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Sample records for subantarctic front saf

  1. Mesoscale eddies in the Subantarctic Front-Southwest Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo D. Glorioso

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Satellite and ship observations in the southern southwest Atlantic (SSWA reveal an intense eddy field and highlight the potential for using continuous real-time satellite altimetry to detect and monitor mesoscale phenomena with a view to understanding the regional circulation. The examples presented suggest that mesoscale eddies are a dominant feature of the circulation and play a fundamental role in the transport of properties along and across the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC. The main ocean current in the SSWA, the Falkland-Malvinas Current (FMC, exhibits numerous embedded eddies south of 50°S which may contribute to the patchiness, transport and mixing of passive scalars by this strong, turbulent current. Large eddies associated with meanders are observed in the ACC fronts, some of them remaining stationary for long periods. Two particular cases are examined using a satellite altimeter in combination with in situ observations, suggesting that cross-frontal eddy transport and strong meandering occur where the ACC flow intensifies along the sub-Antarctic Front (SAF and the Southern ACC Front (SACCF.

  2. Southern Ocean fronts from the Greenwich meridian to Tasmania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, Igor M.; Gordon, Arnold L.

    1996-02-01

    All available meridional sections have been analyzed to investigate the evolution of main fronts between 0° and 150°E. The central South Atlantic is featured by the Subtropical Frontal Zone (STFZ), bordered by the North and South Subtropical Fronts (NSTF and SSTF, respectively), and by the Polar Frontal Zone (PFZ), bordered by the Subantarctic and Polar Fronts (SAF and PF, respectively). This structure becomes more complex in the African sector as the Agulhas Retroflection and the bottom topography force a more convoluted pattern. The Retroflection and associated Agulhas Front (AF) press the SSTF from 38° to 42°-43°S. Strong interactions of the AF, SSTF, and SAF with topography shift the fronts but do not obliterate them. The AF can be traced reliably up to 52°E, sometimes up to 75°E. The SAF is deflected from 45° to 43°S by the Mid-Ocean Ridge and converges with the SSTF north of the Prince Edward Islands to form a combined SSTF/SAF. This front intensifies east of 50°-52°E as a result of the confluence with the AF, and between 52° and 65°E a triple AF/SSTF/SAF ("the Crozet Front") is observed. The PF continues along 49° and 50°S between the Crozet Plateau and the Ob-Lena (Conrad) Rise, passing north of Kerguelen, nearly joining the triple Crozet Front. Downstream of the Kerguelen-Amsterdam Passage, the canonical structure is being restored (SSTF, SAF, PF); however, the front parameters in the Australian sector are different from the African sector, largely because of strong air-sea interaction and cross-frontal exchanges in the Crozet-Kerguelen region. The SSTF, squeezed between the AF and SAF, loses characteristics to both. The SSTF/SAF interaction results in the Australian SAF being warmer and saltier downstream, while the SSTF becomes shallower and weaker. The Australian STF derives its characteristics mostly from the AF, thus bringing the modified Agulhas waters to the Pacific Ocean. The newly defined North Subtropical Front (NSTF) was

  3. SAF for Windows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Timme

    2001-01-01

    SAF for Windows er et computerprogram til parametrisk konstruktion af translationsskaller. Skaloverfladernes tredimensionelle, facetterede form fremkommer ved en kombination af to todimensionelle formbestemmende kurver, som kan vælges og redigeres af brugeren. Programmet kan udfolde de genererede...

  4. Observed Temporal and Spatial Variability in the Marine Environment at the Sub-Antarctic Prince Edward Islands - Evidence of a Changing Climate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asdar, S.; Deshayes, J.; Ansorge, I. J.

    2016-02-01

    The sub-Antarctic Prince Edward Islands (PEI) (47°S,38°E) are classified as isolated, hostile, impoverished regions, in which the terrestrial and marine ecosystems are relatively simple and extremely sensitive to perturbations. Their location between the Sub-Antarctic Front (SAF) and the Antarctic Polar Front (APF), bordering the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) provides an ideal natural laboratory for studying how organisms, ecological processes and ecosystems respond to a changing ocean climate in the Southern Ocean. Recent studies have proposed that climate changes reported at the PEI may correspond in time to a southward shift of the ACC and in particular of the SAF. This southward migration in the geographic position is likely to coincide with dramatic changes in the distribution of species and total productivity of this region. This study focuses on the inter-comparison of observations available at these islands. Using spectral analysis which is a study of the frequency domain characteristics of a process, we first determine the dominant characteristics of both the temporal and spatial variability of physical and biogeochemical properties. In doing so the authors are able to determine whether and how these indices of variability interact with one another in order to understand better the mechanisms underpinning this variability, i.e. the seasonal zonal migrations associated with the SAF. Additionally, we include in our analysis recent data from 2 ADCP moorings deployed between the islands from 2014 to 2015. These in-situ observations of circulation and hydrography in the vicinity of the islands provide a unique opportunity to establish a better understanding of how large scale climatic variability may impact local conditions, and more importantly its influence on the fragile ecosystem surrounding the PEI.

  5. Differences between 1999 and 2010 across the Falkland Plateau: fronts and water masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Pérez-Hernández

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Decadal differences in the Falkland Plateau are studied from the two full-depth hydrographic data collected during the ALBATROSS (April 1999 and MOC-Austral (February 2010 cruises. Differences in the upper 100 dbar are due to changes in the seasonal thermocline, as the ALBATROSS cruise took place in the austral fall and the MOC-Austral cruise in summer. The intermediate water masses seem to be very sensitive to the wind conditions existing in their formation area, showing cooling and freshening for the decade as a consequence of a higher Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW contribution and of a decrease in the Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW stratum. The deeper layers do not exhibit any significant change in the water mass properties. The Subantarctic Front (SAF in 1999 is observed at 52.2–54.8° W with a relative mass transport of 32.6 Sv. In contrast, the SAF gets wider in 2010, stretching from 51.1 to 57.2° W (the Falkland Islands, and weakening to 17.9 Sv. Changes in the SAF can be linked with the westerly winds and mainly affect the northward flow of Subantarctic Surface Water (SASW, SAMW and AAIW/Antarctic Surface Water (AASW. The Polar Front (PF carries 24.9 Sv in 1999 (49.8–44.4° W, while in 2010 (49.9–49.2° W it narrows and strengthens to 37.3 Sv.

  6. Submesoscale processes promote seasonal restratification in the Subantarctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, M.; Swart, S.; Ansorge, I. J.; Mahadevan, A.

    2017-04-01

    Traditionally, the mechanism driving the seasonal restratification of the Southern Ocean mixed layer (ML) is thought to be the onset of springtime warming. Recent developments in numerical modeling and North Atlantic observations have shown that submesoscale ML eddies (MLE) can drive a restratifying flux to shoal the deep winter ML prior to solar heating at high latitudes. The impact of submesoscale processes on the intraseasonal variability of the Subantarctic ML is still relatively unknown. We compare 5 months of glider data in the Subantarctic Zone to simulations of a 1-D mixing model to show that the magnitude of restratification of the ML cannot be explained by heat, freshwater, and momentum fluxes alone. During early spring, we estimate that periodic increases in the vertical buoyancy flux by MLEs caused small increases in stratification, despite predominantly down-front winds that promote the destruction of stratification. The timing of seasonal restratification was consistent between 1-D model estimates and the observations. However, during up-front winds, the strength of springtime stratification increased over twofold compared to the 1-D model, with a rapid shoaling of the MLD from >200 m to Ekman buoyancy flux during down-front winds, resulting in the destruction of ML stratification and deepening of the MLD. These results propose the importance of submesoscale buoyancy fluxes enhancing seasonal restratification and mixing of the Subantarctic ML.

  7. Precipitation products from the hydrology SAF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mugnai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Support to Operational Hydrology and Water Management (H-SAF was established by the EUMETSAT Council on 3 July 2005, starting activity on 1 September 2005. The Italian Meteorological Service serves as Leading Entity on behalf of twelve European member countries. H-SAF products include precipitation, soil moisture and snow parameters. Some products are based only on satellite observations, while other products are based on the assimilation of satellite measurements/products into numerical models. In addition to product development and generation, H-SAF includes a product validation program and a hydrological validation program that are coordinated, respectively, by the Italian Department of Civil Protection and by the Polish Institute of Meteorology and Water Management. The National Center of Aeronautical Meteorology and Climatology (CNMCA of the Italian Air Force is responsible for operational product generation and dissemination. In this paper we describe the H-SAF precipitation algorithms and products, which have been developed by the Italian Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate (in collaboration with the international community and by CNMCA during the Development Phase (DP, 2005–2010 and the first Continuous Development and Operations Phase (CDOP-1, 2010–2012. The precipitation products are based on passive microwave measurements obtained from radiometers onboard different sun-synchronous low-Earth-orbiting satellites (especially, the SSM/I and SSMIS radiometers onboard DMSP satellites and the AMSU-A + AMSU-B/MHS radiometer suites onboard EPS-MetOp and NOAA-POES satellites, as well as on combined infrared/passive microwave measurements in which the passive microwave precipitation estimates are used in conjunction with SEVIRI images from the geostationary MSG satellite. Moreover, the H-SAF product generation and dissemination chain and independent product validation activities are

  8. Fronts and thermohaline structure of the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severov, Dmitri Nikolaevich; Pshennikov, Valentina; Remeslo, Alexsandr Vasilievich

    2012-05-01

    Fronts and thermohaline structure of the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence System (BMCS) are studied from climatic data, "Marathon Exp. Leg.8, 1984" data, and Sea surface temperature (SST) data base "ds277-Reynolds" (1981-2000). The South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) is divided in two main types: tropical (TW) and subtropical water (ST). Water masses, Fronts, Inter-Frontal and Frontal Zones are analysed and classified: (a) the water masses: Tropical Low-Salinity Water, Tropical Surface Water, Tropical Tropospheric Water, Subtropical Low-Salinity Water, Subtropical Surface Water, Subtropical Tropospheric Water. T,S characteristics of intermediate, deep and bottom water defined by different authors are confirmed and completed; (b) the Inter-Frontal Zones: Tropical/Brazil Current Zone, Subtropical Zone and Subantarctic Zone; (c) the Frontal Zones: Subtropical, Subantarctic and Polar, and (d) the Fronts: Subtropical Front of the Brazil Current, Principal Subtropical Front, North Subtropical Front, Subtropical Surface Front, South Subtropical Front, Subantarctic Surface Front, Subantarctic Front and Polar Front. Several stable T-S relationships are found below the friction layer and at the Fronts. The maximum gradient of the oceanographic characteristics occurs at the Brazil Current Front, which can be any of the subtropical Fronts, depending on season. Minimum mean depth of the pycnocline coincides with the Fronts of the BMCS, indicating the paths of low-salinity shelf waters into the open ocean. In the work it is shown how to recover the horizontal and vertical thermohaline structure of waters from satellite data RSMAS SST.

  9. Biological response to millennial variability of dust and nutrient supply in the Subantarctic South Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robert F; Barker, Stephen; Fleisher, Martin; Gersonde, Rainer; Goldstein, Steven L; Kuhn, Gerhard; Mortyn, P Graham; Pahnke, Katharina; Sachs, Julian P

    2014-07-13

    Fluxes of lithogenic material and fluxes of three palaeo-productivity proxies (organic carbon, biogenic opal and alkenones) over the past 100,000 years were determined using the (230)Th-normalization method in three sediment cores from the Subantarctic South Atlantic Ocean. Features in the lithogenic flux record of each core correspond to similar features in the record of dust deposition in the EPICA Dome C ice core. Biogenic fluxes correlate with lithogenic fluxes in each sediment core. Our preferred interpretation is that South American dust, most probably from Patagonia, constitutes a major source of lithogenic material in Subantarctic South Atlantic sediments, and that past biological productivity in this region responded to variability in the supply of dust, probably due to biologically available iron carried by the dust. Greater nutrient supply as well as greater nutrient utilization (stimulated by dust) contributed to Subantarctic productivity during cold periods, in contrast to the region south of the Antarctic Polar Front (APF), where reduced nutrient supply during cold periods was the principal factor limiting productivity. The anti-phased patterns of productivity on opposite sides of the APF point to shifts in the physical supply of nutrients and to dust as cofactors regulating productivity in the Southern Ocean. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Particulate organic carbon export across the Antarctic Circumpolar Current at 10°E: Differences between north and south of the Antarctic Polar Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puigcorbé, Viena; Roca-Martí, Montserrat; Masqué, Pere; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia R.; Rutgers v. d. Loeff, Michiel; Laglera, Luis M.; Bracher, Astrid; Cheah, Wee; Strass, Volker H.; Hoppema, Mario; Santos-Echeandía, Juan; Hunt, Brian P. V.; Pakhomov, Evgeny A.; Klaas, Christine

    2017-04-01

    The vertical distribution of 234Th was measured along the 10°E meridian between 44°S and 53°S in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) during the austral summer of 2012. The overarching goal of this work was to estimate particulate organic carbon (POC) export across three fronts: the Sub-Antarctic Front (SAF), the Antarctic Polar Front (APF) and the Southern Polar Front (SPF). Steady state export fluxes of 234Th in the upper 100 m ranged from 1600 to 2600 dpm m-2 d-1, decreasing with increasing latitude. Using large particle (>53 μm) C/234Th ratios, the 234Th-derived POC fluxes at 100 m ranged from 25 to 41 mmol C m-2 d-1. Observed C/234Th ratios decreased with increasing depth north of the APF while south of the APF, ratios remained similar or even increased with depth. These changes in C/234Th ratios are likely due to differences in the food web. Indeed, satellite images, together with macronutrients and dissolved iron concentrations suggest two different planktonic community structures north and south of the APF. Our results indicate that higher ratios of POC flux at 100 m to primary production occurred in nanophytoplankton dominated surface waters, where primary production rates were lower. Satellite images prior to the expedition suggest that the higher export efficiencies obtained in the northern half of the transect may be the result of the decoupling between production and export (Buesseler 1998). Transfer efficiencies to 400 m, i.e. the fraction of exported POC that reached 400 m, were found to be higher south of the APF, where diatoms were dominant and salps largely abundant. This suggests different remineralization pathways of sinking particles, influencing the transfer efficiency of exported POC to depth.

  11. Radio Refractivity Gradient over Nigeria using CM-SAF Satellite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variations of radio refractivity gradients at the low level, mid-level and upper level of the atmosphere are presented for 26 stations in Nigeria using NOAA 15, 16 and 18 satellite data retrieved from the Department of Satellite Application Facilities on Climate Monitoring (CM-SAF), DWD, Germany. The selected stations were ...

  12. Photosynthesis in a sub-Antarctic shore-zone lichen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, V.; Gremmen, N.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Photosynthetic responses to moisture, light, temperature, salinity and inorganic nitrogen fertilization are reported for a shore-zone lichen Turgidiusculum complicatulum (formerly Mastodia tesselata), a possible recent introduction to sub-Antarctic Marion Island. Optimum moisture contents for net

  13. A 450 000 kyr Surface Hydrography History From the Subantarctic Atlantic Ocean (ODP Site 1089)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, G.; Abelmann, A.; Gersonde, R.

    2002-12-01

    We established a palaeo sea surface temperature (SST) record, by using a radiolarian-based transfer function, for the northern subantarctic Atlantic Ocean (ODP Site 1089, 400 56' S; 90 54 E), in order to reconstruct its surface hydrography and interocean heat exchange history during the last five climate cycles (ca. 450 ka). The produced record has a centennial scale time resolution, which makes it unique (in length and resolution) for the subantarctic zone. At this location, close to the subtropical front, ocean/atmosphere interactions, interoceanic exchange processes, and mesoscale eddy mixing play an important role in shaping the characteristics of sea water eventually advected to the North Atlantic. The centennial resolution allows to recognize millennial scale climatic events, similar to the Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles (originally described from Greenland ice cores), both during Marine Isotopic Stage (MIS) 3 and 6. Similar to observations from Termination I (Antarctic Cold Reversal), rapid cooling rebounds were encountered at Terminations II to V, and are not therefore limited either to the circum-Atlantic area or to last Termination. A comparison of SST and ice volume proxies suggests a lead of a few kyrs between SST and the minimum extent of global ice volume, indicating that temperatures rose substantially at subantarctic latitudes before any considerable northern hemisphere continental ice volume change was recorded. The climatic history of ODP Site 1089 displays good correlation to other records (e.g. Vostok) with the exception of MIS 10, where a warm SST anomaly was recognized. This anomaly is also present in oceanic records along the thermohaline circulation belt path, but absent in both Polar Zone and Vostok climatic records. The implications of our record for interhemispheric climate connecting mechanisms and the role played by the Southern Ocean in steering global climatic change will be discussed.

  14. Subantarctic Pacific hiatuses as clues to periods of enhanced oceanic circulation during the late Neogene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, L. M.; Hendy, I. L.; Moore, T. C.; Lyle, M. W.

    2009-12-01

    New stable isotope records from cores MV0502-4JC (50°20’S, 148°08’W, 4286m), ELT 25-11 (50°02’S, 127°31’W, 3969m), and ELT 20-11 (49°00’S, 144°50’W, 4517 m) obtained in close proximity to the Subantarctic Front in the southeast Pacific show a consistent pattern of hiatuses that could be related to late Neogene changes in the strength of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). These subantarctic Pacific records show three hiatuses that we have dated to 1) the early Pliocene-early late Pliocene, 2) ~1.57-0.68 Ma, and 3) ~0.53-0.19 Ma. These hiatuses correspond well with the timing of the Pliocene Warm Period and the climatic transitions of the Mid-Pleistocene Revolution and the Mid-Brunhes, as well as with periods of reduced or non-deposition on the Maurice Ewing Bank, also located in the path of the ACC (Ciesielski, 1982). Interestingly, sediment cores recovered from regions outside of the ACC that experience significant bottom water flow (e.g. fracture zones and the western margins of continents), including the Vema Channel (Ledbetter et al., 1978), the South Australia Basin (Ledbetter, 1981), and the continental margin of Northwest Africa (Stein et al., 1986), also show intervals of reduced or non-deposition that correlate well with the timing of hiatuses in the subantarctic Pacific. This correlation could indicate that the Pliocene Warm Period and the climatic transitions of the Mid-Pleistocene Revolution and Mid-Brunhes were characterized not only by a more vigourous ACC but also by a stronger and more globally-distributed overturning circulation than the present day.

  15. Prototype Software Assurance Framework (SAF): Introduction and Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-05

    information about the quality of the software being developed. Software testing provides an objective, independent view of the soft- ware program or...REV-03.18.2016.0 Prototype Software Assurance Framework (SAF): Introduction and Overview Christopher Alberts Carol Woody April...www.sei.cmu.edu CMU/SEI-2017-TN-001 | SOFTWARE ENGINEERING INSTITUTE | CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY [DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A] Approved for public

  16. Fronts and Thermohaline Structure of the Brazil Current Confluence System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severov, Dimitri

    and Thermohaline Structure of the Brazil Current Confluence System (BCCS) are stud-ied from climatic data, "Marathon Exp. Leg.8, 1984"data, and two Sea surface temperature (SST) data bases: "Meteor satellite"(1989-1994) and "ds277-Reynolds" (1981-2000).The South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) is divided in two main types: tropical (TW) and subtropical water (ST). Water masses, fronts, inter-frontal and frontal zones are analysed and classified: a) the water masses: Tropical Low-Salinity Water, Tropical Surface Water, Tropical Tropospheric Water, Subtropical Low-Salinity Water, Subtropical Surface Water, Subtropical Tropospheric Water. T,S characteristics of intermediate, deep and bottom water defined by different authors are confirmed and completed; b) the Inter-frontal Zones: Tropical/Brazil Current Zone, Sub-tropical Zone and Subantarctic Zone; c) the Frontal Zones: Subtropical, Subantarctic and Polar, and d) the Fronts: Subtropical Front of the Brazil Current, Principal Subtropical Front, North Subtropical Front, Subtropical Surface Front, South Subtropical Front, Subantarctic Surface Front, Subantarctic Front and Polar Front. Several stable T-S relationships are found below the friction layer and at the Fronts. The maximum gradient of the oceanographic characteris-tics occurs at the Brazil Current Front, which can be any of the subtropical fronts, depending on season. Minimum mean depth of the pycnocline coincides with the fronts of the BCCS, indicating the paths of low-salinity shelf waters into the open ocean. D. N. Severov (a) , V. Pshennikov (b) and A.V. Remeslo (c) a -Sección Oceanologé Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de la Republica, Igué 4225, 11400 ıa, a Montevideo, Uruguay. Tel. (598-2) 525-8618, Fax (598-2) 525-8617, mail: dima@fcien.edu.uy b -Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la Republica, Igué 4225, 11400 Mon-a tevideo, Uruguay, mail: seva@fisica.edu.uy c -Atlantic Research Inst. For Fisheries Oceanology (Atlant

  17. Species composition and biogeography of diatoms in antarctic and subantarctic (Argentine shelf) waters (37-76°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olguín, Héctor F.; Alder, Viviana A.

    2011-03-01

    A large spatial scale study of the diatom species inhabiting waters from the subantarctic (Argentine shelf) to antarctic was made for the first time in order to understand the relationships between these two regions with regard to the fluctuations in diatom abundances in relation with environmental features, their floristic associations and the effect of the Polar Front as a biogeographic barrier. Species-specific diatom abundance, nutrient and chlorophyll- a concentration were assessed from 64 subsurface oceanographic stations carried out during the austral summer 2002, a period characterized by an anomalous sea-ice coverage corresponding to a "warm year". Significant relationships of both diatom density and biomass with chlorophyll- a (positive) and water temperature (negative) were found for the study area as a whole. Within the Subantarctic region, diatom density and biomass values were more uniform and significantly (in average: 35 and 11 times) lower than those of the Antarctic region, and did not correlate with chlorophyll- a. In antarctic waters, instead, biomass was directly related with chlorophyll- a, thus confirming the important contribution of diatoms to the Antarctic phytoplanktonic stock. A total of 167 taxa were recorded for the entire study area, with Chaetoceros and Thalassiosira being the best represented genera. Species richness was maximum in subantarctic waters (46; Argentine shelf) and minimum in the Antarctic region (21; Antarctic Peninsula), and showed a significant decrease with latitude. Floristic associations were examined both qualitatively (Jaccard Index) and quantitatively (correlation) by cluster analyses and results allowed differentiating a similar number of associations (12 vs. 13, respectively) and two main groups of stations. In the Drake Passage, the former revealed that the main floristic change was found at the Polar Front, while the latter reflected the Southern ACC Front as a main boundary, and yielded a higher number of

  18. A preliminary synoptic assessment of soil frost on Marion Island and the possible consequences of climate change in a maritime sub-Antarctic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Nel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Located in the sub-Antarctic, Marion Island (46° 54′ S, 37° 45′ E has a distinct periglacial environment that is sensitive to climate change. Diurnal soil frost is the most important geomorphic process occurring on the island and this paper aims to understand the synoptic weather circulation pattern associated with summer soil frost occurrence in a sub-Antarctic environment. Preliminary results from automated microclimate measurements in the interior of Marion Island show that summer soil frost is dependent on Antarctic air mass circulation. This occurs exclusively during post-cyclonic airflow after the passage of a cold front connected to a mid-latitudinal cyclone and subsequent ridging in of the South Atlantic Anticyclone behind the cold front, or when a series of low pressure systems passes over the island. The duration and intensity of soil frost cycles are dependent on the duration of post-cyclonic Antarctic air mass circulation. Summer soil frost on Marion Island is driven by a complex interaction between the latitudinal position of the passing cyclone, the latitudinal position of the ridging anticyclone as well as the trajectory of the air mass circulation. The data suggest that predicted trends in synoptic climate change in the sub-Antarctic may lead to non-linear responses in soil frost dynamics.

  19. The Bryozoa of subantarctic Marion and Prince Edward Islands ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Bryozoa of subantarctic Marion and Prince Edward Islands were sampled over the period 1982–1989 by dredging, SCUBA-diving and intertidal surveys. This paper comprises illustrated keys to all 82 species of Bryozoa collected during these and previous surveys, including 15 new species, 17 new records and 8 ...

  20. The macaroni penguin Eudyptes chrysolophus has a subantarctic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    The macaroni penguin Eudyptes chrysolophus has a subantarctic distribution in the south-eastern Pacific, south Atlantic and south-western Indian oceans, breeding at several localities between southern Chile and Heard and McDonald Islands, including South. Africa's Prince Edward Islands (Marchant and Higgins. 1990).

  1. Submesoscale processes promote seasonal restratification in the Subantarctic Ocean

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, M

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available compare 5 months of glider data in the Subantarctic Zone to simulations of a 1-D mixing model to show that the magnitude of restratification of the ML cannot be explained by heat, freshwater, and momentum fluxes alone. During early spring, we estimate...

  2. Kelp gulls Larus dominicanus nest in Antarctica, at subantarctic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    Kelp gulls Larus dominicanus nest in Antarctica, at subantarctic islands, in South America, New Zealand,. Australia and in southern Africa (Burger and Gochfield. 1996). All populations, except that in southern. Africa, are of the nominate race L. d. dominicanus. That in southern Africa comprises an endemic sub- species, L. d.

  3. Skull morphometrics of male Subantarctic fur seals ( Arctocephalus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Skull morphometrics of two populations of Subantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) were compared in order to identify possible geographic variation as an indicator of gene flow between the populations, as well as a potential tool to identify the source of vagrant seals. Nineteen metric variables were recorded from ...

  4. Endoparasites of the subantarctic fur seal Arctocephalus tropicalis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1989-03-03

    Mar 3, 1989 ... A. tropicalis is a new host record for the tetraphyllidean cestode ... of the subantarctic fur seal population of Gough Island. Necropsies were .... Seals of the world. British Mus. (Nat. Hist.) London. PAULIAN, P. 1964. Contribution a I'etude de I'otarie de l'ile Amsterdam. Mammalia 28: 1-146. SHAUGHNESSY ...

  5. Millennial-scale variability in dust deposition, marine export production, and nutrient consumption in the glacial subantarctic ocean (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Garcia, A.; Sigman, D. M.; Anderson, R. F.; Ren, H. A.; Hodell, D. A.; Straub, M.; Jaccard, S.; Eglinton, T. I.; Haug, G. H.

    2013-12-01

    Based on the limitation of modern Southern Ocean phytoplankton by iron and the evidence of higher iron-bearing dust fluxes to the ocean during ice ages, it has been proposed that iron fertilization of Southern Ocean phytoplankton contributed to the reduction in atmospheric CO2 during ice ages. In the Subantarctic zone of the Atlantic Southern Ocean, glacial increases in dust flux and export production have been documented, supporting the iron fertilization hypothesis. However, these observations could be interpreted alternatively as resulting from the equatorward migration of Southern Ocean fronts during ice ages if the observed productivity rise was not accompanied by an increase in major nutrient consumption. Here, new 230Th-normalized lithogenic and opal fluxes are combined with high-resolution biomarker measurements to reconstruct millennial-scale changes in dust deposition and marine export production in the subantarctic Atlantic over the last glacial cycle. In the same record foraminifera-bound nitrogen isotopes are used to reconstruct ice age changes in surface nitrate utilization, providing a comprehensive test of the iron fertilization hypothesis. Elevation in foraminifera-bound δ15N, indicating more complete nitrate consumption, coincides with times of surface cooling and greater dust flux and export production. These observations indicate that the ice age Subantarctic was characterized by iron fertilized phytoplankton growth. The resulting strengthening of the Southern Ocean's biological pump can explain the ~40 ppm lowering of CO2 that characterizes the transitions from mid-climate states to full ice age conditions as well as the millennial-scale atmospheric CO2 fluctuations observed within the last ice age

  6. Precipitation retrieval from satellite within EUMETSAT's H-SAF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugnai, A.; Dietrich, S.; Levizzani, V.; Casella, D.; Cattani, E.; di Paola, F.; Formenton, M.; Laviola, S.; Sanò, P.

    2010-09-01

    The EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on support to Operational Hydrology and Water Management (H-SAF) was established by the EUMETSAT Council on July 3, 2005 and started activity at the official date of September 1, 2005. The Italian Meteorological Service serves as "Host Institute" on behalf of 12 European countries. The Project Plan focuses on the generation of the following products for the European and Mediterranean regions: • instantaneous and accumulated precipitation, including liquid/solid discrimination; • soil moisture in the surface layer and in the roots region; • snow parameters such as effective cover, wet/dry discrimination and water equivalent. In addition to products development and generation, the project includes a products validation programme and a hydrological validation programme. The development programme duration is 5 years, ending on August 31, 2010. A follow-on Continuous Development and Operations Phase (CDOP) will start in September 2010 to provide long-term perspective (2010-2017) to the initiative. Precipitation products are being generated according to algorithms developed by CNR-ISAC in collaboration with the international community, by exploiting the following satellites and instruments: • MW conically-scanning radiometers (SSM/I and SSMIS) on LEO satellites (DMSP); • MW cross-track scanning radiometers (AMSU-A and AMSU-B / MHS) on LEO operational satellites (NOAA and MetOp); • VIS/IR imagers (SEVIRI) on GEO satellites (MSG). These products are generated routinely at the Italian Centro Nazionale di Meteorologia e Climatologia Aeronautica (CNMCA), which is responsible of operational product generation and dissemination. Whilst precipitation products continue to be developed and improved, major focus is now on product validation. Products are generated in a pre-operational fashion, with a delay of few minutes to few hours from observation, depending on product and satellite data access. Access to products is

  7. Muscle growth in Antarctic and Subantarctic notothenioid fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Alfredo Fernández

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The suborder Notothenioidei comprises 122 species divided into 8 families, with members of 6 of the families living outside Antarctic waters. The Antarctic species underwent an extensive radiation from a small demersal ancestor to occupy different ecological niches and levels in the water column. The axial muscle of Antarctic and some Subantarctic notothenioids is unusual in containing very large diameter muscle fibres and a low muscle fibre number. Maximum fibre diameters are greater than 500 mm in many species. There is no indication of systematic differences in fibre number, fibre type composition, ATPase activity, time of cessation of fibre recruitment (hyperplasia and swimming performance between Antarctic and Subantarctic species. Instead, fibre number is significantly decreased in species belonging to the most derived families relative to the more basal families (a trend that also correlates with an increase in the diameter of the fibres. The length of the cell cycle of the muscle fibres shows cold compensation in the Antarctic species H. antarcticus relative to the closely related Subantarctic one (H. bispinis. Feeding after a starvation period results in a strong stimulation of the proliferation of muscle fiber progenitors in H. bispinis. Similar studies have not yet been performed on any Antarctic species.

  8. Late Pliocene Changes in Abyssal Southern Ocean Ventilation: New Insights from the Subantarctic Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, L. M.; Hendy, I. L.; Moore, T. C.; Lyle, M. W.

    2008-12-01

    formation, and perhaps accompanied by reduced upwelling of abyssal Southern Ocean waters. We posit low planktonic δ13C values in these subantarctic Pacific records also support the existence of significant sea ice in the Southern Ocean during the late Pliocene, as sea ice cover reduces gas exchange and nutrient utilization south of the Polar Front leading to low δ13C surface waters in the subantarctic. Overall we infer that the pool of cold, poorly-ventilated water was at least sizeable enough to fill the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean below a depth of 4000 m. Such a large, isolated water mass would have been capable of sequestering large amounts of CO2 within the abyssal Southern Ocean, and thus could potentially have played an important role in the amplification of Northern Hemisphere Glaciation during the late Pliocene.

  9. The CM SAF CLAAS-2 cloud property data record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benas, Nikos; Finkensieper, Stephan; Stengel, Martin; van Zadelhoff, Gerd-Jan; Hanschmann, Timo; Hollmann, Rainer; Fokke Meirink, Jan

    2017-04-01

    A new cloud property data record was lately released by the EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF), based on measurements from geostationary Meteosat Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) sensors, spanning the period 2004-2015. The CLAAS-2 (Cloud property dAtAset using SEVIRI, Edition 2) data record includes cloud fractional coverage, thermodynamic phase, cloud top height, water path and corresponding optical thickness and particle effective radius separately for liquid and ice clouds. These variables are available at high resolution 15-minute, daily and monthly basis. In this presentation the main improvements in the retrieval algorithms compared to the first edition of the data record (CLAAS-1) are highlighted along with their impact on the quality of the data record. Subsequently, the results of extensive validation and inter-comparison efforts against ground observations, as well as active and passive satellite sensors are summarized. Overall good agreement is found, with similar spatial and temporal characteristics, along with small biases caused mainly by differences in retrieval approaches, spatial/temporal samplings and viewing geometries.

  10. Impact on internal doses of photon SAFs derived with the GSF adult male voxel phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T J; Phipps, A W; Petoussi-Henss, N; Zankl, M

    2001-05-01

    This paper describes the effect on over 3,000 sets of internal dose estimates of using photon Specific Absorbed Fractions (SAFs) calculated using two different types of phantoms, specifically the MIRD-type anthropomorphic phantom originally developed by Snyder and the new adult male voxel phantom, GOLEM, developed at GSF. The SAFs based on the MIRD-type phantom are currently used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in internal dose calculations, but there are suggestions of moving towards SAFs generated from voxel phantoms, thus there is an interest in the potential differences in internal doses. Overall, it is found that some tissue doses calculated using the voxel phantoms can differ significantly from those of the MIRD-type phantom; however, the effective dose appears to be quite robust to changes in photon SAFs.

  11. A tale of two islands: contrasting fortunes for Subantarctic skuas at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subantarctic skuas Catharacta antarctica are key predators of burrowing petrels at sub-Antarctic islands, and can be used to monitor the health of burrowing petrel populations. A survey of skuas at the Prince Edward Islands was conducted during December 2008, repeating a previous survey in December 2001.

  12. A record of the sub-Antarctic fur seal Arctocephalus tropicalis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A record of the sub-Antarctic fur seal Arctocephalus tropicalis in Angola. T Carr, Nicole Carr, J.H.M. David. Abstract. Two individuals of the sub-Antarctic fur seal, Arctocephalus tropicalis, one of which was photographed, were seen on the beach 1 km south of the mouth of the Kwanza River, Angola, on 2 October 1983.

  13. Productos en aire claro desarrollados por AEMET dentro del proyecto SAF de "Nowcasting"

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Rubio, Miguel Ángel

    2013-01-01

    Comunicación presentada en: XV Congreso de la Asociación Española de Teledetección celebrado los días 22-24 de octubre de 2013 en Torrejón de Ardoz (Madrid). [ES]El objetivo del SAF del “Nowcasting” (NWC SAF) es el desarrollo de software para la obtención de productos de interés en la predicción meteorológica a muy corto plazo (“Nowcasting”) usando los datos del MSG (METEOSAT Segunda Generación). El producto PGE13 SPhR obtiene el agua precipitable...

  14. The influence of iron and light on net community production in the Subantarctic and Polar Frontal Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Cassar

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The roles of iron and light in controlling biomass and primary productivity are clearly established in the Southern Ocean. However, their influence on net community production (NCP and carbon export remains to be quantified. To improve our understanding of NCP and carbon export production in the Subantarctic Zone (SAZ and the northern reaches of the Polar Frontal Zone (PFZ, we conducted continuous onboard determinations of NCP as part of the Sub-Antarctic Sensitivity to Environmental Change (SAZ-Sense study, which occurred in January–February 2007. Biological O2 supersaturation was derived from measuring O2/Ar ratios by equilibrator inlet mass spectrometry. Based on these continuous measurements, NCP during the austral summer 2007 in the Australian SAZ was approximately 43 mmol O2 m−2 d−1. NCP showed significant spatial variability, with larger values near the Subtropical front, and a general southward decrease. For shallower mixed layers (<50 m, dissolved Fe concentrations and Fe sufficiency, estimated from variable fluorescence, correlated strongly with NCP. The strong correlation between NCP and dissolved Fe may be difficult to interpret because of the correlation of dissolved Fe to MLD and because the concentration of iron may not be a good indicator of its availability. At stations with deeper mixed layers, NCP was consistently low, regardless of iron sufficiency, consistent with light availability also being an important control of NCP. Our new observations provide independent evidence for the critical roles of iron and light in mediating carbon export from the Southern Ocean mixed layer.

  15. Oxygen isotope records of Globigerina bulloides across a north-south transect in the south-western Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khare, N.; Chaturvedi, S.K.; Saraswat, R.

    ), Subantarctic Zone (SAZ), Subantarctic Front (SAF), Polar Frontal Zone (PFZ), Polar Front (PF) and Antarctic Zone (AZ) (Whiteworth, 1980). Materials and Methods A total of twenty three surface sediment samples (comprising Peterson grab, piston core top... showing the locations of grab and Piston corer samples. Figure 2a: Latitudinal changes of δ 18 O in Globigerina bulloides and seawater temperature at a water depth of 75 m. Figure 2b: Relationship between seawater temperature and δ 18 O...

  16. Phosphorylation of SAF-A/hnRNP-U Serine 59 by Polo-Like Kinase 1 Is Required for Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pauline; Ye, Ruiqiong; Morrice, Nicholas; Britton, Sébastien; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2015-08-01

    Scaffold attachment factor A (SAF-A), also called heterogenous nuclear ribonuclear protein U (hnRNP-U), is phosphorylated on serine 59 by the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) in response to DNA damage. Since SAF-A, DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), and protein phosphatase 6 (PP6), which interacts with DNA-PKcs, have all been shown to have roles in mitosis, we asked whether DNA-PKcs phosphorylates SAF-A in mitosis. We show that SAF-A is phosphorylated on serine 59 in mitosis, that phosphorylation requires polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) rather than DNA-PKcs, that SAF-A interacts with PLK1 in nocodazole-treated cells, and that serine 59 is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in mitosis. Moreover, cells expressing SAF-A in which serine 59 is mutated to alanine have multiple characteristics of aberrant mitoses, including misaligned chromosomes, lagging chromosomes, polylobed nuclei, and delayed passage through mitosis. Our findings identify serine 59 of SAF-A as a new target of both PLK1 and PP2A in mitosis and reveal that both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of SAF-A serine 59 by PLK1 and PP2A, respectively, are required for accurate and timely exit from mitosis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Satellite-based climate data records of surface solar radiation from the CM SAF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentmann, Jörg; Cremer, Roswitha; Kothe, Steffen; Müller, Richard; Pfeifroth, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    The incoming surface solar radiation has been defined as an essential climate variable by GCOS. Long term monitoring of this part of the earth's energy budget is required to gain insights on the state and variability of the climate system. In addition, climate data sets of surface solar radiation have received increased attention over the recent years as an important source of information for solar energy assessments, for crop modeling, and for the validation of climate and weather models. The EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) is deriving climate data records (CDRs) from geostationary and polar-orbiting satellite instruments. Within the CM SAF these CDRs are accompanied by operational data at a short time latency to be used for climate monitoring. All data from the CM SAF is freely available via www.cmsaf.eu. Here we present the regional and the global climate data records of surface solar radiation from the CM SAF. The regional climate data record SARAH (Surface Solar Radiation Dataset - Heliosat, doi: 10.5676/EUM_SAF_CM/SARAH/V002) is based on observations from the series of Meteosat satellites. SARAH provides 30-min, daily- and monthly-averaged data of the effective cloud albedo, the solar irradiance (incl. spectral information), the direct solar radiation (horizontal and normal), and the sunshine duration from 1983 to 2015 for the full view of the Meteosat satellite (i.e, Europe, Africa, parts of South America, and the Atlantic ocean). The data sets are generated with a high spatial resolution of 0.05° allowing for detailed regional studies. The global climate data record CLARA (CM SAF Clouds, Albedo and Radiation dataset from AVHRR data, doi: 10.5676/EUM_SAF_CM/CLARA_AVHRR/V002) is based on observations from the series of AVHRR satellite instruments. CLARA provides daily- and monthly-averaged global data of the solar irradiance (SIS) from 1982 to 2015 with a spatial resolution of 0.25°. In addition to the solar surface

  18. Front cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof.Dr. Hasan KÜÇÜKBAY

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This is the front cover of JOTCSA 4(2, which contains numerous fruitful information. Kindly read the contents and if you need to ask questions, contact the managing editor (Dr. Akkurt at jotcsa@turchemsoc.org or the chief editor (Prof. Dr. Küçükbay. Let us see each other in the next issue...

  19. Carbon demand, utilization, and metabolic diversity of bacterioplankton in the frontal regimes of the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishnan, K.P.; Sinha, R.K.; Nair, S.; Noronha, S.B.; Chacko, R.; Anilkumar, N.

    Bacterial production, respiration and metabolic diversity were measured up to 120 m depth in the Sub-Antarctic Front (SAF) and Polar Fronts I and II (PFI and PFII) of the Indian Ocean sector of the Southern Ocean during 2010 Austral Summer...

  20. Induction of Ras by SAF-1/MAZ through a feed-forward loop promotes angiogenesis in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Alpana; Ray, Bimal K

    2015-01-01

    In the majority of breast cancers, overexpression and hyperactivation of Ras in the tumor microenvironment play significant role in promoting cancer cell growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. We have previously shown that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in triple negative breast cancer cells is regulated, at least in part, by SAF-1 (serum amyloid A activating factor 1) transcription factor. In this study we show that transformation of normal MCF-10A breast epithelial cells by constitutively active, oncogenic Ras, induces the DNA-binding activity and transcription function of SAF-1. Furthermore, we show that inhibition of MEK/MAPK-signaling pathway prevents Ras-mediated activation of SAF-1. Interestingly, silencing of SAF-1 expression in breast cancer cells by SAF-1-specific short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) significantly reduced H-Ras and K-Ras mRNA level. We show that SAF-1 is a direct transcriptional regulator of H-Ras and K-Ras and overexpression of SAF-1 increases H-Ras and K-Ras gene expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses demonstrated in vivo interaction of SAF-1 at highly purine-rich sequences present at the proximal promoter region, upstream of the transcription start site, in H-Ras and K-Ras genes. Previous studies have shown that these sequences are nuclease hypersensitive and capable of forming G4 quadruplex structure. Together, our results show the presence of a novel transactivating loop, in which, Ras and SAF-1 are interconnected. These findings will help defining molecular mechanisms of abnormal overexpression of Ras in breast tumors, which seldom show genetic Ras mutations. PMID:25449683

  1. Characterisation of the swimming muscles of two Subantarctic notothenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Alfredo Fernández

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The histochemical characteristics and distribution of muscle fibre types have been investigated in the swimming muscles of the róbalo, Eleginops maclovinus and the lorcho, Patagonotothen tessellata, Subantarctic notothenioids that inhabit the Beagle Channel. The fibre types were differentiated on the basis of glycogen and lipid contents and succinate dehydrogenase and myofibrillar ATPase (mATPase activities. White, red, intermediate and tonic fibres were present in the axial muscle of both species. The same fibre types were identified in the pectoral fin adductor muscles, although the intermediate type was absent. The mATPase technique performed at room temperature (21ºC allowed a good differentiation of fibre types, overcoming the problems found by previous researchers when applying this technique to Antarctic notothenioids. Four different zones (peripheral, mosaic, main and adjacent to the bone were found in the adductor profundis muscle. The proportion of the zones varied along the length of the adductor muscle. For both species, the percentage of red fibres found in the axial muscles was less than 5%, indicating that sustained swimming ability is not dependent on these muscles. The pectoral muscle mass/carcase mass ratio was significantly greater in E. maclovinus than in P. tessellata, reflecting a greater capacity for sustained swimming using pectoral fins.

  2. Kelp genes reveal effects of subantarctic sea ice during the Last Glacial Maximum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Ceridwen I; Nikula, Raisa; Spencer, Hamish G; Waters, Jonathan M

    2009-03-03

    The end of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) dramatically reshaped temperate ecosystems, with many species moving poleward as temperatures rose and ice receded. Whereas reinvading terrestrial taxa tracked melting glaciers, marine biota recolonized ocean habitats freed by retreating sea ice. The extent of sea ice in the Southern Hemisphere during the LGM has, however, yet to be fully resolved, with most palaeogeographic studies suggesting only minimal or patchy ice cover in subantarctic waters. Here, through population genetic analyses of the widespread Southern Bull Kelp (Durvillaea antarctica), we present evidence for persistent ice scour affecting subantarctic islands during the LGM. Using mitochondrial and chloroplast genetic markers (COI; rbcL) to genetically characterize some 300 kelp samples from 45 Southern Ocean localities, we reveal a remarkable pattern of recent recolonization in the subantarctic. Specifically, in contrast to the marked phylogeographic structure observed across coastal New Zealand and Chile (10- to 100-km scales), subantarctic samples show striking genetic homogeneity over vast distances (10,000-km scales), with a single widespread haplotype observed for each marker. From these results, we suggest that sea ice expanded further and ice scour during the LGM impacted shallow-water subantarctic marine ecosystems more extensively than previously suggested.

  3. Shifts of the Subtropical Shelf Front controlled by atmospheric variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-10-01

    In the western South Atlantic, off the coast of South America, a band of cold, fresh, nutrient-rich Sub-Antarctic Shelf Water (SASW) meets warm, salty, nutrient-poor Subtropical Shelf Water (STSW) to form the Subtropical Shelf Front (STSF). This front is the shallow-water expression of the major Brazil-Malvinas Confluence Zone and has moved northward and southward during the Holocene (the past ~12,000 years). Bender et al. reconstruct the latitudinal shifts of the STSF over the past 11,000 calendar-equivalent years using records of oxygen and carbon stable isotope compositions of benthic foraminifera and total organic carbon and calcium carbonate content from a sediment record collected off Uruguay. These measurements serve as proxies for ocean water temperature and nutrient content, which can be used to distinguish the SASW and STSW.

  4. Variability and trends of surface solar radiation in Europe based on CM SAF satellite data records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentmann, Jörg; Pfeifroth, Uwe; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Urbain, Manon; Clerbaux, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    The EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) generates satellite-based high-quality climate data records, with a focus on the global energy and water cycle. Here, the latest releases of the CM SAF's data records of surface solar radiation, Surface Solar Radiation Data Set - Heliosat (SARAH), and CM SAF cLouds, Albedo and Radiation dataset from AVHRR data (CLARA), are analyzed and validated with reference to ground-based measurements, e.g., provided by the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN), the World Radiation Data Center (WRDC) and the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA). Focus is given to the trends and the variability of the surface irradiance in Europe as derived from the surface and the satellite-based data records. Both data sources show an overall increase (i.e., brightening) after the 1980s, and indicate substantial decadal variability with periods of reduced increase (or even a decrease) and periods with a comparable high increase. Also the increase shows a pronounced spatial pattern, which is also found to be consistent between the two data sources. The good correspondence between the satellite-based data records and the surface measurements highlight the potential of the satellite data to represent the variability and changes in the surface irradiance and document the dominant role of clouds over aerosol to explain its variations. Reasons for remaining differences between the satellite- and the surface-based data records (e.g., in Southern Europe) will be discussed. To test the consistency of the CM SAF solar radiation data records we also assess the decadal variability of the solar reflected radiation at the top-of-the atmosphere (TOA) from the CM SAF climate data record based on the MVIRI / SEVIRI measurements from 1983 to 2015. This data record complements the SARAH data record in its temporal and spatial coverage; fewer and different assumptions are used in the retrieval to generate the TOA reflected solar

  5. Deglacial palaeoclimate at Puerto del Hambre, subantarctic Patagonia, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusser, Calvin J.; Heusser, Linda E.; Lowell, Thomas V.; Moreira M., Andrés; Moreira M., Simón

    2000-02-01

    The primary objective of this study is to further substantiate multistep climatic forcing of late-glacial vegetation in southern South America. A secondary objective is to establish the age of deglaciation in Estrecho de Magallanes-Bahía Inútil. Pollen assemblages at 2-cm intervals in a core of the mire at Puerto del Hambre (53°3621S, 70°5553W) provide the basis for reconstructing the vegetation and a detailed account of palaeoclimate in subantarctic Patagonia. Chronology over the 262-cm length of core is regulated by 20 AMS radiocarbon dates between 14 455 and 10 089 14C yr BP. Of 13 pollen assemblage zones, the earliest representing the Oldest Dryas chronozone (14 455-13 000 14C yr BP) records impoverished steppe with decreasing frequencies and loss of southern beech (Nothofagus). Successive 100-yr-long episodes of grass/herbs and of heath (Empetrum/Ericaceae) before 14 000 14C yr BP infer deglacial successional communities under a climate of increased continentality prior to the establishment of grass-dominated steppe. The Bølling-Allerød (13 000-11 000 14C yr BP) is characterised by mesic grassland under moderating climate that with abrupt change to heath dominance after 12 000 14C yr BP was warmer and not as humid. At the time of the Younger Dryas (11 000-10 000 14C yr BP), grass steppe expanded with a return of colder, more humid climate. Later, with gradual warming, communities were invaded by southern beech. The Puerto del Hambre record parallels multistep, deglacial palaeoclimatic sequences reported elsewhere in the Southern Andes and at Taylor Dome in Antarctica. Deglaciation of Estrecho de Magallanes-Bahía Inútil is dated close to 14 455 14C yr BP, invalidating earlier dates of between 15 800 and 16 590 14C yr BP.

  6. Geology and geochronology of the Sub-Antarctic Snares Islands/Tini Heke, New Zealand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, JM; Turnbull, IM; Sagar, MW

    2015-01-01

    The first comprehensive geological map, a summary of lithologies and new radiogenic isotope data (U–Pb, Rb–Sr) are presented for crystalline rocks of the Sub-Antarctic Snares Islands/Tini Heke, 150 km south of Stewart Island. The main lithology is Snares Granite (c. 109 Ma from U–Pb dating...

  7. Summer diet of the Salvin's prion at sub-Antarctic Marion Island

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1988-02-14

    Feb 14, 1988 ... Zoo!. 1988,23(4). 309. Summer diet of the Salvin's prion at sub-Antarctic Marion Island. N.A. Gartshore and W.K. Steele*. Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, 7700 Republic of South Africa. N.T. Klages. Port Elizabeth Museum, P.O. Box 13147, Humewood, ...

  8. Prey and seasonal abundance of killer whales at sub-Antarctic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diet of killer whales Orcinus orca was investigated from 48 predation events observed during sightings at sub-Antarctic Marion Island between 2006 and 2009. From these events, there were 10 cases where prey could be identified. Killer whales fed on fur seals Arctocephalus tropicalis, elephant seals Mirounga leonina ...

  9. Summer diet of the Salvin's prion at sub-Antarctic Marion Island ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty-nine food samples were collected from Salvin's prions Pachyptila salvini at sub-Antarctic Marion Island, Prince Edward Islands. The diet was dominated by crustaceans which formed 44,2% of the mass, 99,7% of prey items and occurred in 97,4% of the samples. Amphipods were of particular importance, the most ...

  10. New records of Acari from the sub-Antarctic Prince Edward Islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marshall, D.J.; Gremmen, N.J.M.; Coetzee, L.; Oconnor, B.M.; Pugh, P.J.A.; Theron, P.D.; Ueckermann, E.A.

    1999-01-01

    Sixty species of Acari are recorded from the sub-Antarctic Marion and Prince Edward Islands (the Prince Edward archipelago). Twenty of the 45 species collected on recent expeditions are new and currently undescribed. Other new taxa include a family of Mesostigmata, four new genera, and the first

  11. Additions and corrections to the lichen mycobiota of the subantarctic Prince Edward Islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Øvstedal, D.O.; Gremmen, N.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Fifteen species are reported as new to the subantarctic Prince Edward Islands (47 degrees S, 38 degrees E). Of these 12 are added to the known lichens of Prince Edward Island, and four are added to the Marion Island species list. Two species are new to science, viz. Gyalecta azorellae Ovstedal, with

  12. Thuidium delicatulum (Hedw.) Schimp. (Thuidiaceae) another bipolar moss disjunct from Subantarctic Marion Island

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ochyra, R.; Smith, V.; Gremmen, N.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Thuidium delicatulum (Hedw.) Schimp. is recorded from Marion Island in the Prince Edward Islands Archipelago in the Subantarctic. This is the first report of the genus Thuidium Schimp. from the subpolar region of the Southern Hemisphere and establishes Th. delicatulum as a bipolar species with

  13. Diet of the blue petrel at sub-Antarctic Marion Island | Steele | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Food samples were collected from 49 blue petrels Halobaena caerulea at Marion Island in the sub-Antarctic region. These were analysed and the results compared with previously published data collected at other islands. Crustaceans formed the major prey by mass (59,5%) and frequency (100%), with Euphausia vallentini ...

  14. Underwater Optics in Sub-Antarctic and Antarctic Coastal Ecosystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirjo Huovinen

    Full Text Available Understanding underwater optics in natural waters is essential in evaluating aquatic primary production and risk of UV exposure in aquatic habitats. Changing environmental conditions related with global climate change, which imply potential contrasting changes in underwater light climate further emphasize the need to gain insights into patterns related with underwater optics for more accurate future predictions. The present study evaluated penetration of solar radiation in six sub-Antarctic estuaries and fjords in Chilean North Patagonian region (39-44°S and in an Antarctic bay (62°S. Based on vertical diffuse attenuation coefficients (Kd, derived from measurements with a submersible multichannel radiometer, average summer UV penetration depth (z1% in these water bodies ranged 2-11 m for UV-B (313 nm, 4-27 m for UV-A (395 nm, and 7-30 m for PAR (euphotic zone. UV attenuation was strongest in the shallow Quempillén estuary, while Fildes Bay (Antarctica exhibited the highest transparency. Optically non-homogeneous water layers and seasonal variation in transparency (lower in winter characterized Comau Fjord and Puyuhuapi Channel. In general, multivariate analysis based on Kd values of UV and PAR wavelengths discriminated strongly Quempillén estuary and Puyuhuapi Channel from other study sites. Spatial (horizontal variation within the estuary of Valdivia river reflected stronger attenuation in zones receiving river impact, while within Fildes Bay a lower spatial variation in water transparency could in general be related to closeness of glaciers, likely due to increased turbidity through ice-driven processes. Higher transparency and deeper UV-B penetration in proportion to UV-A/visible wavelengths observed in Fildes Bay suggests a higher risk for Antarctic ecosystems reflected by e.g. altered UV-B damage vs. photorepair under UV-A/PAR. Considering that damage repair processes often slow down under cool temperatures, adverse UV impact could be

  15. ModSAF-based development of operational requirements for light armored vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapanotti, John; Palmarini, Marc

    2003-09-01

    Light Armoured Vehicles (LAVs) are being developed to meet the modern requirements of rapid deployment and operations other than war. To achieve these requirements, passive armour is minimized and survivability depends more on sensors, computers, countermeasures and communications to detect and avoid threats. The performance, reliability, and ultimately the cost of these systems, will be determined by the technology trends and the rates at which they mature. Defining vehicle requirements will depend upon an accurate assessment of these trends over a longer term than was previously needed. Modelling and simulation are being developed to study these long-term trends and how they contribute to establishing vehicle requirements. ModSAF is being developed for research and development, in addition to the original requirement of Simulation and Modelling for Acquisition, Rehearsal, Requirements and Training (SMARRT), and is becoming useful as a means for transferring technology to other users, researchers and contractors. This procedure eliminates the need to construct ad hoc models and databases. The integration of various technologies into a Defensive Aids Suite (DAS) can be designed and analyzed by combining field trials and laboratory data with modelling and simulation. ModSAF (Modular Semi-Automated Forces,) is used to construct the virtual battlefield and, through scripted input files, a "fixed battle" approach is used to define and implement contributions from three different sources. These contributions include: models of technology and natural phenomena from scientists and engineers, tactics and doctrine from the military and detailed analyses from operations research. This approach ensures the modelling of processes known to be important regardless of the level of information available about the system. Survivability of DAS-equipped vehicles based on future and foreign technology can be investigated by ModSAF and assessed relative to a test vehicle. A vehicle can

  16. OSI SAF Sea Surface Temperature reprocessing of MSG/SEVIRI archive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saux Picart, Stéphane; Legendre, Gerard; Marsouin, Anne; Péré, Sonia; Roquet, Hervé

    2017-04-01

    The Ocean and Sea-Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI-SAF) of the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) is planning to deliver a reprocessing of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) from Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager/Meteosat Second Generation (SEVIRI/MSG) archive (2004-2012) by the end of 2016. This reprocessing is drawing from experiences of the OSI SAF team in near real time processing of MSG/SEVIRI data. The retrieval method consist in a non-linear split-window algorithm including the algorithm correction scheme developed by Le Borgne et al. (2011). The bias correction relies on simulations of infrared brightness temperatures performed using Numerical Weather Prediction model atmospheric profiles of water vapour and temperature, and RTTOV radiative transfer model. The cloud mask used is the Climate SAF reprocessing of the MSG/SEVIRI archive. It is consistent over the period in consideration. Atmospheric Saharan dusts have a strong impact on the retrieved SST, they are taken into consideration through the computation of the Saharan Dust Index (Merchant et al., 2006) which is then used to determine an empirical correction applied to SST. The MSG/SEVIRI SST reprocessing dataset consist in hourly level 3 composite of sub-skin temperature projected onto a regular 0.05° grid over the region delimited by 60N,60S and 60W,60E. This presentation gives an overview of the data and methods used for the reprocessing, the products and validation results against drifting buoys measurements extracted from the ERA Clim dataset.

  17. A new CM SAF Solar Surface Radiation Climate Data Set derived from Meteosat Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentmann, J.; Mueller, R. W.; Pfeifroth, U.; Träger-Chatterjee, C.; Cremer, R.

    2014-12-01

    The incoming surface solar radiation has been defined as an essential climate variable by GCOS. It is mandatory to monitor this part of the earth's energy balance, and thus gain insights on the state and variability of the climate system. In addition, data sets of the surface solar radiation have received increased attention over the recent years as an important source of information for the planning of solar energy applications. The EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) is deriving surface solar radiation from geostationary and polar-orbiting satellite instruments. While CM SAF is focusing on the generation of high-quality long-term climate data records, also operationally data is provided in short time latency within 8 weeks. Here we present SARAH (Solar Surface Radiation Dataset - Heliosat), i.e. the new CM SAF Solar Surface Radiation data set based on Meteosat satellite observations. SARAH provides instantaneous, daily- and monthly-averaged data of the effective cloud albedo (CAL), the direct normalized solar radiation (DNI) and the solar irradiance (SIS) from 1983 to 2013 for the full view of the Meteosat satellite (i.e, Europe, Africa, parts of South America, and the Atlantic ocean). The data sets are generated with a high spatial resolution of 0.05 deg allowing for detailed regional studies, and are available in netcdf-format at no cost without restrictions at www.cmsaf.eu. We provide an overview of the data sets, including a validation against reference measurements from the BSRN and GEBA surface station networks.

  18. Moving horizon estimation for assimilating H-SAF remote sensing data into the HBV hydrological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Rodolfo Alvarado; Schwanenberg, Dirk; Krahe, Peter; Lisniak, Dmytro; Sensoy, Aynur; Sorman, A. Arda; Akkol, Bulut

    2016-06-01

    Remote sensing information has been extensively developed over the past few years including spatially distributed data for hydrological applications at high resolution. The implementation of these products in operational flow forecasting systems is still an active field of research, wherein data assimilation plays a vital role on the improvement of initial conditions of streamflow forecasts. We present a novel implementation of a variational method based on Moving Horizon Estimation (MHE), in application to the conceptual rainfall-runoff model HBV, to simultaneously assimilate remotely sensed snow covered area (SCA), snow water equivalent (SWE), soil moisture (SM) and in situ measurements of streamflow data using large assimilation windows of up to one year. This innovative application of the MHE approach allows to simultaneously update precipitation, temperature, soil moisture as well as upper and lower zones water storages of the conceptual model, within the assimilation window, without an explicit formulation of error covariance matrixes and it enables a highly flexible formulation of distance metrics for the agreement of simulated and observed variables. The framework is tested in two data-dense sites in Germany and one data-sparse environment in Turkey. Results show a potential improvement of the lead time performance of streamflow forecasts by using perfect time series of state variables generated by the simulation of the conceptual rainfall-runoff model itself. The framework is also tested using new operational data products from the Satellite Application Facility on Support to Operational Hydrology and Water Management (H-SAF) of EUMETSAT. This study is the first application of H-SAF products to hydrological forecasting systems and it verifies their added value. Results from assimilating H-SAF observations lead to a slight reduction of the streamflow forecast skill in all three cases compared to the assimilation of streamflow data only. On the other hand

  19. Assessment of the EUMETSAT LSA-SAF evapotranspiration product for drought monitoring in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulcre-Canto, Guadalupe; Vogt, Jürgen; Arboleda, Alirio; Antofie, Tiberiu

    2014-08-01

    Evapotranspiration is a key parameter for water stress assessment as it is directly related to the moisture status of the soil-vegetation system and describes the moisture transfer from the surface to the atmosphere. With the launch of the Meteosat Second Generation geostationary satellites and the setup of the Satellite Application Facilities, it became possible to operationally produce evapotranspiration data with high spatial and temporal evolution over the entire continents of Europe and Africa. In the frame of this study we present an evaluation of the potential of the evapotranspiration (ET) product from the EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Land Surface Analysis (LSA-SAF) for drought assessment and monitoring in Europe. To assess the potential of this product, the LSA-SAF ET was used as input for the ratio of ET to reference evapotranspiration (ET0), the latter estimated from the ECMWF interim reanalysis. In the analysis two case studies were considered corresponding to the drought episodes of spring/summer 2007 and 2011. For these case studies, the ratio ET/ET0 was compared with meteorological drought indices (SPI, SPEI and Sc-PDSI for 2007 and SPI for 2011) as well as with the anomalies of the fraction of absorbed photosynthetic active radiation (fAPAR) derived from remote sensing data. The meteorological and remote sensing indicators were taken from the European Drought Observatory (EDO) and the CARPATCLIM climatological atlas. Results show the potential of ET/ET0 to characterize soil moisture variability, and to give additional information to fAPAR and to precipitation distribution for drought assessment. The main limitations of the proposed ratio for drought characterization are discussed, including options to overcome them. These options include the use of filters to discriminate areas with a low percentage vegetation cover or areas that are not in their growing period and the use of evapotranspiration without water restriction (ETwwr

  20. Evolution and biogeography of Pleurophyllum (Astereae, Asteraceae), a small genus of megaherbs endemic to the subantarctic islands

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Steven J. Wagstaff; Ilse Breitwieser; Motomi Ito

    2011-01-01

    ... played a pivotal role in shaping plant distributions in the southern hemisphere. Although the Antarctic flora was largely erased by glaciation during the Pleistocene, at least some Antarctic plant species found refuge on the subantarctic islands. Methods...

