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Sample records for subcommittee relative risk

  1. International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes Subcommittee on the Taxonomy of Campylobacter and Related Bacteria. Minutes of the Meetings, September 15th and 18th 2013, Aberdeen, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    The minutes from the International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes Subcommittee on the Taxonomy of Campylobacter and Related Bacteria was submitted to the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. The subcommittee meets every two years at the Campylobacter, Helicobac...

  2. International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes. Subcommittee on the taxonomy of Campylobacter and related bacteria. Minutes of the Meeting, August 27 2011, Vancouver, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The minutes from the International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes Subcommittee on the Taxonomy of Campylobacter and Related Bacteria was submitted to the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. The subcommittee meets every two years at the Campylobacter, Helicobac...

  3. Recommendations of the subcommittee on the taxonomy of Campylobacter and related bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandamme, P; On, S L

    2001-03-01

    The ICSB Subcommittee on the taxonomy of Campylobacter and related bacteria has discussed several contemporaneous issues and makes the following recommendations. (i) The reported synonymy between Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter hyoilei was based on valid taxonomic arguments. The subcommittee therefore discourages the use of the name C. hyoilei. (ii) The revised infrasubspecific nomenclature of Campylobacter sputorum is endorsed. C sputorum is subdivided into C. sputorum biovar sputorum (characterized by the absence of catalase and urease activity); C. sputorum biovar faecalis (characterized by catalase but not urease activity); and C. sputorum biovar paraureolyticus (characterized by urease, but not catalase activity). (iii) The subcommittee points out that 'Flexispira rappini' is a taxon that is circumscribed by means of morphological criteria. It encompasses multiple Helicobacter species, including Helicobacter billis and Helicobacter trogontum. (iv) Finally, the subcommittee wishes to point out that the etymology of several specific or subspecific epithets of Campylobacter taxa has been corrected and that the spelling of the epithet 'fecalis' was corrected to 'faecalis'.

  4. Decreasing relative risk premium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Frank

    2007-01-01

    such that the corresponding relative risk premium is a decreasing function of present wealth, and we determine the set of associated utility functions. We find a new characterization of risk vulnerability and determine a large set of utility functions, closed under summation and composition, which are both risk vulnerable...... and have decreasing relative risk premium. We finally introduce the notion of partial risk neutral preferences on binary lotteries and show that partial risk neutrality is equivalent to preferences with decreasing relative risk premium...

  5. Recommendations of the Subcommittee on the taxonomy of Campylobacter and related bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandamme, P.; On, S.L.W.

    2001-01-01

    therefore discourages the use of the name C. hyoilei. (ii) The revised infrasubspecific nomenclature of Campylobacter sputorum is endorsed. C. sputorum is subdivided into C. sputorum biovar sputorum (characterized by the absence of catalase and urease activity); C. sputorum biovar faecalis (characterized...... by catalase but not urease activity); and C. sputorum biovar paraureolyticus (characterized by urease, but not catalase activity). (iii) The subcommittee points out that 'Flexispira rappini' is a taxon that is circumscribed by means of morphological criteria. It encompasses multiple Helicobacter species...

  6. Decreasing Relative Risk Premium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Frank

    We consider the risk premium demanded by a decision maker with wealth x in order to be indifferent between obtaining a new level of wealth y1 with certainty, or to participate in a lottery which either results in unchanged present wealth or a level of wealth y2 > y1. We define the relative risk...... premium as the quotient between the risk premium and the increase in wealth y1–x which the decision maker puts on the line by choosing the lottery in place of receiving y1 with certainty. We study preferences such that the relative risk premium is a decreasing function of present wealth, and we determine...... relative risk premium in the small implies decreasing relative risk premium in the large, and decreasing relative risk premium everywhere implies risk aversion. We finally show that preferences with decreasing relative risk premium may be equivalently expressed in terms of certain preferences on risky...

  7. Fuel related risks; Braenslerisker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englund, Jessica; Sernhed, Kerstin; Nystroem, Olle; Graveus, Frank (Grontmij AB, (Sweden))

    2012-02-15

    The project, within which this work report was prepared, aimed to complement the Vaermeforsk publication 'Handbook of fuels' on fuel related risks and measures to reduce the risks. The fuels examined in this project where the fuels included in the first version of the handbook from 2005 plus four additional fuels that will be included in the second and next edition of the handbook. Following fuels were included: woodfuels (sawdust, wood chips, powder, briquettes), slash, recycled wood, salix, bark, hardwood, stumps, straw, reed canary grass, hemp, cereal, cereal waste, olive waste, cocoa beans, citrus waste, shea, sludge, forest industrial sludge, manure, Paper Wood Plastic, tyre, leather waste, cardboard rejects, meat and bone meal, liquid animal and vegetable wastes, tall oil pitch, peat, residues from food industry, biomal (including slaughterhouse waste) and lignin. The report includes two main chapters; a general risk chapter and a chapter of fuel specific risks. The first one deals with the general concept of risk, it highlights laws and rules relevant for risk management and it discuss general risks that are related to the different steps of fuel handling, i.e. unloading, storing, processing the fuel, transportation within the facility, combustion and handling of ashes. The information that was used to produce this chapter was gathered through a literature review, site visits, and the project group's experience from risk management. The other main chapter deals with fuel-specific risks and the measures to reduce the risks for the steps of unloading, storing, processing the fuel, internal transportation, combustion and handling of the ashes. Risks and measures were considered for all the biofuels included in the second version in the handbook of fuels. Information about the risks and risk management was gathered through interviews with people working with different kinds of fuels in electricity and heat plants in Sweden. The information from

  8. 75 FR 45608 - Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future, Transportation and Storage Subcommittee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future, Transportation and Storage Subcommittee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces... risk perception issues related to onsite storage of spent nuclear fuel at operating and shutdown...

  9. The 1997 JANNAF Propellant Development and Characterization Subcommittee and Safety and Environmental Protection Subcommittee Joint Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocchiaro, James E. (Editor); Filliben, Jeff D. (Editor); Watson, Anne H. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    In the Propellant Development and Characterization Subcommittee (PDCS) meeting, topics included: the analysis, characterization, and processing of propellants and propellant ingredients; chemical reactivity; liquid propellants; test methods; rheology; surveillance and aging; and process engineering. In the Safety and Environmental Protection Subcommittee (S&EPS) meeting, topics covered included: hydrazine propellant vapor detection methods; toxicity of propellants and propellants; explosives safety; atmospheric modeling and risk assessment of toxic releases; reclamation, disposal, and demilitarization methods; and remediation of explosives or propellant contaminated sites.

  10. Employment relations, flexibility and risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten Strøby

    Employment relations literature often distinguishes between social democratic/corporatist models of employment relations and liberal models of employment relations as they are seen as opposite or at least different ways of organizing labor markets. They are often characterized as having very...... different risk profiles in terms of relationships between employees, employers, and the state. Low levels of labor market regulation very often characterize the liberal models of employment relations as we know them from, for instance, the USA and the UK. This means that employment conditions are very often...... insecure and that the burden of unemployment risk mostly lies with the employees rather than the employer. Corporatist – or social democratic – employment relations models are, in contrast to the liberal models, often characterized by stricter regulation of the labor market and by high standards...

  11. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Related Knowledge, Risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV) interventions, it has continued to spread from high risk to the low risk population population with the devastating social, economic and health consequences. Aim: The aim of the following study is to identify HIV related knowledge, risk ...

  12. Risk aversion relates to cognitive ability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ola; Holm, Håkan J.; Tyran, Jean-Robert Karl

    Recent experimental studies suggest that risk aversion is negatively related to cognitive ability. In this paper we report evidence that this relation might be spurious. We recruit a large subject pool drawn from the general Danish population for our experiment. By presenting subjects with choice...... tasks that vary the bias induced by random choices, we are able to generate both negative and positive correlations between risk aversion and cognitive ability. Structural estimation allowing for heterogeneity of noise yields no significant relation between risk aversion and cognitive ability. Our...... results suggest that cognitive ability is related to random decision making rather than to risk preferences....

  13. Risk Aversion Relates to Cognitive Ability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ola; Holm, Håkan J.; Tyran, Jean-Robert Karl

    2016-01-01

    Recent experimental studies suggest that risk aversion is negatively related to cognitive ability. In this paper we report evidence that this relation might be spurious. We recruit a large subject pool drawn from the general Danish population for our experiment. By presenting subjects with choice...... tasks that vary the bias induced by random choices, we are able to generate both negative and positive correlations between risk aversion and cognitive ability. Structural estimation allowing for heterogeneity of noise yields no significant relation between risk aversion and cognitive ability. Our...... results suggest that cognitive ability is related to random decision making, rather than to risk preferences....

  14. Roadway related tort liability and risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    This workbook provide government employees background information related to tort liability and risk management. Past experience with lawsuits against government entities are summarized. The reasons for the lawsuits and results are analyzed. The obje...

  15. Risk sharing relations and enforcement mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barr, A.; Dekker, M.; Fafchamps, M.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate whether the set of available enforcement mechanisms affects the formation of risk sharing relations by applying dyadic regression analysis to data from a specifically designed behavioural experiment, two surveys and a genealogical mapping exercise. During the experiment participants

  16. 75 FR 20991 - NACEPT Subcommittee on Promoting Environmental Stewardship

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-22

    ... AGENCY NACEPT Subcommittee on Promoting Environmental Stewardship AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency..., EPA gives notice of a meeting of the NACEPT Subcommittee on Promoting Environmental Stewardship. The purpose of the Subcommittee on Promoting Environmental Stewardship (SPES) of the National Advisory Council...

  17. Generalizing the spatial relative risk function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarojinie Fernando, W T P; Hazelton, Martin L

    2014-04-01

    The spatial relative risk function is defined as the ratio of densities describing respectively the spatial distribution of cases and controls. It has proven to be an effective tool for visualizing spatial variation in risk in many epidemiological applications over the past 20 years. We discuss the generalization of this function to spatio-temporal case-control data, and also to situations where there are covariates available that may affect the spatial patterns of disease. We examine estimation of the generalized relative risk functions using kernel smoothing, including asymptotic theory and data-driven bandwidth selection. We also consider construction of tolerance contours. Our methods are illustrated on spatio-temporal data describing the 2001 outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease in the United Kingdom, with farm size as a covariate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Risk factors for age-related maculopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Connell, Paul P

    2012-02-01

    Age-related maculopathy (ARM) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Although beneficial therapeutic strategies have recently begun to emerge, much remains unclear regarding the etiopathogenesis of this disorder. Epidemiologic studies have enhanced our understanding of ARM, but the data, often conflicting, has led to difficulties with drawing firm conclusions with respect to risk for this condition. As a consequence, we saw a need to assimilate the published findings with respect to risk factors for ARM, through a review of the literature appraising results from published cross-sectional studies, prospective cohort studies, case series, and case control studies investigating risk for this condition. Our review shows that, to date, and across a spectrum of epidemiologic study designs, only age, cigarette smoking, and family history of ARM have been consistently demonstrated to represent risk for this condition. In addition, genetic studies have recently implicated many genes in the pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy, including Complement Factor H, PLEKHA 1, and LOC387715\\/HTRA1, demonstrating that environmental and genetic factors are important for the development of ARM suggesting that gene-environment interaction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of this condition.

  19. Risk Factors for Age-Related Maculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul P. Connell

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related maculopathy (ARM is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Although beneficial therapeutic strategies have recently begun to emerge, much remains unclear regarding the etiopathogenesis of this disorder. Epidemiologic studies have enhanced our understanding of ARM, but the data, often conflicting, has led to difficulties with drawing firm conclusions with respect to risk for this condition. As a consequence, we saw a need to assimilate the published findings with respect to risk factors for ARM, through a review of the literature appraising results from published cross-sectional studies, prospective cohort studies, case series, and case control studies investigating risk for this condition. Our review shows that, to date, and across a spectrum of epidemiologic study designs, only age, cigarette smoking, and family history of ARM have been consistently demonstrated to represent risk for this condition. In addition, genetic studies have recently implicated many genes in the pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy, including Complement Factor H, PLEKHA 1, and LOC387715/HTRA1, demonstrating that environmental and genetic factors are important for the development of ARM suggesting that gene-environment interaction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of this condition.

  20. A toolbox for health risk related decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Easterly, C.E.; Jones, T.D.

    1996-10-01

    Development efforts since the late 1970s have resulted in a generalized method for ranking health hazards. This method provides the basis for a wide range of applications where decisions are needed for allocating resources on the basis of health risk considerations. It has been used for more than a decade to solve real problems, and it is supported by 23 publications in the open literature. The diversity of this generalized methodology allows us to provide support in a great number of problem areas. we give four examples in this manuscript: the relative toxicities of petroleum mixtures; a method to derive Emergency Response Planning Guides; an estimate of the possible carcinogenic potency of tungsten, an alternative material to depleted uranium for heavy armor penetrators; and an approach to low dose extrapolation. Our experience suggests that many more applications of the original concept and variations on it can be of utility in military situations. Some potentially fruitful areas may be in the: development of a health-risk-ranking system for alternative solutions to manufacturing, waste management, and remediation; provision of a basis for identifying levels of hazardous agents which are below health concerns, or which should be of concern; development of a framework for evaluating chemicals and radioactive materials on the same basis, and in the development of a battery of in vitro bioassays which could take the place of long-term whole animal tests.

  1. Climate Change and Food-Related Risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidro Juan Mirón Pérez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available There are two principal concepts to take into account relating food and climate change: food security and food safety. Most papers linking climate change to food risks deal with the first one: the security of the food supply.The increase of the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, together with the rise of the temperatures on a global level would theorically lead to greater yields of crops grown for human and animal consumption. Howevwe, most of these studies have shown that, in general, crop yields are decreasing as this global change also brings about an increase in the frequency of extreme weather events. In adition, these weather anomalies would be unevenly spread and affect developing countries, which are less capable of tackling this change, more severely. All these factors would result in greater uncertainty in the supply of food, which consequently would be less predictable and leave it more exposed to market speculation.A rise in average temperatures would be expected to increase the risk of proliferation of foodborne disease-causing microorganisms such as Salmonella or Campylobacter. Nevertheless, a trend of this sort has not been detected yet in developed countries, where information systems allow the temporal evolution of the occurrence of those diseases to be tracked, since means for food preservation and food controls are wide spread.

  2. Regional scale ecological risk assessment: using the relative risk model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Landis, Wayne G

    2005-01-01

    ...) in the performance of regional-scale ecological risk assessments. The initial chapters present the methodology and the critical nature of the interaction between risk assessors and decision makers...

  3. 75 FR 12231 - NACEPT Subcommittee on Promoting Environmental Stewardship

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-15

    ... AGENCY NACEPT Subcommittee on Promoting Environmental Stewardship AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... Stewardship. The purpose of the Subcommittee on Promoting Environmental Stewardship (SPES) of the National... Protection Agency on how to promote environmental stewardship practices that encompass all environmental...

  4. Managing IT-related operational risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Ana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Not so long ago, information technology (IT risk occupied a small corner of operational risk - the opportunity loss from a missed IT development deadline. Today, the success of an entire financial institution may lay on managing a broad landscape of IT risks. IT risk is a potential damage to an organization's value, resulting from inadequate managing of processes and technologies. IT risk includes the failure to respond to security and privacy requirements, as well as many other issues such as: human error, internal fraud through software manipulation, external fraud by intruders, obsolesce in applications and machines, reliability issues or mismanagement. The World Economic Forum provides best information about this problem. They rank a breakdown of critical information infrastructure among the most likely core global risks, with 10-20 % likelihood over the next 10 years and potential worldwide impact of $250 billion. Sustained investment in IT - almost $1.2 trillion or 29% of 2006 private-sector capital investment in the U.S. alone fuels growing exposure to IT risk. Greg Hughes, chief strategy officer in Symantec Corp. recently claimed "IT risk management is more than using technology to solve security problems. With proper planning and broad support, it can give an organization the confidence to innovate, using IT to outdistance competitors".

  5. Risk Estimates and Risk Factors Related to Psychiatric Inpatient Suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Trine; Erlangsen, Annette; Nordentoft, Merete

    2017-01-01

    is low. It would be of great benefit if future studies would be based on large samples while focusing on modifiable predictors over the course of an admission, such as hopelessness, depressive symptoms, and family/social situations. This would improve our chances of developing better risk assessment...

  6. Relative versus absolute risk of comorbidities in patients with psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Mohammed D; Kesty, Chelsea; Feldman, Steven R

    2017-03-01

    Psoriasis is associated with numerous comorbidities, often reported in terms of relative risk. Both doctors and the general population tend to overestimate the effects of exposures when presented in relative terms, leading to anxiety and potentially poor treatment decisions. Absolute risks might provide a better basis for risk assessment. To characterize and compare relative and absolute risks of comorbidities in patients with psoriasis. A systematic review using Medline identified comorbidities associated with psoriasis, their relative risks, and information for calculating absolute risks. The comorbidities associated with psoriasis with the highest relative risk were nonmelanoma skin cancer, melanoma, and lymphoma, with relative risks of 7.5, 6.12, and 3.61, respectively; the attributable risk for these 3 conditions were 0.64, 0.05, and 0.17 per 1000 person-years, respectively. To attribute 1 event of these conditions to psoriasis would require seeing 1551; 20,135; and 5823 patients, respectively. Database studies might not fully account for confounders, resulting in overestimates of the risk impact of comorbidities. Presenting attributable risk in the form of the number needed to harm provides a clearer picture of the magnitude of risk and a basis for wiser medical decision making and patient education. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism and risk of occult cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veres, Katalin; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet; Ehrenstein, Vera

    2017-01-01

    The cancer risk during the first year after a pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism episode is higher than expected.An aggressive search for cancer in women with pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism is probably not warranted, due to low absolute risk.......The cancer risk during the first year after a pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism episode is higher than expected.An aggressive search for cancer in women with pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism is probably not warranted, due to low absolute risk....

  8. Risk Taking in Late Adolescence: Relations between Sociomoral Reasoning, Risk Stance, and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Leigh A.; Amsel, Eric; Schillo, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    This study explored relations among late adolescents' sociomoral reasoning about risk taking, risk stance, and behavior. One-hundred and thirty-two participants (18-20-year-olds) were surveyed about their own risk stance (Avoidant, Opportunistic, Curious, Risk Seeking) and behavior in three realms (Alcohol Use, Drug Use, Reckless Driving), and…

  9. Brain tumour risk in relation to mobile telephone use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Christoffer

    2010-01-01

    The rapid increase in mobile telephone use has generated concern about possible health risks related to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields from this technology.......The rapid increase in mobile telephone use has generated concern about possible health risks related to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields from this technology....

  10. 75 FR 10845 - Subcommittee on Forensic Science; Committee on Science; National Science and Technology Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ... TECHNOLOGY POLICY Subcommittee on Forensic Science; Committee on Science; National Science and Technology... Subcommittee on Forensic Science of the National Science and Technology Council's (NSTC's) Committee on Science..., Subcommittee on Forensic Science. BILLING CODE 4410-FY-P ...

  11. 78 FR 21421 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Protection Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Protection Subcommittee... and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Planetary Protection Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Subcommittee reports to the Science Committee of the NAC. The meeting...

  12. JANNAF 25th Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee, 37th Combustion Subcommittee and 1st Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee Joint Meeting. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Ronald S.; Becker, Dorothy L.

    2000-01-01

    Volume I, the first of three volumes, is a compilation of 24 unclassified/unlimited-distribution technical papers presented at the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) 25th Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee, 37th Combustion Subcommittee and 1st Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee (MSS) meeting held jointly with the 19th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee. The meeting was held 13-17 November 2000 at the Naval Postgraduate School and Hyatt Regency Hotel, Monterey, California. Topics covered include: a Keynote Address on Future Combat Systems, a review of the new JANNAF Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee, and technical papers on Hyper-X propulsion development and verification; GTX airbreathing launch vehicles; Hypersonic technology development, including program overviews, fuels for advanced propulsion, ramjet and scramjet research, hypersonic test medium effects; and RBCC engine design and performance, and PDE and UCAV advanced and combined cycle engine technologies.

  13. Risk related behaviour under different ambient scent conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Gagarina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The article analyses the effect of two ambient scents (peppermint and vanilla and their intensiveness on risk related behaviour that is expressed through selected decision making heuristics. Purpose of the article: The purpose of this article is to identify the relationship of ambient scent type and intensiveness with risk related behaviour that is expressed through selected decision making heuristics. Methodology/methods: 2x2 factorial experiment with control group was run. Ambient scent type (vanilla vs. peppermint and intensiveness (8 (1mg vs. 16 sprays (2mg of scent concentrate in the same room were manipulated as between subject variables. Risk aversion, effect of anchoring heuristic on bidding, and affect (risk and benefit heuristics were tracked as dependent variables. Scientific aim: To identify whether ambient scent type and intensiveness have effect on risk related behaviour. Findings: Evidence suggests that there are effects of ambient scent on risk related behaviour, thus fulfilling the missing gap to relate ambient environment to decision making heuristics when risks are involved. However, not all heuristics were affected by experimental conditions. Subjects were bidding significantly higher amounts under low anchor conditions, when peppermint scent was around (if compared to vanilla group. Affect risk was perceived as lower in peppermint ambient scent conditions, if compared to the control group. Intensity of ambient scent also had influence on affect risk: subjects perceived less risk under high scent intensity conditions. Conclusions: By manipulating ambient scent, marketers may reduce or increase consumers risk perception and behaviour and as a consequence influence their purchase decisions. Marketers could use peppermint scent in high intensiveness in the situations where they want consumers to undertake higher risks (expensive purchases, gambling, insurance, since stakes were higher under peppermint ambient scent

  14. Relative risk versus absolute risk: one cannot be interpreted without the other.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordzij, Marlies; van Diepen, Merel; Caskey, Fergus C; Jager, Kitty J

    2017-04-01

    For the presentation of risk, both relative and absolute measures can be used. The relative risk is most often used, especially in studies showing the effects of a treatment. Relative risks have the appealing feature of summarizing two numbers (the risk in one group and the risk in the other) into one. However, this feature also represents their major weakness, that the underlying absolute risks are concealed and readers tend to overestimate the effect when it is presented in relative terms. In many situations, the absolute risk gives a better representation of the actual situation and also from the patient's point of view absolute risks often give more relevant information. In this article, we explain the concepts of both relative and absolute risk measures. Using examples from nephrology literature we illustrate that unless ratio measures are reported with the underlying absolute risks, readers cannot judge the clinical relevance of the effect. We therefore recommend to report both the relative risk and the absolute risk with their 95% confidence intervals, as together they provide a complete picture of the effect and its implications. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  15. Relative rates not relative risks: addressing a widespread misinterpretation of hazard ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, Rinku; Austin, Peter C

    2017-11-07

    The use of the Cox proportional hazards model is ubiquitous in modern medical research. Despite the widespread implementation of this model, the terminology and interpretation that is used to describe the estimate hazard ratio (HR) has become loose and, unfortunately, often incorrect. Although some journals offer guidelines that advise against reporting HRs as relative risks, these guidelines are frequently overlooked. Perhaps due to a lack of understanding, authors continue to interpret the resultant HR as a relative risk-such an interpretation is inappropriate and can be misleading. The HR should be described as a relative rate, not as a relative risk. This article demonstrates that although the direction of the HR can be used to explain the direction of the relative risk, the magnitude of the HR alone cannot be used to explain the magnitude of the relative risk. This article clarifies the relationship between HRs and relative risks in a way that may be better suited for the applied clinical researcher. We also provide a convenient table illustrating the magnitude of relative risk under various values of the HR; the table demonstrates that for a given constant HR, the magnitude of the relative risk can vary substantially. As a take-home message, authors should refrain from using the magnitude of the HR to describe the magnitude of the relative risk. Authors should be strongly encouraged to ascribe accurate interpretations to the statistics derived from fitted Cox proportional hazards regression models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Varied definitions of risk related to sensation seeking trait

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daastoel, P.Oe.U.; Drottz-Sjoeberg, B.M. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Dept. of Psychology

    1999-12-01

    This pilot study is based on the assumption and the knowledge that previous results show that the normal use of the word risk varies across subjects. The risk definitions the subjects use have also been shown to be related to various educational interests. A related field of research has developed measures for Sensation Seeking personality trait, with four facets. Three independent groups of first year psychology students reported their normal definition of the word risk using one of three measurement formats. The results showed, e.g. that the typical open-ended response to the personal definition of risk was danger. Subjects who defined risk as the combination of probability and consequences tended to score higher on the total Sensation Seeking Scale, as compared to those defining risk as the probability of an event.

  17. Beyond the contract: managing risk in supply chain relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, H.C.; Sakaguchi, J.; Kawai, T.

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of the development of intensified relations with suppliers, for many firms the supply chain has become a significant source of risk exposure. In this paper we examine firms' use of control practices to manage risks associated with intensified collaboration with supply chain

  18. Regional-scale risk assessment methodology using the Relative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-04-18

    Apr 18, 2012 ... paper presents an integrated approach to carry out regional-scale ecological risk assessments using a Relative Risk Model. (RRM) adapted ..... Recreational activities. Dams&wiers. Plantations. Gold mine. Habitat alteration. Sugar mill. Sugar. Mixed. Flow alterations. Forestry. 1. Irrigation - dam. Exotic fish.

  19. Awareness, perceived risk and practices related to cervical cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Awareness, perceived risk and practices related to cervical cancer and Pap smear screening: A crosssectional study among HIV-positive women attending an urban HIV clinic in Johannesburg, South Africa.

  20. HIV/AIDS Related Knowledge and Perceived Risk Associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    risk populations in Africa, few studies have looked at the adolescent ..... Future studies should investigate further the relationship between condom related knowledge and attitudes towards condom use. Correct condom information and positive.

  1. A risk-based microbiological criterion that uses the relative risk as the critical limit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Kirk; Nørrung, Birgit; da Costa Alves Machado, Simone

    2015-01-01

    A risk-based microbiological criterion is described, that is based on the relative risk associated to the analytical result of a number of samples taken from a food lot. The acceptable limit is a specific level of risk and not a specific number of microorganisms, as in other microbiological...... estimate can be obtained. This relative risk estimate then can be compared with a critical value, defined by the criterion. This microbiological criterion based on a relative risk limit is particularly useful when quantitative enumeration data are available and when the prevalence of the microorganism...... of concern is relatively high. The use of the approach is therefore illustrated with an example of Campylobacter in broiler meat. It shows that this microbiological criterion can be applied in practice. An advantage of the method is that the acceptable limit is directly defined in terms of risk, without...

  2. Risk communication related to animal products derived from biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, D

    2005-04-01

    Previous chapters of this review have dealt with the key considerations related to the application of biotechnology in veterinary science and animal production. This article explores the theory and practice of risk communication and sets out the basic principles for good risk communication when dealing with new technologies, uncertainty, and cautious and sceptical consumers. After failure to communicate with consumers and stakeholders about the risk to human health from bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in the 1990s, Government Agencies in the United Kingdom have made significant improvements in risk communication. The official inquiry that followed the BSE crisis concluded that a policy of openness was the correct approach, and this article emphasises the importance of consultation, consistency and transparency. There are, however, many different factors that affect public perception of risk (religious, political, social, cultural, etc.) and developing effective risk communication strategies must take all of these complex issues into consideration.

  3. 38 CFR 17.251 - The Subcommittee on Academic Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The Subcommittee on Academic Affairs. 17.251 Section 17.251 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants for Exchange of Information § 17.251 The Subcommittee on Academic Affairs. There is...

  4. 38 CFR 17.252 - Ex officio member of subcommittee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ex officio member of subcommittee. 17.252 Section 17.252 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants for Exchange of Information § 17.252 Ex officio member of subcommittee. The Assistant Chief...

  5. JANNAF 37th Combustion Subcommittee Meeting. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Ronald S. (Editor); Gannaway, Mary T. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This volume, the first of two volumes is a compilation of 59 unclassified/unlimited-distribution technical papers presented at the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) 37th Combustion Subcommittee (CS) meeting held jointly with the 25th Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee (APS), 19th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee (PSHS), and 1st Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee (MSS) meetings. The meeting was held 13-17 November 2000 at the Naval Postgraduate School and Hyatt Regency Hotel, Monterey, California. Topics covered at the CS meeting include: a keynote address on the Future Combat Systems, and review of a new JANNAF Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee, and technical papers on gun propellant burning rate, gun tube erosion, advanced gun propulsion concepts, ETC guns, novel gun propellants; liquid, hybrid and novel propellant combustion; solid propellant combustion kinetics, GAP, ADN and RDX combustion, sandwich combustion, metal combustion, combustion instability, and motor combustion instability.

  6. JANNAF Combustion Subcommittee Meeting. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Ronald S. (Editor); Gannaway, Mary T. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This volume, the first of four volumes, is a collection of 33 unclassified/unlimited papers which were presented at the 33rd Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) Combustion Subcommittee Meeting in conjunction with the Propulsion Systems Hazards at the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA. The JANNAF papers contained in this volume review airbreathing combustion measurement, performance and control; electrothermal-chemical gun experiment and modeling; liquid propellant gun experiment and modeling; solid propellant gun interior ballistics; formulation modeling and diagnostics, ignition, and gun barrel wear modeling, blast and flash; and ram, fastcore and gas generator gun propulsion concepts.

  7. Urbanization and traffic related exposures as risk factors for Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Carsten Bøcker; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2006-01-01

    to nearest major road had no significant effect. CONCLUSIONS: The cause(s) or exposure(s) responsible for the urban-rural differences in schizophrenia risk were closer related to the degree of urbanization than to the geographical distance to nearest major road. Traffic related exposures might thus be less......BACKGROUND: Urban birth or upbringing increase schizophrenia risk. Though unknown, the causes of these urban-rural differences have been hypothesized to include, e.g., infections, diet, toxic exposures, social class, or an artefact due to selective migration. METHODS: We investigated the hypothesis...... that traffic related exposures affect schizophrenia risk and that this potential effect is responsible for the urban-rural differences. The geographical distance from place of residence to nearest major road was used as a proxy variable for traffic related exposures. We used a large population-based sample...

  8. Unseen risks: HIV-related risk behaviors among ethnically diverse sexual minority adolescent females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Brian C; Huebner, David M; Rullo, Jordan E

    2013-12-01

    High rates of HIV-related sexual risk behaviors among lesbian and bisexual female adolescents have been documented. However, previous research has not adequately described racial/ethnic subgroup differences in risk behaviors within this population. We examined HIV-related sexual risk behaviors among an ethnically diverse sample of sexual minority girls (N = 244). Compared to their White peers, girls who identified their race/ethnicity as mixed had more than four times the odds of reporting both unprotected vaginal sex with a male and multiple male sex partners. All subgroups exhibited risk behaviors, indicating that sexual minority girls must be included in HIV-prevention efforts targeting adolescent females.

  9. [Work-related stress and risk factors among Korean employees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun Sook; Ha, Yeongmi

    2009-08-01

    Work-related stress and risk factors among Korean employees were identified in this study. Data were obtained from employees aged 20 to 64 using the Korean Working Conditions Survey 2006 (KWCS). Multiple logistic regression analysis using SAS version 9.1 was performed to examine risk factors of work-related stress by gender. The age-adjusted prevalence of work-related stress among male and female employees was 18.4% and 15.1% respectively. After adjustments for multiple variables among both male and female employees, there was a significant relationship between work-related stress and risk factors including education, company size, work time, ergonomic risks, biological.chemical risks, and job demands. The significant variables for male employees were housework load, occupational class, and shift work, and for female employees, type of employment. There is a need to develop and support intensive stress management programs nationally giving consideration to work-related stress associated with working time, physical working environment, and job demands. Based on gender specific approaches, for male employes, stress management programs should be developed with consideration being given to occupational class and shift work. For stress management programs for female employees, consideration needs to be given to permanent employment status, specifically those in small companies.

  10. Heterosexual gender relations in and around childhood risk and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brussoni, Mariana; Olsen, Lise L; Creighton, Genevieve; Oliffe, John L

    2013-10-01

    Injuries are a leading cause of child death, and safety interventions frequently target mothers. Fathers are largely ignored despite their increasing childcare involvement. In our qualitative study with 18 Canadian heterosexual couples parenting children 2 to 7 years old, we examined dyadic decision making and negotiations related to child safety and risk engagement in recreational activities. Parents viewed recreation as an important component of men's childcare, but women remained burdened with mundane tasks. Most couples perceived men as being more comfortable with risk than women, and three negotiation patterns emerged: fathers as risk experts; mothers countering fathers' risk; and fathers acknowledging mothers' safety concerns but persisting in risk activities. Our findings suggest that contemporary involved fathering practices privilege men in the outdoors and can erode women's control for protecting children from unintentional injury. We recommend promoting involved fathering that empowers both parents and developing injury-prevention strategies incorporating both fathers' and mothers' perspectives.

  11. 76 FR 34778 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on June 23, 2011, Room T-2B1... Subcommittee will review recent events at the Fukushima site in Japan. The Subcommittee will hear presentations...

  12. 76 FR 27103 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on May 26, 2011, Room T-2B1... Subcommittee will review recent events at the Fukushima site in Japan. The Subcommittee will hear presentations...

  13. Aerobic fitness related to cardiovascular risk factors in young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Magnus; Thorsson, Ola; Karlsson, Magnus K

    2012-01-01

    Low aerobic fitness (maximum oxygen uptake (VO(2PEAK))) is predictive for poor health in adults. In a cross-sectional study, we assessed if VO(2PEAK) is related to a composite risk factor score for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in 243 children (136 boys and 107 girls) aged 8 to 11 years. VO(2PEAK...... as composite risk factor score for CVD. Pearson correlation revealed significant associations between VO(2PEAK) and composite risk factor score in both boys (r = -0.48 P ...

  14. AIDS-related risk behavior of young college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E J

    2000-01-01

    Protected sex is crucial in reducing college students' risk of contracting sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Trends indicate college students are knowledgeable about HIV prevention measures, yet underestimate their HIV/AIDS risk in light of their sexual behavior, which they fail to alter in significant ways. The purposes of this exploratory correlational study were to: (a) explore the relationship between AIDS risk perception, self-efficacy, AIDS knowledge, and select demographics on ARRB, (b) compare gender and ethnic differences and (c) assess the validity and reliability of the three psychometric instruments (AIDS Risk Perception question, the AIDS Self-efficacy Survey and the Relative AIDS Risk Index) and the National AIDS Awareness Test. Participants were 407 undergraduates who attended one of three state-supported collegiate institutions in Florida. The psychometric instruments were found valid and reliable. Sixty percent of the students engaged in unprotected sex and 59% engaged in sex while under the influence of alcohol. AIDS risk perception and self-efficacy explained 20% of the variance in AIDS-related risk behavior. Clinical and research implications are discussed.

  15. Relative risk of irritable bowel syndrome following acute gastroenteritis and associated risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowalcyk, B.K.; Smeets, H.M.; Succop, P.A.; Wit, N.J. de; Havelaar, A.H.

    2013-01-01

    A prospective cohort study using electronic medical records was undertaken to estimate the relative risk (RR) of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) following acute gastroenteritis (GE) in primary-care patients in The Netherlands and explore risk factors. Patients aged 18–70 years who consulted for GE

  16. Relative risk of irritable bowel syndrome following acute gastroenteritis and associated risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowalcyk, B.K.; Smeets, H.M.; Succop, P.A.; de Wit, N.J.; Havelaar, A.H.

    2014-01-01

    A prospective cohort study using electronic medical records was undertaken to estimate the relative risk (RR) of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) following acute gastroenteritis (GE) in primary-care patients in The Netherlands and explore risk factors. Patients aged 18–70 years who consulted for GE

  17. Are we overestimating the stroke risk related to contraceptive pills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gompel, Anne; Plu-Bureau, Genevieve

    2014-02-01

    Hormonal contraceptives are used by million of women worldwide. Ischemic stroke is one of the major harmful effects of hormonal contraceptives, but remains a very uncommon disease before menopause. The increased risk of stroke under third and fourth-generation contraceptive pills and nonoral contraceptives has been recently highlighted. Given the benefits associated with combined hormonal contraceptives (COCs), it is important to properly evaluate their risks in order to provide a better benefit/risk balance to young women. Scarce studies addressing the rates of stroke in young women suggest that the fraction attributable to the contraceptive pill remains low. In contrast, there is abundant literature on the relative risks of stroke under COCs. The risk of arterial disease seems to be similar among users of second and third-generation pills, drospirenone-containing pills and nonoral hormonal contraceptives. Progestin-only contraceptives do not appear to be associated with an increased risk of stroke. New formulations of hormonal contraceptives are not safer than second-generation COCs. Even if the absolute numbers of strokes attributable to hormonal contraceptives is very low, stringent selection of patients should help to reduce the events still more, and progestin-only contraceptives/nonhormonal methods should be preferred in cases of associated risk factors.

  18. Risk of bleeding related to antithrombotic treatment in cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke; Olesen, Jonas B; Charlot, Mette

    2012-01-01

    syndrome (ACS), atrial fibrillation (AF), cerebrovascular (CVD) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Different risk assessment schemes and bleeding definitions are compared. The HAS-BLED risk score is recommended in patients with AF and in ACS patients with AF. In patients with ACS with or without......Antithrombotic therapy is a cornerstone of treatment in patients with cardiovascular disease with bleeding being the most feared complication. This review describes the risk of bleeding related to different combinations of antithrombotic drugs used for cardiovascular disease: acute coronary...... are recommended ASA or clopidogrel. With future implementation of new antithrombotic treatment regimens as monotherapy and in combinations with antiplatelet therapy, increased focus on risk of thromboembolic events and bleeding and individual tailoring of antithrombotic therapy is warranted....

  19. Elite athletes experiences with risk related to cardiac screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jonas Schmidt; Thing, Lone Friis

    perspective on risk (Foucault 1988). For most elite athletes participation in cardiac screening is done out of a wish to obtain an acquittal from risks. Symptomatic of the risk society cardiac screening can from an athlete perspective at the same time be seen as an attempt to gain control over......Elite Athletes experiences with risks related to Cardiac Screening Jonas Schmidt Christensen1, Lone Friis Thing1 1University of Copenhagen - Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports (NEXS), Cardiac screening of elite athletes are recommended by both the American Heart Association & the European...... is dominated by studies with a clinical medical focus and studies of athlete’s perspectives on cardiac screening are consequently an absence. By using an interpretive sociological perspective (Denzin 2001) and qualitative research done with elite athletes of both gender this paper seeks to explore how elite...

  20. Life and Biomedical Sciences and Applications Advisory Subcommittee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The proceedings of the August 1995 meeting of the Life and Biomedical Sciences and Applications Advisory Subcommittee (LBSAAS) are summarized. The following topics were addressed by the Subcommittee members: the activities and status of the LBSA Division; program activities of the Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications (OLMSA); the medical Countermeasures Program; and the Fettman Report on animal research activities at ARC. Also presented were a history and overview of the activities of the Space Station Utilization Advisory Committee and the Advanced Life Support Program (ALSP). The meeting agenda and a list of the Subcommittee members and meeting attendees are included as appendices.

  1. Deployment-related risk factors of low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Lars Ravnborg; Marott, Jacob Louis; Gyntelberg, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Where much is known about the consequences of spinal and low back pain (LBP) during military deployments, there is lesser knowledge of risk factors for LBP among the deployed forces. The objective of this study was to identify deployment-related exposures associated with LBP. The study...

  2. Determinants of Risky Sexual Behavior, Relation between HIV Risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determinants of Risky Sexual Behavior, Relation between HIV Risk Perception and Condom Utilization among Wollega University Students in Nekemte Town, Western Ethiopia. ... Almost half (50.2%) had two and more than two life time sexual partners. Having multiple sexual partners was significantly associated with ...

  3. Prevalence and associated risk factors of work-related ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Work related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMDs) represent a significant occupational problem among road construction workers. This study conducted a prevalence and symptom survey of WRMDs among road construction workers in a Nigerian community and its relationship with risk factors over a twelve month period.

  4. Disease-related nutritional risk and mortality in systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereda, Emanuele; Codullo, Veronica; Klersy, Catherine; Breda, Silvia; Crippa, Anna; Rava, Maria Luisa; Orlandi, Margherita; Bonardi, Chiara; Fiorentini, Maria Lina; Caporali, Roberto; Caccialanza, Riccardo

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the relationship between mortality and nutritional risk associated with disease activity in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc). A single-centre prospective cohort study involving 160 SSc outpatients (median age, 62 years [25th-75th, 54-68]). Nutritional risk was assessed by the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), a screening tool that combines anthropometric parameters of nutritional status (body mass index [BMI] and percentage of unintentional weight loss [WL]) with the presence of an "acute disease" (as defined by a disease activity score ≥3 according to Valentini's criteria). Prevalence of high nutritional risk (MUST score ≥2) was 24.4% [95%CI, 17.4-31.3]. A low nutritional risk (MUST = 1) was detected in 30% of our study sample. In hazard analysis (median follow-up duration = 46 months [25th-75th percentile, 31-54]), high nutritional risk was significantly associated with mortality (HR = 8.3 [95%CI, 2.1-32.1]). The performance of the model based on nutritional risk including disease activity (Harrell's c = 0.74 [95%CI, 0.59-0.89]) was superior to that based on active disease alone (HR = 6.3 [95%CI, 1.8-21.7]; Harrell's c = 0.68 [95%CI, 0.53-0.84]). Risk scored only by anthropometric parameters (prevalence, 9.4% [95%CI, 4.6-14.2]) was not associated with mortality: HR = 2.8 [95%CI, 0.6-13.2]. In SSc outpatients MUST significantly predicts mortality. The combined assessment of nutritional parameters and disease activity significantly improves the evaluation of mortality risk. Disease-related nutritional risk screening should be systematically included in the clinical workup of every SSc patient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  5. 76 FR 41929 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Standards Related to Reinsurance, Risk Corridors and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-15

    ... risk sharing protections against adverse selection--risk adjustment and risk corridors--are likely to... Affordable Care Act; Standards Related to Reinsurance, Risk Corridors and Risk Adjustment; Proposed Rule #0...; Standards Related to Reinsurance, Risk Corridors and Risk Adjustment AGENCY: Department of Health and Human...

  6. Are All Risks Equal? Early Experiences of Poverty-Related Risk and Children’s Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Amanda L.; Raver, C. Cybele

    2014-01-01

    Using cumulative risk and latent class analysis (LCA) models, this research examines how exposure to deep poverty (income-to-needs ratio risks (single-parent household, residential crowding, caregiver depression, and multiple life stressors) in preschool is related to children’s future difficulty in school in a longitudinal sample of 602 Head-Start enrolled, low-income families. Results from the LCA revealed four risk profiles: low risk, deep poverty and single, single and stressed, and deep poverty and crowded household. Tests of measurement invariance across racial/ethnic groups established that although patterns of risk are similar across groups (i.e. risks co-vary in the same way), the prevalence of risk profiles differ. African American families were over-represented in the ‘deep poverty and single’ profile while Latino and White families were over-represented in the ‘deep poverty and crowded’ profile. Finally, children’s third grade functioning in three domains (academic performance, behavior problems, self-regulatory skills) was predicted using a cumulative risk index and LCA identified risk profiles. Both approaches demonstrated that children who experienced higher levels of risk in preschool had worse school performance than children with low levels of risk. However, the LCA also revealed that children who experienced ‘single and stressed’ family settings had more behavior problems than low risk children while children who experienced ‘deep poverty and crowded’ family settings had worse academic performance. The results indicate that all risks are not equal for children’s development and highlight the utility of LCA for tailoring intervention efforts to best meet the needs of target populations. PMID:24749652

  7. Are all risks equal? Early experiences of poverty-related risk and children's functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Amanda L; Raver, C Cybele

    2014-06-01

    Using cumulative risk and latent class analysis (LCA) models, we examined how exposure to deep poverty (income-to-needs ratio risks (i.e., single-parent household, residential crowding, caregiver depression, and multiple life stressors) in preschool is related to children's future difficulty in school in a longitudinal sample of 602 Head Start-enrolled, low-income families. Results from the LCA revealed 4 risk profiles: low risk, deep poverty and single, single and stressed, and deep poverty and crowded household. Tests of measurement invariance across racial/ethnic groups established that, although patterns of risk are similar across groups (i.e., risks covary in the same way), the prevalence of risk profiles differs. African American families were overrepresented in the "deep poverty and single" profile while Latino and White families were overrepresented in the "deep poverty and crowded" profile. Finally, children's third grade functioning in 3 domains (i.e., academic performance, behavior problems, and self-regulatory skills) was predicted using a cumulative risk index and LCA-identified risk profiles. Both approaches demonstrated that children who experienced higher levels of risk in preschool had worse school performance than children with low levels of risk. However, LCA also revealed that children who experienced "single and stressed" family settings had more behavior problems than low-risk children while children who experienced "deep poverty and crowded" family settings had worse academic performance. The results indicate that all risks are not equal for children's development and highlight the utility of LCA for tailoring intervention efforts to best meet the needs of target populations. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved

  8. 76 FR 52717 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Planning and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ...) and (6) to discuss organizational and personnel matters that relate solely to the internal personnel... matters. The Subcommittee will gather information, analyze relevant issues and facts, and formulate... the NRC Web site at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/acrs . Information regarding topics...

  9. Food for thought - Communicating food-related risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sturloni Giancarlo

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, a continuous series of food alerts have caught the attention of the media and the public in Europe. First, eggs and pork contaminated with dioxins; then, “mad cow” disease, while, all along in the background, a battle against genetically modified plants has been in progress. These food alerts have had complex repercussions on the perception of risks associated with food production. Experts have often been divided over these issues, and the uncertainty of scientific data has been indicated on more than one occasion as one of the factors that influence risk perception. However, the most important factor seems to be undoubtedly the way in which the risk has been communicated (or not communicated to the public. Therefore, risk communication analysis offers an excellent opportunity to understand the profound changes that are taking place in relations among the scientific community, mass media and other members of civil society now that they are fully aware that scientific and technological innovation, the real driving force of modern industrial society, is a source of development but also a source of risks which are not always acceptable. Within this different context, a debate open to all interested parties appears to have become a dire necessity for the “risk society”, especially as far as food is concerned because food has extremely important psychological, ethical and cultural values.

  10. Pregnancy-related characteristics and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasky, Theodore M; Li, Yanli; Jaworowicz, David J; Potischman, Nancy; Ambrosone, Christine B; Hutson, Alan D; Nie, Jing; Shields, Peter G; Trevisan, Maurizio; Rudra, Carole B; Edge, Stephen B; Freudenheim, Jo L

    2013-09-01

    Breast tissues undergo extensive physiologic changes during pregnancy, which may affect breast carcinogenesis. Gestational hypertension, preeclampsia/eclampsia, gestational diabetes, pregnancy weight gain, and nausea and vomiting (N&V) during pregnancy may be indicative of altered hormonal and metabolic profiles and could impact breast cancer risk. Here, we examined associations between these characteristics of a woman's pregnancy and her subsequent breast cancer risk. Participants were parous women that were recruited to a population-based case-control study (Western New York Exposures and Breast Cancer Study). Cases (n = 960), aged 35-79 years, had incident, primary, histologically confirmed breast cancer. Controls (n = 1,852) were randomly selected from motor vehicle records (pregnancy experiences. Multivariable-adjusted logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). N&V during pregnancy was inversely associated with breast cancer risk. Relative to those who never experienced N&V, ever experiencing N&V was associated with decreased risk (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.56-0.84) as were increased N&V severity (p trend pregnancies (p trend pregnancies. Associations were stronger for more recent pregnancies (breast cancer subtype including estrogen receptor and HER2 expression status. Other pregnancy characteristics examined were not associated with risk. We observed strong inverse associations between pregnancy N&V and breast cancer risk. Replication of these findings and exploration of underlying mechanisms could provide important insight into breast cancer etiology and prevention.

