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Sample records for subepidermal bullous disease

  1. Autoimmune Subepidermal Bullous Diseases of the Skin and Mucosae: Clinical Features, Diagnosis, and Management.

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    Amber, Kyle T; Murrell, Dedee F; Schmidt, Enno; Joly, Pascal; Borradori, Luca

    2018-02-01

    Autoimmune subepidermal blistering diseases of the skin and mucosae constitute a large group of sometimes devastating diseases, encompassing bullous pemphigoid, gestational pemphigoid, mucous membrane pemphigoid, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, and anti-p200 pemphigoid. Their clinical presentation is polymorphic. These autoimmune blistering diseases are associated with autoantibodies that target distinct components of the basement membrane zone of stratified epithelia. These autoantigens represent structural proteins important for maintenance of dermo-epidermal integrity. Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is the most common subepidermal autoimmune blistering disease of the skin and mucosae. Although the disease typically presents with a generalized blistering eruption associated with itch, atypical variants with either localized bullous lesions or "non-bullous" presentations are observed in approximately 20% of patients. A peculiar form of BP typically associated with pregnancy is pemphigoid gestationis. In anti-p200 pemphigoid, patients present with tense blisters on erythematosus or normal skin resembling BP, with a predilection for acral surfaces. These patients have antibodies targeting the 200-kDa basement membrane protein. Epidermolysis bullosa is a rare autoimmune blistering disease associated with autoantibodies against type VII collagen that can have several phenotypes including a classical form mimicking dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, an inflammatory presentation mimicking BP, or mucous membrane pemphigoid-like lesions. Mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP) is the term agreed upon by international consensus for an autoimmune blistering disorder, which affects one or more mucous membrane and may involve the skin. The condition involves a number of different autoantigens in the basement membrane zone. It may result in severe complications from scarring, such as blindness and strictures. Diagnosis of these diseases relies on direct immunofluorescence microscopy studies

  2. Antiplectin autoantibodies in subepidermal blistering diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijsrogge, J. J. A.; de Jong, M. C. J. M.; Kloosterhuis, G. J.; Vermeer, M. H.; Koster, J.; Sonnenberg, A.; Jonkman, M. F.; Pas, H. H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Hemidesmosomal proteins may become targets of autoimmunity in subepidermal blistering diseases. Well-known recognized autoantigens are the intracellular plaque protein BP230, the transmembrane BP180 and its shed ecto-domain LAD-1. Objectives To establish the prevalence of autoimmunity

  3. Molecular biological aspects of acquired bullous diseases

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    Dabelsteen, Erik

    1998-01-01

    Bullous diseases of the oral mucosa and skin were originally classified on the basis of clinical and histological criteria. The discovery of autoantibodies in some of these patients and the introduction of molecular biology have resulted in a new understanding of the pathological mechanisms of many...... of the bullous lesions. In this article, updated topics of the immune-mediated bullous lesions which involve oral mucosa and skin are reviewed. Pemphigus antigens, which are desmosomal-associated proteins and belong to the cadherin superfamily of cell adhesion proteins, have been isolated, and their genes have...

  4. Geographic variations in epidemiology of two autoimmune bullous diseases: pemphigus and bullous pemphigoid.

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    Alpsoy, Erkan; Akman-Karakas, Ayse; Uzun, Soner

    2015-05-01

    Autoimmune bullous diseases are rare, organ-specific, a group of blistering disease of skin and mucous membranes. Recent studies suggest that the frequency of the autoimmune bullous diseases has been increasing. Pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid are the most frequently reported autoimmune bullous diseases. High incidence of autoimmune bullous diseases in some ethnic groups such as pemphigus in Ashkenazi Jewish, or in some regions such as pemphigus foliaceus in Brazil has been shown to be related to genetic and environmental factors, respectively. Pemphigus has been reported more frequently in the female gender. Although it is most frequently diagnosed between the ages 50 and 60 in European countries, in the remaining countries in the world, it is seen between the ages of 30 and 50. Bullous pemphigoid is generally seen above 70 years of age. Although overall incidence is slightly higher in females, after the age of 80 years it is more frequent in males. Both pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid has a chronic course with recurrences. Mortality risk of the patients with bullous pemphigoid was found at least 2 times higher and the mortality risk of the patients with pemphigus was found approximately 3 times higher than that of the general population. In this review, the results obtained from the epidemiological studies were analyzed according to geographic regions, and especially epidemiologic features of two prevalent autoimmune bullous diseases, pemphigus and bullous pemphigoid have been discussed.

  5. Bullous lichen planus - a review.

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    Liakopoulou, Angeliki; Rallis, Efstathios

    2017-03-31

    Bullous lichen planus is a rare variant of lichen planus. It is characterized by vesicles or bullae, which usually develop in the context of pre-existing LP lesions. It is often misdiagnosed and should be differentiated from other subepidermal bullous diseases especially lichen planus pemphigoides. The diagnosis is based on clinical suspicion and is confirmed by histopathology and immunofluoresence. The clinical features of bullous lichen planus include typical lichen planus lesions, accompanied by the formation of bullae on the affected or perilesional skin. This is evident on histology, with alteration of the dermo-epidermal junction and intrabasal bullae as a consequence of extensive inflammation. The histologic features in conjunction with the negative immunofluoresence indicate that bullous lichen planus is a form of "hyper-reactive lichen planus" rather than a distinct entity. There is no standard treatment of bullous lichen planus. Topical and systemic corticosteroids, dapsone and acitretin have been described as effective choices.

  6. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis in a patient with renal cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Waal, RIF; Van de Scheur, MR; Pas, HH; Jonkman, MF; Van Groeningen, CJ; Nieboer, C; Starink, TM

    Linear IgA bullous dermatosis (LABD) is an autoimmune subepidermal bullous disease with heterogeneous clinical manifestations, characterized by linear deposition of IgA along the epidermal basement membrane zone. We report a patient with a metastasized renal cell carcinoma who developed an extensive

  7. Bullous dermatitis artefacta.

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    Sokumbi, Olayemi; Comfere, Nneka I; McEvoy, Marian T; Peters, Margot S

    2013-02-01

    Bullous artefactual dermatoses are rare and may be induced by various techniques, including chemicals, heat, or electrical current. Proving a factitial etiology and identifying the mechanism of injury may be difficult. We describe the clinical features and histopathology of 2 patients with bullous disease induced by electrical current or heat. Physical examination in both patients demonstrated geometrically shaped tense bullae. Skin biopsies revealed epidermal necrosis overlying a pauci-inflammatory subepidermal cleft, with homogenization of underlying superficial dermal collagen. In 1 of the 2 patients, there was prominent vertical elongation of keratinocyte nuclei and also of cytoplasmic processes. Direct immunofluorescence study of skin plus testing of serum by indirect immunofluorescence and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for BP180 and BP230 antibodies revealed no evidence for immunobullous disease in either patient. Vertical elongation of keratinocyte nuclei, often attributed to a polarization effect of electrical current, is characteristic of electrical burn but also may be induced by thermal injury. These 2 patients highlight the importance of histopathology in confirming a diagnosis of bullous dermatitis artefacta.

  8. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis in a neonate.

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    Hruza, L L; Mallory, S B; Fitzgibbons, J; Mallory, G B

    1993-06-01

    A newborn black boy had two facial blisters at birth that progressed to bullous lesions over the trunk, genitals, extremities, and oral and tracheal mucosa. A biopsy specimen demonstrated a subepidermal bulla with mixed eosinophilic and neutrophilic, inflammatory infiltrate. Direct immunofluorescence showed linear IgA, IgG, and C3 depositions along the basement membrane zone, consistent with a diagnosis of childhood linear IgA bullous dermatosis (chronic bullous dermatosis of childhood). The skin disease was controlled with combined prednisone and dapsone. This is the youngest reported patient with the disease. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of blistering diseases of the newborn, and immunofluorescence should be performed on a skin biopsy specimen.

  9. Development of a quality-of-life instrument for autoimmune bullous disease: the Autoimmune Bullous Disease Quality of Life questionnaire.

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    Sebaratnam, Deshan F; Hanna, Anna Marie; Chee, Shien-ning; Frew, John W; Venugopal, Supriya S; Daniel, Benjamin S; Martin, Linda K; Rhodes, Lesley M; Tan, Jeremy Choon Kai; Wang, Charles Qian; Welsh, Belinda; Nijsten, Tamar; Murrell, Dédée F

    2013-10-01

    Quality-of-life (QOL) evaluation is an increasingly important outcome measure in dermatology, with disease-specific QOL instruments being the most sensitive to changes in disease status. To develop a QOL instrument specific to autoimmune bullous disease (AIBD). A comprehensive item generation process was used to build a 45-item pilot Autoimmune Bullous Disease Quality of Life (ABQOL) questionnaire, distributed to 70 patients with AIBD. Experts in bullous disease refined the pilot ABQOL before factor analysis was performed to yield the final ABQOL questionnaire of 17 questions. We evaluated validity and reliability across a range of indices. Australian dermatology outpatient clinics and private dermatology practices. PATIENTS AND EXPOSURE: Patients with a histological diagnosis of AIBD. The development of an AIBD-specific QOL instrument. Face and content validity were established through the comprehensive patient interview process and expert review. In terms of convergent validity, the ABQOL was found to have a moderate correlation with scores on the Dermatology Life Quality Index (R = 0.63) and the General Health subscale of the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (R = 0.69; P = .009) and low correlation with the Pemphigus Disease Area Index (R = 0.42) and Autoimmune Bullous Disease Skin Disorder Intensity Score (R = 0.48). In terms of discriminant validity, the ABQOL was found to be more sensitive than the Dermatology Life Quality Index (P = .02). The ABQOL was also found to be a reliable instrument evaluated by internal consistency (Cronbach α coefficient, 0.84) and test-retest reliability (mean percentage variation, 0.92). The ABQOL has been shown to be a valid and reliable instrument that may serve as an end point in clinical trials. Future work should include incorporating patient weighting on questions to further increase content validity and translation of the measure to other languages. anzctr.org.au Identifier: ACTRN12612000750886.

  10. IgG4 autoantibodies are inhibitory in the autoimmune disease bullous pemphigoid.

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    Zuo, Yagang; Evangelista, Flor; Culton, Donna; Guilabert, Antonio; Lin, Lin; Li, Ning; Diaz, Luis; Liu, Zhi

    2016-09-01

    The IgG4 subclass of antibodies exhibits unique characteristics that suggest it may function in an immunoregulatory capacity. The inhibitory function of IgG4 has been well documented in allergic disease by the demonstration of IgG4 blocking antibodies, but similar functions have not been explored in autoimmune disease. Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is a subepidermal autoimmune blistering disease characterized by autoantibodies directed against BP180 and an inflammatory infiltrate including eosinophils and neutrophils. Animal models have revealed that the NC16A region within BP180 harbors the critical epitopes necessary for autoantibody mediated disease induction. BP180 NC16A-specific IgG belong to the IgG1, IgG3, and IgG4 subclasses. The purpose of this study was to determine effector functions of different IgG subclasses of NC16A-specific autoantibodies in BP. We find that IgG4 anti-NC16A autoantibodies inhibit the binding of IgG1 and IgG3 autoantibodies to the NC16A region. Moreover, IgG4 anti-NC16A blocks IgG1 and IgG3 induced complement fixation, neutrophil infiltration, and blister formation clinically and histologically in a dose-dependent manner following passive transfer to humanized BP180-NC16A mice. These findings highlight the inhibitory role of IgG4 in autoimmune disease and have important implications for the treatment of BP as well as other antibody mediated inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bullous pemphigoid associated with chronic hepatitis C virus infection in a hepatitis B virus endemic area: A case report.

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    Jang, Hyunil; Jin, Young-Joo; Yoon, Chang Hwi; Kim, Cheol-Woo; Kim, Lucia

    2018-04-01

    Bullous pemphigoid is a type of acute or chronic autoimmune disease that involves subepidermal skin lesions with bulla formation. Although viral infections, such as, human herpes virus (HHV), human immunodeficiency virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, HHV-6, hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV), are known factors of bullous pemphigoid, HCV infection has only been rarely associated factor, especially in HBV endemic area. A 78-year-old man was admitted to our hospital due to erythematous bulla of onset 3 months before presentation affecting his entire body. Pathologic findings, that is, subepidermal bullae containing eosinophils and neutrophils with superficial perivascular lymphocytic and eosinophilic infiltration, were consistent with bullous pemphigoid. Anti-HCV was positive and HCV quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was 1.25 x 10 IU/mL. HCV genotype was 2a. After a diagnosis of bullous pemphigoid associated with chronic HCV infection was reached, he was treated with oral methylprednisolone for bullous pemphigoid, and his skin lesions improved. Oral direct-acting antiviral agents (sofosbuvir plus ribavirin) were prescribed for chronic hepatitis C, and sustained viral response was achieved. The authors report a rare case of bullous pemphigoid associated with chronic HCV infection in a HBV endemic area and advise that HCV should be considered in the differential diagnosis of factors precipitating bullous pemphigoid, even in HBV endemic areas.

  12. A case of multiple myeloma presenting as a bullous dermatosis

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    Gul Ulker

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma is a malignant plasma cell proliferative disorder that produces a monoclonal immunoglobulin protein. The skin involvement and the development of bullous disease are rarely seen features in multiple myeloma. We present a 55-year-old man with a longstanding, large, tense bullous eruption and hypertrophic scars over his body accompanied recently with weight loss and fatique. He had no response to the previous treatments, which included oral glucocorticoids and dapsone. Histologic examination of the lesions revealed subepidermal bullae, while no immunoflourescence staining was observed. In a further detailed labarotory examination, multiple myeloma was detected. After the treatment of multiple myeloma with chemotherapy, the lesions regressed. Patients with longstanding, recurrent, unusual bullous eruption should be investigated for the development of multiple myeloma.

  13. Bleb Point: Mimicker of Pneumothorax in Bullous Lung Disease

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    Gelabert, Christopher

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In patients presenting with severe dyspnea, several diagnostic challenges arise in distinguishing the diagnosis of pneumothorax versus several other pulmonary etiologies like bullous lung disease, pneumonia, interstitial lung disease, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Distinguishing between large pulmonary bullae and pneumothorax is of the utmost importance, as the acute management is very different. While multiple imaging modalities are available, plain radiographs may be inadequate to make the diagnosis and other advanced imaging may be difficult to obtain. Ultrasound has a very high specificity for pneumothorax. We present a case where a large pulmonary bleb mimics the lung point and therefore inaccurately suggests pneumothorax. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(3:447–449.

  14. Neurological diseases and bullous pemphigoid: A case-control study in Iranian patients.

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    Daneshpazhooh, Maryam; Khorassani, Javad; Balighi, Kamran; Ghandi, Narges; Mahmoudi, Hamidreza; Tohidinik, Hamidreza; Hamzelou, Shahin; Chams-Davatchi, Cheyda

    2017-01-01

    Neurological diseases are important co-morbidities found in association with bullous pemphigoid. Various neurological conditions (stroke, Parkinson's disease, dementia, epilepsy and multiple sclerosis) have been reported as associations of this bullous disease; whether these are significant has not been definitely proved. However, the presence of neurological conditions is a predictor of poorer prognosis. Our aim was to examine the association of bullous pemphigoid and neurological diseases in Iranian bullous pemphigoid patients. The medical records of one hundred and sixty consecutive bullous pemphigoid patients who presented to the Autoimmune Bullous Diseases Research Center, Tehran, Iran, from 2006 to 2011 were examined for evidence of any neurological disease. The control group comprised of 317 age- and sex-matched subjects. Neurological diseases were seen in 42 (26.4%) patients with bullous pemphigoid and in 29 (9.1%) controls (odds ratio: 3.53 (2.1-5.9), P< 0.001). Comparing cases to controls, stroke was seen in 17.5% versus 4.1%, odds ratio 4.96 (2.49-9.88); dementia in 5.6% versus 1.9%, odds ratio 3.09 (1.08-8.84); Parkinson's disease in 2.5% versus 2.2%, odds ratio 1.14 (0.33-3.94); epilepsy in 2.5% versus 0.6%, odds ratio 4.04 (0.73-22.3); and multiple sclerosis in 0 versus 0.3% odds ratio 1.00 (0.98-1.01). The main limitations of our study were referral bias, retrospective design and a rather low sample size. Neurological diseases in general, and stroke and dementia in particular, were significantly associated with bullous pemphigoid in our study.

  15. Flame figures in linear IgA bullous dermatosis: a novel histopathologic finding.

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    Fulton, E; Jan, F; Zimarowski, M J

    2017-11-15

    Linear IgA bullous dermatosis (LABD) is an autoimmune subepidermal blistering disease usually with a neutrophil rich inflammatory infiltrate, and characterized by linear IgA deposition at the basement membrane zone (BMZ), and neutrophil predominant dermal inflammation. We report a case of LABD with numerous eosinophils and flame figure formation, a unique histopathologic finding not previously reported. A 69-year-old woman presented with a rapidly progressive, intensely pruritic rash over forearms, breasts, axillae, hips, and thighs. Thelesions were comprised of annular vesicles and bullae with hemorrhagic crusts and erosions. The clinical differential diagnosis included bullous pemphigoid(BP), LABD, and epidermolysis bullosa aquisita (EBA). A biopsy from a bullous plaque on the wrist revealed a subepidermal blister with neutrophils and numerous eosinophils with flame figure formation.Direct immunofluorescent (DIF) microscopy revealed linear deposition of IgA at the BMZ. Although unusual, the combined findings supported a diagnosis of LABD. Increased eosinophils may be associated with drug-induced LABD and may explain the numerous eosinophils in our case. It is important to be aware of this finding as the pathology may easily be misdiagnosed as BP, or possibly bullousWells syndrome. This case emphasizes that combined clinical, pathologic, and DIF findings are essential in the diagnosis of bullous dermatoses.

  16. Childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Lourenço, D M R; Gomes, R Cunha; Aikawa, N E; Campos, L M A; Romiti, R; Silva, C A

    2014-11-01

    Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus has rarely been described in pediatric lupus population and the real prevalence of childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus has not been reported. From January 1983 to November 2013, 303 childhood-onset SLE (c-SLE) patients were followed at the Pediatric Rheumatology Unit of the Childreńs Institute of Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina Universidade da Universidade de São Paulo, three of them (1%) diagnosed as childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus. All three cases presented tense vesiculobullous lesions unassociated with lupus erythematosus lesions, with the median duration of 60 days (30-60). All patients fulfilled bullous systemic lupus erythematosus criteria. Two had nephritis and serositis and presented specific autoantibodies. The histological pattern demonstrated subepidermal blisters with neutrophils-predominant infiltrates within the upper dermis. Direct immunofluorescence (DIF) showed deposits of IgG and complement along the epidermal basement membrane, in the presence or absence of IgA and/or IgM. A positive indirect immunofluorescence on salt-split skin demonstrating dermal binding was observed in two cases. All of them had moderate/severe disease activity at diagnosis with median Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) of 18 (14-24). Two patients received dapsone and one with severe nephritis received immunosuppressive drugs. In conclusion, in the last 30 years the prevalence of bullous lupus in childhood-onset lupus population was low (1%) in our tertiary University Hospital. A diagnosis of SLE should always be considered in children with recurrent tense vesiculobullous lesions with or without systemic manifestations. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  17. Association between bullous pemphigoid and neurologic diseases: a case-control study.

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    Casas-de-la-Asunción, E; Ruano-Ruiz, J; Rodríguez-Martín, A M; Vélez García-Nieto, A; Moreno-Giménez, J C

    2014-11-01

    In the past 10 years, bullous pemphigoid has been associated with other comorbidities and neurologic and psychiatric conditions in particular. Case series, small case-control studies, and large population-based studies in different Asian populations, mainland Europe, and the United Kingdom have confirmed this association. However, no data are available for the Spanish population. This was an observational, retrospective, case-control study with 1:2 matching. Fifty-four patients with bullous pemphigoid were selected. We compared the percentage of patients in each group with concurrent neurologic conditions, ischemic heart disease, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and solid tumors using univariate logistic regression. An association model was constructed with conditional multiple logistic regression. The case group had a significantly higher percentage of patients with cerebrovascular accident and/or transient ischemic attack (odds ratio [OR], 3.06; 95% CI, 1.19-7.87], dementia (OR, 5.52; 95% CI, 2.19-13.93), and Parkinson disease (OR, 5; 95% CI, 1.57-15.94). A significantly higher percentage of cases had neurologic conditions (OR, 6.34; 95% CI, 2.89-13.91). Dementia and Parkinson disease were independently associated with bullous pemphigoid in the multivariate analysis. Patients with bullous pemphigoid have a higher frequency of neurologic conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  18. Penfigoide bolhoso no adulto mais jovem: relato de três casos Bullous pemphigoid in younger adults: three case reports

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    Roberta Richter Zanella

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available O penfigoide bolhoso é uma dermatose bolhosa autoimune subepidérmica, mais comumente observada na população idosa (acima dos 70 anos. Autoanticorpos são formados contra antígenos específicos da zona de membrana basal: BP180 e BP230 (proteínas do hemidesmossomo. Apresentamos três casos de penfigoide bolhoso, em adultos com menos de 50 anos de idade, destacan do as peculiaridades clínicas na faixa etária mais jovem.Bullous pemphigoid is an autoimmune subepidermal bullous dermatosis more commonly observed in the elderly (over 70 years old. Autoantibodies are produced for specific antigens of the epidermal basement membrane zone: BP 180 and BP 230 (hemidesmosome proteins. We report three cases of bullous pemphigoid in adults younger than 50 years old, discussing the clinical characteristics of the disease in younger patients.

  19. Remission Time after Rituximab Treatment for Autoimmune Bullous Disease: A Proposed Update Definition.

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    Iranzo, Pilar; Pigem, Ramon; Giavedoni, Priscila; Alsina-Gibert, Mercè

    2015-01-01

    A therapeutic endpoint is a very important tool to evaluate response in clinical trials. In 2005, a consensus statement identified two late endpoints of disease activity in pemphigus: complete remission off therapy and complete remission on therapy, both definitions applying to patients without lesions for at least 2 months. The same period of time was considered for partial remission off/on therapy. These definitions were later applied to bullous pemphigoid and are considered in most studies on autoimmune bullous disease. These endpoints were established for different adjuvant agents, but at that moment, rituximab was not considered. Rituximab is known for the long duration of its effect, and in most studies relapses have been reported later than 6 months after treatment. In our opinion, time to remission after rituximab treatment should be redefined. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Bullous Wells’ syndrome

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    Bengu Cevirgen Cemil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wells’ syndrome (WS is an uncommon inflammatory skin disease which typically presents single or multiple erythematous and edematous urticarial plaques similar to cellulitis. The lesions may evolve into blue-grey morphea-like lesions and may persist for weeks or months. They ultimately heal without scar. Other clinical presentations reported in literature include papular and nodular and, rarely, bullous eruptions. Previously, bullous Wells’ syndrome was rarely reported in the literature. Herein, we describe a case of a female patient with bullous Wells’ syndrome localized to the upper limbs without any associated disorders.

  1. Differential diagnostics of bullous dermatoses

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    A. A. Kubanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bullous dermatoses are the diseases characterized by vesication and erosion of skin and/or mucos coats, production of autoantibodies against the structural components of epidermis and/or derma. The most frequent diseases of these disorders are pemphigus, bullous pemphigoid, dermatitis herpetiformis, beningn familial chronic pemphigus (Gougerot Hailey-Hailey disease.Diagnostics of bullous dermatoses is based on assessement of clinical signs, results of cytological and histological studies and immunological tests. However none of the current diagnostic methods allows to reveal bullous dermatosis severally and with absolute certainty. Consequently it is necessary to perform wide range of clinical and laboratory tests for early diagnosis and treatment order.

  2. Linear immunoglobulin A/G bullous dermatosis associated with ulcerative colitis.

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    Onoe, Asuka; Matsuura, Daisuke; Terui, Tadashi; Ishii, Norito; Hashimoto, Takashi; Ochiai, Toyoko

    2017-11-01

    Linear immunoglobulin (Ig)A/G bullous dermatosis (LAGBD) is an autoimmune bullous disease characterized by formation of subepidermal blisters and linear deposition of IgA and IgG antibodies along the basement membrane zone (BMZ). The association between linear IgA bullous dermatosis and ulcerative colitis (UC) is well recognized, but reports of UC-associated LAGBD are lacking. We have reported a 24-year-old man suffering from LAGBD associated with UC, which occurred before exacerbations of skin rash. A skin biopsy indicated a subepidermal blister with an infiltration of primarily neutrophils and eosinophils in the dermis. Direct immunofluorescence (IF) studies showed a linear deposition of IgA, IgG and C3c. Indirect IF of human skin revealed IgA and IgG anti-BMZ autoantibodies. Indirect IF of 1 M NaCl-split human skin demonstrated reactivity of IgA and IgG antibodies at the epidermal side. Immunoblotting showed that IgG antibodies reacted to the BP180 NC16a domain and 120-kDa linear IgA dermatosis-1, and enzyme-linked immunoassay detected IgG anti-BP230 antibodies. Administration of prednisolone and diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS) via the p.o. route improved skin lesions and bowel conditions. These results suggest that the bowel inflammation observed in UC may have a causative effect of initiation of the immune response to the skin and development of the bullous skin lesions in LAGBD. A combination of DDS and corticosteroid could be a recommended therapeutic option for patients with LAGBD with UC. © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  3. Pathophysiology of Autoimmune Bullous Diseases: Nature Versus Nurture.

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    Patel, Forum; Wilken, Reason; Patel, Falin B; Sultani, Hawa; Bustos, Itzel; Duong, Christopher; Zone, John J; Raychaudhuri, Siba P; Maverakis, Emanual

    2017-01-01

    Pemphigus and pemphigoid are the prototypical immunobullous diseases. Although it has been well established that they are caused by deposition of autoreactive antibodies directed against adherence proteins within the skin, the specific genetic and environmental factors leading to development of these diseases continue to be an area of investigation. Herein, we discuss several of the potential environmental triggers that may induce patients to develop immunobullous diseases including medications, viral infections, UV exposure or other radiation injury and dietary factors. In addition, the potential genetic and immunologic mechanisms contributing to the pathogenesis of pemphigus and pemphigoid will be reviewed. The multifactorial nature of these diseases contributes to their complexity and highlights the importance of a detailed personal and family history when caring for these patients.

  4. Association of Autoantibodies to BP180 with Disease Activity in Greek Patients with Bullous Pemphigoid

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    Aikaterini Patsatsi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available 39 bullous pemphigoid (BP patients were studied to assess the clinical significance of anti-BP180 and anti-BP230 circulating autoantibodies of BP and correlate their titers with the clinical scores of the BP Disease Area Index (BPDAI and the Autoimmune Bullous Skin Disorder Intensity Score (ABSIS as well as with the intensity of pruritus measured by the BPDAI pruritus component. All parameters were evaluated by the time of diagnosis (baseline, month 3, and month 6. Titers of anti-BP180 autoantibodies were strongly correlated with BPDAI (, and ABSIS (, values, as well as with BPDAI component for the intensity of pruritus (, at baseline. At month 3, titers of anti-BP180 autoantibodies were strongly correlated with BPDAI (, and ABSIS (, values, as well as with the BPDAI component for the intensity of pruritus (, . At month 6, titers of anti-BP180 autoantibodies were strongly correlated with BPDAI (, and ABSIS (, values, as well as with the BPDAI component for the intensity of pruritus (, . There was no statistically significant correlation between titers of anti-BP230 autoantibodies and the BPDAI, ABSIS, and BPDAI component for the intensity of pruritus at the same time points.

  5. Measuring of quality of life in autoimmune blistering disorders in Poland. Validation of disease - specific Autoimmune Bullous Disease Quality of Life (ABQOL) and the Treatment Autoimmune Bullous Disease Quality of Life (TABQOL) questionnaires.

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    Kalinska-Bienias, Agnieszka; Jakubowska, Beata; Kowalewski, Cezary; Murrell, Dedee F; Wozniak, Katarzyna

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune bullous dermatoses (AIBD) are rare, severe diseases resulting from some antibodies activity against the different adhesion structures within the skin and/or mucosa. Few studies investigated quality of life (QOL) in AIBD by generic and dermatology-specific instruments, all reporting strong impact on QOL. Recently, disease-specific measurement tools have been developed: Autoimmune Bullous Disease Quality of Life (ABQOL) and Treatment of Autoimmune Bullous Disease Quality of Life (TABQOL) questionnaires. The aim of this study was to test the reliability and validity of ABQOL and TABQOL by developing the first foreign language versions and to evaluate ABQOL and TABQOL in Polish patients. The study enrolled 80 patients from the tertiary referral center for AIBD at the outpatient clinic or on admission to the hospital. Sixty six patients completed the 17-item questionnaires of each ABQOL and TABQOL at day 0 and after 5-7 days. Both questionnaires were translated into Polish according to protocol. The internal consistency and test-retest reliability were high (Cronbach α=0.95 for ABQOL, α=0.87 for TABQOL), (R=0.98 for ABQOL, R=0.86 for TABQOL). In convergent validity, the correlation of ABQOL and TABQOL was strong (R=0.81), but low with objective disease activity scales. The strongest impact of AIBD on QOL has been observed in flares and in patients with the onset below 70 years of age. The patients with bullous pemphigoid had the highest QOL compared to other AIBD patients. The ABQOL and TABQOL are reliable and valid instruments for the assessment of QOL in AIBD. Copyright © 2016 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Humoral immune diseases: Cutaneous vasculitis and auto-immune bullous dermatoses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechsler, Janine

    2018-02-01

    Humoral immunity is the cause of multiple diseases related to antibodies (IgA, IgG, IgM) produced by the patient. Two groups of diseases are identified. The first group is related to circulating antigen-antibody complexes. The antigens are various. They are often unknown. These immune complexes cause a vascular inflammation due to the complement fixation. Consequently, this group is dominated by inflammatory vasculitis. In the second group, the pathology is due to the fixation in situ of antibodies to a target antigen of the skin that is no more recognized by the patient. This group is represented by the auto-immune bullous dermatoses. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. Treatment of Intraepidermal Autoimmune Bullous Diseases Sürekli Eğitim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer İrfan Kaya

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pemfigus is an autoimmune bullous skin disease, characterized by intraepidermal blisters. It is a severe and potentially life-threatening chronic disease with blisters and erosions on the mucosae and the skin. Treatment options do not differ for two most common types of pemphigus, pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus, except that the latter is usually less resistant to treatment and corticosteroids can often be started at lower doses. Systemic corticosteroids are still the most widely used drugs in the treatment of pemphigus and continue to be the mainstay of therapy for this disease. Adjuvant drugs are commonly used in combination with the aims of increasing efficacy and of having a steroid-sparing action, thereby allowing reduced corticosteroid side-effects. Mortality and complete remission rates have improved since the introduction of adjuvant drugs to pemphigus. Adjuvant drugs include immunoadsorbtion, corticosteroid pulse therapy, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG, immunosuppressive agents such as azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, mycophenolate mofetil and and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (rituximab. The lack of consensus in the published literature about the treatment of this disorder is responsible for different treatment strategies. Treatments need to be chosen after careful consideration of the potential benefits and side effects according to the patients’ medical condition. Here, both conventional therapies and novel treatment regimens for pemphigus are discussed. (Turkderm 2011; 45 Suppl 1: 44-53

  8. Dermatoses bolhosas auto-imunes Autoimmune bullous dermatoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo R. Cunha

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Dermatoses bolhosas autoimunes são doenças cuja manifestação cutânea primária e fundamental consiste em vesículas e bolhas. Classificam-se conforme a localização da bolha, em intraepidérmica e subepidérmica. Os pacientes produzem autoanticorpos contra estruturas específicas da pele detectáveis por técnicas de imunofluorescência, immunobloting e Elisa. Os recentes avanços da biologia molecular e celular têm permitido conhecer esses autoantígenos, contra os quais os pacientes se sensibilizam e que estão localizados na epiderme ou na junção dermoepidérmica. São doenças de baixa incidência, porém de elevada morbidade e por vezes letais. O objetivo deste trabalho é revisar e descrever os progressos nos conhecimentos de quatro doenças vésico-bolhosas autoimunes: pênfigo foliáceo endêmico (fogo selvagem, pênfigo vulgar, penfigóide bolhoso e dermatite herpetiforme.Autoimmune bullous dermatoses are diseases in which blisters and vesicles are the primary and fundamental types of skin lesion. Their classification is based on the location of the blister: intraepidermal and subepidermal. Patients produce autoantibodies against self-specific structures of the skin detectable by immunofluorescence techniques, immunoblotting and ELISA. Recent advances in molecular and cellular biology have brought to knowledge these self-antigens, against which patients are sensitized, and which are found in epidermis or in the dermo-epidermal junction. These are low incidence, but high morbidity diseases that may be fatal. The aim of this article is to review and describe the progress of four autoimmune vesiculobullous disorders: endemic pemphigus foliaceous (wild fire, pemphigus vulgaris, bullous pemphigoid and dermatitis herpetiformis.

  9. Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lings, Kristina; Bygum, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Linear IgA bullous dermatosis (LAD) is an autoimmune, chronic bullous disease affecting primarily young children and adults. Studies on LAD are relatively sparse and from Scandinavia we could only find a few case reports. Therefore we decided to conduct a retrospective investigation of patients...

  10. Aberrant expression and secretion of heat shock protein 90 in patients with bullous pemphigoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Tukaj

    Full Text Available The cell stress chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 has been implicated in inflammatory responses and its inhibition has proven successful in different mouse models of autoimmune diseases, including epidermolysis bullosa acquisita. Here, we investigated expression levels and secretory responses of Hsp90 in patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP, the most common subepidermal autoimmune blistering skin disease. In comparison to healthy controls, the following observations were made: (i Hsp90 was highly expressed in the skin of BP patients, whereas its serum levels were decreased and inversely associated with IgG autoantibody levels against the NC16A immunodominant region of the BP180 autoantigen, (ii in contrast, neither aberrant levels of circulating Hsp90 nor any correlation of this protein with serum autoantibodies was found in a control cohort of autoimmune bullous disease patients with pemphigus vulgaris, (iii Hsp90 was highly expressed in and restrictedly released from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of BP patients, and (iv Hsp90 was potently induced in and restrictedly secreted from human keratinocyte (HaCaT cells by BP serum and isolated anti-BP180 NC16A IgG autoantibodies, respectively. Our results reveal an upregulated Hsp90 expression at the site of inflammation and an autoantibody-mediated dysregulation of the intracellular and extracellular distribution of this chaperone in BP patients. These findings suggest that Hsp90 may play a pathophysiological role and represent a novel potential treatment target in BP.

  11. Association of linear IgA bullous disease with ulcerative colitis: a case of successful treatment with infliximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, S; Makino, T; Jinnin, M; Sakai, K; Fukushima, S; Inoue, Y; Ihn, H

    2013-01-01

    Linear IgA bullous disease (LABD) has been reported in association with inflammatory bowel disease, in particular ulcerative colitis (UC). We reporting a 34-year-old female who developed LABD during a flare-up of UC. We administered infliximab, which has been approved for the treatment of UC; infliximab dramatically improved the cutaneous lesions and bowel symptoms. This is the first report showing a marked effect of infliximab on LABD. First, we hypothesize that infliximab works for UC and then calms down excessive production of inflammatory cytokines and autoantibodies, and so stricter control of UC by infliximab is beneficial against the skin condition of LABD. Second, we suggest that TNF-α production in the lesion of LABD is increased, so TNF-α plays an important role in developing cutaneous lesions. This case suggests that infliximab, a monoclonal antibody against TNF-α, is efficacious in the cutaneous symptoms of LABD.

  12. A Rare Case of Vancomycin-Induced Linear Immunoglobulin A Bullous Dermatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinky Jha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Linear IgA bullous dermatosis (LABD is an autoimmune vesiculobullous disease, which is typically idiopathic but can also rarely be caused by medications or infections. Vancomycin is the most common drug associated with LABD. Lesions typically appear 24 hours to 15 days after the first dose of vancomycin. It is best characterized pathologically by subepidermal bulla (blister formation with linear IgA deposition at the dermoepidermal junction. Here we report an 86-year-old male with a history of left knee osteoarthritis who underwent a left knee arthroplasty and subsequently developed a prosthetic joint infection. This infection was treated with intravenous vancomycin as well as placement of a vancomycin impregnated joint spacer. Five days following initiation of antibiotic therapy, he presented with a vesiculobullous eruption on an erythematous base over his trunk, extremities, and oral mucosa. The eruption resolved completely when intravenous vancomycin was discontinued and colchicine treatment was begun. Curiously, complete resolution occurred despite the presence of the vancomycin containing joint spacer. The diagnosis of vancomycin-induced linear IgA bullous dermatosis was made based on characteristic clinical and histopathologic presentations.

  13. Herpes Simplex Virus Infection Mimicking Bullous Disease in an Immunocompromised Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne L.Y. Lecluse

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Immunodeficient patients are at risk of developing extended or atypical herpes simplex virus infections, which can be easily misdiagnosed. We present the case of a 79-year-old, treatment-induced (oral corticosteroid, immunocompromised female with an extensive atypical herpes simplex virus infection. This patient presented with multiple erosions and vesicles on the trunk with a subacute onset. The clinical differential diagnosis was herpes simplex infection, herpes zoster infection, pemphigus vulgaris or bullous pemphigoid. Due to the atypical clinical presentation and negative Tzanck test, suspicion of viral infection was low. High-dose steroid treatment was initiated. Subsequent histopathology, however, showed a herpes simplex virus infection. After discontinuing steroid treatment and initiating antiviral treatment, the patient recovered within a week. Emphasis must be placed on the importance of clinical awareness of extended and clinically atypical herpes simplex infections in immunocompromised patients. A negative Tzanck test does not rule out the possibility of a herpes infection.

  14. Association of bullous pemphigoid with malignancy: A myth or reality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joycelin Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bullous pemphigoid (BP is an autoimmune sub-epidermal blistering disorder of the skin. The association of BP with internal malignancy has always been a matter of debate with no consensus reached despite many published case reports and clinical trials. However, we report a hitherto unreported association of BP with squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue, wherein the patient had a recalcitrant downhill course despite adequate treatment measures with control of skin lesions being achieved only following excision of the tumor, and relapse coinciding with detection of metastasis. Hence, given the clinical behavior, it is reasonable to speculate that the association of malignancy was more than co-incidental.

  15. Vanishing Lung Syndrome: Compound Effect of Tobacco and Marijuana Use on the Development of Bullous Lung Disease – A Joint Effort

    OpenAIRE

    Wiesel, Shimshon; Siddiqui, Faraz; Khan, Tahir; Hossri, Sami; El-Sayegh, Dany

    2017-01-01

    Marijuana use has been increasing across the United States due to its legalization as both a medicinal and recreational product. A small number of case reports have described a pathological entity called vanishing lung syndrome (VLS), which is a rare bullous lung disease usually caused by tobacco smoking. Recent case reports have implicated marijuana in the development of VLS. We present a case of a 47-year-old man, who presented to our hospital with shortness of breath, fevers and a producti...