  1. Controls and variability of solute and sedimentary fluxes in Antarctic and sub-Antarctic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolinski, Zbigniew

    2015-04-01

    The currently prepared SEDIBUD Book on "Source-to-Sink Fluxes in Undisturbed Cold Environments" (edited by Achim A. Beylich, John C. Dixon and Zbigniew Zwolinski and published by Cambridge University Press) is summarizing and synthesizing the achievements of the International Association of Geomorphologists` (I.A.G./A.I.G.) Working Group SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments), which has been active since 2005 (http://www.geomorph.org/wg/wgsb.html). The book comprises five parts. One of them is part about sub-Antarctic and Antarctic Environments. This part "Sub-Antarctic and Antarctic Environments" describes two different environments, namely oceanic and continental ones. Each part contains results of research on environmental drivers and rates of contemporary solute and sedimentary fluxes in selected sites. Apart from describing the environmental conditions of the whole continent of Antarctica and sub-Antarctic islands (Zb.Zwolinski, M.Kejna, A.N.Lastochkin, A.Zhirov, S.Boltramovich) this part of the book characterizes terrestrial polar oases free from multi-year ice and snow covers (Zb.Zwolinski). The detailed results of geoecological and sedimentological research come from different parts of Antarctica. Antarctic continental shelf (E.Isla) is an example of sub-Antarctic oceanic environment. South Shetlands, especially King George Island (Zb.Zwolinski, M.Kejna, G.Rachlewicz, I.Sobota, J.Szpikowski), is an example of sub-Antarctic terrestrial environment. Antarctic Peninsula (G.Vieira, M.Francelino, J.C.Fernandes) and surroundings of McMurdo Dry Valleys (W.B.Lyons, K.A.Welch, J.Levy, A.Fountain, D.McKnight) are examples of Antarctic continental environments. The key goals of the Antarctic and sub-Antarctic book chapters are following: (i) identify the main environmental drivers and rates of contemporary solute and sedimentary fluxes, and (ii) model possible effects of projected climate change on solute and sedimentary fluxes in cold climate environments

  2. A New Stable Isotope Record From the Subantarctic Southeastern Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, L. M.; Hendy, I. L.; Moore, T. C.; Lyle, M. W.

    2007-12-01

    Few stable isotope records exist from the southeast Pacific Ocean due to its remote location, low sedimentation rates, and shallow carbonate compensation depth (CCD). The CCD in the southeast Pacific, however, has been found to be unusually deep (~4750 m), thereby allowing for the preservation of Neogene carbonates at abyssal depths. Herein we present stable isotope results from MV0502-4JC, which was recently recovered from the subantarctic region of the Southwest Pacific (50°20S, 148°08W, 4286 m). Dating the record with radiolarian biostratigraphy, we have generated a benthic stable isotope record back to the Middle Miocene from Cibicidoides spp. and a planktic record from Globigerina bulloides into the Late Pliocene. These stable isotope records, in conjunction with carbonate contents and counts of ice-rafted debris (IRD) and manganese micronodules show the effect of global ice sheet build up on this poorly understood region. A prominent negative δ13C shift of ~1‰ (from ~1 to ~0.2‰) in the benthic record occurs at ~15.3 MBSF (Middle Miocene) as carbonate contents in the core decrease from ~80% to ~20%, and significant changes in the bottom water are indicated by changes in the dominant Cibicidoides spp. at the site from C. robertsonianus to C. wuellerstorfi. Trace amounts of IRD and abundant manganese micronodules also appear at the site at this time. A significant hiatus (from the Late Miocene to the Middle Pliocene) occurs somewhere between 11.4 and 9.8 MBSF. From 9.8 to 8 MBSF (Late Pliocene) benthic δ18O increases and δ13C decreases by ~1‰. Also, IRD increases, manganese micronodules decrease, and there is a dramatic increase in the preservation of planktic foraminifera at the site. A planktic δ13C shift of >1‰ (from 0 to 1‰) occurs at ~5 MBSF (Pleistocene) coincident with a 20% increase in carbonate concentration. After this interval, the variability in both benthic δ18O and δ13C and planktic δ18O increases significantly. We interpret the

  3. Top of Atmosphere Radiation MVIRI/SEVIRI Data Record within the Climate Monitoring SAF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbain, Manon; Clerbaux, Nicolas; Ipe, Alessandro; Tornow, Florian; Hollmann, Rainer; Baudrez, Edward; Velazquez Blazquez, Almudena; Moreels, Johan; Trentmann, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    The CM SAF Top of Atmosphere (TOA) Radiation MVIRI/SEVIRI Data Record provides a homogeneous satellite-based climatology of the TOA Reflected Solar (TRS) and Emitted Thermal (TET) radiation in all-sky conditions. The continuous monitoring of these two components of the Earth Radiation Budget is of prime importance to study climate variability and change. The Meteosat Visible and InfraRed Imager (MVIRI - from 1983 until 2004) and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI - from 2004 onward) on board the Meteosat First and Second Generation satellites are combined to generate a long Thematic Climate Data Record (TCDR). Combining MVIRI and SEVIRI allows an unprecedented temporal (30 minutes / 15 minutes) and spatial (2.5 km / 3 km) resolution compared to the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) products. This is a step forward as it helps to increase the knowledge of the diurnal cycle and the small-scale spatial variations of radiation. The MVIRI/SEVIRI Data Record covers a 32 years time period from 1 February 1983 to 30 April 2015. The TOA radiation products are provided as daily mean, monthly mean and monthly averages of the hourly integrated values (diurnal cycle). To ensure consistency with other CM SAF products, the data is provided on a regular grid at a spatial resolution of 0.05 degrees (i.e. about 5.5 km) and covers the region between +/- 70° longitude and +/- 70° latitude. Validation of the MVIRI/SEVIRI Data Record has been performed by intercomparison with several references such as the CERES products (EBAF, SYN1deg-Day and SYN1deg-M3Hour), the HIRS OLR Climate Data Record (Daily and Monthly), the reconstructed ERBS WFOV-CERES (or DEEP-C) dataset and the ISCCP FD products. CERES is considered as the best reference from March 2000 onward. The quality of the early part of the Data Record is verified against the other references. In general, the stability of all the TOA radiation products is estimated to be better than 4 W.m-2

  4. Ground validation of DPR precipitation rate over Italy using H-SAF validation methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puca, Silvia; Petracca, Marco; Sebastianelli, Stefano; Vulpiani, Gianfranco

    2017-04-01

    The H-SAF project (Satellite Application Facility on support to Operational Hydrology and Water Management, funded by EUMETSAT) is aimed at retrieving key hydrological parameters such as precipitation, soil moisture and snow cover. Within the H-SAF consortium, the Product Precipitation Validation Group (PPVG) evaluate the accuracy of instantaneous and accumulated precipitation products with respect to ground radar and rain gauge data adopting the same methodology (using a Unique Common Code) throughout Europe. The adopted validation methodology can be summarized by the following few steps: (1) ground data (radar and rain gauge) quality control; (2) spatial interpolation of rain gauge measurements; (3) up-scaling of radar data to satellite native grid; (4) temporal comparison of satellite and ground-based precipitation products; and (5) production and evaluation of continuous and multi-categorical statistical scores for long time series and case studies. The statistical scores are evaluated taking into account the satellite product native grid. With the recent advent of the GPM era starting in march 2014, more new global precipitation products are available. The validation methodology developed in H-SAF can be easily applicable to different precipitation products. In this work, we have validated instantaneous precipitation data estimated from DPR (Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar) instrument onboard of the GPM-CO (Global Precipitation Measurement Core Observatory) satellite. In particular, we have analyzed the near surface and estimated precipitation fields collected in the 2A-Level for 3 different scans (NS, MS and HS). The Italian radar mosaic managed by the National Department of Civil Protection available operationally every 10 minutes is used as ground reference data. The results obtained highlight the capability of the DPR to identify properly the precipitation areas with higher accuracy in estimating the stratiform precipitation (especially for the HS). An

  5. Dispersal in the sub-Antarctic: king penguins show remarkably little population genetic differentiation across their range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clucas, Gemma V; Younger, Jane L; Kao, Damian; Rogers, Alex D; Handley, Jonathan; Miller, Gary D; Jouventin, Pierre; Nolan, Paul; Gharbi, Karim; Miller, Karen J; Hart, Tom

    2016-10-13

    Seabirds are important components of marine ecosystems, both as predators and as indicators of ecological change, being conspicuous and sensitive to changes in prey abundance. To determine whether fluctuations in population sizes are localised or indicative of large-scale ecosystem change, we must first understand population structure and dispersal. King penguins are long-lived seabirds that occupy a niche across the sub-Antarctic zone close to the Polar Front. Colonies have very different histories of exploitation, population recovery, and expansion. We investigated the genetic population structure and patterns of colonisation of king penguins across their current range using a dataset of 5154 unlinked, high-coverage single nucleotide polymorphisms generated via restriction site associated DNA sequencing (RADSeq). Despite breeding at a small number of discrete, geographically separate sites, we find only very slight genetic differentiation among colonies separated by thousands of kilometers of open-ocean, suggesting migration among islands and archipelagos may be common. Our results show that the South Georgia population is slightly differentiated from all other colonies and suggest that the recently founded Falkland Island colony is likely to have been established by migrants from the distant Crozet Islands rather than nearby colonies on South Georgia, possibly as a result of density-dependent processes. The observed subtle differentiation among king penguin colonies must be considered in future conservation planning and monitoring of the species, and demographic models that attempt to forecast extinction risk in response to large-scale climate change must take into account migration. It is possible that migration could buffer king penguins against some of the impacts of climate change where colonies appear panmictic, although it is unlikely to protect them completely given the widespread physical changes projected for their Southern Ocean foraging grounds

  6. Iron fertilization of the Subantarctic ocean during the last ice age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Alfredo; Sigman, Daniel M; Ren, Haojia; Anderson, Robert F; Straub, Marietta; Hodell, David A; Jaccard, Samuel L; Eglinton, Timothy I; Haug, Gerald H

    2014-03-21

    John H. Martin, who discovered widespread iron limitation of ocean productivity, proposed that dust-borne iron fertilization of Southern Ocean phytoplankton caused the ice age reduction in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). In a sediment core from the Subantarctic Atlantic, we measured foraminifera-bound nitrogen isotopes to reconstruct ice age nitrate consumption, burial fluxes of iron, and proxies for productivity. Peak glacial times and millennial cold events are characterized by increases in dust flux, productivity, and the degree of nitrate consumption; this combination is uniquely consistent with Subantarctic iron fertilization. The associated strengthening of the Southern Ocean's biological pump can explain the lowering of CO2 at the transition from mid-climate states to full ice age conditions as well as the millennial-scale CO2 oscillations.

  7. Extended hatching periods in the subantarctic lithodid crabs Lithodes santolla and Paralomis granulosa (Crustacea: Decapoda: Lithodidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatje, S.; Calcagno, J. A.; Lovrich, G. A.; Sartoris, F. J.; Anger, K.

    2003-06-01

    Temporal pattern of hatching was studied in the subantarctic lithodid crabs Lithodes santolla (Molina) and Paralomis granulosa (Jaquinot) from the Argentine Beagle Channel. In both species, larval hatching occurred in low daily numbers over an extended period of up to several weeks, depending on hatch size. Low daily hatching activity and low oxygen-consumption rates in freshly hatched P. granulosa larvae are discussed as life history adaptations to, and/or physiological constraints by, the environmental conditions of high latitudes.

  8. Magellan Bryozoa: a review of the diversity and of the Subantarctic and Antarctic zoogeographical links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. I. Moyano G.

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Based principally on previous work by the author, the Magellan Bryozoa are reviewed in terms of endemism, specific diversity, zoarial diversity and polymorphism. The Magellan, Atlantic, Pacific, Subantarctic and Antarctic zoogeographical relationships are reevaluated. New data related to the distribution of Magellanic and Antarctic species along the archipelagos of the Scotia Arc and new data on Bryozoa from the Magellan continental slope are added.

  9. Leaf and floral heating in cold climates: do sub-Antarctic megaherbs resemble tropical alpine giants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorna Little

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available High latitude and altitude floras are characterized by low-statured, small, wind-pollinated plants, which mainly reproduce by self-pollination or asexual reproduction. However, at odds with this are some sub-Antarctic islands that have plant species with giant growth forms and large, brightly coloured flowers which require insect visitation for pollination. The size, colour and shape of the inflorescences and leaves of these megaherbs suggest thermal benefits similar to giant tropical alpine plants of equatorial Africa, South America and Hawaii. We evaluated whether heating occurs in sub-Antarctic megaherbs, and to what extent it is related to environmental variables. We measured leaf and inflorescence temperature in six sub-Antarctic megaherb species on Campbell Island, latitude 52.3°S, New Zealand Biological Region. Using thermal imaging techniques, in combination with measurement of solar radiation, ambient air temperature, wind speed, wind chill and humidity, we assessed environmental influences on leaf and floral heating. We found that leaf and inflorescence temperatures of all megaherbs were higher than simultaneously measured ambient temperatures. Greatest heating was seen in Pleurophyllum speciosum, with observed leaves 9°C higher, and inflorescences nearly 11°C higher, than ambient temperature. Heating was highly correlated with brief, unpredictable periods of solar radiation, and occurred most rapidly in species with hairy, corrugated leaves and darkly pigmented, densely packed inflorescences. This is the first evidence that floral and leaf heating occurs in sub-Antarctic megaherbs, and suggests that leaf hairiness, flower colour and shape could provide thermal benefits like those seen in tropical alpine megaherbs.

  10. Kelp genes reveal effects of subantarctic sea ice during the Last Glacial Maximum

    OpenAIRE

    Fraser, Ceridwen I.; Nikula, Raisa; Spencer, Hamish G.; Waters, Jonathan M.

    2009-01-01

    The end of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) dramatically reshaped temperate ecosystems, with many species moving poleward as temperatures rose and ice receded. Whereas reinvading terrestrial taxa tracked melting glaciers, marine biota recolonized ocean habitats freed by retreating sea ice. The extent of sea ice in the Southern Hemisphere during the LGM has, however, yet to be fully resolved, with most palaeogeographic studies suggesting only minimal or patchy ice cover in subantarctic waters. H...

  11. Aeolian processes and landforms in the sub-Antarctic: preliminary observations from Marion Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Hedding

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sub-Antarctic Marion Island has a hyperoceanic climate, with cold and wet conditions and consistently strong wind velocities throughout the year. Recent observations recognized the increasing role of aeolian processes as a geomorphic agent, and this paper presents the first data for transport by aeolian processes on a sub-Antarctic island. Data were collected through an intensive and high-resolution measurement campaign at three study sites using Big Spring Number Eight sediment traps and surface sediment samplers in conjunction with an array of climatic and soil logger sensors. Observed aeolian landforms are megaripples, and the data suggest that aeolian processes are also modifying solifluction landforms. The sediment traps and sediment samplers collected wind-blown scoria at all three study sites, and the annual (horizontal aeolian sediment flux extrapolated from this preliminary data is estimated at 0.36–3.85 kg cm−2 y−1. Importantly, plant material of various species was trapped during the study that suggests the efficiency of wind for the dispersal of plants in this sub-Antarctic environment may be underestimated. This paper advocates long-term monitoring of aeolian processes and that the link between aeolian processes and synoptic climate must be established. Furthermore, wind as a means to disperse genetic material on Marion Island should be investigated.

  12. Scaffold attachment factor A (SAF-A) and Ku temporally regulate repair of radiation-induced clustered genome lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantha, Anil K.; Hegde, Pavana M.; Pandey, Arvind; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Yu, Yaping; Calsou, Patrick; Chen, David; Lees-Miller, Susan P.; Mitra, Sankar

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) induces highly cytotoxic double-strand breaks (DSBs) and also clustered oxidized bases in mammalian genomes. Base excision repair (BER) of bi-stranded oxidized bases could generate additional DSBs as repair intermediates in the vicinity of direct DSBs, leading to loss of DNA fragments. This could be avoided if DSB repair via DNA-PK-mediated nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) precedes BER initiated by NEIL1 and other DNA glycosylases (DGs). Here we show that DNA-PK subunit Ku inhibits DGs via direct interaction. The scaffold attachment factor (SAF)-A, (also called hnRNP-U), phosphorylated at Ser59 by DNA-PK early after IR treatment, is linked to transient release of chromatin-bound NEIL1, thus preventing BER. SAF-A is subsequently dephosphorylated. Ku inhibition of DGs in vitro is relieved by unphosphorylated SAF-A, but not by the phosphomimetic Asp59 mutant. We thus propose that SAF-A, in concert with Ku, temporally regulates base damage repair in irradiated cell genome. PMID:27303920

  13. Optimal Operation of Photovoltaic System with a DC-DC Boost Converter FED SAF Using ICosφ Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.Vijayakumar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an optimal utilization of Photovoltaic (PV solar system based Shunt Active Filter (PV-SAF for harmonic mitigation, real and reactive power compensation at the point of common coupling (PCC throughout the day. This PV system operated SAF reduces the energy consumption by disconnecting the utility grid from the load through semiconductor switches, when the PV system generates excessive or equal real power to the required load demand. However, the reduction of energy consumption is always desirable for the reduction of panel tariff and global warming gasses. The PV module is connected to the DC side of SAF through the DC-DC converter with fuzzy based Perturb & Observe (P&O Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT algorithm to eliminate the drawback of the conventional PV system by tracking maximum power point of the PV array is presented. The reference currents extract by the Fuzzy logic controller based ICosΦ control strategy. This proposed PV-SAF, if connected at the terminals of a small industry or a home or a small enlightening institution can avoid interruptible power supply, use of individual stabilizer and potential panel tariff over a 12 hour period. A MATLAB simulink is presented to validate the advantage of the proposed system.

  14. Assessment of a User Guide for One Semi-Automated Forces (OneSAF) Version 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Chapters 2 (OneSAF Workspaces) and 3 (Start-up, Save, Stopping and 14 Reloading, and Shut Down Procedures) to more readily apply the crawl-walk-run theory ...map. These coordinates can be changed to UTM (Universal Transverse Mercator), MGRS (Military Grid Reference System), and GCC or GDC ( Geocentric or

  15. Iron fertilization of the Subantarctic Ocean during the last ice age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Garcia, A.

    2015-12-01

    Dust has the potential to modify global climate by influencing the radiative balance of the atmosphere and by supplying iron and other essential limiting micronutrients to the ocean. The scarcity of iron limits marine productivity and carbon uptake in one-quarter of the world ocean where the concentration of major nutrients (phosphorus and nitrogen) is perennially high. The Southern Ocean is the region where variations in iron availability can have the largest effect on Earth's carbon cycle through its fertilizing effect on marine ecosystems. Paleoceanographic records from the Subantarctic Atlantic have revealed a remarkable correlation between phytoplankton productivity and aeolian iron flux during glacial periods supporting the iron fertilization hypothesis. In addition, a recent study has shown that peak glacial times and millennial cold events were nearly universally associated not only with increases in dust flux and export production, but also with an increase in nutrient consumption (the last indicated by higher foraminifera-bound δ15N) (Martinez-Garcia et al. 2014). This combination of changes is uniquely consistent with ice age iron fertilization of the Subantarctic Atlantic. The strengthening of the biological pump associated with the observed increase in Subantarctic nutrient consumption during the high-dust intervals of the last two ice ages can explain up to ~40 ppm of the CO2 decrease that characterizes the transitions from mid-climate states to full ice age conditions. However, the impact of iron fertilization in other sectors of the Southern Ocean characterized by lower ice age dust fluxes than the Atlantic remains unclear. A series of recently published records from the Subantarctic Pacific indicate that dust deposition and marine export production were three times higher during glacial periods than during interglacials (Lamy et al. 2014). Here we present new measurements of foraminifera-bound nitrogen isotopes in a sediment core located in the

  16. Inter-comparison of the EUMETSAT H-SAF and NASA PPS precipitation products over Western Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Chris; Panegrossi, Giulia; Ringerud, Sarah; Stocker, Erich

    2017-04-01

    The development of precipitation retrieval techniques utilising passive microwave satellite observations has achieved a good degree of maturity through the use of physically-based schemes. The DMSP Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) has been the mainstay of passive microwave observations over the last 13 years forming the basis of many satellite precipitation products, including NASA's Precipitation Processing System (PPS) and EUMETSAT's Hydrological Satellite Application Facility (H-SAF). The NASA PPS product utilises the Goddard Profiling (GPROF; currently 2014v2-0) retrieval scheme that provides a physically consistent retrieval scheme through the use of coincident active/passive microwave retrievals from the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission core satellite. The GPM combined algorithm retrieves hydrometeor profiles optimized for consistency with both Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and GPM Microwave Imager (GMI); these profiles form the basis of the GPROF database which can be utilized for any constellation radiometer within the framework a Bayesian retrieval scheme. The H-SAF product (PR-OBS-1 v1.7) is based on a physically-based Bayesian technique where the a priori information is provided by a Cloud Dynamic Radiation Database (CDRD). Meteorological parameter constraints, derived from synthetic dynamical-thermodynamical-hydrological meteorological profile variables, are used in conjunction with multi-hydrometeor microphysical profiles and multispectral PMW brightness temperature vectors into a specialized a priori knowledge database underpinning and guiding the algorithm's Bayesian retrieval solver. This paper will present the results of an inter-comparison of the NASA PPS GPROF and EUMETSAT H-SAF PR-OBS-1 products over Western Europe for the period from 1 January 2015 through 31 December 2016. Surface radar is derived from the UKMO-derived Nimrod European radar product, available at 15 minute/5 km resolution. Initial results

  17. Reconstructing Export Production in the Subantarctic South Pacific during the Last Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. W.; Winckler, G.; Anderson, R. F.; Schwartz, R.; Lamy, F.; Gersonde, R.; Pahnke, K.

    2016-02-01

    Despite high concentration of major nutrients in the Southern Ocean, nutrient utilization is inefficient because the scarcity of iron limits phytoplankton growth and primary productivity. Input of eolian dust into the ocean may supply iron, leading to increased export production and nutrient utilization, and potentially affect the Earth's carbon cycle through its fertilizing effect on marine ecosystem. Recent studies (Martínez-Garcia et al., 2009, 2011, 2014) suggest that iron fertilization in the Subantarctic South Atlantic may have contributed to reducing atmospheric CO2 by 40ppm over the last glacial cycle. While most of current observations on the Southern Ocean come from the South Atlantic, the Pacific sector covers the largest surface area of the Southern Ocean, indicating its potential to store the largest fraction of carbon. Dust fluxes to the South Atlantic are generally stronger than those to the South Pacific, but the glacial-interglacial pattern of dust deposition is similar. A recent study (Lamy et al., 2014) suggests a threefold increase of dust deposition over glacial periods than over interglacial periods in the South Pacific, and show a correlation between dust records and preliminary export production. In this study, we examine a set of cores from the Subantarctic South Pacific at higher temporal resolution to observe variability of export production in response to changing dust flux. We present proxy records for paleoproductivity from excess Ba, biogenic opal and authigenic Uranium. The results will allow us to evaluate the importance of iron fertilization in the Subantarctic Pacific Ocean over glacial/interglacial timescale and its potential effect on the global carbon cycle.

  18. Optical waveguides fabricated in Cr:LiSAF by femtosecond laser micromachining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasetti, Demian A.; Di Liscia, Emiliano J.; Torchia, Gustavo A.

    2017-11-01

    In this work we present the fabrication of double-track type II waveguides written in 1% doped Cr:LiSrAlF6 (Cr:LiSAF) crystal by femtosecond laser micromachining. We studied waveguides fabricated at energies from 1 to 7 μJ per pulse at writing speeds of 15-45 μm/s. We found good wave-guiding performance for both, Transversal Magnetic (TM) and Transversal Electric (TE) polarization modes as well as acceptable losses according to the expected values addressed to technological applications. Also, we performed a high-resolution μ-luminescence waveguide cross-section mapping between the tracks, in order to identify possible spectral changes caused for active ions Cr3+ corresponding to the 4T2 →4A2 vibronic transition in the focal volume zone, due to induced anisotropic graded stress. Finally, their lifetimes were measured for bulk as well as for waveguide trapped ions. We found that for the range of parameters of ultra-short micromachining used, the Cr3+ ions embedded in the waveguides remained spectroscopically unchanged compared with those observed in bulk material.

  19. Detrimental Cr-rich Phases Precipitation on SAF 2205 Duplex Stainless Steels Welds After Heat Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argelia Fabiola Miranda Pérez

    Full Text Available Abstract The austeno-ferritic Stainless Steels are commonly employed in various applications requiring structural performances with enhanced corrosion resistance. Their characteristics can be worsened if the material is exposed to thermal cycles, since the high-temperature decomposition of ferrite causes the formation of detrimental secondary phases. The Submerged Arc Welding (SAW process is currently adopted for joining DSS owing to its relatively simple execution, cost savings, and using molten slag and granular flux from protecting the seam of atmospheric gases. However, since it produces high contents of δ-ferrite in the heat affected zone and low content of γ-austenite in the weld, high-Ni filler materials must be employed, to avoid excessive ferritization of the joint. The present work is aimed to study the effect of 3 and 6 hours isothermal heat treatments at 850°C and 900°C in a SAF 2205 DSS welded joint in terms of phases precipitation. The results showed the presence of σ-phase at any time-temperature combination, precipitating at the δ/γ interphases and often accompanied by the presence of χ-phase. However, certain differences in secondary phases amounts were revealed among the different zones constituting the joint, ascribable both to peculiar elements partitioning and to the different morphology pertaining to each microstructure.

  20. An episomally replicating vector binds to the nuclear matrix protein SAF-A in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenke, Bok Hee C.; Fetzer, Christian P.; Stehle, Isa M.; Jönsson, Franziska; Fackelmayer, Frank O.; Conradt, Harald; Bode, Jürgen; Lipps, Hans J.

    2002-01-01

    pEPI-1, a vector in which a chromosomal scaffold/matrix-attached region (S/MAR) is linked to the simian virus 40 origin of replication, is propagated episomally in CHO cells in the absence of the virally encoded large T-antigen and is stably maintained in the absence of selection pressure. It has been suggested that mitotic stability is provided by a specific interaction of this vector with components of the nuclear matrix. We studied the interactions of pEPI-1 by crosslinking with cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II, after which it is found to copurify with the nuclear matrix. In a south-western analysis, the vector shows exclusive binding to hnRNP-U/SAF-A, a multifunctional scaffold/matrix specific factor. Immunoprecipitation of the crosslinked DNA–protein complex demonstrates that pEPI-1 is bound to this protein in vivo. These data provide the first experimental evidence for the binding of an artificial episome to a nuclear matrix protein in vivo and the basis for understanding the mitotic stability of this novel vector class. PMID:11897664

  1. Front matter: Volume 10385

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assoufid, Lahsen; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Asundi, Anand K.

    2017-09-01

    This PDF file contains the front matter associated with SPIE Proceedings Volume 10385, including the Title Page, Copyright information, Table of Contents, Introduction, and Conference Committee listing.

  2. Permeable bio-reactive barriers to address petroleum hydrocarbon contamination at subantarctic Macquarie Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidman, Benjamin L; Terry, Deborah; Wilkins, Dan; Spedding, Tim; Gras, Sally L; Snape, Ian; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Mumford, Kathryn A

    2017-05-01

    A reliance on diesel generated power and a history of imperfect fuel management have created a legacy of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination at subantarctic Macquarie Island. Increasing environmental awareness and advances in contaminant characterisation and remediation technology have fostered an impetus to reduce the environmental risk associated with legacy sites. A funnel and gate permeable bio-reactive barrier (PRB) was installed in 2014 to address the migration of Special Antarctic Blend diesel from a spill that occurred in 2002, as well as older spills and residual contaminants in the soil at the Main Power House. The PRB gate comprised of granular activated carbon and natural clinoptilolite zeolite. Petroleum hydrocarbons migrating in the soil water were successfully captured on the reactive materials, with concentrations at the outflow of the barrier recorded as being below reporting limits. The nutrient and iron concentrations delivered to the barrier demonstrated high temporal variability with significant iron precipitation observed across the bed. The surface of the granular activated carbon was largely free from cell attachment while natural zeolite demonstrated patchy biofilm formation after 15 months following PRB installation. This study illustrates the importance of informed material selection at field scale to ensure that adsorption and biodegradation processes are utilised to manage the environmental risk associated with petroleum hydrocarbon spills. This study reports the first installation of a permeable bio-reactive barrier in the subantarctic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cytotoxic activity of marine sponge extracts from the sub-Antarctic Islands and the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth K. Olsen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 50 years, marine invertebrates, especially sponges, have proven to be a valuable source of new and/or bioactive natural products that have the potential to be further developed as lead compounds for pharmaceutical applications. Although marine benthic invertebrate communities occurring off the coast of South Africa have been explored for their biomedicinal potential, the natural product investigation of marine sponges from the sub-Antarctic Islands in the Southern Ocean for the presence of bioactive secondary metabolites has been relatively unexplored thus far. We report here the results for the biological screening of both aqueous and organic extracts prepared from nine specimens of eight species of marine sponges, collected from around Marion Island and the Prince Edward Islands in the Southern Ocean, for their cytotoxic activity against three cancer cell lines. The results obtained through this multidisciplinary collaborative research effort by exclusively South African institutions has provided an exciting opportunity to discover cytotoxic compounds from sub-Antarctic sponges, whilst contributing to our understanding of the biodiversity and geographic distributions of these cold-water invertebrates. Therefore, we acknowledge here the various contributions of the diverse scientific disciplines that played a pivotal role in providing the necessary platform for the future natural products chemistry investigation of these marine sponges from the sub- Antarctic Islands and the Southern Ocean.

  4. Isolation and characterization of Campylobacter jejuni subsp jejuni from macaroni penguins (Eudyptes chrysolophus) in the subantarctic region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broman, T.; Bergstrom, S.; On, Stephen L.W.

    2000-01-01

    On Bird Island, South Georgia, albatrosses (n = 140), penguins (n = 100), and fur seals (n = 206) were sampled for Campylobacter jejuni. C. jejuni subsp. jejuni was recovered from three macaroni penguins (Eudyptes chrysolophus). These isolates, the first reported for the subantarctic region, showed...

  5. Spatial dynamics of two introduced species of carabid beetles on the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandjes, G.J.; Block, W.; Ernsting, G.

    1999-01-01

    On the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia two species of predatory beetle, Trechisibus antarcticus and Oopterus soledadinus (Coleoptera, Carabidae), were accidentally introduced. The colonisation process offers unique opportunities for testing ecological hypotheses in the field. As a basis for

  6. Fronts, fish, and predators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, Igor M.; Hunt, George L.; Hazen, Elliott L.; Zamon, Jeannette E.; Schick, Robert S.; Prieto, Rui; Brodziak, Jon; Teo, Steven L. H.; Thorne, Lesley; Bailey, Helen; Itoh, Sachihiko; Munk, Peter; Musyl, Michael K.; Willis, Jay K.; Zhang, Wuchang

    2014-09-01

    Ocean fronts play a key role in marine ecosystems. Fronts shape oceanic landscapes and affect every trophic level across a wide range of spatio-temporal scales, from meters to thousands of kilometers, and from days to millions of years. At some fronts, there is an elevated rate of primary production, whereas at others, plankton is aggregated by advection and by the behavior of organisms moving against gradients in temperature, salinity, light irradiance, hydrostatic pressure and other physico-chemical and biological factors. Lower trophic level organisms - phytoplankton and zooplankton - that are aggregated in sufficient densities, attract organisms from higher trophic levels, from planktivorous schooling fish to squid, large piscivorous fish, seabirds and marine mammals. Many species have critical portions of their life stages or behaviors closely associated with fronts, including spawning, feeding, ontogenetic development, migrations, and other activities cued to frontal dynamics. At different life stages, an individual species or population might be linked to different fronts. The nature and strength of associations between fronts and biota depend on numerous factors such as the physical nature and spatio-temporal scales of the front and the species and their life stages in question. In other words, fronts support many different niches and micro/macro-habitats over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales.

  7. Negative Ion Density Fronts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igor Kaganovich

    2000-12-18

    Negative ions tend to stratify in electronegative plasmas with hot electrons (electron temperature Te much larger than ion temperature Ti, Te > Ti ). The boundary separating a plasma containing negative ions, and a plasma, without negative ions, is usually thin, so that the negative ion density falls rapidly to zero-forming a negative ion density front. We review theoretical, experimental and numerical results giving the spatio-temporal evolution of negative ion density fronts during plasma ignition, the steady state, and extinction (afterglow). During plasma ignition, negative ion fronts are the result of the break of smooth plasma density profiles during nonlinear convection. In a steady-state plasma, the fronts are boundary layers with steepening of ion density profiles due to nonlinear convection also. But during plasma extinction, the ion fronts are of a completely different nature. Negative ions diffuse freely in the plasma core (no convection), whereas the negative ion front propagates towards the chamber walls with a nearly constant velocity. The concept of fronts turns out to be very effective in analysis of plasma density profile evolution in strongly non-isothermal plasmas.

  8. Post-instrumentation pain after the use of either Mtwo or the SAF system: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saumya-Rajesh, P; Krithikadatta, J; Velmurugan, N; Sooriaprakas, C

    2017-08-01

    This randomized controlled trial compared the incidence of post-instrumentation pain associated with Mtwo rotary NiTi files and the self-adjusting file system following canal shaping and cleaning. Following sample size estimation, a total of 130 patients were randomized into two groups based on selection criteria [group Mtwo and group SAF (self-adjusting file)]. Root canal treatment was carried out in two appointments. The teeth were endodontically treated with the appropriate allotted systems following the similar clinical parameters. Patients were asked to rate the intensity of pre-instrumentation and post-instrumentation pain (at 2, 4, 6, 8, 24, 48 h) using the VAS score. The Kruskal-Wallis test was carried out for the overall comparisons of the two systems. The Friedman test was used to compare between time-points with each system. Subgroup analyses for independent variables (gender, pulp status and diagnosis) used the Mann-Whitney test and Wilcoxon signed ranks test (P instrumentation pain. Teeth with pulpal necrosis had significant pain at 8 h compared with teeth with vital pulps (P = 0.04). Teeth with vital pulps in the SAF group had significantly less post-instrumentation pain compared with those in the Mtwo group at 6 h (P = 0.042). Patients who had teeth with nonvital pulps in the SAF group experienced more post-instrumentation pain at 8 h (P = 0.017) and 24 h (P = 0.005). The incidence of post-instrumentation pain at different time intervals in patients undergoing root canal treatment was similar for both the self-adjusting file and Mtwo file systems. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Validation of the H-SAF precipitation product H03 over Greece using rain gauge data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feidas, H.; Porcu, F.; Puca, S.; Rinollo, A.; Lagouvardos, C.; Kotroni, V.

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an extensive validation of the combined infrared/microwave H-SAF (EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Support to Operational Hydrology and Water Management) precipitation product H03, for a 1-year period, using gauge observations from a relatively dense network of 233 stations over Greece. First, the quality of the interpolated data used to validate the precipitation product is assessed and a quality index is constructed based on parameters such as the density of the station network and the orography. Then, a validation analysis is conducted based on comparisons of satellite (H03) with interpolated rain gauge data to produce continuous and multi-categorical statistics at monthly and annual timescales by taking into account the different geophysical characteristics of the terrain (land, coast, sea, elevation). Finally, the impact of the quality of interpolated data on the validation statistics is examined in terms of different configurations of the interpolation model and the rain gauge network characteristics used in the interpolation. The possibility of using a quality index of the interpolated data as a filter in the validation procedure is also investigated. The continuous validation statistics show yearly root mean squared error (RMSE) and mean absolute error (MAE) corresponding to the 225 and 105 % of the mean rain rate, respectively. Mean error (ME) indicates a slight overall tendency for underestimation of the rain gauge rates, which takes large values for the high rain rates. In general, the H03 algorithm cannot retrieve very well the light (10 mm/h) precipitation. The poor correlation between satellite and gauge data points to algorithm problems in co-locating precipitation patterns. Seasonal comparison shows that retrieval errors are lower for cold months than in the summer months of the year. The multi-categorical statistics indicate that the H03 algorithm is able to discriminate efficiently the rain from the no rain events

  10. CDRD and PNPR satellite passive microwave precipitation retrieval algorithms: EuroTRMM/EURAINSAT origins and H-SAF operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mugnai

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Satellite Application Facility on Support to Operational Hydrology and Water Management (H-SAF is a EUMETSAT (European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites program, designed to deliver satellite products of hydrological interest (precipitation, soil moisture and snow parameters over the European and Mediterranean region to research and operations users worldwide. Six satellite precipitation algorithms and concomitant precipitation products are the responsibility of various agencies in Italy. Two of these algorithms have been designed for maximum accuracy by restricting their inputs to measurements from conical and cross-track scanning passive microwave (PMW radiometers mounted on various low Earth orbiting satellites. They have been developed at the Italian National Research Council/Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate in Rome (CNR/ISAC-Rome, and are providing operational retrievals of surface rain rate and its phase properties. Each of these algorithms is physically based, however, the first of these, referred to as the Cloud Dynamics and Radiation Database (CDRD algorithm, uses a Bayesian-based solution solver, while the second, referred to as the PMW Neural-net Precipitation Retrieval (PNPR algorithm, uses a neural network-based solution solver. Herein we first provide an overview of the two initial EU research and applications programs that motivated their initial development, EuroTRMM and EURAINSAT (European Satellite Rainfall Analysis and Monitoring at the Geostationary Scale, and the current H-SAF program that provides the framework for their operational use and continued development. We stress the relevance of the CDRD and PNPR algorithms and their precipitation products in helping secure the goals of H-SAF's scientific and operations agenda, the former helpful as a secondary calibration reference to other algorithms in H-SAF's complete mix of algorithms. Descriptions of the algorithms' designs are

  11. Evaluation of the Self-Adjusting File system (SAF) for the instrumentation of primary molar root canals: a micro-computed tomographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, E; Elbay, M; Yiğit, D

    2017-06-01

    The Self-Adjusting File (SAF) system has been recommended for use in permanent teeth since it offers more conservative and effective root-canal preparation when compared to traditional rotary systems. However, no study had evaluated the usage of SAF in primary teeth. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the use of SAF, K file (manual instrumentation) and Profile (traditional rotary instrumentation) systems for primary-tooth root-canal preparation in terms of instrumentation time and amounts of dentin removed using micro-computed tomography (μCT) technology. Study Design: The study was conducted with 60 human primary mandibular second molar teeth divided into 3 groups according to instrumentation technique: Group I: SAF (n=20); Group II: K file (n=20); Group III; Profile (n=20). Teeth were embedded in acrylic blocks and scanned with a μCT scanner prior to instrumentation. All distal root canals were prepared up to size 30 for K file,.04/30 for Profile and 2 mm thickness, size 25 for SAF; instrumentation time was recorded for each tooth, and a second μCT scan was performed after instrumentation was complete. Amounts of dentin removed were measured using the three-dimensional images by calculating the difference in root-canal volume before and after preparation. Data was statistically analysed using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Manual instrumentation (K file) resulted in significantly more dentin removal when compared to rotary instrumentation (Profile and SAF), while the SAF system generated significantly less dentin removal than both manual instrumentation (K file) and traditional rotary instrumentation (Profile) (pInstrumentation time was significantly greater with manual instrumentation when compared to rotary instrumentation (pinstrumentation time did not differ significantly between the Profile and SAF systems. Within the experimental conditions of the present study, the SAF seems as a useful system for root

  12. Head Kidney Transcriptome Analysis and Characterization for the Sub-Antarctic Notothenioid Fish Eleginops maclovinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danixa Martínez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes de novo transcriptome sequencing and annotation analyses for the head kidney of the sub-Antarctic notothenioid fish Eleginops maclovinus, a sister group of the Antarctic notothenioid fish clade. Moreover, E. maclovinus is one of the most eurythermal and euryhaline representatives of the Notothenioidei suborder. RNA-seq data were generated by the 454 GS Junior system, resulting in 11,207 contigs that were then assembled by the Genomic Workbench CLC software. The transcriptome was annotated by BLASTing each sequence against the universal, non-redundant NCBI database (National Center for Biotechnology Information using the AUSTRAL-omics computer cluster. A significant number of transcripts related to innate and adaptive immunity were found in the sequences, which could be used as references in future immunological studies in E. maclovinus.

  13. The Quarantine Protection of Sub-Antarctic Australia: Two Islands, Two Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Potter

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Sub-Antarctic Heard Island and Macquarie Island are among Australia’s offshore properties susceptible to colonization by species introduced by humans. While both islands share World Heritage status and are IUCN Category Ia Protected Areas (Strict Nature Reserves, different quarantine protection regimes are in operation. Macquarie Island’s biosecurity appears to be less catered for while the means and likelihood of introductions are greater. The administrative, political, practical and geographical contexts within which quarantine management planning takes place variously impact on the level of quarantine protection provided to both islands. These and other remote sites of high conservation value are unlikely to receive heightened protection until the issues associated with such management contexts receive greater attention.

  14. A novel lab-on-chip platform with integrated solid phase PCR and Supercritical Angle Fluorescence (SAF) microlens array for highly sensitive and multiplexed pathogen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Tran Quang; Chin, Wai Hoe; Sun, Yi; Wolff, Anders; Bang, Dang Duong

    2017-04-15

    Solid-phase PCR (SP-PCR) has become increasingly popular for molecular diagnosis and there have been a few attempts to incorporate SP-PCR into lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices. However, their applicability for on-line diagnosis is hindered by the lack of sensitive and portable on-chip optical detection technology. In this paper, we addressed this challenge by combining the SP-PCR with super critical angle fluorescence (SAF) microlens array embedded in a microchip. We fabricated miniaturized SAF microlens array as part of a microfluidic chamber in thermoplastic material and performed multiplexed SP-PCR directly on top of the SAF microlens array. Attribute to the high fluorescence collection efficiency of the SAF microlens array, the SP-PCR assay on the LOC platform demonstrated a high sensitivity of 1.6 copies/µL, comparable to off-chip detection using conventional laser scanner. The combination of SP-PCR and SAF microlens array allows for on-chip highly sensitive and multiplexed pathogen detection with low-cost and compact optical components. The LOC platform would be widely used as a high-throughput biosensor to analyze food, clinical and environmental samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Surface destabilisation by the invasive burrowing engineer Mus musculus on a sub-Antarctic island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Bert; Eldridge, David J.

    2014-10-01

    Invasive species are known to have substantial trophic effects on ecosystems and ecosystem processes. The invasion of the house mouse (Mus musculus) onto sub-Antarctic islands has had a devastating effect on plants, invertebrates, and birds with substantial changes in ecosystem functions. Less well understood, however, are the nontrophic, geomorphic effects of mice resulting from their burrowing activities. We examined the extent of burrow construction by M. musculus across an area of about 20 ha on Marion Island and the effects of burrows on water flow and sediment movement. We recorded a density of 0.59 ± 0.48 (mean ± SD) burrows m- 2, with more burrows at lower altitudes and shallower slopes, and twice the density in the solifluction risers (0.86 ± 0.54 m- 2) than the intervening terraces or treads (0.40 ± 0.51 m- 2). Most burrows were dug horizontally into the slope and tended to extend about 20 cm deep before turning. A very conservative estimate of sediment removed from burrows from this depth is 2.4 t ha- 1. However, taking into account more detailed data on burrow morphology based on excavations, actual amounts may be closer to 8.4 t ha- 1. Average soil displacement rate for a single burrow, measured over 5 days, was 0.18 kg burrow- 1 day- 1. Burrows acted as conduits for water and warmer air. Stones at burrow entrances were moved eight times farther by water (10.4 cm) than those not associated with burrows. Similarly, temperatures adjacent to burrow entrances were 4.1 °C higher than sites 10 cm away. Together our data indicate that mice are having substantial deleterious and geomorphic effects on sub-Antarctic ecosystems through their burrowing. With lower rates of mouse mortality resulting from warmer climates predicted under global climate models, we can expect an increase in damage resulting from mouse activity.

  16. Postglacial Records of Southern Hemisphere Westerly Wind Variability From the New Zealand Subantarctic Auckland Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, C. M.; Vandergoes, M.; Gilmer, G. J.; Nichols, J. E.; Dagg, B. J.; Wilson, G. S.; Browne, I. M.; Curtin, L. G.; Aebig, C.; McGlone, M.

    2015-12-01

    The strength and latitudinal position of the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds (SHWW) play a fundamental role in influencing mid latitude climate and carbon dioxide exchange between the Southern Ocean and the atmosphere. Despite their importance, our understanding of past changes in the SHWW is limited by few paleoclimate records from the modern wind maximum that are often not in agreement. The New Zealand subantarctic Auckland Islands are located within the core of the modern wind belt (50°S) where the ocean-atmospheric linkages between the Antarctic and middle latitudes are strong. In contrast to other subantarctic islands on the Campbell Plateau, the Auckland Islands have protected fjord sub-basins, deep lakes, and peatlands that are advantageous for the development of high-resolution paleoclimate records. We will present ongoing work towards the establishment of multi-proxy and multi-site reconstructions of past SHWW variability from the Auckland Islands. Modern process and paleoclimate results from two research cruises in 2014 and 2015 suggest that in lacustrine and fjord settings, the degree of water column mixing, the stable isotopic composition of n-alkanes and benthic foraminifera, the influx of terrestrial organic matter are good indicators of wind-induced mixing of the water column or precipitation-driven erosion within catchments. In ombrotrophic peatlands, hydrogen isotope ratios of specific organic molecules allow reconstructions of the hydrogen isotope ratios of precipitation, which is related to precipitation source area and the latitudinal position of the SHWW. Using macrofossil counts paired with abundances of leaf wax biomarkers, we are able to estimate the moisture balance at peatland coring sites. Early results indicate an overall strengthening of the SHWW at the Auckland Islands through the Holocene. We will discuss these results within the context of complimentary records developed from New Zealand and southern South America to ultimately

  17. Different adaptations of Chinese winter-over expeditioners during prolonged Antarctic and sub-Antarctic residence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nan; Wu, Quan; Li, Hao; Zhang, Tao; Xu, Chengli

    2016-05-01

    Prolonged residence in Antarctica is characterized by exposure to isolated, confined, and extreme (ICE) environment. Winter-over expeditioners at research stations often exhibit a complex of psychophysiological symptoms, which varied by stations and sociocultural backgrounds. To understand the different patterns of psychophysiological responses provoked by environmental stress, we conducted a longitudinal assessment of mood and endocrine function in two groups of Chinese expeditioners who were deployed to sub-Antarctic (Great Wall Station, 62°S, N = 12) and Antarctic (Zhongshan Station, 66°S, N = 16) from December 2003 to 2005. Measures of mood, thyroid function, the levels of plasma catecholamine, and circulating interleukins were obtained at departure from China, mid-winter (Antarctica), end of winter (Antarctica), and return to China, respectively. The Zhongshan Station crew experienced significant increases in fatigue, anger, tension, confusion, and decrease in free thyroxine (FT4), norepinephrine (NE), and epinephrine (E) during the winter, increase in thyrotropin (TSH) and total triiodothyronine (TT3) when returning, whereas their counterparts at Great Wall Station only experienced increased TT3 after deployment. Moreover, compared with the Great Wall Station crew, the Zhongshan Station crew exhibited greater increase in anger, greater decrease in FT4, total thyroxine (TT4), NE and E over the winter, and greater increase in TSH when returning. Chinese expeditioners who lived and worked at the Antarctic station and the sub-Antarctic station for over a year showed different change patterns in mood and endocrine hormones. Negative mood and endocrine dysfunction were positively associated with the severity of environment. The study is a supplement to scientific knowledge on psychophysiological variation under ICE environment, which has certain applied value for the development of preventive countermeasures or interventions.

  18. Effect of Aging on Precipitation Behavior and Pitting Corrosion Resistance of SAF2906 Super Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianchun; Li, Guoping; Liang, Wei; Han, Peide; Wang, Hongxia

    2017-09-01

    The effect of aging temperature and holding time on the precipitation of secondary phases and pitting corrosion resistance of SAF2906 super duplex stainless steel was examined. Chromium nitride and σ phase were observed to preferentially precipitate at the ferrite/austenite interface. An amount of nitrides was also observed within the ferrite grain. The precipitation of chromium nitride occurred before the σ phase. The increase in aging temperature and holding time did not affect the concentration of the nitrides but increased the area fraction of the σ phase at a faster rate. The Cr2N precipitation in SAF2906 is more evident than that of the other duplex stainless steels. The variation tendency of the precipitation concentrations is primarily consistent with the prediction results of Thermo-Calc software. The electrochemical results showed that Cr2N and σ phase significantly reduced the pitting potential. Scanning electron microscope observations revealed that pits appear mainly in regions adjacent to sigma phase and Cr2N.

  19. CM-SAF water vapour and temperature products from ATOVS onboard NOAA and MetOp: 2004-2008, five years of data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courcoux, N.; Schröder, M.; Steenbergen, T.; Schulz, J.

    2009-04-01

    The major objective of the satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM-SAF) is the exploitation of the satellite measurement with state of the art algorithms to derive information about key climate variable of the Earth system. The derived products focus on the atmospheric part of the "Essential Climate Variable" developed within the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) framework. Furthermore, the CM-SAF products are tailored with respect to the need of the current and potential future users and are developed by applying the GCOS climate monitoring principles as far as possible. Concerning water vapour and temperature, which are essential climate variables, the CM-SAF operationally retrieves water vapour and temperature profiles from ATOVS observations. The ATOVS instruments, namely HIRS, AMSU-A, and AMSU-B are flying onboard the NOAA satellites and now onboard MetOp as well. The CM-SAF ATOVS data have a global coverage with a spatial resolution of 90 km2 and are available as monthly and daily means. The CM-SAF ATOVS retrieved products are vertically integrated water vapour from the surface to 100 hPa, layered vertically integrated water vapour, layered mean temperature and layered mean relative humidity all three on five layers, as well as temperature and water vapour mixing ratio on six pressure levels. A total of 28 CM-SAF ATOVS products is available. The CM-SAF ATOVS data are, for example, valuable products for the evaluation of climate models because of the simultaneous retrieval of temperature and water vapour profiles with global coverage and high quality in the upper troposphere. On the other hand, the CM-SAF ATOVS products are not suitable for monitoring the interannual variability and trends since the bias errors due to orbit shift and decay, and the intersatellite biases are not corrected. The CM-SAF operational processing scheme is using the International ATOVS Processing Package (IAPP) developed by the University of Wisconsin to retrieve

  20. A enfermeira pediatra cuidando de crianças/ adolescentes com Síndrome Alcoólica Fetal (SAF La enfermera pediatra cuidando de niños/adolescentes con el Síndrome Alcohólico Fetal (SAF The pediatrician nurse taking care of children/adolescents with Fetal Alcoholic Syndrome (SAF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Atanazio do Nascimento

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Estudo realizado em uma instituição pública de Neurologia com seis crianças que apresentavam diagnóstico de síndrome alcoólica fetal (SAF. Os Objetivos foram: Descrever as necessidades humanas básicas afetadas em crianças com SAF; identificar as áreas de desenvolvimento defasadas; e avaliar o desenvolvimento das crianças. Metodologia: Pesquisa qualitativa, aprovada pelo Comitê de Ética e Pesquisa do Hospital Escola São Francisco de Assis (HESFA e Escola de Enfermagem Anna Nery. O desenvolvimento infantil foi avaliado com a Escala de Desenvolvimento de Heloisa Marinho. Resultados: Todas as crianças apresentaram defasagem na área mental, social e física. As crianças apresentaram alheamento, timidez, recusa em verbalizar e manter contato visual, hiperatividade; dificuldade de aprendizagem; dificuldade na coordenação motora; timidez; e agitação psicomotora. As necessidades afetadas foram: hidratação, higiene oral, higiene corporal, comunicação, coordenação motora, aprendizagem, educação alimentar e visão. Todos apresentaram grande defasagem em relação à idade cronológica, idade de desenvolvimento e idade gráfica e baixo quociente de desenvolvimento.El estudio fue realizado en una Institución pública de Neurología, con seis niños con el Síndrome Alcohólico Fetal (SAF. Los Objetivos eran: Describir las necesidades humanas básicas afectadas en los niños con el Síndrome Alcohólico Fetal (SAF. Identificar las áreas de desarrollo dañadas. Evaluar el desarrollo de los niños con el Síndrome Alcohólico Fetal (SAF. Metodología: Investigación Cualitativa, aprobada por el Comité de Ética y Investigación del Hospital Escuela São Francisco de Assis (HESFA y Escuela de Enfermería Anna Nery. El desarrollo infantil se evaluó por la Escala de Desarrollo de Heloisa Marinho. Resultados: Todos los niños presentaron defasaje en el área mental, social y física. Los niños presentaron alienación, timidez, y

  1. Light-Front QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.

    2004-11-30

    In these lectures, I survey a number of applications of light-front methods to hadron and nuclear physics phenomenology and dynamics, including light-front statistical physics. Light-front Fock-state wavefunctions provide a frame-independent representation of hadrons in terms of their fundamental quark and gluon degrees of freedom. Nonperturbative methods for computing LFWFs in QCD are discussed, including string/gauge duality which predicts the power-law fall-off at high momentum transfer of light-front Fock-state hadronic wavefunctions with an arbitrary number of constituents and orbital angular momentum. The AdS/CFT correspondence has important implications for hadron phenomenology in the conformal limit, including an all-orders derivation of counting rules for exclusive processes. One can also compute the hadronic spectrum of near-conformal QCD assuming a truncated AdS/CFT space. Given the LFWFs, one can compute form factors, heavy hadron decay amplitudes, hadron distribution amplitudes, and the generalized parton distributions underlying deeply virtual Compton scattering. The quantum fluctuations represented by the light-front Fock expansion leads to novel QCD phenomena such as color transparency, intrinsic heavy quark distributions, diffractive dissociation, and hidden-color components of nuclear wavefunctions. A new test of hidden color in deuteron photodisintegration is proposed. The origin of leading-twist phenomena such as the diffractive component of deep inelastic scattering, single-spin asymmetries, nuclear shadowing and antishadowing is also discussed; these phenomena cannot be described by light-front wavefunctions of the target computed in isolation. Part of the anomalous NuTeV results for the weak mixing angle {theta}{sub W} could be due to the non-universality of nuclear antishadowing for charged and neutral currents.

  2. Adjustment of pigment composition in Desmarestia (Desmarestiaceae species along a sub-Antarctic to Antarctic latitudinal gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Mansilla

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis at high latitudes demands efficient strategies of light utilization to maintain algal fitness and performance. The fitness, and physiological adaptation, of a plant or algae species depends in part on the abundance and efficiency of the pigments it can produce to utilize the light resource from its environment. We quantified pigment composition and concentration in six species of the brown macroalgal genus Desmarestia, collected from sub-Antarctic sites (Strait of Magellan, Beagle Channel–Cape Horn Province and sites on the Antarctic Peninsula and adjacent islands. Sub-Antarctic Desmarestia species exhibited lower concentrations of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c and fucoxanthin than endemic Antarctic species. Antarctic samples of D. menziesii and D. antarctica collected along a decreasing latitudinal gradient showed spatial and interspecific differences in light-harvesting pigment composition. Our results suggest distinct physiological adjustments in Desmarestia species in response to heterogeneous abiotic environmental conditions. The marine sub-Antarctic and Antarctic ecosystems are characterized by harsh environments (e.g., extreme irradiance, photoperiod, temperature, salinity to which the physiology of macroalgal species must adapt.

  3. Mağnezitin Kalsinasyon Kinetiği ve Saf MgO Üretimi

    OpenAIRE

    ABALI, Yüksel

    2000-01-01

    Bu çalışmada, % 97.35 MgCO3 ihtiva eden mağnezit minerali 500 - 900 0C sıcaklık aralığında kalsine edildi. Kalsinasyon reaksiyonunun ikinci mertebeden olduğu bulundu ve bu reaksiyona ait aktivasyon enerjisi 173.1 kj/mol olarak hesaplandı. Kalsine cevherin asetik asit çözeltilerinde çözündürülmesiyle elde edilen Mg(CH3COO)2’a NaOH çözeltisi ilave edildi ve Mg(OH)2 üretildi. Mg(OH)2’in 700 0C’de kalsine edilmesi ile saf MgO elde edildi.

  4. Overview of the O3M SAF GOME-2 operational atmospheric composition and UV radiation data products and data availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassinen, S.; Balis, D.; Bauer, H.; Begoin, M.; Delcloo, A.; Eleftheratos, K.; Gimeno Garcia, S.; Granville, J.; Grossi, M.; Hao, N.; Hedelt, P.; Hendrick, F.; Hess, M.; Heue, K.-P.; Hovila, J.; Jønch-Sørensen, H.; Kalakoski, N.; Kauppi, A.; Kiemle, S.; Kins, L.; Koukouli, M. E.; Kujanpää, J.; Lambert, J.-C.; Lang, R.; Lerot, C.; Loyola, D.; Pedergnana, M.; Pinardi, G.; Romahn, F.; van Roozendael, M.; Lutz, R.; De Smedt, I.; Stammes, P.; Steinbrecht, W.; Tamminen, J.; Theys, N.; Tilstra, L. G.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Valks, P.; Zerefos, C.; Zimmer, W.; Zyrichidou, I.

    2016-02-01

    The three Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 instruments will provide unique and long data sets for atmospheric research and applications. The complete time period will be 2007-2022, including the period of ozone depletion as well as the beginning of ozone layer recovery. Besides ozone chemistry, the GOME-2 (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2) products are important e.g. for air quality studies, climate modelling, policy monitoring and hazard warnings. The heritage for GOME-2 is in the ERS/GOME and Envisat/SCIAMACHY instruments. The current Level 2 (L2) data cover a wide range of products such as ozone and minor trace gas columns (NO2, BrO, HCHO, H2O, SO2), vertical ozone profiles in high and low spatial resolution, absorbing aerosol indices, surface Lambertian-equivalent reflectivity database, clear-sky and cloud-corrected UV indices and surface UV fields with different weightings and photolysis rates. The Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M SAF) processes and disseminates data 24/7. Data quality is guaranteed by the detailed review processes for the algorithms, validation of the products as well as by a continuous quality monitoring of the products and processing. This paper provides an overview of the O3M SAF project background, current status and future plans for the utilisation of the GOME-2 data. An important focus is the provision of summaries of the GOME-2 products including product principles and validation examples together with sample images. Furthermore, this paper collects references to the detailed product algorithm and validation papers.

  5. Overview of the O3M SAF GOME-2 operational atmospheric composition and UV radiation data products and data availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassinen, S.; Balis, D.; Bauer, H.; Begoin, M.; Delcloo, A.; Eleftheratos, K.; Gimeno Garcia, S.; Granville, J.; Grossi, M.; Hao, N.; Hedelt, P.; Hendrick, F.; Hess, M.; Heue, K.-P.; Hovila, J.; Jønch-Sørensen, H.; Kalakoski, N.; Kiemle, S.; Kins, L.; Koukouli, M. E.; Kujanpää, J.; Lambert, J.-C.; Lerot, C.; Loyola, D.; Määttä, A.; Pedergnana, M.; Pinardi, G.; Romahn, F.; van Roozendael, M.; Lutz, R.; De Smedt, I.; Stammes, P.; Steinbrecht, W.; Tamminen, J.; Theys, N.; Tilstra, L. G.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Valks, P.; Zerefos, C.; Zimmer, W.; Zyrichidou, I.

