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Sample records for subaqueous shrinkage cracks

  1. Mitigation strategies for autogenous shrinkage cracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Dale P.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2004-01-01

    As the use of high-performance concrete has increased, problems with early-age cracking have become prominent. The reduction in water-to-cement ratio, the incorporation of silica fume, and the increase in binder content of high-performance concretes all contribute to this problem. In this paper......, the fundamental parameters contributing to the autogenous shrinkage and resultant early-age cracking of concrete are presented. Basic characteristics of the cement paste that contribute to or control the autogenous shrinkage response include the surface tension of the pore solution, the geometry of the pore...... of early-age cracking due to autogenous shrinkage. Mitigation strategies discussed in this paper include: the addition of shrinkage-reducing admixtures more commonly used to control drying shrinkage, control of the cement particle size distribution, modification of the mineralogical composition...

  2. Finite element analysis of moisture migration, creep, shrinkage and cracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijl, G.P.A.G. van; Borst, R. de; Rots, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    A finite element formulation is presented for the analysis of moisture migra-tion, creep, shrinkage and cracking in cementitious materials. A one-way coupled approach is followed, where the pore humidity, the driving force for shrinkage, is solved for from a diffusion equation. The evolution of the

  3. Influence of Shrinkage-Reducing Admixtures on the Development of Plastic Shrinkage Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Pease, Bradley Justin; Mazzotta, Guy

    2007-01-01

    -reducing admixture (SRA). Mortars containing SRA show fewer and narrower plastic shrinkage cracks than plain mortars when exposed to the same environmental conditions. It is proposed that the lower surface tension of the pore fluid in the mortars containing SRA results in less evaporation, reduced settlement...

  4. Measurement of shrinkage and cracking in lyophilized amorphous cakes. Part I: final-product assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Sabine; Seyferth, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    An experimental technique is presented to determine independently shrinkage and cracking in lyophilized amorphous cakes based on photographic imaging of their top surface. An inverse correlation between cake shrinkage and cracking during freeze-drying is seen. Shrinkage relaxes the drying tension and gives little cracking, whereas if shrinkage is restrained then more cracking occurs. A lower shrinkage and greater cracking with higher disaccharide concentration correlates with change in cake hardness and brittleness. Adhesion of the cake to the inside vial wall could not be identified as a determining factor for shrinkage. Shrinkage is non-uniform across the cake's surface and is manifested largely in the peripheral region. A correlation between shrinkage and w(g)' for different disaccharides suggests that drying tension develops as non-frozen water is lost from the porous solid after sublimation of the ice phase has exposed the solid/gas interface. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  5. The Shrinkage Cracking Behavior in Reinforced Reactive Powder Concrete Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir A. Al-Mashhadi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the reduced scale wall models were used (they are believed to resemble as much as possible the field conditions to study the shrinkage behavior of reactive powder concrete (RPC base restrained walls. Six base restrained RPC walls were casted in different length/height ratios of two ratios of steel fiber by volume in Summer. These walls were restrained by reinforced concrete bases to provide the continuous base restraint to the walls. The mechanical properties of reactive powder concrete investigated were; compressive strength between (75.3 – 140.1 MPa, splitting tensile strength between (5.7 – 13.9 MPa, flexural tensile strength (7.7 – 24.5 MPa, and static modulus of elasticity (32.7 – 47.1GPa. Based on the observations of this work, it was found that the cracks did not develop in the reduced scale of the reactive powder concrete (RPC walls restrained from movement at their bases for different L/H ratios (2, 5, and 10 and for two ratio of steel fiber (1% & 2% during 90 days period of drying conditions. Moreover, the shrinkage values increase toward the edges. Based on the results of this work, the increase in the maximum shrinkage values of walls with 1% steel fiber were (29%, 28%, 28% of the maximum shrinkage values of walls with 2% steel fiber of length/height ratios of (2, 5, and 10 respectively. The experimental observation in beam specimens showed that the free shrinkage, tensile strain capacity and elastic tensile strain capacity (at date of cracking of beams with 1% steel fiber were higher than the beams with 2% steel fiber by about (24%, (45% and (42% respectively

  6. Evaluation of shrinkage and cracking in concrete of ring test by acoustic emission method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Chikanori

    2015-03-01

    Drying shrinkage of concrete is one of the typical problems related to reduce durability and defilation of concrete structures. Lime stone, expansive additive and low-heat Portland cement are used to reduce drying shrinkage in Japan. Drying shrinkage is commonly evaluated by methods of measurement for length change of mortar and concrete. In these methods, there is detected strain due to drying shrinkage of free body, although visible cracking does not occur. In this study, the ring test was employed to detect strain and age cracking of concrete. The acoustic emission (AE) method was adopted to detect micro cracking due to shrinkage. It was recognized that in concrete using lime stone, expansive additive and low-heat Portland cement are effective to decrease drying shrinkage and visible cracking. Micro cracking due to shrinkage of this concrete was detected and evaluated by the AE method.

  7. Effect of steel fibers on plastic shrinkage cracking of normal and high strength concretes

    OpenAIRE

    Özgür Eren; Khaled Marar

    2011-01-01

    Naturally concrete shrinks when it is subjected to a drying environment. If this shrinkage is restrained, tensile stresses develop and concrete may crack. Plastic shrinkage cracks are especially harmful on slabs. One of the methods to reduce the adverse effects of shrinkage cracking of concrete is by reinforcing concrete with short randomly distributed fibers. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of fiber volume and aspect ratio of hooked steel fibers on plastic shri...

  8. Effectiveness of Fiber Reinforcement on the Mechanical Properties and Shrinkage Cracking of Recycled Fine Aggregate Concrete

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jeongsoo Nam; Gyuyong Kim; Jaechul Yoo; Gyeongcheol Choe; Hongseop Kim; Hyeonggil Choi; Youngduck Kim

    2016-01-01

      This paper presents an experimental study conducted to investigate the effect of fiber reinforcement on the mechanical properties and shrinkage cracking of recycled fine aggregate concrete (RFAC...

  9. Study of Drying Shrinkage Cracking by Lattice Gas Automaton and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Mier, J.G.M.; Jankovic, D.

    2005-01-01

    Numerical modeling of moisture flow, drying shrinkage and crack phenomena in cement microstructure, by coupling a Lattice Gas Automaton and a Lattice Fracture Model, highlighted the importance of a shrinkage coefficient (?sh) as the most significant parameter for achieving realistic numerical

  10. Measurement of Shrinkage and Cracking in Lyophilized Amorphous Cakes. Part II: Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Sabine; Seyferth, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey

    2015-08-01

    Measurement of the kinetic development of shrinkage and cracking of an amorphous trehalose cake as they take place during lyophilization. A novel technique has been developed which monitors a vial in situ during the freeze-drying cycle. The 2-dimensional degrees of shrinkage and cracking in its top surface are determined quantitatively using a digital camera and evaluated using AxioVision. Shrinkage and cracking develop largely already during programmed primary drying and are coupled. For trehalose, sucrose and maltose no clear correlation between shrinkage and wg' is found. There is no dependence of cake rim detachment from the vial inner surface on the trehalose concentration. Cake adhesion is therefore likely not the only determining factor for detachment and shrinkage. If shrinkage can occur during primary drying, then this relaxes the drying tension produced by desorption of non-frozen water out of the amorphous structure left behind as the sublimation front passes through a volume element, and causes little or no cracking. If shrinkage is restrained, then the drying tension is relaxed by cracking of the brittle cake.

  11. Mitigation strategies for early-age shrinkage cracking in bridge decks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Early-age shrinkage cracking has been observed in many concrete bridge decks in Washington State and elsewhere around the U.S. The cracking increases the effects of freeze-thaw damage, spalling, and corrosion of steel reinforcement, thus resulting in...

  12. Effect of steel fibers on plastic shrinkage cracking of normal and high strength concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür Eren

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Naturally concrete shrinks when it is subjected to a drying environment. If this shrinkage is restrained, tensile stresses develop and concrete may crack. Plastic shrinkage cracks are especially harmful on slabs. One of the methods to reduce the adverse effects of shrinkage cracking of concrete is by reinforcing concrete with short randomly distributed fibers. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of fiber volume and aspect ratio of hooked steel fibers on plastic shrinkage cracking behavior together with some other properties of concrete. In this research two different compressive strength levels namely 56 and 73 MPa were studied. Concretes were produced by adding steel fibers of 3 different volumes of 3 different aspect ratios. From this research study, it is observed that steel fibers can significantly reduce plastic shrinkage cracking behavior of concretes. On the other hand, it was observed that these steel fibers can adversely affect some other properties of concrete during fresh and hardened states.

  13. Development of high shrinkage polyethylene terephthalate (PET) shape memory polymer tendons for concrete crack closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teall, Oliver; Pilegis, Martins; Sweeney, John; Gough, Tim; Thompson, Glen; Jefferson, Anthony; Lark, Robert; Gardner, Diane

    2017-04-01

    The shrinkage force exerted by restrained shape memory polymers (SMPs) can potentially be used to close cracks in structural concrete. This paper describes the physical processing and experimental work undertaken to develop high shrinkage die-drawn polyethylene terephthalate (PET) SMP tendons for use within a crack closure system. The extrusion and die-drawing procedure used to manufacture a series of PET tendon samples is described. The results from a set of restrained shrinkage tests, undertaken at differing activation temperatures, are also presented along with the mechanical properties of the most promising samples. The stress developed within the tendons is found to be related to the activation temperature, the cross-sectional area and to the draw rate used during manufacture. Comparisons with commercially-available PET strip samples used in previous research are made, demonstrating an increase in restrained shrinkage stress by a factor of two for manufactured PET filament samples.

  14. Effectiveness of Fiber Reinforcement on the Mechanical Properties and Shrinkage Cracking of Recycled Fine Aggregate Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jeongsoo; Kim, Gyuyong; Yoo, Jaechul; Choe, Gyeongcheol; Kim, Hongseop; Choi, Hyeonggil; Kim, Youngduck

    2016-02-26

    This paper presents an experimental study conducted to investigate the effect of fiber reinforcement on the mechanical properties and shrinkage cracking of recycled fine aggregate concrete (RFAC) with two types of fiber-polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and nylon. A small fiber volume fraction, such as 0.05% or 0.1%, in RFAC with polyvinyl alcohol or nylon fibers was used for optimum efficiency in minimum quantity. Additionally, to make a comparative evaluation of the mechanical properties and shrinkage cracking, we examined natural fine aggregate concrete as well. The test results revealed that the addition of fibers and fine aggregates plays an important role in improving the mechanical performance of the investigated concrete specimens as well as controlling their cracking behavior. The mechanical properties such as compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, and flexural strength of fiber-reinforced RFAC were slightly better than those of non-fiber-reinforced RFAC. The shrinkage cracking behavior was examined using plat-ring-type and slab-type tests. The fiber-reinforced RFAC showed a greater reduction in the surface cracks than non-fiber-reinforced concrete. The addition of fibers at a small volume fraction in RFAC is more effective for drying shrinkage cracks than for improving mechanical performance.

  15. Effectiveness of Fiber Reinforcement on the Mechanical Properties and Shrinkage Cracking of Recycled Fine Aggregate Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jeongsoo; Kim, Gyuyong; Yoo, Jaechul; Choe, Gyeongcheol; Kim, Hongseop; Choi, Hyeonggil; Kim, Youngduck

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study conducted to investigate the effect of fiber reinforcement on the mechanical properties and shrinkage cracking of recycled fine aggregate concrete (RFAC) with two types of fiber—polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and nylon. A small fiber volume fraction, such as 0.05% or 0.1%, in RFAC with polyvinyl alcohol or nylon fibers was used for optimum efficiency in minimum quantity. Additionally, to make a comparative evaluation of the mechanical properties and shrinkage cracking, we examined natural fine aggregate concrete as well. The test results revealed that the addition of fibers and fine aggregates plays an important role in improving the mechanical performance of the investigated concrete specimens as well as controlling their cracking behavior. The mechanical properties such as compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, and flexural strength of fiber-reinforced RFAC were slightly better than those of non-fiber-reinforced RFAC. The shrinkage cracking behavior was examined using plat-ring-type and slab-type tests. The fiber-reinforced RFAC showed a greater reduction in the surface cracks than non-fiber-reinforced concrete. The addition of fibers at a small volume fraction in RFAC is more effective for drying shrinkage cracks than for improving mechanical performance. PMID:28773256

  16. Measurement of shrinkage and cracking in lyophilized amorphous cakes. Part IV: Effects of freezing protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Sabine; Seyferth, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey

    2015-11-10

    The shrinkage and cracking of pure trehalose cakes during lyophilization has been determined quantitatively using different protocols for the freezing step. The influences of shelf cooling rate and of a two-step freezing protocol with holding and annealing phases were investigated. A small change in the shelf cooling rate from 0.4°C to 0.2°C per minute produced surprisingly large increases in shrinkage and reductions in cracking over all trehalose concentrations up to 30% w/v. The two-step freezing protocol also increased shrinkage and reduced cracking in the final-product cakes, especially at trehalose concentrations ≥ 15% and with large vial fill height. A combination of two-step freezing with use of TopLyo vials produced less than 1.5% cracking even at high trehalose concentrations and large fill height. The results give further confirmation of the causal linkage of shrinkage and cracking during lyophilization, and also illustrate how cracking can be greatly reduced by manipulating the freezing protocol. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Numerical simulation of early-age shrinkage effects on RC member deflections and cracking development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bernardi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Shrinkage effects on short-term behavior of reinforced concrete elements are often neglected both in design code provisions and in numerical simulations. However, it is known that their influence on serviceability performance can be significant, especially in case of lightly-reinforced beams. As a matter of fact, the restraint provided by the reinforcement on concrete determines a reduction of the cracking load of the structural element, as well as an increase of its deflection. This paper deals with the modeling of early-age shrinkage effects in the field of smeared crack approaches. To this aim, an existing non-linear constitutive relation for cracked reinforced concrete elements is extended herein to include early-age concrete shrinkage. Careful verifications of the model are carried out by comparing numerical results with significant experimental data reported in technical literature, providing a good agreement both in terms of global and local behavior.

  18. A Mesoscopic Simulation for the Early-Age Shrinkage Cracking Process of High Performance Concrete in Bridge Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available On a mesoscopic level, high performance concrete (HPC was assumed to be a heterogeneous composite material consisting of aggregates, mortar, and pores. The concrete mesoscopic structure model had been established based on CT image reconstruction. By combining this model with continuum mechanics, damage mechanics, and fracture mechanics, a relatively complete system for concrete mesoscopic mechanics analysis was established to simulate the process of early-age shrinkage cracking in HPC. This process was based on the dispersion crack model. The results indicated that the interface between the aggregate and mortar was the crack point caused by shrinkage cracks in HPC. The locations of early-age shrinkage cracks in HPC were associated with the spacing and the size of the aggregate particle. However, the shrinkage deformation size of the mortar was related to the scope of concrete cracking and was independent of the crack position. Whereas lower water to cement ratios can improve the early strength of concrete, this ratio cannot control early-age shrinkage cracks in HPC.

  19. Development and construction of low-cracking high-performance concrete (LC-HPC) bridge decks: Free shrinkage tests, restrained ring tests, construction experience, and crack survey results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jiqiu

    2011-12-01

    The development, construction, and evaluation of low-cracking high-performance concrete (LC-HPC) bridge decks are described based on laboratory test results and experiences gained during the construction of 13 LC-HPC bridge decks in Kansas, along with another deck bid under the LC-HPC specifications but for which the owner did not enforce the specification. This study is divided into four parts covering (1) an evaluation of the free shrinkage properties of LC-HPC candidate mixtures, (2) an investigation of the relationship between the evaporable water content in the cement paste and the free shrinkage of concrete, (3) a study of the restrained shrinkage performance of concrete using restrained ring tests, and (4) a description of the construction and preliminary evaluation of LC-HPC and control bridge decks constructed in Kansas. The first portion of the study involves evaluating the effects of the duration of curing, fly ash, and a shrinkage reducing admixture (SRA) on the free-shrinkage characteristics of concrete mixtures. The results indicate that an increase of curing period reduces free shrinkage. With 7 days of curing, concretes containing fly ash as a partial replacement for cement exhibit higher free shrinkage than concretes with 100% portland cement. When the curing period is increased to 14, 28, and 56 days, the adverse effect of adding fly ash on free shrinkage is minimized and finally reversed. The addition of an SRA significantly reduces free shrinkage for both the 100% portland cement mixture and the mixture containing fly ash. The second portion of the study investigates the relationship between the evaporable water content in the cement paste and the free shrinkage of concrete. A linear relationship between free shrinkage and evaporable water content in the cement paste is observed. For a given mixture, specimens cured for a longer period contain less evaporable water and exhibit lower free shrinkage and less weight loss in the free shrinkage

  20. Measurement of shrinkage and cracking in lyophilized amorphous cakes, part 3: hydrophobic vials and the question of adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Sabine; Seyferth, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey

    2015-06-01

    The importance of cake adhesion to the inside vial wall during lyophilization of amorphous trehalose cakes was determined by using hydrophobized vials. The degrees of cake shrinkage and cracking were determined independently by photographic imaging of the cake top surface in a dark cell. Additionally, measurements with microcomputed tomography were performed. Adhesion is found to be a determining factor in both cake shrinkage and cracking. The correlation between cake detachment from the vial inner wall and trehalose concentration indicates that adhesion of the frozen solute phase is a determining factor in shrinkage. The hydrophobized vials give reduced cracking at trehalose concentrations of up to 15%. The reduced wetting of the hydrophobized inside vial wall gives a planar cake topography with a uniform distribution of cracks within the cake. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  1. Self-healing of drying shrinkage cracks in cement-based materials incorporating reactive MgO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, T. S.; Al-Tabbaa, A.

    2016-08-01

    Excessive drying shrinkage is one of the major issues of concern for longevity and reduced strength performance of concrete structures. It can cause the formation of cracks in the concrete. This research aims to improve the autogenous self-healing capacity of traditional Portland cement (PC) systems, adding expansive minerals such as reactive magnesium oxide (MgO) in terms of drying shrinkage crack healing. Two different reactive grades (high ‘N50’and moderately high ‘92-200’) of MgO were added with PC. Cracks were induced in the samples with restraining end prisms through natural drying shrinkage over 28 days after casting. Samples were then cured under water for 28 and 56 days, and self-healing capacity was investigated in terms of mechanical strength recovery, crack sealing efficiency and improvement in durability. Finally, microstructures of the healing materials were investigated using FT-IR, XRD, and SEM-EDX. Overall N50 mixes show higher expansion and drying shrinkage compared to 92-200 mixes. Autogenous self-healing performance of the MgO containing samples were much higher compared to control (only PC) mixes. Cracks up to 500 μm were sealed in most MgO containing samples after 28 days. In the microstructural investigations, highly expansive Mg-rich hydro-carbonate bridges were found along with traditional calcium-based, self-healing compounds (calcite, portlandite, calcium silicate hydrates and ettringite).

  2. Effect of Addition of A Marble Dust on Drying Shrinkage Cracks of Cement Mortar Reinforced with Various Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basim Thabit Al-Khafaji

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This investigation is conducted to study the effect of addition of marble powder (marble dust and different fibers on drying shrinkage cracks and some properties of fibers reinforcment cement mortar. Steel molds having a trapezoidal section, and the end restrained at square shape with( 2.7 meter at length are used to study restrained drying shrinkage of cement mortar. Specimens of ( compressive .flextural. splitting strength were cast. The admixture (marble dust was used to replacie weight of cement with three levels of (4%, 8% and 16% and the fiber hemp and sisal fiber were added for all mixes with proportion by volum of cement . All specimens were cured for (14 days. Average of three results was taken for any test of compressive, tensil and flextural strength. The experimental results showed that the adding of this admixture(marble dust cause adelay in a formation of cracks predicted from a drying shrinkage ,decreases of its width , and hence increases of (compressive, splitting tensil and flextural strength at levels of (4%, and 8%. Thus there is a the positive effect when fiberes added for all mixes of cement mortar with addition of (marble dust. All The admixtures (marble dust and fibers have the obvious visible effect in the delay of the information of shrinkage cracks and the decrease of its width as Compared to the cement mortar mixes when marble dust added a alone.

  3. Experimental study on the shrinkage properties and cracking potential of high strength concrete containing industrial by-products for nuclear power plant concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KIm, Baek Joong; Yi, Chong Ku [School of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    In Korea, attempts have been made to develop high strength concrete for the safety and design life improvement of nuclear power plants. In this study, the cracking potentials of nuclear power plant-high strength concretes (NPP-HSCs) containing industrial by-products with W/B 0.34 and W/B 0.28, which are being reviewed for their application in the construction of containment structures, were evaluated through autogenous shrinkage, unrestrained drying shrinkage, and restrained drying shrinkage experiments. The cracking potentials of the NPP-HSCs with W/B 0.34 and W/B 0.28 were in the order of 0.34FA25 > 0.34FA25BFS25 > 0.34BFS50 > 0.34BFS65SF5 and 0.28FA25SF5 >> 0.28BFS65SF5 > 0.28BFS45SF5 > 0.28 FA20BFS25SF5, respectively. The cracking potentials of the seven mix proportions excluding 0.28FA25SF5 were lower than that of the existing nuclear power plant concrete; thus, the durability of a nuclear power plant against shrinkage cracking could be improved by applying the seven mix proportions with low cracking potentials.

  4. Drying shrinkage problems in high PI subgrade soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the longitudinal cracking in pavements due to drying : shrinkage of high PI subgrade soils. The study involved laboartory soil testing and modeling. The : shrinkage cracks usually occur within the v...

  5. Crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make people edgy and irritable. They may have panic attacks and full-blown psychosis where they hear ... die. It's extremely hard to kick a crack addiction. Even after people have been off the drug ...

  6. Modelling desiccation shrinkage of large structures

    OpenAIRE

    Torrenti J.-M.; Benboudjema F.

    2013-01-01

    Drying of cement-based materials induces drying shrinkage, which may cause prestress loss or/and cracking if strains are (self or externally) restrained. Drying shrinkage is difficult to predict, since it depends on the material mix, mechanical and hygral boundary conditions, geometry ... This paper focuses on the study of size effect on final drying shrinkage, which is not well documented in the literature. In the Eurocode 2 (European code model), a reduction factor is applied for large stru...

  7. SUBAQUEOUS DISPOSAL OF MILL TAILINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neeraj K. Mendiratta; Roe-Hoan Yoon; Paul Richardson

    1999-09-03

    A study of mill tailings and sulfide minerals was carried out in order to understand their behavior under subaqueous conditions. A series of electrochemical experiments, namely, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and galvanic coupling tests were carried out in artificial seawater and in pH 6.8 buffer solutions with chloride and ferric salts. Two mill tailings samples, one from the Kensington Mine, Alaska, and the other from the Holden Mine, Washington, were studied along with pyrite, galena, chalcopyrite and copper-activated sphalerite. SEM analysis of mill tailings revealed absence of sulfide minerals from the Kensington Mine mill tailings, whereas the Holden Mine mill tailings contained approximately 8% pyrite and 1% sphalerite. In order to conduct electrochemical tests, carbon matrix composite (CMC) electrodes of mill tailings, pyrite and galena were prepared and their feasibility was established by conducting a series of cyclic voltammetry tests. The cyclic voltammetry experiments carried out in artificial seawater and pH 6.8 buffer with chloride salts showed that chloride ions play an important role in the redox processes of sulfide minerals. For pyrite and galena, peaks were observed for the formation of chloride complexes, whereas pitting behavior was observed for the CMC electrodes of the Kensington Mine mill tailings. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy conducted in artificial seawater provided with the Nyquist plots of pyrite and galena. The Nyquist plots of pyrite and galena exhibited an inert range of potential indicating a slower rate of leaching of sulfide minerals in marine environments. The galvanic coupling experiments were carried out to study the oxidation of sulfide minerals in the absence of oxygen. It was shown that in the absence of oxygen, ferric (Fe3+) ions might oxidize the sulfide minerals, thereby releasing undesirable oxidation products in the marine environment. The source of Fe{sup 3{minus}} ions may be

  8. Dry shrinkage characteristics of buffer materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, H. [ITC, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Fujita, A.

    1999-03-01

    Generation of cracks due to drying of compressed bentonite was observed by changing the initial water content to obtain shrinkage constants such as shrinkage limit and shrinking rate. As a result, generation of practically no cracks was observed when the initial water content of samples was below 13%. The volume change due to drying increased with the water content in the sample, and the shrinkage constants were found to depend on the initial water content. Further, the one-dimensional compression strength after drying was compared with that before drying in order to clarify the effect of cracks generated by drying on the mechanical strength. As a result, the dry sample with cracks proved to have large one-dimensional compression strength or E{sub 50} compared to wet samples, so that the mechanical strength was kept even after drying. (H. Baba)

  9. Sealing of Cracks on Florida Bridge Decks with Steel Girders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    One of the biggest problems affecting bridges is the transverse cracking and deterioration of concrete bridge decks. The causes of early age cracking are primarily attributed to plastic shrinkage, temperature effects, autogenous shrinkage, and drying...

  10. Development and construction of low-cracking high-performance concrete (LC-HPC) bridge decks : free shrinkage, moisture optimization and concrete production : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    The development and evaluation of low-cracking high-performance concrete (LC-HPC) for use in bridge decks : is described based on laboratory test results and experience gained during the construction of 14 bridges. This report : emphasizes the materi...

  11. Development and construction of low-cracking high-performance concrete (LC-HPC) bridge decks : free shrinkage, moisture optimization and concrete production : summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    The development and evaluation of low-cracking high-performance concrete (LC-HPC) for use in bridge decks : is described based on laboratory test results and experience gained during the construction of 14 bridges. This report : emphasizes the materi...

  12. Modelling desiccation shrinkage of large structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrenti J.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Drying of cement-based materials induces drying shrinkage, which may cause prestress loss or/and cracking if strains are (self or externally restrained. Drying shrinkage is difficult to predict, since it depends on the material mix, mechanical and hygral boundary conditions, geometry ... This paper focuses on the study of size effect on final drying shrinkage, which is not well documented in the literature. In the Eurocode 2 (European code model, a reduction factor is applied for large structure, which is in agreement with experimental data of one campaign (found in the literature. Using numerical simulations, it is shown that a large panel of models, including phenomenological models as physical ones (which takes into account of (aging creep under capillary pressure (assumed to be the physical mechanism for drying shrinkage, do not predict size effect on final value of drying shrinkage.

  13. Identification of microcracks caused by autogenous shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Guang, Ye

    2005-01-01

    Detection and quantification of microcracks caused by restrained autogenous shrinkage in high-performance concrete is difficult. Available techniques either lack the required resolution or may cause further cracks indistinguishable from the original ones. The new technique presented in this paper...... allows detection of microcracks while avoiding artifacts induced by unwanted restraint, drying or temperature variations. The technique consists of casting small circular cylindrical samples of cement pastes in silicone moulds. Steel rods of different diameters are cast into the cement paste to restrain...... the autogenous shrinkage and cause crack formation during hardening. Subsequently, liquid gallium is intruded into the cracks under pressure. After solidification of the gallium, the crack pattern is frozen and can be analyzed after plane polishing of the samples. The microcracks are identified by optical...

  14. The influence of shrinkage reducing admixtures on plastic shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mora, J.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Shrinkage reducing admixtures (SRAs are viable alternatives for reducing plastic shrinkage cracking in concrete. The objective of the present paper is to study early age plastic shrinkage in restrained concrete elements, where three different SRAs have been used. The influence of the admixture is analyzed through the following measurements: capillary pressure, evaporation, temperature evolution, crack evolution and settlement. The tests for studying the cracking and deformation were made on two different configurations (i.e., restrained prisms with reduced cross-section and restrained panel, in a wind tunnel, with controlled wind temperature and velocity. The conclusions obtained indicate the viability of the use of this type of admixture and the usefulness of the test methods.

    Los aditivos reductores de retracción (SRAs se plantean, hoy en día, como una alternativa viable para reducir la fisuración por retracción plástica. El objetivo del presente artículo es conocer mejor y predecir el comportamiento a primeras edades de la retracción plástica en elementos estructurales coaccionados, a los que se les ha añadido diversos aditivos reductores de retracción (tres tipos diferentes. Esta influencia se analiza a través de las siguientes propiedades: presión capilar, evaporación, evolución de temperaturas, evolución de fisuración, y deformaciones verticales de asentamiento. Los ensayos para estudiar la fisuración y las deformaciones se han realizado sobre diferentes configuraciones (prisma restringido con estrangulamiento y panel restringido, en un túnel de viento, con temperaturas y velocidades de viento controladas. Las conclusiones obtenidas señalan la viabilidad del empleo de este tipo de aditivos y la bondad de los métodos experimentales utilizados.

  15. Shrinkage Properties of Cement Stabilized Gravel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mia Schou Møller; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2014-01-01

    Cement stabilized gravel is an attractive material in road construction because its strength prop-erties are accommodating the increasingly higher requirements to the bearing capacity of a base course. However, reflection cracking of cement stabilized gravel is a major concern. In this pa......-per the shrinkage properties of cement stabilized gravel have been documented under various temperature and relative humidity conditions. Two cement contents corresponding to a 28-days compressive strength of 6.2 MPa and 12.3 MPa have been tested and compared. It is found that the coefficient of linear expansion...... for the two cement contents is 9.9 × 10-6 ⁰C-1 and 11.3 × 10-6 ⁰C-1, respectively. Furthermore, it is found that reflecting cracking can mainly be explained by temperature dependent shrinkage rather than moisture dependent shrinkage....

  16. Phase 1 report on the development of predictive model for bridge deck cracking and strength development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Early-age cracking, typically caused by drying shrinkage (and often coupled with autogenous and thermal : shrinkage), can have several detrimental effects on long-term behavior and durability. Cracking can also provide : ingress of water that can dri...

  17. Sub-aqueous sulfur volcanos at Waiotapu, New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, S.; Rickard, D. [University of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Browne, P.; Simmons, S. [University of Auckland (New Zealand). Geothermal Institute and Geology Dept.; Jull, T. [University of Arizona, Tucson (United States). AMS Facility

    1999-12-01

    Exhumed, sub-aqueous sulfur mounds occur in the Waiotapu geothermal area, New Zealand. The extinct mounds are < 2 m high and composed of small (< 0.5 cm) hollow spheres, and occasional teardrop-shaped globules. They are located within a drained valley that until recently was connected to Lake Whangioterangi. They were formed a maximum of 820 {+-} 80 years BP as a result of the rapid sub-aqueous deposition of sulfur globules, formed when fumarolic gases discharged through molten sulfur pools. Similar globules are now being formed by the discharge of fumarolic gases through a sub-aqueous molten sulfur pool in Lake Whangioterangi. (author)

  18. Development of shrinkage resistant microfibre-reinforced cement-based composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedanimojarrad, P.; Adam, G.; Ray, A.; Thomas, P.; Vessalas, K.

    2012-06-01

    Different shrinkage types may cause serious durability dilemma on restrained concrete parts due to crack formation and propagation. Several classes of fibres are used by concrete industry in order to reduce crack size and crack number. In previous studies, most of these fibre types were found to be effective in reducing the number and sizes of the cracks, but not in shrinkage strain reduction. This study deals with the influence of a newly introduced type of polyethylene fibre on drying shrinkage reduction. The novel fibre is a polyethylene microfibre in a new geometry, which is proved to reduce the amount of total shrinkage in mortars. This special hydrophobic polyethylene microfibre also reduces moisture loss of mortar samples. The experimental results on short and long-term drying shrinkage as well as on several other properties are reported. The hydrophobic polyethylene microfibre showed promising improvement in shrinkage reduction even at very low concentrations (0.1% of cement weight).

  19. Reduction of the Early Autogenous Shrinkage of High Strength Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Saje

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of a laboratory investigation on the early autogenous shrinkage of high strength concrete, and the possibilities of its reduction, are presented. Such concrete demonstrates significant autogenous shrinkage, which should, however, be limited in the early stages of its development in order to prevent the occurrence of cracks and/or drop in the load-carrying capacity of concrete structures. The following possibilities for reducing autogenous shrinkage were investigated: the use of low-heat cement, a shrinkage-reducing admixture, steel fibres, premoistened polypropylene fibres, and presoaked lightweight aggregate. In the case of the use of presoaked natural lightweight aggregate, with a fraction from 2 to 4 mm, the early autogenous shrinkage of one-day-old high strength concrete decreased by about 90%, with no change to the concrete's compressive strength in comparison with that of the reference concrete.

  20. Influence of shrinkage-reducing admixture on drying shrinkage and mechanical properties of high-performance concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Quangphu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available High-performance concrete (HPC has specific performance advantages over conventional concrete in strength and durability. HPC mixtures are usually produced with water/binder mass ratios (mW/mB in the range of 0.2–0.4, so volume changes of concrete as a result of drying, chemical reactions, and temperature change cannot be avoided. For these reasons, shrinkage and cracking are frequent phenomena. It is necessary to add some types of admixture for reduction of shrinkage and cracking of HPC. This study used

  1. Construction monitoring of paving fabrics systems to reduce reflective cracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    Reflective cracking has been a major issue in pavement rehabilitation for many decades, due in part to shrinkage, constant expansion and contraction of pavement. These cracks result in uncomfortable rides and further deteriorate highways and local st...

  2. Comparison of estimated and experimental subaqueous seed transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott Markwith; David Leigh

    2011-01-01

    We compare the estimates from the relative bed stability (RBS) equation that indicates incipient bed movement, and the inertial settling (‘Impact’) law and Wu and Wang (2006) settling velocity equations that indicate suspended particle movement, to flume and settling velocity observations to confirm the utility of the equations for subaqueous hydrochory analyses, and...

  3. Drying shrinkage problems in high-plastic clay soils in Oklahoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Longitudinal cracking in pavements due to drying shrinkage of high-plastic subgrade soils has been a major : problem in Oklahoma. Annual maintenance to seal and repair these distress problems costs significant amount of : money to the state. The long...

  4. Magnitude, modeling and significance of swelling and shrinkage processes in clay soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronswijk, J.J.B.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic process of swelling and shrinkage in clay soils has significant practical consequences, such as the rapid transport of water and solutes via shrinkage cracks to the subsoil, and the destruction of buildings and roads on clay soils. In order to develop measuring methods and

  5. Shrinkage reduction of dental composites by addition of expandable zirconia filler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, M.; Almdal, Kristoffer; Sørensen, Bent F.

    2011-01-01

    A problem with dental resin composites is the polymerization shrinkage, which makes the filling loosen from the tooth or induces crack formation. We have developed an expandable metastable tetragonal zirconia filler, which upon reaction with water, is able to counter the polymer shrinkage...

  6. On Early Age Crack Formation in FRC Slabs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, John Forbes; Stang, Henrik

    1997-01-01

    The problem of early age crack formation in FRC slabs due to restrained temperature and shrinkage deformations, is given an analytical treatment. A model taking into account the ageing properties of the tensile softening curve and the continued development in the temperature and shrinkage...... deformations after crack initiation, is presented. Based on this model a design strategy for FRC slabs is outlined....

  7. Development of spraying agent for reducing drying shrinkage of mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Hiromi; Maruoka, Masanori; Liu, Lingling

    2017-02-01

    Mortar used to repair is sometimes exposed to drying state in early ages after construction and a few days later water is sprayed frequently on the surface of the mortar in order to prevent cracks. This research studied on shrinkage characteristic of mortar subjected to drying conditions like this. The result showed that the water spraying on the mortar after initial drying did not have any effect to prevent shrinkage, but increased. And it also showed when various chemical agents are mixed and used in watersprayingit had the prevention effect on shrinkage. This report was to understand this kind of phenomenon and clarify the mechanism. In addition, based on the results, the new spraying agent was developed to reduce drying shrinkage.

  8. Cure shrinkage in casting resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J. Brock [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    A method is described whereby the shrinkage of a casting resin can be determined. Values for the shrinkage of several resin systems in frequent use by Sandia have been measured. A discussion of possible methods for determining the stresses generated by cure shrinkage and thermal contraction is also included.

  9. The geometry of soil crack networks

    CERN Document Server

    Chertkov, V Y

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this work is the modification and specification of an approach to detail the estimation of soil crack network characteristics. The modification aims at accounting for the corrected soil crack volume based on the corrected shrinkage geometry factor compared to known estimates of crack volume and shrinkage geometry factor. The mode of the correction relies on recent results of the soil reference shrinkage curve. The main exposition follows the preliminary brief review of available approaches to dealing with the geometry of soil crack networks and gives a preliminary brief summary of the approach to be modified and specified. To validate and illustrate the modified approach the latter is used in the analysis of available data on soil cracking in a lysimeter.

  10. Self-compacting fine-grained concretes with compensated shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimov Lev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper substantiates the efficiency of application of fine-grained concrete for erection of cast-in-place concrete and reinforced concrete structures of different purpose. On the basis of analysis of experimental research results it was established that the introduction of microfillers with expansion effect to composite binder allows not only improving the rheological properties of fine-grained concrete, but also decreasing of value of shrinkage strain and improving of concrete crack resistance and durability. The analysis of the results of industrial use of fine-grained concretes with compensated shrinkage is given.

  11. Plastic shrinkage of mortars with shrinkage reducing admixture and lightweight aggregates studied by neutron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrzykowski, Mateusz, E-mail: mateusz.wyrzykowski@empa.ch [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Dübendorf (Switzerland); Lodz University of Technology, Department of Building Physics and Building Materials, Lodz (Poland); Trtik, Pavel [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory for Neutron Scattering and Imaging, Villigen (Switzerland); Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Dübendorf (Switzerland); Münch, Beat [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Dübendorf (Switzerland); Weiss, Jason [Purdue University, School of Civil Engineering, West Lafayette (United States); Vontobel, Peter [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory for Neutron Scattering and Imaging, Villigen (Switzerland); Lura, Pietro [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Dübendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zurich, Institute for Building Materials (IfB), Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    Water transport in fresh, highly permeable concrete and rapid water evaporation from the concrete surface during the first few hours after placement are the key parameters influencing plastic shrinkage cracking. In this work, neutron tomography was used to determine both the water loss from the concrete surface due to evaporation and the redistribution of fluid that occurs in fresh mortars exposed to external drying. In addition to the reference mortar with a water to cement ratio (w/c) of 0.30, a mortar with the addition of pre-wetted lightweight aggregates (LWA) and a mortar with a shrinkage reducing admixture (SRA) were tested. The addition of SRA reduced the evaporation rate from the mortar at the initial stages of drying and reduced the total water loss. The pre-wetted LWA released a large part of the absorbed water as a consequence of capillary pressure developing in the fresh mortar due to evaporation.

  12. Influence of shrinkage-reducing admixture on drying shrinkage and mechanical properties of high-performance concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Quangphu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: High-performance concrete (HPC has specific performance advantages over conventional concrete in strength and durability. HPC mixtures are usually produced with water/binder mass ratios (mW/mB in the range of 0.2-0.4, so volume changes of concrete as a result of drying, chemical reactions, and temperature change cannot be avoided. For these reasons, shrinkage and cracking are frequent phenomena. It is necessary to add some types of admixture for reduction of shrinkage and cracking of HPC. This study used a shrinkage-reducing admixture (SRA for that purpose. Concrete was prepared with two different mW/mB (0.22 and 0.40 and four different mass fractions of SRA to binder (w(SRA = 0%, 1%, 2%, and 4%. The mineral admixtures used for concrete mixes were: 25% fly ash (FA and 25% slag by mass of binder for the mixture with mW/mB = 0.40, and 15% silica fume (SF and 25% FA for the mixture with mW/mB = 0.22. Tests were conducted on 24 prismatic specimens, and shrinkage strains were measured through 120 days of drying. Compressive strength, splitting strength, and static modulus of elasticity were also determined. The results show that the SRA effectively reduces some mechanical properties of HPC. The reductions in compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, and elastic modulus of the concrete were 7%-24%, 9%-19%, and 5%-12%, respectively, after 90 days, compared to concrete mixtures without SRA. SRA can also help reduce drying shrinkage of concrete. The shrinkage strains of HPC with SRA were only as high as 41% of the average free shrinkage of concrete without SRA after 120 days of drying.

  13. Total shrinkage versus partial shrinkage in multiple linear regression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper discusses the merits of partial shrinkage of the ordinary least square estimator of the coefficients of the multiple regression model of full rank. Theoretical comparisons of scalar and matrix-valued risks of the partially shrunken and totally shrunken estimators are given. The strategy of partial shrinkage is applied to ...

  14. Minimum Reinforcement in Concrete Structures under Restrained Shrinkage and Thermal Actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Morten Bo; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1999-01-01

    The present paper deals with minimum reinforcement to ensure limitation of crack widths in concrete structures subjected to small imposed strains, such as those from restrained shrinkage or thermal actions. A theory is presented, which models the behaviour of a tensile member from zero load...... to first yielding of reinforcement. The theory takes into account the formation of each crack. However, concluding the paper, a simple design formula is given, which provides the amount of reinforcement, necessary to ensure a given crack width....

  15. Linear Shrinkage Behaviour of Compacted Loam Masonry Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NAWAB ALI LAKHO

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Walls of wet loam, used in earthen houses, generally experience more shrinkage which results in cracks and less compressive strength. This paper presents a technique of producing loam masonry blocks that are compacted in drained state during casting process in order to minimize shrinkage. For this purpose, loam masonry blocks were cast and compacted at a pressure of 6 MPa and then dried in shade by covering them in plastic sheet. The results show that linear shrinkage of 2% occurred which is smaller when compared to un-compacted wet loam walls. This implies that the loam masonry blocks compacted in drained state is expected to perform better than un-compacted wet loam walls.

  16. Use of rice husk ash for mitigating the autogenous shrinkage of cement pastes at low water cement ratio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, H.; Ye, G.; Fehling, Ekkehard; Middendorf, Bernhard; Thiemicke, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    It is well recognized that the high risk of early age micro-crack of HPC/UHPC is attributed to the large magnitude of early age autogenous shrinkage caused by self-desiccation in binder hydration. Over the years, several methods have been proposed to mitigate autogenous shrinkage based on internal

  17. Development of concrete shrinkage performance specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    During its service life, concrete undergoes volume changes. One of the types of deformation is shrinkage. The four main types of shrinkage associated with concrete are plastic, autogenous, carbonation, and drying shrinkage. The volume changes in conc...

  18. Investigating the explosivity of shallow sub-aqueous basaltic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtagh, R.; White, J. D. L.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions produce pyroclasts containing vesicles, clearly implying exsolution of volatiles from the magma has occurred. Our aim is to understand the textural characteristics of vesiculated clasts as a quantitative indicator of the eruptive behaviour of a volcano. Assessing water's role in volatile degassing and outgassing has been and is being well documented for terrestrial eruptions; the same cannot be said, however, for their shallow subaqueous counterparts. The eruptive behaviour of Surtseyan volcanoes, which include both subaqueous and subaerial phases (for example, the type-location Surtsey, Iceland in 1963) is under investigation here and for good reason. Volcanic eruptions during which water and basaltic magma come into contact appear to ignite violent eruptions of many of the small "monogenetic" volcanoes so abundant on Earth. A key problem remains that detailed conditions of water-magma interactions are not yet fully understood. Field samples obtained from exposed sequences deposited originally in a subaqueous environment allow for the necessary analysis of lapilli. With the aid of experimental data, mathematical modelling and terrestrial analogues the ambition is to unravel volatile degassing, ascent histories and fragmentation processes, allowing us ultimately to identify both the role water plays in the explosivity of shallow subaqueous eruptions, and the rise history of magma to the point of interaction. The first site, Pahvant Butte is located in southwest Utah, U.S. It is a well preserved tuff cone overlying a subaqueously deposited mound of glassy ash composed of sideromelane and tachylite. It was erupted under ~85m of water into Lake Bonneville approximately 15,300 years ago. Our focus is on samples collected from a well-bedded, broadly scoured coarse ash and lapilli lithofacies on the eastern flank of the edifice. Vesicularity indices span from 52.6% - 60.8%, with very broad vesicularity ranges, 20.6% - 81.0% for one extreme sample. The

  19. Cracking of open traffic rigid pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niken Chatarina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The research is done by observing the growth of real structure cracking in Natar, Lampung, Indonesia compared to C. Niken’s et al research and literature study. The rigid pavement was done with open traffic system. There are two main crack types on Natar rigid pavement: cracks cross the road, and cracks spreads on rigid pavement surface. The observation of cracks was analyzed by analyzing material, casting, curing, loading and shrinkage mechanism. The relationship between these analysis and shrinkage mechanism was studied in concrete micro structure. Open traffic make hydration process occur under vibration; therefore, fresh concrete was compressed and tensioned alternately since beginning. High temperature together with compression, cement dissociation, the growth of Ca2+ at very early age leads abnormal swelling. No prevention from outside water movement leads hydration process occur with limited water which caused spreads fine cracks. Limited water improves shrinkage and plastic phase becomes shorter; therefore, rigid pavement can’t accommodate the abnormal swelling and shrinking alternately and creates the spread of cracks. Discontinuing casting the concrete makes both mix under different condition, the first is shrink and the second is swell and creates weak line on the border; so, the cracks appear as cracks across the road.

  20. Time-Dependent Behavior of Shrinkage Strain for Early Age Concrete Affected by Temperature Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Qin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Shrinkage has been proven to be an important property of early age concrete. The shrinkage strain leads to inherent engineering problems, such as cracking and loss of prestress. Atmospheric temperature is an important factor in shrinkage strain. However, current research does not provide much attention to the effect of atmospheric temperature on shrinkage of early age concrete. In this paper, a laboratory study was undertaken to present the time-dependent shrinkage of early age concrete under temperature variation. A newly developed Material Deformation Tester (MDT, which can simulate consecutive variation of atmospheric temperature, was used to collect the shrinkage strain of specimens and temperature data. A numerical model was established to describe the thermoelastic strain of a specimen. The results show that (1 there are several sharp shrinkages up to 600 μ for early age concrete in the first 3 days; (2 the absolute value of shrinkage strain is larger than thermal strain; and (3 the difference of shrinkage strain under temperature variation or constant temperature is up to 500 μ.

  1. Terrestrial subaqueous seafloor dunes: Possible analogs for Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neakrase, Lynn D. V.; Klose, Martina; Titus, Timothy N.

    2017-06-01

    Dunes on Venus, first discovered with Magellan Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) in the early 1990s, have fueled discussions about the viability of Venusian dunes and aeolian grain transport. Confined to two locations on Venus, the existence of the interpreted dunes provides evidence that there could be transportable material being mobilized into aeolian bedforms at the surface. However, because of the high-pressure high-temperature surface conditions, laboratory analog studies are difficult to conduct and results are difficult to extrapolate to full-sized, aeolian bedforms. Field sites of desert dunes, which are well-studied on Earth and Mars, are not analogous to what is observed on Venus because of the differences in the fluid environments. One potentially underexplored possibility in planetary science for Venus-analog dune fields could be subaqueous, seafloor dune fields on Earth. Known to the marine geology communities since the early 1960s, seafloor dunes are rarely cited in planetary aeolian bedform literature, but could provide a necessary thick-atmosphere extension to the classically studied aeolian dune environment literature for thinner atmospheres. Through discussion of the similarity of the two environments, and examples of dunes and ripples cited in marine literature, we provide evidence that subaqueous seafloor dunes could serve as analogs for dunes on Venus. Furthermore, the evidence presented here demonstrates the usefulness of the marine literature for thick-atmosphere planetary environments and potentially for upcoming habitable worlds and oceanic environment research program opportunities. Such useful cross-disciplinary discussion of dune environments is applicable to many planetary environments (Earth, Mars, Venus, Titan, etc.) and potential future missions.

  2. Terrestrial subaqueous seafloor dunes: Possible analogs for Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neakrase, Lynn D.V.; Klose, Martina; Titus, Timothy N.

    2017-01-01

    Dunes on Venus, first discovered with Magellan Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) in the early 1990s, have fueled discussions about the viability of Venusian dunes and aeolian grain transport. Confined to two locations on Venus, the existence of the interpreted dunes provides evidence that there could be transportable material being mobilized into aeolian bedforms at the surface. However, because of the high-pressure high-temperature surface conditions, laboratory analog studies are difficult to conduct and results are difficult to extrapolate to full-sized, aeolian bedforms. Field sites of desert dunes, which are well-studied on Earth and Mars, are not analogous to what is observed on Venus because of the differences in the fluid environments. One potentially underexplored possibility in planetary science for Venus-analog dune fields could be subaqueous, seafloor dune fields on Earth. Known to the marine geology communities since the early 1960s, seafloor dunes are rarely cited in planetary aeolian bedform literature, but could provide a necessary thick-atmosphere extension to the classically studied aeolian dune environment literature for thinner atmospheres. Through discussion of the similarity of the two environments, and examples of dunes and ripples cited in marine literature, we provide evidence that subaqueous seafloor dunes could serve as analogs for dunes on Venus. Furthermore, the evidence presented here demonstrates the usefulness of the marine literature for thick-atmosphere planetary environments and potentially for upcoming habitable worlds and oceanic environment research program opportunities. Such useful cross-disciplinary discussion of dune environments is applicable to many planetary environments (Earth, Mars, Venus, Titan, etc.) and potential future missions.

  3. Observations of sediment transport on the Amazon subaqueous delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, R.W.; Cacchione, D.A.; Paulson, B.; Kineke, G.C.; Drake, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    A 19-day time series of fluid, flow, and suspended-sediment characteristics in the benthic boundary layer is analyzed to identify major sedimentary processes active over the prodelta region of the Amazon subaqueous delta. Measurements were made by the benthic tripod GEOPROBE placed on the seabed in 65 m depth near the base of the deltaic foreset beds from 11 February to 3 March 1990, during the time of rising water and maximum sediment discharge of the Amazon River; and the observations included: hourly measurements of velocity and suspended-sediment concentration at four levels above the seabed; waves and tides; and seabed elevation. Results of the first 14-day period of the time series record indicate that sediment resuspension occurred as a result of tidal currents (91% of the time) and surface gravity waves (46% of the time). Observations of suspended sediment indicated that particle flux in this region is 0.4-2% of the flux measured on the adjacent topset deposits and is directed to the north and landward relative to the Brazilian coast (268??T). Fortnightly variability is strong, with particle fluxes during spring tides five times greater than during neap tides. On the 15th day of the data record, a rapid sedimentation event was documented in which 44 cm of sediment was deposited at the study site over a 14-h period. Evaluation of various mechanisms of mass sediment movement suggests that this event represents downslope migration of fluid muds from the upper foreset beds that were set in motion by boundary shear stresses generated by waves and currents. This transport mechanism appears to occur episodically and may represent a major source of sediment to the lower foreset-bottomset region of the subaqueous delta.

  4. Effect of shrinkage porosity on mechanical properties of ferritic ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zehua

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Casting defects could largely affect the mechanical properties of casting products. A number of test pieces made of ductile iron (EN-GJS-400-18-LT with different levels of shrinkage porosity were prepared and then tensile and fatigue tests were performed to investigate the impact of shrinkage porosity on their mechanical properties. The results showed that the tensile strength decreases linearly with increasing of the shrinkage porosity. The tensile elongation decreases sharply with the increase of the shrinkage porosity mainly due to the non-uniform plastic deformation. The fatigue life also dramatically declines with increasing of the porosity and follows a power law relationship with the area percentage of porosity. The existence of the shrinkage porosity made the fatigue fracture complex. The shrinkage pores, especially those close to the surface usually became the crack initiation sites. For test pieces with less porosity, the fatigue fracture was clearly composed of crack initiation, propagation, and overloading. While for samples with high level of porosity, multiple crack initiation sites were observed.

  5. Control of drying shrinkage in magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H) gel mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, T; Liang, X; Li, C; Lorin, M; Li, Y; Vandeperre, LJM; Cheeseman, CR

    2016-01-01

    ? 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.Magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H) gel can be formed by the reaction of MgO with amorphous silica in the presence of sodium hexametaphosphate (Na-HMP). Typical pastes contain 40% MgO and 60% SF and have a w/c ratio of 0.5, but these exhibit shrinkage cracking on drying. The shrinkage characteristics of M-S-H mortar samples containing different additions of sand have been studied using dilatometry. The drying shrinkage was found to decrease with increas...

  6. Crack opening: from colloidal systems to paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léang, Marguerite; Giorgiutti-Dauphiné, Frédérique; Lee, Lay-Theng; Pauchard, Ludovic

    2017-08-30

    Shrinkage cracks are observed in many materials, particularly in paintings where great interest lies in deducing quantitative information on the material with the aim of proposing authentication methods. We present experimental measurements on the crack opening induced by the drying of colloidal layers and compare these results to the case of a pictorial layer. We propose a simple model to predict the crack width as a function of the thickness of the drying layer, based on the balance between the drying stress buildup and the shear frictional stress with the substrate. Key parameters of the model include the mechanical properties that are measured experimentally using micro-indentation testing. A good agreement between theory and experimental data for both colloidal layers and the real painting is found. These results, by comparing the shrinkage cracks in model layers and in pictorial layers, validate the method based on the use of colloidal systems to simulate and to reproduce drying cracks in paintings.

  7. Sensitivity of Depth-Integrated Satellite Lidar to Subaqueous Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F. Jasinski

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A method is presented for estimating subaqueous integrated backscatter using near-nadir viewing satellite lidar. The algorithm takes into account specular reflection of laser light, laser scattering by wind-generated foam as well as sun glint and solar scattering from foam. The formulation is insensitive to the estimate of wind speed but sensitive to the estimate of transmittance used in the atmospheric correction. As a case study, CALIOP data over Tampa Bay were compared to MODIS 645 nm remote sensing reflectance, which previously has been shown to be nearly linearly related to turbidity. The results indicate good correlation on nearly all CALIOP cloud-free dates during the period 2006 through 2007, particularly those with relatively high atmospheric transmittance. The correlation decreases when data are composited over all dates but is still statistically significant, a possible indication of variability in the biogeochemical composition in the water. Overall, the favorable results show promise for the application of satellite lidar integrated backscatter in providing information about subsurface backscatter properties, which can be extracted using appropriate models.

  8. Quantification of shrinkage microcracking in young mortar with fluorescence light microscopy and ESEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop, J.; Van Mier, J.C.M.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper a method is described to quantify shrinkage microcracking in young mortar by means of crack mapping. Visualisation of the microcracks is realised with two techniques: Fluorescence Light Microscopy (FLM) and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM). The preliminary results

  9. Preliminary test-shrinkage estimators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. H. Lemmer

    1983-03-01

    Full Text Available The advantages of using the very simple shrinkage estimator TL proposed by Lemmer rather than that proposed by Mehta and Srivivasan in the case of preliminary test estimators for parameters of the normal, binomial and Poisson distributions are examined.

  10. Cracking in cement paste induced by autogenous shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Weiss, Jason

    2009-01-01

    technique allows identification of microcracks while avoiding artefacts induced by unwanted restraint, drying, or temperature variations during sample preparation. Small cylindrical samples of cement paste are cast with steel rods of different diameters in their centre. The rods restrain the autogenous...

  11. Crack Formation During Hardening in Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, John Forbes; Stang, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this project is to establish models for the development of cracks in the early age of fibre reinforced concrete due to restrained shrinkage and temperature variations. These models will be based on measurements of age dependant material properties including the post crack response...... of the fibre reinforced concrete....

  12. Development of digital image correlation method to analyse crack ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The crack formation tendencies on masonry wall can be observed at an earlier stage by this proposed method. These results show a great application potential of the DIC technique for various situations such as inspecting shrinkage-induced cracks in fresh concrete, masonry and reinforced concrete structures, and safety of ...

  13. Towards a better understanding of the cracking behavior in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding and modeling shrinkage-induced cracks helps bridge the gap between flow problem in the laboratory and at the field. Modeling flow at the field scale with Darcian fluxes developed at the laboratory scales is challenged with preferential flows attributed to the cracking behavior of soils...

  14. Influence of shrinkage porosity on fatigue performance of iron castings and life estimation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Shrinkage porosity exists more or less in heavy castings, and it plays an important role in the fatigue behavior of cast materials. In this study, fatigue tests were carried out on the QT400-18 cast iron specimens containing random degrees of shrinkage porosity defect. Experimental results showed that the order of magnitude of life scattered from 103 to 106 cycles when the shrinkage percentage ranged from 0.67% to 5.91%. SEM analyses were carried out on the shrinkage porosity region. The inter-granular discontinuous, micro cracks and inclusions interfered with the fatigue sliding or hindering process. The slip in shrinkage porosity region was not as orderly as the ordinary continuous medium. The shrinkage porosity area on fracture surface (SPAFS and alternating stress intensity factor (ASIF were applied to evaluate the tendency of residual life distribution; their relationship was fitted by negative exponent functions. Based on the intermediate variable of ASIF, a fatigue life prediction model of nodular cast iron containing shrinkage porosity defects was established. The modeling prediction was in agreement with the experimental results.

  15. Airborne radar imaging of subaqueous channel evolution in Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, John B.; Ayoub, Francois; Jones, Cathleen E.; Lamb, Michael P.; Holt, Benjamin; Wagner, R. Wayne; Coffey, Thomas S.; Chadwick, J. Austin; Mohrig, David

    2016-05-01

    Shallow coastal regions are among the fastest evolving landscapes but are notoriously difficult to measure with high spatiotemporal resolution. Using Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) data, we demonstrate that high signal-to-noise L band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can reveal subaqueous channel networks at the distal ends of river deltas. Using 27 UAVSAR images collected between 2009 and 2015 from the Wax Lake Delta in coastal Louisiana, USA, we show that under normal tidal conditions, planform geometry of the distributary channel network is frequently resolved in the UAVSAR images, including ~700 m of seaward network extension over 5 years for one channel. UAVSAR also reveals regions of subaerial and subaqueous vegetation, streaklines of biogenic surfactants, and what appear to be small distributary channels aliased by the survey grid, all illustrating the value of fine resolution, low noise, L band SAR for mapping the nearshore subaqueous delta channel network.

