients with periodontitis presented conflicting results

  5. Quantification of the uncertainty in coronary CTA plaque measurements using dynamic cardiac phantom and 3D-printed plaque models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Taylor; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Rubin, Geoffrey; Segars, Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the accuracy of coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) stenosis measurements using newly developed physical coronary plaque models attached to a base dynamic cardiac phantom (Shelley Medical DHP-01). Coronary plaque models (5 mm diameter, 50% stenosis, and 32 mm long) were designed and 3D-printed with tissue equivalent materials (calcified plaque with iodine enhanced lumen). Realistic cardiac motion was achieved by fitting known cardiac motion vectors to left ventricle volume-time curves to create synchronized heart motion profiles executed by the base cardiac phantom. Realistic coronary CTA acquisition was accomplished by synthesizing corresponding ECG waveforms for gating and reconstruction purposes. All scans were acquired using a retrospective gating technique on a dual-source CT system (Siemens SOMATOM FLASH) with 75ms temporal resolution. Multi-planar reformatted images were reconstructed along vessel centerlines and the enhanced lumens were manually segmented by 5 independent operators. On average, the stenosis measurement accuracy was 0.9% positive bias for the motion free condition (0 bpm). The measurement accuracy monotonically decreased to 18.5% negative bias at 90 bpm. Contrast-tonoise (CNR), vessel circularity, and segmentation conformity also decreased monotonically with increasing heart rate. These results demonstrate successful implementation of the base cardiac phantom with 3D-printed coronary plaque models, adjustable motion profiles, and coordinated ECG waveforms. They further show the utility of the model to ascertain metrics of coronary CT accuracy and image quality under a variety of plaque, motion, and acquisition conditions.

  6. Plaque-left-behind after brushing: intra-oral reservoir for antibacterial toothpaste ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Marieke P T; Busscher, Henk J; Abbas, Frank; van der Mei, Henny C; van Hoogmoed, Chris G

    2012-10-01

    Plaque is never fully removed by brushing and may act as a reservoir for antibacterial ingredients, contributing to their substantive action. This study investigates the contribution of plaque-left-behind and saliva towards substantivity of three antibacterial toothpastes versus a control paste without antibacterial claims. First, volunteers brushed 2 weeks with a control or antibacterial toothpaste. Next, plaque and saliva samples were collected 6 and 12 h after brushing and bacterial concentrations and viabilities were measured. The contributions of plaque and saliva towards substantivity were determined by combining control plaques with experimental plaque or saliva samples and subsequently assessing their viabilities. Bacterial compositions in the various plaque and saliva samples were compared using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. The viabilities of plaques after brushing with Colgate-Total® and Crest-Pro-Health® were smaller than of control plaques and up to 12 h after brushing with Crest-Pro-Health® plaques still contained effective, residual antibacterial activity against control plaques. No effective, residual antibacterial activity could be measured in saliva samples after brushing. There was no significant difference in bacterial composition of plaque or saliva after brushing with the different toothpastes. Plaque-left-behind after mechanical cleaning contributes to the substantive action of an antibacterial toothpaste containing stannous fluoride (Crest-Pro-Health®). The absorptive capacity of plaque-left-behind after brushing is of utmost clinical importance, since plaque is predominantly left behind in places where its removal and effective killing matter most. Therewith this study demonstrates a clear and new beneficial effect of the use of antibacterial toothpastes.

  7. Site-based plaque removal efficacy of four branded toothbrushes and the effect of dental floss in interproximal plaque removal: a randomized examiner-blind controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwath, Balachandran; Vijayalakshmi, Rajaraman; Arun, Dayanathi; Kumar, Vasanth

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sitelevel plaque removal efficacy of four commercially available toothbrushes. The adjunctive benefit of dental floss on interproximal plaque removal was also evaluated. This study was designed as a randomized examiner- blinded clinical study involving 60 subjects. The subjects were randomly divided into four groups of 15 participants each, and a particular branded toothbrush was allotted for each group. Brushing technique, toothpaste, and brushing time were standardized for all the subjects. The Turesky- Gilmore-Glickman modification of Quigley-Hein plaque index was used to evaluate plaque scores at baseline, and 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks by one blinded examiner. After 2 weeks, the subjects were provided with dental floss to be used in conjunction with the toothbrush. Buccal, lingual, and interproximal plaque reduction percentages were computed and analyzed for statistical significance. The four toothbrushes showed similar plaque removal scores at the three sites, with no statistical significance (P > .05). The interproximal plaque removal scores of the four toothbrushes were the least at 2 weeks (25%) when compared with buccal (65%) and lingual (60%) percentage scores. The addition of dental floss significantly increased the interproximal plaque removal scores, with 4-week scores revealing 70% removal. These data revealed the lack of significance between the four toothbrushes studied, which is in line with previous studies. The addition of dental floss had a significant effect on the interproximal plaque removal, which could be crucial in the maintenance of gingival health.

  8. Plaques of Alzheimer's disease originate from cysts of Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease spirochete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Alan B

    2006-01-01

    Here is hypothesized a truly revolutionary notion that rounded cystic forms of Borrelia burgdorferi are the root cause of the rounded structures called plaques in the Alzheimer brain. Rounded "plaques' in high density in brain tissue are emblematic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Plaques may be conceptualized as rounded "pock mark-like" areas of brain tissue injury. In this century, in brain tissue of AD, plaques are Amyloid Plaques according to the most up to date textbooks. In the last century, however, Dr. Alois Alzheimer did not require amyloid as the pathogenesis for either the disease or for the origin of its plaques. Surely, amyloid is an event in AD, but it may not be the primal cause of AD. Indeed in plaques, amyloid is regularly represented by the "congophilic core" structure which is so named because the waxy amyloid material binds the congo red stain and is congophilic. However an accepted subset of plaques in AD is devoid of a congophilic amyloid core region (these plaques "cotton wool" type plaques, lack a central congophilic core structure). Furthermore, there is "plaque diversity" in Alzheimer's; small, medium and large plaques parallel variable cystic diameters for Borrelia burgdorferi. Perturbations of AD plaque structure (i.e. young plaques devoid of a central core and older plaques with or without a central core structure) offer room for an alternate pathway for explanation of ontogeny of the plaque structures. If amyloid is not required to initiate all of the possible plaques in Alzheimer's, is it possible that amyloid just a by product of a more fundamental primal path to dementia? If a byproduct status is assigned to amyloid in the realm of plaque formation, then is amyloid also an epiphenomenon rather than a primary pathogenesis for Alzheimer's disease. In the "anatomy is destiny" model, cysts of borrelia are always round. Why then not accept roundness as a fundamental "structure determines function" argument for the answer to the mystery of

  9. Estimation of Plaque Contents With Multi-Angle 3D Compound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhjelm, Jens E.; Grønholdt, Marie Louise; Rasmussen, Steen Tofthøj

    1996-01-01

    This investigation exploits the potential of using multiple insonification angles in characterizing plaques in the carotid artery. Specifically, previous work has shown that certain plaque materials such as lipid exhibit a low degree of angle-dependence in the received echo signal while the signal...... to lateral resolution size (1.4 mm @ -3 dB) to obtain an omnidirectional range cell. After scanning, the plaques underwent histological analysis in order to estimate the amount of calcification, fibrous tissues, lipid, blood and thrombus. So far, 13 plaques surgically removed during carotid endarterectomy...... and the content of fibrous tissues. The preliminary results indicate that the method has good potential for characterization of plaque....

  10. Validity and reliability of autofluorescence-based quantification method of dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sun-Young; Kim, Bo-Ra; Ko, Hae-Youn; Kwon, Ho-Keun; Kim, Baek-Il

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate validity and reliability of autofluorescence-based plaque quantification (APQ) method. The facial surfaces of 600 sound anterior teeth of 50 subjects were examined. The subjects received dental plaque examination using Turesky modified Quigley Hein plaque index (QHI) and Silness & Löe plaque index (SLI). The autofluorescence images were taken before the plaque examination with Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence-Digital, and plaque percent index (PPI) was calculated. Correlation between two existing plaque indices and the PPI of the APQ method was evaluated to find which level of plaque redness on tooth (ΔR) by the APQ method shows the highest correlation. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) analysis and intra- and inter-examiner reliability tests were performed. The PPIΔR20 of the APQ method showed a moderate correlation with two existing plaque indices (rho of QHI=0.48, SLI=0.51). This methodology fell in the fair category and it had an excellent reliability. The APQ method also showed possibility to detect heavy plaque with fair validity. The APQ method demonstrated excellent reliability, and fair validity, compared with 2 conventional indices. The plaque quantification described has the potential to be used in clinical evaluation of oral hygiene procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of dental plaque control on infection of Helicobacter pylori in gastric mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chun-Ling; Jiang, Guang-Shui; Li, Chun-Hai; Li, Cui-Rong

    2012-10-01

    Data on the role of dental plaque in the transmission of Helicobactor pylori have varied. Furthermore, there has been few reports on the relationship between dental plaque control and H. pylori infection of gastric mucosa. The purpose of this study was to elucidate this potential relationship. The 13C urea breath test was conducted on 56 subjects who received dental plaque control and 51 subjects who did not. The prevalence of H. pylori in the gastric mucosa was 19.64% in patients who received dental plaque control, which was significantly lower than in those without dental plaque control (84.31%). Long-term professional dental plaque control was associated with less gastric reinfection by H. pylori, suggesting that dental plaque control may help to prevent H. pylori-induced gastric disease or reinfection.

  12. Efficacy of triphala mouth rinse (aqueous extracts) on dental plaque and gingivitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Ritesh; Nekkanti, Sridhar; Kumar, Nikesh G; Kapuria, Ketan; Acharya, Shashidhar; Pentapati, Kalyana C

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of triphala mouth rinse (aqueous) in the reduction of plaque and gingivitis among children. The study was a randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial, with a total of 60 school children (n = 30 in each group; triphala and chlorhexidine groups). Plaque and gingival indices were used to evaluate baseline and follow-up plaque and gingivitis. A total of 57 children completed the study. Both chlorhexidine and triphala groups showed significantly lower mean gingival and plaque index scores at follow up than baseline (P plaque index was significantly higher in the chlorhexidine group compared to the triphala group (P = 0.048). The effectiveness of triphala in the reduction of plaque and gingivitis was comparable to chlorhexidine, and can be used for short-term purposes without potential side-effects. It is a cost-effective alternative in reducing plaque and gingivitis. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Texture based segmentation method to detect atherosclerotic plaque from optical tomography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Ammu; Hewko, Mark; Sowa, Michael; Sherif, Sherif

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging has been widely employed in assessing cardiovascular disease. Atherosclerosis is one of the major cause cardio vascular diseases. However visual detection of atherosclerotic plaque from OCT images is often limited and further complicated by high frame rates. We developed a texture based segmentation method to automatically detect plaque and non plaque regions from OCT images. To verify our results we compared them to photographs of the vascular tissue with atherosclerotic plaque that we used to generate the OCT images. Our results show a close match with photographs of vascular tissue with atherosclerotic plaque. Our texture based segmentation method for plaque detection could be potentially used in clinical cardiovascular OCT imaging for plaque detection.

  14. Ustekinumab in the therapy of chronic plaque psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna L O’Neill

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Jenna L O’Neill, Robert E KalbState University of New York at Buffalo, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Department of Dermatology, NY, USAAbstract: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disorder characterized by T cell dysregulation and a chronic inflammatory infiltrate within the epidermis. Several cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, including interleukin-12 (IL-12 and IL-23. These cytokines act via induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines which promote chronic inflammation and auto-reactivity. Ustekinumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody against the common p40 subunit of IL-12 and IL-23. Two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of ustekinumab have demonstrated significant and prolonged efficacy in the treatment of plaque psoriasis. Adverse events were generally similar across treatment and control groups. Studies are ongoing to assess the long term safety and efficacy profiles of ustekinumab.Keywords: ustekinumab, psoriasis, plaque

  15. Apollo 11 Commander Armstrong Presents President With Commemorative Plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    On June 4, 1974, 5 years after the successful Apollo 11 lunar landing mission, commander Neil Armstrong (right) presented a plaque to U.S. President Richard Milhous Nixon (left) on behalf of all people who had taken part in the space program. In making the presentation, Armstrong said 'Mr. President, you have proclaimed this week to be United States Space week in conjunction with the fifth anniversary of our first successful landing on the Moon. It is my privilege to represent my colleagues, the crewmen of projects Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, and Skylab, and the men and women of NASA, and the hundreds of thousands of Americans from across the land who contributed so mightily to the success of our efforts in space in presenting this plaque which bears the names of each individual who has had the privilege of representing this country' in a space flight. The presentation was made at the California white house in San Clemente.

  16. Primary pleural lymphoma: plaque-like thickening of the pleura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomou, Anastasia; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Margaritis, Dimitrios; Froudarakis, Marios; Prassopoulos, Panos

    2010-01-01

    Primary pleural lymphoma is a rare entity that has been described in association with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or pyothorax. We report a 63-year-old-man with no history of HIV infection or pyothorax who presented with progressive dyspnea and nonproductive cough. Chest radiography revealed complete opacification of the left hemithorax, and contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed large left pleural effusion and thin, homogeneous, plaque-like thickening of the parietal pleura. Thoracoscopic pleural biopsy was consistent with grade 1 extranodal follicular lymphoma of the pleura. The authors suggest that physicians should be aware of this rare location of primary pleural lymphoma manifested by plaque-like thickening of the pleura but not accompanied by mediastinal lymphadenopathy.

  17. Inhibition of dental plaque formation by toothpaste containing propolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurin Aisyiyah Listyasari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plaque is the main cause of caries and periodontal disease. Caries and periodontal disease can be prevented by inhibiting dental plaque formation. To inhibit the formation of plaque, teeth must be brushed with toothpaste. According to previous studies, propolis contains apigenin and tt-farnesol classified as flavonoid that can inhibit the formation of dental plaque by inhibiting glucosyltransferase enzym and membrane integrity of Streptococcus mutans. Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of toothpaste containing propolis on the formation of dental plaque. Methods: Post test with only control group design was used. The subjects of this study were 30 boarding school students of Hidayatullah, Yayasan Al-Burhan, Gedawang, Semarang, divided into two groups, randomized control group and treatment group. Control group was not treated with toothpaste contanining propolis. Meanwhile, treatment group was treated with toothpaste containing propolis. Plaque then was measured by using plaque index of Sillness and Loe method after using toothpaste containing propolis for four hours. Afterwards, the data was analyzed by a computer program, Mann-Whitney test, with its significance p < 0.05. Results: The result of Mann-Whitney test showed a significant difference, 0.002 (p < 0.05, between the control group and the treatment group. The median of the control group was about 3.41, while that of the treatment group was about 0.58. Conclusion: The use of toothpaste contaning propolis can prevent dental plaque formation.Latar belakang: Plak merupakan penyebab utama terjadinya karies dan penyakit periodontal. Karies dan penyakit periodontal dapat dicegah dengan menghambat pembentukan plak gigi. Untuk mencegah terbentuknya plak, gigi harus digosok menggunakan pasta gigi. Penelitian terdahulu menyebutkan bahwa propolis mengandung flavonoid apigenin dan tt-farnesol yang mampu menghambat aktivitas enzim glukosiltransferase dan menghambat

  18. Definition of human rotavirus serotypes by plaque reduction assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, R G; Greenberg, H B; James, W D; Pittman, A L; Kalica, A R; Flores, J; Chanock, R M; Kapikian, A Z

    1982-07-01

    Twenty different human rotavirus reassortants were characterized serologically by a plaque reduction assay as belonging to one of three distinct serotypes. Fourteen were similar if not identical to our prototype Wa strain; two were like the prototype DS-1 strain, and four belonged to a third serotype for which a prototype has not yet been selected. Hyperimmune sera raised against the three serotypes were required to distinguish among them, since postinfection sera had lower titers and were more cross-reactive than hyperimmune sera. These results confirmed the ability of a qualitative cytopathic neutralization test to predict correctly the Wa or DS-1 serotype. A strain of rhesus rotavirus (MMU 18006) was identified as belonging to the newly defined third serotype. Finally, an attempt was made to correlate previously published serotype analysis by neutralization of fluorescent cell-forming units with the results determined by the plaque reduction neutralization assay.