    2015-07-01

    The three GOME-2 instruments will provide unique and long data sets for atmospheric research and applications. The complete time period will be 2007-2022, including the period of ozone depletion as well as the beginning of ozone layer recovery. Besides ozone chemistry, the GOME-2 products are important e.g. for air quality studies, climate modeling, policy monitoring and hazard warnings. The heritage for GOME-2 is in the ERS/GOME and Envisat/SCIAMACHY instruments. The current Level 2 (L2) data cover a wide range of products such as trace gas columns (NO2, BrO, H2CO, H2O, SO2), tropospheric columns of NO2, total ozone columns and vertical ozone profiles in high and low spatial resolution, absorbing aerosol indices from the main science channels as well as from the polarization channels (AAI, AAI-PMD), Lambertian-equivalent reflectivity database, clear-sky and cloud-corrected UV indices and surface UV fields with different weightings and photolysis rates. The Ozone Monitoring and Atmospheric Composition Satellite Application Facility (O3M SAF) processing and data dissemination is operational and running 24/7. Data quality is quarantined by the detailed review processes for the algorithms, validation of the products as well as by a continuous quality monitoring of the products and processing. This is an overview paper providing the O3M SAF project background, current status and future plans to utilization of the GOME-2 data. An important focus is the provision of summaries of the GOME-2 products including product principles and validation examples together with the product sample images. Furthermore, this paper collects the references to the detailed product algorithm and validation papers.

  6. Validation of monthly surface solar radiation over Europe derived from the CM SAF dataset against homogenized GEBA series (1983-2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Trentmann, Joerg; Wild, Martin

    2013-05-01

    This work presents a validation of the solar surface radiation (SSR) derived from the Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) over Europe for a 23-years period of records on monthly basis. The derived SSR is based on the visible channel of the Meteosat First Generation satellites, providing a dataset with a high spatial resolution (0.03° × 0.03°) covering the 1983-2005 period. The CM SAF SSR dataset is compared against 47 of the longterm SSR monthly series recently homogenized from the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) over Europe. The results show an excellent agreement between both datasets (r = 0.93, p < 0.01), with only a slight overestimation (bias of +5.20 Wm-2) of the CM SAF records as compared to the surface observations. Equally, there is a mean absolute bias (MAB) of 8.19 Wm-2 that is below the accuracy threshold defined by the CM SAF. There is a clear maximum and minimum MAB during the summer and winter, respectively, with an opposite cycle if the relative MAB values are considered.

  7. Recent wind-driven change in Subantarctic Mode Water and its impact on ocean heat storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Libao; Rintoul, Stephen R.; Yu, Weidong

    2018-01-01

    The subduction and export of Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW) supplies the upper limb of the overturning circulation and makes an important contribution to global heat, freshwater, carbon and nutrient budgets1-5. Upper ocean heat content has increased since 2006, helping to explain the so-called global warming hiatus between 1998 and 2014, with much of the ocean warming concentrated in extratropical latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere in close association with SAMW and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW)6,7. Here we use Argo observations to assess changes in the thickness, depth and heat content of the SAMW layer. Between 2005 and 2015, SAMW has thickened (3.6 ± 0.3 m yr-1), deepened (2.4 ± 0.2 m yr-1) and warmed (3.9 ± 0.3 W m-2). Wind forcing, rather than buoyancy forcing, is largely responsible for the observed trends in SAMW. Most (84%) of the increase in SAMW heat content is the result of changes in thickness; warming by buoyancy forcing (increased heat flux to the ocean) accounts for the remaining 16%. Projected increases in wind stress curl would drive further deepening of SAMW and increase in heat storage in the Southern Hemisphere oceans.

  8. Assessing Sub-Antarctic Zone primary productivity from fast repetition rate fluorometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Wee; McMinn, Andrew; Griffiths, F. Brian; Westwood, Karen J.; Wright, Simon W.; Molina, Ernesto; Webb, Jason P.; van den Enden, Rick

    2011-11-01

    In situ primary productivity (PP) in the Sub-Antarctic Zone (SAZ) and the Polar Frontal Zone (PFZ) south of Australia was estimated using fast repetition rate fluorometry (FRRF). FRRF-derived PP at Process station 3 (P3) southeast of Tasmania (46°S, 153°E) were higher than P1 in the southwest of Tasmania (46°S, 140°E) and P2 in the Polar Frontal Zone (54°S, 146°E). The FRRF-derived PP rates were well correlated with 14C-uptake rates from one-hour incubations ( r2=0.85, slope=1.23±0.05, plight-limited conditions in deeper waters. Under light-saturated conditions near the surface (0-45 m), the relationship was less clear. This was likely associated with the effects of physiological processes such as cyclic electron flow and the Mehler reaction, which are stimulated at high irradiance. Our results indicate that FRRF can be used to estimate photosynthesis rates in the SAZ and PFZ but to derive an accurate estimation of C-fixation requires a detailed understanding of the physiological properties of the cells and their response to oceanographic parameters under different environmental conditions.

  9. Energy density of sub-Antarctic fishes from the Beagle Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, D A; Lattuca, M E; Boy, C C; Pérez, A F; Ceballos, S G; Vanella, F A; Morriconi, E R; Malanga, G F; Aureliano, D R; Rimbau, S; Calvo, J

    2009-03-01

    The energy density (ED) of nine species of sub-Antarctic fishes was estimated by calorimetry. The fish, seven notothenioids, one atherinopsid and one galaxiid, represents some of the more abundant species in the ichthyofauna of the Beagle Channel. Principal-components analysis (PCA) of the ED of the different organs/tissues indicated that PC(1) and PC(2) accounted for 87% of the variability. Separation along PC(1) corresponded to differences in muscle and liver energy densities whereas separation along PC(2) corresponded to differences in the ED of the gonads. Differences between species were significant except for P. sima. Inclusion of the gonadosomatic index (GSI) as an explanatory variable enabled us to establish the existence of energy transfer from muscle and liver to the gonads in ripe P. tessellata females. Total ED values varied between 4.21 and 6.26 kJ g(-1), the pelagic Odontesthes sp. being the species with the highest ED. A significant relationship between ED and muscle dry weight (DW(M)) was found for all the species except P. tessellata. These data are the first direct estimates of ED of fishes from the Beagle Channel.

  10. Metagenomic Survey of Viral Diversity Obtained from Feces of Subantarctic and South American Fur Seals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Kluge

    Full Text Available The Brazilian South coast seasonally hosts numerous marine species, observed particularly during winter months. Some animals, including fur seals, are found dead or debilitated along the shore and may harbor potential pathogens within their microbiota. In the present study, a metagenomic approach was performed to evaluate the viral diversity in feces of fur seals found deceased along the coast of the state of Rio Grande do Sul. The fecal virome of two fur seal species was characterized: the South American fur seal (Arctocephalus australis and the Subantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis. Fecal samples from 10 specimens (A. australis, n = 5; A. tropicalis, n = 5 were collected and viral particles were purified, extracted and amplified with a random PCR. The products were sequenced through Ion Torrent and Illumina platforms and assembled reads were submitted to BLASTx searches. Both viromes were dominated by bacteriophages and included a number of potentially novel virus genomes. Sequences of picobirnaviruses, picornaviruses and a hepevirus-like were identified in A. australis. A rotavirus related to group C, a novel member of the Sakobuvirus and a sapovirus very similar to California sea lion sapovirus 1 were found in A. tropicalis. Additionally, sequences of members of the Anelloviridae and Parvoviridae families were detected in both fur seal species. This is the first metagenomic study to screen the fecal virome of fur seals, contributing to a better understanding of the complexity of the viral community present in the intestinal microbiota of these animals.

  11. Plant dispersal in the sub-Antarctic inferred from anisotropic genetic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Céline; Le Roux, Peter C; Spohr, Colin; McGeoch, Melodie A; Van Vuuren, Bettine Jansen

    2012-01-01

    Climatic conditions and landscape features often strongly affect species' local distribution patterns, dispersal, reproduction and survival and may therefore have considerable impacts on species' fine-scale spatial genetic structure (SGS). In this study, we demonstrate the efficacy of combining fine-scale SGS analyses with isotropic and anisotropic spatial autocorrelation techniques to infer the impact of wind patterns on plant dispersal processes. We genotyped 1304 Azorella selago (Apiaceae) specimens, a wind-pollinated and wind-dispersed plant, from four populations distributed across sub-Antarctic Marion Island. SGS was variable with Sp values ranging from 0.001 to 0.014, suggesting notable variability in dispersal distance and wind velocities between sites. Nonetheless, the data supported previous hypotheses of a strong NW-SE gradient in wind strength across the island. Anisotropic autocorrelation analyses further suggested that dispersal is strongly directional, but varying between sites depending on the local prevailing winds. Despite the high frequency of gale-force winds on Marion Island, gene dispersal distance estimates (σ) were surprisingly low (<10 m), most probably because of a low pollen dispersal efficiency. An SGS approach in association with isotropic and anisotropic analyses provides a powerful means to assess the relative influence of abiotic factors on dispersal and allow inferences that would not be possible without this combined approach. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Antioxidant liposomes protect against CEES-induced lung injury by decreasing SAF-1/MAZ-mediated inflammation in the guinea pig lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sutapa; Mukherjee, Shyamali; Ray, Bimal K; Ray, Alpana; Stone, William L; Das, Salil K

    2010-01-01

    We reported earlier in a guinea pig model that exposure of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), a mustard gas analog, causes lung injury associated with the activation of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling, and activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor. Our earlier studies also revealed that antioxidant liposomes can be used as antidotes. Proinflammatory cytokines IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-alpha, either alone or in combination, can induce the activation of another group of transcription factors, namely SAF-1 (serum accelerator factor-1)/MAZ (Myc-associated zinc finger protein). Phosphorylation of SAF-1 via MAPK markedly increases its DNA-binding and transactivational potential. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether CEES exposure causes activation of IL-1 beta, IL-6, and SAF-1/MAZ and whether these effects can be prevented by antioxidant liposomes. A single dose (200 microL) of the antioxidant liposome mixture was administered intratracheally after 5 min of exposure of CEES (0.5 mg/kg). The animals were sacrificed either 1 h or 30 days after CEES exposure. CEES exposure caused an upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-1 beta in the lung along with an increase in the activation of transcription factor SAF-1/MAZ. The antioxidant liposomes treatment significantly blocked the CEES-induced activation of IL-6, IL-1 beta, and SAF-1/MAZ. This might suggest that antioxidant liposomes might offer a potential therapeutic strategy against inflammatory diseases associated with activation of these bioactive molecules. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Dynamics of curved fronts

    CERN Document Server

    Pelce, Pierre

    1989-01-01

    In recent years, much progress has been made in the understanding of interface dynamics of various systems: hydrodynamics, crystal growth, chemical reactions, and combustion. Dynamics of Curved Fronts is an important contribution to this field and will be an indispensable reference work for researchers and graduate students in physics, applied mathematics, and chemical engineering. The book consist of a 100 page introduction by the editor and 33 seminal articles from various disciplines.

  14. LSA-SAF evapotranspiration products based on MSG/SEVIRI: improvement opportunities from moderate spatial resolution satellites sensors for vegetation (SPOT-VGT, MODIS, PROBA-V)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghilain, N.; De Roo, F.; Arboleda, A.; Gellens-Meulenberghs, F.

    2012-04-01

    The Satellite Application Facility on Land Surface Analysis (LSA-SAF) proposes a panel of land surface related products derived from the EUMETSAT satellites, MSG (Meteosat Second Generation) and EPS/METOP, and produced in near-real time over Europe, Africa and part of South America. With LSA-SAF products, key surface variables are observed, and allows to characterizing the main processes governing land atmosphere processes. Land evapotranspiration (ET) is one of the variables monitored within LSA-SAF. ET at a spatial resolution of approximately 3 km at the sub-satellite point above the equator is derived in near-real time, every 30 minutes, using a simplified land surface model, forced by LSA-SAF radiation products derived from MSG/SEVIRI data. Given that spatial resolution, some smaller scale processes cannot be resolved, though their contribution may affect the total MSG pixel area ET estimates. Besides, information with an increased resolution is expected to have a positive impact on the total accuracy of the modeled ET. A variety of new remote sensing products derived from EO data at a higher spatial resolution are now publicly available. This is an opportunity to assess the improvement that moderate spatial resolution (250 m to 1 km) satellites sensors for surface and vegetation characterization could offer to the evapotranspiration monitoring at the MSG/SEVIRI scale in the context of LSA-SAF. On the basis of a global analysis and on test cases, we show the usefulness of EO data acquired from moderate resolution satellites sensors (SPOT-VGT, MODIS/Terra&Aqua, MERIS) towards the improvement of the LSA-SAF ET products derived from MSG/SEVIRI. In particular, 4 different variables/indices (land cover map, LAI, surface albedo, open water bodies detection) are assessed regarding the LSA-SAF ET products: 1) the investigated processes at small scales unresolved by the geostationary satellite, e.g. open water bodies dynamics, are better taken into account in the final

  15. Glacial/interglacial changes in export production in a series of sediment cores spanning the Indian sector Antarctic Polar Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccard, S.; Thöle, L.; Martinez-Garcia, A.; Studer, A.; Michel, E.; Mazaud, A.

    2014-12-01

    Export of organic carbon from surface waters of the Antarctic Zone of the Southern Ocean decreased during the last ice age, coinciding with declining atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, signaling reduced exchange of CO2 between the ocean interior and the atmosphere. In contrast, in the Subantarctic Zone, export production increased into ice ages coinciding with rising dust fluxes, thus suggesting iron fertilization of Subantarctic phytoplankton. Recently developed XRF core-scanning methods permit paleoceanographic reconstructions on time-scales similar to ice core temperature and atmospheric carbon dioxide measurements. We have investigated the sedimentary distribution of various proxies allowing reconstructing export production in a series of sedimentary archives retrieved from the Indian Sector of the Southern Ocean spanning the Antarctic Polar Front in the vicinity of Kerguelen Island (Marion Dufresne Expeditions IndienSud-1 & 2). These high-resolution measurements are complemented with reconstruction of 230Th-normalized biogenic particle flux to the seafloor covering the last glacial termination.This contribution will explore the effects of Fe-fertilization on export production in an area remote from major dust sources. Furthermore, quantitative vertical flux determinations will allow comparing carbon export efficiency in the Indian Ocean with previously published records from the South Atlantic.

  16. Investigation into the impact of storms on sustaining summer primary productivity in the Sub-Antarctic Ocean

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nicholson, Sarah-Anne

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available of such phenomena for ocean-biogeochemical models. 1. Introduction An unexplained peculiarity of phytoplankton blooms in the Southern Ocean (SO) is the regional-scale occur- rence of prolonged blooms into late summer [Swart et al., 2015; Carranza and Gille, 2015...]. Observations of chlorophyll a show that summer blooms are widespread and occur annually [Carranza and Gille, 2015], are prominent within the Sub-Antarctic Zone (SAZ), and may be several months in duration (e.g., ~16weeks in Racault et al. [2012]), typically...

  17. Pseudoisotachis Pocsii Váňa, A New Genus and Species of Liverwort from the Subantarctic Marion Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Váňa Jiří

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A new genus and new species of liverwort, Pseudoisotachis Váňa and Pseudoisotachis pocsii Váňa, is described from Marion Island, part of the Prince Edward Islands, a subantarctic archipelago situated in the Kerguelen Province of the southern Indian Ocean. Family placement of the new genus and species is uncertain due to absence of androecia, gynoecia and sporophytes; morphologically it is compared with some genera of Isotachidaceae and with the genus Orthocaulis of Anastrophyllaceae. The new species is described and illustrated.

  18. Diverse Bacterial Groups Contribute to the Alkane Degradation Potential of Chronically Polluted Subantarctic Coastal Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guibert, Lilian M.; Loviso, Claudia L.; Borglin, Sharon; Jansson, Janet K.; Dionisi, Hebe M.; Lozada, Mariana

    2015-11-07

    We aimed to gain insight into the alkane degradation potential of microbial communities from chronically polluted sediments of a subantarctic coastal environment using a combination of metagenomic approaches. A total of 6178 sequences annotated as alkane-1-monooxygenases (EC 1.14.15.3) were retrieved from a shotgun metagenomic dataset that included two sites analyzed in triplicate. The majority of the sequences binned with AlkB described in Bacteroidetes (32 ± 13 %) or Proteobacteria (29 ± 7 %), although a large proportion remained unclassified at the phylum level. Operational taxonomic unit (OTU)-based analyses showed small differences in AlkB distribution among samples that could be correlated with alkane concentrations, as well as with site-specific variations in pH and salinity. A number of low-abundance OTUs, mostly affiliated with Actinobacterial sequences, were found to be only present in the most contaminated samples. On the other hand, the molecular screening of a large-insert metagenomic library of intertidal sediments from one of the sampling sites identified two genomic fragments containing novel alkB gene sequences, as well as various contiguous genes related to lipid metabolism. Both genomic fragments were affiliated with the phylum Planctomycetes, and one could be further assigned to the genus Rhodopirellula due to the presence of a partial sequence of the 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. This work highlights the diversity of bacterial groups contributing to the alkane degradation potential and reveals patterns of functional diversity in relation with environmental stressors in a chronically polluted, high-latitude coastal environment. In addition, alkane biodegradation genes are described for the first time in members of Planctomycetes.

  19. Hormonal responses to extreme fasting in subantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) pups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, Delphine; Atkinson, Shannon; Guinet, Christophe; Groscolas, René; Arnould, John P Y

    2012-04-15

    Surviving prolonged fasting implies closely regulated alterations in fuel provisioning to meet metabolic requirements, while preserving homeostasis. Little is known, however, of the endocrine regulations governing such metabolic adaptations in naturally fasting free-ranging animals. The hormonal responses to natural prolonged fasting and how they correlate to the metabolic adaptations observed, were investigated in subantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) pups, which, because of the intermittent pattern of maternal attendance, repeatedly endure exceptionally long fasting episodes throughout their development (1-3 mo). Phase I fasting was characterized by a dramatic decrease in plasma insulin, glucagon, leptin, and total l-thyroxine (T(4)) associated with reductions in mass-specific resting metabolic rate (RMR), plasma triglycerides, glycerol, and urea-to-creatine ratio, while nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and β-OHB increased. In contrast, the metabolic steady-state of phase II fasting reached within 6 days was associated with minimal concentrations of insulin, glucagon, and leptin; unchanged cortisol and triiodothyronine (T(3)); and moderately increased T(4). The early fall in insulin and leptin may mediate the shift to the strategy of energy conservation, protein sparing, and primary reliance on body lipids observed in response to the cessation of feeding. In contrast to the typical mammalian starvation response, nonelevated cortisol and minimal glucagon levels may contribute to body protein preservation and downregulation of catabolic pathways, in general. Furthermore, thyroid hormones may be involved in a process of energy conservation, independent of pups' nutritional state. These original hormonal settings might reflect an adaptation to the otariid repeated fasting pattern and emphasize the crucial importance of a tight physiological control over metabolism to survive extreme energetic constraints.

  20. Soil calcium availability influences shell ecophenotype formation in the sub-antarctic land snail, Notodiscus hookeri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryvonne Charrier

    Full Text Available Ecophenotypes reflect local matches between organisms and their environment, and show plasticity across generations in response to current living conditions. Plastic responses in shell morphology and shell growth have been widely studied in gastropods and are often related to environmental calcium availability, which influences shell biomineralisation. To date, all of these studies have overlooked micro-scale structure of the shell, in addition to how it is related to species responses in the context of environmental pressure. This study is the first to demonstrate that environmental factors induce a bi-modal variation in the shell micro-scale structure of a land gastropod. Notodiscus hookeri is the only native land snail present in the Crozet Archipelago (sub-Antarctic region. The adults have evolved into two ecophenotypes, which are referred to here as MS (mineral shell and OS (organic shell. The MS-ecophenotype is characterised by a thick mineralised shell. It is primarily distributed along the coastline, and could be associated to the presence of exchangeable calcium in the clay minerals of the soils. The Os-ecophenotype is characterised by a thin organic shell. It is primarily distributed at high altitudes in the mesic and xeric fell-fields in soils with large particles that lack clay and exchangeable calcium. Snails of the Os-ecophenotype are characterised by thinner and larger shell sizes compared to snails of the MS-ecophenotype, indicating a trade-off between mineral thickness and shell size. This pattern increased along a temporal scale; whereby, older adult snails were more clearly separated into two clusters compared to the younger adult snails. The prevalence of glycine-rich proteins in the organic shell layer of N. hookeri, along with the absence of chitin, differs to the organic scaffolds of molluscan biominerals. The present study provides new insights for testing the adaptive value of phenotypic plasticity in response to spatial

  1. Terrestrial invasions on sub-Antarctic Marion and Prince Edward Islands

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    Michelle Greve

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The sub-Antarctic Prince Edward Islands (PEIs, South Africa’s southernmost territories have high conservation value. Despite their isolation, several alien species have established and become invasive on the PEIs. Objectives: Here we review the invasion ecology of the PEIs. Methods: We summarise what is known about the introduction of alien species, what influences their ability to establish and spread, and review their impacts. Results: Approximately 48 alien species are currently established on the PEIs, of which 26 are known to be invasive. Introduction pathways for the PEIs are fairly well understood – species have mainly been introduced with ship cargo and building material. Less is known about establishment, spread and impact of aliens. It has been estimated that less than 5% of the PEIs is covered by invasive plants, but invasive plants have attained circuminsular distributions on both PEIs. Studies on impact have primarily focussed on the effects of vertebrate invaders, of which the house mouse, which is restricted to Marion Island, probably has the greatest impact on the biodiversity of the islands. Because of the risk of alien introductions, strict biosecurity regulations govern activities at the PEIs. These are particularly aimed at stemming the introduction of alien species, and are likely to have reduced the rates of new introductions. In addition, some effort is currently being made to eradicate selected range-restricted species. However, only one species that had established and spread on the PEIs, the cat, has been successfully eradicated from the islands. Conclusion: Given the ongoing threat of introductions, and the impacts of invaders, it is essential that future invasions to the PEIs are minimised, that the islands’ management policies deal with all stages of the invasion process and that a better understanding of the risks and impacts of invasions is obtained.

  2. Oxidative stress and antioxidant defences generated by solar UV in a Subantarctic marine phytoflagellate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Pablo Hernando

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of the Antarctic stratospheric ozone resulted in significant increases in ultraviolet B radiation (UV-B, 280-320 nm reaching the surface of the ocean. The main objective of this work was to study long-term (growth rate scale, days stress responses (lipid oxidative damage, TBARS, and lipid soluble antioxidants to UV-B and UV-A of a phytoflagellate species (Asteromonas sp. isolated from a natural phytoplankton community of the Subantarctic Beagle Channel. The growth rate was inhibited by UV-B and UV-A radiation during the exponential phase. A marked increase in the TBARS content was observed on day 1 of the experiment, with significant differences between algae subjected to UV-B and UV-A treatments, thus suggesting high damage to the cell membrane. During the second day of the experiment TBARS in UV-A treatments were higher than under photosynthetically active radiation (PAR. The concentration of TBARS decreased to the level of the PAR control on day 3, remaining low until the end of the experiment. Lipid antioxidant concentrations (?-tocopherol and ?-carotene were delayed with respect to variations in TBARS, showing maximum values on day 3 of the experiment. This coincided with the minimum TBARS concentrations in all treatments. The content of both antioxidants increased significantly in cultures exposed to UV-B and UV-A on days 3 and 4. In Antarctic species (phytoflagellate Asteromonas sp., AP and diatom Thalassiosira sp., AT a-tocopherol was more abundant than b-carotene. The phytoflagellate species showed a lag in reaching the maximum content of both antioxidants in relation to AT, which reached the maximum concentration within a short time scale (3 h suggesting a more rapid response to oxidative stress. AT was more resistant to UVR stress than the phytoflagellate species. Overall, our results show that UVR damage/repair balance involves the combined action of several internal factors in the cell.

  3. Submarine geology and geomorphology of active Sub-Antarctic volcanoes: Heard and McDonald Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, S. J.; Coffin, M. F.; Whittaker, J. M.; Lucieer, V.; Fox, J. M.; Carey, R.; Arculus, R. J.; Bowie, A. R.; Chase, Z.; Robertson, R.; Martin, T.; Cooke, F.

    2016-12-01

    Heard and McDonald Islands (HIMI) are World Heritage listed sub-Antarctic active volcanic islands in the Southern Indian Ocean. Built atop the Kerguelen Plateau by Neogene-Quaternary volcanism, HIMI represent subaerial exposures of the second largest submarine Large Igneous Province globally. Onshore, processes influencing island evolution include glaciers, weathering, volcanism, vertical tectonics and mass-wasting (Duncan et al. 2016). Waters surrounding HIMI are largely uncharted, due to their remote location. Hence, the extent to which these same processes shape the submarine environment around HIMI has not been investigated. In early 2016, we conducted marine geophysical and geologic surveys around HIMI aboard RV Investigator (IN2016_V01). Results show that volcanic and sedimentary features prominently trend east-west, likely a result of erosion by the eastward flowing Antarctic Circumpolar Current and tidal currents. However, spatial patterns of submarine volcanism and sediment distribution differ substantially between the islands. >70 sea knolls surround McDonald Island suggesting substantial submarine volcanism. Geophysical data reveals hard volcanic seafloor around McDonald Island, whereas Heard Island is characterised by sedimentary sequences tens of meters or more thick and iceberg scours - indicative of glacial processes. Differences in submarine geomorphology are likely due to the active glaciation of Heard Island and differing rock types (Heard: alkali basalt, McDonald: phonolite), and dominant products (clastics vs. lava). Variations may also reflect different magmatic plumbing systems beneath the two active volcanoes (Heard produces larger volumes of more focused lava, whilst McDonald extrudes smaller volumes of more evolved lavas from multiple vents across the edifice). Using geophysical data, corroborated with new and existing geologic data, we present the first geomorphic map revealing the processes that shape the submarine environment around HIMI.

  4. Stationary flow near fronts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhold Steinacker

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1906, the Austrian scientist Max Margules published a paper on temperature stratification in resting and non-accelerated moving air. The paper derives conditions for stationary slopes of air mass boundaries and was an important forerunner of frontal theories. Its formulation of relations between changes in density and geostrophic wind across the front is basically a discrete version of the thermal wind balance equation. The paper was highly influential and is still being cited to the present day. This paper accompanies an English translation of Margules’ seminal paper. We conclude here our “Classic Papers” series of the Meteorologische Zeitschrift.

  5. Dynamics characterization of microstructural changes in bars of duplex steels SAF 2205 using the information dimension; Caracterizacion dinamica de los cambios microestructurales en barras de aceros duplex SAF 2205 utilizando la dimension de informacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, E.; Suarez, K.; Amorer, L.; Silva, J.

    2014-04-01

    This study evaluates the ultrasonic signals behavior of a duplex stainless steel SAF 2205 (UNS S31803) after aging treatments at 875 and 950 degree centigrade. The first treatment promotes the precipitation of the sigma phase and the second, its dissolution. The microstructural evaluation was carried out by optical microscopy. The results showed an increase of the sigma phase fraction and the secondary austenite with the time of aging treatment at 875 degree centigrade. On the other hand, increasing the time of treatment at 950 degree centigrade promotes a reduction of the sigma phase and the corresponding increase of the ferrite phase fraction. The study proposed to evaluate in the dynamical system field the influence of microstructural phases in the signals behavior and their dependence on the energy losses occurring in system during heat treatment, by deterministic chaos theory. To accomplish characterization, algorithm employs the representation of dynamic phase space and the information dimension estimate. The results show a higher correlation between the information dimension and the attenuation coefficient in comparison with the phase fractions. However, the efficiency of this type of study will depend on the frequency selected for the evaluation of the material. (Author)

  6. Imaging the Sub-Tropical Front off the southeast coast of New Zealand's South Island using high-frequency seismic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, A. R.; Bowman, M. H.

    2010-12-01

    The Sub-Tropical Front off the SE coast of New Zealand is an enigmatic ocean boundary that separates sub-tropical waters that are generally warm, low in nutrients, and sustain high levels of phytoplankton growth (primary productivity) from sub-antarctic waters that are generally cold, high in nutrients, and low in productivity. This region regularly exhibits evidence of nutrient transport across the Sub-Tropical Front that suggests significant ocean mixing across the front resulting in the transfer of iron from sub-tropical to sub-antarctic waters. Conventional ship-based oceanographic methods are incapable of observing these processes due to their sporadic and spatially-constrained nature. Seismic oceanographic methods have been shown to provide a means to image water body interactions such as these. However, a significant deficiency in current seismic oceanography imaging (i.e., using standard airgun profiles) is a failure to image the upper ~150 m of the ocean. This is due to: (1) the masking of shallow reflections by high-amplitude direct arrivals, and (2) the relatively large setback of the first receivers (typically ~200 m), which restricts shallow reflections to large angles of incidence. High-resolution profiling methods, usually used for shallow sub-bottom profiling, address both of these points, given (1) the low energy level of the sources and (2) the close proximity of the hydrophones. In addition to being a new technique for imaging the water column, such methods (with frequency characteristics that cover a large range of possible targets) have the potential to fill in a critical gap in existing seismic oceanography techniques. These methods also are much less expensive (at least over some depth ranges) than conventional methods that use large dedicated seismic vessels. We present first results from a 55-km-long coast-perpendicular transect across the Sub-Tropical Front off the SE coast of New Zealand. The transect is divided into seven segments by

  7. The skin of Commerson's dolphins (Cephalorhynchus commersonii) as a biomonitor of mercury and selenium in Subantarctic waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres-Saez, Iris; Goodall, R Natalie P; Dellabianca, Natalia A; Cappozzo, H Luis; Ribeiro Guevara, Sergio

    2015-11-01

    The skin of bycaught Commerson's dolphins was tested for mercury (Hg) and selenium (Se) biomonitoring in Subantarctic environments. The correlation of levels detected in the skin with those found in internal tissues - lung, liver, kidney and muscle - was assessed to evaluate how skin represents internal Hg and Se distribution for monitoring purposes. Mercury in skin had a concentration range of 0.68-3.11 μg g(-1) dry weight (DW), while Se had a higher concentration range of 74.3-124.5 μg g(-1) DW. There was no significant correlation between selenium levels in any of the analyzed tissues. Thus, the skin selenium concentration did not reflect the tissular Se levels and did not provide information for biomonitoring. The lack of correlation is explained by the biological role of Se, provided that each tissue regulates Se levels according to physiological needs. However, the skin Hg level had significant positive correlation with the levels in internal tissues (ANOVA pdolphins for Hg biomonitoring in the waters of the Subantarctic, which is a poorly studied region regarding Hg levels, sources and processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. First records of aphid-pathogenic Entomophthorales in the sub-Antarctic archipelagos of Crozet and Kerguelen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Papierok

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the 20th century, the sub-Antarctic islands have suffered an increasing number of biological invasions. Despite the large number of publications on this topic, there is a lack of knowledge on parasitism rates of invasive species and on the role of parasites and pathogens to regulate their populations. Six aphid species have been introduced in the archipelagos of Crozet (Île de la Possession, 46° 25’ S–51° 51’ E and Kerguelen (49° 21’ S–70° 13’ E. Five of these species were found infected by entomopathogenic fungi of the order Entomophthorales. All these fungal species are cosmopolitan. Conidiobolus obscurus and Entomophthora planchoniana were the most frequently observed on Île de la Possession and in Archipel des Kerguelen, respectively. This is the first report of pathogenic fungi of aphids on the sub-Antarctic islands. We discuss these results in the light of our current knowledge of these insect pathogens. Their introduction by aphids surviving on plants during transportation is the most likely hypothesis to explain their presence on these remote islands.

  9. A novel lab-on-chip platform with integrated solid phase PCR and Supercritical Angle Fluorescence (SAF) microlens array for highly sensitive and multiplexed pathogen detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hung, Tran Quang; Chin, Wai Hoe; Sun, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Solid-phase PCR (SP-PCR) has become increasingly popular for molecular diagnosis and there have been a few attempts to incorporate SP-PCR into lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices. However, their applicability for on-line diagnosis is hindered by the lack of sensitive and portable on-chip optical detectio......-PCR and SAF microlens array allows for on-chip highly sensitive and multiplexed pathogen detection with low-cost and compact optical components. The LOC platform would be widely used as a high-throughput biosensor to analyze food, clinical and environmental samples.......Solid-phase PCR (SP-PCR) has become increasingly popular for molecular diagnosis and there have been a few attempts to incorporate SP-PCR into lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices. However, their applicability for on-line diagnosis is hindered by the lack of sensitive and portable on-chip optical detection......-PCR directly on top of the SAF microlens array. Attribute to the high fluorescence collection efficiency of the SAF microlens array, the SP-PCR assay on the LOC platform demonstrated a high sensitivity of 1.6 copies/µL, comparable to off-chip detection using conventional laser scanner. The combination of SP...

  10. The seasonal cycle of mixed layer dynamics and phytoplankton biomass in the Sub-Antarctic Zone: A high-resolution glider experiment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Swart, S

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available -resolution glider data (3 hourly, 2 km horizontal resolution), from~6 months of sampling (spring through summer) in the Sub-Antarctic Zone, is used to assess 1) the different forcing mechanisms driving variability in upper ocean physics and 2) how thesemay...

  11. Operational Estimation of Accumulated Precipitation using Satellite Observation, by Eumetsat Satellite Application facility in Support to Hydrology (H-SAF Consortium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Diodato, A.; de Leonibus, L.; Zauli, F.; Biron, D.; Melfi, D.

    2009-04-01

    Operational Estimation of Accumulated Precipitation using Satellite Observation, by Eumetsat Satellite Application facility in Support to Hydrology (H-SAF Consortium). Cap. Attilio DI DIODATO(*), T.Col. Luigi DE LEONIBUS(*), T.Col Francesco ZAULI(*), Cap. Daniele BIRON(*), Ten. Davide Melfi(*) Satellite Application Facilities (SAFs) are specialised development and processing centres of the EUMETSAT Distributed Ground Segment. SAFs process level 1b data from meteorological satellites (geostationary and polar ones) in conjunction with all other relevant sources of data and appropriate models to generate services and level 2 products. Each SAF is a consortium of EUMETSAT European partners lead by a host institute responsible for the management of the complete SAF project. The Meteorological Service of Italian Air Force is the host Institute for the Satellite Application Facility on Support to Operational Hydrology and Water Management (H-SAF). HSAF has the commitment to develop and to provide, operationally after 2010, products regarding precipitation, soil moisture and snow. HSAF is going to provide information on error structure of its products and validation of the products via their impacts into Hydrological models. To that purpose it has been structured a specific subgroups. Accumulated precipitation is computed by temporal integration of the instantaneous rain rate achieved by the blended LEO/MW and GEO/IR precipitation rate products generated by Rapid Update method available every 15 minutes. The algorithm provides four outputs, consisting in accumulated precipitation in 3, 6, 12 and 24 hours, delivered every 3 hours at the synoptic hours. These outputs are our precipitation background fields. Satellite estimates can cover most of the globe, however, they suffer from errors due to lack of a direct relationship between observation parameters and precipitation, the poor sampling and algorithm imperfections. For this reason the 3 hours accumulated precipitation is

  12. Water masses, ocean fronts, and the structure of Antarctic seabird communities: putting the eastern Bellingshausen Sea in perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribic, Christine A.; Ainley, David G.; Ford, R. Glenn; Fraser, William R.; Tynan, Cynthia T.; Woehler, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Waters off the western Antarctic Peninsula (i.e., the eastern Bellingshausen Sea) are unusually complex owing to the convergence of several major fronts. Determining the relative influence of fronts on occurrence patterns of top-trophic species in that area, therefore, has been challenging. In one of the few ocean-wide seabird data syntheses, in this case for the Southern Ocean, we analyzed ample, previously collected cruise data, Antarctic-wide, to determine seabird species assemblages and quantitative relationships to fronts as a way to provide context to the long-term Palmer LTER and the winter Southern Ocean GLOBEC studies in the eastern Bellingshausen Sea. Fronts investigated during both winter (April–September) and summer (October–March) were the southern boundary of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), which separates the High Antarctic from the Low Antarctic water mass, and within which are embedded the marginal ice zone and Antarctic Shelf Break Front; and the Antarctic Polar Front, which separates the Low Antarctic and the Subantarctic water masses. We used clustering to determine species' groupings with water masses, and generalized additive models to relate species' densities, biomass and diversity to distance to respective fronts. Antarctic-wide, in both periods, highest seabird densities and lowest species diversity were found in the High Antarctic water mass. In the eastern Bellingshausen, seabird density in the High Antarctic water mass was lower (as low as half that of winter) than found in other Antarctic regions. During winter, Antarctic-wide, two significant species groups were evident: one dominated by Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) (High Antarctic water mass) and the other by petrels and prions (no differentiation among water masses); in eastern Bellingshausen waters during winter, the one significant species group was composed of species from both Antarctic-wide groups. In summer, Antarctic-wide, a High Antarctic group

  13. Active learning of Pareto fronts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campigotto, Paolo; Passerini, Andrea; Battiti, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    This paper introduces the active learning of Pareto fronts (ALP) algorithm, a novel approach to recover the Pareto front of a multiobjective optimization problem. ALP casts the identification of the Pareto front into a supervised machine learning task. This approach enables an analytical model of the Pareto front to be built. The computational effort in generating the supervised information is reduced by an active learning strategy. In particular, the model is learned from a set of informative training objective vectors. The training objective vectors are approximated Pareto-optimal vectors obtained by solving different scalarized problem instances. The experimental results show that ALP achieves an accurate Pareto front approximation with a lower computational effort than state-of-the-art estimation of distribution algorithms and widely known genetic techniques.

  14. Snowplow Injection Front Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Buzulukova, N.; Collinson, G. A.; Kepko, E. L.; Garcia-Sage, K. S.; Henderson, M. G.; Sitnov, M. I.

    2013-01-01

    As the Polar spacecraft apogee precessed through the magnetic equator in 2001, Polar encountered numerous substorm events in the region between geosynchronous orbit and 10 RE geocentric distance; most of them in the plasma sheet boundary layers. Of these, a small number was recorded near the neutral sheet in the evening sector. Polar/Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment provides a unique perspective on the lowest-energy ion plasma, showing that these events exhibited a damped wavelike character, initiated by a burst of radially outward flow transverse to the local magnetic field at approximately 80 km/s. They then exhibit strongly damped cycles of inward/outward flow with a period of several minutes. After one or two cycles, they culminated in a hot plasma electron and ion injection, quite similar to those observed at geosynchronous orbit. Cold plasmaspheric plasmas comprise the outward flow cycles, while the inward flow cycles contain counterstreaming field-parallel polar wind-like flows. The observed wavelike structure, preceding the arrival of an earthward moving substorm injection front, suggests an outward displacement driven by the inward motion at local times closer to midnight, that is, a "snowplow" effect. The damped in/out flows are consistent with interchange oscillations driven by the arrival at the observed local time by an injection originating at greater radius and local time.

  15. Fronts in Large Marine Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, Igor M.; Cornillon, Peter C.; Sherman, Kenneth

    2009-04-01

    Oceanic fronts shape marine ecosystems; therefore front mapping and characterization are among the most important aspects of physical oceanography. Here we report on the first global remote sensing survey of fronts in the Large Marine Ecosystems (LME). This survey is based on a unique frontal data archive assembled at the University of Rhode Island. Thermal fronts were automatically derived with the edge detection algorithm of Cayula and Cornillon (1992, 1995, 1996) from 12 years of twice-daily, global, 9-km resolution satellite sea surface temperature (SST) fields to produce synoptic (nearly instantaneous) frontal maps, and to compute the long-term mean frequency of occurrence of SST fronts and their gradients. These synoptic and long-term maps were used to identify major quasi-stationary fronts and to derive provisional frontal distribution maps for all LMEs. Since SST fronts are typically collocated with fronts in other water properties such as salinity, density and chlorophyll, digital frontal paths from SST frontal maps can be used in studies of physical-biological correlations at fronts. Frontal patterns in several exemplary LMEs are described and compared, including those for: the East and West Bering Sea LMEs, Sea of Okhotsk LME, East China Sea LME, Yellow Sea LME, North Sea LME, East and West Greenland Shelf LMEs, Newfoundland-Labrador Shelf LME, Northeast and Southeast US Continental Shelf LMEs, Gulf of Mexico LME, and Patagonian Shelf LME. Seasonal evolution of frontal patterns in major upwelling zones reveals an order-of-magnitude growth of frontal scales from summer to winter. A classification of LMEs with regard to the origin and physics of their respective dominant fronts is presented. The proposed classification lends itself to comparative studies of frontal ecosystems.

  16. The importance of oceanographic fronts to marine birds and mammals of the southern oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bost, C. A.; Cotté, C.; Bailleul, F.; Cherel, Y.; Charrassin, J. B.; Guinet, C.; Ainley, D. G.; Weimerskirch, H.

    2009-10-01

    During the last 30 years, at-sea studies of seabirds and marine mammals in the oceans south of the Subtropical Front have described an association with major frontal areas. More recently, the advancement in microtechnology has allowed the tracking of individuals and investigations into how these marine predators actually use the frontal zones. In this review, we examine 1) the relative importance to apex predators of the different frontal zones in terms of spatial distribution and carbon flux; 2) the processes that determine their preferential use; and 3) how the mesoscale dynamics of frontal structures drive at-sea foraging strategies of these predators. We review published results from southern waters and place them in a broader context with respect to what has been learned about the importance of fronts in oceans farther north. Some fronts constitute important boundaries for seabird communities in southern waters. At a mesoscale the maximum values of seabird diversity and abundance correspond to the location of the main fronts. At-sea surveys show a strong curvilinear correlation between seabird abundance and sea surface temperatures. High mean species richness and diversity for whales and seabirds are consistently associated with the southern water mass boundary of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, the Subtropical Front and the Subantarctic Front; in the case of the Polar Front mean seabird densities are more variable. At small-scales, variation in seabird occurrence has been directly related to the processes at fronts in a limited number of cases. A significant positive relation was found between some plankton feeding species and frontal temperature gradient-phytoplankton variables. Telemetric studies have revealed that several apex predators (penguins, albatrosses, seals) perform long, directed foraging trips either to the Subtropical front or Polar Front, depending on locality. Seabirds with low flight costs, such as albatrosses, are able to reach fronts at

  17. Contrasting nurse plants and nurse rocks: The spatial distribution of seedlings of two sub-Antarctic species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haussmann, N. S.; McGeoch, M. A.; Boelhouwers, J. C.

    2010-05-01

    Positive plant interactions, such as those associated with nurse plants, have been suggested to dominate over negative interactions in environments with high abiotic stress. Here we demonstrate that the sub-Antarctic cushion plant species, Azorella selago (Apiaceae), positively affects the distribution of both its own seedlings and those of the perennial grass, Agrostis magellanica (Poaceae). As a result of the light weight and small size of seeds of both species, coupled with strong winds experienced in the study area, we consider it unlikely that these patterns are the result of very localized seed dispersal from the study cushions themselves. Instead, we suggest that both cushions and rocks act as seed traps, trapping seeds dispersed by wind, runoff and/or downslope sediment transport through frost creep. In addition, increased A. selago seedling numbers around cushions, but not around rocks, suggest that cushions provide a biological nurse effect, such as improving soil nutrient status or providing mychorrizae, to seedlings of their own kind.

  18. Effects of summer frost exposures on the cold tolerance strategy of a sub-Antarctic beetle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, J S.; Worland, M R.; Block, W

    2001-09-01

    The sub-Antarctic beetle Hydromedion sparsutum (Coleoptera, Perimylopidae) is common locally on the island of South Georgia where sub-zero temperatures can be experienced in any month of the year. Larvae were known to be weakly freeze tolerant in summer with a mean supercooling point (SCP) around -4 degrees C and a lower lethal temperature of -10 degrees C (15min exposure). This study investigated the effects of successive freezing exposures on the SCP and subsequent survival of summer acclimatised larvae. The mean SCP of field fresh larvae was -4.2+/-0.2 degrees C with a range from -1.0 to -6.1 degrees C. When larvae were cooled to -6.5 degrees C on 10 occasions at intervals of 30min and one and four days, survival was 44, 70 and 68%, respectively. The 'end of experiment' SCP of larvae surviving 10 exposures at -6.5 degrees C showed distinct changes and patterns from the original field population depending on the interval between exposure. In the 30min interval group, most larvae froze between -6 and -8 degrees C, a depression of up to 6 degrees C from the original sample; all larvae were dead when cooling was continued below the SCP to -12 degrees C. In the one and four day interval groups, most larvae froze above -6 degrees C, showing no change as a result of the 10 exposures at -6.5 degrees C. As with the 30min interval group, some larvae froze below -6 degrees C, but with a wider range, and again, all were dead when cooled to -12 degrees C. However, in the one and four day interval groups, some larvae remained unfrozen when cooled to -12 degrees C, a depression of their individual SCP of at least 6 degrees C, and were alive 24h after cooling. In a further experiment, larvae were cooled to their individual SCP temperature at daily intervals on 10 occasions to ensure that every larva froze every day. Most larvae which showed a depression of their SCP of 2-4 degrees C from their day one value became moribund or died after six or seven freezing events. Survival

  19. SAF-RON GOLD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical product bulletin: this dispersant used in oil spill cleanups can be applied by aerial or boat sprayer. A recommended dispersant to water ratio of 1:40 can be used for most spills. Ratios are dependent upon type of oil and weather conditions.

  20. "Front" hotshet izvinitsja / Aleksandr Ikonnikov

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ikonnikov, Aleksandr

    2003-01-01

    Põhiliselt vene rahvusest noori ühendava liikumise "Front" esindajad kavatsevad kohtuda USA suursaadikuga Eestis ja vabandada kevadel suursaatkonna ees vägivallatsemisega lõppenud meeleavalduse pärast

  1. The CM SAF SSM/I-based total column water vapour climate data record: methods and evaluation against re-analyses and satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schröder

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF aims at the provision and sound validation of well documented Climate Data Records (CDRs in sustained and operational environments. In this study, a total column water vapour path (WVPA climatology from CM SAF is presented and inter-compared to water vapour data records from various data sources. Based on homogenised brightness temperatures from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I, a climatology of WVPA has been generated within the Hamburg Ocean–Atmosphere Fluxes and Parameters from Satellite (HOAPS framework. Within a research and operation transition activity the HOAPS data and operation capabilities have been successfully transferred to the CM SAF where the complete HOAPS data and processing schemes are hosted in an operational environment. An objective analysis for interpolation, namely kriging, has been applied to the swath-based WVPA retrievals from the HOAPS data set. The resulting climatology consists of daily and monthly mean fields of WVPA over the global ice-free ocean. The temporal coverage ranges from July 1987 to August 2006. After a comparison to the precursor product the CM SAF SSM/I-based climatology has been comprehensively compared to different types of meteorological analyses from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF-ERA40, ERA INTERIM and operational analyses and from the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA–JRA. This inter-comparison shows an overall good agreement between the climatology and the analyses, with daily absolute biases generally smaller than 2 kg m−2. The absolute value of the bias to JRA and ERA INTERIM is typically smaller than 0.5 kg m−2. For the period 1991–2006, the root mean square error (RMSE for both reanalyses is approximately 2 kg m−2. As SSM/I WVPA and radiances are assimilated into JMA and all ECMWF analyses and

  2. Mesure d'un effet de lentille de population dans un cristal de Cr3+:LiSAF par la technique du Z-scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passilly, N.; Haouas, E.; Ménard, V.; Moncorgé, R.; Aït-Ameur, K.

    2006-10-01

    Nous avons réalisé une expérience permettant de mesurer la variation de la polarisabilité des ions Cr3+ dans le LiSAF lorsqu'ils passent de l'état fondamental 4A{2} à l'état excité 4T{2}. Cette variation de polarisabilité est à l'origine d'un effet de lentille de population non-linéaire dépendant du temps.

  3. Directional Analysis of Sub-Antarctic Climate Change on South Georgia 1905-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto Ferranti, Emma Jayne; Solera Garcia, Maria Angeles; Timmis, Roger James; Gerrard McKenna, Paul; Whyatt, James Duncan

    2010-05-01

    Directional analysis has been used to study changes in the sub-polar climate of the mountainous and glacierised sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia (54-55°S, 36-38°W). Significantly for climate change studies, South Georgia lies in the Scotia Sea between polar and temperate latitudes, and approximately 1000 km northeast and downwind of the Antarctic Peninsula - one of the fastest-warming regions on Earth (Vaughan et al., 2001). South Georgia was chosen for directional analysis because its climate is substantially advected by predominantly westerly circulations, and because it has a long (since 1905) meteorological record from King Edward Point (KEP) on its eastern side. Additional shorter records from Bird Island at the northwest tip of South Georgia allow comparison between windward (Bird Island) and leeward (KEP) climate regimes. The variation of mountain barrier heights with direction from KEP allows climate changes to be studied under different amounts of orographic influence (from ~700 m to ~2200 m). Records of glacier advance and retreat provide further independent evidence of climate change for comparison with the meteorological record. Directional climate analysis is based on a series of monthly-mean pressure fields defining the orientation and strength of synoptic-scale air-mass advection over the Scotia Sea. These fields are used to define directional climatologies for six 30° sectors with bearings from 150-180° to 300-330°; these sectors encompass 99% of recorded months since 1905. The climatologies summarise the frequencies of air masses from each sector, and the accompanying temperatures and precipitation. The 6 sectors can be broadly associated with 4 air-mass types and source regions: (i) sectors 150-210° advect cold polar maritime air that originated over the Antarctic continent before passing over the Weddell Sea, (ii) sectors 210-270° advect warmer, more stable polar maritime air from the Bellingshausen Sea/Antarctic Peninsula region

  4. Highly efficient and robust operation of Kerr-lens mode-locked Cr:LiSAF lasers using gain-matched output couplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canbaz, Ferda; Beyatli, Ersen; Chen, Li-Jin; Sennaroglu, Alphan; Kärtner, Franz X; Demirbas, Umit

    2014-01-15

    We present efficient and robust Kerr-lens mode locking (KLM) of a diode-pumped Cr:LiSAF laser using a gain-matched output coupler (GMOC). An inexpensive, battery-powered 660 nm single-spatial-mode diode was used as the pump source. GMOC enhances the effective self-amplitude modulation depth by reducing the gain-filtering effect in broadband KLM operation to provide significant improvement in efficiency and robustness. Pulsing can be initiated without careful cavity alignment and is sustained for hours. 13 fs pulses with an average power of 25 mW have been generated using only 120 mW of pump power. The corresponding pulse energy and peak power is 200 pJ and 15 kW for the 126 MHz repetition rate cavity. Optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of the system is 21%, which represents an order of magnitude improvement in reported efficiencies for such diode-pumped ultrashort-pulse KLM Cr:LiSAF lasers. The obtainable pulse width is currently limited by the dispersion bandwidth of the available optics and can be potentially reduced to below 7 fs.

  5. Front dynamics in turbulent media

    CERN Document Server

    Martí, A C; Sancho, J M

    1997-01-01

    A study of a stable front propagating in a turbulent medium is presented. The front is generated through a reaction-diffusion equation, and the turbulent medium is statistically modeled using a Langevin equation. Numerical simulations indicate the presence of two different dynamical regimes. These regimes appear when the turbulent flow either wrinkles a still rather sharp propagating interfase or broadens it. Specific dependences of the propagating velocities on stirring intensities appropriate to each case are found and fitted when possible according to theoretically predicted laws. Different turbulent spectra are considered.

  6. Late Holocene intensification of the westerly winds at the subantarctic Auckland Islands (51° S, New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Browne

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Southern Hemisphere westerly winds (SHWWs play a major role in controlling wind-driven upwelling of Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW and outgassing of CO2 in the Southern Ocean, on interannual to glacial–interglacial timescales. Despite their significance in the global carbon cycle, our understanding of millennial- and centennial-scale changes in the strength and latitudinal position of the westerlies during the Holocene (especially since 5000 yr BP is limited by a scarcity of palaeoclimate records from comparable latitudes. Here, we reconstruct middle to late Holocene SHWW variability using a fjord sediment core collected from the subantarctic Auckland Islands (51° S, 166° E, located in the modern centre of the westerly wind belt. Changes in drainage basin response to variability in the strength of the SHWW at this latitude are interpreted from downcore variations in magnetic susceptibility (MS and bulk organic δ13C and atomic C ∕ N, which monitor influxes of lithogenous and terrestrial vs. marine organic matter, respectively. The fjord water column response to SHWW variability is evaluated using benthic foraminifer δ18O and δ13C, both of which are influenced by the isotopic composition of shelf water masses entering the fjord. Using these data, we provide marine and terrestrial-based evidence for increased wind strength from  ∼  1600 to 900 yr BP at subantarctic latitudes that is broadly consistent with previous studies of climate-driven vegetation change at the Auckland Islands. Comparison with a SHWW reconstruction using similar proxies from Fiordland suggests a northward migration of the SHWW over New Zealand during the first half of the last millennium. Comparison with palaeoclimate and palaeoceanographic records from southern South America and West Antarctica indicates a late Holocene strengthening of the SHWW after  ∼  1600 yr BP that appears to be broadly symmetrical across the Pacific Basin

  7. Gene flow and hybridization between numerically imbalanced populations of two duck species on the subantarctic island of South Georgia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin G McCracken

    Full Text Available Hybridization is common between species of animals, particularly in waterfowl (Anatidae. One factor shown to promote hybridization is restricted mate choice, which can occur when 2 species occur in sympatry but one is rare. According to the Hubbs principle, or "desperation hypothesis," the rarer species is more likely to mate with heterospecifics. We report the second of 2 independent examples of hybridization between 2 species of ducks inhabiting island ecosystems in the Subantarctic and South Atlantic Ocean. Yellow-billed pintails (Anas georgica and speckled teal (Anas flavirostris are abundant in continental South America, where they are sympatric and coexist in mixed flocks. But on South Georgia, an isolated island in the Subantarctic, the pintail population of approximately 6000 pairs outnumbers a small breeding population of speckled teal 300∶1. Using 6 genetic loci (mtDNA and 5 nuclear introns and Bayesian assignment tests coupled with coalescent analyses, we identified hybrid-origin speckled teal alleles in 2 pintails on South Georgia. While it is unclear whether introgression has also occurred into the speckled teal population, our data suggest that this hybridization was not a recent event, but occurred some time ago. We also failed to identify unequivocal evidence of introgression in a much larger sample of pintails and speckled teal from Argentina using a 3-population "Isolation-with-Migration" coalescent analysis. Combined with parallel findings of hybridization between these same 2 duck species in the Falkland Islands, where population ratios are reversed and pintails are outnumbered by speckled teal 1:10, our results provide further support for the desperation hypothesis, which predicts that scarcity in one population and abundance of another will often lead to hybridization. While the South Georgia pintail population appears to be thriving, it's possible that low density of conspecific mates and inverse density dependence

  8. Late Holocene intensification of the westerly winds at the subantarctic Auckland Islands (51° S), New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Imogen M.; Moy, Christopher M.; Riesselman, Christina R.; Neil, Helen L.; Curtin, Lorelei G.; Gorman, Andrew R.; Wilson, Gary S.

    2017-10-01

    The Southern Hemisphere westerly winds (SHWWs) play a major role in controlling wind-driven upwelling of Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) and outgassing of CO2 in the Southern Ocean, on interannual to glacial-interglacial timescales. Despite their significance in the global carbon cycle, our understanding of millennial- and centennial-scale changes in the strength and latitudinal position of the westerlies during the Holocene (especially since 5000 yr BP) is limited by a scarcity of palaeoclimate records from comparable latitudes. Here, we reconstruct middle to late Holocene SHWW variability using a fjord sediment core collected from the subantarctic Auckland Islands (51° S, 166° E), located in the modern centre of the westerly wind belt. Changes in drainage basin response to variability in the strength of the SHWW at this latitude are interpreted from downcore variations in magnetic susceptibility (MS) and bulk organic δ13C and atomic C / N, which monitor influxes of lithogenous and terrestrial vs. marine organic matter, respectively. The fjord water column response to SHWW variability is evaluated using benthic foraminifer δ18O and δ13C, both of which are influenced by the isotopic composition of shelf water masses entering the fjord. Using these data, we provide marine and terrestrial-based evidence for increased wind strength from ˜ 1600 to 900 yr BP at subantarctic latitudes that is broadly consistent with previous studies of climate-driven vegetation change at the Auckland Islands. Comparison with a SHWW reconstruction using similar proxies from Fiordland suggests a northward migration of the SHWW over New Zealand during the first half of the last millennium. Comparison with palaeoclimate and palaeoceanographic records from southern South America and West Antarctica indicates a late Holocene strengthening of the SHWW after ˜ 1600 yr BP that appears to be broadly symmetrical across the Pacific Basin. Contemporaneous increases in SHWW at localities on either

  9. Sea-level pressure variability around Antarctica since A.D. 1750 inferred from subantarctic tree-ring records

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalba, R. [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory]|[Departamento de Dendrocronologia e Historia Ambientol, IANIGLA, CONICET, C.C. 330, 5500 Mena (Argentina); Cook, E.R.; D`Arrigo, R.D.; Jacoby, G.C. [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory; Jones, P.D. [Climatic Research Unit, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); Salinger, M.J. [National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, P O Box 109-695, New market, Auckland (New Zealand); Palmer, J. [Department of Plant Science, Lincoln University, P O Box 84, Canterbury (New Zealand)

    1997-07-01

    A tree-ring chronology network recently developed from the subantarctic forests provides an opportunity to study long-term climatic variability at higher latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. Fifty long (1911-1985), homogeneous records of monthly mean sea-level pressure (MSLP) from the southern latitudes (15-65 S) were intercorrelated on a seasonal basis to establish the most consistent, long-term transpolar teleconnections during this century. Variations in summer MSLP between the South America-Antarctic Peninsula and the New Zealand sectors of the Southern Ocean are significantly correlated in a negative sense (r=-0.53, P<0.001). Climatically sensitive chronologies from Tierra del Fuego (54-55 ) and New Zealand (39-47 ) were used to develop verifiable reconstructions of summer (November to February) MSLP for both sectors of the Southern Ocean. These reconstructions, which explain between 37 and 43% of the instrumentally recorded pressure variance, indicate that inverse trends in MSLP from diametrically opposite sides of Antarctica have prevailed during the past two centuries. However, the strength of this relationship varies over time. Differences in normalized MSLP between the New Zealand and the South America-Antarctic Peninsula sectors were used to develop a summer transpolar index (STPI), which represents an index of sea-level pressure wavenumber one in the Southern Hemisphere higher latitudes. Tree-ring based reconstructions of STPI show significant differences in large-scale atmospheric circulation between the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries. (orig.). With 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Response of phytoplankton photophysiology to varying environmental conditions in the Sub-Antarctic and Polar Frontal Zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wee Cheah

    Full Text Available Climate-driven changes are expected to alter the hydrography of the Sub-Antarctic Zone (SAZ and Polar Frontal Zone (PFZ south of Australia, in which distinct regional environments are believed to be responsible for the differences in phytoplankton biomass in these regions. Here, we report how the dynamic influences of light, iron and temperature, which are responsible for the photophysiological differences between phytoplankton in the SAZ and PFZ, contribute to the biomass differences in these regions. High effective photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (F'(q/F'(m0.4, maximum photosynthesis rate (P(B(max, light-saturation intensity (E(k, maximum rate of photosynthetic electron transport (1/[Symbol: see text]PSII, and low photoprotective pigment concentrations observed in the SAZ correspond to high chlorophyll a and iron concentrations. In contrast, phytoplankton in the PFZ exhibits low F'(q/F'(M (~ 0.2 and high concentrations of photoprotective pigments under low light environment. Strong negative relationships between iron, temperature, and photoprotective pigments demonstrate that cells were producing more photoprotective pigments under low temperature and iron conditions, and are responsible for the low biomass and low productivity measured in the PFZ. As warming and enhanced iron input is expected in this region, this could probably increase phytoplankton photosynthesis in this region. However, complex interactions between the biogeochemical processes (e.g. stratification caused by warming could prevent mixing of nutrients, which control phytoplankton biomass and productivity, remain uncertain.

  11. Marinomonas polaris sp. nov., a psychrohalotolerant strain isolated from coastal sea water off the subantarctic Kerguelen islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pratima; Chaturvedi, Preeti; Pradhan, Suman; Delille, Daniel; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2006-02-01

    Two aerobic, psychrohalotolerant, motile bacterial isolates, CK13T and CK16, isolated from sea-water samples collected off the subantarctic Kerguelen island, were characterized by using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence data, the strains were 99.6% similar and exhibited 93-97% similarity with the seven recognized species of Marinomonas. The most closely related species were Marinomonas pontica and Marinomonas primoryensis, with 97 and 96 % similarity at the 16S rRNA gene sequence level, respectively. DNA-DNA hybridization values between strain CK13T and M. pontica and M. primoryensis were only 58 and 40%, respectively. The major fatty acids present in strain CK13T were iso-C(16:0), C(16:0), C(16:1)omega7c and C(18:1)omega7c. The DNA G+C content of strain CK13T was 41.2 mol%. Phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol were identified as the predominant phospholipids. All the above characteristics support the affiliation of strain CK13T to the genus Marinomonas. Phylogenetic analysis and phenotypic and genotypic distinctiveness confirmed that strains CK13T and CK16 are members of a novel species of the genus Marinomonas, for which the name Marinomonas polaris sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CK13T (=MTCC 6645T=DSM 16579T=JCM 12522T).

