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Sample records for subgenus dasystilbe dressler

  1. Euglossa obrima, a new species of orchid bee from Mesoamerica, with notes on the subgenus Dasystilbe Dressler (Hymenoptera, Apidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa-Díaz, Ismael A; Melo, Gabriel A R; Engel, Michael S

    2011-05-11

    A new species of the orchid bee subgenus Dasystilbe Dressler (Euglossini: Euglossa Latreille) is described and figured from a series of males and females collected broadly in Mesoamerica. Euglossa (Dasystilbe) obrima, sp. n., is differentiated from the one known species of Dasystilbe, Euglossa (Dasystilbe) villosa Moure, which occurs only in Panamá and perhaps Costa Rica. The subgenus and its constituent species are diagnosed, and comments provided on Dasystilbe.

  2. Dressler Syndrome

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    Erkan Ceylan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dressler Syndrome (DS is a febrile illness secondary to an inflammatory reaction involving the pleura and pericardium. It is more common in patients who have undergone surgery that involves opening the pericardium. However, DS has also been described following myocardial infarction and as an unusual complication after percutaneous procedures such as coronary stent implantation, after implantation of epicardial pacemaker leads and transvenous pacemaker leads, and following blunt trauma, stab wounds, and heart puncture. Pericardial effusions often accompany the syndrome and may develop into early or late postoperative cardiac tamponade and even recurrent cardiac tamponade. The syndrome is also characterized by pericardial or pleuritic pain, pleural effusions, pneumonitis, and abnormal ECG and radiography findings.

  3. Dressler Syndrome is Characterized by Massive Hemoptysis

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    Erkan Ceylan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 63-year-old man was admitted with signs of dyspnea, pleuritic chest pain, fever, leukocytosis, high sedimentation rate, increase on C-reactive protein level, pleural effusion 2 weeks after coronary artery bypass surgery. According to the clinic and laboratory findings, Dressler syndrome diagnosed by the exclusion of pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, congestive heart failure and coronary artery bypass surgery complications. Massive hemoptysis was thought to be a result of local inflammatory reaction triggered by the immune activation and pleura, pericardium and vascular structures.

  4. Organ-specific transcriptome profiling of metabolic and pigment biosynthesis pathways in the floral ornamental progenitor species Anthurium amnicola Dressler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthurium amnicola Dressler possesses a number of desirable and novel ornamental traits such as a purple-colored upright spathe, profuse flowering, and floral scent, some of which have been introgressed into modern Anthurium cultivars. As a first step in identifying genes associated with these trai...

  5. A new subgenus of Heterotrigona from New Guinea (Hymenoptera: Apidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engel, Michael S.; Rasmussen, Claus

    2017-01-01

    A new subgenus is established within the Indomalayan stingless bee genus Heterotrigona Schwarz (Meliponini). Sahulotrigona Engel & Rasmussen, new subgenus, is distinguished from amongst other Heterotrigona, particularly the subgenus Platytrigona Moure, within which one of the two included species...

  6. Dressler's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medicine: Clinical Essentials. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2013. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed May 27, 2015. Imazio M, et al. Postpericardiotomy syndrome: A proposal for diagnostic criteria. Journal of Cardiovascular Medicine. 2013:14:351. Alraies MC, ...

  7. Aspergillus subgenus Polypaecilum from the built environment

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    J.B. Tanney

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Xerophilic fungi, especially Aspergillus species, are prevalent in the built environment. In this study, we employed a combined culture-independent (454-pyrosequencing and culture-dependent (dilution-to-extinction approach to investigate the mycobiota of indoor dust collected from 93 buildings in 12 countries worldwide. High and low water activity (aw media were used to capture mesophile and xerophile biodiversity, resulting in the isolation of approximately 9 000 strains. Among these, 340 strains representing seven putative species in Aspergillus subgenus Polypaecilum were isolated, mostly from lowered aw media, and tentatively identified based on colony morphology and internal transcribed spacer rDNA region (ITS barcodes. Further morphological study and phylogenetic analyses using sequences of ITS, β-tubulin (BenA, calmodulin (CaM, RNA polymerase II second largest subunit (RPB2, DNA topoisomerase 1 (TOP1, and a pre-mRNA processing protein homolog (TSR1 confirmed the isolation of seven species of subgenus Polypaecilum, including five novel species: A. baarnensis, A. keratitidis, A. kalimae sp. nov., A. noonimiae sp. nov., A. thailandensis sp. nov., A. waynelawii sp. nov., and A. whitfieldii sp. nov. Pyrosequencing detected six of the seven species isolated from house dust, as well as one additional species absent from the cultures isolated, and three clades representing potentially undescribed species. Species were typically found in house dust from subtropical and tropical climates, often in close proximity to the ocean or sea. The presence of subgenus Polypaecilum, a recently described clade of xerophilic/xerotolerant, halotolerant/halophilic, and potentially zoopathogenic species, within the built environment is noteworthy.

  8. Genome Duplication in Soybean (Glycine Subgenus Soja)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, R. C.; Polzin, K.; Labate, J.; Specht, J.; Brummer, E. C.; Olson, T.; Young, N.; Concibido, V.; Wilcox, J.; Tamulonis, J. P.; Kochert, G.; Boerma, H. R.

    1996-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism mapping data from nine populations (Glycine max X G. soja and G. max X G. max) of the Glycine subgenus soja genome led to the identification of many duplicated segments of the genome. Linkage groups contained up to 33 markers that were duplicated on other linkage groups. The size of homoeologous regions ranged from 1.5 to 106.4 cM, with an average size of 45.3 cM. We observed segments in the soybean genome that were present in as many as six copies with an average of 2.55 duplications per segment. The presence of nested duplications suggests that at least one of the original genomes may have undergone an additional round of tetraploidization. Tetraploidization, along with large internal duplications, accounts for the highly duplicated nature of the genome of the subgenus. Quantitative trait loci for seed protein and oil showed correspondence across homoeologous regions, suggesting that the genes or gene families contributing to seed composition have retained similar functions throughout the evolution of the chromosomes. PMID:8878696

  9. Organ-specific transcriptome profiling of metabolic and pigment biosynthesis pathways in the floral ornamental progenitor species Anthurium amnicola Dressler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Jon Y; Amore, Teresita D; Calla, Bernarda; Palmer, Nathan A; Scully, Erin D; Sattler, Scott E; Sarath, Gautam; Lichty, Joanne S; Myers, Roxana Y; Keith, Lisa M; Matsumoto, Tracie K; Geib, Scott M

    2017-05-04

    Anthurium amnicola Dressler possesses a number of desirable and novel ornamental traits such as a purple-colored upright spathe, profuse flowering, and floral scent, some of which have been introgressed into modern Anthurium cultivars. As a first step in identifying genes associated with these traits, the transcriptome from root, leaf, spathe, and spadix from an accession of A. amnicola was assembled, resulting in 28,019 putative transcripts representing 19,458 unigenes. Genes involved in pigmentation, including those for the metabolism of chlorophyll and the biosynthesis of carotenoids, phenylpropanoids, and flavonoids were identified. The expression levels of one MYB transcription factor was highly correlated with naringenin 3-dioxygenase (F3H) and dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR) in leaves, whereas a bHLH transcription factor was highly correlated with flavonoid 3'-monooxygenase (F3'H) and a DFR in spathes, suggesting that these two transcription factors might regulate flavonoid and anthocyanin synthesis in A. amnicola. Gene sequence and expression data from four major organs of A. amnicola provide novel basal information for understanding the genetic bases of ornamental traits and the determinants and evolution of form and function in the Araceae.

  10. A new subgenus and species of Neotropical Trichomyia (Diptera: Psychodidae

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    Maíra Xavier Araújo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A singular group of 19 species of Neotropical Trichomyia Haliday in Curtis, 1839 presents four segments in the palpus, the first two partially fused; five of these species were included in the subgenus Opisthotrichomyia Bravo, 2001 and seven in the subgenus BrachiotrichomyiaBravo & Araújo, 2013. A new species from Brazil is described and a new subgenus proposed for four Neotropical species of this morphological group: T. biloba Quate, 1999 from Panama, and T. onorei Bravo, 2002, T. queirozi Bravo, 2002 and T. horrida sp. nov. from Brazil. Syntrichomyia subgen. nov. can be recognized by its fused gonocoxites and gonostyli, and by its bilobed hypoproct. A key to the known species (males of this new subgenus is presented.

  11. Hygrophoraceae of the Greater Antilles : Hygrocybe subgenus Hygrocybe

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    Sharon A. Cantrell; D. Jean Lodge

    2000-01-01

    A key to six taxa of Hygrocybe, subgenus Hygrocybe, sections Chlorophanae and Hygrocybe is provided. One species is new and four species are reported for the first time from the Greater Antilles. The new species is H. chimaeroderma (section Chlarophanae). Hygrocybe acutoconica, H. calyptriformis and H. incolor (section Hygrocybe) are reported for the first time, and...

  12. Korean Species of the Subgenus Ophina (Diptera: Tachinidae

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    Jong-Su Lim

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We recognized Linnaemya microchaetopsis Shima, L. picta (Meigen and L. zachvatkini Zimin in Korean Linnaemya subgenus Ophina Robineau-Desvoidy and the latter two are reported for the first time in Korea. The subgenus Ophina shares the following morphological characteristics (sensu Shima: 1 the male tergite 6 is fused mid-dorsally with sternite 7+8; 2 the female tergite 6 and tergite 7 are almost always divided longitudinally into two hemitergites; 3 the female tergite 6 is always longer than the tergite 7; 4 circus parallelsided in caudal view; 5 epiphallus present; and 6 pteropleural seta long, reaching posterior margin of lower calypter. We provide a key to the included Korean species, as well as descriptions and illustrations with their diagnostic characters indicated.

  13. Holothuria (Selenkothuria) parvispinea n. sp. (Echinodermata, Hololthuroidea, Holothuriidae) with key to the sub-genus Selenkothuria.

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    Massin, Claude

    2013-01-30

    Description of a new species from Australia, belonging to the subgenus Selenkothuria (Holothuria, Aspidochirotida). A dichotomous key of the thirteen valid species included in the subgenus is also given. The species H. perrieri Thandar, 1977 and H. spinea Cherbonnier, 1988 are considered as non valid.

  14. A New Subgenus of CULEX in the Neotropical Region (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    subgenus in the the Greek nouns phtwna.v (m, deceiver, cheat. New World, and the results of the present impostor: combining form /phnaco’-) and study...mistaken for members of the characters oftthe lar\\al stage, subgenus (’tlehv. The name is feminine in The affinities of tth’nao,,. via arc un- gender. The

  15. Cortinarius subgenus Callistei in North America and Europe-type studies, diversity, and distribution of species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, Tuula; Liimatainen, Kare; Kytövuori, Ilkka; Lindström, Håkan; Dentinger, Bryn T M; Ammirati, Joseph F

    2016-09-01

    Five species of Cortinarius subgenus Callistei, are recognized in Europe and North America. Cortinarius callisteus, C. infucatus, and C. neocallisteus sp. nov. have a broad distribution, extending from western North America to Europe. Cortinarius tofaceus is known from eastern North America and Europe, while C. callistei sp. is known only from one locality in Sweden. All five species are primarily associated with coniferous trees. Previously the species were included either in subgenus Leprocybe or subgenus Cortinarius, but recently they have been separated into subgenus Callistei based on molecular data. Type specimens of the names associated with this subgenus were studied and a neotype proposed for C. tofaceus and an epitype for C. infucatus Barcodes for the species are deposited in RefSeq and UNITE. © 2016 by The Mycological Society of America.

  16. Dehydrogenase isoenzyme polymorphism in genus Prunus, subgenus Cerasus

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    Čolić Slavica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dehydrogenase polymorphism was studied in 36 sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L., sweet cherry (Prunus avuim L., mahaleb (Prunus mahaleb L., ground cherry (Prunus fruticosa Pall., duke cherry (Prunus gondounii Redh., Japanese flowering cherry (Prunus serrulata Lindl. and four iterspecific hybrids (standard cherry rootstocks ‘Gisela 5’, ‘Gisela 6’, ‘Max Ma’ and ‘Colt’. Inner bark of one-year-old shoots, in dormant stage, was used for enzyme extraction. Vertical PAGE was used for isoenzyme analysis: alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, formate dehydrogenase (FDH, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, isocitrate dehydrogenaze (IDH, malate dehydrogenase (MDH, phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (PGD, and shikimate dehydrogenase (SDH. All studied systems were polymorphic at 10 loci: Adh -1 (3 genotypes and Adh-2 (5 genotypes, Fdh-1 (2 genotypes, Gdh-1 (3 genotypes, Idh-1 (4 genotypes i Idh -2 (5 genotypes, Mdh-1 (3 genotypes, Pgd-1 (4 genotypes, Sdh-1 (1 genotype i Sdh-2 (3 genotypes. Cluster analysis was used to construct dendrogram on which four groups of similar genotypes were separated. Obtained results indicate that studied enzyme systems can be used for determination of genus Prunus, subgenus Cerasus. Among studied enzyme systems ADH, IDH and SDH were the most polymorphic and most useful to identify genetic variability. Polymorphism of FDH and GDH in genus Prunus, subgenus Cerasus was described first time in this work. First results for dehydrogenase variability of Oblačinska indicate that polymorphism of loci Idh-2 and Sdh-2 can be useful for discrimination of different clones.

  17. Neopetromyces gen. nov and an overview of teleomorphs of Aspergillus subgenus Circumdati

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jens Christian; Samson, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    Species in the anamorph genus Aspergillus are associated with several teleomorphic genera in the Eurotiales and the most important mycotoxin producers are concentrated in Aspergillus subgenus Circumdati. A new genus, Neopetromyces, is proposed for the recently described Petromyces muricatus, beca...

  18. [Polymorphism of KPI-A genes from plants of the subgenus Potatoe (sect. Petota, Estolonifera and Lycopersicum) and subgenus Solanum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinitsyna, A A; Mel'nikova, N V; Belenikin, M S; Poltronieri, P; Santino, A; Kudriavtseva, A V; Savilova, A M; Speranskaia, A S

    2013-01-01

    Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor proteins of group A (KPI-A) are involved in the protection of potato plants from pathogens and pests. Although sequences of large number of the KPI-A genes from different species of cultivated potato (Solanum tuberosum subsp. tuberosum) and a few genes from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) are known to date, information about the allelic diversity of these genes in other species of the genus Solanum is lacking. In our work, the consensus sequences of the KPI-A genes were established in two species of subgenus Potatoe sect. Petota (Solanum tuberosum subsp. andigenum--5 genes and Solanum stoloniferum--2 genes) and in the subgenus Solanum (Solanum nigrum--5 genes) by amplification, cloning, sequencing and subsequent analysis. The determined sequences of KPI-A genes were 97-100% identical to known sequences of the cultivated potato of sect. Petota (cultivated potato Solanum tuberosum subsp. tuberosum) and sect. Etuberosum (S. palustre). The interspecific variability of these genes did not exceed the intraspecific variability for all studied species except Solanum lycopersicum. The distribution of highly variable and conserved sequences in the mature protein-encoding regions was uniform for all investigated KPI-A genes. However, our attempts to amplify the homologous genes using the same primers and the genomes of Solanum dulcamarum, Solanum lycopersicum and Mandragora officinarum resulted in no product formation. Phylogenetic analysis of KPI-A diversity showed that the sequences of the S. lycopersicum form independent cluster, whereas KPI-A of S. nigrum and species of sect. Etuberosum and sect. Petota are closely related and do not form species-specific subclasters. Although Solanum nigrum is resistant to all known races of economically one of the most important diseases of solanaceous plants oomycete Phytophthora infestans aminoacid sequences encoding by KPI-A genes from its genome have nearly or absolutely no differences to the same from

  19. A new subgenus and species of Topomyia (Diptera: Culicidae: Sabethini) based on a remarkable male mosquito from Sabah, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbach, Ralph E; Culverwell, C Lorna

    2014-05-08

    Miyagiella Harbach, subgen. nov., is introduced as a new subgenus of Topomyia Leicester for a remarkable male mosquito, Topomyia discors Harbach, sp. nov., from Sabah, Malaysia. A diagnosis of the subgenus is provided that features unique anatomical characters of the genitalia of the holotype male. Miyagiella is very distinct from the two previously recognised subgenera of Topomyia, but is perhaps more closely related to the nominotypical subgenus than to subgenus Suaymyia Thurman. Salient differences that distinguish the three subgenera are contrasted; the holotype male of To. discors is described and its unique genitalia are illustrated.

  20. Anatomical study of Rubus subgenus Rubus in Iran

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    Razieh Kasalkheh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rubus L. genus from Rosaceae has about 750 species, from which 8 species and 5 hybrids from Iran. In this study stem, leaflet, petiole, stipule and pedicle anatomy of 7 species of the genus Rubus subgenus. Rubus is invesgitated. These species include R. sanctus, R. persicus, R. hyrcanus, R. hirtus, R. dilichocarpus, R. discolor and R. caesius. Plant samples were collected and then fixed and handmade cross-section of leave were prepared and stained with methyl green and carmine. Several slides were studies and photographed with light microscope (LM. Among studied character, five quantitative features such as shape of transvers cross section, type of glandular and non-glandular trichome, presence or absence of stalk glandular trichome, distribution of calcium oxalate crystal and thickness of cuticle were studied in separation of species. Also, five quantitative features such as number of vascular bundles, number of collenchyma layer (in stem and petiole, number of palisade and spongy paranchymatous layer (in leaflet and presence or absence palisade paranchymatous in stipule are valuable and can be used in distinguishing species.

  1. Morphological and Genotypic Variations among the Species of the Subgenus Adlerius (Diptera: Psychodidae, Phlebotomus in Iran

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    Alireza Zahraei-Ramazani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Female sand flies of subgenus Adlerius are considered as probable vectors of visceral leishmaniasis in Iran. The objective of this study was to determine the morphological and genotypic variations in the populations of this subgenus in the country.Methods: Sand flies collected using sticky traps from 17 provinces during 2008–2010. The morphometric measurements were conducted with an Ocular Micrometer. Data was analyzed by SPSS. The Cytb gene was used to estimate population genetic diversity and identify the female specimens. UPGMA phenetic tree was used for DNA haplotypes of Cytb gene.Results: Six species of subgenus Adlerius identified from which one species, P. (Adlerius kabulensis, is new record. The identification key is provided for males. Results revealed the molecular systematic in the species of subgenus Adlerius and determine the relationship of three females of P. comatus, P. balcanicus and P. halepensis.Conclusion: The positions of three females and the males in the UPGMA tree are correct and the similarities among them confirm our results. The branches of each species are not genetically distinct which justify the overlapping morphological characters among them. Molecular sequencing of Cytb-mtDNA haplotypes can be used for female identification for different species of subgenus Adlerius in Iran.

  2. Phylogeny and nomenclature of the genus Talaromyces and taxa accommodated in Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, R.A.; Yilmaz, N.; Houbraken, J.

    2011-01-01

    . Talaromyces species and most species of Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium sensu Pitt reside in a monophyletic clade distant from species of other subgenera of Penicillium. For detailed phylogenetic analysis of species relationships, the ITS region (incl. 5.8S nrDNA) was sequenced for the available type...... in Penicillium and should be taxonomically unified with the Talaromyces species that reside in the same clade. Following the concepts of nomenclatural priority and single name nomenclature, we transfer all accepted species of Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium to Talaromyces. A holomorphic generic diagnosis......The taxonomic history of anamorphic species attributed to Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium is reviewed, along with evidence supporting their relationship with teleomorphic species classified in Talaromyces. To supplement previous conclusions based on ITS, SSU and/or LSU sequencing...

  3. Taxonomic study of Festuca L. subgenus Schedonorus (P. Beauv. Peterm. in Iran

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    Sayed Zabihollah Hosseini

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was based upon a taxonomic review of the subgenus Schedonorus in Iran. A collection of 30 specimens belonging to the herbaria: W, B and HUI (herbarium of the University of Isfahan were studied. Based on the results of this study, this subgenus included three species: Festuca arundinacea, F. gigantea and F. pratensis in Iran. Furthermore, this study showed that F. arundinacea, occured in this country with two subspecies: orientalis (Hack. Tzvelev and fenas (Lag. Arcang. with the greatest area of distribution compared to the other two species. Our examination of the type specimen of F. elatior subsp. pratensis var. elbursiana confirmed its synonymy with F. arundinacea.

  4. Phylogeography of three snubnose darters (Percidae: subgenus Ulocentra) endemic to the southeastern U.S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven L. Powers; Melvin L Warren

    2009-01-01

    The Yazoo Darter, Etheostoma raneyi (Percidae: subgenus Ulocentra), is a narrowly restricted endemic occurring in small tributaries in the Loessial Hills of the upper Yazoo River basin in northern Mississippi. The range of the species is shared between the Little Tallahatchie and adjacent upper Yocona rivers, but populations in the two...

  5. On the West-African species of the subgenus Eupalaemon Ortm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Man, de J.G.

    1911-01-01

    In addition to my description of Palaemon (Eupalaemon) Lenzii de Man (see p. 225 of this volume) I give here a key to the species of the subgenus Eupalaemon Ortm. as yet known to occur in the rivers of West-Africa. Six species are at present known from there, viz.: 1. Pal. (Eupalaemon) macrobrachion

  6. Hygrophoraceae (Agaricales) of the Greater Antilles : Hygrocybe subgenus Pseudohygrocybe sections Coccineae and Neohygrocybe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon A. Cantrell; D. Jean Lodge

    2004-01-01

    A key to 17 species in the genus Hygrocybe, subgenus Pseudohygrocybe, sections Coccineae and Neohygrocybe sensu Boertmann is provided for the Greater Antilles. Five new species and five taxa that are new reports for the region are described. The new species in section Coccineae are H. pseudoadonis, H. viridiphylla, and H. zonata. The new species in section Neohygrocybe...

  7. Typification of the Linnaean names Plantago serraria and P. subulata (Plantago subgenus Coronopus, Plantaginaceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassemer, Gustavo; Iamonico, Duilio; Rønsted, Nina

    2017-01-01

    Plantago subg. Coronopus is a mainly Mediterranean group of plantains whose taxonomy is very complex. Two Linnaean names within this subgenus still remain untypified: P. serraria and P. subulata. We here discuss the possible types for these names, and designate lectotypes for both....... For nomenclatural purposes, the names P. triquetra and P. pungens are also included in the treatment of P. subulata....

  8. On the Iberian distribution of the species of Tipula, subgenus Tipula (Diptera, Tipulidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterbroek, Pjotr

    1994-01-01

    A list is provided for the species of Tipula, subgenus Tipula, indicating from which Spanish and Portuguese provinces they are known. T. (T.) oleracea is apparently distributed throughout the peninsula, the other three species and kleinschmidti) seem to possess a more limited distribution. The four

  9. On the Iberian distribution of the species of Tipula, subgenus Tipula (Diptera, Tipulidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Oosterbroek, Pjotr

    1994-01-01

    A list is provided for the species of Tipula, subgenus Tipula, indicating from which Spanish and Portuguese provinces they are known. T. (T.) oleracea is apparently distributed throughout the peninsula, the other three species and kleinschmidti) seem to possess a more limited distribution. The four species are recorded here for the first time from Portugal. (paludosa, mediterranean

  10. Phylogeny of osmophillic aspergilli (subgenus Aspergillus) and taxonomic revision of section Restricti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspergillus section Restricti together with sister sect. Aspergillus (formerly Eurotium) comprises osmophilic species, that are able to grow on substrates with low water activity and in extreme environments. We addressed the monophyly of both sections within subgenus Aspergillus and applied multidis...

  11. Studies of Lactarius from Mexico: a new species in subgenus Piperites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montoya, L.; Bandala, V.M.; Moreno, G.

    1998-01-01

    Lactarius lacteolutescens is described as a new member in subgenus Piperites subsect. Croceini. It was found growing in a mixed forest of Pinus spp. and Abies hickellii, at Mt. Cofre de Perote, Central Region of the State of Veracruz (Gulf Area, Mexico).

  12. Contribution to the knowledge of the subgenus Scymnus (Parapullus Yang, 1978 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, with description of eight new species

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    Xiaosheng Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Eight new species of the subgenus Scymnus (Parapullus Yang, 1978 from China are described and illustrated: S. (P. hastatus sp. n., S. (P. baxianshanensis sp. n., S. (P. laojielingensis sp. n., S. (P. annuliformis sp. n., S. (P. papillatus sp. n., S. (P. dichotomus sp. n., S. (P. shenmuensis sp. n. and S. (P. yanzigouensis sp. n. Diagnoses and distributions are provided for each species. An updated key to the Chinese species of the subgenus Parapullus is given. A catalogue to all known species of this subgenus is also presented.

  13. Sphincterochilidae from Tunisia, with a note on the subgenus Rima Pallary, 1910 (Gastropoda, Pulmonata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbes, Intidhar; Nouira, Said; Neubert, Eike

    2011-01-01

    In order to establish an updated checklist of terrestrial gastropod from Tunisia, a revision of the species of Sphincterochilidae is presented, using bibliographic and museum records and the results of our own field work. As a result, only two species, Sphincterochila candidissima and Sphincterochila tunetana, are accepted to occur in Tunisia, and their type specimens are illustrated. The study of the morphological characters of the genital organs of both species clarified their subgeneric affiliation. Comparison of Sphincterochila tunetana with Sphincterochila cariosa from Lebanonshowed that the first has to be classified within the subgenus Albea, and the latter within Sphincterochila s. str.; the subgenus Rima Pallary, 1910 remains in the synonymy of Sphincterochila s. str. Bibliographic records of Sphincterochila baetica and Sphincterochila otthiana from Tunisia could not be confirmed, the latter probably lives close to the border with Algeria.

  14. Sphincterochilidae from Tunisia, with a note on the subgenus Rima Pallary, 1910 (Gastropoda, Pulmonata

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    Intidhar Abbes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to establish an updated checklist of terrestrial gastropod from Tunisia, a revision of the species of Sphincterochilidae is presented, using bibliographic and museum records and the results of our own field work. As a result, only two species, Sphincterochila candidissima and S. tunetana, are accepted to occur in Tunisia, and their type specimens are illustrated. The study of the morphological characters of the genital organs of both species clarified their subgeneric affiliation. Comparison of S. tunetana with S. cariosa from Lebanon showed that the first has to be classified within the subgenus Albea, and the latter within Sphincterochila s. str.; the subgenus Rima Pallary, 1910 remains in the synonymy of Sphincterochila s. str. Bibliographic records of S. baetica and S. otthiana from Tunisia could not be confirmed, the latter probably lives close to the border with Algeria.

  15. Sesquiterpene lactones. XXXIII. Guaianolides in the subgenus Psephellus (Cass. Schmalh., genus Centaurea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Nowak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sesquiterpene lactones were found to occur in all of the studied species of the subgenus Psephellus (Cass. Schmalh. Differing compositions were found in the representatives of three sections. In Centaurea declinata MB. from the section Leucophylle (Sosn. Sosn.. 15-deoxyrepin, linichlorin B and cynaropicrin were found. Linichlorin B dominated in Centaurea hypoleucu DC. from section Hypoleucae (Sosn. Sosn., while in the species classified in section Psephellus Sosn., repin, acroptilin, jenerin, centaurepensin and, in some, also cynaropicrin. dominated.

  16. Contributions to the Mosquito Fauna of Southeast Asia. XV. Genus Aedes Meigen, Subgenus Ayurakitia Thurman

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    small hair- like spicules; proctiger long, paraproct pigmented and bluntly pointed at apex, cereal setae absent; phallosome with aedeagus divided into...Thailand. The range of the subgenus may well extend into the mountain ranges of eastern Burma and northern Malaysia since similar habitats and climates...large flattened, curved bristle at apex, proctiger with cereal setae, and gonostylus long, narrow with an apical gonostylar claw; pupae with abdominal

  17. The genus Solanum (Solanaceae in southern Africa: subgenus Leptostemonum, section Giganteiformia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. G. Welman

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In the genus Solanum L. (Solanaceae, subgenus Leptostemonum (Dunal Bitter, section Giganteiformia (Bitter Child has four representatives in the Flora of southern Africa region (South Africa, Namibia. Botswana. Swaziland. Lesotho, namely S. giganteum Jacq.. S. goetzei Dammer, S. tettense Klotzsch var.  renschii (Vatke A.E.Gonsalves and S. tettense Klotsch var.tettense. Descriptions, discussions, distribution maps and keys are presented, as well as an illustration of  S. goetzei.

  18. The taxonomic significance of seed morphology in the Passiflora subgenus Astrophea (Passifloraceae

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    Ana Carolina Mezzonato-Pires

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The center of diversity for Passiflora subg. Astrophea is in low altitude areas of northern South America. The majority of species of this group are difficult to find in nature. Seed morphology was described in detail for 25 species of Passiflora subgenus Astrophea, a subgenus that until now did not exist. For morphological analysis, 20 seeds per species were measured for length, width and thickness, and the arithmetic means calculated. The seeds varied in length, width and thickness. Eight types of ornamentation were found. The margins varied among crestate, dentate, parted, entire and parted-crestate. The seed apex can be distinguished by the shape and position of the apical appendage. Seed shape varied among obovate, lanceolate, cordiform, and oblong to elliptical. An identification key was developed and a PCA was performed both using the principal morphological characters. Morphological characters of seeds are a new source of data for delimiting taxa with quite conflicting morphological boundaries, such as seen here with the Passiflora subgenus Astrophea. Furthermore, seed morphology is especially useful for the identification of specimens with only fruits and, consequently, seeds available.

  19. Bathyraja panthera, a new species of skate (Rajidae: Arhynchobatinae) from the western Aleutian Islands, and resurrection of the subgenus Arctoraja Ishiyama

    OpenAIRE

    Orr, James W.; Stevenson , Duane E.; Hoff, Gerald R.; Spies, Ingrid; McEachran, John D.

    2011-01-01

    We provide morphological and molecular evidence to recognize a new species of skate from the North Pacific, Bathyraja panthera. We also resurrect the skate subgenus Arctoraja Ishiyama, confirming its monophyly and the validity of the subgenus. Arctoraja was previously recognized as a distinct subgenus of Breviraja and later synonymized with Bathyraja (family Rajidae). Although the nominal species of Arctoraja have all been considered synonyms of Bathyraja parmifera by various authors, on t...

  20. Mitochondrial COI gene as a tool in the taxonomy of mosquitoes Culex subgenus Melanoconion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Gutierrez, Carolina; Bergo, Eduardo Sterlino; Emerson, Kevin J; de Oliveira, Tatiane M P; Greni, Susan; Sallum, Maria Anice Mureb

    2016-12-01

    The subgenus Melanoconion is the second largest subgenus within the genus Culex, with 160 described species. Several of the species are proven vectors of arboviruses, including West Nile virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus complex and Eastern equine encephalomyelitis virus. Species of Melanoconion are well distributed from southern North America to most countries of South America and display the highest species diversity in tropical regions. Taxonomical identification within this group has been primarily based on morphological characters, with the male genitalia as the source of the most solid diagnostic features. The difficulty in reaching accurate species determinations when studying specimens of Culex (Melanoconion) has been extensively documented as a real limitation to expand knowledge of these insects. We tested the utility of the mitochondrial gene COI as a complementary tool in the taxonomy of Melanoconion. Using a data set of 120 COI sequences from Culex specimen captured in several localities in Brazil, the utility of COI barcodes for species delimitation is discussed through the evaluation of genetic divergences among specimens and the clustering patterns of species in three topologies obtained with Neighbor Joining, Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic inference. For all specimens included in this study a previous morphological examination was performed, and most of the taxonomical determinations were corroborated using the COI barcode. We generated COI sequences that belong to 48 species of Melanoconion, with a mean intraspecific K2P genetic divergence of 3%; and all interspecific divergence values higher than the intraspecific divergence values. This is the first comprehensive study of subgenus Melanoconion, with evidence of COI as a useful and accessible DNA barcode. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The oribatid mite subgenus Galumna (Galumna (Acari, Oribatida, Galumnidae in the Philippines

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    Sergey Ermilov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Five species of the subgenus Galumna (Galumna (Acari, Oribatida, Galumnidae are registered in the Philippine oribatid mite fauna. A new species, G. (G. makilingensis sp. n., is described; it is most similar morphologically to G. (G. tokyoensis Aoki, 1966, but differs from the latter by the morphology of porose areas Aa and Ap, rostral setae, and length of interlamellar setae. Three species, G. (G. crenata Deb & Raychaudhuri, 1975, G. (G. cf. exigua Sellnick, 1925 and G. (G. khoii Mahunka, 1989, are recorded in the Philippines for the first time. The species G. (G. crenata is redescribed. An identification key to the Philippine species of Galumna (Galumna is given.

  2. A new species of Cladotanytarsus (Lenziella) from Oregon supports the systematic concept of the subgenus (Diptera: Chironomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchalski, Mateusz; Giłka, Wojciech

    2017-05-18

    A new species of the genus Cladotanytarsus Kieffer, 1921 and the small subgenus Lenziella Kieffer, 1922 is described from Southern Oregon, USA. The adult male of C. (L.) glaber Giłka et Puchalski, sp. nov., featuring tibial lobes armed with dense setae and a large globular swelling of the hypopygial inferior volsella, supports the recently defined systematic concept for Lenziella. This subgenus is known from seven species distributed in the Northern Hemisphere (1 European, 1 Palaearctic and 5 Nearctic), the males of which are included in an updated identification key.

  3. Phenotypic differentiation and phylogenetic signal of wing shape in western European biting midges, Culicoides spp., of the subgenus Avaritia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz-Muñoz, F.; Talavera, S.; Carpenter, S.

    2014-01-01

    of cytochrome oxidase subunit I barcode sequencing and geometric morphometric analyses to investigate wing shape as a means to infer species identification within this subgenus. In addition the congruence of morphological data with different phylogenetic hypotheses is tested. Five different species...... of the subgenus Avaritia were considered in the study (C. obsoletus (Meigen); C. scoticus Kettle and Lawson; C. chiopterus (Meigen); C. dewulfi Goetghebuer and C. imicola (Kieffer)). The study demonstrated that over 90% of individuals could be separated correctly into species by their wing shape and that patterns...

  4. Molecular phylogeny of Crematogaster subgenus Decacrema ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and the colonization of Macaranga (Euphorbiaceae) trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldhaar, Heike; Fiala, Brigitte; Gadau, Jürgen; Mohamed, Maryati; Maschwitz, Ulrich

    2003-06-01

    To elucidate the evolution of one of the most species-rich ant-plant symbiotic systems, the association between Crematogaster (Myrmicinae) and Macaranga (Euphorbiaceae) in South-East Asia, we conducted a phylogenetic analysis of the ant partners. For the phylogenetic analysis partial mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I and II were sequenced and Maximum Parsimony analysis was performed. The analyzed Crematogaster of the subgenus Decacrema fell into three distinct clades which are also characterized by specific morphological and ecological traits (queen morphology, host-plants, and colony structure). Our results supported the validity of our currently used morphospecies concept for Peninsula Malaysia. However, on a wider geographic range (including North and North-East Borneo) some morphospecies turned out to be species complexes with genetically quite distinct taxa. Our phylogenetic analysis and host association studies do not indicate strict cocladogenesis between the subgenus Decacrema and their Macaranga host-plants because multiple ant taxa occur on quite distinct host-plants belonging to different clades within in the genus Macaranga. These results support the view that host-shifting or host-expansion is common in the ants colonizing Macaranga. Additionally, the considerable geographic substructuring found in the phylogenetic trees of the ants suggests that allopatric speciation has also played a role in the diversification and the current distribution of the Decacrema ants.

  5. Unusual sub-genus associations of faecal Prevotella and Bacteroides with specific dietary patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Francesca; Pellegrini, Nicoletta; Laghi, Luca; Gobbetti, Marco; Ercolini, Danilo

    2016-10-21

    Diet has a recognized effect in shaping gut microbiota. Many studies link an increase in Prevotella to high-fibre diet, while Bacteroides abundance is usually associated with the consumption of animal fat and protein-rich diets. Nevertheless, closely related species and strains may harbour different genetic pools; therefore, further studies should aim to understand whether species of the same genus are consistently linked to dietary patterns or equally responsive to diet variations. Here, we used oligotyping of 16S rRNA gene sequencing data to exploit the diversity within Prevotella and Bacteroides genera in faecal samples of omnivore and non-omnivore subjects from a previously studied cohort. A great heterogeneity was found in oligotype composition. Nevertheless, different oligotypes within the same genus showed distinctive correlation patterns with dietary components and metabolome. We found that some Prevotella oligotypes are significantly associated with the plant-based diet but some are associated with animal-based nutrients, and the same applies to Bacteroides. Therefore, an indiscriminate association of Bacteroidetes genera with specific dietary patterns may lead to an oversimplified vision that does not take into account sub-genus diversity and the different possible responses to dietary components. We demonstrated that Prevotella and Bacteroides oligotypes show distinctive correlation patterns with dietary components and metabolome. These results substantiate a current oversimplification of diet-dependent microbe-host associations and highlighted that sub-genus differences must be taken into account when planning gut microbiota modulation for health benefits.

  6. Revision of the Neotropical species of the subgenus Atrichopogon (Psilokempia) (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Gustavo R; Marino, Pablo I; Huerta, Herón

    2015-08-20

    This revision of the midges in the subgenus Psilokempia Enderlein of Atrichopogon Kieffer provides a brief description of the subgenus, diagnoses, descriptions, illustrations and a key to adult males and females of the 17 species from the Neotropical region, as well as distributional records of both new and previously described species. Six new species are described and illustrated: A. arti, A. javieri, A. longirostris, A. nahuelbutensis, A. sergioi and A. woodruffi (n. spp.). The type materials of all previously known Neotropical species except A. penicillatus Delècolle & Rieb were examined. Atrichopogon altivolans Macfie, A. aridus Spinelli & Marino, A. domizii Spinelli, A. glaber Macfie, A. gordoni Macfie, A. insigniventris Macfie, A. pectinatus Macfie and A. penicillatus are redescribed and illustrated, and notes on the types of A. echinodes Macfie, A. harrisi Macfie and A. sanctaeclarae Macfie are provided. Lectotypes are designated for A. glaber, A. insigniventris and A. pectinatus. The previously unknown males of A. altivolans, A. pectinatus and A. penicillatus are described and illustrated, and A. fimbriatus Macfie is recognized as a junior synonym of A. gordoni.

  7. Sesquiterpene lactones. XXIX. Cnicin in species of the subgenus Acrolophus (Cass. Dobrocz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Nowak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cnicin was isolated from 18 species or subspecies of the subgenus Acrolophus (Cass. Dobrocz.: Centaurea aplolepa Moretti subsp. aplolepa, C. aplolepa Moretti subsp. lunensis (Fiori Dostal, C. arenaria Bieb. ex Wild. subsp. arenaria, C. arenaria Bieb. ex Wild, subsp. odessana (Prodan Dostal, C. arenaria Bieb ex Wild. subsp. majorowii (Dumbadze Dostal, C. calvescens Pančić, C. cineraria L. subsp. cineraria, C. cineraria L. var, circae Somm., C. diffusa Lam. var. brevispina Boiss., C. grisebachi (Nyman Form. subsp. grisebachi, C. grisebachi (Nyman Form. subsp. confusa (Halácsy Dostal, C. leucophaea Jordan subsp. leucophaea, C. attica Nyman subsp. ossaea (Halácsy Dostal, C. pallidior Halácsy subsp. palidior, C. pelia DC., C. rhenana Boreau subsp. savranica (Klokow Dostal, C. tymphaea Hausskn subsp. tymphaea, C. tymphaea Hausskn subsp. brevispina Hausskn (Dostal. Chromatographic analysis has shown appearance of cnicin in 10 investigated species or subspecies of subgenus Acrolophus (Cass. Dobrocz.: Centaurea attica Nyman subsp. drakiensis (Freyn, Sint. Dostal, C. kartschiana Scop., C. aggregata Fisch. et Mey, C. cuneifolia Sibth. SM. subsp. pallida (Friv. Hayek, C. exarata Boiss. ex Cosson., C. mantoudii Georg., C. orphanidea Heldr. Sart. ex Boiss, subsp. orphanidea, C. spinosa L. subsp. spinosa, C. transiens Halácsy, C. zuccariniana DC.

  8. ARCHITECTONICS OF BOREAL SPECIES IN THE SUBGENUS SALIX AND VETRIX DUMORT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Nedoseko

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The basis for understanding the patterns of plant growth and development is the research of their structural and functional organization. One of the successfully developing areas of this research is the study of architectural models of woody plants. At the same time, widespread species of willow in the middle belt of European Russia from subgenus Salix and Vetrix are not fully studied in this respect. The goal is to develop a methodology for studying the structural and functional organization of dioecious tree species and on its basis to identify and describe the main structural and functional units (architectural modules of boreal species of willows of subgenus Salix and Vetrix. Materials and methods. Architectural modules are described for 15 boreal species in subgenus Salix and Vetrix. For this, a method based on the analysis of three features of the structural and functional organization of the species was developed: ramification type, the size of the vegetative shoots die-off zone and the longevity of the vegetative parts of the earrings. Results. 7 architectural modules have been identified in the examined species: one- and two-stage drop-down earrings on the basis of acro-, meso- and basitonium, and also with conditionally non-decreasing earrings based on acrotonia. It is established that the degree of death of the upper metamers of annual shoots correlates with the development of shoots from sleeping buds: in low shrubs such shoots develop 4–6 times more often than in trees and high shrubs. It is determined that the architectural modules of female individuals, unlike male individuals, are more branched and contain a greater number of annual assimilative shoots. It is shown that maximum number of architectural types is characteristic of the upper and middle branches, and the smaller of the lower branches in the crowns of female and male individuals of trees and tall shrubs. Conclusions. The offered technique allows us to

  9. Phylogeny and taxonomic revision of the subgenus Velleius Leach (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae: Staphylininae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zong-Yi; Zhou, Hong-Zhang

    2015-05-15

    The subgenus Velleius Leach, 1819 of the genus Quedius Stephens, 1829 is a small and very distinctive group in the subtribe Quediina (Staphylinidae: Staphylininae) with pectinate antennal segments and larvae living in nests of Vespa species. This paper reviews the taxonomy of all Velleius species and analyzes the phylogeny of this group. Two new species, Quedius (Velleius) sagittalis sp. nov. from Shaanxi, China and Q. (V.) rectilatus sp. nov. from Guangdong, China, are described. Q. (V.) simillimus (Fairmaire,1891) syn. nov. is proposed as a new synonym of Q. (V.) pectinatus (Sharp, 1874). Phylogenetic result shows that all nine Velleius species can be divided into two clades and both have strong tree supports of Bremer/Bootstrap/Jackknife values.

  10. Growth and differentiation on a trypanosome of the subgenus Schizotrypanum from the bat Phyllostomus hastatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia I. Hamanaka

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of temperature, pH, osmolarity and aeration on the growth and differentiation of a trypanosome ofthe subgenus Schizotrypanum isolatedfrom the bat Phyllostomus hastatus were studied. In general, the growth characteristics ofthe flagellate were similar to those of Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum cruzi. However, the parasite did not growth at 33 or 37C. Increase in the osmolarity and aeration promoted growth at 33C. Significant metacyclogenesis was detected only in the growth condition where maximal growth occured (28C, pH 7.3, 380m0s/kg, in tissue cullure flasks, at the end ofthe exponential growth phase. The begining of the metacyclogenesis process was coincident with most glucose utilization and lowest pH. During metacyclogenesis both culture medium pH and osmolarity increased steadly.

  11. The genus Solanum (Solanaceae in southern Africa: subgenus Leptostemonum, the introduced sections Acanthophora and Torva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. G. Welman

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In the genus Solanum L. (Solanaceae, subgenus Leptostemonum (Dunal Bitter, section Acanthophora Dunal has four representatives in the Flora of southern Africa region (South Africa. Lesotho, Swaziland, Namibia. Botswana, namely  S. aculeatissimum Jacq.. S. capsicoides Allioni. S. mammosum L. (cultivated only and S. viarum Dunal. Section  Ton a Nees has two representatives in southern Africa, namely S.  chnsotriclium Schltdl. (S.  hispidum auctt. non Pers. and S.  ton um Sw.; both are naturalized weeds.  Solanum capsicoides, S. viarum and S.  torvum have not been listed before for southern Africa. All are introduced species native to the New World. Descriptions, discussions, illustrations and distribution maps of the naturalized species are presented, as well as keys to the species of both sections.

  12. Systematic studies on Anopheles galvaoi Causey, Deane & Deane from the subgenus Nysssorhynchus blanchard (Diptera: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Anice Mureb Sallum

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Anopheles galvaoi, a member of the subgenus Nyssorhynchus, is redescribed based on morphological characters of the adults male and female, fourth-instar larva and pupa. Female, male genitalia, larval and pupal stages are illustrated. Data about medical importance, bionomics, and distribution are given based on literature records. Adult female of An. galvaoi can be easily misidentified as An. benarrochi Gabaldón and An. aquasalis Curry. A few characters are indicated for identifying female and immatures of An. galvaoi. Phylogenetic relationships among An. galvaoi and six other species of the Oswaldoi Subgroup are estimated using COII mtDNA and ITS2 rDNA gene sequences. Lectotype of An. galvaoi, an adult female from Rio Branco, State of Acre, is invalidated.

  13. The genus Solanum (Solanaceae in southern Africa: subgenus Leptostemonum, the introduced sections Acanthophora and Torva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. G. Welman

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In the genus Solanum L. (Solanaceae, subgenus Leptostemonum (Dunal Bitter, section Acanthophora Dunal has four representatives in the Flora of southern Africa region (South Africa. Lesotho, Swaziland, Namibia. Botswana, namely  S. aculeatissimum Jacq.. S. capsicoides Allioni. S. mammosum L. (cultivated only and S. viarum Dunal. Section  Ton a Nees has two representatives in southern Africa, namely S.  chnsotriclium Schltdl. (S.  hispidum auctt. non Pers. and S.  ton um Sw.; both are naturalized weeds.  Solanum capsicoides, S. viarum and S.  torvum have not been listed before for southern Africa. All are introduced species native to the New World. Descriptions, discussions, illustrations and distribution maps of the naturalized species are presented, as well as keys to the species of both sections.

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of Penicillium subgenus Penicillium using partial P-tubulin sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, R.A.; Seifert, K.A.; Kuijpers, A.F.A.

    2004-01-01

    with the classification into sections and series proposed in the accompanying monograph. There was good strict consensus support for much of the gene tree, and good bootstrap support for some parts. The phylogenetic analyses suggested that sect. Viridicata, the largest section in the subgenus, is divided into three...... the paraphyletic P. nordicum. The phylogeny for sect. Roqueforti (100%) was robust, with excellent bootstrap support for all included species, i.e. P. roqueforti (100%), P. carneum (94%) and P. paneum (100%). In sect. Penicillium, Series Expansa was paraphyletic, with the monophyletic ser. Italica derived within...... it. The synnematous species in ser. Claviformia were a paraphyletic group with the species of ser. Urticicolae., including P. griseofulvum (99%), derived within. Section Digitata, ser. Digitata comprised a single well-supported species, P. digitatum (100%). The phylogenetic structure of sect...

  15. Phylogenetic Patterns of Geographical and Ecological Diversification in the Subgenus Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Hojas, Ramiro; Vieira, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Colonisation of new geographic regions and/or of new ecological resources can result in rapid species diversification into the new ecological niches available. Members of the subgenus Drosophila are distributed across the globe and show a large diversity of ecological niches. Furthermore, taxonomic classification of Drosophila includes the rank radiation, which refers to closely related species groups. Nevertheless, it has never been tested if these taxonomic radiations correspond to evolutionary radiations. Here we present a study of the patterns of diversification of Drosophila to test for increased diversification rates in relation to the geographic and ecological diversification processes. For this, we have estimated and dated a phylogeny of 218 species belonging to the major species groups of the subgenus. The obtained phylogenies are largely consistent with previous studies and indicate that the major groups appeared during the Oligocene/Miocene transition or early Miocene, characterized by a trend of climate warming with brief periods of glaciation. Ancestral reconstruction of geographic ranges and ecological resource use suggest at least two dispersals to the Neotropics from the ancestral Asiatic tropical disribution, and several transitions to specialized ecological resource use (mycophagous and cactophilic). Colonisation of new geographic regions and/or of new ecological resources can result in rapid species diversification into the new ecological niches available. However, diversification analyses show no significant support for adaptive radiations as a result of geographic dispersal or ecological resource shift. Also, cactophily has not resulted in an increase in the diversification rate of the repleta and related groups. It is thus concluded that the taxonomic radiations do not correspond to adaptive radiations. PMID:23152919

  16. Phylogenetic patterns of geographical and ecological diversification in the subgenus Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro Morales-Hojas

    Full Text Available Colonisation of new geographic regions and/or of new ecological resources can result in rapid species diversification into the new ecological niches available. Members of the subgenus Drosophila are distributed across the globe and show a large diversity of ecological niches. Furthermore, taxonomic classification of Drosophila includes the rank radiation, which refers to closely related species groups. Nevertheless, it has never been tested if these taxonomic radiations correspond to evolutionary radiations. Here we present a study of the patterns of diversification of Drosophila to test for increased diversification rates in relation to the geographic and ecological diversification processes. For this, we have estimated and dated a phylogeny of 218 species belonging to the major species groups of the subgenus. The obtained phylogenies are largely consistent with previous studies and indicate that the major groups appeared during the Oligocene/Miocene transition or early Miocene, characterized by a trend of climate warming with brief periods of glaciation. Ancestral reconstruction of geographic ranges and ecological resource use suggest at least two dispersals to the Neotropics from the ancestral Asiatic tropical disribution, and several transitions to specialized ecological resource use (mycophagous and cactophilic. Colonisation of new geographic regions and/or of new ecological resources can result in rapid species diversification into the new ecological niches available. However, diversification analyses show no significant support for adaptive radiations as a result of geographic dispersal or ecological resource shift. Also, cactophily has not resulted in an increase in the diversification rate of the repleta and related groups. It is thus concluded that the taxonomic radiations do not correspond to adaptive radiations.

  17. Two new species of the acifer species group of Polypedilum subgenus Tripodura Townes from China (Diptera: Chironomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruilei; Song, Chao; Wang, Liqing; Wang, Xinhua

    2015-02-13

    Polypedilum (Tripodura) falcatum sp. n. and P. (T.) procerum sp. n. of the acifer species group of Polypedilum subgenus Tripodura Townes are described and illustrated as male imagines from China. The male adult of P. (T.) falcatum sp. n. is distinguished by the presence of two faint markings on wing; short and interrupted abdominal tergite bands; the sickle-like superior volsella bearing 0-2 outer setae and a tuft of short setae on its apex. The male adult of P. (T.) procerum sp. n. differs in having short abdominal tergite bands; a long, slender and apically curved superior volsella; a high fore leg ratio (2.30-2.33). A key to known male imagines of Polypedilum subgenus Tripodura from China is presented.

  18. Phylogeography, population structure and evolution of coral-eating butterflyfishes (Family Chaetodontidae, genus Chaetodon , subgenus Corallochaetodon )

    KAUST Repository

    Waldrop, Ellen

    2016-01-11

    Aim This study compares the phylogeography, population structure and evolution of four butterflyfish species in the Chaetodon subgenus Corallochaetodon, with two widespread species (Indian Ocean – C. trifasciatus and Pacific Ocean – C. lunulatus), and two species that are largely restricted to the Red Sea (C. austriacus) and north-western (NW) Indian Ocean (C. melapterus). Through extensive geographical coverage of these taxa, we seek to resolve patterns of genetic diversity within and between closely related butterflyfish species in order to illuminate biogeographical and evolutionary processes. Location Red Sea, Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean. Methods A total of 632 individuals from 24 locations throughout the geographical ranges of all four members of the subgenus Corallochaetodon were sequenced using a 605 bp fragment (cytochrome b) of mtDNA. In addition, 10 microsatellite loci were used to assess population structure in the two widespread species. Results Phylogenetic reconstruction indicates that the Pacific Ocean C. lunulatus diverged from the Indian Ocean C. trifasciatus approximately 3 Ma, while C. melapterus and C. austriacus comprise a cluster of shared haplotypes derived from C. trifasciatus within the last 0.75 Myr. The Pacific C. lunulatus had significant population structure at peripheral locations on the eastern edge of its range (French Polynesia, Johnston Atoll, Hawai\\'i), and a strong break between two ecoregions of the Hawaiian Archipelago. The Indian Ocean C. trifasciatus showed significant structure only at the Chagos Archipelago in the central Indian Ocean, and the two range-restricted species showed no population structure but evidence of recent population expansion. Main conclusions Patterns of endemism and genetic diversity in Corallochaetodon butterflyfishes have been shaped by (1) Plio-Pleistocene sea level changes that facilitated evolutionary divergences at biogeographical barriers between Indian and Pacific Oceans, and the Indian

  19. Systematics and biology of Xylocopa subgenus Schonnherria (Hymenoptera, Apidae) in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, Mariano; Gonzalez, Victor H.; Abrahamovich, Alberto H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Biological information on the species of the large carpenter bee Xylocopa subgenus Schonnherria occurring in Argentina is revised. Based on the appraisal of museum specimens, the study of type material, and field surveys conducted across 15 provinces between 2007 and 2011, the following seven species are recognized for the country: Xylocopa bambusae Schrottky, Xylocopa chrysopoda Schrottky, Xylocopa macrops Lepeletier de Saint Fargeau, Xylocopa simillima Smith Xylocopa splendidula Lepeletier de Saint Fargeau, Xylocopa pulchra Smith, and Xylocopa viridis Smith. Previous literature records of Xylocopa dimidiata Latreille, Xylocopa subcyanea Pérez, and Xylocopa varians Smith for the province of Misiones appear to have been misidentified specimens, although the presence of these species in Argentina cannot be entirely ruled out given the proximity of this province to Brazil and Paraguay where they occur; Xylocopa boops Maidl was described from a male specimen with unusually enlarged eyes and is newly synonymized under Xylocopa macrops. Males and females of all species are diagnosed, described, and figured, including details of the male genitalia. Taxonomic comments, data on the geographical distribution and nesting substrates, and identification keys to all Argentinean species of Schonnherria are provided. The nesting biologies of Xylocopa splendidula and Xylocopa viridis are documented. PMID:26798288

  20. Developmental and ultrastructural characters of the pollen grains and tapetum in species of Nymphaea subgenus Hydrocallis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zini, Lucía Melisa; Galati, Beatriz Gloria; Zarlavsky, Gabriela; Ferrucci, María Silvia

    2017-07-01

    Variations in pollen characters and tapetum behavior were recently acknowledged in the early-divergent family Nymphaeaceae and even within the genus Nymphaea, which probably is not monophyletic; some traits such as infratectum and tapetum type are also a matter of different interpretations. In this study, developmental characters of the pollen grains and tapetum in Nymphaea subgenus Hydrocallis are provided for the first time. Observations were made in N. amazonum, N. gardneriana, and N. prolifera using light, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy. Tapetum is of the secretory type and produces orbicules. At microspore and pollen grain stages, the distal and proximal walls differ considerably. This result supports the operculate condition of the aperture in Hydrocallis, and such aperture might be plesiomorphic for Nymphaeoideae. The infratectum is intermediate, composed of inter-columellae granular elements, robust columellae consisting of agglomerated granules, complete columellae, and fused columellae. Narrow microchannels are present and persist until the mature pollen grain stage. The membranous granular layer is often present in the pollen grains of Nymphaeaceae. In N. gardneriana, this layer is most probably a component of the intine because it is lost after acetolysis. Orbicules in the Nymphaeaceae are characterized as spherical or subspherical, with a smooth sporopolleninic wall that surrounds an electron-lucent core and with individual orbicules that usually merge to give irregular aggregations. The aperture, pollen wall ultrastructure, and the tapetum of the studied species are discussed in an evolutionary and systematic context, and these characters are also compared with those of other angiosperm lineages.

  1. A review of the orientalis group of the Otostigmus subgenus Otostigmus Porat, 1876 (Chilopoda: Scolopendromorpha: Scolopendridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John G E

    2014-12-02

    The Otostigmus subgenus Otostigmus, which currently comprises 58 species, was subdivided by Lewis (2010a) into nine species groups based on Attems' (1930a) monograph. The orientalis group comprising 19 species and two subspecies is the subject of this paper. In most cases, the type material is redescribed and variation discussed. The following species are valid: O. ateles Chamberlin, 1920, O. australianus Attems, 1930, O. brevidentatus Verhoeff, 1937, O. foveolatus Verhoeff, 1937, O. kashmiranus Lewis, 1992, O. metallicus Haase, 1887, O. multidens multidens Haase, 1887, O. oatesi Kraepelin, 1903, O. orientalis Porat, 1876, O. ruficeps Pocock, 1890, and O. striolatus Verhoeff, 1937. O. seychellarum Attems, 1900, is reinstated as a valid species and O. niasensis Silvestri, 1895, and O. sucki Krae-pelin, 1903 which may be O. metallicus are regarded as valid pro tem. O. greggi Chamberlin, 1944, is a junior subjective synonym of O. astenus (Kohlrausch, 1881), and O. loriae Silvestri, 1895, and O. multidens carens Attems, 1938, junior subjective synonyms of O. multidens. O. loriae nordicus Schileyko, 1995, becomes O. multidens nordicus comb. nov. O. nemorensis Silvestri, 1895, O. poonamae Khanna & Tripathi, 1986, and O. telus Chamberlin, 1939, are nomina dubia. A key to the species is provided.

  2. The rediscovery of Passiflora kwangtungensis Merr. (subgenus Decaloba supersection Disemma: a critically endangered Chinese endemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn Krosnick

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Passiflora kwangtungensis is a critically endangered Chinese species known from Guangxi, Guangdong, and Jiangxi Provinces. The species belongs to Passiflora subgenus Decaloba, supersection Disemma, section Octandranthus. Field observations decreased rapidly during the 1970s to 1980s, and it was suspected that this species might have been extirpated due to repeated deforestation events throughout southern China. In recent years, however, small isolated populations of this species have been rediscovered in Hunan Province, representing new locality records for P. kwangtungensis. New herbarium collections, color photographs, and silica gel collections have provided an unexpected opportunity to examine the evolutionary significance of this species. The current study presents a revised morphological description of P. kwangtungensis based on fresh material, along with an updated distribution map. Using nrITS sequence data, preliminary insights into the phylogenetic position of P. kwangtungensis are presented. Molecular data support the placement of P. kwangtungensis within supersection Disemma section Octandranthus. However, the exact placement of P. kwangtungensis within this lineage is unclear. The nrITS data suggest that P. kwangtungensis may be sister to a clade containing Passiflora from China, Nepal, India, and Southeast Asia. Morphologically, P. kwangtungensis displays the most similarity P. geminiflora (Nepal, India and P. henryi (China. Lastly, conservation status and recommendations are made for P. kwangtungensis following the IUCN Red List Criteria, where this species is classified as CR C1+C2a(i; D.

  3. Multigenomic Delineation of Plasmodium Species of the Laverania Subgenus Infecting Wild-Living Chimpanzees and Gorillas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weimin; Sundararaman, Sesh A; Loy, Dorothy E; Learn, Gerald H; Li, Yingying; Plenderleith, Lindsey J; Ndjango, Jean-Bosco N; Speede, Sheri; Atencia, Rebeca; Cox, Debby; Shaw, George M; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Peeters, Martine; Rayner, Julian C; Hahn, Beatrice H; Sharp, Paul M

    2016-07-02

    Plasmodium falciparum, the major cause of malaria morbidity and mortality worldwide, is only distantly related to other human malaria parasites and has thus been placed in a separate subgenus, termed Laverania Parasites morphologically similar to P. falciparum have been identified in African apes, but only one other Laverania species, Plasmodium reichenowi from chimpanzees, has been formally described. Although recent studies have pointed to the existence of additional Laverania species, their precise number and host associations remain uncertain, primarily because of limited sampling and a paucity of parasite sequences other than from mitochondrial DNA. To address this, we used limiting dilution polymerase chain reaction to amplify additional parasite sequences from a large number of chimpanzee and gorilla blood and fecal samples collected at two sanctuaries and 30 field sites across equatorial Africa. Phylogenetic analyses of more than 2,000 new sequences derived from the mitochondrial, nuclear, and apicoplast genomes revealed six divergent and well-supported clades within the Laverania parasite group. Although two of these clades exhibited deep subdivisions in phylogenies estimated from organelle gene sequences, these sublineages were geographically defined and not present in trees from four unlinked nuclear loci. This greatly expanded sequence data set thus confirms six, and not seven or more, ape Laverania species, of which P. reichenowi, Plasmodium gaboni, and Plasmodium billcollinsi only infect chimpanzees, whereas Plasmodium praefalciparum, Plasmodium adleri, and Pladmodium blacklocki only infect gorillas. The new sequence data also confirm the P. praefalciparum origin of human P. falciparum. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  4. Molecular differentiation of Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from the subgenus Culicoides Latreille in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, S. B.; Nielsen, S. Achim; Skovgård, H.

    2012-01-01

    complexes are hard to distinguish. We evaluated the use of the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase I gene (COI) barcode region in the identification of species within the subgenus Culicoides. COI barcode sequence divergence within species was ... impunctatus, and Culicoides grisescens. Additionally, this study confirms the existence of Culicoides halophilus as a valid taxon and presents the first Culicoides deltus barcode sequences. Three additional groups of specimens were identified: Culicoides dk1 with a COI barcode diverging by 14.3% to 17.2% from...... other subgenus Culicoides species and Culicoides Kalix and Culicoides dk3, which diverged by 5.9% from each other and showed 12.5% to 17.6% divergence in COI barcode to subgenus Culicoides specimens....

  5. New species and records of Chimarra (Trichoptera, Philopotamidae) from Northeastern Brazil, and an updated key to subgenus Chimarra (Chimarrita)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilarino, Albane; Calor, Adolfo Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Two new species of Chimarra (Chimarrita) are described and illustrated, Chimarra (Chimarrita) mesodonta sp. n. and Chimarra (Chimarrita) anticheira sp. n. from the Chimarra (Chimarrita) rosalesi and Chimarra (Chimarrita) simpliciforma species groups, respectively. The morphological variation of Chimarra (Curgia) morio is also illustrated. Chimarra (Otarrha) odonta and Chimarra (Chimarrita) kontilos are reported to occur in the northeast region of Brazil for the first time. An updated key is provided for males and females of the all species in the subgenus Chimarrita. PMID:25878540

  6. Penicillium subgenus Penicillium - A guide to identification of food and air-borne terverticillate Penicillia and their mycotoxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jens Christian; Samson, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    Species in Penicillium subgenus Penicillium have terverticillate penicilli and are related to the ascomycete genus Eupenicillium series Crustacea, Many of its species are very common, being associated with stored foods of human beings and other animals, but also with animal dung and building...... illustrations of the colonies and micromorphology of the 58 accepted species are given. Keys to the taxa in the various series are given, but for a more detailed electronic database including partial beta tubulin sequences reference is made to http: //www.cbs.knaw.nl/ penicillium.htm...

  7. From introduced American weed to Cape Verde Islands endemic: the case of Solanum rigidum Lam. (Solanaceae, Solanum subgenus Leptostemonum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Sandra; Vorontsova, Maria S

    2013-01-01

    A Solanum species long considered an American introduction to the Cape Verde Islands off the west coast of Africa is identified as Solanum rigidum, a member of the Eggplant clade of Old World spiny solanums (Solanum subgenus Leptostemonum) and is probably endemic to the Cape Verde Islands. Collections of this species from the Caribbean are likely to have been introduced from the Cape Verde Islands on slave ships. We discuss the complex nomenclatural history of this plant and provide a detailed description, illustration and distribution map. The preliminary conservation status of Solanum rigidum is Least Concern, but needs to be reassessed in light of its endemic rather than introduced status.