  11. Body fatness, related biomarkers and cancer risk: an epidemiological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimptsch, Katharina; Pischon, Tobias

    2015-05-01

    Higher body fatness is not only associated with a higher risk of hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and coronary heart disease but also with certain types of cancer. The scope of this review is to summarize the epidemiological evidence for an association between body fatness and specific types of cancer and to outline the mediating role of obesity-related biomarkers in this context. Epidemiological studies have gathered convincing evidence that greater body fatness is associated with a higher risk of colorectal cancer, postmenopausal breast cancer, endometrial cancer, esophageal adenocarcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, and pancreatic cancer. Further, evidence for an association between higher body fatness and higher risk of ovarian cancer, advanced prostate cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma is growing. Abdominal obesity is an independent risk factor for colorectal cancer beyond general obesity, whereas an independent role is less clear for other obesity-related cancer types. Epidemiological biomarker studies have shown that the positive association between body fatness and risk of cancer may be partly explained by hyperinsulinemia and altered concentrations in adipokines and sex-steroid hormones. In addition, obesity-associated low-grade inflammation plays a role in colorectal carcinogenesis. While epidemiology has contributed substantially to the understanding of the role of higher body fatness and related metabolic alterations in the development of cancer, further epidemiological biomarker studies are necessary to elucidate the complex interrelations between mediating pathways as well as to study novel pathways. Knowledge resulting from this research may help identify an obesity phenotype that is particularly strongly associated with cancer risk and thus pave the way for targeted prevention of cancer morbidity and mortality.

  12. Metabolic and Lifestyle related risk factors for pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Johansen, Dorthe

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims: In spite of the fact that pancreatic cancer is a relatively infrequent disease, it ranks 8th in the worldwide ranking of cancer death due to the poor prognosis. The mortality rate is almost as high as the incidence with a M/I ratio of 98%, indicating an extremely dismal clinical course. This makes it imperative to try to develop new therapeutic strategies and to try to identify risk factors in order to intensify preventive efforts. The most important risk fact...

  13. [Biological Advisory Subcommittee Sampling Methods : Results, Resolutions, and Correspondences : 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document contains a variety of information concerning Biological Advisory Subcommittee sampling methods at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal Refuge in 2002. Multiple...

  14. 77 FR 27209 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-09

    ... College Subcommittee. Date of Meeting: May 31, 2012. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes..., 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA 17013. At any point, however, if a written statement is not received...

  15. 78 FR 23759 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-22

    ... Subcommittee. Dates of Meeting: May 16, 2013. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue... address: ATTN: Alternate Designated Federal Officer, Dept. of Academic Affairs, 122 Forbes Avenue...

  16. 77 FR 4026 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... Subcommittee. Date of Meeting: February 23, 2012. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue..., 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA 17013. At any point, however, if a written statement is not received...

  17. JANNAF Combustion Subcommittee Meeting (37th). Volume 1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fry, Ronald

    2000-01-01

    .... Topics covered at the CS meeting include: a keynote address on the Future Combat Systems, and review of a new JANNAF Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee, and technical papers on gun propellant burning rate, gun tube erosion, advanced gun...

  18. Relative Risk Appraisal, the September 11 Attacks, and Terrorism-Related Fears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Randall D.; Bryant, Richard A.; Amsel, Lawrence; Suh, Eun Jung; Cook, Joan M.; Neria, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    There are now replicated findings that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms related to the September 11, 2001, attacks occurred in large numbers of persons who did not fit the traditional definition of exposure to a traumatic event. These data are not explained by traditional epidemiologic “bull’s eye” disaster models, which assume the psychological effects are narrowly, geographically circumscribed, or by existing models of PTSD onset. In this article, the authors develop a researchable model to explain these and other terrorism-related phenomena by synthesizing research and concepts from the cognitive science, risk appraisal, traumatic stress, and anxiety disorders literatures. They propose the new term relative risk appraisal to capture the psychological function that is the missing link between the event and subjective response in these and other terrorism-related studies to date. Relative risk appraisal highlights the core notion from cognitive science that human perception is an active, multidimensional process, such that for unpredictable societal threats, proximity to the event is only one of several factors that influence behavioral responses. Addressing distortions in relative risk appraisal effectively could reduce individual and societal vulnerability to a wide range of adverse economic and ethnopolitical consequences to terrorist attacks. The authors present ways in which these concepts and related techniques can be helpful in treating persons with September 11– or terrorism-related distress or psychopathology. PMID:17516775

  19. Building-related risk factors and work-related lower respiratory symptoms in 80 office buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendell, M.J.; Naco, G.M.; Wilcox, T.G.; Sieber, W.K.

    2002-01-01

    We assessed building-related risk factors for lower respiratory symptoms in office workers. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health in 1993 collected data during indoor environmental health investigations of workplaces. We used multivariate logistic regression analyses to assess relationships between lower respiratory symptoms in office workers and risk factors plausibly related to microbiologic contamination. Among 2,435 occupants in 80 office buildings, frequent, work-related multiple lower respiratory symptoms were strongly associated, in multivariate models, with two risk factors for microbiologic contamination: poor pan drainage under cooling coils and debris in outside air intake. Associations tended to be stronger among those with a history of physician-diagnosed asthma. These findings suggest that adverse lower respiratory health effects from indoor work environments, although unusual, may occur in relation to poorly designed or maintained ventilation systems, particularly among previously diagnosed asthmatics. These findings require confirmation in more representative buildings.

  20. MicroRNA Related Polymorphisms and Breast Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Sofia; Greco, Dario; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in microRNAs (miRNA) or in the miRNA binding sites may affect the miRNA dependent gene expression regulation, which has been implicated in various cancers, including breast cancer, and may alter individual susceptibility to cancer....... We investigated associations between miRNA related SNPs and breast cancer risk. First we evaluated 2,196 SNPs in a case-control study combining nine genome wide association studies (GWAS). Second, we further investigated 42 SNPs with suggestive evidence for association using 41,785 cases and 41......,880 controls from 41 studies included in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Combining the GWAS and BCAC data within a meta-analysis, we estimated main effects on breast cancer risk as well as risks for estrogen receptor (ER) and age defined subgroups. Five miRNA binding site SNPs associated...

  1. Risk Factors and Biomarkers of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Nathan G.; Singh, Malkit K.; ElShelmani, Hanan; Mansergh, Fiona C.; Wride, Michael A.; Padilla, Maximilian; Keegan, David; Hogg, Ruth E.; Ambati, Balamurali K.

    2016-01-01

    A biomarker can be a substance or structure measured in body parts, fluids or products that can affect or predict disease incidence. As age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the developed world, much research and effort has been invested in the identification of different biomarkers to predict disease incidence, identify at risk individuals, elucidate causative pathophysiological etiologies, guide screening, monitoring and treatment parameters, and predict disease outcomes. To date, a host of genetic, environmental, proteomic, and cellular targets have been identified as both risk factors and potential biomarkers for AMD. Despite this, their use has been confined to research settings and has not yet crossed into the clinical arena. A greater understanding of these factors and their use as potential biomarkers for AMD can guide future research and clinical practice. This article will discuss known risk factors and novel, potential biomarkers of AMD in addition to their application in both academic and clinical settings. PMID:27156982

  2. Risk factors of age-related macular degeneration in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Nano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSES: To assess the risk factors of age-related macular degeneration in Argentina using a case-control study. METHODS: Surveys were used for subjects' antioxidant intake, age/gender, race, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes (and type of treatment, smoking, sunlight exposure, red meat consumption, fish consumption, presence of age-related macular degeneration and family history of age-related macular degeneration. Main effects models for logistic regression and ordinal logistic regression were used to analyze the results. RESULTS: There were 175 cases and 175 controls with a mean age of 75.4 years and 75.5 years, respectively, of whom 236 (67.4% were female. Of the cases with age-related macular degeneration, 159 (45.4% had age-related macular degeneration in their left eyes, 154 (44.0% in their right eyes, and 138 (39.4% in both eyes. Of the cases with age-related macular degeneration in their left eyes, 47.8% had the dry type, 40.3% had the wet type, and the type was unknown for 11.9%. The comparable figures for right eyes were: 51.9%, 34.4%, and 13.7%, respectively. The main effects model was dominated by higher sunlight exposure (OR [odds ratio]: 3.3 and a family history of age-related macular degeneration (OR: 4.3. Other factors included hypertension (OR: 2.1, smoking (OR: 2.2, and being of the Mestizo race, which lowered the risk of age-related macular degeneration (OR: 0.40. Red meat/fish consumption, body mass index, and iris color did not have an effect. Higher age was associated with progression to more severe age-related macular degeneration. CONCLUSION: Sunlight exposure, family history of age-related macular degeneration, and an older age were the significant risk factors. There may be other variables, as the risk was not explained very well by the existing factors. A larger sample may produce different and better results.

  3. Lifestyle and health-related risk factors and risk of cognitive aging among older veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Kristine; Hoang, Tina D; Byers, Amy L; Barnes, Deborah E; Friedl, Karl E

    2014-06-01

    Lifestyle and health-related factors are critical components of the risk for cognitive aging among veterans. Because dementia has a prolonged prodromal phase, understanding effects across the life course could help focus the timing and duration of prevention targets. This perspective may be especially relevant for veterans and health behaviors. Military service may promote development and maintenance of healthy lifestyle behaviors, but the period directly after active duty has ended could be an important transition stage and opportunity to address some important risk factors. Targeting multiple pathways in one intervention may maximize efficiency and benefits for veterans. A recent review of modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer's disease estimated that a 25% reduction of a combination of seven modifiable risk factors including diabetes, hypertension, obesity, depression, physical inactivity, smoking, and education/cognitive inactivity could prevent up to 3 million cases worldwide and 492,000 cases in the United States. Lifestyle interventions to address cardiovascular health in veterans may serve as useful models with both physical and cognitive activity components, dietary intervention, and vascular risk factor management. Although the evidence is accumulating for lifestyle and health-related risk factors as well as military risk factors, more studies are needed to characterize these factors in veterans and to examine the potential interactions between them. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Risk Estimates and Risk Factors Related to Psychiatric Inpatient Suicide—An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Trine; Erlangsen, Annette; Nordentoft, Merete

    2017-01-01

    People with mental illness have an increased risk of suicide. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of suicide risk estimates among psychiatric inpatients based on the body of evidence found in scientific peer-reviewed literature; primarily focusing on the relative risks, rates, time trends, and socio-demographic and clinical risk factors of suicide in psychiatric inpatients. Psychiatric inpatients have a very high risk of suicide relative to the background population, but it remains challenging for clinicians to identify those patients that are most likely to die from suicide during admission. Most studies are based on low power, thus compromising quality and generalisability. The few studies with sufficient statistical power mainly identified non-modifiable risk predictors such as male gender, diagnosis, or recent deliberate self-harm. Also, the predictive value of these predictors is low. It would be of great benefit if future studies would be based on large samples while focusing on modifiable predictors over the course of an admission, such as hopelessness, depressive symptoms, and family/social situations. This would improve our chances of developing better risk assessment tools. PMID:28257103

  5. Risk Estimates and Risk Factors Related to Psychiatric Inpatient Suicide—An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trine Madsen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available People with mental illness have an increased risk of suicide. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of suicide risk estimates among psychiatric inpatients based on the body of evidence found in scientific peer-reviewed literature; primarily focusing on the relative risks, rates, time trends, and socio-demographic and clinical risk factors of suicide in psychiatric inpatients. Psychiatric inpatients have a very high risk of suicide relative to the background population, but it remains challenging for clinicians to identify those patients that are most likely to die from suicide during admission. Most studies are based on low power, thus compromising quality and generalisability. The few studies with sufficient statistical power mainly identified non-modifiable risk predictors such as male gender, diagnosis, or recent deliberate self-harm. Also, the predictive value of these predictors is low. It would be of great benefit if future studies would be based on large samples while focusing on modifiable predictors over the course of an admission, such as hopelessness, depressive symptoms, and family/social situations. This would improve our chances of developing better risk assessment tools.

  6. Risk Estimates and Risk Factors Related to Psychiatric Inpatient Suicide-An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Trine; Erlangsen, Annette; Nordentoft, Merete

    2017-03-02

    People with mental illness have an increased risk of suicide. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of suicide risk estimates among psychiatric inpatients based on the body of evidence found in scientific peer-reviewed literature; primarily focusing on the relative risks, rates, time trends, and socio-demographic and clinical risk factors of suicide in psychiatric inpatients. Psychiatric inpatients have a very high risk of suicide relative to the background population, but it remains challenging for clinicians to identify those patients that are most likely to die from suicide during admission. Most studies are based on low power, thus compromising quality and generalisability. The few studies with sufficient statistical power mainly identified non-modifiable risk predictors such as male gender, diagnosis, or recent deliberate self-harm. Also, the predictive value of these predictors is low. It would be of great benefit if future studies would be based on large samples while focusing on modifiable predictors over the course of an admission, such as hopelessness, depressive symptoms, and family/social situations. This would improve our chances of developing better risk assessment tools.

  7. Young people's perspectives on health-related risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Elisabeth Spencer

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Drawing upon current socio-cultural understandings of risk, this study highlights the disjunction between the expert risk discourses that permeate official public health policy and practice, and young people’s own perspectives on health and risk. Data were collected from young people aged 14-16 years through the use of group and individual interviews in a school and community youth centre setting. Findings from this study question the saliency of expert-defined health-related risks to young people’s everyday lives. Young people in this study saw health as closely linked to ‘being happy’. Friendships and a sense of personal achievement were particularly important to participants’ health and well-being. When accounting for their participation in health-related practices identified as ‘risky’ in government policy – such as smoking, alcohol and substance use – young people emphasised the levels of pressure they experienced. Sources of pressure included arguments and bullying, school work, and negative stereotypes of young people in general. These areas indicated young people’s concerns that reach beyond the official prescriptions permeating current health policy.

  8. Risk Factors of Mortality from All Asbestos-Related Diseases: A Competing Risk Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Blanco, Teresa; Garcia-Allas, Isabel; Rosell-Murphy, Isabel-Magdalena; Albertí-Casas, Constança; Tarrés, Josep; Krier-Günther, Illona; Martinez-Artés, Xavier; Orriols, Ramon; Grimau-Malet, Isidre; Canela-Soler, Jaume

    2017-01-01

    Background The mortality from all malignant and nonmalignant asbestos-related diseases remains unknown. The authors assessed the incidence and risk factors for all asbestos-related deaths. Methods The sample included 544 patients from an asbestos-exposed community in the area of Barcelona (Spain), between Jan 1, 1970, and Dec 31, 2006. Competing risk regression through a subdistribution hazard analysis was used to estimate risk factors for the outcomes. Results Asbestos-related deaths were observed in 167 (30.7%) patients and 57.5% of these deaths were caused by some type of mesothelioma. The incidence rate after diagnosis was 3,600 per 100,000 person-years. In 7.5% of patients death was non-asbestos-related, while pleural and peritoneal mesothelioma were identified in 87 (16.0%) and 18 (3.3%) patients, respectively. Conclusions Age, sex, household exposure, cumulative nonmalignant asbestos-related disease, and single malignant pathology were identified as risk factors for asbestos-related death. These findings suggest the need to develop a preventive approach to the community and to improve the clinical follow-up process of these patients. PMID:28680295

  9. Relational risk and relationship management in facilities management partnerships

    OpenAIRE

    Salonen, Anssi

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation studies facilities management (FM) partnerships and related risks. The study consists of three research phases. The first phase was a qualitative pilot study to gain understanding and form preliminary research questions and propositions. This was conducted through four pilot cases. The second phase of the research process was a qualitative longitudinal case study. In this case work it was possible to investigate the proposed research questions more thoroughly as I worked wit...

  10. [The management of risks related to deaths in geriatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béranger, Christophe; Moustache, Bouchaïb

    Caregivers are inevitably exposed to the death of the people they care for as almost all deaths occur in a health or medical-social facility. This generates emotional situations which naturally impact on caregivers in their everyday work. The healthcare manager must take into account this reality in the management of risks related to the issue of death. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Estimating relative risks for common outcome using PROC NLP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Binbing; Wang, Zhuoqiao

    2008-05-01

    In cross-sectional or cohort studies with binary outcomes, it is biologically interpretable and of interest to estimate the relative risk or prevalence ratio, especially when the response rates are not rare. Several methods have been used to estimate the relative risk, among which the log-binomial models yield the maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) of the parameters. Because of restrictions on the parameter space, the log-binomial models often run into convergence problems. Some remedies, e.g., the Poisson and Cox regressions, have been proposed. However, these methods may give out-of-bound predicted response probabilities. In this paper, a new computation method using the SAS Nonlinear Programming (NLP) procedure is proposed to find the MLEs. The proposed NLP method was compared to the COPY method, a modified method to fit the log-binomial model. Issues in the implementation are discussed. For illustration, both methods were applied to data on the prevalence of microalbuminuria (micro-protein leakage into urine) for kidney disease patients from the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial. The sample SAS macro for calculating relative risk is provided in the appendix.

  12. Relation of anthropometric variables to coronary artery disease risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra C Patil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Anthropometric variables and their relation to conventional coronary artery disease (CAD risk factors in railway employees have been inadequately studied in India. This cross-sectional survey was carried out in the Solapur division of the Central railway in the year 2004, to assess the anthropometric variables in railway employees and their relation to conventional CAD risk factors. Materials and Methods: A total of 995 railway employees, with 872 males and 123 females participated in this cross-sectional study. All subjects underwent anthropometric measurements, fasting lipid profile, and blood sugar level. Various anthropometric indices were calculated for body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, waist-to-height ratio (WHtR, and abdominal volume index (AVI. Statistical analysis was done by EPI Info 6 statistical software. Results: Compared to all other obesity indices, WHtR was most prevalent in both genders. High WHtR was present in 699 (80.16% males and 103 (83.73% females. Age ≥45 years, high systolic BP, high diastolic BP, low HDL, high triglyceride, and diabetes mellitus were positively correlated with high BMI, high WC, high WHR, high WHtR, and high AVI. High BMI, high WC, high WHR, high WHtR, and high AVI were negatively associated with physical inactivity. Conclusions: Over all, anthropometric variables in both genders were significantly deranged in subjects with coronary risk factors. Compared to all other anthropometric variables, WHtR was statistically significantly associated with a majority of coronary artery risk factors. Hence we recommend inclusion of WHtR as a parameter of obesity to predict coronary artery disease risk factor along with WC, WHR, and BMI in epidemiologic studies.

  13. Modelling the genetic risk in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Grassmann

    Full Text Available Late-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a common sight-threatening disease of the central retina affecting approximately 1 in 30 Caucasians. Besides age and smoking, genetic variants from several gene loci have reproducibly been associated with this condition and likely explain a large proportion of disease. Here, we developed a genetic risk score (GRS for AMD based on 13 risk variants from eight gene loci. The model exhibited good discriminative accuracy, area-under-curve (AUC of the receiver-operating characteristic of 0.820, which was confirmed in a cross-validation approach. Noteworthy, younger AMD patients aged below 75 had a significantly higher mean GRS (1.87, 95% CI: 1.69-2.05 than patients aged 75 and above (1.45, 95% CI: 1.36-1.54. Based on five equally sized GRS intervals, we present a risk classification with a relative AMD risk of 64.0 (95% CI: 14.11-1131.96 for individuals in the highest category (GRS 3.44-5.18, 0.5% of the general population compared to subjects with the most common genetic background (GRS -0.05-1.70, 40.2% of general population. The highest GRS category identifies AMD patients with a sensitivity of 7.9% and a specificity of 99.9% when compared to the four lower categories. Modeling a general population around 85 years of age, 87.4% of individuals in the highest GRS category would be expected to develop AMD by that age. In contrast, only 2.2% of individuals in the two lowest GRS categories which represent almost 50% of the general population are expected to manifest AMD. Our findings underscore the large proportion of AMD cases explained by genetics particularly for younger AMD patients. The five-category risk classification could be useful for therapeutic stratification or for diagnostic testing purposes once preventive treatment is available.

  14. A regression-based method for estimating risks and relative risks in case-base studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Tina Tsz-Ting; Lee, Wen-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Both the absolute risk and the relative risk (RR) have a crucial role to play in epidemiology. RR is often approximated by odds ratio (OR) under the rare-disease assumption in conventional case-control study; however, such a study design does not provide an estimate for absolute risk. The case-base study is an alternative approach which readily produces RR estimation without resorting to the rare-disease assumption. However, previous researchers only considered one single dichotomous exposure and did not elaborate how absolute risks can be estimated in a case-base study. In this paper, the authors propose a logistic model for the case-base study. The model is flexible enough to admit multiple exposures in any measurement scale-binary, categorical or continuous. It can be easily fitted using common statistical packages. With one additional step of simple calculations of the model parameters, one readily obtains relative and absolute risk estimates as well as their confidence intervals. Monte-Carlo simulations show that the proposed method can produce unbiased estimates and adequate-coverage confidence intervals, for ORs, RRs and absolute risks. The case-base study with all its desirable properties and its methods of analysis fully developed in this paper may become a mainstay in epidemiology.

  15. A regression-based method for estimating risks and relative risks in case-base studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Tsz-Ting Chui

    Full Text Available Both the absolute risk and the relative risk (RR have a crucial role to play in epidemiology. RR is often approximated by odds ratio (OR under the rare-disease assumption in conventional case-control study; however, such a study design does not provide an estimate for absolute risk. The case-base study is an alternative approach which readily produces RR estimation without resorting to the rare-disease assumption. However, previous researchers only considered one single dichotomous exposure and did not elaborate how absolute risks can be estimated in a case-base study. In this paper, the authors propose a logistic model for the case-base study. The model is flexible enough to admit multiple exposures in any measurement scale-binary, categorical or continuous. It can be easily fitted using common statistical packages. With one additional step of simple calculations of the model parameters, one readily obtains relative and absolute risk estimates as well as their confidence intervals. Monte-Carlo simulations show that the proposed method can produce unbiased estimates and adequate-coverage confidence intervals, for ORs, RRs and absolute risks. The case-base study with all its desirable properties and its methods of analysis fully developed in this paper may become a mainstay in epidemiology.

  16. Pigmentary characteristics and moles in relation to melanoma risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; Perry, Ann E; Spencer, Steven K; Gibson, Jennifer J; Cole, Bernard F; Ernstoff, Marc S

    2005-08-10

    Although benign and atypical moles are considered key melanoma risk factors, previous studies of their influence were small and/or institution-based. We conducted a population-based case-control study in the state of New Hampshire. Individuals of ages 20-69 with an incident diagnosis of first primary cutaneous melanoma were ascertained through the New Hampshire State Cancer Registry. Controls were identified through New Hampshire driver's license lists and frequency-matched by age and gender to cases. We interviewed 423 eligible cases and 678 eligible controls. Host characteristics, including mole counts, were evaluated using logistic regression analyses. Our results showed that pigmentary factors, including eye color (OR = 1.57 for blue eyes compared to brown), hair color (OR = 1.85 for blonde/red hair color compared to brown/black), freckles before age 15 (OR = 2.39 for freckles present compared to absent) and sun sensitivity (OR = 2.25 for peeling sunburn followed by no tan or a light tan and 2.42 for sunburn followed by tan compared to tanning immediately), were related to melanoma risk; these associations held after adjustment for sun-related factors and for moles. In analyses confined to skin examination participants, the covariate-adjusted effects of benign and atypical moles were moderately strong. Compared to 0-4 benign moles, risk increased steadily for 5-14 moles (OR = 1.71), 15-24 moles (OR = 3.55) and >or= 25 moles (OR = 4.33). Risk also increased with the number of atypical moles; compared to none, the ORs for having 1, 2-3, or >or= 4 atypical moles were 2.08, 1.84 and 3.80, respectively. Although risk was highest for those with multiple benign and atypical moles, the interaction was not of statistical significance. Our findings, arising from the first population- and incidence-based study to evaluate atypical moles in relation to melanoma risk, confirm the importance of host susceptibility, represented by pigmentary factors and the tendency to

  17. Modeling risk-related knowledge in tunneling projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Ibsen Chivatá; Al-Jibouri, Saad S H; Halman, Johannes I M; van Tol, Frits A

    2014-02-01

    Knowledge on failure events and their associated factors, gained from past construction projects, is regarded as potentially extremely useful in risk management. However, a number of circumstances are constraining its wider use. Such knowledge is usually scarce, seldom documented, and even unavailable when it is required. Further, there exists a lack of proven methods to integrate and analyze it in a cost-effective way. This article addresses possible options to overcome these difficulties. Focusing on limited but critical potential failure events, the article demonstrates how knowledge on a number of important potential failure events in tunnel works can be integrated. The problem of unavailable or incomplete information was addressed by gathering judgments from a group of experts. The elicited expert knowledge consisted of failure scenarios and associated probabilistic information. This information was integrated using Bayesian belief-networks-based models that were first customized in order to deal with the expected divergence in judgments caused by epistemic uncertainty of risks. The work described in the article shows that the developed models that integrate risk-related knowledge provide guidance as to the use of specific remedial measures. © 2013 Society for Risk Analysis.

  18. MTHFR polymorphisms in relation to ovarian cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Kathryn L; Tworoger, Shelley S; Goode, Ellen L; Gates, Margaret A; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; Kelemen, Linda E; Sellers, Thomas A; Hankinson, Susan E; Cramer, Daniel W

    2010-11-01

    Folate has been hypothesized to influence carcinogenesis due to its dual role in DNA methylation, which regulates gene expression, and synthesis of purine and thymidylate, which is vital for DNA repair. Thus, we examined ovarian cancer risk in relation to two functional polymorphisms (C677T and A1298C) in the MTHFR gene. We genotyped the C677T (rs1801133) and A1298C (rs1801131) MTHFR polymorphisms in 1642 cases and 2068 controls from three studies, the New England Case Control Study (NEC), Nurses' Health Study (NHS), and Mayo Clinic Ovarian Cancer Case Control Study (MAY). Overall, we observed no association between either SNP and ovarian cancer risk (pooled C677T p(trend)=0.59 and A1298C p(trend)=0.58). Significant associations (C677T p(trend)=0.001, A1298C p(trend)=0.02) between these MTHFR SNPs and serous ovarian cancer risk were observed in the NEC study, but were not replicated in the NHS and MAY studies. MTHFR SNPs C677T and A1298C are not associated with ovarian cancer risk. Our results highlight the need for validation of genetic findings. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Components of gene therapy experimentation that contribute to relative risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Sanford H

    2003-04-01

    Gene therapy is the purposeful delivery of genetic material to somatic cells for the purpose of treating disease or biomedical investigation. Either viral or non-viral vector methods can be used. The risk of collateral exposure of laboratory animal care personnel to gene therapy vectors is dependent on a number of factors. These factors are intrinsic to the gene therapy vector (the vehicle for genetic conveyance), product encoded by the genetic construct delivered, method of delivery, and immune status of the recipient. The component risks of gene therapy experiments can be analyzed to surmise the overall relative risk of the experiment. Knowledge of the components that contribute potential hazardous risk to a study can assist animal care staff in identifying area(s) where prudent practices should be focused. Gene therapy experiments involving viral vectors are generally performed at either biosafety level 2 or 3. The objective of this review is to report on various components of gene therapy experiments, focusing on characteristics of viral and non-viral vectors, to assist the laboratory animal science community in determining prudent biosafety practices.

  20. Relation between Risk Factors of Pyoderma and Pyoderma Incidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lila Indria Depari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pyoderma is a purulent bacterial infection of the skin. In developing countries, pyoderma is the most common skin disease in children. Pyoderma attacks male more often than female. Factors influencing pyoderma are low socioeconomic level, low education, low personal hygiene and unhygienic house. This study was conducted to assess the relation between risk factors of pyoderma and pyoderma incidence. Methods: This study used cross-sectional study design and was conducted from August–November 2013. The sample collection was done with multistage random sampling, where 196 primary school children in Jatinangor subdistrict were randomly taken to be admitted into this study. The data collection procedure consisted of physical examination and questionnaire filling. The data were statistically analyzed using independent T and chi-square test. Results: Upon examining 196 subjects, four were found with pyoderma. As such, the prevalence of pyoderma on primary school children in Jatinangor in 2013 was 2%. There was relation between personal hygiene and pyoderma incidence (p=0.041. Sex (p=0.623, healthy housing (p=0.097, socioeconomic level (p=0.742 and education level of parents (p=0.989 were not related with pyoderma. Conclusions: Personal hygiene is the risk factor that had relation with incidence of pyoderma.

  1. Relative radiological risks derived from different TENORM wastes in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, B; Teng, I L; Muhammad Samudi, Y

    2011-11-01

    In Malaysia technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM) wastes are mainly the product of the oil and gas industry and mineral processing. Among these TENORM wastes are tin tailing, tin slag, gypsum and oil sludge. Mineral processing and oil and gas industries produce large volume of TENORM wastes that has become a radiological concern to the authorities. A study was carried out to assess the radiological risk related to workers working at these disposal sites and landfills as well as to the members of the public should these areas be developed for future land use. Radiological risk was assessed based on the magnitude of radiation hazard, effective dose rates and excess cancer risks. Effective dose rates and excess cancer risks were estimated using RESRAD 6.4 computer code. All data on the activity concentrations of NORM in wastes and sludges used in this study were obtained from the Atomic Energy Licensing Board, Malaysia, and they were collected over a period of between 5 and 10 y. Results obtained showed that there was a wide range in the total activity concentrations (TAC) of nuclides in the TENORM wastes. With the exception of tin slag and tin tailing-based TENORM wastes, all other TENORM wastes have TAC values comparable to that of Malaysia's soil. Occupational Effective Dose Rates estimated in all landfill areas were lower than the 20 mSv y(-1) permissible dose limit. The average Excess Cancer Risk Coefficient was estimated to be 2.77×10(-3) risk per mSv. The effective dose rates for residents living on gypsum and oil sludge-based TENORM wastes landfills were estimated to be lower than the permissible dose limit for members of the public, and was also comparable to that of the average Malaysia's ordinary soils. The average excess cancer risk coefficient was estimated to be 3.19×10(-3) risk per mSv. Results obtained suggest that gypsum and oil sludge-based TENORM wastes should be exempted from any radiological regulatory

  2. Evaluation of Risk Factors Related to Recidivism Among Sentenced Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinem Yıldız

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Risk assessment is taking the place of dangerousness in recent criminal research. Detection of static and dynamic risk factors related and/or interacting to recidivism in accordance with personality characteristics and crime types may help crime prevention strategies to improve. Out of all participants 35% (n=41 are sentenced for manslaughter/physical injury, 35% (n=41 sexual crime and 30% (n=35 theft. The mean age of the participants is 33.81 (sd=9-12 years. During the interview, a questionnaire which is prepared by the researcher by reviewing the literature, Symptom Checklist Short Form, aggression inventory was used. Interviews are conducted face to face by the researcher at the relevant correctional facilities with the permissions of Ministry of Justice and ethical committee. Recidivism is found related to having a period far away from nuclear family before age 18, criminal and drag-alcohol abusing friends, anti-social behaviors; abusing illegal drags, displaying disciplinary problems in prison and during military service. Discussion: Results are evaluated under demographics, relationships in family and close friends, childhood abuse by leaning on current literature. Key words: prevention and control, crime, risk assessment

  3. MicroRNA related polymorphisms and breast cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Khan

    Full Text Available Genetic variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in microRNAs (miRNA or in the miRNA binding sites may affect the miRNA dependent gene expression regulation, which has been implicated in various cancers, including breast cancer, and may alter individual susceptibility to cancer. We investigated associations between miRNA related SNPs and breast cancer risk. First we evaluated 2,196 SNPs in a case-control study combining nine genome wide association studies (GWAS. Second, we further investigated 42 SNPs with suggestive evidence for association using 41,785 cases and 41,880 controls from 41 studies included in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC. Combining the GWAS and BCAC data within a meta-analysis, we estimated main effects on breast cancer risk as well as risks for estrogen receptor (ER and age defined subgroups. Five miRNA binding site SNPs associated significantly with breast cancer risk: rs1045494 (odds ratio (OR 0.92; 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.88-0.96, rs1052532 (OR 0.97; 95% CI: 0.95-0.99, rs10719 (OR 0.97; 95% CI: 0.94-0.99, rs4687554 (OR 0.97; 95% CI: 0.95-0.99, and rs3134615 (OR 1.03; 95% CI: 1.01-1.05 located in the 3' UTR of CASP8, HDDC3, DROSHA, MUSTN1, and MYCL1, respectively. DROSHA belongs to miRNA machinery genes and has a central role in initial miRNA processing. The remaining genes are involved in different molecular functions, including apoptosis and gene expression regulation. Further studies are warranted to elucidate whether the miRNA binding site SNPs are the causative variants for the observed risk effects.

  4. Risk factors for volleyball-related shoulder pain and dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeser, Jonathan C; Joy, Elizabeth A; Porucznik, Christina A; Berg, Richard L; Colliver, Ethan B; Willick, Stuart E

    2010-01-01

    To identify risk factors for volleyball-related shoulder pain and dysfunction. Cross-sectional, observational. National championship sporting event. Competitors at the 2006 National Intramural & Recreational Sports Association Collegiate Club Volleyball Championship competition were invited to volunteer for the study. A total of 422 athletes returned questionnaires, of whom 276 also underwent a structured physical examination. Study participants provided information on any history of volleyball-related shoulder pain or dysfunction. The simple shoulder test (SST) and a visual analog scale permitted subjects to quantify the extent of their perceived functional limitation. Subjects also were invited to undergo a physical examination in which dynamic scapular positioning, glenohumeral range of motion, shoulder girdle strength, and core stability were assessed. Standard statistical methods of comparison and tests of association were used to identify risk factors for shoulder pain among participating volleyball athletes. Approximately 60% of participants reported a history of shoulder problems. Attackers and "jump" servers were more likely to have shoulder problems than setters, defensive specialists, and "float" servers. Nearly half of the athletes who reported shoulder problems perceived some associated functional limitation, with female athletes providing lower SST scores than male athletes (9.0 versus 10.1, P = .001). Athletes reporting shoulder pain and dysfunction were more likely to have SICK scapula scores of 3 or greater (P = .010). Participants who demonstrated core instability also had greater SICK scapula scores (3.9 versus 2.9, P = .038), and were more likely to report a history of shoulder problems (chi2 = 8.83, P = .032). Although the authors observed a significant mean left-right difference of 8.9 degrees in available glenohumeral internal rotation among participating athletes, this deficit was not associated with shoulder problems. However, there was an

  5. Alcohol drinking and pancreatic cancer risk: a meta-analysis of the dose-risk relation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramacere, Irene; Scotti, Lorenza; Jenab, Mazda; Bagnardi, Vincenzo; Bellocco, Rino; Rota, Matteo; Corrao, Giovanni; Bravi, Francesca; Boffetta, Paolo; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2010-03-15

    In order to provide a more precise quantification of the association between alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer risk, we performed a meta-analysis of relevant dose-risk results. We conducted a PubMed search of all case-control (N=21) and cohort (N=11) studies published up to March 2009. We computed summary relative risk (RR) estimates using either fixed- or, in the presence of heterogeneity, random-effects models. The pooled RR was 0.92 (95% confidence interval, 95% CI, 0.86-0.97) for or = 3 drinks/day. The increased risk for heavy drinking was similar in women and men, but apparently stronger in cohort studies (RR=1.29), in studies with high quality index (RR=1.30), and did not appear to be explained by residual confounding by either history of pancreatitis or tobacco smoking. This meta-analysis provides strong evidence for the absence of a role of moderate drinking in pancreatic carcinogenesis, coupled to an increased risk for heavy alcohol drinking. Given the moderate increase in risk and the low prevalence of heavy drinkers in most populations, alcohol appears to be responsible only for a small fraction of all pancreatic cancers.

  6. Risk of Misinforming and Message Customization in Customer Related Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitar Grozdanov Christozov

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses applications of the measures of the risk of misinforming and the role of the warranty of misinforming in the context of the informing component of Customer Related Management (CRM issues. This study consists of two parts. Firstly, we propose an approach for customers’ grouping based on their attitude toward assessing product's properties and their expertise on the terminology/domain of the seller’s message describing the product. Also we discuss what the most appropriate personal/group warranty is for each of these group/clusters.

  7. MTHFR polymorphisms in relation to ovarian cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Terry, Kathryn Lynne; Tworoger, Shelley Slate; Goode, Ellen L.; Gates, Margaret A.; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; Kelemen, Linda E.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Hankinson, Susan Elizabeth; Cramer, Daniel William

    2010-01-01

    Objective Folate has been hypothesized to influence carcinogenesis due to its dual role in DNA methylation, which regulates gene expression, and synthesis of purine and thymidylate, which is vital for DNA repair. Thus, we examined ovarian cancer risk in relation to two functional polymorphisms (C677T and A1298C) in the MTHFR gene. Methods We genotyped the C677T (rs1801133) and A1298C (rs1801131) MTHFR polymorphisms in 1642 cases and 2068 controls from three studies, the New Englan...

  8. 77 FR 45700 - Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee On Fukushima...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ...); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee On Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will... addressing the Fukushima Near Term Task Force (NTTF) Recommendation 1: Enhanced Regulatory Framework. The...

  9. 77 FR 12086 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... Networks and Their Evolution --Earth Science Division Communication Strategy It is imperative that the... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting... Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Earth Science Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory...

  10. 78 FR 38076 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ... Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Subcommittee of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. The... Aircraft System (UAS) Integration into the National Airspace System (NAS) Phase 2 Activity Selection...

  11. 77 FR 38090 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-26

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee (APS) of the NASA Advisory Council... the following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update --James Webb Space Telescope Update --Wide-Field...

  12. 77 FR 4370 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-27

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC... meeting includes the following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update --Update on Balloons Return to...

  13. 77 FR 62536 - Meeting of Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council Science Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-15

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Meeting of Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council Science Committee... Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory... topics: --Astrophysics Division Update --Proposed Data Centers Study --Strategic Implementation for the...

  14. 76 FR 35481 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-17

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC... meeting includes the following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update. --Research and Analysis Update...

  15. 75 FR 61778 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC...

  16. 75 FR 51116 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC... the meeting includes the following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update --2010 Astronomy and...

  17. 75 FR 2893 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA... the room. The agenda for the meeting includes the following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update...

  18. 78 FR 66384 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC... INFORMATION: The agenda for the meeting includes the following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update...

  19. 78 FR 20356 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC... following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update --Report from Astrophysics Roadmap Team --James Webb Space...

  20. 75 FR 33837 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA... of the room. The agenda for the meeting includes the following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update...

  1. 75 FR 74089 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC... meeting includes the following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update --James Webb Space Telescope Update...

  2. 76 FR 66998 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting... Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory... following topic: --Astrophysics Division Update --Results from Acting Astrophysics Division Director...

  3. 78 FR 49296 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting... and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA...

  4. 76 FR 5405 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC... meeting includes the following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update --Update from the James Webb Space...

  5. 75 FR 13597 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA... following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update. --Kepler Data Release Policy. It is imperative that the...

  6. 75 FR 44303 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Environment Subcommittee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... of the global economy. The Environment Subcommittee is charged with examining steps and strategies... Environment Subcommittee of the Future of Aviation Advisory Committee taking place on August 10, 2010, from 10...

  7. 75 FR 57520 - NASA Advisory Council; Planetary Science Subcommittee; Supporting Research and Technology Working...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Planetary Science Subcommittee; Supporting Research and..., the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Supporting Research and Technology Working Group of the Planetary Science Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council. DATED: Wednesday...

  8. 77 FR 76089 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR... Committee on Reactor Safeguards. BILLING CODE 7590-01-P ...

  9. 78 FR 79019 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels..., 2013. Cayetano Santos, Chief, Technical Support Branch, Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards...

  10. 78 FR 3474 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-16

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels... Committee on Reactor Safeguards. BILLING CODE 7590-01-P ...

  11. 78 FR 34677 - Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the Acrs Subcommittee on Materials...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-10

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the Acrs Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels... pellet-cladding interaction during anticipated operational occurrences for Pressurized Water Reactors...

  12. 75 FR 36722 - Aeronautics Science and Technology Subcommittee; Committee on Technology; National Science and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... TECHNOLOGY POLICY Aeronautics Science and Technology Subcommittee; Committee on Technology; National Science... development of the draft National Aeronautics Research, Development, Test and Evaluation (RDT&E) Infrastructure Plan. SUMMARY: The Aeronautics Science and Technology Subcommittee (ASTS) of the National Science...

  13. 77 FR 60507 - Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee (MCSAC): Public Subcommittee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee (MCSAC): Public Subcommittee Meeting AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Meeting of Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) Subcommittee of Motor Carrier Safety Advisory...

  14. Substance-related traffic-risk behaviors among college students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arria, Amelia M.; Caldeira, Kimberly M.; Vincent, Kathryn B.; Garnier-Dykstra, Laura M.; O’Grady, Kevin E.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Drunk driving is a major public health concern, but drugged driving has received little attention. This study examines drugged driving and riding with a drugged driver in a college student sample, in terms of prevalence, age-related trends, race/sex differences, overlap with drunk driving, and risk for alcohol and marijuana dependence. Methods Students (N=1194) ages 19 to 22 were interviewed annually for three years about past-year frequency of drugged driving, riding with a drugged/drunk driver, drunk driving, access to a car, and alcohol/drug dependence. Annual follow-up rates were excellent (88% to 91%). Repeated measures analyses were conducted using generalized estimating equations (GEE). Results One in six (17%wt) 19-year-olds with access to a car drove drugged in the past year; prevalence remained stable through age 22. Drugged driving was more prevalent among males (pdrunk (ranges between 47% and 60%). Both drugged and drunk driving were independently associated with increased risk for alcohol dependence, holding constant age, sex, and race. Drunk driving did not add to the risk for marijuana dependence in the context of drugged driving. Conclusions The prevalence of drugged driving is similar to drunk driving among college students. Both are strongly associated with underlying alcohol and drug dependence. Prevention and treatment implications are discussed. PMID:21601379

  15. Teenage obesity in relation to breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, B A

    1998-11-01

    While most studies show a higher body mass in Western women to be positively associated with an increased breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women, they show a negative association in the case of premenopausal women. A review of case-control and cohort studies suggest that such protection applies mainly to obesity in teenage girls, whereas obesity appearing after the teenage years is more likely to be associated with a higher risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. The mechanisms are uncertain. There is evidence that obesity and the components of the Western diet can independently provoke hyperinsulinaemic insulin resistance at puberty, and in adolescent girls this has been related to evidence of abnormal ovarian steroidogenesis and anovulation. This may decrease promotion of mammary carcinogenesis. If however, obesity continues after the teenage years, the higher concentration of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) associated with hyperinsulinaemia can interact with oestrogen receptors in mammary epithelium to lead to increased proliferative activity. This review postulates that the observed protective effect of early obesity against premenopausal breast cancer is likely to be replaced by an increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer if obesity continues after the teenage years. The manifestation of breast cancer is merely postponed to an older age. Recent prospective and case-control studies suggest that increased bioavailability of IGF1 is a marker of increased breast cancer risk in premenopausal women. Nutritional intake in early life may programme later activity in the growth hormone-IGF1 axis and influence the progression of transformed cells in mammary tissue. The question remains whether deliberate weight loss can reverse the effects of weight gain.

  16. Energy drinks and alcohol-related risk among young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviness, Celeste M; Anderson, Bradley J; Stein, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    Energy drink consumption, with or without concurrent alcohol use, is common among young adults. This study sought to clarify risk for negative alcohol outcomes related to the timing of energy drink use. The authors interviewed a community sample of 481 young adults, aged 18-25, who drank alcohol in the last month. Past-30-day energy drink use was operationalized as no-use, use without concurrent alcohol, and concurrent use of energy drinks with alcohol ("within a couple of hours"). Negative alcohol outcomes included past-30-day binge drinking, past-30-day alcohol use disorder, and drinking-related consequences. Just over half (50.5%) reported no use of energy drinks,18.3% reported using energy drinks without concurrent alcohol use, and 31.2% reported concurrent use of energy drinks and alcohol. Relative to those who reported concurrent use of energy drinks with alcohol, and controlling for background characteristics and frequency of alcohol consumption, those who didn't use energy drinks and those who used without concurrent alcohol use had significantly lower binge drinking, negative consequences, and rates of alcohol use disorder (P energy drink without concurrent alcohol groups on any alcohol-related measure (P > .10 for all outcomes). Concurrent energy drink and alcohol use is associated with increased risk for negative alcohol consequences in young adults. Clinicians providing care to young adults could consider asking patients about concurrent energy drink and alcohol use as a way to begin a conversation about risky alcohol consumption while addressing 2 substances commonly used by this population.

  17. Relative risk for concussions in young female soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Sarah; Lechuga, David; Zachariah, Thomas; Beaulieu, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relative risk and reported symptoms of concussions in 11- to 13-year-old, female soccer players. For this, a survey to compare the reported incidence of concussion in age-matched female soccer players to nonsoccer players was performed. The survey included 342 girls between the ages of 11 and 13: 195 were involved in an organized soccer team and 147 were not involved in organized soccer but were allowed to participate in any other sport or activity. A total of 94 of the 195 soccer players, or 48%, reported at least one symptom consistent with a concussion. The most prevalent symptom for these girls was headache (84%). A total of 34 of the 147 nonsoccer players, or 23%, reported at least one symptom consistent with a concussion in the previous six months. These results determined that the relative risk of probable concussions among 11- to 13-year-old, female soccer players is 2.09 (p soccer players is significantly higher than in a control group of nonsoccer players of the same sex and age.

  18. Trampoline related injuries in children: risk factors and radiographic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimek, Peter Michael; Juen, David; Stranzinger, Enno; Wolf, Rainer; Slongo, Theddy

    2013-05-01

    Backyard trampolines are immensely popular among children, but are associated with an increase of trampoline-related injuries. The aim of this study was to evaluate radiographs of children with trampoline related injuries and to determine the risk factors. Between 2003 and 2009, 286 children under the age of 16 with backyard trampoline injuries were included in the study. The number of injuries increased from 13 patients in 2003 to 86 in 2009. The median age of the 286 patients was 7 years (range: 1-15 years). Totally 140 (49%) patients were males, and 146 (51%) females. Medical records and all available diagnostic imaging were reviewed. A questionnaire was sent to the parents to evaluate the circumstances of each injury, the type of trampoline, the protection equipment and the experience of the children using the trampoline. The study was approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee of the University Hospital of Bern. The questionnaires and radiographs of the 104 patients were available for evaluation. A fracture was sustained in 51 of the 104 patients. More than 75% of all patients sustaining injuries and in 90% of patients with fractures were jumping on the trampoline with other children at the time of the accident. The most common fractures were supracondylar humeral fractures (29%) and forearm fractures (25%). Fractures of the proximal tibia occurred especially in younger children between 2-5 years of age. Children younger than 5 years old are at risk for specific proximal tibia fractures ("Trampoline Fracture"). A child jumping simultaneously with other children has a higher risk of suffering from a fracture.