  12. Landscape mapping at sub-Antarctic South Georgia provides a protocol for underpinning large-scale marine protected areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Oliver T.; Huvenne, Veerle A. I.; Griffiths, Huw J.; Dorschel, Boris; Linse, Katrin

    2016-10-01

    Global biodiversity is in decline, with the marine environment experiencing significant and increasing anthropogenic pressures. In response marine protected areas (MPAs) have increasingly been adopted as the flagship approach to marine conservation, many covering enormous areas. At present, however, the lack of biological sampling makes prioritising which regions of the ocean to protect, especially over large spatial scales, particularly problematic. Here we present an interdisciplinary approach to marine landscape mapping at the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia as an effective protocol for underpinning large-scale (105-106  km2) MPA designations. We have developed a new high-resolution (100 m) digital elevation model (DEM) of the region and integrated this DEM with bathymetry-derived parameters, modelled oceanographic data, and satellite primary productivity data. These interdisciplinary datasets were used to apply an objective statistical approach to hierarchically partition and map the benthic environment into physical habitats types. We assess the potential application of physical habitat classifications as proxies for biological structuring and the application of the landscape mapping for informing on marine spatial planning.

  13. Ventilation of the abyssal Southern Ocean during the late Neogene: A new perspective from the subantarctic Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Lindsey M.; Hendy, Ingrid L.; Moore, Theodore C.; Lyle, Mitchell W.

    2009-09-01

    Benthic foraminiferal stable carbon isotope records from the South Atlantic show significant declines toward more "Pacific-like" values at ˜7 and ˜2.7 Ma, and it has been posited that these shifts may mark steps toward increased CO2 sequestration in the deep Southern Ocean as climate cooled over the late Neogene. We generated new stable isotope records from abyssal subantarctic Pacific cores MV0502-4JC and ELT 25-11. The record from MV0502-4JC suggests that the Southern Ocean remained well mixed and free of vertical or interbasinal δ13C gradients following the late Miocene carbon shift (LMCS). According to the records from MV0502-4JC and ELT 25-11, however, cold, low δ13C bottom waters developed in the Southern Ocean in the late Pliocene and persisted until ˜1.7 Ma. These new data suggest that while conditions in the abyssal Southern Ocean following the LMCS were comparable to the present day, sequestration of respired CO2 may have increased in the deepest parts of the Southern Ocean during the late Pliocene, a critical period for the growth and establishment of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets.

  14. Efecto de los ciclos térmicos sobre la ZAT de una soldadura multipasos de un acero inoxidable superdúplex SAF 2507 Effect of thermal cycles on the HAZ of a stainless steel multipass weld of superduplex SAF 2507

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Villalobos

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Los ciclos térmicos de una soldadura multipasos que experimenta un acero inoxidable superdúplex SAF 2507, pueden promover la precipitación de fases secundarias reduciendo significativamente las propiedades mecánicas y la resistencia a la corrosión. Debido a su aplicación en la industria petroquímica, el estudio de las aleaciones superdúplex es de suma importancia para predecir su comportamiento en servicio cuando están involucrados procesos de soldadura por arco eléctrico. En este trabajo, se estudia el cambio microestructural de la zona afectada térmicamente correspondiente al primer cordón depositado de una unión multipasos de acero inoxidable superdúplex SAF 2507 mediante el proceso GTAW y bajo tres temperaturas de interpasos. Los resultados muestran que la temperatura de interpasos tiene una influencia sobre la precipitación de fase sigma en la zona afectada térmicamente del primer cordón depositado.Thermal cycles experienced by a superduplex stainless steel SAF 2507 when is welded, can promote the precipitation of secondary phases which decrease the mechanical properties as well as the corrosion resistance. Due to the application of the duplex alloys in the petrochemical industry, the study of these alloys has become very important in order to predict its service behavior. The aim of this work is to study the microstructural changes in the superduplex stainless steel weld joint after applying the GTAW process under three interpass temperatures after the deposition of every single pass. The results showed that slow cooling rates promoted by the deposition of the subsecuent passes and the higher interpass temperature, promote the precipitation of sigma phase in the HAZ while rapid cooling rates promoted by the lower interpass temperature do not promote the sigma phase precipitation.

  15. Firing up the front line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzenbach, J R; Santamaria, J A

    1999-01-01

    For many organizations, achieving competitive advantage means eliciting superior performance from employees on the front line--the burger flippers, hotel room cleaners, and baggage handlers whose work has an enormous effect on customers. That's no easy task. Front line workers are paid low wages, have scant hope of advancement, and--not surprisingly--often care little about the company's performance. But then how do some companies succeed in engaging the emotional energy of rank-and-file workers? A team of researchers at McKinsey & Company and the Conference Board recently explored that question and discovered that one highly effective route is demonstrated by the U.S. Marine Corps. The Marines' approach to motivation follows the "mission, values, and pride" path, which researchers say is practical and relevant for the business world. More specifically, the authors say the Marines follow five practices: they over-invest in cultivating core value; prepare every person to lead, including front line supervisors; learn when to create teams and when to create single-leader work groups; attend to all employees, not just the top half; and encourage self-discipline as a way of building pride. The authors admit there are critical differences between the Marines and most businesses. But using vivid examples from companies such as KFC and Marriott International, the authors illustrate how the Marines' approach can be translated for corporate use. Sometimes, the authors maintain, minor changes in a company's standard operating procedure can have a powerful effect on front line pride and can result in substantial payoffs in company performance.

  16. Air-sea interaction regimes in the sub-Antarctic Southern Ocean and Antarctic marginal ice zone revealed by icebreaker measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lisan; Jin, Xiangze; Schulz, Eric W.; Josey, Simon A.

    2017-08-01

    This study analyzed shipboard air-sea measurements acquired by the icebreaker Aurora Australis during its off-winter operation in December 2010 to May 2012. Mean conditions over 7 months (October-April) were compiled from a total of 22 ship tracks. The icebreaker traversed the water between Hobart, Tasmania, and the Antarctic continent, providing valuable in situ insight into two dynamically important, yet poorly sampled, regimes: the sub-Antarctic Southern Ocean and the Antarctic marginal ice zone (MIZ) in the Indian Ocean sector. The transition from the open water to the ice-covered surface creates sharp changes in albedo, surface roughness, and air temperature, leading to consequential effects on air-sea variables and fluxes. Major effort was made to estimate the air-sea fluxes in the MIZ using the bulk flux algorithms that are tuned specifically for the sea-ice effects, while computing the fluxes over the sub-Antarctic section using the COARE3.0 algorithm. The study evidenced strong sea-ice modulations on winds, with the southerly airflow showing deceleration (convergence) in the MIZ and acceleration (divergence) when moving away from the MIZ. Marked seasonal variations in heat exchanges between the atmosphere and the ice margin were noted. The monotonic increase in turbulent latent and sensible heat fluxes after summer turned the MIZ quickly into a heat loss regime, while at the same time the sub-Antarctic surface water continued to receive heat from the atmosphere. The drastic increase in turbulent heat loss in the MIZ contrasted sharply to the nonsignificant and seasonally invariant turbulent heat loss over the sub-Antarctic open water.Plain Language SummaryThe icebreaker Aurora Australis is a research and supply vessel that is regularly chartered by the Australian Antarctic Division during the southern summer to operate in waters between Hobart, Tasmania, and Antarctica. The vessel serves as the main lifeline to three permanent research stations on the

  17. A glacial warm water anomaly in the subantarctic Atlantic Ocean, near the Agulhas Retroflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Giuseppe; Abelmann, Andrea; Gersonde, Rainer

    2004-06-01

    ODP Site 1089 is optimally located in order to monitor the occurrence of maxima in Agulhas heat and salt spillage from the Indian to the Atlantic Ocean. Radiolarian-based paleotemperature transfer functions allowed to reconstruct the climatic history for the last 450 kyr at this location. A warm sea surface temperature anomaly during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 10 was recognized and traced to other oceanic records along the surface branch of the global thermohaline (THC) circulation system, and is particularly marked at locations where a strong interaction between oceanic and atmospheric overturning cells and fronts occurs. This anomaly is absent in the Vostok ice core deuterium, and in oceanic records from the Antarctic Zone. However, it is present in the deuterium excess record from the Vostok ice core, interpreted as reflecting the temperature at the moisture source site for the snow precipitated at Vostok Station. As atmospheric models predict a subtropical Indian source for such moisture, this provides the necessary teleconnection between East Antarctica and ODP Site 1089, as the subtropical Indian is also the source area of the Agulhas Current, the main climate agent at our study location. The presence of the MIS 10 anomaly in the δ13C foraminiferal records from the same core supports its connection to oceanic mechanisms, linking stronger Agulhas spillover intensity to increased productivity in the study area. We suggest, in analogy to modern oceanographic observations, this to be a consequence of a shallow nutricline, induced by eddy mixing and baroclinic tide generation, which are in turn connected to the flow geometry, and intensity, of the Agulhas Current as it flows past the Agulhas Bank. We interpret the intensified inflow of Agulhas Current to the South Atlantic as responding to the switch between lower and higher amplitude in the insolation forcing in the Agulhas Current source area. This would result in higher SSTs in the Cape Basin during the

  18. Investigating the turbulence response of a 1-D idealized water column located in the sub-Antarctic zone with focus on the upper ocean dynamics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Boodhraj, Kirodh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available discussed. 40 41 Data and Method 42 This study focussed on the sub-Antarctic zone of the 43 Southern Ocean region off the coast of South Africa (47ºS 44 4.5ºE), chosen due to the availability of in situ glider data. 45 A configuration (named SAZ1D... 107 of glider data (Swart et al. 2015) obtained from the region. 108 The winter deep mixing penetrates down to 150 𝑚 (above 109 the permanent pycnocline) while during the summer 110 stratification, high temperatures penetrate down to 100 𝑚. 111...

  19. Egg masses of the Patagonian squid Doryteuthis (Amerigo gahi attached to giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera in the sub-Antarctic ecoregion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Rosenfeld

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Egg masses of the Patagonian squid Doryteuthis (Amerigo gahi attached to giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera in the Magellanic channels of the sub-Antarctic ecoregion in southern South America is documented for the first time. Of seven egg masses observed between 2008 and 2011, one was taken to the laboratory to be analysed and photographed. Comprising long transparent capsules containing eggs, the masses were strongly attached to the stipes of M. pyrifera. This macroalgae is a potentially important economic resource due to its multiple industrial uses; this study shows that it also serves an important ecological role as a spawning substrate for D. gahi.

  20. Aspects of reproductive ecology and benthic-pelagic coupling in the sub-antarctic sea cucumber Pseudostichopus mollis (Theel)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Andrew; Neal, Lance

    2012-07-01

    For deeper regions of the continental shelf environmental cues entraining reproduction in echinoderms are often absent, which contributes to adoption of continuous reproduction, having larger eggs, and a lecithotrophic mode of larval development. In the present study the sub-Antarctic sea cucumber Pseudostichopus mollis from the family Synallactidae was obtained during June (winter) and September (spring) from a depth of approximately 300 m north of the Auckland Islands in an area abundant in biogenic sediments. Samples were processed for body indices and gonad development. Features characteristic of non-continuous reproduction were exhibited. Although a larger egg size was found (212±14 μm), two distinct winter cohorts of oocytes occurred (41-81 and 161-201 μm) and body wall weight fluctuations (7.6% increase in males and 27.5% reduction in females) coincided with changes in gonad indices between sample dates. For males gonad as a proportion of body wall weight decreased from 3.31±0.9 to 2.11±0.37% and for females it increased from 1.59±0.28 to 2.5±0.30%. For both sample dates the gonad of males maintained mature spermatozoa whereas female gonad shifted from mainly recovery and growth of oocytes to growth and advanced growth of mature oocytes. In habitats with low or variable food availability intermittent reproduction is predicted as resources are too low for a high reproductive effort and too erratic for synchrony. A pattern of reproduction where fluctuations in seasonal organic input into an accumulated benthic food source initiates and synchronises gametogenesis for future spawning is proposed.

  1. Biogeochemical flux and phytoplankton succession: A year-long sediment trap record in the Australian sector of the Subantarctic Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks, Jessica V.; Rigual-Hernández, Andrés S.; Trull, Thomas W.; Bray, Stephen G.; Flores, José-Abel; Armand, Leanne K.

    2017-03-01

    The Subantarctic Zone (SAZ) plays a crucial role in global carbon cycling as a significant sink for atmospheric CO2. In the Australian sector, the SAZ exports large quantities of organic carbon from the surface ocean, despite lower algal biomass accumulation in surface waters than other Southern Ocean sectors. We present the first analysis of diatom and coccolithophore assemblages and seasonality, as well as the first annual quantification of bulk organic components of captured material at the base of the mixed layer (500 m depth) in the SAZ. Sediment traps were moored in the SAZ southwest of Tasmania as part of the long-term SAZ Project for one year (September 2003 to September 2004). Annual mass flux at 500 m and 2000 m was composed mainly of calcium carbonate, while biogenic silica made up on average <10% of material captured in the traps. Organic carbon flux was estimated at 1.1 g m-2 y-1 at 500 m, close to the estimated global mean carbon flux. Low diatom fluxes and high fluxes of coccoliths were consistent with low biogenic silica and high calcium carbonate fluxes, respectively. Diatoms and coccoliths were identified to species level. Diatom and coccolithophore sinking assemblages reflected some seasonal ecological succession. A theoretical scheme of diatom succession in live assemblages is compared to successional patterns presented in sediment traps. This study provides a unique, direct measurement of the biogeochemical fluxes and their main biological carbon vectors just below the winter mixed layer depth at which effective sequestration of carbon occurs. Comparison of these results with previous sediment trap deployments at the same site at deeper depths (i.e. 1000, 2000 and 3800 m) documents the changes particle fluxes experience in the lower ;twilight zone; where biological processes and remineralisation of carbon reduce the efficiency of carbon sequestration.

  2. Habitat associations and distribution of the hyperbenthic shrimp, Nauticaris marionis, around the sub-Antarctic Prince Edward Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Craig; von der Meden, Charles; Atkinson, Lara; Reed, Cecile

    2017-09-01

    The association of organisms with particular habitats and habitat-forming organisms, can strongly influence species distributions, interactions and wider ecosystem services. At the sub-Antarctic Prince Edward Islands, the caridean shrimp Nauticaris marionis is a principal part of the benthic ecosystem, occurring between ca. 50 m and 600 m. Its role as a trophic link between the primary productivity and higher predators is established, but little is understood of its in situ habitat usage and associations or of how these structure patterns of abundance. We investigated these aspects directly using a benthic camera sled, sampling 27 stations between 50 m and 500 m. Substratum type was characterised, and estimates of percentage cover of the 13 main groups of habitat-forming epibenthic taxa were made, alongside absolute counts of N. marionis within 'digital quadrats' drawn from 300 m transects. The distribution of N. marionis was influenced by depth, substratum type and overall biogenic cover, being limited to habitats between 50 and 160 m depth on mud or gravel substrata only, and having > 50% biogenic cover. The presence/absence of N. marionis related to significantly different epibenthic assemblages (termed biogenic habitats), but this effect was contingent on depth. Likewise, densities of N. marionis were significantly affected by biogenic habitat type, identifying an association with two biogenic habitat groups, one dominated by red-algae, the other by structurally complex bryozoan species. These associations likely relate to the structural complexity of the two habitat groups, rather than the specific taxa involved. The apparent absence of N. marionis at depths > 160 m contrasts with earlier records and poses questions about the trophic importance of the shrimp in deeper habitats.

  3. Satellite tagging and biopsy sampling of killer whales at subantarctic Marion Island: effectiveness, immediate reactions and long-term responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan R Reisinger

    Full Text Available Remote tissue biopsy sampling and satellite tagging are becoming widely used in large marine vertebrate studies because they allow the collection of a diverse suite of otherwise difficult-to-obtain data which are critical in understanding the ecology of these species and to their conservation and management. Researchers must carefully consider their methods not only from an animal welfare perspective, but also to ensure the scientific rigour and validity of their results. We report methods for shore-based, remote biopsy sampling and satellite tagging of killer whales Orcinus orca at Subantarctic Marion Island. The performance of these methods is critically assessed using 1 the attachment duration of low-impact minimally percutaneous satellite tags; 2 the immediate behavioural reactions of animals to biopsy sampling and satellite tagging; 3 the effect of researcher experience on biopsy sampling and satellite tagging; and 4 the mid- (1 month and long- (24 month term behavioural consequences. To study mid- and long-term behavioural changes we used multievent capture-recapture models that accommodate imperfect detection and individual heterogeneity. We made 72 biopsy sampling attempts (resulting in 32 tissue samples and 37 satellite tagging attempts (deploying 19 tags. Biopsy sampling success rates were low (43%, but tagging rates were high with improved tag designs (86%. The improved tags remained attached for 26±14 days (mean ± SD. Individuals most often showed no reaction when attempts missed (66% and a slight reaction-defined as a slight flinch, slight shake, short acceleration, or immediate dive-when hit (54%. Severe immediate reactions were never observed. Hit or miss and age-sex class were important predictors of the reaction, but the method (tag or biopsy was unimportant. Multievent trap-dependence modelling revealed considerable variation in individual sighting patterns; however, there were no significant mid- or long-term changes

  4. Satellite tagging and biopsy sampling of killer whales at subantarctic Marion Island: effectiveness, immediate reactions and long-term responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisinger, Ryan R; Oosthuizen, W Chris; Péron, Guillaume; Cory Toussaint, Dawn; Andrews, Russel D; de Bruyn, P J Nico

    2014-01-01

    Remote tissue biopsy sampling and satellite tagging are becoming widely used in large marine vertebrate studies because they allow the collection of a diverse suite of otherwise difficult-to-obtain data which are critical in understanding the ecology of these species and to their conservation and management. Researchers must carefully consider their methods not only from an animal welfare perspective, but also to ensure the scientific rigour and validity of their results. We report methods for shore-based, remote biopsy sampling and satellite tagging of killer whales Orcinus orca at Subantarctic Marion Island. The performance of these methods is critically assessed using 1) the attachment duration of low-impact minimally percutaneous satellite tags; 2) the immediate behavioural reactions of animals to biopsy sampling and satellite tagging; 3) the effect of researcher experience on biopsy sampling and satellite tagging; and 4) the mid- (1 month) and long- (24 month) term behavioural consequences. To study mid- and long-term behavioural changes we used multievent capture-recapture models that accommodate imperfect detection and individual heterogeneity. We made 72 biopsy sampling attempts (resulting in 32 tissue samples) and 37 satellite tagging attempts (deploying 19 tags). Biopsy sampling success rates were low (43%), but tagging rates were high with improved tag designs (86%). The improved tags remained attached for 26±14 days (mean ± SD). Individuals most often showed no reaction when attempts missed (66%) and a slight reaction-defined as a slight flinch, slight shake, short acceleration, or immediate dive-when hit (54%). Severe immediate reactions were never observed. Hit or miss and age-sex class were important predictors of the reaction, but the method (tag or biopsy) was unimportant. Multievent trap-dependence modelling revealed considerable variation in individual sighting patterns; however, there were no significant mid- or long-term changes following

  5. Thermal preference and performance in a sub-Antarctic caterpillar: A test of the coadaptation hypothesis and its alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, Tanya M; Sinclair, Brent J; Chown, Steven L

    2017-04-01

    Physiological ecologists have long assumed that thermoregulatory behaviour will evolve to optimise physiological performance. The coadaptation hypothesis predicts that an animal's preferred body temperature will correspond to the temperature at which its performance is optimal. Here we use a strong inference approach to examine the relationship between thermal preference and locomotor performance in the caterpillars of a wingless sub-Antarctic moth, Pringleophaga marioni Viette (Tineidae). The coadaptation hypothesis and its alternatives (suboptimal is optimal, thermodynamic effect, trait variation) are tested. Compared to the optimal movement temperature (22.5°C for field-fresh caterpillars and 25, 20, 22.5, 25 and 20°C following seven day acclimations to 0, 5, 10, 15 and 5-15°C respectively), caterpillar thermal preference was significantly lower (9.2°C for field-fresh individuals and 9.4, 8.8, 8.1, 5.2 and 4.6°C following acclimation to 0, 5, 10, 15 and 5-15°C, respectively). Together with the low degree of asymmetry observed in the performance curves, and the finding that acclimation to high temperatures did not result in maximal performance, all, but one of the above hypotheses (i.e. 'trait variation') was rejected. The thermal preference of P. marioni caterpillars more closely resembles temperatures at which survival is high (5-10°C), or where feeding is optimal (10°C), than where locomotion speed is maximal, suggesting that thermal preference may be optimised for overall fitness rather than for a given trait. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Holocene shifts of the Subtropical Shelf Front off southeastern South America controlled by high and low latitude atmospheric forcings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Vera B.; Hanebuth, Till J. J.; Chiessi, Cristiano M.

    2013-09-01

    Over the Uruguayan shelf and uppermost slope, the coalescence of northward flowing Subantarctic Shelf Water and southward flowing Subtropical Shelf Water forms a distinct thermohaline front termed the Subtropical Shelf Front (STSF). Running in a SW direction diagonally across the shelf from the coastal waters at 32°S toward the shelf break at ca. 36°S, the STSF represents the shelfward extension of the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence zone. This study reconstructs latitudinal STSF shifts during the Holocene based on benthic foraminifera δ18O and δ13C, total organic carbon, carbonate contents, Ti/Ca, and grain size distribution from a high-accumulation sedimentary record located at an uppermost continental-slope terrace. Our data provide direct evidence for: (1) a southern STSF position (to the South of the core site) at the beginning of the early Holocene (>9.4 cal ka BP) linked to a more southerly position of the Southern Westerly Winds in combination with restricted shelf circulation intensity due to lower sea level; (2) a gradual STSF northward migration (bypassing the core site toward the North) primarily forced by the northward migration of the Southern Westerly Winds from 9.4 cal ka BP onward; (3) a relatively stable position of the front in the interval between 7.2 and 4.0 cal ka BP; (4) millennial-scale latitudinal oscillations close to 36°S of the STSF after 4.0 cal ka BP probably linked to the intensification in El Niño Southern Oscillation; and (5) a southward migration of the STSF during the last 200 years possibly linked to anthropogenic influences on the atmosphere.

  7. Nutritional Immunity Triggers the Modulation of Iron Metabolism Genes in the Sub-Antarctic Notothenioid Eleginops maclovinus in Response to Piscirickettsia salmonis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danixa Martínez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron deprivation is a nutritional immunity mechanism through which fish can limit the amount of iron available to invading bacteria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the modulation of iron metabolism genes in the liver and brain of sub-Antarctic notothenioid Eleginops maclovinus challenged with Piscirickettsia salmonis. The specimens were inoculated with two P. salmonis strains: LF-89 (ATCC® VR-1361™ and Austral-005 (antibiotic resistant. Hepatic and brain samples were collected at intervals over a period of 35 days. Gene expression (by RT-qPCR of proteins involved in iron storage, transport, and binding were statistically modulated in infected fish when compared with control counterparts. Specifically, the expression profiles of the transferrin and hemopexin genes in the liver, as well as the expression profiles of ferritin-M, ferritin-L, and transferrin in the brain, were similar for both experimental groups. Nevertheless, the remaining genes such as ferritin-H, ceruloplasmin, hepcidin, and haptoglobin presented tissue-specific expression profiles that varied in relation to the injected bacterial strain and sampling time-point. These results suggest that nutritional immunity could be an important immune defense mechanism for E. maclovinus against P. salmonis injection. This study provides relevant information for understanding iron metabolism of a sub-Antarctic notothenioid fish.

  8. On the biogeography of Cumacea (Crustacea, Malacostraca. A comparison between South America, the Subantarctic Islands and Antarctica: present state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ute Mühlenhardt-Siegel

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Cumacea (Crustacea were collected during the Joint Magellan expedition in November 1994, by means of an epibenthic sledge from RV Victor Hensen. The cumaceans were well represented, the second abundant order after the amphipods, among the other Peracarida in depth ranges between 25 and 665 m. Twenty-five species were found in the samples mainly from the Beagle Channel, nine of them were already known for this region. 14 species were recorded for the first time for this region, 2 of them were known from the northern Argentinian coast and one from Antarctica. The most important in terms of species richness and abundance were the families Diastylidae, Nannastacidae and Leuconidae. In the Beagle Channel an almost completely different cumacean fauna was found compared to the Subantarctic Islands, the Antarctic Peninsula and eastern Antarctic (Prydz Bay regions. Comparison of published data and the present results show moderate overlap in the cumacean fauna at the species level between the periantarctic South Georgian shelf / Antarctic Peninsula (48%. Little correspondence at the species level was found between Antarctica / Subantarctic Kerguelen (14 %, South Georgia / Kerguelen (13 % and Magellan / Antarctica (11 %. Interestingly, the Magellan region and South Georgia show very little species overlap (5 %. It is concluded that the Antarctic shelf regions were not colonized from the Magellan region via the Scotia Arc.

  9. Front Propagation in Stochastic Neural Fields

    KAUST Repository

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the effects of extrinsic multiplicative noise on front propagation in a scalar neural field with excitatory connections. Using a separation of time scales, we represent the fluctuating front in terms of a diffusive-like displacement (wandering) of the front from its uniformly translating position at long time scales, and fluctuations in the front profile around its instantaneous position at short time scales. One major result of our analysis is a comparison between freely propagating fronts and fronts locked to an externally moving stimulus. We show that the latter are much more robust to noise, since the stochastic wandering of the mean front profile is described by an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process rather than a Wiener process, so that the variance in front position saturates in the long time limit rather than increasing linearly with time. Finally, we consider a stochastic neural field that supports a pulled front in the deterministic limit, and show that the wandering of such a front is now subdiffusive. © 2012 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  10. Bone-Eating Worms Spread: Insights into Shallow-Water Osedax (Annelida, Siboglinidae) from Antarctic, Subantarctic, and Mediterranean Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada, Sergi; Riesgo, Ana; Bas, Maria; Arnedo, Miquel A; Cristobo, Javier; Rouse, Greg W; Avila, Conxita

    2015-01-01

    Osedax, commonly known as bone-eating worms, are unusual marine annelids belonging to Siboglinidae and represent a remarkable example of evolutionary adaptation to a specialized habitat, namely sunken vertebrate bones. Usually, females of these animals live anchored inside bone owing to a ramified root system from an ovisac, and obtain nutrition via symbiosis with Oceanospirillales gamma-proteobacteria. Since their discovery, 26 Osedax operational taxonomic units (OTUs) have been reported from a wide bathymetric range in the Pacific, the North Atlantic, and the Southern Ocean. Using experimentally deployed and naturally occurring bones we report here the presence of Osedax deceptionensis at very shallow-waters in Deception Island (type locality; Antarctica) and at moderate depths near South Georgia Island (Subantarctic). We present molecular evidence in a new phylogenetic analysis based on five concatenated genes (28S rDNA, Histone H3, 18S rDNA, 16S rDNA, and cytochrome c oxidase I-COI-), using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian inference, supporting the placement of O. deceptionensis as a separate lineage (Clade VI) although its position still remains uncertain. This phylogenetic analysis includes a new unnamed species (O. 'mediterranea') recently discovered in the shallow-water Mediterranean Sea belonging to Osedax Clade I. A timeframe of the diversification of Osedax inferred using a Bayesian framework further suggests that Osedax diverged from other siboglinids during the Middle Cretaceous (ca. 108 Ma) and also indicates that the most recent common ancestor of Osedax extant lineages dates to the Late Cretaceous (ca. 74.8 Ma) concomitantly with large marine reptiles and teleost fishes. We also provide a phylogenetic framework that assigns newly-sequenced Osedax endosymbionts of O. deceptionensis and O. 'mediterranea' to ribospecies Rs1. Molecular analysis for O. deceptionensis also includes a COI-based haplotype network indicating that individuals from Deception

  11. Bone-Eating Worms Spread: Insights into Shallow-Water Osedax (Annelida, Siboglinidae from Antarctic, Subantarctic, and Mediterranean Waters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Taboada

    Full Text Available Osedax, commonly known as bone-eating worms, are unusual marine annelids belonging to Siboglinidae and represent a remarkable example of evolutionary adaptation to a specialized habitat, namely sunken vertebrate bones. Usually, females of these animals live anchored inside bone owing to a ramified root system from an ovisac, and obtain nutrition via symbiosis with Oceanospirillales gamma-proteobacteria. Since their discovery, 26 Osedax operational taxonomic units (OTUs have been reported from a wide bathymetric range in the Pacific, the North Atlantic, and the Southern Ocean. Using experimentally deployed and naturally occurring bones we report here the presence of Osedax deceptionensis at very shallow-waters in Deception Island (type locality; Antarctica and at moderate depths near South Georgia Island (Subantarctic. We present molecular evidence in a new phylogenetic analysis based on five concatenated genes (28S rDNA, Histone H3, 18S rDNA, 16S rDNA, and cytochrome c oxidase I-COI-, using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian inference, supporting the placement of O. deceptionensis as a separate lineage (Clade VI although its position still remains uncertain. This phylogenetic analysis includes a new unnamed species (O. 'mediterranea' recently discovered in the shallow-water Mediterranean Sea belonging to Osedax Clade I. A timeframe of the diversification of Osedax inferred using a Bayesian framework further suggests that Osedax diverged from other siboglinids during the Middle Cretaceous (ca. 108 Ma and also indicates that the most recent common ancestor of Osedax extant lineages dates to the Late Cretaceous (ca. 74.8 Ma concomitantly with large marine reptiles and teleost fishes. We also provide a phylogenetic framework that assigns newly-sequenced Osedax endosymbionts of O. deceptionensis and O. 'mediterranea' to ribospecies Rs1. Molecular analysis for O. deceptionensis also includes a COI-based haplotype network indicating that individuals from

  12. Bone-Eating Worms Spread: Insights into Shallow-Water Osedax (Annelida, Siboglinidae) from Antarctic, Subantarctic, and Mediterranean Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada, Sergi; Riesgo, Ana; Bas, Maria; Arnedo, Miquel A.; Cristobo, Javier; Rouse, Greg W.; Avila, Conxita

    2015-01-01

    Osedax, commonly known as bone-eating worms, are unusual marine annelids belonging to Siboglinidae and represent a remarkable example of evolutionary adaptation to a specialized habitat, namely sunken vertebrate bones. Usually, females of these animals live anchored inside bone owing to a ramified root system from an ovisac, and obtain nutrition via symbiosis with Oceanospirillales gamma-proteobacteria. Since their discovery, 26 Osedax operational taxonomic units (OTUs) have been reported from a wide bathymetric range in the Pacific, the North Atlantic, and the Southern Ocean. Using experimentally deployed and naturally occurring bones we report here the presence of Osedax deceptionensis at very shallow-waters in Deception Island (type locality; Antarctica) and at moderate depths near South Georgia Island (Subantarctic). We present molecular evidence in a new phylogenetic analysis based on five concatenated genes (28S rDNA, Histone H3, 18S rDNA, 16S rDNA, and cytochrome c oxidase I–COI–), using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian inference, supporting the placement of O. deceptionensis as a separate lineage (Clade VI) although its position still remains uncertain. This phylogenetic analysis includes a new unnamed species (O. ‘mediterranea’) recently discovered in the shallow-water Mediterranean Sea belonging to Osedax Clade I. A timeframe of the diversification of Osedax inferred using a Bayesian framework further suggests that Osedax diverged from other siboglinids during the Middle Cretaceous (ca. 108 Ma) and also indicates that the most recent common ancestor of Osedax extant lineages dates to the Late Cretaceous (ca. 74.8 Ma) concomitantly with large marine reptiles and teleost fishes. We also provide a phylogenetic framework that assigns newly-sequenced Osedax endosymbionts of O. deceptionensis and O. ‘mediterranea’ to ribospecies Rs1. Molecular analysis for O. deceptionensis also includes a COI-based haplotype network indicating that individuals from

  13. Front propagation and rejuvenation in flipping processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-naim, Eli [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Krapivsky, P I [BOSTON UNIV; Antal, T [HARVARD UNIV; Ben - Avrahm, D [HARVARD UNIV

    2008-01-01

    We study a directed flipping process that underlies the performance of the random edge simplex algorithm. In this stochastic process, which takes place on a one-dimensional lattice whose sites may be either occupied or vacant, occupied sites become vacant at a constant rate and simultaneously cause all sites to the right to change their state. This random process exhibits rich phenomenology. First, there is a front, defined by the position of the leftmost occupied site, that propagates at a nontrivial velocity. Second, the front involves a depletion zone with an excess of vacant sites. The total excess {Delta}{sub k} increases logarithmically, {Delta}{sub k} {approx_equal}ln k, with the distance k from the front. Third, the front exhibits ageing -- young fronts are vigorous but old fronts are sluggish. We investigate these phenomena using a quasi-static approximation, direct solutions of small systems and numerical simulations.

  14. Reaction front formation in contaminant plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribbin, Laura B; Winstanley, Henry F; Mitchell, Sarah L; Fowler, Andrew C; Sander, Graham C

    2014-12-15

    The formation of successive fronts in contaminated groundwater plumes by subsoil bacterial action is a commonly accepted feature of their propagation, but it is not obviously clear from a mathematical standpoint quite how such fronts are formed or propagate. In this paper we show that these can be explained by combining classical reaction-diffusion theory involving just two reactants (oxidant and reductant), and a secondary reaction in which a reactant on one side of such a front is (re-)formed on the other side of the front via diffusion of its product across the front. We give approximate asymptotic solutions for the reactant profiles, and the propagation rate of the front. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Muon front end for the neutrino factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. T. Rogers

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the neutrino factory, muons are produced by firing high-energy protons onto a target to produce pions. The pions decay to muons and pass through a capture channel known as the muon front end, before acceleration to 12.6 GeV. The muon front end comprises a variable frequency rf system for longitudinal capture and an ionization cooling channel. In this paper we detail recent improvements in the design of the muon front end.

  16. Chiral symmetry in light-front QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Menh-Hsiu; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2004-04-01

    The definition of chiral transformations in light-front field theory is very different from the conventional form in equal-time formalism. We study the consistency of chiral transformations and chiral symmetry in light-front QCD and derive a complete new light-front axial-vector current for QCD. The breaking of chiral symmetry in light-front QCD is only associated with helicity flip interaction between quarks and gluons. Remarkably, the new axial-vector current does not contain the pion pole part so that the associate chiral charge smoothly describes pion transitions for various hadronic processes.

  17. Chiral Symmetry in Light-front QCD

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Meng-Hsiu; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2003-01-01

    The definition of chiral transformations in light-front field theory is very different from the conventional form in equal-time formalism. We study the consistency of chiral transformations and chiral symmetry in light-front QCD and derive a complete new light-front axial-vector current for QCD. The breaking of chiral symmetry in light-front QCD is only associated with helicity flip interaction between quarks and gluons. Remarkably, the new axial-vector current does not contain the pion pole ...

  18. Front blind spot crashes in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuk Ki; Wong, Koon Hung; Tao, Chi Hang; Tam, Cheok Ning; Tam, Yiu Yan; Tsang, Cheuk Nam

    2016-09-01

    In 2012-2014, our laboratory had investigated a total of 9 suspected front blind spot crashes, in which the medium and heavy goods vehicles pulled away from rest and rolled over the pedestrians, who were crossing immediately in front of the vehicles. The drivers alleged that they did not see any pedestrians through the windscreens or the front blind spot mirrors. Forensic assessment of the goods vehicles revealed the existence of front blind spot zones in 3 out of these 9 accident vehicles, which were attributed to the poor mirror adjustments or even the absence of a front blind spot mirror altogether. In view of this, a small survey was devised involving 20 randomly selected volunteers and their goods vehicles and 5 out of these vehicles had blind spots at the front. Additionally, a short questionnaire was conducted on these 20 professional lorry drivers and it was shown that most of them were not aware of the hazards of blind spots immediately in front of their vehicles, and many did not use the front blind spot mirrors properly. A simple procedure for quick measurements of the coverage of front blind spot mirrors using a coloured plastic mat with dimensional grids was also introduced and described in this paper. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The hydrography and dynamics of the ocean environment of the Prince Edward Islands (Southern Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansorge, I. J.; Lutjeharms, J. R. E.

    2002-11-01

    The Prince Edward Islands lie in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean at 47°S and 38°E. They lie in the path of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), between the Subantarctic Front (SAF) to the north and the Antarctic Polar Front (APF) to the south. Two extensive hydrographic surveys (MOES 2 and MIOS 2) have been carried out to establish for the first time the mesoscale hydrography and dynamics of the oceanic surroundings of these islands. During the MOES 2, the SAF was deflected northward around the islands, while the APF lay south of the survey grid and south of the islands. Water masses in the region changed gradually from Subantarctic Surface Water (SASW) to Antarctic Surface Water (AASW) on crossing the Polar Frontal Zone (PFZ). Downstream of the islands, a wake, resulting in the generation of broad meanders, was formed. As a consequence, water masses, in particular warm SASW, were displaced from north of the SAF across the PFZ, while cooler waters, which have been modified in the transitional band of the PFZ, were displaced northwards. In contrast, during MIOS 2, the surface expression of the SAF formed an intensive frontal band. On approaching the islands, the SAF split into two branches, with a branch deflected northwards around the islands, while a second branch meandered southward. In the downstream region, an intense cold eddy consisting of AASW was observed within the PFZ, displacing the SAF northwards. South of this eddy, a warm patch of SASW water was encountered, its position possibly controlled by the meandering SAF. Evidence from both these surveys demonstrates that the ACC exhibits high degrees of mesoscale variability in the vicinity of the Prince Edward Islands. The displacement of the SAF in both instances was apparent, resulting in the advection or the entrapment of neighbouring water masses into and across the PFZ. The speed of the incident current on approaching the islands may play a role in the degree of mesoscale mixing downstream

  20. The light-front vacuum and dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Polyzou, W. N.

    2004-01-01

    I give a quantum theoretical description of kinematically invariant vacuua on the algebra of free fields restricted to a light front and discuss the relation between the light-front Hamiltonian, P-, the vacuum, and Poincare invariance. This provides a quantum theoretical description of zero modes.

  1. Propulsive force in front crawl swimming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, M.A.M.; de Groot, G.; Hollander, A.P.

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the propulsive forces in front crawl arm swimming, derived from a three-dimensional kinematic analysis, these values were compared with mean drag forces. The propulsive forces during front crawl swimming using the arms only were calculated using three-dimensional kinematic analysis

  2. Through the EU's Back and Front Doors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler-Nissen, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Through the EU's front- and backdoors: The selective Danish and Norwegian approaches in the Area of Freedom, Security and Justice Rebecca Adler-Nissen......Through the EU's front- and backdoors: The selective Danish and Norwegian approaches in the Area of Freedom, Security and Justice Rebecca Adler-Nissen...

  3. Coping on the Front-line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanden, Guro Refsum; Lønsmann, Dorte

    This article investigates how front-line employees respond to English language policies implemented by the management of three multinational corporations (MNCs) headquartered in Scandinavia. Based on interview and document data the article examines the ways in which front-line employees cross lan...

  4. Light front quantum chromodynamics: Towards phenomenology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We briefly review the application of light front QCD to inclusive deep inelastic scattering. Keywords. Light front dynamics .... longitudinal gluon structure function and to a new sum rule. К. dmFД/m = 4M¾/Q¾. , which ... For the transversely polarized structure function g¾, if the twist three contributions are ignored, one gets an ...

  5. Thermal Fronts Atlas of Canadian Coastal Waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cyr, F.; Larouche, P.

    2015-01-01

    Oceanic fronts are often associated with enhanced biological activity. Depending on their generation mechanism, they are often linked to specific geographical areas. Here we use 25 years of high-resolution satellite sea surface temperature (SST) daily images to generate maps of SST fronts over

  6. End-Users, Front Ends and Librarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Donna E.

    1989-01-01

    The increase in end-user searching, the advantages and limitations of front ends, and the role of the librarian in end-user searching are discussed. It is argued that librarians need to recognize that front ends can be of benefit to themselves and patrons, and to assume the role of advisors and educators for end-users. (37 references) (CLB)

  7. Turbulence spectra measured during fire front passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daisuke Seto; Craig B. Clements; Warren E. Heilman

    2013-01-01

    Four field experiments were conducted over various fuel and terrain to investigate turbulence generation during the passage of wildland fire fronts. Our results indicate an increase in horizontal mean winds and friction velocity, horizontal and vertical velocity variances as well as a decreased degree of anisotropy in TKE during fire front passage (FFP) due to fire-...

  8. Coherent structures for front propagation in fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Kevin; Mahoney, John

    2014-03-01

    Our goal is to characterize the nature of reacting flows by identifying important ``coherent'' structures. We follow the recent work by Haller, Beron-Vera, and Farazmand which formalized the notion of lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) in fluid flows. In this theory, LCSs were derived from the Cauchy-Green strain tensor. We adapt this perspective to analogously define coherent structures in reacting flows. By this we mean a fluid flow with a reaction front propagating through it such that the propagation does not affect the underlying flow. A reaction front might be chemical (Belousov-Zhabotinsky, flame front, etc.) or some other type of front (electromagnetic, acoustic, etc.). While the recently developed theory of burning invariant manifolds (BIMs) describes barriers to front propagation in time-periodic flows, this current work provides an important complement by extending to the aperiodic setting. Funded by NSF Grant CMMI-1201236.

  9. Microscopic Mechanisms for Propagating Deformation Fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Scott

    2001-03-01

    Alloys often deform through the propagation of slowly moving ( cm/s) fronts separating strained and unstrained regions. Theories for these Portevin-Le Chatelier (PLC) fronts are mostly on the macroscopic level, dealing with strains instead of dislocation populations. In these models diffusion, a possible mechanism for propagation, fails to produce front behavior consistent with experiments. Previous work* used a nonlocal strain-rate to successfully reproduce many different aspects of experimentally observed fronts. Ananthakrishna has proposed a set of equations that describe the evolution of different dislocation populations. These equations reproduce the temporal behavior of the PLC effect, serrated stress-strain curves accompanying smooth loading. It is natural to ask whether diffusive or other spatial coupling terms added to this model result in fronts. I will discuss simulations of these equations with added spatial terms and attempt to compare the results with experiments. *S. Franklin, F. Mertens, and M. Marder, Phys. Rev. E V. 62 (2000)

  10. Microangiopatia livedóide associada à síndrome do anticorpo antifosfolípide (SAF Livedoid microangiopathy associated to antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Munhoz Sanches

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A microangiopatia livedóide é uma síndrome de hialinização segmentar crônica dos vasos da derme, de causa desconhecida, que afeta principalmente os membros inferiores. Histopatologicamente, tanto as lesões iniciais quanto as tardias são caracterizadas por infiltrado com escassas células inflamatórias, mas com importante angiogênese capilar e microtrombos, aglomerados nodulares de pequenos capilares misturados com hemácias e depósitos de hemossiderina na derme. A ausência de infiltrado perivascular suficiente ou leucocitoclasia argumenta contra vasculite, favorecendo mais um processo trombótico. A microangiopatia livedóide acomete principalmente mulheres jovens e de meia idade. Pode ser idiopática, ou estar associada a alterações na coagulação, incluindo mutação no fator V de Leiden, deficiência da proteína C, aumento na homocisteína plasmática, anormalidades na fibrinólise, ativação plaquetária e síndrome do anticorpo antifosfolípide (SAF. Nós apresentamos um caso de uma paciente com microangiopatia livedóide, associada à presença de SAF com múltiplas úlceras em membros inferiores, que só apresentou melhora clínica após a anticoagulação plena com warfarina e posterior associação com danazol. A microangiopatia livedóide pode representar uma manifestação clínica inicial de um grupo de doenças que causam vasculopatia oclusiva. Logo, todo paciente deve ser investigado para presença de anticorpo antifosfolípide ou de outra causa de trombofilia.Livedoid microangiopathy is a chronic segmental hyalinizing syndrome of dermal blood vessels, of unknown origin, that affects mainly the lower limbs. Histopathologically, both initial as well as late lesion are characterized by few inflammatory cells infiltrate, with prevalent capillary angiogenesis and microthrombi, agglomerate of small capillaries, and dermal deposits of hemosiderin. The absence of a substantial perivascular infiltrate or leukocytoclasia

  11. Extensive lake sediment coring survey on Sub-Antarctic Indian Ocean Kerguelen Archipelago (French Austral and Antarctic Lands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Fabien; Fanget, Bernard; Malet, Emmanuel; Poulenard, Jérôme; Støren, Eivind; Leloup, Anouk; Bakke, Jostein; Sabatier, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Recent paleo-studies revealed climatic southern high latitude climate evolution patterns that are crucial to understand the global climate evolution(1,2). Among others the strength and north-south shifts of westerlies wind appeared to be a key parameter(3). However, virtually no lands are located south of the 45th South parallel between Southern Georgia (60°W) and New Zealand (170°E) precluding the establishment of paleoclimate records of past westerlies dynamics. Located around 50°S and 70°E, lost in the middle of the sub-Antarctic Indian Ocean, Kerguelen archipelago is a major, geomorphologically complex, land-mass that is covered by hundreds lakes of various sizes. It hence offers a unique opportunity to reconstruct past climate and environment dynamics in a region where virtually nothing is known about it, except the remarkable recent reconstructions based on a Lateglacial peatbog sequence(4). During the 2014-2015 austral summer, a French-Norwegian team led the very first extensive lake sediment coring survey on Kerguelen Archipelago under the umbrella of the PALAS program supported by the French Polar Institute (IPEV). Two main areas were investigated: i) the southwest of the mainland, so-called Golfe du Morbihan, where glaciers are currently absent and ii) the northernmost Kerguelen mainland peninsula so-called Loranchet, where cirque glaciers are still present. This double-target strategy aims at reconstructing various independent indirect records of precipitation (glacier advance, flood dynamics) and wind speed (marine spray chemical species, wind-borne terrigenous input) to tackle the Holocene climate variability. Despite particularly harsh climate conditions and difficult logistics matters, we were able to core 6 lake sediment sites: 5 in Golfe du Morbihan and one in Loranchet peninsula. Among them two sequences taken in the 4km-long Lake Armor using a UWITEC re-entry piston coring system by 20 and 100m water-depth (6 and 7m-long, respectively). One

  12. Long-term variability of iron supply, marine export production, and sea surface temperature in the subantarctic Atlantic, implications for atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Garcia, A.; Rosell-Mele, A.; Geibert, W.; Gersonde, R.; Masque, P.; Gaspari, V.; Barbante, C.

    2008-12-01

    Paleoclimatic reconstructions have provided a unique dataset to test the sensitivity of climate system to changes in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, the mechanisms behind glacial/interglacial (G/IG) variations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations observed in the Antarctic ice cores over the last 800 ky are still not completely understood. Here we present a multiproxy dataset of sea surface temperatures (SST), dust and iron supply, and marine export production, from the marine sediment core PS2489-2/ODP Site 1090 located in the subantarctic Atlantic (SA). This dataset allows us to evaluate various hypotheses focussing on the role of the Southern Ocean (SO) in modulating atmospheric CO2 over the last 800ky, and provides new information on SST, dust, and export production back to the Pliocene. The close correlation observed between iron inputs and marine export production in our record suggests that the process of iron fertilization has been a recurrent process operating in the SA over the G/IG cycles of the last 1.1 My. However, our data indicates that marine productivity in the present Subantarctic Zone can only explain a fraction of atmospheric CO2 changes occurring at glacial maxima in each glacial stage. Moreover, the good correlation of our SST to the EPICA Dome C records (EDC) temperature reconstruction over the last 800ka, suggest that physical processes, possibly related to changes in Antarctic sea-ice extent, surface water stratification and westerly winds position have also played an important role in modulating atmospheric CO2 over the last 800ky. On the long-term, our paleo-SST record reveals a major cooling event around 1.2-1.5 Ma that may have caused a profound impact on atmospheric CO2 and hence in the transition to a 100 kyr world during the Middle Pleistocene Climatic Transition.

  13. Organic matter characterization and decomposition dynamics in sub-Antarctic streams impacted by invasive beavers Caracterización de la materia orgánica y la dinámica de descomposición en arroyos subantárticos impactados por castores invasores

    OpenAIRE

    Erica Ulloa; Anderson, Christopher B.; Marcelo Ardón; Silvia Murcia; Alejandro E.J Valenzuela

    2012-01-01

    Despite being a relatively remote and well conserved area, the sub-Antarctic ecoregion faces pressing global threats from climate change, the ozone hole and introduced species. Its freshwater ecosystems are one of the least studied components of this biome, but they are known to confront a host of invasive taxa including trout and beavers. We set out to understand the basic characterization and dynamics of organic matter processing and decomposition in sub-Antarctic streams under natural fore...

  14. Io in Front of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Jupiter's four largest satellites, including Io, the golden ornament in front of Jupiter in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, have fascinated Earthlings ever since Galileo Galilei discovered them in 1610 in one of his first astronomical uses of the telescope.Images from Cassini that will be released over the next several days capture each of the four Galilean satellites in their orbits around the giant planet.This true-color composite frame, made from narrow angle images taken on Dec. 12, 2000, captures Io and its shadow in transit against the disk of Jupiter. The distance of the spacecraft from Jupiter was 19.5 million kilometers (12.1 million miles). The image scale is 117 kilometers (73 miles) per pixel.The entire body of Io, about the size of Earth's Moon, is periodically flexed as it speeds around Jupiter and feels, as a result of its non-circular orbit, the periodically changing gravitational pull of the planet. The heat arising in Io's interior from this continual flexure makes it the most volcanically active body in the solar system, with more than 100 active volcanoes. The white and reddish colors on its surface are due to the presence of different sulfurous materials. The black areas are silicate rocks.Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  15. Blocking-resistant communication through domain fronting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fifield David

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe “domain fronting,” a versatile censorship circumvention technique that hides the remote endpoint of a communication. Domain fronting works at the application layer, using HTTPS, to communicate with a forbidden host while appearing to communicate with some other host, permitted by the censor. The key idea is the use of different domain names at different layers of communication. One domain appears on the “outside” of an HTTPS request—in the DNS request and TLS Server Name Indication—while another domain appears on the “inside”—in the HTTP Host header, invisible to the censor under HTTPS encryption. A censor, unable to distinguish fronted and nonfronted traffic to a domain, must choose between allowing circumvention traffic and blocking the domain entirely, which results in expensive collateral damage. Domain fronting is easy to deploy and use and does not require special cooperation by network intermediaries. We identify a number of hard-to-block web services, such as content delivery networks, that support domain-fronted connections and are useful for censorship circumvention. Domain fronting, in various forms, is now a circumvention workhorse. We describe several months of deployment experience in the Tor, Lantern, and Psiphon circumvention systems, whose domain-fronting transports now connect thousands of users daily and transfer many terabytes per month.

  16. Ultrashort-pulse wave-front autocorrelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwald, R; Neumann, U; Griebner, U; Reimann, K; Steinmeyer, G; Kebbel, V

    2003-12-01

    Combined spatially resolved collinear autocorrelation and Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensing of femtosecond laser pulses is demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge. The beam is divided into multiple nondiffracting subbeams by thin-film micro-optical arrays. With hybrid refractive-reflective silica/silver microaxicons, wave-front autocorrelation is performed in oblique-angle reflection. Simultaneous two-dimensional detection of local temporal structure and wave-front tilt of propagating few-cycle wave packets is demonstrated.

  17. Pressure transient method for front tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, S.M.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1983-08-01

    A pressure transient technique for tracking the advance of cold water fronts during water flooding and goethermal injection operations has been developed. The technique is based on the concept that the steady state pressure buildup in the reservoir region inside the front can be calculated by a fluid skin factor. By analyzing successive pressure falloff tests, the advance of the front in the reservoir can be monitored. The validity of the methods is demonstrated by application to three numerically simulated data sets, a nonisothermal step-rate injection test, a series of pressure falloffs in a multilayered reservoir, and a series of pressure falloff tests in a water flooded oil reservoir.

  18. Frontón en Lezkairu

    OpenAIRE

    Legarra Arizaleta, Xabier

    2010-01-01

    El objetivo del proyecto es el diseño, cálculo y presupuestado de un frontón cubierto de 36 metros de longitud, con sus correspondientes gradas, instalaciones y aparcamientos en el nuevo barrio pamplonés de Lezkairu. El frontón propuesto está destinado a un uso público debido a la gran demanda que nace en relación a la pelota, y sus diferentes modalidades así como la carencia de más infraestructuras de este tipo. Cabe destacar que las características y medidas del frontón lo ...

  19. LBNL delivers front end of SNS

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, R

    2002-01-01

    After four years of construction, the linear accelerator injector that will form the front end of the US SNS has been commissioned at LBNL. Fulfilling all its major design requirements and performing reliably, the system was shipped by July.

  20. Managing Controversies in the Fuzzy Front End

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, John K.; Gasparin, Marta

    2016-01-01

    This research investigates the controversies that emerge in the fuzzy front end (FFE) and how they are closed so the innovation process can move on. The fuzzy front has been characterized in the literature as a very critical phase, but controversies in the FFE have not been studied before....... The analysis investigates the microprocesses around the controversies that emerge during the fuzzy front end of four products. Five different types of controversies are identified: profit, production, design, brand and customers/market. Each controversy represents a threat, but also an opportunity to search...... demonstrates how the fuzzy front requires managers to deal with controversies that emerge from many different places and involve both human and non-human actors. Closing the controversies requires managers to take account of the situation, identify the problem that needs to be addressed, and initiate a search...

  1. Perturbative High Harmonic Wave Front Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengyan; Brown, Graham; Ko, Dong Hyuk; Kong, Fanqi; Arissian, Ladan; Corkum, P B

    2017-01-20

    We pattern the wave front of a high harmonic beam by intersecting the intense driving laser pulse that generates the high harmonic with a weak control pulse. To illustrate the potential of wave-front control, we imprint a Fresnel zone plate pattern on a harmonic beam, causing the harmonics to focus and defocus. The quality of the focus that we achieve is measured using the spectral wave-front optical reconstruction by diffraction method. We will show that it is possible to enhance the peak intensity by orders of magnitude without a physical optical element in the path of the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) beam. Through perturbative wave-front control, XUV beams can be created with a flexibility approaching what technology allows for visible and infrared light.

  2. Light front distribution of the chiral condensate

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chang, Lei; Roberts, Craig D; Schmidt, Sebastian M

    2013-01-01

    The pseudoscalar projection of the pionE1/4s Poincare-covariant Bethe-Salpeter amplitude onto the light-front may be understood to provide the probability distribution of the chiral condensate within the pion...

  3. Reaction-diffusion fronts under stochastic advection

    CERN Document Server

    Martí, A C; Sancho, J M

    1997-01-01

    We study front propagation in stirred media using a simplified modelization of the turbulent flow. Computer simulations reveal the existence of the two limiting propagation modes observed in recent experiments with liquid phase isothermal reactions. These two modes respectively correspond to a wrinkled although sharp propagating interface and to a broadened one. Specific laws relative to the enhancement of the front velocity in each regime are confirmed by our simulations.

  4. Description of Pseudingolfiella possessionis n. sp. (Crustacea, Amphipoda) from sub-Antarctic Île de La Possession, Crozet archipelago: the second freshwater amphipod known from the Antarctic biome, a human introduction of Gondwanan ancestry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smet, Willem H De

    2015-03-31

    A new species of freshwater amphipod, Pseudingolfiella possessionis n. sp. (Senticaudata, Pseudingolfiellidae), is described from the submerged moss vegetation of small brooklets at sub-Antarctic Île de La Possession, Crozet archipelago. It constitutes the second freshwater amphipod species known for the sub-Antarctic and Antarctic region, and the fourth member of the genus. The main characters distinguishing it from all congeners are: the spine on the posterior margin of the dactylus, incisor and lamina mobilis of mandible each with 5 teeth, the setation of the maxilliped, the vestigial second article of pleopod 3 in the female, the undulate and laterally notched posterolateral margin of the external ramus of uropods 1 and 2 in the male, the spinulate dorsomedian projection of the telson.

  5. The impact of informal irrigation practices on soil drainage condition, soil pollution and land suitability for agriculture in El Saf area of El Giza Governorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan E.M. El Azab

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study area was selected in El Saf District of El Giza Governorate in Egypt, covering 21461.4 ha of Nile sediments and their outskirts of alluvial higher and lower terraces. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of informal irrigation practices on drainage deterioration, soil pollution and land suitability for agricultural use using the satellite LDCM data 2013. From the lower alluvial terraces (partly cultivated using wastewater, the drainage flows westward via descending slopes resulting in land deterioration in both the alluvial lower terraces and alluvial plain of River Nile. The drainage conditions are excessively drained soils in the alluvial upper terraces within soils of Typic Haplocalcids, sandy skeletal, but in the lower terraces it partly occurred within soils of Typic Torriorthents, sandy skeletal. Moderately well drained soils occurred in soils of Typic Torriorthents, sandy in the alluvial lower terraces, while in the alluvial plain of Nile sediments are Sodic Haplotorrerts, fine. Poorly drained soils in the lower alluvial terraces have soils of Typic Epiaquents, sandy associated with Sodic Psammaquents and Aquic Haplocalcids, coarse loamy, while in the alluvial plain of River Nile the soils are Halic Epiaquerts, fine. Very poorly drained soils (submerged areas are scattered spots in both the lower alluvial terraces and the alluvial plain. In the alluvial plain of River Nile, 1967.1 ha become not suitable for the traditional cultivated crops, while in the alluvial terraces 3251.0 ha are not suitable for the proposed cultivation of Jojoba plants. Heavy metals of Cadmium (Cd, Cobalt (Co, Lead (Pb and Nickel (Ni were added to the soil surface and sub-surface in the irrigated areas by wastewater in the lower alluvial terraces (moderately well drained soils, but Cd and Co exceeded the standards of permissible total concentrations in these soils. The same metals were added to soil sub-surface layers in the alluvial plain

  6. Être un maire socialiste en Méditerranée coloniale : Beni-Saf entre Algérie, France et Espagne (1929-1939)

    OpenAIRE

    Marynower, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Cet article est consacré à la vie politique de Beni-Saf, petite ville de création coloniale située dans le département d’Oran. À travers la figure de son maire socialiste, il restitue un ensemble de dynamiques que connait, plus largement, l’Algérie dans les années 1930 : implantation du socialisme français en milieu colonial, manœuvres de l’administration contre les partis de gauche, modes de mobilisation et de contestation empruntant à diverses cultures populaires européennes, sur un registr...

  7. La communication interne et le changement organisationnel en entreprise "Essai d'analyse à travers l'entreprise de la cimenterie de Béni-saf (S.CI.BS.)

    OpenAIRE

    Mahboub, Leila

    2014-01-01

    La premiére partie fait le point sur le développement de l'organisation du travail et son développement au coeur de l'organisation, puis les effets de la communication interne au service de l'entreprise et aprés la réflexion stratégique. et la deuxiéme partie sera resérve à l'étude empirique menée au prés du personnel de la société de la cimenterie de Béni-saf .

  8. Caracterización dinámica de los cambios microestructurales en barras de aceros dúplex SAF 2205 utilizando la dimensión de información

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez, Edda; Suárez, Kleydis; Amorer, Luis; Silva, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the ultrasonic signals behavior of a duplex stainless steel SAF 2205 (UNS S31803) after aging treatments at 875 and 950 °C. The first treatment promotes the precipitation of the sigma phase and the second, its dissolution. The microstructural evaluation was carried out by optical microscopy. The results showed an increase of the sigma phase fraction and the secondary austenite with the time of aging treatment at 875 °C. On the other hand, increasing the time of treatment ...

  9. QCD and Light-Front Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins /Costa Rica U.

    2011-01-10

    AdS/QCD, the correspondence between theories in a dilaton-modified five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space and confining field theories in physical space-time, provides a remarkable semiclassical model for hadron physics. Light-front holography allows hadronic amplitudes in the AdS fifth dimension to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time. The result is a single-variable light-front Schroedinger equation which determines the eigenspectrum and the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons for general spin and orbital angular momentum. The coordinate z in AdS space is uniquely identified with a Lorentz-invariant coordinate {zeta} which measures the separation of the constituents within a hadron at equal light-front time and determines the off-shell dynamics of the bound state wavefunctions as a function of the invariant mass of the constituents. The hadron eigenstates generally have components with different orbital angular momentum; e.g., the proton eigenstate in AdS/QCD with massless quarks has L = 0 and L = 1 light-front Fock components with equal probability. Higher Fock states with extra quark-anti quark pairs also arise. The soft-wall model also predicts the form of the nonperturbative effective coupling and its {beta}-function. The AdS/QCD model can be systematically improved by using its complete orthonormal solutions to diagonalize the full QCD light-front Hamiltonian or by applying the Lippmann-Schwinger method to systematically include QCD interaction terms. Some novel features of QCD are discussed, including the consequences of confinement for quark and gluon condensates. A method for computing the hadronization of quark and gluon jets at the amplitude level is outlined.