  8. Taxonomy of 'Euconnus complex'. Part III. Morphology of Euconnus subgenus Napochus and revision of the Australian species (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Scydmaeninae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jałoszyński, Paweł

    2015-02-26

    Morphological structures of the type species of Euconnus (Napochus) are described and illustrated, and compared with those of Euconnus s. str. Napochus is maintained as a subgenus of Euconnus, and its revised diagnosis is given. Australian species of Napochus are revised: E. palmwoodianus Franz and E. pisoniae Franz are redescribed, and E. setiphallus sp. n., E. yadhaigana sp. n., E. microlaminatus sp. n, E. feeneyi sp. n. (with a subspecies E. feeneyi parallelilaminatus ssp. n.) are described. An unusual variability in body size and proportions of body parts found in E. feeneyi is analyzed and discussed.

  9. Taxonomic study on the subgenus Uresipedilum (Diptera: Chironomidae: Polypedilum, with description of a new species from the Yaewyama Islands, Okinawa, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nao Yamamoto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available As a result of a multi-year survey, we recognized four species including a new species of the subgenus Uresipedilum from the Yaeyama Islands, the Ryukyus, Japan. Polypedilum (Uresipedilum paraconvictum sp. nov. is described. P. (U. classiglobum Zhang et Wang (2004 P. (U. bingoparadoxum Kawai et al. (1998 and P. (U. iriofegeum Sasa et Suzuki (2000 are re-described. The first species is newly recorded from Japan, and the second species is new to the Ryukyus. The diagnostic characters of the subgenus are discussed.

  10. Evolution of a soldier caste specialized to lay unfertilized eggs in the ant genus Crematogaster (subgenus Orthocrema).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Christian; Lin, Chung-Chi; Quinet, Yves; Martins Segundo, Glauco; Billen, Johan

    2013-05-01

    Among social Hymenoptera, only some ant genera have more than one morphological kind of non-reproductive adults. Individuals that are bigger than ordinary workers can function for defence and/or food storage. In Crematogaster (Orthocrema) smithi from Arizona, a third caste exists in addition to winged queens and workers; it is intermediate in size, weight and morphology, and individuals lay many unfertilized eggs that are mostly eaten by larvae (Heinze et al., 1995, 1999). We studied another three species belonging to the subgenus Orthocrema: Crematogaster pygmaea from Brazil, Crematogaster biroi and Crematogaster schimmeri from Taiwan. Using scanning electron microscopy and ovarian dissections, we show that 'intermediates' are a patchwork of queen-like and worker-like traits, just as in C. smithi; importantly the combinations differ across species. 'Intermediates' are numerically few in the colonies, and in C. pygmaea they are produced seasonally. Using histology we confirmed the lack of a spermatheca, thus they are not ergatoid queens. Based on the similarity of their mosaic phenotypes with those in other ant lineages, we suggest that Orthocrema 'intermediates' are a soldier caste with a specialized trophic function. This soldier caste has been reported in other Orthocrema species from Madagascar, Guinea and Costa Rica, suggesting that it is widespread in this subgenus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A review of the genus Mirostenella Bayer, 1988 (Octocorallia: Primnoidae) with a description of a new subgenus and species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata-Guardiola, Rebeca; López-González, Pablo J.; Gili, Josep-Maria

    2013-06-01

    In the present study, the genus Mirostenella Bayer (Proc Biol Soc Wash 101:251-256, 1988) is revised. We add to knowledge of the type species of the genus M. articulata Bayer (Proc Biol Soc Wash 101:251-256, 1988) from newly collected material from the Antarctic cruise Polarstern ANT XIX/5, and an illustrated description of this species is included. Cairns and Bayer (Smithson Contrib Zool 629:1-79, 2009) included Dicholaphis delicatula Thomson and Rennet (Sci Rept C Zool Bot 9(3):1-46, 1931) in the genus Mirostenella but after the examination of the type material, it is proposed to include the species in the recently described Plumarella subgenus, Faxiella (Zapata-Guardiola and López-González in Sci Mar 76:357-380, 2012). In addition, a new species of Plumarella, Plumarella castellviae sp. nov. from SubAntarctic waters is also described and illustrated. The species has similarities to Mirostenella but differs from it in the absence of organic nodes at bifurcation points and the presence of a sympodial branching pattern. Moreover, a new subgenus, Verticillata, is also proposed to include Plumarella species with polyps arranged in whorls around branchlets.

  12. A revision of Ornithogalum subgenus Aspasia section Aspasia, the chincherinchees (Hyacinthaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Manning

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The species of Ornithogalum L. subgenus Aspasia section Aspasia are revised. Section Aspasia is defined by a rosette of  lanceolate to oblong leaves; large, boat-shaped, ± petaloid bracts; moderately-sized white, yellow or orange flowers, sometimes with dark central markings; thin-textured, ellipsoid capsules that are enclosed by and concealed within the persistent, papery perianth; and angular, colliculate to echinulate seeds. Twelve species are recognized in the section, separable into three series based on seed morphology. O. conicum is redefined to exclude specimens from the Eastern Cape, which are recognized as O. synanthifolium, and O. conicum subsp.  strictum is raised to species status as O. strictum. The circumscription of O. duhium is expanded to include O.fimbrimarginatum and O. subcoriaceum, previously distinguished on account of their longer styles.Collections from the Roggeveld Escarpment and Klein Roggeveld that were previously included in O. fimbrimaiginatum are recognized as the new species O. corticatum Mart.-Azarin, on the basis of their unusual, thick, cartilaginous outer tunics and puberulous adaxial leaf surface. O. ceresianum is removed from the synonomy of O. thyrsoides and recognized as a distinct species on account of its extensive glossy black tepal markings, winged inner filaments, and glossy black ovary. The poorly known  O. puberuhim is more ftilly described based on several recent collections, and  O. leeupoortense is neotypified in the absence of any original type material.  O. rupestre and O. multifolium are regarded as colour forms of the same species, for which  O. rupestre is the older name. Similarly, O. roussouwii is a depauperate, pale form of O. maculatum and is thus included in the synonomy of that species. The circumscription of O. pruinosum remains unchanged. The species O. haurii, O. diphyllum and O. sephtonii from the Drakensberg Mountains of Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal are excluded from

  13. Ciscoes (Coregonus, subgenus Leucichthys) of the Laurentian Great Lakes and Lake Nipigon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshenroder, Randy L.; Vecsei, Paul; Gorman, Owen T.; Yule, Daniel; Pratt, Thomas C.; Mandrak, Nicholas E.; Bunnell, David B.; Muir, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    This study of the ciscoes (Coregonus, subgenus Leucichthys) of the Great Lakes and Lake Nipigon represents a furtherance through 2015 of field research initiated by Walter Koelz in 1917 and continued by Stanford Smith in the mid-1900s—a period spanning nearly a century. Like Koelz’s study, this work contains information on taxonomy, geographical distribution, ecology, and status of species (here considered forms). Of the seven currently recognized forms (C. artedi, C. hoyi, C. johannae, C. kiyi, C. nigripinnis, C. reighardi, and C. zenithicus) described by Koelz as major in his 1929 monograph, two (C. johannae and C. reighardi) are extinct. In addition, C. alpenae, described by Koelz but subsequently synonymized with C. zenithicus, although extinct, is recognized as valid making a total of eight major forms. Six of these forms, all but C. artedi and C. hoyi, have been lost from Lake Michigan, and seven have been lost from Lake Huron, leaving in Lake Huron only C. artedi and an introgressed deepwater form that we term a hybrid swarm. C. artedi appears, like its sister form C. alpenae, to have been lost from Lake Erie. Only C. artedi remains extant in Lake Ontario, its three sister forms (C. hoyi, C. kiyi, and C. reighardi) having disappeared long ago.Lakes Superior and Nipigon have retained their original species flocks consisting of four forms each: C. artedi, C. hoyi, and C. zenithicus in both lakes; C. kiyi in Lake Superior; and C. nigripinnis in Lake Nipigon. Morphological deviations from the morphotypes described by Koelz have been modest in contemporary samples. Overall, C. kiyi and C. artedi were the most morphologically stable forms while C. hoyi, C. nigripinnis, and C. zenithicus were the least stable. Although contemporary populations of C. artedi from Lakes Michigan and Huron are highly diverged from the morphotypes described by Koelz, the contemporary samples were of undescribed deep-bodied forms unlikely to have been sampled by Koelz because of

  14. The current challenges of dourine: difficulties in differentiating Trypanosoma equiperdum within the subgenus Trypanozoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zablotskij, V T; Georgiu, C; de Waal, Th; Clausen, P H; Claes, F; Touratier, L

    2003-12-01

    During its 20th annual meeting in Paris in May 1999, the OIE (World organisation for animal health) Ad Hoc Group on Non-Tsetse Transmitted Animal Trypanosomoses expressed the following concerns about dourine: the discrepancies in some of the results of the complement fixation test (CFT), which is the only international diagnostic test officially recognised by the International Organisation for the Transportation of Equidae; the persistence of suspected cases of dourine in some Asian, European and African countries; the impossibility of differentiating Trypanosoma equiperdum from Trypanosoma evansi and of isolating new strains of T. equiperdum from clinical cases that have appeared in various parts of the world since 1982. In the light of these concerns, it was decided, in agreement with the Directorate of the Federal Veterinary Services of Russia in Moscow, to perform comparative trials on the value of CFT/dourine at the OIE Reference Laboratory for dourine in Moscow (The All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Veterinary Medicine) using reagents (antigens and sera) from seven countries with extensive experience in the field of dourine diagnosis, namely, South Africa, France, Italy, Germany, Russia, the United States of America and the People's Republic of China. It is thanks to the successful co-operation of these countries that the trials were made possible. Results showed an overall concordance and were submitted for consideration to the OIE Biological Standards Commission, the commission which is in charge of the Manual of Diagnostic Tests and Vaccines for Terrestrial Animals. These trials serve as a starting point for further study, particularly in the following areas: the isolation of new strains of T. equiperdum from clinical dourine cases; the identification of specific markers for T. equiperdum which would make it possible to differentiate it from among the other species within the subgenus Trypanozoon; the experimental infection of horses with

  15. A revision of Ornithogalum subgenus Aspasia section Aspasia, the chincherinchees (Hyacinthaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Manning

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The species of Ornithogalum L. subgenus Aspasia section Aspasia are revised. Section Aspasia is defined by a rosette of  lanceolate to oblong leaves; large, boat-shaped, ± petaloid bracts; moderately-sized white, yellow or orange flowers, sometimes with dark central markings; thin-textured, ellipsoid capsules that are enclosed by and concealed within the persistent, papery perianth; and angular, colliculate to echinulate seeds. Twelve species are recognized in the section, separable into three series based on seed morphology. O. conicum is redefined to exclude specimens from the Eastern Cape, which are recognized as O. synanthifolium, and O. conicum subsp.  strictum is raised to species status as O. strictum. The circumscription of O. duhium is expanded to include O.fimbrimarginatum and O. subcoriaceum, previously distinguished on account of their longer styles.Collections from the Roggeveld Escarpment and Klein Roggeveld that were previously included in O. fimbrimaiginatum are recognized as the new species O. corticatum Mart.-Azarin, on the basis of their unusual, thick, cartilaginous outer tunics and puberulous adaxial leaf surface. O. ceresianum is removed from the synonomy of O. thyrsoides and recognized as a distinct species on account of its extensive glossy black tepal markings, winged inner filaments, and glossy black ovary. The poorly known  O. puberuhim is more ftilly described based on several recent collections, and  O. leeupoortense is neotypified in the absence of any original type material.  O. rupestre and O. multifolium are regarded as colour forms of the same species, for which  O. rupestre is the older name. Similarly, O. roussouwii is a depauperate, pale form of O. maculatum and is thus included in the synonomy of that species. The circumscription of O. pruinosum remains unchanged. The species O. haurii, O. diphyllum and O. sephtonii from the Drakensberg Mountains of Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal are excluded from

  16. Phylogeny of xerophilic aspergilli (subgenus Aspergillus) and taxonomic revision of section Restricti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklenář, F; Jurjević, Ž; Zalar, P; Frisvad, J C; Visagie, C M; Kolařík, M; Houbraken, J; Chen, A J; Yilmaz, N; Seifert, K A; Coton, M; Déniel, F; Gunde-Cimerman, N; Samson, R A; Peterson, S W; Hubka, V

    2017-09-01

    Aspergillus section Restricti together with sister section Aspergillus (formerly Eurotium) comprises xerophilic species, that are able to grow on substrates with low water activity and in extreme environments. We adressed the monophyly of both sections within subgenus Aspergillus and applied a multidisciplinary approach for definition of species boundaries in sect. Restricti. The monophyly of sections Aspergillus and Restricti was tested on a set of 102 isolates comprising all currently accepted species and was strongly supported by Maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian inferrence (BI) analysis based on β-tubulin (benA), calmodulin (CaM) and RNA polymerase II second largest subunit (RPB2) loci. More than 300 strains belonging to sect. Restricti from various isolation sources and four continents were characterized by DNA sequencing, and 193 isolates were selected for phylogenetic analyses and phenotypic studies. Species delimitation methods based on multispecies coalescent model were employed on DNA sequences from four loci, i.e., ID region of rDNA (ITS + 28S), CaM, benA and RPB2, and supported recognition of 21 species, including 14 new. All these species were also strongly supported in ML and BI analyses. All recognised species can be reliably identified by all four examined genetic loci. Phenotype analysis was performed to support the delimitation of new species and includes colony characteristics on seven cultivation media incubated at several temperatures, growth on an osmotic gradient (six media with NaCl concentration from 0 to 25 %) and analysis of morphology including scanning electron microscopy. The micromorphology of conidial heads, vesicle dimensions, temperature profiles and growth parameters in osmotic gradient were useful criteria for species identification. The vast majority of species in sect. Restricti produce asperglaucide, asperphenamate or both in contrast to species in sect. Aspergillus. Mycophenolic acid was detected for the first time in

  17. Review of Cycadophila Xu, Tang & Skelley (Coleoptera: Erotylidae: Pharaxonothinae) inhabiting Cycas (Cycadaceae) in Asia, with descriptions of a new subgenus and thirteen new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelley, Paul; Xu, Guang; Tang, William; Lindström, Anders J; Marler, Thomas; Khuraijam, Jibankumar Singh; Singh, Rita; Radha, P; Rich, Stephen

    2017-05-12

    The genus Cycadophila Xu, Tang & Skelley (Coleoptera: Erotylidae: Pharaxonothinae) associated with Cycas L. (Cycadacaeae) in Asia is reviewed. Strobilophila, new subgenus, with five species is described: Cycadophila (Strobilophila) assamensis new species, C. (S.) hiepi new species, C. (S.) kwaiensis new species, C. (S.) tansachai new species and C. (S.) yangi new species, all associated with Cycas. For the nominate subgenus Cycadophila eight new species are described, Cycadophila (Cycadophila) abyssa new species, C. (C.) collina new species,C. (C.) samara new species, C. (C.) convexa new species, C. (C.) cyclochasma new species, C. (C.) eurynota new species, C. (C.) papua new species, and C. (C.) torquata new species and four new generic combinations are proposed: C. (C.) vittata (Arrow) new combination, C. (C.) discimaculata (Mader) new combination, C. (C.) intermedia (Chûjô) new combination, and C. (C.) lata (Grouvelle) new combination. Only the first three listed species of the nominate subgenus have known associations with Cycas. Species are distinguished on the basis of morphology and/or by analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. The larva of subgenus Strobilophila is described based on individuals collected together with adults and matched with analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. Keys to subgenera and species of known adults and larvae are provided.

  18. Capricious, or tied to history’s apron strings? Floristic regions in north-west European brambles (Rubus subgenus Rubus, Rosaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haveman, R.; Bijlsma, R.J.; Ronde, de I.; Schaminee, J.H.J.

    2016-01-01

    Aim
    To classify and describe distributional patterns in apomictic Rubus subgenus Rubus in north-west Europe and to characterize the major regions by statistically derived character species.

    Location
    North-western Europe, in particular Ireland, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands,

  19. ITS2 secondary structure improves phylogeny estimation in a radiation of blue butterflies of the subgenus Agrodiaetus (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae: Polyommatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Matthias

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current molecular phylogenetic studies of Lepidoptera and most other arthropods are predominantly based on mitochondrial genes and a limited number of nuclear genes. The nuclear genes, however, generally do not provide sufficient information for young radiations. ITS2 , which has proven to be an excellent nuclear marker for similarly aged radiations in other organisms like fungi and plants, is only rarely used for phylogeny estimation in arthropods, although universal primers exist. This is partly due to difficulties in the alignment of ITS2 sequences in more distant taxa. The present study uses ITS2 secondary structure information to elucidate the phylogeny of a species-rich young radiation of arthropods, the butterfly subgenus Agrodiaetus. One aim is to evaluate the efficiency of ITS2 to resolve the phylogeny of the subgenus in comparison with COI , the most important mitochondrial marker in arthropods. Furthermore, we assess the use of compensatory base changes in ITS2 for the delimitation of species and discuss the prospects of ITS2 as a nuclear marker for barcoding studies. Results In the butterfly family Lycaenidae, ITS2 secondary structure enabled us to successfully align sequences of different subtribes in Polyommatini and produce a Profile Neighbour Joining tree of this tribe, the resolution of which is comparable to phylogenetic trees obtained with COI+COII . The subgenus Agrodiaetus comprises 6 major clades which are in agreement with COI analyses. A dispersal-vicariance analysis (DIVA traced the origin of most Agrodiaetus clades to separate biogeographical areas in the region encompassing Eastern Anatolia, Transcaucasia and Iran. Conclusions With the inclusion of secondary structure information, ITS2 appears to be a suitable nuclear marker to infer the phylogeny of young radiations, as well as more distantly related genera within a diverse arthropod family. Its phylogenetic signal is comparable to the

  20. ITS2 secondary structure improves phylogeny estimation in a radiation of blue butterflies of the subgenus Agrodiaetus (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae: Polyommatus ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemers, Martin; Keller, Alexander; Wolf, Matthias

    2009-12-26

    Current molecular phylogenetic studies of Lepidoptera and most other arthropods are predominantly based on mitochondrial genes and a limited number of nuclear genes. The nuclear genes, however, generally do not provide sufficient information for young radiations. ITS2 , which has proven to be an excellent nuclear marker for similarly aged radiations in other organisms like fungi and plants, is only rarely used for phylogeny estimation in arthropods, although universal primers exist. This is partly due to difficulties in the alignment of ITS2 sequences in more distant taxa. The present study uses ITS2 secondary structure information to elucidate the phylogeny of a species-rich young radiation of arthropods, the butterfly subgenus Agrodiaetus. One aim is to evaluate the efficiency of ITS2 to resolve the phylogeny of the subgenus in comparison with COI , the most important mitochondrial marker in arthropods. Furthermore, we assess the use of compensatory base changes in ITS2 for the delimitation of species and discuss the prospects of ITS2 as a nuclear marker for barcoding studies. In the butterfly family Lycaenidae, ITS2 secondary structure enabled us to successfully align sequences of different subtribes in Polyommatini and produce a Profile Neighbour Joining tree of this tribe, the resolution of which is comparable to phylogenetic trees obtained with COI+COII . The subgenus Agrodiaetus comprises 6 major clades which are in agreement with COI analyses. A dispersal-vicariance analysis (DIVA) traced the origin of most Agrodiaetus clades to separate biogeographical areas in the region encompassing Eastern Anatolia, Transcaucasia and Iran. With the inclusion of secondary structure information, ITS2 appears to be a suitable nuclear marker to infer the phylogeny of young radiations, as well as more distantly related genera within a diverse arthropod family. Its phylogenetic signal is comparable to the mitochondrial marker COI . Compensatory base changes are very rare

  1. Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Three Bactrocera Fruit Flies of Subgenus Bactrocera (Diptera: Tephritidae and Their Phylogenetic Implications.

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    Hoi-Sen Yong

    Full Text Available Bactrocera latifrons is a serious pest of solanaceous fruits and Bactrocera umbrosa is a pest of Artocarpus fruits, while Bactrocera melastomatos infests the fruit of Melastomataceae. They are members of the subgenus Bactrocera. We report here the complete mitochondrial genome of these fruit flies determined by next-generation sequencing and their phylogeny with other taxa of the subgenus Bactrocera. The whole mitogenomes of these three species possessed 37 genes namely, 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs, 2 rRNA and 22 tRNA genes. The mitogenome of B. latifrons (15,977 bp was longer than those of B. melastomatos (15,954 bp and B. umbrosa (15,898 bp. This difference can be attributed to the size of the intergenic spacers (283 bp in B. latifrons, 261 bp in B. melastomatos, and 211 bp in B. umbrosa. Most of the PCGs in the three species have an identical start codon, except for atp8 (adenosine triphosphate synthase protein 8, which had an ATG instead of GTG in B. umbrosa, whilst the nad3 (NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 and nad6 (NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 genes were characterized by an ATC instead of ATT in B. melastomatos. The three species had identical stop codon for the respective PCGs. In B. latifrons and B. melastomatos, the TΨC (thymidine-pseudouridine-cytidine-loop was absent in trnF (phenylalanine and DHU (dihydrouracil-loop was absent in trnS1 (serine S1. In B. umbrosa, trnN (asparagine, trnC (cysteine and trnF lacked the TψC-loop, while trnS1 lacked the DHU-stem. Molecular phylogeny based on 13 PCGs was in general concordant with 15 mitochondrial genes (13 PCGs and 2 rRNA genes, with B. latifrons and B. umbrosa forming a sister group basal to the other species of the subgenus Bactrocera which was monophyletic. The whole mitogenomes will serve as a useful dataset for studying the genetics, systematics and phylogenetic relationships of the many species of Bactrocera genus in particular, and tephritid fruit flies in general.

  2. Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Three Bactrocera Fruit Flies of Subgenus Bactrocera (Diptera: Tephritidae) and Their Phylogenetic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Hoi-Sen; Song, Sze-Looi; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Eamsobhana, Praphathip; Suana, I Wayan

    2016-01-01

    Bactrocera latifrons is a serious pest of solanaceous fruits and Bactrocera umbrosa is a pest of Artocarpus fruits, while Bactrocera melastomatos infests the fruit of Melastomataceae. They are members of the subgenus Bactrocera. We report here the complete mitochondrial genome of these fruit flies determined by next-generation sequencing and their phylogeny with other taxa of the subgenus Bactrocera. The whole mitogenomes of these three species possessed 37 genes namely, 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 2 rRNA and 22 tRNA genes. The mitogenome of B. latifrons (15,977 bp) was longer than those of B. melastomatos (15,954 bp) and B. umbrosa (15,898 bp). This difference can be attributed to the size of the intergenic spacers (283 bp in B. latifrons, 261 bp in B. melastomatos, and 211 bp in B. umbrosa). Most of the PCGs in the three species have an identical start codon, except for atp8 (adenosine triphosphate synthase protein 8), which had an ATG instead of GTG in B. umbrosa, whilst the nad3 (NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3) and nad6 (NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6) genes were characterized by an ATC instead of ATT in B. melastomatos. The three species had identical stop codon for the respective PCGs. In B. latifrons and B. melastomatos, the TΨC (thymidine-pseudouridine-cytidine)-loop was absent in trnF (phenylalanine) and DHU (dihydrouracil)-loop was absent in trnS1 (serine S1). In B. umbrosa, trnN (asparagine), trnC (cysteine) and trnF lacked the TψC-loop, while trnS1 lacked the DHU-stem. Molecular phylogeny based on 13 PCGs was in general concordant with 15 mitochondrial genes (13 PCGs and 2 rRNA genes), with B. latifrons and B. umbrosa forming a sister group basal to the other species of the subgenus Bactrocera which was monophyletic. The whole mitogenomes will serve as a useful dataset for studying the genetics, systematics and phylogenetic relationships of the many species of Bactrocera genus in particular, and tephritid fruit flies in general.

  3. Studies in the genus Riccia (Marchantiales from southern Africa. 21. R. stricta, R. purpurascens and R. fluitans, subgenus Ricciella

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    S. M. Perold

    1990-12-01

    Full Text Available Lindenberg (1836 regarded and published Riccia stricta as a variety of R. fluitans L. Subsequently, Nees (1838 and Gottsche et al. (1846 also treated it as a variety. Trevisan (1877 raised its rank and published the epithet,  Ricciella stricta Trevis.Ricciella is, however, regarded as a subgenus; Ricciella stricta is, therefore, transferred to Riccia stricta (Lindenb. Perold.It is described in detail and illustrated.  R. purpurascens Lehm. & Lindenb., a related endemic species, is also more fully described than before and illustrated.  R. fluitans L. apparently does not occur naturally in southern Africa. As far as is known, a single local specimen of it was introduced.

  4. Two new species and a new subgenus of toothed Brachyhypopomus electric knifefishes (Gymnotiformes, Hypopomidae) from the central Amazon and considerations pertaining to the evolution of a monophasic electric organ discharge

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan,John P.; Zuanon,Jansen; Cox Fernandes,Cristina

    2013-01-01

    We describe two new, closely related species of toothed Brachyhypopomus (Hypopomidae: Gymnotiformes: Teleostei) from the central Amazon basin and create a new subgenus for them. Odontohypopomus, new subgenus of Brachyhypopomus, is diagnosed by (1) small teeth present on premaxillae; (2) medialmost two branchiostegal rays thin with blades oriented more vertically than remaining three rays; (3) background color in life (and to lesser extent in preservation) distinctly yellowish with head and si...

  5. Taxonomic review on the subgenus Tripodura Townes (Diptera: Chironomidae: Polypedilum) from China with eleven new species and a supplementary world checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruilei; Song, Chao; Qi, Xin; Wang, Xinhua

    2016-07-05

    The subgenus Tripodura Townes of Polypedilum Kieffer from China including 26 species is reviewed. Eleven new species, named P. (T.) absensilobum Zhang & Wang sp. n., P. (T.) apiculusetosum Zhang & Wang sp. n., P. (T.) arcuatum Zhang & Wang sp. n., P. (T.) bilamella Zhang & Wang sp. n., P. (T.) conghuaense Zhang & Wang sp. n., P. (T.) dengae Zhang & Wang sp. n., P. (T.) mengmanense Zhang & Wang sp. n., P. (T.) napahaiense Zhang & Wang sp. n., P. (T.) parallelum Zhang & Wang sp. n., P. (T.) pollicium Zhang & Wang sp. n. and P. (T.) trapezium Zhang & Wang sp. n. are described and illustrated based on male imagines. Three species, P. (T.) quadriguttatum Kieffer, P. (T.) unifascia (Tokunaga) and P. (T.) udominutum Niitsuma are firstly recorded in China. A key to known male imagines of Chinese species and an updated world checklist of subgenus Tripodura are presented.

  6. On the colour types in Lycodes nakamurae (Tanaka, 1914) and species composition of the subgenus Furcimanus (Perciformes: Zoarcidae: Lycodes) in the sea of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveliev, Pavel A; Balanov, Andrey A; Kukhlevskii, Andrey D

    2014-05-30

    Two colour types were revealed in a zoarcid fish of the subgenus Furcimanus, genus Lycodes, in the Sea of Japan. A comparison of morphometric, meristic and genetic characters in dark coloured and light coloured individuals suggests that the two colour morphs represent a single species, determined to be Lycodes nakamurae (Tanaka, 1914). Variability in colouration within L. nakamurae and a lack of morphological or molecular characters distinguishing L. nakamurae from L. nishimurai Shinohara & Shirai, 2005 suggest that the latter should be considered a synonym of L. nakamurae (Tanaka, 1914). A record of L. pectoralis in the waters of the Republic of Korea is regarded as a misidentification. Thus, we conclude that only one species of the Lycodes subgenus Furcimanus, L. nakamurae, with dark and light colour morphs as well as specimens of intermediate colouration, inhabits the Sea of Japan.

  7. A taxonomic review of Korean species of the Atheta Thomson subgenus Microdota Mulsant & Rey, with descriptions of two new species (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Aleocharinae

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    Seung-Gyu Lee

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A taxonomic review of the Atheta Thomson subgenus Microdota Mulsant & Rey in Korea is presented. The subgenus is represented in Korea by 15 species including two new species, Atheta (Microdota jangtaesanensis Lee & Ahn, sp. n. and A. (M. pasniki Lee & Ahn, sp. n. Four species [A. (M. kawachiensis Cameron, A. (M. muris Sawada, A. (M. spiniventris Bernhauer, and A. (M. spinula (Sawada] are new to the Korean Peninsula and two [A. (M. formicetorum Bernhauer and A. (M. subcrenulata Bernhauer] to South Korea. Two other species [A. (M. kobensis Cameron and A. (M. scrobicollis (Kraatz] previously recorded in North Korea had been identified incorrectly. A key, descriptions, habitus photographs and illustrations of the diagnostic features are provided. Species distributions and diversity in East Asia are discussed.

  8. The Mosquitoes of the Subgenus Culex in Southwestern Asia and Egypt (Diptera: Culicidae) (Contributions of the American Entomological Institute. Volume 24, Number 1, 1988)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    data: “Type // Entebbe / Dr. Row // Culex / quasigelidus / (Type) Theobald // Entebbe. / bred from / larvae. / Sep . 20. 02”; left wing mounted on...Bigot, J.M.F. 1857. Dipteros, pp. 328-349. In: R. de la Sagra, Historia fisica, politica y natural de la lsla de Cuba. Vol. 7. Paris. 1859. Dipteres de...Naturaleza Mexico 7: 203-213. Harbach: Subgenus Culex in Southwestern Asia 135 Say, T. 1823. Descriptions of dipterous insects of the United States

  9. Rhynchelmis subgenus Sutroa Eisen new rank, with two new species from western North America (Annelida, Clitellata, Lumbriculidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fend, Steven V; Carter, James L

    2014-01-31

    The lumbriculid Rhynchelmis subgenus Sutroa Eisen, 1888 new rank is defined for a group of Nearctic species having multiple diverticula originating at the spermathecal ducts and eversible penial bulbs. Characters are confirmed in specimens of the type species, Rhynchelmis (Sutroa) rostrata (Eisen, 1888), collected from the type locality. Rhynchelmis (Sutroa) klamathensis Fend n. sp. is described from open water benthic habitats in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, USA. It resembles other R. (Sutroa) species in the paired spermathecal diverticula, the spermathecal and penial bulbs, the histological structure of the atria, the nonfunctional anterior male funnels, and the arrangement of blood vessels. Rhynchelmis klamathensis differs from all Nearctic Rhynchelmis in lacking a filiform proboscis. The combination of large body size, the elongate spermathecal ducts with paired and usually unbranched diverticula, the highly contorted atria, and the complex male pores with conical penes also distinguish typical R. klamathensis from other Rhynchelmis species. Smaller specimens with otherwise similar morphology, from the Sacramento River Delta, California, are also assigned to this species. Rhynchelmis (Sutroa) diespluviae Fend n. sp. is described from several stream sites, mostly in northern Idaho, USA. Rhynchelmis diespluviae differs from closely related species in morphology of the conical penes, and in the structure and anterolateral position of the paired spermathecae.

  10. Species delimitation of three species within the Russula subgenus Compacta in Korea: R. eccentrica, R. nigricans, and R. subnigricans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myung Soo; Lee, Hyun; Oh, Seung-Yoon; Jung, Paul Eunil; Seok, Soon Ja; Fong, Jonathan J; Lim, Young Woon

    2014-08-01

    Distinguishing individual Russula species can be very difficult due to extensive phenotypic plasticity and obscure morphological and anatomical discontinuities. In this study, we use the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and 28S nuclear ribosomal large subunit (LSU) markers to identify and study the genetic diversity of species in the Russula subgenus Compacta in Korea. We focus on two morphologically similar species that are often misidentified for each other: R. nigricans and R. subnigricans. Based on molecular phylogenetic analyses, we identify three subgroups of R. nigricans, with two from Asia and one from Europe/North America. Surprisingly, we find Korean R. subnigricans are more closely related to R. eccentrica from North America than the type specimen of R. subnigricans from Japan. These molecular data, along with habitat data, reveal that Korean R. subnigricans had previously been misclassified and should now be recognized as R. eccentrica. Both ITS and LSU exhibit high interspecific and low intraspecific variation for R. eccentrica, R. nigricans, and R. subnigricans. These markers provide enough resolutional power to differentiate these species and uncover phylogeographic structure, and will be powerful tools for future ecological studies of Russula.

  11. Phylogeny and biogeography of pacific Rubus subgenus Idaeobatus (Rosaceae) species: Investigating the origin of the endemic Hawaiian raspberry R. macraei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morden, C.W.; Gardner, D.E.; Weniger, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    The endemic Hawaiian raspberries Rubus hawaiensis and R. macraei (both subgenus Idaeobatus) had been thought to be closely related species until recent molecular studies demonstrated otherwise. These studies suggest that they are the products of separate colonizations to the Hawaiian Islands. Affinities of R. hawaiensis to R. spectabilis of western North America were clearly confirmed. However, no clear relation to R. macraei has been published. This study was initiated to examine species of subg. Idaeobatus from the surrounding Pacific region as well as species from other subgenera to better evaluate biogeographic and phylogenetic affinities of R. macraei by means of chromosome analysis and molecular data using the chloroplast gene ndbF. Results show that R. macraei clusters in a clade with species of blackberries, subg. Rubus, and of these it is most closely linked to R. ursinus. Chromosomally, R. macraei is 2n = 6x = 42, a number that would be a new report for subg. Idaeobatus. However, polyploidy is common in subg. Rubus. Analyses indicate that R. macraei and R. hawaiensis are derived from separate colonizations from North America and that similarities between them are due to convergent evolution in the Hawaiian environment.

  12. A new extinct dwarfed buffalo from Sulawesi and the evolution of the subgenus Anoa: An interdisciplinary perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozzi, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    The fossil and extant faunas of Sulawesi, the largest island within the Wallacea biogeographic region, exhibit a high degree of endemism. The lowland anoa Bubalus depressicornis and the mountain anoa Bubalus quarlesi, two closely-related dwarfed buffaloes, are among the most peculiar endemic mammals of the region. Here, I describe a new species, Bubalus grovesi, from the Late Pleistocene/Holocene of South Sulawesi and I give a revised diagnosis of Anoa. Bubalus grovesi sp. nov. differs from all previously described Bubalus in both the size and proportions of the skeleton and in possessing a unique combination of discrete character states. Body mass estimates suggest an average mass of 117 kg for Bubalus grovesi sp. nov. and a body size reduction of about 90% with respect to a typical water buffalo. A comprehensive overview of body mass estimates of dwarfed buffaloes and differences in their dental and postcranial features is included. Finally, new evidence on the taxonomy and island dwarfing of the anoas and available data from different disciplines are used to discuss the timing and mode of their evolution. The representatives of the subgenus Anoa would be dwarfed forms of the Asian water buffalo that arose following dispersal to Sulawesi during the Middle/Late Pleistocene.

  13. A revision of the species of the pseudoscorpion subgenus Chthonius (Ephippiochthonius) (Arachnida, Pseudoscorpiones, Chthoniidae) from Italy and neighbouring areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardini, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    A taxonomic revision and a key to the species of the subgenus Chthonius (Ephippiochthonius) Beier, 1930 from Italy, Corsica and the Swiss Canton of Ticino are provided. The species are arranged in two species-groups (tetrachelatus group and fuscimanus group) on the basis of the shape of pedipalpal hand and of the type of dentition of the fixed and movable chelal fingers. The following new species are described: i) in the tetrachelatus group: Chthonius (E.) altamurae n. sp. (♀, loc. typ.: Apulia, Bari Prov., Altamura, Grotta Lamalunga 1295 Pu/BA), C. (E.) elymus n. sp. (♂, loc. typ.: Sicily, Trapani Prov., Custonaci, Abisso del Purgatorio 8064 Si/TP), Chthonius (E.) messapicus n. sp. (♂, loc. typ.: Apulia, Brindisi Prov., San Pietro Vernotico, Cerano); ii) in the fuscimanus group: C. (E.) aeneae n. sp. (♂♀, loc. typ.: Liguria, Genoa Prov., Sestri Levante, Punta Manara), C. (E.) etruscus n. sp. (♂♀, loc. typ.: Tuscany, Grosseto Prov., Semproniano, Grotta di Montecchio 254 To/GR), C. (E.) gallii n. sp. (♂♀, loc. typ.: Liguria, Savona Prov., Bergeggi), C. (E.) intemelius n. sp. (♂♀, loc. typ.: Liguria, Imperia Prov., Apricale, Mt Cianela), C. (E.) latellai n. sp. (♂♀, loc. typ.: Latium, Latina Prov., Bassiano, Grotta di Fiume Coperto 1361 La/LT), C. (E.) ligur n. sp. (♂♀, loc. typ.: Liguria, Imperia Prov., near Baiardo), C. (E.) magrinii n. sp. (♂, loc. typ.: Latium, Frosinone Prov., San Giovanni Incarico, Grotta sulla strada per il Santuario della Madonna della Guardia n. c. La/FR), C. (E.) monguzzii n. sp. (♂♀, loc. typ.: Lombardia, Brescia Prov., Sulzano, Oricina de la Pofa del Giardì 438 Lo/BS), C. (E.) sulphureus n. sp. (♂♀, loc. typ.: Marche, Ancona Prov., Genga, Grotta di Frasassi 1 Ma/AN), C. (E.) tyrrhenicus n. sp. (♂♀, loc. typ.: Liguria, Genoa Prov., Genoa, Quinto al Mare, Mt Moro). The following new synonymies are proposed: Chthonius (E.) bauneensis Callaini, 1983 is a junior subjective synonym of C. (E

  14. Identification of Sand flies of the Subgenus Larroussius based on Molecular and Morphological Characters in North Western Iran

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    A Absavaran

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The adult female sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae of the subgenus Larroussius are important vectors of Leishmania infantum (Kinetoplastida: Tripanosomatidae in Meshkinshahr district, Northwest of Iran. Four Phle­boto­mus (Larroussius species are present in this area, i.e. Phlebotomus (Larroussius kandelakii, P. (La. major, P. (La. perfiliewi and P. (La. tobbi. The objective of the present study was to identify and distinguish the females of P. per­filiewi, P. major and P. tobbi, in this district.Methods: Adult sand flies were collected with sticky papers, CDC light traps, and aspirator in 2006. Individual sand flies of this four species from thirty different locations were characterized morphologically and by comparative DNA se­quences analyses of a fragment of mitochondrial gene Cytochrome b (Cyt b and nuclear gene Elongation Factor 1- al­pha (EF-1α. PCR amplification was carried out for all three species P. major, P. perfiliewi and P. tobbi in the sub­ge­nus Larroussius.Results: Phylogenetic analyses of P. major populations in this study displayed two different populations and genetic di­ver­sity. Spermathecal segment number, pharyngeal armature and other morphological characters of these three spe­cies were examined and found to present consistent interspecific differences.Conclusion: According to our findings, the phylogeny of Cyt b and EF-1α haplotypes confirms the relationships be­tween P. major, P. tobbi and P. perfiliewi as already defined by their morphological similarities.

  15. Application of multiple DNA fingerprinting techniques to study the genetic relationships among three members of the subgenus Trypanozoon (Protozoa: Trypanosomatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng-Jun; Gasser, Robin B; Zheng, Jia-Yu; Claes, Filip; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Lun, Zhao-Rong

    2005-12-01

    Three different DNA fingerprinting techniques, the mobile genetic element (MGE)-PCR, simple sequence repeat (SSR)-PCR and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR, were used to define a large set of genetic markers to study genetic similarity within and among Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma equiperdum and Trypanosoma evansi strains (n=18) from China, Africa and South America and to investigate their genetic relationships. Using the three fingerprinting techniques, >890 bands (ranging in size from 0.2 to 2kb) were defined for all 18 strains of Trypanosoma. Within each of the strains, 39-59 bands were defined. The similarity coefficients between strains ranged from approximately 41 to 94%, with a mean of 65%. There was more genetic similarity among strains within T. evansi (mean of approximately 79%) compared with T. equiperdum ( approximately 65%) and T. brucei ( approximately 59%). The similarity coefficient data were used to construct the dendrogram, which revealed that (irrespective of species) the majority of strains from China and South America grouped together to the exclusion of those from Africa. The exceptions were a T. brucei strain from Africa and a T. equiperdum strain of unknown origin. Hence, employing data sets generated using the three different fingerprinting methods, it was not possible to unequivocally distinguish among T. brucei, T. evansi and T. equiperdum, although there was a tendency for T. evansi strains to group together to the exclusion of T. brucei. The findings provide support for the hypothesis that T. evansi originated from a mutated form of T. equiperdum and stimulate further investigations of the genetic make-up and evolution of members of the subgenus Trypanozoon.

  16. New malaria parasites of the subgenus Novyella in African rainforest birds, with remarks on their high prevalence, classification and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkiūnas, Gediminas; Iezhova, Tatjana A; Loiseau, Claire; Smith, Thomas B; Sehgal, Ravinder N M

    2009-04-01

    Blood samples from 655 passerine birds were collected in rainforests of Ghana and Cameroon and examined both by microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based techniques. The overall prevalence of Plasmodium spp. was 46.6%, as determined by combining the results of both these diagnostic methods. In comparison to PCR-based diagnostics, microscopic examination of blood films was more sensitive in determining simultaneous infection of Plasmodium spp., but both detection methods showed similar trends of prevalence of malaria parasites in the same study sites. Plasmodium (Novyella) lucens n. sp., Plasmodium (Novyella) multivacuolaris n. sp. and Plasmodium (Novyella) parahexamerium n. sp. were found in the olive sunbird Cyanomitra olivacea (Nectariniidae), yellow-whiskered greenbul Andropadus latirostris (Picnonotidae), and white-tailed alethe Alethe diademata (Turdidae), respectively. These parasites are described based on the morphology of their blood stages and a segment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b) gene, which can be used for molecular identification and diagnosis of these species. Illustrations of blood stages of new species are given, and phylogenetic analysis identifies DNA lineages closely related to these parasites. Malaria parasites of the subgenus Novyella with small erythrocytic meronts clearly predominate in African passerines. It is probable that the development of such meronts is a characteristic feature of evolution of Plasmodium spp. in African rainforest birds. Subgeneric taxonomy of avian Plasmodium spp. is discussed based on the recent molecular phylogenies of these parasites. It is concluded that a multi-genome phylogeny is needed before revising the current subgeneric classification of Plasmodium. We supported a hypothesis by Hellgren, Krizanauskiene, Valkiūnas, Bensch (J Parasitol 93:889-896, 2007), according to which, haemosporidian species with a genetic differentiation of over 5% in mitochondrial cyt b gene are expected to be

  17. A pilot study applying the plant Anchored Hybrid Enrichment method to New World sages (Salvia subgenus Calosphace; Lamiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragoso-Martínez, Itzi; Salazar, Gerardo A; Martínez-Gordillo, Martha; Magallón, Susana; Sánchez-Reyes, Luna; Moriarty Lemmon, Emily; Lemmon, Alan R; Sazatornil, Federico; Granados Mendoza, Carolina

    2017-12-01

    We conducted a pilot study using Anchored Hybrid Enrichment to resolve relationships among a mostly Neotropical sage lineage that may have undergone a recent evolutionary radiation. Conventional markers (ITS, trnL-trnF and trnH-psbA) have not been able to resolve the relationships among species nor within portions of the backbone of the lineage. We sampled 12 representative species of subgenus Calosphace and included one species of Salvia's s.l. closest relative, Lepechinia, as outgroup. Hybrid enrichment and sequencing were successful, yielding 448 alignments of individual loci with an average length of 704bp. The performance of the phylogenomic data in phylogenetic reconstruction was superior to that of conventional markers, increasing both support and resolution. Because the captured loci vary in the amount of net phylogenetic informativeness at different phylogenetic depths, these data are promising in phylogenetic reconstruction of this group and likely other lineages within Lamiales. However, special attention should be placed on the amount of phylogenetic noise that the data could potentially contain. A prior exploration step using phylogenetic informativeness profiles to detect loci with sites with disproportionately high substitution rates (showing "phantom" spikes) and, if required, the ensuing filtering of the problematic data is recommended. In our dataset, filtering resulted in increased support and resolution for the shallow nodes in maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees resulting from concatenated analyses of all the loci. Additionally, it is expected that an increase in sampling (loci and taxa) will aid in resolving weakly supported, short deep internal branches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Carabus of Subgenus Cathoplius C.G. Thomson, 1875, with description of their life-way, life-cycle and pre-imaginal morphology (Coleoptera: Carabidae) .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busato, Enrico; Ghittino, Claudio; Casale, Achille

    2014-09-25

    According to current taxonomy, Subgenus Cathoplius C.G. Thomson, 1875, within the Genus Carabus Linnaeus, 1758 (in the broad sense), includes two species: C. (Cathoplius) asperatus (Dejean, 1826), monotypic with a northern distribution, and the southern polytypic substitutive species C. (Cathoplius) stenocephalus Lucas, 1866. The authors describe the life-way, life-cycle and pre-imaginal characters of the taxa currently ascribed to Subgenus Cathoplius, with details never provided before. Cathoplius are ground beetles adapted to live in arid environments and extreme habitats such as sub-desert areas. All of them are strictly helicophagous, both during the pre-imaginal stages and as adults, and are localized in a narrow fringe along the Atlantic coast of northwestern Africa. Several data and observations on the eco-ethology of the different taxa, obtained both in field and in laboratory, are reported. The life-cycle of Cathoplius belongs to the winter breeding type, with an extremely high fecundity rate concentrated in a very short period of time, that has no similarity to any other Carabus species. Eggs, larvae and pupae of the different species and subspecies of Cathoplius are described and illustrated. Larval characters clearly place Subgenus Cathoplius into the lineage of Neocarabi, confirming it as a monophyletic and homogeneous assemblage. Hybridization trials between some taxa led to a reduced survival rate of the progeny, thus confirming their specific or subspecific differentiation as proposed by classical taxonomy. Furthermore, hybridization results suggest that C. (Cathoplius) stenocephalus aliai could be considered as a distinct species. Notes about the origin, biogeography and phylogeny of Cathoplius are also provided.

  19. Foliar Essential Oil Glands of Eucalyptus Subgenus Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae Are a Rich Source of Flavonoids and Related Non-Volatile Constituents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Q D Goodger

    Full Text Available The sub-dermal secretory cavities (glands embedded within the leaves of Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae were once thought to be the exclusive repositories of monoterpene and sesquiterpene oils. Recent research has debunked this theory and shown that abundant non-volatile compounds also occur within foliar glands. In particular, glands of four species in subgenus Eucalyptus contain the biologically active flavanone pinocembrin. Pinocembrin shows great promise as a pharmaceutical and is predominantly plant-sourced, so Eucalyptus could be a potential commercial source of such compounds. To explore this we quantified and assessed the purity of pinocembrin in glands of 11 species of E. subg. Eucalyptus using Electro-Spray Ionisation Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry of acetonitrile extracts and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry analyses of hexane extracts of isolated glands which were free from other leaf tissues. Our results showed that the glands of subgenus Eucalyptus contain numerous flavanones that are structurally related to pinocembrin and often present in much greater abundance. The maximum concentration of pinocembrin was 2 mg g-1 dry leaf found in E. stellulata, whereas that of dimethylpinocembrin (5,7-dimethoxyflavanone was 10 mg g-1 in E. oreades and that of pinostrobin (5-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavanone was 12 mg g-1 in E. nitida. We also found that the flavanones are exclusively located within the foliar glands rather than distributed throughout leaf tissues. The flavanones differ from the non-methylated pinocembrin in the degree and positions of methylation. This finding is particularly important given the attractiveness of methylated flavonoids as pharmaceuticals and therapeutics. Another important finding was that glands of some members of the subgenus also contain flavanone O-glucosides and flavanone-β-triketone conjugates. In addition, glands contain free β-triketones, β-triketone heterodimers and chromone C-glucosides. Therefore, the

  20. Foliar Essential Oil Glands of Eucalyptus Subgenus Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae) Are a Rich Source of Flavonoids and Related Non-Volatile Constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodger, Jason Q D; Seneratne, Samiddhi L; Nicolle, Dean; Woodrow, Ian E

    2016-01-01

    The sub-dermal secretory cavities (glands) embedded within the leaves of Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae) were once thought to be the exclusive repositories of monoterpene and sesquiterpene oils. Recent research has debunked this theory and shown that abundant non-volatile compounds also occur within foliar glands. In particular, glands of four species in subgenus Eucalyptus contain the biologically active flavanone pinocembrin. Pinocembrin shows great promise as a pharmaceutical and is predominantly plant-sourced, so Eucalyptus could be a potential commercial source of such compounds. To explore this we quantified and assessed the purity of pinocembrin in glands of 11 species of E. subg. Eucalyptus using Electro-Spray Ionisation Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry of acetonitrile extracts and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry analyses of hexane extracts of isolated glands which were free from other leaf tissues. Our results showed that the glands of subgenus Eucalyptus contain numerous flavanones that are structurally related to pinocembrin and often present in much greater abundance. The maximum concentration of pinocembrin was 2 mg g-1 dry leaf found in E. stellulata, whereas that of dimethylpinocembrin (5,7-dimethoxyflavanone) was 10 mg g-1 in E. oreades and that of pinostrobin (5-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavanone) was 12 mg g-1 in E. nitida. We also found that the flavanones are exclusively located within the foliar glands rather than distributed throughout leaf tissues. The flavanones differ from the non-methylated pinocembrin in the degree and positions of methylation. This finding is particularly important given the attractiveness of methylated flavonoids as pharmaceuticals and therapeutics. Another important finding was that glands of some members of the subgenus also contain flavanone O-glucosides and flavanone-β-triketone conjugates. In addition, glands contain free β-triketones, β-triketone heterodimers and chromone C-glucosides. Therefore, the foliar glands

  1. Foliar Essential Oil Glands of Eucalyptus Subgenus Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae) Are a Rich Source of Flavonoids and Related Non-Volatile Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolle, Dean; Woodrow, Ian E.

    2016-01-01

    The sub-dermal secretory cavities (glands) embedded within the leaves of Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae) were once thought to be the exclusive repositories of monoterpene and sesquiterpene oils. Recent research has debunked this theory and shown that abundant non-volatile compounds also occur within foliar glands. In particular, glands of four species in subgenus Eucalyptus contain the biologically active flavanone pinocembrin. Pinocembrin shows great promise as a pharmaceutical and is predominantly plant-sourced, so Eucalyptus could be a potential commercial source of such compounds. To explore this we quantified and assessed the purity of pinocembrin in glands of 11 species of E. subg. Eucalyptus using Electro-Spray Ionisation Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry of acetonitrile extracts and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry analyses of hexane extracts of isolated glands which were free from other leaf tissues. Our results showed that the glands of subgenus Eucalyptus contain numerous flavanones that are structurally related to pinocembrin and often present in much greater abundance. The maximum concentration of pinocembrin was 2 mg g-1 dry leaf found in E. stellulata, whereas that of dimethylpinocembrin (5,7-dimethoxyflavanone) was 10 mg g-1 in E. oreades and that of pinostrobin (5-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavanone) was 12 mg g-1 in E. nitida. We also found that the flavanones are exclusively located within the foliar glands rather than distributed throughout leaf tissues. The flavanones differ from the non-methylated pinocembrin in the degree and positions of methylation. This finding is particularly important given the attractiveness of methylated flavonoids as pharmaceuticals and therapeutics. Another important finding was that glands of some members of the subgenus also contain flavanone O-glucosides and flavanone-β-triketone conjugates. In addition, glands contain free β-triketones, β-triketone heterodimers and chromone C-glucosides. Therefore, the foliar glands

  2. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences of Aconitum pseudolaeve and Aconitum longecassidatum, and Development of Molecular Markers for Distinguishing Species in the Aconitum Subgenus Lycoctonum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inkyu Park

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aconitum pseudolaeve Nakai and Aconitum longecassidatum Nakai, which belong to the Aconitum subgenus Lycoctonum, are distributed in East Asia and Korea. Aconitum species are used in herbal medicine and contain highly toxic components, including aconitine. A. pseudolaeve, an endemic species of Korea, is a commercially valuable material that has been used in the manufacture of cosmetics and perfumes. Although Aconitum species are important plant resources, they have not been extensively studied, and genomic information is limited. Within the subgenus Lycoctonum, which includes A. pseudolaeve and A. longecassidatum, a complete chloroplast (CP genome is available for only one species, Aconitum barbatum Patrin ex Pers. Therefore, we sequenced the complete CP genomes of two Aconitum species, A. pseudolaeve and A. longecassidatum, which are 155,628 and 155,524 bp in length, respectively. Both genomes have a quadripartite structure consisting of a pair of inverted repeated regions (51,854 and 52,108 bp, respectively separated by large single-copy (86,683 and 86,466 bp and small single-copy (17,091 and 16,950 bp regions similar to those in other Aconitum CP genomes. Both CP genomes consist of 112 unique genes, 78 protein-coding genes, 4 ribosomal RNA (rRNA genes, and 30 transfer RNA (tRNA genes. We identified 268 and 277 simple sequence repeats (SSRs in A. pseudolaeve and A. longecassidatum, respectively. We also identified potential 36 species-specific SSRs, 53 indels, and 62 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs between the two CP genomes. Furthermore, a comparison of the three Aconitum CP genomes from the subgenus Lycoctonum revealed highly divergent regions, including trnK-trnQ, ycf1-ndhF, and ycf4-cemA. Based on this finding, we developed indel markers using indel sequences in trnK-trnQ and ycf1-ndhF. A. pseudolaeve, A. longecassidatum, and A. barbatum could be clearly distinguished using the novel indel markers AcoTT (Aconitum trnK-trnQ and Aco

  3. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences of Aconitum pseudolaeve and Aconitum longecassidatum, and Development of Molecular Markers for Distinguishing Species in the Aconitum Subgenus Lycoctonum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Inkyu; Yang, Sungyu; Choi, Goya; Kim, Wook Jin; Moon, Byeong Cheol

    2017-11-21

    Aconitum pseudolaeve Nakai and Aconitum longecassidatum Nakai, which belong to the Aconitum subgenus Lycoctonum, are distributed in East Asia and Korea. Aconitum species are used in herbal medicine and contain highly toxic components, including aconitine. A. pseudolaeve, an endemic species of Korea, is a commercially valuable material that has been used in the manufacture of cosmetics and perfumes. Although Aconitum species are important plant resources, they have not been extensively studied, and genomic information is limited. Within the subgenus Lycoctonum, which includes A. pseudolaeve and A. longecassidatum, a complete chloroplast (CP) genome is available for only one species, Aconitum barbatum Patrin ex Pers. Therefore, we sequenced the complete CP genomes of two Aconitum species, A. pseudolaeve and A. longecassidatum, which are 155,628 and 155,524 bp in length, respectively. Both genomes have a quadripartite structure consisting of a pair of inverted repeated regions (51,854 and 52,108 bp, respectively) separated by large single-copy (86,683 and 86,466 bp) and small single-copy (17,091 and 16,950 bp) regions similar to those in other Aconitum CP genomes. Both CP genomes consist of 112 unique genes, 78 protein-coding genes, 4 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, and 30 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes. We identified 268 and 277 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in A. pseudolaeve and A. longecassidatum, respectively. We also identified potential 36 species-specific SSRs, 53 indels, and 62 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between the two CP genomes. Furthermore, a comparison of the three Aconitum CP genomes from the subgenus Lycoctonum revealed highly divergent regions, including trnK-trnQ, ycf1-ndhF, and ycf4-cemA. Based on this finding, we developed indel markers using indel sequences in trnK-trnQ and ycf1-ndhF. A. pseudolaeve, A. longecassidatum, and A. barbatum could be clearly distinguished using the novel indel markers AcoTT (Aconitum trnK-trnQ) and AcoYN (Aconitum

  4. Badister Clairville, 1806: A new species and new continental record for the nominate subgenus in Amazonian Perú (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Licinini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Erwin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Badister (Badister amazonus sp. n. is described from Perú, Loreto, 1.0 km SW Boca del Rio Samiria, Vigilante Post 1, 130m, “04°40.5`S, 074°18.9`W" its type locality. It is known also from two other localities in Loreto Department, Perú, in both the Varzea and Igapó river systems. This new species is sufficiently different that a new informal higher taxon, the amazonus species complex, is recognized. An updated key to the Western Hemisphere species of subgenus Badister is provided.

  5. Register of a gynandromorph of Euglossa pleosticta Dressler (Hymenoptera, Apidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariele P. Camargo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Register of a gynandromorph of Euglossa pleosticta (Hymenoptera, Apidae. Here we provide a description of a gynandromorph of Euglossa pleosticta with partial bilateral phenotypic asymmetry. The specimen was collected by cineol baittrap at Parque Estadual São Camilo, a conservation unit in western Paraná. The bee has mostly a female phenotype, except by the right half of its head, including the presence of 11 flagellomeres, ivory markings on scape and parocular area, by the pilosity of the right galea, and by deformed male characteristics on mid and hind tibiae of right legs.

  6. Plastid genome evolution across the genus Cuscuta (Convolvulaceae): two clades within subgenus Grammica exhibit extensive gene loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braukmann, Thomas; Kuzmina, Maria; Stefanovic, Sasa

    2013-02-01

    The genus Cuscuta (Convolvulaceae, the morning glory family) is one of the most intensely studied lineages of parasitic plants. Whole plastome sequencing of four Cuscuta species has demonstrated changes to both plastid gene content and structure. The presence of photosynthetic genes under purifying selection indicates that Cuscuta is cryptically photosynthetic. However, the tempo and mode of plastid genome evolution across the diversity of this group (~200 species) remain largely unknown. A comparative investigation of plastid genome content, grounded within a phylogenetic framework, was conducted using a slot-blot Southern hybridization approach. Cuscuta was extensively sampled (~56% of species), including groups previously suggested to possess more altered plastomes compared with other members of this genus. A total of 56 probes derived from all categories of protein-coding genes, typically found within the plastomes of flowering plants, were used. The results indicate that two clades within subgenus Grammica (clades 'O' and 'K') exhibit substantially more plastid gene loss relative to other members of Cuscuta. All surveyed members of the 'O' clade show extensive losses of plastid genes from every category of genes typically found in the plastome, including otherwise highly conserved small and large ribosomal subunits. The extent of plastid gene losses within this clade is similar in magnitude to that observed previously in some non-asterid holoparasites, in which the very presence of a plastome has been questioned. The 'K' clade also exhibits considerable loss of plastid genes. Unlike in the 'O' clade, in which all species seem to be affected, the losses in clade 'K' progress phylogenetically, following a pattern consistent with the Evolutionary Transition Series hypothesis. This clade presents an ideal opportunity to study the reduction of the plastome of parasites 'in action'. The widespread plastid gene loss in these two clades is hypothesized to be a

  7. Identification of Sand flies of the Subgenus Larroussius based on Molecular and Morphological Characters in North Western Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Absavaran

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The adult female sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae of the subgenus Larroussius are important vectors of Leishmania infantum (Kinetoplastida: Tripanosomatidae in Meshkinshahr district, Northwest of Iran. Four Phle­boto­mus (Larroussius species are present in this area, i.e. Phlebotomus (Larroussius kandelakii, P. (La. major, P. (La. perfiliewi and P. (La. tobbi. The objective of the present study was to identify and distinguish the females of P. per­filiewi, P. major and P. tobbi, in this district."nMethods: Adult sand flies were collected with sticky papers, CDC light traps, and aspirator in 2006. Individual sand flies of this four species from thirty different locations were characterized morphologically and by comparative DNA se­quences analyses of a fragment of mitochondrial gene Cytochrome b (Cyt b and nuclear gene Elongation Factor 1- al­pha (EF-1α. PCR amplification was carried out for all three species P. major, P. perfiliewi and P. tobbi in the sub­ge­nus Larroussius."nResults: Phylogenetic analyses of P. major populations in this study displayed two different populations and genetic di­ver­sity. Spermathecal segment number, pharyngeal armature and other morphological characters of these three spe­cies were examined and found to present consistent interspecific differences."nConclusion: According to our findings, the phylogeny of Cyt b and EF-1α haplotypes confirms the relationships be­tween P. major, P. tobbi and P. perfiliewi as already defined by their morphological similarities.                                                                                  Keywords: Phlebotomus, Larroussius, Cytochrome b, Elongation Factor-1α, Morphology, Iran                 

  8. Pan-African phylogeny of Mus (subgenus Nannomys) reveals one of the most successful mammal radiations in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryja, Josef; Mikula, Ondřej; Šumbera, Radim; Meheretu, Yonas; Aghová, Tatiana; Lavrenchenko, Leonid A; Mazoch, Vladimír; Oguge, Nicholas; Mbau, Judith S; Welegerima, Kiros; Amundala, Nicaise; Colyn, Marc; Leirs, Herwig; Verheyen, Erik

    2014-12-14

    Rodents of the genus Mus represent one of the most valuable biological models for biomedical and evolutionary research. Out of the four currently recognized subgenera, Nannomys (African pygmy mice, including the smallest rodents in the world) comprises the only original African lineage. Species of this subgenus became important models for the study of sex determination in mammals and they are also hosts of potentially dangerous pathogens. Nannomys ancestors colonized Africa from Asia at the end of Miocene and Eastern Africa should be considered as the place of their first radiation. In sharp contrast with this fact and despite the biological importance of Nannomys, the specimens from Eastern Africa were obviously under-represented in previous studies and the phylogenetic and distributional patterns were thus incomplete. We performed comprehensive genetic analysis of 657 individuals of Nannomys collected at approximately 300 localities across the whole sub-Saharan Africa. Phylogenetic reconstructions based on mitochondrial (CYTB) and nuclear (IRBP) genes identified five species groups and three monotypic ancestral lineages. We provide evidence for important cryptic diversity and we defined and mapped the distribution of 27 molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs) that may correspond to presumable species. Biogeographical reconstructions based on data spanning all of Africa modified the previous evolutionary scenarios. First divergences occurred in Eastern African mountains soon after the colonization of the continent and the remnants of these old divergences still occur there, represented by long basal branches of M. (previously Muriculus) imberbis and two undescribed species from Ethiopia and Malawi. The radiation in drier lowland habitats associated with the decrease of body size is much younger, occurred mainly in a single lineage (called the minutoides group, and especially within the species M. minutoides), and was probably linked to aridification and

  9. DNA barcoding of the leaf-mining moth subgenus Ectoedemia s. str. (Lepidoptera: Nepticulidae) with COI and EF1-α: two are better than one in recognising cryptic species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieukerken, E.J.; Doorenweerd, C.; Stokvis, F.R.; Groenenberg, D.S.J.

    2012-01-01

    We sequenced 665bp of the Cytochrome C Oxidase I (COI) barcoding marker for 257 specimens and 482bp of Elongation Factor 1-α (EF1-α) for 237 specimens belonging to the leafmining subgenus Ectoedemia (Ectoedemia) in the basal Lepidopteran family Nepticulidae. The dataset includes 45 out of 48 West

  10. A new subgenus of the weevil genus Otiorhynchus Germar, 1822 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Entiminae for a new species from Mediterranean Turkey associated with the carob tree, Ceratonia siliqua L. (Fabaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genrik E. Davidian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A new species Otiorhynchus ceratoniae Davidian, Gültekin & Korotyaev sp. nov. is described from eastern Mediterranean Turkey. A new monotypic subgenus Arnoldinus Davidian, Gültekin & Korotyaev subgen. nov. is erected for this species. The new species was found only under Ceratonia siliqua L. trees with lower leaves damaged by adults.