  19. Influence of Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction on coronary plaque analysis in coronary computed tomography angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precht, Helle; Kitslaar, Pieter H; Broersen, Alexander; Dijkstra, Jouke; Gerke, Oke; Thygesen, Jesper; Egstrup, Kenneth; Lambrechtsen, Jess

    The purpose of this study was to study the effect of iterative reconstruction (IR) software on quantitative plaque measurements in coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). Thirty patients with a three clinical risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD) had one CCTA performed. Images were reconstructed using FBP, 30% and 60% adaptive statistical IR (ASIR). Coronary plaque analysis was performed as per patient and per vessel (LM, LAD, CX and RCA) measurements. Lumen and vessel volumes and plaque burden measurements were based on automatic detected contours in each reconstruction. Lumen and plaque intensity measurements and HU based plaque characterization were based on corrected contours copied to each reconstruction. No significant changes between FBP and 30% ASIR were found except for lumen- (-2.53 HU) and plaque intensities (-1.28 HU). Between FBP and 60% ASIR the change in total volume showed an increase of 0.94%, 4.36% and 2.01% for lumen, plaque and vessel, respectively. The change in total plaque burden between FBP and 60% ASIR was 0.76%. Lumen and plaque intensities decreased between FBP and 60% ASIR with -9.90 HU and -1.97 HU, respectively. The total plaque component volume changes were all small with a maximum change of -1.13% of necrotic core between FBP and 60% ASIR. Quantitative plaque measurements only showed modest differences between FBP and the 60% ASIR level. Differences were increased lumen-, vessel- and plaque volumes, decreased lumen- and plaque intensities and a small percentage change in the individual plaque component volumes. Copyright © 2016 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Multiple viral plaques with sebaceous differentiation associated with an unclassified papillomavirus type in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, J S; Marshall, S; Thomson, N A; Kiupel, M; Heathcott, R W; French, A

    2017-07-01

    CASE HISTORY AND CLINICAL FINDINGS A 15-year-old neutered male domestic short-haired cat was presented due to multiple 0.5-2 cm-diameter crusting plaques in the left preauricular region, over the bridge of nose, and in the right periocular region. The plaques did not appear to cause discomfort. HISTOPATHOLOGICAL FINDINGS Biopsy samples of four plaques were examined histologically. Three plaques consisted of well-demarcated foci of mild epidermal hyperplasia overlying markedly hyperplastic sebaceous glands. Approximately 60% of the hyperplastic cells contained a large cytoplasmic vacuole that ranged from being clear to containing prominent grey-blue fibrillar material. The fourth plaque was composed solely of epidermal hyperplasia, consistent with previous descriptions of feline viral plaques. MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Papillomavirus DNA was amplified from all four plaques using PCR. A single DNA sequence was amplified from the plaques with sebaceous differentiation. This sequence was identical to the FdPV-MY sequence previously suggested to be from a putative unclassified papillomavirus type. Felis catus papillomavirus type 2 sequences were amplified from the plaque typical of feline viral plaques. Immunohistochemistry to detect p16 CDKN2A protein (p16) showed marked immunostaining throughout the hyperplastic epidermis and adnexal structures within the plaques with sebaceous differentiation. DIAGNOSIS Multiple feline viral plaques with variable sebaceous differentiation. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Feline viral plaques with sebaceous differentiation have not been previously reported in cats. The presence of unique cell changes within these lesions, the detection of an unclassified papillomavirus type, and the p16 immunostaining within these plaques suggest that they may have been caused by the papillomavirus that contains the FdPV-MY sequence.

  1. Dynamics of red fluorescent dental plaque during experimental gingivitis--A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, Monique H; Volgenant, Catherine M C; Keijser, Bart; Ten Cate, Jacob Bob M; Crielaard, Wim

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of red fluorescent plaque (RFP) in comparison to clinical plaque and bleeding scores were studied during an experimental gingivitis protocol in a cohort of healthy participants. Forty-one participants were monitored for RFP before (24h plaque), during 14 days plaque accumulation (days 2, 5, 9, 14) and after 7 days recovery (24h plaque). RFP was assessed on fluorescence photographs of the vestibular aspect of the anterior teeth (cuspid to cuspid) in the upper and lower jaw. Clinical plaque and bleeding were assessed at days -14, 0, 14 and 21. RFP of 24h plaque was reproducible (days -14, 0), then increased during 14 days plaque accumulation and returned to baseline after 7 days recovery. Groups of low, moderate and high RFP formers were statistically significantly different at all times even already at baseline. The individual RFP response during 14 days plaque accumulation correlated well with RFP of 24h plaque (days -14, 0). RFP correlated moderate to well with clinical plaque at days -14, 0, 14 and 21. From day 2 of the gingivitis challenge RFP correlated with bleeding at day 14. RFP provided an objective measure of oral hygiene status. Given the correlation with clinical parameters found, the amount of RFP after 24h plaque accumulation was indicatory for the inflammatory response during a prolonged period of no oral hygiene. This trial was registered at the public trial register ​of the Central Committee on Research Involving Human Subjects (CCMO) under number NL51111.029.14 CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: This paper shows the association between RFP after 24h plaque accumulation and inflammatory response after a prolonged period of no oral hygiene. Red plaque fluorescence can be used to identify subjects at risk for developing gingival inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. HDL-Mimetic PLGA Nanoparticle To Target Atherosclerosis Plaque Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Fay, Francois; Lobatto, Mark E.; Tang, Jun; Ouimet, Mireille; Kim, YongTae; van der Staay, Susanne E. M.; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Priem, Bram; Zhang, Liangfang; Fisher, Edward A.; Moore, Kathryn J; Langer, Robert; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2015-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a natural nanoparticle that exhibits an intrinsic affinity for atherosclerotic plaque macrophages. Its natural targeting capability as well as the option to incorporate lipophilic payloads, e.g., imaging or therapeutic components, in both the hydrophobic core and the phospholipid corona make the HDL platform an attractive nanocarrier. To realize controlled release properties, we developed a hybrid polymer/HDL nanoparticle composed of a lipid/apolipoprotein co...

  3. A rotational ablation tool for calcified atherosclerotic plaque removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Hyeng; Kim, Hyung-Jung; Kim, Nicholas N; Yoon, Hae-Sung; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2011-12-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major cardiovascular disease involving accumulations of lipids, white blood cells, and other materials on the inside of artery walls. Since the calcification found in the advanced stage of atherosclerosis dramatically enhances the mechanical properties of the plaque, restoring the original lumen of the artery remains a challenge. High-speed rotational atherectomy, when performed with an ablating grinder to remove the plaque, produces much better results in the treatment of calcified plaque compared to other methods. However, the high-speed rotation of the Rotablator commercial rotational atherectomy device produces microcavitation, which should be avoided because of the serious complications it can cause. This research involves the development of a high-speed rotational ablation tool that does not generate microcavitation. It relies on surface modification to achieve the required surface roughness. The surface roughness of the tool for differential cutting was designed based on lubrication theory, and the surface of the tool was modified using Nd:YAG laser beam engraving. Electron microscope images and profiles indicated that the engraved surface of the tool had approximately 1 μm of root mean square surface roughness. The ablation experiment was performed on hydroxyapatite/polylactide composite with an elastic modulus similar to that of calcified plaque. In addition, differential cutting was verified on silicone rubber with an elastic modulus similar to that of a normal artery. The tool performance and reliability were evaluated by measuring the ablation force exerted, the size of the debris generated during ablation, and through visual inspection of the silicone rubber surface.

  4. INTRACAMERAL AND INTRACORNEAL VORICONAZOLE IN DEEP KERATOMYCOSIS WITH ENDOTHELIAL PLAQUE

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivas Prasad; Srihari; Atul; Sambasiva Reddy; Sridhar,; Superna; Archana; Kranthi

    2015-01-01

    Fungal keratitis, one of the major causes of ophthalmic mycosis is second only to cataract as the most common cause of blindness worldwide. OBJECTIVE The aim was to study the intracorneal and intracameral Voriconazole in deep keratomycosis with endothelial plaque. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a study in the Cornea Clinic of Sarojini Devi Eye Hospital and Regional Institute of Ophthalmology, a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital of Osmania Medical College (Govt....

  5. Extracellular matrix proteomics identifies molecular signature of symptomatic carotid plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Sarah R; Willeit, Karin; Didangelos, Athanasios; Matic, Ljubica Perisic; Skroblin, Philipp; Barallobre-Barreiro, Javier; Lengquist, Mariette; Rungger, Gregor; Kapustin, Alexander; Kedenko, Ludmilla; Molenaar, Chris; Lu, Ruifang; Barwari, Temo; Suna, Gonca; Yin, Xiaoke; Iglseder, Bernhard; Paulweber, Bernhard; Willeit, Peter; Shalhoub, Joseph; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Davies, Alun H; Monaco, Claudia; Hedin, Ulf; Shanahan, Catherine M; Willeit, Johann; Kiechl, Stefan; Mayr, Manuel

    2017-04-03

    The identification of patients with high-risk atherosclerotic plaques prior to the manifestation of clinical events remains challenging. Recent findings question histology- and imaging-based definitions of the "vulnerable plaque," necessitating an improved approach for predicting onset of symptoms. We performed a proteomics comparison of the vascular extracellular matrix and associated molecules in human carotid endarterectomy specimens from 6 symptomatic versus 6 asymptomatic patients to identify a protein signature for high-risk atherosclerotic plaques. Proteomics data were integrated with gene expression profiling of 121 carotid endarterectomies and an analysis of protein secretion by lipid-loaded human vascular smooth muscle cells. Finally, epidemiological validation of candidate biomarkers was performed in two community-based studies. Proteomics and at least one of the other two approaches identified a molecular signature of plaques from symptomatic patients that comprised matrix metalloproteinase 9, chitinase 3-like-1, S100 calcium binding protein A8 (S100A8), S100A9, cathepsin B, fibronectin, and galectin-3-binding protein. Biomarker candidates measured in 685 subjects in the Bruneck study were associated with progression to advanced atherosclerosis and incidence of cardiovascular disease over a 10-year follow-up period. A 4-biomarker signature (matrix metalloproteinase 9, S100A8/S100A9, cathepsin D, and galectin-3-binding protein) improved risk prediction and was successfully replicated in an independent cohort, the SAPHIR study. The identified 4-biomarker signature may improve risk prediction and diagnostics for the management of cardiovascular disease. Further, our study highlights the strength of tissue-based proteomics for biomarker discovery. UK: British Heart Foundation (BHF); King's BHF Center; and the National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Center based at Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London in

  6. The Dental Plaque Microbiome in Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Scott N.; Snesrud, Erik; Liu, Jia; Ong, Ana C.; Kilian, Mogens; Schork, Nicholas J.; Bretz, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Dental decay is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases worldwide. A variety of factors, including microbial, genetic, immunological, behavioral and environmental, interact to contribute to dental caries onset and development. Previous studies focused on the microbial basis for dental caries have identified species associated with both dental health and disease. The purpose of the current study was to improve our knowledge of the microbial species involved in dental caries and health by performing a comprehensive 16S rDNA profiling of the dental plaque microbiome of both caries-free and caries-active subjects. Analysis of over 50,000 nearly full-length 16S rDNA clones allowed the identification of 1,372 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the dental plaque microbiome. Approximately half of the OTUs were common to both caries-free and caries-active microbiomes and present at similar abundance. The majority of differences in OTU’s reflected very low abundance phylotypes. This survey allowed us to define the population structure of the dental plaque microbiome and to identify the microbial signatures associated with dental health and disease. The deep profiling of dental plaque allowed the identification of 87 phylotypes that are over-represented in either caries-free or caries-active subjects. Among these signatures, those associated with dental health outnumbered those associated with dental caries by nearly two-fold. A comparison of this data to other published studies indicate significant heterogeneity in study outcomes and suggest that novel approaches may be required to further define the signatures of dental caries onset and progression. PMID:23520516

  7. The dental plaque microbiome in health and disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott N Peterson

    Full Text Available Dental decay is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases worldwide. A variety of factors, including microbial, genetic, immunological, behavioral and environmental, interact to contribute to dental caries onset and development. Previous studies focused on the microbial basis for dental caries have identified species associated with both dental health and disease. The purpose of the current study was to improve our knowledge of the microbial species involved in dental caries and health by performing a comprehensive 16S rDNA profiling of the dental plaque microbiome of both caries-free and caries-active subjects. Analysis of over 50,000 nearly full-length 16S rDNA clones allowed the identification of 1,372 operational taxonomic units (OTUs in the dental plaque microbiome. Approximately half of the OTUs were common to both caries-free and caries-active microbiomes and present at similar abundance. The majority of differences in OTU's reflected very low abundance phylotypes. This survey allowed us to define the population structure of the dental plaque microbiome and to identify the microbial signatures associated with dental health and disease. The deep profiling of dental plaque allowed the identification of 87 phylotypes that are over-represented in either caries-free or caries-active subjects. Among these signatures, those associated with dental health outnumbered those associated with dental caries by nearly two-fold. A comparison of this data to other published studies indicate significant heterogeneity in study outcomes and suggest that novel approaches may be required to further define the signatures of dental caries onset and progression.

  8. Ichthyosiform large plaque parapsoriasis: Report of a rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falguni Nag

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Large plaque parapsoriasis (LPP is an idiopathic, chronic scaly dermatosis classified within parapsoriasis group of diseases, occurring commonly in middle aged patients of all races and geographic regions. LPP and its variants are closely related to the patch stage of mycosis fungoides. The two types of LPP mostly described are the poikilodermatous and retiform parapsoriasis. We are reporting an ichthyosiform LPP for its rarity.