  16. Failure of initial disease control in bullous pemphigoid: a retrospective study of hospitalized patients in a single tertiary center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Noa; Zeeli, Tal; Sprecher, Eli; Geller, Shamir

    2017-10-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is the most prevalent autoimmune blistering skin disease in Western countries and in Israel. Initial disease control is achieved in 60-90% of BP patients within 1-4 weeks of corticosteroid therapy. In the remainder of patients, recalcitrant disease is controlled with additional immunosuppressive treatment. We aimed to evaluate the rate of BP patients who needed adjuvant therapy to achieve initial disease control and to identify potential predictors for recalcitrant disease. We conducted a retrospective study of newly diagnosed BP patients who were hospitalized at the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center between the years 2008-2014. We performed statistical analyses to assess the association between clinical factors and failure of initial disease control. Among 114 hospitalized patients with newly diagnosed BP, 1.8% presented with oral mucosa involvement. Seven patients (6.1%) required systemic agents in addition to corticosteroids to achieve disease control. Hypertension (P = 0.048), involvement of the head region (P = 0.042), and metformin treatment (P = 0.02) were significantly more prevalent among patients with recalcitrant disease. The low frequency of recalcitrant BP (6.1%) and the rarity of involvement of the oral mucosa (1.8%) in this study suggest that Israeli BP patients present a milder phenotype compared to similar patients from other geographic areas. Hypertension, head involvement, and metformin therapy were found to be significantly associated with the need for adjuvant therapy to achieve initial control, suggesting that these parameters may serve as predictors of treatment response in BP. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  17. A CONTROVERSIAL ON THE DIAGNOSIS OF CHRONIC BULLOUS TYPE MUCOCUTANEOUS DISEASE INVOLVING ORAL MUCOSA (A CASE REPORT

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    Isadora Gracia

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A case of chronic bullous type mucocutaneous disease involving oral mucosa was reported from a 56 years old man with never healing oral ulcers and wound on the perianal skin for three years. There were also red and black spots on the limb and back skin and a lesion on nail. Painful oral lesion consisted of mucous erosion, desquamative gingivitis, and sloughing area on palate and tongue. The patient is diabetic. The first perianal skin diagnosis was granulomatous candidasis with differential diagnosis pemphigus vegetates and acuminarum condiloma. However the histopathologic examination did not support these diagnosis. After several histopathologic examinations, the latest perianal skin diagnosis was lichen planus with differential diagnosis granulomatous vasculitis, bowenoid papulosis and pyodema gangrenosum. Other skin diagnosis was erythema multiforme. Oral diagnosis was mucous membrane pemphigoid with differential diagnosis lichen planus, Behçet's syndrome and erythema multiforme. Oral histopathologic examinations showed a sub-epithelial blister, which supported mucous membrane pemphigoid. A lip balm, prednisone 5 mg oral rinse and multivitamins were given but oral improvement started after blood sugar level was controlled. Conclusion: It is not yet known whether skin and oral mucous lesions are from the same disease or not.

  18. Modes of Action of Intravenous Immunoglobulin in Bullous Pemphigoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Culton, Donna; Diaz, Luis A; Liu, Zhi

    2018-06-01

    Bullous pemphigoid is an autoantibody-mediated skin blistering disease. Previous studies revealed that intravenous Ig is therapeutic in animal models of bullous pemphigoid by saturating the IgG-protective receptor FcRn, thereby accelerating degradation of pathogenic IgG. Sasaoka et al. demonstrate that the inhibitory effects of intravenous Ig on bullous pemphigoid are also associated with negative modulation of cytokine production by keratinocytes. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A necessidade da imunofluorescência direta no diagnóstico da dermatose bolhosa por IgA The need for direct immunofluorescence in the diagnosis of IgA bullous dermatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Chang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A dermatose bolhosa por imunoglobulina da classe A linear (DbIgA do adulto é uma doença autoimune rara caracterizada por formação de bolhas subepidérmicas e depósito linear de imunoglobulina da classe A (IgA na zona da membrana basal (ZMB. Por possuir aspectos clínicos e histológicos semelhantes a outras dermatoses bolhosas, principalmente a dermatite herpetiforme e o penfigoide bolhoso, faz-se necessária a realização de imunofluorescência direta para confirmação diagnóstica. Apresenta-se então, neste artigo, relato de caso ilustrando essa necessidade.Linear immunoglobulin A bullous dermatosis (DbIgA of adults is a rare autoimmune disease characterized by subepidermal blistering and linear deposits of immunoglobulin A (IgA in the basement membrane zone (BMZ. Owing to the fact it presents clinical and histological aspects similar to other bullous dermatosis, mainly dermatitis herpetiformis and bullous pemphigoid, direct immunofluorescence is required to confirm diagnosis. In this article, we describe a case that illustrates this need.

  20. Evidence for a role of eosinophils in blister formation in bullous pemphigoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graauw, E; Sitaru, C; Horn, M; Borradori, L; Yousefi, S; Simon, H-U; Simon, D

    2017-07-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune bullous disease of the skin characterized by subepidermal blister formation due to tissue-bound and circulating autoantibodies to the hemidesmosomal antigens BP180 and BP230. Although eosinophils and their toxic mediators are found abundantly in BP lesions, their role in blister formation has remained unclear. To investigate the role of eosinophils in the pathogenesis of BP with a specific focus on blister formation and to define conditions inducing dermal-epidermal separation (DES). In an ex vivo human model of BP, normal human skin cryosections were incubated with purified human peripheral blood eosinophils with or without activation in the presence or absence of BP autoantibodies, brefeldin A, diphenyleneiodonium, DNase or blocking F(ab') 2 fragments to CD16, CD18, CD32 and CD64. Dermal-epidermal separation was assessed by light microscopy studies and quantified using Fiji software. Following activation with IL-5 and in the presence of BP autoantibodies, eosinophils induced separation along the dermal-epidermal junction of ex vivo skin. Dermal-epidermal separation was significantly reduced by blocking any of the following: Fcγ receptor binding (P = 0.048), eosinophil adhesion (P = 0.046), reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (P = 0.002), degranulation (P eosinophil extracellular trap (EET) formation (P = 0.048). Our results provide evidence that IL-5-activated eosinophils directly contribute to BP blister formation in the presence of BP autoantibodies. Dermal-epidermal separation by IL-5-activated eosinophils depends on adhesion and Fcγ receptor activation, requires elevated ROS production and degranulation and involves EET formation. Thus, targeting eosinophils may be a promising therapeutic approach for BP. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Autoimmune responses in patients with linear IgA bullous dermatosis: both autoantibodies and T lymphocytes recognize the NC16A domain of the BP180 molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mong-Shang; Fu, Chang-Ling; Olague-Marchan, Monica; Hacker, Mary K; Zillikens, Detlef; Giudice, George J; Fairley, Janet A

    2002-03-01

    Linear IgA bullous disease (LABD) is an autoimmune skin disease characterized by subepidermal blisters and IgA autoantibodies directed against the epidermal basement membrane zone (BMZ) of the skin. Various antigens have been identified as targets of IgA autoantibodies including BP180, a type II glycoprotein that spans the BMZ and lamina lucida. Previously, we have identified a subset of LABD patients whose sera contained IgA antibodies against the 16th noncollagenous (NC16A) domain of BP180. NC16A was previously shown to harbor epitopes that are recognized by both autoantibodies and T cells from patients with bullous pemphigoid and herpes gestationis and is thought to be associated with the development of these immunobullous diseases. The aim of this study was to determine whether T lymphocytes from LABD patients with anti-NC16A IgA autoantibodies respond to epitopes in the same region of the BP180 protein. Indeed, of the four LABD patients in our study, all had T cells that specifically proliferated in response to NC16A. Moreover, two subfragments of NC16A were identified as the predominant targets of LABD T cells. Further analysis of T cell lines and clones derived from these patients revealed that these cells express a CD4 memory T cell phenotype and secrete a Th1/Th2 mixed-cytokine profile, characteristics similar to those of T cells in bullous pemphigoid patients. Our data suggest that the BP180 protein, typically the NC16A region, is the common target of both cellular and humoral immune responses in some LABD patients. This information helps to further elucidate the autoimmune mechanisms in this disease.

  2. A review of scoring systems for ocular involvement in chronic cutaneous bullous diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Brendon W H; Tan, Jeremy C K; Radjenovic, Melissa; Coroneo, Minas T; Murrell, Dedee F

    2018-05-22

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) and autoimmune blistering diseases (AIBD) describe a group of rare chronic dermatoses characterized by cutaneous fragility and blistering. Although uncommon, significant ocular surface disease (OSD) may occur in both and require ophthalmological assessment. Disease scoring systems have a critical role in providing objective and accurate assessment of disease severity. The objectives of this report were, firstly, to document the prevalence and severity of ocular involvement in EB/AIBD. Secondly, to review and evaluate existing ocular and systemic scoring systems for EB/AIBD. Finally, to identify areas where further development of ocular specific tools in EB/AIBD could be pursued. A literature search was performed in October 2017 utilising Medline, Embase, and Scopus databases. The results were restricted by date of publication, between 01.01.1950 and 31.10.2017. The reference lists of these articles were then reviewed for additional relevant publications. Articles of all languages were included if an English translation was available. Articles were excluded if they were duplicates, had no reference to ocular involvement in EB/AIBD or described ocular involvement in other diseases. Descriptions of ocular involvement in EB/AIBD were identified in 88 peer-reviewed journal articles. Findings reported include but are not limited to: cicatrising conjunctivitis, meibomian gland dysfunction, dry eye disease, trichiasis, symblepharon, fornix fibrosis, keratopathy, ectropion/entropion, ankyloblepharon, corneal ulceration, visual impairment and blindness. Although scoring systems exist for assessment of OSD in mucous membrane pemphigoid, no such tools exist for the other AIBD subtypes or for EB. Several systemic scoring systems exist in the dermatological literature that are efficacious in grading overall EB/AIBD severity, but have limited inclusion of ocular features. To the best of our knowledge, there is no recognised or validated scoring systems

  3. IgA LINEAR BULLOUS DERMATOSIS IN CHILDHOOD.

    OpenAIRE

    Ivelina Yordanova; Valentin Valtchev; Dimitar Gospodinov; Snejina Vassileva

    2015-01-01

    IgA linear bullous dermatosis, also known as chronic bullous dermatosis of childhood, is an autoimmune disease which may be idiopathic or drug-induced. The disease affects children and adults. We present a 4 years old girl with itchy polymorphic eruptions. The skin rash was presented by bullous-erosive rosette-like lesions with reddish-brown crust in the center, distributed on the skin of the face, trunk and extremities. The vesicles were filled with serous and hemorrhagic content. Laboratory...

  4. Idiopathic linear IgA bullous dermatosis: prognostic factors based on a case series of 72 adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, J; Ingen-Housz-Oro, S; Alexandre, M; Grootenboer-Mignot, S; Aucouturier, F; Sbidian, E; Tancrede, E; Schneider, P; Regnier, E; Picard-Dahan, C; Begon, E; Pauwels, C; Cury, K; Hüe, S; Bernardeschi, C; Ortonne, N; Caux, F; Wolkenstein, P; Chosidow, O; Prost-Squarcioni, C

    2017-07-01

    Linear IgA bullous dermatosis (LABD) is a clinically and immunologically heterogeneous, subepidermal, autoimmune bullous disease (AIBD), for which the long-term evolution is poorly described. To investigate the clinical and immunological characteristics, follow-up and prognostic factors of adult idiopathic LABD. This retrospective study, conducted in our AIBD referral centre, included adults, diagnosed between 1995 and 2012, with idiopathic LABD, defined as pure or predominant IgA deposits by direct immunofluorescence. Clinical, histological and immunological findings were collected from charts. Standard histology was systematically reviewed, and indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) on salt-split skin (SSS) and immunoblots (IBs) on amniotic membrane extracts using anti-IgA secondary antibodies were performed, when biopsies and sera obtained at diagnosis were available. Prognostic factors for complete remission (CR) were identified using univariate and multivariate analyses. Of the 72 patients included (median age 54 years), 60% had mucous membrane (MM) involvement. IgA IIF on SSS was positive for 21 of 35 patients tested; 15 had epidermal and dermal labellings. Immunoelectron microscopy performed on the biopsies of 31 patients labelled lamina lucida (LL) (26%), lamina densa (23%), anchoring-fibril zone (AFz) (19%) and LL+AFz (23%). Of the 34 IgA IBs, 22 were positive, mostly for LAD-1/LABD97 (44%) and full-length BP180 (33%). The median follow-up was 39 months. Overall, 24 patients (36%) achieved sustained CR, 19 (29%) relapsed and 35% had chronic disease. CR was significantly associated with age > 70 years or no MM involvement. No prognostic immunological factor was identified. Patients with LABD who are < 70 years old and have MM involvement are at risk for chronic evolution. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  5. Coexisting Morphea and Bullous Lichen Sclerosus Et Atrophicus: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Nurcan Metin; Mahizer Yaldız; Teoman Erdem; Şahin Erdem

    2015-01-01

    Morphea and lichen skleroatrofikans (LSA)are localized fibrosing diseases characterized by well-defined fibrotic plaques. Blisters rarely occur on morphea plaque, and these blisters are mostly considered as bullous morphea which is a rare type of morphea. The cases of bullous LSA growing on plaque morphea are rarer. In this case report, we presented a patient has bullous lesions compatible with of lichen skleroatrofikans clinically and histopathologically on morphea lesions, to draw attention...

  6. Origin of the subepidermal tissue in Piper L. leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, A T; Simão, E; Silva, L; Torres, G A

    2015-05-01

    Studies on the anatomy of Piper leaves demonstrate the presence of a subepidermal tissue distinct from the adjacent epidermis, which cells show thin walls and hyaline contents. Some authors consider such cells a hypodermal tissue, while others refer to them as components of a multiple epidermis. In this study, the nature of this subepidermal tissue was investigated through the analysis of leaf ontogeny in three Piper species. The analysis showed that the referred tissue originates from the ground meristem and, thus, should be considered a hypodermis. The studied species suggests that the role of the hypodermis would be to protect the photosynthetic apparatus from excess light, regulating the intensity of light reaching the chlorophyll parenchyma.

  7. Bullous pemphigoid induced by vildagliptin: a report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béné, Johana; Jacobsoone, Aurélie; Coupe, Patrick; Auffret, Marine; Babai, Samy; Hillaire-Buys, Dominique; Jean-Pastor, Marie-Josèphe; Vonarx, Marlène; Vermersch, Annie; Tronquoy, Anne-Fleur; Gautier, Sophie

    2015-02-01

    To report three cases of bullous pemphigoid in patients treated with vildagliptin. Case 1: An 86-year-old woman presented with bullous pemphigoid after 1 month of treatment with vildagliptin and metformin. After introduction of clobetasol, the symptoms resolved although vildagliptin was continued. However, the skin lesions reappeared 3 months later. Sustained remission was achieved only after definitive withdrawal of vildagliptin. Case 2: A 79-year-old man presented with bullous pemphigoid after 37-month treatment with gliclazide, vildagliptin and metformin. The disease at first responded to clobetasol but 3 months later the lesions reappeared. They finally regressed when the gliptin was discontinued. Case 3: A 77-year-old woman, treated with gliclazide and vildagliptin for 26 months, presented with bullous pemphigoid, which responded well to discontinuation of the gliptin and topical clobetasol. Gliptins are new molecules for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, which have been suspected of implication in bullous pemphigoid. Such cases have been described in the literature (seven with vildagliptin and three with sitagliptin). In nine of these cases, the gliptin was associated with metformin, but the latter had never been considered responsible. The mechanism implicated in the development of bullous pemphigoid has not yet been clearly identified, but may involve a modified immune response or alteration of the antigenic properties of the epidermal basement membrane. These reports support the risk of bullous pemphigoid in patients exposed to gliptins. © 2014 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  8. IgA LINEAR BULLOUS DERMATOSIS IN CHILDHOOD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivelina Yordanova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available IgA linear bullous dermatosis, also known as chronic bullous dermatosis of childhood, is an autoimmune disease which may be idiopathic or drug-induced. The disease affects children and adults. We present a 4 years old girl with itchy polymorphic eruptions. The skin rash was presented by bullous-erosive rosette-like lesions with reddish-brown crust in the center, distributed on the skin of the face, trunk and extremities. The vesicles were filled with serous and hemorrhagic content. Laboratory examinations were within normal values according the age. Histopathological examination of the lesional skin revealed sub epidermal blister. Direct immunofluorescence of perilesional skin demonstrated linear deposition of IgA in the basement membrane. Systemic treatment with Methylprednisolon and Claritromycin was applied with satisfactory effect. The patient is under observation.

  9. Erythema gyratum repense like eruption in bullous pemphigoid: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojat Eftekhari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bullous pemphigoid (BP is an autoimmune disease characterized by presence of bullous eruption on the trunk and extremities especially flexural aspects of the limbs. This disease usually occurs in the elderly. The initial presentation of BP is variable. An urticarial or erythematous rash may precede the appearance of the blister formation and can be associated with itch or pruritus. We presented 87 year old bedridden man diagnosed with BP who initially presented with erythema gyratum repens like eruption before blister formation. This case report discusses the presentation of figurate erythema in non-bullous phase of BP for clinicians.

  10. Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis:A Retrospective Study of 23 Patients in Denmark

    OpenAIRE

    Lings, Kristina; Bygum, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Linear IgA bullous dermatosis (LAD) is an autoimmune, chronic bullous disease affecting primarily young children and adults. Studies on LAD are relatively sparse and from Scandinavia we could only find a few case reports. Therefore we decided to conduct a retrospective investigation of patients seen at our department since 1972. The objective is to give a description of the different subgroups of patients with LAD with regard to precipitating factors, demographics, treatments, course of disea...

  11. Intertriginous bullous morphea: A clue for the pathogenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavala Mukaddes

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bullae occurring in lesions of morphea are uncommon. The cause of bullae formation in morphea is multifactorial, although lymphatic obstruction from the sclerodermatous process is considered the likeliest cause. Bullous morphea may be confused clinically with lichen sclerosus et atrophicus since both diseases may cause bullae in sclerodermatous plaques. A 69-year-old woman presented with a history of generalized morphea diagnosed 9 years earlier; and a 1-month history of pruritic bullae on her inframammary folds, axillary regions, lower abdomen, upper extremities and inguinal folds. Physical examination revealed multiple erythematous erosions, hemorrhagic vesicles and eroded bullae with slight scale or crusts overlying hypopigmented, indurated, shiny plaques. Skin biopsy revealed prominent edema in the papillary dermis, resulting in bulla formation and thickening of collagen fibers within the dermis. Direct immunofluorescence was negative. According to histologic and clinical features, the diagnosis of bullous morphea was established.

  12. Subepidermal moisture detection of heel pressure injury: The pressure ulcer detection study outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates-Jensen, Barbara M; McCreath, Heather E; Nakagami, Gojiro; Patlan, Anabel

    2018-04-01

    We examined subepidermal moisture (SEM) and visual skin assessment of heel pressure injury (PrI) among 417 nursing home residents in 19 facilities over 16 weeks. Participants were older (mean age 77 years), 58% were female, over half were ethnic minorities (29% African American, 12% Asian American, 21% Hispanic), and at risk for PrI (mean Braden Scale Risk score = 15.6). Blinded concurrent visual assessments and SEM measurements were obtained at heels weekly. Visual skin damage was categorised as normal, erythema, stage 1 PrI, deep tissue injury (DTI) or stage 2 or greater PrI. PrI incidence was 76%. Off-loading occurred with pillows (76% of residents) rather than heel boots (21%) and often for those with DTI (91%). Subepidermal moisture was measured with a device where higher readings indicate greater moisture (range: 0-70 tissue dielectric constant), with normal skin values significantly different from values in the presence of skin damage. Subepidermal moisture was associated with concurrent damage and damage 1 week later in generalised multinomial logistic models adjusting for age, diabetes and function. Subepidermal moisture detected DTI and differentiated those that resolved, remained and deteriorated over 16 weeks. Subepidermal moisture may be an objective method for detecting PrI. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Bullous impetigo and pregnancy: Case report and review of blistering conditions in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Philip R

    2016-04-18

     Bullous impetigo results from Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) release of exfoliative toxins type A and type B thatresults in flaccid, easily ruptured, bullae in the upper layers of the epidermis.  Physiologic, gestation-associated, and incidental skin changes can occur in pregnancy.  Blisters in pregnant women can occur secondary to either common skin disorders orspecific dermatoses of pregnancy.  To describe a pregnant woman with bullous impetigo and review bullous conditions in pregnant women.  PubMed was used to search the following terms, separately and in combination:  blister, blistering, bullous, gestationis, herpes, herpetiformis, impetigo, pemphigoid, pregnancy, pregnant, psoriasis, pustular, virus. All papers were reviewed and relevant manuscripts, along with their reference citations, were evaluated.  Flaccid, easily rupturing, pustules, which developed into superficial annular erosions with peripheral scale and central healing appeared in a woman of 7-weeks gestation and allergy to penicillin on her lower abdomen, suprapubic region, perineum, buttocks, and proximal legs.  A bacterial culture subsequently isolated methicillin-susceptible S. aureus.  All of the lesions resolved after treatment with clindamycin.  Bullous impetigo should be considered in the differential diagnosis of common skin diseases presenting as blistersin pregnant women.

  14. Calculation of cut-off values based on the Autoimmune Bullous Skin Disorder Intensity Score (ABSIS) and Pemphigus Disease Area Index (PDAI) pemphigus scoring systems for defining moderate, significant and extensive types of pemphigus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulard, C; Duvert Lehembre, S; Picard-Dahan, C; Kern, J S; Zambruno, G; Feliciani, C; Marinovic, B; Vabres, P; Borradori, L; Prost-Squarcioni, C; Labeille, B; Richard, M A; Ingen-Housz-Oro, S; Houivet, E; Werth, V P; Murrell, D F; Hertl, M; Benichou, J; Joly, P

    2016-07-01

    Two pemphigus severity scores, Autoimmune Bullous Skin Disorder Intensity Score (ABSIS) and Pemphigus Disease Area Index (PDAI), have been proposed to provide an objective measure of disease activity. However, the use of these scores in clinical practice is limited by the absence of cut-off values that allow differentiation between moderate, significant and extensive types of pemphigus. To calculate cut-off values defining moderate, significant and extensive pemphigus based on the ABSIS and PDAI scores. In 31 dermatology departments in six countries, consecutive patients with newly diagnosed pemphigus were assessed for pemphigus severity, using ABSIS, PDAI, Physician's Global Assessment (PGA) and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) scores. Cut-off values defining moderate, significant and extensive subgroups were calculated based on the 25th and 75th percentiles of the ABSIS and PDAI scores. The median ABSIS, PDAI, PGA and DLQI scores of the three severity subgroups were compared in order to validate these subgroups. Ninety-six patients with pemphigus vulgaris (n = 77) or pemphigus foliaceus (n = 19) were included. The median PDAI activity and ABSIS total scores were 27·5 (range 3-84) and 34·8 points (range 0·5-90·5), respectively. The respective cut-off values corresponding to the first and third quartiles of the scores were 15 and 45 for the PDAI, and 17 and 53 for ABSIS. The moderate, significant and extensive subgroups were thus defined, and had distinguishing median ABSIS (P cut-off values of 15 and 45 for PDAI and 17 and 53 for ABSIS, to distinguish moderate, significant and extensive pemphigus forms. Identifying these pemphigus activity subgroups should help physicians to classify and manage patients with pemphigus. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  15. Bullous Lichen Planus in an Indian female | Puri | Sudanese Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bullous lichen planus is a rare entity. We describe bullous lichen planus in an. Indian female who had itchy erythematous papular lesions with vesicles and bullae predominantly over the dorsa of both legs. The patient was subjected to histopathological examination after which the diagnosis was confirmed. The patient was ...

  16. Staphylococcal bullous impetigo in a neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggal, Shalini Dewan; Bharara, Tanisha; Jena, Pragnya Paramita; Kumar, Avinash; Sharma, Abha; Gur, Renu; Chaudhary, Sanjay

    2016-07-16

    An otherwise healthy, full-term neonate presented at day 15 of life to the pediatric emergency with generalized papulo-pustular rash for 2 d. This was finally diagnosed as bullous impetigo caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The skin lesions decreased significantly after starting antibiotic therapy and drainage of blister fluid. There was no recurrence of the lesions on follow-up. This case of generalized pustular eruption due to S. aureus in a neonate is reported, as it poses a diagnostic dilemma and can have serious consequences if left untreated.

  17. Bullous pilomatricoma: A stage in transition to secondary anetoderma?

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    Premanshu Bhushan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pilomatricoma is an uncommon hamartomatous tumor of the hair matrix. Bullous and anetodermic changes over pilomatricoma are rare. We report an 18-year-old male with an asymptomatic nodule with overlying cystic changes on the left arm of 6-month duration with clinical and histological features of both bullous and anetodermic modifications. We also reviewed the associated literature to conclude that there is sufficient overlap in these two entities. Both variants show a bullous or pseudobullous appearance clinically and loss of elastin, sparse collagen bundles separated by intense edema, and dilated lymphatics/blood vessels in the dermis overlying the tumor mass histologically. We therefore propose that bullous, pseudoampullary, anetodermic, and lymphangiectatic forms should be considered as synonymous or transitional to the ultimate scar-like anetodermic appearance.

  18. Bullous Henoch–Schonlein purpura with involvement of face

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    Devdeep Mukherjee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Henoch–Schonlein purpura (HSP with facial involvement with bullous rashes are extremely rare. A 12-year-old boy presented with abdominal pain and features of arthritis. He also had multiple purpuric rashes over his lower limbs. Gradually, he developed bullous rashes which were seen on his legs and hands and progressed to involve the face. He was confirmed to be suffering from HSP from clinical presentation and skin biopsy. The child responded well to oral steroids. Bullous lesions may be seen in HSP. However, there is neither prognostic significance of this nor does it alter the management. Other causes of bullous lesions should be ruled out. As facial involvement is associated with renal and gastrointestinal involvement, these children should be monitored for sequelae.

  19. Mediators of Mast Cells in Bullous Pemphigoid and Dermatitis Herpetiformis

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    Agnieszka Zebrowska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bullous pemphigoid (BP and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH are skin diseases associated with inflammation. However, few findings exist concerning the role of mast cells in autoimmune blistering disease. Skin biopsies were taken from 27 BP and 14 DH patients, as well as 20 healthy individuals. Immunohistochemistry was used to identify the localization and mast cell expression of TNFα and MMP9 in skin lesions and perilesional skin. The serum concentrations of TNFα, MMP9, chymase, tryptase, PAF, and IL-4 were measured by immunoassay. TNFα and MMP9 expression in the epidermis and in inflammatory influxed cells in the dermis was detected in skin biopsies from patients. Although these mediators were found to be expressed in the perilesional skin of all patients, the level was much lower than that in lesional skin. Increased serum PAF levels were observed in BP patients. Mast cells may play an essential role in activating inflammation, which ultimately contributes to the tissue damage observed in BP and DH. Our findings suggest that differences in the pattern of cytokine expression directly contribute to variations in cellular infiltration in DH and BP.

  20. HLA-DPDQDR is expressed in all lesional skin from patients with autoimmune skin diseases

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    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Human genes responsible for human antigen presentation and transplant rejection functions are located on the short arm of Chromosome 6 and are called the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC. Moreover, the primary physiologic function of MHC molecules is to present peptides to T lymphocytes. MHC molecules are integral components of the ligands that most T cells recognize, since the T cell receptor (TCR has specificity for complexes of foreign antigenic peptides, as well as self-MHC molecules. Aim: Our investigation attempts to investigate the presence of HLA-DPDQDR within lesional skin biopsies from patients affected by autoimmune skin blistering diseases (ABDs. Materials and Methods: We utilized immunohistochemistry (IHC to evaluate the presence of HLA-DPDQDR in lesional skin biopsies of patients affected by ABDs. We tested 30 patients with endemic pemphigus foliaceus (EPF, 15 controls from the EPF endemic area, and 15 biopsies from healthy controls from the USA. We also tested archival biopsies from patients with selected ABDs, including 30 patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP, 20 with pemphigus vulgaris (PV, 8 with pemphigus foliaceus (PF, 14 with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH and 2 with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA. Results: Most ABD biopsies stained positive for HLA-DPDQDR in the lesional blisters and/or inflamed neurovascular plexus in the superficial dermis, and also at mesenchymal-endothelial like-cell junctions in the dermis. In BP, EBA and EPF, the HLA-DPDQDR staining was also seen in the dermal eccrine sweat gland coils and and ducts. Conclusion: Here, we document that HLA-DPDQDR is expressed in several anatomic areas of lesional skin in patients with ABDs. Notably, HLA-DPDQDR positivity was also consistently present in areas of the classic immune response in pemphigus epidermal keratinocytic intercellular junctions, and at basement membrane sites in bullous pemphigoid and other subepidermal blistering diseases.

  1. The value of Tzanck smear test in diagnosis of erosive, vesicular, bullous, and pustular skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdu, Murat; Baba, Mete; Seçkin, Deniz

    2008-12-01

    Tzanck smear is generally used for the diagnosis of the pemphigus group of autoimmune bullous diseases and mucocutaneous herpesvirus infections. There are only a few studies in the literature investigating its diagnostic value. We aimed to investigate Tzanck smear findings and to determine the diagnostic value of this test in moist (erosive, vesicular, bullous, and pustular) skin lesions. We also aimed to develop an algorithmic approach for the diagnosis of these types of skin lesions according to the Tzanck smear findings. Samples were stained with May-Grünwald-Giemsa and evaluated by the same dermatologist. In some patients, methylene blue and Gram staining or direct immunofluorescence examinations were additionally performed. In all of the study cases, after the evaluation of clinical and laboratory findings (including, when appropriate, potassium hydroxide examination; viral serology; bacterial and fungal cultures; histopathology; direct and indirect immunofluorescence; patch testing), the definite diagnosis was established. We also determined the sensitivity and the specificity of certain Tzanck smear findings. Tzanck smear was performed in a total of 400 patients with moist skin lesions. The sensitivities of multinucleated giant cells and acantholytic cells in herpetic infections, dyskeratotic acantholytic cells and cocci in bullous impetigo, pseudohyphae in candidiasis, acantholytic cells in pemphigus and more than 10 tadpole cells (magnification x100) in spongiotic dermatitis were 84.7%, 92%, 100%, 100%, and 81.5%, respectively. Because Tzanck smears were evaluated by the same dermatologist, no comment could be made regarding the interobserver reliability of this test and how the level of experience with this technique might affect the results. Also, the sensitivity and the specificity of Tzanck smear test findings for certain diseases could not be calculated because of an insufficient number of patients. The Tzanck smear test is an inexpensive, useful

  2. Squamous cell carcinoma of penis with bullous pemphigoid masquerading as lymphogranuloma venereum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, V.; Gnanaraj, Pushpa; Fernandes, S. D.; Narasimhan, Murali; Karthikeyan, Subashini; Rahul, Shwetha

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a 60-year old unmarried male who presented with multiple ulcers and foul smelling discharge from the groin since 4 months and multiple tense bullae over the trunk of 1 month duration. Groove sign was present. Investigations for lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) and other sexually transmitted diseases were negative. Histopathology from the ulcer in the groin and growth in the penis revealed squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Skin biopsy of bulla was diagnostic of bullous pemphigoid (BP). We report a rare case of SCC masquerading as LGV with BP occurring as a paraneoplastic phenomenon. PMID:23919055

  3. B-cell activating factor detected on both naïve and memory B cells in bullous pemphigoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hua; Kusuhara, Masahiro; Li, Xiaoguang; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Tsuchisaka, Atsunari; Ishii, Norito; Koga, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Taihei; Ohara, Koji; Karashima, Tadashi; Ohyama, Bungo; Ohata, Chika; Furumura, Minao; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2014-08-01

    B-cell activating factor (BAFF), an important immune regulatory cytokine, is involved in development of autoimmune diseases. Although BAFF is expressed in various cells, including dendritic cells (DCs) and monocytes, BAFF expression on B cells has not been well documented. In the present study, BAFF molecules on DCs and naïve and memory B cells in autoimmune bullous diseases, including pemphigus vulgaris, pemphigus foliaceus and bullous pemphigoid (BP), were analysed by flow cytometry. Compared with healthy controls (HC), BAFF expression on naïve and memory B cells increased significantly in BP. No difference in BAFF receptor expression in naïve and memory B cells was shown among all study groups. Furthermore, BAFF expression in both naïve and memory B cells of BP, but not HC, was detected by confocal microscopic analysis. These results implied that BAFF expressed by B cells may play a pathogenic role in autoimmune bullous diseases, particularly BP. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Bullous reactions to bed bug bites reflect cutaneous vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluates bullous cutaneous reactions and sequential histopathology in an individual sensitized to bed bug bites in an effort to better understand the allergic response and histology associated with these bites. There was a progression of the inflammatory response across time ranging from...

  5. Bullous impetigo associated with Abiotrophia defectiva in an immunocompetent adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Heather M; Miller, Cathy; Kemp, Earl; Huntington, Mark K

    2012-07-01

    Infection of humans by Abiotrophia defectiva, a nutritionally variant streptococcus, most commonly takes the form of endocarditis, though a variety of other manifestations ranging from central nervous system abscesses to orthopaedic infections have been seen. We report here what we believe is the first case of bullous impetigo associated with this organism.

  6. Dry eye and meibomian gland dysfunction in pseudophakic bullous keratopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamar, Melis; Kiyat, Pelin; Yagci, Ayse

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate dry eye tests and meibography of patients with pseudophakic bullous keratopathy (PBK). Thirty-seven patients with PBK were included. The eyes with PBK were compared with the normal pseudophakic fellow eyes. All patients had undergone a detailed ophthalmic examination including corneal and conjunctival fluorescein staining and Oxford scoring, tear film breakup time, Schirmer 1 test, Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) score assessment, lid margin abnormalities, upper and lower eyelid Meibomian gland evaluation using infrared captures of a biomicroscope. Partial or complete loss of the Meibomian glands (Meibomian dropout) was scored for each eyelid from grade 0 (no loss) through grade 3 (lost area was > 2/3 of the total meibomian gland area). The mean age of the patients was 73.2 ± 8.9 (range, 50-93). Mean tear film breakup time value was statistically lower in PBK eyes (P ≤ 0.001). OSDI, Oxford, lid margin abnormalities, inferior meibography, total meibography score were significantly higher in PBK eyes (P ≤ 0.001). The comparison of Schirmer 1 and superior meibography scores of the groups was insignificant (P = 0.143, P = 0.793, respectively). The Meibomian gland morphology of the PBK eyes demonstrates significant differences when compared with normal fellow eyes and might be related to evaporative dry eye. For this reason, patients with PBK should be monitored for Meibomian gland dysfunction and when needed start prompt treatment in order to prevent further disturbance of the ocular surface.

  7. Short-term evaluation of non-absorbable microgranular hydroxyapatite infiltration in the guinea pig subepidermal abdominal region

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    A.P. Xavier

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-absorbable microgranular hydroxyapatite was infiltrated into the subepidermal abdominal region of guinea pigs in order to assess the possibility of using this material to correct deficiencies in orbital volume. Microgranular hydroxyapatite (2.0 ml was subepidermally infiltrated into the abdominal region of 20 guinea pigs. The animals were divided into four experimental groups of 5 animals each, which were killed 7 (G1, 15 (G2, 30 (G3 and 60 (G4 days after infiltration. The area and the largest and smallest diameters of the nodules formed by infiltration were evaluated at the site of infiltration and histological examination was performed. The mean granuloma area was similar in all groups. Histopathological examination showed that the material remained isolated from surrounding tissues by a pseudocapsule that became denser throughout the experiment. A host reaction started with young fibroblastic tissue that evolved to dense tissue until cartilaginous tissue was formed in G4, progressively advancing towards the center of the granuloma from G1 to G4. Non-absorbable microgranular hydroxyapatite is an inert material that was well tolerated by the animals studied, with maintenance of the infiltrated volume, and may perhaps be useful to fill anophthalmic cavities.

  8. Compositional analysis of Chinese water chestnut (Eleocharis dulcis) cell-wall material from parenchyma, epidermis, and subepidermal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassby, Terri; Jay, Andrew J; Merali, Zara; Parker, Mary L; Parr, Adrian J; Faulds, Craig B; Waldron, Keith W

    2013-10-09

    Chinese water chestnut (Eleocharis dulcis (Burman f.) Trin ex Henschel) is a corm consumed globally in Oriental-style cuisine. The corm consists of three main tissues, the epidermis, subepidermis, and parenchyma; the cell walls of which were analyzed for sugar, phenolic, and lignin content. Sugar content, measured by gas chromatography, was higher in the parenchyma cell walls (931 μg/mg) than in the subepidermis (775 μg/mg) or epidermis (685 μg/mg). The alkali-extractable phenolic content, measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, was greater in the epidermal (32.4 μg/mg) and subepidermal cell walls (21.7 μg/mg) than in the cell walls of the parenchyma (12.3 μg/mg). The proportion of diferulic acids was higher in the parenchyma. The Klason lignin content of epidermal and subepidermal cell walls was ~15%. Methylation analysis of Chinese water chestnut cell-wall polysaccharides identified xyloglucan as the predominant hemicellulose in the parenchyma for the first time, and also a significant pectin component, similar to other nongraminaceous monocots.

  9. A case of bullous pemphigoid ınduced by vildagliptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keseroglu, Havva Ozge; Taş-Aygar, Gamze; Gönül, Müzeyyen; Gököz, Ozay; Ersoy-Evans, Sibel

    2017-06-01

    Bullous pemfigoid (BP), an autoimmune disorder, can also be induced by some medications. Vildagliptin is a new drug used to treat diabetes mellitus (DM). Recently, a few cases of vildagliptin-induced BP have been described in the literature. We report a patient with BP in which vildagliptin was thought to be as a possible causative agent. The awareness of BP development risk during gliptin therapy can prevent unnecessary usage of systemic drugs with serious side effects.

  10. Successful treatment of bullous lichen planus with acitretin monotherapy. Review of treatment options for bullous lichen planus and case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallis, Efstathios; Liakopoulou, Angeliki; Christodoulopoulos, Constantinos; Katoulis, Alexandros

    2016-12-31

    Bullous lichen planus (BLP) is a rare variant of lichen planus, characterized by the development of vesicular and bullous lesions, of skin, nails, hair and/or mucosa. We present a case of 63-year-old woman with BLP, unresponsive to previous therapies with topical corticosteroids, topical calcipotriol, antihistamines and oral cyclosporine (4 mg/kg/day for 4 months). She was already receiving treatment for arterial hypertension, hyperlipidemia, atrial fibrillation and uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. Acitretin was administered for 5 months with complete remission of BLP lesions and no major side effects. This is probably the first reported case of BLP treated with acitretin monotherapy. In this case acitretin was an efficacious and well-tolerated therapeutic option for BLP.