  11. Redefinition of the millipede subgenus Megaphyllum sensu stricto Verhoeff, 1894 and neotype designation for Megaphyllum austriacum (Latzel, 1884) (Myriapoda: Diplopoda: Julida: Julidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazányi, Eszter; Vagalinski, Boyan

    2013-11-26

    Megaphyllum sensu stricto, i.e. the nominotypical subgenus of the very complicated genus Megaphyllum Verhoeff, 1894, is redefined on the basis of examination of type and non-type material and literature data. Four species-groups including twenty species in all are listed, and the identity of M. austriacum (C. L. Koch, 1838) is clarified with a proposal of neotype designation under ICZN Article 75.6. in order to stabilize the current usage of the name. Prevailing usage of M. silvaticum (Verhoeff, 1898) syn. nov. (nomen protectum) over the senior synonym M. nigrescens (Latzel, 1884) (nomen oblitum) is maintained under ICZN Article 23.9. M. banaticum (Verhoeff, 1899) is syn. nov. of M. erythronotum (Latzel, 1884) comb. nov., M. bosniense cotinophilum (Loksa, 1962) syn. nov. of M. bosniense bosniense (Verhoeff, 1897) and M. transsylvanicum transdanubicum (Loksa, 1962) syn. nov. of M. transsylvanicum transsylvanicum (Verhoeff, 1897). M. unilineatum (C. L. Koch, 1838) is new to the fauna of Turkey.

  12. Molecular systematics of the phlebotomine sandflies of the subgenus Paraphlebotomus (diptera, psychodidae, phlebotomus) based on ITS2 rDNA sequences. Hypotheses Of dispersion and speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaquit, J; Ferté, H; Léger, N; Killick-Kendrick, R; Rioux, J A; Killick-Kendrick, M; Hanafi, H A; Gobert, S

    2000-06-01

    Phylogenetic Paraphlebotomus relationships are inferred by a study based on the sequences of ITS2, which has been sequenced in nine Paraphlebotomus species: P. alexandri, P. andrejevi, P. jacusieli, P. kazeruni, P. mireillae, P. mongolensis, P. saevus, P. sergenti and P. similis and in two out-groups species of the subgenus Phlebotomus: P. papatasi and P. duboscqi. Paraphlebotomus alexandri appears as the sister group of all other Paraphlebotomus sandflies. Among the other species, three groupings are clearly highlighted: andrejevi and mongolensis; mireillae and saevus; jacusieli, kazeruni, sergenti and similis. These groupings are related to speculations about the migration of Paraphlebotomus from a centre of dispersion located in the Middle East sometime from the early Eocene to the late Miocene.

  13. Phylogeny of New World Salvia subgenus Calosphace (Lamiaceae) based on cpDNA (psbA-trnH) and nrDNA (ITS) sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Aaron A; Walker, Jay B; Kim, Seung-Chul

    2013-07-01

    Salvia subgenus Calosphace (Lamiaceae) is economically and ethnomedicinally significant and comprised of more than 500 species. Although strongly supported as monophyletic, it has received no comprehensive systematic research since the initial establishment of 91 taxonomic sections in 1939. Representative taxa of 73 sections of Calosphace were sampled to investigate the phylogenetic relationships and identify major lineages using chloroplast (intergenic spacer psbA-trnH) and nuclear ribosomal DNA (internal transcribed spacer). Phylogenetic analysis of the combined data sets established monophyly of seven sections (Blakea, Corrugatae, Erythrostachys, Hastatae, Incarnatae, Microsphace, and Sigmoideae) and four major lineages (S. axillaris, "Hastatae clade", "Uliginosae clade", and "core Calosphace"). Sections spanning two or more centers of diversity are not supported by our results; rather, supported relationships exhibit significant geographic structure. Mexico is supported as the geographic origin of Calosphace, and no more than seven dispersal events to South America are required to account for current disjunct distributions.

  14. Traceability of marketable Japanese shoro in New Zealand: using multiplex PCR to exploit phylogeographic variation among taxa in the Rhizopogon subgenus Roseoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visnovsky, Sandra B; Guerin-Laguette, Alexis; Wang, Yun; Pitman, Andrew R

    2010-01-01

    Rhizopogon roseolus Corda (synonym Rhizopogon rubescens Tul.), an economically important edible mushroom associated with the Pinaceae (mostly Pinus sp.), has a global distribution resulting from the introduction of exotic trees into the Southern Hemisphere for plantation forestry. However, the marketability of R. roseolus varies with the place of origin. R. roseolus strains cultivated in New Zealand from local carpophores for the Japanese market are morphologically and biologically distinct from those produced in Japan and are consequently considered less valuable. In this study, the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 rRNA (internal transcribed spacer [ITS]) region was used to examine the phylogenetic relationships of R. roseolus and other closely related fungi belonging to Rhizopogon subgenus Roseoli to determine the genetic basis for phenotypic differences among R. roseolus isolates from different geographic regions. Phylogenetic comparison revealed phylogeographic variation within Rhizopogon subgenus Roseoli. Collections from the United States and Europe grouped into four distinct clades. Rhizopogon roseolus isolates found in New Zealand were closely related to those from the United States, likely due to introduction of Pinus radiata from its native California in the United States. In contrast, Japanese R. roseolus isolates clustered closely with European collections. Phylogenetic differences between Japanese and New Zealand R. roseolus isolates may explain the morphological and biological properties attributed to these geographical variants. The ITS region was subsequently used to design a multiplex PCR for the simultaneous identification of Japanese and New Zealand R. roseolus isolates to track the establishment of ectomycorrhiza on P. radiata seedlings inoculated with commercially valuable R. roseolus. This diagnostic demonstrated the first fruiting of Japanese shoro cultivated on P. radiata in the Southern Hemisphere.

  15. The Female Cibarial Armature of New World Culex, Subgenus Melanoconion and Related Subgenera with Notes on this Character in Subgenera Culex, Lutzia and Neoculex and Genera Galindomyia and Deinocerites (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Peru ). deeZarator Dyar Subgenus lVeo&!ex: arixonensis Bohart (USA-Arizona), derivator Dyar and Knab (Costa Rica), territans Walker (USA-Maryland...apparently characteris- tic of aZbir,ensis. (d) batesi subtype (Fig. 3E). This subtype is apparently distinc- tive of batesi. The cibarial teeth...in the spissipes subtype (spissipes, eprmastasis, opisthopus, por- tesi , taeniopus and vomerifer) based on the cibarial armature as shown here and

  16. Notes on two species of the cavernicolous subgenus Neobisium (Blothrus) Schiödte, 1847 (Arachnida: Pseudoscorpiones) from Transylvania (Romania), with a key to the species of the Carpathian Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novák, János

    2014-05-19

    Redescriptions of Neobisium (Blothrus) minutum (Tömösváry, 1882) and N. (B.) brevipes (Frivaldszky, 1865) are given, accompanied by new illustrations. Neobisium (B.) brevipes montanum is elevated to full species rank as N. (B.) montanum Beier, 1939. New records of N. (B.) minutum and N. (B.) brevipes from Romania are presented. A key to the members of the subgenus Blothrus occurring in the Carpathian Mountains is provided.

  17. Medical Entomology Studies - VI. A Revision of the Subgenus Lophoceraomyia of the Genus Culex in the Oriental Region (Diptera: Culicidae) (Contributions of the American Entomological Institute, Volume 13, Number 4, 1977)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    cephalothorax and metanotum. Trumpet. Brownish, short, stout, sausage -like, apex slightly projecting beyond margin of middorsal ridge in flat preparation...Subgenus LoPhoceraow2yia in the Oriental Region 137 lighter or yellowish white. Trumpet. Dark brown, short, stout, sausage -like. Complete chaetotaxy...Publ. 20: 1-147. Les moustiques de la Cochinchine et du Sud-Annam. Arch. Inst. Pasteur d’Indochine 3-4: 75-121. Les moustiques de la Cochinchine

  18. Medical Entomolgy Studies - VI. A Revision of the Subgenus Lophoceraomyia of the Genus Culex in the Oriental Region (Diptera: Culicidae) (Contributions of the American Entomological Institute. Volume 13, Number 4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    cephalothorax and metanotum. Trumpet. Brownish, short, stout, sausage -like, apex slightly projecting beyond margin of middorsal ridge in flat preparation...Subgenus LoPhoceraow2yia in the Oriental Region 137 lighter or yellowish white. Trumpet. Dark brown, short, stout, sausage -like. Complete chaetotaxy...Publ. 20: 1-147. Les moustiques de la Cochinchine et du Sud-Annam. Arch. Inst. Pasteur d’Indochine 3-4: 75-121. Les moustiques de la Cochinchine

  19. A new species of Reithrodontomys, subgenus Aporodon (Cricetidae: Neotominae), from the highlands of Costa Rica, with comments on Costa Rican and Panamanian Reithrodontomys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Alfred L.; Carleton, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    A new species of the rodent genus Reithrodontomys (Cricetidae: Neotominae) is described from Cerro Asuncion in the western Cordillera de Talamanca, Costa Rica. The long tail, elongate rostrum, bulbous braincase, and complex molars of the new species associate it with members of the subgenus Aporodon, tenuirostris species group. In its diminutive size and aspects of cranial shape, the new species (Reithrodontomys musseri, sp. nov.) most closely resembles R. microdon, a form known from highlands in Guatemala and Chiapas, Mexico. In the course of differentially diagnosing the new species, we necessarily reviewed the Costa Rican and Panamanian subspecies of R. mexicanus based on morphological comparisons, study of paratypes and vouchers used in recent molecular studies, and morphometric analyses. We recognize Reithrodontomys cherrii (Allen, 1891) and R. garichensis finders and Pearson, 1940, as valid species, and allocate R. mexicanus potrerograndei Goodwin, 1945, as a subjective synonym of R. brevirostris Goodwin, 1943. Critical review of museum specimens collected subsequent to Hooper's (1952) revision is needed and would do much to improve understanding of Reithrodontomys taxonomy and distribution in Middle America.

  20. Albucacrispa and A. grandis (Hyacinthaceae: Omithogaloideae, two new species of subgenus Albuca, the rediscovery of A. albucoides (sub­ genus Osmyne, and the identity of A. reflexa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Manning

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Albuca crispa is a new species of section Falconera series Trianthera with crispulate leaves from the Great Karoo, known  at least since 1947 but overlooked until now. A second new species. A grandis. from the southwestern Cape was previously included in  A. fragrans Jacq. (section  Falconera series  Falconera. It is a robust species that flowers in winter and early spring and the styles are rugulose with ± isodiametric epidermal cells, unlike typical  A. fragrans which is a more slender species flowering in early summer and with derived, smooth styles with fusiform epidermal cells. The recent discovery of a flowering population matching the type of A. albucoides (Aiton J.C.Manning & Goldblatt (subgenus Osmyne allows for a full description and illustration of this poorly know n and taxonomically neglected species that has often been included in A. suaveolens (Jacq. J.C.Manning & Goldblatt. Lastly, examination of the type  of A. reflexa Krause & Dinter from Namibia shows it to be conspecific w ith Drimia indica (Roxb. Jessop.

  1. Albucacrispa and A. grandis (Hyacinthaceae: Omithogaloideae, two new species of subgenus Albuca, the rediscovery of A. albucoides (sub­ genus Osmyne, and the identity of A. reflexa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Manning

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Albuca crispa is a new species of section Falconera series Trianthera with crispulate leaves from the Great Karoo, known  at least since 1947 but overlooked until now. A second new species. A grandis. from the southwestern Cape was previously included in  A. fragrans Jacq. (section  Falconera series  Falconera. It is a robust species that flowers in winter and early spring and the styles are rugulose with ± isodiametric epidermal cells, unlike typical  A. fragrans which is a more slender species flowering in early summer and with derived, smooth styles with fusiform epidermal cells. The recent discovery of a flowering population matching the type of A. albucoides (Aiton J.C.Manning & Goldblatt (subgenus Osmyne allows for a full description and illustration of this poorly know n and taxonomically neglected species that has often been included in A. suaveolens (Jacq. J.C.Manning & Goldblatt. Lastly, examination of the type  of A. reflexa Krause & Dinter from Namibia shows it to be conspecific w ith Drimia indica (Roxb. Jessop.

  2. Scratching the surface? Taxonomic revision of the subgenus Schizoptera (Odontorhagus) reveals vast undocumented biodiversity in the largest litter bug genus Schizoptera Fieber (Hemiptera: Dipsocoromorpha).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Stephanie; Weirauch, Christiane

    2016-11-03

    Schizoptera Fieber, currently the largest genus of litter bugs (Hemiptera: Dipsocoromorpha), comprises 61 extant species in 4 subgenera. Specimens are abundant in New World bulk and residue samples. Schizoptera species showcase stunning morphology including intricate, asymmetrical genitalia in males that have proven to provide excellent species diagnostic features in the past. Recent bulk sample sorting efforts have revealed a vast number of Schizoptera specimens from across the New World, with the majority representing undescribed species. We here taxonomically revise the subgenus Schizoptera (Odontorhagus) that has recently been shown to form a monophyletic group within Schizoptera. Characterized by the blunt tooth on the posterior margin of the propleuron, Schizoptera (Odontorhagus) previously comprised 10 species from Central and the northern part of South America. We here describe 20 new species in S. (Odontorhagus): S. acuta, n. sp., S. angularis, n. sp., S. ansata, n. sp., S. aspera, n. sp., S. brevis, n. sp., S. dentata, n. sp., S. dolosa, n. sp., S. enigmatica, n. sp., S. exacta, n. sp., S. gorgonensis, n. sp., S. insidiosa, n. sp., S. monstrosa, n. sp., S. piscicaudata, n. sp., S. quasicompleta, n. sp., S. radicata, n. sp., S. serrata, n. sp., S. simpla, n. sp., S. singularis, n. sp., S. trivialis, n. sp., S. ungulata, n. sp., increasing the species count of Schizoptera to 81. We provide morphological documentation including digital habitus images and genitalic drawings for all new species and document and redescribe existing species where feasible. Distribution maps and a key to the species of Schizoptera (Odontorhagus) are also presented. We predict that similar increases in species numbers are to be expected for the remaining subgenera of Schizoptera, making this genus a very diverse lineage of minute litter bugs.

  3. The comparison of molecular and morphology-based phylogenies of trichaline net-winged beetles (Coleoptera: Lycidae: Metriorrhynchini with description of a new subgenus

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    Matej Bocek

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Separate morphological and molecular phylogenetic analyses are presented and the classification of trichaline net-winged beetles is revised. The clade, earlier given a subfamily, tribe or subtribe rank, is a terminal lineage in Metriorrhynchina and contains Diatrichalus Kleine, 1926, Eniclases Waterhouse, 1879, Flabellotrichalus Pic, 1921, Lobatang Bocak, 1998, Microtrichalus Pic, 1921, Schizotrichalus Kleine, 1926, and Trichalus Waterhouse, 1877. Maibrius subgen. nov. is proposed in Flabellotrichalus with the type-species Flabellotrichalus (Maibrius horaki sp. nov. Unlike previous studies, Lobatang is included in the trichaline clade. Further, Spinotrichalus Kazantsev, 2010, stat. nov. is down-ranked to the subgenus in Lobatang Bocak, 1998 and a new combination, Lobatang (Spinotrichalus telnovi (Kazantsev, 2010 comb. nov., is proposed. The morphology does not provide a sufficient support for robust phylogeny due to the intrageneric variability of most phenotypic traits and the limited number of characters supporting deep relationships. Most morphological generic diagnoses must be based on the shape of male genitalia. Other characters, such as the shapes of pronotum and antennae are commonly variable within genera. The fronto-lateral pronotal ridges of Eniclases + Schizotrichalus resemble the ancestral condition in Metriorrhynchini and they re-evolved in the terminal clade and do not indicate the early split of Eniclases + Schizotrichalus from other trichaline genera. The evolution of morphological traits and the conflict in the morphological and molecular phylogenetic signal are discussed in details. We suggest that the general appearance is affected by the evolution of mimetic complexes, the patterns of elytral costae by their strengthening function, and the presence of flabellate antennae by their role in sexual communication. Then, similar phenotypic traits evolve in unrelated lineages. The results demonstrate that phylogenetic

  4. Population genetic structure, genetic diversity, and natural history of the South American species of Nothofagus subgenus Lophozonia (Nothofagaceae) inferred from nuclear microsatellite data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Rodrigo; Gitzendanner, Matthew A; Soltis, Douglas E; Soltis, Pamela S

    2014-06-01

    The effect of glaciation on the levels and patterns of genetic variation has been well studied in the Northern Hemisphere. However, although glaciation has undoubtedly shaped the genetic structure of plants in the Southern Hemisphere, fewer studies have characterized the effect, and almost none of them using microsatellites. Particularly, complex patterns of genetic structure might be expected in areas such as the Andes, where both latitudinal and altitudinal glacial advance and retreat have molded modern plant communities. We therefore studied the population genetics of three closely related, hybridizing species of Nothofagus (N. obliqua, N. alpina, and N. glauca, all of subgenus Lophozonia; Nothofagaceae) from Chile. To estimate population genetic parameters and infer the influence of the last ice age on the spatial and genetic distribution of these species, we examined and analyzed genetic variability at seven polymorphic microsatellite DNA loci in 640 individuals from 40 populations covering most of the ranges of these species in Chile. Populations showed no significant inbreeding and exhibited relatively high levels of genetic diversity (H E = 0.502-0.662) and slight, but significant, genetic structure (R ST = 8.7-16.0%). However, in N. obliqua, the small amount of genetic structure was spatially organized into three well-defined latitudinal groups. Our data may also suggest some introgression of N. alpina genes into N. obliqua in the northern populations. These results allowed us to reconstruct the influence of the last ice age on the genetic structure of these species, suggesting several centers of genetic diversity for N. obliqua and N. alpina, in agreement with the multiple refugia hypothesis.

  5. Two new species and a new subgenus of toothed Brachyhypopomus electric knifefishes (Gymnotiformes, Hypopomidae) from the central Amazon and considerations pertaining to the evolution of a monophasic electric organ discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, John P; Zuanon, Jansen; Cox Fernandes, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    We describe two new, closely related species of toothed Brachyhypopomus (Hypopomidae: Gymnotiformes: Teleostei) from the central Amazon basin and create a new subgenus for them. Odontohypopomus, new subgenus of Brachyhypopomus, is diagnosed by (1) small teeth present on premaxillae; (2) medialmost two branchiostegal rays thin with blades oriented more vertically than remaining three rays; (3) background color in life (and to lesser extent in preservation) distinctly yellowish with head and sides peppered with small, widely spaced, very dark brown stellate chromatophores that greatly contrast with light background coloration; (4) a dark blotch or bar of subcutaneous pigment below the eye; (5) electric organ discharge waveform of very long duration (head-positive phase approx. 2 milliseconds or longer, head-negative phase shorter or absent) and slow pulse repetition rate (3-16 Hz). The type species of the new subgenus, Brachyhypopomus (Odontohypopomus) walteri sp. n., is diagnosed by the following additional character states: (1) subcutaneous dark pigment at base of orbit particularly prominent, (2) body semi-translucent and nearly bright yellow background coloration in life, (3) a biphasic electric organ discharge (EOD) waveform of very long duration (between 3.5 and 4 milliseconds at 25° C) with head-positive first phase significantly longer than second head-negative phase in both sexes. Brachyhypopomus (Odontohypopomus) bennetti sp. n. is diagnosed by two character states in addition to those used to diagnose the subgenus Odontohypopomus: (1) a deep electric organ, visible as large semi-transparent area, occupying approximately 14-17% body depth directly posterior to the abdominal cavity in combination with a short, but deep, caudal filament, and (2) a monophasic, head-positive EOD waveform, approximately 2.1 milliseconds in duration in both sexes. These are the only described rhamphichthyoid gymnotiforms with oral teeth, and Brachyhypopomus bennetti is the first

  6. Two new species and a new subgenus of toothed Brachyhypopomus electric knifefishes (Gymnotiformes, Hypopomidae from the central Amazon and considerations pertaining to the evolution of a monophasic electric organ discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Sullivan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe two new, closely related species of toothed Brachyhypopomus (Hypopomidae: Gymnotiformes: Teleostei from the central Amazon basin and create a new subgenus for them. Odontohypopomus, new subgenus of Brachyhypopomus, is diagnosed by (1 small teeth present on premaxillae; (2 medialmost two branchiostegal rays thin with blades oriented more vertically than remaining three rays; (3 background color in life (and to lesser extent in preservation distinctly yellowish with head and sides peppered with small, widely spaced, very dark brown stellate chromatophores that greatly contrast with light background coloration; (4 a dark blotch or bar of subcutaneous pigment below the eye; (5 electric organ discharge waveform of very long duration (head-positive phase approx. 2 milliseconds or longer, head-negative phase shorter or absent and slow pulse repetition rate (3–16 Hz. The type species of the new subgenus, Brachyhypopomus (Odontohypopomus walteri sp. n., is diagnosed by the following additional character states: (1 subcutaneous dark pigment at base of orbit particularly prominent, (2 body semi-translucent and nearly bright yellow background coloration in life, (3 a biphasic electric organ discharge (EOD waveform of very long duration (between 3.5 and 4 milliseconds at 25° C with head-positive first phase significantly longer than second head-negative phase in both sexes. Brachyhypopomus (Odontohypopomus bennetti sp. n. is diagnosed by two character states in addition to those used to diagnose the subgenus Odontohypopomus: (1 a deep electric organ, visible as large semi-transparent area, occupying approximately 14–17% body depth directly posterior to the abdominal cavity in combination with a short, but deep, caudal filament, and (2 a monophasic, head-positive EOD waveform, approximately 2.1 milliseconds in duration in both sexes. These are the only described rhamphichthyoid gymnotiforms with oral teeth, and B. bennetti is the first

  7. In vitro activity of 2-pyridinecarboxylic acid against trypanosomes of the subgenus Schizotrypanum isolated from the bat Phyllostomus hastatus - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v33i4.6482 In vitro activity of 2-pyridinecarboxylic acid against trypanosomes of the subgenus Schizotrypanum isolated from the bat Phyllostomus hastatus - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v33i4.6482

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sueli Fumie Yamada-Ogatta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of 2-pyridinecarboxylic acid (picolinic acid on trypanosomes of the subgenus Schizotrypanum isolated from the bat Phyllostomus hastatus was determined in this study. Picolinic acid, at 50 µg mL-1, inhibited epimastigote growth by 99% after 12 days incubation. In addition, trypomastigote motility decreased by 50% after 6h and completely after 24h in the presence of 50 µg mL-1 picolinic acid. The 50% cytotoxic concentration on HEp-2 cell line was 275 µg mL-1 after 4 days incubation. Altogether, these results indicate higher toxicity against trypanosomes. The inhibitory effect of picolinic acid on epimastigote growth can be partially reversed by nicotinic acid and L-tryptophan, suggesting a competitive inhibition. Furthermore, two anti-Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum cruzi drugs were also evaluated with regard to bat trypanosome growth. Benznidazole, at 50 µg mL-1, inhibited epimastigote growth by 90% after 12 days incubation. Nifurtimox, at the same concentration, caused 96% growth inhibition after four days incubation. Corroborating a previous study, bat trypanosomes are a good model for screening new trypanocidal compounds. Moreover, they can be used to study many biological processes common to human pathogenic trypanosomatids.The effect of 2-pyridinecarboxylic acid (picolinic acid on trypanosomes of the subgenus Schizotrypanum isolated from the bat Phyllostomus hastatus was determined in this study. Picolinic acid, at 50 µg mL-1, inhibited epimastigote growth by 99% after 12 days incubation. In addition, trypomastigote motility decreased by 50% after 6h and completely after 24h in the presence of 50 µg mL-1 picolinic acid. The 50% cytotoxic concentration on HEp-2 cell line was 275 µg mL-1 after 4 days incubation. Altogether, these results indicate higher toxicity against trypanosomes. The inhibitory effect of picolinic acid on epimastigote growth can be partially reversed by nicotinic acid and L-tryptophan, suggesting a

  8. Development of Chloroplast and Nuclear DNA Markers for Chinese Oaks (Quercus Subgenus Quercus and Assessment of Their Utility as DNA Barcodes

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    Jia Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chloroplast DNA (cpDNA is frequently used for species demography, evolution, and species discrimination of plants. However, the lack of efficient and universal markers often brings particular challenges for genetic studies across different plant groups. In this study, chloroplast genomes from two closely related species (Quercus rubra and Castanea mollissima in Fagaceae were compared to explore universal cpDNA markers for the Chinese oak species in Quercus subgenus Quercus, a diverse species group without sufficient molecular differentiation. With the comparison, nine and 14 plastid markers were selected as barcoding and phylogeographic candidates for the Chinese oaks. Five (psbA-trnH, matK-trnK, ycf3-trnS, matK, and ycf1 of the nine plastid candidate barcodes, with the addition of newly designed ITS and a single-copy nuclear gene (SAP, were then tested on 35 Chinese oak species employing four different barcoding approaches (genetic distance-, BLAST-, character-, and tree-based methods. The four methods showed different species identification powers with character-based method performing the best. Of the seven barcodes tested, a barcoding gap was absent in all of them across the Chinese oaks, while ITS and psbA-trnH provided the highest species resolution (30.30% with the character- and BLAST-based methods, respectively. The six-marker combination (psbA-trnH + matK-trnK + matK + ycf1 + ITS + SAP showed the best species resolution (84.85% using the character-based method for barcoding the Chinese oaks. The barcoding results provided additional implications for taxonomy of the Chinese oaks in subg. Quercus, basically identifying three major infrageneric clades of the Chinese oaks (corresponding to Groups Quercus, Cerris, and Ilex referenced to previous phylogenetic classification of Quercus. While the morphology-based allocations proposed for the Chinese oaks in subg. Quercus were challenged. A low variation rate of the chloroplast genome, and

  9. Development of Chloroplast and Nuclear DNA Markers for Chinese Oaks (Quercus Subgenus Quercus) and Assessment of Their Utility as DNA Barcodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jia; Vázquez, Lucía; Chen, Xiaodan; Li, Huimin; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Zhanlin; Zhao, Guifang

    2017-01-01

    Chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) is frequently used for species demography, evolution, and species discrimination of plants. However, the lack of efficient and universal markers often brings particular challenges for genetic studies across different plant groups. In this study, chloroplast genomes from two closely related species (Quercus rubra and Castanea mollissima) in Fagaceae were compared to explore universal cpDNA markers for the Chinese oak species in Quercus subgenus Quercus, a diverse species group without sufficient molecular differentiation. With the comparison, nine and 14 plastid markers were selected as barcoding and phylogeographic candidates for the Chinese oaks. Five (psbA-trnH, matK-trnK, ycf3-trnS, matK, and ycf1) of the nine plastid candidate barcodes, with the addition of newly designed ITS and a single-copy nuclear gene (SAP), were then tested on 35 Chinese oak species employing four different barcoding approaches (genetic distance-, BLAST-, character-, and tree-based methods). The four methods showed different species identification powers with character-based method performing the best. Of the seven barcodes tested, a barcoding gap was absent in all of them across the Chinese oaks, while ITS and psbA-trnH provided the highest species resolution (30.30%) with the character- and BLAST-based methods, respectively. The six-marker combination (psbA-trnH + matK-trnK + matK + ycf1 + ITS + SAP) showed the best species resolution (84.85%) using the character-based method for barcoding the Chinese oaks. The barcoding results provided additional implications for taxonomy of the Chinese oaks in subg. Quercus, basically identifying three major infrageneric clades of the Chinese oaks (corresponding to Groups Quercus, Cerris, and Ilex) referenced to previous phylogenetic classification of Quercus. While the morphology-based allocations proposed for the Chinese oaks in subg. Quercus were challenged. A low variation rate of the chloroplast genome, and complex

  10. Morfoanatomia foliar de microorquídeas de Ornithocephalus Hook. e Psygmorchis Dodson & Dressler Leaf anatomy of micro-orchids of Ornithocephalus Hook. and Psygmorchis Dodson & Dressler

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    Rayza Carla Lopes Della Colleta

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Analisou-se a morfoanatomia foliar de Ornithocephalus bicornis Lindl. ex Benth., Ornithocephalus myrticola Lindl., Psygmorchis pusilla (L. e Psygmorchis glossomystax (Rchb. f., a fim de identificar caracteres de valor taxonômico e significado ecológico. Folhas expandidas foram coletadas na região de Alta Floresta, MT. As amostras foram incluídas em metacrilato, cortadas em micrótomo de mesa e corados com azul de toluidina. As lâminas foram montadas em resina sintética ou gelatina glicerinada. Epidermes foliares foram dissociadas e testes histoquímicos aplicados. As plantas observadas neste estudo são epífitas, carnosas e não apresentam pseudobulbos. A epiderme é uniestratificada e delgada com exceção de O. bicornis que é espessa, apresentando cutícula delgada e lisa. As espécies estudadas apresentam folhas anfiestomáticas com os estômatos presentes no mesmo nível das células epidérmicas. Os estômatos geralmente são anomocíticos e tetracíticos em O. myrticola, P. pusilla e P. glossomystax. Em O. bicornis ocorrem tetracítico, anisocítico e actinocítico. As células-guarda são de paredes periclinais espessas e as câmaras subestomática são pequenas, exceto em P. pusilla. Com exceção de O. bicornis, o mesofilo das espécies é heterogêneo, sendo constituído de diferentes tipos de parênquima. Os feixes vasculares são colaterais. As espécies foram consideradas mesófilas.Leaf anatomy of O. bicornis Lindl. ex Benth., O. myrticola Lindl., P. pusilla (L. and P. glossomystax (Rchb. f. was analyzed to identify valuable taxonomic and ecological traits. Expanded leaves were collected in the Alta Floresta, Mato Grosso State, region. Leaf samples embedded in methacrylate were cut with a table microtome and stained with toluidine blue. Slides were mounted in synthetic resin or in glycerin gelatin. Leaf tissues were dissociated and histochemical tests applied. Plants observed in this study are succulent epiphytes without pseudobulbs. The epidermis is uniseriate and thin, with the exception of O. bicornis which has a relatively thick epidermis, and a thin, smooth cuticle. The species have amphistomatic leaves and the stomata are at the same level as the epidermal cells. Stomata are generally anomocytic and tetracytic in O. myrticola, P. pusilla and P. glossomystax. O. bicornis has tetracytic, anisocytic and actinocytic stomata. Guard cells have thick periclinal walls and small substomatic chambers, except in P. pusilla. With the exception of O. bicornis, species have heterogeneous mesophyll with different types of parenchyma. All vascular bundles are collateral. The species are mesophytic.

  11. Gracilaria, Subgenus Textoriella (Gracilariaceae, Rhodophyta in the Gulf of Mexico and the Mexican Caribbean Gracilaria, subgénero Textoriella (Gracilariaceae, Rhodophyta en el golfo de México y el Caribe mexicano

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    Kurt M. Dreckmann

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Four species of Gracilaria (Gracilariaceae, Rhodophyta with textorii-type spermatangial conceptacles (subgenus Textoriella Yamamoto are recorded for the Gulf of Mexico and the Mexican Caribbean: Gracilaria blodgettii, G. cervicornis, G. mammillaris, and G. tikvahiae. The general distribution of the subgenus for Central America, both Pacific and Atlantic, displays a disjunct pattern explainable based on the geologic vicariant events that interrupted the connection between Pacific and Atlantic at the Isthmuses of Panama (closed 3.1-2.8 million years ago, and Tehuantepec (southern Mexico, closed 4-3.5 million years ago. Gracilaria cuneata/G. crispata, and G. mammillaris (G. hayi/G. veleroae are 2 pairs of sibling species, or sister taxa, that diverged as a result of the final emergence of the Isthmus, and of the same age as the Central American Isthmus itself.Se registran 4 especies de Gracilaria (Gracilariaceae, Rhodophyta con conceptáculos espematangiales tipo textorii- (subgénero Textoriella Yamamoto para el golfo de México y Caribe mexicano: Gracilaria blodgettii, G. cervicornis, G. mammillaris y G. tikvahiae. La distribución general del subgénero para Atlántico y Pacífico de Centroamérica despliega un patrón disyunto explicable por los eventos geológicos vicariantes que interrumpieron la conexión entre Pacífico y Atlántico en los istmos de Panamá (cerrado hace aprox. 3.1-2.8 millones de años y Tehuantepec (sur de México, cerrado hace aprox. 4-3.5 millones de años. Gracilaria cuneata/G. crispata y G. mammillaris (= G. hayi/ G. veleroae corresponden a 2 pares de especies hermanas que divergieron como resultado de la emersión del istmo, y con aproximadamente la misma edad del istmo centroamericano.

  12. Anatomia do escapo floral de espécies brasileiras de Paepalanthus subgênero Platycaulon (Eriocaulaceae Anatomy of the inflorescence scape of Brazilian species of the Paepalanthus subgenus Platycaulon (Eriocaulaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lucia Scatena

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Foi estudada a anatomia dos escapos de 17 espécies de Paepalanthus subgênero Platycaulon, sendo 10 da sect. Divisi e sete da sect. Conferti. O trabalho foi realizado para caracterizar anatomicamente os escapos. como contribuição para o entendimento do grupo, uma vez que. morfologicamente, esse é o caráter laxonômico mais importante. Procurou-se, também, confirmar ou não o reconhecimento das duas seções dentro do subgênero. Para os estudos anatômicos utilizou-se material proveniente do Brasil, obtido de exsicatas de diferentes herbários e/ou coletado na Serra do Cipó, MG. Neste trabalho observou-se que Paepalanthus subg. Platycaulon é caracterizado morfologicamente por apresentar escapos pluricapitulados no ápice. Anatomicamente, as espécies estudadas da sect. Divisi apresentam escapos com vários cilindros vasculares, na região mediana e, ainda apresentam, em Paepalanthus vellozioides e P. spixianus, feixes vasculares corticais, características únicas na família. Diferentemente, as espécies avaliadas da sect. Conferti apresentam escapos com cilindro vascular único na região mediana, padrão análogo ao das demais Eriocaulaccae, e ainda apresentam, em Paepalanthus itatiaiensis, P. planifolius e P. paulensis, feixes vasculares medulares, que até então não haviam sido referidos para a família.The scape anatomy of 17 taxa of Paepalanthus subgenus Platycaylon were studied, being 10 taxa of sect. Divisi and seven of sect. Conferti. The study was carried out to see whether scape morphology and anatomy provide valid taxonomic characters at the subgeneric level in Paepalanthus and to lest a proposal to recognize two sections within Paepalanthus subgenus Platycaylon: sect. Divisi and sect. Conferti. The material for anatomical study was collected in Brazil, partly from herbarium specimens and partly from fresh material collected in the field, from the Serra do Cipó. Minas Gerais State. In this work, we observe that

  13. Fine-scale phylogenetic structure and major events in the history of the current wild soybean (Glycine soja) and taxonomic assignment of semi-wild type (Glycine gracilis Skvortz.) within the Chinese subgenus Soja.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke-Jing; Li, Xiang-Hua; Liu, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Wild and cultivated species of soybeans have coexisted for 5000 years in China. Despite this long history, there is very little information on the genetic relationship of Glycine soja and G. max. To gain insight into the major events in the history of the subgenus Soja, we examined 20 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers of a large number of accessions (910). The results showed no significant differences between wild and semi-wild soybeans in genetic diversity but significant differences between G. soja and G. max. Ancestry and cluster analyses revealed that semi-wild soybeans should belong to the wild category and not to G. max. Our results also showed that differentiation had occurred not only among G. soja, G. gracilis, and G. max but also within G. soja and within G. gracilis. Glycine soja had 3 clear genetic categories: typical small-seeded (≤2.0 g 100-seed weight), dual-origin middle-seeded (2.0-2.5 g), and large-seeded plants (2.51-3.0 g). These last were genetically close to G. gracilis, their defining some traits having been acquired mainly by introgression from soybeans. Small-seeded G. gracilis (3.01-3.5 g) were genetically different from larger seeded ones (from 3.51 to 4.0 to over 10 g). Seed size predominated over seed coat color in evolutionary degree. Typical and large-seeded G. soja were found to have 0.7% and 12% introgressive cultivar genes, respectively. The genetic boundary of G. gracilis was at the range of 2.51-3.0 g of G. soja. In the great majority of wild accessions, traits such as white flowers, gray pubescences, no-seed bloom, and colored seed coats were likely introgressive from domesticated soybeans.

  14. Single step polymerase chain reaction (PCR for the diagnosis of the Leishmania (Viannia subgenus Reação de polimerização em cadeia (PCR em etapa única para diagnóstico de Leishmania do subgênero (Viannia

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    Byanca Regina Paiva

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, the main etiologic agent of Leishmaniasis that frequently presents with mucosal involvement belongs to the Viannia subgenus. The therapeutic conduct in this disease depends on the parasitological diagnosis, and classical methods are restricted in identifying the agent. In this paper we describe a polymerase chain reaction (PCR, which uses primers designed from mini-exons repetitive sequences. The PCR amplifies a 177bp fragment that can distinguish (Viannia from (Leishmania subgenus. This test could be a useful diagnostic tool.No Brasil, o principal agente etiológico da leishmaniose, apresentando freqüentemente comprometimento das mucosas, pertence ao subgênero (Viannia. A conduta terapêutica no tratamento da leishmaniose depende de seu diagnóstico parasitológico e os métodos clássicos restringem sua identificação. Neste trabalho, descrevemos uma reação de PCR, utilizando primers desenhados a partir de seqüências repetitivas de mini-exons, que amplificam um fragmento de 177pb e que são capazes de distinguir o subgênero (Viannia do subgênero (Leishmania, tornando-se uma ferramenta útil no diagnóstico desta doença.

  15. FILOGENIA DE ESPECIES DEL SUBGENERO Parides (LEPIDOPTERA: PAPILIONIDAE BASADA EN SECUENCIAS DEL GEN CITOCROMO OXIDASA I Species phylogeny of the Subgenus Parides (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae Based in Sequences of Citochrome Oxidase I Gene

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    INGRID MARCELA GUTIÉRREZ R

    2012-12-01

    Colombia where the biota of North and South America converge. This work presents a phylogenetic hypothesis of these butterflies and proposes a more robust definition of some taxa. For this, 15 taxa of the subgenus Parides were analyzed as ingroup; species of other two genera of Troidini, closer to Parides , were used as out-group. DNA was extracted using the Pascual et al. (1997 protocol and Quiagen DNAeasy kit. A terminal fragment of Cytochrome Oxidase I gen (476 bp were amplified. We obtained a phylogenetic approximation using maximum parsimony and evaluated the branch support with Jackknife and absolute Bremer support. We also conducted a bayesian analysis. The resulting phylogenetic hypothesis suggested that Parides is a paraphyletic group; the molecular evidence support one species and five subspecies. The analyzed taxa were divided in three principal groups coincident with the Lysander (group 1 and Aeneas (groups 1 and 2 groups proposed by Rothschild and Jordan (1906.

  16. Wolfgang U. Dressler. Morphonology: the dynamics of derivation. Ann Arbor, založba Karoma. 1985. - 439 strani.

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    Janez Orešnik

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available Leto 1985 je prineslo jezikoslovju precej znanstvene bere, dobre in slabe. Med dobro zasluži posebno pozornost knjiga Oblikoglasje dunajskega jezikoslovca Wolfganga U. Dresslerja. V knjigi je zbrano praktično vse, kar se ve o oblikoglasju ( = morfonologiji, pregledno in urejeno. Pisec knjige se postavlja na stališče, da ni v opisni slovnici poleg glasnikoslovja (=fonologije, oblikoslovja, skladnje itd. še posebnega oddelka oblikoglasje, temveč je le-to zgolj prehodno področje med glasnikoslovjem in oblikoslovjem. Spričo tega je razumljivo, da je v knjigi veliko govora tudi o tem dvojem, zlasti o glasnikoslovju. Nekatere obravnavane zadeve so bolj ali manj že znane, druge so nove. Prikazovati novo v tako obsežnem delu (439 strani je seveda težka naloga, podpisani sem si jo olajšal tako, da sem za prikaz izbral samo eno vprašanje: kako se dajo nekatere glasnikoslovne (=fonološke značilnosti izvajati iz znakoslovnih (=semiotičnih zakonitosti.

  17. A sugar pine consensus map: Comparative mapping between the Pinus subgenus Pinus and the subgenus Strobus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen D. Jermstad; Andrew J. Eckert; Bohun B. Kinloch; Dean A. Davis; Deems C. Burton; Annette D. Mix; Jill L. Wegrzyn; David B. Neale

    2011-01-01

    We have constructed a consensus genetic linkage map for sugar pine using three mapping populations that segregate for resistance to white pine blister rust, a disease caused by the fungal pathogen Cronartium ribicola. The major gene of resistance, Cr1, was mapped in two of the populations and included in the consensus map, which contains 400 markers organized into 19...

  18. In vitro activity of 2-pyridinecarboxylic acid against trypanosomes of the subgenus Schizotrypanum isolated from the bat Phyllostomus hastatus = Atividade in vitro do ácido 2-piridinocarboxílico em tripanossoma do subgênero Schizotrypanum isolado do morcego Phyllostomus hastatus

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    Paulo Roberto Ceridóreo Corrêa

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of 2-pyridinecarboxylic acid (picolinic acid on trypanosomes of the subgenus Schizotrypanum isolated from the bat Phyllostomus hastatus was determined in this study. Picolinic acid, at 50 ƒÊg mL-1, inhibited epimastigote growth by 99% after 12 days incubation. In addition, trypomastigote motility decreased by 50% after 6h and completely after 24h in the presence of 50 ƒÊg mL-1 picolinic acid. The 50% cytotoxic concentration on HEp-2 cell line was275 ƒÊg mL-1 after 4 days incubation. Altogether, these results indicate higher toxicity against trypanosomes. The inhibitory effect of picolinic acid on epimastigote growth can be partially reversed by nicotinic acid and L-tryptophan, suggesting a competitive inhibition. Furthermore, two anti-Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum cruzi drugs were also evaluated with regard to bat trypanosome growth. Benznidazole, at 50 ƒÊg mL-1, inhibited epimastigote growth by 90% after 12 days incubation. Nifurtimox, at the same concentration, caused 96% growth inhibition after four days incubation. Corroborating a previous study, bat trypanosomes are a good model for screening new trypanocidal compounds. Moreover, they can be used to study many biological processes common to human pathogenic trypanosomatids.O efeito do acido 2- piridinocarboxilico (acido picolinico sobre um tripanossoma do subgenero Schizotrypanum isolado do morcego Phyllostomus hastatus foi determinado neste estudo. O acido picolinico, na concentracao de 50 ƒÊg mL-1, inibiu 99% do crescimento de epimastigotas apos 12 dias de incubacao. Alem disso, houve um decrescimo de 50 e 100% na mobilidade dos tripomastigotas apos 6 e 24h, respectivamente, em presenca de acido picolinico na concentracao de 50 ƒÊg mL-1. A concentracao citotoxica 50% para celulas HEp-2 foi de 275 ƒÊg mL-1 apos quatro dias de incubacao. Esses resultados indicam maior toxicidade contra os tripanossomas. O efeito inibitoriodo acido picolinico sobre o crescimento de

  19. Pollen morphology of some Geranium subgenus Robertium species of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Keshavarzi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Geranium (Geraniaceae comprises more than 23 annual or perennial species in Iran. There is no study in Iran with pollen morphology emphasize. The main aim of this study is to find diagnostic pollen characters in studied species. Totally 40 accessions of five species (G. albanum, G. molle, G. purpureum, G. mascatense and G. pusillum were collected. Pollen grains were studied by use of light and Scanning electron microscopy. To reveal the species relationships different multivariate statistical methods were used. The pollen grains were monad, isopolar, radially symmetric and of spheroid, prolate-spheroid or oblate-spheroid classes. The main ornamentation type was clavate, however reticulate but striate was also observed. All sections are clearly separated by their pollen features except of Batrachioidea which show confusion with Ruberta. Species relationship is discussed.

  20. A new subgenus of the Coleopterous family Drilidae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorham, H.S.

    1883-01-01

    Generi Diplocladon Gorham 1) valde affine, sed antennae simpliciter pectinatae. Antennae duodecimi-articulatae, articulo basali valido subquadrato, secundo brevi quam hoc dimidio minore, tertio triangulari, angulo interno ramum emittente; quarto ad undecimum perbrevibus, latitudine haud longioribus,

  1. A revision of the genus Inocybe in Europe. I. Subgenus Inosperma and the smooth-spored species of subgenus Inocybe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuyper, Th.W.

    1986-01-01

    Fries (1821: 11) established Agaricus series Derminus tribus Inocybe, which was later elevated by him to generic rank (Fries, 1863: 346). Originally Fries based his circumscription of Inocybe solely on macroscopical characters; when it was raised to generic status Fries added that the spores of all

  2. Medical Entomology Studies - XVI. A Review of the Species of Subgenus Verrallina, Genus Aedes, from Sri Lanka and a Revised Description of the Subgenus (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    features can usually be found to identify specimens from a specific geographical area because only a few species are usually found in any one area...arboviruses of known (Kunjin, Murray Valley encephalitis, Ross River ) or suspected (Sepik) medical importance as well as others (Corriparta...28.10.99, Selangor , A. L. Butler; K. Selangor (mangroves) swarming; Klang jungle, Sept. [on the underside of a circular paper stage on which the

  3. Mycotoxins, drugs and other extrolites produced by species in Penicillium subgenus Penicillium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jens Christian; Smedsgaard, Jørn; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    2004-01-01

    by 13 species, penicillic acid which is produced by 10 species, and terrestric acid and 2-methyl isoborneol that are produced by 8 species. Most species produce both polyketides, terpenes and amino acid derived extrolites and a large number of the species produce bioactive metabolites. The nephrotoxic...

  4. A revision of the Solanum elaeagnifolium clade (Elaeagnifolium clade; subgenus Leptostemonum, Solanaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Sandra; Sagona, Eva; Carbonell, Anna K.Z.; Chiarini, Franco

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The Solanum elaeagnifolium clade (Elaeagnifolium clade) contains five species of small, often rhizomatous, shrubs from deserts and dry forests in North and South America. Members of the clade were previously classified in sections Leprophora, Nycterium and Lathyrocarpum, and were not thought to be closely related. The group is sister to the species-rich monophyletic Old World clade of spiny solanums. The species of the group have an amphitropical distribution, with three species in Mexico and the southwestern United States and three species in Argentina. Solanum elaeagnifolium occurs in both North and South America, and is a noxious invasive weed in dry areas worldwide. Members of the group are highly variable morphologically, and this variability has led to much synonymy, particularly in the widespread S. elaeagnifolium. We here review the taxonomic history, morphology, relationships and ecology of these species and provide keys for their identification, descriptions, full synonymy (including designations of lectotypes) and nomenclatural notes. Illustrations, distribution maps and preliminary conservation assessments are provided for all species. PMID:29033654

  5. Pollen morphology of Quercus (subgenus Quercus, section Quercus in Iran and its systematic implication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Panahi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available For the first time, pollen morphology of 9 (4 spp. and 5 subspp. taxa representing lobed leaved oaks of Iran in the family of Fagaceae has been examined and illustrated using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of acetolysed material. Detailed pollen morphological characteristics are given for Quercus section. The pollen grains are single, isopolar, radially symmetrical, tricolpate, tricolporoidate or tricolporate. Pollens were studied to show all possible characteristics like shape, size, apertures, wall thickness, etc., with special reference to the specific features of each pollen type such as structural, sculptural and suprasculptural patterns. There is considerable variation in pollen morphology between taxa so that, three types of pollen shape, five types of structural pattern, two types of sculptural pattern, five types of suprasculptural pattern and three types of perfora distribution are defined. Furthermore, the relationship between pollen morphology and taxonomy is discussed. Overall, pollen characters are shown to be a useful and informative tool for assessing taxonomic position within Quercus section in Iran.

  6. The Genus Culex, Subgenus Eumelanomyia Theobald in Southeast Asia and Adjacent Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    tergal surface; subapical lobe short or elon or sma 1; distimere slender, sickle shaped and long; B ate; proximal division with 3 stout rods...Nok, 1 P. Tak: Huey Lan Saeng, 6d, 69, 12 p. Nakhon Ratchasima: Pak Chong; Musk Lek; Ban Tha Ma Prang; Khlong Pai; Khao Suan Horn; 7~r, 9?, 1 P, 7 p

  7. Argyritarsis Section of the Subgenus Nyssorhynchus of Anopheles (Diptera: Culicidae). Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Locality not specified, IM gen (JH). Goias: Santo Theresa, 22 Nov 1918, Peryassu, IM (JH). Para: Altamira Area, 7 Jun 1976, Moramy, 4F (M-1). Boa Vista...430. 1944. Um ano de combate os doencas parasitarias que atacam os rodoviarios da estrada Rio Bahia, 1942 o 1943. Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz Rio de J

  8. A Revision of the Argyritarsis Section of the Subgenus Nyssorhynchus of Anopheles (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    May 1929, Fortaleza, 1 Ice, Causey, 22 Nov 1918, (M-l). Boa locality and (1200-102); 1F (JH); same locality, 27 March 1931, H. Kumm, 11F (JH...do Brasil. Mem. Inst. Oswald0 Cruz Rio de J. 34:293-430. 1944. Urn ano de combate OS doencas parasitarias que atacam OS rodoviarios da estrada Rio

  9. Systematics of Ipomoea subgenus Quamoclit (Convolvulaceae) based on ITS sequence data and a Bayesian phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Richard E; McDonald, J Andrew; Manos, Paul S

    2004-08-01

    A Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of 36 Ipomoea species using sequence data from the internal transcribed spacer region was compared with classification schemes based on traditional methods and a previously published cpDNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) study. These molecular studies support a diversity of groups that were circumscribed on the basis of phenetic principles and agree generally with the results from cpDNA RFLP analyses. The congruence between the phylogenetic hypotheses based on new molecular data and the understanding of relationships developed in earlier studies indicate that these classifications may reflect evolutionary history. Two large clades of species, with one including sections Tricolores, Calonyction, and Pharbitis and the other including sections Mina and Leptocallis, were identified. Furthermore, morphologically distinct groups of Ipomoea species received support from the DNA sequence data. Indices of convergence for the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) in the Bayesian phylogenetic analysis were evaluated. A limited range of posterior probabilities for each node in the trees from a set of five MCMC samples provides a useful index of convergence. Bayesian node support values were generally higher than bootstrap values from a maximum parsimony analysis. This is consistent with the notion that these measures of support estimate different qualities of the data.

  10. Studies in the genus Riccia (Marchantiales from southern Africa. 24. R. moenkemeyeri, subgenus Ricciella: new records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Perold

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Riccia moenkemeyeri was twice described by Stephani (1887, 1891, the second time as R abnormis. Amell (1952 described it as R. undulata. It is clearly a plastic species (Jones 1957 and is widely distributed in tropical Africa, from Sierra Leone (as R. undulata, Nigeria, Cameroon and into the Congo Basin. Until recendy, Sim’s specimens from the Matopos in Zimbabwe, were the most southerly records known, but the species has now also been collected in southern Africa, just east of Pretoria and at Kransberg, in the western Transvaal.

  11. Phylogeny of xerophilic aspergilli (subgenus Aspergillus and taxonomic revision of section Restricti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sklenář

    2017-09-01

    The vast majority of species in sect. Restricti produce asperglaucide, asperphenamate or both in contrast to species in sect. Aspergillus. Mycophenolic acid was detected for the first time in at least six members of the section. The ascomata of A. halophilicus do not contain auroglaucin, epiheveadride or flavoglaucin which are common in sect. Aspergillus, but shares the echinulins with sect. Aspergillus.

  12. A note on Combretum subgenus Combretum section Macrostigmatea (Com-bretaceae

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    E. F. Hennessy

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available The history of Combretum section Macrostigmatea, its circumscription and its representation in the Flora of southern Africa region are provided. A specimen from northern Botswana, Miller B/1199. initially misidentified as C. engleri. is shown to be C. kirkii, the first record of this taxon in the  FSA region.  Combretum mkuzense is placed in synonymy in C.  zeyheri section Spathulipetala.

  13. A revision of the Solanum elaeagnifolium clade (Elaeagnifolium clade; subgenus Leptostemonum, Solanaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Knapp

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Solanum elaeagnifolium clade (Elaeagnifolium clade contains five species of small, often rhizomatous, shrubs from deserts and dry forests in North and South America. Members of the clade were previously classified in sections Leprophora, Nycterium and Lathyrocarpum, and were not thought to be closely related. The group is sister to the species-rich monophyletic Old World clade of spiny solanums. The species of the group have an amphitropical distribution, with three species in Mexico and the southwestern United States and three species in Argentina. Solanum elaeagnifolium occurs in both North and South America, and is a noxious invasive weed in dry areas worldwide. Members of the group are highly variable morphologically, and this variability has led to much synonymy, particularly in the widespread S. elaeagnifolium. We here review the taxonomic history, morphology, relationships and ecology of these species and provide keys for their identification, descriptions, full synonymy (including designations of lectotypes and nomenclatural notes. Illustrations, distribution maps and preliminary conservation assessments are provided for all species.

  14. A new species of subgenus Seriphidium of Artemisia L. (Asteraceae) from Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    KURŞAT, Murat; CİVELEK, Şemsettin; TÜRKOĞLU, İsmail; TABUR, Selma; GÜR, Nazmi

    2015-01-01

    Artemisia bashkalensis Kurşat & Civelek sp. nov. from Hakkari Province in East Anatolia, Turkey, has been described. The differences between Artemisia bashkalensis and the related species Artemisia stenocephala Krash. ex Poljak. and Artemisia khorassanica Podl. are reported. The diagnosis, description, distribution map, and taxonomic comments on the new species are provided.

  15. The mode and tempo of genome size evolution in the subgenus Sophophora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelmen, Carl E; Johnston, J Spencer

    2017-01-01

    Genome size varies widely across organisms, with no apparent tie to organismal complexity. While genome size is inherited, there is no established evolutionary model for this trait. Hypotheses have been postulated for the observed variation in genome sizes across species, most notably the effective population size hypothesis, the mutational equilibrium hypothesis, and the adaptive hypothesis. While much data has been collected on genome size, the above hypotheses have largely ignored impacts from phylogenetic relationships. In order to test these competing hypotheses, genome sizes of 87 Sophophora species were analyzed in a comparative phylogenetic approach using Pagel's parameters of evolution, Blomberg's K, Abouheif's Cmean and Moran's I. In addition to testing the mode and rate of genome size evolution in Sophophora species, the effect of number of taxa on detection of phylogenetic signal was analyzed for each of these comparative phylogenetic methods. Sophophora genome size was found to be dependent on the phylogeny, indicating that evolutionary time was important for predicting the variation among species. Genome size was found to evolve gradually on branches of the tree, with a rapid burst of change early in the phylogeny. These results suggest that Sophophora genome size has experienced gradual changes, which support the largely theoretical mutational equilibrium hypothesis. While some methods (Abouheif's Cmean and Moran's I) were found to be affected by increasing taxa numbers, more commonly used methods (λ and Blomberg's K) were found to have increasing reliability with increasing taxa number, with significantly more support with fifteen or more taxa. Our results suggest that these comparative phylogenetic methods, with adequate taxon sampling, can be a powerful way to uncover the enigma that is genome size variation through incorporation of phylogenetic relationships.

  16. A new species of the subgenus Scymnus from Pakistan (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Azad; Chen, Xiaosheng; Qiu, Baoli; Wang, Xingmin

    2017-01-01

    A new species, Scymnus (Scymnus) contortubus Rashid, Chen & Wang, sp. n. , is described and illustrated from Pakistan. A diagnosis, remarks, illustrations, and a distribution map are provided of the new species and its most similar congener, S. (S..) nubilus Mulsant.

  17. Phylogeny of xerophilic aspergilli (subgenus Aspergillus ) and taxonomic revision of section Restricti

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sklenář, F.; Jurjević, Ž.; Zalar, P.

    2017-01-01

    a multidisciplinary approach for definition of species boundaries in sect. Restricti. The monophyly of sections Aspergillus and Restricti was tested on a set of 102 isolates comprising all currently accepted species and was strongly supported by Maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian inferrence (BI) analysis based on β......-tubulin (benA), calmodulin (CaM) and RNA polymerase II second largest subunit (RPB2) loci. More than 300 strains belonging to sect. Restricti from various isolation sources and four continents were characterized by DNA sequencing, and 193 isolates were selected for phylogenetic analyses and phenotypic studies......Cl concentration from 0 to 25 %) and analysis of morphology including scanning electron microscopy. The micromorphology of conidial heads, vesicle dimensions, temperature profiles and growth parameters in osmotic gradient were useful criteria for species identification. The vast majority of species in sect...

  18. Genepool Variation in Genus Glycine Subgenus Soja Revealed by Polymorphic Nuclear and Chloroplast Microsatellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, W.; Morgante, M.; Doyle, J. J.; McNicol, J. W.; Tingey, S. V.; Rafalski, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    A combination of nuclear and chloroplast simple sequence repeats (SSRs) have been used to investigate the levels and pattern of variability detected in Glycine max and G. soja genotypes. Based on the analysis of 700 soybean genotypes with 115 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) probes, 12 accessions were identified that represent 92% of the allelic variability detected in this genepool. These 12 core genotypes together with a sample of G. max and G. soja accessions were evaluated with 11 nuclear SSRs that detected 129 alleles. Compared with the other G. max and G. soja genotypes sampled, the core genotypes represent 40% of the allelic variability detected with SSRs. Despite the multi-allelic nature of soybean SSRs, dendrograms representing phenetic relationships between accessions clustered according to their subspecies origin. In addition to biparentally inherited nuclear SSRs, two uniparentally (maternally) transmitted chloroplast SSRs were also studied. A total of seven haplotypes were identified, and diversity indices of 0.405 +/- 0.088 and 0.159 +/- 0.071 were obtained for the two chloroplast SSRs. The availability of polymorphic SSR loci in the chloroplast genome provides new opportunities to investigate cytonuclear interactions in plants. PMID:8889540

  19. Two new species of Otiorhynchus GERMAR, 1822 subgenus Lixorrhynchus REITTER, 1914 from Morocco (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Otiorhynchini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Białooki Piotr Z.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Otiorhynchus (Lixorrhynchus deceptorius sp. n. and O. (L. incisus sp. n. from northern Morocco are described and illustrated. Both new species are superficially similar to Mirorhynchus bellus MAGNANO, 2003 based on the conspicuously laterally incised rostrum. The erroneous indication of M. bellus from Cyprus is corrected here to Crete

  20. Phylogeny of xerophilic aspergilli (subgenus Aspergillus ) and taxonomic revision of section Restricti

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sklenář, F.; Jurjević, Ž.; Zalar, P.

    2017-01-01

    recognised species can be reliably identified by all four examined genetic loci. Phenotype analysis was performed to support the delimitation of new species and includes colony characteristics on seven cultivation media incubated at several temperatures, growth on an osmotic gradient (six media with Na...

  1. Phylogeography and palaeodistribution modelling of Nassauvia subgenus Strongyloma (Asteraceae): exploring phylogeographical scenarios in the Patagonian steppe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicola, Marcela V; Sede, Silvana M; Pozner, Raúl; Johnson, Leigh A

    2014-11-01

    The Patagonian steppe is an immense, cold, arid region, yet phylogeographically understudied. Nassauvia subgen. Strongyloma is a characteristic element of the steppe, exhibiting a continuum of morphological variation. This taxon provides a relevant phylogeographical model not only to understand how past environmental changes shaped the genetic structure of its populations, but also to explore phylogeographical scenarios at the large geographical scale of the Patagonian steppe. Here, we (1) assess demographic processes and historical events that shaped current geographic patterns of haplotypic diversity; (2) analyze hypotheses of isolation in refugia, fragmentation of populations, and/or colonization of available areas during Pleistocene glaciations; and (3) model extant and palaeoclimatic distributions to support inferred phylogeographical patterns. Chloroplast intergenic spacers, rpl32-trnL and trnQ-5'rps16, were sequenced for 372 individuals from 63 populations. Nested clade analysis, analyses of molecular variance, and neutrality tests were performed to assess genetic structure and range expansion. The present potential distribution was modelled and projected onto a last glacial maximum (LGM) model. Of 41 haplotypes observed, ten were shared among populations associated with different morphological variants. Populations with highest haplotype diversity and private haplotypes were found in central-western and south-eastern Patagonia, consistent with long-term persistence in refugia during Pleistocene. Palaeomodelling suggested a shift toward the palaeoseashore during LGM; new available areas over the exposed Atlantic submarine platform were colonized during glaciations with postglacial retraction of populations. A scenario of fragmentation and posterior range expansion may explain the observed patterns in the center of the steppe, which is supported by palaeomodelling. Northern Patagonian populations were isolated from southern populations by the Chubut and the Deseado river basins during glaciations. Pleistocene glaciations indirectly impacted the distribution, demography, and diversification of subgen. Strongyloma through decreased winter temperatures and water availability in different areas of its range.

  2. Cortinarius prodigiosus—a new species of the subgenus Phlegmacium from Central Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borovička, Jan; Bušek, Bohumil; Mikšík, Michal

    2015-01-01

    A new species, Cortinarius prodigiosus, is reported from the Czech Republic and Hungary. This medium-sized Phlegmacium is distinguished by a yellow pileus and lower part of stipe, by greyish-violet lamellae, and by strikingly bicolorous flesh: yellow in most parts of stipe and whitish in pileus. ....... On the basis of its morphological and molecular characters (ITS rDNA and LSU D1/D2 domain), this novel taxon can be assigned to the Splendentes group of the section Calochroi; it occurs in thermophilous oak forests on calcareous bedrock....

  3. Systematics and biogeography of the ant genus Crematogaster Lund subgenus Orthocrema Santschi in Asia (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hosoishi, Shingo; Ogata, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    .... Its systematics has remained poorly understood because of a lack of modern revisionary work. Crematogaster ( Orthocrema) is revised for the A sian region, and 27 species including ten new species are recognized...

  4. Flora Malesiana precursor for the treatment of Moraceae 3: Ficus subgenus Ficus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, C.C.

    2003-01-01

    The sections of Ficus L. subg. Ficus are described and their Malesian species listed and a key to their identification is provided. One new subsection is established: Ficus subg. Ficus sect. Eriosycea subsect. Auratae. Four new species and two new subspecies are described: F. auricoma, F.

  5. 77 FR 70414 - White River National Forest; Eagle County, CO; Vail Mountain Recreation Enhancements Projects EIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ...: Scott Fitzwilliams, Forest Supervisor, c/o Don Dressler, Winter Sports Administrator, White River... information related to the proposed project can be obtained from: Don Dressler, Winter Sports Administrator... a recreation-based economy, the Vail Valley both relies on, and attracts, large numbers of visitors...

  6. Systematics and biogeography of Orconectes, subgenus Trisellescens, in the southeastern United States, a test of morphology-based classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher A. Taylor; Susan B. Adams; Guenter A. Schuster

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosable taxonomic units are fundamental to conservation biology and management of resources and the need for sound science in both fields is more pressing for aquatic ecosystems. Within freshwater crayfishes, the North American genus Orconectes is one of the most diverse in the World. Accurate assessments of species level relationships and species boundaries within...