  16. Soil microbial activity in hydromorphic-subaqueous ecosystems: processes and functional biodiveristy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra Papp

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The hydromorphic and subaqueous soils have largely been overlooked on their pedogenic concepts or in soil C accounting studies considering their phisico-chemical properties. Conversely, little attention has been paid to the microbial activity playing a key role in regulating the biogeochemical cycle of elements. The aim of the study was to evaluate biological properties such as enzyme activities and the functional diversity of soil microbial population as bio- indicators, sensitive to processes affected by the water shallow. Eight soil profiles were opened along two transects: 1 a-a’ North and 2 b-b' South, in a dune ecosystem of the Adriatic coast, Ravenna (Italy. The soil chemical and biochemical properties were determined. In particular, soil enzyme activities and soil induced respiration were measured using the microplates technique in order to assess the microbial functional diversity. The soil biochemical properties such as the potential enzyme activities and microbial induced respiration, as well as microbial functional diversity were sensitive indicators to study hydromorphic and subaqueous soils. A general reduction of hydrolytic enzyme activities was observed in subaqueous soil with respect to hydromorphic one. Moreover, the endopedon of subaqueous soils showed a lower microbial functional diversity than hydromorphic one. In this study the ratio of enzyme activities involved in C to S cycles (SEIC/Aryl as well as the C:S ratio showed a marked reduction in the subaqueous with respect to hydromorphic soils. In conclusion, in a coastal area the C and S biogeochemical cycles, in the hydromorphic and subaqueous soils, may depend on freshwater and saltwater interface equilibrium.

  17. Normal incidence measurement in a subaqueous sand dune field in the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Linus Y S; Chang, Andrea Y Y

    2014-11-01

    Regions with subaqueous sand dunes have been discovered on the upper continental slope of the northern South China Sea. These large subaqueous sand dunes are expected to cause errors in the measurement of normal incidence reflection. This letter presents experiment results of two normal incidence survey tracks conducted in 2013, and the errors in reflection coefficient estimation and the resulting sediment properties induced by sand dune bedforms. The results demonstrate that the reflected energy is focused and scattered by different parts of sand dune bedforms and that they produce significant variation in the estimated reflection coefficients and the inverted geoacoustic properties.

  18. Smooth Adaptation by Sigmoid Shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atto AbdourrahmaneM

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the properties of a subclass of sigmoid-based shrinkage functions: the non zeroforcing smooth sigmoid-based shrinkage functions or SigShrink functions. It provides a SURE optimization for the parameters of the SigShrink functions. The optimization is performed on an unbiased estimation risk obtained by using the functions of this subclass. The SURE SigShrink performance measurements are compared to those of the SURELET (SURE linear expansion of thresholds parameterization. It is shown that the SURE SigShrink performs well in comparison to the SURELET parameterization. The relevance of SigShrink is the physical meaning and the flexibility of its parameters. The SigShrink functions performweak attenuation of data with large amplitudes and stronger attenuation of data with small amplitudes, the shrinkage process introducing little variability among data with close amplitudes. In the wavelet domain, SigShrink is particularly suitable for reducing noise without impacting significantly the signal to recover. A remarkable property for this class of sigmoid-based functions is the invertibility of its elements. This propertymakes it possible to smoothly tune contrast (enhancement, reduction.

  19. Shrinkage modeling of concrete reinforced by palm fibres in hot dry environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akchiche, Hamida; Kriker, Abdelouahed

    2017-02-01

    The cement materials, such as concrete and conventional mortar present very little resistance to traction and cracking, these hydraulic materials which induces large withdrawals on materials and cracks in structures. The hot dry environments such as: the Saharan regions of Algeria, Indeed, concrete structures in these regions are very fragile, and present high shrinkage. Strengthening of these materials by fibers can provide technical solutions for improving the mechanical performance. The aim of this study is firstly, to reduce the shrinkage of conventional concrete with its reinforcement with date palm fibers. In fact, Algeria has an extraordinary resources in natural fibers (from Palm, Abaca, Hemp) but without valorization in practical areas, especially in building materials. Secondly, to model the shrinkage behavior of concrete was reinforced by date palm fibers. In the literature, several models for still fiber concrete were founded but few are offers for natural fiber concretes. To do so, a still fiber concretes model of YOUNG - CHERN was used. According to the results, a reduction of shrinkage with reinforcement by date palm fibers was showed. A good ability of molding of shrinkage of date palm reinforced concrete with YOUNG - CHERN Modified model was obtained. In fact, a good correlation between experimental data and the model data was recorded.

  20. Knuckle Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people realize that cracking knuckles produces a funny noise and may repeat cracking just to produce the ... main areas of exercise are aerobic exercise and resistance News Categories Ankylosing Spondylitis News Fibromyalgia News Gout ...

  1. Grain-size sorting and slope failure in experimental subaqueous grain flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinhans, M.G.; Asch, Th.W.J. van

    2005-01-01

    Grain-size sorting in subaqueous grain flows of a continuous range of grain sizes is studied experimentally with three mixtures. The observed pattern is a combination of stratification and gradual segregation. The stratification is caused by kinematic sieving in the grain flow. The segregation is

  2. Subaqueous terminus evolution at Tasman Glacier, New Zealand, as determined by remote-controlled survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdie, Heather; Bealing, Paul; Tidey, Emily; Harrison, Justin

    2016-04-01

    The presence of subaqueous ice ramps at the terminus of calving glaciers result from a combination of subaerial and subaqueous processes. These ice ramps eventually buoyantly calve, an event that can be hazardous to companies operating boat tours on proglacial lakes. However our knowledge of ice ramp forming processes, and feedbacks associated with their evolution, is sparse. We are using a remote controlled jet boat to survey bathymetry at an active calving margin. This vessel, mounted with both depth and side-scan sonar, can map subaqueous portions of the terminus right up to the active calving face at no risk to the operators. Surveys at the Tasman Glacier terminus over three consecutive years have revealed that subaqueous ice ramps are ephemeral features. In 2015 multiple ice ramps extended out into the lake from the terminus by 100-200 m, with the ramp surface being as much as 60 m below the water line at its outer perimeter. The maximum depth of the Tasman Lake at this time was 240 m. Within one month of the survey taking place, the largest of these ice ramps had calved and disintegrated. The consistent location of ice ramps between surveys indicates that other factors, like subglacial hydrology, may influence ice ramp evolution.

  3. Accounting for PDMS shrinkage when replicating structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Morten Hannibal; Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj Agentoft; Hansen, Poul-Erik

    2014-01-01

    are seldom applied to counteract the shrinkage of PDMS. Also, to perform metrological measurements using replica techniques one has to take the shrinkage into account. Thus we report a study of the shrinkage of PDMS with several different mixing ratios and curing temperatures. The shrinkage factor, with its...... associated uncertainty, for PDMS in the range 40 to 120 °C is provided. By applying this correction factor, it is possible to replicate structures with a standard uncertainty of less than 0.2% in lateral dimensions using typical curing temperatures and PDMS mixing ratios in the range 1:6 to 1:20 (agent:base)....

  4. Selective Formation of Zigzag Edges in Graphene Cracks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihara, Miho; Inoue, Ryosuke; Kurita, Rei; Taniuchi, Toshiyuki; Motoyui, Yoshihito; Shin, Shik; Komori, Fumio; Maniwa, Yutaka; Shinohara, Hisanori; Miyata, Yasumitsu

    2015-09-22

    We report the thermally induced unconventional cracking of graphene to generate zigzag edges. This crystallography-selective cracking was observed for as-grown graphene films immediately following the cooling process subsequent to chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on Cu foil. Results from Raman spectroscopy show that the crack-derived edges have smoother zigzag edges than the chemically formed grain edges of CVD graphene. Using these cracks as nanogaps, we were also able to demonstrate the carrier tuning of graphene through the electric field effect. Statistical analysis of visual observations indicated that the crack formation results from uniaxial tension imparted by the Cu substrates together with the stress concentration at notches in the polycrystalline graphene films. On the basis of simulation results using a simplified thermal shrinkage model, we propose that the cooling-induced tension is derived from the transient lattice expansion of narrow Cu grains imparted by the thermal shrinkage of adjacent Cu grains.

  5. Polymerization shrinkage strain of interocclusal recording materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Jung-hyun; Pae, Ahran; Kim, Sung-hun

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the polymerization shrinkage behavior and to measure the polymerization shrinkage-strain of interocclusal recording materials. The materials investigated in this study were five polyvinylsiloxane (Imprint Bite, Silagum Automix Bite, O-Bite, Blu-Mousse Classic and Exabite II), one polyether (Ramitec) and one dimethacrylatebased (Luxabite) materials. The polymerization shrinkage values of ten specimens for each material were measured by the Bonded-disk method at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 min after mixing at 37 degrees C. The amount of shrinkage-strain (%) was derived and all data were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and the multiple comparison Scheffé test (alpha=0.05). The representative shrinkage-strain kinetic graphs showed that all specimens shrank immediately, except Luxabite which expanded for the initial few seconds. After that, the shrinkage-strain values increased in the magnitude up to 10 min, but its rate decreased gradually with time. The shrinkage-strain values (0.18+/-0.03-0.16+/-0.03%) of O-Bite at 5, 7 and 10 min were significantly lower than the other materials, but Luxabite exhibited the highest values (3.10+/-0.17-3.30+/-0.16%). The interocclusal recording materials investigated presented significantly different polymerization shrinkage-strain kinetics and showed dimensional changes even after the setting time indicated by respective manufacturers.

  6. Deposição Subaquática Diferencial de Pólen e Esporos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Fernandes Pinto da Luz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho pretende apresentar a importância de realizar uma rigorosa análise espacial de taxas diferenciais de deposição de pólen e esporos em ambientes subaquáticos para uma melhor correlação com a vegetação de origem. A análise espacial da deposição de palinomorfos em sedimentos superficiais de fundo de corpos aquáticos exibe padrões diferenciados de local para local e relaciona-se com a sedimentologia. Os resultados obtidos através da análise palinológica destes sedimentos são relacionados com as principais influências ambientais na sedimentação subaquática de pólen e esporos, ou seja, a batimetria, correntes e ventos dominantes.

  7. Shrinkage Behaviour of Fibre Reinforced Concrete with Recycled Tyre Polymer Fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijana Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Different types of fibres are often used in concrete to prevent microcracking due to shrinkage, and polypropylene fibres are among the most often used ones. If not prevented, microcracks can lead to the development of larger cracks as drying shrinkage occurs, enabling penetration of aggressive substances from the environment and reducing durability of concrete structures. The hypothesis of the present research is that polypropylene fibres, used in concrete for controlling formation of microcracks due to shrinkage, can be replaced with recycled polymer fibres obtained from end-of-life tyres. To test the hypothesis, concrete mixtures containing polypropylene fibres and recycled tyre polymer fibres were prepared and tested. Experimental programme focused on autogenous, free, and restrained shrinkage. It was shown that PP fibres can be substituted with higher amount of recycled tyre polymer fibres obtaining concrete with similar shrinkage behaviour. The results indicate promising possibilities of using recycled tyre polymer fibres in concrete products. At the same time, such applications would contribute to solving the problem of waste tyre disposal.

  8. Sediment consolidation settlement of Chengbei Sea area in the northern Huanghe River subaqueous delta, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Feng, Xiuli; Liu, Xiao

    2017-05-01

    One of the most important factors controlling the morphology of the modern Huanghe (Yellow) River delta is consolidation settlement, which is impacted by fast deposition, high water content, and low density of seafloor sediment. Consolidation settlement of the Huanghe River subaqueous delta was studied based on field data, laboratory experiments on 12 drill holes, and the one-dimensional consolidation theory. Results show that vertical sediment characteristics varied greatly in the rapidly forming sedimentary bodies of the modern Huanghe River subaqueous delta. Sediments in the upper parts of drill holes were coarser than those in the deeper parts, and other physical and mechanical properties changed accordingly. On the basis of the one-dimensional consolidation theory and drilling depth, the final consolidation settlement of drill holes was between 0.6 m and 2.8 m, and the mean settlement of unit depth was at 1.5-3.5 cm/m. It takes about 15-20 years for the consolidation degree to reach 90% and the average sedimentation rate within the overlying 50 m strata was at 5 cm/a to 12 cm/a. This study helps to forecast the final consolidation settlement and settlement rate of the modern Huanghe River subaqueous delta, which provides key geotechnical information for marine engineers.

  9. Study of desiccation cracking and fracture properties of clay soils

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Warnakulasuriya D. Susanga M.

    2017-01-01

    The thesis focuses on the development of shrinkage cracking in clay soils upon drying and the determination of fracture properties of clay soils as applicable to analysis of desiccation cracking phenomenon. The results and conclusions were drawn from comprehensive experimental work analysed drawing from Classical Soil Mechanics, Fracture Mechanics, Unsaturated Soil Mechanics and Mechanics of Materials with the aid of powerful image analysis techniques. Attempts were made to fill the gaps in t...

  10. Potato shrinkage during hot air drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frías, A; Clemente, G; Mulet, A

    2010-08-01

    Shrinkage is one of the most important physical changes that occur during the dehydration of foods. In this work, the effect of the temperature (35, 40, 50, 60 and 70 °C) and air velocity (7, 8, 9 and 10 m/s) on bulk volumetric shrinkage was investigated. Volume changes were evaluated by image analysis. It was found that neither temperature nor air velocity had any significant effects on bulk shrinkage in this system. The bulk shrinkage of the potato cubes was well correlated with the moisture content of the sample during drying (R(2) = 97.28). Volume varied linearly with the moisture content changes under the studied conditions. The volume of lost water and the decrease in volume of the samples during dehydration were similar.

  11. Breast specimen shrinkage following formalin fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horn CL

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Christopher L Horn, Christopher Naugler Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Calgary, and Calgary Laboratory Services, Calgary, AB, Canada Abstract: Accurate measurement of primary breast tumors and subsequent surgical margin assessment is critical for pathology reporting and resulting patient therapy. Anecdotal observations from pathology laboratory staff indicate possible shrinkage of breast cancer specimens due to the formalin fixation process. As a result, we conducted a prospective study to investigate the possible shrinkage effects of formalin fixation on breast cancer specimens. The results revealed no significant changes in tumor size, but there were significant changes in the distance to all surgical resection margins from the unfixed to fixed state. This shrinkage effect could interfere with the accuracy of determining distance to margin assessment and tumor-free margin assessment. Thus, changes in these measurements due to the formalin fixation process have the potential to alter treatment options for the patient. Keywords: breast margins, formalin, shrinkage, cancer

  12. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage of contemporary composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halim Nagem Filho

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill Magic, Alert, and Solitaire to determine whether there are differences among these materials. The tests were conducted with precision of 0.1 mg. The volumetric shrinkage was measured by hydrostatic weighing before and after polymerization and calculated by known mathematical equations. One-way ANOVA (a or = 0.05 was used to determine statistically significant differences in volumetric shrinkage among the tested composite resins. Suprafill (1.87±0.01 and Definite (1.89±0.01 shrank significantly less than the other composite resins. SureFil (2.01±0.06, Filtek Z250 (1.99±0.03, and Fill Magic (2.02±0.02 presented intermediate levels of polymerization shrinkage. Alert and Solitaire presented the highest degree of polymerization shrinkage. Knowing the polymerization shrinkage rates of the commercially available composite resins, the dentist would be able to choose between using composite resins with lower polymerization shrinkage rates or adopting technical or operational procedures to minimize the adverse effects deriving from resin contraction during light-activation.

  13. Durability and Shrinkage Characteristics of Self-Compacting Concretes Containing Recycled Coarse and/or Fine Aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Gesoglu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses durability and shrinkage performance of the self-compacting concretes (SCCs in which natural coarse aggregate (NCA and/or natural fine aggregate (NFA were replaced by recycled coarse aggregate (RCA and/or recycled fine aggregate (RFA, respectively. A total of 16 SCCs were produced and classified into four series, each of which included four mixes designed with two water to binder (w/b ratios of 0.3 and 0.43 and two silica fume replacement levels of 0 and 10%. Durability properties of SCCs were tested for rapid chloride penetration, water sorptivity, gas permeability, and water permeability at 56 days. Also, drying shrinkage accompanied by the water loss and restrained shrinkage of SCCs were monitored over 56 days of drying period. Test results revealed that incorporating recycled coarse and/or fine aggregates aggravated the durability properties of SCCs tested in this study. The drying shrinkage and restrained shrinkage cracking of recycled aggregate (RA concretes had significantly poorer performance than natural aggregate (NA concretes. The time of cracking greatly prolonged as the RAs were used along with the increase in water/binder ratio.

  14. Junction formation during desiccation cracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toga, K B; Alaca, B Erdem

    2006-08-01

    In order to provide a sound physical basis for the understanding of the formation of desiccation crack networks, an experimental study is presented addressing junction formation. Focusing on junctions, basic features of the network determining the final pattern, provides an elemental approach and imparts conceptual clarity to the rather complicated problem of the evolution of crack patterns. Using coffee-water mixtures a clear distinction between junction formation during nucleation and propagation is achieved. It is shown that for the same drying suspension, one can switch from the well-known symmetric triple junctions that are unique to the nucleation phase to propagation junctions that are purely dictated by the variations of the stress state. In the latter case, one can even manipulate the path of a propagating crack in a deterministic fashion by changing the stress state within the suspension. Clear microscopic evidence is provided for the formation of propagation junctions, and material inhomogeneity is observed to be reflected by a broad distribution of angles, in stark contrast to shrinkage cracks in homogeneous solid films.

  15. Thermal drying of wastewater sludge with crack formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J B; Peng, X F; Tao, T; Lee, D J

    2004-01-01

    We examined in this work the drying characteristics of wastewater sludge. The drying flux of the constant-rate period for sludge cake could be up to 40% higher than that from a sand bed. Owing to the considerable volume shrinkage of cake, cracks would form and develop on the crack surface, which yielded three-dimensional but rather than the one-dimensional cake structure assumed in conventional drying theories. The crack length was fully developed in the first 30 min of drying, while the width of crack increased linearly with time. Using these data the drying flux from the cracks was estimated. Enhanced drying flux was noticeable which depended on the crack shape and the crossflow velocity.

  16. A seismic study of the Mekong subaqueous delta: Proximal versus distal sediment accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. Paul; DeMaster, David J.; Nittrouer, Charles A.; Eidam, Emily F.; Nguyen, Thanh T.

    2017-09-01

    The Mekong River Delta is one of the largest in Asia. To understand its sediment distribution, thickness, mass budget, stratigraphic sequences and sediment-transport process, extensive geophysical and geochemical surveys were conducted on the inner portions of the adjacent continental shelf. Analyses of > 80 high-resolution Chirp-sonar profiles show the Mekong River has formed a classic sigmoidal cross-shelf clinoform in the proximal areas, up to 15 m thick, with topset, foreset and bottomset facies, but constrained to water depths of sediment has extended > 250 > 300 km southwestward to the tip of the Ca Mau Peninsula, forming a distal mud depocenter up to 22 m thick, and extending into the Gulf of Thailand. A large erosional trough or channel (up to 8 m deeper than the surrounding seafloor and parallel to the shore) was found on the top of the clinoform, east of the Ca Mau Peninsula. Based on the thicknesses and distribution revealed by Chirp sonar profiles, the total estimated volume of the Mekong River subaqueous clinoform on the shelf is 120 km3, which is equivalent to 120-140 × 109 t of sediment using an average sediment dry-bulk density of 1.0-1.2 g/cm3. Assuming the subaqueous deltaic deposit has formed within 1000 yr, the calculated millennial-timescale average sediment discharge to the shelf could be 120-140 × 106 t per year. Spatially, the proximal subaqueous delta has accumulated 45 × 109 t ( 33%) of sediment; the distal part around the Ca Mau Peninsula has received 55 × 109 t ( 42%) of sediment; and the remaining 35 × 109 t ( 25%) has accumulated within the central transition area, although the coastline and shoreface in this area are presently eroding. The spatially averaged 1000-yr-scale accumulate rate is up to 2 cm/yr. Compared to other tide-dominated fluvial dispersal systems, the Mekong River system has a relatively young (≤1000 yr) subaqueous delta, a shallow rollover at 4-6 m water depth, gentle foreset gradients (0.03-0.57°), and a

  17. Heat shrinkage of electron beam modified EVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, S.K.; Chaki, T.K.; Bhowmick, A.K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India). Rubber Technology Center; Tikku, V.K.; Pradhan, N.K. [NICCO Corporation Ltd., (Cable Div.), Calcutta (India)

    1997-10-01

    Heat shrinkage of electron beam modified ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) has been investigated over a range of times, temperatures, stretching, irradiation doses and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) levels. The irradiated (radiation dose 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%) and stretched (100% elongation) sample shrinks to a maximum level when kept at 453K temperature for 60 s. The heat shrinkage of samples irradiated with radiation doses of 20, 50, 100 and 150 kGy increases sharply with increasing stretching in the initial stage. Amnesia rating decreases with increasing radiation dose and TMPTMA level as well as gel content. The high radiation dose and TMPTMA level lower the heat shrinkage due to the chain scission. The effect of temperature at which extension is carried out on heat shrinkage is marginal. The irradiated (radiation dose 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%) EVA tubes of different dimensions expanded in a laboratory grade tube expander show similar behaviour at 453K and 60 s. The X-ray and DSC studies reveal that the crystallinity increases on stretching due to orientation of chains and it decreases to a considerable extent on heat shrinking. The theoretical and experimental values of heat shrinkage for tubes and rectangular strips are in good accord, when the radiation dose is 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%. (author).

  18. Micro-crack detection in high-performance cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Guang, Ye; Tanaka, Kyoji

    2005-01-01

    Detection and quantification of microcracks due to autogenous shrinkage in high-performance concrete represents a problematic issue. Techniques based on crack impregnation typically require drying of the samples, which may introduce further cracks. Other non-destructive techniques, such as x......-ray tomography, do not allow sufficient resolution of microcracks. A new technique presented in this paper allows detection of microcracks in cement paste while avoiding artefacts induced by unwanted restraint, drying or temperature variations. The technique consists in casting small circular cylindrical samples...... of high-performance cement pastes in silicone moulds that exert minimal external restraint. Cast-in steel rods with varying diameter internally restrain the autogenous shrinkage and lead to crack formation. Dimensions of the steel rods are chosen so that the size of this restraining inclusion resembles...

  19. Crack Mitigation in Concrete: Superabsorbent Polymers as Key to Success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignon, Arn; Snoeck, Didier; Dubruel, Peter; Van Vlierberghe, Sandra; De Belie, Nele

    2017-02-28

    Cracking is a major concern in building applications. Cracks may arise from shrinkage, freeze/thawing and/or structural stresses, amongst others. Several solutions can be found but superabsorbent polymers (SAPs) seem to be interesting to counteract these problems. At an early age, the absorbed water by the SAPs may be used to mitigate autogenous and plastic shrinkage. The formed macro pores may increase the freeze/thaw resistance. The swelling upon water ingress may seal a crack from intruding fluids and may regain the overall water-tightness. The latter water may promote autogenous healing. The use of superabsorbent polymers is thus very interesting. This review paper summarizes the current research and gives a critical note towards the use of superabsorbent polymers in cementitious materials.

  20. Crack Mitigation in Concrete: Superabsorbent Polymers as Key to Success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignon, Arn; Snoeck, Didier; Dubruel, Peter; Van Vlierberghe, Sandra; De Belie, Nele

    2017-01-01

    Cracking is a major concern in building applications. Cracks may arise from shrinkage, freeze/thawing and/or structural stresses, amongst others. Several solutions can be found but superabsorbent polymers (SAPs) seem to be interesting to counteract these problems. At an early age, the absorbed water by the SAPs may be used to mitigate autogenous and plastic shrinkage. The formed macro pores may increase the freeze/thaw resistance. The swelling upon water ingress may seal a crack from intruding fluids and may regain the overall water-tightness. The latter water may promote autogenous healing. The use of superabsorbent polymers is thus very interesting. This review paper summarizes the current research and gives a critical note towards the use of superabsorbent polymers in cementitious materials. PMID:28772599

  1. Crack Mitigation in Concrete: Superabsorbent Polymers as Key to Success?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arn Mignon

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cracking is a major concern in building applications. Cracks may arise from shrinkage, freeze/thawing and/or structural stresses, amongst others. Several solutions can be found but superabsorbent polymers (SAPs seem to be interesting to counteract these problems. At an early age, the absorbed water by the SAPs may be used to mitigate autogenous and plastic shrinkage. The formed macro pores may increase the freeze/thaw resistance. The swelling upon water ingress may seal a crack from intruding fluids and may regain the overall water-tightness. The latter water may promote autogenous healing. The use of superabsorbent polymers is thus very interesting. This review paper summarizes the current research and gives a critical note towards the use of superabsorbent polymers in cementitious materials.

  2. Variety and sustainability of volcanic lakes: Response to subaqueous thermal activity predicted by a numerical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Akihiko; Hashimoto, Takeshi

    2017-08-01

    We use a numerical model to investigate the factors that control the presence or absence of a hot crater lake at an active volcano. We find that given a suitable pair of parameters (e.g., the enthalpy of subaqueous fumaroles and the ratio of mass flux of the fluid input at the lake bottom to lake surface area), hot crater lakes can be sustained on relatively long timescales. Neither a high rate of precipitation nor an impermeable layer beneath the lake bottom are always necessary for long-term sustainability. The two controlling parameters affect various hydrological properties of crater lakes, including temperature, chemical concentrations, and temporal variations in water levels. In the case of low-temperature crater lakes, increases in flux and enthalpy, which are a common precursor to phreatic or phreatomagmatic eruptions, result in an increase in both temperature and water level. In contrast, a decrease in water level accompanied by a rise in temperature occurs at high-temperature lakes. Furthermore, our model suggests that crater geometry is a key control on water temperature. For lakes with a conical topography, a perturbation in the water level due to trivial nonvolcanic activity, such as low levels of precipitation, can cause persistent increases in water temperature and chemical concentrations, and a decrease in the water level, even though subaqueous fumarolic activity does not change. Such changes in hot crater lakes which are not caused by changes in volcanic activity resemble the volcanic unrest that precedes eruptions.

  3. Creep and shrinkage effects on integral abutment bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munuswamy, Sivakumar

    Integral abutment bridges provide bridge engineers an economical design alternative to traditional bridges with expansion joints owing to the benefits, arising from elimination of expensive joints installation and reduced maintenance cost. The superstructure for integral abutment bridges is cast integrally with abutments. Time-dependent effects of creep, shrinkage of concrete, relaxation of prestressing steel, temperature gradient, restraints provided by abutment foundation and backfill and statical indeterminacy of the structure introduce time-dependent variations in the redundant forces. An analytical model and numerical procedure to predict instantaneous linear behavior and non-linear time dependent long-term behavior of continuous composite superstructure are developed in which the redundant forces in the integral abutment bridges are derived considering the time-dependent effects. The redistributions of moments due to time-dependent effects have been considered in the analysis. The analysis includes nonlinearity due to cracking of the concrete, as well as the time-dependent deformations. American Concrete Institute (ACI) and American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) models for creep and shrinkage are considered in modeling the time dependent material behavior. The variations in the material property of the cross-section corresponding to the constituent materials are incorporated and age-adjusted effective modulus method with relaxation procedure is followed to include the creep behavior of concrete. The partial restraint provided by the abutment-pile-soil system is modeled using discrete spring stiffness as translational and rotational degrees of freedom. Numerical simulation of the behavior is carried out on continuous composite integral abutment bridges and the deformations and stresses due to time-dependent effects due to typical sustained loads are computed. The results from the analytical model are compared with the

  4. Desiccation cracks in siliciclastic deposits: Microbial mat-related compared to abiotic sedimentary origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Olga; Owttrim, George W.; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Gingras, Murray K.

    2017-01-01

    Siliciclastic sediment colonized by microbial mats yield a set of distinct sedimentary fabrics that are collectively called "mat-related structures (MRS)". In the rock record, versatile cracks are observed in biostabilized strata, but the mechanisms responsible for their formation remain debated. Microbially stabilized sediments produce desiccation cracks that serve as modern analogs for fossil microbial cracks. However, since both microbial mat shrinkage and clay shrinkage may contribute to the formation of these desiccation cracks, it is difficult to isolate the influence of the microbial mat on the resulting crack formation, distribution and morphology. To address this issue, we conducted a series of desiccation experiments that determine differences between microbially influenced desiccation cracks (i.e. biotic) and those formed in identical, but sterilized (i.e. abiotic) siliciclastic sediment. Three sediment mixtures were used: (1) very fine-sized sand, (2) mixed (ungraded) silt/clay, and (3) normally graded silt/clay. In all of the experiments, the water-rich microbial mat contracted substantially while drying, producing isolated pockets of shallow, but wide cracks, the distribution of which was controlled by heterogeneities in the mat structure and thickness variations of the mat. In the clay-poor substratum, the microbial mat was the only crack-forming mechanism, while in the clay-rich substrata (experiments 2 and 3) desiccation cracks were more strongly influenced by clay shrinkage. The abiotic clay-rich sediment produced a polygonal network of deep cracks intersecting at 90-120o junctions. In the biotic clay-rich experiments, the microbial mat modified these desiccation features by withstanding crack propagation or by producing curled-up crack polygon margins. Even though a microbial mat shrinks substantially with desiccation, its cohesive nature and heterogeneous distribution prevents the formation of a regular crack network, but its shallow penetration

  5. Crack patterns in layers: effect of the thickness and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauchard, L.; Sibrant, A.

    2015-12-01

    The surface of planets is host to many regions displaying cracks patterns that have been identified as potential dessication cracks. Crack patterns can be observed at multi-scales from millimeters in rocks to several kilometers on planetary surface. The mechanisms of cracking usually result from differential shrinkage stress (due to a drying process or temperature change). A large variety of crack morphologies is involved depending on both the microstructure and the thickness of the layer : crack can form isolated junctions or interact each other. In last case cracks can divide the plane hierarchically leading to broken or connected network of cracks, or grow in-depth resulting in the well ordered basalt columns. In particular, crack patterns strongly depend on both the mechanical properties and the thickness of the layer. To understand the physical process involved, the geometrical characteristics of the crack pattern (crack spacing, crack aperture or crack depth) are analyzed by laboratory testing procedures. In this way, crack patterns can be modeled by the drying layers of aqueous suspensions of nanoparticles (silica particles). During the drying process, advection towards the evaporation surface accumulates particles and leads to a porous structure filled of water. The mechanical properties of the layer are related to the structure of the layer and are measured using indentation testing. Depending on the accumulation rate, solid layers exhibit non-homogeneous mechanical properties in depth. This affect the crack formation and stability of crack propagation.

  6. Quantitative analyses of shrinkage characteristics of neem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quantitative analyses of shrinkage characteristics of neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss.) wood were carried out. Forty five wood specimens were prepared from the three ecological zones of north eastern Nigeria, viz: sahel savanna, sudan savanna and guinea savanna for the research. The results indicated that the wood ...

  7. Effect of Expansive Admixtures on the Shrinkage and Mechanical Properties of High-Performance Fiber-Reinforced Cement Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Chang Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High-performance fiber-reinforced cement composites (HPFRCCs are characterized by strain-hardening and multiple cracking during the inelastic deformation process, but they also develop high shrinkage strain. This study investigates the effects of replacing Portland cement with calcium sulfoaluminate-based expansive admixtures (CSA EXAs to compensate for the shrinkage and associated mechanical behavior of HPFRCCs. Two types of CSA EXA (CSA-K and CSA-J, each with a different chemical composition, are used in this study. Various replacement ratios (0%, 8%, 10%, 12%, and 14% by weight of cement of CSA EXA are considered for the design of HPFRCC mixtures reinforced with 1.5% polyethylene (PE fibers by volume. Mechanical properties, such as shrinkage compensation, compressive strength, flexural strength, and direct tensile strength, of the HPFRCC mixtures are examined. Also, crack width and development are investigated to determine the effects of the EXAs on the performance of the HPFRCC mixtures, and a performance index is used to quantify the performance of mixture. The results indicate that replacements of 10% CSA-K (Type 1 and 8% CSA-J (Type 2 considerably enhance the mechanical properties and reduce shrinkage of HPFRCCs.

  8. Impact of water and sediment discharges on subaqueous delta evolution in Yangtze Estuary from 1950 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-ping YANG

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine how the subaqueous delta evolution depends on the water and sediment processes in the Yangtze Estuary, the amounts of water and sediment discharged into the estuary were studied. The results show that, during the period from 1950 to 2010, there was no significant change in the annual water discharge, and the multi-annual mean water discharge increased in dry seasons and decreased in flood seasons. However, the annual sediment discharge and the multi-annual mean sediment discharge in flood and dry seasons took on a decreasing trend, and the intra-annual distribution of water and sediment discharges tended to be uniform. The evolution process from deposition to erosion occurred at the ?10 m and ?20 m isobaths of the subaqueous delta. The enhanced annual water and sediment discharges had a silting-up effect on the delta, and the effect of sediment was greater than that of water. Based on data analysis, empirical curves were built to present the relationships between the water and sediment discharges over a year or in dry and flood seasons and the erosion/deposition rates in typical regions of the subaqueous delta, whose evolution followed the pattern of silting in flood seasons and scouring in dry seasons. Notably, the Three Gorges Dam has changed the distribution processes of water and sediment discharges, and the dam’s regulating and reserving functions can benefit the subaqueous delta deposition when the annual water and sediment discharges are not affected.

  9. Impact of water and sediment discharges on subaqueous delta evolution in Yangtze Estuary from 1950 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-ping Yang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine how the subaqueous delta evolution depends on the water and sediment processes in the Yangtze Estuary, the amounts of water and sediment discharged into the estuary were studied. The results show that, during the period from 1950 to 2010, there was no significant change in the annual water discharge, and the multi-annual mean water discharge increased in dry seasons and decreased in flood seasons. However, the annual sediment discharge and the multi-annual mean sediment discharge in flood and dry seasons took on a decreasing trend, and the intra-annual distribution of water and sediment discharges tended to be uniform. The evolution process from deposition to erosion occurred at the −10 m and −20 m isobaths of the subaqueous delta. The enhanced annual water and sediment discharges had a silting-up effect on the delta, and the effect of sediment was greater than that of water. Based on data analysis, empirical curves were built to present the relationships between the water and sediment discharges over a year or in dry and flood seasons and the erosion/deposition rates in typical regions of the subaqueous delta, whose evolution followed the pattern of silting in flood seasons and scouring in dry seasons. Notably, the Three Gorges Dam has changed the distribution processes of water and sediment discharges, and the dam's regulating and reserving functions can benefit the subaqueous delta deposition when the annual water and sediment discharges are not affected.

  10. Thermally induced strains and total shrinkage of the polymethyl-methacrylate cement in simplified models of total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griza, Sandro; Ueki, Marcelo M; Souza, Dárcio H G; Cervieri, André; Strohaecker, Telmo R

    2013-02-01

    An evaluation of transient and stabilized strains in the cement mantle during polymerization was carried out in simplified cemented total hip arthroplasty (THA) model. A mathematical approach combined with a simple finite element simulation was used to compare measured and calculated stabilized strain values and to provide the Von Mises stresses at the stem/cement interface due to shrinkage related to temperature decrease after exothermal reaction. A second similar model was carried out to measure stem/cement/mold interfacial shear strength and dimensional changes of the cement mantle to obtain total shrinkage due to temperature decrease plus cement polymerization. The results indicated that positive strain peaks found during the exothermic stage of polymerization have the potential to produce pre-loading cracking. After the initial expansion, it was observed a progressive strain decrease pattern down to stabilized values that takes place near 2h after the cementation. Even though there is a great deal of dispersion in the measured stabilized strain values, in average those values match quite well with the numerical simulations, indicating 4,7 MPa von Mises interfacial stress due to thermal shrinkage. The total cement shrinkage leads to a negative radial stress of 11 MPa and 14 MPa von Mises interfacial stress. Finally, total shrinkage has the potential to enhance gaps in the cement/mold interface. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. SHRINKAGE OF SOUND AND DEMINERALIZED HUMAN CORONAL DENTIN SLABS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    RUBEN, J; ARENDS, J

    1993-01-01

    In this article a method is presented for dentine shrinkage measurements. The relative shrinkage of sound dentine slabs is assessed using a Perthometer with respect to a steel reference. The relative shrinkage of lesions in dentine slabs can be estimated using combined Perthometer/microradiography

  12. Soil organic matter degradation and enzymatic profiles of intertidal and subaqueous soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferronato, Chiara; Marinari, Sara; Bello, Diana; Vianello, Gilmo; Trasar-Cepeda, Carmen; Vittori Antisari, Livia

    2017-04-01

    The interest on intertidal and subaqueous soils has recently arisen because of the climate changes forecasts. The preservation of these habitats represents an important challenge for the future of humanity, because these systems represent an important global C sink since soil organic matter (SOM) on intertidal and subaqueous soils undergoes very slow degradation rates due to oxygen limitation. Publications on SOM cycle in saltmarshes are very scarce because of the difficulties involved on those studies i.e. the interaction of many abiotic and biotic factors (e.g., redox changes, water and bio-turbation processes, etc) and stressors (e.g., salinity and anoxia). However, saltmarshes constitute an unique natural system to observe the influence of anoxic conditions on SOM degradation, because the tide fluctuations on the soil surface allow the formation of provisionally or permanently submerged soils. With the aim to investigate the quality of SOM in subaqueous soils, triplicates of subaqueous soils (SASs), intertidal soils (ITSs) and terrestrial soils (TESs) were collected in the saltmarshes of the Baiona Lagoon (Northern Italy) and classified according to their pedogenetic horizons. The SOM quality on each soil horizon was investigated by quantifying SOM, total and water-soluble organic carbon (TOC, WSC) and microbial biomass carbon (MBC). Given the contribution of soil enzymes to the degradation of SOM, some enzymatic assays were also performed. Thereafter, soil classification and humus morpho-functional classification were used to join together similar soil profiles to facilitate the description and discussion of results. Soils were ranked as Aquent or Wassent Entisols, with an A/AC/C pedosequence. SOM, TOC and MBC were statistically higher in A than in AC and C horizons. Among the A horizons, ITSs were those showing the highest values for these parameters (11% TOC, 1.6 mg kg-1 MBC, 0.9 mg kg-1 WSC). These results, combined with the morpho-functional classification

  13. Modelling suspended sediment dynamics on the subaqueous delta of the Mekong River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh, Vo Quoc; Reyns, Johan; Wackerman, Chris; Eidam, Emily F.; Roelvink, Dano

    2017-09-01

    Fluvial sediment is the major source for the formation and development of the Mekong Delta. This paper aims to analyse the dynamics of suspended sediment and to investigate the roles of different processes in order to explore flux pattern changes. We applied modelling on two scales, comprising a large-scale model (the whole delta) to consider the upstream characteristics, particularly the Tonle Sap Lake's flood regulation, and a smaller-scale model (tidal rivers and shelf) to understand the sediment processes on the subaqueous delta. A comprehensive comparison to in-situ measurements and remote sensing data demonstrated that the model is capable of qualitatively simulating sediment dynamics on the subaqueous delta. It estimates that the Mekong River supplied an amount of 41.5 mil tons from April 2014 to April 2015. A substantial amount of sediment delivered by the Mekong River is deposited in front of the river mouths in the high flow season and resuspended in the low flow season. A sensitivity analysis shows that waves, baroclinic effects and bed composition strongly influence suspended sediment distribution and transport on the shelf. Waves in particular play an essential role in sediment resuspension. The development of this model is an important step towards an operational model for scientific and engineering applications, since the model is capable of predicting tidal propagation and discharge distribution through the main branches, and in predicting the seasonal SSC and erosion/deposition patterns on the shelf, while it is forced by readily available inputs: discharge at Kratie (Cambodia), GFS winds, ERA40 reanalysis waves, and TPXO 8v1 HR tidal forcing.

  14. Compensating For Shrinkage In A Cryogenic Seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Arnold E.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed design for seals in liquid-hydrogen plumbing eliminates leaks caused by contraction of seals at low operating temperature. Each seal consists of rubber, polytetrafluorethylene, or lead O-ring including hollow core filled with water. At temperature of liquid hydrogen, anomalous expansion of water keeps seal gland filled and leaktight despite shrinkage of surrounding O-ring material. Design also used in systems using cryogenic fluids other than liquid hydrogen.

  15. Shrinkage measurement for holographic recording materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, R.; Gallego, S.; Márquez, A.; Francés, J.; Navarro Fuster, V.; Neipp, C.; Ortuño, M.; Beléndez, A.; Pascual, I.

    2017-05-01

    There is an increasing demand for new holographic recording materials. One of them are photopolymers, which are becoming a classic media in this field. Their versatility is well known and new possibilities are being created by including new components, such as nanoparticles or dispersed liquid crystal molecules in classical formulations, making them interesting for additional applications in which the thin film preparation and the structural modification have a fundamental importance. Prior to obtaining a wide commercialization of displays based on photopolymers, one of the key aspects is to achieve a complete characterization of them. In this sense, one of the main parameters to estimate and control is the shrinkage of these materials. The volume variations change the angular response of the hologram in two aspects, the angular selectivity and the maximum diffraction efficiency. One criteria for the recording material to be used in a holographic data storage application is the shrinkage, maximum of 0.5%. Along this work, we compare two different methods to measure the holographic recording material shrinkage. The first one is measuring the angle of propagation for both diffracted orders +/-1 when slanted gratings are recorded, so that an accurate value of the grating vector can be calculated. The second one is based on interference measurements at zero spatial frequency limit. We calculate the shrinkage for three different photopolymers: a polyvinyl alcohol acrylamide (PVA/AA) based photopolymer, one of the greenest photopolymers whose patent belongs to the Alicante University called Biophotopol and on the last place a holographic-dispersed liquid crystal photopolymer (H-PDLC).

  16. Nearest shrunken centroids via alternative genewise shrinkages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byeong Yeob Choi

    Full Text Available Nearest shrunken centroids (NSC is a popular classification method for microarray data. NSC calculates centroids for each class and "shrinks" the centroids toward 0 using soft thresholding. Future observations are then assigned to the class with the minimum distance between the observation and the (shrunken centroid. Under certain conditions the soft shrinkage used by NSC is equivalent to a LASSO penalty. However, this penalty can produce biased estimates when the true coefficients are large. In addition, NSC ignores the fact that multiple measures of the same gene are likely to be related to one another. We consider several alternative genewise shrinkage methods to address the aforementioned shortcomings of NSC. Three alternative penalties were considered: the smoothly clipped absolute deviation (SCAD, the adaptive LASSO (ADA, and the minimax concave penalty (MCP. We also showed that NSC can be performed in a genewise manner. Classification methods were derived for each alternative shrinkage method or alternative genewise penalty, and the performance of each new classification method was compared with that of conventional NSC on several simulated and real microarray data sets. Moreover, we applied the geometric mean approach for the alternative penalty functions. In general the alternative (genewise penalties required fewer genes than NSC. The geometric mean of the class-specific prediction accuracies was improved, as well as the overall predictive accuracy in some cases. These results indicate that these alternative penalties should be considered when using NSC.

  17. Polymerization shrinkage assessment of dental resin composites: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaisarly, Dalia; Gezawi, Moataz El

    2016-09-01

    Composite restorations are widely used worldwide, but the polymerization shrinkage is their main disadvantage that may lead to clinical failures and adverse consequences. This review reports, currently available in vitro techniques and methods used for assessing the polymerization shrinkage. The focus lies on recent methods employing three-dimensional micro-CT data for the evaluation of polymerization shrinkage: volumetric measurement and the shrinkage vector evaluation through tracing particles before and after polymerization. Original research articles reporting in vitro shrinkage measurements and shrinkage stresses were included in electronic and hand-search. Earlier methods are easier, faster and less expensive. The procedures of scanning the samples in the micro-CT and performing the shrinkage vector evaluation are time consuming and complicated. Moreover, the respective software is not commercially available and the various methods for shrinkage vector evaluation are based on different mathematical principles. Nevertheless, these methods provide clinically relevant information and give insight into the internal shrinkage behavior of composite applied in cavities and how boundary conditions affect the shrinkage vectors. The traditional methods give comparative information on polymerization shrinkage of resin composites, whereas using three-dimensional micro-CT data for volumetric shrinkage measurement and the shrinkage vector evaluation is a highly accurate method. The methods employing micro-CT data give the researchers knowledge related to the application method and the boundary conditions of restorations for visualizing the shrinkage effects that could not be seen otherwise. Consequently, this knowledge can be transferred to the clinical situation to optimize the material manipulation and application techniques for improved outcomes.

  18. Comparative Study of Shrinkage and Non-Shrinkage Model of Food Drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahari, N.; Jamil, N.; Rasmani, KA.

    2016-08-01

    A single phase heat and mass model has always been used to represent the moisture and temperature distribution during the drying of food. Several effects of the drying process, such as physical and structural changes, have been considered in order to increase understanding of the movement of water and temperature. However, the comparison between the heat and mass equation with and without structural change (in terms of shrinkage), which can affect the accuracy of the prediction model, has been little investigated. In this paper, two mathematical models to describe the heat and mass transfer in food, with and without the assumption of structural change, were analysed. The equations were solved using the finite difference method. The converted coordinate system was introduced within the numerical computations for the shrinkage model. The result shows that the temperature with shrinkage predicts a higher temperature at a specific time compared to that of the non-shrinkage model. Furthermore, the predicted moisture content decreased faster at a specific time when the shrinkage effect was included in the model.

  19. Photogrammetric Assessment of Flexure Induced Cracking of Reinforced Concrete Beams under Service Loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pease, Bradley Justin; Geiker, Mette Rica; Stang, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Reinforced concrete structures are known to crack due to restrained shrinkage, temperature gradients, application of load, and expansive reactions. Cracks provide paths for rapid ingress of moisture, chlorides, and other aggressive substances, which may affect the long-term durability...... of the structure. For example, concrete cracks located at the reinforcing steel may contribute to a rapid corrosion initiation and propagation. Previous research has shown that cracked reinforced concrete under static flexural loading may have an increased ingress of chloride ions along the reinforcement....../concrete interface. The aim of this paper is to provide a detailed description of the development of cracks in reinforced concrete under flexural load. Cracking at both realistic service load levels (1.0-1.8 times estimated cracking load) and unrealistically high service load levels (> 0.5 times beam capacity) has...

  20. Analysis, prediction, and case studies of early-age cracking in bridge decks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElSafty, Adel; Graeff, Matthew K.; El-Gharib, Georges; Abdel-Mohti, Ahmed; Mike Jackson, N.

    2016-06-01

    Early-age cracking can adversely affect strength, serviceability, and durability of concrete bridge decks. Early age is defined as the period after final setting, during which concrete properties change rapidly. Many factors can cause early-age bridge deck cracking including temperature change, hydration, plastic shrinkage, autogenous shrinkage, and drying shrinkage. The cracking may also increase the effect of freeze and thaw cycles and may lead to corrosion of reinforcement. This research paper presents an analysis of causes and factors affecting early-age cracking. It also provides a tool developed to predict the likelihood and initiation of early-age cracking of concrete bridge decks. Understanding the concrete properties is essential so that the developed tool can accurately model the mechanisms contributing to the cracking of concrete bridge decks. The user interface of the implemented computer Excel program enables the user to input the properties of the concrete being monitored. The research study and the developed spreadsheet were used to comprehensively investigate the issue of concrete deck cracking. The spreadsheet is designed to be a user-friendly calculation tool for concrete mixture proportioning, temperature prediction, thermal analysis, and tensile cracking prediction. The study also provides review and makes recommendations on the deck cracking based mainly on the Florida Department of Transportation specifications and Structures Design Guidelines, and Bridge Design Manuals of other states. The results were also compared with that of other commercially available software programs that predict early-age cracking in concrete slabs, concrete pavement, and reinforced concrete bridge decks. The outcome of this study can identify a set of recommendations to limit the deck cracking problem and maintain a longer service life of bridges.

  1. Comparing thixotropic and Herschel–Bulkley parameterizations for continuum models of avalanches and subaqueous debris flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-H. Jeon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Avalanches and subaqueous debris flows are two cases of a wide range of natural hazards that have been previously modeled with non-Newtonian fluid mechanics approximating the interplay of forces associated with gravity flows of granular and solid–liquid mixtures. The complex behaviors of such flows at unsteady flow initiation (i.e., destruction of structural jamming and flow stalling (restructuralization imply that the representative viscosity–stress relationships should include hysteresis: there is no reason to expect the timescale of microstructure destruction is the same as the timescale of restructuralization. The non-Newtonian Herschel–Bulkley relationship that has been previously used in such models implies complete reversibility of the stress–strain relationship and thus cannot correctly represent unsteady phases. In contrast, a thixotropic non-Newtonian model allows representation of initial structural jamming and aging effects that provide hysteresis in the stress–strain relationship. In this study, a thixotropic model and a Herschel–Bulkley model are compared to each other and to prior laboratory experiments that are representative of an avalanche and a subaqueous debris flow. A numerical solver using a multi-material level-set method is applied to track multiple interfaces simultaneously in the simulations. The numerical results are validated with analytical solutions and available experimental data using parameters selected based on the experimental setup and without post hoc calibration. The thixotropic (time-dependent fluid model shows reasonable agreement with all the experimental data. For most of the experimental conditions, the Herschel–Bulkley (time-independent model results were similar to the thixotropic model, a critical exception being conditions with a high yield stress where the Herschel–Bulkley model did not initiate flow. These results indicate that the thixotropic relationship is promising for

  2. The pristine shape of Olympus Mons on Mars and the subaqueous origin of its aureole deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Blasio, Fabio Vittorio

    2018-03-01

    The tallest volcano in the solar system, Olympus Mons on Mars, is bordered by at least ten enormous sub-circular hummocky deposits forming a welded halo, termed the aureole. The aureole units (or simply aureoles), which are the deposits of landslides from Olympus Mons, have dramatically transformed the pristine size and shape of the volcanic edifice. Topographic data are used to determine the amount of collapsed material, and so reconstruct the original outline of Olympus Mons before the landslides took place, under the assumption that the edifice did not start failing until it had reached this maximum size. Due to post-aureole deposition on the eastern and southern flanks and to the uncertainty of the slippage level on the northern side, the reconstruction is sufficiently precise along the western and north-western Olympus Mons flank, it is more uncertain for the northern flank, while it is not feasible around the rest of the volcano. It appears that the radius along the western and north-western Olympus Mons before the collapse of the aureole landslides was approximately 200 km longer or more. The results show that the volume of the aureoles, even if enormous, is insufficient to fill the ideal conical edifice which would be obtained prolonging the Olympus Mons flanks with present slope angles. Thus, an overhang remains in the pre-aureole reconstructed Olympus Mons, which would also explain the onset of instability that led to the aureole collapse. Further, a drape deposit blanketing the southern Acheron Fossae ridge just at the front of the western (W) aureole landslide deposit and a fan-channel system carved on the same W aureole are investigated, and it is suggested that these morphologies have been emplaced in subaqueous setting. While the drape may indicate a landslide-thrust water splash akin to a tsunami deposit caused by the fast travelling W aureole landslide, the fan-channel system is similar to certain morphologies in the terrestrial oceans. A numerical

  3. Distinct spontaneous shrinkage of a sporadic vestibular schwannoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Xiaowen; Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2013-01-01

    We present a case with outspoken spontaneous vestibular schwannoma shrinkage and review the related literature. The patient was initially diagnosed with a left-sided, intrameatal vestibular schwannoma, which subsequently grew into the cerebello-pontine angle (CPA), followed by total shrinkage...... of the CPA component without any intervention over a 12-year observation period. The literature on spontaneous tumor shrinkage was retrieved by searching the subject terms "vestibular schwannoma, conservative management" in PubMed/MEDLINE database, without a time limit. Of the published data, the articles...... on "shrinkage" or "negative growth" or "regression" or "involution" of the tumor were selected, and the contents on the rate, extent and mechanism of spontaneous tumor shrinkage were extracted and reviewed. The reported rate of spontaneous shrinkage of vestibular schwannoma is 5-10% of patients managed...

  4. Multi-scale Constitutive Model of Solidifying Cementitious Composites and Application to Cracking Assessment of a Concrete Structure

    OpenAIRE

    石田, 哲也; 浅本, 晋吾; 前川, 宏一

    2006-01-01

    A multi-scale constitutive model of solidifying cementitious materials is presented based on a systematic knowledge coupling structural mechanics with chemo-physical phenomena. The model can reasonably simulate time-dependent deformations such as autogenous/drying shrinkage and basic/drying creep in laboratory tests under arbitrary environmental and loading conditions. Shrinkage induced cracking in an actual PRC bridge structure was examined by the analytical system, which reveals that large ...

  5. Static and dynamic photoresist shrinkage effects in EUV photoresists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunday, Benjamin; Montgomery, Cecilia; Montgomery, Warren; Cordes, Aaron

    2012-03-01

    Photoresist shrinkage (a.k.a. line slimming) is an important systematic uncertainty source in critical dimension-scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) metrology of lithographic features [1][2][3][4][5]. In terms of metrology gauge metrics, it influences both the precision and the accuracy of CD-SEM measurements, while locally damaging the sample. Minimization or elimination of shrinkage is desirable, yet elusive. This error source will furthermore be a factor in CDSEM metrology on such polymer materials into the era of EUV lithography, such that learning to work around this issue will continue to be necessary. Recent work has demonstrated improved understanding of the trends in the shrinkage response depending on electron beam and target parameters in the static measurement case [2][3][4][5][6]. Another recent work has highlighted a second mode of shrinkage that is apparent over time and progresses as a function of time between consecutive measurements, a form of "dynamic shrinkage" that appears to be activated by electron beam, in which the activated feature perpetually and logarithmically shrinks [7][8]. In this work, we will explore both the static and dynamic shrinkage behaviors of various EUV photoresists. The static shrinkage behaviors will be tested for compliance with the SEMATECH shrinkage model [5][6], and further studies will confirm whether or not the dynamic effects are observable. Knowledge of secondary trends in dynamic shrinkage will also be further explored, including how these vary with electron beam energy, activation dose, feature size, and other parameters.

  6. Numerical Analysis of Moisture Flow and Concrete Cracking by means of Lattice Type Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jankovic, D.; Küntz, M.; Van Mier, J.G.M.

    2001-01-01

    Modelling of fluid-flow and the resulting effects on shrinkage and microcracking by means of a combination of two lattice models are presented. For the moisture transport, a Lattice Gas Automaton (LGA) is adopted since it can effectively model moisture loss, whereas for cracking simulation a Lattice

  7. Assessment of early-age cracking of high-performance concrete in restrained ring specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quang-phu Nguyen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available High-performance concrete (HPC is stronger and more durable than conventional concrete. However, shrinkage and shrinkage cracking are common phenomena in HPC, especially early-age cracking. This study assessed early-age cracking of HPC for two mixtures using restrained ring tests. The two mixtures were produced with water/binder mass ratio (mW/mB of 0.22 and 0.40, respectively. The results show that, with greater steel thickness, the higher degree of restraint resulted in a higher interface pressure and earlier cracking. With steel thickness of 6 mm, 19 mm, and 30 mm, the age of cracking were, respectively, 12 days, 8 days, and 5.4 days with the mW/mB = 0.22 mixture; and 22.5 days, 12.6 days, and 7.1 days with the mW/mB = 0.40 mixture. Cases of the same steel thickness show that the ring specimens with a thicker concrete wall crack later. With the mW/mB = 0.22 mixture, concrete walls with thicknesses of 37.5 mm, 75 mm, and 112.5 mm cracked at 3.4 days, 8.0 days, and 9.8 days, respectively; with the mW/mB = 0.40 mixture, the ages of cracking were 7.1 days, 12.6 days, and 16.0 days, respectively.

  8. Drying Shrinkage Microcracking in Cement-based Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop, J.; Van Mier, J.G.M.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the nature of drying shrinkage microcracking in a variety of model cementbased materials, as well as in more practical types of concrete is described. The model mixtures were studied to elucidate the mechanisms of drying shrinkage microcracking and the factors that influence these

  9. Coping with shrinkage in Europe's cities and towns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hospers, Gerrit J.

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of cities and towns in Europe are facing population decline. In this article we focus on the challenges of this urban shrinkage process from a policy perspective. After a short review of the main causes and consequences of urban shrinkage in Europe, two common public policy

  10. Modified Dugdale cracks and Fictitious cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1998-01-01

    A number of theories are presented in the literature on crack mechanics by which the strength of damaged materials can be predicted. Among these are theories based on the well-known Dugdale model of a crack prevented from spreading by self-created constant cohesive flow stressed acting in local...... areas, so-called fictitious cracks, in front of the crack.The Modified Dugdale theory presented in this paper is also based on the concept of Dugdale cracks. Any cohesive stress distribution, however, can be considered in front of the crack. Formally the strength of a material weakened by a modified...... Dugdale crack is the same as if it has been weakened by the well-known Griffith crack, namely sigma_CR = (EG_CR/phi)^1/2 where E and 1 are Young's modulus and crack half-length respectively, and G_CR is the so-called critical energy release rate. The physical significance of G_CR, however, is different...

  11. Effectiveness of shrinkage-reducing admixtures on Portland pozzolan cement concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Videla, C.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Drying shrinkage causes tensile stress in restrained concrete members. Since all structural elements are subject to some degree of restraint, drying shrinkage is regarded to be one of the main causes of concrete cracking. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of SRA in reducing drying shrinkage strain in Portland pozzolan cement concrete. The major variables examined included slump, admixture type and dose, and specimen size. The measured results indicate that any of the admixtures used in the study significantly reduced shrinkage. Concrete manufactured with shrinkage reducing admixtures shrank an average of 43% less than concrete without admixtures. As a rule, the higher the dose of admixture, the higher was its shrinkage reduction performance. The experimental results were compared to the shrinkage strain estimated with the ACI 209, CEB MC 90, B3, GL 2000, Sakata 1993 and Sakata 2001 models. Although none of these models was observed to accurately describe the behaviour of Portland pozzolan cement concrete with shrinkage reducing admixtures, the Sakata 2001 model, with a weighted coefficient of variation of under 30%, may be regarded to be roughly adequate.