  11. Cutaneous Mucormycosis Following a Bullous Pemphigoid Flare in a Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Patient on Ibrutinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Matthew K; Karri, Saradasri; Reynolds, Jackson; Owsley, Jeff; Wise, Austin; Martin, Mike G; Zare, Fereshteh

    2018-04-01

    While the recent development of novel therapeutics in oncology, such as small molecule kinase inhibitors (SMKIs), has enabled our ability to target disease-specific molecular pathways, the prolonged impact of these agents on the immune system and infectious risk remains to be seen. We present a 68-year-old male with refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) on ibrutinib monotherapy for 3 years who developed extensive cutaneous mucormycosis following a severe bullous pemphigoid (BP) flare. He received amphotericin B for 4 weeks and was continued on posaconazole with resolution of his mucormycosis infection. Consistent with a growing evidence of literature identifying opportunistic fungal infections in patients on ibrutinib therapy, providers should be cognizant of medical comorbidities that may predispose to such infections and explore methods of prevention before starting ibrutinib and other SMKIs.

  12. Ceratopatia bolhosa: etiopatogênese e tratamento Bullous keratopathy: etiopathogenesis and treatment

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    Eliana Domingues Gonçalves

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A ceratopatia bolhosa caracteriza-se pelo edema corneano estromal acompanhado de bolhas epiteliais e subepiteliais devido à perda de células e/ou alterações da junção endotelial. Nos casos mais avançados, ocorre espessamento do estroma e presença de fibrose subepitelial e vascularização corneana. Apresenta baixa de acuidade visual devido à diminuição da transparência da córnea e pode estar acompanhada de sensação de corpo estranho, lacrimejamento e dor devido as alterações epiteliais como a presença de bolhas íntegras ou rotas. Ceratite bolhosa é uma das principais causas de transplante de córnea em diferentes regiões e países. A principal etiologia é a perda de células endoteliais, principalmente após cirurgia de catarata e na distrofia endotelial de Fuchs. Sabe-se que atualmente há cerca de 20 milhões de pessoas com catarata no mundo, e esta complicação pode afetar 1 a 2% das cirurgias de catarata. Este texto faz uma revisão sobre a etiopatogênese da ceratopatia bolhosa e sobre os tratamentos clínicos e cirúrgicos disponíveis para a doença.Bullous keratopathy is characterized by corneal stromal edema with epithelial or subepithelial bullae due to cell loss and endothelial decompensation. In more advanced cases, subepithelial fibrosis, formation of a posterior collagenous layer or retrocorneal fibrous membrane, and corneal vascularization can occur. Decreased vision is present because the loss of corneal transparency with symptoms like tearing and pain caused by epithelial bullae that can rupture. Currently, bullous keratopathy is the most common indication for penetrating keratoplasty and regraft. The main etiology is the endothelial cell loss after ophthalmic surgeries as cataract surgery. Cataract affects approximately 20 million people worldwide, and this complication can occur in 1 to 2% of cataract surgeries. This study revised bullous keratopathy etiopathogenesis, clinical and surgical treatment

  13. Case Report of Bullous Pemphigoid following Fundus Fluorescein Angiography

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    Goktug Demirci

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a first case of bullous pemphigoid (BP following intravenous fluorescein for fundus angiography. Clinical Features: A 70-year-old male patient was admitted to the intensive care unit with BP and sepsis. He reported a history of fundus fluorescein angiography with a pre-diagnosis of senile macular degeneration 2 months prior to presentation. At that time, fluorescein extravasated at the antecubital region. Following the procedure, pruritus and erythema began at the wrists bilaterally, and quickly spread to the entire body. The patient also reported a history of allergy to human albumin solution (Plamasteril®; Abbott 15 years before, during bypass surgery. On dermatologic examination, erythematous patches were present on the scalp, chest and anogenital region. Vesicles and bullous lesions were present on upper and lower extremities. On day 2 of hospitalization, tense bullae appeared on the upper and lower extremities. The patient was treated with oral methylprednisolone 48 mg (Prednol®; Mustafa Nevzat, topical clobetasol dipropionate 0.05% cream (Dermovate®; Glaxo SmithKline, and topical 4% urea lotion (Excipial Lipo®; Orva for presumptive bullous pemphigoid. Skin punch biopsy provided tissue for histopathology, direct immunofluorescence examination, and salt extraction, which were all consistent with BP. After 1 month, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit with sepsis secondary to urinary tract infection; he died 2 weeks later from sepsis and cardiac failure. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of BP following fundus fluorescein angiography in a patient with known human albumin solution allergy. Consideration should be made to avoid fluorescein angiography, change administration route, or premedicate with antihistamines in patients with known human albumin solution allergy. The association between fundus fluorescein angiography and BP should be further investigated.

  14. Airway management in a patient with bullous pemphigoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasir, M.; Khan, F.A.

    2013-01-01

    Airway management in patients with pemphigoid lesions has anaesthetic implications. We report a case of a 23 years old female with bullous pemphigoid who presented with laryngeal stenosis and critical airway narrowing. The airway was initially managed with jet ventilation. Anaesthesia was maintained with propofol infusion and ventilation was performed by introducing a size 10 French gauge suction catheter through the stenotic laryngeal orifice. Thirty minutes into anaesthesia, she developed subcutaneous emphysema and decreased air entry on right side of the chest but remained hemodynamically stable. The airway was further managed by tracheostomy. This case report highlights complications that can occur during the anaesthetic management of such cases. (author)

  15. Bullous lesions, sweat gland necrosis and rhabdomyolysis in alcoholic coma

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    Neelakandhan Asokan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 42-year-old male developed hemorrhagic bullae and erosions while in alcohol induced coma. The lesions were limited to areas of the body in prolonged contact with the ground in the comatose state. He developed rhabdomyolysis, progressing to acute renal failure (ARF. Histopathological examination of the skin showed spongiosis, intraepidermal vesicles, and necrosis of eccrine sweat glands with denudation of secretory epithelial lining cells. With supportive treatment and hemodialysis, the patient recovered in 3 weeks time. This is the first reported case of bullous lesions and sweat gland necrosis occurring in alcohol-induced coma complicated by rhabdomyolysis and ARF.

  16. Nursing diagnoses in patients with immune-bullous dermatosis

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    Euzeli da Silva Brandão

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: identify nursing diagnoses in patients with immune-bullous dermatosis. Method: a quantitative and descriptive research, carried out in three institutions located in Rio de Janeiro and Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, using the Client Assessment Protocol in Dermatology during a nursing consultation. Simple descriptive statistics was used for data analysis. Results: 14 subjects participated in the study, nine with a diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris, pemphigus two and three of bullous pemphigoid. The age ranged between 27 and 82 years, predominantly females (11. 14 nursing diagnoses were discussed and identified from a clinical rationale in all study participants, representing the most common human responses in this sample. The application of the Assessment Protocol in Dermatology facilitated the comprehensive assessment, in addition to providing the identification of diagnostics according to the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association International. Conclusion: the nursing diagnoses presented confirm the necessity of interdisciplinary work during the care for this clientele. For better description of the phenomena related to the client in question, it is suggested the inclusion of two risk factors related in three diagnoses of this taxonomy. It is worth noting the contribution of the findings for the care, education and research in nursing in dermatology.

  17. A case of bullous pemphigoid exacerbated by irradiation after breast conservative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Konishi, Koji; Umegaki, Noriko; Tanei, Tomonori; Koizumi, Masahiko; Yoshioka, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    We present a case, considered to be a form of the Koebner phenomenon, of bullous pemphigoid that was exacerbated mainly within the irradiated field after breast conservative radiotherapy. In May 2009, a 60-year-old woman was diagnosed with bullous pemphigoid, which was treated with steroid therapy. The following month, she was diagnosed with breast cancer (invasive ductal carcinoma, pT1cN0M0). After breast conservative surgery in December 2009, conservative radiotherapy to the right breast was performed (50 Gy in 25 fractions). Portal skin showed no serious change (up to grade 1 skin erythema) and no bullous neogenesis during conservative radiotherapy. However, 2 months after conservative radiotherapy, new blisters became exacerbated mainly within the irradiated field but also in the area outside the irradiated field. Increasing the dosage of oral steroid and minocycline resulted in relief of bullous pemphigoid, although patchy skin pigmentation remained especially in the irradiated skin. (author)

  18. Recurrent rates and risk factors associated with recurrent painful bullous keratopathy after primary phototherapeutic keratectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasetsuwan N

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ngamjit Kasetsuwan, Kanokorn Sakpisuttivanit, Usanee Reinprayoon, Vilavun Puangsricharern Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand Objective: To assess the recurrent rate, mean survival time, and risk factors associated with recurrent painful bullous keratopathy (BK after primary treatment with phototherapeutic keratectomy.Methods: Medical records from 72 patients (72 eyes who had phototherapeutic keratectomy for painful BK were evaluated. Data for sex, age, duration of BK, associated ocular and systemic diseases (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, asthma, dyslipidemia, and rheumatoid arthritis, frequency and degree of pain (grade 1–3, visual acuity, corneal thickness, intraocular pressure, and laser setting were extracted and analyzed.Results: The mean age of the patients was 64.2±11.4 years. The mean preoperative duration of BK was 15.0±11.0 months. Most patients had pseudophakic BK (69.40%. Majority of the cases had grade 3 degree of pain (48.60%. Glaucoma and hypertension were markedly found among these patients (51.40% and 19.40%, respectively. Preoperative mean intraocular pressure and corneal thickness were 13.70±4.95 mmHg and 734.1±83.80 µm, respectively. The mean laser diameter and depth were 8.36±1.22 mm and 38.89±8.81 µm, respectively. Systemic disease was significantly associated with the risk for developing recurrent painful BK (P=0.022, hazard ratio [HR] 1.673, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08–2.58. The overall recurrent rate was 51%. The average duration time of recurrent painful BK was 17.3±12.9 months (range 1–50 months. The median survival time before recurrence was 29.0±6.6 months.Conclusion: Systemic disease was found to be the only risk factor significantly associated with the development of recurrent painful BK. Low recurrent rate and long mean survival time showed that phototherapeutic

  19. Successful Treatment of a Bullous Pemphigoid Patient with Rituximab Who Was Refractory to Corticosteroid and Omalizumab Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslı Bilgiç Temel

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Omalizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody which is an FDA-approved treatment of severe allergic asthma and inhibits IgE binding to FcεRI. According to increasing evidence of IgE inhibition, omalizumab was suggested as a therapeutic approach for bullous pemphigoid (BP. Rituximab has been reported to be effective in various autoimmune diseases, including autoimmune bullous dermatoses. A specific protocol for the use of rituximab to treat BP patients is not yet available. There are only small case series and case reports about the efficacy and safety of rituximab in BP. Here we present a young BP patient who responded well to rituximab therapy and was refractory to conventional and omalizumab therapies although he had elevated IgE levels and eosinophilia. Our case supports the knowledge about the effectiveness and safety of rituximab not only in pemphigus but also in BP. On the other hand, although it did not work in our case, omalizumab may be a potentially effective agent in some carefully selected patients with certain subtypes of BP.

  20. Extracellular matrix alterations in human corneas with bullous keratopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljubimov, A V; Burgeson, R E; Butkowski, R J

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE. To uncover abnormalities of extracellular matrix (ECM) distribution in human corneas with pseudophakic and aphakic bullous keratopathy (PBK/ABK). METHODS. Indirect immunofluorescence with antibodies to 27 ECM components was used on frozen sections of 14 normal and 20 PBK/ABK corneas...... in some cases, correlated with decreased visual acuity. In normal central corneas, tenascin was never found. Other major ECM abnormalities in PBK/ABK corneas compared to normals included: discontinuous epithelial BM straining for laminin-1 (alpha 1 beta 1 gamma 1), entactin/nidogen and fibronectin......; accumulation of fibronectin and alpha 1-alpha 2 type IV collagen on the endothelial face of the Descemet's membrane; and abnormal deposition of stromal ECM (tenascin, fibronectin, decorin, types I, III, V, VI, VIII, XII, XIV collagen) and BM components (type IV, collagen, perlecan, bamacan, laminin-1, entactin...

  1. Concurrent pyogenic granuloma and bullous impetigo of a pregnant woman's finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Rosie; Cohen, Philip R

    2017-03-15

    Bullous impetigo is a superficial skininfection caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus). Pyogenic granuloma is a common benigntumor frequently associated with prior trauma.Bullous impetigo and pyogenic granuloma may occurin pregnant women. The features of a pregnant womanwith pyogenic granuloma and bullous impetigoconcurrently present in a lesion on her finger aredescribed. PubMed was used to search the followingterms: bullous impetigo, pregnancy, and pyogenicgranuloma. All papers were reviewed; relevantarticles, along with their references, were evaluatedResults: A red ulcerated nodule with a collaretteof epithelium around the tumor and surroundingbullae appeared on the fifth digit of the left hand of a31-year-old woman who was at 36 weeks gestation. Abacterial culture grew methicillin sensitive S. aureus.An excisional biopsy was performed. Histologicfindings revealed not only a benign vascular tumorwith an infiltrate of mixed inflammatory cells, butalso an intraepidermal blister. She received oralantibiotics and there was complete resolution of thefinger lesion and infection with preservation of digitfunction. Albeit uncommon, pyogenic granulomaand bullous impetigo may concurrently occur in thesame lesion. Therapeutic intervention should focuson treating both the benign skin tumor and theinfection.

  2. Subepidermal moisture (SEM) and bioimpedance: a literature review of a novel method for early detection of pressure-induced tissue damage (pressure ulcers).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Zena; Patton, Declan; Rhodes, Shannon L; O'Connor, Tom

    2017-04-01

    Current detection of pressure ulcers relies on visual and tactile changes at the skin surface, but physiological changes below the skin precede surface changes and have a significant impact on tissue health. Inflammatory and apoptotic/necrotic changes in the epidermal and dermal layers of the skin, such as changes in interstitial fluid (also known as subepidermal moisture (SEM)), may precede surface changes by 3-10 days. Those same epidermal and subepidermal changes result in changes in the electrical properties (bioimpedance) of the tissue, thereby presenting an objective, non-invasive method for assessing tissue damage. Clinical studies of bioimpedance for the detection of pressure ulcers have demonstrated that changes in bioimpedance correlate with increasing severity of pressure ulcer stages. Studies have also demonstrated that at anatomical locations with pressure ulcers, bioimpedance varies with distance from the centre of the pressure ulcers. The SEM Scanner, a handheld medical device, offers an objective and reliable method for the assessment of local bioimpedance, and therefore, assessment of tissue damage before signs become visible to the unaided eye. This literature review summarises pressure ulcer pathophysiology, principles of bioimpedance and clinical research using bioimpedance technology to assess pressure ulcers. © 2016 The Authors. International Wound Journal published by Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A 12-year retrospective review of bullous systemic lupus erythematosus in cutaneous and systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanprapaph, K; Sawatwarakul, S; Vachiramon, V

    2017-10-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical features, laboratory findings, systemic manifestations, treatment and outcome of patients with bullous systemic lupus erythematosus in a tertiary care center in Thailand. Methods We performed a retrospective review from 2002 to 2014 of all patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for bullous systemic lupus erythematosus to evaluate for the clinical characteristics, extracutaneous involvement, histopathologic features, immunofluorescence pattern, serological abnormalities, internal organ involvement, treatments and outcome. Results Among 5149 patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus and/or systemic lupus erythematosus, 15 developed vesiculobullous lesions. Ten patients had validation of the diagnosis of bullous systemic lupus erythematosus, accounting for 0.19%. Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus occurred after the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus in six patients with a median onset of 2.5 months (0-89). Four out of 10 patients developed bullous systemic lupus erythematosus simultaneously with systemic lupus erythematosus. Hematologic abnormalities and renal involvement were found in 100% and 90%, respectively. Polyarthritis (40%) and serositis (40%) were less frequently seen. Systemic corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, antimalarials and dapsone offered resolution of cutaneous lesions. Conclusion Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus is an uncommon presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus. Blistering can occur following or simultaneously with established systemic lupus erythematosus. We propose that clinicians should carefully search for systemic involvement, especially hematologic and renal impairment, in patients presenting with bullous systemic lupus erythematosus.

  4. Whole body application of a potent topical corticosteroid for bullous pemphigoid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terra, J. B.; Potze, W. J. B.; Jonkman, M. F.

    BackgroundCurrent standard of treatment of bullous pemphigoid (BP) is systemic oral corticosteroids (CS). However, significant iatrogenic morbidity and mortality is reported. Studies have shown that topical potent CS is safer than oral prednisolone in BP. ObjectivesTo examine the local and systemic

  5. Non-Descemet’s stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty for bullous keratopathy secondary to iridoschisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minezaki T

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Teruumi Minezaki, Takaaki Hattori, Hayate Nakagawa, Shigeto Kumakura, Hiroshi GotoDepartment of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjukuku, Tokyo, JapanPurpose: To report a case of bullous keratopathy secondary to iridoschisis treated by non-Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (nDSAEK.Case report: A 79-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with loss of vision in the left eye. Slit lamp examination of her left eye showed a shallow anterior chamber with cataract and schisis in the inferior quadrant of iris stroma. Bullous keratopathy secondary to iridoschisis was diagnosed. Cataract surgery with iridectomy succeeded to deepen the anterior chamber and remove the floating iris leaf, although corneal edema remained. Four days later, nDSAEK was performed, which resolved corneal edema and restored visual acuity.Conclusion: The two-step surgery of cataract surgery plus iridectomy followed by nDSAEK may be an effective strategy for treating bullous keratopathy secondary to iridoschisis.Keywords: iridoschisis, bullous keratopathy, non-Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty

  6. Nursing diagnoses in patients with immune-bullous dermatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Euzeli da Silva; Santos, Iraci Dos; Lanzillotti, Regina Serrão; Ferreira, Adriano Menis; Gamba, Mônica Antar; Azulay-Abulafia, Luna

    2016-08-15

    identify nursing diagnoses in patients with immune-bullous dermatosis. a quantitative and descriptive research, carried out in three institutions located in Rio de Janeiro and Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, using the Client Assessment Protocol in Dermatology during a nursing consultation. Simple descriptive statistics was used for data analysis. 14 subjects participated in the study, nine with a diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris, pemphigus two and three of bullous pemphigoid. The age ranged between 27 and 82 years, predominantly females (11). 14 nursing diagnoses were discussed and identified from a clinical rationale in all study participants, representing the most common human responses in this sample. The application of the Assessment Protocol in Dermatology facilitated the comprehensive assessment, in addition to providing the identification of diagnostics according to the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association International. the nursing diagnoses presented confirm the necessity of interdisciplinary work during the care for this clientele. For better description of the phenomena related to the client in question, it is suggested the inclusion of two risk factors related in three diagnoses of this taxonomy. It is worth noting the contribution of the findings for the care, education and research in nursing in dermatology. identificar diagnósticos de enfermagem em clientes com dermatoses imunobolhosas. pesquisa quantitativa e descritiva, realizada em três instituições localizadas no Rio de Janeiro e no Mato Grosso do Sul-Brasil, aplicando o Protocolo de Avaliação do Cliente em Dermatologia, durante consulta de enfermagem. Utilizou-se a estatística descritiva simples para análise dos dados. participaram do estudo 14 sujeitos, nove com diagnóstico médico de pênfigo vulgar, dois de foliáceo e três de penfigoide bolhoso. A idade variou entre 27 e 82 anos, predominando 11 pessoas do sexo feminino. Foram discutidos 14 diagnósticos de enfermagem

  7. Tissue Destruction in Bullous Pemphigoid Can Be Complement Independent and May Be Mitigated by C5aR2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian M. Karsten

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Bullous pemphigoid (BP, the most frequent autoimmune bullous disorder, is a paradigmatic autoantibody-mediated disease associated with autoantibodies against BP180 (type XVII collagen, Col17. Several animal models have been developed that reflect important clinical and immunological features of human BP. Complement activation has been described as a prerequisite for blister formation, however, the recent finding that skin lesions can be induced by anti-Col17 F(ab′2 fragments indicates complement-independent mechanisms to contribute to blister formation in BP. Here, C5−/− mice injected with anti-Col17 IgG showed a reduction of skin lesions by about 50% associated with significantly less skin-infiltrating neutrophils compared to wild-type mice. Reduction of skin lesions and neutrophil infiltration was seen independently of the employed anti-Col17 IgG dose. Further, C5ar1−/− mice were protected from disease development, whereas the extent of skin lesions was increased in C5ar2−/− animals. Pharmacological inhibition of C5a receptor 1 (C5aR1 by PMX53 led to reduced disease activity when applied in a prophylactic setting. In contrast, PMX-53 treatment had no effect when first skin lesions had already developed. While C5aR1 was critically involved in neutrophil migration in vitro, its role for Col17-anti-Col17 IgG immune complex-mediated release of reactive oxygen species from neutrophils was less pronounced. Our data demonstrate that complement-dependent and -independent mechanisms coexist in anti-Col17-autoantibody-mediated tissue destruction. C5aR1 and C5aR2 seem to play opposing roles in this process with C5aR1 exerting its primary effect in recruiting inflammatory cells to the skin during the early phase of the disease. Further studies are required to fully understand the role of C5aR2 in autoantibody-mediated skin inflammation.

  8. A new diagnosis of Williams-Beuren syndrome in a 49-year-old man with severe bullous emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Monica H; Carmichael, Nikkola; Bieber, Frederick R; Wiener, Daniel C; Madan, Rachna; Pober, Barbara R; Raby, Benjamin A

    2017-08-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a chromosomal microdeletion syndrome typically presenting with intellectual disability, a unique personality, a characteristic facial appearance, and cardiovascular disease. Several clinical features of WBS are thought to be due to haploinsufficiency of elastin (ELN), as the ELN locus is included within the WBS critical region at 7q11.23. Emphysema, a disease attributed to destruction of pulmonary elastic fibers, has been reported in patients without WBS who have pathogenic variants in ELN but only once (in one patient) in WBS. Here we report a second adult WBS patient with emphysema where the diagnosis of WBS was established subsequent to the discovery of severe bullous emphysema. Haploinsufficiency of ELN likely contributed to this pulmonary manifestation of WBS. This case emphasizes the contribution of rare genetic variation in cases of severe emphysema and provides further evidence that emphysema should be considered in patients with WBS who have respiratory symptoms, as it may be under-recognized in this patient population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Mesotherapy for skin rejuvenation: assessment of the subepidermal low-echogenic band by ultrasound evaluation with cross-sectional B-mode scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacarrubba, Francesco; Tedeschi, Aurora; Nardone, Beatrice; Micali, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Skin-targeted ultrasound is a noninvasive technique that has been extensively used to evaluate age-related dermal changes, and the presence of a subepidermal low-echogenic band (SLEB) has been related to chronic UVR exposure in several studies. Since SLEB echogenicity is photoage-related, the aim of this study was to evaluate, through ultrasound imaging, the effects on skin photoaging of mesotherapy, a treatment approach currently used in cosmetic dermatology for skin rejuvenation. Twenty women (mean age: 46.7 range 40-60 years) with physical signs of moderate photoaging on the dorsum of the hands were enrolled and treated with multiple microinjections of hyaluronic acid (HA) salts of biotechnological origin (1.000 Kd) every week for 4 weeks. In all subjects, ultrasound evaluation was performed at each visit and 1 week after the last treatment to evaluate SLEB echogenicity changes during treatment. At the end of study, a statistically significant (p mesotherapy with HA may be an effective treatment for skin photoaging, as confirmed by ultrasound. Follow-up investigations on larger series of patients are necessary to further evaluate the safety, effectiveness, and duration of effect of this possible therapeutic approach to skin photoaging.

  10. Increased Activity and Apoptosis of Eosinophils in Blister Fluids, Skin and Peripheral Blood of Patients with Bullous Pemphigoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engmann, Judith; Rüdrich, Urda; Behrens, Georg; Papakonstantinou, Eleni; Gehring, Manuela; Kapp, Alexander; Raap, Ulrike

    2017-04-06

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune blistering skin disease that is more common in elderly individuals. The aim of this study was to determine the functional activity of eosinophils in patients with BP compared with healthy donors. Blood, skin and blister-derived eosinophils were strongly activated in patients with BP, seen by increased surface expression of CD69 compared with controls. CD11b was also increased in BP blood eosinophils, which may explain the striking accumulation of eosinophils in BP (1×106 per ml blister fluid). Furthermore, CCL26 was expressed by activated eosinophils in BP skin and in blister fluid. BP eosinophils also released IL-6, IL-8 and IL-1α in BP blister fluids. Apoptosis in cultivated BP eosinophils was increased and accompanied by enhanced surface externalization of CD95. Caspase 3 positive eosinophils in lesional BP skin and blister fluid also showed the initiation of apoptosis. These results reveal novel pathophysiological aspects of BP, with a strong activation pattern and increased apoptosis of eosinophils in the peripheral blood, skin and blister fluids.

  11. Delayed diagnosis of bullous pyoderma gangrenosum with acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-05-10

    May 10, 2016 ... Infectious Disease, School of Medicine, Inönü University, Malatya, Turkey. Access this article online .... because prompt administration of glucocorticoids or other immunosuppressive ... corneal keratolysis. Am J Clin Pathol ...

  12. Bullous Variant of Sweet’s Syndrome after Herpes Zoster Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Yuichiro Endo; Miki Tanioka; Hideaki Tanizaki; Minako Mori; Hiroshi Kawabata; Yoshiki Miyachi

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Cutaneous manifestations of Sweet’s syndrome (SS) are typically painful plaque-forming erythematous papules, while bullae are quite uncommon. We present a case of bullous variant of SS in acute myeloid leukaemia. In this case, herpes infection of the left mandible had preceded the development of SS. Case Report: A 75-year-old male with myelodysplastic syndrome first presented with herpes zoster virus infection-like bullae and erosive plaques on the left side of the face and neck. Treatme...

  13. Identification of the target areas to be resected in patients with non-bullous emphysema by using gas and perfusion SPECT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugi, Kazuro; Ueda, Kazuhiro; Fujita, Nobuhiro; Nawata, Kouichi; Kaneda, Yoshikazu; Nawata, Sumihiko; Esato, Kensuke

    1997-01-01

    Significant improvement of pulmonary function after the volume reduction surgery has been reported in patients with bullous emphysema. However, there has been no successful report in patients with non-bullous emphysema. The reason of failure in patients with non-bullous emphysema should lie mainly on the difficulty to identify the target areas to be resected. We describe how to identify the target areas in the patients with non-bullous emphysema by using gas and perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Twelve patients with non-bullous emphysema were studied by 133 Xe gas and 99m Tc MAA SPECT, which revealed that abnormal retention and low perfusion areas were located in the apex of the upper lobe and the basal segment of the lower lobe. The resections were performed thoracoscopically focused on the target areas by hockey-stick shape resection in the upper lobe and spiral shape resection in the lower lobe without deformity formation of the residual lung. Slight but significant improvement in the pulmonary functions was observed after the surgery in patients with non-bullous emphysema. The Xe gas and Tc MAA SPECT were useful procedures to identify the target areas to be resected in patients with non-bullous emphysema. (author)

  14. Linear IgA Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horvath, Barbara; Jonkman, Marcel F.; Jonkman, Marcel F

    2016-01-01

    ​This book provides obligatory study material on courses on autoimmune bullous diseases. Residents and researchers in dermatology and adjacent disciplines can use the book as a quick reference guide when dealing with these patients. The book contains protocols and follows international guidelines.​

  15. Our clinical experience with the use of omalizumab in the treatment of bullous pemphigoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar İncel Uysal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: In the era of biological therapies, omalizumab (OMZ, a monoclonal antibody which inhibits IgE, has been postulated to be effective in the treatment of bullous pemphigoid (BP. We report our clinical experience with the use of OMZ in the treatment of BP. Materials and Methods: Retrospective data analyses of eleven patients were performed. Results: Seven patients receiving OMZ treatment demonstrated clinical improvements. Three patients terminated treatment because of intermittent co-morbidities. None of the patients had any significant adverse events. Conclusion: OMZ may be a promising corticosteroid-sparing treatment option for moderate to severe BP patients. Future randomized controlled trials are indicated to evaluate the efficacy of OMZ in the treatment of BP.

  16. Loss of Work Productivity and Quality of Life in Patients With Autoimmune Bullous Dermatoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heelan, K; Hitzig, S L; Knowles, S; Drucker, A M; Mittmann, N; Walsh, S; Shear, N H

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about quality of life and work productivity in autoimmune bullous dermatoses (AIBDs). To determine the impact of AIBDs on quality of life and work productivity. An observational cross-sectional study took place between February and May 2013 at an AIBD tertiary referral centre. Ninety-four patients were included. All participants completed the Dermatology Life Quality Index and the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment-Specific Health Problem questionnaires. Responders to treatment had less impairment (Pwork missed. Those with a higher Dermatology Life Quality Index score had greater work impairment and overall activity impairment (P=.041, P=.024). Nonresponders had increased impairment while working (Pwork impairment (PWork Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire domains. AIBD has the potential to be a large burden on ability to work and quality of life. Larger studies are needed to clarify how these domains change over time and whether or not they improve with treatment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Perfil do paciente com ceratopatia bolhosa pós-facectomia atendidos em hospital público Profile of patient with aphakic/pseudopfakic bullous keratopaty attended at public hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcony Rodrigues de Santhiago

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Identificar e analisar criticamente o perfil dos pacientes com ceratopatia bolhosa atendidos em um hospital municipal. Métodos: Foi realizada análise retrospectiva de 35 olhos de 35 pacientes em acompanhamento no setor de córnea e doenças externas do Hospital da Piedade, que apresentavam ceratopatia bolhosa pós-facectomia. Foram excluídos aqueles onde não se conseguiu determinar características pré e per-operatórias fundamentais em nossa pesquisa. Esta seleção de pacientes foi realizada durante o período de janeiro de 2007 a junho de 2007. Resultados: Como principais resultadosobservou-se que a ceratopatia bolhosa ocorreu em 22.86 % (8 olhos dos casos pós-facectomia extracapsular (FEC e 74.28 % (26 olhos pós- facoemulsificação. Em 25.71 % (9 olhos foi documentado rotura de cápsula posterior (RCP com perda vítrea. Em 94.29 % (33 olhos a lente intraocular se localizava na câmara posterior, e dois pacientes estavam afácicos. A acuidade visual de todos os pacientes era pior que 20/200. O tempo médio de evolução entre a facectomia e o diagnostico de ceratopatia bolhosa foi 11,93 meses (1 - 44 meses. Conclusão: A análise adequada do endotélio corneano é condição essencial para o sucesso da cirurgia de catarata com transparência corneal, e que a ceratopatia bolhosa parece estar mais associada à facoemulsificação. Esta informação deve ser interpretada com cautela, já que esta relação pode vir do maior numero de facoemulsificações realizadas no Hospital onde foi realizado o estudo e muitas destas por cirurgiões em treinamento.Objective: Analyze and identify critically the profile of patients with aphakic/pseudophakic bullous keratopathy attended at a public hospital. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 35 eyes of 35 patients with diagnosis of bullous keratopathy, which has been followed in the department of cornea and external diseases of Hospital da Piedade. The one whose pre and per operative data we

  18. AUTOIMMUNE EPIDERMAL BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune bullous skin diseases (ABDs are uncommon, potentially fatal diseases of skin and mucous membranes which are associated with deposits of autoantibodies and complement against distinct molecules of the epidermis and dermal/epidermal basement membrane zone (BMZ. These autoantibodies lead to a loss in skin molecular integrity, which manifests clinically as formation of blisters or erosions. In pemphigus vulgaris, loss of adhesion occurs within the epidermis. The pioneering work of Ernst H. Beutner, Ph.D. and Robert E. Jordon, M.D. confirmed the autoimmune nature of these diseases. Walter F. Lever, M.D. contributed significantly to our understanding of the histopathologic features of these diseases. Walter Lever, M.D. and Ken Hashimoto, M.D. contributed electron microscopic studies of these diseases, especially in pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid. In bullous pemphigoid (BP, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH, loss of adhesion takes place within or underneath the BMZ. Classic EBA demonstrates extensive skin fragility; DH is commonly associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy, and manifests clinically with pruritic papulovesicles on the extensor surfaces of the extremities and the lumbosacral area. The clinical spectrum of bullous pemphigoid includes tense blisters, urticarial plaques, and prurigo-like eczematous lesions. Pemphigoid gestationis mostly occurs during the last trimester of pregnancy, and mucous membrane pemphigoid primarily involves the oral mucosa and conjunctivae and leads to scarring. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis manifests with tense blisters in a „cluster of jewels”-like pattern in childhood (chronic bullous disease of childhood and is more clinically heterogeneous in adulthood. Many of the autoantigens in these disorders are known and have been well characterized. ABDs may be influenced by both genetic and exogenous factors. The diagnoses of

  19. Human corneal endothelial cell transplantation using nanocomposite gel sheet in bullous keratopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikumar, Periasamy; Haraguchi, Kazutoshi; Senthilkumar, Rajappa; Abraham, Samuel Jk

    2018-01-01

    Transplantation of in vitro expanded human corneal endothelial precursors (HCEP) cells using a nanocomposite (D25-NC) gel sheet as supporting material in bovine's cornea has been earlier reported. Herein we report the transplantation of HCEP cells derived from a cadaver donor cornea to three patients using the NC gel sheet. In three patients with bullous keratopathy, one after cataract surgery, one after trauma and another in the corneal graft, earlier performed for congenital corneal dystrophy, not amenable to medical management HCEP cells isolated from a human cadaver donor cornea in vitro expanded using a thermoreversible gelation polymer (TGP) for 26 days were divided into three equal portions and 1.6 × 10 5 HCEP cells were injected on to the endothelium of the affected eye in each patient using the D25-NC gel sheet as a supporting material. The sheets were removed after three days. The bullae in the cornea disappeared by the 3 rd -11 th post-operative day in all the three patients. Visual acuity improved from Perception of light (PL)+/Projection of rays (PR)+ to Hand movements (HM)+ in one of the patients by post-operative day 3 which was maintained at 18 months follow-up. At 18 months follow-up, in another patient the visual acuity had improved from HM+ to 6/60 while in the third patient, visual acuity remained HM+ as it was prior to HCEP transplantation. There were no adverse effects during the follow-up in any of the patients.

  20. [Personalized cell therapy for early postoperative bullous keratopathy (experimental proof and clinical results)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasparov, A A; Kasparova, Evg A; Fadeeva, L L; Subbot, A M; Borodina, N V; Kasparova, E A; Kobzova, M V; Musaeva, G M; Pavliuk, A S

    2013-01-01

    The article presents the results of a long-term research on development and clinical application of personalized cell therapy (PCT) for treatment of early postoperative (manifesting within the first 3 months after surgery) bullous keratopathy (BK). The method of intracameral PCT implies in vitro incubation of the patient's blood sample with poly(A:U) stimulator, separation of the serum with activated leukocytes, and injection of the final cell preparation into the anterior chamber. The fundamental part of the research was aimed at a detailed description of the cell preparation and investigation of its possible mechanisms of action. Cytokine and growth factor level in the cell preparation suggested that its high clinical efficacy might be due to its ability to improve regeneration of damaged corneal endothelium. The clinical study was conducted on a group of 52 patients with early BK. A significant effect (smoothing of the Descement's membrane folds, complete resorption of corneal edema, improvement of corneal transparency, reduction of corneal thickness and increase of visual acuity by 0.49 +/- 0.27) was achieved in 44.2% of patients, while partial effect was seen in 21.1% of patients. There was no clinical effect in 34.6% of patients. In those patients who developed significant or partial clinical effect after the PCT, many endotheliocytes appeared to have multiple nuclei (2 and more). In some patients polyploid nuclei persisted for 3-5 years after the treatment. Polyploidy results from incomplete mitosis which might be due to regenerative processes in the endothelium stimulated by the PCT. Obviously, high efficacy and relative simplicity of the method should promote its further clinical introduction.

  1. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Triggers Onset of Bullous Pemphigoid in a Patient with Advanced Melanoma Treated with Nivolumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayo Tanita

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the efficacy of ipilimumab on nivolumab-resistant advanced melanoma is extremely low, additional supportive therapy for anti-PD-1 antibody therapy-resistant advanced melanoma is needed. Although several supportive therapies that enhance the antitumor immune response of anti-PD-1 antibodies have already been reported, unexpected immune-related adverse events were detected at the same time. In this report, we describe a patient with advanced melanoma treated with nivolumab followed by intensity-modulated radiotherapy, which might have triggered bullous pemphigoid (BP. Although several cases of BP developing in anti-PD-1 antibody-treated patients have already been reported, in this report, we shed light on the possible pathogenesis of BP developing in a patient treated with nivolumab through M2 macrophages.

  2. Nontargeted Effect after Radiotherapy in a Patient with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Bullous Pemphigoid

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    Carsten Nieder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe tumor shrinkage of nonirradiated lung metastases in a patient with non-small cell lung cancer. Case Report. The patient had a concurrent autoimmune condition, bullous pemphigoid, which was clinically exacerbated during radiotherapy of mediastinal and axillary lymph node metastases. He also developed a series of infections during and after irradiation, and we hypothesize that the immunological events during this phase might have influenced the size of the nonirradiated metastases. Conclusion. Ionizing radiation generates inflammatory signals and, in principle, could provide both tumor-specific antigens from dying cells and maturation stimuli that are necessary for dendritic cells’ activation of tumor-specific T cells. Even if the detailed mechanisms causing nontargeted immune modulatory effects in individual patients are poorly understood, clinical development of radioimmunotherapy is underway.

  3. Churg-Strauss syndrome with coexistence of eosinophilic vasculitis, granulomatous phlebitis and granulomatous dermatitis in bullous pemphigoid-like blisters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Masafumi; Kudo, Saori; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Shimai, Nobuko; Chen, Ko-Ron

    2011-03-01

    The main histopathological features in the cutaneous lesions of Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) are dermal leukocytoclastic vasculitis with a variable eosinophilic infiltrate and non-vasculitic tissue eosinophilia with granuloma formation. This wide histopathological spectrum may account for the various skin manifestations of CSS. However, the unique histopathological combination of dermal eosinophilic vasculitis and subcutaneous granulomatous phlebitis accompanied by bulla formation has not been previously described. We report an unusual CSS case showing dermal necrotizing eosinophilic vasculitis and granulomatous phlebitis in purpuric lesions coupled with subepidermal blistering. The blisters showed dermal granulomatous dermatitis and eosinophilia without evidence of vasculitis. Dermal necrotizing eosinophilic vasculitis was characterized by fibrinoid alteration of the vessel wall, a prominent perivascular eosinophilic infiltrate, a few infiltrating histiocytes along the affected vessel wall, and the absence of neutrophilic infiltration. The underlying subcutaneous granulomatous phlebitis was characterized by an angiocentric histiocytic infiltrate surrounded by marked eosinophilic infiltrate. Deposition of cytotoxic proteins and radicals derived from eosinophils in the vessel walls and papillary dermis followed by a secondary granulomatous response may account for the unique clinical and histopathological features in this case. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Linear IgA dermatosis associated with ulcerative colitis: complete and sustained remission after total colectomy

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    Vargas,Thiago Jeunon de Sousa; Fialho,Mônica; Santos,Luiza Tavares dos; Rodrigues,Palmira Assis de Jesus Barreto; Vargas,Ana Luisa Bittencourt Sampaio Jeunon; Sousa,Maria Auxiliadora Jeunon

    2013-01-01

    Linear IgA dermatosis has been increasingly associated with inflammatory bowel diseases, particularly ulcerative colitis. A 13-year-old male patient with an 11-month history of ulcerative colitis developed vesicles, pustules and erosions on the skin of the face, trunk and buttocks and in the oral mucosa. The work-up revealed a neutrophil-rich sub-epidermal bullous disease and linear deposition of IgA along the dermoepidermal junction, establishing the diagnosis of linear IgA dermatosis. The p...