  7. Resurrecting a subgenus to genus: molecular phylogeny of Euphyllia and Fimbriaphyllia (order Scleractinia; family Euphyllidae; clade V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina S. Luzon

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background The corallum is crucial in building coral reefs and in diagnosing systematic relationships in the order Scleractinia. However, molecular phylogenetic analyses revealed a paraphyly in a majority of traditional families and genera among Scleractinia showing that other biological attributes of the coral, such as polyp morphology and reproductive traits, are underutilized. Among scleractinian genera, the Euphyllia, with nine nominal species in the Indo-Pacific region, is one of the groups that await phylogenetic resolution. Multiple genetic markers were used to construct the phylogeny of six Euphyllia species, namely E. ancora, E. divisa, E. glabrescens, E. paraancora, E. paradivisa, and E. yaeyamaensis. The phylogeny guided the inferences on the contributions of the colony structure, polyp morphology, and life history traits to the systematics of the largest genus in Euphyllidae (clade V and, by extension, to the rest of clade V. Results Analyses of cytochrome oxidase 1 (cox1, cytochrome b (cytb, and β-tubulin genes of 36 colonies representing Euphyllia and a confamilial species, Galaxea fascicularis, reveal two distinct groups in the Euphyllia that originated from different ancestors. Euphyllia glabrescens formed a separate group. Euphyllia ancora, E. divisa, E. paraancora, E. paradivisa, and E. yaeyamaensis clustered together and diverged from the same ancestor as G. fascicularis. The 3′-end of the cox1 gene of Euphyllia was able to distinguish morphospecies. Discussion Species of Euphyllia were traditionally classified into two subgenera, Euphyllia and Fimbriaphyllia, which represented a dichotomy on colony structure. The paraphyletic groups retained the original members of the subgenera providing a strong basis for recognizing Fimbriaphyllia as a genus. However, colony structure was found to be a convergent trait between Euphyllia and Fimbriaphyllia, while polyp shape and length, sexuality, and reproductive mode defined the dichotomy better. Species in a genus are distinguished by combining polyp morphology and colony form. The cluster of E. glabrescens of the Euphyllia group is a hermaphroditic brooder with long, tubular tentacles with knob-like tips, and a phaceloid colony structure. The Fimbriaphyllia group, with F. paraancora, F. paradivisa, F. ancora, F. divisa, and F. yaeyamaensis, are gonochoric broadcast spawners with short polyps, mixed types of tentacle shapes, and a phaceloid or flabello-meandroid skeleton. Soft-tissue morphology of G. fascicularis and Ctenella chagius were found to be consistent with the dichotomy. Conclusions The paraphyly of the original members of the previous subgenera justify recognizing Fimbriaphyllia as a genus. The integrated approach demonstrates that combining polyp features, reproductive traits, and skeletal morphology is of high systematic value not just to Euphyllia and Fimbriaphyllia but also to clade V; thus, laying the groundwork for resolving the phylogeny of clade V.

  8. Evolution of fruit traits in Ficus subgenus Sycomorus (Moraceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Rhett D.; Rønsted, Nina; Xu, Lei

    2012-01-01

    constructed using 5 kilobases of DNA sequence data from 63 species (50% of global diversity). In particular, we ask whether patterns of trait correlations are consistent with dispersal agents as the primary selective force shaping morphological diversity or if other ecological factors may provide a better...

  9. Transfer of the Subgenus Davismyia from Wyeomyia to Sabethes and Description of the Type Species, Miamyia Petrocchiae (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    Ponte 1928) gave the following information about these specimens but did not indicate where they were deposited: “Localidad del tipo : Tucuman (Race...337-350. Shannon, R.C. 1930. List of species of argentine Cu- Iicidae. Sexta Reunion de la Sociedad Argentina de Patologia Regional de1 Norte. pp

  10. Contributions to the Mosquito Fauna of Southeast Asia. III. The Genus Aedes, Subgenus Neomacleaya Theobald in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-01-01

    It is probable that there are still several unrecognized species within its geographical range. Very little information on adult bionomics is...skins, from about 4 mi. inland along Balsahan River (near Iwahig), Palawan, PHILIPPINES, in the U.S. National Museum. DISTRIBUTION. So far only known...same locality and date as type. DISTRIBUTION. Specimens examined: MALAYA: Selangor , 8 females, 2 males (USNM), 3 females (Bishop); BURMA: Rangoon

  11. Descriptions of Zavortinkius, a New Subgenus of Aedes, and the Eleven Included Species from the Afrotropical Region (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    19 17; Aders 19 17); leaf axils in palms (Haworth 1924); well-shaded rock pools with decaying leaves (Hopkins 1936); treeholes (Harris 1942...axils, seed pods, gutters, rockholes and steps cut in coconut palms (rare), snail shells, tins and wells (exceptional) (van Someren et al. 1955...maladies transmises et methodes de lutte. Mem. Mus. Natl. d’Histoire Nat., Ser. A, 109: 193-246. Collado, J. G. 1936. Culicidos de la Isla de Fernando

  12. Coetzeemyia, a new subgenus of Aedes, and a Redescription of the Holotype Female of Aedes (Coetzeemyia) fryeri (Theobald) (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    a). Etymology. The subgeneric name, Coetzeemyia, honors Prof. (Dr.) Maureen Coetzee (feminine, formed from her surname and myia, the Greek noun for...specimens in the [MRAC/ (CMT)]; Prof. Maureen Coetzee , Vector Control Reference Unit, National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD), Johannesburg

  13. Studies in the genus Riccia (Marchantiales from southern Africa. 8. R. campbelliana (subgenus Riccia, newly recorded for the region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Perold

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available R. campbelliana Howe (1899, a rare species originally known from California and later from Georgia, Arkansas (Jacobs 1951; Wittlake 1954, Kansas and Nebraska (S. Jovet-Ast pers. comm., as well as from Kazakhstan (Ladyzhenskaja 1967, has now also been found at a few localities in southern Africa. It is characterized by the distinctive yellow-brown or rusty colouration of the dorsal surface along the margins and over the proximal parts; enlarged cells, ‘idioblasts', which differ in shape and contents from the adjacent cells, are generally found in all parts of the thallus.

  14. Medical Entomology Studies - XI. The Subgenus Stegomyia of Aedes in the Oriental Region with Keys to the Species (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Inst. Pasteur Indochinie 7: 75-106, 8 pl. Huang: Aedes (Stegomyia) in the Oriental Region 29 BRUG, S. L. 1925. Aanteekeningen omtrent muskieten (III...seta usually 2-branched (2,3), sometimes 4e-X single; no precratal tufts; anal papillae about 2.5-3.0 length of saddle, sausage -like. Siphon. About 1.8

  15. Contributions to the Mosquito Fauna of Southeast Asia. V. Genus Aedes, Subgenus Diceromyia Theobald in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-01-01

    cereal setae absent. PUPA. The pupae of the Oriental species do not, at this time, pre- sent any clear-cut subgeneric characters. They do, however, have...Northern Rhodesia) and from the Oriental Region: BURMA, CEYLON, INDIA(mainland and Nicobar Islands), INDONESIA, WEST MALAYSIA , PHILIPPINES...bearing several teeth and the absence of cereal setae on the paraproct (the characters of the terminalia fit into Section B, Subsec- tion 3 of the

  16. A new species of Oncopeltus Stål, 1868 (Heteroptera: Lygaeidae) in the nominate subgenus from Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faúndez, Eduardo I; Rocca, Javiera R

    2017-03-02

    Oncopeltus Stål is a lygaeine genus currently comprising 39 species classified in two subgenera (Slater & O'Donnell, 1995). Oncopeltus is distributed in both hemispheres in tropical and temperate areas. Species on this genus are commonly known as milkweed bugs, because of their trophic association with plants in the family Apocynaceae (Scudder & Duffey, 1971). From these plants, the bugs sequester cardenolides making them unpalatable for predators (Duffey & Scudder, 1972). These habits are also accompanied with their brightly reddish coloration, which has been interpreted as aposematism (Duffey & Scudder, 1972, O'Rourke, 1979; Faúndez et al., 2016). As these bugs attack several plants in the subfamily Asclepiadoideae; they have an economic impact on several ornamentally used species, and may sometimes be considered as garden pests (Faúndez & Rocca, 2016; Faúndez et al., 2016). Species of this group are also well known for generating some natural hybrids (O'Rourke, 1979); because of this, their systematic treatment at specific level has been confused, and the identity of several taxa remain unclear. The purpose of this contribution is to describe a new species in this genus from Ecuador.

  17. Chromosomal identification of eight species of the subgenus Edwardsellum near and including Simulium (Edwardsellum) damnosum Theobald (Deptera: Simuliidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajime, C G; Dunbar, R W

    1975-03-01

    Examinations of the banding pattern of polytene chromsomes from larval salivary glands of the population in west Africa once thought to be a single species, Simulium (Edwardsellum) damnosum, revealed eight species all within the Nile subgroup of the complex. The following names were proposed: S. (E.) squamosum Enderlein, S. (E.) yahense n.sp., S. (E.) soubrense n.sp., S. (E.) sanctipauli n.sp., S. (E.) dieguerense n.sp., S. (E.) damnosum Theobald, S. (E.) sirbanum n.sp. and S. (E.) sudanense n.sp. Micromorphological characters by which there species are distinguished include interspecific inversions, different sets of intraspecific inversions, different sets of sex chromosomes and a few micromorphological features other than the banding pattern. By following the logical sequential development of interspecific inversions both a key to the species and a phylogenetic chart have been drawn up. Analysis of the proportions of alternate sequences for random distribution or not with ther Hardy-Weinberg equation have confirmed the existance of distinct populations, uncovered an example of incipient speciation and showed the existance of a genetic variant of S. damnosum which could possible colonize below dams.

  18. The Indo-Australian species of the genus Ropalidia (Icaria) (Hymenoptera, Vespidae) (Second Part)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vecht, van der J.

    1962-01-01

    CONTENTS Page Introduction................... 3 Subgenus Anthreneida White (supplement to previous revision in "Treubia", vol. 18, 1941).................. 4 Subgenus Paraicaria Gribodo.............. 37 Subgenus Icarielia Dalla Torre.............. 41 Literature................... 71 Index

  19. As espécies de Euglossa Latreille do nordeste de São Paulo (Apidae, Euglossinae The species of Euglossa Latreille from the northeast of São Paulo, Brazil (Apidae, Euglossinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Macário Rebelo

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available A key and short descriptions are given to the males of the eleven species of Euglossa Latreillle, 1802. collected in cineole; eugenol and vanillin in natural forest reserves of the Northeast of São Paulo State (Cajuru, Sertãozinho, Dumont, Ribeirão Preto, Luís Antônio and Pedregulho. Namely: E. imperialis Cockerell. 1922; E. annectans Dressler. 1982; E. pleosticta Dressler. 1982; E. townsendi Cockerell. 1904; E. melanotricha Moure, 1967; E. cordata (Linaeus, 1758; E. securigera Dressler, 1982; E. fimbriata. sp.n.; E. leucotricha. sp.n.; E. truncata, sp.n. and E. violaceifrons, sp.n..

  20. Consensus Through Conversation How to Achieve High-Commitment Decisions

    CERN Document Server

    Dressler, Larry

    2006-01-01

    Facilitation expert Larry Dressler's Consensus Through Conversation is a guide for the effective facilitation and practice of one of business's most popular - but most widely misunderstood - decision-making models: consensus.

  1. Papers and Studies in Contrastive Linguistics, Volume Twenty Four.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisiak, Jacek, Ed.

    This collection of studies in contrastive linguistics includes the following: "Bilingual Intralinguistic Orthographic Interference" (Philip A. Luelsdorff); "Reassociation of Sentence Melodies" (Wolfgang U. Dressler, Lavinia Merlini Barbaresi); "English Word Stress and Empty Vowel Slots" (Grazyna Rowicka);…

  2. Post-MI pericarditis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post-MI pericarditis is inflammation of the pericardium (the sac-like covering of the heart). Any previous injury to the heart muscle can cause pericarditis. Incidences of pericarditis are associated with Dressler's syndrome, ...

  3. Western Palaearctic Ectoedemia (Zimmermannia) Hering and Ectoedemia Busck s. str. (Lepidoptera: Nepticulidae): five new species and new data on distribution, hostplants and recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieukerken, van E.J.; Laštůvka, A.; Laštůvka, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The nine western Palaearctic species of the subgenus Zimmermannia Hering, 1940 and 48 species in the subgenus Ectoedemia Busck, 1907 of the genus Ectoedemia are reviewed. One species in the subgenus Zimmermannia and four species in the subgenus Ectoedemia are described as new: Ectoedemia

  4. Delineation of Culicoides species by morphology and barcode exemplified by three new species of the subgenus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Achim; Kristensen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) cause biting nuisance to livestock and humans and are vectors of a range of pathogens of medical and veterinary importance. Despite their economic significance, the delineation and identification of species where only morphology is co...

  5. The Subgenus Stegomyia of Aedes in the Afrotropical Region. 2. The Dendrophilus Group of Species (Diptera: Culicidae) (Contributions of the American Entomological Institute. Volume 29, Number 4, 1997)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    tree forks, cut bamboos, leaf axils of Dracaena hookeriana, banana, pineapple , lily; bored bamboos, rot holes, stump holes, fern tree, bamboo stump...Antenna short, less than 0.5 length of head, without spicules; seta 1-A inserted in apical 0.5 of shaft, single; inner mouthbrushes apically pectinate ...92/617) [USNM]; same data except 27-V-1985, Huang & Pecor, leaf axils ( pineapple ), partially shaded, 3 M, 3 F, 6 individual rearings (4 1, 6 p) (SAMP

  6. Sôbre a biomassa dos Anopheles do subgênero kerteszia, em seus criadouros The biomass of Anopheles from the Kerteszia subgenus, in their breeding places

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario B. Aragão

    1968-01-01

    Full Text Available A biomassa média nos criadouros foi calculada com base na quase-constância das razões de crescimento das formas jovens dos insetos e no número médio de larvas de cada estádio. O exame do ciclo anual da biomassa média de cinco populações de Anopheles do subgênero Kerteszia confirmou a observação anterior de que êsses mosquitos, na natureza, têm desenvolvimento muito lento. Nesse estudo, também, ficou evidente que a densidade larvária, como é clàssicamente calculada, dividindo o total de larvas coletadas pelo número de criadouros positivos, é um índice impróprio para representar as potencialidades dos criadouros dêsses anofelinos. O número médio de larvas de 4º estádio, por criadouro positivo, revelou-se um índice muito melhor. A curva do seu ciclo anual é aproximadamente paralela à da biomassa e, por isso, o autor sugere que, em trabalhos posteriores, se conte apenas as formas jovens da última idade.The average biomass in the breeding places has been calculated on the basis of the near constant ratio of the young forms growing and the average number of each stage. The study of the annual cicle of the average biomass of five Anopheles populations has confirmed previous observation that these mosquitoes, in nature, have very slow development. in this study it has been evident also that the larvae density, as it classicaly has been calculated, by dividing the total of colected larvae by the number of positivated breeding places, is an inable index for representation of the breeding places potencialities of those anophelines. The fourth stage larvae average, from positive breeding places, has revealed to be a better index. Its annual circle curve is approximately parallel to that of the biomass and so, the author suggests for news works, the computation solely of the young forms of advanced stages.

  7. A Review of the Systematics and a Proposed Scheme of Internal Classification of the New World Subgenus Melanoconion of Culex (Diptera, Culicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    only, scales absent. Pleural integument usually slightly paler or concolorous with scutum, sometimes pale white or yellow, contrasting with that of...rarely entirely dark scaled. FEMALE CIBAJZIAL ARMATURE. As figured for atratus (Fig. 3). Cibarial dome triangular or ovoid, dark-pigmented and...yells pleural integument, the general facies, the relatively sparse long setae of the flagellar whorls, the type of decumbent scales on the vertex and

  8. Contributions to the Mosquito Fauna of Southeast Asia. XIV. The Subgenus Stegomyia of Aedes in Southeast Asia I - The Scutellaris Group of Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    LAOS. Champassak: Sedone; Pakse; Vientiune ; “Ban Van Heue;” 11 CP, 11% CAMBODIA. Kandal: Phnom-Penh; Oudong; Kompong Speu; Kampot : Sihanoukville...rearings (29 1, 29 p). CAMBODIA. Kampot : Sihanoukville (XII-1966, J. M. Klein), 2d, 3?. Kandal: Phnom-Penh, Ari Ksatr (VII-1967, J.M. Klein), 6d, 79, 2d

  9. Medical Entomology Studies - II. The Subgenus Anopheles in Thailand (Diptera: Culicidae) (Contributions of the American Entomological Institute. Volume 12, Number 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    designed primarily for reliability and time conservation , and should not be construed to indicate relationships, even though such may be the case. The...al. (1963) infected 1 or 2 baezai with Plusmodium sandoshami Dunn, Eyles and Yap, from a flying lemur , Cynocephalus variegatus Audebert, and found

  10. Allium discoloration: the precursor and formation of the red pigment in giant onion (Allium giganteum Regel) and some other subgenus Melanocrommyum species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucerová, Petra; Kubec, Roman; Simek, Petr; Václavík, Lukás; Schraml, Jan

    2011-03-09

    The precursor of the orange-red pigment formed upon wounding the bulbs of Allium giganteum (Allium subg. Melanocrommyum) was isolated and shown to be S-(2-pyrrolyl)cysteine S-oxide. In addition, two other pyrrolylsulfinyl derivatives were found in an extract from the bulbs, namely, 3-(2-pyrrolylsulfinyl)lactic acid and S-(3-pyrrolyl)cysteine S-oxide. Contrary to a previous report, the latter compound was shown not to serve as the precursor of the pigment, being in fact only an artifact formed during isolation. The formation of pyrrolyl-containing compounds following disruption of A. giganteum bulbs was studied by a combination of LC-MS, LC-NMR and DART-MS. It was found that S-(2-pyrrolyl)cysteine S-oxide is cleaved by a C-S lyase (alliinase) to yield 2-pyrrolesulfenic acid. Two molecules of the latter compound give rise to highly reactive S-(2-pyrrolyl) 2-pyrrolethiosulfinate which in turn converts into red 2,2'-epidithio-3,3'-dipyrrole (dipyrrolo[2,3-d:2',3'-e]-1,2-dithiin). Several other pyrrolyl-containing compounds were detected in A. giganteum for the first time, including S-methyl 2-pyrrolethiosulfinate, S-(2-pyrrolyl) methanethiosulfinate, di(2-pyrrolyl) disulfide, and S-(2-pyrrolyl) 2-pyrrolethiosulfonate. It can be concluded that the formation of the orange-red pigment in Allium subg. Melanocrommyum species, despite sharing several analogous features, is of a different nature than the pink discoloration of onion (A. cepa).

  11. Mosquito Studies (Dipera: Culicidae) 34. A Revision of the Albimanus Section of the Subgenus Nyssorhynchus of Anopheles. (Contributions of the American Entomological Institute. Volume 15, Number 7, 1980)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Nov 1943, H. Pratt, 1L. Cayey, 2 Dee 1943, J. Maldonado -Capriles, H. Pratt, 5L. Dorado, PR 151. Fort Buchanan, 14 Dee 1942, T. Aitken, 2M, 2F; same...1943, G. Bradley, 3F. Tortuguero, Laguna, 25 Aug 1942, E. Charneco, 2L; same locality, 15 Dee 1944, H. Pratt, 2L. Yauco, 26 Dee 1942, J. Maldonado ...Canal Zone: Bar- ro Colorado Island, 20 Feb 1942, KO 111-14, 2F; same locality and date, KO 117-8, 1F. Cano Saddle, 7 May 1923, R. Shannon, 6F

  12. Medical Entomology Studies - III. A Revision of the Subgenus Culex in the Oriental Region (Diptera: Culicidae) (Contributions of the American Entomological Institute. Volume 12, Number 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    S. W. ; 4d, 5?, 1 1, 3 lp (P. J. Barraud; H. Cogill). PAKISTAN. Lahore; 1 L (J. Maldonado , Sept. 1957). Additional records from the literature...artificial containers such as canoes , boats, cement tanks, jars, cans, etc. in the vicinity of sea beaches, harbors or piers in populated areas. The...NEPAL. Khatmandu; 1 L (J. Maldonado , 1958). TIBET. Yatung; 2d. INDIA. Western Hima,?uyas: Kasauli; Durhampur; Assam: Tezpur; Ledo; Dibrugarh

  13. Contributions to the Mosquito Fauna of Southeast Asia. XVI. Genus Aedes Meigen, Subgenus Aedimorphus Theobald in Southeast Asia (Contributions of the American Entomological Institute. Volume 9, Number 5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Warmbaths District (Muspratt 1955: 172). Reined.: Aedes (4edimmphus) in Southeast Asia 75 SOUTHERN COOK ISLANDS . Rarotonga ( ?) (Belkin 1962: 429). SOUTH...These species are completely described and compared with closely related forms occurring in the Pacific Islands and Oriental Zoogeographical Regions...species and 1 subspecies from Southeast Asia and compares them to closely related species in the Oriental and Pacific Islands Zoogeographical Regions

  14. Phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) of Chiapas collected near the Guatemala border, with additions to the fauna of Mexico and a new subgenus name.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez-Bernal, Sergio; Muñoz, José; Rebollar-Téllez, Eduardo A; Pech-May, Agelica; Marina, Carlos F

    2015-07-31

    Collections from four localities, two of the High Plateau and two of the Eastern Mountains Municipality of Chiapas, near the border with Guatemala, included 26 species with four new species records for Mexico: Lutzomyia (Helcocyrtomyia) hartmanni (Fairchild & Hertig, 1957), Dampfomyia (Coromyia) disneyi (Williams, 1987), Psychodopygus bispinosus (Fairchild & Hertig, 1951), and Psychodopygus corossoniensis (LePont & Pajot, 1978). These records represent an updated total of 50 species in Mexico, 48 of which are extant species and the remaining two fossils. The name Xiphopsathyromyia n. n. is proposed in substitution of Xiphomyia Artemiev, 1991, a homonym of Xiphomyia Townsend, 1917, a genus of Tachinidae (Diptera).

  15. The Subgenus Stegomyia of Aedes in the Afrotropical Region. 1. The Africanus Group of Species (Diptera: Culicidae) (Contributions of the American Entomological Institute. Volume 26, Number 1, 1990)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    GERMAIN, J. P. HERVY and J. MOUCHET. 1977. Guide partique pour 1’ etude des vecteurs de fievre jaune et methodes de lutte. O.R.S.T.O.M. Initiations-Doe...M., P. SUREAU, J. P. HERVE, J. FABRE, J. MOUCHET, Y.ROBIN and B. GEOFFROY. 1976. Isolements du virus de la fievre jaune a partir d’Aedes du groupe...concernant l’epidemiologie de la fievre jaune . Cah. O.R.S.T.O.M. Ser. Entomol. Med. Parasitol. 9: 3-60. HARBACH, R. E. and K. L. KNIGHT. 1980

  16. Confirming the identity of two enigmatic “spiny solanums” (Solanum subgenus Leptostemonum, Solanaceae collected by Jean-Baptiste Leschenault in Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Aubriot

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Taxonomic revision of the tropical Asian species of Solanum revealed two names, Solanum poka Dunal and Solanum graciliflorum Dunal, whose identities were uncertain and whose application has always been tentative. Material collected in Java at the beginning of the 19th century by Jean-Baptiste Leschenault de la Tour and used to describe these taxa has not been found, despite extensive searches in European herbaria. We here stabilise use of these names by comparing herbarium specimens and drawings of original material made by the artist Toussaint François Node-Véran. Detailed descriptions with synonymy, preliminary conservation assessments and specimen citations are provided for both species. Lectotypes are designated for all names (including synonyms and epitypes designated for S. poka and S. graciliflorum to stabilise usage.

  17. Catalog and Illustrated Review of the Subgenus Melanoconion of Culex (Diptera: Culicidae) (Contributions of the American Entomological Institute. Volume 27, Number 2, 1992)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    de Entomologia Taxonomica, Division de Endemias Rurales, Maracay, Venezuela Section de Entomologia, Departamento de Parasitologia y Microbiologia ...Paulo, Brazil Faculdade de Saude Publica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Brazil Instituto National de Microbiologia , Carlos G. Malbran, Buenos Aires

  18. Contributions of the American Entomological Institute. Volume 27. Number 2. 1992. Catalog and Illustrated Review of the Subgenus Melanoconion of Culex (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Departamento de Parasitologia y Microbiologia , Escuela de Medicina, Universidad de Oriente, Ciudad Bolivar, Venezuela FMRP Departamento de Parasitologia...de Microbiologia , Carlos G. Malbran, Buenos Aires, Argentina IOC Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil ITH Instituut voor Tropische Hygiene en

  19. Allele-specific marker development and selection efficiencies for both flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase and flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylase genes in soybean subgenus soja.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yong; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2013-06-01

    Color is one of the phenotypic markers mostly used to study soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) genetic, molecular and biochemical processes. Two P450-dependent mono-oxygenases, flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H; EC1.14.3.21) and flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H, EC1.14.13.88), both catalyzing the hydroxylation of the B-ring in flavonoids, play an important role in coloration. Previous studies showed that the T locus was a gene encoding F3'H and the W1 locus co-segregated with a gene encoding F3'5'H in soybean. These two genetic loci have identified to control seed coat, flower and pubescence colors. However, the allelic distributions of both F3'H and F3'5'H genes in soybean were unknown. In this study, three novel alleles were identified (two of four alleles for GmF3'H and one of three alleles for GmF3'5'H). A set of gene-tagged markers was developed and verified based on the sequence diversity of all seven alleles. Furthermore, the markers were used to analyze soybean accessions including 170 cultivated soybeans (G. max) from a mini core collection and 102 wild soybeans (G. soja). For both F3'H and F3'5'H, the marker selection efficiencies for pubescence color and flower color were determined. The results showed that one GmF3'H allele explained 92.2 % of the variation in tawny and two gmf3'h alleles explained 63.8 % of the variation in gray pubescence colors. In addition, two GmF3'5'H alleles and one gmF3'5'h allele explained 94.0 % of the variation in purple and 75.3 % in white flowers, respectively. By the combination of the two loci, seed coat color was determined. In total, 90.9 % of accessions possessing both the gmf3'h-b and gmf3'5'h alleles had yellow seed coats. Therefore, seed coat colors are controlled by more than two loci.

  20. Descriptions of Acartia (Euacartia) southwelli Sewell 1914 and A. (Euacartia) sarojus n.sp. from India and status of the subgenus Euacartia Steuer 1923

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhupratap, M.; Haridas, P

    stream_size 8 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Hydrobiologia_292-293_67.pdf.txt stream_source_info Hydrobiologia_292-293_67.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  1. New data on oribatid mites of Galumna (Galumna) (Acari, Oribatida, Galumnidae) from Northern Vietnam, with a key to species of this subgenus in the Oriental region

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ermilov, S.G.; Starý, Josef

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 4 (2017), s. 550-571 ISSN 1362-1971 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : galumnid mites * supplementary description * morphology * systematics * Tam Dao National Park Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Zoology Impact factor: 1.467, year: 2016

  2. Morphological peculiarities of fruits of the species from subgenus Rapunculus (Fourr. Boiss. of genus Campanula L. in the flora of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia G. Dremliuga

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The fruits morphological peculiarities of six species from section RapunculusL. (Fourr. Boiss. of genus CampanulaL. native to the flora of Ukraine were studied. The common characters (obovate for of capsules, erect pedicels, apical or median aperture location, absence of pubescence have been revealed.

  3. Notulae ad Floram agaricinam neerlandicam — XXXIV. Further notes on Psilocybe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordeloos, Machiel E.

    1999-01-01

    A key to the species is given of Psilocybe subgenus Stercophila (Romagn.) Noordel., with a full description of Psilocybe dorsipora, new to the Netherlands, and the status of subgenus Stercophila is discussed. Within subgenus Hypholoma section Psilocyboides four new subsections are presented, viz.

  4. Contribution to the knowledge of the Indo-Australian Psenini (Hymenoptera, Sphecidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lith, van J.P.

    1965-01-01

    CONTENTS Introduction................... 3 The male genitalia of the subgenus Psen Latreille......... 5 Key to the Indo-Australian and East-Asiatic species of the subgenus Psen Latreille 11 Groups of species of the subgenus Psen Latreille with new species and new records 17 Key to the

  5. New species of Amanita from the Dominican Republica, Greater Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orson K. Miller; Deborah Jean Lodge

    2001-01-01

    Three new species of Amanita are described from the Dominican Republic on the island of Hispaniola. One of the new species is in subgenus Lepidella section Amidella and two are in subgenus Amanita. One of the latter two species is in section Amanita, but the other cannot be placed below subgenus.

  6. Three new species and one new subspecies of Toxorhynchites (Diptera: Culicidae) of the afrotropical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Henrique

    2005-05-01

    Three new species and one new subspecies in the subgenus Afrorhynchus of the genus Toxorhynchites are described from the Afrotropical region. With the addition of these four new taxa, 14 species and two subspecies of subgenus Afrorhynchus are presently known in the region. Keys are provided for the identification of adult males and females of the subgenus Afrorhynchus in Africa.

  7. GRAMMATICAL PREREQUISITES TO PHONOLOGICAL CHANGE?*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    When reading the contemporary literature on language change, one is struck by the advocacy of functional ..... achievement of preferred phonotactic structures (cf. Dressler 1977,. Donegan and Stampe ... have a perceptual motivation and enhance the adequacy of surface forms to convey information to the listener.

  8. Scaling relations in early-type galaxies from integral-field stellar kinematics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cappellari, M.; Scott, N.; Alatalo, K.; Blitz, L.; Bois, M.; Bournaud, F.; Bureau, M.; Davies, R. L.; Davis, T. A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Emsellem, E.; Falcon-Barroso, J.; Khochfar, S.; Krajnovic, D.; Kuntschner, H.; Lablanche, P. -Y; McDermid, R. M.; Morganti, R.; Naab, T.; Sarzi, M.; Serra, P.; van den Bosch, R.C.E.; van de Ven, G.; Weijmans, A.; Young, L. M.

    2010-01-01

    Early-type galaxies (ETGs) satisfy a now classic scaling relation Re ∝ σ1.2eI‑0.8e, the Fundamental Plane (FP; Djorgovski & Davis 1987; Dressler et al. 1987), between their size, stellar velocity dispersion and mean surface brightness. A significant effort has been devoted in the past twenty years

  9. MURI Center for Materials Chemistry in the Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-30

    surface was varied from a few inches to >10 inches, depending on whether or not a band-pass filter was used to select a narrow wavelength range of VUV...Dressler (AFRL) - 0+ reactions with hydrocarbons (and a joint paper written) Karl Jug , Thomas Bredow (Hanover) - exchanged visits (collaboration

  10. The leaf surface strucure of the species from the subgenus Sedum of the genus Sedum L. (Crassulaceae DC. from the protected soil collections of A.V. Fomin Botanical Garden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola V. Yatsenko

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available By means of light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM the structure of leaf ’s epidermis of 8 species of genus SedumL. was investigated. A number of common (amphistomatics, anisocytic type of stomatal complex, strum cuticle and different signs have been revealed in the structure of the leaf ’s tissue. The results acquired on the basis of micromorphology of a leaf ’s epidermis can be used in the taxonomy of the investigated Sedumspecies.

  11. Veronica: Acylated flavone glycosides as chemosystematic markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albach, Dirk C.; Grayer, Renée J.; Kite, Geoffrey C.

    2005-01-01

    HPLC/DAD and LCeMS of an extract of Veronica spicata subgenus Pseudolysimachium, Plantaginaceae) revealed the presence of six 6-hydroxyluteolin glycosides acylated with phenolic acids, three of which are new compounds and which we called spicosides. A flavonoid survey of seven more species...... instead. Spicosides appeared to be common in subgenus Pseudolysimachium (detected in five out of eight species), but we did not find them in subgenus Pentasepalae. Previously, acetylated 8-hydroxyflavone glycosides have been isolated from or detected in eight species of V. subgenus Pentasepalae (in 13...

  12. Dinâmica de populações de Euglossina (Hymenoptera, Apidae em mata ciliar, Urbano Santos, Maranhão, Brasil Population dynamics of Euglossina (Hymenoptera, Apidae in riparian forest, Urbano Santos, Maranhão, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane C. de Carvalho

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Machos de Euglossina foram coletados por meio de iscas-odores de benzoato de benzila, eucaliptol, eugenol, salicilato de metila, vanilina, durante um ano em área de mata ciliar, no município de Urbano Santos, Maranhão. As coletas foram realizadas mensalmente, entre 8 h e 16 h, totalizando 96 horas de amostragem. Foram amostrados 283 indivíduos, 4 gêneros e 16 espécies. Euglossa Latreille, 1802 foi o gênero mais abundante, seguido por Eufriesea Cockerell, 1909, Eulaema Lepeletier, 1841 e Exaerete Hoffmannsegg, 1817. As espécies mais freqüentes foram Euglossa modestior (Dressler, 1982, Euglossa cordata (Linnaeus, 1758, Eulaema cingulata (Fabricius, 1804, Exaerete smaragdina (Guérin-Menéville, 1845, Eulaema nigrita Lepeletier, 1841 e Euglossa gaianii Dressler, 1982. Eucaliptol foi a essência mais atrativa. As maiores freqüências de visitas ocorreram no período da manhã e a maior diversidade de espécies ocorreu no período chuvoso.Males of Euglossina bees were collected in benzil benzoate, eucaliptol, eugenol, methyl salicylate and vanillin scent baits, during one year in a riparian forest area, located in the municipality of Urbano Santos, Maranhão. The collections were carried out monthly, between 8 am and 4 pm, totalling 96 hours of sampling, resulting in 283 individuals, 4 genera and 16 species. Euglossa Latreille, 1802 was the most abundant genus, followed by Eufriesea Cockerell, 1909, Eulaema Lepeletier, 1841 and Exaerete Hoffmannsegg, 1817. The most frequent species were Euglossa modestior (Dressler, 1982, Euglossa cordata (Linnaeus, 1758, Eulaema cingulata (Fabricius, 1804, Exaerete smaragdina (Guérin-Menéville, 1845, Eulaema nigrita Lepeletier, 1841 and Euglossa gaianii (Dressler, 1982. Eucaliptol was the most attractive chemical bait. The highest frequencies of visits were in the morning and the highest diversity of species occurred in the rainy period.

  13. Inventário da fauna de Euglossinae (Hymenoptera, Apidae do baixo sul da Bahia, Brasil Inventory of the Euglossinae (Hymenoptera, Apidae fauna of southern Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edinaldo Luz das Neves

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results concerning collection of Euglossinae bees in a mangrove ecosystem in Valença(13º22'08"S and 39º04'20"W, Bahia. These samples were made twice a month, for a year. The chemical baits Citronella, Eucalyptol, Eugenol, Metyl Salicylate and Vanillin attracted 1,144 specimens distributed among twelve species and two genera: Eulaema (Lepeletier, 1841 and Euglossa (Latreille, 1802. The predominam bee species was Eulaema nigrita (Lepeletier, 1841 consisting of 49.4% of the collected specimens, followed by Euglossa cordata (Linnaeus, 1758 with 44.88%, Euglossa imperialis (Cockerell, 1922 with 2.4% and Eulaema meriana flavescens (Friese, 1899 with 1.6%. Theothers species, considering sporadic visitors, Euglossa securigera (Dressler, 1982, Euglossa chalybeata (Friese, 1925, Euglossa liopoda (Dressler, 1982, Euglossa gaianii (Dressler, 1982, Euglossa townsendi (Cockerell, 1904, Euglossa truncata (Rebelo & Moure, 1995, Euglossa melanotricha (Moure, 1967 and Euglossa sapphirina (Moure, 1968 represented together only 1.8% of the total sample. The Euglossinae were more active from October to May. Eucalyptol was the most attractive bait, attracting 1,120 specimens. Methyl Salicylate attracted 17 specimens, followed by Eugenol, which attracted 04 specimens and Vanillin, which attracted 03 specimens. Citronella was not an attractive chemical.

  14. Studies on some Miogypsinoides-Miogypsina s.s. associations with special reference to morphological features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bock, de J.F.

    1976-01-01

    The primary differentiation within the genus Miogypsina is based on features seen in vertical sections. The subgenus Miogypsinoides lacks lateral chambers and the equatorial plane is covered on each side by zones of massive laminae, whereas the subgenus Miogypsina has well-developed lateral chambers

  15. Scymnus (Neopullus) lady beetles from China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael E. Montgomery; Melody A. Keena

    2011-01-01

    In 1995, we found our first Scymnus (Neopullus) lady beetle in China (Neopullus is a subgenus of Scymnus, the largest genus in the family Coccinellidae). At that time there were just a few known species in the subgenus and very little was known of their biology. By the end of the project, 14...

  16. AMPHIBLESTRUM (AVICULAMPHIBLESTRUM RUGGEROI SP. N., SUBGEN. N. (BRYOZOA FROM THE WESTERN MEDITERRANEAN SEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANTONIETTA ROSSO

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available A new species and a new subgenus Amphiblestrum (Aviculamphiblestrum ruggeroi sp.n. are described from deep circalittoral-epibathyal bottoms from the Sicily Strait and the north-western Mediterranean. The new subgenus is created to distinguish, within Amphiblestrum, species with both gymnocystal adventitious and large interzooidal avicularia, both originating from basal pore chambers. 

  17. A new species of the genus Eurhadina Haupt (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha: Cicadellidae: Typhlocybinae) from Korea, with a key to Korean species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sumin; Lim, Jongok; Jung, Sunghoon

    2016-04-11

    The leafhopper genus Eurhadina Haupt, 1929 belongs to the tribe Typhlocybini of subfamily Typhlocybinae (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha: Cicadellidae). Currently, genus Eurhadina includes 3 subgenera, Eurhadina Haupt 1929, Singhardina Mahmood 1967, Zhihadina Yang & Li 1991. A total of 20 valid species of subgenus Eurhadina have been described in the Nearctic and Palaearctic region and the subgenus Singhardina includes 57 species in the Oriental and Palaearctic region (Huang & Zhang 1999, Dworakowska 2002). The subgenus Zhihadina includes only 1 species from China (Yang & Lee, 1991). So far, four species of subgenus Eurhadina were recorded in the Korean Peninsula (Kwon & Huh 2001): Eurhadina (Eurhadina) betularia Anufriev, 1969, E. (E.) koreana Dworakowska, 1971, E. (E.) pulchella (Fallen, 1806), and E. (E.) wagneri Dworakowska, 1969. The majority of species belonging to the subgenus Eurhadina are difficult to distinguish by external appearance because the color patterns of the forewings are very similar among species.

  18. A taxonomic review of the anilline genus Zeanillus Jeannel (Coleoptera: Carabidae: Bembidiini) of New Zealand, with descriptions of seven new species, re-classification of the species, and notes on their biogeography and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Igor M

    2016-11-20

    Based upon external features of adults of the genus Zeanillus ten species are recognized, seven of which are new to science. Because of significant morphological differences, all species are arranged in four subgenera: the nominotypical subgenus Zeanillus, including Z. phyllobius (Broun), Z. punctigerus (Broun), and Z. nunni, new species (New Zealand, South Island, Otago, Trotters George); the monobasic subgenus Brounanillus, new subgenus, including Z. pallidus (Broun); the monobasic subgenus Nunnanillus, new subgenus, including Z. pellucidus, new species (New Zealand, South Island, Otago, Oamaru); and the most species-rich subgenus Otagonillus, new subgenus, including Z. brouni, new species (New Zealand, South Island, Otago, Oamaru), Z. lescheni, new species (New Zealand, South Island, Southland, Waikaia Forest), Z. carltoni, new species (New Zealand, South Island, Otago, Mount Watkin), Z. montivagus, new species (New Zealand, South Island, Otago, North Rough Ridge), and Z. nanus, new species (New Zealand, South Island, Otago, Waipori River Valley). Based on new morphological data, a redescription of genus, redescriptions of previously described species, and descriptions of all new taxa are given and a taxonomic key for all known species is provided. Maps of species distributions and illustrations of main taxonomic characters used in the text are also included. Some biogeographic/evolutionary aspects of Zeanillus origin and diversification are discussed.

  19. Reproductive and genital health and risk of cervical human papillomavirus infection: results from the Ludwig-McGill cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Eileen; Ramanakumar, Agnihotram V; El-Zein, Mariam; Silva, Flavia R; Galan, Lenice; Baggio, Maria L; Villa, Luisa L; Franco, Eduardo L

    2016-03-08

    There are inconsistencies in the literature on reproductive and genital health determinants of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, the primary cause of cervical cancer. We examined these factors in the Ludwig-McGill Cohort Study, a longitudinal, repeated-measurements investigation on the natural history of HPV infection. We analyzed a cohort subset of 1867 women with one complete year of follow-up. We calculated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for reproductive and genital health characteristics from questionnaire and laboratory data in relation to 1-year period prevalence of HPV infection. Two outcomes were measured; the first based on phylogenetic grouping of HPV types based on tissue tropism and oncogenicity (Alphapapillomavirus Subgenus 1: species 1, 8, 10 and 13; Subgenus 2: species 5, 6, 7, 9, 11; Subgenus 3: species 3, 4 and 14) and the second based on transient or persistent HPV infections. Lifetime (Subgenus 3 OR = 2.00, CI: 1.23-3.24) and current (Subgenus 3 OR =2.00, CI: 1.15-3.47) condom use and use of contraceptive injections (Subgenus 1 OR = 1.96, CI: 1.22-3.16, Subgenus 2 OR = 1.34, CI: 1.00-1.79) were associated with increased risk of HPV infection. Intrauterine device use was protective (Subgenus 1 OR = 0.48, CI: 0.30-0.75, Subgenus 2 OR = 0.78, CI: 0.62-0.98). These factors were not associated with persistence of HPV infection. Tampon use, previous gynecologic infections and cervical inflammation were associated with an overall increased risk of HPV infection. Cervical HPV infection was associated with reproductive and genital health factors. Further studies are necessary to confirm the low to moderate associations observed.

  20. Systematic revision of the enigmatic Malagasy broad-headed frogs (Laurentomantis Dubois, 1980), and their phylogenetic position within the endemic mantellid radiation of Madagascar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vences, Miguel; Glaw, Frank; Andreone, Franco; Jesu, Riccardo; Schimmenti, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    A revision of species included in the subgenus Laurentomantis (genus Mantidactylus) yielded new information about phylogeny, taxonomy, and biogeography of the endemic mantellid frog radiation in Madagascar. Four Laurentomantis species, distinguished by morphology and advertisement calls, are

  1. Variación morfológica de las especies de Astyanax, subgénero Zygogaster (Teleostei, Characidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz-C., R. I.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Morphological variation of Astyanax species, subgenus Zygogaster (Teleostei, Characidae The diverse Neotropical fish genus Astyanax inhabits a variety of aquatic environments. As with other species in this genus, the taxonomic status and phylogenetic relationships of species of this subgenus remain largely undetermined. Based on 354 individuals, we analyzed the morphological variation of four species of the subgenus Zygogaster (A. atratoensis, A. caucanus, A. filiferus, and A. magdalenae using procrustes analysis and compared findings with two species of the sister group: subgenus Poecilurichthys (A. orthodus and A. superbus. The PCA (Principal Component Analysis and CVA (Canonical Variates Analysis showed morphological affinity between the subgenera and indicated variance in body depth, anterior trend of dorsal fin origin and humeral spot, depression on the dorsal surface of the skull, and ventral displacement of the orbit and snout. The variation in these structures may provide evidence supporting adaptive speciation as an alternative to speciation driven by geographical isolation.

  2. Taxonomy and biology of some pyemotidae (Acarina: Tarsonemoidea) inhabiting bark beetle galleries in North American conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.A. Cross; John C. Moser

    1971-01-01

    The pyemotid genera Pygmephorus and Pysmotes are redefined. The former is divided into two morphologically and ecologically distinct subgenera, Pygmephorus sensu stricto and Pygmephorus (Pygmephorellus), new subgenus. Three species, Pymeotes parviscolyti, Pygmephorus (Pygmephorellus)...

  3. Exploring the Potential for Actinobacteria as Defensive Symbionts in Fungus-Growing Termites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.A.; Mesquita Nobre, T.; Currie, C.R.; Aanen, D.K.; Poulsen, M.

    2012-01-01

    In fungus-growing termites, fungi of the subgenus Pseudoxylaria threaten colony health through substrate competition with the termite fungus (Termitomyces). The potential mechanisms with which termites suppress Pseudoxylaria have remained unknown. Here we explore if Actinobacteria potentially play a

  4. Two new aflatoxin producing species, and an overview of Aspergillus section Flavi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varga, J.; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Samson, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    Aspergillus subgenus Circumdati section Flavi includes species with usually biseriate conidial heads, in shades of yellow-green to brown, and dark sclerotia. Several species assigned to this section are either important mycotoxin producers including aflatoxins, cyclopiazonic acid, ochratoxins and...

  5. IDENTIFICATION OF PUTATIVE HYBRIDS AND NATURAL LINEAGES IN GENUS POTAMOGETON REVEALED BY CHLOROPLAST AND NUCLEAR DNA MARKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic relations of hybrids and non-hybrid species in the genus Potamogeton were reconstructed based on three spacers and one intron of chloroplast sequences and nuclear sequences of 5S-NTS. By comparing the phylogenetic relationships of subgenus Potamogeton with floral size, we propose that the split in the two main lineages reflects an early differentiation of flower size, perhaps due to the shift from out- to in-breeding; we also presume that more complex evolutionary processes exist in subgenus Potamogeton based on present study. As natural hybridization plays a fundamental role in the evolution of Potamogeton, frequently resulting in the formation of entirely new species, compelling evidence supports the hybrid origin of species: P. anguillanus, P. hubeiensis, P. kamogawaensis, and the triple hybrid-P. sp. hybrid. Incongruence between nuclear and plastid tree indicated that introgression might had occurred from subgenus Coleogeton to subgenus Potamogeton

  6. Simulating the impacts of southern pine beetle and fire on the dynamics of xerophytic pine landscapes in the southern Appalachians

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.D. Waldron; C.W. Lafon; R.N. Coulson; D.M. Cairns; M.D. Tchakerian; A. Birt; K.D. Klepzig

    2007-01-01

    Question: Can fire be used to maintain Yellow pine (Pinus subgenus Diploxylon) stands disturbed by periodic outbreaks of southern pine beetle?Location: Southern Appalachian Mountains, USA.Methods: We used LANDIS to model vegetation disturbance and succession...

  7. Contribution to the knowledge of the Indo-Australian Pseninae (Hymenoptera, Sphecidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lith, van J.P.

    1959-01-01

    Part I. Psen Latreille CONTENTS Introduction................... ι Systematics................... 3 Morphology.................. 4 Key to the genera................. 7 Psen Latreille.................. 7 Key to the subgenera of Psen Latreille........... 8 Subgenus Pseneo Malloch.............. 9

  8. Revision of Ryssopterys and transfer to Stigmaphyllon (Malpighiaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, C.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular evidence shows the Old World genus Ryssopterys (Malpighiaceae) nested within the New World genus Stigmaphyllon; therefore, Ryssopterys is here transferred to Stigmaphyllon as subg. Ryssopterys. The subgenera share most vegetative and fruit characters. Subgenus Stigmaphyllon comprises 92

  9. On unfamiliar Italian lexical blends from names and nouns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Cacchiani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Italian has recently witnessed a steady increase in the use of unfamiliar lexical blends from names and nouns. While they serve an identificatory and descriptive function (in the sense of Anderson 2007, blends are created in extragrammatical morphology with careful attention to the semantic concepts encoded by the individual SWs, understanding blends from names and nouns depends on the decoder's direct or surrogate experience of the related reference. Significantly, blends are coined out of the need to be relevant (Sperber/Wilson 1990 and show various degrees of morphotactic and morphosemantic transparency (Thornton 1986; Dressler 1987, 1999, which makes them memorable (Lehrer 2003. In this paper we therefore address blends from names and nouns within the framework of the Naturalness Theory (Thornton 1986; Dressler et al. 1987; Dressler 1999. As will be seen, although blends are not created in rule-based grammars, some overall preferences and regularities can be observed for more core items (cf. Bat-El/Cohen, in press, within the framework of Optimality Theory under the principle of saliency (Dressler 1987. Focusing on their morphosyntactic transparency, we provide a typology of Italian unfamiliar blends from names and nouns functioning as naming units in order to delimit the category and reassess current typologies. While we allow for a continuum of morphotactic transparency within the prototypical category of extragrammatcial subtractive word-formations, we slightly adapt Ronneberger-Sibold (2006 and suggest we distinguish between blends on the one hand and the neighbouring category of clipped compounds on the other. Moving on to morphosemantic transparency and conceptual motivation, we use concepts from Cognitive Grammar, Cognitive Metaphor Theory and theories of Conceptual Blending (cf. Lakoff/Johnson 1980; Langacker 1987; Ruiz de Mendoza 1998, 2000; Kemmer 2003 to provide some preliminary remarks on specific subtypes, and blends from

  10. A revised subgeneric position for Polypedilum (Probolum) simantokeleum, with description of a new Uresipedilum species in Japan (Diptera: Chironomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Nao; Yamamoto, Masaru

    2015-08-11

    Two Japanese Polypedilum species including a new species are redescribed and described based on the males. Polypedilum (Probolum) simantokeleum, Sasa, Suzuki et Sakai, 1998, is transferred to the subgenus Uresipedilum. Polypedilum (Uresipedilum) dissimilum sp. nov. is easily distinguished from other members of Uresipedilum by having a T-shaped tergal band. Definition of the subgenus Probolum is briefly discussed: we suggest Probolum should be defined as the species with the superior volsella bearing inner lobe pending adequate larval information.

  11. New species of Atropacarus (Hoplophorella), (Acari, Oribatida, Phthiracaridae) from the Afrotropical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedbała, Wojciech; Starý, Josef

    2014-03-04

    Four new species of the subgenus Hoplophorella are desccribed and identified from the Afrotropical region: Atropacarus (Hoplophorella) curtisetosus sp. nov. from Uluguru Mountains of Tanzania, Atropacarus (Hoplophorella) distinctus sp. nov. from Ambohitantely Special Reserve of Madagascar, Atropacarus (Hoplophorella) othneios sp. nov. from Ranomafana National Park of Masagascar, and Atropacarus (Hoplophorella) stenos sp. nov.  from Nguru and Uluguru Mountains of Tanzania. A comparison with the most closely related species of the subgenus Hoplophorella is also presented. 

  12. Description of a new species and record of Bactrocera Macquart (Diptera,Tephritidae) from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li-bing; Chen, Xiao-lin; Deng, Yu-liang; Wang, Shao-jun

    2013-01-01

    One new species, Bactrocera (Zeugodacus) anala Chen et Zhou, sp.nov, and one newly recorded species, B. (Z.) armillata (Hering, 1938), from China are described and illustrated. The male of B. (Z.) armillata (Hering) was discovered for the first time and as a result the species is moved from subgenus Bactrocera to subgenus Zeugodacus. In addition, the morphological differences and comparing illustrations of B. (Z.) adusta (Wang et Zhao) and B. (Z.) biguttata (Bezzi), are provided.

  13. Chromosomal organization of the ribosomal RNA genes in the genus Chironomus (Diptera, Chironomidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Gunderina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal localization of ribosomal RNA coding genes has been studied by using FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization in 21 species from the genus Chironomus Meigen, 1803. Analysis of the data has shown intra- and interspecific variation in number and location of 5.8S rDNA hybridization sites in 17 species from the subgenus Chironomus and 4 species from the subgenus Camptochironomus Kieffer, 1914. In the majority of studied species the location of rDNA sites coincided with the sites where active NORs (nucleolus organizer regions were found. The number of hybridization sites in karyotypes of studied chironomids varied from 1 to 6. More than half of the species possessed only one NOR (12 out of 21. Two rDNA hybridization sites were found in karyotypes of five species, three – in two species, and five and six sites – in one species each. NORs were found in all chromosomal arms of species from the subgenus Chironomus with one of them always located on arm G. On the other hand, no hybridization sites were found on arm G in four studied species from the subgenus Camptochironomus. Two species from the subgenus Chironomus – Ch. balatonicus Devai, Wuelker & Scholl, 1983 and Ch. “annularius” sensu Strenzke, 1959 – showed intraspecific variability in the number of hybridization signals. Possible mechanisms of origin of variability in number and location of rRNA genes in the karyotypes of species from the genus Chironomus are discussed.

  14. The morphology of hairs in species of Plantago L. sectio Oreades Decne

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    Emilia Andrzejewska-Golec

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The hairs of three taxa of sectio Oreades Decne genus Plantago have been studied. We have found that hair typical for the majority of representatives of the genus Plantago, that is, with a unicellular stalk and head vertically divided into two cells, occur in these studied taxa. Some of the headless hairs occurring here are similar to those occurring in sectio Arnoglossum Decne. Rahn's (1978 suggestion of transferring sectio Oreades to the subgenus Psyllium seems wrong since the representatives of this section, in contrast to subgenus Psyllium, do not have hairs with the stalks consisting of several cells and unicellular heads, club-like hairs or iridoid-plantarenaloside. They contain, however, hairs with overlapping cells and iridoid-catapol, which is absent in the taxa of subgenus Psyllium.

  15. New or little-known species of Chaetocladius s. str. Kieffer, 1911 (Diptera: Chironomidae: Orthocladiinae) from the Amur River basin (Russian Far East).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarchenko, Eugenyi A; Makarchenko, Marina A; Semenchenko, Alexander A

    2017-03-27

    Chironomids of the subgenus Chaetocladius s. str. from the Amur River basin are revised using both morphological characters and molecular data. Three new species, C. egorych sp. nov., C. lopatinskiy sp. nov. and C. yavorskayae sp. nov., are described and figured. The pupa of C. fedotkin is described for the first time. Adult males of C. ligni and C. piger, little-known in the Far East, are redescribed and annotated, and key to males of the Chaetocladius s. str. from the Amur River basin is provided. A reference 658 bp barcode sequence from a fragment of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase I (COI) was used as a tool for species delimitation. Comparisons with corresponding regions of COI between 5 species in the subgenus produced K2P genetic distances of 8.3-12.6%, values well associated with interspecific variation. Molecular data were also used for the reconstruction of the phylogenetic relationships within the subgenus Chaetocladius s. str.

  16. P elements are found in the genomes of nematoceran insects of the genus Anopheles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, A; Sengupta, R; Krzywinski, J; Wang, X; Roth, C; Collins, F H

    2003-04-01

    We report the identification of genomic sequences in various anopheline mosquitoes (family Culicidae: suborder Nematocera: order Diptera) showing homology to the class II, short inverted-terminal-repeat (ITR) transposable element P from Drosophila melanogaster (family Drosophilidae; suborder Brachycera: order Diptera). Anopheles gambiae appears to have at least six distinct P elements. Other anopheline species, including four additional members of the An. gambiae species complex (An. arabiensis, An. merus, An. melas and An. quadriannulatus), Anopheles stephensi (all subgenus Cellia), An. quadrimaculatus (subgenus Anopheles) and Anopheles albimanus (subgenus Nyssorhynchus) also possess P elements similar to those found in An. gambiae. Ten distinct P element types were identified in the genus Anopheles. At least two of the An. gambiae elements appears to be intact and potentially functional. Phylogenetic analysis of the anopheline P elements reveals them to belong to a distinctly different clade from the brachyceran P elements.

  17. A systematic study of the polyphenolic composition of aqueous extracts deriving from several Cistus genus species: evolutionary relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrajón-Catalán, Enrique; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Roldán, Cristina; Guillén, Emilio; Saura, Domingo; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Micol, Vicente

    2011-01-01

    Cistaceae is a large family of shrubs widely spread over the Mediterranean area. It includes Helianthemum, Halimium and Cistus genus. Cistus genus contains approximately 20 species distributed in three subgenus. The essential oil of Cistus species has been thoroughly studied, but the polyphenolic composition of the aerial parts of the different Cistus species needs further characterisation. To perform a comparative analysis of the qualitative and quantitative polyphenolic composition of the aerial parts of the most commonly distributed Spanish Cistus species in order to find a relationship between chemotype and subgenus. Thirteen aqueous extracts derived from 10 different Cistus species were analysed by using HPLC with diode array-detection coupled to electrospray ion trap mass spectrometry technique (HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS). Their major compounds were identified and ellagitannins were quantified. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed on the most relevant compounds to find out the statistical association between chemotype and variety. Three main groups of compounds were found, i.e. ellagitannins, flavonoids and phenolic acids derivatives. The polyphenolic profile was specific for each species, although the abundance of some compounds also varied depending on the soil type. Whereas C. ladanifer, C. salviifolius, C. populifolius and C. libanotis were specially rich in ellagitannins, C. clusii, C. laurifolius and C. monspeliensis contained significant amounts of flavonoids and much less ellagitannins. In contrast, C. crispus, C. incanus and C. albidus showed a polyphenolic profile mostly based on flavonoids. PCA analysis showed a strong relationship between Cistus subgenus and its chemotype based on the most relevant water-soluble polyphenolic compounds. Chemical composition of the leaves' aqueous extracts from plants belonging to the Cistus genus is strongly related to their subgenus, in agreement to previous taxonomical and phylogenetic divisions. In contrast

  18. Ontogeny of trichomes in taxa of the genus Plantago subg. Psyllium (Plantaginaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Andrzejewska-Golec

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a continuation of the investigation of hair ontogeny in taxa of the Plantaginaceae family. The previous publication dealt with the development of hairs in representatives of the subgenus Plantago. The present paper concerns the investgation of 5 species of the subgenus Psyllium: Plantago squarrosa, P. arenaria, P. afra, P. webbii and P. arborescens. The development of three types of headed hairs and one type of headless hair has been studied. The hypotetic phylogeny of the hairs of the genus Plantago is presented.

  19. Notas e descrições em Bisaltes Thomson, 1868 e Ptericoptus Lepeletier & Audinet-Serville, 1830 (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae, Apomecynini Notes and descriptions in Bisaltes Thomson, 1868 and Ptericoptus Lepeletier & Audinet-Serville, 1830 (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae, Apomecynini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena M. Galileo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The following new species are described in the subgenus Bisaltes (Bisaltes: B. (B. picticornis sp. nov. from Bolivia; B.(B. taua sp. nov. from Brazil (Paraná and Santa Catarina and B. (B. unicolor sp. nov. from Ecuador. Bisaltes (B. pictus Breuning, 1940 is transferred to the subgenus Craspedocerus. In Ptericoptus, P. hybridus hybridus Breuning, 1939 is considered a synonym of P. acuminatus (Fabricius, 1801; P. dorsalis Audinet-Serville, 1835 previously in the synonymy of P. acuminatus is revalidated and Saperda vitta Newman, 1838 is considered its synonym; P. corumbaensis sp. nov. is described from Brazil (Mato Grosso do Sul.

  20. The taxonomic implication of frontal tubercles in Polypedilum subgenera diagnoses, with re-description of Polypedilum isigabeceum Sasa & Suzuki (Diptera, Chironomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Nao; Yamamoto, Masaru

    2016-11-15

    Polypedilum isigabeceum Sasa et Suzuki, 2000 was described as belonging to subgenus Polypedilum s. str. However, if we accept the conclusion of Sæther et al. (2010), the species might be placed into Kribionympha with P. unagiquartum Sasa, 1985 because of the presence of distinct frontal tubercles in the adult males. However, other taxonomic characters do not support their treatment. P. isigabeceum is re-described and reconfirmed to be assigned to the subgenus Polypedilum s. str. The taxonomic meaning of frontal tubercles is discussed for defining the subgeneric rankings within genus Polypedilum.

  1. Veronica: Chemical characters for the support of phylogenetic relationships based on nuclear ribosomal and plastid DNA sequence data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albach, Dirk C.; Jensen, Søren Rosendal; Özgökce, Fevzi

    2005-01-01

    are monophyletic sister groups with the annual species consecutive sisters to them. All species of Veronica that contain cornoside are found in this subgenus, although some species seem to have secondarily lost the ability to produce this compound. Subgenera Pocilla and Pentasepalae are well supported sister...... to have originated in Eastern Asia. 6-Hydroxyflavones acylated with phenolic acids are common in this subgenus but may have originated only later in the evolution of the group. Possible chemotaxonomic markers for other groups are discussed. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  2. New Mycomya species from the Himalayas (Diptera, Mycetophilidae): 3. Subgenera Cesamya and Mycomyopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väisänen, Rauno

    2013-11-19

    Mycomya Rondani specimens from the Himalayas, mostly Nepal and Myanmar, are revised. Altogether four species of the subgenus Cesamya Koçak & Kemal and eleven species of the subgenus Mycomyopsis Väisänen are recorded from the Himalayas and the Indian subcontinent. The paper includes a key to the Himalayan species of Mycomya of the two subgenera. The following fourteen new species are described: M. aix, M. alticola, M. banteng, M. cissa, M. ducula, M. irena, M. goral, M. jeti, M. kaa, M. naja, M. niltava, M. pitta, M. sachak, and M. sanar. The holotype of M. unipectinata Edwards from Sri Lanka was also examined and its genitalia are described.

  3. Russulaceae in American Samoa: new species and further support for an Australasian origin for Samoan ectomycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropp, Bradley R

    2016-01-01

    Two new species from the Russulaceae, Lactifluus aurantiotinctus and Russula pallidirosea, are described from American Samoa. Based on analyses of nuc rDNA internal transcribed spacer region barcodes (ITS), L. aurantiotinctus has an affinity to subgenus Lactariopsis and strong phylogeographic ties to Papua New Guinea. The ITS data indicate that Russula pallidirosea has an affinity to subgenus Heterophyllidia and suggest that it also has phylogeographic ties to Australasia. Both species were associated with the ectomycorrhizal tree Intsia bijuga. © 2016 by The Mycological Society of America.

  4. Pseudocapillaria (Ichthyocapillaria) ophisterni sp. n. (Nematoda : Capillariidae) from the swamp-eel Ophisternon aenigmaticum (Pisces) in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravec, F; Salgado-Maldonado, G; Jiménez-García, I

    2000-04-01

    A new nematode species, Pseudocapillaria ophisterni sp. n., is described from the intestine and rarely from the stomach of the swamp-eel, Ophisternon aenigmaticum Rosen et Greenwood, from Catemaco Lake, Veracruz, Mexico. In having both caudal lobes in the male interconnected by a distinct dorsal membrane, it belongs to the subgenus Ichthyocapillaria. It differs from the three species in this subgenus mainly in possessing either a distinctly longer spicule or a smaller length of oesophagus relative to body length. It also differs in host type and geographical distribution. P. ophisterni is the first capillariid species reported from synbranchiform fishes.

  5. Three new rotundabaloghid mites (Acari, Uropodina from Sabah (Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenő Kontschán

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Three new species of the family Rotundabaloghiidae are discovered and described from Sabah, Malaysia. The unusual Angulobaloghia rutra sp. n. differs from the other known Angulobaloghia Hirschmann, 1979 species in the long anterior process of the female’s genital shield. Rotundabaloghia (Circobaloghia tobiasi sp. n. has very long and apically pilose dorsal setae and two pairs of bulbiform setae, which are unique in the subgenus Rotundabaloghia (Circobaloghia Hirschmann, 1975. The long, serrate and curved setae in the big ventral cavity of Depressorotunda (Depressorotunda serrata sp. n. is a so far unknown character in the subgenus Depressorotunda (Depressorotunda Kontschán, 2010.