  19. Time Dependent Relative Risks in Life Insurance Medical Underwriting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneepkens, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Introduction .- Life insurance medicine focuses on mortality hazards in specified periods. People are free to insure their lives for shorter or longer terms. Because the chosen terms range from 1 year to a life time, life insurers have to take into account the fact that the predictive value of risk indicators can and will change over time. The time a risk indicator keeps its predictive value, will be dependent on its biological effects, volatility, and treatability. For a given applicant this implies that the relative hazard (RH) calculated for his/her medical condition should be dependent on the term of the insurance. The main objective of this study is to determine if some commonly used risk indicators - previously used to study age dependency of relative risks - have a predictive value that increases with the observation period. (1) Methods .- This population-based cohort study uses NHANES-data files from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) and the NHANES Linked Mortality Files 2010. Only participants aged 20 to 69 that were examined in mobile examination centers, without a history of some prevalent high risk diseases were included. The observed mortality was compared to the expected mortality in a Generalized Linear Model (GLM) with Poisson error structure with two reference populations, which both can serve as preferred reference for life insurers: The United States Life Tables 2008 (USLT) and the 2008 Valuation Basic Tables (VBT) based on the insured population of 35 US Life insurers. The time dependency of the RHs of the systolic blood pressure (SBP), aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), serum albumin and albuminuria, was assessed, with correction for ethnicity, household income, history of diabetes mellitus, BMI and serum cholesterol. To be able to compare the results with the results of the Age Dependency Study (ADS), the same data, risk indicators, statistical analysis method, and the

  20. 78 FR 2694 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Cancellation of the January 18, 2013, ACRS Subcommittee Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee meeting on Fukushima...

  1. 76 FR 44377 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-25

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on August 16, 2011, Room T-2B1... events at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi reactor site in Japan. The Subcommittee will hear presentations by and...

  2. 75 FR 44998 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Aviation Safety Subcommittee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    ...-OST-2010-0074] The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Aviation Safety Subcommittee; Notice.... ACTION: The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC): Aviation Safety Subcommittee; Notice of meeting... meeting of the FAAC Aviation Safety Subcommittee, which will be held August 24, 2010, in Chicago, Illinois...

  3. 75 FR 64720 - Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future, Transportation and Storage Subcommittee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    ... Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future, Transportation and Storage Subcommittee AGENCY: Office of Nuclear Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces an open meeting of the Transportation and Storage (T&S) Subcommittee. The T&S Subcommittee is a...

  4. 76 FR 34070 - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Natural Gas Subcommittee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Natural Gas Subcommittee AGENCY: Department of Energy, DOE. ACTION... Advisory Board (SEAB) Natural Gas Subcommittee. SEAB was reestablished pursuant to the Federal Advisory..., operational issues and other activities as directed by the Secretary. The Natural Gas Subcommittee was...

  5. 78 FR 48438 - Pediatric Ethics Subcommittee of the Pediatric Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Ethics Subcommittee of the Pediatric Advisory... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Subcommittee: Pediatric Ethics Subcommittee... recommendations to the Pediatric Advisory Committee on pediatric ethical issues. Date and Time: The meeting will...

  6. 78 FR 79707 - Notice of Public Meeting, Gateway West Project Subcommittee of the Boise District Resource...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    ....HT0000 LXSS024D0000 241A 4500060956] Notice of Public Meeting, Gateway West Project Subcommittee of the... Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Gateway West Project Subcommittee of the Boise District Resource...) 384-3364. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Gateway West Project Subcommittee advises the Boise District...

  7. 77 FR 57095 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of... plans for four products that are in development for an adult oncology indication. The subcommittee will...

  8. Events per variable for risk differences and relative risks using pseudo-observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stefan Nygaard; Andersen, Per Kragh; Parner, Erik Thorlund

    2014-01-01

    A method based on pseudo-observations has been proposed for direct regression modeling of functionals of interest with right-censored data, including the survival function, the restricted mean and the cumulative incidence function in competing risks. The models, once the pseudo-observations have ...... differences and relative risks for right-censored data. We investigate how coverage probabilities and relative bias of the pseudo-observation estimator interact with sample size, number of variables and average number of events per variable.......A method based on pseudo-observations has been proposed for direct regression modeling of functionals of interest with right-censored data, including the survival function, the restricted mean and the cumulative incidence function in competing risks. The models, once the pseudo-observations have...... been computed, can be fitted using standard generalized estimating equation software. Regression models can however yield problematic results if the number of covariates is large in relation to the number of events observed. Guidelines of events per variable are often used in practice. These rules...

  9. JANNAF 35th Combustion Subcommittee Meeting. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Ronald S. (Editor); Gannaway, Mary T. (Editor); Rognan, Melanie (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    Volume 1, the first of two volumes is a compilation of 63 unclassified/unlimited distribution technical papers presented at the 35th meeting of the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) Combustion Subcommittee (CS) held jointly with the 17th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee (PSHS) and Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee (APS). The meeting was held on 7-11 December 1998 at Raytheon Systems Company and the Marriott Hotel, Tucson, AZ. Topics covered include solid gun propellant processing, ignition and combustion, charge concepts, barrel erosion and flash, gun interior ballistics, kinetics and molecular modeling, ETC gun modeling, simulation and diagnostics, and liquid gun propellant combustion; solid rocket motor propellant combustion, combustion instability fundamentals, motor instability, and measurement techniques; and liquid and hybrid rocket combustion.

  10. Demographic And Risk Factors Related To Military Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rasolinejad

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Tuberculosis is one the major health care problems in developing countries. Miliary tuberculosis is induced by blood dissemination of multiple tubercle bacilli, the paramount importance of accurate diagnosis of military tuberculosis is because of its dismal outcome if untreated and the chance of cure if diagnosis happens early in the course of the disorder. In this study we describe the demographic and risk factors related to military tuberculosis, which enables us to control and reduce the incidence of military tuberculosis. This ultimately reduces the mortality and morbidity consistent with this disorder. Materials and Methods: we conducted a retrospective case control study, which compares 28 patients with military tuberculosis and 56 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis as control. We reviewed all the patients' documents registered between years 1994-2004, after extracting raw data we analyzed them with chi-square and Fisher exact tests. Results and Conclusion: We found that HIV (P< 0.05 infection and lack of BCG vaccination (P< 0.05 increases the number of military tuberculosis among our patients. In addition we did not find any other significant risk factor.

  11. Obesity and related risk of myeloproliferative neoplasms among israeli adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiba, Adi; Duek, Adrian; Afek, Arnon; Derazne, Estela; Leiba, Merav

    2017-07-01

    Obesity has been associated with various malignancies, but a clear association between overweight and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) has not been established. This study assessed the association between adolescent obesity and future risk for MPN. Data on 2,516,256 Israeli adolescents, who underwent a compulsory general health examination at ages 16 to 19, between 1967 and 2011, were linked to the National Cancer Registry in this nationwide, population-based cohort study. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) for MPN associated with BMI measured at adolescence. The mean follow-up of 19.86 ± 12.15 years reflected 49,977,521 person years, during which 433 examinees developed MPN, primarily chronic myelogenous leukemia, polycythemia vera, and essential thrombocythemia. Obesity (BMI ≥ 95th percentile) in adolescence significantly predicted increased risk of MPN with HR (adjusted for sex) of 1.81 (95% confidence interval 1.13-2.92, P = 0.014). Adolescent obesity might be related to an increased incidence of myeloproliferative neoplasms. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  12. Understanding the relative importance of global dengue risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Rachel

    2015-10-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-transmitted viral infection of major international public health concern. Global environmental and socio-economic change has created ideal conditions for the global expansion of dengue transmission. Innovative modelling tools help in understanding the global determinants of dengue risk and the relative impact of environmental and socio-economic factors on dengue transmission and spread. While climatic factors may act as a limiting factor on the global scale, other processes may play a dominant role at the local level. Understanding the spatial scales at which environmental and socio-economic factors dominate can help to target appropriate dengue control and prevention strategies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. [Should physical activity be contraindicated during pregnancy in relation to its potentially related risks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdière, S; Guinhouya, B C; Salerno, D; Deruelle, P

    2017-02-01

    This paper aimed at providing a critical analysis of data on the risks associated with physical activity of women during their pregnancy. Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, PubMed (Medline) and Web of Sciences were searched using a combination of MeSH terms associated to "Physical activity", "Pregnancy" and "Adverse events" or "Risks". Only review papers published from inception of these databases to November 2016 were used in the present analysis. The electronic search yield a total of 104 citations. After a critical analysis of abstracts and/or full-texts, only a systematic review and cohort study on injuries related to physical activity during pregnancy appeared relevant for the current study. Data reveals a very small proportion (<1 %) of adverse events in direct link with the physical activity behavior of pregnant women. Furthermore, there would be less than one serious adverse event per 5000hours of physical activity. The only serious adverse event attributable to physical activity during pregnancy was uterine contractions. The threat of preterm labor and miscarriage risk cannot be primarily attributed to the participation of pregnant women in a physical activity, even vigorous. Moreover, no adverse effects of maternal physical activity on neonatal outcomes were found. Physical activity-related risks during pregnancy appear to be infrequent and of minor severity. Though further studies are required to better understand the risk/benefit balance of physical activity during pregnancy, current data do not support the contraindication of this behavior in pregnant women. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Circadian clock-related genetic risk scores and risk of placental abruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chunfang; Gelaye, Bizu; Denis, Marie; Tadesse, Mahlet G; Luque Fernandez, Miguel Angel; Enquobahrie, Daniel A; Ananth, Cande V; Sanchez, Sixto E; Williams, Michelle A

    2015-12-01

    The circadian clock plays an important role in several aspects of female reproductive biology. Evidence linking circadian clock-related genes to pregnancy outcomes has been inconsistent. We sought to examine whether variations in single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of circadian clock genes are associated with PA risk. Maternal blood samples were collected from 470 PA case and 473 controls. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina Cardio-MetaboChip platform. We examined 119 SNPs in 13 candidate genes known to control circadian rhythms (e.g., CRY2, ARNTL, and RORA). Univariate and penalized logistic regression models were fit to estimate odds ratios (ORs); and the combined effect of multiple SNPs on PA risk was estimated using a weighted genetic risk score (wGRS). A common SNP in the RORA gene (rs2899663) was associated with a 21% reduced odds of PA (P circadian rhythm genes may be associated with PA risk. Larger studies are needed to corroborate these findings and to further elucidate the pathogenesis of this important obstetrical complication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. School-related risk and protective factors associated with truancy among urban youth placed at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kimberly L; Huizinga, David H

    2007-11-01

    Truancy is a serious concern in the United States. Its negative effects are so pervasive that in 2003 the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention named truancy prevention a national priority. Effective prevention of truancy requires a thorough understanding of the characteristics that describe truant youth as well as factors that may put them at risk for truancy. Unfortunately, surprisingly little is known about the correlates and/or causes of truancy. In this paper we explore associations between truancy and several salient school-related risk and protective factors among a sample of youth who grew up in socially disorganized neighborhoods of Denver, CO. We demonstrate that several school-related risk and protective factors are associated with truancy. Perhaps most importantly, we identify that the two most robust predictors are school performance and involvement with delinquent peers, and that these two variables form a synergistic relationship in which the relationship between delinquent peer association and truancy is mitigated among students who perform well in school. EDITORS' STRATEGIC IMPLICATIONS: The authors use data from a large probability sample drawn from neighborhoods with high crime rates to identify key correlates of truancy. They also draw attention to the dearth of efficacious truancy prevention efforts in spite of the magnitude of the problem.

  16. Relative risk perception for terrorism: implications for preparedness and risk communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caponecchia, Carlo

    2012-09-01

    Terrorism presents a significant risk that is often approached at public policy, infrastructure, or emergency management level. Public perceptions of the likelihood of terrorist events, and how this may relate to individual preparedness, are not always extensively examined. The tendency to think that negative events are less likely to happen to oneself than to the average person is known as optimism bias. Optimism bias is relevant to perceptions of terrorism, because it is thought to be related to a reduction in precaution use. Using an online survey of 164 participants, this study aimed to determine whether Sydney residents thought they had a lower likelihood of experiencing terrorist events than other Australians. Significant optimism bias was observed for witnessing terrorist events, but not for personally experiencing terrorist events. In addition, Sydney residents tended to think that terrorist attacks were more likely to occur in Sydney than another major Australian city in the next five years. At the same time, household and workplace preparedness for terrorism was quite low, as was awareness of emergency strategies in the central business district. Perceptions of high likelihood of terrorism happening in one's own city, yet low preparedness present a challenge for risk communication and emergency management strategies. The diversity of possible terrorist targets, and the simple plans that can moderate the effects of a disaster may need to be emphasized in future anti-terrorism initiatives. © 2012 Society for Risk Analysis.

  17. Assessment of Multifactor Gene-Environment Interactions and Ovarian Cancer Risk: Candidate Genes, Obesity, and Hormone-Related Risk Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Usset, J.L.; Raghavan, R.; Tyrer, J.P.; McGuire, V.; Sieh, W.; Webb, P.; Chang-Claude, J.; Rudolph, A.; Anton-Culver, H.; Berchuck, A.; Brinton, L.; Cunningham, J.M.; Defazio, A.; Doherty, J.A.; Edwards, R.P.; Gayther, S.A.; Gentry-Maharaj, A.; Goodman, M.T.; Hogdall, E.; Jensen, A.; Johnatty, S.E.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Kjaer, S.K.; Larson, M.C.; Lurie, G.; Massuger, L.F.; Menon, U.; Modugno, F.; Moysich, K.B.; Ness, R.B.; Pike, M.C.; Ramus, S.J.; Rossing, M.A.; Rothstein, J.; Song, H.; Thompson, P.J.; Berg, D.J. Van Den; Vierkant, R.A.; Wang-Gohrke, S.; Wentzensen, N.; Whittemore, A.S.; Wilkens, L.R.; Wu, A.H.; Yang, H.; Pearce, C.L.; Schildkraut, J.M.; Pharoah, P.; Goode, E.L.; Fridley, B.L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk factors relate to hormone exposure and elevated estrogen levels are associated with obesity in postmenopausal women. Therefore, we hypothesized that gene-environment interactions related to hormone-related risk factors could differ between obese

  18. Binge drinking among adolescents: prevalence, risk practices and related variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golpe, Sandra; Isorna, Manuel; Barreiro, Carmen; Braña, Teresa; Rial, Antonio

    2017-09-29

    According to the last Survey on Drug Use among Secondary School Students (ESTUDES 2014-2015), consumption levels of alcohol and other substances have decreased in the last years in Spain. However, available data on binge drinking remain worrying, given the negative consequences related with this pattern. The aim of this paper is to analyse binge drinking among adolescents, providing updated data on prevalence in addition to information about the consequences and some predictive factors of binge drinking. A correlational method was used for this purpose, comprised of administering a survey to Compulsory Secondary School, High School and Vocational Training students. Based on a sample of 3,419 Galician adolescents aged between 12 and 18 years (M = 14.57; SD = 1.76), the results show that binge drinking is a common and global practice, with few socio-demographic differences but related with a wide range of risk practices. Furthermore, variables such as consumption expectancies, consumption by family and friends, as well as curfew time and allowance money have been identified as interesting predictive factors that should be taken into account at the preventive level.

  19. Risk factors related to fatal truck crashes on Korean freeways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Saerona; Oh, Cheol; Kim, Mijeong

    2014-01-01

    The major purpose of this study was to identify risk factors affecting truck crashes on freeways and propose recommendations for safer truck traffic operations. Truck crashes were analyzed to identify how truck traffic safety is related to prevailing traffic and weather conditions. Prevailing traffic conditions were characterized by central tendencies and the spatiotemporal variation of traffic parameters collected from freeway traffic surveillance systems. A total of 377 truck crashes occurring on Korean freeways in a recent 3-year period, 2008-2010, were analyzed together with corresponding prevailing traffic conditions and weather conditions. Several statistical tests were conducted to understand the characteristics of prevailing traffic conditions before crash occurrence based on different weather conditions. In addition, a binary logistic regression technique was applied to identify causal factors affecting truck crash severity under normal and adverse weather conditions. Major findings from the analyses are discussed with truck operations strategies including speed enforcement, variable speed limit, and truck lane restriction from the safety enhancement point of view. Speed-related variables representing prevailing traffic conditions before crash occurrences were found to be the most statistically significant factors affecting truck crash severity, compared to volume-related variables such as the volume-to-capacity ratio (v/c). It is inferred that speed management is an effective tool for safer truck traffic operations on freeways. The major findings can be further discussed to derive valuable insights into truck traffic operations based on different weather conditions, such as normal and adverse. Some recommendations for safer truck traffic operations were presented based on the results obtained. The outcomes of this study could be effectively utilized to support the development of various traffic operations strategies and policies for truck traffic safety

  20. Risk factors for age-related maculopathy in a 14-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesgaard, Helena; Vinding, Troels; la Cour, Morten

    2005-01-01

    To examine the association between potential risk factors and the 14-year incidence of age-related maculopathy (ARM).......To examine the association between potential risk factors and the 14-year incidence of age-related maculopathy (ARM)....

  1. 78 FR 38956 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee; Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... class size and DLIFLC foreign language potential. August 1--The Board will be briefed on items of... Institute Foreign Language Center Subcommittee. Date: July 31, 2013 and August 1, 2013. Time of Meeting...: Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center and Presidio of Monterey (DLIFLC & POM), Building 614...

  2. 78 FR 69077 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... initiatives and lifelong learning. December 12--The Board will have time to compile observations pertaining to... Army Education Advisory Committee for deliberation by the Committee under the open-meeting rules...

  3. 38th JANNAF Combustion Subcommittee Meeting. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Ronald S. (Editor); Eggleston, Debra S. (Editor); Gannaway, Mary T. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    This volume, the first of two volumes, is a collection of 55 unclassified/unlimited-distribution papers which were presented at the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) 38th Combustion Subcommittee (CS), 26 th Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee (APS), 20th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee (PSHS), and 21 Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee. The meeting was held 8-12 April 2002 at the Bayside Inn at The Sandestin Golf & Beach Resort and Eglin Air Force Base, Destin, Florida. Topics cover five major technology areas including: 1) Combustion - Propellant Combustion, Ingredient Kinetics, Metal Combustion, Decomposition Processes and Material Characterization, Rocket Motor Combustion, and Liquid & Hybrid Combustion; 2) Liquid Rocket Engines - Low Cost Hydrocarbon Liquid Rocket Engines, Liquid Propulsion Turbines, Liquid Propulsion Pumps, and Staged Combustion Injector Technology; 3) Modeling & Simulation - Development of Multi- Disciplinary RBCC Modeling, Gun Modeling, and Computational Modeling for Liquid Propellant Combustion; 4) Guns Gun Propelling Charge Design, and ETC Gun Propulsion; and 5) Airbreathing - Scramjet an Ramjet- S&T Program Overviews.

  4. The Peer Relations of Dropouts: A Comparative Study of At-Risk and Not At-Risk Youths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenbogen, Stephen; Chamberland, Claire

    1997-01-01

    Compared the characteristics of friends, the environments of the friendship network, and the nature of peer relations of students (N=191) at-risk and not at risk of leaving high school. Results indicate that at risk students had more dropout friends, more working friends, fewer school friends, and fewer same-sex friends. (RJM)

  5. About some aspects of weather related risks in Spanish Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, J. M.; Tarquis, A. M.; Grau, J. B.; Saa, A.; Diaz, M. C.

    2009-04-01

    aggressive floods in 1500-1800 era, and actual added trends of "climate change" are towards higher temperatures, less water and higher perturbations. These long term risks are rather poorly predictable and will be handled mostly by improvements in agriculture and also by social and economic adaptations, but at shorter delays and specific areas active policies are possible and exist. An agribusiness can set his production plans lowering his global risk. Sometimes it might use prudently some financial instruments, such as "orange juice futures". When using decision making models, some utility functions may consider that severe losses have higher effects than good profits, letting ranges for business margins for insurers to be limited by concurrence at correct levels. Correct availability of credits is necessary for bad periods, and also state policies for rare bad situations, concerning agribusiness survival and also alimentary safety. Insurance products are effective aids for a growing variety of well definite natural risks, such as in cases of hailstorm, that have probabilities of occurrence measurable from previous events data, and a variety of adequate professional models are continuously made for them. Related to Universidad Politecnica de Madrid the CEIGRAM institute has started recently and is involved in agricultural insurance, being connected with insurers through ENESA and AGROMUTUA. That world is active, important, evolving, and is regulated by diverse laws.

  6. Work related psychosocial risks and musculoskeletal disorders: potential risk factors, causation and evaluation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeney, Colin; O'Sullivan, Leonard

    2009-01-01

    Musculo Skeletal Disorders (MSDs) are the focus of considerable attention and research in occupational health, which is in part due to high prevalence rates and associated costs. In the United States, the total cost associated with MSDs increased from $81 billion in 1986 to $215 billion in 2005 [3]. Epidemiological studies have repeatedly shown associations between work-related psychosocial factors and MSDs, and the role of psychosocial factors and stress in these disorders has received increased attention. Several reviews have reported associations between MSDs and work-related psychosocial factors such as high workload/demands, high perceived stress levels, low social support, low job control, low job satisfaction and monotonous work. Several theories have been proposed to explain the apparent relationship between stress and MSDs in the workplace from a biological perspective. These include the biopsychosocial model of job stress, the hyperventilation theory, the migraine theory, the muscle spindle theory and the Cinderella hypothesis. Within the literature, a vast array of questionnaires have been developed in an attempt to measure the psychosocial factors that occur within the workplace. This article presents a discussion of existing knowledge of the psychosocial risk factors potentially linked to MSDs and potential pathways to injury. A discussion of evaluation approaches used to estimate psychosocial risk exposures in workplaces is also presented.

  7. Obesity and related risk factors in gastric cardia adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olefson, Sidney; Moss, Steven F

    2015-01-01

    Over recent decades, the incidence of cancers of the gastroesophageal junction, including gastric cardia tumors, has increased markedly. This is a trend that has been well documented, especially in studies from the USA and northern Europe that have also demonstrated a concomitant rise in the ratio of cardia to distal gastric cancers. The rise in the prevalence of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma has been paralleled by the worldwide obesity epidemic, with almost all epidemiological studies reporting increased body mass index and obesity increase the risk of cardia cancer development. However, the strength of this association is less marked than the link between obesity and esophageal adenocarcinoma, and the mechanisms remain poorly understood. Other possible confounders of the relationship between obesity and cardia cancer include the decline in Helicobacter pylori infection and the widespread use of proton pump inhibitors, although these have rarely been controlled for in case-control and cohort studies investigating associations between obesity and cardia cancer. We review these epidemiological trends and discuss proposed mechanisms for the association, drawing attention to controversies over the difficulty of defining cardia cancer. The relative paucity of high-quality epidemiological studies from other regions of the world should prompt further investigation of this issue, especially in populations undergoing rapid socioeconomic change.

  8. SPECIFICITY OF INNOVATION RELATED RISKS OF HIGHER SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Motyshina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to innovative activities of educational institutions regarded as the platform for fostering the students’ innovative potential and intellectual capacity. The authors consider the risks of innovative projects carried out in Russian universities; they analyze the biggest external challenges in the given sphere, including the fast obsolescence of knowledge, abrupt social changes, low competitiveness of Russian education in the global market, as well as the internal challenges related to insufficient qualification and advanced age of most academic staff, lack of necessary infrastructure, outdated educational paradigm, poor motivation for innovations, etc. Referring to the external and internal spheres, the author demonstrates possible risks of innovation activity in educational institutions both on the micro- and macro-level. The paper emphasizes the need for identification and classification of innovative project risks as a basis for effective prognostication and risk management. The risk classification model, developed by the author, can be used for estimating the prospects of innovative projects, and effort coordination in overcoming the adverse impact of risks зы развитию системы образования (недостаточная квалификация и преклонный возраст большинства преподавателей, отсутствие необходимой инфраструктуры и устаревшая парадигма управления, слабая нацеленность на производство инноваций и инноваторов и т. д.. В зависимости от сегмента внутренней и внешней среды представлены возможные риски инновационной деятельности вуза на микро- и макроуровнях. Очевидно, что имеющие пр

  9. Review of studies related to uncertainty in risk analsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rish, W.R.; Marnicio, R.J.

    1988-08-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Radiation Programs (ORP) is responsible for regulating on a national level the risks associated with technological sources of ionizing radiation in the environment. A critical activity of the ORP is analyzing and evaluating risk. The ORP believes that the analysis of uncertainty should be an integral part of any risk assessment; therefore, the ORP has initiated a project to develop framework for the treatment of uncertainty in risk analysis. Summaries of recent studies done in five areas of study are presented.

  10. Consumer preferences regarding food-related risk-benefit messages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van H.; Kleef, van E.; Owen, H.; Frewer, L.J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – The aim of this study is to identify and explore consumer preferences and information needs regarding the simultaneous communication of risks and benefits associated with food consumption. The focus is on the net health impact of risks and benefits on life expectancy, quality of life, and

  11. relative risk of metabolic syndrome components in Nigerians: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome is increasing in all populations worldwide and is associated with a substantially elevated risk of type 2 diabetes (5-fold) and of cardiovascular disease (2-3 fold). Metabolic syndrome is now established as a simple means of identifying individuals at increased risk of future ...

  12. [Obesity and cardiovascular risk factors in adolescents. Association with cardiovascular risk factors in first degree relatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albañil Ballesteros, María Rosa; Rogero Blanco, María Eloisa; Olivas Domínguez, Antonio; Sánchez Martín, Magdalena; Rabanal Basalo, Alejandro; Sanz Bayona, María Teresa

    2012-03-24

    Obesity is a major concern in public health. The fact that most teenagers stop contacting the health system during this period of life prevents detection of this problem and its associated morbidity. The aim of this study is to measure the prevalence of obesity at 18. We also aimed to detect overweight, cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) and association with CVRF in parents and siblings. The research includes 153 children followed up to 18 years old in a community health center. Measures of body mass index (BMI), waist perimeter, CVRF, and familiar history were taken. The prevalence of obesity in our study group was 7.18%, (IC: 3.0-11.0), (6.25% male and 7.86% female). The prevalence of overweight was 18.3% (IC: 11.9-24.0), (26.56% male and 12.35% female). A familiy history of CVRF was found in 53.9% (IC: 46.1-61.9) of cases, including high blood pressure (25%), obesity (23.6%), dyslipemia (21.7%), and diabetes (7.2%). This finding was more prevalent in the obesity group (72.72%) than in those with overweight only (64.2%), or with normal weight (49.59%). A family history of obesity and diabetes in first-degree relatives was associated to obesity in the study group. Also, a family history of high blood pressure was associated to the presence of high blood pressure in this group. In order to detect obesity, overweight, and associated complications in young adults, specific attention to children and siblings of persons who present risk factors is recommended. Those with high blood pressure, diabetes or obesity have the higher risk. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Event-related potentials in patients with Huntington's disease and relatives at risk in relation to detailed psychometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hömberg, V; Hefter, H; Granseyer, G; Strauss, W; Lange, H; Hennerici, M

    1986-06-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) were studied in patients with Huntington's disease (HD) and their offspring at risk in a simple auditory oddball paradigm requiring the counting of the rarer of two stimulus categories. Group statistical analysis revealed prolongation of latencies of components P2, N2 and especially P3 in HD patients and to a lesser extent in at-risks. In a large population of normals the age-latency relationship for component P3 showed a non-linear shape with increasing slope and scatter in the older age groups. A bipartate linear regression analysis splitting the normal population at age 50 was used for detection of abnormalities of P3 latency in individual cases. Abnormal P3 latencies were present in the majority of HD patients and also in 25% of clinically normal at-risks. Correlation analysis of ERP components with detailed psychometry revealed a particularly high association of P3 latencies with measurements requiring speeded information processing in non-verbal tasks. P3 amplitude did not covary with performance scores but unlike P3 latency showed association with depression and psychosis scores. From the results it appears that analysis of ERPs is a useful electrophysiological tool for an objective assessment of cognition both in clinically definite and subclinical stages.

  14. Risk of placental abruption in relation to migraines and headaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananth Cande V

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Migraine, a common chronic-intermittent disorder of idiopathic origin characterized by severe debilitating headaches and autonomic nervous system dysfunction, and placental abruption, the premature separation of the placenta, share many common pathophysiological characteristics. Moreover, endothelial dysfunction, platelet activation, hypercoagulation, and inflammation are common to both disorders. We assessed risk of placental abruption in relation to maternal history of migraine before and during pregnancy in Peruvian women. Methods Cases were 375 women with pregnancies complicated by placental abruption, and controls were 368 women without an abruption. During in-person interviews conducted following delivery, women were asked if they had physician-diagnosed migraine, and they were asked questions that allowed headaches and migraine to be classified according to criteria established by the International Headache Society. Logistic regression procedures were used to calculate odds ratios (aOR and 95% confidence intervals (CI adjusted for confounders. Results Overall, a lifetime history of any headaches or migraine was associated with an increased odds of placental abruption (aOR = 1.60; 95% CI 1.16-2.20. A lifetime history of migraine was associated with a 2.14-fold increased odds of placental abruption (aOR = 2.14; 95% CI 1.22-3.75. The odds of placental abruption was 2.11 (95% CI 1.00-4.45 for migraineurs without aura; and 1.59 (95% 0.70-3.62 for migraineurs with aura. A lifetime history of tension-type headache was also increased with placental abruption (aOR = 1.61; 95% CI 1.01-2.57. Conclusions This study adds placental abruption to a growing list of pregnancy complications associated with maternal headache/migraine disorders. Nevertheless, prospective cohort studies are needed to more rigorously evaluate the extent to which migraines and/or its treatments are associated with the occurrence of placental abruption.

  15. Experience-Induced Change of Alcohol-Related Risk Perception in Patients with Alcohol Use Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepper, Sarah; Odenwald, Michael; Rösner, Susanne; Senn, Smeralda; Menning, Hans; Pereyra-Kröll, Devi; Rockstroh, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    The role of alcohol-related risk perception for effective treatment of alcohol use disorders (AUD) is still unclear. The present study on 101 alcohol-dependent patients undergoing a 10-week AUD treatment protocol investigated the relationship between alcohol-related risk perception and alcohol use with the hypotheses that (1) risk perception changes across treatment, (2) changes vary with treatment-related experiences of abstinence/relapse indicating 'risk reappraisal,' and (3) adjustment of perceived own vulnerability according to 'risk reappraisal hypothesis' predicts abstinence during follow-up. Abstinence during treatment was related to a decrease, and relapse during treatment to a slight increase in perceived own risks. Abstinence during the 3-month follow-up varied with experience-induced risk reappraisal. The results show an impact of risk reappraisal on alcohol use and hence advocate a focus on risk reappraisal in AUD treatment.

  16. The risk of cataract in relation to metal arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slagor, Rebekka Michaelsen; Dornonville de la Cour, Morten; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: There are indications that solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) increases the risk of cataract, but there is only circumstantial evidence that metal welding, an important occupational source of UVR exposure, is a risk factor. The objective of this study is to unravel if metal welding......, information on welding was collected from questionnaires and, for both cohorts, information about cataract diagnosis and operation was gathered from Danish national registers. Using Cox regression analysis, the hazard ratio (HR) for cataract diagnosis and/or operation was calculated in the follow-up period.......95–1.21] and the adjusted HR was 1.08 (95% CI 0.95–1.22). Age and diabetes were as expected strong risk factors. Conclusion: We found no increased risk of developing cataract among Danish metal welders who worked with arc welding from 1950–1985. This may be attributed to the effectiveness of personal safety equipment....

  17. The relation of risk assessment and health impact assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ádám, Balázs; Gulis, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    standardised scientific methods to characterise the probability and magnitude of harm caused by a hazard, preferably in a quantitative manner. In turn, HIA is a process to assess future impacts of recent proposals and is dominated by qualitative evaluation. It makes a projection for a future scenario rather......The level and distribution of health risks in a society is substantially influenced by measures of various policies, programmes or projects. Risk assessment can evaluate the nature, likelihood and severity of an adverse effect. Health impact assessment (HIA) provides similar function when used...... their relationship. The experiences accumulated during the preparation of several case studies in a large scale international project (RAPID) are used for argumentation and formulation of recommendations on how risk assessment can be systematically integrated into the HIA process. Risk assessment uses well...

  18. Relation between Childhood Obesity and Adult Cardiovascular Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren M. Allcock

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of overweight and obesity is rising at an alarming pace in the pediatric population, just as in the adult population. The adult comorbidities associated with this risk factor are well-recognized and are being further elucidated continually. Additionally, we are gradually developing a better understanding of the risks of overweight and obesity among children while they are still young. However, there is now a growing body of evidence showing that childhood obesity not only leads all too frequently to adult obesity, but is in itself a risk factor for cardiometabolic syndrome and resultant cardiovascular risk in adulthood. If current trends continue, the problem of pediatric overweight and obesity will become of unmanageable proportions once these individuals reach adulthood. Future research efforts toward understanding this complex problem will need to focus on those overweight and obese children who later went on to change their metabolic course and become normal-weight adults.

  19. Extent of Cropland and Related Soil Erosion Risk in Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidele Karamage

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Land conversion to cropland is one of the major causes of severe soil erosion in Africa. This study assesses the current cropland extent and the related soil erosion risk in Rwanda, a country that experienced the most rapid population growth and cropland expansion in Africa over the last decade. The land cover land use (LCLU map of Rwanda in 2015 was developed using Landsat-8 imagery. Based on the obtained LCLU map and the spatial datasets of precipitation, soil properties and elevation, the soil erosion rate of Rwanda was assessed at 30-m spatial resolution, using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE model. According to the results, the mean soil erosion rate was 250 t·ha−1·a−1 over the entire country, with a total soil loss rate of approximately 595 million tons per year. The mean soil erosion rate over cropland, which occupied 56% of the national land area, was estimated at 421 t·ha−1·a−1 and was responsible for about 95% of the national soil loss. About 24% of the croplands in Rwanda had a soil erosion rate larger than 300 t·ha−1·a−1, indicating their unsuitability for cultivation. With a mean soil erosion rate of 1642 t·ha−1·a−1, these unsuitable croplands were responsible for 90% of the national soil loss. Most of the unsuitable croplands are distributed in the Congo Nile Ridge, Volcanic Range mountain areas in the west and the Buberuka highlands in the north, regions characterized by steep slopes (>30% and strong rainfall. Soil conservation practices, such as the terracing cultivation method, are paramount to preserve the soil. According to our assessment, terracing alone could reduce the mean cropland soil erosion rate and the national soil loss by 79% and 75%, respectively. After terracing, only a small proportion of 7.6% of the current croplands would still be exposed to extreme soil erosion with a rate >300 t·ha−1·a−1. These irremediable cropland areas should be returned to mountain forest to

  20. Development of relative risk model for regional groundwater risk assessment: a case study in the lower Liaohe River Plain, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianbo Li

    Full Text Available Increasing pressure on water supply worldwide, especially in arid areas, has resulted in groundwater overexploitation and contamination, and subsequent deterioration of the groundwater quality and threats to public health. Environmental risk assessment of regional groundwater is an important tool for groundwater protection. This study presents a new approach for assessing the environmental risk assessment of regional groundwater. It was carried out with a relative risk model (RRM coupled with a series of indices, such as a groundwater vulnerability index, which includes receptor analysis, risk source analysis, risk exposure and hazard analysis, risk characterization, and management of groundwater. The risk map is a product of the probability of environmental contamination and impact. The reliability of the RRM was verified using Monte Carlo analysis. This approach was applied to the lower Liaohe River Plain (LLRP, northeastern China, which covers 23604 km2. A spatial analysis tool within GIS which was used to interpolate and manipulate the data to develop environmental risk maps of regional groundwater, divided the level of risk from high to low into five ranks (V, IV, III, II, I. The results indicate that areas of relative risk rank (RRR V cover 2324 km2, covering 9.8% of the area; RRR IV covers 3986 km2, accounting for 16.9% of the area. It is a new and appropriate method for regional groundwater resource management and land use planning, and is a rapid and effective tool for improving strategic decision making to protect groundwater and reduce environmental risk.

  1. Development of Relative Risk Model for Regional Groundwater Risk Assessment: A Case Study in the Lower Liaohe River Plain, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianbo; Zuo, Rui; Teng, Yanguo; Wang, Jinsheng; Wang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Increasing pressure on water supply worldwide, especially in arid areas, has resulted in groundwater overexploitation and contamination, and subsequent deterioration of the groundwater quality and threats to public health. Environmental risk assessment of regional groundwater is an important tool for groundwater protection. This study presents a new approach for assessing the environmental risk assessment of regional groundwater. It was carried out with a relative risk model (RRM) coupled with a series of indices, such as a groundwater vulnerability index, which includes receptor analysis, risk source analysis, risk exposure and hazard analysis, risk characterization, and management of groundwater. The risk map is a product of the probability of environmental contamination and impact. The reliability of the RRM was verified using Monte Carlo analysis. This approach was applied to the lower Liaohe River Plain (LLRP), northeastern China, which covers 23604 km2. A spatial analysis tool within GIS which was used to interpolate and manipulate the data to develop environmental risk maps of regional groundwater, divided the level of risk from high to low into five ranks (V, IV, III, II, I). The results indicate that areas of relative risk rank (RRR) V cover 2324 km2, covering 9.8% of the area; RRR IV covers 3986 km2, accounting for 16.9% of the area. It is a new and appropriate method for regional groundwater resource management and land use planning, and is a rapid and effective tool for improving strategic decision making to protect groundwater and reduce environmental risk. PMID:26020518

  2. Risks of multiple sclerosis in relatives of patients in Flanders, Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, H; Vlietinck, R; Debruyne, J; DeKeyser, J; DHooghe, MB; Loos, R; Medaer, R; Truyen, L; Yee, IML; Sadovnick, AD

    Objectives - To calculate age adjusted risks for multiple sclerosis in relatives of Flemish patients with multiple sclerosis. Methods - Lifetime risks were calculated using the maximum likelihood approach. Results - Vital information was obtained on 674 probands with multiple sclerosis in Flanders

  3. Pushing and pulling in relation to musculoskeletal disorders: a review of risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoozemans, M. J.; van der Beek, A. J.; Frings-Dresen, M. H.; van Dijk, F. J.; van der Woude, L. H.

    1998-01-01

    The objective was to review the literature on risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders related to pushing and pulling. The risk factors have been described and evaluated from four perspectives: epidemiology, psychophysics, physiology, and biomechanics. Epidemiological studies have shown, based on

  4. Pushing and pulling in relation to musculoskeletal disorders : a review of risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoozemans, M J; Van Der Beek, Allard J.; Frings-Dresen, M. H. W.; Dijk, F.J.H.; van der Woude, L H

    The objective was to review the literature on risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders related to pushing and pulling. The risk factors have been described and evaluated from four perspectives: epidemiology, psychophysics, physiology, and biomechanics. Epidemiological studies have shown, based on

  5. Assessment of credit risk based on fuzzy relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsabadze, Teimuraz

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a new approach for an assessment of the credit risk to corporate borrowers. There are different models for borrowers' risk assessment. These models are divided into two groups: statistical and theoretical. When assessing the credit risk for corporate borrowers, statistical model is unacceptable due to the lack of sufficiently large history of defaults. At the same time, we cannot use some theoretical models due to the lack of stock exchange. In those cases, when studying a particular borrower given that statistical base does not exist, the decision-making process is always of expert nature. The paper describes a new approach that may be used in group decision-making. An example of the application of the proposed approach is given.

  6. Family-related obesity risk factors and dietary behaviours in high-risk populations : associations with child weight development

    OpenAIRE

    Svensson, Viktoria

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity rates in Swedish children are currently not increasing, however socioeconomic disparities are widening. Many children become obese as early as their preschool years. Hereditary and environmental family-related risk factors are the dominating determinants of child obesity, with parental obesity as the most important. Prevention is a high priority, and increased knowledge on risk factors specifically in high-risk populations is of vital importance for the development of e...

  7. DDT and related compounds and risk of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabrant, D H; Held, J; Langholz, B; Peters, J M; Mack, T M

    1992-05-20

    A cohort mortality study among 5886 chemical manufacturing workers was completed in 1987 and showed increased mortality due to pancreatic cancer. We conducted a nested case-control study of pancreatic cancer among these chemical manufacturing workers to identify risk factors for this disease. Twenty-eight verified cases of pancreatic cancer and 112 matched controls were studied. Next of kin of each subject were interviewed to determine lifestyle factors, including tobacco, alcohol, and coffee consumption. Written work records and interviews with co-workers were used to determine chemical exposures at the plant under study. DDT was associated with pancreatic cancer (risk ratio [RR] for ever exposed compared with never exposed = 4.8; 95% confidence interval = 1.3-17.6). Among subjects who had a mean exposure to DDT of 47 months, the risk was 7.4 times that among subjects with no exposure. Two DDT derivatives, Ethylan and DDD, were additionally associated with pancreatic cancer (RR = 5.0 and 4.3, respectively); exposures to these two chemicals were correlated, and it was not possible to determine whether each acted independently of the other. Smoking was identified as an independent risk factor, but controlling for smoking (and other potential confounders) in the analyses did not appreciably alter the risks seen for DDT, DDD, or Ethylan. Exposure to DDT was associated with pancreatic cancer. The association was not explained by exposure to lifestyle factors or other chemicals, and risk increased with both duration of exposure and latency since first exposure. These results may indicate that DDT can cause pancreatic cancer in humans under circumstances of heavy and prolonged exposure.

  8. Modeling Risk-Related Knowledge in Tunneling Projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chivatá Cárdenas, Ibsen; Al-Jibouri, Saad H.S.; Halman, Johannes I.M.; van Tol, Frits A.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge on failure events and their associated factors, gained from past construction projects, is regarded as potentially extremely useful in risk management. However, a number of circumstances are constraining its wider use. Such knowledge is usually scarce, seldom documented, and even

  9. Update on procedure-related risks for prenatal diagnosis techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabor, Ann; Alfirevic, Zarko

    2010-01-01

    to very skilled operators, but these figures cannot be used for general counselling. Amniocentesis performed prior to 15 weeks had a significantly higher miscarriage rate than CVS and mid-trimester amniocentesis, and also increased the risk of talipes equinovarus. Amniocentesis should therefore...

  10. Is parental age related to the risk of Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); W. Schulte (Wim); T.A. Tanja (Teun); R. Haaxma (Rob); A.J. Lameris; R.J. Saan; A. Hofman (Albert)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractAdvanced maternal and paternal age were investigated as putative risk factors for AD in 198 clinically diagnosed Alzheimer patients and in 198 randomly selected healthy controls. No significant differences in average age of fathers and of mothers at birth of the subject were observed.

  11. Incidence of shoulder injuries and related risk factors among master ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Swimmers engaging in strength training (OR = 0.78) showed a reduced incidence of shoulder pain. The calculated incidence of shoulder pain over the three-year period among the master swimmers was 62.4%. Significant statistical associations between shoulder pain and the risk factors of osteoporosis, volume of training ...

  12. Advanced prostate cancer risk in relation to toenail selenium levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geybels, M.S.; Verhage, B.A.J.; Schooten, F.J. van; Goldbohm, A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Selenium may prevent advanced prostate cancer (PCa), but most studies on this topic were conducted in populations with moderate to high selenium status. We investigated the association of toenail selenium, reflecting long-term selenium exposure, and advanced PCa risk in a population from

  13. Lung cancer risk in relation to dietary acrylamide intake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogervorst, J.G.F.; Schouten, L.J.; Konings, E.J.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2009-01-01

    Background : Acrylamide is a probable human carcinogen that is present in several heat-treated foods. In epidemiological studies, positive associations between dietary acrylamide intake and the risks of endometrial, ovarian, estrogen receptor-positive breast, and renal cell cancers have been

  14. Age-related and prognostic risk factors in dialysis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.L. Tripepi (Giovanni)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe replacement of renal function by dialysis is one of the major achievements of modern medicine. However, given the fact that renal failure shares common causes with cardiovascular diseases, dialysis patients are a population with a risk profile of almost unique severity. In fact, it

  15. ORIGINAL ARTICLES DVT prophylaxis in relation to patient risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Is the patient taking aspirin or clopidogrel? Does the patient have kidney or liver disease? Is the patient on any medication (such as NSAIDS, and including natural/homoeopathic medication, e.g. garlic tablets, arnica, procydin) that increases the risk of bleeding? Table IV. Patient demographics. Characteristic. Surgical.

  16. Review on risk factors related to lower back disorders at workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    A' Tifah Jaffar, Nur; Nasrull Abdol Rahman, Mohd

    2017-08-01

    This review examines the evidence of the occurrence of risk exposure on work-related lower back disorders in the workplace. This review also investigates potential interactions between the risk factors in the workplace which include heavy physical work risk factor, static work postures risk factor, frequent bending and twisting risk factor, lifting risk factor, pushing and pulling risk factor, repetitive work risk factor, vibration risk factor, psychological and psychosocial risk factor that may be associated with symptoms of musculoskeletal disorders of lower back. These risk factors can reinforce each other and their influence can also be mediated by cultural or social factors. A systematic review of the literature was carried out by searching using databases and the searching strategy was used combined keyword for risk factors, work-related lower back disorders, heavy physical work, static work postures, frequent bending and twisting, lifting, pushing and pulling, repetitive work, vibration, psychological and psychosocial risk factor. A total of 67 articles were identified and reviewed. The risk factors identified that related for low back disorder are seven which are heavy physical work, static work postures, frequent bending and twisting, lifting, pushing and pulling, repetitive work, vibration, psychological and psychosocial risk factor and the level of evidence supporting the relationship with lower back disorders also described such as strong, moderate, insufficient, limited and no evidence. This result confirms that, existing of higher physical and psychosocial demand related to reported risk factors of low back disorders. The result also showed that previous reviews had evaluated relationship between risk factors of low back disorders and specific types of musculoskeletal disorders. This review also highlights the scarves evidence regarding some of the frequently reported risk factors for work related lower back disorders.

  17. Risk. Impact of having a first-degree relative with affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj

    2016-01-01

    : the high-risk group comprised twins at risk of developing affective disorder (DZ or MZ twin; index co-twin affected); the low risk group (control group) comprised twins at low risk of developing affective disorder (DZ or MZ twin; index co-twin not affected). At baseline 234 participants were divided...... enhanced risk and thus accelerate the onset of illness. Low-risk individuals seem to experience fewer life events and may exhibit resilience to their adverse psychological effects. Overall, having a 1st-degree relative with affective disorder matters. This thesis demonstrates that high-risk studies...