    La retracción por secado es un fenómeno intrínseco del hormigón que produce tensiones de tracción en elementos restringidos de hormigón. Puesto que todos los elementos presentan algún grado de retracción, se considera a la retracción por secado como una de las principales causas de agrietamiento en proyectos de construcción en hormigón. Por lo tanto, el objetivo de esta investigación fue evaluar la efectividad de los aditivos reductores de retracción (SRA en hormigones fabricados con cemento Portland puzolánico. Las variables principales estudiadas incluyen el asentamiento de cono de Abrams, marca y dosis de aditivo reductor de retracción, y tamaño de espécimen de hormigón. Los resultados obtenidos permiten concluir que el uso de

  12. Effective Expansion: Balance between Shrinkage and Hygroscopic Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suiter, E A; Watson, L E; Tantbirojn, D; Lou, J S B; Versluis, A

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between hygroscopic expansion and polymerization shrinkage for compensation of polymerization shrinkage stresses in a restored tooth. One resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) (Ketac Nano, 3M ESPE), 2 compomers (Dyract, Dentsply; Compoglass, Ivoclar), and a universal resin-based composite (Esthet•X HD, Dentsply) were tested. Volumetric change after polymerization ("total shrinkage") and during 4 wk of water storage at 37°C was measured using an optical method (n= 10). Post-gel shrinkage was measured during polymerization using a strain gauge method (n= 10). Extracted human molars with large mesio-occluso-distal slot preparations were restored with the tested restorative materials. Tooth surfaces at baseline (preparation), after restoration, and during 4 wk of 37°C water storage were scanned with an optical scanner to determine cuspal flexure (n= 8). Occlusal interface integrity was measured using dye penetration. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and post hoc tests (significance level 0.05). All tested materials shrunk after polymerization. RMGI had the highest total shrinkage (4.65%) but lowest post-gel shrinkage (0.35%). Shrinkage values dropped significantly during storage in water but had not completely compensated polymerization shrinkage after 4 wk. All restored teeth initially exhibited inward (negative) cuspal flexure due to polymerization shrinkage. Cuspal flexure with the RMGI restoration was significantly less (-6.4 µm) than with the other materials (-12.1 to -14.1 µm). After 1 d, cuspal flexure reversed to +5.0 µm cuspal expansion with the RMGI and increased to +9.3 µm at 4 wk. After 4 wk, hygroscopic expansion compensated cuspal flexure in a compomer (Compoglass) and reduced flexure with Dyract and resin-based composite. Marginal integrity (93.7% intact restoration wall) was best for the Compoglass restorations and lowest (73.1%) for the RMGI restorations. Hygroscopic

  13. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... Version Download "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." ©istock.com/ Marjot Stacey is ...

  14. Crack sealer fill characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Laboratory testing was conducted to determine the extent of crack fill for crack sealers composed of methyl methacrylate, : epoxy, urethane, and high molecular weight methacrylate. The test specimens consisted of eight-inch long concrete : cylinders ...

  15. Self-Shrinkage Behaviors of Waste Paper Fiber Reinforced Cement Paste considering Its Self-Curing Effect at Early-Ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengwu Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to study how the early-age self-shrinkage behavior of cement paste is affected by the addition of the waste paper fibers under sealed conditions. Although the primary focus was to determine whether the waste paper fibers are suitable to mitigate self-shrinkage as an internal curing agent under different adding ways, evaluating their strength, pore structure, and hydration properties provided further insight into the self-cured behavior of cement paste. Under the wet mixing condition, the waste paper fibers could mitigate the self-shrinkage of cement paste and, at additions of 0.2% by mass of cement, the waste paper fibers were found to show significant self-shrinkage cracking control while providing some internal curing. In addition, the self-curing efficiency results were analyzed based on the strength and the self-shrinkage behaviors of cement paste. Results indicated that, under a low water cement ratio, an optimal dosage and adding ways of the waste paper fibers could enhance the self-curing efficiency of cement paste.

  16. Field-trip guide to subaqueous volcaniclastic facies in the Ancestral Cascades arc in southern Washington State—The Ohanapecosh Formation and Wildcat Creek beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutzeler, Martin; McPhie, Jocelyn

    2017-06-27

    Partly situated in the idyllic Mount Rainier National Park, this field trip visits exceptional examples of Oligocene subaqueous volcaniclastic successions in continental basins adjacent to the Ancestral Cascades arc. The >800-m-thick Ohanapecosh Formation (32–26 Ma) and the >300-m-thick Wildcat Creek (27 Ma) beds record similar sedimentation processes from various volcanic sources. Both show evidence of below-wave-base deposition, and voluminous accumulation of volcaniclastic facies from subaqueous density currents and suspension settling. Eruption-fed facies include deposits from pyroclastic flows that crossed the shoreline, from tephra fallout over water, and from probable Surtseyan eruptions, whereas re-sedimented facies comprise subaqueous density currents and debris flow deposits.

  17. A Preliminary Numerical Investigation on the Influence of Material Variability in the Early-Age Cracking Behavior of Restrained Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radlinska, Aleksandra; Pease, Bradley Justin; Weiss, Jason

    2007-01-01

    The restraint of drying, autogenous, or thermal shrinkage can result in the development of tensile residual stresses. If the residual stresses that develop are large enough, they may cause cracking in the concrete. Substantial research has focused on the development of test methods to assess stress...... development and the corresponding potential for cracking. These test methods frequently focus on the determination of material properties that can be used in deterministic computer programs to simulate stress development and cracking. While these models are a great step forward, variability is inherent...... in the material properties, the construction processes, and the environmental conditions (i.e., temperature and relative humidity). This paper presents results of considering variability in a model for predicting the time of shrinkage cracking. A Monte Carlo simulation procedure has been adopted to account...

  18. A 3D Lattice Modelling Study of Drying Shrinkage Damage in Concrete Repair Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladena Luković

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Differential shrinkage between repair material and concrete substrate is considered to be the main cause of premature failure of repair systems. The magnitude of induced stresses depends on many factors, for example the degree of restraint, moisture gradients caused by curing and drying conditions, type of repair material, etc. Numerical simulations combined with experimental observations can be of great use when determining the influence of these parameters on the performance of repair systems. In this work, a lattice type model was used to simulate first the moisture transport inside a repair system and then the resulting damage as a function of time. 3D simulations were performed, and damage patterns were qualitatively verified with experimental results and cracking tendencies in different brittle and ductile materials. The influence of substrate surface preparation, bond strength between the two materials, and thickness of the repair material were investigated. Benefits of using a specially tailored fibre reinforced material, namely strain hardening cementitious composite (SHCC, for controlling the damage development due to drying shrinkage in concrete repairs was also examined.

  19. A 3D Lattice Modelling Study of Drying Shrinkage Damage in Concrete Repair Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luković, Mladena; Šavija, Branko; Schlangen, Erik; Ye, Guang; van Breugel, Klaas

    2016-07-14

    Differential shrinkage between repair material and concrete substrate is considered to be the main cause of premature failure of repair systems. The magnitude of induced stresses depends on many factors, for example the degree of restraint, moisture gradients caused by curing and drying conditions, type of repair material, etc. Numerical simulations combined with experimental observations can be of great use when determining the influence of these parameters on the performance of repair systems. In this work, a lattice type model was used to simulate first the moisture transport inside a repair system and then the resulting damage as a function of time. 3D simulations were performed, and damage patterns were qualitatively verified with experimental results and cracking tendencies in different brittle and ductile materials. The influence of substrate surface preparation, bond strength between the two materials, and thickness of the repair material were investigated. Benefits of using a specially tailored fibre reinforced material, namely strain hardening cementitious composite (SHCC), for controlling the damage development due to drying shrinkage in concrete repairs was also examined.

  20. Permeability Enhancement in Fine-Grained Sediments by Chemically Induced Clay Fabric Shrinkage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijesinghe, A M; Kansa, E J; Viani, B E; Blake, R G; Roberts, J J; Huber, R D

    2004-02-26

    The National Research Council [1] identified the entrapment of contaminants in fine-grained clay-bearing soils as a major impediment to the timely and cost-effective remediation of groundwater to regulatory standards. Contaminants trapped in low-permeability, low-diffusivity, high-sorptivity clays are not accessible to advective flushing by treatment fluids from permeable zones, and slowly diffuse out to recontaminate previously cleaned permeable strata. We propose to overcome this barrier to effective remediation by exploiting the ability of certain nontoxic EPA-approved chemicals (e.g., ethanol) to shrink and alter the fabric of clays, and thereby create macro-porosity and crack networks in fine-grained sediments. This would significantly reduce the distance and time scales of diffusive mass transport to advectively flushed boundaries, to yield orders of magnitude reduction in the time required to complete remediation. Given that effective solutions to this central problem of subsurface remediation do not yet exist, the cost and time benefits of successful deployment of this novel concept, both as a stand-alone technology and as an enabling pre-treatment for other remedial technologies that rely on advective delivery, is likely to be very large. This project, funded as a 1-year feasibility study by LLNL's LDRD Program, is a multi-directorate, multi-disciplinary effort that leverages expertise from the Energy & Environment Directorate, the Environmental Restoration Division, and the Manufacturing & Materials Evaluation Division of Mechanical Engineering. In this feasibility study, a ''proof-of-principle'' experiment was performed to answer the central question: ''Can clay shrinkage induced by ethanol in clay-bearing sediments overcome realistic confining stresses, crack clay, and increase its effective permeability by orders of magnitude within a time that is much smaller than the time required for diffusive mass transport of

  1. Shrinkage singularities of amplitudes and weak interaction cross- section asymptotic

    CERN Document Server

    Dolgov, A D; Okun, Lev Borisovich

    1972-01-01

    The so called shrinkage singularities of amplitudes caused by shrinkage of diffraction peak at asymptotically high energies are discussed given the condition that the amplitude singularities are not stronger than t/sup 2/ ln t (as is case for neutrino pair exchange diagrams) then total cross-section sigma /sub tot/ cannot increase faster at s to infinity than s/sup 1/3/. If shrinkage singularities are absent then sigma /sub tot/ cannot increase as any power of s. All the conclusions are valid, if the dispersion relations with finite number of subtractions exist at t

  2. Subaqueous cryptodome eruption, hydrothermal activity and related seafloor morphologies on the andesitic North Su volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thal, Janis; Tivey, Maurice; Yoerger, Dana R.; Bach, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    North Su is a double-peaked active andesite submarine volcano located in the eastern Manus Basin of the Bismarck Sea that reaches a depth of 1154 m. It hosts a vigorous and varied hydrothermal system with black and white smoker vents along with several areas of diffuse venting and deposits of native sulfur. Geologic mapping based on ROV observations from 2006 and 2011 combined with morphologic features identified from repeated bathymetric surveys in 2002 and 2011 documents the emplacement of a volcanic cryptodome between 2006 and 2011. We use our observations and rock analyses to interpret an eruption scenario where highly viscous, crystal-rich andesitic magma erupted slowly into the water-saturated, gravel-dominated slope of North Su. An intense fragmentation process produced abundant blocky clasts of a heterogeneous magma (olivine crystals within a rhyolitic groundmass) that only rarely breached through the clastic cover onto the seafloor. Phreatic and phreatomagmatic explosions beneath the seafloor cause mixing of juvenile and pre-existing lithic clasts and produce a volcaniclastic deposit. This volcaniclastic deposit consists of blocky, non-altered clasts next, variably (1-100%) altered clasts, hydrothermal precipitates and crystal fragments. The usually applied parameters to identify juvenile subaqueous lava fragments, i.e. fluidal shape or chilled margin, were not applicable to distinguish between pre-existing non-altered clasts and juvenile clasts. This deposit is updomed during further injection of magma and mechanical disruption. Gas-propelled turbulent clast-recycling causes clasts to develop variably rounded shapes. An abundance of blocky clasts and the lack of clasts typical for the contact of liquid lava with water is interpreted to be the result of a cooled, high-viscosity, crystal-rich magma that failed as a brittle solid upon stress. The high viscosity allows the lava to form blocky and short lobes. The pervasive volcaniclastic cover on North Su is

  3. Use of Subaqueous Slope Failures to Study the Paleoseismicity of Eastern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, C. D.; Soltau, B.; King, J. W.; Lewis, C.; Coakley, J. P.

    2004-05-01

    The identification, dating, and back analysis of subaqueous slope failures can provide useful information about the history and reoccurrence intervals of large, intraplate earthquakes. Such a failure was discovered in the Rochester Basin of Lake Ontario using HUNTEC seismic reflection data and an analysis of piston cores. Historic variations in the earth's magnetic field were measured in the cores within the failures' debris flow and in adjacent unfailed areas, and these variations were compared to a paleomagnetic reference curve developed for the region from three lakes in New York and Pennsylvania. The age of the failure was estimated to be 7,900 yrbp based on the paleomagnetic dating techniques. Using infinite slope stability analyses, measured values of the undrained shear strength, and slope geometry from a GIS elevation model and the HUNTEC records, the minimum ground acceleration needed to fail the slope ranged from 0.01 to 0.03 g. Based on published attenuation relationships for intraplate earthquakes, an earthquake of Magnitude 5 or greater located 150-200 km from the site could have generated such a ground acceleration, and caused the failure. The Niagara-Attica, 1000 Islands, and western Lake Ontario seismic zones are all within this distance. There is currently no known earthquake of this magnitude in the seismic record that occurred 7,900 years ago. This analysis does not prove conclusively that a seismic trigger is responsible for the failure, but rather identifies a starting point for further research. Other possible failure mechanisms that need to be investigated include rapid changes in lake levels that affect the gas phase in the sediments and bedrock "pop-ups" caused by large horizontal stresses beneath Lake Ontario. However, the results of this study do show the promise of this approach for studying paleoseismic events and earthquake hazards in Eastern North America. The next step in this research is to search for similar features in other lakes

  4. A subaqueous welded tuff from the Ordovician of County Waterford, Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, William J.; Stillman, Chris J.

    1996-01-01

    The Metal Man Tuff (MMT) from the Ordovician of County Waterford, Ireland was emplaced and welded in water depths greater than the thickness of the pyroclastic flow. The MMT is the basal member of the Middle Tramore Volcanic Formation (MTVF) of the 5-km-thick Tramore Group. The MMT consists of a 10-m-thick basal graded zone that represents a pyroclastic flow consisting of angular clasts of black mudstone, pumice, gray flow banded rhyolite, and pink massive rhyolite set in a matrix of non-deformed ash shards and pumice. Maximum grain size grades from large cobbles and small boulders to pebbles. The basal 10-30 cm is depleted with respect to the largest boulders resulting in an inversely graded basal layer. The basal graded zone passes upward into a transition zone with a strong eutaxitic foliation defined by elongated fiamme of mudstone and flattened pumice. Overlying this is an upper welded zone with a pronounced eutaxitic foliation, columnar jointing, flattened ash shards and shards deformed around phenocrysts and spheroids. The presence of these features indicate that the deposit is welded, was hot, and was in motion as the shards deformed. The MMT represents a pyroclastic flow that was a hot primary product of an eruption rather than re-mobilized cold pyroclastic debris. The MMT is bounded by suspension deposited fine-grained tuff, tuffaceous mudstone and terrigenous mudstone deposited below storm wave base. Many of the mudstone horizons contain brachipod faunas from shelf-depth water. Nowhere in the 5-km-thick Tramore Group is there terrigenous sandstone, evidence of unidirectional flowing water, nor any indication of shoreline, alluvial environments, or subaerial exposure. It thus seems reasonable to conclude that the MMT was emplaced and welded subaqueously. The geochemistry of the MMT is typical of other high-silica (70-78 wt.% SiO 2) rhyolite from the Ordovician of Ireland. The chemistry of the MMT is consistent from top to bottom allowing it to be

  5. Crack path and fracture surface modifications in cement composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad Ahmad

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a tremendous increase in the use of high strength and high performance self-consolidating cementitious composites due to their superior workability and mechanical strengths. Cement composites are quasi-brittle in nature and possess extremely low tensile strength as compared to their compressive strength. Due to the low tensile strength capacity, cracks develop in cementitious composites due to the drying shrinkage, plastic settlements and/or stress concentrations (due to external restrains and/or applied stresses etc. These cracks developed at the nanoscale may grow rapidly due to the applied stresses and join together to form micro and macro cracks. The growth of cracks from nanoscale to micro and macro scale is very rapid and may lead to sudden failure of the cement composites. The present paper reports the modifications in the crack growth pattern of the high performance cement composites to achieve enhanced ductility and toughness. The objective was accomplished by the incorporation of the micro sized inert particulates in the cement composite matrix. The results indicate that the incorporation of micro sized inert particles acted as the obstacles in the growth of the cracks thus improving the ductility and the energy absorption capacity of the self-consolidating cementitious composites.

  6. Mesoscopic analysis of drying shrinkage damage in a cementitious material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moonen, P.; Pedersen, R.R.; Simone, A.

    2008-01-01

    Concrete and cement-based materials exhibit shrinkage when exposed to drying. Structural effects and inhomogeneity of material properties adverse free shrinkage, hereby inducing stress concentrations and possibly damage. In this contribution, the magnitude of shrinkage- induced damage during...... a typical sample preparation procedure is assessed. To this extent, a coupled hygro-thermo-mechanical model, incorporating rate-effects, is developed. The constitutive model is applied at a mesoscopic level where the aggregates and the interfacial transition zone (ITZ) are explicitly modelled. Two drying...... temperatures are considered: 35 °C and 50 °C. Significantly more micro-damage and higher internal stresses are found for the latter, revealing the importance of drying shrinkage damage, even at laboratory scale....

  7. Creep and Shrinkage of High Strength Concretes: an Experimental Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berenice Martins Toralles carbonari

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The creep and shrinkage behaviour of high strength silica fume concretes is significantly different from that of conventional concretes. In order to represent the proper time-dependent response of the material in structural analysis and design, these aspects should be adequately quantified. This paper discusses an experimental setup that is able to determine the creep and shrinkage of concrete from the time of placing. It also compares different gages that can be used for measuring the strains. The method is applied to five different concretes in the laboratory under controlled environmental conditions. The phenomena that are quantified can be classified as basic shrinkage, drying shrinkage, basic creep and drying creep. The relative importance of these mechanisms in high strength concrete will also be presented.

  8. Physical properties of safflower grains. Part II: Volumetric shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elton A. S. Martins

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Agricultural products usually have their size reduced during the drying process. The quantification of the reduction in the dimensions is important for the development and optimization of equipment for the post-harvest of the product. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the variation in the moisture content during drying on the volumetric shrinkage of safflower grains and their respective axes. Safflower grains were harvested with an initial moisture content of approximately 0.445 decimal d.b. (dry basis and subjected to drying in an oven with forced air circulation at 40 °C, until the grains reached a final moisture content of 0.073 ± 0.008 decimal d.b. During drying, the contraction of the axes, unit volumetric shrinkage and volumetric shrinkage of the mass of safflower grains were determined at different moisture contents. Based on these results, it can be concluded that reducing the moisture content causes a reduction in the axes of safflower grains and, consequently, reductions in the unit volumetric shrinkage and volumetric shrinkage of the mass of approximately 16 and 13%, respectively, and both variables can be represented by the linear shrinkage model.

  9. TESTING AND ANALYSIS OF CAP CONCRETE STRESS AND STRAIN DUE TO SHRINKAGE, CREEP, AND EXPANSION FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, H.; Restivo, M.

    2011-08-01

    In-situ decommissioning of Reactors P- and R- at the Savannah River Site will require filling the reactor vessels with a special concrete based on materials such as magnesium phosphate, calcium aluminate or silica fume. Then the reactor vessels will be overlain with an 8 ft. thick layer of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) steel reinforced concrete, called the 'Cap Concrete'. The integrity of this protective layer must be assured to last for a sufficiently long period of time to avoid ingress of water into the reactor vessel and possible movement of radioactive contamination into the environment. During drying of this Cap Concrete however, shrinkage strains are set up in the concrete as a result of diffusion and evaporation of water from the top surface. This shrinkage varies with depth in the poured slab due to a non-uniform moisture distribution. This differential shrinkage results in restraint of the upper layers with larger shrinkage by lower layers with lesser displacements. Tensile stresses can develop at the surface from the strain gradients in the bulk slab, which can lead to surface cracking. Further, a mechanism called creep occurs during the curing period or early age produces strains under the action of restraining forces. To investigate the potential for surface cracking, an experimental and analytical program was started under TTQAP SRNL-RP-2009-01184. Slab sections made of Cap Concrete mixture were instrumented with embedded strain gages and relative humidity sensors and tested under controlled environmental conditions of 23 C and relative humidities (RH) of 40% and 80% over a period of 50 days. Calculation methods were also developed for predictions of stress development in the full-scale concrete placement over the reactor vessels. These methods were evaluated by simulating conditions for the test specimens and the calculation results compared to the experimental data. A closely similar test with strain gages was performed by Kim and Lee for

  10. Coupled penetrometer, MBES and ADCP assessments of tidal variations of the surface sediment layer along active subaqueous dunes, Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stark, Nina; Hanff, Henrik; Svenson, Christian

    2011-01-01

    In-situ geotechnical measurements of surface sediments were carried out along large subaqueous dunes in the Knudedyb tidal inlet channel in the DanishWadden Sea using a small free-falling penetrometer. Vertical profiles showed a typical stratification pattern with a resolution of ~1 cm depicting ...

  11. Eliminating cracking during drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qiu; Tan, Peng; Schofield, Andrew B; Xu, Lei

    2013-03-01

    When colloidal suspensions dry, stresses build up and cracks often occur -a phenomenon undesirable for important industries such as paint and ceramics. We demonstrate an effective method which can completely eliminate cracking during drying: by adding emulsion droplets into colloidal suspensions, we can systematically decrease the amount of cracking, and eliminate it completely above a critical droplet concentration. Since the emulsion droplets eventually also evaporate, our technique achieves an effective function while making little changes to the component of final product, and may therefore serve as a promising approach for cracking elimination. Furthermore, adding droplets also varies the speed of air invasion and provides a powerful method to adjust drying rate. With the effective control over cracking and drying rate, our study may find important applications in many drying- and cracking-related industrial processes.

  12. Mesocosmic study on autogenous shrinkage of concrete with consideration of effects of temperature and humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan HAI

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A study on the autogenous shrinkage (AS of concrete from a mesocosmic perspective was carried out using numerical simulation technology. The temperature history and the autogenous relative humidity (ARH, two factors that have been shown to have occasional influence on this process in previous studies, were introduced into this study. According to these concepts, a program for simulation of the temperature field, humidity field, and stress field based on the equivalent age method and a fully automatic aggregate modeling tool were used. With the help of these programs, the study of a small concrete specimen provided some useful conclusions: the aggregate and the matrix show distinct distribution properties in the temperature field, humidity field, and stress field; the aggregate-matrix interface has a high possibility of becoming the location of the initial cracking caused by AS of concrete; the distribution of random aggregates is extremely important for mesoscopical analysis; and the temperature history is the main factor affecting the AS of concrete. On the whole, inherent mechanisms and cracking mechanisms of AS of concrete can be explained more reasonably and realistically only by considering the different characteristics of material phases and the effects of temperature and humidity.

  13. Modeling and numerical investigations for hierarchical pattern formation in desiccation cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirobe, Sayako; Oguni, Kenji

    2017-11-01

    Desiccation cracking and its pattern formation are widely observed in nature. The network of the surface cracks forms polygonal cells with typical size. This crack pattern is not formed in a simultaneous manner, instead, formed in a sequential and hierarchical manner. The strain energy accumulated by the heterogeneous drying shrinkage strain is systematically released by the cracks. In this sense, desiccation cracking phenomenon can be regarded as a typical example of the pattern formation in the dynamical system with dissipation. We propose a mathematical model for the pattern formation in desiccation cracking with emphasis on the emergence of the typical length scale with the typical geometry resulting from the hierarchical cell tessellation. The desiccation crack phenomenon is modeled as the coupling of desiccation, deformation, and fracture. This coupling model is numerically solved by weakly coupled analysis of the desiccation process and the deformation/fracture process. The basic features of the desiccation crack pattern and its formation process reproduced by the numerical analysis show reasonable agreement with experimental observations. This agreement implies that the proposed coupling model properly addresses the fundamental mechanism for the hierarchical pattern formation in desiccation cracking.

  14. The Effect of Crack Width on Chloride-Induced Corrosion of Steel in Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available When subjected to loading or thermal shrinkage, reinforced concrete structures usually behave in a cracking state, which raises the risk of bar corrosion from the working environment. The influence of cover cracking on chloride-induced corrosion was experimentally investigated through a 654-day laboratory test on cracked reinforced concrete specimens exposed to chloride solution. The concrete specimens have a dimension of 100 mm × 100 mm × 400 mm and a single prefabricated crack at the midspan. When the percentage concentration of chloride ion (0.6%, 1.2%, 2.1%, 3.0%, and 6.0% and crack width (uncracked, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5 mm are taken as variables, the experimental results showed that the corrosion rates for cracked specimens increased with increasing percentage concentration of chloride and increasing crack width. This study also showed the interrelationship between crack width and percentage concentration of chloride on the corrosion rate. In addition, an empirical model, incorporating the influence of the cover cracking and chloride concentration, was developed to predict the corrosion rate. This model allows the prediction of the maximum allowable wcr based on the given percentage concentration of chloride in the exposure condition.

  15. Hot cracking of Structural Steel during Laser Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda Huitron, Rosa M.; Vuorinen, Esa

    2017-10-01

    Laser welding is an important technique in many industries due to its high precision in operation, its local and fast processing, narrow welds and its good weld surface quality. However, the process can involve some complications due to the rapid heating and cooling of the material processed, resulting in physical and metallurgical effects as thermal contraction during solidification, giving as a result the presence of residual stresses in the narrow weld. Formation of defects during the process is an important topic to be evaluated in order to achieve better performance of the steels in use. In the present work, defects formed during laser welding of a structural steel have been investigated. The defects formed have been identified and the causes of the defects are discussed. Possible strategies for improvement of the welding procedure and final weld result are proposed. The defects were analysed by optical and scanning electron microscopy and hardness measurement. Cracks were located in the middle of the fusion zone and followed both inter-granular and trans-granular paths. Impurities as manganese sulphides were found along the welding direction, and could act as sites for crack formation. The cracks formed during solidification of the weld are identified as solidification cracks. This kind of cracks is usually caused by solidification shrinkage and thermal contractions during the process, which appear in the fusion zone and sometimes in the heat affected zone.

  16. Method of Preventing Shrinkage of Aluminum Foam Using Carbonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Nakamura

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Metallic foams are commonly produced using titanium hydride as a foaming agent. Carbonates produce aluminum foam with a fine and homogenous cell structure. However, foams produced using carbonates show marked shrinkage, which is clearly different from those produced using titanium hydride. It is essential for practical applications to clarify foam shrinkage and establish a method of preventing it. In this research, cell structures were observed to study the shrinkage of aluminum foam produced using carbonates. The cells of foam produced using dolomite as a foaming agent connected to each other with maximum expansion. It was estimated that foaming gas was released through connected cells to the outside. It was assumed that cell formation at different sites is effective in preventing shrinkage induced by cell connection. The multiple additions of dolomite and magnesium carbonate, which have different decomposition temperatures, were applied. The foam in the case with multiple additions maintained a density of 0.66 up to 973 K, at which the foam produced using dolomite shrank. It was verified that the multiple additions of carbonates are effective in preventing shrinkage.

  17. Geosynthetic clay liners shrinkage under simulated daily thermal cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabadani, Hamid; Rayhani, Mohammad T

    2014-06-01

    Geosynthetic clay liners are used as part of composite liner systems in municipal solid waste landfills and other applications to restrict the escape of contaminants into the surrounding environment. This is attainable provided that the geosynthetic clay liner panels continuously cover the subsoil. Previous case histories, however, have shown that some geosynthetic clay liner panels are prone to significant shrinkage and separation when an overlying geomembrane is exposed to solar radiation. Experimental models were initiated to evaluate the potential shrinkage of different geosynthetic clay liner products placed over sand and clay subsoils, subjected to simulated daily thermal cycles (60°C for 8 hours and 22°C for 16 hours) modelling field conditions in which the liner is exposed to solar radiation. The variation of geosynthetic clay liner shrinkage was evaluated at specified times by a photogrammetry technique. The manufacturing techniques, the initial moisture content, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to width) of the geosynthetic clay liner were found to considerably affect the shrinkage of geosynthetic clay liners. The particle size distribution of the subsoil and the associated suction at the geosynthetic clay liner-subsoil interface was also found to have significant effects on the shrinkage of the geosynthetic clay liner. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Crack and Kids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besharov, Douglas J.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews problems of crack-addicted babies. Suggests the following areas for grant support: (1) results of fetal exposure; (2) medical treatment and foster care for newborns; (3) research on behavioral changes resulting from crack use; (4) public awareness materials; (5) education for addicted mothers who keep their babies; and (6) removing babies…

  19. Updating a cracked database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Idreos (Stratos); M.L. Kersten (Martin); S. Manegold (Stefan)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractA cracked database is a datastore continuously reorganized based on operations being executed. For each query, the data of interest is physically reclustered to speed-up future access to the same, overlapping or even disjoint data. This way, a cracking DBMS self-organizes and adapts

  20. Hydration of Portoguese cements, measurement and modelling of chemical shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maia, Lino; Geiker, Mette Rica; Figueiras, Joaquim A.

    2008-01-01

    Development of cement hydration was studied by measuring the chemical shrinkage of pastes. Five types of Portuguese Portland cement were used in cement pastes with . Chemical shrinkage was measured by gravimetry and dilatometry. In gravimeters results were recorded automatically during at least...... seven days, dilatometers were manually recorded during at least 56 days. The dispersion model was applied to fit chemical shrinkage results and to estimate the maximum (or ultimate) value for calculation of degree of hydration. Except for a pure Portland cement best fits were obtained by the general...... form of the dispersion model. The development of hydration varied between the investigated cements; based on the measured data the degree of hydration after 24 h hydration at 20 C varied between 40 and 50%. This should be taken into account when comparing properties of concrete made from the different...

  1. Improving the Incoherence of a Learned Dictionary via Rank Shrinkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubaru, Shashanka; Seghouane, Abd-Krim; Saad, Yousef

    2017-01-01

    This letter considers the problem of dictionary learning for sparse signal representation whose atoms have low mutual coherence. To learn such dictionaries, at each step, we first update the dictionary using the method of optimal directions (MOD) and then apply a dictionary rank shrinkage step to decrease its mutual coherence. In the rank shrinkage step, we first compute a rank 1 decomposition of the column-normalized least squares estimate of the dictionary obtained from the MOD step. We then shrink the rank of this learned dictionary by transforming the problem of reducing the rank to a nonnegative garrotte estimation problem and solving it using a path-wise coordinate descent approach. We establish theoretical results that show that the rank shrinkage step included will reduce the coherence of the dictionary, which is further validated by experimental results. Numerical experiments illustrating the performance of the proposed algorithm in comparison to various other well-known dictionary learning algorithms are also presented.

  2. Limitation of Shrinkage Porosity in Aluminum Rotor Die Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Chan; Choi, Se-Weon; Kim, Cheol-Woo; Cho, Jae-Ik; Lee, Sung-Ho; Kang, Chang-Seog

    Aluminum rotor prone to have many casting defects especially large amount of air and shrinkage porosity, which caused eccentricity, loss and noise during motor operation. Many attempts have been made to develop methods of shrinkage porosity control, but still there are some problems to solve. In this research, the process of vacuum squeeze die casting is proposed for limitation of defects. The 6 pin point gated dies which were in capable of local squeeze at the end ring were used. Influences of filling patterns on HPDC were evaluated and the important process control parameters were high injection speed, squeeze length, venting and process conditions. By using local squeeze and vacuum during filling and solidification, air and shrinkage porosity were significantly reduced and the feeding efficiency at the upper end ring was improved 10%. As a result of controlling the defects, the dynamometer test showed improved motor efficiency by more than 4%.

  3. Shrinkage-stress kinetics of photopolymerised resin-composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterthwaite, Julian D.

    The use of directly-placed substances as restorative materials in teeth remains the technique of choice for preserving function and form in teeth that have cavities. The current aesthetic restorative materials of choice are resin-composite materials, although these undergo molecular densification during polymerisation, which has deleterious effects. Although shrinkage-strain is the cause, it is the shrinkage-stress effects that may be seen as being responsible for the problems with adhesive resin-based restorations that are encountered clinically, the bond may fail with separation of the material from the cavity wall, leading to marginal discolouration, pulpal irritation and subsequent necrosis, post operative sensitivity, recurrent caries and eventual failure of restorations. Other outcomes include cohesive fracture of enamel or cusps, cuspal movement (strain) and persistent pain. The aims of this research were to characterise the effects of variations in resin-composite formulation on shrinkage-strain and shrinkage-stress kinetics. In particular, the influence of the size and morphology of the dispersed phase was investigated through the study of experimental formulations. Polymerisation shrinkage-strain kinetics were assessed with the bonded-disk method. It was found that resin-composites with spherical filler particles had significantly lower shrinkage-strain compared to those with irregular filler particles. Additionally, shrinkage-strain was found to be dependent on the size of filler particle, and this trend was related, in part, to differences in the degree of conversion. The data were also used to calculate the activation energy for each material, and a relationship between this and filler particle size for the irregular fillers was demonstrated. A fixed-compliance cantilever beam instrument (Bioman) was used for characterisation of shrinkage-stress kinetics. Significant differences were identified between materials in relation to filler particle size and

  4. ASSESSMENT OF CRACKING RESISTANCE OF CELLULAR CONCRETE PRODUCTS UNDER MOISTURE AND CARBONISATION DEFORMATIONS WITH STRESS RELAXATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. I. Apkarov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. On the basis of the experimental, theoretical and field studies, an engineering calculation method was developed for assessing the cracking resistance of external enclosing constructions made of cellular concrete, with the maximum gradient development of moisture and carbonisation forced deformations along their thickness, taking into account the relaxation of the shrinkage stresses. In this regard, the aim of the work is to provide technological measures at the manufacturing stage in order to increase the operational cracking resistance of the construction's outer surface layers by reducing the moisture and carbonation shrinkage of cellular concrete by introducing a large or fine porous aggregate in calculated amounts.Methods. A number of analytical equations were applied to establish the dependence of the shrinkage of heavy concrete of conventional hardness on the amount of aggregate introduced and its elasticity modulus, water-cement ratio and cement consumption, as well as the concrete's moisture content.Results. Knowing the volumes of the structural aggregate and the cellular concrete mass, as well as their modulus of elasticity, the shrinkage reduction factor of the cellular concrete was calculated with the addition of a lightweight porous aggregate. Subsequently, the shrinkage deformations of concrete in the surface layer of the outer enclosing construction, maximising crack resistance due to moisture exchange and carbonation influences under operating conditions, were defined, taking into account the relaxation of tensile stresses due to creep of concrete.Conclusion. Theoretical calculations, based on the recommended method of assessing the cracking resistance of cellular concrete enclosing constructions under moisture exchange and carbonisation processes, taking into account the relaxation of shrinkage stresses, showed that in order to exclude the appearance of cracks in wall panels 280 mm thick made of 700 kg/m3 gas ash

  5. Crack tip strain evolution and crack closure during overload of a growing fatigue crack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Qiang Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that fatigue crack growth is retarded after an overload, which has been explained either by plasticity-induced crack closure or near-tip residual stress. However, any interpretation of overload effect is insufficient if strain evolution in front of crack tip is not properly considered. The current understanding of overload-induced retardation lacks the clarification of the relationship between crack closure at crack wake and strain evolution at crack tip. In this work, a material with low work hardening coefficient was used to study the effect of overload on crack tip strain evolution and crack closure by in-situ SEM observation and digital image correlation technique. Crack opening displacement (COD and crack tip strain were measured before and after the overload. It was observed that the evolution of crack tip strain follows the crack opening behaviour behind the crack tip, indicating a smaller influence of overload on micro-mechanical behaviour of fatigue crack growth. After the overload, plastic strain accumulation was responsible for crack growth. The strain at a certain distance to crack tip was mapped, and it was found that the crack tip plastic zone size correlated well with crack growth rate during post-overload fatigue crack propagation.

  6. Drying shrinkage of mortars with limestone filler and blast-furnace slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrasco, M. F.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available During the 1990's the use of cements made with port land clinker and two mineral admixtures, called ternary or blended cements, has grown considerably. Nowadays, cements containing several combinations of fly ash and silica fume, blast-furnace slag and silica fume or blast-furnace slag and limestone filler are commonly used. There are numerous works on the influence of blended cements on the fresh state and mechanical properties of mortar and concrete, but the their deformations due to drying shrinkage are not so well described. Analysis of drying shrinkage is relevant because this property influences the possibility of cracking occurrence and, hence, the deterioration of mechanical and durable properties of concrete structures. This paper evaluates the influence on the drying shrinkage of mortars of variable contents of limestone filler and/or blast-furnace slag in Portland cement. Additionally, flexion strength and non evaporable water content were evaluated. Test results show that the inclusion of these mineral admixtures, Joint or separately, increments drying shrinkage of mortars at early ages. Despite this fact, mortars made with limestone filler cement are less susceptible to cracking than mortars made with cements incorporating blast-furnace slag or both admixtures.

    Durante los años 90 el uso de cementos fabricados con clínker Portland y dos adiciones suplementarias (cementos ternarios o compuestos se ha incrementado en forma considerable. En la práctica, es cada vez más común el empleo de estos cementos conteniendo combinaciones de ceniza volante y humo de sílice, escoria y humo de sílice o escoria y filler calcáreo. En la actualidad existen numerosos estudios sobre la influencia de los cementos compuestos en las características en estado fresco y las propiedades mecánicas de morteros y hormigones, pero las deformaciones que estos materiales sufren debido a la retracción por secado no son tan conocidas. El análisis de

  7. Numerical Analysis of Hot Cracking in Laser-Hybrid Welded Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Oliver Gebhardt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In welding experiments conducted on heavy wall pipes, the penetration mode (full or partial penetration occurred to be a significant factor influencing appearance of solidification cracks. To explain the observed phenomena and support further optimization of manufacturing processes, a computational model was developed, which used a sophisticated strategy to model the material. High stresses emerged in the models in regions which showed cracking during experiments. In partial penetration welding, they were caused by the prevention of weld shrinkage due to the cold and strong material below the joint. Another identified factor having an influence on high stress localization is bulging of the weld.

  8. INTERRELATION OF RHOMBICITY AND OCCURRENCE OF INTERNAL CRACKS AT CONTINUOUS CASTING OF SORTED SLUG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju. A. Samojlovich

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of deformations and stresses in cross section of sorted uninterruptedly-casted slugs at their solidification and cooling within limits of crystallizer with the aim of determination of possibilities for occurrence of internal cracks of diagonal type is carried out on basis of mathematical modeling, the peculiarities of the slug skin cooling at its shrinkage and separation from crystallizer wall are revealed.

  9. Fatigue crack propagation and cyclic deformation at a crack tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, T. S.; Liu, H. W.

    1974-01-01

    The fatigue crack propagation relation da/dN = f(R) Delta K squared can be derived with three assumptions: small-scale yielding, material homogeneity, and that crack tip stresses and strains are not strongly affected by plate thickness. The function f(R) is a constant at a given stress ratio, R. The effects of plate thickness and stress ratio on crack tip deformation and fatigue crack growth in 2024-T351 aluminum alloy were studied. High Delta K level in a thin specimen causes crack tip necking. Necking is more pronounced at high stress ratio. Necking causes high maximum strain near a crack tip and fast crack growth rate.

  10. Quantity effect of radial cracks on the cracking propagation behavior and the crack morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingjing; Xu, Jun; Liu, Bohan; Yao, Xuefeng; Li, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    In this letter, the quantity effect of radial cracks on the cracking propagation behavior as well as the circular crack generation on the impacted glass plate within the sandwiched glass sheets are experimentally investigated via high-speed photography system. Results show that the radial crack velocity on the backing glass layer decreases with the crack number under the same impact conditions during large quantities of repeated experiments. Thus, the "energy conversion factor" is suggested to elucidate the physical relation between the cracking number and the crack propagation speed. Besides, the number of radial crack also takes the determinative effect in the crack morphology of the impacted glass plate. This study may shed lights on understanding the cracking and propagation mechanism in laminated glass structures and provide useful tool to explore the impact information on the cracking debris.

  11. Drying and radial shrinkage characteristics and changes in color ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drying and radial shrinkage characteristics and changes in color and shape of carrots tissues during air drying were studied. Slices dimensions were obtained by computer vision and the color was quantified by chroma, hue, whitening index and total carotenoids contents. The drying time became shorter of 1 h when ...

  12. Preliminary Investigation of Drying Shrinkage Cement Paste Specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jankovic, D.; Van Mier, J.G.M.

    2002-01-01

    In order to perform drying shrinkage observations in ESEM (Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope), a preparation procedure for cement paste samples is developed. Instead of casting standard prisms (40 x 40 x 160 mm3), cement paste samples were cast in specially designed moulds of 30 x 30 x 2

  13. Magnetic nanoparticles-induced anisotropic shrinkage of polymer emulsion droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, B; de Folter, J.W.J.; Möhwald, H.

    2011-01-01

    We here report magnetic nanoparticles (NPs)-induced buckling instability and anisotropic shrinkage behavior of polymer emulsion droplets. The oil-in-water emulsion is stabilized by the surfactant, and NPs are dispersed into the oil phase. The surface ligands (oleic acid and oleylamine) number of the

  14. Fast generation of computer-generated holograms using wavelet shrinkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2017-01-09

    Computer-generated holograms (CGHs) are generated by superimposing complex amplitudes emitted from a number of object points. However, this superposition process remains very time-consuming even when using the latest computers. We propose a fast calculation algorithm for CGHs that uses a wavelet shrinkage method, eliminating small wavelet coefficient values to express approximated complex amplitudes using only a few representative wavelet coefficients.

  15. Cracking Tendency Prediction of High-Performance Cementitious Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The constraint ring test is widely used to assess the cracking potential for early-age cementitious materials. In this paper, the analytical expressions based on elastic mechanism are presented to estimate the residual stresses of the restrained mortar ring by considering the comprehensive effects of hydration heat, autogenous and drying shrinkage, creeping, and restraint. In the present analytical method, the stress field of the restrained ring is treated as the superposition of those caused by hydration heat, external restraint, autogenous and drying shrinkage, and creep. The factors including the properties of materials, environmental parameters such as relative humidity and temperature, the geometry effect of specimen, and the relative constraint effects of steel ring to mortar ring, are taken into account to predict the strain development with age of mortar. The temperature of the ring, the elastic modulus, the creep strain, and the split tensile strength are measured to validate the model. The age of cracking is predicted by comparing the estimated maximum tensile stress of the restrained mortar ring with the measured split tensile strength of specimen. The suitability of the present analytical method is assessed by comparing with the restraint ring test and a soundly good agreement is observed.

  16. Modelling of Corrosion Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed.......Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed....

  17. Cure shrinkage effects in epoxy and polycyanate matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spellman, G.P.

    1995-12-22

    A relatively new advanced composite matrix, polycyanate ester, was evaluated for cure shrinkage. The chemical cure shrinkage of composites is difficult to model but a number of clever experimental techniques are available to the investigator. In this work the method of curing a prepreg layup on top of a previously cured laminate of identical ply composition is utilized. The polymeric matrices used in advanced composites have been primarily epoxies and therefore a common system of this type, Fiberite 3501-6, was used as a base case material. Three polycyanate matrix systems were selected for the study. These are: Fiberite 954-2A, YLA RS-3, and Bryte Technology BTCy-1. The first three of these systems were unidirectional prepreg with carbon fiber reinforcement. The Bryte Technology material was reinforced with E-glass fabric. The technique used to evaluate cure shrinkage results in distortion of the flatness of an otherwise symmetric laminate. The first laminate is cured in a conventional fashion. An identical layup is cured on this first laminate. During the second cure all constituents are exposed to the same thermal cycles. However, only the new portion of the laminate will experience volumetric changes associate with matrix cure. The additional strain of cure shrinkage results in an unsymmetric distribution of residual stresses and an associated warpage of the laminate. The baseline material, Fiberite 3501-6, exhibited cure shrinkage that was in accordance with expectations. Cure strains were {minus}4.5E-04. The YLA RS-3 material had cure strains somewhat lower at {minus}3.2E-04. The Fiberite 954-2A cure strain was {minus}1.5E-04 that is 70% lower than the baseline material. The glass fabric material with the Bryte BTCy-1 matrix did not result in meaningful results because the processing methods were not fully compatible with the material.

  18. SSRI Facilitated Crack Dancing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doobay, Ravi; Sun, Lili; Shah, Amish; Masuta, Pardeep; Shepherd, Zachary

    2017-01-01

    Choreoathetoid movement secondary to cocaine use is a well-documented phenomenon better known as "crack dancing." It consists of uncontrolled writhing movements secondary to excess dopamine from cocaine use. We present a 32-year-old male who had been using cocaine for many years and was recently started on paroxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) for worsening depression four weeks before presentation. He had been doing cocaine every 2 weeks for the last three years and had never "crack danced" before this episode. The authors have conducted a thorough literature review and cited studies that suggest "crack dancing" is associated with excess dopamine. There has never been a documented case report of an SSRI being linked with "crack dancing." The authors propose that the excess dopaminergic effect of the SSRI lowered the dopamine threshold for "crack dancing." There is a communication with the Raphe Nucleus and the Substantia Nigra, which explains how the SSRI increases dopamine levels. This is the first documented case of an SSRI facilitating the "crack dance."

  19. SSRI Facilitated Crack Dancing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Doobay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Choreoathetoid movement secondary to cocaine use is a well-documented phenomenon better known as “crack dancing.” It consists of uncontrolled writhing movements secondary to excess dopamine from cocaine use. We present a 32-year-old male who had been using cocaine for many years and was recently started on paroxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI for worsening depression four weeks before presentation. He had been doing cocaine every 2 weeks for the last three years and had never “crack danced” before this episode. The authors have conducted a thorough literature review and cited studies that suggest “crack dancing” is associated with excess dopamine. There has never been a documented case report of an SSRI being linked with “crack dancing.” The authors propose that the excess dopaminergic effect of the SSRI lowered the dopamine threshold for “crack dancing.” There is a communication with the Raphe Nucleus and the Substantia Nigra, which explains how the SSRI increases dopamine levels. This is the first documented case of an SSRI facilitating the “crack dance.”

  20. Subaqueous early eruptive phase of the late Aptian Rajmahal volcanism, India: Evidence from volcaniclastic rocks, bentonite, black shales, and oolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh C. Ghose

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The late Aptian (118–115 Ma continental flood basalts of the Rajmahal Volcanic Province (RVP are part of the Kerguelen Large Igneous Province, and constitute the uppermost part of the Gondwana Supergroup on the eastern Indian shield margin. The lower one-third of the Rajmahal volcanic succession contains thin layers of plant fossil-rich inter-trappean sedimentary rocks with pyroclasts, bentonite, grey and black shale/mudstone and oolite, whereas the upper two-thirds consist of sub-aerial fine-grained aphyric basalts with no inter-trappean material. At the eastern margin and the north-central sector of the RVP, the volcanics in the lower part include rhyolites and dacites overlain by enstatite-bearing basalts and enstatite-andesites. The pyroclastic rocks are largely felsic in composition, and comprise ignimbrite as well as coarse-grained tuff with lithic clasts, and tuff breccia with bombs, lapilli and ash that indicate explosive eruption of viscous rhyolitic magma. The rhyolites/dacites (>68 wt.% are separated from the andesites (<60 wt.% by a gap in silica content indicating their formation through upper crustal anatexis with only heat supplied by the basaltic magma. On the other hand, partially melted siltstone xenoliths in enstatite-bearing basalts suggest that the enstatite-andesites originated through mixing of the upper crust with basaltic magma, crystallizing orthopyroxene at a pressure-temperature of ∼3 kb/1150 °C. In contrast, the northwestern sector of the RVP is devoid of felsic-intermediate rocks, and the volcaniclastic rocks are predominantly mafic (basaltic in composition. Here, the presence of fine-grained tuffs, tuff breccia containing sideromelane shards and quenched texture, welded tuff breccia, peperite, shale/mudstone and oolite substantiates a subaqueous environment. Based on these observations, we conclude that the early phase of Rajmahal volcanism occurred under predominantly subaqueous conditions. The presence

  1. Study of ‘real’ shrinkage by ESEM observations and digital image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jankovic, D.

    2007-01-01

    Defining the 'real' shrinkage values of concrete is still a subject of much debate. In shrinkage experiments size effects are inherently present. Through an attempt to determine the real shrinkage of cement-based materials, these size effects have to be eliminated or at least reduced as much a

  2. Topology optimization of reinforced concrete structures considering control of shrinkage and strength failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yangjun; Wang, Michael Yu; Zhou, Mingdong

    2015-01-01

    To take into account the shrinkage effect in the early stage of Reinforced Concrete (RC) design, an effective continuum topology optimization method is presented in this paper. Based on the power-law interpolation, shrinkage of concrete is numerically simulated by introducing an additional design...... to ensure the structural safety under the combined action of external loads and shrinkage....

  3. Effects of Type of Work and Age on Spinal Shrinkage | Ismaila ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spine. The present study was aimed at studying the effects of different types of work on spinal shrinkage. Moreover, the relationship between age and spinal shrinkage was also studied. The heights just before the start and after the close of work were measured in order to determine the spinal shrinkage. The study confirmed ...

  4. Subaqueous hot springs in Köyceğiz Lake, Dalyan Channel and Fethiye-Göcek Bay (SW Turkey): Locations, chemistry and origins

    KAUST Repository

    Avşar, Özgür

    2017-08-07

    In this study, horizontal temperature measurements along organized grids have been used to detect subaqueous hot springs. The study area, located in the southwest of Turkey and comprised of Köyceğiz Lake, Dalyan Channel and Fethiye-Göcek Bay, was scanned by measuring temperatures horizontally, 2–3m above the bottom of the lake or sea. After analyzing the temperature data along the grids, the locations with anomalous temperature values were detected, and divers headed here for further verification. Accordingly, among these anomalies, the divers confirmed seven of them as subaqueous hot springs. Three of these hot springs are located in the Köyceğiz Lake, three of them are located in the Dalyan Channel and one hot spring is located in the Fethiye-Göcek Bay. At the locations where temperature anomalies were detected, the divers collected samples directly from the subaqueous hot spring using a syringe-type sampler. We evaluated these water samples together with samples collected from hot and cold springs on land and from local rivers, lakes and the sea, with an aim to generate a conceptual hydrogeochemical model of the geothermal system in the study area. This model predicts that rainwater precipitating in the highlands percolates through fractures and faults into the deeper parts of the Earth\\'s crust, here it is heated and ascends through the sea bottom via buried faults. Pervious carbonate nappes that are underlain and overlain by impervious rocks create a confined aquifer. The southern boundary of the Carbonate-Marmaris nappes is buried under alluvium and/or sea/lake water bodies and this phenomenon determines whether hot springs occur on land or subaqueous. The chemical and isotopic properties of the hot springs point to seawater mixing at deep levels. Thus, the mixing most probably occurs while the water is ascending through the faults and fractures. The gas geochemistry results reveal that the lowest mantle He contributions occur in the samples from K

  5. Effect of aluminum silicate fiber modification on crack-resistance of a ceramic mould

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Yehua

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available To improve the crack-resistance of the mould for silica sol bonded quartz based ceramic mould casting, aluminum silicate fibers with the diameter ranging from 5 µm to 25 µm and the length about 1 mm were dispersed in the ceramic mould. The effect of the aluminum silicate fibers on the tensile strength, shrinkage rate and the cracking trend of the ceramic mould were investigated. In the ceramic slurry, quartz sand was applied as ceramic aggregate, silica sol containing 30% silicon dioxide as bonder, and the weight ratio of quartz sand to silica sol was 2.69; the dispersed fibers changed from 0 to 0.24vol.%. The mould samples were formed after the slurry was poured and gelled at room temperature, and then sintered at different temperatures ranging from 100 to 800 ℃ to measure the tensile strength and shrinkage rate. The results show that, with the aluminum silicate fiber addition increasing from 0 to 0.24vol.%, the tensile strength increases linearly from 0.175 MPa to 0.236 MPa, and the shrinkage rate decreases linearly from 1.75% to 1.68% for the ceramic mould sintered at 400 ℃, from 1.37% to 1.31% for the ceramic mould at room temperature. As the sintering temperature was raised from 100 ℃ to 800 ℃, the tensile strength increases, and the shrinkage rate decreases at all temperatures, compared with those without fiber dispersion, but their variation patterns remain the same. Furthermore, the cracking trend of the mould and its decreasing proportion were defined and analyzed quantitatively considering both effects of the fiber dispersion on the strength and shrinkage. The cracking trend appears to decrease linearly with increasing fiber content and to reach the maximum reduction of 28.8% when 0.24vol.% fiber was dispersed. Therefore, the investigation proposes a new method to improve the crack-resistance of the ceramic mould, i.e., inorganic fiber dispersion into the ceramic mould.

  6. New System of Shrinkage Measurement through Cement Mortars Drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morón, Carlos; Saiz, Pablo; Ferrández, Daniel; García-Fuentevilla, Luisa

    2017-03-06

    Cement mortar is used as a conglomerate in the majority of construction work. There are multiple variants of cement according to the type of aggregate used in its fabrication. One of the major problems that occurs while working with this type of material is the excessive loss of moisture during cement hydration (setting and hardening), known as shrinkage, which provokes a great number of construction pathologies that are difficult to repair. In this way, the design of a new sensor able to measure the moisture loss of mortars at different age levels is useful to establish long-term predictions concerning mortar mass volume loss. The purpose of this research is the design and fabrication of a new capacitive sensor able to measure the moisture of mortars and to relate it with the shrinkage.

  7. Exploiting tumor shrinkage through temporal optimization of radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Unkelbach, Jan; Hong, Theodore; Papp, David; Ramakrishnan, Jagdish; Salari, Ehsan; Wolfgang, John; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In multi-stage radiotherapy, a patient is treated in several stages separated by weeks or months. This regimen has been motivated mostly by radiobiological considerations, but also provides an approach to reduce normal tissue dose by exploiting tumor shrinkage. The paper considers the optimal design of multi-stage treatments, motivated by the clinical management of large liver tumors for which normal liver dose constraints prohibit the administration of an ablative radiation dose in a single treatment. We introduce a dynamic tumor model that incorporates three factors: radiation induced cell kill, tumor shrinkage, and tumor cell repopulation. The design of multi-stage radiotherapy is formulated as a mathematical optimization problem in which the total dose to the liver is minimized, subject to delivering the prescribed dose to the tumor. Based on the model, we gain insight into the optimal administration of radiation over time, i.e. the optimal treatment gaps and dose levels. We analyze treatments consisting ...

  8. Analysis of Shrinkage on Thick Plate Part using Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najihah S.N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Injection moulding is the most widely used processes in manufacturing plastic products. Since the quality of injection improves plastic parts are mostly influenced by process conditions, the method to determine the optimum process conditions becomes the key to improving the part quality. This paper presents a systematic methodology to analyse the shrinkage of the thick plate part during the injection moulding process. Genetic Algorithm (GA method was proposed to optimise the process parameters that would result in optimal solutions of optimisation goals. Using the GA, the shrinkage of the thick plate part was improved by 39.1% in parallel direction and 17.21% in the normal direction of melt flow.

  9. Compressive performance and crack propagation in Al alloy/Ti{sub 2}AlC composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanaor, D.A.H., E-mail: dorian.hanaor@sydney.edu.au [School of Civil Engineering, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Hu, L. [Ames Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Kan, W.H.; Proust, G. [School of Civil Engineering, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Foley, M. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Karaman, I.; Radovic, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2016-08-30

    Composite materials comprising a porous Ti{sub 2}AlC matrix and Al 6061 alloy were fabricated by a current-activated pressure assisted melt infiltration process. Coarse, medium and fine meso-structures were prepared with Al alloy filled pores of differing sizes. Materials were subjected to uniaxial compressive loading up to stresses of 668 MPa, leading to the failure of specimens through crack propagation in both phases. As-fabricated and post-failure specimens were analysed by X-ray microscopy and electron microscopy. Quasi-static mechanical testing results revealed that compressive strength was the highest in the fine structured composite materials. While the coarse structured specimens exhibited a compressive strength of 80% relative to this. Reconstructed micro-scale X-ray tomography data revealed different crack propagation mechanisms. Large planar shear cracks propagated throughout the fine structured materials while the coarser specimens exhibited networks of branching cracks propagating preferentially along Al alloy-Ti{sub 2}AlC phase interfaces and through shrinkage pores in the Al alloy phase. Results suggest that control of porosity, compensation for Al alloy shrinkage and enhancement of the Al alloy-Ti{sub 2}AlC phase interfaces are key considerations in the design of high performance metal/Ti{sub 2}AlC phase composites.

  10. The Process of Shrinkage as a Challenge to Urban Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stryjakiewicz Tadeusz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For many decades most researchers, planners and local authorities have been focusing almost exclusively on urban growth and its socio-economic and spatial consequences. However, in the current debate concerning the future of cities and regions in Europe the process of their shrinkage starts to attract more attention. In the conditions of a declining population, urban governance is an important challenge for local authorities, being usually much more difficult than during the periods of population growth.