  10. Pareto fronts in clinical practice for pinnacle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Tomas; van Kesteren, Zdenko; Franssen, Gijs; Damen, Eugène; van Vliet, Corine

    2013-03-01

    Our aim was to develop a framework to objectively perform treatment planning studies using Pareto fronts. The Pareto front represents all optimal possible tradeoffs among several conflicting criteria and is an ideal tool with which to study the possibilities of a given treatment technique. The framework should require minimal user interaction and should resemble and be applicable to daily clinical practice. To generate the Pareto fronts, we used the native scripting language of Pinnacle(3) (Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA). The framework generates thousands of plans automatically from which the Pareto front is generated. As an example, the framework is applied to compare intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for prostate cancer patients. For each patient and each technique, 3000 plans are generated, resulting in a total of 60,000 plans. The comparison is based on 5-dimensional Pareto fronts. Generating 3000 plans for 10 patients in parallel requires on average 96 h for IMRT and 483 hours for VMAT. Using VMAT, compared to IMRT, the maximum dose of the boost PTV was reduced by 0.4 Gy (P=.074), the mean dose in the anal sphincter by 1.6 Gy (P=.055), the conformity index of the 95% isodose (CI(95%)) by 0.02 (P=.005), and the rectal wall V(65 Gy) by 1.1% (P=.008). We showed the feasibility of automatically generating Pareto fronts with Pinnacle(3). Pareto fronts provide a valuable tool for performing objective comparative treatment planning studies. We compared VMAT with IMRT in prostate patients and found VMAT had a dosimetric advantage over IMRT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Light-Front Holography and the Light-Front Schrodinger Equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy

    2012-08-15

    One of the most important nonperturbative methods for solving QCD is quantization at fixed light-front time {tau} = t+z=c - Dirac's 'Front Form'. The eigenvalues of the light-front QCD Hamiltonian predict the hadron spectrum and the eigensolutions provide the light-front wavefunctions which describe hadron structure. More generally, we show that the valence Fock-state wavefunctions of the light-front QCD Hamiltonian satisfy a single-variable relativistic equation of motion, analogous to the nonrelativistic radial Schrodinger equation, with an effective confining potential U which systematically incorporates the effects of higher quark and gluon Fock states. We outline a method for computing the required potential from first principles in QCD. The holographic mapping of gravity in AdS space to QCD, quantized at fixed light-front time, yields the same light front Schrodinger equation; in fact, the soft-wall AdS/QCD approach provides a model for the light-front potential which is color-confining and reproduces well the light-hadron spectrum. One also derives via light-front holography a precise relation between the bound-state amplitudes in the fifth dimension of AdS space and the boost-invariant light-front wavefunctions describing the internal structure of hadrons in physical space-time. The elastic and transition form factors of the pion and the nucleons are found to be well described in this framework. The light-front AdS/QCD holographic approach thus gives a frame-independent first approximation of the color-confining dynamics, spectroscopy, and excitation spectra of relativistic light-quark bound states in QCD.

  12. Analytical and numerical modeling of front propagation and interaction of fronts in nonlinear thermoviscous

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Anders Rønne; Sørensen, Mads Peter; Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich

    2008-01-01

    , the model equation considered here is capable to describe waves propagating in opposite directions. Owing to the Hamiltonian structure of the proposed model equation, the front solution is in agreement with the classical Rankine Hugoniot relations. The exact front solution propagates at supersonic speed...

  13. On Front Slope Stability of Berm Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.

    2013-01-01

    The short communication presents application of the conventional Van der Meer stability formula for low-crested breakwaters for the prediction of front slope erosion of statically stable berm breakwaters with relatively high berms. The method is verified (Burcharth, 2008) by comparison...... test results including tests presented in Sigurdarson and Van der Meer (2011) are discussed. A proposal is presented for performance of new model tests with the purpose of developing more accurate formulae for the prediction of front slope erosion as a function of front slope, relative berm height......, relative berm width, method of armour stone placement, and hydraulic parameters. The formulae should cover the structure range from statically stable berm breakwaters to conventional double layer armoured breakwaters....

  14. Optimal back-to-front airplane boarding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmat, Eitan; Khachaturov, Vassilii; Kuperman, Ran

    2013-06-01

    The problem of finding an optimal back-to-front airplane boarding policy is explored, using a mathematical model that is related to the 1+1 polynuclear growth model with concave boundary conditions and to causal sets in gravity. We study all airplane configurations and boarding group sizes. Optimal boarding policies for various airplane configurations are presented. Detailed calculations are provided along with simulations that support the main conclusions of the theory. We show that the effectiveness of back-to-front policies undergoes a phase transition when passing from lightly congested airplanes to heavily congested airplanes. The phase transition also affects the nature of the optimal or near-optimal policies. Under what we consider to be realistic conditions, optimal back-to-front policies lead to a modest 8-12% improvement in boarding time over random (no policy) boarding, using two boarding groups. Having more than two groups is not effective.

  15. TopN-Pareto Front Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-12-21

    The JMP Add-In TopN-PFS provides an automated tool for finding layered Pareto front to identify the top N solutions from an enumerated list of candidates subject to optimizing multiple criteria. The approach constructs the N layers of Pareto fronts, and then provides a suite of graphical tools to explore the alternatives based on different prioritizations of the criteria. The tool is designed to provide a set of alternatives from which the decision-maker can select the best option for their study goals.

  16. Pole solutions for flame front propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Kupervasser, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    This book deals with solving mathematically the unsteady flame propagation equations. New original mathematical methods for solving complex non-linear equations and investigating their properties are presented. Pole solutions for flame front propagation are developed. Premixed flames and filtration combustion have remarkable properties: the complex nonlinear integro-differential equations for these problems have exact analytical solutions described by the motion of poles in a complex plane. Instead of complex equations, a finite set of ordinary differential equations is applied. These solutions help to investigate analytically and numerically properties of the flame front propagation equations.

  17. RF front-end world class designs

    CERN Document Server

    Love, Janine

    2009-01-01

    All the design and development inspiration and direction a harware engineer needs in one blockbuster book! Janine Love site editor for RF Design Line,columnist, and author has selected the very best RF design material from the Newnes portfolio and has compiled it into this volume. The result is a book covering the gamut of RF front end design from antenna and filter design fundamentals to optimized layout techniques with a strong pragmatic emphasis. In addition to specific design techniques and practices, this book also discusses various approaches to solving RF front end design problems and h

  18. New findings and a new species of the genus Ammothea (Pycnogonida, Ammotheidae), with an updated identification key to all Antarctic and sub-Antarctic species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Sánchez, E.; López-González, P. J.

    2014-03-01

    Specimens of the pycnogonid genus Ammothea collected during the Polarstern cruise XXIII/8 (23 November 2006-30 January 2007) were studied. Nine species were recognized in this collection: Ammothea bentartica, A. bicorniculata, A. carolinensis, A. clausi, A. longispina, A. minor, A. spinosa, A. striata and A. tibialis. Three of them ( A. bentartica, A. bicorniculata and A. tibialis) are reported for the second time, enlarging their known geographical and bathymetric range. In the present contribution, the observed morphological variability of all collected Ammothea species is described and discussed. For the identification and description of the material, different museum specimens were consulted. Among them, we have consulted part of the Discovery collection housed at the Natural History Museum in London. That material was initially identified by Isabella Gordon, a reputed author in the field of pycnogonid taxonomy. A new species, based on a museum specimen previously highly confused in the literature, is proposed in the present contribution as Ammothea isabellae n. sp. The new taxon is compared with its closest congeners, especially with A. longispina and A. stylirostris. Finally, we propose an updated dichotomous key to species covering all currently known Antarctic and sub-Antarctic Ammothea species.

  19. Recovering greater fungal diversity from pristine and diesel fuel contaminated Sub-Antarctic soil through cultivation using a high and a novel low nutrient approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Carlene Ferrari

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Novel cultivation strategies for bacteria are widespread and are well described for recovering greater diversity from the hitherto unculturable majority. While similar approaches have not been demonstrated for fungi it has been suggested that of the 1.5 million estimated species less than 5% have been recovered into pure culture. Fungi are known to be involved in many degradative processes, including the breakdown of hydrocarbons, and it has been speculated that in Polar Regions they contribute significantly to bioremediation of soils contaminated with hydrocarbons. Given the biotechnological potential of fungi there is a need to increase efforts for greater species recovery, particularly from extreme environments such as sub-Antarctic Macquarie Island. In this study, like the hitherto unculturable bacteria, high concentrations of nutrients selected for predominantly different species to that recovered using low nutrient media. By combining both approaches to cultivation from contaminated and non-contaminated soils, 99 fungal species were recovered, including 42 yet unidentified species, several of which were isolated from soils containing high concentrations of diesel fuel. These novel species will now be characterized for their potential role in hydrocarbon degradation.

  20. Extraction and characterization of collagen from Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic squid and its potential application in hybrid scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Rui C G; Marques, Ana L P; Oliveira, Sara M; Diogo, Gabriela S; Pirraco, Rogério P; Moreira-Silva, Joana; Xavier, José C; Reis, Rui L; Silva, Tiago H; Mano, João F

    2017-09-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein found in mammals and it exhibits a low immunogenicity, high biocompatibility and biodegradability when compared with others natural polymers. For this reason, it has been explored for the development of biologically instructive biomaterials with applications for tissue substitution and regeneration. Marine origin collagen has been pursued as an alternative to the more common bovine and porcine origins. This study focused on squid (Teuthoidea: Cephalopoda), particularly the Antarctic squid Kondakovia longimana and the Sub-Antarctic squid Illex argentinus as potential collagen sources. In this study, collagen has been isolated from the skins of the squids using acid-based and pepsin-based protocols, with the higher yield being obtained from I. argentinus in the presence of pepsin. The produced collagen has been characterized in terms of physicochemical properties, evidencing an amino acid profile similar to the one of calf collagen, but exhibiting a less preserved structure, with hydrolyzed portions and a lower melting temperature. Pepsin-soluble collagen isolated from I. argentinus was selected for further evaluation of biomedical potential, exploring its incorporation on poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) 3D printed scaffolds for the development of hybrid scaffolds for tissue engineering, exhibiting hierarchical features. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Recovering greater fungal diversity from pristine and diesel fuel contaminated sub-antarctic soil through cultivation using both a high and a low nutrient media approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Belinda C; Zhang, Chengdong; van Dorst, Josie

    2011-01-01

    Novel cultivation strategies for bacteria are widespread and well described for recovering greater diversity from the "hitherto" unculturable majority. While similar approaches have not yet been demonstrated for fungi it has been suggested that of the 1.5 million estimated species less than 5% have been recovered into pure culture. Fungi are known to be involved in many degradative processes, including the breakdown of petroleum hydrocarbons, and it has been speculated that in Polar Regions they contribute significantly to bioremediation of contaminated soils. Given the biotechnological potential of fungi there is a need to increase efforts for greater species recovery, particularly from extreme environments such as sub-Antarctic Macquarie Island. In this study, like the yet-to-be cultured bacteria, high concentrations of nutrients selected for predominantly different fungal species to that recovered using a low nutrient media. By combining both media approaches to the cultivation of fungi from contaminated and non-contaminated soils, 91 fungal species were recovered, including 63 unidentified species. A preliminary biodegradation activity assay on a selection of isolates found that a high proportion of novel and described fungal species from a range of soil samples were capable of hydrocarbon degradation and should be characterized further.

  2. Silicic acid enrichment of subantarctic surface water from continental inputs along the Patagonian archipelago interior sea (41-56°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Rodrigo; Silva, Nelson; Reid, Brian; Frangopulos, Máximo

    2014-12-01

    We estimated Si∗, the surplus or deficit of orthosilicic acid (DSi) relative to nitrate available for diatom growth, in the Chilean Patagonian Archipelago Interior Sea (PAIS). Si∗ and salinity were negatively correlated in the PAIS because of the mixing of high nitrate, low DSi subantarctic surface water and high DSi, low nitrate continental freshwater runoff. Both the slope and the intercept of this relationship decreased from northern to southern Patagonia, which was likely a consequence of reduced DSi inputs from several overlapping hydrological, biological and geological drivers along this gradient. In general, lower freshwater DSi concentrations were expected below 46°S, and a lower total DSi load was expected from reduced runoff below 51°S. The north-south decreasing DSi concentration trend may be linked to dilutions from a higher proportion of runoff in latitudes with higher precipitation rates (45-53°S), the transition to more resistant granitic rocks and glacial melt-water from the Northern and Southern Patagonia Ice Fields (46-51°S) and a reduced density of volcanoes active during the Holocene (48-56°S). The intensification of a southward DSi deficit may be a forcing factor involved in the reported southward reductions in plankton biomass and a more frequent occurrence of non-diatom blooms in southern PAIS.

  3. Phenomena of insulin peak fronting in size exclusion chromatography and strategies to reduce fronting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chi-Ming; Mun, Sungyong; Wang, Nien-Hwa Linda

    2008-05-23

    Insulin peak fronting in size exclusion chromatography (SEC) results in more than 10% yield loss in the production of insulin. The goal of this study is to understand the mechanisms of peak fronting and to develop strategies to reduce fronting and increase insulin yield. Chromatography experiments ruled out pressure surge, viscous fingering, and adsorption as the cause for peak fronting. Theoretical analysis based on a general rate model indicated that reversible dimerization is the major cause for peak fronting and reducing the dimerization equilibrium constant is the most effective method for reducing fronting. Two strategies were developed and tested to reduce the degree of dimer formation. The first strategy was to use 0.1N acetic acid as the presaturant and eluent. The second strategy was to use 0.8 or 2.8N acetic acid in 20vol.% denatured ethanol as the mobile phase. The experimental results showed that both strategies can reduce insulin peak fronting in SEC, maintain desired product purity, and increase insulin yield to higher than 98%.

  4. On Multiple Questions and Multiple WH Fronting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudin, Catherine

    An analysis of languages with multiple fronting of WH words (who, what, whom, etc.) looks in detail at Polish, Serbo-Croatian, Czech, Bulgarian (Slavic languages), and Romanian (a Romance language). In spite of their superficial similarity, the Slavic and East European languages that normally put all WH words at the beginning of clauses fall into…

  5. "All Quiet on the Western Front."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderquist, Alisa

    Based on Erich Maria Remarque's novel "All Quiet on the Western Front" and other war literature, this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that works of art about war can call up strong emotions in readers; and that the writing process can be applied to writing poems. The main activity of the lesson involves…

  6. Light-Front Dynamics in Hadron Physics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ji, C.R.; Bakker, B.L.G.; Choi, H.M.

    2013-01-01

    Light-front dynamics(LFD) plays an important role in the analyses of relativistic few-body systems. As evidenced from the recent studies of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) in hadron physics, a natural framework for a detailed study of hadron structures is LFD due to its direct application in

  7. Displacement Processes in Stable Drainage Fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, S. J.; Pride, S. R.; Manga, M.

    2016-12-01

    Drainage fronts are stabilized at large bond number, when a low density nonwetting fluid displaces a high density wetting fluid from above. This is an ideal flow scenario for studying the correspondence between pore scale processes and continuum models because the front is a persistent macroscale feature that is propagated by discrete, multiplepore scale displacements. We present new observations of stable air/water drainage in thin, threedimensional, poured bead packs at varying capillary number. With backlighting and a high speed camera, we observe short range front velocities that are an order of magnitude larger than bulk pore velocity, consistent with previous studies in ordered 2D structures. We also quantify displacement lengths and front width. For comparison to continuum simulations, we measure saturation by light transmission continuously over a series of 1 cm length voxels. We focus on the critical nonwetting saturation (CNS, or "emergence point") at which voxels are percolated by air and continuum air permeability becomes nonzero. We find that mean CNS is capillary number dependent even at large bond number, with larger CNS at lower capillary number. Continuum simulations with an equivalent discretization demonstrate that CNS is a significant source of uncertainty for predictions of the time and saturation profile at chamber-length air breakthrough.

  8. Teaching Front Handsprings from a Developmental Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stork, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The front handspring is an important gymnastics skill that serves as a transition from beginner-level rolling and static balances to more advanced tumbling. It is, therefore, a skill highly desired by beginners. Early learning requires a great deal of effort during which students experience many failed attempts. Unless they are highly motivated,…

  9. Discretionary Power on the Front-line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanden, Guro Refsum; Lønsmann, Dorte

    and document data, our findings show that employees face a number of different language boundaries in their everyday work, and that ad hoc and informal solutions in many cases are vital for successful cross-language communication. We introduce the concept of ‘discretionary power’ to explain how and why front...

  10. Front-end conceptual platform modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guðlaugsson, Tómas Vignir; Ravn, Poul Martin; Mortensen, Niels Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Platform thinking has been the subject of investigation and deployment in many projects in both academia and industry. Most contributions involve the restructuring of product programs, and only a few support front-end development of a new platform in parallel with technology development. This con......Platform thinking has been the subject of investigation and deployment in many projects in both academia and industry. Most contributions involve the restructuring of product programs, and only a few support front-end development of a new platform in parallel with technology development....... This contribution deals with the development of product platforms in front-end projects and introduces a modeling tool: the Conceptual Product Platform model. State of the art within platform modeling forms the base of a modeling formalism for a Conceptual Product Platform model. The modeling formalism is explored...... through an example and applied in a case in which the Conceptual Product Platform model has supported the front-end development of a platform for an electro-active polymer technology. The case describes the contents of the model and how its application supported the development work in the project...

  11. Front-end electronics for imaging detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Geronimo, G D; Radeka, V; Yu, B

    2001-01-01

    Front-end electronics for imaging detectors with large numbers of pixels (10 sup 5 -10 sup 7) is reviewed. The noise limits as a function of detector capacitance and power dissipation are presented for CMOS technology. Active matrix flat panel imagers (AMFPIs) are discussed and their potential noise performance is illustrated.

  12. QCD and Light-Front Holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2010-10-27

    The soft-wall AdS/QCD model, modified by a positive-sign dilaton metric, leads to a remarkable one-parameter description of nonperturbative hadron dynamics. The model predicts a zero-mass pion for zero-mass quarks and a Regge spectrum of linear trajectories with the same slope in the leading orbital angular momentum L of hadrons and the radial quantum number N. Light-Front Holography maps the amplitudes which are functions of the fifth dimension variable z of anti-de Sitter space to a corresponding hadron theory quantized on the light front. The resulting Lorentz-invariant relativistic light-front wave equations are functions of an invariant impact variable {zeta} which measures the separation of the quark and gluonic constituents within the hadron at equal light-front time. The result is to a semi-classical frame-independent first approximation to the spectra and light-front wavefunctions of meson and baryon light-quark bound states, which in turn predict the behavior of the pion and nucleon form factors. The theory implements chiral symmetry in a novel way: the effects of chiral symmetry breaking increase as one goes toward large interquark separation, consistent with spectroscopic data, and the the hadron eigenstates generally have components with different orbital angular momentum; e.g., the proton eigenstate in AdS/QCD with massless quarks has L = 0 and L = 1 light-front Fock components with equal probability. The soft-wall model also predicts the form of the non-perturbative effective coupling {alpha}{sub s}{sup AdS} (Q) and its {beta}-function which agrees with the effective coupling {alpha}{sub g1} extracted from the Bjorken sum rule. The AdS/QCD model can be systematically improved by using its complete orthonormal solutions to diagonalize the full QCD light-front Hamiltonian or by applying the Lippmann-Schwinger method in order to systematically include the QCD interaction terms. A new perspective on quark and gluon condensates is also reviewed.

  13. Light-Front Holography, Light-Front Wavefunctions, and Novel QCD Phenomena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodsky, S. J.; de Teramond, G. F.

    2012-01-01

    -classical frame-independent first approximation to the spectra and light-front wavefunctions of meson and baryons. The model predicts a Regge spectrum of linear trajectories with the same slope in the leading orbital angular momentum L of hadrons and the radial quantum number n. The hadron eigensolutions...... the eigenspectrum and the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons for general spin and orbital angular momentum. The coordinate z in AdS space is uniquely identified with a Lorentz-invariant coordinate zeta which measures the separation of the constituents within a hadron at equal light-front time and determines...

  14. QCD Phenomenology and Light-Front Wavefunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2001-11-21

    A natural calculus for describing the bound-state structure of relativistic composite systems in quantum field theory is the light-front Fock expansion which encodes the properties of a hadrons in terms of a set of frame-independent n-particle wavefunctions. Light-front quantization in the doubly-transverse light-cone gauge has a number of remarkable advantages, including explicit unitarity, a physical Fock expansion, the absence of ghost degrees of freedom, and the decoupling properties needed to prove factorization theorems in high momentum transfer inclusive and exclusive reactions. A number of applications are discussed in these lectures, including semileptonic B decays, two-photon exclusive reactions, diffractive dissociation into jets, and deeply virtual Compton scattering. The relation of the intrinsic sea to the light-front wavefunctions is discussed. Light-front quantization can also be used in the Hamiltonian form to construct an event generator for high energy physics reactions at the amplitude level. The light-cone partition function, summed over exponentially weighted light-cone energies, has simple boost properties which may be useful for studies in heavy ion collisions. I also review recent work which shows that the structure functions measured in deep inelastic lepton scattering are affected by final-state rescattering, thus modifying their connection to light-front probability distributions. In particular, the shadowing of nuclear structure functions is due to destructive interference effects from leading-twist diffraction of the virtual photon, physics not included in the nuclear light-cone wavefunctions.

  15. Mineral replacement front propagation in deformed rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Nicolas; Koehn, Daniel; Kelka, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Fluid migrations are a major agent of contaminant transport leading to mineral replacement in rocks, impacting their properties as porosity, permeability, and rheology. Understanding the physical and chemical mechanisms that govern mineralogical replacement during and after deformation is required to better understand complex interplays between fluid and rocks that are involved in faulting, seismic cycle, and resource distribution in the upper crust. Dolomitization process related to hydrothermal fluid flow is one of the most studied and debated replacement processes in earth sciences. Dolomitization of limestone is of economic importance as well, as it stands as unconventional oil reservoirs and is systematically observed in Mississippian-Valley Type ore deposit. Despite recent breakthrough about dolomitization processes at large-scale, the small-scale propagation of the reaction front remains unclear. It is poorly documented in the occurrence of stylolites and fractures in the medium while pressure-solution and fracture network development are the most efficient deformation accomodation mechanism in limestone from early compaction to layer-parallel shortening. Thus, the impact of such network on geometry of replaced bodies and on replacement front propagation deserves specific attention. This contribution illustrates the role of fracture and stylolites on the propagation of a reaction front. In a 2 dimensional numerical model we simulate the dolomitization front propagation in a heterogeneous porous medium. The propagation of the reaction front is governed by the competition between advection and diffusion processes, and takes into account reaction rates, disorder in the location of the potential replacement seeds, and permeability heterogeneities. We add stylolites and fractures that can act as barriers or drains to fluid flow according to their orientation and mineralogical content, which can or cannot react with the contaminant. The patterns produced from

  16. Multiclass gene selection using Pareto-fronts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Jagath C; Mundra, Piyushkumar A

    2013-01-01

    Filter methods are often used for selection of genes in multiclass sample classification by using microarray data. Such techniques usually tend to bias toward a few classes that are easily distinguishable from other classes due to imbalances of strong features and sample sizes of different classes. It could therefore lead to selection of redundant genes while missing the relevant genes, leading to poor classification of tissue samples. In this manuscript, we propose to decompose multiclass ranking statistics into class-specific statistics and then use Pareto-front analysis for selection of genes. This alleviates the bias induced by class intrinsic characteristics of dominating classes. The use of Pareto-front analysis is demonstrated on two filter criteria commonly used for gene selection: F-score and KW-score. A significant improvement in classification performance and reduction in redundancy among top-ranked genes were achieved in experiments with both synthetic and real-benchmark data sets.

  17. Front contact solar cell with formed emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Peter John [Menlo Park, CA

    2012-07-17

    A bipolar solar cell includes a backside junction formed by an N-type silicon substrate and a P-type polysilicon emitter formed on the backside of the solar cell. An antireflection layer may be formed on a textured front surface of the silicon substrate. A negative polarity metal contact on the front side of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the substrate, while a positive polarity metal contact on the backside of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the polysilicon emitter. An external electrical circuit may be connected to the negative and positive metal contacts to be powered by the solar cell. The positive polarity metal contact may form an infrared reflecting layer with an underlying dielectric layer for increased solar radiation collection.

  18. Frontón en Aroztegia

    OpenAIRE

    Arraztoa Brust, Xabier

    2011-01-01

    El objetivo de este proyecto fin de carrera es el diseño global de un frontón cubierto con sus correspondientes gradas e instalaciones en el barrio Aroztegia de la localidad de Lekaroz, en el Valle de Baztán. Asimismo y respecto al cálculo estructural, se ha diseñado y calculado una estructura metálica, la cubierta y su cimentación de hormigón armado correspondiente. Cabe destacar que las características y medidas del frontón lo hacen apto para la alta competición de pelota a mano, paleta con...

  19. Laser modes with helical wave fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M.; Hill, C. A.; Tapster, P. R.; Vaughan, J. M.

    1994-04-01

    We report the operation of an argon-ion laser in pure (single-frequency) ``doughnut'' modes of order m=1, 2, and 3. The phase discontinuity at the center of these modes leads to striking two-beam interference patterns that clearly demonstrate the existence of a helical cophasal surface (wave front). The doughnut mode with m=1 (usually called TEM*01) displays a forking interference fringe pattern characteristic of a pure single helix. The m=2 mode shows a pattern with four extra prongs, establishing that the cophasal surface is a two-start or double helix; the m=3 mode is a triple helix with a six-extra-pronged pattern. Each pure doughnut mode is shown to have two possible states corresponding to output wave fronts of opposite helicity.

  20. Dispersion management of the SULF front end

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Yanqi; Xu, Yi; Liu, Zhengzheng; Lu, Jun; Li, Yanyan; Liu, Xingyan; Li, Zhaoyang; Leng, Yuxin; Li, Ruxin

    2017-04-01

    To manage dispersion of the front end in the Shanghai Superintense Ultrafast Laser Facility (SULF), which is a large-scale project aimed at delivering 10 PW laser pulses, a stretcher based on a combination of a grating and a prism (grism) pair is inserted between an Öffner-triplet-type stretcher and a regenerative amplifier to reduce high-order dispersion introduced by optical materials at the amplification stage. The alignment of the grism pair is implemented by controlling the far-field pattern of the output beam of the grism pair. The energy of the front end reaches up to 7 J at a 1-Hz repetition rate. Experimental results show that the pulse duration can be compressed to 22.4 fs and the spectral distortion over the spectrum is less than 2.25 rad.

  1. QUENCH FRONT PROPAGATION IN THE ANNULAR CHANNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Stepanek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the quench front propagation during bottom core reflooding is crucial for the effective cooling during the LOCA accident. The results presented in this paper were obtained on an experimental loop with an annular test section. The test section consists of a vertical electrically heated stainless steel tube with outer diameter 9 mm and length of 1.7 m. The heated tube is placed inside a glass tube with the inner diameter 14.5 mm. Water mass flux during the reflooding is in the range from 100 kg.m−2.s−1 up to 140 kg.m−2.s−1 and the initial wall temperature of the stainless steel tube is in the range from 250 °C up to 800 °C. The presented results show the influence of the initial conditions on the quench front propagation and the complexity of the phenomenon.

  2. Lawfare: The Legal Front of the IDF

    OpenAIRE

    Avihai Mandelblit

    2012-01-01

    Lawfare is closely linked to the theme of this issue of Military and Strategic Affairs: the challenges facing the regular armies of law-abiding nations engaged in asymmetrical confrontations in densely populated civilian urban areas. Therefore, as part of its preparations for the challenges it may have to face in the future, particularly in this type of fighting, the IDF must give the proper weight to the legal front that is likely to develop as an integral part of the same confrontation.

  3. Front roughening of flames in discrete media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Fredric; Mi, XiaoCheng; Higgins, Andrew J.

    2017-07-01

    The morphology of flame fronts propagating in reactive systems composed of randomly positioned, pointlike sources is studied. The solution of the temperature field and the initiation of new sources is implemented using the superposition of the Green's function for the diffusion equation, eliminating the need to use finite-difference approximations. The heat released from triggered sources diffuses outward from each source, activating new sources and enabling a mechanism of flame propagation. Systems of 40 000 sources in a 200 ×200 two-dimensional domain were tracked using computer simulations, and statistical ensembles of 120 realizations of each system were averaged to determine the statistical properties of the flame fronts. The reactive system of sources is parameterized by two nondimensional values: the heat release time (normalized by interparticle diffusion time) and the ignition temperature (normalized by adiabatic flame temperature). These two parameters were systematically varied for different simulations to investigate their influence on front propagation. For sufficiently fast heat release and low ignition temperature, the front roughness [defined as the root mean square deviation of the ignition temperature contour from the average flame position] grew following a power-law dependence that was in excellent agreement with the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) universality class (β =1 /3 ). As the reaction time was increased, lower values of the roughening exponent were observed, and at a sufficiently great value of reaction time, reversion to a steady, constant-width thermal flame was observed that matched the solution from classical combustion theory. Deviation away from KPZ scaling was also observed as the ignition temperature was increased. The features of this system that permit it to exhibit both KPZ and non-KPZ scaling are discussed.

  4. Developing leadership skills at the front line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeavons, Richard

    2011-10-01

    The health secretary announced in July plans to launch a NHS Leadership Academy. This article explains what progress has been made in setting up the body and enabling it to support nurses and other front line staff to develop the leadership skills needed to transform the NHS into a genuinely patient-centred service, one in which different services work together to provide integrated care.

  5. Chemical air mass differences near fronts

    OpenAIRE

    Bethan, S.; Vaughan, G.; Gerbig, C.; Volz-Thomas, A.; Richer, H; Tiddeman, D.

    1998-01-01

    Two case studies are presented of aircraft measurements (ozone, NOy, CO, and meteorological parameters) in the Vicinity of fronts located over the eastern side of the North Atlantic Ocean during spring 1994. The aim of these studies was twofold: (1) to investigate whether frontal circulations can transport ozone from the boundary layer to the free troposphere in well-defined layer; and (2) to ascertain whether or not conveyor belts associated with extratropical cyclones exhibit well-defined c...

  6. Trunk muscle activity during front crawl swimming

    OpenAIRE

    Martens, Jonas; Pellegrims, Ward; Einarsson, Ingi Thor; Fernandes, Ricardo; Staes, Filip; Daly, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Core stability training is of increasing interest to both researchers and coaches. Sufficient core stability is needed to balance forces generated by the upper and lower extremities separately (Hibbs et al., 2008). In swimming the development of wireless EMG has created new possibilities to study underwater muscle activity with little hinder. The purpose here was to analyze lower trunk muscle activation during front crawl swimming and examine how trunk muscle activity is relat...

  7. Combustion Waves and Fronts in Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavin, Paul; Searby, Geoff

    2016-07-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. Physical Insights: 1. General considerations; 2. Laminar premixed flames; 3. Turbulent premixed flames; 4. Gaseous shocks and detonations; 5. Chemical kinetics of combustion; 6. Laser-driven ablation front in ICF; 7. Explosion of massive stars; Part II. Detailed Analytical Studies: 8. Planar flames; 9. Flame kernels and flame balls; 10. Wrinkled flames; 11. Ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability; 12. Shock waves and detonations; Part III. Complements: 13. Statistical physics; 14. Chemistry; 15. Flows; References; Index.

  8. Prototype ALICE front-end card

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    This circuit board is a prototype 48-channel front end digitizer card for the ALICE time projection chamber (TPC), which takes electrical signals from the wire sensors in the TPC and shapes the data before converting the analogue signal to digital data. A total of 4356 cards will be required to process the data from the ALICE TPC, the largest of this type of detector in the world.

  9. On the Front Lines of Rare Disease Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Rare Diseases On the Front Lines of Rare Disease Research Past Issues / Spring ... Diagnosis" Making the Invisible Patients Visible / On the Front Lines of Rare Disease Research Spring 2016 Issue: ...

  10. Kinetics of a plasma streamer ionization front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taccogna, Francesco; Pellegrini, Fabrizio

    2018-02-01

    A streamer is a non-linear and non-local gas breakdown mode. Its large-scale coherent structures, such as the ionization front, are the final results of a hierarchical cascade starting from the single particle dynamics. Therefore, this phenomenon covers, by definition, different space and time scales. In this study, we have reproduced the ionization front formation and development by means of a particle-based numerical methodology. The physical system investigated concerns of a high-voltage ns-pulsed surface dielectric barrier discharge. Different reduced electric field regimes ranging from 50 to 500 Td have been considered for two gases: pure atomic Ar and molecular N2. Results have shown the detailed structure of the negative streamer: the leading edge, the head, the interior and the tail. Its dynamical evolution and the front propagation velocity have been calculated for the different cases. Finally, the deviation of the electron energy distribution function from equilibrium behavior has been pointed out as a result of a fast and very localized phenomenon.

  11. Sub-Antarctic glacier extensions in the Kerguelen region (49°S, Indian Ocean) over the past 24,000 years constrained by 36Cl moraine dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomelli, Vincent; Mokadem, Fatima; Schimmelpfennig, Irene; Chapron, Emmanuel; Rinterknecht, Vincent; Favier, Vincent; Verfaillie, Deborah; Brunstein, Daniel; Legentil, Claude; Michel, Elisabeth; Swingedouw, Didier; Jaouen, Alain; Aumaitre, Georges; Bourlès, Didier L.; Keddadouche, Karim

    2017-04-01

    Similar to many other regions in the world, glaciers in the southern sub-polar regions are currently retreating. In the Kerguelen Islands (49°S, 69°E), the mass balance of the Cook Ice Cap (CIC), the largest ice cap in this region, experienced dramatic shrinking between 1960 and 2013 with retreat rates among the highest in the world. This observation needs to be evaluated in a long-term context. However, data on the past glacier extents are sparse in the sub-Antarctic regions. To investigate the deglaciation pattern since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) period, we present the first 13 cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure ages from four sites in the Kerguelen Islands. The 36Cl ages from erratic and moraine boulders span from 24.4 ± 2.7 ka to 0.3 ± 0.1 ka. We combined these ages with existing glacio-marine radiocarbon ages and bathymetric data to document the temporal and spatial changes of the island's glacial history. Ice began to retreat on the main island before 24.4 ± 2.7 ka until around the time of the Antarctic Cold Reversal (ACR) period (∼14.5-12.9 ka), during which the Bontemps moraine was formed by the advance of a CIC outlet glacier. Deglaciation continued during the Holocene probably until 3 ka with evidence of minor advances during the last millennium. This chronology is in pace with major changes in δ18O in a recent West Antarctica ice core record, showing that Kerguelen Islands glaciers are particularly sensitive and relevant to document climate change in the southern polar regions.

  12. Effects of temperature and fertilization on the structure of total versus active bacterial communities from sub-Antarctic seawater exposed to crude oil and diesel fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Rodríguez-Blanco

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Polar environments are exposed to the risk of oil pollution. However, there is limited knowledge regarding how the variation of physicochemical factors influencing biodegradation may affect bacterial community structure. The effects of temperature (4, 10 and 20°C and organic fertilization (Inipol EAP 22 on community structure and diversity of bacteria inhabiting Kerguelen sub-Antarctic waters were studied in crude- and diesel-amended microcosms. Dynamics of total (i.e., 16S rDNA-based and metabolically active (i.e., 16S rRNA-based bacterial community structure and diversity were monitored using capillary-electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism. Results showed that total and active community structures were differently influenced by temperature and fertilization in the presence of hydrocarbons. Both fertilization and temperature induced changes in total community structure in the presence of crude oil and diesel. However, temperature showed a limited influence on active community structure, and fertilization induced changes in the presence of crude oil only. Simpson's index decreased for total bacterial communities at all temperatures in the presence of crude oil and diesel, whereas a lower reduction was observed for active bacterial populations. In the presence of fertilizer, the diversity of the whole community approached control values after seven incubation weeks; this was not observed for the active bacterial community. This study evidenced qualitative differences in total and active bacterial community structures of Kerguelen seawaters in the presence of hydrocarbons and different responses relative to variation in temperature and fertilization. These factors and hydrocarbons composition have to be taken into account to understand bacterial community dynamics after an oil spill.

  13. Euphotic zone variations in bulk and compound-specific δ13C of suspended organic matter in the Subantarctic Ocean, south of Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, T.; Trull, T. W.; Griffiths, F. B.; Tilbrook, B.; Revill, A. T.

    2001-12-01

    The carbon isotopic compositions of suspended organic matter δ13CPOC collected from Subantarctic Zone surface waters south of Australia in November 1995 decrease southward from -20 to -26‰ and display strong correlations with aqueous carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]aq), consistent with previous studies. In contrast, vertical profiles through the euphotic zone (top ˜100 m) of δ13CPOC at six stations display decreases with depth of up to 2.4‰. These decreases in δ13CPOC cannot be fully explained by the small vertical variations in [CO2]aq or its 13C content. Carbon 13 analyses of several individual sterols revealed similar isotopic changes with depth, suggesting that they derive from a fundamental depth control on primary production, rather than from algal community variations or remineralization processes. Growth rate μ appears to be the most likely source of the depth variations. The relationship between μ/[CO2]aq and δ13CPOC derived from surface water samples can explain the vertical variations of δ13CPOC within the mixed layer, provided integrated mixed layer growth rates are used. Below the mixed layer, differences between the observed δ13CPOC and the growth rate model can be explained by recent shallowing in mixed layer depth and the subsequent effect on growth rates. These results suggest that δ13CPOC determinations can be used to provide some information on the recent history of mixed layer processes and that interpretation of sedimentary δ13CPOC records should include consideration of possible growth rate and mixed layer depth variations.

  14. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) cycling across contrasting biological hotspots of the New Zealand subtropical front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizotte, Martine; Levasseur, Maurice; Law, Cliff S.; Walker, Carolyn F.; Safi, Karl A.; Marriner, Andrew; Kiene, Ronald P.

    2017-11-01

    The oceanic frontal region above the Chatham Rise east of New Zealand was investigated during the late austral summer season in February and March 2012. Despite its potential importance as a source of marine-originating and climate-relevant compounds, such as dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and its algal precursor dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), little is known of the processes fuelling the reservoirs of these sulfur (S) compounds in the water masses bordering the subtropical front (STF). This study focused on two opposing short-term fates of DMSP-S following its uptake by microbial organisms (either its conversion into DMS or its assimilation into bacterial biomass) and has not considered dissolved non-volatile degradation products. Sampling took place in three phytoplankton blooms (B1, B2, and B3) with B1 and B3 occurring in relatively nitrate-rich, dinoflagellate-dominated subantarctic waters, and B2 occurring in nitrate-poor subtropical waters dominated by coccolithophores. Concentrations of total DMSP (DMSPt) and DMS were high across the region, up to 160 and 14.5 nmol L-1, respectively. Pools of DMSPt showed a strong association with overall phytoplankton biomass proxied by chlorophyll a (rs = 0.83) likely because of the persistent dominance of dinoflagellates and coccolithophores, both DMSP-rich taxa. Heterotrophic microbes displayed low S assimilation from DMSP (less than 5 %) likely because their S requirements were fulfilled by high DMSP availability. Rates of bacterial protein synthesis were significantly correlated with concentrations of dissolved DMSP (DMSPd, rs = 0.86) as well as with the microbial conversion efficiency of DMSPd into DMS (DMS yield, rs = 0.84). Estimates of the potential contribution of microbially mediated rates of DMS production (0.1-27 nmol L-1 day-1) to the near-surface concentrations of DMS suggest that bacteria alone could not have sustained DMS pools at most stations, indicating an important role for phytoplankton-mediated DMS

  15. Topology optimization of front metallization patterns for solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, D.K.; Langelaar, M.; Barink, M.; Keulen, F. van

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the application of topology optimization (TO) for designing the front electrode patterns for solar cells. Improving the front electrode design is one of the approaches to improve the performance of the solar cells. It serves to produce the voltage distribution for the front

  16. 76 FR 63656 - Front Range Resource Advisory Council Meeting Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ...] Front Range Resource Advisory Council Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... Front Range Resource Advisory Council meeting scheduled for October 19, 2011 at the BLM Royal Gorge....m. to 4:30 p.m. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Tina Brown, Front Range RAC Coordinator, BLM...

  17. Kinematic analysis of three water polo front crawl styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus, Karla; Figueiredo, Pedro; De Jesus, Kelly; Pereira, Filipa; Vilas-Boas, J Paulo; Machado, Leandro; Fernandes, Ricardo J

    2012-01-01

    During water polo matches, players use different front crawl styles. The purpose of this study was to conduct a kinematic analysis of three water polo front crawl styles: front crawl with head under water, front crawl with head above water, and front crawl when leading the ball. Ten proficient water polo players performed 3 × 15 m sprints in each front crawl style, which were recorded three-dimensionally by two surface and four underwater cameras. The results showed no differences in performance and several kinematic characteristics among the water polo front crawl styles. However, front crawl when leading the ball showed shorter stroke length and greater stroke frequency. Front crawl with head underwater presented greater maximal finger depth and elbow angle at mid-stroke position. Front crawl with head above water and when leading the ball showed greater trunk obliquity and maximal depth of right and left foot, and shorter kick stroke frequency. The findings suggest that proficient players learn to master front crawl with head above water to achieve top velocity. Despite the common use of the front crawl with head underwater as the basis for water polo fast displacement, coaches should emphasize the use of the specific water polo styles to attain high performance.

  18. 49 CFR 393.44 - Front brake lines, protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Front brake lines, protection. 393.44 Section 393... ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Brakes § 393.44 Front brake lines, protection. On every bus, if... any of the front wheels is broken, the driver can apply the brakes on the rear wheels despite such...

  19. 16 CFR 1512.13 - Requirements for front fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for front fork. 1512.13 Section 1512.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Regulations § 1512.13 Requirements for front fork. The front fork shall...

  20. Novel Perspectives from Light-Front QCD, Super-Conformal Algebra, and Light-Front Holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Light-Front Quantization – Dirac’s “Front Form” – provides a physical, frame-independent formalism for hadron dynamics and structure. Observables such as structure functions, transverse momentum distributions, and distribution amplitudes are defined from the hadronic LFWFs. One obtains new insights into the hadronic mass scale, the hadronic spectrum, and the functional form of the QCD running coupling in the nonperturbative domain using light-front holography. In addition, superconformal algebra leads to remarkable supersymmetric relations between mesons and baryons. I also discuss evidence that the antishadowing of nuclear structure functions is nonuniversal; i.e., flavor dependent, and why shadowing and antishadowing phenomena may be incompatible with the momentum and other sum rules for the nuclear parton distribution functions.

  1. Direct drive ablation front stability: numerical predictions against flame front model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, L. [Phd Student at IRPHE St Jerome, 13 - Marseille (France)]|[CEA/DAM-Ile de France, 91 - Bruyeres Le Chatel (France); Hallo, L.; Tallot, C. [CEA/DAM-Ile de France, 91 - Bruyeres Le Chatel (France)

    2000-07-01

    We study the linear stability of flows resulting from constant heating of planar targets by a laser. In the coordinate system of the ablation front there is a flow from the cold to hot region, which is situated in a gravity field oriented from hot to cold region. Similar types of flow can be observed in combustion systems, which involve propagation of flame fronts. A spectral model which studies linear perturbation is directly taken from the combustion community. Here we present the results for state as well as perturbed flows. Growth rate determined from the models are compared to each other, and preliminary numerical results from FC12 simulations are shown. (authors)

  2. AIRS Storm Front Approaching California (animation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for the AIRS Storm Front Approaching California Animation NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument is able to peel back cloud cover to reveal 3-D structure of a storm's water vapor content, information that can be used to improve weather forecast models. In this animation the initial visible cloud image series shows a front moving toward the West Coast of the United States as a low pressure area moves into the Pacific Northwest. The 'Pineapple Express,' a stream of moisture that originates in the tropics South of Hawaii and usually crosses Mexico to enter New Mexico and Texas, has shifted Westward and is also visible moving into Baja California. The area preceding the front appears to be relatively clear in the visible images. As the view shifts from the visible to the infrared wavelengths which highlight water vapor, we see both cloud areas contain heavy burdens of moisture. The area which appears clear in the visible images is seen to contain water vapor near the coastline as well. The viewpoint then rotates so that we can see the vertical cross section of the fronts. The variability of the vertical extent of water vapor and the amount is now clearly visible. The storm moving in from the Gulf of Alaska is more heavily laden with water vapor than that moving in from the Southwest. The moisture is concentrated in the lower atmosphere. The colors indicate the amount of water vapor present. Blue areas denote low water vapor content; green areas are medium water vapor content; red areas signify high water vapor content. The vertical grid for the final frame ranges from 250 millibar pressure at the top to 1000 millibar pressure at the bottom. The top is about 10 km (6.2 miles) above the surface of the Earth. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments

  3. Kommuner i front - organisationsudvikling blandt kommunale socialforvaltninger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Ole

    Det er næsten et princip, at Folketinget i udformningen af sociallovgivningen ikke blander sig i, hvordan kommunerne skal organisere arbejdet med at føre lovgivningen ud i livet. Det er midlertid oplagt, at der parallelt med den lovgivningsmæssige udvikling sker en organisatorisk udvikling blandt...... ideerne om organisationsforandring er her, at nye organisatoriske elementer spredes fra nogle få pionerer til resten (eller en stor andel af resten) af kommunerne. Et af de interessante spørgsmål i forlængelse af denne tankegang er, om det altid er de samme kommuner, der går i front med...

  4. The seasonal evolution of shelf water masses around Bouvetøya, a sub-Antarctic island in the mid-Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, determined from an instrumented southern elephant seal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Lowther

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Our study makes use of a fortuitous oceanographic data set collected around the remote sub-Antarctic island of Bouvetøya by a conductivity–temperature–depth recorder (CTD integrated with a satellite-relayed data logger deployed on an adult female southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina to describe the seasonal evolution of the western shelf waters. The instrumented seal remained in waters over the shelf for 259 days, collecting an average of 2.6 (±0.06 CTD profiles per day, providing hydrographic data encompassing the late austral summer and the entire winter. These data document the thermal stratification of the upper water layer due to summer surface heating of the previous year's Antarctic Surface Water, giving way to a cold subsurface layer at about 100 m as the austral winter progressed, with a concomitant increase in salinity of the upper layer. Upper Circumpolar Deep Water was detected at a depth of approximately 200 m along the western shelf of Bouvetøya throughout the year. These oceanographic data represent the only seasonal time series for this region and the second such animal–instrument oceanographic time series in the sub-Antarctic domain of the Southern Ocean.

  5. AFEII Analog Front End Board Design Specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinov, Paul; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    This document describes the design of the 2nd iteration of the Analog Front End Board (AFEII), which has the function of receiving charge signals from the Central Fiber Tracker (CFT) and providing digital hit pattern and charge amplitude information from those charge signals. This second iteration is intended to address limitations of the current AFE (referred to as AFEI in this document). These limitations become increasingly deleterious to the performance of the Central Fiber Tracker as instantaneous luminosity increases. The limitations are inherent in the design of the key front end chips on the AFEI board (the SVXIIe and the SIFT) and the architecture of the board itself. The key limitations of the AFEI are: (1) SVX saturation; (2) Discriminator to analog readout cross talk; (3) Tick to tick pedestal variation; and (4) Channel to channel pedestal variation. The new version of the AFE board, AFEII, addresses these limitations by use of a new chip, the TriP-t and by architectural changes, while retaining the well understood and desirable features of the AFEI board.

  6. Biomechanics of front and back squat exercises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braidot, A A [Laboratorio de Biomecanica FI-UNER. Ruta 11 Km 10 Oro Verde Entre Rios (Argentina); Brusa, M H [Laboratorio de Biomecanica FI-UNER. Ruta 11 Km 10 Oro Verde Entre Rios (Argentina); Lestussi, F E [Laboratorio de Biomecanica FI-UNER. Ruta 11 Km 10 Oro Verde Entre Rios (Argentina); Parera, G P [Licenciatura en KinesiologIa y FisiatrIa Universidad Abierta Interamericana. Sede Regional Rosario (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    Squat constitutes one of the most popular exercises to strengthen the muscles of the lower limbs. It is considered one of the most widely spread exercises for muscle sport training and is part of the competition movements comprised within olympic weight-lifting. In physical rehabilitation, squats are used for muscular recovery after different injuries of the lower limbs, especially the knee. In previous anterior cruciate ligament injuries, the mini-squats are generally used, in a knee flexion motion range from 0 deg. to 50 deg. because in this range the shear forces, the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral compression forces decrease related to greater flexion angles. The aim of this work is to make a comparative bidimensional study of the kinematic and dynamic variables of the excecution of the parallel squat exercise with the front and back bar. It is observed in the knee a better development of energy with the front bar, allowing a better muscular exercise with the same load. The mean power absorbed by the hip with the back bar is considerably greater, associated to the speed of the gesture.

  7. Internal waves and temperature fronts on slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Thorpe

    Full Text Available Time series measurements from an array of temperature miniloggers in a line at constant depth along the sloping boundary of a lake are used to describe the `internal surf zone' where internal waves interact with the sloping boundary. More small positive temperature time derivatives are recorded than negative, but there are more large negative values than positive, giving the overall distribution of temperature time derivatives a small negative skewness. This is consistent with the internal wave dynamics; fronts form during the up-slope phase of the motion, bringing cold water up the slope, and the return flow may become unstable, leading to small advecting billows and weak warm fronts. The data are analysed to detect `events', periods in which the temperature derivatives exceed a set threshold. The speed and distance travelled by `events' are described. The motion along the slope may be a consequence of (a instabilities advected by the flow (b internal waves propagating along-slope or (c internal waves approaching the slope from oblique directions. The propagation of several of the observed 'events' can only be explained by (c, evidence that the internal surf zone has some, but possibly not all, the characteristics of the conventional 'surface wave' surf zone, with waves steepening as they approach the slope at oblique angles.

    Key words. Oceanography: general (benthic boundary layers; limnology, Oceanography: physical (internal and inertial waves

  8. Universal Millimeter-Wave Radar Front End

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Raul M.

    2010-01-01

    A quasi-optical front end allows any arbitrary polarization to be transmitted by controlling the timing, amplitude, and phase of the two input ports. The front end consists of two independent channels horizontal and vertical. Each channel has two ports transmit and receive. The transmit signal is linearly polarized so as to pass through a periodic wire grid. It is then propagated through a ferrite Faraday rotator, which rotates the polarization state 45deg. The received signal is propagated through the Faraday rotator in the opposite direction, undergoing a further 45 of polarization rotation due to the non-reciprocal action of the ferrite under magnetic bias. The received signal is now polarized at 90deg relative to the transmit signal. This signal is now reflected from the wire grid and propagated to the receive port. The horizontal and vertical channels are propagated through, or reflected from, another wire grid. This design is an improvement on the state of the art in that any transmit signal polarization can be chosen in whatever sequence desired. Prior systems require switching of the transmit signal from the amplifier, either mechanically or by using high-power millimeter-wave switches. This design can have higher reliability, lower mass, and more flexibility than mechanical switching systems, as well as higher reliability and lower losses than systems using high-power millimeter-wave switches.

  9. Travelling fronts in stochastic Stokes’ drifts

    KAUST Repository

    Blanchet, Adrien

    2008-10-01

    By analytical methods we study the large time properties of the solution of a simple one-dimensional model of stochastic Stokes\\' drift. Semi-explicit formulae allow us to characterize the behaviour of the solutions and compute global quantities such as the asymptotic speed of the center of mass or the effective diffusion coefficient. Using an equivalent tilted ratchet model, we observe that the speed of the center of mass converges exponentially to its limiting value. A diffuse, oscillating front attached to the center of mass appears. The description of the front is given using an asymptotic expansion. The asymptotic solution attracts all solutions at an algebraic rate which is determined by the effective diffusion coefficient. The proof relies on an entropy estimate based on homogenized logarithmic Sobolev inequalities. In the travelling frame, the macroscopic profile obeys to an isotropic diffusion. Compared with the original diffusion, diffusion is enhanced or reduced, depending on the regime. At least in the limit cases, the rate of convergence to the effective profile is always decreased. All these considerations allow us to define a notion of efficiency for coherent transport, characterized by a dimensionless number, which is illustrated on two simple examples of travelling potentials with a sinusoidal shape in the first case, and a sawtooth shape in the second case. © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Biomechanics of front and back squat exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braidot, A. A.; Brusa, M. H.; Lestussi, F. E.; Parera, G. P.

    2007-11-01

    Squat constitutes one of the most popular exercises to strengthen the muscles of the lower limbs. It is considered one of the most widely spread exercises for muscle sport training and is part of the competition movements comprised within olympic weight-lifting. In physical rehabilitation, squats are used for muscular recovery after different injuries of the lower limbs, especially the knee. In previous anterior cruciate ligament injuries, the mini-squats are generally used, in a knee flexion motion range from 0° to 50° because in this range the shear forces, the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral compression forces decrease related to greater flexion angles. The aim of this work is to make a comparative bidimensional study of the kinematic and dynamic variables of the excecution of the parallel squat exercise with the front and back bar. It is observed in the knee a better development of energy with the front bar, allowing a better muscular exercise with the same load. The mean power absorbed by the hip with the back bar is considerably greater, associated to the speed of the gesture.

  11. An island in front of Izola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franci Steinman

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Maritime construction in front of Izola restitutes an enriched former state. The island is positioned in a place where there are no legal regimes enforced by the state or local community. Legal regimes that determine the exploitation of water rights and limitations (management, exploitation, use can actually limit all. Therefore their synthesis has to be the starting point for analysing the harmony of present uses and for planning future uses of the sea and coastal area. For example the aquatorium of the shellfish mariculture positioned in the Strunjan Bay without adequate analysis of the prevailing conditions is causing conflicts of uses, unacceptable limiting of general use of the sea and prohibitive limitations in neighbouring areas. The analysis done for the island in front of Izola shows that there are no such consequences. Only uses in the public interest were proposed, since when assessing suitability first public and then common interests where considered, possible specific (e.g. entrepreneurial uses were permitted only if the afore mentioned weren’t obstructed. Thus integral management of the coastal area was enabled, with respect to functional ties between the land and sea.

  12. The ALICE TPC front end electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Musa, L; Bialas, N; Bramm, R; Campagnolo, R; Engster, Claude; Formenti, F; Bonnes, U; Esteve-Bosch, R; Frankenfeld, Ulrich; Glässel, P; Gonzales, C; Gustafsson, Hans Åke; Jiménez, A; Junique, A; Lien, J; Lindenstruth, V; Mota, B; Braun-Munzinger, P; Oeschler, H; Österman, L; Renfordt, R E; Ruschmann, G; Röhrich, D; Schmidt, H R; Stachel, J; Soltveit, A K; Ullaland, K

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present the front end electronics for the time projection chamber (TPC) of the ALICE experiment. The system, which consists of about 570000 channels, is based on two basic units: (a) an analogue ASIC (PASA) that incorporates the shaping-amplifier circuits for 16 channels; (b) a mixed-signal ASIC (ALTRO) that integrates 16 channels, each consisting of a 10-bit 25-MSPS ADC, the baseline subtraction, tail cancellation filter, zero suppression and multi-event buffer. The complete readout chain is contained in front end cards (FEC), with 128 channels each, connected to the detector by means of capton cables. A number of FECs (up to 25) are controlled by a readout control unit (RCU), which interfaces the FECs to the data acquisition (DAQ), the trigger, and the detector control system (DCS) . A function of the final electronics (1024 channels) has been characterized in a test that incorporates a prototype of the ALICE TPC as well as many other components of the final set-up. The tests show that the ...

  13. A role for oxygen delivery and extracellular magnesium in limiting cold tolerance of the sub-antarctic stone crab Paralomis granulosa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Astrid C; Pörtner, Hans O; Sartoris, Franz J

    2012-01-01

    A low capacity for regulation of extracellular Mg(2+) has been proposed to exclude reptant marine decapod crustaceans from temperatures below 0°C and thus to exclude them from the high Antarctic. To test this hypothesis and to elaborate the underlying mechanisms in the most cold-tolerant reptant decapod family of the sub-Antarctic, the Lithodidae, thermal tolerance was determined in the crab Paralomis granulosa (Decapoda, Anomura, Lithodidae) using an acute stepwise temperature protocol (-1°, 1°, 4°, 7°, 10°, and 13°C). Arterial and venous oxygen partial pressures (Po(2)) in hemolymph, heartbeat and ventilation beat frequencies, and hemolymph cation composition were measured at rest and after a forced activity (righting) trial. Scopes for heartbeat and ventilation beat frequencies and intermittent heartbeat and scaphognathite beat rates at rest were evaluated. Hemolymph [Mg(2+)] was experimentally reduced from 30 mmol L(-1) to a level naturally observed in Antarctic caridean shrimps (12 mmol L(-1)) to investigate whether the animals remain more active and tolerant to cold (-1°, 1°, and 4°C). In natural seawater, righting speed was significantly slower at -1° and 13°C, compared with acclimation temperature (4°C). Arterial and venous hemolymph Po(2) increased in response to cooling even though heartbeat and ventilation beat frequencies as well as scopes decreased. At rest, ionic composition of the hemolymph was not affected by temperature. Activity induced a significant increase in hemolymph [K(+)] at -1° and 1°C. Reduction of hemolymph [Mg(2+)] did not result in an increase in activity, an increase in heartbeat and ventilation beat frequencies, or a shift in thermal tolerance to lower temperatures. In conclusion, oxygen delivery in this cold-water crustacean was not acutely limiting cold tolerance, and animals may have been constrained more by their functional capacity and motility. In contrast to earlier findings in temperate and subpolar brachyuran

  14. Light-Front Holography, Light-Front Wavefunctions, and Novel QCD Phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2012-02-16

    Light-Front Holography is one of the most remarkable features of the AdS/CFT correspondence. In spite of its present limitations it provides important physical insights into the nonperturbative regime of QCD and its transition to the perturbative domain. This novel framework allows hadronic amplitudes in a higher dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time. The model leads to an effective confining light-front QCD Hamiltonian and a single-variable light-front Schroedinger equation which determines the eigenspectrum and the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons for general spin and orbital angular momentum. The coordinate z in AdS space is uniquely identified with a Lorentz-invariant coordinate {zeta} which measures the separation of the constituents within a hadron at equal light-front time and determines the off-shell dynamics of the bound-state wavefunctions, and thus the fall-off as a function of the invariant mass of the constituents. The soft-wall holographic model modified by a positive-sign dilaton metric, leads to a remarkable one-parameter description of nonperturbative hadron dynamics - a semi-classical frame-independent first approximation to the spectra and light-front wavefunctions of meson and baryons. The model predicts a Regge spectrum of linear trajectories with the same slope in the leading orbital angular momentum L of hadrons and the radial quantum number n. The hadron eigensolutions projected on the free Fock basis provides the complete set of valence and non-valence light-front Fock state wavefunctions {Psi}{sub n/H} (x{sub i}, k{sub {perpendicular}i}, {lambda}{sub i}) which describe the hadron's momentum and spin distributions needed to compute the direct measures of hadron structure at the quark and gluon level, such as elastic and transition form factors, distribution amplitudes, structure functions, generalized parton distributions and transverse

  15. The CMS Tracker Readout Front End Driver

    CERN Document Server

    Foudas, C.; Ballard, D.; Church, I.; Corrin, E.; Coughlan, J.A.; Day, C.P.; Freeman, E.J.; Fulcher, J.; Gannon, W.J.F.; Hall, G.; Halsall, R.N.J.; Iles, G.; Jones, J.; Leaver, J.; Noy, M.; Pearson, M.; Raymond, M.; Reid, I.; Rogers, G.; Salisbury, J.; Taghavi, S.; Tomalin, I.R.; Zorba, O.

    2004-01-01

    The Front End Driver, FED, is a 9U 400mm VME64x card designed for reading out the Compact Muon Solenoid, CMS, silicon tracker signals transmitted by the APV25 analogue pipeline Application Specific Integrated Circuits. The FED receives the signals via 96 optical fibers at a total input rate of 3.4 GB/sec. The signals are digitized and processed by applying algorithms for pedestal and common mode noise subtraction. Algorithms that search for clusters of hits are used to further reduce the input rate. Only the cluster data along with trigger information of the event are transmitted to the CMS data acquisition system using the S-LINK64 protocol at a maximum rate of 400 MB/sec. All data processing algorithms on the FED are executed in large on-board Field Programmable Gate Arrays. Results on the design, performance, testing and quality control of the FED are presented and discussed.