  9. Murine atherosclerotic plaque imaging with the USPIO Ferumoxtran-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Gert; Kampf, Thomas; Ziener, Christan; Parczyk, Marco; Bauer, Elizabeth; Herold, Volker; Rommel, Eberhard; Jakob, Peter Michael; Bauer, Wolfgang Rudolf

    2009-01-01

    In this study we intended to image plaque inflammation in a murine model of atherosclerosis with MRI and Ferumoxtran-10 (Sinerem, Guerbet, France). 8 apoE-/- mice were injected 500 micromol Fe/kg or 1000 micromol Fe/kg Ferumoxtran-10. 2 apoE-/- mice were injected NaCl. After a post-contrast time of 24 to 336 hours the mice were scarificed and the aortas were imaged ex vivo. All measurements were performed on a 17.6 Tesla Bruker AVANCE 750WB MR scanner (Bruker, Germany). Spin-echo sequences and gradient-echo sequences with variable TE were performed and T2* maps were generated. Prussian-blue and hematoxilin-eosin histology were obtained afterwards and iron-uptake was quantified by counting iron positive areas. 2 apoE-/- mice were imaged in vivo before and 48 hours after 1000 micromol Fe/kg. Atheroma iron uptake was not elevated after 24 hours compared to controls. 48 hours after 1000 micromol Fe/kg but not 500 micromol Fe/kg histology revealed a 1.3- fold increase in plaque iron content compared to NaCl injected mice. Normalized T2*-times decreased from 0.86+/-0.02 in controls to 0.66+/-0.15 after a dose of 500 micromol Fe/ml and 0.59+/-0.14 in mice injected with 1000 micromol Fe/Kg (p=0.038). These results translated into a mean of 122% increase in CNR, as measured by in vivo MRI. We have demonstrated that Ferumoxtran-10 is taken up by atherosclerotic plaques in untreated apoE-/- mice and this alters plaque signal properties.

  10. Supragingival plaque microbial analysis in reflection to caries experience

    OpenAIRE

    Mannaa Alaa; Carlén Anette; Campus Guglielmo; Lingström Peter

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Dental caries develops as a result of the metabolism of carbohydrates by cariogenic bacteria present in a complex biofilm. The present study aimed to examine if bacteria in pooled supragingival plaque samples quantified using a “checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization” based panel of caries-related bacteria, could reflect the caries experience in a manner similar to saliva samples analysed using a chair-side method in a previous investigation. Methods A total of 86 mothers and ...

  11. Adherence of plaque components to different restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, K; Urano, M

    2001-01-01

    This study compared the amount of artificial plaque synthesized in vitro by Streptococcus sobrinus on various dental materials using radioisotopes. In particular, plaque-retaining capacities of new types of ceramics were the focus of this study. Specimens were fabricated from the following materials (one amalgam alloy [Spherical-D], one casting gold alloy [Casting Gold TYPE I], one resin composite [Herculite XR] and three ceramics [Vita Celay Blanks, IPS Empress and Dicor MGC]). The amount of bacteria and glucans adhered on the specimens was measured after incubation for 24 hours at 37 degrees C with radio-labeled cariogenic bacteria and sucrose. This adhesion test was performed using two different surfaces with 600-grit roughness and clinical smoothness. Irrespective of the surface roughness, the least amount of plaque adhered to the ceramics. However, in the case of the resin composite and amalgam, the amount of bacteria and glucan adhesion decreased dramatically by polishing, though there were no statistically different changes in the amount of bacteria and glucans that adhered to the ceramics even after polishing. In general, the amount of adhered bacteria showed almost the same tendency as that of glucans. Although no statistical differences in the amount of bacteria and glucan adhesion were detected among the three ceramics investigated in this study, a lesser amount of bacteria and glucans adhered to them compared to the other materials.

  12. HDL-mimetic PLGA nanoparticle to target atherosclerosis plaque macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L; Fay, Francois; Lobatto, Mark E; Tang, Jun; Ouimet, Mireille; Kim, YongTae; van der Staay, Susanne E M; van Rijs, Sarian M; Priem, Bram; Zhang, Liangfang; Fisher, Edward A; Moore, Kathryn J; Langer, Robert; Fayad, Zahi A; Mulder, Willem J M

    2015-03-18

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a natural nanoparticle that exhibits an intrinsic affinity for atherosclerotic plaque macrophages. Its natural targeting capability as well as the option to incorporate lipophilic payloads, e.g., imaging or therapeutic components, in both the hydrophobic core and the phospholipid corona make the HDL platform an attractive nanocarrier. To realize controlled release properties, we developed a hybrid polymer/HDL nanoparticle composed of a lipid/apolipoprotein coating that encapsulates a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) core. This novel HDL-like nanoparticle (PLGA-HDL) displayed natural HDL characteristics, including preferential uptake by macrophages and a good cholesterol efflux capacity, combined with a typical PLGA nanoparticle slow release profile. In vivo studies carried out with an ApoE knockout mouse model of atherosclerosis showed clear accumulation of PLGA-HDL nanoparticles in atherosclerotic plaques, which colocalized with plaque macrophages. This biomimetic platform integrates the targeting capacity of HDL biomimetic nanoparticles with the characteristic versatility of PLGA-based nanocarriers.

  13. Highlighting Interleukin-36 Signalling in Plaque Psoriasis and Pustular Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furue, Kazuhisa; Yamamura, Kazuhiko; Tsuji, Gaku; Mitoma, Chikage; Uchi, Hiroshi; Nakahara, Takeshi; Kido-Nakahara, Makiko; Kadono, Takafumi; Furue, Masutaka

    2018-01-12

    Plaque psoriasis and pustular psoriasis are overlapping, but distinct, disorders. The therapeutic response to biologics supports the pivotal role of the tumour necrosis alpha (TNF-?)/ interleukin (IL)-23/IL-17/IL-22 axis in the pathogenesis of these disorders. Recently, functional activation of the IL-36 receptor (IL-36R) was discovered to be another driving force in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. This was first highlighted by the discovery that a loss-of-function mutation of the IL-36R antagonist (IL-36Ra) causes pustular psoriasis. Although the TNF-?/IL-23/IL-17/IL-22 axis and the functional activation of IL-36R are fundamentally involved in plaque psoriasis and pustular psoriasis, respectively, the 2 pathways are closely related and mutually reinforced, resulting in full-blown clinical manifestations. This review summarizes current topics on how IL-36 agonists (IL-36?, IL-36?, IL-36?) signal IL-36R, the pathological expression of IL-36 agonists and IL-36Ra in plaque and pustular psoriatic lesions, and the cross-talk between the TNF-?/IL-23/IL-17/IL-22 axis and the functional activation of IL-36R in the epidermal milieu.

  14. Optimization of sup 125 I ophthalmic plaque brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astrahan, M.A.; Luxton, G.; Jozsef, G.; Liggett, P.E.; Petrovich, Z. (Univ. of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Episcleral plaques containing {sup 125}I sources are often used in the treatment of ocular melanoma. Within four years post-treatment, however, the majority of patients experience some visual loss due to radiation retinopathy. The high incidence of late complications suggests that careful treatment optimization may lead to improved outcome. The goal of optimization would be to reduce the magnitude of vision-limiting complications without compromising tumor control. We have developed a three-dimensional computer model for ophthalmic plaque therapy which permits us to explore the potential of various optimization strategies. One simple strategy which shows promise is to maximize the ratio of dose to the tumor apex (T) compared to dose to the macula (M). By modifying the parameters of source location, activity distribution, source orientation, and shielding we find that the calculated T:M ratio can be varied by a factor of 2 for a common plaque design and posterior tumor location. Margins and dose to the tumor volume remain essentially unchanged.

  15. Increased subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with chronic plaque psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evensen, Kristin; Slevolden, Ellen; Skagen, Karolina; Rønning, Ole Morten; Brunborg, Cathrine; Krogstad, Anne-Lene; Russell, David

    2014-12-01

    Psoriasis is an immune-mediated inflammatory skin condition of unknown aetiology which usually requires life-long treatment. It is regarded a systemic inflammatory disease with a possible increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to assess carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), plaque prevalence and carotid stenosis as surrogate measures for cardiovascular disease in psoriasis patients and healthy controls. Sixty-two patients with psoriasis and thirty-one healthy controls were included in the study. All were examined by Colour duplex ultrasound of the carotid arteries to compare carotid IMT values, carotid plaques and carotid stenosis in the two groups. Adjustments were made for traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Patients with psoriasis had increased carotid IMT values compared to the controls: mean ± SD 0.71 ± 0.17 mm vs. 0.59 ± 0.08 mm; p = 0.001. When adjusted for known atherosclerotic risk factors this difference remained significant (p = 0.04). Carotid plaques were also more common (p = 0.03) in patients with psoriasis 13 (21%) compared to controls 1 (3%). There was no difference with regard to the number of carotid stenoses in patients and controls. The results of this study support previous evidence which suggests that psoriasis is associated with an increased risk for atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of two toothpastes on plaque and gingival inflamation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxer, U P; Menghini, G; Bohnert, K J; Ley, F

    1995-01-01

    In this study on 60 adult subjects, the effective of Parodontax, a dentifrice containing herbal ingredients and sodium bicarbonate abrasive, was compared to a non-marketed new toothpaste containing herbal ingredients and calcium hydrogen phosphate as the abrasive. Plaque, gingivitis and gingival bleeding parameters were scored. The periodontal probe bleeding index of Ainamo and Bay was modified to score slight and moderate bleeding. In this first four-week period all subjects used the new toothpaste. After this period the new toothpaste produced a significant decrease (p<0.01) in gingivitis and bleeding on probing, but no effect on plaque was observed. During the second period of eight weeks the subjects were randomly divided into two groups, one using Parodontax and the other group continuing with the new toothpaste. The study design was a double-blind procedure. At the end of the 12-week study period the plaque index showed no changes in both groups. The gingivitis and bleeding indices decreased significantly (p<0.001) by 40% in both groups compared to the baseline examination.

  17. Postoperative radiotherapy of pterygium with Strontium-90 plaque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Michinori; Hada, Yoshihiro; Akagi, Yasushi [National Hospital of Kure, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2000-06-01

    Between 1979 and 1998, radiotherapy with a Strontium (Sr)-90 plaque after pterygium excision was administered in 36 patients (40 eyes). All lesions were nasal (rt. eyes 21, lt. eyes 19). Thirty-eight were primary pterygia and 2 were recurrent ones. The study included 18 males and 18 females, 43 to 80 years of age (median: 64). The interval between pterygium excision and postoperative radiotherapy was less than 24 hours in 17 cases, 2 days in 1, 4 days in 3, 9 days in 5 and 10 days and more in 14. Although total radiation dose in all patients was 40 Gy in the Sr-90 plaque surface, the daily dose fraction was 8 Gy in 20 cases until 1985 and 10 Gy in 20 cases after 1985. All courses of radiotherapy were delivered using once-daily fractionation, 1 day per week. The median follow-up period was 43 months (range, 12-180 months). Of 40 lesions, 5 recurred. Of the 5 recurrent cases, 4 recurred within 5 months after treatment. The remaining 1 case recurred in 30 months. The local control rate at 2 years was 90% in all cases. No significant difference in local control rates was seen for the subgroups classified by age, gender, primary or recurrent, interval between pterygium excision and radiotherapy or treatment time. No patients had severe radiation-induced complications. Postoperative radiotherapy with a Sr-90 plaque was safe and effective in preventing local recurrence after pterygium excision. (author)

  18. Effect of a single-use toothbrush on plaque microflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai Vidya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study and compare the microbial flora of dental plaque after the use of a self-contaminated toothbrush and that of a single-use toothbrush. Materials and Methods: The study group included 40 young volunteers from Yenepoya Dental College, who were free from any systemic or oral disease. In these subjects, plaque samples were collected after 1 month use of a self-contaminated toothbrush. Each subject was given a set of 30 new toothbrushes and a toothpaste tube and instructed to use one toothbrush everyday and discard it after use. The plaque samples were collected on a weekly interval and cultured on Mitis Salivarius agar. The colonies were identified and speciated and their count was recorded. Results: Streptococcus mitis, S. mutans, S. sanguis, S. milleri and Candida were recovered from the samples. A highly significant decrease in their numbers was found after the use of a single-use toothbrush (P value 0.001. Conclusions : As a contaminated toothbrush can reintroduce microorganisms into the oral cavity, it may be a sound practice to change the toothbrush as frequently as possible.

  19. Supragingival plaque microbial analysis in reflection to caries experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannaa Alaa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dental caries develops as a result of the metabolism of carbohydrates by cariogenic bacteria present in a complex biofilm. The present study aimed to examine if bacteria in pooled supragingival plaque samples quantified using a “checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization” based panel of caries-related bacteria, could reflect the caries experience in a manner similar to saliva samples analysed using a chair-side method in a previous investigation. Methods A total of 86 mothers and their children aged 4–6 years and 12–16 years old participated. Caries experience (DMFT/dmft; Decayed, Missing and Filled Teeth for permanent and primary teeth was registered clinically and radiographically. Caries was recorded at the D3 level (caries into dentine. The D/d component was divided into three categories. A pooled supragingival plaque sample per participant was obtained from posterior approximal sites. Analyses of 15 bacterial species were performed using the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridisation technique. Results No significant relationships were found between the bacterial scores and DMFT/dmft nor D/d groups. Conclusions Unlike the saliva samples and the chair-side method, interproximal pooled plaque samples analysed using the “checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique” did not reveal any significant relations between the bacterial counts and the caries experience.

  20. Supragingival plaque microbial analysis in reflection to caries experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannaa, Alaa; Carlén, Anette; Campus, Guglielmo; Lingström, Peter

    2013-01-08

    Dental caries develops as a result of the metabolism of carbohydrates by cariogenic bacteria present in a complex biofilm. The present study aimed to examine if bacteria in pooled supragingival plaque samples quantified using a "checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization" based panel of caries-related bacteria, could reflect the caries experience in a manner similar to saliva samples analysed using a chair-side method in a previous investigation. A total of 86 mothers and their children aged 4-6 years and 12-16 years old participated. Caries experience (DMFT/dmft; Decayed, Missing and Filled Teeth for permanent and primary teeth) was registered clinically and radiographically. Caries was recorded at the D3 level (caries into dentine). The D/d component was divided into three categories. A pooled supragingival plaque sample per participant was obtained from posterior approximal sites. Analyses of 15 bacterial species were performed using the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridisation technique. No significant relationships were found between the bacterial scores and DMFT/dmft nor D/d groups. Unlike the saliva samples and the chair-side method, interproximal pooled plaque samples analysed using the "checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique" did not reveal any significant relations between the bacterial counts and the caries experience.