  11. Spinal shrinkage in unloaded and loaded drop-jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, N E; Lees, A; Reilly, T

    1994-01-01

    Plyometric activities, engaging the muscle in a stretch-shortening cycle, are widely used in athletic training. One such plyometric exercise is drop-jumping, where the athlete drops from a raised platform and immediately on landing performs a maximal vertical jump. These actions are also performed with the athlete externally loaded by the addition of weights to provide greater resistance. Exercises which involve repeated impacts have been shown to give rise to a loss of stature (shrinkage) which can be measured by means of a sensitive stadiometer. This study examined the shrinkage induced by unloaded and loaded drop-jumping from a height of 26 cm. Eight male subjects, aged 20-24 years, performed the test protocol three times, at the same time of day on each occasion. Fifty drop-jumps from a height of 26 cm were performed with no additional load and with a load of 8.5 kg carried in a weighted vest. The third condition was a standing trial where the subject stood for 10 min (the time taken to perform the jumps) wearing the weighted vest. Stature was measured before exercise, immediately after exercise and after a 20 min standing recovery. On a separate occasion the regimen was performed and the vertical reaction force was measured using a Kistler force platform. The mean change in stature for the two jump conditions showed shrinkages of 0.62 (+/- 0.43) mm for unloaded and 2.14 (+/- 1.56) mm for the loaded (p < 0.05). The variance in shrinkage was greater in the loaded case compared to the unloaded condition (p < 0.05) indicating a wider range of jumping strategies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. PREDIKSI SHRINKAGE UNTUK MENGHINDARI CACAT PRODUK PADA PLASTIC INJECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Dwi Anggono

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Plastic injection merupakan proses manufactur untuk membuat produk dengan bahan dasar plastic atau dalam kesempatan ini polypropylene. Pada proses tersebut seringkali terjadi cacat produk seperti pengerutan, retak, dimensi tidak sesuai dan kerusakan saat produk keluar dari mould, sehingga banyak material yang terbuang percuma. Meskipun cacat produk tersebut dipengaruhi banyak factor, tetapi yang paling utama adalah masalah shrinkage, atau penyusutan material setelah terjadi pendinginan. Sangat penting untuk melakukan prediksi lebih awal terjadinya penyusutan setelah pendinginan untuk menghindari cacat produk. Dalam penelitian ini akan dilakukan prediksi shrinkage yang akan digunakan untuk material polypropylene dengan cara perhitungan standar. Pembuatan modeling dalam bentuk 3D (tiga dimensi injection molding baik cavity maupun corenya dengan menggunakan CATIA, kemudian dilakukan analisis dengan software MoldFlow untuk pembuatan mesh dan memberikan batasan panas pada komponen sehingga dapat diketahui mode penyusutannya. Analisis ini akan memberikan gambaran tentang distribusi panas pada mould dan memberikan tentang gambaran aliran fluida. Pada analisis tersebut dapat dilihat gejala terjadinya cacat produk, jika hal itu terjadi maka perlu dilakukan perubahan shrinkage, sampai diperoleh hasil analisis yang baik.

  13. Experimental Analysis on Shrinkage and Swelling in Ordinary Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Kucharczyková

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the experimental determination of shrinkage development during concrete ageing. Three concrete mixtures were made. They differed in the amount of cement in the fresh mixture, 300, 350, and 400 kg/m3. In order to determine the influence of plasticiser on the progress of volume changes, another three concrete mixtures were prepared with plasticiser in the amount of 0.25% by cement mass. Measurements were performed with the goal of observing the influence of cement and plasticiser content on the overall development of volume changes in the concrete. Changes in length and mass losses of the concrete during ageing were measured simultaneously. The continuous measurement of concrete mass losses caused by drying of the specimen’s surface proved useful during the interpretation of results obtained from the concrete shrinkage measurement. During the first 24 hours of ageing, all the concrete mixtures exhibited swelling. Its magnitude and progress were influenced by cement, water, and plasticiser content. However, a loss of mass caused by water evaporation from the surface of the specimens was also recorded in this stage. The measured progress of shrinkage corresponded well to the progress of mass loss.

  14. Prediction of Prestressing Losses by Concrete Creep and Shrinkage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, S.K. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-07-01

    In this study, the personal-computer program was developed to predict prestressing losses of containment structures induced by concrete creep and shrinkage in nuclear power plants. Thie program is composed of three major parts in which are the pre-processor, calculation module and post-processor. Input data for this program are: material properties of concrete, rebar, liner and duct, test results of concrete creep and shrinkage, relative humidity, dimension of containment structures, and the number of prestressing tendon related in containment structures. To obtain better results, this program was designed to reflect the prestressing losses due to influence that occurred after prestressing of each tendon, thus it can predict prestressing losses and allowable prestressing forces of each tendon. As a case study, this program was applied to containment structures of Youngkwang 3 and 4 NPP's and analytical results were compared with test results in Inservice Inspection of containment structures. From this comparison, it was proved that this program could well predict prestressing losses by concrete creep and shrinkage. (author). 4 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Controlled Shrinkage of Expanded Glass Particles in Metal Syntactic Foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sahlani, Kadhim; Taherishargh, Mehdi; Kisi, Erich; Fiedler, Thomas

    2017-09-13

    Metal matrix syntactic foams have been fabricated via counter-gravity infiltration of a packed bed of recycled expanded glass particles (EG) with A356 aluminum alloy. Particle shrinkage was studied and has been utilized to increase the particles' strength and tailor the mechanical properties of the expanded glass/metal syntactic foam (EG-MSF). The crushing strength of particles could be doubled by shrinking them for 20 min at 700 °C. Owing to the low density of EG (0.20-0.26 g/cm³), the resulting foam exhibits a low density (1.03-1.19 g/cm³) that increases slightly due to particle shrinkage. Chemical and physical analyses of EG particles and the resulting foams were conducted. Furthermore, metal syntactic foam samples were tested in uni-axial compression tests. The stress-strain curves obtained exhibit three distinct regions: elastic deformation followed by a stress plateau and densification commencing at 70-80% macroscopic strain. Particle shrinkage increased the mechanical strength of the foam samples and their average plateau stress increased from 15.5 MPa to 26.7 MPa.

  16. Shrinkage of vitreous body caused by hydroxyl radical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Myoung Joo; Shimada, Takashi; Matuo, Yoichirou; Akiyama, Yoko; Izumi, Yoshinobu; Nishijima, Shigehiro [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2008-12-15

    In the study, we examined the effect of hydroxyl radical generated by {gamma}-ray and UV irradiation on shrinkage of vitreous body. Change in gel ratio of vitreous body and change in the properties of its components (collagen, sodium hyaluronate) were analyzed. By comparing these results, the amount of hydroxyl radical, which induces the considerable shrinkage of vitreous body, was evaluated from theoretical calculation based on experimental condition and some reported kinetic parameters. It was concluded that the integrated amount of hydroxyl radical required to liquefy half of the vitreous body (vitreous body gel ratio = 50%) was estimated as 140 {mu}molg{sup -1} from {gamma}-ray irradiation experiment. Also, from UV irradiation experiment result, it was confirmed that the effect of hydroxyl radical is larger than that of other reactive species. The causes of shrinkage of vitreous body are supposed as follows, 1) decrease in viscosity by cleavage of glycoside bond in sodium hyaluronate, 2) leaching of collagen from vitreous body and 3) leaching of crosslinked products and scission products of collagen.

  17. Influence of length-to-diameter ratio on shrinkage of basalt fiber concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruijie, MA; Yang, Jiansen; Liu, Yuan; Zheng, Xiaojun

    2017-09-01

    In order to study the shrinkage performance of basalt concrete, using the shrinkage rate as index, the work not only studied the influence of different length-to-diameter ratio (LDR) on plastic shrinkage and drying shrinkage of basalt fiber concrete, but also analyzed the action mechanism. The results show that when the fiber content is 0.1%, the LDR of 800 and 1200 take better effects on reducing plastic shrinkage, however the fiber content is 0.3%, that of LDR 600 is better. To improve drying shrinkage, the fiber of LDR 800 takes best effect. In the concrete structure, the adding basalt fibers form a uniform and chaotic supporting system, optimize the pore and the void structure of concrete, make the material further compacted, reduce the water loss, so as to decrease the shrinkage of concrete effectively.

  18. Crack-free conditions in welding of glass by ultrashort laser pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Isamu; Cvecek, Kristian; Schmidt, Michael

    2013-06-17

    The spatial distribution of the laser energy absorbed by nonlinear absorption process in bulk glass w(z) is determined and thermal cycles due to the successive ultrashort laser pulse (USLP) is simulated using w(z) based on the transient thermal conduction model. The thermal stress produced in internal melting of bulk glass by USLP is qualitatively analyzed based on a simple thermal stress model, and crack-free conditions are studied in glass having large coefficient of thermal expansion. In heating process, cracks are prevented when the laser pulse impinges into glass with temperatures higher than the softening temperature of glass. In cooling process, shrinkage stress is suppressed to prevent cracks, because the embedded molten pool produced by nonlinear absorption process behaves like an elastic body under the compressive stress field unlike the case of CW-laser welding where the molten pool having a free surface produced by linear absorption process is plastically deformed under the compressive stress field.

  19. Cracking the Credit Hour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, Amy

    2012-01-01

    The basic currency of higher education--the credit hour--represents the root of many problems plaguing America's higher education system: the practice of measuring time rather than learning. "Cracking the Credit Hour" traces the history of this time-based unit, from the days of Andrew Carnegie to recent federal efforts to define a credit…

  20. Cracking the Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heathcote, Dorothy

    1978-01-01

    Prescribes an attitude that teachers can take to help students "crack the code" of a dramatic work, combining a flexible teaching strategy, the suspension of beliefs or preconceived notions about the work, focusing on the drams's text, and choosing a reading strategy appropriate to the dramatic work. (RL)

  1. The influence of superabsorbent polymers on the autogenous shrinkage properties of cement pastes with supplementary cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoeck, D.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; De Belie, N.

    2015-01-01

    shrinkage was determined by manual and automated shrinkage measurements. Autogenous shrinkage was reduced in cement pastes with the supplementary cementitious materials versus Portland cement pastes. At later ages, the rate of autogenous shrinkage is higher due to the pozzolanic activity. Internal curing...

  2. Mihi Breccia: A stack of lacustrine sediments and subaqueous pyroclastic flows within the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Drew

    2016-01-01

    The Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand, encompasses a wide variety of arc-related strata, although most of its small-volume (non-caldera-forming) eruptions are poorly-exposed and extensively hydrothermally altered. The Mihi Breccia is a stratigraphic sequence consisting of interbedded rhyolitic pyroclastic flows and lacustrine sediments with eruption ages of 281 ± 18 to at least 239 ± 6 ka (uncertainties at 2σ). In contrast to other small-volume rhyolitic eruptions within the TVZ, Mihi Breccia is relatively well-exposed within the Paeroa fault block, and contains minimal hydrothermal alteration. Pyroclastic flow characteristics and textures including: 1) breadcrusted juvenile clasts, 2) lack of welding, 3) abundant ash-rich matrix, 4) lack of fiamme and eutaxitic textures, 5) lack of thermal oxidation colors, 6) lack of cooling joints, 7) exclusive lacustrine sediment lithic clasts, and 8) interbedding with lacustrine sediments, all indicating that Mihi Breccia strata originated in a paleo-lake system. This ephemeral paleo-lake system is inferred to have lasted for > 50 kyr (based on Mihi Breccia age constraints), and referred to as Huka Lake. Mihi Breccia pyroclastic flow juvenile clast geochemistry and petrography correspond with similar-aged (264 ± 8, 263 ± 10, and 247 ± 4 ka) intra-caldera rhyolite domes filling the Reporoa caldera (source of the 281 ± 81 Kaingaroa Formation ignimbrite). These exposed intra-caldera rhyolite domes (as well as geophysically inferred subsurface domes) are proposed to be source vents for the Mihi Breccia pyroclastic flows. Soft-sediment deformation associated with Mihi Breccia strata indicate either seismic shock, rapid sediment loading during pyroclastic flow emplacement, or both. Thus, the Mihi Breccia reflects a prolonged series of subaqueous rhyolite dome building and associated pyroclastic flows, accompanied by seismic activity, emplaced into a large paleo-lake system within the TVZ.

  3. Experimental Study on Autogenous and Drying Shrinkage of Steel Fiber Reinforced Lightweight-Aggregate Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunbo Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Steel fiber reinforced lightweight-aggregate concrete (SFRLAC has many advantages applied in structural engineering. In this paper, the autogenous shrinkage and drying shrinkage of SFRLAC for up to 270 days were measured, considering the effects of types of coarse and fine aggregates with the changes of water-to-binder ratio and volume fraction of steel fiber, respectively. The properties of mix workability, apparent density, and compressive strength of SFRLAC were also reported and discussed in relation to above factors. Test results show that the development of autogenous and drying shrinkage of SFRLAC was fast within 28 days and tended to be steady after 90 days. The development of autogenous shrinkage of SFRLAC reduced with the increasing water-to-binder ratio and by using the expanded shale with higher soundness and good water absorption, especially at early age within 28 days; the later drying shrinkage was reduced and the development of drying shrinkage was slowed down with the increasing volume fraction of steel fiber obviously; manufactured sand led to less autogenous shrinkage but greater drying shrinkage than fine lightweight aggregate in SFRLAC. The regularities of autogenous shrinkage and drying shrinkage of SFRLAC expressed as the series of hyperbola are analyzed.

  4. A comparative study between crack analysis and a mechanical test for assessing the polymerization stress of restorative composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Roberto R; Yamamoto, Takatsugu; Tyler, Kenneth; Boaro, Leticia C; Ferracane, Jack L; Swain, Michael V

    2012-06-01

    To verify the hypothesis that crack analysis and a mechanical test would rank a series of composites in a similar order with respect to polymerization stress. Also, both tests would show similar relationships between stress and composite elastic modulus and/or shrinkage. Soda-lime glass discs (2-mm thick) with a central perforation (3.5-mm diameter) received four Vickers indentations 500 μm from the cavity margin. The indent cracks were measured (500×) prior and 10 min after the cavity was restored with one of six materials (Kalore/KL, Gradia/GR, Ice/IC, Wave/WV, Majesty Flow/MF, and Majesty Posterior/MP). Stresses at the indent site were calculated based on glass fracture toughness and increase in crack length. Stress at the bonded interface was calculated using the equation for an internally pressurized cylinder. The mechanical test used a universal testing machine and glass rods (5-mm diameter) as substrate. An extensometer monitored specimen height (2mm). Nominal stress was calculated dividing the maximum shrinkage force by the specimen cross-sectional area. Composite elastic modulus was determined by nanoindentation and post-gel shrinkage was measured using strain gages. Data were subjected to one-way ANOVA/Tukey or Kruskal-Wallis/Mann-Whitney tests (alpha: 5%). Both tests grouped the composites in three statistical subsets, with small differences in overlapping between the intermediate subset (MF, WV) and the highest (MP, IC) or the lowest stress materials (KL, GR). Higher stresses were developed by composites with high modulus and/or high shrinkage. Crack analysis demonstrated to be as effective as the mechanical test to rank composites regarding polymerization stress. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Entre o uso social e o abuso comercial: as percepções do patrimônio cultural subaquático no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilson Rambelli

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo é apresentar algumas reflexões sobre patrimônio cultural subaquático e sobre a Arqueologia Subaquática, buscando analisar o quanto as distorções conceituais presentes nessa temática submersa, resultantes de um histórico milenar aventureiro, contribuíram e ainda contribuem para a destruição de diferentes sítios arqueológicos submersos. O artigo pretende também, aproximar as pessoas desse universo molhado do patrimônio cultural e da pertinência da pesquisa arqueológica subaquática sistemática, chamando atenção, em especial ao problema brasileiro, porque o Brasil ainda permite a exploração comercial, e, conseqüentemente, a destruição desse patrimônio cultural, por meio de uma legislação pouco séria, inspirada nas fantasias milenares de tesouros e fortunas submersas.The aim of this paper is to present some reflections about cultural and archaeological underwater heritage, to arrive at an analysis as to what degree distortions of concepts exist in this "submersed" theme, result from a millenary history of adventures, and how they have contributed and continue to contribute to the destruction of different archaeological submersed sites. The article also aims at contributing to a wider understanding of underwater heritage, and the necessity of systematic, underwater, archaeological research. It draws attention especially to the Brazilian problem, because Brazil still permits the commercial exploitation, and consequently, the destruction of this cultural heritage. This has been made possible through inadequate legislation inspired on the millenary fantasies of underwater treasure and fortune.

  6. Aplicação de técnicas de vídeo subaquático na caracterização de biocenoses marinhas

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Joana Fernandez de

    2008-01-01

    Dissertação mest., Biologia Marinha - Ecologia e Conservação Marinha, Universidade do Algarve, 2008 Desenvolveu-se um trenó de vídeo subaquático para a caracterização das biocenoses marinhas da costa algarvia. Esta técnica foi usada pela primeira vez na região, pretendendo-se assim avaliar a sua aplicabilidade como técnica de amostragem. Filmaram-se um total de 19612m2, entre Junho e Novembro de 2005, no intervalo de profundidade dos 0 aos 30m. Dos vídeos, retirou-se tanto i...

  7. Fatigue crack initiation of magnesium alloys under elastic stress amplitudes: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B. J.; Xu, D. K.; Wang, S. D.; Han, E. H.

    2017-12-01

    The most advantageous property of magnesium (Mg) alloys is their density, which is lower compared with traditional metallic materials. Mg alloys, considered the lightest metallic structural material among others, have great potential for applications as secondary load components in the transportation and aerospace industries. The fatigue evaluation of Mg alloys under elastic stress amplitudes is very important in ensuring their service safety and reliability. Given their hexagonal close packed structure, the fatigue crack initiation of Mg and its alloys is closely related to the deformation mechanisms of twinning and basal slips. However, for Mg alloys with shrinkage porosities and inclusions, fatigue cracks will preferentially initiate at these defects, remarkably reducing the fatigue lifetime. In this paper, some fundamental aspects about the fatigue crack initiation mechanisms of Mg alloys are reviewed, including the 3 followings: 1) Fatigue crack initiation of as-cast Mg alloys, 2) influence of microstructure on fatigue crack initiation of wrought Mg alloys, and 3) the effect of heat treatment on fatigue initiation mechanisms. Moreover, some unresolved issues and future target on the fatigue crack initiation mechanism of Mg alloys are also described.

  8. Polymerization shrinkage of flowable resin-based restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavridakis, Minos M; Dietschi, Didier; Krejci, Ivo

    2005-01-01

    This study measured the linear polymerization displacement and polymerization forces induced by polymerization shrinkage of a series of flowable resin-based restorative materials. The materials tested were 22 flowable resin-based restorative materials (Admira Flow, Aelite Flow, Aeliteflow LV, Aria, Crystal Essence, Definite Flow, Dyract Flow, Filtek Flow, FloRestore, Flow-it, Flow-Line, Freedom, Glacier, OmegaFlo, PermaFlo, Photo SC, Revolution 2, Star Flow, Synergy Flow, Tetric Flow, Ultraseal XT and Wave). Measurements for linear polymerization displacement and polymerization forces were performed using custom made measuring devices. Polymerization of the test materials was carried out for 60 seconds by means of a light curing unit, and each property was measured for 180 seconds from the start of curing in eight specimens for each material. Statistical evaluation of the data was performed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey's Studentized Range (HSD) test (p=0.05) and simple linear regression. A wide range of values was recorded for linear polymerization displacement (26.61 to 80.74 microns) and polymerization forces (3.23 to 7.48 kilograms). Statistically significant differences among materials were found for both properties studied. Very few materials (Freedom, Glacier, and Photo SC) presented low values of linear polymerization displacement and polymerization forces (similar to hybrid resin composites), while the majority of materials presented very high values in both properties studied. Study of the shrinkage kinetics revealed the exponential growth process of both properties. The polymerization forces development exhibited a few seconds delay over linear polymerization displacement. Simple linear regression showed that the two polymerization shrinkage properties that were studied were not highly correlated (r2=0.59).

  9. Postoperative sensitivity associated with low shrinkage versus conventional composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Postoperative sensitivity in restorative dentistry can be related to preparation trauma, dentin adhesives’ ability to seal open dentinal tubules, deformation of restorations under occlusal stresses and microleakage. Objective. The study assessed possible reduction in postoperative sensitivity with low shrinkage compared to conventional composites using different bonding agents and the influence of the operator skill on the incidence of postoperative sensitivity. Methods. Nine hundred and sixty permanent premolars and molars with primary carious lesions from patients 21 to 40 years old were used. Cavities 2 to 3 mm deep and with margins in enamel were prepared by four operators. Two operators had five years (A and B and two had over 20 years (C and D of clinical experience. Teeth were divided into eight groups each contained 120 restorations: (1 Els®+James-2 (original formula, (2 Els®+James-2 (new formula, (3 Els®+Excite, (4 InTenSe®+James-2 (original formula, (5 InTenSe®+James-2 (new formula, (6 InTenSe®+Excite, (7 Tetric Ceram®+Excite, and (8 Point 4®+OptiBond Solo Plus. At 14 days postoperatively, two independent operators, who did not take part in the clinical procedure, assessed postoperative teeth sensitivity using special questionnaires. Data were analyzed using non-parametric chi-square, Mann-Whitney and ANOVA tests. Results. Group 8 showed significantly higher score than the other groups. Less postoperative sensitivity was reported with two low-shrinkage composites (groups 2, 3, and 5 but with no significant difference. There was no statistical difference between groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7. Operator A had the highest postoperative sensitivity score compared to the other three. Conclusion. Conventional composite material Point 4® with its bonding agent caused significantly more postoperative sensitivity than low shrinkage composites combined with different adhesives. Operator skill influenced the incidence of

  10. Sparse electromagnetic imaging using nonlinear iterative shrinkage thresholding

    KAUST Repository

    Desmal, Abdulla

    2015-04-13

    A sparse nonlinear electromagnetic imaging scheme is proposed for reconstructing dielectric contrast of investigation domains from measured fields. The proposed approach constructs the optimization problem by introducing the sparsity constraint to the data misfit between the scattered fields expressed as a nonlinear function of the contrast and the measured fields and solves it using the nonlinear iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithm. The thresholding is applied to the result of every nonlinear Landweber iteration to enforce the sparsity constraint. Numerical results demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method in reconstructing sparse dielectric profiles.

  11. Experimental Study on Forecasting Mathematical Model of Drying Shrinkage of Recycled Aggregate Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanchen Guo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of basic law in AASHTO2007 model, the forecasting mathematical model of drying shrinkage of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC is established by regression analysis and experimental study. The research results show that (1 with the replacement rate of RCA increases, the drying shrinkage value of RAC increases; this trend is even more obvious in the early drying time. (2 The addition of fly ash can inhibit the drying shrinkage of RAC, but the effect is not very obvious. Specifically, the addition of fly ash will increase the shrinkage to some extent when the mixing amount is 20%. (3 The addition of expansive agent can obviously inhibit the shrinkage of RAC; the inhibition affection is better than that of fly ash. (4 The forecasting mathematical models of drying shrinkage of RAC established in this paper have high accuracy and rationality according to experiment validation and error analysis.

  12. Can superabsorbent polymers mitigate shrinkage in cementitious materials blended with supplementary cementitious materials?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoeck, Didier; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; De Belie, Nele

    2016-01-01

    A promising way to mitigate autogenous shrinkage in cementitious materials with a low water-to-binder ratio is internal curing by the use of superabsorbent polymers. Superabsorbent polymers are able to absorb multiple times their weight in water and can be applied as an internal water reservoir...... shrinkage in materials blended with fly ash or blast-furnace slag remain scarce, especially after one week of age. This paper focuses on the autogenous shrinkage by performing manual and automated shrinkage measurements up to one month of age. Without superabsorbent polymers, autogenous shrinkage...... was reduced in cement pastes with the supplementary cementitious materials versus Portland cement pastes. At later ages, the rate of autogenous shrinkage is higher due to the pozzolanic activity of the supplementary cementitious materials. Internal curing by means of superabsorbent polymers is successful...

  13. Experimental Study on Forecasting Mathematical Model of Drying Shrinkage of Recycled Aggregate Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Yuanchen Guo; Xue Wang

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of basic law in AASHTO2007 model, the forecasting mathematical model of drying shrinkage of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) is established by regression analysis and experimental study. The research results show that (1) with the replacement rate of RCA increases, the drying shrinkage value of RAC increases; this trend is even more obvious in the early drying time. (2) The addition of fly ash can inhibit the drying shrinkage of RAC, but the effect is not very obvious. Specifica...

  14. The influence of granulation on lightweight aggregate on early autogenous shrinkage of high strength concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Maleš, Dijana

    2013-01-01

    Early autogenous shrinkage of high strength concretes is relatively large. It can be reduced by using internal water reservoirs. Lightweight aggregate was used for internal water reservoir. 12% of aggregate was replaced with pre-soaked lightweight aggregate in the concrete mixture. On the basis of experiments in the graduation thesis we studied the influence of granulation of lightweight aggregate on early autogenous shrinkage. The shrinkage was measured electronically during the first day. I...

  15. Longitudinal shrinkage of compression wood in dependence on water content and cell wall structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesław Włoch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Compression wood from branches of Pinus silvestris L. was examined. Wide differences were noted in longitudinal shrinkage of the wood when dried from water saturated state. A relation was found between shrinkage and cell wall thickness, particularly of layer S2, and the degree of callose accumulation in the wall. No dependence could be revealed between the shrinkage and the fibril angle in S2.

  16. Effect of resin-composite filler particle size and shape on shrinkage-stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterthwaite, Julian D; Maisuria, Amit; Vogel, Karin; Watts, David C

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of variations in filler particle size and shape on the polymerization shrinkage-stress kinetics of resin-composites. A model series of 12 VLC resin-composites were studied. The particulate dispersed phase volume fraction was 56.7%: these filler particles were systematically graded in size, and further were either spherical or irregular. A Bioman instrument (cantilever beam method) was employed to determine the shrinkage-stress kinetics following 40s irradiation (600 mW/cm(2)) at 23°C (n=3). All data were captured for 60 min and the final shrinkage-stress calculated. Shrinkage-stress varied between 3.86 MPa (SD 0.14) for S3 (spherical filler particles of 500 nm) and 8.44 MPa (SD 0.41) for I1 (irregular filler particles of 450 nm). The shrinkage-stress values were generally lower for those composites with spherical filler particles than those with irregular filler particles. The differences in shrinkage-stress with filler particle size and shape were statistically significant (pparticles exhibit lower shrinkage-stress values compared to those with irregular filler particles. Shrinkage-stress and shrinkage-stress rate vary in a complex manner with variations in the size of the dispersed phase particles: a hypothesized explanation for the effect of filler particle size and shape is presented. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Design changes of device to investigation of alloys linear contraction and shrinkage stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mutwil

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Some design changes in device elaborated by author to examination of linear contraction and shrinkage stresses progress of metals and alloys during– and after solidification have been described. The introduced changes have been focused on design of closing of shrinkage test rod mould. The introduced changes have been allowed to simplify a mounting procedure of thermocouples measuring a temperature of the shrinkage rod casting (in 6 points. Exemplary investigation results of linear contraction and shrinkage stresses development in Al-Si13.5% alloy have been presented.

  18. A consistent partly cracked XFEM element for cohesive crack growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asferg, Jesper L.; Poulsen, Peter Noe; Nielsen, Leif Otto

    2007-01-01

    enrichments to the cracked elements. The extra enrichments are element side local and were developed by superposition of the standard nodal shape functions for the element and standard nodal shape functions for a sub-triangle of the cracked element. With the extra enrichments, the crack-tip element becomes...... capable of modelling variations in the discontinuous displacement field on both sides of the crack and hence also capable of modelling the case where equal stresses are present on each side of the crack. The enrichment was implemented for the 3-node constant strain triangle (CST) and a standard algorithm...... XFEM results applying fully cracked XFEM elements, with computational results achieved using standard cohesive interface elements in a commercial code, and with experimental results. The suggested element performed well in the tests....

  19. Investigation of Shrinkage Defect in Castings by Quantitative Ishikawa Diagram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chokkalingam B.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Metal casting process involves processes such as pattern making, moulding and melting etc. Casting defects occur due to combination of various processes even though efforts are taken to control them. The first step in the defect analysis is to identify the major casting defect among the many casting defects. Then the analysis is to be made to find the root cause of the particular defect. Moreover, it is especially difficult to identify the root causes of the defect. Therefore, a systematic method is required to identify the root cause of the defect among possible causes, consequently specific remedial measures have to be implemented to control them. This paper presents a systematic procedure to identify the root cause of shrinkage defect in an automobile body casting (SG 500/7 and control it by the application of Pareto chart and Ishikawa diagram. with quantitative Weightage. It was found that the root causes were larger volume section in the cope, insufficient feeding of riser and insufficient poured metal in the riser. The necessary remedial measures were taken and castings were reproduced. The shrinkage defect in the castings was completely eliminated.

  20. Impaired decision-making and brain shrinkage in alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Berre, A-P; Rauchs, G; La Joie, R; Mézenge, F; Boudehent, C; Vabret, F; Segobin, S; Viader, F; Allain, P; Eustache, F; Pitel, A-L; Beaunieux, H

    2014-03-01

    Alcohol-dependent individuals usually favor instant gratification of alcohol use and ignore its long-term negative consequences, reflecting impaired decision-making. According to the somatic marker hypothesis, decision-making abilities are subtended by an extended brain network. As chronic alcohol consumption is known to be associated with brain shrinkage in this network, the present study investigated relationships between brain shrinkage and decision-making impairments in alcohol-dependent individuals early in abstinence using voxel-based morphometry. Thirty patients performed the Iowa Gambling Task and underwent a magnetic resonance imaging investigation (1.5T). Decision-making performances and brain data were compared with those of age-matched healthy controls. In the alcoholic group, a multiple regression analysis was conducted with two predictors (gray matter [GM] volume and decision-making measure) and two covariates (number of withdrawals and duration of alcoholism). Compared with controls, alcoholics had impaired decision-making and widespread reduced gray matter volume, especially in regions involved in decision-making. The regression analysis revealed links between high GM volume in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and right hippocampal formation, and high decision-making scores (Palcoholism may result from impairment of both emotional and cognitive networks. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of shrinkage limits and testing protocols for ODOT high performance concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    ODOT has observed varying degrees of cracking in their concrete structures. Cracking of high performance reinforced : concrete structures, in particular bridge decks, is of paramount concern to ODOT. Cracking at early ages (especially within : the fi...

  2. Monitoring of pre-release cracks in prestressed concrete using fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Jaber, Hiba; Glisic, Branko

    2015-04-01

    Prestressed concrete experiences low to no tensile stresses, which results in limiting the occurrence of cracks in prestressed concrete structures. However, the nature of construction of these structures requires the concrete not to be subjected to the compressive force from the prestressing tendons until after it has gained sufficient compressive strength. Although the structure is not subjected to any dead or live load during this period, it is influenced by shrinkage and thermal variations. Thus, the concrete can experience tensile stresses before the required compressive strength has been attained, which can result in the occurrence of "pre-release" cracks. Such cracks are visually closed after the transfer of the prestressing force. However, structural capacity and behavior can be impacted if cracks are not sufficiently closed. This paper researches a method for the verification of the status of pre-release cracks after transfer of the prestressing force, and it is oriented towards achievement of Level IV Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). The method relies on measurements from parallel long-gauge fiber optic sensors embedded in the concrete prior to pouring. The same sensor network is used for the detection and characterization of cracks, as well as the monitoring of the prestressing force transfer and the determination of the extent of closure of pre-release cracks. This paper outlines the researched method and presents its application to a real-life structure, the southeast leg of Streicker Bridge on the Princeton University campus. The application structure is a curved continuous girder that was constructed in 2009. Its deck experienced four pre-release cracks that were closed beyond the critical limits based on the results of this study.

  3. Cracking of anisotropic cylindrical polytropes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardan, S.A. [University of the Management and Technology, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan); Azam, M. [University of Education, Division of Science and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2017-06-15

    We study the appearance of cracking in charged anisotropic cylindrical polytropes with generalized polytropic equation. We investigate the existence of cracking in two different kinds of polytropes existing in the literature through two different assumptions: (a) local density perturbation with conformally flat condition, and (b) perturbing polytropic index, charge and anisotropy parameters. We conclude that cracking appears in both kinds of polytropes for a specific range of density and model parameters. (orig.)

  4. The effect of fibers on the loss of water by evaporation and shrinkage of concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. P. Pillar

    Full Text Available Shrinkage is one of the least desirable attributes in concrete. Large areas of exposed concrete surfaces , such as in shotcrete tunnel linings, where it is practically impossible to make a moist cure, are highly susceptible to plastic shrinkage at early ages. The autogenous and drying shrinkage can lead to states of greater than threshold strength, causing fracture, mechanical damage and lack of durability of concrete structures. The addition of fibers can greatly reduce plastic shrinkage, but has limited effect in mitigating autogenous and drying shrinkage. To evaluate the performance of polypropylene and steel fibers to understand their effect on shrinkage of concrete, a study was carried out to relate the loss of water from the paste and the shrinkage during the first 28 days of age, and compare it with a control mix without fiber. The loss of water was obtained by the weight loss of the specimens at different ages, since the only component that could contribute for the loss of weight was the water lost by the paste of the concrete. And the paste itself is the only source of shrinkage. Uniaxial compressive tests from very early ages enabled the determination of time when plastic shrinkage ended. It was observed that the control concrete mix lost three times more water and developed plastic and drying shrinkage 60 % higher than the fiber reinforced concrete mixes. It was possible to demonstrate that the reduced loss of water caused by the incorporation of fibers is related to the mitigation of plastic shrinkage. It was observed that the fibers are effective to restrain the movement of water through the cement paste in the plastic state, however such effect is limited after concrete starts the hardening state.

  5. Catalytic cracking with deasphalted oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaton, W.I.; Taylor, J.L.; Peck, L.B.; Mosby, J.F.

    1990-07-10

    This patent describes a catalytic cracking process. It comprises: hydrotreating resid; thereafter deasphalting the hydrotreated resid to produce substantially deasphalted oil; catalytically cracking the hydrotreated oil in a catalytic cracking unit in the presence of a cracking catalyst to produce upgraded oil leaving coked catalyst; and regenerating the coked catalyst in the presence of a combustion-supporting gas comprising excess molecular oxygen in an amount greater than the stoichiometric amount required for substantially completely combusting the coke on the catalyst to carbon dioxide.

  6. Polygon-Cracked Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    21 July 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a polygon-cracked plain in the south polar region of Mars. When this picture was acquired in April 2005, the surface was covered with seasonal carbon dioxide frost. Dark spots and streaks indicate areas where the frost had begun to change and sublime away. Location near: 86.8oS, 300.5oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  7. Cryptography cracking codes

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    While cracking a code might seem like something few of us would encounter in our daily lives, it is actually far more prevalent than we may realize. Anyone who has had personal information taken because of a hacked email account can understand the need for cryptography and the importance of encryption-essentially the need to code information to keep it safe. This detailed volume examines the logic and science behind various ciphers, their real world uses, how codes can be broken, and the use of technology in this oft-overlooked field.

  8. Fatigue Crack Topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    possibilities. 2. EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM The materials under investigation were typical commetial aircraft alloys as the titanium alloy Ti6Al4V , aluminium alloys...the macroscopic crack growth rate da/dN is plotted vs. the stress intensity range K as a straight 15e for constant amplitude loading with the Ti6Al4V ...cyc- le, and the units on the ordinate give the amount of striation spacing r mm. For Ti6Al4V striations were detectable for stress intensity ranges

  9. Analysis of the status of pre-release cracks in prestressed concrete structures using long-gauge sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Jaber, H.; Glisic, B.

    2015-02-01

    Prestressed structures experience limited tensile stresses in concrete, which limits or completely eliminates the occurrence of cracks. However, in some cases, large tensile stresses can develop during the early age of the concrete due to thermal gradients and shrinkage effects. Such stresses can cause early-age cracks, termed ‘pre-release cracks’, which occur prior to the transfer of the prestressing force. When the prestressing force is applied to the cross-section, it is assumed that partial or full closure of the cracks occurs by virtue of the force transfer through the cracked cross-section. Verification of the closure of the cracks after the application of the prestressing force is important as it can either confirm continued structural integrity or indicate and approximate reduced structural capacity. Structural health monitoring (SHM) can be used for this purpose. This paper researches an SHM method that can be applied to prestressed beam structures to assess the condition of pre-release cracks. The sensor network used in this method consists of parallel long-gauge fiber optic strain sensors embedded in the concrete cross-sections at various locations. The same network is used for damage detection, i.e. detection and characterization of the pre-release cracks, and for monitoring the prestress force transfer. The method is validated on a real structure, a curved continuous girder. Results from the analysis confirm the safety and integrity of the structure. The method and its application are presented in this paper.

  10. Development and Performance Assessment of the High-Performance Shrinkage Reducing Agent for Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Sub Han

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To develop a high-performance shrinkage reducing agent, this study investigated several shrinkage reducing materials and supplements for those materials. Fluidity and air content were satisfactory for the various shrinkage reducing materials. The decrease in viscosity was the lowest for glycol-based materials. The decrease in drying shrinkage was most prominent for mixtures containing glycol-based materials. In particular, mixtures containing G2 achieved a 40% decrease in the amount of drying shrinkage. Most shrinkage reducing materials had weaker level of compressive strength than that of the plain mixture. When 3% triethanolamine was used for early strength improvement, the strength was enhanced by 158% compared to that of the plain mixture on day 1; enhancement values were 135% on day 7 and 113% on day 28. To assess the performance of the developed high-performance shrinkage reducing agent and to determine the optimal amount, 2.0% shrinkage reducing agent was set as 40% of the value of the plain mixture. While the effect was more prominent at higher amounts, to prevent deterioration of the compressive strength and the other physical properties, the recommended amount is less than 2.0%.

  11. Hardness, density, and shrinkage characteristics of silk-oak from Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. L. Youngs

    1964-01-01

    Shrinkage, specific gravity, and hardness of two shipments of silk-oak (Grevillea robusta) from Hawaii were evaluated to provide basic information pertinent to the use of the wood for cabinet and furniture purposes. The wood resembles Hawaii-grown shamel ash (Fraxinus uhdei ) in the properties evaluated. Shrinkage compares well with that of black cherry, silver maple,...

  12. Modeling dental composite shrinkage by digital image correlation and finite element methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Terry Yuan-Fang; Huang, Pin-Sheng; Chuang, Shu-Fen

    2014-10-01

    Dental composites are light-curable resin-based materials with an inherent defect of polymerization shrinkage which may cause tooth deflection and debonding of restorations. This study aimed to combine digital image correlation (DIC) and finite element analysis (FEA) to model the shrinkage behaviors under different light curing regimens. Extracted human molars were prepared with proximal cavities for composite restorations, and then divided into three groups to receive different light curing protocols: regular intensity, low intensity, and step-curing consisting of low and high intensities. For each tooth, the composite fillings were consecutively placed under both unbonded and bonded conditions. At first, the shrinkage of the unbonded restorations was analyzed by DIC and adopted as the setting of FEA. The simulated shrinkage behaviors obtained from FEA were further validated by the measurements in the bonded cases. The results showed that different light curing regimens affected the shrinkage in unbonded restorations, with regular intensity showing the greatest shrinkage strain on the top surface. The shrinkage centers in the bonded cases were located closer to the cavity floor than those in the unbonded cases, and were less affected by curing regimens. The FEA results showed that the stress was modulated by the accumulated light energy density, while step-curing may alleviate the tensile stress along the cavity walls. In this study, DIC provides a complete description of the polymerization shrinkage behaviors of dental composites, which may facilitate the stress analysis in the numerical investigation.

  13. Effect of modulated photo-activation on polymerization shrinkage behavior of dental restorative resin composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tauböck, T.T.; Feilzer, A.J.; Buchalla, W.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Krejci, I.; Attin, T.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of modulated photo-activation on axial polymerization shrinkage, shrinkage force, and hardening of light- and dual-curing resin-based composites. Three light-curing resin composites (SDR bulk-fill, Esthet X flow, and Esthet X HD) and one dual-curing material

  14. Spontaneous tumour shrinkage in 1261 observed patients with sporadic vestibular schwannoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Xiaoshan; Caye-Thomasen, P; Stangerup, S-E

    2013-01-01

    To determine the rate of spontaneous tumour shrinkage in a group of patients with sporadic vestibular schwannoma managed with a 'wait and scan' approach.......To determine the rate of spontaneous tumour shrinkage in a group of patients with sporadic vestibular schwannoma managed with a 'wait and scan' approach....

  15. Thermo-mechanical simulations of early-age concrete cracking with durability predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlásek, Petr; Šmilauer, Vít; Hájková, Karolina; Baquerizo, Luis

    2017-09-01

    Concrete performance is strongly affected by mix design, thermal boundary conditions, its evolving mechanical properties, and internal/external restraints with consequences to possible cracking with impaired durability. Thermo-mechanical simulations are able to capture those relevant phenomena and boundary conditions for predicting temperature, strains, stresses or cracking in reinforced concrete structures. In this paper, we propose a weakly coupled thermo-mechanical model for early age concrete with an affinity-based hydration model for thermal part, taking into account concrete mix design, cement type and thermal boundary conditions. The mechanical part uses B3/B4 model for concrete creep and shrinkage with isotropic damage model for cracking, able to predict a crack width. All models have been implemented in an open-source OOFEM software package. Validations of thermo-mechanical simulations will be presented on several massive concrete structures, showing excellent temperature predictions. Likewise, strain validation demonstrates good predictions on a restrained reinforced concrete wall and concrete beam. Durability predictions stem from induction time of reinforcement corrosion, caused by carbonation and/or chloride ingress influenced by crack width. Reinforcement corrosion in concrete struts of a bridge will serve for validation.

  16. Hot cracking of ZRE1 alloy in constant joint stiffness condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Adamiec

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available ZRE1 alloy with addition of Zn, Zr and rare earth elements is gravity casted to sand casting moulds, and is used mainly in aerospace and automotive industries. Magnesium alloy castings often have defects, such as misruns and micro-shrinkage. This defects are repaired with welding and overlay welding techniques. Main practical difficulty during welding of magnesium alloys is their susceptibility to hot cracking in the crystallization process.The paper intends to evaluate susceptibility of magnesium alloys to hot cracking and examine influence of heat treatment on cracking of the ZRE1 magnesium alloy with addition of zinc and rare earth elements during welding in conditions of constant stiffness. The results of tests of susceptibility to hot cracking of repair welding joints of ZRE1 alloy castings have been described.The range of research has included the Fisco test and metallographic tests. It has been observed that heat treatment decreases susceptibility of the ZRE1 alloy to hot cracking.

  17. Analysis of gene set using shrinkage covariance matrix approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjanto, Suryaefiza; Aripin, Rasimah

    2013-09-01

    Microarray methodology has been exploited for different applications such as gene discovery and disease diagnosis. This technology is also used for quantitative and highly parallel measurements of gene expression. Recently, microarrays have been one of main interests of statisticians because they provide a perfect example of the paradigms of modern statistics. In this study, the alternative approach to estimate the covariance matrix has been proposed to solve the high dimensionality problem in microarrays. The extension of traditional Hotelling's T2 statistic is constructed for determining the significant gene sets across experimental conditions using shrinkage approach. Real data sets were used as illustrations to compare the performance of the proposed methods with other methods. The results across the methods are consistent, implying that this approach provides an alternative to existing techniques.

  18. Catalytic cracking of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.; Nowak, S.; Naegler, T.; Zimmermann, J. [Hochschule Merseburg (Germany); Welscher, J.; Schwieger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany); Hahn, T. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    A most important factor for the chemical industry is the availability of cheap raw materials. As the oil price of crude oil is rising alternative feedstocks like coal are coming into focus. This work, the catalytic cracking of lignite is part of the alliance ibi (innovative Braunkohlenintegration) to use lignite as a raw material to produce chemicals. With this new one step process without an input of external hydrogen, mostly propylene, butenes and aromatics and char are formed. The product yield depends on manifold process parameters. The use of acid catalysts (zeolites like MFI) shows the highest amount of the desired products. Hydrogen rich lignites with a molar H/C ratio of > 1 are to be favoured. Due to primary cracking and secondary reactions the ratio between catalyst and lignite, temperature and residence time are the most important parameter to control the product distribution. Experiments at 500 C in a discontinuous rotary kiln reactor show yields up to 32 wt-% of hydrocarbons per lignite (maf - moisture and ash free) and 43 wt-% char, which can be gasified. Particularly, the yields of propylene and butenes as main products can be enhanced four times to about 8 wt-% by the use of catalysts while the tar yield decreases. In order to develop this innovative process catalyst systems fixed on beads were developed for an easy separation and regeneration of the used catalyst from the formed char. (orig.)

  19. Polymerization and polymerization shrinkage stress: fast cure versus conventional cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strydom, C

    2005-07-01

    Dentists nowadays have a choice of conventional halogen lights, halogen lights with more sophisticated curing cycles (step-cure, rapid-cure, ramp-cure & pulse-cure), fast halogen lights, laser lights, plasma arc lights (PAC) and, lately, LED lights. While the manufacturers of some of the curing units try to improve on the operational reliability of their lights with a slower initial rate of cure, other manufacturers simply wish to offer as fast a curing time as possible. The conventional approach to cure accepts that sufficient light intensity of at least 400 mW/cm2 at a wavelength of 400-500 nm, and an exposure time of at least 40 seconds is needed to cure a 2-mm layer of composite. When a halogen light with higher or very high intensity is used, alternative curing strategies provide for an initial slower cure to allow flow, and after that a higher-intensity cure to improve the degree of cure. In contrast, in the fast-cure or rapid-cure approach it is suggested that a layer of composite can be cured for only 5- 10 seconds at >2000 mW/cm2. Some go so far as to say that an exposure time of 3 seconds per layer may be enough. This contradictory approach is compounded by the fact that this support for fast cure does not seem to consider the negative consequences. Therefore, to address these concerns, this review discusses the possible effects of a fast cure approach compared to a more conventional approach in polymerization and polymerization shrinkage, and the consequences there-off. Other factors that play an influencing role in polymerization shrinkage stress are also included in the discussion.

  20. Parametric study and shrinkage modelling of natural rubber sheet drying using COMSOL multiphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajani, C.; Kumar, A.; Curcio, S.; Tekasakul, P.

    2017-09-01

    Natural rubber is one of the major exporting cash crops in Thailand. Shrinkage in natural rubber sheet during drying creates uneven stresses in the rubber, hampers the quality and the water activity predisposes it to microbial activation. Hence, the effect of drying parameters on shrinkage has been considered in this work. The finite element concept coupled with the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method was used to solve the two-dimensional coupled physics in the rubber sheet drying chamber and account for the shrinkage effect. The spatial domain (drying chamber), material domain (rubber sheet) was analysed. An isotropic linear elastic model was assumed for the rubber sheet for analysis. Three Case studies of different velocity, temperature, relative humidity and shrinkage coefficient were considered in the numerical study using COMSOL Multiphysics. It is concluded that increase in the operating parameters increases the shrinkage of the rubber. Therefore, rubber should dry at relatively lower operating parameters to improve its quality.

  1. Analysis of the effect of shrinkage on macrosegregation in alloy solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krane, Matthew John M.; Incropera, Frank P.

    1995-09-01

    Numerical calculations based on a continuum model are used to examine the effects of solidification shrinkage on the redistribution of solute in a Pb-19.2 pct Sn mixture which is convectively cooled at a sidewall. For each of three different cooling rates, separate calculations are performed for shrinkage and buoyancy-induced flows, as well as for the combined influence of shrinkage and buoyancy effects. The calculations reveal that flow and macrosegregation patterns are more strongly influenced by buoyancy effects over a wide range of solidification rates. Although extremely large solidification rates yield small regions near the chilled wall in which shrinkage-induced flows control the redis-tribution of solute, the overall effect on macrosegregation is small relative to that associated with buoyancy. Scaling analysis of the governing equations produces reference shrinkage and buoyancy velocities which can be used to extend the current numerical results to other binary systems.

  2. Effects of prepolymerized particle size and polymerization kinetics on volumetric shrinkage of dental modeling resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Tae-Yub; Ha, Jung-Yun; Chun, Ju-Na; Son, Jun Sik; Kim, Kyo-Han

    2014-01-01

    Dental modeling resins have been developed for use in areas where highly precise resin structures are needed. The manufacturers claim that these polymethyl methacrylate/methyl methacrylate (PMMA/MMA) resins show little or no shrinkage after polymerization. This study examined the polymerization shrinkage of five dental modeling resins as well as one temporary PMMA/MMA resin (control). The morphology and the particle size of the prepolymerized PMMA powders were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and laser diffraction particle size analysis, respectively. Linear polymerization shrinkage strains of the resins were monitored for 20 minutes using a custom-made linometer, and the final values (at 20 minutes) were converted into volumetric shrinkages. The final volumetric shrinkage values for the modeling resins were statistically similar (P > 0.05) or significantly larger (P resin and were related to the polymerization kinetics (P resin structures rather than the use of dental modeling resins.

  3. Volcanic facies analysis of a subaqueous basalt lava-flow complex at Hruškovec, NW Croatia — Evidence of advanced rifting in the Tethyan domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palinkaš, Ladislav A.; Bermanec, Vladimir; Borojević Šoštarić, Sibila; Kolar-Jurkovšek, Tea; Palinkaš, Sabina Strmić; Molnar, Ferenc; Kniewald, Goran

    2008-12-01

    The Hru\\vskovec quarry of basaltoid rocks is situated on the northwestern slopes of Mt. Kalnik, within the Zagorje-Mid-Transdanubian zone, a part of the North-western Dinarides. The basaltoids are inter-bedded with radiolarites of the Middle and Upper Triassic age (Langobardian, Carnian-Norian). Spilites, altered diabases and meta-basalts form part of Triassic volcanic-sedimentary sequence, made of sandstones, shales, micritic limestone, altered vitric tuffs and radiolarian cherts, incorporated tectonically into the Jurassic-Cretaceous mélange. The architecture of the 2 km long and 100 m high pile of the extrusive basaltoid rocks is interpreted as a subaqueous basaltic lava flow. The presented research deals with a variety of volcanic facies of the subaqueous basaltic lava flow, which consists of several facial units: 1. Coherent pillow lavas, with massive core; the bending rims around the massive core, 30-50 cm thick, are dissected by polygonal columnar joints radiating from the pillow centres; 2. Closely packed pillows; densely packed and contorted pillows due to emplacement accommodation, clearly younging upward; 3. Pillow fragment breccia; clast supported, matrix poor, monomict breccia, formed proximal to the axis of the extrusion; 4. Isolated pillow breccia; matrix supported, clast poor breccia, made of lava pipes and tubes, within a matrix of fine-grained sideromelan granules and shards; 5. Pyjama-style pillows; spherical, decimetre to meter size pillow lava balls, grown and chilled in isostatic state (i.e. in a state of diminished density contrast) within water-soaked sediments, named after peculiar alternating basaltic shelves inside the sphere, which are encrusted with white secondary minerals; 6. Peperite and peperitic hyaloclastites; blocky and globular peperites developed at the contact of soft, wet sediment and hot intruding magma. Discovery of peperite and peperitic hyaloclastites within the Triassic radiolarian cherts, shales, and micritic

  4. Photoresist shrinkage effects in 16 nm node extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photoresist targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunday, Benjamin; Montgomery, Cecilia; Montgomery, Warren; Cepler, Aron

    2013-04-01

    Photoresist shrinkage (i.e., line slimming) is an important systematic uncertainty source in critical dimension-scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) metrology of lithographic features [1] [2] [3] [4] [5]. It influences both the precision and the accuracy of CD-SEM measurements, while locally damaging the sample. Minimization or elimination of shrinkage is desirable, yet elusive. This error source will be a factor in CD-SEM metrology on polymer materials in EUV lithography. Recent work has demonstrated improved understanding of the trends in the shrinkage response depending on electron beam and target parameters in static measurements [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]. Some research has highlighted a second mode of shrinkage that is apparent over time and progresses as a function of time between consecutive measurements, a form of "dynamic shrinkage" that appears to be activated by electron beam, in which the activated feature perpetually and logarithmically shrinks [7] [8]. Another work has demonstrated that as pitches continue to get smaller with resulting reductions in spaces between lines, charging may emerge as an additional, competing, unpredictable error source for CD-SEM metrology on dense photoresist features, an issue that is predicted to become more common as these spaces become more confined [9]. In this work, we explore the static shrinkage behaviors of various EUV photoresists into the 16 nm half-pitch node, with samples generated using the advanced EUV lithography capable of generating such tight pitches [10]. Dynamic shrinkage behavior was explored on these materials last year [15]. The static shrinkage behaviors will be validated to show compliance with the SEMATECH shrinkage model [5] [6] on small EUV resist features. Using the results of the model fits, a simulation study will predict the shrinkage trends at future nodes. Further studies will confirm whether or not charging phenomena are observable, and the beginning of a charging simulation study will be

  5. Aerosol particle shrinkage event phenomenology in a South European suburban area during 2009-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Blanco, E.; Gómez-Moreno, F. J.; Núñez, L.; Pujadas, M.; Cusack, M.; Artíñano, B.

    2017-07-01

    A high number of aerosol particle shrinkage cases (70) have been identified and analyzed from an extensive and representative database of aerosol size distributions obtained between 2009 and 2015 at an urban background site in Madrid (Spain). A descriptive classification based on the process from which the shrinkage began is proposed according which shrinkage events were divided into three groups: (1) NPF + shrinkage (NPF + S) events, (2) aerosol particle growth process + shrinkage (G + S) events, and (3) pure shrinkage (S) events. The largest number of shrinkages corresponded to the S-type followed by NPF + S, while the G + S events were the least frequent group recorded. Duration of shrinkages varied widely from 0.75 to 8.5 h and SR from -1.0 to -11.1 nm h-1. These processes typically occurred in the afternoon, around 18:00 UTC, caused by two situations: i) a wind speed increase usually associated with a change in the wind direction (over 60% of the observations) and ii) the reduction of photochemical activity at the end of the day. All shrinkages were detected during the warm period, mainly between May and August, when local meteorological conditions (high solar irradiance and temperature and low relative humidity), atmospheric processes (high photochemical activity) and availability of aerosol-forming precursors were favorable for their development. As a consequence of these processes, the particles concentration corresponding to the Aitken mode decreased into the nucleation mode. The accumulation mode did not undergo significant changes during these processes. In some cases, a dilution of the particulate content in the ambient air was observed. This work, goes further than others works dealing with aerosol particles shrinkages, as it incorporates as a main novelty a classification methodology for studying these processes. Moreover, compared to other studies, it is supported by a high and representative number of observations. Thus, this study contributes to

  6. Experiences on IGSCC crack manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veron, P. [Equipos Nucleares, S.A., Maliano (Spain)

    1997-02-01

    The author presents his experience in manufacturing IGSCC realistic defects, mainly in INCONEL 600 MA Steam Generator Tubes. From that experience he extracts some knowledge about this cracking (influence of chemistry in the environment, stress state, crack growth rate, and occurrence in laboratory condition of break before leak).

  7. Effect of temperature and humidity on post-gel shrinkage, cusp deformation, bond strength and shrinkage stress - Construction of a chamber to simulate the oral environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicalho, Aline Aredes; de Souza, Silas Júnior Boaventura; de Rosatto, Camila Maria Peres; Tantbirojn, Daranee; Versluis, Antheunis; Soares, Carlos José

    2015-12-01

    Evaluate the effect of environment on post-gel shrinkage (Shr), cuspal strains (CS), microtensile bond strength (μTBS), elastic modulus (E) and shrinkage stress in molars with large class II restorations. Sixty human molars received standardized Class II mesio-oclusal-distal cavity preparations. Restorations were made with two composites (CHA, Charisma Diamond, Heraus Kulzer and IPS Empress Direct, Ivoclar-Vivadent) using three environment conditions (22°C/50% humidity, 37°C/50% humidity and 37°C/90% humidity) simulated in custom developed chamber. Shr was measured using the strain gauge technique (n=10). CS was measured using strain gauges. Half of the teeth (n=5) were used to assess the elastic modulus (E) and Knoop hardness (KHN) at different depths using microhardness indentation. The other half (n=5) was used to measure the μTBS. The composites and environment conditions were simulated in a two-dimensional finite element analysis of a tooth restoration. Polymerization shrinkage was modeled using Shr data. The Shr, CS, μTBS, KHN and E data were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (significance level: 0.05). Both composites had similar Shr, CS, μTBS and shrinkage stress. CHA had higher elastic modulus than IPS. Increasing temperature and humidity significantly increased Shr, CS and shrinkage stress. μTBS were similar for groups with lower humidity, irrespective of temperature, and higher with higher humidity. E and KHN were constant through the depth for CHA. E and KHN values were affected by environment only for IPS, mainly deeper in the cavity. Shrinkage stress at dentin/composite interface had high inverse correlation with μTBS. Shrinkage stress in enamel had high correlation with CS. Increasing temperature and humidity caused higher post-gel shrinkage and cusp deformation with higher shrinkage stresses in the tooth structure and tooth/restoration interface for both composites tested. The chamber developed for simulating the

  8. Evaluation of polymerization shrinkage, polymerization shrinkage stress, wear resistance, and compressive strength of a silorane-based composite: A finite element analysis study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Mitthra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Understanding the mechanical properties is important in predicting the clinical behavior of composites. Finite element analysis (FEA evaluates properties of materials replicating clinical scenario. Aim: This study evaluated polymerization shrinkage and stress, wear resistance (WR, and compressive strength (CS of silorane in comparison with two methacrylate resins. Settings and Design: This study design was a numerical study using FEA. Materials and Methods: Three-dimensional (3D models of maxillary premolar with Class I cavities (2 mm depth, 4 mm length, and 2.5 mm width created and restored with silorane, nanohybrid, and microhybrid; Groups I, II, and III, respectively. Loads of 200–600 N were applied. Polymerization shrinkage was first determined by displacement produced in the X, Y, and Z planes. Maximum stress distribution due to shrinkage was calculated using AN SYS software. 3D cube models of composite resins were simulated with varying filler particle size. Similar loads were applied. WR and compressive stress were calculated: K W L/H and load/cross-sectional area, respectively. Statistical analysis done using one-way ANOVA, Kruskal–Wallis, and Tukey's honestly significant difference test (P < 0.05. Results: Polymerization shrinkage (0.99% and shrinkage stress (233.21 Mpa of silorane were less compared to microhybrid (2.14% and 472.43 Mpa and nanohybrid (2.32% and 464.88 Mpa. Silorane (7.92×/1011 μm/mm3 and nanohybrid (7.79×/1011 showed superior WR than microhybrid (1.113×/1017. There was no significant difference in compressive stress among the groups. Conclusion: Silorane exhibited less polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress compared to methacrylates. Silorane and nanohybrid showed greater WR compared to microhybrid. CS of all groups was similar.