  6. Comparative characteristics of anatomical and morphological adaptations of plants of two subgenera Haworthia Duval to arid environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Volodymyrivna Nuzhyna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the comparative anatomical and morphological characteristics of plants of two subgenera: Haworthia and Hexangularis. The study revealed two different strategies of adaptation to arid conditions of the growth of different subgenera of the genus Haworthia. Plants of the subgenus Haworthia adapted to arid conditions by increasing the accumulation of water, the presence of “windows”, a smaller stoma size, and a thinner outer wall of the epidermis cells. On the other hand, plants of the subgenus Hexangularis adapted to arid conditions by reducing overheating and transpiration as well as by the presence of papillae and a thickened outer wall of the epidermis cells.

  7. First Draft Genome Sequence of the Dourine Causative Agent: Trypanosoma Equiperdum Strain OVI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Laurent; Moumen, Bouziane; Madeline, Anthony; Steinbiss, Sascha; Lakhdar, Latifa; Van Reet, Nick; Büscher, Philippe; Laugier, Claire; Cauchard, Julien; Petry, Sandrine

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma equiperdum is the causative agent of dourine, a sexually-transmitted infection of horses. This parasite belongs to the subgenus Trypanozoon that also includes the agent of sleeping sickness (Trypanosoma brucei) and surra (Trypanosoma evansi). We herein report the genome sequence of a T. equiperdum strain OVI, isolated from a horse in South-Africa in 1976. This is the first genome sequence of the T. equiperdum species, and its availability will provide important insights for future studies on genetic classification of the subgenus Trypanozoon. PMID:28138343

  8. First Draft Genome Sequence of the Dourine Causative Agent:Trypanosoma EquiperdumStrain OVI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Laurent; Moumen, Bouziane; Madeline, Anthony; Steinbiss, Sascha; Lakhdar, Latifa; Van Reet, Nick; Büscher, Philippe; Laugier, Claire; Cauchard, Julien; Petry, Sandrine

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma equiperdum is the causative agent of dourine, a sexually-transmitted infection of horses. This parasite belongs to the subgenus Trypanozoon that also includes the agent of sleeping sickness ( Trypanosoma brucei ) and surra ( Trypanosoma evansi ). We herein report the genome sequence of a T. equiperdum strain OVI, isolated from a horse in South-Africa in 1976. This is the first genome sequence of the T. equiperdum species, and its availability will provide important insights for future studies on genetic classification of the subgenus Trypanozoon.

  9. Four new species of Thouarella (Anthozoa: Octocorallia: Primnoidae from Antarctic waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Zapata-Guardiola

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Four new Antarctic species of the genus Thouarella, all of them belonging to the subgenus Thouarella, are described and illustrated from material collected at the South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, and off Atka Bay (eastern Weddell Sea on the Polarstern cruises ANT XIX/5 (LAMPOS, and ANT XXIV/2 (ANDEEP-SYSTCO. The study of our new taxa allows us to describe a wider variation in the number of the distal cycles of polyp scales, as well as the existence in the genus (and subgenus of additional species with planar colonial morphologies. The new species are compared with their closest congeners.

  10. A new Gephyromantis (Phylacomantis frog species from the pinnacle karst of Bemaraha, western Madagascar

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    Angelica Crottini

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new mantellid frog of the subfamily Mantellinae from the karstic Bemaraha Plateau, western Madagascar. The new species belongs to the genus Gephyromantis, subgenus Phylacomantis, which previously included G. azzurrae, G. corvus and G. pseudoasper. Gephyromantis atsingy sp. n. has a snout-vent length of 35–43 mm and is a scansorial frog living among the Tsingy de Bemaraha pinnacles and inside the caves present in the area. A morphological analysis and biomolecular comparison revealed the degree of differentiation between these four species of the Phylacomantis subgenus. The new species seems to be endemic to Tsingy de Bemaraha.

  11. The Investigation of Three Species Belong To Artemisia L. (Asteraceae Grown Naturally In Turkey In Point Of Morphological Features

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    Murat Kürşat

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the morphologcal features of Artemisia haussknechtii Boiss., Artemisia splendens Willd. and Artemisia caucasica Willd. grown naturally in Turkey and very close to each others in point of systematics are investigated. All taxa of genus Artemisia L. grown naturally in Turkey are located three subgenus (Artemisia, Dracunculus ve Seriphidium. Three species in this study are located subgenus Artemisia Less.. It were determined some new morphological features and differences which are lead to expansion of their descriptions in the Flora of Turkey. The detailed figures of important morphological features of these species are given for better recognition of their.

  12. Three new species and a new synonym in Strumaria (Amaryllidaceae: Amaryllideae from southern Africa

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    D. A. Snijman

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Newly described are three species of Strumaria Jacq. subgenus Strumaria. S. prolifera Snijman from the Kourkammaberg in Namaqualand, South Africa, is a rare species closely allied to 5.  barbarae Oberm. S. speciosa Snijman from the Sonberg, southern Namibia and S. luteoloba Snijman from Namuskluft, southern Namibia and the Richtersveld in Northern Cape, South Africa, are rare species closely related to  S. phonolithica Dinter.  S. gigantea D.Mull.-Doblies & U.Miill.-Doblies is formally presented as a new synonym of S.  phonolithica. A key to the species in Strumaria subgenus Strumaria is given.

  13. Galaxy evolution in clusters since z=1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón-Salamanca, A.

    2011-11-01

    It is now 30 years since Alan Dressler published his seminal paper onthe morphology-density relation. Although there is still much to learnon the effect of the environment on galaxy evolution, extensive progress has been made since then both observationally and theoretically.Galaxy clusters provide some of the most extreme environments in which galaxies evolve, making them excellent laboratories to study the age old question of "nature'' vs. "nurture'' in galaxy evolution. Here I review some of the key observational results obtained during the last decade on the evolution of the morphology, structure, dynamics, star-formation history and stellar populations of cluster galaxies since the time when the universe was half its present age.Many of the results presented here have been obtainedwithin the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS) and Space Telescope A901/02 Galaxy Evolution Survey (STAGES) collaborations.

  14. Symposium 2 of JENAM

    CERN Document Server

    Pasquali, Anna; Environment and the Formation of Galaxies : 30 years later

    2011-01-01

    The publication of the morphology - density relation by Alan Dressler in 1980 brought into the limelight the role played by environment in the formation and evolution of galaxies. The symposium Environment and the Formation of Galaxies: 30 years later, was organised with the purpose of establishing the environmental impact on the evolution of galaxies and its dependence on look-back time. Special emphasis was placed on the physical mechanisms that are responsible for transforming galaxies once they are accreted by a group or a cluster, including the observable imprint left in the galaxy HI distribution. Other major topics of the symposium were the environmental dependence of galaxy properties at z ≥ 1 and the implementation of environmental effects in cosmological models of galaxy formation and evolution. This book presents the edited proceedings of this stimulating meeting.

  15. Morphology and Ecological Notes on the Larvae and Pupae of Simulium (Simulium from Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam-Kyu Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Morphological features of larvae and pupae of twelve species of Simulium (Simulium from Korea are investigated and redescribed. Detailed descriptions of immature stages of each species are provided with photographs. For the Korean members of subgenus Simulium, combinations of the following characteristics can be used to separate them from other Korean subgenera: larval abdomen without a pair of conical-shaped ventral tubercles; postgenal cleft variously shaped, viz., miter shaped, spearhead, bullet shaped or triangular; rectal papillae 3 simple lobe or compound lobes; pupal gill of 6-16 filaments; cocoon shoe, boot or slipper shaped; and head trichomes 3 pairs (1 facial+2 frontal. Habitat information and other ecological aspects of each species are provided. Updated keys to larvae and pupae of the Korean species of the subgenus Simulium are also provided to facilitate species identification. Taxonomic treatment based on external morphologies of larvae and pupae of Korean species of the subgenus Simulium are focused and included in this study. To understand their interspecific relationships, phylogenetic analyses using multiple data from molecule, morphology, and ecology are warranted in future research. Also continued exploration for new character systems is needed to establish more stable boundaries for subgenus and species delimitations.

  16. The genus Conocybe subgen. Pholiotina. I. The European annulate species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kits van Waveren, E.

    1970-01-01

    Sixty-five collections, comprising all known European annulate species of Conocybe, subgenus Pholiotina, were examined, including the type specimens of C. vexans P. D. Orton and C. percincta P. D. Orton. In accordance with Orton, it is argued that Ricken, Kühner, and several other authors reversed

  17. Ribosomal DNA, heterochromatin, and correlation with genome size in diploid and polyploid North American endemic sagebrushes (Artemisia, Asteraceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonia Garcia; Teresa Garnatje; Jaume Pellicer; E. Durant McArthur; Sonja Siljak-Yakovlev; Joan Valles

    2009-01-01

    Subgenus Tridentatae (Artemisia, Asteraceae) can be considered a polyploid complex. Both polyploidy and hybridization have been documented in the Tridentatae. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and fluorochrome banding were used to detect and analyze ribosomal DNA changes linked to polyploidization in this group by studying four diploidpolyploid species pairs. In...

  18. Ecology of whitebark pine populations in relation to white pine blister rust infection in subalpine forests of the Lake Tahoe Basin: Implications for restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia E. Maloney; Detlev R. Vogler; Camille E. Jensen; Annette. Delfino Mix

    2012-01-01

    For over a century, white pine blister rust (WPBR), caused by the introduced fungal pathogen, Cronartium ribicola J.C. Fisch., has affected white pine (Subgenus Strobus) individuals, populations, and associated forest communities in North America. We surveyed eight populations of whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.) across a range of environmental conditions in...

  19. Paracrossidius radekcervenkai (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Aphodiinae), a new species from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Červenka, Radek; Nakládal, Oto

    2017-05-18

    A new species of Paracrossidius Balthasar, 1932 (Coleoptera Scarabaeidae: Aphodiinae) from China is described and compared with similar species. Paracrossidius was originally described as a monotypic subgenus based on the type species Aphodius (Paracrossidius) instigator Balthasar, 1932 from Sichuan Province, China. Paracrossidius is currently considered a genus with 10 previously described species, most of which inhabit various parts of China (Dellacasa et al. 2016).

  20. Reference karyotype and cytomolecular map for loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Nurul Islam-faridi; C. Dana Nelson; Thomas L. Kubisiak

    2007-01-01

    A reference karyotype is presented for loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L., subgenus Pinus , section Pinus, subsection Australes), based on fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), using 18s-28s rDNA, 5s rDNA, and Arabidopsis-type telomere repeat sequence (A-type TRS). Well...

  1. Aspergillus hancockii sp. Nov., a biosynthetically talented fungus endemic to southeastern Australian soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitt, John I.; Lange, Lene; Lacey, Alastair E.

    2017-01-01

    Aspergillus hancockii sp. nov., classified in Aspergillus subgenus Circumdati section Flavi, was originally isolated from soil in peanut fields near Kumbia, in the South Burnett region of southeast Queensland, Australia, and has since been found occasionally from other substrates and locations...

  2. Comparative reproductive anatomy in the South African giant land snails (Gastropoda: Pulmonata: Achatinidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mead, A.R.

    2004-01-01

    The history and current taxonomic status of 62 nominal taxa are revised that have been associated in the literature with the subgenus Tholachatina Bequaert, 1950, of genus Archachatina Albers, 1850, and the genus Cochlitoma Férussac, 1821, in the land snail family Achatinidae Swainson, 1840.

  3. Detection, typing and subtyping of enteric adenoviruses 40 and 41 in fecal samples, and observation of changing incidences of infections with these types and subtypes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. de Jong (Jan); K. Bijlsma (Klaas); A.G. Wermenbol; M.W. Verweij-Uijterwaal; H.G.A.M. van der Avoort (Harrie); D.J. Wood; A.S. Bailey; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractMonoclonal antibody (MAb) preparations specific for the enteric adenoviruses of subgenus F (AdF) were generated and evaluated as typing reagents in virus neutralization tests and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). A panel of 11 genome types of adenovirus 40 (Ad40), 24 genome

  4. Comparative mapping in Pinus: sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana Dougl.) and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.).Tree Genet Genomes 7:457-468

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen D. Jermstad; Andrew J. Eckert; Jill L. Wegrzyn; Annette Delfino-Mix; Dean A Davis; Deems C. Burton; David B. Neale

    2011-01-01

    The majority of genomic research in conifers has been conducted in the Pinus subgenus Pinus mostly due to the high economic importance of the species within this taxon. Genetic maps have been constructed for several of these pines and comparative mapping analyses have consistently revealed notable synteny. In contrast,...

  5. Description of Pyramimonas diskoicola sp. nov. and the importance of the flagellate Pyramimonas (Prasinophyceae) in Greenland sea ice during the winter–spring transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harðardóttir, Sara; Lundholm, Nina; Moestrup, Øjvind

    2014-01-01

    . Based on morphology and ultrastructure, combined with molecular phylogeny inferred from the small-subunit SSU rDNA and the large-subunit chloroplast-encoded rbcL, the species was placed in subgenus Vestigifera. The cells possessed four flagella, measured 8.3 ± 2.6 lm in length and 5.1 ± 0.8 lm in width...

  6. Haliclona (Haliclona) Epiphytica n. sp. (Porifera, Demospongiae, Haplosclerida), a seaweed-dwelling sponge from the Colombian Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zea, Sven; Weerdt, de Wallie H.

    1999-01-01

    Haliclona (Haliclona) epiphytica n.sp., a new species of seaweed-dwelling sponge of the family Chalinidae (Porifera, Demospongiae, Haplosclerida) from the Colombian Caribbean, is described. As the only member of the subgenus Haliclona (hitherto referred to as the ‘oculata’ group by De Weerdt, 1989)

  7. Artemisia L.: sagebrush

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan E. Meyer

    2008-01-01

    Sagebrush - Artemisia L. - species are probably the most common shrubs in western North America. Big sagebrush alone occupies an estimated 60 million ha as a landscape dominant or codominant in the semiarid interior, and related species of the subgenus Tridentatae are estimated to occupy an additional 50 million ha (Beetle 1960; McArthur and Stevens in press)....

  8. Sagebrush systematics and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Durant McArthur

    2000-01-01

    In this paper on sagebrush systematics and distribution, it is appropriate to begin by defining a few terms. Sagebrush, under my definition, are woody North American Artemisia of the subgenus Tridentatae. Tridentatae are one of four subgenera in Artemisia. Tridentatae or true...

  9. Evolutionary and ecological implications of genome size in the North American endemic sagebrushes and allies (Artemisia, Asteraceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonia Garcia; Miguel A. Canela; Teresa Garnatje; E. Durant McArthur; Jaume Pellicer; Stewart C. Sanderson; Joan Valles

    2008-01-01

    The genome size of 51 populations of 20 species of the North American endemic sagebrushes (subgenus Tridentatae), related species, and some hybrid taxa were assessed by flow cytometry, and were analysed in a phylogenetic framework. Results were similar for most Tridentatae species, with the exception of three taxonomically conflictive species: Artemisia bigelovii Gray...

  10. Cephalopods from the Netherlands Indian Ocean Programme (NIOP)- I. Chiroteuthis spoeli n. spec. and Chiroteuthis picteti somaliensis n. subspec

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salcedo-Vargas, Mario Alejandro

    1996-01-01

    Two new squids from the western Indian Ocean acquired during the Netherlands Indian Ocean Programme (NIOP) expeditions in 1992-1993 are described. The species new to science is Chiroteuthis (C.) spoeli, member of the subgenus Chiroteuthis s.str., which differs from the type species Chiroteuthis (C.)

  11. Cassini's Compositae genera: A nomenclatural and taxonomic assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flann, C.M.; Greuter, W.; Hind, D.J.N.

    2010-01-01

    Work on the Global Compositae Checklist has highlighted uncertainties and errors in the nomenclatural parameters of many genera and subgenera described by Henri Cassini. Problems concern rank (subgenus vs. genus); type designation; correct place of valid publication; alternative names; and other

  12. Usnea christhinae spec. nov. from South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Bystrek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A new lichen species Usnea christhinae Bystrek is described from the Patagonia Andes, the reserve upon lake Onelli in the National Park Los Glaciares. It belongs to subgenus Protousnea Motyka emend. Bystrek and is closely related to U. cavernosa Tucker.

  13. First report of the white pine blister rust fungus, Cronartium ribicola, infecting Ribes inerme in north-central Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. R. Vogler; B. W. Geils; K. Coats

    2017-01-01

    Cronartium ribicola Fisch. has not been found infecting any of the five-needle white pines (Pinus subgenus Strobus) in Utah, despite being established on both white pine and Ribes hosts in the other 10 western states, defined as those west of the 102° meridian.

  14. Medical Entomology Studies - XII. A Revision of the Aedes Scutellaris Group of Tonga (Diptera: Culicidae) (Contributions of the American Entomological Institute. Volume 17, Number 3, 1980)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    end of Lifuka in a coconut plantation with manioke ( Manihot esculenta Crantz) and tall grass, 2.2/min (1000-1010 h). Only 3 collections were less...edulis (Inocarpus) 41 Enoplida 33 esculenta (Colocasia) 14 esculenta ( Manihot ) 43 Finlaya (subgenus) 13 futunae (Aedes) 6k, 8k, 9k, Map VIII, (16

  15. Genetic diversity and seed production in Santa Lucia fir (Abies bracteata),a relict of the Miocene broadleaved evergreen forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    F. Thomas Ledig; Paul D. Hodgskiss; David R. Johnson

    2006-01-01

    Santa Lucia fir (Abies bracteata), is a unique fir, the sole member of the subgenus Pseudotorreya. It is a relict of the Miocene broadleaved evergreen sclerophyll forest, and is now restricted to a highly fragmented range in the Santa Lucia Mountains of central coastal California. Expected heterozygosity for 30 isozyme loci in 18 enzyme systems...

  16. Molluscan fauna from the Miocene sediments of Kachchh, Gujarat ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    According to Morley Davies (1971), subgenus. Clathrus is given the status of an independent genus. Therefore, the present form is identified here as Clathrus gajensis. According to Vredenburg (1928) the fossil form is nearest to the recent form Scala indianorum. Cpr. of the eastern Pacific, which is more broadly conical.

  17. Ecological regime and distribution of @iVirgulinella@@ spp. in the inshore sediments of western India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Setty, M.G.A.P.

    @iVirgulinella@@ Cushman, 1932 was distinguished as a subgenus from @iVirgulina@@ d'Orbigny, 1826 (non @iVirgulina@@ Bory, 1823 = @iFursenkoina@@) on the basis of the development of numerous small arched sutural openings alternating with bridges...

  18. Description of immature stages of Scymnus (Neopullus) sinuanodulus Yu and Yao (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) with notes on life history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenhua Lu; Phetsamon Souphanya; Michael E. Montgomery

    2002-01-01

    We describe for the first time immature stages of the Scymnus subgenus Neopullus; namely the egg, larval (4 instars), and pupal stages of Scymnus (Neopullus) sinuanodulus Yu and Yao (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), which is indigenous to China. This lady beetle was imported to...

  19. An overview of lady beetles in relation to their potential as biological controls for hemlock woolly adelgid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouyue Yu; Michael E. Montgomery

    2008-01-01

    More than 63 species of lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) have been collected in China from hemlock infested with hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae. The lady beetle species that seem most useful for biological control are in the genus/subgenus Scymnus (Neopullus), namely S. camptodromus, S....

  20. Deroceras saronicum spec. nov., eine neue Nacktschneckenart aus Griechenland (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Pulmonata: Agriolimacidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rähle, W.

    1986-01-01

    Deroceras saronicum spec. nov., probably belonging to the subgenus Deroceras s.str., is described. The species is known from the islands of Aegina and Moni (Saronic Gulf) and from the adjacent NE. Peloponnesus, Greece. It is compared with Deroceras maltzani (SIMROTH), a similar species from southern

  1. Data on the Dusty Lacewing Fauna of Northwestern Argentina with Description of a New Species (Neuroptera: Coniopterygidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    György Sziráki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coniopterygidae material collected in two northwestern provinces of Argentina contained six described and one hitherto undescribed species. A list of the determined coniopterygids and the description of a new Incasemidalis species is given. Distinctive features of the species belonging to subgenus Stangesemidalis also are discussed.

  2. On the taxonomy of water mites (Acari: Hydrachnidia) described from the Palearctic, part 2: Hydryphantoidea and Lebertioidea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Sabatino, A.; Gerecke, R.; Gledhill, T.; Smit, H.

    2009-01-01

    The paper explains changes which become necessary in water mite taxonomy after revision of material from museum collections and recent field work. Todothyas Cook, 1974, not Acerbitas Özdikmen, 2006, must replace the preoccupied genus name Thyas Koch, 1836; Acerbitas is ranked as a subgenus of

  3. Degradation and resi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-10-25

    Oct 25, 2011 ... RUBILAR ARANEDA O (2007) Biorremediación de suelos contami- nados con pentaclorofenol (PCF) por hongos de pudrición blanca. Universidad de la Frontera. 30 pp. SAMSON R, SEIFERT K, KUIJPERS A, HOUBRAKEN J and. FRISVAD J (2004) Phylogenetic analysis of Penicillium subgenus.

  4. Simulium cuasiexiguum, a new blackfly species (Diptera: Simuliidae from the Minaçu area in the State of Goiás, Central Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AJ Shelley

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available During studies of Simuliidae at a suspected new focus of human onchocerciasis in central Brazil a new species of Simulium was found. Full descriptions of the adults and pupae of this species, S. cuasiexiguum, are described here, its affinities to closely related species in the subgenus Notolepria are discussed and its distribution in Brazil recorded.

  5. The Brazilian Malaria Vector Anopheles (Kerteszia) Cruzii: Life Stages and Biology (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-01

    F.T. de SB. 1969b. Estudo da longevidade do Anopheies (Kerteszia) cruzii e do Anopheles (Kerteszia) bellator em condiNes naturais. Rev. Bras...and A.M. Zavortink, TJ. 1973. Mosquito studies (Diptera, Borba. 1977. Sobre a longevidade de Anophe- Culicidae). XXIX. A review of the subgenus les

  6. Studies in Entoloma—7. Entoloma sect. Phlebophora, sect. nov

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordeloos, Machiel E.

    1983-01-01

    A new section is created in Entoloma subgenus Inocephalus Noordel., viz. sect. Phlebophora, characterised by a rimose pileal surface and a pileipellis reminding that of Pluteus sect. Hispidoderma. One new species is described, viz. Entoloma kitsii from the Netherlands; type-studies are given of E.

  7. Entoloma albotomentosum (Agaricales, Basidiomycota, a species new to Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Halama

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The first record of Entoloma albotomentosum Noordel. & Hauskn., a member of the subgenus Claudopus and section Claudopus, is reported from Poland. A full description and illustration of the species based on Polish specimens are given and its taxonomy, ecology, and general distribution are also provided.

  8. Index to scientific plant names

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1993-01-01

    Suprageneric epithets have been entered under the family name to which they belong preceded by the indication of their rank (subfamily, tribe, etc.). Infrageneric epithets have been entered immediately under the generic name to which they belong, preceeded by the indication of their rank (subgenus,

  9. Index to scientific plant names

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1997-01-01

    Suprageneric epithets have been entered under the family name to which they belong preceded by the indication of their rank (subfamily, tribe, etc.). Infrageneric epithets have been entered immediately under the generic name to which they belong, preceded by the indication of their rank (subgenus,

  10. Index to scientific plant names

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1996-01-01

    Suprageneric epithets have been entered under the family name to which they belong preceded by the indication of their rank (subfamily, tribe, etc.)- Infrageneric epithets have been entered immediately under the generic name to which they belong, preceded by the indication of their rank (subgenus,

  11. Assessing the gene content of the megagenome: sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel Gonzalez-Ibeas; Pedro J. Martinez-Garcia; Randi A. Famula; Annette Deflino-Mix; Kristian A. Stevens; Carol A. Loopstra; Charles H. Landley; David B. Neale; Jill L. Wegryzn

    2016-01-01

    Sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana Douglas) is within the subgenus Strobus with an estimated genome size of 31 Gbp. Transcriptomic resources are of particular interest in conifers due to the challenges presented in their megagenomes for gene identification. In this study, we present the first comprehensive survey of the P. lambertiana...

  12. Status of biological control of banana poka, P. mollissima (aka P. tarminiana) in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. D. Friesen; C. E. Causton; G. P. Markin

    2008-01-01

    Surveys were conducted between 1982 and 1995 on banana poka, Passiflora mollissima Bailey (also known as P. tarminiana, subgenus Tacsonia) and related species in the Andes Mountains of South America. The objective was to identify potential biocontrol agents for control of banana poka in Hawaii, USA. Host-related insect diversity was greatest in Colombia,...

  13. Origin and relationships of Saintpaulia (Gesneriaceae) based on ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, M; Cronk, Q

    1997-07-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of eight species of Saintpaulia H. Wendl., 19 species of Streptocarpus Lindl. (representing all major growth forms within the genus), and two outgroups (Haberlea rhodopensis Friv., Chirita spadiciformis W. T. Wang) were examined using comparative nucleotide sequences from the two internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA. The length of the ITS 1 region ranged from 228 to 249 base pairs (bp) and the ITS 2 region from 196 to 245 bp. Pairwise sequence divergence across both spacers for ingroup and outgroup species ranged from 0 to 29%. Streptocarpus is not monophyletic, and Saintpaulia is nested within Streptocarpus subgenus Streptocarpella. Streptocarpus subgenus Streptocarpus is monophyletic. The ITS sequence data demonstrate that the unifoliate Streptocarpus species form a clade, and are also characterized by a unique 47-bp deletion in ITS 2. The results strongly support the monophyly of (1) Saintpaulia, and (2) Saintpaulia plus the African members of the subgenus Streptocarpella of Streptocarpus. The data suggest the evolution of Saintpaulia from Streptocarpus subgenus Streptocarpella. The differences in flower and vegetative characters are probably due to ecological adaptation leading to a relatively rapid radiation of Saintpaulia.

  14. Adaptive evolution of drug targets in producer and non-producer organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Sun, Xin E.; Genee, Hans Jasper

    2012-01-01

    MPA (mycophenolic acid) is an immunosuppressive drug produced by several fungi in Penicillium subgenus Penicillium. This toxic metabolite is an inhibitor of IMPDH (IMP dehydrogenase). The MPA-biosynthetic cluster of Penicillum brevicompactum contains a gene encoding a B-type IMPDH, IMPDH-B, which...

  15. Morphology and Evolution of the Larval Maxilla and Its Importance in the Classification of the Sabethini (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    where they lie ventral to the mandi- notypical subgenus of the genus Psorophora bles. For simplicity, the surface of each max- Robineau-Desvoidy. The...containing species with South Pacific (Diptera, Culicidae). Vols. I differently modified maxillae and maxillary and 2. University of California Press

  16. Community structure, biodiversity, and ecosystem services in treeline whitebark pine communities: Potential impacts from a non-native pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana F. Tomback; Lynn M. Resler; Robert E. Keane; Elizabeth R. Pansing; Andrew J. Andrade; Aaron C. Wagner

    2016-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) has the largest and most northerly distribution of any white pine (Subgenus Strobus) in North America, encompassing 18° latitude and 21° longitude in western mountains. Within this broad range, however, whitebark pine occurs within a narrow elevational zone, including upper subalpine and treeline forests, and functions...

  17. Kunci identifikasi lalat buah (Diptera: Tephritidae) di Kabupaten Bogor dan sekitarnya

    OpenAIRE

    Anik Larasati; Purnama Hidayat; Damayanti Buchori

    2016-01-01

    Identification key was developed for 18 species of fruit flies (Bactocera spp.) found in Bogor district. Morphological characters were used as background information for key development: 2 genus and 4 subgenus were identified in the process. Fruit fly species in this identification was Bactrocera (Bactrocera) albistrigata de meijere, Bactrocera (Bactrocera) carambolae Drew & Hancock, Bactrocera (Bactrocera) caudata Fabricus, Bactrocera (Bactrocera) latifrons White & Liquido, Bactrocer...

  18. Kunci Identifikasi Lalat Buah (Diptera: Tephritidae) Di Kabupaten Bogor Dan Sekitarnya

    OpenAIRE

    Larasati, Anik; Hidayat, Purnama; Buchori, Damayanti

    2016-01-01

    Identification key was developed for 18 species of fruit flies (Bactocera spp.) found in Bogor district. Morphological characters were used as background information for key development: 2 genus and 4 subgenus were identified in the process. Fruit fly species in this identification was Bactrocera (Bactrocera) albistrigata de meijere, Bactrocera (Bactrocera) carambolae Drew & Hancock, Bactrocera (Bactrocera) caudata Fabricus, Bactrocera (Bactrocera) latifrons White & Liquido, Bactrocer...

  19. New species and notes on genera of the Celastraceae (incl. Hippocrateaceae). III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mennega, A.M.W.

    1983-01-01

    A description is given of two new species in the genus Pristimera, P. dariense from Panama and P. caudata from Suriname. P. dariense differs by its flattened disk from the other New World species of the genus, but would fit in the subgenus Trochantha N. Hallé known from Africa. Cuervea crenulata sp.

  20. Aanwinsten voor de Nederlandse adventief-flora, 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooststroom, van S.J.; Reichgelt, Th.J.

    1962-01-01

    This paper contains acquisitions to the Netherlands adventitious flora from the year 1961. 1. Amaranthus palmeri S. Wats. This is the second species of the subgenus Acnida (L.) Aellen found in the Netherlands. The first species, A. tamariscinus Nutt. was found in 1953 as a wool-alien. In October

  1. White pines, Ribes, and blister rust: integration and action

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. S. Hunt; B. W. Geils; K. E. Hummer

    2010-01-01

    The preceding articles in this series review the history, biology and management of white pine blister rust in North America, Europe and eastern Asia. In this integration, we connect and discuss seven recurring themes important for understanding and managing epidemics of Cronartium ribicola in the white pines (five-needle pines in subgenus Strobus). Information and...

  2. Distribution of Ribes, an alternate host of white pine blister rust, in Colorado and Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holly S. J. Kearns; William R. Jacobi; Kelly S. Burns; Brian W. Geils

    2008-01-01

    Ribes (currants and gooseberries) are alternate hosts for Cronartium ribicola, the invasive fungus that causes blister rust of white pines (Pinus, subgenus Strobus) in the Rocky Mountain region of Colorado and Wyoming. The location, species, and density of Ribes can affect...

  3. Culicoides (Avaritia) gornostaevae Mirzaeva, 1984 (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) a possible vector species of the Obsoletus group new to the European fauna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Carsten; Dominiak, Patrycja

    2014-01-01

    Culicoides gornostaevae Mirzaeva, 1984, known previously only from Siberia, is a boreal species included into the Obsoletus group of Culicoides sg. Avaritia. Members of the subgenus can act as vectors of various diseases. In Europe they are involved in the transmission of the Schmallenberg virus...

  4. Pseudorhysipolis gen. nov. (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Rhysipolinae), with nine new species from Brazil, Suriname and Panama

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scatolini, D.; Penteado-Dias, A.M.; Achterberg, van C.

    2002-01-01

    Pseudorhysipolis gen. nov. (type species: Pseudorhysipolis fenix spec. nov. from Brazil and Panama) is described and illustrated. A key to nine new species is added; one new subgenus is described (Pararhysipolis nov.; type species: Pseudorhysipolis mellinotum spec. nov.) and the first host record

  5. Sequence of the Sugar Pine Megagenome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristian A. Stevens; Jill L. Wegrzyn; Aleksey Zimin; Daniela Puiu; Marc Crepeau; Charis Cardeno; Robin Paul; Daniel Gonzalez-Ibeas; Maxim Koriabine; Ann E. Holtz-Morris; Pedro J. Martínez-García; Uzay U. Sezen; Guillaume Marçais; Kathie Jermstad; Patrick E. McGuire; Carol A. Loopstra; John M. Davis; Andrew Eckert; Pieter de Jong; James A. Yorke; Steven L. Salzberg; David B. Neale; Charles H. Langley

    2016-01-01

    Until very recently, complete characterization of the megagenomes of conifers has remained elusive. The diploid genome of sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana Dougl.) has a highly repetitive, 31 billion bp genome. It is the largest genome sequenced and assembled to date, and the first from the subgenus Strobus, or white pines, a group...

  6. Recovery plan for Scots pine blister rust caused by Cronartium flaccidum (Alb. & Schwein.) G. Winter and Peridermium pini (Pers.) Lév. [syn. C. asclepiadeum (Willd.) Fr., Endocronartium pini (Pers.) Y. Hiratsuka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian W. Geils; Ned B. Klopfenstein; Mee-Sook Kim; Pauline Spaine; Bryce A. Richardson; Paul J. Zambino; Charles G. Shaw; James Walla; Russ Bulluck; Laura Redmond; Kent. Smith

    2009-01-01

    The sexually reproducing form of Scots pine blister rust, C. flaccidum, completes its life cycle alternating between pines of the subgenus Pinus and seed-plants of various families. Scots pine blister rust is also caused by a form of the rust that spreads directly from pine to pine and is named, Peridermium pini...

  7. White pine blister rust in the interior Mountain West

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly Burns; Jim Blodgett; Dave Conklin; Brian Geils; Jim Hoffman; Marcus Jackson; William Jacobi; Holly Kearns; Anna Schoettle

    2010-01-01

    White pine blister rust is an exotic, invasive disease of white, stone, and foxtail pines (also referred to as white pines or five-needle pines) in the genus Pinus and subgenus Strobus (Price and others 1998). Cronartium ribicola, the fungus that causes WPBR, requires an alternate host - currants and gooseberries in the genus Ribes and species of Pedicularis...

  8. New Leaf Miner and Stem Borer of Sciaridae (Diptera)

    OpenAIRE

    MITSUHIRO, SASAKAWA

    1997-01-01

    A new leaf miner on Codonopsis lanceolata (Campanulaceae), Lycoriella codonopsivora n. sp., and new stem borer on Petasites japonicus (Asteraceae), Zygoneura petasitidis n. sp., are described from Japan. New subgenus, Chorizomma, without complete eye-bridge, of genus Lycoriella is proposed.

  9. Aprostocetus (Ootetrastichus) theioneurus (Masi) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae): a hyperparasitoid on the cereal stem borer Chilo partellus (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salle, J.La

    1993-01-01

    Aprostocetus (Ootetrastichus) theioneurus (Masi) is recorded from Kenya as a hyperparasitoid on Chilo partellus through the braconid Cotesia sesamiae. This is the first known species of the subgenus Ootetrastichus which is not a primary endoparasitoid of eggs. Diagnostic characters are given for

  10. simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers in genetic analysis of

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-08-28

    Aug 28, 2012 ... Cambodia, South China and Central Asia. Mungbean is a. *Corresponding author. E-mail: neelu_jain25@yahoo.com. self pollinated diploid plant with 2n = 2x = 22 chromosomes and a genome size of 515 Mb/1C (Parida et al., 1990). Mungbean belongs to the Asian Vigna subgenus Ceratotropis with South ...

  11. The small barbs Barbus humilis and B. trispilopleura of Lake Tana (Ethiopia): Are they ecotypes of the same species?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dejen, E.; Rutjes, H.A.; Graaf, de M.; Nagelkerke, L.A.J.; Osse, J.W.M.; Sibbing, F.A.

    2002-01-01

    Four species of ‘small barbs’ (Barbus, subgenus Enteromius Cope, 1869) are known from Lake Tana, isolated in the Ethiopian highlands: B. humilis, B. trispilopleura, B. pleurogramma (all Boulenger, 1902) and B. tanapelagius de Graaf, 2000. However, only three species appear valid from cluster

  12. Western Palaearctic Ectoedemia (Zimmermannia Hering and Ectoedemia Busck s. str. (Lepidoptera: Nepticulidae: five new species and new data on distribution, hostplants and recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik van Nieukerken

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The nine western Palaearctic species of the subgenus Zimmermannia Hering, 1940 and 48 species in the subgenus Ectoedemia Busck, 1907 of the genus Ectoedemia are reviewed. One species in the subgenus Zimmermannia and four species in the subgenus Ectoedemia are described as new: Ectoedemia (Zimmermannia vivesi A. Laštůvka, Z. Laštůvka & Van Nieukerken sp. n. from southern Spain and Cyprus with unknown host plant, Ectoedemia (E. hendrikseni A. Laštůvka, Z. Laštůvka & Van Nieukerken sp. n. from southern France on Quercus suber, E. (E. heckfordi Van Nieukerken, A. Laštůvka & Z. Laštůvka sp. n. from southern England on Quercus petraea and Q. robur, E. (E. phaeolepis Van Nieukerken, A. Laštůvka & Z. Laštůvka sp. n. from Spain and Portugal probably on Quercus ilex and Q. rotundifolia and E. (E. coscoja Van Nieukerken, A. Laštůvka & Z. Laštůvka sp. n. from Spain on Quercus coccifera. The following species are redescribed: Ectoedemia (Zimmermannia hispanica Van Nieukerken, Ectoedemia (Zimmermannia reichli Z. & A. Laštůvka, 1998, Ectoedemia (E. algeriensis van Nieukerken, 1985, E. (E. pseudoilicis Z. & A. Laštůvka, 1998 and E. (E. alnifoliae van Nieukerken, 1985. Ectoedemia albiformae Puplesis & Diškus, 2003 is synonymised with E. spinosella (Joannis, 1908. Ectoedemia jacutica Puplesis, 1988, previously synonymised with E. agrimoniae (Frey, 1858, is here synonymised with E. spiraeae Gregor & Povolný, 1983. Updated keys to the subgenus Zimmermannia and the Quercus feeding Ectoedemia are provided.

  13. Differential response to root-knot nematodes in prunus species and correlative genetic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmenjaud, D; Minot, J C; Voisin, R; Pinochet, J; Simard, M H; Salesses, G

    1997-09-01

    Responses of 17 Prunus rootstocks or accessions (11 from the subgenus Amygdalus and 6 from the subgenus Prunophora) were evaluated against 11 isolates of Meloidogyne spp. including one M. arenaria, four M. incognita, four M. javanica, one M. hispanica, and an unclassified population from Florida. Characterization of plant response to root-knot nematodes was based on a gall index rating. Numbers of females and juveniles plus eggs in the roots were determined for 10 of the rootstocks evaluated against one M. arenaria, one M. incognita, one M. javanica, and the Florida isolate. These 10 rootstocks plus Nemaguard and Nemared were retested by growing three different rootstock genotypes together in containers of soil infested individually with each of the above four isolates. Garfi and Garrigues almonds, GF.305 and Rutgers Red Leaf peaches, and the peach-almond GF.677 were susceptible to all isolates. Differences in resistance were detected among the other rootstocks of the subgenus Amygdalus. The peach-almond GF.557 and Summergrand peach were resistant to M. arenaria and M. incognita but susceptible to M. javanica and the Florida isolate. Nemaguard, Nemared, and its two hybrids G x N no. 15 and G x N no. 22 were resistant to all but the Florida isolate. In the subgenus Prunophora, Myrobalan plums P.1079, P.2175, P.2980, and P.2984; Marianna plum 29C; and P. insititia plum AD.101 were resistant to all isolates. Thus, two different genetic systems of RKN resistance were found in the subgenus Amygdalus: one system acting against M. arenaria and M. incognita, and another system also acting against M. javanica. Prunophora rootstocks bear a complete genetic system for resistance also acting against the Florida isolate. The hypotheses on the relationships between these systems and the corresponding putative genes of resistance are presented.

  14. Taxonomical and nomenclatural notes on Centaurea: A proposal of classification, a description of new sections and subsections, and a species list of the redefined section Centaurea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilpold, A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we summarize the results of our long-date research on the genus Centaurea. The first part of the paper deals with the overall classification of the genus, which we propose to divide into three subgenera: subgenus Centaurea, subgenus Cyanus and subgenus Lopholoma. The second part of this publication gives a recopilation of the species of the redefined section Centaurea, a group that includes former sections Acrolophus (sect. Centaurea s. str., Phalolepis and Willkommia, together with taxonomical, geographical, ecological and karyological considerations. Finally, new descriptions or nomenclatural combinations are proposed to correlate nomenclature to the new classification: a new combination (sect. Acrocentron subsect. Chamaecyanus is proposed in subgenus Lopholoma; three new sections (sects. Akamantis, Cnicus, and Hyerapolitanae are described in subgenus Centaurea; two subsections (subsects. Phalolepis and Willkommia in sect. Centaurea; and three subsections (subsects. Exarata, Jacea, and Subtilis in sect. Phrygia.En este trabajo presentamos los resultados de nuestras investigaciones de larga fecha en el género Centaurea. La primera parte del trabajo trata de la clasificación del género, que proponemos dividir en tres subgéneros: subgénero Centaurea, subgénero Cyanus y subgénero Lopholoma. La segunda parte es una recopilación de las especies de la redefinida sección Centaurea, que incluye las antiguas secciones Acrolophus (sect. Centaurea s. str., Phalolepis y Willkommia, junto con consideraciones geográficas, ecológicas y cariológicas. Por último, proponemos nuevas secciones, subsecciones y combinaciones para correlacionar nomenclatura y clasificación: proponemos una nueva (sect. Acrocentron subsect. Chamaecyanus en el subgénero Lopholoma; se describen tres secciones nuevas (sects. Akamantis, Cnicus y Hyerapolitanae en el subgénero Centaurea; dos subsecciones (subsects. Phalolepis and Willkommia en la secci

  15. Contributions to the phylogeny of Ixodes (Pholeoixodes canisuga, I. (Ph. kaiseri, I. (Ph. hexagonus and a simple pictorial key for the identification of their females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sándor Hornok

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Europe, hard ticks of the subgenus Pholeoixodes (Ixodidae: Ixodes are usually associated with burrow-dwelling mammals and terrestrial birds. Reports of Pholeoixodes spp. from carnivores are frequently contradictory, and their identification is not based on key diagnostic characters. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to identify ticks collected from dogs, foxes and badgers in several European countries, and to reassess their systematic status with molecular analyses using two mitochondrial markers. Results Between 2003 and 2017, 144 Pholeoixodes spp. ticks were collected in nine European countries. From accurate descriptions and comparison with type-materials, a simple illustrated identification key was compiled for adult females, by focusing on the shape of the anterior surface of basis capituli. Based on this key, 71 female ticks were identified as I. canisuga, 21 as I. kaiseri and 21 as I. hexagonus. DNA was extracted from these 113 female ticks, and from further 31 specimens. Fragments of two mitochondrial genes, cox1 (cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and 16S rRNA, were amplified and sequenced. Ixodes kaiseri had nine unique cox1 haplotypes, which showed 99.2–100% sequence identity, whereas I. canisuga and I. hexagonus had eleven and five cox1 haplotypes, respectively, with 99.5–100% sequence identity. The distribution of cox1 haplotypes reflected a geographical pattern. Pholeoixodes spp. ticks had fewer 16S rRNA haplotypes, with a lower degree of intraspecific divergence (99.5–100% sequence identity and no geographical clustering. Phylogenetic analyses were in agreement with morphology: I. kaiseri and I. hexagonus (with the similar shape of the anterior surface of basis capituli were genetically more closely related to each other than to I. canisuga. Phylogenetic analyses also showed that the subgenus Eschatocephalus (bat ticks clustered within the subgenus Pholeoixodes. Conclusions A simple

  16. Implications of a Neotropical Origin of the Genus Leishmania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noyes Harry

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis of a Neotropical origin of the Leishmania/Endotrypanum clade is reviewed. The position of the L. (Sauroleishmania external to the subgenus L. (Leishmania is not consistent with the Neotropical origin of the latter subgenus. It is suggested that this may be a consequence of a faster evolutionary rate in the L. (Sauroleishmania. The implications for the classsification of the phlebotomine sandflies of the hypothesis for a Neotropical origin of the Leishmania is also considered. The classification of Galati (1995 is proposed to be most consistent with the hypothesis of a Neotropical origin of the Leishmania, whilst classifications which place the New and Old World species in separate taxa are inconsistent with this hypothesis.

  17. The morphology of hairs in species of Plantago L. Sections: Bauphula Decne and Arnoglossum Decne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Andrzejewska-Golec

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The hairs of one representative of the monotypic sectio Bauphula and of seven taxa of the section Arnoglossum were investigated. Unlike P. amplexicaulis (sectio Bauphula the representatives of sectio Arnoglossum, were found to have headless hairs on the scape with cells overlapping in a characteristic manner. They had no hairs with a unicellular stalk and head divided vertically into two cells, commonly occurring in the representatives of different sections of the genus Plantago: Polyneuron, Lamprosantha, Coronopus, Oreades, Leucopsyllium, Hymenopsyllium and Psyllium. Rahn's decision (1978 to transfer the sections Bauphula and Arnoglossum to the subgenus Psyllium seems incorrect. The representatives of the investigated sections, unlike the taxa of the sectio Psyllium, have no hairs with multicellular stalks and unicellular heads, club-like hairs and iridoid-plantarenaloside, while they have morel-like hairs, hairs with overlapping cells and an iridoid-catalpol, lacking in the taxa of the subgenus Psyllium.

  18. The genus Rubus (Rosaceae in South Africa. IV. Natural hybridiza­ tion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Spies

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available The genus  Rubus L. is represented in southern Africa by the subgenera  Eubatus Focke and  Idaeobatus Focke. A combination o f morphological data, data on the reproductive systems of some collections and meiotic chromosome behaviour indicates that a hybrid swarm in the eastern Transvaal was formed subsequent to the hybridization between R. cuneifolius Pursh. taxon B (subgenus Eubatus and R. longepedicellatus (C. E. Gust. C. H. Stirton (subgenus Idaeobatus. Other examples of intra- and intersubgeneric hybridization were found during this study of the South African material. These instances, with examples found in the literature, indicate that the subgeneric subdivisions of Rubus are artificial. Three different methods were used to analyse the meiotic chromosome configurations. The genome relationship system of Alonso & Kimber (1981 and Kimber & Alonso (1981 and the modification of the binomial system of Jackson & Casey (1980 by Spies (1984 proved to be the most sensitive for distinguishing between alio-, segmental alio- and autoploids.

  19. New sections in Penicillium containing novel species producing patulin, pyripyropens or other bioactive compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houbraken, J.; Wang, L.; Lee, H. B.

    2016-01-01

    Subgenera and sections have traditionally been used in Penicillium classifications. In the past, this sectional classification was based on macro- and microscopic characters, and occasionally supplemented with physiological and/or extrolite data. Currently, 25 sections are accepted, largely based...... on phylogenetic data. Certain sections of subgenus Penicillium were never studied in detail using a multigene sequence approach combined with phenotypic, ecological and extrolite data. Based on a combined partial β-tubulin (BenA), calmodulin (CaM) and RNA polymerase II second largest subunit (RPB2) multigene...... sequence dataset, we introduce two new sections (Osmophila and Robsamsonia) in subgenus Penicillium and synonymize section Digitata with section Penicillium. The phylogeny correlates well with phenotypic, physiological and ecological data, and some extrolites were diagnostic for certain Penicillium...

  20. Description of two new species of Clivina Latreille (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Clivinini from southeastern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Bousquet

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Two new species of the genus Clivina Latreille are described. One, C. choatei Bousquet & Skelley, belongs to the nominotypical subgenus and is known from six specimens collected in northern Florida. The species is structurally similar to C. myops Bousquet, known only from the holotype found in North Carolina, but differs among others by its smaller size and wider elytral striae. The second species, C. alabama Bousquet, belongs to the subgenus Antroforceps Barr and is known from two specimens collected in north-central Alabama. The species is structurally most similar to C. sasajii Ball, known only from Latimer County in Oklahoma, but differs among others in the absence of eyes and inthe pronotum and elytra proportionally wider.

  1. Diversity and Systematics of Schizomavella Species (Bryozoa: Bitectiporidae) from the Bathyal NE Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverter-Gil, Oscar; Berning, Björn; Souto, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Eight NE Atlantic and Mediterranean species, which were originally assigned to the genus Schizoporella (Family Schizoporellidae) when introduced, are redescribed and stabilized by typification. Seven of these species are transferred to the bitectiporid genus Schizomavella: S. fischeri, S. glebula, S. neptuni, S. obsoleta, S. richardi, S. triaviculata, and S. triaviculata var. paucimandibulata, which is here raised to species rank. The eighth species, Schizoporella fayalensis, is transferred to the lanceoporid genus Stephanotheca. Schizomavella obsoleta and S. glebula are considered junior subjective synonyms of S. fischeri and S. richardi, respectively. Two new species are described: Schizomavella rectangularis n. sp. from the Strait of Gibraltar, and Schizomavella phterocopa n. sp. from the Great Meteor Bank. A new subgenus, Calvetomavella n. subgen. is established as a result of a phylogenetic analysis based on morphological characters; it includes S. neptuni, S. triaviculata, S. paucimandibulata and S. phterocopa n. sp., together with Schizomavella discoidea and Schizomavella noronhai. The rest of the species remain in the nominotypical subgenus Schizomavella.

  2. Alpha taxonomy of the genus Kessleria Nowicki, 1864, revisited in light of DNA-barcoding (Lepidoptera, Yponomeutidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huemer, Peter; Mutanen, Marko

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The taxonomy of Kessleria, a highly specialized montane genus of Yponomeutidae with larval host restriction to Saxifragaceae and Celastraceae (Saxifraga spp. – subgenus Kessleria; Saxifraga spp. and Parnassia spp. – subgenus Hofmannia), is revised based on external morphology, genitalia and DNA barcodes. An integrative taxonomic approach supports the existence of 29 species in Europe (the two known species from Asia and North America are not treated herein). A full 658 bp fragment of COI was obtained from 135 specimens representing 24 species, a further seven sequences are >560 bp. Five new species are described: Kessleria cottiensis sp. n. (Prov. Torino, Italy; Dep. Hautes Alpes, France), Kessleria dimorpha sp. n. (Dep. Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, France), Kessleria alpmaritimae sp. n. (Dep. Alpes-Maritimes, France), Kessleria apenninica sp. n. (Prov. Rieti, Prov. L´Aquila, Italy), and Kessleria orobiae sp. n. (Prov. Bergamo, Italy). PMID:26019672

  3. A revision of infrageneric classification in Astelia Banks & Sol. ex R.Br. (Asteliaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne L. Birch

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Systematic investigations and phylogenetic analyses have indicated that Astelia, as currently circumscribed, is paraphyletic, with Collospermum nested within it. Further, A. subgenus Astelia is polyphyletic, and A. subgenera Asteliopsis and Tricella are paraphyletic, as currently circumscribed. Revision of the subgeneric classification of Astelia is warranted to ensure classification accurately reflects the evolutionary history of these taxa. Collospermum is relegated to synonymy within Astelia. Astelia is dioecious or polygamodioecious, with a superior ovary, anthers dorsi- or basifixed, pistillodes or pistils that have a single short or poorly defined style, a 3 lobed stigma, and fleshy uni- or trilocular fruit with funicular hairs that are poorly to well developed. Astelia subgenus Collospermum (Skottsb. Birch is described. A key to Astelia sections is provided. Astelia hastata Colenso, A. montana Seem., and A. microsperma Colenso pro parte are resurrected and the new combination A. samoense (Skottsb. Birch, comb. nov. is made.

  4. Descriptions of Lutzomyia (Evandromyia georgii n. sp. and a Synopsis of the Series infraspinosa (Diptera: Psychodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui A Freitas

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Lutzomyia georgii n. sp. and the female of L. tarapacaensis in the Series infraspinosa of the subgenus Evandromyia are described, from specimens collected in rainforest in the north of the State of Pará, Brazil. The new species was taken together with five other Evandromyia species including L. infraspinosa (sensu strictu in the same locality. L. georgii has previously been confused with both L. begonae and L. infraspinosa, whereas L. tarapacaensis would run to L. infraspinosa in recent taxonomic keys. The fact that both L. georgii and L. tarapacaensis are locally sympatric with L. infraspinosa helps to clarify the taxonomic limits of the latter species. New keys to the subgenus Evandromyia are provided.

  5. A reappraisal of Aspergillus section Nidulantes with descriptions of two new sterigmatocystin-producing species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubka, Vit; Nováková, Alena; Peterson, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    . DNA sequences were obtained from up to four loci to conduct phylogenetic analysis of sect. Nidulantes and other species in subgenus Nidulantes. Comparisons of phenetic characters were made. Our goal was to recognize monophyletic taxa for section Nidulantes as well as the other taxa in the subgenus....... Phylogenetic analysis indicated that sections Versicolores and Aenei formed subclades in the larger clade containing the type species of section Nidulantes. In order to maintain monophyly in section Nidulantes, we synonymized sects. Versicolores and Aenei with sect. Nidulantes. In place of sections, we have...... identified six subclades in sect. Nidulantes that also have shared phenetic character sets that allow for easier morphological identification of species. Earlier reports showed that standard β-tubulin primers can occasionally amplify the tubC gene rather than the benA gene they were designed for. We show...

  6. Description of Lutzomyia velezi, a new species of phlebotomine sand fly (Diptera: Psychodidae from the Department of Antioquia, Colombia

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    Eduar Elías Bejarano

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The phlebotomine sand fly Lutzomyia velezi sp.nov. was described and illustrated from male specimens collected by light trap in the Reserva Natural Cañon del Río Claro in the Central Cordillera of the Colombian Andes. The new species belongs to the series sanguinaria of the subgenus Helcocyrtomyia, which is represented in Colombia by Lutzomyia cirrita, Lutzomyia hartmanni, Lutzomyia sanguinaria, Lutzomyia scorzai, Lutzomyia sp. of Pichindé and Lutzomyia tortura. The new species can be differentiated from others of the subgenus by the combination of the following characteristics: long antennal ascoids, reaching level of the papilla, coxite with a single basal seta and fifth palpomere longer than or equal to the sum of the lengths of the third and fourth palpomeres.

  7. Description of Lutzomyia velezi, a new species of phlebotomine sand fly (Diptera: Psychodidae) from the Department of Antioquia, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, Eduar Elías; Vivero, Rafael José; Uribe, Sandra

    2010-05-01

    The phlebotomine sand fly Lutzomyia velezi sp.nov. was described and illustrated from male specimens collected by light trap in the Reserva Natural Cañon del Río Claro in the Central Cordillera of the Colombian Andes. The new species belongs to the series sanguinaria of the subgenus Helcocyrtomyia, which is represented in Colombia by Lutzomyia cirrita, Lutzomyia hartmanni, Lutzomyia sanguinaria, Lutzomyia scorzai, Lutzomyia sp. of Pichindé and Lutzomyia tortura. The new species can be differentiated from others of the subgenus by the combination of the following characteristics: long antennal ascoids, reaching level of the papilla, coxite with a single basal seta and fifth palpomere longer than or equal to the sum of the lengths of the third and fourth palpomeres.

  8. Further evidence from SSCP and ITS DNA sequencing support Trypanosoma evansi and Trypanosoma equiperdum as subspecies or even strains of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yan-Zi; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Hide, Geoff; Lai, De-Hua

    2016-07-01

    The subgenus Trypanozoon includes three species Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma evansi and Trypanosoma equiperdum, which are morphologically identical and indistinguishable even using some molecular methods. In this study, PCR-based single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) was used to analyze the ribosomal DNA of the Trypanozoon species. Data indicate different patterns of ITS2 fragments between T. brucei, T. evansi and T. equiperdum by SSCP. Furthermore, analysis of total ITS sequences within these three members of the subgenus Trypanozoon showed a high degree of homology using phylogenetic analysis but were polyphyletic in haplotype networks. These data provide novel nuclear evidence to further support the notion that T. evansi and T. equiperdum should be subspecies or even strains of T. brucei. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Alpha taxonomy of the genus Kessleria Nowicki, 1864, revisited in light of DNA-barcoding (Lepidoptera, Yponomeutidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Huemer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomy of Kessleria, a highly specialized montane genus of Yponomeutidae with larval host restriction to Saxifragaceae and Celastraceae (Saxifraga spp. – subgenus Kessleria; Saxifraga spp. and Parnassia spp. – subgenus Hofmannia, is revised based on external morphology, genitalia and DNA barcodes. An integrative taxonomic approach supports the existence of 29 species in Europe (the two known species from Asia and North America are not treated herein. A full 658 bp fragment of COI was obtained from 135 specimens representing 24 species, a further seven sequences are >560 bp. Five new species are described: Kessleria cottiensis sp. n. (Prov. Torino, Italy; Dep. Hautes Alpes, France, Kessleria dimorpha sp. n. (Dep. Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, France, Kessleria alpmaritimae sp. n. (Dep. Alpes-Maritimes, France, Kessleria apenninica sp. n. (Prov. Rieti, Prov. L´Aquila, Italy, and Kessleria orobiae sp. n. (Prov. Bergamo, Italy.

  10. Anatomy of fruit and perianth in Peruvian species of the genus Astrocaryum (Arecaceae: Description and taxonomical importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Vegas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The anatomy of fruit and perianth is described for 12 Peruvian species of the genus Astrocaryum. The fruit displays three well-defined layers: exocarp with fiber boundles and sclereids, free or grouped; mesocarp with parenchyma and schizogenous cavities; and heavily sclerified endocarp. Density of vascular bundles of the calyx is higher in the two species of subgenus Astrocaryum and lower in the ten species of subgenus Monogynanthus. Several structures exhibit useful characters for distinguishing subsections and species in the Huicungo section. Such characters include the form and location of fiber packages of the calyx, density of brachysclereids in the distal zone of the exocarp, form of vascular bundles of the corolla, raphides in the mesocarp, presence or absence of trichomes, structure of trichomes, presence or absence of laminar colenchyma in the exocarp, staminodial ring free or adnate and continuity with the corolla. An identification key based on these anatomical characters is supplied.

  11. Culicoides (Avaritia) gornostaevae Mirzaeva, 1984 (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)--a possible vector species of the Obsoletus group new to the European fauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkeby, Carsten; Dominiak, Patrycja

    2014-09-30

    Culicoides gornostaevae Mirzaeva, 1984, known previously only from Siberia, is a boreal species included into the Obsoletus group of Culicoides sg. Avaritia. Members of the subgenus can act as vectors of various diseases. In Europe they are involved in the transmission of the Schmallenberg virus and bluetongue virus. Culicoides gornostaevae Mirzaeva, 1984 is reported for the first time in Europe with new country records from Norway, Poland and Sweden. Culicoides gornostaevae Mirzaeva, 1984 has not been previously mentioned from Europe, even though there has been an extensive monitoring of Culicoides species during the last decades. Most probably this species has been notoriously overlooked in the materials, because of the problems with identification of the females of the subgenus Avaritia. Similar to other species of the Obsoletus group, C. gornostaevae should be regarded as a possible vector for Schmallenberg and bluetongue virus.

  12. Evolution and origins of the Mazatec hallucinogenic sage, Salvia divinorum (Lamiaceae): a molecular phylogenetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Aaron A; Walker, Jay B; Kim, Seung-Chul

    2011-09-01

    Salvia divinorum Epl. & Játiva-M. (Lamiaceae) is a potent hallucinogenic plant that is classified within Salvia subgenus Calosphace, section Dusenostachys, and hypothesized to be an interspecific hybrid. It is of ethnobotanical significance due to its employment in traditional healing ceremonies by the Mazatecs of Oaxaca, Mexico, and due to its unique pharmacology-a highly selective, non-nitrogenous, κ-opioid receptor agonist. In order to test its phylogenetic position and putative hybridity, we sequenced multiple DNA regions (ITS, trnL-trnF, and psbA-trnH) of 52 species-representing the major lineages of subgenus Calosphace-and six accessions of S. divinorum. Our molecular phylogenetic results suggest that S. divinorum should not be classified within Dusenostachys and that it is not a hybrid. Additionally, we determine that the closest known relative of this psychoactive Mexican sage is S. venulosa, a rare endemic of Colombia.

  13. Review of the genus Saprinus Erichson, 1834 from Madagascar and adjacent islands with description of a new species (Coleoptera: Histeridae: Saprininae) Third contribution to the knowledge of the Histeridae of Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, Tomáš; Gomy, Yves

    2016-02-19

    Clown beetles belonging to the genus Saprinus Erichson, 1834 from Madagascar and adjacent islands are reviewed. The Malagasy fauna of Saprinus consists of seven species: Saprinus (Saprinus) erichsonii Marseul, 1855; Saprinus (Saprinus) fulgidicollis Marseul, 1855; Saprinus (Saprinus) basalis Fairmaire, 1898; Saprinus (Saprinus) cupreus Erichson, 1834; Saprinus (Saprinus) chalcites (Illiger, 1807); Saprinus (Saprinus) splendens (Paykull, 1811); one species S. (Saprinus) labordei sp. nov., is described as new. Saprinus erichsonii Marseul, 1855 is transferred from the subgenus Phaonius Reichardt, 1941 into the nominotypical subgenus based on the morphological evidence. Lectotypes of the following species are designated: Saprinus erichsonii Marseul, 1855; Saprinus basalis Fairmaire, 1898 and Saprinus fulgidicollis Marseul, 1855. Saprinus (Saprinus) cupreus Erichson, 1834 is newly reported from Madagascar and Saprinus (Saprinus) basalis Fairmaire, 1898 is newly reported from the following countries: Congo, Gambia, Central African Republic, Namibia, Zimbabwe and Republic of South Africa.

  14. The genus Amegilla (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Anthophorini in Australia: A revision of the subgenera Notomegilla and Zonamegilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remko Leijs

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Australian bees in the subgenera Notomegilla and Zonamegilla of the genus Amegilla are revised. Commonly in Australia the species in these subgenera are called blue-banded bees, although not all species have blue bands. A phylogeny based on mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 sequence data was used to delineate the species and a set of morphological criteria was developed for species identification. Strong support was obtained for separating the Australian species into the three subgenera previously proposed on the basis of morphology. Two species, are recognised in the subgenus Notomegilla and eleven new synonymies are proposed. Twelve Australian species are recognised in the subgenus Zonamegilla including four new species: indistincta, karlba, paeninsulae and viridicingulata, and twenty new synonymies are proposed. Keys to the species of both sexes and descriptions or redescriptions of all species are provided. Distribution maps, data on flower visitation and phenology are given.

  15. A Revision of the Mite Family Phytoseiidae in Japan (Acari, Gamasina), with Remarks on its Bilogy

    OpenAIRE

    EHARA, Shozo; AMANO, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    The classification of the mite family Phytoseiidae in Japan is revised. The 77 species recognized from Japan are assigned to three sub families, five tribes, nine genera, and 11 subgenera. Moreover, three large subgenera are divided into a total of 16 different species groups. A new tribe, Indoseiulini, is proposed, Okiseius Ehara, 1967 is reduced to a subgenus of Amblyseius, and three new species, Amblyseius (Proprioseiopsis) nemotoi, Typhlodromus (Typhlodromus) pseudopyri, and T. (T.) armig...

  16. Amanita viscidolutea, a new species from Brazil with a key to Central and South American species of Amanita section Amanita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menolli, Nelson; Capelari, Marina; Baseia, Iuri Goulart

    2009-01-01

    We described and illustrated Amanita viscidolutea sp. nov. from specimens collected in the state of Rio Grande do Norte, northeastern Brazil. The main characteristics of the new species are its yellow pileus with white margin, the viscidity of the pileal surface, an exannulate stipe and inamyloid basidiospores. We also present an artificial dichotomous key to Central and South American species of Amanita (subgenus Amanita) section Amanita.

  17. Элементный состав видов рода Equisetum L

    OpenAIRE

    Коломиец, Н.; Агеева, Л.; Абрамец, Н.