  1. Harvesting microalgae grown on wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udom, Innocent; Zaribaf, Behnaz H; Halfhide, Trina; Gillie, Benjamin; Dalrymple, Omatoyo; Zhang, Qiong; Ergas, Sarina J

    2013-07-01

    The costs and life cycle impacts of microalgae harvesting for biofuel production were investigated. Algae were grown in semi-continuous culture in pilot-scale photobioreactors under natural light with anaerobic digester centrate as the feed source. Algae suspensions were collected and the optimal coagulant dosages for metal salts (alum, ferric chloride), cationic polymer (Zetag 8819), anionic polymer (E-38) and natural coagulants (Moringa Oleifera and Opuntia ficus-indica cactus) were determined using jar tests. The relative dewaterability of the algae cake was estimated by centrifugation. Alum, ferric chloride and cationic polymer could all achieve >91% algae recovery at optimal dosages. Life cycle assessment (LCA) and cost analysis results revealed that cationic polymer had the lowest cost but the highest environmental impacts, while ferric chloride had the highest cost and lowest environmental impacts. Based on the LCA results, belt presses are the recommended algae dewatering technology prior to oil extraction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Regional brain hypometabolism is unrelated to regional amyloid plaque burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Andre; Ng, Bernard; Landau, Susan M; Jagust, William J; Greicius, Michael D

    2015-12-01

    In its original form, the amyloid cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease holds that fibrillar deposits of amyloid are an early, driving force in pathological events leading ultimately to neuronal death. Early clinicopathological investigations highlighted a number of inconsistencies leading to an updated hypothesis in which amyloid plaques give way to amyloid oligomers as the driving force in pathogenesis. Rather than focusing on the inconsistencies, amyloid imaging studies have tended to highlight the overlap between regions that show early amyloid plaque signal on positron emission tomography and that also happen to be affected early in Alzheimer's disease. Recent imaging studies investigating the regional dependency between metabolism and amyloid plaque deposition have arrived at conflicting results, with some showing regional associations and other not. We extracted multimodal neuroimaging data from the Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging database for 227 healthy controls and 434 subjects with mild cognitive impairment. We analysed regional patterns of amyloid deposition, regional glucose metabolism and regional atrophy using florbetapir ((18)F) positron emission tomography, (18)F-fluordeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. Specifically, we derived grey matter density and standardized uptake value ratios for both positron emission tomography tracers in 404 functionally defined regions of interest. We examined the relation between regional glucose metabolism and amyloid plaques using linear models. For each region of interest, correcting for regional grey matter density, age, education and disease status, we tested the association of regional glucose metabolism with (i) cortex-wide florbetapir uptake; (ii) regional (i.e. in the same region of interest) florbetapir uptake; and (iii) regional florbetapir uptake while correcting in addition for cortex-wide florbetapir uptake. P-values for each setting

  3. Distribution of dental plaque and gingivitis within the dental arches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasan, Prem K; Prasad, Kakarla V V

    2017-10-01

    Objective The natural accumulation of supragingival plaque on surfaces of human teeth is associated with gingival inflammation and the initiation of common oral diseases. This study evaluated the distribution of dental plaque and gingivitis scores within the dental arches after prophylaxis. Methods Adult subjects from the Dharwad, India area representing the general population who provided written informed consent were scheduled for screening. Healthy subjects over the age of 18 years, not currently requiring any medical or dental care, and presenting with a complement of at least 20 natural teeth were recruited for this parallel design study. Enrolled subjects (n = 41) underwent oral examinations for dental plaque (PI) and gingivitis (GI) using the Turesky modification of the Quigley-Hein and the Löe-Silness Index, respectively, at the baseline visit, followed by a whole mouth dental prophylaxis. Subjects were given fluoride toothpaste for twice daily oral hygiene for the next 30 days. Subjects were recalled on days 15 and 30 for PI and GI examinations identical to baseline. Results Analyses indicated that mean scores for PI and GI on either arch and the whole mouth were higher than 2 and 1, respectively, during all examinations. Anterior surfaces consistently exhibited lower PI scores than posterior regions of either arch, or the entire dentition. Regional GI differences within the dentition were similar to PI scores, with lower scores on anterior than posterior teeth. Prophylaxis reduced both the frequency and mean scores of both PI and GI, irrespective of arch, with lower scores observed on anterior than posterior regions during all recall visits. Molar and lingual regions consistently exhibited higher PI and GI scores compared with anterior surfaces. At all examinations, mean scores for both plaque and gingivitis were higher on approximal vestibular than mid-vestibular surfaces. Conclusions Differences observed in PI and GI within the dentition have

  4. Spectral CT imaging of vulnerable plaque with two independent biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baturin, Pavlo; Alivov, Yahya; Molloi, Sabee

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of a novel four-material decomposition technique for assessing the vulnerability of plaque with two contrast materials spectral computer tomography (CT) using two independent markers: plaque's inflammation and spotty calcification. A simulation study was conducted using an energy-sensitive photon-counting detector for k-edge imaging of the coronary arteries. In addition to detecting the inflammation status, which is known as a biological marker of a plaque's vulnerability, we use spotty calcium concentration as an independent marker to test a plaque's vulnerability. We have introduced a new method for detecting and quantifying calcium concentrations in the presence of two contrast materials (iodine and gold), calcium and soft tissue background. In this method, four-material decomposition was performed on a pixel-by-pixel basis, assuming there was an arbitrary mixture of materials in the voxel. The concentrations of iodine and gold were determined by the k-edge material decomposition based on the maximum likelihood method. The calibration curves of the attenuation coefficients, with respect to the concentrations of different materials, were used to separate the calcium signal from both contrast materials and different soft tissues in the mixtures. Three different materials (muscle, blood and lipid) were independently used as soft tissue. The simulations included both ideal and more realistic energy resolving detectors to measure the polychromatic photon spectrum in single slice parallel beam geometry. The ideal detector was used together with a 3 cm diameter digital phantom to demonstrate the decomposition method while a more realistic detector and a 33 × 24 cm2 digital chest phantom were simulated to validate the vulnerability assessment technique. A 120 kVp spectrum was generated to produce photon flux sufficient for detecting contrast materials above the k-edges of iodine (33.2 keV) and gold (80.7 ke

  5. OCT-measured plaque free wall angle is indicative for plaque burden: overcoming the main limitation of OCT?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogendoorn, Ayla; Gnanadesigan, Muthukaruppan; Zahnd, Guillaume; van Ditzhuijzen, Nienke S; Schuurbiers, Johan C H; van Soest, Gijs; Regar, Evelyn; Wentzel, Jolanda J

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the plaque free wall (PFW) measured by optical coherence tomography (OCT) and the plaque burden (PB) measured by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). We hypothesize that measurement of the PFW could help to estimate the PB, thereby overcoming the limited ability of OCT to visualize the external elastic membrane in the presence of plaque. This could enable selection of the optimal stent-landing zone by OCT, which is traditionally defined by IVUS as a region with a PB OCT and IVUS) were measured in 18 matched IVUS and OCT pullbacks acquired in the same coronary artery. We determined the relationship between OCT measured PFW (PFWOCT) and IVUS PB (PBIVUS) by non-linear regression analysis. An ROC-curve analysis was used to determine the optimal cut-off value of PFW angle for the detection of PB < 40 %. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated. There is a significant correlation between PFWOCT and PBIVUS (r(2) = 0.59). The optimal cut-off value of the PFWOCT for the prediction of a PBIVUS < 40 % is ≥220° with a PPV of 78 % and an NPV of 84 %. This study shows that PFWOCT can be considered as a surrogate marker for PBIVUS, which is currently a common criterion to select an optimal stent-landing zone.

  6. Efficacy of two soft-bristle toothbrushes in plaque removal: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassiano Kuchenbecker ROSING

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy in supragingival plaque removal of two soft-bristle toothbrushes. Seventy volunteers were allocated randomly to the Colgate Slim Soft or Curaprox CS5460 toothbrush grourps. At baseline appointment, volunteers underwent plaque examination using the Rustogi Modification of the Navy Plaque Index. Under supervision, they then brushed their teeth for 1minute with their assigned toothbrushes and the plaque examination was repeated. Volunteers performed daily oral hygiene with their assigned toothbrush and a regular dentifrice provided by the researchers for 7 days. The baseline experimental procedures were then repeated. Separate analyses of variance were performed for the whole-mouth, interproximal, and gumline plaque scores (p < 0.05. No difference in baseline pre-brushing scores was found between groups. After a single toothbrushing, the mean plaque score was significantly reduced in both groups (p < 0.05, with greater reduction of whole-mouth and interproximal plaque scores observed in the SlimSoft group compared with the Curaprox group (p < 0.05. After 7 days, the SlimSoft group showed greater reduction of the whole-mouth and interproximal plaque scores compared with the Curaprox group (p < 0.05. In conclusion, the SlimSoft toothbrush presented greater efficacy in supragingival plaque removal than did the Curaprox CS5460 toothbrush, as reflected by whole-mouth and interproximal plaque scores.

  7. Vascular neuropeptide Y contributes to atherosclerotic plaque progression and perivascular mast cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagraauw, H Maxime; Westra, Marijke M; Bot, Martine; Wezel, Anouk; van Santbrink, Peter J; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Biessen, Erik A L; Kuiper, Johan; Bot, Ilze

    2014-07-01

    Neuropeptide Y is an abundantly expressed neurotransmitter capable of modulating both immune and metabolic responses related to the development of atherosclerosis. NPY receptors are expressed by a number of vascular wall cell types, among which mast cells. However, the direct effects of NPY on atherosclerotic plaque development and progression remain to be investigated. In this study we thus aimed to determine whether NPY is expressed in atherosclerotic plaques and to establish its role in atherosclerotic plaque development. NPY expression was seen to be increased up to 2-fold in unstable human endarterectomy plaques, as compared to stable plaques, and to be significantly upregulated during lesion progression in apoE(-/-) mice. In apoE(-/-) mice focal overexpression of NPY in the carotid artery significantly increased atherosclerotic plaque size compared to controls, while plaque composition was unaffected. Interestingly, perivascular mast cell activation was significantly higher in the NPY-overexpressing mice, suggesting that NPY may impact plaque progression in part via mast cell activation. Furthermore, in vitro NPY-induced murine mast cell activation resulted in the release of pro-atherogenic mediators including IL-6 and tryptase. Our data show that NPY expression is increased during atherogenesis and in particular in unstable plaques. Furthermore, perivascular overexpression of NPY promoted plaque development and perivascular mast cell activation, suggestive of a role for NPY-induced mast cell activation in lesion progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Natural history of dental plaque accumulation in mechanically ventilated adults: a descriptive correlational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Deborah J; Munro, Cindy L; Grap, Mary Jo

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the pattern of dental plaque accumulation in mechanically ventilated adults. Accumulation of dental plaque and bacterial colonisation of the oropharynx is associated with a number of systemic diseases including ventilator associated pneumonia. Data were collected from mechanically ventilated critically ill adults (n=137), enrolled within 24 hours of intubation. Dental plaque, counts of decayed, missing and filled teeth and systemic antibiotic use was assessed on study days 1, 3, 5 and 7. Dental plaque averages per study day, tooth type and tooth location were analysed. Medical respiratory, surgical trauma and neuroscience ICU's of a large tertiary care centre in the southeast United States. Plaque: all surfaces >60% plaque coverage from day 1 to day 7; molars and premolars contained greatest plaque average >70%. Systemic antibiotic use on day 1 had no significant effect on plaque accumulation on day 3 (p=0.73). Patients arrive in critical care units with preexisting oral hygiene issues. Dental plaque tends to accumulate in the posterior teeth (molars and premolars) that may be hard for nurses to visualise and reach; this problem may be exacerbated by endotracheal tubes and other equipment. Knowing accumulation trends of plaque will guide the development of effective oral care protocols. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Ultrasonographic and histological analysis of atheromatous plaques in carotid arteries and apoplectic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkowski, Aleksander; Parafiniuk, Mirosław; Poncyljusz, Wojciech; Kaczmarczyk, Mariusz; Wilk, Grazyna

    2007-05-01

    The aim of the study was to compare a computer assessment of carotid plaques with the quantity and distribution of inflammatory cells in the plaques and to find correlation with the incidence of cerebral stroke. The material consisted of 20 carotid plaques causing stenoses of internal carotid arteries ranging from 70 to 99%. USG images of the plaques were assessed by a computer-assisted program for image analysis. For each plaque a histogram was obtained for which the gray scale median (GSM), a measure of plaque echogenicity, was determined. Then the quantity and distribution of inflammatory cells in plaques taken during endarterectomy were assessed and these data were compared with the GSM and the incidence of stroke. Moreover, grouping of cases according to histometric variables was analyzed. Statistical analysis showed a considerable correlation between low GSM and the incidence of stroke. At the same time, a correlation between the presence of inflammatory cells on the edges of plaque with a low GSM was found and the analysis of clusters demonstrated a significant increase in the number of patients with strokes. The use of computer analysis of USG images allows determining the echogenicity of any carotid plaque and can be applied in clinical studies in which the aim is to find characteristic parameters for an unstable plaque.

  10. Multiple yellow plaques assessed by angioscopy with quantitative colorimetry in patients with myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inami, Shigenobu; Ishibashi, Fumiyuki; Waxman, Sergio; Okamatsu, Kentaro; Seimiya, Koji; Takano, Masamichi; Uemura, Ryota; Sano, Junko; Mizuno, Kyoichi

    2008-03-01

    Multiple angioscopic yellow plaques are associated with diffuse atherosclerotic plaque, and may be prevalent in patients with myocardial infarction (MI), so in the present study the yellow plaques in the coronary arteries of patients with MI was evaluated using quantitative colorimetry, and compared with those of patients with stable angina (SA). In the recorded angioscopic images of 3 coronary vessels in 29 patients (15 patients with MI, 14 with SA), yellow plaques were determined as visually yellow regions with b* value >0 (yellow color intensity) measured by the quantitative colorimetric method. A total of 90 yellow plaques were identified (b* =19.35+/-8.3, 3.05-45.35). Yellow plaques were significantly more prevalent in 14 (93%) of 15 culprit lesions of MI as compared with 8 (57%) of 14 of SA (p=0.03). In non-culprit segments, yellow plaques were similarly prevalent in 13 (87%) patients with MI and 11 (79%) with SA (p=0.65). Overall, multiple (> or =2) yellow plaques were prevalent in 13 (87%) patients with MI, similar to the 10 (71%) with SA (p=0.38). The number of yellow plaques was significantly higher in patients with MI (3.8+/-1.9) than in those with SA (2.4+/-1.6, p=0.03). The present study suggests that patients with MI tend to have diffuse atherosclerotic plaque in their coronary arteries.