  9. Influence of fly ash fineness on water requirement and shrinkage of blended cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanissorn Vimonsatit

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the influence of fly ash fineness on water requirement and shrinkage of blended cement mortar was studied. The results indicate that the water requirement and shrinkage characteristic of the blended cement mortar are dependent on fly ash fineness and replacement level. The use of coarse fly ash slightly reduces the water requirement but greatly reduced the drying and the autogenous shrinkage of the blended cement mortars and the reduction is more with an increase in the fly ash replacement level. The finer fly ashes further reduce the water requirement, but increase the drying and the autogenous shrinkages as compared with coarser fly ash. The incorporation of superplasticizer drastically reduces the water requirement, but the effect on the drying and autogenous shrinkages of the normal Portland cement mortar is small. However, for the fly ash mortar, the use of superplasticizer results in a decrease in drying shrinkage and in a substantial increase in the autogenous shrinkage particularly for the fine fly ash at a high replacement level.

  10. Influence of shade of adhesive resin cement on its polymerization shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ender Akan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Resin cements have the ability to bond to the tooth structure and to several indirect restorative materials and they are available in different transparency and shades. However, polymerization shrinkage remains to be a problem that leads to gap formation at the margins of restoration, and accordingly microleakage may occur. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the shade of adhesive resin cement on its polymerization shrinkage. Five shades (Group 1: universal; Group 2: brown; Group 3: clear; Group 4: opaque white; Group 5: opaque yellow of a dual-cure composite cement system (Clearfil Esthetic Cement, Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan were studied with 10 specimens of each shade. Volumetric shrinkages of the composite cements of these five shades were evaluated using a video-imaging device (Acu-Vol; Bisco, Inc. by measuring the volumes before and after polymerization. Different shades displayed different volumetric shrinkages. Group 5 (2.62% and Group 2 (3.96% displayed the lowest and highest shrinkage percentages, respectively, with their respective shrinkage values being significantly different from those of the other groups (p < 0.05. The obtained results indicate that the shade of resin cement does affect its degree of polymerization shrinkage.

  11. Investigations of linear contraction and shrinkage stresses development in hypereutectic al-si binary alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mutwil

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Shrinkage phenomena during solidification and cooling of hypereutectic aluminium-silicon alloys (AlSi18, AlSi21 have been examined. A vertical shrinkage rod casting with circular cross-section (constant or fixed: tapered has been used as a test sample. Two type of experiments have been conducted: 1 on development of the test sample linear dimension changes (linear expansion/contraction, 2 on development of shrinkage stresses in the test sample. By the linear contraction experiments the linear dimension changes of the test sample and the metal test mould as well a temperature in six points of the test sample have been registered. By shrinkage stresses examination a shrinkage tension force and linear dimension changes of the test sample as well a temperature in three points of the test sample have been registered. Registered time dependences of the test bar and the test mould linear dimension changes have shown, that so-called pre-shrinkage extension has been mainly by mould thermal extension caused. The investigation results have shown that both: the linear contraction as well as the shrinkage stresses development are evident dependent on metal temperature in a warmest region the sample (thermal centre.

  12. Creep and shrinkage of high performance lightweight concrete: A multi-scale investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mauricio

    This multi-scale investigation aimed to provide new knowledge and understanding of creep and shrinkage of high performance lightweight concrete (HPLC) by assessing prestress losses in HPLC prestressed members in a large-scale study; by quantifying the effect of the constituent materials and external conditions on creep and shrinkage in a medium-scale study; and by improving the fundamental understanding of creep and shrinkage in a small-scale study. Creep plus shrinkage prestress losses were between two and eight times lower than those estimated for the design standards and approximately 50% of those measured in similar strength normal weight high performance concrete girders. The lower creep and shrinkage exhibited by HPLC was found to be caused by a synergy between the pre-soaked lightweight aggregate and the low water-to-cementitious material ratio matrix. That is, the water contained in the lightweight aggregate contributes to enhance hydration by providing an internal moist curing. The water in the aggregate also contributes to maintain a high internal relative humidity which reduces or eliminates autogenous shrinkage. This higher internal relative humidity also reduces creep by preventing load-induced water migration. Finally, lightweight aggregate exhibits a better elastic compatibility with the paste than normal weight aggregate. This improved elastic matching and the enhanced hydration are believed to reduce peak deformations at the ITZ which further decreases creep and shrinkage.

  13. Polymerisation shrinkage versus layer thickness of a dentine bonding resin: Method development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafarzadeh T

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Dentine bonding systems are usually unfilled, and so their shrinkage may be significant. High"nshrinkage may cause internal stress at the interface between resin-composite restoration and the dentine"nsubstrate. Failure of the adhesive interface may be observed due to the interna! stress. The aims of this"nstudy were:"nA To obtain a suitable method for measuring the kinetics of polymerisation shrinkage in unfilled resm at different thicknesses, particularly for thin films."nB Consideraing the effect of thickness on shrinkage."nScotchbond Multipurpose (3M adhesive bond resin was used. To overcome the particular challenges presented by thin films, a filled-ring measurement procedure was used. Also, a non-contact laser analogue displacement sensor system was developed and applied to measure polymerisation shrinkage. Regression analysis was performed on a complete data set. Non-linear regression analysis established a logarithmic relationship between polymerisation shrinkage and layer thickness. The method applied in this study was found to be sensitive and accurate procedure for determining photo-polymerisation shrinkage of thin films. Polymerisation shrinkage increased with logarithmic of the adhesive thickness.

  14. Compositional Changes for Reduction of Polymerisation-Induced Shrinkage in Holographic Photopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Cody

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymerisation-induced shrinkage is one of the main reasons why many photopolymer materials are not used for certain applications including holographic optical elements and holographic data storage. Here, two compositional changes for the reduction of shrinkage in an acrylamide-based photopolymer are reported. A holographic interferometric technique was used to study changes in the dynamics of the shrinkage processes occurring in the modified photopolymer during holographic recording in real time. Firstly, the effect of the replacement of the acrylamide monomer in the photopolymer composition with a larger monomer molecule, diacetone acrylamide, on polymerisation-induced shrinkage has been studied. A reduction in relative shrinkage of 10–15% is obtained using this compositional change. The second method tested for shrinkage reduction involved the incorporation of BEA-type zeolite nanoparticles in the acrylamide-based photopolymer. A reduction in relative shrinkage of 13% was observed for acrylamide photopolymer layers doped with 2.5% wt. BEA zeolites in comparison to the undoped photopolymer.

  15. Spacing of crack patterns driven by steady-state cooling or drying and influenced by a solidification boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Martin; Bahr, Hans-Achim; Weiss, Hans-Jürgen; Bahr, Ute; Balke, Herbert

    2011-03-01

    Regular columnar joints that originate from networklike crack patterns can be observed in basalt and, on a much smaller scale, in dried starch slurry. Here, the basalt columns are idealized by a periodic array of parallel cracks driven by steady-state cooling. By means of a bifurcation analysis, the minimal possible crack spacing for sustained propagation of the crack array is calculated. It can be shown qualitatively that the minimal possible crack spacing for sustained propagation increases with decreasing velocity. This is confirmed by numerical calculations. The latent heat released at the solidification front is taken into account in the thermomechanical linear-elastic model of propagating shrinkage. Our calculations show that the solidification front is positioned not far ahead of the crack tips, which influences the result considerably. The results agree reasonably well with new measured data of basalt columns. By use of the analogy between contraction due to cooling and that due to drying the model is applied for columns in dried cornstarch, too, showing good agreement with recent experimental data.

  16. Probabilistic Analysis of Crack Width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Marková

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Probabilistic analysis of crack width of a reinforced concrete element is based on the formulas accepted in Eurocode 2 and European Model Code 90. Obtained values of reliability index b seem to be satisfactory for the reinforced concrete slab that fulfils requirements for the crack width specified in Eurocode 2. However, the reliability of the slab seems to be insufficient when the European Model Code 90 is considered; reliability index is less than recommended value 1.5 for serviceability limit states indicated in Eurocode 1. Analysis of sensitivity factors of basic variables enables to find out variables significantly affecting the total crack width.

  17. Shrinkage insensitivity of NKCC1 in myosin II-depleted cytoplasts from Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else K; Pedersen, Stine F

    2007-01-01

    -actin organization was disrupted, and myosin II, which in shrunken EATC translocates to the cortical region, was absent. Moreover, NKCC1 activity was essentially insensitive to the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7, a potent blocker of shrinkage-induced NKCC1 activity in intact EATC. Cytoplast NKCC1...... to the substantial activation in shrunken intact cells, p38 MAPK could not be further activated by shrinkage of the cytoplasts. Together these findings indicate that shrinkage activation of NKCC1 in EATC is dependent on the cortical F-actin network, myosin II, and MLCK....

  18. Stress intensity and crack displacement for small edge cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orange, Thomas W.

    1988-01-01

    The weight function method was used to derive stress intensity factors and crack mouth displacement coefficients for small edge cracks (less than 20 percent of the specimen width) in common fracture specimen configurations. Contact stresses due to point application of loads were found to be small but significant for three-point bending and insignificant for four-point bending. The results are compared with available equations and numerical solutions from the literature and with unpublished boundary collocation results.

  19. Subsurface metals fatigue cracking without and with crack tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Shanyavskiy

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Very-High-Cycle-Fatigue regime for metals was considered and mechanisms of the subsurface crack origination were introduced. In many metals first step of crack origination takes place with specific area formation because of material pressing and rotation that directed to transition in any volume to material ultra-high-plasticity with nano-structure appearing. Then by the border of the nano-structure takes place volume rotation and fracture surface creates with spherical particles which usually named Fine-Granular-Area. In another case there takes place First-Smooth-Facet occurring in area of origin due to whirls appearing by the one of the slip systems under discussed the same stress-state conditions. Around Fine-Granular-Area or First-Smooth-Facet there plastic zone appeared and, then, subsurface cracking develops by the same manner as for through cracks. In was discussed quantum-mechanical nature of fatigue crack growth in accordance with Yang’s modulus quantization for low level of deformations. New simply equation was considered for describing subsurface cracking in metals out of Fine-Granular-Area or Fist-Smooth-Facet.

  20. Alternative two-step matrix application method for imaging mass spectrometry to avoid tissue shrinkage and improve ionization efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimma, Shuichi; Takashima, Yuki; Hashimoto, Jun; Yonemori, Kan; Tamura, Kenji; Hamada, Akinobu

    2013-12-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) was used to measure the concentrations of drug and biological compounds in plasma and tissues. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging MS (IMS) has recently been applied to the analysis of localized drugs on biological tissue surfaces. In MALDI-IMS, matrix application process is crucial for successful results. However, it is difficult to obtain homogeneous matrix crystals on the tissue surface due to endogenous salts and tissue surface heterogeneity. Consequently, the non-uniform crystals degrade the quality of the spectrum and likely cause surface imaging artifacts. Furthermore, the direct application of matrix solution can cause tissue shrinkage due to the organic solvents. Here, we report an alternative two-step matrix application protocol which combines the vacuum deposition of matrix crystals and the spraying of matrix solution to produce a homogeneous matrix layer on the tissue surface. Our proposed technique can also prevent cracking or shrinking of the tissue samples and improve the ionization efficiency of the distributed exogenous material. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Shrinkage/swelling of compacted clayey loose and dense soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowamooz, Hossein; Masrouri, Farimah

    2009-11-01

    This Note presents an experimental study performed on expansive compacted loose and dense samples using osmotic oedometers. Several successive wetting and drying cycles were applied in a suction range between 0 and 8 MPa under different values of constant net vertical stress (15, 30, and 60 kPa). During the suction cycles, the dense samples showed cumulative swelling strains, while the loose samples showed volumetric shrinkage accumulation. At the end of the suction cycles, the volumetric strains converged to an equilibrium stage that indicated elastic behavior of the swelling soil for any further hydraulic variations. At this stage, the compression curves for the studied soil at the different imposed suctions (0, 2, and 8 MPa) converged towards the saturated state curve for the high applied vertical stresses. We defined this pressure as the saturation stress(P). The compression curves provided sufficient data to examine the soil mechanical behavior at the equilibrium stage. To cite this article: H. Nowamooz, F. Masrouri, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  2. Shrinkage, abrasion, erosion and sorption of clay plasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minke, G.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available At the Buildung Research Institute (FEB, Faculty of Architecture, University of Kassel, Germany, in the last years several hundred tests were made to study the characteristics of different loam mortars in respect of their linear shrinkage, absorption of humidity and their resistance against abrasion and erosion. In order to get data about abrasion and erosion new test methods and special apparatusses were developed. The mortars tested, chosen from the market, showed extremely varying test results.

    En el Laboratorio de Construcciones Experimentales (FEB de la Facultad de Arquitectura, Universidad de Kassel, Alemania, fueron testeados cientos de diferentes pruebas de revoque de barro para estudiar su contracción durante el secado, su absorción de humedad y su resistencia contra abrasión, erosión y absorción. Para recibir datos sobre abrasión y erosión, nuevas aparatos y metodos fueron desarrollados. Los resultados de los revoques comprados en el mercado muestran gran diferencias en los valores.

  3. Polymerization Shrinkage and Flexural Modulus of Flowable Dental Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína Cavalcanti Xavier

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Linear polymerization shrinkage (LPS, flexural strength (FS and modulus of elasticity (ME of low-viscosity resin composites (Admira Flow™, Grandio Flow™/VOCO; Filtek Z350 Flow™/3M ESPE; Tetric Flow™/Ivoclar-Vivadent was evaluated using a well-established conventional micro-hybrid composite as a standard (Filtek Z250™/3M ESPE. For the measurement of LPS, composites were applied to a cylindrical metallic mould and polymerized (n = 8. The gap formed at the resin/mould interface was observed using SEM (1500×. For FS and ME, specimens were prepared according to the ISO 4049 specifications (n = 10. Statistical analysis of the data was performed with one-way ANOVA and the Tukey test. The conventional resin presented significantly lower LPS associated with high FS and ME, but only the ME values of the conventional resin differed significantly from the low-viscosity composites. The relationship between ME and LPS of low-viscosity resin composites when used as restorative material is a critical factor in contraction stress relief and marginal leakage.

  4. Crackscope : automatic pavement cracking inspection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    The CrackScope system is an automated pavement crack rating system consisting of a : digital line scan camera, laser-line illuminator, and proprietary crack detection and classification : software. CrackScope is able to perform real-time pavement ins...

  5. Uncontrolled concrete bridge parapet cracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The Ohio Department of Transportation has recently identified the problem of wide-spread premature cracking of concrete bridge : parapets throughout its District 12 region (Northeast Ohio). Many of the bridge decks that contain these prematurely crac...

  6. Peridynamic model for fatigue cracking.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silling, Stewart Andrew; Abe Askari (Boeing)

    2014-10-01

    The peridynamic theory is an extension of traditional solid mechanics in which the field equations can be applied on discontinuities, such as growing cracks. This paper proposes a bond damage model within peridynamics to treat the nucleation and growth of cracks due to cyclic loading. Bond damage occurs according to the evolution of a variable called the "remaining life" of each bond that changes over time according to the cyclic strain in the bond. It is shown that the model reproduces the main features of S-N data for typical materials and also reproduces the Paris law for fatigue crack growth. Extensions of the model account for the effects of loading spectrum, fatigue limit, and variable load ratio. A three-dimensional example illustrates the nucleation and growth of a helical fatigue crack in the torsion of an aluminum alloy rod.

  7. Premature asphalt concrete pavement cracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Recently, the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) has identified hot mix asphalt concrete : (HMAC) pavements that have displayed top-down cracking within three years of construction. The objective of : the study was to evaluate the top-down cr...

  8. Initiation and propagation of small corner cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellyin, Ferdnand; Kujawski, Daniel; Craig, David F.

    1994-01-01

    The behaviour of small corner cracks, inclined or perpendicular to loading direction, is presented. There are two aspects to this investigation: initiation of small cracks and monitoring their subsequent growth. An initial pre-cracking procedure under cyclic compression is adopted to minimize the residual damage at the tip of the growing and self-arresting crack under cyclic compression. A final fatigue specimen, cut from the larger pre-cracked specimen, has two corner flaws. The opening load of corner flaw is monitored using a novel strain gauge approach. The behaviour of small corner cracks is described in terms of growth rate relative to the size of the crack and its shape.

  9. On formation of transverse cracks on the strand surface of peritectic steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олександр Михайлович Скребцов

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on the analysis of the extensive literature a mechanism for the formation and development of transverse cracks on the surface of slab billets of cast peritectic steels has been displayed. Hot cracking of the complex properties of cast steel - crystallization temperature range, the casting shrinkage, strength and ductility at high temperatures. Pequliarities of steel ingots peritectic solidification in the crystallizer can give rise to a number of weakened localities(«healed» hot microcracks «hooks», metal in the form of coarse oscillation marks, which in their turn act as nucleation transverse cracks nucleation. Analysis of the various mechanisms of the formation of the transverse surface cracks made it possible to offer a series of recommendations to reduce the probability of fracturing: a to optimize the chemical composition of the steel in order to obtain the lowest possible temperature end δ-γ conversion in the range of existence of the single-phase austenite region existence, b to minimize the content of harmful impurities (sulfur phosphorus, nitrogen, non-ferrous metals in the molten steel and alloying elements, the presence of which negatively affects the mechanical properties of the steel at high temperatures; cto provide a stable heat removal from the crust of the ingot that does not make it possible to form coarse macrogranular structure; g to provide the conditions for the formation of large inclusions and uniform distribution in the matrix metal; d to prevent deformation of continuous casting at temperatures with lower plastic properties

  10. Sudden shrinkage of free rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap 15 years after maxilla reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Mochizuki

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old male displayed sudden shrinkage of a left free rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap, which had been grafted to his left maxilla 15 years previously. No post-reconstructive irradiation had been performed, and no late occlusion of the vascular anastomosis, local infection, recurrence of the maxillary cancer, or body weight loss was observed. However, the shrinkage amounted to approximately 50%. This is considerably more than previously reported cases of shrinkage of various free flaps, which ranged between 10% and 25%. The resultant depression was successfully augmented with a right free deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap. The residual fat volume of the previously grafted shrunken flap was revealed to be compatible with that of the newly harvested contralateral perforator flap. Thus, the volume of the previously grafted flap may reflect the status of the intact contralateral donor site, although the mechanism of sudden flap shrinkage is unclear.

  11. Report D : self-consolidating concrete (SCC) for infrastructure elements - creep, shrinkage and abrasion resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Concrete specimens were fabricated for shrinkage, creep, and abrasion resistance : testing. Variations of self-consolidating concrete (SCC) and conventional concrete were : all tested. The results were compared to previous similar testing programs an...

  12. Strength and Drying Shrinkage of Alkali-Activated Slag Paste and Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-chieh Chi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the strengths and drying shrinkage of alkali-activated slag paste and mortar. Compressive strength, tensile strength, and drying shrinkage of alkali-activated slag paste and mortar were measured with various liquid/slag ratios, sand/slag ratios, curing ages, and curing temperatures. Experimental results show that the higher compressive strength and tensile strength have been observed in the higher curing temperature. At the age of 56 days, AAS mortars show higher compressive strength than Portland cement mortars and AAS mortars with liquid/slag ratio of 0.54 have the highest tensile strength in all AAS mortars. In addition, AAS pastes of the drying shrinkage are higher than AAS mortars. Meanwhile, higher drying shrinkage was observed in AAS mortars than that observed comparable Portland cement mortars.

  13. Validation Tests of Prediction Modules of Shrinkage Defects in Cast Iron Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajkowski J.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of experimental-simulation tests of expansion-shrinkage phenomena occurring in cast iron castings. The tests were based on the standard test for inspecting the tendency of steel-carbon alloys to create compacted discontinuities of the pipe shrinkage type. The cast alloy was a high-silicone ductile iron of GJS - 600 - 10 grade. The validation regarding correctness of prognoses of the shrinkage defects was applied mostly to the simulation code (system NovaFlow & Solid CV (NFS CV. The obtained results were referred to the results obtained using the Procast system (macro- and micromodel. The analysis of sensitivity of the modules responsible for predicting the shrinkage discontinuities on selected pre-processing parameters was performed, focusing mostly on critical fractions concerning the feeding flows (mass and capillary and variation of initial temperature of the alloy in the mould and heat transfer coefficient (HTC on the casting - chill interface.

  14. Concrete pavement mixture design and analysis (MDA) : factors influencing drying shrinkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    This literature review focuses on factors influencing drying shrinkage of concrete. Although the factors are normally interrelated, they : can be categorized into three groups: paste quantity, paste quality, and other factors.

  15. Numerical Simulation on Open Wellbore Shrinkage and Casing Equivalent Stress in Bedded Salt Rock Stratum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Most salt rock has interbed of mudstone in China. Owing to the enormous difference of mechanical properties between the mudstone interbed and salt rock, the stress-strain and creep behaviors of salt rock are significantly influenced by neighboring mudstone interbed. In order to identify the rules of wellbore shrinkage and casings equivalent stress in bedded salt rock stratum, three-dimensional finite difference models were established. The effects of thickness and elasticity modulus of mudstone interbed on the open wellbore shrinkage and equivalent stress of casing after cementing operation were studied, respectively. The results indicate that the shrinkage of open wellbore and equivalent stress of casings decreases with the increase of mudstone interbed thickness. The increasing of elasticity modulus will reduce the shrinkage of open wellbore and casing equivalent stress. Research results can provide the scientific basis for the design of mud density and casing strength.

  16. Numerical simulation on open wellbore shrinkage and casing equivalent stress in bedded salt rock stratum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Linzhi; Zhao, Jinzhou

    2013-01-01

    Most salt rock has interbed of mudstone in China. Owing to the enormous difference of mechanical properties between the mudstone interbed and salt rock, the stress-strain and creep behaviors of salt rock are significantly influenced by neighboring mudstone interbed. In order to identify the rules of wellbore shrinkage and casings equivalent stress in bedded salt rock stratum, three-dimensional finite difference models were established. The effects of thickness and elasticity modulus of mudstone interbed on the open wellbore shrinkage and equivalent stress of casing after cementing operation were studied, respectively. The results indicate that the shrinkage of open wellbore and equivalent stress of casings decreases with the increase of mudstone interbed thickness. The increasing of elasticity modulus will reduce the shrinkage of open wellbore and casing equivalent stress. Research results can provide the scientific basis for the design of mud density and casing strength.

  17. Pore Structure and Influence of Recycled Aggregate Concrete on Drying Shrinkage

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Yuanchen; Qian, Jueshi; Wang, Xue

    2013-01-01

    Pore structure plays an important role in the drying shrinkage of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC). High-precision mercury intrusion and water evaporation were utilized to study the pore structure of RAC, which has a different replacement rate of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA), and to analyze its influence on drying shrinkage. Finally, a fractal-dimension calculation model was established based on the principles of mercury intrusion and fractal-geometry theory. Calculations were performed...

  18. Experimental drying shrinkage of hardened cement pastes as a function of relative humidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Baroghel, V.B.

    1996-01-01

    The results of an experimental study concerning drying shrinkage measured as a function of relative humidity on thin specimens of mature hardened cement pastes are presented. The results obtained at two laboratories are compared.......The results of an experimental study concerning drying shrinkage measured as a function of relative humidity on thin specimens of mature hardened cement pastes are presented. The results obtained at two laboratories are compared....

  19. Influence of Aggregate Wettability with Different Lithology Aggregates on Concrete Drying Shrinkage

    OpenAIRE

    Yuanchen Guo; Jueshi Qian; Xue Wang; Zhengyi Yan; Huadong Zhong

    2015-01-01

    The correlation of the wettability of different lithology aggregates and the drying shrinkage of concrete materials is studied, and some influential factors such as wettability and wetting angle are analyzed. A mercury porosimeter is used to measure the porosities of different lithology aggregates accurately, and the pore size ranges that significantly affect the drying shrinkage of different lithology aggregate concretes are confirmed. The pore distribution curve of the different coarse aggr...

  20. Effects of Prepolymerized Particle Size and Polymerization Kinetics on Volumetric Shrinkage of Dental Modeling Resins

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Tae-Yub; Ha, Jung-Yun; Chun, Ju-Na; Son, Jun Sik; Kim, Kyo-Han

    2014-01-01

    Dental modeling resins have been developed for use in areas where highly precise resin structures are needed. The manufacturers claim that these polymethyl methacrylate/methyl methacrylate (PMMA/MMA) resins show little or no shrinkage after polymerization. This study examined the polymerization shrinkage of five dental modeling resins as well as one temporary PMMA/MMA resin (control). The morphology and the particle size of the prepolymerized PMMA powders were investigated by scanning electro...

  1. Urban shrinkage, local housing markets and the role of voluntary community organisations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jacob Norvig

    Since the beginning of the crisis in 2007-08 urban shrinkage has hit a large number of Danish municipalities, towns and villages outside the two major metropolitan areas in the country .Abandoned homes, plunging property prices and out-migration are among the major symptoms. As a consequence...... and voluntary organizations to strengthen civil society and counteract urban shrinkage. The concluding section includes some policy recommendation....

  2. Astrocytic mechanisms explaining neural-activity-induced shrinkage of extraneuronal space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østby, Ivar; Øyehaug, Leiv; Einevoll, Gaute T

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal stimulation causes approximately 30% shrinkage of the extracellular space (ECS) between neurons and surrounding astrocytes in grey and white matter under experimental conditions. Despite its possible implications for a proper understanding of basic aspects of potassium clearance and astr......Neuronal stimulation causes approximately 30% shrinkage of the extracellular space (ECS) between neurons and surrounding astrocytes in grey and white matter under experimental conditions. Despite its possible implications for a proper understanding of basic aspects of potassium clearance...

  3. Analysis of internal crack in a six-ton P91 ingot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-an Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available P91 is a new kind of heat-resistant and high-tensile steel. It can be extruded after ingot casting and can be widely used for different pipes in power plants. However, due to its mushy freezing characteristics, a lack of feeding in the ingot center often generates many defects, such as porosity and crack. A six-ton P91 ingot was cast and sliced, and a representative part of the longitudinal section was inspected in more detail. The morphology of crack-like defects was examined by X-ray high energy industrial CT and reconstructed by 3D software. There are five main portions of defects larger than 200 mm3, four of which are interconnected. These initiated from continuous liquid film, and then were torn apart by excessive tensile stress within the brittle temperature range (BTR. The 3D FEM analysis of thermo-mechanical simulation was carried out to analyze the formation of porosity and internal crack defects. The results of shrinkage porosity and Niyama values revealed that the center of the ingot suffers from inadequate feeding. Several criteria based on thermal and mechanical models were used to evaluate the susceptibility of hot crack formation. The Clyne and Davies’ criterion and Katgerman’s criterion successfully predicted the high hot crack susceptibility in the ingot center. Six typical locations in the longitudinal section had been chosen for analysis of the stresses and strains evolution during the BTR. Locations in the defects region showed the highest tensile stresses and relative high strain values, while other locations showed either low tensile stresses or low strain values. In conclusion, hot crack develops only when stress and strain exceed a threshold value at the same time during the BTR.

  4. Structural health monitoring methods for the evaluation of prestressing forces and pre-release cracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiba Abdel-Jaber

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Prestressed concrete bridges currently account for 45% of bridges built in the last five years in the United States. This has resulted in an increase in the number of deficient bridges composed of prestressed concrete, which requires a better understanding of the on-site performance of this building material. The use of new materials, such as high performance concrete, in conjunction with prestressing provides additional motivation for the creation of structural health monitoring (SHM methods for prestressed concrete. This paper identifies two parameters relevant to prestressed concrete, along with methods for their evaluation. The parameters evaluated are the prestressing force value at transfer and the width of pre-release cracks, both of which are indicators of structural performance. Improper transfer of the prestressing force can result in tensile stresses in the concrete that exceed capacity and result in cracks and/or excessive deflections. Pre-release cracks occur in the concrete prior to transfer of the prestressing force and are mainly caused by autogenous shrinkage and thermal gradients. Closure of the cracks is expected by virtue of prestressing force transfer. However, the extent of crack closure is important in order to guarantee durability and structural integrity. This paper presents an integral overview of two novel methods for the statistical evaluation of the two monitored parameters: prestressing forces and the width of pre-release cracks. Validation of the methods is performed through application to two structures, both of which are components of Streicker Bridge on the Princeton University campus. Uncertainties are evaluated and thresholds for unusual behavior are set through the application.

  5. Digital image analysis of radial shrinkage of fresh spruce (Picea abies L.) wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansmann, Christian; Konnerth, Johannes; Rosner, Sabine

    2011-03-21

    Contact-free digital image analysis was performed of the radial shrinkage of fresh, fully saturated small spruce wood beams. An experimental test set-up was developed to ensure constant distance from the charge-coupled device camera to the sample surface as well as constant climate and light conditions during the whole experiment. Dimensional changes were observed immediately after the drying process began. An unexpected distinct effect could be observed which could not be explained by drying surface layers only. After a fast initial radial shrinkage a slowing down of the dimensional changes occurred at high mean moisture contents. A complete interruption of any dimensional changes followed. Finally, a recovery from shrinkage was even observed. It is assumed that strong negative pressure occurred in the fully saturated capillaries owing to dehydration which led to additional dimensional changes. As a consequence, the break of the water column and aeration in these capillaries finally resulted in a recovery period in the shrinkage rate due to the pressure release. After this effect, the dehydration was characterized by a phase of fast and almost linear shrinkage due to drying surface layers. Finally, the shrinkage slowed down to zero when reaching equilibrium moisture content.

  6. Effect on effective diffusion coefficients and investigation of shrinkage during osmotic dehydration of apricot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togrul, Inci Turk; Ispir, Ayse [Firat University, Engineering Faculty, Department of Chemical Engineering, 23279 Elazig (Turkey)

    2007-10-15

    This article represents the results of the variation in density and shrinkage of apricots during its osmotic dehydration. Shrinkage was investigated by means of dimensionless volume, diameter and length. Various osmotic agents such as sucrose, glucose, fructose, maltodextrin and sorbitol were used. It was found that the shrinkage of apricots could be well correlated with the moisture content of the sample during osmotic dehydration. The relationship between dimensionless parameters and moisture content was investigated by using eight non-linear models for each osmotic agent. It was find that the following proposed model can be confidently use for explaining the effect of shrinkage during osmotic dehydration of apricots.V/V{sub 0},D/D{sub 0},L/L{sub 0},{rho}/{rho}{sub 0}=a+b. exp (cX)+d. exp (e.X{sup f})In addition, the osmotic dehydration kinetics of apricots with and without shrinkage was studied. The effective diffusivities calculated from the diffusional model with and without shrinkage varied from 10.342 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2}/s to 5.139 x 10{sup -9} and from 1.755 x 10{sup -10} and 0.767 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s, respectively. (author)

  7. The effect of mucosal cuff shrinkage around dental implants during healing abutment replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissan, J; Zenziper, E; Rosner, O; Kolerman, R; Chaushu, L; Chaushu, G

    2015-10-01

    Soft tissue shrinkage during the course of restoring dental implants may result in biological and prosthodontic difficulties. This study was conducted to measure the continuous shrinkage of the mucosal cuff around dental implants following the removal of the healing abutment up to 60 s. Individuals treated with implant-supported fixed partial dentures were included. Implant data--location, type, length, diameter and healing abutments' dimensions--were recorded. Mucosal cuff shrinkage, following removal of the healing abutments, was measured in bucco-lingual direction at four time points--immediately after 20, 40 and 60 s. anova was used to for statistical analysis. Eighty-seven patients (49 women and 38 men) with a total of 311 implants were evaluated (120 maxilla; 191 mandible; 291 posterior segments; 20 anterior segments). Two-hundred and five (66%) implants displayed thick and 106 (34%) thin gingival biotype. Time was the sole statistically significant parameter affecting mucosal cuff shrinkage around dental implants (P < 0.001). From time 0 to 20, 40 and 60 s, the mean diameter changed from 4.1 to 4.07, 3.4 and 2.81 mm, respectively. The shrinkage was 1%, 17% and 31%, respectively. The gingival biotype had no statistically significant influence on mucosal cuff shrinkage (P = 0.672). Time required replacing a healing abutment with a prosthetic element should be minimised (up to 20/40 s), to avoid pain, discomfort and misfit. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Observation of Intralaminar Cracking in the Edge Crack Torsion Specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czabaj, Michael W.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Davidson, Barry D.

    2013-01-01

    The edge crack torsion (ECT) test is evaluated to determine its suitability for measuring fracture toughness associated with mode III delamination growth onset. A series of ECT specimens with preimplanted inserts with different lengths is tested and examined using nondestructive and destructive techniques. Ultrasonic inspection of all tested specimens reveals that delamination growth occurs at one interface ply beneath the intended midplane interface. Sectioning and optical microscopy suggest that the observed delamination growth results from coalescence of angled intralaminar matrix cracks that form and extend across the midplane plies. The relative orientation of these cracks is approximately 45 deg with respect to the midplane, suggesting their formation is caused by resolved principal tensile stresses arising due to the global mode-III shear loading. Examination of ECT specimens tested to loads below the level corresponding to delamination growth onset reveals that initiation of intralaminar cracking approximately coincides with the onset of nonlinearity in the specimen's force-displacement response. The existence of intralaminar cracking prior to delamination growth onset and the resulting delamination extension at an unintended interface render the ECT test, in its current form, unsuitable for characterization of mode III delamination growth onset. The broader implications of the mechanisms observed in this study are also discussed with respect to the current understanding of shear-driven delamination in tape-laminate composites.

  9. 3D architecture of cyclic-step and antidune deposits in glacigenic subaqueous fan and delta settings: Integrating outcrop and ground-penetrating radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jörg; Sievers, Julian; Loewer, Markus; Igel, Jan; Winsemann, Jutta

    2017-12-01

    Bedforms related to supercritical flows are increasingly recognised as important constituents of many depositional environments, but outcrop studies are commonly hampered by long bedform wavelengths and complex three-dimensional geometries. We combined outcrop-based facies analysis with ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys to analyse the 3D facies architecture of subaqueous ice-contact fan and glacifluvial delta deposits. The studied sedimentary systems were deposited at the margins of the Middle Pleistocene Scandinavian ice sheets in Northern Germany. Glacifluvial Gilbert-type deltas are characterised by steeply dipping foreset beds, comprising cyclic-step deposits, which alternate with antidune deposits. Deposits of cyclic steps consist of lenticular scours infilled by backset cross-stratified pebbly sand and gravel. The GPR sections show that the scour fills form trains along the delta foresets, which can locally be traced for up to 15 m. Perpendicular and oblique to palaeoflow direction, these deposits appear as troughs with concentric or low-angle cross-stratified infills. Downflow transitions from scour fills into sheet-like low-angle cross-stratified or sinusoidally stratified pebbly sand, deposited by antidunes, are common. Cyclic steps and antidunes were deposited by sustained and surge-type supercritical density flows, which were related to hyperpycnal flows, triggered by major meltwater discharge or slope-failure events. Subaqueous ice-contact fan deposits include deposits of progradational scour fills, isolated hydraulic jumps, antidunes and (humpback) dunes. The gravel-rich fan succession consists of vertical stacks of laterally amalgamated pseudo-sheets, indicating deposition by pulses of waning supercritical flows under high aggradation rates. The GPR sections reveal the large-scale architecture of the sand-rich fan succession, which is characterised by lobe elements with basal erosional surfaces associated with scours filled with backsets related

  10. Corrosion fatigue crack propagation in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    This review assesses fracture mechanics data and mechanistic models for corrosion fatigue crack propagation in structural alloys exposed to ambient temperature gases and electrolytes. Extensive stress intensity-crack growth rate data exist for ferrous, aluminum and nickel based alloys in a variety of environments. Interactive variables (viz., stress intensity range, mean stress, alloy composition and microstructure, loading frequency, temperature, gas pressure and electrode potential) strongly affect crack growth kinetics and complicate fatigue control. Mechanistic models to predict crack growth rates were formulated by coupling crack tip mechanics with occluded crack chemistry, and from both the hydrogen embrittlement and anodic dissolution/film rupture perspectives. Research is required to better define: (1) environmental effects near threshold and on crack closure; (2) damage tolerant life prediction codes and the validity of similitude; (3) the behavior of microcrack; (4) probes and improved models of crack tip damage; and (5) the cracking performance of advanced alloys and composites.

  11. Cracking in Flexural Reinforced Concrete Members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annette Beedholm; Fisker, Jakob; Hagsten, Lars German

    2017-01-01

    The system of cracks developing in reinforced concrete is in many aspects essential when modelling structures in both serviceability- and ultimate limit state. This paper discusses the behavior concerning crack development in flexural members observed from tests and associates it with two different...... existing models. From the investigations an approach is proposed on how to predict the crack pattern in flexural members involving two different crack systems; primary flexural cracks and local secondary cracks. The results of the approach is in overall good agreement with the observed tests and captures...... the pronounced size effect associated with flexural cracking in which the crack spacing and crack widths are approximately proportional to the depth of the member....

  12. Simulation of Chloride Diffusion in Cracked Concrete with Different Crack Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yong Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chloride-induced corrosion of steel rebar is one of the primary durability problems for reinforced concrete structures in marine environment. Furthermore, if the surfaces of concrete structures have cracks, additional chloride can penetrate into concrete through cracked zone. For chloride ingression into cracked concrete, former researches mainly focus on influence of crack width on chloride diffusion coefficients. Other crack characteristics, such as chloride depth, crack shape (equal-width crack or tapered crack, crack density, and spacing, are not studied in detail. To fill this gap, this paper presents a numerical procedure to simulate chloride ingression into cracked concrete with different crack geometry characteristics. Cracked concrete is divided into two parts, sound zone and cracked zone. For stress-free concrete, the diffusion coefficient of sound zone is approximately assumed to be the same as sound concrete, and the diffusion coefficient of cracked zone is expressed as a piecewise function of crack width. Two-dimensional finite element method is used to determine chloride concentration. It is found that, with the increasing of crack width, crack depth, and crack amount, chloride ingression will aggravate. The analysis results generally agree with experimental results.

  13. Shrinkage of the scleral canal during cupping reversal in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Hideki; Lesley, Ashley G; Brandt, James D

    2011-10-01

    The mechanism of cupping reversal seen after lowering intraocular pressure (IOP) in pediatric glaucoma is unknown. Theories include forward movement of the lamina cribrosa or shrinkage of a stretched scleral canal. Our study aimed to quantify changes in optic disc size occurring in children who had undergone glaucoma surgery. Retrospective, single-center, observational case series. Children undergoing incisional surgery for pediatric glaucoma at the University of California, Davis. The electronic charts of all patients with pediatric glaucoma were reviewed for the presence of RetCam digital optic nerve photographs (Clarity Medical Systems, Pleasanton, CA). Cases in which the photographs (baseline and follow-up after surgical intervention) were of sufficient quality were analyzed. The optic disc margin was outlined manually using ImageJ software. Inter-session changes in magnification were accounted for by drawing a control polygon joining 4 or 5 fixed landmarks (e.g., vessel crossings) to include a second larger area containing the optic nerve. The optic disc area (in pixels adjusted with the control polygon) was compared between baseline and follow-up images. Change in disc area between baseline and follow-up after surgery. We identified 29 eyes for which baseline and follow-up images were available for analysis. Fifteen eyes of 9 children showed clinically obvious cupping reversal. Fourteen eyes of 12 children showed no cupping reversal. Disc area decreased by 6.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], -10.0 to -3.3) in the obvious reversal group and increased by 4.3% (95% CI, +1.0 to +7.6) in the no reversal group after surgery (P cupping reversal is clinically apparent after successful IOP-lowering surgery for congenital glaucoma, the scleral canal shrinks in area. In contrast, when cupping reversal is not observed, the scleral ring continues to enlarge, indicating ongoing stress on the optic nerve. Clinically obvious cupping reversal is less frequently observed in

  14. Mechanics of quasi-static crack growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, J R

    1978-10-01

    Results on the mechanics of quasi-static crack growth are reviewed. These include recent studies on the geometry and stability of crack paths in elastic-brittle solids, and on the thermodynamics of Griffith cracking, including environmental effects. The relation of crack growth criteria to non-elastic rheological models is considered and paradoxes with energy balance approaches, based on singular crack models, are discussed for visco-elastic, diffuso-elastic, and elastic-plastic materials. Also, recent approaches to prediction of stable crack growth in ductile, elastic-plastic solids are discussed.

  15. Crack-free yttria stabilized zirconia thin films by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition: Influence of water and carrier gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlupp, M.V.F., E-mail: Meike.Schlupp@mat.ethz.ch [Nonmetallic Inorganic Materials, ETH Zuerich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 10, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Binder, S.; Martynczuk, J.; Prestat, M. [Nonmetallic Inorganic Materials, ETH Zuerich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 10, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Gauckler, L.J. [Nonmetallic Inorganic Materials, ETH Zuerich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 10, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); International Institute for Carbon Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2012-11-01

    Yttria stabilized zirconia thin films are deposited on silicon single crystal substrates by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition from precursor solutions of zirconium and yttrium 2,4-pentanedionate in ethanol. Continuous films are obtained using pure oxygen, pure nitrogen, or mixtures of both as carrier gas. In the simultaneous presence of water and oxygen, crack formation is observed for films deposited at intermediate substrate temperatures (450 Degree-Sign C), while those deposited at low (300 Degree-Sign C) and high (600 Degree-Sign C) temperatures remain crack-free. Crack-free films can be deposited at 450 Degree-Sign C in a water-free setting, or in the presence of water using pure nitrogen as carrier gas. The addition of water to the precursor solutions also significantly reduces film growth rates. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thin film deposition by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition (AA-CVD) Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin films deposited between 300 Degree-Sign C and 600 Degree-Sign C Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Water decreases growth rates and leads to crack formation in AA-CVD of YSZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crack-free YSZ thin films deposited using oxygen and/or nitrogen as carrier gas Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YSZ thin films deposited by AA-CVD show low shrinkage on annealing at 1000 Degree-Sign C.

  16. Formation of shrinkage porosity during solidification of steel: Numerical simulation and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedler, M.; Michelic, S.; Bernhard, C.

    2016-07-01

    The phase transformations in solidification of steel are accompanied by shrinkage and sudden changes in the solubility of alloying elements, resulting in negative side effects as micro- and macrosegregation and the formation of gas and shrinkage porosities. This paper deals with the numerical and experimental simulation of the formation of shrinkage porosity during the solidification of steel. First the physical basics for the mechanism of shrinkage pore formation will be discussed. The main reason for this type of porosity is the restraint of fluid flow in the mushy zone which leads to a pressure drop. The pressure decreases from the dendrite tip to the root. When the pressure falls below a critical value, a pore can form. The second part of the paper deals with different approaches for the prediction of the formation of shrinkage porosity. The most common one according to these models is the usage of a simple criterion function, like the Niyama criterion. For the computation of the porosity criterion the thermal gradient, cooling rate and solidification rate must be known, easily to determine from numerical simulation. More complex simulation tools like ProCAST include higher sophisticated models, which allow further calculations of the shrinkage cavity. Finally, the different approaches will be applied to a benchmark laboratory experiment. The presented results deal with an ingot casting experiment under variation of taper. The dominant influence of mould taper on the formation of shrinkage porosities can both be demonstrated by the lab experiment as well as numerical simulations. These results serve for the optimization of all ingot layouts for lab castings at the Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy.

  17. Water storage change estimation from in situ shrinkage measurements of clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. te Brake

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to assess the applicability of clay soil elevation change measurements to estimate soil water storage changes, using a simplified approach. We measured moisture contents in aggregates by EC-5 sensors, and in multiple aggregate and inter-aggregate spaces (bulk soil by CS616 sensors. In a long dry period, the assumption of constant isotropic shrinkage proved invalid and a soil moisture dependant geometry factor was applied. The relative overestimation made by assuming constant isotropic shrinkage in the linear (basic shrinkage phase was 26.4% (17.5 mm for the actively shrinking layer between 0 and 60 cm. Aggregate-scale water storage and volume change revealed a linear relation for layers ≥ 30 cm depth. The range of basic shrinkage in the bulk soil was limited by delayed drying of deep soil layers, and maximum water loss in the structural shrinkage phase was 40% of total water loss in the 0–60 cm layer, and over 60% in deeper layers. In the dry period, fitted slopes of the ΔV–ΔW relationship ranged from 0.41 to 0.56 (EC-5 and 0.42 to 0.55 (CS616. Under a dynamic drying and wetting regime, slopes ranged from 0.21 to 0.38 (EC-5 and 0.22 to 0.36 (CS616. Alternating shrinkage and incomplete swelling resulted in limited volume change relative to water storage change. The slope of the ΔV–ΔW relationship depended on the drying regime, measurement scale and combined effect of different soil layers. Therefore, solely relying on surface level elevation changes to infer soil water storage changes will lead to large underestimations. Recent and future developments might provide a basis for application of shrinkage relations to field situations, but in situ observations will be required to do so.

  18. Leaf shrinkage with dehydration: coordination with hydraulic vulnerability and drought tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoffoni, Christine; Vuong, Christine; Diep, Steven; Cochard, Hervé; Sack, Lawren

    2014-04-01

    Leaf shrinkage with dehydration has attracted attention for over 100 years, especially as it becomes visibly extreme during drought. However, little has been known of its correlation with physiology. Computer simulations of the leaf hydraulic system showed that a reduction of hydraulic conductance of the mesophyll pathways outside the xylem would cause a strong decline of leaf hydraulic conductance (K(leaf)). For 14 diverse species, we tested the hypothesis that shrinkage during dehydration (i.e. in whole leaf, cell and airspace thickness, and leaf area) is associated with reduction in K(leaf) at declining leaf water potential (Ψ(leaf)). We tested hypotheses for the linkage of leaf shrinkage with structural and physiological water relations parameters, including modulus of elasticity, osmotic pressure at full turgor, turgor loss point (TLP), and cuticular conductance. Species originating from moist habitats showed substantial shrinkage during dehydration before reaching TLP, in contrast with species originating from dry habitats. Across species, the decline of K(leaf) with mild dehydration (i.e. the initial slope of the K(leaf) versus Ψ(leaf) curve) correlated with the decline of leaf thickness (the slope of the leaf thickness versus Ψ(leaf) curve), as expected based on predictions from computer simulations. Leaf thickness shrinkage before TLP correlated across species with lower modulus of elasticity and with less negative osmotic pressure at full turgor, as did leaf area shrinkage between full turgor and oven desiccation. These findings point to a role for leaf shrinkage in hydraulic decline during mild dehydration, with potential impacts on drought adaptation for cells and leaves, influencing plant ecological distributions.

  19. Getter materials for cracking ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boffito, Claudio; Baker, John D.

    1999-11-02

    A method is provided for cracking ammonia to produce hydrogen. The method includes the steps of passing ammonia over an ammonia-cracking catalyst which is an alloy including (1) alloys having the general formula Zr.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x M.sub.1 M.sub.2, wherein M.sub.1 and M.sub.2 are selected independently from the group consisting of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni, and x is between about 0.0 and about 1.0 inclusive; and between about 20% and about 50% Al by weight. In another aspect, the method of the invention is used to provide methods for operating hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines and hydrogen fuel cells. In still another aspect, the present invention provides a hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engine and a hydrogen fuel cell including the above-described ammonia-cracking catalyst.

  20. Cracking and corrosion recovery boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suik, H. [Tallinn Technical University, Horizon Pulp and Paper, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    The corrosion of heat surfaces and the cracking the drums are the main problems of the recovery boiler. These phenomena have been appeared during long-term operation of boiler `Mitsubishi - 315` erected at 1964. Depth of the crack is depending on the number of shutdowns and on operation time. Corrosion intensity of different heat surfaces is varying depend on the metal temperature and the conditions at place of positioning of tube. The lowest intensity of corrosion is on the bank tubes and the greatest is on the tubes of the second stage superheater and on the tubes at the openings of air ports. (orig.) 5 refs.

  1. Nonlinear structural crack growth monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Donald E.; Hively, Lee M.; Holdaway, Ray F.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for the detection, through nonlinear manipulation of data, of an indicator of imminent failure due to crack growth in structural elements. The method is a process of determining energy consumption due to crack growth and correlating the energy consumption with physical phenomena indicative of a failure event. The apparatus includes sensors for sensing physical data factors, processors or the like for computing a relationship between the physical data factors and phenomena indicative of the failure event, and apparatus for providing notification of the characteristics and extent of such phenomena.

  2. The Reflective Cracking in Flexible Pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pais Jorge

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Reflective cracking is a major concern for engineers facing the problem of road maintenance and rehabilitation. The problem appears due to the presence of cracks in the old pavement layers that propagate into the pavement overlay layer when traffic load passes over the cracks and due to the temperature variation. The stress concentration in the overlay just above the existing cracks is responsible for the appearance and crack propagation throughout the overlay. The analysis of the reflective cracking phenomenon is usually made by numerical modeling simulating the presence of cracks in the existing pavement and the stress concentration in the crack tip is assessed to predict either the cracking propagation rate or the expected fatigue life of the overlay. Numerical modeling to study reflective cracking is made by simulating one crack in the existing pavement and the loading is usually applied considering the shear mode of crack opening. Sometimes the simulation considers the mode I of crack opening, mainly when temperature effects are predominant.

  3. Retention of aqueous {sup 226}Ra fluxes from a sub-aqueous mill tailings disposal at the Bois Noirs site (Loire, France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courbet, Christelle; Simonucci, Caroline; Dauzeres, Alexandre; Matray, Jean-Michel [French Institute for Radiation protection and Nuclear Safety - IRSN, Radiation Protection Division - PRP, Nuclear Waste and Geosphere Department - DGE, SRTG/LETIS, B.P. 17, 92262 Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France); Bassot, Sylvain [French Institute for Radiation protection and Nuclear Safety - IRSN, Radiation Protection Division - PRP, Nuclear Waste and Geosphere Department - DGE, SRTG/LAME, B.P. 17, 92262 Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France); Mangeret, Arnaud [French Institute for Radiation protection and Nuclear Safety - IRSN, Radiation Protection Division - PRP, Nuclear Waste and Geosphere Department - DGE, SEDRAN/BRN, B.P. 17, 92262 Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France)

    2013-07-01

    This study focuses on a sub-aqueous mill tailings disposal site located in France (Bois Noirs) where 1.3 million tons of uranium mill sludge (fine tailings fraction < 50 μm) have been disposed since the 60's in a man-made pond below 4 meters of water maintained artificially by a rock-fill dam. A significant attenuation of aqueous {sup 226}Ra activity is observed in ground waters. This paper presents the preliminary modeling work performed for evaluating the role of water-rock interactions on aqueous {sup 226}Ra attenuation through the dam. This modeling attempt, assuming thermodynamic equilibrium, aims at checking the hydrochemical conceptual model developed in a previous study, in which Ra retention through the dam was assumed to most likely result from sorption onto metallic oxide-hydroxides. A 2D coupled reactive transport model was conceived to test this hypothesis over time and identify the measurements required to verify its consistency over the long term. (authors)

  4. Subaqueous eruption-fed mass-flow deposits: Records of the Ordovician arc volcanism in the northern Famatina Belt; Northwestern Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisterna, Clara Eugenia; Coira, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    This study is focused on the analyses of a Chaschuil section (27° 49‧ S-68° 04‧ W), north of the Argentina Famatina Belt, where Ordovician explosive-effusive arc volcanism took place under subaerial to subaqueous marine conditions. In analyzing the profile, we have recognized an Arenigian succession composed by dominant volcaniclastic lithofacies represented by volcaniclastic debris flow, turbidity current and minor resedimented syn-eruptive pyroclastic depositsand lavas. The upper portions of succession are represented by volcanogenic sedimentary lithofacies with fossiliferous levels. Great volumes of the volcaniclastic deposits are strongly controlled in their transport by mass flow processes. These representative deposits provide significant data in relation to the coeval volcanic events for recognizing a continuous explosive volcanism together a minor effusive activity and the degradation of volcanic edifices. Likewise mass flow deposits give indications of the high rate of sedimentation, strong slope control and instability episodes in the basin, typical of those volcanic environments. That substantial information was the key to understand the features and evolution of the Arenigian basin in the north of the Famatina System.

  5. Farriery for hoof wall defects: quarter cracks and toe cracks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleasant, R Scott; O'Grady, Stephen E; McKinlay, Ian

    2012-08-01

    Conditions that result in the loss of the structural integrity of the hoof wall, such as quarter and toe cracks, are not uncommon and usually manifest in lameness. The successful management of these problems involves identifying and addressing the underlying causes, stabilization of the foot, and committed follow-up. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Modified Dugdale crack models - some easy crack relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1997-01-01

    _Ldelta_CR where sigma_L is strength, and at the same time constant flow stress, of the uncracked material while delta_CR is flow limit (displacement).Obviously predictions by the Dugdale model are most reliable for materials with stress-strain relations where flow can actually be described (or well approximated...... are assumed to be self created by local materials flow. The strength sigma_CR predictid by the Dugdale model is sigma_CR =(E Gamma_CR/phi1)^½ where E and 1 are Young’s modulus and crack half-length respectively of the material considered. The so-called critical strain energy rate is Gamma_CR = sigma......) by a constant flow stress (sigma_L). A number of materials, however, do not at all exhibit this kind of flow. Such materials are considered in this paper by Modified Dugdale crack models which apply for any cohesive stress distribution in crack front areas. Formally modified Dugdale crack models exhibit...

  7. Drying Shrinkage Behaviour of Fibre Reinforced Concrete Incorporating Polyvinyl Alcohol Fibres and Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Noushini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study assesses the drying shrinkage behaviour of polyvinyl alcohol fibre reinforced concrete (PVA-FRC containing short-length (6 mm and long-length (12 mm uncoated monofilament PVA fibres at 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.375%, and 0.5% volumetric fractions. Fly ash is also used as a partial replacement of Portland cement in all mixes. PVA-FRC mixes have been compared to length change of control concrete (devoid of fibres at 3 storage intervals: early-age (0–7 days, short-term (0–28 days, and long-term (28–112 days intervals. The shrinkage results of FRC and control concrete up to 112 days indicated that all PVA-FRC mixes exhibited higher drying shrinkage than control. The shrinkage exhibited by PVA-FRC mixes ranged from 449 to 480 microstrain, where this value was only 427 microstrain in the case of control. In addition, the longer fibres exhibited higher mass loss, thus potentially contributing to higher shrinkage.

  8. Effect of limestone and granite coarse aggregate on drying shrinkage of a concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woyciechowski Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the effect of limestone and granite aggregate on drying shrinkage of a concrete is investigated. Mixes containing limestone and granite with different Dmax and cement paste volume were tested. A two level, full factorial experiment with three independent factors was conducted which allowed not only to determine the influence of every single factor itself but also potential interactions between them. Measurements of shrinkage were performed up to 98 days after demolding on the beams (10×10×50 cm, in accordance with the procedure from polish standard PN-84/B-06714/23 (Amsler’s method. The multivariate analysis of variances (MANOVA was used for the statistical analysis of the results. The obtained results confirm that the cement paste volume has a decisive influence on a drying shrinkage of a concrete. However statistical analysis showed that with the assumed variability, either the Dmax or type of coarse aggregate has no significant influence on drying shrinkage, still those parameters may potentially be crucial in some cases. A statistically significant interaction between Dmax and type of aggregate has been found. Furthermore the results of drying shrinkage measurements were compared with estimation results from Bażant-Baweja B3 Model and Eurocode 2. The comparison shows that B3 Model provided more accurate results than Eurocode 2.

  9. Modified creep and shrinkage prediction model B3 for serviceability limit state analysis of composite slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholamhoseini, Alireza

    2016-03-01

    Relatively little research has been reported on the time-dependent in-service behavior of composite concrete slabs with profiled steel decking as permanent formwork and little guidance is available for calculating long-term deflections. The drying shrinkage profile through the thickness of a composite slab is greatly affected by the impermeable steel deck at the slab soffit, and this has only recently been quantified. This paper presents the results of long-term laboratory tests on composite slabs subjected to both drying shrinkage and sustained loads. Based on laboratory measurements, a design model for the shrinkage strain profile through the thickness of a slab is proposed. The design model is based on some modifications to an existing creep and shrinkage prediction model B3. In addition, an analytical model is developed to calculate the time-dependent deflection of composite slabs taking into account the time-dependent effects of creep and shrinkage. The calculated deflections are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  10. Pore Structure and Influence of Recycled Aggregate Concrete on Drying Shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanchen Guo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pore structure plays an important role in the drying shrinkage of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC. High-precision mercury intrusion and water evaporation were utilized to study the pore structure of RAC, which has a different replacement rate of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA, and to analyze its influence on drying shrinkage. Finally, a fractal-dimension calculation model was established based on the principles of mercury intrusion and fractal-geometry theory. Calculations were performed to study the pore-structure fractal dimension of RAC. Results show the following. (1 With the increase in RCA content, the drying shrinkage values increase gradually. (2 Pores with the greatest impact on concrete shrinkage are those whose sizes ranging from 2.5 nm to 50 nm and from 50 nm to 100 nm. In the above two ranges, the proportions of RAC are greater than those of RC0 (natural aggregate concrete, NAC, which is the main reason the shrinkage values of RAC are greater than those of NAC. (3 The pore structure of RAC has good fractal feature, and the addition of RCA increases the complexity of the pore surface of concrete.