    2014-01-01

    A study of the elemental composition of 10 species of flora horsetail Siberia using neutron activation and X-ray fluorescence analysis methods. Established the presence of 38 chemical elements. In the systematically closely related species within a single subgenus, installed a similar elemental composition. Identified items that as phenolic compounds, can be considered an additional chemotaxonomic marker for the genus, subgenera and species. A horsetail species which contain a lot of silicon,...

  18. Description of Pintomyia salomoni sp. n., a new phlebotomine species from northwest Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuenzalida, A D; Quintana, M G

    2017-06-01

    A new species of phlebotomine sandfly is described and illustrated using male and female specimens collected in the provinces of Jujuy and Tucumán, Argentina. Both male and female morphological characters allow the inclusion of the new species within the Pintomyia genus, Pifanomyia subgenus, serrana series (Diptera: Psychodidae). The species was denominated as Pintomyia salomoni n. sp., and is closely related to Pintomyia (Pifanomyia) torresi and Pintomyia (Piffanomyia) boliviana. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  19. Two new species and updated checklist of Oxyethira Eaton, 1873 (Trichoptera, Hydroptilidae) from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Isabela C; Dumas, Leandro L; Souza, Wagner R M

    2017-10-16

    Two new species of Oxyethira Eaton, 1873 are described: Oxyethira cascadanta sp. n. and Oxyethira quadrilobata sp. n. Description and illustrations of the new species are provided based on specimens collected in Parque Nacional da Serra da Canastra, Minas Gerais State, Southeast Brazil. Both species are assigned to the subgenus Loxotrichia but differ from other species mainly in morphology of the subgenital plate, subgenital processes and inferior appendages. Additionally, we provide an updated checklist of the Oxyethira species from Brazil.

  20. A new subterranean Iberian Cephennium with unusually modified metatrochanters (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Scydmaeninae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jałoszyński, Paweł; Struyve, Tim

    2016-11-10

    Cephennium (Geodytes) gladiator sp. n. is described from north-western Spain (Galicia). This is the first known species of Cephennium (and Cephenniini) with males showing monstrously modified metatrochanters in the form of blade-like projections as long as 3/4 of femora. Similar modifications in Scydmaeninae were known previously only among Oriental and South Pacific Glandulariini. Morphological structures of the new species and its placement in the subgenus Geodytes are discussed.

  1. Systematics and Population Level Analysis of Anopheles darlingi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conn JE

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A new phylogenetic analysis of the Nyssorhynchus subgenus (Danoff-Burg and Conn, unpub. data using six data sets {morphological (all life stages; scanning electron micrographs of eggs; nuclear ITS2 sequences; mitochondrial COII, ND2 and ND6 sequences} revealed different topologies when each data set was analyzed separately but no heterogeneity between the data sets using the arn test. Consequently, the most accurate estimate of the phylogeny was obtained when all the data were combined. This new phylogeny supports a monophyletic Nyssorhynchus subgenus but both previously recognized sections in the subgenus (Albimanus and Argyritarsis were demonstrated to be paraphyletic relative to each other and four of the seven clades included species previously placed in both sections. One of these clades includes both Anopheles darlingi and An. albimanus, suggesting that the ability to vector malaria effectively may have originated once in this subgenus. Both a conserved (315 bp and a variable (425 bp region of the mitochondrial COI gene from 15 populations of An. darlingi from Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, French Guiana, Peru and Venezuela were used to examine the evolutionary history of this species and to test several analytical assumptions. Results demonstrated (1 parsimony analysis is equally informative compared to distance analysis using NJ; (2 clades or clusters are more strongly supported when these two regions are combined compared to either region separately; (3 evidence (in the form of remnants of older haplotype lineages for two colonization events; and (4 significant genetic divergence within the population from Peixoto de Azevedo (State of Mato Grosso, Brazil. The oldest lineage includes populations from Peixoto, Boa Vista (State of Roraima and Dourado (State of São Paulo.

  2. Occurrence of Mesopostnotal Setae and Scales in the Family Culicidae

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    subgenus, and Mpn setae were generally absent, with the following exceptions. Five of 35 specimens ofmetempsytus Dyar, from Costa Rica and Panama had...alveoli: 3 males, 2 females (Brazil); 1 male (Ecuador); 17 males (French Guiana); 1 male, 3 females ( Panama ); and 1 female (Peru). Usually from 2 to 6...Peterson 1981b), and Chironomidae (Oliver 1981). Using the evolutionary ranking of these families (McAlpine et al. 1981), only the most primitive

  3. Hybridization in East African swarm-raiding army ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronauer, Daniel Jc; Peters, Marcell K; Schöning, Caspar

    2011-01-01

    Hybridization can have complex effects on evolutionary dynamics in ants because of the combination of haplodiploid sex-determination and eusociality. While hybrid non-reproductive workers have been found in a range of species, examples of gene-flow via hybrid queens and males are rare. We studied...... hybridization in East African army ants (Dorylus subgenus Anomma) using morphology, mitochondrial DNA sequences, and nuclear microsatellites....

  4. The J. Pedro Duret Mosquito Collection (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    the subgenus Mochlostyrox. Holotype male: ൙.I.60/ Colombia /Dep. Choco /Quibdo/Col. Duret/ [underside oflabel] 3354//HOLOTIPO/ /3354//Culex...1955/& Damasceno." Paratypes - none. chitIIe Duret, 1967b:113. Culex (Culex). Holotype male: "I.60/ Colombia /BogotajMonserrat/Col. Duret/[under- side of...Duret - Det. 1971." Paratypes - 4 males. ferreri Duret, 1968f:79. Culex (Melanoconion). Holotype male: ൞.III.61/ Colombia /N. Santander/Cucuta/Col. Duret

  5. Hidracáridos (Acari, Hydrachnidia de la cuenca Andina del río Beni, Bolivia Hydracarids (Acari, Hydrachnidia from the Andean basin of Beni river, Bolivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Rosso de Ferradás

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Water mites from Andean part of the Bolivian Amazonian rivers were examined. A new species is described, Limnesia aymara. New records and redescription are made for Hygrobatella multiacetabulata Cook,1980, Atractides brasiliensis (Lundblad, 1937 and Krendowskia convexa (Ribaga, 1902. A new subgenus Schwoerbelobatella for hygrobatelids poliacetabulated is proposed and characterized. Ecological characteristics of the river area sampled and ecological preferences of the analyzed species are discussed.

  6. On Three Species Of The Trematode Genus Plagioporus Stafford, 1904 From Red Sea Fishes

    OpenAIRE

    Ramadan, M. M. [مصطفى محمود رمضان

    1985-01-01

    The genus PIagioporus is breiefly reviewed. P. (Caudotestis) neopercis is re-described from Anampses caeruleopunctatus and Lethrinus miniatus and P. (Caudotestis) lethrini from L. nebulosus and L. miniatus. Both trematodes are re-described on the basis of certain additional morphological features as well as new host and locality records. PIagioporus (Paraplagioporus) saoudin. sp., from Acanthopagurus bifasciatus, represents the second species in the subgenus. The new species is characterised ...

  7. On the taxonomy of the genus Sidonis Mulsant, stat. nov. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Chnoodini) with descriptions of new species from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churata-Salcedo, Julissa M; Almeida, Lucia M; González, Guillermo; Gordon, Robert D

    2017-11-20

    The subgenus Sidonis Mulsant, 1850 is elevated to generic status and two new species from Brazil are described and illustrated: Sidonis bira sp. nov. and Sidonis biguttata sp. nov. New geographic distribution records are provided. In addition, lectotypes of Sidonis consanguinea (Mulsant, 1850) and S. guttata (Sicard, 1912) are designated. Illustrations of diagnostic characters from five of six species of the genus, comments on the differences from similar species and a key to all recognized taxa are included.

  8. A new species of the genus Nalassus Mulsant (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae: Helopini) from the Baltic amber

    OpenAIRE

    M. V. Nabozhenko; Perkovsky, E.E.; Chernei, L. S.

    2016-01-01

    The first Eocene species of the tribe Helopini, Nalassus klebsi sp. nov., from the Baltic amber is described. The new species is included in the nominative subgenus and similar to the extant species N. dermestoides (Illiger) and N. laevioctostriatus (Goeze), from which it differs in the shape of eyes (eyes are considerably less transverse than in living Palearctic species of the genus Nalassus Mulsant), the shape of the pronotum with acute posterior angles (other Palearctic Nalassus have o...

  9. Anatomical structure of pericarp and seed skin of Quercus species introduced in St. Petersburg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay V. Lavrentyev

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The results of anatomical study of pericarp and seed skin of 8 species from 3 sections and 7 subsections of subgenus Euquercus of genus Quercus introduced in Saint-Petersburg are given. The structure of pericarp is peculiar not only in limits of sections but inside of subsections as well. The results of research may be of practical importance for species identification in arboreal collections. The study was supported by RFBR, grant 13-04-00852.

  10. A new species of the genus Halolaelaps Berlese & Trouessart, 1889 (Acari, Gamasida, Halolaelapidae from the Spanish mediterranean coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehrnsberger, R.

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The new species Halolaelaps (Saprogamasellus hispanicus sp. nov. of Halolaelapidae mites (Acari, Gamasida is described and determination keys to the males and females of the subgenus Saprogamasellus are given.Se describe una nueva especie de ácaro de la familia Halolaelapidae, Halolaelaps (Saprogamasellus hispanicus sp. nov., y se proporcionan claves de identificación de machos y hembras del subgénero Saprogamasellus.

  11. SOME ASPECTS OF THE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. MATHEW

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The Juno group of Iris (Mathew, 1981 have been treated taxonomically as a section (sect. Juno, as a subgenus (subg. Scorpiris and as a separate genus (Juno. Whatever its status, the group, comprising some 57 species, is a morphologically convincing assemblage, occurring in the Mediterranean region eastwards into western and central Asia. The distribution, habitat and characteristics of the group are described.

  12. SOME ASPECTS OF THE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. MATHEW

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available The Juno group of Iris (Mathew, 1981 have been treated taxonomically as a section (sect. Juno, as a subgenus (subg. Scorpiris and as a separate genus (Juno. Whatever its status, the group, comprising some 57 species, is a morphologically convincing assemblage, occurring in the Mediterranean region eastwards into western and central Asia. The distribution, habitat and characteristics of the group are described.

  13. Polymerase chain reaction-miniexon: a promising diagnostic method for mucocutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovalle-Bracho, Clemencia; Díaz-Toro, Yira Rosalba; Muvdi-Arenas, Sandra

    2016-05-01

    Mucocutaneous leishmaniasis is a chronic disease caused mainly by Leishmania species that belong to Viannia subgenus. It affects upper respiratory airways and may lead to deformity, dysphagia, and even death in severe cases. Diagnosis is a challenge because clinical and histopathologic changes are easily confused with other diseases, and conventional methods for parasite identification and culture have a low sensitivity. Molecular methods have been used in the last two decades. In 2007, we published a validation study using internal transcript spacers and kinetoplast DNA as molecular targets with satisfactory results. In this research, we tested miniexon gene as the target. Mucosal tissue samples from 60 Colombian patients with clinical signs of mucocutaneous leishmaniasis were included. A composite reference standard defined 30 cases and 30 controls. Two blind observers performed patient classification and test application independently. Miniexon gene amplification generated: 226-230 bp fragment for subgenus Viannia; 308 bp fragment for L. amazonensis; 340 bp fragment for L. mexicana; and 418 bp fragment for L. infantum-chagasi. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sensitivity for fresh samples was 87.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 72.2-100), specificity, 95% (95% CI 83.0-100), and positive likelihood ratio was 17.5 (95% CI 2.58-118.93), similar to results obtained with paraffin-embedded samples. Agreement between observers was 96% (kappa = 0.912; 95% CI 0.815-1.000) for both subgenus Viannia and Leishmania. We consider PCR-miniexon as a diagnostic method of first choice for mucocutaneous leishmaniasis due to its excellent diagnostic performance and its ability to discriminate between Leishmania and Viannia subgenera as well as between species belonging to Leishmania subgenus. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  14. Genome-wide SNP analysis reveals distinct origins of **Trypanosoma evansi** and **Trypanosoma equiperdum**

    OpenAIRE

    Cuypers, Bart; Broeck, Van den, Frederik; Reet, Van, Nick; Meehan, Conor J.; Cauchard, Julien; Wilkes, Jonathan M.; Claes, Filip; Goddeeris, Bruno; Birhanu, Hadush; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Laukens, Kris; Büscher, Philippe; Deborggraeve, Stijn

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosomes cause a variety of diseases in man and domestic animals in Africa, Latin America and Asia. In the Trypanozoon subgenus, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense cause human African trypanosomiasis, while T. b. brucei, T. evansi and T. equiperdum are responsible for nagana, surra and dourine in domestic animals, respectively. The genetic relationships between T. evansi and T. equiperdum and other Trypanozoon species remain unclear because the majority of phylogenetic ana...

  15. Further evidence from SSCP and ITS DNA sequencing support Trypanosoma evansi and Trypanosoma equiperdum as subspecies or even strains of Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Y; Lun, Z; Zhu, X; Hide, G; Lai, D

    2016-01-01

    The subgenus Trypanozoon includes three species Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma evansi and Trypanosoma equiperdum, which are morphologically identical and indistinguishable even using some molecular methods. In this study, PCR-based single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) was used to analyze the ribosomal DNA of the Trypanozoon species. Data indicate different patterns of ITS2 fragments between T. brucei, T. evansi and T. equiperdum by SSCP. Furthermore, analysis of total ITS seque...

  16. Isolation, cultivation and molecular characterization of a new Trypanosoma equiperdum strain in Mongolia

    OpenAIRE

    Suganuma, Keisuke; Narantsatsral, Sandagdorj; Battur, Banzragch; Yamasaki, Shino; Otgonsuren, Davaajav; Musinguzi, Simon Peter; Davaasuren, Batdorj; Battsetseg, Badgar; Inoue, Noboru

    2016-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma equiperdum causes dourine via sexual transmission in Equidae. T. equiperdum is classified under the subgenus Trypanozoon along with the T. brucei sspp. and T. evansi; however, the species classification of Trypanozoon remains a controversial topic due to the limited number of T. equiperdum reference strains. In addition, it is possible that some were misclassified T. evansi strains. Thus, there is a strong need for a new T. equiperdum strain directly isolated from the g...

  17. First Draft Genome Sequence of the Dourine Causative Agent: Trypanosoma Equiperdum Strain OVI

    OpenAIRE

    H?bert, Laurent; Moumen, Bouziane; Madeline, Anthony; Steinbiss, Sascha; Lakhdar, Latifa; Van Reet, Nick; B?scher, Philippe; Laugier, Claire; Cauchard, Julien; Petry, Sandrine

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma equiperdum is the causative agent of dourine, a sexually-transmitted infection of horses. This parasite belongs to the subgenus Trypanozoon that also includes the agent of sleeping sickness (Trypanosoma brucei) and surra (Trypanosoma evansi). We herein report the genome sequence of a T. equiperdum strain OVI, isolated from a horse in South-Africa in 1976. This is the first genome sequence of the T. equiperdum species, and its availability will provide important insights for future...

  18. Molecular characterization and classification of Trypanosoma spp. Venezuelan isolates based on microsatellite markers and kinetoplast maxicircle genes

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez, E.; Perrone, T.; Recchimuzzi, G.; Cardozo, I.; Biteau, N.; Aso, PM; Mijares, A.; Baltz, T.; Berthier, D.; Balzano-Nogueira, L.; Gonzatti, MI

    2015-01-01

    Background Livestock trypanosomoses, caused by three species of the Trypanozoon subgenus, Trypanosoma brucei brucei, T. evansi and T. equiperdum is widely distributed throughout the world and constitutes an important limitation for the production of animal protein. T. evansi and T. equiperdum are morphologically indistinguishable parasites that evolved from a common ancestor but acquired important biological differences, including host range, mode of transmission, distribution, clinical sympt...

  19. Das Verhalten der Schneemaus : (Chionomys nivalis)

    OpenAIRE

    Niederer, Arlette

    2008-01-01

    1. Biology of the snow vole The snow vole (Chionomys nivalis) belongs to the family of voles (Arvicolidae). Within the Microtus genus it constitutes its own sub-genus (Chionomys), of which it is the only representative. The territory in which it appears is vast, ranging from the northwest of Spain to Turkmenistan and from the Carpathian Mountains to Lebanon, but its appearance is generally limited to small residual areas. The Alps constitute the largest area of cohesive occu...

  20. Ape malaria transmission and potential for ape-to-human transfers in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Makanga, B; Yangari, P.; Rahola, N; Rougeron, V.; Elguero, E; Boundenga, L; Moukodoum, ND; Okouga, AP; Arnathau, C; Durand, P; Willaume, E.; Ayala, D; D. Fontenille; Ayala, FJ; Renaud, F.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the large diversity of malaria parasites infecting African great apes (subgenus Laverania) and their strong host specificity. Although the existence of genetic incompatibilities preventing the cross-species transfer may explain host specificity, the existence of vectors with a high preference for a determined host represents another possibility. To test this hypothesis, we undertook a 15-mo-long longitudinal entomological survey in two forest regions of Gabon, ...

  1. New species of Grossander Slater, 1976 (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Rhyparochromidae: Drymini) from the Oriental Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondorosy, Előd; Fábics, Anita

    2015-01-05

    The previously known distribution area of the genus Grossander Slater, 1976 (Hemiptera, Heteroptera, Rhyparochromidae, Drymini) is broadened with the description of two new species: Grossander papuanus sp. nov. (New Guinea) and Grossander eylesi sp. nov. (Burma, Laos, Thailand, Malaysia and Indonesia). Grossander (Oculoander) subgen. nov. is created for these new taxa. Drawings of habitus and male genitalia are presented. Keys to the subgenera of Grossander, and to the species of the new subgenus are provided.

  2. Hábitat y distribución de cinco especies de Quercus (Fagaceae) en la Meseta Central de Chiapas, México

    OpenAIRE

    J.G. Alvarez-Moctezuma; Ochoa-Gaona, S.; J. de Jong, B H; Soto-Pinto, M L

    2015-01-01

    We describe the habitat ofspecies within .the Fagaceae subgenus Lepidobalanus (genus Quercus) and identify environmental variables relatedto their distribution in the Meseta Central of Chiapas, Southern Mexico. In 258 plots adortúnance index was used, combining tree density arid crown cover, for Quercus peduncularis, Q. polymorpha,Q. rugosa, Q. sebifera and Q.segoviensis. The following variables were measmed:. altitude, pre' cipitatioh from November through April (PPNA), exposure, slope, fuel...

  3. A Checklist of the Mosquitoes of Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    TOXORHYNCHITINAE Genus TOXORHYNCHITES Theobald Subgenus TOr’RHYNCHS Theobald 1. amboinensis (Doleschall), 1857 L* L L LT L 2. aurifluus (Edwards), 1921 L L ?L 3...Topomyia 10 Tripteroides 44 Uranotaenia 30 Toxorhynchites 13 Total (18 genera) 457 -21- ANNEX 2 Further possible species records in Indonesia: Kalimantan...Rah. Rachisoura - Rac. 25 Tripteroides - Trp. Uranotaenia I Ur. Pseudoficalbia -Pfc. Uranotaenia -Ura. Toxorhynchites = Tx. Toxorhynchtes -TOx

  4. The surface charge of trypanosomatids of the genus trypanosoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Souto Padrón

    1990-06-01

    Full Text Available Cell electrophoresis was used for determionation of the electrophoretic mobility (EPM of epimastigo and trypamastigote forms of several isolates of Trypanosoma cruzi and some stocks of other members of the Schizotrypanum subgenus, such as T. dionisii, T. vespertilionis and T. myoti. The EPM of T. bruceli, T. rangeli, and T. conorhini was also determined. The results obtained show that the EPM values con be useful to distinguish the parasites.

  5. Correction of existing generic and species concepts in Platyceroidini (Coleoptera: Lucanidae: Lucaninae) and the description of four new species of Platyceroides Benesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, M J

    2017-05-23

    The endemic North American stag beetle tribe Platyceroidini Paulsen & Hawks (Coleoptera: Lucanidae: Lucaninae) is reviewed. All primary types were studied and the existing generic and species concepts are subsequently corrected. Based on study of the male genitalia and external morphology, the previously monotypic genus Platyceropsis Benesh is reduced to subgeneric status under Platyceroides Benesh, new status, and the species Platyceroides laticollis (Casey) and Platyceroides keeni (Casey) new combination are transferred to this subgenus. Praocerus, new subgenus, is created to contain the species Platyceroides latus (Fall), and P. viriditinctus (Benesh). In the nominal subgenus, confusion has resulted from the historic misapplication of the oldest available name, Platyceroides agassii (LeConte), resulting in significant underestimation of the number of extant taxa. Lectotypes are designated for four species-group names (listed in their original combinations): Platycerus latus Fall, Platycerus opacus Fall, Platycerus pacificus Casey, and Platycerus parvicollis Casey. Four new species (Platyceroides barrae, P. infernus, P. pampinatus, and P. umpquus) are described from California and Oregon, United States of America. The following species are valid and are removed from synonymy with P. agassii: P. pacificus (Casey), revised status, and P. californicus (Casey), revised status. The synonym Platycerus parvicollis Casey is transferred from Platyceroides agassii to P. californicus, new synonymy. With the addition of four new species and the correction of the mistaken synonymies the total number of species in the tribe Platyceroidini is now 16.

  6. The role of defensive ecological interactions in the evolution of conotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashanth, J R; Dutertre, S; Jin, A H; Lavergne, V; Hamilton, B; Cardoso, F C; Griffin, J; Venter, D J; Alewood, P F; Lewis, R J

    2016-01-01

    Venoms comprise of complex mixtures of peptides evolved for predation and defensive purposes. Remarkably, some carnivorous cone snails can inject two distinct venoms in response to predatory or defensive stimuli, providing a unique opportunity to study separately how different ecological pressures contribute to toxin diversification. Here, we report the extraordinary defensive strategy of the Rhizoconus subgenus of cone snails. The defensive venom from this worm-hunting subgenus is unusually simple, almost exclusively composed of αD-conotoxins instead of the ubiquitous αA-conotoxins found in the more complex defensive venom of mollusc- and fish-hunting cone snails. A similarly compartmentalized venom gland as those observed in the other dietary groups facilitates the deployment of this defensive venom. Transcriptomic analysis of a Conus vexillum venom gland revealed the αD-conotoxins as the major transcripts, with lower amounts of 15 known and four new conotoxin superfamilies also detected with likely roles in prey capture. Our phylogenetic and molecular evolution analysis of the αD-conotoxins from five subgenera of cone snails suggests they evolved episodically as part of a defensive strategy in the Rhizoconus subgenus. Thus, our results demonstrate an important role for defence in the evolution of conotoxins. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Phylogeny and Historical Biogeography of Asian Pterourus Butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae): A Case of Intercontinental Dispersal from North America to East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Wei; Yen, Shen-Horn; Lees, David C; Lu, Chih-Chien; Yang, Ping-Shih; Hsu, Yu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The phylogenetic status of the well-known Asian butterflies often known as Agehana (a species group, often treated as a genus or a subgenus, within Papilio sensu lato) has long remained unresolved. Only two species are included, and one of them especially, Papilio maraho, is not only rare but near-threatened, being monophagous on its vulnerable hostplant, Sassafras randaiense (Lauraceae). Although the natural history and population conservation of "Agehana" has received much attention, the biogeographic origin of this group still remains enigmatic. To clarify these two questions, a total of 86 species representatives within Papilionidae were sampled, and four genes (concatenated length 3842 bp) were used to reconstruct their phylogenetic relationships and historical scenarios. Surprisingly, "Agehana" fell within the American Papilio subgenus Pterourus and not as previously suggested, phylogenetically close to the Asian Papilio subgenus Chilasa. We therefore formally synonymize Agehana with Pterourus. Dating and biogeographic analysis allow us to infer an intercontinental dispersal of an American ancestor of Asian Pterourus in the early Miocene, which was coincident with historical paleo-land bridge connections, resulting in the present "East Asia-America" disjunction distribution. We emphasize that species exchange between East Asia and America seems to be a quite frequent occurrence in butterflies during the Oligocene to Miocene climatic optima.

  8. Phylogeny and Historical Biogeography of Asian Pterourus Butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae: A Case of Intercontinental Dispersal from North America to East Asia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Wei Wu

    Full Text Available The phylogenetic status of the well-known Asian butterflies often known as Agehana (a species group, often treated as a genus or a subgenus, within Papilio sensu lato has long remained unresolved. Only two species are included, and one of them especially, Papilio maraho, is not only rare but near-threatened, being monophagous on its vulnerable hostplant, Sassafras randaiense (Lauraceae. Although the natural history and population conservation of "Agehana" has received much attention, the biogeographic origin of this group still remains enigmatic. To clarify these two questions, a total of 86 species representatives within Papilionidae were sampled, and four genes (concatenated length 3842 bp were used to reconstruct their phylogenetic relationships and historical scenarios. Surprisingly, "Agehana" fell within the American Papilio subgenus Pterourus and not as previously suggested, phylogenetically close to the Asian Papilio subgenus Chilasa. We therefore formally synonymize Agehana with Pterourus. Dating and biogeographic analysis allow us to infer an intercontinental dispersal of an American ancestor of Asian Pterourus in the early Miocene, which was coincident with historical paleo-land bridge connections, resulting in the present "East Asia-America" disjunction distribution. We emphasize that species exchange between East Asia and America seems to be a quite frequent occurrence in butterflies during the Oligocene to Miocene climatic optima.

  9. Towards a Phylogeny for Coffea (Rubiaceae): identifying well-supported lineages based on nuclear and plastid DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurin, Olivier; Davis, Aaron P; Chester, Michael; Mvungi, Esther F; Jaufeerally-Fakim, Yasmina; Fay, Michael F

    2007-12-01

    The phylogenetic relationships between species of Coffea and Psilanthus remain poorly understood, owing to low levels of sequence variation recovered in previous studies, coupled with relatively limited species sampling. In this study, the relationships between Coffea and Psilanthus species are assessed based on substantially increased molecular sequence data and greatly improved species sampling. Phylogenetic relationships are assessed using parsimony, with sequence data from four plastid regions [trnL-F intron, trnL-F intergenic spacer (IGS), rpl16 intron and accD-psa1 IGS], and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of nuclear rDNA (ITS 1/5.8S/ITS 2). Supported lineages in Coffea are discussed within the context of geographical correspondence, biogeography, morphology and systematics. Several major lineages with geographical coherence, as identified in previous studies based on smaller data sets, are supported. Other lineages with either geographical or ecological correspondence are recognized for the first time. Coffea subgenus Baracoffea is shown to be monophyletic, but Coffea subgenus Coffea is paraphyletic. Sequence data do not substantiate the monophyly of either Coffea or Psilanthus. Low levels of sequence divergence do not allow detailed resolution of relationships within Coffea, most notably for species of Coffea subgenus Coffea occurring in Madagascar. The origin of C. arabica by recent hybridization between C. canephora and C. eugenioides is supported. Phylogenetic separation resulting from the presence of the Dahomey Gap is inferred based on sequence data from Coffea.

  10. Equisetum species show uniform epicuticular wax structures but diverse composition patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, Thomas; Haas, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Only few data on the epicuticular waxes (EWs) of horsetails are available. This contribution therefore focuses on the wax micromorphology and chemical composition of Equisetum species of the subgenera Equisetum and Hippochaete. Distribution patterns and structural details of EW on the shoots were studied by scanning electron microscopy. After extraction with chloroform, the chemical composition of wax isolates was analysed by gas chromatography. Epicuticular wax crystals were non-oriented platelets or membraneous platelets. They were usually located on subsidiary cells of stomata and adjacent cells. Other parts of the shoots were covered mainly with a smooth wax film or small granules only. The chemical constituents found were alkanes, esters, aldehydes, primary alcohols and free fatty acids in a range of C(20)-C(36) (in esters C(36)-C(56)). All species of the subgenus Hippochaete showed a similar pattern of fractions with high percentages of alkanes and aldehydes, whereas the subgenus Equisetum species had distinctly different wax compositions. Extracts from the internodes-surfaces without well-developed EW crystals and only few stomata-showed the lowest contents of aldehydes. The covering with EW crystals will provide unhindered gas exchange and, combined with intracuticular wax, may prevent excess water loss during winter in the evergreen shoots of the subgenus Hippochaete. The results indicate that the Equisetum wax micromorphology and biosynthesis are comparable to EW of other pteridophyte classes and mosses.

  11. The phylogeny of Simulium (Chirostilbia (Diptera: Simuliidae and perspectives on the systematics of the genus in the Neotropical Region

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    Leonardo Henrique Gil-Azevedo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, knowledge of Neotropical Simuliidae has been accumulating quickly. However, information about supra-specific relationships is scarce and diagnoses of Simulium subgenera are unsatisfactory. To investigate the relationships among Simulium (Chirostilbia species and test the subgenus monophyly, we performed a cladistic analysis. The ingroup included all species of this subgenus and the outgroup included representatives of the 17 species groups of Neotropical Simulium and three Holarctic species. The study was based on a data matrix with 31 terminal taxa and 45 morphological characteristics of adult, pupa and larva. The phylogenetic analysis under equal weights resulted in eight most-parsimonious trees (length = 178, consistency index = 34, retention index = 67. The monophyly of the S. (Chirostilbia was not supported in our analysis. The Simulium subpallidum species group was closer to Simulium (Psilopelmia and Simulium (Ectemnaspis than to the Simulium pertinax species group. Additionally, we describe the three-dimensional shape of the terminalia of male and female of Simulium (Chirostilbia for the first time and provide comments about the taxonomic problems involving some species of the subgenus: Simulium acarayense, Simulium papaveroi, S. pertinax, Simulium serranum, Simulium striginotum and S. subpallidum.

  12. Phylogenetic relationships of Palaearctic Formica species (Hymenoptera, Formicidae based on mitochondrial cytochrome B sequences.

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    Anna V Goropashnaya

    Full Text Available Ants of genus Formica demonstrate variation in social organization and represent model species for ecological, behavioral, evolutionary studies and testing theoretical implications of the kin selection theory. Subgeneric division of the Formica ants based on morphology has been questioned and remained unclear after an allozyme study on genetic differentiation between 13 species representing all subgenera was conducted. In the present study, the phylogenetic relationships within the genus were examined using mitochondrial DNA sequences of the cytochrome b and a part of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6. All 23 Formica species sampled in the Palaearctic clustered according to the subgeneric affiliation except F. uralensis that formed a separate phylogenetic group. Unlike Coptoformica and Formica s. str., the subgenus Serviformica did not form a tight cluster but more likely consisted of a few small clades. The genetic distances between the subgenera were around 10%, implying approximate divergence time of 5 Myr if we used the conventional insect divergence rate of 2% per Myr. Within-subgenus divergence estimates were 6.69% in Serviformica, 3.61% in Coptoformica, 1.18% in Formica s. str., which supported our previous results on relatively rapid speciation in the latter subgenus. The phylogeny inferred from DNA sequences provides a necessary framework against which the evolution of social traits can be compared. We discuss implications of inferred phylogeny for the evolution of social traits.

  13. A new large species of Bitis Gray, 1842 (Serpentes: Viperidae) from the Bale Mountains of Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, David J; Wade, Edward O Z; Spawls, Stephen; Böhme, Wolfgang; Buechley, Evan R; Sykes, Daniel; Colston, Timothy J

    2016-03-20

    A new species of viperine viperid snake is described, Bitis harenna sp. nov. The new species is a member of the subgenus Macrocerastes based on it having three scales separating the nasal and rostral shields, and on the combination of 'divisions' of dorsal scale rows on the upper flanks and 'fusions' of rows on the lower flanks. Bitis harenna sp. nov. is distinguished from other members of the subgenus by its unique colour pattern, posterior parietal flange on the lateral wall of the braincase, and possibly by differences in scalation and head proportions. Only a single museum specimen is known, a female collected from 'Dodola' in Ethiopia probably in the late 1960s and previously identified as a possibly unusually coloured and patterned B. parviocula. A live, presumably male, specimen very closely resembling the holotype of Bitis harenna sp. nov. was photographed on the Harenna escarpment of the Bale Mountains National Park, Ethiopia in 2013, providing secure occurrence data and evidence that the holotype is not a uniquely aberrant specimen. A revised key to the species of Bitis in Ethiopia is presented. Aspects of body scalation are compared among species of the subgenus Macrocerastes and between species of Macrocerastes and Bitis, and several systematic characters are highlighted and clarified.

  14. The unexpectedly dull tadpole of Madagascar’s largest frog, Mantidactylus guttulatus

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    Arne Schulze

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Madagascar-endemic mantellid genus Mantidactylus contains one subclade with two described frog species characterized by very large body sizes. This subclade is classified as the subgenus Mantidactylus and is widespread in eastern and northern Madagascar, but their reproductive biology and larval stages are still unknown. We here provide a detailed description of the larvae of one species in this subgenus, M. guttulatus, on the basis of genetic assignment (16S DNA barcoding. The tadpoles were collected in the dry season from shallow waters near a stream in the Mahajanga Province in northwestern Madagascar. Their body and tail shape is remarkably generalized as typical for stream-adapted tadpoles, and the oral disc and labial keratodont row formula (4(2-4/3(1 are similar to those of other lotic mantellid frog larvae with generalized mouthparts like those in the subgenus Brygoomantis. The well-separated positions of these subgenera in the mantellid phylogeny suggest extensive homoplasy in the evolution of larval mouthpart morphology within Mantidactylus.

  15. The First Comprehensive Phylogeny of Coptis (Ranunculaceae and Its Implications for Character Evolution and Classification.

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    Kun-Li Xiang

    Full Text Available Coptis (Ranunculaceae contains 15 species and is one of the pharmaceutically most important plant genera in eastern Asia. Understanding of the evolution of morphological characters and phylogenetic relationships within the genus is very limited. Here, we present the first comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of the genus based on two plastid and one nuclear markers. The phylogeny was reconstructed using Bayesian inference, as well as maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood methods. The Swofford-Olsen-Waddell-Hillis and Bayesian tests were used to assess the strength of the conflicts between traditional taxonomic units and those suggested by the phylogenetic inferences. Evolution of morphological characters was inferred using Bayesian method to identify synapomorphies for the infrageneric lineages. Our data recognize two strongly supported clades within Coptis. The first clade contains subgenus Coptis and section Japonocoptis of subgenus Metacoptis, supported by morphological characters, such as traits of the central leaflet base, petal color, and petal shape. The second clade consists of section Japonocoptis of subgenus Metacoptis. Coptis morii is not united with C. quinquefolia, in contrast with the view that C. morii is a synonym of C. quinquefolia. Two varieties of C. chinensis do not cluster together. Coptis groenlandica and C. lutescens are reduced to C. trifolia and C. japonica, respectively. Central leaflet base, sepal shape, and petal blade carry a strong phylogenetic signal in Coptis, while leaf type, sepal and petal color, and petal shape exhibit relatively higher levels of evolutionary flexibility.

  16. Tekslinguistiek: van teorie tot praktyk

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    S. Prinsloo

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Text linguistics: From theory to practice In this article it is argued that theory and practice are reconcilable in the case of text linguistics and the teaching of writing skills. First, text linguistics as a theoretical discipline is explained. Text linguistics, according to De Beaugrande and Dressler (1981, focuses on the seven constitutive principles, as well as the three regulative principles of textuality that determine the linguistic quality or standard of a text. The constitutive principles are cohesion, which in its turn, can be obtained by means of reference, ellipsis, substitution, conjunction and lexical cohesion, coherence, intentionality, acceptability, information, contextuality and intertextuality. The three regulative principles are efficiency, effectiveness and appropriateness. This is followed by a discussion of the relationship between text linguistics and the teaching of writing skills. Knowledge of the principles of text linguistics enables the teacher of writing skills to evaluate texts and to make learners aware of the properties of a “good” text, resulting in effective communication. Text-linguistic concepts are then applied to texts created by Afrikaans second-language speakers. It is then indicated how knowledge of text-linguistic concepts can be an aid in the teaching of writing skills.

  17. Evolution of the BCG in Disturbed Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, Felipe; Strauss, Michael A.; Lauer, Tod R.; Postman, Marc

    2017-01-01

    The present paradigm in cosmology tells us that large-scale structures grow hierarchically. This suggests that galaxy clusters grow by accreting mass and merging with other clusters, a process which should be detectable by the presence of substructure within a cluster. Using the Dressler-Shectman (DS) three-dimensional test for dynamical substructure, we determined which clusters showed evidence for disturbance from a set of 227 Abell clusters from Lauer et al. (2014) with at least 50 member galaxies and spectroscopic redshifts, z BCG luminosities (Lm), but not in their BCG stellar velocity dispersions (σ), their BCG spatial offsets from the x-ray centers of the clusters, their BCG velocity offsets from the mean cluster velocity, the logarithmic slopes of their BCG photometric curves of growth (α), their cluster velocity dispersions, or their luminosity differences between the BCG and the second-ranked galaxy in the cluster (M2). Similarly, no significant difference was found in the fitting of the Lm-α-σ metric plane for BCGs of clusters with substructure compared those in which there is not substructure. This is surprising since our hierarchical growth models suggest that some of these BCG/cluster properties would be affected by a disturbance of the cluster, indicating that our understanding of how BCGs evolve with their clusters is incomplete and we should explore other ways to probe the level of disturbance.

  18. Workshop session on pros and cons for different target materials/corrosion and corrosion control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Y.; Mansur, L.K.; Dai, Y.; DiStefano, J.R.

    1996-06-01

    Two of the originally planned workshop sessions, indicated by the titles on each side of the {open_quotes}/{close_quotes} in the above title were combined. The session was structured into four areas in which target material attributes were considered: nuclear properties; physical properties; compatibility; and liquid metal engineering/safety. Short presentations were either volunteered by participants or requested by the session organizers to help establish a background and stimulate discussion. G. Bauer, J. Takeda, T. Gabriel and S. Wender covered the first two areas; J. DiStefano, Y. Dai and Y. Orlov made presentations in the third area. O. Lielausis and R. Dressler spoke on the fourth area. L.K. Mansur served as moderator for the combined session. Although there was much discussion and some differences of opinion, the overall recommendations, considering all available factors, as distilled by this session`s organizers, are as follows. Choose Hg as the prime candidate target material to which most resources should be devoted. A strong alternate candidate is considered to exist in Pb-Bi eutectic. Other candidate materials such as Pb, Pb-Mg eutectic and Bi are weaker choices for various reasons, with Bi being the weakest.

  19. The relation between prototypical and marginal morphology : the case of reduplicative constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Schwaiger

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates a paradigm case of a borderline phenomenon in linguistic analysis: constructions in which linguistic material is meaningfully iterated (or repeated and their relation to prototypical and marginal areas of morphology. The fuzzy state of affairs prevailing in this research area is described and a survey of relevant and irrelevant iteration phenomena is undertaken. The discussion finally narrowing in on morphological reduplication, the data dealt with (mostly come from the typologically oriented Graz Database on Reduplication (gdr. In light of certain data encountered there (i.e. reduplicative imperatives and a pragmatically emphatic vowel copying construction, the morphological process of reduplication is further differentiated, the general term reduplicative construction (Moravcsik 1978 thereby being endowed with a special meaning subsuming both prototypical and marginal instances of the process under scrutiny, couching the investigation into a morphological framework along lines similar to those proposed by Zwicky/Pullum (1987 and Dressler (2000. The study concludes with a tentative general picture of repetition phenomena in language in which grammaticalization theory can comprehensively account for such constructions that linguistically range from discourse to morphology. Finally, the potential benefit of the present approach for any typological undertaking in the realm of the reduplication process is highlighted.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SPT-SZ survey galaxy clusters optical spectroscopy (Ruel+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruel, J.; Bazin, G.; Bayliss, M.; Brodwin, M.; Foley, R. J.; Stalder, B.; Aird, K. A.; Armstrong, R.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bocquet, S.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Chapman, S. C.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Desai, S.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dudley, J. P.; Forman, W. R.; George, E. M.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; High, F. W.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Joy, M.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Liu, J.; Lueker, M.; Luong-van, D.; Mantz, A.; Marrone, D. P.; McDonald, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L.; Mohr, J. J.; Montroy, T. E.; Murray, S. S.; Natoli, T.; Nurgaliev, D.; Padin, S.; Plagge, T.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shaw, L.; Shirokoff, E.; Song, J.; Suhada, R.; Spieler, H. G.; Stanford, S. A.; Staniszewski, Z.; Starsk, A. A.; Story, K.; Stubbs, C. W.; van Engelen, A.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikhlinin, A.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2017-04-01

    Most of the galaxy clusters for which we report spectroscopic observations were published as SPT cluster detections (and new discoveries) in Vanderlinde et al. (2010ApJ...722.1180V), Williamson et al. (2011ApJ...738..139W), and Reichardt et al. (2013, J/ApJ/763/127); we refer the reader to those publications for details of the SPT observations. The spectroscopic observations presented in this work are the first of our ongoing follow-up program. The data were taken from 2008 to 2012 using the Gemini Multi Object Spectrograph (GMOS; Hook et al. 2004PASP..116..425H) on Gemini South, the Focal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrograph (FORS2; Appenzeller et al. 1998Msngr..94....1A) on VLT Antu, the Inamori Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph (IMACS; Dressler et al. 2006SPIE.6269E..0FD) on Magellan Baade, and the Low Dispersion Survey Spectrograph (LDSS339; Allington-Smith et al. 1994PASP..106..983A) on Magellan Clay. (3 data files).

  1. Ab initio R-matrix/multi-channel quantum defect theory study of nitric oxide: II. Analysis of valence/Rydberg interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiyama, Miyabi; Child, Mark S [Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1-3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2003-11-28

    A combination of ab initio R-matrix techniques and multi-channel quantum defect theory (R-matrix/MQDT method), previously formulated in part I of this project, is used to analyse resonant changes in the MQDT scattering matrix arising from valence state interactions with the Rydberg channels. Results for NO are reported for six l channels associated with the lowest,{sup 1}{sigma}{sup +}, target channels of NO{sup +}. The resonant couplings between the Rydberg channels and four valence states, I (2{sup {sigma}}{sup +}), B (22{sup {pi}}), L (32{sup {pi}}), 4{sup 2}{pi} and B{sup '}(2{sup {delta}}), are shown to vary sufficiently smoothly with both bond length and energy to allow easy interpolation. The coupling constants between p {pi} Rydberg and the B valence states are in good agreement with the experimental data of Gallusser and Dressler. Sets of interacting potential curves for states of symmetries 2{sup {sigma}}{sup +},2{sup {pi}} and 2{sup {delta}} are reconstructed from the MQDT K-matrix data.

  2. Old Fragments of Forest Inside an Urban Area Are Able to Keep Orchid Bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Euglossini) Assemblages? The Case of a Brazilian Historical City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, R P; Martins, C; Dutra, M C; Mentone, C B; Antonini, Y

    2013-10-01

    Retention of habitat fragments within the urban matrix can provide critical resources for the maintenance of regional biodiversity while still providing socio-economic value. Euglossini bees are important components in a community as they are important pollinators for economically valuable plants as well as hundreds of orchid species. However, some species are very sensitive to environmental impacts like urbanization. This study presents the role of antique urban fragments in a historical city in Brazil and compares it with a conservation area on the aspects of orchid bee assemblage, such as richness, composition, and abundance. Four fragments inside the city of Ouro Preto and three inside Parque Estadual do Itacolomi (PEIT) were sampled for Euglossini bees. Sorensen similarity index was used to compare community composition. The Mantel test was applied to verify the hypothesis that an urban center is a barrier for the mobility of the individuals. Fourteen Euglossini species from the region were registered. Close to 75% of the sampled bees were collected from the PEIT sampling areas. The fragments presented differences in Euglossini richness and abundance. A majority of the sampled fragments were dominated by the Eulaema cingulata Fabricius, Eulaema nigrita Lepeletier, and Euglossa securigera Dressler species. We found differences on community composition between the fragments localized in PEIT and those located in the urban center. The data suggest that there is a possible flux of individuals between the sampled fragments. The various small forest fragments in Ouro Preto, primarily in backyards, may also serve as stepping stones between sampled fragments.

  3. Euglossine bees (Hymenoptera, Apidae in a remnant of Atlantic Forest in Paraná State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia H. Sofia

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Species composition, relative abundance, seasonal changes in the species abundance and scent association of male Euglossini collected in a semi-deciduous forest fragment in the north of the State of Paraná, southern Brazil, were recorded. Euglossine males were collected twice a month, for twelve months, from 8:00 am to 3:00 pm. The scents eucalyptol, eugenol, vanillin, methyl salicylate and benzyl acetate were used as baits. A total of 434 males distributed among 3 genera and 9 species were attracted to the chemical baits. Eufriesea violacea (Blanchard, 1840 (49.8%, Eulaema nigrita Lepeletier, 1841 (23.0% and Euglossa pleosticta Dressler, 1982 (13.8% were dominant in number of individuals. Among the non-dominant species, Euglossa fimbriata Rebêlo & Moure, 1995 was more common (9.0%, followed by E. cordata (L., 1758 (1.8%, E. truncata Rebêlo & Moure, 1995 (1.4%, E. melanotricha Moure, 1967 (0.7%, E. townsendi Cockerell, 1904 (0.23% and Eufriesea auriceps Friese, 1899 (0.23%. In general, bees were more abundant in warm-wet season (September-March. Eufriesea violacea was the most seasonal species, showing activity through the warm-wet season, from October to February. Eucalyptol was the most attractive fragrance, which was responsible for 92.6% of all visits by euglossine bees.

  4. Cinco estrategias para la enseñanza de la producción de textos argumentativos en el área de ciencias biológicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan David Zambrano-Valencia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo proponemos cinco estrategias para la producción de textos argumentativos escritos, derivadas del proyecto de investigación Enseñanza para la argumentación científica. Una propuesta didáctica dirigida a profesores del programa de Biología de la Universidad del Quindío. Para ello optamos por el método investigación-acción desde la perspectiva de Elliott (1993, 2000, y nos apoyamos principalmente en los presupuestos teóricos de Stephen Toulmin (1977, 2003, 2007 y Anthony Weston (2005, en lo referido a la argumentación, al igual que en los postulados de la didáctica de la lengua materna (Camps, 1995, 2004; Álvarez, 2005 y 2010, Camargo y Uribe, 2007, la lingüística textual (Bernárdez, 1982 y 1994; De Beaugrande y Dressler, 1997 y la secuencia prototípica argumentativa de Adam (1985, 1992, 1995. Las estrategias propuestas son: 1. La configuración de la dispositio: argumentar desde la estructura; 2. El reconocimiento de la fuente: argumentar desde la autoridad; 3. El recurso de la definición: argumentar desde la versatilidad; 4. El uso de la analogía: argumentar desde la proximidad; 5. El valor de la discusión: argumentar desde la distancia.

  5. Controlled but not cured: Structural processes and explanatory models of Chagas disease in tropical Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Colin

    2015-11-01

    Dressler (2001:456) characterizes medical anthropology as divided between two poles: the constructivist, which focuses on the "meaning and significance that events have for people," and the structuralist, which emphasizes socioeconomic processes and relationships. This study synthesizes structuralist and constructivist perspectives by investigating how structural processes impact explanatory models of Chagas disease in a highly endemic area. The research took place from March-June 2013 through the Centro Medico Humberto Parra, a non-profit clinic servicing low income populations in Palacios, Bolivia and surrounding communities. Semistructured interviews (n = 68) and consensus analysis questionnaires (n = 48) were administered to people dealing with Chagas disease. In the interview narratives, respondents link Chagas disease with experiences of marginalization and rural poverty, and describe multilayered impediments to accessing treatment. They often view the disease as incurable, but this reflects inconsistent messages from the biomedical system. The consensus analysis results show strong agreement on knowledge of the vector, ethnomedical treatment, and structural factors related to Chagas disease. In interpreting Chagas disease, respondents account for the structural factors which place them at risk and impede access to care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. In situ morphometric survey elucidates the evolutionary systematics of the Eurasian Himantoglossum clade (Orchidaceae: Orchidinae

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    Richard M. Bateman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims The charismatic Himantoglossum s.l. clade of Eurasian orchids contains an unusually large proportion of taxa that are of controversial circumscriptions and considerable conservation concern. Whereas our previously published study addressed the molecular phylogenetics and phylogeography of every named taxon within the clade, here we use detailed morphometric data obtained from the same populations to compare genotypes with associated phenotypes, in order to better explore taxonomic circumscription and character evolution within the clade. Methods Between one and 12 plants found in 25 populations that encompassed the entire distribution of the Himantoglossum s.l. clade were measured in situ for 51 morphological characters. Results for 45 of those characters were subjected to detailed multivariate and univariate analyses. Key Results Multivariate analyses readily separate subgenus Barlia and subgenus Comperia from subgenus Himantoglossum, and also the early-divergent H. formosum from the less divergent remainder of subgenus Himantoglossum. The sequence of divergence of these four lineages is confidently resolved. Our experimental approach to morphometric character analysis demonstrates clearly that phenotypic evolution within Himantoglossum is unusually multi-dimensional. Conclusions Degrees of divergence between taxa shown by morphological analyses approximate those previously shown using molecular analyses. Himantoglossum s.l. is readily divisible into three subgenera. The three sections of subgenus Himantoglossum—hircinum, caprinum and formosum—are arrayed from west to east with only limited geographical overlap. At this taxonomic level, their juxtaposition combines with conflict between contrasting datasets to complicate attempts to distinguish between clinal variation and the discontinuities that by definition separate bona fide species. All taxa achieve allogamy via food deceit and have only weak pollinator specificity

  7. In situ morphometric survey elucidates the evolutionary systematics of the Eurasian Himantoglossum clade (Orchidaceae: Orchidinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár V., Attila; Sramkó, Gábor

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims The charismatic Himantoglossum s.l. clade of Eurasian orchids contains an unusually large proportion of taxa that are of controversial circumscriptions and considerable conservation concern. Whereas our previously published study addressed the molecular phylogenetics and phylogeography of every named taxon within the clade, here we use detailed morphometric data obtained from the same populations to compare genotypes with associated phenotypes, in order to better explore taxonomic circumscription and character evolution within the clade. Methods Between one and 12 plants found in 25 populations that encompassed the entire distribution of the Himantoglossum s.l. clade were measured in situ for 51 morphological characters. Results for 45 of those characters were subjected to detailed multivariate and univariate analyses. Key Results Multivariate analyses readily separate subgenus Barlia and subgenus Comperia from subgenus Himantoglossum, and also the early-divergent H. formosum from the less divergent remainder of subgenus Himantoglossum. The sequence of divergence of these four lineages is confidently resolved. Our experimental approach to morphometric character analysis demonstrates clearly that phenotypic evolution within Himantoglossum is unusually multi-dimensional. Conclusions Degrees of divergence between taxa shown by morphological analyses approximate those previously shown using molecular analyses. Himantoglossum s.l. is readily divisible into three subgenera. The three sections of subgenus Himantoglossum—hircinum, caprinum and formosum—are arrayed from west to east with only limited geographical overlap. At this taxonomic level, their juxtaposition combines with conflict between contrasting datasets to complicate attempts to distinguish between clinal variation and the discontinuities that by definition separate bona fide species. All taxa achieve allogamy via food deceit and have only weak pollinator specificity. Artificial

  8. A Comparative Study of the Short Term Cold Resistance Response in Distantly Related Drosophila Species: The Role of regucalcin and Frost

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    Reis, Micael; Vieira, Cristina P.; Morales-Hojas, Ramiro; Aguiar, Bruno; Rocha, Hélder; Schlötterer, Christian; Vieira, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The molecular basis of short term cold resistance (indexed as chill-coma recovery time) has been mostly addressed in D. melanogaster, where candidate genes (Dca (also known as smp-30) and Frost (Fst)) have been identified. Nevertheless, in Drosophila, the ability to tolerate short term exposure to low temperatures evolved several times independently. Therefore, it is unclear whether variation in the same candidate genes is also responsible for short term cold resistance in distantly related Drosophila species. It should be noted that Dca is a candidate gene for cold resistance in the Sophophora subgenus only, since there is no orthologous gene copy in the Drosophila subgenus. Here we show that, in D. americana (Drosophila subgenus), there is a north-south gradient for a variant at the 5′ non-coding region of regucalcin (a Dca-like gene; in D. melanogaster the proteins encoded by the two genes share 71.9% amino acid identities) but in our D. americana F2 association experiment there is no association between this polymorphism and chill-coma recovery times. Moreover, we found no convincing evidence that this gene is up-regulated after cold shock in both D. americana and D. melanogaster. Size variation in the Fst PEST domain (putatively involved in rapid protein degradation) is observed when comparing distantly related Drosophila species, and is associated with short term cold resistance differences in D. americana. Nevertheless, this effect is likely through body size variation. Moreover, we show that, even at two hours after cold shock, when up-regulation of this gene is maximal in D. melanogaster (about 48 fold expression change), in D. americana this gene is only moderately up-regulated (about 3 fold expression change). Our work thus shows that there are important differences regarding the molecular basis of cold resistance in distantly related Drosophila species. PMID:21991316

  9. The influence of pre- and post-zygotic barriers on interspecific Corymbia hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Geoffrey R; Lee, David J; Wallace, Helen M

    2012-06-01

    Corymbia species from different sections hybridize readily, with some of increasing economic importance to plantation forestry. This study explores the locations of reproductive barriers between interspecific Corymbia hybrids and investigates the reproductive success of a wide taxonomic range of C. torelliana hybrid crosses. Pollen, pistil and embryo development were investigated for four C. torelliana crosses (×C. torelliana, ×C. citriodora subsp. citriodora, ×C. tessellaris and ×C. intermedia) using fluorescent and standard microscopy to identify the locations of interspecific reproductive isolating barriers. Corymbia torelliana was also crossed with 16 taxa, representing six of the seven Corymbia sections, both Corymbia subgenera and one species each from the related genera, Angophora and Eucalyptus. All crosses were assessed for capsule and seed yields. Interspecific C. torelliana hybridization was controlled by pre-zygotic reproductive isolating barriers inhibiting pollen adhesion to the stigma, pollen germination, pollen tube growth in the style and pollen tube penetration of the micropyle. Corymbia torelliana (subgenus Blakella, sect. Torellianae) was successfully hybridized with Corymbia species from subgenus Blakella, particularly C. citriodora subsp. citriodora, C. citriodora subsp. variegata, C. henryi (sect. Maculatae) and C. tessellaris (sect. Abbreviatae), and subgenus Corymbia, particularly C. clarksoniana and C. erythrophloia (sect. Septentrionales). Attempted intergeneric hybrids between C. torelliana and either Angophora floribunda or Eucalyptus pellita were unsuccessful. Corymbia hybrids were formed between species from different sections and subgenera, but not with species from the related genera Angophora or Eucalyptus. Reproductive isolation between the interspecific Corymbia hybrid crosses was controlled by early- and late-acting pre-zygotic isolating barriers, with reproductive success generally decreasing with increasing taxonomic

  10. THE GENUS CAREX IN MALAYSIA

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    E. NELMES

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a fully descriptive account of the 108 species of Carex known to occur in Malaysia. They are arranged in three subgenera: Subgenus Indocarex Baill. (43 species, Subgenus Carex (Eucarex Coss. et Germ. (57 species, and Subgenus Vignea (P. Beauv. Nees (8 species. These are in turn divided into 33 sections. The classi- fication of these Malaysian Carices differs radically from past systems (cf. that of Kiikenthal, Engl. Pflanzenreich, 1909 and is based on the phylogenetic views of the author. Following the descriptions are citations of all the specimens seen by the author, and a few not seen but which have mainly been determined' by Kiikenthal. The majority of the specimens Came from Bogor (Buitenzorg (about 1500 sheets and Leiden (about 600, including important historical specimens. About half of the species are restricted (endemic to one or another of the 'island areas' into which Malaysia can be conveniently divided: 18 species in New Guinea, 10 in the Philippines, 5 in Borneo and in Sumatra, 4 in the Malay Peninsula, 3 in Java and in Celebes, 2 in the Moluccas, and 1 in the Lesser Sunda Islands. The remaining 58 species have a slightly to much wider distribution, the chief connection being with India, and, to a slightly less extent, Japan and China. Keys are provided to the species as a whole, to the subgenera, the sections, and to the species in each section. The introductory part of the work explains, among other things, the classi- fication, the relative taxonomic value of characters in the descriptions, distribution, and sources of the material,.

  11. Adenovirus type 7 associated with severe and fatal acute lower respiratory infections in Argentine children

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    Misirlian Alicia

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adenoviruses are the second most prevalent cause of acute lower respiratory infection of viral origin in children under four years of age in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical features and outcome of acute lower respiratory infection associated with different adenovirus genotypes in children. Methods Twenty-four cases of acute lower respiratory infection and adenovirus diagnosis reported in a pediatric unit during a two-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Adenovirus was detected by antigen detection and isolation in HEp-2 cells. Adenovirus DNA from 17 isolates was studied by restriction enzyme analysis with Bam HI and Sma I. Results Subgenus b was found in 82.3% of the cases, and subgenus c in 17.7%. Within subgenus b, only genotype 7 was detected, with genomic variant 7h in 85.7% (12/14 and genomic variant 7i in 14.3% (2/14. Mean age was 8.8 ±; 6 months, and male to female ratio was 3.8: 1. At admission, pneumonia was observed in 71% of the cases and bronchiolitis in 29%. Malnutrition occurred in 37% of the cases; tachypnea in 79%; chest indrawing in 66%; wheezing in 58%; apneas in 16%; and conjunctivitis in 29%. Blood cultures for bacteria and antigen detection of other respiratory viruses were negative. During hospitalization, fatality rate was 16.7% (4 /24. Of the patients who died, three had Ad 7h and one Ad 7i. Thus, fatality rate for adenovirus type 7 reached 28.6% (4/14. Conclusions These results show the predominance of adenovirus 7 and high lethality associated with the genomic variants 7h and 7i in children hospitalized with acute lower respiratory infection.

  12. Three cryptic new species of Aristea (Iridaceae from southern Africa

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    P. Goldblatt

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Field work in southern Africa over the past several years has resulted in the discovery of three new species of the sub- Saharan African and Madagascan genus Aristea Aiton, which now comprises some 53 species. Aristea has a pronounced centre in southern Africa and a centre of diversity in the winter rainfall zone of the subcontinent, where all three new species occur, one extending eastward into the adjacent southern edge of the summer rainfall zone. All three novelties have been collected in the past but were confused with related species. A elliptica (subgenus Eucapsulares, confused in the past with A. pusilla (Thunb. Ker Gawl., has a more robust habit, usually with 4 or 5 flower clusters per flowering stem, pale blue flowers, smooth ellipsoid seeds with flattened surface cells, and pollen shed as monads, whereas A. pusilla usually has 1-3 flower clusters per flowering stem, dark blue flowers, pollen shed as tetrads, and globose seeds with faint foveate sculpturing and colliculate surface cells. A. nana (also subgenus  Eucapsulares, known from few collections, and also confused with A. pusilla or A. anceps Eckl. ex Klatt. has the unbranched and leafless flowering stem of the latter but has large green floral spathes, flowers borne on long pedicels, and lacks a leaf subtending the single terminal flower cluster in contrast to nearly sessile flowers in A. pusilla and A. anceps, and in the latter, dry, rusty spathes. A. cistiflora (subgenus Pseudaristea closely resembles A. teretifoha Goldblatt & J.C.Manning but has linear to narrowly sword-shaped leaves and ± secund flowers with the outer tepals only slightly smaller than the inner and with small, dark brown markings at the bases of all the tepals. In contrast, A. teretifolia has narrower, sometimes terete leaves and flowers held upright with the outer tepals notice-ably smaller than the inner and bearing dark markings covering the lower half, whereas the inner tepals are unmarked.

  13. Phylogeny, new generic-level classification, and historical biogeography of the Eucera complex (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorchin, A; López-Uribe, M M; Praz, C J; Griswold, T; Danforth, B N

    2018-02-01

    The longhorn bee tribe Eucerini (Hymenoptera: Apidae) is a diverse, widely distributed group of solitary bees that includes important pollinators of both wild and agricultural plants. About half of the species in the tribe are currently assigned to the genus Eucera and to a few other related genera. In this large genus complex, comprising ca. 390 species, the boundaries between genera remain ambiguous due to morphological intergradation among taxa. Using ca. 6700 aligned nucleotide sites from six gene fragments, 120 morphological characters, and more than 100 taxa, we present the first comprehensive molecular, morphological, and combined phylogenetic analyses of the 'Eucera complex'. The revised generic classification that we propose is congruent with our phylogeny and maximizes both generic stability and ease of identification. Under this new classification most generic names are synonymized under an expanded genus Eucera. Thus, Tetralonia, Peponapis, Xenoglossa, Cemolobus, and Syntrichalonia are reduced to subgeneric rank within Eucera, and Synhalonia is retained as a subgenus of Eucera. Xenoglossodes is reestablished as a valid subgenus of Eucera while Tetraloniella is synonymized with Tetralonia and Cubitalia with Eucera. In contrast, we suggest that the venusta-group of species, currently placed in the subgenus Synhalonia, should be recognized as a new genus. Our results demonstrate the need to evaluate convergent loss or gain of important diagnostic traits to minimize the use of potentially homoplasious characters when establishing classifications. Lastly, we show that the Eucera complex originated in the Nearctic region in the late Oligocene, and dispersed twice into the Old World. The first dispersal event likely occurred 24.2-16.6 mya at a base of a clade of summer-active bees restricted to warm region of the Old World, and the second 13.9-12.3 mya at the base of a clade of spring-active bees found in cooler regions of the Holarctic. Our results further

  14. Accumulation, functional annotation, and comparative analysis of expressed sequence tags in eggplant (Solanum melongena L.), the third pole of the genus Solanum species after tomato and potato.

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    Fukuoka, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Hirotaka; Nunome, Tsukasa; Negoro, Satomi; Miyatake, Koji; Ohyama, Akio

    2010-01-15

    Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) is a widely grown vegetable crop that belongs to the genus Solanum, which is comprised of more than 1000 species of wide genetic and phenotypic variation. Unlike tomato and potato, Solanum crops that belong to subgenus Potatoe and have been targets for comprehensive genomic studies, eggplant is endemic to the Old World and belongs to a different subgenus, Leptostemonum, and therefore, would be a unique member for comparative molecular biology in Solanum. In this study, more than 60,000 eggplant cDNA clones from various tissues and treatments were sequenced from both the 5'- and 3'-ends, and a unigene set consisting of 16,245 unique sequences was constructed. Functional annotations based on sequence similarity to known plant reference datasets revealed a distribution of functional categories almost similar to that of tomato, while 1316 unigenes were suggested to be eggplant-specific. Sequence-based comparative analysis using putative orthologous gene groups setup by reciprocal sequence comparison among six solanaceous species suggested that eggplant and its wild ally Solanum torvum were clustered separately from subgenus Potatoe species, and then, all Solanum species were clustered separately from the genus Capsicum. Microsatellite motif distribution was different among species and likely to be coincident with the phylogenetic relationships. Furthermore, the eggplant unigene dataset exhibited its utility in transcriptome analysis by the SAGE strategy where a considerable number of short tag sequences of interest were successfully assigned to unigenes and their functional annotations. The eggplant ESTs and 16k unigene set developed in this study would be a useful resource not only for molecular genetics and breeding in eggplant itself, but for expanding the scope of comparative biology in Solanum species.