  18. Using prior risk-related knowledge to support risk management decisions: lessons learnt from a tunneling project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Ibsen Chivatá; Al-Jibouri, Saad S H; Halman, Johannes I M; van de Linde, Wim; Kaalberg, Frank

    2014-10-01

    The authors of this article have developed six probabilistic causal models for critical risks in tunnel works. The details of the models' development and evaluation were reported in two earlier publications of this journal. Accordingly, as a remaining step, this article is focused on the investigation into the use of these models in a real case study project. The use of the models is challenging given the need to provide information on risks that usually are both project and context dependent. The latter is of particular concern in underground construction projects. Tunnel risks are the consequences of interactions between site- and project-specific factors. Large variations and uncertainties in ground conditions as well as project singularities give rise to particular risk factors with very specific impacts. These circumstances mean that existing risk information, gathered from previous projects, is extremely difficult to use in other projects. This article considers these issues and addresses the extent to which prior risk-related knowledge, in the form of causal models, as the models developed for the investigation, can be used to provide useful risk information for the case study project. The identification and characterization of the causes and conditions that lead to failures and their interactions as well as their associated probabilistic information is assumed to be risk-related knowledge in this article. It is shown that, irrespective of existing constraints on using information and knowledge from past experiences, construction risk-related knowledge can be transferred and used from project to project in the form of comprehensive models based on probabilistic-causal relationships. The article also shows that the developed models provide guidance as to the use of specific remedial measures by means of the identification of critical risk factors, and therefore they support risk management decisions. Similarly, a number of limitations of the models are

  19. The thickness and volume of LLETZ specimens can predict the relative risk of pregnancy-related morbidity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khalid, S

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if the individual physical characteristics of the extirpated transformation zone after large loop excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ) might predict the relative risk of adverse obstetric outcome, specifically preterm labour (PTL).

  20. The evolution of risk perceptions related to bovine spongiform encephalopathy--Canadian consumer and producer behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Goddard, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    In this study the dynamics of risk perceptions related to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) held by Canadian consumers and cow-calf producers were evaluated. Since the first domestic case of BSE in 2003, Canadian consumers and cow-calf producers have needed to make decisions on whether or not their purchasing/production behavior should change. Such changes in their behavior may relate to their levels of risk perceptions about BSE, risk perceptions that may be evolving over time and be affected by BSE media information available. An econometric analysis of the behavior of consumers and cow-calf producers might identify the impacts of evolving BSE risk perceptions. Risk perceptions related to BSE are evaluated through observed market behavior, an approach that differs from traditional stated preference approaches to eliciting risk perceptions at a particular point in time. BSE risk perceptions may be specified following a Social Amplification of Risk Framework (SARF) derived from sociology, psychology, and economics. Based on the SARF, various quality and quantity indices related to BSE media information are used as explanatory variables in risk perception equations. Risk perceptions are approximated using a predictive difference approach as defined by Liu et al. (1998). Results showed that Canadian consumer and cow-calf producer risk perceptions related to BSE have been amplified or attenuated by both quantity and quality of BSE media information. Government policies on risk communications need to address the different roles of BSE information in Canadian consumers' and cow-calf producers' behavior.

  1. Risk Management related to Privacy Policies of an Online Store

    OpenAIRE

    George Cristian Schin

    2016-01-01

    This paper seeks to explore the early warning alerts that NORSE system proposes to e-commerce merchants. The real time visibility to cyber-attacks empowers this intelligence tool with high capabilities to detect the threats that companies confront with. The fight against cyber-criminality should be reinforced globally, in the attempt to mitigate the risks and losses determined by attackers. By analysing two case studies, the article proposes a framework which can guide e-commerce merchants to...

  2. European consumers' perceived seriousness of their eating habits relative to other personal health risks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoefkens, Christine; Valli, Veronica; Mazzocchi, Mario; Traill, W Bruce; Verbeke, Wim

    2013-01-01

    .... This study investigates European consumers' perceived seriousness of their eating habits, its determinants and relative importance among other potential personal health risks including weight, stress and pollution...

  3. Risk Perception Analysis Related To Existing Dams In Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solimene, Pellegrino

    2013-04-01

    In the first part of this work, the progress of Italian National Rules about dams design, construction and operation are presented to highlight the strong connection existing between the promulgation of new decrees, as a consequence of a dam accidents, and the necessity to prevent further loss of lives and goods downstream. Following the Gleno Dam failure (1923), a special Ministerial Committee wrote out the first Regulations and made the proposal to establish, within the High Council of Public Works, a special department that become soon the "Dam Service", with the tasks of control and supervision about construction and operation phases of the dams and their reservoirs. A different definition of tasks and the structure of Dam Service were provided in accordance with law n° 183/1989, which transferred all the technical services to the Office of the Prime Minister; the aim was to join the Dam Office with the Department for National Technical Services, with the objective of increasing the knowledge of the territory and promoting the study on flood propagation downstream in case of operations on bottom outlet or hypothetical dam-break. In fact, population living downstream is not ready to accept any amount of risk because has not a good knowledge of the efforts of experts involved in dam safety, both from the operators and from the safety Authority. So it's important to optimize all the activities usually performed in a dam safety program and improve the emergency planning as a response to people's primary needs and feeling about safety from Civil Protection Authority. In the second part of the work, a definition of risk is provided as the relationship existing between probability of occurrence and loss, setting out the range within to plan for prevention (risk mitigation), thanks to the qualitative assessment of the minimum safety level that is suited to assign funds to plan for Civil Protection (loss mitigation). The basic meaning of the reliability of a zoned

  4. Self-esteem and "at risk" women:determinants and relevance to sexual and HIV-related risk behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterk, Claire E; Klein, Hugh; Elifson, Kirk W

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we describe the relationship between self-esteem and HIV-related risk behaviors, and explore what factors predict self-esteem levels of "at risk" women. Interviews were conducted with 250 (predominantly African American) women living in the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area between August 1997 and August 2000. A community identification process was used to identify potential study participants, with further expansion of the sample via targeted and theoretical sampling and ethnographic mapping procedures. Self-esteem was related to the number of times having oral sex, the number of times having sex with paying partners, the frequency of sexual risk-taking (all during the 90 days prior to interview), the number of different HIV risk behaviors practiced during the previous year, and condom use attitudes and self-efficacy. Greater involvement HIV risk behaviors was associated with lower self-esteem. Multivariate analyses revealed five significant predictors of women's self-esteem levels: race, religiosity, childhood experiences with emotional neglect, the number of money-related problems experienced, and the number of drug-related problems experienced. The findings indicate that self-esteem is highly relevant to "at risk" women's HIV risk behavior practices, and this has important implications for HIV intervention programs.

  5. Risk of infectious diseases among first-degree relatives of transplant recipients who develop CMV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekenberg, C; Lodding, I P; Wareham, N E

    2017-01-01

    infection have higher rates of severe infections compared to relatives of recipients without this infectious phenotype. In a register-based study, we included first-degree relatives of transplant recipients and examined the risk of hospitalisation due to overall infection or viral infection and risk......Transplant recipients are at high risk of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Mechanisms explaining the variation in risk of infections are far from fully elucidated. We hypothesised that host genetics explains part of the variation in risk of infection and examined if relatives of recipients with CMV.......6; 2.0). There was no increased risk of hospitalisation due to infections, IR ratio (IRR) 0.99 (95% CI, 0.88; 1.12), nor specifically viral infections, IRR 0.87 (95% CI, 0.63; 1.19), in relatives of recipients with CMV compared to relatives of recipients without CMV. Also, no difference was seen...

  6. Early Identification of SE-Related Program Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-30

    X    X    Stevens LIs  X  X    X    SISAIG LIs/ Macro Risk  X    X  X  NRC Top‐20 List  X    X   X  SEI  CMMI ‐Based LIs  X  X    X  USC AP‐Feasibility...2] Al Said, M. 2003. Detecting Model Clashes During Software Systems Development. Doctoral Thesis . Department of Computer Science, University of...Unified Process SADB – Systemic Analysis Database SE – Systems Engineering SECAT – Systems Engineering Competency Assessment Tool SEI- CMMI

  7. Risk Management related to Privacy Policies of an Online Store

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Cristian Schin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to explore the early warning alerts that NORSE system proposes to e-commerce merchants. The real time visibility to cyber-attacks empowers this intelligence tool with high capabilities to detect the threats that companies confront with. The fight against cyber-criminality should be reinforced globally, in the attempt to mitigate the risks and losses determined by attackers. By analysing two case studies, the article proposes a framework which can guide e-commerce merchants to integrate intelligent systems for threat detection. The managerial implications are obvious, equipping the leaders with tools to prevent both financial and knowledge loss.

  8. The effect of flight-related behaviour on the risk of venous thrombosis after air travel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreijer, Anja J.M.; Cannegieter, Suzanne C.; Doggen, Catharina Jacoba Maria; Rosendaal, Frits R.

    2009-01-01

    In a case–control study including 11 033 participants (The Multiple Environmental and Genetic Assessment of risk factors for venous thrombosis study) on risk factors of venous thrombosis, we studied the effect of flight-related behaviour on the risk of venous thrombosis after air travel. Patients

  9. Natural hazards and technological risk in Russia: the relation assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Petrova

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Almost every natural disaster is accompanied by some sort of technological one. A number of studies also show a correlation between technological disasters and various global processes such as solar disturbances, geophysical field variation etc. In this study we attempted to ascertain and codify the relationship between different types of technological disasters and natural hazards. Two types of natural hazards were found, based on their genesis, distribution in time, and impact pattern on the technosphere. Solar and geomagnetic disturbances generally affect technological risk through the failure of automatic machinery and the reduction of operator reliability. They increase the probability of transport accidents, fires, and catastrophic toxic emissions. These types of technological disasters are widely prevalent throughout Russia and in all federal regions. Geological, climatic, hydrological, and other natural hazardous processes increase technological risk through direct mechanical impacts. Their occurrence in space and time depends on the character of the natural process and the specific regional environment. The total number and proportion of technological disasters in federal regions results mainly from the concentration of industrial units and their type, as well as the local natural and social environment. Temporal changes in the number of technological disasters of different groups depend on the prevailing type of natural processes.

  10. Tradeoffs in Risk and Return of Financial Hedging Solutions to Mitigate Drought-Related Financial Risks for Water Utilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, R.; Characklis, G. W.

    2016-12-01

    Financial hedging solutions have been examined as tools for effectively mitigating water scarcity related financial risks for water utilities, and have become more prevalent as conservation (resulting in reduced revenues) and water transfers (resulting in increased costs) play larger roles in drought management. Individualized financial contracts (i.e. designed for a single utility) provide evidence of the potential benefits of financial hedging. However, individualized contracts require substantial time and information to develop, limiting their widespread implementation. More generalized contracts have also shown promise, and would allow the benefits of risk pooling to be more effectively realized, resulting in less expensive contracts. Risk pooling reduces the probability of an insurer making payouts that deviate significantly from the mean, but given that the financial risks of drought are spatially correlated amongst utilities, these more extreme "fat tail" risks remain. Any group offering these hedging contracts, whether a third-party insurer or a "mutual" comprised of many utilities, will need to balance the costs (i.e. additional risk) and benefits (i.e. returns) of alternative approaches to managing the extreme risks (e.g. through insurance layers). The balance of these different approaches will vary depending on the risk pool being considered, including the number, size and exposure of the participating utilities. This work first establishes a baseline of the tradeoffs between risk and expected return in insuring against the financial risks of water scarcity without alternative hedging approaches for water utilities across all climate divisions of the United States. Then various scenarios are analyzed to provide insight into how to maximize returns for risk pooling portfolios at various risk levels through balancing different insurance layers and hedging approaches. This analysis will provide valuable information for designing optimal financial risk

  11. School-related risk factors for drunkenness among adolescents: risk factors differ between socio-economic groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anette; Holstein, Bjørn E; Due, Pernille

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To examine, separately for boys and girls, whether socio-economic differences in drunkenness exist in adolescence, whether the level of exposure to school-related risk factors differ between socio-economic groups, and whether the relative contribution of school-related risk factors...... to drunkenness differ between socio-economic groups. METHODS: The study population was a random sample of 1453 Danish 15-year-old students. The outcome measure was drunkenness 10 times or more, as a lifetime measure. Predictor variables comprised five aspects of well-being at school. Socio-economic position (SEP......) was measured by parental occupation. RESULTS: Among girls, exposures to school-related risk factors were more prevalent in lower socio-economic groups. Poor school satisfaction was associated with drunkenness among girls from high SEP, odds ratio (OR) = 2.98 (0.73-12.16). Among boys from high SEP autonomy...

  12. Impact of prison status on HIV-related risk behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Angela L; Nyamathi, Adeline; Bhattacharya, Debika; Marlow, Elizabeth; Shoptaw, Steven; Marfisee, Mary; Leake, Barbara

    2011-02-01

    Baseline data were collected to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions on completion of the hepatitis A and B vaccine series among 664 sheltered and street-based homeless adults who were: (a) homeless; (b) recently (prison; (c) discharged 1 year or more; and (d) never incarcerated. Group differences at baseline were assessed for socio-demographic characteristics, drug and alcohol use, sexual activity, mental health and public assistance. More than one-third of homeless persons (38%) reported prison time and 16% of the sample had been recently discharged from prison. Almost half of persons who were discharged from prison at least 1 year ago reported daily use of drugs and alcohol over the past 6 months compared to about 1 in 5 among those who were recently released from prison. As risk for HCV and HIV co-infection continues among homeless ex-offenders, HIV/HCV prevention efforts are needed for this population.

  13. Aluminium: Food-related health risk assessment of the consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.V. Bagryantseva

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum is the most abundant metal in the lithosphere, constituting 8 % of the earth's crust. Aluminum enters the food from the various objects of environment such as water, food contact materials (packaging materials, cooking vessels, aluminum-containing food additives. In raw food products the content of aluminum is less than 5.7 mg/kg of the product. Normally, aluminum is not practically found in a human body. However, within the last decade various toxic effects of aluminum on human body have been revealed, and they are able to cause the risk of various diseases. The analysis of the available data has demonstrated that the excessive entry of aluminum in human body with food items is associated first of all with the content of aluminum-containing food additives, as well as with the use of materials and products made of aluminum and its alloys intended for contact with food. High level of aluminum consumption has been also detected among children of all ages. At the same time, today, theprovisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI of aluminum for children is not established. To reduce negative effect of aluminum on human body it is necessary to: * exclude from the list of Annex 2 of the Technical Regulations of the Customs Union "Requirements for Food Additives, Flavorings and Technological Aids” (TR TS 029/2012 the following food additives – potassium aluminum silicate (E555, bentonite (E558, sodium aluminum silicate (E554, potassium aluminum silicate (E555, calcium aluminum silicate (E556, aluminum silicate (kaolin (E559; * to develop requirements for the aluminum content in food products intended for children nutrition; * to obtain data on aluminum content in food items sold on the domestic market and to assess health risks to consumers.

  14. Incidence and relative risk of hearing disorders in professional musicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schink, Tania; Kreutz, Gunter; Busch, Veronika; Pigeot, Iris; Ahrens, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Background Hearing disorders have been associated with occupational exposure to music. Musicians may benefit from non-amplified and low-intensity music, but may also have high risks of music-induced hearing loss. Aims To compare the incidence of hearing loss (HL) and its subentities in professional musicians with that in the general population. Methods We performed a historical cohort study among insurants between 19 and 66 years who were employed subject to social insurance contributions. The study was conducted with data from three German statutory health insurance providers covering the years 2004–2008 with about 7 million insurants. Incidence rates with 95% CIs of HL and the subentities noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), conductive HL, sensorineural HL, conductive and sensorineural HL, as well as tinnitus were estimated stratified by age, sex and federal state. A Cox regression analysis was conducted to estimate adjusted HRs and two-sided 95% CIs for HL and its subentities. Results More than 3 million insurants were eligible, of whom 2227 were identified as professional musicians (0.07%). During the 4-year observation period, 283 697cases of HL were seen, 238 of them among professional musicians (0.08%), leading to an unadjusted incidence rate ratio of 1.27. The adjusted hazard ratio of musicians was 1.45 (95% CI 1.28 to 1.65) for HL and 3.61 (95% CI 1.81 to 7.20) for NIHL. Conclusions Professional musicians have a high risk of contracting hearing disorders. Use of already available prevention measures should reduce the incidence of HL in professional musicians. PMID:24790053

  15. Age-Related Sensory Impairments and Risk of Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Mary E; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Schubert, Carla R; Pinto, Alex A; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Klein, Barbara EK; Klein, Ronald; Tweed, Ted S.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives To evaluate the associations of sensory impairments with the 10-year risk of cognitive impairment. Previous work has primarily focused on the relationship between a single sensory system and cognition. Design The Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study (EHLS) is a longitudinal, population-based study of aging in the Beaver Dam, WI community. Baseline examinations were conducted in 1993 and follow-up exams have been conducted every 5 years. Setting General community Participants EHLS members without cognitive impairment at EHLS-2 (1998–2000). There were 1,884 participants (mean age = 66.7 years) with complete EHLS-2 sensory data and follow-up information. Measurements Cognitive impairment was a Mini-Mental State Examination score of impairment was a pure-tone average of hearing thresholds (0.5, 1, 2 and 4 kHz) of > 25 decibel Hearing Level in either ear. Visual impairment was Pelli-Robson contrast sensitivity of impairment was a San Diego Odor Identification Test score of impairment were independently associated with cognitive impairment risk [Hearing: Hazard Ratio (HR) = 1.90, 95% Confidence Interval (C.I.) = 1.11, 3.26; Vision: HR = 2.05, 95% C.I. = 1.24, 3.38; Olfaction: HR = 3.92, 95% C.I. = 2.45, 6.26]. However, 85% with hearing impairment, 81% with visual impairment, and 76% with olfactory impairment did not develop cognitive impairment during follow-up. Conclusion The relationship between sensory impairment and cognitive impairment was not unique to one sensory system suggesting sensorineural health may be a marker of brain aging. The development of a combined sensorineurocognitive measure may be useful in uncovering mechanisms of healthy brain aging. PMID:27611845

  16. Cancer Risks for Relatives of Children with Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Heath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We determined the extent and distribution of cancers in relatives of 379 children newly diagnosed with cancer. Family history was collected from 1,337 first-degree and 3,399 second-degree relatives and incidence compared with national age- and gender-specific rates. Overall, 14 children (3.7% had a relative with a history of childhood cancer and 26 children (6.9% had a first-degree relative with a history of cancer, with only one of these having an identifiable familial cancer syndrome. There was a higher than expected incidence of childhood cancer among first-degree relatives (parents and siblings (standardized incidence ratio (SIR 1.43; 95% CI 0.54–5.08. There was also a higher than expected incidence of adult cancers among first-degree relatives (SIR 1.45; 95% CI 0.93–2.21, particularly in females (SIR 1.82; 95% CI 1.26–3.39. The increased family cancer history in first-degree females was largely attributable to an effect in mothers (SIR 1.78; 95% CI 1.27–3.33. The gender-specific association was reflected in higher than expected incidence rates of breast cancer in both mothers (SIR 1.92; 95% CI 0.72–6.83 and aunts (SIR 1.64; 95% CI 0.98–2.94. These findings support the hypothesis that previously undetected familial cancer syndromes contribute to childhood cancer.

  17. Optimal Consumption and Investment under Time-Varying Relative Risk Aversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    We consider the continuous time consumption-investment problem originally formalized and solved by Merton in case of constant relative risk aversion. We present a complete solution for the case where relative risk aversion with respect to consumption varies with time, having in mind an investor...

  18. Risk of Seizures in First Degree Relatives of Probands with Epilepsy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the risk of seizures in first degree relatives of epileptic patients. To relate the risk to several clinical characteristics in the probands. Such information is useful for genetic counselling. Methods: A prospective case-control study of 648 FDR of 88 probands attending the neurology out-patient clinic of a ...

  19. Three Studies Point to Same Risk Gene for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Three studies point to same risk gene for age-related macular degeneration NIH-funded research helps unravel the biology of ... as a rare, but powerful risk factor for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a common cause of vision loss in ...

  20. Informing relatives about their hereditary or familial cancer risk: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Geus, E.D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304841161; Aalfs, C.M.; Verdam, M.G.E.; de Haes, J.C.J.M.; Smets, E.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic counseling for hereditary breast or colon cancer has implications for both counselees and their relatives. Although counselees are encouraged by genetic counselors to disclose genetic cancer risk information, they do not always share this information with their at-risk relatives.

  1. Informing relatives about their hereditary or familial cancer risk: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Geus, Eveline; Aalfs, Cora M.; Verdam, Mathilde G. E.; de Haes, Hanneke C. J. M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic counseling for hereditary breast or colon cancer has implications for both counselees and their relatives. Although counselees are encouraged by genetic counselors to disclose genetic cancer risk information, they do not always share this information with their at-risk relatives. Reasons for

  2. Informing relatives about their hereditary or familial cancer risk: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Geus, E.; Aalfs, C.M.; Verdam, M.G.E.; de Haes, H.C.J.M.; Smets, E.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Genetic counseling for hereditary breast or colon cancer has implications for both counselees and their relatives. Although counselees are encouraged by genetic counselors to disclose genetic cancer risk information, they do not always share this information with their at-risk relatives.

  3. Parent Involvement in School: Conceptualizing Multiple Dimensions and Their Relations with Family and Demographic Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Gwynne O.; Lengua, Liliana J.; McMahon, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Explores the association between parental involvement (PI) and children's positive academic performance and social competence. Study examines the relations between a set of family and demographic risk factors and PI. Results reveal different patterns of relations between the risk factors studied-parental education, maternal depression, and…

  4. Risk factors for treatment related mortality in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Bendik; Åsberg, Ann; Heyman, Mats

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In spite of major improvements in the cure rate of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), 2-4% of patients still die from treatment related complications. PROCEDURE: We investigated the pattern of treatment related deaths (TRDs) and possible risk factors in the NOPHO ALL-92 an...... towards patients at risk. Pediatr Blood Cancer. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc....

  5. CURRENT RESEARCHES OF NOTION “CREATIVITY” IN PSYCHOLOGY AND ITS RELATION TO RISK

    OpenAIRE

    NATALJA MIHEJEVA

    2011-01-01

    The article considers theoretical sources for the purpose of systematization of notion “creativity”, as well as its related notion “risk appetite”. The author analyzes classical and the latest studies of the creativity and its related phenomena, remaining within a focus of research concerned with social instability The author studies scope of an inquiry of creativity and creative individuals, as well as the risk appetite and scope of an inquiry of risk in psychology. It is suggested that crea...

  6. Risk of cancer in relatives of patients with myotonic dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, M; Diaz, L J; Gørtz, S

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Myotonic dystrophies (DM) are autosomal dominantly inherited neuromuscular disorders caused by unstable nucleotide repeat expansions. DM and cancer have been associated, but the pathogenesis behind the association remains unclear. It could relate to derived effects of the DM...

  7. Vascular related pregnancy complications: genetics and remote cardiovascular risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.L. Berends (Anne)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPreeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) are common vascular related pregnancy syndromes of unknown cause. Both preeclampsia and IUGR are responsible for a significant maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Preeclampsia affects approximately 2.5-3.0% of

  8. risk related behaviour among SSS3 students in Port Harcourt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kemrilib

    Among the sexually active students only 437 (36.9%) used condom. Sex of student, social class and school gender were significant predictors of ever-had sexual activity. The paper concludes that the prevalence of sexual behaviour related to the development of. HIV/AIDS amongst the students is high. The need to highlight ...

  9. Nutritional risk factors for age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ersoy, L.; Ristau, T.; Lechanteur, Y.T.E.; Hahn, M.; Hoyng, C.B.; Kirchhof, B.; Hollander, A.I. den; Fauser, S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the role of nutritional factors, serum lipids, and lipoproteins in late age-related macular degeneration (late AMD). Methods. Intake of red meat, fruit, fish, vegetables, and alcohol, smoking status, and body mass index (BMI) were ascertained questionnaire-based in 1147 late AMD

  10. Health careworkers and risk of hospital-related tuberculosis | Salami ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -ray features of TBand aspiration cytology or tissue histology. Thirty-two (1.5%) of the 2,173 total staff ... diabetesmellitus 9.4%, “alcoholic” liver cirrhosis; 6.3%and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease 3.1%. Incidence of hospital-related TB is ...

  11. 76 FR 2397 - Menthol Report Subcommittee of the Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Menthol Report Subcommittee of the Tobacco Products... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Menthol Report Subcommittee of... Services regarding the impact of use of menthol in cigarettes on the public health. FDA intends to make...

  12. 75 FR 52008 - Menthol Report Subcommittee of the Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Menthol Report Subcommittee of the Tobacco Products... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Menthol Report Subcommittee of... Secretary of Health and Human Services regarding the impact of use of menthol in cigarettes on the public...

  13. 77 FR 28637 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on May 22- 23, 2012, Room T-2B1...

  14. 78 FR 17945 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on April 10, 2013, Room T-2B1... requested in the March 2012 10 CFR 50.54(f) letters to address Fukushima Near-Term Task Force Report Task 2...

  15. 78 FR 27442 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on May 23, Room T-2B1, 11545...

  16. 77 FR 64147 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on October 31, 2012, Room T-2B1...

  17. 77 FR 68161 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on December 4, 2012, Room T-2B1...

  18. 77 FR 28903 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on May 22, 2012, Room T-2B1...

  19. 78 FR 50457 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on September 4, 2013, Room T-2B1...

  20. 77 FR 31676 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on June 20, 2012, Room T-2B1...

  1. 77 FR 74697 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on January 18, 2013, Room T-2B3...

  2. 77 FR 59676 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on October 3, 2012, Room T-2B1...

  3. 78 FR 51752 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on September 18, 2013, Room T...

  4. 78 FR 65008 - Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee On Fukushima...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee On Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on November 5, 2013, Room T-2B1...

  5. 77 FR 52371 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on September 5, 2012, Room T-2B1...

  6. 77 FR 45699 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ... [Federal Register Volume 77, Number 148 (Wednesday, August 1, 2012)] [Notices] [Page 45699] [FR Doc No: 2012-18757] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will...

  7. 76 FR 61118 - Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR...

  8. 78 FR 19268 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... subcommittee: Time and Date: 10:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m., April 25, 2013. Place: Audio Conference Call via FTS... contact person below in advance of the meeting. Background: The ABRWH was established under the Energy.... The Subcommittee on Procedures Review is responsible for overseeing, tracking, and participating in...

  9. 76 FR 59172 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC... password [email protected] The agenda for the meeting includes the following topics: --Astrophysics...

  10. 76 FR 14106 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC... meeting includes the following topic: --Astrophysics Division Update. It is imperative that the meeting be...

  11. 78 FR 36276 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC... [email protected] The agenda for the meeting includes the following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update...

  12. 78 FR 2293 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-10

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC...: --Astrophysics Division Update --NASA Astrophysics Roadmapping It is imperative that the meeting be held on this...

  13. 77 FR 28861 - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board, Small Modular Reactor Subcommittee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Secretary of Energy Advisory Board, Small Modular Reactor Subcommittee AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION... Advisory Board (SEAB), Small Modular Reactor Subcommittee (SMR). The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L...

  14. 76 FR 6163 - Subcommittee on Forensic Science; Committee on Science; National Science and Technology Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    ... No: 2011-2440] OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY Subcommittee on Forensic Science; Committee on... Sciences 2009 report: ``Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward'' ( http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=12589#toc ). SUMMARY: The Subcommittee on Forensic Science (SoFS) of the...

  15. 75 FR 4882 - Subcommittee on Forensic Science; Committee on Science; National Science and Technology Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... TECHNOLOGY POLICY Subcommittee on Forensic Science; Committee on Science; National Science and Technology... Executive Branch responses to the National Academy of Sciences 2009 report: ``Strengthening Forensic Science... ). SUMMARY: The Subcommittee on Forensic Science (SOFS) of the National Science and Technology Council's...

  16. 76 FR 38430 - Subcommittee on Forensic Science; Committee on Science; National Science and Technology Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-30

    ... TECHNOLOGY POLICY Subcommittee on Forensic Science; Committee on Science; National Science and Technology... interoperability issues identified in the National Academy of Sciences 2009 report: ``Strengthening Forensic... ). SUMMARY: The Subcommittee on Forensic Science (SoFS) of the National Science and Technology Council's...

  17. 75 FR 8997 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting... Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Earth Science Subcommittee of the NASA...., and Wednesday, March 17, 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. EST. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street, SW...

  18. 78 FR 77719 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Science Subcommittee; Meeting... Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Planetary Science Subcommittee of the NASA....m., Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, Room 3H42, 300 E Street SW., Washington, DC 20546. FOR...

  19. 76 FR 31641 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Science Subcommittee; Meeting... Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Planetary Science Subcommittee of the NASA... meeting by telephone. The WebEx link is https://nasa.webex.com/ , meeting number 990 482 047, and password...

  20. 76 FR 69292 - NASA Advisory Council Science Committee Planetary Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council Science Committee Planetary Science Subcommittee; Meeting... Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces that the meeting of the Planetary Science Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council originally scheduled for November 2-3, 2011, at NASA Headquarters, has...

  1. 78 FR 64024 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Science Subcommittee; Meeting... Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Planetary Science Subcommittee of the NASA... PSS, to participate in this meeting by telephone. The WebEx link is https://nasa.webex.com/ , meeting...

  2. 77 FR 67027 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-08

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting... Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Earth Science Subcommittee of the ] NASA Advisory... Thursday, November 29, 2012, 8:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street...

  3. 76 FR 58303 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Science Subcommittee; Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Science Subcommittee; Meeting... Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Planetary Science Subcommittee of the NASA... meeting by telephone. The WebEx link is https://nasa.webex.com/ , meeting number 992 537 420, and password...

  4. 76 FR 67158 - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Natural Gas Subcommittee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Natural Gas Subcommittee AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of... of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Natural Gas Subcommittee. The public meeting was...

  5. 76 FR 63613 - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Natural Gas Subcommittee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... Doc No: 2011-26464] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Natural Gas Subcommittee... meeting of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Natural Gas Subcommittee. SEAB was reestablished... recommendations to the SEAB on how to improve the safety and environmental performance of natural gas hydraulic...

  6. 75 FR 68017 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Environment Subcommittee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ... needs, challenges, and opportunities of the global economy. The Environment Subcommittee is charged with examining steps and strategies that can be taken by aviation-sector stakeholders and the Federal Government... the Environment Subcommittee of the FAAC taking place on November 16, 2010, from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m...

  7. 75 FR 34519 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Subcommittee on Environment; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... global economy. The Environment Subcommittee is charged with examining steps and strategies that can be... Environment Subcommittee of the Future of Aviation Advisory Committee taking place on June 30, 2010, from 9 a... are responsible for paying long-distance charges. Minutes of the meeting will be taken and will be...

  8. 78 FR 37595 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR.... Kathy Weaver, Acting Chief, Technical Support Branch, Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. BILLING...

  9. 76 FR 68793 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Economic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... No: 2011-28737] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) will hold a meeting on November 30, 2011...

  10. 77 FR 59678 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR... Branch, Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. BILLING CODE 7590-01-P ...

  11. 75 FR 58449 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels will hold a meeting... inconvenience. Dated: September 17, 2010. Antonio Dias, Chief, Reactor Safety Branch B, Advisory Committee on...

  12. 78 FR 20959 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-08

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) will hold a meeting.... Antonio Dias, Technical Advisor, Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. BILLING CODE 7590-01-P ...

  13. 76 FR 5218 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR); Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor... inconvenience. Dated: January 24, 2011. Antonio Dias, Chief, Reactor Safety Branch B, Advisory Committee on...

  14. 78 FR 31987 - Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels..., Technical Support Branch, Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. BILLING CODE 7590-01-P ...

  15. 76 FR 16016 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy And Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy and Reactor...: March 15, 2011. Cayetano Santos, Chief, Reactor Safety Branch A, Advisory Committee on Reactor...

  16. 76 FR 57082 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards; Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-15

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards; Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels Revision to September 21, 2011, ACRS Meeting; Federal Register Notice The Federal Register Notice for the ACRS Subcommittee Meeting on Materials, Metallurgy and Reactor Fuels is being...

  17. 76 FR 34276 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-13

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR..., Chief, Reactor Safety Branch A, Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. BILLING CODE 7590-01-P ...

  18. 75 FR 7632 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-22

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) The ACRS Subcommittee on ABWR will hold a meeting on March 2, 2010, at 11545...: February 12, 2010. Antonio F. Dias, Chief Reactor Safety Branch B, Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards...

  19. 76 FR 34778 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels... room. Dated: June 7, 2011 Cayetano Santos, Chief, Reactor Safety Branch A, Advisory Committee on...

  20. 76 FR 27102 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Economic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) will hold a meeting on May 26, 2011, Room T-2B1, 11545 Rockville Pike, Rockville...

  1. 76 FR 62866 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Economic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) will hold a meeting on October 21, 2011, Room T-2B1, 11545 Rockville Pike...

  2. 76 FR 76442 - Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards Meeting of The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-07

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards Meeting of The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels Revision to December 15, 2011, ACRS Meeting Federal Register Notice The Federal Register Notice for the ACRS Subcommittee Meeting on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels scheduled to be held on...

  3. 76 FR 72451 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ...-72452] [FR Doc No: 2011-30238] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels will hold a meeting on December 15, 2011...

  4. 78 FR 29159 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels.... Cayetano Santos, Chief, Technical Support Branch, Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. BILLING CODE...

  5. 76 FR 55718 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels will hold a meeting... (RES) initiative on quantitatively ensuring ``extremely low (XLPR) probability of rupture'' for reactor...

  6. 75 FR 10840 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR); Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on ABWR will hold a meeting on March 18... 3, 2010. Antonio F. Dias, Chief, Reactor Safety Branch B, Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards...

  7. 75 FR 61139 - Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future, Reactor and Fuel Cycle Technology Subcommittee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-04

    ... advantages and disadvantages of adopting new fuel cycle technologies and the associated waste management... Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future, Reactor and Fuel Cycle Technology Subcommittee AGENCY... announces an open meeting of the Reactor and Fuel Cycle Technology (RFCT) Subcommittee. The RFCT...

  8. 75 FR 34520 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Aviation Safety Subcommittee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... competitiveness of the U.S. aviation industry and its capability to manage effectively the evolving transportation... The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Aviation Safety Subcommittee; Notice of Meeting... Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC): Aviation Safety Subcommittee; notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The...

  9. 76 FR 61713 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of..., are in late stage development for an adult oncology indication, or in late stage development in...

  10. 76 FR 58520 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of...

  11. 75 FR 66773 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of... were either recently approved by FDA or, are in late stage development for an adult oncology indication...

  12. [Oral language acquisition: relation and risk for written language].

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Marcio Pezzini; Wolff, Clarice Lehnen; Moojen, Sônia; Rotta, Newra Tellechea

    2004-06-01

    The present study relates the acquisition of oral language to the development of writing in 236 children of a private school in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. The objective of this research was to identify non-linguistic factors involved in phonological acquisition and to describe the relation of phonological acquisition with alterations of writing. At the age of 6 years, kindergarten students were divided into 2 groups, based on the test of Phonological Evaluation of Children. In the follow-up, at 9 years of age, students were evaluated by means of Balanced Dictation and textual production. The comparison of results from case and control groups showed statistically significant difference as to the number of mistakes made in writing, pointing to the acquisition of oral language as a predictive factor for the development of spelling.

  13. Physical Abuse is Associated with HIV-related Drug Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, Madhavi K.; Anderson, Bradley J; Liebschutz, Jane; Stein, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Those who have experienced abuse may be prone to engaging in risky sexual behavior and risky drug use. The relationship between sexual abuse and risky behavior has been well established in the literature, but the association between physical abuse and risky drug use has been equivocal. We hypothesize that the experience of PTSD symptoms following physical abuse leads to risky drug use. Therefore, we examined the associations among physical abuse history, PTSD symptoms, and HIV-related drug ri...

  14. [Lifestyles related with cardiovascular risk in university students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Cuesta, Juana Yikenia; Abellán Huerta, José; Leal Hernández, Mariano; Gómez Jara, Purificación; Ortín Ortín, Enrique J; Abellán Alemán, José

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the lifestyles associated with cardiovascular risk in a university population in university admission. A descriptive, observational, cross-sectional students of the Catholic University San Antonio of Murcia. Select a sample of 672 college students enrolled in the first year of the race. The instrument used to collect the data, is a self-completed questionnaire anonymous, with a total of 59 questions. With respect to smoking 242 are smokers (36%), 117 former smokers (17.4%), and 313 non-smokers (46.6%). When compared snuff consumption by sex, no differences are detected. By running the largest group of non-smokers often seen in students of physical sciences (59.1%) compared to the careers humanities (40.9%). 87.4% (587) of students surveyed report using alcohol, compared to 12.6% (85) no. According to the race group not detected association between race group and the fact consume alcohol or not. The 65.6% of students surveyed physical exercise commonly referred, being higher the frequency of exercise in men than in women (81.7% versus 49.4%) (P<.001). 54.3% of surveyed students follow a dietary pattern typical of the Mediterranean diet. The University does not exercise the role that could mean in terms of enhancing healthy lifestyles and abandonment of harmful health styles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEA. All rights reserved.

  15. Risks associated with melamine and related triazine contamination of food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baynes, Re; Riviere, Je

    2010-01-01

    Recent adulteration of milk products with melamine (ME) in several countries caused adverse health effects and even deaths in infants. Earlier, in 2007, contamination of pet food with ME and its related contaminants was associated with many clinical cases of canine and feline nephrotoxicity, and in some cases mortality. ME is a triazine compound that is often detected with other triazine analogs such as cyanuric acid. As is the custom in some livestock operations, the contaminated pet food was mixed with feed intended for the swine and poultry industry. This practice has raised several questions as to whether ME and its related triazines would adversely affect the health of these food animals, and whether meat products derived from swine and poultry could contain high-enough levels of these contaminants to warrant public health concern. Data for this review article were obtained from recent research efforts in our laboratory, peer-reviewed publications cited in PubMed, and information available at USDA, US FDA, and WHO websites. The primary issues discussed are related to (1) the chemistry and interactions between ME and its triazine analogs; (2) reported animal and human exposures with possible pathways through which ME can enter the human food chain; (3) mammalian toxicology; (4) comparative pharmacokinetics (PK) and modeling strategies used to predict residue levels; and (5) emerging issues and management strategies.

  16. Changes in Classes of Injury-Related Risks and Consequences of Risk-Level Drinking: a Latent Transition Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Gerald; Field, Craig; Caetano, Raul

    2015-07-01

    Risk-level drinking, drinking and driving, and alcohol-related violence are risk factors that result in injuries. The current study sought to identify which subgroups of patients experience the most behavioral change following a brief intervention. A secondary analysis of data from a brief alcohol intervention study was conducted. The sample (N = 664) includes at-risk drinkers who experienced an injury and were admitted for care to a Level 1 trauma center. Injury-related items from the Short Inventory of Problems+6 were used to perform a latent transition analysis to describe class transitions participants experienced following discharge. Four classes emerged for the year before and after the current injury. Most individuals transitioned from higher-risk classes into those with lower risk. Some participants maintained risky profiles, and others increased risks and consequences. Drinking and driving remained a persistent problem among the study participants. Although a large portion of intervention recipients improved risks and consequences of alcohol use following discharge, more intensive intervention services may be needed for a subset of patients who showed little or no improvement.

  17. Confusing Relative Risk with Absolute Risk Is Associated with More Enthusiastic Beliefs about the Value of Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caverly, Tanner J; Prochazka, Allan V; Binswanger, Ingrid A; Kutner, Jean S; Matlock, Daniel D

    2014-07-01

    Reviews of how data are presented in medical literature document that the benefit from an intervention is often exaggerated relative to the harm (e.g., relative risk for benefit and absolute risk for harm). Such mismatched presentations may create unwarranted enthusiasm, especially among those who misinterpret the statistics presented. The objective was to determine whether misinterpretation of risk data predicts enthusiasm for cancer screening. The authors administered a survey with 14 items assessing beliefs about cancer screening and 6 items measuring data interpretation ability. Multiple linear regression was used to evaluate the association between data interpretation and enthusiasm for cancer screening, with adjustment for gender and year graduated from medical school. Eighty-eight of 139 physicians at a state-wide professional meeting returned completed surveys (63% response rate). Lower data interpretation scores were associated with higher enthusiasm for cancer screening scores (P = 0.004) in the adjusted primary analysis. Confusing relative risk with absolute risk appeared to drive the overall association. Biased presentations of risk data could affect general beliefs about the value of cancer screening, especially among physicians who uncritically accept mismatched presentations of data. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Risk factors for osteoporosis and factors related to the use of DXA in Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiberg, M. P.; Rubin, K. H.; Gram, J.

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: To evaluate the case-finding strategy for osteoporosis in Norway, a questionnaire concerning risk factors for osteoporosis and history of osteodensitometry was mailed to a population-based cohort of 6000 men and 6000 women. Suboptimal examination rates among high risk and reallocation...... of scanning capacity to seemingly low-risk individuals was found. PURPOSE: In Norway, a case-finding strategy for osteoporosis has been used. No data exist regarding the efficacy of this approach. The aim was to examine the prevalence of risk factors for osteoporosis and factors related to the use of dual X......-risk individuals was found. Of all DXA, 19.5 % were reported by women without any risk factor for osteoporosis, similarly by 16.2 % of men. Distance to DXA facilities and current smoking were inversely related to probability of reporting a DXA. CONCLUSIONS: Suboptimal examination rates among high risk...

  19. Should Associations between HIV-Related Risk Perceptions and Behaviors or Intentions Be Positive or Negative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Hiyi; Lau, Joseph T. F.; Xiang, Weina; Gu, Jing; Wang, Zixin

    2012-01-01

    Risk perceptions are important in HIV research and interventions; mixed results were found between HIV-related perceptions and behaviors. We interviewed 377 sexually active injecting drug users in China, finding mixed associations between HIV-related risk perception assessed by two general measures and two previous risk behaviors (syringe sharing: p.05) – partially supporting the ‘reflective hypothesis’ that reflection on previous behaviors increases risk perceptions. When we use specific measures for risk perceptions (HIV transmission via unprotected sex with specific types of sex partner and via syringe sharing) and use behavioral intention to adopt protective risk behaviors (condom use and avoid syringe sharing totally) as dependent variables, positive significant associations were observed – supporting the motivational hypothesis that risk perceptions motivate one to adopt protective behaviors. The direction and significance of the associations of concern depends on types of measures used. It has important implications on research design, data interpretation and services. PMID:23284896

  20. Anemia risk in relation to lead exposure in lead-related manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan-Hung Hsieh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lead-exposed workers may suffer adverse health effects under the currently regulated blood lead (BPb levels. However, a probabilistic assessment about lead exposure-associated anemia risk is lacking. The goal of this study was to examine the association between lead exposure and anemia risk among factory workers in Taiwan. Methods We first collated BPb and indicators of hematopoietic function data via health examination records that included 533 male and 218 female lead-exposed workers between 2012 and 2014. We used benchmark dose (BMD modeling to estimate the critical effect doses for detection of abnormal indicators. A risk-based probabilistic model was used to characterize the potential hazard of lead poisoning for job-specific workers by hazard index (HI. We applied Bayesian decision analysis to determine whether BMD could be implicated as a suitable BPb standard. Results Our results indicated that HI for total lead-exposed workers was 0.78 (95% confidence interval: 0.50–1.26 with risk occurrence probability of 11.1%. The abnormal risk of anemia indicators for male and female workers could be reduced, respectively, by 67–77% and 86–95% by adopting the suggested BPb standards of 25 and 15 μg/dL. Conclusions We conclude that cumulative exposure to lead in the workplace was significantly associated with anemia risk. This study suggests that current BPb standard needs to be better understood for the application of lead-exposed population protection in different scenarios to provide a novel standard for health management. Low-level lead exposure risk is an occupational and public health problem that should be paid more attention.

  1. Anemia risk in relation to lead exposure in lead-related manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Nan-Hung; Chung, Shun-Hui; Chen, Szu-Chieh; Chen, Wei-Yu; Cheng, Yi-Hsien; Lin, Yi-Jun; You, Su-Han; Liao, Chung-Min

    2017-05-05

    Lead-exposed workers may suffer adverse health effects under the currently regulated blood lead (BPb) levels. However, a probabilistic assessment about lead exposure-associated anemia risk is lacking. The goal of this study was to examine the association between lead exposure and anemia risk among factory workers in Taiwan. We first collated BPb and indicators of hematopoietic function data via health examination records that included 533 male and 218 female lead-exposed workers between 2012 and 2014. We used benchmark dose (BMD) modeling to estimate the critical effect doses for detection of abnormal indicators. A risk-based probabilistic model was used to characterize the potential hazard of lead poisoning for job-specific workers by hazard index (HI). We applied Bayesian decision analysis to determine whether BMD could be implicated as a suitable BPb standard. Our results indicated that HI for total lead-exposed workers was 0.78 (95% confidence interval: 0.50-1.26) with risk occurrence probability of 11.1%. The abnormal risk of anemia indicators for male and female workers could be reduced, respectively, by 67-77% and 86-95% by adopting the suggested BPb standards of 25 and 15 μg/dL. We conclude that cumulative exposure to lead in the workplace was significantly associated with anemia risk. This study suggests that current BPb standard needs to be better understood for the application of lead-exposed population protection in different scenarios to provide a novel standard for health management. Low-level lead exposure risk is an occupational and public health problem that should be paid more attention.

  2. Talking About Type 2 Diabetes: Family Communication From the Perspective of At-Risk Relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Melanie F; Fernandes, Sara L; Arduser, Lora; Hopper, Jennifer L; Koehly, Laura M

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe type 2 diabetes (T2DM) communication and risk reduction recommendations from the perspective of family members at risk for T2DM based on family history. Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted with 33 individuals with a first-degree relative with T2DM. Participants were recruited from the community and a previous pharmacogenetics study. Deductive and inductive codes were applied to the transcripts. Conversations with family members with and without T2DM focused on symptoms and disease management of the family member with T2DM. With at-risk relatives, conversations also focused on prevention. Lack of perceived relevance to family members without T2DM was a barrier to communication. Recommendations to facilitate communication included education of an at-risk family member to increase awareness of risk, followed by sharing of learned information with others. Efforts are needed to increase awareness and improve communication about T2DM risk factors, familial risk, and risk reduction behaviors within families with a family history of T2DM. Family members with and without T2DM should be encouraged to communicate with their relatives about T2DM and the risk to family members. Identification of family members who can facilitate communication, education, and modeling of healthy behaviors may increase awareness and motivate at-risk individuals to engage in risk-reducing behaviors. © 2015 The Author(s).

  3. Risk for non-smoking-related cancer in atherosclerotic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, L; Olsen, J H

    1999-01-01

    Some studies have suggested that the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and that of cancer have common features, and in addition to tobacco smoking, oxidative stress, diet, and sex hormones have been considered as common etiological factors. To investigate whether there is an association between...... between atherosclerosis and colorectal cancers or hormone-related cancers, except from a decreased standardized incidence ratio of 0.7 (95% confidence interval, 0.5-0.9) for endometrial cancer. The standardized incidence ratio for cancers of the brain and nervous system was 1.1 (95% confidence interval, 0...