  11. Some Issues of Shrinkage-Reducing Admixtures Application in Alkali-Activated Slag Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bílek, Vlastimil; Kalina, Lukáš; Novotný, Radoslav; Tkacz, Jakub; Pařízek, Ladislav

    2016-06-10

    Significant drying shrinkage is one of the main limitations for the wider utilization of alkali-activated slag (AAS). Few previous works revealed that it is possible to reduce AAS drying shrinkage by the use of shrinkage-reducing admixtures (SRAs). However, these studies were mainly focused on SRA based on polypropylene glycol, while as it is shown in this paper, the behavior of SRA based on 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol can be significantly different. While 0.25% and 0.50% had only a minor effect on the AAS properties, 1.0% of this SRA reduced the drying shrinkage of waterglass-activated slag mortar by more than 80%, but it greatly reduced early strengths simultaneously. This feature was further studied by isothermal calorimetry, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Calorimetric experiments showed that 1% of SRA modified the second peak of the pre-induction period and delayed the maximum of the main hydration peak by several days, which corresponds well with observed strength development as well as with the MIP and SEM results. These observations proved the certain incompatibility of SRA with the studied AAS system, because the drying shrinkage reduction was induced by the strong retardation of hydration, resulting in a coarsening of the pore structure rather than the proper function of the SRA.

  12. Radial shrinkage and ultrasound acoustic emissions of fresh versus pre-dried Norway spruce sapwood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Sabine; Konnerth, Johannes; Plank, Bernhard; Salaberger, Dietmar; Hansmann, Christian

    2010-10-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) and radial shrinkage were compared between fully saturated fresh and pre-dried Norway spruce sapwood during dehydration at ambient temperature. Hydraulic conductivity measurements, anatomical investigations on bordered pits and X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans were done to search for possible AE sources other than the breakage of the water columns inside the tracheids. Both fresh and pre-dried specimens showed radial shrinkage due to drying surface layers right from the beginning of dehydration, which induced almost no AE. Whereas no dimensional changes occurred in pre-dried wood thereafter, fresh wood showed a rapid shrinkage increase starting at 25% relative water loss. This dimensional change ceased when further moisture got lost and was even partially reversed. AE of fresh wood showed much higher activity and energy, which is a waveform feature that describes the strength of the acoustic signal. Extremely high single AE energy events were detected at this critical stage of dehydration. After partial recovery from shrinkage, neither dimensional changes nor AE activity showed differences between fresh and pre-dried wood after more than 80% relative moisture loss. Our results suggested that fresh sapwood is more prone to dehydration stresses than pre-dried sapwood. Differences in AE and shrinkage behavior might be due to the weakening or distortion of the pit membranes (cavitation fatigue), pit aspiration, structural changes of the cell walls and micro-checks, which occurred during the first dehydration cycle.

  13. A shrinkage method for testing the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Yong; Yuan, Ying

    2013-11-01

    Testing for the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) is often used as an initial step for checking the quality of genotyping. When testing the HWE for case-control data, the impact of a potential genetic association between the marker and the disease must be controlled for otherwise the results may be biased. Li and Li [2008] proposed a likelihood ratio test (LRT) that accounts for this potential genetic association and it is more powerful than the commonly used control-only χ² test. However, the LRT is not efficient when the marker is independent of the disease, and also requires numerical optimization to calculate the test statistic. In this article, we propose a novel shrinkage test for assessing the HWE. The proposed shrinkage test yields higher statistical power than the LRT when the marker is independent of or weakly associated with the disease, and converges to the LRT when the marker is strongly associated with the disease. In addition, the proposed shrinkage test has a closed form and can be easily used to test the HWE for large datasets that result from genome-wide association studies. We compare the performance of the shrinkage test with existing methods using simulation studies, and apply the shrinkage test to a genome-wide association dataset for Alzheimer's disease. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  14. A generalized DEMATEL theory with a shrinkage coefficient for an indirect relation matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Hsiang-Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL theory with a shrinkage coefficient of indirect relation matrix is proposed, and a useful validity index, called Liu’s validity index, is also proposed for evaluating the performance of any DEMATEL model. If the shrinkage coefficient of an indirect relation matrix is equal to 1, then this new theory is identical to the traditional theory; in other words, it is a generalization of the traditional theory. Furthermore, the indirect relation is always considerably greater than the direct one in traditional DEMATEL theory, which is unreasonable and unfair because it overemphasizes the influence of the indirect relation. We prove in this paper that if the shrinkage coefficient is equal to 0.5, then the indirect relation is less than its direct relation. Because the shrinkage coefficient belongs to [0.5, 1], according to Liu’s validity index, we can find a more appropriate shrinkage coefficient to obtain a more efficient DEMATEL method. Some crucial properties of this new theory are discussed, and a simple example is provided to illustrate the advantages of the proposed theory.

  15. Effects of Prepolymerized Particle Size and Polymerization Kinetics on Volumetric Shrinkage of Dental Modeling Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Yub Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental modeling resins have been developed for use in areas where highly precise resin structures are needed. The manufacturers claim that these polymethyl methacrylate/methyl methacrylate (PMMA/MMA resins show little or no shrinkage after polymerization. This study examined the polymerization shrinkage of five dental modeling resins as well as one temporary PMMA/MMA resin (control. The morphology and the particle size of the prepolymerized PMMA powders were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and laser diffraction particle size analysis, respectively. Linear polymerization shrinkage strains of the resins were monitored for 20 minutes using a custom-made linometer, and the final values (at 20 minutes were converted into volumetric shrinkages. The final volumetric shrinkage values for the modeling resins were statistically similar (P>0.05 or significantly larger (P<0.05 than that of the control resin and were related to the polymerization kinetics (P<0.05 rather than the PMMA bead size (P=0.335. Therefore, the optimal control of the polymerization kinetics seems to be more important for producing high-precision resin structures rather than the use of dental modeling resins.

  16. Measurement of linear polymerization shrinkage in light cure Ideal Makoo composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghavam M.

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available "nAbstract: Polymerization shrinkage of light cure composite resins causes many complications in conservative and esthetic restorations. The objective of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the polymerization shrinkage, degree of conversion and the amount of filler in IDM and tetric ceram composites. Ten disk shaped, uncured specimens (8mm×1.547mm of each composite were placed on glass slide in the center of the metal attached to it. Then specimens were light cured for 60s from underneath. After 30 minutes, the thickness of specimens, using a micrometer and the percent of the polymerization shrinkage of each sample were measured. Statistical analysis was carried out by t-test (P<0.05. Also the degree of conversion of specimens was evaluated with FTIR and the mineral filler content was measured by burning in electric oven. Polymerization shrinkage in IDM and tetric ceram was not significantly different. Degree of conversion and mineral filler content in tetric ceram was greater than that of IDM. "nIt is assumed that the low degree of conversion in IDM is due to its chemical composition and filler content. Also, the similarity in linear polymerization shrinkage between IDM and tetric ceram may be caused by the low degree of conversion in IDM.

  17. Precise Cross-Sectional Measurement of Photoresist Shrinkage Caused by Electron Beam Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Takeyoshi; Sekiguchi, Tomoko; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Tanaka, Junichi; Kawada, Hiroki

    2013-06-01

    A mechanism of the photoresist shrinkage induced by electron-beam (EB) irradiation was studied in detail. A precise cross-sectional profile of a photoresist pattern is obtained by a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) after HfO2 atomic layer deposition on a sample. Photoresist lines and spaces formed on either of bottom anti-reflective coating (BARC) layer or spin-on-glass (SOG) layer were exposed to EB at a much higher dose than a practical dose (to accelerate shrinkage intentionally). The obtained STEM images of the patterns before and after EB irradiation showed that EB irradiation causes necking of the pattern profile as well as linewidth slimming. In addition, it was suggested that the BARC layer shrinkage results in the elastic deformation of the pattern profile, whereas the SOG layer does not shrink. Furthermore, EB irradiation only to the lines or spaces was performed. The EB irradiation to spaces caused sidewall shrinkage and necking of the pattern profile, although no electron was irradiated directly into the pattern. This result is considered to be due to the electrons scattered from the spaces to the pattern sidewall. Finally, a Monte Carlo simulation showed that the distribution of the deposited energy on the pattern surface corresponds to the change of the pattern shape. Consequently, our study clarifies the importance of the effect of elastic shape change and the impact of the electrons scattered from the underlying layer to the sidewall on photoresist shrinkage.

  18. Shrinkage Characteristics of Experimental Polymer Containing Composites under Controlled Light Curing Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Pefferkorn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of polymethylmethacrylate polymer of different molecular weight at the aerosil/ethyleneglycol- or 1,3 butanediol-dimethacrylate interfaces was determined to provide microstructured networks. Their structural characteristics were determined to be controlled by the amount of polymer initially supplied to the system. The sediment (the settled phase characteristics, determined as a function of the polymer concentration and the rate of the polymerization shrinkage determined for composite resins, obtained by extrusion of the sediment after centrifugation, were found to be correlated. The specific role of the adsorbed polymer was found to be differently perturbed with the supplementary supply of dimethacrylate based monomer additives. Particularly, the bisphenol A dimethacrylate that generated crystals within the sediment was found to impede the shrinkage along the crystal lateral faces and strongly limit the shrinkage along its basal faces. Addition of ethyleneglycol- or polyethylene-glycoldimethacrylate monomers was determined to modify the sedimentation characteristics of the aerosil suspension and the shrinkage properties of the composites. Finally, the effects of stepwise light curing methods with prolonged lighting-off periods were investigated and found to modify the development and the final values of the composite shrinkage.

  19. Some Issues of Shrinkage-Reducing Admixtures Application in Alkali-Activated Slag Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bílek, Vlastimil; Kalina, Lukáš; Novotný, Radoslav; Tkacz, Jakub; Pařízek, Ladislav

    2016-01-01

    Significant drying shrinkage is one of the main limitations for the wider utilization of alkali-activated slag (AAS). Few previous works revealed that it is possible to reduce AAS drying shrinkage by the use of shrinkage-reducing admixtures (SRAs). However, these studies were mainly focused on SRA based on polypropylene glycol, while as it is shown in this paper, the behavior of SRA based on 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol can be significantly different. While 0.25% and 0.50% had only a minor effect on the AAS properties, 1.0% of this SRA reduced the drying shrinkage of waterglass-activated slag mortar by more than 80%, but it greatly reduced early strengths simultaneously. This feature was further studied by isothermal calorimetry, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Calorimetric experiments showed that 1% of SRA modified the second peak of the pre-induction period and delayed the maximum of the main hydration peak by several days, which corresponds well with observed strength development as well as with the MIP and SEM results. These observations proved the certain incompatibility of SRA with the studied AAS system, because the drying shrinkage reduction was induced by the strong retardation of hydration, resulting in a coarsening of the pore structure rather than the proper function of the SRA. PMID:28773584

  20. Fracture mechanics parameters for small fatigue cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a review of some common small-crack test specimens, the underlying causes of the small-crack effect, and the fracture-mechanics parameters that have been used to correlate or predict their growth behavior. This review concentrates on continuum mechanics concepts and on the nonlinear behavior of small cracks. The paper reviews some stress-intensity factor solutions for small-crack test specimens and develops some simple elastic-plastic J integral and cyclic J integral expressions that include the influence of crack-closure. These parameters were applied to small-crack growth data on two aluminum alloys, and a fatigue life prediction methodology is demonstrated. For these materials, the crack-closure transient from the plastic wake was found to be the major factor in causing the small-crack effect.

  1. Cracking of SHCC due to reinforcement corrosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savija, B.; Lukovic, M.; Pacheco Farias, J.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.; Saouma, V.; Bolander, J.; Landis, E.

    2016-01-01

    Reinforcement corrosion is the most important deterioration mechanism affecting reinforced concrete infrastructures. After corrosion starts, expansive pressures are exerted onto the surrounding concrete, causing cracking and spalling of the cover concrete. The amount of cover cracking can possibly

  2. Effectiveness of two reflection crack attenuation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Asphalt overlays are one of the most common tools for rehabilitating existing asphalt and concrete pavements. : However, the performance of new overlays is often jeopardized by the cracking distress in the existing : pavement. This existing cracking ...

  3. Investigation of reflective cracking mitigation techniques : [summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    When new asphalt is placed over concrete or : asphalt pavement, cracks or joints in the old : layer can appear in the new overlay; this is : called reflective cracking (RC). In current Florida : practice, an asphalt rubber membrane interlayer : (ARMI...

  4. Development of the crack sealant adhesion test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Crack sealants are widely used in Texas to prevent water from entering into lower structural layers thereby : extending pavement life. However, most current crack sealants have been reported to have a very short life mainly due : to adhesive failures...

  5. In situ investigation of the shrinkage of photopolymerized micro/nanostructures: the effect of the drying process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Quan; Ueno, Kosei; Misawa, Hiroaki

    2012-02-15

    We report on experimental study of the shrinkage of photopolymerized micro/nanostructures fabricated by femtosecond direct laser writing in organic-inorganic resists. Blueshift of the stop-band positions of fabricated photonic crystals during the drying process, which follows the development and rinsing stages, indicates that the drying process plays an important role in the formation of the shrinkage. It is further confirmed that the shrinkage almost completely occurs during the drying process by in situ optical monitoring the structures. These findings will help to better understand, control, and even positively utilize the shrinkage in the applications of the photopolymerization-based direct laser writing technique.

  6. Conjugation of diisocyanate side chains to dimethacrylate reduces polymerization shrinkage and increases the hardness of composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yih-Dean Jan

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Conjugation of diisocyanate side chains to dimethacrylate represents an effective means of reducing polymerization shrinkage and increasing the surface hardness of dental composite resins.

  7. An Experimental Study on Shrinkage Strains of Normal-and High-Strength Concrete-Filled Frp Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Thomas; Ozbakkaloglu, Togay

    2017-09-01

    It is now well established that concrete-filled fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) tubes (CFFTs) are an attractive construction technique for new columns, however studies examining concrete shrinkage in CFFTs remain limited. Concrete shrinkage may pose a concern for CFFTs, as in these members the curing of concrete takes place inside the FRP tube. This paper reports the findings from an experimental study on concrete shrinkage strain measurements for CFFTs manufactured with normal- and high-strength concrete (NSC and HSC). A total of 6 aramid FRP (AFRP)-confined concrete specimens with circular cross-sections were manufactured, with 3 specimens each manufactured using NSC and HSC. The specimens were instrumented with surface and embedded strain gauges to monitor shrinkage development of exposed concrete and concrete sealed inside the CFFTs, respectively. All specimens were cylinders with a 152 mm diameter and 305 mm height, and their unconfined concrete strengths were 44.8 or 83.2 MPa. Analysis of the shrinkage measurements from concrete sealed inside the CFFTs revealed that embedment depth and concrete compressive strength only had minor influences on recorded shrinkage strains. However, an analysis of shrinkage measurements from the exposed concrete surface revealed that higher amounts of shrinkage can occur in HSC. Finally, it was observed that shrinkage strains are significantly higher for concrete exposed at the surface compared to concrete sealed inside the CFFTs.

  8. The debauchery that crack brings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Eudison da Silva Maia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Among the substances with psychoactive effects, the most powerful and damaging is the crack, which acts directly on the central nervous system, producing various sensations of pleasure over the conventional. Currently, because of the debauchery that is causing, it is considered a problem of public health worldwide.

  9. Steam Hydrocarbon Cracking and Reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombok, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The interactive methods of steam hydrocarbon reforming and cracking of the oil and chemical industries are scrutinized, with special focus on their resemblance and variations. The two methods are illustrations of equilibrium-controlled and kinetically-controlled processes, the analysis of which involves theories, which overlap and balance each…

  10. Crack and seat concrete pavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    Prevention of reflective cracking in HMAC overlays placed over PCCP has been based on experience gained from trial and error methods of in-service pavements in many states. Arizona recently utilized this technique on a PCCP section of Interstate 40 b...

  11. The quest for intensified steam cracking process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Goethem, M.W.M.; Verheijen, P.J.T.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the results are presented on the quest for an intensified steam cracking process. The main focus is to improve the efficiency of the steam cracking process. The first part of the investigation is to examine which of the current available processes is close to the ideal steam cracking

  12. Twisting cracks in Bouligand structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksangpanya, Nobphadon; Yaraghi, Nicholas A; Kisailus, David; Zavattieri, Pablo

    2017-12-01

    The Bouligand structure, which is found in many biological materials, is a hierarchical architecture that features uniaxial fiber layers assembled periodically into a helicoidal pattern. Many studies have highlighted the high damage-resistant performance of natural and biomimetic Bouligand structures. One particular species that utilizes the Bouligand structure to achieve outstanding mechanical performance is the smashing Mantis Shrimp, Odontodactylus Scyllarus (or stomatopod). The mantis shrimp generates high speed, high acceleration blows using its raptorial appendage to defeat highly armored preys. The load-bearing part of this appendage, the dactyl club, contains an interior region [16] that consists of a Bouligand structure. This region is capable of developing a significant amount of nested twisting microcracks without exhibiting catastrophic failure. The development and propagation of these microcracks are a source of energy dissipation and stress relaxation that ultimately contributes to the remarkable damage tolerance properties of the dactyl club. We develop a theoretical model to provide additional insights into the local stress intensity factors at the crack front of twisting cracks formed within the Bouligand structure. Our results reveal that changes in the local fracture mode at the crack front leads to a reduction of the local strain energy release rate, hence, increasing the necessary applied energy release rate to propagate the crack, which is quantified by the local toughening factor. Ancillary 3D simulations of the asymptotic crack front field were carried out using a J-integral to validate the theoretical values of the energy release rate and the local stress intensity factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Prediction and improvement of shrinkage porosity in TiAl based alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Yong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The present research has developed a novel investment casting process for ingot production of TiAl alloys through forming a small vertical temperature gradient on the mold. The advantage of this process is to guarantee that the castings solidify sequentially from bottom to top. The analysis of numerical simulation and experimental results showed that the shrinkage porosity of Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy was significantly improved by forming a vertical temperature gradient of 3 ℃/mm on the mold, while the increase of pouring temperature and pressure on the molten alloys had no apparent effect on the reduction of shrinkage porosity. The critical value of the Niyama criterion that can reliably predict the shrinkage porosity in Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy was identified by the comparison of experimental and simulated results.

  14. Significance of Shrinkage Induced Clamping Pressure in Fiber-Matrix Bonding in Cementitious Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    inhomogeneity embedded in a matrix consisting of acementitious material undergoing shrinkage during hydration(autogenous shrinkage). Furthermore, the paperpresents the analysis necessary to perform an interpretation of the experimental results and which allows for thedetermination of the clamping pressure......The present paper accesses the significance of shrinkage inducedclamping pressure in fiber/matrix bonding mechanisms incementitious composite materials. The paper contains a description of an experimental setup whichallows mbox{measurement} of the clamping pressure which develops on anelastic...... acting on any elastic inhomogeneityembedded in the same cementitious matrix material. Fiber-shaped inhomogeneities are of special interest in cementitious composite material systems andresults are presented for the development of clamping pressure on three typical fiber types in two typical cementpastes...

  15. Shrinkage of freeze-dried cryosections of cells: Investigations by EFTEM and cryo-CLEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, G; Nolin, F; Wortham, L; Ploton, D; Banchet, V; Michel, J

    2016-09-01

    Freeze-drying of cryosections of cells or tissues is considered to be the most efficient preparation for microanalysis purpose related to transmission electron microscopy. It allows the measurements of ions and water contents at the ultrastructural level. However an important drawback is associated to freeze-drying: the shrinkage of the cryosections. The aim of this paper is the investigation of this phenomenon by means of three different methods applied to both hydrated and dehydrated cryosections: direct distance measurements on fiducial points, thickness measurements by energy filtered transmission microscopy (EFTEM) and cryo-correlative light electron microscopy (cryo-CLEM). Measurements in our experimental conditions reveal a lateral shrinkage around 10% but the most important result concerns the lack of differential shrinkage between most of the cellular compartments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Shrinkage Analysis on Thick Plate Part using Response Surface Methodology (RSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isafiq M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The work reported herein is about an analysis on the quality (shrinkage on a thick plate part using Response Surface Methodology (RSM. Previous researches showed that the most influential factor affecting the shrinkage on moulded parts are mould and melt temperature. Autodesk Moldflow Insight software was used for the analysis, while specifications of Nessei NEX 1000 injection moulding machine and P20 mould material were incorporated in this study on top of Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS as a moulded thermoplastic material. Mould temperature, melt temperature, packing pressure and packing time were selected as variable parameters. The results show that the shrinkage have improved 42.48% and 14.41% in parallel and normal directions respectively after the optimisation process.

  17. Fiber Bragg grating sensors as a tool to evaluate the influence of filler on shrinkage of geopolymer matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campopiano, Stefania; Iadicicco, Agostino; Messina, Francesco; Ferone, Claudio; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2015-05-01

    Geopolymer matrices represent one of the main sustainable alternatives to ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and other clinker-based blended cements. Real scale applications are limited and a relevant amount of data is still needed to assess the early age and long-term behavior of these systems. Particularly, the early-age monitoring of geopolymers represent a key parameter for mix design optimization. Most of the available methods for the measurement of temperature evolution due to polycondensation kinetics and early age deformations are related to laboratory activities. The upscaling to in situ techniques represents a crucial step toward technological assessment. To this aim, authors propose to use Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) embedded in the geopolymer matrices. Starting from a case study by authors related to the design of externally bonded fiber reinforced geopolymers for strengthening of existing structures, the matrix was optimized in terms of quartz filler content. The measurements carried out by means of FBG sensors allowed to reduce filler content respect to the abovementioned work. Particularly, quartz content can be reduced by 50%. The temperature associated to polycondensation was slightly below 65°C for the three studied systems, limiting the use of designed metakaolin geopolymer to non-massive structures, since thermal cracking could occur, unless further research will be able to assess the viability of retardants. The experimental results confirm that FBG represent an accurate method for simultaneous shrinkage and temperature measurements for geopolymers and the application in real scale structures for remote sensing could help to create database on inner temperatures and early age deformations.

  18. Diversity shrinkage: Cross-validating pareto-optimal weights to enhance diversity via hiring practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Q Chelsea; Wee, Serena; Newman, Daniel A

    2017-12-01

    To reduce adverse impact potential and improve diversity outcomes from personnel selection, one promising technique is De Corte, Lievens, and Sackett's (2007) Pareto-optimal weighting strategy. De Corte et al.'s strategy has been demonstrated on (a) a composite of cognitive and noncognitive (e.g., personality) tests (De Corte, Lievens, & Sackett, 2008) and (b) a composite of specific cognitive ability subtests (Wee, Newman, & Joseph, 2014). Both studies illustrated how Pareto-weighting (in contrast to unit weighting) could lead to substantial improvement in diversity outcomes (i.e., diversity improvement), sometimes more than doubling the number of job offers for minority applicants. The current work addresses a key limitation of the technique-the possibility of shrinkage, especially diversity shrinkage, in the Pareto-optimal solutions. Using Monte Carlo simulations, sample size and predictor combinations were varied and cross-validated Pareto-optimal solutions were obtained. Although diversity shrinkage was sizable for a composite of cognitive and noncognitive predictors when sample size was at or below 500, diversity shrinkage was typically negligible for a composite of specific cognitive subtest predictors when sample size was at least 100. Diversity shrinkage was larger when the Pareto-optimal solution suggested substantial diversity improvement. When sample size was at least 100, cross-validated Pareto-optimal weights typically outperformed unit weights-suggesting that diversity improvement is often possible, despite diversity shrinkage. Implications for Pareto-optimal weighting, adverse impact, sample size of validation studies, and optimizing the diversity-job performance tradeoff are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Influence of resin cement polymerization shrinkage on stresses in porcelain crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Liliana G; Kelly, J Robert

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of polymerization shrinkage of the cement layer on stresses within feldspathic ceramic crowns, using experimentally validated FEA models for (1) increasing occlusal cement thickness; and, (2) bonded versus non-bonded ceramic-cement interfaces. 2-D axial symmetric models simulated stylized feldspathic crowns (1.5mm occlusal thickness) cemented with resin-cement layers of 50-500μm on dentin preparations, being loaded (500N) or not. Ceramic-cement interface was either bonded or not. Cement was bonded to the dentin in all models. Maximum axial shrinkage of 0%, 1%, 2%, 3%, 4% and 4.65% were simulated. The first principal stresses developing in the cementation surface at the center and at the occluso-axial line-angle of the crown were registered. Polymerization shrinkage of the cement increased tensile stresses in the ceramic, especially in loaded non-bonded crowns for thicker cement layers. Stresses in loaded non-bonded crowns increased as much as 87% when cement shrinkage increased from 0% to 4.65% (100-187MPa), for a 500μm-thick cement. Increasing polymerization shrinkage strain raised the tensile stresses, especially at the internal occlusal-axial line-angle, for bonded crowns. Changes in the polymerization shrinkage strain (from 0% to 4.65%) have little effect on the tensile stresses generated at the cementation surface of the ceramic crowns, when the occlusal cement thickness is thin (approx. 50μm for bonded crowns). However, as the cement becomes thicker stresses within the ceramic become significant. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Polymerization Behavior and Mechanical Properties of High-Viscosity Bulk Fill and Low Shrinkage Resin Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, S; Takamizawa, T; Nojiri, K; Imai, A; Tsujimoto, A; Endo, H; Suzuki, S; Suda, S; Barkmeier, W W; Latta, M A; Miyazaki, M

    The present study determined the mechanical properties and volumetric polymerization shrinkage of different categories of resin composite. Three high viscosity bulk fill resin composites were tested: Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (TB, Ivoclar Vivadent), Filtek Bulk Fill posterior restorative (FB, 3M ESPE), and Sonic Fill (SF, Kerr Corp). Two low-shrinkage resin composites, Kalore (KL, GC Corp) and Filtek LS Posterior (LS, 3M ESPE), were used. Three conventional resin composites, Herculite Ultra (HU, Kerr Corp), Estelite ∑ Quick (EQ, Tokuyama Dental), and Filtek Supreme Ultra (SU, 3M ESPE), were used as comparison materials. Following ISO Specification 4049, six specimens for each resin composite were used to determine flexural strength, elastic modulus, and resilience. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage was determined using a water-filled dilatometer. Data were evaluated using analysis of variance followed by Tukey's honestly significant difference test (α=0.05). The flexural strength of the resin composites ranged from 115.4 to 148.1 MPa, the elastic modulus ranged from 5.6 to 13.4 GPa, and the resilience ranged from 0.70 to 1.0 MJ/m 3 . There were significant differences in flexural properties between the materials but no clear outliers. Volumetric changes as a function of time over a duration of 180 seconds depended on the type of resin composite. However, for all the resin composites, apart from LS, volumetric shrinkage began soon after the start of light irradiation, and a rapid decrease in volume during light irradiation followed by a slower decrease was observed. The low shrinkage resin composites KL and LS showed significantly lower volumetric shrinkage than the other tested materials at the measuring point of 180 seconds. In contrast, the three bulk fill resin composites showed higher volumetric change than the other resin composites. The findings from this study provide clinicians with valuable information regarding the mechanical properties and

  1. Conventional and high-intensity halogen light effects on polymerization shrinkage of orthodontic adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Yagmur; Uysal, Tancan; Basciftci, Faruk Ayhan; Demir, Abdullah; Botsali, Murat Selim

    2006-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the polymerization shrinkage of three orthodontic adhesives. In addition we wanted to determine the effectiveness of the high-intensity quartz tungsten halogen (HQTH) in curing orthodontic adhesives on polymerization shrinkage with that of the quartz tungsten halogen (QTH). A total of 120 glass ring molds were prepared using a low-speed saw. The internal surface of the glass rings were roughened and etched. Adhesive pastes were placed into the glass molds, which were sandwiched between two glass slides. Samples were divided into six groups according to the combination of three orthodontic adhesives (Kurasper F, Light Bond, and Transbond XT) and two light intensities. One half of each 40 samples of three adhesive pastes was polymerized for 20 seconds by a QTH (Hilux 350), and the other half was polymerized for 10 seconds by a HQTH (Optilux 501). The volumetric polymerization shrinkage for each system was measured through the specific density method modified by Puckett and Smith. Statistical analysis was performed using two-way analysis of variance for intergroup comparisons. The HQTH-curing unit resulted in a more polymerization shrinkage than did the QTH for all investigated adhesives. However, no statistically significant differences were found. The highest shrinkage was observed for Light Bond cured with HQTH (1.59 +/- 0.82%), and the lowest value was observed for Transbond XT cured with QTH (1.23 +/- 0.60%). There are no significant differences in polymerization shrinkage of the three investigated orthodontic adhesives when polymerized with a QTH or a HQTH.

  2. Precise measurement of photoresist cross-sectional shape change caused by SEM-induced shrinkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Takeyoshi; Sekiguchi, Tomoko; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Tanaka, Junichi; Kawada, Hiroki

    2013-04-01

    The mechanism of photoresist shrinkage induced by electron-beam (EB) irradiation was studied. A precise cross-sectional profile of a photoresist pattern was obtained by a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) after atomic layer deposition of HfO2 on the sample patterns. Photoresist lines and spaces fabricated with positive-tone development and negative-tone development were exposed to an EB with much higher dose than a practical dose (to accelerate shrinkage intentionally). The obtained STEM images of the patterns before and after EB irradiation show that the shrinkage of the negative-tone-developed patterns is smaller than that of the positive-tone-developed patterns. This observation is explained by the fact that negative-tone-developed photoresist molecules do not contain protection groups, whose volatilization caused by EB irradiation is one of the origins of shrinkage. Another finding is that the EB irradiation causes top-rounding and necking of the pattern profile as well as linewidth slimming. The rounding of the pattern top profile suggests that the pattern's shape was elastically deformed. In addition, EB irradiation only onto the spaces caused sidewall shrinkage and a necking profile, although no electrons were irradiated directly onto the pattern. These phenomena are considered to be due to the electrons scattered from the spaces to the pattern sidewall. Finally, a Monte Carlo simulation of electron scattering showed that the distribution of the deposited EB energy on the pattern surface corresponds to the above-described change in pattern shape. Consequently, these observations and simulation results clarify the importance of the effect of elastic shape change and the impact of the electrons scattered from the underlying layer onto the sidewall in the mechanism of photoresist shrinkage.

  3. Regional brain shrinkage over two years: individual differences and effects of pro-inflammatory genetic polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, N; Ghisletta, P; Dahle, C L; Bender, A R; Yang, Y; Yuan, P; Daugherty, A M; Raz, N

    2014-12-01

    We examined regional changes in brain volume in healthy adults (N=167, age 19-79years at baseline; N=90 at follow-up) over approximately two years. With latent change score models, we evaluated mean change and individual differences in rates of change in 10 anatomically-defined and manually-traced regions of interest (ROIs): lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC), orbital frontal cortex (OF), prefrontal white matter (PFw), hippocampus (Hc), parahippocampal gyrus (PhG), caudate nucleus (Cd), putamen (Pt), insula (In), cerebellar hemispheres (CbH), and primary visual cortex (VC). Significant mean shrinkage was observed in the Hc, CbH, In, OF, and PhG, and individual differences in change were noted in all regions, except the OF. Pro-inflammatory genetic variants modified shrinkage in PhG and CbH. Carriers of two T alleles of interleukin-1β (IL-1β C-511T, rs16944) and a T allele of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T, rs1801133) polymorphisms showed increased PhG shrinkage. No effects of a pro-inflammatory polymorphism for C-reactive protein (CRP-286C>A>T, rs3091244) or apolipoprotein (APOE) ε4 allele were noted. These results replicate the pattern of brain shrinkage observed in previous studies, with a notable exception of the LPFC, thus casting doubt on the unique importance of prefrontal cortex in aging. Larger baseline volumes of CbH and In were associated with increased shrinkage, in conflict with the brain reserve hypothesis. Contrary to previous reports, we observed no significant linear effects of age and hypertension on regional brain shrinkage. Our findings warrant further investigation of the effects of neuroinflammation on structural brain change throughout the lifespan. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cake shrinkage during freeze drying: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambhatla, S; Obert, J P; Luthra, S; Bhugra, C; Pikal, Michael J

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate, by experimental studies and theoretical analysis, the phenomenon of cake shrinkage during the lyophilization process and to investigate the effect of shelf temperature during primary drying and secondary drying on the degree of cake shrinkage. Freeze-drying experiments were performed using 5% w/v sucrose where the drying protocols were altered in order to produce differing product temperature profiles. Resistance data during freeze drying were evaluated by the Manometric Temperature Measurement (MTM) method. Theoretical simulation of the freeze-drying process was performed using the Passage Freeze-Drying software. The difference between the glass transition temperature and the product temperature (Tg-T) obtained from the theoretical analysis was calculated and used for correlation with experimental shrinkage data. The Brunauer, Emmeth, Teller (BET) Specific Surface Area (SSA) Analysis was used as a method to quantify the degree of shrinkage. Samples were also analyzed for pore volume by mercury porosimetry. The SSA analysis on the freeze-dried samples showed an increase in SSA when samples were freeze dried at a lower shelf temperature during primary drying and at a slower ramp rate during secondary drying. The trend in surface area values was consistent with that obtained for pore size values. However, differences obtained among the various samples are small and cake diameter measurements showed that there was approximately 17% shrinkage even in the sample freeze dried at temperatures well below the Tg' and Tg. Variations in process and product temperature only accounted for an additional 2%-3% shrinkage. Resistance data obtained at various primary drying shelf temperatures showed a good correlation with surface area. The Tg-T behavior of the freeze-dried samples showed that a slow ramp rate of 0.1 degrees C/min during secondary drying maintains a product well below the Tg at all times and a higher ramp rate gives negative

  5. The effect of mold surface topography on plastic parat in-process shrinkage in injection molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arlø, Uffe Rolf; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Kjær, Erik Michael

    2003-01-01

    An experimental study of the effect of mold surface roughness on in-process in-flow linear part shrinkage in injection molding has been carried out. The investigation is based on an experimental two-cavity tool, where the cavities have different surface topographies, but are otherwise identical....... The study has been carried out for typical commercial polystyrene and polypropylene grades. The relationship between mold surface topography and linear shrinkage has been investigated with an experimental two-cavity mold producing simple rectangular parts with the nominal dimensions 1 x 25 x 50 mm (see...

  6. Sparse contrast-source inversion using linear-shrinkage-enhanced inexact Newton method

    KAUST Repository

    Desmal, Abdulla

    2014-07-01

    A contrast-source inversion scheme is proposed for microwave imaging of domains with sparse content. The scheme uses inexact Newton and linear shrinkage methods to account for the nonlinearity and ill-posedness of the electromagnetic inverse scattering problem, respectively. Thresholded shrinkage iterations are accelerated using a preconditioning technique. Additionally, during Newton iterations, the weight of the penalty term is reduced consistently with the quadratic convergence of the Newton method to increase accuracy and efficiency. Numerical results demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method.

  7. Cell shrinkage as a signal to apoptosis in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Martin B; Friborg, Christel R; Schneider, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Cell shrinkage is a hallmark of the apoptotic mode of programmed cell death, but it is as yet unclear whether a reduction in cell volume is a primary activation signal of apoptosis. Here we studied the effect of an acute elevation of osmolarity (NaCl or sucrose additions, final osmolarity 687...... mosmol l(-1)) on NIH 3T3 fibroblasts to identify components involved in the signal transduction from shrinkage to apoptosis. After 1.5 h the activity of caspase-3 started to increase followed after 3 h by the appearance of many apoptotic-like bodies. The caspase-3 activity increase was greatly enhanced...

  8. Comparison of thermal cracking and hydro-cracking yield distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, S.; Sayles, S. [KBC Advanced Technologies Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Operators of bitumen upgraders are faced with the challenge of obtaining maximum performance from existing equipment whose performance is already pushed to the limits. The main constraint is the primary upgrader processes, notably coking and hydrocracking. Under the current economic conditions, funding for new equipment is difficult. However, changes can be made to optimize unit performance by better understanding the basic kinetics in thermal cracking and hydrocracking. This paper reviewed the yield distribution differences between thermal cracking and hydrocracking to provide insight into the basic components of operational changes. The objective was to compare yields, product quality distributions and the elemental balances. The opportunities to increase production and improve performance were then analyzed quantitatively within the existing unit equipment limits. tabs., figs.

  9. CRACK REASON ANALYSIS OF DAMAGED CARBONITRIDED PART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Kocúrová

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the analysis of a damaged part, which was designed for use in a mechanical clutch of a car. The crack in the part was found during the production inspection. The aim of metallographic and fractography analyses of the fracture surfaces was to discover the reasons for the crack. The reason for creating the crack was the formation of smaller cracks in the production during pressing process of the semiproduct. These cracks even grew after the following thermochemical treatment. The fracture was initiated during the straightening process of quenched part.

  10. Subcritical crack propagation due to chemical rock weakening: macroscale chemo-plasticity and chemo-elasticity modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueckel, T.; Hu, M.

    2015-12-01

    Crack propagation in a subcritically stressed rock subject to chemically aggressive environment is analyzed and numerically simulated. Chemically induced weakening is often encountered in hydraulic fracturing of low-permeability oil/gas reservoirs and heat reservoirs, during storage of CO2 and nuclear waste corroding canisters, and other circumstances when rock matrix acidizing is involved. Upon acidizing, mineral mass dissolution is substantially enhanced weakening the rock and causing crack propagation and eventually permeability changes in the medium. The crack process zone is modeled mathematically via a chemo-plastic coupling and chemo-elastic coupling model. In plasticity a two-way coupling is postulated between mineral dissolution and a yield limit of rock matrix. The rate of dissolution is described by a rate law, but the mineral mass removal per unit volume is also a function of a variable internal specific surface area, which is in turn affected by the micro-cracking (treated as a plastic strain). The behavior of the rock matrix is modeled as rigid-plastic adding a chemical softening capacity to Cam-Clay model. Adopting the Extended Johnson's approximation of processes around the crack tip, the evolution of the stress field and deformation as a function of the chemically enhanced rock damage is modeled in a simplified way. In addition, chemical reactive transport is made dependent on plastic strain representing micro-cracking. Depending on mechanical and chemical boundary conditions, the area of enhanced chemical softening is near or somewhat away from the crack tip.In elasticity, chemo-mechanical effect is postulated via a chemical volumetric shrinkage strain proportional to mass removal variable, conceived analogously to thermal expansion. Two versions are considered: of constant coefficient of shrinkage and a variable one, coupled to deviatoric strain. Airy Potential approach used for linear elasticity is extended considering an extra term, which is

  11. Polygon/Cracked Sedimentary Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    4 December 2004 Exposures of sedimentary rock are quite common on the surface of Mars. Less common, but found in many craters in the regions north and northwest of the giant basin, Hellas, are sedimentary rocks with distinct polygonal cracks in them. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example from the floor of an unnamed crater near 21.0oS, 311.9oW. Such cracks might have formed by desiccation as an ancient lake dried up, or they might be related to ground ice freeze/thaw cycles or some other stresses placed on the original sediment or the rock after it became lithified. The 300 meter scale bar is about 328 yards long. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  12. Study of SEM preparation artefacts with correlative microscopy: Cell shrinkage of adherent cells by HMDS-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsen-Globa, Alisa; Puetz, Norbert; Gepp, Michael M; Neubauer, Julia C; Zimmermann, Heiko

    2016-11-01

    One of the often reported artefacts during cell preparation to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is the shrinkage of cellular objects, that mostly occurs at a certain time-dependent stage of cell drying. Various methods of drying for SEM, such as critical point drying, freeze-drying, as well as hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS)-drying, were usually used. The latter becomes popular since it is a low cost and fast method. However, the correlation of drying duration and real shrinkage of objects was not investigated yet. In this paper, cell shrinkage at each stage of preparation for SEM was studied. We introduce a shrinkage coefficient using correlative light microscopy (LM) and SEM of the same human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The influence of HMDS-drying duration on the cell shrinkage is shown: the longer drying duration, the more shrinkage is observed. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that cell shrinkage is inversely proportional to cultivation time: the longer cultivation time, the more cell spreading area and the less cell shrinkage. Our results can be applicable for an exact SEM quantification of cell size and determination of cell spreading area in engineering of artificial cellular environments using biomaterials. SCANNING 38:625-633, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Crack Propagation in Single-Crystal Aluminum Plate with Central Cracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ding

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The crack propagation process in single-crystal aluminum plate (SCAP with central cracks under tensile load was simulated by molecular dynamics method. Further, the effects of model size, crack length, temperature, and strain rate on strength of SCAP and crack growth were comprehensively investigated. The results showed that, with the increase of the model size, crack length, and strain rate, the plastic yield point of SCAP occurred in advance, the limit stress of plastic yield decreased, and the plastic deformability of material increased, but the temperature had less effect and sensitivity on the strength and crack propagation of SCAP. The model size affected the plastic deformation and crack growth of the material. Specifically, at small scale, the plastic deformation and crack propagation in SCAP are mainly affected through dislocation multiplication and slip. However, the plastic deformation and crack propagation are obviously affected by dislocation multiplication and twinning in larger scale.

  14. Fatigue cracks in Eurofer 97 steel: Part II. Comparison of small and long fatigue crack growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruml, T.; Hutař, P.; Náhlík, L.; Seitl, S.; Polák, J.

    2011-05-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate in the Eurofer 97 steel at room temperature was measured by two different methodologies. Small crack growth data were obtained using cylindrical specimens with a shallow notch and no artificial crack starters. The growth of semicircular cracks of length between 10-2000 μm was followed in symmetrical cycling with constant strain amplitude ( R ɛ = -1). Long crack data were measured using standard CT specimen and ASTM methodology, i.e. R = 0.1. The growth of cracks having the length in the range of 10-30 mm was measured. It is shown that the crack growth rates of both types of cracks are in a very good agreement if J-integral representation is used and usual assumptions of the crack closure effects are taken into account.

  15. Experimental evaluation and simulation of volumetric shrinkage and warpage on polymeric composite reinforced with short natural fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Jonnathan D.; Fajardo, Jorge I.; Cuji, Alvaro R.; García, Jaime A.; Garzón, Luis E.; López, Luis M.

    2015-09-01

    A polymeric natural fiber-reinforced composite is developed by extrusion and injection molding process. The shrinkage and warpage of high-density polyethylene reinforced with short natural fibers of Guadua angustifolia Kunth are analyzed by experimental measurements and computer simulations. Autodesk Moldflow® and Solid Works® are employed to simulate both volumetric shrinkage and warpage of injected parts at different configurations: 0 wt.%, 20 wt.%, 30 wt.% and 40 wt.% reinforcing on shrinkage and warpage behavior of polymer composite. Become evident the restrictive effect of reinforcing on the volumetric shrinkage and warpage of injected parts. The results indicate that volumetric shrinkage of natural composite is reduced up to 58% with fiber increasing, whereas the warpage shows a reduction form 79% to 86% with major fiber content. These results suggest that it is a highly beneficial use of natural fibers to improve the assembly properties of polymeric natural fiber-reinforced composites.

  16. Taguchi design and flower pollination algorithm application to optimize the shrinkage of triaxial porcelain containing palm oil fuel ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainudin, A.; Sia, C. K.; Ong, P.; Narong, O. L. C.; Nor, N. H. M.

    2017-01-01

    In the preparation of triaxial porcelain from Palm Oil Fuel Ash (POFA), a new parameter variable must be determined. The parameters involved are the particle size of POFA, percentage of POFA in triaxial porcelain composition, moulding pressure, sintering temperature and soaking time. Meanwhile, the shrinkage is the dependent variable. The optimization process was investigated using a hybrid Taguchi design and flower pollination algorithm (FPA). The interaction model of shrinkage was derived from regression analysis and found that the shrinkage is highly dependent on the sintering temperature followed by POFA composition, moulding pressure, POFA particle size and soaking time. The interaction between sintering temperature and soaking time highly affects the shrinkage. From the FPA process, targeted shrinkage approaching zero values were predicted for 142 μm particle sizes of POFA, 22.5 wt% of POFA, 3.4 tonne moulding pressure, 948.5 °C sintering temperature and 264 minutes soaking time.

  17. Linear shrinkage test: justification for its reintroduction as a standard South African test method

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sampson, LR

    2009-06-04

    Full Text Available Several problems with the linear shrinkage test specified in Method A4 of the THM 1 1979 were addressed as part of this investigation in an effort to improve the alleged poor reproducibility of the test and justify its reintroduction into THM 1. A...

  18. Fabrication and characterization of self-folding thermoplastic sheets using unbalanced thermal shrinkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Christian; Mehrnezhad, Ali; YekrangSafakar, Ashkan; Park, Kidong

    2017-06-14

    Self-folding or micro-origami technologies are actively investigated as a novel manufacturing process to fabricate three-dimensional macro/micro-structures. In this paper, we present a simple process to produce a self-folding structure with a biaxially oriented polystyrene sheet (BOPS) or Shrinky Dinks. A BOPS sheet is known to shrink to one-third of its original size in plane, when it is heated above 160 °C. A grid pattern is engraved on one side of the BOPS film with a laser engraver to decrease the thermal shrinkage of the engraved side. The thermal shrinkage of the non-engraved side remains the same and this unbalanced thermal shrinkage causes folding of the structure as the structure shrinks at high temperature. We investigated the self-folding mechanism and characterized how the grid geometry, the grid size, and the power of the laser engraver affect the bending curvature. The developed fabrication process to locally modulate thermomechanical properties of the material by engraving the grid pattern and the demonstrated design methodology to harness the unbalanced thermal shrinkage can be applied to develop complicated self-folding macro/micro structures.

  19. Analysis of the shrinkage at the thick plate part using response surface methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, N. M.; Azlan, M. Z.; Shayfull, Z.; Roselina, S.; Nasir, S. M.

    2017-09-01

    Injection moulding is well known for its manufacturing process especially in producing plastic products. To measure the final product quality, there are lots of precautions to be taken into such as parameters setting at the initial stage of the process. Sometimes, if these parameters were set up wrongly, defects may be occurred and one of the well-known defects in the injection moulding process is a shrinkage. To overcome this problem, a maximisation at the precaution stage by making an optimal adjustment on the parameter setting need to be done and this paper focuses on analysing the shrinkage by optimising the parameter at thick plate part with the help of Response Surface Methodology (RSM) and ANOVA analysis. From the previous study, the outstanding parameter gained from the optimisation method in minimising the shrinkage at the moulded part was packing pressure. Therefore, with the reference from the previous literature, packing pressure was selected as the parameter setting for this study with other three parameters which are melt temperature, cooling time and mould temperature. The analysis of the process was obtained from the simulation by Autodesk Moldflow Insight (AMI) software and the material used for moulded part was Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS). The analysis and result were obtained and it found that the shrinkage can be minimised and the significant parameters were found as packing pressure, mould temperature and melt temperature.

  20. A quantitative analysis of mineral loss and shrinkage of in vitro demineralized human root surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Cate, J M; Nyvad, B; Van de Plassche-Simons, Y M; Fejerskov, O

    1991-10-01

    Demineralization of dentin specimens proceeds at a faster rate than that of enamel. Although this is generally accepted, a quantification of the rate of formation of root lesions is hampered by the shrinkage of the lesions when these are dried prior to microradiographic analysis. This leads to a significant underestimation of the lesion depth and total mineral loss. The aim of this paper was to quantitate the rate of mineral loss during root lesion formation in vitro and to determine the shrinkage of root specimens as a result of drying. Unerupted roots of human teeth were subjected to a demineralizing system of 0.1 mol/L lactate buffer (pH = 4.8) with 0.2 mmol/L methanehydroxydiphosphonate during four, 11, 22, and 44 days. The root lesions were assessed by quantitative microradiography. The demineralizing solutions were analyzed to determine the amounts of root tissue dissolved. A comparison of these two sets of data showed that, with the demineralizing system used, root lesions may shrink up to 62%. Fixation of the specimens in fixative did not affect this shrinkage. Chemical analysis showed that mineral loss proceeded linearly with time. From the data-sets of this study, a model was developed to compensate for the shrinkage in the dentin specimens. In this way, it was possible to calculate the lesion depth at four demineralization times as being 130, 220, 320, and 530 microns, respectively. These values were in agreement with a microscopic determination of the lesion depth.

  1. A modelling study of drying shrinkage damage in concrete repair systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukovic, M.; Savija, B.; Schlangen, E.; Ye, G.; van Breugel, K.

    2014-01-01

    Differential shrinkage between repair material and concrete substrate is considered to be the main cause of premature failure of repair systems (Martinola, Sadouki et al. 2001, Beushausen and Alexander 2007). Magnitude of induced stresses depends on many factors, for example the amount of restraint,

  2. Combined Use of Shrinkage Reducing Admixture and CaO in Cement Based Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittarelli, Francesca; Giosuè, Chiara; Monosi, Saveria

    2017-10-01

    The combined addition of a Shrinkage-Reducing Admixture (SRA) with a CaO-based expansive agent (CaO) has been found to have a synergistic effect to improve the dimensional stability of cement based materials. In this work, aimed to further investigate the effect, mortar and self-compacting concrete specimens were prepared either without admixtures, as reference, or with SRA alone and/or CaO. Their performance was compared in terms of compressive strength and free shrinkage measurements. Results showed that the synergistic effect in reducing shrinkage is confirmed in the specimens manufactured with SRA and CaO. In order to clarify this phenomenon, the effect of SRA on the hydration of CaO as well as cement was evaluated through different techniques. The obtained results show that SRA induces a finer microstructure of the CaO hydration products and a retarding effect on the microstructure development of cement based materials. A more deformable mortar or concrete, due to the delay in microstructure development by SRA, coupled with a finer microstructure of CaO hydration products could allow higher early expansion, which might contribute in contrasting better the successive drying shrinkage.

  3. Specimen size effect in the volumetric shrinkage of cancellous bone measured at two levels of dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievers, W Brent; Lee, Victoria; Arsenault, Simon M; Waldman, Stephen D; Pilkey, A Keith

    2007-01-01

    Water is commonly removed from bone to study its effect on mechanical behaviour; however, dehydration also alters the bone structure. To make matters worse, measuring structural changes in cancellous bone is complicated by a number of factors. Therefore, the goals of this study were to address these issues by (1) comparing Archimedes' method and a helium pycnometer as methods for measuring cancellous bone volume; (2) measuring the apparent dimensional and volumetric tissue shrinkage of cancellous bone at two levels of dehydration; and, (3) identifying whether a size effect exists in cancellous bone shrinkage. Cylindrical specimens (3, 5 and 8.3 mm diameters) of cancellous bone were taken from the distal bovine femur. The apparent dimensions of each cylindrical specimen were measured in a fully hydrated state (HYD), after drying at room temperature (AIR), and after oven drying at 105 degrees C (OVEN). Tissue volume measurements for those three hydration states were obtained using both a helium pycnometer and Archimedes' method. Aluminium foams, which mimic the cancellous structure, were used as controls. The results suggest that the helium pycnometer and Archimedes' method yield identical results in the HYD and AIR states, but that Archimedes' method under-predicts the nominal OVEN volume by incorporating the collagen-apatite porosity. A distinct size effect on volumetric shrinkage is observed (pshrinkage (2% and 7%) at the two dehydration levels is much smaller than the measured volumetric tissue shrinkage (16% and 29%), which results in a reduced dehydrated bone volume fraction.

  4. Short-term effects of radiofrequency shrinkage treatment for anterior cruciate ligament relaxation on proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Min; Liu, Yujie; Li, Zhongli; Wang, Zhigang

    2013-10-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) shrinkage is used in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The present study investigated the therapeutic effects of RF on ACL relaxation and the probable influencing factors. Patients with ACL relaxation were included. Participants were randomly divided into two groups: a treatment group, in which patients were treated with RF shrinkage (RF group); a control group, in which patients received conventional surgical treatment. Thermal shrinkage was performed on ACL using an ArthroCare® CAPSure® wand. Lysholm scores, proprioceptive testing and Tegner activity scores were evaluated before and after treatment (at 6 and 12 months). A total of 38 patients were included. The mean ± SD Lysholm score of those in the RF group at 12 months' post-treatment was significantly higher than in controls. The angle of deviation of the knee joint in RF group was significantly larger than in the control group at 6 months' post-treatment. RF shrinkage treatment for ACL laxity could improve knee scores, and may affect proprioception and recovery of activity after surgery.

  5. Shrinkage-reducing admixtures and early-age desiccation in cement pastes and mortars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, D. P.; Geiker, Mette Rica; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2001-01-01

    Fundamental studies of the early-age desiccation of cement-based materials with and without a shrinkage-reducing admixture (SRA) have been performed. Studies have been conducted under both sealed and drying conditions. Physical measurements include mass loss, surface tension, X-ray absorption...

  6. Minimal volume regulation after shrinkage of red blood cells from five species of reptiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Karina; Berenbrink, Michael; Koldkjær, Pia

    2008-01-01

    cell function. The present study demonstrates that oxygenated RBCs in all major groups of reptiles exhibit no or a very reduced RVI upon ~ 25% calculated hyperosmotic shrinkage. Thus, RBCs from the snakes Crotalus durissus and Python regius, the turtle Trachemys scripta and the alligator Alligator...

  7. A 3D Lattice Modelling Study of Drying Shrinkage Damage in Concrete Repair Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukovic, M.; Savija, B.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.; Ye, G.; van Breugel, K.

    2016-01-01

    Differential shrinkage between repair material and concrete substrate is considered to be the main cause of premature failure of repair systems. The magnitude of induced stresses depends on many factors, for example the degree of restraint, moisture gradients caused by curing and drying conditions,

  8. Prediction of Shrinkage Porosity Defect in Sand Casting Process of LM25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Hardik; Dhulia, Jay K.; Maniar, Nirav P.

    2017-08-01

    In the present worldwide and aggressive environment, foundry commercial enterprises need to perform productively with least number of rejections and create casting parts in shortest lead time. It has become extremely difficult for foundry industries to meet demands of defects free casting and meet strict delivery schedules. The process of casting solidification is complex in nature. Prediction of shrinkage defect in metal casting is one of the critical concern in foundries and is one of the potential research areas in casting. Due to increasing pressure to improve quality and to reduce cost, it is very essential to upgrade the level of current methodology used in foundries. In the present research work, prediction methodology of shrinkage porosity defect in sand casting process of LM25 using experimentation and ANSYS is proposed. The objectives successfully achieved are prediction of shrinkage porosity distribution in Al-Si casting and determining effectiveness of investigated function for predicting shrinkage porosity by correlating results of simulating studies to those obtained experimentally. The real-time application of the research reflects from the fact that experimentation is performed on 9 different Y junctions at foundry industry and practical data obtained from experimentation are used for simulation.

  9. Setting shrinkage strains of chemical-cured glass ionomer-based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shrinkage strains are exhibited by the current formulations of chemical-cured dental restorative systems. In resin-modified glass ionomer systems, these have been linked to filler contents, types and quantity of monomer. Post-gelation rigid contraction that follows onset of cure leading to marginal defects is a clinically ...

  10. Direct voxel-based comparisons between grey matter shrinkage and glucose hypometabolism in chronic alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, Ludivine; Segobin, Shailendra; Lannuzel, Coralie; Boudehent, Céline; Vabret, François; Eustache, Francis; Beaunieux, Hélène; Pitel, Anne L

    2016-09-01

    Alcoholism is associated with widespread brain structural abnormalities affecting mainly the frontocerebellar and the Papez's circuits. Brain glucose metabolism has received limited attention, and few studies used regions of interest approach and showed reduced global brain metabolism predominantly in the frontal and parietal lobes. Even though these studies have examined the relationship between grey matter shrinkage and hypometabolism, none has performed a direct voxel-by-voxel comparison between the degrees of structural and metabolic abnormalities. Seventeen alcoholic patients and 16 control subjects underwent both structural magnetic resonance imaging and (18)F-2-fluoro-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography examinations. Structural abnormalities and hypometabolism were examined in alcoholic patients compared with control subjects using two-sample t-tests. Then, these two patterns of brain damage were directly compared with a paired t-test. Compared to controls, alcoholic patients had grey matter shrinkage and hypometabolism in the fronto-cerebellar circuit and several nodes of Papez's circuit. The direct comparison revealed greater shrinkage than hypometabolism in the cerebellum, cingulate cortex, thalamus and hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus. Conversely, hypometabolism was more severe than shrinkage in the dorsolateral, premotor and parietal cortices. The distinct profiles of abnormalities found within the Papez's circuit, the fronto-cerebellar circuit and the parietal gyrus in chronic alcoholism suggest the involvement of different pathological mechanisms. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Ultra high performance concrete made with rice husk ash for reduced autogenous shrinkage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Breugel, K.; Van Tuan, N.

    2014-01-01

    Ultra High Strength Concrete (UHPC) is generally made with low w/c mixtures and by adding silica fume. Low w/c mixtures, however, exhibit high autogenous shrinkage, while a high amount of silica fume increases the price of these mixtures. For designing ultra high strength mixtures with low

  12. SEM-induced shrinkage and site-selective modification of single-crystal silicon nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Wang, Yifan; Deng, Tao; Liu, Zewen

    2017-07-01

    Solid-state nanopores with feature sizes around 5 nm play a critical role in bio-sensing fields, especially in single molecule detection and sequencing of DNA, RNA and proteins. In this paper we present a systematic study on shrinkage and site-selective modification of single-crystal silicon nanopores with a conventional scanning electron microscope (SEM). Square nanopores with measurable sizes as small as 8 nm × 8 nm and rectangle nanopores with feature sizes (the smaller one between length and width) down to 5 nm have been obtained, using the SEM-induced shrinkage technique. The analysis of energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and the recovery of the pore size and morphology reveal that the grown material along with the edge of the nanopore is the result of deposition of hydrocarbon compounds, without structural damage during the shrinking process. A simplified model for pore shrinkage has been developed based on observation of the cross-sectional morphology of the shrunk nanopore. The main factors impacting on the task of controllably shrinking the nanopores, such as the accelerating voltage, spot size, scanned area of e-beam, and the initial pore size have been discussed. It is found that single-crystal silicon nanopores shrink linearly with time under localized irradiation by SEM e-beam in all cases, and the pore shrinkage rate is inversely proportional to the initial equivalent diameter of the pore under the same e-beam conditions.