  15. Morphological adaptations for digging and climate-impacted soil properties define pocket gopher (Thomomys spp. distributions.

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    Ariel E Marcy

    Full Text Available Species ranges are mediated by physiology, environmental factors, and competition with other organisms. The allopatric distribution of five species of northern Californian pocket gophers (Thomomys spp. is hypothesized to result from competitive exclusion. The five species in this environmentally heterogeneous region separate into two subgenera, Thomomys or Megascapheus, which have divergent digging styles. While all pocket gophers dig with their claws, the tooth-digging adaptations of subgenus Megascapheus allow access to harder soils and climate-protected depths. In a Northern Californian locality, replacement of subgenus Thomomys with subgenus Megascapheus occurred gradually during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition. Concurrent climate change over this transition suggests that environmental factors--in addition to soil--define pocket gopher distributional limits. Here we show 1 that all pocket gophers occupy the subset of less energetically costly soils and 2 that subgenera sort by percent soil clay, bulk density, and shrink-swell capacity (a mineralogical attribute. While clay and bulk density (without major perturbations stay constant over decades to millennia, low precipitation and high temperatures can cause shrink-swell clays to crack and harden within days. The strong yet underappreciated interaction between soil and moisture on the distribution of vertebrates is rarely considered when projecting species responses to climatic change. Furthermore, increased precipitation alters the weathering processes that create shrink-swell minerals. Two projected outcomes of ongoing climate change--higher temperatures and precipitation--will dramatically impact hardness of soil with shrink-swell minerals. Current climate models do not include factors controlling soil hardness, despite its impact on all organisms that depend on a stable soil structure.

  16. New geophytic Peperomia (Piperaceae species from Mexico, Belize and Costa Rica Nuevas especies geofíticas de Peperomia (Piperaceae de México, Belice y Costa Rica

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    Guido Mathieu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Peperomia subgenus Tildenia is a poorly known group of geophytic species occurring in seasonal habitats in 2 biodiversity hot spots (Mexico-Guatemala and Peru-Bolivia with few species reported from the countries in between. Recent fieldwork combined with detailed study of herbarium specimens of this subgenus in Mexico and Central America resulted in the discovery of 12 new species, which are here described and illustrated. In addition, 1 formerly published variety is raised to species rank. Distribution, habitat and phenology data and detailed comparisons with other species are included, as well as an identification key for all species belonging to this subgenus in the studied area.Peperomia subgénero Tildenia es un grupo poco conocido de especies geofíticas de hábitats estacionales en 2 hotspots de biodiversidad (México-Guatemala y Perú-Bolivia con pocas especies en los países de enmedio. El trabajo de campo realizado recientemente en México y América Central, combinado con un estudio detallado de ejemplares de herbario de este subgénero, resultó en el descubrimiento de 12 especies nuevas, que se describen e ilustran. Además, una variedad anteriormente publicada es elevada a la categoría de especie. Se incluyen datos de distribución, hábitat y fenología, comparaciones detalladas con otras especies, así como una clave de identificación para todas las especies del subgénero en la región estudiada.

  17. Species of Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae attracted to dung and carrion baited pitfall traps in the Uruguayan Eastern Serranías

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    Beatriz Goñi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the species richness and abundance of Drosophila Fallén, 1823 attracted to dung and carrion baited pitfall traps in natural areas with heterogeneous habitats at the Sierra de Minas, Eastern Serranías, southeastern Uruguay. Collecting was carried out on a monthly basis (May 2002 through April 2003. Drosophilids accounted for 0.84% (n = 131 and 3.61% (n = 158 of the Diptera collected from dung (n = 15,630 and carrion (n = 4,382 pitfall traps, respectively. A total of 12 species were identified, 11 of which belong to the subgenus Drosophila (the richest and one to the subgenus Sophophora Sturtevant, 1939. Over 90% of the Drosophila specimens collected belong to five species of the subgenus Drosophila, namely D. gaucha Jaeger & Salzano, 1953, D. immigrans Sturtevant, 1921, D. mediovittata Frota-Pessoa, 1954, D. aff. nappae Vilela, Valente & Basso-da-Silva, 2004, and D. ornatifrons Duda, 1927. Drosophila cardini Sturtevant, 1916 is recorded for the first time from Uruguay. Drosophila abundance and species richness in the four habitats sampled in the Uruguayan Eastern Serranías, namely woodlands sierra, riparian forest, pine plantation and grazing grassland, were considered to be a function of habitat conservation. Diversity indices were low in all habitats. Different habitats supported particular coprophilous and necrophilous Drosophila species. The woodland sierra represents the most preserved habitat, and contributed with the highest species richness observed. Drosophila ornatifrons was the dominant species, with a restricted habitat distribution. On the other hand, grazed grassland, an environment modified by livestock management, had the lowest species richness: only a few specimens of D. repleta Wollaston, 1858. Regarding species composition, significant differences were found in some pairwise comparisons of groups of Drosophila species that included D. ornatifrons. Fly attraction to dung can be exploited as an

  18. Spatial Scales of Genetic Structure in Free-Standing and Strangler Figs (Ficus, Moraceae Inhabiting Neotropical Forests.

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    Katrin Heer

    Full Text Available Wind-borne pollinating wasps (Agaonidae can transport fig (Ficus sp., Moraceae pollen over enormous distances (> 100 km. Because of their extensive breeding areas, Neotropical figs are expected to exhibit weak patterns of genetic structure at local and regional scales. We evaluated genetic structure at the regional to continental scale (Panama, Costa Rica, and Peru for the free-standing fig species Ficus insipida. Genetic differentiation was detected only at distances > 300 km (Jost´s Dest = 0.68 ± 0.07 & FST = 0.30 ± 0.03 between Mesoamerican and Amazonian sites and evidence for phylogeographic structure (RST>>permuted RST was only significant in comparisons between Central and South America. Further, we assessed local scale spatial genetic structure (SGS, d ≤ 8 km in Panama and developed an agent-based model parameterized with data from F. insipida to estimate minimum pollination distances, which determine the contribution of pollen dispersal on SGS. The local scale data for F. insipida was compared to SGS data collected for an additional free-standing fig, F. yoponensis (subgenus Pharmacosycea, and two species of strangler figs, F. citrifolia and F. obtusifolia (subgenus Urostigma sampled in Panama. All four species displayed significant SGS (mean Sp = 0.014 ± 0.012. Model simulations indicated that most pollination events likely occur at distances > > 1 km, largely ruling out spatially limited pollen dispersal as the determinant of SGS in F. insipida and, by extension, the other fig species. Our results are consistent with the view that Ficus develops fine-scale SGS primarily as a result of localized seed dispersal and/or clumped seedling establishment despite extensive long-distance pollen dispersal. We discuss several ecological and life history factors that could have species- or subgenus-specific impacts on the genetic structure of Neotropical figs.

  19. El género Polygala (Polygalaceae en el Mediterráneo Occidental

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    Paiva, Jorge

    1989-06-01

    Full Text Available Polygala L. comprises about 720 species (400 American, 206 African, 32 European, 70 Asiatic and 12 Australian.The genus is extended all over the world except Polynesia. New Zealand and the polar regions. The 24 Western Mediterranean species of Polygala belong to three subgenera (5 to the subgen. Chamaebuxus, 1 to the subgen. Brachytropis and 18 to the subgen. Polygala. Looking into morphological, caryological, Palynological, anatomical and ontogenic data, subgenus Chamaebuxus looks more primitive than subgenus Polygala, and subgenus Brachytropis is perhaps derived from the former.

    Polygala es un género con cerca de 720 especies (400 americanas, 206 africanas, 32 europeas, 70 asiáticas y 12 australianas distribuidas por casi lodo el globo excepto Polinesia, Nueva Zelanda y las regiones polares. Las 24 especies de Polygala confinadas en el Mediterráneo Occidental pertenecen a 3 subgéneros (5 al subgénero Chamaebuxus, 1 al subgénero Brachytropis y 18 al subgénero Polygala. De los datos morfológicos, cariológicos, palinológicos, anatómicos y ontogénicos, se desprende que el subgénero Chamaebuxus resulta más primitivo que el subgénero Polygala y que el subgénero Brachytropis se deriva tal vez del primero de los citados.

  20. Analysis of spawning behavior, habitat, and season of the federally threatened Etheostoma scotti, Cherokee darter (Osteichthyes: Percidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, C.M.; Porter, B.A.; Freeman, Mary C.; Freeman, B.J.

    2006-01-01

    Etheostoma scotti (Cherokee darter) is a member of the subgenus Ulocentra and a federally threatened endemic to the Etowah River system, GA. Field observations of spawning behavior of the Cherokee darter were made at five stream sites to identify spawning season and habitat over two field seasons. Cherokee darters primarily spawn in pool habitats between mid-March and early June, at temperatures between 11 and 18 ?C. Egg deposition was typically on large gravel substrate, but ranged from gravel to bedrock in size and included woody debris. Spawning occurred in a variety of depths (0.09-0.59 m) and velocities (0-0.68 m/s).

  1. Xeractinol: a new flavanonol C-glucoside from Paepalanthus argenteus var. argenteus (Bongard) Hensold (Eriocaulaceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dokkedal, Anne Ligia; Lavarda, Francisco [UNESP, Bauru, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias]. E-mail: dokkedal@fc.unesp.br; Santos, Lourdes Campaner dos; Vilegas, Wagner [UNESP, Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2007-03-15

    New compound isolated from methanolic extract from the leaves of Paepalanthus argenteus var. argenteus (Bongard) Hensold was characterized as xeractinol, a new dihydroflavonol C-glucoside. The structure was elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis (1D and 2D NMR, MS, HREIMS, IR and UV). Ab initio electronic structure calculations support our proposal to the molecular structure. The dihydroflavonol herein isolated may serve as taxonomic marker of Paepalanthus subgenus Xeractis, because this flavonoid have not been reported in any other taxon of Eriocaulaceae. (author)

  2. Myoxanthus ortizianus (Orchidaceae, a new species from southern Colombia

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    Kolanowska Marta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available With over 3000 species, Colombian orchid flora represents one of the richest in the World. The neotropical subtribe Pleurothallidinae is the most diverse, but it is still a poorly recognized Orchidaceae group and numerous new discoveries within national representatives are described every year. An examination of material collected recently in the Colombian department of Putumayo revealed the existence of a new species of Myoxanthus, named M. ortizianus, which is described, illustrated and placed within an identification key for national species of the nominal section of the subgenus Myoxanthus.

  3. Penicillium kongii, a new terverticillate species isolated from plant leaves in China.

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    Wang, Bo; Wang, Long

    2013-01-01

    A new Penicillium species isolated from plant leaves, characterized by restricted growth, terverticillate penicilli, ovoid to ellipsoidal conidia and a red soluble pigment on yeast extract sucrose agar is reported here. Penicillium kongii sp. nov. belongs to subgenus Penicillium section Brevicompacta and is morphologically similar to P. bialowiezense and P. brevicompactum. Phylogenetic analyses based on sequence data from calmodulin gene, β-tubulin gene and rDNA ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 show that P. kongii forms a distinctive clade.

  4. A new species of Solanum (Solanaceae from South Africa related to the cultivated eggplant

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    Maria Vorontsova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new andromonoecious species related to the eggplant and belonging to Solanum subgenus Leptostemonum from southern Africa is described. Solanum umtuma Voronts. & S.Knapp, sp. nov. is found in the eastern part of South Africa, and is sympatric with its close relative S. linnaeanum Hepper & P.M-L.Jaeger. It is morphologically very similar to S. cerasiferum Dunal of northern tropical Africa. A comparison table with similar and closely related species is provided, as are a distribution map and illustration of S. umtuma.

  5. Performance of a real time PCR for leishmaniasis diagnosis using a L. (L.) infantum hypothetical protein as target in canine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Fabio Antonio; Pereira-Chioccola, Vera Lucia; Meira, Cristina da Silva; Motoie, Gabriela; Gava, Ricardo; Hiramoto, Roberto M; de Almeida, Marcos E; da Silva, Alexandre J; Cutolo, Andre Antonio; Menz, Ingrid

    2015-10-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis represents an important public health issue in different parts of the world, requiring that measures be put in place to control the spread of the disease worldwide. The canine leishmaniasis diagnosis is not easy based on clinical signs, since dogs may not develop the infection with recognizable signs. Thus, the laboratorial diagnosis is essential to ascertain the incidence and prevalence of canine leishmaniasis especially in areas with major control efforts. Although, the diagnosis can be performed by the use of different approaches, the molecular methods such as PCR have become an indispensable tool for leishmaniases diagnosis. A TaqMan assay for real-time PCR (Linj31-qPCR) was developed to determine the parasite occurrence in clinical cases of leishmaniasis. The assay targets an L. (L.) infantum hypothetical protein region. The specificity of the assay was verified by using Leishmania World Health Organization reference strains including parasites belonging to subgenus L. (Leishmania), subgenus L. (Viannia), other Leishmania species and Trypanosoma cruzi. The sensitivity was verified by using isolates of L. (L.) amazonensis and L. (L.) infantum. The usefulness of the assay for diagnosis was ascertained by testing 277 samples from dogs in regions endemic for visceral and/or cutaneous leishmaniasis and from regions in which leishmaniasis was not endemic in São Paulo State, Brazil. Diagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) was determined on these animals by conventional PCR and three serological tests. The dog samples were divided into four groups. I, dogs with CVL (n = 101); II, dogs with other diseases and without CVL (n = 97); III, dogs with American cutaneous leishmaniasis (n = 7), and, IV, dogs without CVL (n = 72) from areas where leishmaniasis was not endemic as control group. Results indicated that Linj31-qPCR was able to identify parasites belonging to subgenus L. (Leishmania) with no cross-amplification with

  6. Subfamily Limoniinae Speiser, 1909 (Diptera, Limoniidae) from Baltic Amber (Eocene): The Genus Elephantomyia Osten Sacken, 1860

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kania, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    A revision of the genus Elephantomyia Osten Sacken (Diptera: Limoniidae) from Baltic amber (Eocene) is presented. Four species—E. baltica Alexander, E. brevipalpa Loew, E. longirostris Loew, and E. pulchella Loew—are redescribed and documented with photographs and drawings. In addition, two new species of the genus are described: Elephantomyia bozenae sp. nov., and Elephantomyia irinae sp. nov. All these fossil species are placed within the subgenus Elephantomyia. A key to the extinct species of Elephantomyia is provided, and the genus’ ecological pattern and evolutionary aspects are discussed. PMID:25706127

  7. Botany, Taxonomy and Cytology of Crocus sativus series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, R. B.

    2010-01-01

    Saffron is produced from the dried styles of Crocus sativus L. (Iridaceae) which is unknown as wild plant, representing a sterile triploid. These belong to subgenus Crocus series Crocus sativus – series are closely related species; and are difficult to be separated taxonomically and have a complex cytology. Botany of C. sativus – series, taxonomy of their species and their infraspecific taxa are presented, and their distribution, ecology and phenology; full description and chromosome counts are provided with key to their identification. PMID:22131743

  8. Three new species of tiger beetles and new data on Cicindelina species from Angola (Coleoptera: Carabidae: Cicindelinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Artur R M; Capela, Rúben A; Oesterle, Andreas

    2015-10-15

    Three new species of tiger beetles, two of the genus Trichotaenia Rivalier, 1957 and one of the genus Cylindera Westwood, 1831, subgenus Ifasina Jeannel, 1946 are described from Angola. An annotated list of species of Cicindelina sampled in this country is provided also. Records for three species previously unknow from Angola are given: Ophryodera smrzi Werner, 2005, Lophyra clatharta (Dejean, 1825) and Lophyra sumlini Cassola, 1976. Some considerations on the distribution and general ecology of these beetles in Angola are also presented. Further, two dichotomic keys are made available for the identification of Trichotaenia species with marked shoulders and Cylindera (Ifasina) species of western and southwestern Africa, respectively.

  9. The evolutionary history of Eryngium (Apiaceae, Saniculoideae): rapid radiations, long distance dispersals, and hybridizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calviño, Carolina I; Martínez, Susana G; Downie, Stephen R

    2008-03-01

    Eryngium is the largest and arguably the most taxonomically complex genus in the family Apiaceae. Infrageneric relationships within Eryngium were inferred using sequence data from the chloroplast DNA trnQ-trnK 5'-exon and nuclear ribosomal DNA ITS regions to test previous hypotheses of subgeneric relationships, explain distribution patterns, reconstruct ancestral morphological features, and elucidate the evolutionary processes that gave rise to this speciose genus. In total, 157 accessions representing 118 species of Eryngium, 15 species of Sanicula (including the genus Hacquetia that was recently reduced to synonymy) and the monotypic Petagnaea were analyzed using maximum parsimony and Bayesian methods. Both separate and simultaneous analyses of plastid and nuclear data sets were carried out because of the prevalence of polyploids and hybrids within the genus. Eryngium is confirmed as monophyletic and is divided into two redefined subgenera: Eryngium subgenus Eryngium and E. subgenus Monocotyloidea. The first subgenus includes all examined species from the Old World (Africa, Europe, and Asia), except Eryngium tenue, E. viviparum, E. galioides, and E. corniculatum. Eryngium subgenus Monocotyloidea includes all examined species from the New World (North, Central and South America, and Australia; herein called the "New World sensu stricto" clade) plus the aforementioned Old World species that fall at the base of this clade. Most sectional and subgeneric divisions previously erected on the basis of morphology are not monophyletic. Within the "New World sensu stricto" group, six clades are well supported in analyses of plastid and combined plastid and nuclear data sets; the relationships among these clades, however, are unresolved. These clades are designated as "Mexican", "Eastern USA", "South American", "North American monocotyledonous", "South American monocotyledonous", and "Pacific". Members of each clade share similar geographical distributions and

  10. Leptoconops bezzii (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) parasitizing tortoises Testudo graeca (Testudines: Testudinidae) in mountain ranges of Lebanon and western Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siroký, P; Jandzík, D; Mikulícek, P; Moravec, J; Országh, I

    2007-07-01

    Biting midges of the genus Leptoconops, subgenus Leptoconops (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) were repeatedly found parasitizing on spur-thighed tortoises Testudo graeca in western Syria and Lebanon. Collected females were assigned to the species L. bezzii according to their morphological characteristics. Tortoises parasitized by midges were observed throughout the daytime, under mild temperatures, and slight winds, in Mediterranean or stony steppe habitats. Intensity of the infestations ranged from a few specimens up to thousands of midges per tortoise. Midges infested predominantly the tortoises' carapax, finding their approach to the capillaries in the seams between the keratinized scutes. The vector potential of ceratopogonids is discussed.

  11. Faunistic and bibliographical inventory of the Psychodinae moth-flies of North Africa (Diptera, Psychodidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzan, Hanan; Belqat, Boutaïna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract All published records for the 49 species of moth flies known from North Africa are reviewed and discussed: Morocco (27 species), Algeria (33 species), Tunisia (18 species) and Egypt (five species). In addition, records of seven species of Psychodinae new to the fauna of Morocco are added, of which three are new mentions for North Africa (Table 1) and one is a new record for Egypt. Telmatoscopus squamifer Tonnoir, 1922 is transferred to the genus Iranotelmatoscopus Ježek, 1987, comb. n. Satchelliella reghayana Boumezzough & Vaillant, 1987 is transferred to the genus Pneumia Enderlein, 1935, comb. n. Pneumia aberrans Tonnoir, 1922 is transferred to the subgenus Logima. PMID:27006599

  12. Studies in the Marchantiales (Hepaticae from southern Africa. 8. The genus Plagiochasma (Aytoniaceae: Aytonioideae and six local taxa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Perold

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available A taxonomic account is given ot the genus Plagiochasma Lehm. & Lindenh. and its two subgenera. Micropvlum Bischl. and Plagiochasma. The first subgenus is represented in southern Africa by P. rupestre var. rupestre (J.R. & G. Forst. Steph. and P. rupestre var.  volkii Bischl.: the second by  P. appendiculatum Lehm. & Lindenb. (newly recorded for the region.  P. heccarianum Steph.. P eximium (Schiffn. Steph. and P. microcephalum (Steph. Steph. var. microcephalum. Descriptions and illustrations of these taxa together with distribution maps and a key to the subgenera and species are provided.

  13. Redescription of Enterobius (Enterobius) macaci Yen, 1973 (Nematoda: Oxyuridae: Enterobiinae) based on material collected from wild Japanese macaque, Macaca fuscata (Primates: Cercopithecidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hideo; Sato, Hiroshi; Torii, Harumi

    2012-02-01

    Enterobius (Enterobius) macaci Yen, 1973 (Nematoda: Oxyuridae: Enterobiinae) was collected from a Japanese macaque, Macaca fuscata, in Nara and Yamaguchi Prefectures, Honshu Island, Japan, for the first time. A redescription is presented along with DNA sequence data. This pinworm is a typical member of the subgenus Enterobius and is characteristic in the spicule morphology, being readily distinguished from other congeners. Phylogenetic analyses based on 18S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) Cox1 gene assign its position in the pinworm lineage adapted to the Old World primates, showing divergence before the splitting of the chimpanzee and human pinworms.

  14. Estudios en las Apocynaceae neotropicales XXXII: tres nuevas especies de Prestonia (Apocynoideae, Echiteae para Sudamérica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales, J. Francisco

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Three new species of Prestonia subgenus Prestonia, P. cogolloi, P. premontana and P. racemosa, from Colombia, Venezuela and Peru, respectively, are described and illustrated, and their relationships with related taxa discussed, including distribution, phenology, additional specimens examined and a key of the group.Se describen e ilustran tres nuevas especies de Prestonia subgénero Prestonia, P. cogolloi, P. premontana y P. racemosa, de Colombia, Venezuela y Perú respectivamente, comentándose sus relaciones con especies afines. Se incluye una clave del grupo, datos de distribución, fenología y especímenes adicionales examinados.

  15. Natural Leishmania Infection of Lutzomyia auraensis in Madre de Dios, Peru, Detected by a Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer–Based Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Hugo O. Valdivia; De Los Santos, Maxy B.; Fernandez, Roberto; Baldeviano, G. Christian; Zorrilla, Victor O.; Vera, Hubert; Lucas, Carmen M; Edgel, Kimberly A.; Andrés G Lescano; Mundal, Kirk D.; Paul C. F. Graf

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania species of the Viannia subgenus are responsible for most cases of New World tegumentary leishmaniasis. However, little is known about the vectors involved in disease transmission in the Amazon regions of Peru. We used a novel real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to assess Leishmania infections in phlebotomines collected in rural areas of Madre de Dios, Peru. A total of 1,299 non-blood fed female sand flies from 33 species were captured by using miniature CDC light traps. Lutzo...

  16. A new species of Bolitoglossa (Amphibia, Caudata) from the Sierra de Juárez, Oaxaca, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovito, Sean M; Parra-Olea, Gabriela; Lee, Dana; Wake, David B

    2012-01-01

    We describe a new species of Bolitoglossa (Nanotriton) from the Sierra de Juárez and Sierra Mixe of Oaxaca, Mexico. Bolitoglossa chinantecasp. n. is distinguished from the three other species in the subgenus Nanotriton by its more robust body, by having substantial numbers of maxillary teeth and differences in relative head width, foot width, and limb length. The new species occurs in sympatry with Bolitoglossa (Nanotriton) rufescens at the type locality. The description of another species of salamander from the Sierra de Juárez is noteworthy, given the already high plethodontid salamander species richness of the region.

  17. Anti-trypanosomal activity of pentacyclic triterpenes isolated from Austroplenckia populnea (Celastraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Lucienir Pains; Vieira Filho, Sidney Augusto; Silva, Grácia Divina de Fátima; de Sousa, José Rego; Pinto, Artur da Silveira

    2002-01-01

    Four pentacyclic triterpenes isolated from Austroplenckia populnea and four compounds of known anti T. cruzi or anti-malarial activity were tested. Of those triterpenes tested 20alpha-hydroxy-tingenone showed high activity, epikatonic acid was less active, while populnilic and populninic acids were inactive against the trypanosome of the subgenus Schizotrypanum tested. Benzonidazole, nifurtimox, ketoconazole and primaquine presented a remarkable dose-dependent inhibitory effect reaching practically to a total growth inhibition of the parasite at the end of incubation time. The trypanosome tested appear to be a suitable model for preliminary screen for anti T. (S.) cruzi compounds.

  18. Lectotypes for species of Passiflora L. (Passifloraceae described by João Barbosa Rodrigues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Mezzonato-Pires

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT During taxonomic review of the Brazilian species of the Passiflora subgenus Astrophea and P. subg Decaloba, six names published by the Brazilian botanist João Barbosa Rodrigues were found in need of discussion: Passiflora alliacea, P. amalocarpa, P. cabedelensis, P. hexagonocarpa, P. hydrophila and Tacsonia coccinea. The original illustrations are here designated as lectotypes for P. alliacea, P. amalocarpa, P. cabedelensis (a synonym of P. amalocarpa, P. hexagonocarpa, P. hydrophila (a synonym of P. costata and Tacsonia coccinea (a synonym of P. spinosa.

  19. Computerized screening for novel producers of Monascus-like food pigments in Penicillium species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mapari, Sameer Shamsuddin; Hansen, Michael Adsetts Edberg; Meyer, Anne S.

    2008-01-01

    of Monascus-like pigments from ascomycetous filamentous fungi belonging to Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium that are not reported to produce citrinin or any other known mycotoxins. The screening was carried out using the X-hitting algorithm as a tool to quickly screen through chromatographic sample data...... files of 22 different Penicillium extracts with 12 Monascus pigment extracts as controls. The algorithm searched for the most similar UV-vis spectra of the metabolites (cross hits) present in the pigment extracts to those of the selected reference metabolites viz. monascin, rubropunctatin...

  20. A new class of IMP dehydrogenase with a role in self-resistance of mycophenolic acid producing fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Genee, Hans Jasper; Kaas, Christian Schrøder

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many secondary metabolites produced by filamentous fungi have potent biological activities, to which the producer organism must be resistant. An example of pharmaceutical interest is mycophenolic acid (MPA), an immunosuppressant molecule produced by several Penicillium species...... not produce MPA. The growth of an A. nidulans strain expressing mpaF was only marginally affected by MPA at concentrations as high as 200 μg/ml. To further substantiate the role of mpaF in MPA resistance, we searched for mpaF orthologs in six MPA producer/non-producer strains from Penicillium subgenus...

  1. Isolation and identification of Adenovirus in hospitalized children, under five years, with acute respiratory disease, in Havana, Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Pumariega

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Nine Adenovirus (Ad strains isolated in Cuba, from 128 nasopharingeal swab specimens of children below five years old, with acute respiratory diseases, during 1996 and 1997, were studied by restriction enzyme analysis of genomic DNA with two endonucleases BamH I and Sma I. All different fragment patterns were compared with the respective prototypes. The identified adenoviruses were Ad 1 (n=4, Ad 2 (n=1 and Ad 6 (n=4. Males were more frequently infected than females. The analysis of the occurrence of these Adenovirus strains of subgenus C revealed that Ad 1 and Ad 6 were the predominant serotypes in 1996 and in 1997, respectively.

  2. Reference and deixis in the hybridization strategies of a Western- Islamic corpus of finance in ELF: A Discourse Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariarosaria Provenzano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract in English The paper introduces a socio-cognitive enquiry into the hybridization processes occurring in the academic discourse of Islamic Finance as represented in a corpus of recently-published textbooks written in English as a ‘specialized lingua franca’ dealing with financial topics (cf. Iqbal and Mirakhor 2011. Hybridization involves the structural, textual and pragmatic choices identified in such textbooks reflecting as they do a specific attempt on the part of the text producers to make financial concepts informed by Shariah practices accessible (Widdowson 1991 and acceptable to Western/International university students, especially those from the expanding circle. The focus is placed on selected texts written by Islamic/Muslim scholars reformulating original texts in the L1-Arabic through ELF structures and pragmatics in order to provide explanations and clarifications to the original Islamic concepts. The objective of the enquiry, based on a systematic comparative analysis grounded on Halliday’s (1985 functional grammar, involves an identification of the strategies writers apply to: (a make a text function in a cross-cultural perspective and (b facilitate students to acquire content competences in a way that best fits their background knowledge of the discipline. Therefore, facilitating strategies such as definitions, periphrasis and repetitions of noun phrases shall be explored as triggers for Western students’ processes of schema redefinition, of cross-cultural revision of textuality standards (de Beaugrande and Dressler 1981 and of simplification rules (van Dijk 1980 which actually define a specialized ELF variety of hybrid academic discourse.   Abstract in Italian Il presente studio introduce un’indagine socio-cognitiva sui processi di ibridazione in atto nel discorso accademico della Finanza Islamica rappresentato in un corpus di testi di recente pubblicazione in lingua inglese utilizzata come ‘lingua franca

  3. Fauna de euglossina (Hymenoptera: Apidae da Amazônia sul-ocidental, Acre, Brasil Fauna of euglossina (Hymenoptera: Apidae from southwestern Amazonia, Acre, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Storck-Tonon

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Machos de abelhas Euglossina foram coletados entre dezembro de 2005 e setembro de 2006 em 11 áreas florestais de diferentes tamanhos na região de Rio Branco, Acre, Amazônia Sul-Ocidental. As abelhas foram atraídas por 6 substâncias odoríferas e coletadas com rede entomológica e armadilhas. Um total de 3.675 machos de Euglossina pertencentes a 4 gêneros e 36 espécies foi coletado. Eulaema cingulata (Fabricius foi a espécie mais comum (24,6%, seguida por Eulaema meriana (Olivier (14,6%, Euglossa amazonica Dressler (10,5%, Eulaema nigrita Lepeletier (10,5% e Eulaema pseudocingulata (Oliveira (7,2%. Cineol foi a substância que atraiu maior número de indivíduos (23,8% e metil salicilato o maior número de espécies (28 para ambos os métodos de coleta. Foram coletados 31 indivíduos pertencentes a 9 espécies portando polinários. O número acumulado de espécies coletadas na região estabilizou a partir da 48ª coleta. Poucas espécies foram abundantes, a maioria representada por menos que 50 indivíduos. A falta de um protocolo amostral padronizado tem limitado comparações entre trabalhos realizados em diferentes regiões. Contudo, os resultados aqui apresentados indicam que o Acre apresenta elevada riqueza dessas abelhas.Male orchid bees were collected between December 2005 and September 2006 in 11 forest areas of different sizes in the region of Rio Branco, Acre, Southwestern Amazonia, Brazil. The bees were attracted by 6 aromatic compounds and collected by insect nets and scent baited traps. A total of 3,675 males of Euglossina in 4 genera and 36 species were collected. Eulaema cingulata (Fabricius was the most common (24.6%, followed by Eulaema meriana (Olivier (14.6%, Euglossa amazonica Dressler (10.5%, Eulaema nigrita Lepeletier (10.5% and Eulaema pseudocingulata (Oliveira (7.2%. Cineole was the scent that attracted the greatest number of individuals (23.8% and methyl salicylate the greatest number of species (28 for both

  4. Dos objetivos da linguística de texto à articulação textual: a busca pela coerência do texto e do ensino de língua materna Dos objetivos da linguística de texto à articulação textual: a busca pela coerência do texto e do ensino de língua materna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Neto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to reflect on the goals of linguistic text, in general, to the field of language teaching, by analyzing the sequential elements of cohesion and its influence on the progression of the text, focusing on the study some argumentative operators and relations of meaning established by not using these connectors. All this, of course, tied to a teaching perspective that many theorists speak, which many teachers, thanks to the influence of applied linguistics, follow. The research also proposes a rethinking of the teaching of language and emphasizes the concept of cohesion and coherence beyond the surface structure, prioritizing what “behind” is any act of communication, here restricted to the verbal. For this, this work is based on the studies of authors such as Beaugrande& Dressler (1981 and Koch (2007, among others that will be cited during the text. For analysis, we selected the text entitled “Felicidade”, by Fernando Bastos de Ávila, and a newspaper matter published in “Folha de São Paulo”. The results led us to conclude that the connectors carry some social, historic and cultural factors which are decisive to the meaning of the text. We also concluded that the no use of these connectors can lead to the meaning construction. It will depend on the extralinguistic factors.

    O presente trabalho objetiva fazer uma reflexão acerca dos objetivos da linguística de texto, de uma maneira geral, para o campo de ensino de língua materna, procurando analisar os elementos de coesão sequencial e sua influência na progressão do texto, a partir do estudo de alguns operadores argumentativos e das relações de sentido estabelecidas pelo não uso desses articuladores, em textos escritos. Tudo isso atrelado a uma perspectiva de ensino de que muitos teóricos falam, a qual muitos professores seguem: o funcionalismo. A pesquisa também propõe um repensar sobre o ensino de língua materna e enfatiza o conceito de coesão e coer

  5. Acute Hypotension and Chest Pain as The Presentation of a Post-Myocardial Infarction Acute Pericarditis (Dressler’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo De Giorgi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 53-year old man admitted because of fever (38.5°C and atypical chest pain. He also complained of epigastric pain spread to left hypochondrium and exacerbated by breathing. In his past medical history, Hodgkin’s lymphoma, gastric MALToma (oncologic follow-up only, hypothyroidism, and hypertension are recorded. Fifteen days prior actual hospital admission, the patient underwent angioplasty with stenting due to a ST elevation myocardial infarction. Moreover, he was enrolled in the experimental clinical double-blind trial GEMINI-ACS [1], designed to compare the safety of rivaroxaban vs aspirin in addition to either clopidogrel or ticagrelor. Thus, his complete therapy included also ticagrelor, bisoprolol, perindopril, levothyroxine, pantoprazole, and atorvastatin. At the time of admission chest X-ray showed bilateral pleural effusion. Blood chemistry panel showed moderate anemia, increase of inflammatory indexes, in particular fibrinogen 1057 mg/dl (normal range 150-400 mg/dl, C-reactive-protein 17.6 mg/dl (normal range <0.5 mg/dl, serum ferritin 650 ng/ml (normal range 11-306 ng/ml, while serum pro-calcitonin was normal. Electrocardiography and cardiac troponin I were not suggestive of further heart ischemic damage. Two days later, the patient showed hypotension, exacerbation of chest pain, as well as a rapid drop hemoglobin values. A thoracicabdominal CT (figure 1 was performed, showing peri-hepatic and pericardial effusions associated with hyper-reflectivity of pericardial leaflets. After a precautionary discontinuation of the experimental drugs, acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel were only given, together with antibiotics, diuretics and steroids. Clinical conditions slowly improved, blood pressure levels raised, together with hemoglobin values, and inflammatory parameters decreased. The patient was discharged in good clinical conditions, with the conclusive discharge diagnosis of Dressler syndrome (DS related to

  6. Process technology and effects of spallation products: Circuit components, maintenance, and handling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigg, B.; Haines, S.J.; Dressler, R.; McManamy, T.

    1996-06-01

    Working Session D included an assessment of the status of the technology and components required to: (1) remove impurities from the liquid metal (mercury or Pb-Bi) target flow loop including the effects of spallation products, (2) provide the flow parameters necessary for target operations, and (3) maintain the target system. A series of brief presentations were made to focus the discussion on these issues. The subjects of these presentations, and presenters were: (1) Spallation products and solubilities - R. Dressler; (2) Spallation products for Pb-Bi - Y. Orlov; (3) Clean/up/impurity removal components - B. Sigg; (4) {open_quotes}Road-Map{close_quotes} and remote handling needs - T. McManamy; (5) Remote handling issues and development - M. Holding. The overall conclusion of this session was that, with the exception of (i) spallation product related processing issues, (ii) helium injection and clean-up, and (iii) specialized remote handling equipment, the technology for all other circuit components (excluding the target itself) exists. Operating systems at the Institute of Physics in Riga, Latvia (O. Lielausis) and at Ben-Gurion University in Beer Shiva, Israel (S. Lesin) have demonstrated that other liquid metal circuit components including pumps, heat exchangers, valves, seals, and piping are readily available and have been reliably used for many years. In the three areas listed above, the designs and analysis are not judged to be mature enough to determine whether and what types of technology development are required. Further design and analysis of the liquid metal target system is therefore needed to define flow circuit processing and remote handling equipment requirements and thereby identify any development needs.

  7. T-cell immunity in myocardial inflammation: pathogenic role and therapeutic manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, E; Savvatis, K; Mohiddin, S A; Marelli-Berg, F M

    2017-11-01

    T-cell-mediated immunity has been linked not only to a variety of heart diseases, including classic inflammatory diseases such as myocarditis and post-myocardial infarction (Dressler's) syndrome, but also to conditions without an obvious inflammatory component such as idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and hypertensive cardiomyopathy. It has been recently proposed that in all these conditions, the heart becomes the focus of T-cell-mediated autoimmune inflammation following ischaemic or infectious injury. For example, in acute myocarditis, an inflammatory disease of heart muscle, T-cell responses are thought to arise as a consequence of a viral infection. In a number of patients, persistent T-cell-mediated responses in acute viral myocarditis can lead to autoimmunity and chronic cardiac inflammation resulting in dilated cardiomyopathy. In spite of the major progress made in understanding the mechanisms of pathogenic T-cell responses, effective and safe therapeutic targeting of the immune system in chronic inflammatory diseases of the heart has not yet been developed due to the lack of specific diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers at an early stage. This has also prevented the identification of targets for patient-tailored immunomodulatory therapies that are both disease- and organ-selective. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the development and functional characteristics of pathogenic T-cell-mediated immune responses in the heart, and, in particular, in myocarditis, as well as recent advances in experimental models which have the potential to translate into heart-selective immunomodulation. This article is part of a themed section on Targeting Inflammation to Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Risk. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v174.22/issuetoc and http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bcp.v82.4/issuetoc. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Symbiotic germination of three species of epiphytic orchids susceptible to genetic erosion, from Soconusco (Chiapas, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Bertolini

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Soconusco region of southeast Mexico has almost a quarter of the orchid species registered in Mexico and 37 threatened species (NOM-059-SEMARNAT-2001, many with severely reduced and non-viable populations. We chose two of the most threatened species, Rossioglossum grande (Lindl. Garay and G. C. Kenn. and Cuitlauzina convallarioides (Schltr. Dressler and N. H. Williams and a rare species recently discovered in the region, Rhynchostele bictoniensis (Bateman Soto Arenas and Salazar, to study the mycorrhizal fungi associated with the roots, isolate them and use them to induce seed germination and promote development in asymbiotically produced protocorms, in the laboratory. We isolated ten strains of Rhizoctonia-like orchid mycorrhizal fungi from Rossioglossum grande and three from Cuitlauzina convallarioides. Using selected fungal strains from the same species, we tested for the promotion of further development of asymbiotically pre-germinated protocorms of R. grande and the promotion of seed germination of C. convallarioides. In the case of R. bictoniensis, we studied the effects on seed germination of nine strains of Rhizoctonia-like fungi isolated from other orchid species. For R. grande, after 10 months, one strain of Rhizoctonia promoted development of the pre-germinated protocorms, and almost 90% of the protocorms produced rhizoids. For C. convallarioides, after 3 months, one fungal strain promoted protocorm development to the stage where they produced green tissue under illumination, suggesting the onset of photosynthesis. For R. bictoniensis three of the fungal strains (from other orchid species promoted germination and, after 4 months, autotrophic protocorms.

  9. [Taxonomic problems of the Leishmania of reptiles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovezmukhammedov, A; Saf'ianova, V M

    1989-01-01

    The history of description and state of knowledge of 17 species and 40 not identified to species forms of Leishmania, described from reptiles of the world, are traced. It is suggested to retain 10 species and 3 forms of Leishmania in the list of the subgenus Sauroleishmania as follows: L. (S) tarentolae, L.(S.) hemidactyli, L.(S.) ceramodactyli, L.(S.) nicollei, L.(S.) gymnodactyli, L.(S.) adleri, L.(S.) hoogstraali, L.(S.) senegalensis, L.(S.) gulikae, L.(S.) sp., L.(S.) sp. I, L.(S.) sp. II. 7 species and one form, L(S.) henrici, L.(S.) davidi, L.(S.) zmeevi, L.(S.) sofieffi, L.(S.) chameleonis, L.(S.) phrynocephali, L.(S.) helioscopi, L.(S.) sp. Markov e.a., 1964 must be excluded from the above subgenus since their description does not correspond to the development of the life cycle of Leishmania from reptiles. Flagellata Protozoa from the peripheral blood and intestine of reptiles, which were regarded by some authors as a "leptomonad stage of Leishmania", appear to belong to the genera Proteromonas, Monocercomonas and other Protozoa.

  10. Phylogeny of minute carabid beetles and their relatives based upon DNA sequence data (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Trechitae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddison, David R.; Ober, Karen A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The phylogeny of ground beetles of supertribe Trechitae is inferred using DNA sequences of genes that code for 28S ribosomal RNA, 18S ribosomal RNA, and wingless. Within the outgroups, austral psydrines are inferred to be monophyletic, and separate from the three genera of true Psydrina (Psydrus, Nomius, Laccocenus); the austral psydrines are formally removed from Psydrini and are treated herein as their own tribe, Moriomorphini Sloane. All three genes place Gehringia with Psydrina. Trechitae is inferred to be monophyletic, and sister to Patrobini. Within trechites, evidence is presented that Tasmanitachoides is not a tachyine, but is instead a member of Trechini. Perileptus is a member of subtribe Trechodina. Against Erwin’s hypothesis of anillines as a polyphyletic lineage derived from the tachyine genus Paratachys, the anillines sampled are monophyletic, and not related to Paratachys. Zolini, Pogonini, Tachyina, and Xystosomina are all monophyletic, with the latter two being sister groups. The relationships of the subtribe Bembidiina were studied in greater detail. Phrypeus is only distantly related to Bembidion, and there is no evidence from sequence data that it belongs within Bembidiina. Three groups that have been recently considered to be outside of the large genus Bembidion are shown to be derived members of Bembidion, related to subgroups: Cillenus is related to the Ocydromus complex of Bembidion, Zecillenus is related to the New Zealand subgenus Zeplataphus, and Hydrium is close to subgenus Metallina. The relationships among major lineages of Trechitae are not, however, resolved with these data. PMID:22379388

  11. Determination of L-ascorbic acid in Lycopersicon fruits by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiana-Balaguer, L; Roselló, S; Herrero-Martínez, J M; Maquieira, A; Nuez, F

    2001-09-15

    This study shows an improved method for the determination of L-ascorbic acid (l-AA) in fruits of Lycopersicon by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). Two backgrounds electrolytes (BGEs) have been tested: (i) 400 mM borate at pH 8.0 and 1 x 10(-2)% hexadimethrine bromide, for the separation of Eulycopersicon subgenus species; and (ii) as in BGE(i) but supplemented with 20% (v/v) acetonitrile, for the separation of species of the Eriopersicon subgenus. The present procedures were compared with two routine methods-enzymatic assay and potentiometric titration with 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol. While these routine methods presented some difficulties in quantifying l-AA in several Lycopersicon fruits, CZE was successfully applied in all the analyzed samples. The proposed CZE protocols give lower detection limits (<0.4 microg ml(-1)); are cheaper, quicker, and highly reproducible; and can be applied to analyze large series of samples (ca. 50 samples per day) which is utmost importance, not only in screening trials for internal quality and tomato breeding programs, but also in systematic and routine characterization of Lycopersicon fruits. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  12. Mitochondrial phylogenomics of modern and ancient equids.

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    Julia T Vilstrup

    Full Text Available The genus Equus is richly represented in the fossil record, yet our understanding of taxonomic relationships within this genus remains limited. To estimate the phylogenetic relationships among modern horses, zebras, asses and donkeys, we generated the first data set including complete mitochondrial sequences from all seven extant lineages within the genus Equus. Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood phylogenetic inference confirms that zebras are monophyletic within the genus, and the Plains and Grevy's zebras form a well-supported monophyletic group. Using ancient DNA techniques, we further characterize the complete mitochondrial genomes of three extinct equid lineages (the New World stilt-legged horses, NWSLH; the subgenus Sussemionus; and the Quagga, Equus quagga quagga. Comparisons with extant taxa confirm the NWSLH as being part of the caballines, and the Quagga and Plains zebras as being conspecific. However, the evolutionary relationships among the non-caballine lineages, including the now-extinct subgenus Sussemionus, remain unresolved, most likely due to extremely rapid radiation within this group. The closest living outgroups (rhinos and tapirs were found to be too phylogenetically distant to calibrate reliable molecular clocks. Additional mitochondrial genome sequence data, including radiocarbon dated ancient equids, will be required before revisiting the exact timing of the lineage radiation leading up to modern equids, which for now were found to have possibly shared a common ancestor as far as up to 4 Million years ago (Mya.

  13. Evolution of niche preference in Sphagnum peat mosses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew G; Granath, Gustaf; Tahvanainen, Teemu; Pouliot, Remy; Stenøien, Hans K; Rochefort, Line; Rydin, Håkan; Shaw, A Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Peat mosses (Sphagnum) are ecosystem engineers-species in boreal peatlands simultaneously create and inhabit narrow habitat preferences along two microhabitat gradients: an ionic gradient and a hydrological hummock-hollow gradient. In this article, we demonstrate the connections between microhabitat preference and phylogeny in Sphagnum. Using a dataset of 39 species of Sphagnum, with an 18-locus DNA alignment and an ecological dataset encompassing three large published studies, we tested for phylogenetic signal and within-genus changes in evolutionary rate of eight niche descriptors and two multivariate niche gradients. We find little to no evidence for phylogenetic signal in most component descriptors of the ionic gradient, but interspecific variation along the hummock-hollow gradient shows considerable phylogenetic signal. We find support for a change in the rate of niche evolution within the genus-the hummock-forming subgenus Acutifolia has evolved along the multivariate hummock-hollow gradient faster than the hollow-inhabiting subgenus Cuspidata. Because peat mosses themselves create some of the ecological gradients constituting their own habitats, the classic microtopography of Sphagnum-dominated peatlands is maintained by evolutionary constraints and the biological properties of related Sphagnum species. The patterns of phylogenetic signal observed here will instruct future study on the role of functional traits in peatland growth and reconstruction. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  14. Phylogeny of minute carabid beetles and their relatives based upon DNA sequence data (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Trechitae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Maddison

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The phylogeny of ground beetles of supertribe Trechitae is inferred using DNA sequences of genes that code for 28S ribosomal RNA, 18S ribosomal RNA, and wingless. Within the outgroups, austral psydrines are inferred to be monophyletic, and separate from the three genera of true Psydrina (Psydrus, Nomius, Laccocenus; the austral psydrines are formally removed from Psydrini and are treated herein as their own tribe, Moriomorphini Sloane. All three genes place Gehringia with Psydrina. Trechitae is inferred to be monophyletic, and sister to Patrobini.Within trechites, evidence is presented that Tasmanitachoides is not a tachyine, but is instead a member of Trechini. Perileptus is a member of subtribe Trechodina. Against Erwin’s hypothesis of anillines as a polyphyletic lineage derived from the tachyine genus Paratachys, the anillines sampled are monophyletic, and not related to Paratachys. Zolini, Pogonini, Tachyina, and Xystosomina are all monophyletic, with the latter two being sister groups. The relationships of the subtribe Bembidiina were studied in greater detail. Phrypeus is only distantly related to Bembidion, and there is no evidence from sequence data that it belongs within Bembidiina. Three groups that have been recently considered to be outside of the large genus Bembidion are shown to be derived members of Bembidion, related to subgroups: Cillenus is related to the Ocydromus complex of Bembidion, Zecillenus is related to the New Zealand subgenus Zeplataphus, and Hydrium is close to subgenus Metallina. The relationships among major lineages of Trechitae are not, however, resolved with these data.

  15. Differential Midgut Attachment of Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis in the Sand Flies Lutzomyia (Nyssomyia whitmani and Lutzomyia (Nyssomyia intermedia

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    Rodrigo P. Soares

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between Leishmania and sand flies has been demonstrated in many Old and New World species. Besides the morphological differentiation from procyclic to infective metacyclic promastigotes, the parasite undergoes biochemical transformations in its major surface lipophosphoglycan (LPG. An upregulation of β-glucose residues was previously shown in the LPG repeat units from procyclic to metacyclic phase in Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis, which has not been reported in any Leishmania species. LPG has been implicated as an adhesion molecule that mediates the interaction with the midgut epithelium of the sand fly in the Subgenus Leishmania. These adaptations were explored for the first time in a species from the Subgenus Viannia, L. (V. braziliensis with its natural vectors Lutzomyia (Nyssomyia intermedia and Lutzomyia (Nyssomyia whitmani. Using two in vitro binding techniques, phosphoglycans (PGs derived from procyclic and metacyclic parasites were able to bind to the insect midgut and inhibit L. braziliensis attachment. Interestingly, L. braziliensis procyclic parasite attachment was ∼11-fold greater in the midgut of L. whitmani than in L. intermedia. The epidemiological relevance of L. whitmani as a vector of American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (ACL in Brazil is discussed.

  16. Phylogeny, character evolution, and biogeography of Cuscuta (dodders; Convolvulaceae) inferred from coding plastid and nuclear sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Miguel A; Costea, Mihai; Kuzmina, Maria; Stefanović, Saša

    2014-04-01

    The parasitic genus Cuscuta, containing some 200 species circumscribed traditionally in three subgenera, is nearly cosmopolitan, occurring in a wide range of habitats and hosts. Previous molecular studies, on subgenera Grammica and Cuscuta, delimited major clades within these groups. However, the sequences used were unalignable among subgenera, preventing the phylogenetic comparison across the genus. We conducted a broad phylogenetic study using rbcL and nrLSU sequences covering the morphological, physiological, and geographical diversity of Cuscuta. We used parsimony methods to reconstruct ancestral states for taxonomically important characters. Biogeographical inferences were obtained using statistical and Bayesian approaches. Four well-supported major clades are resolved. Two of them correspond to subgenera Monogynella and Grammica. Subgenus Cuscuta is paraphyletic, with section Pachystigma sister to subgenus Grammica. Previously described cases of strongly supported discordance between plastid and nuclear phylogenies, interpreted as reticulation events, are confirmed here and three new cases are detected. Dehiscent fruits and globose stigmas are inferred as ancestral character states, whereas the ancestral style number is ambiguous. Biogeographical reconstructions suggest an Old World origin for the genus and subsequent spread to the Americas as a consequence of one long-distance dispersal. Hybridization may play an important yet underestimated role in the evolution of Cuscuta. Our results disagree with scenarios of evolution (polarity) previously proposed for several taxonomically important morphological characters, and with their usage and significance. While several cases of long-distance dispersal are inferred, vicariance or dispersal to adjacent areas emerges as the dominant biogeographical pattern.

  17. A molecular phylogeny of the Percidae (Teleostei, Perciformes) based on mitochondrial DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloss, Brian L; Billington, Neil; Burr, Brooks M

    2004-08-01

    The family Percidae is among the most speciose families of northern hemisphere fishes with > 178 178 North American species and 14 Eurasian species. Previous phylogenetic studies have been hampered by a lack of informative characters, inadequate taxonomic sampling, and conflicting data. We estimated phylogenetic relationships among 54 percid species (9 of 10 genera and all but one subgenus of darters) and four outgroup taxa using mitochondrial DNA data from the 12S rRNA and cytochrome b genes. Four primary evolutionary lineages were consistently recovered: Etheostomatinae (Ammocrypta, Crystallaria, Etheostoma, and Percina), Perca, Luciopercinae (Romanichthys, Sander, and Zingel), and Gymnocephalus. Except Etheostoma and Zingel, all polytypic genera were monophyletic. The Etheostoma subgenus Nothonotus failed to resolve with other members of the genus resulting in a paraphyletic Etheostoma. The subfamily Percinae (Gymnocephalus and Perca) was not recovered in phylogenetic analyses with Gymnocephalus sister to Luciopercinae. Etheostomatinae and Romanichthyini were never resolved as sister groups supporting convergent evolution as the cause of small, benthic, stream-inhabiting percids in North American and Eurasian waters.

  18. The fiddler crabs (Crustacea: Brachyura: Ocypodidae: genus Uca of the South Atlantic Ocean

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    Luis Ernesto Arruda Bezerra

    Full Text Available The taxonomy of the 11 species of fiddler crabs [Uca (Uca maracoani (Latreille, 1802-1803, U. (U. tangeri (Eydoux, 1835, U. (Minuca burgersi Holthuis, 1967, U. (M. mordax (Smith, 1870, U. (M. rapax (Smith, 1870, U. (M. thayeri Rathbun, 1900, U. (M. victoriana von Hagen, 1987, U. (M. vocator (Herbst, 1804, U. (Leptuca cumulanta Crane, 1943, U. (L. leptodactyla Rathbun, 1898 and U. (L. uruguayensis Nobili, 1901] of the South Atlantic Ocean is reviewed. Keys for identification, updating the keys for the Atlantic Ocean are proposed, including the species recently described. Comments reporting morphological variations among types and additional material and among populations of different localities are included. The Atlantic species are divided into three subgenera: Uca s. str., Minuca and Leptuca. The eastern Atlantic species U. (U.tangeri is included in subgenus Uca s. str. due to the presence of a proximal spine opposing the spoon-tipped setae of the second maxilliped, which is considered an apomorphic character of the subgenus Uca s. str.

  19. Phylogenetic relationship among all living species of the genus Bubalus based on DNA sequences of the cytochrome b gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, K; Solis, C D; Masangkay, J S; Maeda, K; Kawamoto, Y; Namikawa, T

    1996-12-01

    The cytochrome b genes of all living species of Bubalus, including the river type and the swamp type of domestic buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis), were sequenced to clarify their phylogenetic relationships. These sequences were compared together with the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) and banteng (Bos javanicus) sequences as an outgroup. Phylogenetic trees of Bubalus species based on the DNA sequences of the cytochrome b gene demonstrated that the tamaraw (Bubalus mindorensis), endemic to the Philippines, could be classified into the subgenus Bubalus, not the subgenus Anoa. The divergence time between the lowland anoa (B. depressicornis) and the mountain anoa (B. quarlesi) was estimated at approximately 2.0 million years (Myr), which is almost the same as the coalescence time for the Bubalus sequences. This large genetic distance supports the idea that the lowland anoa and the mountain anoa are different species. An unexpectedly large genetic distance between the river and the swamp type of domestic buffaloes suggests a divergence time of about 1.7 Myr, while the swamp type was noticed to have the closest relationship with the tamaraw (1.5 Myr). This result implies that the two types of domestic buffaloes have differentiated at the full species level.

  20. Localization of oleuropeyl glucose esters and a flavanone to secretory cavities of Myrtaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heskes, Allison M; Goodger, Jason Q D; Tsegay, Sammi; Quach, Tim; Williams, Spencer J; Woodrow, Ian E

    2012-01-01

    We report the widespread occurrence of structurally diverse oleuropeyl glucose esters, including the new diester eucaglobulin B, localized specifically to the essential oil secretory cavities of myrtaceous species. Clear taxonomic patterns in the composition of cavity extracts within the genus Eucalyptus are shown with species from subgenus Symphyomyrtus dominated by oleuropeyl glucose esters and species from subgenus Eucalyptus dominated instead by the flavanone, pinocembrin. We also examined the intra-species occurrence of oleuropeyl glucose esters by quantifying the abundant constituents cuniloside B and froggattiside A in trees from two populations of Eucalyptus polybractea R.T. Baker. All trees contained both compounds, which were positively correlated with total essential oil concentration. This apparent ubiquity of oleuropeyl glucose esters at both intra- and inter-specific levels in Eucalyptus is indicative of important physiological or ecological functions. The significance of their prevalence and the sequestration of these esters and also pinocembrin to the extracellular domain of secretory cavities is discussed in light of their potential biological activities and our findings that they are spatially segregated to the exterior of cavity lumina. The localization of oleuropeyl glucose esters to a specific and isolatable tissue type has the potential to aid in future elucidation of function and biosynthesis.

  1. Description of the male of Lepidodexia (Xylocamptopsis teffeensis (Townsend (Diptera, Sarcophagidae

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    Karlla Patrícia Silva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Description of the male of Lepidodexia (Xylocamptopsis teffeensis (Townsend (Diptera, Sarcophagidae. The male of Lepidodexia (Xylocamptopsis teffeensis (Townsend, 1927 is described and illustrated for the first time based on material housed in the entomological collection of Museu Nacional, Rio de Janeiro (MNRJ. This monotypic subgenus has been recorded in the Brazilian Amazon Rainforest, first in the state of Amazonas and now in the state of Pará. The general structure of the male terminalia is similar that of other Lepidodexia, especially of the subgenus Lepidodexia, by the short distiphallus, juxta with apical projection, and vesica with a membranous spinous lobe.Descrição do macho de Lepidodexia (Xylocamptopsis teffeensis (Townsend, 1927 (Diptera: Sarcophagidae. O macho de Lepidodexia (Xylocamptopsis teffeensis é descrito e ilustrado pela primeira vez, com base em material depositado na coleção entomológica do Museu Nacional, Rio de Janeiro (MNRJ. Esse subgênero monotípico tem sido registrado na Floresta Amazônica brasileira, primeiramente no estado do Amazonas e agora no Pará. A estrutura geral da terminália masculina é similar a de outras espécies de Lepidodexia, especialmente do subgênero Lepidodexia, pelo distifalo curto, juxta com projeção apical e vesica com lobo membranoso e espinhoso.

  2. Revision of the West Palaearctic Polistes Latreille, with the descriptions of two species – an integrative approach using morphology and DNA barcodes (Hymenoptera, Vespidae

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    Christian Schmid-Egger

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The genus Polistes is revised for the West Palaearctic region based on morphology and DNA barcodes. The revision includes all known West Palaearctic species, raising the number of species in Europe to 14 and to 17 for the West Palaearctic realm. DNA barcodes were recovered from 15 species, 14 of which belong to the subgenus Polistes, and one, P. wattii, to the subgenus Gyrostoma. An integrative taxonomic approach combining morphology and molecular data (DNA barcoding was employed to resolve longstanding taxonomic problems in this group. Two species, P. austroccidentalis van Achterberg & Neumeyer, sp. n. (= P. semenowi auctt. from W and SW Europe and P. maroccanus Schmid-Egger, sp. n. from Morocco are described as new. Polistes bucharensis Erichson, 1849, and P. foederatus Kohl, 1898, were restored from synonymy. The following new synonyms are proposed: P. sulcifer Zimmermann, 1930, and Pseudopolistes sulcifer var. similator Zirngiebl, 1955, under P. semenowi Morawitz, 1889, syn. n.; Polistes iranus Guiglia, 1976, Polistes gallica var. ornata Weyrauch, 1938 and Polistes gallicus muchei Gusenleitner, 1976, under P. bucharensis Erichson, 1849, syn. n.; Polistes omissus var. ordubadensis Zirngiebl, 1955, and P. hellenicus Arens, 2011, under Polistes mongolicus du Buysson, 1911, syn. n. An illustrated key includes all species and additionally three species from the subgenera Aphanilopterus Meunier, 1888 and Gyrostoma Kirby, 1828 (including a Nearctic species recently introduced to Spain and two species occurring in Egypt, the Arabian Peninsula, and SW Asia. A phylogenetic analysis using Bayesian inference provides insights into phylogenetic relationships within the genus Polistes.

  3. Pollen morphology of the Polish species of the genus Sorbus L.

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    Leszek Bednorz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the study on pollen morphology of five Polish species of the genus Sorbus L. (S. aria (L. Crantz, S. aucuparia L. Emend. Hedl., S. chamaemespilus (L. Crantz, S. intermedia (Ehrh. Pers. and S. torminalis (L. Crantz. Observations were carried out with light and scanning microscopes. Investigated pollen grains were small or medium size, most often subprolate or prolate spheroidal in outline. Exine of medium thickness, consisted of two layers. Mainly 3-zonocolporate or sometimes 4-zonocolporate (S. chamaemespilus and S. torminalis grains were noted. Usually striatae type of sculpture was observed, except the grains of S. intermedia, which were characterized by intermediate type of sculpture, with the features both striate and regulate ornamentation. Pollen morphology of the investigated Sorbus species corresponds with their systematic classification. It is relatively easy to separate pollen grains of the following subgenera: Sorbus, Chamaemespilus and Torminaria. Only subgenus Aria includes grains of different morphology and therefore it is impossible to determine the diagnostic features of this subgenus. Pollen morphology does not confirm a close relationship between S. aria and S. intermedia. It is possible to distinguished pollen grains of all the analysed native species. However, there are no important differences in pollen morphology between the subspecies of Sorbus aucuparia. The key for Polish Sorbus species, based on pollen grain characters is given too.

  4. Two new Mycale (Naviculina Gray (Mycalidae, Poecilosclerida, Demospongiae from the Paulista Biogeographic Province (Southwestern Atlantic

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    Cléa Lerner

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Two new Mycale (Naviculiiia Gray, 1867 are described, M. (N. arcuiris sp. n. and M. (N.purpurata sp. n., from the Paulista Biogeographic Province (Southwestern Atlantic. They both occur in the São Sebastião Channel area (São Paulo stale coast, the former extending its known distribution to "Arvoredo Marine Biological Reserve" (Santa Catarina state coast. The new species are sibling and differ from each other by a series of very small traits, the most notorious being live-color: yellow, orange, green, white, grey and beige, always light, in M. (N. arcuiris sp. n. and bordeaux in M. (N. purpúrala sp. n. Both species are compared with other known M. (Naviculiiia. Mycale (Aegogropila henlscheli Sim & Lee, 2001 is transferred to subgenus Naviculiiia and given a new name, viz. M. (N. chungue nom. n., as the specific name was preoccupied by M. (Curmia henlscheli Bergquist & Fromont, 1988. An identification key for all the species hitherto assigned to the subgenus is provided.

  5. Redefinition of Cosmolaelaps Berlese (Acari: Laelapidae) and description of five new species from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Grazielle Furtado; Klompen, Hans; José De Moraes, Gilberto

    2014-02-11

    Cosmolaelaps Berlese, 1903 was originally described as a subgenus of Laelaps Koch. More recently, this group has been treated at the generic level or as a subgenus of Hypoaspis Canestrini, 1885. One of the objectives of the present paper is to provide a detailed characterisation of Cosmolaelaps, here considered at the generic level, a group that was poorly characterised in its original description as well as in subsequent publications. It is most closely related to Stratiolaelaps Berlese, from which it can usually be distinguished by the presence of extra paired and unpaired setae on the opisthonotal region of the dorsal shield, as well as by not having hypertrophied chelicerae or corniculi. A total of 108 species belong to Cosmolaelaps, including the new species described here. Five other species may also belong to this genus, but the available published information does not allow their conclusive placement. The Brazilian fauna of Hypoaspidinae is poorly known, but Cosmolaelaps seems to be well represented in Brazil. Thus, the second objective of this paper is to describe five new species of Cosmolaelaps from that country, namely C. barbatus sp. nov., C. busolii sp. nov., C. confinisetarum sp. nov., C. jaboticabalensis sp. nov. and C. oliveirai sp. nov.