  4. Prevalence and risk factors related to preterm birth in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Leal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of preterm birth has been increasing worldwide, including in Brazil. This constitutes a significant public health challenge because of the higher levels of morbidity and mortality and long-term health effects associated with preterm birth. This study describes and quantifies factors affecting spontaneous and provider-initiated preterm birth in Brazil. Methods Data are from the 2011–2012 “Birth in Brazil” study, which used a national population-based sample of 23,940 women. We analyzed the variables following a three-level hierarchical methodology. For each level, we performed non-conditional multiple logistic regression for both spontaneous and provider-initiated preterm birth. Results The rate of preterm birth was 11.5 %, (95 % confidence 10.3 % to 12.9 % 60.7 % spontaneous - with spontaneous onset of labor or premature preterm rupture of membranes - and 39.3 % provider-initiated, with more than 90 % of the last group being pre-labor cesarean deliveries. Socio-demographic factors associated with spontaneous preterm birth were adolescent pregnancy, low total years of schooling, and inadequate prenatal care. Other risk factors were previous preterm birth (OR 3.74; 95 % CI 2.92–4.79, multiple pregnancy (OR 16.42; 95 % CI 10.56–25.53, abruptio placentae (OR 2.38; 95 % CI 1.27–4.47 and infections (OR 4.89; 95 % CI 1.72–13.88. In contrast, provider-initiated preterm birth was associated with private childbirth healthcare (OR 1.47; 95 % CI 1.09–1.97, advanced-age pregnancy (OR 1.27; 95 % CI 1.01–1.59, two or more prior cesarean deliveries (OR 1.64; 95 % CI 1.19–2.26, multiple pregnancy (OR 20.29; 95 % CI 12.58–32.72 and any maternal or fetal pathology (OR 6.84; 95 % CI 5.56–8.42. Conclusion The high proportion of provider-initiated preterm birth and its association with prior cesarean deliveries and all of the studied maternal/fetal pathologies suggest that a reduction of this type of

  5. Risk of endometrial cancer in relation to medical conditions and medication use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuny, Joan; Sima, Camelia; Bayuga, Sharon; Wilcox, Homer; Pulick, Katherine; Faulkner, Shameka; Zauber, Ann G.; Olson, Sara H.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the relation of medical conditions related to obesity and medications used for these conditions with endometrial cancer. We also investigated the association of other medical conditions and medications with risk. This US population-based case-control study included 469 endometrial cancer cases and 467 controls. Information on putative risk factors for endometrial cancer was collected through personal interviews. We asked women about their medical history and medications used for six months or longer and the number of years each medication was taken. Risk was strongly associated with increasing obesity (p for trend <0.001). Among conditions related to obesity, and after adjustment for age, body mass index (BMI), and other risk factors and conditions, uterine fibroids were independently related to an increased cancer risk (adjusted OR= 1.8, 95%CI= 1.2–2.5). Although hypertension was not significantly related to endometrial cancer after adjustment for age and BMI, use of thiazide diuretics was independently associated with an increased risk (OR= 1.8, 95%CI= 1.1–3.0). Anemia was associated with decreased risk (OR= 0.6, 95%CI= 0.5–0.9). Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was related to a decreased risk (OR= 0.7, 95%CI= 0.5–0.97). To our knowledge, the observation about thiazide diuretics is novel and requires confirmation in other studies and populations. PMID:19383893

  6. Job stressors and other risk factors related to the risk of hypertension among selected employees in Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feni Krisnawati

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Almost everyone, including employees, may develop hypertension. Several risk factors, including stresses in the work environment, are related to hypertension. The aim of this study is to identify these work-related risk factors in hypertension. A nested case-control study was conducted among office employees in Jakarta during May 2004. Employees with stage 1 or stage 2 hypertension (based on the United States of America Joint National Committee on high blood pressure 2003, or those taking antihypertensive drugs were designated as cases. As controls were employees with no history of hypertension. One case was randomly matched by gender with two controls. All risk factors for cases and controls were counted as of the reference date of diagnosis for cases. There were 70 cases and 140 controls aged 25 to 65 years. Hypertension was found to be related to the qualitative and quantitative increase in the workload, career development, age, obesity, current and past smoking habits, and a family history of hypertension. However, it was noted that role of ambiguity, role of conflict, and personal responsibility did not increase the risk of hypertension. Compared to those with low qualitative job stressor, those who had moderate or high qualitative job stressor had a seven-fold risk to be hypertensive [adjusted odds ratio (ORa = 7.47; 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.40-39.76]. In addition, relative to those who had low quantitative job stressor, those with moderate or high stressors were four times at risk to be hypertensive (ORa = 4.10; 95% CI = 1.06-15.90. In conclusion moderate or high qualitative and quantitative job stressors as well as career development increased risk hypertension. Therefore these stressors need to be prevented. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:177-84 Keywords: hypertension, qualitative job stressor, quantitative job stressor, career development

  7. Suicide risk in relation to psychiatric hospitalization: evidence based on longitudinal registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Ping; Nordentoft, Merete

    2005-01-01

    population control subjects matched for sex, age, and calendar time of suicide.Main Outcome Measure Risk of suicide is estimated by conditional logistic regression. Data are adjusted for socioeconomic factors. RESULTS: This study demonstrates that there are 2 sharp peaks of risk for suicide around...... effect size and population attributable risk; and suicide risk associated with affective and schizophrenia spectrum disorders declines quickly after treatment and recovery, while the risk associated with substance abuse disorders declines relatively slower. This study also indicates that an admission...

  8. The Relationship between Musculoskeletal Symptoms and Work-related Risk Factors in Hotel Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jin Woo; Lee, Ju Jong; Mun, Hyeon Je; Lee, Kyung-Jae; Kim, Joo Ja

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To identify work-related musculoskeletal symptoms and any associated work-related risk factors, focusing on structural labor factors among hotel workers. Methods A total of 1,016 hotel workers (620 men and 396 women) were analyzed. The questionnaire surveyed participants’ socio-demographics, health-related behaviors, job-related factors, and work-related musculoskeletal symptoms. Work-related musculoskeletal symptoms were assessed using the Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire. All...

  9. Lens aging in relation to nutritional determinants and possible risk factors for age-related cataract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendschot, T.T.J.M.; Broekmans, W.M.R.; Klöpping-Ketelaars, I.A.A.; Kardinaal, A.F.M.; Poppel, G. van; Norren, D. van

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether nutritional factors and possible risk factors for cataract influence the lens optical density (LOD). Design: Three hundred seventy-six subjects, aged 18 to 75 years, were recruited. In a cross-sectional design, serum was analyzed for lutein, zeaxanthin, vitamin C,

  10. Lens aging in relation to nutritional determinants and possible risk factors for age-related cataract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendschot, T.T.J.M.; Broekmans, W.; Klopping-Ketelaars, I.A.A.; Kardinaal, A.F.M.; Poppel, van G.; Norren, van D.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether nutritional factors and possible risk factors for cataract influence the lens optical density (LOD). Design Three hundred seventy-six subjects, aged 18 to 75 years, were recruited. In a cross-sectional design, serum was analyzed for lutein, zeaxanthin, vitamin C,

  11. Assessment of weather-related risk on chestnut productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Pereira

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to its economic and nutritional value, the world production of chestnuts is increasing as new stands are being planted in various regions of the world. This work focuses on the relation between weather and annual chestnut production to model the role of weather, to assess the impacts of climate change and to identify appropriate locations for new groves. The exploratory analysis of chestnut production time series and the striking increase of production area have motivated the use for chestnut productivity. A large set of meteorological variables and remote sensing indices were computed and their role on chestnut productivity evaluated with composite and correlation analyses. These results allow for the identification of the variables cluster with a high correlation and impact on chestnut production. Then, different selection methods were used to develop multiple regression models able to explain a considerable fraction of productivity variance: (i a simulation model (R2-value = 87% based on the winter and summer temperature and on spring and summer precipitation variables; and, (ii a model to predict yearly chestnut productivity (R2-value of 63% with five months in advance, combining meteorological variables and NDVI. Goodness of fit statistic, cross validation and residual analysis demonstrate the model's quality, usefulness and consistency of obtained results.

  12. Ignorance is bliss: women's knowledge regarding age-related pregnancy risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinis, Michal; Carpe, Nicole; Gold, Shira; Selk, Amanda

    2017-10-12

    Pregnancy risks rise with age and the average age of first time mothers is rising. This study aimed to assess women's actual knowledge and their perceived knowledge of pregnancy complications relating to advanced maternal age. A cross-sectional survey was administered to primiparous women measuring demographics, knowledge of age-related pregnancy risks, previous counselling and health literacy. Of the 218 women surveyed, the mean knowledge score was not significantly different for women difference in knowledge between the two groups, women ≥35 years of age perceived themselves to be more knowledgeable than those under 35 (p informing them of their increased risk of complications if they begin childbearing at older ages. Impact statement What is already known on this subject: The average age of first time mothers is rising worldwide. Pregnancy risks rise with age, especially in first time mothers. Previous studies have shown that knowledge of age-related pregnancy risks correlate with educational level and health literacy. What the results of this study add: This study supports those findings and also demonstrates that perceived knowledge does not correlate with measured knowledge of age-related pregnancy risks. Women ≥35 years of age (higher-risk women) are no more knowledgeable than their younger counterparts though they perceive themselves to be better informed. Greater education regarding these risks may allow women to mitigate some of these risks through lifestyle and diet alteration and will prepare women for what to expect if these risks and complications occur. The majority of women in this study seek pregnancy information on the internet, but desire further counselling from their doctors regarding age-related pregnancy risks. What the implications are of these findings for clinical practice and/or further research: Given these results, physicians must consider making greater efforts to counsel women about pregnancy risks in advanced maternal age and

  13. How are lung cancer risk perceptions and cigarette smoking related?-testing an accuracy hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei-Shih; Kaphingst, Kimberly A; Tseng, Tung-Sung; Zhao, Shixi

    2016-10-01

    Subjective risk perception is an important theoretical construct in the field of cancer prevention and control. Although the relationship between subjective risk perception and health behaviors has been widely studied in many health contexts, the causalities and associations between the risk perception of developing lung cancer and cigarette smoking have been inconsistently reported among studies. Such inconsistency may be from discrepancies between study designs (cross-sectional versus longitudinal designs) and the three hypotheses (i.e., the behavior motivation hypothesis, the risk reappraisals hypothesis, and the accuracy hypothesis) testing different underlying associations between risk perception and cigarette-smoking behaviors. To clarify this issue, as an initial step, we examined the association between absolute and relative risk perceptions of developing lung cancer and cigarette-smoking behaviors among a large, national representative sample of 1,680 U.S. adults by testing an accuracy hypothesis (i.e., people who smoke accurately perceived a higher risk of developing lung cancer). Data from the U.S. Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) were analyzed using logistic regression and multivariate linear regression to examine the associations between risk perception and cigarette-smoking behaviors among 1,680 U.S. adults. Findings from this cross-sectional survey suggest that absolute and relative risk perceptions were positively and significantly correlated with having smoked >100 cigarettes during lifetime and the frequency of cigarette smoking. Only absolute risk perception was significantly associated with the number of cigarettes smoked per day among current smokers. Because both absolute and relative risk perceptions are positively related to most cigarette-smoking behaviors, this study supports the accuracy hypothesis. Moreover, absolute risk perception might be a more sensitive measurement than relative risk perception for perceived lung

  14. Autoantibodies to IA-2beta improve diabetes risk assessment in high-risk relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achenbach, P; Bonifacio, E; Williams, A J K

    2008-01-01

    . METHODS: Autoantibodies to insulin (IAA), glutamate decarboxylase (GADA) and IA-2 (IA2A) were measured in 549 participants at study entry, and IA2A-positive samples tested for IA2betaA. First-phase insulin response (FPIR) and oral glucose tolerance were determined at baseline. RESULTS: Of 212 ICA/IA2A......-positive participants (median age 12.1 years; 57% male), 113 developed diabetes (5 year cumulative risk 56%), and 148 were also GADA-positive and IAA-positive (4Ab-positive). IA2betaA were detected in 137 (65%) ICA/IA2A-positive participants and were associated with an increased 5 year diabetes risk (IA2beta...

  15. Patient-Related Risk Factors for Recurrence After Inguinal Hernia Repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Jakob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Bisgaard, Thue

    2015-01-01

    Background. Several factors influence the risk of recurrence after inguinal hernia surgery; however, a systematic review and meta-analysis of patient-related risk factors for recurrence after inguinal hernia surgery has not been performed earlier. Methods. MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane databases...... were searched in June 2013 for studies evaluating patient-related risk factors for recurrence after inguinal hernia operation. Observational studies evaluating nontechnical patient-related risk factors for recurrence after inguinal hernia surgery were included. Outcome variables were grouped under...... patient demographics, hernia characteristics, connective tissue composition and degradation, habits and social relations, and conditions related to inguinal hernia recurrence. Results. From a total of 5061 records screened, we included 40 observational studies enrolling 720 651 inguinal hernia procedures...

  16. Criteria for Climate and Weather Related Risks Identification over the Republic of Moldova Territory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedealcov Maria

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The accelerating pace of climate change is associated to weather-climate related risks manifestations, which in recent years are becoming more intensive and more frequent. Unfortunately, we find that far at regional level there are no a basic scientific information which could highlight their specific spatio-temporal manifestation. In this context, criteria for several weather-related risks identification were quantified, the main ones being material damages, the number of casualties and victims and not the least - and the period they occur. The identified weather and climate related risks may be subject to a complex spatiotemporal analysis, having as a research tool - Geographic Information Systems.

  17. Use-related risk analysis for medical devices based on improved FMEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Long; Shuai, Ma; Wang, Zhu; Li, Ping

    2012-01-01

    In order to effectively analyze and control use-related risk of medical devices, quantitative methodologies must be applied. Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a proactive technique for error detection and risk reduction. In this article, an improved FMEA based on Fuzzy Mathematics and Grey Relational Theory is developed to better carry out user-related risk analysis for medical devices. As an example, the analysis process using this improved FMEA method for a certain medical device (C-arm X-ray machine) is described.

  18. Assessment of arsenic (As) occurrence in arable soil and its related health risk in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiuying; Zhong, Taiyang; Chen, Dongmei; Cheng, Min; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaomin; Li, Xinhui

    2016-06-01

    Arsenic (As) is a major global environmental pollutant due to its high toxicity on human and animal health. This study collected 427 relevant papers to study As concentrations in Chinese arable soil and evaluate the health risk of exposure to As for humans. Results showed that the average of As concentration was 9.46 mg/kg in Chinese arable soil. Soil As concentrations in Hunan Province and Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region posed high carcinogenic and non-cancer risks on human health through diet, Yunnan, Guizhou, Guangdong, and Xinjiang provinces had relative high health risks, while As concentrations in the other provinces posed low health risks on humans. The physical factors controlled the spatial pattern of health risk on a provincial scale, but the As-related human activities introduced high health risk on people, particularly the agricultural activities such as sewage irrigation and fertilizer application should be given more attention due to its large area.

  19. Anxious and depressive symptoms in the French Asbestos-Related Diseases Cohort: risk factors and self-perception of risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounchetrou Njoya, Ibrahim; Paris, Christophe; Dinet, Jerome; Luc, Amandine; Lighezzolo-Alnot, Joelle; Pairon, Jean-Claude; Thaon, Isabelle

    2017-04-01

    Asbestos is known to be an independent risk factor for lung and pleural cancers. However, to date, little attention has been paid to the psychological effects of asbestos exposure among exposed subjects. The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of anxious and depressive symptoms among >2000 French participants of the Asbestos-Related Diseases Cohort (ARDCO), 6 years after their inclusion, to identify the risk factors associated with those anxious and depressive symptoms and to evaluate the impact of the asbestos-risk perception. The ARDCO was constituted in four regions of France between October 2003 and December 2005, by including former asbestos workers. Between 2011 and 2012, participants of the ARDCO program were invited to undergo another chest CT scan 6 years after the previous scan. Participants were asked to complete questionnaires including asbestos exposure assessment, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), asbestos-risk perception and self-perception of asbestos-related diseases. Among the 2225 participants, 2210 fully completed questionnaires were collected and analyzed. The prevalence of symptoms of probable anxiety and probable depression was 19.7% and 9.9%, respectively. The risk of anxious and depressive symptoms was independently associated with self-perception of the intensity of asbestos exposure, asbestos-risk perception and self-perception of asbestos-related diseases. The results obtained in this large study confirm that previously asbestos-exposed subjects are likely to develop anxious and depressive symptoms. Finally, implications related to the prevention of anxiety and depression among asbestos-exposed workers is discussed.

  20. Work-related cardiovascular disease risk factors using a socioecological approach: implications for practice and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Won Ju; Hong, Oisaeng

    2012-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of mortality. Numerous investigations have linked occupational factors and CVD. Occupational factors such as overtime work have an enormous effect on the CVD risk of industrial workers. However, risk factors for CVD are not systematically reviewed in the workplace. The purpose of the paper is to review work-related risk factors for CVD. A systematic review of work-related CVD risk factors was performed, yielding 180 articles. All articles were assessed in relation to inclusion and exclusion criteria, resulting in 44 articles being reviewed. The sole inclusion criteria was work-related environmental factors and intra/inter-personal factors (psychosocial factors), which is based on the socioecological perspective. The articles were also assessed regarding the quality of each study using the scoring methods developed by Cesario et al. and Brown et al. The literature review demonstrated that work environment factors such as shift work, overtime work, and noise and chemical exposures; and psychosocial factors such as job stress, social support, and socioeconomic status cannot be explained or intervened by one single risk factor. Furthermore, certain occupational factors were shown to aggravate or attenuate other risk factors. The implication of these findings is to incorporate work-related environmental and psychosocial factors into assessment of the patient's CVD risks and intervention plan. Future research should also incorporate a well-defined conceptual framework to address the effects of work-related environmental and psychosocial factors on CVD among CVD patients.

  1. Waterborne disease-related risk perceptions in the Sonora River basin, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morua, Agustin Robles; Halvorsen, Kathleen E; Mayer, Alex S

    2011-05-01

    Waterborne disease is estimated to cause about 10% of all diseases worldwide. However, related risk perceptions are not well understood, particularly in the developing world where waterborne disease is an enormous problem. We focus on understanding risk perceptions related to these issues in a region within northern Mexico. Our findings show how waterborne disease problems and solutions are understood in eight small communities along a highly contaminated river system. We found major differences in risk perceptions between health professionals, government officials, and lay citizens. Health professionals believed that a high level of human-waste-related risk existed within the region. Few officials and lay citizens shared this belief. In addition, few officials and lay citizens were aware of poor wastewater-management-related disease outbreaks and water contamination. Finally, aside from health professionals, a few interviewees understood the importance of basic hygiene and water treatment measures that could help to prevent disease. Our results add to the literature on environmentally-related risk perceptions in the developing world. We discuss recommendations for improving future human-wastewater-related risk communication within the region. © 2011 Society for Risk Analysis.

  2. Testing Models Relating Rejection, Depression, Interpersonal Needs, and Psychache to Suicide Risk in Nonclinical Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Rui C; Holden, Ronald R

    2015-10-01

    Using structural equation modeling, we tested a primary model of suicide risk and 3 competing, alternative models based on 4 psychological variables deemed important in the literature (perception of parental rejection, depression, interpersonal needs comprising perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness, and psychache), in a nonclinical sample of Portuguese adults. A convenience sample of 203 adults (100 men, 103 women; aged 18-65 years) participated in this study. Analyses demonstrated that the proposed primary model had the best fit to the observed data. The differences in fit indexes for this model and one of the alternative models, however, were not substantial. Perceived parental rejection related directly to suicide risk and indirectly via depression and interpersonal needs. Depression linked indirectly to suicide risk via interpersonal needs and psychache. Interpersonal needs related directly to suicide risk and indirectly via psychache, which related directly to suicide risk. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Relative risk analysis in regulating the use of radiation-emitting medical devices. A preliminary application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, E.D.; Banks, W.W.; Altenbach, T.J.; Fischer, L.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This report describes a preliminary application of an analysis approach for assessing relative risks in the use of radiation- emitting medical devices. Results are presented on human-initiated actions and failure modes that are most likely to occur in the use of the Gamma Knife, a gamma irradiation therapy device. This effort represents an initial step in a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) plan to evaluate the potential role of risk analysis in regulating the use of nuclear medical devices. For this preliminary application of risk assessment, the focus was to develop a basic process using existing techniques for identifying the most likely risk contributors and their relative importance. The approach taken developed relative risk rankings and profiles that incorporated the type and quality of data available and could present results in an easily understood form. This work was performed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the NRC.

  4. Structural Equation Modeling of Associations among Taste-Related Risk Factors, Taste Functioning and Adiposity

    OpenAIRE

    Rawal, Shristi; Huedo-Medina, Tania; Hoffman, Howard J.; Swede, Helen; Duffy, Valerie B.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Variation in taste perception and exposure to risk factors of taste alterations have been independently linked with elevated adiposity. Using a laboratory database, we modeled taste-adiposity associations and examined whether taste functioning mediates the association between taste-related risk factors and adiposity. Methods Healthy women (n=407, 35.5?16.9 years) self-reported histories of risk factors of altered taste functioning (tonsillectomy, multiple ear infections, head trauma...

  5. Perceptions of risks for diabetes?related complications in Type 2 diabetes populations: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Rouyard, T.; Kent, S.; Baskerville, R.; Leal, J.; Gray, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In type 2 diabetes, there is no clear understanding of how patients perceive their risk of experiencing diabetes-related complications.Objective: To address this issue, we undertook an evidence-based synthesis of how people with type 2 diabetes perceive their risk of complications.Methods: We performed a systematic search of nine electronic databases for peer-reviewed articles published on or before 1 March 2016. Data from 18 studies reporting lay perceptions of risks for complica...

  6. The perils of picky eating: dietary breadth is related to extinction risk in insectivorous bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin G Boyles

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Several recent papers evaluate the relationship between ecological characteristics and extinction risk in bats. These studies report that extinction risk is negatively related to geographic range size and positively related to habitat specialization. Here, we evaluate the hypothesis that extinction risk is also related to dietary specialization in insectivorous vespertilionid bats using both traditional and phylogenetically-controlled analysis of variance. We collected dietary data and The World Conservation Union (IUCN rankings for 44 Australian, European, and North American bat species. Our results indicate that species of conservation concern (IUCN ranking near threatened or above are more likely to have a specialized diet than are species of least concern. Additional analyses show that dietary breadth is not correlated to geographic range size or wing morphology, characteristics previously found to correlate with extinction risk. Therefore, there is likely a direct relationship between dietary specialization and extinction risk; however, the large variation in dietary breadth within species of least concern suggests that diet alone cannot explain extinction risk. Our results may have important implications for the development of predictive models of extinction risk and for the assignment of extinction risk to insectivorous bat species. Similar analyses should be conducted on additional bat families to assess the generality of this relationship between niche breadth and extinction risk.

  7. Review of clinical practice guidelines for the management of LDL-related risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Pamela B; Ballantyne, Christie M; Birtcher, Kim K; Dunn, Steven P; Urbina, Elaine M

    2014-07-15

    Managing risk related to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is vital in therapy for patients at risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) events given its important etiologic role in atherogenesis. Despite decades of research showing reduction of ASCVD risk with multiple approaches to lowering of LDL cholesterol, there continue to be significant gaps in care with inadequate numbers of patients receiving standard of care lipid-lowering therapy. Confusion regarding implementation of the multiple published clinical practice guidelines has been identified as one contributor to suboptimal management of LDL-related risk. This review summarizes the current guidelines for reduction of LDL-related cardiovascular risk provided by a number of major professional societies, which have broad applicability to diverse populations worldwide. Statements have varied in the process and methodology of development of recommendations, the grading system for level and strength of evidence, the inclusion or exclusion of expert opinion, the suggested ASCVD risk assessment tool, the lipoproteins recommended for risk assessment, and the lipoprotein targets of therapy. The similarities and differences among important guidelines in the United States and internationally are discussed, with recommendations for future strategies to improve consistency in approaches to LDL-related ASCVD risk and to reduce gaps in implementation of evidence-based therapies. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Relations between Early Family Risk, Children's Behavioral Regulation, and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sektnan, Michaella; McClelland, Megan M.; Acock, Alan; Morrison, Frederick J.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined relations among early family risk, children's behavioral regulation at 54 months and kindergarten, and academic achievement in first grade using data on 1298 children from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. Family risk was indexed by ethnic…

  9. Expert forecast on emerging psychosocial risks related to occupational safety and health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milczarek, M.; Brun, E.; Houtman, I.; Goudswaard, A.; Evers, M.; Bovenkamp, M. van de; Roskams, N.; Op de Beeck, R.; Pahkin, K.; Berthet, M.; Morvan, E.; Kuhn, K.; Kaluza, K.; Hupke, M.; Hauke, A.; Reinert, D.; Widerszal-Bazyl, M.; Perez, J.; Oncins de Frutos, M.

    2007-01-01

    This report is in cooperation with TNO Work and Employment and the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work. The expert forecast on emerging psychosocial risks was carried out by means of the Delphi method. The main emerging psychosocial risks revealed were related to new forms of employment

  10. Prenatal stress exposure related to maternal bereavement and risk of childhood overweight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jiong; Olsen, Jørn; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that prenatal stress contributes to the risk of obesity later in life. In a population-based cohort study, we examined whether prenatal stress related to maternal bereavement during pregnancy was associated with the risk of overweight in offspring during school age....

  11. Pedo-Climatic Risks Over Făllticeni City Related Orchards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitariu Vasile

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Through this study, “Pedo-climatic risks over Fălticeni city related orchards”, we intend to conduct a study that highlights the way that a number of parameters such as climate and soil, through their evolution, may be considered a risk factor for orchards nearby Fălticeni city.

  12. The burden of high blood pressure and related risk factors in urban ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To provide the current burden of high blood pressure and related risk factors in urban setting in Cameroon. Methods:We used the WHO STEPS approach for Surveillance of non-communicable diseases and their risk factors to collect data from 2,559 adults aged 15-99 years, residing at Cite des Palmiers in Douala ...

  13. The Relations among Cumulative Risk, Parenting, and Behavior Problems during Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentacosta, Christopher J.; Hyde, Luke W.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Gardner, Frances; Wilson, Melvin

    2008-01-01

    Background: This study examined relations among cumulative risk, nurturant and involved parenting, and behavior problems across early childhood. Methods: Cumulative risk, parenting, and behavior problems were measured in a sample of low-income toddlers participating in a family-centered program to prevent conduct problems. Results: Path analysis…

  14. Risk perception: The social construction of spatial knowledge around climate change-related scenarios in Lima

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sara, L.; Jameson, S.; Pfeffer, K.; Baud, I.

    2016-01-01

    Lima's environmental sustainability is threatened by increasing water scarcity, heavy rain events and limited attention for water vulnerability and climate change scenarios. In this paper we examine how knowledge construction and risk perception on water-related disaster risks and vulnerabilities

  15. Extracolonic cancer risk in patients with serrated polyposis syndrome and their first-degree relatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazewinkel, Yark; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Vasen, Hans F.; van Os, Theo A. M.; van Leerdam, Monique E.; Koornstra, Jan-Jacob; Dekker, Evelien; Reitsma, J.

    2013-01-01

    Serrated polyposis syndrome is associated with an increased colorectal cancer risk. Although the underlying genetic cause of the condition is unknown, first-degree relatives of patients with serrated polyposis have an increased risk for colorectal cancer compared with the general population. This

  16. Nutrition-Related Cancer Prevention Cognitions and Behavioral Intentions: Testing the Risk Perception Attitude Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Helen W.; Beckjord, Ellen Burke; Finney Rutten, Lila J.; Hesse, Bradford W.

    2008-01-01

    This study tested whether the risk perception attitude framework predicted nutrition-related cancer prevention cognitions and behavioral intentions. Data from the 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey were analyzed to assess respondents' reported likelihood of developing cancer (risk) and perceptions of whether they could lower their…

  17. Helicobacter pylori-related chronic gastritis as a risk factor for colonic neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Izumi; Kato, Jun; Tamai, Hideyuki; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Maekita, Takao; Yoshimura, Noriko; Ichinose, Masao

    2014-02-14

    To summarize the current views and insights on associations between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-related chronic gastritis and colorectal neoplasm, we reviewed recent studies to clarify whether H. pylori infection/H. pylori-related chronic gastritis is associated with an elevated risk of colorectal neoplasm. Recent studies based on large databases with careful control for confounding variables have clearly demonstrated an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm associated with H. pylori infection. The correlation between H. pylori-related chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) and colorectal neoplasm has only been examined in a limited number of studies. A recent large study using a national histopathological database, and our study based on the stage of H. pylori-related chronic gastritis as determined by serum levels of H. pylori antibody titer and pepsinogen, indicated that H. pylori-related CAG confers an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm, and more extensive atrophic gastritis will probably be associated with even higher risk of neoplasm. In addition, our study suggested that the activity of H. pylori-related chronic gastritis is correlated with colorectal neoplasm risk. H. pylori-related chronic gastritis could be involved in an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm that appears to be enhanced by the progression of gastric atrophy and the presence of active inflammation.

  18. Helicobacter pylori-related chronic gastritis as a risk factor for colonic neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Izumi; Kato, Jun; Tamai, Hideyuki; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Maekita, Takao; Yoshimura, Noriko; Ichinose, Masao

    2014-01-01

    To summarize the current views and insights on associations between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-related chronic gastritis and colorectal neoplasm, we reviewed recent studies to clarify whether H. pylori infection/H. pylori-related chronic gastritis is associated with an elevated risk of colorectal neoplasm. Recent studies based on large databases with careful control for confounding variables have clearly demonstrated an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm associated with H. pylori infection. The correlation between H. pylori-related chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) and colorectal neoplasm has only been examined in a limited number of studies. A recent large study using a national histopathological database, and our study based on the stage of H. pylori-related chronic gastritis as determined by serum levels of H. pylori antibody titer and pepsinogen, indicated that H. pylori-related CAG confers an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm, and more extensive atrophic gastritis will probably be associated with even higher risk of neoplasm. In addition, our study suggested that the activity of H. pylori-related chronic gastritis is correlated with colorectal neoplasm risk. H. pylori-related chronic gastritis could be involved in an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm that appears to be enhanced by the progression of gastric atrophy and the presence of active inflammation. PMID:24587623

  19. Illegibility and lack of information in medical prescriptions: risk factors related to medication errors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Geysa Aguiar; Lourival Alves da Silva Júnior; Marco Antônio Magalhães Ferreira

    2006-01-01

    .... They have multiple causes, amongst them, the prescriptions’ illegibility and lack of information. A study of medical prescriptions was conducted in order to analyze the frequency of risk factors related to medication errors...

  20. Risk Assessment, Genetic Counseling, and Genetic Testing for BRCA-Related Cancer in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Risk Assessment, Genetic Counseling, and Genetic Testing for BRCA-related Cancer in Women The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final ...

  1. PERCEIVED RISK AND SAFETY-RELATED BEHAVIORS AFTER LEAVING A VIOLENT RELATIONSHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosaura González-Méndez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Given that victim’ risk perception could improve risk assessment in cases of intimate partner violence research is paying attention to it. However, it is not clear whether perceived risk relates to safety-related behaviors. This study is aimed to analyze how perceived risk by women who have left a violent partner relates to their safety-related behaviors and post-separation violence. Participants were 249 women (from protection services and the community who had concluded a violent relationship. A structural equation model describes the relationships between three groups of factors: (1 women’s risk perception; (2 three types of conditions that increase the opportunity for victim/abuser contact: (a women’s actions that make them easier to track, (b women’s reasons for not protecting themselves, and (c batterers’ strategies to gain access to their former intimate partners; and (3 post-separation violence. Results indicate that psychological violence is positively related to perceived risk and helplessness. Moreover, while women’s risk perception predicts less contact and self-deception, male strategies predict greater contact and routines. In turn, contact predicts intimacy, whose absence fully accounts for 93.3% of the prediction of no re-abuse, six months later. The results’ implications for intervention are discussed.

  2. Metabolic health reduces risk of obesity-related cancer in framingham study adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lynn L; Chadid, Susan; Singer, Martha R; Kreger, Bernard E; Denis, Gerald V

    2014-10-01

    It is unknown whether the risk for obesity-related cancers differs between metabolically unhealthy and healthy overweight/obese adults. Data on body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), and random blood glucose in Framingham Heart Study adults (n = 3,763) ages 55 to 69 years were used to estimate risks of obesity-related cancers (n = 385), including postmenopausal breast, female reproductive, colon, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, and kidney cancers, as well as esophageal adenocarcinomas. Multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate risk for obesity-related cancers associated with body fat and metabolic health (as defined by glucose levels) among subjects in three risk groups (vs. referent group with normal weight/normal glucose): normal weight/elevated glucose, overweight/normal glucose, and overweight/elevated glucose. Overweight adults [BMI ≥ 25 or WHtR ≥ 0.51 (men) and ≥0.57 (women)] with elevated glucose (≥125 mg/dL) had a statistically significant 2-fold increased risk of developing obesity-related cancer, whereas overweight adults with normal glucose had a 50% increased risk. Normal-weight adults with elevated glucose had no excess cancer risk. The effects of BMI and WHtR were independent of one another. Finally, overweight women with elevated blood glucose had a 2.6-fold increased risk [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.4-4.9] of female reproductive (cervical, endometrial, uterine cancers) and postmenopausal breast cancers, whereas overweight women with normal glucose levels had only a 70% increased risk (95% CI, 1.1-2.5). These results suggest that cancer risk may be lower among metabolically healthy overweight/obese older adults than among overweight/obese adults with metabolic dysfunction. Metabolic dysfunction and obesity act synergistically to increase cancer risk. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Assessment of Multifactor Gene-Environment Interactions and Ovarian Cancer Risk: Candidate Genes, Obesity, and Hormone-Related Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usset, Joseph L; Raghavan, Rama; Tyrer, Jonathan P; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Webb, Penelope; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Berchuck, Andrew; Brinton, Louise; Cunningham, Julie M; DeFazio, Anna; Doherty, Jennifer A; Edwards, Robert P; Gayther, Simon A; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Goodman, Marc T; Høgdall, Estrid; Jensen, Allan; Johnatty, Sharon E; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kjaer, Susanne K; Larson, Melissa C; Lurie, Galina; Massuger, Leon; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ness, Roberta B; Pike, Malcolm C; Ramus, Susan J; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph; Song, Honglin; Thompson, Pamela J; van den Berg, David J; Vierkant, Robert A; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wilkens, Lynne R; Wu, Anna H; Yang, Hannah; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Pharoah, Paul; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L

    2016-05-01

    Many epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk factors relate to hormone exposure and elevated estrogen levels are associated with obesity in postmenopausal women. Therefore, we hypothesized that gene-environment interactions related to hormone-related risk factors could differ between obese and non-obese women. We considered interactions between 11,441 SNPs within 80 candidate genes related to hormone biosynthesis and metabolism and insulin-like growth factors with six hormone-related factors (oral contraceptive use, parity, endometriosis, tubal ligation, hormone replacement therapy, and estrogen use) and assessed whether these interactions differed between obese and non-obese women. Interactions were assessed using logistic regression models and data from 14 case-control studies (6,247 cases; 10,379 controls). Histotype-specific analyses were also completed. SNPs in the following candidate genes showed notable interaction: IGF1R (rs41497346, estrogen plus progesterone hormone therapy, histology = all, P = 4.9 × 10(-6)) and ESR1 (rs12661437, endometriosis, histology = all, P = 1.5 × 10(-5)). The most notable obesity-gene-hormone risk factor interaction was within INSR (rs113759408, parity, histology = endometrioid, P = 8.8 × 10(-6)). We have demonstrated the feasibility of assessing multifactor interactions in large genetic epidemiology studies. Follow-up studies are necessary to assess the robustness of our findings for ESR1, CYP11A1, IGF1R, CYP11B1, INSR, and IGFBP2 Future work is needed to develop powerful statistical methods able to detect these complex interactions. Assessment of multifactor interaction is feasible, and, here, suggests that the relationship between genetic variants within candidate genes and hormone-related risk factors may vary EOC susceptibility. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(5); 780-90. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. [Mother-newborn relational risk - Study of prevalence and associated variables].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Maribel; Poo, Ana María; Baeza, Bernardita; Bustos, M Luis

    2015-01-01

    Clinical evidence reveals the importance of mother-newborn bonding experience for health promoting and maintenance of human life. If the newborn lacks care and affection, she/he may develop an attachment disorder. A predictive scale regarding the risk of mothernewborn relationships is available, which makes possible an early intervention to prevent the development of relational disorders. The aim of this study is to apply the Kimelman measurement scale to determine the relational risk in mother-newborn pairs, as well as the prevalence and the associated biopsychosocial variables. A cross-sectional study with a probabilistic sample of 333 mother-infant pairs in postpartum maternity at Temuco hospital. The Kimelman mother-newborn attachment assessment guide was used. Biopsychosocial variables were obtained from the mothers studied. The association of biopsychosocial variables with relational risk was analyzed using OR and confidence intervals of 95%. The prevalence of high relational risk was 43.8%. The associated biopsychosocial variables included, women with no steady partner, single parent, teenage mothers, unwanted and unplanned pregnancy. Almost half of the mothers were in the high risk group. Early identification of relational risk and its related variables could help in the intervention in this vulnerable group. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  5. Risk Factors for Developing Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders during Dairy Farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Mohammad Taghavi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dairy farming work involves frequent use of poor postures. These postures may increase the risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders among dairy workers. Objective: To assess postural load during performance of various tasks related to dairy farming. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on a dairy farm in Iran. In order to assess postural load, tasks related to dairy farming were divided into 3 categories: feeding, milking, and manure disposal. Each task was then divided into its constituent work subdivisions (tasks. Finally, the working posture for each work subdivision was evaluated using Rapid Entire Body Assessment (REBA. Results: Based on the results from the REBA score, the poorest risk scores (risk level 4 were associated with the following tasks: (1 manure disposal, (2 filling feed bags, and (3 pouring milk into a bucket. Other tasks such as filling corn containers, pouring corn into the milling machine, preparing the feed, pouring food into mangers, attaching the milking machine, and pouring milk from a bucket into a tank imposed high risk (risk level 3. The risk for the tasks of washing and disinfecting the udders were assessed as medium risks. Conclusion: The risk levels associated with most of the tasks on the studied farm were unacceptably high. Therefore, it is essential to implement ergonomic interventions to reduce risk levels of the tasks.

  6. Lifestyle and safety practices of firefighters and their relation to cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastlake, Adrienne C; Knipper, Brad S; He, Xinjian; Alexander, Barbara M; Davis, Kermit G

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, over 50% of the deaths of on-duty firefighters are classified as sudden cardiac deaths. A holistic view of the multiple risk factors and their relation to the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is necessary to determine a baseline for prevention. This study surveyed 154 firefighters in a large Midwestern county about their individual exposure to particulates, noise, heat stress, skin contamination, and physical stress; lifestyle factors such as exercise, diet, smoking, and alcohol consumption; health status; and demographic factors. Consumption of whole grains and alcohol were associated with a reduction of the risk of heart disease, while higher Body Mass Index (BMI) scores and increasing age were associated with increased risk of heart disease. Although firefighters are exposed to substantial occupational risks, only lifestyle factors were found to significantly predict CVD and related health issues. BMI is a modifiable risk factor, which, if controlled, could appreciably improve health outcomes.

  7. Assessment of Credit Risk Approaches in Relation with Competitiveness Increase of the Banking Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cipovová Eva

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is focused on a presentation and analysis of selected methods of credit risk management in relation with competitiveness increase of the banking sector. The article is defined credit risk approaches under the Basel III gradually. Aim of this contribution constitutes various methods of credit risk management and effects of their usage on regulatory capital amount in respect of corporate exposures. Optimal equity amount in relation to the risk portfolio presents an essential prerequisite of performance and competitiveness growth of commercial banks. Gradually capital requirements using Standardized Approach and Internal Based Approach in a case of used and unused techniques of credit risk reduce has been quantified. We presume that sophisticated approach means significant saving for bank’s equity which increases competitiveness of banking sector also. Within the article, quantification of capital savings in case of Standardized (with and without assigned external ratings and Foundation Internal Based Approach at the selected credit portfolio has been effected.

  8. Prospective associations between vitamin D status, vitamin D-related gene polymorphisms, and risk of tobacco-related cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschasaux, Mélanie; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Latino-Martel, Paule; Sutton, Angela; Charnaux, Nathalie; Druesne-Pecollo, Nathalie; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Le Clerc, Sigrid; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle; Ezzedine, Khaled; Touvier, Mathilde

    2015-11-01

    Experimental evidence has suggested that vitamin D may be protective against tobacco-related cancers through the inhibition of the formation of tumors induced by tobacco carcinogens. To our knowledge, only one previous epidemiologic study investigated the association between vitamin D status and tobacco-related cancer risk, and no study has focused on vitamin D-related gene polymorphisms. Our objective was to prospectively study the association between plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations, vitamin D-related gene polymorphisms, and risk of tobacco-related cancers. A total of 209 tobacco-related cancers were diagnosed within the SU.VI.MAX (Supplémentation en vitamines et minéraux antioxydants) cohort (1994-2007) and were matched with 418 controls as part of a nested case-control study. Tobacco-related cancers (i.e., cancers for which tobacco is one of the risk factors) included several sites in the respiratory, digestive, reproductive, and urinary systems. Total plasma 25(OH)D was assessed with the use of an electrochemoluminescent assay. Polymorphisms were determined with the use of a TaqMan assay. Conditional logistic regression models were computed. A 25(OH)D concentration ≥30 ng/mL was associated with reduced risk of tobacco-related cancers (OR for ≥30 compared with cancers [OR for homozygous mutant type (MT) compared with wild type (WT): 1.87; 95% CI: 1.08, 3.23; P-trend = 0.02; OR for heterozygous type (HT) plus MT compared with WT: 1.60; 95% CI: 1.07, 2.38; P = 0.02]. In this prospective study, high vitamin D status [25(OH)D concentration ≥30 ng/mL] was associated with decreased risk of tobacco-related cancers, especially in smokers. These results, which are supported by mechanistic plausibility, suggest that vitamin D may contribute to the prevention of tobacco-induced cancers in smokers and deserve additional investigation. The SU.VI.MAX trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00272428. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  9. Company Risk-related Disclosures in a Code Law Country: A Synopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Oliveira

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This synopsis provides a concise historical contextualisation of current risk disclosure issues, highlights major factors influencing contemporary risk reporting practices, and engages in a reflective overview of four recently published papers on aspects of corporate risk-related disclosures in a code law country, Portugal. The breadthand depth of our analysis is modest. Nonetheless we report findings indicating that risk-related disclosures are inadequate, lack transparency, and compound the difficulty of assessing the risk profile of a company. We contend that recent regulation initiatives have been of dubious effectiveness in improving the quality of riskinformation disclosed. In respect of the Portuguese context, we find that companies disclose risk-related information principally to reduce agency costs and to enhance corporate reputation. We contend that enhanced corporate accountability would be more likely to ensue if further disclosures of relevant risk-related information were mandated. One mechanism to do so would be through regulations recommended by the International Integrated Reporting Committee (IIRC.

  10. Cancer risk in first- and second-degree relatives of men with poor semen quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ross E.; Hanson, Heidi A.; Patel, Darshan P.; Johnstone, Erica; Aston, Kenneth I.; Carrell, Douglas T.; Lowrance, William T.; Smith, Ken R.; Hotaling, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To further characterize the association of male infertility with health risks by evaluating semen quality and cancer risk in family members. Design Retrospective, cohort study. Setting Not applicable. Patient(s) A total of 12,889 men undergoing SA and 12,889 fertile control subjects that had first-degree relative (FDR) data (n = 130,689) and 8,032 men with SA and 8,032 fertile control subjects with complete second-degree relative (SDR) data (n = 247,204) were identified through the UPDB. An equal number of fertile population control subjects were matched. Interventions None. Main Outcome Measure(s) Adult all-site, testicular, thyroid, breast, prostate, melanoma, bladder, ovarian, and kidney cancer diagnoses in FDRs and SDRs. Result(s) The FDRs of men with SA had a 52% increased risk of testicular cancer compared with the FDRs of fertile population control subjects. There was no significant difference in testicular cancer risk for the SDRs based on any of the semen parameters. The FDRs and SDRs of azoospermic men had a significantly increased risk of thyroid cancer compared with fertile population control subjects. Conclusion(s) These data suggest a link between male infertility and selected cancer risk in relatives. This highlights the possibilities of shared biologic mechanisms between the two diseases, exposure to environmental factors, and an increased level of genetic and/or epigenetic burden in subfertile men and their relatives that may be associated with risk of cancer. PMID:27336212

  11. Treatment-dependent and treatment-independent risk factors associated with the risk of diabetes-related events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilke, Thomas; Mueller, Sabrina; Groth, Antje

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to analyse which factors predict the real-world macro-/microvascular event, hospitalisation and death risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Furthermore, we aimed to investigate whether there exists both an under- and over-treatment risk....../microvascular/hospitalization risk and for young/less comorbid patients. CONCLUSIONS: Both blood pressure and HbA1C seem to be very important treatment targets, especially in comorbid old patients. It is of particular clinical importance that both over- and under-treatment pose a threat to patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus....... of these patients. METHODS: We used a German claims/clinical data set covering the years 2010-12. Diabetes-related events were defined as (1) macro-, (2) microvascular events leading to inpatient hospitalisation, (3) other hospitalisations with type 2 diabetes mellitus as main diagnosis, (4) all-cause death and (5...

  12. Understanding the impact of mortality-related health-risk information: a terror management theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessop, Donna C; Albery, Ian P; Rutter, Jean; Garrod, Heather

    2008-07-01

    Four studies explored the effects of providing mortality-related health-risk information from a terror management theory perspective. Study 1 (N = 48) revealed that exposure to information about the mortality-related risks of driving made mortality salient for young male drivers. Studies 2 (N = 60) and 3 (N = 139) demonstrated that young male drivers who perceived driving (fast) to be beneficial for self-esteem reported higher intentions to take driving risks (Study 2) and drive fast (Study 3) after exposure to such information compared to controls. Study 3 further demonstrated that the inclusion of a prime to behave responsibly eliminated this effect. Study 4 (N = 92) revealed that exposure to this prime alongside the mortality-related information generated increased accessibility of responsibility-related constructs and reduced accessibility of mortality-related constructs among young male drivers. The implications of these findings for terror management theory are discussed.

  13. Exploring relations between positive mood state and school-age children's risk taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrongiello, Barbara A; Stewart, Julia; Pope, Kristina; Pogrebtsova, Ekaterina; Boulay, Karissa-June

    2015-05-01

    To examine whether children engage in greater risk taking when in a positive versus neutral mood state, and whether positive urgency trait relates to risk taking. Positive mood in 7-10-year-old children was induced experimentally, and children's risk-taking intentions and actual behaviors were measured when the child was in a positive and neutral mood state. Within-person comparisons revealed that children showed greater risk-taking intentions and actual risk behaviors when in a positive mood state compared with a neutral one. Positive urgency was associated with greater risk taking when in a positive mood state, and this effect was stronger in the actual risk taking than intentions to risk take task. Mood state affects children's risk taking. Positive mood is associated with greater risk taking in elementary-school children, and those high in positive urgency are especially likely to show this effect. Implications for injury prevention are discussed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Height, height-related SNPs, and risk of non-melanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Liang, Liming; Feng, Yen-Chen Anne; De Vivo, Immaculata; Giovannucci, Edward; Tang, Jean Y; Han, Jiali

    2017-01-03

    Adult height has been associated with risk of several site-specific cancers, including melanoma. However, less attention has been given to non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). We prospectively examined the risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in relation to adult height in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS, n=117 863) and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS, n=51 111). We also investigated the relationships between height-related genetic markers and risk of BCC and SCC in the genetic data sets of the NHS and HPFS (3898 BCC cases, and 8530 BCC controls; 527 SCC cases, and 8962 SCC controls). After controlling for potential confounding factors, the hazard ratios were 1.09 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.15) and 1.10 (95% CI: 1.07, 1.13) for the associations between every 10 cm increase in height and risk of SCC and BCC respectively. None of the 687 height-related single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was significantly associated with the risk of SCC or BCC, nor were the genetic scores combining independent height-related loci. Our data from two large cohorts provide further evidence that height is associated with an increased risk of NMSC. More studies on height-related genetic loci and early-life exposures may help clarify the underlying mechanisms.