  5. Homozygous ALOXE3 Nonsense Variant Identified in a Patient with Non-Bullous Congenital Ichthyosiform Erythroderma Complicated by Superimposed Bullous Majocchi’s Granuloma: The Consequences of Skin Barrier Dysfunction

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    Tao Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (NBCIE is a hereditary disorder of keratinization caused by pathogenic variants in genes encoding enzymes important to lipid processing and terminal keratinocyte differentiation. Impaired function of these enzymes can cause pathologic epidermal scaling, significantly reduced skin barrier function. In this study, we have performed a focused, genetic analysis of a probrand affected by NBCIE and extended this to his consanguineous parents. Targeted capture and next-generation sequencing was performed on NBCIE associated genes in the proband and his unaffected consanguineous parents. We identified a homozygous nonsense variant c.814C>T (p.Arg272* in ALOXE3 (NM_001165960.1 in the proband and discovered that his parents are both heterozygous carriers of the variant. The clinical manifestations of the proband’s skin were consistent with NBCIE, and detailed histopathological assessment revealed epidermal bulla formation and Majocchi’s granuloma. Infection with Trichophyton rubrum was confirmed by culture. The patient responded to oral terbinafine antifungal treatment. Decreased skin barrier function, such as that caused by hereditary disorders of keratinization, can increase the risk of severe cutaneous fungal infections and the formation of Majocchi’s granuloma and associated alopecia. Patients with NBCIE should be alerted to the possible predisposition for developing dermatophytoses and warrant close clinical follow-up.

  6. A case of linear IgA bullous dermatosis with IgA anti-type VII collagen autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, T; Ishiko, A; Shimizu, H; Tanaka, T; Dodd, H J; Bhogal, B S; Black, M M; Nishikawa, T

    1996-02-01

    In this study we present a patient with the sublamina densa type of linear IgA bullous dermatosis (LABD), with IgA autoantibodies reactive with the 290-kDa type VII collagen (the epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) antigen) and with immunoblotting of normal human dermal extracts. The clinical and histological features of the present case were compatible with those of LABD but quite different from those of EBA. Although EBA sera reacted with the bacterial fusion protein of the N-terminal globular (NC1) domain of type VII collagen, this patient's serum did not show reactivity. Furthermore, ultrastructural localization of target epitopes on the anchoring fibrils in this patient was considerably different from EBA. These results indicate that, whereas EBA antibodies react with the NC1 domain of type VII collagen, the epitope in this case is different from that of EBA (and is most likely on the central triple helical domain). This difference may be responsible for the clinical presentation in this patient being distinct from that of EBA.

  7. Bullous Impetigo Rapid Diagnostic and Therapeutic Quiz: A Model for Assessing Basic Dermatology Knowledge of Primary Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkin, Daren J; Grossberg, Anna L; Cohen, Bernard A

    2016-11-01

    Bullous impetigo (BI) is a common dermatologic condition, particularly in children, yet confusion regarding its diagnosis and treatment persists. This study measured pediatricians' ability to diagnose and appropriately treat BI and explored factors that might influence pediatricians' accuracy in managing BI. We administered an expert-validated survey to 64 pediatrics house staff and faculty at three Johns Hopkins Medicine facilities. The survey requested demographic information, diagnoses for five "unknown" cases, and preferred treatments for localized and widespread BI. Overall, BI was diagnosed correctly 31.9% of the time. There was little difference between house staff and faculty performance, although faculty 50 years of age and older demonstrated better diagnostic acumen. Regarding treatment of localized BI, 92% of faculty members and 84.6% of house staff listed mupirocin as first- or second-line treatment. The second most common medication listed for localized BI was bacitracin. Regarding treatment of widespread BI, faculty listed cephalexin or clindamycin as first- or second-line treatment 56.0% of the time and house staff listed one of these two medications 51.3% of the time. Results for faculty 50 years of age and older were comparable. Improved pediatrician proficiency in the diagnosis and treatment of BI is needed for safe, cost-effective management. Physician age and experience appear to have a limited effect on the accuracy of BI diagnosis and management. Future educational efforts must be directed at trainees and their instructors. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The use of typing methods and infection prevention measures to control a bullous impetigo outbreak on a neonatal ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koningstein, Maike; Groen, Leon; Geraats-Peters, Kathelijn; Lutgens, Suzanne; Rietveld, Ariene; Jira, Petr; Kluytmans, Jan; de Greeff, Sabine C; Hermans, Mirjam; Schneeberger, Peter M

    2012-11-20

    We describe an outbreak of Bullous Impetigo (BI), caused by a (methicillin susceptible, fusidic acid resistant) Staphylococcus aureus (SA) strain, spa-type t408, at the neonatal and gynaecology ward of the Jeroen Bosch hospital in the Netherlands, from March-November 2011. We performed an outbreak investigation with revision of the hygienic protocols, MSSA colonization surveillance and environmental sampling for MSSA including detailed typing of SA isolates. Spa typing was performed to discriminate between the SA isolates. In addition, Raman-typing was performed on all t408 isolates. Nineteen cases of BI were confirmed by SA positive cultures. A cluster of nine neonates and three health care workers (HCW) with SA t408 was detected. These strains were MecA-, PVL-, Exfoliative Toxin (ET)A-, ETB+, ETAD-, fusidic acid-resistant and methicillin susceptible. Eight out of nine neonates and two out of three HCW t408 strains yielded a similar Raman type. Positive t408 HCW were treated and infection control procedures were reinforced. These measures stopped the outbreak. We conclude that treatment of patients and HCW carrying a predominant SA t408, and re-implementing and emphasising hygienic measures were effective to control the outbreak of SA t408 among neonates.

  9. The use of typing methods and infection prevention measures to control a bullous impetigo outbreak on a neonatal ward

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    Koningstein Maike

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We describe an outbreak of Bullous Impetigo (BI, caused by a (methicillin susceptible, fusidic acid resistant Staphylococcus aureus (SA strain, spa-type t408, at the neonatal and gynaecology ward of the Jeroen Bosch hospital in the Netherlands, from March-November 2011. Methods We performed an outbreak investigation with revision of the hygienic protocols, MSSA colonization surveillance and environmental sampling for MSSA including detailed typing of SA isolates. Spa typing was performed to discriminate between the SA isolates. In addition, Raman-typing was performed on all t408 isolates. Results Nineteen cases of BI were confirmed by SA positive cultures. A cluster of nine neonates and three health care workers (HCW with SA t408 was detected. These strains were MecA-, PVL-, Exfoliative Toxin (ETA-, ETB+, ETAD-, fusidic acid-resistant and methicillin susceptible. Eight out of nine neonates and two out of three HCW t408 strains yielded a similar Raman type. Positive t408 HCW were treated and infection control procedures were reinforced. These measures stopped the outbreak. Conclusions We conclude that treatment of patients and HCW carrying a predominant SA t408, and re-implementing and emphasising hygienic measures were effective to control the outbreak of SA t408 among neonates.

  10. Young donor-graft assisted endothelial keratoplasty (PDEK/DMEK) with epithelial debridement for chronic pseudophakic bullous keratopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Amar; Narang, Priya; Kumar, Dhivya A; Agarwal, Ashvin

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the applicability and report visual outcomes for the treatment of subepithelial fibrosis and anterior stromal scarring in cases of chronic pseudophakic bullous keratopathy (PBK) with epithelial debridement and endothelial keratoplasty (EK) (pre-Descemet endothelial keratoplasty [PDEK]; Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty [(DMEK]) using young donor tissue. Prospective, single-centre, interventional study. 6 cases with chronic PBK (> 1 year duration). Case 1 underwent PDEK with glued intraocular lens (IOL) as a single-stage procedure, whereas cases 2 and 3 underwent glued IOL followed by DMEK and PDEK, respectively, as a second-stage procedure. Cases 4 and 6 underwent PDEK, whereas case 5 underwent DMEK. Epithelial debridement was performed in all cases at the time of EK, and young donor grafts were used. The main outcome measures were best spectacle-corrected visual acuity, clearance of corneal scar and haze, central corneal thickness (CCT), specular microscopy, and endothelial cell count (ECC). Postoperatively, all cases demonstrated significant improvement in visual acuity. The mean value of depth of subepithelial haze was 121±71.7 µm and 25.3 ± 19.8 µm in the preoperative and postoperative periods, respectively (p = 0.028). At the 1-month follow-up, the mean preoperative CCT of 676 ± 92.7 µm was reduced to 534.6 ± 21.1µm. At the 6-month follow-up, the mean ECC loss resulting from the procedure was 36.5 ± 10.4%. EK with epithelial debridement performed for the treatment of chronic PBK resulted in significantly improved visual acuity to a functional level, with the clearance of subepithelial fibrosis and anterior stromal scar, in most patients. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Accuracy of molecular diagnostics in pemphigus and bullous pemphigoid: comparison of commercial and modified mosaic indirect immunofluorescence tests as well as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornowicz-Porowska, Justyna; Seraszek-Jaros, Agnieszka; Bowszyc-Dmochowska, Monika; Kaczmarek, Elżbieta; Pietkiewicz, Paweł; Bartkiewicz, Paweł; Dmochowski, Marian

    2017-02-01

    Pemphigus and bullous pemphigoid (BP) are identified by autoantibodies (abs) against desmoglein 1, 3 (DSG1/3) and BP180/BP230, respectively. A novel mosaic to indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) using purified BP180 recombinant proteins spotted on slide and transfected cells expressing BP230, DSG1, DSG3 is available. The commercial (IgG detection) and modified (IgG4 detection) mosaic for indirect immunofluorescence (IIFc - IIF commercial, IIFm - IIF modified) and IgG ELISAs were evaluated in pemphigus and bullous pemphigoid (BP) molecular diagnostics. To compare diagnostic accuracy of commercial (IgG detection) and modified (IgG4 detection) mosaic IIF assay and to examine the diagnostic value of ELISAs in relation to mosaic IIF in routine laboratory diagnostics of pemphigus and BP. Sera from 37 BP and 19 pemphigus patients were studied. Associations between tests were assessed using Fisher's exact test. There are associations between the positive/negative samples detected by IIFc with desmoglein1 (DSG1)/desmoglein3 (DSG3)/BP230 transfected cells and ELISAs and no association between anti-BP180 IgG detection by IIFc and ELISA. IIFm with DSG1 and DSG3 showed both 100% sensitivity and 100% and 78% specificity, respectively, and 100% and 83% positive predictive value in relation to IIFc. IIFm with BP230 had 87% specificity, 55% sensitivity, whereas IIFm with BP180 had a 100% sensitivity and 13% specificity in relation to IIFc. The IIFc with DSG1/DSG3/BP230 transfected cells, excluding BP180 spots, is an alternative method to ELISA in pemphigus/BP diagnostics. IgG4 antibodies, both pathogenically and diagnostically important, are inconsistently detectable with IIFm.

  12. Accuracy of molecular diagnostics in pemphigus and bullous pemphigoid: comparison of commercial and modified mosaic indirect immunofluorescence tests as well as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays

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    Justyna Gornowicz-Porowska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Pemphigus and bullous pemphigoid (BP are identified by autoantibodies (abs against desmoglein 1, 3 (DSG1/3 and BP180/BP230, respectively. A novel mosaic to indirect immunofluorescence (IIF using purified BP180 recombinant proteins spotted on slide and transfected cells expressing BP230, DSG1, DSG3 is available. The commercial (IgG detection and modified (IgG4 detection mosaic for indirect immunofluorescence (IIFc – IIF commercial, IIFm – IIF modified and IgG ELISAs were evaluated in pemphigus and bullous pemphigoid (BP molecular diagnostics. Aim : To compare diagnostic accuracy of commercial (IgG detection and modified (IgG4 detection mosaic IIF assay and to examine the diagnostic value of ELISAs in relation to mosaic IIF in routine laboratory diagnostics of pemphigus and BP. Material and methods : Sera from 37 BP and 19 pemphigus patients were studied. Associations between tests were assessed using Fisher’s exact test. Results: There are associations between the positive/negative samples detected by IIFc with desmoglein1 (DSG1/desmoglein3 (DSG3/BP230 transfected cells and ELISAs and no association between anti-BP180 IgG detection by IIFc and ELISA. IIFm with DSG1 and DSG3 showed both 100% sensitivity and 100% and 78% specificity, respectively, and 100% and 83% positive predictive value in relation to IIFc. IIFm with BP230 had 87% specificity, 55% sensitivity, whereas IIFm with BP180 had a 100% sensitivity and 13% specificity in relation to IIFc. Conclusions : The IIFc with DSG1/DSG3/BP230 transfected cells, excluding BP180 spots, is an alternative method to ELISA in pemphigus/BP diagnostics. IgG4 antibodies, both pathogenically and diagnostically important, are inconsistently detectable with IIFm.

  13. Skin ulcers related to chronic graft-versus-host disease: clinical findings and associated morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachiet, M; de Masson, A; Peffault de Latour, R; Rybojad, M; Robin, M; Bourhis, J-H; Xhaard, A; Dhedin, N; Sicre de Fontbrune, F; Suarez, F; Barete, S; Parquet, N; Nguyen, S; Ades, L; Rubio, M-T; Wittnebel, S; Bagot, M; Socié, G; Bouaziz, J-D

    2014-07-01

    According to the National Institutes of Health classification of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD), skin ulcers after allogeneic haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) are recorded as having the maximal severity score but published data are scarce. To describe skin ulcers related to cGVHD with an emphasis on clinical findings, associated morbidity, management and evolution. A multicentre retrospective analysis was carried out of patients with a diagnosis of cGVHD skin ulcers. All 25 patients included in the study had sclerotic skin cGVHD and 21 had lichenoid skin lesions associated with the sclerotic skin lesions. Thirteen patients had severe cGVHD without considering the skin, because of the involvement of an extracutaneous organ by cGVHD. The median time from HSCT to the onset of ulcers was 44 months. In addition to scleroderma, initial skin lesions at the site of ulcers were bullous erosive lichen in 21 patients and bullous erosive morphoea in four patients. Fifteen patients had an inaugural oedema. Ulcers were mostly bilateral with a predilection for the lower limbs. They were frequently colonized but few infections occurred. Four patients died during a median follow-up period of 55 months. Chronic graft-versus-host disease skin ulcers occur in patients with sclerodermatous skin cGVHD, are associated with severe cGVHD, often start with bullous lichenoid lesions or bullous morphoea and seem to cause more morbidity than mortality, given the low rate of mortality observed in our series of patients. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  14. Eosinophils in Autoimmune Diseases

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    Daniela Čiháková

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that contribute to initiation and modulation of inflammation. Their role in asthma and parasitic infections has long been recognized. Growing evidence now reveals a role for eosinophils in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of eosinophils in inflammatory bowel diseases, neuromyelitis optica, bullous pemphigoid, autoimmune myocarditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and other autoimmune diseases. Clinical studies, eosinophil-targeted therapies, and experimental models have contributed to our understanding of the regulation and function of eosinophils in these diseases. By examining the role of eosinophils in autoimmune diseases of different organs, we can identify common pathogenic mechanisms. These include degranulation of cytotoxic granule proteins, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, release of proteases degrading extracellular matrix, immune modulation through cytokines, antigen presentation, and prothrombotic functions. The association of eosinophilic diseases with autoimmune diseases is also examined, showing a possible increase in autoimmune diseases in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, and non-allergic asthma. Finally, we summarize key future research needs.

  15. Eosinophils in Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diny, Nicola L.; Rose, Noel R.; Čiháková, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that contribute to initiation and modulation of inflammation. Their role in asthma and parasitic infections has long been recognized. Growing evidence now reveals a role for eosinophils in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of eosinophils in inflammatory bowel diseases, neuromyelitis optica, bullous pemphigoid, autoimmune myocarditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and other autoimmune diseases. Clinical studies, eosinophil-targeted therapies, and experimental models have contributed to our understanding of the regulation and function of eosinophils in these diseases. By examining the role of eosinophils in autoimmune diseases of different organs, we can identify common pathogenic mechanisms. These include degranulation of cytotoxic granule proteins, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, release of proteases degrading extracellular matrix, immune modulation through cytokines, antigen presentation, and prothrombotic functions. The association of eosinophilic diseases with autoimmune diseases is also examined, showing a possible increase in autoimmune diseases in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, and non-allergic asthma. Finally, we summarize key future research needs. PMID:28496445

  16. Outbreak of bullous impetigo caused by Staphylococcus aureus strains of phage type 3C/71 in a maternity ward linked to nasal carriage of a healthcare worker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechowicz, Lidia; Garbacz, Katarzyna; Budzyńska, Anna; Dąbrowska-Szponar, Maria

    2012-01-01

    We describe an outbreak of bullous impetigo (BI) that occurred in a maternity unit and show phenotypic and genotypic properties and relatedness of isolated Staphylococcus aureus strains. Clinical material was obtained from 11 affected neonates. Additionally, nasal swabs from 67 healthy care workers (HCWs) as well as 107 environmental swabs were investigated. All isolates were screened for exfoliative toxin genes (eta, etb), antibiotic susceptibility and phage typed. Chromosomal DNA was genotyped by MLVF method and PCR/RFLP of coagulase gene were tested. Affected neonates were infected by two clusters of eta-positive S. aureus of phage type 3C/71: (1) MLVF type A isolates resistant only to penicillin, and (2) MLVF type B isolates resistant to penicillin and erythromycin/clindamycin. All isolates were susceptible to methicillin. We found 19 of 67 HCWs to be S. aureus nasal carriers. Two nasal isolates from HCWs were related to the outbreak on the basis of phage typing, PCR detection of eta/etb genes, antibiotyping and genotyping. Additionally, environmental swabs from the maternity unit revealed a 3C/71 S. aureus in the mattress of a baby bed. This is the first documented case of an outbreak of BI caused by phage type 3C/71 eta-positive strain of S. aureus.

  17. Relationship between theoretical molecular weight and blister fluid/serum ratio of cytokines and five other molecules evaluated in patients with bullous pemphigoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Auria, L; Pimpinelli, F; Ferraro, C; D'Ambrogio, G; Giacalone, B; Bellocci, M; Ameglio, F

    1998-01-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) blisters contain several molecules, some of which spread into the blisters from the interstitial fluid, while others are produced locally and migrate into the circulation. The calculation of the ratios between blister/serum concentrations may help to distinguish between these two types of molecules. The rules regulating the diffusion of the molecules have been described only in suction blisters, where the theoretical molecular weight (MW) represents one of the principal influencing factors. The aim of the present study was to analyse the relationship between theoretical MWs and the ratios of concentrations of several molecules evaluated both in sera and in blister fluids. Eight cytokines (interleukin-2, interleukin-3, interleukin-4, interleukin-5, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, oncostatin-M and vascular endothelial growth factor), two acute phase reactants (alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, haptoglobin), albumin, one soluble membrane molecule with adhesion functions (sICAM-1) and the eosinophil cathionic protein (ECP) were measured in samples from 15 patients affected with BP by means of commercially available tests. The data suggest that the MW may influence the rate of diffusion throughout the blister, both in input and output directions, despite the discontinuity observed at the basement membrane level on the BP blister floor.

  18. The effect of autoimmune blistering diseases on work productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, E Q; Radjenovic, M; Castrillón, M A; Feng, G H Y; Murrell, D F

    2018-05-06

    Autoimmune blistering diseases (AIBD) are known to negatively impact upon quality of life (QoL); however, there is a paucity of research on the effect of AIBD on work productivity. AIBD can be quite disfiguring in terms of a patient's appearance due to their blistering nature. To determine the impact of AIBD on work productivity and to determine whether patients are stigmatized at work due to their appearance. Sixty-one patients with AIBD completed the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire-Specific Health Problem (WPAIQ-SHP), the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), the Autoimmune Bullous Disease Quality of Life (ABQOL) and the Treatment of Autoimmune Bullous Disease Quality of Life questionnaires (TABQOL). Non-responders to treatment had more work and activity impairment compared to responders. Worse WPAIQ-SHP scores were correlated with higher ABQOL, TABQOL and DLQI scores. Approximately 14.8% of subjects experienced stigmatization at work due to their appearance. The most common body areas stigmatized were easily visible sites, particularly the hands, arms and feet, with the majority of occurrences related to co-workers; for some patients, this stigmatization occurred on a daily basis. Loss of productivity at work was statistically much higher in those with higher disease severity, ABQOL & TABQOL scores and in non-responders to treatment. Autoimmune blistering diseases negatively impacts upon work productivity and activity. Stigmatization was common in the workplace which leads to increased stress, itself a stimulator of pemphigus. © 2018 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  19. Electrocauterización de la membrana de Bowman para el tratamiento de la queratopatía bullosa dolorosa Electrocauterization of Bowman's membrane for the treatment of painful bullous keratopathy

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    Elizabeth Escalona Leyva

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available El propósito en este trabajo es evaluar la electrocauterización de la membrana de Bowman como alternativa quirúrgica en el tratamiento de la queratopatía bullosa dolorosa. Se estudiaron 30 ojos de 30 pacientes con diagnóstico de queratopatía bullosa dolorosa que no habían logrado mejoría con los tratamientos habituales. Se tomaron como variables fundamentales la edad, el sexo, la etiología, el tiempo de evolución, la epitelización, las complicaciones y el alivio sintomático, los datos se tabularon de forma manual teniendo en cuenta el universo de pacientes. Predominó la queratopatía bullosa posquirúrgica (afáquicas y pseudofáquicas en el 83,3 % de los pacientes. Las edades más afectadas fueron los mayores de 60 años (63,3 %; no se encontraron diferencias significativas en cuanto al sexo. El tiempo de epitelización fue de 7 a 14 días en el 93,3 % de los pacientes y solo se encontraron complicaciones en el 14 % que no fueron de gravedad. El alivio de los síntomas se produjo en el 66,6 % en la primera semana del posoperatorio. La electrocauterización de la membrana de Bowman constituye un método eficaz, sencillo y con resultados satisfactorios en el tratamiento de la queratopatía bullosa dolorosaThe purpose of this paper is to evaluate the electrocauterization of Bowman's membrane as a surgical alternative in the treatment of painful bullous keratopathy. 30 eyes from 30 patients who were diagnosed painful bullous keratopathy and had not improved with the habitual treatments were studied. Age, sex, ethiology, time of evolution, epithelialization, complications and the symptomatic relief were taken as fundamental variables. Data were manually tabulated, taking into account the number of patients. The psotsurgical bullous keratopathy (aphakic y pseudophakic prevailed in 83.3 % of the patients. The most affected were those over 60 (63.3 %. No significant differences were found in relation to sex. The time of epithelialization

  20. Eritema multiforme ampollar extenso asociado a infección por virus herpes simplex Extended Bullous Erythema Multiforme Associated To Herpes Simplex Virus Infection

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    A Elgueta-Noy

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available El Eritema Multiforme (EM es una reacción cutánea aguda generalmente benigna y autolimitada, asociada a la infección por Virus Herpes Simplex (HSV. Se caracteriza por lesiones polimorfas y tipo diana en extremidades y mucosas. Presentamos un paciente de 22 años con pápulas, vesículas y ampollas, que evoluciona con un 90% de la superficie corporal comprometida en tres semanas. Se realizó una reacción de polimerasa en cadena para HSV, resultando positiva en una costra. La biopsia de piel y la tinción de inmunohistoquímica positiva para linfocitos T CD4, fueron compatibles con EM ampollar asociado a HSV. Destacamos la importancia de la correlación clínico patológica, apoyada por el estudio virológico, en el diagnóstico de este caso de presentación atípica. Los hallazgos de laboratorio confirmaron lo descrito en la literatura respecto de la patogenia del EM asociado a HSV.Erythema Multiforme (EM is a generally benign and self-limited acute cutaneous reaction, associated with Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV infection. It is characterized by polymorphic "target" lesions in extremities and mucosal tissues. We report a 22-year old patient with papules, vesicles and blisters, which evolved to cover 90% of the body in three weeks. We performed a PCR study for HSV, which was positive in a crust. A skin biopsy and positive immunohistochemical stain for LT CD4+ were compatible with bullous EM associated with HSV. We underline the importance of pathological clinical correlation, reinforced by a virological study, in the diagnosis of this case with atypical symptoms. The laboratory findings confirmed literature descriptions with respect to the pathogenicity of EM associated with HSV.

  1. Linear IgA dermatosis associated with ulcerative colitis: complete and sustained remission after total colectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Thiago Jeunon de Sousa; Fialho, Mônica; Santos, Luiza Tavares dos; Rodrigues, Palmira Assis de Jesus Barreto; Vargas, Ana Luisa Bittencourt Sampaio Jeunon; Sousa, Maria Auxiliadora Jeunon

    2013-01-01

    Linear IgA dermatosis has been increasingly associated with inflammatory bowel diseases, particularly ulcerative colitis. A 13-year-old male patient with an 11-month history of ulcerative colitis developed vesicles, pustules and erosions on the skin of the face, trunk and buttocks and in the oral mucosa. The work-up revealed a neutrophil-rich sub-epidermal bullous disease and linear deposition of IgA along the dermoepidermal junction, establishing the diagnosis of linear IgA dermatosis. The patient experienced unsatisfactory partial control of skin and intestinal symptoms despite the use of adalimumab, mesalazine, prednisone and dapsone for some months. After total colectomy, he presented complete remission of skin lesions, with no need of medications during two years of follow-up. A review of previously reported cases of the association is provided here and the role of ulcerative colitis in triggering linear IgA dermatosis is discussed.

  2. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karabulut, N.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) denote progressive lung diseases characterized by airway obstruction. COPD exhibits specific morphologic changes in the lung parenchyma, central and peripheral airways and pulmonary vasculature. A person with COPD may have either emphysema or chronic bronchitis, but most have both. Some people with COPD may also have an asthma-like or reactive component. Imaging modalities play important role in the detection or exclusion of COPD, distribution and extent of disease processes. Combined inspiratory and expiratory high resolution CT allows phenotyping of COPD (emphysema predominant, airway predominant, or mixed) and quantification of severity. Magnetic resonance imaging enables functional evaluation and demonstrates ventilation defects correlating closely with pulmonary function tests. Imaging techniques are also helpful in guiding the treatment, such as bullectomy in patients with bullous emphysema, lung volume reduction surgery or endoscopic interventions in those with severe emphysema, and smoking cessation and medical treatment designed to stop lung destruction in patients with mild or moderate emphysema or bronchiectasis.

  3. DISEASES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Pallejà, Albert; Tsafou, Kalliopi

    2015-01-01

    Text mining is a flexible technology that can be applied to numerous different tasks in biology and medicine. We present a system for extracting disease-gene associations from biomedical abstracts. The system consists of a highly efficient dictionary-based tagger for named entity recognition...... of human genes and diseases, which we combine with a scoring scheme that takes into account co-occurrences both within and between sentences. We show that this approach is able to extract half of all manually curated associations with a false positive rate of only 0.16%. Nonetheless, text mining should...... not stand alone, but be combined with other types of evidence. For this reason, we have developed the DISEASES resource, which integrates the results from text mining with manually curated disease-gene associations, cancer mutation data, and genome-wide association studies from existing databases...

  4. Outcomes in bullous retinal detachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah P. Read

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions and importance: GRTs are an uncommon cause of retinal detachment. While pars plana vitrectomy with tamponade is standard in GRT management, there is variability in the use of scleral buckling and PFO in these cases. This is in contrast to retinal dialysis where scleral buckle alone can yield favorable results. Though a baseball ocular trauma is common, retinal involvement is rare compared to other sports injuries such as those occurring with tennis, soccer and golf. Sports trauma remains an important cause of retinal injury and patients should be counseled on the need for eye protection.

  5. Sensitivity of direct immunofluorescence in oral diseases. Study of 125 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Susana Mariela; Quarracino, María Cecilia; Aguas, Silvia Cristina; González, Ernestina Jesús; Harada, Laura; Krupitzki, Hugo; Mordoh, Ana

    2008-05-01

    Direct immunofluorescence (DIF) is widely used for the diagnosis of bullous diseases and other autoimmune pathologies such as oral lichen planus. There is no evidence in the literature on how the following variants influence the detection rate of DIF: intraoral site chosen for the biopsy, perilesional locus or distant site from the clinical lesion, number of biopsies and instrument used. to determine if the following variants influenced the sensitivity (detection rate): intraoral site chosen for the biopsy, perilesional or distant site from the clinical lesion, number of biopsies and instrument used (punch or scalpel). A retrospective study was done at the Cátedra de Patología y Clínica Bucodental II at the Facultad de Odontología, Universidad de Buenos Aires; 136 clinical medical histories were revised for the period March 2000 - March 2005 corresponding to patients with clinical diagnosis of OLP and bullous diseases (vulgar pemphigus, bullous pemphigoid and cicatricial pemphigoid). DIF detection rate was 65.8% in patients with OLP, 66.7% in cicatricial pemphigoid patients, in bullous pemphigoid 55.6%, in pemphigus vulgaris 100%, and in those cases in which certain diagnosis could not be obtained, the DIF positivity rate was 45.5% (Pearson chi(2) (4)= 21.5398 Pr= 0.000). There was no statistically significant difference between the different sites of biopsy (Fisher exact test: 0.825). DIF detection rate in perilesional biopsies was 66.1% and in those distant from the site of clinical lesion was 64.7% (Pearson chi(2) v1)= 0.0073 Pr= 0.932. When the number of biopsies were incremented, DIF detection rate also incremented (Pearson chi(2) = 8.7247 Pr= 0.003). The biopsies taken with punch had a higher detection rate than those taken with scalpel (39.1% versus 71.7%) (Pearson chi(2) = 49.0522 Pr= 0.000). While not statistically significant, the tendency outlined in this study indicates there are intraoral regions in which the detection rate of the DIF technique is

  6. Elevated serum BAFF levels in patients with localized scleroderma in contrast to other organ-specific autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Takashi; Hasegawa, Minoru; Matsushita, Yukiyo; Echigo, Takeshi; Wayaku, Takamasa; Horikawa, Mayuka; Ogawa, Fumihide; Takehara, Kazuhiko; Sato, Shinichi

    2007-02-01

    Serum levels of B-cell activating factor belonging to the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF), a potent B-cell survival factor, are elevated in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis and systemic sclerosis (SSc). The objective of this study was to determine serum BAFF levels and relate the results to the clinical features in patients with organ-specific autoimmune diseases of the skin, such as localized scleroderma and autoimmune bullous diseases. Serum BAFF levels were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 44 patients with localized scleroderma, 20 with pemphigus vulgaris/pemphigus foliaceus, 20 with bullous pemphigoid and 30 healthy controls. Twenty patients with SSc and 20 with SLE were also examined as disease controls. Serum BAFF levels were elevated in localized scleroderma patients compared with healthy controls. Concerning localized scleroderma subgroups, patients with generalized morphea, the severest form of localized scleroderma, had higher serum BAFF levels than linear scleroderma or morphea patients. The BAFF levels of generalized morphea were comparable with those of SSc or SLE. Furthermore, serum BAFF levels correlated positively with antihistone antibody levels and the severity of skin lesion as well as the number of skin lesions. By contrast, serum BAFF levels were not significantly elevated in patients with pemphigus or pemphigoid. These results suggest that BAFF may be contributing to autoimmunity and disease development in localized scleroderma.

  7. OCT imaging of skin cancer and other dermatological diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mette; Thrane, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini

    2009-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides clinicians and researchers with micrometer-resolution, in vivo, cross-sectional images of human skin up to several millimeter depth. This review of OCT imaging applied within dermatology covers the application of OCT to normal skin, and reports on a lar...... number of applications in the fields of non-melanoma skin cancer, malignant melanomas, psoriasis and dermatitis, infestations, bullous skin diseases, tattoos, nails, haemangiomas, and other skin diseases. (© 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim)......Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides clinicians and researchers with micrometer-resolution, in vivo, cross-sectional images of human skin up to several millimeter depth. This review of OCT imaging applied within dermatology covers the application of OCT to normal skin, and reports on a large...

  8. Complement Activation in Inflammatory Skin Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Giang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The complement system is a fundamental part of the innate immune system, playing a crucial role in host defense against various pathogens, such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Activation of complement results in production of several molecules mediating chemotaxis, opsonization, and mast cell degranulation, which can contribute to the elimination of pathogenic organisms and inflammation. Furthermore, the complement system also has regulating properties in inflammatory and immune responses. Complement activity in diseases is rather complex and may involve both aberrant expression of complement and genetic deficiencies of complement components or regulators. The skin represents an active immune organ with complex interactions between cellular components and various mediators. Complement involvement has been associated with several skin diseases, such as psoriasis, lupus erythematosus, cutaneous vasculitis, urticaria, and bullous dermatoses. Several triggers including auto-antibodies and micro-organisms can activate complement, while on the other hand complement deficiencies can contribute to impaired immune complex clearance, leading to disease. This review provides an overview of the role of complement in inflammatory skin diseases and discusses complement factors as potential new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  9. Marijuana and Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashkin, Donald P

    2018-05-17

    As marijuana smoking prevalence increases in the U.S. concern regarding its potential risks to lung health has also risen, given the general similarity in the smoke contents between marijuana and tobacco. Most studies have found a significant association between marijuana smoking and chronic bronchitis symptoms after adjustment for tobacco. While reports are mixed regarding associations between marijuana smoking and lung function, none has shown a relationship to decrements in forced expired volume in 1 sec (FEV1) and few have found a relationship to a decreased ratio of FEV1 to forced vital capacity (FVC), possibly related to an association between marijuana and an increased FVC. A few studies have found a modest reduction in specific airway conductance in relation to marijuana, probably reflecting endoscopic evidence of bronchial mucosal edema among habitual marijuana smokers. Diffusing capacity in marijuana smokers has been normal and two studies of thoracic high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) have not shown any association of marijuana smoking with emphysema. Although bronchial biopsies from habitual marijuana smokers have shown precancerous histopathological changes, a large cohort study and a pooled analysis of six well-designed case-control studies have not found evidence of a link between marijuana smoking and lung cancer. The immunosuppressive effects of delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol raise the possibility of an increased risk of pneumonia, but further studies are needed to evaluate this potential risk. Several cases series have demonstrated pneumothoraces/pneumomediastinum, as well as bullous lung disease, in marijuana smokers, but these associations require epidemiologic studies for firmer evidence of possible causality. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Vimentin may reflect areas of pathologic involvement in biopsies from patients with autoimmune skin diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Autoimmune bullous skin diseases (ABDs represent a group of disorders of the skin and mucosa commonly associated with deposits of immunoglobulins, complement and fibrinogen, and usually directed against distinct adhesion molecules. After studing these diseases for many years, we noted alterations not only between the cells junctions of the epidermis and/or the dermal/epidermal junction, but also in dermal skin appendageal structures and in mesenchymal tissue around the blisters. Based on our findings, we wanted to determine if the observed patterns of autoimmunity correlated with cutaneous vimentin expression. Materials and Methods: Archival biopsies previously diagnosed with ABDs by clinical, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E and direct and/or immunofluorescence data were stained with antibodies directed against vimentin via immunohistochemistry (IHC. We tested 30 patients affected by endemic pemphigus, 30 controls from the endemic area, and 15 normal controls. We also tested 30 biopsies from patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP, 20 with pemphigus vulgaris (PV, 8 with pemphigus foliaceus, 14 with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH and 3 with Senear-Usher syndrome. Results: The H&E, DIF and vimentin patterns of positivity in the different ABDs confirmed that vimentin was compartmentalized around areas of dermal inflammation, around skin appendages and in epidermal, dermal and mesenchymal cell junction areas. Conclusion: Vimentin may be a useful tool for highlighting patterns of microenvironmental tissue alteration in multiple ABDs. The vimentin staining pattern observed was analogous to that we have previously described for proteases and protease inhibitors in patients affected by ABDs, expanding the concept that the autoimmune process extends beyond cell junctions.

  11. Disease: H00691 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00691 Bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (BCIE); Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis...LE ... Histopathologic characterization of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis: a systematic review of histology fr...AUTHORS ... Lacz NL, Schwartz RA, Kihiczak G ... TITLE ... Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis: a keratin 1 or 10 mutat

  12. Unusual presentation of childhood Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sathish; Agarwal, Indira

    2007-01-01

    Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus is a rare blistering condition with a distinctive combination of clinical, histological and immunopathologic features that together constitute a unique bullous disease phenotype. It is often associated with autoimmunity to type VII collagen. Here we report a child who presented with bullous systemic lupus erythematosus. Rapid resolution of the blisters occurred following treatment with dapsone. PMID:18028550

  13. Cardiomyopathy in Patients With Hereditary Bullous Epidermolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalla, A; Vicente, A; Bartrons, J; Prada, F; Fortuny, C; González-Enseñat, M A

    In recent decades, an association has been reported between epidermolysis bullosa (EB) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DC). DC is typically in an advanced phase when detected, leading to a poorer prognosis. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of DC in patients with EB seen in Hospital San Joan de Déu in Barcelona, Spain, between May 1986 and April 2015. This was a descriptive, cross-sectional chart-review study in which we recorded the type and main subtypes of EB and the presence or absence of DC. Fifty-seven patients with EB were found, 19 with EB simplex, 10 with junctional EB, 27 with dystrophic EB (14 dominant dystrophic and 13 recessive dystrophic), and just 1 with Kindler syndrome. DC was detected in only 2 patients with recessive dystrophic EB. Twenty-three patients had presented factors that could have had a causal relationship with the potential onset of DC. DC is a possible complication of EB, particularly in recessive dystrophic EB. Periodic follow-up should be performed to make an early diagnosis and start treatment. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Mast cells are important modifiers of autoimmune disease: With so much evidence, why is there controversy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Ann Brown

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available There is abundant evidence that mast cells are active participants in events that mediate tissue damage in autoimmune disease. Disease-associated increases in mast cell numbers accompanied by mast cell degranulation and elaboration of numerous mast cell mediators at sites of inflammation are commonly observed in many human autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and bullous pemphigoid. In animal models, treatment with mast cell stabilizing drugs or mast cell ablation can result in diminished disease. A variety of receptors including those engaged by antibody, complement, pathogens and intrinsic danger signals are implicated in mast cell activation in disease. Similar to their role as first responders in infection settings, mast cells likely orchestrate early recruitment of immune cells, including neutrophils, to the sites of autoimmune destruction. This co-localization promotes cellular crosstalk and activation and results in the amplification of the local inflammatory response thereby promoting and sustaining tissue damage. Despite the evidence, there is still a debate regarding the relative role of mast cells in these processes. However, by definition, mast cells can only act as accessory cells to the self-reactive T and/or antibody driven autoimmune responses. Thus, when evaluating mast cell involvement using existing and somewhat imperfect animal models of disease, their importance is sometimes obscured. However, these potent immune cells are undoubtedly major contributors to autoimmunity and should be considered as important targets for therapeutic disease intervention.