  11. Association of gingivitis with dental calculus thickness or dental calculus coverage and subgingival bacteria in feline leukemia virus- and feline immunodeficiency virus-negative cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thengchaisri, Naris; Steiner, Jörg M.; Suchodolski, Jan S.; Sattasathuchana, Panpicha

    2017-01-01

    Periodontal disease is the most common oral disease in cats. The objectives of this study were to determine the relationships between gingivitis and dental calculus thickness (DCT), or dental calculus coverage (DCC); determine the association of gingivitis scores and types of oral bacteria; and to evaluate bacterial co-infection in cats with periodontal disease. Twelve cats that were not infected with feline leukemia or feline immunodeficiency viruses were enrolled in the study. Gingivitis, DCT, and DCC were scored and recorded. A Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare scores among canine, 2nd premolar, 3rd premolar, 4th premolar, and 1st molar teeth. The relationship between gingivitis and DCT or DCC scores was determined using the Spearman rank sum test (ρ). Subgingival bacteria were cultured and the association between bacterial species and gingivitis score was evaluated using a Fisher’s exact test. The average gingivitis, DCT, and DCC scores for the caudal maxillary teeth were higher for the caudal mandibular teeth and more severe for the 3rd premolar, 4th premolar, and 1st molar teeth than for the canine teeth. A strong relationship between average DCT or DCC score and average gingivitis score was found (ρ = 0.96 and 1, respectively). Aerobic and anaerobic bacterial infections were identified in a large number of cats with periodontal disease (71.1% and 28.9%, respectively). In conclusion, severe gingivitis scores were associated with anaerobic bacterial infection. The caudal teeth are affected with more severe gingivitis, DCT, and DCC than the other teeth. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be prescribed in cats with periodontal disease. PMID:28154463

  12. Quantitative assessment of changes in carotid plaques during cilostazol administration using three-dimensional ultrasonography and non-gated magnetic resonance plaque imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Mao; Ohba, Hideki; Mori, Kiyofumi; Narumi, Shinsuke; Katsura, Noriyuki; Ohura, Kazumasa; Terayama, Yasuo [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurology and Gerontology, Morioka (Japan); Sasaki, Makoto; Kudo, Kohsuke [Iwate Medical University, Division of Ultrahigh Field MRI, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Morioka (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Cilostazol, an antiplatelet agent, is reported to induce the regression of atherosclerotic changes. However, its effects on carotid plaques are unknown. Hence, we quantitatively investigated the changes that occur within carotid plaques during cilostazol administration using three-dimensional (3D) ultrasonography (US) and non-gated magnetic resonance (MR) plaque imaging. We prospectively examined 16 consecutive patients with carotid stenosis. 3D-US and T1-weighted MR plaque imaging were performed at baseline and 6 months after initiating cilostazol therapy (200 mg/day). We measured the volume and grayscale median (GSM) of the plaques from 3D-US data. We also calculated the contrast ratio (CR) of the carotid plaque against the adjacent muscle and areas of the intraplaque components: fibrous tissue, lipid, and hemorrhage components. The plaque volume on US decreased significantly (median at baseline and 6 months, 0.23 and 0.21 cm{sup 3}, respectively; p = 0.03). In the group exhibiting a plaque volume reduction of more than 10%, GSM on US increased significantly (24.8 and 71.5, respectively; p = 0.04) and CR on MRI decreased significantly (1.13 and 1.04, respectively; p = 0.02). In this group, in addition, the percent area of the fibrous component on MRI increased significantly (68.6% and 79.4%, respectively; p = 0.02), while those of the lipid and hemorrhagic components decreased (24.9% and 20.5%, respectively; p = 0.12) (1.0% and 0.0%, respectively; p = 0.04). There were no substantial changes in intraplaque characteristics in either US or MRI in the other group. 3D-US and MR plaque imaging can quantitatively detect changes in the size and composition of carotid plaques during cilostazol therapy. (orig.)

  13. In vivo coronary artery plaque assessment with computed tomography angiography: is there an impact of iterative reconstruction on plaque volume and attenuation metrics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongyi; Boldeanu, Irina; Nepveu, Simon; Durand, Madeleine; Chin, Anne S; Kauffmann, Claude; Mansour, Samer; Soulez, Gilles; Tremblay, Cécile; Chartrand-Lefebvre, Carl

    2017-06-01

    Background Coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) allows the evaluation of coronary plaque volume and low attenuation (lipid-rich) component, for plaque vulnerability assessment. Purpose To determine the effect of iterative reconstruction (IR) on coronary plaque volume and composition. Material and Methods Consecutive patients without coronary artery disease were prospectively enrolled for 256-slice CT. Images were reconstructed with both filtered back projection (FBP) and a hybrid IR algorithm (iDose4, Philips) levels 1, 3, 5, and 7. Coronary plaques were assessed according to predefined Hounsfield unit (HU) attenuation intervals, for total plaque and HU-interval volumes. Results Fifty-three patients (mean age, 53.6 years) were included. Noise was significantly decreased and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) / contrast-to-noise (CNR) were both significantly improved at all IR levels in comparison to FBP. Plaque characterization was performed in 41 patients for a total of 125 plaques. Total plaque volume ranged from 104.4 ± 120.7 to 107.4 ± 128.9 mm3 and low attenuation plaque component from 40.5 ± 54.7 to 43.5 ± 58.9 mm3, with no statistically significant differences between all IR levels and FBP ( P = 0.786 and P ≥ 0.078, respectively). Conclusion IR improved image quality. Total and low attenuation plaque volumes were similar using either IR or FBP.

  14. Dental plaque removal efficacy of three toothbrushes with different designs: A comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirapelli, Camila; de Carvalho, José Ferreira; Ribas, José Paulo; Panzeri, Heitor

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed to compare dental plaque removal efficacy of three manual toothbrushes. Three toothbrushes (Colgate Flexível - Colgate (T1), Oral B Advantage Control Grip - Oral B (T2), Comfort Clean - Johnson & Johnson - Reach (T3) were evaluated for dental plaque removal in 17 subjects. Dental plaque was scored before and after seven days' use of each toothbrush, employing an adaptation of Quigley-Hein Index modified by Turesky (Plaque Index). Assessments were performed at days 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35. At the end of the trial each subject was asked which toothbrush was preferred. Final dental plaque scores for toothbrush T3 were statistically different from toothbrushes T1 and T2, which in turn did not differ from each other. Subjects showed preference towards toothbrush T3. Toothbrush T3 was more efficient in terms of dental plaque removal when compared with toothbrushes T2 and T1.

  15. Inter-Scan Reproducibility of Carotid Plaque Volume Measurements by 3-D Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandholt, Benjamin V; Collet-Billon, Antoine; Entrekin, Robert

    2018-01-01

    We tested a novel 3-D matrix transducer with respect to inter-scan reproducibility of carotid maximum plaque thickness (MPT) and volume measurements. To improve reproducibility while focusing on the largest plaque/most diseased part of the carotid artery, we introduced a new partial plaque volume...... (PPV) measure centered on MPT. Total plaque volume (TPV), PPV from a 10-mm segment and MPT were measured using dedicated semi-automated software on 38 plaques from 26 patients. Inter-scan reproducibility was assessed using the t-test, Bland-Altman plots and Pearson's correlation coefficient...... of agreement: -88.2 to 61.5 mm3, Pearson's correlation coefficient: 0.91). The good reproducibility revealed by the present results encourages future studies on establishing plaque quantification as part of cardiovascular risk assessment and for follow-up of disease progression over time....

  16. The effect of aging on atherosclerotic plaque inflammation and molecular calcification: A PET CT imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Björn; Thomassen, Anders; Simonsen, Jane Angel

    Aim: Aging is an important independent risk factor for the inception and maturation of atherosclerotic plaques. This study aimed to investigate the effect of aging on atherosclerotic plaque inflammation and molecular calcification. Methods: Thirteen healthy volunteers without traditional...... polynomial regression established that aging is a strong predictor of the degree of aortic plaque inflammation (R2 = 0.71, F statistic = 11.98, P = 0.002). A linear relationship was observed between aging and molecular calcification. Linear regression established that aging is a predictor of both the degree.......001). Conclusions: Based on preliminary data, a quadratic relationship appears to exist between aging and plaque inflammation. In contrast, a linear relationship was observed between aging and plaque molecular calcification. These data reject the existence of a linear relationship between plaque inflammation...

  17. Clinical evaluation of plaque removal by counterrotational electric toothbrush in orthodontic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombeli, L; Scabbia, A; Griselli, A; Zangari, F; Calura, G

    1995-03-01

    In the present crossover clinical trial, the plaque-removing efficacy of a counterrotational toothbrush was compared to that of a normal toothbrush in orthodontic patients. Twenty subjects, aged 11 to 26 years, who had orthodontic brackets on all fully erupted teeth of at least one arch were selected. At the first appointment, a prophylaxis was given to bring the plaque score to 0. Ten subjects received counterrotational brushes, and 10 subjects received manual brushes according to a randomized list. At 14 days, plaque scores were recorded and another prophylaxis was given. The subjects who were using the electric brush were assigned to the manual brush and vice versa. At 28 days, plaque scores were reassessed. Results showed that the counterrotational brush was significantly more effective in removing supragingival plaque from bracketed teeth than was the manual brush. The differences in plaque-removing effectiveness were particularly consistent on the proximal surfaces of the teeth.

  18. Competitiveness of organically grown cereals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Jánský

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The contribution is aimed at the assessment of recommended crop management practices of chosen cereals for organic farming. To increase competitiveness, these practices are modified depending on soil and climatic conditions, and on a way of production use. Furthermore, impacts of the recommended crop management practices on economics of growing chosen cereals are evaluated and compared with economic results obtained under conventional farming. It is assumed that achieved results will contribute to the increase in proportion of arable crops in the Czech Republic where organic production offer does not meet current demands.When evaluating results of growing individual cereal species in a selective set of organic farms, triticale, spelt and spring barley (in this ranking can be considered as profitable crops. Moreover, triticale and spelt have even higher gross margin under organic farming than under conventional farming (by 62 % in triticale. Oat brings losses, however, it is important for livestock production. Winter wheat seems to be also unprofitable since less grain is produced at lower imputs per hectare and only part of it is produced in quality “bio”, i.e. marketed for higher prices. Rye also brings losses under organic farming, particularly due to lower yields, similarly to the other mentioned cereals. Special cereal species that are still neglected in organic farming systems are of potential use. Durum wheat has vitreous kernels with a high content of quality gluten which is used for pasta production. It can be grown in the maize production area on fertile soils only.

  19. Dimethyl Fumarate: A Review in Moderate to Severe Plaque Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Hannah A

    2018-01-01

    Fumaric acid esters (FAEs) have been used in the treatment of psoriasis in some European countries for over 20 years, and are recommended in the European guidelines for the management of moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. Dimethyl fumarate (Skilarence ® ; hereafter referred to as DMF) is an orally administered FAE indicated for the treatment of moderate to severe plaque psoriasis in adults in need of systemic medicinal therapy; unlike other available FAEs, it is not formulated in combination with monoethyl fumarate salts. EU approval was based on results of the phase III BRIDGE trial, and supported by previous publications of FAE preparations, including a combination of FAEs containing dimethyl fumarate and monoethyl fumarate salts (DMF/MEF; Fumaderm ® ). In the BRIDGE trial, DMF was superior to placebo in terms of the proportion of patients achieving a ≥ 75% improvement from baseline in the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI 75) and a Physician Global Assessment score of 0 (clear) or 1 (almost clear) at week 16. DMF was also noninferior to DMF/MEF for PASI 75 at week 16. Patients receiving DMF also reported clinically meaningful improvements in body surface area involvement and health-related quality of life. The safety profile of DMF was similar to that of DMF/MEF, and no major or unexpected safety concerns were identified. The most common adverse events (flushing and gastrointestinal disorders) occurred mainly during the first few weeks of treatment. Currently available data indicate that DMF is an effective oral systemic treatment option for patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis.

  20. The Effects of Sanguinaria Extract on Plaque Retention and Gingival Health in Active Orthodontic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    rely *on the validity of the specific plaque hypothesis 5 which means that certain forms of dental decay and periodontal disease are due to an...after an initial plaque and gingival index, oral hygiene * instructions were reviewed including a review of toothbrushing technique. The following...1984. 14. Greenfield, W., Cuchel, S.J., The Use of an Oral Rinse and Dentrifice as a System for Reducing Dental Plaque . The Compendium of Continuing

  1. The effect of brushing time and dentifrice on dental plaque removal in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creeth, Jonathan E; Gallagher, Andrew; Sowinski, Joseph; Bowman, James; Barrett, Kathy; Lowe, Shirley; Patel, Kartik; Bosma, Mary Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Routine toothbrushing is the principal method by which individuals remove plaque and control plaque-related diseases, such as periodontitis and caries. Oral health care professionals generally recommend at least 2 minutes brushing with an appropriate technique, and yet the average brushing time in the general population is closer to 45 seconds. Our understanding of the relationship between brushing time and plaque removal, in an untutored general population using a conventional manual toothbrush and dentifrice, is limited. The role of dentifrice in plaque removal is also unclear. This study was undertaken to measure plaque removal during untutored brushing over timed periods between 30 and 180 seconds with 1.5 g dentifrice, using an Aquafresh Flex brush and Aquafresh Advanced dentifrice. Plaque removal after brushing without dentifrice was also determined (at the 60 second time point only). Forty-seven subjects participated in the study, in which plaque level was assessed using the Quigley-Hein (Turesky-modification) Index. Plaque removal increased with brushing time across the range studied, tending towards a maximum at longer brushing times. At the extremes, brushing for 180 seconds removed 55% more plaque than brushing for 30 seconds. Brushing for 120 seconds removed 26% more plaque than brushing for 45 seconds. The use of dentifrice did not increase plaque removal during 60 seconds of brushing. Oral health care professionals should reinforce efforts to persuade patients to brush for longer periods of time, as increasing brushing time to the consensus minimum of 2 minutes from a more typical 45 seconds increases plaque removal to an extent likely to provide clinically significant oral health benefits.

  2. Investigation and comparison of the effect of two mouthrinses, Plax and Irsha on dental plaque reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Saghazadeh M; Navidi AO

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aim: Although toothbrushing is still the most effective method in plaque reduction, it is insufficient for total plaque removal. Considering this limitation, it is suggested that toothbrushing could be aided by chemical methods. For this purpose, it is advised to use some kind of mouthrinses before toothbrushing to increase the rate of microbial plaque removal. Several prebrushing mouthrinses are available in the market and comparing their efficiency is valuable for dentists. T...

  3. 64Cu-DOTATATE PET/MRI for detection of activated macrophages in carotid atherosclerotic plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sune Folke; Sandholt, Benjamin Vikjær; Keller, Sune Høgild

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A feature of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques of the carotid artery is high activity and abundance of lesion macrophages. There is consensus that this is of importance for plaque vulnerability, which may lead to clinical events, such as stroke and transient ischemic attack. We used...... polymerase chain reaction in the final multivariate model, indicating that 64Cu-DOTATATE PET is detecting alternatively activated macrophages. This association could potentially improve noninvasive identification and characterization of vulnerable plaques....

  4. Plaque-left-behind after brushing: intra-oral reservoir for antibacterial toothpaste ingredients

    OpenAIRE

    Otten, Marieke P. T.; Busscher, Henk J.; Abbas, Frank; van der Mei, Henny C.; van Hoogmoed, Chris G.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Plaque is never fully removed by brushing and may act as a reservoir for antibacterial ingredients, contributing to their substantive action. This study investigates the contribution of plaque-left-behind and saliva towards substantivity of three antibacterial toothpastes versus a control paste without antibacterial claims. Materials and methods First, volunteers brushed 2 weeks with a control or antibacterial toothpaste. Next, plaque and saliva samples were collected 6 and 12 h af...

  5. Clinical validation of robot simulation of toothbrushing - comparative plaque removal efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Tomas; Staufer, Sebastian; Jennes, Barbara; Gaengler, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical validation of laboratory toothbrushing tests has important advantages. It was, therefore, the aim to demonstrate correlation of tooth cleaning efficiency of a new robot brushing simulation technique with clinical plaque removal. Methods Clinical programme: 27 subjects received dental cleaning prior to 3-day-plaque-regrowth-interval. Plaque was stained, photographically documented and scored using planimetrical index. Subjects brushed teeth 33–47 with three techniques (hori...