  15. Temporally varying relative risks for infectious diseases: implications for infectious disease control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Edward; Pitzer, Virginia E.; O'Hagan, Justin J.; Lipsitch, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Risks for disease in some population groups relative to others (relative risks) are usually considered to be consistent over time, though they are often modified by other, non-temporal factors. For infectious diseases, in which overall incidence often varies substantially over time, the patterns of temporal changes in relative risks can inform our understanding of basic epidemiologic questions. For example, recent work suggests that temporal changes in relative risks of infection over the course of an epidemic cycle can both be used to identify population groups that drive infectious disease outbreaks, and help elucidate differences in the effect of vaccination against infection (that is relevant to transmission control) compared with its effect against disease episodes (that reflects individual protection). Patterns of change in the in age groups affected over the course of seasonal outbreaks can provide clues to the types of pathogens that could be responsible for diseases for which an infectious cause is suspected. Changing apparent efficacy of vaccines during trials may provide clues to the vaccine's mode of action and/or indicate risk heterogeneity in the trial population. Declining importance of unusual behavioral risk factors may be a signal of increased local transmission of an infection. We review these developments and the related public health implications. PMID:27748685

  16. Risk factors for work-related eczema and urticaria among vocational students of agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śpiewak, Radosław; Góra-Florek, Anna; Horoch, Andrzej; Jarosz, Mirosław J; Doryńska, Agnieszka; Golec, Marcin; Dutkiewicz, Jacek

    2017-12-23

    Farmers are at high risk of occupational skin diseases which may start already during vocational training. This study was aimed at identification of risk factors for work-related skin diseases among vocational students of agriculture. The study involved 440 students (245 males, 195 females aged 17-21 years) in 11 vocational schools which were at least 100 km from each other. The protocol included a physician-managed questionnaire and medical examination, skin prick tests, patch tests, total IgE and Phadiatop. Logistic regression model was used for the identification of relevant risk factors. Work-related dermatoses were diagnosed in 29 study participants (6.6%, 95%CI: 4.3-8.9%): eczema in 22, urticaria in 14, and co-existence of both in 7 students. Significant risk factors for work-related eczema were: history of respiratory allergy (OR=10.10; pagriculture. Atopy, past history of asthma, allergic rhinitis, and eczema (either atopic, allergic or irritant) are relevant risk factors for work-related eczema and urticaria in young farmers, along with family history of any skin disease. Positive skin prick tests seem relevant, especially in the case of urticaria. Asking simple, aimed questions during health checks while enrolling students into agricultural schools would suffice to identify students at risk for work-related eczema and urticaria, giving them the chance for selecting a safer profession, and hopefully avoiding an occupational disease in the future.

  17. Emotional Distress May Increase Risk for Self-Medication and Lower Risk for Mood-related Drinking Consequences in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Laura Feagans; Hussong, Andrea M.; Hersh, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    The current study examines indicators of emotional distress and coping that may define sub-populations of adolescents at risk for two potential affect-related mechanisms underlying substance misuse: self-medication and mood-related drinking consequences. Although theory and empirical evidence point to the salience of affect-related drinking to current and future psychopathology, we have little knowledge of whether or for whom such mood-related processes exist in adolescents because few studies have used methods that optimally match the phenomenon to the level of analysis. Consequently, the current study uses multilevel modeling in which daily reports of negative mood and alcohol use are nested within individuals to examine whether adolescents with more emotional distress and poorer coping skills are more likely to evidence self-medication and mood-related drinking consequences. Seventy-five adolescents participated in a multi-method, multi-reporter study in which they completed a 21-day experience sampling protocol assessing thrice daily measures of mood and daily measures of alcohol use. Results indicate that adolescents reporting greater anger are more likely to evidence self-medication. Conversely, adolescents displaying lower emotional distress and more active coping are more likely to evidence mood-related drinking consequences. Implications for identifying vulnerable sub-populations of adolescents at risk for these mechanisms of problematic alcohol use are discussed. PMID:24358457

  18. Emotional Distress May Increase Risk for Self-Medication and Lower Risk for Mood-related Drinking Consequences in Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Feagans

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The current study examines indicators of emotional distress and coping that may define sub-populations of adolescents at risk for two potential affect-related mechanisms underlying substance misuse: self-medication and mood-related drinking consequences. Although theory and empirical evidence point to the salience of affect-related drinking to current and future psychopathology, we have little knowledge of whether or for whom such mood-related processes exist in adolescents because few studies have used methods that optimally match the phenomenon to the level of analysis. Consequently, the current study uses multi-level modeling in which daily reports of negative mood and alcohol use are nested within individuals to examine whether adolescents with more emotional distress and poorer coping skills are more likely to evidence self-medication and mood-related drinking consequences. Seventy-five adolescents participated in a multi-method, multi-reporter study in which they completed a 21-day experience sampling protocol assessing thrice daily measures of mood and daily measures of alcohol use. Results indicate that adolescents reporting greater anger are more likely to evidence self-medication. Conversely, adolescents displaying lower emotional distress and more active coping are more likely to evidence mood-related drinking consequences. Implications for identifying vulnerable sub-populations of adolescents at risk for these mechanisms of problematic alcohol use are discussed.

  19. Social/Behavioral Effects of Violence on Television. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Telecommunications, Consumer Protection, and Finance of the Committee on Energy and Commerce. House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session (October 21, 1981).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

    This subcommittee hearing report presents testimony of television network officials, academic researchers, and consumer representatives concerning the social and behavioral effects of portrayed violence on television, especially as it relates to children. It also provides documents used as attachments to the oral testimony and written statements…

  20. Rio Arriba County Strategy To Combat Heroin Addiction. Hearing before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, United States Senate, One Hundred Sixth Congress, First Session. Special Hearing (Espanola, New Mexico, March 30, 1999).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Appropriations.

    At an Espanola (New Mexico) hearing, the Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies of the Senate Committee on Appropriations heard testimony on heroin addiction and intervention efforts in Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. An opening statement of Senator Pete Domenici outlined the problem of an epidemic of…

  1. Low Vision Rehabilitation, Age-Related Vision Loss, and Risk: A Critical Interpretive Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laliberte Rudman, Debbie; Egan, Mary Y; McGrath, Colleen E; Kessler, Dorothy; Gardner, Paula; King, Judy; Ceci, Christine

    2016-06-01

    Given the centrality of risk in geriatric rehabilitation, it is critically important to attend to how conceptualizations of risk shape research, policies, and rehabilitation practices. This paper presents a critical interpretive synthesis (CIS) of literature addressing risk and low vision rehabilitation for older adults with age-related vision loss (ARVL) to identify key guiding assumptions regarding risk and discuss implications for what gets attended to, and not attended to, within research and rehabilitation. This CIS combined guidelines proposed by Dixon-Woods and colleagues (2006-Conducting a critical interpretive synthesis of the literature on access to healthcare by vulnerable groups. BMC Medical Research Methodology, 6, 35) and Alvesson and Sandberg (2011-Generating research questions through problematization. Academy of Management Review, 36, 247-271; 2013-Constructing research questions: Doing interesting research. London: Sage). The iterative review process involved 3 steps: literature search and selection, data extraction, and syntheses to identify boundary assumptions. The dataset included 83 research and practice description articles. Older adults with ARVL were constructed as "at risk" for various adverse outcomes, particularly dependency and self-harm, and as posing risks to others. An epidemiological approach to risk based in assumptions aligned with a technico-scientific perspective was dominant, with risk conceptualized as an embodied, individual-level phenomenon that is to be determined and managed through objective screening and expert monitoring. Key concerns include a lack of: attention to the tensions created when rehabilitation research and practice attempt to promote independence while simultaneously reducing risk, incorporation of aging adults' perspectives on risk, and analysis of environmental factors that shape risks. Research that starts by valuing older adults' experiences and attends to context can inform rehabilitation practices

  2. Global Risks as Factors that Affect the Current system of international Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina A. Zaitseva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the globalization of risks is examined in this article. Based on the World Economic Forum (WEF report on global risks 2015-2017, the impact of global risks on the social and economic development of countries is examined. Economic, social, environmental, geopolitical, technological risks are analyzed in a coordinated fashion. The article notes that the main risks are in the field of environment and ecology. Anthropogenic pressure amplification, scientific and technological advance have an influence on the natural environment. The risks of infrastructure and environmental damage in danger zone are increased because of the growth of the frequency of extreme weather events. The measures for the protection of the environment are examined. The unilateral approach to solving international issues, instead of the collective efforts of the international community; the deployment of weapons of mass destruction (nuclear, chemical, biological and technologies for the production of radioactive materials; escalation of economic and resource nationalization (the desire of States to expropriate or restrict the export of important for the world economy of resources, etc. promote the increasing geopolitical risks.Economic risks include the risk in terms of their likelihood their impact on the macroeconomic, as from the financial systems and infrastructure to price volatility and regulatory issues. Social risks are the risks relating to instability of population dynamics, social crises and human survival.Technological risks include such problems as software defects, failure of important information systems, upon which today industrial production is depended, the services and communications sector; the escalation of large-scale cyber-attacks; theft of electronic information and the illegal usage of personal data. The trends that can intensify the global risks or to change the correlation between them are analyzed in this article.

  3. Sensation Seeking and Risk-Taking Propensity as Mediators in the Relationship between Childhood Abuse and HIV-Related Risk Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornovalova, Marina A.; Gwadz, Marya A.; Kahler, Christopher; Aklin, W. M.; Lejuez, C. W.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Although a wealth of literature suggests that childhood physical, emotional, and sexual abuse are related to later-life HIV-related risk behaviors, few studies have explored disinhibition (e.g., impulsivity, risk-taking propensity, and sensation-seeking) as a risk factor in this relationship. Method: This cross-sectional study examined…

  4. Prolonged work- and computer-related seated immobility and risk of venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Bridget; Levin, Erik; Perrin, Kyle; Weatherall, Mark; Beasley, Richard

    2010-11-01

    To determine the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) associated with prolonged work- and computer-related seated immobility. Case-control study in which cases were patients aged 18-65 years attending outpatient VTE clinics, and controls were patients aged 18-65 years admitted to CCU with a condition other than VTE. Interviewer-administered questionnaires obtained detailed information on VTE risk factors and clinical details. VTE Clinics and Coronary Care Unit (CCU), Wellington and Kenepuru Hospitals, Wellington between February 2007 and February 2009. The relative risk of VTE associated with prolonged work- and computer-related seated immobility, defined as being seated at work and on the computer at home, at least 10 hours in a 24-hour period and at least 2 hours at a time without getting up, during the four weeks prior to the onset of symptoms that led to VTE diagnosis or CCU admission. There were 197 cases and 197 controls. Prolonged work- and computer-related seated immobility was present in 33/197 (16.8%) and 19/197 (9.6%) cases and controls, respectively. In multivariate analyses, prolonged work- and computer-related seated immobility was associated with an increased risk of VTE, odds ratio 2.8 (95% CI 1.2-6.1, P=0.013). The maximum and average number of hours seated in a 24-hour period were associated with an increased risk of VTE, with odds ratios of 1.1 (95% CI 1.0-1.2, P=0.008) and 1.1 (95% CI 1.0-1.2, P=0.014) per additional hour seated. Prolonged work- and computer-related seated immobility increases the risk of VTE. We suggest that there needs to be both a greater awareness of the role of prolonged work-related seated immobility in the pathogenesis of VTE, and the development of occupational strategies to decrease the risk.

  5. Exploration of health risks related to air pollution and temperature in three Latin American cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Lankao, P.; Borbor Cordova, M.; Qin, H.

    2013-12-01

    We explore whether the health risks related to air pollution and temperature extremes are spatially and socioeconomically differentiated within three Latin American cities: Bogota, Colombia, Mexico City, Mexico, and Santiago, Chile. Based on a theoretical review of three relevant approaches to risk analysis (risk society, environmental justice, and urban vulnerability as impact), we hypothesize that health risks from exposure to air pollution and temperature in these cities do not necessarily depend on socio-economic inequalities. To test this hypothesis, we gathered, validated, and analyzed temperature, air pollution, mortality and socioeconomic vulnerability data from the three study cities. Our results show the association between air pollution levels and socioeconomic vulnerabilities did not always correlate within the study cities. Furthermore, the spatial differences in socioeconomic vulnerabilities within cities do not necessarily correspond with the spatial distribution of health impacts. The present study improves our understanding of the multifaceted nature of health risks and vulnerabilities associated with global environmental change. The findings suggest that health risks from atmospheric conditions and pollutants exist without boundaries or social distinctions, even exhibiting characteristics of a boomerang effect (i.e., affecting rich and poor alike) on a smaller scale such as areas within urban regions. We used human mortality, a severe impact, to measure health risks from air pollution and extreme temperatures. Public health data of better quality (e.g., morbidity, hospital visits) are needed for future research to advance our understanding of the nature of health risks related to climate hazards.

  6. Structural equation modeling of associations among taste-related risk factors, taste functioning, and adiposity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawal, Shristi; Huedo-Medina, Tania B; Hoffman, Howard J; Swede, Helen; Duffy, Valerie B

    2017-04-01

    Variation in taste perception and exposure to risk factors of taste alterations have been independently linked with elevated adiposity. Using a laboratory database, taste-adiposity associations were modeled and examined for whether taste functioning mediates the association between taste-related risk factors and adiposity. Healthy women (n = 407, 35.5 ± 16.9 y) self-reported histories of risk factors of altered taste functioning (tonsillectomy, multiple ear infections, head trauma) and were assessed for taste functioning (tongue-tip and whole-mouth intensities of quinine and salt) and density of taste papillae. Twenty-four percent had elevated waist circumferences; thirty-nine percent had overweight or obesity. Using structural equation modeling, direct and indirect associations between taste-related risk factors, taste functioning, and adiposity were tested. In models with good fit, elevated central adiposity was explained directly by history of risk factors (tonsillectomy, multiple ear infections) and directly by lower taste functioning (lower tongue-tip taste function, lower papillae density). Risk factors of taste alterations were significantly associated with lower taste functioning, with taste mediating the association between head trauma and reduced adiposity. This large laboratory-based study supports associations between taste-related risk factors, taste functioning, and adiposity. These findings need to be confirmed with other population-based studies, including the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2013-2014 taste data. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  7. HIV-related sexual risk behavior among African American adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Carla Kmett; Walsh, Kate; McCauley, Jenna; Ruggiero, Kenneth J; Brown, Jennifer L; Sales, Jessica M; Rose, Eve; Wingood, Gina M; Diclemente, Ralph J

    2014-05-01

    Latent class analysis (LCA) is a useful statistical tool that can be used to enhance understanding of how various patterns of combined sexual behavior risk factors may confer differential levels of HIV infection risk and to identify subtypes among African American adolescent girls. Data for this analysis is derived from baseline assessments completed prior to randomization in an HIV prevention trial. Participants were African American girls (n=701) aged 14-20 years presenting to sexual health clinics. Girls completed an audio computer-assisted self-interview, which assessed a range of variables regarding sexual history and current and past sexual behavior. Two latent classes were identified with the probability statistics for the two groups in this model being 0.89 and 0.88, respectively. In the final multivariate model, class 1 (the "higher risk" group; n=331) was distinguished by a higher likelihood of >5 lifetime sexual partners, having sex while high on alcohol/drugs, less frequent condom use, and history of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), when compared with class 2 (the "lower risk" group; n=370). The derived model correctly classified 85.3% of participants into the two groups and accounted for 71% of the variance in the latent HIV-related sexual behavior risk variable. The higher risk class also had worse scores on all hypothesized correlates (e.g., self-esteem, history of sexual assault or physical abuse) relative to the lower risk class. Sexual health clinics represent a unique point of access for HIV-related sexual risk behavior intervention delivery by capitalizing on contact with adolescent girls when they present for services. Four empirically supported risk factors differentiated higher versus lower HIV risk. Replication of these findings is warranted and may offer an empirical basis for parsimonious screening recommendations for girls presenting for sexual healthcare services.

  8. Weight-Related Sports Involvement in Girls: Who Is at Risk for Disordered Eating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Nancy E.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Story, Mary; Beuhring, Trish; Resnick, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the relationship between weight-related sport involvement, disordered eating, health behavior, and psycho-social factors in female adolescents. Survey data indicated that girls in weight-related sports were at increased risk for disordered eating, though the majority did not report disordered eating. This group was also at decreased risk…

  9. Depressive Symptoms and Health-Related Risk-Taking in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, C. Rylann; Steinberg, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the relation between symptoms and a variety of health-related risk-taking behaviors during adolescence. A survey of 20,745 adolescents from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health provided data for analysis. Adolescents who reported more depressive symptoms were found to wear seatbelts less often, wear…

  10. Teacher Behavioral Practices: Relations to Student Risk Behaviors, Learning Barriers, and School Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Andrew; Mcmahon, Susan D.; Coker, Crystal; Keys, Christopher B.

    2016-01-01

    Student behavioral problems pose a myriad of challenges for schools. In this study, we examine the relations among teacher and school-level constructs (i.e., teacher collaboration, supervision/discipline, instructional management), and student-related outcomes (i.e., high-risk behaviors, barriers to learning, student social-behavioral climate).…

  11. Visible Age-Related Signs and Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease in the General Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Schnohr, Peter

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease is 1 of the most common age-related diseases, and also 1 of the most common causes of death in the general population. We tested the hypothesis that visible age-related signs associate with risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD), myocardial infarction (MI), and de...

  12. VEGF expression and microvascular density in relation to high-risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    VEGF expression and microvascular density in relation to high-risk-HPV infection in cervical carcinoma – An immunohistochemical study. ... Eleven cases were low grade and 19 were high-grade cases. VEGF expression was detected in 100% of cases. The relation between carcinoma grade and VEGF expression and ...

  13. Perception of risk for Domoic Acid related health problems: A Cross-cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Sparkle M; Grattan, Lynn M; Toben, Alexandra C; Ausherman, Christina; Trainer, Vera; Tracy, Kate; Morris, J Glenn

    2016-07-01

    Risk perception is a complex process that refers to the way people approach, think about and interpret risks in their environment. An important element of risk perception is that it is culturally situated. Since HAB's can present a health risk in many places around the world, looking at cultural parameters for understanding and interpreting risks are important. This study examined how two different groups of people perceive the potential health risks of low level exposure to domoic acid (DA) through razor clam consumption. The risk perceptions of Washington State, USA coastal dwelling Native American nations (NA) were compared to that of a community sample of recreational razor clam harvesters (CRH). Overall, the findings support the hypothesis that cultural and community specific contexts impact the perception of risk of a DA related illness. Specifically, the NA sample was distinguished by worrying more about ocean pollution, attributing DA risks to climate change, expressing concerns about the potential impact of DA on future generations, and feeling better informed than the CRH group. The CRH group were more likely to attribute the DA problem to anthropogenic or industrial causes; and view the risk of health problems as lower than that associated with smoking, high cholesterol, anxiety or depression, alcoholism, high blood pressure or obesity. The CRH group was also more likely to turn to the media for DA related information. Both groups trust the decisions of state and tribe health and natural resources officials and demonstrated a complex pattern of findings that involved gender. It was recommended that risk communication and outreach activities are designed to take into consideration factors that specifically apply to each cultural community.

  14. 78 FR 8202 - Meeting of the Joint ACRS Subcommittees on Thermal Hydraulic Phenomena and Materials, Metallurgy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... Hydraulic Phenomena and Materials, Metallurgy and Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The Joint ACRS Subcommittees on Thermal Hydraulic Phenomena and Materials, Metallurgy and Reactor Fuels will hold a meeting on...

  15. 75 FR 4882 - Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on EPR; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... AREVA, NP, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552b(c)(4). The proposed agenda for the subject meeting shall be as...) Application. The Subcommittee will hear presentations by and hold discussions with representatives of AREVA...

  16. 75 FR 44819 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Siting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-29

    .... Until 5 p.m. The Subcommittee will review the MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (Shaw-Areva MOX Services... discussions with representatives of the NRC staff, Shaw-Areva, LLC, and other interested persons regarding...

  17. 78 FR 24241 - Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology Subcommittee; Committee on Technology, National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... TECHNOLOGY POLICY Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology Subcommittee; Committee on Technology, National Science and Technology Council; Notice of Public Meeting AGENCY: Executive Office of the President, Office of Science and Technology Policy. ACTION: Notice of Public Meeting. SUMMARY: The National...

  18. Phase II Recommendations by the Air Quality Management Subcommittee to the Clean Air Act Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    The primary charge of the AQM Subcommittee was to develop recommendations to improve the air quality management system and address the air quality challenges in this country expected over the next 10 to 20 years. This report addresses those challenges.

  19. Biological Advisory Subcommittee (BAS) Minutes, Members, & Agendas : Rocky Mountain Arsenal : 1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This record contains a variety of documents produced by the Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR's Biological Advisory Subcommittee (BAS) in 1998, from June 3, 1998 to...

  20. 78 FR 20696 - NASA Advisory Council; Human Exploration and Operations Committee; Research Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Human Exploration and Operations Committee; Research... Exploration and Operations Committee (HEOC) of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Subcommittee reports to... CONTACT: Dr. Bradley Carpenter, Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters...

  1. 78 FR 42805 - NASA Advisory Council; Human Exploration Operations Committee; Research Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-17

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Human Exploration Operations Committee; Research... Exploration and Operations Committee (HEOC) of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Subcommittee reports to... Carpenter, Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC 20546...

  2. 78 FR 7816 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems Subcommittee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems... Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Subcommittee... NASA UAS Systems Analysis Review of UAS in the National Airspace System Project Integration of...

  3. 78 FR 25100 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-29

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems... Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Subcommittee... of NASA UAS Integration into the National Airspace System (NAS) Phase 2 Activity Selection Discussion...

  4. 76 FR 75565 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Subcommittee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS... National Airspace System project. UAS Subcommittee 2012 Planning. It is imperative that these meetings be...

  5. 75 FR 80851 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    .... --Update on Research and Analysis Program Working Group. --Update on Progress of Planetary Science... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Science Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance...

  6. [Biological Advisory Subcommittee : Review and Recommendations of Dioxin/Furan Issue on RMA : 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The first three pages of this document consist of the Biological Advisory Subcommittee's review and recommendations of the dioxin and furan issue on Rocky Mountain...

  7. 78 FR 34100 - National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics: Meeting Standards Subcommittee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... Disorders, 5th edition. Finally, the Subcommittee will discuss new uses of ICD-10 data by different stakeholders, including relationships to new payment models, big data/data analytics, population management...

  8. 78 FR 5243 - Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee (MCSAC): Public Meeting of Subcommittees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee (MCSAC): Public Meeting of Subcommittees AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of meeting of Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee (MCSAC). SUMMARY: FMCSA announces that the...

  9. Subcommittee on New Highway Materials materials and technologies : 2006 summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    Scope: The subcommittee has a scope for them to identify the needs and types of new : highway materials and technologies required and to provide the appraisal, : evaluation, and specification development for new materials and technologies : being pro...

  10. 77 FR 13318 - Meeting of the Mobile Sources Technical Review Subcommittee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... being conducted by EPA's Office of Transportation and Air Quality. The preliminary agenda for the... interested parties should monitor the Subcommittee Web site (above) for the latest logistical information... CONTACT: For technical information: Jennifer Krueger, Designated Federal Officer, Transportation and...

  11. Characterizing users of new psychoactive substances using psychometric scales for risk-related behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreeker, Annabel; van der Burg, Babette G; van Laar, Margriet; Brunt, Tibor M

    2017-07-01

    Studies investigating risk-related behavior in relation to new psychoactive substance (NPS) use are sparse. The current study investigated characteristics of NPS users by comparing risk-related behavior of NPS users to that of illicit drugs (ID) users and licit substances users and non-users (NLC) users. In this cross-sectional study we included 528 individuals across an age range of 18-72years. Using a web-based questionnaire we collected self-report data on substance use, sensation seeking, impulsivity, peer substance use and risk perception of substance use. NPS and ID users had a higher level of sensation seeking compared to NLC users (NPS users: pusers: pusers (pusers (p=0.16), had increased levels of impulsivity compared to NLC users. NPS users had significantly higher scores for sensation seeking (F1,423=51.52, pusers. Additionally, NPS users had significantly more peers who use substances compared to ID and NLC users. Also, NPS and ID users had lower risk perception for most substances than NLC users. NPS users had lower risk perception for most substances than ID users. The findings highlight that NPS users show substantial more risk-related behavior than both ID and NLC users. Therefore, NPS users might be considered as a distinctive group of substance users that need another approach in terms of prevention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Community Perceptions of Air Pollution and Related Health Risks in Nairobi Slums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remare Ettarh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution is among the leading global risks for mortality and responsible for increasing risk for chronic diseases. Community perceptions on exposure are critical in determining people’s response and acceptance of related policies. Therefore, understanding people’ perception is critical in informing the design of appropriate intervention measures. The aim of this paper was to establish levels and associations between perceived pollution and health risk perception among slum residents. A cross-sectional study of 5,317 individuals aged 35+ years was conducted in two slums of Nairobi. Association of perceived score and individual characteristics was assessed using linear regression. Spatial variation in the perceived levels was determined through hot spot analysis using ArcGIS. The average perceived air pollution level was higher among residents in Viwandani compared to those in Korogocho. Perceived air pollution level was positively associated with perceived health risks. The majority of respondents were exposed to air pollution in their place of work with 66% exposed to at least two sources of air pollution. Less than 20% of the respondents in both areas mentioned sources related to indoor pollution. The perceived air pollution level and related health risks in the study community were low among the residents indicating the need for promoting awareness on air pollution sources and related health risks.

  13. Using genetic variation and environmental risk factor data to identify individuals at high risk for age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylee L Spencer

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A major goal of personalized medicine is to pre-symptomatically identify individuals at high risk for disease using knowledge of each individual's particular genetic profile and constellation of environmental risk factors. With the identification of several well-replicated risk factors for age-related macular degeneration (AMD, the leading cause of legal blindness in older adults, this previously unreachable goal is beginning to seem less elusive. However, recently developed algorithms have either been much less accurate than expected, given the strong effects of the identified risk factors, or have not been applied to independent datasets, leaving unknown how well they would perform in the population at large. We sought to increase accuracy by using novel modeling strategies, including multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR and grammatical evolution of neural networks (GENN, in addition to the traditional logistic regression approach. Furthermore, we rigorously designed and tested our models in three distinct datasets: a Vanderbilt-Miami (VM clinic-based case-control dataset, a VM family dataset, and the population-based Age-related Maculopathy Ancillary (ARMA Study cohort. Using a consensus approach to combine the results from logistic regression and GENN models, our algorithm was successful in differentiating between high- and low-risk groups (sensitivity 77.0%, specificity 74.1%. In the ARMA cohort, the positive and negative predictive values were 63.3% and 70.7%, respectively. We expect that future efforts to refine this algorithm by increasing the sample size available for model building, including novel susceptibility factors as they are discovered, and by calibrating the model for diverse populations will improve accuracy.

  14. Work related violence and threats and the risk of depression and stress disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieclaw, Joanna; Agerbo, Esben; Mortensen, Preben Bo; Burr, Hermann; Tüchsen, Finn; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2006-09-01

    To examine the risk of depression and stress related disorders as a function of occupational exposure to violence and threats. Population based nested case-control study. All gainfully employed Danes. Cases and controls: 14 166 hospital inpatients and outpatients, aged 18-65, treated for affective or stress related disorders during 1995-1998 selected from The Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register and 58 060 controls matched for age, sex, and time, drawn from Statistics Denmark's Integrated Database for Labour Market Research. Clinical psychiatric diagnosis (WHO ICD-10) of affective (F30-39) or stress related (F40-48) disorders compared with controls by the occupation held the year before treatment. The occupation held the year before treatment was used as exposure proxy. Potential exposure to occupational violence is associated with significantly increased relative risks of both disorders in either sex (women: depression RR 1.45 CI 1.27 to 1.65, stress RR 1.32 CI 1.19 to 1.46; men: depression RR 1.48 CI 1.18 to 1.86, stress RR 1.55 CI 1.29 to 1.84). Work related threats are associated with increase in the risk of depression in women (RR 1.48 CI 1.23 to 1.79) and the risk of stress related disorders in men (RR 1.59 CI 1.32 to 1.91). Risks rose with increasing prevalence of violence and threats. The results remain significant and only slightly attenuated after controlling for extent of professional contact with people other than colleagues. Employment in occupations involving exposure to work related threats and violence is a risk factor for depression and stress related disorders in both sexes. These findings have implications for health and safety at work policies.

  15. Utility of relative and absolute measures of mammographic density vs clinical risk factors in evaluating breast cancer risk at time of screening mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolell, Mohamed; Tsuruda, Kaitlyn M; Lightfoot, Christopher B; Payne, Jennifer I; Caines, Judy S; Iles, Sian E

    2016-01-01

    Various clinical risk factors, including high breast density, have been shown to be associated with breast cancer. The utility of using relative and absolute area-based breast density-related measures was evaluated as an alternative to clinical risk factors in cancer risk assessment at the time of screening mammography. Contralateral mediolateral oblique digital mammography images from 392 females with unilateral breast cancer and 817 age-matched controls were analysed. Information on clinical risk factors was obtained from the provincial breast-imaging information system. Breast density-related measures were assessed using a fully automated breast density measurement software. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted, and area under the receiver-operating characteristic (AUROC) curve was used to evaluate the performance of three cancer risk models: the first using only clinical risk factors, the second using only density-related measures and the third using both clinical risk factors and density-related measures. The risk factor-based model generated an AUROC of 0.535, while the model including only breast density-related measures generated a significantly higher AUROC of 0.622 (p risk factor model (p cancer compared with clinical risk factors. Breast cancer risk models based on density-related measures alone can outperform risk models based on clinical factors. Such models may support the development of personalized breast-screening protocols.

  16. Cultural capital or relative risk aversion? Two mechanisms for educational inequality compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Werfhorst, Herman G; Hofstede, Saskia

    2007-09-01

    In this paper we empirically examined two explanatory mechanisms for educational inequality: cultural reproduction and relative risk aversion, using survey data taken from secondary school pupils in Amsterdam. Cultural reproduction theory seeks to explain class variations in schooling by cultural differences between social classes. Relative risk aversion theory argues that educational inequalities can be understood by between-class variation in the necessity of pursuing education at branching points in order to avoid downward mobility. We showed that class variations in early demonstrated ability are for a substantial part cultural: cultural capital - measured by parental involvement in highbrow culture - affected school performance at the primary and secondary level. However, relative risk aversion - operationalized by being concerned with downward mobility - strongly affects schooling ambitions, whereas cultural capital had no effect. Thus, we conclude that 'primary effects' of social origin on schooling outcomes are manifested through cultural capital and not through relative risk aversion (in addition to other potential sources of class variations such as genetics). Relative risk aversion, and not cultural capital, affects schooling ambitions, which is relevant for our understanding of secondary effects.

  17. Cognitive risk factors explain the relations between neuroticism and social anxiety for males and females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Nicholas P; Oglesby, Mary E; Uhl, Aubree; Schmidt, Norman B

    2017-04-01

    The hierarchical model of vulnerabilities to emotional distress contextualizes the relation between neuroticism and social anxiety as occurring indirectly through cognitive risk factors. In particular, inhibitory intolerance of uncertainty (IU; difficulty in uncertain circumstances), fear of negative evaluation (FNE; fear of being judged negatively), and anxiety sensitivity (AS) social concerns (fear of outwardly observable anxiety) are related to social anxiety. It is unclear whether these risk factors uniquely relate to social anxiety, and whether they account for the relations between neuroticism and social anxiety. The indirect relations between neuroticism and social anxiety through these and other risk factors were examined using structural equation modeling in a sample of 462 individuals (M age = 36.56, SD = 12.93; 64.3% female). Results indicated that the relations between neuroticism and social anxiety could be explained through inhibitory IU, FNE, and AS social concerns. No gender differences were found. These findings provide support for the hierarchical model of vulnerabilities to emotional distress disorders, although the cognitive risk factors accounted for variance beyond their contribution to the relation between neuroticism and social anxiety, suggesting a more complex model than that expressed in the hierarchical model of vulnerabilities.

  18. The impact of major transformations of a production process on age-related accident risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blank, V L; Laflamme, L; Diderichsen, Finn

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a study of whether accident risks were equally distributed across age categories among a population of mining workers whose work activities were suspected to be age-impaired. The impairment factors in focus are the transformation of production technology during the 80s...... and consequent changes in job content. It was hypothesized that the combined effect of these factors might lead accident risks, both non-specific (aggregated) and specific (by kind), to increase with age. Accident risk ratios (ARRs), however, proved to be higher for younger workers than older ones, in both...... the non-specific and the specific cases. However, two accident patterns (specific risks) also show relatively high ARRs among workers in their 40s (and even 30s), results that might be explained by particular exposures and/or age-related performance problems. The findings suggest that technological...

  19. Work related physical activity and risk of a hospital discharge diagnosis of atrial fibrillation or flutter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, L; Frost, P; Vestergaard, P

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Excessive sporting activities have been associated with risk of atrial fibrillation. To study if work related physical activity also confers risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter, the association between work related physical strain and the risk of a hospital discharge......, Cancer, and Health Study. The physical strain during working hours was categorised as sedentary, light, or heavy, and analysed using proportional hazard models. Subjects were followed up in the Danish National Registry of Patients and in the Danish Civil Registration System. RESULTS: During follow up...... of atrial fibrillation or flutter associated with sedentary work in a standing position, light workload, or heavy workload in men or women. CONCLUSION: No evidence was found of an association between physical activities during working hours and risk of a hospital discharge diagnosis of atrial fibrillation...

  20. Trait Emotional Intelligence Is Related to Risk Taking when Adolescents Make Deliberative Decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Panno

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Most forms of risky behavior reach their peak during adolescence. A prominent line of research is exploring the relationship between people’s emotional self-efficacy and risk taking, but little is known about this relationship in the cognitive-deliberative domain among adolescents. The main aim of the present study consists in investigating whether trait EI (Emotional Intelligence is positively related to risk taking under predominantly cognitive-deliberative conditions among adolescents. Ninety-four adolescents played the cold version of the Columbia Card Task one month following an assessment of their trait EI. Results showed that trait EI is associated with risk taking under cognitive-deliberative conditions among adolescents. Moreover, the present research showed that trait EI is related to risk taking through the decision makers’ self-motivation. These results provide novel insights into research investigating the connections between emotional intelligence, decision science and adolescence research.

  1. Determinants and stability over time of perception of health risks related to mobile phone base stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowall, Bernd; Breckenkamp, Jürgen; Blettner, Maria

    2012-01-01

    about other environmental and health risks, is associated with psychological strain, and is stable on the individual level over time. METHODS: Self-administered questionnaires filled in by 3,253 persons aged 15-69 years in 2004 and 2006 in Germany. RESULTS: Risk perception of MPBS was strongly...... in 2004 expressed these concerns again 2 years later, the corresponding figure for attribution of health complaints to MPBS was 31.3%. CONCLUSION: Risk perception of MPBS is strongly associated with general concern, anxiety, depression, and stress, and rather instable over time.......OBJECTIVE: Perception of possible health risks related to mobile phone base stations (MPBS) is an important factor in citizens' opposition against MPBS and is associated with health complaints. The aim of the present study is to assess whether risk perception of MPBS is associated with concerns...

  2. Causative bacteria and risk factors for peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis: A retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Abe, Shinichi; Obata, Yoko; Sato, Shuntaro; Muta, Kumiko; Kitamura, Mineaki; Kawasaki, Satoko; Hirose, Misaki; Uramatsu, Tadashi; Nishino, Tomoya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although peritoneal dialysis (PD) is beneficial for patients with end-stage renal diseases (ESRD), there are some critical complications. PD-related peritonitis accounts for about 30% of all cases of catheter removal and transition to hemodialysis. We investigated the incidence, causative bacteria, and risk factors of PD-related peritonitis and peritonitis-related withdrawal in patients treated in the Nagasaki University Hospital. Methods: Subjects were 43 PD patients in the Nagas...

  3. Integrated methodology for production related risk management of vehicle electronics (IMPROVE)

    OpenAIRE

    Geis, Stefan Rafael

    2006-01-01

    This scientific work is designated to provide an innovative and integrated conceptional approach to improve the assembly quality of automotive electronics. This is achieved by the reduction and elimination of production related risks of automotive electronics and the implementation of a sustainable solution process. The focus is the development and implementation of an integrated technical risk management approach for automotive electronics throughout the vehicle life cycle and the vehicle pr...

  4. The Relations Among Multiple Risks, Parenting Styles, and Chinese American Children's Internalizing and Externalizing Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Xiao Tong

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the prospective effects of multiple risks on the internalizing and externalizing problems of 258 1st and 2nd generation Chinese American school-aged children, as well as the mediating and moderating roles of parenting styles. When examining the relations between risk domains and children's behavioral adjustment, children's low self-regulation and negative emotionality, single-parent family structure, and gaps in parent-child cultural orientations were found to be unique pr...

  5. Placental genetic variations in circadian clock-related genes increase the risk of placental abruption

    OpenAIRE

    Chunfang, Qiu; GELAYE, Bizu; Denis, Marie; Tadesse, Mahlet G.; Enquobahrie, Daniel A.; Ananth, Cande V.; Pacora, Percy N; Salazar, Manuel; Sanchez, Sixto E.; Williams, Michelle A

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of placental abruption (PA) remains poorly understood. We examined variations in SNPs of circadian clock-related genes in placenta with PA risk. We also explored placental and maternal genomic contributions to PA risk. Placental genomic DNA samples were isolated from 280 PA cases and 244 controls. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina Cardio-MetaboChip. We examined 116 SNPs in 13 genes known to moderate circadian rhythms. Logistic regression models were fit to e...

  6. Norms and international standards related to reduce risk management: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Fuentes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The current work aims to develop a revision of the literature within the main concepts in the international rules and standards related to risk management in companies. By this way, there will be an analysis of issues such as the COSO - ERM model, an introduction to the ISO 27000 and 31000 standards; and the Project Management according to PMI targeted at risk management

  7. Evaluation of major risk factors related to depression among medical students of NRS medical college.

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhopadhyay Prianka, Sain Sonali, Mandal Nirmal Kumar, Saha Tushar Kanti , Dey Indira, Chattopadhyay Amitava

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives: Medical students experience depression, burnout, and mental illness at a higher rate than general population. A better understanding of related risk factors can help target appropriate support services for them. The aim of the study was to assess the occurrence of depression and identify its risk factors among undergraduate students in a medical College in Kolkata, India. Methodology: A descriptive, cross-sectional study using a two stage, stratified cluster samplin...

  8. Children at Risk for Suicide Attempt and Attempt-related Injuries: Findings from the 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Bethany A; Swahn, Monica H; McCarty, Frances

    2010-08-01

    The current study examines the associations between a range of risk factors and reports of suicide attempts and attempts requiring medical care in a nationally representative study of high school students. The goal is to examine sex differences in the risk factors associated with suicide attempts and attempt-related injuries requiring treatment by a health-care provider. We used data from the 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Survey for students in grades 9-12 to assess the prevalence and risk factors for suicidal behavior, as well as differences in these for boys and girls. Cross-sectional multivariate logistic regression analyses were computed to determine the most important risk factors for suicide attempts and for suicide attempts requiring medical care for the sample overall and also stratified for boys and for girls. Overall, 6.9% of adolescents attempted suicide (9.3% of girls versus 4.6% of boys). Girls were more likely than boys to report a suicide attempt in the past year (Adj.OR=2.89). Among girls, sadness (Adj.OR=5.74), weapon carrying (Adj.OR=1.48), dating violence (Adj.OR=1.60), forced sex (Adj.OR=1.72), and huffing glue (Adj.OR=2.04) were significantly associated with suicide attempts. Among boys, sadness (Adj.OR=10.96), weapon carrying (Adj.OR=1.66), forced sex (Adj.OR=2.60), huffing glue (OR=1.63), hard drug use (Adj.OR=2.18), and sports involvement (Adj.OR=1.52) were significantly associated with suicide attempts. These findings demonstrate similarities and differences in the modifiable risk factors that increase risk for suicide attempts among boys and girls. In terms of the differences between boys and girls, hard drug use and sports involvement may be important factors for suicide-prevention strategies directed specifically towards boys, while dating violence victimization may be an important risk factor to address for girls. Overall, these findings can help guide prevention, clinical practice, and intervention strategies to prevent suicidal behaviors

  9. Children at Risk for Suicide Attempt and Attempt-related Injuries: Findings from the 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Survey

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    West, Bethany A

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The current study examines the associations between a range of risk factors and reports of suicide attempts, and attempts requiring medical care in a nationally representative study of high school students. The goal is to examine sex differences in the risk factors that are associated with suicide attempts and attempt-related injuries requiring treatment by a health-care provider. Methods: Data from the 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Survey for students in grades 9-12 were used to assess the prevalence and risk factors for suicidal behavior as well as differences in these for boys and girls. Cross-sectional multivariate logistic regression analyses were computed to determine the most important risk factors for suicide attempts and for suicide attempts requiring medical care for the sample overall and also stratified for boys and for girls. Results: Overall, 6.9% of adolescents attempted suicide (9.3% of girls versus 4.6% of boys. Girls were more likely than boys to report a suicide attempt in the past year (Adj.OR=2.89. Among girls, sadness (Adj.OR=5.74, weapon carrying (Adj.OR=1.48, dating violence (Adj.OR=1.60, forced sex (Adj.OR=1.72, and huffing glue (Adj.OR=2.04 were significantly associated with suicide attempts. Among boys, sadness (Adj.OR=10.96, weapon carrying (Adj.OR=1.66, forced sex (Adj.OR=2.60, huffing glue (OR=1.63, hard drug use (Adj.OR=2.18, and sports involvement (Adj.OR=1.52 were significantly associated with suicide attempts. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate similarities and differences in terms of the modifiable risk factors that increase risk for suicide attempts among boys and girls. In terms of the differences between boys and girls, hard drug use and sports involvement may be important factors for suicide prevention strategies that are directed specifically towards boys, while dating violence victimization may be an important risk factor to address for girls. Overall, these findings can help guide prevention

  10. The Relative Risk of Divorce in Parents of Children with Developmental Disabilities: Impacts of Lifelong Parenting

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    Song, Jieun; Greenberg, Jan S.; Mailick, Marsha R.; Floyd, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    We examined prospectively the risk of divorce in 190 parents of children with developmental disabilities compared to 7,251 parents of children without disabilities based on a random sample drawn from the community and followed longitudinally for over 50 years. A significant interaction between the parental group status and number of children was found: In the comparison group, having a larger number of children was related to an increased risk of divorce, whereas the number of children did not increase divorce risk among parents of children with developmental disabilities. PMID:26505872

  11. The Relative Risk of Divorce in Parents of Children With Developmental Disabilities: Impacts of Lifelong Parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkung, Eun Ha; Song, Jieun; Greenberg, Jan S; Mailick, Marsha R; Floyd, Frank J

    2015-11-01

    We prospectively examined the risk of divorce in 190 parents of children with developmental disabilities compared to 7,251 parents of children without disabilities based on a random sample drawn from the community and followed longitudinally for over 50 years. A significant interaction between the parental group status and number of children was found: In the comparison group, having a larger number of children was related to an increased risk of divorce, whereas the number of children did not increase divorce risk among parents of children with developmental disabilities.

  12. What are the main risk factors for running-related injuries?

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    Saragiotto, Bruno Tirotti; Yamato, Tiê Parma; Hespanhol Junior, Luiz Carlos; Rainbow, Michael J; Davis, Irene S; Lopes, Alexandre Dias

    2014-08-01

    Despite several studies that have been conducted on running injuries, the risk factors for running-related injuries are still not clear in the literature. The aim of this study was to systematically review prospective cohort studies that investigated the risk factors for running injuries in general. We conducted electronic searches without restriction of language on EMBASE (1980 to Dec 2012), PUBMED (1946 to Dec 2012), CINAHL (1988 to Dec 2012) SPORTDiscus (1977 to Dec 2012), Latin American and Caribbean Centre on Health Sciences Information (1985 to Dec 2012) and Scientific Electronic Library Online (1998 to Dec 2012) databases, using subject headings, synonyms, relevant terms and variant spellings for each database. Only prospective cohort studies investigating the risk factors for running-related musculoskeletal injuries were included in this review. Two independent reviewers screened each article and, if they did not reach a consensus, a third reviewer decided whether or not the article should be included. Year of publication, type of runners, sample size, definition of running-related musculoskeletal injury, baseline characteristics, reported risk factors and the statistical measurement of risk or protection association were extracted from the articles. A scale adapted by the authors evaluated the risk of bias of the articles. A total of 11 articles were considered eligible in this systematic review. A total of 4,671 pooled participants were analysed and 60 different predictive factors were investigated. The main risk factor reported was previous injury (last 12 months), reported in 5 of the 8 studies that investigated previous injuries as a risk factor. Only one article met the criteria for random selection of the sample and only six articles included a follow-up of 6 months or more. There was no association between gender and running injuries in most of the studies. It is possible that eligible articles for this review were published in journals that were

  13. The Association between the Lipids Levels in Blood and Risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Yafeng Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lipid metabolism may be involved in the pathogenic mechanism of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. However, conflicting results have been reported in the associations of AMD with blood lipids. We performed a meta-analysis including a total of 19 studies to evaluate associations between blood lipids and this disease. The result reported that the high level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C obtained with an increment of 1 mmol/L could result in a significantly increase in the AMD risk of approximately 18% (relative risk (RR, 1.18; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.01 to 1.35; I2 = 53.8%; p = 0.007. High levels of total cholesterol (TC, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, and triglycerides (TG were significantly associated with a decreased risk of AMD (RRs ranging from 0.92 to 0.95; all p < 0.05. The stratified analysis based on AMD subtypes showed that these blood lipids were only significantly associated with the risk of early AMD (all p < 0.05. The association between the blood lipids and AMD risk did not differ substantially based on the other characteristics of the participants. A high HDL-C level was associated with an increased AMD risk, whereas participants with high TC, LDL-C, and TG concentrations may show a decreased risk for this disease. Further well-designed large studies are warranted to confirm the conclusions.

  14. Using a relative health indicator (RHI) metric to estimate health risk reductions in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfredo, Katherine A; Seidel, Chad; Ghosh, Amlan; Roberson, J Alan

    2017-03-01

    When a new drinking water regulation is being developed, the USEPA conducts a health risk reduction and cost analysis to, in part, estimate quantifiable and non-quantifiable cost and benefits of the various regulatory alternatives. Numerous methodologies are available for cumulative risk assessment ranging from primarily qualitative to primarily quantitative. This research developed a summary metric of relative cumulative health impacts resulting from drinking water, the relative health indicator (RHI). An intermediate level of quantification and modeling was chosen, one which retains the concept of an aggregated metric of public health impact and hence allows for comparisons to be made across "cups of water," but avoids the need for development and use of complex models that are beyond the existing state of the science. Using the USEPA Six-Year Review data and available national occurrence surveys of drinking water contaminants, the metric is used to test risk reduction as it pertains to the implementation of the arsenic and uranium maximum contaminant levels and quantify "meaningful" risk reduction. Uranium represented the threshold risk reduction against which national non-compliance risk reduction was compared for arsenic, nitrate, and radium. Arsenic non-compliance is most significant and efforts focused on bringing those non-compliant utilities into compliance with the 10 μg/L maximum contaminant level would meet the threshold for meaningful risk reduction.