  16. Additional shielding in front of M2

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, B

    2013-01-01

    This note presents studies on possibilities to improve the shielding in front of M2 in order to reduce occupancy of the hottest areas of the Muon System and to mitigate the dead-time problem. Two places for installing additional shielding have been considered: behind HCAL, in place of the PMTs and their bases for the readout, and inside ECAL, in place of the innermost modules of the calorimeter. Studies on the additional shielding inside ECAL have been done for the complementarity of the research rather than for practical purpose due negative effects on the physics. Various studies have been carried out and different configurations of shielding in terms of dimensions and materials have been tested using MC simulations. Moreover the correlation between hits was studied by analysing angles of the tracks passing through M2.

  17. The front-end electronics for LHCb calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Breton, D

    2002-01-01

    For the readout of the calorimeters of the LHCb experiment at CERN, specific front-end electronics have been designed. In particular, three different front-end analog chips were studied respectively for the ECAL/HCAL, preshower and scintillator pad detector. We will present the three front-end electronic chains, point out their specific requirements together with their common purpose, and describe the corresponding ASICs. (6 refs).

  18. MMIC front-ends for optical communication systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anders Kongstad

    1993-01-01

    Two different types of optical front-end MMIC amplifiers for a 2.5-Gb/s coherent heterodyne optical receiver are presented. A bandwidth of 6-12 GHz has been obtained for a tuned front-end and 3-13 GHz for a distributed front-end. An input noise current density of 5-15 pA/√Hz has been obtained for...

  19. White-fronted Goose Telementry, 1998-2000 [ds330

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Using radio-telemetry, greater white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons frontalis) distribution and movements during winter in Central California were determined during...

  20. Convection induced by thermal gradients on thin reaction fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruelas Paredes, David R. A.; Vasquez, Desiderio A.

    2017-09-01

    We present a thin front model for the propagation of chemical reaction fronts in liquids inside a Hele-Shaw cell or porous media. In this model we take into account density gradients due to thermal and compositional changes across a thin interface. The front separating reacted from unreacted fluids evolves following an eikonal relation between the normal speed and the curvature. We carry out a linear stability analysis of convectionless flat fronts confined in a two-dimensional rectangular domain. We find that all fronts are stable to perturbations of short wavelength, but they become unstable for some wavelengths depending on the values of compositional and thermal gradients. If the effects of these gradients oppose each other, we observe a range of wavelengths that make the flat front unstable. Numerical solutions of the nonlinear model show curved fronts of steady shape with convection propagating faster than flat fronts. Exothermic fronts increase the temperature of the fluid as they propagate through the domain. This increment in temperature decreases with increasing speed.

  1. Light-front holography: a first approximation to QCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Téramond, Guy F; Brodsky, Stanley J

    2009-02-27

    Starting from the Hamiltonian equation of motion in QCD, we identify an invariant light-front coordinate zeta which allows the separation of the dynamics of quark and gluon binding from the kinematics of constituent spin and internal orbital angular momentum. The result is a single-variable light-front Schrödinger equation for QCD which determines the eigenspectrum and the light-front wave functions of hadrons for general spin and orbital angular momentum. This light-front wave equation is equivalent to the equations of motion which describe the propagation of spin-J modes on anti-de Sitter (AdS) space.

  2. Front contact solar cell with formed electrically conducting layers on the front side and backside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Peter John

    2012-06-26

    A bipolar solar cell includes a backside junction formed by a silicon substrate and a first doped layer of a first dopant type on the backside of the solar cell. A second doped layer of a second dopant type makes an electrical connection to the substrate from the front side of the solar cell. A first metal contact of a first electrical polarity electrically connects to the first doped layer on the backside of the solar cell, and a second metal contact of a second electrical polarity electrically connects to the second doped layer on the front side of the solar cell. An external electrical circuit may be electrically connected to the first and second metal contacts to be powered by the solar cell.

  3. Front propagation in the bromate-sulfite-ferrocyanide-aluminum (III) system: Autocatalytic front in a buffer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Klara; Leda, Marcin; Vanag, Vladimir K.; Epstein, Irving R.

    2010-06-01

    We study the propagation of pH fronts in a narrow, pseudo-one-dimensional strip of gel containing bromate, sulfite, ferrocyanide and aluminum ions. The front propagation speed v decreases with [ Al 3+] as 1/v=1/v0+c[Al], where c is a constant. We determine the diffusion coefficients of protons and ferricyanide ions and find that Al(OH) 3 loaded in agarose or acrylamide gels binds protons reversibly, thereby slowing the propagating fronts without significantly affecting the diffusion of ferricyanide ions. We present a model that qualitatively reproduces the experimental behavior, and we suggest some general principles governing autocatalytic fronts in buffered systems.

  4. Observations of a tidal intrusion front in a tidal channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shasha; Xia, Xiaoming; Thompson, Charlie E. L.; Cao, Zhenyi; Liu, Yifei

    2017-11-01

    A visible front indicated by a surface colour change, and sometimes associated with foam or debris lines, was observed in a tidal channel during neap tide. This is an example of a tidal intrusion front occurring in the absence of sudden topographical changes or reversing flows, typically reported to be associated with such fronts. Detailed Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler and conductivity/temperature/depth measurements were taken on repeated transects both with fronts apparent and with fronts absent. The results indicated that the front occurred as a result of stratification, which was sustained by the buoyancy flux and the weak tide-induced mixing during neap ebb tide. The stronger tide-induced mixing during spring tide restrained stratification, leading to the absence of a front. The mechanism of the frontogenesis was the density gradient between the stratified water formed during neap ebb tide, and the more mixed seawater during neap flood tide; thus, the water on the landward (southwestern) side of the front was stratified, and that on the seaward side (northeastern) of the front was vertically well mixed. Gradient Richardson number estimates suggest that the flow between the stratified and mixed water was near the threshold 0.25 for shear instability. Meanwhile, the density gradient would provide an initial baroclinic contribution to velocity convergence, which is indicated by the accumulation of buoyant matter such as foam, grass, and debris into a sharply defined line along the surface. The front migrates with the flood current, with a local maximum towards the eastern side of the channel, leading to an asymmetrical shape with the eastern side of the front driven further into the Tiaozhoumen tidal channel.

  5. [History of Polish botanical and mycological researches on sheets of land of Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic in the years 1977-2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Piotr; Olech, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Antarctic from the late Cretaceous period to the beginning of Melville's continental glaciation. One singled out three floristic stages and were reconstructed their peculiarities in the development of flora. There was also described an early Jurassic flora of Hope Bay (Półwysep Antarktyczny - Antarctic Peninsula) that turned out to be the richest Jurassic flora in the world. From that point of view were analyzed new species of mineral plants. Ecological researches concentrated on the problems connected with several issues and, among others, with the processes of settlement and succession, distribution and ecology of land biotopes, changes in their spatial structure, and state of biotopes' biological mass. The second group of issues concerned the anthropogenous impacts. One also analyzed early stages of synanthropization of flora. Another important issue was recognizing an extent of the pollution of the environment, particularly with base metals. In the years 1977-2009 were published, at least, 426 notes, articles and monographs that were a result of botanical and mycological researches on sheets of land of Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic.

  6. Thermal front propagation in variable aperture fracture–matrix ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Thermal front; variable aperture; rock-matrix; geothermal reservoir; numerical model, liquid dominated. Abstract. A numerical study on the effect of complex fracture aperture geometry on propagation of thermal front in a coupled single fracture-matrix system has been carried out. Sinusoidal and logarithmic ...

  7. A programmable front-end system for arrays of bolometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandrello, A.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Cremonesi, O.; Giuliani, A.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Perego, M.; Pessina, G.; Pirro, S.; Previtali, E.; Vanzini, M.

    2000-04-01

    We report on a new front-end system developed to readout an array of large mass bolometers. The front-end allows setting all the necessary parameters for each detector by remote control. A special circuit, also fired remotely, has been developed in order to adjust the output voltage, allowing the DC coupling to the detector.

  8. A programmable front-end system for arrays of bolometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessandrello, A.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Cremonesi, O.; Giuliani, A.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Perego, M.; Pessina, G. E-mail: pessina@mi.infn.it; Pirro, S.; Previtali, E.; Vanzini, M

    2000-04-07

    We report on a new front-end system developed to readout an array of large mass bolometers. The front-end allows setting all the necessary parameters for each detector by remote control. A special circuit, also fired remotely, has been developed in order to adjust the output voltage, allowing the DC coupling to the detector.

  9. Stability of reaction fronts in random walk simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagy, Noemi; Izsak, F.

    A model of propagating reaction fronts is given for simple autocatalytic reactions and the stability of the propagating reaction fronts are studied in several numerical experiments. The corresponding random walk simulations - extending of a recent algorithm - make possible the simultaneous treatment

  10. An Attempt to Simulate Historic Front Variations of Nigardsbreen, Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    1986-01-01

    Nigardsbreen (Norway) is one of the very few highlatitude glaciers from which a long record of front positions is known (starting in the beginning of the 18th century). In this paper a dynamic glacier model is used to investigate the possible causes of the observed front variations. These

  11. Desirable forest structures for a restored Front Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvette L. Dickinson; Rob Addington; Greg Aplet; Mike Babler; Mike Battaglia; Peter Brown; Tony Cheng; Casey Cooley; Dick Edwards; Jonas Feinstein; Paula Fornwalt; Hal Gibbs; Megan Matonis; Kristen Pelz; Claudia Regan

    2014-01-01

    As part of the federal Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program administered by the US Forest Service, the Colorado Front Range Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Project (FR-CFLRP, a collaborative effort of the Front Range Roundtable1 and the US Forest Service) is required to define desired conditions for lower montane ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa...

  12. Chemotaxis : signalling modules join hands at front and tail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Devreotes, Peter N.

    2004-01-01

    Chemotaxis is the result of a refined interplay among various intracellular molecules that process spatial and temporal information. Here we present a modular scheme of the complex interactions between the front and the back of cells that allows them to navigate. First, at the front of the cell,

  13. Cost of pedestrian and bicycle accidents involving car front ends.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, L.T.B. van & Huijbers, J.J.W.

    1995-01-01

    A cost study has been carried out, based on Dutch insurance data of payments to victims (pedestrians and cyclists) of collisions against car front ends. The results of this study will be used for a cost-benefit analysis of a proposed amendment (a series of car front end crash tests) to the existing

  14. Ambient-light-absorbing screen for front projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilborn, E. H.

    1970-01-01

    Screen permits front surface projection of collimated light beam under conditions of high extraneous illumination. Screen has high reflective efficiency over any desired viewing area. Its optical properties are maintained when moisture droplets are present on the external front planar surface. Surface is easily cleaned and maintained.

  15. MMIC tuned front-end for a coherent optical receiver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anders Kongstad; Jagd, A. M.; Ebskamp, F.

    1993-01-01

    A low-noise transformer tuned optical front-end for a coherent optical receiver is described. The front-end is based on a GaInAs/InP p-i-n photodiode and a full custom designed GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC). The measured equivalent input noise current density is between 5-16 p...

  16. Nitrogen uptake by phytoplankton in surface waters of the Indian sector of Southern Ocean during austral summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, S. C.; Patra, Sivaji; Vishnu Vardhan, K.; Sarkar, A.; Mishra, R. K.; Anilkumar, N.

    2017-04-01

    This study reports the nitrogen uptake rate (using 15N tracer) of phytoplankton in surface waters of different frontal zones in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean (SO) during austral summer of 2013. The investigated area encompasses four major frontal systems, i.e., the subtropical front (STF), subantarctic front (SAF), polar front-1 (PF1) and polar front-2 (PF2). Southward decrease of surface water temperature was observed, whereas surface salinity did not show any significant trend. Nutrient (NO3 - and SiO4 4-) concentrations increased southward from STF to PF; while ammonium (NH4 +), nitrite (NO2 -) and phosphate (PO4 3-) remained comparatively stable. Analysis of nutrient ratios indicated potential N-limited conditions at the STF and SAF but no such scenario was observed for PF. In terms of phytoplankton biomass, PF1 was found to be the most productive followed by SAF, whereas PF2 was the least productive region. Nitrate uptake rate increased with increasing latitude, as no systematic spatial variation was discerned for NH4 + and urea (CO(NH2)2). Linear relationship between nitrate and total N-uptake reveals that the studied area is capable of exporting up to 60% of the total production to the deep ocean if the environmental settings are favorable. Like N-uptake rates the f-ratio also increased towards PF region indicating comparatively higher new production in the PF than in the subtropics. The moderately high average f-ratio (0.53) indicates potentially near equal contributions by new production and regenerated production to the total productivity in the study area. Elevation in N-uptake rates with declining temperature suggests that the SO with its vast quantity of cool water could play an important role in drawing down the atmospheric CO2 through the "solubility pump".

  17. Pareto-front shape in multiobservable quantum control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiuyang; Wu, Re-Bing; Rabitz, Herschel

    2017-03-01

    Many scenarios in the sciences and engineering require simultaneous optimization of multiple objective functions, which are usually conflicting or competing. In such problems the Pareto front, where none of the individual objectives can be further improved without degrading some others, shows the tradeoff relations between the competing objectives. This paper analyzes the Pareto-front shape for the problem of quantum multiobservable control, i.e., optimizing the expectation values of multiple observables in the same quantum system. Analytic and numerical results demonstrate that with two commuting observables the Pareto front is a convex polygon consisting of flat segments only, while with noncommuting observables the Pareto front includes convexly curved segments. We also assess the capability of a weighted-sum method to continuously capture the points along the Pareto front. Illustrative examples with realistic physical conditions are presented, including NMR control experiments on a 1H-13C two-spin system with two commuting or noncommuting observables.

  18. Light-Front Holography: A First Approximation to QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Teramond, Guy F.; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2008-10-03

    Starting from the Hamiltonian equation of motion in QCD, we identify an invariant light-front coordinate {zeta} which allows the separation of the dynamics of quark and gluon binding from the kinematics of constituent spin and internal orbital angular momentum. The result is a single variable light-front Schroedinger equation for QCD which determines the eigenspectrum and the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons for general spin and orbital angular momentum. This light-front wave equation is equivalent to the equations of motion which describe the propagation of spin-J modes on anti-de Sitter (AdS) space. This allows us to establish formally a gauge/gravity correspondence between an effective gravity theory defined on AdS5 and light front QCD.

  19. Design of Laboratory Experiments to Study Photoionization Fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, William James; Davis, Josh; Drake, R. Paul

    2017-06-01

    Here we present the theoretical foundation for a laboratory experiment to study photoionization fronts. Photoionization fronts play important roles in the formation and evolution of structure in the Universe. A properly designed experiment will have to control the recombination rate, electron impact ionization rate, and the initial thermal spectrum. We show that such an experiment can be designed, but requires the use of the largest high-energy-density laser facilities, such as Omega, Z, and NIF. We also show that prior experiments do not actually generate photoionization fronts, rather a heat front is produced by heat conductions. We show some initial simulation results of the current experimental design and characterize the ionization front.

  20. Nonvariational mechanism of front propagation: Theory and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Socorro, A J; Clerc, M G; González-Cortés, G; Wilson, M

    2017-01-01

    Multistable systems exhibit a rich front dynamics between equilibria. In one-dimensional scalar gradient systems, the spread of the fronts is proportional to the energy difference between equilibria. Fronts spreading proportionally to the energetic difference between equilibria is a characteristic of one-dimensional scalar gradient systems. Based on a simple nonvariational bistable model, we show analytically and numerically that the direction and speed of front propagation is led by nonvariational dynamics. We provide experimental evidence of nonvariational front propagation between different molecular orientations in a quasi-one-dimensional liquid-crystal light valve subjected to optical feedback. Free diffraction length allows us to control the variational or nonvariational nature of this system. Numerical simulations of the phenomenological model have quite good agreement with experimental observations.

  1. Front tracking for hyperbolic conservation laws

    CERN Document Server

    Holden, Helge

    2002-01-01

    Hyperbolic conservation laws are central in the theory of nonlinear partial differential equations and in science and technology. The reader is given a self-contained presentation using front tracking, which is also a numerical method. The multidimensional scalar case and the case of systems on the line are treated in detail. A chapter on finite differences is included. "It is already one of the few best digests on this topic. The present book is an excellent compromise between theory and practice. Students will appreciate the lively and accurate style." D. Serre, MathSciNet "I have read the book with great pleasure, and I can recommend it to experts as well as students. It can also be used for reliable and very exciting basis for a one-semester graduate course." S. Noelle, Book review, German Math. Soc. "Making it an ideal first book for the theory of nonlinear partial differential equations...an excellent reference for a graduate course on nonlinear conservation laws." M. Laforest, Comp. Phys. Comm.

  2. Front tracking for hyperbolic conservation laws

    CERN Document Server

    Holden, Helge

    2015-01-01

    This is the second edition of a well-received book providing the fundamentals of the theory hyperbolic conservation laws. Several chapters have been rewritten, new material has been added, in particular, a chapter on space dependent flux functions, and the detailed solution of the Riemann problem for the Euler equations. Hyperbolic conservation laws are central in the theory of nonlinear partial differential equations and in science and technology. The reader is given a self-contained presentation using front tracking, which is also a numerical method. The multidimensional scalar case and the case of systems on the line are treated in detail. A chapter on finite differences is included. From the reviews of the first edition: "It is already one of the few best digests on this topic. The present book is an excellent compromise between theory and practice. Students will appreciate the lively and accurate style." D. Serre, MathSciNet  "I have read the book with great pleasure, and I can recommend it to experts ...

  3. Pulse Front Tilt and Laser Plasma Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelberger, Daniel; Thévenet, Maxence; Nakamura, Kei; Lehe, Remi; Gonsalves, Anthony; Benedetti, Carlo; Leemans, Wim

    2017-10-01

    Pulse front tilt (PFT) is potentially present in any CPA laser system, but its effects may be overlooked because spatiotemporal pulse characterization is considerably more involved than measuring only spatial or temporal profile. PFT is particularly important for laser plasma accelerators (LPA) because it influences electron beam injection and steering. In this work, experimental results from the BELLA Center will be presented that demonstrate the effect of optical grating misalignment and optical compression, resulting in PFT, on accelerator performance. Theoretical models of laser and electron beam steering will be introduced based on particle-in-cell simulations showing distortion of the plasma wake. Theoretical predictions will be compared with experiments and complimentary simulations, and tolerances on PFT and optical compressor alignment will be developed as a function of LPA performance requirements. This work was supported by the Office of High Energy Physics, Office of Science, US Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231 and the National Science Foundation under Grant PHY-1415596.

  4. Usage Count: A New Indicator to Detect Research Fronts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Liang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Research fronts build on recent work, but using times cited as a traditional indicator to detect research fronts will inevitably result in a certain time lag. This study attempts to explore the effects of usage count as a new indicator to detect research fronts in shortening the time lag of classic indicators in research fronts detection. Design/methodology/approach: An exploratory study was conducted where the new indicator “usage count” was compared to the traditional citation count, “times cited,” in detecting research fronts of the regenerative medicine domain. An initial topic search of the term “regenerative medicine” returned 10,553 records published between 2000 and 2015 in the Web of Science (WoS. We first ranked these records with usage count and times cited, respectively, and selected the top 2,000 records for each. We then performed a co-citation analysis in order to obtain the citing papers of the co-citation clusters as the research fronts. Finally, we compared the average publication year of the citing papers as well as the mean cited year of the co-citation clusters. Findings: The citing articles detected by usage count tend to be published more recently compared with times cited within the same research front. Moreover, research fronts detected by usage count tend to be within the last two years, which presents a higher immediacy and real-time feature compared to times cited. There is approximately a three-year time span among the mean cited years (known as “intellectual base” of all clusters generated by usage count and this figure is about four years in the network of times cited. In comparison to times cited, usage count is a dynamic and instant indicator. Research limitations: We are trying to find the cutting-edge research fronts, but those generated based on co-citations may refer to the hot research fronts. The usage count of older highly cited papers was not taken into consideration, because the

  5. Iu. Ushakov & A. Stukalov, Front voennykh prokurorov [The Military Procurators’ Front], Moskva, Viatka, 2000, 223 pages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Voisin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Front voennykh prokurorov is a collection of essays written by two writers who are not known as specialists of military history, but obviously have access to archives, as proves the reprint, in the middle of the book, of several pages from the personal files of Afanas’ev, former Main Military Prosecutor of Soviet Armed Forces.The first part of the book is devoted to Nikolai Porfir’evich Afanas’ev’s memoirs, written, according to the editors, after his retirement in 1950. Afanas’ev, though les...

  6. Biomechanics of competitive front crawl swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, H M; Beek, P J

    1992-01-01

    Essential performance-determining factors in front crawl swimming can be analysed within a biomechanical framework, in reference to the physiological basis of performance. These factors include: active drag forces, effective propulsive forces, propelling efficiency and power output. The success of a swimmer is determined by the ability to generate propulsive force, while reducing the resistance to forward motion. Although for a given competitive stroke a range of optimal stroking styles may be expected across a sample of swimmers, a common element of technique related to a high performance level is the use of complex sculling motions of the hands to generate especially lift forces. By changing the orientation of the hand the propulsive force acting on the hand is aimed successfully in the direction of motion. Furthermore, the swimming velocity (v) is related to drag (A), power input (Pi, the rate of energy liberation via the aerobic/anaerobic metabolism), the gross efficiency (eg), propelling efficiency (ep), and power output (Po) according to: [formula; see text] Based on the research available at present it is concluded that: (a) drag in groups of elite swimmers homogeneous with respect to swimming technique is determined by anthropometric dimensions; (b) total mechanical power output (Po) is important since improvement in performance is related to increased Po. Furthermore, it shows dramatic changes with training and possibly reflects the size of the 'swimming engine'; (c) propelling efficiency seems to be important since it is much higher in elite swimmers (61%) than in triathletes (44%); and (d) distance per stroke gives a fairly good indication of propelling efficiency and may be used to evaluate individual progress in technical ability.

  7. Caracterización dinámica de los cambios microestructurales en barras de aceros dúplex SAF 2205 utilizando la dimensión de información

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez, Edda

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the ultrasonic signals behavior of a duplex stainless steel SAF 2205 (UNS S31803 after aging treatments at 875 and 950 °C. The first treatment promotes the precipitation of the sigma phase and the second, its dissolution. The microstructural evaluation was carried out by optical microscopy. The results showed an increase of the sigma phase fraction and the secondary austenite with the time of aging treatment at 875 °C. On the other hand, increasing the time of treatment at 950 °C promotes a reduction of the sigma phase and the corresponding increase of the ferrite phase fraction. The study proposed to evaluate in the dynamical system field the influence of microstructural phases in the signals behavior and their dependence on the energy losses occurring in system during heat treatment, by deterministic chaos theory. To accomplish characterization, algorithm employs the representation of dynamic phase space and the information dimension estimate. The results show a higher correlation between the information dimension and the attenuation coefficient in comparison with the phase fractions. However, the efficiency of this type of study will depend on the frequency selected for the evaluation of the material.En el presente estudio se evalúa el comportamiento dinámico de las señales ultrasónicas de muestras de acero dúplex SAF 2205 (UNS31803, sometidos a tratamientos de envejecimiento a 875 y 950 °C. En el primer tratamiento se promueve la precipitación de la fase sigma y en el segundo su disolución. Los resultados obtenidos por microscopía óptica indican que la cantidad relativa de la fase sigma aumenta progresivamente con el tiempo de envejecimiento a 875 °C, observándose la transformación de la fase ferrita en fase sigma y en austenita secundaria. Por otra parte, a medida que se aumenta el tiempo de tratamiento a 950 °C, se observa una reducción del porcentaje de fase sigma y un aumento de la fase ferr

  8. Hindrances to bistable front propagation: application to Wolbachia invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadin, Grégoire; Strugarek, Martin; Vauchelet, Nicolas

    2017-09-22

    We study the biological situation when an invading population propagates and replaces an existing population with different characteristics. For instance, this may occur in the presence of a vertically transmitted infection causing a cytoplasmic effect similar to the Allee effect (e.g. Wolbachia in Aedes mosquitoes): the invading dynamics we model is bistable. We aim at quantifying the propagules (what does it take for an invasion to start?) and the invasive power (how far can an invading front go, and what can stop it?). We rigorously show that a heterogeneous environment inducing a strong enough population gradient can stop an invading front, which will converge in this case to a stable front. We characterize the critical population jump, and also prove the existence of unstable fronts above the stable (blocking) fronts. Being above the maximal unstable front enables an invading front to clear the obstacle and propagate further. We are particularly interested in the case of artificial Wolbachia infection, used as a tool to fight arboviruses.

  9. Spin-1 particles with light-front approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Melo J.P.B.C.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available For the vector sector, i.e, mesons with spin-1, the electromagnetic form factors and anothers observables are calculated with the light-front approach. However, the light-front quantum field theory have some problems, for example, the rotational symmetry breaking. We solve that problem added the zero modes contribuition to the matrix elements of the electromagnetic current, besides the valence contribuition. We found that among the four independent matrix elements of the plus component in the light-front helicity basis only the 0 → 0 one carries zero mode contributions.

  10. Determination of cut front position in laser cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, M.; Thombansen, U.

    2016-07-01

    Laser cutting has a huge importance to manufacturing industry. Laser cutting machines operate with fixed technological parameters and this does not guarantee the best productivity. The adjustment of the cutting parameters during operation can improve the machine performance. Based on a coaxial measuring device it is possible to identify the cut front position during the cutting process. This paper describes the data analysis approach used to determine the cut front position for different feed rates. The cut front position was determined with good resolution, but improvements are needed to make the whole process more stable.

  11. Adaptive RF front-ends for hand-held applications

    CERN Document Server

    van Bezooijen, Andre; van Roermund, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    The RF front-end - antenna combination is a vital part of a mobile phone because its performance is very relevant to the link quality between hand-set and cellular network base-stations. The RF front-end performance suffers from changes in operating environment, like hand-effects, that are often unpredictable. ""Adaptive RF Front-Ends for Hand-Held Applications"" presents an analysis on the impact of fluctuating environmental parameters. In order to overcome undesired behavior two different adaptive control methods are treated that make RF frond-ends more resilient: adaptive impedance control,

  12. Visible leadership: going back to the front line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Nigel

    2013-07-01

    The report into care at Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust called for strong leadership in nursing and the government's response acknowledged the importance of senior managers gaining front line experience of the NHS. This article discusses the background to the need for visible leadership and the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to engaging with the front line. Lessons from other industries are considered and a spectrum of engagement activities relevant to health care suggested. Senior leaders' visits to the front line have brought identified benefits for staff but there is little proof of patient benefits, so more research needs to be commissioned to generate evidence of effectiveness.

  13. Fronts, water masses and heat content variability in the Western Indian sector of the Southern Ocean during austral summer 2004

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    AnilKumar, N.; Luis, A.J.; Somayajulu, Y.K.; RameshBabu, V.; Dash, M.K.; Pednekar, S.M.; Babu, K.N.; Sudhakar, M.; Pandey, P.C.

    of the southern sector of the Indian Ocean (Fu, 1986; Nagata et al, 1988; Park et al, 1993; Orsi et al., 1995; Belkin and Gordon, 1996; Sparrow et al., 1996; Holliday and Read, 1998; Park et al., 1998; Reid, 2003) which emphasized that the areas west... compared to previous studies (Park et al, 1993; Belkin and Gordon, 1996; Sparrow et al., 1996) are noted in the position of SAF in the present study. SAF narrowed from ~4? to 1.5? latitude width along 45?E and 57?30?E sections, respectively. On the other...

  14. Interacting wave fronts and rarefaction waves in a second order model of nonlinear thermoviscous fluids : Interacting fronts and rarefaction waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Anders Rønne; Sørensen, Mads Peter; Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich

    2011-01-01

    the Hamiltonian structure, in contrast to the Kuznetsov equation, a model often used in nonlinear acoustics. An exact traveling wave front solution is derived from a generalized traveling wave assumption for the velocity potential. Numerical studies of the evolution of a number of arbitrary initial conditions...... as well as head-on colliding and confluent wave fronts exhibit several nonlinear interaction phenomena. These include wave fronts of changed velocity and amplitude along with the emergence of rarefaction waves. An analysis using the continuity of the solutions as well as the boundary conditions...

  15. Your employees: the front line in cyber security

    OpenAIRE

    Ashenden, D

    2016-01-01

    First published in The Chemical Engineer and reproduced by Crest - Centre for Research and Evidence on Security Threats, 26/01/2016 (https://crestresearch.ac.uk/comment/employees-front-line-cyber-security/)

  16. Relvakogujad sõjaajalooklubist Front Line vahistati / Kadri Ratt

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ratt, Kadri

    2009-01-01

    Kaitsepolitsei võttis vahi alla 9 meest, keda kahtlustatakse suures koguses lõhkeainete, lõhkekehade ja tulirelvade ebaseaduslikus käitlemises. 6 meest neist kuuluvad sõjaajalooklubisse Front Line

  17. Antarctic Ice-Shelf Front Dynamics from ICESat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, John W.; Zwally, H. Jay; Saba, Jack L.; Yi, Donghui

    2012-01-01

    Time variable elevation profiles from ICESat Laser Altimetry over the period 2003-2009 provide a means to quantitatively detect and track topographic features on polar ice surfaces. The results of this study provide a measure of the horizontal motion of ice-shelf fronts. We examine the time histories of elevation profiles crossing the ice fronts of the Ross, Ronne, Filchner, Riiser-Larson and Fimbul shelves. This provides a basis for estimating dynamics in two dimensions, i.e. in elevation and horizontally in the along-track direction. Ice front velocities, corrected for ground-track intersection angle, range from nearly static to 1.1 km/yr. In many examples, a decrease in elevation up to 1 m/yr near the shelf frontis also detectable. Examples of tabular calving along shelf fronts are seen in some elevation profiles and are confirmed by corresponding MODIS imagery.

  18. Management plan for Midcontinent greater white-fronted geese

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this plan is to provide guidelines for management decisions affecting the Midcontinent Population of Greater White-fronted Geese (Anser albifrons...

  19. FACILITATING RADICAL FRONT-END INNOVATION THROUGH TARGETED HR PRACTICES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Annabeth

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how radical front end innovation can be actively facilitated through selected and targeted HR practices and bundles of HR practices. The empirical field is an explorative case study of front end innovation and HR practices in the pharmaceutical industry, with an in-depth case...... study of the Danish pharmaceutical company, H. Lundbeck A/S, and explorative studies of seven European and American pharmaceutical and biotech companies. The study aims to show how companies can apply HR practices in ways that actively supports the development of radical front end innovation. The value...... added and the contribution of this article to the existing FEI and HR literature therefore lies in the exploration and mapping of how radical front end innovation is and can be facilitated through targeted HR practices; and in identifying the unique opportunities and challenges of innovation...

  20. Quarkonium as a relativistic bound state on the light front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James P.

    2017-07-01

    We study charmonium and bottomonium as relativistic bound states in a light-front quantized Hamiltonian formalism. The effective Hamiltonian is based on light-front holography. We use a recently proposed longitudinal confinement to complete the soft-wall holographic potential for the heavy flavors. The spin structure is generated from the one-gluon exchange interaction with a running coupling. The adoption of asymptotic freedom improves the spectroscopy compared with previous light-front results. Within this model, we compute the mass spectroscopy, decay constants and the r.m.s. radii. We also present a detailed study of the obtained light-front wave functions and use the wave functions to compute the light-cone distributions, specifically the distribution amplitudes and parton distribution functions. Overall, our model provides a reasonable description of the heavy quarkonia.

  1. Nucleon parton distributions in a light-front quark model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E; Schmidt, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Continuing our analysis of parton distributions in the nucleon, we extend our light-front quark model in order to obtain both the helicity-independent and the helicity-dependent parton distributions...

  2. Cosmic Pressure Fronts Mapped by Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-01

    A colossal cosmic "weather system" produced by the collision of two giant clusters of galaxies has been imaged by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. For the first time, the pressure fronts in the system can be traced in detail, and they show a bright, but relatively cool 50 million degree Celsius central region embedded in large elongated cloud of 70 million degree Celsius gas, all of which is roiling in a faint "atmosphere"of 100 million degree Celsius gas. "We can compare this to an intergalactic cold front," said Maxim Markevitch of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Mass. and leader of the international team involved in the analysis of the observations. "A major difference is that in this case, cold means 70 million degree Celsius." The gas clouds are in the core of a galaxy cluster known as Abell 2142. The cluster is six million light years across and contains hundreds of galaxies and enough gas to make a thousand more. It is one of the most massive objects in the universe. Galaxy clusters grow to vast sizes as smaller clusters are pulled inward under the influence of gravity. They collide and merge over the course of billions of years, releasing tremendous amounts of energy that heats the cluster gas to 100 million degrees Celsius. The Chandra data provides the first detailed look at the late stages of this merger process. Previously, scientists had used the German-US Roentgensatellite to produce a broad brush picture of the cluster. The elongated shape of the bright cloud suggested that two clouds were in the process of coalescing into one, but the details remained unclear. Chandra is able to measure variations of temperature, density, and pressure with unprecedented resolution. "Now we can begin to understand the physics of these mergers, which are among the most energetic events in the universe," said Markevitch. "The pressure and density maps of the cluster show a sharp boundary that can only exist in the moving environment of a

  3. Tsunami generation by ocean floor rupture front propagation: Hamiltonian description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Pavlov

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The Hamiltonian method is applied to the problem of tsunami generation caused by a propagating rupture front and deformation of the ocean floor. The method establishes an alternative framework for analyzing the tsunami generation process and produces analytical expressions for the power and directivity of tsunami radiation (in the far-field for two illustrative cases, with constant and gradually varying speeds of rupture front propagation.

  4. Traveling wave front solutions in lateral-excitatory neuronal networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sittipong Ruktamatakul

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss the shape of traveling wave front solutions to a neuronal model with the connection function to be of lateral excitation type. This means that close connecting cells have an inhibitory influence, while cells that aremore distant have an excitatory influence. We give results on the shape of the wave fronts solutions, which exhibit different shapes depend ing on the size of a threshold parameter.

  5. Flow structure in front of the broad-crested weir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachoval Zbyněk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with research focused on description of flow structure in front of broad-crested weir. Based on experimental measurement, the flow structure in front of the weir (the recirculation zone of flow and tornado vortices and flow structure on the weir crest has been described. The determined flow character has been simulated using numerical model and based on comparing results the suitable model of turbulence has been recommended.

  6. Indico front-end: From spaghetti to lasagna

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    We will present how we transitioned from legacy spaghetti UI code to a more coherent, easier to understand and maintain ecosystem of front-end technologies and facilities with a strong emphasis in reusable components. In particular, we will share with you: 1) how we use Sass to maintain our home-baked CSS, 2) how we survive in 2017 without front-end Javascript frameworks, and 3) how we use template macros and WTForms for generating consistent HTML transparently.

  7. Light-Front Holography and AdS/QCD Correspondence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.

    2008-04-23

    Light-Front Holography is a remarkable consequence of the correspondence between string theory in AdS space and conformal field theories in physical-space time. It allows string modes {Phi}(z) in the AdS fifth dimension to be precisely mapped to the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in terms of a specific light-front impact variable {zeta} which measures the separation of the quark and gluonic constituents within the hadron. This mapping was originally obtained by matching the exact expression for electromagnetic current matrix elements in AdS space with the corresponding exact expression for the current matrix element using light-front theory in physical space-time. More recently we have shown that one obtains the identical holographic mapping using matrix elements of the energy-momentum tensor, thus providing an important consistency test and verification of holographic mapping from AdS to physical observables defined on the light-front. The resulting light-front Schrodinger equations predicted from AdS/QCD give a good representation of the observed meson and baryon spectra and give excellent phenomenological predictions for amplitudes such as electromagnetic form factors and decay constants.

  8. Observed Low Frequency Variability of the Brazil Current Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goni, G. J.; Bringas Gutierrez, F.; Di Nezio, P. N.

    2012-12-01

    The Brazil Current is a weak western boundary current, the southwest component of the South Atlantic subtropical gyre, which is the main conduit of upper ocean waters in the region. We report her the observed low frequency variability of the Brazil Current front using satellite-derived sea height anomaly and sea surface temperature observations during the 1993-2008 period. The variability of the front is studied in terms of the separation of the Brazil Current front from the continental shelf break. During the study period, estimates of this parameter indicate a shift to the south of approximately 1.5 degrees. Statistically significant changes are not observed in the geostrophic transport of the Brazil and Malvinas currents suggesting that the low-frequency changes of the Brazil Current front are governed by different mechanisms than the seasonal variability of these surface currents. Surface drifter trajectories as well as simulations using synthetic drifters are consistent with the observed shift to the south of the Brazil Current front. Trends of eddy kinetic energy, sea height anomaly, sea surface temperature and wind stress curl are also in agreement with the variability reported here. Wavelet transform analysis revealed an interesting change in the periodicity of the separation of the Brazil Current front from the continental shelf break from annual to bi-annual during 2003. Longer records together with comprehensive numerical experiments will ultimately be needed to determine the origin of these changes.

  9. Digital front-end module (DFEM) series; Digital front end module (DFEM) series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The digital front-end module (DFEM) is a module in which the processes ranging from the reception of digitally modulated radiofrequencies to the output of digital IF (Intermediate Frequency) signals or data streams are integrated. Beginning with a module for the MCNS (Multimedia Cable Network System) cable modem which was the first module in this business field approved by the Cable Labs, U.S., Toshiba has developed a series of DFEMs for various digital media for satellites, ground waves, and CATV (Cable Television) systems. The series is characterized by (1) the serialization of DFEMs compatible with various digital modulation techniques such as 8 PSK (Phase Shift Keying), OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing), and 256 QAM (Quadrature Amplitude Modulation), (2) easy connection with digital circuits thanks to the high shielding effect, and (3) the achievement of smaller size, higher performance, and lower power consumption. (translated by NEDO)

  10. Combustion waves and fronts in flows flames, shocks, detonations, ablation fronts and explosion of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Clavin, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Combustion is a fascinating phenomenon coupling complex chemistry to transport mechanisms and nonlinear fluid dynamics. This book provides an up-to-date and comprehensive presentation of the nonlinear dynamics of combustion waves and other non-equilibrium energetic systems. The major advances in this field have resulted from analytical studies of simplified models performed in close relation with carefully controlled laboratory experiments. The key to understanding the complex phenomena is a systematic reduction of the complexity of the basic equations. Focusing on this fundamental approach, the book is split into three parts. Part I provides physical insights for physics-oriented readers, Part II presents detailed technical analysis using perturbation methods for theoreticians, and Part III recalls the necessary background knowledge in physics, chemistry and fluid dynamics. This structure makes the content accessible to newcomers to the physics of unstable fronts in flows, whilst also offering advanced mater...

  11. A Tailward Moving Current Sheet Normal Magnetic Field Front Followed by an Earthward Moving Dipolarization Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, K.-J.; Goldstein, M. L.; Moore, T. E.; Walsh, B. M.; Baishev, D. G.; Moiseyev, A. V.; Shevtsov, B. M.; Yumoto, K.

    2014-01-01

    A case study is presented using measurements from the Cluster spacecraft and ground-based magnetometers that show a substorm onset propagating from the inner to outer plasma sheet. On 3 October 2005, Cluster, traversing an ion-scale current sheet at the near-Earth plasma sheet, detected a sudden enhancement of Bz, which was immediately followed by a series of flux rope structures. Both the local Bz enhancement and flux ropes propagated tailward. Approximately 5 min later, another Bz enhancement, followed by a large density decrease, was observed to rapidly propagate earthward. Between the two Bz enhancements, a significant removal of magnetic flux occurred, possibly resulting from the tailward moving Bz enhancement and flux ropes. In our scenario, this flux removal caused the magnetotail to be globally stretched so that the thinnest sheet formed tailward of Cluster. The thinned current sheet facilitated magnetic reconnection that quickly evolved from plasma sheet to lobe and generated the later earthward moving dipolarization front (DF) followed by a reduction in density and entropy. Ground magnetograms located near the meridian of Cluster's magnetic foot points show two-step bay enhancements. The positive bay associated with the first Bz enhancement indicates that the substorm onset signatures propagated from the inner to the outer plasma sheet, consistent with the Cluster observation. The more intense bay features associated with the later DF are consistent with the earthward motion of the front. The event suggests that current disruption signatures that originated in the near-Earth current sheet propagated tailward, triggering or facilitating midtail reconnection, thereby preconditioning the magnetosphere for a later strong substorm enhancement.

  12. A beam-splitter-type 3-D endoscope for front view and front-diagonal view images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiuchi, Hiroki; Masamune, Ken; Kuwana, Kenta; Dohi, Takeyoshi; Kim, Keri; Yamashita, Hiromasa; Chiba, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    In endoscopic surgery, surgeons must manipulate an endoscope inside the body cavity to observe a large field-of-view while estimating the distance between surgical instruments and the affected area by reference to the size or motion of the surgical instruments in 2-D endoscopic images on a monitor. Therefore, there is a risk of the endoscope or surgical instruments physically damaging body tissues. To overcome this problem, we developed a Ø7- mm 3-D endoscope that can switch between providing front and front-diagonal view 3-D images by simply rotating its sleeves. This 3-D endoscope consists of a conventional 3-D endoscope and an outer and inner sleeve with a beam splitter and polarization plates. The beam splitter was used for visualizing both the front and front-diagonal view and was set at 25° to the outer sleeve's distal end in order to eliminate a blind spot common to both views. Polarization plates were used to avoid overlap of the two views. We measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), sharpness, chromatic aberration (CA), and viewing angle of this 3-D endoscope and evaluated its feasibility in vivo. Compared to the conventional 3-D endoscope, SNR and sharpness of this 3-D endoscope decreased by 20 and 7 %, respectively. No significant difference was found in CA. The viewing angle for both the front and front-diagonal views was about 50°. In the in vivo experiment, this 3-D endoscope can provide clear 3-D images of both views by simply rotating its inner sleeve. The developed 3-D endoscope can provide the front and front-diagonal view by simply rotating the inner sleeve, therefore the risk of damage to fragile body tissues can be significantly decreased.

  13. Biogeografía histórica de la familia Curculionidae (Coleoptera en las subregiones Subantártica y Chilena Central Historical biogeography of family Curculionidae (Coleoptera on Subantarctic and Central Chilean subregions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Posadas

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available El análisis de los patrones de distribución y la información filogenética de 71 especies de Curculionidae, distribuidas en las subregiones Subantártica y Chilena Central, aplicando los métodos biogeográficos de los árboles reconciliados y análisis de parsimonia de Brooks (BPA, resulta en un único cladograma general de áreas: ((Chile Central (Maule, Bosque Valdiviano (Islas Malvinas (Páramo Magallánico, Bosque Magallánico. La aplicación del análisis de dispersión-vicarianza (DIVA muestra que el evento vicariante más frecuente es el que separa las Islas Malvinas de las otras dos provincias subantárticas meridionales. Por otra parte, de acuerdo con los resultados del DIVA, se evidencia que las relaciones entre el Maule, Bosque Valdiviano y Chile Central no se deberían a eventos de vicarianza sino a eventos de dispersión, ya que el 61% del total de los eventos de dispersión implica a estas tres áreas. Aún más, los eventos de dispersión más frecuentes implican al Maule, ya sea en relación con Chile Central o con el Bosque Valdiviano, por lo que se deduce que la aparente complejidad de las relaciones biogeográficas del Maule podría estar relacionada con dichos eventos de dispersión.The application of the historical biogeographic techniques of reconciled trees and Brooks parsimony analysis (BPA to the distributional and phylogenetic information of 71 species of Curculionidae ranged in the Subantarctic and Central Chilean subregions results in a single general area cladogram: ((Central Chile (Maule, Valdivian Forest (Malvinas Islands (Magellanic Moorland, Magellanic Forest. The application of dispersal-vicariance analysis (DIVA to the same data set shows as the most frequent vicariant event the split of Islas Malvinas from the two southern Subantarctic provinces. In addition, DIVA results evidenced that the relationship among Maule, Valdivian Forest, and Central Chile did not arise from vicariance events (common history

  14. ALMA North American Integration Center Front-End Test System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediss, Geoffrey A.; Crabtree, Joshua; Crady, Kirk; Gaines, Erik; McLeod, Morgan; Morris, Greg; Williams, Rick; Perfetto, Antonio; Webber, John

    2010-10-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter (ALMA) Array Front End (FE) system is the first element in a complex chain of signal receiving, conversion, processing and recording. 70 Front Ends will be required for the project. The Front End is designed to receive signals in ten different frequency bands. In the initial phase of operations, the antennas will be fully equipped with six bands. These are Band 3 (84-116 GHz), Band 4 (125-163 GHz), Band 6 (211-275 GHz), Band 7 (275-373 GHz), Band 8 (385-500 GHz) and Band 9 (602-720 GHz). It is planned to equip the antennas with the missing bands at a later stage of ALMA operations, with a few Band 5 (163-211 GHz) and Band 10 (787-950 GHz) receivers in use before the end of the construction project. The ALMA Front End is far superior to any existing receiver systems; spin-offs of the ALMA prototypes are leading to improved sensitivities in existing millimeter and submillimeter observatories. The Front End units are comprised of numerous elements, produced at different locations in Europe, North America and East Asia and are integrated at several Front End integration centers (FEIC) to insure timely delivery of all the units to Chile. The North American FEIC (NA FEIC) is at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory facility in Charlottesville, Virginia, USA. This paper describes the design and performance of the test set used at the NA FEIC to check the performance of the Front Ends, following integration and prior to shipment to Chile.

  15. Acute Effects of Eccentric Overload on Concentric Front Squat Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munger, Cameron N; Archer, David C; Leyva, Whitney D; Wong, Megan A; Coburn, Jared W; Costa, Pablo B; Brown, Lee E

    2017-05-01

    Munger, CN, Archer, DC, Leyva, WD, Wong, MA, Coburn, JW, Costa, PB, and Brown, LE. Acute effects of eccentric overload on concentric front squat performance. J Strength Cond Res 31(5): 1192-1197, 2017-Eccentric overload is used to enhance performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of eccentric overload on concentric front squat performance. Twenty resistance-trained men (age = 23.80 ± 1.82 years, height = 176.95 ± 5.21 cm, mass = 83.49 ± 10.43 kg, 1 repetition maximum [1RM] front squat = 131.02 ± 21.32 kg) volunteered. A dynamic warm-up and warm-up sets of front squat were performed. Eccentric hooks were added to the barbell. They descended for 3 seconds, until eccentric hooks released, and performed the concentric phase as fast as possible. There were 3 randomly ordered conditions with the concentric phase always at 90% 1RM and the eccentric phase at 105, 110, and 120% of 1RM. Two repetitions were performed for each condition. A repeated measures analysis of variance was used to determine differences. For peak velocity, there were main effects for time and condition (p front squat is a precursor.

  16. Virulence evolution at the front line of spreading epidemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griette, Quentin; Raoul, Gaël; Gandon, Sylvain

    2015-11-01

    Understanding and predicting the spatial spread of emerging pathogens is a major challenge for the public health management of infectious diseases. Theoretical epidemiology shows that the speed of an epidemic is governed by the life-history characteristics of the pathogen and its ability to disperse. Rapid evolution of these traits during the invasion may thus affect the speed of epidemics. Here we study the influence of virulence evolution on the spatial spread of an epidemic. At the edge of the invasion front, we show that more virulent and transmissible genotypes are expected to win the competition with other pathogens. Behind the front line, however, more prudent exploitation strategies outcompete virulent pathogens. Crucially, even when the presence of the virulent mutant is limited to the edge of the front, the invasion speed can be dramatically altered by pathogen evolution. We support our analysis with individual-based simulations and we discuss the additional effects of demographic stochasticity taking place at the front line on virulence evolution. We confirm that an increase of virulence can occur at the front, but only if the carrying capacity of the invading pathogen is large enough. These results are discussed in the light of recent empirical studies examining virulence evolution at the edge of spreading epidemics. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  17. Submesoscale CO2 variability across an upwelling front off Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhn, Eike E.; Thomsen, Sören; Arévalo-Martínez, Damian L.; Kanzow, Torsten

    2017-12-01

    As a major source for atmospheric CO2, the Peruvian upwelling region exhibits strong variability in surface fCO2 on short spatial and temporal scales. Understanding the physical processes driving the strong variability is of fundamental importance for constraining the effect of marine emissions from upwelling regions on the global CO2 budget. In this study, a frontal decay on length scales of 𝒪(10 km) was observed off the Peruvian coast following a pronounced decrease in down-frontal (equatorward) wind speed with a time lag of 9 h. Simultaneously, the sea-to-air flux of CO2 on the inshore (cold) side of the front dropped from up to 80 to 10 mmol m-2 day-1, while the offshore (warm) side of the front was constantly outgassing at a rate of 10-20 mmol m-2 day-1. Based on repeated ship transects the decay of the front was observed to occur in two phases. The first phase was characterized by a development of coherent surface temperature anomalies which gained in amplitude over 6-9 h. The second phase was characterized by a disappearance of the surface temperature front within 6 h. Submesoscale mixed-layer instabilities were present but seem too slow to completely remove the temperature gradient in this short time period. Dynamics such as a pressure-driven gravity current appear to be a likely mechanism behind the evolution of the front.

  18. 40 CFR 63.486 - Batch front-end process vent provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Batch front-end process vent provisions... Batch front-end process vent provisions. (a) Batch front-end process vents. Except as specified in paragraph (b) of this section, owners and operators of new and existing affected sources with batch front...

  19. Ocean fronts drive marine fishery production and biogeochemical cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodson, C. Brock; Litvin, Steven Y.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term changes in nutrient supply and primary production reportedly foreshadow substantial declines in global marine fishery production. These declines combined with current overfishing, habitat degradation, and pollution paint a grim picture for the future of marine fisheries and ecosystems. However, current models forecasting such declines do not account for the effects of ocean fronts as biogeochemical hotspots. Here we apply a fundamental technique from fluid dynamics to an ecosystem model to show how fronts increase total ecosystem biomass, explain fishery production, cause regime shifts, and contribute significantly to global biogeochemical budgets by channeling nutrients through alternate trophic pathways. We then illustrate how ocean fronts affect fishery abundance and yield, using long-term records of anchovy–sardine regimes and salmon abundances in the California Current. These results elucidate the fundamental importance of biophysical coupling as a driver of bottom–up vs. top–down regulation and high productivity in marine ecosystems. PMID:25624488

  20. Direct Numerical Simulations of Reacting Fronts in Incompressible Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirova, N.; Cattaneo, F.; Malagoli, A.; Oberman, A.; Ruchayskiy, 0.; Rosner, R.

    2000-11-01

    We perform direct numerical simulations of an advected scalar field which diffuses and reacts according to a nonlinear reaction law. The goal of the simulations is to study flame stability with respect to initial conditions, and to determine how the bulk burning rate of the reaction front is affected by an imposed flow. We focus for simplicity on the cases of an imposed periodic shear or cellular flow. The interaction between the reaction front and the applied flow is determined by the following parameters: (a) the ratio between the laminar front thickness and the shear length scale, (b) the ratio between the laminar flame speed and the characteristic flow velocity, and (c) the ratio between heat conductivity and material diffusion (Lewis Number). We compare the numerical results with recent work of P. Constantin and collaborators, in particularly, their prediction for flame stability and analytical upper and lower bounds for the bulk burning rate.

  1. FRONT AXLE OF MERCEDES AMG GT. MODELLING IN AUTODESK INVENTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    COROLENCU Eduard – Narcis

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the front axle of the Mercedes AMG GT model, as so as the graphical representation of the axle and of the subassemblies of suspension system and steering system, using the AutoCAD and Autodesk Inventor software. The paper include the steps for made the 3D model of the front axle in order to highlight the advantages of suspension and steering system, the function of this systems and methods for manufacturing of these. The 3D model presents a suite of complex surfaces. This type of surfaces is often designed with non-analytical means. The main commands and options used in Autodesk Inventor software were presented and explained. All the component parts of the front axle were modelled and assembled according to their functional role. Finally, the models were rendered in order to have a realistic appearance.

  2. Stability of a laminar flame front propagating within a tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamandra, G.D.; Maiorov, N.I.

    1983-01-01

    The present study examines the deformation of a flame propagating in a semi-closed horizontal tube under the action of perturbations artificially created on the flame surface by brief action of a transverse electrical field on the combustion zone. The fuel mixture used was a dry methane-air mixture containing 10% CH4, which produced a flame front with relatively low convexity. Flame front propagation was recorded by high-speed photographic methods. Interpretation of the photographs reveals that the magnitude of the perturbations increases by an exponential law; fine scale perturbations on the flame surface are suppressed by coarse scale perturbations, while the stable curved form of the flame front in the tube is ensured by the stabilizing action of the tube walls.

  3. Concepts for a Muon Accelerator Front-End

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratakis, Diktys [Fermilab; Berg, Scott [Brookhaven; Neuffer, David [Fermilab

    2017-03-16

    We present a muon capture front-end scheme for muon based applications. In this Front-End design, a proton bunch strikes a target and creates secondary pions that drift into a capture channel, decaying into muons. A series of rf cavities forms the resulting muon beams into a series of bunches of differerent energies, aligns the bunches to equal central energies, and initiates ionization cooling. We also discuss the design of a chicane system for the removal of unwanted secondary particles from the muon capture region and thus reduce activation of the machine. With the aid of numerical simulations we evaluate the performance of this Front-End scheme as well as study its sensitivity against key parameters such as the type of target, the number of rf cavities and the gas pressure of the channel.

  4. Ocean fronts drive marine fishery production and biogeochemical cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodson, C Brock; Litvin, Steven Y

    2015-02-10

    Long-term changes in nutrient supply and primary production reportedly foreshadow substantial declines in global marine fishery production. These declines combined with current overfishing, habitat degradation, and pollution paint a grim picture for the future of marine fisheries and ecosystems. However, current models forecasting such declines do not account for the effects of ocean fronts as biogeochemical hotspots. Here we apply a fundamental technique from fluid dynamics to an ecosystem model to show how fronts increase total ecosystem biomass, explain fishery production, cause regime shifts, and contribute significantly to global biogeochemical budgets by channeling nutrients through alternate trophic pathways. We then illustrate how ocean fronts affect fishery abundance and yield, using long-term records of anchovy-sardine regimes and salmon abundances in the California Current. These results elucidate the fundamental importance of biophysical coupling as a driver of bottom-up vs. top-down regulation and high productivity in marine ecosystems.

  5. Light-Front Holography and Non-Perturbative QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2009-12-09

    The combination of Anti-de Sitter space (AdS) methods with light-front holography leads to a semi-classical first approximation to the spectrum and wavefunctions of meson and baryon light-quark bound states. Starting from the bound-state Hamiltonian equation of motion in QCD, we derive relativistic light-front wave equations in terms of an invariant impact variable {zeta} which measures the separation of the quark and gluonic constituents within the hadron at equal light-front time. These equations of motion in physical space-time are equivalent to the equations of motion which describe the propagation of spin-J modes in anti-de Sitter (AdS) space. Its eigenvalues give the hadronic spectrum, and its eigenmodes represent the probability distribution of the hadronic constituents at a given scale. Applications to the light meson and baryon spectra are presented. The predicted meson spectrum has a string-theory Regge form M{sup 2} = 4{kappa}{sup 2}(n + L + S = 2); i.e., the square of the eigenmass is linear in both L and n, where n counts the number of nodes of the wavefunction in the radial variable {zeta}. The space-like pion form factor is also well reproduced. One thus obtains a remarkable connection between the description of hadronic modes in AdS space and the Hamiltonian formulation of QCD in physical space-time quantized on the light-front at fixed light-front time {tau}. The model can be systematically improved by using its complete orthonormal solutions to diagonalize the full QCD light-front Hamiltonian or by applying the Lippmann-Schwinger method in order to systematically include the QCD interaction terms.

  6. Lock-exchange experiments with an autocatalytic reaction front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malham, I. Bou; Jarrige, N.; Martin, J.; Rakotomalala, N.; Talon, L.; Salin, D.

    2010-12-01

    A viscous lock-exchange gravity current corresponds to the reciprocal exchange of two fluids of different densities in a horizontal channel. The resulting front between the two fluids spreads as the square root of time, with a diffusion coefficient reflecting the buoyancy, viscosity, and geometrical configuration of the current. On the other hand, an autocatalytic reaction front between a reactant and a product may propagate as a solitary wave, namely, at a constant velocity and with a stationary concentration profile, resulting from the balance between molecular diffusion and chemical reaction. In most systems, the fluid left behind the front has a different density leading to a lock-exchange configuration. We revisit, with a chemical reaction, the classical situation of lock-exchange. We present an experimental analysis of buoyancy effects on the shape and the velocity of the iodate arsenous acid autocatalytic reaction fronts, propagating in horizontal rectangular channels and for a wide range of aspect ratios (1/3 to 20) and cylindrical tubes. We do observe stationary-shaped fronts, spanning the height of the cell and propagating along the cell axis. Our data support the contention that the front velocity and its extension are linked to each other and that their variations scale with a single variable involving the diffusion coefficient of the lock-exchange in the absence of chemical reaction. This analysis is supported by results obtained with lattice Bathnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) simulations Jarrige et al. [Phys. Rev. E 81, 06631 (2010)], in other geometries (like in 2D simulations by Rongy et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 127, 114710 (2007)] and experiments in cylindrical tubes by Pojman et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 95, 1299 (1991)]), and for another chemical reaction Schuszter et al. [Phys. Rev. E 79, 016216 (2009)].

  7. Differential sensor in front photopyroelectric technique: II. Experimental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, R; Moreno, I; Araujo-Andrade, C [Facultad de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Calz. Solidaridad Esquina Paseo de la Bufa s/n, CP 98060, Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); MarIn, E [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y TecnologIa Avanzada-Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, CP 11500, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Cruz-Orea, A [Departamento de Fisica, CINVESTAV-IPN, Av. IPN No. 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, CP 07360, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Pichardo-Molina, J L, E-mail: rumen@fisica.uaz.edu.m [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, Loma del Bosque 115, Loma del Campestre, CP 37150, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2009-06-21

    We describe the differential cell design and the experimental (optical and electronic) setup for the differential front photopyroelectric technique, whose theory has been developed in the first part of this paper (Ivanov et al 2008 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 41 085106). We will show first how the direct (non-differential) front photopyroelectric theory described in our previous paper reproduces well the experimental results. The usefulness of the differential technique is demonstrated by means of experimental measurements of the thermal effusivity in binary ethanol-water and glycerol-water mixtures, based on a theoretical methodology that simplifies the measurement procedure and diminishes the experimental uncertainty.

  8. Taking charge: front-line nurse leadership development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzkopf, Ruth; Sherman, Rose O; Kiger, Anna J

    2012-04-01

    The recent Institute of Medicine (2010) report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, included a recommendation that nurses at all levels should be prepared and enabled to lead change to advance health care in the United States. Historically, in most organizations, nursing leadership development programs have focused on nurses in management or executive roles rather than those working in front-line leadership roles. This article describes a front-line leadership development initiative developed by Tenet Healthcare Corporation and attended by 400 charge nurses. Program development, evaluation, and lessons learned that can be applied in other organizations are discussed. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Cold Fronts in Clusters of Galaxies: Observations and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markevitch, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    Mergers of galaxy clusters -- some of the most energetic events in the Universe -- produce disturbances in hot intracluster medium, such as shocks and cold fronts, that can be used as tools to study the physics of galaxy clusters. Cold fronts may constrain viscosity and the structure and strength of the cluster magnetic fields. Combined with radio data, these observations also shed light on the production of ultrarelativistic particles that are known to coexist with the cluster thermal plasma. This talk will summarize the current X-ray observations of cluster mergers, as well as some recent radio data and high resolution hydrodynamic simulations.

  10. General characteristics of current in front of Port Said, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed S. Elsharkawy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a preliminary investigation of the general characteristics of the current in front of the coastal Mediterranean city: Port Said, Egypt. The study of the current regime in front of Port Said helps environmental engineers to tackle problems as marine port sedimentation and shoreline changes. Surface and bottom current recordings at a single offshore station of depth 104 m located at 31° 34.90′ N, 32° 30.01′ E have been subject to statistical analysis. The measurements showed unexpectedly that bottom currents were relatively stronger than surface currents during May-99.

  11. Overtopping of Rubble Mound Breakwaters with Front Reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    2007-01-01

    The design and performance of breakwaters with front reservoir are discussed on the basis of physical 2-D model tests with a number of cross sections, in which vertopping discharge and spatial distribution, wave forces on inner parapet walls, and stability of reservoir armour were studied....... The sensitivity of these quantities to the width of the reservoir is discussed. It is demonstrated that front reservoir solutions are more economical than conventional cross section solutions, such as bermed structures and mild slope structures, in cases where low crests and small overtopping discharges...