  6. Aspergillus section Nidulantes (formerly Emericella: Polyphasic taxonomy, chemistry and biology

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    A.J. Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus section Nidulantes includes species with striking morphological characters, such as biseriate conidiophores with brown-pigmented stipes, and if present, the production of ascomata embedded in masses of Hülle cells with often reddish brown ascospores. The majority of species in this section have a sexual state, which were named Emericella in the dual name nomenclature system. In the present study, strains belonging to subgenus Nidulantes were subjected to multilocus molecular phylogenetic analyses using internal transcribed spacer region (ITS, partial β-tubulin (BenA, calmodulin (CaM and RNA polymerase II second largest subunit (RPB2 sequences. Nine sections are accepted in subgenus Nidulantes including the new section Cavernicolus. A polyphasic approach using morphological characters, extrolites, physiological characters and phylogeny was applied to investigate the taxonomy of section Nidulantes. Based on this approach, section Nidulantes is subdivided in seven clades and 65 species, and 10 species are described here as new. Morphological characters including colour, shape, size, and ornamentation of ascospores, shape and size of conidia and vesicles, growth temperatures are important for identifying species. Many species of section Nidulantes produce the carcinogenic mycotoxin sterigmatocystin. The most important mycotoxins in Aspergillus section Nidulantes are aflatoxins, sterigmatocystin, emestrin, fumitremorgins, asteltoxins, and paxillin while other extrolites are useful drugs or drug lead candidates such as echinocandins, mulundocandins, calbistrins, varitriols, variecolins and terrain. Aflatoxin B1 is produced by four species: A. astellatus, A. miraensis, A. olivicola, and A. venezuelensis.

  7. Genome-Wide SNP Analysis Reveals Distinct Origins of Trypanosoma evansi and Trypanosoma equiperdum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuypers, Bart; Van den Broeck, Frederik; Van Reet, Nick; Meehan, Conor J; Cauchard, Julien; Wilkes, Jonathan M; Claes, Filip; Goddeeris, Bruno; Birhanu, Hadush; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Laukens, Kris; Büscher, Philippe; Deborggraeve, Stijn

    2017-08-01

    Trypanosomes cause a variety of diseases in man and domestic animals in Africa, Latin America, and Asia. In the Trypanozoon subgenus, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense cause human African trypanosomiasis, whereas Trypanosoma brucei brucei, Trypanosoma evansi, and Trypanosoma equiperdum are responsible for nagana, surra, and dourine in domestic animals, respectively. The genetic relationships between T. evansi and T. equiperdum and other Trypanozoon species remain unclear because the majority of phylogenetic analyses has been based on only a few genes. In this study, we have conducted a phylogenetic analysis based on genome-wide SNP analysis comprising 56 genomes from the Trypanozoon subgenus. Our data reveal that T. equiperdum has emerged at least once in Eastern Africa and T. evansi at two independent occasions in Western Africa. The genomes within the T. equiperdum and T. evansi monophyletic clusters show extremely little variation, probably due to the clonal spread linked to the independence from tsetse flies for their transmission. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  8. Detection and identification of Trypanosoma of African livestock through a single PCR based on internal transcribed spacer 1 of rDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desquesnes, M; McLaughlin, G; Zoungrana, A; Dávila, A M

    2001-05-01

    Primers hybridising with the rDNA cistron have previously been evaluated for PCR diagnosis specific for kinetoplastids, and shown to detect and differentiate the Trypanosoma brucei complex and Trypanosoma cruzi. Kin1 and Kin2 primers, amplifying internal transcribed spacer 1, were subsequently evaluated for the diagnosis of African livestock trypanosomosis. Based on the size of the PCR products obtained, Kin primers allowed detection and identification of three Trypanosoma congolense types (savannah, forest and Kenya Coast), with distinction among themselves and from the subgenus Trypanozoon (T. brucei spp., Trypanosoma evansi and Trypanosoma equiperdum), Trypanosoma vivax, Trypanosoma simiae and Trypanosoma theileri. These primers were shown to be suitable for the sensitive and type-specific diagnosis of African livestock trypanosome isolates through a single PCR even in the case of multi-taxa samples. With field samples (buffy-coat from cattle blood) sensitivity was close to the sensitivity observed in single reactions with the classical specific primers for the Trypanozoon subgenus and T. congolense-type savannah, but was lower for detection of T. vivax. Additional reaction, improvement of DNA preparation, and/or new primers design are necessary to improve the sensitivity for detection of T. vivax in field samples. However, these primers are suitable for isolate typing through a single PCR.

  9. Two new species of nocturnal bees of the genus Megalopta (Hymenoptera: Halictidae with keys to species

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    Victor H Gonzalez

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Megalopta Smith, 1853, is a Neotropical genus of nocturnal or crepuscular bees. Two subgenera are recognized with most of its nearly 30 species placed in the nominate subgenus. Species of Megalopta s. str. are more commonly collected than species of Noctoraptor Engel et al. 1997, all presumably parasites of Megalopta s. str. Two new species of Megalopta are described here: M. (Megalopta tetewana, n. sp., from Mexico and M. (Noctoraptor huaoranii, n. sp., from Ecuador. Identification keys to the Central American species of Megalopta s. str. and the species of the parasitic subgenus Noctoraptor are presented. Rev. Biol. Trop. 58 (1: 255-263. Epub 2010 March 01.Megalopta Smith, 1853, es un género Neotropical de abejas nocturnas o crepusculares. Dos subgéneros son reconocidos con la mayoría de las 30 especies ubicadas en el subgénero nominal. Las especies de Megalopta s. str. son más comúnmente recolectadas que las especies de Noctoraptor Engel et al. 1997, todas probablemente parásitas de Megalopta s. str. Aquí se describen dos especies nuevas de Megalopta: M. (Megalopta tetewana, n. sp., de México y M. (Noctoraptor huaoranii, n. sp., de Ecuador. Se presentan claves de identificación para las especies de Megalopta s. str. de América Central y las especies del subgénero parásito Noctoraptor.

  10. Terpenes as Useful Markers in Differentiation of Natural Populations of Relict Pines Pinus heldreichii, P. nigra, and P. peuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitić, Zorica S; Nikolić, Biljana M; Ristić, Mihailo S; Tešević, Vele V; Bojović, Srdjan R; Marin, Petar D

    2017-08-01

    Comparative analysis of terpene diversity and differentiation of relict pines Pinus heldreichii, P. nigra, and P. peuce from the central Balkans was performed at the population level. Multivariate statistical analyses showed that the composition of needle terpenes reflects clear divergence among the pine species from different subgenera: P. peuce (subgenus Strobus) vs. P. nigra and P. heldreichii (subgenus Pinus). In addition, despite the described morphological similarities and the fact that P. nigra and P. heldreichii may spontaneously hybridize, our results indicated differentiation of their populations naturally growing in the same area. In accordance with recently proposed concept of 'flavonic evolution' in the genus Pinus, we assumed that the terpene profile of soft pine P. peuce, defined by high amounts of six monoterpenes, is more basal than those of hard pines P. nigra and P. heldreichii, which were characterized by high content levels of mainly sesquiterpenes. In order to establish precise positions of P. heldreichii, P. nigra and P. peuce within the taxonomic and phylogenetic tree, as well as develop suitable conservation strategies and future breeding efforts, it is necessary to perform additional morphological, biochemical, and genetic studies. © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  11. Phylogenetic Relationships between Four Salix L. Species Based on DArT Markers

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    Jerzy A. Przyborowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to evaluate the usefulness of DArT markers in genotypic identification of willow species and describe genetic relationships between four willow species: Salix viminalis, S. purpurea, S. alba and S. triandra. The experimental plant material comprised 53 willow genotypes of these four species, which are popularly grown in Poland. DArT markers seem to identify Salix species with a high degree of accuracy. As a result, the examined species were divided into four distinct groups which corresponded to the four analyzed species. In our study, we observed that S. triandra was very different genetically from the other species, including S. alba which is generally classified into the same subgenus of Salix. The above corroborates the findings of other authors who relied on molecular methods to reveal that the classification of S. triandra to the subgenus Salix was erroneous. The Principal Coordinate Analysis (PCoA and the neighbor-joining dendrogram also confirmed the clear division of the studied willow genotypes into four clusters corresponding to individual species. This confirmed the usefulness of DArT markers in taxonomic analyses and identification of willow species.

  12. Comparative pollen morphological analysis in the subgenera Passiflora and Decaloba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Taliane L; Jesus, Onildo N; Souza, Everton H; Rossi, Mônica L; Oliveira, Eder J

    2017-10-16

    The genus Passiflora is the most diversified of the Passifloraceae, and its palynology presents wide morphological variability. The objective of the study was to evaluate the pollen morphology of 18 Passiflora species in order to identify informative pollinic characteristics to contribute to the taxonomic classification of the genus. The morphology of the pollen grains and the exine structure were investigated using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Differences in the pollen morphology were found in the studied species, mainly in terms of shape, pollen aperture and ornamentation pattern of the exine. Most of the species belonging to the subgenus Passiflora presented ornamented 6-syncolpate pollen grains with an oblate-spheroidal shape and an exine with large lumens. In the subgenus Decaloba the pollen grains were 6-colporate, 12-colpate and 12-colporate, with subprolate to prolate-spheroidal shape, as well as an exine with smaller lumen size and few ornamented. The pollen morphology of the species of the subgenera Passiflora and Decaloba has shown palynological characteristics that have specific diagnostic value, thus allowing a better understanding of the taxonomy of the genus Passiflora.

  13. Species composition and natural infectivity of anthropophilic Anopheles (Diptera: Culicidae) in Córdoba and Antioquia states in northwestern Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Lina A; González, John J; Gómez, Giovan F; Castro, Martha I; Rosero, Doris A; Luckhart, Shirley; Conn, Jan E; Correa, Margarita M

    2011-01-01

    Malaria is a serious health problem in Córdoba and Antioquia states in northwestern Colombia, where 64.4% of the total Colombian cases were reported in 2007. Because little entomological information is available in this region, the aim of this work was to identify the Anopheles species composition and natural infectivity of mosquitoes distributed in seven localities with the highest malaria transmission. A total of 1,768 Anopheles mosquitoes were collected using human landing catches from March 2007 to July 2008. Ten species were identified; overall, An. nuneztovari s.l. was the most widespread (62%) and showed the highest average human biting rates. There were six other species of the Nyssorhynchus subgenus: An. albimanus (11.6%), An. darlingi (9.8%), An. braziliensis (6.6%), An. triannulatus s.l. (3.5%), An. albitarsis s.l. and An. oswaldoi s.l. at <1%; and three of the Anopheles subgenus: An. punctimacula, An. pseudopunctipennis s.l. and An. neomaculipalpus at <1% each. Two species from Córdoba, An. nuneztovari and An. darlingi, were detected naturally infected by Plasmodium vivax VK247 using ELISA and confirmed by nested PCR. All species were active indoors and outdoors. These results provide basic information for targeted vector control strategies in these localities. PMID:20140372

  14. Review of West-Palaearctic Hebridae with description of a new species and redescription of Hebrus fulvinervis (Hemiptera: Heteroptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kment, Petr; Jindra, Zdeněk; Berchi, Gavril Marius

    2016-08-04

    A review of the West-Palaearctic Hebridae and their distribution is given, including two genera and 21 species-group taxa (18 species and 3 subspecies). A new species, Hebrus (Hebrus) atlas sp. nov. (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Hebroidea: Hebridae: Hebrinae), is described from Morocco and is the first micropterous species of Hebrus s. str. in the Palaearctic Region. The species Hebrus fulvinervis Horváth, 1929, not recorded since its original description, is rediscovered, redescribed, and its species status is confirmed. Based on the morphological characters, H. fulvinervis is considered closely related to H. ruficeps Thomson, 1871, and transferred to the subgenus Hebrusella Poisson, 1944. Remarks on the morphology of Hebrus syriacus Horváth, 1896 are provided and its placement in the subgenus Hebrus s. str. is confirmed. The following new or confirmed distribution records are provided: Hebrus acutiscutatus Brown, 1951 from Israel, H. fulvi-nervis from Bulgaria, H. jeanneli djaneti Poisson, 1953 from Morocco, H. montanus Kolenati, 1857 from Israel and Romania, H. pusillus arabicus Linnavuori, 1971 from Iran (Hormozgan) and Oman, H. pusillus pusillus (Fallén, 1807) from Greece and Lithuania, H. syriacus from Cyprus, and H. vaillanti Poisson, 1953 from Morocco. Several corrections concerning type localities, type material and depositories are also provided.

  15. Localization of oleuropeyl glucose esters and a flavanone to secretory cavities of Myrtaceae.

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    Allison M Heskes

    Full Text Available We report the widespread occurrence of structurally diverse oleuropeyl glucose esters, including the new diester eucaglobulin B, localized specifically to the essential oil secretory cavities of myrtaceous species. Clear taxonomic patterns in the composition of cavity extracts within the genus Eucalyptus are shown with species from subgenus Symphyomyrtus dominated by oleuropeyl glucose esters and species from subgenus Eucalyptus dominated instead by the flavanone, pinocembrin. We also examined the intra-species occurrence of oleuropeyl glucose esters by quantifying the abundant constituents cuniloside B and froggattiside A in trees from two populations of Eucalyptus polybractea R.T. Baker. All trees contained both compounds, which were positively correlated with total essential oil concentration. This apparent ubiquity of oleuropeyl glucose esters at both intra- and inter-specific levels in Eucalyptus is indicative of important physiological or ecological functions. The significance of their prevalence and the sequestration of these esters and also pinocembrin to the extracellular domain of secretory cavities is discussed in light of their potential biological activities and our findings that they are spatially segregated to the exterior of cavity lumina. The localization of oleuropeyl glucose esters to a specific and isolatable tissue type has the potential to aid in future elucidation of function and biosynthesis.

  16. Unveiling the Rosetta Stone of syllids: redescription and neotype designation of Syllis monilaris Savigny in Lamarck, 1818, type species of type genus of family Syllidae Grube, 1850 (Annelida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Campos, Patricia; Gil, João; San Martín, Guillermo

    2015-11-11

    Syllis monilaris Savigny in Lamarck, 1818, the type species of the genus Syllis Savigny in Lamarck, 1818, is redescribed based on two specimens deposited in the Museum für Naturkunde Berlin (Germany). One specimen is designated as neotype, since the original type material is considered to be lost, and there is a necessity to stabilize the nomenclature of the group. The species is large sized, with long dorsal cirri on anterior segments, becoming short and fusiform from midbody, it has thick compound chaetae with short, unidentate blades, not fused to shafts. The lack of chaetae with fused shafts and blades contradicts the division of the genus Syllis into subgenera as proposed by Langerhans (1879), who considered the subgenus Syllis as having thick fused chaetae on midbody, in addition to compound chaetae, and the subgenus Typosyllis with only compound chaetae. A discussion about the systematics of the genus is included, and according to this new data, Typosyllis is a junior synonymy of Syllis.

  17. Evolutionary changes in correlations among functional traits in Ceanothus in response to Mediterranean conditions

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    T. M. Hardig

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Ceanothus is a widely speciated genus with two sections that differ markedly in size, patterns of biomass allocation and reproductive strategies. On greenhouse-grown seedlings we tested whether divergence occurred in single traits or in suites of traits, and whether taxonomic affinity or the ability to fix nitrogen (N influenced the relationships among functional traits. Species of the subgenus Cerastes differed from species in the subgenus Ceanothus in the following characteristics: reproduction by seed rather than primarily resprouting, high rates of photosynthesis and high stomatal conductance, thick leaves, low root allocation, and high leaf allocation. Correlations of traits across the entire genus showed positive correlations among traits that maximize photosynthesis and tradeoffs between root allocation and carbon gain patterns frequently observed in other broad taxonomic comparisons. Trait correlations differed between the two subgenera (divergence in allocation-photosynthesis tradeoffs in Ceanothus and divergence of growth-related traits in Cerastes. Similarly, N-fixers, which were distributed broadly between the two subgenera, differed in trait correlations (primarily among traits related to photosynthesis from non-fixers (primarily among traits related to growth and allocation. These results indicate that 1 divergence in genus Ceanothus was associated with changes in entire suite of traits, rather than independent changes in individual traits and 2 evolution occurring under different environmental or nutritional circumstances alters the suites of traits exhibited by plants.

  18. Unveiling of a cryptic Dicranomyia (Idiopyga from northern Finland using integrative approach (Diptera, Limoniidae

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    Jukka Salmela

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The subgenus Idiopyga Savchenko, 1987 is a northern hemisphere group of short-palped crane flies (Diptera, Limoniidae. In the current article we describe a new species, Dicranomyia (I. boreobaltica Salmela sp.n., and redescribe the male and female post-abdomen of a closely related species, D. (I. intricata Alexander. A standard DNA barcoding fragment of 5′ region of the cytochrome c oxidase I (COI gene of the new species is presented, whilst the K2P minimum distances between the new species and 10 other species of the subgenus were found to range from 5.1 to 15.7 % (mean 11.2 %. Phylogenetic analyses (parsimony and maximum likelihood based on COI sequences support the identity of the new species and its close relationship with D. (I. intricata and D. (I. esbeni (Nielsen. The new species is known from the northern Baltic area of Finland. The new species has been mostly collected from Baltic coastal meadows but an additional relict population is known from a calcareous rich fen that was estimated to have been at sea level circa 600-700 years ago. Dicranomyia (I. intricata (syn. D. suecica Nielsen is a Holarctic species, occurring in the north boreal and subarctic vegetation zones in Fennoscandia.

  19. Two new Lactarius species from a subtropical cloud forest in eastern Mexico.

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    Bandala, Victor M; Montoya, Leticia; Ramos, Antero

    2016-09-01

    Two species of Lactarius from the subtropical montane cloud forest of central Veracruz are described as new. Both species are placed in subgenus Lactarius based on an accurate study of macro- and micromorphological features and supported by molecular phylogenetic analyses of a single nuc rDNA ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 (ITS), a concatenated ITS, D1, and D2 domains of nuc 28S rDNA (28S), and part of the second largest subunit of the RNA polymerase II (rpb2) (6-7 region) sequence datasets. In the phylogenetic reconstruction presented, the two species appear nested in two clearly distinct, well supported clades that reveal their phylogenetic position among members of subgenus Lactarius (= subg. Piperites s. auct.), a complex group of which a worldwide phylogeny requires further study. According to field observations, both taxa are possible ectomycorrhizal associates of Quercus spp. and one of Fagus grandifolia var. mexicana Taxonomic descriptions based on the study of specimens gathered during fieldwork from 2012 to 2014 are presented. Descriptions are accompanied with illustrations of macro and micromorphological characters and a discussion of related species is provided. © 2016 by The Mycological Society of America.

  20. Proteomic Characterization of the Venom of Five Bombus (Thoracobombus Species

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    Nezahat Pınar Barkan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Venomous animals use venom, a complex biofluid composed of unique mixtures of proteins and peptides, to act on vital systems of the prey or predator. In bees, venom is solely used for defense against predators. However, the venom composition of bumble bees (Bombus sp. is largely unknown. The Thoracobombus subgenus of Bombus sp. is a diverse subgenus represented by 14 members across Turkey. In this study, we sought out to proteomically characterize the venom of five Thoracobombus species by using bottom-up proteomic techniques. We have obtained two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel (2D-PAGE images of each species’ venom sample. We have subsequently identified the protein spots by using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS. We have identified 47 proteins for Bombus humilis, 32 for B. pascuorum, 60 for B. ruderarius, 39 for B. sylvarum, and 35 for B. zonatus. Moreover, we illustrated that intensities of 2DE protein spots corresponding to putative venom toxins vary in a species-specific manner. Our analyses provide the primary proteomic characterization of five bumble bee species’ venom composition.

  1. New species of sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae) from the Aleutian Islands and Gulf of Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Helmut; Stone, Robert P

    2015-10-27

    Ten new species of demosponges, assigned to the orders Poecilosclerida, Axinellida and Dictyoceratida, discovered in the Gulf of Alaska and along the Aleutian Island Archipelago are described and compared to relevant congeners. Poecilosclerida include Cornulum globosum n. sp., Megaciella lobata n. sp., M. triangulata n. sp., Artemisina clavata n. sp., A. flabellata n. sp., Coelosphaera (Histodermion) kigushimkada n. sp., Stelodoryx mucosa n. sp. and S. siphofuscus n. sp. Axinellida is represented by Raspailia (Hymeraphiopsis) fruticosa n. sp. and Dictyoceratida is represented by Dysidea kenkriegeri n. sp. The genus Cornulum is modified to allow for smooth tylotes. We report several noteworthy biogeographical observations. We describe only the third species within the subgenus Histodermion and the first from the Indo-Pacific Region. Additionally, the subgenus Hymerhaphiopsis was previously represented by only a single species from Antarctica. We also report the first record of a dictyoceratid species from Alaska. The new collections further highlight the richness of the sponge fauna from the region, particularly for the Poecilosclerida.

  2. Multiple invasions of Gypsy and Micropia retroelements in genus Zaprionus and melanogaster subgroup of the genus Drosophila

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    Carareto Claudia MA

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Zaprionus genus shares evolutionary features with the melanogaster subgroup, such as space and time of origin. Although little information about the transposable element content in the Zaprionus genus had been accumulated, some of their elements appear to be more closely related with those of the melanogaster subgroup, indicating that these two groups of species were involved in horizontal transfer events during their evolution. Among these elements, the Gypsy and the Micropia retroelements were chosen for screening in seven species of the two Zaprionus subgenera, Anaprionus and Zaprionus. Results Screening allowed the identification of diverse Gypsy and Micropia retroelements only in species of the Zaprionus subgenus, showing that they are transcriptionally active in the sampled species. The sequences of each retroelement were closely related to those of the melanogaster species subgroup, and the most parsimonious hypothesis would be that 15 horizontal transfer events shaped their evolution. The Gypsy retroelement of the melanogaster subgroup probably invaded the Zaprionus genomes about 11 MYA. In contrast, the Micropia retroelement may have been introduced into the Zaprionus subgenus and the melanogaster subgroup from an unknown donor more recently (~3 MYA. Conclusion Gypsy and Micropia of Zaprionus and melanogaster species share similar evolutionary patterns. The sharing of evolutionary, ecological and ethological features probably allowed these species to pass through a permissive period of transposable element invasion, explaining the proposed waves of horizontal transfers.

  3. The host specificity of ape malaria parasites can be broken in confined environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoubangoye, Barthélémy; Boundenga, Larson; Arnathau, Céline; Mombo, Illich Manfred; Durand, Patrick; Tsoumbou, Thierry-Audrey; Otoro, Bertony Vacky; Sana, Rick; Okouga, Alain-Prince; Moukodoum, Nancy; Willaume, Eric; Herbert, Anaïs; Fouchet, David; Rougeron, Virginie; Bâ, Cheikh Tidiane; Ollomo, Benjamin; Paupy, Christophe; Leroy, Eric M; Renaud, François; Pontier, Dominique; Prugnolle, Franck

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have revealed a large diversity of Plasmodium spp. among African great apes. Some of these species are related to Plasmodium falciparum, the most virulent agent of human malaria (subgenus Laverania), and others to Plasmodium ovale, Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium vivax (subgenus Plasmodium), three other human malaria agents. Laverania parasites exhibit strict host specificity in their natural environment. Plasmodium reichenowi, Plasmodium billcollinsi, Plasmodium billbrayi and Plasmodium gaboni infect only chimpanzees, while Plasmodium praefalciparum, Plasmodium blacklocki and Plasmodium adleri are restricted to gorillas and Plasmodium falciparum is pandemic in humans. This host specificity may be due to genetic and/or environmental factors. Infrastructures hosting captive primates, such as sanctuaries and health centres, usually concentrate different primate species, thus favouring pathogen exchanges. Using molecular tools, we analysed blood samples from captive non-human primates living in Gabon to evaluate the risk of Plasmodium spp. transfers between host species. We also included blood samples from workers taking care of primates to assess whether primate-human parasite transfers occurred. We detected four transfers of Plasmodium from gorillas towards chimpanzees, one from chimpanzees to gorillas, three from humans towards chimpanzees and one from humans to mandrills. No simian Plasmodium was found in the blood samples from humans working with primates. These findings demonstrate that the genetic barrier that determines the apparent host specificity of Laverania is not completely impermeable and that parasite exchanges between gorillas and chimpanzees are possible in confined environments. Copyright © 2016 Australian Society for Parasitology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Taxonomic placement of Paphiopedilum rungsuriyanum (Cypripedioideae; Orchidaceae) based on morphological, cytological and molecular analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yung-I; Chung, Mei-Chu; Sydara, Kongmany; Souliya, Onevilay; Aphay, Sulivong Luang

    2017-12-01

    Paphiopedilum rungsuriyanum from Northern Laos was discovered and described in 2014. It is characterized by having miniature tessellated leaves, a flower having a helmet shaped lip with a V-shaped neckline, and a semi-lunate, 3-dentate staminode with an umbo. These morphological features distinguish P. rungsuriyanum from the other known sections/subgenera of Paphiopedilum, making it difficult to group with existing infrageneric units. Paphiopedilum rungsuriyanum has chromosome number of 2n = 26. Fluorescence in situ hybridization study demonstrates that there are two 45S rDNA signals in the telomeric region of chromosomes, and more than 20 5S rDNA signals dispersed signals in the pericentromeric and centromeric regions. Phylogenetic analyses based on four nuclear (i.e. ITS, ACO, DEF4 and RAD51) and four plastid (i.e. atpI-atpH, matK, trnS-trnfM and ycf1) gene regions indicate that P. rungsuriyanum is nested in subgenus Paphiopedilum and is a sister to section Paphiopedilum. The results in combination with karyomorphological, rDNA FISH patterns, morphological and phylogenetic analyses suggest a new section Laosianum to accommodate this species in the current sectional circumscription of subgenus Paphiopedilum.

  5. Molecular phylogeny, divergence time estimates and historical biogeography within one of the world's largest monocot genera.

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    Li, Qin-Qin; Zhou, Song-Dong; Huang, De-Qing; He, Xing-Jin; Wei, Xian-Qin

    2016-01-01

    A primary aim of historical biogeography is to identify the causal factors or processes that have shaped the composition and distribution of biotas over time. Another is to infer the evolution of geographic ranges of species and clades in a phylogenetic context. To this end, historical biogeography addresses important questions such as: Where were ancestors distributed? Where did lineages originate? Which processes cause geographic ranges to evolve through time? Allium subgenus Anguinum comprises approximately twelve taxa with a disjunct distribution in the high mountains from south-western Europe to eastern Asia and in northeastern North America. Although both the systematic position and the geographical limits of Anguinum have been identified, to date no molecular systematic study has been performed utilizing a comprehensive sampling of these species. With an emphasis on the Anguinum eastern Asian geographical group, the goals of the present study were: (i) to infer species-level phylogenetic relationships within Anguinum, (ii) to assess molecular divergence and estimated the times of the major splits in Anguinum and (iii) to trace the biogeographic history of the subgenus. Four DNA sequences (ITS, matK, trnH-psbA, rps16) were used to reconstruct the phylogeny of Allium subgen. Anguinum RbcL sequences were used to estimate divergences time for Allium, and sequences of ITS were used to estimate the divergence times for Anguinum and its main lineages and to provide implications for the evolutionary history of the subgenus. Phylogenetic analyses for all Allium corroborate that Anguinum is monophyletic and indicate that Anguinum is composed of two sister groups: one with a Eurasian-American distribution, and the other restricted to eastern Asia. In the eastern Asian geographical group, incongruence between gene trees and morphology-based taxonomies was recovered as was incongruence between data from plastid and nuclear sequences. This incongruence is likely due to

  6. Revisión del grupo Iberobathynella (Iberobathynella Camacho & Serban, 1998 (Crustacea, Syncarida, Parabathynellidae endémico de la Península Ibérica

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    Serban, E.

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present additional information on the subgenus Iberobathynella (Iberobathynella Camacho & Serban, 1998, made up of five species endemic to the Iberian Peninsula and belonging to the Tribe Iberobathynellini Camacho & Serban, 1998. We give a complete description of the Iberobathynella (Iberobathynella paragracilipes Camacho & Serban, 1998 which, previously preliminary described. We also carry out an analysis of the population variability of the species. We show that the phylogenetic position of this subgenus is the most primitive in thistribe made up of four genera and five subgenera and we conclude that the species Iberobathynella (Iberobathynella paragracilipes and Iberobathynella (Iberobathynella gracilipes ((Braga, 1960 seem to be more plesiomorphic than the group comprising the other three species of the subgenus, I. (I. lusitanica (Braga, 1949, I. (I. valbonensis (Galhano, 1970 e I. (I. barcelensis (Noodt & Galhano, 1969. The paleodistribution derivated from the current known distribution of the genus in the Iberian Peninsula and its phylogenetic relationships lead us to conclude that speciation of the group could have occurred at the end of the Cretaceous (65 Myrs.En este trabajo abordamos la revisión del subgénero Iberobathynella (Iberobathynella Camacho & Serban, 1998, compuesto por cinco especies endémicas de la Península Ibérica y que pertenecen a la tribu Iberobathynellini Camacho & Serban, 1998. Se presenta una descripción completa de la especie Iberobathynella (Iberobathynella paragracilipes Camacho & Serban, 1998 de la cual sólo se dispone hasta la fecha de una diagnosis preliminar. Se realiza un análisis de la variación poblacional de la misma. Se muestra la posición filogenética de este subgénero, el más primitivo, dentro de la tribu que consta de 4 géneros y 5 subgéneros, y se concluye que las especies I. gracilipes (Braga, 1960 e I. paragracilipes parecen ser más plesiomorfas que el grupo formado

  7. Infection by Haemoproteus parasites in four species of frigatebirds and the description of a new species of Haemoproteus (Haemosporida: Haemoproteidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Santiago; Hennicke, Janos; Martinez, Javier; Ludynia, Katrin; Torres, Roxana; Work, Thierry M.; Stroud, Stedson; Masello, Juan F.; Quillfeldt, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Among seabirds, the fregatids stand out with a high prevalence of blood parasites. Four of 5 species in this family have been found to be infected with Haemoproteus; however, complete species descriptions with molecular phylogeny are lacking. Seventy-five samples from 4 species of frigatebirds, i.e., Fregata andrewsi, Fregata minor, Fregata magnificens, and Fregata aquila, were screened for infections caused by species of Haemoproteus. Four different parasite haplotypes were found infecting frigatebirds based on the sequencing of a fragment of the cytochrome b gene. Two haplotypes belong to the subgenus Parahaemoproteus, and the other 2 correspond to haplotypes within the subgenus Haemoproteus. The more prevalent and cosmopolitan Parahaemoproteus haplotype (FregPHae1) was phylogenetically grouped with other Haemoproteus parasites infecting non-passerine birds, but it could not be detected from the single sample from F. aquila. The other Parahaemoproteus haplotype (FregPHae2) was not phylogenetically clustered with parasites infecting non-passerine birds, and it was sequenced from a single (1 each) F. andrewsi and F. minor. Blood smears from F. andrewsi infected only by FregPHae1 haplotype showed sufficient gametocytes to allow description of a new species, Haemoproteus valkiūnasi sp. nov. In contrast to Haemoproteus iwa, the only previously known blood parasite infecting frigatebirds and described from F. minor from Galapagos Islands, parasites from F. andrewsi (1) are shorter with no contact of gametocyte with host cell membrane, (2) have fewer pigment granules, and (3) have wider microgametocytes, with a smaller host nuclear displacement. In contrast, patent single infections corresponding to the cosmopolitan haplotype of the subgenus Haemoproteus (FregHae1) were also found in samples from 1 F. andrewsi, 1 F. minor, and 1 F. aquila. In all these cases, the number of microgametocytes was very low, resembling H. iwa, which lacks microgametocytes in the original

  8. Murine cytomegalovirus is not restricted to the house mouse Mus musculus domesticus: prevalence and genetic diversity in the European house mouse hybrid zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goüy de Bellocq, Joëlle; Baird, Stuart J E; Albrechtová, Jana; Sobeková, Karolína; Piálek, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) is a betaherpesvirus of the house mouse, Mus musculus domesticus. It is a common infectious agent of wild mice and a highly studied pathogen of the laboratory mouse. Betaherpesviruses are specific to their hosts, and it is not known if other Mus taxa carry MCMV or if it is restricted to M. m. domesticus. We sampled mice over a 145-km transect of Bavaria-Bohemia crossing a hybrid zone between M. m. domesticus and Mus musculus musculus in order to investigate the occurrence of MCMV in two Mus subspecies and to test the limits of the specificity of the virus for its host. We hypothesized that if the two subspecies carry MCMV and if the virus is highly specific to its host, divergent MCMV lineages would have codiverged with their hosts and would have a geographical distribution constrained by the host genetic background. A total of 520 mice were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and/or nested PCR targeting the M94 gene. Seropositive and PCR-positive individuals were found in both Mus subspecies. Seroprevalence was high, at 79.4%, but viral DNA was detected in only 41.7% of mice. Sequencing revealed 20 haplotypes clustering in 3 clades that match the host genetic structure in the hybrid zone, showing 1 and 2 MCMV lineages in M. m. domesticus and M. m. musculus, respectively. The estimated time to the most recent common ancestor (1.1 million years ago [Mya]) of the MCMVs matches that of their hosts. In conclusion, MCMV has coevolved with these hosts, suggesting that its diversity in nature may be underappreciated, since other members of the subgenus Mus likely carry different MCMVs. Murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) is a betaherpesvirus of the house mouse, Mus musculus domesticus, an important lab model for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. The majority of lab studies are based on only two strains of MCMVs isolated from M. m. domesticus, Smith and K181, the latter derived from repeated passage of Smith in mouse

  9. Two new species of the Pterostichus macrogenys species group (Coleoptera, Carabidae discovered in shallow subterranean habitats in northern Honshu, Japan

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    Kôji Sasakawa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Shallow subterranean environments have recently received attention as a habitat for Carabidae beetles, and many new species have been discovered using collection techniques devised for this habitat. We report the discovery of two new species of the macrogenys species group of the Pterostichus subgenus Nialoe Tanaka, 1958, collected by subterranean baited traps in northern Honshu, Japan. Pterostichus shinbodakensis Sasakawa & Itô, sp. n. is described from Mt. Shinbodake, Niigata Prefecture, and P. tateishiyamanus Sasakawa & Itô, sp. n. is described from the southeastern foot of Mt. Tateishiyama, Fukushima Prefecture. Comparative male genital morphology shows that among the known species, the two new species are most closely related to P. falcispinus Sasakawa, 2005 and P. chokaisanus Sasakawa, 2009, respectively. In addition, sympatric occurrence of P. shinbodakensis with a smaller, unidentified species of the species group was also confirmed. The implications of these results for future studies of the macrogenys species group, as well as those of Nialoe, are discussed.

  10. The morphology of hairs in Plantago famarae Svent.

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    Emilia Andrzejewska-Golec

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a part of a series of investigations on hairs in the genus Plantago L. It deals with an endemic taxon - Plantago famarae Svent. which has not been investigated yet in respect to hairs. The presence of two types of headless hairs and two types of headed hairs was observed. The results of this study are compared to those of another work on two other species from the Canary Islands. P. famarae does not differ from P. arborescens by either hair type or distribution. However, in contrast to P. webbii it has no web-like hairs while hairs with a multicellular stalk and unicellular head hairs (characteristic for the taxa of subgenus Psyllium are distributed in a different way.

  11. A taxonomic study on the genus Tectodamaeus Aoki (Acari, Oribatida, Damaeidae, with description of two new species from China

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    Lixia Xie

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Two new species of the genus Tectodamaeus from Yunnan and Anhui Province respectively, China are described, Tectodamaeus daliensis sp. n., Tectodamaeus longus sp. n. Nine new combinations, Tectodamaeus costanotus (Wang & Norton comb. n., Tectodamaeus exspinosus (Wang & Norton comb. n., Tectodamaeus wulongensis (Wang & Cui comb. n., Tectodamaeus brevisetus (Wang comb. n., Tectodamaeus spiniger (Wang comb. n., Tectodamaeus exsertus (Wang comb. n., Tectodamaeus yaoi (Wang comb. n., Tectodamaeus furcatus (Wang & Lu comb. n., Tectodamaeus cuii (Wang & Lu comb. n. are presented. The subgenus Damaeus (Tectodamaeus as a genus in the oribatid mite family Damaeidae was reestablished. A key is given to distinguish all the species of the genus. Th e type specimens of the new species are deposited in the Institute of Entomology, Guizhou University (IEGU.

  12. Studies in the genus Riccia (Marchantiales from southern Africa. 11. Riccia montana and R. alboporosa, a further two new white-scaled species of the group ‘Squamatae’

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    S. M. Perold

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available Another two new endemic species of the subgenus  Riccia. section  Riccia. group ‘Squamatae , are described:  R. montana and R alboporosa. The distribution of R montana is apparently restricted to high altitudes in the Drakensberg and Witteberg Mountain ranges. The species is characterized by ligulate branches, finely spongy dorsal surface and hyaline to white, calcium-encrusted scales.  R alboporosa is found in Namaqualand. but it is rare It can be recognized by the distinctly porous appearance of the dorsal surface due to the presence of large. ± regularly spaced air pores, which are encircled by six or seven radially arranged, wedge-shaped cells that become white on drying, hence the specific epithet.

  13. Reassessment of the hairy long-nosed armadillo "Dasypus" pilosus (Xenarthra, Dasypodidae) and revalidation of the genus Cryptophractus Fitzinger, 1856.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Mariela C; Ciancio, Martín R; Pacheco, Víctor; Salas-Gismondi, Rodolfo M; Bostelmann, J Enrique; Carlini, Alfredo A

    2015-04-14

    The hairy long-nosed armadillo, currently referred as Dasypus (Cryptophractus) pilosus, is an enigmatic species endemic to montane cloud forests and subparamo of Peruvian Andes. Its strikingly different external features, which include the carapace concealed by abundant hair, the presence of more movable bands, and a slender skull, have raised questions regarding its taxonomic status as subgenus or as genus. This paper assesses this issue based on a cladistic study and provides a detailed comparative description of the species, including the first account on the distinctive ornamentation of its osteoderms. Based on several unique characters in the carapace, skull, mandible, and teeth, as well as on the external phylogenetic position relative to other Dasypus, we favor the assignment of the hairy long-nosed armadillo to other genus. As result, we revalidate the original generic epithet, so that the valid name of the species is Cryptophractus pilosus Fitzinger, 1856.

  14. Redescription and taxonomical considerations about Aonchotheca (Aonchotheca pulchra n. comb. (Enoplida: Trichuridae, a nematode of Nyctinomops spp.

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    Daniel Fontana Ferreira Cardia

    Full Text Available Pterothominx pulchra (Freitas, 1934 are little known gastric nematodes of Nyctinomops laticaudatus (Chiroptera: Molossidae. Information about the occurrence and host range of these parasites in Neotropical region is still scanty, and the only two morphological descriptions available in the literature are divergent about the presence or absence of a spiny spicular sheath in males, which may lead to incorrect taxonomical positioning, since this feature represents the main difference between the genera Pterothominx and Aonchotheca. Based on the absence of this morphological feature in specimens of this nematode obtained from N. laticaudatus and Nyctinomops macrotis bats captured in two municipalities in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, the present study reclassifies the aforementioned species in the genus Aonchotheca and allocates it to the subgenus Aonchotheca. Additional morphometric data and new host and locality records are also provided.

  15. Two New Species of the Simulium (Simulium) variegatum Species-Group of Black Flies (Diptera: Simuliidae) From Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, Hiroyuki; Srisuka, Wichai; Saeung, Atiporn

    2017-09-01

    Two new species of black flies, Simulium (Simulium) srisukai and S. (S.) kiewmaepanense, are described from specimens collected in Thailand. Both species are assigned to the Simulium variegatum species-group of the subgenus Simulium (Simulium) Latreille. They are characterized by the darkened female femora and tibiae and six inflated pupal gill filaments, and the darkened female tibiae and six ordinary thread-like pupal gill filaments, respectively. Taxonomic notes are given to separate these new species from 10 related species among the group. These new species represent the third and fourth species of the S. variegatum species-group from Thailand. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com Version of Record, first published online May 15, 2017 with fixed content and layout in compliance with Art. 8.1.3.2 ICZN.

  16. Molecular detection of Plasmodium in free-ranging birds and captive flamingos (Phoenicopterus chilensis) in Chicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Mary Irene; Gamble, Kathryn C; Krebs, Bethany; Goldberg, Tony L

    2014-12-01

    Frozen blood samples from 13 species of free-ranging birds (n = 65) and captive Chilean flamingos (Phoenicopterus chilensis) (n = 46) housed outdoors in the Chicago area were screened for Plasmodium. With the use of a modified polymerase chain reaction, 20/65 (30.8%) of free-ranging birds and 26/46 (56.5%) of flamingos were classified as positive for this parasite genus. DNA sequencing of the parasite cytochrome b gene in positive samples demonstrated that eight species of free-ranging birds were infected with five different Plasmodium spp. cytochrome b lineages, and all positive Chilean flamingos were infected with Plasmodium spp. cytochrome b lineages most closely related to organisms in the Novyella subgenus. These results show that Chilean flamingos may harbor subclinical malaria infections more frequently than previously estimated, and that they may have increased susceptibility to some Plasmodium species.

  17. Five new species of the genus Philydrodes Bernhauer, 1929 from China (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae: Omaliinae: Anthophagini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavrin, Alexey V

    2017-02-09

    Five new species of the subgenus Minyphilydrodes of the genus Philydrodes Bernhauer, 1929 (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae: Omaliinae: Anthophagini) from China are described and illustrated: Ph. tridentatus sp.n. (Hubei, Gansu, Shaanxi and Sichuan), Ph. tibetanus sp.n. (Yunnan), Ph. reticulatus sp.n. (Shaanxi), Ph. wrasei sp.n. (Sichuan) and Ph. michaeli sp.n. (Sichuan). The morphological features of Philydrodes, differences between Japanese and Chinese species, the relations of the genus with other taxa of the tribe Anthophagini Thomson, 1859 are briefly discussed. A key to the species of the genus from China and a distribution map are provided. The genus Philydrodes is recorded from continental Asia and China for the first time.

  18. Molecular phylogeny and Holarctic diversification of the subtribe Calathina (Coleoptera: Carabidae: Sphodrini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Carlos; Jordal, Bjarte H; Emerson, Brent C; Will, Kipling W; Serrano, José

    2010-05-01

    A molecular phylogeny of the subtribe Calathina was inferred from DNA sequence data from the mitochondrial cox1-cox2 region and the nuclear genes 28S and EF-1alpha. All lineages within Calathina from the Holarctic region were represented except for the monotypic subgenus Tachalus. Maximum Parsimony and Bayesian analyses of the combined data set showed that the subtribe is a monophyletic lineage that includes a single genus Calathus, where other taxa currently ranked as independent genera (Lindrothius, Synuchidius, Thermoscelis and Acalathus) are nested within this genus.Neocalathus and Lauricalathus, both subgenera of Calathus, were found to be polyphyletic and in need of taxonomic revision. The subtribe appears to have originated in the Mediterranean Basin and thereafter expanded into most parts of the Palearctic region, the Macaronesian archipelagos (at least five independent colonisation events), the Ethiopian highlands and the Nearctic region (at least two independent events). Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Review of Stantonia Ashmead (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Orgilinae from Vietnam, China, Japan, and Russia, with descriptions of six new species

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    Cornelis van Achterberg

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The genus Stantonia Ashmead, 1904 (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Orgilinae is reviewed for Vietnam, China, Japan, and Russia. Six new species of the genus Stantonia are described and illustrated: Stantonia brevicaudata van Achterberg, sp. n., S. dickyyui van Achterberg & Long, sp. n., S. granulata Long & van Achterberg, sp. n., S. robustifemur van Achterberg & Long, sp. n., S. stilpnosoma Long & van Achterberg, sp. n., and S. vietnamica van Achterberg, sp. n. A new subgenus (Planitonia subg. n.: type species Stantonia robustifemur van Achterberg & Long, sp. n. is proposed for the species with a flat clypeus and face, and reduced vein r-m of the fore wing. Three species are newly recorded from Vietnam: Stantonia gracilis van Achterberg, 1987, S. sumatrana Enderlein, 1908, and S. tianmushana Chen, He & Ma, 2004. A key to species of Stantonia from Vietnam, China, Russia, and Japan is provided.

  20. Unusual arrangement and behaviour of the sex chromosomes of Aphodius (Agolius abdominalis Bonelli, 1812, and comparison with A. (A. bonvouloiri Harold, 1860 (Coleoptera: Aphodiidae

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    Robert Angus

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aphodius abdominalis Bonelli, 1812 is shown to have a karyotype comprising nine pairs of autosomes and sex chromosomes which are X0 (male, XX (female. At first metaphase of meiosis the X chromosome is linked to an autosomal bivalent by a darkly staining area of the cytoplasm, resembling the Xy p arrangement typical of Aphodius species, but giving nine, rather than 10, elements in the nucleus. C-banding, which shows the centromeres, confirms this unusual arrangement. A. bonvouloiri, the only other known species of subgenus Agolius Mulsant et Rey, 1869, has a male karyotype with nine pairs of autosomes and Xy sex chromosomes. No preparations of its meiosis are available.

  1. Molecular genetic evidence for interspecific hybridization among endemic Hispaniolan Bursera (Burseraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Andrea; Simpson, Beryl B

    2004-06-01

    Historically, genetic introgression among species as well as hybrid origins for species of the diploid tree genus Bursera (Burseraceae) have been proposed based on the supposition that individuals morphologically intermediate between sympatric "parent" species must be derived from hybridization. This study reports the first molecular genetic evidence for both unidirectional and reciprocal interspecific hybridization within Bursera. Phylogenies of hybrids and other species in B. subgenus Bursera are reconstructed based on nuclear and chloroplast sequence data. Compelling evidence supports the hybrid origin of three endemic Hispaniolan species: B. brunea (B. nashii × B. simaruba), B. gracilipes (B. spinescens × B. simaruba), and B. ovata (B. simaruba × B. spinescens). Cloning studies of nuclear markers from B. ovata suggests that this species is an introgressed or later backcross generation hybrid and thus reproduces sexually.

  2. Sloanea pacuritana Pal.-Duque, sp. nov. (Elaeocarpaceae del Chocó (Colombia

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    Palacios-Duque, Leonardo

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A new species of the central Chocó (Colombia rainforest is described: Sloanea pacuritana. The new species is included in subgenus Sloanea section Sloanea, where it is characterized by large leaves (to 24.4 cm wide with acute base and apex, narrowly triangular stipules more than 9 mm long, and smooth and tomentose peduncles.Se describe Sloanea pacuritana de la selva pluvial central del departamento del Chocó (Colombia. La nueva especie se incluye en el subgénero Sloanea sección Sloanea, en donde se caracteriza por sus hojas de gran tamaño (hasta 24,4 cm de ancho y de ápice y base agudas, estípulas estrechamente triangulares y de más de 9 mm, y pecíolos lisos y tomentosos.

  3. Penicillium cecidicola, a new species on cynipid insect galls on Quercus pacifica in the western United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, K.A.; Hoekstra, E.H.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2004-01-01

    A synnematous species of Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium was found inside emergence tunnels from insect galls (Cynipidae, Hymenoptera, the so-called gall wasps) on scrub oaks (Quercus pacifica Nixon & C.H. Muller) collected in the western United States. The fungus produces synnemata with white...... is a sister species to P. dendriticum, an Australian species with yellow synnemata that also sometimes occurs on insect galls. Notes are included on other Penicillium species we have isolated from insect galls....... isolates exposed to light after 10 days. The fungus produces the extrolite apiculide A and a series of unidentified extrolites also produced by P. panamense. The oak gall species is described here as Penicillium cecidicola and compared with similar species. An ITS phylogeny suggests that P. cecidicola...

  4. Morphological and molecular study of Symphyla from Colombia

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    Diego Alberto Salazar Moncada

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The symphylans are a poorly studied group. In Colombia the number of symphylan species is unknown with only Scutigerella immaculata (Symphyla: Scutigerellidae being reported previously. The aim of this research was to collect and identify the symphylan pests of flower crops in Colombia. Morphological descriptions showed that our specimens shared more than one of the characters that define different genera within Scutigerellidae. The COI barcode haplotype showed interspecific level genetic divergence with S. causeyae (at least 23% and Hanseniella sp. (22%. Furthermore, our Colombian symphylans shared the same COI haplotype as some Symphyla found in Cameroon indicating a wide geographical distribution of this taxon. Our results suggest the presence of a new genus or subgenus in the class Symphyla.

  5. Morphological and molecular study of Symphyla from Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Moncada, Diego A; Calle-Osorno, Jaime; Ruiz-Lopez, Freddy

    2015-01-01

    The symphylans are a poorly studied group. In Colombia the number of symphylan species is unknown with only Scutigerellaimmaculata (Symphyla: Scutigerellidae) being reported previously. The aim of this research was to collect and identify the symphylan pests of flower crops in Colombia. Morphological descriptions showed that our specimens shared more than one of the characters that define different genera within Scutigerellidae. The COI barcode haplotype showed interspecific level genetic divergence with Scutigerellacauseyae (at least 23%) and Hanseniella sp. (22%). Furthermore, our Colombian symphylans shared the same COI haplotype as some Symphyla found in Cameroon indicating a wide geographical distribution of this taxon. Our results suggest the presence of a new genus or subgenus in the class Symphyla.

  6. Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Miller as a source of bioactivity compounds for health and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragona, M; Lauriano, E R; Pergolizzi, S; Faggio, C

    2017-08-14

    Plants with beneficial properties are known in traditional medicine. Nowadays, in spite of widespread availability of synthetic compounds, the search goes towards natural compounds to lower cost and few side effects. The increasing interest in preventive medicine encourages use of nutraceuticals, bioactive compounds of vegetable origin with important nutritional values. Among the medicinal plants, Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Miller (Family Cactaceae, subfamily Opuntiodeae, Genus Opuntia, subgenus Platyopuntia, species Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Miller) is widely known for its beneficial properties. The aim of the present review is to stress the major classes of Opuntia components and their medical interest through emphasis on some of their biological effects, particularly those having the most promising expected health benefits and therapeutic impacts on fish and mammals.

  7. Rearrangement hotspots in the sex chromosome of the Palearctic black fly Simulium bergi (Diptera, Simuliidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Peter H; Yildirim, Alparslan; Onder, Zuhal; Tasci, G Taskin; Duzlu, Onder; Arslan, M Ozkan; Ciloglu, Arif; Sari, Baris; Parmaksizoglu, Nilgun; Inci, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    An extreme example of nonrandom rearrangements, especially inversion breaks, is described in the polytene chromosomes of the black fly Simulium bergi Rubtsov, 1956 from Armenia and Turkey. A total of 48 rearrangements was discovered, relative to the standard banding sequence for the subgenus Simulium Latreille, 1802. One rearrangement, an inversion (IIS-C) in the short arm of the second chromosome, was fixed. Six (12.5%) of the rearrangements were autosomal polymorphisms, and the remaining 41 (85.4%) were sex linked. More than 40 X- and Y-linked rearrangements, predominantly inversions, were clustered in the long arm of the second chromosome (IIL), representing about 15% of the total complement. The pattern conforms to a nonrandom model of chromosome breakage, perhaps associated with an underlying molecular mechanism.

  8. Morphological and Molecular Characterization of Paramecium (Viridoparamecium nov. subgen.) chlorelligerum Kahl, 1935 (Ciliophora)

    Science.gov (United States)

    KREUTZ, MARTIN; STOECK, THORSTEN; FOISSNER, WILHELM

    2013-01-01

    We redescribe Paramecium chlorelligerum, a forgotten species, which Kahl (1935) briefly but precisely described in the addendum to his ciliate monographs as a Paramecium with symbiotic green algae. The redescription is based on classical morphological methods and the analysis of the small subunit (SSU) rDNA. Morphologically, P. chlorelligerum differs from P. (Chloroparamecium) bursaria, the second green species in the genus, by having a special swimming shape, the length of the caudal cilia, the size of the micronucleus, the size of the symbiotic algae, the contractile vacuoles (with collecting vesicles vs. collecting canals), and the number of excretory pores /contractile vacuole (1 vs. 2--3). The molecular investigations show that P. chlorelligerum forms a distinct branch distant from the P. (Chloroparamecium) bursaria clade. Thus, we classify P. chlorelligerum in a new subgenus: Paramecium (Viridoparamecium) chlorelligerum. The symbiotic alga belongs to the little-known genus Meyerella, as yet recorded only from the plankton of a North American lake. PMID:22827482

  9. Wood anatomy of Ribes magellanicum (Grossulariaceae Anatomía de la madera de Ribes magellanicum (Grossulariaceae

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    Roberto R. Pujana

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Wood anatomy description of Ribes magellanicum Poir. is given including specimens of its two subspecies. This is the first detailed secondary xylem study of a species included in the South and Central American subgenus Parilla Jancz. Wood anatomy of R. magellanicum shows the following typical anatomical features cited for northern hemisphere Ribes L.: small vessels, rays of two distinct sizes and scalariform perforation plates.Se describe la anatomía de la madera de Ribes magellanicum Poir. incluyendo especimenes de sus dos subespecies. Es la primera descripción detallada del xilema secundario de una especie del subgénero de Centro y Sudamérica Parilla Jancz. La anatomía de R. magellanicum muestra las características típicas citadas para las Ribes L. del hemisferio norte: vasos pequeños, radios de dos tamaños distintos y placas de perforación escalariformes.

  10. Occupationally Acquired American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

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    Maria Edileuza Felinto de Brito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report two occupationally acquired cases of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL: one accidental laboratory autoinoculation by contaminated needlestick while handling an ACL lesion sample, and one acquired during field studies on bird biology. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays of patient lesions were positive for Leishmania, subgenus Viannia. One isolate was obtained by culture (from patient 2 biopsy samples and characterized as Leishmania (Viannia naiffi through an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA with species-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs and by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE. Patients were successfully treated with N-methyl-glucamine. These two cases highlight the potential risks of laboratory and field work and the need to comply with strict biosafety procedures in daily routines. The swab collection method, coupled with PCR detection, has greatly improved ACL laboratory diagnosis.

  11. Genetic variability assessment in the genus Passiflora by SSR markers

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    Claudia Lougon Paiva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The genus Passiflora encompasses many species that are endemic to the Brazilian territory, including some with economic value. Studies on genetic diversity in this genus are fundamental because they allow understanding genetic variability and distance. The present study aimed to determine the genetic variability and distances among 10 species of the genus Passiflora by using microsatellite markers (Simple Sequence Repeat, SSR. Twenty-eight heterologous microsatellite markers were tested, but only 12 were used in the diversity analysis because they amplified in at least 80% of the species. A clear separation was observed among the subgenuses studied, as well as wide variation among the accessions of Passiflora. This knowledge enables breeders to explore diversity and transfer favorable alleles found in wild species.

  12. First description of Leishmania (Viannia) infection in Evandromyia saulensis, Pressatia sp. and Trichophoromyia auraensis (Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) in a transmission area of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Acre state, Amazon Basin, Brazil.

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    Araujo-Pereira, Thais de; Pita-Pereira, Daniela de; Boité, Mariana Côrtes; Melo, Myllena; Costa-Rego, Taiana Amancio da; Fuzari, Andressa Alencastre; Brazil, Reginaldo Peçanha; Britto, Constança

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the sandfly fauna to evaluate natural infection indexes are still limited in the Brazilian Amazon, a region with an increasing incidence of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Here, by using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction directed to Leishmania kDNA and hybridisation, we were able to identify L. (Viannia) subgenus in 12 out of 173 sandflies captured in the municipality of Rio Branco, Acre state, revealing a positivity of 6.94%. By sequencing the Leishmania 234 bp-hsp70 amplified products from positive samples, infection by L. (V.) braziliensis was confirmed in five sandflies: one Evandromyia saulensis, three Trichophoromyia auraensis and one Pressatia sp. The finding of L. (Viannia) DNA in two Ev. saulensis corresponds to the first record of possible infection associated with this sandfly. Moreover, our study reveals for the first time in Brazil, Th. auraensis and Pressatia sp. infected by L. (Viannia) parasites.

  13. Sawfly taxa (Hymenoptera, Symphyta described by Edward Newman and Charles Healy

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    Andrew Liston

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Type specimens of seven nominal species of sawfly described by Edward Newman and one by Charles Healy were studied. This material is housed in the Oxford University Museum of Natural History, United Kingdom. The following new synonymies are proposed (valid names in parentheses: Hartigia Schiødte, 1839 (Phylloecus Newman, 1838, Cephus helleri Taschenberg, 1871 (Phylloecus faunus Newman, 1838 and Euura gallae Newman, 1837 (Euura mucronata (Hartig, 1837. The type species of Euura Newman, 1837 and Euura subgenus Gemmura E. L. Smith, 1968 belong to the same taxonomic species, Euura mucronata (Hartig, 1837, so that these genus group names become new synonyms. Lectotypes are designated for Phyllotoma tormentillae Healy, 1868, Fenusa ianthe Newman, 1837, Fenusa parviceps Newman, 1837, Selandria pallida Newman, 1837 and Phylloecus faunus Newman, 1838. 26 new combinations are proposed for species formerly placed in Hartigia and here transferred to Phylloecus, and 4 original combinations are re-instated as valid.

  14. Phylogeny of the sea hares in the aplysia clade based on mitochondrial DNA sequence data

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    Medina, Monica; Collins, Timothy; Walsh, Patrick J.

    2004-02-20

    Sea hare species within the Aplysia clade are distributed worldwide. Their phylogenetic and biogeographic relationships are, however, still poorly known. New molecular evidence is presented from a portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase c subunit 1 gene (cox1) that improves our understanding of the phylogeny of the group. Based on these data a preliminary discussion of the present distribution of sea hares in a biogeographic context is put forward. Our findings are consistent with only some aspects of the current taxonomy and nomenclatural changes are proposed. The first, is the use of a rank free classification for the different Aplysia clades and subclades as opposed to previously used genus and subgenus affiliations. The second, is the suggestion that Aplysia brasiliana (Rang, 1828) is a junior synonym of Aplysia fasciata (Poiret, 1789). The third, is the elimination of Neaplysia since its only member is confirmed to be part of the large Varria clade.

  15. Two new species of Leptopsyllus from Korea (Copepoda, Harpacticoida, Paramesochridae)

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    Back, Jinwook; Lee, Wonchoel

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Two new species of Leptopsyllus are described from the subtidal zone of Korea. Both species were assigned to the subgenus Leptopsyllus (Leptopsyllus) T. Scott, 1894, based on following three characters: two-segmented rami of P1, absence of endopod on P2 and P3, and presence of one-segmented endopod of P4. L. (L.) pundius sp. n. is most closely related to L. (L.) punctatus Mielke, 1894, however clearly distinguishable from it based on mandibular exopod with two setae, shape of P6, and caudal seta III ornamented with spinules in the new species. L. (L.) koreanus sp. n. is clearly distinguishable from its congeners by the second segment of P1 endopod armed with one element, male baseoendopod of P5 with one seta, and one segmented endopod of mandibular palp. The world distribution and updated key to the species of the genus Leptopsyllus are provided. PMID:28769625

  16. Never judge an iguana by its spines: Systematics of the Yucatan spiny tailed iguana, Ctenosaura defensor (Cope, 1866).

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    Malone, Catherine L; Reynoso, Víctor Hugo; Buckley, Larry

    2017-10-01

    Spiny tailed iguanas are highly diverse clade of lizards in Mesoamerica, ranging from northern Mexico through Panama. Utilizing 2 regions of mitochondrial DNA (1948bp) and 4 nuclear loci (2232bp) we explored the relationships between these species and the phylogeographic history of the major clades. We discovered that the lineage endemic to the Yucatan Peninsula renders the genus Ctenosaura paraphyletic. To resolve this non-monophyly, we resurrect the taxon Cachryx Cope, 1866, and provide a new diagnosis for the genus. We also find that small body-size and highly spinose tails in the species previously referred to the subgenus Enyaliosaurus, have evolved independently 3 times. Cachryx were recovered as sister to the lineage of iguanines endemic to the Galapagos Islands, and we discuss biogeographic scenarios to explain this relationship as well as those among the primary clades of Ctenosaura in Mesoamerica. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Redescription of the stygobitic shrimp Troglocaris (Xiphocaridinella) jusbaschjani Birštein, 1948 (Decapoda: Caridea: Atyidae) from Agura River, Sochi, Russia, with remarks on other representatives of the genus from Caucasus.

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    Marin, Ivan; Sokolova, Agniya

    2014-01-15

    The complete re-description of Caucasian local endemic stygobitic atyid shrimp Troglocaris (Xiphocaridinella) jusbaschjani Birštein, 1948 is firstly presented after its original description given by Dr. Ya. A. Birštein (1948) under the name Troglocaris schmidti jusbaschjani. The species is still known exclusively from the type locality, hydrogen sulfide bathes of the small Agura River, Sochi area, Russian Federation. Remarks on morphology, coloration of both females and males and data on ecology of Troglocaris (Xiphocaridinella) jusbaschjani Birštein, 1948 as well as remarks on morphology of relative congeneric species from Caucassus, Troglocaris (Xiphocaridinella) kutaissiana (Sadowsky, 1930) (type species of the subgenus) and Troglocaris (Xiphocaridinella) fagei Birštein, 1939, are provided. Discussion on the validity of some subgenera within the genus Troglocaris s. str. Dormitzer, 1853 are also presented.

  18. Laimosemion leticia (Teleostei: Cyprinodontiformes: Rivulidae), a new species from the upper Rio Amazonas, Southern Colombia.

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    Valdesalici, Stefano

    2016-03-02

    Laimosemion leticia is described from the Rio Tacana drainage, upper Rio Amazonas basin, Southern Colombia. The new species was found in a shallow swamp within a tropical rainforest in the vicinity of Leticia, capital of the department of Amazonas and southernmost municipality of Colombia. This miniature species is considered to be a member of the Owiyeye subgenus, which is diagnosed by a unique frontal squamation. Laimosemion leticia can be distinguished from all other species of the genus by the unique colour pattern on the unpaired fins. The new species appears related to L. jauaperi, L. uatuman and L. ubim due to the similar flank colour pattern in males, but is easy distinguished by coloration of the unpaired fins and morphological characters.

  19. Preimaginal stages of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae: an invasive pest on ash trees (Fraxinus.

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    M Lourdes Chamorro

    Full Text Available This study provides the most detailed description of the immature stages of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire to date and illustrates suites of larval characters useful in distinguishing among Agrilus Curtis species and instars. Immature stages of eight species of Agrilus were examined and imaged using light and scanning electron microscopy. For A. planipennis all preimaginal stages (egg, instars I-IV, prepupa and pupa were described. A combination of 14 character states were identified that serve to identify larvae of A. planipennis. Our results support the segregation of Agrilus larvae into two informal assemblages based on characters of the mouthparts, prothorax, and abdomen: the A. viridis and A. ater assemblages, with A. planipennis being more similar to the former. Additional evidence is provided in favor of excluding A. planipennis from the subgenus Uragrilus.

  20. [Mosquitos (Diptera: Culicidae) in the small village where a human case of Venezuelan equine encephalitis was recorded].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Cristina; Olano, Víctor Alberto; Ahumada, Martha; Weaver, Scott

    2008-06-01

    The enzootic focus of subtype ID of Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus in the Central Magdalena region (central Colombia) occasionally produces human cases. The report of a VEE infection in a three-year-old girl in the small Chingalé, municipalitype of Puerto Wilches, Santander, motivated this study. The village of Chingalé was evaluated as the probable site of infection. In June 2005, mosquitoes were collected with CDC light traps in and outside of dwellings in the village. Trinidad traps were placed in nearby vegetation, and hamsters were used as sentinel animals near homes. One hundred and seven samples, consisting of 14,423 mosquitoes of 35 species were collected. The relative abundance of incriminated vectors of subtype ID of VEE, Culex (Melanoconion) pedroi and Cx. (Mel.) ocossa, was generally low (mosquitoes of the subgenus Melanoconion carried the virus into the village from a neighboring habitat.