  15. Dairy foods and nutrients in relation to risk of ovarian cancer and major histological subtypes.

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    Merritt, Melissa A; Cramer, Daniel W; Vitonis, Allison F; Titus, Linda J; Terry, Kathryn L

    2013-03-01

    Inconsistent results for the role of dairy food intake in relation to ovarian cancer risk may reflect the potential adverse effects of lactose, which has been hypothesized to increase gonadotropin levels, and the beneficial antiproliferative effects of calcium and vitamin D. Using data from the New England case-control study (1,909 cases and 1,989 controls), we examined dairy foods and nutrients in relation to risk of ovarian cancer overall, histological subtypes and rapidly fatal versus less aggressive disease. We used logistic regression and polytomous logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). In models that were simultaneously adjusted for total (dietary plus supplements) calcium, total vitamin D and lactose, we observed a decreased overall risk of ovarian cancer with high intake of total calcium [Quartile 4 (Q4, >1,319 mg/day) vs. Quartile 1 (Q1, cancer risk, but was inversely associated with risk of serous borderline (Q4, >559 IU/day vs. Q1, cancer risk or that risk varied by tumor aggressiveness in the analyses of intake of dairy foods and nutrients. The overall inverse association with high intake of calcium and the inverse associations of calcium and vitamin D with specific histological subtypes warrant further investigation. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  16. Risk factors for contact lens-related microbial keratitis in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, C H L; Carnt, N A; Farook, M; Lam, J; Tan, D T; Mehta, J S; Stapleton, F

    2016-03-01

    To investigate independent risk factors for contact lens-related microbial keratitis in Singapore and estimate their impact on disease load. Cases were contact lens wearers presenting to Singapore National Eye Centre with microbial keratitis between 2008 and 2010. Community contact lens wearers were recruited as controls. All wearers completed a previously validated questionnaire describing contact lens wear history, hygiene and compliance habits, and demographics. Risk factors significant in univariate analysis (Pcontact lens wear (less often than one night per week) was associated with a 4 × higher risk (95% CI: 1.2-15.4, P=0.03) compared with daily use. Not washing hands before handling was associated with a 13 × increased risk (95% CI: 1.9-84.8, P=0.008). Use of multipurpose solution A carried a 16 × higher risk compared with hydrogen peroxide (95% CI: 1.5-174.0, P=0.02). The combined PAR% for modifiable risk factors (occasional overnight wear, not washing of hands, and MPS A) was 82%. Consistent with previous findings, independent risk factors for contact lens-related microbial keratitis include poor hand hygiene, occasional overnight wear, and type of lens care solution. Prolonged overnight or extended contact lens use was infrequent in this population.

  17. Diabetes and Insulin Therapy, but Not Metformin, Are Related to Hepatocellular Cancer Risk

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    Luca Miele

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Metabolic conditions, including type 2 diabetes, have been related to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC risk. We have further analyzed the role of diabetes and antidiabetic treatments on HCC. Methods. Data derived from a hospital-based case-control study (Italy, 2005–2012 on 224 HCC patients and 389 controls. Odds ratios (ORs were estimated using multiple logistic regression models. Results. Sixty-nine (30.9% cases versus 52 (13.5% controls reported a diabetes diagnosis, corresponding to a multivariate OR of 2.25 (95% confidence interval, CI = 1.42–3.56. A stronger excess risk emerged for a longer time since diabetes diagnosis (OR = 2.96 for <10 years and 5.33 for ≥10 years. Oral therapies were inversely, though not significantly, related to HCC risk, OR being 0.44 for metformin and 0.88 for sulfonylureas; conversely, insulin was nonsignificantly directly associated (OR = 1.90. Compared to nondiabetic subjects who were never smokers, those who were diabetics and ever smokers had an OR of 6.61 (95% CI 3.31–13.25. Conclusion. Our study confirms an over 2-fold excess HCC risk in diabetics, with a stronger excess risk in diabetic subjects who are also tobacco smokers. Metformin may decrease the risk of HCC, whereas insulin may increase the risk.

  18. Risk of tobacco-related multiple primary cancers in Bavaria, Germany

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    Braisch Ulrike

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the prospect of increasing prevalence of cancer, the issue of multiple primary cancers becomes more relevant. The aim of this study was to estimate the risk of developing a tobacco-related subsequent primary cancer (TRSPC in persons with a tobacco-related first primary cancer (TRFPC compared with the general population in Bavaria, Germany. Methods Using data from the Population-Based Cancer Registry Bavaria, we analyzed TRFPC and TRSPC diagnosed in Bavaria between 2002 and 2008 to estimate the relative and absolute risk of developing TRSPC using standardized incidence ratios (SIR and excess absolute risks (EAR. Results 121,631 TRFPC in men and 75,886 respective cancers in women were registered, which in 2.5% of male and 1.2% of female cancer patients were followed by at least one TRSPC. In both males and females, the highest increased risks compared to the general population were found within the group of cancer in the mouth/pharynx, oesophagus, larynx, and lung/bronchus. Conclusions With respect to cancer in the mouth/pharynx, oesophagus, larynx, lung/bronchus, kidney, urinary bladder and urinary tract, smoking was confirmed as a shared risk factor based on our finding of mutually significantly increased risks of TRSPC. The results of this study illustrate the importance of smoking cessation and of continued follow-up care especially of smokers with the aforementioned TRFPC to detect TRSPC at an early stage.

  19. Important characteristics of an entrepreneur in relation to risk taking: Czech Republic case study

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    Ludmila Kozubíková

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available New businesses arising at the market usually operate in the sector of small and medium-sized enterprises and account for a significant part of the whole global economy. Not only the success of a start-up company, but also its sequel within the SME sector are significantly influenced by entrepreneur's personality. The aim of this article is to explore the attitude to financial risk in relation to sociodemographic characteristics (gender, education, age and the most important personality traits of entrepreneurs (risk-taking, decisiveness, optimism. We have analyzed the data collected from 1141 respondents during 2015 in 14 regions of Czech Republic. Empirical results of our paper show that the researched entrepreneurs rather can't manage financial risks in their firms regardless their gender, education, age or personality traits. Most entrepreneurs consider the importance of financial risk to increase during the crisis period. These opinions differed in relation to age, gender and such personality traits as "decisiveness" and "optimism". The results also show that the entrepreneurs try to minimise the financial risk through building-up reserves in relation to such qualities as "risk-taking" and "decisiveness" in comparison to a rather negative attitude to "optimism".

  20. The Role of Knowledge in the prevention of natural hazards and related risks.

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    Enrico Miccadei

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Human activities, especially over the last two centuries, have had a huge impact on the environment and the landscape. Mankind is able to control and induce landscape changes but is subject to natural processes and hazards due to severe and extreme events (particularly earthquakes but also landslides and flooding and related risks. Risks are the result of hazards, exposed elements and vulnerability and they are consequently not only an expression of the natural environment, but also related to human interaction with nature. Risks need to be addressed regularly by means of a high level of knowledge in order to provide most up­to­date information for any decision which needs to be taken by any party involved. A high level of knowledge concerning natural hazards and related risks stems from the geological and geomorphological history and from the historical records of the natural processes and grows with multi­scale, multi­temporal and multidisciplinary studies and investigations, which include land management, economic and social issues. A strong effort has to be made in this way to improve risk assessment and the enforcement of existing laws and ­ if necessary ­ new laws, really stem from recent disasters. This will help to achieve improved and effective land management, based on an interdisciplinary approach in which expert geologists and land managers will play a role, because of the importance of natural processes in inducing risks.

  1. Antioxidant and DNA methylation-related nutrients and risk of distal colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christina Dawn; Satia, Jessie A; Adair, Linda S; Stevens, June; Galanko, Joseph; Keku, Temitope O; Sandler, Robert S

    2010-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between antioxidant nutrients (vitamins C and E, beta-carotene, selenium) and DNA methylation-related nutrients (folate, vitamins B6 and B12) and distal colorectal cancer risk in whites and African Americans and to examine intakes from food only versus total (food plus dietary supplements) intakes. Data are from the North Carolina Colon Cancer Study-Phase II, a case-control study of 945 distal colorectal cancer (including sigmoid, rectosigmoid, and rectum) cases and 959 controls. In-person interviews captured usual dietary intake and various covariates. Multivariate logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). High intakes of each antioxidant and DNA methylation-related nutrient were significantly associated with lower risk in whites. In African Americans, the highest category of selenium from food only had a marginally significant inverse association with distal colorectal cancer risk (Q4 vs. Q1 OR: 0.55, 95% CI 0.29-1.02). Supplements did not provide additional risk reduction beyond intakes from food. Our findings provide evidence that antioxidant and DNA methylation-related nutrients may lower the risk of distal colorectal cancer in whites, and selenium may lower risk in African Americans. Optimal micronutrient intakes from food alone may be more beneficial than supplementation.

  2. Association of relatives of hemodialysis patients with metabolic syndrome, albuminuria and Framingham Risk Score.

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    Jiun-Chi Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Metabolic syndrome (MetS, albuminuria, and the Framingham Risk Score (FRS are significant predictors for cardiovascular disease (CVD. However, the relationship and clinical significance of these CVD predictors in individuals with a family history of end-stage renal disease (ESRD are unclear. We investigated the association of relatives of hemodialysis (HD patients with MetS, albuminuria, and the FRS. METHODS: One hundred and sixty-six relatives of HD patients and 374 age- and sex- matched community controls were enrolled. MetS was defined using the Adult Treatment Panel III for Asians. Albuminuria was defined as urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio ≥ 30 mg/g. CVD risk was evaluated by the FRS. RESULTS: A significantly higher prevalence of MetS (19.9% vs. 12.5%, P = 0.026, albuminuria (12.7% vs. 5.1%, P = 0.002 and high FRS risk ≥ 10% of 10-year risk (15.7% vs. 8.5%, P = 0.013 was found in relatives of HD patients compared to their counterpart controls. In multivariate analysis, being relatives of HD patients (vs. controls was an independent determinant for MetS (odds ratio [OR], 1.785; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.045 to 3.050, albuminuria (OR, 2.891; 95% CI, 1.431 to 5.841, and high FRS risk (OR, 1.863; 95% CI, 1.015 to 3.418. Higher low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (OR, 1.034; 95% CI, 1.017 to 1.052 and betel nut chewing (OR, 13.994; 95% CI, 3.384 to 57.871 were independent determinants for having a high FRS risk in relatives of HD patients. CONCLUSIONS: Being relatives of HD patients was independently associated with MetS, albuminuria and high FRS risk, suggesting family members of ESRD patients may have higher CVD risks through the interactions of renal risk factors. Proactive surveillance of these CVD predictors and preventive strategies should be targeted to this high-risk population.

  3. Racial differences in cancer risk among relatives of patients with early onset lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naff, Jessica L; Coté, Michele L; Wenzlaff, Angela S; Schwartz, Ann G

    2007-05-01

    Relatives of patients with early onset lung cancer are at increased risk for lung cancer, and this risk varies by race. This study evaluates whether first-degree relatives of patients with early onset lung cancer are at increased risk for cancer at sites other than lung. Family histories were ascertained from 673 lung cancer patients < 50 years of age identified from the Metropolitan Detroit Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results program, and 773 age-, race-, and sex-matched control subjects were obtained via random-digit dialing. Data were collected for 3,556 case relatives (mothers, fathers, and siblings) and 3,943 control relatives, and unconditional logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Among case relatives, African Americans were 2.44-fold more likely to have head and neck cancers and 1.86-fold more likely to have any tobacco-related cancer compared to white case relatives (95% CI, 1.04 to 5.69% and 95% CI, 1.25 to 2.76, respectively). African-American case relatives were at increased risk for head and neck cancers (OR, 13.42; 95% CI, 1.65 to 109.01), all tobacco-related cancers (OR, 3.77; 95% CI, 2.16 to 6.55), tobacco-related cancers other than lung (OR, 4.10; 95% CI, 1.56 to 10.79), and cancer at any site (OR, 1.45, 95% CI, 1.04 to 2.02) compared to African-American control relatives. These results can be used to counsel family members of patients with early onset lung cancer, and suggest target populations for preventive strategies, including smoking cessation and appropriate screening.

  4. Dispersion of ventricular repolarization in relation to cardiovascular risk factors in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciobanu, A; Gheorghe, G S; Ababei, M; Deaconu, M; Ilieşiu, A M; Bolohan, M; Păun, N; Nicolae, C; Nanea, I T

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension associates with sudden cardiac death, its relationship with ventricular arrhythmias being demonstrated by multiple studies, an increased dispersion of repolarization being an important arrhythmogenesis mechanism. Only a small percentage of hypertensive patients presents increased blood pressure values exclusively as risk factor, most of them presenting additional risk factors that reinforce each other leading to increased total cardiovascular risk. to analyze the dispersion of repolarization parameters (QT interval, QT dispersion, Tpeak-Tend interval (Tpe), Tpe/QT, Tpe dispersion) in relation to cardiovascular risk factors, as well as total cardiovascular risk estimated by SCORE model, in mild to moderate essential hypertension. 62 consecutive patients, mean age 55±11 years, were evaluated by 24 hours Holter electrocardiography monitoring. Manual measurement of dispersion of repolarization parameters was performed. Based on SCORE model, 33.9% patients presented low risk, 40.3% moderate risk, 16.1% high risk and 9.1% very high risk. Age had a positive correlation with QT and reverse correlations with QT dispersion, Tpe and Tpe/QT in lead V1. Tpe/QT showed significantly higher values in men versus women. Glucose metabolism disorders associated with higher values of QT and Tpe dispersion were present. However, dispersion of repolarization parameters was similar between risk categories assessed by SCORE model, Tpe in lead V3 correlated significantly with SCORE score. In mild to moderate hypertension, the dispersion of repolarization parameters is influenced by age, gender and glucose metabolism disorders. Among these, Tpe in lead V3 correlates with total cardiovascular risk assessed by SCORE model.

  5. Interpretation of Melanoma Risk Feedback in First-Degree Relatives of Melanoma Patients

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    Jennifer L. Hay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about how individuals might interpret brief genetic risk feedback. We examined interpretation and behavioral intentions (sun protection, skin screening in melanoma first-degree relatives (FDRs after exposure to brief prototypic melanoma risk feedback. Using a 3 by 2 experimental pre-post design where feedback type (high-risk mutation, gene environment, and nongenetic and risk level (positive versus negative findings were systematically varied, 139 melanoma FDRs were randomized to receive one of the six scenarios. All scenarios included an explicit reminder that melanoma family history increased their risk regardless of their feedback. The findings indicate main effects by risk level but not feedback type; positive findings led to heightened anticipated melanoma risk perceptions and anticipated behavioral intentions. Yet those who received negative findings often discounted their family melanoma history. As such, 25%, 30%, and 32% of those who received negative mutation, gene-environment, and nongenetic feedback, respectively, reported that their risk was similar to the general population. Given the frequency with which those who pursue genetic testing may receive negative feedback, attention is needed to identify ideal strategies to present negative genetic findings in contexts such as direct to consumer channels where extensive genetic counseling is not required.

  6. Mitigation of disease- and treatment-related risks in patients with psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Martin; Lundholm, Amy

    2017-03-20

    Psoriatic arthritis is a part of the family of diseases referred to as spondyloarthropathies, a diverse group of chronic inflammatory disorders with common clinical, radiographic, and genetic features. Peripheral arthritis is the most common symptom of psoriatic arthritis and patients also frequently experience involvement of the entheses, spine, skin, and nails. Due to the diverse clinical spectrum of disease severity, tissues affected, and associated comorbidities, the treatment of psoriatic arthritis can be challenging and it is necessary to mitigate risks associated with both the disease and its treatment. These risks include disease-specific, treatment-related, and psychological risks. Disease-specific risks include those associated with disease progression that can limit functional status and be mitigated through early diagnosis and initiation of treatment. Risks also arise from comorbidities that are associated with psoriatic arthritis such as cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes mellitus, and gastrointestinal inflammation. Patient outcomes can be affected by the treatment strategy employed and the pharmacologic agents administered. Additionally, it is important for physicians to be aware of risks specific to each therapeutic option. The impact of psoriatic arthritis is not limited to the skin and joints and it is common for patients to experience quality-of-life impairment. Patients are also more likely to have depression, anxiety, and alcoholism. This article reviews the many risks associated with psoriatic arthritis and provides guidance on mitigating these risks.

  7. Chinese travellers visiting friends and relatives--A review of infectious risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tara; Heywood, Anita; MacIntyre, C Raina

    2015-01-01

    Travellers are potential vectors in the transmission of infectious diseases across international borders. Travellers visiting friends and relatives (VFR) have a particularly high risk of acquiring certain infections during travel. Chinese VFR travellers account for a substantial proportion of all travel in Western countries with high migrant populations. A literature review was undertaken regarding major infectious disease risks for VFR travellers visiting China. This included an examination of the previous pandemics arising in China, the likelihood of future outbreaks in China from H5N1 and H7N9 avian influenza viruses, the potential role of travellers in disease transmission, and the special risks for VFR travellers. China has been the origin of several influenza pandemics in past few decades, and the origin of several emerging infectious diseases with pandemic potential, including SARS. Travel to and from China has the potential for global spread of emergent infectious diseases, as seen in the SARS outbreak in 2003. For VFR travellers, the risk of other infectious diseases may also be greater in China compared to their countries of migration, including hepatitis A and B, dengue fever, typhoid, and other diseases. VFR travel to China may be associated with increased risk of acquiring a range of infectious diseases, and also poses a potential risk for importation of future pandemics to other countries. Chinese VFR travellers need to be cognisant of these risks and health professionals should consider educational interventions to minimise these risks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Psychosocial risks and work-related stress in developing countries: health impact, priorities, barriers and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortum, Evelyn; Leka, Stavroula; Cox, Tom

    2010-01-01

    The current research explores experts' perceptions of psychosocial risks and work-related stress in emerging economies and developing countries. This paper focuses on knowledge of potential health impact of psychosocial risks and preliminary priorities for action, and discusses potential barriers and solutions to addressing psychosocial risks and work-related stress in developing countries. This research applied a mixed methodology including semi-structured interviews, two rounds of an online Delphi survey, and four focus groups. Twenty nine experts with expertise in occupational health were interviewed. Seventy four experts responded to the first round of an online Delphi survey and 53 responded to the second round. Four groups of experts with a total of 37 active participants with specific or broader knowledge about developing country contexts participated in focus group discussions. High concern was expressed for the need to address psychosocial risks and work-related stress and their health impact. Developing country experts' knowledge about these issues was comparable to knowledge from industrialized countries, however, application of expert knowledge was reported to be weak in developing countries. Socio-economic conditions were regarded as important considerations. Priorities to be addressed were identified, and barriers to implementing possible solutions were proposed. The future research and action paradigms in relation to psychosocial risk management will need to be broadened to include the larger social, political and economic contexts in developing countries beyond issues focusing solely on the working environment. Work-related psychosocial risks and the emerging priority of work-related stress should urgently be included in the research and political agendas and action frameworks of developing countries.

  9. The effect of flight-related behaviour on the risk of venous thrombosis after air travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreijer, Anja J M; Cannegieter, Suzanne C; Doggen, Carine J M; Rosendaal, Frits R

    2009-02-01

    In a case-control study including 11,033 participants (The Multiple Environmental and Genetic Assessment of risk factors for venous thrombosis study) on risk factors of venous thrombosis, we studied the effect of flight-related behaviour on the risk of venous thrombosis after air travel. Patients and control subjects received a questionnaire on risk factors for venous thrombosis, including recent travel history and details of their last flight. From this population, 80 patients and 108 control subjects were selected who had recently (travelled for more than 4 h by aeroplane. Window seating compared to aisle seating increased the risk twofold [odds ratio (OR) 2.2; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1-4.4], particularly in those who were obese (OR 6.1; 95% CI: 0.5-76.2). Anxiety (OR 2.5; 95% CI: 0.9-7.0) and sleeping (OR 1.5; 95% CI: 0.7-3.1) may increase the risk slightly. The risk was not affected by alcohol consumption (OR 1.1; 95% CI: 0.5-2.4). Flying business class may lower the risk (OR 0.7; 95% CI: 0.2-1.8). We did not find a protective effect for several measures currently part of standard advice from airlines and clinicians, i.e. drinking non-alcoholic beverages, exercising or wearing stockings. The effect of behavioural factors during flying on the risk of venous thrombosis after air travel is limited. Current advice on prevention of travel-related thrombosis may have to be reconsidered.

  10. Perceptions of psychosocial hazards, work-related stress and workplace priority risks in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortum, Evelyn; Leka, Stavroula; Cox, Tom

    2011-01-01

    During the last few decades, major global developments in the world of work include an international trend to shift production to developing countries, with wide variations in working conditions and exposure to traditional and emerging occupational risks, such as psychosocial risks. The latter have rarely been addressed or explored in developing and economically-emerging country contexts while we find an abundant body of research from industrialized countries. The research presented, which is part of a larger study, explored the perception of multi-disciplinary experts from different regions, as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO), of the nature of psychosocial hazards, and work-related stress, as well as their views on workplace priorities that require urgent attention. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 29 experts from developing countries which were subjected to thematic analysis. A two-tiered Delphi survey was completed by 74 experts in the first round with 53 of these experts completing the survey in the second round. Psychosocial hazards and work-related stress were mostly seen as interchangeable in terms of source and effect and all participants perceived them as concern to their workforce. Through the interviews and the Delphi surveys they allude to our contemporary understanding of psychosocial risks. Workplace risks of priority differed by region but primarily work-related stress, injury and accident prevention, and substance abuse and risk behaviors were reported to require urgent attention. The current lack of awareness and research in the area of psychosocial risks and work-related stress hampers action in developing countries. International experts should support the exchange of information and the development of interventions in workplaces in developing countries with a view to integrating these emerging risks into comprehensive occupational health and safety policy frameworks to make such approaches more effective.

  11. [Survey of degree of passive smoking exposure and related risk awareness in adults in China, 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C; Wang, L M; Huang, Z J; Zhao, Z P; Zhang, M; Zhang, X

    2017-05-10

    Objective: To understand the passive smoking exposure level and related risk awareness in adults in China in 2013. Methods: A face-to-face questionnaire survey was conducted in 179 570 adults selected through multistage cluster sampling from Chinese chronic disease and risk factors surveillance sample population (2013) in 302 surveillance sites. The effective sample size was 176 179 adults. After comprehensive weighting of the samples, the passive smoking exposure level and the awareness rate of related risks were analyzed. Results: The passive smoking exposure rate was 52.8 % (95 %CI : 51.2 % -54.4 % ) and the rate decreased with age ( χ (2)=515.8, P passive smoking related lung cancer was highest (88.5 % , 95 %CI : 87.5 % -89.5 % ), followed by lung disease in children (70.0 % , 95 %CI : 68.1 % -71.9 % ), the awareness rate of passive smoking related heart disease was lowest (46.8 % , 95 %CI : 44.6 % -49.1 % ). Conclusion: The passive smoking exposure level is relatively high in adults in China, and the awareness rate of passive smoking exposure risks, especially heart disease, is low.

  12. Motivators and barriers to incorporating climate change-related health risks in environmental health impact assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lyle R; Alderman, Katarzyna; Connell, Des; Tong, Shilu

    2013-03-22

    Climate change presents risks to health that must be addressed by both decision-makers and public health researchers. Within the application of Environmental Health Impact Assessment (EHIA), there have been few attempts to incorporate climate change-related health risks as an input to the framework. This study used a focus group design to examine the perceptions of government, industry and academic specialists about the suitability of assessing the health consequences of climate change within an EHIA framework. Practitioners expressed concern over a number of factors relating to the current EHIA methodology and the inclusion of climate change-related health risks. These concerns related to the broad scope of issues that would need to be considered, problems with identifying appropriate health indicators, the lack of relevant qualitative information that is currently incorporated in assessment and persistent issues surrounding stakeholder participation. It was suggested that improvements are needed in data collection processes, particularly in terms of adequate communication between environmental and health practitioners. Concerns were raised surrounding data privacy and usage, and how these could impact on the assessment process. These findings may provide guidance for government and industry bodies to improve the assessment of climate change-related health risks.

  13. Frequency of Risk-Related News Media Messages in 2016 Coverage of Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, Tara Kirk; Watson, Crystal; Meyer, Diane; Kronk, Marissa; Ravi, Sanjana; Pechta, Laura E; Lubell, Keri M; Rose, Dale A

    2018-01-03

    News media plays a large role in the information the public receives during an infectious disease outbreak, and may influence public knowledge and perceptions of risk. This study analyzed and described the content of U.S. news media coverage of Zika virus and Zika response during 2016. A random selection of 800 Zika-related news stories from 25 print and television news sources was analyzed. The study examined 24 different messages that appeared in news media articles and characterized them using theories of risk perception as messages with characteristics that could increase perception of risk (risk-elevating messages; n = 14), messages that could decrease perception of risk (risk-minimizing messages; n = 8), or messages about travel or testing guidance (n = 2). Overall, 96% of news stories in the study sample contained at least one or more risk-elevating message(s) and 61% contained risk-minimizing message(s). The frequency of many messages changed after local transmission was confirmed in Florida, and differed between sources in locations with or without local transmission in 2016. Forty percent of news stories included messages about negative potential outcomes of Zika virus infection without mentioning ways to reduce risk. Findings from this study may help inform current federal, state, and local Zika responses by offering a detailed analysis of how news media are covering the outbreak and response activities as well as identifying specific messages appearing more or less frequently than intended. Findings identifying the types of messages that require greater emphasis may also assist public health communicators in responding more effectively to future outbreaks. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  14. Human health risk assessment related to contaminated land: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartjes, F A

    2015-08-01

    Exposure of humans to contaminants from contaminated land may result in many types of health damage ranging from relatively innocent symptoms such as skin eruption or nausea, on up to cancer or even death. Human health protection is generally considered as a major protection target. State-of-the-art possibilities and limitations of human health risk assessment tools are described in this paper. Human health risk assessment includes two different activities, i.e. the exposure assessment and the hazard assessment. The combination of these is called the risk characterization, which results in an appraisal of the contaminated land. Exposure assessment covers a smart combination of calculations, using exposure models, and measurements in contact media and body liquids and tissue (biomonitoring). Regarding the time frame represented by exposure estimates, biomonitoring generally relates to exposure history, measurements in contact media to actual exposures, while exposure calculations enable a focus on exposure in future situations. The hazard assessment, which is different for contaminants with or without a threshold for effects, results in a critical exposure value. Good human health risk assessment practice accounts for tiered approaches and multiple lines of evidence. Specific attention is given here to phenomena such as the time factor in human health risk assessment, suitability for the local situation, background exposure, combined exposure and harmonization of human health risk assessment tools.

  15. ABO blood group related venous thrombosis risk in patients with peripherally inserted central catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Chung Mo; Vissapragada, Ravi; Sharp, Rebecca; Nguyen, Phi; Ung, Thomas; Solanki, Chrismin; Esterman, Adrian

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the association between ABO blood group and upper limb venous thrombosis (VT) risk in patients with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC). Single centre retrospective cohort study. A cohort of patients who underwent PICC insertion from September 2010 to August 2014 were followed up for symptomatic VT presentations diagnosed by ultrasound. Blood group status was identified from hospital information systems. 2270 participants had 3020 PICCs inserted. There were 124 cases of symptomatic VT, an incident rate of 4% [95% confidence interval, CI (3-5%)]. Univariate analysis adjusting for the clustered sample showed that having chemotherapy, two or more previous PICCs, a larger catheter size, a diagnosis of cancer and having a blood group B were all associated with an increased risk of a VT. In the multivariate analysis, PICC diameter, cancer diagnosis and blood group B were all independently associated with increased risk of VT. Patients undergoing PICC insertion with a blood group B appear to have a higher risk of VT, independent of risks attached to the PICC procedure and cancer diagnosis. Without any existing guidelines for PICC-related VT, this investigation creates a platform for further research to be conducted in order to establish guidelines. Advances in knowledge: Previous studies investigating VT risk associated with blood group status related to large heterogeneous populations. In this article, we look at patients specifically with PICC, which reduces the heterogeneity in the cohort. In addition, due to the substantial number of patients enrolled, we had a chance to perform multivariate analyses with statistical significance.

  16. Placental genetic variations in circadian clock-related genes increase the risk of placental abruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chunfang; Gelaye, Bizu; Denis, Marie; Tadesse, Mahlet G; Enquobahrie, Daniel A; Ananth, Cande V; Pacora, Percy N; Salazar, Manuel; Sanchez, Sixto E; Williams, Michelle A

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of placental abruption (PA) remains poorly understood. We examined variations in SNPs of circadian clock-related genes in placenta with PA risk. We also explored placental and maternal genomic contributions to PA risk. Placental genomic DNA samples were isolated from 280 PA cases and 244 controls. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina Cardio-MetaboChip. We examined 116 SNPs in 13 genes known to moderate circadian rhythms. Logistic regression models were fit to estimate odds ratios (ORs). The combined effect of multiple SNPs on PA risk was estimated using a weighted genetic risk score. We examined independent and joint associations of wGRS derived from placental and maternal genomes with PA. Seven SNPs in five genes (ARNTL2, CRY2, DEC1, PER3 and RORA), in the placental genome, were associated with PA risk. Each copy of the minor allele (G) of a SNP in the RORA gene (rs2899663) was associated with a 30% reduced odds of PA (95% CI 0.52-0.95). The odds of PA increased with increasing placental-wGRS (Ptrendcircadian clock-related genes are associated with PA risk; and the association persists after control of genetic variants in the maternal genome.

  17. Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies: FY2007 Appropriations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vincent, Carol H; Bearden, David M; Corn, M. L; Gorte, Ross W; Humphries, Marc; Sheikh, Pervaze A; Whiteman, David L; Boren, Susan; Walke, Roger; Bea, Keith

    2007-01-01

    ... of Health and Human Services. It also includes funding for arts and cultural agencies; the Environmental Protection Agency, which was recently transferred to the appropriations subcommittees that deal with Interior and Related Agencies...

  18. Basic auditory processing is related to familial risk, not to reading fluency: an ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakvoort, Britt; van der Leij, Aryan; Maurits, Natasha; Maassen, Ben; van Zuijen, Titia L

    2015-02-01

    Less proficient basic auditory processing has been previously connected to dyslexia. However, it is unclear whether a low proficiency level is a correlate of having a familial risk for reading problems, or whether it causes dyslexia. In this study, children's processing of amplitude rise time (ART), intensity and frequency differences was measured with event-related potentials (ERPs). ERP components of interest are components reflective of auditory change detection; the mismatch negativity (MMN) and late discriminative negativity (LDN). All groups had an MMN to changes in ART and frequency, but not to intensity. Our results indicate that fluent readers at risk for dyslexia, poor readers at risk for dyslexia and fluent reading controls have an LDN to changes in ART and frequency, though the scalp activation of frequency processing was different for familial risk children. On intensity, only controls showed an LDN. Contrary to previous findings, our results suggest that neither ART nor frequency processing is related to reading fluency. Furthermore, our results imply that diminished sensitivity to changes in intensity and differential lateralization of frequency processing should be regarded as correlates of being at familial risk for dyslexia, that do not directly relate to reading fluency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Risk behaviour of prison inmates in relation to HIV/STI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravlija, Jelena; Vasilj, Ivan; Marijanović, Inga; Vasilj, Marina

    2014-12-01

    Persons serving a prison sentence are identified as a population exposed to a higher risk of HIV/STIs due to a high incidence of risk behaviour, especially intravenous drug misuse. To show results of research on prevalence of HIV/STIs in relation to spread of risk behaviour and other risk factors. Cross-sectional study on a sample of 620 respondents in 10 prisons. A specially structured questionnaire was applied as a research instrument, together with blood sample taking for laboratory analysis of HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis. Majority of respondents show insufficient knowledge about HIV/AIDS, ways of transmission prevention, especially knowledge on ways of HIV transmission. Every sixth respondent has experience of intravenous drug use, of which 58% exchanged drug injection equipment. Every fifth respondent with a tattoo had their tattoo done in prison. Below 2% of respondents quote being victims of sexual abuse, and having wilful anal sexual intercourse in prison. Test results in this research: HIV (0), HBV (1.5%), HCV (14.3%) syphilis (0.5%). Intravenous drug use presents the strongest risk factor for HCV, and therefore for HIV/ STIs. Other risk factors - tattooing with kit exchange, sexual risk intercourse, abuse, insufficient knowledge and information about HIV/AIDS, ways of transmission and way of protection, and lack of access to measures of prevention and "Harm reduction" programme.

  20. Approach Regarding a Framework for Risk Reporting in Order to Enhance the Related Good Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Nichita

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The nowadays accounting information user profile became more sophisticated and the financial reports face new challenges in accomplishing process to meet users’ needs. The purpose of financial reports is to provide useful information to users. According to International Accounting Standards Board, the utility of information is defined through the qualitative characteristics (fundamental and enhancing. The financial crisis emphasized the limits of financial reporting who has been unable to prevent investors about the risks they were facing. Some managers expressed reservations about the quality and relevance of corporate reporting, stating that the annual report is no longer a useful tool. Due to the current changes in business environment, managers have been highly motivated to rethink and improve the risk governance philosophy, processes and methodologies. The lack of quality, timely data and adequate systems to capture, report and measure the right information across the organization is a fundamental challenge to implementing and sustaining all aspects of effective risk management. Starting from 80s, the investors became more interested in narratives (Notes to financial statements, than in primary reports (financial position and performance. Our research suggests a framework for risk reporting with the main goal of improving the good practice in risk management field. Also, we will debate the relation between the qualitative characteristics of accounting information, transparency and risk, and explore the possibility of developing some good practices in risk reporting.

  1. Dual task cost of walking is related to fall risk in persons with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajda, Douglas A; Motl, Robert W; Sosnoff, Jacob J

    2013-12-15

    Persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) commonly have walking and cognitive impairments. While walking with a simultaneous cognitive task, persons with MS experience a greater decline in walking performance than healthy controls. This change in performance is termed dual task cost or dual task interference and has been associated with fall risk in older adults. We examined whether dual task cost during walking was related to fall risk in persons with MS. Thirty-three ambulatory persons with MS performed walking tasks with and without a concurrent cognitive task (dual task condition) as well as underwent a fall risk assessment. Dual task cost was operationalized as the percent change in velocity from normal walking conditions to dual task walking conditions. Fall risk was quantified using the Physiological Profile Assessment. A Spearman correlation analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between dual task cost of walking velocity and fall risk as well as dual task cost of stride length and fall risk. Overall, the findings indicate that dual task cost is associated with fall risk and may be an important target for falls prevention strategies. © 2013.

  2. A model for managing cold-related health and safety risks at workplaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risikko, Tanja; Mäkinen, Tiina M; Påsche, Arvid; Toivonen, Liisa; Hassi, Juhani

    2003-05-01

    Cold conditions increase health and safety risks at work in several ways. The effects of cold have not been sufficiently taken into consideration in occupational safety and health practices. A systematic model and methods were developed for managing cold-related health and safety risks at workplaces. The development work was performed, in a context-bound manner, in pilot industries and workplaces. The model can be integrated into the company's occupational health and safety management system, such as OHSAS 18001. The cold risks are identified and assessed by using a checklist. The preventive measures are systematically planned in a written form specifically produced for cold workplaces. It includes the organisational and technical preventive measures, protective clothing and personal protective equipment, as well as training and information of the personnel. According to the model, all the workers, foremen, occupational safety personnel and occupational health care personnel are trained to recognise the cold risks and to conduct preventive actions. The developed model was evaluated in the context of cold outdoor (construction) and indoor work (fish processing), and by occupational health and safety professionals. According to the feedback, the model and methods were easy to use after a one-day introduction session. The continuum between the cold risk assessment and management worked well, although there was some overlap in the documentation. The cold risk management model and its methods form an essential part of ISO CD 15743 Strategy for risk assessment, management and work practice in cold environments.

  3. Factors Influencing Running-Related Musculoskeletal Injury Risk Among U.S. Military Recruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Joseph M

    2016-06-01

    Running-related musculoskeletal injuries among U.S. military recruits negatively impact military readiness. Low aerobic fitness, prior injury, and weekly running distance are known risk factors. Physical fitness screening and remedial physical training (or discharging the most poorly fit recruits) before entry-level military training have tended to reduce injury rates while decreasing attrition, training, and medical costs. Incorporating anaerobic running sessions into training programs can offset decreased weekly running distance and decrease injury risk. Varying lower extremity loading patterns, stride length or cadence manipulation, and hip stability/strengthening programming may further decrease injury risk. No footstrike pattern is ideal for all runners; transitioning to forefoot striking may reduce risk for hip, knee, or tibial injuries, but increase risk for calf, Achilles, foot or ankle injuries. Minimal evidence associates running surfaces with injury risk. Footwear interventions should focus on proper fit and comfort; the evidence does not support running shoe prescription per foot type to reduce injury risk among recruits. Primary injury mitigation efforts should focus on physical fitness screening, remedial physical training (or discharge for unfit recruits), and continued inclusion of anaerobic running sessions to offset decreased weekly running distance. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  4. Definition of a shortcut methodology for assessing flood-related Na-Tech risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Marzo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a qualitative methodology for the initial assessment of flood-related Na-Tech risk was developed as a screening tool to identify which situations require a much more expensive quantitative risk analysis (QRA. Through the definition of some suitable key hazard indicators (KHIs, the proposed methodology allows the identification of the Na-Tech risk level associated with a given situation; the analytical hierarchy process (AHP was used as a multi-criteria decision tool for the evaluation of such qualitative KHIs. The developed methodology was validated through two case studies by comparing the predicted risk levels with the results of much more detailed QRAs previously presented in literature and then applied to the real flood happened at Spolana a.s., Neratovice, Czech Republic in August 2002.

  5. Reduction of work-related musculoskeletal risk factors following ergonomics education of sewing machine operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulduk, Sıdıka; Bulduk, Emre Özgür; Süren, Tufan

    2017-09-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) are a major hazard for sewing machine operators. Ergonomics education is recommended for reducing musculoskeletal disorders at workstations. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an ergonomics education in reducing the exposure to risk factors for WMSDs among sewing machine operators. In this study of 278 workers, their exposure to the risk of WMSDs was assessed using the quick exposure check scale prior to them attending an ergonomics education programme and then again 3 months after the programme. The scores for risk exposure before the education programme were moderate for back (static) and back (dynamic), high for shoulder/arm and very high for wrist/hand and neck. The results obtained 3 months later were low for back (static) and shoulder/arm, and moderate for back (dynamic), wrist/hand and neck. Based on our results, ergonomics education can reduce the exposure to risk factors for WMSDs in the workplace.

  6. Morbid risk of schizophrenia for relatives of patients with cannabis-associated psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, P K; Jones, P; Harvey, I; Williams, M; McGuffin, P; Murray, R M

    1995-05-01

    Twenty-three patients admitted with acute psychosis who were cannabis positive on urinary screening were each matched, with respect to sex, with two psychotic controls who screened negatively for all substances. The lifetime morbid risk of psychiatric disorder was estimated among the first degree relatives of cases and controls, using RDC-FH criteria to define diagnoses, and Weinberg's shorter method of age correction. The cases had a significantly greater familial morbid risk of schizophrenia (7.1%) than the controls (0.7%), while the risks of other psychoses, and of non-psychotic conditions were similar. The same pattern of familial risk was evident when the analysis was restricted to patients with DSM-III schizophrenia. The data suggest that the development or recurrence of acute psychosis in the context of cannabis use may be associated with a genetic predisposition to schizophrenia.

  7. Genotype relative risks: Methods for design and analysis of candidate-gene association studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaid, D.J.; Sommer, S.S. (Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States))

    1993-11-01

    Design and analysis methods are presented for studying the association of a candidate gene with a disease by using parental data in place of nonrelated controls. This alternating design eliminates spurious differences in allele frequencies between cases and nonrelated controls resulting from different ethnic origins and population stratification for these two groups. The authors present analysis methods which are based on two genetic relative risks: (1) the relative risk of disease for homozygotes with two copies of the candidate gene versus homozygotes without the candidate gene and (2) the relative risk for heterozygotes with one copy of the candidate gene versus homozygotes without the candidate gene. In addition to estimating the magnitude of these relative risks, likelihood methods allow specific hypotheses to be tested, namely, a test for overall association of the candidate gene with disease, as well as specific genetic hypotheses, such as dominant or recessive inheritance. Two likelihood methods are presented: (1) a likelihood method appropriate when Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium holds and (2) a likelihood method in which the authors condition on parental genotype data when Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium does not hold. The results for the relative efficiency of these two methods suggest that the conditional approach may at times be preferable, even when equilibrium holds. Sample-size and power calculations are presented for a multitiered design. Tier 1 detects the presence of an abnormal sequence for a postulated candidate gene among a small group of cases. Tier 2 tests for association of the abnormal variant with disease, such as by the likelihood methods presented. Tier 3 confirms positive results from tier 2. Results indicate that required sample sizes are smaller when expression of disease is recessive, rather than dominant, and that, for recessive disease and large relative risks, necessary sample sizes may be feasible. 19 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Quantity of documentation of maltreatment risk factors in injury-related paediatric hospitalisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Kirsten; Scott, Debbie A

    2012-07-28

    While child maltreatment is recognised as a global problem, solid epidemiological data on the prevalence of child maltreatment and risk factors associated with child maltreatment is lacking in Australia and internationally. There have been recent calls for action to improve the evidence-base capturing and describing child abuse, particularly those data captured within the health sector. This paper describes the quantity of documentation of maltreatment risk factors in injury-related paediatric hospitalisations in Queensland, Australia. This study involved a retrospective medical record review, text extraction and coding methodology to assess the quantity of documentation of risk factors and the subsequent utility of data in hospital records for describing child maltreatment and data linkage to Child Protection Service (CPS). There were 433 children in the maltreatment group and 462 in the unintentional injury group for whom medical records could be reviewed. Almost 93% of the maltreatment code sample, but only 11% of the unintentional injury sample had documentation identified indicating the presence of any of 20 risk factors. In the maltreatment group the most commonly documented risk factor was history of abuse (41%). In those with an unintentional injury, the most commonly documented risk factor was alcohol abuse of the child or family (3%). More than 93% of the maltreatment sample also linked to a child protection record. Of concern are the 16% of those children who linked to child protection who did not have documented risk factors in the medical record. Given the importance of the medical record as a source of information about children presenting to hospital for treatment and as a potential source of evidence for legal action the lack of documentation is of concern. The details surrounding the injury admission and consideration of any maltreatment related risk factors, both identifying their presence and ruling them out are required for each and every case

  9. [Correlation analysis of sub-health status and health-related risk behaviors in college students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, De-qin; Yao, Rong-ying; Yuan, Chang-jiang; Hu, Lan

    2011-01-01

    To study the sub-health status in college students in relation to health-related risk behaviors. Using convenient sampling method, 6176 college students (3285 male and 2891 female students) were surveyed with questionnaires for general demographical data, sub-health state and health-risk behaviors. The reported rate of sub-health state was 10.2%. The reported rate of physical sub-health was 11.7%, and the rate was 21.7%, 13.9% and 15.0% for inadequate physical activities, poor physical function and poor immunity, respectively. The reported rate of psychological sub-health was 10.5%, with a rate of 14.7%, 22.6% and 7.3% for emotional problems, behavioral problems and social adaptation difficulties, respectively. The risk factors for college students included insufficient sleeping, inadequate sport activities, missing breakfast, partial dietary, smoking and drinking (Pcollege students.

  10. Polymorphisms in fatty acid metabolism-related genes are associated with colorectal cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeft, B.; Linseisen, J.; Beckmann, L.

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common malignant tumor and the fourth leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The crucial role of fatty acids for a number of important biological processes suggests a more in-depth analysis of inter-individual differences in fatty acid metabolizing genes...... as contributing factor to colon carcinogenesis. We examined the association between genetic variability in 43 fatty acid metabolism-related genes and colorectal risk in 1225 CRC cases and 2032 controls participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Three hundred...... variants with CRC risk. Our results support the key role of prostanoid signaling in colon carcinogenesis and suggest a relevance of genetic variation in fatty acid metabolism-related genes and CRC risk....

  11. Elevated risk of human papillomavirus-related second cancers in survivors of anal canal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Rebecca A; Lai, Lily L

    2017-10-15

    Over the last decade, the causal link between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and squamous cell carcinoma of the anus (SCCA) has been well described. Because HPV infection in one site is often associated with other sites of infection, it then follows that patients with SCCA may have an increased risk of additional HPV-related cancers. Identifying and targeting at-risk sites through cancer screening and surveillance may help to guide best practices. The current study sought to ascertain sites and risk of HPV-related second primary malignancies (SPMs) in survivors of SCCA. Using population-based data from 1992 through 2012, the authors identified patients with SCCA and determined their risk of HPV-related SPMs, including anal, oral, and genital cancers. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs), defined as observed to expected cases, were calculated to determine excess risk. Of 10,537 patients with SCCA, 416 developed HPV-related SPMs, which corresponded to an overall SIR of 21.5 (99% confidence interval [99% CI], 19.0-24.2). Men were found to have a higher SIR (35.8; 99% CI, 30.7-41.6) compared with women (12.8; 99% CI, 10.4-15.5). SIRs for a second SCCA were markedly higher in men (127.5; 99% CI, 108.1-149.2) compared with women (47.0; 99% CI, 34.7-62.1), whereas SIRs for oral cavity and pharyngeal cancers were elevated in men (3.1; 99% CI, 1.5-5.7) and women (4.4; 99% CI, 1.5-9.7). SIRs for sex-specific sites also were elevated, with male genital cancers having an SIR of 19.6 (99% CI, 8.7-37.6) and female genital cancers an SIR of 8.3 (99% CI, 6.1-11.0). Patients with index SCCA are at an increased risk of subsequent HPV-related SPMs. The elevated risk is most striking in patients with second primary SCCAs; however, the risk of second cancers also appears to be increased in other HPV-related sites. Cancer 2017;123:4013-21. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  12. When performance and risk taking are related: Working for rewards is related to risk taking when the value of rewards is presented briefly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veling, Harm; Bijleveld, Erik

    2015-12-01

    Valuable monetary rewards can boost human performance on various effortful tasks even when the value of the rewards is presented too briefly to allow for strategic decision making. However, the mechanism by which briefly-presented reward information influences performance has remained unclear. One possibility is that performance after briefly-presented reward information is primarily boosted via activation of the dopamine reward system, whereas performance after very visible reward information is driven more by strategic processes. To examine this hypothesis, we first presented participants with a task in which they could earn rewards of relatively low (1 cent) or high (10 cents) value, and the value information was presented either briefly (17 ms) or for an extended duration (300 ms). Furthermore, responsiveness of the dopamine system was indirectly estimated with a measure of risk taking, the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART). Results showed that performance after high- compared to low-value rewards was indeed related to the BART scores only when reward information was presented briefly. These results are suggestive of the possibility that brief presentation of reward information boosts performance directly via activating the dopamine system, whereas extended presentation of reward information leads to more strategic reward-driven behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Adapting the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Model: Predicting HIV-Related Sexual Risk among Sexual Minority Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Colleen M.