  15. BP180 dysfunction triggers spontaneous skin inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Hwang, Bin-Jin; Liu, Zhen; Li, Ning; Lough, Kendall; Williams, Scott E; Chen, Jinbo; Burette, Susan W; Diaz, Luis A; Su, Maureen A; Xiao, Shengxiang; Liu, Zhi

    2018-06-04

    BP180, also known as collagen XVII, is a hemidesmosomal component and plays a key role in maintaining skin dermal/epidermal adhesion. Dysfunction of BP180, either through genetic mutations in junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) or autoantibody insult in bullous pemphigoid (BP), leads to subepidermal blistering accompanied by skin inflammation. However, whether BP180 is involved in skin inflammation remains unknown. To address this question, we generated a BP180-dysfunctional mouse strain and found that mice lacking functional BP180 (termed Δ NC16A ) developed spontaneous skin inflammatory disease, characterized by severe itch, defective skin barrier, infiltrating immune cells, elevated serum IgE levels, and increased expression of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). Severe itch is independent of adaptive immunity and histamine, but dependent on increased expression of TSLP by keratinocytes. In addition, a high TSLP expression is detected in BP patients. Our data provide direct evidence showing that BP180 regulates skin inflammation independently of adaptive immunity, and BP180 dysfunction leads to a TSLP-mediated itch. The newly developed mouse strain could be a model for elucidation of disease mechanisms and development of novel therapeutic strategies for skin inflammation and BP180-related skin conditions.

  16. Dermatological disease in the older age group: a cross-sectional study in aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Maneka S; Kerse, Ngaire; Vandal, Alain C; Jarrett, Paul

    2015-12-23

    To estimate the prevalence of dermatological disease in aged care facilities, and the relationship between cognitive or physical disability and significant disease. 2 large aged care facilities in Auckland, New Zealand, each providing low and high level care. All 161 residents of the facilities were invited to participate. The only exclusion criterion was inability to obtain consent from the individual or designated guardian. 88 participants were recruited-66 females (75%), 22 males (25%) with average age 87.1 years (SD 5.5 years). Primary--presence of significant skin disease (defined as that which in the opinion of the investigators needed treatment or was identified as a patient concern) diagnosed clinically on full dermatological examination by a dermatologist or dermatology trainee. Secondary--functional and cognitive status (Rehabilitation Complexity Scale and Abbreviated Mental Test Score). 81.8% were found to have at least one significant condition. The most common disorders were onychomycosis 42 (47.7%), basal cell carcinoma 13 (14.8%), asteototic eczema 11 (12.5%) and squamous cell carcinoma in situ 9 (10.2%). Other findings were invasive squamous cell carcinoma 7 (8%), bullous pemphigoid 2 (2.3%), melanoma 2 (2.3%), lichen sclerosus 2 (2.3%) and carcinoma of the breast 1 (1.1%). Inflammatory disease was more common in those with little physical disability compared with those with serious physical disability (OR 3.69; 95% CI 1.1 to 12.6, p=0.04). No significant association was found between skin disease and cognitive impairment. A high rate of dermatological disease was found. Findings ranged from frequent but not life-threatening conditions (eg, onychomycosis), to those associated with a significant morbidity (eg, eczema, lichen sclerosus and bullous pemphigoid), to potentially life-threatening (eg, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma and breast cancer). Those with less significant physical impairment were found to be at greater risk of inflammatory

  17. Steroid sparing regimens for management of oral immune-mediated diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arti Agrawal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune-mediated mucocutaneous disease may present oral symptoms as a first sign of the disease. The primary etiology could be the cellular and/or humoral immune responses directed against epithelial or connective tissue, in a chronic and recurrent pattern. Lichen planus, pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid are the most frequent immunologically mediated mucocutaneous diseases. More often than not, patients present with complaints of blisters, oral ulcers, pain, burning sensation, and bleeding from the various oral sites. Steroids, whether topical or systemic, are the treatment of choice as they have both anti-inflammatory and immune-suppressant properties; however, challenges in the treatment of autoimmune diseases are the complexity of symptoms, the need to manage long-term medications for preserving organ function, and the long-term adverse effects of steroids. In such situations steroid sparing agents, such as, tacrolimus, dapsone, azathioprine, cyclosporine, and so on, may be helpful. Here an attempt is made to review various treatment regimens that could be used as alternatives to steroids for management of such diseases.

  18. Penfigoide de membranas mucosas com estenose esofágica grave Mucous membrane pemphigoid with severe esophageal stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia do Nascimento Barbosa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available O penfigoide de membranas mucosas é entidade nosológica encarada como um fenótipo, que engloba várias dermatoses autoimunes com lesões bolhosas subepidérmicas, ocorrendo predominantemente nas membranas mucosas, com êxito cicatricial. O acometimento esofágico no penfigoide de membranas mucosas é raro e observado em pacientes com lesão disseminada. As alterações mais comuns são múltiplas membranas ou constrições esofagianas. No presente relato, os autores apresentam paciente com PMM sem lesões cutâneas e estenose esofágica grave, que entrou em remissão após uso de imunoglobulina venosaMucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP is a rare nosological entity. MMP consists of a clinical phenotype in which several autoimmune subepidermal bullous diseases are classified. It occurs predominantly in the mucous membranes and usually results in scarring. Esophageal involvement in MMP is rare and is generally seen in patients in whom lesions are widespread. The most common alterations are multiple esophageal membranes or strictures. In the present case, the authors report on a patient with MMP without any skin lesions and with severe esophageal strictures who went into remission following use of intravenous immunoglobulin

  19. Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita: clinical manifestations, microscopic findings, and surgical periodontal therapy. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakki, S S; Celenligil-Nazliel, H; Karaduman, A; Usubütün, A; Ertoy, D; Ayhan, A; Ruacan, S

    2001-04-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is an uncommon, acquired, chronic subepidermal bullous disease. This report describes a case of EBA with gingival involvement. A 43-year-old woman with EBA was referred to our clinic for periodontal therapy because of gingival tenderness and bleeding. She has been on cyclosporin A therapy for the last 2 years. Clinical findings were analyzed. Anterior gingivectomy operations were performed in 2 stages. The samples obtained during the surgery were examined using histopathologic, immunohistologic, and electronmicroscopic methods. Long-term effects of the surgical periodontal treatment on gingiva were evaluated both clinically and microscopically. The dentition displayed minimal enamel hypoplasia. Decayed, missing, and filled surfaces score was found to be elevated. Periodontal examination showed generalized diffuse gingival inflammation and gingival enlargement localized mainly to the anterior region. Nikolsky's sign was positive. However, wound healing was uneventful after the operations. Microscopic findings were similar to those obtained from the skin. Twenty-one months after the operations, Nikolsky's sign was negative and no remarkable gingival inflammation was noted. Microscopic examination revealed that the blisters were fewer in number and smaller in size. These results indicate that gingival tissues may also be involved in EBA. Uneventful wound healing after periodontal surgery in this case suggests that periodontal surgery can be performed in patients with EBA. Moreover, both our clinical and histopathologic findings imply that gingivectomy proves useful in maintaining gingival integrity in these patients. Our data may also suggest that the patients with EBA are highly likely to develop dental caries.

  20. Broncho-pleural fistula with hydropneumothorax at CT: Diagnostic implications in mycobacterium avium complex lung disease with pleural involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Chung, Myung Jin; Lee, Kyung Soo; Park, Hye Yun; Koh, Won Jung; Kim, Jung Soo

    2016-01-01

    To determine the patho-mechanism of pleural effusion or hydropneumothorax in Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung disease through the computed tomographic (CT) findings. We retrospectively collected data from 5 patients who had pleural fluid samples that were culture-positive for MAC between January 2001 and December 2013. The clinical findings were investigated and the radiological findings on chest CT were reviewed by 2 radiologists. The 5 patients were all male with a median age of 77 and all had underlying comorbid conditions. Pleural fluid analysis revealed a wide range of white blood cell counts (410-100690/µL). The causative microorganisms were determined as Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare in 1 and 4 patients, respectively. Radiologically, the peripheral portion of the involved lung demonstrated fibro-bullous changes or cavitary lesions causing lung destruction, reflecting the chronic, insidious nature of MAC lung disease. All patients had broncho-pleural fistulas (BPFs) and pneumothorax was accompanied with pleural effusion. In patients with underlying MAC lung disease who present with pleural effusion, the presence of BPFs and pleural air on CT imaging are indicative that spread of MAC infection is the cause of the effusion

  1. (3)He pO2 mapping is limited by delayed-ventilation and diffusion in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Helen; Parra-Robles, Juan; Deppe, Martin H; Lipson, David A; Lawson, Rod; Wild, Jim M

    2014-03-01

    Lung pO2 mapping with (3)He MRI assumes that the sources of signal decay with time during a breath-hold are radiofrequency depolarization and oxygen-dependent T1 relaxation, but the method is sensitive to other sources of spatio-temporal signal change such as diffusion. The purpose of this work was to assess the use of (3)He pO2 mapping in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Ten patients with moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were scanned with a 3D single breath-hold pO2 mapping sequence. Images showed signal increasing over time in some lung regions due to delayed ventilation during breath-hold. Regions of physically unrealistic negative pO2 values were seen in all patients, and regional mean pO2 values of -0.3 bar were measured in the two patients most affected by delayed ventilation (where mean time to signal onset was 3-4 s). Movement of gas within the lungs during breath-hold causes regional changes in signal over time that are not related to oxygen concentration, leading to erroneous pO2 measurements using the linear oxygen-dependent signal decay model. These spatio-temporal sources of signal change cannot be reliably separated at present, making pO2 mapping using this methodology unreliable in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with significant bullous emphysema or delayed ventilation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Combined therapeutic use of oral alitretinoin and narrowband ultraviolet-B therapy in the treatment of Hailey-Hailey disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlin A. Vanderbeck

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hailey-Hailey disease (HHD is a chronic familial bullous disease characterized by recurrent blisters and erosions typically at friction-prone areas of the body accompanied by acantholysis upon histologic examination. There are a number of therapies used in the management of HHD. Its symptoms have been effectively treated with antimicrobial therapies, corticosteroids and other agents such as cyclosporine and prednisone. However, such treatments are not always effective. Therefore, there is a need for new treatments for the management of HHD. In this report, a patient with long-standing HHD responsive only to high levels of prednisone is described. After the successful tapering and cessation of oral prednisone the patient began a new combination therapy of complementary doses of oral alitretinoin, and narrowband UVB therapy, which yielded a favorable response within 2-3 weeks. After 6 weeks, a mono-therapy of daily (30 mg oral alitretinoin was sufficient to maintain successful near-complete remission of the disease.

  3. Broncho-pleural fistula with hydropneumothorax at CT: Diagnostic implications in mycobacterium avium complex lung disease with pleural involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Chung, Myung Jin; Lee, Kyung Soo; Park, Hye Yun; Koh, Won Jung [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Soo [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Inha University Hospital, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    To determine the patho-mechanism of pleural effusion or hydropneumothorax in Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung disease through the computed tomographic (CT) findings. We retrospectively collected data from 5 patients who had pleural fluid samples that were culture-positive for MAC between January 2001 and December 2013. The clinical findings were investigated and the radiological findings on chest CT were reviewed by 2 radiologists. The 5 patients were all male with a median age of 77 and all had underlying comorbid conditions. Pleural fluid analysis revealed a wide range of white blood cell counts (410-100690/µL). The causative microorganisms were determined as Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare in 1 and 4 patients, respectively. Radiologically, the peripheral portion of the involved lung demonstrated fibro-bullous changes or cavitary lesions causing lung destruction, reflecting the chronic, insidious nature of MAC lung disease. All patients had broncho-pleural fistulas (BPFs) and pneumothorax was accompanied with pleural effusion. In patients with underlying MAC lung disease who present with pleural effusion, the presence of BPFs and pleural air on CT imaging are indicative that spread of MAC infection is the cause of the effusion.

  4. Epidemiological investigation of nosocomial outbreak of staphylococcal skin diseases in neonatal ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurlenda, J; Grinholc, M; Krzysztoń-Russjan, J; Wiśniewska, K

    2009-05-01

    During a 1-month period, eight neonates developed staphylococcal skin disease diagnosed as a bullous impetigo in the maternity unit of the Provincial Hospital in Gdansk. An epidemiological investigation based on phenotyping and genotyping methods was performed. All neonates involved in the outbreak, their mothers and 15 staff members were screened for carriage of Staphylococcus aureus by nasal swabs. Isolated strains were compared with strains cultured from affected skin and purulent conjunctiva of infected newborns. Isolates were analyzed for the presence of the etA and etB genes using polymerase chain reaction and genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and coa gene polymorphism. The analyzed S. aureus strains were methicillin-sensitive and could be divided into two groups according to antibiotyping, phage typing, coa polymorphism and PFGE pattern. The first group consisted of etA and etB negative strains, and the second one involved only the etB positive ones. Our results have shown that there were two different clusters of infection caused by two populations of S. aureus strains. Among the 15 medical staff members screened we have found seven carriers. However, phage typing revealed that distinct strains unrelated to the outbreak isolates were carried. Although we have not been able to establish the source of bacteria involved in the outbreak, our results suggest that for both groups, mothers could be the source of the infecting strains.

  5. Farber's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... management, and therapy of rare diseases, including the lipid storage diseases. Research on lipid storage diseases within the Network includes ... management, and therapy of rare diseases, including the lipid storage diseases. Research on lipid storage diseases within the Network includes ...

  6. CYCLO-OXYGENASE 2 IS PRESENT IN THE MAJORITY OF LESIONAL SKIN FROM PATIENTS WITH AUTOINMUNE BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The in situ immune response within skin biopsies from patients affected by autoimmune skin blistering diseases (ABDs is not well characterized. Aim: Based on the fact that the ABD immune response is considered an adaptive immune response, both an innate immune response and inflammation would be expected in these diseases. Our investigation investigates the presence of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2, since this enzyme is commonly involved in innate immune responses. Methods: We utilized immunohistochemistry (IHC to evaluate the presence of COX-2 in lesional skin biopsies of patients affected by ABDs. We tested 30 patients with endemic pemphigus foliaceus (EPF, 15 controls from the endemic area, and 15 biopsies from healthy controls from the USA. We also tested archival biopsies from patients with selected ABDs, including 20 patients with bullous pemphigoid, 20 with pemphigus vulgaris, 8 with pemphigus foliaceus and 12 with dermatitis herpetiformis. Results: Most ABD biopsies stained positive for COX-2 in the lesional blister and/or the dermal inflammatory infiltrate, accentuated in the upper neurovascular plexus. In BP and EPF, the COX-2 staining was also seen in the sweat glands. All controls were negative. Conclusions: We document that COX-2 is expressed in lesional skin of patients with ABDs.

  7. Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita with moderately severe dysphagia due to esophageal strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Tu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA is a chronic, autoimmune condition involving the skin and mucous membranes. Symptomatic mucosal involvement is rare, but can impact on quality of life, due to esophageal strictures and dysphagia. We report a case involving a 60-year-old male presenting with bullous skin lesions on areas of friction on his hands, feet and mouth. Milia were visible on some healed areas. Biopsy showed a subepidermal vesicle. Direct immunofluorescence showed intense linear junctional IgG and C3 at the dermo-epidermal junction. Serological tests also supported the diagnosis of EBA. Screening tests for underlying malignancies were negative. Despite treatment with systemic steroids, the patient developed increasing dysphagia, requiring further investigation with esophagoscopy and a barium swallow. Confirmation of extensive esophageal stricturing prompted adjustment of medications including an increase in systemic steroids and addition of azathioprine. Currently, the patient′s disease remains under control, with improvement in all his symptoms and return of anti-basement membrane antibody levels to normal, whilst he remains on azathioprine 150 mg daily and prednisolone 5 mg daily. This case highlights the fact that the treatment of a given patient with EBA depends on severity of disease and co-morbid symptoms. Newer immunoglobulin and biological therapies have shown promise in treatment resistant disease. Considering that long-term immunosuppressants or biologicals will be required, potential side effects of the drugs should be considered. If further deterioration occurs in this patient, cyclosporin A or intravenous immunoglobulin (IV Ig will be considered. Vigilance for associated co-morbidities, especially malignancies, should always be maintained.

  8. Effectiveness and side effects of anti-CD20 therapy for autoantibody-mediated blistering skin diseases: A comprehensive survey of 71 consecutive patients from the Initial use to 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D Peterson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer D Peterson1, Lawrence S Chan2,3,41Department of Dermatology, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center at Lubbock, Lubbock, TX, USA; 2Department of Dermatology; 3Department of Microbiology/Immunology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; 4Medicine Service, Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: In order to examine the efficacy and side effects of the monoclonal antibody anti-CD20 (rituximab on autoimmune blistering skin diseases, we performed a comprehensive survey of 71 consecutive patients from initial use up to 2007, using the PubMed database. A heterogeneous group of patients, including 51 patients with pemphigus vulgaris, one with pemphigus vegetans, nine with pemphigus foliaceus, five with paraneoplastic pemphigus, four with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, and one with both bullous pemphigoid and graft vs host disease was included in this survey. Overall the monoclonal antibody seems to be effective in that 69% of patients showed complete response, 25% of patients showed partial response, whereas 6% of patients showed progressive disease. Six deaths occurred in association with the treatment, with four of these deaths in patients with paraneoplastic pemphigus, a disease characteristically resistant to conventional medication and with a high mortality rate. Of note, 11 patients who received combined rituximab and intravenous immune globulin treatments had the best outcome: complete response without any serious side effects. Therefore further investigation on rituximab with controlled clinical trial is a worthy pursuit.Keywords: blistering diseases, skin, anti-CD20, pemphigus, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita

  9. TISSUE INHIBITOR OF METALLOPROTEINASE 1, MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE 9, ALPHA-1 ANTITRYPSIN, METALLOTHIONEIN AND UROKINASE TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR RECEPTOR IN SKIN BIOPSIES FROM PATIENTS AFFECTED BY AUTOIMMUNE BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Proteinases and proteinase inhibitors have been described to play a role in autoimmune skin blistering diseases. We studied skin lesional biopsies from patients affected by several autoimmune skin blistering diseases for proteinases and proteinase inhibitors. Methods: We utilized immunohistochemistry to evaluate biopsies for alpha-1-antitrypsin, human matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9, human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1, metallothionein and urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR. We tested 30 patients affected by endemic pemphigus, 30 controls from the endemic area, and 15 normal controls. We also tested 30 biopsies from patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP, 20 with pemphigus vulgaris (PV, 8 with pemphigus foliaceus, and 14 with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH. Results: Contrary to findings in the current literature, most autoimmune skin blistering disease biopsies were negative for uPAR and MMP9. Only some chronic patients with El Bagre-EPF were positive to MMP9 in the dermis, in proximity to telocytes. TIMP-1 and metallothionein were positive in half of the biopsies from BP patients at the basement membrane of the skin, within several skin appendices, in areas of dermal blood vessel inflammation and within dermal mesenchymal-epithelial cell junctions.

  10. Endocrine Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Syndrome (PCOS) Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease Primary Hyperparathyroidism Prolactinoma Thyroid Tests Turner Syndrome Contact Us The National ... Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition Blood Diseases Diagnostic Tests La información de la ...

  11. Dermatose por IgA e IgG linear: relato de caso com boa resposta terapêutica à dapsona e ao micofenolato mofetil Linear IgA/IgG bullous dermatosis: successful treatment with dapsone and mycophenolate mofetil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leny Passos

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Relata-se o caso de paciente feminina, de 21 anos, com dermatose por IgA e IgG linear. Inicialmente, a resposta clínica foi favorável à dapsona. Após a interrupção desta medicação, por crise de anemia sintomática, precipitada por malária, houve piora da doença, apesar da utilização da prednisona e pulsoterapia com metilprednisolona. A reintrodução da dapsona, associada ao micofenolato mofetil, possibilitou o controle da enfermidadeA 21-year-old female presenting linear IgA and IgG disease initially responded well to dapsone therapy. However, the treatment with dapsone was withdrawn due to severe anemia induced by malaria, which led to worsening of the clinical picture. Although prednisone and methylprednisolone were tried, the patient responded only to the association of dapsone and mycophenolate mofetil

  12. Complex parasitism and symbiosis of crinoid, subepidermal parasite, and tabulate coral. Lower Devonian (Pragian, Barrandian, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Galle, Arnošt; Prokop, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 4 (2000), s. 441-444 ISSN 1210-3527 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3013807 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3013912 Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy http://www.geology.cz/bulletin/contents/2000/vol75no4/bullgeosci200004441a.pdf

  13. Ribbing disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukkada, Philson J; Franklin, Teenu; Rajeswaran, Rangasami; Joseph, Santhosh

    2010-01-01

    Ribbing disease is a rare sclerosing dysplasia that involves long tubular bones, especially the tibia and femur. It occurs after puberty and is reported to be more common in women. In this article we describe how Ribbing disease can be differentiated from diseases like Engelmann-Camurati disease, van Buchem disease, Erdheim-Chester disease, osteoid osteoma, chronic osteomyelitis, stress fracture, etc

  14. [Lung volume reduction surgery for emphysema and bullous pulmonary emphysema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pimpec-Barthes, F; Das Neves-Pereira, J-C; Cazes, A; Arame, A; Grima, R; Hubsch, J-P; Zukerman, C; Hernigou, A; Badia, A; Bagan, P; Delclaux, C; Dusser, D; Riquet, M

    2012-04-01

    The improvement of respiratory symptoms for emphysematous patients by surgery is a concept that has evolved over time. Initially used for giant bullae, this surgery was then applied to patients with diffuse microbullous emphysema. The physiological and pathological concepts underlying these surgical procedures are the same in both cases: improve respiratory performance by reducing the high intrapleural pressure. The functional benefit of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) in the severe diffuse emphysema has been validated by the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT) and the later studies which allowed to identify prognostic factors. The quality of the clinical, morphological and functional data made it possible to develop recommendations now widely used in current practice. Surgery for giant bullae occurring on little or moderately emphysematous lung is often a simpler approach but also requires specialised support to optimize its results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Anterior stromal puncture in the treatment of bullous keratopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, José Alvaro Pereira; Haraguchi, Daniel Keizo de Medeiros; Zambrano, Delbis Uzcátegui; Villavicencio, Luis Izquierdo; Cunha, Marcelo C.; Freitas, Denise de

    2000-01-01

    Objetivo: Avaliar o efeito terapêutico das punções do estroma anterior corneal em pacientes com ceratopatia bolhosa (CB). Métodos:Vinte e cinco pacientes com CB sintomáticos, com baixa visão, com e sem indicação de transplante de córnea, foram avaliados antes, uma, 4 e 12 semanas após punções estromais anteriores realizadas com agulha #25 à lâmpada de fenda. Em cada visita, os pacientes foram questionados sobre intensidade da dor, fotofobia, sensação de corpo estranho, além de serem submetido...

  16. Bullous pemphigoid antigen localization suggests an intracellular association with hemidesmosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westgate, G E; Weaver, A C; Couchman, J R

    1985-01-01

    immunofluorescent staining for BPA is linear at the basement membrane zone (BMZ) of skin and many other epithelial tissues. At higher magnification however, we observed a punctate staining pattern for BPA which was regular in appearance and suggested localization of BPA to discrete structures at the BMZ. Subsequent...... intracellularly both in vivo and in vitro. We suggest that BPA is not normally a lamina lucida component, but that it may form part of a linkage between the cytoskeleton and the basement membrane....

  17. Prostate Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Prostate Diseases Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic ... body. Approximately 3 million American men have some type of prostate disease. The most common prostate diseases ...

  18. Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... But some of them can make you sick. Infectious diseases are diseases that are caused by germs. There ... many different ways that you can get an infectious disease: Through direct contact with a person who is ...

  19. Pick disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semantic dementia; Dementia - semantic; Frontotemporal dementia; FTD; Arnold Pick disease; 3R tauopathy ... doctors tell Pick disease apart from Alzheimer disease. (Memory loss is often the main, and earliest, symptom ...

  20. Prion Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Prion Diseases Prion diseases are a related group of ... deer and elk. Why Is the Study of Prion Diseases a Priority for NIAID? Much about TSE ...

  1. Periodontal Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diseases. The primary research focus was on oral bacteria. Periodontal diseases were thought to begin when chalky white ... tools to target their treatment specifically to the bacteria that trigger periodontal disease. At the same time, because biofilms form ...

  2. IMMUNOHISTOCHEMISTRY VERSUS IMMUNOFLUORESENCE IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF AUTOIMMUNE BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In patients with autoimmune skin blistering diseases (ABDs, the diagnostic gold standard has classically been direct and indirect immunofluorescence (DIF and IIF, despite inherent technical problems of autofluorescence. Aim: We sought to overcome autofluorescence issues and compare the reliability of immunofluorescence versus immunohistochemistry (IHC staining in the diagnoses of these diseases. Methods: We tested via IHC for anti-human IgG, IgM, IgA, IgD, IgE, Kappa light chains, Lambda light chains, Complement/C3c, Complement/C1q, Complement/C3d, albumin and fibrinogen in 30 patients affected by a new variant of endemic pemphigus foliaceus in El Bagre, Colombia (El Bagre-EPF, and 30 control biopsies from the endemic area. We also tested archival biopsies from patients with ABDs whose diagnoses were made clinically, histopathologically and by DIF/IIF studies from 2 independent dermatopathology laboratories in the USA. Specifically, we tested 34 patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP, 18 with pemphigus vulgaris (PV, 8 with pemphigus foliaceus (PF, 14 with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH and 30 control skin samples from plastic esthetic surgery reduction surgeries. Results: The diagnostic correlation between IHC and DIF-IIF was almost 98% in most cases. IHC revealed evidence of autofluorescence around dermal blood vessels, dermal eccrine glands and neurovascular packages feeding skin appendices in ABDs; this autofluorescence may represent a non-specific immune response. Strong patterns of positivity were seen also in endothelial-mesenchymal cell junction-like structures, as well as between dermal fibrohistiocytic cells. In PV, we noted strong reactivity to neurovascular packages supplying sebaceous glands, as well as apocrine glands with edematous changes. Conclusions: We suggest that IHC is as reliable as DIF or IIF for the diagnosis of ABDs; our findings further suggest that what has previously been considered DIF/IIF autofluorescence

  3. Addison's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of potassium and low levels of sodium. What causes Addison’s disease? Addison’s disease is caused by injury to your ... example, a problem with your pituitary gland can cause secondary Addison’s disease. Or, you may develop Addison’s disease if you ...

  4. Graves' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2011 survey of clinical practice patterns in the management of Graves' disease. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2012 Dec;97( ... 30 a.m. to 5 p.m. eastern time, M-F Follow Us NIH… Turning Discovery Into ... Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  5. Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  6. Gaucher Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaucher disease is a rare, inherited disorder. It is a type of lipid metabolism disorder. If you ... affected. It usually starts in childhood or adolescence. Gaucher disease has no cure. Treatment options for types ...

  7. Lyme Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spread to the nervous system, causing facial paralysis ( Bell's palsy ), or meningitis. The last stage of Lyme disease ... My Lyme Disease Risk? Bug Bites and Stings Bell's Palsy Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Meningitis View more About ...

  8. Stargardt Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stargardt disease, lipofuscin accumulates abnormally. The Foundation Fighting Blindness supports research studying lipofuscin build up and ways to prevent it. A decrease in color perception also occurs in Stargardt disease. This is ...

  9. Refsum Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... night blindness due to degeneration of the retina (retinitis pigmentosa). If the disease progresses, other symptoms may include ... night blindness due to degeneration of the retina (retinitis pigmentosa). If the disease progresses, other symptoms may include ...

  10. Addison Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your blood pressure and water and salt balance. Addison disease happens if the adrenal glands don't make ... A problem with your immune system usually causes Addison disease. The immune system mistakenly attacks your own tissues, ...

  11. Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... likely need to plan for their loved one's future care. The final phase of the disease may ... disease and other dementias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  12. Menkes Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Menkes disease is caused by a defective gene named ATPTA ... arteries. Weakened bones (osteoporosis) may result in fractures. × Definition Menkes disease is caused by a defective gene named ATPTA ...

  13. Fabry Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Fabry disease is caused by the lack of or faulty ... severe symptoms similar to males with the disorder. × Definition Fabry disease is caused by the lack of or faulty ...

  14. Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases: Diseases caused by viruses, such as hepatitis ...

  15. Liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000205.htm Liver disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The term "liver disease" applies to many conditions that stop the ...

  16. Digestive Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lactose Intolerance Liver Disease Ménétrier’s Disease Microscopic Colitis Ostomy Surgery of the Bowel Pancreatitis Peptic Ulcers (Stomach ... and outreach materials. Clinical Trials Clinical trials offer hope for many people and opportunities to help researchers ...

  17. Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Kidney Disease KidsHealth / For Teens / Kidney Disease What's in ... Coping With Kidney Conditions Print What Do the Kidneys Do? You might never think much about some ...

  18. Sandhoff Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which had been particularly high in people of Eastern European and Ashkenazi Jewish descent, but Sandhoff disease ... which had been particularly high in people of Eastern European and Ashkenazi Jewish descent, but Sandhoff disease ...

  19. Fifth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvovirus B19; Erythema infectiosum; Slapped cheek rash ... Fifth disease is caused by human parvovirus B19. It often affects preschoolers or school-age children during the spring. The disease spreads through the fluids in the nose and mouth ...

  20. Cardiovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Kazunori

    1992-01-01

    This paper is aimed to discuss the involvement of delayed radiation effects of A-bomb exposure in cardiovascular diseases. First, the relationship between radiation and cardiovascular diseases is reviewed in the literature. Animal experiments have confirmed the relationship between ionizing radiation and vascular lesions. There are many reports which describe ischemic heart disease, cervical and cerebrovascular diseases, and peripheral disease occurring after radiation therapy. The previous A-bomb survivor cohort studies, i.e., the RERF Life Span Study and Adult Health Study, have dealt with the mortality rate from cardiovascular diseases, the prevalence or incidence of cardiovascular diseases, pathological findings, clinical observation of arteriosclerosis, ECG abnormality, blood pressure abnormality, and cardiac function. The following findings have been suggested: (1) A-bomb exposure is likely to be involved in the mortality rate and incidence of ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases; (2) similarly, the involvement of A-bomb exposure is considered in the prevalence of the arch of aorta; (3) ECG abnormality corresponding to ischemic heart disease may reflect the involvement of A-bomb exposure. To confirm the above findings, further studies are required on the basis of more accurate information and the appropriate number of cohort samples. Little evidence has been presented for the correlation between A-bomb exposure and both rheumatic heart disease and congenital heart disease. (N.K.) 88 refs

  1. Autoinflammatory Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penaranda P, Edgar; Spinel B, Nestor; Restrepo, Jose F; Rondon H, Federico; Millan S, Alberto; Iglesias G Antonio

    2010-01-01

    We present a review article on the autoinflammatory diseases, narrating its historical origin and describing the protein and molecular structure of the Inflammasome, the current classification of the autoinflammatory diseases and a description of the immuno genetics and clinical characteristics more important of every disease.

  2. Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, George C.

    1991-01-01

    This overview of the public health significance of Lyme disease includes the microbiological specifics of the infectious spirochete, the entomology and ecology of the ticks which are the primary disease carrier, the clinical aspects and treatment stages, the known epidemiological patterns, and strategies for disease control and for expanded public…

  3. Gaucher disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please enable JavaScript. Gaucher disease is a rare genetic disorder in which a person lacks an enzyme called glucocerebrosidase (GBA). Causes Gaucher disease is rare in the general population. People of Eastern and Central European (Ashkenazi) Jewish heritage are more likely to have this disease. It ...

  4. Dent disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina R Rus

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Dent disease is an x-linked disorder of proximal renal tubular dysfunction that occurs almost exclusively in males. It is characterized by significant, mostly low molecular weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis, and chronic kidney disease. Signs and symptoms of this condition appear in early childhood and worsen over time. There are two forms of Dent disease, which are distinguished by their genetic cause and pattern of signs and symptoms (type 1 and type 2. Dent disease 2 is characterized by the features described above and also associated with extrarenal abnormalities (they include mild intellectual disability, hypotonia, and cataract. Some researchers consider Dent disease 2 to be a mild variant of a similar disorder called Lowe syndrome.We represent a case of a 3-year old boy with significant proteinuria in the nephrotic range and hypercalciuria. We confirmed Dent disease type 1 by genetic analysis.

  5. Morgellons Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ohn, Jungyoon; Park, Seon Yong; Moon, Jungyoon; Choe, Yun Seon; Kim, Kyu Han

    2017-01-01

    Morgellons disease is a rare disease with unknown etiology. Herein, we report the first case of Morgellons disease in Korea. A 30-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of pruritic erythematous patches and erosions on the arms, hands, and chin. She insisted that she had fiber-like materials under her skin, which she had observed through a magnifying device. We performed skin biopsy, and observed a fiber extruding from the dermal side of the specimen. Histopathological examination sho...

  6. Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holtmeier Wolfgang

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Celiac disease is a chronic intestinal disease caused by intolerance to gluten. It is characterized by immune-mediated enteropathy, associated with maldigestion and malabsorption of most nutrients and vitamins. In predisposed individuals, the ingestion of gluten-containing food such as wheat and rye induces a flat jejunal mucosa with infiltration of lymphocytes. The main symptoms are: stomach pain, gas, and bloating, diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, edema, bone or joint pain. Prevalence for clinically overt celiac disease varies from 1:270 in Finland to 1:5000 in North America. Since celiac disease can be asymptomatic, most subjects are not diagnosed or they can present with atypical symptoms. Furthermore, severe inflammation of the small bowel can be present without any gastrointestinal symptoms. The diagnosis should be made early since celiac disease causes growth retardation in untreated children and atypical symptoms like infertility or neurological symptoms. Diagnosis requires endoscopy with jejunal biopsy. In addition, tissue-transglutaminase antibodies are important to confirm the diagnosis since there are other diseases which can mimic celiac disease. The exact cause of celiac disease is unknown but is thought to be primarily immune mediated (tissue-transglutaminase autoantigen; often the disease is inherited. Management consists in life long withdrawal of dietary gluten, which leads to significant clinical and histological improvement. However, complete normalization of histology can take years.

  7. Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a multysystemic autoimmune disease induced by gluten in wheat, barley and rye. It is characterized by polygenic predisposition, high prevalence (1%, widely heterogeneous expression and frequent association with other autoimmune diseases, selective deficit of IgA and Down, Turner and Williams syndrome. The basis of the disease and the key finding in its diagnostics is symptomatic or asymptomatic inflammation of the small intestinal mucosa which resolves by gluten-free diet. Therefore, the basis of the treatment involves elimination diet, so that the disorder, if timely recognized and adequately treated, also characterizes excellent prognosis.

  8. IN SITU IMMUNE RESPONSE EVALUATION VIA IMMUNOHISTOCHEMISTRY IN SKIN BIOPSIES FROM PATIENTS AFFECTED BY AUTOIMMUNE BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The in situ immune response in skin biopsies from patients affected by autoimmune skin blistering diseases (ABD is not well characterized. Aim: Our investigation attempts to immunophenotype cells in lesional skin in several ABD, utilizing immunohistochemistry (ICH. Methods: We tested by IHC for CD4, CD8, CD19, CD20, CD45, CD56/NCAM, PAX-5, granzyme B, myeloperoxidase, neutrophil elastase, LAT and ZAP-70 in patients affected by ABD. We tested 30 patients with endemic pemphigus foliaceus (EPF, 15 controls from the EPF endemic area, and 15 biopsies from healthy controls from the USA. We also tested archival biopsies from patients with selected ABD, including 30 patients with bullous pemphigoid, 20 with pemphigus vulgaris, 8 with pemphigus foliaceus and 14 with dermatitis herpetiformis. Results: We found a predominantly CD8 positive/CD45 positive T cell infiltrate in all ABD. Our skin biopsies demonstrated consistently positive staining for myeloperoxidase, but negative staining for neutrophil elastase. Most ABD biopsies displayed negative staining for CD4 and B cell markers; natural killer cell markers were also rarely seen. ZAP-70 and LAT were frequently detected. In El Bagre-EPF, a significant fragmentation of T cells in lesional skin was noted, as well as autoreactivity to lymph nodes. Conclusions: The documented T cell and myeloperoxidase staining are indicative of the role of T lymphocytes and neutrophils in lesional biopsies in patients with ABD, in addition to previously documented deposition of B cells, immunoglobulins and complement in situ. In El Bagre-EPF, T cells could also target lymph nodes; however, further studies are needed to confirm this possibility.

  9. Peyronie's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Frederick L; Levine, Laurence A

    2007-11-01

    Peyronie's disease is a psychologically and physically devastating disorder that is manifest by a fibrous inelastic scar of the tunica albuginea, resulting in palpable penile scar in the flaccid condition and causing penile deformity, including penile curvature, hinging, narrowing, shortening, and painful erections. Peyronie's disease remains a considerable therapeutic dilemma even to today's practicing physicians.

  10. Parasitogenic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    Radiological semiotics of parasitogenic diseases of the intestinal tract is presented. The problem of radiological examination in the case of the diseases consists in the determination of the large intestine state, depth and extension of lesions, and also in solution of treatment efficiency problem

  11. Batten Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the country. NIH is the leading supporter of biomedical research in the world. Much of NINDS’ research on Batten disease and the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses focuses on gaining a better understanding of the disease, gene therapy, and developing novel drugs to treat the disorders. ...

  12. Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and ridding your body of toxic substances. Liver disease can be inherited (genetic) or caused by a variety of factors that damage the ... that you can't stay still. Causes Liver disease has many ... or semen, contaminated food or water, or close contact with a person who is ...

  13. Leigh's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... X-linked form of Leigh’s disease, a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet may be recommended. View Full Treatment Information Definition Leigh's disease is a rare inherited neurometabolic disorder that affects the central nervous system. This progressive disorder begins in infants between the ...

  14. Meniere's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ears and head) special tests that check your balance and how well your ears work. Can Meniere’s disease be prevented or avoided? Because ... find ways to limit the stress in your life or learn how to deal with stress ... Let your family, friends, and co-workers know about the disease. Tell ...

  15. Parasitic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.S.

    1983-01-01

    Foundations of roentgenological semiotics of parasitic diseases of lungs, w hich are of the greatest practical value, are presented. Roentgenological pictu res of the following parasitic diseases: hydatid and alveolar echinococcosis, pa ragonimiasis, toxoplasmosis, ascariasis, amebiasis, bilharziasis (Schistosomias is) of lungs, are considered

  16. Angara disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-12

    Oct 12, 2011 ... 1988). Since the disease emerged in this specific geographic area, HHS was initially referred to as “Angara. Disease”. The disease is caused by an avian adenovirus serotype-iv in Pakistan. This virus is responsible for development of intranuclear inclusion bodies in the cells of liver, pancreas and kidneys.