  6. Plaque index differences before and after teeth brushing with and without propolis dentifrice

    OpenAIRE

    Allin Perama Iswari; Eriska Riyanti; Dede Hadidjah

    2010-01-01

    Dentifrices used to aid plaque removal from dental surfaces and gums while teeth brushing. Propolis is one of bee products that can be added into dentifrices and its property is to inhibit plaque-forming bacteria growth. The main objective of this study was to rule out any plaque index differences before and after teeth brushing with and without propolis contained dentifrices. It was a quasi-experimental research with the single blind-parallel method. Subjects were 30 students...

  7. Combining carotid intima-media thickness with carotid plaque on screening for coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, David S; Bestwick, Jonathan P; Morton, Geraint; Drummond, Linda; Jenkins, Nick; Khodabakhsh, Pouran; Curzen, Nick P

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasound-detected carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and carotid plaque are possible screening tests for coronary heart disease (CHD) among asymptomatic individuals. To assess the increase in screening performance of combining carotid IMT and plaque compared with each measurement alone in the identification of individuals with CHD. Ultrasound examination of left and right carotid arteries was performed on 100 individuals (median age 57), 55 with a history of CHD (unstable angina or myocardial infarction) and 45 without. IMT measurements were taken from the common carotid artery and plaque was identified above, at and below the carotid bifurcation. Associations between IMT and plaque were determined using logistic regression, and screening performance was assessed from the distributions of IMT and plaque among cases and controls. At a false-positive rate of 5%, IMT (cut-off >0.75 mm) identified 30% (95% CI 14-58) of affected individuals. There was an increase in the detection rate of 8 percentage points (1-33%) using IMT and plaque combined compared with IMT alone. As the false-positive increased, the difference in the detection rate increased, up to a maximum of 20 percentage points (5-38%) at a false-positive rate of 20%. The comparison of IMT and plaque combined with plaque alone could only be estimated for the false-positive rate observed using plaque alone (18%); at this point the detection rate was 72% for plaque and 75% for plaque and IMT combined, an increase of 3 percentage points (0-4%). In screening for CHD, combining carotid IMT measurement with plaque assessment is better than using either measurement alone, but the improvement in discrimination is not sufficient to make carotid ultrasound screening for CHD worthwhile.

  8. Detection of Helicobacter pylori using PCR in dental plaque of patients with and without gastritis

    OpenAIRE

    Eskandari, Amir; Mahmoudpour, Ali; Abolfazl, Nader; Lafzi, Ardeshir

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) accounts for gastritis, peptic ulcer and is a probable cause of gastric cancer. Since its detection in the oral cavity, concerns have been raised about dental plaque as a reservoir for reinfection. The aim of this study was to detect the organism in the dental plaque and to determine the association, if any, between H. pylori gastritis and dental plaque contamination causing H. pylori. Study design: A polymerase chain reaction-based method was u...

  9. Stereotactic radiotherapy as an alternative to plaque brachytherapy in retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldebawy, Eman; Patrocinio, Horacio; Evans, Michael; Hashem, Rania; Nelson, Sylvie; Sidi, Rubina; Freeman, Carolyn

    2010-12-01

    Radioactive plaque brachytherapy has an established role for selected patients with retinoblastoma. Newer non-invasive radiotherapy techniques such as stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (SCR) that uses highly accurate positioning to deliver treatment with small beams may be an interesting alternative to brachytherapy. We report a case treated with SCR and compare the dosimetry with that achievable with brachytherapy. With advantages and disadvantages to both, SCR should more often be considered in the management of RB because of the more homogeneous dose within the target volume and similar or lower doses to surrounding normal tissues.

  10. Visual Loss Induced by Adalimumab Used for Plaque Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Saffra

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A 61-year-old Caucasian male with severe plaque psoriasis without joint involvement was initiated on adalimumab therapy. Shortly thereafter he presented to the emergency room with acute loss of vision in the right eye. A comprehensive systemic workup was instituted which included magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with and without gadolinium of the brain and orbits. MRI revealed findings that were consistent with CNS demyelination and retrobulbar optic neuritis. Immediate cessation of adalimumab was instituted without any other systemic therapy. Complete return of vision occurred within 6 weeks. No additional psoriatic or neurologic treatment was instituted, and the patient has remained stable now for 14 months.

  11. Radiation related complications after ruthenium plaque radiotherapy of uveal melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summanen, P.; Immonen, I.; Kivela, T.; Tommila, P.; Tarkkanen, A. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Meilahti Clinic; Heikkonen, J. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept of Radiotherapy and Oncology

    1996-08-01

    The aims were to analyse radiation related complications and secondary enucleation after irradiation of malignant uveal melanoma with ruthenium-106 plaques. A series of 100 consecutive eyes irradiated in 1981-91 was analysed using the life table method and the Cox proportional hazards model. The 3 and 5 year probabilities of being without radiation cataract were 73% and 63%, without neovascular glaucoma 91% and 81%, without vitreous haemorrhage 83% and 74%, without radiation maculopathy 85% and 70%, and without radiation optic neuropathy 90% and 88%, respectively. (Author).

  12. The efficacy of honey solution as plaque reducing agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Nurul M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periodontal care is an important step of periodontal health management. Some chemically active substances have been studied as an adjunct to mechanical plaque control. Honey is a traditional topical treatment for infected wounds and have inhibitory effect to around 60 species of bacteria including aerobes and anaerobes, gram-positives and gram-negatives. Purpose: To compare the efficacy of 5% and 25% honey solution and aquadest as mouth-rinses to control dental plaque during 4 days period. Method: After a thorough prophylaxis, during 4 days period of no oral hygiene all subjects were rinsed with 10 ml mouth-rinse they received 3 times a day after meal. Group I rinse with 5% honey solution, group II with 25%, and group III with aquadest as control. Results: There were significant increases of plaque index within each group, but no differences between all three groups in every experimental day. The fact that the probability value from day 1 (0.766 were gradually decreased to day 4 (0.076. Conclusion: Anti-microbial properties of honey solution as mouth-rinse did not show any inhibition effect on plaque formation until day 4.Latar belakang: Menjaga kesehatan periodontal merupakan tahap penting dalam pemeliharaan kesehatan periodontal. Beberapa substansi kimiawi aktif telah diteliti untuk membantu dalam kontrol plak gigi secara mekanik. Madu merupakan obat tradisional untuk luka terinfeksi dan dinyatakan mempunyai pengaruh menghambat sekitar 60 spesies termasuk bakteri aerob dan anaerob gram positif dan gram negatif. Tujuan: Membandingkan manfaat larutan madu 5% dan 25% terhadap akuades sebagai obat kumur untuk mengontrol pembentukan plak gigi selama 4 hari penelitian. Metode: Setelah tindakan profilaksis pembersihan sempurna, semua subjek penelitian dipersilahkan berkumur dengan 10 ml larutan yang telah diterima, 3 kali sehari setelah makan. Kelompok 1 berkumur dengan larutan madu 5%, kelompok 2 dengan 25%, dan kelompok 3 dengan akuades

  13. Preliminary Study of In Vivo Formed Dental Plaque Using Confocal Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KA. Al-Salihi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM is relatively a new light microscopical imaging technique with a wide range of applications in biological sciences. The primary value of CLSM for the biologist is its ability to provide optical sections from athree-dimensional specimen. The present study was designed to assess the thickness and content of in vivo accumulated dental plaque using CLSM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.Materials and Methods: Acroflat lower arch splints (acrylic appliance were worn by five participants for three days without any disturbance. The formed plaques were assessed using CLSM combined with vital fluorescence technique and SEM.Results: In this study accumulated dental plaque revealed varied plaque microflora vitality and thickness according to participant’s oral hygiene. The thickness of plaque smears ranged from 40.32 to 140.72 μm and 65.00 to 128.88 μm for live (vital and dead accumulated microorganisms, respectively. Meanwhile, the thickness of plaque on the appliance ranged from 101 μm to 653 μm. CLSM revealed both dead and vital bacteria on the surface of the dental plaque. In addition, SEM revealed layers of various bacterial aggregations in all dental plaques.Conclusion: This study offers a potent non-invasive tool to evaluate and assess the dental plaque biofilm, which is a very important factor in the development of dental caries.

  14. Validation of Noninvasive In Vivo Compound Ultrasound Strain Imaging Using Histologic Plaque Vulnerability Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Hendrik H G; de Borst, Gert Jan; Bots, Michiel L; Moll, Frans L; Pasterkamp, Gerard; de Korte, Chris L

    2016-11-01

    Carotid plaque rupture is a major cause of stroke. Key issue for risk stratification is early identification of rupture-prone plaques. A noninvasive technique, compound ultrasound strain imaging, was developed providing high-resolution radial deformation/strain images of atherosclerotic plaques. This study aims at in vivo validation of compound ultrasound strain imaging in patients by relating the measured strains to typical features of vulnerable plaques derived from histology after carotid endarterectomy. Strains were measured in 34 severely stenotic (>70%) carotid arteries at the culprit lesion site within 48 hours before carotid endarterectomy. In all cases, the lumen-wall boundary was identifiable on B-mode ultrasound, and the imaged cross-section did not move out of the imaging plane from systole to diastole. After endarterectomy, the plaques were processed using a validated histology analysis technique. Locally elevated strain values were observed in regions containing predominantly components related to plaque vulnerability, whereas lower values were observed in fibrous, collagen-rich plaques. The median strain of the inner plaque layer (1 mm thickness) was significantly higher (Ppredictive value, and negative predictive value of 75%, 86%, 88%, and 71%, respectively. Strain did not significantly correlate with fibrous cap thickness, smooth muscle cell, or macrophage concentration. Compound ultrasound strain imaging allows differentiating (fibro)atheromatous from fibrous carotid artery plaques. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. The origins of urinary stone disease: upstream mineral formations initiate downstream Randall's plaque

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hsi, Ryan S; Ramaswamy, Krishna; Ho, Sunita P; Stoller, Marshall L

    2017-01-01

    .... A biomechanical perspective on Randall's plaque formation through form and function relationships is applied to functional units within the kidney, we have termed the 'medullo-papillary complex...

  16. Coronary artery plaque imaging: Comparison of black-blood MRI and 64-multidetector computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi He

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To comparatively evaluate black-blood coronary arterial wall MRI and 64-multidetector computed tomography (64-MDCT for detection and classification of coronary artery plaques. Methods: We included 15 patients with confirmed coronary artery plaques in the proximal or middle segments of coronary arteries by 64-MDCT, who underwent black-blood coronary wall MRI at 1.5 T within 10 days. Cross-sectional coronary wall images were acquired using a 2D double-inversion-recovery, electrocardiograph-triggered, navigator-gated, fat-suppressed, turbo-spin-echo sequence on the coronary arteries with lesions from the ostium to the middle segment continuously without gap. The vessel cross-sectional area (CSA, luminal CSA, maximal wall thickness, plaque burden, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR were measured in each slice and subsequently compared with computed tomography angiography (CTA images. CTA images were divided into 5-mm segments for side-by-side comparison with MRI. Results: Of the 15 patients, 12 were enrolled in the study. Coronary plaques were found in 46 slices on both CTA and MRI. Plaques were classified to 3 groups based on CTA: calcified plaques (n = 11, soft plaques (n = 23, and mixed plaques (n = 12. In MRI, the plaque burden, maximal wall thickness, SNR, and CNR in the coronary walls containing plaques were greater than in the normal coronary walls (0.83 ± 0.08 vs. 0.73 ± 0.08, 1.88 ± 0.51 vs. 1.51 ± 0.26 mm, 12.95 ± 2.78 vs. 9.93 ± 2.31, and 6.76 ± 2.52 vs. 3.89 ± 1.54, respectively; P < 0.05. The luminal CSA at the plaque was smaller than in normal coronary walls (2.50 ± 1.50 vs. 4.72 ± 2.28 mm2; P < 0.05. The SNR in the soft plaque was significantly greater than in calcified and mixed plaques (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Coronary wall MRI can identify coronary plaques in the proximal and middle segments and has the potential to differentiate plaque types based on

  17. When to image carotid plaque inflammation with FDG PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græbe, Martin; Borgwardt, Lise; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    Quantification of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in inflamed high-risk carotid atherosclerotic plaques is challenged by the spatial resolution of positron emission tomography (PET) and luminal blood activity. Late acquisition protocols have been used to overcome these challenges to enhance...... the contrast between the plaque and blood-pool FDG activity. However, for prospective studies the late acquisition is inconvenient for the patient and staff, and most retrospective studies of plaque uptake use data from early acquisition protocols. The objective was to evaluate changes in the quantification...... methods of FDG uptake in carotid artery plaques between early and late PET scans....

  18. F-18 fluoride positron emission tomography-computed tomography for detecting atherosclerotic plaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Won Jun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    A large number of major cardiovascular events occur in patients due to minimal or some lumen narrowing of the coronary artery. Recent biological studies have shown that the biological composition or vulnerability of the plaque is more critical for plaque rupture compared to the degree of stenosis. To overcome the limitations of anatomical images, molecular imaging techniques have been suggested as promising imaging tools in various fields. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), which is widely used in the field of oncology, is an example of molecular probes used in atherosclerotic plaque evaluation. FDG is a marker of plaque macrophage glucose utilization and inflammation, which is a prominent characteristic of vulnerable plaque. Recently, F-18 fluoride has been used to visualize vulnerable plaque in clinical studies. F-18 fluoride accumulates in regions of active microcalcification, which is normally observed during the early stages of plaque formation. More studies are warranted on the accumulation of F-18 fluoride and plaque formation/vulnerability; however, due to high specific accumulation, low background activity, and easy accessibility, F-18 fluoride is emerging as a promising non-invasive imaging probe to detect vulnerable plaque.

  19. Toxoplasma gondii plaque assays revisited: Improvements for ultrastructural and quantitative evaluation of lytic parasite growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufermann, Christoph-Martin; Müller, Florian; Frohnecke, Nora; Laue, Michael; Seeber, Frank

    2017-09-01

    Lytic growth of intracellular Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoite stages over a period of days results in plaques within mononolayers of host cells. Plaque assays are in frequent use to isolate single clones and to investigate invasion, replication and egress over a longer time frame. To allow correlating plaque morphology and/or size with ultrastructural examination of individual parasites we introduce a simple protocol for correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) of entire plaques. We also illustrate the advantages of visualizing only the boundaries of plaques by staining for infected cells ('positive staining') rather than the traditional staining of the intact cell monolayer, thus outlining the area of lysed cells ('negative staining'). Tachyzoites expressing β-galactosidase of Escherichia coli are an easy to visualize histochemical marker for this purpose. Quantitative measurements of plaque area with our compiled user-friendly ImageJ macros are compared to commercial software for ease and shown to be more accurate for some applications. Finally, a chemically defined medium is shown to be superior to the fetal bovine serum-containing medium for plaque assays, resulting in larger plaques. The reported additions and changes of the plaque assay procedure offer improved ways to analyze subtle differences in invasion, pathogen growth and egress. Our chemically defined medium will improve standardization of e.g. drug screening assays. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Contemporary management of moderate to severe plaque psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jashin J

    2017-12-01

    Psoriasis is a multisystem inflammatory disease that is often underdiagnosed, leaving many patients untreated. Plaque psoriasis, the most common form of the disease, affects approximately 80% to 90% of patients with psoriasis. Formulating a treatment plan can be complicated when various factors are considered. For example, type of therapy is dependent on the severity of the disease. Topical agents are preferred for mild disease, while phototherapy alone or in combination with systemic agents is recommended for the treatment of moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. Traditional systemic agents have the convenience of oral dosing; however, their toxicity profile can be a limiting factor. Newer biologic agents haven proven efficacious, if not superior to traditional oral agents, but their high cost can be a substantial disadvantage. Psoriasis has also been associated with increased risk of developing comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity, and psoriatic arthritis, all of which increase the patient's overall mortality and further worsen their overall physical well-being. Management of these comorbidities is often overlooked. Moreover, psoriasis may affect a patient's psychological and social well-being. Patients with psoriasis are at a higher risk of developing clinical depression than patients without psoriasis. Inadequate management of comorbidities inevitably leads to poor outcomes, which increases the economic burden to the patient and society. Prevention and management of comorbidities, including cardiovascular and mental health, must be addressed as a part of a patient's overall treatment plan. Specialist coordination may be beneficial for patients with psoriasis. Improved patient care may lead to better clinical and economical outcomes.