  13. The evolution of shrinkage strain of pet-mortar composite eco ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Concretes and mortars are subjected to several kinds of shrinkage strains which represent the volumic variations resulting from the cement hydration and are governed by various physical and chemical aspects. The use of polyethylene terephthalate PET plastic wastes which are available in quantity and within low cost in ...

  14. Reducing of on Polymerization Shrinkage by Application of UV Curable Dental Restorative Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Świderska Jolanta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript describes dental compositions contain in-organic fillers, multifunctional methacrylates and photoinitiators. The main problem by application and UV curing process is the shrinkage of photoreactive dental materials during and after UV curing process. Total shrinkage of UV curable dental composites is a phenomenon of polymerization shrinkage, typical behavior for multifunctional methacrylates during polymerization process. The important factors by curing of dental composites are: kind and concentration of used methacrylates, their functionality, double bond concentration, kind and concentration of added photoinitiator and UV dose. They are investigated UV-curable dental compositions based on 2,2-bis-[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryxloyloxypropylphenyl]propane (Bis-GMA and containing such multifunctional monomers as 1,3-butanediol dimethacrylate (1,3-BDDMA, diethylene glycol dimethacrylate (DEGDMA, tetraethylene glycol dimethacrylate (T3EGDMA, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA, polyethylene glycol 200 dimethacrylate (PEG200DA. Reduction of polymerization shrinkage of dental compositions is at the moment a major problem by dental technology.

  15. Influence of rare earths on shrinkage porosity in thin walled ductile cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl Martin; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2009-01-01

    Ductile cast iron has been cast in test bars with thickness from 2 to 10 mm. The rare earth elements La and Ce have been added to some of the castings to evaluate their influence on microstructure and shrinkage tendency. Both La and Ce increased the graphite nodule count, especially for thickness...

  16. Autogenous shrinkage of Ducorit S5R ASTM C 1698-09 test method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkilde, Lars

    The report deals with experimental measurement of autogenous shrinkage of Ducorit S5R according to the test method ASTM C 1698-09. This test method measures the bulk strain of a sealed cementitious specimen, at constant temperature and not subjected to external forces, from the time of final...

  17. Porous stainless steel hollow fibers with shrinkage-controlled small radial dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten-Olieman, Maria W.J.; Raaijmakers, Michiel; Raaijmakers, Michiel J.T.; Winnubst, Aloysius J.A.; Wessling, Matthias; Nijmeijer, Arian; Benes, Nieck Edwin

    2011-01-01

    A method is presented for the preparation of thin (∼250 μm) porous stainless steel hollow fiber membranes based on dry–wet spinning of a particle-loaded polymer solution followed by heat treatment. Extraordinarily small radial dimensions were achieved by controlled shrinkage during thermal

  18. The Influence of Water Sorption of Dental Light-Cured Composites on Shrinkage Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinga Bociong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The contraction stress generated during the photopolymerization of resin dental composites is the major disadvantage. The water sorption in the oral environment should counteract the contraction stress. The purpose was to evaluate the influence of the water sorption of composite materials on polymerization shrinkage stress generated at the restoration-tooth interface. The following materials were tested: Filtek Ultimate, Gradia Direct LoFlo, Heliomolar Flow, Tetric EvoCeram, Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, Tetric EvoFlow, Tetric EvoFlow Bulk Fill, X-tra Base, Venus BulkFil, and Ceram.X One. The shrinkage stress was measured immediately after curing and after: 0.5 h, 24 h, 72 h, 96 h, 168 h, 240 h, 336 h, 504 h, 672 h, and 1344 h by means of photoelastic study. Moreover, water sorption and solubility were evaluated. Material samples were weighted on scale in time intervals to measure the water absorbency and the dynamic of this process. The tested materials during polymerization generated shrinkage stresses ranging from 6.3 MPa to 12.5 MPa. Upon water conditioning (56 days, the decrease in shrinkage strain (not less than 48% was observed. The decrease in value stress in time is material-dependent.

  19. Astrocytic mechanisms explaining neural-activity-induced shrinkage of extraneuronal space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivar Østby

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal stimulation causes approximately 30% shrinkage of the extracellular space (ECS between neurons and surrounding astrocytes in grey and white matter under experimental conditions. Despite its possible implications for a proper understanding of basic aspects of potassium clearance and astrocyte function, the phenomenon remains unexplained. Here we present a dynamic model that accounts for current experimental data related to the shrinkage phenomenon in wild-type as well as in gene knockout individuals. We find that neuronal release of potassium and uptake of sodium during stimulation, astrocyte uptake of potassium, sodium, and chloride in passive channels, action of the Na/K/ATPase pump, and osmotically driven transport of water through the astrocyte membrane together seem sufficient for generating ECS shrinkage as such. However, when taking into account ECS and astrocyte ion concentrations observed in connection with neuronal stimulation, the actions of the Na(+/K(+/Cl(- (NKCC1 and the Na(+/HCO(3 (- (NBC cotransporters appear to be critical determinants for achieving observed quantitative levels of ECS shrinkage. Considering the current state of knowledge, the model framework appears sufficiently detailed and constrained to guide future key experiments and pave the way for more comprehensive astroglia-neuron interaction models for normal as well as pathophysiological situations.

  20. Measurement with corrugated tubes of early-age autogenous shrinkage of cement-based material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Qian; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2009-01-01

    The use of a special corrugated mould enables transformation of volume strain into horizontal, linear strain measurement in the fluid stage. This allows continuous measurement of the autogenous shrinkage of cement-based materials since casting, and also effectively eliminates unwanted influence...

  1. Characterizetion of Flexural Strength, Warpage and Shrinkage of Polypropylene-Nanoclay-Nanocomposites Blend with Gigantochloa Scortechinii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamis, S. Z.; Othman, M. H.; Hasan, S.; Ibrahim, M. H. I.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the characterization of Flexural Strength, Warpage and Shrinkage of reinforcement gigantochloa scortechinii fibre. The content of fiber were fixed at 0 wt.%, 3 wt.% and 6 wt.% in uniform increased. The selected injection moulding processing conditions were packing pressure, melt temperature, screw speed and filling time. The quality factors that need to be improved upon the characterization were flexural strength, warpage and shrinkage. This research started by drying the Gigantochloa Scortechinii fibres at 120°C. After that, 3 wt.% of the fibres were mixed with 81 wt.% of polypropylene, 15 wt.% of polypropylene grafted maleic anhydride (compatibilizer) and 1 wt. % of nanoclay. Samples with 6 wt.% of fibers were also prepared for comparison purpose. The mixing process was performed by using Brabender Lab-Compounder KETSE 20/40 and the pallets were produced using used Brabender® pelletizer with diameters of 1 to 4 mm. The optimisation process was accomplished by adopting the Taguchi L9 orthogonal array method. According to the results, for 0 wt.% GS, the flexural strength is 30.0082 MPa, the warpage is 0.0030000 mm and the shrinkage is 0.0003830 mm at packing pressure 40%, melt temperature 165°C, filled time 2 seconds and screw speed 35%. For the result 3 wt.% GS, the flexural strength is 32.2477 MPa, the warpage is 0.006670 mm and the shrinkage is 0.0003830 mm at packing pressure is 35%, melt temperature 165°C, filled times is 1 seconds and screw speed is 30%. While for the 6 wt.% GS, the results of the flexural strength is 36.9084 MPa, the warpage is 0.0066700 mm and the shrinkage is 0.0003830 mm at packing pressure is 35%, melt temperature 165°C, filled time is 2 seconds and screw speed is 30%. The existence of Gigantochloa Scortechinii fibre was also proven to effect significantly towards flexural strength with 6% increasing value ordering from 0 wt.% GS to 6 wt.% GS. while, the warpage value increasing from 0.003000 mm to 0.00667 mm and

  2. Predicting shrinkage and warpage in injection molding: Towards automatized mold design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicke, Florian; Behr, Marek; Elgeti, Stefanie

    2017-10-01

    It is an inevitable part of any plastics molding process that the material undergoes some shrinkage during solidification. Mainly due to unavoidable inhomogeneities in the cooling process, the overall shrinkage cannot be assumed as homogeneous in all volumetric directions. The direct consequence is warpage. The accurate prediction of such shrinkage and warpage effects has been the subject of a considerable amount of research, but it is important to note that this behavior depends greatly on the type of material that is used as well as the process details. Without limiting ourselves to any specific properties of certain materials or process designs, we aim to develop a method for the automatized design of a mold cavity that will produce correctly shaped moldings after solidification. Essentially, this can be stated as a shape optimization problem, where the cavity shape is optimized to fulfill some objective function that measures defects in the molding shape. In order to be able to develop and evaluate such a method, we first require simulation methods for the diffierent steps involved in the injection molding process that can represent the phenomena responsible for shrinkage and warpage ina sufficiently accurate manner. As a starting point, we consider the solidification of purely amorphous materials. In this case, the material slowly transitions from fluid-like to solid-like behavior as it cools down. This behavior is modeled using adjusted viscoelastic material models. Once the material has passed a certain temperature threshold during cooling, any viscous effects are neglected and the behavior is assumed to be fully elastic. Non-linear elastic laws are used to predict shrinkage and warpage that occur after this point. We will present the current state of these simulation methods and show some first approaches towards optimizing the mold cavity shape based on these methods.

  3. Control of polymerization shrinkage and stress in nanogel-modified monomer and composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Rafael R; Garcia, Jeffrey W; Barros, Matthew D; Lewis, Steven H; Pfeifer, Carmem S; Liu, JianCheng; Stansbury, Jeffrey W

    2011-06-01

    This study demonstrates the effects of nano-scale prepolymer particles as additives to model dental monomer and composite formulations. Discrete nanogel particles were prepared by solution photopolymerization of isobornyl methacrylate and urethane dimethacrylate in the presence of a chain transfer agent, which also provided a means to attach reactive groups to the prepolymer. Nanogel was added to triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) in increments between 5 and 40 wt% with resin viscosity, reaction kinetics, shrinkage, mechanical properties, stress and optical properties evaluated. Maximum loading of barium glass filler was determined as a function of nanogel content and composites with varied nanogel content but uniform filler loading were compared in terms of consistency, conversion, shrinkage and mechanical properties. High conversion, high molecular weight internally crosslinked and cyclized nanogel prepolymer was efficiently prepared and redispersed into TEGDMA with an exponential rise in viscosity accompanying nanogel content. Nanogel addition at any level produced no deleterious effects on reaction kinetics, conversion or mechanical properties, as long as reactive nanogels were used. A reduction in polymerization shrinkage and stress was achieved in proportion to nanogel content. Even at high nanogel concentrations, the maximum loading of glass filler was only marginally reduced relative to the control and high strength composite materials with low shrinkage were obtained. The use of reactive nanogels offers a versatile platform from which resin and composite handling properties can be adjusted while the polymerization shrinkage and stress development that challenge the adhesive bonding of dental restoratives are controllably reduced. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Measurement, growth types and shrinkage of newly formed aerosol particles at an urban research platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salma, Imre; Németh, Zoltán; Weidinger, Tamás; Kovács, Boldizsár; Kristóf, Gergely

    2016-06-01

    Budapest platform for Aerosol Research and Training (BpART) was created for advancing long-term on-line atmospheric measurements and intensive aerosol sample collection campaigns in Budapest. A joint study including atmospheric chemistry or physics, meteorology, and fluid dynamics on several-year-long data sets obtained at the platform confirmed that the location represents a well-mixed, average atmospheric environment for the city centre. The air streamlines indicated that the host and neighbouring buildings together with the natural orography play an important role in the near-field dispersion processes. Details and features of the airflow structure were derived, and they can be readily utilised for further interpretations. An experimental method to determine particle diffusion losses in the differential mobility particle sizer (DMPS) system of the BpART facility was proposed. It is based on CPC-CPC (condensation particle counter) and DMPS-CPC comparisons. Growth types of nucleated particles observed in 4 years of measurements were presented and discussed specifically for cities. Arch-shaped size distribution surface plots consisting of a growth phase followed by a shrinkage phase were characterised separately since they supply information on nucleated particles. They were observed in 4.5 % of quantifiable nucleation events. The shrinkage phase took 1 h 34 min in general, and the mean shrinkage rate with standard deviation was -3.8 ± 1.0 nm h-1. The shrinkage of particles was mostly linked to changes in local atmospheric conditions, especially in global radiation and the gas-phase H2SO4 concentration through its proxy, or to atmospheric mixing in few cases. Some indirect results indicate that variations in the formation and growth rates of nucleated particles during their atmospheric transport could be a driving force of shrinkage for particles of very small sizes and on specific occasions.

  5. Porcine intestinal mast cells. Evaluation of different fixatives for histochemical staining techniques considering tissue shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rieger

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Staining of mast cells (MCs, including porcine ones, is critically dependent upon the fixation and staining technique. In the pig, mucosal and submucosal MCs do not stain or stain only faintly after formalin fixation. Some fixation methods are particularly recommended for MC staining, for example the fixation with Carnoy or lead salts. Zinc salt fixation (ZSF has been reported to work excellently for the preservation of fixation-sensitive antigens. The aim of this study was to establish a reliable histological method for counting of MCs in the porcine intestinum. For this purpose, different tissue fixation and staining methods that also allow potential subsequent immunohistochemical investigations were evaluated in the porcine mucosa, as well as submucosa of small and large intestine. Tissues were fixed in Carnoy, lead acetate, lead nitrate, Zamboni and ZSF and stained subsequently with either polychromatic methylene blue, alcian blue or toluidine blue. For the first time our study reveals that ZSF, a heavy metal fixative, preserves metachromatic staining of porcine MCs. Zamboni fixation was not suitable for histochemical visualization of MCs in the pig intestine. All other tested fixatives were suitable. Alcian blue and toluidine blue co-stained intestinal goblet cells which made a prima facie identification of MCs difficult. The polychromatic methylene blue proved to be the optimal staining. In order to compare MC counting results of the different fixation methods, tissue shrinkage was taken into account. As even the same fixation caused shrinkage-differences between tissue from small and large intestine, different factors for each single fixation and intestinal localization had to be calculated. Tissue shrinkage varied between 19% and 57%, the highest tissue shrinkage was found after fixation with ZSF in the large intestine, the lowest one in the small intestine after lead acetate fixation. Our study emphasizes that MC counting results from

  6. Literature Survey on Weld-Metal Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    1952-08-01

    Granj6n, H., "Hardenability and Metallurgical Weldability of Steels" Soudure Techniques Connexes, Vol 1, November-December, 1947, pp 230-242. WADC TR 52...September, 1939, pp 312s-317s. H142. Jaeger, H. E., "Shrinkage and Shrinkage Phenomena Resulting From Arc Welding" (In French), Rev. soudure ...Ductility" (In French), Soudure techniques connexes, Vol 3, May-June 1949, pp 115-124; Discussionpp 124-126. H152. Klinke, H. 0., "Impact Strength of Arc

  7. Controlling fatigue crack paths for crack surface marking and growth investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Barter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While it is well known that fatigue crack growth in metals that display confined slip, such as high strength aluminium alloys, develop crack paths that are responsive to the loading direction and the local microstructural orientation, it is less well known that such paths are also responsive to the loading history. In these materials, certain loading sequences can produce highly directional slip bands ahead of the crack tip and by adjusting the sequence of loads, distinct fracture surface features or progression marks, even at very small crack depths can result. Investigating the path a crack selects in fatigue testing when particular combinations of constant and variable amplitude load sequences are applied is providing insight into crack growth. Further, it is possible to design load sequences that allow very small amounts of crack growth to be measured, at very small crack sizes, well below the conventional crack growth threshold in the aluminium alloy discussed here. This paper reports on observations of the crack path phenomenon and a novel test loading method for measuring crack growth rates for very small crack depths in aluminium alloy 7050-T7451 (an important aircraft primary structural material. The aim of this work was to firstly generate short- crack constant amplitude growth data and secondly, through the careful manipulation of the applied loading, to achieve a greater understanding of the mechanisms of fatigue crack growth in the material being investigated. A particular focus of this work is the identification of the possible sources of crack growth retardation and closure in these small cracks. Interpreting these results suggests a possible mechanism for why small fatigue crack growth through this material under variable amplitude loading is faster than predicted from models based on constant amplitude data alone.

  8. Mechanisms of Subcritical Cracking in Calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royne, A.; Dysthe, D. K.; Bisschop, J.

    2008-12-01

    Brittle materials are characterized by a critical stress intensity factor above which they will fail catastrophically by dynamic cracking. However, it has been observed that materials can also fail at much lower stresses, through slow crack growth, often referred to as subcritical cracking. This phenomenon can take place even in vacuum, but is greatly enhanced by water and other reactive species in the environment. For a given material and environmental condition there is a systematic relationship between the crack tip velocity and the stress intensity factor. The presence of a lower stress limit to subcritical cracking has been predicted from thermodynamics but has not been firmly demonstrated experimentally. This parameter would control the long- term strength of geological materials. Subcritical cracking must necessarily be important in controlling the rock strength in near-surface processes where water and other active species are present and the displacements and stresses are low. Weathering is one example of such a process. Modelling has shown that fracture networks generated by a high degree of subcritical cracking will percolate at much lower fracture densities than purely stochastical fracture networks. This has important implications for how water can move through the crust. Understanding the mechanisms for subcritical crack growth in geological materials is also important in assessing the stability and long term performance of sequestration reservoirs for CO2 or nuclear waste. The mechanism for stress corrosion is well known for glasses and quartz. For carbonate minerals, the mechanism for subcritical crack growth has not been identified, and the only experimental studies on calcitic materials have been on polycrystalline rocks such as marble. Suggested mechanisms include stress corrosion (weakening reactions at the crack tip), preferential dissolution at the crack tip with rapid removal of dissolved species, and environmentally controlled

  9. Recrystallization-Induced Surface Cracks of Carbon Ions Irradiated 6H-SiC after Annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Ye

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Single crystal 6H-SiC wafers with 4° off-axis [0001] orientation were irradiated with carbon ions and then annealed at 900 °C for different time periods. The microstructure and surface morphology of these samples were investigated by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Ion irradiation induced SiC amorphization, but the surface was smooth and did not have special structures. During the annealing process, the amorphous SiC was recrystallized to form columnar crystals that had a large amount of twin structures. The longer the annealing time was, the greater the amount of recrystallized SiC would be. The recrystallization volume fraction was accorded with the law of the Johnson–Mehl–Avrami equation. The surface morphology consisted of tiny pieces with an average width of approximately 30 nm in the annealed SiC. The volume shrinkage of irradiated SiC layer and the anisotropy of newly born crystals during annealing process produced internal stress and then induced not only a large number of dislocation walls in the non-irradiated layer but also the initiation and propagation of the cracks. The direction of dislocation walls was perpendicular to the growth direction of the columnar crystal. The longer the annealing time was, the larger the length and width of the formed crack would be. A quantitative model of the crack growth was provided to calculate the length and width of the cracks at a given annealing time.

  10. Crack formation and prevention in colloidal drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Ryu, Seul-A.; Kim, So Youn; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-08-01

    Crack formation is a frequent result of residual stress release from colloidal films made by the evaporation of colloidal droplets containing nanoparticles. Crack prevention is a significant task in industrial applications such as painting and inkjet printing with colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we illustrate how colloidal drops evaporate and how crack generation is dependent on the particle size and initial volume fraction, through direct visualization of the individual colloids with confocal laser microscopy. To prevent crack formation, we suggest use of a versatile method to control the colloid-polymer interactions by mixing a nonadsorbing polymer with the colloidal suspension, which is known to drive gelation of the particles with short-range attraction. Gelation-driven crack prevention is a feasible and simple method to obtain crack-free, uniform coatings through drying-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles.

  11. Closure measurements of naturally initiating small cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, W. N., Jr.; Su, X.

    1988-01-01

    The initiation and growth of cracks in smooth 2024-T3 aluminum specimens have been investigated using acetate replicas. Crack opening displacements were measured as a function of load at several positions along the crack as it grew across the thickness of the specimen and became a through-the-thickness crack of a few millimeters in length. Tests run for R-ratios of 0.5, 0.0 and -1.0 showed that closure loads were well predicted by Newman's (1984) model. It is noted that small cracks grow slightly faster than would be predicted by long-crack data, and it is suggested that effects other than plasticity-induced closure must be taken into account.

  12. Numerical Study of Corrosion Crack Opening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Svensson, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    for the corrosion crack opening. Experiments and theoretical analysis by a numerical method, FEM, support that the relation between the reduction of the reinforcement bar diameter due to corrosion and the corresponding increase in crack width for a given time interval, measured on the surface of a concrete specimen...... is proportional. More recently, the constant of proportionality, the so-called crack-corrosion index, has been studied further with respect to its dependence on the diameter of the reinforcement and the concrete cover. In the present paper the above-mentioned work is presented and extended with more realistic 3D......-models of the cracked concrete beam. The crack-corrosion index is evaluated for a variation of different parameters, i.e. bar diameter, concrete cover, crack length and type of corrosion product. This paper is an extended version of a paper by Thoft-Christensen et al. (2005) presented at the IFIP WG 7.5 Conference...

  13. Online Bridge Crack Monitoring with Smart Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benniu Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Smart film crack monitoring method, which can be used for detecting initiation, length, width, shape, location, and propagation of cracks on real bridges, is proposed. Firstly, the fabrication of the smart film is developed. Then the feasibility of the method is analyzed and verified by the mechanical sensing character of the smart film under the two conditions of normal strain and crack initiation. Meanwhile, the coupling interference between parallel enameled wires of the smart film is discussed, and then low-frequency detecting signal and the custom communication protocol are used to decrease interference. On this basis, crack monitoring system with smart film is designed, where the collected crack data is sent to the remote monitoring center and the cracks are simulated and recurred. Finally, the monitoring system is applied to six bridges, and the effects are discussed.

  14. Crack formation and prevention in colloidal drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Ryu, Seul-A; Kim, So Youn; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-08-17

    Crack formation is a frequent result of residual stress release from colloidal films made by the evaporation of colloidal droplets containing nanoparticles. Crack prevention is a significant task in industrial applications such as painting and inkjet printing with colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we illustrate how colloidal drops evaporate and how crack generation is dependent on the particle size and initial volume fraction, through direct visualization of the individual colloids with confocal laser microscopy. To prevent crack formation, we suggest use of a versatile method to control the colloid-polymer interactions by mixing a nonadsorbing polymer with the colloidal suspension, which is known to drive gelation of the particles with short-range attraction. Gelation-driven crack prevention is a feasible and simple method to obtain crack-free, uniform coatings through drying-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles.

  15. Study of crack inversions utilizing dipole model of a crack and Hall element measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minkov, Dorian E-mail: dminkov@rift.mech.tohoku.ac.jp; Lee, Jinyi; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2000-07-01

    A method is proposed for computing the depth and width of simple surface cracks based on dipole model of a crack. Surface cracks with different widths cut mechanically in SS400 steel specimens are investigated. Hall voltage distributions are measured by a Hall element sliding on the specimen's surface along a line parallel to the direction of the applied magnetic field, perpendicular to the long axis of the crack, and halving its length. The performed crack inversions show that the depth of the crack can be determined with 2% error, provided, that the crack length and width are measured independently. When the crack width is unknown, the depth error is within 12%, but the width error can be as large as 30%.0.

  16. Ductile crack growth simulation and effects of crack growth on single-edge notched bend specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Keito; Komiya, Shinji; Iwashita, Tsutomu

    2017-10-01

    This paper describes the testing of single-edge notched bend (SENB) specimens, which are used for fracture toughness tests, and the ductile crack initiation from the notch tip of the specimens. All of the specimens exhibited brittle fracture with relatively large ductile crack growth (from 1.0 to 4.8 mm). The paper also shows the ductile crack growth simulation using a damage model (Bonora model) for finite element analysis (FEA). FEA reproduced ductile crack growth observed in the SENB tests and the analysis results showed the effects of the ductile crack growth rate on stress distribution around the crack tips. In addition, the value of the Weibull stress was calculated in the paper, and the Weibull stress slightly decreased if the model had a higher ductile crack growth rate as compared with the model that had a lower ductile crack growth rate.

  17. Opening-mode cracking in asphalt pavements : crack initiation and saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    This paper investigates the crack initiation and saturation for opening-mode cracking. Using elastic governing equations : and a weak form stress boundary condition, we derive an explicit solution of elastic fields in the surface course and : obtain ...

  18. Anisotropic Cracking of Nanocrystal Superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diroll, Benjamin T; Ma, Xuedan; Wu, Yaoting; Murray, Christopher B

    2017-10-11

    The synthesis colloidal nanocrystals in nonpolar organic solvents has led to exceptional size- and shape-control, enabling the formation of nanocrystal superlattices isostructural to atomic lattices built with nanocrystals rather than atoms. The long aliphatic ligands (e.g., oleic acid) used to achieve this control separate nanocrystals too far in the solid state for most charge-transporting devices. Solid-state ligand exchange, which brings particles closer together and enhances conductivity, necessitates large changes in the total volume of the solid (compressive stress), which leads to film cracking. In this work, truncate octahedral lead selenide nanocrystals are shown to self-assemble into body-centered cubic superlattices in which the atomic axes of the individual nanocrystals are coaligned with the crystal axes of the superlattice. Due to this coalignment, upon ligand exchange of the superlattices, cracking is preferentially observed on ⟨011⟩ superlattice directions. This observation is related to differences in the ligand binding to exposed {100} and {111} planes of the PbSe nanocrystal surfaces. This result has implications for binary and more complex structures in which differential reactivity of the constituent elements can lead to disruption of the desired structure. In addition, cracks in PbSe superlattices occur in a semiregular spacings inversely related to the superlattice domain size and strongly influenced by the presence of twin boundaries, which serve as both emission centers and propagation barriers for fractures. This work shows that defects, similar to behavior in nanotwinned metals, could be used to engineer enhanced mechanical strength and electrical conductivity in nanocrystal superlattices.

  19. [Desiccation cracking of soil body: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yin-Ge; Xu, Ze-Min; Zhang, Jia-Ming

    2012-04-01

    Desiccation cracking of soil body is a complex physical process, which can affect the strength, stability, and permeability of soil body, and involve in several disciplines such as soil science, agricultural science, engineering geology, and environmental science. This paper introduced the significances of the study on the desiccation cracking of soil body, reviewed the related theoretical and applied researches and the quantitative analysis of crack morphology, and discussed the deficiencies in the research fields, research contents, and research methods. The future research directions about the desiccation cracking of soil body were pointed out.

  20. Expansive Soil Crack Depth under Cumulative Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei-xiao Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The crack developing depth is a key problem to slope stability of the expansive soil and its project governance and the crack appears under the roles of dry-wet cycle and gradually develops. It is believed from the analysis that, because of its own cohesion, the expansive soil will have a certain amount of deformation under pulling stress but without cracks. The soil body will crack only when the deformation exceeds the ultimate tensile strain that causes cracks. And it is also believed that, due to the combined effect of various environmental factors, particularly changes of the internal water content, the inherent basic physical properties of expansive soil are weakened, and irreversible cumulative damages are eventually formed, resulting in the development of expansive soil cracks in depth. Starting from the perspective of volumetric strain that is caused by water loss, considering the influences of water loss rate and dry-wet cycle on crack developing depth, the crack developing depth calculation model which considers the water loss rate and the cumulative damages is established. Both the proposal of water loss rate and the application of cumulative damage theory to the expansive soil crack development problems try to avoid difficulties in matrix suction measurement, which will surely play a good role in promoting and improving the research of unsaturated expansive soil.

  1. Cracks in Sheets Draped on Curved Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Noah P.; Koning, Vinzenz; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Irvine, William T. M.

    Conforming materials to surfaces with Gaussian curvature has proven a versatile tool to guide the behavior of mechanical defects such as folds, blisters, scars, and pleats. In this talk, we show how curvature can likewise be used to control material failure. In our experiments, thin elastic sheets are confined on curved geometries that stimulate or suppress the growth of cracks, and steer or arrest their propagation. By redistributing stresses in a sheet, curvature provides a geometric tool for protecting certain regions and guiding crack patterns. A simple model captures crack behavior at the onset of propagation, while a 2D phase-field model successfully captures the crack's full phenomenology.

  2. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  3. Fatigue crack growth detect, assess, avoid

    CERN Document Server

    Richard, Hans Albert

    2016-01-01

    This book offers a concise introduction to fatigue crack growth, based on practical examples. It discusses the essential concepts of fracture mechanics, fatigue crack growth under constant and variable amplitude loading and the determination of the fracture-mechanical material parameters. The book also introduces the analytical and numerical simulation of fatigue crack growth as well as crack initiation. It concludes with a detailed description of several practical case studies and some exercises. The target group includes graduate students, researchers at universities and practicing engineers.

  4. Semi-empirical crack tip analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Ben Ouezdon, M.

    1988-01-01

    Experimentally observed crack opening displacements are employed as the solution of the multiple crack interaction problem. Then the near and far fields are reconstructed analytically by means of the double layer potential technqiue. Evaluation of the effective stress intensity factor resulting from the interaction of the main crack and its surrounding crazes in addition to the remotely applied load is presented as an illustrative example. It is shown that crazing (as well as microcracking) may constitute an alternative mechanism to Dugdale-Berenblatt models responsible for the cancellation of the singularity at the crack tip.

  5. Effects of molecular structure of the resins on the volumetric shrinkage and the mechanical strength of dental restorative composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, L U; Kim, J W; Kim, C K

    2006-09-01

    To prepare a dental composite that has a low amount of curing shrinkage and excellent mechanical strength, various 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxy propoxy) phenyl] propane (Bis-GMA) derivatives were synthesized via molecular structure design, and afterward, properties of their mixtures were explored. Bis-GMA derivatives, which were obtained by substituting methyl groups for hydrogen on the phenyl ring in the Bis-GMA, exhibited lower curing shrinkage than Bis-GMA, whereas their viscosities were higher than that of Bis-GMA. Other Bis-GMA derivatives, which contained a glycidyl methacrylate as a molecular end group exhibited reduced curing shrinkage and viscosity. Methoxy substitution for hydroxyl groups on the Bis-GMA derivatives was performed for the further reduction of the viscosity and curing shrinkage. Various resin mixtures, which had the same viscosity as the commercial one, were prepared, and their curing shrinkage was examined. A resin mixture containing 2,2-bis[3,5-dimethyl, 4-(2-methoxy-3-methacryloyloxy propoxy) phenyl] propane] (TMBis-M-GMA) as a base resin and 4-tert-butylphenoxy-2-methyoxypropyl methacrylate (t-BP-M-GMA) as a diluent exhibited the lowest curing shrinkage among them. The composite prepared from this resin mixture also exhibited the lowest curing shrinkage along with enhanced mechanical properties.

  6. Measurements of Seismic Anisotropy in Synthetic Rocks with Controlled Crack Geometry and Different Crack Densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Pinbo; Di, Bangrang; Wang, Ding; Wei, Jianxin; Li, Xiangyang

    2017-05-01

    Seismic anisotropy can help to extract azimuthal information for predicting crack alignment, but the accurate evaluation of cracked reservoir requires knowledge of degree of crack development, which is achieved through determining the crack density from seismic or VSP data. In this research we study the dependence of seismic anisotropy on crack density, using synthetic rocks with controlled crack geometries. A set of four synthetic rocks containing different crack densities is used in laboratory measurements. The crack thickness is 0.06 mm and the crack diameter is 3 mm in all the cracked rocks, while the crack densities are 0.00, 0.0243, 0.0486, and 0.0729. P and S wave velocities are measured by an ultrasonic investigation system at 0.5 MHz while the rocks are saturated with water. The measurements show the impact of crack density on the P and S wave velocities. Our results are compared to the theoretical prediction of Chapman (J App Geophys 54:191-202, 2003) and Hudson (Geophys J R Astron Soc 64:133-150, 1981). The comparison shows that measured velocities and theoretical results are in good quantitative agreement in all three cracked rocks, although Chapman's model fits the experimental results better. The measured anisotropy of the P and S wave in the four synthetic rocks shows that seismic anisotropy is directly proportional to increasing crack density, as predicted by several theoretical models. The laboratory measurements indicate that it would be effective to use seismic anisotropy to determine the crack density and estimate the intensity of crack density in seismology and seismic exploration.

  7. In-situ subaqueous capping of mercury-contaminated sediments in a fresh-water aquatic system, Part I—Bench-scale microcosm study to assess methylmercury production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, Paul M., E-mail: randall.paul@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 W. Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Fimmen, Ryan [Geosyntec Consultants, 150 E. Wilson Bridge Road, Suite 232, Worthington, OH 43085 (United States); Lal, Vivek; Darlington, Ramona [Battelle, 505 King Ave., Columbus, OH 43201 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Bench-scale microcosm experiments were designed to provide a better understanding of the potential for Hg methylation in sediments from an aquatic environment. Experiments were conducted to examine the function of sulfate concentration, lactate concentration, the presence/absence of an aqueous inorganic Hg spike, and the presence/absence of inoculums of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, a strain of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) commonly found in the natural sediments of aquatic environments. Incubations were analyzed for both the rate and extent of (methylmercury) MeHg production. Methylation rates were estimated by analyzing MeHg and Hg after 2, 7, 14, 28, and 42 days. The production of metabolic byproducts, including dissolved gases as a proxy for metabolic utilization of carbon substrate, was also monitored. In all treatments amended with lactate, sulfate, Hg, and SRB, MeHg was produced (37 ng/g-sediment dry weight) after only 48 h of incubation and reached a maximum sediment concentration of 127 ng/g-sediment dry weight after the 42 day incubation period. Aqueous phase production of MeHg was observed to be 10 ng/L after 2 day, reaching a maximum observed concentration of 32.8 ng/L after 14 days, and declining to 10.8 ng/L at the end of the incubation period (42 day). The results of this study further demonstrates that, in the presence of an organic carbon substrate, sulfate, and the appropriate consortia of microorganisms, sedimentary Hg will be transformed into MeHg through bacterial metabolism. Further, this study provided the basis for evaluation of an in-situ subaqueous capping strategy that may limit (or potentially enhance) MeHg production. -- Highlights: • Hg methylation by SRB is limited by the depletion of sulfate and carbon. • Hg methylation is sensitive to competition by methanogens for carbon substrate. • In high lactate environment, all lactate was utilized in the microcosms within seven days. • In the absence of adequate metabolic fuel, Me

  8. Extended FEM modeling of crack paths near inclusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Legarth, Brian Nyvang; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2012-01-01

    the effects on the crack path when changing the relative stiffness between inclusion and matrix material, the relative distance between initial crack and inclusion, and the size of the inclusion. Both edge cracks and internal cracks are studied. An example with an internal crack near an inclusion is presented...

  9. Early age volume changes in concrete due to chemical shrinkage of cement paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebensperger, L.

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available Unrestrained early age volume changes due to chemical shrinkage in cement pastes, mortars and concretes have been determined. The measurements were performed on sealed and unsealed samples which were stored under water. The chemical shrinkage of unsealed specimens represents the amount of absorbed water due to the chemical reaction of the cement It depends only on the cement content of the sample and does not lead to changes of the external dimensions. However the chemical shrinkage of sealed specimens is connected with a real volume change due to self-desiccation and the effect of internal pressures. The shrinkage depends in this case on the restraining effect of coarse aggregates as well as the cement content. The chemical shrinkage measured on sealed concretes was much higher than the one expected to ocurr on concretes, because normally an equalization of pressure takes place to some extent in the interior of the concrete. The use of expansive additives showed that they may compensate the chemical shrinkage, but its dosage is very sensitive and should be defined exactly for each case particularly.

    Se han determinado los cambios volumétricos que ocurren en pastas de cemento, morteros y hormigones a edad temprana debido al efecto de la retracción química. Las mediciones se realizaron en probetas selladas y no selladas sumergidas bajo agua. La retracción química en probetas no selladas representa la cantidad de agua absorbida debido a la reacción química del cemento. Depende solamente del contenido de cemento de la probeta y no produce ningún cambio en las dimensiones de la probeta. Por el contrario, la retracción química en probetas selladas está relacionada con un cambio volumétrico real debido al efecto de la autodesecación y presiones internas. La retracción en este caso depende tanto de la restricción que imponen los áridos, como del contenido de cemento. La retracción química medida en hormigones sellados

  10. Nucleation of squat cracks in rail, calculation of crack initiation angles in three dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naeimi, M.; Li, Z.; Dollevoet, R.P.B.J.

    2015-01-01

    A numerical model of wheel-track system is developed for nucleation of squat-type fatigue cracks in rail material. The model is used for estimating the angles of squat cracks in three dimensions. Contact mechanics and multi-axial fatigue analysis are combined to study the crack initiation mechanism

  11. Chloride Penetration through Cracks in High-Performance Concrete and Surface Treatment System for Crack Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Seok Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For enhancing the service life of concrete structures, it is very important to minimize crack at surface. Even if these cracks are very small, the problem is to which extend these cracks may jeopardize the durability of these decks. It was proposed that crack depth corresponding with critical crack width from the surface is a crucial factor in view of durability design of concrete structures. It was necessary to deal with chloride penetration through microcracks characterized with the mixing features of concrete. This study is devoted to examine the effect of high strength concrete and reinforcement of steel fiber on chloride penetration through cracks. High strength concrete is regarded as an excellent barrier to resist chloride penetration. However, durability performance of cracked high strength concrete was reduced seriously up to that of ordinary cracked concrete. Steel fiber reinforcement is effective to reduce chloride penetration through cracks because steel fiber reinforcement can lead to reduce crack depth significantly. Meanwhile, surface treatment systems are put on the surface of the concrete in order to seal the concrete. The key-issue is to which extend a sealing is able to ensure that chloride-induced corrosion can be prevented. As a result, penetrant cannot cure cracks, however, coating and combined treatment can prevent chloride from flowing in concrete with maximum crack width of 0.06 mm and 0.08 mm, respectively.

  12. Evaluation of shrinkage polymerization and temperature of different acrylic resins used to splinting transfer copings in indirect impression technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Ana Paula G. O.; Karam, Leandro Z.; Galvão, José R.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was evaluate the shrinkage polymerization and temperature of different acrylic resins used to splinting transfer copings in indirect impression technique. Two implants were placed in an artificial bone, with the two transfer copings joined with dental floss and acrylic resins; two dental resins are used. Measurements of deformation and temperature were performed with Fiber Braggs grating sensor for 17 minutes. The results revealed that one type of resin shows greater values of polymerization shrinkage than the other. Pattern resins did not present lower values of shrinkage, as usually reported by the manufacturer.

  13. Study of transfers and their interactions with self-healing in the cracks to increase the service life of infrastructures (bridges, nuclear centrals); Etude des transferts et de leurs interactions avec la cicatrisation dans les fissures pour prolonger la duree de service des infrastructures (ponts, centrales nucleaires)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, M

    2006-04-15

    Concrete structures are frequently cracked by the action of different types of physicochemical mechanisms (external loads, restrained shrinkage, internal expansion). Cracks could impair the durability of concrete structures by creating preferential paths for the penetration of various types of potentially aggressive agents (liquids, gases, and ions). The aim of this thesis is to study transport properties in mechanically induced cracks. The first objective of the study is to better understand the potential effect of critical crack opening and self-healing. Cracks were generated in an inert material (brick) and in old mortar samples of 28 days and 2 years of age. A mechanical expansive core was used to generate cracks of constant width across the thickness of the sample. For the brick material, results show that a mechanical interaction between the fracture surfaces (critical crack opening) can affect the chloride-diffusion process along a crack path. A critical crack opening was also found for mortar samples. The age at which cracks were generated is also an important parameter. Self-healing was found to be more important in young mortars (28 days). The second objective of this thesis is the prediction of airflow in cracked cementitious material samples. A model proposed by Rizkalla et al. was evaluated through the experimental measurement of the flow coefficient n and the friction coefficient k. A simplified model was proposed to predict airflow through a crack for laminar type flow. The third research objective is to study the effect of self-healing on airflow through cracked mortar samples stored in a 100% relative humidity environment. Results show that self-healing mainly occurs during the first two months of storage. SEM analysis of fracture surfaces shows the formation of self-healing products such as calcite, C-S-H, and ettringite. (author)

  14. Learned Shrinkage Approach for Low-Dose Reconstruction in Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Shtok

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a direct nonlinear reconstruction algorithm for Computed Tomography (CT, designed to handle low-dose measurements. It involves the filtered back-projection and adaptive nonlinear filtering in both the projection and the image domains. The filter is an extension of the learned shrinkage method by Hel-Or and Shaked to the case of indirect observations. The shrinkage functions are learned using a training set of reference CT images. The optimization is performed with respect to an error functional in the image domain that combines the mean square error with a gradient-based penalty, promoting image sharpness. Our numerical simulations indicate that the proposed algorithm can manage well with noisy measurements, allowing a dose reduction by a factor of 4, while reducing noise and streak artifacts in the FBP reconstruction, comparable to the performance of a statistically based iterative algorithm.

  15. Durability of a low shrinkage TEGDMA/HEMA-free resin composite system in Class II restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this randomized controlled prospective trial was to evaluate the durability of a low shrinkage and TEGDMA/HEMA-free resin composite system in posterior restorations in a 6-year follow up. Material and methods: 139 Class II restorations were placed in 67 patients...... with a mean age of 53 years (range 29-82). Each participant received at random two, as similar as possible, Class II restorations. In the first cavity of each pair the TEGDMA/HEMA-free resin composite system was placed with its 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (cmf-els). In the second cavity a 1-step HEMA...... for failure were fracture followed by recurrent caries. Most fractures and all caries lesions were found in high risk participants. Significance: The tested Class II resin composite restorations performed with the new TEGDMA/HEMA-free low shrinkage resin composite system showed good durability over six years....

  16. Shrinkage Simulation of Holographic Grating Using Diffusion Model in PQ-PMMA Photopolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zepeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An extended model based on nonlocal polymerization-driven diffusion model is derived by introducing shrinkage process for describing photopolymerized dynamics in PQ-PMMA photopolymer. The kinetic parameters, polymerization rate and diffusion rate are experimentally determined to provide quantitative simulation. The numerical results show that the fringes at edge of grating are firstly shifted and consequently, it leads to a contrast reduction of holograms. Finally, theoretical results are experimentally checked by temporal evolution of diffraction efficiency, and the shrinkage coefficient 0.5% is approximately achieved under incident intensity 25.3mw/cm2. This work can enhance the applicability of diffusion model and contribute to the reasonable description of the grating formation in the photopolymer.

  17. A moment projection method for population balance dynamics with a shrinkage term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Shaohua [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Engineering Block EA, Engineering Drive 1, 117576 (Singapore); Yapp, Edward K.Y.; Akroyd, Jethro; Mosbach, Sebastian [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, New Museums Site, Pembroke Street, Cambridge, CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); Xu, Rong [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, 637459 (Singapore); Yang, Wenming [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Engineering Block EA, Engineering Drive 1, 117576 (Singapore); Kraft, Markus, E-mail: mk306@cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, New Museums Site, Pembroke Street, Cambridge, CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, 637459 (Singapore)

    2017-02-01

    A new method of moments for solving the population balance equation is developed and presented. The moment projection method (MPM) is numerically simple and easy to implement and attempts to address the challenge of particle shrinkage due to processes such as oxidation, evaporation or dissolution. It directly solves the moment transport equation for the moments and tracks the number of the smallest particles using the algorithm by Blumstein and Wheeler (1973) . The performance of the new method is measured against the method of moments (MOM) and the hybrid method of moments (HMOM). The results suggest that MPM performs much better than MOM and HMOM where shrinkage is dominant. The new method predicts mean quantities which are almost as accurate as a high-precision stochastic method calculated using the established direct simulation algorithm (DSA).

  18. Hybrid processing and anisotropic sintering shrinkage in textured ZnO ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskinbora, Kahraman; Suzuki, Tohru S.; Ozgur Ozer, I.; Sakka, Yoshio; Suvaci, Ender

    2010-12-01

    We have studied the combined effects of the templated grain growth and magnetic alignment processes on sintering, anisotropic sintering shrinkage, microstructure development and texture in ZnO ceramics. Suspensions of 0-10 vol % ZnO template particles were slip cast in a 12 T rotating magnetic field. Sintering and texture characteristics were investigated via thermomechanical analysis and electron backscatter diffraction, respectively. Sintering as well as texture characteristics depend on template concentration. For the studied ZnO system, there is a critical template concentration (2 vol % in this study) above which densification is limited by the templates owing to constrained sintering. Below this limit, the densification is enhanced and the anisotropic shrinkage is reduced, which is attributed to densifying characteristics of the templates.

  19. Development of crack shape: LBB methodology for cracked pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulin, D.; Chapuliot, S.; Drubay, B. [Commissariat a l Energie Atomique, Gif sur Yvette (France)

    1997-04-01

    For structures like vessels or pipes containing a fluid, the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) assessment requires to demonstrate that it is possible, during the lifetime of the component, to detect a rate of leakage due to a possible defect, the growth of which would result in a leak before-break of the component. This LBB assessment could be an important contribution to the overall structural integrity argument for many components. The aim of this paper is to review some practices used for LBB assessment and to describe how some new R & D results have been used to provide a simplified approach of fracture mechanics analysis and especially the evaluation of crack shape and size during the lifetime of the component.

  20. Predicting the growth of small and large cracks using a crack-closure model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Phillips, E. P.; Swain, M. H.

    1988-01-01

    An evaluation is conducted of the ability of a crack-closure model to predict the fatigue life of notched specimens under spectrum loading, for the cases of crack initiation and growth along the bore of a semicircular notch and the growth of large cracks in 2024-T3 Al alloy sheets under constant-amplitude loading. These cases are used to establish an initial defect size and relationship between the stress-intensity factor range and crack-growth rate. Experimental and calculation results for small-crack growth rates are in good agreement and exhibited a stress level effect at equal values of stress-intensity factor range.

  1. Fatigue cracks in Eurofer 97 steel: Part I. Nucleation and small crack growth kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruml, T.; Polák, J.

    2011-05-01

    Fatigue crack nucleation and growth were studied in the Eurofer 97 ferritic-martensitic steel at room temperature. Cylindrical specimens with a shallow notch and no artificial crack starters were used. The constant strain amplitude cycling was adopted. First fatigue cracks nucleate at about 5% of the fatigue life along the surface slip bands. If a crack overcome the barrier of the first high angle boundary, its growth is regular and an exponential growth law is observed. This law may be used for the residual fatigue life prediction based on the small crack growth kinetics.

  2. Mitigation strategies for reflective cracking in pavements : [research project capsule].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Refl ection cracks are caused by discontinuities (cracks or joints) in underlying layers, : which propagate through hot-mix asphalt (HMA) overlay due to continuous movement : at the crack prompted by thermal expansion and traffi c loading. If the new...

  3. Pretensioned concrete girder end crack control : research brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Research Objectives: : Prove through physical testing and observation that debonding strands can reduce or eliminate critical girder end cracking : Eliminate cracking in the bottom flange of the girders, where cracks could allow moisture to r...

  4. Corrosion of steel in cracked concrete: a microscale study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacheco, J.; Savija, B.; Schlangen, E.; Polder, R.B.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of concrete cracking upon reinforcement corrosion is complex. Cracks allow fast penetration of chlorides, potentially leading to a shorter initiation period of reinforcement corrosion. Structural regulations control acceptable crack width values based on the exposure class of the

  5. Can hygroscopic expansion compensate polymerization shrinkage? Part I. Deformation of restored teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versluis, Antheunis; Tantbirojn, Daranee; Lee, Michael S; Tu, Lam S; DeLong, Ralph

    2011-02-01

    Restorative materials exhibit contraction and expansion due to polymerization and water absorption. Each process deforms and stresses a restored tooth structure in opposite direction. This study evaluated the tooth deformations during these competing processes. Large MOD cavities were prepared in 10 extracted molars. Five were restored with a hydrophobic resin composite (Filtek Supreme, 3M ESPE) and the others with a hydrophilic resin-modified glass-ionomer (Ketac Nano, 3M ESPE). The restored molars and two unrestored controls were stored in water for 24 weeks. The molars were digitized with an optical scanner at baseline, after preparation, restoration, and at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 24 weeks water immersion. The digitized buccal, lingual, and restoration surfaces were analyzed to determine their deformation patterns. The results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA followed by Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc tests (p=0.05). The buccal and lingual tooth surfaces moved 13-14 μm inward after restoration. After water immersion, cuspal deformation in the resin composite group gradually decreased, reversing the shrinkage deformation within four weeks. The immersed resin-modified glass ionomer group reversed shrinkage deformation within one week, and continued to expand further to 28 μm after 24 weeks. Cuspal deformations after water immersion were significantly different with the two restoratives. Restoration surfaces also expanded after water immersion, while the control teeth showed no significant deformation. Polymerization shrinkage deformation was compensated by hygroscopic expansion within 4 weeks in teeth restored with a hydrophobic resin composite, while a hydrophilic restorative over-compensated polymerization shrinkage within 1 week causing tooth expansion. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Light polymerization during cavity filling: influence of total energy density on shrinkage and marginal adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotto, Tissiana; Prando, Federico; Dietschi, Didier; Krejci, Ivo

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the marginal adaptation and shrinkage stress development of a micro hybrid restorative composite as a function of energy density. Linear displacement and shrinkage forces were measured with custom-made devices for energies of 4,000, 8,000, 16,000 and 32,000 mJ/cm(2) at a constant power density of 800 mW/cm(2). Marginal adaptation of composite restorations cured with the same energy density was evaluated before and after mechanical loading with 300,000 cycles at 70 N. The group "4,000 mJ/cm(2)" showed the lowest shrinkage force [2.9(0.2) kg] and linear displacement [23.5(0.7) μm] but led to the worst marginal adaptation after loading [46.4(23.5) %CM] probably due to under-curing. When the maximum energy of 32,000 mJ/cm(2) was applied, a slight increase in shrinkage forces [3.6(0.2) kg and 29.2(0.8) μm], and a slight decrease in marginal adaptation after loading [75.4(11.5) %CM] were observed, but these changes were not significantly different in comparison to groups cured with energies of 8,000 and 16,000 mJ/cm(2). For the resin composite tested in this study, no differences in marginal adaptation could be detected above the energy threshold of 8,000 mJ/cm(2).

  7. Polymerization shrinkage evaluation of three packable composite resins using a gas pycnometer

    OpenAIRE

    Amore, Ricardo; Pagani, Clóvis; Youssef, Michel Nicolau; Anauate Netto, Camillo; Lewgoy, Hugo Roberto

    2003-01-01

    Modern restorative dentistry has been playing an outstanding role lately since composite resins, allied to adhesive systems, have been widely applied on anterior and posterior teeth restorations. The evolution of composite resins has mostly been verified due to the improvement of their aesthetic behavior and the increase in their compressive and abrasive strengths. In spite of these developments, the polymerization shrinkage inherent to the material has been a major deficiency that, so far, h...

  8. Polymerization shrinkage evaluation of three packable composite resins using a gas pycnometer.

    OpenAIRE

    Amore, Ricardo; Pagani, Clóvis; Youssef, Michel Nicolau; Anauate Netto, Camillo; Lewgoy, Hugo Roberto

    2003-01-01

    Modern restorative dentistry has been playing an outstanding role lately since composite resins, allied to adhesive systems, have been widely applied on anterior and posterior teeth restorations. The evolution of composite resins has mostly been verified due to the improvement of their aesthetic behavior and the increase in their compressive and abrasive strengths. In spite of these developments, the polymerization shrinkage inherent to the material has been a major deficiency that, so far, h...

  9. Seeing without the Occipito-Parietal Cortex: Simultagnosia as a Shrinkage of the Attentional Visual Field

    OpenAIRE

    Michel, Fran?ois; Henaff, Marie-Anne

    2004-01-01

    Following bi-parietal lesions patient AT showed a severe inability to relocate her attention within a visual field which perimetry proved to be near-normal. An experimental approach with tasks testing visuo-spatial attention demonstrated a shrinkage of A.T.’s attentional visual field. With her visual attention narrowed to a kind of functional tunnel vision, the patient exhibited simultanagnosia (Wolpert, 1924), a symptom previously described in 1909 by Balint under the label of Psychic paraly...

  10. Crack Formation in Grouted Annular Composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    The objective of the present analysis is to identify the reason for extensive crack formation which occurred during an annulus grouting performance test, to evaluate possible consequences of the cracking, and to recommend measures to be taken in order to avoid similar problems in the future....

  11. Crack Monitoring of Operational Wind Turbine Foundations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Marcus; McAlorum, Jack; Fusiek, Grzegorz; Niewczas, Pawel; McKeeman, Iain; Rubert, Tim

    2017-08-21

    The degradation of onshore, reinforced-concrete wind turbine foundations is usually assessed via above-ground inspections, or through lengthy excavation campaigns that suspend wind power generation. Foundation cracks can and do occur below ground level, and while sustained measurements of crack behaviour could be used to quantify the risk of water ingress and reinforcement corrosion, these cracks have not yet been monitored during turbine operation. Here, we outline the design, fabrication and field installation of subterranean fibre-optic sensors for monitoring the opening and lateral displacements of foundation cracks during wind turbine operation. We detail methods for in situ sensor characterisation, verify sensor responses against theoretical tower strains derived from wind speed data, and then show that measured crack displacements correlate with monitored tower strains. Our results show that foundation crack opening displacements respond linearly to tower strain and do not change by more than ±5 μ m. Lateral crack displacements were found to be negligible. We anticipate that the work outlined here will provide a starting point for real-time, long-term and dynamic analyses of crack displacements in future. Our findings could furthermore inform the development of cost-effective monitoring systems for ageing wind turbine foundations.

  12. Entering a Crack: An Encounter with Gossip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Linda

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I enter a crack to think otherwise about the concept "gossip". Drawing on previous scholarship engaging with Deleuzian concepts to inform research methodologies, this paper builds on this body of work. Following Deleuze and Guattari, the paper undertakes a mapping of gossip, subsequent to an encounter with a crack.…

  13. Corrosion and Cracking of Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of the deterioration of reinforced concrete has in recent years changed from being a deterministic modelling based on experience to be stochastic modelling based on sound and consistent physical, chemical and mechanical principles. In this paper is presented a brief review of modern mod...... for time to initial corrosion, time to initial cracking, and time to a given crack width may be obtained....

  14. Strength of Cracked Reinforced Concrete Disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao Linh; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1999-01-01

    The paper deals with models, based on the theory of plasticity, to be used in strength assessments of reinforced concrete disks suffering from different kinds of cracking. Based on the assumption that the sliding strength of concrete is reduced in sections where cracks are located, solutions...

  15. Fracture Mechanical Markov Chain Crack Growth Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gansted, L.; Brincker, Rune; Hansen, Lars Pilegaard

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of the B-model developed in [J. L. Bogdanoff and F. Kozin, Probabilistic Models of Cumulative Damage. John Wiley, New York (1985)] a new numerical model incorporating the physical knowledge of fatigue crack propagation is developed. The model is based on the assumption that the crack...

  16. Uncertainty Quantification in Fatigue Crack Growth Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Sankararaman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology to quantify the uncertainty in fatigue crack growth prognosis, applied to structures with complicated geometry and subjected to variable amplitude multi-axial loading. Finite element analysis is used to address the complicated geometry and calculate the stress intensity factors. Multi-modal stress intensity factors due to multi-axial loading are combined to calculate an equivalent stress intensity factor using a characteristic plane approach. Crack growth under variable amplitude loading is modeled using a modified Paris law that includes retardation effects. During cycle-by-cycle integration of the crack growth law, a Gaussian process surrogate model is used to replace the expensive finite element analysis. The effect of different types of uncertainty – physical variability, data uncertainty and modeling errors – on crack growth prediction is investigated. The various sources of uncertainty include, but not limited to, variability in loading conditions, material parameters, experimental data, model uncertainty, etc. Three different types of modeling errors – crack growth model error, discretization error and surrogate model error – are included in analysis. The different types of uncertainty are incorporated into the crack growth prediction methodology to predict the probability distribution of crack size as a function of number of load cycles. The proposed method is illustrated using an application problem, surface cracking in a cylindrical structure.

  17. Hysteresis from Multiscale Porosity: Modeling Water Sorption and Shrinkage in Cement Paste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinson, Matthew B.; Masoero, Enrico; Bonnaud, Patrick A.; Manzano, Hegoi; Ji, Qing; Yip, Sidney; Thomas, Jeffrey J.; Bazant, Martin Z.; Van Vliet, Krystyn J.; Jennings, Hamlin M.

    2015-06-01

    Cement paste has a complex distribution of pores and molecular-scale spaces. This distribution controls the hysteresis of water sorption isotherms and associated bulk dimensional changes (shrinkage). We focus on two locations of evaporable water within the fine structure of pastes, each having unique properties, and we present applied physics models that capture the hysteresis by dividing drying and rewetting into two related regimes based on relative humidity (RH). We show that a continuum model, incorporating a pore-blocking mechanism for desorption and equilibrium thermodynamics for adsorption, explains well the sorption hysteresis for a paste that remains above approximately 20% RH. In addition, we show with molecular models and experiments that water in spaces of ≲1 nm width evaporates below approximately 20% RH but reenters throughout the entire RH range. This water is responsible for a drying shrinkage hysteresis similar to that of clays but opposite in direction to typical mesoporous glass. Combining the models of these two regimes allows the entire drying and rewetting hysteresis to be reproduced accurately and provides parameters to predict the corresponding dimensional changes. The resulting model can improve the engineering predictions of long-term drying shrinkage accounting also for the history dependence of strain induced by hysteresis. Alternative strategies for quantitative analyses of the microstructure of cement paste based on this mesoscale physical model of water content within porous spaces are discussed.