  17. Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... monitor a disease) for HD. A large and related NINDS-supported study aims to identify additional genetic factors in people that influence the course of the disease. Other research hopes to identify variations in the genomes of individuals with HD that may point to new targets ...

  18. Coeliac disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-08

    Mar 8, 2013 ... Two factors are involved in the development of coeliac disease, namely the ... degradation by gastric, pancreatic and intestinal brush ... epithelial layer with chronic inflammatory cells in patients ... Coeliac disease increases the risk of malignancies, such as small bowel adenocarcinoma and enteropathy-.

  19. Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoochehr Karjoo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease also known as gluten-sensitive enteropathy is characterized by intestinal mucosal damage and malabsorption from dietary intake of wheat, rye or barley. Symptoms may appear with introduction of cereal in the first 3 years of life. A second peak in symptoms occurs in adults during the third or forth decade and even as late as eight decade of life. The prevalence of this disease is approximately 1 in 250 adults. The disease is more prevalent in Ireland as high as 1 in 120 adults. The disorder occurs in Arab, Hispanics, Israeli Jews, Iranian and European but is rare in Chinese and African American. To have celiac disease the patient should have the celiac disease genetic markers as HLA DQ 2 and HLA DQ 8. Patient with celiac disease may have 95 per cent for DQ 2 and the rest is by DQ 8. Someone may have the genetic marker and never develops the disease. In general 50 percent with markers may develop celiac disease. To develop the disease the gene needs to become activated. This may happen with a viral or bacterial infection, a surgery, delivery, accident, or psychological stress. After activation of gene cause the tight junction to opens with the release of Zonulin This results in passage of gluten through the tight junction and formation of multiple antibodies and autoimmune disease. This also allows entrance of other proteins and development of multiple food allergies. As a result is shortening, flattening of intestinal villi resulting in food, vitamins and minerals malabsorption.

  20. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2016-04-22

    Apr 22, 2016 ... Papulosquamous disorders, Infectious disorders, Connective tissue diseases, Bullous disorders, ... surgical pathology specimen received within the study period. The modal age ... enable appropriate management. ... basic clinical data including age, gender were noted. ... Confidentiality of the identity of the.

  1. Pseudoporfyri er et symptomkompleks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velander, Marie Juul; Thorsteinsdóttir, Sunna; Bygum, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoporphyria is a photosensitive bullous disease, which resembles porphyria cutanea tarda. Normal porphyrin levels in urine, stool and blood define pseudoporphyria. Pseudoporphyria is associated with chronic renal failure, haemodialysis, a variety of drugs (e.g. naproxen, nabumetone, furosemide...

  2. Refractory disease in autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasconcelos, Carlos; Kallenberg, Cees; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    Refractory disease (RD) definition has different meanings but it is dynamic, according to knowledge and the availability of new drugs. It should be differentiated from severe disease and damage definitions and it must take into account duration of adequate therapy and compliance of the patient. It

  3. Thyroid diseases and cerebrovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Squizzato, A.; Gerdes, V. E. A.; Brandjes, D. P. M.; Büller, H. R.; Stam, J.

    2005-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Acute cerebral ischemia has been described in different diseases of the thyroid gland, and not only as a result of thyrotoxic atrial fibrillation and cardioembolic stroke. The purpose of this review is to summarize the studies on the relationship between thyroid diseases and

  4. Morgellons Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohn, Jungyoon; Park, Seon Yong; Moon, Jungyoon; Choe, Yun Seon; Kim, Kyu Han

    2017-04-01

    Morgellons disease is a rare disease with unknown etiology. Herein, we report the first case of Morgellons disease in Korea. A 30-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of pruritic erythematous patches and erosions on the arms, hands, and chin. She insisted that she had fiber-like materials under her skin, which she had observed through a magnifying device. We performed skin biopsy, and observed a fiber extruding from the dermal side of the specimen. Histopathological examination showed only mild lymphocytic infiltration, and failed to reveal evidence of any microorganism. The polymerase chain reaction for Borrelia burgdorferi was negative in her serum.

  5. [Infectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapuis-Taillard, Caroline; de Vallière, Serge; Bochud, Pierre-Yves

    2009-01-07

    In 2008, several publications have highlighted the role of climate change and globalization on the epidemiology of infectious diseases. Studies have shown the extension towards Europe of diseases such as Crimea-Congo fever (Kosovo, Turkey and Bulgaria), leismaniosis (Cyprus) and chikungunya virus infection (Italy). The article also contains comments on Plasmodium knowlesi, a newly identified cause of severe malaria in humans, as well as an update on human transmission of the H5NI avian influenza virus. It also mentions new data on Bell's palsy as well as two vaccines (varicella-zoster and pneumococcus), and provides a list of recent guidelines for the treatment of common infectious diseases.

  6. Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haricharan, Ramanath N; Georgeson, Keith E

    2008-11-01

    Hirschsprung disease is a relatively common condition managed by pediatric surgeons. Significant advances have been made in understanding its etiologies in the last decade, especially with the explosion of molecular genetic techniques and early diagnosis. The surgical management has progressed from a two- or three-stage procedure to a primary operation. More recently, definitive surgery for Hirschsprung disease through minimally invasive techniques has gained popularity. In neonates, the advancement of treatment strategies for Hirschsprung disease continues with reduced patient morbidity and improved outcomes.

  7. Crohn's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2012-02-03

    Crohn\\'s disease is a disorder mediated by T lymphocytes which arises in genetically susceptible individuals as a result of a breakdown in the regulatory constraints on mucosal immune responses to enteric bacteria. Regulation of immune reactivity to enteric antigens has improved understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of Crohn\\'s disease, and has expanded therapeutic options for patients with this disorder. Disease heterogeneity is probable, with various underlying defects associated with a similar pathophysiological outcome. Although most conventional drug treatments are directed at modification of host response, therapeutic manipulation of the enteric flora is becoming a realistic option.

  8. Norries disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini J

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A 2-month-old male infant was found to have Norrie′s disease. The clinical presentation and detailed histological features diagnostic of the disease are discussed. This is the first authentic, histologically proven case of Norrie′s disease from India. The absence of hearing loss and mental retardation at the time of presentation at the early stage of infancy and the fact that the case was sporadic do not detract from the diagnosis. However the child at the age of one year developed hearing loss.

  9. Blount disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Unlike bowlegs , which tend to straighten as the child develops, Blount disease slowly gets worse. It can cause severe bowing of one or both legs. This condition is more common among African American children. It is also associated with obesity ...

  10. Pneumococcal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pneumococcal disease kills one in every four to five people over the age of 65 who gets it. ... A second PPSV23 vaccine is recommended for these persons five years after the first PPSV23. CDC recommends only ...

  11. Behcet's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this research; and the dissemination of information on research progress in these diseases. Contact Us NIAMS Archive Viewers and Players Social Media Moderation Policy FOIA Privacy Statement Accessibility Disclaimer Digital Strategy ...

  12. Coeliac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reilly, Norelle R; Husby, Steffen; Sanders, David S

    2018-01-01

    Coeliac disease is increasingly recognized as a global problem in both children and adults. Traditionally, the findings of characteristic changes of villous atrophy and increased intraepithelial lymphocytosis identified in duodenal biopsy samples taken during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy have...... been required for diagnosis. Although biopsies remain advised as necessary for the diagnosis of coeliac disease in adults, European guidelines for children provide a biopsy-sparing diagnostic pathway. This approach has been enabled by the high specificity and sensitivity of serological testing. However......, these guidelines are not universally accepted. In this Perspective, we discuss the pros and cons of a biopsy-avoiding pathway for the diagnosis of coeliac disease, especially in this current era of the call for more biopsies, even from the duodenal bulb, in the diagnosis of coeliac disease. In addition, a contrast...

  13. Addison disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms of Addison disease include: Chronic diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting Darkening of the skin in some places Dehydration Dizziness when standing up Low-grade fever Extreme weakness , fatigue , and slow, sluggish movement Darker ...

  14. Alpers' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... underlying liver disease, failure to thrive, infection-associated encephalopathy, spasticity, myoclonus (involuntary jerking of a muscle or group of muscles), seizures, or liver failure. An increased protein level is seen in ...

  15. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it may be caused by diseases, such as connective tissue disorders, excessive iron buildup in your body (hemochromatosis), the buildup of abnormal proteins (amyloidosis) or by some cancer treatments. Causes of heart infection A heart infection, ...

  16. Alexander Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Administrator Channels Synapses Circuits Cluster Neurosurgery Research Fellowships Scientific Director, Division of Intramural Research ... Disease Information Page What research is being done? Recent discoveries show that most individuals (approximately 90 percent) with ...

  17. Retinal Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Linked Retinoschisis (XLRS) X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa (XLRP) Usher Syndrome Other Retinal Diseases Glossary News & Research News & Research ... central portion of the retina called the macula. Usher Syndrome Usher syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  18. Sever's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... boys 10 years to 12 years of age. Soccer players and gymnasts often get Sever’s disease, but ... Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans ...

  19. Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The disease leads to shaking ( tremors ) and trouble walking and moving . ... include: Difficulty starting movement, such as starting to walk or ... are not moving. This is called resting tremor. Occur when your ...

  20. Behcet's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... organs and affect the central nervous system, causing memory loss and impaired speech, balance, and movement. The effects of the disease may include blindness, stroke, swelling of the spinal cord, and intestinal ...

  1. Extrapyramidal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2010380 Evaluation non-motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease and its influence on ability of daily living. WANG Rongfei(王荣飞),et al. Dept Neurol,1st Hosp,Guangzhou Med Coll,Guangzhou 510000. Chin J Neurol 2010;43(4):273-276. Objective To evaluate the non-motor symptoms (NMS) in Parkinson’s disease (PD),and its influence on ability of daily living (ADL) in PD

  2. Menkes disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tümer, Zeynep; Møller, Lisbeth B

    2010-01-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is a lethal multisystemic disorder of copper metabolism. Progressive neurodegeneration and connective tissue disturbances, together with the peculiar 'kinky' hair are the main manifestations. MD is inherited as an X-linked recessive trait, and as expected the vast majority...... of surplus copper from cells. Severely affected MD patients die usually before the third year of life. A cure for the disease does not exist, but very early copper-histidine treatment may correct some of the neurological symptoms....

  3. Elm diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. Peacock

    1989-01-01

    Dutch elm disease was found in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1930, and is now in most of the contiguous 48 states. The disease is caused by a fungus that has killed millions of wild and planted elms. Losses have been the greatest in the eastern United States. The fungus attacks all elms, but our native species, American, slippery, and rock elm have little or no resistance to the...

  4. Ollier disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jüppner Harald

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enchondromas are common intraosseous, usually benign cartilaginous tumors, that develop in close proximity to growth plate cartilage. When multiple enchondromas are present, the condition is called enchondromatosis also known as Ollier disease (WHO terminology. The estimated prevalence of Ollier disease is 1/100,000. Clinical manifestations often appear in the first decade of life. Ollier disease is characterized by an asymmetric distribution of cartilage lesions and these can be extremely variable (in terms of size, number, location, evolution of enchondromas, age of onset and of diagnosis, requirement for surgery. Clinical problems caused by enchondromas include skeletal deformities, limb-length discrepancy, and the potential risk for malignant change to chondrosarcoma. The condition in which multiple enchondromatosis is associated with soft tissue hemangiomas is known as Maffucci syndrome. Until now both Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome have only occurred in isolated patients and not familial. It remains uncertain whether the disorder is caused by a single gene defect or by combinations of (germ-line and/or somatic mutations. The diagnosis is based on clinical and conventional radiological evaluations. Histological analysis has a limited role and is mainly used if malignancy is suspected. There is no medical treatment for enchondromatosis. Surgery is indicated in case of complications (pathological fractures, growth defect, malignant transformation. The prognosis for Ollier disease is difficult to assess. As is generally the case, forms with an early onset appear more severe. Enchondromas in Ollier disease present a risk of malignant transformation of enchondromas into chondrosarcomas.

  5. Pregnancy and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with Rheumatic Disease Pregnancy & Rheumatic Disease Pregnancy and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Diseases with the potential to affect ... control. What are the effects of pregnancy on rheumatic disease? The effects of pregnancy on rheumatic diseases vary ...

  6. Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Roon, Alexander C; Reese, George E; Orchard, Timothy R; Tekkis, Paris P

    2007-11-07

    Crohn's disease is a long-term chronic condition of the gastrointestinal tract. It is characterised by transmural, granulomatous inflammation that occurs in a discontinuous pattern, with a tendency to form fistulae. The cause is unknown but may depend on interactions between genetic predisposition, environmental triggers, and mucosal immunity. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of medical treatments in adults to induce remission in Crohn's disease? What are the effects of lifestyle interventions in adults with Crohn's disease to maintain remission? What are the effects of surgical interventions in adults with small-bowel Crohn's disease to induce remission? What are the effects of surgical interventions in adults with colonic Crohn's disease to induce remission? What are the effects of medical interventions to maintain remission in adults with Crohn's disease; and to maintain remission following surgery? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to March 2006 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 60 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aminosalicylates, antibiotics, azathioprine/mercaptopurine, ciclosporin, corticosteroids (oral), enteral nutrition, fish oil, infliximab, methotrexate, probiotics, resection, segmental colectomy, smoking cessation, and strictureplasty.

  7. Dent's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakker Rajesh V

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dent's disease is a renal tubular disorder characterized by manifestations of proximal tubule dysfunction, including low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, and progressive renal failure. These features are generally found in males only, and may be present in early childhood, whereas female carriers may show a milder phenotype. Prevalence is unknown; the disorder has been reported in around 250 families to date. Complications such as rickets or osteomalacia may occur. The disease is caused by mutations in either the CLCN5 (Dent disease 1 or OCRL1 (Dent disease 2 genes that are located on chromosome Xp11.22 and Xq25, respectively. CLCN5 encodes the electrogenic Cl-/H+ exchanger ClC-5, which belongs to the CLC family of Cl- channels/transporters. OCRL1 encodes a phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2 5-phosphatase and mutations are also associated with Lowe Syndrome. The phenotype of Dent's disease is explained by the predominant expression of ClC-5 in the proximal tubule segments of the kidney. No genotype-phenotype correlation has been described thus far, and there is considerable intra-familial variability in disease severity. A few patients with Dent's disease do not harbour mutations in CLCN5 and OCRL1, pointing to the involvement of other genes. Diagnosis is based on the presence of all three of the following criteria: low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria and at least one of the following: nephrocalcinosis, kidney stones, hematuria, hypophosphatemia or renal insufficiency. Molecular genetic testing confirms the diagnosis. The differential diagnosis includes other causes of generalized dysfunction of the proximal tubules (renal Fanconi syndrome, hereditary, acquired, or caused by exogenous substances. Antenatal diagnosis and pre-implantation genetic testing is not advised. The care of patients with Dent's disease is supportive, focusing on the treatment of hypercalciuria and

  8. Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The mean age of onset of Parkinson's disease is about 65 years, with a median time of 9 years between diagnosis and death. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of fetal cell or stem cell......-derived therapy in people with Parkinson's disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to September 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from...

  9. Hashimoto's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diagnosed with hypothyroidism or had not yet started treatment for hypothyroidism. 4 Problems during pregnancy. The unborn baby's brain ... can last up to a year and requires treatment. Most often, thyroid function returns to normal as the ... from Hashimoto's disease treated during pregnancy? During pregnancy, ...

  10. Prionic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abelardo Q-C Araujo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are neurodegenerative illnesses due to the accumulation of small infectious pathogens containing protein but apparently lacking nucleic acid, which have long incubation periods and progress inexorably once clinical symptoms appear. Prions are uniquely resistant to a number of normal decontaminating procedures. The prionopathies [Kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD and its variants, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS syndrome and fatal familial insomnia (FFI] result from accumulation of abnormal isoforms of the prion protein in the brains of normal animals on both neuronal and non-neuronal cells. The accumulation of this protein or fragments of it in neurons leads to apoptosis and cell death. There is a strong link between mutations in the gene encoding the normal prion protein in humans (PRNP - located on the short arm of chromosome 20 – and forms of prion disease with a familial predisposition (familial CJD, GSS, FFI. Clinically a prionopathy should be suspected in any case of a fast progressing dementia with ataxia, myoclonus, or in individuals with pathological insomnia associated with dysautonomia. Magnetic resonance imaging, identification of the 14-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid, tonsil biopsy and genetic studies have been used for in vivo diagnosis circumventing the need of brain biopsy. Histopathology, however, remains the only conclusive method to reach a confident diagnosis. Unfortunately, despite numerous treatment efforts, prionopathies remain short-lasting and fatal diseases.

  11. Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a long and relatively healthy life. What Causes Parkinson's Disease? In the very deep parts of the brain, there is a collection of nerve cells that help control movement, known as the basal ganglia (say: BAY-sul GAN-glee-ah). In a ...

  12. Grover's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information for Authors Information for Reviewers Human & Animal Rights Job Postings Sections of the ... dermatosis) is a condition that appears suddenly as itchy red spots on the trunk, most often in older men. Minor cases of Grover's disease may be rather common. ...

  13. Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; Law, Ian; Jønch, Aia

    2011-01-01

    In this open-label pilot study, the authors evaluated the effect of memantine on the distribution of brain glucose metabolism in four Huntington's disease (HD) patients as determined by serial 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose [F(18)]FDG-PET scans over a period of 3-4 months (90-129 days, with one patient...

  14. Canavan disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affects how the body breaks down and uses aspartic acid . ... scan Head MRI scan Urine chemistry for elevated aspartic acid ... Matalon KM, Matalon RK. Aspartic acid (Canavan disease). In: ... JW III, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. ...

  15. DEVIC'S DISEASE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    had been poor in the right eye and he had found it hard to pass urine. ... right optic:-nerve disease, and was followed in 1880 by mention pupil was large and reacted very sluggishly to light, and the left .... The enzyme theory is that an enzyme-.

  16. Wilson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... yellowing of the skin and the whites of the eye (jaundice) Golden-brown eye discoloration (Kayser-Fleischer rings) Fluid buildup ... is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, which means that to develop the disease you must inherit one copy of the ...

  17. Morgellons disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accordino, Robert E; Engler, Danielle; Ginsburg, Iona H; Koo, John

    2008-01-01

    Morgellons disease, a pattern of dermatologic symptoms very similar, if not identical, to those of delusions of parasitosis, was first described many centuries ago, but has recently been given much attention on the internet and in the mass media. The present authors present a history of Morgellons disease, in addition to which they discuss the potential benefit of using this diagnostic term as a means of building trust and rapport with patients to maximize treatment benefit. The present authors also suggest "meeting the patient halfway" and creating a therapeutic alliance when providing dermatologic treatment by taking their cutaneous symptoms seriously enough to provide both topical ointments as well as antipsychotic medications, which can be therapeutic in these patients.

  18. Celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Jensen, Michael Dam; Reimer, Maria Christina

    2015-01-01

    This national clinical guideline approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology describes the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease (CD) in adults. CD is a chronic immunemediated enteropathy of the small intestine triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing proteins......, which are found in wheat, rye, and barley. The disease prevalence is 0.5-1.0%, but CD remains under-diagnosed. The diagnosis relies on the demonstration of lymphocyte infiltration, crypt hyperplasia, and villous atrophy in duodenal biopsies. Serology, malabsorption, biochemical markers......, and identification of specific HLA haplotypes may contribute to CD diagnosis. Classical CD presents with diarrhoea and weight loss, but non-classical CD with vague or extraintestinal symptoms is common. The treatment for CD is a lifelong gluten-free diet (GFD), which, in the majority of patients, normalises...

  19. disease patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setareh Mamishi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD is an inherited disorder of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase complex. This disorder results in recurrent life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections. Aspergillus species are the most common fungal infections in these patients. Case Report: Herein, we present a case of fungal infection in a girl with CGD. We confirmed aspergillosis through the positive microscopic and macroscopic examinations, as well as radiology results. Invasive aspergillosis in this patient with pneumonia, lung abscess, and osteomyelitis of the ribs was not initially treated with amphotericin B (Am B and recombinant interferon-gamma. Conclusion: Among infectious diseases, fungal infections, in particular aspergillosis, remain a serious problem in CGD patients. Considering poor clinical response and deficient immune system, rapid diagnosis of fungal infection and optimizing the treatment of these patients are recommended.

  20. [Addison's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinkler, M

    2012-09-01

    The clinical signs and symptoms of primary adrenal insufficiency are unspecific often causing a delayed diagnosis or even misdiagnosis. In the diagnostic work-up the short synacthen test is regarded as the gold standard. Hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone are the preferred therapy for Addison's disease. The management and surveillance of therapy requires experience and several aspects need to be followed to prevent side effects which might occur due to overtreatment or undertreatment. Very important aspects in therapy are the repeated teaching of the patient and relatives, the issuing of an emergency steroid card and the prescription of a glucocorticoid emergency set. Acute adrenal failure (adrenal crisis), which might be the first manifestation of adrenal insufficiency, is a life-threatening situation requiring immediate glucocorticoid administration and fluid substitution. The most common causes for an adrenal crisis are gastrointestinal infections and fever and discontinuation of glucocorticoid therapy. This article gives an up-to-date overview of diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of Addison's disease.

  1. Joint diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, S.D.

    1989-01-01

    The authors discuss how x-ray examination is essential in the diagnosis and evaluation of the arthritides. Most arthritides are first suspected by the clinician, and x-ray evaluation of these entities along with laboratory testing is important for confirmation of the clinical diagnosis and in staging of the disease process. Several arthritides are often diagnosed first by the podiatrist on x-ray evaluation, including pseudogout, ankylosing spondylitis, early rheumatoid arthritis, degenerative joint disease, and tuberculosis of bone. The joint responds to insult in only a limited number of ways that become apparent on x-ray. The soft tissues surrounding the joint, the articulating bones, and alignment of the joint space may all be involved by the arthritic process. On roentgenographic examination, the soft tissues must be examined for edema, masses, calcifications, and atrophy. The articulating bones must be examined for demineralization, erosions, osteophytes, periosteal reaction, cysts and sclerosis

  2. Thyroid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, S.

    1990-01-01

    Presenting a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease, this volume provides a comprehensive picture of current thyroid medicine and surgery. The book integrates the perspectives of the many disciplines that deal with the clinical manifestations of thyroid disorders. Adding to the clinical usefulness of the book is the state-of-the-art coverage of many recent developments in thyroidology, including the use of highly sensitive two-site TSH immunoradionetric measurements to diagnose thyroid activity; thyroglobulin assays in thyroid cancer and other diseases; new diagnostic applications of MRI and CT; treatment with radionuclides and chemotherapy; new developments in thyroid immunology, pathology, and management of hyperthyroidism; suppressive treatment with thyroid hormone; and management of Graves' ophthalmopathy. The book also covers all aspects of thyroid surgery, including surgical treatment of hyperthyroidism; papillary, follicular, and other carcinomas; thyroidectomy; and prevention and management of complications.

  3. Thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, S.

    1990-01-01

    Presenting a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease, this volume provides a comprehensive picture of current thyroid medicine and surgery. The book integrates the perspectives of the many disciplines that deal with the clinical manifestations of thyroid disorders. Adding to the clinical usefulness of the book is the state-of-the-art coverage of many recent developments in thyroidology, including the use of highly sensitive two-site TSH immunoradionetric measurements to diagnose thyroid activity; thyroglobulin assays in thyroid cancer and other diseases; new diagnostic applications of MRI and CT; treatment with radionuclides and chemotherapy; new developments in thyroid immunology, pathology, and management of hyperthyroidism; suppressive treatment with thyroid hormone; and management of Graves' ophthalmopathy. The book also covers all aspects of thyroid surgery, including surgical treatment of hyperthyroidism; papillary, follicular, and other carcinomas; thyroidectomy; and prevention and management of complications

  4. Gaucher's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainaux, B.; Christophe, C.; Hanquinet, S.; Perlmutter, N.

    1992-01-01

    We report our observations made by conventional radiography, ultrasound, computerized tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on a 3 1/2-year-old girl with Gaucher's disease. The interest of the case consists in the exceptional lungs involvement, the demonstration by MRI of the bone marrow involvement and the necrosis and fibrosis of the liver, as shown by CT. This liver complication has been previously reported only once. (orig.)

  5. Mitochondrial Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bulent Kurt; Turgut Topal

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are the major energy source of cells. Mitochondrial disease occurs due to a defect in mitochondrial energy production. A valuable energy production in mitochondria depend a healthy interconnection between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. A mutation in nuclear or mitochondrial DNA may cause abnormalities in ATP production and single or multiple organ dysfunctions, secondarily. In this review, we summarize mitochondrial physiology, mitochondrial genetics, and clinical expression and ...

  6. Cushing disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Esteche, V.; Menafra Prieto, M.; Ormaechea Gorricho, R.; Vignolo Scalone, G.; Larre Borges, A.

    1998-01-01

    A review of the Cushings disease in its various aspects. It highlights the importance of early diagnosis to avoid repercussions hypercortisolism secondary to parenchymal. We describe the findings in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), noting that the pituitary adenoma is often of small size and sometimes not visible on MRI. The treatment of choice remains surgical treatment other contingencies exist for particular cases (Author) [es

  7. Mucocutaneous manifestations in patients with chronic kidney disease: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattan S Rashpa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD-associated mucocutaneous manifestations significantly impair the quality of life but often remain understudied. They may also vary across regions, socioeconomic and nutritional status, and racial differences. Objectives: To study the patterns of mucocutaneous disorders and their prevalence in CKD patients irrespective of clinical stage or dialysis status. Materials and Methods: 122 (M:F = 77:45 patients aged 21‒85 (Mean ± SD = 57.5 ± 14.0 years having CKD for 3 month to 5 years were studied for mucocutaneous manifestations. Fifty (41% patients were on hemodialysis for 1‒42 months. Detailed medical history, clinical and mucocutaneous examination, and lab investigations were performed. KOH mounts, skin biopsy, Gram's and Giemsa staining, bacterial or fungal cultures were performed as required. Results: Xerosis in 93 (76.2%, skin pallor in 61 (50%, pruritus in 57 (46.7%, pigmentation in 47 (38.5%, and purpura in 18 (14.8% patients were the major dermatoses. Bullous lesions and perforating folliculitis occurred in 3 (2.5% patients each. Major nail abnormalities were pallor (in 35.2%, absent lunula (in 23.8%, nail discoloration (in 18%, and “half-and-half nails” in 16.4% patients, respectively. Hair abnormalities included sparse scalp and body hairs (in 35.2% and 13.1%, respectively and lusterless hair in 12.3% patients. Coated tongue (in 14.8%, xerostomia (in 12.3%, and macroglossia with teeth indention (in 7.4% patients were the mucosal manifestations. Conclusions: Xerosis, pruritus, skin pallor/pigmentary changes, nail pallor, absent lunula, nail discoloration, sparse hairs, coated tongue, xerostomia, macroglossia, and infections were the most common mucocutaneous manifestations in the studied patients irrespective of hemodialysis status. Cold and dry climates might be additional aggravators for xerosis/pruritus. Lifelong follow-up may be needed to reduce the morbidity associated with CKD

  8. Diabetic Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetic Eye Disease What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease is a group ... eye diseases that can threaten your sight are Diabetic retinopathy The retina is the inner lining at ...

  9. Heavy Chain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of heavy chain produced: Alpha Gamma Mu Alpha Heavy Chain Disease Alpha heavy chain disease (IgA heavy ... the disease or lead to a remission. Gamma Heavy Chain Disease Gamma heavy chain disease (IgG heavy ...

  10. Thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noma, Koji

    1992-01-01

    This chapter reviews the correlation between thyroid disease, other than cancer, and radiation in the literature. Radiation-induced thyroid disturbance is discussed in the context of external and internal irradiation. External irradiation of 10 to 40 Gy may lower thyroid function several months or years later. Oral administration of I-131 is widely given to patients with Basedow's disease; it may also lower thyroid function with increasing radiation doses. When giving 70 Gy or more of I-131, hypothyroidism has been reported to occur in 20-30% and at least 10%. Thyroiditis induced with internal I-131 irradiation has also been reported, but no data is available concerning external irradiation-induced thyroiditis. The incidence of nodular goiter was found to be several ten times higher with external irradiation than internal irradiation. Thyroid disturbance is correlated with A-bomb survivors. A-bomb radiation can be divided into early radiation within one minute after A-bombing and the subsequent residual radiation. Nodular goiter was significantly more frequent in the exposed group than the non-exposed group; it increased with increasing radiation doses and younger age (20 years or less) at the time of exposure. The incidence of decrease in thyroid function was higher with increasing radiation doses. However, in the case of Nagasaki, the incidence of hypothyroidism was significantly higher in the low-dose exposed group, especially A-bomb survivors aged 10-39 at the time of exposure and women. (N.K.)

  11. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk ...

  12. Diseases of the skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval', G.Yu.

    1984-01-01

    Different forms of skull diseases viz. inflammatory diseases, skull tumors, primary and secondary bone tumors, are considered. Roentgenograms in some above-mentioned diseases are presented and analysed

  13. Hirayama disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul T Tayade

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 17-year-old male, who gave up his favorite sport cricket and started playing football, presented with one-year history of slowly progressive atrophic weakness of forearms and hands. Neurological examination showed weak and wasted arms, forearms and hand but no evidence of pyramidal tract, spinothalmic tract and posterior column lesions. Plain cervical spine radiographs showed no abnormal findings. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed asymmetric cord atrophy; images obtained with neck flexed showed the anterior shifting of the posterior wall of the lower cervical dural sac resulting in cord compression. These findings suggest Hirayama disease, a kind of cervical myelopathy related to the flexion movements of the neck.

  14. Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find your local chapter Join our online community Parkinson's Disease Dementia Parkinson's disease dementia is an impairment ... disease. About Symptoms Diagnosis Causes & risks Treatments About Parkinson's disease dementia The brain changes caused by Parkinson's ...

  15. HIV and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Select a Language: Fact Sheet 652 HIV and Cardiovascular Disease HIV AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE WHY SHOULD PEOPLE WITH HIV CARE ABOUT CVD? ... OF CVD? WHAT ABOUT CHANGING MEDICATIONS? HIV AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE Cardiovascular disease (CVD) includes a group of problems ...

  16. What Is Celiac Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease" Articles Celiac Disease Changes Everything / What is Celiac Disease? / Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment / Four Inches and Seven Pounds… / Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease / Living Gluten-Free Spring 2015 Issue: Volume 10 ...

  17. Celiac Disease Changes Everything

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease" Articles Celiac Disease Changes Everything / What is Celiac Disease? / Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment / Four Inches and Seven Pounds… / Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease / Living Gluten-Free Spring 2015 Issue: Volume 10 ...

  18. Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Conditions Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Make an Appointment Find a Doctor ... by Barbara Goldstein, MD (February 01, 2016) Undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) is a systemic autoimmune disease. This ...

  19. Associated Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gland in the neck, thick and coarse hair. Addison’s Disease Arare disease involving the adrenal gland. The prevalence of celiac disease in people with addison’s disease is significant. Symptoms of Addison’s may include weight ...

  20. Genetics and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Well with Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Studying twins has ... 70%, and for non-identical pairs, even lower. Genetics and ankylosing spondylitis Each rheumatic disease has its ...

  1. Mad Cow Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Mad Cow Disease KidsHealth / For Teens / Mad Cow Disease What's ... are people to get it? What Is Mad Cow Disease? Mad cow disease is an incurable, fatal ...

  2. Niemann-Pick disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    NPD; Sphingomyelinase deficiency; Lipid storage disorder - Niemann-Pick disease; Lysosomal storage disease - Niemann-Pick ... lipofuscinoses or Batten disease (Wolman disease, cholesteryl ... metabolism of lipids. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, ...

  3. American Lyme Disease Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Infectious Diseases, 35: 451-464, 2002) What is Lyme Disease? Lyme disease (LD) is an infection caused by ... mission with your own tax-deductible contribution. American Lyme Disease Foundation, Inc. PO Box 466 Lyme, CT 06371 ...

  4. Heart disease and women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007188.htm Heart disease and women To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. People often DO NOT consider heart disease a woman's disease. Yet cardiovascular disease is the ...

  5. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 13,2017 Understand the risks of ... inflammation causes cardiovascular disease, inflammation is common for heart disease and stroke patients and is thought to be ...

  6. Men and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Men and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Source: Interactive Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke Heart Disease Facts in Men Heart disease is the leading ...

  7. Heart disease and diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - heart disease; CAD - diet; Coronary artery disease - diet; Coronary heart disease - diet ... diet and lifestyle can reduce your risk of: Heart disease, heart attacks, and stroke Conditions that lead ...

  8. Heart disease - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...

  9. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... buildup of plaque in the arteries to your heart. This may also be called hardening of the ...

  10. Osler's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlhelm, F.; Mueller, U.; Lieb, J.; Schneider, G.; Ulmer, S.

    2013-01-01

    Osler's disease, also known as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) and Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome, is an autosomal dominant disorder leading to abnormal blood vessel formation in the skin, mucous membranes and often in organs, such as the lungs, liver and brain (arteriovenous malformations AVM). Various types are known. Patients may present with epistaxis. Teleangiectasia can be identified by visual inspection during physical examination of the skin or oral cavity or by endoscopy. Diagnosis is made after clinical examination and genetic testing based on the Curacao criteria. Modern imaging modalities, such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have become more important as they can depict the AVMs. Pulmonary AVMs can be depicted in CT imaging even without the use of a contrast agent while other locations including the central nervous system (CNS) usually require administration of contrast agents. Knowledge of possible clinical manifestations in various organs, possible complications and typical radiological presentation is mandatory to enable adequate therapy of these patients. Interventional procedures are becoming increasingly more important in the treatment of HHT patients. (orig.) [de

  11. Renal disease in patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonpheng, Boonphiphop; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Wijarnpreecha, Karn

    2018-04-01

    Celiac disease, an inflammatory disease of small bowel caused by sensitivity to dietary gluten and related protein, affects approximately 0.5-1% of the population in the Western world. Extra-intestinal symptoms and associated diseases are increasingly recognized including diabetes mellitus type 1, thyroid disease, dermatitis herpetiformis and ataxia. There have also been a number of reports of various types of renal involvement in patients with celiac disease including diabetes nephropathy, IgA nephropathy, membranous nephropathy, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, nephrotic syndrome related to malabsorption, oxalate nephropathy, and associations of celiac disease with chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease. This review aims to present the current literature on possible pathologic mechanisms underlying renal disease in patients with celiac disease.

  12. Hematopoietic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dohi, Hiroo

    1992-01-01

    A-bombing panicked many people with anxiety because they suffered from various symptoms after A-bombing (ie, they generally called them A-bomb disease). In this chapter, major two conditions (ie, leukopenia and anemia), which caused their symptoms, are reviewed based on the early data soon after A-bombing. According to the chronological changes in both white blood cell (WBC) and red blood cell (RBC) counts, both leukopenia and anemia are discussed. The findings can be divided into acute (one week or at least 10 days), subacute (2 weeks to one month), and delayed (thereafter) periods. During an acute period, some exposed even at ≤200 m from the hypocenter showed WBC count of 6,000/mm 3 or more one week after exposure but others exposed at 1,500-2,000 m showed WBC count of less than 3,000/mm 3 , suggesting the influence of shielding on WBC count. WBC count sometimes became the lowest during a subacute period, although it was normal during an acute period. A survey for WBC count during a delayed period (one year later) showed that WBC count of less than 4,000/mm 3 was more frequent in the exposed group (78/523 A-bomb survivors, 14.9%) than the non-exposed group (6/173 persons, 3.5%). In the exposed group, leukopenia was independent of distance and symptoms at the time of exposure. For anemia, there was no data available during an acute period. Anemia frequently occurred during a subacute period. Morphological abnormality of RBC tended to be high in death cases. A delayed survey on anemia 10 years after exposure showed that there was no statistically significant difference in any of the factors, such as hemoglobin, RBC count, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin, between the exposed and non-exposed groups. (N.K.)

  13. CD1a, HAM56, CD68 and S-100 are present in lesional skin biopsies from patients affected by autoimmune blistering diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Previous research on autoimmune skin blistering diseases (ABD has primarily focused on the humoral immune response; moreover, little attention has been given to the potential role of the antigen presenting cells (APCs in lesional skin. Aim: The purpose of our study was to immunophenotype selected APC in the lesional skin of ABDs, utilizing immunohistochemistry (IHC stains. Materials and Methods: We utilized IHC to stain for dendritic cells (DC, staining with CD1a, CD68, HAM56, and S-100 in lesional skin from 30 patients with endemic pemphigus foliaceus (EPF, 15 controls from the EPF endemic area, and 15 healthy controls from the USA. We also tested archival biopsies from patients with selected ABD, including 30 patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP, 20 with pemphigus vulgaris (PV, 8 with pemphigus foliaceus (PF and 14 with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH and 2 with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA. Results: Cells stained by CD68, HAM56 and S-100 were present in the majority of the ABD skin biopsies; these cells were located primarily in perivascular infiltrates surrounding dermal vessels subjacent to the blisters. However, these cells were also noted within the blisters, in vessels supplying dermal eccrine glands and ducts, and in areas of dermal endothelial-mesenchymal cell junction-like structures, especially in BP cases. In our CD1a staining, the number and location of positive staining cells varied with each disease, being abundant in most ABD in the epidermis suprajacent to the blisters, or in the epidermis surrounding the blister site if the blister site epidermis was missing. In the control biopsies, most did not display positive IHC staining, with the exception of a few CD1a positive cells in the epidermis Conclusion: Our findings confirm positive IHC staining for APCs in areas of the skin besides the disease blisters. Our findings suggest that the antigen presentation in ABD proceeds in areas distant from the blister site

  14. Association between periodontal diseases and systemic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Weidlich

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Current evidence suggests that periodontal disease may be associated with systemic diseases. This paper reviewed the published data about the relationship between periodontal disease and cardiovascular diseases, adverse pregnancy outcomes, diabetes and respiratory diseases, focusing on studies conducted in the Brazilian population. Only a few studies were found in the literature focusing on Brazilians (3 concerning cardiovascular disease, 7 about pregnancy outcomes, 9 about diabetes and one regarding pneumonia. Although the majority of them observed an association between periodontitis and systemic conditions, a causal relationship still needs to be demonstrated. Further studies, particularly interventional well-designed investigations, with larger sample sizes, need to be conducted in Brazilian populations.

  15. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin Health and Skin Diseases Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin is the largest organ of your body? It ...

  16. Lysosomal storage disease 2 - Pompe's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, Ans T.; Reuser, Arnold J. J.