  1. Serum Osteoprotegerin Is Associated With Calcified Carotid Plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ami; Choi, Yun-Seok; Choi, Yong-Won; Chung, Woo-Baek; Park, Chul-Soo; Chung, Wook-Sung; Lee, Man-Young; Youn, Ho-Joong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a kind of tumor necrosis factor, which is related to bone metabolism and vascular calcification. The increase of Osteoprotegerin concentration in serum is related to cardiovascular diseases in humans. The purpose of this study was to figure out the relevance between osteoprotegerin in serum and carotid calcification. Serum OPG concentrations were compared in 145 patients who underwent carotid sonography (average age: 68 ± 9 years old, male: female = 81:64). A calcified plaque (CP) (37 people [27%]), a noncalcified plaque (NCP) (54 people [37%]), and a nonplaque (NP) (54 people [37%]) were classified for this study. No significant differences among 3 groups were demonstrated in the distribution of age, diabetes, high blood pressure, and hyperlipidemia. Serum osteoprotegerin concentrations were significantly increased in CP group rather than NCP group or NP group; (median [interquartile range], 4016 [1410] vs 3210 [1802] pg/mL, P osteoprotegerin concentrations did not indicate a significant difference between NCP Group or NP Group. This study had proved that patient group accompanied with carotid calcification in carotid artery disease had an increased serum OPG concentration, so it could consider that OPG plays an important function on calcification related to arteriosclerosis. PMID:27082605

  2. Amyloid plaque imaging in vivo: current achievement and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordberg, Agneta [Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2008-03-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a very complex neurodegenerative disorder, the exact cause of which is still not known. The major histopathological features, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, already described by Alois Alzheimer, have been the focus in research for decades. Despite a probable whole cascade of events in the brain leading to impairment of cognition, amyloid is still the target for diagnosis and treatment. The rapid development of molecular imaging techniques now allows imaging of amyloid plaques in vivo in Alzheimer patients by PET amyloid ligands such as Pittsburgh compound B (PIB). Studies so far have revealed high {sup 11}C-PIB retention in brain at prodromal stages of AD and a possibility to discriminate AD from other dementia disorders by {sup 11}C-PIB. Ongoing studies are focussing to understand the relationship between brain and CSF amyloid processes and cognitive processes. In vivo imaging of amyloid will be important for early diagnosis and evaluation of new anti-amyloid therapies in AD. (orig.)

  3. Plaque, caries, periodontal diseases, and acculturation among Yanomamoe Indians, Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, C.J. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor); Thomson, L.A.; Stiles, H.M.; Brewer, C.; Neel, J.V.; Brunelle, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    The number of DM and d teeth and surfaces was recorded for 220 Yanomamoe Indians from three groups of villages with different degrees of contact with Western culture. Specimens of plaque were taken from the teeth, transported in a holding solution, cultured, and examined for specific oral streptococci. In addition, the periodontal health and oral hygiene of one group of villagers were assessed using the Russell PI and the Greene and Vermillion OHIS. Caries experience among the Yanomamoe was shown to be positively associated with exposure to Western culture. S. mutans was recovered with about the same frequency from specimens taken from the teeth of Indians living at all three village locations. However, the presence of S. mutans alone did not account for the disparity in dental caries scores. The examinees had abundant and persistent accumulations of soft deposits on their teeth accompanied by markedly inflamed gingival tissues. However, periodontal pockets and loss of appreciable amounts of bone did not appear as early in life nor were they as severe as reported for some other populations which practice little oral hygiene. Those disparities in the distribution of plaque-induced oral diseases between Western populations and the Yanomamoe warrant further study.

  4. Enhancement of plaque removal by baking soda toothpastes from less accessible areas in the dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thong, S; Hooper, W; Xu, Y; Ghassemi, A; Winston, A

    2011-01-01

    To determine if baking soda toothpastes are relatively more effective than non-baking soda toothpastes in promoting plaque removal from less accessible sites in the dentition. Several single-brushing comparisons of baking soda and non-baking soda toothpastes for their overall ability to remove plaque have been published. In this study, individual comparisons of these published data, comparing the plaque removal performance of baking soda and non-baking soda toothpastes at various sites in the dentition, were examined to see if there were any site-dependant performance trends. The site-specific single-brushing data were then combined and analyzed in two ways. Meta-analyses of the clinical studies were performed to compare baking soda's relative plaque removal advantage at various sites in the mouth using paired t-testing at p baking soda toothpastes were graphically compared with plaque index reductions due to brushing with non-baking soda dentifrices. The percent relative plaque removal advantage for baking soda toothpastes at various sites were plotted against the reduction in plaque index due to brushing with non-baking soda toothpastes. Individual comparisons showed that brushing with the toothpastes containing baking soda generally removed significantly more plaque from each site than brushing with toothpastes without baking soda. The relative efficacy advantage for baking soda toothpastes was consistently higher at sites where the non-baking soda toothpastes removed less plaque. Meta-analytical comparisons confirmed baking soda toothpastes to be relatively more effective in enhancing plaque removal from sites where less plaque was removed compared to brushing with non-baking soda toothpastes (p baking soda toothpastes' relative plaque removal advantage could be seen to increase hyperbolically with decreasing plaque removal by the non-baking soda toothpastes with which they were compared. We presuppose that the reason less plaque is removed by non-baking soda

  5. [Effect of iron plaque on root surfaces on phosphorus uptake of two wetland plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-yu; Liu, Li-hua; Wen, Sheng-fang; Peng, Chang-sheng; Xing, Bao-shan; Li, Feng-min

    2010-03-01

    In situ micro-suction cups were used to collect samples of soil solution with Arundo donax Linn and Typha latifolia from defined segments at rhizosphere in field. The experiment was conducted to elucidate the contribution of iron plaque while wetland plants were used to remove phosphorus. The reddish iron plaque was observed and measured on the surfaces of roots of Arundo donax Linn and Typha latifolia in the field, 20,170.8 mg/kg (fresh weight) for Arundo donax Linn and 7640.3 mg/kg (fresh weight) for Typha latifolia were collected. Olsen-P contents of Arundo donax Linn with iron plaque were 28.85 mg/kg, 46.2% more than that of without, 34.99 mg/kg for Typha latifolia 21.9% more than that of without. The phosphate concentrations in the in situ rhizosphere soil solution of Arundo donax Linn with iron plaque were 0.65 mg/kg, 9.2% more than that of without, 0.56 mg/kg for Typha latifolia, 33.9% more than that of without. The phosphorus contents adsorbed by iron plaque were 81.7% for Arundo donax Linn and 85.7% for Typha latifolia of the wetland plants with iron plaque. Phosphate use efficiency of Arundo donax Linn with iron plaque was 16.5% more than that of without, 31.4% for Typha latifolia. The contents of phosphorus of single plant of the two wetland plants with iron plaque are higher than that of without. Due to adsorb phosphate with iron plaque, the transfer speeds of phosphate from non-rhizosphere to rhizosphere and from soil to soil solution are increasing. The phosphorus contents with iron plaque accumulated at rhizosphere and depleted at rhizosphere without iron plaque of Arundo donax Linn and Typha latifolia.

  6. Quantitative analysis of carotid plaque vasa vasorum by CEUS and correlation with histology after endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavuranakis, Manolis; Sigala, Fragiska; Vrachatis, Dimitrios A; Papaioannou, Theodore G; Filis, Konstantinos; Kavantzas, Nikolaos; Kalogeras, Konstantinos I; Massoura, Constantina; Toufektzian, Levon; Kariori, Maria G; Vlasseros, Ioannis; Kallikazaros, Ioannis; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2013-05-01

    Intraplaque neovascularization and vasa vasorum (VV) proliferation contribute in the progression and rupture of atherosclerotic lesions. Contrast enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) has been reported to attain data regarding intraplaque neovessels and VV. However, whether the detection of microbubbles by CEUS within atherosclerotic plaques truly represents microvessels is a point of concern. We aimed to evaluate stable and unstable carotid artery plaque (CAP) VV pattern by CEUS and its correlation with histology and immunochemistry. Patients with CAP scheduled for plaque endarterectomy were enrolled. CAP was initially identified by conventional ultrasonography and subsequently CEUS (harmonic ultrasound imaging with simultaneous intravenous contrast agent injection) was performed. The recorded image loops were evaluated by a semi-automated method. Plaque specimens were excised and underwent histological and immunochemical (for CD34, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, CD68 and CD3 antibodies) analysis. Fourteen patients (67.6 ± 10.2 years, 10 males) with a 86.9 ± 11.5 % degree of carotid artery stenosis were evaluated. Histology showed that half of the plaques were unstable. Enhancement of plaque brightness on CEUS was significant for both stable and unstable plaque subgroups (p = 0.018 for both). Immunochemistry showed that microvessels, as assessed by CD34 antibody, were more dense in unstable vs. stable plaques (36.6 ± 17.4 vs. 13.0 ± 7.2 respectively, p = 0.002). However, correlation between plaque brigthness enhancement on CEUS and microvessel density was significant only for stable (r = 0.800, p = 0.031) plaques. The identification of brightness enhacement during CEUS in carotid atherosclerotic plaques may not always reflect the presence of VV.

  7. Correlation between Plaque Composition as assessed by Virtual Histology and C-reactive Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, Dimytri Alexandre de Alvim, E-mail: dimytri@cardiol.br; Sousa, Amanda Guerra Moraes R.; Costa Junior, José de Ribamar; Costa, Ricardo Alves da; Staico, Rodolfo; Tanajura, Luis Fernando Leite; Centemero, Marinella Patrizia; Feres, Fausto; Abizaid, Alexandre Antonio Cunha; Sousa, J. Eduardo Moraes R. [Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-15

    Previous studies have shown that coronary plaque composition plays a pivotal role in plaque instability, and imaging modalities and serum biomarkers have been investigated to identify vulnerable plaque. Virtual histology IVUS (VH-IVUS) characterizes plaque components as calcified, fibrotic, fibrofatty, or necrotic core. C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is an independent risk factor and a powerful predictor of future coronary events. However, a relationship between inflammatory response indicated by CRP and plaque characteristics in ACS patients remains not well established. To determine, by using VH-IVUS, the relation between coronary plaque components and plasma high-sensitivity CRP levels in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). 52 patients with ACS were enrolled in this prospective study. Electrocardiographically-gated VH-IVUS were performed in the culprit lesion before PCI. Blood sample was drawn from all patients before the procedure and after 24 hours, and hs-CRP levels were determined. Mean age was 55.3±4.9 years, 76.9% were men and 30.9% had diabetes. Mean MLA was 3.9±1.3 mm{sup 2}, and plaque burden was 69±11.3%, as assessed by IVUS. VH-IVUS analysis at the minimum luminal site identified plaque components: fibrotic (59.6±15.8%), fibrofatty (7.6±8.2%), dense calcium (12.1±9.2%) and necrotic core (20.7±12.7%). Plasma hs-CRP (mean 16.02±18.07 mg/L) did not correlate with necrotic core (r=-0.089, p = 0.53) and other plaque components. In this prospective study with patients with ACS, the predominant components of the culprit plaque were fibrotic and necrotic core. Serum hs C-reactive protein levels did not correlate with plaque composition.

  8. Detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques by Raman probe spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthäus, Christian; Dochow, Sebastian; Egodage, Kokila D.; Schie, Iwan; Romeike, Bernd F.; Brehm, Bernhard R.; Popp, Jürgen

    2017-02-01

    Visualization and characterization of inner arterial plaque depositions is of vital diagnostic interest. Established intravascular imaging techniques provide valuable morphological information, but cannot deliver information about the chemical composition of individual plaques. Probe based Raman spectroscopy offers the possibility for a biochemical characterization of atherosclerotic plaque formations during an intravascular intervention. From post mortem studies it is well known that the severity of a plaque and its stability are strongly correlated with its biochemical composition. Especially the identification of vulnerable plaques remains one of the most important and challenging aspects in cardiology. Thus, specific information about the composition of a plaque would greatly improve the risk assessment and management. Furthermore, knowledge about the composition can offer new therapeutic and medication strategies. Plaque calcifications as well as major lipid components such as cholesterol, cholesterol esters and triglycerides can be spectroscopically easily differentiated. Intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT) is currently a prominent catheter based imaging technique for the localization and visualization of atherosclerotic plaque depositions. The high resolution of OCT with 10 to 15 µm allows for very detailed characterization of morphological features such as different plaque formations, thin fibrous caps and accurate measurements of lesion lengths. In combination with OCT imaging the obtained spectral information can provide substantial information supporting on on-site diagnosis of various plaque types and therefor an improved risk assessment. The potential and feasibility of combining OCT with Raman spectroscopy is demonstrated on excised plaque samples, as well as under in vivo conditions. Acknowledgements: Financial support from the Carl Zeiss Foundation is greatly acknowledged.

  9. Atherosclerotic plaque in carotid arteries in systemic lupus erythematosus: frequency and associated risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Wagner Silva de Souza

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Atherosclerotic disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients. No previous study has estimated carotid disease prevalence in such patients in Brazil. The aim was to evaluate the prevalence of atherosclerotic plaque in carotid arteries, in SLE patients and controls, and to verify possible associations between risk factors and carotid plaque. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study, at Universidade Federal de São Paulo - Escola Paulista de Medicina. METHODS: Carotid plaque prevalence was assessed by B-mode ultrasound in 82 female SLE patients of mean age 34.0 years and 62 controls of mean age 35.7 years. Plaque was defined as a distinct area of hyperechogenicity and/or focal protrusion of the vessel wall into the lumen. Risk factors for coronary disease and SLE-related variables were determined. RESULTS: 50% of patients and 29% of controls presented carotid plaque. Older age, longer disease duration, higher Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC score, higher levels of low-density lipoprotein and greater diabetes, obesity, premature ovarian failure and family history of coronary artery disease were found in patients with carotid plaque than in those without plaque. Patients with plaque were younger than controls with plaque. SLE diagnosis, obesity, older age, higher SLICC score and longer disease duration were independent risk factors for carotid plaque. CONCLUSION: Young patients with SLE present higher prevalence of carotid plaque than controls. SLE diagnosis was a significant risk factor for carotid atherosclerosis.