  18. Moisture Diffusivity and Shrinkage of Fruit and Cladode of Opuntia ficus-indica during Infrared Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Touil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drying behaviour of prickly pear cladodes and fruits was studied with an Infrared dryer. The volume shrinkage for Opuntia ficus-indica products is calculated and a linear relation was established to describe the experimental variation of shrinkage of the product versus its moisture content. Effective diffusion coefficient of moisture transfer was determined using the Fick law at three drying temperatures (40, 50, and 60°C. Shrinkage was also included into the diffusion model for the determination of the effective diffusion coefficient. The obtained results of the effective moisture diffusivity, for the cladode and the fruit, were evaluated in the range of 1.77 × 10−10–5.07 × 10−10 m2/s and 2.53 × 10−10–7.6 × 10−10 m2/s, respectively. The values of the activation energies for cladode and fruit were estimated to be 45.39 and 47.79 kJ/mol, respectively. However, these values of moisture diffusivity were estimated independently of the evolution of moisture content during drying process. Therefore, a correlation (full quadratic equation for moisture diffusivity as a function of moisture content and temperature was developed. The parameters are obtained by a multilinear regression method. This equation was found satisfactory to describe the diffusivity evolution function of moisture content and temperature with correlation coefficients of 91.5 and 95%.

  19. Modelling the shrinkage in pigmented coatings during drying: a stick-slip mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudone, G M; Matthews, G P; Gane, P A C

    2006-12-01

    Pigmented coatings, used to improve optical and printing properties, are applied to fibrous paper substrates as slurry, which then dries. We have elucidated the mechanism of the shrinkage which occurs during drying. The void space of the dry coating layers and their effective solid skeletal elements were modelled using the porous network simulation software Pore-Cor. The water-filled porous structures at the beginning of the shrinking process were modelled by creating simulated structures with the same effective skeletal element size distribution as the dry ones, but with higher given porosity to account for the water present. The capillary forces acting on the surface of the drying coating were calculated for the model structures and found to be orders of magnitude larger than the experimentally measured shrinkage forces. The shrinkage process was therefore postulated as resulting from the effect of capillary forces resisted by a discrete stick-slip process. The differences in the visco-elastic properties of the slurries also supported this postulate, as did further experimental evidence.

  20. Shrinkage Porosity Criterion and Its Application to A 5.5 Ton Steel Ingot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang C.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to predict the distribution of shrinkage porosity in steel ingot efficiently and accurately, a criterion R√L and a method to obtain its threshold value were proposed. The criterion R√L was derived based on the solidification characteristics of steel ingot and pressure gradient in the mushy zone, in which the physical properties, the thermal parameters, the structure of the mushy zone and the secondary dendrite arm spacing were all taken into consideration. The threshold value of the criterion R√L was obtained with combination of numerical simulation of ingot solidification and total solidification shrinkage rate. Prediction of the shrinkage porosity in a 5.5 ton ingot of 2Cr13 steel with criterion R√L>0.21 m · °C1/2 · s−3/2 agreed well with the results of experimental sectioning. Based on this criterion, optimization of the ingot was carried out by decreasing the height-to-diameter ratio and increasing the taper, which successfully eliminated the centreline porosity and further proved the applicability of this criterion.

  1. Graphene oxide as an anti-shrinkage additive for resorcinol-formaldehyde composite aerogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kang; Song, Huaihe; Chen, Xiaohong; Du, Xian; Zhong, Liang

    2014-06-21

    In order to strengthen the nanostructure and suppress the collapse of nanopores of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels during the drying process, graphene oxide (GO) was incorporated into the RF matrix to prepare GO-RF composite aerogels by sol-gel polymerization. The influences of GO content on the sol-gel process, structure, and physical properties of RF aerogels were investigated. The morphologies of composite aerogels were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, and it was found that GO was well dispersed in the RF matrix. In addition, GO can obviously accelerate the gelation of the RF solution and reduce both the drying shrinkage and aerogel density. As the content of GO increased from 0 to 2 wt%, both the linear shrinkage and density of composite aerogels decreased progressively from 28.3% to 2.0% and 506 to 195 kg m(-3), respectively, implying that GO is an effective additive for inhibiting the volume shrinkage of aerogels during the drying process.

  2. Influence Of Volcanic Scoria On Mechanical Strength, Chemical Resistance And Drying Shrinkage Of Mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Swaidani A.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the study, three types of cement have been prepared; one CEM I type (the control sample and two blended cements: CEM II/A-P and CEM II/B-P (EN 197-1, each of them with three replacement levels of volcanic scoria: (10 %, 15 %, 20 % wt. and (25 %, 30 %, 35 % wt., respectively. Strength development of mortars has been investigated at 2, 7, 28 and 90 days curing. Evaluation of chemical resistance of mortars containing scoria-based cements has been investigated through exposure to 5 % sulphate and 5 % sulphuric acid solutions in accordance with ASTM C1012 & ASTM 267, respectively. Drying shrinkage has been evaluated in accordance with ASTM C596. Test results showed that at early ages, the mortars containing CEM II/B-P binders had strengths much lower than that of the control mortar. However, at 90 days curing, the strengths were comparable to the control mortar. In addition, the increase of scoria significantly improved the sulphate resistance of mortars. Further, an increase in scoria addition improved the sulphuric acid resistance of mortar, especially at the early days of exposure. The results of drying shrinkage revealed that the CEM II/B-P mortar bars exhibited a greater contraction when compared to the control mortar, especially at early ages. However, drying shrinkage of mortars was not influenced much at longer times.

  3. Development of shrinkage and fracture parameters in selected fine-grained cement-based composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kucharczyková Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarizes results of a pilot study aimed at the evaluation of an experimental investigation focused on determination of the material characteristics development of selected fine-grained cement-based composites during their ageing. The composition of composites being investigated differed only in a water to cement (w/c ratio and in amount of superplasticizer. Quite extensive experiments were performed with the aim to determine shrinkage, dynamic a static modulus of elasticity and fracture properties on test specimens exposed to free drying during the whole time of its ageing (including the early stage of setting and hardening. The article presents especially results (including their statistical evaluation of shrinkage and fracture parameters development within 90 days of composites’ ageing. Experimental results show the dependence of the investigated characteristics on the value of w/c ratio. The most visible effect was observed in the case of shrinkage development. The curing conditions were reflected especially in high variability of the test results.

  4. Influence of Aggregate Wettability with Different Lithology Aggregates on Concrete Drying Shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanchen Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The correlation of the wettability of different lithology aggregates and the drying shrinkage of concrete materials is studied, and some influential factors such as wettability and wetting angle are analyzed. A mercury porosimeter is used to measure the porosities of different lithology aggregates accurately, and the pore size ranges that significantly affect the drying shrinkage of different lithology aggregate concretes are confirmed. The pore distribution curve of the different coarse aggregates is also measured through a statistical method, and the contact angle of different coarse aggregates and concrete is calculated according to the linear fitting relationship. Research shows that concrete strength is determined by aggregate strength. Aggregate wettability is not directly correlated with concrete strength, but wettability significantly affects concrete drying shrinkage. In all types’ pores, the greatest impacts on wettability are capillary pores and gel pores, especially for the pores of the size locating 2.5–50 nm and 50–100 nm two ranges.

  5. Multiple-Shrinkage Multinomial Probit Models with Applications to Simulating Geographies in Public Use Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgette, Lane F; Reiter, Jerome P

    2013-06-01

    Multinomial outcomes with many levels can be challenging to model. Information typically accrues slowly with increasing sample size, yet the parameter space expands rapidly with additional covariates. Shrinking all regression parameters towards zero, as often done in models of continuous or binary response variables, is unsatisfactory, since setting parameters equal to zero in multinomial models does not necessarily imply "no effect." We propose an approach to modeling multinomial outcomes with many levels based on a Bayesian multinomial probit (MNP) model and a multiple shrinkage prior distribution for the regression parameters. The prior distribution encourages the MNP regression parameters to shrink toward a number of learned locations, thereby substantially reducing the dimension of the parameter space. Using simulated data, we compare the predictive performance of this model against two other recently-proposed methods for big multinomial models. The results suggest that the fully Bayesian, multiple shrinkage approach can outperform these other methods. We apply the multiple shrinkage MNP to simulating replacement values for areal identifiers, e.g., census tract indicators, in order to protect data confidentiality in public use datasets.

  6. Glutaraldehyde crosslinking of collagen: effects of time, temperature, concentration and presoaking as measured by shrinkage temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruijgrok, J M; de Wijn, J R; Boon, M E

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to study the effect on the degree of crosslinking of: (a) short term (1 or 5 min) high (50 degrees C) temperature glutaraldehyde (GA) fixation of native collagen membrane, (b) a combination of GA presoaking at low temperature [0 degree C or room temperature (rt)] followed by short time (collagen fleece in a multilayer diffusion model. As a measure for the degree of crosslinking the shrinkage temperature (Ts) was determined. Short time (1 or 5 min) high temperature (50 degrees C) fixation using 0.1% GA solution caused the shrinkage temperature to increase to 80% and 93% respectively, of the maximum attainable Ts employing GA crosslinking (ca 91 degrees C). Fixation with 0.01% GA for 5 min at 50 degrees C appeared equally as effective as 1 min with 0.1% GA. Although an elevated fixation temperature (from rt to 45 degrees C) was found to produce a substantial increase in Ts of the collagen sheets, a homogeneous distribution of cross links was not obtained by this method. Presoaking the samples at rt (1 h) or at 0 degree C (3 h) with subsequent short time heating to 45 degrees C caused an almost equal rise in shrinkage temperature in Ts throughout the collagen samples.

  7. A Study of Shrinkage Stress Reduction and Mechanical Properties of Nanogel-Modified Resin Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiancheng; Howard, Gregory D; Lewis, Steven H; Barros, Matthew D; Stansbury, Jeffrey W

    2012-11-01

    A series of nanogel compositions were prepared from urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) and isobornyl methacrylate (IBMA) in the presence of a thiol chain transfer agent. The linear oligomer of IBMA was synthesized by a similar solution polymerization technique. The nanogels were prepared with different crosslinker concentrations to achieve varied branching densities and molecular weights. The prepolymers were dispersed in triethylene glycol dimethacrylate at loading levels ranging from 10 wt% to 50 wt%. Photopolymerization reaction kinetics of all prepolymer modified systems were enhanced relative to the nanogel-free control during early stage polymerization while limiting conversion was similar for most samples. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage was reduced proportionally with the prepolymer content while the corresponding decrease in polymerization stress was potentially greater than an additive linear behavior. Flexural strength for inert linear polymer-modified systems decreased significantly with the increase in the prepolymer content; however, with an increase in the crosslinker concentration within the nanogel additives, and an increase in the concentration of residual pendant reactive sites, flexural strength was maintained or improved regardless of the nanogel loading level. This demonstrates that covalent attachment rather than just physical entanglement with the polymer matrix is important for effective polymer mechanical reinforcement by nanogel additives. Reactive nanogel additives can be considered as a practical, generic means to achieve substantial reductions in polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress in common polymers.

  8. Shrinkage-based diagonal Hotelling’s tests for high-dimensional small sample size data

    KAUST Repository

    Dong, Kai

    2015-09-16

    DNA sequencing techniques bring novel tools and also statistical challenges to genetic research. In addition to detecting differentially expressed genes, testing the significance of gene sets or pathway analysis has been recognized as an equally important problem. Owing to the “large pp small nn” paradigm, the traditional Hotelling’s T2T2 test suffers from the singularity problem and therefore is not valid in this setting. In this paper, we propose a shrinkage-based diagonal Hotelling’s test for both one-sample and two-sample cases. We also suggest several different ways to derive the approximate null distribution under different scenarios of pp and nn for our proposed shrinkage-based test. Simulation studies show that the proposed method performs comparably to existing competitors when nn is moderate or large, but it is better when nn is small. In addition, we analyze four gene expression data sets and they demonstrate the advantage of our proposed shrinkage-based diagonal Hotelling’s test.

  9. Application of Artificial Neural Network to Predict Colour Change, Shrinkage and Texture of Osmotically Dehydrated Pumpkin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, S. Y.; Lee, J. S.; Loh, S. P.; Tham, H. J.

    2017-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to use Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to predict colour change, shrinkage and texture of osmotically dehydrated pumpkin slices. The effects of process variables such as concentration of osmotic solution, immersion temperature and immersion time on the above mentioned physical properties were studied. The colour of the samples was measured using a colorimeter and the net colour difference changes, ΔE were determined. The texture was measured in terms of hardness by using a Texture Analyzer. As for the shrinkage, displacement of volume method was applied and percentage of shrinkage was obtained in terms of volume changes. A feed-forward backpropagation network with sigmoidal function was developed and best network configuration was chosen based on the highest correlation coefficients between the experimental values versus predicted values. As a comparison, Response Surface Methodology (RSM) statistical analysis was also employed. The performances of both RSM and ANN modelling were evaluated based on absolute average deviation (AAD), correlation of determination (R2) and root mean square error (RMSE). The results showed that ANN has higher prediction capability as compared to RSM. The relative importance of the variables on the physical properties were also determined by using connection weight approach in ANN. It was found that solution concentration showed the highest influence on all three physical properties.

  10. Shrinkage of the Toona ciliata wood from three counties in the south of Minas Gerais state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra de Oliveira Ribeiro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to evaluate the shrinkage, in the bottom-up and pith-bark direction, of the australian cedar wood from three Counties in the south of Minas Gerais state, and also to check the variation in chemical composition of wood due the location of planting. The australian cedar wood was obtained with four years of age and in three cities in the south of Minas Gerais state (Campo Belo, Cana Verde and Santo Antonio do Amparo. The chemical constituents of wood, shrinkage values (tangential, radial, longitudinal and volumetric and the anisotropy coefficient. According to the results, there was no significant variation in the levels of holocellulose were determined, lignin, extractives and ashes between the three plantation sites evaluated. For the shrinkage of the wood in the bottom-up direction, there was no significant variation of the radial and longitudinal contractions for the three locations evaluated. However, significant variation was observed for the tangential and volumetric contractions for cities of Campo Belo and Cana Verde, and significant variation of Tangential contraction for the plantation of Santo Antonio do Amparo. In the pith-bark direction, significant variation was observed only on the radial contraction and the coefficient of anisotropy for location of Cana Verde.

  11. DH and ESPI laser interferometry applied to the restoration shrinkage assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, L. M. P.; Parra, D. F.; Vasconcelos, M. R.; Vaz, M.; Monteiro, J.

    2014-01-01

    In dental restoration postoperative marginal leakage is commonly associated to polymerization shrinkage effects. In consequence the longevity and quality of restorative treatment depends on the shrinkage mechanisms of the composite filling during the polymerization. In this work the development of new techniques for evaluation of those effects under light-induced polymerization of dental nano composite fillings is reported. The composite resins activated by visible light, initiate the polymerization process by absorbing light in wavelengths at about 470 nm. The techniques employed in the contraction assessment were digital holography (DH) and Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) based on laser interferometry. A satisfactory resolution was achieved in the non-contact displacement field measurements on small objects concerning the experimental dental samples. According to a specific clinical protocol, natural teeth were used (human mandibular premolars). A class I cavity was drilled and restored with nano composite material, according to Black principles. The polymerization was monitored by DH and ESPI in real time during the cure reaction of the restoration. The total displacement reported for the material in relation of the tooth wall was 3.7 μm (natural tooth). The technique showed the entire tooth surface (wall) deforming during polymerization shrinkage.

  12. Activity-Dependent Dendritic Spine Shrinkage and Growth Involve Downregulation of Cofilin via Distinct Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Barbara; Saffin, Jean-Michel; Halpain, Shelley

    2014-01-01

    A current model posits that cofilin-dependent actin severing negatively impacts dendritic spine volume. Studies suggested that increased cofilin activity underlies activity-dependent spine shrinkage, and that reduced cofilin activity induces activity-dependent spine growth. We suggest instead that both types of structural plasticity correlate with decreased cofilin activity. However, the mechanism of inhibition determines the outcome for spine morphology. RNAi in rat hippocampal cultures demonstrates that cofilin is essential for normal spine maintenance. Cofilin-F-actin binding and filament barbed-end production decrease during the early phase of activity-dependent spine shrinkage; cofilin concentration also decreases. Inhibition of the cathepsin B/L family of proteases prevents both cofilin loss and spine shrinkage. Conversely, during activity-dependent spine growth, LIM kinase stimulates cofilin phosphorylation, which activates phospholipase D-1 to promote actin polymerization. These results implicate novel molecular mechanisms and prompt a revision of the current model for how cofilin functions in activity-dependent structural plasticity. PMID:24740405

  13. Hygroscopic swelling and shrinkage of latewood cell wall micropillars reveal ultrastructural anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Stiefel, Michael; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Mokso, Rajmund; Derome, Dominique; Carmeliet, Jan

    2014-06-06

    We document the hygroscopic swelling and shrinkage of the central and the thickest secondary cell wall layer of wood (named S2) in response to changes in environmental humidity using synchrotron radiation-based phase contrast X-ray tomographic nanoscopy. The S2 layer is a natural fibre-reinforced nano-composite polymer and is strongly reactive to water. Using focused ion beam, micropillars with a cross section of few micrometres are fabricated from the S2 layer of the latewood cell walls of Norway spruce softwood. The thin neighbouring cell wall layers are removed to prevent hindering or restraining of moisture-induced deformation during swelling or shrinkage. The proposed experiment intended to get further insights into the microscopic origin of the anisotropic hygro-expansion of wood. It is found that the swelling/shrinkage strains are highly anisotropic in the transverse plane of the cell wall, larger in the normal than in the direction parallel to the cell wall's thickness. This ultrastructural anisotropy may be due to the concentric lamellation of the cellulose microfibrils as the role of the cellulose microfibril angle in the transverse swelling anisotropy is negligible. The volumetric swelling of the cell wall material is found to be substantially larger than the one of wood tissues within the growth ring and wood samples made of several growth rings. The hierarchical configuration in wood optimally increases its dimensional stability in response to a humid environment with higher scales of complexity.

  14. Multiple-Shrinkage Multinomial Probit Models with Applications to Simulating Geographies in Public Use Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgette, Lane F.; Reiter, Jerome P.

    2013-01-01

    Multinomial outcomes with many levels can be challenging to model. Information typically accrues slowly with increasing sample size, yet the parameter space expands rapidly with additional covariates. Shrinking all regression parameters towards zero, as often done in models of continuous or binary response variables, is unsatisfactory, since setting parameters equal to zero in multinomial models does not necessarily imply “no effect.” We propose an approach to modeling multinomial outcomes with many levels based on a Bayesian multinomial probit (MNP) model and a multiple shrinkage prior distribution for the regression parameters. The prior distribution encourages the MNP regression parameters to shrink toward a number of learned locations, thereby substantially reducing the dimension of the parameter space. Using simulated data, we compare the predictive performance of this model against two other recently-proposed methods for big multinomial models. The results suggest that the fully Bayesian, multiple shrinkage approach can outperform these other methods. We apply the multiple shrinkage MNP to simulating replacement values for areal identifiers, e.g., census tract indicators, in order to protect data confidentiality in public use datasets. PMID:24358073

  15. Non-uniform shrinkage of multiple-walled carbon nanotubes under in situ electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lunxiong [South China Normal University, Brain Science Institute, Guangzhou (China); Xiamen University, China-Australia Joint Laboratory for Functional Nanomaterials and Physics Department, Xiamen (China); Su, Jiangbin [Xiamen University, China-Australia Joint Laboratory for Functional Nanomaterials and Physics Department, Xiamen (China); Chang Zhou University, School of Mathematics and Physics, Changzhou (China); Zhu, Xianfang [Xiamen University, China-Australia Joint Laboratory for Functional Nanomaterials and Physics Department, Xiamen (China)

    2016-10-15

    Instability of multiple-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was investigated by in situ transmission electron microscopy at room temperature. Specially, the non-uniform shrinkage of tubes was found: The pristine MWCNT shrank preferentially in its axial direction from the most curved free cap end of the tube, but the shrinkage of the tube diameter was offset by the axial shrinkage: For the complex MWCNT, the two inner MWCNTs also preferentially axially shrank from their most curved cap ends and separated from each other. However, for the effect of the radial pressure from the out walls which enveloped the two inner tubes and the tube amorphization, the two inner tubes were extruded to come close to each other and finally touched again. The new ''evaporation'' and ''diffusion'' mechanisms of carbon atoms as driven by the nano-curvature of CNT and the electron beam-induced athermal activation were suggested to explain the above phenomena. (orig.)

  16. The Comfort Properties of Two Differential-Shrinkage Polyester Warp Knitted Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Qing

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Single-layered warp knitted fabrics were produced by the 60D/36F (containing 36 filaments polyester yarn with differential shrinkage (DS property in this study. Due to the differential shrinkage property, the fabric becomes curly and bulkier, simulating cotton fabric in terms of its appearance and fabric handle. The performance and appearance of these DS polyester warp knitted fabrics were evaluated objectively and subjectively. The testing results demonstrated that the DS polyester warp knitted fabric had better abrasion property, worse pilling resistance due to the mechanical property of polyester yarn when compared with 100% cotton warp knitted fabric. Meanwhile, lower water vapour permeability and air resistance were found for DS polyester warp knitted fabric resulting from the dense structure of yarn shrinkage after heat-moisture treatment. Besides, the fabric handle was evaluated by Kawabata evaluation system and subject to trial under dry and wet fabric condition. DS polyester warp knitted fabrics provide better recovery under low stress mechanical pressure. The subjective evaluation result shows that the warp knitted fabrics made of DS polyester had similar handle against cotton warp knitted fabric in terms of prickle, smooth, comfort and dry feeling in both dry and wet testing conditions.

  17. Fretting Fatigue with Cylindrical-On-Flat Contact: Crack Nucleation, Crack Path and Fatigue Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noraphaiphipaksa, Nitikorn; Manonukul, Anchalee; Kanchanomai, Chaosuan

    2017-01-01

    Fretting fatigue experiments and finite element analysis were carried out to investigate the influence of cylindrical-on-flat contact on crack nucleation, crack path and fatigue life of medium-carbon steel. The location of crack nucleation was predicted using the maximum shear stress range criterion and the maximum relative slip amplitude criterion. The prediction using the maximum relative slip amplitude criterion gave the better agreement with the experimental result, and should be used for the prediction of the location of crack nucleation. Crack openings under compressive bulk stresses were found in the fretting fatigues with flat-on-flat contact and cylindrical-on-flat contacts, i.e., fretting-contact-induced crack openings. The crack opening stress of specimen with flat-on-flat contact was lower than those of specimens with cylindrical-on-flat contacts, while that of specimen with 60-mm radius contact pad was lower than that of specimen with 15-mm radius contact pad. The fretting fatigue lives were estimated by integrating the fatigue crack growth curve from an initial propagating crack length to a critical crack length. The predictions of fretting fatigue life with consideration of crack opening were in good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:28772522

  18. Stress-corrosion cracking in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-01

    Criteria and recommended practices for preventing stress-corrosion cracking from impairing the structural integrity and flightworthiness of space vehicles are presented. The important variables affecting stress-corrosion cracking are considered to be the environment, including time and temperature; metal composition, and structure; and sustained tensile stress. For designing spacecraft structures that are free of stress-corrosion cracking for the service life of the vehicle the following rules apply: (1) identification and control of the environments to which the structure will be exposed during construction, storage, transportation, and use; (2) selection of alloy compositions and tempers which are resistant to stress-corrosion cracking in the identified environment; (3) control of fabrication and other processes which may introduce residual tensile stresses or damage the material; (4) limitation of the combined residual and applied tensile stresses to below the threshold stress level for the onset of cracking throughout the service life of the vehicle; and (5) establishment of a thorough inspection program.

  19. XFEM for Thermal Crack of Massive Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guowei Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal cracking of massive concrete structures occurs as a result of stresses caused by hydration in real environment conditions. The extended finite element method that combines thermal fields and creep is used in this study to analyze the thermal cracking of massive concrete structures. The temperature field is accurately simulated through an equivalent equation of heat conduction that considers the effect of a cooling pipe system. The time-dependent creep behavior of massive concrete is determined by the viscoelastic constitutive model with Prony series. Based on the degree of hydration, we consider the main properties related to cracking evolving with time. Numerical simulations of a real massive concrete structure are conducted. Results show that the developed method is efficient for numerical calculations of thermal cracks on massive concrete. Further analyses indicate that a cooling system and appropriate heat preservation measures can efficiently prevent the occurrence of thermal cracks.

  20. Evaluation of crack tip constraint using photoelasticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayatollahi, M.R.; Safari, H

    2003-09-01

    The method of photoelasticity has been used extensively in the past for investigating elastic stresses in cracked specimens. However, previous studies concentrate predominantly on different methods for determining the stress intensity factors. Some of these methods make use of the higher order stress terms including the T-stress to achieve more accurate experimental results for stress intensity factors. Nevertheless, the effect of T-stress on the stress fields near the crack tip has received little attention in previous photoelastic studies. In this paper, a two-parameter formulation is used to study how the T-stress influences the isochromatic fringe patterns around the tip of a mode I crack. Theoretical and experimental results obtained in this research show that the isochromatic fringes near the crack tip rotate forward and backward for negative and positive values of T-stress, respectively. Therefore, the experimental technique of photoelasticity can be used to distinguish low constraint cracked components from high constraint ones.

  1. Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkins, R.N. (Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (UK). Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)

    1990-03-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.

  2. Small crack test program for helicopter materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annigeri, Bal; Schneider, George

    1994-01-01

    Crack propagation tests were conducted to determine crack growth behavior in five helicopter materials for surface cracks between 0.005 to 0.020 inches in depth. Constant amplitude tests were conducted at stress ratios R equals 0.1 and 0.5, and emphasis was placed on near threshold data (i.e., 10-8 to 10-6 inches/cycle). Spectrum tests were conducted using a helicopter spectrum. The test specimen was an unnotched tension specimen, and cracks were initiated from a small EDM notch. An optical/video system was used to monitor crack growth. The material for the test specimens was obtained from helicopter part forgings. Testing was conducted at stresses below yield to reflect actual stresses in helicopter parts.

  3. Crack shape developments and leak rates for circumferential complex-cracked pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brickstad, B.; Bergman, M. [SAQ Inspection Ltd., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-04-01

    A computerized procedure has been developed that predicts the growth of an initial circumferential surface crack through a pipe and further on to failure. The crack growth mechanism can either be fatigue or stress corrosion. Consideration is taken to complex crack shapes and for the through-wall cracks, crack opening areas and leak rates are also calculated. The procedure is based on a large number of three-dimensional finite element calculations of cracked pipes. The results from these calculations are stored in a database from which the PC-program, denoted LBBPIPE, reads all necessary information. In this paper, a sensitivity analysis is presented for cracked pipes subjected to both stress corrosion and vibration fatigue.

  4. Fully plastic crack opening analyses of complex-cracked pipes for Ramberg-Osgood materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Uk; Choi, Jae Boong [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Nam Su [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun Jae [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The plastic influence functions for calculating fully plastic Crack opening displacement (COD) of complex-cracked pipes were newly proposed based on systematic 3-dimensional (3-D) elastic-plastic Finite element (FE) analyses using Ramberg-Osgood (R-O) relation, where global bending moment, axial tension and internal pressure are considered separately as a loading condition. Then, crack opening analyses were performed based on GE/EPRI concept by using the new plastic influence functions for complex-cracked pipes made of SA376 TP304 stainless steel, and the predicted CODs were compared with FE results based on deformation plasticity theory of tensile material behavior. From the comparison, the confidence of the proposed fully plastic crack opening solutions for complex-cracked pipes was gained. Therefore, the proposed engineering scheme for COD estimation using the new plastic influence functions can be utilized to estimate leak rate of a complex-cracked pipe for R-O material.

  5. Toward assessing the effects of crack front curvature /CFC/.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swedlow, J. L.; Ritter, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    Consideration of the effect of crack front curvature (CFC) on the K calibration of five special geometries in which CFC occurs. The five cases considered include an elliptical crack in an infinite medium, an internal annular crack in a thick-walled cylinder, a through crack in a flat plate, a part-through crack in a plate, and an irregularly shaped crack in a solid. It is shown that K depends on CFC differently in each case.

  6. Computed tomographic studies of the basis pedunculi in chronic hemiplegic patients: Topographic correlation between cerebral lesion and midbrain shrinkage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warabi, T.; Miyasaka, K.; Inoue, K.; Nakamura, N.

    1987-09-01

    A computed tomographic method for analyzing the shrinkage of the basis pedunculi (BP) due to the secondary degeneration of the descending fibers was applied in correlation to the site of cerebral lesions in 89 chronic hemiplegic patients. Cerebral lesions in the anterior corona radiata or the anterior limb of the capsula interna caused shrinkage of the medial BP. Lesions in the central corona radiata or the genu and posterior limb of the capsula interna caused shrinkage of the central BP, while lesions of the posterior corona radiata or the posterior limb of the capsula interna caused shrinkage of the lateral BP. These results suggested that CT images are able to reveal the principle sites of atrophy of the descending fiber tracts in chronic hemiplegia.

  7. Characteristics of low polymerization shrinkage flowable resin composites in newly-developed cavity base materials for bulk filling technique

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    NITTA, Keiko; NOMOTO, Rie; TSUBOTA, Yuji; TSUCHIKAWA, Masuji; HAYAKAWA, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate polymerization shrinkage and other physical properties of newly-developed cavity base materials for bulk filling technique, with the brand name BULK BASE (BBS...

  8. Effect of cyclic loading on microleakage of silorane based composite compared with low shrinkage methacrylate-based composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Kermanshah

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Silorane did not provide better marginal seal than the low shrinkage methacrylate-based composites (except Aelite. In addition, cyclic loading did not affect the marginal microleakage of evaluated composite restorations .

  9. Depth of cure, flexural properties and volumetric shrinkage of low and high viscosity bulk-fill giomers and resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2017-03-31

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the depth of cure, flexural properties and volumetric shrinkage of low and high viscosity bulk-fill giomers and resin composites. Depth of cure and flexural properties were determined according to ISO 4049, and volumetric shrinkage was measured using a dilatometer. The depths of cure of giomers were significantly lower than those of resin composites, regardless of photo polymerization times. No difference in flexural strength and modulus was found among either high or low viscosity bulk fill materials. Volumetric shrinkage of low and high viscosity bulk-fill resin composites was significantly less than low and high viscosity giomers. Depth of cure of both low and high viscosity bulk-fill materials is time dependent. Flexural strength and modulus of high viscosity or low viscosity bulk-fill giomer or resin composite materials are not different for their respective category. Resin composites exhibited less polymerization shrinkage than giomers.

  10. Crack branching in cross-ply composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Saponara, Valeria

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this research work is to examine the behavior of an interface crack in a cross-ply laminate which is subject to static and fatigue loading. The failure mechanism analyzed here is crack branching (or crack kinking or intra-layer crack): the delamination located between two different plies starts growing as an interface crack and then may branch into the less tough ply. The specimens were manufactured from different types of Glass/Epoxy and Graphite/Epoxy, by hand lay-up, vacuum bagging and cure in autoclave. Each specimen had a delamination starter. Static mixed mode tests and compressive fatigue tests were performed. Experiments showed the scale of the problem, one ply thickness, and some significant features, like contact in the branched crack. The amount of scatter in the experiments required use of statistics. Exploratory Data Analysis and a factorial design of experiments based on a 8 x 8 Hadamard matrix were used. Experiments and statistics show that there is a critical branching angle above which crack growth is greatly accelerated. This angle seems: (1) not to be affected by the specimens' life; (2) not to depend on the specimen geometry and loading conditions; (3) to strongly depend on the amount of contact in the branched crack. Numerical analysis was conducted to predict crack propagation based on the actual displacement/load curves for static tests. This method allows us to predict the total crack propagation in 2D conditions, while neglecting branching. Finally, the existence of a solution based on analytic continuation is discussed.

  11. Investigating Reaction-Driven Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Hirth, G.; Savage, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    Many metamorphic reactions lead to large volume changes, and potentially to reaction-driven cracking [1,2]. Large-scale hydration of mantle peridotite to produce serpentine or talc is invoked to explain the rheology of plate boundaries, the nature of earthquakes, and the seismic properties of slow-spread ocean crust and the 'mantle wedge' above subduction zones. Carbonation of peridotite may be an important sink in the global carbon cycle. Zones of 100% magnesite + quartz replacing peridotite, up to 200 m thick, formed where oceanic mantle was thrust over carbonate-bearing metasediments in Oman. Talc + carbonate is an important component of the matrix in subduction mélanges at Santa Catalina Island , California, and the Sanbagawa metamorphic belt, Japan. Engineered systems to emulate natural mineral carbonation could provide relatively inexpensive CO2 capture and storage [3]. More generally, engineered reaction-driven cracking could supplement or replace hydraulic fracture in geothermal systems, solution mining, and extraction of tight oil and gas. The controls on reaction-driven cracking are poorly understood. Hydration and carbonation reactions can be self-limiting, since they potentially reduce permeability and armor reactive surfaces [4]. Also, in some cases, hydration or carbonation may take place at constant volume. Small changes in volume due to precipitation of solid products increases stress, destabilizing solid reactants, until precipitation and dissolution rates become equal at a steady state stress [5]. In a third case, volume change due to precipitation of solid products causes brittle failure. This has been invoked on qualitative grounds to explain, e.g., complete serpentinization of mantle peridotite [6]. Below ~ 300°C, the available potential energy for hydration and carbonation of olivine could produce stresses of 100's of MPa [2], sufficient to fracture rocks to 10 km depth or more, causing brittle failure below the steady state stress required

  12. Cracks assessment using ultrasonic technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Maria Pia; Tomasella, Marcelo [OLDELVAL S.A. Oleoductos del Valle, Rio Negro (Argentina). Pipeline Integrity Dept.

    2005-07-01

    The goal of Oldelval Integrity Program is to prevent ruptures and leaks, developing strategies for a better handling of the integrity of our pipelines. In order to achieve it we have studied and modeled each process that involved in the integrity pipeline. Those processes are mainly based on defects reported by an internal inspection tool and supplied with field inspection and monitoring data. Years of evaluation, study and the continuous effort overturned towards a phenomenon that worries to the industry, as it is the SCC. Since 1998 up to 2004 SCC was included in the integrity program with some preventive maintenance programs. The accomplishment of the inspection based on ultrasound tools, is the culmination of years of evaluation and investigations supported by field digs and materials susceptibility. This paper describes Oldelval's results with ultrasonic crack detection tool, and how it can be reliably to detect SCC. (author)

  13. Environmental stress cracking of polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, K. I.

    1980-01-01

    A two point bending method for use in studying the environmental stress cracking and crazing phenomena is described and demonstrated for a variety of polymer/solvent systems. Critical strain values obtained from these curves are reported for various polymer/solvent systems including a considerable number of systems for which critical strain values have not been previously reported. Polymers studied using this technique include polycarbonate (PC), ABS, high impact styrene (HIS), polyphenylene oxide (PPO), and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). Critical strain values obtained using this method compared favorably with available existing data. The major advantage of the technique is the ability to obtain time vs. strain curves over a short period of time. The data obtained suggests that over a short period of time the transition in most of the polymer solvent systems is more gradual than previously believed.

  14. Model to predict shrinkage and ejection forces of injection moulded tubular parts of short glass fiber reinforced thermoplastics

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, M. C. R.; Netto, A. C. S.; Pontes, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a model to predict shrinkage and ejection forces for glass fiber reinforced thermoplastics of tubular geometry. This mathematical model was based in Jansen’s Model to predict shrinkage and residual stresses in fiber reinforced injection molded products and Pontes’s Model to predict ejection forces for tubular parts of pure PP. The model used the modified classical laminate theory applied to injection moulding and it uses the fiber orientation state, temperatu...

  15. Calculation of the fracture strength of in-situ reinforced concrete structures of multi-storeyed buildings considering shrinkage deformation propagation Расчет трещиностойкости монолитных железобетонных конструкций многоэтажных зданий с учетом развития деформаций усадки

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golovin Nikolay Grigor'evich

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cracking of different nature may occur in the process of construction of multi-storeyed reinforced concrete buildings. Usually, the diagnosis of their causes is not complicated. However, in some cases the diagnosis is a sophisticated problem due to the special distribution of rigidities over the building frame.The article focuses on the technique of the three-dimensional modeling and analysis of building frame elements based on shrinkage cracks using the finite element analysis in Abaqus. The concrete damaged plasticity model is used to describe reinforcement steel. Simulation of cracking process was made using the partial model of a building having solid elements (for the concrete and membrane and beam elements (for the reinforcement. Two cycles of simulation were implemented. Firstly, the calculation of crack propagation due to the nominal load was made. Simulation showed no cracks in the mid-span zones of beams. The second step was the simulation of crack propagation in case of shrinkage deformation propagation. This evaluation showed the possibility of crack formation and growth inside beams and slabs. The first shrinkage cracks appeared 25 days after the concrete curing completion. The first shrinkage cracks appeared in the midspan zone of beams in the aftermath of 29 days.Simulation of shrinkage deformations in the floor structure has showed that formation and propagation of cracks in the floor beams is possible. As a result of calculations, cracks appeared in the bottom part of the beams. In some beams, formation of shrinkage cracks may occur solely in the supports.Рассмотрена методика трехмерного моделирования и расчета элементов каркаса здания по образованию силовых и усадочных трещин с применением конечноэлементного анализа в программном комплексе Abaqus.

  16. Partial shrinkage of venous tissues near valves using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichardo, Samuel; Curiel, Laura; Milleret, René; Pichot, Olivier; Lacoste, François; Chapelon, Jean-Yves

    2005-03-01

    The cross-section of a vein can be reduced by exposing the collagen of the vein wall to high temperature (85° C) for a few seconds. Partial shrinkage of the vein is appropriate for correcting deformations of valvular tissues that can cause the abnormal blood reflux which is the main cause of varicose veins and Superficial Venous Insufficiency. Due to its suitability for inducing localized heating, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) is a good method for correcting valvular tissue. In the present study, the feasibility of using HIFU for inducing partial shrinkage of the saphenous vein wall is demonstrated. The position and size of valvular deformations are well suited to being heated and, consequently, reduced with HIFU. The resulting shrinkage of deformations should restore normal function of the valve. An experimental protocol was used in which several in vitro segments of human saphenous vein were exposed with a monochromatic signal produced by a real-time imaging HIFU probe. The probe has a focal length of 45 mm, a diameter of 52.5 mm and operates at 3 MHz. Ultrasonic imaging, obtained with an 8-MHz 128-element linear array placed at the centre of the HIFU probe, was used to target the vein. The segment was inserted in a porcine muscle sample, and both were placed into a PVC cylinder. Individual sonications of the vein wall were performed for acoustic power values ranging between 8.75 and 35 W at a constant sonication duration of 5 s. Different durations ranging between 3 and 7 s at constant power were also tested. Finally, a long duration of 18 s was tested while the focal point was displaced along the vein wall at a speed of 0.5 mm/s. Results showed that shrinkage of the vein wall was observed using echographic and macroscopic analysis. In particular, the vein diameter was reduced by 15% for a sonication-duration of 18 s with continuous displacement of the focal point. Results showed that HIFU is suitable for partial shrinkage of the saphenous vein and

  17. Investigation on Failures of Composite Beam and Substrate Concrete due to Drying Shrinkage Property of Repair Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattnaik, Rashmi Ranjan

    2017-06-01

    A Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and an experimental study was conducted on composite beam of repair material and substrate concrete to investigate the failures of the composite beam due to drying shrinkage property of the repair materials. In FEA, the stress distribution in the composite beam due to two concentrate load and shrinkage of repair materials were investigated in addition to the deflected shape of the composite beam. The stress distributions and load deflection shapes of the finite element model were investigated to aid in analysis of the experimental findings. In the experimental findings, the mechanical properties such as compressive strength, split tensile strength, flexural strength, and load-deflection curves were studied in addition to slant shear bond strength, drying shrinkage and failure patterns of the composite beam specimens. Flexure test was conducted to simulate tensile stress at the interface between the repair material and substrate concrete. The results of FEA were used to analyze the experimental results. It was observed that the repair materials with low drying shrinkage are showing compatible failure in the flexure test of the composite beam and deform adequately in the load deflection curves. Also, the flexural strength of the composite beam with low drying shrinkage repair materials showed higher flexural strength as compared to the composite beams with higher drying shrinkage value of the repair materials even though the strength of those materials were more.

  18. The correlation between aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 level and tumor shrinkage after preoperative chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhandyka Rafli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to determine the correlation between aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1A1 level and tumor shrinkage after chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer. This is a retrospective study of 14 locally advanced rectal cancer patients with long course neoadjuvant chemoradiation. ALDH1A1 level was measured using ELISA from paraffin embedded tissue. Tumor shrinkage was measured from computed tomography (CT scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumor v1.1 (RECIST v1.1. The mean of ALDH1A1 level was 9.014 ± 3.3 pg/mL and the mean of tumor shrinkage was 7.89 ± 35.7%. Partial response proportion was 28.6%, stable disease proportion was 50% and progressive disease proportion was 21.4%. There was a significant strong negative correlation (r = –0.890, plt; 0.001 between ALDH1A1 and tumor shrinkage. In conclusion, tumor shrinkage in locally advanced rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiation was influenced by ALDH1A1 level. Higher level of ALDH1A1 suggests decreased tumor shrinkage after preoperative chemoradiation.

  19. 1-D diffusion based solidification model with volumetric expansion and shrinkage effect: A semi-analytical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monde, Aniket D.; Chakraborty, Prodyut R.

    2017-10-01

    Volumetric expansion and shrinkage due to different densities of solid and liquid phases are common phenomena during solidification process. Simple analytical models addressing effect of volumetric expansion/shrinkage during solidification are rarely found. The few existing 1-D solidification models are valid only for semi-infinite domain with limitations of their application for finite domain size. The focus of the present work is to develop a 1-D semi-analytical solidification model addressing effects of volumetric expansion/shrinkage in a finite domain. The proposed semi-analytical scheme involves finding simultaneous solution of transient 1-D heat diffusion equations at solid and liquid domain coupled at the interface by Stefan condition. The change of the total domain length during solidification due to volumetric expansion/shrinkage is addressed by using mass conservation. For validation of the proposed model, solidification of water in a finite domain is studied without considering volumetric expansion/shrinkage effect and results are compared with those obtained from existing enthalpy updating based numerical model. After validation, case studies pertaining to volumetric expansion and shrinkage are performed considering solidification of water and paraffin respectively and physically consistent results are obtained. The study is relevant for understanding unidirectional crystal growth under the effect of controlled boundary condition.

  20. Clod-o-meter: A New Method for the Calculation of Shrinkage/Swelling Curves for Soil Clods by Integrating an Open Source Software Solution and Digital Imagery Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Najm, M. R.; Stewart, R. D.; Rupp, D. E.; Selker, J. S.

    2010-12-01

    Characterizing the shrinkage and swelling dynamics of swelling soils is fundamental to the understanding of soil cracking and moisture movement within the vadose zone. The shrinkage and swelling curves relate the change in the soil’s specific volume (volume of soil/mass of solids) to the change in the soil’s moisture content. Current methods determine clod volume by dipping saran-coated clods in water or by relying on expensive equipment and proprietary software (such as using laser scanners to measure the sample in three dimensions). We propose an alternative method for determining the volume of a soil clod, which is both low-cost and utilizes completely free and open-source software. To measure the volume, the clod is placed on a stand and imaged from multiple angles using a digital camera. The images are then combined using the free Microsoft program, Photosynth, to create a 3-dimensional point cloud (a three-dimensional set of vertices, representing the outer surface of the object). This point cloud is then edited using the open source program Meshlab to remove outliers and create a Poisson surface mesh. Finally, an Octave code is used to calculate the relative volume of the 3-dimensional surface. To obtain the actual volume of the clod, the relative volume needs to be calibrated using an object within the same 3D image with known dimensions and volume. For this analysis we used the soil clod holder (a cylinder painted with bright, random patterns) as the calibration object to be able to calculate the real volume of the clod from the relative volume obtained by Octave. The clods were kept at room temperature under small temperature and humidity fluctuations to ensure slow and uniform shrinkage. This procedure was repeated at multiple moisture contents (clod weight was recorded immediately prior to each image session). To verify the final volume calculation from the image processing, the clod was dipped in saran resin and placed into a water-filled graduated

  1. The fracture mechanics of fatigue crack propagation in compact bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, T M; Hayes, W C

    1976-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to apply the techniques of fracture mechanics to a study of fatigue crack propagation in compact bone. Small cracks parallel to the long axis of the bone were initiated in standardized specimens of bovine bone. Crack growth was achieved by cyclically loading these specimens. The rate of crack growth was determined from measurements of crack length versus cycles of loading. The stress intensity factor at the tip of the crack was calculated from knowledge of the applied load, the crack length, and the specimen geometry. A strong correlation was found between the experimentally determined crack growth rate and the applied stress intensity. The relationship takes the form of a power law similar to that for other materials. Visual observation and scanning electron microscopy revealed that crack propagation occurred by initiation of subcritical cracks ahead of the main crack.

  2. On the application of cohesive crack modeling in cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    2007-01-01

    for a centrally cracked sheet is established applying semi-analytical, bridged and fictitious crack modeling. The semi-analytical crack model is compared with a FEM analysis and it is demonstrated, that the standard fictitious crack implementation in FEM packages (in this case DIANA) provides a good approximation......Cohesive crack models-in particular the Fictitious Crack Model - are applied routinely in the analysis of crack propagation in concrete and mortar. Bridged crack models-where cohesive stresses are assumed to exist together with a stress singularity at the crack tip-on the other hand, are used...... typically for multi scale problems such as crack propagation in fiber reinforced composites. Mortar and concrete, however, are multi-scale materials and the question naturally arises, if bridged crack models in fact are more suitable for concrete and mortar as well? In trying to answer this question a model...

  3. Crack detection in a beam with an arbitrary number of transverse cracks using genetic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaji, N. [Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehrjoo, M. [Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, a crack detection approach is presented for detecting depth and location of cracks in beam-like structures. For this purpose, a new beam element with an arbitrary number of embedded transverse edge cracks, in arbitrary positions of beam element with any depth, is derived. The components of the stiffness matrix for the cracked element are computed using the conjugate beam concept and Betti's theorem, and finally represented in closed-form expressions. The proposed beam element is efficiently employed for solving forward problem (i.e., to gain precise natural frequencies and mode shapes of the beam knowing the cracks' characteristics). To validate the proposed element, results obtained by new element are compared with two-dimensional (2D) finite element results and available experimental measurements. Moreover, by knowing the natural frequencies and mode shapes, an inverse problem is established in which the location and depth of cracks are determined. In the inverse approach, an optimization problem based on the new finite element and genetic algorithms (GAs) is solved to search the solution. It is shown that the present algorithm is able to identify various crack configurations in a cracked beam. The proposed approach is verified through a cracked beam containing various cracks with different depths.

  4. HETEK - Control of Early Age Cracking in Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Christensen, Søren Lolk; Dela, Birgitte Friis

    1997-01-01

    This report deals with autogenous shrinkage of two concretes and the corresponding mortars. The theory of self-desiccation and autogenous deformation is presented. Autogenous shrinkage of mortar is measuredin a paste dilatometer at constant and varying temperatures. Similarly the autogenous shrin...

  5. Crack growth monitoring at CFRP bond lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahammer, M.; Adebahr, W.; Sachse, R.; Gröninger, S.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2016-02-01

    With the growing need for lightweight technologies in aerospace and automotive industries, fibre-reinforced plastics, especially carbon-fibre (CFRP), are used with a continuously increasing annual growth rate. A promising joining technique for composites is adhesive bonding. While rivet holes destroy the fibres and cause stress concentration, adhesive bond lines distribute the load evenly. Today bonding is only used in secondary structures due to a lack of knowledge with regard to long-term predictability. In all industries, numerical simulation plays a critical part in the development process of new materials and structures, while it plays a vital role when it comes to CFRP adhesive bondings conducing the predictability of life time and damage tolerance. The critical issue with adhesive bondings is crack growth. In a dynamic tensile stress testing machine we dynamically load bonded CFRP coupon specimen and measure the growth rate of an artificially started crack in order to feed the models with the results. We also investigate the effect of mechanical crack stopping features. For observation of the bond line, we apply two non-contact NDT techniques: Air-coupled ultrasound in slanted transmission mode and active lockin-thermography evaluated at load frequencies. Both methods give promising results for detecting the current crack front location. While the ultrasonic technique provides a slightly higher accuracy, thermography has the advantage of true online monitoring, because the measurements are made while the cyclic load is being applied. The NDT methods are compared to visual inspection of the crack front at the specimen flanks and show high congruence. Furthermore, the effect of crack stopping features within the specimen on the crack growth is investigated. The results show, that not all crack fronts are perfectly horizontal, but all of them eventually come to a halt in the crack stopping feature vicinity.

  6. Cracks in high-manganese cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chojecki

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The reasons which account for the formation of in service cracks in castings made from Hadfield steel were discussed. To explain the source of existence of the nuclei of brittle fractures, the properties of cast steel were examined within the range of solidification temperatures, remembering that feeding of this material is specially difficult, causing microporosity in hot spots. This creates conditions promoting the formation of microcracks which tend to propagate during service conditions involving high dynamic stresses, and explains why the cracks are mainly characterized by a brittle nature. The reason for crack formation in service are micro-porosities formed during casting solidification.

  7. Resistance to Crack Propagation of Algerian Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhakim DAOUI

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Wood is the most building materials widely used since prehistory for the construction of houses, tools, weapons. Accidents occurring during the use of materials caused by different defaults, as: knots, resin pockets, cracks. These various defaults and others are the starting point of the principle of crack mechanics. Our present work focuses on determining the resistance to crack propagation of three types of Algerians wood, (Aleppo pine, eucalyptus and oak, by calculating the energy release rate G (mode I. The estimation of factor G allows the possibility of fracture propagation.

  8. Hot cracking during laser welding of steel: influence of the welding parameters and prevention of cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Marcel; Kessler, Steffen; Scheible, Philipp; Speker, Nicolai; Harrer, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    In continuous wave keyhole-mode laser welding of high strength steel alloys hot cracking can occur. The hot crack susceptibility depends on the mutual interaction of several factors like the welding parameters, the alloy composition and the weld fixturing. In this paper we focus on the influence of the welding parameters and investigate the dependency of the laser power, the welding speed and the laser wavelength on the crack formation. X-ray images are used to visualize the hot crack patterns, which exhibit a pronounced periodicity. To influence the hot crack formation, the incident energy input into the process was adapted. For specific welding parameters, we show exemplarily the prevention of hot cracking by the use of a twin-spot optics.

  9. The initiation of environmentally-assisted cracking in semi-elliptical surface cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, L.A.

    1997-02-01

    A criterion to predict under what conditions EAC would Initiate In cracks In a high-sulfur steel in contact with low-oxygen water was recently proposed by Wire and U. This EAC Initiation Criterion was developed using transient analyses for the diffusion of sulfides plus experimental test results. The experiments were conducted mainly on compact tension-type specimens with initial crack depths of about 2.54 mm. The present paper expands upon the work of Wire and U by presenting results for significantly deeper initial semi-elliptical surface cracks. In addition, in one specimen, the surface crack penetrated weld-deposited cladding into the high-sulfur steel. The results for the semi-elliptical surface cracks agreed quite well with the EAC Initiation Criterion, and provide confirmation of the applicability of the criterion to crack configurations with more restricted access to water.

  10. An analysis of creep crack growth of interface cracks in layered/graded materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biner, S.B.

    1997-07-01

    In this study, the growth behavior of interface cracks in bimaterials and in layered materials resulting from the creep cavitation was studied. The growth model includes the effects of material deposition resulting from the growth of creep cavities on the crack tip stress fields. The results indicate that in layered materials under identical applied loading, the location of the interface crack strongly influence the amplitude of the stress field at steady-state. Due to large variation in the distribution of the stresses ahead of the interface cracks at creep regime, depending upon the crack location, the creep crack growth rates will be significantly different from each other under identical loading for a given layered material.

  11. CRACK2. Modelling calcium carbonate deposition from bicarbonate solutions in cracks in concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Brodersen, Knud Erik

    2003-01-01

    The numerical CRACK2 model simulates precipitation of calcite from calcium bicarbonate solution (e.g. groundwater) passing through cracks in concrete or other cementitious materials. A summary of experimental work is followed by a detailed description ofthe model. Hydroxyl ions are transported by diffusion in pore systems in columns of cementitious materials. The hydroxyl is precipitating calcite from a flow of bicarbonate solution in a crack connecting the ends of a row of such columns. Thec...

  12. Fatigue crack sizing in rail steel using crack closure-induced acoustic emission waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Kuang, Kevin Sze Chiang; Ghee Koh, Chan

    2017-06-01

    The acoustic emission (AE) technique is a promising approach for detecting and locating fatigue cracks in metallic structures such as rail tracks. However, it is still a challenge to quantify the crack size accurately using this technique. AE waves can be generated by either crack propagation (CP) or crack closure (CC) processes and classification of these two types of AE waves is necessary to obtain more reliable crack sizing results. As the pre-processing step, an index based on wavelet power (WP) of AE signal is initially established in this paper in order to distinguish between the CC-induced AE waves and their CP-induced counterparts. Here, information embedded within the AE signal was used to perform the AE wave classification, which is preferred to the use of real-time load information, typically adopted in other studies. With the proposed approach, it renders the AE technique more amenable to practical implementation. Following the AE wave classification, a novel method to quantify the fatigue crack length was developed by taking advantage of the CC-induced AE waves, the count rate of which was observed to be positively correlated with the crack length. The crack length was subsequently determined using an empirical model derived from the AE data acquired during the fatigue tests of the rail steel specimens. The performance of the proposed method was validated by experimental data and compared with that of the traditional crack sizing method, which is based on CP-induced AE waves. As a significant advantage over other AE crack sizing methods, the proposed novel method is able to estimate the crack length without prior knowledge of the initial crack length, integration of AE data or real-time load amplitude. It is thus applicable to the health monitoring of both new and existing structures.

  13. A Microstructure Based Multi-Site Crack Growth Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockenbrough, J. R.; Fridy, J. M.; Weiland, H.

    A simple computational method to simulate component failures in engineered structures based on microstructure characteristics has been developed. The computational model deals directly with a large set of cracks in a defined geometrical region, and is capable of tracking the simultaneous growth and interaction of those cracks, including crack-tip shielding and link-up, until final failure. The Multi-Site Crack Growth (MSCG) tool is designed to start from either an initial uncracked state where cracks may nucleate from cracked particles or other microstructural features, or from an initial cracked state such as might be expected at a percentage of fatigue life expended. Alternatively, the input can be expected crack nucleation sites from microstructure simulations. The MSCG tool is designed based on microstructural origins of fatigue cracks, and the statistical distributions of microstructural parameters. Thus it is possible to extend this framework to corrosion-fatigue. The computational algorithms used enable rapid calculation of the complete crack growth geometry for the current loading cycle, including the current number of cracks, the maximum crack length, the average crack length, and the total cracked area. This makes application to life predictions possible as crack length, area, and number distribution are predicted for given number of load cycles. Example simulations of crack nucleation from large second phase particles will be given.

  14. Page 1 Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels 691 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels 691 and crack growth per event computed from acoustic emission and crack growth data are presented in table 3. The crack growth per event varies from less than a micron for a solution annealed material to 15 pm for 10% cold worked material. 4.4 Fractographic ...

  15. Fatigue crack growth retardation in spot heated mild steel sheet

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A fatigue crack can be effectively retarded by heating a spot near the crack tip under nil remote stress condition. The subcritical spot heating at a proper position modifies the crack growth behaviour in a way, more or less, similar to specimen subjected to overload spike. It is observed that the extent of crack growth retardation ...

  16. Introduction of Residue Fluid Catalytic Cracking Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    SAKAKURA, Kei

    2014-01-01

    .... Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) is one of the most important conversion processes in a petroleum refinery, it also occupies very significant position in the refinery due to its economic benefits...

  17. Dynamic Strain and Crack Monitoring Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Los Gatos Research proposes to develop a new automated vehicle health monitoring sensor system capable of measuring loads and detecting crack, corrosion, and...

  18. Investigation of reflective cracking mitigation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    In the state of Florida, an asphalt rubber membrane interlayer (ARMI) has been commonly used as a reflective cracking (RC) mitigation method, but inconsistent performance of an ARMI has been observed in the field. Moreover, the Heavy Vehicle Simulato...

  19. Internal shear cracking in bulk metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter; Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Bay, Niels Oluf

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an uncoupled ductile damage criterion for modelling the opening and propagation of internal shear cracks in bulk metal forming. The criterion is built upon the original work on the motion of a hole subjected to shear with superimposed tensile stress triaxiality and its overall...... performance is evaluated by means of side-pressing formability tests in Aluminium AA2007-T6 subjected to different levels of pre-strain. Results show that the new proposed criterionis able to combine simplicity with efficiency for predicting the onset of fracture and the crack propagation path for the entire...... cracking to internal cracks formed undert hree-dimensional states of stress that are typical of bulk metal forming....

  20. Cracking the code of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, M; Nohria, N

    2000-01-01

    Today's fast-paced economy demands that businesses change or die. But few companies manage corporate transformations as well as they would like. The brutal fact is that about 70% of all change initiatives fail. In this article, authors Michael Beer and Nitin Nohria describe two archetypes--or theories--of corporate transformation that may help executives crack the code of change. Theory E is change based on economic value: shareholder value is the only legitimate measure of success, and change often involves heavy use of economic incentives, layoffs, downsizing, and restructuring. Theory O is change based on organizational capability: the goal is to build and strengthen corporate culture. Most companies focus purely on one theory or the other, or haphazardly use a mix of both, the authors say. Combining E and O is directionally correct, they contend, but it requires a careful, conscious integration plan. Beer and Nohria present the examples of two companies, Scott Paper and Champion International, that used a purely E or purely O strategy to create change--and met with limited levels of success. They contrast those corporate transformations with that of UK-based retailer ASDA, which has successfully embraced the paradox between the opposing theories of change and integrated E and O. The lesson from ASDA? To thrive and adapt in the new economy, companies must make sure the E and O theories of business change are in sync at their own organizations.