    2008-01-01

    Pompe's disease, glycogen-storage disease type II, and acid maltase deficiency are alternative names for the same metabolic disorder. It is a pan-ethnic autosomal recessive trait characterised by acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency leading to lysosomal glycogen storage. Pompe's disease is also

  17. Huntington's disease: a perplexing neurological disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Huntington's disease is an inherited intricate brain illness. It is a neurodegenerative, insidious disorder; the onset of the disease is very late to diagnose. It is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the Huntingtin gene, which encodes an abnormally long polyglutamine repeat in the Huntingtin protein. Huntington's disease ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Expert Briefings: Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease NY Nightly News with Chuck ... Briefings: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: ...

  19. Parkinson disease - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your doctor has told you that you have Parkinson disease . This disease affects the brain and leads ... have you take different medicines to treat your Parkinson disease and many of the problems that may ...

  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips for Care Partners Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Innovations in PD Nurse Education CareMAP: Managing Advanced Parkinson's ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis How Is Parkinson's Disease ...

  1. Understanding cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000759.htm Understanding cardiovascular disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... lead to heart attack or stroke. Types of Cardiovascular Disease Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common ...

  2. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Pediatric Celiac Disease If your child has celiac disease, ... physician. Established by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) Celiac Disease Eosinophilic ...

  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Conference: Lessons Learned How Does the DBS Device Work? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Managing Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis CareMAP: ...

  4. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many ... viruses. Sometimes the cause is not known. Degenerative nerve diseases include Alzheimer's disease Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Friedreich's ...

  5. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) is a rare and deadly disease ...

  6. Mixed Connective Tissue Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixed connective tissue disease Overview Mixed connective tissue disease has signs and symptoms of a combination of disorders — primarily lupus, scleroderma and polymyositis. For this reason, mixed connective tissue disease ...

  7. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 29,2018 The following ... clear that there is a strong correlation between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes. At least 68 percent ...

  8. Lou Gehrig's Disease (ALS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease. Who Gets ALS? Although this disease can strike anyone, ALS is extremely rare in kids. According ... home to provide care that the family cannot handle alone. Living With Lou Gehrig's Disease Living with ...

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Does Caregiving Change from Day to Day? Unconditional Love How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect the Urinary System? ... Mind Guide to Parkinson's Disease Guide to Deep Brain Stimulation Sleep: A Mind Guide to Parkinson’s Disease ...

  10. Lyme Disease Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... materials Why is CDC concerned about Lyme disease? Data and Statistics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... sixth most common Nationally Notifiable disease . Lyme Disease Data File To facilitate the public health and research ...

  11. Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Topics Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases Arthritis is often used to refer to any ... primary immunodeficiency syndrome March 11, 2013 Arthritis and Rheumatic Disease News Research Brief | January 9, 2017 Tofacitinib Shows ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis OHSU - Overview of Parkinson's ... Disease? What Are Some Strategies to Improve the Quality of Community Care for PD Patients? CareMAP: Dealing ...

  13. Chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    disease, together with other related non -communicable diseases. (NCDs), poses not only a threat ... but because if we do not act against NCDs we will also be increasing individual and ... respiratory diseases and cancer. This is in recognition ...

  14. Tay-Sachs Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay-Sachs disease is a rare, inherited disease. It is a type of lipid metabolism disorder. It causes too ... cells, causing mental and physical problems. . Infants with Tay-Sachs disease appear to develop normally for the first few ...

  15. Menopause and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Menopause and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 23,2017 Heart ... can become more evident after the onset of menopause. Menopause does not cause cardiovascular diseases . However, certain ...

  16. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cholangitis (formerly called primary biliary cirrhosis). This group of tests ...

  17. Lyme disease (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyme disease is an acute inflammatory disease characterized by skin changes, joint inflammation and symptoms similar to the ... that is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi . Lyme disease is transmitted by the bite of a deer ...

  18. Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... How many Americans over age 65 may have Alzheimer's disease? as many as 5 million as many ...

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Disease: One Voice, Many Listeners Expert Briefings: Medical Therapies: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: Under-recognized Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ...

  20. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Back to Patient Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Millions of people experience irregular or abnormal ... harmless and happen in healthy people free of heart disease. However, some abnormal heart rhythms can be serious ...

  1. Parasitic diseases of lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.C.; Rybakova, N.I.; Vinner, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Roentgenologic semiotics of the main parasitic diseases of lungs is described: echinococcosis, paragonimiasis, cysticercosis, toxoplasmosis, ascariasis, amebiosis and some rarely met parasitic diseases

  2. Biomarker for Glycogen Storage Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-03

    Fructose Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Glycogen Storage Disease; Glycogen Storage Disease Type I; Glycogen Storage Disease Type II; Glycogen Storage Disease Type III; Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV; Glycogen Storage Disease Type V; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VI; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VII; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VIII

  3. Diabetes and Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... some in the family will have celiac disease. • Symptoms of celiac disease vary widely, but are often absent in persons ... Abnormal labs XX Diabetes and Celiac Disease | continued CELIAC DISEASE Classic symptoms... Gas, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, vomiting, weight loss, anemia. ...

  4. Poorly Responsive Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Close Celiac Disease Understanding Celiac Disease What is Celiac Disease? Symptoms Screening and Diagnosis Treatment and Follow-Up Dermatitis ... Schuppan D, Kelly CP. Etiologies and predictors of diagnosis in nonresponsive celiac disease. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2007; 5 : 445–50. Finding ...

  5. The integrated disease network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Buchan, Natalie; Larminie, Chris; Pržulj, Nataša

    2014-11-01

    The growing body of transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic and genomic data generated from disease states provides a great opportunity to improve our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving diseases and shared between diseases. The use of both clinical and molecular phenotypes will lead to better disease understanding and classification. In this study, we set out to gain novel insights into diseases and their relationships by utilising knowledge gained from system-level molecular data. We integrated different types of biological data including genome-wide association studies data, disease-chemical associations, biological pathways and Gene Ontology annotations into an Integrated Disease Network (IDN), a heterogeneous network where nodes are bio-entities and edges between nodes represent their associations. We also introduced a novel disease similarity measure to infer disease-disease associations from the IDN. Our predicted associations were systemically evaluated against the Medical Subject Heading classification and a statistical measure of disease co-occurrence in PubMed. The strong correlation between our predictions and co-occurrence associations indicated the ability of our approach to recover known disease associations. Furthermore, we presented a case study of Crohn's disease. We demonstrated that our approach not only identified well-established connections between Crohn's disease and other diseases, but also revealed new, interesting connections consistent with emerging literature. Our approach also enabled ready access to the knowledge supporting these new connections, making this a powerful approach for exploring connections between diseases.

  6. Epigenetics of kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Nicola; Bechtel-Walz, Wibke

    2017-07-01

    DNA methylation and histone modifications determine renal programming and the development and progression of renal disease. The identification of the way in which the renal cell epigenome is altered by environmental modifiers driving the onset and progression of renal diseases has extended our understanding of the pathophysiology of kidney disease progression. In this review, we focus on current knowledge concerning the implications of epigenetic modifications during renal disease from early development to chronic kidney disease progression including renal fibrosis, diabetic nephropathy and the translational potential of identifying new biomarkers and treatments for the prevention and therapy of chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease.

  7. [Periodontal disease in pediatric rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabri, Gisele M C; Savioli, Cynthia; Siqueira, José T; Campos, Lucia M; Bonfá, Eloisa; Silva, Clovis A

    2014-01-01

    Gingivitis and periodontitis are immunoinflammatory periodontal diseases characterized by chronic localized infections usually associated with insidious inflammation This narrative review discusses periodontal diseases and mechanisms influencing the immune response and autoimmunity in pediatric rheumatic diseases (PRD), particularly juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (C-SLE) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Gingivitis was more frequently observed in these diseases compared to health controls, whereas periodontitis was a rare finding. In JIA patients, gingivitis and periodontitis were related to mechanical factors, chronic arthritis with functional disability, dysregulation of the immunoinflammatory response, diet and drugs, mainly corticosteroids and cyclosporine. In C-SLE, gingivitis was associated with longer disease period, high doses of corticosteroids, B-cell hyperactivation and immunoglobulin G elevation. There are scarce data on periodontal diseases in JDM population, and a unique gingival pattern, characterized by gingival erythema, capillary dilation and bush-loop formation, was observed in active patients. In conclusion, gingivitis was the most common periodontal disease in PRD. The observed association with disease activity reinforces the need for future studies to determine if resolution of this complication will influence disease course or severity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Occupational skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahler, V; Aalto-Korte, K; Alfonso, J H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Work-related skin diseases (WSD) are caused or worsened by a professional activity. Occupational skin diseases (OSD) need to fulfil additional legal criteria which differ from country to country. OSD range amongst the five most frequently notified occupational diseases (musculoskeletal...... diseases, neurologic diseases, lung diseases, diseases of the sensory organs, skin diseases) in Europe. OBJECTIVE: To retrieve information and compare the current state of national frameworks and pathways to manage patients with occupational skin disease with regard to prevention, diagnosis, treatment...... in Science and Technology (COST) Action TD 1206 (StanDerm) (www.standerm.eu). RESULTS: Besides a national health service or a statutory health insurance, most European member states implemented a second insurance scheme specifically geared at occupational diseases [insurance against occupational risks...

  9. Pregnancy and periodontal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sağlam, Ebru; Saruhan, Nesrin; Çanakçı, Cenk Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Some maternal immunological changes due to pregnancy increases susceptibility to infections. Periodontal disease, the main cause is plaque, is a common disease which is seen multifactorial and varying severity. There are many clinical criteria for diagnosis of periodontal disease. Correlation between pregnancy and periodontal inflammation is known for many years. Periodontal disease affects pregnant’s systemic condition and also has negative effects on fetus. Periodontal disease increases the...

  10. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease and prion disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelenboom, P.; Bate, C.; van Gool, W. A.; Hoozemans, J. J. M.; Rozemuller, J. M.; Veerhuis, R.; Williams, A.

    2002-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and prion disease are characterized neuropathologically by extracellular deposits of Abeta and PrP amyloid fibrils, respectively. In both disorders, these cerebral amyloid deposits are co-localized with a broad variety of inflammation-related proteins (complement factors,

  11. Human Environmental Disease Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Audouze, Karine

    2017-01-01

    During the past decades, many epidemiological, toxicological and biological studies have been performed to assess the role of environmental chemicals as potential toxicants for diverse human disorders. However, the relationships between diseases based on chemical exposure have been rarely studied...... by computational biology. We developed a human environmental disease network (EDN) to explore and suggest novel disease-disease and chemical-disease relationships. The presented scored EDN model is built upon the integration on systems biology and chemical toxicology using chemical contaminants information...... and their disease relationships from the reported TDDB database. The resulting human EDN takes into consideration the level of evidence of the toxicant-disease relationships allowing including some degrees of significance in the disease-disease associations. Such network can be used to identify uncharacterized...

  12. Menopause and Rheumatic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talsania, Mitali; Scofield, Robert Hal

    2017-05-01

    Menopause occurs naturally in women at about 50 years of age. There is a wealth of data concerning the relationship of menopause to systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoarthritis; there are limited data concerning other rheumatic diseases. Age at menopause may affect the risk and course of rheumatic diseases. Osteoporosis, an integral part of inflammatory rheumatic diseases, is made worse by menopause. Hormone replacement therapy has been studied; its effects vary depending on the disease and even different manifestations within the same disease. Cyclophosphamide can induce early menopause, but there is underlying decreased ovarian reserve in rheumatic diseases. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Wilson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figen Hanağası

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Wilson’s disease is a autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism. Clinical phenotypes include hepatic, haemolytic, neurologic and psychiatric diseases. Wilson’s disease is caused by mutations in the ATP7B gene. ATP7B encodes a hepatic copper-transporting protein, which is important for copper excretion into bile. Neurological symptoms in Wilson’s disease include variable combinations of dysathria, ataxia, parkinsonism, dystonia and tremor. Wilson’s disease is lethal if untreated. This review discusses the epidemiology, genetics, clinical features, etiopathophysiology, diagnostic tests, and treatment of Wilson’s disease

  14. BULLOUS DEGENERATION OF THE LEFT LOWER LOBE IN A HEROIN-ADDICT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SMEENK, FWJM; SERLIE, J; VANDERJAGT, EJ; POSTMUS, PE

    1990-01-01

    A 34 yr old heroin addict was referred because of chest pain caused by air-trapping in a bulla in the left lower lobe. There was a marked difference between the functional residual capacity measured by body-plethysmography and helium dilution. A slow wash-in and wash-out were demonstrated by

  15. The need for direct immunofluorescence in the diagnosis of IgA bullous dermatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    A dermatose bolhosa por imunoglobulina da classe A linear (DbIgA) do adulto é uma doença autoimune rara caracterizada por formação de bolhas subepidérmicas e depósito linear de imunoglobulina da classe A (IgA) na zona da membrana basal (ZMB). Por possuir aspectos clínicos e histológicos semelhantes a outras dermatoses bolhosas, principalmente a dermatite herpetiforme e o penfigoide bolhoso, faz-se necessária a realização de imunofluorescência direta para confirmação diagnóstica. Apresenta-se ...

  16. Serratia marcescens Bullous Cellulitis in a Splenectomized Patient: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, John B; Dabiri, Ganary; Thomas, Vinod; Skowron, Gail; Carson, Polly; Falanga, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    Serratia marcescens is a Gram-negative bacillus belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae family. Cutaneous infection with Serratia is rare, and usually occurs in immunocompromised individuals. Primary cutaneous infections are uncommon, but they are typically severe and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The pathogenetic factors leading to S. marcescens infection are not fully understood, but contributing virulence factors include proteases, secreted exotoxins, and the formation of biofilm. We report a case of cellulitis occurring in a splenectomized patient, which led to multiple wound debridements and a transmetatarsal amputation. This dramatic case led us to review the published literature on soft tissue infections caused by S. marcescens. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. [Anesthesia for thoracoscopic laser ablation of bullae in a patient with severe bullous emphysema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Y; Hayashida, M; Arita, H; Hanaoka, K

    1995-05-01

    A 46-year-old male underwent laser-ablation of emphysematous bullae of the right lung via thoracoscope. For almost a year he had been bedridden because of severe dyspnea on exertion, in spite of medication and oxygen therapy. He also complained of orthopnea at rest and had suffered from body weight loss of 10 kg during the preceding year. Radiologic examination revealed emphysemotous lung with bilateral giant bullae. In spirogram, forced vital capacity in 1 second was markedly low (0.45 l, corresponding to 19% in %FVC1.0), vital capacity moderately depressed (2.41 l, 64%) and residual volume markedly elevated (5.85 l, 387%). Anesthesia was induced and maintained using the combination of thoracic-epidural anesthesia and intravenous anesthesia (midazolam and fentanyl). One lung ventilation (OLV) was used to facilitate thoracoscopic procedure. Mechanical ventilation was conducted at first with an anesthesia ventilator. As the duration of OLV was prolonged, however, the peak airway pressure increased, the tidal volume decreased and the value of percutaneous arterial hemoglobin saturation (SpO2) declined. In order to keep adequate oxygenation, brief periods of two lung ventilation (TLV) became necessary, in addition to the application of continuous positive airway pressure to the non-dependent lung. When ventilation was changed from volume-cycled ventilation to pressure-cycled and from using an anesthesia ventilator to a critical care type ventilator (Servo 900C), sufficient tidal volume was achieved with lower peak airway pressure, producing reasonable Spo2 value with much less frequent TLV. At the end of the surgery bronchopleural fistulae still persisted, with resultant air leak of about 50% of inspired tidal volume.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Bullous eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome) associated with Churg-Strauss syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuttelaar, M L A; Jonkman, M F

    We report a patient with Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) with asthma, eosinophilia, nasal polyposis and ANCA-associated multisystem vasculitis, who's skin eruption started with erythematous urticarial-plaques followed by haemorrhagic bullae. Histology of the plaques revealed 'flame figures' in the

  19. Association Between Inflammatory Skin Disease and Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Co-Morbidities in US Adults: Analysis of Nationwide Inpatient Sample Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwa, Michael C; Silverberg, Jonathan I

    2017-12-01

    Psoriasis, atopic dermatitis or eczema (AD-E), pemphigus, bullous pemphigoid (BP), and hidradenitis are chronic inflammatory skin disorders associated with systemic immune activation, considerable symptom burden, stigma, functional disturbances, and mental health symptoms. All of these might increase cardiovascular risk. The objective of this study was to determine whether these inflammatory skin diseases are associated with increased cardiovascular/cerebrovascular risk and/or disease. We analyzed data from the 2002-2012 National Inpatient Sample, including a representative 20% sample of all US hospitalizations (n = 72,108,077 adults). In multivariate logistic regression models with propensity score matching, patients hospitalized with versus without a diagnosis the inflammatory skin diseases examined had higher odds of obesity (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] for pemphigus: 1.16 [1.05-1.29]; BP 1.14 [1.06-1.23]; AD-E: 1.82 [1.79-1.86]; psoriasis: 2.36 [2.32-2.41]; hidradenitis: 2.79 [2.59-3.01]). Inflammatory skin disease was also associated with significantly higher odds of different cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension (pemphigus: 1.39 [1.31-1.48]; BP 1.96 [1.88-2.05]; AD-E: 1.19 [1.17-1.21]; psoriasis: 1.61 [1.59-1.64]), and diabetes mellitus with complications (pemphigus: 1.34 [1.18-1.52]; BP: 2.06 [1.90-2.24]; AD-E: 1.13 [1.10-1.17]; psoriasis: 1.39 [1.35-1.44]), as well as vascular, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular disease, including peripheral vascular disease (pemphigus: 1.14 [1.00-1.30]; BP: 1.83 [1.69-1.98]; AD-E: 1.18 [1.14-1.22]; psoriasis: 1.32 [1.28-1.35]), peripheral and visceral atherosclerosis (BP: 1.67 [1.53-1.81]; AD-E: 1.16 [1.12-1.20]; psoriasis: 1.27 [1.24-1.30]), pulmonary circulation disorders (pemphigus: 1.67 [1.39-2.01]; BP: 2.17 [1.92-2.45]; AD-E: 1.39 [1.33-1.45]; psoriasis: 1.37 [1.31-1.43]), congestive heart failure (pemphigus: 1.75 [1.60-1.90]; BP: 2.82 [2.68-2.98]; AD-E: 1.10 [1.07-1.13]; psoriasis: 1.05 [1

  20. Lysosomal storage diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Carlos R.; Gahl, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are cytoplasmic organelles that contain a variety of different hydrolases. A genetic deficiency in the enzymatic activity of one of these hydrolases will lead to the accumulation of the material meant for lysosomal degradation. Examples include glycogen in the case of Pompe disease, glycosaminoglycans in the case of the mucopolysaccharidoses, glycoproteins in the cases of the oligosaccharidoses, and sphingolipids in the cases of Niemann-Pick disease types A and B, Gaucher disease, Tay-Sachs disease, Krabbe disease, and metachromatic leukodystrophy. Sometimes, the lysosomal storage can be caused not by the enzymatic deficiency of one of the hydrolases, but by the deficiency of an activator protein, as occurs in the AB variant of GM2 gangliosidosis. Still other times, the accumulated lysosomal material results from failed egress of a small molecule as a consequence of a deficient transporter, as in cystinosis or Salla disease. In the last couple of decades, enzyme replacement therapy has become available for a number of lysosomal storage diseases. Examples include imiglucerase, taliglucerase and velaglucerase for Gaucher disease, laronidase for Hurler disease, idursulfase for Hunter disease, elosulfase for Morquio disease, galsulfase for Maroteaux-Lamy disease, alglucosidase alfa for Pompe disease, and agalsidase alfa and beta for Fabry disease. In addition, substrate reduction therapy has been approved for certain disorders, such as eliglustat for Gaucher disease. The advent of treatment options for some of these disorders has led to newborn screening pilot studies, and ultimately to the addition of Pompe disease and Hurler disease to the Recommended Uniform Screening Panel (RUSP) in 2015 and 2016, respectively. PMID:29152458

  1. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease - A multisystem disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolasevic, Ivana; Milic, Sandra; Turk Wensveen, Tamara; Grgic, Ivana; Jakopcic, Ivan; Stimac, Davor; Wensveen, Felix; Orlic, Lidija

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common comorbidities associated with overweight and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Importantly, NAFLD is one of its most dangerous complications because it can lead to severe liver pathologies, including fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatic cellular carcinoma. Given the increasing worldwide prevalence of obesity, NAFLD has become the most common cause of chronic liver disease and therefore is a major global health problem. Currently, NAFLD is predominantly regarded as a hepatic manifestation of MetS. However, accumulating evidence indicates that the effects of NAFLD extend beyond the liver and are negatively associated with a range of chronic diseases, most notably cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is becoming increasingly clear that these diseases are the result of the same underlying pathophysiological processes associated with MetS, such as insulin resistance, chronic systemic inflammation and dyslipidemia. As a result, they have been shown to be independent reciprocal risk factors. In addition, recent data have shown that NAFLD actively contributes to aggravation of the pathophysiology of CVD, T2DM, and CKD, as well as several other pathologies. Thus, NAFLD is a direct cause of many chronic diseases associated with MetS, and better detection and treatment of fatty liver disease is therefore urgently needed. As non-invasive screening methods for liver disease become increasingly available, detection and treatment of NAFLD in patients with MetS should therefore be considered by both (sub-) specialists and primary care physicians. PMID:27920470

  2. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Library is an extensive collection of books, fact sheets, videos, podcasts, and more. To get started, use ...

  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... PD Library Search library Topic Type Expert Briefings: Marijuana and PD: What Do We Really Know? Nurse ... Mind Guide to Parkinson's Disease Guide to Deep Brain Stimulation Sleep: A Mind Guide to Parkinson’s Disease ...

  4. Lyme Disease Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not known to transmit Lyme disease include Lone star ticks ( Amblyomma americanum ), the American dog tick ( Dermacentor ... of Vector-Borne Diseases (DVBD) Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs ...

  5. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Beckham Leads Stretches Is Compulsive Behavior a Side Effect of PD Medications? What Are Some Practical Strategies ...

  6. APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At a ... help understand the role of genetic factors in cardiovascular disease . However, the testing is sometimes used in clinical ...

  7. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Learn More Research Research We Fund Parkinson's Outcomes Project Grant Opportunities Science News & Progress Patient Engagement Research ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies ...

  8. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Conference: Lessons Learned How Does the DBS Device Work? Why Is It Important to Continue Self-Care ...

  9. Children and Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... because they disproportionately affect impoverished people. More on: Neglected Tropical Diseases Prevention One of the most important ways to help prevent these parasitic diseases is to teach children the importance of washing hands correctly with soap ...

  10. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... with Advanced Parkinson's How Does the DBS Device Work? What Are the Strategies for Managing Problems with ...

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... 2016: Coping Strategy: Yoga & Stretching CareMAP: Medications and General Health Part 1 Expert Briefings: Depression and PD: ...

  12. Celiac Disease: Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Greg; Feighery, Conleth F

    2015-01-01

    Historically the diagnosis of celiac disease has relied upon clinical, serological, and histological evidence. In recent years the use of sensitive serological methods has meant an increase in the diagnosis of celiac disease. The heterogeneous nature of the disorder presents a challenge in the study and diagnosis of the disease with patients varying from subclinical or latent disease to patients with overt symptoms. Furthermore the related gluten-sensitive disease dermatitis herpetiformis, while distinct in some respects, shares clinical and serological features with celiac disease. Here we summarize current best practice for the diagnosis of celiac disease and briefly discuss newer approaches. The advent of next-generation assays for diagnosis and newer clinical protocols may result in more sensitive screening and ultimately the possible replacement of the intestinal biopsy as the gold standard for celiac disease diagnosis.

  13. Celiac Disease Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diet When To Get Tested? When you have symptoms suggesting celiac disease, such as chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, anemia , and ... Celiac tests are usually ordered for people with symptoms suggesting celiac disease, including anemia and abdominal pain. Sometimes celiac testing ...

  14. Addison's Disease: Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison's disease Diagnosis Your doctor will talk to you first about your medical history and your signs and ... If your doctor thinks that you may have Addison's disease, you may undergo some of the following tests: ...

  15. Lyme disease antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript. The Lyme disease blood test looks for antibodies in the blood to the bacteria that causes ... needed. A laboratory specialist looks for Lyme disease antibodies in the blood sample using the ELISA test . ...

  16. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... There is a lot to know about Parkinson's disease. Learn about symptoms, how it is diagnosed and ... quality of life and live well with Parkinson's disease. Learn More Expert Care Patient Centered Care Centers ...

  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Conference: Lessons Learned How Does the DBS Device Work? CareMAP: Cambios para Realizar en Casa, Parte 1 ...

  19. Fatty Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    What is fatty liver disease? Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. Fatty liver disease is a condition in which fat builds ...

  20. Gum Disease and Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Club Program Perio Store Education & Careers Careers in Periodontics Perio Exam for Dental Licensure Recommended Competencies Periodontal ... your risk of cardiovascular disease. Both diseases are chronic inflammatory conditions, and researchers believe that inflammation is ...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies ... to Know? Why Is Comprehensive Care or Team Approach Important? 2013 PSA Featuring Katie Couric What Are ...

  2. Progression of Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... for Following a Medication Schedule? CareMAP: Medications and General Health Part 1 What Is Patient-Centered Care? ...

  4. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies for Problems with Urination? CareMAP: Changes Around the ...

  5. Valvular heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gelson, E; Gatzoulis, M; Johnson, M

    2007-01-01

    Valvular disease may be unmasked in pregnancy when physiological changes increase demands on the heart. Women with valvular heart disease require close follow-up during pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum

  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... for Parkinson's Care Partners OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Is the Progression ... Disease? What Are Some Strategies to Improve the Quality of Community Care for PD Patients? Hallucinations and ...

  7. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping Skills for ... the Helpline? What are some strategies to prevent falls in PD patients? How Does Speech Therapy Help ...

  8. Machado-Joseph Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregiver Education » Fact Sheets Machado-Joseph Disease Fact Sheet What is Machado-Joseph disease? What are the ... the repeat is in a protein-producing or coding region of the gene. Modifications of the mutant ...

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping Skills for ... or Exercise Programs Are Recommended? CareMAP: Movement and Falls: Part 1 Expert Briefings: Depression and PD: Treatment ...

  10. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Patients with Parkinson's Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis CareMAP: Movimientos y Caídas, Parte 2 What Are Some Strategies for Problems with Urination? Caregiver ...

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Learn More Research Research We Fund Parkinson's Outcomes Project Grant Opportunities Science News & Progress Patient Engagement Research ... Is Parkinson's Disease Diagnosed? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis CareMAP: Getting Dressed What ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... and Apathy in Parkinson's Disease Nurse Webinars: Interdisciplinary Education on Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation and Travel with PD Expert Briefings: Sleep and Parkinson's Nurse: ...

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Excessive Daytime Sleepiness? Is Compulsive Behavior a Side Effect of PD Medications? CareMAP: Putting Things in Place ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Bringing Care to You Expert Care Programs Professional Education Expert Care Research shows people with Parkinson’s who ... and Apathy in Parkinson's Disease Nurse Webinars: Interdisciplinary Education on Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease: Financial, Legal and Medical Planning Tips for Care Partners Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: ... and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: Planning Ahead When You are Living with Parkinson's Expert ...

  16. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... PD: What Do We Really Know? Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Improving Caregiver Strain through Science and Model ... Disease Psychosis: Hallucinations, Delusions and Paranoia Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Understanding Fatigue and Apathy in Parkinson's Disease ...

  17. Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People Who Were Treated with hGH Thyroid Disease & Pregnancy Thyroid disease is a group of disorders that ... prescribes. What role do thyroid hormones play in pregnancy? Thyroid hormones are crucial for normal development of ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's There is a lot to know about Parkinson's disease. Learn about symptoms, how it is diagnosed and ... your quality of life and live well with Parkinson's disease. Learn More Expert Care Patient Centered Care Centers ...

  19. Glomerular Disease in Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Wiles

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Gender differences exist in the prevalence of glomerular diseases. Data based on histological diagnosis underestimate the prevalence of preeclampsia, which is almost certainly the commonest glomerular disease in the world, and uniquely gender-specific. Glomerular disease affects fertility via disease activity, the therapeutic use of cyclophosphamide, and underlying chronic kidney disease. Techniques to preserve fertility during chemotherapy and risk minimization of artificial reproductive techniques are considered. The risks, benefits, and effectiveness of different contraceptive methods for women with glomerular disease are outlined. Glomerular disease increases the risk of adverse outcomes in pregnancy, including preeclampsia; yet, diagnosis of preeclampsia is complicated by the presence of hypertension and proteinuria that precede pregnancy. The role of renal biopsy in pregnancy is examined, in addition to the use of emerging angiogenic biomarkers. The safety of drugs prescribed for glomerular disease in relation to reproductive health is detailed. The impact of both gender and pregnancy on long-term prognosis is discussed.

  20. Genetic Disease Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... has used its fundraising efforts to help further research programs at Mount Sinai. Spotlight: Gaucher Gaucher Disease is the most common of the lipid storage diseases. Learn about its symptoms, how it ...

  1. Tay-Sachs Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... better understanding of how neurological deficits arise in lipid storage diseases and on the development of new treatments targeting disease mechanisms. Specific research on the gangliodisoses including expanding the use of ...

  2. Acid Lipase Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Neurological Disorders and Stroke conducts and supports research to understand lipid storage diseases such as acid lipase deficiency and ... of Neurological Disorders and Stroke conducts and supports research to understand lipid storage diseases such as acid lipase deficiency and ...

  3. Maple syrup urine disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000373.htm Maple syrup urine disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a disorder in ...

  4. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Help with Cognitive Impairment? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis: A Caregiver’s Story What Are Some Strategies for Problems with Urination? CareMAP: Las Actividades en ...

  5. [Emerging noninfectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consiglio, Ezequiel

    2008-11-01

    In recent years, emerging diseases were defined as being infectious, acquiring high incidence, often suddenly, or being a threat or an unexpected phenomenon. This study discusses the hallmarks of emerging diseases, describing the existence of noninfectious emerging diseases, and elaborating on the advantages of defining noninfectious diseases as emerging ones. From the discussion of various mental health disorders, nutritional deficiencies, external injuries and violence outcomes, work injuries and occupational health, and diseases due to environmental factors, the conclusion is drawn that a wide variety of noninfectious diseases can be defined as emergent. Noninfectious emerging diseases need to be identified in order to improve their control and management. A new definition of "emergent disease" is proposed, one that emphasizes the pathways of emergence and conceptual traits, rather than descriptive features.

  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... What Medications Help with Cognitive Impairment? CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving Help is just a click away. ...

  7. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... library Topic Type Living Alone: Home Safety and Management in PD Expert Briefings: Marijuana and PD: What ... Misconceptions About Parkinson's Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies ...

  8. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Pensamiento y el Comportamiento, Parte 2 CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving Jose Maria Lobo: Musica en vivo ...

  9. Motor Neuron Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and other neurodegenerative diseases to better understand the function of neurons and other support cells and identify candidate therapeutic ... and other neurodegenerative diseases to better understand the function of neurons and other support cells and identify candidate therapeutic ...

  10. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... this disease. Learn more In your area About Shop A A ... Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Improving Caregiver Strain through Science and Model Interventions Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease Psychosis: ...

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... library Topic Type Living Alone: Home Safety and Management in PD Expert Briefings: Marijuana and PD: What ... Overview of Parkinson's Disease OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Is There a Cure ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Delusions and Paranoia Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Understanding Fatigue and Apathy in Parkinson's Disease Nurse Webinars: Interdisciplinary ... Missing? Communication and the PD Partnership Expert Briefings: Fatigue, Sleep Disorders and Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: What's ...

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Learn More Research Research We Fund Parkinson's Outcomes Project Grant Opportunities Science News & Progress Patient Engagement Research ... Help with Cognitive Impairment? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis: A ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Learn More Research Research We Fund Parkinson's Outcomes Project Grant Opportunities Science News & Progress Patient Engagement Research ... Help with Freezing Episodes? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Overview of Parkinson's Disease ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  16. Gallstone disease and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel Mønsted; Sørensen, Lars Tue; Jørgensen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this cohort study was to determine whether subjects with gallstone disease identified by screening of a general population had increased overall mortality when compared to gallstone-free participants and to explore causes of death. METHODS: The study population (N...... built. RESULTS: Gallstone disease was present in 10%. Mortality was 46% during median 24.7 years of follow-up with 1% lost. Overall mortality and death from cardiovascular diseases were significantly associated to gallstone disease. Death from unknown causes was significantly associated to gallstone...... disease and death from cancer and gastrointestinal disease was not associated. No differences in mortality for ultrasound-proven gallstones or cholecystectomy were identified. CONCLUSIONS: Gallstone disease is associated with increased overall mortality and to death from cardiovascular disease. Gallstones...

  17. Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rule out conditions such as asthma , cystic fibrosis , acid reflux, heart disease, neuromuscular disease, and immune deficiency. Various ... a lung infection. Acid-blocking medicines can prevent acid reflux, which can lead to aspiration. Lung Transplant A ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  1. Takayasu's disease and pregnancy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    basic disease appears to be unaffected by pregnancy. S Afr Med J ... Takayasu's disease is an idiopathic chronic granulomatous .... prevalence of tuberculosis in Asia." In our 3 .... lower limbs may be significantly lower than the central blood.

  2. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth / For Kids / Chronic Kidney Diseases What's ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  3. Hypertensive heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000163.htm Hypertensive heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hypertensive heart disease refers to heart problems that occur because of ...

  4. Heart disease and intimacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000540.htm Heart disease and intimacy To use the sharing features on ... Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald’s Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  5. Aspirin and heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000092.htm Aspirin and heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... healthy people who are at low risk for heart disease. You provider will consider your overall medical condition ...

  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  7. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  8. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Managing Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Is the Relationship Between Depression and Parkinson's Disease? What Are Some Strategies for Problems with Urination? Hallucinations and Delusions CareMAP: ...

  10. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Briefings: Dealing with Dementia in PD Expert Briefings: Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's ... and Tomorrow Expert Briefings: A Closer Look at Anxiety and Depression in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Driving ...

  11. Congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a problem with the heart's structure and function that is present at birth. ... Fraser CD, Kane LC. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM Jr, ... Sabiston Textbook of Surgery: The Biological Basis of Modern ...

  12. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About CDC.gov . Home About Heart Disease Coronary Artery Disease Heart Attack Heart Attack Signs and Symptoms ... Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO ( ...

  13. Leprosy (Hansen's Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Leprosy (Hansen's Disease) Credit: NIAID Some classic histopathologic changes ... as Mycobacterium leprae . Why Is the Study of Leprosy (Hansen's Disease) a Priority for NIAID? At the ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sexual Dysfunction? Attachment: consultation.jpg What Is the Relationship Between Depression and Parkinson's Disease? OHSU - Therapeutic Approaches for PD: Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis: A Caregiver’s Story CareMAP: ...

  15. Myonecrosis of Behcet's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubbs, Alana Y.; Taljanovic, Mihra S.; Massey, Brandon Z.; Graham, Anna R.; Friend, Christopher J.; Walsh, Joshua A.

    2008-01-01

    Behcet's disease is an inflammatory disease of unknown cause characterized by intermittent episodes of acute inflammation manifested by oral aphthous ulcers, genital ulcers, uveitis, and skin lesions. We report a rare case of myonecrosis associated with Behcet's disease. Myonecrosis of Behcet's disease can mimic soft tissue abscess and therefore awareness of this entity in the appropriate clinical setting is important for initiation of appropriate and timely treatment. (orig.)

  16. Addison′s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Soumya Brata Sarkar; Subrata Sarkar; Supratim Ghosh; Subhankar Bandyopadhyay

    2012-01-01

    Addison's disease is a rare endocrinal disorder, with several oral and systemic manifestations. A variety of pathological processes may cause Addison's disease. Classically, hyperpigmentation is associated with the disease, and intraoral pigmentation is perceived as the initial sign and develops earlier than the dermatological pigmentation. The symptoms of the disease usually progress slowly and an event of illness or accident can make the condition worse and may lead to a life-threatening cr...

  17. Parkinson's disease and anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, K; Bennett, G

    2001-01-01

    There has been a recent surge of interest in the subject of anxiety in patients with Parkinson's disease. Up to 40% of patients with Parkinson's disease experience clinically significant anxiety. This anxiety may be a psychological reaction to the stress of the illness or may be related to the neurochemical changes of the disease itself. Antiparkinsonian drugs may have a role in the pathogenesis of the anxiety. The anxiety disorders in Parkinson's disease patients appear to be clustered in th...

  18. [Tick-borne diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissot Dupont, H; Raoult, D

    1993-05-01

    Due to their worldwide distribution, from hottest to coldest climates, and due to their behaviour, ticks are capable of transmitting numerous human and animal bacterial viral or parasitous diseases. Depending on the disease, they play the role of biological vector or intermediate host. In France, six tick borne diseases are of epidemiologic importance. Q fever (not often tick-borne), Mediterranean Spotted Fever, Lyme disease, Turalemia (human and animal), Babesiosis and Tick-borne Viral Encephalitis.

  19. Gender and Cardiovascular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Ruijter, Hester M.; Pasterkamp, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    More women than men die of cardiovascular disease (CVD) each year in every major developed country and most emerging economies. Nonetheless, CVD has often been considered as men’s disease due to the higher rates of coronary artery disease (CAD) of men at younger age. This has led to the

  20. Diseases of lodgepole pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank G. Hawksworth

    1964-01-01

    Diseases are a major concern to forest managers throughout the lodgepole pine type. In many areas, diseases constitute the primary management problem. As might be expected for a tree that has a distribution from Baja California, Mexico to the Yukon and from the Pacific to the Dakotas, the diseases of chief concern vary in different parts of the tree's range. For...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect Memory? CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving CareMAP: La Alimentación y la Deglución, ...

  2. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... We Walk at Moving Day CareMAP: Managing Caregiver Stress Aware in Care: Real Stories CareMAP: End-of- ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Overview of Parkinson's Disease ...

  3. Symptoms of Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tested for celiac disease and if negative the test should be repeated on a periodic basis. These conditions include insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (requiring insulin therapy), Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, Turner’s syndrome, Williams syndrome, Graves disease and Sjogren’s disease. what turns ...

  4. Peptic Ulcer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Site ACG Patients Home / Digestive Health Topic / Peptic Ulcer Disease Peptic Ulcer Disease Basics Overview An “ulcer” is an open ... for pain in patients at risk for peptic ulcer disease. Peptic – caused by acid. PPIs – P roton P ump ...

  5. Armillaria Root Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.E. Williams; C.G. III Shaw; P.M. Wargo; W.H. Sites

    1986-01-01

    Armillaria root disease is found throughout temperate and tropical regions of the world. In the continental United States, the disease has been reported in nearly every State. Hosts include hundreds of species of trees, shrubs, vines, and forbs growing in forests, along roadsides, and in cultivated areas. The disease is caused by fungi, which live as parasites on...

  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... and Parkinson's Disease? Hallucinations and Delusions CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 ...

  7. diseases free body

    OpenAIRE

    thararose

    2018-01-01

    Diseases are very common now a days . It is our food habits itself that causes this diseases. Diseases can cause many health problems. goiter causes and symptoms It is very important to follow healthy food habits and to maintain good health. A healthy body is always a treasure to every person.