  12. CMOS front-end electronics for radiation sensors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2071026

    2015-01-01

    This book offers a comprehensive treatment of front-end electronics for radiation detection. It discusses the fundamental principles of signal processing for radiation detectors and describes circuits at the level of functional building blocks, omitting transistor-level implementation. It also covers important system-level topics commonly found in the world of front-end electronics for radiation sensors. The book develops the topics in detail, with a constant focus on practical problems. It also provides real implementation examples that offer insights and stimuli for more experienced engineers already working in the field.

  13. ATLAS LAr Phase upgrade of the Front End Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Newcomer, Mitchel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Phase II upgrade of the ATLAS Liquid Argon detector includes a 17 bit dynamic range front end amplifier with a two or three gain multi‐pole shaper employing CR‐(RC)n shaping. Each gain stage of the shaper will be followed by a 40Msps, 14b dynamic range, 12‐13b ENOB digitizer, serializer and fiber optic driver. A study is underway to see if a single technology (65nm or 130nm CMOS) will be suitable for all blocks up to the optical Link, enabling consideration of the development a Front End System On a Chip (FESOC).

  14. Osteoma in a blue-fronted Amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, João Felipe Rito; Levy, Marcelo Guilherme Bezerra; Liparisi, Flavia; Romão, Mario Antonio Pinto

    2013-09-01

    Osteoma is an uncommon bone formation documented in avian species and other animals. A blue-fronted Amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva) with clinical respiratory symptoms was examined because of a hard mass present on the left nostril. Radiographs suggested a bone tumor, and the mass was surgically excised. Histopathologic examination revealed features of an osteoma. To our knowledge, this is the first description of an osteoma in a blue-fronted Amazon parrot. Osteoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis in birds with respiratory distress and swelling of the nostril.

  15. Front Range Forest Health Partnership Phase 1 feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkin, P

    1998-09-01

    The Front Range Forest Health Partnership is an alliance of individuals, citizen groups, federal, state, private, and nonprofit organizations that formed to promote forest health restoration and reduce fire risks on Colorado's Front Range. The partnership promotes selective thinning to restore forest health and supports economically feasible end uses for wood waste materials. The Phase I study was initiated to determine the environmental and economic feasibility of using wood wastes from forested and urban areas for the production of fuel-grade ethanol.

  16. Fermions in light front transverse lattice quantum chromodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    boost invariant wave functions. Furthermore, rotations in the transverse plane remains kinematical. Since vacuum processes receive contributions only from k· =0, Fock vacuum becomes an eigenstate of the light front Hamiltonian in the interacting theory (with the exception of theories with spontaneous symmetry breaking) ...

  17. Vocal matching by orange-fronted conures (Aratinga canicularis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balsby, Thorsten J S; Bradbury, Jack W

    2009-01-01

    in groups with variable composition, and lack multiple alarm signals. Here we present the results of interactive playbacks in a fission/fusion parrot species, the orange-fronted conjure (Aratinga canicularis), that provide evidence of vocal matching. A randomly selected loud contact call (chee) per trial...

  18. Propagating fronts in reaction-transport systems with memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, A. [Department of Chemistry, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275-0314 (United States)], E-mail: ayadav1@lsu.edu; Fedotov, Sergei [School of Mathematics, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1DQ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: sergei.fedotov@manchester.ac.uk; Mendez, Vicenc [Grup de Fisica Estadistica, Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain)], E-mail: vicenc.mendez@uab.es; Horsthemke, Werner [Department of Chemistry, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275-0314 (United States)], E-mail: whorsthe@smu.edu

    2007-11-26

    In reaction-transport systems with non-standard diffusion, the memory of the transport causes a coupling of reactions and transport. We investigate the effect of this coupling for systems with Fisher-type kinetics and obtain a general analytical expression for the front speed. We apply our results to the specific case of subdiffusion.

  19. Thermal front propagation in variable aperture fracture–matrix system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the cold water and hot fractured rock to access the feasibility of geothermal energy production. Propagation of thermal fronts in a single phase fractured porous media was first studied by. Lauwerier (1955). Lauwerier developed an analytical solution for injection of hot water into oil bearing fractured rocks. Gringarten & Sauty ...

  20. Accidental entrapment of cats in front-loading washing machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Sarah A; Gaunt, Matthew C; Taylor, Susan M; Snead, Elizabeth C R

    2010-09-01

    Two clinical cases of accidental entrapment of cats in front-loading washing machines are described. One cat died the day after presentation as a result of aspiration pneumonia and head trauma, despite supportive care. The second cat survived with supportive treatment, but developed dermatologic complications 10 d later.

  1. Extreme weather caused by concurrent cyclone, front and thunderstorm occurrences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdy, Andrew J; Catto, Jennifer L

    2017-01-11

    Phenomena such as cyclones, fronts and thunderstorms can cause extreme weather in various regions throughout the world. Although these phenomena have been examined in numerous studies, they have not all been systematically examined in combination with each other, including in relation to extreme precipitation and extreme winds throughout the world. Consequently, the combined influence of these phenomena represents a substantial gap in the current understanding of the causes of extreme weather events. Here we present a systematic analysis of cyclones, fronts and thunderstorms in combination with each other, as represented by seven different types of storm combinations. Our results highlight the storm combinations that most frequently cause extreme weather in various regions of the world. The highest risk of extreme precipitation and extreme wind speeds is found to be associated with a triple storm type characterized by concurrent cyclone, front and thunderstorm occurrences. Our findings reveal new insight on the relationships between cyclones, fronts and thunderstorms and clearly demonstrate the importance of concurrent phenomena in causing extreme weather.

  2. Front Matter - JTSiskom Volume 5 Nomor 2 Tahun 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketua Editor JTSiskom

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Artikel ini berisi front-matter JTSiskom Volume 5 Nomor 2 Tahun 2017, yaitu meliputi halaman sampul, halaman judul, susunan tim penyunting, ucapan terima kasih, kebijakan editorial dan daftar isi. Kebijakan editorial JTSiskom meliputi fokus dan ruang lingkup, proses review, frekuensi publikasi, kebijakan open access, pengarsipan dan pernyataan biaya pemrosesan artikel.

  3. Front Matter - JTSiskom Volume 5 Nomor 3 Tahun 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketua Editor JTSiskom

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Artikel ini berisi front-matter JTSiskom Volume 5 Nomor 3 Tahun 2017, yaitu meliputi halaman sampul, halaman judul, susunan tim penyunting, ucapan terima kasih, kebijakan editorial dan daftar isi. Kebijakan editorial JTSiskom meliputi fokus dan ruang lingkup, proses review, frekuensi publikasi, kebijakan open access, pengarsipan dan pernyataan biaya pemrosesan artikel.

  4. Front Matter - JTSiskom Volume 5 Nomor 4 Tahun 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketua Editor JTSiskom

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Artikel ini berisi front-matter JTSiskom Volume 5 Nomor 4 Tahun 2017, yaitu meliputi halaman sampul, halaman judul, susunan tim penyunting, ucapan terima kasih, kebijakan editorial dan daftar isi. Kebijakan editorial JTSiskom meliputi fokus dan ruang lingkup, proses review, frekuensi publikasi, kebijakan open access, pengarsipan dan pernyataan biaya pemrosesan artikel.

  5. Front Matters - JTSiskom Volume 5 Nomor 1 Tahun 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketua Editor JTSiskom

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Artikel ini berisi front-matters JTSiskom Volume 5 Nomor 1 Tahun 2017, yaitu meliputi halaman sampul, halaman judul, susunan tim penyunting, ucapan terima kasih, kebijakan editorial dan daftar isi. Kebijakan editorial JTSiskom meliputi fokus dan ruang lingkup, proses review, frekuensi publikasi, kebijakan open access, pengarsipan dan pernyataan biaya pemrosesan artikel.

  6. PACE3 - front-end chip for the CMS Preshower

    CERN Multimedia

    Aspel, Paul

    2003-01-01

    This is PACE3 which is the front-end chip for the CMS Preshower. In fact PACE3 is the combination of two ASICs called Delta3 and PACEAM3. Delta3 is on the left and PACEAM3 is on the right. The two ASICs are bonded together and then packaged within a single 196 pin fpBGA package.

  7. Oceanic fronts: transition zones for bacterioplankton community composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltar, F.; Currie, K.; Stuck, E.; Roosa, S.; Morales, S.

    2016-02-01

    Oceanic fronts are widespread mesoscale features that exist in the boundary between different water masses. Bacterioplankton (including Bacteria and Archaea) drive oceanic biogeochemical cycles, regulating the composition of Earth's atmosphere and influencing climate. Despite the recognized importance of bacterioplankton on the marine biogeochemical cycles and the ubiquitousness of fronts, the effect of frontal zones on the distribution of bacterioplankton community remains unknown. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing coupled with a high spatial resolution analysis of the physical properties of the water masses, we demonstrate strong shifts in bacterioplankton community composition (BCC) across the Subtropical Frontal Zone off New Zealand. Transition between water masses resulted in a clear modification of the dominant taxa and a significant increase in community dissimilarity. Our results, linking physical oceanography and marine molecular ecology, support the strong role of oceanic frontal zones in delimiting the distribution of bacterioplankton in the ocean, where fronts serve as clear transition zones, indicating boundaries for bacterioplankton distribution in the ocean. Owing to the widespread abundance of fronts in the marine environment, future efforts should focus on confirming their roles in demarking bacterioplankton distribution and whether they act as indicators of ecosystem process changes. This would allow a better understanding of the forces that control energy flow in the ocean as well as the cycling of compounds that influence climate change, and concomitantly building more accurate models of global biogeochemical cycles.

  8. Variational formulation based analysis on growth of yield front in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study investigates the growth of elastic-plastic front in rotating solid disks of non-uniform thickness having exponential and parabolic geometry variation. The problem is solved through an extension of a variational method in elastoplastic regime. The formulation is based on von-Mises yield criterion and linear ...

  9. Water chemistry of Rocky Mountain Front Range aquatic ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert C. Musselman; Laura Hudnell; Mark W. Williams; Richard A. Sommerfeld

    1996-01-01

    A study of the water chemistry of Colorado Rocky Mountain Front Range alpine/subalpine lakes and streams in wilderness ecosystems was conducted during the summer of 1995 by the USDA Forest Service Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forests and Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, and the University of Colorado Institute of Alpine and Arctic Research. Data...

  10. The Front-End System For MARE In Milano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaboldi, Claudio; Pessina, Gianluigi

    2009-12-01

    The first phase of MARE consists of 72 μ-bolometers composed each of a crystal of AgReO4 readout by Si thermistors. The spread in the thermistor characteristics and bolometer thermal coupling leads to different energy conversion gains and optimum operating points of the detectors. Detector biasing levels and voltage gains are completely remote-adjustable by the front end system developed, the subject of this paper, achieving the same signal range at the input of the DAQ system. The front end consists of a cold buffer stage, a second pseudo differential stage followed by a gain stage, an antialiasing filter, and a battery powered detector biasing set up. The DAQ system can be used to set all necessary parameters of the electronics remotely, by writing to a μ-controller located on each board. Fiber optics are used for the serial communication between the DAQ and the front end. To suppress interference noise during normal operation, the clocked devices of the front end are maintained in sleep-mode, except during the set-up phase of the experiment. An automatic DC detector characterization procedure is used to establish the optimum operating point of every detector of the array. A very low noise level has been achieved: about 3nV/□Hz at 1 Hz and 1 nV/□Hz for the white component, high frequencies.

  11. Consumer preferences for front-of-pack calories labelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleef, van E.; Trijp, van J.C.M.; Paeps, F.; Fernández-Celemín, L.

    2008-01-01

    Objective In light of the emerging obesity pandemic, front-of-pack calories labels may be an important tool to assist consumers in making informed healthier food choices. However, there is little prior research to guide key decisions on whether caloric content should be expressed in absolute terms

  12. Front and backside processed thin film electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hao-Chih; Wang, Guogong; Eriksson, Mark A.; Evans, Paul G.; Lagally, Max G.; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2010-10-12

    This invention provides methods for fabricating thin film electronic devices with both front- and backside processing capabilities. Using these methods, high temperature processing steps may be carried out during both frontside and backside processing. The methods are well-suited for fabricating back-gate and double-gate field effect transistors, double-sided bipolar transistors and 3D integrated circuits.

  13. Bibliometric analysis of acupuncture research fronts and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Considerable research has been conducted on acupuncture worldwide. This study chronologically examined the changing features and research fronts of acupuncture and elucidated the differences among the six most productive countries. Methods: Bibliographic coupling is a powerful tool for identifying the ...

  14. Iterative wave-front reconstruction in the Fourier domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Charlotte Z; Correia, Carlos M; Sauvage, Jean-François; Neichel, Benoit; Fusco, Thierry

    2017-05-15

    The use of Fourier methods in wave-front reconstruction can significantly reduce the computation time for large telescopes with a high number of degrees of freedom. However, Fourier algorithms for discrete data require a rectangular data set which conform to specific boundary requirements, whereas wave-front sensor data is typically defined over a circular domain (the telescope pupil). Here we present an iterative Gerchberg routine modified for the purposes of discrete wave-front reconstruction which adapts the measurement data (wave-front sensor slopes) for Fourier analysis, fulfilling the requirements of the fast Fourier transform (FFT) and providing accurate reconstruction. The routine is used in the adaptation step only and can be coupled to any other Wiener-like or least-squares method. We compare simulations using this method with previous Fourier methods and show an increase in performance in terms of Strehl ratio and a reduction in noise propagation for a 40×40 SPHERE-like adaptive optics system. For closed loop operation with minimal iterations the Gerchberg method provides an improvement in Strehl, from 95.4% to 96.9% in K-band. This corresponds to ~ 40 nm improvement in rms, and avoids the high spatial frequency errors present in other methods, providing an increase in contrast towards the edge of the correctable band.

  15. The role of pH fronts in reversible electroporation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Turjanski

    Full Text Available We present experimental measurements and theoretical predictions of ion transport in agar gels during reversible electroporation (ECT for conditions typical to many clinical studies found in the literature, revealing the presence of pH fronts emerging from both electrodes. These results suggest that pH fronts are immediate and substantial. Since they might give rise to tissue necrosis, an unwanted condition in clinical applications of ECT as well as in irreversible electroporation (IRE and in electrogenetherapy (EGT, it is important to quantify their extent and evolution. Here, a tracking technique is used to follow the space-time evolution of these pH fronts. It is found that they scale in time as t(½, characteristic of a predominantly diffusive process. Comparing ECT pH fronts with those arising in electrotherapy (EChT, another treatment applying constant electric fields whose main goal is tissue necrosis, a striking result is observed: anodic acidification is larger in ECT than in EChT, suggesting that tissue necrosis could also be greater. Ways to minimize these adverse effects in ECT are suggested.

  16. Morale among French colonial troops on the Western Front during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Morale among French colonial troops on the Western Front during World War I: 1914–1918. ... Bringing men to a foreign land and culture to fight in a new type of horrific war was quite a strain on these 600 000 soldiers.2 The bulk of these soldiers were drawn from North and West Africa, with smaller numbers coming from ...

  17. Microstrip-Transmission-Line Shock-Front Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiweke, Robert J.; Smith, William C.

    1993-01-01

    Microstrip-transmission-line sensor measures velocities of low-overpressure shock fronts and offers dynamic range needed for measurements both far from and near explosions. Fabricated easily, relatively inexpensive, and repaired in field. In addition, basic geometry modified easily, as needed.

  18. Analytic Sharp Fronts for the Surface Quasi-Geostrophic Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fefferman, Charles; Rodrigo, José L.

    2011-04-01

    We study the evolution of sharp fronts for the Surface Quasi-Geostrophic equation in the context of analytic functions. We showed that, even though the equation contains operators of order higher than 1, by carefully studying the evolution of the second derivatives it can be adapted to fit an abstract version of the Cauchy-Kowaleski Theorem.

  19. Moving boundary approximation for curved streamer ionization fronts: solvability analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Brau (Fabian); B. Davidovitch; U. Ebert (Ute)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe minimal density model for negative streamer ionization fronts is investigated. An earlier moving boundary approximation for this model consisted of a “kinetic undercooling” type boundary condition in a Laplacian growth problem of Hele-Shaw type. Here we derive a curvature

  20. Wave-front-engineered grating mirrors for VCSELs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carletti, Luca; Malureanu, Radu; Mørk, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    High-index-contrast grating mirrors featuring beam steering abilities for the transmitted beam as well as high reflectivity over a broad bandwidth are suggested. Gratings designed to provide control over the wave front of the transmitted beam are numerically investigated. The proposed structures ...

  1. Calibration method for direct conversion receiver front-ends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Müller

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Technology induced process tolerances in analog circuits cause device characteristics different from specification. For direct conversion receiver front-ends a system level calibration method is presented. The malfunctions of the devices are compensated by tuning dominant circuit parameters. Thereto optimization techniques are applied which use measurement values and special evaluation functions.

  2. FACILITATING RADICAL FRONT-END INNOVATION THROUGH TARGETED HR PRACTICES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Annabeth

    2017-01-01

    study of the Danish pharmaceutical company, H. Lundbeck A/S, and explorative studies of seven European and American pharmaceutical and biotech companies. The study aims to show how companies can apply HR practices in ways that actively supports the development of radical front end innovation. The value...

  3. A socio-internactive framework for the fuzzy front end

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, Frido E.; van den Broek, Egon; van der Voort, Mascha C.; Fernandes, A.; Teixeira, A.; Natal Jorge, R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to illustrate that the dominating rational-analytic perspective on the Fuzzy Front End (FFE) of innovation could benefit by a complementary socio-interactive perspective that addresses the social processes during the FFE. We have developed a still fledgling socio-interactive

  4. An operational map of the Polish Coastal Front 1970

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Theis; Svenningsen, Stig Roar; Tinning, Morten

    2016-01-01

    The map of the Operational Plan for the Coastal Front, from Poland 1970 forms the basis for this paper. The map portraits the blueprint of the combined operational war plans for the Polish military in the late 1960’s and 70’s. It details the offensive against NATO countries and their forces in No...

  5. Smart front-ends, from vision to design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roermund, H.M. van; Baltus, P.; Bezooijen, A. van; Hegt, J.A.; Lopelli, E.; Mahmoudi, R.; Radulov, G.I.; Vidojkovic, M.

    2009-01-01

    An integral multi-disciplinary chain optimization based on a high-level cascaded Shannon-based channel modeling is proposed. It is argued that the analog part of the front-end (FE) will become a bottleneck in the overall chain. This requires a FE-centric design approach, aiming for maximizing the

  6. Covariance of light-front models: pair current

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melo, J.P.B.C. de; Frederico, T.; Naus, H.W.L.; Sauer, P.U.

    1999-01-01

    We compute the + component, i.e., j+ = j0 + j3, of the electromagnetic current of a composite spin-one two-fermion system for vanishing momentum transfer component q+ = q0 + q3. In particular, we extract the nonvanishing pair production amplitude on the light-front. It is a consequence of the

  7. Direct Writing with Tilted-Front Femtosecond Pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Aabid; Svirko, Yuri; Durfee, Charles; Kazansky, Peter G

    2017-10-10

    Shaping light fields in both space and time provides new degrees of freedom to manipulate light-matter interaction on the ultrafast timescale. Through this exploitation of the light field, a greater appreciation of spatio-temporal couplings in focusing has been gained, shedding light on previously unexplored parameters of the femtosecond light pulse, including pulse front tilt and wavefront rotation. Here, we directly investigate the effect of major spatio-temporal couplings on light-matter interaction and reveal unambiguously that in transparent media, pulse front tilt gives rise to the directional asymmetry of the ultrafast laser writing. We demonstrate that the laser pulse with a tilted intensity front deposits energy more efficiently when writing along the tilt than when writing against, producing either an isotropic damage-like or a birefringent nanograting structure. The directional asymmetry in the ultrafast laser writing is qualitatively described in terms of the interaction of a void trapped within the focal volume by the gradient force from the tilted intensity front and the thermocapillary force caused by the gradient of temperature. The observed instantaneous transition from the damage-like to nanograting modification after a finite writing length in a transparent dielectric is phenomenologically described in terms of the first-order phase transition.

  8. Different profiles of the aerial start phase in front crawl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seifert, L.; Vantorre, J.; Lemaitre, F.; Chollet, D.; Toussaint, H.M.; Vilas-Boas, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzed the kinematics and kinetics (jumping ability) of the aerial start phase in 11 elite front crawl sprinters. The aim was to determine whether a particular start technique leads to a short 15 m start time or whether several start profiles contribute equally well. All swimmers

  9. On the propagation of a coupled saturation and pressure front

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, D. W.

    2010-12-01

    Using an asymptotic technique, valid for a medium with smoothly varying heterogeneity, I derive an expression for the velocity of a propagating, coupled saturation and pressure front. Due to the nonlinearity of the governing equations, the velocity of the propagating front depends upon the magnitude of the saturation and pressure changes across the front in addition to the properties of the medium. Thus, the expression must be evaluated in conjunction with numerical reservoir simulation. The propagation of the two-phase front is governed by the background saturation distribution, the saturation-dependent component of the fluid mobility, the porosity, the permeability, the capillary pressure function, the medium compressibility, and the ratio of the slopes of the relative permeability curves. Numerical simulation of water injection into a porous layer saturated with a nonaqueous phase liquid indicates that two modes of propagation are important. The fastest mode of propagation is a pressure-dominated disturbance that travels through the saturated layer. This is followed, much later, by a coupled mode with a large saturation change. These two modes are also observed in a simulation using a heterogeneous porous layer. A comparison between the propagation times estimated from the results of the numerical simulation and predictions from the asymptotic expression indicates overall agreement.

  10. Chiral Boson Theory on the Light-Front

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Prem P.

    1999-09-16

    The framework for describing the quantized theory of chiral boson is discussed. It avoids the conflict with the requirement of the principle of microcausality as is found in the conventional treatment. The discussion of the Floreanini-Jackiw model and its modified version for describing the chiral boson becomes very transparent on the light-front.

  11. Precision forging of front fan blades, abridged version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigtlaender, O.; Degenhardt, H.

    1983-10-01

    The manufacturing of titanium alloy front fan blades with ready-for-assembly contact surfaces on conventional counterblow hammers is reported. Thermal contraction and elastic die-deformation were determined and the tooling was fabricated by computerized design. Forging trials give fan blades which dimensionally and metallurgically meet the requirements.

  12. 5-D interpolation with wave-front attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yujiang; Gajewski, Dirk

    2017-11-01

    Most 5-D interpolation and regularization techniques reconstruct the missing data in the frequency domain by using mathematical transforms. An alternative type of interpolation methods uses wave-front attributes, that is, quantities with a specific physical meaning like the angle of emergence and wave-front curvatures. In these attributes structural information of subsurface features like dip and strike of a reflector are included. These wave-front attributes work on 5-D data space (e.g. common-midpoint coordinates in x and y, offset, azimuth and time), leading to a 5-D interpolation technique. Since the process is based on stacking next to the interpolation a pre-stack data enhancement is achieved, improving the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of interpolated and recorded traces. The wave-front attributes are determined in a data-driven fashion, for example, with the Common Reflection Surface (CRS method). As one of the wave-front-attribute-based interpolation techniques, the 3-D partial CRS method was proposed to enhance the quality of 3-D pre-stack data with low S/N. In the past work on 3-D partial stacks, two potential problems were still unsolved. For high-quality wave-front attributes, we suggest a global optimization strategy instead of the so far used pragmatic search approach. In previous works, the interpolation of 3-D data was performed along a specific azimuth which is acceptable for narrow azimuth acquisition but does not exploit the potential of wide-, rich- or full-azimuth acquisitions. The conventional 3-D partial CRS method is improved in this work and we call it as a wave-front-attribute-based 5-D interpolation (5-D WABI) as the two problems mentioned above are addressed. Data examples demonstrate the improved performance by the 5-D WABI method when compared with the conventional 3-D partial CRS approach. A comparison of the rank-reduction-based 5-D seismic interpolation technique with the proposed 5-D WABI method is given. The comparison reveals that

  13. Extension of the modal wave-front reconstruction algorithm to non-uniform illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoyu; Mu, Jie; Rao, ChangHui; Yang, Jinsheng; Rao, XueJun; Tian, Yu

    2014-06-30

    Attempts are made to eliminate the effects of non-uniform illumination on the precision of wave-front measurement. To achieve this, the relationship between the wave-front slope at a single sub-aperture and the distributions of the phase and light intensity of the wave-front were first analyzed to obtain the relevant theoretical formulae. Then, based on the principle of modal wave-front reconstruction, the influence of the light intensity distribution on the wave-front slope is introduced into the calculation of the reconstruction matrix. Experiments were conducted to prove that the corrected modal wave-front reconstruction algorithm improved the accuracy of wave-front reconstruction. Moreover, the correction is conducive to high-precision wave-front measurement using a Hartmann wave-front sensor in the presence of non-uniform illumination.

  14. Consumer preferences for front-of-pack calories labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kleef, Ellen; van Trijp, Hans; Paeps, Frederic; Fernández-Celemín, Laura

    2008-02-01

    In light of the emerging obesity pandemic, front-of-pack calories labels may be an important tool to assist consumers in making informed healthier food choices. However, there is little prior research to guide key decisions on whether caloric content should be expressed in absolute terms or relative to recommended daily intake, whether it should be expressed in per serving or per 100 g and whether the information should be further brought alive for consumers in terms of what the extra calorie intake implies in relation to activity levels. The present study aimed at providing more insight into consumers' appreciation of front-of-pack labelling of caloric content of food products and their specific preferences for alternative execution formats for such information in Europe. For this purpose, eight executions of front-of-pack calorie flags were designed and their appeal and information value were extensively discussed with consumers through qualitative research in four different countries (Germany, The Netherlands, France and the UK). The results show that calories are well-understood and that participants were generally positive about front-of-pack flags, particularly when flags are uniform across products. The most liked flags are the simpler flags depicting only the number of calories per serving or per 100 g, while more complex flags including references to daily needs or exercise and the flag including a phrase referring to balanced lifestyle were least preferred. Some relevant differences between countries were observed. Although participants seem to be familiar with the notion of calories, they do not seem to fully understand how to apply them. From the results, managerial implications for the design and implementation of front-of-pack calorie labelling as well as important directions for future research are discussed.

  15. Consumer preferences for front-of-pack calories labelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kleef, Ellen; van Trijp, Hans; Paeps, Frederic; Fernández-Celemín, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Objective In light of the emerging obesity pandemic, front-of-pack calories labels may be an important tool to assist consumers in making informed healthier food choices. However, there is little prior research to guide key decisions on whether caloric content should be expressed in absolute terms or relative to recommended daily intake, whether it should be expressed in per serving or per 100 g and whether the information should be further brought alive for consumers in terms of what the extra calorie intake implies in relation to activity levels. The present study aimed at providing more insight into consumers’ appreciation of front-of-pack labelling of caloric content of food products and their specific preferences for alternative execution formats for such information in Europe. Design For this purpose, eight executions of front-of-pack calorie flags were designed and their appeal and information value were extensively discussed with consumers through qualitative research in four different countries (Germany, The Netherlands, France and the UK). Results The results show that calories are well-understood and that participants were generally positive about front-of-pack flags, particularly when flags are uniform across products. The most liked flags are the simpler flags depicting only the number of calories per serving or per 100 g, while more complex flags including references to daily needs or exercise and the flag including a phrase referring to balanced lifestyle were least preferred. Some relevant differences between countries were observed. Although participants seem to be familiar with the notion of calories, they do not seem to fully understand how to apply them. Conclusion From the results, managerial implications for the design and implementation of front-of-pack calorie labelling as well as important directions for future research are discussed. PMID:17601362

  16. DESIGN OF MEDICAL RADIOMETER FRONT-END FOR IMPROVED PERFORMANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemetsen, Ø.; Birkelund, Y.; Jacobsen, S. K.; Maccarini, P. F.; Stauffer, P. R.

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility of building a singleband Dicke radiometer that is inexpensive, small-sized, stable, highly sensitive, and which consists of readily available microwave components. The selected frequency band is at 3.25–3.75 GHz which provides a reasonable compromise between spatial resolution (antenna size) and sensing depth for radiometry applications in lossy tissue. Foreseen applications of the instrument are non-invasive temperature monitoring for breast cancer detection and temperature monitoring during heating. We have found off-the-shelf microwave components that are sufficiently small (radiometers have been realized: one is a conventional design with the Dicke switch at the front-end to select either the antenna or noise reference channels for amplification. The second design places a matched pair of low noise amplifiers in front of the Dicke switch to reduce system noise figure. Numerical simulations were performed to test the design concepts before building prototype PCB front-end layouts of the radiometer. Both designs provide an overall power gain of approximately 50 dB over a 500 MHz bandwidth centered at 3.5 GHz. No stability problems were observed despite using triple-cascaded amplifier configurations to boost the thermal signals. The prototypes were tested for sensitivity after calibration in two different water baths. Experiments showed superior sensitivity (36% higher) when implementing the low noise amplifier before the Dicke switch (close to the antenna) compared to the other design with the Dicke switch in front. Radiometer performance was also tested in a multilayered phantom during alternating heating and radiometric reading. Empirical tests showed that for the configuration with Dicke switch first, the switch had to be locked in the reference position during application of microwave heating to avoid damage to the active components (amplifiers and power meter). For the configuration with a low noise amplifier up front

  17. The Prince Edward Islands pelagic ecosystem, south Indian Ocean: a review of achievements, 1976 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomov, E. A.; Froneman, P. W.

    1999-01-01

    This review summarizes the main research findings of the multi-year oceanographic and biological studies conducted in the vicinity of the Prince Edward Archipelago during the period 1976 to 1990. The Prince Edward Islands represent a flow-through system on the mainstream of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Although there are no taxonomic differences between the pelagic communities of the upstream, inter-island and downstream regions, these mesoscale subsystems may operate differently. The mesoscale oceanographic and biological processes appear to be affected by the position of the Subantarctic Front (SAF) in the vicinity of the islands. Both the rich benthic community, which is supported by the local enhancement of primary production, and the strong advection of zooplankton/micronekton from the upstream region provide the food resources necessary for the survival of the huge community of land-based predators present on the islands. Collectively this is termed the `life-support system'. Future studies should concentrate on the meridional shifts in the position of the SAF and its influence on background productivity upstream and downstream of the Prince Edward Archipelago.

  18. A New Formula for Front Slope Recession of Berm Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Burcharth, Hans F.

    2010-01-01

    The front slope stability of breakwaters with a homogeneous berm was studied in a large number of two dimensional model tests at Aalborg University, Denmark. The results are presented together with a new formula for prediction of the berm recession which is the most important parameter for descri......The front slope stability of breakwaters with a homogeneous berm was studied in a large number of two dimensional model tests at Aalborg University, Denmark. The results are presented together with a new formula for prediction of the berm recession which is the most important parameter...... for describing the reshaping. The formula has also been calibrated and validated against model test data from other researchers. The significance of the new design formula is that it predicts berm recession much better than the existing methods, especially in case of more stable structures....

  19. Delivering Faster Congestion Feedback with the Mark-Front Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunlei; Jain, Raj

    2001-01-01

    Computer networks use congestion feedback from the routers and destinations to control the transmission load. Delivering timely congestion feedback is essential to the performance of networks. Reaction to the congestion can be more effective if faster feedback is provided. Current TCP/IP networks use timeout, duplicate Acknowledgement Packets (ACKs) and explicit congestion notification (ECN) to deliver the congestion feedback, each provides a faster feedback than the previous method. In this paper, we propose a markfront strategy that delivers an even faster congestion feedback. With analytical and simulation results, we show that mark-front strategy reduces buffer size requirement, improves link efficiency and provides better fairness among users. Keywords: Explicit Congestion Notification, mark-front, congestion control, buffer size requirement, fairness.

  20. Confounding adjustment through front-door blocking in longitudinal studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvid Sjölander

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A common aim of epidemiological research is to estimate the causal effect of a particular exposure on a particular outcome. Towards this end, observed associations are often ‘adjusted’ for potential confounding variables. When the potential confounders are unmeasured, explicit adjustment becomes unfeasible. It has been demonstrated that causal effects can be estimated even in the presence of umeasured confounding, utilizing a method called ‘front-door blocking’. In this paper we generalize this method to longitudinal studies. We demonstrate that the method of front-door blocking poses a number of challenging statistical problems, analogous to the famous problems associ- ated with the method of ‘back-door blocking’.

  1. Metamaterial Huygens' surfaces: tailoring wave fronts with reflectionless sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Carl; Grbic, Anthony

    2013-05-10

    Huygens' principle is a well-known concept in electromagnetics that dates back to 1690. Here, it is applied to develop designer surfaces that provide extreme control of electromagnetic wave fronts across electrically thin layers. These reflectionless surfaces, referred to as metamaterial Huygens' surfaces, provide new beam shaping, steering, and focusing capabilities. The metamaterial Huygens' surfaces are realized with two-dimensional arrays of polarizable particles that provide both electric and magnetic polarization currents to generate prescribed wave fronts. A straightforward design methodology is demonstrated and applied to develop a beam-refracting surface and a Gaussian-to-Bessel beam transformer. Metamaterial Huygens' surfaces could find a wide range of applications over the entire electromagnetic spectrum including single-surface lenses, polarization controlling devices, stealth technologies, and perfect absorbers.

  2. Front-end electronics for multichannel semiconductor detector systems

    CERN Document Server

    Grybos, P

    2010-01-01

    Front-end electronics for multichannel semiconductor detektor systems Volume 08, EuCARD Editorial Series on Accelerator Science and Technology The monograph is devoted to many different aspects related to front-end electronics for semiconductor detector systems, namely: − designing and testing silicon position sensitive detectors for HEP experiments and X-ray imaging applications, − designing and testing of multichannel readout electronics for semiconductor detectors used in X-ray imaging applications, especially for noise minimization, fast signal processing, crosstalk reduction and good matching performance, − optimization of semiconductor detection systems in respect to the effects of radiation damage. The monograph is the result mainly of the author's experience in the above-mentioned areas and it is an attempt of a comprehensive presentation of issues related to the position sensitive detection system working in a single photon counting mode and intended to X-ray imaging applications. The structure...

  3. Flexible Frequency Discrimination Subsystems for Reconfigurable Radio Front Ends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey-Smith Bruce E.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The required flexibility of the software-defined radio front end may currently be met with better overall performance by employing tunable narrowband circuits rather than pursuing a truly wideband approach. A key component of narrowband transceivers is appropriate filtering to reduce spurious spectral content in the transmitter and limit out-of-band interference in the receiver. In this paper, recent advances in flexible, frequency-selective, circuit components applicable to reconfigurable SDR front ends are reviewed. The paper contains discussion regarding the filtering requirements in the SDR context and the use of intelligent, adaptive control to provide environment-aware frequency discrimination. Wide tuning-range frequency-selective circuit elements are surveyed including bandpass and bandstop filters and narrowband tunable antennas. The suitability of these elements to the mobile wireless SDR environment is discussed.

  4. The Role of Devices in Staging Front End Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Christian; Yoshinaka, Yutaka

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses Front End Innovation as an object for the management and staging of innovation processes. We examine the role which devices play in the managing of Front End Innovation, with inspiration from Science and Technology Studies (STS). The paper contributes to a new understanding...... into realisations. Inputs from different knowledge domains must be grappled with, both in terms of needing to be elucidated as well as synthesized, in the engineering design process. The paper argues that the existing research may be seen as a response to perceived difficulties in dealing with uncertain conditions...... in the innovative process of product development. The sole reliance on formalised models of planning, and rigid Stage-Gate models for product-based innovations in industry is seen to be wanting in this pursuit. What remains unaddressed is the role of models and other devices such as representations of users...

  5. Novel Front-end Electronics for Time Projection Chamber Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    García García, Eduardo José

    This work has been carried out in the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and it was supported by the European Union as part of the research and development towards the European detector the (EUDET) project, specifically for the International Linear Collider (ILC). In particle physics there are several different categories of particle detectors. The presented design is focused on a particular kind of tracking detector called Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The TPC provides a three dimensional image of electrically charged particles crossing a gaseous volume. The thesis includes a study of the requirements for future TPC detectors summarizing the parameters that the front-end readout electronics must fulfill. In addition, these requirements are compared with respect to the readouts used in existing TPC detectors. It is concluded that none of the existing front-end readout designs fulfill the stringent requirements. The main requirements for future TPC detectors are high integration, an increased n...

  6. Managing Front-End Innovation through Idea Markets at Novozymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauto, Giancarlo; Valentin, Finn; Hatzack, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Online collaboration is a powerful tool for boosting idea generation in large corporations. However, management may experience an overload of proposals from employees. To improve front-end innovation, the Danish industrial biotech company Novozymes implemented an internal idea competition in whic...... and screening and that active involvement of R&D management is a key success factor in any idea competition.......Online collaboration is a powerful tool for boosting idea generation in large corporations. However, management may experience an overload of proposals from employees. To improve front-end innovation, the Danish industrial biotech company Novozymes implemented an internal idea competition in which...... a relatively small number of highly motivated participants screened their colleagues' inventions through an "idea market." The idea competition fulfilled its goals of generating two ideas with high growth potential within a short time, uncovering and recombining old proposals that inventors had not previously...

  7. Radiation validation for the CMS HCAL front-end electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Whitmore, J; Elias, J E; Holm, S; Knickerbocker, K; Los, S; Rivetta, C; Ronzhin, A; Shenai, A; Yarema, R J; Zimmerman, T

    2002-01-01

    Over a 10 year operating period, the CMS Hadron Calorimeter (HCAL) detector will be exposed to radiation fields of approximately 1 kRad of total ionizing dose (TID) and a neutron fluence of 4E11 n/cm/sup 2 /. All front-end electronics must be qualified to survive this radiation environment with no degradation in performance. In addition, digital components in this environment can experience single-event upset (SEU) and single-event latch-up (SEL). A measurement of these single-event effects (SEE) for all components is necessary in order to understand the level that will be encountered. Radiation effects in all electronic components of the HCAL front-end system have been studied. Results from these studies will be presented. (17 refs).

  8. Fast Simulations of Gas Sloshing and Cold Front Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roediger, E.; ZuHone, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a simplified and fast method for simulating minor mergers between galaxy clusters. Instead of following the evolution of the dark matter halos directly by the N-body method, we employ a rigid potential approximation for both clusters. The simulations are run in the rest frame of the more massive cluster and account for the resulting inertial accelerations in an optimised way. We test the reliability of this method for studies of minor merger induced gas sloshing by performing a one-to-one comparison between our simulations and hydro+N-body ones. We find that the rigid potential approximation reproduces the sloshing-related features well except for two artifacts: the temperature just outside the cold fronts is slightly over-predicted, and the outward motion of the cold fronts is delayed by typically 200 Myr. We discuss reasons for both artifacts.

  9. Nucleon parton distributions in a light-front quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutsche, Thomas [Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Tuebingen (Germany); Lyubovitskij, Valery E. [Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Tuebingen (Germany); Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Laboratory of Particle Physics, Mathematical Physics Department, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Departamento de Fisica y Centro Cientifico Tecnologico de Valparaiso (CCTVal), Valparaiso (Chile); Schmidt, Ivan [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Departamento de Fisica y Centro Cientifico Tecnologico de Valparaiso (CCTVal), Valparaiso (Chile)

    2017-02-15

    Continuing our analysis of parton distributions in the nucleon, we extend our light-front quark model in order to obtain both the helicity-independent and the helicity-dependent parton distributions, analytically matching the results of global fits at the initial scale μ∝ 1 GeV; they also contain the correct Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution. We also calculate the transverse parton, Wigner and Husimi distributions from a unified point of view, using our light-front wave functions and expressing them in terms of the parton distributions q{sub v}(x) and δq{sub v}(x). Our results are very relevant for the current and future program of the COMPASS experiment at SPS (CERN). (orig.)

  10. A tsunami wave recorded near a glacier front

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Marchenko

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We observed a tsunami wave near the glacier front in the Temple Fjord (Spitsbergen. Two temperature and pressure recorders were deployed on a wire from the ice approximately 300 m from the glacier front. A pressure recorder was located under them on the bottom. The vertical displacement of the ice was approximately 30 cm and the period of the tsunami wave was 90 s. We attribute the generation of this wave to the displacement of the glacier similarly to the landslide tsunami generated by the motion of a block of rocks down the sloping bottom. The glacier motion also generated a short-period (12 s deformation wave in the ice cover. The measurements allowed us to estimate the wave number of these waves and the Young's modulus of the ice.

  11. Relating precipitation to fronts at a sub-daily basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénin, Riccardo; Ramos, Alexandre M.; Liberato, Margarida L. R.; Gouveia, Célia

    2017-04-01

    High impact events over Western Iberia include precipitation extremes that are cause for concern as they lead to flooding, landslides, extensive property damage and human casualties. These events are usually associated with low pressure systems over the North Atlantic moving eastward towards the European western coasts (Liberato and Trigo, 2014). A method to detect fronts and to associate amounts of precipitation to each front is tested, distinguishing between warm and cold fronts. The 6-hourly ERA-interim 1979-2012 reanalysis with 1°x1° horizontal resolution is used for the purpose. An objective front identification method (the Thermal Method described in Shemm et al., 2014) is applied to locate fronts all over the Northern Hemisphere considering the equivalent potential temperature as thermal parameter to use in the model. On the other hand, we settled a squared search box of tuneable dimension (from 2 to 10 degrees long) to look for a front in the neighbourhood of a grid point affected by precipitation. A sensitivity analysis is performed and the optimal dimension of the box is assessed in order to avoid over(under) estimation of precipitation. This is performed in the light of the variability and typical dynamics of warm/cold frontal systems in the Western Europe region. Afterwards, using the extreme event ranking over Iberia proposed by Ramos et al. (2014) the first ranked extreme events are selected in order to validate the method with specific case studies. Finally, climatological and trend maps of frontal activity are produced both on annual and seasonal scales. Trend maps show a decrease of frontal precipitation over north-western Europe and a slight increase over south-western Europe, mainly due to warm fronts. REFERENCES Liberato M.L.R. and R.M. Trigo (2014) Extreme precipitation events and related impacts in Western Iberia. Hydrology in a Changing World: Environmental and Human Dimensions. IAHS Red Book No 363, 171-176. ISSN: 0144-7815. Ramos A.M., R

  12. Atomic scale front propagation at the onset of frictional sliding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, Silvia; Taloni, Alessandro; Negri, Carlotta; Sellerio, Alessandro; Manini, Nicola; Zapperi, Stefano

    2017-10-20

    Macroscopic frictional sliding emerges from atomic-scale interactions and processes at the contact interface, but bridging the gap between micro and macro scales still remains an unsolved challenge. Direct imaging of the contact surface and simultaneous measurement of stress fields during macroscopic frictional slip revealed the formation of crack precursors, questioning the traditional picture of frictional contacts described in terms of a single degree of freedom. Here we study the onset of frictional slip at atomic scale by simulating the motion of an aluminum block pushed by a slider on a copper substrate. We show the formation of dynamic slip front propagation and precursory activity that resemble macroscopic observations. The analysis of stress patterns during slip, however, reveals subtle effects due to the lattice structures which hinder a direct application of linear elastic fracture mechanics. Our results illustrate that dynamic front propagation arises already at the atomic scales and shed light on the connections between atomic-scale and macroscopic friction.

  13. High Dynamic Range Cognitive Radio Front Ends: Architecture to Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Arun; Subbiah, Iyappan; Varga, Gabor; Schrey, Moritz; Heinen, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Advent of TV white space digitization has released frequencies from 470 MHz to 790 MHz to be utilized opportunistically. The secondary user can utilize these so called TV spaces in the absence of primary users. The most important challenge for this coexistence is mutual interference. While the strong TV stations can completely saturate the receiver of the cognitive radio (CR), the cognitive radio spurious tones can disturb other primary users and white space devices. The aim of this paper is to address the challenges for enabling cognitive radio applications in WLAN and LTE. In this process, architectural considerations for the design of cognitive radio front ends are discussed. With high-IF converters, faster and flexible implementation of CR enabled WLAN and LTE are shown. The effectiveness of the architecture is shown by evaluating the CR front ends for compliance of standards namely 802.11b/g (WLAN) and 3GPP TS 36.101 (LTE).

  14. Front dynamics in fractional-order epidemic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanert, Emmanuel; Schumacher, Eva; Deleersnijder, Eric

    2011-06-21

    A number of recent studies suggest that human and animal mobility patterns exhibit scale-free, Lévy-flight dynamics. However, current reaction-diffusion epidemics models do not account for the superdiffusive spread of modern epidemics due to Lévy flights. We have developed a SIR model to simulate the spatial spread of a hypothetical epidemic driven by long-range displacements in the infective and susceptible populations. The model has been obtained by replacing the second-order diffusion operator by a fractional-order operator. Theoretical developments and numerical simulations show that fractional-order diffusion leads to an exponential acceleration of the epidemic's front and a power-law decay of the front's leading tail. Our results indicate the potential of fractional-order reaction-diffusion models to represent modern epidemics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Using noble gases to investigate mountain-front recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, A.H.; Solomon, D.K.

    2003-01-01

    Mountain-front recharge is a major component of recharge to inter-mountain basin-fill aquifers. The two components of mountain-front recharge are (1) subsurface inflow from the mountain block (subsurface inflow), and (2) infiltration from perennial and ephemeral streams near the mountain front (stream seepage). The magnitude of subsurface inflow is of central importance in source protection planning for basin-fill aquifers and in some water rights disputes, yet existing estimates carry large uncertainties. Stable isotope ratios can indicate the magnitude of mountain-front recharge relative to other components, but are generally incapable of distinguishing subsurface inflow from stream seepage. Noble gases provide an effective tool for determining the relative significance of subsurface inflow, specifically. Dissolved noble gas concentrations allow for the determination of recharge temperature, which is correlated with recharge elevation. The nature of this correlation cannot be assumed, however, and must be derived for the study area. The method is applied to the Salt Lake Valley Principal Aquifer in northern Utah to demonstrate its utility. Samples from 16 springs and mine tunnels in the adjacent Wasatch Mountains indicate that recharge temperature decreases with elevation at about the same rate as the mean annual air temperature, but is on average about 2??C cooler. Samples from 27 valley production wells yield recharge elevations ranging from the valley elevation (about 1500 m) to mid-mountain elevation (about 2500 m). Only six of the wells have recharge elevations less than 1800 m. Recharge elevations consistently greater than 2000 m in the southeastern part of the basin indicate that subsurface inflow constitutes most of the total recharge in this area. ?? 2003 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  16. HomeFront Strong: Building Resiliency in Military Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    HFS mobile website and Administrative Console have the potential to significantly impact the well-being of military and veteran spouses/partners who...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0362 TITLE: HomeFront Strong: Building Resiliency in Military Families PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michelle Kees...Strong: Building Resiliency in Military Families 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Michelle Kees, PhD

  17. Frequency to Voltage Converter Analog Front-End Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Carlos; Raines, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The frequency to voltage converter analog front end evaluation prototype (F2V AFE) is an evaluation board designed for comparison of different methods of accurately extracting the frequency of a sinusoidal input signal. A configurable input stage is routed to one or several of five separate, configurable filtering circuits, and then to a configurable output stage. Amplifier selection and gain, filter corner frequencies, and comparator hysteresis and voltage reference are all easily configurable through the use of jumpers and potentiometers.

  18. Toward assessing the effects of crack front curvature /CFC/.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swedlow, J. L.; Ritter, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    Consideration of the effect of crack front curvature (CFC) on the K calibration of five special geometries in which CFC occurs. The five cases considered include an elliptical crack in an infinite medium, an internal annular crack in a thick-walled cylinder, a through crack in a flat plate, a part-through crack in a plate, and an irregularly shaped crack in a solid. It is shown that K depends on CFC differently in each case.

  19. Assessment of Ibicella lutea for antibacterial agent front Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Lisiane Martins Volcão; Tatiane Silveira Coelho; Alváro Vàsquez; Maria Pia Cerdeiras; Pedro Eduardo Almeida da Silva; Flávio Manoel Rodrigues da Silva Júnior; Daniela Fernandes Ramos

    2016-01-01

    Justificative and Objectives: the study aimed the assessment of the antibacterial activity of crude extracts and fractions of Ibicella lutea, front Staphylococcus aureus, thecombination of these compounds and cytotoxic activity. Methods: was used for antibacterial activity the Microdilution Test Broth, and performed the Checkerboard Test. The extracts showed antibacterial activity were submitted to the citotoxicity test, with macrophages cell and determination of the Selectivity Index (SI). R...

  20. MDT-ASD, CMOS front-end for ATLAS MDT

    CERN Document Server

    Posch, C; Oliver, J

    2007-01-01

    This document serves as the main reference and user`s manual for the read-out chip of the Monitored Drift Tubes in the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer. The eight-channel front-end ASIC is referred to as MDT-ASD. The document contains the requirements and complete specifications, a detailed description of the design with characteristics of all sub-circuits and building blocks, a comprehensive section on functionality and performance test results, and a complete bibliography.

  1. Automated reconstruction of neural trees using front re-initialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Amit; Stepanyants, Armen

    2012-02-01

    This paper proposes a greedy algorithm for automated reconstruction of neural arbors from light microscopy stacks of images. The algorithm is based on the minimum cost path method. While the minimum cost path, obtained using the Fast Marching Method, results in a trace with the least cumulative cost between the start and the end points, it is not sufficient for the reconstruction of neural trees. This is because sections of the minimum cost path can erroneously travel through the image background with undetectable detriment to the cumulative cost. To circumvent this problem we propose an algorithm that grows a neural tree from a specified root by iteratively re-initializing the Fast Marching fronts. The speed image used in the Fast Marching Method is generated by computing the average outward flux of the gradient vector flow field. Each iteration of the algorithm produces a candidate extension by allowing the front to travel a specified distance and then tracking from the farthest point of the front back to the tree. Robust likelihood ratio test is used to evaluate the quality of the candidate extension by comparing voxel intensities along the extension to those in the foreground and the background. The qualified extensions are appended to the current tree, the front is re-initialized, and Fast Marching is continued until the stopping criterion is met. To evaluate the performance of the algorithm we reconstructed 6 stacks of two-photon microscopy images and compared the results to the ground truth reconstructions by using the DIADEM metric. The average comparison score was 0.82 out of 1.0, which is on par with the performance achieved by expert manual tracers.

  2. Frontón Augusto Ibáñez

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez Santolaya, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Este proyecto consiste en el diseño, cálculo y presupuesto de la construcción de un frontón cubierto dotado de aseos, vestuarios, almacén, zona de gradas, etc. Dicho proyecto se llevará a cabo en el municipio de Viana, en la zona de las piscinas municipales para reforzar la oferta deportiva de las instalaciones. Ingeniería Técnica Industrial Industria Ingeniaritza Teknikoa

  3. Vertebral chondrosarcoma in a blue-fronted parrot (Amazona aestiva)

    OpenAIRE

    Blume, Guilherme Reis; Oliveira, Ayisa Rodrigues de; Mattioli, Mariana Portugal; Oliveira, Letícia Batelli de; Reis Junior, Janildo Ludolf; Sant'Ana, Fabiano José Ferreira de

    2015-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is a malignant mesenchymal tumor in which the neoplastic cells produce cartilaginous matrix and is uncommonly described in birds. This report describes the clinical and pathological findings of one case of chondrosarcoma in a blue-fronted parrot (Amazona aestiva). Macroscopically a 3.6x3.5x1.8cm, nodular, ulcerated, and firm mass was identified in the dorsal synsacrum. Microscopically, the mass was composed of a monomorphic proliferation of pleomorphic spindle chondrocytes with...

  4. The 3He spectral function in light-front dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinaldi Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A distorted spin-dependent spectral function for 3He is considered for the extraction of the transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions in the neutron from semi-inclusive deep inelastic electron scattering off polarized 3He at finite momentum transfers, where final state interactions are taken into account. The generalization of the analysis to a Poincaré covariant framework within the light-front dynamics is outlined.

  5. Taxonomy of Greater White-fronted Geese (Aves: Anatidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    Five subspecies of the Greater White-fronted Goose, Anser albifrons (Scopoli, 1769), have been named, all on the basis of wintering birds, and up to six subspecies have been recognized. There has been confusion over the application of some names, particularly in North America, because of lack of knowledge of the breeding ranges and type localities, and incorrect taxonomic decisions. There is one clinally varying subspecies in Eurasia, one that breeds in Greenland, and three in North America, one newly named herein.

  6. Light-front interpretation of proton generalized polarizabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorchtein, M; Lorcé, C; Pasquini, B; Vanderhaeghen, M

    2010-03-19

    We extend the recently developed formalism to extract light-front quark charge densities from nucleon form factor data to the deformations of these quark charge densities when applying an external electric field. We show that the resulting induced polarizations can be extracted from proton generalized polarizabilities. The available data for the generalized electric polarizability of the proton yield a pronounced structure in its induced polarization at large transverse distances, which will be pinned down by forthcoming high precision virtual Compton scattering experiments.

  7. Possible sand resources on the reef front around Oahu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, M.A.; Torresan, M.E.; Wong, F.L.; Frazee, C.S.; ,

    1999-01-01

    Large sediment deposits on the reef front around Oahu are a possible resource for replenishing eroded beaches. An overview is given on the collection of closely spaced, high-resolution subbottom profiles that clearly depict the deposits in three areas, namely, the Kailua Bay off the windward coast, Makua to Kahe Point off the leeward coast, and Camp Erdman to Waimea off the north coast.

  8. On an upwelling front along the west coast of India during later part of southwest monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Unnikrishnan, A.S.; Antony, M.K.

    A coastal front, associated with upwelling, is identified from the observed thermal field along the west coast of India during September, 1987. The front, which is seen very clearly upto a depth of about 75 m, has a horizontal gradient...

  9. Social perceptions of individuals missing upper front teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Mary S; Esqueda, Cynthia Willis; Schacht, Ryan N

    2008-04-01

    Although it is assumed that there are negative social consequences for individuals missing visible front teeth, no study of the way in which edentulous individuals were perceived in a social context and the potential social repercussions could be located. This initial study concerned college students' perceptions of individuals missing visible upper front teeth. 200 volunteers, 19 to 50 years of age (M = 20.6, SD = 4.4), rated five photographs depicting tooth presence or absence, from a full dentition to missing as many as four upper front teeth, on social traits including attractiveness, health status, educational attainment, satisfaction with life, active social life, aggressiveness, intelligence, trustworthiness, amount of caring, friendship, dating, and likelihood to live as a neighbor. Analysis suggested a person missing visible teeth was more negatively perceived on all social traits than a person with full dentition. Results were strongest when students were proposed to be linked to the edentulous individual in a personal way, i.e., dating or living as neighbor. Men and women agreed on perceptions of social traits and dentition condition. These results suggest the presence of strong Western cultural values, whereby those who are missing teeth may experience significant barriers to personal and social success.

  10. Relationship between Muscle Strength and Front Crawl Swimming Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gola Radosław

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. competitive performance in swimming depends on a number of factors including, among others, the development of relevant muscle groups. The aim of the study was to clarify the relationship between muscle strength and swimming velocity and the role of individual muscle groups in front crawl swimming. Methods. sixteen physical education university students participated in the study. The strength values, defined as torque produced during isometric contractions, of eight upper and lower extremity muscle groups were measured. Data were compared with participants' front crawl swim times in the 25m and 50m distances. Results. correlation analysis demonstrated a relationship between muscle strength and swimming velocity. statistically significant relationships were observed between swimming velocity and the torque values of the elbow flexor and shoulder extensor muscles as well as the sum of upper extremity muscle torque values (p ⋋ 0.05. Conclusions. The results indicate the need for a focus on training those muscle groups identified as having a statistically significant relationship with swimming velocity for a given distance, as the sample showed deficiencies in the strength of those muscle groups responsible for generating propulsive force in the front crawl. Additionally, the collected data can serve as a diagnostic tool in evaluating the development of muscle groups critical for swimming performance.

  11. DESIGN OF MEDICAL RADIOMETER FRONT-END FOR IMPROVED PERFORMANCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemetsen, O; Birkelund, Y; Jacobsen, S K; Maccarini, P F; Stauffer, P R

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility of building a singleband Dicke radiometer that is inexpensive, small-sized, stable, highly sensitive, and which consists of readily available microwave components. The selected frequency band is at 3.25-3.75 GHz which provides a reasonable compromise between spatial resolution (antenna size) and sensing depth for radiometry applications in lossy tissue. Foreseen applications of the instrument are non-invasive temperature monitoring for breast cancer detection and temperature monitoring during heating. We have found off-the-shelf microwave components that are sufficiently small (water baths. Experiments showed superior sensitivity (36% higher) when implementing the low noise amplifier before the Dicke switch (close to the antenna) compared to the other design with the Dicke switch in front. Radiometer performance was also tested in a multilayered phantom during alternating heating and radiometric reading. Empirical tests showed that for the configuration with Dicke switch first, the switch had to be locked in the reference position during application of microwave heating to avoid damage to the active components (amplifiers and power meter). For the configuration with a low noise amplifier up front, damage would occur to the active components of the radiometer if used in presence of the microwave heating antenna. Nevertheless, this design showed significantly improved sensitivity of measured temperatures and merits further investigation to determine methods of protecting the radiometer for amplifier first front ends.

  12. Adaptive two-regime method: Application to front propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Martin, E-mail: martin.robinson@maths.ox.ac.uk; Erban, Radek, E-mail: erban@maths.ox.ac.uk [Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Andrew Wiles Building, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6GG (United Kingdom); Flegg, Mark, E-mail: mark.flegg@monash.edu [School of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Monash University Wellington Road, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2014-03-28

    The Adaptive Two-Regime Method (ATRM) is developed for hybrid (multiscale) stochastic simulation of reaction-diffusion problems. It efficiently couples detailed Brownian dynamics simulations with coarser lattice-based models. The ATRM is a generalization of the previously developed Two-Regime Method [Flegg et al., J. R. Soc., Interface 9, 859 (2012)] to multiscale problems which require a dynamic selection of regions where detailed Brownian dynamics simulation is used. Typical applications include a front propagation or spatio-temporal oscillations. In this paper, the ATRM is used for an in-depth study of front propagation in a stochastic reaction-diffusion system which has its mean-field model given in terms of the Fisher equation [R. Fisher, Ann. Eugen. 7, 355 (1937)]. It exhibits a travelling reaction front which is sensitive to stochastic fluctuations at the leading edge of the wavefront. Previous studies into stochastic effects on the Fisher wave propagation speed have focused on lattice-based models, but there has been limited progress using off-lattice (Brownian dynamics) models, which suffer due to their high computational cost, particularly at the high molecular numbers that are necessary to approach the Fisher mean-field model. By modelling only the wavefront itself with the off-lattice model, it is shown that the ATRM leads to the same Fisher wave results as purely off-lattice models, but at a fraction of the computational cost. The error analysis of the ATRM is also presented for a morphogen gradient model.

  13. Holographic Optical Receiver Front End for Wireless Infrared Indoor Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jivkova, S.; Kavehrad, M.

    2001-06-01

    Multispot diffuse configuration (MSDC) for indoor wireless optical communications, utilizing multibeam transmitter and angle diversity detection, is one of the most promising ways of achieving high capacities for use in high-bandwidth islands such as classrooms, hotel lobbies, shopping malls, and train stations. Typically, the optical front end of the receiver consists of an optical concentrator to increase the received optical signal power and an optical bandpass filter to reject the ambient light. Using the unique properties of holographic optical elements (HOE), we propose a novel design for the receiver optical subsystem used in MSDC. With a holographic curved mirror as an optical front end, the receiver would achieve more than an 10-dB improvement in the electrical signal-to-noise ratio compared with a bare photodetector. Features such as multifunctionality of the HOE and the receiver s small size, light weight, and low cost make the receiver front end a promising candidate for a user s portable equipment in broadband indoor wireless multimedia access.

  14. Numerical simulation on the multiple dipolarization fronts in the magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haoyu; Li, Yun; Cao, Jinbin; Ge, Yasong; Zhang, Tielong; Yu, Yiqun

    2017-10-01

    Using an extended MHD model including the Hall effect and finite Larmor radius effect, we reproduce multiple dipolarization fronts (DFs) associated with the interchange instability in the braking region of bursty bulk flow in the plasma sheet. Our simulations reveal that the multiple DFs produced by the interchange instability are "growing" type DFs because the maximum plasma flow speeds are behind the fronts. Both the earthward and tailward moving DFs can be produced by interchange instability in the near-Earth region. The Hall electric field is the dominant electric field component in the dip region and the DF layer. The convective and the electron pressure gradient electric field components are smaller. The sharp Bz changes in both the dip region and DF layer correspond to the oppositely directed currents that are primarily associated with electrons. The ion diamagnetic current due to the strong ion pressure gradient causes an intense downward current in the dip region, which can produce the dip ahead of the front. The energy dissipations in the dip region and DF layer are dominated by ions through the work done by the Lorentz force. Our simulation results indicate that the magnetic energy can be converted to plasmas on the DF layer, and vice versa in the dip region.