  10. Echo-lucency of computerized ultrasound images of carotid atherosclerotic plaques are associated with increased levels of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins as well as increased plaque lipid content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønholdt, Marie-Louise Moes; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Weibe, Brit M.

    1998-01-01

    Background-Echo-lucency of carotid atherosclerotic plaques on computerized ultrasound B-mode images has been associated with a high incidence of brain infarcts as evaluated on CT scans. We tested the hypotheses that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in the fasting and postprandial state predict...... computer processed to yield a measure of echogenicity (gray-scale level). Lipoproteins were measured before and hourly ibr 4 hours after a standardized fatty meal, A subgroup of 58 patients underwent endarterectomy. On linear regression analysis, echu-lucency (low gray-scale level) was associated......-rich lipoproteins predict echo-lucency of carotid plaques, which is associated with increased plaque Lipid content, Because echo-lucency has been associated with a high incidence of brain infarcts on CT scans, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins may predict a plaque type particularly vulnerable to rupture....

  11. Echolucency of computerized ultrasound images of carotid atherosclerotic plaques are associated with increased levels of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins as well as increased plaque lipid content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønholdt, Marie-Louise M.; Nordestgaard, Børge; Wiebe, Britt M.

    1998-01-01

    Background-Echo-lucency of carotid atherosclerotic plaques on computerized ultrasound B-mode images has been associated with a high incidence of brain infarcts as evaluated on CT scans. We tested the hypotheses that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in the fasting and postprandial state predict...... computer processed to yield a measure of echogenicity (gray-scale level). Lipoproteins were measured before and hourly ibr 4 hours after a standardized fatty meal, A subgroup of 58 patients underwent endarterectomy. On linear regression analysis, echu-lucency (low gray-scale level) was associated......-rich lipoproteins predict echo-lucency of carotid plaques, which is associated with increased plaque Lipid content, Because echo-lucency has been associated with a high incidence of brain infarcts on CT scans, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins may predict a plaque type particularly vulnerable to rupture....

  12. Carotid atherosclerotic plaque progression and change in plaque composition over time: A 5-year follow-up study using serial ct angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. van Gils (Marjon); D. Vukadinovic (Danijela); A.C. Nouwens- van Dijk (Anouk); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); W.J. Niessen (Wiro); A. van der Lugt (Aad)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Serial in vivo imaging of atherosclerosis is important for understanding plaque progression and is potentially useful in predicting cardiovascular events and monitoring treatment efficacy. This prospective study aims to quantify temporal changes in carotid

  13. Preliminary in vivo atherosclerotic carotid plaque characterization using the accumulated axial strain and relative lateral shift strain indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hairong; Mitchell, Carol C.; McCormick, Matthew; Kliewer, Mark A.; Dempsey, Robert J.; Varghese, Tomy

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, we explore two parameters or strain indices related to plaque deformation during the cardiac cycle, namely, the maximum accumulated axial strain in plaque and the relative lateral shifts between plaque and vessel wall under in vivo clinical ultrasound imaging conditions for possible identification of vulnerable plaque. These strain indices enable differentiation between calcified and lipidic plaque tissue utilizing a new perspective based on the stiffness and mobility of the plaque. In addition, they also provide the ability to distinguish between softer plaques that undergo large deformations during the cardiac cycle when compared to stiffer plaque tissue. Soft plaques that undergo large deformations over the cardiac cycle are more prone to rupture and to release micro-emboli into the cerebral bloodstream. The ability to identify vulnerable plaque, prone to rupture, would significantly enhance the clinical utility of this method for screening patients. We present preliminary in vivo results obtained from ultrasound radio frequency data collected over 16 atherosclerotic plaque patients before these patients undergo a carotid endarterectomy procedure. Our preliminary in vivo results indicate that the maximum accumulated axial strain over a cardiac cycle and the maximum relative lateral shift or displacement of the plaque are useful strain indices that provide differentiation between soft and calcified plaques.

  14. Bacterial Amyloid and DNA are Important Constituents of Senile Plaques: Further Evidence of the Spirochetal and Biofilm Nature of Senile Plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklossy, Judith

    2016-06-13

    It has long been known that spirochetes form clumps or micro colonies in vitro and in vivo. Cortical spirochetal colonies in syphilitic dementia were considered as reproductive centers for spirochetes. Historic and recent data demonstrate that senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are made up by spirochetes. Spirochetes, are able to form biofilm in vitro. Senile plaques are also reported to contain elements of biofilm constituents. We expected that AβPP and Aβ (the main components of senile plaques) also occur in pure spirochetal biofilms, and bacterial DNA (an important component of biofilm) is also present in senile plaques. Histochemical, immunohistochemical, and in situ hybridization techniques and the TUNEL assay were used to answer these questions. The results obtained demonstrate that Aβ and DNA, including spirochete-specific DNA, are key components of both pure spirochetal biofilms and senile plaques in AD and confirm the biofilm nature of senile plaques. These results validate validate previous observations that AβPP and/or an AβPP-like amyloidogenic protein are an integral part of spirochetes, and indicate that bacterial and host derived Aβ are both constituents of senile plaques. DNA fragmentation in senile plaques further confirms their bacterial nature and provides biochemical evidence for spirochetal cell death. Spirochetes evade host defenses, locate intracellularly, form more resistant atypical forms and notably biofilms, which contribute to sustain chronic infection and inflammation and explain the slowly progressive course of dementia in AD. To consider co-infecting microorganisms is equally important, as multi-species biofilms result in a higher resistance to treatments and a more severe dementia.

  15. Novel Papillomaviral Sequence Detected within Epidermal Plaques in a Wolf (Canis lupus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenburger, Jamie L; Myers, Sherry; Lockerbie, Betty; Wobeser, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    We describe numerous pale plaques affecting the inguinal skin of a grey wolf (Canis lupus). Histologically, these were consistent with papillomaviral plaques. Immunohistochemistry confirmed papillomavirus antigens, and partial sequencing of the L1 gene suggests this is a novel papillomavirus most-closely related to Canis familiaris Papillomavirus 5.

  16. Angiopoietin-2 blocking antibodies reduce early atherosclerotic plaque development in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, Thomas L.; Lappalainen, Jari P.; Sluimer, Judith C.; Gurzeler, Erika; Cleutjens, Jack P.; Gijbels, Marion J.; Biessen, Erik A. L.; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.; Alitalo, Kari; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) blocking agents are currently undergoing clinical trials for use in cancer treatment. Ang-2 has also been associated with rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaques in humans, suggesting a role for Ang-2 in plaque stability. Despite the availability of Ang-2 blocking agents, their

  17. ACAT inhibition reduces the progression of preexisting, advanced atherosclerotic mouse lesions without plaque or systemic toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, James X; Blachford, Courtney; Feig, Jonathan E; Bander, Ilda; Mayne, Jeffrey; Kusunoki, Jun; Miller, Christine; Davis, Matthew; Wilson, Martha; Dehn, Shirley; Thorp, Edward; Tabas, Ira; Taubman, Mark B; Rudel, Lawrence L; Fisher, Edward A

    2013-01-01

    Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) converts cholesterol to cholesteryl esters in plaque foam cells. Complete deficiency of macrophage ACAT has been shown to increase atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice because of cytotoxicity from free cholesterol accumulation, whereas we previously showed that partial ACAT inhibition by Fujirebio compound F1394 decreased early atherosclerosis development. In this report, we tested F1394 effects on preestablished, advanced lesions of apolipoprotein-E-deficient mice. Apolipoprotein-E-deficient mice on Western diet for 14 weeks developed advanced plaques, and were either euthanized (Baseline), or continued on Western diet with or without F1394 and euthanized after 14 more weeks. F1394 was not associated with systemic toxicity. Compared with the baseline group, lesion size progressed in both groups; however, F1394 significantly retarded plaque progression and reduced plaque macrophage, free and esterified cholesterol, and tissue factor contents compared with the untreated group. Apoptosis of plaque cells was not increased, consistent with the decrease in lesional free cholesterol. There was no increase in plaque necrosis and unimpaired efferocytosis (phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells). The effects of F1394 were independent of changes in plasma cholesterol levels. Partial ACAT inhibition by F1394 lowered plaque cholesterol content and had other antiatherogenic effects in advanced lesions in apolipoprotein-E-deficient mice without overt systemic or plaque toxicity, suggesting the continued potential of ACAT inhibition for the clinical treatment of atherosclerosis, in spite of recent trial data.

  18. Role of infrasound pressure waves in atherosclerotic plaque rupture: a theoretical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsatsaris, Athanasios; Koukounaris, Efstathios; Motsakos, Theodoros; Perrea, Despina

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the role of infrasound aortic pressure waves (IPW) in atherosclerotic plaque rupture. Atherosclerotic plaques have been simulated partly, in two dimensions, as being short or long Conical Intersections (CIS), that is to say elliptic, parabolic or hyperbolic surfaces. Consequently, the course and reflection of the generated aortic pressure wave (infrasound domain-less than 20Hz) has been examined around the simulated plaques. The incidence of IPW on plaque surface results both in reflection and "refraction" of the wave. The IPW course within tissue, seems to be enhanced by high Cu-level presence at these areas according to recent evidence (US2003000388213). The "refracted", derived wave travels through plaque tissue and is eventually accumulated to the foci of the respective CIS-plaque geometry. The foci location within or underneath atheroma declares zones where infrasound energy is mostly absorbed. This process, among other mechanisms may contribute to plaque rupture through the development of local hemorrhage and inflammation in foci areas. In future, detection of foci areas and repair (i.e. via Laser Healing Microtechnique) may attenuate atherosclerotic plaque rupture behavior.

  19. Validation of Noninvasive In Vivo Compound Ultrasound Strain Imaging Using Histologic Plaque Vulnerability Features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, Hendrik H G; de Borst, Gert Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/237108151; Bots, Michiel L|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/110610032; Moll, Frans L|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070246882; Pasterkamp, Gerard|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/138488304; de Korte, Chris L

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Carotid plaque rupture is a major cause of stroke. Key issue for risk stratification is early identification of rupture-prone plaques. A noninvasive technique, compound ultrasound strain imaging, was developed providing high-resolution radial deformation/strain images of

  20. Plaque-left-behind after brushing : intra-oral reservoir for antibacterial toothpaste ingredients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, Marieke P. T.; Busscher, Henk J.; Abbas, Frank; van der Mei, Henny C.; van Hoogmoed, Chris G.

    2012-01-01

    Plaque is never fully removed by brushing and may act as a reservoir for antibacterial ingredients, contributing to their substantive action. This study investigates the contribution of plaque-left-behind and saliva towards substantivity of three antibacterial toothpastes versus a control paste

  1. Plaque, caries level and oral hygiene habits in young patients receiving orthodontic treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martignon, S; Ekstrand, K R; Lemos, M I

    2010-01-01

    To assess plaque, caries, and oral hygiene habits amongst patients receiving fixed-orthodontic treatment at the Dental-Clinic, Universidad-El-Bosque, Bogotá, Colombia.......To assess plaque, caries, and oral hygiene habits amongst patients receiving fixed-orthodontic treatment at the Dental-Clinic, Universidad-El-Bosque, Bogotá, Colombia....

  2. Efficacy of homecare regimens for mechanical plaque removal in managing gingivitis: a meta review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Weijden, F.A.; Slot, D.E.

    2015-01-01

    Focused question Based on evidence as presented in systematic reviews what is the efficacy and safety of available homecare toothbrush regimens for mechanical plaque removal on plaque and gingivitis in adults? Material & Methods Three Internet sources were used (up to and including August 2014) to

  3. Comparison of red autofluorescing plaque and disclosed plaque—a cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volgenant, C.M.C.; Fernandez y Mostajo, M.; Rosema, N.A.M.; van der Weijden, F.A.; ten Cate, J.M.; van der Veen, M.H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the correlation between dental plaque scores determined by the measurement of red autofluorescence or by visualization with a two-tone solution. Clinical photographs were used for this study. Materials and methods Overnight plaque from

  4. Ultrasound Biomicroscopy for Longitudinal Studies of Carotid Plaque Development in Mice: Validation with Histological Endpoints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmon, Erin Y.; Fronhofer, Van; Keller, Rebecca S.; Feustel, Paul J.; Brosnan, M. Julia; von der Thüsen, Jan H.; Loegering, Daniel J.; Lennartz, Michelle R.

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is responsible for the death of thousands of Americans each year. The carotid constriction model of plaque development has recently been presented as a model for unstable plaque formation in mice. In this study we 1) validate ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) for the determination of

  5. Effect of kibble size, shape and additives on plaque in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clarke, D.E.; Servet, E.; Hendriks, W.H.; Thomas, D.G.; Weidgraaf, K.; Biourge, V.C.

    2010-01-01

    Forty mixed-breed cats completed a parallel-group, clinical study to compare supragingival plaque accumulation using a triangular or rectangular shaped dry-expanded diet, with or without an anti-calculus agent (sodium tripolyphosphate) or an anti-plaque agent (plaquereducing nutrient). The cats were

  6. Determinants of carotid atherosclerotic plaque burden in a stroke-free population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selwaness, Mariana; Hameeteman, Reinhard; Van 't Klooster, Ronald; Van den Bouwhuijsen, Quirijn; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H.; Niessen, W.J.; Klein, Stefan; Vernooij, Meike W.; Van Der Lugt, Aad; Wentzel, Jolanda J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims In a large stroke-free population, we sought to identify cardiovascular risk factors and carotid plaque components associated with carotid plaque burden, lumen volume and stenosis. Methods The carotid arteries of 1562 stroke-free participants from The Rotterdam Study were

  7. Veins in plaques of multiple sclerosis patients - a longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging study at 7 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dal-Bianco, Assunta; Auff, Eduard; Leutmezer, Fritz; Vass, Karl [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Neurology, Wien (Austria); Hametner, Simon [Medical University of Vienna, Center for Brain Research, Wien (Austria); Grabner, Guenther; Schernthaner, Melanie; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Wien (Austria); Reitner, Andreas; Vass, Clemens; Kircher, Karl [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Ophthalmology, Wien (Austria)

    2015-10-15

    To monitor the venous volumes in plaques of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) compared to an age-matched control group over a period of 3.5 years. Ten MS patients underwent an annual neurological examination and MRI. Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) combined with fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) or FLAIR-like contrast at 7 Tesla (7 T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used for manual segmentation of veins in plaques, in the normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and in location-matched white matter of 9 age-matched controls. Venous volume to tissue volume ratio was assessed for each time point in order to describe the dynamics of venous volumes in MS plaques over time. MS plaques, which were newly detected during the study period, showed significantly higher venous volumes compared to the preplaque area 1 year before plaque detection and the corresponding NAWM regions. Venous volumes in established MS plaques, which were present already in the first scans, were significantly higher compared to the NAWM and controls. Our data underpin a relation of veins and plaque development in MS and reflect increased apparent venous cal