  8. Granulomatous diseases in otolaryngology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuczkowski, J.; Barcinski, G.; Narozny, W.

    1994-01-01

    The authors describe clinical material of 49 patients treated in period 1960-1992 at the Dept. of Otolaryngology Medical Acad. of Gdansk on reason various granulomatous diseases. On the ground of retrospective analysis 44 cases with mild granulomas disease and 5 cases with malignant granulomatous disease were separated. Clinical course diagnosis, treatment and prognosis were discussed. (author)

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping Skills for ... Caregivers: Caremap and Caring & Coping CareMAP: Movement and Falls: Part ... There Any Ways to Control the Rate of Progression of the Disease? CareMAP: ...

  10. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping Skills for ... Caregivers: Caremap and Caring & Coping CareMAP: Movement and Falls: Part ... There Any Ways to Control the Rate of Progression of the Disease? CareMAP: ...

  11. Lyme Disease (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Lyme Disease KidsHealth / For Kids / Lyme Disease What's in this article? Ticks Want to Suck ... and summer, you might hear about something called Lyme disease. It has nothing to do with limes, but ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Foundation How Is Parkinson's Disease Diagnosed? CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 ...

  13. Dutch elm disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    James W. Walters

    1992-01-01

    Since its discovery in the United States in 1930, Dutch elm disease has killed thousands of native elms. The three native elms, American, slippery, and rock, have little or no resistance to Dutch elm disease, but individual trees within each species vary in susceptibility to the disease. The most important of these, American elm, is scattered in upland stands but is...

  14. Heart Disease in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing ... the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and ...

  15. Chronic Inflammatory Diseases and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Riis

    2018-01-01

    Inflammation plays a significant role in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Patients with chronic inflammatory diseases are at increased risk of CVD, but it is debated whether this association is causal or dependent on shared risk factors, other exposures, genes, and/or inflammatory...... pathways. The current review summarizes epidemiological, clinical, and experimental data supporting the role of shared inflammatory mechanisms between atherosclerotic CVD and rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, and periodontitis, respectively, and provides insights to future...... prospects in this area of research. Awareness of the role of inflammation in CVD in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases and the potential for anti-inflammatory therapy, e.g., with tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors, to also reduce atherosclerotic CVD has evolved into guideline- based recommendations...

  16. Coronary Artery Disease - Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not as great as men's. Heredity (Including Race) Children of parents with heart disease are more likely to develop it themselves. African Americans have more severe high blood pressure than Caucasians and a higher risk of heart ...

  17. Disease-modifying drugs in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghezzi L

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Laura Ghezzi, Elio Scarpini, Daniela Galimberti Neurology Unit, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Fondazione Cà Granda, IRCCS Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disorder and the most common cause of dementia. The early stages of AD are characterized by short-term memory loss. Once the disease progresses, patients experience difficulties in sense of direction, oral communication, calculation, ability to learn, and cognitive thinking. The median duration of the disease is 10 years. The pathology is characterized by deposition of amyloid beta peptide (so-called senile plaques and tau protein in the form of neurofibrillary tangles. Currently, two classes of drugs are licensed by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of AD, ie, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for mild to moderate AD, and memantine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, for moderate and severe AD. Treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors or memantine aims at slowing progression and controlling symptoms, whereas drugs under development are intended to modify the pathologic steps leading to AD. Herein, we review the clinical features, pharmacologic properties, and cost-effectiveness of the available acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, and focus on disease-modifying drugs aiming to interfere with the amyloid beta peptide, including vaccination, passive immunization, and tau deposition. Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, memantine, disease-modifying drugs, diagnosis, treatment

  18. Radiotherapy of benign diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haase, W.

    1982-01-01

    Still today radiotherapy is of decisive relevance for several benign diseases. The following ones are briefly described in this introductory article: 1. Certain inflammatory and degenerative diseases as furuncles in the face, acute thrombophlebitis, recurrent sudoriparous abscesses, degenerative skeletal diseases, cervical syndrome and others; 2. rheumatic joint diseases; 3. Bechterew's disease; 4. primary presenile osteoporosis; 5. synringomyelia; 6. endocrine ophthalmopathy; 7. hypertrophic processes of the connective tissue; 8. hemangiomas. A detailed discussion and a profit-risk analysis is provided in the individual chapters of the magazine. (MG) [de

  19. Diagnosis of Pompe disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, John; Lukacs, Zoltan; Straub, Volker

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of Pompe disease (acid maltase deficiency, glycogen storage disease type II) in children and adults can be challenging because of the heterogeneous clinical presentation and considerable overlap of signs and symptoms found in other neuromuscular diseases. This review evaluates some...... to identify late-onset Pompe disease often leads to false-negative results and subsequent delays in identification and treatment of the disorder. Serum creatine kinase level can be normal or only mildly elevated in late-onset Pompe disease and is not very helpful alone to suggest the diagnosis...

  20. Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Didde; Andreassen, Bente Utoft; Heegaard, Niels Henrik H

    2018-01-01

    Background: Kidney disease has been reported in adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is regarded an extraintestinal manifestation or more rarely a side effect of the medical treatment. Methods: In this cross-sectional study we describe the extent of kidney pathology in a cohort of 56...... children with IBD. Blood and urine samples were analyzed for markers of kidney disease and ultrasonography was performed to evaluate pole-to-pole kidney length. Results: We found that 25% of the patients had either previously reported kidney disease or ultrasonographic signs of chronic kidney disease...... are at risk of chronic kidney disease, and the risk seems to be increased with the severity of the disease....

  1. Pregnancy and rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayed, M; Gordon, C

    2007-11-01

    Pregnancy is an issue that should be discussed with all patients with rheumatic diseases who are in the reproductive age group. Infertility is rarely due to the disease but can be associated with cyclophosphamide therapy. Most rheumatic diseases that are well controlled prior to pregnancy do not deteriorate in pregnancy, providing that the patient continues with appropriate disease-modifying therapy. Some patients with inflammatory arthritis go in to remission during pregnancy. Patients with renal involvement may be at increased risk of disease flare. This needs to be distinguished from pre-eclampsia. Intrauterine growth restriction is more likely in patients with active systemic disease, hypertension, a history of thrombosis and renal involvement. Premature delivery may need to be planned to reduce the risks of stillbirth and can be associated with a variety of neonatal complications. Post-partum flare is common in all the rheumatic diseases.

  2. Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Diseases Resources Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... important step in staying healthy. If you have cardiovascular disease, talk with your doctor about getting your vaccinations ...

  3. Coeliac disease and epilepsy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Whether there is an association between coeliac disease and epilepsy is uncertain. Recently, a syndrome of coeliac disease, occipital lobe epilepsy and cerebral calcification has been described, mostly in Italy. We measured the prevalence of coeliac disease in patients attending a seizure clinic, and investigated whether cerebral calcification occurred in patients with both coeliac disease and epilepsy. Screening for coeliac disease was by IgA endomysial antibody, measured by indirect immunofluorescence using sections of human umbilical cord. Of 177 patients screened, four patients were positive. All had small-bowel histology typical of coeliac disease. The overall frequency of coeliac disease in this mixed patient sample was 1 in 44. In a control group of 488 pregnant patients, two serum samples were positive (1 in 244). Sixteen patients with both coeliac disease and epilepsy, who had previously attended this hospital, were identified. No patient had cerebral calcification on CT scanning. Coeliac disease appears to occur with increased frequency in patients with epilepsy, and a high index of suspicion should be maintained. Cerebral calcification is not a feature of our patients with epilepsy and coeliac disease, and may be an ethnically-or geographically-restricted finding.

  4. Viral Disease Networks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbahce, Natali; Yan, Han; Vidal, Marc; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2010-03-01

    Viral infections induce multiple perturbations that spread along the links of the biological networks of the host cells. Understanding the impact of these cascading perturbations requires an exhaustive knowledge of the cellular machinery as well as a systems biology approach that reveals how individual components of the cellular system function together. Here we describe an integrative method that provides a new approach to studying virus-human interactions and its correlations with diseases. Our method involves the combined utilization of protein - protein interactions, protein -- DNA interactions, metabolomics and gene - disease associations to build a ``viraldiseasome''. By solely using high-throughput data, we map well-known viral associated diseases and predict new candidate viral diseases. We use microarray data of virus-infected tissues and patient medical history data to further test the implications of the viral diseasome. We apply this method to Epstein-Barr virus and Human Papillomavirus and shed light into molecular development of viral diseases and disease pathways.

  5. Hereditary neuromuscular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezsarlak, O. E-mail: ozkan.ozsarlak@uza.be; Schepens, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Goethem, J.W. van; Vanhoenacker, F.; Schepper, A.M. de; Martin, J.J

    2001-12-01

    This article presents the actual classification of neuromuscular diseases based on present expansion of our knowledge and understanding due to genetic developments. It summarizes the genetic and clinical presentations of each disorder together with CT findings, which we studied in a large group of patients with neuromuscular diseases. The muscular dystrophies as the largest and most common group of hereditary muscle diseases will be highlighted by giving detailed information about the role of CT and MRI in the differential diagnosis. The radiological features of neuromuscular diseases are atrophy, hypertrophy, pseudohypertrophy and fatty infiltration of muscles on a selective basis. Although the patterns and distribution of involvement are characteristic in some of the diseases, the definition of the type of disease based on CT scan only is not always possible.

  6. Genetics of complex diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellerup, Erling; Møller, Gert Lykke; Koefoed, Pernille

    2012-01-01

    A complex disease with an inheritable component is polygenic, meaning that several different changes in DNA are the genetic basis for the disease. Such a disease may also be genetically heterogeneous, meaning that independent changes in DNA, i.e. various genotypes, can be the genetic basis...... for the disease. Each of these genotypes may be characterized by specific combinations of key genetic changes. It is suggested that even if all key changes are found in genes related to the biology of a certain disease, the number of combinations may be so large that the number of different genotypes may be close...... to the number of patients suffering from the disease. This hypothesis is based on a study of bipolar disorder....

  7. Castleman disease (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Melikyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Castleman disease (angiofollicular hyperplasia of lymph nodes – a rare benign lymphoproliferative disease with prolonged asymptomatic course, associated with a wide variety of autoimmune and oncological diseases and the risk of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The rare occurrence of this disease and a variety of clinical course did not allow for a complete and consistent research on the etiology and pathogenesis and the standard therapies development. In recent years, the number of patients with Castleman disease in the Russian Federation has increased, which requires its recognition among non-neoplastic and neoplastic lymphadenopathy. The article provides an overview about clinical and histological variants of Castleman’s disease, its pathogenesis concepts, classification and treatment.

  8. Celiac disease in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malekzadeh R

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Until a few decades ago, celiac disease was considered to be essentially a disease of European people and to be very rare in Middle Eastern countries. During the last two decades, having met the criteria for the WHO general screening, the advent and application of novel serological assays used to screen for celiac disease and the use of endoscopic small bowel biopsy have led to increasing numbers of diagnoses of celiac disease in western countries. With this new data, our knowledge on both the clinical pattern and epidemiology of celiac disease has increased, and is now known to be a relatively common autoimmune disorder. Studies performed in different parts of the developing world have shown that the prevalence of celiac disease in this area is similar to or even higher than that in western countries. In fact, celiac disease is known to be the most common form of chronic diarrhea in Iran. However, contrary to common belief, celiac disease is more than a pure digestive alteration. It is a protean systemic disease, and, with a 95 percent genetic predisposition, has a myriad of symptoms including gastrointestinal, dermatological, dental, neurological and behavioral that can occur at a variety of ages. Monosymptomatic, oligosymptomatic, atypical (without gastrointestinal symptoms, silent and latent forms of celiac disease have been identified. In this study we review the epidemiology of celiac disease based on the studies performed in Iran and discuss its pathogenesis, the role of antibodies in the diagnosis of celiac disease and the importance of its diagnosis and treatment in Iran.

  9. [Male breast diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmin-Lefebvre, D; Misery, L

    2013-01-01

    Because andrology is relatively undeveloped in France, the dermatologist is often the doctor first consulted for diseases of the nipple in men. All dermatological diseases can in fact occur at this site. There are some specific nipple diseases such as gynaecomastia, congenital abnormalities, hyperplasia, benign tumours and breast cancer. All clinical examinations and laboratory examinations should focus on diagnosis of this type of cancer and its elimination. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Diseases Transmitted by Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levison, Matthew E

    2015-08-01

    Although many people these days actually work very hard at leisure time activities, diseases are most commonly acquired from birds during the course of work in the usual sense of the term, not leisure. However, travel for pleasure to areas where the diseases are highly endemic puts people at risk of acquiring some of these bird-related diseases (for example, histoplasmosis and arbovirus infections), as does ownership of birds as pets (psittacosis).

  11. CDC Disease Detective Camp

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-02

    The CDC Disease Detective Camp gives rising high school juniors and seniors exposure to key aspects of the CDC, including basic epidemiology, infectious and chronic disease tracking, public health law, and outbreak investigations. The camp also helps students explore careers in public health.  Created: 8/2/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/2/2010.

  12. At Risk for Kidney Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Causes of Chronic Kidney Disease Diabetes and high blood pressure are the most ... blood vessels in your kidneys. Other causes of kidney disease Other causes of kidney disease include a genetic ...

  13. Heart Disease in Hispanic Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease in Women Heart Disease in Hispanic Women “I thought it couldn’t be true,” says ... disease is their No. 1 killer. Why Hispanic women? While heart disease doesn’t discriminate, you could ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do not have celiac disease . On average, a diagnosis of celiac disease is not made until 6 to 10 years ... and tissues and leads to the signs and symptoms of celiac disease . Almost all people with celiac disease have specific ...

  15. Mad Cow Disease (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Mad Cow Disease KidsHealth / For Parents / Mad Cow Disease What's ... Is Being Done About It Print About Mad Cow Disease Mad cow disease has been in the ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Alzheimer disease Alzheimer disease Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Alzheimer disease is a degenerative disease of the brain ...

  17. Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease Updated:May 3,2018 Most illegal drugs can ... www.dea.gov/druginfo/factsheets.shtml Alcohol and Heart Disease Caffeine and Heart Disease Tobacco and Heart Disease ...

  18. Thoracic imaging in AIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barneveld Binkhuysen, F H [Eemland Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Amersfoort (Netherlands)

    1996-12-31

    The contents are infectious diseases i.e. pneumocystis carinii, mycobacterium tuberculosis, atypical mycobacteria, fungal infections, viral infections ; Malignant diseases : kaposi`s sarcoma (KS), malignant lymphoma and other disorders i.e. lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis, hypersensitivity reactions, bullous changes, pericardial abnormalities (15 refs.).

  19. Thoracic imaging in AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barneveld Binkhuysen, F.H.

    1995-01-01

    The contents are infectious diseases i.e. pneumocystis carinii, mycobacterium tuberculosis, atypical mycobacteria, fungal infections, viral infections ; Malignant diseases : kaposi's sarcoma (KS), malignant lymphoma and other disorders i.e. lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis, hypersensitivity reactions, bullous changes, pericardial abnormalities (15 refs.)

  20. Eye Disease and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Barnebeck; Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars; Selaya, Pablo

    This research advances the hypothesis that cross-country variation in the historical incidence of eye disease has influenced the current global distribution of per capita income. The theory is that pervasive eye disease diminished the incentive to accumulate skills, thereby delaying the fertility...... transition and the take-off to sustained economic growth. In order to estimate the influence from eye disease incidence empirically, we draw on an important fact from the field of epidemiology: Exposure to solar ultraviolet B radiation (UVB-R) is an underlying determinant of several forms of eye disease...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Help with Freezing Episodes? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of ... or Team Approach Important? OHSU - Therapeutic Approaches for PD: Depression, Anxiety & ...

  2. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heneka, Michael T; Carson, Monica J; Khoury, Joseph El

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia......, and trigger an innate immune response characterised by release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to disease progression and severity. Genome-wide analysis suggests that several genes that increase the risk for sporadic Alzheimer's disease encode factors that regulate glial clearance of misfolded...... therapeutic or preventive strategies for Alzheimer's disease....

  3. "Diseases and natural kinds".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulmasy, Daniel P

    2005-01-01

    David Thomasma called for the development of a medical ethics based squarely on the philosophy of medicine. He recognized, however, that widespread anti-essentialism presented a significant barrier to such an approach. The aim of this article is to introduce a theory that challenges these anti-essentialist objections. The notion of natural kinds presents a modest form of essentialism that can serve as the basis for a foundationalist philosophy of medicine. The notion of a natural kind is neither static nor reductionistic. Disease can be understood as making necessary reference to living natural kinds without invoking the claim that diseases themselves are natural kinds. The idea that natural kinds have a natural disposition to flourish as the kinds of things that they are provides a telos to which to tether the notion of disease - an objective telos that is broader than mere survival and narrower than subjective choice. It is argued that while nosology is descriptive and may have therapeutic implications, disease classification is fundamentally explanatory. Sickness and illness, while referring to the same state of affairs, can be distinguished from disease phenomenologically. Scientific and diagnostic fallibility in making judgments about diseases do not diminish the objectivity of this notion of disease. Diseases are things, not kinds. Injury is a concept parallel to disease that also makes necessary reference to living natural kinds. These ideas provide a new possibility for the development of a philosophy of medicine with implications for medical ethics.

  4. Emerging zoonotic viral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L-F; Crameri, G

    2014-08-01

    Zoonotic diseases are infectious diseases that are naturally transmitted from vertebrate animals to humans and vice versa. They are caused by all types of pathogenic agents, including bacteria, parasites, fungi, viruses and prions. Although they have been recognised for many centuries, their impact on public health has increased in the last few decades due to a combination of the success in reducing the spread of human infectious diseases through vaccination and effective therapies and the emergence of novel zoonotic diseases. It is being increasingly recognised that a One Health approach at the human-animal-ecosystem interface is needed for effective investigation, prevention and control of any emerging zoonotic disease. Here, the authors will review the drivers for emergence, highlight some of the high-impact emerging zoonotic diseases of the last two decades and provide examples of novel One Health approaches for disease investigation, prevention and control. Although this review focuses on emerging zoonotic viral diseases, the authors consider that the discussions presented in this paper will be equally applicable to emerging zoonotic diseases of other pathogen types.

  5. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... live well with Parkinson's disease. Learn More Expert Care Patient Centered Care Centers of Excellence Bringing Care to You Expert Care Programs Professional Education Expert ...

  6. Moyamoya disease: Diagnostic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasów, Eugeniusz; Kułakowska, Alina; Łukasiewicz, Adam; Kapica-Topczewska, Katarzyna; Korneluk-Sadzyńska, Alicja; Brzozowska, Joanna; Drozdowski, Wiesław

    2011-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a progressive vasculopathy leading to stenosis of the main intracranial arteries. The incidence of moyamoya disease is high in Asian countries; in Europe and North America, the prevalence of the disease is considerably lower. Clinically, the disease may be of ischaemic, haemorrhagic and epileptic type. Cognitive dysfunction and behavioral disturbance are atypical symptoms of moyamoya disease. Characteristic angiographic features of the disease include stenosis or occlusion of the arteries of the circle of Willis, as well as the development of collateral vasculature. Currently, magnetic resonance angiography and CT angiography with multi-row systems are the main imaging methods of diagnostics of the entire range of vascular changes in moyamoya disease. The most common surgical treatment combines the direct arterial anastomosis between the superficial temporal artery and middle cerebral, and the indirect synangiosis involving placement of vascularised tissue in the brain cortex, in order to promote neoangiogenesis. Due to progressive changes, correct and early diagnosis is of basic significance in selecting patients for surgery, which is the only effective treatment of the disease. An appropriate qualification to surgery should be based on a comprehensive angiographic and imaging evaluation of brain structures. Despite the rare occurrence of moyamoya disease in European population, it should be considered as one of causes of ischaemic or haemorrhagic strokes, especially in young patients

  7. Immunologic lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harman, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    The term immunologic lung disease comprises a broad spectrum of disease. The authors have covered a few entities in which recent studies have been particularly helpful in elucidating pathophysiology though not in uncovering the inciting cause. Common to all of these entities is the problem of finding appropriate methods of defining disease activity and response to treatment. As exemplified by the improved outlook for Goodpasture's syndrome with elucidation of its underlying immunopathology, it is likely that better understanding of the immunologic basis of sarcoid and interstitial disease may be helpful in planning more effective treatment strategies. 44 references

  8. Lyme disease and conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, H.

    1994-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness that is wide-spread in North America, especially in the northeastern and northcentral United States. This disease could negatively influence efforts to conserve natural populations in two ways: (1) the disease could directly affect wild animal health; and (2) tick control efforts could adversely affect natural populations and communities. Lyme disease affects several domestic animals, but symptoms have been reported in only a few wild species. Direct effects of Lyme disease on wild animal populations have not been reported, but the disease should be considered as a possible cause in cases of unexplained population declines in endemic areas. Methods available to manage ticks and Lyme disease include human self-protection techniques, manipulation of habitats and hosts species populations, biological control, and pesticide applications. The diversity of available techniques allows selection of approaches to minimize environmental effects by (1) emphasizing personal protection techniques, (2) carefully targeting management efforts to maximize efficiency, and (3) integrating environmentally benign techniques to improve management while avoiding broad-scale environmentally destructive approaches. The environmental effects of Lyme disease depend, to a large extent, on the methods chosen to minimize human exposure to infected ticks. Conservation biologists can help design tick management programs that effectively lower the incidence of human Lyme disease while simultaneously minimizing negative effects on natural populations.

  9. Neuroimaging of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    Main purposes of neuroimaging in Alzheimer's disease have been moved from diagnosis of advanced Alzheimer's disease to diagnosis of very early Alzheimer's disease at a prodromal stage of mild cognitive impairment, prediction of conversion from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease, and differential diagnosis from other diseases causing dementia. Structural MRI studies and functional studies using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET and brain perfusion SPECT are widely used in diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Outstanding progress in diagnostic accuracy of these neuroimaging modalities has been obtained using statistical analysis on a voxel-by-voxel basis after spatial normalization of individual scans to a standardized brain-volume template instead of visual inspection or a conventional region of interest technique. In a very early stage of Alzheimer's disease, this statistical approach revealed gray matter loss in the entorhinal and hippocampal areas and hypometabolism or hypoperfusion in the posterior cingulate cortex. These two findings might be related in view of anatomical knowledge that the regions are linked through the circuit of Papez. This statistical approach also offers accurate evaluation of therapeutical effects on brain metabolism or perfusion. The latest development in functional imaging relates to the final pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease-amyloid plaques. Amyloid imaging might be an important surrogate marker for trials of disease-modifying agents. (author)

  10. Chronic Diseases Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Plan Templates All Chronic Surveillance Systems Communications Center Social Media Press Room Press Release Archives Multimedia Communication Campaigns Publications Chronic Disease Overview 2016–2017 At A ...

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... CareMAP: Dealing with Dementia OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, ... Care or Team Approach Important? What Is the Relationship Between Depression and ...

  12. Association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, M.M.; Salama, R.P.

    2004-01-01

    Studies have supported the notion that subjects with periodontitis and patients with multiple tooth extractions as a result of chronic advanced periodontal disease (PDD) have a greater risk of developing Cardiovascular disease (CVD) than those who had little or no periodontal infection. Periodontitis may predispose affected patients to CVD by elevating systemic C-reactive protein level and pro-inflammatory activity in atherosclerotic lesions and accelerate development of cardiovascular diseases, Oral health variables including loss of teeth, positive plaque Benzoyl-D-L-Arginine- Naphthyl Amide test (BANA) scores, and compliant of xerostomia may by considered as risk indicators for CVD. Exact mechanism which links PDD and CVD has not been firmly established. The link between PDD and CVD may be attributed to bacteria entering blood stream and attaching to the fatty plaque in coronary artery and contributing to clot formation which can lead to heart attack. Inflammation caused by PDD increases the plaque build up. The association between the two disease entities is cause for concern. However, dental and medical practitioners should be aware of these findings to move intelligently to interact with inquiring patients with periodontitis. They should be urged to maintain medical surveillance of their cardiovascular status, and work on controlling or reducing all known risk factors associated with CVD, including periodontal infection. (author)

  13. Falls in Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Yvette Anna Maria

    2012-01-01

    Falls in Parkinson’s (PD) and Huntington’s disease (HD) are common. 50 % of moderately affected PD patients sustained two or more falls during a prospective follow-up of 6 months. During a 3 month period 40 % of HD patients reported one or more fall. Many falls resulted in minor injuries and 42 % of

  14. Association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, M M; Salama, R P [Ajman Univ. of Science and Technology Network, Abu-Dhabi Campus (United Arab Emirates)

    2004-06-01

    Studies have supported the notion that subjects with periodontitis and patients with multiple tooth extractions as a result of chronic advanced periodontal disease (PDD) have a greater risk of developing Cardiovascular disease (CVD) than those who had little or no periodontal infection. Periodontitis may predispose affected patients to CVD by elevating systemic C-reactive protein level and pro-inflammatory activity in atherosclerotic lesions and accelerate development of cardiovascular diseases, Oral health variables including loss of teeth, positive plaque Benzoyl-D-L-Arginine- Naphthyl Amide test (BANA) scores, and compliant of xerostomia may by considered as risk indicators for CVD. Exact mechanism which links PDD and CVD has not been firmly established. The link between PDD and CVD may be attributed to bacteria entering blood stream and attaching to the fatty plaque in coronary artery and contributing to clot formation which can lead to heart attack. Inflammation caused by PDD increases the plaque build up. The association between the two disease entities is cause for concern. However, dental and medical practitioners should be aware of these findings to move intelligently to interact with inquiring patients with periodontitis. They should be urged to maintain medical surveillance of their cardiovascular status, and work on controlling or reducing all known risk factors associated with CVD, including periodontal infection. (author)

  15. Defining an emerging disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutou, F; Pastoret, P-P

    2015-04-01

    Defining an emerging disease is not straightforward, as there are several different types of disease emergence. For example, there can be a 'real' emergence of a brand new disease, such as the emergence of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in the 1980s, or a geographic emergence in an area not previously affected, such as the emergence of bluetongue in northern Europe in 2006. In addition, disease can emerge in species formerly not considered affected, e.g. the emergence of bovine tuberculosis in wildlife species since 2000 in France. There can also be an unexpected increase of disease incidence in a known area and a known species, or there may simply be an increase in our knowledge or awareness of a particular disease. What all these emerging diseases have in common is that human activity frequently has a role to play in their emergence. For example, bovine spongiform encephalopathy very probably emerged as a result of changes in the manufacturing of meat-and-bone meal, bluetongue was able to spread to cooler climes as a result of uncontrolled trade in animals, and a relaxation of screening and surveillance for bovine tuberculosis enabled the disease to re-emerge in areas that had been able to drastically reduce the number of cases. Globalisation and population growth will continue to affect the epidemiology of diseases in years to come and ecosystems will continue to evolve. Furthermore, new technologies such as metagenomics and high-throughput sequencing are identifying new microorganisms all the time. Change is the one constant, and diseases will continue to emerge, and we must consider the causes and different types of emergence as we deal with these diseases in the future.

  16. Disease quantification in dermatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Tanja Maria; Kamp, Søren; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2013-01-01

    Accurate documentation of disease severity is a prerequisite for clinical research and the practice of evidence-based medicine. The quantification of skin diseases such as psoriasis currently relies heavily on clinical scores. Although these clinical scoring methods are well established and very ...

  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the House: Part 1 What Are the Neuroprotective Benefits of Exercise for PD Patients? Are There Any Ways to Control the Rate of Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Falls: Part 2 How Does the DBS Device Work? CareMAP: Changes Around the House: Part 2 CareMAP: ...

  19. Insects and diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. Couston

    2009-01-01

    Insects and diseases are a natural part of forested ecosystems. Their activity is partially regulated by biotic factors, e.g., host abundance, host quality; physical factors, e.g., soil, climate; and disturbances (Berryman 1986). Insects and diseases can influence both forest patterns and forest processes by causing, for example, defoliation and mortality. These...

  20. Peripheral Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pressure High blood cholesterol Coronary heart disease Stroke Metabolic syndrome Screening and Prevention Taking action to control your risk factors can help prevent or delay peripheral artery disease (P.A.D.) and its complications. Know your family history of health problems related to P.A. ...

  1. Rheumatic diseases and pregnancy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    women with rheumatic diseases constitute a high-risk population, with potential adverse fetal ... who are not actively planning a pregnancy, or are taking drugs that are ... disease.[9] Fetal loss (miscarriage or stillbirth) occurs in about 20% of ..... trimester,[3] with up to 70% of patients needing NSAIDs. .... No. Use low dose.

  2. Coeliac disease and lymphangiectasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Perisic, V N; Kokai, G

    1992-01-01

    Two out of 74 children with coeliac disease demonstrated severe intestinal protein loss. In both children a serial small bowel biopsy specimen showed intestinal lymphangiectasia to be also present. Intestinal lymphangiectasia is another disorder that may be associated with coeliac disease.

  3. Beech Bark Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. Houston; James T. O' Brien

    1983-01-01

    Beech bark disease causes significant mortality and defect in American beech, Fagus grandifolia (Ehrh.). The disease results when bark, attacked and altered by the beech scale, Cryptococcus fagisuga Lind., is invaded and killed by fungi, primarily Nectria coccinea var. faginata Lohman, Watson, and Ayers, and sometimes N. galligena Bres.

  4. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... and Its Treatment Affect Sexual Functioning? CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 ...

  5. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... for PD Patients? How Does the DBS Device Work? CareMAP: Bathroom: Part 2 CareMAP: El Vestirse ¿Cómo ...

  6. Kashin-Beck's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerman, J.; Uyttendaele, D.; Broecke, van den W.; Claessens, H.A.

    1992-01-01

    A case of Kashin-Beck's disease is presented. It is an acquired, disabling, polyarthritic, degenerative condition of early onset, sometimes leading to a variable degree of dwarfism. It occurs endemically in certain Asian areas. Treatment is, if possible, preventive. In the established disease the

  7. Myopathy in Addison's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Mor, F; Green, P; Wysenbeek, A J

    1987-01-01

    Since the first description of primary adrenocortical insufficiency by Thomas Addison in 1855 several large series of patients with Addison's disease have been published. The common signs and symptoms include: weakness, hyperpigmentation, weight loss, gastrointestinal complaints, and hypotension. It is rare for patients with Addison's disease to present with musculoskeletal symptoms including flexion contractures, hyperkalaemic neuromyopathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome, migratory myalgia, sciati...

  8. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Functioning? CareMAP: Las Actividades en Casa CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving Jose Maria Lobo: Música en vivo ...

  9. Bistability in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Mosekilde, Erik; Lund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases damage host tissue, which, in turn, may trigger a stronger immune response. Systems characterized by such positive feedback loops can display co-existing stable steady states. In a mathematical model of autoimmune disease, one steady state may correspond to the healthy state...

  10. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Medicinal: “Terapia fisica para el Parkinson” CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 ...

  11. Imaging in hepatobiliary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, J.

    1987-01-01

    This book covers the diagnostic and interventional use of imaging techniques in hepatobiliary disease. The first of the book's two sections describes the role of imaging in the diagnostic work up of common clinical syndromes. The second part is concerned with therapy and reviews interventional techniques for hepatobiliary disease

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disease Affect the Urinary System? CareMAP: Managing Caregiver Stress CareMAP: End-of-Life Care CareMAP: Thinking Changes: ... Rest and Sleep: Part 2 What Are the Causes of Parkinson's Disease? Are There Disorders That Have ...

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... How Is Parkinson's Disease Diagnosed? CareMAP: Managing Caregiver Stress CareMAP: Getting Dressed CareMAP: End-of-Life Care ... Care: Real Stories How Does the DBS Device Work? OHSU - Overview of Parkinson's Disease CareMAP: Cambios para ...

  14. Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... et.al. Clinical manifestations of kidney disease among US adults with diabetes. Journal of the American Medical Association. 2016;316( ... of Washington, Associate Director, Kidney Research Institute ... The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Health Information Center ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rest and Sleep: Part 2 What Are the Causes of Parkinson's Disease? Are There Disorders That Have Similar Symptoms? How ... What Do I Do if I Suspect Compulsive Behavior in a Loved One with PD? How Is Parkinson's Disease Diagnosed? CareMAP: Getting Dressed Adolfo Diaz, PTA, NPF - ...

  16. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping Skills for ... Does the DBS Device Work? CareMAP: Movement and Falls: Part 1 CareMAP: Cambios para Realizar en Casa, ...

  17. Cushing's disease and craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackland, F M; Stanhope, R; Preece, M A

    1987-01-01

    A 14-year old girl presented with growth failure and Cushing's disease. Histological examination confirmed a craniopharyngioma but failed to show that the tumour secreted adrenocorticotrophic hormone. We suggest that her Cushing's disease was caused by hypothalamic dysfunction associated with increased corticotrophin-releasing hormone secretion, secondary to the craniopharyngioma. Images Figure PMID:2823728

  18. Mitophagy and Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerr, Jesse S.; Adriaanse, Bryan A.; Greig, Nigel H.

    2017-01-01

    Neurons affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD) experience mitochondrial dysfunction and a bioenergetic deficit that occurs early and promotes the disease-defining amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) and Tau pathologies. Emerging findings suggest that the autophagy/lysosome pathway that removes damaged...

  19. Malignent diseases in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havers, W.

    1980-01-01

    As malignant diseases in childhood are rare, and only a small group of radiotherapists have been able to gain experience in this field, this chapter treats the particularities of childhood from this aspect. The side effects of radiotherapy are particularly important here for the growing and developing organism of the child. The most frequently occuring malignant diseases are treated individually. (MG) [de

  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Swallowing: Part 1 How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect Memory? What Do I Do if I Suspect Compulsive ... Disease Psychosis: A Caregiver’s Story When and What Type of Treatment Is Initiated After Diagnosis? CareMAP: Las ...

  1. Dysphagia in Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk-van den Berg, Willemien Antoinette

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with an autosomal, dominant mode of inheritance. Patients with HD suffer from dysphagia which can have serious consequences, such as weight loss, dehydration, and pneumonia leading to death. Many patients with HD die of aspiration

  2. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation and Travel with PD Expert Briefings: Sleep and Parkinson's Nurse: ... Psychosis What Medications Help with Cognitive Impairment? CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 2 Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis: A ...

  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Non-Parkinson's Disease Medications? CareMAP: Life Beyond This Life What Treatments Exist for Parkinson's Disease Patients with a ... Learned Unconditional Love How Does the DBS Device ... When and What Type of Treatment Is Initiated After Diagnosis? Building ...

  4. Hodgkin's disease in pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szelc, S.; Szeliga, E.

    1993-01-01

    Pregnancy outcome and its influence on the effect of the MOPP chemotherapy for 30 patients with Hodgkin's disease were analyzed. During the first 6 months after completing the treatment 305 of pregnancies were interrupted. Pregnancy during complete remission of Hodgkin's disease after combined treatment does not increase the risk of relapse and is not a risk to delivery and foetus. (author)

  5. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Learned Unconditional Love How Does the DBS Device Work? CareMAP: Rest and Sleep: Part 1 CareMAP: Cambios ...

  6. Pathology of Gaucher's Disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-06-01

    Jun 1, 1974 ... disability in 2 of them. One patient also developed restric- tive lung disease, presumably on the ... Brother of case 9; diagnosed as Gaucher's. 8500 g disease at age 6 yrs on basis of hepato- ... other siblings, one of whom is said to have an enlarged spleen. Estimations of ,a-glucosidase on lymphocytes from.

  7. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Health Part 2 How Does the DBS Device Work? ¿Cómo Se Diagnostica el Parkinson? CareMAP: Cambios para ...

  8. Liver disease in pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noel M Lee; Carla W Brady

    2009-01-01

    Liver diseases in pregnancy may be categorized into liver disorders that occur only in the setting of pregnancy and liver diseases that occur coincidentally with pregnancy. Hyperemesis gravidarum, preeclampsia/eclampsia, syndrome of hemolysis, elevated liver tests and low platelets (HELLP), acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy are pregnancy-specific disorders that may cause elevations in liver tests and hepatic dysfunction. Chronic liver diseases, including cholestatic liver disease, autoimmune hepatitis, Wilson disease, and viral hepatitis may also be seen in pregnancy. Management of liver disease in pregnancy requires collaboration between obstetricians and gastroenterologists/hepatologists. Treatment of pregnancy-specific liver disorders usually involves delivery of the fetus and supportive care, whereas management of chronic liver disease in pregnancy is directed toward optimizing control of the liver disorder. Cirrhosis in the setting of pregnancy is less commonly observed but offers unique challenges for patients and practitioners. This article reviews the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of liver diseases seen in pregnancy.

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Medication Schedule? CareMAP: Medicamentos y la Salud en General, Parte 2 CareMAP: Medications and General Health Part ...

  10. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... from Day to Day? CareMAP: Is a Care Facility Needed? CareMAP: Caring from Afar CareMAP: Dressing CareMAP: ... Overview of Parkinson's Disease OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies ...

  11. Falls in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Y.A.M.; Munneke, M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize the latest insights into the clinical significance, assessment, pathophysiology and treatment of falls in Parkinson's disease. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies have shown that falls are common in Parkinson's disease, even when compared with other fall-prone

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation and Travel with PD Expert Briefings: Sleep and Parkinson's Nurse: ... Parkinson's Disease Patients with a Depression Diagnosis? CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 CareMAP: Ayudando a una ...

  13. Astroglia in neurological diseases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio; Parpura, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2013), s. 149-158 ISSN 1479-6708 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0184; GA ČR GA309/09/1696 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : amyotrophic lateral sclerosis * Alzheimer's disease * Alexander disease Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Day? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect the Urinary System? NPF Caregiver Summit 2016: Tools For Family Caregivers: Caremap and Caring & Coping OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Managing Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis CareMAP: Movement and Falls: Part 2 CareMAP: ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... and Benefits of DBS Surgery? CareMAP: Managing Caregiver Stress Caregiver Summit 2016: Embracing The Challenge: A Panel ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Panel de Expertos: Sesión ...

  16. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation and Travel with PD Expert Briefings: Sleep and Parkinson's Nurse: ... the Relationship Between Depression and Parkinson's Disease? CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 Hallucinations and Delusions CareMAP: ...

  17. Ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlberg Hansen, Louise; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Correct prehospital diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) may accelerate and improve the treatment. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of prehospital diagnoses of ischemic heart diseases assigned by physicians. Methods. The Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) in Odense, Denmark...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... MAPC - Parkinson- Pasion, Positivismo y Participacion” CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 ...

  19. Bowel Diseases and Kidneys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Dorofeiev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review of contemporary publications analyzes the prevalence of combinations of bowel and renal diseases. Special attention is paid to the problem of correlation between bowel diseases and urolithiasis. We consider the possible pathogenic mechanisms of lesions, such as genetically determined violations of intestinal absorption and secretion, changes in the intestinal microbiota, systemic inflammatory response, water and electrolyte disturbances.

  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's CareMAP: End-of-Life Care CareMAP: Thinking Changes: Part 1 Ask the ...