  15. General advancing front packing algorithm for the discrete element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfa, Carlos A. Recarey; Pérez Morales, Irvin Pablo; de Farias, Márcio Muniz; de Navarra, Eugenio Oñate Ibañez; Valera, Roberto Roselló; Casañas, Harold Díaz-Guzmán

    2018-01-01

    A generic formulation of a new method for packing particles is presented. It is based on a constructive advancing front method, and uses Monte Carlo techniques for the generation of particle dimensions. The method can be used to obtain virtual dense packings of particles with several geometrical shapes. It employs continuous, discrete, and empirical statistical distributions in order to generate the dimensions of particles. The packing algorithm is very flexible and allows alternatives for: 1—the direction of the advancing front (inwards or outwards), 2—the selection of the local advancing front, 3—the method for placing a mobile particle in contact with others, and 4—the overlap checks. The algorithm also allows obtaining highly porous media when it is slightly modified. The use of the algorithm to generate real particle packings from grain size distribution curves, in order to carry out engineering applications, is illustrated. Finally, basic applications of the algorithm, which prove its effectiveness in the generation of a large number of particles, are carried out.

  16. Role of weighting in the dynamics of front propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zekri, Nouredine, E-mail: zekri@univ-usto.dz [Université des Sciences et de la Technologie d' Oran Mohamed Boudiaf, Département de Physique, LEPM, BP 1505 El Mnaouer, Oran (Algeria); Khelloufi, Khadidja; Zekri, Lotfi [Université des Sciences et de la Technologie d' Oran Mohamed Boudiaf, Département de Physique, LEPM, BP 1505 El Mnaouer, Oran (Algeria); Porterie, Bernard; Kaiss, Ahmed; Clerc, Jean-Pierre [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, IUSTI UMR 7343, 13453, Marseille (France)

    2012-07-30

    Non-equilibrium front propagation in a two-dimensional network modelling wildfire propagation was studied. The model includes deterministic long-range interactions due to radiation and a time weighting procedure. Three weight-dependent propagation regimes were found: dynamical, static, and non-propagative. The dynamical regime shows saturation for small weight values and a percolation transition area depending on the weight and size of the interaction domain. From the scaling interface exponents, the model seems to belong to the dynamical percolation universality class. In the limit of static regime it belongs to the random deposition class. -- Highlights: ► Percolation model used includes the weighting procedure and long-range interactions (an interaction domain). The interaction strength is chosen to decrease inversely with the square distance. ► There is a weight threshold R{sub c} above which the front cannot propagate. ► At R{sub c} the percolation is static (usual percolation), and below this threshold it becomes dynamic. ► A generalized dependence of the percolation threshold on both the interaction size n{sub y} and the weight parameter R is proposed. ► A further study of the front dynamic scaling is added to this version and dynamic exponents determined.

  17. Transmural anoxic wave front and regional dysfunction during early ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaide, H; Taira, Y; Nakamura, M

    1987-08-01

    The relative time courses of early changes in myocardial metabolism and function during anoxia, global ischemia, and regional ischemia were compared in isolated rat hearts. Transmural anoxic wave front was determined with NADH fluorescence photography, and oxygen saturation of myoglobin and dynamic systolic wall thickening were measured with spectrophotometry of light transmitted through the left ventricular free wall. In all three treatments, anoxic wave front first appeared in the subendocardium and reached the epicardial half of the myocardium in 10 s, when oxygen saturation of myoglobin decreased by 50% and tissue ATP and creatine phosphate remained at aerobic levels. During this period, systolic wall thickening decreased gradually in anoxia and global ischemia, whereas a marked decrease in systolic wall thickening and appearance of dyskinesia (wall thinning) occurred in regional ischemia. Thus the early extension of anoxic wave front and metabolic changes are similar with all three treatments, and dyskinesia, observed only in case of regional ischemia, occurs when the inner half is ischemic or anoxic.

  18. Optimized capture section for a muon accelerator front end

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham Kamal Sayed

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In a muon accelerator complex, a target is bombarded by a multi-MW proton beam to produce pions, which decay into the muons which are thereafter bunched, cooled, and accelerated. The front end of the complex captures those pions, then manipulates their phase space, and that of the muons into which they decay, to maximize the number of muons within the acceptance of the downstream systems. The secondary pion beam produced at the target is captured by a high field target solenoid that tapers down to a constant field throughout the rest of the front end. In this study we enhance the useful muon flux by introducing a new design of the longitudinal profile of the solenoid field at, and downstream of, the target. We find that the useful muon flux exiting the front end is larger when the field at the target is higher, the distance over which the field tapers down is shorter, and the field at the end of the taper is higher. We describe how the solenoid field profile impacts the transverse and longitudinal phase space of the beam and thereby leads to these dependencies.

  19. Mechanobiological predictions of growth front morphology in developmental hip dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shefelbine, Sandra J; Carter, Dennis R

    2004-03-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is the most common orthopedic problem of newborn children. Most clinicians and researchers agree that the primary cause of DDH is abnormal mechanical forces on the head of the femur due to limb position, pressure from the womb, or ligament laxity. The abnormal mechanical forces result in altered growth and bony deformities, in particular large neck-shaft and anteversion angles in the proximal femur and a shallow acetabulum. Previous studies have suggested that intermittent octahedral shear stress promotes growth and ossification, while intermittent hydrostatic compressive stress inhibits growth and ossification. We implemented these mechanobiological principles into a finite element model to predict the rate of progression of the growth front and the formation of coxa valga (large neck-shaft angle) in DDH. Under the assumed normal fetal loading conditions the hydrostatic stress was even across the growth front, but the octahedral shear stress was higher in the center than at the edges. This stress profile promoted growth in the center and a produced a convex growth front shape. Under loading conditions of the dysplastic hip, the octahedral shear stress was much larger on the medial side than on the lateral side, which promoted growth on the medial side and resulted in coxa valga. These results indicate that abnormal forces on the prenatal hip might influence total bone morphology and the development of DDH. These findings might help in understanding the etiology and pathology of other developmental bone deformities.

  20. 24 CFR 203.280 - One-time or Up-front MIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false One-time or Up-front MIP. 203.280... Payment § 203.280 One-time or Up-front MIP. For mortgages for which a one-time or up-front MIP is to be... the mortgage by the Commissioner or the up-front portion of the total obligation, as applicable...

  1. 40 CFR 63.492 - Batch front-end process vents-reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Batch front-end process vents-reporting... Batch front-end process vents—reporting requirements. (a) The owner or operator of a batch front-end... Compliance Status specified in § 63.506(e)(5). (1) For each batch front-end process vent complying with § 63...

  2. Advance of Wetting Front in Silt Loam Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mahmood

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Under drip irrigation , the plant's root is concentrated inside the wetted bulb (region. Thus, the development of these roots and the plant production are greatly affected by the wetting pattern. Therefore, the wetting pattern of soil under drip irrigation must be taken into consideration in the design of drip irrigation system for both single dripping source or multi-overlapping wetting patterns of dripping water sources.2The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of initial water content of the soil and spacing between two adjacent dripping sources with different flow rate on the movement of the wetting front.This study included 16 tests for monitoring the advancement of the wetting front with time during and after the water application phase. The water advance and water distribution measurement are carried out for two cases of the soil profile: for the first case with initial volumetric water content of 4.08% and for the second case with initial volumetric water content of 12.24%. Two spacing between the emitter were tested 25cm and 50 cm using application flow rates of 0.606, 1.212, 1.818, and 2.424 cm3 /min/cm to show the combined effect of spacing and flow rate on the performance of two adjacent emitter.The study proposed a method for determining the spacing between the two emitting sources , the water application rate and watering time. The proposed method depends on a wetted zone whose depth is equal to the root zone depth with a values equals to the maximum vertical advance of the wetting front underneath the drip line at time when this depth is equal to the depth of wetting at mid­point between the drip line. the study revealed that both the vertical water advance in soil underneath the emitter and the horizontal advance of the wetting front is larger than those in the case of single emitter.Furthermore, the vertical water advance increases with the decrease spacing between the two drip lines. Also, the horizontal advance of the

  3. Passive front-ends for wideband millimeter wave electronic warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastram, Nathan Joseph

    This thesis presents the analysis, design and measurements of novel passive front ends of interest to millimeter wave electronic warfare systems. However, emerging threats in the millimeter waves (18 GHz and above) has led to a push for new systems capable of addressing these threats. At these frequencies, traditional techniques of design and fabrication are challenging due to small size, limited bandwidth and losses. The use of surface micromachining technology for wideband direction finding with multiple element antenna arrays for electronic support is demonstrated. A wideband tapered slot antenna is first designed and measured as an array element for the subsequent arrays. Both 18--36 GHz and 75--110 GHz amplitude only and amplitude/phase two element direction finding front ends are designed and measured. The design of arrays using Butler matrix and Rotman lens beamformers for greater than two element direction finding over W band and beyond using is also presented. The design of a dual polarized high power capable front end for electronic attack over an 18--45 GHz band is presented. To combine two polarizations into the same radiating aperture, an orthomode transducer (OMT) based upon a new double ridge waveguide cross section is developed. To provide greater flexibility in needed performance characteristics, several different turnstile junction matching sections are tested. A modular horn section is proposed to address flexible and ever changing operational requirements, and is designed for performance criteria such as constant gain, beamwidth, etc. A multi-section branch guide coupler and low loss Rotman lens based upon the proposed cross section are also developed. Prototyping methods for the herein designed millimeter wave electronic warfare front ends are investigated. Specifically, both printed circuit board (PCB) prototyping of micromachined systems and 3D printing of conventionally machined horns are presented. A 4--8 GHz two element array with

  4. 40 CFR 63.487 - Batch front-end process vents-reference control technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 63.487 Batch front-end process vents—reference control technology. (a) Batch front-end process vents... process vent, reduce organic HAP emissions for the batch cycle by 90 weight percent using a control device... control device as it relates to continuous front-end process vents shall be used. Furthermore, the...

  5. Quality in Higher Education: Perspectives from Front-Line Faculty in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Molly Reas

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore perceptions of front-line faculty members in the United States related to quality and quality management in higher education. The study's three research questions were: (1) How do front-line faculty members in the United States define quality in higher education? (2) How do front-line faculty members in the…

  6. Topology optimization: An effective method for designing front metallization patterns of solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, D.K.; Langelaar, M.; Barink, M.; Keulen, F. van

    2014-01-01

    Optimal front electrode design is one of the approaches to improve the performance of solar cells. This work introduces the application of topology optimization (TO) to design complex front metallization patterns for solar cells. TO optimizes the distribution of electrode material on the front

  7. 40 CFR 63.491 - Batch front-end process vents-recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Batch front-end process vents... § 63.491 Batch front-end process vents—recordkeeping requirements. (a) Group determination records for batch front-end process vents. Except as provided in paragraphs (a)(7) and (a)(8) of this section, each...

  8. Riparian ecosystem consequences of water redistribution along the Colorado Front Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    John D. Wiener; Kathleen A. Dwire; Susan K. Skagen; Robert R. Crifasi; David Yates

    2008-01-01

    Water has shaped the American West. Nowhere is this more evident than along the Front Range of Colorado. At the west end of the famous Great Plains rainfall gradient, the Front Range extends most of the length of Colorado and is one of the fastest growing metropolitan regions in the nation. Annual precipitation along the Front Range averages about 16 inches, and...

  9. 40 CFR 81.52 - Wasatch Front Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wasatch Front Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.52 Section 81.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Quality Control Regions § 81.52 Wasatch Front Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Wasatch Front...

  10. 24 CFR 257.120 - Appreciation sharing or up-front payment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Appreciation sharing or up-front... Appreciation sharing or up-front payment (a) Calculation of appreciation. For purposes of section 257(k)(2) of... election to offer up-front payment in lieu of a share of appreciation. In lieu of any shared appreciation...

  11. 24 CFR 290.27 - Up-front grants and loans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Up-front grants and loans. 290.27... MULTIFAMILY MORTGAGES Disposition of Multifamily Projects § 290.27 Up-front grants and loans. (a) General. HUD may provide up-front grants and loans for rehabilitation, demolition, rebuilding and other related...

  12. 46 CFR 111.30-4 - Circuit breakers removable from the front.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Circuit breakers removable from the front. 111.30-4... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Switchboards § 111.30-4 Circuit breakers removable from the front... such a manner that the circuit breaker may be removed from the front without unbolting bus or cable...

  13. Properties of Deflagration Fronts and Models for Type IA Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, I.; Höflich, P.

    2000-01-01

    Detailed models of the explosion of a white dwarf that include self-consistent calculations of the light curve and spectra provide a link between observational quantities and the underlying explosion model. These calculations assume spherical geometry and are based on parameterized descriptions of the burning front. Recently, the first multidimensional calculations for nuclear burning fronts have been performed. Although a fully consistent treatment of the burning fronts is beyond the current state of the art, these calculations provide a new and better understanding of the physics. Several new descriptions for flame propagation have been proposed by Khokhlov et al. and Niemeyer et al. Using various descriptions for the propagation of a nuclear deflagration front, we have studied the influence on the results of previous analyses of Type Ia supernovae, namely, the nucleosynthesis and structure of the expanding envelope. Our calculations are based on a set of delayed detonation models with parameters that give a good account of the optical and infrared light curves and of the spectral evolution. In this scenario, the burning front first propagates in a deflagration mode and subsequently turns into a detonation. The explosions and light curves are calculated using a one-dimensional Lagrangian radiation-hydro code including a detailed nuclear network. We find that the results of the explosion are rather insensitive to details of the description of the deflagration front, even if its speed and the time from the transition to detonation differ almost by a factor of 2. For a given white dwarf (WD) and a fixed transition density, the total production of elements changes by less than 10%, and the distribution in the velocity space changes by less than 7%. Qualitatively, this insensitivity of the final outcome of the explosion to the details of the flame propagation during the (slow) deflagration phase can be understood as follows: for plausible variations in the speed of

  14. Dynamics of Evaporation Front Propagation in Freon R21 With Addition of Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moiseev Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of an experimental study on propagation dynamics of the self-sustained evaporation front in a large volume of Freon-R21 with the addition of SiO2 nanoparticles. The experimental data on propagation velocity and structure of evaporation fronts were obtained; the spectral analysis of fluctuations of the evaporation front interface was carried out. The characteristic frequencies and amplitudes of interface fluctuations were determined depending on the velocity of evaporation front propagation. It was shown that the addition of nano-sized particles significantly affects the front velocity and character of interface fluctuations.

  15. Research fronts analysis : A bibliometric to identify emerging fields of research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Sayaka; Ando, Satoko

    Research fronts analysis identifies emerging areas of research through observing co-clustering in highly-cited papers. This article introduces the concept of research fronts analysis, explains its methodology and provides case examples. It also demonstrates developing research fronts in Japan by looking at the past winners of Thomson Reuters Research Fronts Awards. Research front analysis is currently being used by the Japanese government to determine new trends in science and technology. Information professionals can also utilize this bibliometric as a research evaluation tool.

  16. Front instability and energy of the free surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrame, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, there has been a proliferation of research devoted to the formation of preferential flow paths occurring without macroscopic heterogeneity of the porous media. DiCarlo (2013) points out the connection between "overshoot" and the front instability. Extension of the standard Richards equation is required to capture this phenomenon. In most of the improvements, interfacial phenomena as the triple line at the front are considered. For instance, velocity dependent contact angle (Wang et al., 2013) or contact angle hysteresis (Rätz and Schweizer, 2012) allow to simulate successfully the instability. Another approach proposed by Cueto-Felgueroso and Juanes (2009) introduces a macroscopic surface tension related to the existence of the water/air interface. As previously, the simulation of an advancing front displays physical looking fingering displacements. The goal of this contribution is to better understand the role of the different surface energies in the emergence of the front instability. We propose a model involving both the macroscopic surface tension and the soil wettability. This latter allows to define a contact angle and possibly hysteresis using heterogeneous wettability (Beltrame et al., 2011). Therefore, we employ the phase field approach developed by Felgueroso and Juanes, 2009 to which we add a free energy term corresponding to the wettability: a disjoining or conjoining pressure resulting from effective molecular interactions between the substrate and the free surface (DeGennes, 1985). The difference with the classical suction pressure is the hydrophobic behavior for ultra-thin film (small water saturation). Such a water repellency was recently estimated in the soil (Diamantopoulos et al. 2013). Stability analysis of an advancing front in an uniform porous media shows that macroscopic surface tension and wettability may independently produce the instability growth. In contrast, for a front stopping when reaching the layers interface of

  17. Meson Transition Form Factors in Light-Front Holographic QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; Cao, Fu-Guang; /Massey U.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2011-06-22

    We study the photon-to-meson transition form factors (TFFs) F{sub M{gamma}}(Q{sup 2}) for {gamma}{gamma}* {yields} M using light-front holographic methods. The Chern-Simons action, which is a natural form in 5-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space, leads directly to an expression for the photon-to-pion TFF for a class of confining models. Remarkably, the predicted pion TFF is identical to the leading order QCD result where the distribution amplitude has asymptotic form. The Chern-Simons form is local in AdS space and is thus somewhat limited in its predictability. It only retains the q{bar q} component of the pion wavefunction, and further, it projects out only the asymptotic form of the meson distribution amplitude. It is found that in order to describe simultaneously the decay process {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} and the pion TFF at the asymptotic limit, a probability for the q{bar q} component of the pion wavefunction P{sub q{bar q}} = 0.5 is required; thus giving indication that the contributions from higher Fock states in the pion light-front wavefunction need to be included in the analysis. The probability for the Fock state containing four quarks (anti-quarks) which follows from analyzing the hadron matrix elements, P{sub q{bar q}q{bar q}} {approx} 10%, agrees with the analysis of the pion elastic form factor using light-front holography including higher Fock components in the pion wavefunction. The results for the TFFs for the {eta} and {eta}{prime} mesons are also presented. The rapid growth of the pion TFF exhibited by the BABAR data at high Q{sup 2} is not compatible with the models discussed in this article, whereas the theoretical calculations are in agreement with the experimental data for the {eta} and {eta}{prime} TFFs.

  18. Helical crack-front instability in mixed-mode fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Antonio J; Karma, Alain

    2010-03-04

    Planar crack propagation under pure tension loading (mode I) is generally stable. However, it becomes universally unstable with the superposition of a shear stress parallel to the crack front (mode III). Under this mixed-mode (I + III) loading configuration, an initially flat parent crack segments into an array of daughter cracks that rotate towards a direction of maximum tensile stress. This segmentation produces stepped fracture surfaces with characteristic 'lance-shaped' markings observed in a wide range of engineering and geological materials. The origin of this instability remains poorly understood and a theory with which to predict the surface roughness scale is lacking. Here we perform large-scale simulations of mixed-mode I + III brittle fracture using a continuum phase-field method that describes the complete three-dimensional crack-front evolution. The simulations reveal that planar crack propagation is linearly unstable against helical deformations of the crack front, which evolve nonlinearly into a segmented array of finger-shaped daughter cracks. Furthermore, during their evolution, facets gradually coarsen owing to the growth competition of daughter cracks in striking analogy with the coarsening of finger patterns observed in nonequilibrium growth phenomena. We show that the dynamically preferred unstable wavelength is governed by the balance of the destabilizing effect of far-field stresses and the stabilizing effect of cohesive forces on the process zone scale, and we derive a theoretical estimate for this scale using a new propagation law for curved cracks in three dimensions. The rotation angles of coarsened facets are also compared to theoretical predictions and available experimental data.

  19. Wind-induced subduction at the South Atlantic subtropical front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calil, Paulo H. R.

    2017-10-01

    The South Atlantic Subtropical Front, associated with the eastward-flowing South Atlantic Current, separates the colder, nutrient-rich waters of the subpolar gyre from the warmer, nutrient-poor waters of the subtropical gyre. Perturbations to the quasi-geostrophic, eastward flow generate meanders and filaments which induce cross-frontal exchange of water properties. Down-front winds transport denser waters from the South over warm waters from the North, inducing convective instability and subduction. Such processes occur over spatial scales of the order of 1 km and thus require high horizontal spatial resolution. In this modeling study, a high-resolution (4 km) regional grid is embedded in a basin-wide configuration (12 km) of the South Atlantic Ocean in order to test the importance of submesoscale processes in water mass subduction along the subtropical front. Stronger and more numerous eddies obtained in the high-resolution run yield more intense zonal jets along the frontal zone. Such stronger jets are more susceptible to instabilities, frontogenesis, and the generation of submesoscale meanders and filaments with O(1) Rossby number. As a consequence, vertical velocities larger than 100 md 1 are obtained in the high-resolution run, one order of magnitude larger than in the low-resolution run. Wind-driven subduction occurs along the frontal region, associated with negative Ertel potential vorticity in the surface layer. Such processes are not observed in the low-resolution run. A passive tracer experiment shows that waters with density characteristics similar to subtropical mode waters are preferentially subducted along the frontal region. The wind-driven buoyancy flux is shown to be much larger than thermal or haline fluxes during the wintertime, which highlights the importance of the frictional component in extracting PV from the surface ocean and inducing subduction, a process that has been overlooked in subtropical mode water formation in the region.

  20. Detection and Characters Analysis of Sea Surface Temperature Fronts in the Northwest Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Meng; Wang, Jin

    2016-08-01

    Sea Surface Temperature (SST) front is a typical mesoscale phenomenon in the ocean. The SST field of the Northwest Pacific Ocean is complex and the SST fronts are well developed in this area. In this research, the accuracy of SST fusion data product of RSS is validated by Argo buoys and the standard deviation is found to be 0.6K. Additionally, the performance of two front detection methods (temperature gradient and Jensen-Shannon divergence method) is compared and assessed by a simulated temperature field. Results show that the JSD is superior to GM. Consequently, SST fronts in the study area are detected by the JSD divergence method and some characters such as evolution process, seasonal variation, fronts intensity and length are studied. The results show that the front is active in January and weaken in September. The front intensity is maximum in winter and reaches its minimum in summer.

  1. Null geodesics and wave front singularities in the Gödel space-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Thomas P.; Roebuck, Kevin; Grotzke, Eric

    2018-01-01

    We explore wave fronts of null geodesics in the Gödel metric emitted from point sources both at, and away from, the origin. For constant time wave fronts emitted by sources away from the origin, we find cusp ridges as well as blue sky metamorphoses where spatially disconnected portions of the wave front appear, connect to the main wave front, and then later break free and vanish. These blue sky metamorphoses in the constant time wave fronts highlight the non-causal features of the Gödel metric. We introduce a concept of physical distance along the null geodesics, and show that for wave fronts of constant physical distance, the reorganization of the points making up the wave front leads to the removal of cusp ridges.

  2. Topological defects govern crack front motion and facet formation on broken surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolvin, Itamar; Cohen, Gil; Fineberg, Jay

    2018-02-01

    Cracks develop intricate patterns on the surfaces that they create. As faceted fracture surfaces are commonly formed by slow tensile cracks in both crystalline and amorphous materials, facet formation and structure cannot reflect microscopic order. Although fracture mechanics predict that slow crack fronts should be straight and form mirror-like surfaces, facet-forming fronts propagate simultaneously within different planes separated by steps. Here we show that these steps are topological defects of crack fronts and that crack front separation into disconnected overlapping segments provides the condition for step stability. Real-time imaging of propagating crack fronts combined with surface measurements shows that crack dynamics are governed by localized steps that drift at a constant angle to the local front propagation direction while their increased dissipation couples to long-ranged elasticity to determine front shapes. We study how three-dimensional topology couples to two-dimensional fracture dynamics to provide a fundamental picture of how patterned surfaces are generated.

  3. Improving Polyp Detection Algorithms for CT Colonography: Pareto Front Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Adam; Li, Jiang; Summers, Ronald M; Petrick, Nicholas; Hara, Amy K

    2010-03-21

    We investigated a Pareto front approach to improving polyp detection algorithms for CT colonography (CTC). A dataset of 56 CTC colon surfaces with 87 proven positive detections of 53 polyps sized 4 to 60 mm was used to evaluate the performance of a one-step and a two-step curvature-based region growing algorithm. The algorithmic performance was statistically evaluated and compared based on the Pareto optimal solutions from 20 experiments by evolutionary algorithms. The false positive rate was lower (pPareto optimization process can effectively help in fine-tuning and redesigning polyp detection algorithms.

  4. Instrument Front-Ends at Fermilab During Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Thomas; Slimmer, David; Voy, Duane; /Fermilab

    2011-07-13

    The optimization of an accelerator relies on the ability to monitor the behavior of the beam in an intelligent and timely fashion. The use of processor-driven front-ends allowed for the deployment of smart systems in the field for improved data collection and analysis during Run II. This paper describes the implementation of the two main systems used: National Instruments LabVIEW running on PCs, and WindRiver's VxWorks real-time operating system running in a VME crate processor.

  5. Structuring front-end innovation activities throughout strategic product planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaisa Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Abstract Strategic product planning (SPP for new product development (NPD in the front-end of innovation (FEI is a great challenge for managers and practitioners. This article analyzes the structuring process of FEI activities during SPP. A research was carried out with 78 industries from both food and furniture in Brazil. Our study revealed that FEI activities are structured in an intricate network with a high level of complexity and interdependence. The large amount of activities and the complexity in structuring them denote that companies are concerned to reduce uncertainties and risks intensifying the planning phase.

  6. Front-end electronics for the CMS preshower detector

    CERN Document Server

    Go, A; Barney, D; Bloch, P; Peisert, Anna; Löfstedt, B; Reynaud, S; Borkar, S; Lalwani, S

    2002-01-01

    The front-end readout system PACE2 for the CMS preshower detector consists of two chips: Delta is a 32 channel preamplifier and shaper that provides low noise, charge to voltage readout for large capacitive silicon sensors over a large dynamic range (up to 400 MIPs); PACE-AM contains a 32-channel wide, 160-cell deep, analog memory with a 32 to 1 multiplexer for serial readout. These chips are designed in .8 mu m BiCMOS DMILL radiation tolerant technology. The performance in terms of dynamic range, linearity, noise, peaking time and memory uniformity are presented. (4 refs).

  7. PENETRATION OF A SHOCK WAVE IN A FLAME FRONT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan PANTAZOPOL

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the interactions between a fully supersonic flame front, situated in a supersonic two-dimensional flow of an ideal homogeneous combustible gas mixture, and an incident shock wawe, which is penetrating in the space of the hot burnt gases. A possible configuration, which was named ,,simple penetration” is examined. For the anlysis of the interference phenomena, shock polar and shock-combustion polar are used. At the same time, the paper shows the possibility to produce similar but more complicated configurations, which may contain expansion fans and reflected shock waves.

  8. Thermal diagnostics front-end electronics for LISA Pathfinder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjuán, J; Lobo, A; Nofrarias, M; Ramos-Castro, J; Riu, P J

    2007-10-01

    Precision temperature measurements are required in the LTP, the LISA technology package, for various diagnostics objectives. In this article, we describe in detail the front-end electronics design and the associated temperature sensors to achieve the LTP requirements: noise equivalent temperature of 10 microK Hz(-12) in the frequency range from 1 to 30 mHz at room temperature. We designed an ac Wheatstone bridge and a subsequent digital demodulation to minimize 1/f noise. We show experimental results where the required sensitivity in the measurement bandwidth is fulfilled.

  9. Dynamic stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in ablation fronts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piriz A.R.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in an ablation front is studied by considering the simplest possible modulations in the acceleration. Explicit analytical expressions for the instability growth rate and for the boundaries of the stability region are obtained by considering a sequence of Dirac deltas. Besides, general square waves allow for studying the effect of the driving asymmetries on the stability region as well as the optimization process. The essential role of compressibility is phenomenologically addressed in order to find the constraints it imposes on the stability region.

  10. Cloacolith in a blue-fronted amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufrère, Hugues; Nevarez, Javier; Tully, Thomas N

    2010-06-01

    A 4-year-old blue-fronted Amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva) was admitted for vocalization secondary to constipation. Saline infusion cloacoscopy revealed the presence of a 2-cm-diameter cloacolith within the coprodeum that was obstructing the rectal opening. The cloacolith was fragmented with a pair of biopsy forceps and the pieces removed. The cloacolith was subsequently analyzed and was composed of 100% uric acid salts. The bird improved completely and was able to defecate normally after the procedure. Cloacoliths are relative uncommon cloacal conditions, and this case documents cloacoscopic findings, rectal obstruction, and confirmation of its uric acid composition by urolith analysis.

  11. Vertebral chondrosarcoma in a blue-fronted parrot (Amazona aestiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Reis Blume

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chondrosarcoma is a malignant mesenchymal tumor in which the neoplastic cells produce cartilaginous matrix and is uncommonly described in birds. This report describes the clinical and pathological findings of one case of chondrosarcoma in a blue-fronted parrot (Amazona aestiva. Macroscopically a 3.6x3.5x1.8cm, nodular, ulcerated, and firm mass was identified in the dorsal synsacrum. Microscopically, the mass was composed of a monomorphic proliferation of pleomorphic spindle chondrocytes with abundant cartilaginous matrix, consistent with chondrosarcoma

  12. Invasion front-specific expression and prognostic significance of microRNA in colorectal liver metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlert, Christoph; Klupp, Fee; Brand, Karsten; Lasitschka, Felix; Diederichs, Sven; Kirchberg, Johanna; Rahbari, Nuh; Dutta, Shamik; Bork, Ulrich; Fritzmann, Johannes; Reissfelder, Christoph; Koch, Moritz; Weitz, Juergen

    2011-10-01

    The tumor edge of colorectal cancer and its adjacent peritumoral tissue is characterized by an invasion front-specific expression of genes that contribute to angiogenesis or epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Dysregulation of these genes has a strong impact on the invasion behavior of tumor cells. However, the invasion front-specific expression of microRNA (miRNA) still remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate miRNA expression patterns at the invasion front of colorectal liver metastases. Laser microdissection of colorectal liver metastases was performed to obtain separate tissue compartments from the tumor center, tumor invasion front, liver invasion front and pure liver parenchyma. Microarray expression analysis revealed 23 miRNA downregulated in samples from the tumor invasion front with respect to the same miRNA in the liver, the liver invasion front or the tumor center. By comparing samples from the liver invasion front with samples from pure liver parenchyma, the tumor invasion front and the tumor center, 13 miRNA were downregulated. By quantitative RT-PCR, we validated the liver invasion front-specific downregulation of miR-19b, miR-194, let-7b and miR-1275 and the tumor invasion front-specific downregulation of miR-143, miR- 145, let-7b and miR-638. Univariate analysis demonstrated that enhanced expression of miR-19b and miR-194 at the liver invasion front, and decreased expression of let-7 at the tumor invasion front, is an adverse prognostic marker of tumor recurrence and overall survival. In conclusion, the present study suggests that invasion front-specific downregulation of miRNA in colorectal liver metastases plays a pivotal role in tumor progression.

  13. Lower hybrid waves at the shock front: a reassessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Walker

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The primary process occurring at a collisionless shock is the redistribution of the bulk upstream energy into other degrees of freedom. One part of this process results in the acceleration of electrons at the shock front. Accelerated electrons are observed at the terrestrial and other planetary shocks, comets, and their effects are observed in astrophysical phenomena such as supernova remnants and jets in the form of X-ray bremsstrahlung radiation. One of the physical models for electron acceleration at supercritical shocks is based on low-hybrid turbulence due to the presence of reflected ions in the foot region. Since lower hybrid waves propagate almost perpendicular to the magnetic field they can be simultaneously in resonance with both the unmagnetised ions (ω=Vik and magnetised electrons (ω=Vek||. In this paper, Cluster observations of the electric field are used to study the occurrence of lower hybrid waves in the front of the terrestrial bow shock. It is shown that the lower hybrid waves exist as isolated wave packets. However, the very low level of the observed lower hybrid turbulence is too small to impart significant energisation to the electron population.

  14. Evolved hypabyssal rocks from Station 7, Apennine Front, Apollo 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, G.; Martinez, R. R.

    1991-01-01

    Three 4-10-mm coarse fines cataclasized particles from Station 7 on the Apennine Front, Apollo 15, have mineral phases and compositions similar to those in the quartz monzodiorites in 15405, from Station 6a. The chemical analyses of the Station 7 particles have lower trace-element abundances and flatter rare earth element patterns, and there is considerable disagreement among and between mineral norms and modes. The zoning of pyroxenes and the nature of their exsolution strongly suggest a common origin of the three particles and 15405 quartz monzodiorites in a hypabyssal environment. The differences then are a result of short-range differences in igneous modes considerably exaggereted by unrepresentative sampling of coarse rocks in small fragments. The parent hypabyssal rocks crystallized (4.35 Ga ago?) by fractionation of a poorly defined KREEP basalt magma, before the residual liquid reached any field of immiscibility. An impact event, possibly that forming Aristillus, ejected the upper levels of the bypabyssal intrusion, some of the ejecta spraying the Apennine Front.

  15. Influence of wheelchair front caster wheel on reverse directional stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Songfeng; Cooper, Rory A; Corfman, Tom; Ding, Dan; Grindle, Garrett

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study directional stability during reversing of rear-wheel drive, electric powered wheelchairs (EPW) under different initial front caster orientations. Specifically, the weight distribution differences caused by certain initial caster orientations were examined as a possible mechanism for causing directional instability that could lead to accidents. Directional stability was quantified by measuring the drive direction error of the EPW by a motion analysis system. The ground reaction forces were collected to determine the load on the front casters, as well as back-emf data to attain the speed of the motors. The drive direction error was found to be different for various initial caster orientations. Drive direction error was greatest when both casters were oriented 90 degrees to the left or right, and least when both casters were oriented forward. The results show that drive direction error corresponds to the loading difference on the casters. The data indicates that loading differences may cause asymmetric drag on the casters, which in turn causes unbalanced torque load on the motors. This leads to a difference in motor speed and drive direction error.

  16. Underwater fiber-wireless communication with a passive front end

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Sun, Bin; Lyu, Weichao; Kong, Meiwei; Sarwar, Rohail; Han, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Ning

    2017-11-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel concept on underwater fiber-wireless (Fi-Wi) communication system with a fully passive wireless front end. A low-cost step-index (SI) plastic optical fiber (POF) together with a passive collimating lens at the front end composes the underwater Fi-Wi architecture. We have achieved a 1.71-Gb/s transmission at a mean BER of 4.97 × 10-3 (1.30 × 10-3 when using power loading) over a 50-m SI-POF and 2-m underwater wireless channel using orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM). Although the wireless part is very short, it actually plays a crucial role in practical underwater implementation, especially in deep sea. Compared with the wired solution (e.g. using a 52-m POF cable without the UWOC part), the proposed underwater Fi-Wi scheme can save optical wet-mate connectors that are sophisticated, very expensive and difficult to install in deep ocean. By combining high-capacity robust POF with the mobility and ubiquity of underwater wireless optical communication (UWOC), the proposed underwater Fi-Wi technology will find wide application in ocean exploration.

  17. Computing gap free Pareto front approximations with stochastic search algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütze, Oliver; Laumanns, Marco; Tantar, Emilia; Coello, Carlos A Coello; Talbi, El-Ghazali

    2010-01-01

    Recently, a convergence proof of stochastic search algorithms toward finite size Pareto set approximations of continuous multi-objective optimization problems has been given. The focus was on obtaining a finite approximation that captures the entire solution set in some suitable sense, which was defined by the concept of epsilon-dominance. Though bounds on the quality of the limit approximation-which are entirely determined by the archiving strategy and the value of epsilon-have been obtained, the strategies do not guarantee to obtain a gap free approximation of the Pareto front. That is, such approximations A can reveal gaps in the sense that points f in the Pareto front can exist such that the distance of f to any image point F(a), a epsilon A, is "large." Since such gap free approximations are desirable in certain applications, and the related archiving strategies can be advantageous when memetic strategies are included in the search process, we are aiming in this work for such methods. We present two novel strategies that accomplish this task in the probabilistic sense and under mild assumptions on the stochastic search algorithm. In addition to the convergence proofs, we give some numerical results to visualize the behavior of the different archiving strategies. Finally, we demonstrate the potential for a possible hybridization of a given stochastic search algorithm with a particular local search strategy-multi-objective continuation methods-by showing that the concept of epsilon-dominance can be integrated into this approach in a suitable way.

  18. AUV based study on physical and ecological processes at fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippenhauer, Sandra; Wulff, Thorben; Von Appen, Wilken-Jon

    2017-04-01

    Small-scale processes and their effects get more and more attention when it comes to understanding processes and changes in the (Arctic) ocean. Here we present a study on physical processes and ecological responses at submesoscale frontal systems in the Fram Strait investigated using an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). The AUV is equipped with physical and biogeochemical sensors such as an acoustic Doppler current profiler, a turbulence probe, a conductivity-temperature-depth probe, and sensors for Oxygen, Nitrate, Chlorophyll a, and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). The study is designed such that the AUV covers tracks of several kilometers length in cross-frontal direction with the front roughly located in the middle of the track. On its way, the AUV records high-resolution vertical or zigzag profiles of the physical and biogeochemical properties in the upper 50 m which includes the euphotic zone. In both, physical and biogeochemical terms, the measurements revealed a complex structure of the water column. At the fronts the distribution of phytoplankton and nutrients was highly inhomogeneous, possibly due to wind-driven frontogenesis or the growth of mixed layer eddies. To set the observations into a larger context we also examine ship-based and satellite data. We investigate how the observed patterns of the potential vorticity and the biogeochemical properties may be formed and which processes could lead to a smoothing of the observed gradients.

  19. Crash simulation of UNS electric vehicle under frontal front impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susilo, D. D., E-mail: djoksus-2010@yahoo.com; Lukamana, N. I., E-mail: n.indra.lukmana@gmail.com; Budiana, E. P., E-mail: budiana.e@gmail.com; Tjahjana, D. D. D. P., E-mail: danar1405@gmail.com [Mechanical Engineering Department, Sebelas Maret University, Surakarta (Indonesia)

    2016-03-29

    Sebelas Maret University has been developing an Electric Vehicle namely SmarT-EV UNS. The main structure of the car are chasis and body. The chasis is made from steel and the body is made from fiberglass composite. To ensure the safety of the car, both static and dynamic tests were carried out to these structures, including their materials, like: tensile test, bending test, and impact test. Another test needed by this vehicle is crashworthiness test. To perform the test, it is needed complex equipments and it is quite expensive. Another way to obtain vehicle crashworthiness behaviour is by simulate it. The purpose of this study was to simulate the response of the Smart-EV UNS electric vehicle main structure when crashing rigid barrier from the front. The crash simulation was done in according to the NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) within the speed of the vehicle of 35 mph. The UNS Electric Vehicle was modelled using SolidWorks software, and the simulation process was done by finite element method using ANSYS software. The simulation result showed that the most internal impact energy was absorbed by chassis part. It absorbed 76.2% of impact energy, then the base absorbed 11.3 %, while the front body absorbed 2.5 %, and the rest was absorbed by fender, hood, and other parts.

  20. High-linearity CMOS RF front-end circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Yongwang

    2005-01-01

    This monograph presents techniques to improve the performance of linear integrated circuits (IC) in CMOS at high frequencies. Those circuits are primarily used in radio-frequency (RF) front-ends of wireless communication systems, such as low noise amplifiers (LNA) and mixers in a receiver and power amplifiers (PA) in a transmitter. A novel linearization technique is presented. With a small trade-off of gain and power consumption this technique can improve the linearity of the majority of circuits by tens of dB. Particularly, for modern CMOS processes, most of which has device matching better than 1%, the distortion can be compressed by up to 40 dB at the output. A prototype LNA has been fabricated in a 0.25um CMOS process, with a measured +18 dBm IIP3. This technique improves the dynamic range of a receiver RF front-end by 12 dB. A new class of power amplifier (parallel class A&B) is also presented to extend the linear operation range and save the DC power consumption. It has been shown by both simulation...

  1. Instability of planar detonation front in energetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzevich, Mikalai; Zhakhovsky, Vasily; Landerville, Aaron; White, Carter; Oleynik, Ivan

    2012-02-01

    Detonation wave propagation in solid energetic materials (EMs), as described by the standard AB model, was studied using a novel moving window molecular dynamics (MW-MD) technique. Parameters of the AB model were modified to investigate the mechanisms of detonation propagation in EMs as a function of the activation barrier for the chemical reaction AB+B -> A+BB + 3 eV. For barriers below 0.2 eV, the detonation front structure remained planar irregardless of the cross-section of the sample. For higher activation barriers, the one-dimensional planar detonation evolves into a cellular detonation upon increase of one of the transverse dimensions of the sample. The cellular detonation transforms into a stable three-dimensional turbulent-like detonation upon simultaneous increase of both transverse dimensions of the sample. These various instabilities of the planar detonation front in solid EMs observed in our MW-MD simulations mirror the major regimes of gas-phase detonation, thus confirming the universal nature of detonation phenomena.

  2. Quantifying methane emissions and sources in the Colorado Front Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, S.; Townsend-Small, A.; Schroeder, J.; Blake, N. J.; Blake, D. R.

    2016-12-01

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and is relatively constant throughout the atmosphere, at 1.8 ppmv. This value, however, is increasing primarily due to anthropogenic sources, including agriculture and natural gas extraction. Here we present atmospheric methane fluxes measured during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE) in July - August 2014 in the Colorado Front Range on the NCAR C-130. During this campaign 775 advanced whole air samples (AWAS) were collected onboard the aircraft and 248 samples were collected on the ground in order to quantify and evaluate air pollution sources. Methane concentrations were measured continuously aboard the aircraft using cavity ringdown spectroscopy. Major sources of methane in this region are oil and natural gas extraction and distribution, landfills, and cattle feed lots. In order to assess the impact of methane emissions on this area, methane flux was evaluated by comparing upwind and downwind concentrations where significant enhancements were observed downwind. We also present information from other hydrocarbons measured in canisters to attribute methane emissions to urban, agricultural, and oil and gas sources. The state of Colorado recently enacted legislation to reduce emissions of hydrocarbons from oil and gas facilities and our measurements will provide a preliminary estimate of whether these regulations are effective.

  3. Wildfire risk transmission in the Colorado Front Range, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Jessica R; Calkin, David E; Thompson, Matthew P

    2015-02-01

    Wildfires are a global phenomenon that in some circumstances can result in human casualties, economic loss, and ecosystem service degradation. In this article we spatially identify wildfire risk transmission pathways and locate the areas of highest exposure of human populations to wildland fires under severe, but not uncommon, weather events. We quantify varying levels of exposure in terms of population potentially affected and tie the exposure back to the spatial source of the risk for the Front Range of Colorado, USA. We use probabilistic fire simulation modeling to address where fire ignitions are most likely to cause the highest impact to human communities, and to explore the role that various landowners play in that transmission of risk. Our results indicated that, given an ignition and the right fire weather conditions, large areas along the Front Range in Colorado could be exposed to wildfires with high potential to impact human populations, and that overall private ignitions have the potential to impact more people than federal ignitions. These results can be used to identify high-priority areas for wildfire risk mitigation using various mitigation tools. © 2014 Society for Risk Analysis Published 2014. This article is a U.S. government work and is in the public domain for the USA.

  4. Spontaneous Wave Generation from Submesoscale Fronts and Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, C. J.; Hogg, A.

    2016-02-01

    Submesoscale features such as eddies, fronts, jets and filaments can be significant sources of spontaneous wave generation at the ocean surface. Unlike near-inertial waves forced by winds, these spontaneous waves are typically of higher frequency and can propagate through the thermocline, whereupon they break and drive mixing in the ocean interior. Here we investigate the spontaneous generation, propagation and subsequent breaking of these waves using a combination of theory and submesoscale resolving numerical models. The mechanism of generation is nearly identical to that of lee waves where flow is deflected over a rigid obstacle on the sea floor. Here, very sharp fronts and filaments of order 100m width moving in the submesoscale surface flow generate "surface lee waves" by presenting an obstacle to the surrounding stratified fluid. Using our numerical model we quantify the net downward wave energy flux from the surface, and where it is dissipated in the water column. Our results suggest an alternative to the classical paradigm where the energy associated with mixing in the ocean interior is sourced from bottom-generated lee waves.

  5. Front-Side Microstrip Line Feeding a Raised Antenna Patch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Richard; Hoppe, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    An improved design concept for a printed-circuit patch antenna and the transmission line that feeds the patch calls for (1) a microstrip transmission line on the front (radiative) side of a printed-circuit board based on a thin, high-permittivity dielectric substrate; (2) using the conductor covering the back side of the circuit board as a common ground plane for both the microstrip line and the antenna patch; (3) supporting the antenna patch in front of the circuit board on a much thicker, lower-permittivity dielectric spacer layer; and (4) connecting the microstrip transmission line to the patch by use of a thin wire or narrow ribbon that extends through the thickness of the spacer and is oriented perpendicularly to the circuit-board plane. The thickness of the substrate is typically chosen so that a microstrip transmission line of practical width has an impedance between 50 and 100 ohms. The advantages of this design concept are best understood in the context of the disadvantages of prior design concepts, as explained

  6. Deep reduced PEDOT films support electrochemical applications: Biomimetic color front.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toribio Fernandez OTERO

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Most of the literature accepts, despite many controversial results, that during oxidation/reduction films of conducting polymers move from electronic conductors to insulators. Thus, engineers and device’s designers are forced to use metallic supports to reoxidize the material for reversible device work. Electrochromic front experiments appear as main visual support of the claimed insulating nature of reduced conducting polymers. Here we present a different design of the biomimetic electrochromic front that corroborates the electronic and ionic conducting nature of deep reduced films. The direct contact PEDOT metal/electrolyte and film/electrolyte was prevented from electrolyte contact until 1cm far from the metal contact with protecting Parafilm®. The deep reduced PEDOT film supports the flow of high currents promoting reaction induced electrochromic color changes beginning 1 cm far from the metal-polymer electrical contact and advancing, through the reduced film, towards the metal contact. Reverse color changes during oxidation/reduction always are initiated at the film/electrolyte contact advancing, under the protecting film, towards the film/metal contact. Both reduced and oxidized states of the film demonstrate electronic and ionic conductivities high enough to be used for electronic applications or, as self-supported electrodes, for electrochemical devices. The electrochemically stimulated conformational relaxation (ESCR model explains those results.

  7. Design Optimization for Superconducting Bending Magnets using Pareto Front Curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yukihiro; Abe, Mitsushi; Ando, Ryuya

    2017-09-01

    A novel limit design method for superconducting magnets is presented. It is particularly suitable for ion core magnets such as those used in accelerator magnets. In general, a stochastic optimization whose objective functions consist of values, e.g., the magnetic field, experience field of superconducting coils, current density, and multipole field integral, is often used. However, it is well known that the obtained solution strongly depends on the initial one. Furthermore, once the calculation model is fixed, the range of solutions is also fixed, i.e., there are times when it may be impossible to find the global optimum solution even with a lot of parameter sweeps. In this study, we draw the Pareto front curve to obtain the range and infer whether the solution is an optimum one. In addition, the Pareto front curve indicates the neighborhood solution that is substituted for the initial one. After this process a stochastic optimization is implemented with its initial design parameters. To confirm the validity, we designed a superconducting bending magnet, and it showed that this method works well.

  8. Outdoor ultrafine particle concentrations in front of fast food restaurants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vert, Cristina; Meliefste, Kees; Hoek, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs) have been associated with negative effects on human health. Emissions from motor vehicles are the principal source of UFPs in urban air. A study in Vancouver suggested that UFP concentrations were related to density of fast food restaurants near the monitoring sites. A previous monitoring campaign could not separate the contribution of restaurants from road traffic. The main goal of this study has been the quantification of fast food restaurants' contribution to outdoor UFP concentrations. A portable particle number counter (DiscMini) has been used to carry out mobile monitoring in a largely pedestrianized area in the city center of Utrecht. A fixed route passing 17 fast food restaurants was followed on 8 days. UFP concentrations in front of the restaurants were 1.61 times higher than in a nearby square without any local sources used as control area and 1.22 times higher compared with all measurements conducted in between the restaurants. Adjustment for other sources such as passing mopeds, smokers or candles did not explain the increase. In conclusion, fast food restaurants result in significant increases in outdoor UFP concentrations in front of the restaurant.

  9. Polarized front-face fluorescence for muscle tissue structure evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luc, C.; Clerjon, S.; Peyrin, F.; Lepetit, J.

    2008-05-01

    The fluorescence anisotropy of a rigid medium is a consequence of photoselection of fluorophores and their orientations. This makes it possible to use polarized front-face fluorescence to provide structural information on biological tissues like muscle. Tryptophan is the major intrinsic fluorophore in muscle. It is embedded in proteins which act as building blocks for muscle structuration because of their preferential alignment. Our working hypothesis is that when the arrangement of the proteins changes, there are concomitant changes in fluorescence anisotropy parameters. Our research is directed toward evaluating muscle structure and its evolution post mortem. We report a theoretical simple model of tryptophan fluorescence and an experimental method to measure the fluorescence anisotropy of biological opaque tissues. Instrumental and optical considerations have to be taken into account in experiments on front-face polarization to make certain of measurement accuracy. Therefore, we present a detailed report on the adjustments and corrections made on a conventional L-spectrofluorimeter to adapt it to fluorescence anisotropy measurements on biological tissues. Data from several experiments demonstrate how the method is able to show muscle structure modifications. We show how it is possible to fit experimental data with the model developed in order to obtain structural information.

  10. Crash simulation of UNS electric vehicle under frontal front impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilo, D. D.; Lukamana, N. I.; Budiana, E. P.; Tjahjana, D. D. D. P.

    2016-03-01

    Sebelas Maret University has been developing an Electric Vehicle namely SmarT-EV UNS. The main structure of the car are chasis and body. The chasis is made from steel and the body is made from fiberglass composite. To ensure the safety of the car, both static and dynamic tests were carried out to these structures, including their materials, like: tensile test, bending test, and impact test. Another test needed by this vehicle is crashworthiness test. To perform the test, it is needed complex equipments and it is quite expensive. Another way to obtain vehicle crashworthiness behaviour is by simulate it. The purpose of this study was to simulate the response of the Smart-EV UNS electric vehicle main structure when crashing rigid barrier from the front. The crash simulation was done in according to the NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) within the speed of the vehicle of 35 mph. The UNS Electric Vehicle was modelled using SolidWorks software, and the simulation process was done by finite element method using ANSYS software. The simulation result showed that the most internal impact energy was absorbed by chassis part. It absorbed 76.2% of impact energy, then the base absorbed 11.3 %, while the front body absorbed 2.5 %, and the rest was absorbed by fender, hood, and other parts.

  11. Seabird diving behaviour reveals the functional significance of shelf-sea fronts as foraging hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, S. L.; Miller, P. I.; Embling, C. B.; Scales, K. L.; Bicknell, A. W. J.; Hosegood, P. J.; Morgan, G.; Ingram, S. N.; Votier, S. C.

    2016-09-01

    Oceanic fronts are key habitats for a diverse range of marine predators, yet how they influence fine-scale foraging behaviour is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the dive behaviour of northern gannets Morus bassanus in relation to shelf-sea fronts. We GPS (global positioning system) tracked 53 breeding birds and examined the relationship between 1901 foraging dives (from time-depth recorders) and thermal fronts (identified via Earth Observation composite front mapping) in the Celtic Sea, Northeast Atlantic. We (i) used a habitat-use availability analysis to determine whether gannets preferentially dived at fronts, and (ii) compared dive characteristics in relation to fronts to investigate the functional significance of these oceanographic features. We found that relationships between gannet dive probabilities and fronts varied by frontal metric and sex. While both sexes were more likely to dive in the presence of seasonally persistent fronts, links to more ephemeral features were less clear. Here, males were positively correlated with distance to front and cross-front gradient strength, with the reverse for females. Both sexes performed two dive strategies: shallow V-shaped plunge dives with little or no active swim phase (92% of dives) and deeper U-shaped dives with an active pursuit phase of at least 3 s (8% of dives). When foraging around fronts, gannets were half as likely to engage in U-shaped dives compared with V-shaped dives, independent of sex. Moreover, V-shaped dive durations were significantly shortened around fronts. These behavioural responses support the assertion that fronts are important foraging habitats for marine predators, and suggest a possible mechanistic link between the two in terms of dive behaviour. This research also emphasizes the importance of cross-disciplinary research when attempting to understand marine ecosystems.

  12. Facts up front versus traffic light food labels: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberto, Christina A; Bragg, Marie A; Schwartz, Marlene B; Seamans, Marissa J; Musicus, Aviva; Novak, Nicole; Brownell, Kelly D

    2012-08-01

    The U.S. food and beverage industry recently released a new front-of-package nutrition labeling system called Facts Up Front that will be used on thousands of food products. To test consumer understanding of the Facts Up Front system (Facts Up Front) compared to the Multiple Traffic Light system (Traffic Light). Facts Up Front displays grams/milligrams and percentage daily value information for various nutrients; Traffic Light uses an interpretive color-coded scheme to alert consumers to low, medium, and high levels of certain nutrients. Participants in an Internet-based study were randomized to one of five front-of-package label conditions: (1) no label; (2) Traffic Light; (3) Traffic Light plus information about protein and fiber (Traffic Light+); (4) Facts Up Front; or (5) Facts Up Front plus information about "nutrients to encourage" (Facts Up Front+). A total of 703 adults recruited through an online database in May 2011 participated in this study, and data were analyzed in June 2011. Total percentage correct quiz scores were generated reflecting participants' ability to compare two foods on nutrient levels, based on their labels, and to estimate amounts of saturated fat, sugar, sodium, fiber and protein in the foods. The front-of-package label groups outperformed the control group on nearly all of the nutrient quizzes (pFacts Up Front group on the saturated fat quiz, or from the Facts Up Front+ group on the sugars quiz. Those in the Traffic Light+ group had the best overall performance (>80% on all quizzes). Overall, those in the Traffic Light+ condition performed better than those in the Facts Up Front conditions on measures of nutrition knowledge and label perceptions. This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov NCT01626729. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiative ablation with two ionizing-fronts when opacity displays a sharp absorption edge

    CERN Document Server

    Poujade, Olivier; Vandenboomgaerde, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of a strong flux of photons with matter through an ionizing-front (I-front) is an ubiquitous phenomenon in the context of astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) where intense sources of radiation put matter into motion. When the opacity of the irradiated material varies continuously in the radiation spectral domain, only one single I-front is formed. In contrast, as numerical simulations tend to show, when the opacity of the irradiated material presents a sharp edge in the radiation spectral domain, a second I-front (an edge-front) can form. A full description of the mechanism behind the formation of this edge-front is presented in this article. It allows to understand supernumerary shocks (edge-shocks), displayed by ICF simulations, that might affect the robustness of the design of fusion capsules in actual experiments. Moreover, it may have consequences in various domains of astrophysics where ablative flows occur.

  14. Front propagation in a bistable system: how the energy is released.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, V V; Gendelman, O V; Manevitch, L I

    2014-05-01

    In this Rapid Communication we consider a front of transition between metastable and stable states in a conservative system. Due to the difference of energies between initial and finite states, such transition front can propagate only while radiating energy. A simulation of such a process in a one-dimensional nonlinear lattice shows an essential imbalance between the energy released in each act of transition, and the density of energy of oscillations behind the front. It means that the stationary front propagation must be accompanied by an essentially nonstationary radiative process. We reveal the origin of this phenomenon and show that the characteristics of the front propagation critically depend on boundary conditions. In the framework of a simple model of a bistable system we propose analytic evaluation of all important features of the transition process, such as front velocity, radiation frequency, and oscillation amplitude. All calculated values are in good agreement with numerical simulation data.

  15. Experimental and numerical investigation on the motorcycle front frame flexibility and its effect on stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossalter, V.; Doria, A.; Massaro, M.; Taraborrelli, L.

    2015-08-01

    It is well known that front fork flexibility may have a significant effect on motorcycle stability. This work addresses the problem of developing lumped element models of the front fork from experimental results. The front forks of an enduro motorcycle and of a super sport motorcycle are characterized performing static, dynamic and modal tests by means of specific testing equipment. The concept of wheel twisting axis is proposed to characterize static and dynamic deformability of the front fork. Modal analysis results show the presence of two important modes of vibration of the front assembly in the low frequency range: the lateral mode and the longitudinal mode. Different lumped models are discussed and a new model that takes into account information obtained from static and dynamic tests is proposed. Simulations are carried out by means of a multibody code and show the effect of the front assembly deformability on the weave and wobble vibration modes.

  16. Discovery of invisible extra fronts in single-component frontal analysis in liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsson, Jörgen; Fornstedt, Torgny

    2006-05-05

    Frontal analysis (FA) is often used in the "staircase mode", in which the solute concentration in the eluent increases stepwise. We demonstrate here in the single-component case, that all eluted breakthrough curves (fronts) for the second and subsequent steps consist solely of displaced plateau molecules. The newly introduced molecules (i.e., the introduced mass) instead elute later, in a breakthrough front hidden from detection, i.e., the mass front. These effects were studied using experimentally verified numerical calculations, the mass fronts being visualized using an enantiomer pair in an achiral separation system. Notably, the mass front displays no self-sharpening effects, even under strongly nonlinear conditions. Instead, the front is sigmoidal in shape.

  17. Radiative ablation with two ionizing fronts when opacity displays a sharp absorption edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poujade, Olivier; Bonnefille, Max; Vandenboomgaerde, Marc

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of a strong flux of photons with matter through an ionizing front (I-front) is an ubiquitous phenomenon in the context of astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) where intense sources of radiation put matter into motion. When the opacity of the irradiated material varies continuously in the radiation spectral domain, only one single I-front is formed. In contrast, as numerical simulations tend to show, when the opacity of the irradiated material presents a sharp edge in the radiation spectral domain, a second I-front (an edge front) can form. A full description of the mechanism behind the formation of this edge front is presented in this article. It allows us to understand extra shocks (edge-shocks), displayed by ICF simulations, that might affect the robustness of the design of fusion capsules in actual experiments. Moreover, it may have consequences in various domains of astrophysics where ablative flows occur.

  18. Fronts at the Surface Ocean Can Shape Distinct Regions of Microbial Activity and Community Assemblages Down to the Bathypelagic Zone: The Azores Front as a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Baltar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Oceanic fronts are widespread features which separate distinct water masses. They are well known to control the distribution of microbial communities in surface waters, although there is scarce information on their role in delimiting critical functions that microbes perform, and on whether their effects can be translated down into the dark ocean. Here we carried out the first study on the variability of hydrolysis of organic matter (extracellular enzymatic activity; EEA across a permanent front (the Azores Front, coupled with changes in microbial assemblage composition, from the surface down to the bathypelagic zone. The front separated the study area (enclosed into the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyral Province into two distinct latitudinal sub-regions with sharp differences in the abundance of autotrophic and heterotrophic microbial assemblages, as well as in the extracellular enzymes activities of glucosidases, alkaline phosphatase, and leucine aminopeptidase. South of the front there was an abrupt decline in the abundance of picophytoplankton as well as in heterotrophic prokaryotes with high nucleic-acid content, but an increase in the abundance of prokaryotes with high side-scatter, an indication that cells were growing attached to particles. Concomitantly, there was also an increase in the aminopeptidase to glucosidase ratio, a proxy of higher degradation of proteinaceous material relative to carbohydrates. Interestingly, these sharp changes in microbial assemblages and enzymatic activities north and south of the front were translated down to the deep ocean. Our results suggest that permanent fronts, like the Azores Front, can act as ecological boundaries in the ocean (even within a biogeographical province, in terms of microbial community structure and biogeochemical cycling. Oriented studies on oceanic fronts down to the deep ocean will help to understand how the variability of these widely-extended hydrographic futures will impact

  19. Evolutionary algorithm for the neutrino factory front end design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poklonskiy, Alexey A.; /Michigan State U.; Neuffer, David; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The Neutrino Factory is an important tool in the long-term neutrino physics program. Substantial effort is put internationally into designing this facility in order to achieve desired performance within the allotted budget. This accelerator is a secondary beam machine: neutrinos are produced by means of the decay of muons. Muons, in turn, are produced by the decay of pions, produced by hitting the target by a beam of accelerated protons suitable for acceleration. Due to the physics of this process, extra conditioning of the pion beam coming from the target is needed in order to effectively perform subsequent acceleration. The subsystem of the Neutrino Factory that performs this conditioning is called Front End, its main performance characteristic is the number of the produced muons.

  20. Rapid Pitch Angle Evolution of Suprathermal Electrons Behind Dipolarization Fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. M.; Fu, H. S.; Cao, J. B.; Xu, Y.; Yu, Y. Q.; Kronberg, E. A.; Daly, P. W.

    2017-10-01

    The pitch angle distribution (PAD) of suprathermal electrons can have both spatial and temporal evolution in the magnetotail and theoretically can be an indication of electron energization/cooling processes there. So far, the spatial evolution of PAD has been well studied, leaving the temporal evolution as an open question. To reveal the temporal evolution of electron PAD, spacecraft should monitor the same flux tube for a relatively long period, which is not easy in the dynamic magnetotail. In this study, we present such an observation by Cluster spacecraft in the magnetotail behind a dipolarization front (DF). We find that the PAD of suprathermal electrons can evolve from pancake type to butterfly type during effect, which possibly exists behind the DF as well.