    2012-01-01

    Young sexual minority males are among those at highest risk for HIV infection, yet we know relatively little about the impact of sexual identity development on HIV risk. This study used cross-sectional data to investigate factors associated with HIV-related sexual risk among a sample of sexual minority males (n = 156), ages 14 to 21 years, using…

  14. Low plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin d and risk of tobacco-related cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzal, Shoaib; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco smoke chemicals may influence vitamin D metabolism and function, and conversely vitamin D may modify the carcinogenicity of tobacco smoke chemicals. We tested the hypothesis that lower plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] is associated with a higher risk of tobacco-related cancer in the g...

  15. Lupus-related single nucleotide polymorphisms and risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernatsky, Sasha; Velásquez García, Héctor A; Spinelli, John; Gaffney, Patrick; Smedby, Karin E; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Wang, Sophia S.; Adami, Hans-Olov; Albanes, Demetrius; Angelucci, Emanuele; Ansell, Stephen M.; Asmann, Yan W.; Becker, Nikolaus; Benavente, Yolanda; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Birmann, Brenda M.; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Bracci, Paige M.; Brennan, Paul; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R.; Cerhan, James R.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Clavel, Jacqueline; Conde, Lucia; Cotenbader, Karen H; Cox, David G; Cozen, Wendy; Crouch, Simon; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; De Sanjose, Silvia; Di Lollo, Simonetta; Diver, W. Ryan; Dogan, Ahmet; Foretova, Lenka; Ghesquières, Hervé; Giles, Graham G.; Glimelius, Bengt; Habermann, Thomas M.; Haioun, Corinne; Hartge, Patricia; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Holford, Theodore R.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Kaaks, Rudolph; Kane, Eleanor; Kelly, Rachel S.; Klein, Robert J.; Kraft, Peter; Kricker, Anne; Lan, Qing; Lawrence, Charles; Liebow, Mark; Lightfoot, Tracy; Link, Brian K.; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; Melbye, Mads; Molina, Thierry Jo; Monnereau, Alain; Morton, Lindsay M.; Nieters, Alexandra; North, Kari E.; Novak, Anne J.; Offit, Kenneth; Purdue, Mark P.; Rais, Marco; Riby, Jacques; Roman, Eve; Rothman, Nathaniel; Salles, Gilles; Severi, Gianluca; Severson, Richard K.; Skibola, Christine F.; Slager, Susan L.; Smith, Alex; Smith, Martyn T.; Southey, Melissa C.; Staines, Anthony; Teras, Lauren R.; Thompson, Carrie A.; Tilly, Hervé; Tinker, Lesley F.; Tjonneland, Anne; Turner, Jenny; Vajdic, Claire M.; Vermeulen, Roel C H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/216532620; Vijai, Joseph; Vineis, Paolo; Virtamo, Jarmo; Wang, Zhaoming; Weinstein, Stephanie; Witzig, Thomas E.; Zelenetz, Andrew; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zhang, Yawei; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Clarke, Ann E

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Determinants of the increased risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) in SLE are unclear. Using data from a recent lymphoma genome-wide association study (GWAS), we assessed whether certain lupus-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were also associated with DLBCL.

  16. Policy-level interventions and work-related psychosocial risk management in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leka, S.; Jain, A.; Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.; Cox, T.

    2010-01-01

    There exists a substantial degree of diversity across strategies to prevent and manage work- related psychosocial risks and their associated health effects. Whereas it is common to distinguish between organizational and individual interventions, the important level of policy- level interventions has

  17. School-Related Assets and Youth Risk Behaviors: Alcohol Consumption and Sexual Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspy, Cheryl B.; Vesely, Sara K.; Oman, Roy F.; Tolma, Eleni; Rodine, Sharon; Marshall, LaDonna; Fluhr, Janene

    2012-01-01

    Background: Two risk behaviors, alcohol consumption and early initiation of sexual intercourse (ISI), can have devastating consequences for youth. The purpose of this study was to determine the association of school connectedness and school-related behaviors (eg, academic performance, skipping school, getting into trouble at school) with these 2…

  18. Work-related risk factors for neck pain : results of a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariëns, G.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to determine which work related physical and psychosocial risk factors exist which cause neck pain and absenteeism because of neck pain. There is some evidence for a positive relationship between he duration of sedentary posture at work and neck pain, and between twisting

  19. Hospitalizations for Students with an Alcohol-Related Sanction: Gender and Pregaming as Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rimsha; Hustad, John T. P.; LaSalle, Linda; Borsari, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to investigate whether pregaming (ie, drinking prior to a social event) is a risk factor for hospitalization. Participants: Participants (N = 516) were undergraduate students with an alcohol-related sanction. Methods: Participants completed a survey about alcohol use, as well as behaviors and experiences,…

  20. Relative absorption and dermal loading of chemical substances: Consequences for risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, H.E.; Schaafsma, G.; Sandt, J.J.M. van de

    2009-01-01

    Quantification of skin absorption is an essential step in reducing the uncertainty of dermal risk assessment. Data from literature indicate that the relative dermal absorption of substances is dependent on dermal loading. Therefore, an internal exposure calculated with absorption data determined at

  1. 77 FR 29235 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Standards Related to Reinsurance, Risk Corridors, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 45 CFR Part 153 RIN 0938-AR07 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Standards... ] entitled, ``Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Standards Related to Reinsurance, Risk Corridors... section 553(b) of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) (5 U.S.C. 553(b)). However, we can waive this...

  2. Depression, Suicidal Ideation and STD-Related Risk in Homeless Older Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Paul; Noell, John; Ochs, Linda; Seeley, John R.

    2001-01-01

    Goals of this study were to examine the frequency of depression and related constructs of suicidal ideation and hopelessness in a sample of homeless older adolescents and their associations with behaviors, such as infrequent condom use and homosexual experience, that may increase the risk of sexually transmitted disease (STD). (BF)

  3. Hypertension and related risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: This cross sectional study was done in Gaborone City Council clinics in Botswana. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of hypertension and related cardiovascular risk factors among DM patients. Methods: A total of 401 patients were included in a cross sectional study during a ...

  4. Risk factors related to Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence in indoor-housed Dutch dairy goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, Huifang; Dam-Deisz, Cecile; Luttikholt, Saskia; Maas, Miriam; Nielen, Mirjam; Swart, Arno; Vellema, Piet; van der Giessen, Joke; Opsteegh, Marieke

    Toxoplasma gondii can cause disease in goats, but also has impact on human health through food-borne transmission. Our aims were to determine the seroprevalence of T. gondii infection in indoor-housed Dutch dairy goats and to identify the risk factors related to T. gondii seroprevalence. Fifty-two

  5. Relative potency as a means of evaluating ELF (Extremely Low Frequency) health risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Easterly, C.E.; Glass, L.R.

    1990-09-01

    In the 1970's, a variety of developments took place to heightened public and scientific interest in electromagnetic fields. During this time, biological studies of nonionizing electromagnetic fields were taking place, but no clear evidence of risks to public health was identified. Then came the surprising epidemiological finding suggesting that 60 Hz magnetic fields may be related to some childhood leukemias. Our particular interest at ORNL was how to interpret the available data with respect to human exposures to the nearly ubiquitous fields. A review of the available data showed that consistent biological effects were difficult to identify. Classical toxicological tests used in chemical risk assessment had not been performed with Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) fields but rather a wide range of mechanistic studies had been pursued. To evaluate the level of anticipated hazard or risk there was neither a mechanistic understanding nor a consistent phenomenological outcome. A risk evaluation normally requires one or the other of these two types of information. Two quite different approaches were pursued: meta-analysis and relative potency. The first of these is a method to combine data from similar experiments to enhance the relative statistical power of a collection of small sample size studies, and will not be discussed further. The second, relative potency, will be the focus of this paper. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Quantification and evaluation of safety risks related to the use of ammonia and hydrocarbons as refrigerants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Gerwen, R.J.M.; Verwoerd, M. [Department of Refrigeration and Heat Pump Technology, Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research TNO, Apeldoorn (Netherlands)

    1997-10-01

    Models and techniques for the quantification and evaluation of safety aspects related to the use of ammonia and hydrocarbons as working fluids are discussed. TNO has been working with Quantitative Risk Analysis (QRA) for a number of years, and have applied the advanced models in many case studies. 9 refs.

  7. Nutrients related to one-carbon metabolism and risk of renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunyoung; Giovannucci, Edward L; Joh, Hee-Kyung

    2013-02-01

    Folate, vitamins B6 and B12, methionine, choline, and betaine are nutrients related to one-carbon metabolism and have been hypothesized to decrease cancer risk. Few studies have evaluated dietary intakes of these nutrients in relation to renal cell cancer (RCC). We conducted prospective follow-up studies of women in the Nurses' Health Study and men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Diet was assessed repeatedly using a validated semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire in both studies. During follow-up of 24 years among 77,208 women (918,891 person-years) and 22 years among 47,886 men (1,731,752 person-years), we accrued 436 cases of RCC (225 women and 211 men). Intakes of folate, vitamins B6 and B12, methionine, and betaine were not found to be related to RCC risk. Higher intake of free choline, but not other forms of choline, was associated with reduced RCC risk. The results were similar in men and women. We found little evidence that higher intakes of nutrients related to one-carbon metabolism lower RCC risk. One-carbon metabolism may have little influence on renal carcinogenesis.

  8. Potential Mediating Pathways through Which Sports Participation Relates to Reduced Risk of Suicidal Ideation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taliaferro, Lindsay A.; Rienzo, Barbara A.; Miller, M. David; Pigg, R. Morgan; Dodd, Virginia J.

    2010-01-01

    Suicide ranks as the third leading cause of death for American youth. Researchers examining sport participation and suicidal behavior have regularly found inverse relationships. This study represents the first effort to test a model depicting potential mechanisms through which sport participation relates to reduced risk of suicidal ideation. The…

  9. Dairy product intake in relation to glucose regulation indices and risk of type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijk, E.A.; Heraclides, A.; Witte, D.R.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Toft, U.; Lau, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and aim A high intake of dairy has been linked to lower risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). The relationship between dairy intake and glucose metabolism is still not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between the intake of total dairy and dairy subgroups and

  10. Developing a Safety Management System for Fatigue Related Risks in easyJet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stewart, S.; Koornneef, F.; Akselsson, R.; Turner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Chapter 5: Developing a Safety Management System for Fatigue Related Risks in easyJet The European Commission HILAS project (Human Integration into the Lifecycle of Aviation Systems - a project supported by the European Commission’s 6th Framework between 2005-2009) was focused on using human factors

  11. Perceived Threat, Risk Perception, and Efficacy Beliefs Related to SARS and Other (Emerging) Infectious Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Zwart, Onno; Veldhuijzen, Irene; Elam, Gillian

    2009-01-01

    -efficacy for SARS were higher in Asia compared to Europe. In multiple linear regression analyses, country was strongly associated with perceived threat. CONCLUSIONS: The relatively high perceived threat for SARS indicates that it is seen as a public health risk and offers a basis for communication in case...

  12. A CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR EVALUATING RELATIVE POTENCY DATA FOR USE IN ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    For chemicals with a common mechanism of toxicity, relative potency factors (RPFs) allow dose and exposure measures to be normalized to an equivalent toxicity amount of a model chemical... In ecological risk assessments the large number of possible target species, variety of expo...

  13. Fatty acid intake and its dietary sources in relation with markers of type 2 diabetes risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, A.J.; Alssema, M.; Koning, de E.J.P.; Cessie, Le S.; Vries, de J.H.; Zock, P.L.; Rosendaal, F.R.; Heijer, den M.; Mutsert, de R.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the relations between intakes of total, saturated, mono-unsaturated, poly-unsaturated and trans fatty acids (SFA, MUFA, PUFA and TFA), and their dietary sources (dairy, meat and plant) with markers of type 2 diabetes risk. Subjects/Methods: This was

  14. High Risk Behaviors but Low Injury-Related Mortality Among Hispanic Teens in Missouri

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shumei Yun; Noaman Kayani; Sarah Geiger; Sherri Homan; Janet Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Our objective was to examine racial/ethnic disparities in injury-related risk behaviors and deaths among teens in Missouri, with a focus on Hispanic people--the fastest-growing racial/ethnic group in the state. Methods...

  15. Early Life Processes, Endocrine Mediators and Number of Susceptible Cells in Relation to Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    Early life processes, endocrine mediators and number of susceptible cells in relation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER to breast cancer ... cancer risk. Method: Five interlinked component projects covering the spectrum from endometrial to adult life . Progress report: Component projects...Analyses are pending and no findings can be reported yet. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast cancer , early life , mammary gland specific stem cells, hormones 16

  16. Risk of AIDS related complex and AIDS in homosexual men with persistent HIV antigenaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wolf, F.; Goudsmit, J.; Paul, D. A.; Lange, J. M.; Hooijkaas, C.; Schellekens, P.; Coutinho, R. A.; van der Noordaa, J.

    1987-01-01

    One hundred and ninety eight men seropositive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody and 58 HIV antibody seroconverters were studied for an average of 19.3 (SEM 0.5) months to assess the relation between HIV antigenaemia and the risk of developing the acquired immune deficiency syndrome

  17. Risk factors for legal induced abortion-related mortality in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Linda A; Berg, Cynthia J; Shulman, Holly B; Zane, Suzanne B; Green, Clarice A; Whitehead, Sara; Atrash, Hani K

    2004-04-01

    To assess risk factors for legal induced abortion-related deaths. This is a descriptive epidemiologic study of women dying of complications of induced abortions. Numerator data are from the Abortion Mortality Surveillance System. Denominator data are from the Abortion Surveillance System, which monitors the number and characteristics of women who have legal induced abortions in the United States. Risk factors examined include age of the woman, gestational length of pregnancy at the time of termination, race, and procedure. Main outcome measures include crude, adjusted, and risk factor-specific mortality rates. During 1988-1997, the overall death rate for women obtaining legally induced abortions was 0.7 per 100000 legal induced abortions. The risk of death increased exponentially by 38% for each additional week of gestation. Compared with women whose abortions were performed at or before 8 weeks of gestation, women whose abortions were performed in the second trimester were significantly more likely to die of abortion-related causes. The relative risk (unadjusted) of abortion-related mortality was 14.7 at 13-15 weeks of gestation (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.2, 34.7), 29.5 at 16-20 weeks (95% CI 12.9, 67.4), and 76.6 at or after 21 weeks (95% CI 32.5, 180.8). Up to 87% of deaths in women who chose to terminate their pregnancies after 8 weeks of gestation may have been avoidable if these women had accessed abortion services before 8 weeks of gestation. Although primary prevention of unintended pregnancy is optimal, among women who choose to terminate their pregnancies, increased access to surgical and nonsurgical abortion services may increase the proportion of abortions performed at lower-risk, early gestational ages and help further decrease deaths. II-2

  18. The influence of media communication on risk perception and behavior related to mad cow disease in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jee-Eun; Sohn, Aeree

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the influence of media communication on risk behavior related to mad cow disease (MCD). Mothers of elementary school students in Seoul were recruited as the survey participants of this study. Media reports affected risk behavior related to MCD. Also, knowledge and attitude toward MCD affects risk behavior. Risk-related information provided by the media should maintain consistency and objectivity. For effective risk communication, there should be an open communication between the government and public, experts, and related industries, who should all collaborate.

  19. Risk Assessment of Adverse Birth Outcomes in Relation to Maternal Age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hao Weng

    Full Text Available Although a number of studies have investigated correlations of maternal age with birth outcomes, an extensive assessment using age as a continuous variable is lacking. In the current study, we estimated age-specific risks of adverse birth outcomes in childbearing women.National population-based data containing maternal and neonatal information were derived from the Health Promotion Administration, Taiwan. A composite adverse birth outcome was defined as at least anyone of stillbirth, preterm birth, low birth weight, macrosomia, neonatal death, congenital anomaly, and small for gestational age (SGA. Singletons were further analyzed for outcomes of live birth in relation to each year of maternal age. A log-binomial model was used to adjust for possible confounders of maternal and neonatal factors.In total, 2,123,751 births between 2001 and 2010 were utilized in the analysis. The risk of a composite adverse birth outcome was significantly higher at extreme maternal ages. In specific, risks of stillbirth, neonatal death, preterm birth, congenital anomaly, and low birth weight were higher at the extremes of maternal age. Furthermore, risk of macrosomia rose proportionally with an increasing maternal age. In contrast, risk of SGA declined proportionally with an increasing maternal age. The log-binomial model showed greater risks at the maternal ages of 30 years for a composite adverse birth outcome.Infants born to teenagers and women at advanced age possess greater risks for stillbirth, preterm birth, neonatal death, congenital anomaly, and low birth weight. Pregnancies at advanced age carry an additional risk for macrosomia, while teenage pregnancies carry an additional risk for SGA. The data suggest that the optimal maternal ages to minimize adverse birth outcomes are 26∼30 years.

  20. The Relationship between Musculoskeletal Symptoms and Work-related Risk Factors in Hotel Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Woo; Lee, Ju Jong; Mun, Hyeon Je; Lee, Kyung-Jae; Kim, Joo Ja

    2013-10-11

    To identify work-related musculoskeletal symptoms and any associated work-related risk factors, focusing on structural labor factors among hotel workers. A total of 1,016 hotel workers (620 men and 396 women) were analyzed. The questionnaire surveyed participants' socio-demographics, health-related behaviors, job-related factors, and work-related musculoskeletal symptoms. Work-related musculoskeletal symptoms were assessed using the Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire. All analyses were stratified by gender, and multiple logistic regression modeling was used to determine associations between work-related musculoskeletal symptoms and work-related risk factors. The risk of developing work-related musculoskeletal symptoms was 1.9 times higher among male workers in the kitchen department than males in the room department (OR = 1.92, 95% CI = 1.03-3.79), and 2.5 times higher among male workers with lower sleep satisfaction than those with higher sleep satisfaction (OR = 2.52, 95% CI = 1.57-4.04). All of the aforementioned cases demonstrated a statistically significant association with work-related musculoskeletal symptoms. Moreover, the risk of developing work-related musculoskeletal symptoms was 3.3 times higher among female workers aged between 30 and 34 than those aged 24 or younger (OR = 3.32, 95% CI = 1.56-7.04); 0.3 times higher among females in the back office department than those in the room department (OR = 0.34, 95% CI = 0.12-0.91); 1.6 times higher among females on shift schedules than those who were not (OR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.02-2.59); 1.8 times higher among females who performed more intensive work than those who performed less intensive work (OR = 1.88, 95% CI = 1.17-3.02), and; 2.1 times higher among females with lower sleep satisfaction than those with higher sleep satisfaction (OR = 2.17, 95% CI = 1.34-3.50). All of the aforementioned cases also displayed a statistically significant association with work-related musculoskeletal symptoms. This study

  1. HIV-related risk perception among female sex workers in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankomah, Augustine; Omoregie, Godpower; Akinyemi, Zacch; Anyanti, Jennifer; Ladipo, Olaronke; Adebayo, Samson

    2011-01-01

    Over one-third of sex workers in Nigeria are infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), yet there is a lack of understanding of sex workers' own perception of sexual risk-taking. Applying the theory of cognitive dissonance, this paper examined the personal HIV risk perception of brothel-based sex workers. The study is based on 24 focus group discussions held among brothel-based sex workers in four geographically and culturally dispersed cities in Nigeria. It was found that sex workers underestimated their risk of infection and rationalized, defended, or justified their behaviors, a typical psychological response to worry, threat, and anxiety arising from the apparent discrepancies between beliefs and behaviors. To reduce dissonance, many sex workers had a strong belief in fatalism, predestination, and faith-based invulnerability to HIV infection. Many believed that one will not die of acquired immune deficiency syndrome if it is not ordained by God. The sex workers also had a high level of HIV-related stigma. From these findings, most sex workers considered risk reduction and in particular condom use as far beyond their control or even unnecessary, as a result of their strong beliefs in fatalism and predestination. Therefore, one critical area of intervention is the need to assist sex workers to develop accurate means of assessing their personal vulnerability and self-appraisal of HIV-related risk.

  2. [Exposition to total parenteral nutrition increases the risk of catheter-related bloodstream infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Teresa; Véliz, Elena; Fica, Alberto

    2016-12-01

    Infectious complications associated to central venous catheter (CVC) increase morbidity, mortality and costs. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is one of the risk factors described for catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR-BSI). The aim of this study was explore if TPN and time of exposition, are risk factors for CR-BSI among patient exposed to this therapy. Cohort study of patients with CVC exposed and not exposed to TPN with calculation of the relative risk (RR) for CR-BSI and percentage of CR-BSI according to different times of exposition to TPN. Study encompassed years 2010-2015 and only adult patients were included. During the study period 51 events of CR-BSI were identified, with 27 occurring among those exposed to TPN and 24 among those not exposed. CR-BSI incidence rate was 6.3 in the group with TPN and 1.2 in those without this therapy (RR 5.4; IC 95 3.6-8.2). The percentage of patients with CR-BSI increased in parallel to exposition time (Pearson coefficient +0.91) and the OR increased for expositions ≥ 7 days (OR 2.8; IC 95 1.047.4; p < 0.05). Exposition to TPN increases the risk to CR-BSI in adult patients with CVC and this risk raise with exposition time.

  3. A method for determining weights for excess relative risk and excess absolute risk when applied in the calculation of lifetime risk of cancer from radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Linda [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Department of Radiation Protection and Health, Oberschleissheim (Germany); University of Manchester, The Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, Manchester (United Kingdom); Schneider, Uwe [University of Zurich, Vetsuisse Faculty, Zurich (Switzerland); Radiotherapy Hirslanden AG, Aarau (Switzerland)

    2013-03-15

    Radiation-related risks of cancer can be transported from one population to another population at risk, for the purpose of calculating lifetime risks from radiation exposure. Transfer via excess relative risks (ERR) or excess absolute risks (EAR) or a mixture of both (i.e., from the life span study (LSS) of Japanese atomic bomb survivors) has been done in the past based on qualitative weighting. Consequently, the values of the weights applied and the method of application of the weights (i.e., as additive or geometric weighted means) have varied both between reports produced at different times by the same regulatory body and also between reports produced at similar times by different regulatory bodies. Since the gender and age patterns are often markedly different between EAR and ERR models, it is useful to have an evidence-based method for determining the relative goodness of fit of such models to the data. This paper identifies a method, using Akaike model weights, which could aid expert judgment and be applied to help to achieve consistency of approach and quantitative evidence-based results in future health risk assessments. The results of applying this method to recent LSS cancer incidence models are that the relative EAR weighting by cancer solid cancer site, on a scale of 0-1, is zero for breast and colon, 0.02 for all solid, 0.03 for lung, 0.08 for liver, 0.15 for thyroid, 0.18 for bladder and 0.93 for stomach. The EAR weighting for female breast cancer increases from 0 to 0.3, if a generally observed change in the trend between female age-specific breast cancer incidence rates and attained age, associated with menopause, is accounted for in the EAR model. Application of this method to preferred models from a study of multi-model inference from many models fitted to the LSS leukemia mortality data, results in an EAR weighting of 0. From these results it can be seen that lifetime risk transfer is most highly weighted by EAR only for stomach cancer. However

  4. The relation of overweight to cardiovascular risk factors among children and adolescents: the Bogalusa Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, D S; Dietz, W H; Srinivasan, S R; Berenson, G S

    1999-06-01

    Although overweight and obesity in childhood are related to dyslipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hypertension, most studies have examined levels of these risk factors individually or have used internal cutpoints (eg, quintiles) to classify overweight and risk factors. We used cutpoints derived from several national studies to examine the relation of overweight (Quetelet index, >95th percentile) to adverse risk factor levels and risk factor clustering. The sample consisted of 9167 5- to 17-year-olds examined in seven cross-sectional studies conducted by the Bogalusa Heart Study between 1973 and 1994. About 11% of examined schoolchildren were considered overweight. Although adverse lipid, insulin, and blood pressure levels did not vary substantially with the Quetelet index at levels Quetelet index. Overweight schoolchildren were 2.4 times as likely as children with a Quetelet index <85th percentile to have an elevated level of total cholesterol. Odds ratios for other associations were 2.4 (diastolic blood pressure), 3.0 (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol), 3.4 (high-density lipoprotein cholesterol), 4.5 (systolic blood pressure), 7.1 (triglycerides), and 12.6 (fasting insulin). Several of these associations differed between whites and blacks, and by age. Of the 813 overweight schoolchildren, 475 (58%) were found to have at least one risk factor. Furthermore, the use of overweight as a screening tool could identify 50% of schoolchildren who had two or more risk factors. Because overweight is associated with various risk factors even among young children, it is possible that the successful prevention and treatment of obesity in childhood could reduce the adult incidence of cardiovascular disease.

  5. Relation of temperature and humidity to the risk of recurrent gout attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Tuhina; Chen, Clara; Niu, Jingbo; Chaisson, Christine; Hunter, David J; Choi, Hyon; Zhang, Yuqing

    2014-08-15

    Gout attack risk may be affected by weather (e.g., because of volume depletion). We therefore examined the association of temperature and humidity with the risk of recurrent gout attacks by conducting an internet-based case-crossover study in the United States (in 2003-2010) among subjects with a diagnosis of gout who had 1 or more attacks during 1 year of follow-up. We examined the association of temperature and humidity over the prior 48 hours with the risk of gout attacks using a time-stratified approach and conditional logistic regression. Among 632 subjects with gout, there was a significant dose-response relationship between mean temperature in the prior 48 hours and the risk of subsequent gout attack (P = 0.01 for linear trend). Higher temperatures were associated with approximately 40% higher risk of gout attack compared with moderate temperatures. There was a reverse J-shaped relationship between mean relative humidity and the risk of gout attacks (P = 0.03 for quadratic trend). The combination of high temperature and low humidity had the greatest association (odds ratio = 2.04, 95% confidence interval: 1.26, 3.30) compared with moderate temperature and relative humidity. Thus, high ambient temperature and possibly extremes of humidity were associated with an increased risk of gout attack, despite the likelihood that individuals are often in climate-controlled indoor environments. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Parity and Oral Contraceptive Use in Relation to Ovarian Cancer Risk in Older Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Valerie; Hartge, Patricia; Liao, Linda M; Sinha, Rashmi; Bernstein, Leslie; Canchola, Alison J; Anderson, Garnet L; Stefanick, Marcia L; Whittemore, Alice S

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have suggested that the ovarian cancer risk reductions associated with parity and oral contraceptive use are weaker in postmenopausal than premenopausal women, yet little is known about the persistence of these reductions as women age. This question gains importance with the increasing numbers of older women in the population. We addressed the question using data from three large U.S. cohort studies involving 310,290 white women aged 50+ years at recruitment, of whom 1,815 developed subsequent incident invasive epithelial ovarian cancer. We used Cox regression, stratified by cohort, to examine age-related trends in the HRs per full-term pregnancy and per year of oral contraceptive use. The parity-associated risk reductions waned with age (Ptrend parity. However, we observed no such attenuation in the oral contraceptive-associated risk reductions (P = 0.79 for trend in HR with increasing age). These findings suggest that prior oral contraceptive use is important for ovarian cancer risk assessment among women of all ages, while the benefits of parity wane as women age. This information, if duplicated in other studies, will be useful to preventive counseling and risk prediction, particularly for women at increased ovarian cancer risk due to a personal history of breast cancer or a family history of ovarian cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(7); 1059-63. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Determinants of sexual activity and its relation to cervical cancer risk among South African Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williamson Anna-Lise

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invasive cervical cancer is the commonest cause of cancer morbidity and mortality in South African women. This study provides information on adult women's sexual activity and cervical cancer risk in South Africa. Methods The data were derived from a case-control study of hormonal contraceptives and cervical cancer risk. Information on age of sexual debut and number of lifetime sexual partners was collected from 524 incident cases and 1541 hospital controls. Prevalence ratios and adjusted prevalence ratios were utilised to estimate risk in exposures considered common. Crude and adjusted relative risks were estimated where the outcome was uncommon, using multiple logistic regression analysis. Results The median age of sexual debut and number of sexual partners was 17 years and 2 respectively. Early sexual debut was associated with lower education, increased number of life time partners and alcohol use. Having a greater number of sexual partners was associated with younger sexual debut, being black, single, higher educational levels and alcohol use. The adjusted odds ratio for sexual debut Conclusion Lower socio-economic status, alcohol intake, and being single or black, appear to be determinants of increased sexual activity in South African women. Education had an ambiguous effect. As expected, cervical cancer risk is associated with increased sexual activity. Initiatives to encourage later commencement of sex, and limiting the number of sexual partners would have a favourable impact on risk of cancer of the cervix and other sexually transmitted infections

  8. Cardiovascular risk in lupus nephritis: Do renal disease-related and other traditional risk factors play a role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inoshi Atukorala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to evaluate the prevalence of thickened carotid intima media thickness (CIMT in a Sri Lankan cohort of lupus nephritis (LN patients and to identify associations between traditional cardiovascular disease (CVD and LN-related risk factors with increased CIMT. Consecutive patients with biopsy-proven LN were evaluated for conventional CVD risk factors, renal parameters and extent of organ involvement in this cross-sectional study. Current disease activity and damage were assessed by the British Isles Lupus Activity Group (BILAG score and the Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics/American College of Rheumatology (SLICC/ACR damage index, respectively. CIMT was assessed by B Mode grey scale ultrasonography. Increased CIMT was defined as CIMT more than the 75th percentile based on cutoffs from the "Carotid Atherosclerosis Progression Study." Forty patients (98% female, with a mean age of 38 years (age range of 20-50 and of South Asian descent, were evaluated. The mean duration of disease of 6.15 years (SD = 4.66. The overall prevalence of cardiovascular events was low and included previous acute coronary syndromes in 7.5%, stable angina in 5%, cerebrovascular accidents in 7.5% and transient ischemic attacks in 2.5% of the patients; 72.5% had hypertension (HTN [mean blood pressure (BP 140/80 mm Hg]; 32.5% had dyslipidemias (mean serum cholesterol 5.9; SD = 5.6 and 25% had diabetes (mean blood sugar 103.7; SD = 15.6. Forty percent were obese and 20% were overweight (Asian cutoffs. Increased CIMT (57.5% and atherosclerotic plaques (15.36% indicated a high CVD risk in this cohort. Diabetes (P = 0.016, HTN (P = 0.002, dyslipidemia (P = 0.002 and obesity (P = 0.048 were associated with thickened CIMT. The only LN-related risk factor associated with thickened CIMT (P <0.05 was the SLICC/ACR damage index. The independent predictors of thickened CIMT determined by logistic regression analysis were HTN and dyslipidemia.

  9. Midlife Work-Related Stress Increases Dementia Risk in Later Life: The CAIDE 30-Year Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindi, Shireen; Hagman, Göran; Håkansson, Krister; Kulmala, Jenni; Nilsen, Charlotta; Kåreholt, Ingemar; Soininen, Hilkka; Solomon, Alina; Kivipelto, Miia

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the associations between midlife work-related stress and mild cognitive impairment (MCI), dementia, and Alzheimer's disease later in life, in a large representative population. Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Dementia (CAIDE) study participants were randomly selected from independent population-based surveys (mean age 50 years). A random sample of 2,000 individuals was invited for two reexaminations including cognitive tests (at mean age 71 and mean age 78), and 1,511 subjects participated in at least one reexamination (mean follow-up 28.5 years). Work-related stress was measured using two questions on work demands that were administered in midlife. Analyses adjusted for important confounders. Higher levels of midlife work-related stress were associated with higher risk of MCI (odds ratio [OR], 1.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-1.76), dementia (OR, 1.53; CI, 1.13-2.07), and Alzheimer's disease (OR, 1.55; CI, 1.19-2.36) at the first follow-up among the CAIDE participants. Results remained significant after adjusting for several possible confounders. Work-related stress was not associated with MCI and dementia during the extended follow-up. Midlife work-related stress increases the risk for MCI, dementia, and Alzheimer's disease in later life. The association was not seen after the extended follow-up possibly reflecting selective survival/participation, heterogeneity in dementia among the oldest old, and a critical time window for the effects of midlife stress.

  10. Prospectively measured thyroid hormones and thyroid peroxidase antibodies in relation to breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosovic, Ada; Becker, Charlotte; Bondeson, Anne-Greth; Bondeson, Lennart; Ericsson, Ulla-Britt; Malm, Johan; Manjer, Jonas

    2012-11-01

    Thyroid hormones influence both normal breast cell differentiation and breast cancer cell proliferation and stimulate the angiogenesis of certain cancer forms. Several cross-sectional studies have measured thyroid hormones/autoantibodies in breast cancer ceases vs. controls, but it is difficult to determine the cause-effect direction in these studies. Only three prospective studies have reported on the subject so far. The aim of our study was to investigate prediagnostically measured levels of thyroid hormones, thyrotropin (TSH) and thyroid autoantibodies in relation to subsequent risk of breast cancer. The Malmoe Diet and Cancer study examined 17,035 women between 1991 and 1996. Blood samples were collected at baseline and free triiodothyronine (T3), free thyroxin (T4), TSH and thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies (TPO-Ab) levels were measured in 676 cases and 680 controls. Relative risks with 95% confidence intervals were assessed using a logistic regression analysis adjusted for potential confounders. Free T4 levels were positively associated with a high risk of breast cancer, and the OR for women with free T4 levels above vs. below the median was 1.40 (1.10-1.77). This association was most pronounced in overweight women (1.51:1.07-2.12). Women with high levels of TPO-Ab had a lower risk of breast cancer, but only the analysis of TPO-Ab as a continuous variable reached statistical significance. Free T4 was in our study positively associated with a high risk of breast cancer. This association was most pronounced in overweight/obese women. Women with a high level of TPO-Ab had a relatively low risk of breast cancer. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  11. Height, weight, and aerobic fitness in relation to risk of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Casey; Sundquist, Jan; Winkleby, Marilyn A; Sundquist, Kristina

    2017-06-21

    Tall stature or obesity has been associated with higher risk of atrial fibrillation (AF), but reported effects of aerobic fitness have been conflicting. A national cohort study was conducted to examine interactions between height or weight and aerobic fitness among 1,547,478 Swedish military conscripts during 1969-1997 (97-98% of all 18-year-old males) in relation to AF identified from nationwide inpatient and outpatient diagnoses through 2012 (maximum age 62). Increased height, weight, or aerobic fitness (but not muscular strength) at age 18 was associated with higher AF risk in adulthood. Positive additive and multiplicative interactions were found between height or weight and aerobic fitness (relative excess risk due to interaction between height and aerobic fitness, highest vs. lowest tertiles: 0.51; 95% CI, 0.40-0.62; ratio of hazard ratios: 1.50; 95% CI, 1.34-1.65). High aerobic fitness was associated with increased risk among men with height ≥186 cm (6 feet 1 inch), but was protective among shorter men. Men with the combination of tall stature and high aerobic fitness had the highest risk (highest vs. lowest tertiles: adjusted hazard ratio, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.61-1.80). These findings suggest important interactions between body size and aerobic fitness in relation to AF and may help identify high-risk subgroups. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Spanish consensus on the risks and detection of antipsychotic drug-related hyperprolactinaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montejo, Ángel L; Arango, Celso; Bernardo, Miguel; Carrasco, José L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Cruz, Juan J; Del Pino, Javier; García Escudero, Miguel A; García Rizo, Clemente; González-Pinto, Ana; Hernández, Ana I; Martín Carrasco, Manuel; Mayoral Cleries, Fermin; Mayoral van Son, Jaqueline; Mories, M Teresa; Pachiarotti, Isabella; Ros, Salvador; Vieta, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic hyperprolactinaemia (IHPRL) has been more frequently related to some antipsychotic drugs that provoke an intense blockade of dopamine D2 receptors. There is a wide variation in clinical practice, and perhaps some more awareness between clinicians is needed. Due to the high frequency of chronic treatment in severe mental patients, careful attention is recommended on the physical risk. IHPRL symptoms could be underestimated without routine examination. An intense scientific literature search was performed in order to draw up a multidisciplinary consensus, including different specialists of psychiatry, endocrinology, oncology and internal medicine, and looking for a consensus about clinical risk and detection of IHPRL following evidence-based medicine criteria levels (EBM I- IV). Short-term symptoms include amenorrhea, galactorrhoea, and sexual dysfunction with decrease of libido and erectile difficulties related to hypogonadism. Medium and long-term symptoms related to oestrogens are observed, including a decrease bone mass density, hypogonadism, early menopause, some types of cancer risk increase (breast and endometrial), cardiovascular risk increase, immune system disorders, lipids, and cognitive dysfunction. Prolactin level, gonadal hormones and vitamin D should be checked in all patients receiving antipsychotics at baseline although early symptoms (amenorrhea-galactorrhoea) may not be observed due to the risk of underestimating other delayed symptoms that may appear in the medium term. Routine examination of sexual dysfunction is recommended due to possible poor patient tolerance and low compliance. Special care is required in children and adolescents, as well as patients with PRL levels >50ng/ml (moderate hyperprolactinaemia). A possible prolactinoma should be investigated in patients with PRL levels >150ng/ml, with special attention to patients with breast/endometrial cancer history. Densitometry should be prescribed for males >50 years old

  13. A longitudinal investigation of sports-related risk factors for disordered eating in aesthetic sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krentz, E M; Warschburger, P

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies have indicated a higher risk of disordered eating in certain types of elite sports such as aesthetic sports (e.g., rhythmical gymnastics, figure skating). But even though some studies on risk factors for disordered eating in sports exist, most research on this topic is based on cross-sectional data with limitations on causal inferences. We examined sports-related risk factors for disordered eating in a 1-year longitudinal study with two assessment points. The participants were 65 adolescent athletes from aesthetic sports (mean age 14.0  ±.2.2 years) who completed measures of disordered eating, social pressure from the sports environment, sports-related body dissatisfaction, desire to be leaner to improve sports performance, and emotional distress resulting from missed exercise sessions. All variables were relatively stable in the mean. Individual changes in the desire to be leaner to improve sports performance were associated with individual changes in disordered eating. Furthermore, a cross-lagged partial correlation analysis showed that the desire to be leaner to improve sports performance was predictive of disordered eating and not vice versa. The results of our study indicate that athletes are more at risk for disordered eating if they believe it is possible to enhance their sports performance through weight regulation. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Noncancer-related mortality risks in adult survivors of pediatric malignancies: the childhood cancer survivor study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Cheryl L; Nolan, Vikki G; Leisenring, Wendy; Yasui, Yutaka; Ogg, Susan W; Mertens, Ann C; Neglia, Joseph P; Ness, Kirsten K; Armstrong, Gregory T; Robison, Les L

    2014-09-01

    We sought to identify factors, other than cancer-related treatment and presence/severity of chronic health conditions, which may be associated with late mortality risk among adult survivors of pediatric malignancies. Using the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study cohort and a case-control design, 445 participants who died from causes other than cancer recurrence/progression or non-health-related events were compared with 7,162 surviving participants matched for primary diagnosis, age at baseline questionnaire, time from diagnosis to baseline questionnaire, and time at-risk. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for overall/cause-specific mortality. Independent measures included number/severity of chronic conditions, medical care, health-related behaviors, and health perceptions/concerns. Adjusting for education, income, chemotherapy/radiation exposures, and number/severity of chronic health conditions, an increased risk for all-cause mortality was associated with exercising fewer than 3 days/week (OR = 1.72, CI 1.27-2.34), being underweight (OR = 2.58, CI 1.55-4.28), increased medical care utilization (P cancer treatment and chronic health conditions modify the risk of death among adult survivors of pediatric cancer. Continued cohort observation may inform interventions to reduce mortality.

  15. [The time-related risk for knee osteoarthritis after ACL injury. Results from a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, G; Schiltenwolf, M; Hartmann, B; Grifka, J; Hofmann, G O; Klemm, H-T

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review was to evaluate the time-related risk for knee osteoarthritis in patients after ACL injury. The primary search was carried out in different medical databases with the deadline 12.01.2014. The search strategy for the evaluation was [ACL] AND [osteoarthritis] including "all fields". All 1656 title/abstracts were reviewed by two independent researchers who selected 140 papers for full text review. Finally, a total of 21 relevant publications were identified for inclusion in this current paper. The incidence of knee osteoarthritis rises significantly over time. Two years after injury it was 6.9%, after 5 years 32.2%, after 7 years 36.3%, and after 10 years 79.6%. At the same time, the crude relative risk of OA rises as the time interval since injury increases. The relative risk of OA has already doubled by 2 years after ACL injury). By 7 years it has increased fivefold and compared with OA status at the time of injury it is still increasing significantly after 10 years. The ACL injury is a significant risk factor for the development of early-onset secondary knee osteoarthritis. Within 5 years of the injury the knee shows clear signs of osteoarthritis on MRI. However, these lesions are often not associated with any clinical signs. Knee osteoarthritis as a severe disease starts 8 years or later after the injury, when it requires treatment.

  16. Social Networking Technology Use and Engagement in HIV Related Risk and Protective Behaviors among Homeless Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman-Adhikari, Anamika; Rice, Eric; Bender, Kimberly; Lengnick-Hall, Rebecca; Yoshioka-Maxwell, Amanda; Rhoades, Harmony

    2016-01-01

    Preliminary studies with homeless youth find surprisingly pervasive social media use and suggest youths’ online interactions may be associated with their HIV-related risk and protective behaviors. As homeless youth are transient and difficult to engage in place-based services, social media may represent a novel venue for intervention. A critical first step in intervention development is gaining greater understanding of how homeless youth use social media especially as it relates to whom they connect to and around what topics. Given the salience of Social Networking Sites in the lives of these otherwise difficult to reach adolescents, and their potential to disseminate prevention interventions, this study assessed associations between online social networking technology use and HIV risk behaviors among homeless youth in Los Angeles, California. Homeless youth ages 13 through 24 (N=1046) were recruited through three drop-in centers and surveyed about their social media use and self-reported HIV-related risk behaviors. Results suggest that social media use is widely prevalent among this population, and the content of these online interactions is associated with whether or not they engage in risk or protective behaviors. Implications for interventions and further research are discussed. PMID:27337044

  17. [Interpersonal relations as a source of risk of mobbing in the local police].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segurado Torres, Almudena; Agulló Tomás, Esteban; Rodríguez Suárez, Julio; Agulló Tomás, Ma Silveria; Boada i Grau, Joan; Medina Centeno, Raúl

    2008-11-01

    Social relations in the workplace are one of the main sources of risk for the onset of mobbing. In this work, we analyzed, through the perceived social climate, the influence of interpersonal relations on the characterization of the processes of mobbing, in a sample of local police (N = 235). In particular, the policemen and women's opinions of the quality of the personal relations among the group members and the treatment they receive from the command posts were assessed. The results of the study show that the development of guidelines of social interaction based on discrimination and abuse of authority are predicting variables of mobbing in this group.

  18. Health-related quality of life in diabetic people with different vascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Juan; Fernández-Bolaños, Antonio; Hidalgo, Alvaro

    2012-09-20

    The number of papers on the health related quality of life of patients with DM has grown in recent years but fewer studies have drawn comparisons between diabetic persons and the general population considering different risk groups. The aim of this study is to examine health related quality of life (HRQOL) in people with diabetes mellitus (DM) and to analyze the differences in HRQOL adjusting by vascular risk. The data used in this analysis was obtained from the responses of 15,926 individuals who participated in the 2006 Catalonia Health Survey. Our analysis provides a number of multivariate statistical models designed for studying HRQOL, based on the EQ-5D questionnaire, controlling for demographic factors of survey participants and variables that identify diagnosed illnesses and health problems. Our findings suggest there is a significant, moderate negative relationship between DM and HRQOL in comparison with non diabetic people (absolute value of the coefficient ranges between -0.04 and -0.054 points on a scale of 1). A further analysis of subgroups reveals that diabetics who have not had vascular risk factors neither vascular diseases do not have a diminished HRQOL when compared to the non-diabetic population in general, when other factors are controlled for. In contrast, a comparison of diabetics and non-diabetics who exhibit vascular disease or risk factors for vascular disease reveals HRQOL is significantly diminished to a greater extent for those with diabetes (between 0.152 and 0.175 points loss when comparing a non-diabetic person with a diabetic with vascular disease). Also, HRQOL in diabetic patients who have additional risk factors or a vascular disease are lower than people non-diabetic who have additional risk factors or a vascular disease. When we focus our analysis to the EQ-5D dimensions, we observe that diabetic persons who are neither at risk for nor have a diagnosed vascular disease are no more likely than non-diabetics to report problems

  19. Health- related quality of life in diabetic people with different vascular risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliva Juan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of papers on the health related quality of life of patients with DM has grown in recent years but fewer studies have drawn comparisons between diabetic persons and the general population considering different risk groups. The aim of this study is to examine health related quality of life (HRQOL in people with diabetes mellitus (DM and to analyze the differences in HRQOL adjusting by vascular risk. Methods The data used in this analysis was obtained from the responses of 15,926 individuals who participated in the 2006 Catalonia Health Survey. Our analysis provides a number of multivariate statistical models designed for studying HRQOL, based on the EQ-5D questionnaire, controlling for demographic factors of survey participants and variables that identify diagnosed illnesses and health problems. Results Our findings suggest there is a significant, moderate negative relationship between DM and HRQOL in comparison with non diabetic people (absolute value of the coefficient ranges between −0.04 and −0.054 points on a scale of 1. A further analysis of subgroups reveals that diabetics who have not had vascular risk factors neither vascular diseases do not have a diminished HRQOL when compared to the non-diabetic population in general, when other factors are controlled for. In contrast, a comparison of diabetics and non-diabetics who exhibit vascular disease or risk factors for vascular disease reveals HRQOL is significantly diminished to a greater extent for those with diabetes (between 0.152 and 0.175 points loss when comparing a non-diabetic person with a diabetic with vascular disease. Also, HRQOL in diabetic patients who have additional risk factors or a vascular disease are lower than people non-diabetic who have additional risk factors or a vascular disease. When we focus our analysis to the EQ-5D dimensions, we observe that diabetic persons who are neither at risk for nor have a diagnosed vascular disease are

  20. Risk for disordered eating relates to both gender and ethnicity for college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerr, Sharon L; Bokram, Ronda; Lugo, Brenda; Bivins, Tanya; Keast, Debra R

    2002-08-01

    To estimate the frequency of disordered eating behaviors among college students and associations by gender, ethnicity, participation in social organizations and college athletics and to determine whether responses to eight health behavior and attitude questions and body weight predicted a high score on the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT)-26, a screening instrument used to identify risks of developing an eating disorder. Subjects were a convenience sample of 1,899 college students (cleaned to 1620) who attended four classes, were members of 14 sororities or lived in five residence halls. Students reported height and weight and responded to the EAT-26 and eight items regarding health behaviors and attitudes. Among women and men, 4.5% and 1.4%, respectively, reported previous treatment for an eating disorder, and 10.9% of women and 4.0% of men were at risk for eating disorders (scores > or = 20 on EAT). Among African-Americans, 8.3% of women were at risk. One group of women who lived separately in a social sorority had the highest risk of 15%. The frequency of "weight concerns interfering with academic performance" and "eliminating high fat foods" was moderately correlated to risk for disordered eating for both genders. Body mass only weakly related to risk for disordered eating and the association varied by subgroup. Students at risk for disordered eating report weight concerns interfering with their academic performance and include both men and African-Americans, as well as Caucasian American women. Sorority women living in separate residences might be at increased risk.